Citation
Crestview news bulletin

Material Information

Title:
Crestview news bulletin
Portion of title:
Bulletin
Portion of title:
Crestview news
Place of Publication:
Crestview, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Lee Knapp - Publisher, Thomas Boni - Editor
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crestview (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okaloosa County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Okaloosa -- Crestview
Coordinates:
30.767994 x -86.567682

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 9, no. 37 (Sept. 5, 2001); Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Crestview News Bulletin. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
002758666 ( ALEPH )
48122675 ( OCLC )
ANN6621 ( NOTIS )
2001229458 ( LCCN )

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Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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** A GateHouse Media newspaper read by 10,450 people every week. Obituaries .............. A2-4 Opinion .................... A8 Education.................. A9 Lifestyle ..................... B1 Sports.................... B2-3 Bulletin Board ............ B4 A6Eight-month-old gets robotic surgery B4Enjoy the crisp weather during these fall events SEE CRESTVIEW AS IT WAS DECADES AGO | B1 THE CIRCUS IS COMING TO TOWN! | B4 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 @cnbulletin facebook.com/crestviewbulletin50 ¢ crestviewbulletin.com Vol. 43 Issue 85MIDWEEK EDITION By Jim Thompson 315-4445 | @Jimtnwfdn jthompson@nwfdailynews.comHURLBURT FIELD„ Master Sgt. John A. Chapman, the Air Force Special Tactics combat controller awarded a posthumous Medal of Honor earlier this year, will be further honored this week with a portrait dedication and the renaming of a building at Hurlburt Field, headquarters of Air Force Special Opera-tions Command.Those honors, set for Thursday at Hurlburt Field, will be part of three days of observances honoring Chap-man and Special Tactics personnel. The events won't be open to the public, but will be available to Department of Defense cardholders and their escorted guests.Live feeds, videos and photos of the weekend's events will be available on the Air Force Special Operations Command's Facebook page at Facebook.com/AfsocOfficial.President Donald Trump presented Chapman's Medal of Honor to his widow, Valerie Nessel, and the couple's two daughters in an Aug. 22 ceremony at the White House. Chapman was honored for his actions on March 4, 2002 Honored recipient to be rememberedPortrait unveiling, building renaming will honor Master Sgt. John Chapman President Donald J. Trump presents the Medal of Honor to Valerie Nessel, widow of U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Chapman, during an Aug. 22 ceremony at the White House. Chapman was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for actions on Takur Ghar mountain in Afghanistan on March 4, 2002. He will be further honored later this week at Hurlburt Field. [WAYNE A. CLARK/U.S. AIR FORCE] By Renee Bell 682-6524 | @cnbRenee reneeb@crestviewbulletin.comCRESTVIEW „ Revolt Pro Wrestling is giving area residents a fun way to help people who suffered losses due to Hurricane Michael. RPW wrestlers will have their sixth Crestview live wrestling event soon, with all proceeds going to directrelief.org. Doors open 6 p.m. Nov. 17 at the Crestview Community Center, 1446 Commerce Drive, and wrestling begins at 7 p.m. General admission tickets are $10 each, and front row tickets are $15 each. "We picked Direct Relief due to the fact that 100 percent of the proceeds that we make from this event will all go to disaster relief for those that are in need," RPW co-owner Ryan Fury said. According to the DR website, its mission is to improve the health and lives of people affected by poverty or emergencies without regard to politics, religion, or ability to pay. Two RPW wrestlers were among people affected by the storm, one of whom lost everything. "There are also other wrestlers in that area that were affected but we do not know to what degree," Fury said. Event attendees will get to see bouts between the International Superstars and The Space Cowboys; Zane Stevens and Revolt Heavyweight Champion Christopher Santos; and women's wrestling with Avery Taylor and Ellie. Competitors also includeCameron Thomas, Blanco Loco, Zane Stevens, Ox Haney, El Cachi, Joey Ozbourne and Brian Valor. Visit the Revolt Pro Wrestling Facebook page or www.revoltprowrestling.com for more information.Crestview pro wrestling event will help hurricane survivorsZane Stevens Tony Storm Chris Justice Christopher Santos An undated photograph shows Air Force Special Tactics combat controller John Chapman, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor earlier this year for actions in Afghanistan in 2002. He will be honored at Hurlburt Field this week with a portrait unveiling and the renaming of a building in his honor. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CHAPMAN, A10By Kaylin Parker682-6524 | @kparkercnb kparker@crestviewbulletin.comCRESTVIEW „ "Bienvenue" (or "welcome") opened the special council meeting Monday in Warrior Hall with over 100 in attendance including attendees from Crestview's sister city in Noirmoutier-en-l le, France.This meeting marked the beginning of "City Government Week" „ a week dedicated to giving the community an opportunity to learn more about city operations.Although this was a "special" meeting, the council began in regular meeting format with an invocation."We open every meeting with an invocation, and some people say, 'Why do you do that'," Whitten said. "We are a Christian country based on Christian principles.""What we're going to do is walk you through the meeting so you can see what we do," Whitten said. "Normally, we have very long, boring meet-ings. Tonight, we will have a short boring meeting."The council business portion of the meeting was quick with only one item discussed, an out-of-city water service petition by Crestview residents, which passed unanimously with all members present.Mayor David Cadle then stood before the crowd and read a proclamation designating this week as "City Government Week" for 2018."I encourage the citizens of this city to become involved in the activities of your local government thereby enhanc-ing the quality of life in your community," Cadle said.A large portion of the crowd consisted of groups the coun-cil recognized.After the council recognized their groups, Cadle read the "Sister City Proclamation," but not before taking a moment to honor City Government WeekOver 100 in attendance as city council kicks o meetingSee KICK OFF, A10

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** A2 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin OBITUARIESSUBMISSIONSThe News Bulletin publishes North Okaloosa County residents and former residents obituaries, including a photo, for $95 in print and online. Family members should write the 500-word announcements and funeral homes should submit them to the newspaper for con“ rmation. We may edit submissions for style. Call 682-6524 or email news@crestviewbulletin.com for more information.On Tuesday, October 16th, 2018, Robert BobbyŽ McGee Bowick of Destin, Florida passed away at the age of 74. Born in Monroe, Louisiana to parents Emile McGee and Jane Luke Bowick March 7,1944, Bobby was raised in Eufaula, Alabama by his devoted grandparents Dr. and Mrs. James and Josephine Luke. He was an Eagle Scout, attended Baylor Military Academy in Chattanooga, Tennessee and finished at Eufaula High School in 1963. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity at Auburn University and graduated in 1968. Bobbys political career began as Governor George Wallaces Executive Assistant. He headed the Bicentennial Commission of Alabama and then worked in governmental affairs and sales for 3M, Mohawk Data Science and National Business Systems. Bobby retired to Destin, Florida in 1994 and became a tireless champion of local community projects including President of Gulf Pines Community Association, Board member of Walton County Tax Commission and Walton County Planning Commission. He was also an active member of the Walton County Sheriffs Association. Whether we knew him as The Slim Prince, Bull, Coach or Big Bobby, we will remember him as being larger than life in every situation with a true heart of gold. He never met a stranger and touched so many lives with his charm and charisma, instantly making people feel comfortable and welcome. Bobby would go to extraordinary lengths to help others, no matter if it was planning a trip or party, he could always find the best deal. He was passionate in his beliefs and his loyalty to his friends and family was unparalleled. Bobby realized the importance of tradition and he was ever loyal to the places and experiences that made him who he was. He valued his history and told many fantastic and funny stories about growing up in Eufaula, the lifelong friendships he made at Auburn University and his shared life and travels with his family. Bobby is survived by his wife of 48 years, Bettye; his son Robert and his wife Paige, and granddaughters Chandler and Payton of Houston, Texas; his daughter Bonnie Raffa and her husband Matthew Raffa of St. John, Virgin Islands. A reception to celebrate the life and love of Bobby Bowick will be held at the Eufaula Country Club on Saturday,October 27th at four oclock.ROBERT BOBB MCGEE BOWICK1944 2018Mirtala V. Calix, lovingly known as Mama TalaŽ passed on October 11, 2018 at the age of 88. Born February 23, 1930 in Gracias, Honduras, Central America to Manuel & Otilia Villela. She is preceded in death by her husband, Arturo Gustavo Calix. Mama TalaŽ was the loving mother of 4 children, grandmother of 6 and greatgrandmother of 2. A Celebration of Life Service will be held on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:00 pm at Spirit of Christ Church located on 206 Jonquil Avenue NW, Fort Walton Beach, FL with Interment following at Sunset Cemetery, Valparaiso, FL. Arrangements are entrusted to McLaughlin Mortuary in Fort Walton Beach, FL. Guest book and condolences are available online at www. mclaughlinmortu ary.com/tributes/ Mirtala-Calix.MIRTALA HIGINIA VILLELA DE CALIX1930 2018USAF Lt. Colonel Robert J Carlson did his last wheels up call on October 17, 2018. He died peacefully at home, surrounded by his loving family who had cared for him for an extended period of time. Born in Seattle Washington, January 9, 1921 he was the only child of Robert and Estella Carlson. He attended elementary school in Elk WA, making a friend of 90 years in Pat McVay. He spent some of his early childhood traveling the west, living in a motorhome his machinist father fashioned on the back of a 1921 Model T. They later returned to settle in Spokane, WA where he graduated from John Rogers High school in 1938. Proudly, several years ago he was inducted to their Wall of Fame as notable alumni. He joined the Army Air Corp immediately after Pearl Harbor. While in flight training in Thomasville, GA he met the lovely Johnnie Rigsby, whom he returned to marry at war end. A decorated combat pilot in WW II he flew the famed P-51 MustangŽ out of the N African theatre. He attended Georgia Tech with help from the GI bill, graduating with a degree in Industrial engineering in 1950. He went to work with Ford Motor Company in Atlanta, GA. He still owns the car he watched move down the assembly line he helped design and oversee. At the onset of Korean War he rejoined the Air Force as a pilot and opted to stay for a full thirty years. He served as a test pilot, an instructor pilot, and the Assistant Director of Aircraft Maintenance for the HQ 5th Air Force as well as Director of the Pacific Air Forces Maintenance and Standardization and Evaluation team. The P51 and the T bird were two of his favorite planes although he logged time in over 25 different prop, jet and rotary craft. During his USAF career he received many official decorations including the Distinguished Flying Cross which was his most cherished. He retired from the USAF in 1971 and with Johnnie, started, Choctaw Associates, the successful land surveying and civil Engineering firm in Fort Walton Beach, FL. They sold the company after their girls completed college. Bobs love for travel kept him busy. Many family vacations crisscrossed the United States and always included National Parks. In his 80s he discovered cruisingŽ and enjoyed sailing the Caribbean, Mexico, Alaska, South America, traversing through the Panama Canal and then the Fjords of Norway. His beloved hiking stick with its numerous medallions is testimony to his many travels. It was always a conversation starter and he enjoyed sharing tales of his travels with others. He was an avid car enthusiast, photographer, memorabilia collector and generous supporter of countless causes. Robert is preceded in death by Johnnie his wife of 62 years and his infant daughter, Cynthia Louise. He is survived by his daughters and their families; Dr. Christel Carlson (Gail Mackie) granddaughter Cyra Carlson, all of Spokane, Washington; Sharon (Richard) Adams, grandsons Ryan and Travis Adams of Fort Walton Beach; Cyndi (Vic) Mette, step-grandsons Travis and Trevor Mette of Fort Walton Beach. Viewing will be at McLaughlin Mortuary, 17 Chestnut Avenue SE, Fort Walton Beach, FL on Saturday 10/ 27 at 10:00 a.m. with services beginning at 11:00 a.m. Interment with Full Military Honors will follow at Beal Memorial Cemetery, 316 NW Beal Pkwy, Fort Walton Beach, FL. In lieu of flowers please send support to the Seacrest Wolf Preserve, 3449 Bonnett Pond Road, Chipley FL, 32428, SOCKS, 498 Carmel Drive, Fort Walton Beach, FL (where his constant companion Roxie was adopted from) or the USAF Armament Museum, 100 Museum Drive, Eglin AFB, FL. Robert touched the lives of many especially those of his daughters and his beloved grandchildren. His steadfast presence, quiet guidance, unfailing love and his twinkling blue eyes will be forever missed. Expressions of love and sympathy may be viewed or submitted online at www.mclaugh linmortuary.com.ROBERT JOSEPH CARLSON1921 2018Kimberly Sue (Bleacher) Corlew, 48, of Crestview, FL, born in Lancaster, PA on September 1, 1970 to Donald L. Bleacher and the late Sandra F. Weit, was called to be with her Heavenly Father on October 3, 2018. Kim leaves behind the love of her life, Lew Corlew, Jr., sons Neal and Nicholas, and grandchildren Draven and Emmaryss. Kims loving sisters, Tammy Bartlett (Jimmy) and Stephanie Gebhard (Scott), with whom she shared an inseparable bond, loving stepmother Arlene Bleacher, and stepsiblings Michelle Leed (John) and Ronnie Weit, Jr., as well as the nieces and nephews she enjoyed spoiling, all of whom she loved dearly, also mourn Kims unexpected passing. Kim graduated from Mesa High School, Mesa, AZ, on June 1, 1989. After graduation, she returned to her hometown of Lancaster, where she met Lew; they married on July 16, 1990. As a military family, they were stationed at Schofield Barracks, HI (where their sons were born); Fort Drum, NY; Kirtland AFB, Albuquerque, NM; Fort Sill, OK; and Fort Campbell, KY, finally settling in Crestview, FL after her husband retired from the Army. Nick marrying Anjelika gave Kim the daughter she always wanted and she became a proud Mimi to her grandbabies. Kim devoted her life to God, family, and her dogs Kiley, Kera, Kayla, Lucky, Lady, Lily, and Kasey. She was a proud military wife who was a member of the Army Family Support Group (FSG), a Cub Scout leader, teachers aide, and volunteer at the soup kitchen at LifePoint Church, where she attended. Kim didnt shy away from a challenge and was adventurous, loved rollercoasters, hiking, and riding in airplanes, making many cross country road trips to visit family. She enjoyed reading the Chicken Soup for the Soul series and found inspiration in the Bible, both of which bolstered her strong faith. Kim displayed elements of her Christian beliefs throughout her home, which served as ever-present reminders of Gods love. She loved thrift shopping and going to garage sales. However, the number one thing Kim loved to do was talk. She was blessed with Gods gift to gab, conversing with everyone with whom she came into contact, so much so that she was always caught up in conversation, making her lose track of time. No matter what problems life threw in her path, such as her long term battle with chronic pain, Kim put her trust in God, remaining steadfast in His love and promises. She displayed unwavering kindness and love, and blessed others all the days of her life, which was routinely witnessed by those around her. Kim was very compassionate, extending grace to whomever she met, and had a special place in her heart for those feeling rejected, unworthy, and lost, seeing the beauty in everyone. She was respectful and always put others first. Those around her loved and clung to her. Kim was a charismatic, devout, and God-fearing Christian. Though Kim was always pondering what her specific personal gifts were, it became obvious in the way she lived that her purpose in life was simply to show God's love. Kim was a reflection of her favorite bible verse, 1 Corinthians 13:4…8a, Love is patient, love is kind. [ƒ] Love never fails,Ž which she displayed in her everyday life with everyone she met. Kim, you left us way too soon. We miss you dearly. All our love, our beloved Kim. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the disaster relief fund at LifePoint Church (https://www.mlpc. org/) or mail to Lifepoint Disaster Relief (In Memory of Kimberly Corlew), 400 S Ferdon Blvd, Crestview, FL 32536, which will be used for the children affected by Hurricane Michael. Services were conducted October 19, 2018. Arrangements are entrusted to Whitehurst Powell Funeral Home in Crestview. Guest book and condolences are available online at www. whitehurstpow ellfuneralhome.com.KIMBERLY SUE (BLEACHER) CORLEW1970 2018Ret M/Sgt John Grady Gordon, Sr. passed away peacefully at his home on October 14, 2018. He was born August 16, 1927 in Laurel Hill, FL and was a lifelong resident of Okaloosa County. At a young age he joined the Air Force where he proudly served 30 years with tours in Korea and Vietnam. He was preceded in death by his wife, Thelma, father John David Gordon, mother Ellen Clary Gordon, Brothers Clary Gordon, Troy Gordon, granddaughter Samantha Ann Gordon and sonin-law Richard Prue. He is survived by his children, Linda Lysiak, John Grady BuddyŽ Gordon, Jr. (Diane), Donna Prue, Georgette Howell (Michael) and Wanda Gordon Taylor (Ricky), brother, Brady Gordon (Edna), and step-son, Harold Hughes. Dad will leave 9 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Viewing will be Friday, October 19, 2018 from 6 to 8 p.m.. Services were held October 20, 2018. The family extends our sincere loving gratitude to Syretha Stokes and Glenda Lanasse for their loving care. You may leave your condolences at www. brackneyfuneral service.com.JOHN GRADY GORDON SR.1927 2018 Gladys Jones age 91 of Fort Walton Beach made her final transition from his Earthly home peacefully at her residence Thursday October 11, 2018 to join her Heavenly Family: husband: Eugene; children: Sanford (Big Daddy); Edward (Eddie D); Linda (Lynn) and Jesse. Funeral Services were held Saturday, October 20, 2018. She leaves to cherish her memories: Children: Barbara Jones, Madie Williams, Donnie Jones, Lanford Jones and Hercules Jones; 12 grandchildren and a host of other close relatives and friends. McKinnie Funeral Home (Crestview) directing.GLADYS JONES Please recycle this paper

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, October 24, 2018 A3Captain William Patrick Murphy (retired), or MurphŽ was born in Smithtown on Long Island New York to Robert and Ilene Murphy on March 12th 1964. At an early age the family including his older brother Robert and twin sister Maureen (Zeurcher) moved to Lake Havasu City Arizona. He often spoke of the beauty of his new home town and state. Upon completing Air Force ROTC and graduation from Arizona State University Murph joined the US Air Force where he completed Specialize Undergraduate Navigator Training and Electron Warfare Training at Mather AFB, California. Upon graduation he was awarded a Navigator Rating to start a career he excelled at, and loved. In February 1989 he was assigned to Hurlburt Field, Florida to begin a career that included assignments with the 16th Special Operations Squadron (SOS), 19th SOS, 4th SOS, and 18th Flight Test Squadron. While part of these dedicated organizations he served as AC-130H Gunship Electronics Warfare Officer (EWO), AC130U Instructor, and Instructor and Evaluation Assistant Flight Commander of the Combat Applications Flight. During his 20 year career Murphy deployed in support of Joint Endeavor in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq, along with other various deployments including Panama and capture of the dictator Noriega. Captain Murphy retired in June 2007 from the US Air Force as a Master Navigator. He was extremely proud to be part of the AF and the Special Operations Community of heroes. As he often said, their motto was you can run, but you will only die tired.Ž Following retirement Murph worked for Lockheed Martin Corporation and continued to support his AF flying units as an AC-130U Contract Aircrew Instructor and U-28 Contract Combat Systems Office Instructor. Throughout his life he was an avid runner. WILLIAM PATRICK MURPHY1964 2018Mary Katherine Dill Hansen, 83, passed away on Monday, October 15th at her home in Valparaiso, FL. Mary had been a resident of Valparaiso since the late 1950s. In addition to being an Air Force spouse, Mary held a variety of jobs throughout her life, including working for Vanity Fair/ Russell Mills, and many local and military businesses, but her most important job was being a mother to her three daughters. She was also a devoted Babu to her four grandchildren. Mary was born in Maple Ridge, Pennsylvania to Joseph Dill and Anna Michlo on March 22, 1935. She was preceded in death by her parents, her brothers Joseph and Kevin and sister Dorothy, her husband Edward Hansen, and her three daughters, Patricia Wilt, Debra Coon, and Nancy Mulberry. She is survived by her sisters Joanne Felix, Helen Rullo, and Ann Schossler and brothers Andrew and Michael Dill, many nieces and nephews and her cousins Cathy, Maria, and Patty. She is also survived by her grandchildren, Jason Knight (Bridget), Garrett Knight (Angela), Kevin Wilt, and Katherine Mulberry, honorary grandson, Christopher Staples, and great-grandchildren Jaiden, Skyler, Zachary, Destinee, Mya, and Luke. She was a proud member of the AMVETS 78 auxiliary club and a devoted parishioner of St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church on Eglin Air Force Base. She loved her church family and rarely missed a Sunday morning mass. She greatly appreciated the kindness of the staff at the Eglin AFB commissary and all of her close friends, former co-workers, and neighbors, especially Beverly and Rosie. Services were held October 18 & 19, 2018. Marys family would like to thank Father Toledo and Susan Huberty of St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church at Eglin AFB and the staff of Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church in Niceville. We love you, Babu, and miss you already. Expressions of sympathy may be viewed or submitted online at www.mclaughlintwincities.comMARY KATHERINE DILL HANSEN1935 2018 OBITUARIESSUBMISSIONSThe News Bulletin publishes North Okaloosa County residents and former residents obituaries, including a photo, for $95 in print and online. Family members should write the 500-word announcements and funeral homes should submit them to the newspaper for con“ rmation. We may edit submissions for style. Call 682-6524 or email news@ crestviewbulletin.com for more information. Nancy Pitchford was born in Glendale, California to Franz Gabriel and Ruth (Allen) Baum. She graduated from Cal State Los Angeles in 1952, and worked in Baltimore, Maryland and Los Angeles County as a social worker. She was an accomplished musician: she played the cello in the Glendale Symphony Orchestra, and also played the guitar, piano and mandolin. She had a lifelong passion for the opera, a gift she gave her family. On March 6, 1954 she married Lynn Pitchford, and raised daughters Kim and Susan while following him from one assignment to another: California; Colorado; Seville, Spain; Florida; Rome, Italy; Alabama. She made the most of every place she found herself in. In Colorado Springs she became an expert skier, while in both Seville and Rome she took the opportunity to explore much of Europe. In Huntsville, Alabama she worked at the Legislative Office and was always politically astute and engaged. Finally, in her retirement in Florida she played golf into her 80s and made many friends, who will miss her. Nancy was strong and resourceful, but also beautiful, charming and fun. She and Lynn gave memorable parties, and she adored a good laugh. She didnt hesitate to pull her daughters out of school and take them to the opera, the ballet, a museum, or anywhere she thought theyd learn something more valuable. She was a loyal friend and was cherished by people whod known her since her youth. Nancy is survived by her husband Lynn, daughters Kim Pitchford and Susan Pitchford, and son-in-law Bob Crutchfield. She also left behind a third daughterŽ Sara (Laase) Deaton, along with her husband Tim and sons Paul and David, who will also miss her greatly. Nancy wanted her friends and family to know how much she appreciated them and the good and full life she had. She was at peace at the end and, as usual, impatient with anything or anyone that did not arrive on time. We miss her, but are grateful for having had this dear lady for so long. There will be no service, at Nancys request, but a small gathering to share memories is being planned for December. Donations can be made in her name to support musicians in need at https:// www.grammy.com/ musicares/donationsNANCY PITCHFORD1929-2018William Edward BillŽ Troxell passed into the arms of his Lord and Savior, fully healed, on October 10, 2018 at his home in Fort Walton Beach, FL. He was born on April 7, 1950 in Washington, D.C., into a military family, thus living in various places until his dad retired from Hurlburt Field AFB. Bill attended St. Mary Catholic School and was a 1969 Choctawhatchee H.S. graduate. He also took classes at OWCC in the accounting field. Bill was a Real Estate Broker, member of the FL Board of Realtors, and a Licensed General Contractor. He worked with his in-laws at Higdon Agency for many years and built townhouses, custom homes and additions in the area. He had jobs from the age of 14 and had a strong work ethic. Bill liked spending time with family and friends grilling out, listening to music, boating and taking trips to New Orleans. In earlier years, he enjoyed surfing and dirt bike riding. His favorite holiday was Thanksgiving with plenty of turkey leftovers! Bill was a faithful member of St. Mary Catholic Church and also attended Baptist services with his wife. They shared their faith in Jesus and were blessed with 45 years of marriage recently on Sept. 1, 2018. He is survived by his loving family, wife, Marilyn B. Troxell; daughter, Heather McAllister (Joe); son, William Evan Troxell; grandchildren, Jonah and Eleanor Grey McAllister, sister, Geralyn Roberts; brother-in-law, Brown Boswell; and niece, Lana Boswell. Bill was preceded in death by his parents, William and Ann Troxell; a sister, Jean Troxell; and nephew, Rylan Arflin. A funeral mass will be held at 1:00 p.m. on Sat., Oct. 27, 2018 at St. Mary Catholic Church with a reception to follow in the Parish Life Center. In lieu of flowers, donate to St. Judes Hospital or St. Mary Catholic Church in Bills memory. Special thanks to Emerald Coast Hospice, and his caregivers Mary, Kimber and lifelong friend William Day for their care and help during this time. Thanks also to Father Doug, communion ladies and other friends who visited Bill to make his days a little brighter. Psalm 118:24 To share condolences, please visit www.daviswatkins.comWILLIAM EDWARD TROXELL1950 2018Joseph Valentine Wildinger, Jr. (Lt Col USAF Retired) was born February 15, 1943 in Salinas, California to his proud parents, Beatrice Ann Smith and Major (USAF) Joseph Valentine Wildinger, Sr. Upon graduation at Peru State College, Nebraska, Joe immediately joined the Air Force to proudly serve his country and to fly airplanes. During his 23 years in the Air Force he flew KC-135 tankers and UH-1N helicopters. After retiring, he continued flying with Eastern Metro Express before beginning his dream of inspiring in others his love of aviation at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. He spent 20 years as an Adjunct Professor and later a full time Associate Professor and Director of Academics at Eglin AFB and Hurlburt Field AFB. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Jeanne Ables Wildinger; his daughter, Erica Wildinger; son, Evan Joseph Wildnger (Jolie); grandchildren, Jackson Joseph, Macy, Mallory and Ellis; his sister, Pamela Wildinger Brooks (Thomas); nephews Craig Brooks (Jennifer), Tyler and William, and Douglas Brooks (Wendy), Sylvia and Sebastian. He is also survived by his adoring dogs, Airey, Dino, Destiny and Court. Services were held October 22, 2018. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you support ASHA: Alabama Sighthound Adoptions, a non-profit organization for rescued greyhounds and salukis. Expressions of love and sympathy may be placed and viewed online at www.emeraldcoast funeralhome.comJOSEPH VALENTINE WILDINGER JR.1943 2018Jessica Marie Young, 39, of Fort Walton Beach, Florida, passed away on October 7, 2018. She was born February 21, 1979 in Manhasset, New York, to her parents, Gloria Jenkins Rine and Frank P. Hawthorne. As a child, her father and step-father were both members of the U.S. Coast Guard, so Jessica moved frequently and lived in Tampa, FL, Lake Charles, LA, Renton, WA, Leland, NC and Chesapeake, VA. She was a long-time resident of Leland, NC before moving to the Fort Walton Beach, FL area, which she considered to be her home. She managed the restaurant, bars, convention and banquet rooms for the Wyndham Gardens for many years, coordinating events of all sizes and delivering Wyndham Gardens as a destination wedding location. Having worked for years in the hospitality field, Jessica saw there was a need for a breakfast restaurant catering to the late night patron as well as those wanting a quality brunch, and so the idea of Asiagos Skillet was born. Her restaurants showed almost immediate success. The Skillet was voted Best Brunch in Destin in 2016, Best Catering in 2016 and 2017, and was featured in the USA Travel Vlog article The Best Food & Beaches on Floridas Emerald CoastŽ. Jessica was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in January, 2017 and sought the medical care of MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. While a patient in their care, Jessica participated in numerous clinical trials and received a non-related stem cell transplant to treat her illness. The family would like to express their deep gratitude to the dedicated doctors and nurses at MD Anderson for their devoted care over the last 22 months. She was a devoted mother and sister, a dedicated Philadelphia Eagles fan, a determined gamer, a champion pool player, and a card shark! Jessica is preceded in death by her grandparents Howard Jenkins Sr. and Gloria Simpson Jenkins and Florence Esther and George Hawthorne, as well as her uncle, George Hawthorne II. She had a very special bond with and survived by her daughter, Claudia Marie Young and her son, Zachary Young, her husband, George Young, her mother, Gloria Rine and step-father, Claude Rine, her father, Frank Hawthorne, stepmother Marilyn Hawthorne and her brother, Jonathan. Jessica has a strong love and devotion for her sister Holli Annette Croope, Hollis husband Troy and son William as well as her aunt, Theresa Brannon, Theresas husband Billy and their children Josh and Mirranda, as well as Mirrandas husband Matthew, and children, Rhett and Emory. The relationship Jessica has with Holli and Theresa is a bond that will never be broken. She also leave behind her beloved German Shepherd, Rex. Jessica has many aunts, uncles, and cousins that loved her and will miss her greatly. There are so many other friends and business associates that will miss Jessicas drive and dedication; the family expresses their appreciation for your help during Jessicas battle with cancer, especially Lawrence Taylor, Dale Andrews, Michelle Anders, Nicole McBee, Doug Filpi, and Theresa TŽ Follachio. Jessicas love for her family and extended family of friends will transcend her death.Services were held October 21, 2018.Flowers will be received by the family, although it is Jessicas wish that in lieu of flowers donations can be made to a GoFund-Me account for her children. Expressions of love and sympathy may be placed and viewed online at www.emeraldcoastfuneralhome.com.JESSICA MARIE YOUNG1979 2018 See MURPHY, A4

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** A4 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletincompeted in high school and college cross country. Following college and throughout his AF career and into retirement Murph was a constant part of the running community. He competed in numerous events from 5ks to marathons including several Boston, New York and Chicago marathons as well as Marine Corp and many others. One of his greatest joys was running a marathon or training run with his running brothersŽ Steve Cookman and Calvin Ziegler. Through running he met his fiance Val. Murph is survived by his great love and fiancee Valerie Hein, her son Stormi Hein and Daughter Indiana (Indi) Hein and Indis sons Easton and Stephen Madden and daughter Cadence Madden who called Murph Papa.Ž He is also survived by his brother Robert Murphy, twin sister Maureen Zeucher and their children. Murph was a trivia nut, or as he was known„the fount of all useless information. It was quicker and easier to ask him a question that to Google an answer. Once he owned a Smart Phone, no topic was beyond his reach. Touch on any topic and he would quickly respond with more information and a link. He will be sorely missed by so many people. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Wounded Warrior Project Organization to support victims or Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). MURPHYFrom Page A3Ada May JimmieŽ Wayne passed away October 15, 2018. Jimmie was born to Sidney and Lena Ward on June 10, 1926 in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Jimmie was a forty year resident of the Fort Walton Beach area, a boating enthusiast and devoted Christian Scientist. Jimmie was preceded in death by her husband of 63 years, Ret. Lt. Col John W. Wayne III; daughter, Jami Lee Mahoney and brother, Sidney Ward. Jimmie is survived by her son, Ret. Lt. Col John W. Wayne VI and his wife, Cindy as well as her grand-daughters Jessica Ball and wife Anna and Audrey Pope and husband, Randy. Jimmie was a beloved great-grandmother to Donovan, Lilly, Charlotte and Emily. Angels are pure thoughts from God, winged with Truth and LoveŽ Mary Baker Eddy.OBITUARIES ADA MAY JIMMIE WAYNE1926 2018 By More Content NowWORD OF THE DAYanneal [uh-neel] (verb) to heat to remove or prevent internal stress.THIS DAY IN HISTORYOct. 24, 1901: A 63-year-old schoolteacher named Annie Edson Taylor becomes the “ rst person to take the plunge over Niagara Falls in a barrel.QUOTE OF THE DAYThe world is round so that friendship may encircle it.Ž „ Pierre Teilhard de ChardinMORNING MINUTES

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, October 24, 2018 A5PRIZE DONATIONS NEEDED: The Crestview Police Department Community Services Division is accepting prize donations for the games night it has with special needs teens and adults in Crestview. Previous prizes were such items as T-shirts, sunglasses, baseball caps, small games, and stuffed animals. Donations of bottle water, soft drinks and snacks are also welcome. take donations to the CPD, Whitehurst Municipal Building, 201 Stillwell Blvd., Crestview. ENERGY ASSISTANCE AND SERVICES FOR LOW-INCOME FAMILIES: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, Tri-County Community Council, 290 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Crestview. 306-1134. CRESTVIEW SOUP KITCHEN NEEDS VOLUNTEERS: Serves Mondays through Saturdays. To volunteer at Central Baptist Church, call 682-5525; Our Savior Lutheran Church, 682-3154; LifePoint Church, 682-3518; Community of Christ, 682-7474; First Presbyterian Church, 682-2835; or First United Methodist Church, 682-2018. SUPPORT CIRCLE FOR SEXUAL ASSAULT SURVIVORS: Meetings take place as follows. „5-6 p.m. Tuesdays at Shelter House, 120 Woodruff Ave., Suite A, Crestview. This is a Shelter House survivor-led support group. Walk-ins are welcome. 683-0845. „6-7 p.m. Wednesdays, Shelter House, 16 Ferry Road SE, Fort Walton Beach. A Shelter House survivor-led support group. Walk-ins are welcome. 243-1201. „noon to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, Shelter House, 3590 U.S. Highway 331 S., Suite 102, DeFuniak Springs. A Shelter House survivor-led support group. Walk-ins are welcome. 362-7190. FREE CLOTHING GIVEAWAY: 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesdays; 1-3:30 p.m. Thursdays; and 9 a.m. to noon second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 247 S. Booker St., Crestview. Free items include shoes and other accessories. Presented by Concerned Citizens of Crestview. Details: 689-1582 or 428-6997. EMPLOY FLORIDA WORKSHOPS: 9-11 a.m. fourth Thursdays of the month at CareerSource Okaloosa Walton, 409 Racetrack Road, Fort Walton Beach. Learn to conduct job searches on the state system, create a resume, access labor market data for wage, job experience and education requirements for a speci“ c occupation. Learn about Training Grant opportunities, online training courses, and the organization's virtual recruiter. COLLEGE OFFERS ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT: A Florida State University program that offers relief … free of charge … to distressed African-Americans who provide care to a loved one with dementia. It uses trained lay pastoral-care facilitators and is recruiting caregivers in North and Central Florida. ACTS 2 (African-American Alzheimers Caregiver Training and Support) won a $20,000 award as well. Caregivers participate in a 12-session, telephone-based skills-building and support program covering topics such as relaxation, effective thinking and problemsolving skills. Call 866-778-2724 toll free, 850-274-4945, or go to www.ACTS2Project.org for details. SHINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders, a Department of Elder Affairs program, seeks volunteers to help elderly residents answer Medicare questions and resolve problems, help them make informed choices about their health insurance, save money on prescription medications and learn about their eligibility for helpful programs. There is no charge for seniors to use the program. Bilingual volunteers are also encouraged to call. Dial 1-800-963-5337 for details. EMERALD COAST HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS WANTED: ECH provides compassionate care through a team of professional staff members and volunteers. Volunteers are thoroughly trained and provided ongoing education. They can serve in a variety of areas from administrative help to offering support to a hospice patient through visits or weekly phone calls. Just a few hours a month makes an impact. Details: Ann O'Connor, 6890300. SENIORS VS. CRIME VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: Seniors vs. Crime's Crestview of“ ce, which assists senior citizens whom someone scammed or took advantage of, needs help. Hours are 10 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and Thursdays at 296 S. Ferdon Blvd., Suite 8. To volunteer, contact Of“ ce Manager Joe Loria, 306-3176, or Region 5 Deputy Director JB Whitten, 813-489-5657. Contact 800-203-3099, see www. seniorsvscrime.com, or email crestview@svcproject.org for more information. REPORT ELDERS ABUSE: Call the Northwest Florida Area Agency on Aging at 1-800-96ABUSE (800-962-2873) if you suspect elderly friends and neighbors are being abused. Many elders may suffer from “ nancial exploitation, neglect or physical or emotional abuse, often caused by family members. The NFAAA is a private, non-pro“ t agency supported by the federal Older Americans Act and the State of Florida General Revenue Fund through the Florida Department of Elder Affairs. Gwen Rhodes, 494-7100 or rhodesg@nw” aaa.org UWF ACADEMIC ADVISING: The University of West Florida offers assistance with admissions, academic and degree advising and registration in Crestview. Contact Deborah Cluff, 863-6550, to schedule an appointment for “ rst Thursdays at the Crestview Area Chamber of Commerce, 1446 Commerce Drive. HOMELESS ASSISTANCE: Need help? Contact the Okaloosa Walton Homeless Continuum of Care, 409-3070, www. okaloosawaltonhomeless.org; Opportunity Inc., 659-3190; or Helping Hands of Crestview, 428 McLaughlin St., behind First United Methodist Church. Helping Hands is open 1-4 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays. WOMEN AND FAMILY INTERVENTION SERVICES AND EDUCATION: a Crestviewbased Community Drug and Alcohol Council program that helps pregnant women with substance abuse. 689-4024. CHILDCARE ASSISTANCE: Eligible low-income families can receive “ nancial assistance through the Early Learning Coalition of Okaloosa and Walton Counties. Apply at www.elc-ow.org. Hover over "Services" and click "School Readiness" to register. FREE MEDICARE COUNSELING: By appointment, Crestview Public Library and Elder Services of Okaloosa County, in Crestview, 494-7101 or 1-866-531-8011. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: Nonpro“ t seeks Crestview area lots for families needing housing. 758-0779 or 315-0025. VA VETERANS CRISIS LINE: Veterans in crisis, their families and friends can call 800-273-TALK (8255), and press 1 to talk with quali“ ed, caring VA responders. Con“ dential. www.veteranscrisisline.net. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA NEEDS MENTORS: Adult volunteers spend two hours weekly mentoring children. Pairs go to the library, museum, park or beach, hike, roller-skate or play sports. 664-5437. VOLUNTEER ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVE IN DISASTERS: Group needs people to work in the Emergency Operations Center assisting county personnel. Contact: Yvonne Earle, 8631530, extension 230. FREE HAZARDOUS HOUSEHOLD WASTE DROPOFF: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, Okaloosa County Recycling Of“ ce, 80 Ready Ave., Fort Walton Beach. Okaloosa residents may drop off paints, pesticides, pool chemicals, used oil, gas, antifreeze, computers, televisions, ” uorescent lamps, car batteries, rechargeable batteries, cleaners, solvents, aerosols and printers. MUSEUM SEEKS VOLUNTEERS: Heritage Museum of Northwest Florida seeks friendly, reliable volunteers to greet guests and answer phones in its gift shop 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 1-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Details: 678-2615, stop by 115 Westview Ave., Valparaiso, or email info@heritage-museum. org. CARS NEEDED: Opportunity Inc. accepts donations of cars, boats and other vehicles to support Opportunity Place, an emergency shelter for families. Shelley Poirrier, 409-3070 or shelley@okaloosawaltonhomeless.org. SHELTER HOUSE FINANCIAL SUPPORT: It costs just more than $100 a day to shelter a domestic violence victim. Every little bit helps. 683-0845. DRIVE VETERANS: Help veterans attend appointments at the VA Outpatient Clinic in Pensacola two days a month. Veterans Service Of“ ce, 689-5922. VEHICLES NEEDED: Covenant Hospice accepts cars, trucks, SUVs, motorcycles, boats and RVs. Quali“ ed professionals pick up vehicles from Pensacola to Tallahassee at convenience. Rachel Mayew, 428-0605. LAKEVIEW CENTER'S FAMILIES FIRST NETWORK NEEDS BEDS: Donations wanted for local children in protective services. Cribs and beds for children must be in good condition. 833-3840.HELPING HANDS

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** A6 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin By Press Gazette contributorPENSACOLA „At only eight-months-old, Maci Lynn has endured more hospital stays and surgical procedures than a child her age should. Fortunately, for a recent surgery to repair weak spots in her abdomen, her pediatric surgeon utilized a robotic surgical system that resulted in smaller scars and quicker recov-ery time for the infant.Dr. Bryan Weidner, a pediatric surgeon at the Studer Family Childrens Hospital at Sacred Heart, is the first doctor in the region to perform robotic surgery on a patient as young as Maci. Sacred Heart is part of Ascen-sion, the nations largest, nonprofit health system.Robotic surgery is the next generation of minimally invasive sur-gery because it combines the best of laparoscopy and open surgery techniques,Ž Weidner said. Robotic surgery allows me to make tiny incisions … less than an inch … that translates to less postoperative pain and a shorter hospital stay for the patient.ŽWhen operating on infants, surgeons work in confined surgical space. In infants, I work in a space thats the size of a quart of milk carton; theres not a lot of room,Ž he explained. The da Vinci Surgical System increases my visibility by generating a magnified, high-definition 3D view of the surgical site.ŽDuring robotic surgery, Weidner sits at a console and manipulates the robots four arms … three that hold different surgical instru-ments, and a fourth that holds the systems camera … by maneuvering two master controls that exactly replicate his hand movements. The 3D high-definition camera provides a 10 times mag-nification of the surgical workspace allowing for crystal clear images of the patients anatomy.Maci had her first procedure before she was two-monthsold. Weidner, who has performed all of Macis surgeries, used a minimally-invasive laparoscopic technique to repair an enlarged muscle (pylorus) that was block-ing food from entering her small intestine.Using the three small incisions from that previous surgery, Weidner used a robotic approach to repair two weak spots (hernias) in her diaphragm. This condition can be life-threatening because it can cause organs that should be in the stomach go through the hole up into the chest.With Macis second surgery, the da Vinci Sur-gical System enhanced my ability to operate in a hard-to-reach place with more accuracy and preci-sion,Ž he said. Without this new tool, this surgery would have required a large, four-inch upside down U incision that would have taken twice as long to heal.ŽMacis mother, Amanda, said shes grateful that there was a surgical option that reduced her daughters discomfort.As a parent, nothing hurts worse than seeing your child in pain; you want to make it all better,Ž she said. Maci felt more discomfort when she was teething than after her surgery to repair her her-nias. No parent wants a child to have to go through surgery, but if your child does, robotic surgery makes the healing process easier.ŽWeidner has performed robotic surgeries for diaphragmatic hernias, diseases of the colon, gastroesophageal reflux, gall bladder removal, and masses in the chest cavity.Robotic surgery: Tiny incisions for the smallest patientsTo repair weak spots in her abdomen, eight-month-old Maci Lynn received surgery through a robotic system. She is the youngest in the region to receive such surgery. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] News Bulletin contributorGAINESVILLE „ Uni-versity of Florida Health brain cancer researchers have discovered a new use of stem cells that could clear a revolutionary pathway to making immunotherapy drugs effective in treating brain cancer.This is truly one of the more exciting developments Ive seen in our field in many years,Ž said Duane Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D., co-director of the Preston A. Wells Jr. Center for Brain Tumor Therapy at the University of Florida. This discovery gives us profound insights into the mechanisms of resis-tance to immunotherapy drugs, and it may offer a roadmap to use immunotherapy to effectively treat many forms of cancer.ŽSome tumors can send signals that prevent immune cells from recognizing and attacking the tumor. A new class of immunotherapy drug, called immune checkpoint inhibitors, blocks these inhibitory signals, allowing immune cells to be more effective in fighting the tumor. This treatment has been shown to be effective in treating many types of cancer, but many cancers, including brain tumors, have yet to demonstrate signifi-cant response to immune checkpoint inhibitors.Catherine Flores, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the UF College of Medicines Lillian S. Wells Department of Neurosurgery, has been studying mechanisms of resistance to a type of immunotherapy called PD-1 checkpoint block-adeŽ in rodent models of glioblastoma and medulloblastoma.Glioblastoma is the most aggressive form of adult brain cancer, with life expectancy of less than 24 months from diagnosis. Medulloblastoma, a brain tumor in the cerebellum that occurs most commonly in children, is curable in most cases, but up to 20 to 30 percent of patients succumb to recurrent disease.In her paper, Flores and her team show that in a rodent model, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cellsŽ isolated from bone marrow could be used to reprogram glio-blastoma tumors to make them sensitive to immu-notherapy treatment.The diagnosis of glioblastoma is devastating for patients and their loved ones. Standard treatment includes high-dose chemotherapy, aggressive surgery and radiation. Without treat-ment, survival is typically less than six months. Flores lab tested a new approach in three differ-ent malignant brain tumor models: glioblastoma, medulloblastoma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or DIPG, a rare but deadly glioma that arises in the brainstem.Of the new approach, Flores said, It was very encouraging to see that this therapy was efficacious in multiple animal models of brain tumors, not just glioblastoma but also medulloblastoma and brainstem glioma.ŽWe have found that the stem cell transfer actually impacts the entire immune system, not just the tumor itself. So if we can boost a host immune system with a simple stem cell transfer, this may have huge impli-cations across different tumor types,Ž Flores said.Feasibility and safety studies are underway. Clinical testing may occur within the next 18 months.UF researchers: New stem cells could help defeat brain cancer

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, October 24, 2018 A7By Rachel Bluth Kaiser Health NewsEveryone has seen the ads or the products on the shelves.A dietary supplement that promises to make consumers skinny, without dieting or exercise. Or the one that will bulk them up and turn them into the envy of other weight-lifters at the gym. Not to mention the one to make them perform better in the bedroom.Their labels say they are safe and all-natural. But are they?Many of these products contain unapproved and unregulated pharmaceutically active ingredients, according to a study published Friday in JAMA Network Open. The authors wrote that the substances represent a serious public health concern.ŽResearchers from the California Department of Public Health found that, from 2007 to 2016, 776 products marketed as dietary supplements contained hidden active ingredients that are unsafe or unstudied. Among them, dapoxetine, an antide-pressant that is not approved in the United States; and sibutra-mine, which was included in some weight-loss supplements but was banned from the U.S. market in 2010 because of cardiovascular risks.Its mind-boggling to imag-ine whats happening here,Ž said Dr. Pieter Cohen, an asso-ciate professor of medicine at the Cambridge Health Alli-ance in Massachusetts. Cohen wasnt involved in the study but wrote a commentary published alongside the research.The California researchers based their findings on an analysis of a Food and Drug Administration database that identifies taintedŽ supplements. The study lays a foundation for ongoing enforcement work in this area, by the FDA and other partner agencies, to curb the illegal manufacture, importation, distribution, and sales of adulterated dietary supplements,Ž CDPH spokesman Corey Egel said in an email.Being tainted or adulterated means the product contains active ingredients not listed on the label that fly under the FDAs radar. Dietary supplements arent classified by the FDA as drugs. They are instead considered foods. They include vitamins, minerals and botanicals, among other things. They are not intended to treat or prevent disease and are not subject to premarket safety and efficacy testing that drugs undergo.The FDA database tracked problems that emerged during post-market surveillanceŽ „ for instance, adverse events reports and consumer complaints „ when bottles were already in consumers medicine cabinets. These issues generally draw FDA warning letters and agency requests for voluntary recalls by the manufacturer.With an estimated 50 per-cent of Americans consuming some type of supplement, researchers note that the $35 billion industry is a big business. But Duffy MacKay, senior vice president for scientific and regulatory affairs at the supplement industrys Council for Responsible Nutri-tion, noted that with between 50,000 and 80,000 supple-ment labels on the market, 776 tainted products is serious but not widespread.Of the adulterated products, nearly 46 percent were for sexual performance, 41 percent were for weight loss and 12 per-cent were for building muscle. Ingredients like sildenafil, the active drug in Viagra, and ephedrine, a stimulant banned from diet pills since 2004, were found in supplements. Anabolic steroids, or ingredients like them, were in 73 of the muscle-building supplements.Nearly a fifth of these sup-plements contained more than one unapproved ingredient.Study: Drugs and danger lurk in over-the-counter supplementsBy Press Gazette contributorMIAMI „ In celebration of Disability Employment Awareness Month, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) staff recognized five outstanding Miami employers for their commitment to hiring people with disabilities. Individuals with disabilities contribute greatly to our communities and are integral to our states workforce,Ž said Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart. Through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, we are proud to connect jobseekers with disabilities to career opportunities that enable them to lead more independent lives. I hope more businesses will follow in the footsteps of todays honorees.Ž The following businesses were honored: € Academica € Chick-Fil-A € Red Lobster € Vezina, Lawrence & Piscitelli, P.A. € Wingstop We are honored to recognize these employers who are leading the way in building an inclusive workforce and looking beyond the disability,Ž VR Bureau Chief of Field Services, Melinda Mitchell. Individuals with disabilities offer a broad pool of talents and tend to stay on the job longer than employees without disabilities. Given the opportunity, individuals with disabilities are able to show their skills, loyalty, and determination and become successful members of the community. Thanks to outstanding employers throughout the state, VR assisted nearly 5,000 individuals obtain or maintain employment last year. Hiring people with disabilities is a win-win for everyone!Ž We are grateful that VR understood the vision for the Work Opportunity Ventures Program and our partnership with them and The WOW Center,Ž said Lilian Salazar, Academica National Director of Special Education Student Support. This program will be an enormous asset in our community and we cant be more thankful for all the support and this partnership. There is no doubt that together we will improve the lives of so many adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.Ž Working with Vocational Rehabilitation has been a very fulfilling partnership,Ž said Tina D. Howell, Manger, Wingstop, Miami Gardens. Employing individuals with disabilities and allowing them the opportunity to thrive in the work place is very rewarding.Ž Vezina, Lawrence & Piscitelli, P.A. is the recipient of very special blessings from our employment of Katron Hope,Ž said Joseph W. Lawrence, Shareholder, Vezina, Lawrence & Piscitelli, P.A. He has been an integral part of our law firm family through his growth aided by the training and mentoring of The de Moya Foundation together with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and The de Moya Foundation should be applauded for its commitment on behalf of such fine men and women, like Katron, in providing them these opportunities. Although Katron may believe he has been fortunate to work with our law firm, the firm believes it has been the most fortunate in working with Katron and The de Moya Foundation in conjunction with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.Ž VR is a federal-state program that is committed to helping individuals with disabilities find meaningful careers and helping employers find qualified employees. As a partner in Floridas statewide workforce system, VR focuses on helping youth, students and adults get the skills, education and supports needed to compete in todays labor market. VR has 96 offices across Florida, and last year helped nearly 5,000 Floridians with significant disabilities find or keep a job. For more information about VR and its services, visit www.rehabworks.org.Florida Department of Education honors ve employers

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** A8 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin OPINION HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?The Crestview News Bulletin regularly publishes readers thoughtful and humorous comments posted on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Join the discussion at facebook.com/crestview.bulletin or tweet @cnbulletin Address: 638 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536 Online: crestviewbulletin.com CONTACT US Call 682-6524 to report news, subscribe or learn about our classi“ ed and display advertising options. The Crestview News Bulletin is published each Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media Group, at 638 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL32536. Periodical postage paid at Crestview, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 638 N. Ferson Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536. USPS 010-209 All material is property of the Crestview News Bulletin. SUBSCRIPTION RATES In County 13 weeks ................................$9.45 26 weeks ..............................$17.85 52 weeks ..............................$32.76 Out of county 13 weeks ..............................$14.70 26 weeks ..............................$23.10 52 weeks ..............................$38.01 Delivery subscriptions may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. NEWS BULLETIN ADVERTISING Ask your advertising representative about our Color by the Inch program and Customer Appreciation sale by calling 850-682-6524. Publisher Jim Fletcher ...........................j” etcher@crestviewbulletin.com Executive Editor Jason Blakeney .............jblakeney@nwfdailynews.com Editor Aaron Little ...........................................alittle@srpressgazette.com Editorial Assistant Renee Bell ....................news@crestviewbulletin.com Reporter Aaron Jacobs .......................... ajacobs@crestviewbulletin.com Reporter Kaylin Parker ...........................kparker@crestviewbulletin.com Legals Barbara Dale ....................................bdale@crestviewbulletin.com Circulation Assistant Dale Robinson ......drobinson@crestviewbulletin.com Media Consultant Sherrie Stanley .......sherries@crestviewbulletin.com Media Consultant Katie Newton..........knewton@crestviewbulletin.comLast week, Sen. Elizabeth Warrens 2020 campaign for the presidency stumbled out of the gate following her declaration that a DNA test reveals she has a dollop of Native American ancestry, contrary to accusations the president and others lobbed her way. The test result suggests Warren has somewhere between 1 /64th and 1/1024th Native American ancestry, which prompted even more bashing and criticism. As the saying goes: Never hand your enemies a stick; theyll just crack you in the head with it. Its all somewhat baffling and amusing. No one ever wrangles to claim theyre 1/1024th black. In the aftermath of the Civil War, many southern states enacted the One-DropŽ rule, meaning any black relatives in your background, no matter how distant and minuscule, meant you were mixed-race, or black. One drop doomed you to quasi-citizenship and a life of segregation, injustice and domestic terror. Because you could be charged criminally with trying to pass as white, some people were dragged into court. Even today, there are fables circulating that certain celebrities and people of note were actually black „ among them J. Edgar Hoover, actress Ava Gardner,and even a president, Warren G. Harding, though it was disproved in his case. In her 2002 memoir, Just Lucky, I Guess,Ž Broadway star Carol Channing revealed her paternal grandmother was black and that her father was one of those who passed for white.Family lore Warren, who says the information about her roots was passed along through family lore, like many of us, has been accused of using her one drop to further her former academic career, but theres no evidence she ever did so. A DNA test wont stop a president who embraced the birther movement from slandering Warren, whom he derides as Pocahontas.Ž Bullies are gonna bully. Its too bad the debate over Warrens ancestry doesnt extend to the plight of actual Native Americans. People who are ready to go to war and to court over team mascots never seem to give a moments thought about the current plight of living, breathing humans those caricatures represent. According to the Center for Native American Youth at the Aspen Institute, suicide and homicide account for 75 percent of all deaths for Alaskan Inuit and Native Americans ages 12 to 22. The suicide rate for Native American and Alaskan Inuit girls is four times the rate of white girls. In 2014, it was the leading cause of death for Native American girls ages 10 to 14.Broken promises A study published by Pub Med Central and the National Institutes of Health says Native Americans lead minority groups in addiction to alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and hallucinogens. Concerning methamphetamine addiction among minorities, Native Americans are outpaced only by Native Hawaiians. The U.S. Census reports that nearly 30 percent of Native Americans live below the federal poverty line, a figure that jumps to nearly 40 percent for those living on reservations. Four in 10 Native American adults are unemployed. In 2003, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights found that 40 percent of reservation families live in substandard housing. At least half of those homes have no connection to a public sewer system. There arent enough hours in the day to detail all the disparity, not to mention that the federal government has broken virtually every treaty it has made with tribes. Though the remnant of tribal culture can be found in every city, in every community (TuscarawasŽ and OhioŽ come to mind), the abysmal state of Native Americans remains our open, national shame. Lets talk about that. Reach Charita M. Goshay at 330-580-8313 or charita. goshay@cantonrep.com. Writer for More Content NowGUEST COLUMNBickering over DNA obscures, ignores current su eringANOTHER VIEW C h a r i t a M G o s h a y Charita M. GoshayI recently had the opportunity to interview Dr. James Stevens, Radiation Oncologist and Medical Director of 21st Century Oncology, which has clinics in Crestview, Fort Walton Beach and Santa Rosa Beach. New radiation machines have been installed in both Crestview and Santa Rosa Beach, and the Fort Walton location will receive their new machine in January 2019. As a former employee of the Crestview location, I was able to witness first hand the treatment options that are made available to those who are diagnosed with cancer. Dr Stevens stated "the benefit of the new machine is that we have more precision and are able to conduct treatments that patients were previously sent to Tertiary Institutions for, such as the University of Alabama, or treatment centers in Tallahassee and Pensacola," just to name a few. When discussing Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Dr. Stevens was honest in stating that North West Florida has been identified as a region where patients are not actively seeking medical attention to allow for early detection. Reasons for this vary, but he is hopeful that regular promotion and educating people about this disease, as well as other forms of cancer, will change that. One of the little known benefits of receiving radiation treatment here in these clinics is that they are able to work with your insurance companies, offer self-pay options and indeed support those who have no financial means, by providing programs to, in Dr. Stevens words, "make it work." Those patients who do undergo treatment are now able to benefit from tremendous breakthroughs and improvements in specialized treatment options, resulting in increased survival rates. The three methods of fighting this disease are surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. As 21st Century offer all three, it really is a case of multi-disciplinary treatment being offered in a centralized location. The new radiation machine is aweinspiring and offers the best radiation treatment currently available. The ceiling of the radiation chamber features ceiling tiles that have been painted or decorated by former patients and family members and reminds patients they are not alone in this battle, plus it gives them something pleasant to focus on while undergoing daily treatment. Cancer is an insidious disease that seemingly knows no boundaries. Thankfully, there are outstanding treatment options available locally, to those who are afflicted, as we continue to seek a cure for the disease. Barbara Dale is the receptionist for the Crestview News Bulletin. Email her at bdale@crestviewbulletin.com.CancerJOIN THE CONVERSATIONThe Crestview News Bulletin encourages public discussion on local issues. The paper publishes letters to the editor on a “ rst-come, “ rst-served, space-available basis. Letters should be original to the News Bulletin, written on topics concerning North Okaloosa County communities, and should not contain profanity, personal attacks or other questionable content. The newspaper reserves the rights to decline publication of any letter for any reason, and to use published letters in advertising and other promotions. Email letters to news@crestviewbulletin.com Alternatively, send letters to Crestview News Bulletin, ATTN: Letter to Editor, 638 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536. The new radiation machine at 21st Century Oncology represents the best radiation treatment currently available. [PHOTO BY BARBARA DALE] B a r b a r a D a l e Barbara Dale

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, October 24, 2018 A9PoliticsŽ was a gift from the Greeks, derived from their word for a city-state, polis. Man is a POLitical animal,Ž Aristotle wrote. He was thinking of how we as social creatures and citizens function, or malfunction, in the governance of the state. In the maelstrom of presidential and midterm electioneering weve experienced in recent years, two other political terms inherited from classical Athens swirl in the news daily, both from the root demos, meaning the people,Ž and yet with near opposite meanings. DEMocracy is rule by the people,Ž in contrast to plutocracy, rule by the rich, and autocracy, rule by a single person, a tyrant. DEMagoguery, on the other hand, which originally meant leading the people,Ž early acquired the sense that it has today, of luring people to follow your lead by appealing to their fears, prejudices and basest instincts. Originally the ninth month in Romes earliest calendar (from novem/nine), November is when we elect presidents in the U.S., every four years (QUADRENNially, from quattuor/quadri+ annus). Presidential politics now seem never-ending and ever at the boiling point. The Romans elected their chief magistrates usually in July, originally named Quintilis, simply fifth monthŽ (as in QUINTet and QUINTuplets), until, in the midst of civil strife, the electoral process faltered, Julius Caesar was appointed Dictator in 47 B.C., and the senate renamed the month in his honor following his assassination in 44. (Heaven forbid that we should for any reason end up renaming a month ClintonemberŽ or Trumpober.Ž) Like the U.S. in certain respects, Rome revolted against an imperialist monarchy, the Etruscans, and around 500 B.C. reconstituted their government as a republic.Ž The word, from Latin res publica, as in REal estate and PUBLIC, means literally the peoples propertyŽ and generally refers to a political system in which citizens have at least limited democratic powers. The Roman Republic had a senate, legislative assemblies, and elected magistracies. The senate was made up of former magistrates, and the magistrates were elected by the assemblies, whose membership was open to all adult male citizens (women, slaves, and noncitizens could neither vote nor hold office). The chief state magistrates were called consulsŽ (source of COUNSEL and CONSULtant). Two were inaugurated annually and took office on Jan. 1. The CONSULar colleagues shared roles as the states chief executives and commanders-in-chief of the legions; each had veto power over the other. The assembly that elected the consuls, the CENTuriate (from centum/100) was organized in CENTuries of originally 100 men each by economic class. Ultimately the one century that contained the largest group of citizens, the urban poor or proletariateŽ (so called because their offspring, or proles, represented nearly the only propertyŽ they owned), had but a single electoral vote, out of the nearly 200 cast in the elections. Thus Rome, like the U.S., was never a one-man, one-vote democracy like the one that governed Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries. Nevertheless, throughout the Republican period, male citizens at least retained the right to vote on who would govern them. Dissatisfaction with senatorial corruption, however, economic abuses by bankers and big business (the equestrianŽ class), and widening income inequality had by the second century B.C. led to polarization and civil discord. Two brothers, Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus „ reminiscent in some ways of the Kennedys „ stepped forward in the 130s as leaders of the populares, a political faction advocating debt relief and other economic reforms for the poor, including such radical measures as land redistribution. In short order both brothers were assassinated and a century of mob violence, widespread executions and outright civil war followed, leading to the clash of such political titans as the conservative general Sulla and the popularist leader Marius, and later Pompey the Great,Ž who emerged as a champion of the senate, and the reformer Julius Caesar. Four years after defeating Pompey, Caesar was himself murdered, on the Ides of March, 44 B.C., by a band of assassins fearing he aspired to kingship. A power struggle subsequently ensued between Caesars lieutenant Marc Antony and his nephew and adopted son Octavian. Antonys liaison with the Egyptian Cleopatra (subject of a recent biography by Pulitzer Prize winner Stacy Schiff) and a series of actions that signaled his intention of sharing not only rule but also Roman real estate with the foreign monarch, led many of even his most ardent supporters to defect to Octavian. In 31 B.C. their forces clashed at sea in the Battle of Actium, one of the most consequential military encounters in the history of the western world. Antony and Cleopatra (well known, to some of us oldsters, as Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor) were defeated and fled to Egypt, where shortly thereafter both committed suicide. Octavian returned to a Rome exhausted by a century of civil strife and, while trumpeting his restoration of the Republic,Ž proceeded to establish one-man control over the Senate, degradation of the rights of the citizen assemblies, including popular elections, and domination of the states magistrates. The young general dubbed himself son of the divine Julius,Ž had the Senate anoint him Augustus/ the Revered One, and was declared permanent commander of the army, imperator, source of our words EMPERor, EMPIRe (as this final period of Roman history is called), and IMPERialism. Weary of war, grateful for the return of law and orderŽ and the promised pax Romana, The Roman Peace,Ž citizens and politicians more or less acquiesced in what was effectively the end of the Republic and establishment of the Principate,Ž rule by the princeps/first man, the PRINCe. Augustus reign lasted 45 years, from Actium until his death at the age of 75 in A.D. 14. His dictatorship might be viewed as relatively benign. Certainly the worst was yet to come. Augustus was succeeded by his step-son, Tiberius, who, during his reign from A.D. 14-37, abandoned any pretense of republican government and ended popular elections „ transferring selection of the consuls and other magistrates to the Senate, over which he presided with an iron hand. The historian Tacitus commented that the people didnt complain much, and most senators were supportive, as it saved them the ever escalating costs of campaigning and bribery. Rome had a number of intelligent, humane, highly capable emperors, to be sure; one thinks of Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius, two of those Machiavelli dubbed the five good emperors.Ž But others were thuggish, maniacal, even murderous brutes. The Empire itself survived for centuries more, by the force of momentum and military might. But free elections and liberty and justice for allŽ were lost in Romes slide into tyranny. The problem with democracies is they are susceptible to demagogues, and have the right to elect them. And the problem with electing demagogues is their natural, narcissistic bent toward becoming despots „ another Greek term, for the masterŽ of slaves. The best means of avoiding this fate is to foster a society in which the demos are all well educated, have equal opportunity to share in the prosperity of the polis, and are thus neither tempted by the promises of a demagogue, nor susceptible to his rhetoric. In the short term, our own best recourse is going to the polls each November, voting for presidential and congressional candidates who are less likely to govern by intimidation, bluster, and mean-spiritedness, and then working with our friends of all political persuasions to end gridlock and polarization and insure our res publica rightly remains the peoples property.Ž Rick LaFleur is retired from 40 years of teaching Latin language and literature at the University of Georgia Writer for More Content NowDemocracy, demagoguery and despotsGet ready for pumpkin painting soon at the library. [PIXABAY. COM] Crestview Library is holding its first ever Pumpkin Decorating Contest! Stop by the library to view the artistic talent in our community and vote for your favorite. They will be on display through Halloween. Heather Nitzel is the Crestview Public Library's youth services librarian.CHECK IT OUTDesign a pumpkin for the librarys contest By News Bulletin contributorHere are upcoming Crestview Public Library-related events. The library's address is 1445 Commerce Drive.UPCOMINGTRUNK OR TREAT: 5-7 p.m. Oct. 29, in the library's east parking lot. TO RSVP a space: Call Ginny, 682-4432. Prizes for best trunk decorations. Call to volunteer or donate candy.RECURRINGADULT COLORING THERAPY: 5-6 p.m. third Mondays for ages 18 or older. Hot tea, coloring pages, pencils and markers are provided. CRESTVIEW WRITERS GROUP: 6-7:30 p.m. every fourth Monday, Crestview Public Library. Online: http://www.cityofcrestview. org/library.php. POETRY OPEN MIC READING: 6:30 p.m. second Tuesdays. Arrive at 6 p.m. for conversation and snacks. Poets and musicians may read, perform, improvise and play together. Free. Esther Hurwitz, 682-4432. FAMILY HISTORY CLUB: 10 a.m. to noon every third Thursday features the basics and a question-and-answer discussion led by volunteer cindy Barber. Contact dotdane99@gmail.com for information. BEGINNER'S CHESS CLUB: 3-4 p.m. every “ rst and third Thursday at the library. For ages 6 and up. Learn to play the game. ESSENTIAL OILS 101: 6 p.m. every fourth Thursday and 2:30 p.m. every fourth Saturday learn about essential oils with volunteer consultant Lynisha Smith. Contact 758-6482 or YLBlessed1@gmail.com for more information. TEEN TIME: 2-4 p.m. Fridays at the library for students in grades six through 12. READ TO DOZER: 10 to 11 a.m. on the “ rst Saturdays of each month (as long as it's not raining). COFFEE & CRAFT: 10 a.m. second Saturdays, Crestview library. Call 682-4432 to reserve your spot. BRIGHT FUTURES VOLUNTEER HOURS: for students in grades nine through 12 to use toward Bright Futures scholarships. Contact Youth Librarian Heather Nitzel, 682-4432, for details.UPCOMING Rick LaFleur Heather NitzelBy Katie Oakes & Taylor Wilken Okaloosa County Extension OfficeFall to most people means pumpkin patches, cooler weather, and preparing for the upcoming holiday season. Fall to Okaloosa County 4-H means fair week at the Northwest Florida Fair. The Okaloosa County 4-H program coordinated the annual 4-H events and had over 100 youth participants from Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton County. The diverse group of exhibit judges this year included past 4-Hers, Okaloosa County Master Gardeners, the Okaloosa County Farm Bureau president, and extension faculty from both the University of Florida and the University of Georgia. The 4-H youths ranged from 5-18 years old, from both the community clubs and military clubs. They participated in a variety of animal exhibits and shows, including poultry, rabbit, beef, and meat and dairy goat. They also had the opportunity to participate in a dog show, archery competition, and enter project exhibits. Animal projects provide the youths with a life skills package that includes responsibility, animal care and feeding, management, and record keeping. Showmanship teaches them communication, selfdiscipline, social skills, and sportsmanship while also showcasing what they have learned with their project animal. The newly included archery competition allowed youths to showcase the shooting techniques, problem-solving skills, and discipline they had acquired through the safe, educational, and socially acceptable environments in which they participated in throughout the 4-H year. Their project exhibits gave them an outlet to express their creativity while educating themselves in the subject matter of their choosing. The Okaloosa County 4-H program had over 740 youth entries in the various events that allowed them to share their accomplishments and educate the public on their projects. For more information about of school enrichment programs, in-school/out-of-school clubs, community clubs, or becoming a volunteer please contact us as follows: Taylor Wilken, 4-H Youth Development Extension Agent, and Katie Oakes, 4-H Program Assistant, UF IFAS Extension Okaloosa County, 3098 Airport Road, Crestview, FL 32539; 689-5850. Katie Oakes and Taylor Wilken are agents at the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension office in Crestview.EXTENSION CONNECTIONNorthwest Florida Fair showcases 4H youths' skills

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** A10 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletinon Takur Ghar, a mountaintop in Afghanistan, in a battle with al-Qaida militants. Chapman was part of a joint special operations team whose helicopter was struck by enemy fire, throwing Navy SEAL Petty Officer 1st Class Neil Roberts onto enemy-infested terrain. The helicopter crashed a couple of miles away, but Chapman and Roberts other teammates soon returned for Roberts in a second helicopter.Under heavy enemy fire on the ground, Chapman was critically injured, but continued to fight beyond the effort to rescue Rob-erts. His actions, at the cost of his life, saved other lives and provided cover to allow additional troops to land on Takur Ghar.During the Medal of Honor presentation, Trump called Chapman a great warriorŽ and a hero our nation will for-ever remember.ŽI know John would be extremely hum-bled,Ž Nessel said as she accepted the medal. For him, she said, the medal would be for all of the men who were lost on that mountain.ŽA portrait of Chapman will be unveiled at 8:30 a.m. Thursday at Air Force Special Operations Command headquarters Building 1 at Hurlburt Field. At 10 a.m., the 24th Special Operations Wing headquarters on Hurlburt Field will be renamed for Chapman.Friday at Hurlburt Field will include a day-long series of events honor-ing Chapman and looking toward the 11 a.m. Satur-day unveiling of a Medal of Honor plaque installed on the Special Tactics Memorial at the installation's Airpark.Among the events scheduled for Friday are static displays of military aircraft, aerial demonstrations and musical concerts including Big & Rich, Madison Rising and Black Stone Cherry. Last week, the 1st Spe-cial Operations Wing's public affairs office issued a traffic and noise advisory for Friday's events."The celebration will generate an increase of base traffic during the hours of 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., and will also include sev-eral low-flying aircraft in the vicinity of Hurlburt Field during an Air Force Special Operations Com-mand aerial-capabilities demonstration," noted the advisory. CHAPMANFrom Page A1the community for assist-ing in Hurricane Michael relief efforts. "Let me thank each one of you for the heart you gave to our friends and relatives in the Panama City area," Cadle said. "We can go home this evening in comfort, and they're looking at months and years of rebuilding ... We will keep them in our prayers."Nol Faucher, the mayor of Noirmoutier, and Cadle exchanged gifts from each city."On Saturday, as I was telling you, we had a bar-becue right at this very spot," Cadle said as he held a framed photo of Northwest Florida State College Robert L. F. Sikes Education Center.They dedicated a garden to Noirmoutier called "Le Jardin de Noirmoutier," the mayor said.Faucher gave a speech with the help of a professor of English at a university in Noirmoutier."These exchanges have allowed our young French citizens to come here and discover your culture," Faucher said. "... Part of their dream was the American dream to come and check what they had seen for so many years in television and their books and their songs."The gift from Noirmoutier was a painting of a sea buoy that leads to Noirmoutier "showing you the way."The night concluded with what many of the boy and girl scouts had been waiting for „ cake.The Crestview Police Department, Crestview Fire Department, council members, and other department heads had booths set up with infor-mation for attendees interested in learning and asking questions.The city will continue having events throughout the week. KICK OFFFrom Page A1The Crestview city council kicked off City Government WeekŽ in Warrior Hall Monday. Over 100 people attended the meeting including visitors from Crestviews Sister CityŽ Noirmoutier-en-lI^le, France. [KAYLIN PARKER/NEWS BULLETIN]

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, October 24, 2018 A11 By More Content Now TIP OF THE WEEKHow to properly store summer clothes to avoid a pest infestation Try the following tips from Terminix to best protect your clothing in storage: 1. Keep a close eye on the places where fabric-eating bugs like to hide like carpets, rugs, wall hangings and upholstered furniture. Vacuuming these areas can remove larvae and help prevent an infestation. Be sure to repair torn screens and block cracks under doors to prevent clothes moths from entering. 2. Another key to keeping stored clothes bug-free is to clean them before packing them. Stains can attract hungry pests, so remove any obvious ones such as food or oil before boxing things up. Keep the area where youre storing your clothing as clean as possible. Vacuum the area and wipe down any shelves and walls. 3. If you find yourself with damaged clothes and an infestation too big to tackle alone, its time to contact a specialist. Trained pest control professionals can help remove destructive pests.HYGGE3 tips for achieving the Danish concept of hygge Hygge is a Danish word for the feelings of coziness and contentment often associated with cooler weather. Noa Santos of Homepolish provides three tips so you can master this trend at home. 1. Declutter: Theres nothing more satisfying than coming home to a streamlined space,Ž says Santos, who stresses decluttering doesnt mean de-styling. 2. Invite the outdoors inside: Artfully arranged flowers and perfectly placed plants help cement your space as an indoor Eden,Ž says Santos. The positive psychological benefits arent too shabby either. Organic materials like wood and leather work like a charm as well.Ž 3. Gather: It could be a cozy night in for two or a bountiful feast for a crew „ togetherness is at the heart of hygge and allows you to show off your home design.OUTDOORS4 ways real grass bene“ ts your family Well-maintained outdoor spaces increase curb appeal and can bolster homeowners property values. They inspire kids imaginations and support healthy play. They make a homegrown neighborhood hangout. RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment) has some facts about real grass: € Healthy kids need healthy outdoor spaces to play: They will not only spend valuable time together, but research shows physically active children achieve 40 percent higher test scores. € Real grass play spaces boost property values: Real grass yards make a great first impression. Desirable public parks and spaces can boost nearby property values by 8-20 percent. € Grass keeps it cool: Real grass is an alwayscool surface to run and play on, especially when summer temperatures rise above 85 degrees. € A well-maintained lawn is a point of pride. € Real grass spaces provide a place to escape screens, play with loved ones and enjoy time together outside.FLORENCEWhat to watch out for during recovery These tips from USAA.com can give homeowners affected by Hurricane Florence a better idea of what they can do next to recover. 1. If you need to relocate, keep the receipts of your expenses. Homeowners insurance will generally provide coverage, but review your policy and contact information. 2. Report your claim. You can file a claim online or by calling. 3. Secure your home and make temporary repairs. Protect property from further damage. Photograph debris or damaged items. Save receipts. 4. Prepare for the adjusters visit. Provide complete information about the damage to your property. 5. Hire a contractor „ with care. Check the contractors license or identification, do not pay upfront, take photos of the contractors and their license plates, and call your insurance provider if you suspect fraud.Avoid infestation in clothes storageOne key to keeping stored clothes bug-free is to clean them before packing them as stains can attract hungry pests. [CONTRIBUTED] Hygge is a Danish word for the feelings of coziness and contentment often associated with cooler weather. [CONTRIBUTED]

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** A12 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, October 24, 2018 B1 LIFESTYLEBy Del Stone Jr. GateHouse MediaThe Hub City is the biggest city in Okaloosa County and has a great deal of history behind it, as these photos attest. All photos were obtained from the state archive Florida Memory and were designated as belonging to the public domain.VINTAGE PHOTOSCrestview from the 1920s-1980sCity attorney Brooks Taylor and May Harry Booth participate in the Old Spanish Trail Festival, 1959. [FLORIDA MEMORY / PUBLIC DOMAIN ] A group of people gathers on the gallows at the east end of the Okaloosa County Courthouse, 1920. [ FLORIDA MEMORY / PUBLIC DOMAIN] Okaloosa Memorial Hospital in Crestview, 1960. [FLORIDA MEMORY / PUBLIC DOMAIN] Okaloosa County Courthouse, year unknown. [FLORIDA MEMORY / PUBLIC DOMAIN ] Spanish Trail riders in a Crestview parade, 1959. [FLORIDA MEMORY / PUBLIC DOMAIN ] Street scene, 1974. [FLORIDA MEMORY / PUBLIC DOMAIN ] Blueberry patch in Crestview, 1950. [ FLORIDA MEMORY / PUBLIC DOMAIN ] Aerial view of Crestview, 1950. [FLORIDA MEMORY / PUBLIC DOMAIN ]

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** B2 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin SPORTSLAST WEEKS SCORES Baker 35, Northview 7 Choctaw 28, Leon 20 South Walton 20, Freeport 18* *Game does not count toward either teams playoff resumeSCORES & SCHEDULE By Sam Grubenhoff315-4476 | @GHoffNWFDN sgrubenhoff@nwfdailynews.comIt was a quiet week across the Panhandle. At least, in terms of football it was quiet.Several area teams, such as Niceville, Crestview and Navarre, had scheduled bye week. Others had bye weeks forced upon them, as football programs from the Panama City area continued to rebuild their homes and lives.Of the games we did see, Freeport and South Walton played for charity, Choctaw ended a losing streak and Rocky Bayou dropped two games in four days. It wasnt exactly the stuff of legend, but it does help us form a more clear picture of where area teams stand just weeks away from the playoffs.As weve said in the past and will likely continue to say, please keep in mind these rankings are based on the success each team is having and not necessarily head-to-head matchups (because we know Baker is great but probably not great enough to beat Crestview, though that would be fun). No. 1 Crestview (6-2, 2-0); Last Week: 1This is arguably the most exciting week for football in the Panhandle, and it starts with Crestview-Niceville.The Bulldogs will host the Eagles at 7 p.m. Friday in a matchup thats become mustwatch in recent years. Its the Mayweather-McGregor of the area.Crestview is angling for a third straight District 2-7A championship after pulling the rug out from underneath the Eagles in each of the two past years. Niceville lost 35-18 at home last season and 27-21 on the road in 2016. No. 2: Navarre (7-1, 2-0); Last Week: 2Not to be outdone, Navarre gets Gulf PANHANDLE PIGSKIN POWER RANKINGS: WEEK 9I promised Phil Tisa I wasnt actually this thick. I knew why the South Walton coach wanted to play Freeport this past Friday, but I still had to ask the dumb question. With both teams still in the race, the game wouldnt count toward eithers playoff resume. Practicing in a controlled environment would likely keep players more healthy than playing a true opponent. So why, coach? Why play a football game just to raise a little money? I think because were able to,Ž Tisa told me on Tuesday. Were very fortunate, especially where were located. (Hurricane Michael) was so close that it could have been us. If it wouldnt have turned in that last hour before landfall this could have been us. We get to use a sport that we love and means so much to us to help other people out.Ž I was taken aback a little bit. Over the past year and a half, I feel as if Ive been able to get to know most of the area football coaches pretty well. At least, I dont have to introduce myself anymore. I know all of these coaches care about their players above all else. It still surprises me sometimes how deep that caring goes. And how sometimes a softball question gets MONDAY MORNING QUARTERBACKSoftball questions, good answers and a great cause S a m G r u b e n h o Sam Grubenho And then there were five teams with zero losses. Four of them are in the South, after one big upset this week. Remember the saying, On any given day, any given school can upset any otherŽ? They did; there was a big party at West Lafayette, Indiana Saturday night and Im sure well into Sunday. All the bookies are crying in their beer at their losses, along with Ohio State. Teams are now scrambling for a big bowl game and a big finish for their year. In the Southeastern Conference Vanderbilt Commodores versus Arkansas Razorbacks: Arkansas cannot sink the Commodores Ship. Vanderbilt by 10. Florida Gators vs. Georgia Bulldogs, the SEC Game of the week: Who let the Dawgs out? Georgia still in the hunt by 12. Kentucky Wildcats vs. Missouri Tigers: Its a cat fight in Columbia. Missouri and the Tigers cannot tame the Wildcats. Kentucky by 3. Tennessee Volunteers vs. South Carolina Gamecocks: Both teams are trying to get into a bowl game. Tennessee lucks out and wins this one by 3. Texas A&M Aggies vs. Mississippi State Bulldogs: Texas A&M is still knocking on the door and saying, Let me in the top 25.Ž Aggies by 10. In the Atlantic Coast Conference Miami Hurricanes vs. Boston College Eagles, the ACC game of the week: Both teams are trying to show off a bit here, but neither is really ready to be the big winner. Boston College has the opportunity to show that the first few weeks were real and look at them now. Eagles by 7. Clemson Tigers vs. Florida State Seminoles: From here on out Clemson is on a run with just a bit of help. The Seminoles do help. Tigers by 12. Wake Forest Demon Deacons vs. Louisville Cardinals: Wake Forest needs to wakeŽ up. With too many ups and Pittsburgh will beat Duke in college football Bill EverettSouth Walton students Taylor Collier, Mary Claire Brown, Neely Brewer and Payton Troy hang banners on the railings before the Rivals for Relief fundraiser/donation football game between the South Walton Seahawks and the Freeport Bulldogs at South Walton. [ MICHAEL SNYDER/GATEHOUSE MEDIA] WEEK 10 SCHEDULE: Choctaw (2-6, 0-2) at Fort Walton Beach (1-7, 0-2) Freeport (3-4) at Jay (3-4) Gulf Breeze (7-1, 2-0) at Navarre (7-1, 2-0) Niceville (7-1, 2-0) at Crestview (6-2, 2-0) South Walton (4-4) at Bozeman (2-4)* Walton (0-7) at Blountstown (6-1)** Game involves a team from Panama City and is subject to schedule changes ** Walton is scheduled to play at Blountstown at 11 a.m. SaturdaySee EVERETT, B3 See GRUBENHOFF, B3 South Walton linebacker Mason Levasseur goes tackle Freeport running back Brandon Siples during the Rivals for Relief fundraiser/donation football game between the South Walton Seahawks and the Freeport Bulldogs at South Walton. [MICHAEL SNYDER/GATEHOUSE MEDIA] See RANKINGS, B3

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, October 24, 2018 B3By Sam Grubenhoff315-4476 | @GHoffNWFDN sgrubenhoff@nwfdailynews.comPENSACOLA „ Had he felt the need, Rommel Guer-rier had time to stop, turn around and wave goodbye to Damarius Brinson.Brinson, a West Florida corner, couldnt have done anything about it. Gurriel cruised untouched into the end zone midway through the fourth quarter for what proved to be the game-winner.In a sloppy game that light-ning and rain delayed an hour and a half, Gurrier and Florida Tech were simply too fast and too methodical for an Argonaut offense that couldnt keep up in a 30-28 loss Saturday night at Blue Wahoos Stadium in Pensacola.The conferences leading receiver, Gurrier finished with six catches for 116 yards and two scores, all game highs.Trailing 30-21 late in the fourth UWF (5-3 overall, 3-2 Gulf South Conference) put together its best drive of the night and capped the sevenplay, 70-yard march with a 16-yard touchdown pass from Sam Vaughn to Kevin Grant, which cut the deficit to two points, but Vaughn fumbled on the first play of the ensuing drive after the Argos recov-ered an onside kick.Vaughn struggled in the loss, completing 11 of 28 passes for 174 yards, two touchdowns, three intercep-tions and two fumbles. Some of his passes sailed. Others were dropped. Neither he nor his coach attributed any of the struggles to the field conditions.Despite the loss, the Argos were in the drivers seat early.UWF wasted little time get-ting on the board Saturday. Florida Tech quarterback Trent Chmelik dropped back on the Panthers first third down of the game and fired his second pass of the night directly into the stomach of corner David Richardson, who was making his second start of the year, for an easy snatch and score. On the ensuing Argo drive, Vaughn connected with receiver Ishmel Morrow on a 72-yard touchdown pass, Morrow recovering from a stumble to race into the end zone untouched to make it 14-3.The play was the third longest offensive play in school history. Injured quar-terback Mike Beaudry, who is dealing with the effects of a right foot injury, owns the record with his 76-yard strike to KaRon Ashley last year against Florida Tech (6-2, 3-1).Receiver Antoine Griffin made it 21-3 Argos, weaving his way up the sideline early in the second quarter for 61-yard punt return for a score. It was the first score on a punt or kick return in school history.From there, the Panthers began to chip away.Panther edge rusher Rich-ard Leveille turned Vaughns first fumble into points with a 5-yard scoop-and-score, making it 21-10 before the half, and Chmelik hooked up Gurrier out of the break on the duos first score to make 21-17, and a pair of Trey Schaneville field goals erased the Argos 17-point lead for good.The Argos have now dropped two in row for the first time since November 2016 when the Argos dropped the final three games of their inaugural season to finish 5-6.Up next, UWF gets back on the road to face North Greenville at noon Saturday in Tigerville, South Carolina. The Crusaders are 4-3 and coming off a 44-21 loss to Valdosta State, the topranked team in the Gulf South.No. 19 UWF blows 17-point lead in loss to Florida TechDB David Richardson is hoisted by LB Martes Wheeler after Richardson returned an interception for a touchdown on the “ rst series, as the Argos hosted the Panthers in a weather-delayed game at Blue Wahoo Stadium, on Saturday. [PHOTOS BY MICHAEL SNYDER/GATEHOUSE MEDIA] knocked out of the park. Football is fun, football is difficult, but at the end of the day, football is about people, especially at the high school level, and Friday night I saw firsthand just how much good football could do for a community. I got to South Walton an hour early just to get a feel for the atmosphere. Our photographer, Michael Snyder, had beaten me by almost 40 minutes. He said the stream of people coming through had been steady since he arrived. There was no price to get in at the gates. Tisa said South Walton decided to waive the typical $6 admission fee in favor of a donation jar. Instead the gates used buckets, and they were steadily filled with $5, $10 and $20 bills. Off the 600 T-shirts made for the game, only 73 remained when the lights shut off and everyone went home. Selling for $12 apiece, the shirts alone raised at least $6,324. The trailer and school bus brought to be stuffed with relief supplies were nearly full when last I checked, ready to be trucked down to communities in need Saturday morning. And the players on both sides of the field thanked the members of the TV stations and newspapers for being there to legitimizeŽ the game and bring some awareness to the schools. The entire night was an incredible testament to the spirit of human generosity. To be able to give back because we can just means a lot,Ž Tisa said. And the fact that our two communities were able come together „ Were rivals every time we step on the field, the court, whatever, but to be able to pull together and do this as a joint effort means a lot.Ž GRUBENHOFFFrom Page B2Seahawk coach Phil Tisa watches from the sideline during the Rivals for Relief fundraiser/ donation football game. [MICHAEL SNYDER/GATEHOUSE MEDIA] Crestviews Terelle Holliday brings down Niceville quarterback Will Koch during the 2017 season. [DEVON RAVINE/GATEHOUSE MEDIA] Anthony Johnson Jr and Jamel Jackson stop a Florida Tech running back on a sloppy “ eld as the Argos hosted the Panthers in a weather-delayed game at Blue Wahoo Stadium Saturday. Florida Tech LB JT Hassell is upended while rushing UWF QB Sam Vaughn as the Argos hosted the Panthers in a weather-delayed game at Blue Wahoo Stadium Saturday. Jamel Jackson is beaten for a touchdown as the Argos hosted the Panthers in a weatherdelayed game at Blue Wahoo Stadium Saturday. Breeze at home at 7:30 p.m. Friday with a chance to lock up the District 1-7Achampionship.This rivalry, too, has some heat with each taking home a district championship during the past two years. The Dolphins got theirs first, winning 31-28 on the Raid-ers home turf before Navarre repaid the favor last year with a 29-23 victory.If Crestview-Niceville is Mayweather-McGregor, this is MayweatherPacquiao. No. 3: Baker (8-0); Last Week: 3 If the boxing comps con-tinue, Baker is the areas Muhammad Ali.Cant you just picture Matt Brunson climbing one of his mountains to shout I am the greatestŽ at the top of his lungs? I can.The Gators blasted North-view on Friday 35-7, using their patented formula: Give the ball to Junior McLaugh-lin. He had 231 more yards and three more touchdowns on 22 carries Friday. No. 4: Niceville (7-1, 2-0); Last Week: 4Niceville will be two weeks removed from a 17-14 victory against Choctaw when it plays the Bulldogs on Friday. The Eagles might need to score three times as many points to get a win in the Dawg Pound. No. 5: South Walton (4-4); Last Week: 6Fridays game between the Seahawks and Freeport was about more than football. The two teams raised money and supplies for hur-ricane relief in Panama City and put on a great night, but South Walton got the win, so Ill give them the bump here.No. 6: Freeport (3-4); Last Week: 5Freeport is still alive in the playoff hunt after the FHSAA announced a week ago it would allow eight teams into the regional playoff bracket for Regions 1 and 2, and it nearly got the win Friday if not for an ending only Hollywood could write. No. 7: Choctaw (2-6, 0-2); Last Week: 7Maybe the nightmare is over for the Indians.After suffering another rash of injuries to the quar-terback position midgame, Choctaw rallied to beat Leon this past Thursday for a 28-20 victory that snapped a five-game losing streak. No. 8: Fort Walton Beach (1-7, 0-1); Last Week: 8Get up, football fans. Its The GameŽ day.The Vikings host Choctaw at 7 p.m. Friday in the highly touted rivalry matchup for bragging rights until next year. The Indians have owned those rights for five straight years, but with both teams struggling, any-thing can happen. No. 9: Rocky Bayou (2-5); Last Week: 9Remember when Rocky Bayou was 2-0? Pepperidge Farm remembers. No. 10 Walton (0-7); Last Week: 10Walton has one last shot to get a win this year and it comes against 6-1 Blountstown. Do you believe in miracles? RANKINGSFrom Page B2downs, it looks like they will miss Halloween. Louisville by 6. Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets vs. Virginia Tech Hokies: Two engineering schools trying to figure out how to beat each other with math. Sorry, folks „ it takes more than brains to beat the brawn of Virginia Tech. Hokies by 12 and sitting pretty for a bowl game. Duke Blue Devils vs. Pittsburgh Panthers: Trick or treat. Pittsburgh will win by the bag full „ 13 points. The tiebreaker game is Iowa Hawkeyes vs. Penn State Nittany Lions: Could this be a real whiteout with real snow on the ground or should we just stay with the white handkerchief in the stadium? Penn State is looking for a complete whiteout, but it will be the Hawkeyes by 1. The game to watch is the South Florida Bulls vs. Houston Cougars. This is an enjoyable good game to watch with all the thrills and spills. Houston is trying to thin out the herd (good luck on that). Its the Bulls by 13. See you next week! Bill Everett is a member of the Military Order of the Purple Heart. He lives in Baker. EVERETTFrom Page B2

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** B4 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin BULLETIN BOARDWe went ape in Library Class on Tuesday; Oct. 16. The monkeys behind the masks are Crestview residents June McDuf“ e (age 2) and Evey Shipp (age 3). [HEATHER NITZEL | SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN] By News Bulletin contributorCRESTVIEW „ Crafts at a recent library event focused on animals. Have a cute photo of your kids out and about? They could be our next The Bulletin Kid! Email a photo with your child's name, age, hometown and a description of the action to news@ crestviewbulletin.com.Monkey faces decorated at the libraryBy News Bulletin staffCRESTVIEW „ The activities listed below are scheduled through Nov. 30 in Crestview and surrounding areas. Email details of your upcoming event to news@crestviewbulletin.com to have it listed here.HAUNTED HERITAGE MINI FESTIVAL: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 27 at the Heritage Museum, 115 Westview Ave., Valparaiso. Museum admission is free that day. Games with prizes, spooky stories, and crafts are planned. There will also be a bake sale and lunch plates for purchase. Call 678-2615 or email info@heritagemuseum.org for details.THE CRESTVIEW FALL FESTIVAL: 1-6 p.m. Oct. 27 along Main Street. A pet costume contest and parade is at 2 p.m., and a costume contest for groups and individuals up to age 18 is at 3 p.m. Vendors may register online at www.downtowncrestview.org. Volunteers are also needed. Several 2-3 hour slots are available; RSVP online.PYRON CHAPEL FALL FESTIVAL: 5-8 p.m. Oct. 27, Pyron Chapel Baptist Church, 6498 William Gary Johnson Road, Baker. The free festival includes food, games and more. Call 598-3935 or 537-8747 for details.TRUNK OR TREAT: 5-7 p.m. Oct. 29, in the Crestview Public Library'seast parking lot, 1445 Commerce Drive. Call Ginny, 6824432, toreserve a space. Prizes for best trunk decorations. Call to volunteer or donate candy.Fall festival activities set for October and NovemberOnce again, we have the good fortune to host visitors from Noirmoutier, France, which is Crestview's Sister City. Mayor David Cadle recently sponsored a picnic lunch for our visitors, their hosts and the Sister City members so that everyone could get to know each other the morning after their arrival. On hand were Crestview's police and fire departments with displays, as well as a police K-9 demonstration. Brian Hughes, president of the local Sister City program, along with the Sister City committee and Crestview High School teachers, have arranged a variety of activities for students and adult visitors along with their host families. The Mayor of Noirmoutier, Dr. Noel Faucher, his wife and two children were in Crestview as representatives of their city. Crestview hosted City Government Week at Warriors Hall and Dr. Faucher was one of the participants along with Mayor Cadle and our City Council members. Different departments had displays and students were encouraged to learn about our form of city government. We have 37 visitors, and 21 are junior high school students hosted by CHS students and families. Many of these students have been corresponding back and forth with their host families for a long time. While in Crestview, they will attend some classes at the high school. CHS Art teacher Alex Pottinger will have an art session for the students to make souvenir tee shirts. Some will attend cheer and football practice, and all will attend a football game. There are also activities while the student hosts are in school, such as a tour of Northwest Florida State College and Eglin Air Force Base. Some are aspiring dancers who will attend a dance class during the college tour. There will be a CHS pep rally with the French students, which promises to be fun. The organizers have fun activities for a variety of ages, including a beach picnic. Visitors will also attend a church service. Mount Zion AME Church youths will lead a gospel service at 11 a.m. Oct. 28 at the church, 502 McDonald St., Crestview. This service is open to the public and all are welcome. A canoeing trip along the Blackwater River and a picnic lunch are also planned. Be sure to welcome these visitors with warm Southern hospitality should you see them around our town. Janice Lynn Crose, a former accountant, lives in Crestview with her husband, Jim; her two rescue collies, Shane and Jasmine; and two cats, Kathryn and Prince Valiant.HAPPENINGSSeveral activities planned for our French visitors J a n i c e L y n n C r o s e Janice Lynn Crose Area residents planning fall events may send details to news@crestviewbulletin.com. [PIXABAY.COM] By News Bulletin contributorCRESTVIEW „ Loomis Bros. Circus Americas last real 3-ring circus, will be making their annual return to Crestviews Old Spanish Trail Park, Nov. 8-11. Shows will take place on Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. only. The circus will perform in the parks covered theater pavilion located on Stillwell Blvd, one block off N Ferdon Blvd. (Highway 85). The annual fundraising event is once again sponsored by the Crestview Historic Preservation Board, who receive a portion of each ticket sold. The Florida based Loomis Bros. Circus has been keeping the circus tradition alive for over twenty years, and this years show promises to be bigger and better than ever with a worldclass cast of both human and animal performers assembled from all corners of the globe. Presented in a traditional fashion, the show is over ninety-minutes The circus comes to CrestviewTrained elephants are part of the Loomis Bros. Circus experience. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Loomis Bros. Circus will be making their annual return to Crestview Nov. 8-11.[CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CIRCUS, B6

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, October 24, 2018 B5

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** B6 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin BULLETIN BOARDof family fun featuring three rings of everything you would expect to see in a circus including elephants, tigers, acrobats, clowns, and motorcycle daredevils. This year the circus is excited to feature Magical Quick ChangeŽ, as seen on NBC televisions summer talent series, performed by the amazing Matagirov Duo who come to us all the way from Moscow, Russia. Loomis Bros. Circus is currently the only show touring the United States to still have a full live band, animals, and three rings.Ž said producer Justin Loomis, who also serves as the shows singing Ringmaster. The circus is deep seeded in American history and is as much of an American tradition as baseball and apple pie,Ž Loomis said. Every child deserves a chance to see the circus! Its a truly magical place where you can get lost just for a little while and forget about your troubles, a place where even the adults get to feel like a kid again! Dont miss what could be your last chance to see this living treasure known as circus.Ž Admission to the circus is $20 for adults and $8 for children ages 2-12. Coupons for Free Kids TicketsŽ are available at merchants throughout Okaloosa County. There are also a limited number of discounted $10 adult tickets, which include free childs admission, available for purchase in advance only at retail locations in the area by calling the events sponsor at (850) 537-5714 or online by visiting the shows website at loomiscircus.com. Full priced tickets will be available on the day of show at the circus box office or online. The onsite box office opens one hour prior to each showtime. All seating is general admission and patrons are encouraged to arrive early for best seat selection. CIRCUSFrom Page B4A dog jumps through a hoop during a Loomis Brothers circus show. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] By News Bulletin contributorCRESTVIEW „ A local group was able to raise $7,500 for three Northwest Florida organizations.Members of the Richard A. Capozzola Lodge, Sons of Italy No. 2865 presented checks for $2,500 each to Children in Crisis, Emerald Coast Hospice and the Crest-view Manor.Sons of Italy raise donationsThe Richard A. Capozzola Lodge No. 2865 Sons of Italy is proud to present a check to Children in Crisis. Presenting the check i s Crestview President Bob Grappone and accepting is Laura Moore. Also present are Ron Milburne, Ginger Grappone, Martha Hughes and Immediat e Past President Tom Hughes. [PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN] The Richard A. Capozzola Lodge No. 2865 Crestview President Bob Grappone recently presented a check to Kim Bowman representing Emerald Coast Hospice. Also present are Ginger Grappone, Ron Milburne, Martha Hughes and Immediate Past President Tom Hughes. Becky Brice-Nash from the Crestview Manor accepted a donation from President Bob Grappone of the Richard A Capozzola Lodge, Sons of Italy No. 2865 in Crestview. Also pictured are Martha Hughes, Immediate Past President Tom Hughes, Ron Milburne and Ginger Grappone, seated. Local group presents $7,500 in funds to area organizations

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, October 24, 2018 B7

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ClassifiedsB B 8 8 Wednesday, October 24, 2018| Crestview News Bulletin Insurance Agent Needed For Busy Insurance O ce Call 850-682-3536NF-11009211 20180541 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 18-DR-1628 CIVIL ACTION In The Matter Of The Adoption Of: Minor Children. NOTICE OF ACTION, NOTICE OF JOINT PETITION FOR ADOP TION B Y STEPP AR ENT AND NOTICE OF HEARING TO:Andrew Riley Sparks (Description: Age -42; Caucasian Male, Brown Hair, Blue Eyes, 5’9” Tall, 175 lbs) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a joint petition for adoption by stepparent has been filed and commenced against you in this Court seeking termination of any parental rights and obligations you may have, or claim, concerning a minor male child born on February 17, 2009 in Crestview, Okaloosa County, Florida. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, on the Petitioners’ attorney, whose name and address are: ROBISON R. HARRELL, ADOPTION CENTER, 3 Clifford Drive, Shalimar, Florida 32579, and file the original with the Clerk of Court, Okaloosa County Courthouse, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, 32547, on or before November 27, 2018. If you fail to do so, a default judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the petition. There will be a hearing on said petition on Tuesday, December 11, 2018, at 11:50 a.m. (Central Time) before Judge Terrance R. Ketchel at the Okaloosa County Courthouse 101 East James Lee Boulevard, Crestview, Florida, 32536. The court has set aside five (5) minutes for this hearing. UNDER SECTION 63.087(6) AND SECTION 63.089, FLORIDA STATUTES, FAILURE TO TIMELY FILE A WRITTEN RESPONSE TO THIS NOTICE AND THE PETITION WITH THE COURT AND TO APPEAR AT THIS HEARING CONSTITUTES GROUNDS UPON WHICH THE COURT SHALL END ANY PARENTAL RIGHTS YOU MAY HAVE OR ASSERT REGARDING THE MINOR CHILD. DATED: Oct 2, 2018 JD PEACOCK II Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Diane Watkins Deputy Clerk 10/17/2018 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 11/07/2018 20180518 Notice of Public Hearing Notice is hereby given that a Public Hearing will be held on November 14, 2018, at 10:00 AM to receive comments concerning the Crestview Housing Authority’s FY2019 Annual Update to the FY2015 -FY2019 Five-Year Agency Plan. Comments will also be received on the Authority’s FY2019 Capital Fund Program Annual Statement and Five-Year Action Plan during the same Public Hearing. Both documents will be available for review over the next forty-five days at the Authority’s central office located at: 371 West Hickory Avenue Crestview, Florida 32536-3305 The Public Hearing will also be held at the above location. Any person wishing to comment on either of the above documents may file his or her comments in writing with the Authority’s Executive Director at the above address by 5:00 PM November 13, 2018, or may attend the Public Hearing. All comments will be considered in preparing the final Five-Year Agency Plan and Capital Fund Program Annual Statement and Five-Year Plan before submittal to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. 09/26/2018 10/03/2018 10/10/2018 10/17/2018 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 11/07/2018 20180546 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 1st JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR Okaloosa COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 2017-CA-002799 Specialized Loan Servicing LLC Plaintiff vs. BRIAN L. PITTMAN and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant who are unknown to be dead or alive whether said unknown are persons, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRIAN L. PITTMAN; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; INDIAN LAKE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION AT DESTIN, INC., A FLORIDA NOT FOR PROFIT CORPORATION; DAVID W. SMITH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID W. SMITH; DENISE R. SMITH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DENISE R. SMITH; TENANT I/UNKNOWN TENANT; TENANT II/UNKNOWN TENANT; TENANT III/UNKNOWN TENANT and TENANT IV/UNKNOWN TENANT in possession of the subject real property, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the final judgment/order entered in the above noted case, that the Clerk of Court of Okaloosa County, Florida will sell the following property situated in Okaloosa County, Florida described as: CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 260, INDIAN LAKE, A CONDOMINIUM, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM THEREOF, AND ALL EXHIBITS AND AMENDMENTS THERETO, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2671, PAGE 3647, AND RE-RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2672, PAGE 3597, ALL OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO, AS SET FORTH IN THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at www.Okaloosa.realforeclose.com at 11:00 A.M. CST on November 15, 2018. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE CLERK OF THE COURT By:Sharon Pattern Deputy Clerk Dated:October 8, 2018 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADA Liaison Okaloosa County 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547 Phone (850) 609-4700 Fa (850) 651-7725 A DA.Okaloosa@flcourt s1.gov at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.” 10/17/2018 10/24/2018 20180547 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 18-CP-1354 IN RE: ESTATE OF ALAN LEE BREWER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDI TORS The administration of the Estate of Alan Lee Brewer, deceased, whose date of death was July 30, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Okaloosa County, Florida, the address of which is 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claim with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against Decedent’s estate must file their claims with the court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is: October 24, 2018 Personal Representative: Sandra Faye Brewer, 107 Lacey Lane, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547 PERRI & JENNINGS, Attorneys at Law Attorneys for Personal Representative 4 Eleventh Avenue, Suite One Shalimar, Florida 32579 (850) 651-3011 dperri@perrijennings.la w /s/Daniel C. Perri DANIEL C. PERRI Florida Bar No.: 0138590 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 20180555 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. James Gregory Tucker, et al., Defendants. GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 2017 CA 003004 C NOTICE OF FORE CL OSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 30, 2018, entered in Case No. 2017 CA 003004 C of the Circuit Court of the First Judicial Circuit, in and for Okaloosa County, Florida, wherein Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. is the Plaintiff and James Gregory Tucker a/k/a James G. Tucker; Christina Tucker are the Defendants, that JD Peacock II, Okaloosa County Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale at www.okaloosa.realforeclose.c om, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 7th day of November, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: START AT THE GOVERNMENT MARKER AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 24 WEST, GO SOUTH 89 07’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 33 FEET TO EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A NORTH-SOUTH DEDICATED, GRADED, COUNTY ROAD; THENCE NORTH 01 59’ WEST ALONG THE SAID EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 219.18 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF UNION STREET, AN EAST-WEST DEDICATED 66 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY COUNTY ROAD; THENCE EAST ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF UNION STREET, A DISTANCE OF 1134.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE AS DISTANCE OF 115.20 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A GRADED ROAD; THENCE NORTH 0 42’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 140.07 FEET ALONG THE SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE WEST A DISTANCE OF 110.6 FEET; THENCE SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 140 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF UNION STREET AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO KNOWN AS A PART OF LOTS 41 AND 42 OF GARDEN ESTATES, #3, UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION SURVEYED BY WILLARD WALSTON CERTIFICATION #799 FEBRUARY 1965. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a subordinate lienholder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Dated this 16th day of October, 2018. BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC Attorney for Plaintiff 1501 N.W. 49th Street, Suite 200 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954) 618-6955, ext. 6108 Fax: (954) 618-6954 FLCourtDocs@brockan dscott.com By Giuseppe Cataudella, Esq. Florida Bar No. 88976 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, ADA Liaison, Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547, Phone (850) 609-4700 Fax (850) 651-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@flcourts1.go vat least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 20180557 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2015 CA 001703 F U.S. BANK NA, SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA, NA, SUCESSOR IN INTEREST TO LASALLE BANK NA, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR11, Plaintiff, vs. BRENDA G. BENTON; CHARLES D. BENTON; et al, Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF SALE PURSU ANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated April 19, 2018 and an Order Resetting Sale dated October 2, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2015 CA 001703 F of the Circuit Court in and for Okaloosa County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NA, SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA, NA, SUCESSOR IN INTEREST TO LASALLE BANK NA, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR11 is Plaintiff and BRENDA G. BENTON; CHARLES D. BENTON; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FEDERAL ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash website of www.okaloosa.realforeclose.c om 11:00 a.m., on November 29, 2018 ,the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 1, BLOCK D, CHATEAUGUAY II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 111, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADA Liaison; Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, FL, 32547, Phone (850) 609-4700 Fax (850) 651-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@flcourts1.g ov., at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED at Fort Walton Beach, Florida, on October 4th, 2018. JD PEACOCK II As Clerk, Circuit Court By Tamara Hendricks As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 19519 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33318 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com The newspaper is requested pursuant to the provisions of Administrative Directive OCAD 2010 7 to deliver the proof of publication directly to the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Okaloosa County. 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 20180558 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA ALEXUS MAMON Petitioner, and DAVID MAMON Respondent Case No: 2018-DR-003093 NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PETITION FOR DIS SOL UTION OF MARIAGE TO: David Mamon 403 Winddrift Court, Crestview, FL 32536 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Alexus Mamon, whose address is 208 Dates Avenue, Apt 5, Fort Walton Beach FL 32548 on or before November 23rd, 2018, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at Okaloosa County Courthouse Annex Ext., 1940 Lewis Turner Blvd., Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. NONE Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed tothe address on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of proceedings. Dated: October 12th, 2018 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Carla Andrews Deputy Clerk 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 11/07/2018 11/14/2018 For Sale 2 Cemetery Plots in Live Oak Memorial Park $2000.00 for both. Call: 850-865-1014 Handyman I do general all around handyman work. There is not much that I cannot do. I am licensed and will serve the nearby Crestview areas. I am willing to negotiate price. Please call 850-612-1505. New Bethel UMC in Crestview Church Pianist Wanted at Sunday mornings 11 am service. If interested please call 850-572-2482 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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** @cnbulletin facebook.com/crestviewbulletinFREE crestviewbulletin.com Vol. 18 Issue 43 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 Address: 638 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536 Online: crestviewbulletin.com Publisher Jim Fletcher ...........................j” etcher@crestviewbulletin.com Executive Editor Jason Blakeney .............jblakeney@nwfdailynews.com Editor Aaron Little ...........................................alittle@srpressgazette.com Editorial Assistant Renee Bell ....................news@crestviewbulletin.com Reporter Aaron Jacobs .......................... ajacobs@crestviewbulletin.com Reporter Kaylin Parker ...........................kparker@crestviewbulletin.com Legals Barbara Dale ....................................bdale@crestviewbulletin.com Circulation Assistant Dale Robinson ......drobinson@crestviewbulletin.com Media Consultant Sherrie Stanley .......sherries@crestviewbulletin.com Media Consultant Katie Newton..........knewton@crestviewbulletin.com CONTACT US Call 682-6524 to report news, subscribe or learn about our classi“ ed and display advertising options. The Crestview News Bulletin is published each Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media Group, at 638 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL32536. Periodical postage paid at Crestview, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 638 N. Ferson Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536. USPS 010-209 All material is property of the Crestview News Bulletin. SUBSCRIPTION RATES In County 13 weeks ................................$9.45 26 weeks ..............................$17.85 52 weeks ..............................$32.76 Out of county 13 weeks ..............................$14.70 26 weeks ..............................$23.10 52 weeks ..............................$38.01 Delivery subscriptions may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. NEWS BULLETIN ADVERTISING Ask your advertising representative about our Color by the Inch program and Customer Appreciation sale by calling 850-682-6524. A SPECIAL PUBLICATION OF THE By Kaylin Parker 682-6524 | @kparkercnb | kparker@crestviewbulletin.comCRESTVIEW „ Mobile vending might sound odd to some, but in Crestview its defined as the selling of any product out of any self-pro-pelled or non-self-propelled vehicle including carts, trucks, trailers and movable stands and kiosks.ŽProposed changes to the existing ordinance regulating mobile vending would allow the city to charge licensing fees on things like tent sales, firework stands, Christmas tree stands, road side or garageŽ type sales, fruit stands, mobile food trucks, hot dog carts, and other vendors.Growth Management Director Teresa Gaillard pre-sented the amendments to the city council Monday, Oct. 15, and the council discussed it at some length.But by the end of the special workshop meeting, Crest-view officials had yet to post the ordinance online.Documents were provided to each council member, the mayor and department heads present at the meeting, but the press and the public were left to wonder what the ordinance might say.This, according to Attorney John Bussian, was clearly a violation of the Florida Sun-shine law.He said based on what was described about the special workshop meeting, the city violated the open meetings law by not posting the proposed ordinance before the meeting.Floridas Sunshine Law has always been read liberally to promote government transparency and not narrowly to deny the publics Sunshine law always been read liberally By Kaylin Parker 682-6524 | @kparkercnb kparker@crestviewbulletin.comCRESTVIEW „ Its been over a week since Hurricane Michael tore through the Florida Panhandle, and the community is making strides to recover from the devastation.The Crestview Police Department is working to assist in the recovery.After heaps of donations from community members flowed into the police department, Crestview offi-cers loaded the supplies into a four vehicle convoy includ-ing a Public Works truck and headed to Marianna Thursday morning, per direction from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.Public Information Offi-cer Brian Hughes said he was amazed by the amount of sup-plies the community donated in a short period of time.People have been overwhelmingly responsive,Ž Hughes said.The police department received donations from the Ladies of Law Enforcement and other community members look-ing for an opportunity to get involved.Jae Williams, 7, has been a huge help to the police department, Hughes said.Crestview community continues assisting neighbors to the eastBy Kaylin Parker682-6524 | @kparkercnb kparker@crestviewbulletin.comCRESTVIEW „ The city of Crestview could be getting another fast-food joint.Panda Express has purchased property at the south end next to the Zaxbys on State Road 85.According to Growth Management Director Teresa Gaillard, the restaurants next step will be submission of their plans to the growth management department, which will go through the meeting process for approval.Gaillard said theres no estimate on when the plans will be presented to the council, but will likely happen before the end of this year.Land purchased for potential Panda Express in CrestviewPanda Express will be located next to the Zaxbys on State Road 85.[KAYLIN PARKER/NEWS BULLETIN] Crestview City Hall[KAYLIN PARKER/NEWS BULLETIN] Anybody who was available was drafted into helping unload donors vehicles, including records custodian Lisa Sprague and Deputy Chief Jamie Grant (pictured above). Nancy Worley (second from right) unloads water from her truck with Michael Bell (right) with help from of“ cers Zachary Schmidt (left) and Michael Hills. [BRIAN HUGHES/CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] The Crestview Police Department loaded up a four vehicles and headed to Marianna. The police department took supplies donated by the community to fellow law enforcement Thursday morning. See COUNCIL, E2 See RECOVERY, E2

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** E2 Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletinright to know,Ž Bussian said.According to City Clerk Elizabeth Roy, the council announced the meeting on Sep. 24 at the regular city council meeting and published the agenda online Oct. 11, which meets the seven day requirement stated in Florida Statutes. Roy also said that because Mondays meeting was a special workshop, the city was only required to give a 24-72 hour notice. However, the issue lies with the ordinance docu-ments that were left out of the agenda. Roy said the city was not required to publish the ordinance packet.We dont have to pub-lish all the information,Ž Roy said.Although Sunshine Laws are subject to inter-pretation, Bussian said this statute is clear.The spirit of the Sunshine Law clearly commanded the city to release the draft ordinance before the workshop,Ž Bussian said. The only way this occurs is when local government senses that neither the public nor the press will challenge their refusal to release documents to be discussed at a public meeting.ŽFor any meeting except in the case of emergency meetings, Florida Statute 120.525 in Chapter 120 Administrative Procedure ActŽ states the following:The agenda, along with any meeting materi-als available in electronic form excluding confidential and exempt information, shall be published on the agen-cys website. The agenda shall contain the items to be considered in order of presentation. After the agenda has been made available, a change shall be made only for good cause, as determined by the person designated to preside, and stated in the record. Notification of such change shall be at the earliest practicable time.ŽAccording to Bussian, this violation could be addressed with a civil law suit and an order barring the city from doing this in the future.The hope is the city can learn from its mis-take,Ž Bussian said.Florida Sunshine Laws are designed to give access to public government meetings and documents in the state of Florida. COUNCILFrom Page E1 Williams received an honorary official uniform after loading the back of his moms SUV with cases of water.Riley Martin, 3, used money she raised from her lemonade stand over the weekend to help chil-dren of law enforcement officers affected by the storm.It has really been heartwarming to see this out-pour of generosity from the community,Ž Hughes said. We were not expecting this.ŽHughes said donations have poured in from all ages, young to elderly.One woman bought a brand new pickup truck and immediately loaded it with pallets of water from Sams club.She then unloaded the water at the police department with help from two newly sworn-in officers, Hughes said.Some of the items donated to the Crestview Police Department included a waffle maker, begging, plenty of dia-pers, toiletries, and even childrens car seats.The police department is continuously asking for socks and undergarments due to the inability to do laundry in the affected areas.Just that willingness to pitch in makes it a city wide effort,Ž Hughes said. RECOVERYFrom Page E1Volunteers move water into a bigger trailer. Forming a line (from left) are of“ cers Michael Hills, Patrick Stephenson, Mellie Reynolds, Jonathon Sprague and Sgt. Lucas Kraus. [BRIAN HUGHES/CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] Above, right: The group of volunteers were off-duty and assisting on their own time. From left are Of“ cer Jonathon Sprague, Corp. Evan Reynolds, Sgt. Lucas Kraus, and of“ cers Patrick Stephenson, Mellie Roberts, Zachary Schmidt and Michael Hills. Community members donated supplies to help hurricane victims in neighboring communities. Above, left: The Crestview Police Department loaded up four vehicles and headed to Marianna. The police department took supplies donated by the community to fellow law enforcement Thursday morning. Volunteers “ lled this vehicle with water to be delivered to a neighboring community.

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, October 24, 2018 E3Emerald Coast Zoo owners plan to host overnight campingBy Heather Osbourne315-4440 | @heatheronwfdn hosbourne@ nwfdailynews.com CRESTVIEW „ Its been one year since Rick the Reptile GuyŽ de Ritter gave his 11-year-old daughter Suzy a sloth, which came along with a complimentary zoo.The de Ritters „ dad Rick, mom Sara and children David, Suzy and Betsy „ rolled into the Emerald Coast Zoo for the first time last October, ready to call their little mobile trailer parked near the entrance of their new zoo home.Bedtime for the de Ritter children sounds like theyre camping out in the middle of the African bush, Rick and Sara said, rather than a 10-acre plot just east of Crestview. And falling asleep to the lullabies of Levi the lion, wolf pups and even a trio of porcupines is an experience they have decided not to keep for themselves.On Nov. 3, the de Ritters will host 150 Girl Scouts overnight as the Emerald Coast Zoos first official primitive campers. The camp-out will be the kickoff of a larger zoo camping project, Rick said, to bring the North-west Florida community even closer to nature.Weve been living in this trailer for a year, and we want to give people a place to park their trailers, too,Ž Rick said. I think we can fit about eight trailers in a campsite were going to be working on. The zoo is a lot of fun at night. Youll hear the lion roar, which is pretty scary.Where else can you camp 150 kids who are trying to learn about nature?ŽRick said the project will begin once the Emerald Coast Zoo completes con-struction on a new state of the art diet center, where zookeepers can properly store the animals food. The de Ritters will trans-form the old diet center, which is located even closer to the animals than the familys trailer, into their new home.Weve spent the year making sure all of the animals had proper and larger enclosures before we worried about a home for us,Ž Rick said. At times it was all five of us in that trailer along with a monkey, lemur, coyote, zebra and muntjac. Sara is ready to have her own nest.ŽThe de Ritter family recently invited a North-west Florida Daily News reporter to experience A Night at the Zoo.Ž Heres the overnight accountDusk was only minutes away as I worked swiftly to put the finishing touches on my dust-coated campsite, just a few yards from the mascot of the Emerald Coast Zoo.There are only so many Dont get eaten tonightŽ text messages a girl can receive before the thought of being Levi the lions next meal morphs into an unfounded fear. So whether intentional or subconscious, I never quite turned my back on Levis enclosure while pitching the tent.As I climbed into my camping hammock at 8 p.m., the evening was peaceful. The only nearby noises were the clucking of silkie chickens and a parrot who repeatedly greeted me with a Hello.ŽRick said Levis roar could be heard from 3 miles in each direction, so I was excited to have a front row seat.I was not disappointed.It was a few hours into nightfall when Levi, whod slept most of the evening away, sprung to life. Although I was expecting a full on roar, what I got instead was more of a deep bellow. The Lions wake-up calls continued for hours as he paced the fence in his enclosure.The roars were oddly peaceful as they filled the cool night air. The lack of light, save for the stars, seemed to only make his bellows amplified.But the lion wasnt the only animal waking up to greet me during the 9 p.m. hour.During my third stroll around the zoo, this time to visit a pair of snuggling sloths, I heard a clicking noise that was all too familiar „ palmetto bugs.I was warned before my stay that Id see them in the restroom. The zoo owners even showed me where I could put the cockroaches if I found myself brave enough to catch a few for the reptiles next meals. I politely declined.Even less cuddly than the lion and roaches, but a lot cuter, were a trio of porcupines whose panting could be heard from quite a distance. The pointy critters worked tirelessly to dig a hole near their den, the sounds of their quills clacking as they dug competing with Levis chatter. Still, a night at the zoo was oddly quiet. A lot quieter, at least, than Id ever imagined for a zoo.A few hours past midnight, though, the silence diminished all too quickly.It was at 2:53 a.m. when I awoke with goose bumps covering my arms. Levi had let out his loudest roar yet, quickly responded to by the barking of the previ-ously silent coyote pack. The 4-month-old pups chimed in, accompanied by a few chuffs from the white tiger.The chorus of animals, which normally wouldnt be packed together in nature, continued on until a roosters crow signaled morning. As I took one last stroll around the zoo before packing up my belongings, the momentary silence I experienced following a long night of howls, growls and roars made me understand why the Emerald Coast Zoo owners werent keeping his overnight encounter to themselves.My Night at the ZooŽ was over.But, in just a few months, others adven-tures would begin.A night at the zooLevi the lion paces in his enclosure around 9 p.m. [HEATHER OSBOURNE/DAILY NEWS]

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ExtraE E 4 4 Wednesday, October 24, 2018| Crestview News Bulletin Insurance Agent Needed For Busy Insurance O ce Call 850-682-3536NF-11009211 20180541 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 18-DR-1628 CIVIL ACTION In The Matter Of The Adoption Of: Minor Children. NOTICE OF ACTION, NOTICE OF JOINT PETITION FOR ADOP TION B Y STEPP AR ENT AND NOTICE OF HEARING TO:Andrew Riley Sparks (Description: Age -42; Caucasian Male, Brown Hair, Blue Eyes, 5’9” Tall, 175 lbs) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a joint petition for adoption by stepparent has been filed and commenced against you in this Court seeking termination of any parental rights and obligations you may have, or claim, concerning a minor male child born on February 17, 2009 in Crestview, Okaloosa County, Florida. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, on the Petitioners’ attorney, whose name and address are: ROBISON R. HARRELL, ADOPTION CENTER, 3 Clifford Drive, Shalimar, Florida 32579, and file the original with the Clerk of Court, Okaloosa County Courthouse, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, 32547, on or before November 27, 2018. If you fail to do so, a default judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the petition. There will be a hearing on said petition on Tuesday, December 11, 2018, at 11:50 a.m. (Central Time) before Judge Terrance R. Ketchel at the Okaloosa County Courthouse 101 East James Lee Boulevard, Crestview, Florida, 32536. The court has set aside five (5) minutes for this hearing. UNDER SECTION 63.087(6) AND SECTION 63.089, FLORIDA STATUTES, FAILURE TO TIMELY FILE A WRITTEN RESPONSE TO THIS NOTICE AND THE PETITION WITH THE COURT AND TO APPEAR AT THIS HEARING CONSTITUTES GROUNDS UPON WHICH THE COURT SHALL END ANY PARENTAL RIGHTS YOU MAY HAVE OR ASSERT REGARDING THE MINOR CHILD. DATED: Oct 2, 2018 JD PEACOCK II Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Diane Watkins Deputy Clerk 10/17/2018 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 11/07/2018 20180518 Notice of Public Hearing Notice is hereby given that a Public Hearing will be held on November 14, 2018, at 10:00 AM to receive comments concerning the Crestview Housing Authority’s FY2019 Annual Update to the FY2015 -FY2019 Five-Year Agency Plan. Comments will also be received on the Authority’s FY2019 Capital Fund Program Annual Statement and Five-Year Action Plan during the same Public Hearing. Both documents will be available for review over the next forty-five days at the Authority’s central office located at: 371 West Hickory Avenue Crestview, Florida 32536-3305 The Public Hearing will also be held at the above location. Any person wishing to comment on either of the above documents may file his or her comments in writing with the Authority’s Executive Director at the above address by 5:00 PM November 13, 2018, or may attend the Public Hearing. All comments will be considered in preparing the final Five-Year Agency Plan and Capital Fund Program Annual Statement and Five-Year Plan before submittal to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. 09/26/2018 10/03/2018 10/10/2018 10/17/2018 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 11/07/2018 20180546 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 1st JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR Okaloosa COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 2017-CA-002799 Specialized Loan Servicing LLC Plaintiff vs. BRIAN L. PITTMAN and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant who are unknown to be dead or alive whether said unknown are persons, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRIAN L. PITTMAN; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; INDIAN LAKE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION AT DESTIN, INC., A FLORIDA NOT FOR PROFIT CORPORATION; DAVID W. SMITH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID W. SMITH; DENISE R. SMITH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DENISE R. SMITH; TENANT I/UNKNOWN TENANT; TENANT II/UNKNOWN TENANT; TENANT III/UNKNOWN TENANT and TENANT IV/UNKNOWN TENANT in possession of the subject real property, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the final judgment/order entered in the above noted case, that the Clerk of Court of Okaloosa County, Florida will sell the following property situated in Okaloosa County, Florida described as: CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 260, INDIAN LAKE, A CONDOMINIUM, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM THEREOF, AND ALL EXHIBITS AND AMENDMENTS THERETO, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2671, PAGE 3647, AND RE-RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2672, PAGE 3597, ALL OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO, AS SET FORTH IN THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at www.Okaloosa.realforeclose.com at 11:00 A.M. CST on November 15, 2018. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE CLERK OF THE COURT By:Sharon Pattern Deputy Clerk Dated:October 8, 2018 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADA Liaison Okaloosa County 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547 Phone (850) 609-4700 Fa (850) 651-7725 A DA.Okaloosa@flcourt s1.gov at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.” 10/17/2018 10/24/2018 20180547 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 18-CP-1354 IN RE: ESTATE OF ALAN LEE BREWER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDI TORS The administration of the Estate of Alan Lee Brewer, deceased, whose date of death was July 30, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Okaloosa County, Florida, the address of which is 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claim with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against Decedent’s estate must file their claims with the court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is: October 24, 2018 Personal Representative: Sandra Faye Brewer, 107 Lacey Lane, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547 PERRI & JENNINGS, Attorneys at Law Attorneys for Personal Representative 4 Eleventh Avenue, Suite One Shalimar, Florida 32579 (850) 651-3011 dperri@perrijennings.la w /s/Daniel C. Perri DANIEL C. PERRI Florida Bar No.: 0138590 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 20180555 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. James Gregory Tucker, et al., Defendants. GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 2017 CA 003004 C NOTICE OF FORE CL OSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 30, 2018, entered in Case No. 2017 CA 003004 C of the Circuit Court of the First Judicial Circuit, in and for Okaloosa County, Florida, wherein Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. is the Plaintiff and James Gregory Tucker a/k/a James G. Tucker; Christina Tucker are the Defendants, that JD Peacock II, Okaloosa County Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale at www.okaloosa.realforeclose.c om, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 7th day of November, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: START AT THE GOVERNMENT MARKER AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 24 WEST, GO SOUTH 89 07’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 33 FEET TO EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A NORTH-SOUTH DEDICATED, GRADED, COUNTY ROAD; THENCE NORTH 01 59’ WEST ALONG THE SAID EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 219.18 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF UNION STREET, AN EAST-WEST DEDICATED 66 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY COUNTY ROAD; THENCE EAST ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF UNION STREET, A DISTANCE OF 1134.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE AS DISTANCE OF 115.20 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A GRADED ROAD; THENCE NORTH 0 42’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 140.07 FEET ALONG THE SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE WEST A DISTANCE OF 110.6 FEET; THENCE SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 140 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF UNION STREET AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO KNOWN AS A PART OF LOTS 41 AND 42 OF GARDEN ESTATES, #3, UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION SURVEYED BY WILLARD WALSTON CERTIFICATION #799 FEBRUARY 1965. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a subordinate lienholder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Dated this 16th day of October, 2018. BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC Attorney for Plaintiff 1501 N.W. 49th Street, Suite 200 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954) 618-6955, ext. 6108 Fax: (954) 618-6954 FLCourtDocs@brockan dscott.com By Giuseppe Cataudella, Esq. Florida Bar No. 88976 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, ADA Liaison, Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547, Phone (850) 609-4700 Fax (850) 651-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@flcourts1.go vat least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 20180557 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2015 CA 001703 F U.S. BANK NA, SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA, NA, SUCESSOR IN INTEREST TO LASALLE BANK NA, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR11, Plaintiff, vs. BRENDA G. BENTON; CHARLES D. BENTON; et al, Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF SALE PURSU ANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated April 19, 2018 and an Order Resetting Sale dated October 2, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2015 CA 001703 F of the Circuit Court in and for Okaloosa County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NA, SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA, NA, SUCESSOR IN INTEREST TO LASALLE BANK NA, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR11 is Plaintiff and BRENDA G. BENTON; CHARLES D. BENTON; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FEDERAL ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash website of www.okaloosa.realforeclose.c om 11:00 a.m., on November 29, 2018 ,the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 1, BLOCK D, CHATEAUGUAY II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 111, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADA Liaison; Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, FL, 32547, Phone (850) 609-4700 Fax (850) 651-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@flcourts1.g ov., at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED at Fort Walton Beach, Florida, on October 4th, 2018. JD PEACOCK II As Clerk, Circuit Court By Tamara Hendricks As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 19519 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33318 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com The newspaper is requested pursuant to the provisions of Administrative Directive OCAD 2010 7 to deliver the proof of publication directly to the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Okaloosa County. 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 20180558 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA ALEXUS MAMON Petitioner, and DAVID MAMON Respondent Case No: 2018-DR-003093 NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PETITION FOR DIS SOL UTION OF MARIAGE TO: David Mamon 403 Winddrift Court, Crestview, FL 32536 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Alexus Mamon, whose address is 208 Dates Avenue, Apt 5, Fort Walton Beach FL 32548 on or before November 23rd, 2018, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at Okaloosa County Courthouse Annex Ext., 1940 Lewis Turner Blvd., Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. NONE Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed tothe address on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of proceedings. Dated: October 12th, 2018 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Carla Andrews Deputy Clerk 10/24/2018 10/31/2018 11/07/2018 11/14/2018 For Sale 2 Cemetery Plots in Live Oak Memorial Park $2000.00 for both. Call: 850-865-1014 Handyman I do general all around handyman work. There is not much that I cannot do. I am licensed and will serve the nearby Crestview areas. I am willing to negotiate price. Please call 850-612-1505. New Bethel UMC in Crestview Church Pianist Wanted at Sunday mornings 11 am service. If interested please call 850-572-2482 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.