Group Title: Crestview News Bulletin
Title: Crestview news bulletin!
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028411/00551
 Material Information
Title: Crestview news bulletin!
Alternate Title: Bulletin
Crestview news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Crestview news bulletin
Publisher: Crestview news bulletin
Okaloosa Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Crestview, Fla
Publication Date: September 25, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crestview (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okaloosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Okaloosa -- Crestview
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 9, no. 37 (Sept. 5, 2001); Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 9, no. 40 (Sept. 26, 2001).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028411
Volume ID: VID00551
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ANN6621
oclc - 48122675
alephbibnum - 002758666
lccn - 2001229458
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Preceded by: Crestview news leader

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CRESTV


EW


A 1 V/ J kJ JEEEl. J II L .. Area arts guide, INSIDE

Saturday, SEPTEMBER 25, 2010 www.crestviewbulletin.com 50(


For the latest
breaking news, visit
(RESTVIEWBU LLETIN.COM

INSIDE


Oncology
expansion


Her hero


Coming
festivals


B4

WEATHER
High 90
Low 66
Scattered thunderstorms
Sunrise 6:35 a.m.
Sunset 6:41 p.m.

TABLE OF
CONTENTS
EDUCATION .......................... A 5
BUSINESS............................. A 6
FAITH ...................................A 8
STATE/REGION.................. A 0
SPORTS ................................ B 1
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT........ B 4
CLASSIFIEDS .................... B 1

Award Winning
Newspaper
Florida Press Association
Better Weekly Newspaper Contest

FREEDOM
F I 0 F- I E A,
NEWSPAPERS*INTERACTIVE
Phone: 850-682-6524
Web site: crestviewbulletin.com
Fax: 850-682-2246
35th Year Number 77
24 Pages 2 Sections


r -4 ANN SPANN I N,, I:, I. i,,'



Leaders of the pack


Drum majors keep Big Red Machine in step


Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor
There aren't too many high
school students who can keep
284 of their classmates in line,
let alone in step. But for the
Crestview High School Band,
Jennifer Wright and Geoffrey
Loften do just that, and more.
The duo are this year's drum
major and assistant drum ma-
jor, respectively.
"They've really gone
beyond being good drum
majors," band director Jody
Dunn said. "They're two of the
best kids in the organization.
I'm really, really, really lucky.
They're great kids."
It wasn't an easy march to
the head of the band for the
seniors. After years of middle
school and high school band
experience, Wright and Loften
had to audition with other
candidates and then attend a
weeklong clinic.
"If they make the first cut,
we ask them to come back and
conduct the symphonic band,"
Dunn explained. "That is the
real test."
After Wright and Loften
passed the first series of tests,
they appeared before Dunn
and his assistant director,
Matt Clark, for interviews. The
directors had determined that
this year, because of its size,
the Big Red Machine would
need two drum majors, espe-
cially when the band faces the
backfield.
"I don't know how we'd hold


BRIAn nuGnES I News unelaun
MAJOR DUO: Because of its size, the Big Red Machine has
two drum majors, Geoffrey Loften and Jennifer Wright.
DRUM MAJORS (top): Wright serves as drum major, and


Loften is assistant drum major.
it together otherwise," Dunn
said.
When he appeared for his
interview, "I didn't know what
to expect," Loften said. "I was
kind of nervous."
But then came the word:
They had passed all the tests
with flying colors. Wright and
Loften would lead the Big Red
Machine onto the field for its
72nd year of performance.
"It was pretty exciting,"
Wright said.
Before the first note of the
year's first rehearsal even
sounded, the drum majors had
been hard at work. Since late
June, they were involved with
Dunn and Clark in planning


the organization's repertoire
and scheduling performances
and rehearsals.
"There's a lot more to be-
ing a drum major than just
conducting the band," Dunn
said.
Then, when summer re-
hearsals began, Wright and
Loften took their places in
front of their classmates for
the first time.
"It's scary at first," Wright
said. "You don't know how
they're going to respond to
what you say. At the same
time, it's good knowing you
have a teammate."
See MAJORS A3


SEE MORE: See a roster of this year's Big Red Machine and learn the history
behind the organization in the "Art & Soul" insert inside today's News Bulletin.
View photos of the Big Red Machine online at www.crestviewbulletin.com.



Poker run benefits local USO centers


John Parrott
Crestview News Bulletin
About 67 riders from Crestview's Am-
vets Post No. 35 showed up for a Sept. 18
poker run to benefit the USO of Northwest
Florida.
This is the second year for the poker run
that will likely become an annual event.
Last year, Post 35 raised $1,700 from the
poker run that was donated to the USO of
Northwest Florida, and Saturday's event
netted a total of $1,318 for the charity.
"Post 35 riders are the first service
organization to choose us as their prima-


ry charity, and we could not be happier,"
said Heidi Blair, Northwest Florida USO
director.
Event chairwoman Duan Byrd, the Post
35 Ladies Auxiliary officer, said the organi-
zation chose USO of Northwest Florida af-
ter searching for a charity that does some-
thing for service members abroad.
When you consider it gets no federal
or state money and depends upon private
or corporate donations, it does a won-
derful job, and has for a very long time,"
Byrd said.
See POKER A3


Budget,




village




adopted


Property tax rates

unchanged, deep

cuts citywide

Michael Stewart
michaels@crestviewbulletin.com
Millage rates used to calculate
Crestview residents' property taxes
won't go up this coming year.
At a Wednesday afternoon public
hearing, the Crestview City Council
adopted both last year's millage rate
of 5.8466 mills and the 2010-11 budget
for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1.
A mill equals $1 in tax for every
$1,000 of assessed value on a property.
Both the budget and millage rate
were approved without comment in
unanimous votes at the meeting that
lasted four minutes. No members of
the public spoke at the sparsely at-
tended meeting.
Holding the millage rate flat dur-
ing a time of declining property values
required $3 million in cuts in the 2010-
11 budget that resulted in the imple-
mentation of a four-day work week for
some city employees beginning Oct. 6;
a 10-day unpaid furlough for city em-
ployees and the contracting out of city
animal control services to PAWS.
Twelve employee positions were
eliminated, a 7 percent raise promised
to employees was withheld, and the
city, which pays 75 percent of family
medical coverage for employees, will
reduce the contribution to 50 percent
in the coming fiscal year.
"I can tell you for a fact what's going
to happen it's going on worldwide
- employees are not going to have
family insurance for their families,"
Deputy Fire Chief Cedric Peterson
said at a prior public hearing.
City Finance Director Patti Beebe
said the city's employee medical costs
for the coming year are rising 9 per-
cent, even with the reduction in medi-
cal benefits.
Like other municipalities across
the country, the city is also faced with
ballooning pension costs that are con-
suming a larger share of available
funds.
Estimated 2010-11 retirement con-
tributions to the Crestview Police De-
partment alone are expected to cost
$449,014, up from $198,586 this year.
The cost to fund Crestview Fire
Department pensions is expected to
jump from $225,886 to $411,617.


JOHN PARROTT I News Bulletin
The second Crestview Amvets Post No. 35 poker run
to benefit USO of Northwest Florida raised $1,31 8
for the charity.


Join the Crestview Chatter

Your online community.

forums.crestviewbulletin.com






A2 I Crestview News Bulletin


Local


Saturday, September 25, 2010


What's HAPPENING


From staff reports

NORTH OKALOOSA
REUNION: The Mc-
Curley Family Reunion will
be held Oct. 10 at 10 a.m. at
the Baker Community Cen-
ter. Fish and hush puppies
will be provided; please
bring additional sides to
complement the fish. Bring
your family and enjoy.
RSVP your attendance by
e-mailing tony
despainl@yahoo.com, or
call Frances at 305-3208.
CHRISTMAS BA-
ZAAR: The Ladies Aux-
iliary to the Knights of
Columbus in Crestview is
having its annual Christ-
mas Bazaar on Saturday,
Oct. 2, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at the Knights' hall on U.S.
Highway 90 near Twin Hills
Park. Proceeds will go to
local charities. Breakfast
and lunch will be available.
There will be a bake sale,
giveaways and lots of items
to make great gifts. Ven-
dors and craftsmen inter-
ested in renting a space for
$25 are asked to call Sally
at 689-1631 after 6 p.m.
YARD SALE FUND-
RAISER: The Davidson
Middle School gymnasium
will be the setting for a
yard sale on Saturday,
Oct. 2, to raise money for
the eighth grade field trip
to Washington, D.C.
This event will be a
huge multifamily sale with
a large variety of items of-
fered. The sale begins at
8 a.m. and continues until
noon. The school is on Old
Bethel Road behind Winn-
Dixie. Follow the signs.
ARTS EVENT: On Sat-
urday, Oct. 23, from 11 a.m.
until 3 p.m. on the lawn of
the Laurel Hill Presbyte-
rian Church, 8115 Fourth
St., an afternoon of student,
professional and amateur
visual and performing arts
from throughout the region
is being sponsored by the
Okaloosa Arts Alliance-
North, the county's official
arts organization, and the
Laurel Hill Presbyterian
Church. Enjoy paintings,
sculptures, photography,
drawings, ceramics, jew-
elry, textile art, digital
music and handicrafts, and
musical performances by
the Wesley Boys, Walker
Sherman & Friends, and
more performers to be con-
firmed. Food will be avail-
able for purchase from lo-
cal nonprofits. Free admis-
sion and free registration
for artists and performers.
Contact Brian Hughes at
682-6524 or
brianh@crestviewbulletin.
com, or Rae Schwartz at
585-5672, bakerny@yahoo.
com.
FREE GED CLASS-
ES: New Life Missionary
Church, 285 Duggan Ave.
in Crestview, is offering
GED classes Tuesdays
and Thursdays from 5:30-
8:30 p.m. through Dec. 9
through Northwest Florida
State College. New stu-
dents may start the class
any day within the semes-


I


ter. Call 729-6020, 729-5387,
Pastor Hayes at 621-4186 or
Tony Boyer at 865-1882.
USDA FOOD GIVE-
AWAY: is Saturday, Sept.
25, from 9 a.m. until the
monthly food allowance
has been distributed at
New Beginnings Church's
Raymond Williams Mission
Center, 404 W James Lee
Blvd., Crestview. Details:
Jimmy Smith, 689-2988.
New Beginnings Church
is an equal-opportunity
provider.
BLUE JEAN BALL:
You are invited to the Blue
Jean Ball, a casually el-
egant evening to benefit
Covenant Hospice, on Sat-
urday, Oct. 9, at 6 p.m. at
the Crestview Community
Center. Dine and dance the
night away in the comfort
of your favorite blue jeans.
Enjoy a delicious steak
dinner, a decadent dessert
buffet, available bar, danc-
ing and a silent auction.
Performers include Jaded
Klark, the Northwest
Florida State College show
choir, The Soundsations,
and a Dancing with the
Covenant Stars Competi-
tion performance.
Tickets are $40 each
or $70 per couple. All pro-
ceeds go to services of
Covenant Hospice in North
Okaloosa and North Walton
counties. Buy tickets online
at http://support.covenant
hospice.org/bluejeanball or
by phone at 598-5003. For
more information, call Lill
Jennings at 729-1800.
HOMELESS VET-
ERAN Stand Down will be
held Friday, Oct. 22, at First
Presbyterian Church, 134
Beal Parkway S.W in Fort
Walton Beach from 8:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. All honorably
discharged veterans in
need are welcome. Avail-
able services include medi-
cal wound care, flu shots,
VA benefits assistance,
state benefits assistance,
dental screening, clothing,
boots and blankets, em-
ployment services, mental
health screening, personal
hygiene bags, a hot meal
and optional misdemeanor
resolution.
BRING YOUR OWN
PUMPKIN and wear
clothes you can paint in
to the Crestview Robert
L. E Sikes Public Library
on Tuesday, Oct. 12. We're
painting pumpkins (and the
paint does stain). Children
age 6 on up to adults are
welcome to register at the
front desk. Registration
is recommended. Begin
painting anytime between
6 and 7 p.m. in the Meeting
Room. You must be fin-
ished by 8 p.m. When you
visit the pumpkin patch to
pick the perfect pumpkin,
keep in mind that it will be
wet with paint when you
leave. Small pie pumpkins
are recommended because
they are cost-effective and
easier to handle, especially
when wet. Thank you to
Friends of the Library for
buying the paint. Call 682-
4432 with questions.
SAFETY SEAT IN-


SECTION: The Crest-
view Police Department is
proud to celebrate National
Child Safety Seat Inspec-
tion Day. Certified techni-
cians will inspect and in-
stall child safety seats and
instruct parents and care-
givers on proper usage and
installation. Statistics show
that many children are not
properly restrained. The
CPD and The Florida De-
partment of Transportation
want to help you keep your
children safe.
The event will be held
Saturday, Sept. 25, from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
Crestview Public Library
on Commerce Drive. In-
spections are free. Please
bring your safety seats and
equipment, safety seat in-
struction manuals and ve-
hicle manuals with you to
ensure proper installation.
PILL TAKE-BACK:
The Crestview Police De-
partment and the Drug
Enforcement Agency will
be participating in the Na-
tional Pill Take-Back Initia-
tive on Sept. 25 from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
Crestview Public Library
to help prevent medica-
tions from getting into the
wrong hands.
CPD wants to make it
easier for you to do your
part. If you have expired
medications or medica-
tions you no longer use,
you can dispose of them
quickly, easily and anony-
mously. Simply bring the
medications and place
them in the drop box. Ab-
solutely no information of
any type will be collected
from you.
Because of the risk
involved with intravenous
medications and injection
systems, syringes and nee-
dles cannot be accepted.
Illegal drugs (marijuana,
methamphetamine, co-
caine, crack, heroin, etc.)
may also be disposed of
anonymously.
CRESTVIEW LI-
BRARY: The Crestview
Public Library, 1445 Com-
merce Drive in Crestview
(682-4432 or www.cityof
crestview.org/library.htm),
is hosting the following
activities:
The Friends of the
Crestview Library are ask-
ing for donations of used
books and movies on
VHS and DVD for the
book sale in October. Books
and movies will be accept-
ed at the library. All types
of hardbound and paper-
back books are needed, but
not magazines.
Joan Strewler-Carter
and Stephen Carter of
Life Options Institute will
present "Planning for Life
After 50" at the Oct. 5 First
Tuesday program at 10:30
a.m. The Carters will pro-
vide guidelines on how to
approach retirement and
offer "how-to" advice on
the nonfinancial aspects
of retirement. Coffee and
cookies will be served
starting at 10 a.m.
FALL FESTIVAL:
The Main Street Crestview


Association is accepting
sign-ups for participants
and volunteers for the
Downtown Crestview Fall
Festival on Saturday, Oct.
30, from 3-8 p.m.
If you would like to
provide an enjoyable ac-
tivity for youngsters, be a
food or craft vendor or a
participant in the event's
planning process, or need
more information, call
Promotions Committee
Chairperson Viola Owens
at 683-5252 or 423-1214. You
may also contact Board
President Mickey Rytman
at 974-4369, MSCA Vice
President Ellis Conner
at 682-4846 or the City of
Crestview Administrative
Department at 689-3722.
Registration forms must
be completed and turned in
by 5 p.m. Oct. 15. They are
available online at www.
mainstreet
crestview.org and www.
cityofcrestview.org, and
from the Administrative
Department in the west
wing of City Hall.
RIDE THE WAVE
FREE: Okaloosa County
Public Library Cooperative
and Okaloosa County Tran-
sit are providing free rides
on the WAVE throughout
September. As September
is Library Card Sign-Up
Month, all you have to do is
show a current library card
from any of the six par-
ticipating libraries when
boarding to ride free.
This includes the Crest-
view, Destin, Fort Walton
Beach, Mary Esther, Nicev-
ille and Valparaiso libraries
and the Bookmobile, and
all WAVE routes in Crest-
view, Fort Walton Beach,
Destin and Okaloosa
Island. It also includes
the NEW WAVE Express
Route. Bus schedules can
be found at all the libraries
and on board the vehicles.
To get a free library
card, residents of these cit-
ies or the unincorporated
areas of Okaloosa County
should bring something
with adequate proof of ad-
dress. Residents of any
military installation in Oka-
loosa County are also eli-
gible for free membership.
Any employee of Okaloosa
County or a member city
may also apply for a free
library card regardless of
residence. Citizens who do
not fall into one of the cat-
egories mentioned above
may be required to pay a
fee to attain membership in
a library for one year.
Visit www.co.okaloosa.
fl.us or readokaloosa.org,
or call 609-5102 for more
information.
SONS OF ITALY: The
Order Sons of Italy in
America (OSIA) is starting
a new chapter in the Crest-
view area. All interested
persons of either direct or
related American-Italian
heritage are welcome to
join.
The Oct. 10 meeting
will be held at 3 p.m. in the
Knights of Columbus Hall,
701 E. James Lee Blvd.
(U.S. Highway 90) in Crest-


L An 689.5400

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678-5338


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NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our office policy that we have the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination, or treatment
which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for any free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination ortreatment.


view. For more information,
call 585-3166.
Now is the time to par-
ticipate as a charter mem-
ber in a national nonprofit
fraternal organization that
helps preserve Italian heri-
tage, traditions and family
values, in addition to sup-
porting local communities
by raising funds for note-
worthy charities and local
high school scholarship
programs.
Become a charter mem-
ber, meet new friends and
make lasting friendships
as you continue to enhance
the cultural contributions
Italians have made before
and since their arrival on
the shores of this won-
derful experience called
America.
HIV/AIDS TESTING:
available every two weeks
at Mount Zion A.M.E.
Church, 502 McDonald
St., Crestview. Testing
takes place every second
Saturday from 10 a.m. to
noon and every fourth
Saturday from 2-4 p.m. Call
the church at 398-6985 on
Wednesday for more infor-
mation.
EXCHANGE CLUB
OF CRESTVIEW: meets
the second and fourth
Thursday of each month
at the First Presbyterian
Church Fellowship Hall.
Come see what the Ex-
change Club is all about.
For more information, call
President Sharlene Cox at
682-6824.
CREATIVE ARRANG-
ERS GUILD: Valparaiso
Community Library and
Valparaiso Garden Club
are sponsoring a new Cre-
ative Arrangers Guild. The
group will meet on the first
Friday of each month (Sep-
tember through April) from
9-11 a.m. at the Valparaiso
Community Library, 459
Valparaiso Parkway.
All sessions will be
taught by accredited flower
showjudges. During each
session, the instructor will
demonstrate a floral de-
sign, after which students
will construct their own
designs. All classes are
free, but students must
bring their own equipment
and materials. The class
is open to all who are in-
terested, and no previous
experience is necessary.
Call the library at 729-
5406 or e-mail mariehar-
rison@valp.net to register
and to request a list of
supplies needed for the
first session. The class is
limited to 30 participants,
so advance registration is
required. Nonregistered
participants will be admit-
ted if space is available.
BECOME A TOAST-
MASTER: The Crestview
Toastmasters Club has


added a second meeting
day to accommodate more
members and allow them
more opportunities to earn
educational awards. The
club now meets the second
and fourth Tuesdays of
each month from 6-7 p.m.
at Lundy and Bowers, 296
S. Ferdon Blvd. The person
with strong communication
skills has a clear advantage
over tongue-tied colleagues
- especially in a competi-
tive job market. The club is
a learn-by-doing workshop
where members practice
their speaking skills in
a friendly, relaxed atmo-
sphere. Call Ruth Salazar
at 974-1618, and join us in
learning how to speak with
confidence and say what
you want to say.
BLOOD DRIVES: As
part of the Drive For Life
giveaway, all blood dona-
tions made to The North-
west Florida Blood Center
between now and Dec. 31
are automatically entered
into the drawing for a 2010
Kia Soul automobile donat-
ed by Kia Autosports Gen-
eral Manager Jessica Lee
in Pensacola. The drawing
will be held in January. Call
434-2535 for more informa-
tion, or e-mail Betty Rob-
erts at broberts@fbsblood.
org.
Upcoming blood drives
are listed below.
Sept. 26, Paxton Bap-
tist Church, 21757 U.S.
Highway 331 N., 10 a.m. to
3 p.m.
Sept. 27, Northwest
Florida State College in
Crestview, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. Free movie ticket for
all donors.
Sept. 28, Paxton
School, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m.
Sept. 29, Northwest
Florida State College caf-
eteria in Niceville, 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. Free movie ticket for
all donors.
RED CROSS: Registra-
tion for classes and other
Red Cross events are avail-
able at www.yourred
cross.org. You may also call
800-773-7620, ext. 0.
FOSTER FAMILIES
CAR WASHES: Foster
Families of America, 113
Main St. in Crestview, is
washing cars for donations
Tuesday and Thursdays
from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The
washes support family fun
outdoor activities.
DAUGHTERS OF
THE CONFEDERACY:
Pensacola Chapter 298
meets regularly every
second Thursday at 9 a.m.
Members of the lineage
organization reside in
Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and
Escambia counties. For
more information, call
Glenda Manis at 678-7318
or 902-7049.


CRESTVIEW



News Bulletin
To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524.


NEWS INFORMATION
IF YOU HAVE A CONCERN OR COMMENT
ABOUT CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN'S
COVERAGE, PLEASE CALL 682-6524.
PUBLISHER
JASON MOBLEY
EDITOR
MICHAEL STEWART
OFFICE STAFF
DENISE CADENHEAD. OFFICE ASSISTANT
SHERRIE STANLEY .... RECEP./CIRC. ASST.
ADVERTISING INFORMATION
DIANA BAKER ....... AD CONSULTANT
RANDY BEARD ...... SALES MANAGER
MELSSA TEDDER .... MEDIA CONSULTANT
EDITORIAL
BRIAN HUGHES. ..... WRITER
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR
ANN SPANN ........ PHOTOGRAPHER
RANDY DICKSON .... SPORTS EDITOR
RENEE BELL ........ TYPESETTING


PRODUCTION
GREG ALLEN ....... PRODUCTION
CIRCULATION INFORMATION
682-6524
THE CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN
IS PUBLISHED TWICE WEEKLY EACH
WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY BY FLORIDA
FREEDOM NEWSPAPERS, INC., AT 295 W.
JAMES LEE BLVD., CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA
32536. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT
CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA. POSTMASTER:
PLEASE SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO
295 W. AMES LEE BLVD., CRESTVIEW,
FLORIDA 32536-3313. ALL MATERIAL
HEREIN IS PROPERTY OF THE CRESTVIEW
NEWS BULLETIN.





0


lSUBSICR. f I;T-ON 11T "


In County
13 weeks.........................$9.45
26 weeks.......................$17.85
52 weeks.......................$32.76


Out of County
13 weeks......................... $14.70
26 weeks......................... $23.10
52 weeks......................... $38.01


Ask your Advertising Representative about our Color
by the Inch Program, Customer Appreciation Sale,
and Online packages.
CRESTVI EW


News Bulletin (850) 682-6524


NE ~*I


I


I T- A -- -


i






Saturday, September 25, 2010


POKER from page Al


On an early Saturday morn-
ing, a small group of enthusiastic
well-wishers cheered the motor-
cyclists on as they roared out of
their John King Road parking lot
onto State Road 85 and headed
north on their assigned run.
One of those wishing riders
success was June Baddorf, who
was making a video of the event
to send to her husband, who is
stationed in Afghanistan.
"I want to do something for
him even though he is thousands
of miles away," Baddorf said. "I
want to send him something to
remind him of home, something
that he can connect to and know
and be constantly reminded that
we love him and care for him and
that we are proud of what he and
all the others are doing for our
nation."
Byrd was also among the by-
standers, but it wasn't by choice.
"I had planned to ride, but with
this rotator cuff problem, I had to
forgo that," Byrd said, pointing to
her arm in a sling. "But I am happy
we pulled it off, because it is such
a great charity, and this is my first
year at organizing the event."
The USO has been a star per-
former since the early days of
World War II, and the late, great
comedian Bob Hope became its
best-known supporter.


Local


Crestview News Bulletin I A3


-_ -,. .


Members of the Crestview Amvets Post 35 gather before a Sept. 18 poker run to raise money for th


Today the USO has an opera-
tion that spans the globe, and
wherever there are American
service personnel, there is a USO
facility somewhere close by.
According to Heidi Blair,
Northwest Florida USO direc-


tor, the three area USO centers
are staffed, funded and managed
by local businesses, civic groups
and individuals. The three USO
centers are at Pensacola Naval
Air Station, Pensacola Regional
Airport and Northwest Florida


Regional Airport in Valparaiso,
which recently opened its USO
center.
"Our expectations were the
center at the (Northwest Florida
Regional) airport would be used,
but we had no idea we would have


JOHN PARROTT I News Bulletin
e USO of Northwest Florida.

so much traffic using the facility,"
Blair said. "So far we are aver-
aging about 2,500 visits a month
by individual service members
or their family, and we are posi-
tive the numbers will grow
larger."


Crestview

City Council AGENDA


The Crestview City
Council meets Monday at
6 p.m. in the council cham-
bers at City Hall, 198 N. Wil-
son St.
The agenda for the regu-
lar meeting is as follows:

REGULAR AGENDA
1. Approval of Consent
Agenda.
2. Presentation of ser-
vice award, Mayor David
Cadle.
3. Public Hearings:
a. Ordinance #1440 -
Amending and restating
the City of Crestview po-
lice officers' and firefight-
ers' retirement plan City
Clerk.
b. Ordinance #1441 -
Amending and restating
the City of Crestview gen-
eral employees' retirement
plan City Clerk.
4. New Business:
a. Fred Barber funds
to be withdrawn for the
purchase of library books
- Library.
b. Ordinance #1439 -
Providing for a scheduled
increase in fees in Section
102-352 (Administrative
Fees) Administrative
Services Department -
(First Reading).
c. Ordinance #1443
- Establishment of the
Public Library Department
- Administrative Servic-
es Department (First
Reading).
d. Schedule a CRA
(Community Redevelop-
ment Agency) Board Meet-
ing Administrative Ser-
vices Department.
e. Approval of Okaloosa
County Public Library
Cooperative Interlocal
Agreement Councilman


Bob Allen.
f. CRA Buildings Im-
provement Grant Review
Board Appointment -
Propose to appoint Cindy
Harris to replace William
Kilpatrick. City Council
Appointment. (Note: The
Main Street Association
Board has designated Ms.
Harris as the interim Pro-
gram Manager) Admin-
istrative Services Depart-
ment.
g. Liability Insurance for
the Crestview Fall Festival
- Administrative Services
Department.
h. Resolution #10-17 -
Oppose the adoption of
stricter EPA Numeric Nu-
trient Standards Public
Services Department.
i. Acceptance of low bid
for Fire Engine Mainte-
nance Joe Traylor.
j. Sports Complex -
Councilman Ben lannucci.
5. Mayoral Report.
6. Business from the
floor.

CONSENT AGENDA
1. Approval of the min-
utes for the special meet-
ing Sept. 8, 2010, and the
regular Council meeting
Sept. 13, 2010.
2. Approval of Request
for Certificate of Compli-
ance for the sale of beer
and wine (2APS Alcoholic
Beverage License) for Fer-
don Convenience Store,
located at 510 N. Ferdon
Blvd. Requested by Tat-
shiv, Inc.
3. Approval of Council-
man lannucci attending
the 2010 Institute for Elect-
ed Municipal Officials (Oct.
1-3, 2010, St. Augustine,
Florida).


BRIAN HUGHES I News Bulletin
FIRST PARADE: Jennifer Wright and Geoffrey Loften lead the high school band in their first public parade
during the Homecoming Parade on Sept. 10.


MAJORS from page Al


Loften draws much of his support
from the students he's performed
with for several years.
"People help you," he said. "Peo-
ple give you assistance. Having my
friends out there, they know when
it's time to be serious, and they know
when I'm joking around."
In addition to their duties in the
Big Red Machine, the drum majors


also participate in several co-curricu-
lar activities. Wright is vice president
of the Tri-M Music Honor Society and
recently found time to win a competi-
tion in the school's culinary arts pro-
gram for her edible centerpiece.
She also serves on the Link Crew,
which provides an upperclass con-
tact for freshmen. Loften is president
of the Minority Council and is corre-


spending secretary for the student
council.
But when they stand in front of the
nearly 300 members of the Crestview
High School Band, their focus is com-
pletely on assuring the orchestra-
tion moves and performs together, in
synch and in step.
"It's not just Geoff and I," Wright
said. "We all work as one team."


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locations and looks forward to providing ongoing
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A4 I Crestview News Bulletin


Local


Saturday, September 25, 2010


Traffic at Crestview DMV to increase

Crestview will be only place in county to offer driving test due to county budget cuts


Wendy Victora
Florida Freedom Newspapers
Beginning Monday,
there will be just one
place in Okaloosa County
to take a behind-the-wheel
exam for a driver license
renewal: the Department
of Highway Safety and
Motor Vehicles office in
Crestview.
The department is
closing its other Okaloosa
County location an of-
fice on Racetrack Road
in Choctaw Plaza on
Friday.
And the Okaloosa
County Tax Collector's of-
fices, which have already
taken on many of the driv-
er license renewal tasks,
are not ready to start of-
fering road tests.
"We do just about ev-
erything except the actu-
al driving test," said Tax
Collector Chris Hughes.
"We want to make sure
our folks are fully trained
and know what they're
doing."


He said clerks have
been undergoing training
for months to learn how
to administer the test and
that he has hired three of
the examiners from the
office that is closing.
The state has approved
a driving route for test-
taking around his Fort
Walton Beach office.
But the plan is for the
Crestview DHSMV office
on East James Lee Bou-
levard to handle the driv-
ing tests until that loca-
tion closes sometime next
year. Hughes said that is
expected to happen no
later than June.
"If the need is big
enough, we might offer it
earlier," he said. "We're
trying to move slowly
and make sure we know
everything we need to
know."
The latest closure is
part of a statewide move
to streamline costs and
services. By 2015, most of
the DHSMV driver license
offices will be closed and


their functions handed
over to tax collectors' of-
fices. The exception will
be those counties in which
the tax collector is not a
constitutional officer, ac-
cording to communica-
tions director Dave West-
berry.
"Our goal is to cre-
ate one-stop shopping
for the customer," West-
berry said, adding that
the Florida Legislature
passed a law in the most
recent session mandating
that the services be tran-
sitioned.
All of the DHSMV of-
fices in Okaloosa, Santa
Rosa and Walton counties
will eventually be closed,
but Westberry could not
give dates on any of the
other locations' closures.
Savings from the Choc-
taw Plaza office alone are
estimated to be more than
$400,000 a year, Westberry
said, with the majority of
that expense being sala-
ries, benefits and lease
expense.


The Choctaw Plaza of-
fice opened in November
2005, relocating from a
small office on Hollywood
Boulevard.
Hughes said that most
driver license services
are already offered at
his offices in Destin, Fort
Walton Beach and Nicev-
ille.
The behind-the-wheel
exams will eventually be
offered at the Fort Wal-
ton Beach, Niceville and
Crestview offices, Hughes
said. His Destin and Eglin
Air Force Base offices are
too small, he said.
Westberry said that
his department will make
sure there are enough
employees at the Crest-
view location to handle
the extra demands.
"I'm sure that, based
on the demographics of
Okaloosa, our plans will
be to staff that up in the
short term until (Hughes)
is ready to offer those
services at all locations,"
Westberry said.


Man charged



with burglary

Michael Stewart
michaels@crestviewbulletin.com
A Crestview man faces charges of bur-
glary and larceny and is ac-
cused of stealing a laptop
and prescription drugs from
a home.
Courtney Zane Taylor, 25,
was arrested Sept. 14 and
released from the Okaloosa
County Jail the following
day. No bond amount was ZANE TAYLOR
listed on the jail website.
Crestview police responded to a call in
the 200 block of Anderson Street of a bur-
glary at a home.
A woman at the home told police she and
her mother had just returned home when
they entered a side door and saw a white
male run out the front door carrying some-
thing in his arms.
A neighbor told police children living in
the area told her a man had hidden some
items on her property and that when she
looked she found a Dell laptop computer and
prescription drugs.
Police recovered the laptop and two pre-
scription bottles, with 34 Xanax in one pill
bottle and four Bupropion in the other.
Another neighbor told police Taylor, who
he said he knew personally, had asked him if
he wanted to buy a laptop for $100.
Taylor was spotted in a red pickup truck,
was pulled over by police and identified by
the burglary victim as the man she saw run-
ning from her home, according to the arrest
report.


Crestview man accused of fracturing woman's jawbone with cane


Michael Stewart
michaels@crestviewbulletin.com
A Crestview man accused of hit-
ting a woman in the face with his
walking cane and fracturing her
jawbone has been arrested.
Paul Raymond "Guitar Man"
PAUL Lavallee, 61, is charged with aggra-
LAVALLEE vated battery in connection with a
Sept. 18 incident. He is in custody


at the Okaloosa County Jail.
No bond amount has been set.
On Sept. 19, the day after the in-
cident reportedly occurred, mem-
bers of the Crestview Police De-
partment responded to the home
of woman in the 800 block of South
Brett Street, who identified herself
as Lavallee's cousin.
According Lavallee's arrest re-
port, the woman's face and neck


were purple and green with bruis-
es. She told police she was laying
down on her couch when Laval-
lee struck her in the face with his
walking cane.
The woman told police Laval-
lee, who had been staying with her
for the past year, became upset af-
ter she told him he would have to


lee he would have to leave after
he allegedly grabbed her arm dur-
ing an argument between the two
about a curtain she removed from
a doorway. She told police she later
fell asleep on the couch and was
assaulted by her cousin.
Lavallee denied hitting the
woman, who doctors said might re-


move out in October. quire surgery to repair three frac-
The woman said she told Laval- tures in her jawbone.


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Saturday, September 25, 2010


Education


Crestview News Bulletin I AS


Study: Teoche



poy does not


offed test scwres


Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


Essay contest talks U.S. citizenship


Special to the News Bulletin
ARLINGTON, VA. U.S.
ninth- through 12th-grade
high school students and
their teachers are invited
to compete for almost
$115,000 in prize money by
participating in the Bill of
Rights Institute's fifth an-
nual Being an American
Essay Contest. Top prize
winners and their teach-
ers will also receive all-
expenses paid trips to the
nation's capital
The deadline for essay
submissions is Dec. 1, and
they must be submitted by
a high school teacher at
www.BeingAnAmerican.
org.
"This contest is unique
in that it gives students
the opportunity to think
about the important civic
values communicated in
our Founding documents,
and embodied by Ameri-
can civic heroes," said Dr.
Jason Ross, Bill of Rights
Institute Vice President
of Education Programs.


"This context is vital
to helping students see
their own acts of good
citizenship as a meaning-
ful part of the American
experiment of self-
government."
Specifically, students
are asked to share their
thoughts on American citi-
zenship by answering the
following question: "What
civic value do you believe
is most essential to being
an American?"
The largest high school
essay contest in the coun-
try, awarding 180 students
and teachers with cash
prizes and attracting more
than 50,000 essays lastyear,
explores the rights and re-
sponsibilities of American
citizenship. The contest is
administered by the Bill
of Rights Institute, a non-
profit educational organi-
zation in the Washington,
D.C., area devoted to edu-
cating children about the
Constitution and Found-
ing principles. The spon-
sors include the History


Channel and the Stuart
Family Foundation.
The top three winners
and their teachers from
each of the nine geograph-
ical regions will be an-
nounced at a special Wash-
ington, D.C. Awards Gala
in the spring of 2011, where
they will be awarded cash
prizes of$5,000 (first place),
$1,000 (second place), and
$500 (third place). The win-
ning students will also ex-
plore the nation's capital,
meet contemporary Amer-
ican heroes and national
leaders, and visit national
landmarks. Additionally,
the contest will award 126
honorable mention prizes
of $100 to seven students
and their teachers from
each region.
"The contest not only
honors and awards spon-
soring teachers, but also
equips them with free les-
son plans and other sup-
plemental materials that
meet state and national
academic standards so
they can easily incorporate


the essay contest into their
classrooms," said Being an
American Essay Contest
Director John Croft.
Almost 100,000 stu-
dents have participated in
the essay contest since it
began in 2006. Now in its
fifth year, the contest is the
largest high school essay
contest in the country.
"The Being an American
Essay Contest is a wonder-
ful way to awaken students'
interest in the ideas of the
American founding. The
Stuart Family Foundation
is honored to be one of the
Contest's supporters," said
Stuart Family Foundation
Executive Director Tru-
man Anderson.
Further information,
including submission cri-
teria, lesson plans and
background information
on the Constitution, Bill
of Rights, Founders and
other Americans who have
contributed to America's
shared civic values, are
available at www.Being
AnAmerican.org.


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A6 I Crestview News Bulletin


Business


Saturday, September 25, 2010


21st Century Oncology expanding


Crestview facility breaks ground for expansion


Ann Spann
anns@crestviewbulletin.com

The staff at 21st Century
Oncology held a ground-
breaking ceremony this
week to kickoff the new ex-
pansion planned for their
Crestview facility.
Work at the facility,
known locally as the Crest-
view Cancer Center, will
include doubling the che-
motherapy infusion capac-
ity. A state-of-the art "Tri-
ology" radiation machine
was added, and physician's
assistant Bonnie Grundel
was hired.
Additional buildings will
be added to both sides of the
current structure for a total
of 3,800 square feet when
the project is complete.
"My father opened the


original Cancer Center
in Crestview in 1986," Dr.
Warren Amos said.
Amos, along with doc-
tors James Stevens and
David Mann, joined togeth-
er with 21st Century Oncol-
ogy in 2004 to open the new
cancer center, located at
601 West Redstone Ave.
The center treats be-
tween 20 to 30 patients a day
on the radiation therapy side
and about 30 to 45 chemo-
therapy patients per week.
"When we moved to our
new center in 2004, patients
no longer had to travel out of
town for treatment," Amos
said. "We are expanding
the facility again because
of our commitment to the
Crestview community."
Crestview Mayor David
Cadle spoke firsthand about


the quality of care provided at
the Crestview Cancer Center
during the ceremony.
"I have a debt of person-
al gratitude for the care that
I received here at 21st Cen-
tury Oncology," Cadle said.
Cadle was diagnosed
with an aggressive form of
prostate cancer in early 2009
and chose to undergo treat-
ment at the local facility.
"The professionalism of
the radiation department
was first rate," Cadle said.
21st Century Oncology
is a leading developer and
operator of radiation ther-
apy centers, with 98 cen-
ters operating in regional
networks across the coun-
try. The centers provide a
full spectrum of radiation
therapy services to cancer
patients.


ANN SPANN I Crestview News Bulletin
EXPANDING: Doctors David Mann, Warren Amos and James Stevens gathered
with staff and community members to break ground on the 3,800-square-foot
expansion at the 21 st Century Oncology Center in Crestview.


BP-funded tourist program canceled

Dusty Ricketts with a $200 debit card if Bellinger said.
Florida Freedom Newspapers they booked at least a two- "We are very, very dis-


Okaloosa County might
have to return more than
$750,000 to BP after a pro-
gram designed to attract
tourists was canceled
when it was learned that
businesses were abusing
the system.
The Okaloosa County
Tourist Development Coun-
cil's Emerald Money Debit
program was designed to
provide tourists or locals


night stay at a lodging that
collects local bed taxes. The
program was scheduled to
run from Sept. 17 to Oct. 31,
or until the 5,000 debit cards
had been taken.
Instead, the debit card
deal was stopped Sept. 18
after just 1,221 qualified
reservations because nu-
merous lodgings did not
follow the TDC's guide-
lines for the program, TDC
Executive Director Mark


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appointed to learn about all
the different scenarios and
all the ways that folks were
trying to beat the system,"
Bellinger said. "It was
disappointing. It was dis-
heartening. It was almost
like a blow to the chest. I
was very discouraged. So
any future programs, mar-
keting programs that we
do, the TDC has to control

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Lions Club announces new

officers, plans charter meeting


The new officers of the Baker Lions Club are, from
left, Leah Harlan, treasurer; Royce Henley, vice-
president; Joyce Blalock, president; Mike Paul, tail-
twister; Mary Henley, lion tamer; and (not pictured)
Dana Hodge, secretary. The group will hold a
charter meeting Thursday, Sept. 30 at
6:30 p.m. at Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church in Baker.
There is a $10 donation fee for charter meeting
attendees; refreshments will be served, and door
prizes will be distributed afterward. For more
details, call 902-3367.

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Business


Crestview News Bulletin I A7


Firehouse Subs to kick

off Fire Safety Month


Special to the News Bulletin
CRESTVIEW Firehouse
Subs Public Safety Foun-
dation is kicking off Octo-
ber's Fire Safety Month on
Oct. 2 at 2252 S. Ferdon
Blvd. with a day of commu-
nity fun including firefight-
er demonstrations, family
activities, fire safety tips,
and delicious steaming hot
subs. Fire Safety Month
is also an opportunity to
support our local heroes
by purchasing medallions
for $1 or $5. These funds
help provide much-needed
lifesaving equipment to
public safety entities and
provide education through
distribution of fire safety
prevention tools. More
than 200 years of firefight-
ing heritage in the Fire-
house Subs founder's lives
inspired the formation of
the company's foundation
to improve lifesaving ca-
pabilities of fire, police and
EMS.
"We are fired up for Fire
Safety Month and want
to raise awareness, as
well as funds, for deserv-
ing departments through
our kick off events," said
Robin Peters, executive


director of the foundation.
"Through donations raised
in our restaurants, we
have given $2.2 million in
lifesaving equipment to fire
and police departments
across the country. We hope
to raise a record amount
this October, to give back to
our first responders."
Participating locations
are offering a variety of
food, fire truck and police
car displays, chances to win
collectible toy fire trucks,
as well as a bounce houses
and games. Firehouse Subs
will also be passing out fire
safety tips to ensure each
family has a plan.
The foundation's funds
for equipment are raised
through individual dona-
tions, pickle bucket sales
and canisters placed by
registers. Each restaurant
recycles leftover five-gallon
pickle buckets and allows
customers to purchase
them for $2, and donation
canisters on register coun-
ters collect change.
For more informa-
tion, call 689-1500 or visit
www.firehousesubs.com,
facebook.com/firehouse
subs or follow on twitter at
(@firehousesubs.


BP from page A6


100 percent of that program.
"The responsibility was
placed on the lodging in-
dustry to make this work,"
Bellinger added. "It's a
shame. I'm sorry that those
who did this the correct way
were penalized. I really am.
It's a shame."
BP provided a $7 million
grant to seven counties in
Northwest Florida to help
them salvage a tourist sea-
son crippled by the Deep-
water Horizon oil spill.
Okaloosa received about
$1.37 million, with $1 mil-
lion intended to be spent on
the debit cards.
Before the Emerald
Money Debit program
started, 189 lodging estab-
lishments signed up to par-
ticipate. The TDC provided
a set of guidelines for the
businesses to follow and
hosted a luncheon for those
who wanted more informa-
tion.
Bellinger said the TDC
received many question-
able reservations, includ-
ing trips that were booked
before the start of the pro-
gram and reservations
that were not paid in full as
required.
That prompted Bell-
inger to end the program.
"I applaud Mark for tak-
ing it off the table if peo-
ple weren't following the
rules," said Jeanne Dai-
ley, president and owner
of Newman-Dailey Resort
Properties. "I appreciate
the TDC tried to find a way
to put more heads in beds
and to take advantage of
the moneys that BP sent
us. It's just unfortunate
that we weren't able to
utilize this the way it was
intended."
Michelle Eason,
vice president of Dale E.


Peterson Vacations, said
her company received a
lot of response to the debit
card offer and was disap-
pointed it ended early.
"The intent was good,
but there were still some
holes in the program, and
the TDC did what they had
to do," Eason said. "We did
have some upset guests be-
cause of it.
"It's unfortunate be-
cause we did see a momen-
tum develop because of
it," Eason added. "It would
have been nice if it could
have lasted longer. I think
we all could have benefited
from it."
Of the $1 million allo-
cated for the debit cards,
at least $755,800 will not be
spent. Bellinger said the
TDC will ask BP for per-
mission to use the remain-
ing funds on other market-
ing initiatives.
Bellinger has asked for
an audit of the program
to look at properties the
TDC suspects of breaking
procedures and a random
selection of the other lodg-
ings. He wants the audit
to be completed before
Oct. 31, when the program
was scheduled to end.
"We have to manage
the money properly," Bell-
inger said. "We have to
account for it, and unfor-
tunately it's a tough pro-
gram to implement simply
because so much depends
on the lodging properties
to make this happen cor-
rectly. With these times,
with the economy and the
oil disaster, their business
is down, and folks were
pretty aggressive to get
the $200 debit cards. We
gave it a shot. We will nev-
er do debit cards again as
long as I'm here."


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SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN
TRAVEL FUNDS: The Crestview Old Spanish Trail Shrine Club presents a check for $500 to Kevin Lusk,
second from right, Crestview High School choral music director, to help defray costs for the school
chorus' December trip to perform at Disney World's candlelight spectacular. Members of the Shriner
are, from left, Walt Harkness, treasurer; Amon Burt, president; and member George Bonner.


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A8 I Crestview News Bulletin


Faithfulness is everything


Sheryl Tedder
of Omaha, Neb.,
told this story from
her own minis-
try. She said, "As
a children's pas-
tor, I listened as a
fourth grade Sun-
day School teacher
shared a concern.
Completing a quar-
ter's lessons on the


REV. MARK
BROADHEAD
From the Pulpit


Ten Commandments, he
had asked the kids, 'What
is the hardest command-
ment for you to keep?' to
which most of them re-
sponded, 'Thou shalt not
commit adultery.'
"We couldn't under-
stand why fourth graders
would find that command
a problem until a mother
quizzed her son on what
he thought committing
adultery meant. Without
blinking, the boy replied,
'Thou shalt not sass back
to adults.'
Don't we wish it were
that simple! You shall not
commit adultery. This is
an important command-
ment from God. When it
comes to human relation-
ships, breaking this com-
mandment will probably
do the greatest emotional
damage more than nearly
any other transgression.
Adultery is a very selfish
act with far-reaching con-
sequences.
How does it happen? It


can be rather com-
plex, but simply
put, one thought
leads to another.
One flirtation leads
to another. Step-
by-step, one edges
closer to the chasm
of infidelity, until
a critical juncture
is met: to jump, or
to turn around and


run as fast and as far away
as possible.
Should the line be
crossed, lying starts. A
great deal of mental ener-
gy is spent trying to keep
stories straight. But in a
strange way, keeping the
secret is part of the allure.
In the vast majority of
cases, however, the faith-
ful spouse learns about
the adultery and life will
never be the same. Trust
is shattered. The ego is
destroyed. Anger flares.
Shame floods in. A whole
way of life becomes evis-
cerated.
Will the marriage sur-
vive? A counselor friend of
mine who deals with many
cases of adultery said that
90 percent of couples can-
not repair their marriage
because the effects are
so devastating. For those
who do survive, it will take
years for trust to return
- if it ever fully does.
Is there any wonder
why God gave this com-


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mandment? He knows
the devastating effects of
broken trust. He knows
the severe damage being
unfaithful can cause. With-
out trust, there is little to
nothing to hold the rela-
tionship together.
Now, if we were to take
a look at this command-
ment from a slightly differ-
ent perspective, it would
probably read: "You shall
remain faithful." Faithful-
ness in life is paramount!
Faithfulness helps us
weather the emotional
storms that come in life.
Faithfulness shows a
commitment to working
together to get through
tough times. Faithfulness
means you will hang tight
even when it seems easier
to slip away. Remaining
faithful, remaining com-
mitted, builds trust. And
trust is the bond that holds
every relationship togeth-
er.
Couples need to prom-
ise to face difficulties and
challenges together, no
matter how painful or dif-
ficult. When faithfulness
is part of any relationship,
the hardships in life can be
faced and the relationship
will grow stronger.
Years back a survey
of couples who had been
married 30-plus years was
taken. They were asked,
"Why did you get mar-


ried?" The vast majority
of them said because they
were in love. Then they
were asked, "Why do you
stay married?" Almost to
a couple they said it was
because of trust (although
some women said it would
take too long to break in
another husband). It is
faithfulness that builds
trust.
In this life we are to re-
sist the temptation to back
down on our promises.
We are to do everything
we can, with the strength
of God, to remain faithful
in all things especially
in our relationship with a
spouse, a significant other,
our families, our God.
You shall not commit
adultery. You shall remain
faithful. Faithfulness is ev-
erything.

The Rev. Mark Broad-
head is pastor at Laurel
Hill Presbyterian Church,
Hill 8115 Fourth Street,
Laurel Hill (652-2164)
and First Presbyterian
Church of Crestview, 492
N. Ferdon Blvd. at the in-
tersection of U.S. High-
way 90 and State Road 85
in the heart of Crestview.
Sunday morning worship
is at 9 a.m. in Laurel Hill
and 11 a.m. in Crestview
(682-2835). Website: www.
firstpresbyterian-crest-
view.org.


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SIGNS OF FAITH


BRIAN HUGHES
Crestview News
Bulletin
This church
sign was
recently
spotted in the
community of
Baker.


Church BRIEFS


Please turn in your
church news briefs to the
News Bulletin by 5 p.m.
Tuesday for the Saturday
issue.
EVENTS

BORN TO WIN: Ra-
dio show airs every day at
12:30 p.m. on WTJT 90.1 FM.
Presented by Northwest
Florida Church of God, pas-
tored by Carl Dillenback.
CATHOLIC RCIA: The
Rite of Christian Initiation of
Adults (RCIA) is designed for
those seeking one or more of
the Sacraments of Initiation;
Baptism, Confirmation, and
Eucharist. This formation
process is the church's ap-
proved method for individu-
als to become members of
the Catholic community. Ses-
sions are held at the Eglin
Chapel Center Annex from
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. each Wednes-
day evening. Details: Susan
Huberty at 882-7320.
FREE BIBLE
COURSE: Airport Road
Church of Christ is offer-
ing a free Bible correspon-
dence course. Call 682-4025
for more information. The
radio program airs Monday
through Saturday at 5:45
a.m. on WAAZ, 104.7 FM.
BOOK OF REVELA-


TION STUDY: Each Sun-
day evening at 5 p.m., the
Good Hope Congregational
Church presents the study
of the Book of Revelation.
Rev Tommy Coleman will
be presenting the study and
there will be finger foods to
follow every Sunday evening.
Anyone interested may join.
Call 537-4307 for more infor-
mation.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
SULLIVAN CONCERT:
Central Baptist Church at
951 S Ferdon Blvd. in Crest-
view will host a concert with
Dove Award winner Kirk
Sullivan on Sept. 26 at 6 p.m.
This is a free event, however
a love offering will be collect-
ed. Details: 682-5525.
MEN'S DAY CEL-
EBRATION: On Oct. 3 at
3 p.m., New Hope Minis-
tries of Laurel Hill will have
Men's Day. The Rev. Wal-
ter Williams, Th. D., of All
God's Children and the Liv-
ing Word Worship Center in
Niceville is guest speaker.
The theme is "Men of Integ-
rity. Dinner will be served
following worship. New
Hope is located at 3830 New
Ebenezer Road Laurel Hill.
Details: 652-2588.


Westside Assembly of God

homecoming and revival


Special to the News
Bulletin


You are invited
to Westside As- .
sembly of God's
homecoming cel-
ebration sched-
uled for Oct. 10. BROTI
Sunday School DON RA
begins at 9:45 a.m.
Brother Selma Peacock
will be teaching. Morn-
ing worship begins at


11 a.m., with special
singing by the Kol-
metz family. Broth-
er Don Railey will
be preaching, and
lunch will be served
in the fellowship
S hall afterward.
The Sunday ser-
ILEY vices kick off the re-
vival, which will be
held Sunday, Oct. 10 17,
with services starting at
7 p.m. nightly.


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Saturday, September 25, 2010


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Saturday, September 25, 2010

Sunday services are pub-
lished in the News Bulletin on
a space-available basis. Call
682-6524 to update or add your
church's Saturday or Sunday
worship services.

APOSTOLIC
Apostolic Life Tabernacle
and Pastor Michael Braswell cor-
dially invite you to worship with
them. Sunday worship, 10 a.m.,
6 p.m. Located U.S. Highway
90 West one mile from city limit
sign. Turn left onto Shoffner Bou-
levard. then left on Pinewood to
3136 Pinewood Dr., Crestview. For
more information call the church
at 689-2422. Website: www.apos-
toliclifetabernacle.com; pastor's
e-mail address md.braswell@
yahoo.com.

APOSTOLIC/PENTECOSTAL
Pentecostals of Baker is lo-
cated at 1599 Hester Church Road
in Baker. Pastor Kenneth Bray.
Sunday services 2 p.m. Sunday
School, 3 p.m. worship. Call 398-
5000 for information. Website,
www.pentecostalsofbaker.org.

ASSEMBLIES
Campton Assembly of God
Church is located at 6924 State
Road 85 North in Laurel Hill.
The Sunday service is at 10:30
a.m. For more information call
the church at 652-4581 or Pastor
Ray Johnson at 652-1929.
Clear Springs Assembly
of God is located off Bill Lundy
Road in Baker (North State Road
85). Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m.,
and worship is at 10:45 a.m. Pas-
tor Cliff Larson, 682-2702.
First Assembly of God: 400
S. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, Office
hours Monday through Friday, 9-
4. Pastor Mark English.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. early morn-
ing worship, 10 a.m. Sunday
School; 11 a.m. morning worship;
and a 6 p.m. evening service. X-
cel Youth Ministry 3 p.m., X-ceed
Children's Ministry 4 p.m.
Special needs bus available for
11 a.m. service. Call the church at
682-3518 for pickup.
Golan Assembly of God:
6612 County Road 189 N., Baker.
Phone 537-3043. Pastored by Todd
Sowell. Sunday services: Sunday
School 9:45 a.m., morning wor-
ship at 11 a.m., and evening wor-
ship at 6 p.m.
Milligan Assembly of God:
5408 U.S. Highway 4, Baker.
Phone 537-4945. Senior Pastor
Mike White, Youth Pastor Jesse
Jernigan. Sunday services: Sun-
day School 9:30 a.m., worship
10:30 a.m., Kingdom Kids 10:30
a.m., evening service 6 p.m. www.
milliganassembly.org.
North Central Assembly of
God: at 158 N. Woodlawn Drive
in Crestview. Phone: 689-0209 or
537-7115. Minister A. Paul Hinton.
Sunday services Sunday School
at 10 a.m., morning worship at 11
a.m., evening worship at 6 p.m.
Shady Grove Assembly of
God: Sunday services begin at
9:45 a.m. with Sunday School,
followed by 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.
worship services. Shady Grove
is located at 1189 Shady Grove
Church Road in Baker, just off
Highway 189.
Welcome Assembly of God
located on County Road 393 in the
Dorcas community, invites you
to join them for Sunday services
including Sunday School at 9:45
a.m. and worship services at 10:45
a.m. and 6 p.m. Call 682-1683 for
directions.
Westside Assembly of God:
179 Kit Drive, Crestview. Sunday
services: Sunday School 9:45 a.m.,
worship 10:30 a.m., evening ser-
vice at 5 p.m.

BAPTIST
Beaver Creek BC services:
Beaver Creek Baptist Church, lo-
cated six miles west of Baker, has
Sunday School at 10 a.m., morning
worship at 11 a.m., and children's
church at 11:15 a.m.
Calvary Baptist Church:
612 E. Chestnut Ave., Crestview.
Pastor: Rev. Lewis Wilson Jr.
Sunday services 8:45 a.m. con-
tinental breakfast; 9:30 a.m. Sun-
day School; 10:45 a.m. morning
worship; 6 p.m. evening service.
Nursery provided for children 5
and under.
Central Baptist Church:
Located at 951 S. Ferdon Blvd.,
Crestview. Sunday services in-
clude 9:15 a.m. Bible study; 10:30
a.m. worship and praise service;


5:30 p.m. worship and praise,
AWANA for Kids. For additional
information call 682-5525 or visit
the Website at www.centralcrest-
view.com.
Emmanuel Baptist Church,
3252 East James Lee Blvd., Crest-
view. Phone: 682-9416. E-mail ad-
dress: ebc@ebccrestview.com. In-
terim Teaching Pastor Ian Ander-
son. Celebration services: Sunday


at 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. Discovery
Park for nursery, Preschool/The
Zone (children's church) K-5th
graders during all celebrations.
Evening celebrations, Sunday
5-7 p.m.: Life groups for adults.
On Campus Sunday Night for
preschoolers, G-Force for K-5th
Graders. Riel 247- Worship Ser-
vice/Small Groups (Youth).
Evelenar Baptist Church:
2820 Carver Ave., Crestview. Pas-
tor Benjamin T. Randolph. Sun-
day School 9:30 a.m., worship 11
a.m. Every first Sunday at 3 p.m.
is the Hour of Power. Phone: 682-
2218.
First Baptist Church ofCrest-
view: 798 N. Pearl St. (across U.S.
Highway 90 from courthouse, be-
hind Burger King. Pastor Alan
Kilgore. Phone 682-2544.
Sunday services 8:45 Wel-
come Center opens/9 a.m. Sunday
School/10:30 a.m. morning wor-
ship, children's worship/ 4 p.m.
Student Leadership; Youth Choir
/ 5 p.m. Youth discipleship; Youth
Ensemble; ladies, men, children
and preschool bible studies; book
club/ 6 p.m. evening worship.
First Baptist Church of Bak-
er: Located at 1347 14th St., Baker
(across from the Baker School
football field). Rev. Cliff Morgan.
Bible Study at 9 a.m. and worship
at 10:30 a.m. For more informa-
tion call the church office at 537-
2993.
First Baptist Church of Holt:
532 U.S. Highway 90 W, PO. Box
38, Holt. Phone 537-6170. Pastor
Fred H. Sanford.
Sunday services: 9 a.m. Sun-
day School, 10:15 a.m. and 6 p.m.
worship services.
First Baptist Church of Mil-
ligan: 5238 Old River Rd., Milli-
gan. 682-6277 or 682-8559. Pastor
Ted Jernigan. Sunday School,
9:45 a.m., worship, 11 a.m.; dis-
cipleship training 5 p.m.; evening
worship, 6 p.m.
Goodhope Baptist Church,
1895 Owen Cotton Road off U.S.
Highway 189, Baker, in the Es-
cambia Farms community. Pas-
tor Jim Skates. Phone: 537-8720
or 537-8740.
Services: Men's prayer 9:30
a.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m.,
worship 11 a.m.. Evening ser-
vices: Discipleship training 5 p.m.
worship 6 p.m.
Live Oak Baptist Church,
located at 4565 Live Oak Church
Road in Crestview (near Shoal
River Country Club).
Sunday services Sunday
School at 9:45 a.m., morning wor-
ship at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Evening
worship.
Phone: 682-5160. Associate
Pastor Dennis Walker.
Living Faith Baptist Church:
837 West James Lee Blvd., Crest-
view. Pastor Chaplain David Pet-
tis. Sunday services Sunday
School 10 a.m. and worship at 11
a.m. Discipleship training 6 p.m.,
and evening worship 7 p.m. chil-
dren's church Sunday morning.
Phone 682-4371.
Magnolia Baptist Church:
Located at 3198 Highway 602,
Laurel Hill. Pastor Danny Star-
ling.
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.,
Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.
with children's church for 3-5 and
nursery for under 3. Evening
Worship 6 p.m. For further infor-
mation, call 652-2300.
New Beginnings Church:
The church is at 412 West James
Lee Blvd. in Crestview. The Sun-
day service begins at 10:30 a.m.
AWANA for children ages 2-12
is on Sunday nights from 5 to 7
p.m. at 421 W James Lee Blvd. in
Crestview.
New Life Missionary Baptist
Church: Pastor Sanford Hayes.
285 Duggan Ave., Crestview. Sun-
day School 9:30 a.m. Morning
worship 11 a.m. on Sunday.
Palm Chapel Primitive Bap-
tist Church: 201 Cadle Dr., Crest-
view. Elder Michael Green, Jr,
Pastor. Sunday 10:30 a.m. Call
689-3383 for more information.
Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church:
Pastor, Dr. Jerry Haley. 5595 State
Road 4 South, Baker. Phone 537-
9221. FAX 537-6798. Church web-
site www.pilgrimrestbaptist.org.
Sunday services including
morning worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m.; bible study at 9:45 a.m.;
adult study, youth ministry, Dis-
ciple Kids and children's choir at
5:30 p.m. and evening worship at
6:30 p.m.
Pyron Chapel Baptist
Church: 6498 Wm. Gary Johnson
Road, Baker. Pastor Victor Bet-
tenhausen, 398-0355.


Sunday services: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.;
choir practices, 4:30 p.m.; Bible
study and prayer, 5:30 p.m.
Valley Road Baptist Church:
1018 Valley Road, Crestview.
Phone 682-4513. Rev Philip Mark.
Times for Sunday Services: Bible
Study 9:45 a.m., morning worship


Religious Services

11 a.m., discipleship training 5
p.m., and evening worship 6 p.m.
Woodlawn Baptist Church:
located at 824 N. Ferdon Blvd.,
Crestview, Pastor Patrick Pfrim-
mer.
Sunday Bible study meets at
9 a.m. with morning worship at 8
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. A service for
the hearing impaired is also of-
fered on Sunday morning. Sun-
day evening service is at 6 p.m.
and the Youth Choir meets at 5
p.m. Call the church at 682-2924
for information.

CATHOLIC
Our Lady of Victory Catholic
Church, 550 Adams Drive, Crest-
view. Phone 682-4622. Pastor Fr.
John Cayer. Parochial Vicar--Fr.
Florencio Lagura.
Sunday Masses at 8:30 and
10:30 a.m. Monday through Fri-
day, Mass at 8 a.m. Saturday Vigil
Mass at 5 p.m.
Spanish Mass (2nd and last
Saturday of the month) at 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
Live Oak Church of Christ:
Sunday morning worship 10 a.m.
followed by Bible study at 11 a.m.
The church is located at 1049 S.
Wilson St. Call 682-2697 for more
information.
McDonald Street Church of
Christ: at 744 S. McDonald St.
in Crestview, with Minister Bro.
Henry Herbert and Youth Minis-
ter, Bro. Daniel Jackson. 10 a.m.
Bible class on Sunday, followed
by 11:15 a.m. worship. Evening
worship at 6 p.m. on Sundays. For
more information, call 682-6230.
Church of Christ Airport
Road: Sunday Bible study at 9
a.m., worship services at 10 a.m.,
Sunday worship at 6 p.m., with
Minister Mark Dillman.
Crestview Church of God,
Pastor Larry Collins. Sunday
school 10 11 a.m.; morning wor-
ship 11 a.m. 12 p.m.; and 6-9 p.m.
evening service on Sundays. Call
682-3045 for more information.
Church of New Covenant,
Pastors Charles, Sr., and Maxine
Whisnand invite you to attend
their services, located at 3191
North Newman Ave. in Crest-
view.
Sunday services include Adult
Bible Study and children's church
at 10 a.m., followed by Praise
Hour at 11 a.m. Call 682-8433 for
more information.
Church of the Resurrection:
66 8th St., Shalimar Fla. The Rev
Canon Michael G. Carr. Sun-
day services at 10 a.m., morning
prayer on first, third, and fifth;
and holy communion on second
and fourth Sundays.

EPISCOPAL
Church of the Epiphany:
Located at 424 Garden St., Crest-
view behind the Teachers Credit
Union.
Children's church 10 a.m. Holy
Eucharist 7:30 and 10 a.m. Nurs-
ery is available. A potluck brunch
is held on the first Sunday of the
month following the service.
Vicar is the Rev. De Freeman.
Office hours are Monday Friday,
9 a.m. 4 p.m. Call 689-1410 for
more information. All are wel-
come.

INDEPENDENT
Northwest Florida Church of
God: Meets at 158 Woodlawn Ave.
in Crestview on Saturdays at 11
a.m. Pastor Carl Dillenback. The
church has a radio presentation
called "Born to Win" at 12:30 p.m.
everyday at WTJT, 90.1 FM.

LATTER DAY SAINTS
The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints is located at
3 Del Cerro Camino in Crestview.
Sunday worship services are at
9 and 11 a.m., Phone: 682-6624 or
682-4766.

LUTHERAN
Our Savior Evangelical Lu-
theran Church LCMS: 178 W
North Ave. in Crestview. Rev.
Vance G. Tech. Sunday services
include Sunday School for all ages
at 9 a.m., and a historic worship
service with Holy Communion
every Sunday at 10 a.m. and Sat-
urday at 5 p.m. Call 682-3154 for
more information.
First Lutheran Church of
Florala: at 24512 5th Ave. (U.S.
Highway 331) in Florala, pastored
by Rev Jack Betz. 9:30 a.m. wor-
ship, fellowship 10:30 a.m., and
Sunday School 11 a.m.


Phone 334-858-3515. On U.S.
331 near the Florida line in Flora-
la, Ala. Call 334-858-3515 for more
specific directions.

METHODIST
Baker First United Method-
ist Church: located at 5826 N.
Highway 189, just north of the traf-
fic light in Baker. The Rev Johna-
than J. McDaniel, contemporary


service 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10
a.m.; traditional service 11 a.m.
Combined service last Sunday of
every month 10:30 a.m.
Christian Home United
Methodist Church: Approxi-
mately 5 miles N.E. of Laurel Hill
on Alabama County Road 6, Par-
rish Road, Ala. Phone: 652-4766.
Sunday services: Second and
fourth Sundays at 8:45 a.m. Sun-
day School at 9 a.m. Rev. Edward
Britton.
First United Methodist:
599 Eighth Ave., Crestview, Rev.
Bruce Sheffield is Senior Pastor,
Associate Pastor Brandon Das-
inger and Dr. R. Lee Thigpen, Lay
Leader (FUMC).
Traditional services at 8 a.m.
in the Christ Chapel, and at 11
a.m. in the Main Sanctuary. Con-
temporary service in the Sanctu-
ary at 9:12 a.m. Sunday school at
8, 9:30 and 11 a.m.
For information, call 682-2018,
during normal business hours.
First United Methodist
Church of Florala: 1319 Fifth
St., Florala, Ala. Phone: (334) 222-
3286. Sunday Services 11 a.m. and
5 p.m. Rev. Sam Persons Parkes.
Hopewell United Method-
ist Church: 987 Gomillion Road,
Ala., five miles west of Laurel Hill
on New Ebenezer Road. 652-4474.
Sunday services, First and third
Sunday at 9 a.m., with Sunday
School at 10 a.m. Rev. Edward
Britton.
Mount Zion African Method-
ist Episcopal (AME) Church,
502 McDonald St., in Crestview.
Rev. Matthew Ewing. Sunday
services: church school 9:30 a.m.,
praise service 10:45 a.m., and
worship service 11 a.m. For infor-
mation, call 682-7799.
New Bethel United Method-
ist Church, 5984 Highway 85N,
Crestview and Reverend Ed Cot-
ten invite you to worship with
them. Sunday services, 11 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Bible study Wednes-
day, 7 p.m. 682-9671.
St. Mark United Methodist
Church, 2250 PJ. Adams Pkwy
in Crestview, offers the following
Sunday services: 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School and traditional worship,
11 a.m. contemporary worship,
kids worship and Sunday School.
A nursery is available for all ser-
vices. Clergyman is the Rev. Lisa
Ausley, the Rev. Brice Early and
the Rev Greg McKinnon. Call
682-5280 for more information.

NAZARENE
Crestview Church of the Naz-
arene: 395 Aplin Road, Crestview.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m., morning
worship 10:45 a.m., and evening
service at 6 p.m. 682-7995. All are
welcome.

NONDENOMINATIONAL
Fellowship Church of Praise
KTC: Pastor Darlene Haynes.
Sunday services begin at 11 a.m.
at Country Inn & Suites, Rasber-
ry Road, Crestview.
Sonlight Covenant Church:
Manifesting the Spirit of Son-
ship. Pastor and Founder Alvin
E. Smith invites all interested to
attend Sunday services at 11 a.m.
Sunday school starts at 9:45 a.m.
The church is located at 798 S.
Main St., Suite A, Crestview. Call
689-3129 for more information.
Good Hope Congregational
Church: Come and join the con-
gregation for old-fashion, South-
ern gospel music and service.
Sunday school starts at 9:45 a.m.
followed by service at 10:45 a.m.
The church is located seven
miles west of Baker. Call Pastor
Joel Carden at 537-4307 for more
information.
Mount Olive Community
Church: Pastor D.L. Lyons invites
all interested to Sunday Services
at 10 a.m., Tuesday Ladies' meet-
ing at 7 p.m. with Marie C. Lyons.
The church is located at 5661 Mt.
Olive Road in Crestview. Direc-
tions approximately 7 miles east
on Highway 90, turn left on Mt. Ol-
ive Road, 2 miles. Call 682-6218 for
more information.
Joy Fellowship: 5978 Old
Bethel Road, Crestview; 682-6219.
www.joyfellowship.net. Pastor
Dale and Brenda Walters. Sunday
Services: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School,
10:30 a.m. worship service.

PENTECOSTAL
Auburn Pentecostal Church:
Independent Pentecostal church
at 6144 Highway 85 North, Crest-
view. Pastor: Rev. Ron Williamson.
Sunday Services: Sunday School
9:30 a.m., morning worship and
children's church 10:30 a.m., eve-


ning and youth services at 6 p.m.
Nursery available for all services.
Phone: 6826357; fax 689-4402.
Calvary United: 1010 Bay St.,
Crestview. Sunday 10 a.m. wor-
ship service with Sunday School.
The Rev. Charles Braneff Jr., 682-
6191. Church phone: 423-1198.
First Pentecostal Church of


Crestview News Bulletin I A9

Jesus Christ: Sunday services
for First Pentecostal are at 10
a.m. and 6 p.m. Pastor Wilbur
Hawkins. Located at 997 East
Chestnut Ave. in Crestview. Call
682-3497 for more information.

PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian Church:
492 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview,
pastored by Rev. Mark Broad-
head. Sunday School, 10 a.m.;
worship 11 a.m. For more infor-
mation, call 682-2835.
Laurel Hill Presbyterian
Church: 8115 4th St. 652-2164.
Rev. Mark Broadhead, Minister.
Sunday worship service, 9 a.m.,
Sunday School, 10 a.m.
1st Presbyterian Church-
PCA, 23500 5th Ave., Florala, Ala.
Services Sundays at 11 a.m. Rev.
David McMillan, 334-858-3865.

UNITARIAN
Unitarian Universalist Fel-
lowship of the Emerald Coast
(UUFEC): located at 1295 Bay-
shore Drive, Valparaiso. Minister:
Rev. Rodney Debs. Service is held
at 10:30 a.m. each Sunday. For fur-
ther updates, check www.uufec.
com, the Verbal Chalice, Wick, or
please call the Fellowship at 678-
7197, or 243-5247.
Unity Way of Life Unity
Center: Pastor Rev. George A.
Schmidt, Ph.D., the Way of Life
Unity Center is located at 1797
Hurlburt Road in Fort Walton
Beach.
Sunday services: 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Celebration Services.
Youth Education programs along
with childcare are only provided
at the 11 a.m. service. All are wel-
come.
For information, call the office
at 864-1232 (hours by appoint-
ment).

OTHER
Eglin Air Force Base Chapel:
Protestant Sunday Worship Ser-
vices Sunday: 9 a.m. Tradi-
tional, West Gate Chapel; 9:30 a.m.
- Gospel, Chapel Center; 10 a.m.
- Contemporary, Building 605.
All military and their families
are invited to attend the chapel's
many diverse services. Call 882-
2111 for times and locations.
Eglin Air Force Base Chapel:
Catholic Weekend Mass Sched-
ule Sunday 7:45 a.m., Chapel
Center, 11:15 a.m., West Gate Cha-
pel. Confession: Saturday 4 p.m.,
West Gate Chapel.
All military and their families
are invited to attend the chapel's
many diverse services. Call 882-
2111 for times and locations.
Eglin Air Force Base Chapel:
Jewish Worship: Friday: 7 p.m. -
Sabbath Worship, Chapel Center.
All military and their families
are invited to attend the chapel's
many diverse services. Call 882-
2111 for times and locations.
Eglin Air Force Base Chapel:
Islamic Services: Please call the
chapel at 882-2111 for more infor-
mation.
Eglin Air Force Base Cha-
pel: Orthodox Christian Ser-
vices: Please call Saint Markella
and Demetrios Greek Orthodox
Church at 244-0822 for days and
times of services.
Christian Life Center: Pastor
Jason Palmer. Prayer is held Sun-
day at 2 p.m., with Sunday ser-
vices and Sunday School at 2:30.
Christian Life Center is located at
410 Wingard St.; call 305-0198 for
more information.
Healing Stream Ministries:
Pastor Jonathan Griffin. Satur-
day services are being held. The
ministry is located at the corner
of E. Robinson and Church Street
in Crestview. Call Pastor Griffin
at 682-5455 for more information.
The Chapel, an independent
worshipping community, has
services every Sunday morning
at 7:30 a.m. with Chaplain Hay-
ward Chapman, and at 9 a.m. with
Chaplain Chuck Chapman. Ser-
vices are held at 1093 S. Ferdon
Blvd. in Crestview. Phone: 682-
9887 or 423-0526.
The Awakening Ministries,
Inc., a not-for-profit Christian
music ministry, meets every Sat-
urday from 2-7 p.m. under the
pavilion, Kit Drive, Crestview. For
more information call 689-1259 or
send an e-mail to awakeningmin-
istries@praize.com.
Iglesia Hispana Bet-el Pen-
tecostal: 110 Main St., Crestview.
Te invita: A nuestros servicios.
Domingos 4 p.m. Martes: Oracion
y ensefanza 7 p.m. Viernes: Al-


banza y Predicacion. 7 p.m. Pas-
tores: Jose y Claudia Nufez. Lla-
manos 682-1247 or 398-3817. Dios
te bendiga.
New Hope Ministries of
Laurel Hill, 3828 New Ebenezer
Road, Laurel Hill. Minister: Rev.
Willie Earl Williams Jr. Phone:
652-2588. Sunday Services: Sun-
day School 10 a.m., morning wor-
ship 11 a.m.


*I


'V






Al 0 I Crestview News Bulletin


State/Region


Saturday, September 25, 2010


Golf ball man thrives on gaffes

a- f.. a%


Copyrighted Material


-- Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


S-- ^^^^^^^^1^^^-^^^^


. mome. womp-m


News BRIEFS


The Associated Press

Website aids jobless
construction workers
TALLAHASSEE (AP) The
Florida Home Builders
Association has launched
a website to provide
job leads and training
information to almost
332,000 unemployed
construction workers.
The trade organization
Tuesday announced it
had joined with Florida
State University to use
a grant from the state's
Workforce Florida
employment program to
create the website: http://
reconstructfl.com/.
It's a virtual one-stop
shopping website that
includes job information
from various state,
federal and local stimulus
programs.

Obama fundraiser
named to commission
TALLAHASSEE (AP) Gov.
Charlie Crist, a former
Republican running as an
independent for the U.S.
Senate, has named a key
supporter of Democratic
President Barack Obama
to a key legal position.
Crist on Tuesday
selected prominent
Tallahassee attorney Don
Hinkle to serve a four-
year term on the judicial
nominating commission
for the state's 2nd Circuit.
Hinkle replaces Ken
Sukhia on the board
which recommends
nominees for openings on
the bench.
Hinkle was an
early supporter and
major fundraiser for
Obama's successful 2008
presidential run.

2 die in Hernando Co.
mobile home fire
SPRING HILL (AP) -
Authorities have identified


the two fatal victims of
a mobile home fire in
Hernando County.
The victims were
identified as 66-year-old
Trudy Mauck Kemper
and 34-year-old Tamerla
Kay Kemper. The sheriff's
office released the names
Wednesday.
A preliminary
investigation shows the
fire appeared to be an
accidental electrical fire
that may have started in
the wall.

Man charged with
guitar attack
ST. PETERSBURG (AP) -
A St. Petersburg man
reportedly smashed
an electric guitar over
another man's head during
an argument.
Police said 47-year-old
Julius A. Casterberry was
arguing with another man
early Saturday morning
when he grabbed the
instrument and hit the
other man over the head
several times.
The victim was taken
to a nearby hospital,
where he was treated and
released.
Casterberry was
charged with aggravated
battery. He was being held
on $10,000 bail.

Lionfish found off
Pensacola Beach
PENSACOLA BEACH (AP) -
A lionfish captured on a
reef off Pensacola Beach is
igniting fears of a possible
threat to swimmers and lo-
cal fishermen.
A 6-inch lionfish
was captured Sept. 9 off
the coast of Northwest
Florida. Another one was
found in the eastern Gulf
of Mexico, and there have
been other undocumented
sightings.
Wildlife officials
fear the beautiful yet
venomous fish could be


rapidly spreading and its
population could explode.

Dad who stormed bus
to speak at conference
SANFORD (AP)- A
Florida father who
stormed onto a school bus
and threatened children
because his 13-year-old
disabled daughter had
been bullied is planning to
speak at a national school
bus conference.
The National
Association for Pupil
Transportation announced
Thursday that James
Willie Jones will
participate in a panel
discussion of the school
bus industry at its annual
conference in Portland,
Oregon. The conference
begins Oct. 30.
Jones was charged
last week with disorderly
conduct and disturbing
a school function for the
Sept. 3 incident in Sanford,
Fla., just north of Orlando.
He later posted $2,000 bail
and was ordered to stay
away from the driver and
county school buses.

Crist, Cabinet commute
burglar's life sentence
TALLAHASSEE (AP) -
A Florida man who has
served almost 25 years of a
life sentence for breaking
into a restaurant is being
freed.
Gov Charlie Crist
and the Florida Cabinet
on Thursday agreed to
commute Clyde Bunkley's
sentence.
Bunkley received the
harsh sentence because
he was carrying a
pocketknife, and Florida
law permits a life term for
burglary committed with
a "dangerous weapon."
It was handed down even
though the restaurant was
unoccupied and Bunkley
never used the knife.
Attorney General Bill


McCollum and Agriculture
Commissioner Charles
Bronson argued that
25 years was more than
enough for a nonviolent
crime.

Panhandle man
charged in child's death
PENSACOLA (AP)- A
Florida Panhandle man
charged with the fatal
stabbing of a pregnant
mother has now been
charged with the child's
death
Phillip Arnold was
indicted in July on a first-
degree murder charge. On
Wednesday, he was also
indicted on an additional
first-degree murder count
for the child's death.
The 65-year-old's
neighbor was six months
pregnant when she
was attacked. Doctors
performed a cesarean
section, but the infant died
seven hours later. The
woman had seven other
children.

SUV crashes
into school bus
TAMPA (AP)- A
sport utility vehicle
reportedly crashed into
a Hillsborough County
school bus, but no injuries
were reported.
The sheriff's office
reports that the collision
occurred Wednesday
afternoon. The bus was
headed toward the Citrus
Park and Odessa areas,
carrying students from
several magnet schools.

Scuffle with police,
man under review
ORLANDO (AP) -The
scuffle between an
Orlando police officer and
an elderly man is under
review.
Authorities said Officer
Travis Lamont used
an approved takedown


technique on 84-year-old
Daniel Daley. Still, the
department is looking into
whether the method was
appropriate considering
the man's age.
Authorities said Daley
was drunk when he got
into an argument with
a tow-truck driver at a
convenience store last
Saturday. When police
arrived, Daley allegedly
grabbed Lamont in an
attempt to punch him. The
officer had to force Daley
to the ground.
Daley suffered a broken
neck. He's in a medically
induced coma to prevent
further injury, but he is not
paralyzed.
If Lamont's superiors
find that his actions were
inappropriate, the case
will be investigated by the
department's Internal
Affairs division.

FHA lifts cancer-
clustering warning
THE ACREAGE (AP) -
The Federal Housing
Administration has lifted
a warning it imposed for
appraisals in a Palm Beach
County town stricken by
a cluster of childhood
cancer.
The warning advised
appraisers that The
Acreage might harm home
values in the community.
The county is investigating
whether buyers were
discriminated against
when they were denied
loans.
The alert was removed
on Sept. 15. Health officials
told the families in the
town that interviews
conducted for their
investigation don't show
a cause for the area's
elevated rates of childhood
brain cancer.

Hammerhead shark
becomes research tool
BONITA BEACH (AP) -A


dead hammerhead shark
that washed ashore on
Bonita Beach is being
used as a research tool
at Florida Gulf Coast
University.
Researchers say it's
rare to be able to study
dead sharks since most
dead marine animals get
eaten by other creatures.
Because there were
no signs of decay, this
shark presented a rare
opportunity.

Corrections officer
arrested on charges
LEESBURG (AP)- A
state corrections officer
in central Florida
has been arrested on
charges of attempting to
purchase cocaine from
an undercover narcotics
detective.
An arrest report
shows 44-year-old Freddie
Baker attempted to buy
cocaine Tuesday night
from an undercover
detective at a Leesburg
gas station. He was
arrested and charged early
Wednesday with cocaine
possession and solicitation
of another to purchase
cocaine.

Lisa weakens to
tropical depression
MIAMI (AP) On
Thursday, Lisa was
drifting slowly far out over
the Atlantic Ocean after
weakening to a tropical
depression.
The depression had
maximum sustained winds
Thursday near 35 mph,
with some strengthening
forecast during the next
two days.
Lisa was located about
340 miles west-northwest
of the Cape Verde Islands
and was moving north
near 2 mph. Heavy rainfall
was possible over the
northwestern Cape Verde
Islands.


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A1 2 I Crestview News Bulletin


Local


Saturday, September 25, 2010


m ,-- '


Making This Right

Beaches


Claims
Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental
Restoration
Health and Safety
W wildlife


I was born in New Orleans. My family still lives here. We have
to restore the Gulf communities for the shrimpers, fishermen,
hotel and restaurant owners who live and work here.
Iris Cross, BP Community Outreach


No oil has flowed into the Gulf for weeks. But we know this is just the
beginning of our work. BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup
in the Gulf and that includes keeping you informed.

Restoring Gulf Communities
We can't undo this tragedy. But we can help people get back on their feet.
We have been working with impacted communities since day one.

Partnering with local governments and community organizations, my job is
to listen to people's needs and frustrations and find ways to help. We have
19 community centers and teams in four states, listening and helping.

Restoring The Economy
BP is here in Gulf communities with shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and
restaurant owners, helping to make them whole.

More than 120,000 claim payments totaling over $375 million have
already gone to people affected by the spill. We have committed a
$20 billion independent fund to pay all legitimate claims, including lost
incomes until people impacted can go back to work. And none of this
will be paid by taxpayers.

BP has also given grants of $87 million to the states to help tourism
recover and bring people back to the Gulf beaches.

Restoring The Environment
We're going to keep looking for oil and cleaning it up if we find it. Teams
will remain in place for as long as it takes to restore the Gulf Coast.

And we've dedicated $500 million to work with local and national scientific
experts on the impact of the spill and to restore environmental damage.

Thousands of BP employees have their roots in the Gulf. We support
over 10,000 jobs in the region and people here are our neighbors. We
know we haven't always been perfect, but we will be here until the oil
is gone and the people and businesses are back to normal. We will do
everything we can to make this right.


For general information visit: bp.com
For help or information: (866) 448-5816

restorethegulf.gov
Facebook: BP America
Twitter: @BP America
YouTube: BP

For claims information visit: bp.com/claims
floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BP, E&P


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INSIDE

More local news


SPORTS


B
Section


Saturday, September 25, 2010 w ww.crestvie wbulletin.com Page 1


News

& NOTES

SCHEDULE
Monday
High school volleyball
Freeport at Crestview,
JV 5 p.m./V 6 p.m.

High school boys golf
Crestview at FCA
tournament

Middle school volleyball
Meigs at Baker,
3:30 p.m.
Davidson at Lewis,
3:30 p.m.
St. Mary's at Shoal
River, 3:30 p.m.

Tuesday
High school volleyball
Baker at Laurel Hill,
JV 5 p.m./V 6 p.m.
Crestview at Mosley,
JV 5 p.m./V 6 p.m.

High school girls golf
Crestview at FCA
tournament

BRIEFS
Punt, Pass and Kick
The Crestview Family
YMCA will host an NFL
Punt, Pass and Kick
Competition on Sunday,
Sept. 26, at 2 p.m. at
Crestview High School's
Jack Foster Stadium.
The event is free for
boys and girls ages 6-15.
Winners will advance to
the sectional competition,
set for Oct. 17 at Fort
Walton Beach High
School.
Participants are
reminded that no cleats
will be allowed.
For more information,
call Troy Donofro at the
Crestview YMCA at 689-
2999.

Traveling Eagles
Registration and
information for the
NAYB Traveling Eagles
spring 2011 season
is now open at www.
travelingeagles.com
Registration is for
players ages 8-14
(birthday as of April 30,
2011). There are a
number of exciting
proposed tournament
locations for each age
group being discussed.
Feel free to contact Mike
Wells at 428-0005.

Reporting scores
Attention high school
and middle school
coaches and parents,
if you have any game
results and photos you
would like to get in the
News Bulletin, please
e-mail the information
to sports editor Randy
Dickson at randyd@
crestviewbulletin.com.
Please note the
deadline for Saturday's
paper is 9 a.m. Thursday,
and the deadline for
Wednesday's paper is
9 a.m. Monday.
Thank you for your
help.

Calendar deadlines
If you have an
announcement for our
sports calendar or would
like to submit a story,
please note the following
deadlines.
The deadline for the
Wednesday issue is
9 a.m. Monday. Our
deadline for Saturday is
9 a.m. Thursday.
In the event of limited
space, calendar items
are prioritized by the
closest dates. Other
submitted material is
published as we have
available space.


GUEST C



In a daugl

Some say that the measure of a man is
not how high he jumps, but how straight he
walks when he lands. Well
I think that the measure
of coach is not how many
wins he accumulates in his
career, but how he impacts
a kid's life when the game
clock runs out.
Each week, I sit at a high
KACY school game and hear for the
KELLOGG entire four quarters men and
Guest Columnist women talk about how sorry
the head coach is and how
they can do better, that he should have run
this play, that he is stupid and doesn't have a


COLUMN



iter's eyes

clue about the game of football, that he is a
terrible coach and needs to be replaced.
I sit there and wonder what these
people do for a living. I wonder if some are
attorneys or accountants. Do they sell real
estate or have their own business, or are
they mechanics or salesmen?
And then I wonder how they would feel
if they had spent 35 years investing their
lives into becoming the very best they could
at what they do only to have someone cut
them down so badly.
What if they had a random person watch
them each week and the whole time they
See KELLOGG B2


r


RANDY DICKSONIN is M r.



Mainor is Mr. Versati


Randy Dkkson
hInli\,I. I I t4 it lnlih tll.1 1,,lll
BAKER Christian lMainor
is the personification ot a
small-school football player.
Throughout his career.
the -tohot-2. 195-pound Bak-
er senior has pIla.ed almost
eerTy position on the field


lainor 1has played qua'r-
terback. tilht end. \\lmde
receI\er and r'unntin1 back
on the Gator ottenrse He's
been just as versatile and
valuable on defense, lining
up at defensive end. line-
backer and detenisile back
See MAINOR B2


Knights overpower Hoboes


Randy Dickson
randyd@crestviewbulletin.com
LAUREL HILL The Rocky
Bayou Christian volleyball
team put on a power display
Tuesday night as the Knights
downed Laurel Hill in straight
sets in District 1-1A play.
Set scores were 25-15, 25-
14,25-13.
The Knight trio of Hannah
Peters, Kat Rogers and Ra-
chel Mosley dominated play at
the net as each recorded five
kills.
The other areas of their
games weren't too bad, either.
Mosley recorded seven
aces and six digs to go along
with her kills. Rogers had four
aces, 10 digs and two blocks.
And Peters added three aces


GAME STATS
Rocky Bayou Christian 3,
Laurel Hill 0
Scores: 25-15, 25-14, 25-13.
Top performers:
Rocky Bayou (12-3, 1-0): Hannah Peters
3 aces, 12 digs, 5 kills; Kat Rogers 4 aces,
10 digs, 2 blocks, 5 kills; Katie Kaim
9 aces, 15 assists; Rachel Mosley 7 aces,
6 digs, 5 kills.
Laurel Hill (1-5, 0-3): Brittany Baggett
1 kill, 3 digs; Maegan Goodwin 2 digs.
and 12 digs.
Midway through the first
set, the Knights (12-3, 1-0) took
control of the match.
"Overall I think we settled
in and played our match,"
See HOBOES B2


ABOVE: BEcker s
iC t-,rlshc I
Chrisin
M r.: r.:::.r h-cIls
C r-, r I.:::.,,c h- .:::.. .-,
pass during a
seven-on-seven

Gulf Bra.rz.s
in JI reez
J ly


C








.


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN
Kacy Kellogg is pictured her with her father, Bob
Kellogg, head coach for the Baker football team.


Gators



hold off



Bulldogs

Adam Rosenberg
Florida Freedom Newspapers
FREEPORT As is the
norm when Baker and
Freeport meet on the vol-
leyball court, Tuesday's
match couldn't have been
much closer.
Besides Baker's rela-
tively easy win in the first
game, neither team looked
dominant. Four grueling
games later, the Gators
held on for a 25-19, 18-25,
23-25, 25-18 and 15-10 vic-
tory over the Bulldogs.
Mollie Royal led the Ga-
tors with 16 kills, and Jenni-
fer Ellis chipped in with 12,
while Katie Wickery added
21 assists. Although Baker
coach Tomikko Parks was
happy to get a District 1-2A
win, she wasn't as pleased
with the overall play of her
team.
"We're not playing our
best volleyball right now,"
Parks said. "We're just kind
of taking ourselves through
the motions and getting
the ball over the net. We're
trying to build until district
and playoff time, and right
now we're not doing that."
After pulling ahead
early and holding off a mild
threat late in Game 1, the
Gators (4-2, 4-0 in district)
struggled in the second
game. They committed
several mental mistakes,
much to the ire of Parks.
The Bulldogs used a string
of five straight points to
build an early lead and hold
on to even the match at a
game apiece.
Freeport (1-4, 1-2) came
back to win Game 3 25-23
after trailing 20-18 late. De-
spite playing with two in-
jured players, Briana Ross
and Ashleigh Gray, the
Bulldogs never let Baker
keep the upper hand.
"They played their
hearts out," Freeport coach
Stacey Morrison said. "We
had two injured players,
and we still went toe-to-
toe with them. I couldn't be
prouder."
In the fourth game, it
was shaky serving that
seemed to do Freeport in.
The Bulldogs committed
service errors on four con-
secutive serves, allowing
the Gators to pull ahead
15-7 without having to do
much work themselves.
"In the games we lost,
serves killed us," Morrison
said.
Once the match was
forced to a decisive fifth
game, Baker began to as-
sert itself offensively. The
Gators pulled ahead 4-0
thanks to key kills by Royal
and Laurie Steele, who fin-
ished with five blocks.
See GATORS B2


At


Laurel Hill's Kasey Harrison makes a play on
the ball out of the net in Tuesday's match with
Rocky Bayou Christian.


*


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.... ".. "
b-
.a e^ W *


NE






B2 I Crestview News Bulletin


PHOTOS BY RANDY DICKSON I News Bulletin
ABOVE: Gracie Simmons serves for Laurel Hill
against Rocky Bayou Christian. RIGHT: Lauren
Gordon hits a bump pass against Rocky Bayou
Christian on Tuesday.


HOBOES from page B1


Knight coach Lisa Eaves said.
"They just love the game, and
that makes it fun to watch them
play.
"The big thing was starting
off district with a win, and now
we've got five more to go."
A Mosley kill broke a 10-10
deadlock and opened the flood-
gates for a 15-5 run to close out
the set.
Katie Kaim controlled the
serve for the Knights during
an 8-0 stretch that put Rocky in
front 22-11.
What little offense the Ho-
boes (1-5, 0-3) mustered came
off unforced Knight errors or
errant serves as Laurel Hill
struggled to get on track.
The second set was more of
the same.
The Hoboes kept things
close early only to succumb to
the taller, more athletic Knight
players at the net.
Laurel Hill wouldn't go away
easily, though, as the Hoboes
tried to rally to defend their
home court in the third set.
With Maegan Goodwin serv-


ing, the Hoboes scored three
unanswered points and were
up 5-2 early in the set.
Laurel Hill maintained the
slim lead for a few more points
before Rocky Bayou kicked in
the power again.
The Knights led 12-10 when
Rogers took over at serve and
rallied her team for seven
straight points to give Rocky a
17-10 lead.
A few minutes later, Mos-
ley closed out the win for the
Knights.
Laurel Hill coach Fresca
Paul was disappointed that her
team didn't play as well as she
thinks they can.
"Honestly, I think if we
would have played like a team
and played 100 percent the
whole time, we could have beat
them," Paul said. "They had re-
ally good hitters, and we know
that's our weakest point this
year.
"If they would go out there
and talk, and play like a team,
so far I think they could beat
everybody we've played."


KELLOGG from page B1


work tell their family and
friends how terrible they
were? These coaches
don't just walk out on the
field on Friday night and
throw things together; they
spend countless hours
preparing for each game
and practice.
They are experts at
what they do, whether you
like the play or not. They
create strategic game
plans, but when that clock
starts, it is up to these
teenage boys to execute
that plan correctly.
For 26 years now, I
have sat in the stands to
cheer on my hero. My hero
doesn't make millions or
ask to be in the limelight.
He doesn't get to drive
the fancy car or take the
extravagant vacations.
My hero has spent his
life investing in the lives
of young men as a football
coach. He wakes before
the sun is up each day to
be at school early and get
in some extra hours in
the office, and he returns
home in the late hours of
the evening with his arms
full of articles, films and
playbooks to look over so
he can best prepare his
players.
He spends his entire
summer vacation working
with kids, all day on
Saturday, studying film,
washing uniforms, etc.,
and then Sunday afternoon
meeting with the coaching
staff to improve their
performance.
My hero doesn't just
care about the wins on
Friday nights; he cares
about the wins in life.
You see, he believes that
football is an incredible


sport because it teaches
kids many life lessons.
Sure, he would love to
win every game and have
tons of players be the stars
at universities, but more
so, he wants to develop
in these young men good
character. He teaches
them self-discipline,
respect, how to play fair
and how to lose graciously.
He teaches them the
importance of hard work
and teamwork. He teaches
them more than just how
to take the talent they were
given and be the very best
football player they can.
You see, he invests in
his players so that when
they play their very last
game, they can walk out
into the world and be a
man of character, a man
of his word, a hard worker,
someone who sticks
through the tough times,
a man that we can all be
proud of.
You see, my hero is my
dad. I've been a football
coach's daughter all my
life. I've been the little
girl in the cheerleading
uniform, the ball girl, the
water girl, filmed games -
I've done it all. I've spent
my Saturday watching
the films with dad and my
Friday nights being his
biggest supporter.
I know that although he
might never accumulate
the number of wins that
other coaches have, over
his 35 years of coaching,
he has changed more
young men's lives so that
when football season
comes to a close, they
can walk into their future
better prepared for life's
challenges.


I write this because
I wonder if all of those
"know-it-all fans" ever
stop long enough to see
things through my eyes.
That coach down there
is somebody's daddy,
a husband, a son. He's
someone's best friend.
He is the father to those
kids that might not have
one.
He is a tutor to a
struggling student, a
ride home when their
parents forget to pick
them up, the man on the
other end of the phone
when one of his players
needs someone to talk
to, a grandpa, a teacher.
He is someone's hero,
and yet so many people
think it is OK to tear him
down constantly without
ever thinking that, to
the person sitting in
front of them in the
stands, he might be their
everything.
I wish that for once
fans would stop and
remember that those
are someone's kids they
are talking about, that
sometimes coaches can
prepare the team, but
they can't run the plays
for the kids.
Players must execute
the game plan, and
these boys are only
teenagers. They are not
pro athletes who get
paid millions. They are
boys who love the game
and go out each week
giving it their best shot.
So next time you're
sitting at that game and
you feel yourself ready
to spout off because
you don't like that play
or because your team
might be losing, I ask
you to see that man
down there on the field
through a daughter's
eyes and remember
that to you he may be a
nobody, but to me he is
my everything!



I I

until 2pm
MONDAYS AT
BLACK STONE
Play Golf for only


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FREE Pina Colada
at the turn.


Blackstone Golf Course
108 Blackstone Lane
Mossy Head, Off Highway 90
www.blackstonemossyhead.com
(80 52-47


RANDY DICKSON I News Bulletin
Christian Mainor (15) moves in for a tackle in Baker's spring game against South
Walton.

MAINOR from page B1


And for good measure, he's done every-
thing from long snaps to kicking for the
Baker special teams.
"The kid has played every position on
defense, from defensive line to DB," Bak-
er coach Bob Kellogg said. "I think he's
played every offensive position if you con-
sider a tight end an offensive lineman.
"We don't run a lot of tight end, but he
does that. I don't know if we've ever put
him at a guard or a tackle. We might have,
but he's the long snapper for us."
Always a team player, Mainor takes his
versatility in stride and with a quick sense
of humor.
"I don't drive the bus," he said, "but I've
sat in the front seat and thought about it
before."
In the last year or so, Mainor has set-
tled in at wide receiver and defensive back,
where he serves as an anchor for both the
Gator offensive and defensive units.
Through three games, Mainor led the
team in receptions with 21 catches for 201
yards, scoring a touchdown and a two-point
conversion. As a leader in the Gator defen-
sive secondary, he has been in on more
than 20 tackles and was credited with a
tackle for loss and a fumble recovery.
Mainor loves playing wide receiver.
"I just like running the routes and
catching the ball and just trying to do stuff
in space," he said. "Most people know I'm
not blessed with speed, so I have to coun-
ter that with skill and good hands.
"I'm more like a possession receiver
instead of a deep threat. I just have to do
the little things right, run the routes right,
and I have to break down blocking-wise
and do all the little things."
Having gone against Mainor several
years in practice, Baker senior Dylan
Kersey appreciates what Mainor brings to
the team.
"Christian is a good player," Kersey
said. "He's our best receiver we have.
"He's real hard to defend. He'll shake
you off. He's real good at that. It's hard to
cover him."
Kellogg said Mainor is more than just a
good football player.
"I think the biggest thing he brings to
us is the leadership part of getting kids to
play hard and have a good attitude," Kel-
logg said. "The intangible things that he
brings are more than the physical things.
"I think he has been a kid that, along
with Logan (Wagner), took us through a


GATORS from page B1
Although the Bulldogs eventually pulled
to within two points by making the score
8-6, the Gators were too much. Of the Ga-
tors' final six points, Ellis had an ace and a
kill, while Royal and Wickery each added a
kill of their own.
Parks said that some of her team's men-
tal mistakes could be attributed to girls play-


Not blessed with great speed,
Christian Mainor has become Baker's
leading receiver through practice and
hard work.
tough year his junior year and held us to-
gether."
Mainor's good nature has endeared
him to his teammates as well as Baker
coaches.
Just don't call him Fonzie (as in the
character from the TV show "Happy
Days").
"When Christian had real long hair, we
used to call him Fonzie," Kersey said, "and
Christian didn't like it too much.
"He used to get mad at us, but it was a
good time."
There have been plenty of good times
for Mainor on and off the field.
"Probably the best part is the locker
room (where he has bonded with his team-
mates)," he said. "The on-the-field stuff -
everybody loves Friday nights. They love
that feeling, but just the friendships and
the moments you have with your team-
mates, and you are never going to forget
those moments."
It's that attitude that makes Mainor a
leader on and off the field.
"He's just a kid that is a pleasure to
coach," Kellogg said. "He's one of the kids
that high school football is all about."


ing positions they weren't accustomed to.
"We're just trying to gel and get used
to the new spots," Parks said. "We're like
that little train trying to get up the hill.
We're getting there."
Prophecy Spaid had 16 assists and six
aces for Freeport, while Gray and Ross
added seven and four kills, respectively.


NE *I


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I I I I I I I I


Saturday, September 25, 2010


Sports






Saturday, September 25, 2010


Local


Crestview News Bulletin I B3


News and notes from UP ON THE HILL


I suspect fall is trying into the kitchen at Baron's
to slip in from the sound of with pumpkin soup, teas
crisp leaves crunching un- and apple cake. Erica is do-
der the wheels of my car as ing a great job and is now on
I enter the driveway. Facebook.


Temperatures
are sure denying
the entrance of the
approaching cooler
season. The fig tree
and scuppernong
vines are slowly
disrobing, work is
done, time for them
to rest.
The Baron's Tea


UP ON THE HILL
Estelle Rogers


House served hot tea and
delicious lunch on Tuesday
to the growing group of
friends gathering twice a
month for lunch and fellow-
ship. Fall flavors carry over


Ladies attend-
ing, Donna Flem-
ing and her mother,
Frances Settles,
Kathleen McMi-
chael, Laura Evans,
Sheila Powell and I,
enjoyed the soft mu-
sic and atmosphere
of the Tea House as
we discussed excit-


ing happenings at Life Tab-
ernacle. We also decided to
make plans for a cruise in
January, when the rates will
be super good, holidays past
and a new year beginning!


Mark your calendars for
the annual Laurel Hill Hobo
Festival Saturday, Oct. 9 at
Gene Clary City park. Bring
your lawn chair and plan to
spend the day, from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m.
There will be lots to
see, unusual craft items by
many vendors, all kinds of
food and the annual auction.
You will renew friendships
and visit with neighbors you
haven't seen in a long time.
Many activities for children,
live entertainment and
Hobo shirts will be on sale.
For more information, call
652-3512 or 652-3677.
Our Laurel Hill support
group facilitator, Carolyn
Williams, and the Laurel


Hill and DeFuniak ladies
were invited to attend a
special lunch at Parthenon
Healthcare of Crestview
for our September meeting.
We were treated royally by
staff and served a delicious
meal.
We also toured the
brand new special unit for
Alzheimer's patients. We
appreciate their care and
concern for patients and
care givers.
One of the ladies pres-
ent had recently placed her
husband in their care. The
family is now processing a
big lifestyle change, dealing
with their doubts, and all
that goes with the process.
While we feel bad for the


patient, this disease deals
with the whole family; it can
divide or bring family closer
together.
Sadly, the very time fam-
ily support is needed most
for caregivers, in many
times the family splits by
disagreeing on what is best
for the patient.
Scientists have called
the spread of dementia an
epidemic that is increasing
its pace with the graying
of the population around
the world. After age 65, the
chances of developing Al-
zheimer's disease, the most
common form of dementia,
doubles every five years.
At age 85, people have
about a 50 percent chance


of developing Alzheimer's.
The Laurel Hill Gallery
is closing. It hurts to write
those few words, but it is
true. The beautiful building
gave our city a classic ap-
pearance; we have plenty of
old buildings falling down to
keep us humble.
Our only hope is for
someone to purchase the
building and continue on
with the work George and
Hope Wittmer began sev-
eral years ago. We wish the
present owners our best as
they continue their lives.

"The earth is the Lord's,
and the fullness thereof; the
world, and they that dwell
therein." Psalm 24:1


Check it OUT


Heather Nitzel
Special to the News Bulletin


PROGRAMS
On Wednesday, Sept. 29, we welcome Mom's Club
for a library tour at 10:15 a.m.
At Story Time Thursday, Sept. 30, we're going to
have "Fall RFn," even if it's 90 degrees outside. Sign-
in begins at 10 a.m. Autumn stories and songs begin
at 10:15 a.m. We'll make a scarecrow to take home.
(Don't worry. He's not too scary!)
Story Time is designed for children ages 3 to 5.
Younger siblings (accompanied by an adult) and
older children are also welcome. On Wednesday, Oct.
6, we're going on an alphabet romp. Join us for "ABC
Stories" and songs. Then, make some alphabet soup.
For teens ages 12 to 17, play Wii on Fridays from
2 to 4 p.m. The Teen Anime Club meets on Tuesdays
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Find bargains at the semi-annual Friends of the
Library Book Sale. All of the VHS that we recently
removed from our shelves will be available at this
sale for only a quarter. For a $2 admission charge or a
Friends membership, early birds get first pick Friday,
Oct. 1 from 5-8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday there is no
admission charge, and anyone can shop from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. All proceeds benefit the library.
Red and yellow and pink and green, purple and
orange and blue ... We're reading and singing a
rainbow at Lap Sit on Monday, Oct. 4 and Tuesday,
Oct. 5. Sign-in begins at 10 a.m., and stories and
songs about colors begin at 10:15 a.m.
Finally! You've come to that fork in the road
where it's time to start thinking about "life after
retirement." What will you do? Where will you go? To
a new career? To a closer relationship with friends
and family? To volunteering in your community?
What you need is a road map a plan of
action. Joan Strewler-Carter and Stephen Carter
of Life Options Institute will present "Planning for
Life After 50" at the Oct. 5 First Tuesday program.
The Carters are the authors of "What's Next in Your
Life?" a guide to the nonfinancial aspects of
retirement.
Appealing to the nation's 76 million baby boomers
who need the tools to plan for a more fulfilling and
rewarding life after 50, the Carters provide guidelines
on how to approach retirement and offer "how-to"
advice on the nonfinancial aspects of retirement.
The program begins at 10:30 a.m. with coffee and
cookies served starting at 10 a.m.

STAFF PICKS
"Hats Hats Hats" by ,
Ann Morris (E Mor).
A hat can say a lot IA '.-,
about where you come, H"'. A
from, what you do,
and who you are. You
see, there's a lot more
under a hat than just a
head. Engaging, well-
composed color photos
from all the inhabited
continents celebrate
the diversity of the I E'TrF J j) tj_
world's people. Ofi
"Elmo Says *C fO,
ACHOO!" by Sarah "
Albee (ER Alb, red
dot). As we enter cold
and flu season, here's
a fun way to practice ,.
sneezing into your
elbow, as Elmo has se
taught us so well. A-
You won't believe all ,
the crazy things that
happen after each
sneeze. It's also a
delightful book for those just learning to read (not
nearly as boring as some).

JUST ASK
Any questions? Just ask Jean, Sandra, Anna,
Marie, Tracey, Audrey, Sharon, Mike, Sabrina, Annie
or Heather. We will be happy to assist you.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK
When "asked to write a letter to the London
Times on 'What's wrong with the world?' G. K.
Chesterton wrote, 'Dear Sirs, I am. Yours truly, G.K.
Chesterton.'" Peter Kreeft

HOW TO CONTACT US
In person: 1445 Commerce Drive, (behind the Post
Office); By phone: 682-4432; On the web:
www.cityofcrestview.org/library.htm

Heather Nitzel is the Youth Services librarian at
Robert Sikes Public Library.


5 generations meet up


A get together of the
Wadsworth family was
held recently. Shown
from left are
(bottom row) great-
great-grandfather
Charles T. Wadsworth
of Holt and great-
grandmother Rebecca
Strong of Citronelle,
Ala.; (top row)
grandmother Mary
Weaver, mother April
Weaver and baby
Adelyn Harris, all of
Axis, Ala.

SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN


Homeless Veteran Stand Down needs donations


Special to the News Bulletin

Homeless Veteran
Stand Down will be held
Friday, Oct. 22 at First
Presbyterian Church at
134 Beal Parkway SW in
Fort Walton Beach from
8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. All hon-
orably discharged veter-
ans in need are welcome.
Available services include
medical wound care/flu
shots, VA benefits assis-
tance, state benefits as-
sistance dental screen-
ing, clothing, boots and
blankets, employment
services, mental health
screening, personal hy-
giene bags, a hot meal,
and optional misdemean-
or resolution.
A stand down is a coop-
erative event between lo-
cal veteran organizations,
the VA and other commu-


nity resources to provide
services and information
to homeless veterans and/
or families of veterans.
These organizations and
individuals stand down
from normal duties to as-
sist our fellow veterans.
Each year the Men-
tal Health Association of
Okaloosa & Walton Coun-
ties (www.mhaow.org)
puts together hundreds of
"Personal Bags" for our
area's homeless veterans.
They are short of several
key items for the bags cur-
rently in progress.
Typically, these items
are travel-size since the
Personal Bag is supposed
to be easy to carry. If you
have any of the following
items please contact the
Mental Health Associa-
tion at 244-1040 or at their
571 Mooney Road, NE


address in Fort Walton
Beach, or Robert Vanden
Berg at JobsPlus, 409 NE
Racetrack Road, Fort Wal-
ton Beach.
Items needed for bags:
deodorant, rain ponchos,
socks (new only), wash-
cloths, cracker packages
(like in the vending ma-
chines), ball caps (new),
insect repellent, first aid
kits with band aids.
Items needed on a
recurring basis (for all
homeless people, includ-
ing veterans): pocket
T-shirt (new, size large &
extra large), hand sanitiz-
ers (small), sewing kits,
deck of cards, combs,
Kleenex packs, shampoo,
lotion, floss, toothpaste,
toothbrushes, toothbrush
travel holders, small note-
pads, pens, reading glass-
es and sunglasses.


Volunteers are also
needed to help run the
stand down, set up the
church and transport
cargo from DAV Chapter
72's office in Fort Walton
Beach to the church on
Oct. 21.
Volunteers will also
perform such services at
the event as ushering vet-
erans to the many service
providers, serve food and
do other types of kitch-
en work, distribute cold
weather items, assist ser-
vice providers, assist with
crowd control, assist with
setup and cleanup and
talk to our veterans.
To volunteer, contact
Robert Vanden Berg at
rvandenberg@jobsplus02.
com or DAV Chapter 72
Commander Cathy Mag-
nuson at dav@fwb.gccox-
mail.com.


Crestview Veterans Day Parade scheduled for Nov. 6


Special to the News Bulletin

The Crestview Veterans
Affairs Committee and the
City of Crestview are proud
to announce that the joint-
ly sponsored annual Vet-
erans Day Parade will be
held this year on Saturday,
Nov. 6 at 2 p.m., with line
up beginning at 12:30 p.m.
in the vicinity of the First
Assembly of God Church
on south Main Street.
The committee and city
invite local civic organi-
zations, religious organi-
zations, businesses, and
individuals to participate
in this event honoring all
military veterans. This is
a perfect opportunity to
show all veterans that you


believe in what they have
done and are still doing,
organizers said.
The parade will pro-
ceed north on Main Street
past the Okaloosa County
Courthouse and will then
turn west at Badcock Fur-
niture on to Cedar Avenue
and then south on to North
Wilson Street for disper-
sal. Some coordination
will be provided by the
Main Street Crestview
Association.
Candy and trinket
throwing from entry units
will be allowed. Units are
asked to have some walk-
ers to hand distribute can-
dy and trinkets to those
lined up along the parade
route.


Parade participant
registration forms may
be acquired by download-
ing a copy fromwww.cityof
crestview.org/events; from
the City of Crestview's
Administrative Services
Department at City Hall;
or by calling Fletcher Wil-
liams Jr, Crestview Vet-
erans Affairs Committee
chairperson, at 689-1895.
The participant registra-
tion forms should be com-
pleted as soon as possible
and returned by mail to
Administrative Services
Department, 198 N. Wilson
St., Crestview, FL 32536, or
personally delivered to the
office of the Administra-
tive Services Department
at City Hall no later than


5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 5. There
is no charge for participat-
ing in this event.
For planning purposes,
it is highly preferred that
replies indicating par-
ticipant intentions be pro-
vided no later than Friday,
Nov. 5. The Crestview Vet-
erans Affairs Committee,
however, will still accept
entrant registrations up
to the actual date of the
event.
Any additional corre-
spondence may be direct-
ed to Veterans Day Parade
Committee, c/o Crestview
Administrative Services
Department, 198 N. Wilson
St., Crestview, FL 32536,
or by e-mail to fletcher.
williams@cox.net.


Candidate training program offered by elections office


Special to the News Bulletin

The Okaloosa County
Supervisor of Elections
Office is offering its fall
sessions of Candidate Uni-
versity. The program is for
those seeking to run for
public office or anyone in-
terested in learning about
the process. It is designed
to inform interested
persons of the appropriate
procedures and documents


required to run for office in
Okaloosa County.
The class consists
of a three-hour curricu-
lum focused on the fun-
damentals of becoming
and being a candidate.
Participants will be intro-
duced to each step involved
in the process including
prefiling, collecting peti-
tions and qualifying. Cam-
paign pitfalls also will be
discussed as well as audits,


recounts and contests of
elections. All participants
will receive a certificate
upon completion of the
program.
The dates in which the
sessions will be held are
listed below.
Crestview: Thurs-
day, Oct. 14, Buddy
Brackin/First National
Bank Building, 3rd Floor
Conference Room, 302
N. Wilson St., 9:30 a.m.-


12:30 p.m.
Fort Walton Beach:
Thursday, Oct. 14, Water &
Sewer Building, 3rd Floor,
BCC Board Room, 1804
Lewis Turner Blvd., 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m.
To register, call Tiffany
C. Rivera at 689-5600 or e-
mail trivera@co.okaloosa.
fl.us.
The deadline to register
is Monday, Oct. 11. Space is
limited.


NE *I






B4 I Crestview News Bulletin


Arts and Entertainment


Saturday, September 25, 2010


Festival time in Laurel Hill


Hobo and arts fests coming in October


Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com
There's been just the
slightest hint of morning
coolness, and the autumnal
equinox occurred Wednes-
day evening under a brilliant
harvest moon. Fall is in the
air as well as on the calendar
and in Laurel Hill, the annual
Hobo Festival and the debut
of a new Oktoberfestival of
the Arts are right around the
corner.
On Saturday, Oct. 9, the
community will gather in
Gene Clary Park for the
Hobo Festival, a traditional
event dating back many
years. Once sponsored by
the Laurel Hill Volunteer
Fire Department, the festi-
val has grown into its own
non-profit organization.
Two weeks later, perform-
ing and visual artists from
throughout the region will
gather for the Okaloosa Arts
Alliance-North's first music
and arts festival in Laurel
Hill, collaborating with the
Laurel Hill Presbyterian
Church.
Hobo Festival president
Sharon Conway is excited
about the scope and variety
of activities this year's event
will bring.
"This is my first year be-
ing chairwoman and I love
it!" Conway said. "We're go-


ESTELLE ROGERS I Crestview News Bulls
GOOD CAUSE: Non-profit school and community organizations sell food and
goods at the Hobo Festival to raise funds. Here the Laurel Hill School leadership
class sells doughnuts during the 2008 festival.


ing to have some different
activities than before, includ-
ing a cake and pie walk"
Auctions will let lucky at-
tendees take home "lots of
things," including gift cer-
tificates from many area
merchants, and a lucky raf-
fle winner will be ready for
the hunting season with his
or her new MKE T43 rifle.
Young Hobos aren't left out
of the raffle, either, Conway
said.
"One of our sponsors do-
nated a small child's John
Deere bicycle," she en-
thused. "It's very darling!"
In addition to plenty of
great food, games, live en-


tertainment and vendors'
booths, "Mayor Joan Smith
will give a history of Laurel
Hill," Conway said. "It's go-
ing to be a good time."
On Saturday, Oct. 23, the
historic Laurel Hill Presby-
terian Church's huge side
yard will become a focal
point for north county per-
forming and visual artists
and people who love art.
Local visual artists,
including students from
Sabine Lyons' art classes
at Laurel Hill School as
well as Lyons herself, will
be showcased among the
many painters, sketch art-
ists, photographers, and


ceramics, crafts and textile
artists who have already
registered.
Performing artists will
include acoustic guitar play-
ers and vocalists Walker
Sherman, Eric Melvin and
friends, who have delighted
fans at the recent Music
and Art on Main Street fes-
tival series in Crestview.
The Wesley Boys gospel
harmony quartet will per-
form selections from their
forthcoming first CD, and
Laurel Hill digital music
artist Todd Turner will host
a listening station featur-
ing selections from his new
"Alien Saga" CD.


ESTELLE ROGERS I Crestview News Bulletin
FAMILY FUN: With plenty of games, food,
prizes and live entertainment, the Laurel Hill Hobo
Festival is fun for the entire family.


LAUREL HILL FESTIVALS

SHobo Festival: Sat., Oct. 9, 9
a.m. 5 p.m., Gene Clary Park, New
Ebenezer Road, free parking and
admission. For more information or
booth space reservation, contact Sharon
Conway at 652-3512 or Caroline
March at 652-3677.
Oktoberfestival of the Arts: Sat.,
Oct. 23, 11 a.m. 3 p.m., Laurel Hill
Presbyterian Church, 8115 Fourth St.,
free parking, admission, and registration
for artists/performers. For information or
exhibit space registration, contact Rae
Schwartz, bakerny@yahoo.com, 585-
5672.

.. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .


Art and food will be of-
fered for sale, including
"Bowls for Hope," which
are lovely ceramic bowls
created by members of the
Crestview High School Art
Club, the sale of which will
benefit the Sharing & Car-
ing food bank.


"We're excited to show-
case the tremendous talent
to be found in north Oka-
loosa County," said OAA-N
chairwoman Rae Schwartz,
one of the Oktoberfestival's
organizers. "This will be a
great opportunity for both
artists and art lovers."


Arts



Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor
Whetheryour muse is tickling you to
create, perform or just savor the arts,
there is a plethora of opportunities in
northern Okaloosa County. Here's a list
of cultural pursuits you can enjoy with-
out venturing too far from home.

ARTS ORGANIZATION
Okaloosa Arts Alliance-North:
The north county committee of the
county's official arts organization
organizes arts events and festivals
and provides art instruction in area
schools. Meets monthly at the Crest-
view Public Library. Open to any artist,
art educator or art lover in the visual or
performing arts. Contact chairwoman
Rae Schwartz at bakerny@yahoo.com
or 585-5672, or visit www.OkaloosaArts.
org.

CINEMA
Crestview Cinema Three, 789
North Ferdon Blvd., 682-3201.
Marquis Cinema: 10-screen cin-
ema, including three digital auditori-
ums, Richbourg Lane, Crestview, 306-
2500, www.movieshowtime.net.

CONCERTS
Crestview High School Band.
Nicknamed "The Big Red Machine"
for its precisions marching prowess
in venues and competitions across the
nation, including Macy's Thanksgiv-
ing Day Parade and on the deck of the
USS Missouri, the 280-piece band also
produces extraordinary Christmas
and spring concerts. Directed by Jody
Dunn. Call 689-7177 for performance
info.
Crestview High School Chorus.


d Find your muse at
Sone of the many
opportunities in
*Okaloosa County
coming in October


The 125-voice chorus has thrilled au-
diences from San Francisco and New
York to Washington, D.C. and London
with their virtuosity in various musical
genres. From pop favorites and show-
tunes to classical and folk selections,
you'll delight in their Christmas and
spring concerts under the direction of
Kevin Lusk. Call 689-7177 for perfor-
mance info.
Baker School High School Band.
The more than 75-member "Sound of
the Swamp" is one of the county's old-
est marching bands and performs at
Baker football games and at festivals
and regional competitions under di-
rector Tony Chiarito. Call 689-7279 for
information.
Baker School High School Cho-
rus. Choral music is a strong tradition
at Baker School. Under director Betty
Avery, the singing Gators perform at
local and regional festivals and cho-
ral competitions, and perform annual
spring and holiday concerts. Call 689-
7279 for information.
Madrigal Singers and Bella Voc-
ce. Classical music choirs composed of
Northwest Florida State College stu-
dent performers from throughout the
region. Call 729-6000 for performance
information.
Northwest Florida Symphony
Orchestra. The region's premiere
symphony, under the direction of Mae-
stro Jeffrey Rink, now entering its 23rd
season, performs at the Mattie Kelly
Arts Center at Northwest Florida State
College. For information visit www.
nfsymphony.org or call the box office at
729-6000.
Okaloosa Chamber Singers.
Sumptuous melodies both old and new
delight audiences in this ensemble of
professional vocalists gleaned from
throughout the county during their
Christmas and spring concerts. Mem-


BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
CHRISTMAS VOICES: Northwest Florida State College's Schola Cantorum,
or "college of singing," performs its eager anticipated Christmas concert.


BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
ART ENTHUSIASTS: Margaret Stewart describes her needlework and
quilting to a father-daughter pair of art lovers who browsed the
Crestview High School multi-purpose room during the January CALA
arts festival sponsored by the Okaloosa Arts Alliance-North.


bership is by audition and new mem-
bers are always welcome. Call director
Dr. Marilyn Overturf at 682-9651 for in-
formation.
Schola Cantorum. Latin for
"college of music," this talented vocal
ensemble is composed of area stu-
dents, military personnel and anyone
else who enjoys singing in a variety of
genres, including classic, pop, show
tunes and folk Fullfill your musical
muse in their ranks, or simply delight
in their twice-annual concerts during
spring and Christmastime. Directed by
John Leatherwood. For more informa-
tion call 830-2062.
The Soundsations. Show choir of
Northwest Florida State College com-
posed of talented young performers
from throughout the region perform-
ing kicky, exuberant pop, rock and jazz
tunes with dazzling showmanship. Call
729-6000 for performance information.

LECTURES & EXHIBITIONS
Robert Sikes Crestview Public
Library. "First' Tesday" lecture series
on a variety of fascinating topics, from
regional history to gardening, popu-
lar entertainment, history, music and
more. Monthly "Family Library Time"
features speakers and demonstrations.
Special presentations, art exhibits, col-
lections on display and more. Visit
www.cityofcrestview.org/library or call
682-4432.
Mattie Kelly Arts Center Galler-
ies. Northwest Florida State College.
Presents year-round exhibitions of
extraordinary local, regional, state, na-
tional and international artists. Gallery
office: 729-6044.


THEATRE
Crestview High School Drama
Program. Spring musicals and fall
dramas or comedies performed by tal-
ented student thespians under the di-
rection and instruction of professional
theatre faculty member Annette Geb-
hardt. Crestview High School, 1250
North Ferdon Blvd., 689-7177.
Baker School Drama Program
and Drama Llamas theatre club. Pro-
duces musicals and holiday vignettes
under the direction of teacher/ direc-
tor Roger O'Neal. Call 689-7279 for in-
formation.
Florida Chautauqua Theatre.
Student theatre performed in a re-
stored movie palace in nearby De-
Funiak Springs, including student
workshop productions, musicals and
comedies. E-mail info@fcweb.org, or
call (850) 892-9494 for ticket informa-
tion or reservations.
Act4Murder. Regional murder
mystery dinners and tea parties at
local restaurants. Watch for upcom-
ing performances announced in the
Crestview News Bulletin, e-mail mur-
der@Act4Murder, or call (850) 682-
2885.
Northwest Florida State Col-
lege. Summer, fall and spring theat-
ricals performed by college students,
faculty and area professionals. Call
the box office at 729-6000 for info.
Broadway Series. Professional
touring productions of blockbusters
from the Great White Way. Northwest
Florida State College Mattie Kelly
Arts Center. Box office: 729-6000 or
online at www.mattiekellyartscenter.
org.


NE ~*I






Saturday, September 25, 2010


Arts & Entertainment


Crestview News Bulletin I BS


fal l


a"HO 0


Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor

september


'German Masterpieces'
SEPT. 25 The Northwest Flor-
ida Symphony Orchestra begins its
season with an evening of some of
the most beautiful and enduring mu-
sic ever written for orchestra. The
concert features guest artist Tobias
Steymans, concertmaster for the
Bavarian Radio Symphony Orches-
tra. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m.
in the Mattie Kelly Arts Center with
Maestro Jeffrey Rink conducting.
Single tickets are $22.50 each. Visit
www.mattiekellyartscenter.org or
call 729-6000 for tickets.

october

Arts alliance meeting
OCT. 5 The Okaloosa Arts Al-
liance-North committee meets at
6 p.m. at the Crestview Public Li-
brary. The gathering is open to all
artists, including performing and
visual arts, professional, amateur
and student artists, and arts lovers.
The Oktoberfestival of the Arts in
Laurel Hill will be one of the topics
discussed. 6 p.m.
Greek Mythology
OCT. 6 to 9 "Iliad, Odyssey &
All Greek Mythology in 99 Minutes
or Less" happens on a simple stage
with the clock ticking as the cast from
NWF State College speeds through
all of Greek mythology in 99 min-
utes. It's funny, updated and easy to
understand. The Gods walk the Red
Carpet. The Creation of Mankind is
a botched subcontractor's job.
From Man and Pandora to a kid-
napped Helen of Troy (with a 10-year
slap-fight of epic proportions with
pouty Achilles) presented lightning-
bolt fast with hysterical results as the
clock is stopped with only seconds to
spare. 7:30 p.m., Mattie Kelly Fine
& Performing Arts Center, Sprint
Theater, at Northwest Florida State
College, $15 Adult/$10 Youth (18 &
younger). Reserve tickets at the Box
Office 729-6000 or at www.mattiekel-
lyartscenterorg.
Chorus yard sale
OCT. 9 Pick up treasures and
support the Crestview High School
chorus at this bodacious multi-family
morning yard sale on the front lawn
of the high school. From household
goods and clothes to hardware and
toys and games, you'll find plenty to
browse through. Proceeds benefit
the chorus' travel fund. For more in-
formation, call choral music director
Kevin Lusk at 689-7177.


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN

Momix 'Botanica'
OCT. 10 MOMIX has made
its mark with a spectacular blend of
athletic dance, riveting music, out-
rageous costumes, illusion and pure
talent. The group brings the national
tour of its newest extravaganza, "Bo-
tanica," for a special matinee show-
ing at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10, at the
Mattie Kelly Arts Center at Norwest
Florida State College in Niceville.
Known internationally for pre-
senting works of exceptional in-
ventiveness and physical beauty,
the MOMIX company of dancer-
illusionists is under the artistic di-
rection of Moses Pendleton. His lat-
est creation follows the rhythms of
the New England seasons, but also
the evolution of the world and the
passing of a day. The exotic, sensual


and mystifying realm of nature is re-
imagined to an eclectic score rang-
ing from birdsongs to Vivaldi.
Flowers bloom, go to seed and
die; vegetable, animal and mineral
- all in human form combine and
metamorphose. Fabrics, colors, cos-
tumes, projections and props create
a landscape populated by the cre-
ations of Pendleton's original, whim-
sical, mythical imagination.
(Parental note, certain
costuming and programming in
"Botanica" may be considered PG-
13 rated.)
Tickets to "Botanica" are $45
each or $40 for groups of 10 or more.
Purchase tickets by phone, in-per-
son or online from the Mattie Kelly
Arts Center box office at 729-6000
or the website at www.mattiekelly
artscenter.org.
District band competition
OCT. 16 The Florida Band As-
sociation's district competition, in-
cluding the Big Red Machine and the
Baker Gator's Sound of the Swamp,
will be held at Fort Walton Beach
High School. Call your school's band
director of information.


All-County Honor Chorus
OCT. 18 Members of choruses
and show choirs from Crestview
High School, Baker School (middle
and high school level choruses)
and Davidson Middle School join
other middle and high schools from
throughout the county on the Mattie
Kelly Performing Arts Center Main
Stage at Northwest Florida State
College to perform on the Okaloosa
All-County Honor Chorus. The per-
formance, which follows weeks of
rehearsal and two days of clinical
work, begins at 7 p.m. and is free and
open to the public.
Gator Growl
OCT. 22 Once more the ad-
ventures of Lois Llama and Super-
gator unfold as the Baker School
Drama Llamas theatre club per-
forms the fearless duo's continuing
struggle for Gator glory, pride and
justice. This year Supergator must
rescue beautiful Lois from the evil
clutches of the Blue Devils and their
two evil cheerleaders. Call Baker
School at 689-7279 for performance
information.
Oktoberfestival of the Arts
OCT. 23 Student, professional
and amateur artists and performers
will gather in Laurel Hill for an after-
noon of visual and performing arts,
joined by art lovers from throughout
the region. This will be the Okaloosa
Arts Alliance-North's first foray into
the more northern reaches of the
county.
The county's official arts orga-
nization joins the Laurel Hill Pres-
byterian Church in presenting the
event. On exhibit will be paintings,
sculptures, photography, drawings,
ceramics, jewelry, textile art, digital
music and handicrafts. Enjoy mu-
sical performances by the Wesley
Boys gospel harmony quartet, the
acoustical guitar and vocals by
Walker Sherman & Friends, and
more performers to be confirmed.
In between, delight in the dexter-
ity and comedy of local juggler Josh
Bitikofer.
Student art and demonstra-
tions from Laurel Hill School and
Crestview High School art classes
will also be exhibited. Food will be
available for purchase from booths
manned by local non-profits.
The Oktoberfestival will be Sat-
urday, Oct. 23, from 11 a.m. until
3 p.m. on the lawn of the Laurel Hill
Presbyterian Church, 8115 4th St.
Admission is free. There is no fee
to register to exhibit or perform.
Contact Brian Hughes, 682-6524,
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com, or
Rae Schwartz, 585-5672, bakery@
yahoo.com.
West Florida Classic
OCT. 23 The Crestview High
School band, the Big Red Machine,
will host the annual band classic, a
daylong cornucopia of the region's
finest precision marching bands.
The modest admission benefits
the Crestview band's travel fund.
For more information, call Band
Director Jody Dunn at 689-7177.


Album release concert
OCT. 23 Chevon Corlew &
Jeremiah 29:11 debut in their inde-
pendent, self-titled album release
concert at 6:30 p.m. at the Sonlight
Covenant Church, 150 W Oakdale
Ave. in Crestview. Admission is free
and the concertopen to the public.
The group performs original mu-
sic, written and arranged by Chevon
Corlew, produced by lead musician,
Samuel Hill. Corlew includes writ-
ing credit for Grammy Award-win-
ning gospel artist CeCe Winans 2008
"Pure Worship" compilation album.
The rhythmic and lyrical-driven
self-titled album features a blend of
gospel, contemporary, and country
music influences.
CD purchases are available for
$13 the night of the concert. Trinity
Broadcasting Network host Evange-
list Cherisse Stephens from Atlanta
will serve as master of ceremony.
Opening performances are by Titus
Tucker and Kimberly Pitts.
For more information, call Nakia
Coleman, 259-3480 or colemanna-
kia@yahoo.com.Visitwww.facebook.
com/chevoncorlewjeremiah2911.
Pastel Society exhibition
OCT. 24 DEC 2 The Mattie
Kelly Arts Center Galleries present
pieces from the Pastel Society of
North Florida 11th Biennial Nation-
al Juried Exhibition with original
works executed in pastel by artists
from all over the United States. This
year's judge of awards is Margaret
Dyer, PSA, a nationally-known pastel
artist and workshop leader who has
been featured in "Pastelagram and
Pure Color: The Best of Pastels."
Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Thursday; 1 to 4 p.m.
Sunday and 6 to 7:30 p.m. prior to
performances in the mainstage the-
ater. Free and open to the public.
Opening reception Sunday, Oct. 24 at
2 p.m., awards at 3 p.m.
Fall Festival
OCT. 30 The annual Crestview
Fall Festival features fun for the fam-
ily, including arts, crafts and plenty
of Halloween trick-or-treating fun.
On Main Street, 3-8 p.m. Free.
'Madame Butterfly'
OCT. 30 The Northwest Florida
Symphony Orchestra invites you to
soar with one of the most emotional
operas ever written as it brings the
romance and pathos of the heart-
wrenching "Madame Butterfly" to
life in full concert version sung in
Italian with English subtitles.
The radiant Maria Ferrante of
Boston guest stars as the trusting
geisha, whose love for an American
naval officer ends tragically when
Eastern and Western cultures col-
lide. NFSO conductor and music di-
rector Jeffrey Rink, well-known dur-
ing his career in New England for
concert performances of operatic
works, leads the NFSO in this per-
formance of Puccini's masterpiece.
7:30 p.m. Mattie Kelly Fine &
Performing Arts Center at North-
west Florida State College. Tickets
are $22.50 Adults/$16 Youth (18 &
younger) at the Box Office, 729-6000
or www.mattiekellyartscenter.org.

november

Arts alliance meeting
NOV. 2 The Okaloosa Arts
Alliance-North committee meets at
6 p.m. at the Crestview Public Li-
brary. The gathering is open to all
artists, including performing and vi-
sual arts, professional, amateur and
student artists, and arts lovers. For
information contact Chairwoman
Rae Schwartz at bakerny@yahoo.
com or 585-5672.


BRIAN HUGHES I CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN


Crestview Veterans Parade
NOV. 6 The 280-member Crest-
view High School band will be a


highlight of the community's annual
salute to our veterans. The parade
will progress up Main Street, begin-
ning at 2 p.m.
'Diary of Anne Frank'
NOV 11 Relive the remarkable
life of Anne Frank as she shares her
hopes, dreams and observations on
family, love and life. The courage of
this young Jewish Dutch girl, forced
into hiding during the Nazi occu-
pation of her homeland, will come
alive for audiences of all ages in this
national touring production based
on the famous diary that has kept
Anne's words and spirit alive for
generations.
The story of Anne Frank, as she
endures and ultimately falls victim
to the Holocaust in World War II, has
become an icon of light worldwide
for all who dare to dream. Don't miss
this emotional and timely theatrical
production. Special pricing makes
this a must-see journey through his-
tory for the whole family.
7:30 p.m. at the Mattie Kelly Fine
& Performing Arts Center at North-
west Florida State College, Main-
stage. Tickets are $20 Adults/$10
Youth/Student (ages 18 & younger &
NWFSC students w/ID) at the Box
Office, 729-6000 or www.mattiekelly
artscenter.org.
Chorus pancake breakfast
NOV 13 A small donation gets
you a fantastic pancake breakfast
complete with fixin's, accompanied
by performances by the Crestview
High School Chorus' individual
choirs and show groups. It's a great
way to start your weekend and help
the award-winning CHS chorus
earn money for out-of-town travel
to regional competitions. Breakfast
is served from 7 to 10 a.m. in the
high school cafeteria/multi-purpose
room.
'A Christmas Story'
NOV 18-20 The Crestview
High School Drama Department
presents the stage adaptation of
the beloved 1983 Bob Clark Christ-
mas film, with all the elements that
make it a favorite for every member
of the family. It's all there: the bunny
PJs, the Old Man, Scutt Farkas, the
weird kid with the aviator helmet,
Randy, Miss Shields, Mother (and
her meatloaf), Schwartz, Flic, and
yes, the most famous table lamp in
all of filmdom.
From the short stories of Ameri-
can humorist Jean Shepherd comes
this warm holiday tale of a special
Christmas back in 1938 and the
most fabulous Christmas present a
boy ever received. 7 p.m. each night
at the Pearl Tyner Auditorium, ten-
tative admission is $7. Note: If Crest-
view High's football team makes
regional playoffs, the Friday night
performance will be moved to a Sat-
urday or Sunday matinee.
After the Saturday night perfor-
mance, the audience is invited to join
the cast and crew for a meet-and-
greet reception across the hall from
the auditorium in the multi-purpose
room. Holiday refreshments will be
served.
Fall musical
NOV 18-21 The Florida Chau-
tauqua Theatre will present its fall
Music & More Workshops produc-
tion for young thespians, a musical
theatre show to be announced. Per-
formances are Thursday through
Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday af-
ternoon at 2 p.m. Ticket prices TBA.
The theatre is at 848 Baldwin Ave.,
DeFuniak Springs. For details, con-
tact the theater at 892-9494 or info@
fcweb.org (preferred).
'Christmas Follies'
NOV 30 The Baker School
drama program and Drama Llamas
theatre club present their annual
revue of Christmas music, readings
andjokes at three Crestview nursing
facilities TBA. Offering a credited
drama class has allowed the troupe
to expand its cast and provide even
more holiday fun. Call the school at
689-7279 for performance locations
and times, or if you wish to attend
with a family member who is a resi-
dent in one of the facilities, confirm
performance times with the facility
administration.

december

Okaloosa Chamber concert
DEC. 3 & 5 The Okaloosa
Chamber Singers celebrates its 13th
season with its much anticipated
holiday concerts on Friday, Dec. 3,
7:30 p.m., at the First United Meth-
odist Church in Fort Walton Beach,
and Sunday, Dec. 5, 4 p.m., at the
First United Methodist Church in


DeFuniak Springs.
The centerpiece of the program
will be Vivaldi's "Gloria," performed
in Baroque style with harpsichord
and string orchestra. Christmas
carols for both audience and choir
comprise the second part of the pro-
gram, which concludes with "Deck
the Hall." Admission is free, with a
suggested donation of $15.
For more information, call the
chamber singers' director, Dr. Mari-
lyn Overturf, at 682-9651. Visit www.
okaloosachambersingers.org.
Christmas Parade
DEC. 4 Business, religious,
community, school and civic organi-
zations from throughout the region
parade up Main Street in floats glit-
tering with lights and decorations as
the north county region welcomes
Christmas. Marching units include
area bands. It begins at 5:30 p.m.
Arts alliance meeting
DEC. 7 The Okaloosa Arts
Alliance-North committee meets at
6 p.m. at the Crestview Public Li-
brary. The gathering is open to all
artists, including performing and vi-
sual arts, professional, amateur and
student artists, and arts lovers. For
information, contact Chairwoman
Rae Schwartz at bakerny@yahoo.
com or 585-5672.
'A Baroque Christmas'
DEC. 10 The stellar North-
west Florida Symphony Chorus
joins Northwest Florida Symphony
Orchestra to perform a marvel-
ous array of some of the finest sea-
sonal music of the 18th century.
Ring in the holidays in grande style
with this popular annual NFSO
concert and carol sing-a-long sure
to inspire your holiday spirit. NFSO
conductor and music director Jef-
frey Rink leads the Emerald Coast's
premiere professional orchestra and
Lois Van Dam leads the community
chorus of some of the region's finest
vocalists.
7:30 p.m. at the Mattie Kelly Fine
& Performing Arts Center at North-
west Florida State College, Main-
stage. Tickets are $22.50 Adults/$16
Youth (18 & under) at the Box Office,
729-6000 or www.mattiekellyarts
center.org.


^MBJii.? W.S*^ M


BRIAN HUGHES I CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN

CHS winter choral concert
DEC. 14 The joyous voices of
the Crestview High School Chorus
help you usher in the Christmas
holidays with the 125-voice group's
much-anticipated annual Winter
Choral Concert. Enjoy traditional
holiday favorites and pop standards
during this evening of skillful vocal
music certain to be a highlight of the
whole family's holiday. The evening
concludes with the traditional audi-
ence sing-along of "Silent Night" and
the entire chorus, including alumni
members, rendition of the "Hallelu-
jah Chorus" from "The Messiah." In
the Pearl Tyner Auditorium, 7 p.m.,
tickets are $5, benefiting the chorus'
travel fund. Call 689-7177 for more
information.
'Tales of Aim'
DEC. 15 The Northwest Flor-
ida State College Theater Depart-
ment presents this offering in the
Children's Series for school groups
of live theatre at 10 a.m. at the Mat-
tie Kelly Fine & Performing Arts
Center on the Mainstage. Tickets
are $6 for each student/chaperone.
Limited seating for others may be
available for $6 each, call Delores
Merrill, Mattie Kelly Arts Center
house manager, at 729-6065 for res-
ervations and ticket availability.
CHS winter band concert
DEC. 16 Holiday festivities
continue as the 280-member Crest-
view High School Big Red Machine
performs its popular annual holiday
concert, featuring favorite Christ-
mas songs, carols and lively rendi-
tions of orchestral music sure to set
your toes tapping. In the Pearl Tyner
Auditorium, 7 p.m., free admission.
Call 689-7177 for more information.

Be sure to let the community
know about your arts or entertain-
ment event. Submit listings for the
Community Arts Calendar to bri-
anh@crestviewbulletin.com or call
682.6524 at least two weeks before
your event.


NE ~*I


0to






B6 I Crestview News Bulletin


Lifestyle


Saturday, September 25, 2010


A doctor's long





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Dr. Hor (far ri
posed with he
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JERILEE BENNETT I Freedom News Service
Dr. Michelle Kern Hor, right, checks a monitor during an endoscopy procedure on a
patient recently at Penrose hospital. R.N. Soon Lee assists her during the procedure.


Patients, women in medicine benefit from

physicians persistence, heart for service


i tFreedom News Service
Dr. Michelle Hor's office looks like a typical
physician's office. Inches-thick textbooks with
S polysyllabic titles fill her bookshelf a testament
to the intellectual rigor required for the job. Some
half-dozen degrees hang behind her desk as proof
that all those books are more than show.
But as typical as her office might seem, her
'? 2 journey to get there was anything but ordinary.
ght) Hor, a 55-year-old gastroenterologist, was born
ar in Malaysia, where she faced dire poverty and
ing grew up in a culture that discriminated against
.im Ch- women. Despite the odds, she learned English,
village became a nurse and eventually graduated from
grew medical school, even though she didn't have a high
t, Dr. school diploma.
em She's become a role model for women in the
her medical profession. Two years ago she started
a Colorado Springs, Colo., chapter of Women in
son, Medicine, a national group that mentors and sup-
her, ports women in her profession.
see her
ome in Children carrying coconuts
ia.
Hor was born in a remote village lush with
vegetation and full of monkeys and exotic wildlife.
For all the natural beauty, though, life was hardly
paradise.
The youngest of a dozen children, she and her
siblings started working rows of coconut palms
when they were as young as 5. The work was gru-
eling. Days began at 4 a.m. and ended late into the
night. As a young girl, her job was to haul coconut
shells, used for firewood, in heavy woven baskets.
The family home had an outdoor well and no
running water, and everyone shared one out-
house. Virtually all the children were infested with
worms. Two of her siblings died, a 5-year-old sister
and 1-year-old brother, of what Hor believes would
have been preventable conditions with modern
medical care.
Such a life, especially for a girl, was hard to es-
cape in the traditional Malaysian-Chinese culture
of the time, Hor said. Women filled their plates af-
ter the men, and girls were discouraged from fin-
ishing high school. None of her older siblings went
to college.
Even so, she decided there must be more out
there. "I said, 'That's enough. I have to get out of
this place.'"
Although most girls ended school by the sixth
grade, Hor persuaded her father to let her contin-
ue. Several jobs she held as a teen helped pay tu-
ition at a private Catholic school where she could
learn English.
It was a sound plan, but in high school she saw
another potential threat to her ambitions for a
better life. Each semester, one by one, girls were
Kenm, disappearing. For as little as $50, they were being
: s sold into marriages to wealthy businessmen. She
:1 cii worried that the same could happen to her.
,.,, 11-, Without finishing high school, Hor went to Pen-
-I er ang, the country's second-largest city, where she
could establish her independence. She worked four
eft, jobs: From 6 a.m. to 2 p.m., she was on an assembly
line for Texas Instruments. In the afternoons, she
sold cosmetics door-to-door. Evenings, she tutored
ur-.:d as high school students in math and science, and she
i.r in g spent nights and weekends as a maid.
cI.,-nit in After a year, she moved to Malaysia's capital,
:,cd-:::n. Kuala Lumpur, where she demonstrated food in a
supermarket and attended night school to become
a telephone operator. That led to a better-paying
job, and after saving her money, Hor was able to
buy a one-way ticket to nursing school in England.
She became the first and only one in her immedi-
ate family to leave Malaysia.
The pursuit of medicine
Hor attended the Birchill Hospital in Rochdale,


Lancashire, to train as a nurse, and worked at
Hammersmith Hospital in London. In 1978 she
married James Hor, a student studying business.
In 1981, they came to the United States, where
she'd lined up ajob at Arkansas Children's Hospital
in Little Rock A year later, she got a job at Baptist
Medical Center in Little Rock and worked there
for 10 years as a critical care and cardiac nurse.
During that time, the couple had two children.
As Hor continued her education in nursing, one
of the doctors at Baptist suggested she pursue
medical school. Soon, the rest of the staff was urg-
ing her to do the same.
So, at age 35 after more than a decade of
earning a good wage, starting a family and enjoy-
ing a life that allowed her some modest luxuries -
she started the 10-year process of medical school,
doing a residency and finishing a fellowship to be-
come a specialist.
Hor lived on peanut butter and jelly sandwich-
es as a medical student. During her fellowship,
she worked on-call overnight and weekends at a
Veteran's Administration nursing home.
She moved to Colorado Springs in 2001 and a
year later started her own practice, working as a
gastroenterologist and hepatologist, specializing
in the digestive system and liver.
Giving back
Today, Hor has a full schedule tending to pa-
tients, doing procedures at area hospitals and sur-
gical centers and teaching at Rocky Vista Univer-
sity medical school in Parker, Colo. Colleagues say
her experiences have shaped her into a physician
who's especially approachable by patients and
staff members.
Laura Jolly, a nurse practitioner and former
Intensive Care Unit nurse, said physicians can
sometimes be cranky when they get that 3 a.m.
call to come to the hospital. Not Hor, who's been
known to sit by patients' bedsides long after an ini-
tial assessment.
Hor's passion for medicine, though, goes be-
yond work itself. She sits on the El Paso County
Medical Society's Board of Directors, and found-
ed the Colorado Springs chapter of The Gut Club,
a social group for gastroenterologists, and the
Women in Medicine chapter. She also sits on the
El Paso County Medical Society's Board of Direc-
tors.
Jolly, who works for Internal Medicine of the
Rockies, said Hor was instrumental in encour-
aging her to stick with nurse practitioner school
several years ago when she was considering drop-
ping out. When they encountered each other at the
hospital, for example, Hor would bring medical ar-
ticles to help Jolly with subjects she was covering
and would give her pep talks.
"She's always been somebody I can turn to,"
Jolly said.
When Hor started a Women in Medicine chap-
ter, five people attended the first meeting, said Jol-
ly. Today, most meetings have 10 times that. Hor
has become a confidante for other women in the
medical profession.
"I have (female) physicians that come to me
crying, because they are treated like dirt," she
said.
She said women who are physicians, in many
cases, have to work harder to establish themselves
among male colleagues, and sometimes even to
patients. One of her patients, an elderly lady, could
not believe that Hor was the doctor and the nurse,
a man, was not.
"You learn to accept it and still live together,"
she said.
Hor's attitude, she said, comes from simple
gratitude. Her toughest days in medical school
did not compare to the backbreaking loads of co-
conuts she hauled as a child. And she's become
convinced that any barrier can be overcome with
hard work.


NE ~*I





Saturday, September 25, 2010


Lifestyle


Crestview News Bulletin I B7


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Copyrightedd Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


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OnLO a":: :. mmOma


Family photos
get promoted in
the workplace
By JENNIFER FORKER
For The Associated Press
Think outside the box the
photo frame or the bulletin
board, that is in bringing
personal photos into the
workspace.
"People are kind of looking
for style everywhere now," said
Samantha Thorpe, senior home
design editor for Better Homes
and Gardens magazine. "They
want to make their (work) place
look more personal and pretty."
Ideas include applying
images to surprising surfaces
- a porcelain vase, a lampshade
or inside a clear glass jar.
Today's digital photography
makes it possible.
"A lot of us spend so much


time in our offices. We should try
to incorporate the people we love
into our spaces," said Rachael
Liska, senior editor at Fresh
Home magazine.
The key is to decorate a
workspace for attractiveness
without distractions.
"It's kind of this whole de-
cluttering feeling," Thorpe said.
"De-clutter your photos, and
de-clutter your work space. It
makes your space feel more
organized, and this may help you
out."
Better Homes and Gardens'
photo-displaying ideas for the
home often can translate to
the office. Thorpe suggested
painting or decoupaging a
simple desk organizer, adding a
few sentimental words, such as
"Worth a thousand words," with
stencils or scrapbook letters and
grouping matted photos on top
of that.
If the photo mattes are the
same color, it lends consistency
- thus elegance to the


collection. Displaying only black
and white photos helps, too,
creating "that classic feel people
like," Thorpe said.
Another idea from Thorpe:
Ring a small can or jar with
colorful paper topped with family
images, then embellish with
scrapbook letters or stickers.
And jazz up frames by tweaking
what's inside: Thorpe suggests
incorporating scrapbooking
skills and ephemera with family
members' faces in perfect
circles cut with a large-sized
hole punch. Alternate family
images with punched-out
circles of scrapbook paper and
embellishments in a grid format
for a 3-D effect.
"It works because it's still
really simple," Thorpe said.
"Doing a grid like this one you
give yourself a good structure.
It's like a recipe."
Thorpe also suggested
tucking computer-printed photos
- again, preferably in black and
white inside clear glass jars


tj\t0


that then can be used for pencils
and other office supplies. The
photos can be switched out at
any time.
From a recent issue of Fresh
Home, Liska shares several
home-to-office photo-keepsake
ideas:
Print a simple black-and-
white image onto a clear or white
self-adhesive label, available at
office-supply stores, and attach
it to a smooth surface, such as a
ceramic vase.
Print a family photo onto
photo-transfer fabric and wrap it
around an existing lampshade;
attach with decorative brads,
or spray with fabric adhesive or
liquid fabric glue.
Another use for a larger
image printed onto photo-
transfer fabric: Stretch it across
a stretcher frame or a pre-
existing canvas frame and staple
into place for that "I'm a canvas
painting" look.
To showcase framed images,
here's something new: Kodak


has created a "metallic" paper
for printing digital images, which
adds brightness and sharpness
to photos.
Jeff Lawson, store manager
of Wolf Camera in Lakewood,
Colo., said the metallic printing
process works best for pictures
that have high color contrasts,
so black-and-white images are
ideal.
"It really does make the
image pop. In a way, it reflects
light just like metal would,"
Lawson said.
"The only thing I've seen
it doesn't work with are those
inside-with-a-flash photos of
grandkids sitting on the floor,"
he said.
Sharing family photos in
the workplace in an attractive,
organized manner helps co-
workers become and remain
connected.
"It gives people something to
talk about," Thorpe said. "We all
have family. We can all connect
on that level."


^ Copyrighted Material


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aestviewbulletinIom


I 110U0
cult Court of Okaloosa
County, Florida will on
October 13, 2010, at
11:00 a.m. (Central
Time), or as soon
thereafter as the sale
may proceed pursuant
to a public auction at
www,okaloosa,realforedose.co
m, which is
conducted by agents of
the Clerk of Okaloosa
County to sell to the
highest bidder for cash,
except in the event the
property is sold to
Plaintiff via application
of a credit bid, all in ac-
cordance with Section
45.031 of the Florida
Statutes, the property
located in Okaloosa
County, Florida as de-
scribed on Exhibit "A'
attached hereto and
made a part hereof

SUBJECT PARCEL "A'
(AS SURVEYED DY
SOUTHERN ENGI-
NEERING GROUP,
PA.)

BEGINI'IING AT THE
NORTHWEST COR-
NER OF SECTION 29,
TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH,
RANGE 23 WEST,
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE
PROCEED SOUTH 88
DEGREES 30 MIN-
UTES 35 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE OF
1930.09 FEET;
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 01 DEGREES
27 MINUTES 15 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1221.56
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 20 MINUTES
09 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 703.10
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 27 MINUTES
24 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 463.67
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 47 MINUTES
40 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 513.86
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 15 DE-
CREES 24 MINUTES
15 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 727.14
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 88 DE-
GREES 41 MINUTES
44 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 338.59
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 27 MINUTES
24 SECONDS WEST, A
'DISTANCE OF 90.90
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 44' MINUTES
27 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 446.90
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 49 DE-
GREES 34 MINUTES
20 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 109.49
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHWEST
AND HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 770.05 FEET;
THENCE PROCEED
ALONG THE ARC OF
SAID CURVE
THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 10'57'24"
AN ARC DISTANCE.
OF 147.26 FEET
(CHORD N 83'05'00" W,
147.03 FEET) TO A
POINT OF TANGENCY
OF SAID CURVE;
THENCE PROCEED
NORTH 88 DEGREES
.33 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 91.57
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 26 MINUTES
18 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 15.00
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 88 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES
42 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 374.36
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 26 MINUTES
18 SECONDS WEST,
A' DISTANCE OF 50.00
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES
42 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 274.84
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
CREES 26 MINUTES
18 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE 82.00
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES
42 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 93.67
FEET; THENCE PRO-


a ou
CEED NORTH 06 DE-
GREES 25 MINUTES
'49 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 67.26
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES
42 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 91.57
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURES OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHWEST
AND HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 689.98 FEET:
THENCE PROCEED
ALONG THE ARC OF
SAID CURVE
THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGEL OF 04'35'06",
AN ARRC DISTANCE
OF 55.21 FEET
(CHORD S 86'16'09" E,
55..20 FEET); THENCE
PROCEED SOUTH 22
DEGREES 48 MIN-
UTES 13 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 72.26 FEET:
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 09 DEGREES
26 MINUTES 41 SEC-
ONDS WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 52.85
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 18 DE-
GREES 09 MINUTES
04 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 68.63
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 09 DE-
GREES 23 MINUTES
00 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 55.24
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 72 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES
19 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 476.04
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
330.00 FEET; THENCE
PROCEED ALONGTHE
ARC OF SAID CURVE
THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 11'59'32",
AN ARC DISTANCE OF
69.07 FEET (CHORD S
66'50'11" W, 68.94
FEET) TO A POINT OF
TANGENCY OF SAID
CURVE; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 61 DE-
GREES 22 MINUTE, 38
SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 207.13
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 84 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
41 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 856.87
FEET: THENCE CON-
TINUE SOUTH 84 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
41 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 487.85
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 01 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES 2
1 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 669. 61
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 01 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES
28 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 1328.67
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 01 DE-
CREES 53 MINUTES
24: SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF
1318.70, FEET TO THE
BEGINNING OF SAID
PARCEL HEREIN DE-
SCRIBED, CONTAIN-
ING 168.54 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS, LESS
AND EXCEPT THAT
CERTAIN PARCEL TO
THE CITY OF CREST-
VIEW AS RECORDED
IN THE OFFICIAL REC-
ORDS OF OKALOOSA
COUNTY FLORIDA IN
BOOK 2550 PAGE 1.

SUBJECT PARCEL "B"
(AS SURVEYED BY
SOUTHERN ENGI-
NEERING GROUP,
PA.)

COMMENCING AT
THE NORTHWEST
CORNER CF SECTION
29, TOWNSHIP 3
NORTH, RANCE 23
WEST, OKALOOSA
COUNTY FLORIDA;
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 01 DEGREES
53 MINUTES 24 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1318,70
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES
28 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 1328.67
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES
21 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 669.91
FEET; THENCE CON-
TINUE. SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES
21 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 664,04
FEET; THENCE PRO-


S 1100 I
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 39 MINUTES
27 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 369.72
FEET; TI-IENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
04 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 114.30
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
41 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 809.11
FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING;
THENCE PROCEED
NORTH 05 DEGREES
10 MINUTES 19 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 254.79
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 36 MINUTES
31 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 237,24
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 05 DE-
GREES 23 MINUTES
29 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 405.06
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 34 DE-
GREES 34 MINUTES
45 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 19.37
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 60 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
25 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 105.97
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
270.00 FEET; THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
11'59'30", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 56.51 FEET
(CHORD N: 66'50'10" E,
56.41 FEET) TO A
POINT OF TANGENCY
OF SAID. CURVE;
THENCE PROCEED-
NORTH 72 DEGREES
49 MINUTES 55 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 478.68
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 51 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES
13 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 99.51
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH-60 DE-
GREES 14 MINUTES
34 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 159,65
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 17 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES
05 SECONDS: WEST,
A DISTANCE OF 47.59
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 72 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
55 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 162.86
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHWEST
AND HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 149.0 1 FEET;
THENCE PROCEED
ALONG THE ARC OF
SAID CURVE
THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 53'03'52".
AN ARC DISTANCE OF
138.01 FEET (CIHORD
S 81'08"43" E, 133.13
FEET); THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 35 DE-
GREES 08 MINUTES
44 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 34,27
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
175.00 FEET; THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
19'58'42", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 61.02 FEET
(CHORD S 25'09'23" W,
60,71 FEET) TO A
POINT' OF TANGENCY
OF SAID CURVE;
THENCE PROCEED


I 1 10U
SOUTH 15 DEGREES
10 MINUTES 04 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 178.57
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
175.00 FEET; THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
26'09'10", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 79.88 FEET
(CHORD S 02'05'26" W,
79.19 FEET) To A
POINT OF CURVA-
TURE OF A CURVE
CONCAVE TO THE
SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
333,00 FEET; THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC Of SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL- ANGLE OF
38'29'13", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 223.68
FEET (CHORD S
58'55'00" W, 219.50
FEET) TO A POINT OF
TANGENCY OF SAID
CURVE; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 39 DE-
GREES 40 MINUTES
24 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 100.39
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH SO DE-
GREES 19 MINUTES
36 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 68.00
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 50 DE-
CREES 54 MINUTES
11 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 138.64
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 50 DE-
GREES 19 MINUTES
36 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 95.00
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 39 DE-
GREES 40 MINUTES
24 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 305.29
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE NORTHWEST
AND HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 267.00 FEET;
THENCE PROCEED
ALONG THE ARC OF
SAID CURVE
THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL. ANGLE OF
45'09'21", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 210.43
FEET (CHORD S
62'15'04 W., 205.02
FEET) TO A POINT OF
TANGENCY OF SAID
CURVE; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 84 DE-
CREES 49 MINUTES
45 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE Of 58.25
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 05 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES
15 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 93.00
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH' 84 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
45 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 115.00
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 05 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES
15 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 93.00
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 84 DE-
GREES ,49 MINUTES
43 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE. OF 273.45
FEET TO THE BEGIN-
NING OF SAID PAR-
CEL HEREIN DE-
SCRIDED, CONTAIN-
ING 14.38 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.

EXHIBIT 'A'
SUBJECT PARCEL "C"
(AS SURVEYED DY
SOUTHERN ENGI-
NEERING GROUP
'PA.)

COMMENCING AT
THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION


i ,Ul 5 iE
DI RU Ek T0


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Tear out, replacement
driveways, patios, Free
Est. Open 7 days week
Lic/Ins, 850-461-6733



Farm Direct
Centipede, Zoysia,
St Augustine, Bermuda
We Deliver & Install
Call 244-6651
Suncoast Sod Farms


Robert Brewer
Plumbing
Plumbing service &
sales, waterheater re-
pair, auth. service for
Rheem, Ruud, State,
A.O. smith, Bradford
White and others. call
682-8683 or 830-2631
Do Something
Good For
Tomorrow
RECYCLE
TODAY!


+1+ +1+ +








B 12 I Crestview News Bulletin


1 1100
29, TOWNSHIP 3
NORTH, RANGE 23
WEST, OKALOOSA
COUNTY FLORIDA;
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 01 DEGREES
53 MINUTES 24 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1318.70
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES
28 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 1328.67
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES
21 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 669.61
FEET; THENCE CON-
TINUE SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES
21 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 664.04
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 39 MINUTES
27 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 369.72
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
04 SECONDS EAST,. A
DISTANCE OF 114.30
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
41 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 809.11
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 05 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES
19 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 254.79
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 36 MINUTES
31 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 237.24
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH '05 DE-
GREES 23 MINUTES
29 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 405.06
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH. 34 DE-
GREES 34 MINUTES
45 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 19.37
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 60 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
25 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 105.97
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
270.00 FEET; THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF I
11'59'30", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 56.51 FEET
(CHORD N 66'50' 10"
E', 56.41 FEET) TO A
POINT OF TANGENCY
OF SAID CURVE;
THENCE PROCEED
NORTH 72 DEGREES
49 MINUTES 55 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 478.68
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 51 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES
13 SECONDS, EAST".
A DISTANCE OF 99.51
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 60 DE-
GREES 14 MINUTES
34 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 150.65
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 17 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES
05 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 47.59
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 72 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
55 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 162.86
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
SOUTHWEST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
149.01 FEET; THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
53'03'52", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 138,01
FEET (CHORD S
81'08"43" E, 133.13
FEET); THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 54 DE-
GREES 31 MINUTES
46 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 50.00
FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING;
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 35 DEGREES
08 MINUTES 44 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OR 33.99 FEET
TO A POINT OF CUR-
VATURE OF A CURVE
CONCAVE TO THE
SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
125.00 FEET: THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
19'58'42", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 43.59 FEET
(CHORD S 25'09'23" W,
43.37 FEET) TO A
POINT OF TANGENCY
OF SAID CURVE;
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 15 DEGREES
10 MINUTES 02 SEC-
ONDS WEST. A DIS-
TANCE OF 178.58
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
125.00 FEET; THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
27'32'09", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 60.07 FEET
(CHORD S 01'23'58" W,
59.50 FEET) TO A
POINT Of CURVA-
TURE OF A CURVE
CONCAVE TO THE
SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
333.00 FEET; THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
01 02'58", AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 6.10
FEET (CHORD S
87'19'02" E,, 6.10


FEET); THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 14 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
32 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF' 198.72
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 15 DE-
GREES 19 MINUTES
20 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 110.44
FEET TO THE BEGIN-
NING OF SAID PAR-


1100
CEL HEREIN DE-
SCRIBED, CONTAIN-
ING 0.12 ACRES.
MORE UR LESS.

SUBJECT PARCEL "DI'
All of the East Half of
the Northeast Quarter
of the Southeast Quar-
ter In Section 30, Town-
ship 3 North, Range 23
West, Okaloosa
County, Florida.

ANY PERSON CLAIM-
ING AN INTEREST IN
THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE
PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF
THE LIS PENDENS,
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AF-
TER THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabil-
ities Act of 1990, per-
sons needing special
accommodations to
participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact
the Clerk of the Court
not later than five busi-
ness days prior to the
proceeding at the
Okaloosa County
Courthouse. Telephone
850 -6 5 1 7 2 0 0
(S h a I mar )
850 -6 8 9 5 8 2 0
(Crestv iew),
1-800-955-8771 (TDD),
or 1-800-9558770 via
Florida Relay Service.

WITNESS my hand and
official seal of said
Court, this 10day of
September 2010.

DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURT
By:Beth McDonald

RICHARD M. COL-
BERT, ESQ.
Richard M. Colbert,
PA.
Florida Bar No. 654329
4 Laguna Street, Suite
101
Fort Walton Beach,
Florida 32548
Tel: 850-244-0350
Fax: 850-244-5231

09-18-10
09-25-10

Legal # 101297

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT IN AND FOR
OKALOOSA COUNTY
FIRST JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA


IN RE: ESTATE OF:
DEBRA ANN NITSCHE,

CASE NO. 2010 CP
000623 C
Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS

The administration of
the estate of DEBRA
ANN NITSCHE, de-
ceased, whose date of
death was March 31,
2010, File Number
10-CP-000623 is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court
for Okaloosa County,
Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of
which is Okaloosa
County Clerk of Circuit
Court, 101 Highway 90,
Crestview, Florida
32536. The names and
addresses of the per-
sonal representative
and the personal
representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.

All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING
THIS TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publl-
cation of this notice is
September 25, 2010.

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Connie Roper, Esquire
PO. Box 249
Crestview, Florida
32536
Telephone: (850)
683-3940
Florida Bar No:
0811971

Personal Representa-
tive:


Daniel Bowers, Jr.
296 South Ferdon
Boulevard
Crestview, Florida
32536

09-25-10
10-02-10
Legal # 101297

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE 1ST


1100
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR OKALOOSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO 10 DR 1035
DIVISION

Onny M .Lassiter,
Petitioner

and

Porcha R. Lassiter,
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE

TO: Porcha R. Lassiter
108 Azalea Drive, Eglin
AFB, FL. 32542

YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action has been
filed against you and
that you are required to
serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any,
to it on Onny M. Lassl-
ter, on or before Octo-
ber 13,2010, and file
the original with the
clerk of this Court at
1250 N. Eglin Pkwy,
Shalimar, FI 32579, be-
fore service on Petl-
tioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to
do so, a default may
be entered against
you for the relief de-
manded in the peti-
tion.

Copies of all court
documents in this
case, including
orders, are available
at the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court;Court's of-
fice. You may review
these documents
upon request.

You must keep the
Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified
of your current ad-
dress. (You may file
Notice of Current
Address, Florida Su-
preme Court Ap-
proved Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the
address on record at
the clerk's office.

WARNING: Rule
123285, Florida Fam-
ily Rules of Proce-
dure, requires certain
automatic disclosure
of documents and in-
formation. Failure to
comply can result in
sanctions, including
dismissal or striking
of pleadings.

Dated September
1,2010

CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURT
By: Kitty Sims

09-04-10
09-11-10
09-18-10
09-25-10



LEGAL#120684

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE
FIRST JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT, IN AND FOR
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO:10CP817

IN RE: ESTATE OF:
JIMMY OTTIS HAMIL-
TON,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS

The administration of
the estate of JIMMY
OTTIS HAMILTON, de-
ceased, is pending in
the Circuit Court for
Okaloosa County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
1250 North Eglin Park-
way, Okaloosa County
Courthouse Annex,
Shalimar, Florida
32579. The names and
addresses of the Per-
sonal Representative
and of the Personal
Representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured,
contingent or unliqul-
dated claims, on whom
a copy of this notice is
served, must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against
decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured,
contingent or unliqul-
dated claims, must file
their claims with the
Court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.

JUSTIN HAMILTON Per
sonal Representative
170 E. Burns Road
Crestview, Florida
32539

The date of this first
publication is
9-18-2010.


MICHAEL A. JONES,
ESQ. POST OFFICE
BOX 947 NICEVILLE,
FL 32588-0947
850-729-7440 Florida
Bar No. 332471 Attor-
ney for Personal Repre-
sentative

9/18/2010
9/25/2010


1100
Legal # 120692

NOTICE OF SALE

In accordance with
Florida Statues, let it be
known that Brown's
Mini Storage, located in
Crestview, Okaloosa
County, Florida, gives
notice to Wayne Hoff-
man that personal
property stored in unit
#156 shall be sold to
the public on October
4, 2010 at 9:00 am at
the mini-storage facility
at 4759 Live Oak
Church Rd Crestview
Fl. 32539. Outside stor-
age

09-25-10


LEGAL # 120694

NOTICE OF SALE

In accordance with
Florida Statutes,
Dansher Mini Ware-
houses, located at
1110 N. Ferdon Blvd.,
in Crestview, Florida
will offer for sale to the
highest bidder the
household and other
goods stored in the be-
low listed units of
Dansher Mini Ware-
houses. Said goods
are to be sold to re-
cover the rents not paid
by the tenant.

Unit#A-13
Sheila Hahn 5 Wilson
Street Crestview Flor-
ida

Unit#A-23
Kimberly Hancock
1115 Country Living
Rd. Baker, Florida

Unit#A-21
Ken Higgins 5301 Hare
St Lot 12 Crestview,
Florida

Unit#E-32
Nathan Kirschner 114
S. 22nd Street Esca-
naba MI

Unit#B-30
Jill Miller 6156 Barnes
Rd Crestview Florida

Unit#A-15
Tiffany Sledge 816 Val-
ley Rd. Crestview Flor-
ida

The sale shall take
place October 11,
2010, at 9:00 A.M., at
the Dansher Mini Ware-
house.

9/25/2010
10/2/2010

LEGAL#120686

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT IN AND FOR
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 10-CP-819

IN RE: ESTATE OF
GASTON BISHOP,
DECEASED.

NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS

The administration of
the estate of GASTON
BISHOP deceased,
whose date of death
was February 13, 2010,
is pending in the Circuit
Court for Okaloosa
County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the ad-
dress of which is
Okaloosa County
Courthouse, Crestview,
Florida, The names
and addresses of the
personal representative
and the personal
representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this
notice is required to he
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF
FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM,
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

Date of the first publi-
cation of the Notice of
Administration:September
18,2010

JASON R. MOULTON
660 North Ferdon
Boulevard, Suite A
Crestview, Florida
32536 (850)689-1474
Florida Bar No.
0150126 Attorney for
Petitioner


Personal Representa-
tive: Phylis Young
6444 Highway 20 East
Freeport, Florida 32439

9/18/10
9/25/10

Do Something
Good For
Tomorrow
RECYCLE
TODAY!


Classifieds



1100
LEGAL#120691

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT IN AND FOR
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE
DIVISION CASE
NO.:2010CP838C

IN RE: THE ESTATE
OF MARVIN LEE
THOMPSON,
Deceased,

NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS (Summary Ad-
ministration)

TO ALL PERSONS
HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Sum-
mary Administration
has been entered in the
Estate of MARVIN LEE
THOMPSON, de-
ceased, File Number
2010 CP 838, by the
Circuit Court for
Okaloosa County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
Okaloosa County
Courthouse, 101
James Lee Boulevard
East, Crestview, Florida
32536; that the
Decedent's date of
death was December 6,
2008; that the total
value of the estate is
$6350.00 and that the
names and address of
those to whom it has
been assigned by such
order are:
Gloria D. Thompson
4610 Antioch Rd.
Crestview Florida
32536
Keith Thompson 140
Troy Circle Ft. Walton
Beach, FL 32547
Kenneth Thompson 34
Cinderella Lane Ft.
Walton Beach, FL
32547
Cheryl Broscious 284
Plantation Hill Rd. Gulf
Breeze, FL 32561
Pat Tiley 1136 Oak Av-
enue Williamson Town,
NJ 08094
ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:
All creditors of the Es-
tate of the Decedent
and persons having
claims or demands
against the Estate of
the Decedent other
than those on whom
provision for full pay-
ment was made in the
Order of Summary Ad-
ministration must file
their claims with his
court WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL FOREVER BE
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
ANY OTHER APPLICA-
BLE TIME PERIOD,
ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first
publication of this No-
tice is September 25,
2010.

Attorney for Personal
Representative
JAMES C. CAMPBELL
James C. Campbell,
Esquire Florida Bar No.
708283 #4 11th Ave-
nue, Suite 2 Shalimar,
Florida 32579
(850)651-9313

Personal Representa-
tive
KEITH THOMPSON
140 Troy Circle Ft. Wal-
ton Beach, FL 32547

9/25/2010
10/2/2010



1120
Elks Lodge Turkey
Shoot starts 9am Sept.
25, 2010. Hwy 90 East
to Fairchild Rd. follow
signs.

NOTICE: Calling this
number will subject you
to HUGE savings on
statewide advertising in
over 100 newspapers.
Advertising Networks of
Florida, Put us to work
for You! (866)742-1373
www.flornda-classlfeds.co
m.





Pregnant? Considering
adoption? A childless,
successful, woman
seeks to adopt & needs
your help! Financially
secure. Expenses paid.
Call Margle. (ask for
mlchelle/adam). (800)
790-5260. FL Bar#
0150789


I JFs&ANjl
2100 Pets
2110-Pets: Free It
Good Home
2120 Pet Supplies
2130 Farm Animals/
Supplies
2140 Pets/Livestock
Wanted
2150 Pet Memorials



2100
Yorkies, Morkles, Mal-
tese, AKC, M- F $500
up, tiny, shots, hlth.
cert, guarantee, Call
(850)469-1466
Text FL20337 to 56654


2100
AKC Maltese
Puppies
Two adorable 10 week
old maltese puppies (1
female & 1 male) for
sale. Vet checked and
pee pad trained. Call
850-978-6480 or
850-978-9577.
Text FL20784 to 56654



2110
Free Kittens
All colors. Please call
850-398-5882


3100 -Antiques
3110 -Appliances
3120 -Arts & Crafts
3130-Auctions
3140 Baby Items
3150 Building Supplies
3160 Business
Equipment
3170-Collectibles
3180 Computers
3190 Electronics
3200 Firewood
3210- Free Pass it On
3220 Furniture
3230 Garage/Yard Sales
3240 Guns
3250 Good Things to Eat
3260 Health & Fitness
3270 Jewelry/Clothing
3280 Machinery/
Equipment
3290 Medical Equipment
3300 Miscellaneous
3310 Musical Instmments
3320- Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 Restaurant/Hotel
3340 Sporting Goods
3350- Tickets (Buy & Sell)


S. .
3220



Crib for Sale: Founda-
tion Stowaway folding
compact size metal
crib w/mattress. Asking
$90. 682-4785



3230



Crestview 110 Adams
Dr Crestview F. 9/24 -
Sat.9/25 800 1200
BIG YARD SALE- stuff
for everyone
Crestview: 4682 Caho-
kia Run. Saturday Sep-
tember 25th.
8:am-until. Furniture,
Videos, toy's. Girls
clothing 3t and up,
House hold goods and
much more
Text FL20724 to 56654
Crestview: All of Tran-
quility St. Saturday
September 25th
Garage/Street
Sale



3240
GUN SHOW
Fort Walton
FAIRGROUNDS
Sept 25th & 26th
SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4
FREE PARKING
Info (407)275-7233
flondaaunshows com
Text FL34120550 to 56654



S3280
New Norwood Saw-
mills, LumberMate-Pro
handles logs 34" diam-
eter, mills boards 28"
wide. Automated quick
cycle sawing increases
efficiency up to 40%!
Call (800) 661-7746,
Extension 300N, www.
NorwoodSawmills.com/30
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3300
Airlines Are Hiring.
Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid
if qualified Housing
available. CALL Avia-
tion Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769
Are you behind on
your Mortgage pay-
ment? Do you have an
adjustable rate mort-
gage? FREE Evaluation
and Advice. Call Ex-
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Government Spon-
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payment Of Your Elec-
tric Bill Must Be A
Home Owner, (No
Renters) Up to a
1,000.00 Utility Credit
Get a 3,000.00 tax
credit for 2011 Call to
see if you Qualify
(877)791-6142
It's Your Money! Lump
sums paid for struc-
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fixed annuity payments.
Rapid, high payouts.
Call J.G. Wentworth.
(866)294-8772. A+ by
the Better Business Bu-
reau rating.




National Arms Show
Gun Show Sept. 25-26
SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-5
ATLANTA EXPO CEN-
TER (3650 JONES-
BORO RD SE) EXIT
#55 OFF 1-285


Buy-Sell-Trade
(563)927-8176


Info:


Saturday, September 25, 2010



4130 6140
Heat & Air JOBS Crestview- 2BD, ref.
Ready to work? 3 week stove, dishwasher,
accelerated program. W/D. $600. mo. call
Hands on environment. 259-0267
Nationwide certifica- Crestview/Millgan &
EMPOYM tions and Local Job Baker- 1, 2, 3 & 4 BR
4100 Help Wanted Placement Assistance! Homes for Rent. Call
413 Employment (877)994-9904 850-682-4070, (850)
Information 830-2061,682-1972.


4100
ti | 6160 ]
Crestview- Roommate
wanted to share quiet
S 3br brick home. Auburn
Admin/Clercal BUSINESS FINANCIA area $400 mo includes
utls. Call 689-8978.
I I i n n .- = ....


Secretary
Full Time Secretary
Position for multiple
offices in Okaloosa
County.
Ideal candidate will
possess excellent
communication
skills, strong data
entry skills, and the
ability to work in a
team environment.
Salary plus bonus
opportunity. EOE.
Call 1-877-608-4327
Web ID#: 34121656


Driver Trainees
Needed
Now at Werner Enter-
prises! Earn up to $700
per week after training.
Great Benefits! No Ex-
perience needed! Local
15 day CDL Training
available with TDI.
1-8766-280-5309





Install/Maint/Repair

Electricians
Now accepting applica-
tlons for experienced
electricians for projects
at Duke Field and Eglin
AFB, applicants may
apply in person at 648
Anchors ST N.W., Suite
3A Ft Walton Beach Fl.
850 243-2223. EOE
Web ID 34119170



Medical/Health

Counselor
For substance abuse
program at Walton Cor-
rectional in Defunlak
Springs. AA-4 yrs exp
or BA-2 yrs exp.
401(k)/dental/medical
$28k neg. Fax resume
to 386-752-2387 or
email SheliaRand@
aol.com
Web ID#: 34119147

Sales/Business Dev

Hiring Locally
This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided -
Potential of $60K+ An-
nually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension
for those who Qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.





Wanted: Hair Stylists &
Nail Tech. private
rooms rentals $70. wk
682-0031 or 682-2175




4130
Colonial Life seeks en-
trepreneunal profes-
sional with sales experi-
ence to become a Dis-
trict Manager.
Life/Health license is
required. Substantial
earnings potential.
Please contact
meredith.brewer@colonallfe.c
om or call
(904)424-5697

Drivers Food Tanker
Drivers Needed OTR
positions available
NOW! CDL-A w/ Tanker
REQ'D. Outstanding
pay & Benefits! Call a
recruiter TODAY!
(877)484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com

Drivers-ASAP! New
Pay Increase! 37-43
cpm Fuel Bonus -up to
4cpm! Need CDL-A &3
mos recent OTR
(877) 2 5 8-8782
www.meltontruck.com

Drivers-CDL/A $2,000
SIGN-ON BONUS!
Start up to .42 CPM.
Good Home Time and
Benefits. OTR Experi-
ence Required. No Fel-
onies. Lease Purchase
A v a a ble.
(800)441-4271 xFL-100

Drivers-CDL-A drivers.
No experience, no
problem! Need more
training? We can help.
Must be 23.
(888)632-5230.
www.JoinWiltrans.com


POSTAL &
GOVT JOB
INFO FOR SALE?

Caution

You NEVER have to
pay for information
about federal or postal
jobs. If you see a job
"guarantee", contact the
FTC.
The Federal Trade
Commission is
America's consumer
protection agency.

www.ftc.gov/jobscams
1-877-FTC-HELP

A public service
message from the FTC
and Your Florida
Freedom Newspaper


luu D-1usines
Opportunities
5110- Money to Lend


5100
Part time business nets
$60k from home. Chris-
tian themed publica-
tion. No exp. nec. cli-
ents estb. for you. Re-
tiring $29,900.
941-685-8291



5110
$ Access Lawsuit
Cash Now! $ As seen
on TV$ Injury Lawsuit
Dragging? Need $500-
$500,000 ++within
48/hrs? Low rates Ap-
ply Now By Phone! Call
Today! Toll-Free: (800)
568-8321, LawCapital
Enterprises, LLC, 110
Columbia Street, Van-
couver, WA 98660,
www. lawcapital.com


6100- Business/
Commercial
6110 Apartments
6120 Beach Rentals
6130 Condo/Townhouse
6140 House Rentals
6150 Roommate Wanted
6160 Rooms for Rent
6170 Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 -Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals


6100

Office Space
Crestview
150SFto7500SF
Conveniently located
near the new FAMU
Pharmacy School.
Located between
Hwy 85 and Main St.
850-682-0791
Text FL20595 to 56654



6110

Publisher's
Notice

All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to the Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to ad-
vertise "any preference,
limitation or discrimina-
tion based on race,
color, religion, sex,
handicap, familal status
or national origin, or an
intention, to make any
such preference, limlta-
tlon or discrimination"
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing cus-
tody of children under
18.

This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation
of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed
that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper
are available on a equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The

hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPORTUNII



6140
4 br, 2 ba house. Pri-
vacy fenced backyard
w/workshop. $850 mo.
850-826-1687




Crestview 3 br, 2.5 ba,
$700 month + deposit
or 4 br, 2 ba, $1200
month + deposit. Call
Rose for more info
850-573-5054/482-2038
Text 21314 to 56654




Crestview Nice 3 br. 2
ba, close to schools
$750 month + deposit
850-682-9335/865-5106
Text FL20936 to 56654
Crestview, 462 Savage
Street, 3 br, 1 Bath with
Central Heat and Air on
a Large Shaded Lot.
$500 per month, $500
Deposit. 850-682-3931
Text FL19299 to 56654

Teel &
Waters
Real Estate
RENTALS
682-6156
162 Woodlawn Dr, A
$775, 1BR, 1BAfurn,
utilities included
162 Woodlawn Dr, D
$525, 1BR, 1BAfurn,
utilities included
123 Gills Dr,
$1,300, 4BR, 3.5BA
All properties require
a credit check, one
year lease; no inside
smoking, pet fees
are non-refundable.
Call Debra Frost
682-6156
Text FL20606 to 56654


6170
Crestview 3BR/2BA
large double wide out-
side of crstv city limits.
$800. mo w/ $600. dep.
Serious inquiries only.
Call 603-3701
Defuniak Springs 3 br,
2 bath. $550 per month
Also have a 2 br, $400
month. 850-892-1051


I E MFQRSA
7100 Homes
7105 Open House
7110- Beach Home/
Properly
7120 Commercial
7130 Condo/Townhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 Waterfront
7180 Investment
Properly
7190 Out-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 -Timeshare


7100


LOOK
Individual wants to
buy house for
investment. Please Call
850-651-0987



7130
Destin Holiday Isle TH
on Harbor. Boat Slip, 2
Br, 2.5 Ba, Lrg Garage,
2 Decks, New Paint
and Carpet $139,500.
Owner: 850-855-7533


Buy Mountain Land
Now! Lowest prices
ever! N.C. Bryson City
2.5acres, spectacular
views, paved road.
High altitude. Easily ac-
cessible, secluded.
$45,000. Owner financ-
ing: (800)810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com
Lakefront Bargain!
Only $44,900 Adjacent
lakefront sold for
$149,900. Beautiful es-
tate size homesite in
prestigious, gated
coastal community w/
direct ocean access.
Enjoy pool, clubhouse,
FREE boat slips, more.
ALL utilities completed.
Only one! Easy financ-
ing. Call now
(877)888-1415, x 2639.


8100- Anique& Collectibles
8110 -Cars
8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
8130 Trucks
8140 -Vans
8150 Commercial
8160 Motorcycles
8170 Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210-Boats
8220 Personal Watercraft
8230 Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine
Supplies
8245 Boat Slips & Docks
8310- Aircraft/Aviation
8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 Campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes


8340
2003 Jayco Granite
Ridge, 32', E450 V10
eng. with only 11,000
miles, new tires, bat-
tery, 4KW generator, 3
burner cook top, micro-
wave, oven, ice maker
in frig, queen pillow top
mattress, ducted AC,
new carpet & DR
chairs, recliner sofa.
Like New. Asking
$39,995.850-689-0419

Dixie RV
SuperStores
FL's Newest RV
Dealer
NOW
OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm

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New and Used Units
7 Manufacturers:
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Located off 1-10
Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funlak Springs,
FL 32435

Sales
850-951-1000

www.dixierv.com


+1+ +1+ +











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r


ional


' CULTURE QUEST
"Art is the soul and spirit of each generation to be passed along to the next
and beyond." Stewart Turcotte, Canadian artist and gallery owner
Brian Hughes region's de facto arts center, with artists signing up
Arts & Entertainment Editor almost a year in advance to exhibit their works. The
north county committee of the Okaloosa Arts Alliance,
Sa r iv s r the official county arts organization, is organizing
For a relatively small rural area, northern public arts festivals throughout the year.
Okaloosa County is blessed with a plethora of cultural pub arts festivals thought the y
opportunities, and refreshingly, many are centered We're fortunate to have a large variety of
opportunities, and refreshingly many are centered opportunities to fulfill our entertainment, creative and
in our schools. Elementary students are discovering Theatrical productions, concerts,
cultural pursuits. Theatrical productions, concerts,
the beauty of the violin, middle school choruses are eents occur trou
entering-and winning-regional and state music fairs, festivals and arts events occur throughout the
competitions, our high school bands and choruses year around town, in neighboring communities, and at
are performing from coast to coast. And our drama nearby Northwest Florida State College.
Keep up with our region's cultural opportunities
students are creating their own performance pieces i he wekly community arts calendar in the
and bringing home state-level awards from thespian Crestview News Bulletin and on our website,
competitions. www.crestviewbulletin.com.
Throughout the region visual artists are filling
their studio and living room walls with paintings and C a d b
photography inspired by the beauty of the Panhandle. Cover art design by Brian Hughes.
In Crestview, the public library has blossomed into the Cello courtesy ofMontavius Diamond.


CRESTVIEW



News Bulletin
To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524.


NEWS INFORMATION
IF YOU HAVE A CONCERN OR COMMENT
ABOUT CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN'S
COURAGE, PLEASE CALL 682-6524.
PUBLISHER
JASON MOBLEY
EDITOR
MICHAEL STEWART
OFFICE STAFF
DENISE CADENHEAD. OFFICE ASSISTANT
SHERRIE STANLEY .... RECEP./RC. ASST.
ADVERTISING INFORMATION
DIANA BAKER ...... AD CONSULTANT
RANDY BEARD ...... SALES MANAGER
MELISSA TEDDER .... MEDIA CONSULTANT
EDITORIAL
BRIAN HUGHES ...... MITER
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR
ANN SPANN ........ PHOTOGRAPHER
RANDY DICKSON .... SPORTS EDITOR
RENEE BELL ........ TYPESETTING


PRODUCTION
GREG ALLEN ....... PRODUCTION
CIRCULATION INFORMATION
682-6524
THE CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN
IS PUBLISHED TWICE WEEKLY EACH
WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY BY FLORIDA
FREEDOM NEWSPAPERS, INC., AT 295 W
JAMES LEE BLVD., CRESTIEW, FLORIDA
32536. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT
CRESTIEW, FLORIDA. POSTMASTER:
PLEASE SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO
295 W JAMES LEE BLD., CRESTVIEW,
FLORIDA 32536-3313. ALL MATERIAL
HEREIN IS PROPERTY OF THE CRESTVIEW
NEWS BULLETIN.





II BS II *TES


In County
13 weeks........................$9.45
26 weeks....................... $17.85
52 weeks.......................$32.76


Out of County
13 weeks....................... $14.70
26 weeks.......................$23.10
52 weeks....................... $38.01


JOHN DEERE


For all your lawn care & maintenance needs!










IN STEP


WITH THE BRM


Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor

The Crestview High School Band
-known fondly as the Big Red Machine-
is such a local fixture, whether on the
field at Jack Foster Stadium, parading
up Main Street or performing on the
Pearl Tyner Auditorium stage, it's hard to
imagine a time when it wasn't part of our
community.
But before 1938, the county seat's
high school was band-less. We can thank
Romulus H. Thompson for remedying the
situation.
When a committee including a school
board member, a Crestview doctor,
the county tax collector and four other
gentlemen, decided Crestview needed
some culture and a band would bring
it, they persuaded DeFuniak Spring's
assistant band director to head west and
take over the as-yet unformed Okaloosa


School Band.
Thompson advertised for "students
interested in learning how to play
band instruments." He drummed up
enthusiasm and soon had garnered an
eager troupe of musicians. Thompson
proved his prowess as not just a band
leader but a music teacher as well.
Within a few short weeks, on June 4,
1938, the new band proudly performed
in public for the first time, according
to a story by James L. Connor in the
"Heritage of Okaloosa County" The
city's first football field in which the band
performed was filled with sandspurs and
had no lighting at all.
From that dedicated group of 48
members, led by drum majorette
Josephine Tisdale, the Big Red Machine
has grown to more than 280 members.
Today it performs under the brilliant
floodlights that illuminate Jack Foster
Stadium like a Broadway stage.
In 1938, Mr. Connor tells us, the band


BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
THE BIG RED MACHINE: The Crestview High School Band takes to Main Street for its
first public parade of the season during Homecoming 2010 festivities.


also became the county's first band
booster organization after it persuaded
the principal of Crestview High School
and the football coach to give the band
half the gate receipts if it built the team
a stadium suitable for a halftime show
performance.
Director Thompson used his
organizational skills to rally the


community. A farmer donated sod, which
the Baker Future Farmers of America
laid. A sawmill operator provided lumber.
City leaders found funds-always tight
in those late-Depression years-for
lighting.
By the fall of 1938, 600 fans flocked to
SEE BRM, 7


SeS**eSS **006*006 ****** S**********SSS*** ***SO**SOOS OSOOSO*S


THE

Sound of the Swamp


journey '
( t'


ANN SPANN I Crestview News Bulletin
REEDS: Members of the Sound of the Swamp's reed section perform during a recent
Baker football game.


) Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor
It wasn't long after Romulus H.
Thompson formed the Okaloosa County
Band at Crestview High School that
another marching unit sprang up in the
county's north end, this time a few miles
west at Baker School.
Tony Chiarito, who has been band
music director at Baker School for 28
years, isn't sure when the school's high
school band was first founded, but knows
it probably dates to the World War II era.
Record-keeping may have been a bit less
important than making great music back
then.
Since the "Sound of the Swamp" ("I
didn't choose the name," Chiarito said)
was founded, there had already been four
or five directors before Chiarito picked up
his baton. Today he directs the more than
70-member high school band as well as
the middle school band program, a fertile
breeding ground for his older student
group.
Beginning shortly after school lets
out in May, the marching Gators begin
tuning up for summer band practice. Both
marching routines and music rehearsal


are practiced so by the time school started
at the beginning of August, under the
direction of drum major Paige Dabney, the
Sound of the Swamp was ready to take the
field at the first football game halftime.
This year's halftime show takes
audiences on a journey the band
Journey, that is with classic rock
numbers "Any Way You Want It," "Open
Arms" and "Don't Stop Believin'."
Besides drilling in marching routines
and learning music, there's another part
of being a member of the Sound of the
Swamp: Fund-raising, and lots of it. "It's
non-stop!" laughed Chiarito.
Band members can be found bagging
groceries at the Baker Pic-and-Save
and undertaking other fundraisers to go
toward transportation to competitions
and away football games. Sales from gift
catalogs, bake sales and car washes all
contribute to the band's budget.
Chiarito and the Gator Band are
grateful for the enthusiastic support the
band receives from the Baker community,
as well as the school administration,
county school district, and, especially, the
tireless efforts of his kids' band parents.
"They're the ones that raise the
money," he said.










Acting out in class


Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor


Most of Crestview High School teacher
Annette Gebhardt's class schedule is
filled with drama. But in the case of the
former English and reading teacher,
that's a good thing.
When the school's previous drama
teacher, Alison Wilks, departed in May
after only one year, community theatre
lovers as well as drama students
wondered if her departure might spell
the doom of the much vaunted program.
But when Gebhardt was announced as
the new drama teacher, an almost audible
sigh of relief floated over the North Ferdon
Boulevard campus.
Now in her second year at CHS,
Gebhardt still teaches reading, but the
majority of her class schedule is devoted
to teaching theatre arts. To watch her face
light up in her drama classes, especially
when her students are in the spotlight,
it's easy to guess where her heart lays.
"We're trying to build on what Miss
Wilks and Joe Hernandez did," Gebhardt
000000000000000


said, referring to the school's last two
drama teachers. And, she assured
members of the co-curricular drama club,
"We will continue the Thespian Society
program where you will go to district
(competition) in January."
With four drama classes comprising
five sections, more than 140 students
are studying theatre arts at Crestview
High. The majority of them are in the
program by very enthusiastic choice.
However, even those who were assigned
to the elective are embracing the art once
exposed to it, Gebhardt said.
"I have found there are some students,
there just weren't any other electives to
take so they were placed in here and now
they found they enjoy it more than they
thought they would," she said. "They
don't realize that they have that in them.
A lot of them have really come out of their
shell."
Gebhardt's more experienced
students frequently help kids in the
less experienced sections. "I do find the
second (level) and on students are good
mentors," she said.
Students have classroom instruction in
000000000000000


BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
CLASSTIME: The Crestview High School Pearl Tyner Auditorium forms a big
classroom for drama teacher Annette Gebhardt, left, at lectern, and several of her
classes.


the technicalities of theatre. A recent class
found them learning theatre terminology
as they distinguished stage left from
stage right, and upstage from downstage
and center stage. They learned what the
book was, and about auditions, blocking
and asides, and were warned what it is to
be panned.
But best of all, it's the exercises (some
might call them "games") that help a
student hone the craft of theatre that
000000000000000


most excite and animate Gebhardt's
classes. Some are conducted by veteran
students, including senior Jessie Hinton,
who is this year's Thespian Society
president.
Unlike Wilks, who inherited a program
that was deeply in debt, Gebhardt is
fortunate to begin her first year with a
small surplus. She's putting it to good use.
SEE ACTING, 7


Getting dramatic


Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor


When a teacher is informed that
another subject must be added to an
already heavy teaching schedule, it can
mean a tremendous burden. When Baker
School Principal Tom Shipp and Assistant
Principal Victoria Hayden approached
geography teacher Roger O'Neal earlier
this year about adding a drama class
to his schedule, his reaction was quite
different.
"I was thrilled," O'Neal said. "I couldn't
believe my ears. This is the first time
we've had this opportunity in over eight
years. This is a big deal and we're looking
to do some wonderful things."
O'Neal's third period drama class
includes 24 eighth graders and high
school students, plus five more students
whose schedules conflicted with the
class time, but who love theatre so much
they continue as members of the Drama
Llamas theatre club.
"This is the natural evolution of the
program," O'Neal said. He founded the
club after the drama class was cancelled
eight years ago but kids still wanted to


experience the joys of theatre.
I could tell I was approaching a class full
of drama students as I approached room
211. A piercing shriek echoed down the
corridor. Other classrooms in the vicinity
have apparently become accustomed
to occasional outbursts of, well, drama,
from O'Neal's room. In this case, it was a
student trapped in an elevator.
Of course, it wasn't a real elevator.
The students were improvising scenes in
which, given a situation by O'Neal, they
had to create dialogue and action on the
spot. Improvisation and role-playing are
two teaching tools that will prepare his
students for roles in a scripted play.
"I love these kids," O'Neal said
happily. "I could not have hand-picked
a better group. I was surprised at their
eagerness and energy. You're not going to
find a group of kids with more desire to
perform."
As if to confirm his observation, O'Neal
asked for another cast of volunteers for a
different situational improve. More than
half the hands in the classroom shot up.
This time it was a student trapped in her
car after having dropped her keys out the
window.


BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
APPRECIATIVE AUDIENCE: As their classmates watch and react, several Baker
School drama students engage in an improvisational scene during class.


"I don't know why this is their favorite
skit," O'Neal said, shaking his head as
supposed friends taunted the entrapped
driver.
During the period, the kids also ran
through some musical numbers for the
upcoming "Christmas Follies," which
they will perform in several area nursing


facilities. In the spring they will produce a
stage show, generally a musical comedy.
"I can't tell you what it is yet," O'Neal
said, because performance rights are
still being acquired, but, he added
conspiratorially, "Think zombies."

SEE DRAMATIC, 7







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BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
CHORALE: The Chorale ensemble combines the best singers from the Crestview
High men's and women's choruses.


Raising their voices


Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor
They've sung from San Francisco to
Disney World, and from the base of the
Statue of Liberty and Carnegie Hall to
London. They're the Crestview High
School chorus, more than 10 dozen
extraordinary young vocalists singing
everything from Bach to Broadway.
Under choral music director Kevin
Lusk, the CHS chorus pops up at diverse
venues throughout the region, including
the Cox Communications Mentoring
Telethon, singing "The Star-Spangled
Banner" at the Crestview High School
Homecoming game, All-County Choir
concerts, the chorus' Nov. 13 pancake
breakfast, and its popular Dec. 14 annual
Christmas concert.
The chorus is subdivided into several
smaller choral groups, several of which
have overlapping membership. Girls
comprise Destiny, a show choir that
couples a dazzling stage presence with
tunes including Motown, classic pop and
Broadway. Chanticleer is the chorus'
other show choir, a mixed male and female
group with a similar repertoire.
When the two combine to form
Singers, their material includes classic
and "serious" pieces, often from other
cultures and in other languages.
The individual Men's Chorus and
Women's Chorus are the two largest
groups, with repertoires drawn from
great choral music through the centuries.
Together the groups form Chorale,
one of the county's must stunning and
accomplished vocal groups.
No CHS chorus concert is complete


until the entire 125 students appear
together on the risers, delighting
audiences with the sweeping glory of a
massed vocal ensemble.
Choral music is a CHS tradition older
than both the present campus and its
previous location at the former Richbourg
Middle School.
"There has always been a choral
program at this school," Lusk said proudly,
adding, "though we're not as old as band.
There's been a choral program here at
least 50 years, maybe 60."
Past directors of the program included
Dr. Marilyn Overturf, the founder and
director of the Okaloosa Chamber
Singers, and Shirley Cadle, whose
husband, Crestview's Mayor David Cadle,
was band director during her tenure.
Contributing to the chorus members'
vocal music education and supporting
Lusk's efforts are the chorus' community
accompanists, Leon Curenton Jr., who is
also organist at the First United Methodist
Church, and Judah DeGraaf, who also
accompanies the First Baptist Church's
youth choir. Both are CHS alumni and
sang with the chorus during their student
years.
As with other arts organizations, fund-
raising is an integral part of the choral
program, benefiting its travel fund for
both regional and distant performances.
"We're busywith constantfundraising,"
Lusk said. "The community here in
Crestview supports us just tremendously.
I'm very appreciative of everything the
community does."
And when Lusk's kids raise their voices
in song, the community appreciates their
contribution to Crestview's cultural life.


1133 INDUSTRIAL DR., HWY. 85 N 850.689.8500









For artists, by artists


Arts Alliance's north county


committee keeps it local


Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor
It's a lament that's decades old.
Organizations in the south end of the
countyforget there are potential members
and supporters at the north end. Even
some "official" organizations seem to
forget that Crestview is the county seat
as well as Okaloosa County's largest
community, and seem almost stalwart in
their determination to exclude our region
from their activities.
Luckily for us, the Okaloosa Arts
Alliance, the official county arts agency,
recognized the need to pull north county
artists and art lovers into the fold, met
with area arts supporters and city leaders
in the summer of 2009, and formed the
Okaloosa Arts Alliance-North committee.
Only a year old as of July 20, the OAA-N
has already organized four substantial


public arts events, including CALA
-Crestview Area Loves the Arts a
day long multi-school and professionals
exhibit held in January 2010, and three
downtown Friday night Music & Art on
Main Street festivals this summer.
The OAA-N's core group of about a
dozen members meets on the first Tuesday
of each month at 6 p.m. at the Crestview
Public Library, a suitable gathering place
as the facility has become the city's de
facto arts center. The region's thirst for
public expressions of artistic ability is
evident in the demand for exhibition
space in the library's lobby display cases
and on its walls, say library officials.
"Artists are calling us," library Director
Jean Lewis said during one of the first
OAA-N meetings in her facility. "We don't
even have to go looking for exhibitors."
The chairwoman of the committee
is dedicated community leader Rae


HUG:11 M
BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
ART FESTIVAL: An art lover pauses to admire the black-light artistry of Mike
Schwartz during one of this summer's Music & Art on Main Street festivals.


Schwartz, an active member of several
Chamber of Commerce committees and
unit commissioner for the regional Boy
Scout council. Schwartz is one of the
originators of the OVAL arts program
(Okaloosa Volunteer Art Lessons) that
brings art classes to elementary schools


that do not have art teachers. She is also
a board member of the OAA
"There is a lot of talent in Crestview
and the Crestview area," said Schwartz
at the OAA-N's organizational meeting.
SEE ARTISTS, 7


Support the Arts in Your Community


The mission of the Okaloosa Arts Alliance is
to facilitate the growth and development of
art and culture in Okaloosa County through
coordination and communication among tax
exempt art and cultural organizations as well
as individual artists of the county.
WWW.OKALOOSAARTS.ORG

The Star is the Arts


;.:..- W "


The Okaloosa Arts Alliance North (04AAN)
think' tiht niminv pl- li who lht-p ll l iiiak tlhi- -'LCh
ai -'.i((--ftl l \tir thr tll art-. in tlhl (re-,t\it-\\ mic!
The Okaloosa Arts Alliance North (OAAN) thanks the many people who
helped make this such a successful year for the arts in the Crestview area!
Jean Lewis (Crestview Library). Audrey Milcarek (Crestview Library).
Ed Coleman (CHS Principal). Chayne Sparagowski. Viola Owens (Hart Printing).
Cal Zethmayr. Brian Hughes. Bill Kilpalrick. Mike Wing. Linda Parker.
Mayor Cadle and the City Council. Main Street Crestview Association.
Crestview Presbyterian Church. Kenny Martin. Crestview Police Department.
and all our wonderful area artists and performers!


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BRM, FROM 3
the new Sandspur Field and paid $1 each
to attend the first nighttime football game
in Okaloosa County, enjoying a lavish
halftime show that was, after all, the
whole reason the stadium was built.
The 2010-11 Big Red Machine has
been working hard on its current halftime
performance since early this summer. The
early start of the school year expedited
preparations for the new show, but to
see them perform, led by drum majors
Jennifer Wright and Geoffrey Loften,
you'd think they'd been performing
together for years.
This year's show theme is "Distorted
Dances," inspired by "Distorted" from
ACTING, FROM 4
The first production under her tenure will
be the stage version of the beloved 1983
film, "A Christmas Story."
"We are going to buy the leg lamp,"
she promised her students to excited
applause. "They sell it in the big crate
that's marked 'fra-geal-lay,"' pronouncing
"fragile" as the Old Man did in the film.
Technical instruction over for the
period, the students engaged in theatre


the Cirque du Soleil troupe. You'll also
hear the Big Red Fanfare, "Dancer in the
Dark" and "Danza Final," From Dances
from Estancia (Malambo).
Leading the program is Band Director
Jody Dunn and Assistant Director Matt
Clark. Supporting Jennifer and Geoffrey
are fellow student leaders, Band President
Catherine Stewart and Color Guard
Commanding Officer Katie Lowrey.
"Band Council is planning a lot of good
stuff this year," Jennifer assured.
With 72 years of tradition behind
them, "good stuff" is exactly what the
community has come to expect from the
Big Red Machine.

exercises that involved periodically
freezing in place upon command and
improvising a scene completely different
from the one they were engaged in before
ordered to freeze.
"Theatre is a confidence builder,"
Gebhardt said as she watched her kids
perform. "A lot of them are shy. They catch
a bug, but a good bug. They're just so into
it and they're devoted to it."


DRAMATIC, FROM 4
It was Ellen Mitchell, another Baker of the art before," O'Neal said. "My
School drama teacher quite a few years teacher made drama come alive. It was
ago, who bit a younger Roger O'Neal with a wonderful experience. Hopefully what I
the drama bug as a student, can do is share some of that beauty and
"I had never appreciated the beauty love for the art with these kids."
ARTISTS, FROM 4
"The economy is tough and the arts are 30. A monthly Music & Art on Main Street
considered by many to be expendable, but series is already being discussed with the
they enrich our lives." Main Street Crestview Association for
Following the success of its efforts thus next summer.
far, the OAA-N is looking forward to its "Our experience has proven how much
next event, the Oktoberfestival of the Arts talent there is in our area," Schwartz said.
in Laurel Hill on Oct. 23, co-sponsored by "We are looking forward to even more
the Laurel Hill Presbyterian Church. It opportunities to showcase that talent in
will be followed by another CALA school the future and adding to the cultural life
event, and appearances by member of our community and especially enjoying
artists at Crestview's Fall Festival on Oct. our beautiful Main Street.


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