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Group Title: Crestview News Bulletin
Title: Crestview news bulletin!
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028411/00549
 Material Information
Title: Crestview news bulletin!
Alternate Title: Bulletin
Crestview news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Crestview news bulletin
Publisher: Crestview news bulletin
Okaloosa Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Crestview, Fla
Publication Date: September 18, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crestview (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okaloosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okaloosa -- Crestview
Coordinates: 30.754167 x -86.572778 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 9, no. 37 (Sept. 5, 2001); Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 9, no. 40 (Sept. 26, 2001).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028411
Volume ID: VID00549
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ANN6621
oclc - 48122675
alephbibnum - 002758666
lccn - 2001229458
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Preceded by: Crestview news leader

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Table of Contents
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Saturday, SEPTEMBER l8, 2010 www.crestviewbulletin.com 50(


~QF1 Join the CrestviewN Chatter

Your online community.

~tlrp~ forums. crestviewbul letin. com


Now Accepting
Student Apphications
Call us to become a student today!
Ft. Walton Beach/Crestview
850-306-2395 troy.edu


Tkov
UNIVERSITY,
A futre ofopporturnities


MHAT PEOPLE HAD TO SAY
Proponents and opponents
weighed in on Crestview's ON THE WEB
approval of a contract that will
turn animal control services over To comment on this
to PAWS. Here's what Crestview article, visit www.
residents had to say: crestviewbulletin.com .
"There's nothing like voting
on something, approving it and bersoibefrpcigp
then asking for comments on it. ... and dspoeesin deAd sanims in hi
That's like six-day-old fish. That orsresPWstesiter
really, really doesn't smell good.,,cnrc hy ilntd t
Charles Nicholson
aonie Ty ngs
"None of us citizens that are
'One question the public
would like to know is, what SeFRMA
about roadkcill? Who is going to SeFRMA


Michael Stewart
michaels~crestviewbulletin.com
Although a contentious issue
over animal services in the city
of Crestview that has divided
council members and angered
some residents has been settled,
it is still generating controversy.
In a 3-2 vote, the council ap-
proved closing the city's Animal
Control department and con-
tracting services out to Panhan-
dle Animal Welfare Society Inc.,
or PAWS.
Ba nclT mebrearsdCrharl s


and Ben lannucci III cast the
majority votes approving the
contract with PAWS. Council
members Bob Allen and Linda
Parker voted no.
The city will pay PAWS $89,000
a year to handle animal-related
calls within Crestview begin-
ning Oct. 1. City Finance Direc-
tor Patti Beebe said closing the
city's Animal Control division,
eliminating the department's
three employee positions and
contracting the services out will
save the city $115,000 a year.
See PAWS A3


Teen injured
18 ROcldent


Officer
honored

A6


100 years
of scouting

All



Copyrighted Material
Availabl efon d dC nt~ee rvies




TABLE OF
CONTENTS
CRIME .................................. A 4
OBITUARIES.......................... A6
FAITH ................................... A 8
SPORTS .................BI
FO D ................................. B

G.ASSIFIEDS ......................... B 7

Award Winning
Newspaper
Florida PressAssociation
Better Weekly Newspaper Contest 3

FREEDOM
ALO I

Phone: 850-682-6524
Web site: crestviewbulletin.com
Fa x: 85 0- 68 2- 2 24 6
35th Year Number 75
20 Pages 2 Sections


Ann 5 p000
anns~crestviewbulletin.com
-A Baker woman has been arrest-
ed and accused of burglarizing two
homes in Baker earlier this week.
IBBrandee Carol Weathersby, 32, of
-- the 6400 block of State Road 4, was
o otrwlilehd sbse nc ep i tou
BRANDEE prescription and two counts of bur-
CAROL glary. .
WEATHRSBY She is in custody at the Okaloosa
County Jail on a $14,000 bond.
On Monday, deputies responded to a burglary
that had occurred at a residence on Griffith Mill
Road southwest of Baker early that day.
See BURGLARY A3


Th js map
shows the
appr x mate
of the
burg arles
on Griffith
Mill Rad
and R ves
Road
southwest
of Baker.
GREG ALLEN
News Bulletin


CRESTV


E W


INSIDE


(restview awards contract to PAWS


Bough shuts out debate, ruffles feathers


II
$,
I,
~r
d o


Hospital

names


new CEO

Michael Stewart
michaels ~crestviewbulletin.com
North Okaloosa Medical Cen-
ter will soon be under new lead-
ership.
David EAller
will take over as
chief executive
officer on Oct. 4.
He will replace
former CEO Da-
vid Sanders, who
left Sept. 3 to FULLER
assume the top
spot at Fannin Regional Hospi-
tal in Blue Ridge, Ga.
EAller comes from Southamp-
ton Memorial Hospital in Frank-
lin, Va., where he has served as
CEO since 2007.
"This is an exciting time to be
a part of North Okaloosa Medi-
cal Center as they grow to bet-
ter serve the community," EAller
said. "My focus will be on quickly
developing solid working rela-
tiOnships with the board of trust-
ees, physicians, employees and
volunteers to sustain the focus
on providing high-quality health
care and excellent patient expe-
riences."
Fuller, a Mississippi native,
has more than 25 years of hospi-
tal leadership experience, a hos-
pital press release states.
"While at Southampton, EAller
has successfully increased phy-
sician and employee satisfaction
to the highest levels in the hospi-
tal's history and the hospital has
recently achieved the highest
HCAHPS ((Hospital Consumer
Assessment of Healthcare Pro-
vdr,7 g: *ystes) s>.horesaamon
ROads market according to
the press release. "EAller has
recruited 19 new physicians to
vstmeth tnaI inf nst ute
and technology such as new CT
scanners and digital mammog-
raphy to increase the care and
services available for patients."

pit Sleupa oy 49n5 Meeom loeaand dha
90 acute-care beds and 131 long-
term care licensed beds, accord-
ing to the hospital website.
"David is an experienced
leader with an excellent record
of supporting a high standard of
patient service," said Pamela S.
See CEO A3


BUrglary Suspect arrested near Baker























































































































































NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our olfice policy that we have the night to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination, or treatment
which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for any free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.


Saturday, September 1 8, 2010


A2 I Crestview News Bulletin


Local


From staff reports

NORTH OKALOOSA
SAFETY SEAT
INSPECTION: The
Crestview Police
Department is proud to
celebrate National Child
Safety Seat Inspection
Day. Certified technicians
will inspect and install
child safety seats, and
instruct parents, and
care givers on proper
usage and installation.
Statistics show that many
children are not properly
restrained. CPD and
The Florida Department
of Transportation want
to help you keep your
children safe.
The event will be held
on Saturday, Sept. 25 from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
Crestview Public Library
on Commerce Drive.
Inspections are free.
Please bring your safety
seats and equipment,
safety seat instruction
manuals and vehicle
manuals with you to .
ensure proper installation.
PILL TAKE-BACK:
The Crestview Police
Department and the Drug
Enforcement Agency will
be participating in the
National Pill Take-Back
Initiative on Sept. 25 from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
Crestview Public Library
to help prevent them from
getting into the wrong
hands.
SCPD wants to make
it easier for you to do
your part. If you have
expired medications or
medications that you
no longer use, you can
dispose of them quickly,
easily, and anonymously.
Simply bring the
medications and place
them in the drop box.
Absolutely no information
of any type will be collected
from you.
Due to the risk
involved with intravenous
medications and injection
systems, syringes and
needles cannot be
accepted. Any other
illegal drugs (marijuana,
methamphetamine,
cocaine, crack, heroin etc.)
may also be disposed of
anonymously.
CRESTVIEW
LIBRARY: The Crestview
Public Library at 1445
Commerce Drive in
Crestview (682-4432 or
www.cityoferestview.org/
library.htm) is hosting the
following activities:
*The Friends of the
Crestview Library are
asking for donations of
used books and movies
on VHS and DVD -for
the book sale in October.
Books and movies will be
accepted at the library.
All types of hardbound
and paperback books are
needed, but not magazines.
*Joan Strewler-Carter
and Stephen Carter of
Life Options Institute will
present "Planning for
Life After 50" at the Oct. 5
First Tuesday program at


10:30 a.m. The Carters will
provide guidelines on how
to approach retirement
and offer "how-to" advice
on the nonfinancial aspects
of retirement. Coffee and
cookies will be served
starting at 10 a.m.
SHADY GROVE
CONCERT: James and
Starla Dean of the Gaither
Homecoming Choir will be
in concert Sunday, Sept. 19
at Shady Grove Assembly
of God Church, 1189 Shady
Grove Road, Baker. The
event starts at 6 p.m. Call
537-2774 for details.
OPEN HOUSE: TOPS
No. FL 504, Crestview,
cordially invites you to
their Open House at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 21. The
group meets in the First
United Methodist Church
fellowship hall, located
at 599 Eighth Avenue in
Crestview. Details: Elsie
Beck, 682-6040.
M/ULLET FESTIVAL
PAGEANT: The 2010
Mullet Festival Kings &
Queens Pageant will be
held Sept. 25 at Niceville
High School. The deadline
to enter is Saturday, Sept.
18 at 12 p.m.
Applications are
available at www.md-
events.com. For more
information, call 974-0220,
682-6129 or 682-0031.
DIGESTION
SEMINAR: On Sept. 21
at 6 p.m., Body-B-Healthy
of Crestview will offer
a seminar on digestive
imbalances featuring
Dr. Cole Heisler. Signs,
symptoms, causes and
natural treatment options
and various approaches to
restore a healthy digestive
system. Seating is limited;
please R.S.YP by calling
682-8893.
AHA FUNDRAISER:
Okaloosa County Water
and Sewer is selling
Boston butts for $25. Place
your order by Sept. 21
by calling Mark Griffin,
978-9939 or Alice Gaston,
651-7172. The orders will
be available for pickup on
Sept. 23.
FALL FESTIVAL: The
Main Street Crestview
Association is accepting
sign ups for participants
and volunteers for the
Downtown Crestview Fall
Festival on Saturday, Oct.
30 from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.
If you would like to
provide an enjoyable
activity for youngsters, be
a food or craft vendor, a
participant in the event's
planning process or need
further information, call
Promotions Committee
Chairperson Viola Owens
at 683-5252 or 423-1214. You
may also contact Board
President Mickey Rytman
at 974-4369, MSCA Vice-
President Ellis Conner
at 682-4846 or the City of
Crestview Administrative
Department at 689-3722.
Registration forms
must be completed
and turned in by Oct.
15 by 5 p.m. They are
available online at www.
mainstreetcrestview.org or


www.cityoferestview.org,
from the Administrative
Department in the west
wing of City Hall.
RIDE THE WAVE
FREE: Okaloosa County
Public Library Cooperative
and Okaloosa County
Transit are providing
free rides on the WAVE
throughout the month of
September. As September
is Library Card Sign-Up
Month, all you have to do
is show a current library
card from any one of the
six participating libraries
when boarding and ride
free.
This includes the
Crestview, Destin, Fort
Walton Beach, Mary
Esther, Niceville and
Valparaiso libraries and
the bookmobile, all WAVE
routes in Crestview, Fort
Walton Beach, Destin
and Okaloosa Island. It
also includes the NEW
WAVE Express Route. Bus
schedules can be found
at all the libraries and on
board the vehicles.
To get a free library
card, residents of
these cities or the
unincorporated areas
of Okaloosa County
should bring something
with adequate proof of
address. Residents of
any military installation
located within Okaloosa
County are also eligible
for free membership. Any
employee of Okaloosa
County or a member city
may also apply for a free
library card regardless of
their place of residence.
Citizens who do not fall
into one of the categories
mentioned above may be
required to pay a fee to
attain membership in a
library for one year.
Visit www.co.okaloosa.
fl.us, readokaloosa.org,
or call 609-5102 for more
information.
SONS OF ITALY: The
Order Sons Of Italy In
America is starting a new
chapter in Crestview. All
people of American-Italian
heritage are welcome to
join. Meet new friends and
make lasting friendships
as you continue to enhance
the cultural contributions
Italians have made before
and since their arrival
on the shores of this
wonderful experience
called America. For
additional information, call
585-3166.
HIV/AIDS TESTING:
is now available every
two weeks at Mount
Zion A.M.E. Church, 502
McDonald St., Crestview.
Testing takes place every
second Saturday from
10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and
every fourth Saturday
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Call
the church at 398-6985
on Wednesday for more
information.
EXCHANGE CLUB
OF CRESTVIEW: meets
on the second and fourth
Thursday of each month at
First Presbyterian Church
Fellowship Hall. Come see
what the Exchange Club


is all about. For further
information call President
Sharlene Cox at 682-6824.
CREATIVE
ARRANGERS GUILD:
Valparaiso Community
Library and Valparaiso
Garden Club are
sponsoring a new Creative
Arrangers Guild. The
group will meet on the
first Friday of each month
(September through April)
from 9 a.m. 11 a.m. at the
Valparaiso Community
Library at 459 Valparaiso
Parkway.
All sessions will be
taught by accredited flower
show judges. During each
session, the instructor
will demonstrate a floral
design, after which
students will construct
their own designs. All
classes are free, but
students must bring
their own equipment
and materials. The class
is open to all who are
interested, and no previous
experience is necessary.
Call the library
at 729-5406 or e-mail
marieharrison evalp.net
to register and to request
a copy of supplies needed
for the first session. The
class is limited to 30
participants, so advance
registration is required.
Nonregistered participants
will be admitted if space is
available.
OKALOOSA COUNTY
BUDGET MEETINGS:
Crestview meetings are
held in the Okaloosa
County Courthouse at
101 E. James Lee Blvd.
in Crestview. The last
meeting in Crestview is a
Sept. 21 public hearing at
6 p.m.
Agendas are available
at www.co.okaloosa.fl.us.
*BECOME A
TOASTMASTER:The
Crestview Toastmasters
Club has added a
second meeting day
to accommodate more
members and allow them
more opportunities to earn
educational awards. The
club now meets the second
and fourth Tuesdays of
each month from 6-7 p.m.
at Lundy and Bowers,
296 S. Ferdon Blvd.
The person with strong
communication skills has
a clear advantage over
tongue-tied colleagues _
especially in a competitive
job market. The club is a
learn-by-doing workshop
where members practice
their speaking skills
in a friendly, relaxed
atmosphere. Call Ruth
Salazar at 850-974-1618 and
join us in learning how to
speak with confidence and
say what you want to say!
BLOOD DRIVES:
As part of the Drive For
Life giveaway, all blood
donations made to The
Northwest Florida Blood
Center between now and
Dec. 31 are automatically
entered into the drawing
for a 2010 Kia Soul
automobile donated by
Kia Autosports General
Manager Jessica Lee in


Pensacola. The drawing
will be held in January
2011. Call 434-2535 for
additional information or
contact Betty Roberts at
brobertsefbsblood.org.
Sept. 19, First United
Methodist Church, 599
Eighth Ave., Crestview, 8
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Sept. 22, Woodlawn
Baptist Church, 824 N.
Ferdon Blvd., 1 p.m. to 6
p.m.
Sept. 26, Paxton
Baptist Church, 21757 U.S.
Highway 331 N., 10 a.m. to
3 p.m.
Sept. 27, Northwest
Florida State College in
Crestview, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. Free movie ticket for
all donors.
Sept. 28, Paxton School,
8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Sept. 29, Northwest
Florida State College
cafeteria in Niceville, 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. Free movie
ticket for all donors.
RED CROSS:
Registration for classes
and other Red Cross
events are available at
www.yourredeross.org.
You may also call 1-800-
773-7620 ext. 0.
FOSTER FAMILIES
CAR WASHES: Foster
Families of America,
located at 113 Main St. in
Crestview, is washing cars
for donations Tuesdays
and Thursdays from 9 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. The washes
support family fun outdoor
activities.
DAUGHTERS OF
THE CONFEDERACY:
Pensacola Chapter 298
meets regularly every
second Thursday at 9 a.m.
Members of the lineage
organization reside in
Okaloosa, Santa Rosa
and Escambia Counties.
For more information call
Glenda Manis at 678-7318
or 902-7049.
MOUNTAIN
DULCIM/ER GROUP
meets every Thursday
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at
First Baptist Church.
Come listen or play;
beginners are welcome.
Details: Marlin Bass, 682-
3165.

MISCELLANEOUS
CIVIL POLITICS* '
The League of Women
Voters of Okaloosa County
will host a free reception
Saturday, Sept. 18 from 4-6
p.m. to recognize people
comteddao "B igd,
at Niceville City Hall, 208
N. Partin Drive. County
citizens who demonstrate
their dedication
to promoting civil
behavior and courteous
cmmumacat ne will be
honord atthe ven'


which is open to the public.
The league opposes the
increasing strident tone of
public discourse, negative
campaigning and name-
calling, which impedes real
progress on the important
issues that affect all of us.
GERM/AN CLUB:
Members of German Club
"Germania" plan an open
house and welcoming
coffee, coupled with a
membership drive, at
the clubhouse at 428 W.
Racetrack Road, Fort
Walton Beach. Those
of German background
and/or those who love
German culture and food
are invited to attend on
Sunday, Sept. 26 from
3 to 5 p.m. There will
be German specialties,
homemade dishes, home-
baked goodies as well as
coffee, tea or soft drinks
all served in German style
China (Sammeltassen with
matching cake plates.) For
more information call Inge
Myers at 654-2941.
CHRISTM/AS
BAZAAR: First United
Methodist Church in
Niceville will host its 34th
Annual Bayou Country
Craft Bazaar at 214 S.
Partin Drive on Saturday,
Oct. 23 from 9 am. to 3
p.m. Proceeds will benefit
missions. A lunch counter,
silent auction and bake
sale are planned.
MISS HEART OF
AM/ERICA: Pageant on
Saturday, Oct. 2 in south
Okaloosa County is a
benefit for Shelter House
of Northwest Florida. The
basis of this year's pageant
is a food drive. Contestants
must collect a minimum of
10 cans of food for donation
to a local organization, as
a part of their pageant fee.
The contestant who brings
the most food will earn
the "Queen of Hearts"
title. There will be 12
contestants per division,
which includes girls and
women ages 0 to 23, and
married women ages 24
and up.
Register today at www.
missheartofamerica.com/
southokaloosacounty.
Winners in each division
will receive a rhinestone
crown, monogrammed
sash and entry fee paid to
the Oct. 1 2011 Miss Heart
of America State Pageant
to be held in Panama City
Beach.
Area businesses may
also get involved. You
may donate a door prize,
donate non-perishable
food items, or become
a sponsor. For more
information contact Sherry
Crews at 334-684-6051

See HAPPENING Al 1


NEWS INFORMATION
IF YOU HAVE A CONCERN OR COMMEwr
ABOUT CMESTWrEW NEWS RULLEDN S
CO"GPESE CLL 682-6524.


EDIO
MIon STEWART
OFFICE STAFF
DEMISE CADWHEAD. OFFICE ASSISTANT
SHmxE STANLEY. .. RECEP./GRC. ASST.
ADVERTISING INFORMATION
DIANA RAKER. .. .. .AD CONSULT&T


BRIAN HUGHE. .. .. WXITER
ARTS b ENTERTMINMENI EDITOR
ANN SPAN .. .. .. PHOTOGRMFHER
RANDY DICKSON . .. SPORTS EDITOR
RweE RELL .. .. .. TYPESEIRING


PnoDucTION
GREG ALLEN ... .. .. PRODUICTION
CIRCULATION INFORMATION

THE CMEST rEW NEWS RLREI
RE AASF TIEWEKYEC

IgmE LPEE R LS.CRESTVrEW, FLOMID
CMFST rEW, FLORIDA. POSTMASTER:
LEMSE SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO
RI5 W. ME3S6 EE RL .,L LRSVI
HREWN IS PROPETY OF ME CMEST rEW
NEWS RULLEDN.


Ask your Advertising Representative about our Color
by the Inch Program, Customer Appreciation Sale,
and Online packages.
CRESTVIE W

New Bllein(85) 82-52


:/ //ho // < li 2/J.5.5<.5 J/

In County
13 weeks...........................$9.45
26 weeks.........................$17.85
52 weeks......................... $32.76


Out of County
13 weeks.........................$14.70
26 weeks......................... $23.10
52 weeks.........................$38.01


Niceville Location
115 Bailey Dr.
678-5338


What's HAPPENING


CRESTVIE W





To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524.


** ^689.5400

Dean Insurance Group Inc '"san mei" noes" A
1455 S Ferdon Blvd Ste A2 Crestview FL 32536 (Across from Eglin FCU South) www.De anInsGrp.com





Need Eye Glasses to Read?


Smar LRSES SM


Crestview Location MULI Y IN TUE
930 N Ferdon Blvd. Darren Payne, MD
682-5338 Board
I GCataract Specialist
















































CEO from page Al


Overhead Door Company


Coin Show sponsored by

Ft. w ltonBeac

C0in Club. ~

Saturday, Sept. 25, 10 am 5 pm
and Sunday, Sept. 26, 10 am 4 pm.
In the Atrium of Westwood Retirement Resort,
1001 Mar Walt Drive, FWB, FL (across from FWB Medical Center).
FREE Coin to all Attendees signing in @ Welcome Table.













Admission = FREE Parking = FREE.
Coin Dealers from all over the southeast will be
set up. Buy-Sell-Trade, Coins, Paper Money,
Tokens, Medals. Numismatic literature available
while supplies last. Don't Miss The Fun!
For additional info:
Dave (850) 936-4892 or Bill (850) 865-0529.


)1)1Y I I YIIIY LI1Y I I YI~ )Y Y)LIY Y Y)


"My patients are my number one priority. I strive to
provide the best care by listening to their needs and
understanding them personally to achieve the best
quality of life for them. I never forget everyone
deserves care with dignity, respect and empathy."
Dr. Preston is relocating her office to the above
locations and looks forward to providing ongoing
services to her established patients as well as new
patients. No referral is necessary. Dr. Preston
brings more than 17 years of medical expertise in
cardiovascular and sleep medicine to the Okaloosa
County. She is a graduate of the University Of
Kentucky College Of Medicine where she achieved
the accolades of Graduation with the Highest
Distinction and Summa Cum Laude.

For an appointment call 850-398-5922


*All garage doors rated to withstand

at least 140 mph winds

*Quality service for over

40 years '
*FREE ESTIMATES '


Saturday, September 18, 2010


TRIPS from page Al
up at the yard sale, and more is
expected. The Chinese auction,
in which bidders buy tickets and
place them in envelopes in front
of items on which they wish to
bid, and 50/50 drawing are still
ongoing.
"It was a really good turn-
out," Lyons said. "All of our
people were very pleased with
the turnout and the money they
made."
Lyons' group isn't the only
local school planning student
travel. Groups from Davidson
Middle School will visit New
York and Washington, D.C., in
the spring.
At Shoal River Middle School,
world cultures teacher Nick
Kootsouradis is planning an ed-
ucational excursion for eighth-
graders. While a destination has
not been chosen, Kootsouradis
said that to keep costs down and
allow more students to experi-
ence the trip, he is researching
places closer to the Panhandle.
"Last year was Orlando,
which came to about $400 a per-
son after fundraising," Kootsou-
radis said. "We took 100 kids, but
we had 600 in the class. We're
trying to reduce the number of
days to reduce the cost so hope-
fully more can go."
Davidson vocal music teach-
er Keitha Bledsoe will conduct
the New York trip, which will
focus on history and the per-
forming arts, with highlights to
include Rockefeller Center, the
Empire State Building, the site
of the World Trade Center, a
tour of NBC Studios, Chinatown
and Little Italy.
"'lk~aveling to New York City
will give students an opportuni-
ty to experience history and the
arts in a setting the classroom
cannot provide," Bledsoe said.
"I am so excited to share in this
experience with them."


PAWS from Doane Al


Local


crestview News Bulletin I A3


The resident told deputies
she woke up at about 8 a.m. and
saw a female inside her bedroom
who was going through a jewelry
box. She confronted the woman,
who left the room and exited the
house through a rear door.
The intruder asked for help
as she was leaving the house and
told the resident she was being
chased, according to an Okaloosa
County Sheriff 's Office report.
She fled into a wooded area on
the south side of the home, taking
no property with her, according
to the report.
Another resident at the home
said he woke up and saw the
woman looking into his room
through a window. He went out-
side to investigate and saw the
same woman exiting through the
rear door.
Officers with K-9s from the
Okaloosa Correctional Institute
tracked the woman from the
Griffith Mill Road location to a
residence on Reeves Road that
had also been burglarized. At the
Reeves Road residence, deputies
found that a rear side window had
been broken, and the back door to
the home was open.


The homeowner arrived on
the scene and discovered that a
rear living room window had also
been broken and a small metal
lock box containing personal pa-
pers was missing.
K-9s later tracked the suspect
from the home on Reeves Road to
a residence on Tom Paige Road,
which was later determined to be
the home of Weathersby's grand-
parents. The lock box taken from
the home on Reeves Road was
found along the way.
Weathersby was identified in
a photo lineup by the residents at
the first burglary as the woman
who broke into their home, ac-
cording to an arrest report.
Weathersby was arrested
'lI~esday during a traffic stop on
Shockley Springs Road when a
deputy recognized her as one of
the passengers in the vehicle. The
arresting officer discovered five
syringes, a glass smoking device,
and a spoon that field-tested posi-
tive for cocaine residue inside her
purse.
Weathersby said she is a co-
caine user and usually shoots the
drug intravenously, according to
her arrest report.


BRIAN HUGHES | News Bulletin
BARGAIN HUNTERS: Among the shoppers at Laurel Hill School's
yard sale were Catherine and Wayne Sherwood. Catherine
said she had not yet found any treasures, "but my daughter
did. She just borrowed $5 from us to buy something."


Like Lyons' students, Bled-
soe's group will sample some
of the Big Apple's cuisine and
attend a Broadway show, but
something that makes the
Laurel Hill group's experience
unique will be a walk across the
Brooklyn Bridge, during which
the changing view of the Man-
hattan skyline is rivaled only by
the sheer impressiveness of the
bridge. Lyons' group will also
venture backstage at Radio City
Music Hall, visit St. Patrick's
Cathedral and head out to the
Statue of Liberty and Ellis Is-
land.
"For many of our students,
this is a once-in-a-lifetime
event," Lyons said. "This and
the Washington trips take the
place of the annual senior trips
and offers students a choice
during their high school years.
This is the first year for the New
York trip."
Davidson U.S. historyteacher
Patrick Humphrey is organizing


the school's eighth-grade Wash-
ington adventure, scheduled for
May. The itinerary includes a
plethora of famous museums,
including the Smithsonian Mu-
seum of Natural History, the
International Spy Museum, the
National Holocaust Museum
and the National Air and Space
Museum.
Students will also embark
on a Potomac River cruise to
George Washington's home at
Mount Vernon and will explore
the monuments and memori-
als on the National Mall. Visits
to the Bureau of Printing and
Engraving, Ford's Theater, Ar-
lington National Cemetery, the
Capitol and the White House
are also planned.
Overthe next several months,
local students and their families
will be feverishly engaged in
yard sales, bagging for tips at lo-
cal grocery stores, holding bake
sales, and manning booths at
area events.


Meadows, Ph.D., chairman of the
North Okaloosa Medical Center
Board of Trustees. "We are excit-
ed to welcome David and his fam-
ily to our hospital and the Crest-
view community."
Filler will oversee comple-
tion of a $22-million expansion
project under way to build a 40-
bed patient tower at North Oka-
loosa Medical Center, an affiliate
of Community Health Systems,
as is Southampton Memorial
Hospital.
According to the Com-
munity Health Systems web-


site, Southampton Memorial
Hospital recently underwent
$24 million in renovations and
new construction.
Sanders took over at
North Okaloosa Medical Cen-
ter in April 2007 and oversaw
$12 million in upgrades.
"Georgia is home for
my wife and me, so this move
takes us much closer to our fami-
lies," Sanders said in an interview
before his departure.
North Okaloosa Medical Cen-
ter employs 760 people, according
to the company website.


"We have a financial
and fiscal responsibility to
ensure that taxpayer dol-
lars given by citizens of
Crestview are spent wisely,"
Baugh said at the Monday
night meeting where the is-
sue was decided.
Grandberry urged
residents to give PAWS a
chance.
"We have not seen what
they can do," Grandberry
said. "They seem to work
fine in Niceville and Eglin
and other places around
town, and they are not com-
plaining about it."
lannucci agreed.
"I fail to see where we are
losing anything," lannucci
said. "For every complaint I
get about us going to PAWS,
I get an equal complaint
from city people saying they
have that same problem
with our current Animal
Control that they don't
get responses on weekends;
they wait for several days
sometimes before someone
comes up to their house."
Baugh, council president,
angered some residents
when he ignored requests
to allow citizens an oppor-
tunity to speak on the issue
before the vote was taken,
"Are you going to hear
these people here tonight?"
Parker asked Baugh. "They
are citizens and taxpay-


was on the agenda, anybody
COuld address it," Young
said. "I was surprised the
president didn't allow any-
one to speak."
The issue has sparked
controversy over two e-
mails sent by PAWS Direc-
tor of Animal Services Dee
Thompson to city Admin-
istrative Services Director
Mike Wing.
In an e-mail dated July
29, Thompson wrote that
the 2,000 animals cared for
by the city's Animal Control
department "would greatly
affect the numbers of ani-
mals we are already taking
care of."
"With our own budget
cutbacks and staffing, at
this time I will not be able to
offer the contract for animal
services to the City of Crest-
view," Thompson wrote. "If
there is some other way I
may be able to help, please
feel free to contact me."
On Aug. 5, a week later,
Thompson sent a second e-
mail to Wing.
"I have been asked by
my county commissioners
to give the City of Crestview


a bid for animal services,"
Thompson wrote. "I will be
sending over a contract to
outline the services."
"PAWS, by its directors
own words, is incapable of
providing the necessary
and expected service," said
Allen, who also questioned
why the county would be-
come involved in a city is-
sue.
Thompson said in a tele-
phone interview that she
initially declined offering
her agency's services to the
city because she felt had
for the city employees who
would lose their jobs if Ani-
mal Control closes.
"That was me showing
my soft underbelly," Thomp-
son said. "We are the only
game in town, and if we
don't bid, people won't lose
their jobs."
When asked last week
about the e-mail in which
she said county commis-
sioners had asked her to bid
on the contract for animal
services, Thompson said
she could not recall whom
she spoke with from Okaloo-
sa County about the issue.


Commission Chairman
Wayne Harris said Baugh
expressed an interest in
checking into PAWS, so Har-
ris asked a staff member to
call Okaloosa Public Safety
Director Dino Villani and
have him contact Thomp-
son and request she contact
Baugh.
"I never directed Dee
Thompson to give a propos-
al for the city," Harris said.
Thompson subsequently
confirmed it was Villani she
spoke with but said there
was no attempt to persuade
her to submit a proposal. As
a nonprofit group, Thomp-
son said, "Nobody can put
pressure on us to do any-
thing."
The county also has acon-
tract with PAWS and pays
$477,732 annually for the
agency's services. Thomp-
son said the county will not
benefit by Crestview's sign-
ing up with PAWS.
"No money will be de-
ducted from the county's
bill or anybody else's,"
Thompson said. "There is
no hidden agenda whatso-
ever."


ers, too. I think they should
have a voice in how they feel
about what we are about to
do."
Baugh said residents
could speak during an open
forum at the end of the
meeting, after the issue was
decided.
"Isn't that a little after the
fact, after you have voted on
an issue?" Parker asked.
Baugh also did not ac-
knowledge residents who
stood up asking to speak,
instead calling for a vote on
a motion by lannucci and
seconded by Grandberry to
approve the PAWS contract.
"It's nice to know the citi-
zens of this city are listened
to by this council," one lady
in the audience said angrily


after the vote.
Baugh refused to com-
ment following the meeting.
Crestview resident
Charles Nicholson was on
the agenda to speak about
the issue but was taken off.
City Clerk Janice Young said
it was her fault. Nicholson
had already spoken to the
council about the issue at a
public hearing the previous
week, and she thought he
would be allowed to speak
again.
"I thought if the item


BURGLARY from page Al


FOKUlW1710m page Al

for contracting out getting PAWS want to see
anybody lose their jobs. If you save $10,000, you've
saved $10,000. If you save $40,000, you can hire
three cops. I'd rather see you save money, contract
it out and give it a chance rather than do nothing."
Phillip Berezo

"Everybody has come out from the woodworkcs,
and they get upset and want to complain. ... I've
listened to everybody badmouth PAWS left and
right. I grew up helping this organization. They are
great people."
Christino Jennifer lonnucci


Helen A

Preston M.D.

F.A.C.C.

BOa rd Certified In:
Cardiovascular Disease
Nuclear Cardiology
Internal Medicine





Crestview man accused of molesting 2 girls


Swww.movieshowtime.net


CITY OF LAUREL HILL, FLORIDA, GENERAL FUND
PROPOSED TENTATIVE BUDGET FISCAL YEAR 2010-2011

ESITMATED BEGINNING BALANCE ................. ............... .12,000

MONEY MARKET ................. ........................132,000

PROJECTED INCOME:
AD VALOREM TAXES ................. .......................50,048
LOCAL OPTION FUEL TAXES........,,....... ,,,,..............28,005
FRANCHISE FEES ,,,,.,.. ................ .. .............17,000
UTILITY SERVICE TAXES ................. .. ............... ,,,20,000
MOBILE HOME LICENSES ................. .......... ...... ,,,,250
LCENSES ............. ..............210.
COMMUNITY SERVICE TAX ................ .. ............... ,,11,656
STATE SHARED REVENUE ................. .. ............... ,,,33,434

ERAP PUPK ENRANE ................... ......... ,,,,3,0
FINES AND FORFEITURES ................ ... .............. ,, .1,000
INTEREST EARNED. ,,. . .1,200.....
RENTS &ROYALTIES ................. .......... ..... ....12,000
DEP FUNDING GRANT.......,,....,... ,,,,,....... ........240,000
STATE MOWING CONTRACT ................. ................. ,,10,400
SCHOLARSHIPS &PARK DONATIONS ................. ................. 0
WATER OPERATIONS ................ .. ............... ,,,,206,320
GRANT FOR EAR PLAN ................... ....... ....... ..... ..,,,,2,000
TOTAL REVENUE AND OTHER FINANCING SOURCES......,............853,628

EXPENDITURES AND EXPENSES

GENERAL GOVERNMENTAL SERVICES ............... ..........,.....154,508

EAR PLAN &AMENDMENTS ................. ... .............. ,,.26,000
WATER SERVICE ................ ... ............. ,,,,,. .206,320
DEBT SERVICE
OLD BUILDING DEBT LOAN. .. .. .. . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .,27,000
RUAL DEV WATER LOAN ................ ... .............. ,, .34,800
PARKS AND IMPROVEMENTS ................. ... ...............,33,000
WATER DEPT UPGRADE ................. .. ............... ,,,240,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES .............. .......,.......721 ,628

RESERVES ................ ................. .........132,000
TOTAL ................ ................ ......... .853,628


saturday, September 18, 2010


Special to the News Bulletin

In our technologically
advanced society, we have
a lot of advantage sand con-
veniences. Unfortunately,
technological advance-
ments can also provide an
avenue for law violators.
Online businesses that deal
in the wildlife trade are an
increasing concern for
Florida's law enforcement
agencies.
With merely a laptop,
garage and mailbox, any-
one can open a business
dealing in Florida's wildlife.
These businesses could be


exchanging dangerous spe-
cies, such as conditional
snakes and lizards, or ven-
omous reptiles, which are a
serious public-safety con-
cern. Also, if released into
the wild, these nonnative
species can pose a threat
to indigenous wildlife. The
Internet needs to be moni-
tored to protect Florida's
natural resources from ex-
ploitation,
Fortunately, the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission is aware
of this issue and has an ef-
fective tool on its side: the
Internet Crimes Unit.


The unit, a part of the
FWC's Division of Law
Enforcement, is experienc-
ing tremendous success.
In the past six months,
seven hard-working under-
cover officers have made
151 arrests and issued 51
warnings through covert
Internet operations. This
technique is one of the lat-
est evolving technologies
to combat illegal captive
wildlife sales.
Legitimate businesses
that follow FWC captive
wildlife regulations are
safe for the public and the
environment. However, the


FWC has uncovered many
illegal businesses through-
out the state. The presence
of these illegal businesses
undermines legitimate
companies. Legal wildlife
trade businesses obtain the
appropriate permits from
the FWC and operate safe-
ly, and these businesses
are the ones with the right
to operate in this state.
The Internet Crimes
Unit uses investigative
measures that supplement
our traditional face-to-
face efforts. These online
methods are effective in
enhancing public safety,


continuing conservation
efforts, combating invasive
species and ensuring fair
business practices.
One case in Central
Florida has even led to in-
vestigations into six other
states. The case involves
a particularly large illegal
import/export business
that was shut down last
year. FWC investigators
are continuing to examine
it, and six people have been
charged with 121 criminal
violations so far.
The FWC remains ac-
tive in its conservation ef-
forts. Its Division of Law


Enforcement is not only
able to react to conserva-
tion issues, but, through
efforts like the Internet
Crimes Unit, it isprotect-
ing Florida's future by pur-
suing proactive measures.
The Internet Crimes Unit
is actively working to pro-
tect our state by tracking
down Internet crimes at
their source.
You can also help the
FWC in its conservation en-
deavors. To report wildlife
law violations, visit www.
myfwc.com/About/LE/
About_LE_Alert.htm, or
call 888-404-FWCC (3922).


on


Michael Stewart
michaels~crestviewbulletin.
com

A woman is facing felo-
ny charges in connection
with the death of
two dogs found at
a Crestview home
with no food or m
water.
Michelle Lynn '
Mackee, 32, is
charged with two
counts of "caus- MICH
ing cruel death/ MAC
pain and suffer-
ing," a third degree felony.
Mackee also faces three
counts of animal abandon-
ment, which is a misde-
meanor charge. She is in
custody at the Okaloosa
County Jail, where bond
has been set at $8,000.
Mackee's plea date is
scheduled for Oct. 19.


Mackee's Sept. 9 ar-
rest stems from a July 13
incident when deputies
responded to a call for a
welfare check of animals
at 3246 Little Silver Road


decomposition.
When contacted, the
owner of the home, who
lives in Arkansas, told
deputies MacKee was re-
sponsible for the animals'
welfare.
Mackee was arrested
in Fort Walton Beach and
her arrest report lists a
Fort Walton Beach ad-
dress on Vita Lane. In
prior arrests, however,
Mackee's address is listed
in Crestview at the home
where the dead dogs were
found.
After her arrest, Mack-
ee told investigators she
had checked on the dogs
two days before their bod-
ies were discovered and
they had food and water at
that time.
A veterinarian deter-
mined the dogs died of
heat stroke.


Michael Stewart
michaels~crest~viewbulletin.com

Two Crestview men are
accused of having sex with
an intoxicated 14-year-old
girl.
Timothy Scott Thacker,
23, and Stephen James Scott
Jr., 20, are charged with sex-
ual battery on a minor over
the age of 12, who was physi-
cally incapacitated.
In addition, Thacker fac-
es a charge of contributing
to the delinquency of a minor
and giving alcohol to a per-


.,Police Department the men
encouraged her to take a
shower after she became in-
a ~toxicated and that they "all
"-B'took a shower and had sex."
Prior the incident, the
men went to the girl's home
STEPHN TIOTHY and asked her to sneak
SCOTT JR THACKER out and so they could all
meet at the house of one of
son under the age of21. the men, according to the
Both men are in custody report.
at the Okaloosa County Jail Investigators respond-
without bond. ed to the girl's Crestview
According to an arrest home about 3:30 a.m.
report, the girl told investi- Monday after her mother
gators with the Crestview called police.


in Crestview. They
were alerted by an
animal control offi-
cer with PAWS.
Deputies found
two dead dogs in
a fenced in yard,
with no food and
water. One of the
had a choke chain
around its neck


that was tangled around
a dog house, according to
Mackee's arrest report. A
cat, which was alive, was
found inside the house.
Investigators said it
appeared as if no one was
living at the house. Both
dog carcasses were in
advanced stages of


Michael Stewart
michaels~crestviewbulletin.
com

A Crestview man is
facing charges of
molestation on a
minor.
Kevin Allan IS -
Crabtree, 28, is ,
charged with lewd I c
and lascivious mo-
lestation on a victim
younger than 12, ac- KE~
cording to an Oka- CRAB
loosa County Sher-
iff's Office press release.
Crabtree is in custody in
the Okaloosa County Jail
on a $50,000 bond. He faces
charges in two separate in-
cidents, deputies reported.





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Crabtree was arrested
Aug. 12 and accused of mo-
le sting a 7-year-old girl in her
home in an incident deputies
allege occurred May 3.
"During conver-
sations with inves-
tigators however,
Crabtree also admit-
ted he was guilty of
kissing and fondling
an 8-year-old girl on
occasions between
VIN December 2002 and
ITREE December 2004," the
press release states.
While still in custody,


Crabtree was charged
Sept. 8 with lewd and las-
civious molestation in con-
nection with the alleged
earlier incidents.
"Investigators Monte
Easterday and Ralph Gar-
rett say there is the potential
that additional victims exist,"
the press release states.
Anyone with informa-
tion is asked to contact
the Okaloosa County Sher-
iff's Office at 689-5705 or
651-7410, or Emerald Coast
Crime Stoppers at 850-863-
TIPS.


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A4 I Crestview News Bulletin


Law Enforcement


FWC cracks down on illegal


Internet sales


Crest view men (har ged with



seX UO bat 6 y 0n drn 0 f n KB00


Dogs died with no food, water


IELLE
:KEE


Notice of


Bud et Hearin

The City of Laurel Hill has tentatively
adopted a budget for fiscal year
2010-2011.


A public hearing to make a FIN~AL
DECISION\ on the budget AN\D TAXES
will be held on:


DATE: Tuesday, September 21, 2010
TIME: 6:00 p.m.
PLACE: City Hall
8209 Hwy. 85
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Saturday, September 18, 2010


Law Enforcement


Crestview News Bulletin I AS


~crrrr II.l;~:~t;~lllll~,T~I~,T~%1CiTi~~~iTillT


'Car surfing' juveni le dragged by truck


Ann Spann,
Crestview News Bulletin
A Crestview teen- '
ager was seriously
injured in a 'car surf-
ing' accident at the
entrance to Country -
View Park Wednes-
day afternoon.
Eric Russell
Arden, 17, was rid-
ing on the hood--
of a white Dodge F'iFP ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ey
Ram pickup truck -( -- -'
driven by 17-year- 3 1 ~ r ~ ~ r~ ~~~~J
old Thomas Garrett
Carrico, when Arden
fell from the truck.
Arden was
dragged about 27 3
feet, said Lt. Andrew
Schneider, public .a~ `a Td
information officer.


Plce D pyrmet 1I
ter to Sacred Heart
Hospital where her.$q
was treated for se- OL lI
rious injuries. He .3 -.I C MBLAC
sustained a broken.
s'cght arm aindr oes ..
as a result of the ac-
cident, Schneider -Ibn
said. IL,-IP!EY7C~;-zi i
A police officer on
scene said the site -
of the accident was --
handled as a crime
scene. Charges are .-- -_..-*
pending completion --
of an investigation. **


I~ s


North Okaloosa Medical Center
Dr. Wanda Batson, Dr. Amy Riggs
&r Dr. Lea Spears, Optometrists
David A. Herf M.D. General Surgeon
Glen M. Bankert, D.O. OB/GYN
Okaloosa Heart &r Vascular
Lee Buick GMC
State Farm Insurance Ann Teel Hatcher


Covenant Hospice
Certified Constructors Services, Inc.
LPL Financial- Joe Faulk
21st Century Oncology
CCB Community Bank
Compass Bank
Carr, Riggs &r Ingram, LLC
Crestview News Bulletin


Silver Sponsors:
Dr. Robert Caputo &r The Crest~view Pharmacy
Legacy Insurance &r North Florida Financial Corp.
Childcare Network, Inc.



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Brooks &r Brooks Real-estate, Inc.
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Okaloosa Medical Group- Baker Clinic
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DeFuniak Springs
Gateway Medical
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Okaloosa Orthopedies
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Sunshine Aero Flight Testing Facility
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Eglin Federal Credit Union
First National Bank OE Crestview


Gulf Power Company
Peoples Home Health
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Insurance Craig Barbee
Cedar Pearl Dentistry-Roy M~
Nakaiye, DDS, PA
Club Jiu-Jitsu Family Training
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Okaloosa schools pass budget, approves $24 million in new funds


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Saturday, September 1 8, 2010


A6 I Crestview News Bulletin


Local


Brian litghes
brianh~crestviewbulletin.com
Crestview Police Officer Brian
McCallum received a Certificate
ofSecia RC nessoa Rea!T

lorieg Pesentin re awr
tive, Helen Hunt Rigdon, who said,
"I guess officers call it 'part of the
job,' but it's really going above and


beyond." McCallum responded to a
medical emergency call on July 12
at Shaw Moving & Storage when
a 50-year-old employee suffered a
major heart attack and died. Using
a defibrillator carried in his squad
car, McCallum was able to revive
the man before other safety officers
arrived on the scene to treat him.
"It's difficult to be a law enforce-
ment officer," Rigdon acknowl-
edged during the presentation in


the office of Chief Brian Mitchell.
"It's a job that's challenging and
takes you away from your family."
'It is the thing we do every day,
but we never know how we'll be
challenged next," agreed Mitchell.
McCallum, who also received
the CPD lifesaving award for his
fast actions, was modest. "Thank
you very much, ma'am," he said
when accepting the recognition
from Rigdon. "I'm very honored."


$262 million is dedicated to the
district's operating fund, which
primarily pays teacher salaries.
Another $45 million of the budget
makes up the district's total capital
fund, but only about $24 million is
new money, said Rita Scallan, the
chief financial officer for the school
district.
The school board also approved
a 7.534 total millage rate, which is
the lowest levied in about 20 years.
Before the board voted on the
budget, they opened up the floor


to the public. Only one person took
them up on the offer.
"I'm here to talk to your budget
process and how you come up with
your budget," said Charles Rigdon,
who is involved in school advisory
committees at both Destin ele-
mentary and middle schools.
Rigdon said he understood
schools were in a budget crisis, but
he thought they had a clear way to
get out: reduce salaries.
"Until you get your labor costs
in line with what's in the real world


today, you're not going to balance
your budget," he said. "That labor
contract is what's got you in the
situation you are in today."
Between 80 percent and 85 per-
cent of the schools' operating bud-
get is tied up in teacher salaries,
and Rigdon said he didn't think
the district could possibly make
enough cuts to the remaining 15
percent to fix the funding problem.
Rigdon also asked the board to
reconsider their policy for small
school supplements because even


schools with large student popula-
tions like Destin and Antioch El-
ementary are losing art programs
because of the Class Size Amend-
ment.
"We're out there drowning," he
said. "We've cut all our programs."
The board acknowledged his
issue, but quick solutions were in
short supply. The new budget is
more than 5 percent less than last
year's spending plan, which was
already 8.3 percent less than the
previous year.


Katie Tommen
Florida Freedom Newspapers

FORT WALTON BEACH The Oka-
loosa County School Board ap-
proved a $361.5 million total budget
for next school year.
The board unanimously passed
the budget piece by piece, with
very little discussion during the
Monday evening meeting in Fort
Walton Beach.
Under the approved budget,


Ruth Clark Newkirk, age 96,
passed away at Shoal Creek
Rehabilitation Center in Crestview,
on Sept. 6, 2010, after an extended
illness. Born Aug. 30, 1914, in
Brownstown, Ind., she was the
daughter of Worth Lawrence and
Grace Vance Clark of that city.
Mrs. Newkirk graduated from
Brownstown High School in 1932.
In 1938, she married Emerald
George Newkirk of North Vernon,
Ind. The couple moved to Dayton,
Ohio in 1940, where Mr. Newkirk
managed a large supermarket for
several years. In 1949, Ruth, her
husband and their three children,
moved to Lake Worth where she
resided until 2008. In September
1999, Ruth and Emerald celebrated
their 61st wedding anniversary.
Emerald preceded her in death
Nov. 2, 1999.
Ruth and her husband operated
Newkirk's Grocery, which was
located at Fourth Avenue and South
Dixie Highway in Lake Worth, from
1949 through 1955. Later, she was
employed as a real estate sales
person, was a part-time postal
employee and worked for many
years at Cole's Sundry Store in Lake
Worth until her retirement. Mrs.


Newkirk worked for several years in
the 1980s as an activity assistant at
the Maclen Rehabilitation Center in
Lake Worth.
She leaves behind to cherish her
memory sons, Thomas Newkirk of
Lake Worth, Robert Newkirk and his
wife, Carol, of Crestview. A daughter,
Nancy Ruth Stearns, preceded her in
death in 2008. Grandchildren include
Larry Stearns and wife, Melissa, of
West Palm Beach; Kenneth Newkirk
and wife, Maria, of Huntsville, Ala.;
Tammy Puckett and husband,
Brett, of Amelia, Ohio; and Meghan
Newkirk of West Palm Beach.
Mrs. Newkirk also leaves 10 great-
grandchildren.
A memorial service is planned
for the near future. In lieu of flowers,
those who wish may donate to Shoal
Creek Rehabilitation Center, 500
Hospital Drive, Crestview, FL 32539,
or Covenant Hospice, 370 West
Redstone Avenue, Crestview, FL
32539. Ruth asked to be remembered
as she was in life happy with her
family. Mrs. Newkirk was loved and
appreciated by all who knew her.
Sign, leave a remembrance
or view the guest book for Ruth
Newkirk online at
www.cre stviewbulletin.com.


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Saturday, September 18, 2010


Local


crestview News Bulletin I A7


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THE ERA (right): AplrlI andlc Todicd Tucker, backs to camera,
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Special to the News Bulletin

The Flying Needles Quilt
Guild, a 501c3 organization, will
host a raffle for an award-winning
quilt and a crazy quilt during the
Okaloosa County Fair, Oct. 26-
30, at the C.H. Bull Rigdon Fair-
grounds in Fort Walton Beach.
The 2010 Opportunity Quilt,
measuring 75-by-90 inches, is
comprised of 12 different star
blocks, built on foundation paper,
in hand-dyed fabrics of rich gem
shades on black. A wide black bor-
der has hias- stem swirls appliqued
with shaped blooms and "buds"
in the same rich, eye-catching


hues. This quilt was given a Best
Innovation ribbon at the Greater
Jackson Quilt Celebration 2009 in
Mississippi and was magnificent-
ly quilted by guild member Patty
Butcher of Katydids Quilting
Service of Niceville. Prof essional
appraiser Alma Moates gave
this quilt an appraisal of $3,400,
and the rich combination of reds,
greens, yellows, golds, blues and
purples make this a true feast for
the eyes.
The crazy quilt, measuring 54-
by-67 inches, is a wonderful com-
bination of 7-inch square blocks
sewn with five colors (beige/
whites, yellow/golds, blues, light


blue/greens and reds), with four
blocks meeting together, having
the red points create a star.
Machine quilting, hand-quilt-
ing, embroidery, heads and ma-
chine-guided written words in
the center of most blocks (Love,
Hope, Faith, Charity, Church,
Country, etc.) make this quilt look
more than 50 years old, although
it was created this spring. Mem-
bers will eagerly "hunt up and
show you" the blocks that they
made when you visit the guild
booth.
Raffle tickets, one for $1 or six
for $5, will be available, and mem-
bers will gladly show the work


that they truly love to do.
Rinds from the raffle will be
used to buy supplies for the char-
itable items the guild makes and
donates to local organizations.
Also displayed will be the
Quilts of Valor. The Flying Nee-
dles Quilt Guild will send them to
recovering military personnel in
November through the national
Quilts of Valor Foundation. The
guild's annual goal is to make 12
Quilts of Valor in addition to the
dozens of charitable quilts and
hundreds of Christmas stockings,
so any and all new members are
encouraged to attend.
Members make quilts, draw-


string tote bags, smaller zippered
cosmetic/school supply bags and
filled Christmas stockings, which
are given to shelters throughout
the area for distribution to chil-
dren; wheelchair lap quilts, given
to the VA Hospital or nursing
homes; and adult-size easy on/off
bibs for seniors with Alzheimer's
in nursing homes.
The guild has a website at
www.flyingneedlesquiltguild.org,
and members meet every sec-
ond Thursday at 9:30 a.m. at the
Niceville Church of Christ, di-
rectly across from Niceville High
School. For more information, call
Sandra Congleton at 862-8588.


Sunday services are published
in the News Bulletin on a space-
available basis. Call 682-6524 to
update or add your church's Sat-
urday or Sunday worship ser-
vices.

APOSTOLIC
Apostolic Life TIabernacle and
Pastor Michael Braswell cordially
invite you to worship with them.
Sunday worship, 10 a.m., 6 p.m.
Located U.S. Highway 90 West one
mile from city limit sign. 'lIrn left
onto Shoffner Boulevard. then left
on Pinewood to 3136 Pinewood Dr.,
Crestview. For more information
call the church at 689-2422. Web-
site: www.apostoliclifetabernacle.
com; pastor's e-mail address -
md.braswella eyahoo.com.

APOSTOLIC/PENTECOSTAL
Pentecostals of Baker is lo-
cated at 1599 Hester Church Road
in Baker. Pastor Kenneth Bray.
Sunday services 2 p.m. Sunday
School, 3 p.m. worship. Call 398-
5000 for information. Website,
www.pentecostalsofbakercorg.

ASSEMBLIES
Campton Assembly of God
Church is located at 6924 State
Road 85 North in Laurel Hill.
The Sunday service is at 10:30
a.m. For more information call the
church at 652-4581 or Pastor Ray
Johnson at 652-1929.
Clear Springs Assembly of
God is located off Bill Lundy Road
in Baker (North State Road 85).
Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m., and
worship is at 10:45 a.m. Pastor Cliff
Larson, 682-2702.
First Assembly of God: 400
S. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, Office
hours Monday through Friday, 9-4.
Pastor Mark English.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. early morn-
ing worship, 10 a.m. Sunday School;
11 a.m. morning worship; and a 6
p.m. evening service. X-cel Youth
Ministry 3 p.m., X-ceed Children's
Ministry 4 p.m.
Special needs bus available for
11 a.m. service. Call the church at
682-3518 for pickup.


Golan Assembly of God: 6612
County Road 189 N., Baker. Phone
537-3043. Pastored by Todd Sowell.
Sunday services: Sunday School
9:45 a.m., morning worship at 11
a.m., and evening worship at 6
p.m.
M/illigan Assembly of God:
5408 U.S. Highway 4, Baker. Phone
53 7-4945. Senior Pastor Mike White,
Youth Pastor Jesse Jernigan. Sun-
day services: Sunday School 9:30
a.m., worship 10:30 a.m., Kingdom
Kids 10:30 a.m., evening service 6
p.m. www.milliganassembly.org.
North Central Assembly of
God: at 158 N. Woodlawn Drive in
Crestview. Phone: 689-0209 or 537-
7115. Minister A. Paul Hinton. Sun-
day services Sunday School at 10
a.m., morning worship at 11 a.m.,
evening worship at 6 p.m.
Shady Grove Assembly of
God: Sunday services begin at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday School, followed
by 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. worship
services. Shady Grove is located at
1189 Shady Grove Church Road in
Baker, just off Highway 189.
Welcome Assembly of God
located on County Road 393 in the
Dorcas community, invites you to
join them for Sunday services in-
cluding Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
and worship services at 10:45 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Call 682-1683 for direc-
tions.
Westside Assembly of God:
179 Kit Drive, Crestview. Sunday
services: Sunday School 9:45 a.m.,
worship 10:30 a.m., evening ser-
vice at 5 p.m.

BAPTIST
Beaver Creek BC services:
Beaver Creek Baptist Church, lo-
cated six miles west of Baker, has
Sunday School at 10 a.m., morning
worship at 11 a.m., and children's
church at 11:15 a.m.
Calvary Baptist Church: 612
E. Chestnut Ave., Crestview. Pas-
tor: Rev. Lewis Wilson Jr. Sunday
services 8:45 a.m. continental
breakfast; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:45 a.m. morning worship; 6 p.m.
evening service. Nursery provided
for children 5 and under.


Central Baptist Church: Lo-
cated at 951 S. Ferdon Blvd., Crest-
view. Sunday services include 9:15
a.m. Bible study; 10:30 a.m. wor-
ship and praise service; 5:30 p.m.
worship and praise, AWANA for
Kids. For additional information
call 682-5525 or visit the Website at
www.centralerestview.com.
Emmanuel Baptist Church,
3252 East James Lee Blvd., Crest-
view. Phone: 682-9416. E-mail ad-
dress: ebc~a ebccrestview.com.
Interim Teaching Pastor Ian An-
derson. Celebration services: Sun-
day at 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. Discovery
Park for nursery, Preschool/The
Zone (children's church) K-5th
graders during all celebrations.
Evening celebrations, Sunday 5-
7 p.m.: Life groups for adults. On
Campus Sunday Night for pre-
schoolers, G-Force for K-5th Grad-
ers. Riel 247- Worship Service/
Small Groups (Youth).
Evelenar Baptist Church:
2820 Carver Ave., Crestview. Pas-
tor Benjamin T. Randolph. Sunday
School 9:30 a.m., worship 11 a.m.
Every first Sunday at 3 p.m. is the
Hour of Power. Phone: 682-2218.
First Baptist Church of Crest-
view: 798 N. Pearl St. (across U.S.
Highway 90 from courthouse, be-
hind Burger King. Pastor Alan
Kilgore. Phone 682-2544.
Sunday services 8:45 Wel-
come Center opens/ 9 a.m. Sunday
School/10:30 a.m. morning wor-
ship, children's worship/ 4 p.m.
Student Leadership; Youth Choir
/ 5 p.m. Youth discipleship; Youth
Ensemble; ladies, men, children
and preschool bible studies; book
club/ 6 p.m. evening worship.
First Baptist Church of Bak-
er* Located at 1347 14th St., Baker
(across from the Baker School
football field). Rev. Cliff Morgan.
Bible Study at 9 a.m. and worship
at 10:30 a.m. For more information
call the church office at 537-2993.
First Baptist Church of Holt:
532 U.S. Highway 90 W., PO. Box 38,
Holt. Phone 537-6170. Pastor Fred
H. Sanford.
Sunday services: 9 a.m. Sunday
School, 10:15 a.m. and 6 p.m. wor-


ship services.
First Baptist Church of M/illi-
gan: 5238 Old River Rd., Milligan.
682-6277 or 682-8559. Pastor Ted
Jernigan. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.,
worship, 11 a.m.; discipleship train-
ing 5 p.m.; evening worship, 6 p.m.
Goodhope Baptist Church,
1895 Owen Cotton Road off U.S.
Highway 189, Baker, in the Escam-
bia Farms community. Pastor Jim
Skates. Phone: 537-8720 or 537-
8740.
Services: Men's prayer 9:30
a.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m., wor-
ship 11 a.m.. Evening services:
Discipleship training 5 p.m. wor-
ship 6 p.m.
Live Oak Baptist Church,
located at 4565 Live Oak Church
Road in Crestview (near Shoal
River Country Club).
Sunday services Sunday School
at 9:45 a.m., morning worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. Evening worship.
Phone: 682-5160. Associate Pas-
tor Dennis Walker.
Living Paith Baptist Church:
837 West James Lee Blvd., Crest-
view. Pastor Chaplain David Pettis.
Sunday services Sunday School
10 a.m. and worship at 11 a.m.
Discipleship training 6 p.m., and
evening worship 7 p.m. children's
church Sunday morning. Phone -
682-4371.
Magnolia Baptist Church: Lo-
cated at 3198 Highway 602, Laurel
Hill. Pastor Robert Smith.
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m., Sun-
day morning worship, 11 a.m. and
nursery for under 3. Evening wor-
ship 6 p.m. For further information,
call 652-2300.
New Beginnings Church: The
church is at 412 West James Lee
Blvd. in Crestview. The Sunday
service begins at 10:30 a.m. AWA-
NA for children ages 2-12 is on Sun-
day nights from 5 to 7 p.m. at 421 W
James Lee Blvd. in Crestview.
New Life Missionary Baptist
Church: Pastor Sanford Hayes.
285 Duggan Ave., Crestview. Sun-
day School 9:30 a.m. Morning wor-
ship 11 a.m. on Sunday.
Palm Chapel Primitive Bap-
tist Church: 201 Cadle Dr., Crest-


view. Elder Michael Green, Jr.,
Pastor. Sunday 10:30 a.m. Call 689-
3383 for more information.
Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church:
Pastor, Dr. Jerry Haley. 5595 State
Road 4 South, Baker. Phone 537-
9221. FAX 537-6798. Church web-
site www.pilgrimrestbaptist.org.
Sunday services including
morning worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m.; bible study at 9:45 a.m.; adult
study, youth ministry, Disciple Kids
and children's choir at 5:30 p.m.
and evening worship at 6:30 p.m.
Pyron Chapel Baptist Church:
6498 Wm. Gary Johnson Road,
Baker. Pastor Victor Bettenhau-
sen, 398-0355.
Sunday services: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.;
choir practices, 4:30 p.m.; Bible
study and prayer, 5:30 p.m.
Valley Road Baptist Church:
1018 Valley Road, Crestview. Phone
682-4513. Rev. Philip Mark. Times
for Sunday Services: Bible Study
9:45 a.m., morning worship 11 a.m.,
discipleship training 5 p.m., and
evening worship 6 p.m.
Woodlawn Baptist Church: lo-
cated at 824 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crest-
view, Pastor Patrick Pfrimmer.
Sunday Bible study meets at
9 a.m. with morning worship at 8
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. A service for
the hearing impaired is also of-
fered on Sunday morning. Sunday
evening service is at 6 p.m. and the
Youth Choir meets at 5 p.m. Call
the church at 682-2924 for informa-
tion.

CATHOLIC
Our Lady of Victory Catholic
Church, 550 Adams Drive, Crest-
view. Phone 682-4622. Pastor Fr.
John Cayer. Parochial Vicar--Fr.
Florencio Lagura.
Sunday Masses at 8:30 and
10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday,
Mass at 8 a.m. Saturday Vigil Mass
at 5 p.m.
Spanish Mass (2nd and last Sat-
urday of the month) at 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
Live Oak Church of Christ:

See SERVICES A8


"? ifsteps back to the


a amlyLiray im'60s and '70s


r.






i~t~l I


Guild to display, raffle quilts at Okaloosa fair in October


Church SERVK(ES





--


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_~_ ~__~ ~ _~~~___ !I


Saturday, September 1 8, 2010


A8 I Crestview News Bulletin


Faith


disbelief.
For the most part, when
we think about the senseless
taking of life, most feel a sense of
outrage, as well we should. The
intentional taking of another's
life goes against what God truly
believes that life is good, life
is sacred, life is holy. To murder
another person is an offense
against humanity, but it is also a
grievous offense against God.
Now, the vast majority of
people will not take another's
physical life. But this still begs
the question of how we do with
regard to not taking another's
emotional or spiritual life. How do
we do on not destroying another's
self-esteem or self-image? I think
you'll find this to be completely
different.
There are those who belittle
others, pointing out flaws and
mistakes with a sense of great
satisfaction. They tear down
others and point out others'
faults, and do this because
they either consciously or
unconsciously feel insecure or
miserable about themselves.


And as you know, misery loves
company.
Have you known couples
where one spouse, in front of
other people, will take a jab at
their partner in a joking way? It
may get a laugh from the group,
but it tears at the heart of the
one being poked at. This is often
an unconscious way of lashing
out at the other for something. It
is a form of passive-aggressive
behavior.
When a child makes a mistake,
don't lash out in a frenzy of
frustration and anger. Instead,
tell the child what wrong was
done, why it was wrong and what
could have been done differently.
Reassure the child of your love for
them. Use appropriate discipline
levels time out, deprivation of a
favorite toy or activity. If you feel
the need to spank which I do
not encourage give one swat
with an open hand on a clothed
bottom. And bear in mind, if it
hurt your hand, you stepped over
the line.
The whole concept of
appropriate discipline is to


build life, to help one make
better decisions throughout
life. Proverbs 22:6 says, "'Itain
children in the right way, and
when old, they will not stray."
How do you treat your
husband or wife, or boyfriend or
girlfriend? Did something happen
and you are getting back at him
or her in some form of passive-
aggressive behavior? Did you
have a poor role model early in
life, so belittling behavior just
seems natural? It truly is not.
That is not giving life to either
of you. Should you find yourself
doing this, ask God for the
wisdom and courage to stop, and
to seek forgiveness.
If change needs to take place
somewhere, it needs to start in
us. We can only change ourselves.
And the way we change ourselves
will eventually have a ripple
effect. The way we treat others
will cause little chain reactions
that will continue to spread out.
One act of kindness, one major
decision, one act of love, goes
beyond the immediate. It reaches
beyond that one person, because


that person will influence others
because of what you had done
for them. It will build life in
wonderful and joyful ways.
Life is a precious gift from
God. We are to avoid taking
life from another person,
whether physically, spiritually
or emotionally. Instead, we
are called to remember the
sacredness of life, not only our
own, but of those around us. We
are to give life; we are to give
honor to life. We are to build up
others. We are expected to live
our lives to God's glory and to
enjoy God forever.

The Rev. Marke Broadhead
is pastor at Laurel Hill
Presbyterian Church, 8115
Fourth St., Laurel Hill (652-21 64),
and First Presbyterian Church
of Crestview, 492 N. Ferdon
Blvd. at the intersection of U.S.
Highway 90 and State Road 85 in
the heart of Crestview (682-2835).
Sunday morning worship is at
9 a.m. in Laurel Hill and 11 a.m.
in Crestview. Website: www.
~firstpresbyterian-crestview.0rg.


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Please turn in your church news
briefs to the News Bulletin by 5 p.m.
Tuesday for the Saturday issue.

EVENTS
BORN TO WIN: Radio show airs
every day at 12:30 p.m. on WTJT 90.1
FM. Presented by Northwest Florida
Church of God, pastored by Carl
Dillenback.
CATHOLIC RCIA: The Rite
of Christian Initiation of Adults
(RCIA) is designed for those seeking
one or more of the sacraments of
initiation, baptism, confirmation and
Eucharist. This formation process
is the church's approved method for
individuals to become members of
the Catholic community. Sessions
are held at the Eglin Chapel


Center Annex from 7-9 p.m. each
Wednesday. Details: Susan Huberty
at 882-7320.
FREE BIBLE COURSE: Airport
Road Church of Christ is offering a
free Bible correspondence course.
Call 682-4025 for more information.
The radio program airs Monday
through Saturday at 5:45 a.m. on
WAAZ, 104.7 FM.
BOOK OF REVELATION
STUDY: Each Sunday at 5 p.m.,
the Good Hope Congregational
Church presents the study of the
Book of Revelation. The Rev. Tommy
Coleman will be presenting the
study, and there will be finger foods
to follow every Sunday evening.
Anyone interested may join. Call
537-4307 for more information.


I


Sunday morning worship 10 a.m.
followed by Bible study at 11 a.m.
The church is located at 1049 S.
Wilson St. Call 682-2697 for more
information.
M/cDonald Street Church of
Christ: at 744 S. McDonald St.
in Crestview, with Minister Bro.
Henry Herbert and Youth Minister,
Bro. Daniel Jackson. 10 a.m. Bible
class on Sunday, followed by 11:15
a.m. worship. Evening worship at
6 p.m. on Sundays. For more infor-
mation, call 682-6230.
Church of Christ Airport
Road: Sunday Bible study at 9
a.m., worship services at 10 a.m.,
Sunday worship at 6 p.m., with
Minister Mark Dillman.
Crestview Church of God, Pas-
tor Larry Collins. Sunday school 10
- 11 a.m.; morning worship 11 a.m.
-12 p.m.; and 6-9 p.m. evening ser-
vice on Sundays. Call 682-3045 for
more information.
Church of New Covenant,
Pastors Charles, Sr., and Maxine
Whisnand invite you to attend their
services, located at 3191 North
Newman Ave. in Crestview.
Sunday services include Adult
Bible Study and children's church
at 10 a.m., followed by Praise Hour
at 11 a.m. Call 682-8433 for more in-
formation.
Church of the Resurrection:
66 8th St., Shalimar Fla. The Rev
Canon Michael G. Carr. Sunday
services at 10 a.m., morning prayer
on first, third, and fifth; and holy
communion on second and fourth
Sunday.

EPISCOPAL
Church of the Epiphany:
Located at 424 Garden St., Crest-
view behind the Teachers Credit
Union,
Children's church 10 a.m. Holy
Eucharist 7:30 and 10 a.m. Nurs-
ery is available. A potluck brunch
is held on the first Sunday of the
month following the service.
Vicar is the Rev. De Freeman.
Office hours are Monday Friday, 9
a.m. 4 p.m. Call 689-1410 for more
information. All are welcome.

INDEPENDENT
Northwest Florida Church of
God: Meets at 158 Woodlawn Ave.
in Crestview on Saturdays at 11
a.m. Pastor Carl Dillenback. The
church has a radio presentation
called "Born to Win" at 12:30 p.m.
everyday at WTJT, 90.1 FM.

LATTER DAY SAINTs
The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints is located at
3 Del Cerro Camino in Crestview.
Sunday worship services are at
9 and 11 a.m., Phone: 682-6624 or
682-4766.


Independent Pentecostal church
at 6144 Highway 85 North, Crest-
view. Pastor: Rev. Ron Williamson.
Sunday Services: Sunday School
9:30 a.m., morning worship and
children's church 10:30 a.m., eve-
ning and youth services at 6 p.m.
Nursery available for all services.
Phone: 6826357; fax 689-4402.
Calvary United: 1010 Bay St.,
Crestview. Sunday 10 a.m. wor-
ship service with Sunday School.
The Rev. Charles Braneff Jr., 682-
6191. Church phone: 423-1198.
First Pentecostal Church of
Jesus Christ: Sunday services for
First Pentecostal are at 10 a.m. and
6 p.m. Pastor Wilbur Hawkins. Lo-
cated at 997 East Chestnut Ave. in
Crestview. Call 682-3497 for more
information.

PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian Church:
492 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview,
pastored by Rev. Mark Broadhead.
Sunday School, 10 a.m.; worship
11 a.m. For more information, call
682-2835.
Laurel Hill Presbyterian
Church: 8115 4th St. 652-2164. Rev
Mark Broadhead, Minister. Sun-
day worship service, 9 a.m., Sun-
day School, 10 a.m.
1st Presbyterian Church-
PCA, 23500 5th Ave., Florala, Ala.
Services Sundays at 11 a.m. Rev.
David McMillan, 334-858-3865.

UNITARIAN
Unitarian Universalist Fel-
lowship of the Emerald Coast
(UUFEC): located at 1295 Bay-
shore Drive, Valparaiso. Minister:
Rev. Rodney Debs. Service is held
at 10:30 a.m. each Sunday. For fur-
ther updates, check www.uufec.
com, the Verbal Chalice, Wick, or
please call the Fellowship at 678-
7197, or 243-5247.
Unity Way of Life Unity Cen-
ter: Pastor Rev.George A. Schmidt,
Ph.D., the Way of Life Unity Center
is located at 1797 Hurlburt Road in
Fort Walton Beach.
Sunday services: 9:30 a.m. and
11 a.m. Celebration Services. Youth
Education programs along with
childcare are only provided at the
11 a.m. service. All are welcome.
For information, call the of-
fice at 864-1232 (hours by appoint-
ment).

OTHER
Eglin Air Fbrce Base Chapel:
Protestant Sunday Worship Ser-
vices Sunday: 9 a.m. 'Itadi-
tional, West Gate Chapel; 9:30 a.m.
-Gospel, Chapel Center; 10 a.m.
- Contemporary, Building 605.
All military and their families
are invited to attend the chapel's
many diverse services. Call 882-


2111 for times and locations.
Eglin Air Force Base Chapel:
Catholic Weekend Mass Sched-
ule Sunday -7:45 a.m., Chapel Cen-
ter, 11:15 a.m., West Gate Chapel.
Confession: Saturday 4 p.m., West
Gate Chapel.
All military and their families
are invited to attend the chapel's
many diverse services. Call 882-
2111 for times and locations.
Eglin Air Force Base Chapel:
Jewish Worship: Friday: 7 p.m.-
Sabbath Worship, Chapel Center.
All military and their families are
invited to attend the chapel's many
diverse services. Call 882-2111 for
times and locations.
Eglin Air Force Base Chapel:
Islamic Services: Please call the
chapel at 882-2111 for more infor-
mation.
Eglin Air Force Base Cha-
pel: Orthodox Christian Ser-
vices: Please call Saint Markella
and Demetrios Greek Orthodox
Church at 244-0822 for days and
times of services.
Christian Life Center: Pastor
Jason Palmer. Prayer is held Sun-
day at2 p.m., with Sunday services
and Sunday School at 2:30. Chris-
tian Life Center is located at 410
Wingard St.; call 305-0198 for more
information.
Healing Stream Ministries:
Pastor Jonathan Griffin. Saturday
services are being held. The min-
istry is located at the corner of E.
Robinson and Church Street in
Crestview. Call Pastor Griffin at
682-5455 for more information.
The Chapel, an independent
worshipping community, has ser-
vices every Sunday morning at
7:30 a.m. with Chaplain Hayward
Chapman, and at 9 a.m. with Chap-
lain Chuck Chapman. Services
are held at 1093 S. Ferdon Blvd. in
Crestview. Phone: 682-9887 or 423-
0526.
The Awakening Ministries,
Inc., a not-for-profit Christian mu-
sic ministry, meets every Saturday
from 2-7 p.m. under the pavilion,
Kit Drive, Crestview. For more in-
formation call 689-1259 or send an
e-mail to awakeningministries@
praize.com.
Iglesia Hispana Bet-el Pen-
tecostal: 110 Main St., Crestview.
Te invita: A nuestros servicios.
Domingos 4 p.m. Martes: Oracion
y ~nsebanza 7p.m. Viernes: Alban-
za y Predicacion. 7 p.m. Pastores:
Jose y Claudia Nubez. Llamanos
682-1247 or 398-3817. Dios te ben-
diga.
New Hope Ministries of Lau-
rel Hill, 3828 New Ebenezer Road,
Laurel Hill. Minister: Rev. Willie
Earl Williams Jr. Phone: 652-2588.
Sunday Services: Sunday School
10 a.m., morning worship 11 a.m.


LUTHERAN
Our Savior Evangelical Lu-
theran Church LCM/S: 178 W
North Ave. in Crestview. Rev
Vance G. Tech. Sunday services in-
clude Sunday School for all ages at
9 a.m., and a historic worship ser-
vice with Holy Communion every
Sunday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at
5 p.m. Call 682-3154 for more infor-
mation.
First Lutheran Church of Flo-
rala: at 24512 Sth Ave. (U.S. High-
way 331) in Florala, pastored by
Rev. Jack Betz. 9:30 a.m. worship,
fellowship 10:30 a.m., and Sunday
School 11 a.m.
Phone 334-858-3515. On U.S. 331
near the Florida line in Florala,
Ala. Call 334-858-3515 for more spe-
cific directions.

METHODIST
Baker First United Methodist
Church: located at 5826 N. High-
way 189, just north of the traffic
light in Baker. The Rev. Johnathan
J. McDaniel, contemporary ser-
vice 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m.;
traditional service 11 a.m. Com-
bined service last Sunday of every
month 10:30 a.m.
Christian Home United M/eth-
odist Church: Approximately
5 miles N.E. of Laurel Hill on
Alabama County Road 6, Parrish
Road, Ala. Phone: 652-4766. Sunday
services: Second and fourth Sun-
days at 8:45 a.m. Sunday School at
9 a.m. Rev. Edward Britton.
First United Methodist: 599
Eighth Ave., Crestview, Rev. Bruce
Sheffield is Senior Pastor, Associ-
ate Pastor Brandon Dasinger and
Dr. R. Lee Thigpen, Lay Leader
(FUMC) .
'Itaditional services at 8 a.m. in
the Christ Chapel, and at 11 a.m.
in the Main Sanctuary. Contem-
porary service in the Sanctuary at
9:12 a.m. Sunday school at 8, 9:30
and 11a.m.
For information, call 682-2018,
during normal business hours.
First United Methodist
Church of Florala: 1319 Fifth St.,
Florala, Ala. Phone: (334) 222-3286.
Sunday Services 11 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Rev. Sam Persons Parkes.
Hopewell United M/ethod-
ist Church: 987 Gomillion Road,
Ala., five miles west of Laurel Hill
on New Ebenezer Road. 652-4474.
Sunday services, First and third
Sunday at 9 a.m., with Sunday
School at 10 a.m. Rev. Edward Brit-
ton.
Mount Zion African M/ethod-
ist Episcopal (AM/E) Church, 502
McDonald St., in Crestview. Rev
Matthew Ewing. Sunday services:
church school 9:30 a.m., praise ser-
vice 10:45 a.m., and worship ser-
vice 11 a.m. For information, call


682-7799.
New Bethel United Methodist
Church, 5984 Highway 85N, Crest-
view and Reverend Ed Cotten
invite you to worship with them.
Sunday services, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Bible study Wednesday, 7 p.m. 682-
9671.
St. Mark United Methodist
Church, 2250 RJ. Adams Pkwy.
in Crestview, offers the following
Sunday services: 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School and traditional worship, 11
a.m. contemporary worship, kids
worship and Sunday School. A
nursery is available for all services.
Clergyman is the Rev. Lisa Ausley,
the Rev. Brice Early and the Rev
Greg McKinnon. Call 682-5280 for
more information.

NAZARENE
Crestview Church of the Naz-
arene: 395 Aplin Road, Crestview.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m., morning
worship 10:45 a.m., and evening
service at 6 p.m. 682-7995. All are
welcome.

NONDENOMINATIONAL
Fellowship Church of Praise
KTC: Pastor Darlene Haynes.
Sunday services begin at 11 a.m.
at Country Inn & Suites, Rasberry
Road, Crestview.
Sonlight Covenant Church:
Manifesting the Spirit of Sonship.
Pastor and Founder Alvin E. Smith
invites all interested to attend
Sunday services at 11 a.m. Sunday
school starts at 9:45 a.m.
The church is located at 798 S.
Main St., Suite A, Crestview. Call
689-3129 for more information.
Good Hope Congregational
Church: Come and join the con-
gregation for old-fashion, Southern
gospel music and service. Sunday
school starts at 9:45 a.m. followed
by service at 10:45 a.m.
The church is located seven
miles west of Baker. Call Pastor
Joel Carden at 537-4307 for more
information.
Mount Olive Community
Church: Pastor D.L. Lyons invites
all interested to Sunday Services
at 10 a.m., 'Ibesday Ladies' meet-
ing at 7 p.m. with Marie C. Lyons.
The church is located at 5661 Mt.
Olive Road in Crestview. Direc-
tions approximately 7 miles east
on Highway 90, turn left on Mt. Ol-
ive Road, miles. Call 682-6218 for
more information.
Joy Fellowship: 5978 Old Beth-
el Road, Crestview; 682-6219. www.
joyfellowship.net. Pastor Dale and
Brenda Walters. Sunday Services:
9:30 a.m. Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.
worship service.

PENTECOSTAL
Auburn Pentecostal Church:


From the PULPIT


Giv6 ilnor to life
Our God is a God of life. In
his eyes, life is precious. When
God created all
things, he said
it was good. But
when he created
Humans, he said it
was "very good."
Life is precious
Oto God. It is holy.
REV. MARK It is sacred.
BROADHEAD Another
From the Pulpit commandment
God gave is
"You shall not murder." God
gave this commandment as yet
another way to remind us of our
responsibility to look beyond
ourselves and toward the world
around us, to look at other human
beings through the eyes of God,
to remember that life is precious
to God.
Yet many people don't seem
to honor life, do they? Nearly
every day in the news, we hear of
people taking the lives of others.
Images in the news cause strong
reactions of anger, sorrow and


Faith BRIEFS


SIGN OF

FAITH

This church sign
was recently
spotted in the
comm unity of
Dorcas.

AMN SPNN


SE RVICES from pane Al





Saturday, September 18, 2010


Fashion


cresiview News Bulletin I A9


PHOTOS BY GINDY YAMANAKA | Freedom News Service
A school field trip to a recycling center sparked George Powell's idea to recycle denim to make new jeans. Several stores carry Powell's brand, Reuse Jeans.


By (AND ICE SHIH
Freedom News Service

Until two years ago, George Powell didn't think
about recycling.
He was 56, had been mostly retired for four
years and was spending most of his time with his
young son and golfing.
On a field trip to a recycling center with his son,
Luke, with about 500 plastic and glass bottles, he
came to a realization.
"If I had started recycling, I'll bet there are a
lot of other people who recycle a lot better and
with more enthusiasm than I do," said Powell, of
Laguna Niguel, Calif.
He applied this thought to the retail and apparel
industry, in which he had worked since 1979. He
had connections in China and began exploring
ways to recycle fabric.
What Powell wants people to know is that he's
not just taking someone else's jeans, slapping a
new label on it and reselling it.
Instead, Powell's company, Reuse Jeans, takes
preconsumer waste as its raw material. When
factories in China produce leftover fabric from cut
cloth and defective stock, Reuse takes it and runs it
through a machine that resembles a shredder.
"In large part, it looks like cotton when it comes
from the fields," Powell said.
The newly formed material is spun into yarn,
then woven into new fabric and cut into brand-
new jeans. The leftovers and defects from Reuse's
manufacturing process are again run through the
recycling process.
Reuse's signature jeans are made from 80
percent recycled materials and other yarns to add
stretch and pliability. Powell said he believes this to
he the most efficient use of recycled material in the
denim market.
And he believes it is a sign of things to come.
"Some day, when we reach critical mass and
enough people are buying recycled fabric, you will
he shocked how most of the clothes will be coming
from recycled materials," Powell said.
He also is committed to reducing the company's
environmental impact with its non-denim
materials. Reuse makes its labels and hang tags
from recycled paper and is packaging its summer
shipment in biodegradable bags. Powell is looking
for sources of recycled zippers, rivets and shanks,
and he wants to use vacuum packing to reduce the


Reuse Jeans are made of 80 percent preconsumer recycled cloth, the company says.


amount of cardboard packaging.
But for the stylish woman, Powell knows his
product has to look right, feel right and be priced
right. For that, he called upon his experience
producing jeans for other brands.
The results include a dark skinny jean, a boot-
cut jean with back-pocket embellishments and
a classic-cut jean with distressing on the front.
They cost $85 to $95 per pair on Reuse's Web site,
reusejeans.com.
Powell's 47-year-old wife and his 31-year-old
daughter wear Reuse, and it's resonating with
teenagers, too.
"They're most likely to make a change and wrap
their arms around a new trend," he said.
Reuse launched in January, and Orange County,
Calif., stores were the first to pick up the brand,


with three locations of Hobie leading the way.
Today, Reuse is also sold at Variant, Angel Wings,
Bliss and Julie Beach Wear in San Clemente, Calif.;
Frou Frou in Laguna Beach, Calif.; KC Diamonds
and Apparel in Laguna Niguel, Calif.; and Model
Citizen in Huntington Beach, Calif.
Kim Waxman, the buyer for Frou Frou, said
the story behind Reuse Jeans was only part of
the reason she decided to include it as one of two
denim lines in her store.
"The other big part of it was the phenomenal
fit," she said. "It's all the best high-end designer
jeans put into one."
Next up for Reuse is adding men's denim in the
fall and later two more lines: Rejeaneration for the
mid-price department store market, and Regear
for big-box stores.


~d~J~i~9;~





CINDY YAMANAKA | Freedom News Service
"I value my clients. I feel like I'm a journal they write in every four to six weeks,"
says hairstylist Stevi Russell, who catches up with client Daniel Minx as she
touches up his cut at Gods and Heroes salon.


Saturday, September 18, 2010


Al 0 1 Crestview News Bulletin


LifestyleS


By (ANDICE SHIH
Freedom News Service

only a hairstylist at
Alec Tennace is not
salon. He also runs
interference.
Because he knew one client
so well, he was able to separate
three women he knew to be his
client's ex-wife, former mistress
and current girlfriend at the
salon so they never saw each
other.
"He still owes me for that,"
said Tennace, who works in
Costa Mesa, Calif.
As many hairstylists can
confirm, doing hair is only
part of the job. They also are
therapists, friends and potential
dates. And for clients, that level
of intimacy means it might be
difficult to "break up" with them
if dissatisfied with the job they
are doing.
"They want to tell you
everything from family issues,
best friends, mostly about
relationships. They'll tell
you things they won't tell their
best friends like plastic
surgeries" said Stevi Russell,
who works at Gods and Heroes
with Tennace. "They know it's
confidential and it won't go

aong o Iair is more akin to
being one's therapist than one's
bar en isnheo how often her
clients get their hair done, "I'm
like a four- or six-week journal,"
Russell said.
At Tribeca Salon in Aliso
Viejo, Calif., hairstylist Jason
West has had a similar
experience with his clients.
"People are looking for
someone to tell them whatever
they're not getting from their
job or at home. They're basically


MICHAEL GOULDING | Freedom News Service
Jason West of Tribeca Salon works on Lindsay Johnson. West says clients have revealed intimate details such as marital infidelity.


hairstylists develop meaningful
relationships.
Stephanie Olson started
getting her hair done 19 years
ago by Tim Telles, who owns
Tribeca Salon with his wife,
Treeny. When she lost her job
as an interior designer a year
ago, she still made it to her hair
appointment that day.


chemistry right away," she said.
Rotunno, a student at
Chapman University in
Orange, Calif., never intended
to find a date while getting
his hair cut. He previously had
gone to inexpensive walk-in
salons and was referred to
Russell by his best friend, her
cousin.
He felt a connection with
Russell and decided to ask her
out, figuring it was a chance
worth taking.
"Either I'll get a different
hairstylist or we'll get dinner
and it'll work out," he said.
Even if there is no romantic
relationship between a
hairstylist and a client, it still
can be uncomfortable when the
client decides to move on.
"It's hard because
there's ego and people feel
embarrassed," West said.
Megan King, a hairstylist
at Richard Michael Aveda
Salon at South Coast Plaza in
Costa Mesa, Calif., said she
knows being broken up with,
professionally, is part of the job,
but thinks honesty is the best
policy.
"Ideally, I'd want them to
tell me what they want different.
It's all about verbalizing it," she
said.
Exhibiting the friendliness
that no doubt attracts clients,
King added, "I don't really mind
(clients leaving) as long as I get
to see them."
Just don't try going to the
same salon when the hairstylist
you are trying to break up with
isn't working. They can see that
you have made an appointment
with someone else in the books
anyway.
So be honest, bottle up
your true feelings or slink
away in the night. And watch
out, because a hairstylist can
break up with a client, too.
Russell let one go after the
client repeatedly arrived late
for his appointments and never
apologized. "Some people act
like it's just hair." she said "But
It' I1i no


Tim Telles,
who had been
encouraging her
to work for him,
offered her a
job immediately.
She started work
as his salon's
manager the next
day.
Jacqueline
Putney comes
every Thursday
to get her hair
done and to
banter with Tim
Telles.
"I talk about
everything. Just
ask Tim," she
said. "I have
no secrets. He
is kind of like
family."
He joked in


getting it out
to somebody,"
said West, whose
clients have
admitted to him
that they are
cheating on their
spouses.
For many
people, getting
one's hair done
is an intimate
experience. The
hairstylist touches
your head and
changes the
way you look.
The stylist gives
you one-on-one
attention and
usually makes you
feel better about
yourself.
"They're
in your hands


"lThey'r 1:n yo'ur
hands their

beauty, their
Outlook an~d hoze

lleyfe 881. 1 T Hf
in theie~r hife. I'm
rHOt weith their

firen l. I'm ~like



Stevi Russell


-- their beauty, their outlook
and how they feel," Russell said.
"It's that trust. I'm not in their
life. I'm not with their friends.
I'm like their therapist."
A visit might take an
hour, and you might visit
every few weeks. It's no
wonder that clients and their


response, "I'm the son she
never wanted."
Putney began getting her
hair done by Tim Telles because
her daughter, who was her
hairstylist and worked with him,
moved away. She tried other
hairstylists but found the best
chemistry with Telles.
She tells him about her
gret-graLndclhildre~n He
sharest~ storiest aboullt hIs


MICHAEL GOULDING | Freedom News Service
Co-owner Treeny Telles chats with Christine Cook at Tribeca
Sa on.


and developing a rapport
with a client are a crucial
part of the job. Sometimes,
so is anticipating what they
need. eve~n if it is outside the
aloln
--I'm a ecood attorney referral
senl' ICet. whether family or
cr~imIlinIal.'" Tennace said. "I
don't ele tn know if I'm a good
ha3Ir'lltdresser I know how to talk
tol p~eole~t "
Thelelt It\l of closeness that is
delt\lleclpd between a hairstylist
a~nd the person sitting in their
chair alsoI means romance


can enter the picture. It is
common for clients to date their
hairstylist, a hairstylist they are
sitting near or another client,
Russell said.
She gets asked out and isn't
surprised to be hit on when a
new male client is referred to
her by a client who had been
flirtatious.
Russell only dated a client
once. Five years later, she
and David Rotunno still are
together and have a 4-year-old
son.
"The second I saw him,
I thought he was drop-dead
gorgeous. There was a


Hairstylists: It's not just



































BRIAN HUGHES | Crestview News Bulletin
LOCAL REPRESENTATION: Members of the Gulf Coast Council's Rising Suns patrol stand on the National Mall with the U.S. Capitol behind them during the Centennial
Jamboree. The patrol members are, left to right, William Sanford, Patrick Wallace, Nick Rhyne, Reed Forman, Patrol Captain Kody Lusk from Crestview, Dylan
Gean and an unidentified member. RIGHT: Created in honor of Scouting's Centennial, this patch puzzle depicts some of the Boy Scouts of America sub-camps. In the
foreground are some of the special centennial patches Scouts can wear.






Saluin g Scou in g's 0


Saturday, September 18, 2010


Local


crestview News Bulletin I Al 1


them by demonstrating skills in
signaling, path finding, tracking
and carpentry.
Scouts, including adult
leaders, can also earn other
special Scouting Centennial
patches displayed at the library.
Special centennial council
patches are also displayed,
including those for our local
Gulf Coast Council's Scout Jam
event held at the Fort Walton
Beach Fairgrounds in May. A
sub-camps puzzle patch consists
of 21 patches that, assembled
together, form the number 100.
"I won't tell you how long it
took to get them in order because
there was no picture" to use as a
guideline, Schwartz said.
The Gulf Coast Council
was represented earlier this
summer at the Centennial
Jamboree, a nationwide event
that drew thousands of Boy
Scouts to Virginia, including
Kody Lusk, a Crestview High
senior and member of local
Troop 773. Kody was captain
of the Rising Suns patrol at
the event. Also representing
Crestview was Eagle Scout
Chayne Sparagowski, who,
having attained scouting's
highest rank, was on the
jamboree staff.


boys and girls ages 14 through
20.
Included in a section on
accomplishments of local scouts
are photos of Venture Crew
member and Girl Scout Yvonne
Masters' creation of a butterfly
garden in Crestview's McMahon
Environmental Center. Also
displayed is local Eagle Scout
Chayne Sparagowski's award
for a photo exhibited in the
International Library of
Photography.
But one of the most exciting
pieces in the display, Schwartz
said, is an old certificate
displayed at the bottom of the
right-hand case. It's the charter
for Crestview Troop 30, which
was the first troop in Northwest
Florida and has served boys -
and the community for nearly
90 of the Boy Scouts of America's
100 proud years.

'lb learn more about the
Centennial of the Boy Scout
movement in the United
States, visit www.scouting.org/
100years. Fbr information about
joining a Boy Scout troop, Cub
Scout packc, or Venture Crew in
north Okaloosa County, contact
Rae Schwartz at bakcerny@
yahoo.com or 585-5672.


BRIAN HUGHES | Crestview News Bulletin
CHARTER: The charter for Crestview Troop 30, center, the first
troop chartered in Northwest Florida, is among memorabilia of
scout accomplishments displayed at the Crestview Public Library.


"Every council marked the
Centennial," Schwartz said,
and issued special patches to
commemorate the event.
A commemorative emblem
collection honors national
projects Boy Scouts have
undertaken over the years,
including wartime scrap
metal drives, "feed a soldier"


campaigns and the 1970s "Keep
America Beautiful" project.
The exhibit, which will
remain up at the library through
October, features material on
Boy Scouting's sub-branches
including Sea Scouts and Cub
Scouts for younger boys, patches,
centennial Pinewood Derby
vehicle kits and Venture Crew for


or Carol Doxey at 859-2742 or
send an e-mail to sherry@
missheartofamerica.com or
carol~missheartofamerica.com.
M/ARIANNA HISTORY:
History will come alive on the
streets of downtown Marianna
at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept.
25 as the Civil War "Battle of
Marianna" is reenacted as
part of the 'Marianna Day' Fall
festival. It includes a touching
memorial ceremony for the 14
"Home Guard" defenders who
lost their lives in that September
of 1864. Another reenactment,
the North Florida Raid, will
he presented Saturday and
Sunday afternoons at Citizens
Lodge Park where the festival
will be held. Four bands will
provide entertainment Friday
evening, Saturday afternoon,
and Saturday evening. Vendors,
Civil War era sutlers, arts and
crafts, plenty of great food, and
a fun-filled weekend await you in
Marianna the weekend of Sept.
24-26. Details: 850-718-1022, or
visit www.mariannareenactment.
info/.
ARC FUNDRAISER: On
Sept. 26 from 2 4 p.m., a wine
tasting fundraiser for the
American Red Cross will be held
at Magnolia Grill in Fort Walton
Beach. Fine wines and delicious
hors d'oeuvres will be featured,
along with raffles and door
prizes. Tickets are only $20 per
person and can be purchased
at the Magnolia Grill, online at
www.yourredeross.org or by
calling 432-7601.
VOLUNTEERS: The
Heritage Museum is seeking
responsible community
volunteers to assist with
greeting, reception and in the
gift shop. Flexible days and
times are available for 1-3
hour shifts. To sign up stop by
the museum during regular
business hours, Tuesday -
Saturday 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Details:
Call 678-2615.


TASTE OF HOME: WZEP
Taste of Home Cooking School
is planned for Thursday, Sept.
23, at the South Walton High
School auditorium. Doors open
at 4:30 p.m. Taste of Home
economist Michelle Roberts
starts cooking at 6:30. Before
the show, attendees can visit the
booths, register for prizes from
local businesses and pick up
promotional items.
Tickets are $10 in advance
at WZEP 449 North 12th Street,
DeEkniak Springs. They can be
purchased by mail by sending
a stamped envelope to PO. Box
627, DeEkniak Springs, FL 32435
or by visiting www.wzepl460.
com. Tickets are $12 on the day
of show, if available. Concessions
will be provided by the Pilot
Club of DeEhniak Springs.
Major sponsors are CHELCO,
Clary-Glenn Ekneral Homes
and Regency Hospice. For
information call 892-3158.
NEIL YOUNG CONCERT:
At the Saenger Theatre on
Tuesday, Sept. 28 at 8 p.m.
Tickets for this reserved seating
event are $65, $45, & $35 (plus
applicable service charges).
Tickets are available from
www.ticketmaster.com; charge
by phone by calling 800-745-3000
only. Tickets will not be available
at any Ticketmaster outlets or
at the Saenger Theatre Box
Office. All tickets sold will be
delivered via paperless ticket.
Attendees will not receive paper
tickets for this event. At the time
of entry, you must present the
credit card used to purchase
your tickets as well as a valid,
government-issued photo id.
The entire party must enter
the Saenger at the same time.
Tickets are nontransferable.
Limit of four tickets per order,
per household. Duplicate orders
will be cancelled.
HERITAGE PARK
EVENTS: The Fort Walton
Beach Heritage Park & Cultural


Center at 139 Miracle Strip
Parkway SE in Fort Walton
Beach is offering a series of
Native American arts and
crafts classes on Saturdays
at 11 a.m. Each class will last
between three to four hours and
all supplies will be included.
There is a five person minimum
required for each class, with a
maximum of 10 participants.
Advance registration and
payment of cash or check is
required. Participants can
attend any class they wish and
are not required to register for
entire series. The workshop will
include: Oct. 2 -Leatherworks
(4x6 leather bag) $45; Oct. 16-
Fingerweaving (belt/sash) $50;
Nov. 13- Pine needle basketry -
$35; Dec. 11- Drum making $85.
Heritage Park and the Indian
Temple Mound Museum are
open Monday through Saturday
10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and are
located at 139 Miracle Strip
Parkway SE. The exhibit is
included in regular admission
to Heritage Park: $5 plus tax for
adults, $4.50 plus tax for seniors
55 + and active military, and
$3 plus tax for children 4 to 17.
For further information please
contact Mike Thomin at 833-9595.
HERITAGE MUSEUM
EVENTS: The Heritage
Museum at 115 Westview Ave.
in Valparaiso is hosting the
events listed below. Hours are
Tuesday Saturday, 10 a.m. 4
p.m. Admission is $2 or free for
museum foundation members
and children younger than
four. Details, 678-2615 or www.
heritage-museum.org.
*Hot & Bothered, a cool new
exhibit of vintage collections on
view through Oct. 30, features
a 1930's era kitchen with a rare
Universal Electric Stove, one
of the first General Electric
Monitor Round-Top refrigerators
and, collections of household
items and advertising from days
gone by. Vintage photographs


from the museum's collection
and Florida State Archives are
included as well as an extensive
collection of electric fans dating
from 1906.
PLANT CLINICS: Okaloosa
County Horticulture Extension
Agent Larry Williams will hold
a series of plant clinics on the
fourth Wednesday of each month
(Sept. 22 and Oct. 27 from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m.) at the Extension Annex
Building, 127 Hollywood Blvd. in
Fort Walton Beach. Residents
may bring plant problems for
identification or diagnosis.
Williams and Okaloosa County
Master Gardeners will provide
information to solve gardening
problems.
Details: 689-5850 or 729-1400
extension 5850.
FLORIDA TRAIL
SCHEDULE: Visit http://
choctaw.floridatrail.org for
details on the group's upcoming
events.
'Iesday, Sept. 21, 6 p.m.
monthly meeting at Ed's
Hometown Seafood & Steaks
in Niceville. Visitors welcome.
Details: 682-6098.
Wednesday, Sept. 22, 6 p.m.
hike in downtown Pensacola
with dinner following. Details:
207-7390.
Saturday, Sept. 25, 6:30 p.m.
canoe or kayak moonlight paddle
trip on Boggy Bayou with dinner
afterwards. Details: 683-0803 or
729-0344.
Wednesday, Sept. 29, 6 p.m.
hike in downtown Pensacola
with dinner following. Details:
207-7390.
ADVENTURE CLUB: For
details on club activities, call
Clarice Hebinck at 581-4591 or
e-mail her at freklz100@cox.net.
'Iesday, Sept. 21, 8:30 a.m.
bike ride on Navarre Beach.
Meet at the parking area near
Sailors Grill Restaurant. Bring
a picnic breakfast for afterward.
Honcho: Clarice Hebinck.
Thursday, Sept. 23, 8:30 a.m.


bike ride on Scenic 98 in Destin.
Meet at the Village Baptist
Church on Matthews Blvd. Early
lunch afterward at a nearby
restaurant. Honcho: Clarice
Hebinck.
Saturday, Sept. 25, 10 a.m.
bike ride in Pensacola in
the Navy Point Pensacola
Country Club area. Meet at
the Food World on Barrancas
Ave. Lunch after the ride at a
nearby restaurant. Honcho:
Bobbi Serpico (cell 499-4404) and
Clarice Hebinck.
Tuesday, Sept. 28, 4:30 p.m.
bike ride on Pensacola Beach
and enjoy the free Bands on
the Beach concert afterward.
Meet at the public parking
area across from the Portofino
Condo Complex, at the east end
of Pensacola Beach. Bring a
folding chair and picnic supper
for the concert. Honcho: Nancy
Fremgen (cell 850-377-4676)
Thursday, Sept. 30, 4 p.m. bike
ride in Niceville in the Bluewater
Bay-Parkwood area. Meet at the
Winn Dixie on U.S. Highway 20.
Supper afterward at a nearby
restaurant. Honcho: Bob and
Audrey Hains (897-3624).
STRICTLY WEAVERS
M/EETINGS: are held once a
month by the Strictly Weavers
Guild of the Emerald Coast.
For exact meeting location
and more information please
call Alice (934-4403) or Betsy
(678-1926), or send an e-mail to
strictlyweavers eyahoo.com.
Anyone interested in the art of
weaving handwoven fabric is
invited to attend.
HURLBURT
TOASTMASTERS: If your goal
in 2010 is to grow professionally,
Hurlburt Toastmasters Club can
help you achieve it. The group
meets Wednesdays from 11:30 to
12:30 p.m. in Classroom L of the
Hurlburt Field Education Center
(Building 90220) Membership is
an investment that can pay off in
career advancement.


Exhibit celebrates die

B0y Scouts' (entennial

Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor

If you think being a Boy Scout
is limited to the old cliche of
assisting elderly ladies across
the street, you particularly
need to check out the display
in honor of the Centennial of
the Boy Scouts of America now
on exhibit in the lobby of the
Crestview Public Library.
Area Boy Scout unit
commissioner Rae Schwartz has
assembled a diverse collection
of scouting memorabilia, many
pieces specifically created to
celebrate the last 100 years since
the movement, created by Lord
Robert Baden-Powell in England
in 1907, arrived on our shores
three years later.
Included in the exhibit are
special commemorative rank
badges that can only be earned
by scouts during this centennial
year, Schwartz said. In addition,
she displays four merit badges
that had been previously been
retired but have been revived
just for this year. Boys may earn


HAPPENING from pane A2











































































































bp


Saturday, September 18, 2010


A12 I Crestview News Bulletin


Local


-


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f





1


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G


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I was born in New Orleans. My family still lives here. We have
to restore the Gulf communities for the shrimpers, fishermen,
hotel and restaurant owners who live and work here.
Iris Cross, BP Community Outreach


C811imS

C leanup

Economic Investment

Environme ntal
Resto ratio n

H ea Ith a nd Safety
Wildlife


No oil has flowed into the Gulf for weeks. But we know this is just the
beginning of our work. BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup
in the Gulf and that includes keeping you informed.

Restoring Gulf Commumities
We can't undo this tragedy. But we can help people get back on their feet.
We have been working with impacted communities since day one.

Partnering with local governments and community organizations, my job is
to listen to people's needs and frustrations and find ways to help. We have
19 community centers and teams in four states, listening and helping.

Restoring The Economy
BP is here in Gulf communities with shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and
restaurant owners, helping to make them whole.

More than 120,000 claim payments totaling over $375 million have
already gone to people affected by the spill. We have committed a
$20 billion independent fund to pay all legitimate claims, including lost
incomes until people impacted can go back to work. And none of this
will be paid by taxpayers.

BP has also given grants of $87 million to the states to help tourism
recover and bring people back to the Gulf beaches.

Restoring The Environment
We're going to keep looking for oil and cleaning it up if we find it. Teams
will remain in place for as long as it takes to restore the Gulf Coast.

And we've dedicated $500 million to work with local and national scientific
experts on the impact of the spill and to restore environmental damage.

Thousands of BP employees have their roots in the Gulf. We support
over 10,000 jobs in the region and people here are our neighbors. We
know we haven't always been perfect, but we will be here until the oil
is gone and the people and businesses are back to normal. We will do
everything we can to make this right.


For general information visit: bp.com
For help or information: (866) 448-5816

restorethegulf.gov
Facebook: BP America
Twitter: @BPAmerica
YouTube: BP

For claims information visit: bp.com/claims
floridagulfresponse.com


o 2010 BP, E&P


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Mak ing This Rig h t

Beaches















Saturday, September 18, 2010 w ww. cre stv ie bullet i n. co0m Page B1


PHOTOS BY RANDY DKCKSON | Crestview News Bulletin
Haley Meeks makes a valiant effort to get to the ball
against Central on Tuesday.
they all know what they to do itout there."
need to do and it's just a
matter of getting them See HOBOES B2


(RESTVIEW FOOTBALL


section


News

& NOTES

Today

High school volleyball
Crestview at Tate
tournament, TBA

Monday

High school volleyball
Milton at Crestview,
JV 5 p.m./V 6 p.m.

Middle school
volleyball
Lewis at Baker,
3:30 p.m.
Davidson at St.
Mary's, 3:30 p.m.
Ruckel at Shoal River,
3:30 p.m.

Tuesday

High school volleyball
Rocky Bayou at
Laurel Hill, JV 5 p.m./V
6 p.m.
Baker at Freeport, JV
5 p.m./V 6 p.m.

High school boys golf
Crestview vs.N~iceville

Middle school
football
Baker at Jay, 6 p.m.

High school girls golf
Crestview, Niceville,
Choctaw at Fort Walton
Beach, 3 p.m.

Punt, Pass and Kick
The Crestview Family
YMCA will host a NFL
Punt, Pass and Kick
Competition on Sunday,
Sept. 26 at 2 p.m. at
Crestview H ig h School's
Jack Foster Stadium.
The event is free for
boys and girls ages
6-15.
Winners will
advance to the sectional
competition set for
Oct. 17 at Fort Walton
Beach High School.
Participants are
reminded that no cleats
will be allowed.
For more information
contact Troy Donofro at
the Crestview YMCA at
689-2999.

Traveling Eagles
Registration and
Information for the
NAYB Traveling Eagles
Spring 2011 Season
is now open at www.
travelingeagles.com
Registration is
for players 8 to 1
(birthday as of April
30, 201 1). T ere are
a number of exciting
proposed tournament
locations for each age
group being discussed.
Please feel free to
contact Mike Wells at
850-42 8-0005

Reporting scores
Attention high
school and middle
school coaches and
parents, if you have
any game results and
khoo tht s y u woeu d



Dickson at randyd@
crestviewbulletin.com.
Please note the
deadline for Saturday's
Paper is 9 a.m.
Thursday morning
and the deadline for
Wednesday paper is 9
a.m. Monday morning.
Thank you for your
hel .

See NOTES B2


Randy Dickson
randyd~crestviewbulletin.com
LAUREL HILL It was a
rough start to District 1-1A
play for the Laurel Hill vol-
leyball team Tuesday.
The Hoboes lost to Cen-
tral in straight sets 25-19'
25-17 and 25-15.
toThe Jaguar etoork tc n
and never looked back in
a match they totally domi-
nated.
Laurel Hill (1-3, 0-1)
could get no closer than
a 2-2 tie in the second set
before Central ran off four

fot ohtcp n sor alp 1n t


match.
Hobo coach Fresca Paul
was disappointed in sev-
eral aspects of her team's
play.
"They (the Hobo play-
ers) weren't communicat-
ing," she said. "Central
has more hitters than we
do a little bit stronger
hitters than we do. If they
were talking, and playing
as a team, they could have
dug everything right up off
the court and set it back to
them until they tired them
out or got them to make a
mistake.
"We got a couple of good
blocks in, but they waited


until the end of the third
game to decide that they
could hang with Central."
Paul, who wasn't hired
until shortly before the
season started, admits
that there is still a grow-
ing curve for the team, but
she refused to use it as an
excuse for the way the Ho-
boes played against Cen-
tral.
"We did end up with
about three weeks less
than everybody else as far
as practices and stuff go
and that did put us a little
bit behind," Paul said.
"It's a little bit to blame
for it, but at the same time


Randy Dickson
randyd~crestviewbulletin.com

CREST VIEW Perhaps no adage in football
rings more true than the one that states,
"You can't run a play if you can't snap the
ball."
As the Crestview center, it is senior Dar-
ius Smith's job to snap the ball and get the
play started.
Listening to Smith's coaches and team-
mates talk, it seems hard to believe that


this is his first year to play center.
"Darius Smith has been a great per-
former in our program for about three
years," Bulldog head coach Matt Brunson
said. "We moved him over to center and he
had big shoes to fill. Nick Brown did a great
job last year and Darius has stepped over
there and hasn't missed a beat.
"He doesn't lead a lot with words be-
cause you very rarely hear him say any-
thing, but he leads by his actions and his
See SMITH B2


Special to liews Bulletin

The Davidson Lady Pan-
thers volleyball team is off
to a promising start this
season, with victories over
Destin and Baker in the first
matches.
The Lady Panthers de-
feated Destin 25-15 and
25-18 in their season opener
on Sept. 8, at Destin Mid-
dle School. The following


Saturday, Davidson par-
ticipated in an eight-team
round-robin tournament at
Destin Middle School.
Davidson finished third
in the tournament, posting a
3-2 record.
The Panthers hosted con-
ference newcomer Baker on
Monday and took the match
in straight sets 25-13, 25-5.
Davidson's sixthgrade
team is off to a strong start


as well, winning its first two
matches.
"This year's team is one
of the best teams thatlIhave
ever coached," Davidson
coach James Kerrell said.
"The girls are very athletic,
smart, and have a desire to
work hard. When you have a
team like that it makes a lot
of fun."
'Two-year starter and
team co-captain Molly


Kitchen thinks the Panthers
can turn in a strong season.
"If we can keep our heads
on straight and work hard
we are going to do real well,"
she said.
Davidson's varsity roster
this year has two sixth grad-
ers, three seventh graders
and nine eighth graders.
The members of the
varsity team this year are
Molly Kitchen (co-captain),


Macie Adams (co-captain),
Malia Gandy, Ellen Gilliam,
Baylee Estep, Karina Portu-
gal, Lakayla Robinson, Sa-
vannah Barefield, Brittany
Quarrier, Summer Wagner,
Ashley Humphrey, Halie Ste-
venson, Taylor Brunson, and
Sydney Diven.
Davidson's sixth grade
team is dressing out 13 girls

See DAVIDSON B2


SPORTS


INSIDE

More local news


Hoboes drop district o ener


COllege football

Randy Dickson
randyd~crestviewbulletin.com

Today is an anniversary of sorts for
me.
No, seeing as how I'm
a longtime bachelor, it's
not a wedding anniver-
sary. Nor is it an anniver- -~~~
sary most people would ~ C
think of unless, like my-
self, they are hopelessly
hooked on college foot- NORTH END
ball. ZONE
It was 34 years ago Randy Dickson
today, on Sept. 18, 1976,
that I attended my first college football
game at the University of Tennessee's
Neyland Stadium.
For years I had dreamed of attend-
ing games at Neyland, but growing up in
Gulf Breeze I never had that opportunity.
I finally experienced Tennessee football
live as an 18-year-old college freshman.
The Volunteers beat Texas Christian
31-0 that night in what would turn out to
be a 6-5 season, and Bill Battle's last as
the Volunteer head coach. If I remember
correctly, the cost of a ticket was $8.
The cost of a ticket to today's Florida-
Tennessee game at Neyland Stadium is
$70, which is a subject for a completely
different column.
No matter what the year or the team,
there's something special about attend-
ing your first big time college football
game. And there's something extra spe-
cial about attending the game in your
school's home stadium. But I think that
first game might have been even more
special in the days before cable TV
with sports networks that offer enough
games that any college football junkie
can overdose on any given Saturday.
When I was growing up you were for-
tunate if your favorite team was on TV
once or twice a year. And long before dig-
ital, fiber optic and high definition tech-
nology, some got their football games
televised in black and white. I think those
memories are what made that first game
at Neyland Stadium so special.
I have been fortunate enough to at-
tend dozens of games at Tennessee,
as well as games at Mississippi State,
Kentucky, Alabama, Florida and Florida
State and each setting is special to the
fans that flock to games each Saturday.
As a Tennessee guy I'll admit I'm a
bit biased when I say nothing tops a col-
lege football Saturday on the Tennes-
see campus. My second favorite place
to attend a game is Alabama, followed
by Florida, Florida State, Kentucky and
Mississippi State.


Smitl RI1010 TSldU1Og

offensive ln


Davidson volley ball of f to strong start





NOTES

from page B1
Calendar deadlines
If you have an
announcement for our
sports calendar, or would
like to submit a story,
please note the following
deadlines.
The deadline for the
Wednesday issue is 9 a.m.
Monday. Our deadline
for Saturday is 9 a.m.
Th sdhaeevent of limited

space, calendar items are
Prioritized by the closest
dates. Other submitted
material is published as
we have available space.



I I f~
until 2pm
MONDAYS AT
BLACK) STONE
Play Golf for only


and get a
FREE Pina Colada
at the turn.
Blackstone Golf Course
108 Blackstone Lane
Mossy Head. Off Highway 90
wiww.blackstonemossyhead .com


HOBOES from page B1


DAVIDSON from page B1

this year.
When asked about the sixth graders, Coach Tammy
Kerrell said, "This group of girls is doing real well. They
have been making huge strides in learning the fundamen-
tals of the game. They are a good group of girls that want
to be out here all the time."
Sixth grade team members are Ashley Parker, Isabella
Avery, Torri Robinson, Cailey Ness, Danyele Carroll, Des-
tiny Rowan, Shelly Howington, Madison Holloway, Mad-
die Luke, Michaela Pawlak, Kayla Moulton, April Gudinas,
and Brooklyn Nicholson.


The venues might be different, but each has a simi-
lar feel to the one I experienced for the first time 34
years ago.
There is nothing like seeing fans from opposing
teams tailgate side-by-side as the smells of roasted
chicken, grilled burgers, hotdogs and steaks gently fill
the air on a crisp fall afternoon.
I love the sights of pretty young coeds mixing with
alumni who still proudly wear their school colors 50
years after they graduated. And seeing crazy young
men painted with those school colors reminds me of
the boy I used to be.
Yes, there is something about college football and
the fans that have helped make it a special game.
I wish I could be in Neyland Stadium this afternoon
cheering on my Volunteers on this special 34th anniver-
sary, but instead I'll watch the game from the best seat
in the house in my living room.
And whether the Vols win or lose, I will celebrate my
experience that is college football.


WWW.C reSt~iewnbul letin.com


I BLACK STONE '
I I
Bring in this Coupon & Play
I Tuesday Wednesday& Thursday. 1
I (Offer not vald on Friday. Saturday or Sunda~y) I
108 Blackstone Lane. Mossy Head, Off Highway 90
wwu~w.blackstonemossyhead .com (850) 520-4670

gg g a m g gg g am gg I


saturday, September 1 8, 2010


B2 | Crestview News Bulletin


SMITH from page B1


Sports


work ethic. He's a rock on
our offensive line and does a
great job."
Standing 6 feet tall and
weighing in at about 200
pounds, Smith is dwarfed by
some of his larger offensive
line mates. What he lacks in
size he more than makes up
for with intelligence and a
will to succeed.
"Darius is the best cen-
ter you could ask for," quar-
terback Garrett Teal said.
"The other linemen always
look to him when they don't
know what to do because
he's a smart football player
and everybody can count on
him to know what's going
on. He's a dependable guy
and I love having him on the
team.
"His fundamentals are
totally sound. He knows ex-
actly what he is doing. He
brings all 200 pounds into a
hit so he brings a lot of force
and he does the other stuff
well."
Bulldog offensive line
coach Thomas Grant be-
lieves that Smith is an al-
most perfect center,
"He does everything
right," Grant said. "He hus-
tles every single play. He
makes all of our line calls
for us.
"He just sets the tempo
for our offensive line as a
senior leader for us. He has


gotten better every one of
his four years -- every day.
He's a perfect technician."
Smith played guard his
first three years in the pro-
gram, but when asked to
move to center he willingly
made the move.
"It's been pretty tough,
but it was just a transition I
made for my team to win,"
Smith said.
It is the team-first at-
titude that has endeared
Smith to Brunson.
"Darius Smith will do
anything we ask him to do,
and do it with everything
he's got and that's what
he does," Brunson said. "I
think somebody that works
as hard as he does and has
his attitude can play any
position. I don't think there
was anything (difficult)
about the transition. He just
wants to play ball."
Smith has always played
with purpose, but this year
he might have a little extra
incentive to do well.
Smith's father, James
Smith, is in the Air Force
and was deployed last year,
missing the football season.
"It has meant quite a bit
to me because he hasn't had
a chance to watch me play
football and all of that kind
of stuff," Darius said. "So
for him to behere my senior
year means a lot."


Darius Smith
is front and
center for the
Crestview.
offensive 11ne.


~~ ~



Darius Smith (52) pulls to his left during an offensive
line drill during Tuesday's practice.


Darius Smith takes a few minutes to relax before
the start of Tuesday's practice.


Kasey Harrison sets the ball
for Laurel Hill on Tuesday.

Gracie Simmons led
the Hobo attack with three
blocks and two kills. Nichole
Bailey had two assists and
a kill. And Chloe Talaric had
two aces.
The Hoboes picked up their
first win of the season Monday
night as they beat Florala in
straight sets by the scores of
25-19, 25-13, 25-12.
Kasey Harrison had five
aces in the win. Bailey and
Lauren Gordon each had three
aces.
"All of the girls played re-
ally well," Paul said. "They
had good chatter going on and
worked as a team and it paid off
for them.
"We still had some errors,
but mistakes are going to hap-
pen and we just need to use
that as a guideline for what we
need to improve on. I'm really
proud of all of them."


n ewhs


Laurel Hill's Chloe Talaric serves during the
second set against Central on Tuesday.


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News BRIEFS


Saturday, September 18, 2010


Local


crestview News Bulletin I B3


Specjg| to the News Bulletin

WASHINGTON Agricul-
ture Secretary Tom Vilsack
announced Sept. 9 that
USDA has awarded grants
to strengthen the research,
teaching and extension ca-
pabilities at 18 historically
black land-grant colleges
and universities in an effort
to recruit and train students
for careers in agriculture.
"Our 1890 historically
black land-grant univer-
sities play a critical role
teaching students to meet
the high quality, innovative
research needs that are vi-
tal to the well-being of our
nation's food, fuel and fiber,"
Vilsack said. "These awards
mark a substantial invest-
ment in addressing the ro-
bust and varied research
challenges facing Ameri-
can agriculture today, but,
more importantly, it is also
an investment in our future
scientists and engineers,


farmers and foresters."
USDA's National Insti-
tute of Food and Agriculture
(NIFA) provides support to
historically black colleges
and universities that were
designated at as land-grant
universities in the Second
Morrill Act in 1890. Grants
to these 1890 universities
support research, extension
and teaching in the food and
agricultural sciences by
building the institutional ca-
pacities of these schools.
The 1890 Institution
Research, Extension and
Teaching Capacity Build-
ing Grants (CBG) Program
strengthens the linkages
among the 1890 universi-
ties, other colleges and
universities, USDA, and
private industry. It focuses
on advancing cultural di-
versity in the scientific and
professional workforce by
attracting and educating
more students from under-
represented groups.


The 1890 Facilities
Grants Program provides
funds for acquiring and im-
proving food sciences facili-
ties and equipment, includ-
ing libraries. Grants enable
1890 land-grant universities
to be well-equipped to fully
address research, exten-
sion, and academic needs.
In fiscal 2010, NIFA
awarded$32,514,064through
the 1890 CBG Program and
$18,979,200 through the 1890
Facilities Grants Program.

Fiscal 2010
1890 CBG a rd
Alabama A&M Univer-
sity, Normal, Ala., $1,471,027
(six awards); Tuskegee
University, 'Iskegee, Ala.,
$2,853,067 (eight awards);
University of Arkansas,
Pine Bluff, Ark., $1,404,751
(five awards); Delaware
State University, Dover, Del.,
$1,436,438 (seven awards);
Florida A&M University,


Tallahassee, $3,100,829 (12
awards); Fort Valley State
University, Fort Valley, Ga.,
$589,767 (three awards);
Kentucky State University,
Frankfort, Ky., $1,186,239
(four awards); Southern
University, Baton Rouge,
La., $2,881,820 (12 awards);
University of Maryland-
Eastern Shore, Princess
Anne, Md., $3,498,597 (11
awards); Alcorn State Uni-
versity, Lorman, Miss.,
$929,901 (five awards); Lin-
coln University, Jefferson
City, Mo., $1,702,913 (four
awards)
North Carolina A&T Uni-
versity, Greensboro, N.C.,
$2,635,372 (12 awards)
Langston University,
Langston, Okla., $1,911,560
(six awards); South Carolina
State University, Orange-
burg, S.C., $649,921 (two
awards); Tennessee State
University, Nashville, Tenn.,
$2,910,311 (10 awards); Prai-
rie View A&M University,


Prairie View, Texas, $857,931
(four awards); Virginia State
University, Petersburg, Va.,
$1,329,697 (four awards);
West Virginia State Univer-
sity, Institute, W.V, $1,163,923
(three awards).

Fiscal 2010
1890 facilities grantS
Alabama A&M Univer-
sity, Normal, Ala., 1,049,103;
'Iskegee University,
'Iskegee, Ala, $1,049,103;
University of Arkansas,
Pine Bluff, Ark., $972,294;
Delaware State Univer-
sity, Dover, Del., $744,682;
Florida A&M University,
Tallahassee, Fla., $982,622;
Fort Valley State University,
Fort Valley, Ga., $1,105,861;
Kentucky State University,
Frankfort, Ky., $1,220,410;
Southern University, Baton
Rouge, La., $912,794; Uni-
versity of Maryland-East-
ern Shore, Princess Anne,
Md., $850,069; Alcorn State


University, Lorman, Miss.,
$977,673; Lincoln Univer-
sity, Jefferson City, Mo.,
$1,243,693; North Carolina
A&T University, Greens-
boro, N.C., $1,235,946;
Langston University, Langs-
ton, Okla., $1,032,996; South
Carolina State University,
Orangeburg, S.C., $967,310;
Tennessee State University,
Nashville, Tenn., $1,152,844;
Prairie View A&M Univer-
sity, Prairie View, Texas,
$1,546,923; Virginia State
University, Petersburg, Va.,
$1,066,004; West Virginia
State University, Institute,
W.V, $868,873.

Through federal funding
and leadership for research,
education and extension
programs, NIFA focuses
on investing in science and
solving critical issues im-
pacting people's daily lives
and the nation's future.
For more information, visit
www.nifa.usda.gov.


Special to the News Bulletin

'Living in heear
country' guest lecture
Se t. I6
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission and the
South Walton Community
Council hosted a lecture
on living safely with bears
Thursday, Sept. 16, from 7
to 8:30 p.m.
The event will take
place at the Seaside
Meeting Hall Theatre,
216 Quincy Circle, Santa
Rosa Beach. It will include
showing the FWC's new
15-minute DVD, "Living
with Florida Black Bears."
FWC wildlife biologist
Alan Knothe will be on
hand to answer questions
about bears and suggest
ways to reduce problems
and increase enjoyment of
local wildlife.
The talk is free and
open to the public. For
more information, contact
the FWC's Northwest
Regional Office in Panama
City at 265-3676.

Women's outdoor
WOrkshops
Wanted: Adventurous
and outdoorsy women
wishing to learn more
about Florida's great
outdoors in a comfortable,
noncompetitive, hands-
on environment. If this
could be you, contact the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) to participate in a
Becoming an Outdoors-
Woman workshop.
The next workshop
will be Oct. 8-10 in Quincy
near Tallahassee at the
Wallwood Boy Scout
Camp, 23 Wallwood BSA
Drive, Quincy. Another
will be Nov. 12-14 at the
tehreglaesC both imdpie
Management Area, near
West Palm Beach. Sessions
begin Friday at 10 a.m. and
end Sunday with lunch.
The cost for the three-
day workshop is $175,
and there are a limited
number of discounted
slots available for low-
income participants,
single parents and college
students attending the
workshop for the first time.
The workshop is restricted
to 100 participants on a
first-come, first-served

basr more information
about the BOW workshop
or to register, visit
MyFWC.com/BOW or call
561-625-5122.

Blue crab rule

changes proposed
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission proposed
a series of draft rule
amendments on Thursday,
Sept. 2 to modify blue
crab regulations. These
proposals include some
recommendations by the
FWC's Blue Crab Advisory


Board, which helps the
commission manage
Florida's blue crab fishery,
as well as some technical
blue crab amendments.
The FWC will hold a
final public hearing on
these proposals at its
December meeting in
Weston. More information
is available online at http://
myfwc.com/docs/
CommissionMeetings/
2010/2010 Sep BlueCrab_
presentation.pdf.

F WC serves up bonUS
Gulf red snapper
SOOSON
Anglers got some good
news on Thursday, Sept.
2 as the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission agreed to
reopen the recreational
harvest season for
red snapper in Gulf of
Mexico state waters
for eight straight three-
day weekends this fall.
This action coincides
with a proposed open
season for red snapper
that is expected to be
implemented in Gulf
federal awatehres of ofdae.
The regular
recreational harvest
season for red snapper
in all waters of the Gulf
off Florida took place
from June 1 until July 24
this year. Anglers will be
able to keep the current
Gulf daily recreational
limit of two red snapper
greater than 16 inches
total length per person on
Friday, Saturdays and
Sunday beginning Oct.
1 and extending for eight
consecutive weekends
through Sunday, Nov. 21.
"That gives folks an
extra 24 days to enjoy Gulf
red snapper fishing at a
time when the weather
is usually very nice and
on weekends when most
people are able to take
off from work," Barreto
said. Updated information
is available online at
MyFWC.com/Rules (click
on "Fishing Saltwater").

FWC pro oses
increase to redfisit
bag limit
On Thursday, Sept. 2'
the FWC proposed a draft
rule that would raise the
recreational daily redfish
bag limit from one fish to
two per person in large
areas of northern Florida.
The FWC also is proposing
to create three regional
management areas for
redfish to better target its
management approaches
for this popular Florida
fish.
"we ve come a long
way since the early 1990s,
when redfish stocks were
largely depleted, but the
management of redfish in
Florida is turning out to be
a success story," said FWC
Chairman Rodney Barreto.
"The fishery is holding its
own in southern Florida,
and numbers of redfish in


northern parts of the state
are now at a point where
it's safe to give back some
fish to anglers."
The FWC has scheduled
a series of workshops this
fall to hear what people
think about its redfish
proposals. Information
regarding these workshops
is available online at
MyFWC.com/Rules (click
on "Fishing Saltwater).
A final public hearing
on the FWC's redfish rule
proposals is scheduled
for the commission's
February public meeting in
Apalachicola.

B whutn field drO nigy
ja Jefferson COUnty
The FWC is sponsoring
a bowhunting field day
in Jefferson County on
Sept. 18 for archers who
have completed the online
National Bowhunter
Education Foundation
course
The class runs from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the
Beau Turner Youth
Conservation Center, 9194
S. Jefferson Highway in
Monticello. Attendees

I srcio o suc topics
as the fundamentals
of bowhunting, safety,
hunting techniques
stalking, trailing and
sportsmanship. Even
though it is not required
in Florida, completion
of a bowhunting class
is required in at least
14 other states before a
hunter can purchase a
bowhunting license.
Participants must have
completed the online
portion of the course and
bring the official NBEF
Field Day Qualifier
Voucher with them. In
addition, participants
should dress for hunting
and bring their own

Inld ng mosan arrows
(field points or target
points), pen or pencil and a
packed lunch
People interested in
attending this course can
register online and obtain
information about future
bowhunting classes at
MyFWC.com/HunterSafety
or by calling the FWC's
regional office in Panama
City at 265-3676.

Atlantic snook
10fVOSt season

reopens
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission
(FWC)reopened the
recreational harvest
season for snook on Friday
in Florida's Atlantic waters
and maintain a catch-and-
release snook fishery in
Florida's Gulf waters.
Only catch-and-release
fishing for snook has been
allowed statewide under
FWC executive orders,
which have been in effect
since January, to protect
snook populations affected
by prolonged cold weather


in Florida earlier this year.
Commissioners
received a staff report
regarding the latest
information on the status
of the snook population,
which suggests that snook
on Florida's Atlantic
coast were less severely
impacted by cold weather
than were Gulf coast
snook. Based on this
information and public
comment received, the
Commission agreed to
reopen snook harvest
season this fall in Atlantic
waters.
The regular daily bag
limit of one snook per
recreational angler will
apply, as will the slot limit
of 28-32 inches total length,
Also, as a precautionary
measure, the commission
agreed to keep the harvest
of Atlantic snook closed
from Dec. 15 until Sept.
1, 2011, to protect snook
populations this coming
winter and during next
spring and summer's
spawning months.
In addition, the current
harvest prohibition of
snook in all of Florida's
Gulf, Everglades National
Park and M nroe County

will remain in effect until
Sept. 1, 2011. Anglers may
still catch and release
snook during snook
harvest closures, and the
FWC encourages everyone
to handle and release
these fish carefully to help
ensure their survival upon
release. More information
is available online at
MyFWC.com/Rules (click
on "Fishing Saltwater").

NOW ilUnting dateS
possible for
2011-12 season
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission recently
directed its staff to develop
draft rules to modify
hunting season dates on
FWC-managed areas for
next year. Commissioners
will consider the draft
rules at a future meeting.
The FWC, along with its
partners and cooperating
agency landowners,
has been working with
stakeholders in developing
proposals to change
hunting season dates for
these areas, which include
wildlife management
areas, wildlife and
environmental areas and
miscellaneous areas.
The FWC held nine
public meetings across
the state and gathered
input and feedback on
the subject through an
online poll. Proposed
changes would take into
consideration when deer
breed on each area,
Other hunter preferences
- such as hunting during
holidays and the desires
of other area users.
Any future changes
made to area season dates
would not take effect
until the 2011-12 hunting
season.


in the ocean's pH.
NOAA's State of the Sci-
ence Fact Sheet on ocean
acidification states oceans
have absorbed approxi-
mately 50 percent of the
carbon dioxide released
from burning fossil fu-
els, which has increased
ocean acidity by about 30
percent since
the start of
:at the the Industrial
*f i Revolution.Ee m l

s been changes in
the acidity of
dl, w~e seawater can
a si h have dramat-icefcso
t2OUS sea life, which
may include:
ation~. De-
creased rate
our of the produc-

skeleto~ns.

(ul 8( Renduc-
12e8 at ability of ma-
cos. ne alae and
ming zoo-
plankton to
maintain protective shells.
Reduction in the sur-
vival of marine species,
including commercial fish
and shellfish.
The increase in ocean
acidification adds more
stress to ecosystems al-
ready stressed by human
activities. The FWC and
other wildlife managers
know that addressing this
issue requires reducing
those stresses over which
we have better control.
"For example, we can
reduce pollution and run-
off from land, develop
wise coastal zoning regu-
lations, eliminate destruc-
tive fishing practices and
restore ecosystem integ-
rity," Glazer said. "These
approaches increase the
health of ecosystems and
are just good manage-
ment practices; period."
For every tragedy that
occurs, such as the Deep-
water Horizon oil spill,
opportunity exists for re-
evaluation of priorities.
Some of these things
will even be good for our
wallets as well as the en-
vironment. You've heard
them all before, but it
doesn't hurt to have re-
minders, especially today.
'Irning off the lights when
you leave the room will
lower electric bills by not
burning electricity and not
pumping out more heat
into the room. When an old
bulb burns out, replace it
with compact fluorescent
light bulb. These last lon-
ger and use less energy.
Next month, try a few
more changes. Soon we'll all
be substantially helping life
above and below the sea.

Contact Patricia
Behnke at pat~behnke@
M/yFWC.com.


i
I


Grants awarded to historically black colleges and universities


Saving deep water


requires digmgin


deep into our habits


Special to the News Bulletin

Many of us Floridians
don't like to go too long
without getting a whiff of
salt air. Even those of us
living inland are always
within an hour or two of
one coast or another. We
take our lovely white-sand
beaches,
crystal clear
blue water NOwe th

anskies dottedcla gilA I~i
with fluffy weell har
white clouds
for granted. cappe
,At lteaost breathl

granted untilfo c~c
April 20. On celebr~
that day, the
dire possibil- But
wllfity of oiledan decen


ptoemcovered onfs
beaches still CO:
lomedexpas ahih
sion from the
Deepwater
Horizon oil rig reverberat-
ed through economic and
environmental lines.
SNow that the gushing
oil well has been capped,
we breathe a sigh of cau-
tious celebration. But our
dependence on fossil fuels
still comes at a high cost.
The carbon dioxide
emissions created from
burning fossil fuels do
more than change our
climate. They also cause
a phenomenon known
as ocean acidification.
While scientists debate
the severity of climate
change, most can look at
the data and agree that
the increase in the atmo-
sphere's carbon dioxide
levels impacts ocean life.
"Ocean acidification
and climate change share
a common insidious influ-
ence," said Bob Glazer, a
biologist with the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission
(FWC) and a co-leader of
the FWC's climate change
research and monitor-
ing working group. "They
are both caused by the in-
creases in carbon dioxide
in the atmosphere."
The process of ocean
acidification does not
mean the ocean is turning
into a boiling cauldron of
acid. It refers to changes
in the water because of the
additional carbon dioxide
from the environment.
The U.S. Geological
Survey's website explains
the process of ocean acidi-
fication. Even though the
ocean serves as a natural
reservoir for carbon diox-
ide, increasing carbon diox-
ide in the atmosphere and
the resulting uptake by the
ocean results in increased
seawater acidity. This pro-
cess results in a decrease





Saturday, September 1 8, 2010


B4 | Crestview News Bulletin


Food


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B6 | Crestview News Bulletin


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II B CS~ 1~1 ~d~i 1~1~ID)~P ai t


Saturday, September 18, 2010


NlorthWOSI Florida Daily N~ews Newls Herald Destin Log Creslview News Bulletin Wralton Sun The Star Holmes County Times Adverbser WIashinglon County N~ews Santa Rosa's Press Gazette The Tlmes










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IPL~ ~ +:


|1100
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
270.00 FEET: THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
11'59'30", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 56.51 FEET
(CHORD N: 66'50'10" E,
56.41 FEET) TO A
POINT OF TANGENCY
OF SAID. CURVE:
THENCE PROCEED-
NORTH 72 DEGREES
49 MINUTES 55 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 478.68
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 51 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES
13 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 99.51
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH-60 DE-
GREES 14 MINUTES
34 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 159,65
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 17 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES
05 SECONDS: WEST
A DISTANCE OF 47.59
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 72 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
55 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 162.86
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHWEST
AND HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 149.0 1 FEET
THENCE PROCEED
ALONG THE ARC OF
SAID CURVE
THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 53'03'52".
AN ARC DISTANCE OF
138.01 FEET (ClHORD
S 81'08"43" E, 133.13
FEET); THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 35 DE-
GREES 08 MINUTES
44 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 34,27
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
175.00 FEET: THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
19'58'42", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 61.02 FEET
(CHORD S 25'O9'23" W.
60,71 FEET) TO A
POINT' OF TANGENCY
OF SAID CURVE:
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 15 DEGREES
10 MINUTES 04 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 178.57
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
175.00 FEET: THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
26'O9'10", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 79.88 FEET
(CHORD S O2'05'26" W,
79.19 FEET) To A
POINT OF CURVA-
TURE OF A CURVE
CONCAVE TO THE
SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
333,00 FEET: THENCE
PROCEED ALONG


1100
Nancy Elizabeth Vorhis
filed their Petition for
Adoption of Ethan
S Nickolas Hopkins, a ml-
nor.,, The said William
EMNs G. Hopkins, or any
advertising other Interested party,
ed Notices shall file any answer,
Notices/ response, or objection
cements to this adoption petition
s & within thirty (30) days
"Bby malling said re-
(ds sponse to Fred Hamic,
lts Probate Judge, Post
Office Box 430, Ge-
neva, Alabama 36340
and shall further pro-
vide a copy of said re-
00sponse to Honorable
Charles W. Blakeney,
Attorney for Petitioners,
19 Post Office Box 100
Geneva, Alabama
ROBATE 36340. Failure to re-
GENEVA spond could result In
'LABAMA the walver o any ob-
NO. jections to the adoption
petition.
MATTER OF
ON PETI- Given under my hand
and seal this 15th day
of June 2010.
NICKOLAS
Fred Hamic, Probate
Judge
WILLIAM Geneva County, Ala-
ID NANCY bama
ORHIS,
06-26-10
07-03-10
07-10-10
IOTICE 07-17-10


|1100
THE ARC Of SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL- ANGLE OF
38'29'13", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 223.68
FEET (CHORD S
58'55'00" W, 219.50
FEET) TO A POINT OF
TANGENCY OF SAID
CURVE: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 39 DE-
GREES 40 MINUTES
24 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 100.39
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH SO DE-
GREES 19 MINUTES
36 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 68.00
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 50 DE-
CREES 54 MINUTES
11 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 138.64
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 50 DE-
GREES 19 MINUTES
36 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 95.00
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 39 DE-
GREES 40 MINUTES
24 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 305.29
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE NORTHWEST
AND HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 267.00 FEET:
THENCE PROCEED
ALONG THE ARC OF
SAID CURVE
THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL. ANGLE OF
45'O9'21", AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 210.43
FEET (CHORD S
62'15'04 W., 205.02
FEET) TO A POINT OF
TANGENCY OF SAID
CURVE: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 84 DE-
CREES 49 MINUTES
45 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE Of 58.25
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 05 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES
15 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 93.00
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH' 84 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
45 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 115.00
FEET; THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 05 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES
15 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 93.00
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 84 DE-
GREES ,49 MINUTES
43 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE. OF 273.45
FEET TO THE BEGIN-
NING OF SAID PAR-


|1100
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 26 MINUTES
18 SECONDS WEST
A" DISTANCE OF 50.00
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES
42 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 274.84
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
CREES 26 MINUTES
18 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE 82.00
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES
42 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 93.67
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 06 DE-
GREES 25 MINUTES
'49 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 67.26
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES
42 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 91.57
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURES OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHWEST
AND HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 689.98 FEET:
THENCE PROCEED
ALONG THE ARC OF
SAID CURVE
THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGEL OF 04'35'06",
AN ARRC DISTANCE
OF 55.21 FEET
(CHORD S 86'16'O9" E,
55..20 FEET); THENCE
PROCEED SOUTH 22
DEGREES 48 MIN-
UTES 13 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 72.26 FEET:
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 09 DEGREES
26 MINUTES 41 SEC-
ONDS WEST. A DIS-
TANCE OF 52.85
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 18 DE-
GREES 09 MINUTES
04 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 68.63
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 09 DE-
GREES 23 MINUTES
00 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 55.24
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 72 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES
19 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 476.04
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
330.00 FEET: THENCE
PROCEED ALONGTHE
ARC OF SAID CURVE
THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 11'59'32",
AN ARC DISTANCE OF
69.07 FEET (CHORD S
66'50'11" W, 68.94
FEET) TO A POINT OF
TANGENCY OF SAID
CURVE: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 61 DE-
GREES 22 MINUTE, 38
SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 207.13
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 84 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
41 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 856.87
FEET: THENCE CON-
TINUE SOUTH 84 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
41 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 487.85
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 01 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES 2


|1100
CEL HEREIN DE-
SCRIDED, CONTAIN-
ING 14.38 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.

EXHIBIT X
SUBJECT PARCEL C"
(AS SURVEYED DY
SOUTHERN ENGl-
NEERING GROUP
'PA.)
COMMENCING AT
THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION
29, TOWNSHIP 3
NORTH, RANGE 23
WEST, OKALOOSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 01 DEGREES
53 MINUTES 24 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1318.70
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES
28 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 1328.67
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES
21 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 669.61
FEET: THENCE CON-
TINUE SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES
21 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 664.04
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 39 MINUTES
27 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 369.72
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
04 SECONDS EAST,. A
DISTANCE OF 114.30
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
41 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 809.11
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 05 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES
19 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 254.79
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 36 MINUTES
31 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 237.24
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH '05 DE-
GREES 23 MINUTES
29 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 405.06
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH. 34 DE-
GREES 34 MINUTES
45 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 19.37
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 60 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
25 SECONDS EAST A


A-1 Able Concrete
Tear out, replacement
driveways, patios, Free
Est. Open 7 days week
Llic/ns, 850-461-6733



Farm Direct
Centipede, Zoysia,
StWAug~usilne,& sTrmda
Call 244-6651
Suncoast Sod Farms


Robert Brewer
Plumbing
Plumbing service &
sales, waterheater re-
pair, auth, service for
Rheem, Ruud, State,
A.O, smith, Bradford
White and others. call
682-8683 or 830-2631

itter a~ppen~


rp~iM
Be1Ie rlkalrs.un~nr.


|1100
located In Okaloosa
County, Florida as de-
scribed on Exhibit "A"
attached hereto and
made a part hereof
SUBJECT PARCEL "i
(AS SURVEYED DY
SOUTHERN ENGl-
NEERING GROUP
PA.)
BEGINI'llNG AT THE
NORTHWEST COR-
NER OF SECTION 29,
TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH,
RANGE 23 WEST
OKALOOSA COUNTY
FLORIDA; THENCE
PROCEED SOUTH 88
DEGREES 30 MIN-
UTES 35 SECONDS
EAST A DISTANCE OF
1930.09 FEET:
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 01 DEGREES
27 MINUTES 15 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1221.56
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 20 MINUTES
09 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 703.10
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 27 MINUTES
24 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 463.67
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 47 MINUTES
40 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 513.86
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 15 DE-
CREES 24 MINUTES
15 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 727.14
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 88 DE-
GREES 41 MINUTES
44 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 338.59
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 27 MINUTES
24 SECONDS WEST A
'DISTANCE OF 90.90
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 44' MINUTES
27 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 446.90
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 49 DE-
GREES 34 MINUTES
20 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 109.49
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHWEST
AND HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 770.05 FEET:
THENCE PROCEED
ALONG THE ARC OF
SAID CURVE
THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 10'57'24"
AN ARC DISTANCE.
OF 147.26 FEET
(CHORD N 83'05'00" W.
147.03 FEET) TO A
POINT OF TANGENCY
OF SAID CURVE:
THENCE PROCEED
NORTH 88 DEGREES
.33 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 91.57
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 26 MINUTES
18 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 15.00
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 88 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES
42 SECONDS WEST. A
DISTANCE OF 374.36
FEET: THENCE PRO-


|1100
1 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 669. 61
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 01 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES
28 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF l328.67
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 01 DE-
CREES 53 MINUTES
24: SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF
1318.70, FEET TO THE
BEGINNING OF SAID
PARCEL HEREIN DE-
SCRIBED, CONTAIN-
ING 168.54 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS, LESS
AND EXCEPT THAT
CERTAIN PARCEL TO
THE CITY OF CREST-
VIEW AS RECORDED
IN THE OFFICIAL REC-
ORDS OF OKALOOSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA IN
BOOK 2550 PAGE 1.

SUBJECT PARCEL "B"
(AS SURVEYED BY
SOUTHERN ENGl-
NEERING GROUP
PA.)
COMMENCING AT
THE NORTHWEST
CORNER CF SECTION
29, TOWNSHIP 3
NORTH, RANCE 23
WEST, OKALOOSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 01 DEGREES
53 MINUTES 24 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1318,70
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES
28 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 1328.67
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES
21 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 669.91
FEET: THENCE CON-
TINUE. SOUTH01 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES
21 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 664,04
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 39 MINUTES
27 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 369.72
FEET: TI-IENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
04 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 114.30
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES
41 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 809.11
FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING:
THENCE PROCEED
NORTH 05 DEGREES
10 MINUTES 19 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 254.79
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 84 DE-
GREES 36 MINUTES
31 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 237,24
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 05 DE-
GREES 23 MINUTES
29 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 405.06
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 34 DE-
GREES 34 MINUTES
45 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 19.37
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 60 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
25 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 105.97


SnANUC
1100-LegalA
1110 -Classifi
1120 Public h
Announ~
1125 -Carpool
1130 R oti
1140 Hppy A
1150 -Persona
1100 Lost
1170- Found


11(

Legal #10111
IN THE P~
COURT OF
COUNTY, A
CASE

IN THE MI
THE ADOPTI
TION OF:

ETHAN
HOPKINS,

ROGER
VORHIS, AN
ELIZABETH Vt

PETITIONERS

LEGAL N


William G. Hopkins and
all other persons con-
cerned with the adop-
tlon of Ethan Nickolas Legal#101295
Hopkins are hereby no-
tlfled that on March 4, IN THE CIR(
2010, Roger William COURT INAN
Vorhis and his wife, OKLOOln SACe


FLORIDA BEACH
COMMUNITY BANK,

Plaintiff.
CASE NO.: 2010 CA
004836 Cvs.

CRESTVIEW HOLD-
INGS, LLC, a Florida
Ilmited lability com-
pany,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice Is hereby given
that pursuant to the FI-
nal Judgment of Fore-
closure signed on Sep-
tember 1, 2010, In the
case of BEACH COM-
MUNITY BANK, Plain-
tiff, v, CRESTVIEW
HOLDINGS, LLC, a
Florida limited lability
company, Defendant,
Case No.: 2010 CA
004836 C, the under-
signed Clerk of the Cir-
cult Court of Okaloosa
County, Florida will on
October 13, 2010, at
11:00 a.m. (Central
Time), or as soon
thereafter as the sale
may proceed pursuant
to a public auction at
vwa~kaloosa,realforedose.co
m, which Is
conducted by agents of
the Clerk of Okaloosa
County to sell to the
highest bidder for cash,
except In the event the
property Is sold to
Plaintiff via application
of a credit bid, all In ac-
cordance with Section
45.031 of the Florida
Statutes, the property


CUIT
D FOR
COUNTY


Classified


crestview News Bulletin I B7


P COVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA








08rm 6as


iAD 0T A

HOMELESS

ANIMAL.




850.243.1525


0 80methig

GodF

00Of ro


0 ( CL


OTHE N CI

LITTER




S OHULD

MVR )I;V















Ever cat needs the kind of litter yu
pour in a litter box. So put it on your
shopping list. But with so many sur-
plus cats already in need of homes,
please skip the litters of kitties!

OET THE FACTS ON CATS




The lla~nacSociervof the unitedd State
21ootLstreet. NIl: 19shinaton.1x: 20037













|6170
Crestylew 2BR/2BA
Central alr, Refrig,
washer/dryer, garbage
& lawn Incl. very clean
$450. mo Call 682-4731

Defuniak Springs 3 br,
2 bath. $550 per month
Also have a 2 br, $400
month. 850-892-1051


,


7100 -Homes
7105 Open House
7110 -Beach I amel
7120-Commercial
7130- Condo/Townhouse
7140 Forms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
710-Me le Homes/Lots
7180- Investment
Properly
7190 ul-of-Town
Real Estate
7200-Timeshare



|7100




Individual wants to
buy house for
Investment. Please Call
850-651-0987





5000 SQ7FT steel bldg.
Wing AL. $125,000.
Owner Financing
682-8243or546-1321



|7130
Destin Holiday Isle TH
on Harbor. Boat Slip, 2
Br, 2.5 Ba, Lrg Garage,
2 Decks, New Paint
and Carpet $139,500.
Owner: 850-855-7533


|3230
Crestview: 381 John
King Road, Saturday
Sept25,7AM-NOON
Multi Family
Grill, microwave, pres-
sure washer & trailer,
children's toy car and
much much morel

Leonard's Estate Sales
23 Memorial Prkwy NW
Sept 16th Sept 18th
8:00am-2:00pm
The Estate Of
Jame & D etta Land.
En iree intents of
house.
1950's-1970 s Vintage,
Lots of furn, smalls,
Costume Jewelry,
For Info and Photos
Go to estatesales.net
Text Fll9486 to 56654



| 240

GUN SHOW
Fort Walton
FAIRGROUNDS
Septl18th&19th
SAT.9-5&gSUN. 104
FREE PARKING







| 3280
New Norwood Saw-
mills, LumberMate-Pro
handles logs 34" diam,
eter, mills boards 28
wd Automate creqa

eficlency up to 4%.
alen 8nO)00M 61-7746
No rwoodSawmll s.com/30
ON



330o
Airlines Are Hiring.
Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial ald
If qualified Housing
available. CALL Avia-

ace ( 66 3el4 76M9at-

Are you behind on
your Mortgage pay-
ment? Do you have an
ajues abl Eratevalmot n
and Advice. Call Ex-
press Audits today!
(877)270-4415, 12250
BISCAYNE BLVD
SUITE 310 NORTH MI-
AMI FL3381

Buried vinhDoebtand)ant

Eliminate Your Debt up
to 60% WefoCan HELE

Consultation !
(888)496-3167 Rated
"A with the BBB, FYC
Inc., 5927 Balfour Ct.
#105, Carlsbad, CA
92081

It's Your Money! Lump
sums pai toe nstru -

fixed annuity payments.
Rapid, high payouts
Call J.G. Wentworth
(866)294-8772. A+ by
aueB tter Business Bu-


Local Honey For Sale
pet ofM Lge CPlant r
Pla ts, a panaese Tews

50% off 850-682-4889



| 340




Compound Bow Hoyte.
Fully equip. with quiver,
drop away mech rest, 3
pin site, ready to go.
$400.00 call 830-3115



//a-


|7190
Buy Mountain Land
Nowl Lowest prices
ever N.C. Bryson City
2.5acres, spectacular
views, paved road.
High altitude. Easily ac-
cssib01e, Onsecltriec
Ing: (800)810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com

Lakefront Bargain!
Only $44,900 Adjacent
lakefront sold for
$149,900. Beautiful es-
tate size homesite In
prestigious, gated
coastal community w/
direct ocean access.
Ejoy bpool,slclubhouse,
ALL utilities completed.
Only onel Easy financ-
Ing. Call now
(877)888-1415, x2639.








AtW IVE IN


o10-niue ICullect bles
8130 Trucks
8140 -Vans
8150 -Commercial
8160 -Motorcycles
8170 Auto Parts
8210 Boa essre
8220 -Personal Watercraft
8230 Sailboats
820 Boat & Marine

8245 Bouat SI s & Docks
fA- T/M oa coeh cles
8330 Campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes



|8110




3yide 50 seed god
condition-New A/C over
50 miles per gallon.
$1800. Call 305-3766





de0 E45co Gra ite

eng swi wones11,00

bery, 4KW generator, 3
burner coen, top, macro-

In frig, queen pillow top
mattress, ducted AC,
new carpet & DR
chairs, recliner sofa.
Like New. Asking
$39,995.850-689-0419

Dixie RV
SuperStores
FL's Ne rst RV

NOW
OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*

8:00am-6:00pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands
New aand ufted Units
Newmar


Jayco
Fleetwood
Forest River
Prime Time

Located offl1-10

328 r en re 5Dr.
De Funlak Springs,
FL 32435


850- 51 000

wwwdixiery.com


.

|4130

I rvrss -N doedd Tank~eR

NOos nsDL-A wi av e
REQ D. Beeutstanadling

reacruter TODAYa
( 87 7) 4 84- 3 04 2
www.oakleytransport.com


Drivers- Flatbed CDL/A
N ,00Tr ks Arn bonus6
months Experience Re-
aurd lLeaNe PF esse

tHoonnad80-4 Tra pota-
FL-100


POSTAL &
GOV'T JOB
INFO FOR SALE?


Caution

You NEVER have to

P out fe eral formpsat
jobs. If you see a job
"guarantee", contact the
FTC.

Th~eoFedera Trade
America'sconsumer
protection agency.

www. tcg~o iscms


A public service
message from the FTC
and Your Florida
Freedom Newspaper


Saturday, September 18, 2010


1100
DISTANCE OF 105.97
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
270.00 FEET: THENCE
PROCEED ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF I
11'59'30 AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 56.51 FEET
(CHORD N 66'50' 10
E', 56.41 FEET) TO A
POINT OF TANGENCY
OF SAID CURVE:
THENCE PROCEED
NORTH 72 DEGREES
49 MINUTES 55 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 478.68
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED SOUTH 51 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES
13 SECONDS, EAST".
A DISTANCE OF 99.51
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 60 DE-
GREES 14 MINUTES
34 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 150.65
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 17 DE-
GREES 10 MINUTES
05 SECONDS WEST A


CETT N RTNO U7T D
55 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 162.86
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
SOUTHWEST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
149.01 FEET: THENCE
PROCEED ALONG

EURVEARCHRUGHSAIA
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
53'03'52 AN ARC DIS-

T TCE (COHFORD3 S
81E );43TH CE 133R 3

SEDSOUTHM U4DE
46 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 50.00
FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING.
THENCE PROCEED
SOUTH 35 DEGREES
08 MINUTES 44 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OR 33.99 FEET

VCOTNACA ONFT OFCU U

SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
125.00 FEET: THENCE
PROC RDCO ALSANG
CURVE THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
19'58'42 AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 43.59 FEET
(CHORD S 25'O9'23" W,
43.37 FEET) TO A
POINT OF TANGENCY
T ENSAID PRCREVE
SOUTH 15 DEGREES
10N MINUWTEEST OA SDEl
TANCE OF 178.58
FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST AND
HAVING A RADIUS OF
125.00 FEET: THENCE
PROCEED ALONG

EURVEARCHRUGHSAIA
CENTRAL ANGLE OF
27'32'O9 AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 60.07 FEET
(CHORD S 01'23'58" W,
59dNOT FEET) CUORVAA
TURE OF A CURVE
CONCAVE TO THE
SH THGE FS E AT AN


PROC RDCO ALONG

CRAL THARNOGUGH A

E.0'5" AON 1RC
FEET (CHORD S
87 19 02" E, 6.10
FEET); THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 14 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
32 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF' 198.72
FEET: THENCE PRO-
CEED NORTH 15 DE-
GREES 19 MINUTES
20 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 110.44
FEET TO THE BEGIN-
NING OF SAID PAR-

SRIBEDHE, CONT IN
ING 0.12 ACRES.
MORE UR LESS.

SBJECT PARCEL "If f

thethNordtah ast Ouarta
ter In Section 30, Town-
ship 3 North, Range 23
West, Okaloosa
County, Florida.

ANNY APNERSNONRECSLTAI

TOHTEHESUARPUAS FRTNH

PROPERTY EDOWNER

THE LIS PENDENS,
MUTSHTNFI6LE DA AYS M
TER THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabil-
Itles Act of 1990, per-
mosnn Inos specitao
participate In this pro-
tcheedingrkshould econtac

sstlatdershapnrfivetabu l
proceeding at the
Okaloosa County
Courthouse. Telephone

8S Oh al 9 m5820


or 1-800-9558770 via
Florida Relay Service.

WITNESS my hand and
official seal of said
Court, this 10day of
September 2010.


DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-

IyB~ethOMU onald

RICHARD M. COL-
BERT ESQ.
Richard M. Colbert,
PA.
Florida Bar No. 654329
4 Laguna Street, Sulte


|1100
Legal # 101297

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE 1ST
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR OKALOOSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO 10 DR 1035
DIVISION

Onny M .Lassiter,
Petitioner

and

Porcha R. Lassiter,
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE

TO: Porcha R. Lassiter
108 Azalea Drive, Eglin
AFB,FL.32542

YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action has been
filed against you and
that you are required to
serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any.
to It on Onny M. Lassl-
ter, on or before Octo-
ber 13,2010, and file
the original with the


o25 m s32Co tPk y

tloner or Immediately
thereafter. If you fail to
do so, a default may
be entered against
you for the relief de-
manded in the peti-
tion.

Copies of all court
documents cludthig

orders, are available
at the Clerk of the Cir-
cu t Court;Court'revi

tuheosnereuetdocuments

You must keep the
Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified
of your current ad-
dress. (You may file
Notice of Current
Address, Florida Su-
preme Court Ap-
proved Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future


ades o record s
the clerk's office.

WARNING: Rule
132 ulesFlorida Fam
dure, requires certain
automatic disclosure
of documents and in-
formation. Failure to
comply can result in
sanctions, including
dismissal or striking
of pleadings.

Dated September
1,2010

CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURT
By: Kitty Sims

09-04-10
09-11-10
09-18-10
09-25-10


|1100
FL 32588-0947
850-729-7440 Florida
Bar No. 332471 Attor-
ney for Personal Repre-
sentative

9/18/12010
9/25/2010


LEGAL#120685

Marquis Ranch Self
Storage located at 997
Industrial Drive, Crest-
view, FL, 32539; Phone
(850)682-9437
Will sell, At Auction, for
cash to the highest bid-
der, the contents of the
following units which
Includes: household
some business and
clothing Items, various
tools and electronics,
at 10:00 AM on
Wednesday, Septem-
ber 22, 2010.
We reserve the right to
refuse any and all bids.

Unit# 212
Natlra Lyons

Unit#1 65
Debble Clinton




LEGAL#120686

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT IN AND FOR
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 10-CP-819

IN RE: ESTATE OF
GASTON BISHOP,
DECEASED.

NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS

Thheeestminstra3TOo o
BISHOP deceased,
whose date of death
was February 13, 2010,
Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Okaloosa
County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is
Okaloosa County

aodrhudse Cresta ew

personal representative
and the personal
representative s attor-
ny ae set forth beloew.d-

cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this
notice Is required to he
served must file their
ca ms withH this L ur

OF THREE MONTHS
AFRTSETR THEUTl ATIMEO
OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM,
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims

deceddent' n tatea ms
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
IUBLNCOAT ON OF
ALL CLAIMS NOT

IED PTIO NS S T
F303 H2 OlN TSEE IOON

IAL RBOEBATEFOCEODR

NORTRTHSTANDING


FMY HLM VDE D
TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

Date of the first publl-
cation of the Notice of
Administration :September
18, 2010

JASON R. MOULTON
660 North Ferdon
Boulevard, Sulte A
tview, (850)68 -47
Florida Bar No.
0150126 Attorney for


FPtrso Representa-

644 Highhwsay 20 oas
Freeport, Florida 32439

9/18/10
9/25/10

LEGAL#120690

NOTICE OF SALE

I~noraccortda tces, w

t~ery In., lc taede at C9e0n
Industrial Drive, Crest-
view, Florida, will offer
for sale to the highest
bidder the household
and other goods stored
In the below lsted units

CenSr I. Min~t Wage
houses. Said goods
ar to en sd tpoa covb
the tenant.

1Elt re6Frn kBlaoctk
FL. 32564

Unit#E-2 Thomas Vn-
don3547CHres v Holl w
32539

The said sale shall take
place on Monday, Oc-

ta rat the Ief Ser i
Storage Center, Inc. lo-
cation.


9/18/12010


ClassifiedS



1120
NOTICE: Calling this
number will subject you
to HUGE savings on
statewide advertising In
over 100 newspapers.
Advertising Networks of
Florida, Put us to work
for Youl (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.co
m.

The Crestylew Housing
Authority will accept
sealed bids on a 1997
Chevrolet Pickup and a
1992 -16 passenger
Ford Van. The public
may view these vehl-
cles at 371 West Hick-
ory Avenue from 2:00
p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday.
Sealed bids will be
opened after 3:30 p.m.
on Friday, October 1,
2010. Envelopes must
be clearly marked
"Sealed Bld, Attn: Sam
Brunson Any ques-
tions, please call Sam
Brunson at
850-682-2413. No bid
will be accepted after
3:30 p.m. on October
1, 2010, Crestylew
Housing Authority re-

jeect ay hre Iler bdHosre

Authority will be ac-
cepting sealed bids on
various obsolete Items
on September 24, 2010
at 371 West Hickory
Avenue, Crestylew, FL.
The public may view
these Items for bid at
371 West Hickory Ave-
3ue fro m2:00 Mpmday
through Friday. Sealed
bids wI be opened af-
tb r 1, 201 ., Nno bd
wil be accepted a te

vetvry be170 sown-
will be various Refriger-
ators, Gas Stoves, and
Gas Water Heaters. For
questions, call Sam
Brunson at
850-682-2413. The en-
velopes must be clearly
marked "Sealed Bld
Attn: Sam Brunson .



|1130
Pregnant? Considering
adoption? A childless
suc essful dp&wom n

your help Financlally
secure. Expenses paid.
Call Margle. (ask for
mlchelle/adam). (800)
790-5260. FL Bar#
0150789



1170
Dog Found Collie re-
triever mixed, w/ purple
collars no tag, found on
Brentwood, please call
546-0995


4100
Driver Trainees
N eded
Now at Werner Enter-
prlses! Earn up to $700
per week after training.
Great Benefits! No Ex-
perience needed! Local
15 day CDL Training
available with TDI.
1-8766-280-5309





Install/Maint/Repair

Electricians
Now accepting applica-
tlons for experienced
electricians for projects
at Duke Field and Eglin
AFB, applicants may
applyIn person at 648
Anchors ST N.W., Sulte
3A Ft Walton Beach Fl.
850 243-2223. EOE
Web ID 34119170



Medical/Health

COURnS910f
Fo sub tnc alt ub


Springs. AA-4 yrs exp
or BA-2 yrs exp.
401(k)/dental/medical
$28k neg. Fax resume
to 386-752-2387 or
emall ShellaRand@
aol.com
Web ID#: 34119147


1Medical/Health

I Parthenon I
I Healthcare of I
I CreStview I

I NOWHIRING 1
I FT/PT I
I C.N.A.s I
I I
MustA have acurren
lbN. Icensel an
I e team player

We offer co~m etitive



u h f& Weekendst
SDifferentials
+5 Attendance Bonus



SWa ge I

ISafe Minimal Lift En-1
I lomnt Drug
r reenWer lace EOE I

I Apy proa
S1Ap9pFi tp se. E st I
I W D 4 2 08 L


Medical/Health

RN
Health Care Center
of Destin Is looking
for a FT Day Shift
RN. Please come by
orndfatcility at Lai3
Destin FL, 32550 or
call 850-267-2887 for
more Information
EOE
Web Id #34117934


Production/Operations

Electronic
Assemblers

Min d ea expe i

saeecrcine car plassss

bly, IPC610 accept-
ance criteria, proficient
building to level 3
drawings and work In-
structions. Certified
Manufactt ring, Inc.
Holt Ind. Park
850-537-3777
Web ID#: 34120168


Sales/Business Dev

Hiring Locally
This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company


Iuly nI 1K, 0 CAB
Insurance wh Pes

Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an Interview.


|4130
Drivers--ASAP! New
Pay Increasel 37-43
cpm Fuel Bonus -up to
4cpml Need CDL-A &3
mos recent OTR
( 877 )2 5 8- 878 2
www.meltontruck.com

Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tlons and Local Job
Placement Assistancel
(877)994-9904


5100 Business
510-poportunit 5

5110 oe oLn


$ Access Lawsuit
Cash Nowl $ As se
on TV$ Injury Lasa i

hr ? 9Low Nee~d $50 -

ply Now By Phonel Call
Today! Toll-Free: (800)
568-8321, LawCapital
Enterprises, LLC, 110
Columbla Street, Van-
couver, WA 98660,
www. lawcapital.com


:10- ee Free to
Good Home

e upuplsas/
2140 esi vsestock
2150 Pet Memorials




For sale, Ch hoahua
puppies, long hair,
born Aug. 3. CKC reg-
Istered. blue merle
males & 1 bicolored fe-
male. $425 each.
850-902-7275



2110
Free Kittens
All colors. Please call
850-398-5882.










3100 -Antiques
3110 Appliances
3120 -Arts & Crafts
3130 -Auctions

91 BIldini supplies



M10 Electronics

320- ilePases It On
320 Ganasge/Yard Sales
3250 Good Things to Eat
3260 Health & Fitness
3270 Jeweiry/Clothing
3280 Machinely/
Equipment
M20-Meia IEqumment

3320 Plants & Shrubs/

3330 inesars nt/Hotel
335-ickt (Buy od1)


3220
Brand new Queen Mat-
crl sn Set-camt%, Id
$225. 850-255-0123
Full size Mattress/box
New, In plastic, war-

85-711-033plCa d 110.




Crestvie32330 Vulpes
Sanctuary Loop, Satur-

da47AF~a ily Sale
Baby Furniture, Baby &
Toddler Clothes, Tons
of Toys, Brand New
Beauty Products, High
Chair, Table & Chairs,
New 3 Tie Shelf & Mir-


6100- Busine~sschi
6110-Apartments
6120 Beach Rentals
613 Condoffewnhouse
6140 House Rentals
61D-Roommatre Wanted
6170 Mobile Home/Lot
6180 -Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals





Office Space
Crestyie

Colvn enS l 0 cted
near the new FAMU
Pharmacy School.
Locat d between
Hwy 85 and Main St
850-682-0791



6110

Publisher's
Notice

All real estate advertis-
Ing In this newspaper Is
subject to the Fair
Housing Act which
makes It Illegal to ad-
vertise "any preference,
Imtatonsorgodiscrlmuna-

handicap, famillal status
or national origin, or an
Intention, to make any
such preference, 11mita-
tlliaor dstcrim ntlon"
children under the age
of18 11 rlg w sth patss


tod op o I dn cunde


ohsw nwspaapcere ill not

taadt he cw. Or t aer
are hereby Informed
that all dwellings adver-
tisedIn this newspaper
are available on a equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
aln 0c 9F9UD toll-free hae
toll-free number for the
hearing Impaired Is
1-800-927-9275.









4 br, 2 6b 40use. Pni-
orksehnoced 8bck ar
850-826-1687

Crestview, 462 Savage
Street, 3 br, 1 Bath with
Central Heat and Air on
a Lar e Shaded Lot.

D psit. r50m6 31$500

TextsF 19299 t 56654 g

Bkers1i, 2, Re& t4C B
850-682-4070, (850)
830-2061,682-1972.

Crestview: Nice 3 br,
1.5 ba, House, Stove
and Refrigerator, $700
month + $700 deposit
1307 Pinewood Lane.
(850)682-6514

Teel &
Waters

R IN Estate
682-6156
162 Woodlawn Dr, A
$775, 1BR, 1BAfurn
utilities Included

$25W 1B 1BA ur
utllltes I.Ddred
$1,300, 4BR, 3.5BA
All properties require
a cr ats check, dnee

smoking, pet fees
are non-refundable.
Call Debra Frost

Text F6198921 06 56654



6170 1
Crestylew 3BR/2BA
large double wide out-
side of crsty city lmits.
$800. mo w/ $600. dep.
Srlou 3-3quirles only.


|1120
FREE DEBT CONSUL
TATIONI Debt Settle-
ment. Home Loan
Modification. law office.
1-888-355-4450


LEGAL#120684

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE
FIRST JUDICIAL CIR-

OUT I. RN FUOR,

CASE NO:10CP817


JMRME ETS TSFHAMIL-

Dcased.

NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS

The administration of
the estate of JIMMY
OTTIS HAMILTON, de-
ceased, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for
Okaloosa County, Flor-
Ida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is
1250 North Eglin Park-
way, Okaloosa County
alurthouse Alnne ,
32579. The names and
addresses of the Per-


aR prs nta iese a tr
ny are set forth bloew.d-

cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent s estate, In-
cluding unmatured

nae n amsoronu qhou

e o y o t his n ti c h

VF THIMO THS A TE
THE DATE OF FIRST

TIBSLIN TE OR 3
DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
tphe erc ed In andc Iher
or demands against
chucedent s eutte ur
cldn g or maurtliq

their claims with the
Court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
IBLNCOAT ON OF

ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.

JUSTIN HAMILTON Per
sonal Representative
170 E. Burns Road
Cet~view, Florida


h1 daten of this flr t


MICHAEL A. JONES,
ESQ. POST OFFICE
BOX 947 NICEVILLE,


43-mlowaent
Information


|4100




Const/Skilled Trade

EXPERIENCED
COMMERCIAL
TREE TRIMER
Person MUST be expe-
rlenced with knowledge
of CLIMBING trees
while cutting lmbs!
Call 334-222-7022 ask
fo~Wm D34119764


Healthcare

RN/Staff
Development
Coordinator
The Health Care
Center of Destin Is

/ ~tff Develo -
ment Coordinator
Ths positit n c orn
training and educa-
sone ofnrursong pr
bed facility. Excellent
pay and benefits are
available to the per-
ion wsth th rlgtt
Team.
Please forward


coasthealthcare.com or
apply In person at
1M38 Sandel hLa e
Ilramar~ecF

Web ld5534E1 916


I


B8 | Cresiview News Bulletin


|1100
101
Fort Walton Beach
Florida 32548
Tel: 850-244-0350
Fax: 850-244-5231

09-18-10
09-25-10


LEGAL#120667

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE
FIRST JUDICIAL CIR-

IN ACN TFOR
OKALOOSA.
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE
NO.10-CA4699C

MACKEY T. BISHOP
TERESA D. CARROLL
and ELIZABETH GAIL
MERRITT SPICER

Plaintiffs

vs.

J.G. WEATHERLY a/k/a

EHANHERLY, GOdE

endn heirsd d Ilse s

grateesa ashsegns

through:, under, or
against him; ANNIE
LEE WEATHERLY a
known natural person
not known to be either
dead or alive, and her
unknown heirs, devl-
sees, grantees, as-
signs, creditors and
ainy othetrpoaut es cl lmr
or against her; and
JHN HUNT WEATH
J.G. W wtherly ela/k/oa
Jhn Alkwer WeeWt el

ethernode owntalivbee
and his unknown heirs
devisees, grantees, as-
signs, creditors and
any other parties claim-
Ing by, through, under
or against him
Defendants

NOTICE OF ACTION


a/ ia J HNWEAGLHOEVRE
WEATHERLY, de-
ceased, And his un-
known heirs, devisees

c Ed RL, ANNI ka
WETELa known
natural person, not
kown tol be delther
dedor a ive, and er
unknown heirs, devl-
sees, grantees, as-
signs, and creditors

EdATHEROHN k ow
heir of J.G. Weatherly

Waaherly oand Anl
Lee Weatherly, not
known to be either
dead or alive and his
unknown heirs, devl-
sees, grantees, as-
signs, creditors, and
any other parties claim-
Ing by, through, under

Adrs Un nmwn

YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action to quiet
title to the following
p~roupnt FoIda Okaloosa


crn r of thhe SNou ha

1 4the S uthort a41/4 o
Sctt nR geTonshl s3

Odkalotoh nCounsty F or8


ni0 ftth ho th 500 fe
East 210 feet; South 50
feet to the Point of Be-
glnning.

And

Begin at the Southeast
corner of the Northeast

1 4the S utwort alt1/4 o
Section 22, Township 3
North, Range 23 West
Okaloosa County, Flor-

et; noth 5Vfe et2 t
the Point of Beginning;
thence North 50 feet;


te Pitn o einingou

has been filed against
you In the Circuit Court
ultthe First Juddclal Crr
Okaloosa Count Flor-
Ida and you are re-
quie eo an te a c p


JASON R. MOULTON
AttorneyN frdoPla ntff

Crestylew, FL 32536

on or before Septem-
ber 30, 2010 and file
the original with the
Clerk of this Court at
the Okaloosa County
Courthouse, Crestview

seric oeltP~lantiff a -
torney or Immediately
thereafteren re a adeaau t

aundeodr the eliefC de
plaint or Petition.

DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF COURT


Dp ty I ek

82812/10
9/11/12010
9/18/2010




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