Group Title: Courier (Plant City, Fla.)
Title: The courier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028413/00139
 Material Information
Title: The courier
Uniform Title: Courier (Plant City, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Courier (Plant City, Fla.)
Publisher: Sunbelt Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Plant City Fla
Publication Date: November 4, 2004
Copyright Date: 2004
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Plant City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Plant City
Coordinates: 28.014167 x -82.128889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Description based on: 105th year, no. 34 (May 26, 1988).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028413
Volume ID: VID00139
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEV0235
oclc - 33501757
alephbibnum - 000974604
lccn - sn 95047320
 Related Items
Preceded by: Plant City courier

Full Text









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P. .LA,
404LJL5


in the
NEWS


ADVOCATE

Johnny Dean Page
has worked behind


PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE TAMPA TRIBUNE




THE COURIER


PRSRT STD
U. S. POSTAGE
PAID
TAMPA FL
PERMIT NO. 6238


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2004 SERVING PLANT CITY, FLORIDA

Y UV 326
NVsT HEALTH FOCUS
: FL .




Uncharted Waters

While one Plant City woman deals with the uncertainty of multiple sclerosis, new drugs are
helping those with the disease and an unprecedented amount of research shows promise.


the scene
advocate
City.


DIGE

Money f
too man
calling a
superior


MAI


Asailfish
mouth i
two in t



INDEX


es as an ByTONYMARRERO
e for Plant tmarrero@mediageneral.com
At 28 years old, the simple act
of walking up steps is taken for
PAGE 3 granted.
................... In 1991, Terry Christ found
she no longer had that luxury.
"I would have to stop and sit,
then stop and sit again," Christ
recalls.
or meals, Christ suffered from irregular
y politicians heartbeat, to which doctors attri-
nd one buted her weakness. In 1996, she
r band. had blurry vision in one eye. The
symptoms would come and go
PAGE 5 for 11 years.
............. Last spring, while recovering
from serious injuries Christ suf-
|I fered from a fall down a spiral,
staircase, doctors sought an
explanation for numbness in her
arms and legs. An MRI found*
multiple sclerosis.
In an instant, the life of the.
emergency medical technician
and personal trainer had
changed. But it also suddenly
made sense after she did some
Sin the research on the disease.
worth "It was really scary because I
he sea. started putting all the pieces
PAGE 8 together and I was like, 'This is
................... m e,'" said Christ, 41.
Christ is one of roughly
400,000 people nationwide who
EX have the neurological disease,
according to statistics from the
National Multiple Sclerosis Soci-
CALENDAR ety. Three-quarters of MS
PAGE 1 patients are women who, like
.................. Christ, begin to see symptoms in
CLASSIFIED the prime of their lives, between'
the ages of 20 and 50.
PAGE 1 The disease can cause blurred
................... vision, loss of balance, poor
CROSSWORD coordination, slurred speech,
PAGE 14 tremors, numbness, extreme
.................. fatigue and even paralysis and
FAMILYUVING blindness. The disease is not
fatal, and MS patients usually
PAGE 8 have a typical life span.
................... It is often a very different life
OPINION then they once knew, however."-
PAGE 6 A local group will hold the
................... fourth annual Plant City MS Walk
SPORTS
PAE 11


TONY MARRERO/Staff photo
Terry Christ's life has changed dramatically since she was diagnosed
with multiple sclerosis last year, but she said she has kept a positive
attitude despite the days when it's difficult to even get out of bed.


Nov. 6 at Plant City High School
to help raise money for MS
research that might minimize
those effects or even cure the dis-
ease.
Registration begins at 8:30 a.m.
Walkers can raise money through
pledges or just show up to offer
financial support through a
donation and moral support by
walking around the track, said


event chairwoman Carol Rodri-
guez.
All proceeds go to MS research
to help improve the lives of
people such as Christ, Rodriguez
said.
"This year we hope to make it
bigger, better and raise more
money for research," she said.
For Christ, the disease has
been devastating financially. She


4th annual MS Walk
.The fourth annual Plant
City MS Walk is slated for
Nov. 6 at Plant City High
School.
Registration begins at 8:30
a.m.. the walk at 9:30.
Walkers are encouraged to
seek pledges beforehand, or
they can show up to support
by walking and/or making a
financial contribution on
site. said event chairwoman
Carol Rodriguez.
There will be chance draw-
ings, games for children, a
dunk tank and magicians.
All proceeds will go to the
National Multiple Sclerosis
Society to help fund the
search for a cure. The event
raised $12,000 last year.
To pre-register or for more
information, call Rodriguez
at 757-6234 or Dolores Stio-
pagel, 759-9454.


can no longer spot people in the
gym as a trainer or lift them into
an ambulance as an EMT, so she
has been out of work. She suffers
from numbness in one leg and
both hands, and has only half of
her vision in each eye.
The medical bills from her fall
and from MS treatments are
mounting and she has no insur-
ance. She moved in with her par-
ents in their Walden Lake home,
but still can't afford the drugs
many MS patients take to stop
the progression of the disease
and minimize the flare-ups.
Some cost as much as $18,000 a
year.
She applied for disability,
which she was told could take up
to two years.
See HEALTH, Page 18


VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

Life Of Service Makes For Lifelong Friends


IN THETRIBUNE
Here's a preview of
what you 'll find in
The Tampa Tribune's
Plant City section
Saturday:


[] Nine members
of the First Baptist
Church of Plant City
recently returned
from a mission trip
to Haiti.


"I do what I do because I enjoy
it," says Fran Johnson, shown
above with the Beta Sigma Phi
International Award of Distinc-
tion.


JOHNSON EARNS SORORITY'S
HIGHEST HONOR
By TONY MARRERO
tmarrero@mediageneral.com
Thirty thousand volunteer hours.
That's enough hours to give an hour of your time
every day for 82 years.
When you average her community service over
her lifetime, that's exactly what Fran Johnson has
done.
Johnson, 81, of Plant City, has dedicated roughly
30,000 hours of her time since joining the Beta
Sigma Phi service sorority in 1962. There are 20,000
members worldwide who participate in service
projects and fundraising through their local chap-


ters and raise money for the group's causes.
For her dedication to the community and to the
sorority, Johnson has earned the sorority's highest
honor, the International Award of Distinction.
Among the requirements for the award, the recipi-
ent must contribute to the sorority's service objec-
tives "in an extraordinary way," according to
sorority literature.
In what friends say is her typical modest manner,
Johnson expressed surprise when her name was
called at the sorority's Area Ridge Council held Oct.
23 at the Ramada Inn in Plant City. More than 130
sorority members from the district that spans from
Plant City to Sebring attended.
"I was shocked," said Johnson, who is a member
of Laureat Beta Nu, one of five Beta Sigma Phi
See SERVICE, Page 14


WORSHIP
PAGE 10


............




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CALENDAR


Page Works Behind The Scenes As Plant City Advocate


THURSDAY
Voices of the Harlem
Renaissance
The Florida Humanities
Council and Bruton
Memorial Library will
present "Voices of the
Harlem Renaissance" Nov.
4 at 7 p.m. at the 1914
Plant City High School
Community Center Audi-
torium, 605 N. Collins St.
Bob Devin will portray
Langston Hughes, Phyllis
McEwen will play Zora
Neale Hurston, and Leroy
MitcheU will play James
Weldon. They will speak to
the audience in character
and answer questions
about their role in 20th
century literature.
Call: Anne Haywood,
757-9215.

FRIDAY
Fall festival
Dover Elementary
School, 3035 Nelson Ave.
in Dover, will hold a fall
festival Nov. 5 from 5 to 8
p.m.
Parents, teachers and
current and former stu-
dents are invited. There
will be games, prizes, food
and more.

SATURDAY
MS Walk
The fourth annual MS
Walk will be Nov. 6 at Plant
City High School, 1 Raider
.Place.. Registration will
begin 'at 8 a.m., walk
begins at 9.
Call: Carol Rodriguez,
757-6234.

Rummage sale
The GFWC Woman's
Club will hold an indoor
rummage sale Nov. 6 from
8 a.m. to noon at its club
house, 1110 N. Wheeler St.
The sale will include
clothing, holiday attire,
household items and
more.
Donations are
accepted.
Call: Irmgard Tannery.
See CALENDAR, Page 21


EFFORTS AID AREA
DEVELOPMENT
By GEORGE H. NEWMAN
gnewman@mediageneral.com
People who know Johnny
Dean Page say his contribu-
tion of time and effort during
the past 40 yeais has helped
shape past, present and future
growth in Plant City and the
rest of the county.
Page's involvement in proj-
ects and service to a multitude
of organizations and commit-
tees, from the Greater Plant
City Chamber of Commerce to
the United Way, has had a far
reaching effect in the develop-
ment of Hillsborough County.
"He has worked hard and
promoted the Plant City area
in everything he has done,"
said lawyer Robert Trinkle,
past president of the Florida
Strawberry Festival Associa-
tion, who first met Page
through the local -National
Guard unit. "He is a
personable, high-quality,.
common-sense leader in the
community," Trinkle said.
For the most part, though,
Page's efforts tend to be pri-
marily behind the scenes. This
includes involvement in
groups such as the Tampa
Committee of 100, the former
Plant City Business and Mer-
chants Association, the down-
town revitalization committee
and the Citizens Advisory
Committee to the Hills-
borough County Commission.
His covers about to be
blown. ,
In 2005, Page is in line to be
elected to the presidency of.
the Florida Strawberry Festival
Association. That position,
should he be elected, will
place Page at the forefront of
year-round activities where he
won't be able to stand in the
background anymore.
A native bof Opp, Ala., Page
moved to the Plant City area in
1945. He. graduated from
.Turkey Creek High School in
1953 and almost immediately
joined the Florida National
Giard. He served in the Guard
for 34 years, retiring as a ser-


GEORGE H. NEWMAN /Statt photo
Johnny Dean Page, left, and Mac Smith share a moment recalling
the good old days in Plant City. Page has been an ambassador
for the area, providing government and business officials an
opportunity to get to know each other.


geant major in 1987.
"I learned a lot in the
Guard," Page said. "Honor,
respect, discipline. But I also
learned a great deal about
management there. Those
skills served me well in other
parts of my life."
After working for the Agrico-
IMC phosphate company for
two years, Page married Reba
Jeanette Clemons, his high
school .sweetheart, in 1955.'
They have a daughter, Debra
Jeanette Causey, and a son,
Johnny Dean Page Jr.:
He worked for the Atlantic-
Coastline Railroad and jobs
with a local dairy company
and Hav-A-Tampa Cigar soon
followed. But Page found his
real niche when he landed a
job with Tampa Electric Co. in
1957.
"TECO has been and con-
tinues to be a first-class
organization," Page said. "The
company's culture encour-
ages its employees to become
involved in the community,
local activities and service
organizations. That philoso-
phy still holds true today."
Page, 68, took the TECO cul-


tire to heart, making it his
career to do service to the
community.
Starting with the company
as a meter reader, Page recalls
that he was "dog-bit" 13 times
in the two and half years he
worked in the job.
"There wasn't any estimat-
ing or remote reading in those
days, Page said. "You had to
jump the fence, or go through
the gate and get it. I survived,"
he said. "And I have a healthy
respect for all dogs, big and.
small."
A job camera open to help
with the construction of a
TECO large warehouse in
Plant City. Page jumped at the
opportunity.
"I have been watching Plant
City grow ever since," he said.
"This area has grown from
9,000 residents in 1957 to over
33,000. The number of
residential and commercial
customers to the electric com-
pany has grown in a similar
proportion."
"Page retired from TECO at
the end of 2002 as vice presi-
dent of governmental and
community affairs. He


remains a consultant to the
president of TECO Energy.
Mac Smith, a Plant City
businessman, stressed Page's
contributions to Plant City.
"Johnny Dean has kept
Plant City leaders, in
government and the business
community, involved in the
issues facing the greater
Tampa Bay area. He keeps
Plant City, and the best inter-
ests of Plant City in the fore-
front."
Page and his wife now live
northeast of the city. He con-
tinues to bring government
officials from the county and
state to speak at service and
business organizations around
town. His contacts within
these clubs runs deep. He still
belongs to many of them.
Page remains active in the
Greater Tampa and Greater
Plant City chambers of com-
merce.
He has served with the East-
ern Hillsborough County Law
Enforcement Appreciation
Committee, the Florida Straw-
berry Growers Association,
the Rotary Club, the Metro-
politan Planning Organization
Advisory Board and the county
Charter Review Board. He has
been active with the Tampa
Sports Authority since 1993,
serving as chairman of the
organization during
construction of Raymond
James Stadium.
"I love to stay busy, I enjoy
my work. But I set my priori-
ties and take care of thenn" he'
said.
Page's priorities include
family. He is celebrating his
50th wedding anniversary in
February.
"Reba has been a tremen-
dous strength to me. None of
this could happen without
her. My family is very impor-
tant," he said.
Page is a member of the
First Baptist Church of Plant
City. He likes to travel, and
plays a good game of golf.
"Plant City is a great com-
munity," Page said. "It is my
town. I will do all that I can to
promote it in a positive way."


The Courier: For news and advertising, call 752-3113.


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4 p THE COURIER NOVEMBER 4. 2004,


Winner: Florida Insurance Center, Inc.


The Business Of Halloween
Congratulations to the Florida Insurance Center, winners
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of tourists. Thanks to all the businesses that participated.


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The Courier welcomes reader-submitted photos. Include
photographer's name, contact person's name and phone
number and a brief description, including names of those
pictured.


Send photos to:
The Courier 101 N. Wheeler St., Plant City, FL 33566
Call 752-3113 for information.





N0O'EMBER 4,'2664'- THE 0R'Ei*5


PLANT CITY DIGEST


That's A Lot Of Meals
Employees at the Albertsons Distri-
bution Center in Plant City turned vol-
unteer into hours into cash.
Now that money will go to help feed
the needy.
Representatives from the center off
Park Road recently presented Meals on
Wheels president Mack McKendrick
with a check for $5,000.
The distribution center's employees
logged the most community volunteer
hours in the company's eastern divi-
sion. As a reward for their efforts,
Albertsons gave them the money to
donate to a charity of their choice, said
Rick Bunnell, vice president of the
company's regional supply chain.
"Our No. 2 core value out of 10 is to
really partner with the community and
try to give back," Bunnell said.
Albertsons employees Kim Fields
and Ann Gilbert volunteer for Meals on
Wheels and suggested the donation.
The pair deliver meals during their
lunch hours.
"I just kind of took a heart to it,"
Fields said.
McKendrick said Meals on Wheels is
particularly appreciative of the large
donation because the group is espe-
cially dependent on such gifts since
losing funding from the United Way
last year.
"This will really help," McKendrick
said.
Political Party
A Republican meet-the-candidate
event held at the Plant City last week
felt like a mini-convention, with just
about everything but the president
and the confetti.
"We put Plant City on the map," said
Joyce Mozzicato, a member of the
Plant City Republican Women's Club,


TONYMARRERO/Staff photo
Albertsons employees Rick Bunnell, left, Ann Gilbert and Kim Fields, far right,
present Meals On Wheels of Plant City president Mack McKendrick with a check
for $5,000. Albertsons encouraged employees at the distribution center on Park
Road to donate the money to a charity of their choice.


which hosted the event. "It was awe-
some."
Fourteen candidates and more than
250 people showed up to the event
held Oct. 28 at the Plant City Ramada
Inn Plantation House. Balloons
bobbed and signs waved as politicians
mingled. Students from Marshall
Middle School's FFA followed each
candidate waving their respective
signs, lending to the convention-type
atmosphere of the event.
U.S. Rep. Mike Bilirakis, R-Tarpon
Springs, who ran to keep his seat in
Congress's 9th district, was the guest
speaker. He told attendees that the


Medicare plan in place isn't perfect,
but is will be the best plan possible
after some tweaking. Ralph Hughes, an
eastern Hillsborough County political
mover and shaker, asked the crowd to
pay special attention to the county
commission race, endorsing candi-
dates Brian Blair and Mark Sharpe for
the countywide seats.
Many from outside of Plant City
were surprised by Plant City's political
fervor, and by the quality of the
Ramada Inn's facilities, Mozzicato
said.
Though First Lady Laura Bush was
in the Bay area, she couldn't make it.


k A


She was busy campaigning with U.S.
Senate candidate Mel Martinez, who
sent a representative to Plant City for
the event.
"I told someone in the Martinez
camp that (Bush and Martinez) could
stop by if they wanted to," Mozzicato
said with a laugh.
They've Got Her Number
Andrea Cough was astounded by
how many dignitaries called her house
Monday, the eve of Election Day.
She got calls from President Bush,
Sen. John Kerry, former president Bill
Clinton and Caroline Kennedy, to
name a few.
But instead of being honored, she
was livid.
The Valrico resident vented to her
fellow cast members Monday night
before rehearsing for her role as Lenya
in Plant City Entertainment's upcom-
ing production of Neil Simon's
"Fools."
She estimates the phone rang some
40 times, all last minute appeals for her
vote.
"It's probably still going," she said
Monday night.
She even got a call from Judy Davis.
"I don't know who she is, but I really
despise her," because she called more
than a few times. (Judy Davis, by the
way, is an Australian actor who has
been a vocal critic of President Bush's
decision to invade Iraq).
Cough said she had to answer the
phone each time because she was
expecting an important phone call
from a number she wouldn't recog-
nize.
"Not that they could have gotten
through," she said.

See DIGEST, Page p5


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S-.~Il HEC-QURIER I NOVEMBER 4.2004


OPINION


Our Health Care System


Needs An Overhaul


Just east of Atlanta, there is
one of the world's largest
outcroppings of granite.
's called Stone Mountain.
It's about 800 feet high. Its
bulk is estimated at 7 billion
cubit feet.
In days when it was unde-,
veloped, a number of people
were killed by falling off it.
The top is so gently rounded
that you can walk toward
what appears to be the ever-
receding edge until you
suddenly find yourself
plummeting down to the
rocks below. There is an
invisible tip point, and once
you reach it, you can't go
back.
We long ago reached that
tip point in terms of health
care. Despite the malarkey of
the politicians, there is simply
no going back to free-enter-
prise medicine. It's as dead as
Hector. The first blow was
struck by private health
insurance, and the killing
blows were delivered by
Medicare and Medicaid.
Free-enterprise health care
had no third-party payers. In
those days, doctors and
patients, and patients and
hospitals, had to negotiate
payment because it was either
that or nothing. Most doctors
and hospitals would decide
that something was better
than nothing. And there were
many doctors and hospitals


CHARLEY
REESE
Columnist


that would provide free
service as a form of charity.
Private health insurance,
which got its big start in the
1950s, negates the need for
negotiations. The doctors and
hospitals will, of course,
charge what the insurance
will pay. It's like a lawyer I
knew who used to do uncon-
tested divorces for $500. He
had handled the divorce for
an out-of-state businessman,
and when it came time to pay,
the businessman said, "Before
you say how much I owe you,
let me make it clear I'm not
paying a penny over $1,000."
"Well," said my lawyer friend,
"that just happens to be my
fee."
In the 1960s, politicians"
ever eager to buy votes
See REESE, Page 20


Sto UStA cEe- Public Servants Must Start
The Courier welcomes letters
to the editor and guest commen-
taries. Letters and commentaries ff
can be on a wide range of subjects,
and should be made as legible as Thinking Dfferently
possible. Please include author's
signature, and telephone number
for verification purposes. Sub- t long last it's time to
missions will be edited to meet A gi tsti men to u a
legal, grammatical and stylistic A begin picking up all
requirements. ose signs. Bush, Kerry,
Send submissions to: Castor, Martinez. Local, state,
101 N. Wheeler St. national. A yearlong effort to
Plant Cit, FL 33566 place our favorite people in
E-mail: tmarrero@mediageneral.com positions of political power.
Fax:754-3725 Now that it's over, bar
whatever complaints and
Tnt lawsuits and general bicker-
D ings emerge, I'd like to .
address both the victors and
Published every Thursday by the vanquished especially DEREK
Sunbelt Newspapers. *those preparing to take or MAUL
Carla Floyd resume office.
Publisher I have been thinking about Columnist
cfloyd@mediageneral.com the moniker of "Public
Russell Holecek Servant," a term thrown God use them for his pur-
Managing Editor around so glibly by those poses." So, if you evoked the
rholecek@mediageneral.com seekingpublic office. You name of God at any juncture
rholecekmediageneral.com shouldn't be nervous, all you during the campaign then I
Tony Marrero newly elected "servants" out am happy to remind you that
Editor there, because you are the serving is a significantly more
tmarrero@mediageneral.com ones who brought this issue taxin sins than usin.
gadn business than using.


News: 752-3113
Advertising: 752-3113
Classifieds: 259-8295
Circulation: 657-4500
@ Sunbelt Newspapers 2004
Sunbelt Newspapers is a
Media General publication.


up. I believe that today, Nov.
3, is a timely moment to
review what the concept
really means.
With a nod to author Rick
Warren and a reminder to all
of us that many candidates -
including both Bush and
Kerry have been throwing
the "God" word around a lot
recently, let's take a moment
to think about the things
these self-declared servants
are supposed to be doing now
we've elected them.
"Real servants," Warren
writes, "don't try to use God
for their purposes. They let


It's time to ante up.
When a real servant does
something good, or generous,
or heroic, the point of the act
is always the benefit of other
people. Leaders emerge, they
do not choose themselves.
Heroes are seldom disposed
to see themselves that way. A
legacy cannot be crafted. And
servants don't check the
scoreboard to see how many
stars have popped up next to
their names.
When Jesus washed the
filthy feet of his disciples he
See MAUL, Page 15


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( Magic Moments provides the perfect atmosphere .-


F I AF EV Y T
FIRST SATURDAY NIGHTP/a r^va OF EVERY MONTH


NOV. 6 5-9 P.M. IN HISTORIC DOWNTOWN PLANT CITY
Bike Show Vendors Restaurants 50/50 Drawing
FOR INFORMATION. CALL 813-754-3707.
Brought to you by The Greater Plant City Chamber of Commerce, Attorney John MacKay,
Bill Heard Chevrolet, Big Dog Motorcycles of Tampa Bay, Harley-Davidson/Buell of Lakeland,
Plant City Motors and Motorsports
THE AMPA TRIBUNE THE COURIER
LIFE. PRINTED DAILY.


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for your party, with as much or as little
Involvement as you desire.

Call Catherine Jones


422842


All Breed DogGrooming.
"Taking Pride in Creating the Perfect Coat for Your Pet"
Rolling, Stripping the Coat DeMatting
Hand Scissor & Blending Shave Downs .
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1/2 mile West of Branch Ranch Restaurant '--'
By Appointment Only. Salon Hours: Wed-Sat 8:00-5:00 DOG BOARDING
(813) 986-2622 or Cell (863) 738-5115 ty
Certified Groomers. Pickup & Delivery Available. r
Proof of Current Inoculations Required. WWW.SLRKENNELS.COM




'NOVEMBER 4, 2004',THE-COURIER* 7

SOUTH FLORIDA BAPTIST HOSPITAL

Team Member 2004

Halloween Costume Contest


Second d
il pla-ice
Physical






Swindle Diagnostic Center Third place winner:
"Hurricane Task Force" Don Alcantara
S- Histology/ Lab

oFirstp"placeBwinners: etLlaleRer
SwindleDiagnostic Centeri i pla i









ghol time. Ma the spiritsDori lcantarakeep you
alvltlneyewill survive












Special Thanks to our Photographers:al-
Timothy Bedgood and Tina Haslwante. SpiAnd our judges Monica Fleming,
e'"Best Little Record House

ghoul time. May the spirits keep you

Special Thanks to our Photographers

Bill Holley, Betty Barker Watkins.


SOUTH FLORIDA BAPTIST HOSPITAL
ST.JOSEPH'S-BAPTIST HEALTH CARE
301 N. Alexander St. Plant City, FL 33563
757-1200
www.southfloridabaptist.com
422835






&*;M~COUPRER'OVEMBER-4,'2OG44


FAMILY


LIVING


COMMUNITY

ROUNDUP

Planteen events
The Planteen Recreation
Center, 301 Dort St., offers the
following:,
Monday senior aerob-
ics, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; Cheer
America, 6 to 9 p.m.; country
line dancing, 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Tuesday ceramics (for
adults), 9 a.m. to noon; home
school co-op, 9:30 a.m. to 12:
30 p.m.; tae kwon do, 5:30 to
8:30 p.m.; Jazzercise, 6 to 7
p.m.
Wednesday senior
aerobics, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.;
Berry Patch Quilters, 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m.; AA- women's book
study meeting, 7 to 9 p.m.
Thursday- Living Skills,
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Patrick's
Patriots Twirling Corps, 3:30
to 7:30 p.m.; tae kwon do, 5:30
to 8:30 p.m.; Jazzercise, 6 to 7
p.m.; Berry Patch Quilters
(second and fourth week of
the month), 7 to 8:30 p.m.;
Strawberry Stitchers, 7 to 9
p.m.; Habitat for Humanity, 7:
15 to 9:15 p.m.
Friday senior aerobics,
8:30 to 10:30 a.m.; duplicate
bridge club, 1 to 4 p.m.; AA-
Helping Hands, 8 to 9 p.m.;
Teen Night, first Friday from 6
to 10 p.m., Nov. 5, Dec. 3 and
Jan. 7.
Saturday Kenpo Karate,
8 to 11:30 a.m.; AA-Suppoort
Group, 7 to 8 p.m.; Kids Night
Out, first Saturdays from 6 to
10 p.m., Nov. 6, Dec. 4 and
Jan. 8.
Sunday Alcoholics
Anonymous-Weed Patch
Group, 9 a.m. to noon;
Narcotics Anonomyous, New
City of Grace, 6 to 7 p.m.
After-school program is
offered for children grades
three through eight from
Lincoln and Wilson Elemen-
tary and Tomlin Middle
School every week day.
Information:
www.plantcitygov.com/rec.

Mature driver course
An AARP 55 Alive Driver
Safety Class will be held Nov.
11 and 12 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
each day at South Florida
Baptist Hospital, 301 N. Alex-
ander St. Insurance discounts
may be available to anyone 55
and older, consult your insur-
ance agent. To register, call
754-4444.

YMCA offerings
Plant City Family YMCA,
1507 YMCA Place, and the
Youth Extension Site, 502 E.
Young St., offer the following
programs:
Another creative writing
class has been added the third
Monday of each month from
11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.
Sign Language for Babies
is offered Tuesdays from 6:30
to 7:15 p.m. The fee is $30 per
member and $45 per program
member.
A beginner water color
painting class is offered
Wednesday from 2 to 4 p.m.
Bunko will start in
November and will be held
the second and fourth
Saturday of the month from
1 to 3 p.m.
Call: 757-6677.


a I x - -I
LINDA CHION KENNEY/Staff photo

Cougar Queen
Durant High School senior Jenna Willis enjoys her new tiara at halftime of the Cougars'
homecoming game against Riverview Friday night. Willis was voted this year's homecom-
ing queen.


BETTY'S PLACE


Sailfish, Family And Weddings


I've heard of putting a foot
in your mouth, but never a
fin.
Until now, that is.
Wayne Shuff tells me the
only way to get a photo of a
live sailfish is to hold the fin in
your teeth. Otherwise, it flat-
tens back. Grandson Hunter
took the interesting shot of
Grandpa Wayne, fin in teeth,
and Dad Tim, who caught and
released the fish.
They also caught mahimahi
and Hunter hooked a nice
lane snapper. They would
have fished longer, but Hunter
had his heart set on scouting
for goblins and ghosts on Hal-
loween night dressed as a
Gator fanatic. He joined sister,
Holly as Dorothy and brother,
Cole the Lion-Man, at their
grandparent's "spooky" old
house in the historic district.
Actually, Wayne and Janie
have one of the friendliest old
homes in all of Plant City.
*****


BETTY
BRIGGS
Columnist


It's not too early to celebrate
Thanksgiving and Christmas
for the Geer and Fuller fami-
lies. Pfc. Brad Cassels, son of
Penny and Tim Fuller and
Brad and Janice Cassels, is
leaving for Camp Analonda in
northwest Iraq on Nov. 25. He
is with the 50th Signal Batta-
lion.
They celebrated early so 20-
year-old Brad could join in.
Brad is anxious to serve his
country, though his family


tells me they are deeply con-
cerned. Our prayers go with
him.


Many can identify with the
elation of marrying off the last
child.
The hitching of my youn-
gest daughter took place with-
out a hitch last weekend in
Nashville. I was delighted to
see old friends, Kathy and
Keith Cribbs, formerly of Plant
City (I'll show you a picture
next week of this special
family). Keith works in
accounts payable at Vander-
bilt University and told me
he's received a promotion
recently and another is on the
way. Congratulations!
Daughter Sarah graduates
this year from high school and
wants to study journalism),
James plays football, though
he is tall enough to take on a
basketball team. And it was
great to see Keith and his
youngest, Anna, cut a rug on


the dance floor.


Another old friend, formerly
of Plant City, Frances (Groth)
Painter flew in from Michigan.
She taught chemistry at
Hillsborough Community
College and coached more
than a few Plant City babies
into the world as a Lamaze
instructor. She's now a small
town Hillsdale mom with
three grown boys and twin
- girls getting ready to graduate
from high school.
Husband, Joe, a radiologist,
is doing his part for the coun-
try in the National Guard. Last
summer, the family joined
him in Germany for a visit.
Frances is looking forward to
being a grandmother for the
first time when son, Frederick,
and his wife, in Nebraska,
welcome a baby boy.


See BRIGGS, Page 16


CLUB NOTES

NARFE
The Strawberry Chapter of
the National Association of
Retired Federal Employees
(NARFE) will hold meet Nov. 4
at 1:30 p.m. at First Baptist
Church of Plant City, 503 N.
Palmer St. The meeting will be
in the church's Singles Minis-
tries building, just west of the
main church building.
Speaker will be Eddie
Williams of Blue Cross/Blue
Shield.
All current and retired
federal employees are invited.
Call: chapter president Dick
Zeiner, 759-2887, or e-mail
pazrsz@aol.com.

Quilt guild
The Berry Patch Quilt Guild
will meet Nov. 11 at 7:15 at the
Winter Visitors Center, 301
Dort St.
The guild has a show and
tell of latest projects.
Prospective members
welcome.
The group also will meet
Wednesday mornings in
November at the center to
create holiday gifts for the
needy. Bring a sewing machine
and something to eat.
Call: Sally Weiner, 752-
1993.

Plant City Toastmasters
The Plant City Toastmasters
Club meets Thursdays at 7:30
a.m. at the Plant City Chamber
of Commerce, 106 N. Evers St.
Call: Hal Brewer, 752-4949.

Plant City Rotary
The Plant City Rotary Club
meets Mondays at noon at the
Ramada Inn, 2011 N. Wheeler
St.
Call: Bill Hermance, 707-
5590.





NGVMBER 4y2OO4*14E COURIER *-T.


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
Dover: S. Dover Rd & Dowu
659-2600
AFRICAN METHODIST
EPISCOPAL
Allen Chapel: 1109 E. La
752-7389
Mount Olive: 1113 -1 Ma
Mount Olive: Horton Rd
'37-2628
APOSTOUC
Asaiblea Apostolica:
1501 Colson Rd, 737-34
Apostolic Church
of esus Christ:
1212 W. Reynolds, 477-3
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Abundant Life: Pinecres
Litbhia, 685-4240
Bethany: 9804 Harney I
Thonotosassa. 986-5771
S Calvary PFellowship:
1110 N. Gordon St, 752-
Dover First: SR 574 & Pe
689-0343
Faith Temple: 1-4 at
Hillsborough-Polk Coun
line, '52-0532
Faith lighthouse:
3409 SR 39 N. '52-1885
First Plant City:
Charlie Griffin Rd,
WofSR39 S, 752-3351
Fort Alafla: Corner of So
Huy. 39 & Suilley Rd, 7.
Keysritle: SR 640. 737-4
Mount Zion:
1- at Thonotosassa Rd, "
Pleasant Grove:
Turkey Creek Rd, '"3-3
Victory Worship Center.
Count' line Rd. 754-60
Sydney: Sydney Rd. 1/16
of Sydney-Dover Rd, 65
Turkey Creek:
Turkey Creek Rd. 754-5
BAPTIST
Ahara: Turkey Creek Rd
N. ofSR 60, 737-3739
Alafia Baptist:
222 Alafia Church Rd, 63
';' Antioch: Horton Rd, 73
*-Y Berea:SR39 5, 737-123
.. Bethany: Cork Rd, 752-1
S Bethel: 804 W. Renfro Si
754-2239
Beulah: Allen & County i
Litbia, 737-1122
Bible: Charlie Griffin R
752-2875
Burchwood Temple:
Euclid Dr & SR 574, 75.
Calvary Free Will:
':;- 3539 Trapnell Rd E.
Cedar Grove: E. Keysvil
. 737-1234
Central of lithia:
Pinecrest & Keyseille R
Church on the Rock:
301 E. Alsobrook, 752-j
Community Christian:
1310 N. Shannon Are. 7
Crossroads: SR 39 S. Pit
73.-1211
Dover Eastside: Countr
Baptist Church. 2820
Gallagher, 5'1-8200
Dorer First: N. Gallaghi
659-0203
Eastside: 1318 E. Calho
754-2681
East Thonotosassa: Mcl
& Knights-Griffin Rd, 9
Faith Temple Primitive
808 W. Washington St. 7
First Baptist Church of
Midway: Midway Rd, 7J


To adve

First Baptist Lithia: "52-
ning St, Intersection of SR 39 & Turk
lithia-Pinecrest Rd. '37-1121 at SR
First Plant Cit,: Thot
503 N. Palmer, 752-4104 1O02
ura St, First Thonolosassa Missionary:
uran McIntosh Rd, 986-4756 CHUI
ison Harmon Baptist Church: (And
di S 6008 W: Knights Griffin Rd, King
' 986-7165 N.. S
Hopewell: SR 39 S, 737-3053 Plan
Knights: Paul Buchman Huy. "13.
752-4972 Firsi
196 Lebanon: Branch Forbes Rd, 752-
752-2006 Gosp
Lone Oak: Lone Oak Rd, Allen
5130 754-5278
Mount Moriah Freewill: EPIS
st Rd, Warren &Johnson SI, 754-4397 St. P
Mount Moriab Freewill: 752-
2042 Colson Rd, 737-1490 HOUL
d- Mount Olive: 604 W. Ball Si, Dell
1 754-3834 808
Newu Hope Freewill Ref
5005 Baptist Church: 728
?tie Rd, 3101 Sydney Dover Rd., Dover
New Mt. Zion Freenill: INDE
3041 Daniels Rd., 752-3985 Full
nO' Northside: 2311
1700 N. Franklin St, '52-2779 Rest
Oakwood: Airport Rd. '52-5499 106
Plant Cit' Primitive: Eau
509 N. EEvers St, 754-3261 Tabe
Pleasant Grore First: SR 5
Turkey Creek Rd. "3"-2556 INTE
uth Shilob: W. Terrace Dr, "54-7445 Chri
37--656 Springhead: S. Wiggins Road. 1310
4803 754-4879 Cor
St. Luke Missionary: 14j
52-1614 108 S. Warnell St, 754-4992 Dee
St. Mary's Freewill: Coar
529 Hunter & Marren St. 754-6853 Re,
St. Matry Missionary: 225
89 1804 .SJ. 60E., 737-3668
0 mi. E St. Mary's Primiitive Baptist JEH
9-0532 Church: 907 E. Laura Si, King
754-1616 3202
3'2 Sydney: 1510 Cre Rd, 659-1502 334
Turkey Creek Community LAT
4, Baptist Church: Chu.
5447 S. Turkey Creek Rd, 180
737-1224 LUT
34-8845 Turkey Creek First: Lop
7-3240 Trapnell Rd, 752-7890 752-
12 Victory Missionary: Maki Rd 75
9209 Westside: 2503 Granfleld Are, 2
752-1450
Whitehurst Rd: NAZ
Line Rd, 901 N. Whitehurst Rd, 754-5405 Wag
d, CATHOLIC 240
St. Clement 1104 N.Alexander St, NON
752-8251 Cali
2-3782 CHURCH OF CHRIST 210.
N. Wilder Rd: 938 N. Wilder Rd, Ful
752-2771 .M
le Rd, Cork: Cork Road, 752-1521 Full
Laura Si: 1310 E. Laura St, 231
752-2858 Imp
d Springhead: Wiggins Rd. Mee
754-1485 Sche
3740 Kai
CHRISTIAN Chu
54-5383 (Disciples of Christ) 902
necrest, First: 2108 Thonotosassa Rd, Gre,
'52-5385 110
side CHRISTIAN INDEPENDENT Tam
Cornerstone Christian: 102
McIntosh Rd, Nof SR 574 '54
r Rd. CHRISTIAN METHODIST uni9
EPISCOPAL 191
un St. New Grace: 1214 E. Laura St )ou

Intosh CHURCH OF GOD Cen
86-4346 (Cleveland, Tenn.) OR1
6: Calvary Community: Ho0
5q-6661 5209 Smith-Rrals Rd Orti
Dover: Downing St, 659-2900 Lak
52-7209 Plant City: 2103 Mudlake Rd.


ertise your church in our Church Directory, please call Natasha Davis at 752-3113.


4591
ev Creek: Turkey Creek Rd
'60, 737-1331
notosassa:
N. Taylor Rd, 986-1916
RCH OF GOD
erson. Indiana)
'sway First: 2808 KinswaY,
effner, 657-7500
t City: Grace Fellowship
Alsobrook SI, 361-8190
N: N. Gordon and Baker St.
6438
pel Tabernacle:
n & Haines St
COPAL
Peter's: 301 N. Carey St,
5061
NESS
verance Tabernacle:
W. Grant St.
ige Church of Our Lord:
W. Ball St.
DEPENDENT
Gospel Tabernacle:
1 Sammonds Rd, "54-3843
oration Assembly:
S. Evers St.
ngelists for esus
wrnacle:
574. E. of Dover, 659-0102
ERDENOMINATIONAL
stian Growth Center:
0 N. Shannon. 719-2909
tenant Bible Church:
8E. Tomlin St, 754-1133
per Life Fellowship:
illa Rd, W of SR 39 N.
rival Outreach Center:
N. Dover Rd, 681-2250
OVAH'S WITNESSES
gdom Hall:
2 N. Maryland Are, 752-
5
TER-DAY SAINTS
rcb ofiesus Christ LDS:
5 N. Park Rd. 752-6364
HERAN
e LCMS: 2001 Park Bvird,
.4622
dof Life ELCA:
4 Mud Lake Rd, 752-6064
ARENE
oner Memorial:
2 Mud Lake Rd, 752-7863
I-DENOMINATIONAL
vary Chapel of Plant City:
2 N. Park Rd, 892-0510
f Gospel Fellowship:
McLin Ave.
f Gospel Tabernacle:
I Sammonds Rd, 754-3843
act Family Worship Center:
its at Seffner Elementary
ool. 65'-7914
nos International
rch of Florida:
E. Renfo St. '64-0929
water lore Christian Center:
9 N. Franklin St, '59-82"0
ipa Bible Fellowship:
01 E. Hillshorough Ave.
-26'4
rfy Christ Church:
1 N. Gordon St. 659-2624
man's Praise and Worship
ter: U'.S. 92 E
HODOX
I Protection Ukrainian
hodox Church: 3820 Moores
e Rd, Dover, 659-0123


PENTECOSTAL
Christian life Assembly:
3120 5. Miller Rd., 657-4802
Living Waters Foursquare
Church: 602 S. Evers St, "59-0528
New Hope Worship Center:
803 W. Mahoney St, 757-6123
New Life Temple Pentecostal
Church of God:
3301 Clemons Rd, 754-'088
PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS
Dover: Moore's Lake &
Holiness Church Rd. 659-1301
Church of the Living God:
1102 T.,ler St, "54-5840
PRESBYTERIAN
Evangelical Plant City:
1107 Charlie Griffin Rd. 759-9383
First Presbyterian Plant City:
404 W. Reynolds St. "52-4211
SANCTIFIED HOLINESS
Walk with God Ministry:
15140 SR 574, Dover. 659-0930
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST
Plant City: 2203 Strawberry Dr.
752-4694
SOUTHERN METHODIST
First: 103 I: Johnson Rd.
754-5968
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
St. Mark United Church:
'2914 lithia-Pinecrest Rd.,
I'alrico, 685-0998
UNITED METHODIST
Cork: 4815 W. Sam Allen Rd,
"54-3233
Dover First: Moore's Lake Rd at
Methodist Church Rd, 659-1415
First Plant City: 303 N. Evers St,
'54-3519
Grace: 1801 E. Cherry St,
659-3718
Sunset Heights: Walter Dr,
754-2441
Springhead: 2305 Sparkman
Rd, 752-5751
St. Luke: 809 E. Laura St,
757-6051
Thonotosassa: Fort King wy
at Mistletoe Dr, 986-7135
Trinity Plant City: 402 W.
English St. 752-9316


FINE

AR S
SERIES


St. Clement
Catholic Church
Saturday Vigil Mass:
5pm English, 6:30pm Spanish
at
San Jose Mission
3224 San Jose Mission Dr.
(Off of 574 Dover)
Sunday Masses
7am,10:30am & 12:15pm English
8:30am & 7pm Spanish
1104 N. Alexander St.
Plant City, FL 33563 *tnir
(IOf 1-4. Exit 21 South)
(813)752-8251
St Clement Preschool
Accepting ages 3 to 5 years old
(8131754-1237 or (813)478-1185


First United
Methodist
Church of
Plant City
303 N. Even, Street
Downtown Plant City
iaoss I, n ftv Hall parking k'r
754-3519
WORSHIP HOURS
8 00 am Chapel Commuruon
Service
9.00 am Contemporary Worship
In The Wesley Centre
10:00 am Sunday School
1huldren Adult)
11.00 am Trachbonal Worship In
The Sanctuary
Youth Fellowship
Sunday & Wednesday
Evenings
www.thelotonl me.org
Dr. Alan L. Beaver
Senior Pastor
Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors
www.rvumcplantdtv.org


Fine Arts Series presented by
First United Methodist Church
PLANT CITY
An Invitation for You & Your Familv!
Sunday November 7th at -.00pm
A FREE performance by Eleonora Lvov


J


'. : ;


:4 *i


The Fine Arr pro am wdl take place in the beaunfuid
stamnedglias san.ctuary of'douniowun.

a Lvov, .erain. . ... . p .a


First United Methodist Church
303 N. Evers St., Plant City
A,,-,.. ,fi', ,',r ,New Cm H.zll
(813) 754-3514

Get fthe Word Out!
Advertise in the
PLANT CITY COURIER
Church Directory
,CaH Amy Chase at

, j 813-752-3113


,....


I






10 THE COURIER NOVEMBER 4,2004


W O SH I P


OFFERINGS


Pet blessing
Unity Christ Church, 1911 N. Gordon St.,
plans a pet blessing service on Nov. 6 at 10 a.m.
Treats for both pets and owners will be pro-
vided.
Call: 659-2624.

Church dinner
First United Methodist Church of Dover,
Moores Lake Road, plans a church dinner Nov.
6 from 4:30.to 6:30 p.m.
The menu will include roast beef or ham,
mashed potatoes and gravy, green beans, cole-
slaw, rolls, dessert, tea of coffee. The cost is $6
per adult and $2.50 per child.

Mount Zion plans 74th homecoming
Mount Zion Assembly of God, 3005 Thonto-
sassa Road, will celebrate its 74th anniversary
and homecoming Nov. 7 at 10 a.m.
The Rev. Billy J. Cotton will officiate with
guest speaker the Rev. Lamar Taylor, son of
former Rev. Allie Taylor.
The services will be followed by a covered
dish lunch with an afternoon sing at 2 p.m.
Call: 752-1614.

Mission in Mexico
First Baptist Church of Plant City, 503 N.
Palmer, will offer a course on mission work in
Mexico featuring testimonies, stories, and facts
on Nov. 7, 14, 21 and Dec. 5 from 5 to 6:15 p.m.
Call: 752-4104

Church bazaar
First United Methodist Church of Dover,
Moores Lake Road, plans a church bazaar Nov.
13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will feature
crafts, games, jellies, baked goods, candy and
more.

First Baptist offers
host of new courses
First Baptist Church of Plant City, 503 N.
Palmer St., offers Christian training courses on
Sunday evenings. Call the church for times.
Current courses are: "A Heart Like His," a
Beth Moore Bible study for women, "Christian
Money Management," "The Five Love Lan-
guages of Children," "A study of the Book of
Revelation," "Divorce Care," "All God's Chil-
dren: Meeting the Needs of Children with Disa-
bilities" and "Understanding the Bible."



CROSS-CAMPUS.

CROSS-COUNTRY.

INSTANTLY.


4 i


Every Nextel* phone comes with built-In
walkie-talkie and Two-Way Messaging access
that lets you connect In under a second.
And plenty of other features to help you
get more done.

Phones start at $24.99
Rate plans start at $39.99 ... .' s
Ask about our special student offers.
Cellular
Unlhnimited
1803 Jim Redman Pkwy.
Plant City
754-1550


There are also men's Bible study groups
meeting on Monday or Tuesday mornings and
a women's study on Friday mornings. Call the
church office, 752-4104, for times and meeting
places.

Divine Family Worship Center
The nondenominational Divine Family Wor-
ship Center offers services Sundays at 11:15
a.m. at the Comfort Inn, 2003 S. Frontage
Road.
Call: 643-8989.

Bible study program
The women's ministry of Bethany Baptist
Church offers a Bible study, "Beloved Disciple:
The Life and Ministry of John," Wednesdays at
9 a.m.
Brunch will be served each week and child
care will be provided. The church is at 3409 N.
Cork Road.
Call: 752-9209.

Musical theater program
The First Baptist Church School of Music will
offer a musical theater program for its fall
semester.
Classes will meet once a week for 45 minutes
and will prepare to perform the play "A Par-
tridge in a Pear Tree." The semester will con-
clude with a dessert theater presentation.
Call: 750-4878.

Torah study
Torah study, teaching and instructions from
Genesis to Deuteronomy, is Tuesdays from 7 to
9 p.m. at the Plant City Garden Club, 1112 N.
Wheeler St.
Information: 654-2222 or www.topraise.net.

Breakthrough Youth Ministry
Breakthrough Youth Ministry meets Mon-
days from 7 to 9 p.m. at New Hope Worship
Center, 803 W. Mahoney St. All youngsters in
grades six to 12 are invited.
Call: Nancy, 754-9289.

Teen Bible study
Teen Bible study and values discussions are
offered the first and third Monday of each
month from 5 to 6 p.m. at the Youth Extension
Site, Plant City Family YMCA, 1507 YMCA
Place.
Call: 757-6677.


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Board Certified

A. John Saranko, M.D. Family Practice
Gregg W. Gutowski, M.D. Family Practice
Mark D. Ford, D.O. Family Practice
Robert N. Baskin, M.D. Family Practice & G
Brian J. Korte, M.D. Family Practice & Spor
Gwyneth A. Davis, M.D. Family Practice
Dien K. Duong, P.A.


DEATHS


Calhoun
Louise Calhoun, 61, of Plant
City died Oct. 23.
She was born in Clarksville,
Tenn., and came here from
Tennessee 44 years ago.
She was a homemaker and
attended Shiloh Baptist
Church.
She is survived by a son,
James E. of King, N.C.; a
daughter, Tina Holcomb of
Senath, Mo.; a brother, George
Cobb of Lithia Springs, Ga.;
four sisters, Lucy Reed and
Sue Hampton, both of Hop-
kinsville, Ky., Rebecca Lowrey
of Mulberry and Janie Morrow
of Lakeland; and four grand-
children.
Haught Funeral Home.

Coker
Bevelen G. Coker, 65, of
Stuart died Oct. 26.
She was born in Fort
Meade.
She is survived by three
sons, Dutch of Palm City,
Arthur D. III of Lakeland and
Keith D. of Plant City.
Central Florida Casket Store
and Funeral Chapel, Lake-
land.

Hughes
Helga Hughes, 81, of Plant
City died Oct. 27.
She was born in Cochran,
Ga., and came here from
Georgia in 1946.
She was a homemaker and a
member of Countryside Bapt-
ist Church of Dover.
She was an avid antique col-
lector, reader, crocheter and
master jigsaw puzzle
assembler.
She is survived by two
daughters, Joan Lawson of
Plant City and Bonnie Baker of
Tampa; a brother, John H.
Horton Jr. of Cochran; three
sisters, Hazel Manning of


Cary, Ga., Neline Bernard of
Crowley, La., and Pauline
Johnson of Greenville, S.C.;
seven grandchildren; and 11
great grandchildren.
Wells Memorial Funeral
Home.

Osborne
Betty Mae Osborne, 70, of
Plant City died Oct. 27.
She was born in Plant City
and was a lifelong resident of
the area.
She was retired from Alcon
Extrusions.
She is survived by two
daughters, Carol Shelling and
Connie White, both of Plant
City; a brother, Henry Smith of
Plant City; three sisters, Willia
Dean Pass of Plant City; Sherry
Gregory of Perry, and Margie
Mott of California; and four
grandchildren.
Hopewell Funeral Home.

Roberts
Helen C. Roberts, 52, of
Plant City died Oct. 28.
She wvas born in Washing-
ton, D.C., and came here from
St. Petersburg in 1979.
She is survived by her
husband, Tom; two sons,
Adam and Greg, both of Plant
City- a brother, Michael
Colangelo of St. Petersburg;
and three sisters, Ann Colang-
elo and Mary Colangelo, both
of Boston, and Lura Colangelo
of Chesapeake, Va.
Wells Memorial Funeral
Home.

Skinner
Monika L. Skinner, 37, of
Plant City died Oct. 24.
She was a lifelong resident
of Plant City and a Baptist.
She was employed by
Publix.
She is survived by her life-
long companion, Mark Skin-
ner of Plant City; her father,
Curtis Highsmith Jr. of Cross
See DEATHS, Page 12


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NOVEMBER 4,20044* THE COURilER*'11


Last weekend in Plant City
Below, teens line up for the costume contest during the
Hallowscreams Dance Friday night at the Planteen Recreation
Center. The Plant City Recreation and Parks Department hosted
the event for teens ages 12 to 16.


DAVE BUYENS/Photo!
Above, Danita Peterson stirs her witch's brew as
part of the ghost walk at the Masquerade Ball
Saturday night at the Plant City Community Bingo
Hall. Unity in the Community organized the fund-
raising event to help its cause of feeding Plant City's
needy. Unity president Joyce Jordan said she
expects to make the ball an annual event. At left,
bear sighting: Elise Tibbs, 1, escorted by her mother,
Bekki, seeks a treat at the door of a home in Walden
Lake East Sunday night.


CLASS NOTES

DeSpain named
to cheerleading roster
Lauren DeSpain of Plant
City has been named to the
2004-05 cheerleading roster at
Florida Southern College in
Lakeland.
In addition to home games,
the squad will accompany
teams during regional play.
DeSpain, a freshman, is
majoring in public relations.
She is the daughter of Allen
and Lynne DeSpain of


Plant City.

Coons wins education
scholarship
Karen E. Coons of Plant City
is one of 35 recent high school
seniors selected to receive Phi
Delta Kappa's 2004 Schol-
arship for Prospective Educat-
ors.
Coons was awarded a
$1,000 grant to pursue a career
in teaching or professional
education.
Coons is the daughter of
Scott and Victoria Anderson.


HONOR ROLL

J.S. Robinson
The following students have
been named to the Principal's
Honor Roll at J.S. Robinson
Elementary School:
Dakota Filipiak, Alisha Ellis, Emily
Gonzalez, Dallas McClellan, Emily God-
helm, Daniel Sprouse, Bronsyn Speak-
man, Mavric Griffin, Aidan McFarland.
Travis Riley, Jailine Alvarez, Viridiana
Castro-Juarez, Erick Nieto, Erwing Nieto,
Lorena Rodriguez, Gabriel Rondon,


Noah Dooley, Kelsi Guy. Kara Raburn,
Leslie Alvarez, Olivia Johnson, Nataly
Cordova. Jose Villegas. Sarah Montgom-
ery. Teagan Olfson, Kayla Tague, Patrick
Whitehouse. Shana Davenport, Jacob
Roberts. Abraham Vasquez, Gavin Garcia,
Daniel Pritchard, Chaun Simmons. Tyler
Trapnell, Nicole Carroll, Bradley Ceto.
Austin Hammel, Michelle Quijada, Cyn-
thia Juarez, Alisha Ellis, Emily Gonzalez,
Dallas McClellan, Emily Godheim, Daniel
Sprouse and Bronsyn Speakman.


Photos sought
The The Courier staff
welcomes reader-sub-
mitted photos. Include
photographer's name,
contact person's name
and phone number and
a brief description,
including names of those
pictured.
Send photos to: The
Courier, 101 N. Wheeler
St., Plant City, FL 33566.
Call 752-3113 for
information.





12 THE COURIER NOVEMBER 4, 2004


City Asks Residents To Think Before Polluting


STORM DRAIN AWARENESS
PROGRAM CONTINUES
By GEORGE H. NEWMAN
gnewman@mediageneral.com
The city continues to remind residents and
business owners that storm drains are for rain-
water, not a convenient receptacle for dumping
unwanted chemicals and yard clippings.
Besides being illegal, with polluters subject
to fines if found guilty, contaminated stormwa-
ter is more difficult to treat, and costs all tax-
payers additional money in the end, officials
said.
"Our stormwater awareness program dates
back to 1995," said Julia Klupacs, a city st6rm-
water employee. "We want to remind people
that we all need to be careful and protect the
environment. We send out fliers, place door-
hangers and label storm drains asking people
to help stop pollution."
One door-hanger placed by the city men-
tions that pollutants such as motor oil, antif-
reeze, yard clippings, pesticides and other
toxins are washed into storm drains every day.
Stormwater runoff from streets, yards and pas-
-tures carries all sorts of pollutants into the city
storm drains. Some of the contamination can-
not be avoided, such as oily residue washed
from street surfaces; But any intentional mis-
use of the stormwater system is prohibited.
The city treats and. processes stormwater
separate from its wastewater and sewage.
"Sewage and stormwater are two different
systems," said Frank Coughenour, a utilities


operation manager. "The city uses a series of
retention ponds, attenuation ponds and
ditches to help cleanse the stormwater runoff.
They also depend upon commercial on-site
cleansing systems, and wetland regeneration
projects to help treat the water before it is
returned to the natural systems."
Waste and sewer water is routed to the city
wastewater treatment plant on South Alex-
ander Street. Large commercial sites are
required to treat some of the wastewater prior
to releasing it to the city sewer system.
Stormwater is also treated at large
commercial and industrial sites before enter-
ing the stormwater system.
Individuals and businesses can help keep the
environment healthy by properly disposing of
toxic chemicals.
Recycled oil can be taken to the city's Used
Oil Collection Center at 1500 W. Victoria St.
"There is no charge and it is a convenient
way for us to keep used oil out of our natural
systems," Klupacs said.
An 8-inch blue tag, depicting a fish-shaped
smiley face, reads "No dumping," and "Help
stop .water pollution." The tags are placed
throughout the city on storm drains in new and
old neighborhoods.
"We sometimes apply them with the help of
students during field trips for local schools,"
Klupacs said. "That is a great way for us to get
the word out to students. They can pass that
information on to their parents and friends."
For additional information, to report illegal
dumping, or to volunteer in the Awareness Pro-
gram, contact Julia Klupacs at 757-9289, Ext.
249.


DEATHS


Continued From Page 10
City; her mother, Patricia A. Goff-Highsmith of
Plant City; a brother, Curtis Highsmith III of
Plant City; and three sisters, Charla Barash of
Clearwater, Angela Meyer of Cape Coral and
Rhonda Santa of St. Petersburg.
Wells Memorial Funeral Home.

Staggs
Phillip W. Staggs, 39, of Plant City died Oct.
17.
He was born in Tampa and was a lifelong
resident of Plant City.
He was employed by Roberts Nursery and
Home Depot.
He is survived by his companion, Becki Cul-
lins of Plant City; his father, Winfred Douglas of


Plant City; two sisters, Rhonda Douglas and
Wanda Douglas; an aunt, Brenda Craft of Plant
City; a nephew, Joshua; and a niece, Hanna.
Haught Funeral Home.

Wald
Katherine L. Wald, 48, of Plant City died Oct.
13.
She is survived by her husband, Henry; two
sons, Shiloh Sladon of Plant City and Brandon
Hudson of New Mexico; a daughter, Danielle
Kennedy of Plant City; her parents, Cleve and
Bonnie Byrd of Homosassa; and three grand-
children; and many more brothers, sisters and
loved ones.
Hamilton Funeral Home.


Wheelchair bowler Bob Snodden.


A COURIER CHAT


Bob Snodden, wheelchair
bowler:
Bob Snodden lives to
bowl.
In fact, he almost tried to
bowl professionally in the
1950s but decided the
traveling, financially
inconsistent life of a
professional bowler wasn't
the best way to provide for
his family.
In 2001, Snodden, now 76,
had a stroke that left him
nearly paralyzed on the left
side of his body. The man
who once bowled 300-point
games couldn't use the
traditional delivery to bowl,
but he didn't let it stop him.
Though he can now walk
some with a cane, he uses a
wheelchair when he hits the
lanes every Tuesday night at
Plant City Family Bowl as a
member of the Two Guys
and Gal team.
A teammate hands
Snodden his ball, which is
now lighter than he what he
once used, and he rolls up to
the line to deliver with his
good arm.
The Courier sat down to
chat with Snodden about his
new lease on the sport he


loves.
What is it about bowling
that brought you back to it
after your stroke?
Bowling is a mind game
because you're always
thinking. What can I do to
control what I did wrong?
Move over? Move back?
Slow my speed?
What adjustments did
you have to make from the
wheelchair? '
Nothing as far as delivery,
but getting used to throwing
at the same spot is hard.
How was your first game
from the wheelchair?
It was bad. I think I
bowled a 59.
Did you get discouraged?
Nothing discourages me
in bowling. You just get mad
at yourself for not doing the
right thing. I knew I was
going to overcome the
hardship and wasn't going
to let it get me down.
What's your average score
See CHAT, Page 20


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Pioneer Day, Concert At Night


BLUEGRASS, GOSPEL SHOW
FOLLOWS ANNUAL EVENT
By TONY MARRERO
tmarrero@medlageneral.com
After a day of reliving history, atten-
dees at this year's Pioneer Day can
enjoy an evening of bluegrass, oldies
and gospel music.
The East Hillsborough Historical
Society's 27th annual event will be
Nov. 13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
1914 Plant City High School Commu-
nity Center, 605 N. Collins St.
The event is free and open to the
public.
At 7 p.m., Unity in the Community
will present its Bluegrass, Gospel and
Oldies Extravaganza.
The concert, an annual fundraiser to
raise money to help Unity feed the
area's needy, was postponed due to
Hurricane Jeanne. It will feature the
The Back Porch Bluegrass Band, Trini-
ty's Voices gospel group and the G
Daddy's oldies band. Tickets are $10.
"It's going to be a great evening of
fun music," said Unity president Joyce
Jordan.
There will be plenty of entertain-
ment during Pioneer Day, too, said
historical society president Shelby
Bender, including children's dancing
and acts ranging from clogging to
yodeling to harp playing.
Plant City's premiere history buff
D.E. Bailey will sign copies of the book
he co-authored with the late Quintilla
Geer Bruton, "Plant City: Its Origin and
History."
Many of the Pioneer Day staples
return. The day begins with a pancake
breakfast at 7 a.m. An old-fashioned
dinner featuring ham and all the fix-


Southern
belles from
Jackie's Dance
Theatre will
begin this
year's Pioneer
Day with a
promenade
from Jackie's
Dance Studio
to the 1914
PCHS Commu-
nity Center.


DAVE BUYENS/File photo


ings to be served at noon. A bake sale
will feature homemade recipes from
the area's best cooks.
Plant City's United Daughters of the
Confederacy chapter will offer its
cookbook for sale and members will
act as hostesses, and a variety of ven-
dors will offer everything from jellies to
jewelry and arts and crafts.
The Strawberry Stitchers and Berry
Patch Quilt Guild will give demonstra-
tions.
Awards will be given to the longest
beard and oldest resident. Families


with 100 years in the area will receive
centennial certificates from the histor-
ical society.
And as always, all of the society's
museum rooms in the 1914 High
School will be open.
All proceeds from the event benefit
the society and its efforts to restore the
old school.
Bender said the society was
"delighted" that Unity could resched-
ule its show for Pioneer Day and said
this might establish a tradition.
"We just feel those two go together


very well," she said.
To find about more about Pioneer
Day, call the historical society at 757-
9226.
Advance tickets to Unity's Bluegrass,
Gospel and Oldies Extravaganza are
available at the The Courier, 101 N.
Wheeler St., Family & Friends Antiques
and Collectibles, 1004 E. Baker St., and
the Greater Plant City Chamber of
Commerce, 106 N. Evers St.' Tickets
will also be sold at the door. Call
Jordan, 752-1275.


Deadline is Thursday the week before the item is to appear in the paper. This includes club news, calendar items, church-related
items, business notes, entertainment and school notes.

The Courier
101 N. Wheeler St. Plant City, FL 33566 Phone 752-3113 FAX 754-3725


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14 THE COURIER NOVEMBER 4,2004


SERVICE
Continued From Page I
chapters in Plant City.
"I just do what I do because I enjoy
it," she said.
Johnson can be found all over the
city putting in volunteer time. One day
she's clad in pink, directing visitors or
escorting patients as a member of the
South Florida Baptist Hospital Auxili-
ary. Another day she's delivering meals
to the needy for Meals on Wheels of
Plant City. And still another she's guid-
ing travelers at the Greater Plant City
Chamber of Commerce's Welcome
Center on Park Road.
She still finds time to crochet baby
caps for newborns at the hospital -
she's up to more than 1,500.
Shirley Gill, a member of the Xi Mu
Sigma chapter, helped put together
Johnson's nomination, which was
submitted to the Beta Sigma Phi
International organization for review.
Johnson easily met the high stan-
dards necessary to be considered for
an award that Gill said, "is not given
lightly."
"She just gives and gives," Gill said.
"She is a lady of ladies."

'Immediate friends'
Walter W. Ross founded the sorority
in 1931 as a way for women to have
fellowship during the depths of the
Great Depression. Not long after, the
group established a tradition of
service. During World War II, it raised
millions of dollars in war bonds.
The group boasts 165,000 members
today that raise $3 million per year for
local charities and contribute 200,000
volunteer hours in an average year,
according to the Beta Sigma Phi Web
site.


Special to The Courier
Johnson in 1960, when she moved to Atlanta from Los Angeles. Soon after, at the
invitation of a customer of her dry cleaning business, she would join Beta Sigma
Phi and meet lifelong friends.


To be considered for the award, a
candidate must have an active mem-
bership in the sorority for at least 30
years, hold the highest sorority degree
to which she is eligible, and must have
contributed to the Beta Sigma Phi's
service objectives in an extraordinary
way, among other requirements.
Born in Iowa and raised in Los Ang-
eles, Johnson joined the group not
long after moving to Atlanta in 1960. A
customer of the dry cleaning business


she ran with her now-late husband
invited her to join and Johnson
decided to give it a try to meet friends.
She met at least two lifelong friends
and 42 years later boasts a perfect
attendance record.
When she moved to Tampa in 1977,
she joined a chapter there. Because
membership is transferable between
chapters, Johnson said it's like having
"immediate friends" wherever you go.
She did the same in 1980 when she


moved to Plant City, the hometown of
her second husband, John.
Johnson has held every office in her
chapter at least once, some of them
several times. The same goes for the
chapter's various committees. She has
held numerous offices on the sorori-
ty's City Council, comprised of mem-
bers of each of Plant City's chapters.
She is considered the ultimate
authority on the sorority, said Cynthia
Dross of Plant City, a member of Xi Mu
Sigma. Johnson acts as an advisor to
that chapter.
"She's the type of person we all
strive to be," Dross said.

'People person'
The personal benefits of volunteer-
ism are many, Johnson said. At the
Welcome Center, for example, she can
be the "people person" she says she's
always been. The same goes for social-
izing with and befriending her fellow
volunteers.
"They're the kind of people you like
to know because they're all very out-
going and giving people," she said.
Most fundraisers, such as the local
sororities' joint garage sales, double as
socials for the members, she said.
Johnson was impressed by her
sorority sisters' ability to keep the
secret of her award. Ironically, John-
son is in the middle of doing the same
for one of her closest friends in an
Atlanta chapter. She traveled there this
week for the presentation.
It is fulfilling work, she said, espe-
cially at an age when many slow
down.
"It gives me pleasure to know I'm
physically and mentally able to help
someone else," she said.
What about the future?
"I hope I'm still on my feet and able
to do what I do," she said, laughing.


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NOVEMBER 4, 2004 THE COURIER 15


BIRTHS


Brandon Regional Hospital
July 20
A daughter, Emily Dawn Hughbanks, to Dawn and Rich-
ard Hughbanks of Plant City.
A daughter, Jordan Riley Oliva, to Jessica Oliva of Plant
City.
July 26
A son, Walker Reed Kahelin, to Carol and Matthew
Kahelin of Plant City.
July 28
A daughter, Kendall Brooke Barker, to Jessica and Larry
Barker of Plant City.
July29
A daughter, Amanda Rae Parrish, to Kimberly L. and
Bobby R. Parrish of Plant City.
A son, Devon Jacob Burgos, to Jennifer Ferdin and
Alberto Burgos of Plant City.
Aug. 2
A daughter, Hasana Jazel Gallegos, to Karina Sanchez
and Fidencio Gallegos of Plant City.
Aug. 5
A daughter, Hannah Grace Lamb, to Melissa and Danny


Lamb Jr. of Plant City.
Aug. 6
A daughter, Cali Lynn Sappington, to Lorrie and Rick
Sappington of Plant City.
A daughter, Adamaris Chavez, to Deyanira and Merced
Chavez of Plant City.
Aug. 8
A daughter, Catherine Elizabeth Ross, to Gretchen and
Allen Ross of Plant City.
Aug. 11
A daughter, Madison Skylar Cullen, to Kimberly and
Steve Cullen of Plant City.
Aug. 12
A son, Peyton Allen Strawn, to Heather and Shane
Strawn of Plant City.
A daughter, Lillian Brianna Martinez, to Kristin Noon-
chester and Bluy Martinez of Plant City.
Aug. 13
A daughter, Hally Breanne Karr, to Jessica Morris and
Roger D. Karr of Plant City.
Aug. 16
A son, Seth Robert May, to Jamie and Jason May of Plant
City.
Aug. 17
A son, Preston Colin Crews-Huether, to Nina Crews and
Robert Huether II of Plant City.


DIGEST


Continued From Page 5
Raider Band Boasts
Superior "'Pirates"
When the rating came in, these
Raiders were a merry band of "Pirates"
players.
The 2004-05 Plant City High Raider
Marching Band earned a "superior"
rating, the highest possible, at the
Florida Bandmasters Association Dis-
trict VII Festival held Oct. 30 at Cham-
berlain High School in Tampa.
Band director Matthew Green led
the group as it performed selections
from "The Pirates of the Caribbean."
Green was assisted by drum majors
Jason Reschke and Josh Sagraves,
band captains Ashley Hawthorne and
Stephanie Hill, and drum captains
farad Bean, Chris Castagno and Lind-


sey Causey.

Tools To Fight Terror
Funds to fight terror are trickling
down to police departments in
smaller cities. The Plant City Police
Department is one of them.
The department has secured a
$40,000 from the Office of Domestic
Preparedness. It will be used to pur-
chase:
A decontamination station, fea-
turing a chemical-trap collection bag,
portable air heater, and portable hot
shower system. Price: $8,000.
Terrorism incident prevention
equipment. The system allows text
messaging between police and fire
departments to enhance real-time
notification and communication.


Price: $10,000.
A portable, wireless surveillance
system. Price: $10,000.
Logistical support equipment,
including a portable shelter and light
tower with generator. Price: $9,000.

Top Brass
Detective Scott Rehbein is the Plant
City Police Department's employee of
the month for October.
He was recognized for issuing five
criminal report affidavits on stolen
vehicles, the arrest of two suspects on
vehicle breaking and entering, and his
"commitment to excellence," depart-
ment officials said.


MAUL
Continued From Page 6
said more about leadership that I have
heard from our exceptionally wordy
political candidates the past few
months. Whoever is elected president
would do well to ask to be presented a
towel, the symbol of servant leadership,
when they take the oath of office.
I want to be surrounded by leaders
who are more impressed with this
country than they are with their ability
to hold office. I want to see a cadre of
public servants emerge who give as
much attention to poverty and opportu-
nity as they did their own election. I
want to see.Tallahassee and Washington
populated by men and women with a
commitment to the common good that
overshadows their dedication to
political power.
Here's the deal I'm offering, and it
applies to everyone from county
commissioner to state representative to
U.S. senator to president of the whole
nation.
I'm prepared to take you at your
word. Seriously. I'm prepared to believe
that you really meant it when you said
you wanted to be a public servant. I'll
even believe the stuff you threw in about
God. All I expect in return is true servant
leadership.
In the Book of Numbers often
avoided because of extensive geneal-
ogies and legalistic minutia this nugget
is hidden about a leader named Caleb.
"My servant Caleb thinks differently,"
God observed, "and follows me com-
pletely." Numbers 14:24
Today, after the campaigning and all
the extravagant promises, I'm ready for
some politicians to begin thinking
differently too.

Derek Maul is a writer who lives in
Valrico. You can view his work at


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16 THE COURIER NOVEMBER 4, 2004


BRIGGS
Continued From Page 8


."Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Conte nt

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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We sure appreciated the
wedding entourage from Plant
City Jeff and Barb Jackson,
their grandchildren, daughter
Erin and friend, David and
Vickie Hawthorne, Tim and
Becky Martin, Jean Weaver,
daughter Jean Ann and
husband, Dave- Davenport.
Jeff brought his guitar and
sang the first dance.


Our town has some pretty
sharp cookies. Becky, Vicki,
Barb and Jeff recognized a few
Nashville celebrities when a
group of us took to Music Row
one night at Robert's Western
World Honky Tonk Grill.
They spotted the lead
singer, Ronnie Dunn, of
Brooks and Dunn, who was
persuaded to do a song with


Speci
the band (he was celebrating
wife Janene's birthday). Becky
recognized Gretchen Wilson
("I'm a Redneck Woman,")
and I think it was Jeff who saw
one of Patty Lovelace's guitar-
ists.
We were sure proud of the
Plant City guys for making it
past midnight (although Jeff, a
guitarist with Plant City's Buck
Hummer and the Pickups,
needed no persuading!).


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A mouthful:
"gt Wayne Shuff,
right, and son
Tim show off
the sailfish
they caught on
a recent
fishing trip.
That's as far
into the mouth
as it got,
though they
released it.
al to The Courier
Someone asked me about
the most memorable wedding
moments.
The photographer asked us
to pose for a mother-daughter
picture. "Just look at each
other," she said. Bad idea! We
burst into tears.
The funniest moment goes
to the groom, a surgical resi-
dent, when he tried unsuc-
cessfully to put the bride's ring
on the wrong hand (your bud-
dies aren't going to let you
forget that one, Nick!).
And finally, there was the
truly delightful time when
three of my grandchildren, all
under the age of 6, stole the
dance floor. Luckily, they did
not get their grammy's shy
genes, though their parents
may wish they had in a few
years.
As for the father of the bride,
he said, "Now all we have to do
is marry off the dogs and we'll
be free!" Any takers?
Since this is the last Briggs'
wedding, I am sorely in need
of new stories from my read-
ers. Please e-mail me!
Send items to gabylee@ao-
Lcom or mail them to The
Courier, c/o Betty Briggs, 101
N. Wheeler-St., Plant City, FL
33566.


Come Taste Our


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Whole Turkey with Turkey Gravy
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Cheese Display
Bread Display
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Mushrooms and Artichokes


Tomato Mozzarella
Smoked Salmon w/Garnishes
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GibletGravy
Corn Bread Stuffing
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Vegetable Medley
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Sweet Potato Casserole

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NOVEMBER 4, 2004 THE COURIER *17


of Each Wooeek wi
h entele to win
ftr GraDl Prize.
* 4 Movie Passes to Lake
Walden Cinema and Gift
Card for Concession Stand
* 1 Year Membership for
24 Hour Coast to Coast
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* $50 Gift Certificate
to Cherry's
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to Lake Walden Cinema
* $20 Gift Certificate
from Cherry's


Cherry/s
Wins: 51
Losses: 36
Miami
Auburn
S. Carolina
USF
Bucs
Ravens
Chiefs
Steelers
Vikings
49ERS


To Enter-Mail or Bring Entry Form by 5pm Thursday to:
The Courier 101 N. Wheeler St., Plant City, FL 33566
Name
Address
Citv


1. Miami @ V
2. Georgia @
3. S. Carolina


CIRCLE ONE FROM EACH GAME
FOR WEEKEND OF SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6TH
irgina 4. East Carolina @ USF 7. Chiefs @ Saints
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TALK TO A REAL, LIVE PERSON WHO'S IN
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RALPH L. FEOLA, CLU, ChFC, LUTCF
752-2556
1003 S. Collins St., Plant City





AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
established 1954
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Dean Roberts, Vice President


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102 W. Baker St. 752-6193


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18 THE COURIER NOVEMBER 4,2004

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Uo3's


TONY MARRERO/Staff photo
Christ practices on a special software program she hopes will allow her to become a court
reporter. She speaks into the mask and the words appear on the screen, which is ideal because
multiple sclerosis affects her ability to type.


HEALTH
Continued From Page 1
"In the meantime, you wait," she said.
One of the most unsettling aspects of MS is
the unpredictability. Symptoms can come and
go or might be permanent. Some might have
no symptoms at all, some might be paralyzed
for life. There is no way to tell if and how it
might progress.
"I don't really know what to expect," Christ
said. "No one can really tell me."

Search for a cure
That may be true, but the situation has
improved greatly in the last 15, 10 and even
five years, said Dr. Patricia O'Looney, director
of biomedical research at the MS Society.
"We have experienced an exponential
growth in the number of researchers working
on MS, and this growth is increasing the
number of clinical trials to find better treat-
ments," O'Looney said.
MS results from a breakdown in myelin, the
protective insulation surrounding the nerve
fibers of the central nervous system, which
allows input from the brain to be lost. What's
left in those areas is scar tissue, or sclerosis,
that interferes with the transmission of signals
and results in MS symptoms.
MS might go undetected for years because it
might attack part of the brain that does not
affect functions, O'Looney said.
Though there is still no cure, research on
several fronts have helped slow the progression
of the disease and the frequency of attacks, she
said. There are several drugs already on the
market that do that.
Once difficult to diagnose, the advent of MRI
technology has helped doctors spot MS earlier.
That has helped improve tremendously the
lives of MS patients, O'Looney said, because
the sooner MS patients start those drugs, the
better, even if they aren't experiencing symp-
toms.
Other others of research show promise, she
said.
"There's nothing that's coming out tomor-
row, but there are new ideas of ways we can
stop activity," she said.
A drug currently under review shows
promise in blocking the migration of the
immune cells to the brain that cause damage
to the myelin. Other investigators have found
that station drugs used to regulate cholesterol,
such as Lipitor, have the potential to regulate
the immune system in a way that might benefit


The Courier welcomes reader-submitted photos.
Include photographer's name, contact person's
name and phone number and a brief description,
including names of those pictured.


"We have experienced an expo-
nential growth in the number
ofresearchers working on MS,
and this growth is increasing the
number of clinical trials to find
better treatments."
DR. PATRICIA O'LOONEY
MS Society, director of biomedical research

MS patients.
Researchers also suspect that "combination
therapy," or using together more than one MS
drug already on the market, might be
effective.
MS is not directly inherited, but researchers
are looking for a genetic susceptibility. They
also wonder if they might use to their advan-
tage the knowledge that more women then
man are stricken with the disease, and that the
disease goes into remission during the last few
months of a woman's pregnancy. That leads
them to believe .that hormone therapy could
regulate the disease.
Finally, scientists are looking for ways to
repair damaged myelin to help restore func-
tions lost to the disease.
"Because MS is such a complex disease that
crosses over many aspects of science, that's
why the effort is to approach MS research on
so many fronts," O'Looney said.

Won't 'sit out'
Back in Walden Lake, Christ is preparing to
attack life on a different front.
She is now training to be a court reporter at
Erwin Technical Center in Tampa. Her MS and
the effects of her fall don't allow her to type, so
she is using voice recognition software that
allows her to dictate verbatim court proceed-
ings into a laptop computer.
The prospect of working again has been a
tremendous boost for her, she said, even
though there are days when she can hardly get
out of bed.
"I think I'm actually pretty positive," Christ
said. "I'm very glad I could find something that
I could retrain to do. I don't want to sit the rest
of my life out."
The MS Walk in Plant City will be her first.
She urged others to come out to support the
cause.
"It could be their son or daughter sitting in
my shoes," she said. "The sooner we find a
cure, the sooner no one has to live with this."


Send photos to:
The Courier
101 N. Wheeler St.
Plant City, FL 33566
Call 752-3113 for information.




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