Crestview news bulletin

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Material Information

Title:
Crestview news bulletin
Portion of title:
Bulletin
Crestview news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Okaloosa Publishing Co.,.
Place of Publication:
Crestview Fla
Creation Date:
June 22, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crestview (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okaloosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Okaloosa -- Crestview
Coordinates:
30.754167 x -86.572778 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 9, no. 37 (Sept. 5, 2001); Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002758666
oclc - 48122675
notis - ANN6621
lccn - 2001229458
System ID:
UF00028411:00885

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www.crestviewbulletin.com 50 CHS leadership program collects 3 tons of food, clothes for needy classmatesBy BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Today, thousands of North Okaloosa residents will unwrap their Christmas presents. But the holiday came early for families of underserved Crestview High School students, who browsed 35 6-foot tables of food and 10 round tables of clothing on Thursday. More than 6,000 canned goods and $1,000 in cash donations were among CHS students contributions for them. Before the giveaway, 50 leadership program students unpacked almost 3 tons of food donated for more than 40 classmates families. This is compassion right here, digital design teacher Yolanda Porter said. This is good. These are good kids.Making people happyStudents had collected the canned vegetables for three weeks. The effort grew into a competition between classrooms, leadership teacher Stephanie Sanders said. Math teacher Carrie Valdes students won by donating more than 1,100 cans.By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW The Crestview Public Safety Academy, whose rst class graduated Dec. 5, will return next spring, said community policing ofcer Wanda Hulion, the programs administrator. And graduates of the 10-week course, which teaches residents the inner workings of rst responders operations, can expect an advanced course, Police Chief Tony Taylor said. Im very pleased with this class, he said. This program will do nothing but grow. Graduates can help by generating interest among residents for the second class, he said. That shouldnt be difcult, based on some of the 11 graduates enthusiastic reactions after completing the course.By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Many underserved kids have something under their Christmas trees today thanks to a Bob Sikes Elementary School fth-graders efforts. Justice Livingston, who publishes a newsletter in the Garden City Brownstone Manor development, encouraged her neighbors to donate toys for the Crestview Police Departments Cops for Kids program. It is the second year the 10year-old has collected toy donations. Thursday afternoon, Justice and her grandparents, Pat and Howard Mosely, brought the toys to Crestview City Hall. There, Mayor David Cadle, City Clerk Betsy Roy and community policing ofcer Wanda Hulion received them. Were so proud of ... Justice, Cadle said. The police department is proud of (her), too, for helping with their effort to give toys to children who need them this Christmas. The toys beneted more than 40 families, organizers said. Pat Mosely said she and her husband encourage Justice to be community oriented. Im glad to do it because it helps other kids, Justice said. That kind of attitude inspires adults, city ofcials said. It makes you feel good when kids care about other kids, Hulion said. WANT TO GO?Call Community Policing Ofcer Wanda Hulion, 682-3544, for details on the Crestview Public Safety Academys spring course. FinIND itIT onONLineINESee www.crestviewbulletin. com/photos for an image gallery of Crestview High School leadership program students unpacking donated food and clothing for needy classmates The Crestview Public Safety Academys rst graduating class includes, front row, from left, Adrienne McKinnie, Obie and Joyce Heath, Nina Blake, Linda Parker, and Linda and Michael Mitchem. Second row: Thomas Schmoldt, Glenn Goll, Keith Wroten and Luke Sheplock. In the back row are academy administrator Wanda Hulion and Police Chief Tony Taylor.BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Photos H OTOS bB Y BRIAN HUGHES | News BulletinCity Clerk Betsy Roy, Crestview community policing ofcer Wanda Hulion and Mayor David Cadle accept 10-year-old Justice Livingstons toy collections for the Cops for Kids program. Below, Justice helps Hulion load donated toys in a vehicle for delivery.Cops for Kids drive aids 40-plus familiesPolice: Public Safety Academy to return in the spring See ACAD DEMYY A338th Year, Number 103 This is compassionCrestviewRESTVIEW highHIGH schooSCHOOL FOODD DDRIVEPhotos HOTOS bB Y BRIAN HUGHES | News BulletinCrestview High School leadership students including senior Jasmine Thomas and sophomores Hanna Duke and Megan Howard stack canned vegetables Thursday before distributing them to needy families.. Below, students including senior Emily Parker, right, unpack and fold donated clothes in the schools cafeteria.See FOOD D DDRIVE A3 FACEBOOKFind us at www. facebook.com/ crestviewbulletin TWITTERFollow us at twitter.com/ cnbulletinBusiness. ......................A2Opinion. ......................A6Lifestyle. .......................A7Education. ....................A8Sports. .........................B1Classieds. ...................B6TABLE OF CONTENTSA Halifax Media paper read by 10,450 people every week INSIDE TODAY ONLINE Watch a special blooper reel of the North End Zone Sports Report at 6 p.m. today at crestviewbulletin. com/video NWF State College nursing program ofcials pin graduates, B4Northwood Elementary reopens library after three years, A9Obituary: Raymond Ernest Moon, A2Therapy dog now allowed at Northwood Elementary, A8MeERRY CHRRISTMAS, nNORR TH OKALOOSA CC OUNTYY! Wednesday, DecemberDECEMBER 25 2013 NWF State softball player Hannah Day signs with Troy, B1

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Merry Christmas Rememberthe Reasonforthe Season...GodBless Forourhome toyours 981W.NelsonAve. DefuniakSprings 850-892-7311 594N.MainStreet Crestview 850-682-6835 Locallyownedandoperatedby DarelandDonnaLundy J&PGlitz&Glitter(NEXTDOORHELLOBEAUTIFUL&ACROSSFROMLOSRANCHEROS) John&PatCooperat GlitzandGlitterwantto wisheveryonea MerryChristmas& HappyNewYear Wearereadyforallof yourholidayattireneeds! r atpeooat Cn & PhoJ ont tar wetitlnd Gz aitlG ont tar wetitlnd Gz aitlG Special to the News BulletinCHELCO recently welcomed communications specialist Tammy Kearce. Kearce, a former newspaper and magazine editor, writer and Northwest Florida State College instructor, studied communications and print journalism at University of West Florida in Pensacola. She has worked for publications from the Washington, D.C., to Montgomery, Ala., areas. Still, she has always made her home in DeFuniak Springs. I am excited to be working with a memberowned cooperative, she said. I have long believed that electric power on demand is one of our greatest luxuries here in the United States; however, it is something most of us take for granted. So Im eager to inform members about CHELCOs products and services. Kearce has recently made trips to CHELCO ofces in Santa Rosa Beach, Freeport, Bluewater Bay, Baker and Auburn to familiarize herself with those communities. We make assumptions every day. We assume the people we encounter will behave in the manner to which we are accustomed. We assume if we maintain our cars, they will get us to where we want to go. We make assumptions to bring order to our world. But in some parts of life namely investing assumptions can prove dangerous. Not all investment-related assumptions are bad, but here are a few that might prove counterproductive: Real estate will always increase in value. Up until the 2008 nancial crisis, which was caused at least partially by the housing bubble, most people probably would have said real estate is always a good investment. Since then, weve grown aware that housing prices can rise and fall. Granted, real estate, as a relatively small part of a diversi ed portfolio, can be appropriate, depending on your goals and risk tolerance. But dont expect endless gains with no setbacks. Gold will always glitter. During periods of market volatility, investors often ee to gold, thereby driving its price up. But gold prices will uctuate, sometimes greatly, and there are risks in all types of gold ownership, whether youre investing in actual bars of gold, gold futures, or stocks of gold-mining companies. I can avoid all risks by sticking with CDs. Its true that certi cates of deposit offer a degree of preservation of principal. But theyre not risk-free; their rates of return might be so low that they dont even keep up with in ation, which means you could incur purchasingpower risk. Having CDs in your portfolio is not bad, but youll only want to own amounts suitable for your objectives. The price of my investment has gone up I must have made the right decision. This assumption could also be made in reverse that is, you might think that, since the price of your investment has dropped, you must have made the wrong choice. This type of thinking causes investors to hold on to some investments too long, hoping to recapture early gains, or selling promising investments too soon, just to cut their losses. Dont judge investments based on shortterm performance; instead, look at fundamentals and long-term potential. If I need long-term care, Medicare will cover it. You might never need longterm care, but if you do, be prepared for big expenses. The annual national average for a private room in a nursing home is almost $84,000, according to a recent survey by Genworth, a nancial security company. This cost, repeated over a period of years, could prove catastrophic to your nancial security during your retirement. Further, Medicare might only pay a small percentage of long-term care costs. You can help yourself by consulting with a nancial professional, who can offer strategies designed to help cope with long-term care costs. You cant avoid all assumptions when investing. But by avoiding questionable ones, you might avoid being tripped up on the road toward your nancial goals. Joe Faulk is a nancial adviser. BUSINESSPage A2 Wednesday, December 25, 2013Raymond Ernest Moon, 81, has gone to his eternal heavenly home following a loving and Christlled life. Ray, who recently moved to Crestview from Tarpon Springs, was known for his strong faith, strength, sense of adventure and love for people. He was born Dec. 5, 1932, in Tallahassee to Fred and Madge Moon. He enjoyed scuba diving, spear shing, hunting and speed racing, in addition to traveling and experiencing worldwide dive locations. Ray was fortunate to retire from two jobs he loved. Employers included Carlisle Motors and Bill Jacksons Shop for Adventure, where he was a scuba technician and instructor, the highlight of his life. Survivors include his loving wife, Pamela; children, Cindy and Rick; grandchildren, Jason and Caithlyn; loving stepmom, Judy Moon; stepchildren, Greg and Melissa; grandchildren, Katie, Anna and Ashley; and sisterand brother-in-law, Libby and David. In lieu of owers, please consider a donation to Emerald Coast Hospice, 131 E. Redstone Ave., Suite 110, Crestview, FL 32539; or the American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123. Memorial services and times of warm remembrance are 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 28, at Airport Road Church of Christ, with Minister Mark Dillman of ciating. A second service is 11 a.m. Jan. 11, 2014, at Lake Tarpon Church of Christ. Arrangements are under Davis-Watkins Crestview Memorials direction. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins.com or http://obits.crestviewbulletin. com .Raymond Ernest Moon RAYMOND MOON TAMMY KEARCE OBITUARY SUBMISSIONSThe News Bulletin publishes north Okaloosa County residents and former residents obituaries for $45 including a photo. Family members should write the obituaries and funeral homes should submit them to the newspaper for con rmation. We may edit submissions for style. Call 682-6524 or email news@crestviewbulletin.com for more information. FINANCIAL FOCUSAssumptions can be dangerous to investors JOE FAULKFinancial Focus www.crestviewbulletin.comCHELCO hires communications specialist

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Wednesday, December 25, 2013 WeatCooper'sFineJewelrywant tothankallofourcustomers includingSanta! Welookforwardtoserving allyourjewelryneedsin2014.~HaveaMerryChristmas &HappyNewYear~ CustomDesigns&Settings A.M-6P.M. 850-683-8004 Dr.RichardThomas andhis compassionate caregivers wishyou health&happiness thisholidayseason andinthecoming NewYear! NowOering BotoxandJuvedermXCTreatments!(850)682-4516102AlabamaStreet,SuiteA,CrestviewHours:Mon-Thurs8am-5pm,ClosedFridayswww.crestviewdentist.com eHomeofDocHollidaysDentalChair I was hoping to learn what the police department does, and I found out they do a whole lot more than I thought they did, Joyce Heath said. Her husband, Obie, and their classmates learned about police, re, judicial and legal public safety services from agencies including Crestviews police and re departments, the state attorneys ofce, defense attorneys, the court system and the Child Advocacy Center. Students learned about communications, evidence gathering, investigations, domestic violence, trafc enforcement, chaplaincy, police patrol, drug investigation, rearm safety, the SWAT team and reghting. The goal was to give them a glimpse of our world, Taylor said. That mission was accomplished, if Crestview High School senior Michael Mitchems reaction is an indication. I liked it more than school, he said. Academy graduates represented a range of ages. Michael, who is also in the Police Explorers club, will enter the Marine Corps upon high school graduation in June. He joined retirees and others who participated in the program. Glenn Goll, a retired corrections ofcer who had experience in policing while a Marine, said the program satised his curiosity. This was very enlightening, he said. Graduates agreed that ring weapons on the shooting range ranked high among their favorite lessons. I had never red a hand gun, Linda Mitchem said. I was pretty nervous, but (Lt.) Andrew (Schneider) is a really good teacher. He put us so at ease. When he offered us a chance to shoot another round, I jumped on it. Mitchem, Michaels mother, said she felt pride when she successfully shot a target. I killed a Smurf! she laughed, likening the blue silhouette on the target to the blue Belgian cartoon trolls. It was fun, but we worked hard, graduate Linda Parker said. ACADEMY from page A1But students said their main motivation was giving to others. Im really proud of our school, sophomore Megan Howard said Thursday. This is good, sophomore Hanna Duke said. ... These families will have food for Christmas. Its amazing that our school has gathered this much food, junior Jared Bufkin said. Im proud of my school. I think its going to make a lot of people pretty happy.Teachers reactThe collective effort touched faculty members. Teacher Elizabeth Rivera said she was close to tears as she watched donations pile up. I want to cry, she said. This is the rst time Ive seen so many kids throughout the whole school this involved in something. This is incredible, choral music director Kevin Lusk said. In all the (20) years Ive been here, Ive never seen anything like this. Students donated sacks of potatoes, bottles of juice and soda, and frozen hams and turkeys, in addition to the 6,000 canned foods and cash contributions. The teenagers used the money Dec. 18 at the Crestview Wal-Mart, where they bought 10 shopping carts full of laundry soap and personal hygiene products. Students at neighboring Davidson Middle School launched a clothing drive. Soon, cartons of donated clothes were wheeled into the high school cafeteria, where leadership students waited to unpack and fold them. It feels so good to give back to the community for people who are less fortunate, especially at Christmas, senior Emily Parker said.By MATTHEW BROWN682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Sharing and Caring volunteers need nonperishable foods to last beyond the winter holidays, organizers said. We are holding our own right now, said Robin Marston, vice president of the local pantry. Unfortunately, donations usually begin to fall after the holidays, and we are already low. Volunteers said they appreciate local organizations, churches, schools and Cub Scout Troop 799 for donating large amounts of canned food items. However, almost 40 residents daily come to receive food items, and its difcult to meet the demand, Marston said. Thats because the number of donations has dipped since the countrys economic downturn, volunteers said. Yet one thing is certain: There are a lot of hungry people in our city, volunteer Doris Mauldin said. Sharing and Caring needs these items: Rice Dried beans Canned vegetables, fruit, beans, tomatoes and soup Crackers Tuna Cereal Peanut butter and jelly Spam, hotdogs and hamburger meat Powdered milk Pasta and spaghetti sauce Dinner items including macaroni and cheese mix, stews, chili and ravioli Sharing and Caring is closed through Jan. 6 for the holidays, but regular hours are 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday at 208 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Crestview. Call 682-1907 for more details. WANT TO HELP? LocalCrestview News Bulletin | A3Sharing and Caring low on food, seeks donations FOOD DRIVE from page A1BRIAN HUGHES | News BulletinSenior Camron Clark, junior Jared Bufkin and sophomore Matthew Bottom disappear behind a wall of canned corn Thursday as they unpack food donations. BRIAN HUGHES | News BulletinCrestview Police Explorers Frankie Frazier, 18, Haillee, 16, and MacKensie Lehneis, 12, serve cake to Crestview Public Safety Academy graduates Michael Mitchem and Luke Sheplock after the rst graduating class Dec. 6 ceremony.

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MILITARY www.crestviewbulletin.comWednesday, December 25, 2013 Page A6 The Crestview News Bulletin encourages public discussion on issues you care about. The paper publishes letters to the editor on a rstcome, rst-served, spaceavailable basis. Letters should be original to the News Bulletin, written on topics concerning Crestview or the Baker, Holt, Milligan or Laurel Hill communities, and should not contain profanity or other questionable content. The newspaper reserves the rights to decline publication of any letter for any reason, and to use published letters in advertising and other promotions. Email letters to news@ crestviewbulletin.com. Alternatively, send letters to Crestview News Bulletin, ATTN: Letter to Editor, 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536.JOIN THE CONVERSATION HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?The Crestview News Bulletin regularly publishes readers thoughtful and humorous comments posted on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Join the discussion at facebook.com/crestview.bulletin or tweet @cnbulletin. posted on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Join the ADVERTISE IN THE NEWS BULLETIN NEWS INFORMATIONIf you have a concern or comment about the Crestview News Bulletins coverage, please call 682-6524.PUBLISHERSkip Foster sfoster@crestviewbulletin.comEDITORThomas Boni tboni@crestviewbulletin.comOFFICE STAFFDawn Barnes ...circulation assistant dawnb@crestviewbulletin.comADVERTISING INFORMATIONMelissa Tedder............ad consultant melissa@crestviewbulletin.com Sherrie Stanley .....media consultant sherries@crestviewbulletin.comEDITORIALBrian Hughes .......................reporter Arts & entertainment editor brianh@crestviewbulletin.com Matthew Brown ...................reporter matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com Randy Dickson .............sports editor randyd@crestviewbulletin.com Renee Bell .............editorial assistant news@crestviewbulletin.comMAIN OFFICE FAX NUMBER850-682-2246 The Crestview News Bulletin is published each Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, at 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview FL 32536. Periodical postage paid at Crestview, Florida. POSTMASTER: Please send address change to 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536. All material herein is property of the Crestview News Bulletin. USPS Number 010-209 SUBSCRIPTION RATES 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524.IN COUNTY13 weeks ....................................$9.45 26 weeks ...................................$17.85 52 weeks ..................................$32.76OUT OF COUNTY13 weeks ...................................$14.70 26 weeks ..................................$23.10 52 weeks ..................................$38.01 Ask your advertising representative about our Color by the Inch Program and Customer Appreciation Sale. 850-682-6524Home delivery subscriptions may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. LETTER TO THE EDITORBy CPL. JOSEPH SCANLANSpecial to the News Bulletin TWENTYNINE PALMS, Calif. Marines with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, swarmed the Combat Center on Dec. 6 when they conducted live re training in an urban facility here during their Mission Readiness Exercise. The facility, titled Range 210, resembled an urban environment and was unique because its buildings walls were constructed of shock absorbent concrete. Unlike most urban training facilities, Marines were able to conduct live re training versus ring blank ammunition. This is probably one of the most dynamic ranges in the Marine Corps because you can re live rounds into buildings, said Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Bergeron of Crestview, a platoon sergeant with Alpha Company. This is as real as it gets because we can re machine guns and ri es into the buildings and engage targets like we would in an actual combat environment. The night before assaulting the range, a scout sniper team inserted into the surrounding terrain to photograph the area and visually show Capt. Lonnie Wilson, Alpha commander, the battle eld. With that critical information, Wilson nished planning the assault and the company was ready to attack the following day. Mortarmen and artillerymen were the rst to destroy targets on the outskirts of the facility while a combined anti-armor team moved in to surround the town. Tanks and assault amphibious vehicles loaded with Marines arrived shortly after, and it was time for boots to hit the ground. Infantrymen poured out of the AAVs and immediately assaulted the town. Machine gun and ri e re lled the area as Marines maneuvered through the terrain and moved into buildings while M1A1 Abrams tanks assaulted the town. Tanks dont ever move through an urban environment by themselves, Bergeron said. They weigh more than 40 tons, but theyre very vulnerable because someone can shoot a rocket-propelled grenade at them from the roof of a building or from an alleyway. The company moved uidly through dozens of buildings and eliminated every target in their path. A tremendous amount of trust and con dence is put in each Marine when clearing a building with live ammunition. Whether a Marine has recently graduated The School of Infantry or has completed several combat deployments, every Marine is accountable for the safety of one another. Its pretty intense being in a leadership position, said Lance Cpl. Nick Beckham, a team leader with Alpha Co. and a native of VA expanding traumatic brain injury bene tsSome veterans with traumatic brain injury who are diagnosed with any of five other ailments will have an easier path to receive additional disability pay under new regulations developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. The new regulation activates Jan. 15 and affects some veterans living with TBI who also have Parkinsons disease, certain types of dementia, depression, unprovoked seizures or certain diseases of the hypothalamus and pituitary glands. This regulation stems from a National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine report regarding the association between TBI and the five diagnosable illnesses. The report, Gulf War and Health, Volume 7: LongTerm Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury, found sufficient evidence to link moderate or severe levels of TBI with the five ailments. Veterans who have questions or who wish to file new disability claims may use the eBenefits website, available at www. eBenefits.va.gov/ebenefits Residents generosity inspires reader to pay it forwardDear editor, Someone stole my stepdaughters scooter off our front porch... (and) we didnt notice it until we gave my stepson a scooter for his birthday on Dec. 17. They were so excited to ride together, and sure enough, Amayas scooter was gone and she was heartbroken. I was also heartbroken, seeing her so upset about a sel sh act of a stranger. I gave her a big hug and told her maybe another kid needed it more than her. That seemed to cheer her up. Later, I posted on Facebook about how someone made my 7-year-old girl cry. Well, Dec. 18, the doorbell rang, and there was a brand new scooter on my porch! That was the most amazing, sweetest act of kindness, and I will be forever grateful! I soon gured out who the secret Santa was, but of course, he doesnt want any glory or recognition because thats not the reason he did it. He simply did it out of the goodness of his heart and to put some joy back into the holidays. This has inspired me to pay it forward! I thought maybe it could be an inspiration to others as well. Kimberly AndersonCrestview My favorite Christmas movie is the 1954 musical White Christmas, starring Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen. Oh, Im old school! Youve probably heard some of the soundtracks songs even if you havent seen the lm. Hearing the title track on a holiday playlist is no surprise, but Count Your Blessings (Instead of Sheep) is less likely to be shuf ed with Rockin Around the Christmas Tree during parties. Still, its the one that grabs my heart. Blessings including our family, friends and health are personal to us; sheep, and gifts, arent. We really could live without the latest smart phone or tablet either of which will be obsolete in a few months but wed be lost without our loved ones. So many people have encountered things we cannot begin to imagine. I was reminded of this on Friday while sur ng channels for national news. The CBS Evening News reported on Jackie Turner, a William Jessup University student who posted a Craigslist ad to ultimately match families with lonely adults. The Sacramento area woman knew, all too well, the need to feel warmth and belonging during the holidays; she had no pleasant childhood memories, she said. I remember getting locked up and locked in rooms. And I remember getting beatings for stealing food, she told the CBS reporter. NBC Nightly News reported on some 250,000 civilians in Syrian suburbs who hunger amid civil war. The more fortunate civilians hop on bicycles and pedal quickly to produce enough energy to charge batteries, and they chop rewood to stay warm, Keir Simmons reported. Its a much different picture from anywhere in the United States. And its why, on this day, we should count our blessings instead of gifts. Evidently, many North Okaloosa residents know a lot about that. Theyre helping others, and theyve inspired me. Crestview High School students, with help from Davidson Middle School students, collected 3 tons of food and clothes for needy classmates. (See This is compassion, Page A1 .) Crestview Amvets Post 35 members are delivering free Christmas feasts to needy North Okaloosa families. (Im writing this on Saturday, before of cial numbers are in, but if the groups Thanksgiving deliveries are an indication, they could be helping more than 200 families.) Justice Livingston, a local 10-yearold, spearheaded an effort to provide toys for more than 40 families this Christmas. (See Cops for Kids drive bene ts 40-plus families, Page A1 .) Baker student Railey Conner denied herself birthday presents Dec. 15 and collected toiletries and other household staples for North Okaloosa nursing homes. Chesser & Bar Attorneys, with Crestview and Shalimar of ces, raised enough money to provide gift cards for nearly 40 teenagers across Crestview and Fort Walton Beach. Nathan Boyles Crestview law of ce and title company delivered more than 65 bags of useful items to Crestview Manor residents. The Okaloosa County Sheriffs Of ce, Gordon Martial Arts and the News Bulletin served as of cial collection sites for Sharing and Carings Crestview of ce. And I know this list is just the tip of a generous Northwest Florida iceberg that includes area churches doubling as cold-weather shelters and soup kitchens. Yet, more is needed, and nonpro ts volunteers gently remind us that giving opportunities dont end with the winter holidays. (See Sharing and Caring low on food, seeks donations, Page A3 .) We all have encountered struggles at some point in life, but they likely paled in comparison to the experiences of fellow human beings in impoverished areas. Even current issues may be trivial compared to numerous North Okaloosans hunger. Lets be grateful for the gifts we received today, however large or small, and then remember those who lack lifes necessities. Merry Christmas, North Okaloosa County. Whats your view? Email news@ crestviewbulletin.com or tweet News Bulletin Editor Thomas Boni @ cnbeditor. Count your blessings (instead of gifts) THOMAS BONIEditor-in-Chief FROM THE EDITORS DESK OPINION BRIEF SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETINTOP: Marines with 1st Tank Battalion assault an urban facility with M1A1 Abrams Tanks during a live re exercise on Range 210 at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center in Twentynine Palms, Calif. ABOVE: Marines with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, maneuver uprange. Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Bergeron of Crestview said Range 210 excellently mimics a combat environment.Marines use shock-absorbing concrete during live fire trainingSee MARINES A7

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LIFESTYLE www.crestviewbulletin.com The WorkingParents BestFriendTwolocationstoserveyou! Calltoscheduleatourtoday!ChildcareNetwork#183405BrookmeadeDrive,Crestview,Florida(850)398-8806www.childcarenetwork.net/183License#C01OK0115ChildcareNetwork#1321040FarmerStreet,Crestview,Florida(850)683-1680www.childcarenetwork.net/132License#C01OK0088 Thesights...thesmells...the sounds.Itstheonetimeof yearwhenjustonewhiffofa Christmastreeinstantlybringsusbacktoourchildhood Dad,tryingtountanglethelights,Mom,cookingupastorm.Weknowthisbecausewehave families,aswell.Wewishyour familyahappyholidayseason. ItsnolongeraboutSKINNYNowitsabout HEALTHY BurnFat&Inches, NOT MusclePlexushasbeenmakingdreamscometrue rightinyouneighborhood. Comehearabouttheseexcitingproducts andlearnaboutourwonderfulbusiness opportunities SpecialGuestSpeaker JillSadler,SeniorRubyAmbassadorSaturday,December28,2013,6PMatCentralBaptistChurchROC 951S.FerdonBlvd.,Crestview,Florida32536MentionthisadtobeenteredintotheOpportunityofaLifetimedrawingNO MealReplacements NO Caffeine NO Stimulants DIABETIC FRIENDLY Fromourfamilytoyourfamilywewouldlike towishyouaveryMerryChristmas. Weknowthatthistimeofyearcannotonly bespecialbutalsoatimeofsadness.Times spentwithfamilyincludethememoriesofthe lovedoneswhohavepassedonfromourlives. We,too,havememoriesofourownfamily memberswhohavepassedaway,youngand old.Thesememoriesarepreciousandwehold deartothem.Wepraythatyouhaveasafe andMerryChristmas.Ourprayerforyou isthatyoubecomfortedinthememoryofyour lovedonesandknowingthattheyarespending ChristmasinheavenwithJesusthisyear. MerryChristmas~ FromAndy,Heather,RyleeandClairePowell GeorgeandAnnelleWhitehurst-TheStaffof Whitehurst-PowellFuneralHome FamilyOwned&OperatedbyHeather&AndyPowell436WestJamesLeeBlvd. LIFESTYLE LIFESTYLE www.crestviewbulletin.comWednesday, December 25, 2013 Page 7 CALENDARWant to learn a skill while helping your North Okaloosa neighbors? The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program, or VITA, seeks help here in Crestview. VITA is an IRS community initiative led by the United Way of Okaloosa and Walton counties and the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension of ce. VITA sites provide free income tax preparation for lowto moderate-income taxpayers generally those earning $52,000 and below who need help ling their returns. Crestviews program needs volunteers along with two laptop computers, a paper shredder, paper, ink and various of ce supplies to continue the program. The Crestview site is recruiting a site coordinator, greeters and tax preparers. Tax experience is not required for VITA volunteers, who become IRS trained and certi ed. If you are interested in volunteering or sponsoring the program, or want to nd out more, attend the volunteer orientation, 1 p.m. Jan. 10 at First Presbyterian Church in Crestview. Training is offered online and in a classroom setting. Contact me, ecourtne@ u .edu, or Melissa Forte, VITA coordinator, vita@united-way.org, to volunteer. Elaine Courtney is an agent at the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension of ce in Crestview. EXTENSION CONNECTION UPCOMING WEBINARSTop Ten Money Tips for 2014: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Jan. 7, http://bit.ly/top102014Tips for Tax Preparation and Filing: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Jan. 30, http://bit.ly/TaxFilTips SPRING INTO VEGETABLE GARDENING SERIES: 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Jan. 14 through Feb. 4. Cost: $30 per person, $45 per couple. Interactive video series for novices. Jan. 14 topic: Homeowner Vegetable Garden Expectations. Learn what to grow each season, proper site selection, and how to improve planting soils. Available at extension of ces throughout NW Florida.COGON GRASS WORKSHOP: 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Jan. 14, Crestview extension of ce, 5479 Old Bethel Road, Crestview. Cost: $20 per person. Awareness and control for forest and right of way managers, private landowners and pesticide applicators. Interactive video class, available at multiple extension of ces.Volunteers needed for income tax assistance ELAINE COURTNEYExtension Connection BY THE NUMBERS 11,521 returns in Crestview zip codes are eligible for free tax preparation. Floridas working families in 2012 collectively received more than $14 million from the Child Tax Credit, due in part to Volunteer Income Tax Assistance programs.FROM STAFF REPORTSThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is considering dividing the states Hunting Zone D from Pensacola to Tallahassee into two deer management units. Proposals would require that bucks harvested north of I-10 in Hunting Zone D have antlers with at least three points on one side, and each point must be 1 inch long. South of I-10 in Zone D, the minimum antler requirement would be two points on one side. The proposal includes an exception to antler requirements in both units; youths 15 years old and younger may continue to harvest bucks with at least one antler 5 inches or longer. The FWC also is considering rescheduling antlerless deer season doe days on private lands within Zone D. Currently in that zone, the season to take deer of either sex, except spotted fawns, runs Dec. 26 through Jan. 1. In proposed rules, dates north of I-10 would change to eight days distributed across four weekends: Saturday through Sunday after Thanksgiving; the rst weekend of muzzleloading gun season; the third weekend of general gun season; and the weekend after Christmas. South of I-10, in Zone D, the proposal would change antlerless season to four days, the weekends after Thanksgiving and Christmas. The purpose of modifying the antlerless deer season is to spread out the hunting opportunity, so that more hunters may be able to participate without substantially reducing deer populations, an FWC spokesperson said. Proposals for Zone D, if passed in April, would take effect during the 2014-15 hunting season. FIND IT ONLINESee www. crestviewbulletin. com/lifestyle for more details on proposed changes to deer hunting regulationsFWC proposes new deer hunting regulationsWALK ON THE WILD SIDE PAINTINGS BY DENI K.: Crestview Public Library exhibit, featuring wildlife paintings, runs through December. Details: 682-4432. ANTIQUE CHRISTMAS CARDS: Crestview Public Library exhibit, featuring Victorian and Edwardian cards from resident Lynn Lees collection, runs through December. Details: 682-4432. FLUTE FESTIVAL POSTER CONTEST: Entries due Jan. 11. Musical Echoes Flute Festival poster competition submissions are due for a chance to win $200. This years festival totem is the hummingbird. The Indian ute and the hummingbird must be included in the poster design. Contact Gail Meyer, gmeyer@fwb. org, 833-9595 or www.musicalechoes. org, for information. Let the community know about your arts or entertainment event. Submit listings to brianh@ crestviewbulletin.com or call 682-6524 at least two weeks before your event. Follow Arts & Entertainment editor Brian Hughes on Twitter @cnbBrian. Waynesboro, Tenn. Its a lot of fun being the guy leading Marines through training and combat, but at the same time its a lot of responsibility. Ive already had my experience in combat from this past deployment, so I try to pass off the things I learned to the new guys in the unit who havent deployed yet. Accompanying each squad of Marines was an infantryman from 3rd Battalion, 4th Marines, who recently returned from a combat deployment to Afghanistan. To ensure 1st Battalion, 7th Marines received the most up-to-date information and training for their upcoming deployment, the infantrymen constantly evaluated tactics and decision making skills from the platoon level down to the re team level. The evaluators give us things that we could improve on for every single range that we do, and also things that weve done well that we need to continue doing well, Bergeron said. This allows key individual leaders down to the re team level to understand the good and bad things theyve done so they dont make the same mistake twice. The Marines ultimately cleared the town, and shortly after received a thorough debrief from the evaluators. The evaluators helped the Marines to the best of their ability and shared tactics that proved successful during their deployment. The company took a vast amount of knowledge away from the day of training and transitioned immediately to preparing for their next range. The battalion is slated to continue pre-deployment training before deploying to Afghanistan this spring. Cpl. Joseph Scanlan is a journalist with the 1st Marine Division at Camp Pendleton, Calif. MARINES from page A6 FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION Like us on CRESTVIEW BULLETIN

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Fromallofour campuses¢ers....HaveaSafe&HappyHoliday!NicevilleCampus FortWaltonBeachCampus EglinAFBEducationCenter HurlburtFieldEducationCenterChautauquaCenterDeFuniakSprings SouthWaltonCenter RobertL.F.SikesEducationCenterCrestview NorthwestFloridaStateCollege isclosedfortheholidays. Allcampuseswillre-openforbusiness andregistrationservicesonJanuary2nd. Studentsmayenrollforclasses andpayfeesovertheholidaybreakthroughtheNWFStateCollegewebsiteatwww.nwfsc.eduSpringclasses beginJanuary13th HappyHolidays MAINOFFICE1301IndustrialDrive Crestview,FL32539 850-682-5111DOWNTOWNOFFICE302N.WilsonStreet Crestview,FL32536 850-682-5112SOUTHSIDEOFFICE2541S.Hwy85 Crestview,FL32539 850-682-3111www.fnbcrestview.com OFCRESTVIEW MEMBERFDIC YourHometo w nBank S ince1 9 56! 6516577 Compassionate,qualitycarefor yourlovedone...30private Rehabsuites Longtermcare Outpatientphysical occupationaland speechtherapy1849JamesLeeBlvd,CrestviewFL682-5322 1849FirstAvenueE.,CrestviewFL 6517900 www.fourpawspetsalon.com FourPaws PetSalon (NexttoGoodThingsDonuts) Offering Boarding, Grooming, DoggyDaycare, &Boutique .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www 8a.m.to5:30p.m. 9a.m.to2p.m. 20%OFF ALLBATHS 10%off AllGrooming ThroughDecember By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Northwood Arts and Sciences Academy students have a new reason to fill their reading logs. Accomplished readers get to read to Dozer, a certified therapy dog who has become a local canine celebrity. Dozer, a Great Dane, visited with the Cougars Thursday morning for three hours on the first of his monthly visits. Students had been eagerly anticipating Dozers visit to the newly reopened library, Northwoods media specialist, Kristal Petruzzi, said. They make frequent visits to the library and complete book after book to fill their reading logs to earn a visit with the dog, she said. Last week, secondgrader Jonas Andrew knew why Dozer took a special interest in him right away. I had waffles for breakfast, Jonas said. I think he smells them on me. Seth Smith, also a second-grader, was impressed that he and Dozer can see eye-to-eye. If he stands up on his (hind) legs, hell be taller than a person, Seth said. Reading to Dozer was fun for many reasons, particularly since the dog doesnt correct a mispronunciation; nor does he mind if the reader skips a hard word. Plus, theres the slobber factor, second-grader Isabelle Cooper said. Hes not one of those dogs that would come up licking your face, she said. School visits were in the works for quite some time, the dogs owner said. Angie Nousiainen said she had approached school officials several times to receive permission to bring Dozer into area schools. Over the summer, Northwoods new principal, Dr. Donna Goode, met Dozer while he greeted Walgreens customers another regular gig and she became an instant fan, Nousiainen said. When I contacted her and asked about bringing him to school, she was more than willing to go to bat before the school board, Nousiainen said. Dozer has a been a regular at Crestview Public Library reading programs and visits residents in area rehabilitation and nursing facilities. Nousiainen said she hopes to one day gain permission to let Dozer visit North Okaloosa Medical Center patients. FIND IT ONLINESee www.crestviewbulletin.com/photos for an image gallery of Dozers rst visit to Northwood Arts and Sciences Academy.Therapy dog enhances Northwood reading program EDUCATION www.crestviewbulletin.comWednesday, December 25, 2013 Page A8 Dozer goes to schoolBRIAN HUGHES | News BulletinDozer, a therapy dog, gets a hug from Northwood Elementary School third-grader Madison Perkins as her classmates, Brianna Rice and Jackson Richard, await their turns to read to the Great Dane.

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awardchevrolet.com 4150SouthFerdonBlvd Crestview,FL Merry Christmas fromallofusat &Happy NewYear! A CHEVROLET A A CHEVROLET A CHEVROLET A CHEVROLET A WARD ARDW ARDW CRESTVIEW 8506822731 FT.WALTONBEACH 8502437214 PENSACOLA 8509940101 EducationCrestview News Bulletin | A9Wednesday, December 25, 2013By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Since November, Northwood Arts and Sciences Academy students have been discovering a new world contained within the pages of books. Theyre really excited, media specialist Kristal Petruzzi said. We havent had a library in several years. Prior to Petruzzis appointment, Northwoods library had been shuttered due to budget reductions that cost the school its former librarian. Volunteer staffers helped it open occasionally. That was before Dr. Donna Goode, the schools new principal, took the helm for the 2013-14 school year. Our principal said reading is a priority at Northwood, Petruzzi said. Goode asked school superintendent Mary Beth Jackson for funds to allow the library to open full time. I am so thankful that our superintendent made opening our library a priority, Goode said. Now, grasping purple library cards, students such as secondgrader Brandyn Hickingbottom and his classmates eagerly browse the stacks, choose books and check them out. Having the kids scan their library cards and book barcodes helps them connect with the library, Petruzzi said. It gives them ownership, she said. This is their library.Reading programsPetruzzi said she keeps lists of books that students request, and has started a donation box to collect money to buy them. She has also started programs to make the librarys services more diverse. A morning art club, for example, meets at 8 a.m. Then, students look through drawing books waiting on the art table. Last week, Dozer, a certied therapy dog, made his rst monthly appearance at the library. Students who complete a reading log or become library regulars may read to Dozer and hug on him, Petruzzi said. (Editors Note: Please see Dozer goes to school, Page A8, for more on this story.) Additionally, a library club has sprung up as students ask to help maintain the facility, Petruzzi said. I have kids coming in during their lunch time and saying, I want to be a junior librarian, she said. Those students help her shelve books and assist their peers in checking books in or out. Bringing in community speakers to talk to students about books and reading is also on Petruzzis agenda and, ultimately, she and Goode would like to see Northwoods library become a neighborhood resource. What we would like to do is open up the library in the (evenings), maybe from 6 to 7, Goode said. We would be open to adults in the community wanting to build partnerships with our readers.Northwood reopens library after 3 yearsBy MATTHEW BROWN682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Northwood Elementary School kindergartners parents recently watched performing arts in action during a Christmas concert. Parents gathered in the schools gymnasium Thursday to see their children perform numerous Christmas songs, including Frosty the Snowman and Silent Night. The students also recognized the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah with the I have a Little Dreidel song. Several students also read a line from an adapted Principal: Christmas concert part of schools developing arts programMATTHEW BROWN | News BulletinNorthwood Elementary School kindergartners perform holiday music, using hand gestures, for family members on Thursday morning in the schools auditorium. The Christmas concert is just one way the school is implementing a new arts curriculum. See Per ER Formance ORMANCE A10 BRIAN HUGHES | News BulletinNorthwood Arts and Sciences Academy media specialist Kristal Petruzzi assists as second-graders, from left, Erica Carroll, Abygayle Hoist, Alison Cruz and Brandyn Hickingbottom check out books.

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By MATTHEW BROWN682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Riverside Elementary Schools parent teacher organization raised nearly $1,400 after turning a school storage room into a Santa Shop. The PTOs store earlier this month sold items such as key chains, Christmas tree ornaments and picture frames to students. Im happy with the amount we raised, event organizer Lisa Hernly said. The kids loved it. Hernly, the PTOs treasurer, said the event allowed students to provide Christmas presents for loved ones and gave them experience dealing with money. There are denitely a lot of lessons to be learned from this, she said. I think it gives the kids a sense of giving and responsibility, fellow PTO volunteer Rebecca Gardner said. Gardner, who regularly volunteers at the school, where her 7-year-old daughter, Katelyn Greer, attends the rst grade, said teachers taught students the importance of giving during the holiday season. That particular lesson seems to have stuck with Katelyn, who said the best part of her shopping experience is getting stuff for (her) family. Proceeds will help purchase educational materials for teachers at the school, Hernly said.MATTHEW BROWN | News BulletinRiverside Elementary School parent teacher organization volunteer Jennifer Lee, left, nishes a transaction made by 7-year-old Katelyn Greer as her mother, Rebecca Gardner, watches. The PTO, which operated the Santa Shop, raised almost $1,400 for educational materials at the school. Riverside PTO raises $1,400 with Santa Shop EducationA10 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, December 25, 2013 version of The Night Before Christmas poem. Karey Estingoy was happy to see her 5-yearold daughter, Amelie, participate in the program. We feel really fortunate to come to the Northwood Arts and Sciences Academy; they are really putting an emphasis on the arts, she said. We really care about the arts. This school year, students were introduced to drama, dance and music in the arts and sciences academy. New Principal Dr. Donna Goode said Thursday mornings concert was a step in the right direction. Our goal is to give every child the opportunity to perform, she said. Kindergarten teacher Missy Holley was proud of all of the students. They all worked really hard on this, she said. They (had) been practicing since we got back from Thanksgiving (break). Holley said the performance brought out an emotional response in some parents. One dad said it brought tears to his eyes, she said. As successful as this was, we will do it again. One of her students, Parker Slade, 6, said he enjoyed singing We Wish you a Merry Christmas for the crowd and a few of his family members. In addition to seeing her grandson Parker sing, Sue Fernandez enjoyed watching all of the children perform. It was cute, she said. You always get a surprise, when you see them perform, she said. PERFORMANCE from page A9 MATTHEW BROWN | News BulletinKarey Estingoy photographs her daughter, Amelie, 5, after a Thursday morning Christmas concert at Northwood Elementary School.

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www.crestviewbulletin.com BSectionINSIDEMore local news SPORTSHannah Day signs with TroyBy RANDY DICKSON682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Former Crestview High School softball player Hannah Day has taken the next step in her softball career. Day, a sophomore catcher at Northwest Florida State College, recently accepted a softball scholarship at Troy University. Shell enroll at Troy in fall 2014. Day, the daughter of Dexter and Rhonda Day, chose Troy over Auburn University and Samford University. A lot of thought went into the decision because I had several options, she said. None of them were bad choices, so it was really hard making that decision. Im a home person, and it was the closest to home. And it felt more comfortable than the other schools did. I felt I should be there. Day said her older sister, Lauren, attends Troy. Hannah said she has frequently visited the school to hang out with her sister. As a freshman catcher at Northwest Florida State, Hannah nished in the top three on the team in almost every offensive category. She led the Raiders with 77 hits and 187 at bats. She tied for the team lead with eight home runs, was second in batting average with a .412 average and second in runs batted in with 59. My Christmas wish listToday is Christmas, and so much has changed since last December, when my family gathered in DeLand to celebrate the birth of Bethlehems Baby. The Dickson family has always embraced and looked to the hope and joy the birth of the Christ child represents. Im sure there will be a little less joy and a few tears around the table today. There will be an empty chair at the table and a little less laughter as we have our rst Christmas without my dad, who, as most of you know, passed away earlier this year. But in the Christ child, we have the hope that our separation is only temporary and that we will again be reunited with those we love. So many memories of a lifetime of Christmases come pouring back as I write this column. I think of the sacri ces my parents made working extra hours and denying things for themselves so that we kids could get many of the gifts we wanted. Many of my Christmases were lled with gifts I could use in my athletic endeavors. Somewhere in an old photo album theres a picture of me at the age 4 with a football under my arm, standing next to an in atable Popeye punching bag. Through the years, there were more footballs and football equipment as well as basketballs, tennis rackets and even a ping pong table and a BB gun. And, no, I didnt shoot my eye out, but I did manage to put a hole in the kitchen window that rst long ago Christmas morning. I have no BB guns, footballs or ping pong tables to give our local coaches and players. But, if I had the magic of giving certain gifts, I have a list of things Id like to pass along to those players and coaches that are such a vital part of my job. My rst gift would go to the Crestview football team. I would give the Bulldogs another win over Niceville in 2014. Along with the win over the Eagles, I would give Bulldog football coach Tim Hatten and his crew a District 17A championship and a long run into the playoffs next fall. I also would give Hatten a long and productive stay with the Bulldogs. My next gift would go to Baker football coach Matt Brunson and his Gator team. And I also would give the Gators a championship. For Crestview volleyball coach and girls basketball coach Kathy Combest, I would give a little patience to deal with dreadfully young teams. I would give rst-year Bulldog boys basketball coach Greg Watson a strong showing in a tough district this year. I would give Crestview basketball star Ronnie Baylark the college of his dreams, where he could continue his playing career. I would give former Crestview High School baseball star Dakota Dean, who is now a freshman at Louisiana State, all the success his older brother, Blake, had while playing for the Tigers. I would give former Baker basketball star Chad Donley and his Liberty University teammates another opportunity to play in the NCAA tournament. If I could, I would give former Laurel Hill basketball star Jeff Reese a healthy heart so he could again play the game he loves. I would give Jeffs older brother, Brad, continued success playing basketball in Europe. I really would love to give Brad the gift of playing in the National Basketball Association. Legend has it that Santas gift bag is bottomless so he doesnt have to worry about running out of space as he takes gifts to little boys and girls around the world. Since Im not Santa, and my space is limited, I only have a couple of more gifts I would like to give. I would give the gift of love to all the athletes, coaches and fans who make this job such a pleasure. I would also give shared memories to last a lifetime with special teammates and those you love. Finally, I would give us all the gift of peace on earth and good will to men that the angels outside of Bethlehem proclaimed 2,000 years ago. Merry Christmas. Randy Dickson is the Crestview News Bulletins sports editor. Email him at randyd@crestviewbulletin.com, tweet him @BigRandle, or call 682-6524. NORTH END ZONERandy DicksonRANDY DICKSON | News BulletinWednesday, December 25, 2013 Page 1 By RANDY DICKSON682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW The Crestview High School boys basketball team fought off a sluggish start to take a 72-54 win over District 1-7A foe Tate on Friday. Perhaps it was the Bulldogs had a hangover from their win over Fort Walton Beach on Tuesday. Or maybe the Crestview players were already thinking about Christmas as the holidays started Friday. Whatever the reason, Bulldog coach Greg Watson was not happy with the way the team played. It was just a very frustrating night, he said. We didnt play well defensively. Offensively, we had too many sloppy turnovers. We couldnt make a shot. It just seemed like everything was going wrong. But right there in the fourth quarter, we made some big plays. Several times throughout the game, it seemed as if the Bulldogs (7-1, 3-0) were on the brink of putting the game out of the reach of the Aggies. Crestviews big man tandem of Denzel Ware and Jerry Siler gave the Bulldogs a quick boost in the rst quarter. Ware and Siler each scored four points in the rst quarter, helping Crestview to a 15-8 lead at the end of the period. Three free throws by Wesley St. Vil with 5:31 left in the rst half pushed the Bulldog lead to 19-10. Tate then went on a 10-2 run Bulldogs keep rolling with win over Tate FILE PHOTOLEFT: Former Crestview High School softball player Hannah Day and her father, CHS assistant principal Dexter Day, are all smiles over Hannah accepting a softball scholarship to Troy University. RIGHT: Day follows through on a practice swing last spring while playing for Northwest Florida State College. See DAY B2 PHOTOS BY RANDY DICKSON | News BulletinLEFT: Jerry Aaron goes up for a shot over Tates D.J. Wells, left, and Danny Cafarella on Friday. TOP RIGHT: Marcelle Moorer looks for an open Bulldog teammate against Tate on Friday. BOTTOM RIGHT: Crestviews Dakota Childree tries to get away from Tate defender Brandon Fryman. Trevin Arrington tries to work his way through the lane for Crestview. See BULLDOGS B2

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B2 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, December 25, 2013Special to the News BulletinTALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott has announced the Pensacola-Ferry PassBrent Metropolitan Statistical Area experienced 17 consecutive months of positive job growth, with an increase of 2,500 jobs over the year in November 2013. The unemployment rate in the Pensacola metro area declined by 1.6 percentage points over the year, from 7.5 percent in November 2012 to 5.9 percent in November 2013. The Pensacola areas positive job growth rate for 17 consecutive months and 2,500 new jobs created is further proof that the steps were taking to create jobs and opportunities for Florida families is working, Scott said. With the areas unemployment rate of 5.9 percent, more families are succeeding in Pensacola and across the state. The Pensacola metro area showed a 10 percent increase in online job demand in November 2013 compared to a year ago, with 5,152 job openings. There were 916 openings for STEM occupations in the metro area in November 2013. STEM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and these jobs are considered high wage and high skill. In November, Workforce Escarosa, along with the states other 23 Regional Workforce Boards, reported more than 42,100 Floridians were placed in jobs. An individual who receives employment and training assistance through a One-Stop Career Center and nds a job within 180 days is deemed a placement and may be reported by a regional workforce board. Of these individuals, 12,091 previously received Reemployment Assistance. In 2012, more than 426,000 Floridians were placed in jobs, with 111,173 former claimants nding employment. Floridas unemployment rate decreased to 6.4 percent in November 2013, down from 6.7 percent in October 2013. The statewide unemployment rate has remained below the national average of 7.0 percent since March 2013. Florida has created 446,300 private sector jobs since December 2010. To view the November 2013 monthly employment data, visit the Florida Jobs website at http://bit.ly/18Z2915.FROM STAFF REPORTSLegislature grants transportation funding The Florida Legislature recently approved funding for many key transportation projects across Northwest Florida. Okaloosa County funding includes: Project development and environmental study for the replacement of Brooks Bridge. Interstate 10 lighting for the County Road 189-Holt Road interchange. PJ Adams Parkway widening and right of way purchasing from Wildhorse Drive to I-10. PJ Adams Parkway widening with funding for construction from Ashley Drive to State Road 85. Funding has also been approved for Escambia and Santa Rosa road construction.Boyles: Employee awards suggestion may ruf e feathersOkaloosa County Commissioner Nathan Boyles wants to end the decadeslong practice of awarding county employees for their years of service. Boyles, who broached the issue in his regular newsletter, said he values county employees but questions honoring people simply for staying in their jobs year after year. Employee awards, which take place at all daytime county commission meetings, generally are the rst order of business after the prayer and Pledge of Allegiance. Employees of varying levels of service, who often bring family members for photos, are applauded and bestowed with T-shirts, sweatshirts and other tokens of appreciation. Boyles, who said his suggestion could ruffle feathers, says the county should honor service that surpasses expectations.Tax collectors office offers 3 percent discount in DecemberOkaloosa property tax owners have until Dec. 31 to receive a 3 percent early payment discount offered by the Okaloosa County Tax Collectors office. The office is closed today and New Years Day. Payments can be made at www.OkaloosaTax.com or in person weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Crestview, Fort Walton Beach, Niceville and Destin. NATHAN BOYLESOkaloosa County Commissioner BRIEFS DAY from page B1Hannah said playing for Raider softball coach Jack Byerly will help her as she moves to Division I softball in the Sunbelt Conference. The transition will be easier because I know if I can handle coach Byerly, I can handle anybody, she said. Hes tough, but hes a good coach, he really is. Everything he does, he does it to get us to the next level. Byerly isnt the only tough coach she has had to put up with through the years. Dexter Day, a former college and minor league baseball player, said he has been tough on Hannah. Shes put in a lot of time (working on the eld and in the weight room), and shes had to put up with me, too, Dexter said. Im not just the easiest person to play for. I think looking back on it, and she can speak for herself, but shes glad that she did what she did to get to where shes at today. Hannah has embraced her fathers coaching. Having him at the games helps a lot because he is always helping me no matter what I do, she said. During the Christmas break, we are going to be out there working and getting better all the time, because you can always get better. He picks me apart every time Im up to bat and every play I make. Hes always videoing me. Hes always correcting me, which is good, because I always need it. The catcher is always considered the eld leader on a softball or baseball team and Hannah enjoys that mental aspect of the game. I like being vocal on the eld and trying to be a leader, she said. If you are quiet, they (the teammates) are not going to look to you for help. I like being out there and taking charge on the eld behind the plate. Stepping out of his role as Hannahs dad and into the role of coach, Dexter assessed her game and what she brings to the diamond. Shes strong, a hard worker, committed, he said. Shes a coachs player. Shes the kind of player coaches like. Shes my daughter, but Im going to talk to you as a coach. Shes that person you can depend on to be at practice every day with a great attitude. Shes going to come to work every day. Shes going to give her best all the time and shes not going to go out and do something stupid and hurt the team. When asked, Dexter also was quick to list some areas of Hannahs game where she can improve. Among those things were improving her bat speed, as she will see faster pitching at Troy than shes seen at Northwest Florida State. He also said she needs to work on hitting the outside pitch that might be a little away from her. Defensively, Dexter said Hannah should continue to work on the things that have gotten her this far, such as blocking the ball in front of the plate and getting her throws off quicker when trying to throw out a base runner. Stepping back into the role of dad, Dexter expressed his pride in what Hannah has accomplished. Im just happy for her to be able to experience what Ive experienced (being successful), he said. Its not about softball. Lets take softball away from it and youve got the work ethic that youve done this. You will carry that (work ethic) the rest of your life. You are going to be dependable and the kind of person you want to have working for you. Im proud of her. Im very proud of her. thanks in part to sloppy passing and ball handling by the Bulldogs. Christian Cass sparked the Aggie run, scoring seven of his 13 points in a span of 100 seconds. Two Cass free throws, with 3:15 left in the half, pulled Tate to within a point of Crestview at 21-20. A 3-point basket by Rusty Moorer pushed the Bulldog lead back to 24-20. A Ronnie Baylark basket with 1:28 left in the half pushed the Crestview lead to six points. Tate pulled to within three points of the Bulldogs on a 3-pointer by Danny Cafarella with 25 seconds left in the half. But Siler hit a basket as the quarter ended to put the Bulldogs up 33-28 at the half. Ware scored on a 3-point play for Crestview to open the second half, and the Aggies never got closer than six points the rest of the way. Aaron and Baylark shared highscoring honors with 18 points each. Ware joined them in double gures with 14 points. St. Vil had 9 points and Moorer seven points. You are not going to play your best every night, and I realize that, Watson said. But effort wise, I felt like in the rst half we were nonchalant, and we were sloppy with the ball. I felt like we were starting to turn the page, and then we took a step back. Luckily, Ronnie made some big plays in the second half, and we kind of got Denzel going, so that was a good thing. Its not about softball. Lets take softball away from it and youve got the work ethic that youve done this. You will carry that (work ethic) the rest of your life. You are going to be dependable and the kind of person you want to have working for you. Im proud of her. Im very proud of her.Dexter Day Hannah Days father BULLDOGS from B1PHOTOS BY RANDY DICKSON | News BulletinLEFT: Josh Hinton shoots a jumper from just inside the free throw line. RIGHT: Denzel Ware goes up for a score off an offensive rebound for Crestview on Friday. BELOW: Wesley St. Vil is fouled by a Tate defender as he takes a jump shot from just outside the lane. GOVERNMENT Gov. Scott: Pensacola gained 2,500 new jobs Sports

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www.crestviewbulletin.comWednesday, December 25, 2013 Page B3 GATHERINGS WHATS HAPPENING HELPING HANDS PUBLIC MEETINGS BULLETIN BOARDWHATS HAPPENING?Whats Happening in Okaloosa County? Let us know. Email items or updates to news@crestviewbulletin.com. Publication is free on a space-available basis.ANNOUNCEMENTPASTEL SOCIETY OF NORTH FLORIDA SEEKS NEW MEMBERS: Beginning to professional artists and patrons wanted. Annual membership costs $35. Details: Carrie Raeburn, psnf@centurytel.net.ONGOINGFREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS: 7 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, Mt. Ewell Lodge 131, U.S. Highway 198, Baker. CRESTVIEW LIONS CLUB: 12 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays at Hideaway Pizza, 326 N. Main St., Crestview. Details: B.J. Thomhave, 682-2012. CRESTVIEW TOASTMASTERS: 6-7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesdays, Holiday Inn Express, 125 Cracker Barrel Road, Crestview. Visitors are welcome. Details: Kathy Morrow, 974-3662. NORTH OKALOOSA PATRIOTS: 6:30 p.m. third Tuesdays, 150 N. Woodlawn Blvd., Crestview. See www. panhandlepatriots.com for details. SENIORS VS. CRIME: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, 296 S. Ferdon Blvd., Suite 8, Crestview. Call 306-3176 to report incidents. Details: okaloosacountysvc@ yahoo.com. EMERALD COAST PROFESSIONALS NETWORKING GROUP: 4-6 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, Crestview JobsPlus OneStop Center, Wilson Street, Crestview. For job seekers with a bachelors degree and two years professional work experience, or more than eight years professional, managerial or supervisory experience. Registration: email a resume and cover letter to ecp@jobsplus02.com. emeraldcoast professionals.com or jobsplusonestop.com. CRESTVIEW EXCHANGE CLUB: second and fourth Thursdays, Covenant Hospice, Crestview. Call Sharlene Cox, 682-6824, for details. DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN COLONISTS CHAPTER promotes interest in the history and deeds of the American colonists prior to 1776. Women who can document lineal descent from an ancestor who serviced the colonies prior to 1776 are eligible for membership. Details: 897-1278. STRICTLY WEAVERS MEETINGS: monthly, TBA. Details: Alice, 934-4403. WEEKLYKNITTING & CROCHET GROUP: 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays, Crestview Public Library. Details: Rae Schwartz, bakerny@ yahoo.com. CRESTVIEW KIWANIS CLUB: 11:45 a.m. Wednesdays, Coach-N-Four, 114 John King Road, Crestview. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 10-11 a.m. Thursdays, 704 E. Robinson, Crestview. For info call 689-1842. MOUNTAIN DULCIMER GROUP: 2-4 p.m. Thursdays, First Baptist Church of Crestview. Listen or play; beginners welcome. Call 682-3165 for details. WEIGHT WATCHERS: 5 p.m. Thursdays, Episcopal Church of the Epiphany, 424 Garden St., Crestview. CONCERNED CITIZENS OF CRESTVIEW: 5:30 p.m. rst Thursdays, Allen Park, Crestview. EMERALD COAST PROFESSIONALS NETWORKING GROUP: 4-6 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, Crestview JobsPlus OneStop Center, Wilson Street, Crestview. For job seekers with a bachelors degree and two years professional work experience, or more than eight years professional, managerial or supervisory experience. Registration: email a resume and cover letter to ecp@jobs plus02.com. emeraldcoast professionals.com or jobsplus onestop.com. CRESTVIEW AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MONTHLY BREAKFAST MEETING: 7 a.m. rst Thursdays, Crestview Community Center, 1446 Commerce Drive, Crestview. TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY: 8 a.m. Fridays, Valley Road Baptist Church, 1018 Valley Road, Crestview. Details: Mary Ann Vincek, 682-5927. See TOPS.org for more information. FREE LINE DANCE LESSONS: 7-8 p.m. Fridays, American Legion Post 75 lounge, 898 E. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. Followed by live band music from 8 p.m. to midnight. Details: 689-3195. STEAK NIGHT: 6 p.m. rst Fridays. American Legion Post 75, 898 E. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. Cost: $14 per person; includes Tbone steak, baked potato, salad, bread and dessert. Details: 689-3195. KARAOKE: 8 p.m. Saturdays, American Legion Post 75, 898 E. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. Details: 689-3195.SERVICES COLD WEATHER SHELTERS are available 6 p.m. to 8 a.m., when temperature is below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, at the following Crestview churches. Sundays: Lifepoint Church Mondays: First Presbyterian Church Tuesdays and Wednesdays: Community of Christ Thursdays: New Beginnings Church Fridays: First Presbyterian Church Saturdays: First United Methodist ChurchHELP NEEDEDAMERICAN LEGION FOOD DRIVE ITEMS NEEDED: James McCullough Post 395 members and Sharing and Caring, a food bank, plan to collect 250 pounds of nonperishable food per month through 2013. Food will be distributed to needy people in the Crestview area. Drop off items 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays at 2260 S. Ferdon Blvd., Unit 35, or call Robert Williams, coordinator, 682-0287, to arrange pick-up. AARP TAX-AIDE VOLUNTEERS help low-to-middleincome taxpayers with their income tax returns, most of which are led electronically. You dont need to be in AARP to participate. Counselors are trained and IRS-certi ed in U.S. Individual Tax Code basics and IRS tax prep software. Must commit to January training and prepare taxes one day a week February through April 15. Details; www. AARP.org/taxvolunteer or contact Dennis Malik, 537-8404. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA NEEDS MENTORS: Adult volunteers spend two hours weekly mentoring children. Pairs go to the library, museum, park or beach, hike, rollerskate or play sports. Call 664-5437 for details. VOLUNTEER ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVE IN DISASTERS:needs people to work in the Emergency Operations Center assisting county personnel. Call Yvonne Earle at 863-1530, extension 230 for details. NORTH OKALOOSA YMCA VOLUNTEERS needed. Contact Susan Goff, 682-8635, for details. HERITAGE MUSEUM VOLUNTEER TRAINING is available. Call Carol Visalpatara, 678-2615, for details.ONGOINGVA SUICIDE HOTLINE: 800273-TALK (8255), or www. veteranscrisisline.net for con dential chat and selfcheck quiz. ENERGY ASSISTANCE AND SERVICES FOR LOW-INCOME FAMILIES: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, Tri-County Community Council, 290 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Crestview. Details: 306-1134. BAKER SOUP KITCHEN: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, Shady Grove Assembly of God. Details: 537-2744. WOMEN AND FAMILY INTERVENTION SERVICES AND EDUCATION: a Crestviewbased Community Drug and Alcohol Council program that helps pregnant women with substance abuse. Details: 689-4024. CHILDCARE ASSISTANCE: Eligible low-income families can receive nancial assistance through the Early Learning Coalition of Okaloosa and Walton Counties. Details: 833-9330 or 833-9333. FREE MEDICARE COUNSELING: By appointment, Crestview Public Library and Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church in Crestview. Details: 3062240 or 1-866-531-8011.COUNTYLEGISLATIVE DELEGATION PUBLIC HEARING: 5-6:30 p.m. Jan. 27, Niceville City Hall, 208 N. Partin Drive, Niceville. Public comments will be heard on proposals for the 2014 Regular Session of the Florida Legislature. To be placed on the agenda or submit handouts, contact Amanda Neeld, 833-9328 or Amanda.Neeld@ my oridahouse.gov, by 5 p.m. Jan. 22. Any member of the public is welcome to attend and participate. The Okaloosa County Legislative Delegation consists of Sens. Greg Evers and Don Gaetz, and Reps. Doug Broxson and Matt Gaetz. OKALOOSA-WALTON TRANSPORTATION PLANNING ORGANIZATION: 3 p.m. third Thursdays, Niceville Community Center, 204 N. Partin Drive. Call 1800-226-8914 ext. 231 to con rm. CITY/TOWNLPA BOARD MEETING: 6 p.m. Jan. 21, City Hall, 198 N. Wilson St., Crestview. No December meetings are scheduled. CRESTVIEW CITY COUNCIL: 6 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, Crestview City Hall. HOLT FIRE DEPARTMENT: 7 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, re station. HOLT FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSION: 6:30 p.m. third Thursdays, 490 W. U.S. Highway 90. NORTH OKALOOSA FIRE DISTRICT: 6 p.m. third Thursdays, re station 82, 5549 John Givens Road, Crestview.ANNOUNCEMENTSWASTE PRO WILL BE CLOSED Dec. 25, Christmas Day and Jan. 1, New Years Day. After-Christmas residential yard waste pickup is Dec. 26 and recycling pickup is Dec. 28 in Crestview. Post-New Years Day recycling is Jan. 2, and residential yard waste collection is Jan. 4 in Crestview. LAUREL HILL TRASH PICKUP is scheduled Dec. 26 and Jan. 2 after Christmas and New Years Day. BOSTON BUTT RELAY FUNDRAISER: 4-5 p.m. Dec. 31 pickup, Crestview Publix parking lot. Cost is $25 per roast. Duke it Out American Cancer Society Relay For Life team fundraiser. Details: Lonie Whitley, 603-3500 or 537-4654. UPCOMINGOKALOOSA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE CITIZENS ACADEMY: 6-9 p.m. Tuesdays, Jan. 7 through April 4, OCSO administrative building, 50 2nd St., Shalimar. Learn more about police of cer training. Details: Ashley Bailey, abailey@sheriff-okaloosa.org.ONGOINGHERITAGE PARK AND INDIAN TEMPLE MOUND MUSEUM TOURS: 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 139 Miracle Strip Parkway S.E., Fort Walton Beach. Cost: $5 plus tax for adults, $4.50 plus tax for seniors 55-plus and active military, and $3 plus tax for children 4-17. Details: Mike Thomin, 833-9595. BAKER BLOCK MUSEUM: 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and on third Saturdays, or by appointments, 1307B Georgia Ave. Free admission. The museum has exhibits, pioneer buildings from the 1800s and a research library with historical documents. Details: 537-5714. CRESTVIEW KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS BINGO: Quarterly games 4:30-6 p.m.; regular games 6-9 p.m. every Tuesday at 701 James Lee Blvd., Crestview. ZUMBA CLASSES: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays, 395 Aplin Road, Crestview. $5 per person. Presented by Crestview Church of the Nazarene. CRESTVIEW SENIOR CENTER MUSIC: 1-4 p.m. Fridays, Old Spanish Trail Park, Stillwell Boulevard. Bring a musical instrument. Card and bingo days also are available. Details: Estelle, 682-8230. VFW HORSESHOE TOURNAMENT: 12 p.m. third Saturdays, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5450, 2240 W. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. Details: Lynn Mobley, 682-5552. COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR: North Okaloosa community organizations may list upcoming events on the Crestview Area Chamber of Commerce online events calendar to avoid scheduling con icts. Free. Non-members welcome. Visit www. crestviewchamber.com and click on Calendar of Events

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Wecareforallyourdermatologicconcernsincluding acne,rashes,wartsandmoles.CharlesF.Trapp,M.D.,F.A.A.D(DiplomateAmericanBoardofDermatologyDiplomateAmericanSocietyForMohsSurgery)HeatherE.Bien,MHS,PA-C,DebraM.Cole,PA-C, ErinMcClure,PA-C,AshleyC.Wagner,PA-C SpecializinginSkinCancerDetectionandTreatment PUBLIC SAFETY www.crestviewbulletin.comWednesday, December 25, 2013 Page B4By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Okaloosa County Sheriffs Deputy Heath Hehl is the rst recipient of American Legion James McCollough Post 395s Law Of cer of the Year award. This award recognizes a law enforcement of cer who has proven personal dedication to societal security and protection, post Cmdr. Raymond Nelson said during a Dec. 9 presentation at city hall. Hehl, who has served the sheriffs of ce three years, has a thorough knowledge of the needs of the community, as his roots and ties in this community are deep, his supervisor, Sgt. Micah Redmon, said. Post members plan to annually recognize an of cer in the Crestview Police Department, the Florida Highway Patrol or the Okaloosa County Sheriffs Ofce, Nelson said. Sheriffs deputies and state troopers nominated for the award must serve in North Okaloosa County, Nelson stated in a media release. The recognition goes to a well-rounded law enforcement of cer who has exceeded the duty requirements expected of his or her position and has demonstrated a distinct pattern of community service coupled with professional achievement, Nelson said.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETINAmerican Legion Post 395 executive committee members and Okaloosa County Sheriff Larry Ashley gather to recognize Deputy Heath Hehl as recipient of the posts Law Of cer of the Year award. From left are Robert Williams, Everett Gilbert, Adrienne McKinney, Hehl, Ashley, Raymond Nelson, Olson Grant, Clarence Collins, Len Ashley and George Stakley. AMERICAN LEGION POST 395 Meets at 6:30 p.m. every third Tuesday at 895 McClelland St., Crestview. Call 262-9583 for more information. Special to the News BulletinNICEVILLE Northwest Florida State College will host 16 teams of regional middle school students Jan. 18 in its rst robotics tournament. The competition takes places from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the Niceville campus Student Services Center. FIRST LEGO League participants ages 9 to 16 will explore nature disasters and what can be done to help people master them in the 2013 Natures Fury Challenge. The program is designed to build community support and engagement; promote STEM learning; and foster innovation. Volunteers are needed as judges, referees, and support for the event. For details or to volunteer, contact Wanjiku Jackson at jacksonw@ nwfsc.edu or (850) 729-5202College hosts robotics tourney Special to the News BulletinNICEVILLE On Dec. 12, Northwest Florida State College recognized students who successfully completed the colleges Associate Degree in Nursing program during the Fall 2013 academic semester. Graduates recognized with special awards were Brandy Barger of Crestview, for Future Nurse Leadership; Jennifer Smith of Fort Walton Beach for Clinical Excellence in Nursing; and Kathleen Beyhl of Destin for Academic Achievement in Nursing. Janet Place, RN, CNM, CNE, a retired U.S. Air Force lieutenant colonel, was given the opportunity to address the students and asked the graduates to be the best nurses they could be. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETINAbove: Northwest Florida State College nursing graduates, in no particular order, are: Brandy Barger, Rose M. Leno and Tanya Simon, Crestview; Kathleen Shirah Beyhl, Destin; Danielle Bohannon, Tiffany McCoy, Lita M. Milord, Linda Moore, Jennifer Powell, Brittney Azlee Sims, Jennifer N. Smith, Fort Walton Beach; Michelle Crenshaw, DeFuniak Springs; Casey N. Davis, Kortney Lewis, Niceville; Tyra Ann Ricci, Santa Rosa Beach; and Katie Leanne Vanzandt, Navarre. Top: Nursing award recipients, from left, are Behyl, Barger and Smith. Northwest Florida State College has pinning ceremony for nurse program graduates FROM STAFF REPORTSMILLIGAN A Milligan man is charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, possession of a controlled substance, resisting an of cer without violence, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of listed chemicals in connection with an arrest Thursday. An Okaloosa County deputy, following an informants tip, investigated activity at a utility shed adjacent to a Milligan residence around 4:30 a.m. Thursday. The of cer found two men he believed were manufacturing methamphetamine. When they exited the shed, the deputy reportedly observed one of the men carrying paraphernalia commonly used to make meth. One suspect ed, but the deputy detained 32-yearold Jason Earl Chessher. The Okaloosa County Multi-Agency Drug Task Force obtained and executed a search warrant at the 1894 Wadsworth Road shed. Lawmen stated they found various chemicals and equipment used to manufacture methamphetamine in the shed and inside a nearby bus that Chessher lives in.Milligan man faces meth charges JASON EARL CHESSHERLegion post honors deputy Like us on CRESTVIEW BULLETIN HEALTH

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COMMUNITY www.crestviewbulletin.com DavidR.Arrowsmith,M.D.Announceshisretirement fromthepracticeof DermatologyeffectiveJanuary31,2014Recordsmaybeobtainedat 1110thAvenue Shalimar,FL32579 (850)651-3376 WEEKDAYS8A.M.TO5P.M.484NorthWilsonStreet,Crestview(850)682-1022ANNOUNCESEXPANSIONOF MEDICALSERVICESTOALL PATIENTSATTHECRESTVIEWHEARTCLINICD.J SExpandedServicesWillIncludeFollowingAndMore:Obesity GastrointestinalProblems Diarrhea Constipation Arthritis Migraines/Headaches UrinaryInfections SexuallyTransmittedDiseases AllHeartProblems HighBloodPressure SkinRash Fever/Cold Allergies RespiratoryProblems Diabetes SleepProblems NewPatientsWelcome|MostInsuranceAccepted OF ANSION EXP ANNOUNCES ALL OT VICESSER MEDICAL CRESTVIEW JD e:or wing And M ollo nclude Fill IWvices er xpanded SE By MATTHEW BROWN682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Attending Noel Night at the Crestview Public Library has become an annual tradition for T.J. Fultons family. Its something different, the 22-year-old said. I enjoyed pretty much everything. Families like Fultons had several activities to choose from Thursday. Children participated in a scavenger hunt or made snowman ornaments, craft stick replicas of a kinara or a menorah and played the traditional Hanukkah dreidel game. Crestview resident Jay Haberline said his 4-year-old daughter, Lillianna, enjoyed spinning the dreidel. She caught on to it quickly, he said. Attendees listened to live music performed by Crestview High Schools Chanticleer chorus and Emmanuel Baptist Churchs worship music team, featuring event organizer Heather Nitzel. Upon Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus arrival, parents and children quickly led in line to photograph keepsake snapshots and share Christmas wish lists. Nitzel, who serves as childrens director at the library, said she was thankful for everyone who participated in the event. Enjoy popular audio and eBooks from the comfort of homeCheck out best-selling and classic eBooks and audiobooks available 24/7 from the librarys digital collection at http:// okaloosa.lib.overdrive.com. With hundreds of popular ction and non ction titles to choose from, this collection is guaranteed to have something for everyone. You can enjoy best-selling novels, well-known classics, self-improvement guides and much more all on your own time, wherever you may be. You can browse the collection, borrow with your library card and enjoy on your computer, tablet, smartphone or eReader device. Borrowed eBooks can be enjoyed immediately in your web browser with OverDrive Read. Or, you can download eBooks into free software, Adobe Digital Editions or send to your Kindle device or app. Downloaded eBooks can be transferred to eReader devices such as NOOK Sony Reader and many more. Audiobooks can be downloaded into OverDrive Media Console (just MP3 audiobooks for Mac users). Once downloaded, titles can be enjoyed immediately or transferred to a variety of devices, including iPod and many others. Users with smartphones or tablets can install the OverDrive Media Console app to directly download EPUB eBooks and MP3 audiobooks titles to their device. No matter how you plan to enjoy, titles will automatically expire at the end of the lending period. There are no late fees! This service, powered by OverDrive, is free with your library card. To get started enjoying eBooks and audiobooks, visit www.cityofcrestview.org/library.php or go to the librarys website and click on the Search OCPLC eBooks link. Marie Garcia is the Crestview Public Librarys assistant library director. MARIE GARCIACheck It Out ACTIVITIESFIRST TUESDAY LECTURE: 10:30 a.m. Jan. 7 at the library. Topic: History of the Florida Chautauqua, by Dean Debolt. Coffee and cookies served at 10 a.m. The 2014 Florida Chautauqua Assembly is Jan. 24-26 in DeFuniak Springs. Details: 8927613.STARGAZING: 6:30-8 p.m. third Tuesdays, Crestview Public Library. Tom Haugh, with the Northwest Florida Astronomy Association, facilitates. Details: www.nwfastro. org.BEGINNING COMPUTER SKILLS TRAINING FOR SENIORS: Call 682-4432 to schedule one-hour appointments at the Crestview Public Library. Library card required. Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Page B5 CHECK IT OUTPHOTOS BY MATTHEW BROWN | News BulletinTOP LEFT: Mario Lindsey helps his 4-year-old son, Armon, make a snowman ornament. TOP RIGHT: Rae Schwartz, president of the Friends of the Crestview Library, teaches attendees how to spin a dreidel. ABOVE: Attendees listen to Crestview High Schools Chanticleer chorus perform Christmas music. RIGHT: Jay Haberline photographs his children, 2-year-old Conner, left, and 4-year-old Lillianna, center, as they visit with Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus. BELOW: Parents help their children make Christmas tree ornaments at the crafts table. See www.crestviewbulletin.com/ photos for an image gallery of Noel Night.Crestview library celebrates 10th annual Noel Night

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50 Cent Value FREECall 682-6524 to subscribe to the Crestview News BulletinBy MATTHEW BROWN682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW The Fitzpatrick family continues to do its part in making sure less fortunate residents are able to have their own live Christmas trees this year. With assistance from Crestview retailers Lowes Home Improvement and Ace Hardware, the Fitzpatrick family collected 25 trees. The family donated both Douglas rs and Fraser rs for the clientele at Sharing and Caring in Crestview. Sharing and Caring vice president Robin Marston said the food pantrys clientele is always thankful for the familys continued donations. Our clientele have been asking about when the trees will be here, she said. A lot of people would not have a Christmas tree if it wasnt for (the Fitzpatrick family). Collecting and donating the Christmas trees has been the family tradition for the past 24 years, David said. He regularly enlists the assistance of both his daughters, Misty and Reba, to help in the oneday event. Helping the less fortunate is normal for the family, Misty said. We have always done this, she said. This just comes naturally to us. David said collecting the live trees would not be possible without the support of local businesses. We are just happy to be helping out the community, said Lowes Manager Roger Jay. We always try to do what we can to help. In addition to donating trees, David recently dressed as Santa Claus and visited children staying at the Ronald McDonald House and Sacred Heart Hospital, both in Pensacola. I just love seeing the big smiles on their faces, he said. I wouldnt do it for money; the pay would be seeing their smiles. Fitzpatrick said this month is the greatest time of year to be charitable. I have been waiting for this month all year long, he said. I have loved doing charity work all my life. Fromallofour campuses¢ers....HaveaSafe&HappyHoliday!NicevilleCampus FortWaltonBeachCampus EglinAFBEducationCenter HurlburtFieldEducationCenterChautauquaCenterDeFuniakSprings SouthWaltonCenter RobertL.F.SikesEducationCenterCrestview NorthwestFloridaStateCollege isclosedfortheholidays. Allcampuseswillre-openforbusiness andregistrationservicesonJanuary2nd. Studentsmayenrollforclasses andpayfeesovertheholidaybreakthroughtheNWFStateCollegewebsiteatwww.nwfsc.eduSpringclasses beginJanuary13th M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey FREEEYEEXAMForNEWPatients59andOlderThisCerticateisgoodforacompleteMedicalEyeExamwithDarrenPayne,M.D.InOurCrestviewOfceBoardCertiedEyePhysicianandSurgeon CODE:CB00 NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourofcepolicythatwehavetherighttorefusetopay,cancelpaymentorbereimbursedforpaymentforanyotherservices,examinations,ortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofandwithin72hoursof respondingtotheadvertisementforanyfree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. BoardCertiedEyePhysician andCataractSpecialist WespecializeintheDiagnosisandTreatmentof EyeConditionsAssociatedwithaging,including: Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Volume 13, Number 52 PHOTOS BY MATTHEW BROWN | News BulletinDavid Fitzpatrick, right, hands a Douglas r Christmas tree to Sharing and Caring volunteer Joshua Miller on Tuesday. Below, Fitzpatrick carries two Douglas rs from the outside garden department of Lowes Home Improvement in Crestview to a truck. Crestview family continues tradition of collecting Christmas trees for less fortunate THE GIVING TREES Like us on CRESTVIEW BULLETINI have been waiting for this month all year long. I have loved doing charity work all my life. David Fitzpatrick

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ExtraA2 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, December 25, 2013 HappyHolidays MAINOFFICE1301IndustrialDrive Crestview,FL32539 850-682-5111DOWNTOWNOFFICE302N.WilsonStreet Crestview,FL32536 850-682-5112SOUTHSIDEOFFICE2541S.Hwy85 Crestview,FL32539 850-682-3111www.fnbcrestview.com OFCRESTVIEW MEMBERFDIC YourHometo w nBank S ince1 9 56! Home delivery subscriptions may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. NEWS INFORMATIONIf you have a concern or comment about the Crestview News Bulletins coverage, please call 682-6524.PUBLISHERSkip Foster sfoster@crestviewbulletin.comEDITORThomas Boni tboni@crestviewbulletin.comOFFICE STAFFDawn Barnes ...circulation assistant dawnb@crestviewbulletin.comADVERTISING INFORMATIONMelissa Tedder............ad consultant melissa@crestviewbulletin.com Sherrie Stanley .....media consultant sherries@crestviewbulletin.comEDITORIALBrian Hughes .......................reporter Arts & entertainment editor brianh@crestviewbulletin.com Matthew Brown ...................reporter matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com Randy Dickson .............sports editor randyd@crestviewbulletin.com Renee Bell .............editorial assistant news@crestviewbulletin.comMAIN OFFICE FAX NUMBER850-682-2246 The Crestview News Bulletin is published twice weekly each Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, at 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview FL 32536. Periodical postage paid at Crestview, Florida. POSTMASTER: Please send address change to 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536. All material herein is property of the Crestview News Bulletin. USPS Number 010-209 CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN SUBSCRIPTION RATES705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524.IN COUNTY13 weeks ....................................$9.45 26 weeks ...................................$17.85 52 weeks ..................................$32.76OUT OF COUNTY13 weeks ...................................$14.70 26 weeks ..................................$23.10 52 weeks ..................................$38.01 A SPECIAL PUBLICATION OF awardchevrolet.com 4150SouthFerdonBlvd Crestview,FL Merry Christmas fromallofusat &Happy NewYear! A CHEVROLET A A CHEVROLET A CHEVROLET A CHEVROLET A WARD ARDW ARDW CRESTVIEW 8506822731 FT.WALTONBEACH 8502437214 PENSACOLA 8509940101 By MATTHEW BROWN682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW It was no surprise to Crestview High School band director Jody Dunn that a crowd had lined up just outside the Pearl Tyner auditorium before the Christmas concert Tuesday night. There are a little less than 500 seats available in the auditorium. We usually have an excess of that, he said. Friends and family members of students who performed in the concert lled the auditorium to listen a variety of Christmas music selections. Attendees fortunate enough to get inside the auditorium were able to listen to six different ensembles, including four concert bands and two jazz bands, Dunn said. Each ensemble performed renditions of holiday classics. The schools concert and symphonic band performed selections from The Nutcracker and O Magnum Mysterium, among others. The schools jazz ensembles performed other holiday favorites, like Winter Wonderland and Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer. Using the jazz ensembles for background music, Azyia Taylor, Nick Watson and Elizabeth Dunn earned applause after their solo performances of Christmas Time Is Here, Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas and Jingle Bells. Performing before a large crowd was nothing new to senior Foster Lux, 16, who played a clarinet in the wind ensemble at the end of the concert. I like the crowd ... when you get to hear their feedback and how much they enjoyed it, she said. I just like performing before other people, because they can enjoy it as much as we do. In addition to being in the 2014 Okaloosa All County Band with 31 other band members, Lux also made the 2014 Florida AllState Symphonic Band. Lux said her nal year performing in the CHS Christmas concert is bittersweet. Its sad to go, but it is about time, she said. Kathi Peyton attended to see her 17-year-old daughter, Shayna Clay, play the schools concert band. Peyton said in addition to seeing her daughters performance, watching the other students is just as enjoyable. I like it mostly to see the other kids talents, she said. CHS Christmas concert continues to draw crowdsMATTHEW BROWN | News BulletinNick Watson, center, holds the microphone while singing Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas with the jazz ensemble playing the music during the 2013 Crestview High School Christmas Concert on Tuesday night at the schools Pearl Tyner auditorium. To his right conducting the jazz band is Jody Dunn, the schools band director. It comes around every year, although when it actually starts may vary. Does it really make a difference? Some say, Absolutely! Others say, Its just really annoying! Im referring to the ubiquitous advertising blitz for getting you to spend your hard earned money on Christmas gifts. Oops, excuse me holiday gifts in order to be politically correct. Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday each offer great deals to get us to spend. The pressure is on. As of right now, there are only a few shopping days left. Are you in a panic? (Im trying to not be, myself.) While doing some shopping recently, I saw a large mug. There was a message printed on the mug which, when I rst read it, thought was a bit trite. But then the full meaning of it dawned on me. The mug said, Next year Im going to think about what Christmas means to God. What does Christmas mean to God? Here is something to ponder: Christmas, for God, demonstrates that at a particular time and place, God came to be with us himself. When Quirinius was governor of Syria, in a town called Bethlehem, a child was born. That child was God himself. The one who inhabits eternity came to dwell in time. The one whom people learned to fear came to demonstrate great love and forgiveness. The God of all mercies came so that we could experience his divine mercy and receive life. Let me encourage you to ask yourself a question, When Christmas this year has come and gone, what difference will your hectic pace have made? Was all the anxiety, rushing around, exhaustion worth it? Then ask yourself: Is this what God intended when he came to this earth in the baby Jesus? The Rev. Mark Broadhead is Laurel Hill Presbyterian Church and First Presbyterian Church of Crestviews pastor. FROM THE PULPIT REV. MARK BROADHEADFrom the PulpitHype, hyperbole and Jesus during the holidays I just like performing before other people, because they can enjoy it as much as we do. Foster Lux CHS senior

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ExtraCrestview News Bulletin | A3Wednesday, December 25, 2013 J&PGlitz&Glitter(NEXTDOORHELLOBEAUTIFUL&ACROSSFROMLOSRANCHEROS) John&PatCooperat GlitzandGlitterwantto wisheveryonea MerryChristmas& HappyNewYear Wearereadyforallof yourholidayattireneeds! r atpeooat Cn & PhoJ ont tar wetitlnd Gz aitlG ont tar wetitlnd Gz aitlG Dr.RichardThomas andhis compassionate caregivers wishyou health&happiness thisholidayseason andinthecoming NewYear! NowOering BotoxandJuvedermXCTreatments!(850)682-4516102AlabamaStreet,SuiteA,CrestviewHours:Mon-Thurs8am-5pm,ClosedFridayswww.crestviewdentist.com eHomeofDocHollidaysDentalChair By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com GAZA VALLEY, Afghanistan While residents throughout the north county region are shopping for last-minute gifts, decorating their homes and baking cookies, many families loved ones are spending a decidedly nontraditional Christmas. Several hundred members of the 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) deployed to Afghanistan at the beginning of November in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Other soldiers from the group are concurrently serving in South America. Its a very active period here, spokesman Capt. Thomas Cieslak said Wednesday morning from the groups base at Bagram Aireld. Cieslak said one of the groups main missions is to build rapport with the Afghan population, Afghan National Army Special Forces and Afghan commandoes. Its a side-by-side relationship working together to make Afghanistan a more secure place for the Afghans, Cieslak said. The Afghan forces are extremely condent in their abilities and their skills.Fa AMIlyLY SUPPORTHelping the American soldiers remain focused on their mission is the comfort in knowing their loved ones are among friends back in the Crestview area. Its a peace of mind knowing there is a lot of support for our families back home, Cieslak said, adding soldiers keep in touch with their families regularly. Were blessed with a great infrastructure to communicate with our families, he said. Its a good feeling. Were away from our families but were in touch with our families. Though fully focused on their jobs, Cieslak said the soldiers havent forgotten two of their comrades who died near the beginning of their deployment, nor their families at the holidays. The families of Staff Sgts. Alex Viola and Richard Vazquez are still in our hearts, he said. They remain in our thoughts and prayers. No matter how focused they are on their mission, soldiers thoughts naturally turn to home and loved ones at this special time of year, Cieslak said. Of course, every member of the group not just in Afghanistan but in South America were missing our families while deployed, but its an honor to serve our country, he said. For his comrades, making sure each soldier is safe and will return to his or her family is a paramount concern. Everybody is doing their best, not just for the mission but for each other, for the soldier to the left and right, Cieslak said. Above all he said, while 7th Special Forces troops are deployed, they are drawing strength from the support they receive from back home in north Okaloosa County. Its wonderful to have a community like Crestview supporting us, Cieslak said. It means the world to us to have the support were getting back there.Strength flows from homeAt Christmas, 7th Special Forces soldiers draw comfort knowing families are cared forTOP: U.S. Army Special Forces, including Crestview area residents, cross a wide river Dec. 11 in Gaza Valley, Zabul province, Afghanistan. BOTTOM LEFT: As seen through night-vision equipment, Afghan National Security Forces and U.S. Special Forces conduct a pre-mission brieng. BOTTOM RIGHT: A U.S. Special Forces soldier with the Combined Joint Special Operations Task ForceAfghanistan, unidentied for security, crosses a creek during a clearance operation.PP HOTOS By Y PP FC. DAVI I D DEVI I CH H | Special to the News Bulletin

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ExtraA4 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Merry Christmas Rememberthe Reasonforthe Season...GodBless Forourhome toyours 981W.NelsonAve. DefuniakSprings 850-892-7311 594N.MainStreet Crestview 850-682-6835 Locallyownedandoperatedby DarelandDonnaLundy WeatCooper'sFineJewelrywant tothankallofourcustomers includingSanta! Welookforwardtoserving allyourjewelryneedsin2014.~HaveaMerryChristmas &HappyNewYear~ CustomDesigns&Settings A.M-6P.M. 850-683-8004 By MATTHEW BROWN682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Members of the First Baptist Church of Crestview continued their annual tradition of providing a Christmas store for the residents of the Crestview Manor. They have blessed us tremendously and made our hearts smile, resident Vicki Ripley said. Ripley was one of almost 40 residents in the assisted living facility who picked out free presents for family members and friends who visit during the holidays. We have been doing this since 1985, the year the manor opened, said Ida Faye Powell, the event organizer. This is just a way for us to give to the residents who dont have the money to buy gifts or get out and buy the gifts ... for family members or friends. The store featured gift items for men, women and children. From toys to jewelry and tool sets, each resident was able to pick out at least four items to give to visiting family members. Church members donated many of the items, along with money saved in the churchs budget, Powell said. The womens ministry led the event with assistance from youth in the Acteens group, who wrapped each gift in Christmas wrapping paper and delivered the gifts to the residents rooms. After volunteering with the store on behalf of the church in the past, current resident Neta Roberts is now on the receiving end. It feels ne, not as good as being the giver, but I love it, she said. I hope they always have this going on, because some are not as fortunate as others. The facilitys activities director, Susan Josey, agreed. Its a wonderful, wonderful thing that they are doing, she said. Without this, residents would not be able to give presents to their friends and family. FiIND itIT ONLiINeESee www.crestviewbulletin.com for a photo gallery from the shopping event at the Crestview Manor, presented by the womens ministry at the First Baptist Church of Crestview. Church offers Christmas store to manor residents PHOt T Os S BY BB RIAN N HH UGH H ES | News BulletinWith its Christmas decorations glowing, Main Street casts a festive holiday spirit on a recent evening. Above, the Okaloosa County courthouse forms a backdrop for the Crestview Christmas tree. Its Christmastime in the cityPHOt T Os S BY MATTH H EW B B RO O WN N | News BulletinBev Lilley, left, of the womens ministry at First Baptist Church of Crestview, assists Helen Malone, a resident at Crestview Manor, select gifts for friends and family at the Christmas store on Monday night. Below, Lauren Medford, 12, left, and Jenna Morales, 15, of the First Baptist Church of Crestview prepare to wrap gifts in Christmas wrapping paper for Crestview Manor residents Monday night. Residents were able to select free Christmas presents for friends and family at a Christmas store, thanks to the womens ministry at the church.

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ExtraA6| Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, 25, 2013 Legal # 161718 NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE 1ST JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 13 CA2309 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN RE: SURF CONSULTANTS, INC. as successor in interest to Compass Bank vs. DEBORAH J THORNTON TO: DEBORAH J THORNTON 113 TRISTATERRACE CT DESTIN FL32541 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition for COMPLAINT has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any to it on Stacey S. Fisher, Esq. attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 2775 Sunny Isles Blvd, Ste 100, Miami, FL 33160-4007 and file the original with the clerk of the above styled court on or before December 30, 2013; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief prayed for in the complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said court at OKALOOSA, Florida on this 18 day of November, 2013. Clerk Name: DON HOWARD As clerk, Circuit Court OKALOOSACounty, Florida By Nancy Moxcey As Deputy Clerk Sprechman & Associates, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff, 2775 Sunny Isles Blvd, Ste 100 Miami, FL 33160-4007 phone: (305) 931-0100 S17269:P354NOA 12/04/2013 12/11/2013 12/18/2013 12/25/2013 Legal # 161730 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-CA-4221F Paul Jennings Gregory, as Personal Representative of The Estate of Paul W. Jennings, Plaintiff, vs. The Church of Philip The Evangelist of Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, Inc., and all unknown persons claiming by, through, or under said corporation, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: The Church of Philip The Evangelist of Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, Inc., a dissolved Florida corporation, and all unknown persons or parties who may be interested in the subject matter of the action. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action seeking a declaratory judgment to enforce an interest in and remove a cloud on title on the following described property in Okaloosa and Holmes County, Florida: Parcel 1: Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 23, Township 4 North, Range 17 West, Holmes County, Florida, and run North 02 East 166.17 feet to the centerline of U.S. Highway 90, thence North 57 East along said centerline 2490.36 feet, thence North 54 West 456.94 feet to a nail on the centerline of old U.S. Highway No. 90, thence run North 47 East 462.53 feet, thence run North 45 East 210.90 feet, thence run South 45 East 33.0 feet to an iron pipe on the Southeasterly right-of-way boundary of old U.S. Highway No. 90 for a point of beginning, from said point of beginning continue South 45 East 200.00 feet, thence run North 43 East 241.34 feet, thence run North 46 West 200.00 feet to an iron pipe on said Southeasterly right-of-way boundary, thence run South 43 West along said right-of-way boundary 101.69 feet to a point on a curve concaved Northwesterly, thence run Southwesterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 8627.45 feet, through a central angle of 0 for an arc length of 135.53 feet to the point of beginning. Parcel 2: E 1/2 of SW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of Section 28, Township 6 North, Range 15 West, Holmes County, Florida. LESS AND EXCEPT that portion of subject property encumbered by road right of way as now exists. Hancock Bank, Account # 731116372 and # 20419090. Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Account # 3627-0735 and # 2106-2131. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiffs attorney: Richard P. Petermann Anchors Smith Grimsley 909 Mar Walt Drive, Suite 1014 Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547 (850) 863-4064 on or before January 15, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Okaloosa County Courthouse, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED on December 4, 2013. Don W. Howard, Clerk of Court By: Courtney Eslinger As Deputy Clerk 12/11/2013 12/18/2013 12/25/2013 01/01/2014 Legal # 161751 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WALTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO. 13 CP 185 IN RE: ESTATE OF: LEONARD F. MARTIN, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LEONARD F. MARTIN, deceased, whose date of death was September 13, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Walton County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 571 Highway 90 East, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is December 18, 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: Michael A. Jones Attorney for Barbara L. Noll Florida Bar Number: 332471 MATTHEWS & JONES, LLP 323 E. John Sims Parkway Niceville, FL 32578 Telephone: (850) 729-7440 Fax: (850) 729-7871 E-Mail:mjones@destinlaw.comSecondary E-Mail: aprivett@destinlaw.comPersonal Representative: Barbara L. Noll 38 Reed Place Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32548 12/18/2013 12/25/2013 Legal # 161753 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 46-2010-CA-001401S DIVISION W US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR WFMBS 2004-EE, Plaintiff, vs. COURT DEL MAR HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION. INC. SUSANNA MILGRAM; WELLS FARGO BANK N.A. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated November 26, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 46-2010-CA-001401S of the Circuit Court of the FIRST Judicial Circuit in and for OKALOOSA County, Florida wherein US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR WELLS FARGO ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-EE1, is the Plaintiff and COURT DEL MAR HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION. INC.; SUSANNA MILGRAM; WELLS FARGO BANK N.A.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at WWW.OKALOOSA.REALFORECLOSE.COM at 11:00AM, on the 9 day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: PARCEL 1: UNIT 106, COURT DEL-MAR, A TOWNHOUSE DEVELOPMENT, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN PLAT BOOK 13, PAGE 60, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL 2: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 22 WEST, OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER OF LOT 124, BLOCK F, HOLIDAY ISLE RESIDENTIAL SECTION NO.5 SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, AT PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA;

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ExtraCrestview News Bulletin |A7Wednesday, 25, 2013 Customer SupportLegal Advertising ClerkThe Northwest Florida Daily News is looking for an individual to join our fast paced legal department. The job includes typesetting, scheduling public notices and oversees the preparation of legal affidavits. PC Window and Excel necessary. The ideal candidates must be skilled in computer data entry & type 45 wpm. Must also give attention to detail, have excellent spelling, grammar and interpersonal communication skills. Excellent proof reading is a must. The Daily News offers an excellent benefit package, health, dental, vision coverage and 401k. Drug screen and background check will be required. Email resume to ehypes@nwfdailynews.com Interview will be scheduled. Drug-free workplace -EOE Web ID 34274703 Text FL74703 to 56654 Mike Golles Painting Int., Ext., pressure washing Lic & Ins Free estimates. Ph. 682-5347 Sr. Citizen Discounts. Farm DirectCentipede, Zoysia, St Augustine and Bermuda We Deliver & Install Call 850-244-6651 Suncoast Sod Farms Text FL73694 to 56654 Spot Advertising works! 6517783 THENCE GO NORTH 59 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 66.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DURANGO ROAD (66 FEET RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF THE QUAYS PHASE I, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGE 157, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA THE FOLLOWING TWO CALLS: (1) THENCE GO NORTH 30 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 107.08 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE; (2) THENCE GO ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 23.91 FEET; AN ARC DISTANCE OF 41.21 FEET (CHORD -36.29 FEET, CHORD BEARING -NORTH 18 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST) TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY LINE AND A NORTHWESTERLY EXTENSION THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 181.48 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 21 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 116.67 FEET TO THE PCB; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 21 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 14.24 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 70.00 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE, AN ARC DISTANCE OF 54.98 FEET (CHORD -53.58 FEET CHORD BEARING -SOUTH 45 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST); THENCE GO NORTH 75 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 13.08 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 24 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 5.01 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 18.00 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 24 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 18.50 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 43.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND ACCEPT: PARCEL DESCRIBED: (AS WRITTEN) A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 22 WEST, OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER OF LOT 124, BLOCS F, HOLIDAY ISLE RESIDENTIAL SECTION NO. 5 SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, AT PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO NORTH 59 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 66.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DURANGO ROAD (66 FEET RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF THE QUAYS PHASE I, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGE 157, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA THE FOLLOWING TWO CALLS: (1) THENCE GO NORTH 30 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 107.08 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE: (2) THENCE GO ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 23.91 FEET; AN ARC DISTANCE OF 41.21 FEET (CHORD -36.29 FEET, CHORD BEARING NORTH 18 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST) TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY LINE AND A NORTHWESTERLY EXTENSION THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 181.48 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 21 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 116.67 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 21 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 14.24 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 70.00 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE, AN ARC DISTANCE OF 40.32 FEET (CHORD -39.77 FEET CHORD BEARING -SOUTH 45 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST) TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING: THENCE CONTINUE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE, HAVING A RADIUS OF 70.00 FEET AN ARC DISTANCE OF 14.66 FEET (CHORD -14.63 FEET CHORD BEARING SOUTH 29 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST); THENCE GO NORTH 75 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 13.08 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 24 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 5.01 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 18.00 FEET: THENCE GO NORTH 24 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 18.50 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 4.00 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 24 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 23.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 192 DURANGO ROAD, DESTIN, FL 32541 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 27, 2013. Don W. Howard Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Kim Bouhall Deputy Clerk 1 Plaintiff name has changed pursuant to order previously entered. Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10012771 **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, ADA Liaison, Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547, Phone (850)609-4700 Fax (850)652-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@flcourts 1.gov, At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired call 711. 12/18/2013 12/25/2013 Legal # 161754 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 46-2012-CA-002592C DIVISION PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. JASON E BARNARD ; JINJU L BARNARD ; FOX VALLEY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. ; FOX VALLEY HOMEOWNERS ASSOC., INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 19, 2013 and entered in Case No. 46-2012-CA-002592C of the Circuit Court of the FIRST Judicial Circuit in and for OKALOOSA County, Florida wherein PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION is the Plaintiff and JASON E BARNARD; JINJU L BARNARD; FOX VALLEY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; FOX VALLEY HOMEOWNERS ASSOC., INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at WWW.OKALOOSA.REALFORECLOSE.COM at 11:00AM, on the 10 day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 8, BLOCK I, FOX VALLEY PHASE 1, BEING A PORTION OF SECTIONS 26 AND 35, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 24 WEST, CITY OF CRESTVIEW, OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 21, PAGES 29-32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY. A/K/A 653 TERRITORY LANE, CRESTVIEW, FL 32536 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 22, 2013. Don W. Howard Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Vicki Jackson Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F11016546 **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, ADA Liaison, Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547, Phone (850)609-4700 Fax (850)652-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@flcourts1.go v, At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired call 711. 12/18/2013 12/25/2013 UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? Adoption-A brave & selfless choice. Medical, living & counseling expenses paid. Choose the loving & financially secure family. Compassionate Atty. Lauren Feingold 24/7 866-633-0397 www.fklhearttoheart.net #0958107 We Buy GoldJewelry & Diamonds Get a $1000 Loan for $50 a month 700 Beal Pkwy US GOLD PAWN Call TOM Now!! 850-974-2462www .usgold p awn.com Logistics/TransportClass ACDL DriversNeeded Immediately3 years min. driving with Dump Trailer Experience. $500 Sign On Bonus *Local Panhandle Hauling *Home Nights Apply ONLY online www.perdido trucking.com Perdido Trucking Service, LLC251-470-0355Web ID#: 34272984 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com. EOE Training/EducationWant to be a CNA/ Phlebotomist?Dont want to wait? Express Training Services now offering our nursing asst. exam prep classes in DESTIN Class for 1 week. 850-502-5521 Military Spouses We Are mycaa certifiedexpresstraining services.com Next class 01/13/2014 Holt 1150sf, 2 br, 2 ba, Stove, Fridge, Micro, DW, included. With w/d hkup, lots of storage, & covered parking. $680 mo + damage deposit. Call 850-537-2894 or 850-287-5338 Crestview-FSBO 4 homes by pool 3BD 2BA, 3BD1BA2 Studios & office, ovr 5800 sq ft @ $70/sq ft, ovr 2K sq ft adtnl strg on 2.9 private ac, 3690 Hwy 90 E $411,100 Pics on zillow.com 682-4994 Individual wants to buy house for investment. 850-651-0987 Text FL74232 to 56654 If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers. The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds.

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ExtraA8| Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, 25, 2013 MPG is Estimated MPG sale price does not include Tax, Tag, Title or $199. Dealer Processing Fee. Photos for Illustration Purposes. Actual vehicle will vary. Sale ends Jan. 2nd 2014awardchevrolet.comCRESTVIEW 8506822731 FT. WALTON BEACH 8502437214 PENSACOLA 85099401014150 South Ferdon Blvd Crestview, FL 2013 SONIC LTZ LOADED$17,975Leatherette Int, Cruise, XMM My Link Radio, PW, PL, Spoiler, Alm Wheels, Fog lights, Enhanced Premium 6 Speakers#152862014 EQUINOX$24,250 INCLUDES REBATE PW,PL,CR,TL,XM, OnStar and More 2014 SILVERADO DOUBLE CAB2014 2500 H.D. DIESEL CREW CAB Z71 4X4 LTZ DEMOTRADE IN ASSIST MUST TRADE IN 99 OR NEWER DEMO DISCOUNT AND REBATE$25,397 $1,000$58,495 $7,688$24,397 $50,8072013 CAMARO$23,258 INCLUDES REBATE PW,PL,CR,TL,AUTO TRANSMISSION, ONSTAR & MORE#15660 2013 TRA VERSE LTZ LOADED$37,957NAVIGATION, REAR DVD, HEATED AND COOLED FRONT SEATS WITH MEMORY, XM, ALL POWER, ONSTAR AND MUCH MORE #15481 DEMO#15840 #15613$25,893INCLUDES REBATEPW, PL, CR, TL, XM, ONSTAR, and moreALL NEW 2014 IMPALA$34,987INCLUDES REBATEHURST SHIFTER, BOSTON ACOUSTICS, RS, REAR VISION PKG, PW, PL, CR, TL, ONSTAR AND MUCH MORE#146152012 CAMARO C ONVERTIBLE SS 420 H.P 2013 SUBURBAN LTZ 4X4 DEMOMSRP DEMO DISCOUNT AND REBATES OWNER LOYALTY MUST OWN 99 OR NEWER GM VEHICLE$64,395 $5,832 $2,500$56,063 DEMO#15451SUNROOF, DVD, NAVIGATION, HEATED AND COOLED LEATHER SEATS, BOSE, XM/CD, ONSTAR AND MUCH MORECRUISE, AC, PL, PW, AUTO TRANSMISSION AND MORE LTZ, LEATHER, HEATED WITH MEMORY SEATS, BOSE, XM/CD, 4WD, TRAILER TOW, LOCKING REAR DIFF, ONSTAR AND MORE.#15838 #15856 Merry Christmas from 6517266 A CHEVROLET WARD



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www.crestviewbulletin.com 50¢ CHS leadership program collects 3 tons of food, clothes for needy classmates By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Today, thousands of North Okaloosa residents will un wrap their Christmas presents. But the holiday came early for families of underserved Crestview High School students, who browsed 35 6-foot tables of food and 10 round tables of clothing on Thursday. More than 6,000 canned goods and $1,000 in cash donations were among CHS students’ contributions for them. Before the giveaway, 50 leader ship program students unpacked al most 3 tons of food donated for more than 40 classmates’ families. “This is compassion right here,” digital design teacher Yolanda Por ter said. “This is good. These are good kids.” Making people happy Students had collected the canned vegetables for three weeks. The effort grew into a competition between classrooms, leadership teacher Stephanie Sanders said. Math teacher Carrie Valdes’ stu dents won by donating more than 1,100 cans. By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — The Crestview Pub lic Safety Academy, whose rst class graduated Dec. 5, will return next spring, said community polic ing ofcer Wanda Hulion, the pro gram’s administrator. And graduates of the 10-week course, which teaches residents the inner workings of rst respond ers’ operations, can expect an ad vanced course, Police Chief Tony Taylor said. “I’m very pleased with this class,” he said. “This program will do nothing but grow.” Graduates can help by generat ing interest among residents for the second class, he said. That shouldn’t be difcult, based on some of the 11 graduates’ enthu siastic reactions after completing the course. By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Many un derserved kids have some thing under their Christmas trees today thanks to a Bob Sikes Elementary School fth-grader’s efforts. Justice Livingston, who publishes a newsletter in the Garden City Brown stone Manor development, encouraged her neighbors to donate toys for the Crest view Police Department’s Cops for Kids program. It is the second year the 10year-old has collected toy donations. Thursday afternoon, Justice and her grand parents, Pat and Howard Mosely, brought the toys to Crestview City Hall. There, Mayor David Cadle, City Clerk Betsy Roy and community policing ofcer Wanda Hulion received them. “We’re so proud of ... Justice,” Cadle said. “The police department is proud of (her), too, for helping with their effort to give toys to children who need them this Christmas.” The toys beneted more than 40 families, organizers said. Pat Mosely said she and her husband encourage Justice to be community oriented. “I’m glad to do it be cause it helps other kids,” Justice said. That kind of attitude in spires adults, city ofcials said. “It makes you feel good when kids care about other kids,” Hulion said. WANT TO GO? Call Community Policing Ofcer Wanda Hulion, 682-3544, for details on the Crestview Public Safety Academy’s spring course. F inIN D itIT onON L ineINE See www.crestviewbulletin. com/photos for an image gallery of Crestview High School leadership program students unpacking donated food and clothing for needy classmates The Crestview Public Safety Academy’s rst graduating class includes, front row, from left, Adrienne McKinnie, Obie and Joyce Heath, Nina Blake, Linda Parker, and Linda and Michael Mitchem. Second row: Thomas Schmoldt, Glenn Goll, Keith Wroten and Luke Sheplock. In the back row are academy administrator Wanda Hulion and Police Chief Tony Taylor. BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin P hotos HOTOS bB Y BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin City Clerk Betsy Roy, Crestview community policing ofcer Wanda Hulion and Mayor David Cadle accept 10-year-old Justice Livingston’s toy collections for the Cops for Kids program. Below, Justice helps Hulion load donated toys in a vehicle for delivery. Cops for Kids drive aids 40-plus families Police: Public Safety Academy to return in the spring See ACA DD EM YY A3 38th Year, Number 103 ‘This is compassion’ C restviewRESTVIEW highHIGH schooSCHOO L FOO DD DD RIVE P hotos HOTOS bB Y BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Crestview High School leadership students including senior Jasmine Thomas and sophomores Hanna Duke and Megan Howard stack canned vegetables Thursday before distributing them to needy families.. Below, students including senior Emily Parker, right, unpack and fold donated clothes in the school’s cafeteria. See FOO DD DD RIVE A3 FACEBOOK Find us at www. facebook.com/ crestviewbulletin TWITTER Follow us at twitter.com/ cnbulletin Business . ...................... A2 Opinion . ...................... A6 Lifestyle . ....................... A7 Education . .................... A8 Sports. ......................... B1 Classieds . ................... B6 TABLE OF CONTENTS A Halifax Media paper read by 10,450 people every week INSIDE TODAY ONLINE Watch a special blooper reel of the “North End Zone Sports Report” at 6 p.m. today at crestviewbulletin. com/video NWF State College nursing program ofcials pin graduates, B4 ••• Northwood Elementary reopens library after three years, A9 ••• Obituary: Raymond Ernest Moon, A2 Therapy dog now allowed at Northwood Elementary, A8 M eE RRY CHRR ISTMAS, nN O RR TH OKALOOSA CC OUNT YY Wednesday, DecemberDECEMBER 25 2013 NWF State softball player Hannah Day signs with Troy, B1

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Me r r y C h r i st m a s R em em b er t h e R e a s o n f o r t h e S e a s o n. . G o d Bl es s F o r o u r h o m e t o y ou r s 981 W Nelson A v e. Defuniak Spr ings 850-892-7311 594 N. Main Str eet Cr es tvie w 850-682-6835 Locally o wned and opera ted b y Dar el and Donna Lundy J & P Glitz & Glitter (NEXT DOOR HELLO BEAUTIFUL & ACROSS FROM LOS RANCHEROS) J o h n & P at C o o pe r at G l it z a nd G l it t e r w a nt t o w is h e v e r y o ne a M e rr y C h r is t m a s & H a p p y N ew Y ea r W e a r e r e ad y f o r al l o f y o u r h o l i d a y at t i r e ne e d s r at pe o o at C n & P h o J o nt t a r w e t it l nd G z a it l G o nt t a r w e t it l nd G z a it l G Special to the News Bulletin CHELCO recently welcomed communications specialist Tammy Kearce. Kearce, a former newspaper and magazine editor, writer and Northwest Florida State College instructor, studied communications and print journalism at University of West Florida in Pensacola. She has worked for publications from the Washington, D.C., to Montgomery, Ala., areas. Still, she has always made her home in DeFuniak Springs. “I am excited to be working with a memberowned cooperative,” she said. “I have long believed that electric power on demand is one of our greatest luxuries here in the United States; however, it is something most of us take for granted. So I’m eager to inform members about CHELCO’s products and services.” Kearce has recently made trips to CHELCO ofces in Santa Rosa Beach, Freeport, Bluewater Bay, Baker and Auburn to familiarize herself with those communities. We make assumptions every day. We assume the people we encounter will behave in the manner to which we are accustomed. We assume if we maintain our cars, they will get us to where we want to go. We make assumptions to bring order to our world. But in some parts of life — namely investing — assumptions can prove dangerous. Not all investment-related assumptions are bad, but here are a few that might prove counterproductive: • “Real estate will always increase in value.” Up until the 2008 nancial crisis, which was caused at least partially by the “housing bubble,” most people probably would have said real estate is always a good investment. Since then, we’ve grown aware that housing prices can rise and fall. Granted, real estate, as a relatively small part of a diversi ed portfolio, can be appropriate, depending on your goals and risk tolerance. But don’t expect endless gains with no setbacks. • “Gold will always glitter.” During periods of market volatility, investors often ee to gold, thereby driving its price up. But gold prices will uctuate, sometimes greatly, and there are risks in all types of gold ownership, whether you’re investing in actual bars of gold, gold “futures,” or stocks of gold-mining companies. • “I can avoid all risks by sticking with CDs.” It’s true that certi cates of deposit offer a degree of preservation of principal. But they’re not risk-free; their rates of return might be so low that they don’t even keep up with in ation, which means you could incur purchasingpower risk. Having CDs in your portfolio is not bad, but you’ll only want to own amounts suitable for your objectives. • “The price of my investment has gone up — I must have made the right decision.” This assumption could also be made in reverse — that is, you might think that, since the price of your investment has dropped, you must have made the wrong choice. This type of thinking causes investors to hold on to some investments too long, hoping to recapture early gains, or selling promising investments too soon, just to “cut their losses.” Don’t judge investments based on shortterm performance; instead, look at fundamentals and long-term potential. • “If I need long-term care, Medicare will cover it.” You might never need longterm care, but if you do, be prepared for big expenses. The annual national average for a private room in a nursing home is almost $84,000, according to a recent survey by Genworth, a nancial security company. This cost, repeated over a period of years, could prove catastrophic to your nancial security during your retirement. Further, Medicare might only pay a small percentage of long-term care costs. You can help yourself by consulting with a nancial professional, who can offer strategies designed to help cope with long-term care costs. You can’t avoid all assumptions when investing. But by avoiding questionable ones, you might avoid being tripped up on the road toward your nancial goals. Joe Faulk is a nancial adviser. B USINESS Page A2 Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Raymond Ernest Moon, 81, has gone to his eternal heavenly home following a loving and Christlled life. Ray, who recently moved to Crestview from Tarpon Springs, was known for his strong faith, strength, sense of adventure and love for people. He was born Dec. 5, 1932, in Tallahassee to Fred and Madge Moon. He enjoyed scuba diving, spear shing, hunting and speed racing, in addition to traveling and experiencing worldwide dive locations. Ray was fortunate to retire from two jobs he loved. Employers included Carlisle Motors and Bill Jackson’s Shop for Adventure, where he was a scuba technician and instructor, the highlight of his life. Survivors include his loving wife, Pamela; children, Cindy and Rick; grandchildren, Jason and Caithlyn; loving stepmom, Judy Moon; stepchildren, Greg and Melissa; grandchildren, Katie, Anna and Ashley; and sisterand brother-in-law, Libby and David. In lieu of owers, please consider a donation to Emerald Coast Hospice, 131 E. Redstone Ave., Suite 110, Crestview, FL 32539; or the American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123. Memorial services and times of warm remembrance are 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 28, at Airport Road Church of Christ, with Minister Mark Dillman of ciating. A second service is 11 a.m. Jan. 11, 2014, at Lake Tarpon Church of Christ. Arrangements are under Davis-Watkins Crestview Memorial’s direction. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins.com or http://obits.crestviewbulletin. com Raymond Ernest Moon RAYMOND MOON TAMMY KEARCE OBITUARY SUBMISSIONS The News Bulletin publishes north Okaloosa County residents and former residents’ obituaries for $45 including a photo. Family members should write the obituaries and funeral homes should submit them to the newspaper for con rmation. We may edit submissions for style. Call 682-6524 or email news@crestviewbulletin.com for more information. FINANCIAL FOCUS Assumptions can be dangerous to investors JOE FAULK Financial Focus www.crestviewbulletin.com CHELCO hires communications specialist

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Wednesday, December 25, 2013 W e a t C o o p e r s F i n e J e w e l r y w a n t t o t h a n k a l l of o u r c u s t o m e r s in c l ud in g S a n t a W e l o o k f o r w a r d t o s e r v i n g a l l yo u r j e w e l r y n e e d s i n 2 0 1 4 ~ H a v e a M e r r y C h r i s t m a s & H a p p y N e w Y e a r ~ Cust om Designs & S ettings A.M 6 P .M. 850-683-8004 Dr. Richard Thomas and his compassionate care givers wish you health & happiness this holiday season and in the coming New Year! No w O ering B ot o x and Juv ederm X C T r eatments! ( 850 ) 682-4516 102 A labama S tr eet Suit e A, C r est view Hours: M on T hurs 8am-5pm, Closed F r ida y s w w w .cr est vie w den tist .c om e H o m e o f Doc H o l l ida y ’ s De n t a l C h a i r “I was hoping to learn what the police department does, and I found out they do a whole lot more than I thought they did,” Joyce Heath said. Her husband, Obie, and their classmates learned about police, re, judicial and legal public safety ser vices from agencies includ ing Crestview’s police and re departments, the state attorney’s ofce, defense attorneys, the court system and the Child Advocacy Center. Students learned about communications, evidence gathering, investigations, domestic violence, traf c enforcement, chap laincy, police patrol, drug investigation, rearm safety, the SWAT team and reghting. “The goal was to give them a glimpse of our world,” Taylor said. That mission was ac complished, if Crestview High School senior Michael Mitchem’s reaction is an indication. “I liked it more than school,” he said. Academy graduates rep resented a range of ages. Michael, who is also in the Police Explorers club, will enter the Marine Corps upon high school gradua tion in June. He joined re tirees and others who par ticipated in the program. Glenn Goll, a retired cor rections ofcer who had ex perience in policing while a Marine, said the program satised his curiosity. “This was very enlight ening,” he said. Graduates agreed that ring weapons on the shooting range ranked high among their favorite lessons. “I had never red a hand gun,” Linda Mitchem said. “I was pretty nervous, but (Lt.) Andrew (Schneider) is a really good teacher. He put us so at ease. When he offered us a chance to shoot another round, I jumped on it.” Mitchem, Michael’s mother, said she felt pride when she successfully shot a target. “I killed a Smurf!” she laughed, likening the blue silhouette on the target to the blue Belgian cartoon trolls. “It was fun, but we worked hard,” graduate Linda Parker said. ACADEMY from page A1 But students said their main motivation was giv ing to others. “I’m really proud of our school,” sophomore Megan Howard said Thursday. “This is good,” sopho more Hanna Duke said. “... These families will have food for Christmas.” “It’s amazing that our school has gathered this much food,” junior Jared Bufkin said. “I’m proud of my school. I think it’s go ing to make a lot of people pretty happy.” Teachers react The collective effort touched faculty members. Teacher Elizabeth Rivera said she was close to tears as she watched donations pile up. “I want to cry,” she said. “This is the rst time I’ve seen so many kids throughout the whole school this involved in something.” “This is incredible,” choral music director Kev in Lusk said. “In all the (20) years I’ve been here, I’ve never seen anything like this.” Students donated sacks of potatoes, bottles of juice and soda, and frozen hams and turkeys, in addition to the 6,000 canned foods and cash contributions. The teenagers used the money Dec. 18 at the Crestview Wal-Mart, where they bought 10 shopping carts full of laun dry soap and personal hy giene products. Students at neighboring Davidson Middle School launched a clothing drive. Soon, cartons of donated clothes were wheeled into the high school cafeteria, where leadership students waited to unpack and fold them. “It feels so good to give back to the community for people who are less fortu nate, especially at Christ mas,” senior Emily Parker said. By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Sharing and Caring volunteers need nonperishable foods to last beyond the winter holidays, organizers said. “We are holding our own right now,” said Robin Mar ston, vice president of the local pantry. “Unfortunate ly, donations usually begin to fall after the holidays, and we are already low.” Volunteers said they appreciate local organiza tions, churches, schools and Cub Scout Troop 799 for donating large amounts of canned food items. However, almost 40 resi dents daily come to receive food items, and it’s difcult to meet the demand, Mar ston said. That’s because the number of donations has dipped since the country’s economic downturn, volun teers said. Yet one thing is certain: “There are a lot of hungry people in our city,” volun teer Doris Mauldin said. Sharing and Caring needs these items: •Rice •Dried beans •Canned vegetables, fruit, beans, tomatoes and soup •Crackers •Tuna •Cereal •Peanut butter and jelly •Spam, hotdogs and hamburger meat •Powdered milk •Pasta and spaghetti sauce •Dinner items including macaroni and cheese mix, stews, chili and ravioli Sharing and Caring is closed through Jan. 6 for the holidays, but regular hours are 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday at 208 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Crestview. Call 682-1907 for more details. WANT TO HELP? Local Crestview News Bulletin | A3 Sharing and Caring low on food, seeks donations FOOD DRIVE from page A1 BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Senior Camron Clark, junior Jared Bufkin and sophomore Matthew Bottom disappear behind a wall of canned corn Thursday as they unpack food donations. BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Crestview Police Explorers Frankie Frazier, 18, Haillee, 16, and MacKensie Lehneis, 12, serve cake to Crestview Public Safety Academy graduates Michael Mitchem and Luke Sheplock after the rst graduating class’ Dec. 6 ceremony.

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Local A4 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Local Crestview News Bulletin | A5 Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Y e a r E n d C el e b r a t i o n T h e h o li d a y s h o p p i n g s e a s o n i s h e r e S o a r e t h e b e s t h o li d a y o f f e r s a t H ub Cit y F o r d G E T A F R E E S P R A Y I N B ED L I N ER W / P U RC H A SE I N S T OC K N E W T R UCK S O N L Y “WHILE OTHERS SHUFFLE, WE DEAL!” 4060 S. FERDON BL VD. 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M ILITARY www.crestviewbulletin.com Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Page A6 The Crestview News Bulletin encourages public discussion on issues you care about. The paper publishes letters to the editor on a rstcome, rst-served, spaceavailable basis. Letters should be original to the News Bulletin, written on topics concerning Crestview or the Baker, Holt, Milligan or Laurel Hill communities, and should not contain profanity or other questionable content. The newspaper reserves the rights to decline publication of any letter for any reason, and to use published letters in advertising and other promotions. Email letters to news@ crestviewbulletin.com. Alternatively, send letters to Crestview News Bulletin, ATTN: Letter to Editor, 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536. JOIN THE CONVERSATION HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? The Crestview News Bulletin regularly publishes readers’ thoughtful and humorous comments posted on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Join the discussion at facebook.com/crestview.bulletin or tweet @cnbulletin. posted on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Join the ADVERTISE IN THE NEWS BULLETIN NEWS INFORMATION If you have a concern or comment about the Crestview News Bulletin’s coverage, please call 682-6524. PUBLISHER Skip Foster sfoster@crestviewbulletin.com EDITOR Thomas Boni tboni@crestviewbulletin.com OFFICE STAFF Dawn Barnes ... circulation assistant dawnb@crestviewbulletin.com ADVERTISING INFORMATION Melissa Tedder ............ ad consultant melissa@crestviewbulletin.com Sherrie Stanley ..... media consultant sherries@crestviewbulletin.com EDITORIAL Brian Hughes ....................... reporter Arts & entertainment editor brianh@crestviewbulletin.com Matthew Brown ................... reporter matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com Randy Dickson ............. sports editor randyd@crestviewbulletin.com Renee Bell ............. editorial assistant news@crestviewbulletin.com MAIN OFFICE FAX NUMBER 850-682-2246 The Crestview News Bulletin is published each Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, at 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview FL 32536. Periodical postage paid at Crestview, Florida. POSTMASTER: Please send address change to 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536. All material herein is property of the Crestview News Bulletin. USPS Number 010-209 SUBSCRIPTION RATES 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536 To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524. IN COUNTY 13 weeks .................................... $9.45 26 weeks ................................... $17.85 52 weeks .................................. $32.76 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks ................................... $14.70 26 weeks .................................. $23.10 52 weeks .................................. $38.01 Ask your advertising representative about our Color by the Inch Program and Customer Appreciation Sale 850-682-6524 Home delivery subscriptions may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. LETTER TO THE EDITOR By CPL. JOSEPH SCANLAN Special to the News Bulletin TWENTYNINE PALMS, Calif. — Marines with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, swarmed the Combat Center on Dec. 6 when they conducted live re training in an urban facility here during their Mission Readiness Exercise. The facility, titled Range 210, resembled an urban environment and was unique because its buildings’ walls were constructed of shock absorbent concrete. Unlike most urban training facilities, Marines were able to conduct live re training versus ring blank ammunition. “This is probably one of the most dynamic ranges in the Marine Corps because you can re live rounds into buildings,” said Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Bergeron of Crestview, a platoon sergeant with Alpha Company. “This is as real as it gets because we can re machine guns and ri es into the buildings and engage targets like we would in an actual combat environment.” The night before assaulting the range, a scout sniper team inserted into the surrounding terrain to photograph the area and visually show Capt. Lonnie Wilson, Alpha commander, the battle eld. With that critical information, Wilson nished planning the assault and the company was ready to attack the following day. Mortarmen and artillerymen were the rst to destroy targets on the outskirts of the facility while a combined anti-armor team moved in to surround the town. Tanks and assault amphibious vehicles loaded with Marines arrived shortly after, and it was time for boots to hit the ground. Infantrymen poured out of the AAVs and immediately assaulted the town. Machine gun and ri e re lled the area as Marines maneuvered through the terrain and moved into buildings while M1A1 Abrams tanks assaulted the town. “Tanks don’t ever move through an urban environment by themselves,” Bergeron said. “They weigh more than 40 tons, but they’re very vulnerable because someone can shoot a rocket-propelled grenade at them from the roof of a building or from an alleyway.” The company moved uidly through dozens of buildings and eliminated every target in their path. A tremendous amount of trust and con dence is put in each Marine when clearing a building with live ammunition. Whether a Marine has recently graduated The School of Infantry or has completed several combat deployments, every Marine is accountable for the safety of one another. “It’s pretty intense being in a leadership position,” said Lance Cpl. Nick Beckham, a team leader with Alpha Co. and a native of VA expanding traumatic brain injury bene ts Some veterans with traumatic brain injury who are diagnosed with any of five other ailments will have an easier path to receive additional disability pay under new regulations developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. The new regulation activates Jan. 15 and affects some veterans living with TBI who also have Parkinson’s disease, certain types of dementia, depression, unprovoked seizures or certain diseases of the hypothalamus and pituitary glands. This regulation stems from a National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine report regarding the association between TBI and the five diagnosable illnesses. The report, “Gulf War and Health, Volume 7: LongTerm Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury,” found “sufficient evidence” to link moderate or severe levels of TBI with the five ailments. Veterans who have questions or who wish to file new disability claims may use the eBenefits website, available at www. eBenefits.va.gov/ebenefits Resident’s generosity inspires reader to pay it forward Dear editor, Someone stole my stepdaughter’s scooter off our front porch... (and) we didn’t notice it until we gave my stepson a scooter for his birthday on Dec. 17. They were so excited to ride together, and sure enough, Amaya’s scooter was gone and she was heartbroken. I was also heartbroken, seeing her so upset about a sel sh act of a stranger. I gave her a big hug and told her maybe another kid needed it more than her. That seemed to cheer her up. Later, I posted on Facebook about how someone made my 7-year-old girl cry. Well, Dec. 18, the doorbell rang, and there was a brand new scooter on my porch! That was the most amazing, sweetest act of kindness, and I will be forever grateful! I soon gured out who the secret Santa was, but of course, he doesn’t want any glory or recognition because that’s not the reason he did it. He simply did it out of the goodness of his heart and to put some joy back into the holidays. This has inspired me to pay it forward! I thought maybe it could be an inspiration to others as well. Kimberly Anderson Crestview My favorite Christmas movie is the 1954 musical “White Christmas,” starring Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen. Oh, I’m old school! You’ve probably heard some of the soundtrack’s songs even if you haven’t seen the lm. Hearing the title track on a holiday playlist is no surprise, but “Count Your Blessings (Instead of Sheep)” is less likely to be shuf ed with “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” during parties. Still, it’s the one that grabs my heart. Blessings — including our family, friends and health — are personal to us; sheep, and gifts, aren’t. We really could live without the latest smart phone or tablet — either of which will be obsolete in a few months — but we’d be lost without our loved ones. So many people have encountered things we cannot begin to imagine. I was reminded of this on Friday while sur ng channels for national news. The CBS Evening News reported on Jackie Turner, a William Jessup University student who posted a Craigslist ad to ultimately match families with lonely adults. The Sacramento area woman knew, all too well, the need to feel warmth and belonging during the holidays; she had no pleasant childhood memories, she said. “I remember getting locked up and locked in rooms. And I remember getting beatings for stealing food,” she told the CBS reporter. NBC Nightly News reported on some 250,000 civilians in Syrian suburbs who hunger amid civil war. The more fortunate civilians hop on bicycles and pedal quickly to produce enough energy to charge batteries, and they chop rewood to stay warm, Keir Simmons reported. It’s a much different picture from anywhere in the United States. And it’s why, on this day, we should count our blessings instead of gifts. Evidently, many North Okaloosa residents know a lot about that. They’re helping others, and they’ve inspired me. Crestview High School students, with help from Davidson Middle School students, collected 3 tons of food and clothes for needy classmates. (See “This is compassion,” Page A1 .) Crestview Amvets Post 35 members are delivering free Christmas feasts to needy North Okaloosa families. (I’m writing this on Saturday, before of cial numbers are in, but if the group’s Thanksgiving deliveries are an indication, they could be helping more than 200 families.) Justice Livingston, a local 10-yearold, spearheaded an effort to provide toys for more than 40 families this Christmas. (See “Cops for Kids drive bene ts 40-plus families,” Page A1 .) Baker student Railey Conner denied herself birthday presents Dec. 15 and collected toiletries and other household staples for North Okaloosa nursing homes. Chesser & Bar Attorneys, with Crestview and Shalimar of ces, raised enough money to provide gift cards for nearly 40 teenagers across Crestview and Fort Walton Beach. Nathan Boyles’ Crestview law of ce and title company delivered more than 65 bags of useful items to Crestview Manor residents. The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Of ce, Gordon Martial Arts and the News Bulletin served as of cial collection sites for Sharing and Caring’s Crestview of ce. And I know this list is just the tip of a generous Northwest Florida iceberg that includes area churches doubling as cold-weather shelters and soup kitchens. Yet, more is needed, and nonpro ts’ volunteers gently remind us that giving opportunities don’t end with the winter holidays. (See “Sharing and Caring low on food, seeks donations,” Page A3 .) We all have encountered struggles at some point in life, but they likely paled in comparison to the experiences of fellow human beings in impoverished areas. Even current issues may be trivial compared to numerous North Okaloosans’ hunger. Let’s be grateful for the gifts we received today, however large or small, and then remember those who lack life’s necessities. Merry Christmas, North Okaloosa County. What’s your view? Email news@ crestviewbulletin.com or tweet News Bulletin Editor Thomas Boni @ cnbeditor. Count your blessings (instead of gifts) THOMAS BONI Editor-in-Chief FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK O PINION BRIEF SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN TOP: Marines with 1st Tank Battalion assault an urban facility with M1A1 Abrams Tanks during a live re exercise on Range 210 at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center in Twentynine Palms, Calif. ABOVE: Marines with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, maneuver uprange. Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Bergeron of Crestview said Range 210 excellently mimics a combat environment. Marines use shock-absorbing concrete during live fire training See MARINES A7

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L IFESTYLE www.crestviewbulletin.com The W orking P arent’ s Best F riend T w o locations to ser v e y ou! Call to schedule a tour toda y! Childcare Network #183 405 Brookmeade Drive, Crestview Florida (850) 398-8806 www .c hildc ar e n et w o rk n et/183 L ice n se #C01OK0115 Childcare Network #132 1040 F armer Street, Crestview Florida (850) 683-1680 www .c hildc ar e n et w o rk n et/132 L ice n se #C01OK0088 % &( (! ( &( ( $ $$ % &$$ # The sights... the smells... the sounds. It’ s the one time of year when just one whiff of a Christmas tree instantly brings us back to our childhood— Dad, trying to untangle the lights, Mom, cooking up a storm. W e know this because we have families, as well. W e wish your family a happy holiday season. It’ s no longer about SKINNY Now it’ s about HEAL THY Bur n Fat & Inches, NOT Muscle Plexus has been making dreams come true right in you neighborhood. Come hear about these exciting products and learn about our wonderful business opportunities Special Guest Speaker Jill Sadler Senior Ruby Ambassador Saturday December 28, 2013, 6PM at Central Baptist Church ROC 951 S F erdon Blvd., Crestview Florida 32536 Mention this ad to be entered in to the Opportunity of a Lifetime drawing NO Meal Replacements NO Caf feine NO Stimulants DIABETIC FRIENDL Y From our family to your family we would like to wish you a very Merry Christmas. W e know that this time of year can not only be special but also a time of sadness. T imes spent with family include the memories of the loved ones who have passed on from our lives. W e, too, have memories of our own family members who have passed away, young and old. These memories are precious and we hold dear to them. W e pray that you have a safe and Merry Christmas. Our prayer for you is that you be comforted in the memory of your loved ones and knowing that they are spending Christmas in heaven with Jesus this year. Merry Christmas ~ From Andy, Heather, Rylee and Claire Powell George and Annelle Whitehurst The Staff of Whitehurst-Powell Funeral Home Family Owned & Operated by Heather & Andy Powell 436 W est J ames Lee B lv d. L IFESTYLE L IFESTYLE www.crestviewbulletin.com Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Page 7 CALENDAR Want to learn a skill while helping your North Okaloosa neighbors? The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program, or VITA, seeks help here in Crestview. VITA is an IRS community initiative led by the United Way of Okaloosa and Walton counties and the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension of ce. VITA sites provide free income tax preparation for lowto moderate-income taxpayers — generally those earning $52,000 and below — who need help ling their returns. Crestview’s program needs volunteers along with two laptop computers, a paper shredder, paper, ink and various of ce supplies to continue the program. The Crestview site is recruiting a site coordinator, greeters and tax preparers. Tax experience is not required for VITA volunteers, who become IRS trained and certi ed. If you are interested in volunteering or sponsoring the program, or want to nd out more, attend the volunteer orientation, 1 p.m. Jan. 10 at First Presbyterian Church in Crestview. Training is offered online and in a classroom setting. Contact me, ecourtne@ u .edu, or Melissa Forte, VITA coordinator, vita@united-way.org, to volunteer. Elaine Courtney is an agent at the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension of ce in Crestview. EXTENSION CONNECTION UPCOMING WEBINARS Top Ten Money Tips for 2014: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Jan. 7, http://bit.ly/top102014 Tips for Tax Preparation and Filing: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Jan. 30, http://bit.ly/TaxFilTips SPRING INTO VEGETABLE GARDENING SERIES: 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Jan. 14 through Feb. 4. Cost: $30 per person, $45 per couple. Interactive video series for novices. Jan. 14 topic: Homeowner Vegetable Garden Expectations. Learn what to grow each season, proper site selection, and how to improve planting soils. Available at extension of ces throughout NW Florida. COGON GRASS WORKSHOP: 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Jan. 14, Crestview extension of ce, 5479 Old Bethel Road, Crestview. Cost: $20 per person. Awareness and control for forest and right of way managers, private landowners and pesticide applicators. Interactive video class, available at multiple extension of ces. Volunteers needed for income tax assistance ELAINE COURTNEY Extension Connection BY THE NUMBERS • 11,521 returns in Crestview zip codes are eligible for free tax preparation. • Florida’s working families in 2012 collectively received more than $14 million from the Child Tax Credit, due in part to Volunteer Income Tax Assistance programs. FROM STAFF REPORTS The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is considering dividing the state’s Hunting Zone D — from Pensacola to Tallahassee — into two deer management units. Proposals would require that bucks harvested north of I-10 in Hunting Zone D have antlers with at least three points on one side, and each point must be 1 inch long. South of I-10 in Zone D, the minimum antler requirement would be two points on one side. The proposal includes an exception to antler requirements in both units; youths 15 years old and younger may continue to harvest bucks with at least one antler 5 inches or longer. The FWC also is considering rescheduling antlerless deer season — “doe days” — on private lands within Zone D. Currently in that zone, the season to take deer of either sex, except spotted fawns, runs Dec. 26 through Jan. 1. In proposed rules, dates north of I-10 would change to eight days distributed across four weekends: Saturday through Sunday after Thanksgiving; the rst weekend of muzzleloading gun season; the third weekend of general gun season; and the weekend after Christmas. South of I-10, in Zone D, the proposal would change antlerless season to four days, the weekends after Thanksgiving and Christmas. The purpose of modifying the antlerless deer season is to spread out the hunting opportunity, so that more hunters may be able to participate without substantially reducing deer populations, an FWC spokesperson said. Proposals for Zone D, if passed in April, would take effect during the 2014-15 hunting season. FIND IT ONLINE See www. crestviewbulletin. com/lifestyle for more details on proposed changes to deer hunting regulations FWC proposes new deer hunting regulations ‘WALK ON THE WILD SIDE’ PAINTINGS BY DENI K.: Crestview Public Library exhibit, featuring wildlife paintings, runs through December. Details: 682-4432. ANTIQUE CHRISTMAS CARDS: Crestview Public Library exhibit, featuring Victorian and Edwardian cards from resident Lynn Lee’s collection, runs through December. Details: 682-4432. FLUTE FESTIVAL POSTER CONTEST: Entries due Jan. 11. Musical Echoes Flute Festival poster competition submissions are due for a chance to win $200. This year’s festival totem is the hummingbird. The Indian ute and the hummingbird must be included in the poster design. Contact Gail Meyer, gmeyer@fwb. org, 833-9595 or www.musicalechoes. org, for information. Let the community know about your arts or entertainment event. Submit listings to brianh@ crestviewbulletin.com or call 682-6524 at least two weeks before your event. Follow Arts & Entertainment editor Brian Hughes on Twitter @cnbBrian. Waynesboro, Tenn. “It’s a lot of fun being the guy leading Marines through training and combat, but at the same time it’s a lot of responsibility. I’ve already had my experience in combat from this past deployment, so I try to pass off the things I learned to the new guys in the unit who haven’t deployed yet.” Accompanying each squad of Marines was an infantryman from 3rd Battalion, 4th Marines, who recently returned from a combat deployment to Afghanistan. To ensure 1st Battalion, 7th Marines received the most up-to-date information and training for their upcoming deployment, the infantrymen constantly evaluated tactics and decision making skills from the platoon level down to the re team level. “The evaluators give us things that we could improve on for every single range that we do, and also things that we’ve done well that we need to continue doing well,” Bergeron said. “This allows key individual leaders down to the re team level to understand the good and bad things they’ve done so they don’t make the same mistake twice.” The Marines ultimately cleared the town, and shortly after received a thorough debrief from the evaluators. The evaluators helped the Marines to the best of their ability and shared tactics that proved successful during their deployment. The company took a vast amount of knowledge away from the day of training and transitioned immediately to preparing for their next range. The battalion is slated to continue pre-deployment training before deploying to Afghanistan this spring. Cpl. Joseph Scanlan is a journalist with the 1st Marine Division at Camp Pendleton, Calif. MARINES from page A6 FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION Like us on CRESTVIEW BULLETIN

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F r om all of our campuses & c en t ers .... Hav e a S a fe & Ha pp y Holiday! N ic eville C ampus F or t W alt on B each C ampus E glin AFB E duca tion C en t er Hur lbur t F ield E duca tion C en t er Chautauqua C en t er –D eF uniak Spr ings S outh W alt on C en t er R ober t L. F Sikes E duca tion C en t er – C r est view Nor th w est F lor ida S ta t e C ollege is closed f or the holida y s A ll campuses will r e open f or business and r eg istr a tion ser vic es on Januar y 2nd S tuden ts ma y enr oll f or classes and pa y f ees o v er the holida y br eak thr ough the NWF S ta t e C ollege w ebsit e a t w w w .n wf sc .edu Spring classes b egin Ja n u a r y 13th Happy Holidays !" " " " MAIN OFFICE 1301 Industrial Drive Crestview FL 32539 850-682-51 1 1 DO WNT O WN OFFICE 302 N Wilson Street Crestview FL 32536 850-682-5112 SOUTHSIDE OFFICE 2541 S. Hwy 85 Crestview FL 32539 850-682-31 1 1 www .fn b c rest vie w .co m OF CRESTVIEW MEMBER FDIC Y our Hometo w n Bank S ince 1 9 56! 6516577 Compassionate, quality care for your loved one... 30 private Rehab suites Long term care Outpatient physical occupational and speech therapy 1849 James Lee Blvd, Crestview FL 682-5322 1849 F irs t A v e n u e E., C r es t v i e w FL 6517900 www .fourpawspetsalon.com Four Paws Pet Salon (Next to Good Things Donuts) O f f e r i ng B o a rd in g, G roomi n g D o g g y D a y c a re & B ou t iq u e .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www .fourpawspetsalon.com www 8 a.m. to 5:30 p .m. 9 a.m. to 2 p .m. 20% OFF ALL BA THS 10% off All Grooming Through December By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Northwood Arts and Sciences Academy students have a new reason to fill their reading logs. Accomplished readers get to read to Dozer, a certified therapy dog who has become a local canine celebrity. Dozer, a Great Dane, visited with the Cougars Thursday morning for three hours on the first of his monthly visits. Students had been eagerly anticipating Dozer’s visit to the newly reopened library, Northwood’s media specialist, Kristal Petruzzi, said. They make frequent visits to the library and complete book after book to fill their reading logs to earn a visit with the dog, she said. Last week, secondgrader Jonas Andrew knew why Dozer took a special interest in him right away. I had waffles for breakfast,” Jonas said. “I think he smells them on me.” Seth Smith, also a second-grader, was impressed that he and Dozer can see eye-to-eye. “If he stands up on his (hind) legs, he’ll be taller than a person,” Seth said. Reading to Dozer was fun for many reasons, particularly since the dog doesn’t correct a mispronunciation; nor does he mind if the reader skips a hard word. Plus, there’s the slobber factor, second-grader Isabelle Cooper said. “He’s not one of those dogs that would come up licking your face,” she said. School visits were in the works for quite some time, the dog’s owner said. Angie Nousiainen said she had approached school officials several times to receive permission to bring Dozer into area schools. Over the summer, Northwood’s new principal, Dr. Donna Goode, met Dozer while he greeted Walgreens customers — another regular gig — and “she became an instant fan,” Nousiainen said. “When I contacted her and asked about bringing him to school, she was more than willing to go to bat before the school board,” Nousiainen said. Dozer has a been a regular at Crestview Public Library reading programs and visits residents in area rehabilitation and nursing facilities. Nousiainen said she hopes to one day gain permission to let Dozer visit North Okaloosa Medical Center patients. FIND IT ONLINE See www.crestviewbulletin.com/photos for an image gallery of Dozer’s rst visit to Northwood Arts and Sciences Academy. Therapy dog enhances Northwood reading program E DUCATION www.crestviewbulletin.com Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Page A8 Dozer goes to school BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Dozer, a therapy dog, gets a hug from Northwood Elementary School third-grader Madison Perkins as her classmates, Brianna Rice and Jackson Richard, await their turns to read to the Great Dane.

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" w HWo o c oOxo c oOxo HWo o w c oOxo HWo o w [OTH My W` mrjH `MO cR `c j oV wO mo R[ cjW N H a w ar dche vr olet .c om 4150 S outh F er don Blv d C r est vie w FL M e rr y C hri s t m a s f r om a l l of u s a t & H app y N e w Y e ar A CHEVROLET A A CHEVROLET A CHEVROLET A CHEVROLET A W ARD ARD W ARD W CREST VIE W 850 682 2731 FT W AL T ON BEA CH 850 243 7214 PENSA C OL A 850 994 0101 Education Crestview News Bulletin | A9 Wednesday, December 25, 2013 By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Since November, Northwood Arts and Sciences Academy students have been dis covering a new world contained within the pages of books. “They’re really excited,” me dia specialist Kristal Petruzzi said. “We haven’t had a library in several years.” Prior to Petruzzi’s appoint ment, Northwood’s library had been shuttered due to budget re ductions that cost the school its former librarian. Volunteer staff ers helped it open occasionally. That was before Dr. Donna Goode, the school’s new princi pal, took the helm for the 2013-14 school year. “Our principal said reading is a priority at Northwood,” Petru zzi said. Goode asked school superin tendent Mary Beth Jackson for funds to allow the library to open full time. “I am so thankful that our su perintendent made opening our library a priority,” Goode said. Now, grasping purple library cards, students such as secondgrader Brandyn Hickingbot tom and his classmates eagerly browse the stacks, choose books and check them out. Having the kids scan their li brary cards and book barcodes helps them connect with the li brary, Petruzzi said. “It gives them ownership,” she said. “This is their library.” Reading programs Petruzzi said she keeps lists of books that students request, and has started a donation box to collect money to buy them. She has also started programs to make the library’s services more diverse. A morning art club, for ex ample, meets at 8 a.m. Then, students look through drawing books waiting on the art table. Last week, Dozer, a certi ed therapy dog, made his rst monthly appearance at the li brary. Students who complete a reading log or become library regulars may read to Dozer “and hug on him,” Petruzzi said. (Ed itor’s Note: Please see “Dozer goes to school,” Page A8 for more on this story.) Additionally, a library club has sprung up as students ask to help maintain the facility, Petruzzi said. “I have kids coming in dur ing their lunch time and saying, ‘I want to be a junior librarian,’” she said. Those students help her shelve books and assist their peers in checking books in or out. Bringing in community speak ers to talk to students about books and reading is also on Pe truzzi’s agenda and, ultimately, she and Goode would like to see Northwood’s library become a neighborhood resource. “What we would like to do is open up the library in the (eve nings), maybe from 6 to 7,” Goode said. “We would be open to adults in the community wanting to build partnerships with our readers.” Northwood reopens library after 3 years By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Northwood Elementary School kinder gartners’ parents recently watched performing arts in action during a Christmas concert. Parents gathered in the school’s gymnasium Thursday to see their chil dren perform numerous Christmas songs, including “Frosty the Snowman” and “Silent Night.” The students also rec ognized the Jewish holi day of Hanukkah with the “I have a Little Dreidel” song. Several students also read a line from an adapted Principal: Christmas concert part of school’s developing arts program MATTHEW BROWN | News Bulletin Northwood Elementary School kindergartners perform holiday music, using hand gestures, for family members on Thursday morning in the school’s auditorium. The Christmas concert is just one way the school is implementing a new arts curriculum. See P er ER F ormance ORMANCE A10 BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Northwood Arts and Sciences Academy media specialist Kristal Petruzzi assists as second-graders, from left, Erica Carroll, Abygayle Hoist, Alison Cruz and Brandyn Hickingbottom check out books.

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By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Riverside Elementary School’s par ent teacher organization raised nearly $1,400 after turning a school storage room into a Santa Shop. The PTO’s store earlier this month sold items such as key chains, Christmas tree ornaments and pic ture frames to students. “I’m happy with the amount we raised,” event organizer Lisa Hernly said. “The kids loved it.” Hernly, the PTO’s trea surer, said the event al lowed students to provide Christmas presents for loved ones and gave them experience dealing with money. “There are denitely a lot of lessons to be learned from this,” she said. “I think it gives the kids a sense of giving and re sponsibility,” fellow PTO volunteer Rebecca Gard ner said. Gardner, who regularly volunteers at the school, where her 7-year-old daughter, Katelyn Greer, attends the rst grade, said teachers taught students the importance of giving during the holiday season. That particular lesson seems to have stuck with Katelyn, who said the best part of her shopping expe rience is “getting stuff for (her) family.” Proceeds will help pur chase educational mate rials for teachers at the school, Hernly said. MATTHEW BROWN | News Bulletin Riverside Elementary School parent teacher organization volunteer Jennifer Lee, left, nishes a transaction made by 7-year-old Katelyn Greer as her mother, Rebecca Gardner, watches. The PTO, which operated the Santa Shop, raised almost $1,400 for educational materials at the school. Riverside PTO raises $1,400 with Santa Shop Education A10 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, December 25, 2013 version of “The Night Be fore Christmas” poem. Karey Estingoy was happy to see her 5-yearold daughter, Amelie, par ticipate in the program. “We feel really for tunate to come to the Northwood Arts and Sci ences Academy; they are really putting an empha sis on the arts,” she said. “We really care about the arts.” This school year, stu dents were introduced to drama, dance and music in the arts and sciences academy. New Principal Dr. Don na Goode said Thursday morning’s concert was a step in the right direction. “Our goal is to give ev ery child the opportunity to perform,” she said. Kindergarten teacher Missy Holley was proud of all of the students. “They all worked really hard on this,” she said. “They (had) been practic ing since we got back from Thanksgiving (break).” Holley said the per formance brought out an emotional response in some parents. “One dad said it brought tears to his eyes,” she said. “As successful as this was, we will do it again.” One of her students, Parker Slade, 6, said he enjoyed singing “We Wish you a Merry Christmas” for the crowd and a few of his family members. In addition to seeing her grandson Parker sing, Sue Fernandez enjoyed watching all of the chil dren perform. “It was cute,” she said. “You always get a sur prise, when you see them perform,” she said. PERFORMANCE from page A9 MATTHEW BROWN | News Bulletin Karey Estingoy photographs her daughter, Amelie, 5, after a Thursday morning Christmas concert at Northwood Elementary School.

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www.crestviewbulletin.com B Section INSIDE More local news S PORTS Hannah Day signs with Troy By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Former Crestview High School softball player Hannah Day has taken the next step in her softball career. Day, a sophomore catcher at Northwest Florida State College, recently accepted a softball scholarship at Troy University. She’ll enroll at Troy in fall 2014. Day, the daughter of Dexter and Rhonda Day, chose Troy over Auburn University and Samford University. “A lot of thought went into the decision because I had several options,” she said. “None of them were bad choices, so it was really hard making that decision. “I’m a home person, and it was the closest to home. And it felt more comfortable than the other schools did. I felt I should be there.” Day said her older sister, Lauren, attends Troy. Hannah said she has frequently visited the school to hang out with her sister. As a freshman catcher at Northwest Florida State, Hannah nished in the top three on the team in almost every offensive category. She led the Raiders with 77 hits and 187 at bats. She tied for the team lead with eight home runs, was second in batting average with a .412 average and second in runs batted in with 59. My Christmas wish list Today is Christmas, and so much has changed since last December, when my family gathered in DeLand to celebrate the birth of Bethlehem’s Baby. The Dickson family has always embraced and looked to the hope and joy the birth of the Christ child represents. I’m sure there will be a little less joy and a few tears around the table today. There will be an empty chair at the table and a little less laughter as we have our rst Christmas without my dad, who, as most of you know, passed away earlier this year. But in the Christ child, we have the hope that our separation is only temporary and that we will again be reunited with those we love. So many memories of a lifetime of Christmases come pouring back as I write this column. I think of the sacri ces my parents made working extra hours and denying things for themselves so that we kids could get many of the gifts we wanted. Many of my Christmases were lled with gifts I could use in my athletic endeavors. Somewhere in an old photo album there’s a picture of me at the age 4 with a football under my arm, standing next to an in atable Popeye punching bag. Through the years, there were more footballs and football equipment as well as basketballs, tennis rackets and even a ping pong table and a BB gun. And, no, I didn’t shoot my eye out, but I did manage to put a hole in the kitchen window that rst long ago Christmas morning. I have no BB guns, footballs or ping pong tables to give our local coaches and players. But, if I had the magic of giving certain gifts, I have a list of things I’d like to pass along to those players and coaches that are such a vital part of my job. My rst gift would go to the Crestview football team. I would give the Bulldogs another win over Niceville in 2014. Along with the win over the Eagles, I would give Bulldog football coach Tim Hatten and his crew a District 17A championship and a long run into the playoffs next fall. I also would give Hatten a long and productive stay with the Bulldogs. My next gift would go to Baker football coach Matt Brunson and his Gator team. And I also would give the Gators a championship. For Crestview volleyball coach and girls basketball coach Kathy Combest, I would give a little patience to deal with dreadfully young teams. I would give rst-year Bulldog boys basketball coach Greg Watson a strong showing in a tough district this year. I would give Crestview basketball star Ronnie Baylark the college of his dreams, where he could continue his playing career. I would give former Crestview High School baseball star Dakota Dean, who is now a freshman at Louisiana State, all the success his older brother, Blake, had while playing for the Tigers. I would give former Baker basketball star Chad Donley and his Liberty University teammates another opportunity to play in the NCAA tournament. If I could, I would give former Laurel Hill basketball star Jeff Reese a healthy heart so he could again play the game he loves. I would give Jeff’s older brother, Brad, continued success playing basketball in Europe. I really would love to give Brad the gift of playing in the National Basketball Association. Legend has it that Santa’s gift bag is bottomless so he doesn’t have to worry about running out of space as he takes gifts to little boys and girls around the world. Since I’m not Santa, and my space is limited, I only have a couple of more gifts I would like to give. I would give the gift of love to all the athletes, coaches and fans who make this job such a pleasure. I would also give shared memories to last a lifetime with special teammates and those you love. Finally, I would give us all the gift of peace on earth and good will to men that the angels outside of Bethlehem proclaimed 2,000 years ago. Merry Christmas. Randy Dickson is the Crestview News Bulletin’s sports editor. Email him at randyd@crestviewbulletin.com, tweet him @BigRandle, or call 682-6524. NORTH END ZONE Randy Dickson RANDY DICKSON | News Bulletin Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Page 1 By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — The Crestview High School boys basketball team fought off a sluggish start to take a 72-54 win over District 1-7A foe Tate on Friday. Perhaps it was the Bulldogs had a hangover from their win over Fort Walton Beach on Tuesday. Or maybe the Crestview players were already thinking about Christmas as the holidays started Friday. Whatever the reason, Bulldog coach Greg Watson was not happy with the way the team played. “It was just a very frustrating night,” he said. “We didn’t play well defensively. Offensively, we had too many sloppy turnovers. “We couldn’t make a shot. It just seemed like everything was going wrong. But right there in the fourth quarter, we made some big plays.” Several times throughout the game, it seemed as if the Bulldogs (7-1, 3-0) were on the brink of putting the game out of the reach of the Aggies. Crestview’s big man tandem of Denzel Ware and Jerry Siler gave the Bulldogs a quick boost in the rst quarter. Ware and Siler each scored four points in the rst quarter, helping Crestview to a 15-8 lead at the end of the period. Three free throws by Wesley St. Vil with 5:31 left in the rst half pushed the Bulldog lead to 19-10. Tate then went on a 10-2 run Bulldogs keep rolling with win over Tate FILE PHOTO LEFT: Former Crestview High School softball player Hannah Day and her father, CHS assistant principal Dexter Day, are all smiles over Hannah accepting a softball scholarship to Troy University. RIGHT: Day follows through on a practice swing last spring while playing for Northwest Florida State College. See DAY B2 PHOTOS BY RANDY DICKSON | News Bulletin LEFT: Jerry Aaron goes up for a shot over Tate’s D.J. Wells, left, and Danny Cafarella on Friday. TOP RIGHT: Marcelle Moorer looks for an open Bulldog teammate against Tate on Friday. BOTTOM RIGHT: Crestview’s Dakota Childree tries to get away from Tate defender Brandon Fryman. Trevin Arrington tries to work his way through the lane for Crestview. See BULLDOGS B2

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B2 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Special to the News Bulletin TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott has announced the Pensacola-Ferry PassBrent Metropolitan Statistical Area experienced 17 consecutive months of positive job growth, with an increase of 2,500 jobs over the year in November 2013. The unemployment rate in the Pensacola metro area declined by 1.6 percentage points over the year, from 7.5 percent in November 2012 to 5.9 percent in November 2013. “The Pensacola area’s positive job growth rate for 17 consecutive months and 2,500 new jobs created is further proof that the steps we’re taking to create jobs and opportunities for Florida families is working,” Scott said. “With the area’s unemployment rate of 5.9 percent, more families are succeeding in Pensacola and across the state.” The Pensacola metro area showed a 10 percent increase in online job demand in November 2013 compared to a year ago, with 5,152 job openings. There were 916 openings for STEM occupations in the metro area in November 2013. STEM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and these jobs are considered high wage and high skill. In November, Workforce Escarosa, along with the state’s other 23 Regional Workforce Boards, reported more than 42,100 Floridians were placed in jobs. An individual who receives employment and training assistance through a One-Stop Career Center and nds a job within 180 days is deemed a placement and may be reported by a regional workforce board. Of these individuals, 12,091 previously received Reemployment Assistance. In 2012, more than 426,000 Floridians were placed in jobs, with 111,173 former claimants nding employment. Florida’s unemployment rate decreased to 6.4 percent in November 2013, down from 6.7 percent in October 2013. The statewide unemployment rate has remained below the national average of 7.0 percent since March 2013. Florida has created 446,300 private sector jobs since December 2010. To view the November 2013 monthly employment data, visit the Florida Jobs website at http://bit.ly/18Z2915 FROM STAFF REPORTS Legislature grants transportation funding The Florida Legislature recently approved funding for many key transportation projects across Northwest Florida. Okaloosa County funding includes: • Project development and environmental study for the replacement of Brooks Bridge. • Interstate 10 lighting for the County Road 189-Holt Road interchange. • PJ Adams Parkway widening and right of way purchasing from Wildhorse Drive to I-10. • PJ Adams Parkway widening with funding for construction from Ashley Drive to State Road 85. Funding has also been approved for Escambia and Santa Rosa road construction. Boyles: Employee awards suggestion may ‘ruf e feathers’ Okaloosa County Commissioner Nathan Boyles wants to end the decadeslong practice of awarding county employees for their years of service. Boyles, who broached the issue in his regular newsletter, said he values county employees but questions honoring people simply for staying in their jobs year after year. Employee awards, which take place at all daytime county commission meetings, generally are the rst order of business after the prayer and Pledge of Allegiance. Employees of varying levels of service, who often bring family members for photos, are applauded and bestowed with T-shirts, sweatshirts and other tokens of appreciation. Boyles, who said his suggestion could “ruffle feathers,” says the county should honor service that surpasses expectations. Tax collectors office offers 3 percent discount in December Okaloosa property tax owners have until Dec. 31 to receive a 3 percent early payment discount offered by the Okaloosa County Tax Collector’s office. The office is closed today and New Year’s Day. Payments can be made at www.OkaloosaTax.com or in person weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Crestview, Fort Walton Beach, Niceville and Destin. NATHAN BOYLES Okaloosa County Commissioner BRIEFS DAY from page B1 Hannah said playing for Raider softball coach Jack Byerly will help her as she moves to Division I softball in the Sunbelt Conference. “The transition will be easier because I know if I can handle coach Byerly, I can handle anybody,” she said. “He’s tough, but he’s a good coach, he really is. “Everything he does, he does it to get us to the next level.” Byerly isn’t the only tough coach she has had to put up with through the years. Dexter Day, a former college and minor league baseball player, said he has been tough on Hannah. “She’s put in a lot of time (working on the eld and in the weight room), and she’s had to put up with me, too,” Dexter said. “I’m not just the easiest person to play for. I think looking back on it, and she can speak for herself, but she’s glad that she did what she did to get to where she’s at today.” Hannah has embraced her father’s coaching. “Having him at the games helps a lot because he is always helping me no matter what I do,” she said. “During the Christmas break, we are going to be out there working and getting better all the time, because you can always get better. “He picks me apart every time I’m up to bat and every play I make. He’s always videoing me. He’s always correcting me, which is good, because I always need it.” The catcher is always considered the eld leader on a softball or baseball team and Hannah enjoys that mental aspect of the game. I like being vocal on the eld and trying to be a leader,” she said. “If you are quiet, they (the teammates) are not going to look to you for help. “I like being out there and taking charge on the eld behind the plate.” Stepping out of his role as Hannah’s dad and into the role of coach, Dexter assessed her game and what she brings to the diamond. “She’s strong, a hard worker, committed,” he said. She’s a coach’s player. She’s the kind of player coaches like. “She’s my daughter, but I’m going to talk to you as a coach. She’s that person you can depend on to be at practice every day with a great attitude. She’s going to come to work every day. She’s going to give her best all the time and she’s not going to go out and do something stupid and hurt the team.” When asked, Dexter also was quick to list some areas of Hannah’s game where she can improve. Among those things were improving her bat speed, as she will see faster pitching at Troy than she’s seen at Northwest Florida State. He also said she needs to work on hitting the outside pitch that might be a little away from her. Defensively, Dexter said Hannah should continue to work on the things that have gotten her this far, such as blocking the ball in front of the plate and getting her throws off quicker when trying to throw out a base runner. Stepping back into the role of dad, Dexter expressed his pride in what Hannah has accomplished. “I’m just happy for her to be able to experience what I’ve experienced (being successful),” he said. “It’s not about softball. Let’s take softball away from it and you’ve got the work ethic that you’ve done this. You will carry that (work ethic) the rest of your life. “You are going to be dependable and the kind of person you want to have working for you. I’m proud of her. I’m very proud of her.” thanks in part to sloppy passing and ball handling by the Bulldogs. Christian Cass sparked the Aggie run, scoring seven of his 13 points in a span of 100 seconds. Two Cass free throws, with 3:15 left in the half, pulled Tate to within a point of Crestview at 21-20. A 3-point basket by Rusty Moorer pushed the Bulldog lead back to 24-20. A Ronnie Baylark basket with 1:28 left in the half pushed the Crestview lead to six points. Tate pulled to within three points of the Bulldogs on a 3-pointer by Danny Cafarella with 25 seconds left in the half. But Siler hit a basket as the quarter ended to put the Bulldogs up 33-28 at the half. Ware scored on a 3-point play for Crestview to open the second half, and the Aggies never got closer than six points the rest of the way. Aaron and Baylark shared highscoring honors with 18 points each. Ware joined them in double gures with 14 points. St. Vil had 9 points and Moorer seven points. “You are not going to play your best every night, and I realize that,” Watson said. “But effort wise, I felt like in the rst half we were nonchalant, and we were sloppy with the ball. I felt like we were starting to turn the page, and then we took a step back. “Luckily, Ronnie made some big plays in the second half, and we kind of got Denzel going, so that was a good thing.” “It’s not about softball. Let’s take softball away from it and you’ve got the work ethic that you’ve done this. You will carry that (work ethic) the rest of your life. You are going to be dependable and the kind of person you want to have working for you. I’m proud of her. I’m very proud of her.” Dexter Day Hannah Day’s father BULLDOGS from B1 PHOTOS BY RANDY DICKSON | News Bulletin LEFT: Josh Hinton shoots a jumper from just inside the free throw line. RIGHT: Denzel Ware goes up for a score off an offensive rebound for Crestview on Friday. BELOW: Wesley St. Vil is fouled by a Tate defender as he takes a jump shot from just outside the lane. G OVERNMENT Gov. Scott: Pensacola gained 2,500 new jobs Sports

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www.crestviewbulletin.com Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Page B3 GATHERINGS WHAT’S HAPPENING HELPING HANDS PUBLIC MEETINGS B ULLETIN BOARD WHAT’S HAPPENING? What’s Happening in Okaloosa County? Let us know. Email items or updates to news@crestviewbulletin.com. Publication is free on a space-available basis. ANNOUNCEMENT PASTEL SOCIETY OF NORTH FLORIDA SEEKS NEW MEMBERS: Beginning to professional artists and patrons wanted. Annual membership costs $35. Details: Carrie Raeburn, psnf@centurytel.net. ONGOING FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS: 7 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, Mt. Ewell Lodge 131, U.S. Highway 198, Baker. CRESTVIEW LIONS CLUB: 12 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays at Hideaway Pizza, 326 N. Main St., Crestview. Details: B.J. Thomhave, 682-2012. CRESTVIEW TOASTMASTERS: 6-7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesdays, Holiday Inn Express, 125 Cracker Barrel Road, Crestview. Visitors are welcome. Details: Kathy Morrow, 974-3662. NORTH OKALOOSA PATRIOTS: 6:30 p.m. third Tuesdays, 150 N. Woodlawn Blvd., Crestview. See www. panhandlepatriots.com for details. SENIORS VS. CRIME: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, 296 S. Ferdon Blvd., Suite 8, Crestview. Call 306-3176 to report incidents. Details: okaloosacountysvc@ yahoo.com. EMERALD COAST PROFESSIONALS NETWORKING GROUP: 4-6 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, Crestview JobsPlus OneStop Center, Wilson Street, Crestview. For job seekers with a bachelor’s degree and two years’ professional work experience, or more than eight years’ professional, managerial or supervisory experience. Registration: email a resume and cover letter to ecp@jobsplus02.com. emeraldcoast professionals.com or jobsplusonestop.com. CRESTVIEW EXCHANGE CLUB: second and fourth Thursdays, Covenant Hospice, Crestview. Call Sharlene Cox, 682-6824, for details. DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN COLONISTS CHAPTER promotes interest in the history and deeds of the American colonists prior to 1776. Women who can document lineal descent from an ancestor who serviced the colonies prior to 1776 are eligible for membership. Details: 897-1278. STRICTLY WEAVERS MEETINGS: monthly, TBA. Details: Alice, 934-4403. WEEKLY KNITTING & CROCHET GROUP: 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays, Crestview Public Library. Details: Rae Schwartz, bakerny@ yahoo.com. CRESTVIEW KIWANIS CLUB: 11:45 a.m. Wednesdays, Coach-N-Four, 114 John King Road, Crestview. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 10-11 a.m. Thursdays, 704 E. Robinson, Crestview. For info call 689-1842. MOUNTAIN DULCIMER GROUP: 2-4 p.m. Thursdays, First Baptist Church of Crestview. Listen or play; beginners welcome. Call 682-3165 for details. WEIGHT WATCHERS: 5 p.m. Thursdays, Episcopal Church of the Epiphany, 424 Garden St., Crestview. CONCERNED CITIZENS OF CRESTVIEW: 5:30 p.m. rst Thursdays, Allen Park, Crestview. EMERALD COAST PROFESSIONALS NETWORKING GROUP: 4-6 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, Crestview JobsPlus OneStop Center, Wilson Street, Crestview. For job seekers with a bachelor’s degree and two years’ professional work experience, or more than eight years’ professional, managerial or supervisory experience. Registration: email a resume and cover letter to ecp@jobs plus02.com. emeraldcoast professionals.com or jobsplus onestop.com. CRESTVIEW AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MONTHLY BREAKFAST MEETING: 7 a.m. rst Thursdays, Crestview Community Center, 1446 Commerce Drive, Crestview. TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY: 8 a.m. Fridays, Valley Road Baptist Church, 1018 Valley Road, Crestview. Details: Mary Ann Vincek, 682-5927. See TOPS.org for more information. FREE LINE DANCE LESSONS: 7-8 p.m. Fridays, American Legion Post 75 lounge, 898 E. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. Followed by live band music from 8 p.m. to midnight. Details: 689-3195. STEAK NIGHT: 6 p.m. rst Fridays. American Legion Post 75, 898 E. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. Cost: $14 per person; includes Tbone steak, baked potato, salad, bread and dessert. Details: 689-3195. KARAOKE: 8 p.m. Saturdays, American Legion Post 75, 898 E. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. Details: 689-3195. SERVICES COLD WEATHER SHELTERS are available 6 p.m. to 8 a.m., when temperature is below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, at the following Crestview churches. •Sundays: Lifepoint Church •Mondays: First Presbyterian Church •Tuesdays and Wednesdays: Community of Christ •Thursdays: New Beginnings Church •Fridays: First Presbyterian Church •Saturdays: First United Methodist Church HELP NEEDED AMERICAN LEGION FOOD DRIVE ITEMS NEEDED: James McCullough Post 395 members and Sharing and Caring, a food bank, plan to collect 250 pounds of nonperishable food per month through 2013. Food will be distributed to needy people in the Crestview area. Drop off items 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays at 2260 S. Ferdon Blvd., Unit 35, or call Robert Williams, coordinator, 682-0287, to arrange pick-up. AARP TAX-AIDE VOLUNTEERS help low-to-middleincome taxpayers with their income tax returns, most of which are led electronically. You don’t need to be in AARP to participate. Counselors are trained and IRS-certi ed in U.S. Individual Tax Code basics and IRS tax prep software. Must commit to January training and prepare taxes one day a week February through April 15. Details; www. AARP.org/taxvolunteer or contact Dennis Malik, 537-8404. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA NEEDS MENTORS: Adult volunteers spend two hours weekly mentoring children. Pairs go to the library, museum, park or beach, hike, rollerskate or play sports. Call 664-5437 for details. VOLUNTEER ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVE IN DISASTERS: needs people to work in the Emergency Operations Center assisting county personnel. Call Yvonne Earle at 863-1530, extension 230 for details. NORTH OKALOOSA YMCA VOLUNTEERS needed. Contact Susan Goff, 682-8635, for details. HERITAGE MUSEUM VOLUNTEER TRAINING is available. Call Carol Visalpatara, 678-2615, for details. ONGOING VA SUICIDE HOTLINE: 800273-TALK (8255), or www. veteranscrisisline.net for con dential chat and selfcheck quiz. ENERGY ASSISTANCE AND SERVICES FOR LOW-INCOME FAMILIES: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, Tri-County Community Council, 290 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Crestview. Details: 306-1134. BAKER SOUP KITCHEN: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, Shady Grove Assembly of God. Details: 537-2744. WOMEN AND FAMILY INTERVENTION SERVICES AND EDUCATION: a Crestviewbased Community Drug and Alcohol Council program that helps pregnant women with substance abuse. Details: 689-4024. CHILDCARE ASSISTANCE: Eligible low-income families can receive nancial assistance through the Early Learning Coalition of Okaloosa and Walton Counties. Details: 833-9330 or 833-9333. FREE MEDICARE COUNSELING: By appointment, Crestview Public Library and Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church in Crestview. Details: 3062240 or 1-866-531-8011. COUNTY LEGISLATIVE DELEGATION PUBLIC HEARING: 5-6:30 p.m. Jan. 27, Niceville City Hall, 208 N. Partin Drive, Niceville. Public comments will be heard on proposals for the 2014 Regular Session of the Florida Legislature. To be placed on the agenda or submit handouts, contact Amanda Neeld, 833-9328 or Amanda.Neeld@ my oridahouse.gov, by 5 p.m. Jan. 22. Any member of the public is welcome to attend and participate. The Okaloosa County Legislative Delegation consists of Sens. Greg Evers and Don Gaetz, and Reps. Doug Broxson and Matt Gaetz. OKALOOSA-WALTON TRANSPORTATION PLANNING ORGANIZATION: 3 p.m. third Thursdays, Niceville Community Center, 204 N. Partin Drive. Call 1800-226-8914 ext. 231 to con rm. CITY/TOWN LPA BOARD MEETING: 6 p.m. Jan. 21, City Hall, 198 N. Wilson St., Crestview. No December meetings are scheduled. CRESTVIEW CITY COUNCIL: 6 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, Crestview City Hall. HOLT FIRE DEPARTMENT: 7 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, re station. HOLT FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSION: 6:30 p.m. third Thursdays, 490 W. U.S. Highway 90. NORTH OKALOOSA FIRE DISTRICT: 6 p.m. third Thursdays, re station 82, 5549 John Givens Road, Crestview. ANNOUNCEMENTS WASTE PRO WILL BE CLOSED Dec. 25, Christmas Day and Jan. 1, New Years Day. After-Christmas residential yard waste pickup is Dec. 26 and recycling pickup is Dec. 28 in Crestview. Post-New Year’s Day recycling is Jan. 2, and residential yard waste collection is Jan. 4 in Crestview. LAUREL HILL TRASH PICKUP is scheduled Dec. 26 and Jan. 2 after Christmas and New Year’s Day. BOSTON BUTT RELAY FUNDRAISER: 4-5 p.m. Dec. 31 pickup, Crestview Publix parking lot. Cost is $25 per roast. Duke it Out American Cancer Society Relay For Life team fundraiser. Details: Lonie Whitley, 603-3500 or 537-4654. UPCOMING OKALOOSA COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE CITIZENS ACADEMY: 6-9 p.m. Tuesdays, Jan. 7 through April 4, OCSO administrative building, 50 2nd St., Shalimar. Learn more about police of cer training. Details: Ashley Bailey, abailey@sheriff-okaloosa.org. ONGOING HERITAGE PARK AND INDIAN TEMPLE MOUND MUSEUM TOURS: 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 139 Miracle Strip Parkway S.E., Fort Walton Beach. Cost: $5 plus tax for adults, $4.50 plus tax for seniors 55-plus and active military, and $3 plus tax for children 4-17. Details: Mike Thomin, 833-9595. BAKER BLOCK MUSEUM: 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and on third Saturdays, or by appointments, 1307B Georgia Ave. Free admission. The museum has exhibits, pioneer buildings from the 1800s and a research library with historical documents. Details: 537-5714. CRESTVIEW KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS BINGO: Quarterly games 4:30-6 p.m.; regular games 6-9 p.m. every Tuesday at 701 James Lee Blvd., Crestview. ZUMBA CLASSES: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays, 395 Aplin Road, Crestview. $5 per person. Presented by Crestview Church of the Nazarene. CRESTVIEW SENIOR CENTER MUSIC: 1-4 p.m. Fridays, Old Spanish Trail Park, Stillwell Boulevard. Bring a musical instrument. Card and bingo days also are available. Details: Estelle, 682-8230. VFW HORSESHOE TOURNAMENT: 12 p.m. third Saturdays, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5450, 2240 W. James Lee Blvd., Crestview. Details: Lynn Mobley, 682-5552. COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR: North Okaloosa community organizations may list upcoming events on the Crestview Area Chamber of Commerce online events calendar to avoid scheduling con icts. Free. Non-members welcome. Visit www. crestviewchamber.com and click on “Calendar of Events”

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New Xtrac Ultra Laser for Psorias is. Botox and Juvder m Ultra for wrinkle s. W e car e for all your dermato logic concer ns includi ng acne, rashes, warts and moles. Charles F T rapp, M.D., F .A.A.D (Diplomat e American Boar d of Dermatolo gy Diplomate American Society For Mohs Sur gery) Heather E. Bien, MHS, P A-C, Debra M. Cole, P A-C, Erin McClur e, P A-C, Ashley C. W agner P A-C Special izing in Skin Cancer Detecti on and T r eatment P UBLIC S AFETY www.crestviewbulletin.com Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Page B4 By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Deputy Heath Hehl is the rst recipient of American Legion James McCollough Post 395’s Law Of cer of the Year award. “This award recognizes a law enforcement of cer who has proven personal dedication to societal security and protection,” post Cmdr. Raymond Nelson said during a Dec. 9 presentation at city hall. Hehl, who has served the sheriff’s of ce three years, “has a thorough knowledge of the needs of the community, as his roots and ties in this community are deep,” his supervisor, Sgt. Micah Redmon, said. Post members plan to annually recognize an of cer in the Crestview Police Department, the Florida Highway Patrol or the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Ofce, Nelson said. Sheriff’s deputies and state troopers nominated for the award must serve in North Okaloosa County, Nelson stated in a media release. “The recognition goes to a well-rounded law enforcement of cer who has exceeded the duty requirements expected of his or her position and has demonstrated a distinct pattern of community service coupled with professional achievement,” Nelson said. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN American Legion Post 395 executive committee members and Okaloosa County Sheriff Larry Ashley gather to recognize Deputy Heath Hehl as recipient of the post’s Law Of cer of the Year award. From left are Robert Williams, Everett Gilbert, Adrienne McKinney, Hehl, Ashley, Raymond Nelson, Olson Grant, Clarence Collins, Len Ashley and George Stakley. AMERICAN LEGION POST 395 Meets at 6:30 p.m. every third Tuesday at 895 McClelland St., Crestview. Call 262-9583 for more information. Special to the News Bulletin NICEVILLE — Northwest Florida State College will host 16 teams of regional middle school students Jan. 18 in its rst robotics tournament. The competition takes places from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the Niceville campus Student Services Center. FIRST LEGO League participants ages 9 to 16 will explore nature disasters and what can be done to help people master them in the 2013 Nature’s Fury Challenge. The program is designed to build community support and engagement; promote STEM learning; and foster innovation. Volunteers are needed as judges, referees, and support for the event. For details or to volunteer, contact Wanjiku Jackson at jacksonw@ nwfsc.edu or (850) 729-5202 College hosts robotics tourney Special to the News Bulletin NICEVILLE — On Dec. 12, Northwest Florida State College recognized students who successfully completed the college’s Associate Degree in Nursing program during the Fall 2013 academic semester. Graduates recognized with special awards were Brandy Barger of Crestview, for Future Nurse Leadership; Jennifer Smith of Fort Walton Beach for Clinical Excellence in Nursing; and Kathleen Beyhl of Destin for Academic Achievement in Nursing. Janet Place, RN, CNM, CNE, a retired U.S. Air Force lieutenant colonel, was given the opportunity to address the students and asked the graduates to be the best nurses they could be. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN Above: Northwest Florida State College nursing graduates, in no particular order, are: Brandy Barger, Rose M. Leno and Tanya Simon, Crestview; Kathleen Shirah Beyhl, Destin; Danielle Bohannon, Tiffany McCoy, Lita M. Milord, Linda Moore, Jennifer Powell, Brittney Azlee Sims, Jennifer N. Smith, Fort Walton Beach; Michelle Crenshaw, DeFuniak Springs; Casey N. Davis, Kortney Lewis, Niceville; Tyra Ann Ricci, Santa Rosa Beach; and Katie Leanne Vanzandt, Navarre. Top: Nursing award recipients, from left, are Behyl, Barger and Smith. Northwest Florida State College has pinning ceremony for nurse program graduates FROM STAFF REPORTS MILLIGAN — A Milligan man is charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, possession of a controlled substance, resisting an of cer without violence, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of listed chemicals in connection with an arrest Thursday. An Okaloosa County deputy, following an informant’s tip, investigated activity at a utility shed adjacent to a Milligan residence around 4:30 a.m. Thursday. The of cer found two men he believed were manufacturing methamphetamine. When they exited the shed, the deputy reportedly observed one of the men carrying paraphernalia commonly used to make meth. One suspect ed, but the deputy detained 32-yearold Jason Earl Chessher. The Okaloosa County Multi-Agency Drug Task Force obtained and executed a search warrant at the 1894 Wadsworth Road shed. Lawmen stated they found various chemicals and equipment used to manufacture methamphetamine in the shed and inside a nearby bus that Chessher lives in. Milligan man faces meth charges JASON EARL CHESSHER Legion post honors deputy Like us on CRESTVIEW BULLETIN H EALTH

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C OMMUNITY www.crestviewbulletin.com David R. Arr owsmith, M.D. Announces his r etir ement fr om the practice of Dermatology ef fective Januar y 31, 2014 Recor ds may be obtained at 11 10th A venue Shalimar FL 32579 (850) 651-3376 W E E K D A Y S 8 A.M. T O 5 P .M. 484 N or th W ilson S tr eet, C r estview ( 850 ) 682-1022 ANNOUNCES EXP ANSION OF MEDICAL SER VICES T O ALL P A TIENT S A T THE CRESTVIEW HEAR T CLINIC D J S E xpanded S er vices W ill I nclude F ollo wing And M or e: O besity G astr ointestinal P r oblems D iarrhea Constipation Ar thritis M igraines/H eadaches U rinar y I nfections S exually T ransmitted D iseases All H ear t P r oblems H igh B lood P r essur e S kin R ash F ev er/Cold Allergies R espirator y P r oblems D iabetes S leep P r oblems N ew P atients W elcome | M ost I nsurance A ccepted OF ANSION EXP ANNOUNCES ALL O T VICES SER MEDICAL CRESTVIEW J D e: or wing And M ollo nclude F ill I W vices er xpanded S E By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Attending Noel Night at the Crestview Public Library has become an annual tradition for T.J. Fulton’s family. “It’s something different,” the 22-year-old said. “I enjoyed pretty much everything.” Families like Fulton’s had several activities to choose from Thursday. Children participated in a scavenger hunt or made snowman ornaments, craft stick replicas of a kinara or a menorah and played the traditional Hanukkah dreidel game. Crestview resident Jay Haberline said his 4-year-old daughter, Lillianna, enjoyed spinning the dreidel. “She caught on to it quickly,” he said. Attendees listened to live music performed by Crestview High School’s Chanticleer chorus and Emmanuel Baptist Church’s worship music team, featuring event organizer Heather Nitzel. Upon Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus’ arrival, parents and children quickly led in line to photograph keepsake snapshots and share Christmas wish lists. Nitzel, who serves as children’s director at the library, said she was thankful for everyone who participated in the event. Enjoy popular audio and eBooks from the comfort of home Check out best-selling and classic eBooks and audiobooks available 24/7 from the library’s digital collection at http:// okaloosa.lib.overdrive.com With hundreds of popular ction and non ction titles to choose from, this collection is guaranteed to have something for everyone. You can enjoy best-selling novels, well-known classics, self-improvement guides and much more all on your own time, wherever you may be. You can browse the collection, borrow with your library card and enjoy on your computer, tablet, smartphone or eReader device. Borrowed eBooks can be enjoyed immediately in your web browser with OverDrive Read. Or, you can download eBooks into free software, Adobe Digital Editions or send to your Kindle device or app. Downloaded eBooks can be transferred to eReader devices such as NOOK Sony Reader and many more. Audiobooks can be downloaded into OverDrive Media Console (just MP3 audiobooks for Mac users). Once downloaded, titles can be enjoyed immediately or transferred to a variety of devices, including iPod and many others. Users with smartphones or tablets can install the OverDrive Media Console app to directly download EPUB eBooks and MP3 audiobooks titles to their device. No matter how you plan to enjoy, titles will automatically expire at the end of the lending period. There are no late fees! This service, powered by OverDrive, is free with your library card. To get started enjoying eBooks and audiobooks, visit www.cityofcrestview.org/library.php or go to the library’s website and click on the “Search OCPLC eBooks” link. Marie Garcia is the Crestview Public Library’s assistant library director. MARIE GARCIA Check It Out ACTIVITIES FIRST TUESDAY LECTURE: 10:30 a.m. Jan. 7 at the library. Topic: “History of the Florida Chautauqua,” by Dean Debolt. Coffee and cookies served at 10 a.m. The 2014 Florida Chautauqua Assembly is Jan. 24-26 in DeFuniak Springs. Details: 8927613. STARGAZING: 6:30-8 p.m. third Tuesdays, Crestview Public Library. Tom Haugh, with the Northwest Florida Astronomy Association, facilitates. Details: www.nwfastro. org. BEGINNING COMPUTER SKILLS TRAINING FOR SENIORS: Call 682-4432 to schedule one-hour appointments at the Crestview Public Library. Library card required. Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Page B5 CHECK IT OUT PHOTOS BY MATTHEW BROWN | News Bulletin TOP LEFT: Mario Lindsey helps his 4-year-old son, Armon, make a snowman ornament. TOP RIGHT: Rae Schwartz, president of the Friends of the Crestview Library, teaches attendees how to spin a dreidel. ABOVE: Attendees listen to Crestview High School’s Chanticleer chorus perform Christmas music. RIGHT: Jay Haberline photographs his children, 2-year-old Conner, left, and 4-year-old Lillianna, center, as they visit with Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus. BELOW: Parents help their children make Christmas tree ornaments at the crafts table. See www.crestviewbulletin.com/ photos for an image gallery of Noel Night. Crestview library celebrates 10th annual Noel Night

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50 Cent Value FREE Call 682-6524 to subscribe to the Crestview News Bulletin By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — The Fitzpatrick family continues to do its part in making sure less fortunate residents are able to have their own live Christmas trees this year. With assistance from Crestview retailers Lowe’s Home Improvement and Ace Hardware, the Fitzpatrick family collected 25 trees. The family donated both Douglas rs and Fraser rs for the clientele at Sharing and Caring in Crestview. Sharing and Caring vice president Robin Marston said the food pantry’s clientele is always thankful for the family’s continued donations. “Our clientele have been asking about when the trees will be here,” she said. “A lot of people would not have a Christmas tree if it wasn’t for (the Fitzpatrick family).” Collecting and donating the Christmas trees has been the family tradition for the past 24 years, David said. He regularly enlists the assistance of both his daughters, Misty and Reba, to help in the oneday event. Helping the less fortunate is normal for the family, Misty said. “We have always done this,” she said. “This just comes naturally to us.” David said collecting the live trees would not be possible without the support of local businesses. “We are just happy to be helping out the community,” said Lowe’s Manager Roger Jay. “We always try to do what we can to help.” In addition to donating trees, David recently dressed as Santa Claus and visited children staying at the Ronald McDonald House and Sacred Heart Hospital, both in Pensacola. “I just love seeing the big smiles on their faces,” he said. “I wouldn’t do it for money; the pay would be seeing their smiles.” Fitzpatrick said this month is the greatest time of year to be charitable. “I have been waiting for this month all year long,” he said. “I have loved doing charity work all my life.” F r om all of our campuses & c en t ers .... Hav e a S a fe & Ha pp y Holiday! N ic eville C ampus F or t W alt on B each C ampus E glin AFB E duca tion C en t er Hur lbur t F ield E duca tion C en t er Chautauqua C en t er –D eF uniak Spr ings S outh W alt on C en t er R ober t L. F Sikes E duca tion C en t er – C r est view Nor th w est F lor ida S ta t e C ollege is closed f or the holida y s A ll campuses will r e open f or business and r eg istr a tion ser vic es on Januar y 2nd S tuden ts ma y enr oll f or classes and pa y f ees o v er the holida y br eak thr ough the NWF S ta t e C ollege w ebsit e a t w w w .n wf sc .edu Spring classes b egin Ja n u a r y 13th M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey e Institute ullis Ey % & $ $" $ !($ $$" / 0 6.( 050 % ++ ,560 ( 5-05660 % *$ $ )) %!) (* $ $ % $$ FREE EYE EXAM For NEW Patients 59 and Older This Certi cate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Darr en Payne, M.D. In Our Cr estview Of ce Board Certi ed Eye Physician and Surgeon &40 ,7 5-6.0 0-55 2 00 36,0 ,. 0 2 6,-7,( ,,,,. 40 00 .50,0 !# )!'# ""!&& &) '$ 550 6553 5 40 65., ",4,.60( / 0, ,. 6.0 ( 006 .0 -, 0 5 0 + ++ CODE: CB00 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our of ce policy that we have the right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other ser vices, examinations, or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for any free, discounted fee or reduced fee ser vice, examination or treatment. $ $# Boar d Certi ed Ey e Ph ysician and Catar act Specialist $ )$$ $ $" %( $ $" %( && W e specialize in the Diagnosis and T r eatment of Ey e Conditions Associated with aging including: % ) $ $ $ Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Volume 13, Number 52 PHOTOS BY MATTHEW BROWN | News Bulletin David Fitzpatrick, right, hands a Douglas r Christmas tree to Sharing and Caring volunteer Joshua Miller on Tuesday. Below, Fitzpatrick carries two Douglas rs from the outside garden department of Lowe’s Home Improvement in Crestview to a truck. Crestview family continues tradition of collecting Christmas trees for less fortunate THE GIVING TREES Like us on CRESTVIEW BULLETIN “I have been waiting for this month all year long. I have loved doing charity work all my life.” David Fitzpatrick

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Extra A2 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Happy Holidays !" " " " MAIN OFFICE 1301 Industrial Drive Crestview FL 32539 850-682-51 1 1 DO WNT O WN OFFICE 302 N Wilson Street Crestview FL 32536 850-682-5112 SOUTHSIDE OFFICE 2541 S. Hwy 85 Crestview FL 32539 850-682-31 1 1 www .fn b c rest vie w .co m OF CRESTVIEW MEMBER FDIC Y our Hometo w n Bank S ince 1 9 56! Home delivery subscriptions may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. NEWS INFORMATION If you have a concern or comment about the Crestview News Bulletin’s coverage, please call 682-6524. PUBLISHER Skip Foster sfoster@crestviewbulletin.com EDITOR Thomas Boni tboni@crestviewbulletin.com OFFICE STAFF Dawn Barnes ... circulation assistant dawnb@crestviewbulletin.com ADVERTISING INFORMATION Melissa Tedder ............ ad consultant melissa@crestviewbulletin.com Sherrie Stanley ..... media consultant sherries@crestviewbulletin.com EDITORIAL Brian Hughes ....................... reporter Arts & entertainment editor brianh@crestviewbulletin.com Matthew Brown ................... reporter matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com Randy Dickson ............. sports editor randyd@crestviewbulletin.com Renee Bell ............. editorial assistant news@crestviewbulletin.com MAIN OFFICE FAX NUMBER 850-682-2246 The Crestview News Bulletin is published twice weekly each Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, at 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview FL 32536. Periodical postage paid at Crestview, Florida. POSTMASTER: Please send address change to 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536. All material herein is property of the Crestview News Bulletin. USPS Number 010-209 CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN SUBSCRIPTION RATES 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536 To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524. IN COUNTY 13 weeks .................................... $9.45 26 weeks ................................... $17.85 52 weeks .................................. $32.76 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks ................................... $14.70 26 weeks .................................. $23.10 52 weeks .................................. $38.01 A SPECIAL PUBLICATION OF a w ar dche vr olet .c om 4150 S outh F er don Blv d C r est vie w FL M e rr y C hri s t m a s f r om a l l of u s a t & H app y N e w Y e ar A CHEVROLET A A CHEVROLET A CHEVROLET A CHEVROLET A W ARD ARD W ARD W CREST VIE W 850 682 2731 FT W AL T ON BEA CH 850 243 7214 PENSA C OL A 850 994 0101 By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — It was no surprise to Crestview High School band director Jody Dunn that a crowd had lined up just outside the Pearl Tyner auditorium before the Christmas concert Tuesday night. “There are a little less than 500 seats available in the auditorium. We usually have an excess of that,” he said. Friends and family members of students who performed in the concert lled the auditorium to listen a variety of Christmas music selections. Attendees fortunate enough to get inside the auditorium were able to listen to six different ensembles, including four concert bands and two jazz bands, Dunn said. Each ensemble performed renditions of holiday classics. The school’s concert and symphonic band performed selections from “The Nutcracker” and “O Magnum Mysterium,” among others. The school’s jazz ensembles performed other holiday favorites, like “Winter Wonderland” and “Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer.” Using the jazz ensembles for background music, Azyia Taylor, Nick Watson and Elizabeth Dunn earned applause after their solo performances of “Christmas Time Is Here,” “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” and “Jingle Bells.” Performing before a large crowd was nothing new to senior Foster Lux, 16, who played a clarinet in the wind ensemble at the end of the concert. “I like the crowd ... when you get to hear their feedback and how much they enjoyed it,” she said. “I just like performing before other people, because they can enjoy it as much as we do.” In addition to being in the 2014 Okaloosa All County Band with 31 other band members, Lux also made the 2014 Florida AllState Symphonic Band. Lux said her nal year performing in the CHS Christmas concert is “bittersweet.” “It’s sad to go, but it is about time,” she said. Kathi Peyton attended to see her 17-year-old daughter, Shayna Clay, play the school’s concert band. Peyton said in addition to seeing her daughter’s performance, watching the other students is just as enjoyable. “I like it mostly to see the other kids’ talents,” she said. CHS Christmas concert continues to draw crowds MATTHEW BROWN | News Bulletin Nick Watson, center, holds the microphone while singing “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” with the jazz ensemble playing the music during the 2013 Crestview High School Christmas Concert on Tuesday night at the school’s Pearl Tyner auditorium. To his right conducting the jazz band is Jody Dunn, the school’s band director. It comes around every year, although when it actually starts may vary. Does it really make a difference? Some say, “Absolutely!” Others say, “It’s just really annoying!” I’m referring to the ubiquitous advertising blitz for getting you to spend your hard earned money on Christmas gifts. Oops, excuse me … “holiday gifts” in order to be politically correct. Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday — each offer great deals to get us to spend. The pressure is on. As of right now, there are only a few shopping days left. Are you in a panic? (I’m trying to not be, myself.) While doing some shopping recently, I saw a large mug. There was a message printed on the mug which, when I rst read it, thought was a bit trite. But then the full meaning of it dawned on me. The mug said, “Next year I’m going to think about what Christmas means to God.” What does Christmas mean to God? Here is something to ponder: Christmas, for God, demonstrates that at a particular time and place, God came to be with us himself. When Quirinius was governor of Syria, in a town called Bethlehem, a child was born. That child was God himself. The one who inhabits eternity came to dwell in time. The one whom people learned to fear came to demonstrate great love and forgiveness. The God of all mercies came so that we could experience his divine mercy and receive life. Let me encourage you to ask yourself a question, “When Christmas this year has come and gone, what difference will your hectic pace have made? Was all the anxiety, rushing around, exhaustion worth it?” Then ask yourself: “Is this what God intended when he came to this earth in the baby Jesus?” The Rev. Mark Broadhead is Laurel Hill Presbyterian Church and First Presbyterian Church of Crestview’s pastor. FROM THE PULPIT REV. MARK BROADHEAD From the Pulpit Hype, hyperbole and Jesus during the holidays “I just like performing before other people, because they can enjoy it as much as we do.” Foster Lux CHS senior

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Extra Crestview News Bulletin | A3 Wednesday, December 25, 2013 J & P Glitz & Glitter (NEXT DOOR HELLO BEAUTIFUL & ACROSS FROM LOS RANCHEROS) J o h n & P at C o o pe r at G l it z a nd G l it t e r w a nt t o w is h e v e r y o ne a M e rr y C h r is t m a s & H a p p y N ew Y ea r W e a r e r e ad y f o r al l o f y o u r h o l i d a y at t i r e ne e d s r at pe o o at C n & P h o J o nt t a r w e t it l nd G z a it l G o nt t a r w e t it l nd G z a it l G Dr. Richard Thomas and his compassionate care givers wish you health & happiness this holiday season and in the coming New Year! No w O ering B ot o x and Juv ederm X C T r eatments! ( 850 ) 682-4516 102 A labama S tr eet Suit e A, C r est view Hours: M on T hurs 8am-5pm, Closed F r ida y s w w w .cr est vie w den tist .c om e H o m e o f Doc H o l l ida y ’ s De n t a l C h a i r By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com GAZA VALLEY, Afghanistan — While residents through out the north county region are shopping for last-min ute gifts, decorating their homes and baking cookies, many families’ loved ones are spending a decidedly nontraditional Christmas. Several hundred mem bers of the 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) deployed to Afghanistan at the beginning of November in support of Operation En during Freedom. Other soldiers from the group are concurrently serving in South America. “It’s a very active pe riod here,” spokesman Capt. Thomas Cieslak said Wednesday morning from the group’s base at Bagram Aireld. Cieslak said one of the group’s main missions is to build rapport with the Afghan population, Af ghan National Army Spe cial Forces and Afghan commandoes. “It’s a side-by-side rela tionship working together to make Afghanistan a more secure place for the Afghans,” Cieslak said. “The Afghan forces are ex tremely condent in their abilities and their skills.”F a A MI lyLY SUPPORT Helping the American soldiers remain focused on their mission is the comfort in knowing their loved ones are among friends back in the Crest view area. “It’s a peace of mind knowing there is a lot of support for our families back home,” Cieslak said, adding soldiers keep in touch with their families regularly. “We’re blessed with a great infrastructure to communicate with our families,” he said. “It’s a good feeling. We’re away from our families but we’re in touch with our families.” Though fully focused on their jobs, Cieslak said the soldiers haven’t forgotten two of their comrades who died near the beginning of their deployment, nor their families at the holidays. “The families of Staff Sgts. Alex Viola and Rich ard Vazquez are still in our hearts,” he said. “They re main in our thoughts and prayers.” No matter how focused they are on their mission, soldiers’ thoughts natural ly turn to home and loved ones at this special time of year, Cieslak said. “Of course, every mem ber of the group — not just in Afghanistan but in South America — we’re miss ing our families while de ployed, but it’s an honor to serve our country,” he said. For his comrades, mak ing sure each soldier is safe and will return to his or her family is a para mount concern. “Everybody is doing their best, not just for the mission but for each other, for the soldier to the left and right,” Cieslak said. Above all he said, while 7th Special Forces troops are deployed, they are drawing strength from the support they receive from back home in north Oka loosa County. “It’s wonderful to have a community like Crestview supporting us,” Cieslak said. “It means the world to us to have the support we’re getting back there.” Strength flows from home At Christmas, 7th Special Forces soldiers draw comfort knowing families are cared for TOP: U.S. Army Special Forces, including Crestview area residents, cross a wide river Dec. 11 in Gaza Valley, Zabul province, Afghanistan. BOTTOM LEFT: As seen through night-vision equipment, Afghan National Security Forces and U.S. Special Forces conduct a pre-mission brieng. BOTTOM RIGHT: A U.S. Special Forces soldier with the Combined Joint Special Operations Task ForceAfghanistan, unidentied for security, crosses a creek during a clearance operation.PP HOTOS By Y PP FC. DAVI I D DEVI I C H H | Special to the News Bulletin

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Extra A4 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, December 25, 2013 Me r r y C h r i st m a s R em em b er t h e R e a s o n f o r t h e S e a s o n. . G o d Bl es s F o r o u r h o m e t o y ou r s 981 W Nelson A v e. Defuniak Spr ings 850-892-7311 594 N. Main Str eet Cr es tvie w 850-682-6835 Locally o wned and opera ted b y Dar el and Donna Lundy W e a t C o o p e r s F i n e J e w e l r y w a n t t o t h a n k a l l of o u r c u s t o m e r s in c l ud in g S a n t a W e l o o k f o r w a r d t o s e r v i n g a l l yo u r j e w e l r y n e e d s i n 2 0 1 4 ~ H a v e a M e r r y C h r i s t m a s & H a p p y N e w Y e a r ~ Cust om Designs & S ettings A.M 6 P .M. 850-683-8004 By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Members of the First Baptist Church of Crestview continued their annual tradition of providing a Christmas store for the residents of the Crestview Manor. “They have blessed us tremendously and made our hearts smile,” resident Vicki Ripley said. Ripley was one of almost 40 residents in the assisted living facility who picked out free presents for family members and friends who visit during the holidays. “We have been doing this since 1985, the year the manor opened,” said Ida Faye Powell, the event orga nizer. “This is just a way for us to give to the residents who don’t have the money to buy gifts or get out and buy the gifts ... for family mem bers or friends.” The store featured gift items for men, women and children. From toys to jew elry and tool sets, each resi dent was able to pick out at least four items to give to visiting family members. Church members do nated many of the items, along with money saved in the church’s budget, Powell said. The women’s ministry led the event with assis tance from youth in the Ac teens group, who wrapped each gift in Christmas wrap ping paper and delivered the gifts to the residents’ rooms. After volunteering with the store on behalf of the church in the past, current resident Neta Roberts is now on the receiving end. “It feels ne, not as good as being the giver, but I love it,” she said. “I hope they always have this going on, because some are not as fortunate as others.” The facility’s activities di rector, Susan Josey, agreed. “It’s a wonderful, won derful thing that they are doing,” she said. “Without this, residents would not be able to give presents to their friends and family.” F iI ND itIT ONL iI N eE See www.crestviewbulletin.com for a photo gallery from the shopping event at the Crestview Manor, presented by the women’s ministry at the First Baptist Church of Crestview. Church offers Christmas store to manor residents PHOt T O s S BY BB RIAN N HH UGH H ES | News Bulletin With its Christmas decorations glowing, Main Street casts a festive holiday spirit on a recent evening. Above, the Okaloosa County courthouse forms a backdrop for the Crestview Christmas tree. It’s Christmastime in the city PHOt T O s S BY MATTH H EW B B R O O W N N | News Bulletin Bev Lilley, left, of the women’s ministry at First Baptist Church of Crestview, assists Helen Malone, a resident at Crestview Manor, select gifts for friends and family at the Christmas store on Monday night. Below, Lauren Medford, 12, left, and Jenna Morales, 15, of the First Baptist Church of Crestview prepare to wrap gifts in Christmas wrapping paper for Crestview Manor residents Monday night. Residents were able to select free Christmas presents for friends and family at a Christmas store, thanks to the women’s ministry at the church.

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ExtraA6 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, 25, 2013 Legal # 161718 NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE 1ST JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 13 CA2309 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN RE: SURF CONSULTANTS, INC. as successor in interest to Compass Bank vs. DEBORAH J THORNTON TO: DEBORAH J THORNTON 113 TRISTATERRACE CT DESTIN FL32541 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition for COMPLAINT has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any to it on Stacey S. Fisher, Esq. attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 2775 Sunny Isles Blvd, Ste 100, Miami, FL 33160-4007 and file the original with the clerk of the above styled court on or before December 30, 2013; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief prayed for in the complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said court at OKALOOSA, Florida on this 18 day of November, 2013. Clerk Name: DON HOWARD As clerk, Circuit Court OKALOOSACounty, Florida By Nancy Moxcey As Deputy Clerk Sprechman & Associates, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff, 2775 Sunny Isles Blvd, Ste 100 Miami, FL 33160-4007 phone: (305) 931-0100 S17269:P354NOA 12/04/2013 12/11/2013 12/18/2013 12/25/2013 Legal # 161730 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-CA-4221F Paul Jennings Gregory, as Personal Representative of The Estate of Paul W. Jennings, Plaintiff, vs. The Church of Philip The Evangelist of Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, Inc., and all unknown persons claiming by, through, or under said corporation, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: The Church of Philip The Evangelist of Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, Inc., a dissolved Florida corporation, and all unknown persons or parties who may be interested in the subject matter of the action. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action seeking a declaratory judgment to enforce an interest in and remove a cloud on title on the following described property in Okaloosa and Holmes County, Florida: Parcel 1: Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 23, Township 4 North, Range 17 West, Holmes County, Florida, and run North 0239’00” East 166.17 feet to the centerline of U.S. Highway 90, thence North 5708’00” East along said centerline 2490.36 feet, thence North 5429’ West 456.94 feet to a nail on the centerline of old U.S. Highway No. 90, thence run North 4757’ East 462.53 feet, thence run North 4523’ East 210.90 feet, thence run South 4524’ East 33.0 feet to an iron pipe on the Southeasterly right-of-way boundary of old U.S. Highway No. 90 for a point of beginning, from said point of beginning continue South 4524’ East 200.00 feet, thence run North 4354’ East 241.34 feet, thence run North 4634’57” West 200.00 feet to an iron pipe on said Southeasterly right-of-way boundary, thence run South 4325’03” West along said right-of-way boundary 101.69 feet to a point on a curve concaved Northwesterly, thence run Southwesterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 8627.45 feet, through a central angle of 054’ for an arc length of 135.53 feet to the point of beginning. Parcel 2: E 1/2 of SW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of Section 28, Township 6 North, Range 15 West, Holmes County, Florida. LESS AND EXCEPT that portion of subject property encumbered by road right of way as now exists. Hancock Bank, Account # 731116372 and # 20419090. Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Account # 3627-0735 and # 2106-2131. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiff’s attorney: Richard P. Petermann Anchors Smith Grimsley 909 Mar Walt Drive, Suite 1014 Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547 (850) 863-4064 on or before January 15, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Okaloosa County Courthouse, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547, either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED on December 4, 2013. Don W. Howard, Clerk of Court By: Courtney Eslinger As Deputy Clerk 12/11/2013 12/18/2013 12/25/2013 01/01/2014 Legal # 161751 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WALTON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO. 13 CP 185 IN RE: ESTATE OF: LEONARD F. MARTIN, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LEONARD F. MARTIN, deceased, whose date of death was September 13, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Walton County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 571 Highway 90 East, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is December 18, 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: Michael A. Jones Attorney for Barbara L. Noll Florida Bar Number: 332471 MATTHEWS & JONES, LLP 323 E. John Sims Parkway Niceville, FL 32578 Telephone: (850) 729-7440 Fax: (850) 729-7871 E-Mail:mjones@destinlaw.comSecondary E-Mail: aprivett@destinlaw.comPersonal Representative: Barbara L. Noll 38 Reed Place Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32548 12/18/2013 12/25/2013 Legal # 161753 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 46-2010-CA-001401S DIVISION W US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR WFMBS 2004-EE, Plaintiff, vs. COURT DEL MAR HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION. INC. SUSANNA MILGRAM; WELLS FARGO BANK N.A. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated November 26, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 46-2010-CA-001401S of the Circuit Court of the FIRST Judicial Circuit in and for OKALOOSA County, Florida wherein US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR WELLS FARGO ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-EE1, is the Plaintiff and COURT DEL MAR HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION. INC.; SUSANNA MILGRAM; WELLS FARGO BANK N.A.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at WWW.OKALOOSA.REALFORECLOSE.COM at 11:00AM, on the 9 day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: PARCEL 1: UNIT 106, COURT DEL-MAR, A TOWNHOUSE DEVELOPMENT, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN PLAT BOOK 13, PAGE 60, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL 2: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 22 WEST, OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER OF LOT 124, BLOCK F, HOLIDAY ISLE RESIDENTIAL SECTION NO.5 SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, AT PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA;

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ExtraCrestview News Bulletin |A7 Wednesday, 25, 2013 Customer Support Legal Advertising Clerk The Northwest Florida Daily News is looking for an individual to join our fast paced legal department. The job includes typesetting, scheduling public notices and oversees the preparation of legal affidavits. PC Window and Excel necessary. The ideal candidates must be skilled in computer data entry & type 45 wpm. Must also give attention to detail, have excellent spelling, grammar and interpersonal communication skills. Excellent proof reading is a must. The Daily News offers an excellent benefit package, health, dental, vision coverage and 401k. Drug screen and background check will be required. Email resume to ehypes@nwfdailynews.com Interview will be scheduled. Drug-free workplace -EOE Web ID 34274703 Text FL74703 to 56654 Mike Golles Painting Int., Ext., pressure washing Lic & Ins Free estimates. Ph. 682-5347 Sr. Citizen Discounts. Farm Direct Centipede, Zoysia, St Augustine and Bermuda We Deliver & Install Call 850-244-6651 Suncoast Sod Farms Text FL73694 to 56654 Spot Advertising works! 6517783 THENCE GO NORTH 59 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 66.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DURANGO ROAD (66 FEET RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF THE QUAYS PHASE I, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGE 157, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA THE FOLLOWING TWO CALLS: (1) THENCE GO NORTH 30 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 107.08 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE; (2) THENCE GO ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 23.91 FEET; AN ARC DISTANCE OF 41.21 FEET (CHORD -36.29 FEET, CHORD BEARING -NORTH 18 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST) TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY LINE AND A NORTHWESTERLY EXTENSION THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 181.48 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 21 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 116.67 FEET TO THE PCB; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 21 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 14.24 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 70.00 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE, AN ARC DISTANCE OF 54.98 FEET (CHORD -53.58 FEET CHORD BEARING -SOUTH 45 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST); THENCE GO NORTH 75 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 13.08 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 24 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 5.01 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 18.00 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 24 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 18.50 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 43.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND ACCEPT: PARCEL DESCRIBED: (AS WRITTEN) A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 22 WEST, OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHERNMOST CORNER OF LOT 124, BLOCS F, HOLIDAY ISLE RESIDENTIAL SECTION NO. 5 SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, AT PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO NORTH 59 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 66.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DURANGO ROAD (66 FEET RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF THE QUAYS PHASE I, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGE 157, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA THE FOLLOWING TWO CALLS: (1) THENCE GO NORTH 30 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 107.08 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE: (2) THENCE GO ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 23.91 FEET; AN ARC DISTANCE OF 41.21 FEET (CHORD -36.29 FEET, CHORD BEARING NORTH 18 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST) TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY LINE AND A NORTHWESTERLY EXTENSION THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 181.48 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 21 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 116.67 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 21 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 14.24 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 70.00 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE, AN ARC DISTANCE OF 40.32 FEET (CHORD -39.77 FEET CHORD BEARING -SOUTH 45 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST) TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING: THENCE CONTINUE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE, HAVING A RADIUS OF 70.00 FEET AN ARC DISTANCE OF 14.66 FEET (CHORD -14.63 FEET CHORD BEARING —SOUTH 29 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST); THENCE GO NORTH 75 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 13.08 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 24 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 5.01 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 18.00 FEET: THENCE GO NORTH 24 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 18.50 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 65 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 4.00 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 24 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 23.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 192 DURANGO ROAD, DESTIN, FL 32541 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 27, 2013. Don W. Howard Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Kim Bouhall Deputy Clerk 1 Plaintiff name has changed pursuant to order previously entered. Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10012771 **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, ADA Liaison, Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547, Phone (850)609-4700 Fax (850)652-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@flcourts 1.gov, At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired call 711. 12/18/2013 12/25/2013 Legal # 161754 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 46-2012-CA-002592C DIVISION PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. JASON E BARNARD ; JINJU L BARNARD ; FOX VALLEY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. ; FOX VALLEY HOMEOWNERS ASSOC., INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 19, 2013 and entered in Case No. 46-2012-CA-002592C of the Circuit Court of the FIRST Judicial Circuit in and for OKALOOSA County, Florida wherein PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION is the Plaintiff and JASON E BARNARD; JINJU L BARNARD; FOX VALLEY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; FOX VALLEY HOMEOWNERS ASSOC., INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at WWW.OKALOOSA.REALFORECLOSE.COM at 11:00AM, on the 10 day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 8, BLOCK I, FOX VALLEY PHASE 1, BEING A PORTION OF SECTIONS 26 AND 35, TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 24 WEST, CITY OF CRESTVIEW, OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 21, PAGES 29-32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY. A/K/A 653 TERRITORY LANE, CRESTVIEW, FL 32536 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 22, 2013. Don W. Howard Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Vicki Jackson Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F11016546 **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, ADA Liaison, Okaloosa County, 1940 Lewis Turner Boulevard, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547, Phone (850)609-4700 Fax (850)652-7725, ADA.Okaloosa@flcourts1.go v, At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired call 711. 12/18/2013 12/25/2013 UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? Adoption-A brave & selfless choice. Medical, living & counseling expenses paid. Choose the loving & financially secure family. Compassionate Atty. Lauren Feingold 24/7 866-633-0397 www.fklhearttoheart.net #0958107 We Buy GoldJewelry & Diamonds Get a $1000 Loan for $50 a month 700 Beal Pkwy US GOLD PAWN Call TOM Now!! 850-974-2462 www .usgold p awn.com Logistics/TransportClass ACDL Drivers Needed Immediately 3 years min. driving with Dump Trailer Experience. $500 Sign On Bonus *Local Panhandle Hauling *Home Nights Apply ONLY online www.perdido trucking.com Perdido Trucking Service, LLC 251-470-0355 Web ID#: 34272984 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com. EOE Training/EducationWant to be a CNA/ Phlebotomist? Don’t want to wait? Express Training Services now offering our nursing asst. exam prep classes in DESTIN Class for 1 week. 850-502-5521 Military Spouses We Are mycaa certified expresstraining services.com Next class 01/13/2014 Holt 1150sf, 2 br, 2 ba, Stove, Fridge, Micro, DW, included. With w/d hkup, lots of storage, & covered parking. $680 mo + damage deposit. Call 850-537-2894 or 850-287-5338 Crestview-FSBO 4 homes by pool 3BD 2BA, 3BD1BA2 Studios & office, ovr 5800 sq ft @ $70/sq ft, ovr 2K sq ft adtnl strg on 2.9 private ac, 3690 Hwy 90 E $411,100 Pics on zillow.com 682-4994 Individual wants to buy house for investment. 850-651-0987 Text FL74232 to 56654 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds.

PAGE 25

ExtraA8 | Crestview News Bulletin Wednesday, 25, 2013 MPG is Estimated MPG sale price does not include Tax, Tag, Title or $199. Dealer Processing Fee. Photos for Illustration Purpos es. Actual vehicle will vary. Sale ends Jan. 2nd 2014 awardchevrolet.com CRESTVIEW 8506822731 FT. WALTON BEACH 8502437214 PENSACOLA 8509940101 4150 South Ferdon Blvd Crestview, FL 2013 SONIC LTZ LOADED $17,975 Leatherette Int, Cruise, XMM My Link Radio, PW, PL, Spoiler, Alm Wheels, Fog lights, Enhanced Premium 6 Speakers#15286 2014 EQUINOX $24,250 INCLUDES REBATE PW,PL,CR,TL,XM, OnStar and More 2014 SILVERADO DOUBLE CAB2014 2500 H.D. DIESEL CREW CAB Z71 4X4 LTZ DEMOTRADE IN ASSIST MUST TRADE IN 99 OR NEWER DEMO DISCOUNT AND REBATE$25,397 $1,000 $58,495 $7,688 $24,397 $50,807 2013 CAMARO $23,258 INCLUDES REBATE PW,PL,CR,TL,AUTO TRANSMISSION, ONSTAR & MORE#15660 2013 TRA VERSE LTZ LOADED $37,957 NAVIGATION, REAR DVD, HEATED AND COOLED FRONT SEATS WITH MEMORY, XM, ALL POWER, ONSTAR AND MUCH MORE #15481 DEMO #15840 #15613 $25,893 INCLUDES REBATEPW, PL, CR, TL, XM, ONSTAR, and moreALL NEW 2014 IMPALA $34,987 INCLUDES REBATEHURST SHIFTER, BOSTON ACOUSTICS, RS, REAR VISION PKG, PW, PL, CR, TL, ONSTAR AND MUCH MORE#14615 2012 CAMARO C ONVERTIBLE SS 420 H.P 2013 SUBURBAN LTZ 4X4 DEMOMSRP DEMO DISCOUNT AND REBATES OWNER LOYALTY MUST OWN 99 OR NEWER GM VEHICLE$64,395 $5,832 $2,500 $56,063 DEMO #15451 SUNROOF, DVD, NAVIGATION, HEATED AND COOLED LEATHER SEATS, BOSE, XM/CD, ONSTAR AND MUCH MORE CRUISE, AC, PL, PW, AUTO TRANSMISSION AND MORE LTZ, LEATHER, HEATED WITH MEMORY SEATS, BOSE, XM/CD, 4WD, TRAILER TOW, LOCKING REAR DIFF, ONSTAR AND MORE.#15838 #15856 Merry Christmas from 6517266 A CHEVROLET WARD