Citation
Crestview news bulletin

Material Information

Title:
Crestview news bulletin
Portion of title:
Bulletin
Portion of title:
Crestview news
Place of Publication:
Crestview, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Lee Knapp - Publisher, Thomas Boni - Editor
Creation Date:
January 5, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crestview (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okaloosa County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Okaloosa -- Crestview
Coordinates:
30.767994 x -86.567682

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 9, no. 37 (Sept. 5, 2001); Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Crestview News Bulletin. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
002758666 ( ALEPH )
48122675 ( OCLC )
ANN6621 ( NOTIS )
2001229458 ( LCCN )

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Crestview news leader

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Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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Full Text

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** A GateHouse Media newspaper read by 10,450 people every week. Obituaries ................. A2 Opinion .................... A6 Education.................. A7 Lifestyle ..................... B1 Sports & Outdoors ...... B2 Bulletin Board ............ B4 A4Crestview man graduates U.S. Army training A7Learn about free dental x-rays BAKER HOME OVER 120 YEARS OLD | B1 HUB CITY LAKERS BOYS TEAM GETS THE WIN | B2 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 @cnbulletin facebook.com/crestviewbulletin50 ¢ crestviewbulletin.com Vol. 43 Issue 45MIDWEEK EDITION By Renee Bell 682-6524 | @cnbRenee reneeb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW „ Margie Greene celebrated her 47th anniversary as a Crestview business owner in May. She opened Margies Nylon and Lace Boutique in 1971 at 2014 Lacey Lane."In that era there was about 13 nylon and lace shops in Pensacola, one in Fort Walton," she said. "I was tired of driving up into Pensacola every time I needed something for my customers, because I had a custom dressmaking busi-ness out of my little trailer out of my house."Greene spoke to her hus-band Richard about moving into a three-room building on their property."I convinced him to move over here and let ... me move my sewing into there to keep people from coming into „ like, you get off from work. You come by to try on your stuff. Im trying to get supper for the family in the same room you have to try on your dress, you know," she said."I opened up with $1,500 worth of merchandise. Thats all I had," she said.Even though she had no formal business training, the self-taught seamstress was careful to reinvest profitinto her growing company."Starting with nothing and reinvesting every dime that came in for many years to build the business wasnt easy. I didnt take home a paycheck from the business for(20) years,but I did earn some money from dressmaking I did for cus-tomers," Greene said.Her company also pro-vided a way for her to stay close to home and her chil-dren, a daughter, Tammi, thenage 7,and a 9-yearoldson, Shawn,a special needs child. Few options were available for after-school care.Tammi Hudson, the stores machine technician and part owner, said watching her mother build her business taught her to work very hard for what she wanted."You have to listen to your customers and be willing to be flexible and move your business with what the customers are looking for. For instance, I cant imagine doing anything elseBy Renee Bell 682-6524 | @cnbRenee reneeb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW „ Jennifer Garcia, a full-time nurse at Eglin Air Force Base and mother of four, runs a photography business in her spare time.The Crestview resident started her company, Jennifer G Photography, in 2013 after some prodding from her husband, Benjamin Garcia II, a crew chief at Hurlburt Field."Ive always loved taking photographs. It started out as a hobby taking pictures of my family and eventually became a business. My husband bought me my first Nikon DSLR and put the idea in my head that I could start my own business, and the rest is history," she said.Her photography sessions are normally of weddings and family portraits, butin Aprilshe shot her first "ugly location" shoot for fun. The shoots consist of photos taken in an area not normally used or arranged for professional photos."No one would even think about having his or her family pictures taken at say, Lowe's or an auto body shop. These 'ugly' locations are chal-lenging. I use whatever lighting there is at that location and I dont move anything out of the way. I dont take any extra lighting or equip-ment with me. Its just the model, my camera, and me," Jennifer said.Garcia's June 3 shoot was at Main Street Local photographer takes on ugly shoot challengeCerisa Collazo and Jennifer Garcia stand together June 3 in Crestview. [RENEE BELL | NEWS BULLETIN] Most of Jennifer Garcias ugly shootŽ photos of model Cerisa Collazo make use of the environment as is, such as this stack of tires June 3 at Main Street Automotive in Crestview. [JENNIFER G PHOTOGRAPHY | SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Margies celebrates 47 years in businessLauren Williams, her grandmother, Margie Greene, and her mother, Tammi Hudson, stand outside Margies Sew Much Fun recently in Crestview. Hudson said, One of the reasons Lauren comes (to) our open house to help is because shes very impressed with her grandmother, as to how long shes been in business.Ž [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN] By Renee Bell 682-6524 | @cnbRenee reneeb@crestviewbulletin.comCRESTVIEW „ There were approximately 790 car burglaries reported to the Okaloosa County Sheriffs Office in 2017.Approximately 67 of those occurred in Baker, Crestview, Holt, Laurel Hill, Holt and Milligan, according to information available from the sheriffs office.The Crestview Police Department handled a total of 163 unlocked vehicle bur-glaries from May 2017 to May 2018, and officers hope to pre-vent an increase in such thefts this summer by reminding people to not only lock their vehicles, but to take any valu-ables with them to prevent theft."A rash of the vehicle burglaries occurred over the summer, when youths with too much free time on their hands were recruited by older people into car burglary rings," CPD Public Information Officer Brian Hughes stated.A further concern is that, of the 23 of the firearms car bur-glars stole in that time period, two were used in the commis-sion of a crime. "In one instance „ part of a rash of more than 10 overnight burglaries that occurred June 22-23, 2017 in two neighbor-hoods „ a vehicle owner, who surprised the thieves was shot at with his own gun. In another burglary, a gun stolen from an unlocked vehicle was used by youths to shoot another child who was waiting for his school bus," Hughes stated.Hughes reiterated that the easiest way for people to deter theft is to remove or hide valuables and then lock their vehicles, because most thieves are looking for an easy entry target."This is not just a Crestview problem. Our colleagues in neighboring cities police agencies and the sheriffs offices in Okaloosa, Walton and Santa Rosa counties all face the same challenge of people just not locking their vehicles,"he said.CPD: Car burglaries on the riseThe Crestview Police Department asks every driver in the city to make it a point to hit that lock button every time they exit their vehicles. [CRESTVIEW POLICE DEPARTMENT | SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN] See MARGIE, A9 See SHOOT, A8

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** A2 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin OBITUARIESSUBMISSIONSThe News Bulletin publishes North Okaloosa County residents and former residents obituaries, including a photo, for $95 in print and online. Family members should write the 500-word announcements and funeral homes should submit them to the newspaper for con“ rmation. We may edit submissions for style. Call 682-6524 or email news@crestviewbulletin.com for more information.On May 28, 2018, Grady I. Cadenhead joined his pre-deceased wife of 57 years, Ruby Thorne Cadenhead; parents Reverend I.P. Cadenhead and Sidney Kilpatrick Cadenhead; sisters Gussie Nowling and Essie Mae Mason in heaven. Grady is survived by his sons Barth Lyn Cadenhead and wife Diane and Mark Cadenhead. 6 grandchildren, 18 great grandchildren, and 9 great-great grandchildren survive him. His sisters also survive: Esther Raybon, Beulah McCallum and Magdalene Barrow and her husband Dewie, along with many caring and devoted nieces and nephews. Grady served his country in the Army during World War II. He retired from a career of working for Centel Telephone Company, primarily in the surrounding Crestview area where he was a long-time resident. Grady celebrated his 100th birthday recently with several parties included his family, friends and church family. Over the years, he served his Lord in many capacities in his church including Sunday School director and Deacon. He was much loved by all who knew him. His many acts of kindness and charity toward the community will long be remembered though his years on earth have passed. The celebration of Gradys life was on Saturday, June 2, 2018, with burial to follow in the Liveoak Park Memorial Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family asks that you please feel free to donate to your favorite charity. Arrangements are entrusted to Whitehurst Powell Funeral Home in Crestview. Guest book and condolences are available online at www. whitehurstpowellfuneralhome.comGRADY CADENHEAD1918 2018Wallace ŽWallyŽ Barion Cobb, age 76, of Shalimar, Florida, passed away on Monday, May 28, 2018. He was born in 1941 to the late Willie and Geraldine Cobb. He was preceded in death by his parents. Wallace retired as a Tech Sgt. after serving 25 years in the United States Air Force. After retirement he worked in the Civil Service for another 25 years and retired from there as well. Wallace enjoyed fishing so much that he was even doing that when his children were born. Every morning and afternoons he enjoyed meeting his buddies at the Waffle House in Shalimar for the daily conversations of the latest events. Wallace leaves many cherished memories to his loving wife of 57 years, Mary Kathryn Cobb; children David Cobb and Terri Cobb; grandchildren Hunter Cobb, Matthew Cobb and Crystal Perrin; great-grandchildren Zoe Perrin and Jameson McGlaughn; as well as many close friends and relatives. Expression of love and sympathy may be placed and viewed at www.emeraldcoastfuneralhome.com.WALLACE WALLY BARION COBB1941 2018Kenneth Dale Deulley, age 90 of Navarre, FL, passed away on Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in an assisted living facility. He was born on July 7, 1927, in Brownsville, PA, to Hubert Ray and Grace Mildred Deulley. Kenneth honorably served his country in both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force, from which he retired after 27 years of service. Following his retirement, he was a teacher at the Vocational Technical Institute. He was a member of the Masons and during his leisure time enjoyed sailing and camping. He was preceded in death by his parents, and a sister Lois Rae Roese and step-mother Henrietta Deulley. He is survived by his loving wife Vilma Deulley of 71 years marriage; two sons, Cliff (Margaret) Deulley of Navarre, FL, and Gary (Pam) Deulley of Lone Tree, CO,; three grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Funeral Services will follow at 4 p.m. Interment will be in Barrancas National Cemetery on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at 1 p.m. with full military honors. Expressions of love and sympathy may be viewed or submitted online at www.mclaughlinmortuary.comKENNETH DALE DEULLEY1927 -2018Martha Mae Tyler Ballard East, 82, of Shalimar, Florida, died Sunday, May 27, 2018 in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. Mrs. East was a native of Trafford, Alabama, and had resided in Niceville and Fort Walton Beach area since retiring with her husband, David Ballard, in 1973. She was member of First Baptist Church of Niceville. She was preceded in death by her first husband, David O. Ballard; grandson Richard Scott Hall; and second husband James C. East. Survivors include: siblings, Inez Tyler Greer, sister; John Edward Tyler, brother; sons, David Ballard, of Key West, Florida; Perry Ballard, of Rockledge, Florida; and daughter, Janet, of Orlando, Florida; and grandsons, Nicholas and Mitchell Hall, of Orlando. Funeral services will be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday, June 6 at First Baptist Church of Niceville with the Rev. Chuck Hartness officiating. The family will receive friends at the church one hour prior to the services. Her interment, alongside her husband David, will be at 12 noon Thursday June 7, 2018, at Barrancas National Cemetery in Pensacola, Florida, with Chaplain Timothy Hall officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations should be made to METAvivor. org, which is dedicated to the specific fight of women and men living with stage 4 metastatic breast cancer, or the International Mission Board (IMB), which partners with churches to empower limitless missionary teams who are evangelizing, planting, and multiplying healthy churches, and training leaders among unreached peoples and places for the glory of God at imb.org. Expressions of love and sympathy can be viewed or submitted online at www.mclaughlintwincitiesfuneralhome.comMARTHA MAE TYLER BALLARD EAST1935 2018Mrs. Mary Ella Farrington, age 91, passed away Saturday, May 26, 2018. She was born on February 2, 1927 in Florala, Alabama to James Anderson Knight and Sarah Jane Brown Knight. Mrs. Farrington was a resident of Freeport, Florida. She was Presbyterian by faith and a member of Freeport Presbyterian Church, where she was the longest living member and had recently been presented as an Honorary Life Member of Presbyterian Women in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A). She loved working with her husband on their shrimp and fishing boats. She was a loving mother and a wonderful homemaker. Mrs. Farrington was preceded in death by her father and mother; her son, David Eugene Farrington; and three brothers, George Knight, James Knight, and Donald Knight. Mrs. Farrington is survived by her loving husband of 70 years, David Farrington; a loving daughter-in-law, Elaine Farrington; and two grandchildren, Jeffrey Farrington and his wife Beth of Chesnee, South Carolina, and Jennifer F. Ziegler and husband Mike of Valparaiso, Florida; four greatgrandchildren; and one great-great grandchild, along with numerous nieces and nephews. Celebration of Life Services were held, Sunday, June 3, 2018 at Freeport Presbyterian Church, with Reverend Gene Harris officiating. Memorials may be made to Freeport Presbyterian Church. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www. clary-glenn.com. Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Homes & Crematory is entrusted with the arrangements.MARY ELLA FARRINGTON1927 2018James Vance Gibson, age 85, made his final journey in this life to go home to be with his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, Thursday morning, May 31, 2018 in Crestview, FL. He was born Oct. 18, 1932, in Hudson, North Carolina, by the late Alfred F. and Lena Estelle Gibson. He is preceded in death by his parents and his sister, Elaine Gibson. He is survived by his wife Jacquelyn Gibson; two brothers, Johnny Gibson and wife Gloria, and William Gibson and wife Barbara; sister Mary Jeanne (Gidget) DuMouchel and husband Michael; two sons, Gary Gibson and wife Christy, Bruce Gibson and wife Shannon; four step-children, Chris Chouinard and husband Mark, Mike Blasberg and wife Mary, Roni Edwards and husband Phil, and Ricky Blasberg and wife Mary Ann; 17 grandchildren; and 24 great-grandchildren. James was of the Baptist faith and served as deacon of Dorcas Baptist Church for over 25 years. He enjoyed singing in the churchs choir for many years. Preparing for the Christmas Cantata every year was one of the delights of his service to the church as well as serving others as Christ teaches us. James served his country as a navigator in the U.S. Air Force and retired after 22 years of service from the 1st Special Operations Wing with a rank of major from Hurlburt Field, FL, on Feb. 29, 1976. He served in Vietnam during his career in the military. James was highly decorated for his service in the U.S. Air Force including: Air Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal, Army and Air Force Good Conduct Medals, Outstanding Unit Award, National Defense Medal, Air Force Reserve Medal, Vietnam Service Medals (1961, 1962, 1968, and 1970), Longevity Service Award Ribbon for 22 years and 8 months of service, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Small Arms Expert Ribbon, and the Vietnam Campaign Metal. Following his career in the military, James and partner Harvey Hallman owned a successful business named the Destin Fishin Hole in Destin, FL, for about 20 years. James always loved hearing the stories from the fishermen after a day out on the water. Family and friends will miss his warm smile and his stories of his life. James was pure in spirit and will always be remembered as one of the kindest, most thoughtful, goly men that has ever walked on this earth. The celebration of James life was held on Monday, June 4, 2018, at Dorcas Baptist Church with burial to follow in the Dorcas Baptist Church Cemetery. A time of visitation with the family will begin at 10 a.m. Arrangements are entrusted to Whitehurst Powell Funeral Home in Crestview. Guest book and condolences are available online at www. whitehurstpowellfuneralhome.comJAMES VANCE GIBSON1932 2018Guy Irving Macey, 81, of Fort Walton Beach, FL, died Thursday, May 17, 2018, due to respiratory failure while receiving treatment at the Fort Walton Beach Medical Center. He was born in Middlesex, VT, on June 29, 1936, to Irving and Ruth (Boyce) Macey. He was preceded in death by his first wife Nancy (Brunelle) Macey in 2006. Guy retired to Fort Walton Beach in 1983 upon his separation from military service. Guy was a 30-year veteran of the armed forces, having served in both the U.S. Army and the U.S. Air Force, and was stationed in locations all over the world. He retired from the Air Force on Nov. 1, 1983, at the rank of Chief Master Sergeant. While in the Air Force, Guy served three combat tours in Vietnam as a member of the 18th Special Operations Squadron (Stingers) as a Crew Chief on board the AC-119 Gunships. While in military service, Guy received numerous awards and decorations to include The Distinguished Flying Cross, The Bronze Star, (8) Air Medals and The Air Force Commendation Medal. Guy was a lifetime member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Disabled American Veterans, Air Force Association, Non-Commissioned Officers Association, AC-119 Gunship Association and a 30-year member of The American Legion. Guy is survived by his current wife Sandy (Reisen) Macey, who he married on October 08, 2014; two children, Cindy (Macey) Marvicsin GUY IRVING MACEY, CMSGT, USA/ USAF (RET.)1936 2018 See MACEY, A3

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 A3James Edward Mahan Sr., passed away peacefully on Sunday May 20th, 2018. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Lucille. Three children James Mahan Jr., Steven and Laura Mahan, Mary and Kenny Peirson. Three grandchildren Emily, Robert, and Rebecca. He was an active and long-time resident of Freeport Florida. As an honorable member of the Navy and retiree of Lakehurst Naval Air Engineering Center, interment was held at Barrancas National Cemetery on Monday June 4th.JAMES EDWARD MAHAN SR.Margaret PeggyŽ Grove Sedlecky, born Jan. 13, 1924, passed away peacefully at her home in Fort Walton Beach surrounded by her loving family on May 27, 2018. Her strong spirituality and loving concern for each member of her family will be deeply missed. Margaret is survived by her husband and childhood sweetheart from the age of 10, Alexander F. Sedlecky; five children, Maureen Nation (Fred) of Daphne, AL, Brian (Margaret) of Bay Minette, AL, Alexander (Karen) of Mobile, AL, Daniel (Leiah) of Cumming, GA, and Valerie Snyder (Paul) of Navarre, FL; 10 grandchildren, Nicole Clements (Matthew), Nathan Packard (Jess), Jeremy Snyder (Rowena), Rachel Hansen (John), Stephanie Sedlecky (Russell Gwin), Sara Griffin (Brandon), Laura Cedillo (Joey), Gregory Sedlecky, Michelle Snyder and Michael Snyder; 15 greatgrandchildren, Samuel, Noah and Gabriel Clements, Kaleigh Packard, Nikolas and Roman Snyder, Kaylis Gavin and Hayley Hansen, Ashlyn Sedlecky, Kaia, Chloe, and Dylan Griffin, and Julian and Audrey Cedillo; and daughterin-law Teresa Packard of Groveport, OH. Margaret was preceded in death by her parents, Parker A. and Ann Margaret Kielty Grove; brothers, Jack, James, William and Charles Grove; sisters, Betty Steimle and Mary Petterson; son, Robert Packard; two grandsons, Shane Sedlecky and Daniel Snyder; and great-grandson, Benjamin Clements. Margaret was proud of her Irish heritage, receiving Irish citizenship by grandparent derivation. During WWII, Margaret was not, as she insisted, Rosy the Riveter,Ž but Peggy the Machinist.Ž She machined high tolerance industrial items such as B-29 aircraft parts, which coincidentally her sweetheart and future husband, Alex, flew during the last period of the war. Margarets family wishes to thank the staff of Emerald Coast Hospice for their loving and professional care. A private celebration of life service will be held at a future date. Interment will be in Beal Memorial Cemetery, Fort Walton Beach, FL. In lieu of flowers, please donate to your selected charitable cause. Professional services are entrusted to Davis-Watkins Funeral Home. To share memories, express condolences, order flowers and sign the online guestbook, please visit www. daviswatkins.com.MARGARET PEGGY GROVE SEDLECKY1924 2018David Tucker 40, of Niceville, FL passed away unexpectedly on Thursday, May 17th, 2018 the memorial service to celebrate his life was held 10 a.m. Monday, June 4th ,2018 at Heritage Gardens in Niceville. David known as Tuck or D-tuck by many was born in Okinawa, Japan to Dwight Tucker and Paoyu Holloway on April 11, 1978. He moved to Niceville during high school where he played football, which was one of his favorite things, along with Dragon Ball Z, but loved his sons the most. David was full of energy and enjoyed life to the fullest. He had a smile and laugh that caught everyone's attention. He was a playful, headstrong, and hardworking man that always took a stand for himself and his family. He was a loyal friend through and through with the strength of a warrior who never backed down from a challenge. You are loved by many and will be missed. He is survived by his sons Desmond Tucker and Demetrius Duke, father Dwight Tucker, mother Paoyu Holloway, and brothers Dwight L. Tucker, Darryl Tucker, and Tony Manson.DAVID TUCKER1978 2018Nancy Williams age 69 of Crestview passed away on May 26, 2018. She was born in Middletown, OH on July 8, 1948, to Mary and Frank Howard. She has lived in Crestview for 3years. Nancy was a member of LifePoint Church. She loved to garden, to sew and talk. Nancy loved music especially playing the piano and singing. She enjoyed traveling and loved the water. But most of all Nancy loved her grandchildren and loved her Lord. Survivors include her mother Mary Howard, sons: Kevin and Frank Kirk; daughters: Angela McGinnis and Sonya Griffin. Brothers: Terry and Eddie Howard and sisters: Sherry Thompson and Peggy Darby. 15 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren also survive. The celebration of Nancy s life was on Sunday, June 3, 2018, LifePoint Church in Crestview with burial to follow in the Liveoak Park Memorial Cemetery. Arrangements are entrusted to Whitehurst Powell Funeral Home in Crestview. Guest book and condolences are available online at www.whitehurstpowellfuneralhome.comNANCY LOU WILLIAMS1948 2018and Randy Macey; and four stepchildren Robert (Deb) Reisen, Richard (Jennette) Reisen, Keith (Sue) Reisen and Chad (Marissa) Reisen; 16 grandchildren; and 5 great grandsons. In lieu of flowers, Guy has requested donations be made to Save Our Cats and Kittens (SOCKS) Shelter in Fort Walton Beach, FL. Family and friends are invited to attend the graveside service being held on June 8th at 11:30 a.m. at Barrancas National Cemetery on Pensacola Naval Air Station. Following the graveside service, a Celebration of Life reception will be held at the Fort Walton Beach VFW on Carol Avenue from 3…5 p.m. The Macey Family would like to invite anyone wanting to share a memory of Guy or wishing to express condolences to the family, to visit www.mclaughlinmortuary. com and leave a message on Guys tribute page. MACEYFrom Page A2 OBITUARIES

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** A4 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin By News Bulletin contributorCRESTVIEW „ U.S. Army soldierJonathan McDougald has achieved distinguished honors recognition in military training.He studied to become a multichannel transmission system operator and main-tainer during Advanced Intensive Training at Fort Gordon, Georgia this year. He graduated May23 and earned the Army Achievement Medal for distinguished honors graduate with a 100 per-cent averageThe 2007 Crestview High School graduate served three years in the National Guard, joining the army full time in December 2017.His first duty station is Fort Carson, Colorado Springs, Colorado.McDougald graduates U.S. Army with honorsBarbara Harrison, right, of the Sand Dunes Chapter of the Embroiderers Guild of America, presents a welcome sampler to Lorraine Karagiannes and her granddaughter, Sariya, at the dedication of their new Habitat for Humanity home in May in Crestview. EGA member Kimberly Mortimer stitched the sampler, and EGA member Cynthia Hardesty framed it. Members meet from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. fourth Sundays at The Holy Name of Jesus Catholic church in Niceville. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN] Embroidery group donates sampler to Habitat for Humanity homeowners HOMETOWN HEROES For more news go to crestviewbulletin.com

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 A5 By Press Gazette contributorNAVARRE „ The Trauma Intervention Program of Northwest Florida, a national nonprofit organization, recently hired Martina M. Sternberg, Ph.D., and retired Air Force as the Crisis Team Manager.Martina shared that working with TIP is her pas-sion.She shared a personal story that speaks to the importance of TIP.Sternberg said she remem-bersthe call she received from a police officer telling her that her son died in a car accident. She was over an hour from home with her mother who was in the late stages of Alzheimers disease, and she had her one-year-old grandson with her.When the police officer called Sternberg at the eye doctors office where she was with her mom and grandson, she looked around and there she was in a room full of people and she was all alone.She couldnt cry or break down and feel her pain because she had to care for her mom and grandson. There was no one there to help her, to understand, to be there with her so she wasnt all alone in the worst pain she had ever felt.This is what TIP does. Trained TIP volunteers pro-vide comfort, support and resources.TIP of Northwest Florida works with local public safety officials in Santa Rosa and Escambia Counties to provide emotional and practical support of citizens experiencing trauma 365 days per year, 24 hours a day. A TIP Chapter is a group of very well trained community volunteers who emergency personnel call to tragic scenes to provide sup-port to those who have been affected."Residents of this community who have just experienced a tragedy should not be alone in what may be the worst few hours of their lives,"TIP founder Wayne Fortin said. "Our volunteers provide support until the survivors' family members and friends are able to."TIP of Northwest Florida will hold a training academy beginning on August 16 … 26 at St. Sylvesters in Navarre for citizens want-ing to join this elite group of compassionate citizens. The academy is a 10-day training comprised of national train-ers and outside speakers who ensure that the citizens are ready to respond to scenes of tragedy.There is no experience required. However, recruits must be at least 16 years old, pass a background investigation, have a clean driving record and be flexible and willing to respond anywhere in Escambia or Santa Rosa Counties. Visithttps://tipofnwflor-ida.org or call (765) 977-2181 for complete details.Trauma Intervention Program Northwest Florida program hires new manager, o ers trainingThe Trauma Intervention Program (TIP) of Northwest Florida recently hired Martina M. Sternberg, Ph.D., and retired Air Force as the Crisis Team Manager. [SPECIAL TO THE PRESS GAZETTE]

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** A6 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin OPINION Address: 638 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536 Online: crestviewbulletin.com Publisher Jim Fletcher ...........................j” etcher@crestviewbulletin.com Executive Editor Jason Blakeney .............jblakeney@nwfdailynews.com Editor Aaron Little ...........................................alittle@srpressgazette.com Editorial Assistant Renee Bell ....................news@crestviewbulletin.com Reporter Aaron Jacobs .......................... ajacobs@crestviewbulletin.com Legals Barbara Dale ....................................bdale@crestviewbulletin.com Circulation Assistant Dale Robinson ......drobinson@crestviewbulletin.com Media Consultant Sherrie Stanley .......sherries@crestviewbulletin.com CONTACT US Call 682-6524 to report news, subscribe or learn about our classi“ ed and display advertising options. The Crestview News Bulletin is published each Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media Group, at 638 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL32536. Periodical postage paid at Crestview, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 638 N. Ferson Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536. USPS 010-209 All material is property of the Crestview News Bulletin. SUBSCRIPTION RATES In County 13 weeks ................................$9.45 26 weeks ..............................$17.85 52 weeks ..............................$32.76 Out of county 13 weeks ..............................$14.70 26 weeks ..............................$23.10 52 weeks ..............................$38.01 Delivery subscriptions may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. NEWS BULLETIN ADVERTISING Ask your advertising representative about our Color by the Inch program and Customer Appreciation sale by calling 850-682-6524. ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS TO THE EDITORWe welcome letters to the editor. Letters must be typed and may be edited for content or to “ t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for veri“ cation, if necessary. Send letters to news@srpressgazette.com or mail them to 6576 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570. Dear editor, Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. If no use is made of the labors of past ages, the world must remain always in the infancy of knowledge.Ž Cicero was a Roman senator in 10 b.c. over 2,000 years ago. Paraphrasing his comment, Those who do not know history are children.Ž To some extent we have all forgotten prominent issues and events of our distant past. Many take little effort in remembering major events and most give little effort and energy remembering crucial details of their past. Whether by design, demand or laziness, we tend to short change our community history, overlook governmental history and many times dismiss our own family history. We remain overwhelmed by demanding current activities, chores and commitments while failing to realize the value of what has happened in our past. We busy our days with demanding issues and approach the future with corrections, diversions and paradoxes as we follow our loves and demands like deer caught in headlights. Unable to see beyond the blinding dilemmas in our path, we divert, shun and fear the past and future like bad dreams. One factor of life, which we cannot change, is the past, both personal, community and world history. Most carry their history like old cloth rags. They are handy for cleaning up messes, but they have negligible use for current and future needs. What was once a fine shirt, pretty dress or snow-white cotton socks become a tool to mop up dirt, grime, grease and spills on the way to the garbage. But then writes a man, a senator of the Roman government, over 2,000 years ago, to remind us that history is indeed not just important but paramount. He further expands his conclusion to proclaim if anyone knows not history, they are a child. One trade explains this clearly, the construction industry. The Egyptian pyramids still stand today. Any engineer today worth his salt would have no problem using the same concepts, principles and methods of engineering to build todays structures. Materials have changed, and tools are different but mathematical calculations of structural engineering remain the same. Everything is or will soon be history. To learn of yesterday is to create, design and construct foundations for today. Lessons proven and tried in the past are paramount principles of modern day designs. There is no more insightful, endearing, comforting and tangible paradigm than to realize and know our own history. To realize, we stand where someone else stood having the same thoughts and some of the same ideas that are crossing our minds. How enriching and comforting to embrace their knowledge, their challenge, their drive, their determination, while embracing our own unique desires and dreams. The more we look back to history, the more we realize and understand our future. Historical principles and concepts confirm lasting foundational evidence for tomorrow. The future becomes clearer and more satisfying because of the enormity of our rear-view mirror.Michael Johnson BagdadTrump … Americas Hired Gun Dear editor, In the old west, a town sometimes might hire a gunslinger to clean up their town, when they hadnt done it for themselves. When the town was cleaned up, most of the townsfolk hoped the gunslinger would move on. (i.e. not take up residence in their town). I think Donald J. Trump has a very similar assignment … hes been hired to clean up Washington because the currently elected Washingtonians have not cleaned it up for all of us as yet, and then, if and when hes done, then Trump should move on. The majority of voters didnt want him to go to Washington in the first place, but the system allowed him in, so lets clean it up, Donald, and get out of town. Next election, lets have the majority of us shoot to elect a truer Christian leader rather than the lesser of two evils. Now, under his reign so far, he has become king of the obsessive tweet, master of denigrating other peoples characters (similar to the pre-election campaign of his 16 opponents), and has American Democracy reeling about the value of the first amendment of free speech by attacking the American media, and the value of the American justice system, by defaming the FBI and the intelligence agencies. Now hey, thats a successful hired gun. But, is that the agenda that needs cleaning up? He rightly identified Bob Muellers efforts as a witch hunt. He just misspelled the word. Its really a WHICH hunt, or figuring out WHICH of Trumps hires or appointees or associates are criminals and likely to be getting jail terms. I eagerly await Mr. Muellers final list. Currently, 19 indictments and 5 convictions. Oh sure, Trump will pardon them all including himself before he leaves town. But, wow, what a hired gun. Im also still hoping that the summit with North Korea happens on June 14 instead of June 12. Why? Well, thats Trumps birthday and he can c laim all successes are an appropriate wonderful birthday present from Kim Jung Un to him. Nice touch.Jim Moore PaceLETTER TO THE EDITORHere are featured comments from our Speak Out hotline. ARREST REPORTS Yes, this is Joe. I was just wondering what happened to the arrest report in the Press Gazette. I was just wondering if you guys dropped that section there. Thank you very much. Editor's note: We have indeed dropped the arrest report. We dont think its ethical. No one has been convicted, and the crimes the people are being booked on tend not to rise to the level of deserving being added in the paper. We will still cover significant arrests and other law enforcement stories. We welcome Santa Rosa County residents comments on local issues. Call 623-5887 to Speak Out.Ž Share your thoughts and your comment could appear in the print edition and on srpgressgazette.com. Say whats on your mind, but please be civil.SPEAK OUT"Regrets ... I've had a few ... But then again ... too few to mention." "My Way," as performed by Frank SinatraIf you could go back to a pivotal age in your life, say 16 years old, and start over again, would you choose to do it? Think about all the things we could choose to do differently. We could relive our lives and never say a bad word about anyone. We could do more listening and less talking. We could choose this career and discard that one. We could travel, learn to speak another language, take better care of our health. We could be better, smarter people. My husband and I fell into this conversation during a recent holiday respite. While both of us wish we could have avoided some mistakes and missteps and make better use of our time, neither of us said "Yes, I'd like to go back and relive most of my life." My guess is that most, but not all, people would make the same choice if granted the option of starting over. Maybe we're happy with the way things turned out. Maybe we're just tired and can't envision pushing the rock up the hill again for decades. Maybe we feel like we've faced life's most difficult challenges, like childbirth and raising small children, or growing a business from the ground up, and we don't want to return to the starting line. Maybe, though, we realize that even if granted another chance, we'd probably make mistakes in our second life, too. The same is true of our financial history. We all experience mishaps with money. How much better off would we be financially if we could go back 50 years and do things differently? We'd save more, wouldn't we? We'd start investing at an earlier age. We'd spend less on useless items and eschew unnecessarily expensive purchases. Maybe we'd make an investment that scared us off at the time; maybe we'd avoid one that didn't turn out as well as we had hoped. Managing our money is a lot like managing our personal lives. We've all made mistakes. We all need to forgive ourselves. And we all need to realize that it's never too late to turn things around. Winning the lottery or scoring big at a casino isn't the answer. It's not too likely, anyway. What most of us need to do is simply attempt to live within our means, to save and invest as much of our income as we can, and to keep our investments in the black each year. Some years we'll earn more than others, but we just need to move in the right direction over time. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, author of the syndicated economic column "Arbor Outlook," is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121 „ www.arborwealth. net), a fee-onlyŽ registered investment advisory firm located near Sandestin.ARBOR OUTLOOKFinancial forgiveness, do overs and SinatraHistory expands our lives Margaret McDowell

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 A7 By News Bulletin staffCRESTVIEW „ Here are highlights involving area students: John Dent of Crestview graduated with Master of Science degree in Information Management Project Man-agement from Grantham University, a 100 per-centonline university.Troy University released the names of chancellors list students. They are full-time undergraduate students who are registered for at least 12 semester hours and who earn a grade point average of 4.0 to qualify. Local residents who made the list are Mary Champion, Taylor Martin, Haley Parnell, and Lenny Holloway, allof Crestview; Leah Carter of Holt; and Jennifer Robinson of Laurel Hill. Troy Universitys provost list students are full-time undergraduate students who are registered for at least 12 semester hours and who have a grade point average of at least 3.65. Local residents who made the list are Philip Barksdale of Baker; and Sarah Giacometti, Lexus Ivy, Laken Johnson, and John Cuthriell, allof Crestview. Local Term 4 graduates at Troy University are Manuel Camacho of Crestview, who graduated with aMaster of Science in Criminal Justice; andMatthew Jones of Crest-view, who graduated with a Bachelor of Science.Term 4 graduates include students at TROYs cam-puses in Dothan, Phenix City and Montgomery, Ala., along with teaching sites outside of Alabama and online.CAMPUS KUDOSNorth Okaloosa students recognized[PIXABAY.COM] By Aaron Little Santa Rosa Press GazetteNICEVILLE „ Students in the Dental Assisting Program at Northwest Florida State College are now accepting appointments for free dental X-rays.If you need dental X-rays, please obtain a written request (prescription) from your dentist. Save time and have your dentist fax the prescription to the Dental Assisting Clinic at 850-729-6460.If you do not have access to a dentists office, NWF faculty member Dr. Elvira Chiccarelli can write a pre-scription for your X-rays for you on site.To schedule an appoint-ment or for more information, call the NWF Dental Assist-ing Clinic at 850-729-6480. Appointments are available 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 4 to 21.NWF State College o ering free dental x-rays[PIXABAY.COM] By News Bulletin contributorVALPARAISO „ The Heritage Museum of North-west Florida will hold KIDS Summer SagasŽ one Saturday a month on June 9, July 14 and August 4, 10:30am … 12:00pm. KIDS Summer SagasŽ is a public program for ages 5-14, designed to spark the minds of young people and provide children with a fun hands-on learning experience.The Bees Waggle DanceŽ, 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, is all about bees communication.Local beekeeper, Edward Crosby will teach kids all about the honey bee by showing his live bee hive, identifying the parts of the hive and talking about the tasks of a beekeeper.Chil-dren will identify the queen, done and the worker bees, but most importantly how, when, and why bees do the waggle dance.The cost is $10 per child, $8 per museum family member.Space is limited so call to make reservations at 678-2615. Mastercard and Visa are acceptable.The Heritage Museum of Northwest Florida is located at115 Westview Avenue in Valparaiso. Call 678-2615 or visit www.heritage-museum.orgfor more information.Heritage museum presents The Bees Waggle DanceBy Melissa Erickson More Content NowA backyard playset is more than just a combina-tion of slides and swings. It offers a treasure trove of benefits to a childs physi-cal, social and cognitive health for life.Parents who want to eliminate the danger from the play environment should realize that a level of risk can help spark creativity, challenge and discovery, said Bambi Yost, associate professor of landscape architecture at Iowa State University.While injury should be minimized, a play area should allow kids to challenge themselves and discover their own abili-ties and limits,Ž said Yost, who grew up in the middle of nowhere without a play-ground nearby. Instead, she climbed trees, ran up hills and explored caves.The benefits of play are wide-ranging. For example, children who are allowed to run fullthrottleŽ tend to be more physically active and have lower obesity rates, Yost said.Risk-taking may be asso-ciated with improvements in learning gross motor skills, which could reduce the potential for future injury. When children learn balance and proprio-ception (an awareness of ones body moving through physical space) at an early age, they tend to be more secure on their feet later in life, she said.Theres a lot of benefit in trying something youve never done. It will fire new neurons and help instill a greater sense of self-assurance. If you fail once, you might succeed the next time,Ž she said. Being able to move bars higher or far-ther apart empowers kids to challenge themselves gradually and gain confidence. If they dont test their abilities and limits sooner, they will when theyre older, and the risk of injury is greater.Ž What to considerWhen choosing a playset parents need to first consider their level of supervision, Yost said. Will they be outside watching kids play or sending them out on their own?Secondly, make sure there is an adequate and safe fall zone,Ž Yost said. Falling is a part of play, as is learning how to do things like safely jumping off a swing in motion.Watch out for chain link on swings, which can catch and break a finger, Yost said. Most swing chains are covered in PVC or rub-berized coatings. If not, you can do it yourself with a plastic guard or garden hose, Yost said.When locating a play zone, you need an area that is flat, away from objects that might (even over time) be obstacles or become obstacles or impediments to swings, slides, etc. Area should be prepared to be a soft landing area with mulch or another material ... under the playset,Ž said Geoff Case, Home Depot merchant for playsets and landscape. Safety mats like the kind used in gyms are also easily available, Yost said. Whats trendingThe goal of a playset is about getting the kids outside, Case said. The trend continues toward building a playset that is expandable.Start small and add features and products „ additional swings, slide and climbing features „ each year to keep the play area new and exciting,Ž Case said. Web swings have been the best-selling new addition for playsets for the past couple of years, he said. Safer designThe No. 1 cause of injuries is falls, and slides are often the culprit, Yost said. A closed slide with a tunnel or spiral feature can be higher „ and safer „ than an open slide.It can provide the thrill and adrenaline rush but still be safer than an open slide,Ž Yost said.If installing a zipline, add in a braking system or posi-tion so it ends going uphill with a gradual slow down so that a rider can get off sooner rather than later,Ž Yost said.Backyard playsets: Where to start[SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN] By News Bulletin staffCRESTVIEW „ A freeOka-loosa County forum will give school board candidates and Okaloosa County voters an opportunity to hear candidates discuss the issues important to them during the upcoming election.Doors open at 5:30 p.m. June 12 atAmerican Legion Post 75, 898 E. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. The forum is 6:30-8:30 p.m. The post will serve a spaghetti dinner at 6 p.m. with salad, breadsticks and dessert for $8 per person.The candidates will answer questions writtenand submitted by the public from a moderator. The forum will follow the nonpartisan, impartial format the Shoal River Republican Club established.Local forum to feature school board candidates

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** A8 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | Crestview News BulletinAutomotive in Crestview.When asked how he felt about MSA being considered for such a shoot, co-owner Jason O'Daniels said, "It made me raise my eyebrows until it was explained to me that it's not necessarily an ugly establishment, but just something that's not your usual photo shoot loca-tion. I was fine with that."The family owned, veteran-operated shop opened specifically for the shoot, the first one in the whole 25 years O'Daniels has worked there.They didn't have to do anything in particular to prepare the space, O'Daniels said."They told me to leave it the way we usually have it. You know at the end of the day we clean up any-ways, to a point," he said with a laugh."We are an auto shop, and we just made sure that it was safe and nothing for tripping hazards, and made sure that they had what they need, which wasn't much of nothing except opening doors."And what did model Cerisa Collazo think of the ugly shoot process?"It's lots of fun. I enjoyed every bit of it," she said. SHOOTFrom Page A1Photographer Jennifer Garcia takes a photo of model Cerisa Collazo June 3 at Main Street Automotive in Crestview. [RENEE BELL | NEWS BULLETIN] Model Cerisa Collazo is pictured June 3 at Main Street Automotive in Crestview. [JENNIFER G PHOTOGRAPHY | SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN]Cerisa Collazo sits behind the wheel of a car June 3 in Crestview. [JENNIFER G PHOTOGRAPHY | SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN]

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 A9we began with lingerie fabric, added t-shirt kits, moved to more fashion fabrics for garment and evening/wedding wear. Now we are focused on quilting fabrics and embroidery," Hudson said. "I hope that I can keep Margie's Sew Much Fun going for several more decades using the principles she has taught me."The store has gone through several expansions and a name change to Margie's Sew Much Fun to encompass the variety of classes and products available. Customers take quilting, embroidery and individualproject classes. There are also classes that teach sewing techniques and how to use specialty fabricssuch as Kraft-Tex „ made from leather„ andmaterial from corks. A family a airGreene said she's had too many students through the years to count."We have grandchildren of people she taught how to sew taking classes," Hudson said."In the summer, we're fixing to have our varsity and junior varsity kids' camp classes, and a lot of these kids that come are children of people that we taught. Even greatgrandchildren," Greene said.With Hudson, the apple doesn't fall far from the tree."I worked in the busi-ness from the time I could stand up and cut fabric," Hudson said.She and her mother would make Bulldog cheerleader uniforms in the summer. Hudson said she also made her own clothes since store-bought clothesrarely fit her."I made nearly everything I wore to school," Hudson said, "and what's really funny about that story is I thought my peers knew how poor I was because I made all my clothes. I'd come in wanting a new outfit for the dance or something tonight, and I'd make me something real quick ... All that time I was in school I thought my peers all looked down on me," she said.A few years ago, she spoke to one of her fellow classmates, she said,who told her that her peers thought she'd actually gone to Birmingham and Atlanta and bought all her clothes.Even when Hudson was in kindergarten, her mom said, customers would give Margie the left over fabric from their dresses to make clothes for her daughter. She also would barter with her motherin-law for feed sack material."She wore a lot of feed sack dresses ƒ to get one of Mrs. Greene's (her mother-in-law) feed sacks I had to agree to make her something out of feed sack so I could get one for Tammi," Greene said.Hudson graduated from Crestview High School, went to college for a year, and after that began working forthe distributor who introduced her mother to the Bernina sewing machine, Derrel Slaughter. She was a Bernina district manager until 1994.The Bernina connectionSlaughter owned a company called Derrel's Sewing Center in Pensac-ola, with four franchises, and was a southeastern U.S. distributor for Bernina machines and supplies.He contacted Margie one Sunday to show her a Bernina and see if she would sell them to her customers. Greene said the buttonhole and blind hem features she tried that day were what sold her on the brand."I've been sewing on a Bernina ever since," she said.The staff of 10at Margie's providesin-person, in-depthinstruction for every machine they carry, whether Bernina or Janome, quilting, sewing or embroidery-related. Customers ideally leave the store knowing exactly how to use their new purchase.Hudson said one customer looking at a 16-needle embroidery machine asked her, "What do I get with this machine?""I looked at her and I said, 'The most important thing you get with this machine is me,' and she said, 'Sold.' ... She didn't need to know anything else, because she'd already done all the research. And I didn't know it but she'd been somewhere else and asked the same question and got the wrong answer."The other business had given her the option of home delivery andteach-ing herself fromonline videos, according to Hudson.When Hudsoncame back to Margie's, her dadwas the store'stech-nician and repair person. She has fond memories of working with him on customer's machine repairs. Shehadvolunteered to attendall the training classes for the new machines Bernina released in 2008."When we had those kind of machines come in, I would do that service and my dad would kind of work with me, and when he had older machines, I would work with him on those. He passed in 2014, so now I have to do all of them," she said.Greene, 74,and Hudson became partners in 2016 to address the continuity of the business.Greene recognizes that she's not going to be here forever, "but I can't imag-ine doing anything else, so I guess I'll just be doing this," she said. MARGIEFrom Page A1Tammi Hudson arranges some thread on a rack at Margies Sew Much Fun May 25 in Crestview. [RENEE BELL PHOTOS | NEWS BULLETIN] Margie Greene talks about a cat-and-mouse-themed quilt one of their former class teachers made for her in 2012. I wanted it really bad and she knew I wasnt going to get it done in time, so she took it home and made it for me,Ž Greene said. The create banner is the project for an embroidery class at Margies Sew Much Fun in Crestview.

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** A10 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 B1 LIFESTYLEBy Tony Judnich 315-4438 | @Tonyjnwfdn tjudnich@nwfdailynews.comBAKER „ Featuring two brick chimneys and a wealth of history, the Dallas Peaden House stands about halfway between Baker and Laurel Hill and along Old River Road, which winds through red clay lands and under tree canopies just west of the Yellow River.The two-story house at 7378 Old River Road was built in 1895. Thats according to the Baker Block Museums copy of the 2004 book, "The Heritage of Okaloosa County, Florida."Museum Director Ann Spann said she thinks the wood-frame structure is the oldest house in the county.I think so, but I cant prove that,Ž she said recently. Its one of the oldest, thats for sure.ŽA March 2017 Daily News story on historic homes lists nine houses in Okaloosa County that were each built in 1900: two of the houses are in Baker, two are in Niceville and five are in Laurel Hill.Like the Peaden house, each of those structures is older than Okaloosa County, which was formed from parts of Santa Rosa and Walton counties in 1915.Today, thick tree cover makes it difficult to see the front of the Peaden house, which the heritage book describes as one of Okaloosa Countys oldest and finest architectural examples of its time.ŽJeff Adams, who owns the apparently unoccupied house but lives elsewhere in the Baker area, could not be reached for comment about his plans for the structure.According to the heritage book, Jackson Peaden in 1885 homesteaded the family property and built a home just south of the Oak Grove settlement, which was located on the upper course of the Yellow River.The Peadens were described as industrious farmers who occupied choice agricultural lands, with cotton and corn as their principal crops,Ž according to the book.It states that Jackson Peadens sons, Dallas, Bartlet and Jack, each built a home within a short distance of their father, in a spot that soon became known as Peadentown. Other historical records refer to the area as Peaden.Like dozens of other now long-gone settlements in the region, Peadentown likely was more of a community than a town, Spann said.According to the heritage book, lumber used in construction of the Dallas Peaden House was shipped to Milligan by rail from the Bagdad Lumber Co. at a cost of $12 per 1,000 board feet,Ž and Dallas then loaded the lumber on a two-mule wagon and traveled 12 miles north along the Yellow River to his home site.ŽBesides farming, the Peaden brothers worked in logging and sheep herding, according to the book. It also shares that Mabel Peaden, Dallas daugh-ter, was born in the house in 1901 and provided an oral his-tory about the home before her death in 1995.The brothers sheep herd reached 8,000-plus head at its height, according to Mabel, who recalled how she and her sister rode on horses while helping tend the flock.Another aspect of Dallas life is highlighted just outside of the Baker Block Museum at the Jeanette and Charles Henderson Heritage Park. The group of historic buildings in the park includes the old Otahite Post Office, which was built in the early 1900s.Dallas served as the first postmaster for the post office, which used to stand in the Otahite community that has long since faded back into the Blackwater River State Forest, according to information at the museum.Baker resident Jeanette Henderson, who along with her late husband, Charles, founded the 22-year-old museum, remembers talking with Mabel about the house she grew up in.According to Mabel, the walkway to the upstairs bed-rooms had what looked like a place to sit, but was used by her papaŽ to hide moonshine from stragglers who once roamed the Yellow River area, Henderson said recently.In an August 1991 interview that was published in the 1992 Daily News book, Our Town,Ž Mabel recalled that a family of gangsters/bootleggers from the Florala, Alabama area would routinely terrorize residents of Peaden and Oak Grove in the years just prior to the Great Depression.In a separate interview, Mabel remembered even earlier times when many wealthy, prominent white people from the nearby Blackman community ran the areas then-booming turpen-tine industry.I was born in 1901 and I was a small child at that time,Ž she said in April 1990. But Mama sold eggs and butter and I can remember those fancy, high-falutin women would drive their horse-and-buggy out to our place four miles to buy dairy products from Mama. Oh, they looked grand!ŽROOTS OF OKALOOSA19th century house endures near Baker, Laurel HillThe north side of the Dallas Peaden House. [TONY JUDNICH PHOTOS/DAILY NEWS] A view of the section of Old River Road that runs past the Dallas Peaden House. Trees block most of the front view of the Dallas Peaden House.

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** B2 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin By News Bulletin contributorCRESTVIEW „ The Hub City Lakers boystravel basketball team won a basketball tournament in Lagrange,Georgia called the 2018 Georgia Hoop Festival. They beat the Bama Ballers in the championship game 43-42 the weekend of June 2. According to a Lakers coach, the team took the win "with two seconds on the clock down by one with a great pass from David Loggins III to Robert Cruise, who scored the bucket on the final play."Hub City Lakers boys team wins tournamentTake a hunter safety class this summer. Hunting teaches patience while fo stering one of the closest relationships we can have with the natural world around us,Ž said University of Florida rising sophomore Hanna Hodges. Hunting also contributes to conservation.Ž Hodges loves hunting for deer and turkeys with her family and boyfriend, and enjoys introducing new people to hunting and taking youth on their first hunting trips. However, that hasnt always been the case for Hodges. Hodges father signed her up for a week long Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission hunter safety camp at the Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center during the summer before her sixth-grade year. Growing up in a hunting family and attending hunter safety camp had such an effect on Hodges that she is now majoring in wildlife ecology and conservation and hopes one day to work in a field that blends hunting and conservation. And for this summer, she is proud to announce she will be a hunt camp counselor at the place where it all got started for her … the Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center. If you havent completed the states hunter safety course requirement, nows a good time to sign up. Many of these classes, offered statewide, fill up fast. People born after May 31, 1975, must complete the FWCs hunter safety class before they can buy the type of hunting license that allows them to legally hunt alone. If youre a youngster and already into hunting, I suggest you go ahead and take a hunter safety class before you turn 16. And you can purchase your very first hunting license thats good until your 17th birthday. Even if you were born before June 1, 1975, and are exempt from having to take the class, its still a good idea because yovull learn so much. The FWC encourages beginning hunters to do so. Even the most experienced hunters will learn something new, which will help them become even better hunters or mentors. If youre new to our state, these classes will make you aware of Floridas hunting laws. Or if you just relocated from another town, the classes are a great way to meet other hunters. You can make some new hunting buddies or maybe even get a line on a great hunt club thats looking for new members. You can register for a hunter safety class by going to MyFWC.com/ HunterSafety or by contacting your nearest FWC regional office. Virtual School Florida also offers a virtual school outdoor education course. This course, which combines hunting and boating safety, is free and open to Florida residents ages 12 to 18. Participants will develop outdoor skills and learn about the benefits of physical activity while using proper safety procedures to experience a range of outdoor activities. By meeting all the requirements of the Outdoor Education course, students will receive their Florida Boating Safety Education ID Card and be eligible to obtain a Florida Hunter Safety Certificate. Theyll also earn half a credit for high school, and meet public school requirements for taking an online course and a physical education course. Registrations for these instructor-led courses are limited. Those who are interested can find out more at MyFWC. com/HunterSafety. Online training and skills day A popular option for completing the hunter safety training is to take online training and a skills day. The online course is designed to help new hunters of all ages learn how to be safe and responsible hunters. Before you begin the online training, youll need to register to attend a skills day. Skills days are led by a corps of volunteer hunter safety instructors who give you the opportunity to demonstrate the skills you learned in the online course. Skills day takes about five hours to complete and includes time on the shooting range. In the last hour of the skills day, youll be given a standardized test of multiple-choice questions. You need to score 80 percent or higher to successfully complete the course. The last steps After you pass the test for either course, youll be given a temporary hunter safety card. Youll receive a permanent card in the mail about four to six weeks after the class. Once the hunter safety requirement is met, you can purchase your first Florida hunting license and be ready for opening day. Register to take a hunter safety class today, because the 2018-19 hunting season will be here before we know it. Remember, safe hunting is no accident. Tony Young is a Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission columnist.Outta the Woods: Take a hunter safety class this summerThe Hub City Lakers travel basketball team stands with their coaches. Pictured are Coach David Loggins, Kenya McRae, Tekee Tolbert, Robert Cruise, Adrian McRae, Elliott Davis, Tre Trotz, Damon Clark, David Loggins III, Cecil Perdue, Anthony Boyer, coach Morion James. Not pictured are Jayson Osborne, Marcus Belle and Alex Murry. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN] Tony Young

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 B3Schools out for the summer! So sang Alice Cooper a coons age ago, crowing an anti-establishmentarian anthem that even I, your friendly neighborhood librarian, occasionally get stuck in my head. And, lets be honest, even when we were young, summer vacation was a hallowed two months free from the confines and chains of our educational bondage. Well, let me throw in a few cents here: rest is necessary, fun is a blessing, but laziness is a curse. So how do you beat the heat while still keeping your kids mind active and readily honed for positive growth? Camp can be fun, the pool can be cool, and, of course, beach time! But hey, whats the beach without a beach book? Your local library is literally bursting with fun and educational things to do this summer. Celebrate Libraries Rock!ÂŽ with two summer reading programs, one for ages 6-11, one for middle and high school kids. And with summer reading comes prizzzzeeesss (read that in a TV infomercial voice for full effect.) But wait, theres more! A ukulele class, story classes, Lego Club, Chess Club, Teen Time: Gamers Edition, a Family Game Night, an Instrument Petting Zoo, and other activities are on the library's schedule. Adults may look for our volunteer-led clubs and classes on essential oils, financial investing, family history, crocheted mats for the homeless, and astronomy. We also have our monthly poetry open mic, trivia night, and Coffee & Craft. So, in conclusion, you could easily let your kids turn their brains into gelatinous blobs of sludge after binge watching Netflix 24/7, drooling polychromatic trails of sticky popsicle on your couch „or, hey, check out a book! Or a ton, and binge like its 1899. Your brain and your kids' brains will thank you. Emily Knie is the Crestview Public Library's CHECK IT OUTFun activities for kids and adults are part of the summer schedule E m i l y K n i e Emily KnieHow nice to get a new sit-down restaurant in town. I haven't had the opportunity to eat there, but hope to try out Vitaliano's Pizza in the near future. I would like to see more sit down restaurants open in Crestview, I look forward to Pepper's Mexican Restaurant opening this summer. It is great to see new fast food restaurants like ChickFil-A and Popeye's Chicken since they provide jobs for residents. The new hotel being built behind ChickFil-A will also provide jobs. Having jobs stimulates the economy as there is money to spend. We need to patronize our local businesses to encourage the business owners as well as benefit our local economy. There seems to be some dislike when a "chain" opens in town. I think we need a mix of chains and locally owned businesses. Both types provide jobs, pay taxes as well as deliver services. Many fast food and hotel chains are franchises, which means that a small business owner pays to use the corporate name and logo, but invests their own money. In many ways this is the best of both worlds, having a small business backed by a large corporation. Since it is not in the interest of large corporations to allow their franchise owners to fail, should there be problems, many times the corporation will help resolve them. McDonald's, Chick-Fil-A, Taco Bell and Best Western, as well as many others, know that in order for their franchises to be successful, employees and owners will need extensive training and on-going support. Therefore the corporation provides all the necessary tools to run a successful business. The requirements to franchise any business are stringent, as the parent company wants each franchise to succeed. In many cases, when you patronize a fast food restaurant, or hotel, you are patronizing a small business. Whatever the type of business model, we residents need to embrace the businesses in Crestview and thank them for being here. They make our lives easier, we don't have to leave our city to shop, eat, bank, rent a hotel room, see a doctor or dentist, buy a car and so forth. These businesses pay taxes, provide services and employment. Thank you businesses here in Crestview. I wish you continued success. Janice Lynn Crose, a former accountant, lives in Crestview with her husband, Jim; her two rescue collies, Shane and Jasmine; and two cats, Kathryn and Prince Valiant.HAPPENINGSLooking forward to the new local restaurants J a n i c e L y n n C r o s e Janice Lynn Crose LIFESTYLEMore American households are gardening now than ever before. That's just one of many findings in the National Gardening Survey from Garden Research, a private company that provides market research information for the lawn, garden and nursery industries. The 77 percent of households who reported doing something in the garden is the highest in 35 years of the national survey. Increasingly, today's gardener is a young man. More males 18 to 34 are flexing their green thumbs with lawn and garden activities — from 23 percent in 2016 to 27 percent in 2017. Gardening participation among younger households reached an all-time high in 2017, while the proportion of older gardeners (55 and older) held steady at 35 percent, the annual survey found. Younger gardeners do not spend as much money as their parents do on the activity, but they report being seriously engaged in more than simply houseplants and vegetables, said industry analyst Ian Baldwin, who participated in the survey. "From small beginnings with a succulent here and a houseplant there, the under35s are now truly engaged in the full range of gardening activities," Baldwin said. "Eighteento 34-year-olds now occupy 29 percent of all gardening households. It's a strong sign that they are finally 'in.'" Smaller-scale gardening Plant-loving millennials are also responsible for a big boom in the industry, especially embracing houseplants and container gardening. With a trend toward wellness and many millennials opting to rent rather than buy a home, houseplants and container gardens are affordable, entry-level ways to embrace gardening, Baldwin said. "More and more consumers are choosing not to dig holes in their leisure times. If they have the finances, they are investing in raised beds," Baldwin said. From the slightly exotic, easy-to-grow Chinese money plant to the traditionally popular fiddle leaf ficus, houseplants are back in a big way. People of all ages are integrating greenery into their homes and offices with plants of various shapes and sizes, Baldwin said. Overall, American gardeners reported spending a record $47.8 billion on lawn and garden retail sales, the highest ever, with a record average household spend of $503 ­— up nearly $100 over the previous year. This is the first year the survey included information on cannabis growing, and 33 million households (27 percent) said it should be legal to grow for personal use. Fifteen percent of households (19 million) said they would grow cannabis if it were legal to do so. The online survey used a representative sample of more than 2,000 U.S. households nationwide. It is an annual survey that was released in mid-April. Free garden apps While gardeners may have previously bought glossy coffee table books and catalogs to learn about their hobby, today's gardeners are increasingly seeking information with the help of gardening apps and websites. Here are a few of the most popular free apps: € Garden Compass offers plant identification, expert advice and monthly reminders. € Homegrown with Bonnie Plants offers information on over 250 vegetables and herbs, how-to guides and the ability to track your garden's progress. € Garden Time Planner is a database of plants, local weather and how-to videos. € Gardroid tells you how and when to plant and harvest fruits and vegetables, plus offers tips and notifications.Survey nds more, younger people are getting greenBy Melissa Erickson More Content NowIs your kitchen counter-top crowded with appliances or littered in odds and ends? When you clear away the clutter in your life you liter-ally make room to get things done.The kitchen is the most important area of the home when it comes to organization and efficiency, but it requires constant upkeep,ÂŽ said professional organizer Monica Friel, president of Chaos to Order, Chicago. Most people want a clean, fresh surface to work on, but things tend to pile up on the countertop.ÂŽThe No. 1 tip to alleviate clutter is to streamline what youre not using on a regular basis,ÂŽ Friel said. If youre not using it regularly, it may not deserve a place on the countertop. Plugged in and used dailyThe best tip for an unclut-tered kitchen counter is to put everything away except for things that have to be plugged in and are used daily. These are primarily appliances like the coffee maker and toaster or toaster oven. Anything that is used less than daily can be put away unless its too heavy to move or too big to fit anywhere,ÂŽ agreed organizing expert Eileen Roth, author of Organizing For Dummies.ÂŽ My KitchenAid mixer is heavy, but I dont use it more than once a month so its in a pantry on the bottom shelf. I lift it out when I need it.ÂŽNo matter how much you paid for your gorgeous appli-ances, theyre taking up a ton of valuable real estate. ... These items should be neatly tucked and only pulled out while in use,ÂŽ said Leigh Anderson, a private chef in Los Angeles. Keep on top of thingsClean as you go,ÂŽ said Claudia Sidoti, head chef and recipe developer at Hel-loFresh. If you save it all until youre finished cooking, youll end up with a chaotic counter and extra work wait-ing for you once youre done eating. If you put ingredients away and clear and clean dishes step by step, youll be able to focus on enjoying your meal with the view of a clean kitchen.ÂŽ Designed for useMy tip for having an uncluttered kitchen countertop is, have a designated cabinet or shelf for everything,ÂŽ said home decor and lifestyle blogger Jenna Shaughnessy, whose blog is called Wife in Progress. I love drawers next to the dish-washer for easy dinnerware storage. The toaster has a designated shelf on an upper cabinet while the microwave is built into an island. Finally, corral coffee-making items onto a tray for an attractive beverage station.ÂŽ Gather in groupsGroup regularly used counter items together in containers, said professional organizer Laura Souders with Healthier Spaces Organizing in Middletown, Pennsylvania.For example, salt and pepper „ they look neater and the space looks less clut-tered if they are on a small tray. Use baskets or bowls to keep loose snacks and/or produce,ÂŽ Souders said. Avoid the dumping groundMail, keys, school work, notes about activities, receipts, checkbooks and more get lost in piles on your counters if theres no method to the madness. The first thing you need to do to control the clutter is, designate an inbox for the paper items,ÂŽ said Marty Basher, home organization expert at Modular Closets.Take a couple of minutes every day to sort through the inbox. Toss anything that can be thrown, file bills and important mail away in the office, and handle school work and permission slips right away. Anything with upcom-ing dates should be put into your main calendar system, whether its electronic or an old-school write-on calen-dar,ÂŽ Basher said.Clear the clutter from your countertops

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** B4 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin BULLETIN BOARDRECURRINGMONDAYSYOUTH NIGHT: 6-8:30 p.m. Mondays, Convergence Coffeehouse, 498 Wilson St. N. Visitors may enjoy free refreshments, play games, watch old movies, or fellowship. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS: 8 p.m. Mondays, the clubhouse at 704 Robinson St., Crestview, for beginners and newcomers. Details: Jerry, 830-6218. www. fwb-area-aa.org. DOGWOOD GARDEN CLUB: 10:30 a.m. “ rst Mondays, September through May, location to be announced. Details: 683-0839. COUNTRY PATCHERS QUILT GUILD: 9:30 a.m. second Mondays, Antioch Baptist Church, 4824 Antioch Road, Crestview. Yearly membership: $20. FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS: 7 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, Mt. Ewell Lodge 131, U.S. Highway 198, Baker. COUNTRY PATCHERS QUILT GUILD: 9:30 a.m. fourth Mondays, Antioch Baptist Church, 4824 Antioch Road, Crestview. Sit-n-sew and workshop meeting. CRESTVIEW WRITERS GROUP: 6-7:30 p.m. every fourth Monday, Crestview Public Library. Online: http://www. cityofcrestview.org/library. php. THE OKALOOSA COUNTY COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN: fourth Mondays. Details: info@occsw.org. FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS: 7 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, Mount Ewell Lodge 131, U.S. Highway 198, Baker. TUESDAYS CRESTVIEW LIONS CLUB: 7 a.m. second and fourth Tuesdays, Hub City Smokehouse, 168 Main St. S, Crestview. Details: crestviewlions@hotmail.com, secretary Charlotte Jones, 533-9931. TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY : 8 a.m. Tuesdays at First Baptist Church of Garden City, 3140 Haskell-Langley Road, Crestview. Details: Mary Cole, 683-1899. 5 p.m. weigh-in; meeting starts from 5:25-5:30 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church fellowship hall, 599 Eighth Ave., Crestview. Brooke Bratton, 225-8197. www.TOPS. org. SENIORS VS. CRIME: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, 296 S. Ferdon Blvd., Suite 8, Crestview. Call 306-3176 to report incidents. okaloosacountysvc@yahoo.com. STORY TIME: 10:15 a.m. Tuesdays, Crestview Public Library, 1445 Commerce Drive. Children ages 3 to 5 can enjoy stories and activities, and make a simple craft. CRESTVIEW KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS BINGO: Quarterly games 4:30-6 p.m.; regular games 6-9 p.m. every Tuesday at 701 James Lee Blvd., Crestview. BAKER GARDEN CLUB: 10 a.m. “ rst Tuesdays September through May at different locations. Liz Davis, 537-4512. OSTOMY SUPPORT GROUP: 1 p.m. “ rst Tuesdays, Wellness Center at Twin Cities Hospital, Niceville. A Registered Nurse is present, and meetings include details of specialty care and product innovations that may be helpful. Details: 389-7071. CARVER-HILL MEMORIAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY: 5:30 p.m. “ rst Tuesdays, Allen Park, 895 McClelland St., Crestview. OPEN MIC POETRY AT THE LIBRARY: 6 p.m. second Tuesdays, Crestview Public Library, 1445 Commerce Drive, Crestview. Free. Esther Hurwitz, 682-4432 or ehurwitz@ okaloosa.lib.” .us; Rick Sanders, 585-6399. Read poetry or play music. http://cvwlibrary. tumblr.com/. SHOAL RIVER REPUBLICAN CLUB: 6 p.m. second Tuesdays of each month at Hideaway Pizza, 326 Main St., Crestview. Meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. CRESTVIEW TOASTMASTERS: 6-7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesdays, Greater Federation of Womens Club building, 150 Woodlawn Drive, Crestview. Visitors are welcome. Details: Kathy Morrow, 974-3662. AMERICAN LEGION POST 395: 5:30 p.m. third Tuesdays, Carver-Hill Museum, 895 S. McClelland St., Crestview. Cmdr. Raymond Nelson, 420-0706. NORTH OKALOOSA PATRIOTS: 6:30 p.m. third Tuesdays, 150 N. Woodlawn Blvd., Crestview. www.panhandlepatriots.com.WEDNESDAYSCRESTVIEW KIWANIS CLUB: 11:45 a.m. Wednesdays, Samuels Roadhouse, 114 John King Road, Crestview. KNITTING GROUP: 5-7 p.m. Wednesdays, Casbah Coffee Company, 196 Pine Ave. W, Crestview. PANHANDLE SADDLE CLUB: 6 p.m. “ rst Wednesdays, Davids Cat“ sh House, 1296 N. Ferdon Blvd. Crestview. Includes socializing, dinner and a meeting. November topic: how to keep your horse healthy. Details: Donna Curry, 830-6403 or donna@embarqmail.com. SONS OF ITALY, CRESTVIEW CHAPTER 2865: 6 p.m. third Wednesdays. All people of American-Italian heritage may join. Group president Thomas Hughes, 682-3597, thomasjhughessr@hotmail.com. THURSDAYSGRIEFSHARE SUPPORT GROUP: 10 a.m. Thursdays, Crosspoint, in portable 2, 2250 PJ Adams Parkway, Crestview. For people grieving the death of a loved one or other losses. 6784411 extension 109. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 10-11 a.m. Thursdays, 704 E. Robinson Ave., Crestview. 689-1842. SENIORS VS. CRIME: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, 296 S. Ferdon Blvd., Suite 8, Crestview. Call 306-3176 or email okaloosacountysvc@yahoo. com to report incidents. CRESTVIEW AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MONTHLY BREAKFAST MEETING: 7 a.m. “ rst Thursdays, Crestview Community Center, 1446 Commerce Drive, Crestview. CONCERNED CITIZENS OF CRESTVIEW: 5:30 p.m. “ rst Thursdays, Allen Park, 895 McClelland St., Crestview. FLYING NEEDLES QUILT GUILD: 9:30 a.m. second Thursdays at Niceville Church of Christ. Visitors and quilters are welcome. CRESTVIEW PHOTO CLUB: 6:30-8:30 p.m. “ rst Thursdays, Northwest Florida State College Robert L.F. Sikes Education Center, room 306, 805 U.S. Highway 90 E., Crestview. NORTH OKALOOSA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB: 7 p.m. second Thursdays, Live Oak Baptist Church, 4565 Live Oak Church Road, Crestview. Call 398-7524 for details. MAINSTREET CRESTVIEW ASSOCIATION: 8 a.m. third Thursdays, FAMU College of Pharmacy in downtown Crestview. Group improves and promotes Main Street and Crestview Community Redevelopment Agency businesses. CRESTVIEW EXCHANGE CLUB: fourth Thursdays, Covenant Hospice, Crestview. Sharlene Cox, 682-6824. FRIDAYS TEEN WII: 2-4 p.m. Fridays, Crestview library, 1445 Commerce Drive. Wii playing for students in sixth through 12th grades. STEAK NIGHT: 6 p.m. “ rst Fridays. American Legion Post 75, 898 E. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. Cost: $15 per person; includes T-bone steak, baked potato, salad, bread and dessert. 689-3195. SATURDAYSADULT/FAMILY NIGHT: 6-9 p.m. Saturdays, Convergence Coffeehouse, 498 Wilson St. N., Crestview. Free refreshments, play games, watch old movies, or just fellowship. KARAOKE: 8 p.m. Saturdays, American Legion Post 75, 898 E. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. 689-3195. READ TO DOZER: 10-11 a.m. “ rst Saturdays, Crestview library, 1445 Commerce Drive. For children ages 4 and up. BOBBIN LACE GROUP: 11 a.m. “ rst Saturdays, Heritage Museum, 115 Westview Ave., Valparaiso. Anyone may attend to inquire about the craft. 678-2615. GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS ASSOCIATION: 9 a.m. to eat and 10 a.m. meeting third Saturdays of the month. Dwayne Hopkins, 217-1001. All motorcyclists are welcome. VFW HORSESHOE TOURNAMENT: 12 p.m. third Saturdays, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5450, 2240 W. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. Lynn Mobley, 682-5552.GATHERINGSCRESTVIEW „ Upcoming North Okaloosa County events and surrounding area activities are as follows. MOTORCYCLE POKER RIDE BENEFIT: 9:30-11 a.m. June 9 at SOCKS, 498 Carmel Drive, Fort Walton Beach. Raises funds for Animal Protection League and Save Our Cats and Kittens. Funds will help spay or neuter feral cats, and help low income people get their pets spayed or neutered to reduce the euthanasia of companion animals. FREE DENTAL X-RAYS: The Northwest Florida Dental Assisting Clinic will over free dental X-rays Monday-Thursay through June 21. Participants must obtain a written prescription from their dentists, who can fax it to the clinic at 7296480. Those with no access to a dentists of“ ce may contact faculty member Dr. Elvira Chiccarelli to write a prescription for the serviceon site. Call for details or to schedule an appointment. WELDING ORIENTATION & INFORMATION: 4:30 p.m. June 25, in the welding shop, building 500 at Northwest Florida State Collge, 100 College Blvd., Niceville.For anyone interested in beginning the program this fall. Scottie Smith, Professor of Welding, 729-5224 or smiths60@nwfsc.edu.PUBLIC MEETINGSBLACKMAN FIRE DISTRICT BOARD: 7 p.m. “ rst Mondays, 1850 U.S. Highway 2, Baker. CRESTVIEW CITY COUNCIL: 6 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, City Hall, 198 N. Wilson St., Crestview. CRESTVIEW HOUSING AUTHORITY BOARD: 5:15 p.m. third Mondays, 371 Hickory Ave. W, Crestview. Open to the public. CRESTVIEW CITY COUNCIL: 6 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, City Hall, 198 N. Wilson St., Crestview. MILLIGAN WATER SYSTEM BOARD: 6 p.m. second Tuesdays, 5340 U.S. Highway 4. BAKER FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSION: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays in the Baker Area Public Safety Building, 1375 19th St. REP. JAYER WILLIAMSON OFFICE HOURS: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. “ rst and third Thursdays, Okaloosa County Extension of“ ce, 3098 Airport Road, Crestview. Call 995-3698 for an appointment. LAUREL HILL CITY COUNCIL: 6 p.m. “ rst Thursdays, City Hall. DORCAS FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSIONERS : DFDC now meets 7 p.m. “ rst Thursdays, 5232 Deer Springs Drive, Crestview, off Highway 90. HOLT FIRE DEPARTMENT: 7 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, “ re station, 490 W. U.S. Highway 90, Holt. ALMARANTE VOLUNTEER FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSIONERS: 7 p.m. second Thursdays, Almarante Fire Station, 3710 Old California Road, Laurel Hill. OKALOOSA-WALTON NORTH OKALOOSA FIRE DISTRICT: 6 p.m. third Thursdays, “ re station 82, 5549 John Givens Road, Crestview. HOLT FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSION: 6:30 p.m. third Thursdays, 490 W. U.S. Highway 90. HOLT FIRE DEPARTMENT: 7 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, “ re station. LAUREL HILL VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT: 7 p.m., second Fridays, in Laurel Hill City Halls “ re department of“ ce. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CRESTVIEW AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE EVENTS: for chamber members and their employees. Details: 682-3212 or info@crestviewchamber.com. http://www.crestviewchamber.com. HEALTH FAIR: Visit the events tab at www.crestviewchamber. com or call 682-3212 to sponsor or purchase a booth for the chambers 2018 Annual Health Fair. The event is 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 4 at the Crestview Community Center, 1446 Commerce Drive.HERITAGE MUSEUM ACTIVITIESThe Heritage Museum of Northwest Florida is located at 115 Westview Ave. in Valparaiso. SOAP MAKING CLASS: 1-3 p.m. June 9, Heritage Museum, 115 Westview Ave., Valparaiso. Learn the basics, using the cold-process method and working with lye to make a one-pound batch of soap to take home. All materials are included. Cost is $50 ($45 for museum members). Space is limited. Call 678-2615 to register. BOBBIN LACE & TATTERS GROUP: 1 p.m. “ rst Saturdays at the museum.WHATS HAPPENING

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 B5COLLEGE OFFERS ALZHEIMERS SUPPORT: A Florida State University program that offers relief … free of charge … to distressed African-Americans who provide care to a loved one with dementia. It uses trained lay pastoral-care facilitators and is recruiting caregivers in North and Central Florida. ACTS 2 (African-American Alzheimers Caregiver Training and Support) won a $20,000 award as well. Caregivers participate in a 12-session, telephone-based skills-building and support program covering topics such as relaxation, effective thinking and problemsolving skills. Call 866-778-2724 toll free, 850-274-4945, or go to www.ACTS2Project.org for details. FREE CLOTHING GIVEAWAY: 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesdays; 1-3:30 p.m. Thursdays; and 9 a.m. to noon second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 247 S. Booker St., Crestview. Free items include shoes and other accessories. Presented by Concerned Citizens of Crestview. Details: 689-1582 or 428-6997. he building at 247 S. Booker St., Crestview, is currently under construction due to a ” ooding incident. The Concerned Citizens of Crestview group will give an update when the giveaway resumes. SHINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders, a Department of Elder Affairs program, seeks volunteers to help elderly residents answer Medicare questions and resolve problems, help them make informed choices about their health insurance, save money on prescription medications and learn about their eligibility for helpful programs. There is no charge for seniors to use the program. Bilingual volunteers are also encouraged to call. Dial 1-800-963-5337 for details. SUPPORT CIRCLE FOR SEXUAL ASSAULT SURVIVORS: Meetings take place as follows. „5-6 p.m. Tuesdays at Shelter House, 120 Woodruff Ave., Suite A, Crestview. This is a Shelter House survivorled support group. Walk-ins are welcome. 683-0845. „ 6-7 p.m. Wednesdays, Shelter House, 16 Ferry Road SE, Fort Walton Beach. A Shelter House survivor-led support group. Walk-ins are welcome. 243-1201. „ noon to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, Shelter House, 3590 U.S. Highway 331 S., Suite 102, DeFuniak Springs. A Shelter House survivor-led support group. Walk-ins are welcome. 362-7190. EMPLOY FLORIDA WORKSHOPS: 9-11 a.m. fourth Thursdays of the month at CareerSource Okaloosa Walton, 409 Racetrack Road, Fort Walton Beach. Learn to conduct job searches on the state system, create a resume, access labor market data for wage, job experience and education requirements for a speci“ c occupation. Learn about Training Grant opportunities, online training courses, and the organizations virtual recruiter. EMERALD COAST HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS WANTED: ECH provides compassionate care through a team of professional staff members and volunteers. Volunteers are thoroughly trained and provided ongoing education. They can serve in a variety of areas from administrative help to offering support to a hospice patient through visits or weekly phone calls. Just a few hours a month makes an impact. Details: Ann OConnor, 6890300. SENIORS VS. CRIME VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: Seniors vs. Crimes Crestview of“ ce, which assists senior citizens whom someone scammed or took advantage of, needs help. Hours are 10 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and Thursdays at 296 S. Ferdon Blvd., Suite 8. To volunteer, contact Of“ ce Manager Joe Loria, 306-3176, or Region 5 Deputy Director JB Whitten, 813-489-5657. Contact 306-3176 or 800-203-3099, or seewww. seniorsvscrime.comfor more information. REPORT ELDERS ABUSE: Call the Northwest Florida Area Agency on Aging at 1-800-96ABUSE (800-962-2873) if you suspect elderly friends and neighbors are being abused. Many elders may suffer from “ nancial exploitation, neglect or physical or emotional abuse, often caused by family members. The NFAAA is a private, non-pro“ t agency supported by the federal Older Americans Act and the State of Florida General Revenue Fund through the Florida Department of Elder Affairs. Gwen Rhodes, 494-7100 or rhodesg@nw” aaa.org UWF ACADEMIC ADVISING: The University of West Florida offers assistance with admissions, academic and degree advising and registration in Crestview. Contact Deborah Cluff, 863-6550, to schedule an appointment for “ rst Thursdays at the Crestview Area Chamber of Commerce, 1446 Commerce Drive. HOMELESS ASSISTANCE: Need help? Contact the Okaloosa Walton Homeless Continuum of Care, 409-3070, www. okaloosawaltonhomeless.org; Opportunity Inc., 659-3190; or Helping Hands of Crestview, 428 McLaughlin St., behind First United Methodist Church. Helping Hands is open 1-4 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays. ENERGY ASSISTANCE AND SERVICES FOR LOW-INCOME FAMILIES: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, Tri-County Community Council, 290 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Crestview. 306-1134. CRESTVIEW SOUP KITCHEN NEEDS VOLUNTEERS: Serves Mondays through Saturdays. To volunteer at Central Baptist Church, call 682-5525; Our Savior Lutheran Church, 682-3154; LifePoint Church, 682-3518; Community of Christ, 682-7474; First Presbyterian Church, 682-2835; or First United Methodist Church, 682-2018. WOMEN AND FAMILY INTERVENTION SERVICES AND EDUCATION: a Crestviewbased Community Drug and Alcohol Council program that helps pregnant women with substance abuse. 689-4024. CHILDCARE ASSISTANCE: Eligible low-income families can receive “ nancial assistance through the Early Learning Coalition of Okaloosa and Walton Counties. Apply at www.elc-ow.org. Hover over "Services" and click "School Readiness" to register. FREE MEDICARE COUNSELING: By appointment, Crestview Public Library and Elder Services of Okaloosa County, in Crestview, 494-7101 or 1-866-531-8011. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: Nonpro“ t seeks Crestview area lots for families needing housing. 758-0779 or 315-0025. VA VETERANS CRISIS LINE: Veterans in crisis, their families and friends can call 800-273-TALK (8255), and press 1 to talk with quali“ ed, caring VA responders. Con“ dential. www.veteranscrisisline.net. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA NEEDS MENTORS: Adult volunteers spend two hours weekly mentoring children. Pairs go to the library, museum, park or beach, hike, roller-skate or play sports. 664-5437. VOLUNTEER ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVE IN DISASTERS: Group needs people to work in the Emergency Operations Center assisting county personnel. Contact: Yvonne Earle, 8631530, extension 230. FREE HAZARDOUS HOUSEHOLD WASTE DROPOFF: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, Okaloosa County Recycling Of“ ce, 80 Ready Ave., Fort Walton Beach. Okaloosa residents may drop off paints, pesticides, pool chemicals, used oil, gas, antifreeze, computers, televisions, ” uorescent lamps, car batteries, rechargeable batteries, cleaners, solvents, aerosols and printers. MUSEUM SEEKS VOLUNTEERS: Heritage Museum of Northwest Florida seeks friendly, reliable volunteers to greet guests and answer phones in its gift shop 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 1-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Details: 678-2615, stop by 115 Westview Ave., Valparaiso, or email info@heritage-museum. org. CARS NEEDED: Opportunity Inc. accepts donations of cars, boats and other vehicles to support Opportunity Place, an emergency shelter for families. Shelley Poirrier, 409-3070 or shelley@okaloosawaltonhomeless.org. SHELTER HOUSE FINANCIAL SUPPORT: It costs just more than $100 a day to shelter a domestic violence victim. Every little bit helps. 683-0845. DRIVE VETERANS: Help veterans attend appointments at the VA Outpatient Clinic in Pensacola two days a month. Veterans Service Of“ ce, 689-5922. VEHICLES NEEDED: Covenant Hospice accepts cars, trucks, SUVs, motorcycles, boats and RVs. Quali“ ed professionals pick up vehicles from Pensacola to Tallahassee at convenience. Rachel Mayew, 428-0605. LAKEVIEW CENTERS FAMILIES FIRST NETWORK NEEDS BEDS: Donations wanted for local children in protective services. Cribs and beds for children must be in good condition. 833-3840.HELPING HANDSBy News Bulletin contributorCRESTVIEW „ Crestview Public Library guests learned about animals and enjoyed playing after classes in recent months.Have a cute photo of your kids out and about? They could be our next The Bulletin Kid! Email a photo with your childs name, age, hometown and a description of the action to news@crestviewbulletin.com.Nonies Ark, Stay & Play events take placeTenten Santana of Crestview, age 9, meets Walter the chinchilla at a recent Family Library Time in Crestview. Nonie Maines introduced attendees to several animals and challenged them to think about how our choices affect their habitats. Tenten is a resident of Crestview. Adam Brown chooses a puzzle while Adriana Dealagdon chooses a doll during the Crestview Public Librarys Stay & Play recently. The three year olds are Crestview residents. [HEATHER NITZEL | PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN]

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** B6 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | Crestview News Bulletin

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ClassifiedsCrestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 B B 7 7 20180258 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE CASE NO.: 2018 CP 000571C IN RE: ESTATE OF STEPHEN E. PAYTON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of S TEPHEN E. PAYTON, deceased, whose date of death was March 17, 2018, File Number 2018-CP-000571C is pending in the Circuit Court for Okaloosa County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 601-B North Pearl Street, Crestview, Florida 32536. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representativeÂ’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedentÂ’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedentÂ’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTÂ’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is Attorney for Personal Representative: Bill E. Parker -Fl/bar/no. 134450 P.O. Box 1131 Crestview, Fl 32536 (850) 682-4220 parkerlaw@bplaw.gcco xmail.com Personal Representative: Philip N. Payton 20531 E. Weaver Ave. Aurora, CO 80016 05/30/2018 06/06/2018 20180259 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FIRSTJUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR OKALOOSACOUNTY, FLORIDA GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2017 CA 000326 C U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW C. BRUNSON JR., ET.AL; Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 15, 2018, in the above-styled cause. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at www.okaloosa.realforeclose.c om, on June 13, 2018 at 11:00 am the following described property: LOT1, BLOCK 2, CORNER OAKS ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 101 JAMIE COURT, CRESTVIEW, FL 32539 ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, ADALiaison, Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547, Phone (850) 609-4700 Fax (850) 652-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@Okaloosa.flc ourts1.gov at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand on 22 day of May 2018. Rusti Mynard Deputy Clerk of Court, Okaloosa County 05/30/2018 06/06/2018 20180260 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2017 CA 003169 C BAY VIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, Plaintiff, VS. CYNTHIA C. HILPERT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CYNTHIA C. HILPERT; UNKNOWN TENANT 1, UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORE CL OSURE SALE PURSU ANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on March 15, 2018 in Civil Case No. 2017 CA 003169 C, of the Circuit Court of the FIRST Judicial Circuit in and for Okaloosa County, Florida, wherein, BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY is the Plaintiff, and CYNTHIA C. HILPERT, is Defendants. The Clerk of the Court, J.D. Peacock II will sell to the highest bidder for cash at www.okaloosa.realforeclose.c om on 6/26/2018 at 11:00 AM the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO-WIT: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, RUN SOUTH 89 DEG. 55 MIN. 30 SEC. WEST 787.56 FEET THENCE SOUTH 34 DEG. 38 MIN. EAST 269.57 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 27 DEG. 46 MIN. EAST 119.56 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 55 MIN. 38 DEC. EAST 579.09 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEG. 13 MIN. WEST 327.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT THE NORTH 33 FEET AND THE WEST 33 FEET FOR ROAD PURPOSES. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on 06/26/2018. CLERK OF THE COURT J.D. Peacock II Courtney Eslinger Deputy Clerk Aldridge I Pite, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 1615 South Congress Avenue Suite 200 Delray Beach, FL 33445 Phone: 561.392.6391 Fax: 561.392.6965 IMPORT ANT AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADA Liaison, Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547, Phone (850) 609-4700, Fax (850) 651-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@flcourtsl.gov, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 06/06/2018 06/13/2018 20180261 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2016 CA 003735 F WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OR BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF SALLY W. BORCHIK, DECEASED, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECL OSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of foreclosure dated May 11, 2018, and entered in Case No. 2016 CA 003735 F of the Circuit Court of the FIRST Judicial Circuit in and for OKALOOSA COUNTY, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC., is Plaintiff, and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OR BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF SALLY W. BORCHIK, DECEASED, et al are Defendants, the clerk, J.D. Peacock II, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM www.okaloosa.realforeclose.c om, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 06 day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 2, BLOCK 3, LAKE LORRAINE ESTATES THIRD ADDITION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF OF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crestview, OKALOOSA COUNTY, Florida, this 5th day of May, 2018. J.D. Peacock II Clerk of said Circuit Court By: Rusti Mynard As Deputy Clerk WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. c/o Phelan Hallinan Diamond & Jones, PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 2001 NW 64th Street Suite 100 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Adminstration, ADA Liaison Okaloosa County 1940 Lewis Turner Blvd. Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32547 Phone (850) 609-4700 Fax (850) 651-7725 ADA.Okaloosa@flcour ts1.gov at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 06/06/2018 06/13/2018 20180262 NOTICE OF SALE In accordance with Florida Statutes, Dansher Mini Warehouses, located at 1110 N Ferdon Blvd., in Crestview, Florida will offer for sale to the highest bidder the household and other goods stored in the below listed units of Dansher Mini Warehouses. Said goods are to be sold to recover the rents not paid by the tenant. Unit #E4, E10 Edith Andrews P O Box 784 Cumming, GA 30028 Unit #B20 Nakiya Brown 3172 Forest Ave Crestview, FL 32539 Unit #A16 Howard Payne 116 Loop Dr Crestview, FL 32536 Unit #B29, D7, D33, E11 Alixia McKnight 3990 Bambi Rd Crestview, FL 32539 Unit #A35 Jennifer Hagan 288 Brown Mason Rd DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433 Unit #C5 Stephen Ford 213 Hwy Ave Ft Walton Beach, FL 32547 The sale shall take place June 29, 2018 at 9:00 AM, at Dansher Mini Warehouses. 06/06/2018 06/13/2018 20180264 20180263 NOTICE OF SALE In accordance with Florida Statutes, East 90 Mini Storage, located at 3191 East James Lee Blvd., in Crestview, Florida will offer for sale to the highest bidder the household and other goods stored in the below listed units of East 90 Mini Storage. Said goods are to be sold to recover the rents not paid by the tenant. Unit# B24 Shree Hinote 15 Oz Dr Crestview, FL 32539 Unit# B45 Terrance Clausell 125 West First Ave Crestview, FL 32536 Unit# C9 Natalie Haynes 297 South Spring St Crestview, FL 32536 Unit# C19 Tisha Brown 6147 Santee St Crestview, FL 32539 Unit# C37, C38, C39 Paul Ingram 6507 Torrey Pines Trace Laurel Hill, FL 32567 The sale shall take place June 28, 2018 at 9:00 AM, at East 90 Mini Storage. 06/06/2018 06/13/2018

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ClassifiedsB B 8 8 Wednesday, June 6, 2018| Crestview News Bulletin District ManagerThe Northwest Florida Daily News has an opening for District Manager ; The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations.The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation, as well as a management background, is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have the ability to read and understand a road map and must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Hiring Requirements: Drug Testing/Screening, Background Checks, Reference Checks. Education Level: High School Diploma or Equivalent Benefits: Medical, Dental, Life Insurance, Vision, Vacation, Holidays, Sick Leave, 401K, Retirement/Pension, Uniform Allowance. Interested candidates please submit resume to Dale Robinson: drobinson@nwfdailynews.com IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE:ESTATE OF ROBERT ELMER SUTPHEN Deceased. CASE NO.: 2018 CP 000735 NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of Robert Elmer Sutphen, deceased, File Number 2018 CP 000735, is pending in the Circuit Court for Okaloosa County, Florida, the address of which is 601 B North Pearl Street, Crestview, FL 32536, (850) 689-5000. The names and addresses of the personal representative and that personal representative=s attorney is set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is 6th June, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative RYAN MYNARD RYAN M. MYNARD, ATTORNEY AT LAW, P.A. POST OFFICE BOX 249 CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA 32536 Telephone: (850) 683-3940 Facsimile: (850) 689-8630 Primary Email: eservice.ryanmynard@yahoo.com Secondary Email: assistant.ryanmynard@yahoo.com Florida Bar No.: 0150185 Personal Representative Kevin Robert Sutphen 2422 Genevieve Way Crestview, Florida 32536 06/06/2018 06/13/2018 Now Hiring!Crestview Location•BartenderCook Server Host ManagerWork in a friendly neighborhood environment. Steady employment with great pay & opportunities! Interested applicants apply in person between 2pm-4pm Monday -Friday Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. W E S E L L A T C O S T P L U S A 1 0 % S U R C H A R G EA T T H E C H E C K O U T C O S T I N C L U D E S F R E I G H T F E E S A N D A N Y A S S O C I A T E D E X P E N S E .3 2 o z b o t t l e T h i r s t Q u e n c h e rG a t o r a d e8 8¢3 0 6 5 o z c o n t a i n e r M a x w e l l H o u s eW a k e U p R o a s t C o f f e e$55 01 6 3 o z c a n P i l l s b u r yG r a n d s B i s c u i t s$15 05 9 o z c a r t o nM i n u t e M a i d P u n c h$12 52 4 c o u n t h a l f l i t e r b o t t l e sN i a g a r a W a t e r5$1 02 0 c o u n t p k g .F r i t o L a yV a r i e t y P a c k$55 23 0 o z j a rB e s t C h o i c eM a y o n n a i s e$14 5e a f o re a STORE HOURS 6:00 A.M. 10:00 P.M. 7 DAYS A WEEK 2 0 l b b a g B i g V a l u eR u s s e t P o t a t o e s$29 5J u i c y S o u t h e r nP e a c h e s9 7¢ e a l b COST PLUS 10%310 W. JAMES LEE BLVD.CRESTVIEW, FL850-398-6919PRICES EFFECTIVE JUNE 6 12, 2018 $18 8e a e ae a e ae a J u m b o P a c kF r e s hF r y e r W i n g s$14 4F a m i l y P a c k B l a c k C a n y o n A n g u s B e e fB o n e I nR i b e y e S t e a k s$59 7F a m i l y P a c k B l a c k C a n y o n A n g u s B e e fB o n e l e s sS h o u l d e r R o a s t$29 7F a m i l y P a c k B l a c k C a n y o n A n g u s B e e fB o n e l e s sS h o u l d e r S t e a k s$32 7V a c u u m P a c k S w i f tP o r kR i b T i p s$14 61 6 o z p k g O s c a r M a y e rR e d R i n d T h i c kS l i c e d B o l o g n a$15 0F a m i l y P a c k L e a n & T e n d e rB o n e l e s s P o r kL o i n C h o p s$16 7W o n d e r 8 c o u n t B u n s o r 1 8 2 0 o z l o a fC l a s s i c B r e a d$15 09 o z H o t ,L e a n o rC r o i s s a n t P o c k e t s e a e a .l b e a 1 0 l b b a gB e s t C h o i c eS u g a r$35 0F A R M F R E S H P R O D U C ED o l e 9 o z b a g I t a l i a n B l e n d o r 7 o z .F i e l d G r e e n s$22 8R e d R i p e S e e d l e s sW a t e r m e l o n s$50 01 l b c o n t a i n e r R e dR i p e S t r a w b e r r i e s$26 5N u t r i t i o u sB r o c c o l i C r o w n s$16 0S l i c e d F r e e L e a n & T e n d e r W h o l eB o n e l e s sP o r k L o i n$12 5l b .2 4 o z b o t t l eH u n t ’ sK e t c h u p7 9¢5 6 o z c a r t o nB l u e B u n n yI c e C r e a m$18 8e al b l b l b l b l b l b e a .e a Savings You CanCount On! e a .e a NF-10995914

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 E1 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 @cnbulletin facebook.com/crestviewbulletinFREE crestviewbulletin.com Vol. 18 Issue 24Address: 638 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536 Online: crestviewbulletin.com Publisher Jim Fletcher ...........................j” etcher@crestviewbulletin.com Executive Editor Jason Blakeney .............jblakeney@nwfdailynews.com Editor Aaron Little ...........................................alittle@srpressgazette.com Editorial Assistant Renee Bell ....................news@crestviewbulletin.com Reporter Aaron Jacobs .......................... ajacobs@crestviewbulletin.com Legals Barbara Dale ....................................bdale@crestviewbulletin.com Circulation Assistant Dale Robinson ......drobinson@crestviewbulletin.com Media Consultant Sherrie Stanley .......sherries@crestviewbulletin.com CONTACT US Call 682-6524 to report news, subscribe or learn about our classi“ ed and display advertising options. The Crestview News Bulletin is published each Wednesday and Saturday by GateHouse Media Group, at 638 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL32536. Periodical postage paid at Crestview, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 638 N. Ferson Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536. USPS 010-209 All material is property of the Crestview News Bulletin. SUBSCRIPTION RATES In County 13 weeks ................................$9.45 26 weeks ..............................$17.85 52 weeks ..............................$32.76 Out of county 13 weeks ..............................$14.70 26 weeks ..............................$23.10 52 weeks ..............................$38.01 Delivery subscriptions may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. NEWS BULLETIN ADVERTISING Ask your advertising representative about our Color by the Inch program and Customer Appreciation sale by calling 850-682-6524. A SPECIAL PUBLICATION OF THE By Renee Bell 682-6524 | @cnbRenee reneeb@crestviewbulletin.comCRESTVIEW „ With the signing of Bill 7055 in March, Gov. Rick Scott made first aid training for Florida stu-dents part of state law.A brief section of Bill 7055, posted on http://laws.flrules.org, recommends first aid basic training every two years for students beginning in the sixth grade, and that the training must be based on a nationally recognized program using the most current evidence-based emergency cardiovascular care guidelines.ŽThe bill further states, The instruc-tion must allow students to practice the psychomotor skills associated with performing cardiopulmonary resusci-tation and use an automated external defibrillator when a school district has the equipment necessary to perform the instruction. Private and public partnerships for providing training or necessary fund-ing are encouraged.ŽThe AED is a device that can check a persons heartbeat and shock the heart back into a normal rhythm when it stops functioning, according to the American Heart Associations web-site, www.heart.org. The device also provides guided instruaction on its use. Dexter Day, Crestview High School principal, said CHS students currently have the option of taking CPR classes as one of their electives, after which they are CPR certified. A personal view of the billThe Simas, Stacey and Shawn, and their two children, Lexi and Carter, are among people who have worked to get the bill passed over the last two years.They became involved in the legisla-tive side of things two years ago when Lexi, then 16, had a cardiac arrest „ meaning her heart malfunctioned and stopped beating „while running on a treadmill at a Viera gym.First aid training bill passesStaff reportOnce a Bulldog, always a BulldogŽ was a recurring theme in the messages to the 390 new graduates of Crestview High School Friday evening. The 2018 commencement ceremony was held in a packed Jack Foster Stadium, the scene of recent football glory.Crestview graduates 390The Class of 2018 throws their caps in the air after the Crestview High School 2018 commencement at Jack Foster Stadium [PHOTOS BY MICHAEL SNYDER/DAILY NEWS] By Aaron Jacobs @cnb_ajacobs ajacobs@crestviewbulletin.comCRESTVIEW „ Jennifer Jackson never expected her Facebook group to become so popular.It took on a life of its own. This was not expected. It was kind of a knee-jerk reaction to even start the group,Ž Jackson said. Then it just took off.ŽJackson and her husband, Terry, started Crestview Citizens for Change on Facebook in 2017, along with another Crestview resident, Matt Gates. They formed thegroup after the 2017 municipal election, in which Joe Blocker was re-elected to the city council with fewer than 600 votes cast in the race, a 3.8 percent voter turnout.That was appalling,Ž Gates said. So the Jacksons and I got together with this idea that we were going to spur some involve-ment and get people involved in the city.Ž Since then, the main focus for the group has been to push to amend the city charter to allow for a city manager. The city is in the process of crafting the ballot question that will appear on the August 28 primary ballot. If approved, it would allow the city council to appoint a city manager to oversee the various city departments. Gates thinks that would be a good thing.I want a qualified professional to come in and set us up for success,Ž Gates said. We dont need a politician. We need a professional.ŽCrestview activism group tops 1,500 membersA graduate is hugged following the Crestview High School 2018 commencement. See BILL, E2 See ACTIVISM, E2Above: A sign is held above the crowd after the Crestview High School 2018 commencement. The Class of 2018 enters Jack Foster Stadium to start the Crestview High School 2018 commencement. Below: Keon Voisin celebrates with family and friends after receiving his diploma. Jackson Gates

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** E2 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | Crestview News BulletinBecause the people at the gym knew CPR and used an AED, they were able to resuscitate Lexi until para-medics arrived.As we stood over Lexi as she laid in the emergency room, we didnt know if she would live or die. The helpless feeling you have as a parent is indescrib-able,Žher dad, Shawn,said in a previous News Bulletin interview.Lexi never had really any health problems. She had been an athlete since 4 years old. She started playing T-ball and soccer when we lived in Crestview. Sudden cardiac arrest struck our family out of nowhere ... I made a promise to God that we would pay this forward if he gave her another chance and he did. The Lord has worked this out for our good and the good of others,Ž Shawn said.Lexi spent three weeks in the hospital. Doctors implanted a cardiac defibrillator inher chest that has to be checked by a cardiologist every three months, but they cleared her to return to school and all activities except contact sports. She finished her junior and senior years as a varsity cheerleader at Viera High School.Along the way, she and her father requested that the Brevard County school board pass legislation for her fellow high school stu-dents to take CPR training, which they did Nov. 21.Previous efforts to get Senate and House CPR bills passed in Flor-idafailed. It was called an unfunded mandate, mean-ing the state did not want to mandate this training without the funds,Ž Shawn Sima said in a previous interview.Essentially the cost should not be an issue at all. Most of the CPR kits are donated. We could honestly set up a Go Fund Me and have the money. We are actually working with the American Heart Association to possibly set up an area for donation in the state of Florida,Ž he said. BILLFrom Page E1One problem with the current form of government, Gates said, is that things move too slowly due to the city council only meeting two or three times a month. These guys are expected to run a city twice a month. I cant do my job twice a month. If I cant do my little thing over here that only has to do with me, how can they run a city effectively twice a month?ŽThe city council currently holds a regular meeting the second Monday of each month and a work-shop the fourth Monday. Special meetings are scheduled as needed.Gates said a major benefit of the city manager form of government is that the city manager is appointed, so he or she can be fired by the council for poor performance without having to wait for another election. The cities of Milton and DeFuniak Springs recently fired their respective city managers, leading to some controversy among Crestviews neighbors to the east and west.Jackson said she hasnt thought much about what the group will focus on after the August charter vote, but she feels the group will find some way to push solutions to the problems thatappear with Crestviews growth.Its growing. Theres nothing you can do to stop it,Ž Jackson said. If were growing population-wise, then we need to be growing to support our population.Ž Jackson and Gates both hope the group has an impact on voter turnout in the August 28 election and the upcoming municipal elections in 2019. Two city council seats and the mayors office will be up for grabs in that election, scheduled for March.If this whole move results in 20 percent voter turnout, Im going to see it as a success,Ž Gates said. Editors note: While group members see membership numbers above 1,500, due to privacy settings, non members visiting the Crestview Citizens For Change page may only see a total of approximately 1,370 members. ACTIVISMFrom Page E1Stacey, Lexi, Shawn, and Carter Sima are pictured during Lexis Senior Night. [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN]

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** Crestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 E3

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** E4 Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | Crestview News BulletinBy Aaron Jacobs (850) 682-6524 @cnb_ajacobs | ajacobs@ crestviewbulletin.comCRESTVIEW „ A group of Crestview stu-dents put on one last event before the end of the school year, offering a dinner and a show to the deaf community.American Sign Language students at Crestview High School hosted a deaf community banquet May 23 at the school.The banquet was fol-lowed by entertainment in the auditorium, featuring songs, skits and educational demonstra-tions focused on the deaf community.Connie Salvador, who teaches American Sign Language at the school, said the banquet was intended to celebrate the deaf community and to thank them for giving the students the oppor-tunity to be a part of that community.Its our way to say thank you, that we appreciate that you let us learn your language,Ž Salvador said. She said it also helps fulfill one of the ASL standards her program has.This is the first year the school has hosted an event like this, and Salvador hopes to make it an annual occurrence. Each of the students in her classes pitched in to make the event a success.We put it together in a month and every student had something to do with it,Ž Salvador said. Every student had a talent and they all gave it, and theyre here tonight pro-viding their talents.ŽStudents from the Fort Walton Beach High School ASL program took part in the entertainment program as well, perform-ing their version of Will Smiths theme song to The Fresh Prince of Bel Air.Mark Ehrlichmann, director of the non-profit Agency for Deaf Advo-cacy and Services, helped with outreach for the event. Ehrlichmann, who is deaf, spread the word within the community and provided Salvador and her students with names of people to con-tact for the event.We work together professionally and col-laborate ideas on how we can make a better positive impact for the deaf community,Ž Salvador said.Students host deaf community banquetBy Brian HughesCrestview Police DepartmentCRESTVIEW „ Three new Crestview Police Department recruits ably passed the agencys strenuous, departmentmandated physical abilities test, or PAT, on a hot Tuesday morning. But perhaps as equally stress-ful as the PAT was the interview that followed for two of the candidates.Brian Foreman, Nellie Roberts and Ann Ruryk each successfully completed the vigorous course in under the maxi-mum allowable time of six minutes, four seconds. Without even a chance to change into spiffier duds, Foreman and Ruryk were seated outside Interim Chief Jamie Grants office waiting to interview for police officer positions.Each of the three had graduated from a Florida police academy and received their law enforcement officer certification.Roberts, having already successfully interviewed with Police Department command staff members, was a step ahead of her fellow recruits once she passed the PAT. She now moved into the back-ground check phase.In addition to command staff, Cmdr. Grant expanded the interview panel to include patrol officers and investigators. These are the law enforce-ment officers alongside whom a new officer would be serving, and under some of whom new officers undergo approximately 14 weeks of field training before they are authorized to hit the streets of Crestview as full-fledged police officers.After nearly half an hour each of prepared questions, exploratory questions and candidates own statements, both Mr. Foreman and Ms. Ruryk were given conditional offers of employment as Crestview Police officers, joining Ms. Roberts in the extensive background check phase.All of them are strong candidates,Ž operations Commander Andrew Schneider said. Were looking forward to having them as part of our family here at the Crestview Police Department.ŽNew CPD o cer candidates sweat out physical test, interviewCrestview High School students perform a skit showing a humorous take on some of the struggles deaf people deal with in their daily interactions. [AARON JACOBS|NEWS BULLETIN] Crestview Police recruit Brian Foreman interviews with command staff and investigators following his successful completion of the agencys physical abilities test. Clockwise from left are Deputy Chief Rick Brown, acting chief Cmdr. Jamie Grant, and Investigators Chaise Rawles and Joshua Burgess. [PHOTOS BY BRIAN HUGHES | CRESTVIEW POLICE DEPARTMENT] Investigator Chaise Rawles, Crestview Police training of“ cer, explains the agencys physical abilities test „ the PAT „ procedure to potential recruits Brian Foreman, Nellie Roberts and Ann Ruryk. All three candidates passed the test. Ann Ruryk grimaces as she climbs over a 4-foot wall while running the Crestview Police Departments physical abilities test. Under the direction of training of“ cer Inv. Chaise Rawles, Crestview Police candidate Nellie Roberts runs the serpentine portion of the agencys physical abilities test, which she passed well within the 6-minute, 4-second maximum allowable time. We put it together in a month and every student had something to do with it. Every student had a talent and they all gave it, and theyre here tonight providing their talents.ŽConnie Salvador, American Sign Language teacher

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ExtraCrestview News Bulletin | Wednesday, June 6, 2018 E E 5 5 20180258 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE CASE NO.: 2018 CP 000571C IN RE: ESTATE OF STEPHEN E. PAYTON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of S TEPHEN E. PAYTON, deceased, whose date of death was March 17, 2018, File Number 2018-CP-000571C is pending in the Circuit Court for Okaloosa County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 601-B North Pearl Street, Crestview, Florida 32536. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representativeÂ’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedentÂ’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedentÂ’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTÂ’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is Attorney for Personal Representative: Bill E. Parker -Fl/bar/no. 134450 P.O. Box 1131 Crestview, Fl 32536 (850) 682-4220 parkerlaw@bplaw.gcco xmail.com Personal Representative: Philip N. Payton 20531 E. Weaver Ave. Aurora, CO 80016 05/30/2018 06/06/2018 20180259 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FIRSTJUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR OKALOOSACOUNTY, FLORIDA GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2017 CA 000326 C U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW C. BRUNSON JR., ET.AL; Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 15, 2018, in the above-styled cause. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at www.okaloosa.realforeclose.c om, on June 13, 2018 at 11:00 am the following described property: LOT1, BLOCK 2, CORNER OAKS ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 101 JAMIE COURT, CRESTVIEW, FL 32539 ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, ADALiaison, Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547, Phone (850) 609-4700 Fax (850) 652-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@Okaloosa.flc ourts1.gov at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand on 22 day of May 2018. Rusti Mynard Deputy Clerk of Court, Okaloosa County 05/30/2018 06/06/2018 20180260 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2017 CA 003169 C BAY VIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, Plaintiff, VS. CYNTHIA C. HILPERT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CYNTHIA C. HILPERT; UNKNOWN TENANT 1, UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORE CL OSURE SALE PURSU ANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on March 15, 2018 in Civil Case No. 2017 CA 003169 C, of the Circuit Court of the FIRST Judicial Circuit in and for Okaloosa County, Florida, wherein, BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY is the Plaintiff, and CYNTHIA C. HILPERT, is Defendants. The Clerk of the Court, J.D. Peacock II will sell to the highest bidder for cash at www.okaloosa.realforeclose.c om on 6/26/2018 at 11:00 AM the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO-WIT: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, RUN SOUTH 89 DEG. 55 MIN. 30 SEC. WEST 787.56 FEET THENCE SOUTH 34 DEG. 38 MIN. EAST 269.57 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 27 DEG. 46 MIN. EAST 119.56 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 55 MIN. 38 DEC. EAST 579.09 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEG. 13 MIN. WEST 327.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT THE NORTH 33 FEET AND THE WEST 33 FEET FOR ROAD PURPOSES. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on 06/26/2018. CLERK OF THE COURT J.D. Peacock II Courtney Eslinger Deputy Clerk Aldridge I Pite, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 1615 South Congress Avenue Suite 200 Delray Beach, FL 33445 Phone: 561.392.6391 Fax: 561.392.6965 IMPORT ANT AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADA Liaison, Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547, Phone (850) 609-4700, Fax (850) 651-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@flcourtsl.gov, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 06/06/2018 06/13/2018 20180261 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2016 CA 003735 F WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OR BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF SALLY W. BORCHIK, DECEASED, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECL OSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of foreclosure dated May 11, 2018, and entered in Case No. 2016 CA 003735 F of the Circuit Court of the FIRST Judicial Circuit in and for OKALOOSA COUNTY, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC., is Plaintiff, and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OR BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF SALLY W. BORCHIK, DECEASED, et al are Defendants, the clerk, J.D. Peacock II, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM www.okaloosa.realforeclose.c om, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 06 day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 2, BLOCK 3, LAKE LORRAINE ESTATES THIRD ADDITION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF OF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crestview, OKALOOSA COUNTY, Florida, this 5th day of May, 2018. J.D. Peacock II Clerk of said Circuit Court By: Rusti Mynard As Deputy Clerk WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. c/o Phelan Hallinan Diamond & Jones, PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 2001 NW 64th Street Suite 100 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Adminstration, ADA Liaison Okaloosa County 1940 Lewis Turner Blvd. Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32547 Phone (850) 609-4700 Fax (850) 651-7725 ADA.Okaloosa@flcour ts1.gov at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 06/06/2018 06/13/2018 20180262 NOTICE OF SALE In accordance with Florida Statutes, Dansher Mini Warehouses, located at 1110 N Ferdon Blvd., in Crestview, Florida will offer for sale to the highest bidder the household and other goods stored in the below listed units of Dansher Mini Warehouses. Said goods are to be sold to recover the rents not paid by the tenant. Unit #E4, E10 Edith Andrews P O Box 784 Cumming, GA 30028 Unit #B20 Nakiya Brown 3172 Forest Ave Crestview, FL 32539 Unit #A16 Howard Payne 116 Loop Dr Crestview, FL 32536 Unit #B29, D7, D33, E11 Alixia McKnight 3990 Bambi Rd Crestview, FL 32539 Unit #A35 Jennifer Hagan 288 Brown Mason Rd DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433 Unit #C5 Stephen Ford 213 Hwy Ave Ft Walton Beach, FL 32547 The sale shall take place June 29, 2018 at 9:00 AM, at Dansher Mini Warehouses. 06/06/2018 06/13/2018 20180264 20180263 NOTICE OF SALE In accordance with Florida Statutes, East 90 Mini Storage, located at 3191 East James Lee Blvd., in Crestview, Florida will offer for sale to the highest bidder the household and other goods stored in the below listed units of East 90 Mini Storage. Said goods are to be sold to recover the rents not paid by the tenant. Unit# B24 Shree Hinote 15 Oz Dr Crestview, FL 32539 Unit# B45 Terrance Clausell 125 West First Ave Crestview, FL 32536 Unit# C9 Natalie Haynes 297 South Spring St Crestview, FL 32536 Unit# C19 Tisha Brown 6147 Santee St Crestview, FL 32539 Unit# C37, C38, C39 Paul Ingram 6507 Torrey Pines Trace Laurel Hill, FL 32567 The sale shall take place June 28, 2018 at 9:00 AM, at East 90 Mini Storage. 06/06/2018 06/13/2018

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ExtraE E 6 6 Wednesday, June 6, 2018| Crestview News Bulletin District ManagerThe Northwest Florida Daily News has an opening for District Manager ; The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations.The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation, as well as a management background, is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have the ability to read and understand a road map and must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Hiring Requirements: Drug Testing/Screening, Background Checks, Reference Checks. Education Level: High School Diploma or Equivalent Benefits: Medical, Dental, Life Insurance, Vision, Vacation, Holidays, Sick Leave, 401K, Retirement/Pension, Uniform Allowance. Interested candidates please submit resume to Dale Robinson: drobinson@nwfdailynews.com IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE:ESTATE OF ROBERT ELMER SUTPHEN Deceased. CASE NO.: 2018 CP 000735 NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of Robert Elmer Sutphen, deceased, File Number 2018 CP 000735, is pending in the Circuit Court for Okaloosa County, Florida, the address of which is 601 B North Pearl Street, Crestview, FL 32536, (850) 689-5000. The names and addresses of the personal representative and that personal representative=s attorney is set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is 6th June, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative RYAN MYNARD RYAN M. MYNARD, ATTORNEY AT LAW, P.A. POST OFFICE BOX 249 CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA 32536 Telephone: (850) 683-3940 Facsimile: (850) 689-8630 Primary Email: eservice.ryanmynard@yahoo.com Secondary Email: assistant.ryanmynard@yahoo.com Florida Bar No.: 0150185 Personal Representative Kevin Robert Sutphen 2422 Genevieve Way Crestview, Florida 32536 06/06/2018 06/13/2018 Now Hiring!Crestview Location•BartenderCook Server Host ManagerWork in a friendly neighborhood environment. Steady employment with great pay & opportunities! Interested applicants apply in person between 2pm-4pm Monday -Friday Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. W E S E L L A T C O S T P L U S A 1 0 % S U R C H A R G EA T T H E C H E C K O U T C O S T I N C L U D E S F R E I G H T F E E S A N D A N Y A S S O C I A T E D E X P E N S E .3 2 o z b o t t l e T h i r s t Q u e n c h e rG a t o r a d e8 8¢3 0 6 5 o z c o n t a i n e r M a x w e l l H o u s eW a k e U p R o a s t C o f f e e$55 01 6 3 o z c a n P i l l s b u r yG r a n d s B i s c u i t s$15 05 9 o z c a r t o nM i n u t e M a i d P u n c h$12 52 4 c o u n t h a l f l i t e r b o t t l e sN i a g a r a W a t e r5$1 02 0 c o u n t p k g .F r i t o L a yV a r i e t y P a c k$55 23 0 o z j a rB e s t C h o i c eM a y o n n a i s e$14 5e a f o re a STORE HOURS 6:00 A.M. 10:00 P.M. 7 DAYS A WEEK 2 0 l b b a g B i g V a l u eR u s s e t P o t a t o e s$29 5J u i c y S o u t h e r nP e a c h e s9 7¢ e a l b COST PLUS 10%310 W. JAMES LEE BLVD.CRESTVIEW, FL850-398-6919PRICES EFFECTIVE JUNE 6 12, 2018 $18 8e a e ae a e ae a J u m b o P a c kF r e s hF r y e r W i n g s$14 4F a m i l y P a c k B l a c k C a n y o n A n g u s B e e fB o n e I nR i b e y e S t e a k s$59 7F a m i l y P a c k B l a c k C a n y o n A n g u s B e e fB o n e l e s sS h o u l d e r R o a s t$29 7F a m i l y P a c k B l a c k C a n y o n A n g u s B e e fB o n e l e s sS h o u l d e r S t e a k s$32 7V a c u u m P a c k S w i f tP o r kR i b T i p s$14 61 6 o z p k g O s c a r M a y e rR e d R i n d T h i c kS l i c e d B o l o g n a$15 0F a m i l y P a c k L e a n & T e n d e rB o n e l e s s P o r kL o i n C h o p s$16 7W o n d e r 8 c o u n t B u n s o r 1 8 2 0 o z l o a fC l a s s i c B r e a d$15 09 o z H o t ,L e a n o rC r o i s s a n t P o c k e t s e a e a .l b e a 1 0 l b b a gB e s t C h o i c eS u g a r$35 0F A R M F R E S H P R O D U C ED o l e 9 o z b a g I t a l i a n B l e n d o r 7 o z .F i e l d G r e e n s$22 8R e d R i p e S e e d l e s sW a t e r m e l o n s$50 01 l b c o n t a i n e r R e dR i p e S t r a w b e r r i e s$26 5N u t r i t i o u sB r o c c o l i C r o w n s$16 0S l i c e d F r e e L e a n & T e n d e r W h o l eB o n e l e s sP o r k L o i n$12 5l b .2 4 o z b o t t l eH u n t ’ sK e t c h u p7 9¢5 6 o z c a r t o nB l u e B u n n yI c e C r e a m$18 8e al b l b l b l b l b l b e a .e a Savings You CanCount On! e a .e a NF-10995914