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Crestview news bulletin ( June 22, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028411/00777

Material Information

Title: Crestview news bulletin
Portion of title: Bulletin
Crestview news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Okaloosa Publishing Co.,.
Place of Publication: Crestview Fla
Creation Date: June 22, 2013
Publication Date: 07-06-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crestview (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okaloosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okaloosa -- Crestview
Coordinates: 30.754167 x -86.572778 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

General Note: Description based on: Vol. 9, no. 37 (Sept. 5, 2001); Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002758666
oclc - 48122675
notis - ANN6621
lccn - 2001229458
System ID: UF00028411:00840

Related Items

Preceded by: Crestview news leader

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028411/00777

Material Information

Title: Crestview news bulletin
Portion of title: Bulletin
Crestview news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Okaloosa Publishing Co.,.
Place of Publication: Crestview Fla
Creation Date: June 22, 2013
Publication Date: 07-06-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crestview (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okaloosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okaloosa -- Crestview
Coordinates: 30.754167 x -86.572778 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

General Note: Description based on: Vol. 9, no. 37 (Sept. 5, 2001); Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002758666
oclc - 48122675
notis - ANN6621
lccn - 2001229458
System ID: UF00028411:00840

Related Items

Preceded by: Crestview news leader


This item is only available as the following downloads:


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www.crestviewbulletin.com 50¢ TABLE OF CONTENTS Find us at www. facebook.com/ crestviewbulletin Follow us at twitter.com/ cnbulletin TWITTER FACEBOOK A Halifax Media paper read by 10,450 people every week By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com NOIRMOUTIER, France — Visitors to Crestview’s sister city can expect redcarpet hospitality from big-hearted host families. Some visitors, however, receive a bit more. Jocelyne and Grard Pontoizeau have welcomed more than 50 guests from Northwest Florida since Crestview and the French island town Noirmoutieren-l’Ile formed a relationship through Sister Cities International. Grard — known as “Pompom” to friends — and his father-in-law built the couple’s six-bedroom, two-bathroom and threewater-closet stone house almost 30 years ago. The Pontoizeaus are well-known among Northwest Florida State College show choir students, who perform every two years in Noirmoutier. By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — This month, Hub City Ford staffers hope to store as many school supplies as they can in a van. The items would bene t Calvary United Church’s effort for needy children. “Stuff the Van” is a rst for the church, which in prior years purchased school items with business donations, the Rev. Charles Braneff said. MATTHEW BROWN | News Bulletin The Rev. Charles Braneff, Calvary United Church’s pastor, right, watches as Hub City Ford general manager Chris Daggs stores school supplies for needy children inside a van. WANT TO HELP? Visit Hub City Ford on South Ferdon Boulevard through July 31 to “stuff the van” for needy children. Available 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Auto dealer, church present school supplies drive By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 / @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Crestview Community Emergency Response Team and Holt Volunteer Fire Department members are helping Holt Boy Scouts work toward earning the Emergency Preparedness merit badge. In turn, Troop 532 members will help Holt during natural or manmade disasters. Mark Brown, the Crestview CERT’s team chief, on Monday advised six scouts MATTHEW BROWN | News Bulletin Troop 532 Boy Scouts Michael Barlow, Dillon Fredericks and Aaryn Cooper peer inside a Holt re engine on display Monday in the First Baptist Church of Holt parking lot. The scouts, the Holt Volunteer Fire Department and the Crestview Community Emergency Response Team will collaborate for emergencies. Holt Boy Scouts learn emergency preparedness See SCHOOL A6 ‘Awesome’ French hosts treat Crestview visitors ‘like family’ Bienvenue! By THOMAS BONI 682-6524 / @cnbEditor tboni@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — New Laurel Hill School principal Lee Martello said she anticipates the K-12 environment and its potential, off-campus impact. “Truly everyone in the community invests themselves in the school because that is the center of their lives,” she said. “... I want the school to be the hub of their being so that the family can grow along with the kids.” Complementing teachers The former Shoal River Middle School assistant principal — whom Okaloosa School District superintendent Mary Beth Jackson recruited last month for the Laurel Hill position, with the school board’s approval — is on campus and assessing needs. Speci c curriculum changes, if any, are unknown, but the Crestview resident will implement initiatives as needed, she said. “I’m not afraid to try new things,” Martello said. “At the end of the day, even if I’m frustrated and I have to look back and say ‘OK, take a deep breath,’ I want to make sure the decisions we make are in the best interest of the child.” That also means working with Laurel Hill’s 25 teachers and support staff to complement their plans, she said. LEE MARTELLO Laurel Hill School principal Emotional health affects academics NEW LAUREL HILL SCHOOL PRINCIPAL: Laurel Hill School’s new leader eyes ‘creating a well-rounded, successful child’ See HEALTH A6 See SCOUTS A6 INSIDE See more coverage abroad, with German students’ message to their Crestview friends, Page A4. See HOSTS A6 BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Grard Pontoizeau, center, stands above his Noirmoutier shing beach with Montavius Diamond, left, and Chris Embree, who are with the 22-person Crestview contingent visiting the island. Obituaries ............................ A2 Law Enforcement ............... A3 Lifestyle ............................... A4 Bulletin Board ..................... A5 Classi eds ............................ A8 Sports ................................ A10 VA CUTTING DOWN ON CLAIMS BACKLOG, A7 Saturday, JULY 6 2013 Gator middle school players learning teamwork, A10 Local historian’s book guides readers on region’s heritage, A4 Obituaries: Tim Wilkinson and Chad Hall, A2 INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE Readers may notice a delay in receiving this edition. A lightning strike impairing our press has required us to rely on other newspapers’ equipment and accommodate their schedules. We regret any inconvenience from this delay and appreciate your patience during this time. Thank you for reading. 38th Year, Number 54

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O}ƒm ‰qi{ u‹„‰ {m„… Call Now! 850-863-1212 or e-mail customerser vice@nwfdailynews.com T o Subscribe! i{l o m‰ ky}„mƒ ‰} }‹ƒ k}zz‹{s‰ ‚ Subscribe Now to the Crestview News Bulletin! & )"" $"(" % $"" ( " % "" ## %"" " "" % % % "" " "" " "" "" C OMMUNITY www.crestviewbulletin.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A2 OBITUARIES OBITUARIES The News Bulletin publishes north Okaloosa County residents and former residents’ obituaries for $45 including a photo. Family members should write the obituaries and mortuaries should submit them to the newspaper for con rmation. Call 682-6524 or email news@crestviewbulletin.com for more information. Tim Wilkinson, 82, of Crestview, died Saturday, June 29, 2013. He was born July 31, 1930, in Milligan, and was a life-long resident of Okaloosa County. He retired as a Vo Tech instructor with the Okaloosa County School Board after 28 years of service. He was Assembly of God by faith. Tim was proud to be a U.S. Marine and served during the Korean Con ict. He was a member of the American Legion, an avid sports fan and a collector of old cars. Survivors include his wife of 60 years, Edna G. Wilkinson; four children, Michael T. and Lynda Wilkinson, Kevin Scott and Martha Wilkinson, Suzanne and Ron Humphrey, and Cynthia L. and Jimmy Willis; one sister, Jewel Bush; ve grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and a host of nieces, nephews and friends. Funeral services were at 10 a.m. Wednesday, July 3 at Shady Grove Assembly of God with the Revs. James Paul and Shane Chessor of ciating. Burial, with military honors, followed in Live Oak Park Memorial Cemetery. The family received friends 6-8 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. Flowers are appreciated, or contributions may be made to Feed the Hungry, Shady Grove Assembly of God, 1185 Shady Grove Road, Baker, FL 32531. Brackney Funeral Service, Crestview, is in charge of the arrangements. You may offer condolences and share memories at www. brackneyfuneralservice.com. Tim Wilkinson TIM WILKINSON Chad “Country Boy” Hall, 19, of Holt, lost his battle with cystic brosis Sunday, June 30, 2013. He was born April 24, 1994 in Crestview and was a lifelong resident. He attended Milligan Assembly of God and loved his mud truck, working on trucks, shing and camping. Chad enjoyed life. His great-greatgrandparents, David and Ethel Stiller, and an uncle, Delma Denmon, preceded him in death. Survivors include his parents, Crystal and James Briggs and Robert Hall and Melissa Parker; grandparents, Maxine Lee, Donald Hartley and Camilla and Troyce Johnson; greatgrandparents, W.B. and Lillian Denmon; one brother, Robert Lee (Dooner) Hall Jr.; four sisters, Savannah Hall, Isis Dawson, Hannah Dawson and Courtney Carroll. Survivors also include his aunts and uncles, Natasha Hall, Fritz Hall, Christina Creech and Karen Parker; and special cousins, Brian (BC) Hall, Brittany Hall, Joshua Hall, Natalie Hall and Bryan Denmon. A celebration of life was at 2 p.m. Friday, July 5, from the Brackney Funeral Service chapel, with the Rev. Wayne Johnson and Nate Cotton of ciating. Burial followed in the Old Holt Cemetery. The family received friends one hour prior to the service. Brackney Funeral Service, Crestview, is in charge of the arrangements. Chad Hall CHAD HALL Special to the News Bulletin CRESTVIEW — The Okaloosa County Commission on the Status of Women is accepting nominations for the 2013 Women’s Hall of Fame. Deadline is July 12. Nominees must be volunteers who help with community activities in Okaloosa County, inspire others and act as role models, and positively affect the direction and success of community projects, programs or individuals here. Candidates must be living and Floridian by birth or permanent residence; they must have made signi cant contributions to the improvement and enhancement of life for all women and Okaloosa County citizens. Only contributions made while living and working in Okaloosa County will be considered. Candidates will be judged only on application contents. Accomplishments may be in one or more elds of art, agriculture, athletics, business, community services, education, environment, government, health, humanities, law, philanthropy or science. A Hall of Fame inductee celebration is 7 p.m. Aug. 26 at Northwest Florida State College’s Costa Leadership Institute in Niceville. FIND IT ONLINE Nomination forms are available at www. crestviewbulletin.com/ news/community Women’s hall of fame nominations due July 12 Special to the News Bulletin FORT WALTON BEACH — Two Okaloosa County parks might have potentially hazardous bathing water, the Florida Department of Health in Okaloosa County stated this week. Advisories have been issued for Liza Jackson Park of Fort Walton Beach and East Pass of Destin based on the enterococci standards recommended by the EPA. These areas present potential health risks to the bathing public. The department tests weekly for enterococci, which indicates fecal pollution and comes from stormwater runoff, pets, wildlife and human sewage. Ratings are based on EPA standards. 2 parks receive advisories for hazardous water COUNTY BRIEF

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MAIN OFFICE 1301 Industrial Drive Crestview FL 32539 850-682-51 1 1 DO WNT O WN M O T O R B ANK 385 Nor t h Spring St. Crestview FL 32536 850-682-5112 SOUTHSIDE OFFICE 2541 S. Hwy 85 Crestview FL 32539 850-682-31 1 1 www .fn b c rest vie w .co m Y o u r H o m e t o w n B a n k S i n c e 1 9 5 6 Y our Hometown Bank Since 1956! 6516577 Compassionate, quality care for your loved one... 30 private Rehab suites Long term care Outpatient physical occupational and speech therapy 1849 James Lee Blvd, Crestview FL 682-5322 A UCTI O N O NLINE U .S. G o v e rnme n t P r o p e r t y S in g l e F a mi ly R es i d e nc e 4588 S c a rl e t Driv e C r es t v i e w FL O p e n H o us e D a t es: J u ly 02, 2013AMPM CS T J u ly 16, 2013AMPM CS T S in g l e F a mi ly R es i d e nc e 402 S w i F o x R un, C r es t v i e w FL O p e n H o us e D a t es: J u ly 02, 2013PMPM CS T J u ly 16, 2013PMPM CS T S ta r t D a t e: J u ly 9, 2013 F o r a F r e e B r o ch ur e-C a l l o r V is i t O ur W e b S i t e: h t t ps://p r o p e r t y dis p os a l .gs a.go v o r h t t p://r e a l es ta t es a l es.go v (404) 331-9611 FROM STAFF REPORTS DEFUNIAK SPRINGS If you plan to visit relatives, travel overseas or even enjoy a trip close to home, the Walton County Sheriffs Office offers these crime prevention tips: Call your local sheriffs office or police department and have your address placed on the vacation watch list. Officers will perform security checks while you are away. Set indoor and outdoor lights on automatic timers. Do not share details of your travel plans on social media websites. Be extra cautious about locking doors and windows when you leave the house. Check smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. Trim hedges and bushes around your home. Ask the post office and the Crestview News Bulletin to hold deliveries until your return. Inform your home security provider of your travel plans and leave a number for emergencies. Ensure pets are properly cared for while you are away. LAW ENFORCEMENT www.crestviewbulletin.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A3 BRIEFS Special to the News Bulletin CRESTVIEW Okaloosa Correctional Institutions veterans observed the Fourth of July with a ceremony that complements morning reveille and evening retreat rituals begun in spring. Earlier this year, Corrections Ofcer Sgt. Craig Young, a U.S. Army Reserves member, recruited inmates who served their country into a group. As former service members, they can still participate in military ceremonies honoring their country. In addition to daily ag raising, inmates conduct ceremonies on Memorial Day, Independence Day, Veterans Day and Pearl Harbor Day, and honor each military branch on their establishment date. OCI staffers in the military also participate. Dennis Wise, Clay White and Jayly Jackson, retired Air Force members, donated a agpole and ag to the compound when Thomas Dugan, Airport Road Church of Christ prison minister and retired USAF captain, noticed there was no ag inside the facility. OCI maintenance personnel installed the ag in the spring. FROM STAFF REPORTS Okaloosa jail of cials eye growing inmate population CRESTVIEW Okaloosa County Jail of cials are monitoring recent increases that have pushed inmate population above the facilitys 594 capacity. The most recent spike, bringing the inmate count to 640, occurred during the last days of May to celebrate the Billy Bowleg Pirate Festival, said Paul Lawson, the countys chief correctional of cer. Fluctuations are similar to what other counties across Florida are experiencing, of cials said. However, any long-term increase could require the jail to open an unused 46bed section. County judges are working with jail of cials to provide alternatives to prolonged jail time. New law enacts stiffer penalty for organized retail theft TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott has signed a bill that increases penalties for people engaged in organized retail theft activities. Organized retail theft occurs when individuals form a group to coordinate sophisticated shoplifting activities at retail stores. The new legislation guarantees a minimum sentencing period of at least 21 months for those convicted of retail theft totaling more than $50,000. Man faces sentencing after November break-in CRESTVIEW A Hub City man faces sentencing on July 31 following conviction associated with a 2011 burglary. Michael McCallum, convicted of burglary of a dwelling and grand theft after a jury trial, quali es as a habitual felony offender for a maximum 40-year prison sentence, William Eddins, the First Judicial Circuit state attorney, announced. Charges arose from a Nov. 27, 2011 incident on Old Bethel Road. Victims left their home for approximately an hour, came home and discovered a broken front window. A television, clothing and jewelry were taken. The defendants prints were on the outside and inside of the broken window, investigators said. Man gets 21 months for luring child DEFUNIAK SPRINGS A Crestview man will spend 21 months in prison for traveling to Walton County to meet whom he thought was a 14-yearold girl, according to the Walton County Sheriffs Of ce. Shawn Brock, 31, planned to have sex with Katie actually a sheriffs investigator while her parents were not home, according to the sheriffs of ce. He was arrested Jan. 9 at a convenience store, where he planned to meet the girl, the sheriffs of ce reported. Deputies reportedly found sexually related items in Brocks vehicle. SHAWN BROCK MICHAEL MCCALLUM Sheriffs of ce releases vacation safety tips 2091730 SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN Inmates and former military members begin a reveille, or morning, ceremony at Okaloosa Correctional Institution in Crestview. OKALOOSA CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION Veterans participate in ag-raising ceremonies

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ADVERTISE IN THE NEWS BULLETIN NEWS INFORMATION If you have a concern or comment about the Crestview News Bulletins coverage, please call 682-6524. REGIONAL PUBLISHER Roger Quinn rquinn@pcnh.com EDITOR Thomas Boni tboni@crestviewbulletin.com OFFICE STAFF Dawn Barnes ... circulation assistant dawnb@crestviewbulletin.com ADVERTISING INFORMATION Melissa Tedder ............ ad consultant melissa@crestviewbulletin.com Sherrie Stanley ..... media consultant sherries@crestviewbulletin.com EDITORIAL Brian Hughes ....................... reporter Arts & entertainment editor brianh@crestviewbulletin.com Matthew Brown ................... reporter matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com Randy Dickson ............. sports editor randyd@crestviewbulletin.com Renee Bell ............. editorial assistant news@crestviewbulletin.com MAIN OFFICE FAX NUMBER 850-682-2246 The Crestview News Bulletin is published each Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, at 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview FL 32536. Periodical postage paid at Crestview, Florida. POSTMASTER: Please send address change to 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536. All material herein is property of the Crestview News Bulletin. USPS Number 010-209 SUBSCRIPTION RATES 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536 To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524. IN COUNTY 13 weeks .................................... $9.45 26 weeks ................................... $17.85 52 weeks .................................. $32.76 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks ................................... $14.70 26 weeks .................................. $23.10 52 weeks .................................. $38.01 Ask your advertising representative about our Color by the Inch Program and Customer Appreciation Sale 850-682-6524 Home delivery subscriptions may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. LIFESTYLE www.crestviewbulletin.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A4 By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com BERLIN Two Crestview students are helping a German brother and sister improve their English language skills while experiencing the culture of each others countries. When Jonah Fischer, 15, and his father, Tillman, visited Crestview from Berlin, Germany in 2010, he befriended Ethan Sparagowski, now a Crestview High freshman. After hearing stories about his two weeks of shing, swimming and visiting classes at Davidson Middle School, Jonahs little sister, Marlene, wanted to experience some of the same southern friendship. Last fall, the 9-yearold, known as Lilli to friends and family, started exchanging letters with Baker School fth-grader Jordyn Barnes. Having American friends in Crestview has helped the children learn English better, their mother, elementary school teacher Sabine Fischer, said. They learn things from their friends that we dont teach in the school. During a recent walk along Berlins Spree River with their parents, Jonah and Lilli stopped near the iconic Reichstag building to send greetings to Ethan and Jordyn. Lilli hopes to greet her Crestview friend in person one day. Perhaps we can visit during Lillis Easter holidays, Tillman Fischer said. For now, she looks forward to each of Jordyns letters and is thinking of things to write to her about. In her rst letter to Lilli, Jordyn enclosed a crocheted bracelet that Lilli proudly wears on her arm. While her family is on its annual summer trip in their motor home to visit friends in Greece, Lilli said she would gather many topics for her next letters. By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Schools out and the kids are screaming for something to do. Dr. Brian Rucker has a suggestion: Take a drive into our regional heritage. The University of West Florida history professors recently published Treasures of the Panhandle: A Journey Through West Florida is more than a lively history lesson. Its a guide for eco and heritage tourism, Rucker said. Its a celebration of the place we call home. Rucker said his book lls the void left by other Florida guides. Every time you read a book about Florida, it always stops at Tallahassee, he said. I got tired of our area being the bastard stepchild of Florida. We have a long history here. Local sites Without leaving Okaloosa County, cultural tourists can choose from many destinations, beginning with the Carver-Hill Museum in Crestview and Baker Block Museum. Heading south, Rucker recommends the U.S. Air Force Armament Museum, noting, For people who like things that go boom, this is the place. The Heritage Museum of Northwest Florida in Valparaiso and the Indian Temple Mound Heritage Park and Cultural Center in Fort Walton Beach also rate a visit, Rucker said. The Indian temple mound is the last of several, one of which was lost when bulldozed to put in a bowling alley in the 1950s because thats progress, he said. Head west, young man Newspaperman Horace Greeleys advice to go west is also appropriate for seekers of local history. Traveling U.S. 90 west toward Milton takes visitors into the heart of Northwest Floridas once booming timber and turpentine industry. Along the way, motorists drive parallel to a restored section of the rst paved highway in the area. The Old Brick Road, or Highway 1, was a brickpaved section of the Old Spanish Trail. People came from Pensacola in their Model Ts just to ride up and down a paved road at 35 miles per hour, Rucker said. At the site of the regions rst industrial park, Arcadia Mills Archaeological Site in Milton, visitors follow an elevated walkway and sense the large scale of the long lost sawmill, turpentine still and cotton gin complex. Downtown Miltons historic center includes the L&N Railroad depot museum. The same railroad served Crestview, which is marked on several pieces of equipment displayed. Looking east Like Milton, DeFuniak Springs historic downtown is ideal for Victorian architecture lovers, Rucker said. A stroll around Lake DeFuniak is a wander through history. In addition to a promenade of picturesque railroad industrialists homes, historic structures include the stately Florida Chautauqua Hall of Brotherhood and several elegant churches. DeFuniaks 1882 L&N Railroad Depot is also now a regional history and culture museum. With the 1972 horror lm Frogs, Hollywood made famous Eden Gardens State Park, the stately 1890s Greek-revival plantation home. BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Jonah Fischer and his sister Lilli send greetings to their Crestview friends Ethan Sparagowski and Jordyn Barnes in front of Berlins landmark Reichstag. PHOTOS BY BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Above: Visitors explore the site of Northwest Floridas rst industrial park at Arcadia Mills Archaeological Site in Milton. Top left: Less than 45 minutes from Crestview is the historic Milton area, including the L&N Railroad depot and museum. Bottom left: Dr. Brian Rucker recommends visiting Baker Block Museum and Heritage Park, among other regional cultural sites. A POSTCARD FROM BERLIN German students forge friendships in Crestview Local historians new book is a guide to regional heritage Panhandle treasures University of West Florida historian Dr. Brian Rucker displays a copy of his new book, Treasures of the Panhandle: A Journey Through West Florida.

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Dont Let This Happen to Y ou F alling trees and limbs can cause major damage to your property Dont delay Protect your assets by calling the tree removal and trimming experts at C SI before a storm takes them down for you. Call or go online to request a quote today! 3533944 www.crestviewbulletin.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A5 BULLETIN BOARD WHATS HAPPENING? Whats Happening in Okaloosa County? Let us know. Email items or updates to news@crestviewbulletin.com. Publication is free on a space-available basis. GATHERINGS HELPING HANDS UPCOMING CRUISESHIP OR NURSING HOME SEMINAR: 6:15 p.m. July 22, Chiropractic Associates, 705 W. John Sims Parkway, Niceville. With Dr. Dean Jacks. Learn to make future decisions about your health and lifestyle. Details: 678-8048. HISTORY ROCKS SUMMER CAMP: 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 5-9, Heritage Museum, 115 Westview Ave., Valparaiso. For ages 5-12. Cost: $60, $50 for museum members. Pre-register: 678-2615. ONGOING HERITAGE PARK AND INDIAN TEMPLE MOUND MUSEUM TOURS: 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 139 Miracle Strip Parkway S.E., Fort Walton Beach. Cost: $5 plus tax for adults, $4.50 plus tax for seniors 55-plus and active military, and $3 plus tax for children 4-17. Details: Mike Thomin, 833-9595. BAKER BLOCK MUSEUM: 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and on third Saturdays, or by appointments, 1307B Georgia Ave. Free admission. The museum has exhibits, pioneer buildings from the 1800s and a research library with historical documents. Details: 537-5714. CRESTVIEW KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS BINGO: Quarterly games 4:30-6 p.m.; regular games 6-9 p.m., 701 James Lee Blvd., Crestview. ZUMBA CLASSES: 6:307:30 p.m. Thursdays, 395 Aplin Road, Crestview. $5 per person. Presented by Crestview Church of the Nazarene. CRESTVIEW SENIOR CENTER MUSIC: 1-4 p.m. Fridays, Old Spanish Trail Park, Stillwell Blvd. Bring a musical instrument. Card and bingo days also are available. Details: Estelle, 682-8230. COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR: North Okaloosa community organizations may list upcoming events on the Crestview Area Chamber of Commerce online events calendar to avoid scheduling con icts. Free. Non-members welcome. Visit www. crestviewchamber.com and click on Calendar of Events under News and Events. WHATS HAPPENING PUBLIC MEETINGS COUNTY OKALOOSA COUNTY COMMISSION: Meets rst and third Tuesdays, alternating between the Crestview courthouse and the Fort Walton Beach site. Morning meetings at 8:30 a.m.; evening meetings at 6 p.m. OKALOOSA COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE: 3 p.m. rst Wednesdays, alternating between the Crestview Public Works conference room, 1759 S. Ferdon Blvd., and the Fort Walton Beach Water & Sewer Buildings thirdoor conference room, 1804 Lewis Turner Blvd. OKALOOSA-WALTON TRANSPORTATION PLANNING ORGANIZATION: 3 p.m. third Thursdays, Niceville Community Center, 204 N. Partin Drive. Call 1800-226-8914 ext. 231 to con rm. CITY/TOWN ALMARANTE VOLUNTEER FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSIONERS MEETING: 7 p.m. second Thursdays, Almarante Fire Station, 3710 Old California Road, Laurel Hill. BLACKMAN FIRE DISTRICT BOARD: 7 p.m. rst Mondays, 1850 U.S. Highway 2, Baker. CRESTVIEW CITY COUNCIL: 6 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, Crestview City Hall. LAUREL HILL CITY COUNCIL: 6 p.m. rst Thursdays, City Hall. MILLIGAN WATER SYSTEM BOARD: 6 p.m. second Tuesdays, 5340 U.S. Highway 4. Annual meeting is the second Tuesday of July. BAKER FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSION: 7 p.m. rst Thursdays, Baker Area Public Safety Building. DORCAS FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSIONERS: 7 p.m. rst Thursdays, 5232 Deer Springs Drive, Crestview, off Highway 90. HOLT FIRE DEPARTMENT: 7 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, re station. HOLT FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSION: 6:30 p.m. third Thursdays, 490 W. U.S. 90. NORTH OKALOOSA FIRE DISTRICT: 6 p.m. third Thursdays, re station 82, 5549 John Givens Road, Crestview. LAUREL HILL VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT: 7 p.m., second Fridays, in the re department of ce in Laurel Hill City Hall. ANNOUNCEMENT MILITARY GROUP SEEKS FORMER MEMBERS: The Second (Indianhead) Division Association seeks anyone who served in the Armys 2nd Infantry Division. The associations annual reunion is Sept. 17-21 in Columbus, Ga. Details: Bob Haynes, 2idahq@comcast. net or 224-225-1202. UPCOMING FLORIDA TRAIL ASSOCIATION: 7:30 a.m. July 11: Bring your canoe or kayak for a Turkey Creek paddle trip in Niceville. Details: 651-0902. 9 a.m. July 20: Bring your canoe or kayak for a Boiling Creek paddle trip in Santa Rosa County. Eglin recreation permit required. Details: 826-3605. 6 p.m. July 23: monthly meeting, Rocky Bayou Country Club, Niceville. Details: 546-1172. See http://choctaw. oridatrail.org for more details on the club. ADVENTURE CLUB 8 a.m. July 6: Bike ride in Fort Walton Beachs older section. Meet in the parking area under the Brooks Bridge. Restaurant supper. Details: Bruce, 301-9452. 9 a.m. July 9: Bike ride in Gulf Breeze. Meet at the Gulf Islands National Seashore Visitors Center on U.S. Highway 98. Bring a picnic lunch. Details: Dianne Kanning, 932-0401. 4 p.m. July 11: Bike ride in Shalimar/Lake Lorraine. Meet at the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church at 1 Meigs Drive. Restaurant supper. Details: Bruce, 301-9452. 9 a.m. July 13: Bike ride in Milton on the Blackwater Heritage Rails-to-Trails bike path. Meet at the trailhead behind the Truly Spokin Bicycle Shop, U.S. Highway 87 North. Restaurant lunch. Details: Clarice, 581-4591. ONGOING TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY 8 a.m. Tuesdays: First United Methodist Church, 599 Eighth Ave., Crestview. Details: Mary Cole, 683-1899. 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays: First United Methodist Church, Crestview. Details: Brooke Bratton, 225-8197. 8 a.m. Fridays: Valley Road Baptist Church, 1018 Valley Road, Crestview. Details: Mary Ann Vincek, 682-5927. See TOPS.org for more information. CRESTVIEW GASTRIC BYPASS SUPPORT GROUP: rst Mondays. Contact Sharon, 689-3242 or snbuttr y@cox. net, for details. CRESTVIEW DOGWOOD GARDEN CLUB: rst Mondays, except for September. Call 683-0839 or 682-3639 for details. FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS: 7 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, Mt. Ewell Lodge 131, U.S. Highway 198, Baker. THE OKALOOSA COUNTY COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN: fourth Mondays. Email info@occsw.org for details. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS: rst Tuesdays, room four in the Religious Education Building, Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church, Niceville. Support group for parents and grandparents who have experienced a childs death. Call Diane Kingsley, 398-8403, for details. SENIORS VS. CRIME HOURS CHANGE: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, 296 S. Ferdon Blvd., Suite 8, Crestview. Call 306-3176 to report a scam. Email okaloosacountysvc@yahoo. com for details. CARVER-HILL MEMORIAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY: 5:30 p.m. rst Tuesdays, Allen Park, Crestview. CRESTVIEW TOASTMASTERS: 6-7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesdays, Holiday Inn Express, 125 Cracker Barrel Road, Crestview. Visitors are welcome. Details: Kathy Morrow, 974-3662. SERVICES ALZHEIMERS SUPPORT GROUP: 12 p.m. July 9, Covenant Hospice, 370 W. Redstone Ave., Crestview. For family members or friends coping with a loved one who has Alzheimers disease. Limited respite care is available by calling 866-478-7792 in advance. VA SUICIDE HOTLINE: 800-273TALK (8255). ENERGY ASSISTANCE AND SERVICES FOR LOW-INCOME FAMILIES: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, Tri-County Community Council, 290 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Crestview. Call 306-1134 for details. WOMEN AND FAMILY INTERVENTION SERVICES AND EDUCATION: a Crestviewbased Community Drug and Alcohol Council program that helps pregnant women with substance abuse. Call 6894024 for details. CHILDCARE ASSISTANCE: Eligible low-income families can receive nancial assistance through the Early Learning Coalition of Okaloosa and Walton Counties. Call 833-9330 or 833-9333 for details. FREE MEDICARE COUNSELING: By appointment, Crestview Public Library and Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church in Crestview. Call 306-2240 or 1-866-531-8011 for details. HELP NEEDED JINGLE BELL CRAFT FAIR VENDORS: Sign up by Sept. 21 for the fair, which is 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 5, Mary Esther United Methodist Church, 703 Miracle Strip Parkway. Fees: $75 in fellowship hall, $55 other indoor spaces and $45 outdoors. No refund for bad weather. Spaces about 8 by 10 feet. Tables $8. Applications: haleyscf@yahoo.com or www.maryestherumc.org. Details: 243-7595. SPONSORSHIPS WANTED FOR CRESTVIEW CHAMBER WINE GALA: Contact Crystal Boyles, 758-6492, or crystal@ emeraldcoastaviation.com to help. Event planned for 6-10 p.m. Nov. 9 at Emerald Coast Aviation, Bob Sikes Airport, 5545 John Givens Road, Crestview. Live music, dancing, wine tasting, food and a large silent auction. Business sponsorship packages are available. VETS CARING FOR VETS VOLUNTEERS: Emerald Coast Hospice seeks help for hospice patients. Details: Ann OConnor, 689-0300 or Kathryn.OConnor@ gentiva.com. AMERICAN LEGION FOOD DRIVE: James McCullough Post 395 members and Sharing and Caring, a food bank, plan to collect 250 pounds of nonperishable food per month through 2013. Food will be distributed to needy people in the Crestview area. Drop off items 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays at 2260 S. Ferdon Blvd., Unit 35, or call Robert Williams, coordinator, 6820287, to arrange pick-up. BICYCLE REPAIR PERSON AND PARTS NEEDED: The Hope Network, a charity branch of Opportunity, Inc.s Homeless Coalition, needs a volunteer with bike maintenance and repair experience. The group repairs bikes for homeless people. Bicycle parts are also wanted. Details: John Parrott, 585-4714. CRESTVIEW SOUP KITCHEN serves Mondays through Saturdays. Call the following numbers to volunteer at Central Baptist Church, 682-5525; Our Savior Lutheran Church, 682-3154; LifePoint Church, 682-3518; Community of Christ, 682-7474; First Presbyterian Church, 682-2835; or First United Methodist Church, 682-2018. BAKER SOUP KITCHEN: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, Shady Grove Assembly of God. Call 537-2744 for details.

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Local A6 | Crestview News Bulletin Saturday, July 6, 2013 about creating a troop mo bilization plan. With the scouts’ assistance, volun teer reghters could con centrate on providing relief in the community, helping the elderly and clearing roadways during emergen cies, Holt Volunteer Fire Department Chief Scott Chestnut said. “They can help us out in a lot of different ways, handing out water, hand ing out tarps, ice,” he said. “That frees up our guys to do what they are trained to do.” First, the scouts need to identify a meeting place, such as the troop’s regular meeting location or at the church. Additionally, they need an alternative loca tion, should the rst one be unavailable. Other priori ties include establishing an alternative communication method, should telephone lines and cell phone towers be unavailable. Once the troop writes the plan, it must be present ed to Brown and Chestnut. “This is the rst time we have endeavored to do the Emergency Preparedness merit badge,” Scoutmaster Max Cooper said. “I have been afliated with other scout troops in other cities; we have really never had a mobilization plan.” Bryce Taylor, 10, summed it up. “Let’s just say, a tornado happens out in Holt, you have got to know what to do then,” he said. “That is kind of what the badge is all about.” Scouts browsed Holt re engines and asked ques tions; later, they will tour the re station to learn how they can assist the commu nity during disasters. The skills they’re devel oping have long-term im plications, Brown said. “This badge will develop a lifelong learning process that they will carry with them for the rest of their lives,” he said. “What they learn now at this early age will teach them skills that they will continue to build on.” Crestview CERT, which trains residents in emer gency preparedness, pro vides a similar service to support Hub City emergen cy responders. The group regularly assists members to be come CPR-certied and trains amateur radio en thusiasts for licensed communication. “In the rst 72 to 96 hours after a catastrophe hits ... it’s going to be neigh bors helping neighbors at that time,” Brown said. Martello’s experience in elementary, middle school and high school lev els, along with her people skills, should make that easy, Jackson has said. The administrator was a counselor for six years at Emma E. Booker El ementary School in Sara sota County; served a year each at Bob Sikes Elementary School and Crestview High School; and was assistant princi pal at Richbourg Middle and Shoal River. In that time, she helped develop programs that boosted student enthusiasm for literature and separated boys and girls in genderspecic classes to aid language arts and math comprehension. She also helped establish Shoal River’s lauded Mustang Learning Community. Eye on emotional health Students’ academic performance raised con cerns, Jackson has said. In December, the Florida Department of Education gave Laurel Hill School a C using the state account ability system. However, the letter grade receives too much focus, Martello, formerly of the grade-A Shoal River Middle, said. “My focus is that the kids have a great year of achieving and feeling suc cess in whatever area it might be. That’s my per sonal measure of success: if the kids are growing — even if they are grow ing incrementally. “ Emotional health also plays a role, she said. “Part of it is knowing where the target lies and then developing a pre scriptive plan in terms of how can we target and strengthen the weak ness,” Martello said. “Also ... it is so important that we meet the social and the emotional needs of the kids. In order for them to focus on academics, we have to have met those needs ... I can work with my teachers to target that and then we can focus on the academic as well to create a well-rounded, successful child.” She plans to be in the classroom to monitor the process, learn from it, and set an example. “I want kids to see that every adult on campus is a lifelong learner and I want them to want that for themselves,” she said. Collections will be dis tributed, as amount allows, to the rst 200 attendees at the 8th annual “Back 2 School Bash,” scheduled for 6-9:30 p.m. Aug. 16 at Old Spanish Trail Park on Still well Boulevard. The event will feature games, prizes and refreshments. Donors can visit the South Ferdon Boulevard auto dealer to contribute. Additionally, the van will ap pear Aug. 9 at the Crestview Wal-Mart, allowing custom ers to purchase school sup plies inside the store and donate them on their way out, Braneff said. Chris Daggs, the deal er’s general manager, said the event likely will benet several Hub City students. “Crestview is a big grow ing community, and we have a lot of kids here; everybody could use a little help,” he said. “We will sell vehicles and work on vehicles for people, but we also want to help out and give back.” Northwest Florida Daily News 34 th Annual Marvin DeBolt JUNIOR GOLF CLASSIC WEDNESDA Y & THURSDA Y JUL Y 17-18, 2013 FORT W AL TON BEACH GOLF CLUB PINES OPEN TO BOYS & GIRLS AGES 8 18 JUNIOR CLASSIC GOLF TOURNAMENT OFFICIAL ENTR Y FORM Gr een F ees F ood R efr eshmen ts T our namen t T -Shir t & T r ophies t o winners in all divisions P lus O v er all B o y s & Gir ls T r ophies $85 ENTR Y FEE $60 AGES 8 11 36 HOLES, 18 EACH DA Y EXCEPT 8-11 DIVISIONS WHICH PLA Y 18 HOLES, 9 EACH DA Y T ournament results will be forwarded to NJGS Scoreboard for ranking consideration BENEFITING THE CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTER NO TE: W ednesda y star ting times will be pub lished in T uesda y and W ednesda y Daily N ews Pla y ers c an c all c ourses T uesda y af t ernoon f or star ting times FWB P ines: 833-9529 N A M E : _________________________________________________________ D O B : _______________________________ C E L L : ______________________________________________ S H I R T S I Z E A D U L T S I Z E S : _________________________ A D D R E S S :__________________________________________________________________________________________ C I T Y : __________________________________________________ S T A T E : _______________ Z I P : ___________________ E M A I L : ______________________________________________________________________ P A R E N T C E L L : ____________________________________ C A S H / C H E C K : $_____________ C R E D I T C A R D #: _________________________________________________________ E X P D A T E : _____ / _____ PLEASE CHECK APPR OPRIA TE DIVISION: BO Y S 12-13 BO Y S 14-15 BO Y S 16-18 GIRLS 12-14 GIRLS 15-18 BO Y S/GIRLS 8-9 BO Y S/GIRLS 10-11 M ake checks pa y able t o: “ T he Childr en ’ s A dv ocac y C en t er ” M ail t o: 1810 Hun tingt on R oad N ic eville FL 32578 F or mor e inf or ma tion C all M ichele a t (850) 585-8980 or V isit w w w .ecjr golf t our .c om www .ecjrgolftour .com 3032319 Spo tli ght Y our Me nu On Me nu Mo ut h. co m! E v er y one needs a plac e t o go t o nd the menus f or all of their fa v orit e r estaur an ts the mea t & thr ees tha t backw oods bur ger join t or the big chain do wn the r oad Menumo ut h.c om is the answer! S or t b y C uisine L oc a tion and Mor e S ear ch b y Name D o wnload PDF Menus W ith the pr omotio n al po w er of the L oc al N e wspape r and N e wspape r W ebsit es MenuMo u th will get y our name out in fr on t of hungr y c ust omers lik e ne v er bef or e! W ith gr ea t pricin g and amazin g pr omotio n c an y ou a or d NO T t o be ther e? w w w .new sher ald .c om w w w .thedes tinlog .c om 2091542 SCHOOL from page A1 HEALTH from page A1 SCOUTS from page A1 HOSTS from page A1 “Older students pass the word, ‘Stay with Pompom,’ ” said Montavius Diamond, who is with the 22-person Crestview contingent re turning from visiting the island. Guests become part of a large, extended family. Chris Embree and Marie Anne Fella, members of the Crestview group, stayed with the Pontoizeaus. “We had shrimp and crab for lunch today that Pompom and I caught this morning,” Embree said. “We went out in his boat, pulled the traps and got the crabs.” “Jocelyne made us quiche with herbs from the garden and eggs from their hens when I stayed here,” Diamond said. “Everything is always fresh from the sea or the garden.” Jocelyn Pontoizeau pre pares meals that include regional dishes and treats, like homemade pizza, that are popular with student palates not adjusted to French country cooking. “I like staying with peo ple instead of hotels,” Em bree said. “People who stay in hotels miss out on this,” he said, waving his arm around the sunny courtyard. He and Fella sat drinking coffee from cups that were more like small bowls. “I can sum it up in one word: awesome!” Fella said. “I feel like I’m family here.” JOC eE LYNeE AND GRARD PONTOIZ eE AU

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www.crestviewbulletin.com COMING SOON! The Daily News newest publication Emerald Coast Senior Living. Look for your copy in the August 28th issue of the Daily News. Contact the adver tising depar tment for more infor mation at 850-863-1111 CALENDAR MILITARY Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A7 THE QUICKS GOSPEL CONCERT: 6 p.m. July 13, Central Baptist Church, 951 S. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview. $10 donation requested at door; love offerings appreciated. Tennessee-based group formed in 1999 at Eglin Air Force Base. Details: Libby White, 496-7106. UGANDAN CHILDRENS PERFORMANCE: 6:30 p.m. July 14, St. Mark United Methodist Church, 2250 PJ Adams Parkway, Crestview. African song and dance. Free tickets at church of ce, or call 6825280. Child care provided for birth to 2 years old. www.stmarkcrestview. com. GOODHOPE BAPTIST CHURCH VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL is 6-8:30 p.m. July 15-19, U.S. 189 North, Baker. Class for preschool through teens. Celebrating the fruits of the Spirit with SonHarvest County Fair theme. Details: 537-7600 or 305-7317. USHERS FELLOWSHIP & TRAINING: 2-4 p.m. July 20, Peoples Missionary Baptist Church, 722 School Ave., Crestview. Ushers and pastors asked to attend. Training provided by Beulah Baptist Church, Fort Walton Beach. Details: Jean Bell, 682-1842 or Pearl Bess, 682-5733. MCGLAMERY & ANDERSON CONCERT: 7 p.m. July 26, Central Baptist Church, 951 S. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview. $10 donation requested at door; love offerings appreciated. Details: 496-7106. As we contemplate Thursdays celebration of our nations independence, lets never forget Gods grace. Gods grace has been evident in Americas formation. Consider this: The rst English colony in Jamestown, Va., included a building for church services. When Puritans landed in present-day Plymouth Rock, Mass., they knelt in worship, praised God and dedicated the colony to God. Roger Williams, a Baptist Minister, established Rhode Island. Lord Baltimore held church services while establishing Maryland as a colony. William Penn, a Quaker, established colonies in Pennsylvania, New York, Delaware, Connecticut, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. In writing Pennsylvanias policies, he ensured that all treasurers, judges and all elected of cials professed faith in Christ. We could use those policies now. Today, government works overtime to remove reminders of the Christian faith. The Ten Commandments are vanishing from courthouses. FOUNDED ON THE GOSPEL Our Founding Fathers consistently spoke of the need to use the Bible and JudeoChristian values to de ne and preserve this nation. Twelve of the original 13 colonies incorporated the Ten Commandments into their civil and criminal codes. It is impossible to govern the world without God and the Bible, President George Washington said. Of all dispositions and habits that lead to political prosperity, our religion and morality are indispensable supporters. In 1782, the U.S. Congress voted up a resolution approving the Bible for use in public schools. It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded, not by religionists, but by Christians; not on religions, but on the Gospel of Jesus Christ, stated Patrick Henry, Virginias rst governor and a Continental Congress member. WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO AMERICA Fast forward to the present what is happening in America? In 1962, our government outlawed prayer in the public schools. In 1963, our government outlawed Bible reading in public schools. In 1973, our government legalized abortion. It appears government has criminalized the Christian faith and has ignored the Lord God who blessed this land. I was born in America, raised in Crestview as a child, have been saved 43 years as a Christian 40 have been a minister and I love America and consider myself a loyal citizen. However, can God continue blessing a nation that has turned its back on Him? The Rev. Albert Corey is Oak Ridge Assembly of Gods pastor. Special to the News Bulletin More than 65,000 claims nationwide have been eliminated from a disability compensation claims backlog, the Department of Veterans Affairs has announced. Ninety-seven percent of claims more than two years old have been processed after an April initiative to reduce the backlog. The initiative, centrally managed nationally, involved all VA regional of ces working claims for veterans across the country. The Jackson VA regional of ce now joins VA efforts to complete the disability claims of veterans waiting more than one year for a decision, while completing the nal batch of oldest claims in progress. The VA aims to end the disability claims backlog before 2016 and process claims within 125 days at 98 percent accuracy. Today, the VA reportedly has the least claims in its inventory since August 2011 and has reduced the number in the VA backlog claims pending more than 125 days by 10 percent. FIND IT ONLINE Learn more about disability bene ts on the Department of Defense/ VA web portal eBene ts, www.ebene ts.va.gov. VA processes more than 65,000 claims older than 2 years FAITH SHARE YOUR NEWS Send your churchs announcements to news@crestviewbulletin.com. FROM THE PULPIT REV. ALBERT COREY From the Pulpit Decay of Christian values raises concerns

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SPORTS www.crestviewbulletin.com What can you catch? By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com Editors Note: This is the second of a six-part series in which Crestview High School Outdoor Education instructor Ernie Martin shares shing tips. Today, Martin shares what kinds of catches to expect in lakes, ponds and rivers. CRESTVIEW Pan sh, cat sh and bass are among the many potential catches in north Okaloosa Countys lakes, ponds and rivers, Crestview High School Outdoor Education instructor Ernie Martin said. PANFISH There are several subcategories, he said of pan sh, or game sh that could t in a frying pan. One of the major ones would be a crappie (from the sun sh family). Another pan sh would be the bluegill or bream. There are two that we mainly go after here: the bluegill (which puts up a ght when hooked) and the shell cracker. Then theres the warmouth, also known as a goggle-eye; they ght well, and they can get up to 5 pounds, he said. Martin, who has been catching pan sh since he was a child, said all you need for the catch is a cane pole, a sinker and a cricket for bait. CATFISH The three main ones that are out in our area are the channel cat, the athead and then what we call the bullhead, Martin said. If you are an older guy, you might know that bullhead as a pollywog or a butter cat. The athead cat sh, hes a predator cat sh, and he wants whatever he eats alive and kicking. The channel cat, hes a scrap eater. He wants all those different kind of things that he can nd the smell on and track in on. BASS Perhaps the most well known species of freshwater sh no doubt because of the singing wall prop is the bass. Theres the Florida strain of the largemouth that will get in the teens and a few 20s in weight. You have a spotted bass that is cousin to him, Martin said. Then you have a hybrid bass something we call a sunshine bass. Its a mixture of a white bass and a striper. And then you have the striped bass that is in the area in the lakes and rivers. Large-mouth bass shing is a multibillion-dollar industry, the north Okaloosa angler said. There have been billions and billions of dollars spent catching those sh, whether it be in a tournament or just pleasure shing, he said. Local anglers typically catch pan sh, cat sh and bass, but Martin also likes hooking a chain pickerel, a greenish sh with a chain-like pattern. Have questions about what types of sh you can catch in north Okaloosa County? Ernie Martin invites you to call him at 758-6473. By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW June meant nonstop basketball for Baker Schools middle school boys team. If the Gators werent playing the Monday night league at Shoal River Middle School, they were on the road at Central or Laurel Hill. They even managed a few home games. All that experience is useful. We get the fundamentals that are important all the way through high school, Gator coach Andy Valmus said. And the more they play, the better they get, because there is no experience like game experience. It is the first time for some of them being on a team, and one of the things we learn is how to handle adversity. There is always going to be adversity in every game and in life. How they adjust to that adversity is important. The Gators improved from the start of June to the end of the month, Valmus said. You can tell they are getting used to the offense, playing zone defense and playing as a team, he said. I think it will help them not only in the middle school league we are about to join, but also when they get to high school. Valmus said the team played in typical Baker fashion. Every Gator team I have ever been around has always worked hard and played hard and played with great intensity, he said. That has been no surprise this summer. They have continued to do that and uphold that Gator tradition. They all have done a great job. They have carried the Gator name very well. Ive been very proud of them. By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW The Bulldog Bash Summer Classic Volleyball Tournament is July 25 at Crestview High School and Davidson Middle School. The tournament is open to middle school, high school junior varsity and high school varsity teams. All the varsity teams will play the varsity teams, Bulldog volleyball coach Kathy Combest said. The JV teams (from the larger schools) will play smaller schools (varsities) if there arent enough JV teams. The middle schools will play the smaller JV or the other middle schools. Combest needs teams to ll out the tournament eld. The entry fee is $100 per team. The $5 admission covers the full day at both schools. Concession stands will offer food and T-shirts. Combest said she took the tournament idea from other schools. I started going to one in Florala, Ala., and Jay, she said. And I thought ... We are so centrally located, I dont know how many teams we could get. So I thought, Why not? ANGLER EDUCATION ERNIE MARTIN Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A10 WANT TO GO? What: Bulldog Bash Summer Classic Volleyball Tournament When: July 25 Where: Crestview High School and Davidson Middle School Cost: $5, spectators; $100, team entry Notes: Call Kathy Combest, 2401347, for team entry Volleyball teams face off in July 25 Bulldog Bash PHOTOS BY RANDY DICKSON | News Bulletin At left, Lane Boone protects the basketball for the Baker middle school basketball team. At right, Kameron Jones res up a baseline jump shot for Baker. Below, Bakers Michael Adams takes the ball to the basket against Paxton High School in a game last month at Shoal River Middle School. Coach: Gator middle school players learning teamwork Coach: Gator middle school players



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www.crestviewbulletin.com 50¢ TABLE OF CONTENTS Find us at www. facebook.com/ crestviewbulletin Follow us at twitter.com/ cnbulletin TWITTER FACEBOOK A Halifax Media paper read by 10,450 people every week By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com NOIRMOUTIER, France — Visitors to Crestview’s sister city can expect redcarpet hospitality from big-hearted host families. Some visitors, however, receive a bit more. Jocelyne and Grard Pontoizeau have welcomed more than 50 guests from Northwest Florida since Crestview and the French island town Noirmoutieren-l’Ile formed a relationship through Sister Cities International. Grard — known as “Pompom” to friends — and his father-in-law built the couple’s six-bedroom, two-bathroom and threewater-closet stone house almost 30 years ago. The Pontoizeaus are well-known among Northwest Florida State College show choir students, who perform every two years in Noirmoutier. By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 | @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — This month, Hub City Ford staffers hope to store as many school supplies as they can in a van. The items would bene t Calvary United Church’s effort for needy children. “Stuff the Van” is a rst for the church, which in prior years purchased school items with business donations, the Rev. Charles Braneff said. MATTHEW BROWN | News Bulletin The Rev. Charles Braneff, Calvary United Church’s pastor, right, watches as Hub City Ford general manager Chris Daggs stores school supplies for needy children inside a van. WANT TO HELP? Visit Hub City Ford on South Ferdon Boulevard through July 31 to “stuff the van” for needy children. Available 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Auto dealer, church present school supplies drive By MATTHEW BROWN 682-6524 / @cnbMatthew matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — Crestview Community Emergency Response Team and Holt Volunteer Fire Department members are helping Holt Boy Scouts work toward earning the Emergency Preparedness merit badge. In turn, Troop 532 members will help Holt during natural or manmade disasters. Mark Brown, the Crestview CERT’s team chief, on Monday advised six scouts MATTHEW BROWN | News Bulletin Troop 532 Boy Scouts Michael Barlow, Dillon Fredericks and Aaryn Cooper peer inside a Holt re engine on display Monday in the First Baptist Church of Holt parking lot. The scouts, the Holt Volunteer Fire Department and the Crestview Community Emergency Response Team will collaborate for emergencies. Holt Boy Scouts learn emergency preparedness See SCHOOL A6 ‘Awesome’ French hosts treat Crestview visitors ‘like family’ Bienvenue! By THOMAS BONI 682-6524 / @cnbEditor tboni@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW — New Laurel Hill School principal Lee Martello said she anticipates the K-12 environment and its potential, off-campus impact. “Truly everyone in the community invests themselves in the school because that is the center of their lives,” she said. “... I want the school to be the hub of their being so that the family can grow along with the kids.” Complementing teachers The former Shoal River Middle School assistant principal — whom Okaloosa School District superintendent Mary Beth Jackson recruited last month for the Laurel Hill position, with the school board’s approval — is on campus and assessing needs. Speci c curriculum changes, if any, are unknown, but the Crestview resident will implement initiatives as needed, she said. “I’m not afraid to try new things,” Martello said. “At the end of the day, even if I’m frustrated and I have to look back and say ‘OK, take a deep breath,’ I want to make sure the decisions we make are in the best interest of the child.” That also means working with Laurel Hill’s 25 teachers and support staff to complement their plans, she said. LEE MARTELLO Laurel Hill School principal Emotional health affects academics NEW LAUREL HILL SCHOOL PRINCIPAL: Laurel Hill School’s new leader eyes ‘creating a well-rounded, successful child’ See HEALTH A6 See SCOUTS A6 INSIDE See more coverage abroad, with German students’ message to their Crestview friends, Page A4. See HOSTS A6 BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Grard Pontoizeau, center, stands above his Noirmoutier shing beach with Montavius Diamond, left, and Chris Embree, who are with the 22-person Crestview contingent visiting the island. Obituaries ............................ A2 Law Enforcement ............... A3 Lifestyle ............................... A4 Bulletin Board ..................... A5 Classi eds ............................ A8 Sports ................................ A10 VA CUTTING DOWN ON CLAIMS BACKLOG, A7 Saturday, JULY 6 2013 Gator middle school players learning teamwork, A10 Local historian’s book guides readers on region’s heritage, A4 Obituaries: Tim Wilkinson and Chad Hall, A2 INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE Readers may notice a delay in receiving this edition. A lightning strike impairing our press has required us to rely on other newspapers’ equipment and accommodate their schedules. We regret any inconvenience from this delay and appreciate your patience during this time. Thank you for reading. 38th Year, Number 54

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O}ƒm ‰qi{ u‹„‰ {m„… Call Now! 850-863-1212 or e-mail customerser vice@nwfdailynews.com T o Subscribe! i{l o m‰ ky}„mƒ ‰} }‹ƒ k}zz‹{s‰ ‚ Subscribe Now to the Crestview News Bulletin! & )"" $"(" % $"" ( " % "" ## %"" " "" % % % "" " "" " "" "" C OMMUNITY www.crestviewbulletin.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A2 OBITUARIES OBITUARIES The News Bulletin publishes north Okaloosa County residents and former residents’ obituaries for $45 including a photo. Family members should write the obituaries and mortuaries should submit them to the newspaper for con rmation. Call 682-6524 or email news@crestviewbulletin.com for more information. Tim Wilkinson, 82, of Crestview, died Saturday, June 29, 2013. He was born July 31, 1930, in Milligan, and was a life-long resident of Okaloosa County. He retired as a Vo Tech instructor with the Okaloosa County School Board after 28 years of service. He was Assembly of God by faith. Tim was proud to be a U.S. Marine and served during the Korean Con ict. He was a member of the American Legion, an avid sports fan and a collector of old cars. Survivors include his wife of 60 years, Edna G. Wilkinson; four children, Michael T. and Lynda Wilkinson, Kevin Scott and Martha Wilkinson, Suzanne and Ron Humphrey, and Cynthia L. and Jimmy Willis; one sister, Jewel Bush; ve grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and a host of nieces, nephews and friends. Funeral services were at 10 a.m. Wednesday, July 3 at Shady Grove Assembly of God with the Revs. James Paul and Shane Chessor of ciating. Burial, with military honors, followed in Live Oak Park Memorial Cemetery. The family received friends 6-8 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. Flowers are appreciated, or contributions may be made to Feed the Hungry, Shady Grove Assembly of God, 1185 Shady Grove Road, Baker, FL 32531. Brackney Funeral Service, Crestview, is in charge of the arrangements. You may offer condolences and share memories at www. brackneyfuneralservice.com. Tim Wilkinson TIM WILKINSON Chad “Country Boy” Hall, 19, of Holt, lost his battle with cystic brosis Sunday, June 30, 2013. He was born April 24, 1994 in Crestview and was a lifelong resident. He attended Milligan Assembly of God and loved his mud truck, working on trucks, shing and camping. Chad enjoyed life. His great-greatgrandparents, David and Ethel Stiller, and an uncle, Delma Denmon, preceded him in death. Survivors include his parents, Crystal and James Briggs and Robert Hall and Melissa Parker; grandparents, Maxine Lee, Donald Hartley and Camilla and Troyce Johnson; greatgrandparents, W.B. and Lillian Denmon; one brother, Robert Lee (Dooner) Hall Jr.; four sisters, Savannah Hall, Isis Dawson, Hannah Dawson and Courtney Carroll. Survivors also include his aunts and uncles, Natasha Hall, Fritz Hall, Christina Creech and Karen Parker; and special cousins, Brian (BC) Hall, Brittany Hall, Joshua Hall, Natalie Hall and Bryan Denmon. A celebration of life was at 2 p.m. Friday, July 5, from the Brackney Funeral Service chapel, with the Rev. Wayne Johnson and Nate Cotton of ciating. Burial followed in the Old Holt Cemetery. The family received friends one hour prior to the service. Brackney Funeral Service, Crestview, is in charge of the arrangements. Chad Hall CHAD HALL Special to the News Bulletin CRESTVIEW — The Okaloosa County Commission on the Status of Women is accepting nominations for the 2013 Women’s Hall of Fame. Deadline is July 12. Nominees must be volunteers who help with community activities in Okaloosa County, inspire others and act as role models, and positively affect the direction and success of community projects, programs or individuals here. Candidates must be living and Floridian by birth or permanent residence; they must have made signi cant contributions to the improvement and enhancement of life for all women and Okaloosa County citizens. Only contributions made while living and working in Okaloosa County will be considered. Candidates will be judged only on application contents. Accomplishments may be in one or more elds of art, agriculture, athletics, business, community services, education, environment, government, health, humanities, law, philanthropy or science. A Hall of Fame inductee celebration is 7 p.m. Aug. 26 at Northwest Florida State College’s Costa Leadership Institute in Niceville. FIND IT ONLINE Nomination forms are available at www. crestviewbulletin.com/ news/community Women’s hall of fame nominations due July 12 Special to the News Bulletin FORT WALTON BEACH — Two Okaloosa County parks might have potentially hazardous bathing water, the Florida Department of Health in Okaloosa County stated this week. Advisories have been issued for Liza Jackson Park of Fort Walton Beach and East Pass of Destin based on the enterococci standards recommended by the EPA. These areas present potential health risks to the bathing public. The department tests weekly for enterococci, which indicates fecal pollution and comes from stormwater runoff, pets, wildlife and human sewage. Ratings are based on EPA standards. 2 parks receive advisories for hazardous water COUNTY BRIEF

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MAIN OFFICE 1301 Industrial Drive Crestview FL 32539 850-682-51 1 1 DO WNT O WN M O T O R B ANK 385 Nor t h Spring St. Crestview FL 32536 850-682-5112 SOUTHSIDE OFFICE 2541 S. Hwy 85 Crestview FL 32539 850-682-31 1 1 www .fn b c rest vie w .co m Y o u r H o m e t o w n B a n k S i n c e 1 9 5 6 Y our Hometown Bank Since 1956! 6516577 Compassionate, quality care for your loved one... 30 private Rehab suites Long term care Outpatient physical occupational and speech therapy 1849 James Lee Blvd, Crestview FL 682-5322 A UCTI O N O NLINE U .S. G o v e rnme n t P r o p e r t y S in g l e F a mi ly R es i d e nc e 4588 S c a rl e t Driv e C r es t v i e w FL O p e n H o us e D a t es: J u ly 02, 2013AMPM CS T J u ly 16, 2013AMPM CS T S in g l e F a mi ly R es i d e nc e 402 S w i F o x R un, C r es t v i e w FL O p e n H o us e D a t es: J u ly 02, 2013PMPM CS T J u ly 16, 2013PMPM CS T S ta r t D a t e: J u ly 9, 2013 F o r a F r e e B r o ch ur e-C a l l o r V is i t O ur W e b S i t e: h t t ps://p r o p e r t y dis p os a l .gs a.go v o r h t t p://r e a l es ta t es a l es.go v (404) 331-9611 FROM STAFF REPORTS DEFUNIAK SPRINGS If you plan to visit relatives, travel overseas or even enjoy a trip close to home, the Walton County Sheriffs Office offers these crime prevention tips: Call your local sheriffs office or police department and have your address placed on the vacation watch list. Officers will perform security checks while you are away. Set indoor and outdoor lights on automatic timers. Do not share details of your travel plans on social media websites. Be extra cautious about locking doors and windows when you leave the house. Check smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. Trim hedges and bushes around your home. Ask the post office and the Crestview News Bulletin to hold deliveries until your return. Inform your home security provider of your travel plans and leave a number for emergencies. Ensure pets are properly cared for while you are away. LAW ENFORCEMENT www.crestviewbulletin.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A3 BRIEFS Special to the News Bulletin CRESTVIEW Okaloosa Correctional Institutions veterans observed the Fourth of July with a ceremony that complements morning reveille and evening retreat rituals begun in spring. Earlier this year, Corrections Ofcer Sgt. Craig Young, a U.S. Army Reserves member, recruited inmates who served their country into a group. As former service members, they can still participate in military ceremonies honoring their country. In addition to daily ag raising, inmates conduct ceremonies on Memorial Day, Independence Day, Veterans Day and Pearl Harbor Day, and honor each military branch on their establishment date. OCI staffers in the military also participate. Dennis Wise, Clay White and Jayly Jackson, retired Air Force members, donated a agpole and ag to the compound when Thomas Dugan, Airport Road Church of Christ prison minister and retired USAF captain, noticed there was no ag inside the facility. OCI maintenance personnel installed the ag in the spring. FROM STAFF REPORTS Okaloosa jail of cials eye growing inmate population CRESTVIEW Okaloosa County Jail of cials are monitoring recent increases that have pushed inmate population above the facilitys 594 capacity. The most recent spike, bringing the inmate count to 640, occurred during the last days of May to celebrate the Billy Bowleg Pirate Festival, said Paul Lawson, the countys chief correctional of cer. Fluctuations are similar to what other counties across Florida are experiencing, of cials said. However, any long-term increase could require the jail to open an unused 46bed section. County judges are working with jail of cials to provide alternatives to prolonged jail time. New law enacts stiffer penalty for organized retail theft TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott has signed a bill that increases penalties for people engaged in organized retail theft activities. Organized retail theft occurs when individuals form a group to coordinate sophisticated shoplifting activities at retail stores. The new legislation guarantees a minimum sentencing period of at least 21 months for those convicted of retail theft totaling more than $50,000. Man faces sentencing after November break-in CRESTVIEW A Hub City man faces sentencing on July 31 following conviction associated with a 2011 burglary. Michael McCallum, convicted of burglary of a dwelling and grand theft after a jury trial, quali es as a habitual felony offender for a maximum 40-year prison sentence, William Eddins, the First Judicial Circuit state attorney, announced. Charges arose from a Nov. 27, 2011 incident on Old Bethel Road. Victims left their home for approximately an hour, came home and discovered a broken front window. A television, clothing and jewelry were taken. The defendants prints were on the outside and inside of the broken window, investigators said. Man gets 21 months for luring child DEFUNIAK SPRINGS A Crestview man will spend 21 months in prison for traveling to Walton County to meet whom he thought was a 14-yearold girl, according to the Walton County Sheriffs Of ce. Shawn Brock, 31, planned to have sex with Katie actually a sheriffs investigator while her parents were not home, according to the sheriffs of ce. He was arrested Jan. 9 at a convenience store, where he planned to meet the girl, the sheriffs of ce reported. Deputies reportedly found sexually related items in Brocks vehicle. SHAWN BROCK MICHAEL MCCALLUM Sheriffs of ce releases vacation safety tips 2091730 SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN Inmates and former military members begin a reveille, or morning, ceremony at Okaloosa Correctional Institution in Crestview. OKALOOSA CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION Veterans participate in ag-raising ceremonies

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ADVERTISE IN THE NEWS BULLETIN NEWS INFORMATION If you have a concern or comment about the Crestview News Bulletins coverage, please call 682-6524. REGIONAL PUBLISHER Roger Quinn rquinn@pcnh.com EDITOR Thomas Boni tboni@crestviewbulletin.com OFFICE STAFF Dawn Barnes ... circulation assistant dawnb@crestviewbulletin.com ADVERTISING INFORMATION Melissa Tedder ............ ad consultant melissa@crestviewbulletin.com Sherrie Stanley ..... media consultant sherries@crestviewbulletin.com EDITORIAL Brian Hughes ....................... reporter Arts & entertainment editor brianh@crestviewbulletin.com Matthew Brown ................... reporter matthewb@crestviewbulletin.com Randy Dickson ............. sports editor randyd@crestviewbulletin.com Renee Bell ............. editorial assistant news@crestviewbulletin.com MAIN OFFICE FAX NUMBER 850-682-2246 The Crestview News Bulletin is published each Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, at 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview FL 32536. Periodical postage paid at Crestview, Florida. POSTMASTER: Please send address change to 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536. All material herein is property of the Crestview News Bulletin. USPS Number 010-209 SUBSCRIPTION RATES 705 Ashley Drive, Crestview, FL 32536 To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524. IN COUNTY 13 weeks .................................... $9.45 26 weeks ................................... $17.85 52 weeks .................................. $32.76 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks ................................... $14.70 26 weeks .................................. $23.10 52 weeks .................................. $38.01 Ask your advertising representative about our Color by the Inch Program and Customer Appreciation Sale 850-682-6524 Home delivery subscriptions may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. LIFESTYLE www.crestviewbulletin.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A4 By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com BERLIN Two Crestview students are helping a German brother and sister improve their English language skills while experiencing the culture of each others countries. When Jonah Fischer, 15, and his father, Tillman, visited Crestview from Berlin, Germany in 2010, he befriended Ethan Sparagowski, now a Crestview High freshman. After hearing stories about his two weeks of shing, swimming and visiting classes at Davidson Middle School, Jonahs little sister, Marlene, wanted to experience some of the same southern friendship. Last fall, the 9-yearold, known as Lilli to friends and family, started exchanging letters with Baker School fth-grader Jordyn Barnes. Having American friends in Crestview has helped the children learn English better, their mother, elementary school teacher Sabine Fischer, said. They learn things from their friends that we dont teach in the school. During a recent walk along Berlins Spree River with their parents, Jonah and Lilli stopped near the iconic Reichstag building to send greetings to Ethan and Jordyn. Lilli hopes to greet her Crestview friend in person one day. Perhaps we can visit during Lillis Easter holidays, Tillman Fischer said. For now, she looks forward to each of Jordyns letters and is thinking of things to write to her about. In her rst letter to Lilli, Jordyn enclosed a crocheted bracelet that Lilli proudly wears on her arm. While her family is on its annual summer trip in their motor home to visit friends in Greece, Lilli said she would gather many topics for her next letters. By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Schools out and the kids are screaming for something to do. Dr. Brian Rucker has a suggestion: Take a drive into our regional heritage. The University of West Florida history professors recently published Treasures of the Panhandle: A Journey Through West Florida is more than a lively history lesson. Its a guide for eco and heritage tourism, Rucker said. Its a celebration of the place we call home. Rucker said his book lls the void left by other Florida guides. Every time you read a book about Florida, it always stops at Tallahassee, he said. I got tired of our area being the bastard stepchild of Florida. We have a long history here. Local sites Without leaving Okaloosa County, cultural tourists can choose from many destinations, beginning with the Carver-Hill Museum in Crestview and Baker Block Museum. Heading south, Rucker recommends the U.S. Air Force Armament Museum, noting, For people who like things that go boom, this is the place. The Heritage Museum of Northwest Florida in Valparaiso and the Indian Temple Mound Heritage Park and Cultural Center in Fort Walton Beach also rate a visit, Rucker said. The Indian temple mound is the last of several, one of which was lost when bulldozed to put in a bowling alley in the 1950s because thats progress, he said. Head west, young man Newspaperman Horace Greeleys advice to go west is also appropriate for seekers of local history. Traveling U.S. 90 west toward Milton takes visitors into the heart of Northwest Floridas once booming timber and turpentine industry. Along the way, motorists drive parallel to a restored section of the rst paved highway in the area. The Old Brick Road, or Highway 1, was a brickpaved section of the Old Spanish Trail. People came from Pensacola in their Model Ts just to ride up and down a paved road at 35 miles per hour, Rucker said. At the site of the regions rst industrial park, Arcadia Mills Archaeological Site in Milton, visitors follow an elevated walkway and sense the large scale of the long lost sawmill, turpentine still and cotton gin complex. Downtown Miltons historic center includes the L&N Railroad depot museum. The same railroad served Crestview, which is marked on several pieces of equipment displayed. Looking east Like Milton, DeFuniak Springs historic downtown is ideal for Victorian architecture lovers, Rucker said. A stroll around Lake DeFuniak is a wander through history. In addition to a promenade of picturesque railroad industrialists homes, historic structures include the stately Florida Chautauqua Hall of Brotherhood and several elegant churches. DeFuniaks 1882 L&N Railroad Depot is also now a regional history and culture museum. With the 1972 horror lm Frogs, Hollywood made famous Eden Gardens State Park, the stately 1890s Greek-revival plantation home. BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Jonah Fischer and his sister Lilli send greetings to their Crestview friends Ethan Sparagowski and Jordyn Barnes in front of Berlins landmark Reichstag. PHOTOS BY BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin Above: Visitors explore the site of Northwest Floridas rst industrial park at Arcadia Mills Archaeological Site in Milton. Top left: Less than 45 minutes from Crestview is the historic Milton area, including the L&N Railroad depot and museum. Bottom left: Dr. Brian Rucker recommends visiting Baker Block Museum and Heritage Park, among other regional cultural sites. A POSTCARD FROM BERLIN German students forge friendships in Crestview Local historians new book is a guide to regional heritage Panhandle treasures University of West Florida historian Dr. Brian Rucker displays a copy of his new book, Treasures of the Panhandle: A Journey Through West Florida.

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Dont Let This Happen to Y ou F alling trees and limbs can cause major damage to your property Dont delay Protect your assets by calling the tree removal and trimming experts at C SI before a storm takes them down for you. Call or go online to request a quote today! 3533944 www.crestviewbulletin.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A5 BULLETIN BOARD WHATS HAPPENING? Whats Happening in Okaloosa County? Let us know. Email items or updates to news@crestviewbulletin.com. Publication is free on a space-available basis. GATHERINGS HELPING HANDS UPCOMING CRUISESHIP OR NURSING HOME SEMINAR: 6:15 p.m. July 22, Chiropractic Associates, 705 W. John Sims Parkway, Niceville. With Dr. Dean Jacks. Learn to make future decisions about your health and lifestyle. Details: 678-8048. HISTORY ROCKS SUMMER CAMP: 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 5-9, Heritage Museum, 115 Westview Ave., Valparaiso. For ages 5-12. Cost: $60, $50 for museum members. Pre-register: 678-2615. ONGOING HERITAGE PARK AND INDIAN TEMPLE MOUND MUSEUM TOURS: 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 139 Miracle Strip Parkway S.E., Fort Walton Beach. Cost: $5 plus tax for adults, $4.50 plus tax for seniors 55-plus and active military, and $3 plus tax for children 4-17. Details: Mike Thomin, 833-9595. BAKER BLOCK MUSEUM: 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and on third Saturdays, or by appointments, 1307B Georgia Ave. Free admission. The museum has exhibits, pioneer buildings from the 1800s and a research library with historical documents. Details: 537-5714. CRESTVIEW KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS BINGO: Quarterly games 4:30-6 p.m.; regular games 6-9 p.m., 701 James Lee Blvd., Crestview. ZUMBA CLASSES: 6:307:30 p.m. Thursdays, 395 Aplin Road, Crestview. $5 per person. Presented by Crestview Church of the Nazarene. CRESTVIEW SENIOR CENTER MUSIC: 1-4 p.m. Fridays, Old Spanish Trail Park, Stillwell Blvd. Bring a musical instrument. Card and bingo days also are available. Details: Estelle, 682-8230. COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR: North Okaloosa community organizations may list upcoming events on the Crestview Area Chamber of Commerce online events calendar to avoid scheduling con icts. Free. Non-members welcome. Visit www. crestviewchamber.com and click on Calendar of Events under News and Events. WHATS HAPPENING PUBLIC MEETINGS COUNTY OKALOOSA COUNTY COMMISSION: Meets rst and third Tuesdays, alternating between the Crestview courthouse and the Fort Walton Beach site. Morning meetings at 8:30 a.m.; evening meetings at 6 p.m. OKALOOSA COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE: 3 p.m. rst Wednesdays, alternating between the Crestview Public Works conference room, 1759 S. Ferdon Blvd., and the Fort Walton Beach Water & Sewer Buildings thirdoor conference room, 1804 Lewis Turner Blvd. OKALOOSA-WALTON TRANSPORTATION PLANNING ORGANIZATION: 3 p.m. third Thursdays, Niceville Community Center, 204 N. Partin Drive. Call 1800-226-8914 ext. 231 to con rm. CITY/TOWN ALMARANTE VOLUNTEER FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSIONERS MEETING: 7 p.m. second Thursdays, Almarante Fire Station, 3710 Old California Road, Laurel Hill. BLACKMAN FIRE DISTRICT BOARD: 7 p.m. rst Mondays, 1850 U.S. Highway 2, Baker. CRESTVIEW CITY COUNCIL: 6 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, Crestview City Hall. LAUREL HILL CITY COUNCIL: 6 p.m. rst Thursdays, City Hall. MILLIGAN WATER SYSTEM BOARD: 6 p.m. second Tuesdays, 5340 U.S. Highway 4. Annual meeting is the second Tuesday of July. BAKER FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSION: 7 p.m. rst Thursdays, Baker Area Public Safety Building. DORCAS FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSIONERS: 7 p.m. rst Thursdays, 5232 Deer Springs Drive, Crestview, off Highway 90. HOLT FIRE DEPARTMENT: 7 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, re station. HOLT FIRE DISTRICT COMMISSION: 6:30 p.m. third Thursdays, 490 W. U.S. 90. NORTH OKALOOSA FIRE DISTRICT: 6 p.m. third Thursdays, re station 82, 5549 John Givens Road, Crestview. LAUREL HILL VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT: 7 p.m., second Fridays, in the re department of ce in Laurel Hill City Hall. ANNOUNCEMENT MILITARY GROUP SEEKS FORMER MEMBERS: The Second (Indianhead) Division Association seeks anyone who served in the Armys 2nd Infantry Division. The associations annual reunion is Sept. 17-21 in Columbus, Ga. Details: Bob Haynes, 2idahq@comcast. net or 224-225-1202. UPCOMING FLORIDA TRAIL ASSOCIATION: 7:30 a.m. July 11: Bring your canoe or kayak for a Turkey Creek paddle trip in Niceville. Details: 651-0902. 9 a.m. July 20: Bring your canoe or kayak for a Boiling Creek paddle trip in Santa Rosa County. Eglin recreation permit required. Details: 826-3605. 6 p.m. July 23: monthly meeting, Rocky Bayou Country Club, Niceville. Details: 546-1172. See http://choctaw. oridatrail.org for more details on the club. ADVENTURE CLUB 8 a.m. July 6: Bike ride in Fort Walton Beachs older section. Meet in the parking area under the Brooks Bridge. Restaurant supper. Details: Bruce, 301-9452. 9 a.m. July 9: Bike ride in Gulf Breeze. Meet at the Gulf Islands National Seashore Visitors Center on U.S. Highway 98. Bring a picnic lunch. Details: Dianne Kanning, 932-0401. 4 p.m. July 11: Bike ride in Shalimar/Lake Lorraine. Meet at the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church at 1 Meigs Drive. Restaurant supper. Details: Bruce, 301-9452. 9 a.m. July 13: Bike ride in Milton on the Blackwater Heritage Rails-to-Trails bike path. Meet at the trailhead behind the Truly Spokin Bicycle Shop, U.S. Highway 87 North. Restaurant lunch. Details: Clarice, 581-4591. ONGOING TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY 8 a.m. Tuesdays: First United Methodist Church, 599 Eighth Ave., Crestview. Details: Mary Cole, 683-1899. 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays: First United Methodist Church, Crestview. Details: Brooke Bratton, 225-8197. 8 a.m. Fridays: Valley Road Baptist Church, 1018 Valley Road, Crestview. Details: Mary Ann Vincek, 682-5927. See TOPS.org for more information. CRESTVIEW GASTRIC BYPASS SUPPORT GROUP: rst Mondays. Contact Sharon, 689-3242 or snbuttr y@cox. net, for details. CRESTVIEW DOGWOOD GARDEN CLUB: rst Mondays, except for September. Call 683-0839 or 682-3639 for details. FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS: 7 p.m. second and fourth Mondays, Mt. Ewell Lodge 131, U.S. Highway 198, Baker. THE OKALOOSA COUNTY COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN: fourth Mondays. Email info@occsw.org for details. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS: rst Tuesdays, room four in the Religious Education Building, Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church, Niceville. Support group for parents and grandparents who have experienced a childs death. Call Diane Kingsley, 398-8403, for details. SENIORS VS. CRIME HOURS CHANGE: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, 296 S. Ferdon Blvd., Suite 8, Crestview. Call 306-3176 to report a scam. Email okaloosacountysvc@yahoo. com for details. CARVER-HILL MEMORIAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY: 5:30 p.m. rst Tuesdays, Allen Park, Crestview. CRESTVIEW TOASTMASTERS: 6-7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesdays, Holiday Inn Express, 125 Cracker Barrel Road, Crestview. Visitors are welcome. Details: Kathy Morrow, 974-3662. SERVICES ALZHEIMERS SUPPORT GROUP: 12 p.m. July 9, Covenant Hospice, 370 W. Redstone Ave., Crestview. For family members or friends coping with a loved one who has Alzheimers disease. Limited respite care is available by calling 866-478-7792 in advance. VA SUICIDE HOTLINE: 800-273TALK (8255). ENERGY ASSISTANCE AND SERVICES FOR LOW-INCOME FAMILIES: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, Tri-County Community Council, 290 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Crestview. Call 306-1134 for details. WOMEN AND FAMILY INTERVENTION SERVICES AND EDUCATION: a Crestviewbased Community Drug and Alcohol Council program that helps pregnant women with substance abuse. Call 6894024 for details. CHILDCARE ASSISTANCE: Eligible low-income families can receive nancial assistance through the Early Learning Coalition of Okaloosa and Walton Counties. Call 833-9330 or 833-9333 for details. FREE MEDICARE COUNSELING: By appointment, Crestview Public Library and Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church in Crestview. Call 306-2240 or 1-866-531-8011 for details. HELP NEEDED JINGLE BELL CRAFT FAIR VENDORS: Sign up by Sept. 21 for the fair, which is 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 5, Mary Esther United Methodist Church, 703 Miracle Strip Parkway. Fees: $75 in fellowship hall, $55 other indoor spaces and $45 outdoors. No refund for bad weather. Spaces about 8 by 10 feet. Tables $8. Applications: haleyscf@yahoo.com or www.maryestherumc.org. Details: 243-7595. SPONSORSHIPS WANTED FOR CRESTVIEW CHAMBER WINE GALA: Contact Crystal Boyles, 758-6492, or crystal@ emeraldcoastaviation.com to help. Event planned for 6-10 p.m. Nov. 9 at Emerald Coast Aviation, Bob Sikes Airport, 5545 John Givens Road, Crestview. Live music, dancing, wine tasting, food and a large silent auction. Business sponsorship packages are available. VETS CARING FOR VETS VOLUNTEERS: Emerald Coast Hospice seeks help for hospice patients. Details: Ann OConnor, 689-0300 or Kathryn.OConnor@ gentiva.com. AMERICAN LEGION FOOD DRIVE: James McCullough Post 395 members and Sharing and Caring, a food bank, plan to collect 250 pounds of nonperishable food per month through 2013. Food will be distributed to needy people in the Crestview area. Drop off items 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays at 2260 S. Ferdon Blvd., Unit 35, or call Robert Williams, coordinator, 6820287, to arrange pick-up. BICYCLE REPAIR PERSON AND PARTS NEEDED: The Hope Network, a charity branch of Opportunity, Inc.s Homeless Coalition, needs a volunteer with bike maintenance and repair experience. The group repairs bikes for homeless people. Bicycle parts are also wanted. Details: John Parrott, 585-4714. CRESTVIEW SOUP KITCHEN serves Mondays through Saturdays. Call the following numbers to volunteer at Central Baptist Church, 682-5525; Our Savior Lutheran Church, 682-3154; LifePoint Church, 682-3518; Community of Christ, 682-7474; First Presbyterian Church, 682-2835; or First United Methodist Church, 682-2018. BAKER SOUP KITCHEN: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, Shady Grove Assembly of God. Call 537-2744 for details.

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Local A6 | Crestview News Bulletin Saturday, July 6, 2013 about creating a troop mo bilization plan. With the scouts’ assistance, volun teer reghters could con centrate on providing relief in the community, helping the elderly and clearing roadways during emergen cies, Holt Volunteer Fire Department Chief Scott Chestnut said. “They can help us out in a lot of different ways, handing out water, hand ing out tarps, ice,” he said. “That frees up our guys to do what they are trained to do.” First, the scouts need to identify a meeting place, such as the troop’s regular meeting location or at the church. Additionally, they need an alternative loca tion, should the rst one be unavailable. Other priori ties include establishing an alternative communication method, should telephone lines and cell phone towers be unavailable. Once the troop writes the plan, it must be present ed to Brown and Chestnut. “This is the rst time we have endeavored to do the Emergency Preparedness merit badge,” Scoutmaster Max Cooper said. “I have been afliated with other scout troops in other cities; we have really never had a mobilization plan.” Bryce Taylor, 10, summed it up. “Let’s just say, a tornado happens out in Holt, you have got to know what to do then,” he said. “That is kind of what the badge is all about.” Scouts browsed Holt re engines and asked ques tions; later, they will tour the re station to learn how they can assist the commu nity during disasters. The skills they’re devel oping have long-term im plications, Brown said. “This badge will develop a lifelong learning process that they will carry with them for the rest of their lives,” he said. “What they learn now at this early age will teach them skills that they will continue to build on.” Crestview CERT, which trains residents in emer gency preparedness, pro vides a similar service to support Hub City emergen cy responders. The group regularly assists members to be come CPR-certied and trains amateur radio en thusiasts for licensed communication. “In the rst 72 to 96 hours after a catastrophe hits ... it’s going to be neigh bors helping neighbors at that time,” Brown said. Martello’s experience in elementary, middle school and high school lev els, along with her people skills, should make that easy, Jackson has said. The administrator was a counselor for six years at Emma E. Booker El ementary School in Sara sota County; served a year each at Bob Sikes Elementary School and Crestview High School; and was assistant princi pal at Richbourg Middle and Shoal River. In that time, she helped develop programs that boosted student enthusiasm for literature and separated boys and girls in genderspecic classes to aid language arts and math comprehension. She also helped establish Shoal River’s lauded Mustang Learning Community. Eye on emotional health Students’ academic performance raised con cerns, Jackson has said. In December, the Florida Department of Education gave Laurel Hill School a C using the state account ability system. However, the letter grade receives too much focus, Martello, formerly of the grade-A Shoal River Middle, said. “My focus is that the kids have a great year of achieving and feeling suc cess in whatever area it might be. That’s my per sonal measure of success: if the kids are growing — even if they are grow ing incrementally. “ Emotional health also plays a role, she said. “Part of it is knowing where the target lies and then developing a pre scriptive plan in terms of how can we target and strengthen the weak ness,” Martello said. “Also ... it is so important that we meet the social and the emotional needs of the kids. In order for them to focus on academics, we have to have met those needs ... I can work with my teachers to target that and then we can focus on the academic as well to create a well-rounded, successful child.” She plans to be in the classroom to monitor the process, learn from it, and set an example. “I want kids to see that every adult on campus is a lifelong learner and I want them to want that for themselves,” she said. Collections will be dis tributed, as amount allows, to the rst 200 attendees at the 8th annual “Back 2 School Bash,” scheduled for 6-9:30 p.m. Aug. 16 at Old Spanish Trail Park on Still well Boulevard. The event will feature games, prizes and refreshments. Donors can visit the South Ferdon Boulevard auto dealer to contribute. Additionally, the van will ap pear Aug. 9 at the Crestview Wal-Mart, allowing custom ers to purchase school sup plies inside the store and donate them on their way out, Braneff said. Chris Daggs, the deal er’s general manager, said the event likely will benet several Hub City students. “Crestview is a big grow ing community, and we have a lot of kids here; everybody could use a little help,” he said. “We will sell vehicles and work on vehicles for people, but we also want to help out and give back.” Northwest Florida Daily News 34 th Annual Marvin DeBolt JUNIOR GOLF CLASSIC WEDNESDA Y & THURSDA Y JUL Y 17-18, 2013 FORT W AL TON BEACH GOLF CLUB PINES OPEN TO BOYS & GIRLS AGES 8 18 JUNIOR CLASSIC GOLF TOURNAMENT OFFICIAL ENTR Y FORM Gr een F ees F ood R efr eshmen ts T our namen t T -Shir t & T r ophies t o winners in all divisions P lus O v er all B o y s & Gir ls T r ophies $85 ENTR Y FEE $60 AGES 8 11 36 HOLES, 18 EACH DA Y EXCEPT 8-11 DIVISIONS WHICH PLA Y 18 HOLES, 9 EACH DA Y T ournament results will be forwarded to NJGS Scoreboard for ranking consideration BENEFITING THE CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTER NO TE: W ednesda y star ting times will be pub lished in T uesda y and W ednesda y Daily N ews Pla y ers c an c all c ourses T uesda y af t ernoon f or star ting times FWB P ines: 833-9529 N A M E : _________________________________________________________ D O B : _______________________________ C E L L : ______________________________________________ S H I R T S I Z E A D U L T S I Z E S : _________________________ A D D R E S S :__________________________________________________________________________________________ C I T Y : __________________________________________________ S T A T E : _______________ Z I P : ___________________ E M A I L : ______________________________________________________________________ P A R E N T C E L L : ____________________________________ C A S H / C H E C K : $_____________ C R E D I T C A R D #: _________________________________________________________ E X P D A T E : _____ / _____ PLEASE CHECK APPR OPRIA TE DIVISION: BO Y S 12-13 BO Y S 14-15 BO Y S 16-18 GIRLS 12-14 GIRLS 15-18 BO Y S/GIRLS 8-9 BO Y S/GIRLS 10-11 M ake checks pa y able t o: “ T he Childr en ’ s A dv ocac y C en t er ” M ail t o: 1810 Hun tingt on R oad N ic eville FL 32578 F or mor e inf or ma tion C all M ichele a t (850) 585-8980 or V isit w w w .ecjr golf t our .c om www .ecjrgolftour .com 3032319 Spo tli ght Y our Me nu On Me nu Mo ut h. co m! E v er y one needs a plac e t o go t o nd the menus f or all of their fa v orit e r estaur an ts the mea t & thr ees tha t backw oods bur ger join t or the big chain do wn the r oad Menumo ut h.c om is the answer! S or t b y C uisine L oc a tion and Mor e S ear ch b y Name D o wnload PDF Menus W ith the pr omotio n al po w er of the L oc al N e wspape r and N e wspape r W ebsit es MenuMo u th will get y our name out in fr on t of hungr y c ust omers lik e ne v er bef or e! W ith gr ea t pricin g and amazin g pr omotio n c an y ou a or d NO T t o be ther e? w w w .new sher ald .c om w w w .thedes tinlog .c om 2091542 SCHOOL from page A1 HEALTH from page A1 SCOUTS from page A1 HOSTS from page A1 “Older students pass the word, ‘Stay with Pompom,’ ” said Montavius Diamond, who is with the 22-person Crestview contingent re turning from visiting the island. Guests become part of a large, extended family. Chris Embree and Marie Anne Fella, members of the Crestview group, stayed with the Pontoizeaus. “We had shrimp and crab for lunch today that Pompom and I caught this morning,” Embree said. “We went out in his boat, pulled the traps and got the crabs.” “Jocelyne made us quiche with herbs from the garden and eggs from their hens when I stayed here,” Diamond said. “Everything is always fresh from the sea or the garden.” Jocelyn Pontoizeau pre pares meals that include regional dishes and treats, like homemade pizza, that are popular with student palates not adjusted to French country cooking. “I like staying with peo ple instead of hotels,” Em bree said. “People who stay in hotels miss out on this,” he said, waving his arm around the sunny courtyard. He and Fella sat drinking coffee from cups that were more like small bowls. “I can sum it up in one word: awesome!” Fella said. “I feel like I’m family here.” JOC eE LYNeE AND GRARD PONTOIZ eE AU

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www.crestviewbulletin.com COMING SOON! The Daily News newest publication Emerald Coast Senior Living. Look for your copy in the August 28th issue of the Daily News. Contact the adver tising depar tment for more infor mation at 850-863-1111 CALENDAR MILITARY Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A7 THE QUICKS GOSPEL CONCERT: 6 p.m. July 13, Central Baptist Church, 951 S. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview. $10 donation requested at door; love offerings appreciated. Tennessee-based group formed in 1999 at Eglin Air Force Base. Details: Libby White, 496-7106. UGANDAN CHILDRENS PERFORMANCE: 6:30 p.m. July 14, St. Mark United Methodist Church, 2250 PJ Adams Parkway, Crestview. African song and dance. Free tickets at church of ce, or call 6825280. Child care provided for birth to 2 years old. www.stmarkcrestview. com. GOODHOPE BAPTIST CHURCH VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL is 6-8:30 p.m. July 15-19, U.S. 189 North, Baker. Class for preschool through teens. Celebrating the fruits of the Spirit with SonHarvest County Fair theme. Details: 537-7600 or 305-7317. USHERS FELLOWSHIP & TRAINING: 2-4 p.m. July 20, Peoples Missionary Baptist Church, 722 School Ave., Crestview. Ushers and pastors asked to attend. Training provided by Beulah Baptist Church, Fort Walton Beach. Details: Jean Bell, 682-1842 or Pearl Bess, 682-5733. MCGLAMERY & ANDERSON CONCERT: 7 p.m. July 26, Central Baptist Church, 951 S. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview. $10 donation requested at door; love offerings appreciated. Details: 496-7106. As we contemplate Thursdays celebration of our nations independence, lets never forget Gods grace. Gods grace has been evident in Americas formation. Consider this: The rst English colony in Jamestown, Va., included a building for church services. When Puritans landed in present-day Plymouth Rock, Mass., they knelt in worship, praised God and dedicated the colony to God. Roger Williams, a Baptist Minister, established Rhode Island. Lord Baltimore held church services while establishing Maryland as a colony. William Penn, a Quaker, established colonies in Pennsylvania, New York, Delaware, Connecticut, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. In writing Pennsylvanias policies, he ensured that all treasurers, judges and all elected of cials professed faith in Christ. We could use those policies now. Today, government works overtime to remove reminders of the Christian faith. The Ten Commandments are vanishing from courthouses. FOUNDED ON THE GOSPEL Our Founding Fathers consistently spoke of the need to use the Bible and JudeoChristian values to de ne and preserve this nation. Twelve of the original 13 colonies incorporated the Ten Commandments into their civil and criminal codes. It is impossible to govern the world without God and the Bible, President George Washington said. Of all dispositions and habits that lead to political prosperity, our religion and morality are indispensable supporters. In 1782, the U.S. Congress voted up a resolution approving the Bible for use in public schools. It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded, not by religionists, but by Christians; not on religions, but on the Gospel of Jesus Christ, stated Patrick Henry, Virginias rst governor and a Continental Congress member. WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO AMERICA Fast forward to the present what is happening in America? In 1962, our government outlawed prayer in the public schools. In 1963, our government outlawed Bible reading in public schools. In 1973, our government legalized abortion. It appears government has criminalized the Christian faith and has ignored the Lord God who blessed this land. I was born in America, raised in Crestview as a child, have been saved 43 years as a Christian 40 have been a minister and I love America and consider myself a loyal citizen. However, can God continue blessing a nation that has turned its back on Him? The Rev. Albert Corey is Oak Ridge Assembly of Gods pastor. Special to the News Bulletin More than 65,000 claims nationwide have been eliminated from a disability compensation claims backlog, the Department of Veterans Affairs has announced. Ninety-seven percent of claims more than two years old have been processed after an April initiative to reduce the backlog. The initiative, centrally managed nationally, involved all VA regional of ces working claims for veterans across the country. The Jackson VA regional of ce now joins VA efforts to complete the disability claims of veterans waiting more than one year for a decision, while completing the nal batch of oldest claims in progress. The VA aims to end the disability claims backlog before 2016 and process claims within 125 days at 98 percent accuracy. Today, the VA reportedly has the least claims in its inventory since August 2011 and has reduced the number in the VA backlog claims pending more than 125 days by 10 percent. FIND IT ONLINE Learn more about disability bene ts on the Department of Defense/ VA web portal eBene ts, www.ebene ts.va.gov. VA processes more than 65,000 claims older than 2 years FAITH SHARE YOUR NEWS Send your churchs announcements to news@crestviewbulletin.com. FROM THE PULPIT REV. ALBERT COREY From the Pulpit Decay of Christian values raises concerns

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SPORTS www.crestviewbulletin.com What can you catch? By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com Editors Note: This is the second of a six-part series in which Crestview High School Outdoor Education instructor Ernie Martin shares shing tips. Today, Martin shares what kinds of catches to expect in lakes, ponds and rivers. CRESTVIEW Pan sh, cat sh and bass are among the many potential catches in north Okaloosa Countys lakes, ponds and rivers, Crestview High School Outdoor Education instructor Ernie Martin said. PANFISH There are several subcategories, he said of pan sh, or game sh that could t in a frying pan. One of the major ones would be a crappie (from the sun sh family). Another pan sh would be the bluegill or bream. There are two that we mainly go after here: the bluegill (which puts up a ght when hooked) and the shell cracker. Then theres the warmouth, also known as a goggle-eye; they ght well, and they can get up to 5 pounds, he said. Martin, who has been catching pan sh since he was a child, said all you need for the catch is a cane pole, a sinker and a cricket for bait. CATFISH The three main ones that are out in our area are the channel cat, the athead and then what we call the bullhead, Martin said. If you are an older guy, you might know that bullhead as a pollywog or a butter cat. The athead cat sh, hes a predator cat sh, and he wants whatever he eats alive and kicking. The channel cat, hes a scrap eater. He wants all those different kind of things that he can nd the smell on and track in on. BASS Perhaps the most well known species of freshwater sh no doubt because of the singing wall prop is the bass. Theres the Florida strain of the largemouth that will get in the teens and a few 20s in weight. You have a spotted bass that is cousin to him, Martin said. Then you have a hybrid bass something we call a sunshine bass. Its a mixture of a white bass and a striper. And then you have the striped bass that is in the area in the lakes and rivers. Large-mouth bass shing is a multibillion-dollar industry, the north Okaloosa angler said. There have been billions and billions of dollars spent catching those sh, whether it be in a tournament or just pleasure shing, he said. Local anglers typically catch pan sh, cat sh and bass, but Martin also likes hooking a chain pickerel, a greenish sh with a chain-like pattern. Have questions about what types of sh you can catch in north Okaloosa County? Ernie Martin invites you to call him at 758-6473. By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW June meant nonstop basketball for Baker Schools middle school boys team. If the Gators werent playing the Monday night league at Shoal River Middle School, they were on the road at Central or Laurel Hill. They even managed a few home games. All that experience is useful. We get the fundamentals that are important all the way through high school, Gator coach Andy Valmus said. And the more they play, the better they get, because there is no experience like game experience. It is the first time for some of them being on a team, and one of the things we learn is how to handle adversity. There is always going to be adversity in every game and in life. How they adjust to that adversity is important. The Gators improved from the start of June to the end of the month, Valmus said. You can tell they are getting used to the offense, playing zone defense and playing as a team, he said. I think it will help them not only in the middle school league we are about to join, but also when they get to high school. Valmus said the team played in typical Baker fashion. Every Gator team I have ever been around has always worked hard and played hard and played with great intensity, he said. That has been no surprise this summer. They have continued to do that and uphold that Gator tradition. They all have done a great job. They have carried the Gator name very well. Ive been very proud of them. By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW The Bulldog Bash Summer Classic Volleyball Tournament is July 25 at Crestview High School and Davidson Middle School. The tournament is open to middle school, high school junior varsity and high school varsity teams. All the varsity teams will play the varsity teams, Bulldog volleyball coach Kathy Combest said. The JV teams (from the larger schools) will play smaller schools (varsities) if there arent enough JV teams. The middle schools will play the smaller JV or the other middle schools. Combest needs teams to ll out the tournament eld. The entry fee is $100 per team. The $5 admission covers the full day at both schools. Concession stands will offer food and T-shirts. Combest said she took the tournament idea from other schools. I started going to one in Florala, Ala., and Jay, she said. And I thought ... We are so centrally located, I dont know how many teams we could get. So I thought, Why not? ANGLER EDUCATION ERNIE MARTIN Saturday, July 6, 2013 Page A10 WANT TO GO? What: Bulldog Bash Summer Classic Volleyball Tournament When: July 25 Where: Crestview High School and Davidson Middle School Cost: $5, spectators; $100, team entry Notes: Call Kathy Combest, 2401347, for team entry Volleyball teams face off in July 25 Bulldog Bash PHOTOS BY RANDY DICKSON | News Bulletin At left, Lane Boone protects the basketball for the Baker middle school basketball team. At right, Kameron Jones res up a baseline jump shot for Baker. Below, Bakers Michael Adams takes the ball to the basket against Paxton High School in a game last month at Shoal River Middle School. Coach: Gator middle school players learning teamwork Coach: Gator middle school players