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Group Title: Crestview News Bulletin
Title: Crestview news bulletin!
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028411/00525
 Material Information
Title: Crestview news bulletin!
Alternate Title: Bulletin
Crestview news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Crestview news bulletin
Publisher: Crestview news bulletin
Okaloosa Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Crestview, Fla
Publication Date: June 26, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Crestview (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okaloosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okaloosa -- Crestview
Coordinates: 30.754167 x -86.572778 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 9, no. 37 (Sept. 5, 2001); Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 9, no. 40 (Sept. 26, 2001).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028411
Volume ID: VID00525
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ANN6621
oclc - 48122675
alephbibnum - 002758666
lccn - 2001229458
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Preceded by: Crestview news leader

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Table of Contents
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        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Are You Prepared? 2010 Hurricane Survival Guide
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4-5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
Full Text




C RESTV


EW


Saturday, JUNE 26,2010 www.crestviewbulletin.com 50C


For the latest
breaking news, visit
(RESTVI EWBU LLETIN.(OM


INSIDE


Local news


Storm ready


Fire safety


WEATHER
High 96
~ Low 72
Isolated thunderstorms.
Sunrise 5:45 a.m.
Sunset 7:53 p.m.

TABLE OF
CONTENTS
OBITUARIES........................7....
STATE ..................... .............. 11
FAITH ............................. 13...... 3
TRAVEL................................. 1 5
FOOD................................ 20
CLASSIFIEDS...................... 23
SPORTS ............................. 26

Award Winning
Newspaper
Florida Press Association
Better Weekly Newspaper Contest

FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE
Phone: 850-682-6524
Web site: crestviewbulletin.com
Fax: 850-682-2246
35th Year Number 51
26 Pages 1 Section


A deed-signing ceremony is scheduled for
today where city of Crestview officials will
sign over the Alatex Building to Florida A&M
University, which plans to turn the former
sewing factory into a pharmacy school.
The event begins at 10 a.m. on Woodruff
Avenue, between Main and Wilson streets.
The historic Alatex Building once housed


ALATEX HISTORY


EXTRA


Vol. 2.---Number 16


U


R


EXTRA
Four Pages


F


Will Be Scene Of Much Activity At Early I


BUL T'Z' ITp()


Ulost LhVety h~y we
eoTc, h 1.1m ti
lo in tate rnt walk
.1w. th.y Mi' tofed
.on, 1-., Wid aMt
w. thsldoofthLbulsa
Atn 1h.. w irr Tin

Th".girl I.
t h ~ t h h d I r' .


vv Wil ie Felt. All
th 1. 1 Through County


.Dr....hn.
big Friday The recent I ..~ .
aidh' by biun ... -. .r r,.
Alee were Vreled, and that orderR are now
wnployni, Coming in I" nisffidewt number t.
theybad rc!... nthe entire Iforce to ork
per beer, Rhortly, One informer predicted
1k. it that that -ro people w~ild 1'e eploy-
or it any. eilthanen.verbforl and ta hat the
i- 'of I,--- and bungneas
Ie ..IQreLviw and the sur-
1h, Ing territory,
I- rking at flt _Uj-ity wih a11
vi. ~.~ 0 machines in operation, lingo
ti- of r .,.faoturrl articles
11 ir -illrain fow to the
"' 1 l ii,


Okaloosa's first factory



helped develop Crestview


Ann Spann
Crestview News Bulletin
Known by locals as the Alatex Building, the former sewing
factory that soon will house a Florida A&M University phar-
macy school first was occupied by another garment company
that is credited with sparking a building boom in the city.
See ALATEX 3


EXTRA: Above, this four
page extra was printed by
the Okaloosa News Journal
in 1940 and devoted
entirely to Crestview's new
sewing factory.
SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN


two different garment factories, which are
credited with sparking a building boom in the
city. Former workers of the old Alatex sewing
factory have been invited to attend the deed-
signing event.
For a history of the garment factories that
once served as Crestview's major employers,
read the accompanying article.


Protecting Okaloosa's

natural resources

District conservationist a local fixture


By Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com
Darryl Williams knows
water, and the water he
knows best is in Okaloosa
County.
Williams is the district
conservationist for the


Natural Resource Conser-
vation Service, which has
been in operation 75 years.
With the NRCS for 29
years, Williams transplant-
ed to the area 23 years ago
from his previous assign-
See WILLIAMS 3


4r~r ( Okalumioa NLrUu-ifur~uri


Join the Crestview Chatter

Your online community.

forums.crestviewbulletin.com


*


Crestiirw, Florida, Monday, April 15. 1940


TO PIC


CTORYI
Date MORE WORKERS THAN
EVER TO BE EMPLOYED
AT VERY EARLY DATE
Workers Satisfied li ,' ".d. Pyr oll -


FAMU DEED-SIGNING CEREMONY


---------


Robbed at

knifepoint

Two suspects
in custody

Michael Stewart
michaels@crestviewbulletin.com
CRESTVIEW -- A man
helping a friend get her car
started was grabbed from
behind and robbed at knife-
point.
The Okaloosa County
Sheriff's Office arrested
Crestview resident An-
dre Pedro
Flientes,
26, and Mi-
chelle Lynn
Bigham,
18, of Mon-
roe, N.C., in
connection
with an in-
ANDRE cident that
FUENTES occurred at
the intersec-
tion of State
Road 85
and Auburn
Road.
SFuientes
faces multi-
ple charges,
including
MICHELLE aggravated
assault with
BIGHAM a deadly
weapon
without intent to kill, grand
theft less than $20,000 and
robbery with a weapon.
Bigham is charged with
robbery with a weapon.
Both are in custody in the
Okaloosa County Jail.
Fuentes is beingheld on a
$65,000 bond. Bigham's bond
has been set at $25,000.
According to an arrest
report, the victim told depu-
ties on June 19 he was help-
ing a friend get her car start-
ed when a male jumped him
from behind, held a knife to
his throat and told him to
empty his pockets.
The suspect, who depu-
ties said later was identified
as Fuentes, grabbed the
keys to the vehicle the vic-
tim was driving and drove
away.
Although the press re-
lease does not specifically
identify the type vehicle tak-
en, it does state the victim
had borrowed a motorcycle
valued at $8,000.
Bigham told deputies she
and Fuentes had planned to
rob the victim of marijuana
he reportedly was going to
sell to them, according to
the arrest report.

REPAIRS: City and county
workers replace a washed-
out culvert under Earl
Campbell Road in Laurel
Hill in January. Helping
spearhead the project,
i the U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Natural
Resources Conservation
Service Emergency
Watershed Protection
Program will mitigate
! future flooding up to the
Road line.
' BRIAN HUGHES |
I Crestview News Biilletin


NE






2 I Crestview News Bulletin


Local


Saturday, June 26, 2010


What's HAPPENING


From staff reports

NORTH OKALOOSA

CRAWFISH BOIL:
American Legion Post 75
at 898 E. U.S. Highway 90
in Crestview is hosting
their last all-you-can-eat
crawfish boil of the season
at a cost of $7 per person
at 1 p.m. on June 26.
A horseshoe tourna-
ment (entry fee $5 per per-
son) will begin at 2 p.m.
The rain or shine event
will have live music featur-
ing vintage oldies by Jaded
Klark from 1-4 p.m.; drink
specials and prizes. For
more information, call Oz
at 689-7627.
TOASTMASTERS:
The Crestview Toastmas-
ters club meets on the
second Tuesday of every
month from 6-7 p.m. at
Lundy & Bowers, 296 S.
Ferdon Blvd. in Crestview.
Details: Kathy Morrow,
865-6993.
BLOOD DRIVES: The
Northwest Florida Blood
Center is hosting the blood
drives listed below in
North Okaloosa County:
*July 1, Winn Dixie -
Crestview, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.;
every donor will receive a
$10 gift card.
*July 2, Walmart
- Crestview, 11 a.m. to 6
p.m.; every donor will re-
ceive a gift card.
*July 14, Woodlawn
Baptist Church, 824 N.
Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, 1
p.m. to 6 p.m.
*July 18, First United
Methodist Church, 599 8th
Avenue Crestview, 8 a.m.
to 1 p.m.
RED CROSS CLASS-
ES: To see what classes
The American Red Cross
is offering in North Oka-
loosa and Walton counties,
visit www.yourredcross.
org.
TEACH CHILDREN
TO SAVE: Okaloosa $aves'
Teach Children to Save
program continues now
through July 31. Any child
or youth 18 or younger who
sets a savings goal and
makes a deposits) into a
saving account (Existing
or New Account) is eli-
gible to win a $100 savings
bonds, 689-5850.
BOOK DONATIONS:
The Friends of the Crest-
view Library are asking for
donations of used books
- and movies on VHS and
DVD for the book sale in
October.
Books and movies will
be accepted at the library,
which is located off State
Road 85 behind the post of-
fice. All types of hardbound
and paperback books are
needed, but not magazines.
SWORD FENCING


PROGRAM: Come to the
Crestview Public Library
at 10:30 a.m., Tuesday, July
6, when Robert Drake and
the North Bay Society
of the Sword will pres-
ent "Conversation with a
Sword: The Art of Fencing"
for the July First Tuesday
program.
The library is located
at 1445 Commerce Drive
behind the post office in
Crestview. For more infor-
mation on the North Bay
Society of the Sword go to
www.northbayfencing.wee-
bly.com. For more library
information call 682-4432
or visit the library website
at www.cityofcrestview.
org/library.htm.
AFTER HOURS NET-
WORKING Thursday, July
15 at the Crestview Public
Library.
Bring your business
cards for some network-
ing fun from 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. Food provided by the
Friends of the Crestview
Library. Music provided
by Dennis Mitchell, Troy
University. Door prizes
provided by Cooper's Fine
Jewelry, First National
Bank, and Premier Com-
munity Bank. Choice of
free paperback book to the
first 100 guests.
The library is located
at 1445 Commerce Drive
behind the post office
and next to the Crestview
Community Center and
Crestview Area Chamber
of Commerce in north
Crestview. Call 682-4432
for details.
HOSPICE TRAINING:
Hospice volunteer train-
ing will be held on July
22 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in
Crestview. Lunch will be
provided.
Volunteers are thor-
oughly trained and pro-
vided ongoing education.
They can serve in a variety
of areas from administra-
tive help to making patient
visits or weekly phone
calls. Volunteering just a
few hours a month makes
an incredible impact. To
learn more about volun-
teering or to inquire about
hospice services please
call 689-0300.
FOSTER FAMILIES
CAR WASHES: Foster
Families of America, lo-
cated at 113 Main St. in
Crestview, is washing cars
for donations Tuesdays
and Thursdays from 9 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. The washes
support family fun outdoor
activities.

MISCELLANEOUS

ROCK THE BEACH:
is a free concert sponsored
by The Emerald Coast
Convention & Visitors


Bureau featuring The Doo-
bie Brothers and Kenny
Loggins live on Sunday,
June 27 at 5 p.m. Come
to the beach behind the
Boardwalk on Okaloosa
Island to Rock the Beach
and celebrate our beautiful
Emerald Coast.
There will be refresh-
ments and beverages avail-
able no coolers allowed.
Free parking is available
at the Boardwalk, the Em-
erald Coast Conference
Center, Beasley Park, Gulf
Islands National Seashore
and Marler Park. Dona-
tions will be accepted in
support of the losses suf-
fered by locals because of
the oil spill.
For more information,
please call 609-3800.
MASTER NATURAL-
IST CLASS: The Wetlands
Module of the Florida
Master Naturalist class is
being held in Okaloosa and
Walton Counties.
It provides 40 contact
hours of instruction in the
flora and fauna of Florida
wetlands through class-
room instruction, field trips
and guest speaker Wednes-
day and Thursday each
week from July 7 to July 22
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Please visit www.
masternaturalist.ifas.ufl.
edu for more information
on the Florida Master
Naturalist program and
registration. Go to course
offerings and Okaloosa/
Walton County. Registra-
tion closes June 30.
ANGELS ON THE
BEACH FUNDRAISER:
Independence for the Blind
of West Florida is selling
tickets for an Angels on
the Beach getaway. A $5
donation per ticket enters
your name in the drawing
for a three-night stay at the
Hilton Pensacola Beach
Gulf Front on Blue Angels
Weekend July 8-10. Dinner
packages from restaurants
on the beach are included.
Second place winner in
the drawing will receive an
original painting by Quen-
by called "The Blind Saxo-
phonist." The drawing will
be held Tuesday, June 29
at the Bands on the Beach
performance. You don't
have to be present to win.
BEAD RECYCLING:
The Greater Fort Walton
Beach Chamber of Com-
merce is offering a way
for all parade goers to "go
green" by recycling parade
beads after the recent
Billy Bowlegs Torchlight
Parade. Take them to the
chamber, and they'll give
you a vintage Bowlegs
T-shirt or another chosen
goodie (one item for a
minimum donation of 25
strands). That will keep
the beads out of closets,


drawers, and the local
landfill, and they'll have
another chance to bring joy
to local parade goers.
Take your clean, reus-
able beads, to 34 Miracle
Strip Parkway, SE, Fort
Walton Beach.
GET RID OF YOUR
OLD RIDE: If you would
like to donate your old
automobile as part of your
summer cleanup, Boys and
Girls Club would be happy
to accept it. Finds from its
sale will contribute to the
program, which helps chil-
dren in the program. Dona-
tions are tax deductible. To
donate, call 800-246-0493.
HURLBURT TOAST-
MASTERS: If your goal in
2010 is to grow profession-
ally, Hurlburt Toastmasters
club can help you achieve
it. The group meets
Wednesday from 11:30 to
12:30 p.m. in Classroom L
of the Hurlburt Field Edu-
cation Center (Building
90220) Membership is an
investment that can pay off
in career advancement.
STRICTLY WEAV-
ERS MEETINGS: are
held once a month by the
Strictly Weavers Guild of
the Emerald Coast. For
exact meeting location and
more information please
call Alice (934-4403) or Bet-
sy (678-1926), or send an
e-mail to strictlyweavers@
yahoo.com. Anyone inter-
ested in the art of weaving
handwoven fabric is invited
to attend.
UW OIL SPILL
FUND: United Way of Oka-
loosa & Walton Counties
has started a Gulf Oil Spill
Fund to help local families
affected by this disaster.
To make a donation, go
to www.united-way.org or
mail your contribution to
112 Tupelo Ave., Fort Wal-
ton Beach, FL 32548.
PLANT CLINICS: Oka-
loosa County Horticulture
Extension Agent Larry
Williams will hold a series
of plant clinics on the
fourth Wednesday of each
month (July 28, Aug. 25,
Sept. 22 and Oct. 27 from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.) at the
Extension Annex Building,
127 Hollywood Blvd. in Fort
Walton Beach. Residents
may bring plant problems
for identification or diagno-
sis. Williams and Okaloosa
County Master Gardeners
will provide information to
solve gardening problems.
Details: 689-5850 or 729-
1400 extension 5850.
FLORIDA TRAIL
SCHEDULE: Visit http://
choctaw.floridatrail.org for
details on the group's up-
coming events.
The July 26, 5:30 p.m.
full moon beach hike has
been cancelled.
Saturday, July 10 at 9


a.m. Bring your canoe or
kayak for a float trip down
Titi Creek to Shoal River to
the U.S. Highway 85 bridge.
Details: 682-6098.
Saturday, July 17 at 10
a.m. Bring your canoe or
kayak for a float trip in
Santa Rosa County. De-
tails: 623-1646.
Sunday, July 18 at 8 a.m.
Volunteers needed for trail
maintenance in the Yellow
River Ravines. Details:
474-5359.
ADVENTURE CLUB:
For details on club activi-
ties, call Clarice Hebinck
at 581-4591 or e-mail her at
freklzl00@cox.net.
Tuesday, June 29, 4 p.m.
bike ride in Gulf Breeze.
Meet at Gulf Islands Na-
tional Seashore Visitors'
Center on U.S. Highway
98. Supper afterward at a
nearby restaurant. Hon-
chos: Rich and Nancy
Fremgen, cell 850-377-5468.
JULY 4 VENDORS:
The City of Fort Walton
Beach is currently ac-
cepting food/merchandise
vendor and display booth
applications for the 2010
4th of July celebration
scheduled to take place at
the Fort Walton Landing on
Sunday, July 4 from 3 p.m.
until 9:30 p.m.
Booth fees are for a 12' x
15' space. The food vendor
fee is $75 for-profit and $35
for non-profits. The mer-
chandise vendor fee is $35
for businesses and $15 for
non-profits. There will be
a $50 refundable cleaning
deposit required and there
will be an additional $25
charge for 220-volt electri-
cal connections. There
is no charge for display
booths.
For more information
contact City Clerk Helen
Spencer at 833-9509. Appli-
cations are also available
on the City website under
the City Clerk heading at
www.fwb.org.

ONGOING

RESOURCES AD-
DRESS STUTTERING:
Stuttering is a frustrating
and embarrassing problem
for millions of people. Help


is available at most public
libraries in the form of
DVDs and books. If you are
interested in checking one
out and your library doesn't
have it, ask them to contact
the Stuttering Foundation
for a complimentary copy.
"Stuttering and Your
Child: Help for Parents,
Straight Talk for Teens,"
"Stuttering: For Kids By
Kids," "Self Therapy for the
Stutterer, and If You Stut-
ter: Advice for Adults" are
some of the titles available,
with several also available
in Spanish.
More than three million
Americans stutter, yet stut-
tering remains misunder-
stood by most people," said
Jane Fraser, president of
the Stuttering Foundation.
"Myths such as believing
people who stutter are
less intelligent or suffer
from psychological prob-
lems still persist despite
research refuting these
erroneous beliefs."
Books and DVDs pro-
duced by the non-profit
Stuttering Foundation are
available free of charge
to any public library. Visit
your library for informa-
tion about stuttering for
children, parents, teens,
adults, teachers, and em-
ployers; call 1-800-992-9392,
e-mail info@stutteringhelp.
org, or visit at www.stut-
teringhelp.org and www.
tartamudez.org.
HABITAT FOR HU-
MANITY REQUEST:
Habitat for Humanity is
seeking lots in the Crest-
view area to be donated on
behalf of families in need
of housing. Please call 758-
0779 or 315-0025 for details.
FLORIDA KIDCARE:
Paula Jackson, of Families
Count, is offering assis-
tance to local residents
who want to register their
children for Florida Kid-
Care insurance. Walk-ins
are now accepted every
second and fourth Tuesday
and Thursday from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at Jobs Plus on
Wilson Street in Crestview.
Please bring proof of in-
come and Social Security
numbers for every member
of your household. Contact
phone: 530-2621.


CORRECTION

State Road 85 is the only road within
the city limits of Laurel Hill slated for future
work under the Northwest Florida Rural
Transportation Area. A June 16 article
in the Crestview News Bulletin indicated
otherwise.


OF CRESTVIEW


St0 1956

MAIN OFFICE
1301 Industrial Drive
Crestview, FL 32539
850-682-5111


FIlRTAIONAL BANK
OF CRESTVIEW MEMBER FDIC
Your Hometown Bank Since 1956!


DOWNTOWN OFFICE
302 N. Wilson Street
Crestview, FL 32536
850-682-5112


SOUTHSIDE OFFICE
2541 S. Hwy 85
Crestview, FL 32539
850-682-3111


Ew wfbrstviw cm0


CRESTVIEW



News Bulletin
To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524.


NEWS INFORMATION
IF YOU HAVE A CONCERN OR COMMENT
ABOUT CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETN'S
COVERAGE, PLEASE CALL 682-6524.
PUBLISHER
JASON MOBLEY
EDITOR
MICHAEL STEWART
OFFICE STAFF
DENISE CADENHEAD.. OFFICE ASSISTANT
SHERRIE STANLEY .... RECEP./CIRC. ASST.
ADVERTISING INFORMATION
DIANA BAKER ....... AD CONSULTANT
RANDY BEARD ...... SALES MANAGER
MELISA TEDDER .... MEDIA CONSULTANT
EDITORIAL
BRIAN HUGHES. ..... WRITER
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR
ANN SPANN ........ PHOTOGRAPHER
RANDY DICKSON .... SPORTS EDITOR
RENEE BELL ........ TYPESETTING


PRODUCTION
GREG ALLEN ....... PRODUCTION
CIRCULATION INFORMATION
682-6524
THE CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN
IS PUBLISHED TWICE WEEKLY EACH
WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY BY FLORIDA
FREEDOM NEWSPAPER, INC., AT 295 W.
JAMES LEE BLVD., CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA
32536. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT
CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA. POSTMASTER:
PLEASE SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO
295 W. JAMES LEE BLVD., CRESTVIEW,
FLORIDA 32536-3313. ALL MATERIAL
HEREIN IS PROPERTY OF THE CRESTVIEW
NEWS BULLETIN.






IB IP N T


In County
13 weeks......................... $9.45
26 weeks....................... $17.85
52 weeks....................... $32.76


Out of County
13 weeks....................... $14.70
26 weeks....................... $23.10
52 weeks....................... $38.01


Ask your Advertising Representative about our Color
by the Inch Program, Customer Appreciation Sale,
and Online packages.
C RESTVI EW


News Bulletin (850) 682-6524


NE ~*I


111 -- -I L C~






Saturday, June 26, 2010


Local


Crestview News Bulletin I 3


ALATEX from page 1


The Smith-Johnson gar-
ment factory began operations
at Crestview in September 1937.
The factory's opening was re-
ported by local newspapers to
be the culmination of a two-year
dream by Crestview citizens, with
bonds sold to provide the $25,000
needed to build the factory.
The factory was a branch of
the Riverside Manufacturing
Company of New York. J. Geten-
stine, who was over operations
at the company's Florala, Ala.,
facility, was named manger of the
new location.
Crestview attorney, builder
and State Sen. Purl G. Adams
was contractor for the project.
The building was given a lock
and key completion July 7, 1937,
and installation of 250 machines
began immediately. When opera-
tions began in September, there
were approximately 200 employ-
ees at the factory, with several
hundred more expected when it
reached full capacity.
Newspaper accounts of the
event referred to the building
as Crestview's new city hall be-
cause city government offices oc-
cupied one corner of the ground
floor. The Okaloosa Messenger's
July 1, 1937, issue stated: "The
City Hall building is not only the
largest in Crestview, but it is one
of the largest single units in this
section of the state. It has already
gained a wide reputation over
this entire section and Crestview
has every right to be very proud
of it."
During the week of July 23,
the Okaloosa News Journal re-
ported: "W. Bea Adams, city
clerk, moved his office into the
new garment factory building
this week. The new quarters are
a big improvement over those
formerly occupied by the city
clerk, the double rooms being
lighted and well ventilated by
four large windows."


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN
ALATEX WORKERS: Employees of the Alatex sewing factory are pictured in front of the building in this 1954 photo.


The city offices were in the
northeast corner of the building
with a separate entrance that
faced Woodruff Avenue.
After operating at about the
same scale for the next two years,
it was reported in April 1940 that
the factory would reach full ca-
pacity within the next two weeks.
A four page extra, printed by
the Okaloosa News Journal dur-
ing that same month, was de-
voted entirely to the factory and
dedicated to the workers in Oka-
loosa's first major manufacturing
plant.
Workers stated that they were
making 30 cents per hour and
were perfectly satisfied with the
pay and working conditions in the
local factory.
The two-story brick build-
ing was 100 by 200 feet wide and
contained approximately 150
large windows that provided an
abundance of light and fresh air.
It boasted the most modern sani-


tary facilities of the time, com-
plete with comfortable dressing
rooms, all of which had been in-
corporated into the building dur-
ing construction.
The publication reported
a building boom in Crestview
since the factory had been estab-
lished, conservatively estimat-
ing new construction at $150,000
since 1937. Local businessmen
had built small houses, conve-
niently located near the factory,
that could be rented or bought
at a reasonable rate. Trade in-
creased, and merchants needed
new and larger structures. The
northwest portion of the town
was said to have seen the great-
est building boom in the history
of the county.
Crestview Mayor Author
Hodges was credited with being
one of the most enthusiastic ad-
vocates of the garment factory,
working to help secure its Crest-
view location and fighting for oth-


er city improvements.
Hodges had moved to Crest-
view in 1900 with the Savage Tur-
pentine Company, and after see-
ing the natural resources of the
industry exhausted, he became
concerned with providing an-
other means of bringing employ-
ment to the area.
Hodges had enlisted the aid
of state and federal government
in paving an additional 90 blocks
of street. The water system had
been improved and extensions to
main lines made in order to serve
the many new homes. Sewer
disposal was improved, and the
number of telephones in the town
had jumped from 35 in 1937 to 150
by 1940.
All of the activity and growth
was said to have attracted atten-
tion from many parts of the na-
tion and played a role in the Civil
Aeronautics Authority choosing
Crestview as the ideal site for an
emergency landing field.


Smith-Johnson pulled out
of the factory by early 1943, and
Alatex took over. The factory re-
mained operational as Alatex un-
til 1986.
Many local residents were
employed in the factory, but
workers also moved to the area
from south Alabama and across
northwest Florida. Many car-
pooled from rural communities
and often altered vehicles to pro-
vide as much seating as possible
for the long ride to Crestview and
the much needed wages that the
factory provided.
Former workers remember
sewing several military-related
items during World War II, such
as the khaki-colored underwear
for the Army. As they reminisce
during annual Alatex reunions,
all share the same sentiment
that the sewing factory helped
educate a lot of children and put
bread on the table for many in
north Okaloosa County.


WILLIAMS from page 1


ment in Tavares, Fla. "You
can apply for positions
around the nation, but I am
planning on being here for-
ever and a day," Williams
assured.
Williams understands
the needs of Okaloosa
County and its people and
is tasked with protecting
the county's rich natural
resources.
When a culvert washed
out on Earl Campbell Road
in Laurel Hill right before
Christmas, creating a sink-
hole big enough to swallow
a bulldozer or two, Wil-
liams' agency cooperated
closely with city and county
officials to push through
emergency repairs.
Williams' agency falls
under the umbrella of the
U.S. Department of Agri-
culture, and guidelines on
what could be done on the
road were carefully spelled
out.
The agency couldn't build
a replacement culvert or re-
build the road. But it could
work right up to the edge
of the roadway to mitigate
the flooding problem so that
when the road is rebuilt,
the chances were lessened
of it washing away again, a
regular rainy-weather oc-


currency for Earl Campbell
Road residents.
"You get to know the
politics of the county, the -
concerns, the issues and
the resources," Williams
said. "One program that
is only being used to as-
sist local units of govern-
ment from national storm
events is the National -
Watershed Protection
Program. Since 1996, just
with federal matching,
we're right at $26 million
and counting."
Counting Earl Campbell ---
Road, "We have currently
four project sites that are Darryl
being administered now Hayes
through that program with 2009 r
the Okaloosa County Board
of Commissioners," Wil-
liams said. "That's a per- said. "I
fect example of that type program
project. We come in and from 75
assist local units of govern- cent NI
ment." servati(
The NRCS also works agricult
with individual landown- install p
ers, as well. In fact, it's as- natural
sisting individual landown- of the lI
ers that accounts for most "Fo
of the local NRCS office's vidual s
work. planning
"We regularly assist lo- erosion
cal landowners, whether explain
it's farmers, ranchers, common
property owners," Williams through


' r \ -
___. .
-
ANN SPANN I Crestview News Bulletin
Williams, right, talks with Ralph Hayes of
Construction during a conservation project in
north of Baker.


It is a year-round
m that can range
percent to 100 per-
RCS cost-share con-
on practices with
;ural landowners to
projectss to meet the
resources concerns
and."
r example, an indi-
signs up for pasture
g, tree planting,
control," Williams
ed, describing three
n projects. "They go
a process of apply-


ing and then they're ranked
through our system. If it
ranks high enough, we of-
fer a contract with that in-
dividual to implement con-
servation practices. That's
where our day-to-day work
is done mainly.
"We are a voluntary
organization. We are not
a regulatory agency to
make anybody to do any-
thing," Williams continued.
"That's what makes us a
popular agency. We don't
tell them what to do. They


tell us, 'This is the problem
I have,' and we have con-
servation solutions to help
them meet that need."
In addition to federal
conservation funds, Wil-
liams' agency helps govern-
ment entities and individu-
als find funding through
state and local resources.
"That list of partners is al-
most a mile long," he said.
Williams is about to put
his expertise to work in a
critical area: cleaning up
after the BP oil spill that
is starting to affect area
beaches. Having worked on
coastal dune projects with
school classes and govern-
ment entities, his famil-
iarity with our local ecol-
ogy will prove a boon. This
week, he's off to Maryland
for two days of training.
"I'm pretty sure at times
I will be on these teams
looking to determine what
is needed along our shore-
lines to correct the prob-
lem from the oil spill," Wil-
liams said. "Currently, I'm
the only one from Florida
from this region. Hopefully
there's opportunity to have
someone from Okaloosa
County to be on the nation-
al task force."
The NRCS's local office


shares space with the Yel-
low River Soil and Water
Conservation District, a
state/county organization.
"It's a perfect match-up,"
Williams said. The two or-
ganizations frequently col-
laborate on projects and, in
turn, work with the North-
west Florida Water Conser-
vation District, as well.
In Okaloosa County
since 1941, the NRCS quiet-
ly plugs away sometimes
literally at addressing
the conservation needs of
county government and
landowners.
"We do a lot of things.
One of my earth team vol-
unteers once said the NRCS
is an agency that does a lot
and nobody knows any-
thing about it," Williams
said with a chuckle. "I had
never thought about it that
way until she said it. But it
is true in a lot of ways. It is
hard to let the public know
that we are here to serve
and protect the natural re-
sources of the county."

Want to learn more?
Visit the USDA Natural
Resources Conservation
Agency's website at www.
nrcs.usda.gov/about/in-
dex.html.


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4 I Crestview News Bulletin

Okaloosa

CRIME

REPORTS

Special to the News Bulletin
Crestview Police Dept. re-
ports:
5/21: JIM ANTHONY SIM-
ONEAUX, 30, of 109 Lakeview
Drive, Crestview, was charged
with possession of drug para-
phernalia.
5/22: MARCUS KENT
MAYS, 26, of 3212 George Ave.,
Crestview, was charged with
making a false reports to law
enforcement authorities and
leaving the scene of a traffic
crash with property damage.
5/23: BRADLEY JAMES
NOUSIAINEN, 22, of 5461
U.S. Highway 393, Crestview,
was charged with violation of a
domestic violence injunction.
* DREW MARTINEZ, 51,
of 6460 Possum Ridge Road,
Crestview, was charged with
violation of probation.
5/24: MICHAEL S. HUNT,
39, of 303 Northwest Live Oak
Place, Lake City, was charged
with driving under the influ-
ence of alcohol or drugs.
5/25: JEREMY CASTIEL
BURNETTE, 20, of 156
Rickey Ave., 4, Crestview, was
charged with failure to appear
based on a Walton County
warrant. TRAVIS DANIEL
DYER, 40, of 516 Boronia
Road, Arlington, Texas, was
charged with driving under
the influence of alcohol or
drugs.
5/26: CECILIA L.
SIDLER, 52, of 4603 Scarlett
Drive, Crestview, was issued
a notice to appear on a charge
of retail theft. MATTHEW
JOEL SHEPARD, 30, of 117
Stephens Lane, Crestview, was
charged with possession of
marijuana, less than 20 grams.
* LONNIE M. ODOM, 40, of
241 Tiffot Court, Crestview,
was charged with violation of a
domestic violence injunction.
5/31: MELANIE JEN-
NETTE WARD, 36, of 3822
Golden Acres Rd., Crestview,
was charged with retail theft.


Local


Saturday, June 26, 2010


Woman charged with bringing drugs to sheriff's office


Mona Moore
Florida Freedom Newspapers
BAKER A Crestview woman
was charged with four counts of
drug possession when she visit-
ed investigators for an update on
a case with drugs in her purse.


Summer E. Powell, 29, spoke
to investigators May 21 about the
death of her boyfriend, according
to an arrest report from the Oka-
loosa County Sheriff's Office.
During an interview that
lasted nearly three hours, Powell
gave a deputy permission to look


through her purse.
The deputy found pills in her
makeup bag and an unlabeled
prescription bottle. Powell had
five Cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril);
three Roxicodone (Oxycodone);
seven Alprazolam (Xanax); and
two Lorazepam.


Powell told the deputy the
prescriptions were not hers and
that "they were used to crush
and snort," the report said.
She was charged with four
felony counts of possession of a
controlled substance without a
prescription.


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ROLLOVER ON AIRPORT ROAD








4.,



PHOTOS AND STORY BY ANN SPANN I CrestviewNews Bulletin
A firefighter from the North Okaloosa Fire District
works at the scene of a vehicle rollover on Airport Road
Monday afternoon.














The North Okaloosa Fire Department responded to a
single vehicle rollover at the intersection of John Givens
Road and Airport Road on Monday.
A truck carrying firewood rolled over at the intersection
of Airport Road and John Givens Road Monday afternoon
shortly after 2 p.m. The vehicle was traveling east on Airport
Road when a tire blew out according to witnesses.
The driver of the truck, who appeared to be uninjured,
left the scene of the accident, running into a nearby wooded
area before law enforcement arrived, witnesses said.
The North Okaloosa Fire Department responded to the
accident.


HOUSE FIRE ON SCHOOL AVENUE














PHOTOS AND STORY BY ANN SPANN I Crestview News Bulletin
A Crestview firefighter extinguishes a fire at a home
located at 711 School Ave.














Firefighters arrive on the scene of a house fire at 711
School Ave. Monday afternoon.

The Crestview Fire Department responded to a house
fire at 711 School Avenue on Monday afternoon.
Neighbors reported seeing a dump truck leaving the
yard of the residence and pulling electrical service lines
from the home as it left.
The fire damage was limited to the exterior of the house
and caused only minor damage, according to Crestview
Deputy Fire Chief Cedric Peterson.


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Crestview News Bulletin I 5


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TRAFFIC CRASH ON INTERSTATE 10, WEST OF HOLT





















PHOTOS AND STORY ANN SPANN I Crestview News Bulletin
The driver of a Chevy sedan that rolled over on Interstate 10 west of the Holt exit retrieves items from his vehicle.
A single vehicle traf-
.fic crash occurred on
I 5Interstate 10 about two
miles west of the Holt
exit Wednesday morn-
Paramed- ing.
th A small Chevy sedan
ics with with Santa Rosa Coun-
Okaloosa ty license plates left the
County roadway, overturned
Emer- and came to rest in the
agency median. The vehicle
Medical was traveling in the
Services westbound lane when
check the the accident occurred.
driver The driver did not
involved appear to be injured.
The Okaloosa Coun-
in a roll- ty Sheriff's Office and
over on the Okaloosa Emer-
Interstate agency Medical Services
10 for responded to the acci-
injuries, dent.


P


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NE ~*I


FDLE
recognizes
June as National
Internet Safety
Month
Special to the News Bulletin
The Florida Department of Law
Enforcement joins the National Cen-
ter for Missing and Exploited Children
and SecureFlorida.org in recogniz-
ing June as National Internet Safety
Month. Floridians are encouraged to
educate themselves about Internet
safety and to review tips for keeping
children safe online.
"Online safety is important year
round," said Special Agent Supervisor
Mike Phillips, of FDLE's Computer
Crime Center. "Adults and children
should be aware of the potential dan-
gers in cyberspace and take steps to
protect their information and them-
selves against cyber stalking, identity
theft, and sexual exploitation."
Parents are encouraged to discuss
the dangers of the Internet with their
children and develop guidelines for us-
ing it safely. Some helpful tips include:
Teach children what personal
information is and how to keep it pri-
vate.
Help children find information
online. By searching the Internet to-
gether you help them find reliable
sources of information and distinguish
fact from fiction.
Encourage children to tell you
when they encounter problems online.
FDLE recommends Floridians visit
www.secureflorida.org or www.miss-
ingkids.com to learn how to minimize
the potential risks of instant messag-
ing, social networking, online gaming,
and more. Citizens may also go to www.
flsexoffender.net to search an e-mail or
instant message address to determine
if it may belong to a registered sexual
predator or offender. Florida's Sexual
Offender/Predator Registry is main-
tained by FDLE and currently houses
data on more than 54,000 registered
sex offenders and predators. Florida
law requires all registered sexual of-
fenders and predators to register their
e-mail and instant message addresses
prior to using them. Additional tips for
keeping children safe online may be
found at http://www.netsmartz.org.


Saturday, June 26, 2010


Local


Dim w






6 | Crestview News Bulletin


Lessons learned: Experience inspires hurricane evacuation suggestions


By Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com
When I evacuated New Or-
leans for Hurricane Katrina, like
everyone else, I thought it was
for a three-day vacation in the
country, as Hurricane Ivan had
been for us.
Unfortunately, I didn't bother
to empty and turn off the fridge.
Fortunately, I did think to grab
important papers, including
the plane tickets for a vacation
I planned to take the following
week. Good thing I did, because
I didn't see my home in Metairie
for almost four weeks.
From that experience, I
learned to be more prepared. My
hurricane evacuation kit would
now include:
*Three books (or more, de-
pending on the storm's forecast-
ed severity)
*Clothes enough for a week,


including a pair of Dockers and a
polo shirt in case we go out some-
where "nice" while evacuated
Credit cards as well as debit
card
Cash (plastic won't work
when computer lines are out)
*Insurance papers (for both
me and the car)
*Contact list of family and
friends, written on a card kept in
my wallet
Cell phone and charger (in-
cluding the kind that plugs into a
cigarette lighter)
*Meds and toiletries, includ-
ing baby wipes in case showers
or baths aren't available
Camera (to document dam-
age), SD cards, battery charger
and spare batteries in case pow-
er is out a long time.
I'd also remember to com-
pletely empty the freezer and
fridge, turn it off and let it stand
with the doors open. I was luckier


than some. By the time I returned
to my house, the power had been
restored and the primordial soup
that had spent several weeks
brewing in the enclosed freezer
had frozen solid, making it easy
to lift out.
(It didn't make it smell much
better, though. Despite hours
of scrubbing, disinfecting and
sticking an industrial odor re-
mover in it, the fridge eventually
followed its contents out to the
side of the street.)
However, living in Crestview,
I am now well above the storm
surge zone (remember: "run
from water, hide from wind")
and the house is less than a
mile from the county emergen-
cy shelter at Davidson Middle
School. Instead of adding to the
clogged roads, I'll just make
sure my storm pantry is stocked
and sit at home. And, of course,
we'll eat up the contents of the


fridge ASAP if the power is out
for long.
Being prepared makes post-
storm life more bearable. For


DEBRIS: Storm-
damaged
household
appliances,
furnishings,
toys and other
belongings line
a Metairie,
La., street a
few weeks
after Hurricane
Katrina swept
through.

BRIAN HUGHES
CrestviewNews
Bulletin
more valuable tips, see the spe-
cial "Are You Prepared?" hurri-
cane guide in today's News Bul-
letin.


Local Century 21 office


releases spring survey results


Special to the News Bulletin
CRESTVIEW Many peo-
ple dream of buying their
first home or trading up to
a new home that will better
suit their changing needs.
However, as the market be-
gins to climb out of one of
the most challenging eco-
nomic downturns in recent
history, the current state of
the real estate market may
be in question in many peo-
ples' minds. "Is it the right
time to make a move?"
In April, two giants in
the real estate market an-
nounced interesting sur-
vey results. Fannie Mae
found that two-thirds of
Americans (65 percent) are
still bullish on homeowner-
ship, preferring to own a
home despite the challeng-


ing economic environment
and the housing downturn.
Additional research con-
ducted by Century 21 Real
Estate LLC provides fur-
ther insight.
The Century 21 First-
Time Home Buyers and
Sellers survey captured
and compared the opinions
of prospective home buyers
and sellers who either pur-
chased or sold their first
home within the past year
or are planning to buy or
sell their first home within
the next year. The majority
of survey respondents had
moved or intended to move
more than 10 miles but less
than 50 miles from their
previous location, indicat-
ing current market condi-
tions may be a catalyst for
buying or selling homes,


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21 11 ,ir


as opposed to a desire to
dramatically change geo-
graphic location or relocate
for a job. "Buying a home,
whether it's your first or
subsequent purchase, is
the single greatest finan-
cial decision that most
people will make in their
lifetime," counsels RickDa-
vidson, president and chief
executive officer, Century
21 Real Estate LLC. "And,
our research indicates that
today's market presents a
generational opportunity
for home buyers and cur-
rent home owners looking
to leverage their market
position."
Current market
conditions
More than 80 percent
of first-time home buyers


and sellers feel the current
housing market is more
affordable today than this
time last year. This is de-
spite the fact that 40 per-
cent of all respondents are
more worried about the
economy now compared
to this time last year. Fed-
eral tax credits and solid
mortgage rates have had a
positive impact on driving
people to take action.
Re-establishing
balance
A full market recovery
takes time and current con-
ditions continue to favor
buyers. While buyers are
excited about the opportu-
nities in the current mar-
ket, sellers note their main
concern is losing money on
the sale of their home and


Aspen 1,417 sq. ft.
$79.400


receiving offers near their
asking price.
When will the balance
between housing need and
inventory return? The real
estate industry typically
considers six months of in-
ventory to represent a bal-
anced market. According
to the National Association
of Realtors, the number of
homes for sale currently
represents approximately
eight months of inventory
and has decreased 21.7
percent below the record of
4.58 million homes for sale
in July 2008.*
First-time home buy-
ers anticipate home prices
will soon begin to rise and
in fact, about half of first-
time buyers (48 percent)
expect an increase by this
time next year, thereby re-
establishing better market
equilibrium.
Let an expert
help guide you
Whether you are con-
sidering buying or selling
a home, 60 percent of first-
time home buyers do not
feel they have a good han-
dle on the real estate pro-
cess. Given the complexity
and opportunity of today's
real estate market, 85 per-
cent of both first-time buy-
ers and sellers feel that
using a real estate profes-
sional is important.
Allow an experienced


professional to help guide
you to the home that is
right for you, at a price you
can afford. The market is
recovering and providing
a powerful opportunity to
act. Take advantage of pos-
itive price points and low
interest rates today.
For additional informa-
tion about market condi-
tions in Crestview, contact
James M. Moulton at 682-
3849 or jmmoulton@cen-
tury21.gccoxmail.com.

*National Association
of Realtors Existing Home
Sales Report, March 2010
Methodology Century 21
RealEstate LLC First Time
Home Buyers and Sellers
Survey MarketTools, Inc.
conducted a quantitative
survey on behalf of Centu-
ry 21 Real Estate LLC with
708 prospective home buy-
ers and sellers who either
purchased or sold their
first home within the past
year or are planning to
buy or sell their first home
within the next year. The
quantitative study yielded
results from 353 first-time
home buyers and 355 first-
time home sellers in the
form of an online survey
fielded from March 12 to
16. The margin of error for
this study is 3.7 percent.


62 10



II --- \-

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Special to the News Bulletin
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. The
supply of type 0 negative
blood at the American Red
Cross has dropped to criti-
cally low levels. Type 0
negative blood is always
in high demand because
it can be transfused to pa-
tients with any blood type,
especially in emergency
situations. Type 0 negative
donors are needed to help
prevent the fragile type 0
negative blood supply from
reaching a crisis level.
"While all blood types
are needed during the criti-
cal summer months, we
urge those eligible donors
with 0 negative blood type
to make and keep appoint-
ments to give blood this
summer," said Mark Bed-
dingfield, CEO of the Amer-
ican Red Cross Alabama
and Central Gulf Coast
Blood Services Region.
[, "You can make the differ-
ence between an adequate
blood supply and a summer
shortage."
',. Every two seconds,
someone in the United
States needs blood. The
Red Cross Alabama and
Central Gulf Coast Blood


Services Region, which
includes Escambia, Santa
Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton,
Holmes, Washington, Bay,
Jackson, Gulf and Franklin
counties, provides lifesav-
ing blood to approximately
100 hospitals and must
have 600 people give blood
and platelets each weekday
to meet hospital demand.
Accident victims as well as
patients with cancer, sickle
cell disease, blood disor-
ders and other illnesses
receive lifesaving transfu-
sions every day. There is
no substitute for blood and
volunteer donors are the
only source.
Individuals who are 17
years of age (16 with pa-
rental permission in some
states), meet weight and
height requirements (110
pounds or more, depending
on their height) and are in
generally good health may
be eligible to give blood.
Please bring your Red
Cross blood donor card or
other form of positive ID
when you come to donate.
For more information
or to locate a nearby blood
drive, please call 800-
RED CROSS or visit red
crossblood.org.


NE *I


11


Saturday, June 26, 2010


Local


I






Saturday, June 26, 2010


Local


Crestview News Bulletin I 7


City of Crestview

MEETING AGENDA
Special to the News Bulletin
The regular agenda for the 6 p.m.,
Monday, June 28 meeting of the Crest-
view City Council is listed below. Meet-
ings are held at City Hall on Wilson St.
in Crestview.
Regular Agenda
1. Approval of Consent Agenda.
2. Presentation of Service Award
Mayor Cadle.
3. New Business:
a. Protect Our Children Margaret
Barbaree.
b. FMLA (Family Medical Leave
Act) Senior Captain Brown Chief
Traylor.
c. Board Appointments:
1. Board of Adjustment Appoint-
ment effective through July 4, 2012 -
(Resignation of Ronald Reeves) Coun-
cilman lannucci appointment.
2. Code Enforcement Board -
(Wayne Butler term through May 29)
- Councilman Allen appointment.
d. Approval of Crestview Commu-
nity Center Fee Adjustment Adminis-
trative Services.
e. City Council Chamber Renovation
Plan Public Services Department.
4. Mayoral Report.
5. Business from the Floor.
Consent Agenda
1. Approval of the minutes for the
workshop and regular meeting of June
14 and the workshop of June 21.
2. Approval of invoice in the amount
of $9,100 for professional services. Re-
quested by Allen, Yagow & Carr.
3. Approval of Site Construction
Plans for a 3,824 square-foot expan-
sion to 21st Century Oncology, located
at 601 Redstone Ave. West (PIN 29-3N-
23-0442-0000-0020/0010). Requested
by Dean Burgis, PE., Emerald Coast
Associates, Inc., Agent for Property
Owner. LPA 10-04. (See Blue Booklet
for June 2010 Council Meetings).

Note: If any person decides to ap-
peal any decision made by the city
council with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing,
he or she will need a record of the pro-
ceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.


Obituaries


Linda Perdue Reed
Linda Perdue Reed, age 88, passed away Sat-
urday, June 19. She was born on April 13, 1922, in
Geneva County, Ala., and was a lifelong resident of
Okaloosa County. Mrs. Reed was a homemaker.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Wil-
liam Reed, and a daughter, Helen E. Parker.
Survivors include her two sons, Mack and Sherry
Reed, and John R. and Jeanette Reed; one brother,
Riley Perdue; a lifelong friend, Janet Larson; six
grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held at 1:30 p.m. Monday,
June 21 at the chapel of Brackney Funeral Service.
Burial followed in the Live Oak Park Memorial Cem-
etery. The family received friends one hour prior to
the service.
Sign, leave a remembrance or view the guest
book for Linda Reed online at www.crestviewbul-
letin.com.


Okaloosa Co.


trash schedule


for holiday

Special to the News Bulletin
Independence Day will be observed on
Monday, July 5.
However Waste Management will collect
garbage, yard waste and recycling on the
regular Monday schedule. Wright Compost-
ing Facility will be open from 7 a.m. until
noon.
Baker Transfer Station will be open from
6 a.m. until 2 p.m. July 5 and Fort Walton
Beach Transfer Station will be open for it's
normal hours, 6 a.m. until 5 p.m.


SWAT warning
Public Works reminds everyone to check
their yards for containers holding water,
with recent rain and thunderstorms. Also
remember to "SWAT."
Stay inside with screened doors and
windows when mosquitoes are biting (dusk
and dawn).
When outside, wear clothing that cov-
ers skin.
Apply mosquito repellant that include
DEET [N, N diethyl-m-toluamide] on skin
when you are outside.
Turn over standing water where mos-
quito lay eggs. (Rid your home of standing
water in which mosquitoes can lay their
eggs.)


Gail Livingston Brown, age
65, of Holt, passed away Satur-
day, June 19. She was born on
March 11, 1945, in Crestview and
was a lifelong resident of Oka-
loosa County. She was a home-
maker and a member of the Holt
Assembly of God.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Jimmy Brown; her
son, Jimmy Dewayne Brown; her
parents, Lester and Marie Liv-
ingston; and a brother, William
(Hoss) Livingston.
Survivors include two sons,
James Brown and Dean Brown;
two daughters, Denise Corbin
and Michelle Brown; one broth-


er, James Livingston; one sister,
Martha Booth; and 18 grand-
children and 14 great-grandchil-
dren.
Funeral services were held
at 2 p.m. Tuesday, June 22 at the
Holt Assembly of God with the
Rev. Gus Carpenter officiating.
Burial followed in Holt Cemetery.
The family received friends from
6-8 p.m. Monday at the church.
Brackney Funeral Service,
Crestview, was in charge of the
arrangements.
Sign, leave a remembrance
or view the guest book for Gail
Brown online at www.crestview-
bulletin.com.


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8 | Crestview News Bulletin


KEEPING UP WITH MIA



What's cooking' with Crestview speedskating champ


By Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com
Just about anyone in Crest-
view knows world-class speed
skating champion Mia Man-
ganello's name. It's still on the
Italian restaurant her father
founded in the shopping center
on the corner of South Ferdon
Boulevard and Redstone Av-
enue.
While Mia and her family pe-
riodically pop back into the town
where she grew up, she's come
a long way since she first start-
ed inline roller skating while a
student at Walker Elementary
School. Once bitten by the skat-
ing bug, her family moved to
Ocala where she could pursue
her interest in whizzing around
on small wheels.
While in central Florida, Mia,
then 12, set a national inline
speed skating record in 2002
that still stands. As her talent
developed, she attended a speed
skating camp in Salt Lake City
operated by the coach of today's
Olympians, Bart Schouten.
When he saw her prowess on
wheels, he instantly recognized
her potential on ice.
The family drove their RV to
Utah, living in the vehicle while
house hunting. Mia's skill grew.
She soon made the U.S. World
Cup speed skating team. Her
goal was to earn one of the cov-
eted spots on this year's U.S.
Winter Olympics team. We re-
cently checked in with her to
see how things are going.
"Life's been busy," Mia
said. "I went to my last Junior
World Cup last year in Poland. I
unfortunately fell in my second
race, not only taking me out of
the run for the all around com-
petition, but it also injured me.
"I was very excited going
into this competition, it being
my last Junior Worlds. I really
wanted to do well but everything
happens for a reason," Mia said,
just a little sadly.


I'vTe lived my whole life for this
sport, sacrificing many things to be the
best. But that's just what you do wicin you
love something and want to be the best."

Mia Manganello


Earlier last season Mia had
graduated, earning a spot on
the Senior World Cup team, on
which she was on the team pur-
suit event's team.
"We got third place in Berlin,
the first World Cup, which was
the first medal any U.S. women's
team pursuit team ever got,"
Mia said proudly. "Then the
next weekend we just missed
it by getting fourth. That was in
the Netherlands."
Mia called her membership
on the Senior World Cup team
"one of the coolest things I've
ever been a part of."
2010 marked Mia's first year
as a senior athlete, and it was
also an Olympic year. But events
from the end of 2009 were des-
tined to have a negative effect
on her plans.
"It wasn't a very good year,"
Mia lamented. "At the end of last
year, my coach was fired so I ba-
sically had to start from scratch
this year. It being an Olympic
year, that's not something you
want to have to get through."
After searching, Mia found
a new coach and a new team to
workout with.
"It was up and down all sea-
son," Mia said. "I was having
problems with some ongoing
injuries throughout the years. I
ended up not making the World
Cup team in the fall because of
one of those injuries. So my plan
was to just go home, work hard
and wait for Olympic Trial."
In December Mia and her
teammates started working


for competition in the Olympic
team trials. Old injuries, how-
ever, resurfaced again. "I just
trying to not let them get into
my head," Mia said. "I tried to
fight through it.
"I skated pretty well, defi-
nitely not my best but decent,"
she said. "I ended up missing
the team by about a second. But
let me tell you, a second in this
sport is much longer than a sec-
ond in the real world."
Mia remains philosophical
about skating and life in gen-
eral.
"I've decided to move on,"
she said. "I've lived my whole
life for this sport, sacrificing
many things to be the best.
But that's just what you do when
you love something and want to
be the best. But after this year
and how hard things were for
me, I starting thinking about all
the other things I would love to
do with my life.
"I just turned 20, and yes, it's
still young but for me, I feel so
much older, I'm guessing be-
cause of all I've been through,"
she said. "So I've decided to look
into one other thing I've always
loved to do, and what also runs
through my veins...cooking."
It may be quite a change
from the exhilaration of the
wind on her face as she whizzes
around the track but in her new
position as a cook at Ruby Tues-
day's, she's finding fulfillment
in a whole different way.
"I'm loving it," Mia said. "I'm
learning a lot and getting tons


SPECIAL TO THE CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN
TRIALS & TRIBULATIONS: In Poland last year, former Crestview
resident Mia Manganello skims through her last Junior
World Cup competition before advancing to senior level
competition.















COOL LADY: A winter's day in Utah is perfect weather for
speed skater Mia Manganello, once a Walker Elementary
School student.


of experience. But what I've
always wanted to do is go to cu-
linary school. I'm not exactly
sure when I'll be doing that, so
right now I'm just having fun
and saving up some money."
Life has a funny way of work-
ing out sometimes. For Mia and
her supportive parents, Domi-
nic and Karen, the change in
her life's direction opens up a
whole new chapter.
"I greatly appreciate every-


thing my family has done for
me," Mia said affectionately.
"There's no way I would of got-
ten so far in this sport, or in life,
without them. I love them.
"But I'm doing really well,"
she said reassuringly.

Mia would enjoy hearing
from her old Walker Elemen-
tary School classmates. You
may e-mail her atfastice4life@
yahoo.com.


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Dubois Employee of the

Month at Shoal Creek

Special to the News Bulletin
Congratulations to Chris Dubois for
being elected Employee of the Month for
June 2010. He has been employed at Shoal
Creek for a year as the dietary cook. He
works the 5 a.m. shift, so every morning
he's at work he makes sure the patients CHRIS
get a good breakfast to start their day.
Dubois is currently attending college, DUBOIS
and says he might change his major from a
business degree. He likes to lift weights and play softball in
his spare time. Dubois commented that he enjoys working
with everyone at Shoal Creek and that it is a good place to
work. His colleagues congratulate him on this honor and
say he makes a difference and puts forth the extra effort.


Commission seeks

nominations for women's

achievement award


Special to the News Bulletin
TALLAHASSEE The Flor-
ida Commission on the
Status of Women (FCSW)
is pleased to announce the
opening of the 2010 nomi-
nation period for its Florida
Achievement Award. The
commission will recognize
meritorious women who
have improved the lives of
women of Florida and/or
who have served as posi-
tive role models for women
and girls in their commu-
nity. Recipients selected
to receive the award will
be honored Sept. 25 at the
University of South Florida
in Tampa.
"The Florida Commis-
sion on the Status of Women
is dedicated to empowering
women in achieving their
fullest potential, and to rec-
ognizing women's accom-
plishments," said Susanne
Hebert, commission chair.
"We are proud to honor out-
standing women for their
tremendous achievements


and dedicated service."
The FCSW invites the
public to nominate a meri-
torious woman deserving
of recognition for service to
their communities. Nomi-
nations may be made in two
categories, nominees ages
25 and up, and those ages
25 and younger. Nomina-
tions must be postmarked
by July 31 at 5 p.m. Nomi-
nation forms and instruc-
tions are available online at
www.fcsw.net, or by calling
414-3300.
The Florida Commis-
sion on the Status of Wom-
en is a nonpartisan board
statutorily created in 1991
consisting of 22 appointed
members, administratively
housed in the Office of the
Attorney General, Bill Mc-
Collum. The commission
is dedicated to empower-
ing women in achieving
their fullest potential, to
eliminating barriers to that
achievement, and to rec-
ognizing women's accom-
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Saturday, June 26, 2010


Local






Saturday, June 26, 2010


Local


Crestview News Bulletin I 9


Sl he Crestview Fire Department promoted fire Always
safety this week with a Kids Safety House at Twin
Hills Park.Plaf
"'Most of these kdds knoow a hlot about fire safety fronmi 2 Ways
school. but a trip through the house helps to refresh the ut!

to help them." Crestxiew' irefighter Cory Winkler said. 1


Crestview Assistant Fire Chief Rick Sanders talks with children from
Welch's Family Day Care about fire safety during their visit to the Kids
Safety House.


Seralyn
Welch
climbs
out the
window
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help of a
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firefighter.
PHOTOS BY
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Crestview
News
Bulletin


Cole Tabb exits the Kids Safety House during a mock fire drill.


Caitlyn Hearn learned about fire safety during a trip to the Kids Safety
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1 0 Crestview News Bulletin


Local


Saturday, June 26, 2010


Choctaw student struck, killed outside home


Wendy Vidora
Florida Freedom Newspapers

FORT WALTON BEACH -A girl
looking forward to her se-
nior year at the high school
her mother and grand-
mother attended was killed
Wednesday night when she
was struck pulling into the
driveway of her Kenwood
home.
Alayna Bowman was 16.
The car she was driving was
crushed by a vehicle driven
by 22-year-old John Camp-
bell Arthur of Fort Walton
Beach.
Arthur, a 2006 Choctaw
grad and football player, had
been driving northbound at a
high speed on Country Club
Road and had already passed


one vehicle when he struck
Bowman's car, according to
the Fort Walton Beach Police
press release. Arthur was in-
jured and taken to Fort Wal-
ton Beach Medical Center.
Alayna's 13-year-old
brother, Mack, was also in-
jured, but not critically.
Some members of Alay-
na's family, as well as neigh-
bors and fellow Choctaw
students gathered at the
accident scene. Eight hours
after the 10:30 p.m. accident,
all that remained was debris,
a twisted traffic sign and
torn-up grass.
A woman sat on the ce-
ment driveway across the
street, staring at the spot in
silence. She did not identify
herself; but said it wouldn't


be appropriate to talk.
Alayna was the editor of
Choctaw's school newspa-
per and was due to meet with
the adviser, Linda Evanchyk,
next week. Evanchyk said
she started getting calls
from stunned students just
after midnight.
They are devastated, and
so is she.
"She was very giving,
loved our school. If there
was ever a big green Indian,
she was it," Evanchyk said
Thursday morning. "She
was very open-hearted, al-
ways wanted to help some-
body. Friendly everyone
knew her."
School officials opened
the auditorium for students
to stop by and sign cards


for the family.
By noon, a number of
students had already placed
flowers and posters filled
with messages to her out-
side of the school.
Counselors are available
at the school to help stu-
dents, their families and fac-
ulty deal with the loss of one
of their own, said Principal
Cindy Gates.
"We're providing as much
support as possible," Gates
said. "She was determined
to be a leader and make good
things happen in whatever
she was involved in."
Okaloosa County Schools
superintendent Alexis Tib-
betts cried as she talked
about the loss. She had
known Alayna since she


was a baby.
"The whole Choctaw
community is just devas-
tated," she said. "Alayna was
just a great kid. She was a
fabulous, beautiful, talented
young lady."
In addition to her work
with the newspaper, Alayna
was the Indian Princess,
a spirit leader attached to
the cheerleaders. She was
a Miss CHS contestant in
2009 and 2010 and had been
a cheerleader at Pryor Mid-
dle School. Before that, she
attended Kenwood Elemen-
tary.
Her brother is going into
the eighth grade at Pryor.
Evanchyk said Alayna
was really looking for-
ward to "the whole senior


year experience."
"She wanted to take it all
in," Evanchyk said.
The circumstances of the
accident made it even more
horrific, she added.
"If Alayna had been out in
Destin in the tourist traffic,
it would be devastating but
you could kind of wrap your
head around it," she said.
"But turning into your drive-
way..."
Arthur served just un-
der a year in jail four years
ago after being convicted of
charges of carrying a con-
cealed firearm, reckless
driving, driving with a sus-
pended license with prior
convictions and refusing to
submit to a blood alcohol
test.


'Questions need to be answered:' Counties blast BP


Tom McLaughlin
Florida Freedom Newspapers
OKALOOSA ISLAND Giv-
en an audience with some
high ranking BP officials,
representatives from
eight Northwest Florida
counties spoke Wednes-
day with one voice.
They said they're tired
of waiting for BP to open
its checkbook and give
them the money they need
to protect their coastlines
from an oily mess of the
company's creation.
"We've put a great plan
together. Now you need to
pay for it," Okaloosa Coun-
ty Commission Chairman
Wayne Harris told BP Vice
President Bryant Chap-
man.
The local government
officials pressed the BP
PLC representatives, along
with U.S. Coast Guard of-
ficials and Department of
Environmental Protection
Secretary Mike Sole for
greater freedom to take ac-
tion when residue from the
Deepwater Horizon oil spill
threatens their shores.


"We know our vulnera-
ble areas; we know our as-
sets. This whole process of
having to ask permission
to clean our beaches isn't
working," said Bob Majka,
an assistant county man-
ager in Bay County. "And in
Bay County, quite frankly,
we're not doing that."
The representatives
from the Unified Com-
mand, which has overseen
the preparation and re-
sponse since the oil spill
happened in April, declined
to relinquish their control
over the decision making
process.
Coast Guard Capt. Ste-
ven Poulin did announce,
however, a new "task
force" strategy designed
to streamline the decision-
making process. He has
assigned Commander Joe
Boudrow to oversee opera-
tions in Florida and desig-
nated Coast Guard repre-
sentatives to each county's
Emergency Operations
Center.
The county representa-
tives will be able to make
some decisions and move


requests quickly up the
chain of command, Boud-
row told the gathering.
"We want to coordinate
it so information flows as
quickly as possible," he
said. "We want complete
transparency of communi-
cation."
Okaloosa County Public
Safety Director Dino Vil-
lani said the new command
structure, while imperfect,
probably will function more
quickly.
"I think the unified com-
mand understands we want
more local control," Villani
said. "I'm not sure to what
degree what they've done
will make that better, but I
think it will get better."
The unified command
officials were blasted from
every corner of the room
by county administrators,
commissioners and public
safety directors.
Warren Yeager, of Gulf
County, complained be-
cause the boom plan his
county had come up with
has now been denied.
"We have no plan. I don't
know what we're going to


do," Yeager said.
Escambia and Bay
county officials spoke of
spending millions to pro-
tect their counties or clean
up what oil has arrived,
and of receiving no reim-
bursement.
"We've been waiting for
funding to come through
for several weeks," said
Escambia County Com-
missioner Grover Robin-
son. "Is there somebody
we can contact that can
write checks?"
Others, like Santa Rosa
County Commission Chair-
man Gordon Goodin, want-
ed to see better on-the-
ground coordination to get
oil cleaned up in a timely
fashion.
While Chapman, the BP
vice president, had little
to say, another company
representative explained
what was presented as
a new process through
which counties could make
claims for reimbursement.
Most claims will still
have to wind their way
through state and unified
command channels before


"We 'k/ow?' our
vulnerable
areas; we 1'ntow
our assets. This
whole process of
hvil'ig to ask
permission to
clean our beaches
isn't working.
And in Bay
County, quite
frankly, we're
not doing that."

Bob Majka
assistant county manager
in Bay County.

being approved.
The change in the
claims process, according
to a news release issued
after the event, "will al-
low counties to seek reim-


bursement of their direct
protective measures while
still coordinating with the
state EOC."
Few, if any, county of-
ficials left the meeting
feeling uplifted by BP's re-
sponses to questions about
reimbursement for their
out-of-pocket expenses.
"This is their sixth dif-
ferent plan," Walton Coun-
ty Sheriff Mike Adkinson
said as he left the meeting.
"I'd be satisfied if they just
stayed with something."
Villani said, "I don't think
they got the reimburse-
ment process straightened
out any more than they did
before the meeting."
Though everyone pres-
ent agreed the meeting
had been productive, Bay
County Commissioner Bill
Dozier said there's still a
lot of work left to be done.
"There were some
questions brought out in
the meeting that couldn't
be answered to our satis-
faction," he said. "Those
questions need to be an-
swered, and quickly, I be-
lieve."


Graduates complete criminal justice executive training


Special to the News Bulletin tute announces the June
17 graduation of 27 senior
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Saturday, June 26, 2010


State


Crestview News Bulletin I 1 1


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PENSACOLA BEACH CLOSED
AFTER OIL WASHES ASHORE
PENSACOLA BEACH A popular section of Pensacola
Beach was closed Thursday because of oil that washed
ashore there.
Government officials closed about a quarter-mile section
of Casino Beach after thick pools of oil washed ashore
Wednesday.
Workers ran yellow tape 75 yards back from the water.
Officials said the area was closed because heavy equip-
ment is being brought in to clean up the mess.
Lifeguard Collin Cobia was wearing a red handkerchief
over his nose and mouth to block out the smell of the oil.
"I've been smelling it for days. It's enough to knock you
down," he said.
Beachgoer Nancy Salinas of Gulf Breeze was in tears
after lifeguards told her not to go near the water.
"It's just awful. It just breaks your heart," she said. "I
can't get my feet in the water."
Normally, there would have been hundreds of people
on the sands and in the water. But on Thursday, only two
sunbathers and a few people who had come to see the oil
were in the area when the beach was closed.
The oil is from the Deepwater Horizon spill that has
gushed millions of gallons of crude into the Gulf of Mexico
since April.


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Faith


Crestview News Bulletin 1 3


SIGNS OF FAITH


BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
This sign was taken at Campton Assembly of God church off State Road 85
north of Crestview.


Church BRIEFS


ANNOUNCEMENTS

FIREWORKS FUND-
RAISER: First Assembly
of God at 4513 Forsyth St.,
in Bagdad is selling fire-
works to raise money for
their church youth activi-
ties. The June 28 through
July 4 sale will be held at
Walmart Supercenter in
Crestview off South Fer-
don Blvd.
TNT Fireworks offers
a "no dud" guarantee, and
several "buy one, get one
free" items and fireworks
that are legal in Florida.
STAKE CONFER-
ENCE: schedule for Fort
Walton Beach and other
stakes is listed below.
These meetings will take
the place of all normally
scheduled Sunday meet-
ings.
Saturday, June 26,
Priesthood Leadership
Meeting at 2 p.m. at the
Fort Walton Beach Stake
Center, 339 Lake Drive, fol-
lowed by adult session, 5
p.m. to 7 p.m.
Sunday, June 25, 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m. at the Fort Wal-
ton Beach Stake Center for
Fort Walton Wards 1 and
2, Niceville and Sandestin


Branch.
The schedule for the
Crestview area stake
includes a meeting on
Sunday June 27 for Crest-
view, Baker and DeRiniak
Springs in the Crestview
Chapel from 1 p.m. to 3:30
p.m. until 3 p.m.
Details: 862-3263.
THE GREAT PHY-
SICIAN: A new series of
discussions by G. Camp-
bell Morgan, the pastor's
great-grandfather, will
begin Sunday, June 27 at
the First Presbyterian
Church-PCA in Florala,
Ala. The event begins at
5:30 p.m. with a fellowship
meal to follow. 1st Presby-
terian PCA is across from
Piggly Wiggly. Details: 334-
858-3865.


EVENTS

BORN TO WIN: Ra-
dio show airs every day at
12:30 p.m. on WTJT 90.1
FM. Presented by North-
west Florida Church of
God, pastored by Carl Dil-
lenback.
CATHOLIC RCIA:
The Rite of Christian Ini-
tiation of Adults (RCIA) is


designed for those seeking
one or more of the Sacra-
ments of Initiation; Bap-
tism, Confirmation, and
Eucharist. This formation
process is the church's ap-
proved method for individ-
uals to become members
of the Catholic community.
Sessions are held at the
Eglin Chapel Center An-
nex from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
each Wednesday evening.
Details: Susan Huberty at
882-7320.
FREE BIBLE
COURSE: Airport Road
Church of Christ is offer-
ing a free Bible correspon-
dence course. Call 682-
4025 for more information.
The radio program airs
Monday through Saturday
at 5:45 a.m. on WAAZ, 104.7
FM.
BOOK OF REVELA-
TIONS STUDY: Each
Sunday evening at 5 p.m.,
the Good Hope Congrega-
tional Church presents the
study of the Book of Reve-
lations. Rev. Tommy Cole-
man will be presenting
the study and there will be
finger foods to follow every
Sunday evening. Anyone
interested may join. Call
537-4307 for more informa-
tion.


Church SERVICES


Sunday services are pub-
lished in the News Bul-
letin on a space-available
basis. Call 682-6524 to up-
date or add your church's
Saturday or Sunday wor-
ship services.

APOSTOLIC
Apostolic Life Taber-
nacle and Pastor Michael
Braswell cordially invite you
to worship with them. Sun-
day worship, 10 a.m., 6 p.m.
Located U.S. Highway 90
West one mile from city limit
sign. Turn left onto Shoff-
ner Boulevard. then left on
Pinewood to 3136 Pinewood
Dr., Crestview. For more
information call the church
at 689-2422. Website: www.
apostoliclifetabernacle.com;
pastor's e-mail address -
md.braswell@yahoo.com.

APOSTOLIC/PENTECOSTAL
Pentecostals of Baker
is located at 1599 Hester
Church Road in Baker. Pas-
tor Kenneth Bray. Sunday
services 2 p.m. Sunday
School, 3 p.m. worship. Call
398-5000 for information.
Website, www.pentecostal-
sofbaker.org.

ASSEMBLIES
Campton Assembly of
God Church is located at
6924 State Road 85 North in
Laurel Hill.
The Sunday service is at
10:30 a.m. For more infor-
mation call the church at
652-4581 or Pastor Kelly at
423-0375.
First Assembly of God:
400 S. Ferdon Blvd., Crest-
view, Office hours Monday
through Friday, 9-4. Pastor
Mark English.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. early
morning worship, 10 a.m.
Sunday School; 11 a.m.
morning worship; and a 6


p.m. evening service. X-cel
Youth Ministry 3 p.m., X-
ceed Children's Ministry 4
p.m.
Special needs bus avail-
able for 11 a.m. service. Call
the church at 682-3518 for
pickup.
Golan Assembly of
God: 6612 County Road 189
N., Baker. Phone 537-3043.
Pastored by Rev James E.
Paul. Sunday services: Sun-
day School 9:45 a.m., morn-
ing worship at 11 a.m., and
evening worship at 6 p.m.
Milligan Assembly of
God: 5408 U.S. Highway
4, Baker. Phone 537-4945.
Senior Pastor Mike White,
Youth Pastor Jesse Jerni-
gan. Sunday services: Sun-
day School 9:30 a.m., wor-
ship 10:30 a.m., Kingdom
Kids 10:30 a.m., evening ser-
vice 6 p.m. www.milliganas-
sembly.org.


North Central Assem-
bly of God: at 158 N. Wood-
lawn Drive in Crestview.
Phone: 689-0209 or 537-7115.
Minister A. Paul Hinton.
Sunday services Sunday
School at 10 a.m., morning
worship at 11 a.m., evening
worship at 6 p.m.
Shady Grove Assembly
of God: Sunday services
begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sun-
day School, followed by 10:45
a.m. and 6 p.m. worship
services. Shady Grove is
located at 1189 Shady Grove
Church Road in Baker, just
off Highway 189.
Welcome Assembly
of God located on County
Road 393 in the Dorcas com-
munity, invites you to join
them for Sunday services
including Sunday School at
9:45 a.m. and worship ser-
vices at 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.
See SERVICES 17


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For holy rollers only


New ramp

aids access to

105-year-old

church

By Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com

The construction of a
new handicap ramp on
the front of the Laurel
Hill Presbyterian Church
isn't the first addition
the 105-year-old building
has experienced in its
distinguished history of
service to the small com-
munity. As the congrega-
tion grew, a kitchen and a
combined Sunday school
room/fellowship hall
were added to the rear of
the church in the 1950s.
More recently, a ramp
was added to the north
side of the church, en-
tering the building in a
vestibule off the kitchen.
However, its steep slope
poses a challenge to mo-
bility-impaired visitors
and church members.
When one of the church's
senior members started
using a wheeled walker
to get around, the church
leadership began dis-
cussing adding an Amer-
icans with Disabilities
Act-compliant handicap
ramp to the front en-
trance.
"We're building it (the
ramp) because we have
some folks who have
difficulty climbing the
stairs and we don't want


I -. -

'p1 '. ,..,. .
BRIAN HUGHES | Crestview News Bulletin
RAMPWAY: A member of the Laurel Hill Presbyterian
Church surveys progress on the church's new
handicap ramp prior to the start of last Sunday's
services.


steps to be any barrier
to anyone coming to wor-
ship, whether church
members or members
of the community," ex-
plained the Rev. Mark
Broadhead, the church's
pastor.
Johnny Reeves of
Reeves Construction, a
Laurel Hill contractor, is
doing the work, Broad-
head said.
"We're glad we can
have the construction
work done by someone
from right here in Laurel
Hill," Broadhead added.


The decking on the
U-shaped ramp was in
place as of last Sunday.
Railings will soon be in
place, after which land-
scaping can be replaced.
When the old steps were
removed, some wood rot
was discovered under the
front doors of the church.
Reeves will also repair
the damaged wood.
The project will cost
the congregation "in the
neighborhood of $9,000,"
Broadhead said, includ-
ing the repairs to the en-
trance area.


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1 4 I Crestview News Bulletin


Features


Saturday, June 26, 2010


REMEMBERING A LIBERATOR



American memorialized with French resistance fighters


By Donald M. Bohler
Special to the News Bulletin

Traveling north on the
autoroute A-75 in the south-
ern part of France just
past the village of Le Cay-
lar, you'll have to look fast
not to miss the sign on the
right side of the highway
that announces a curiously
named place, "Memorial
De La Pezade," with the
admonition "Remember."
Even more intriguing are
the two small flags embla-
zoned on the sign: French
and American.
If you decide to double
back and exit into Le Cay-
lar, then you'll find, after
some searching, a small
road that parallels the au-
toroute and arrives at a
well-maintained area that,
at first sight, appears to
be a small French military
cemetery: 24 simple white
stone crosses and a French
flag flying on a small hill be-
hind a stone obelisk upon
which is affixed the Cross
of Lorraine, the symbol of
the Free French during
World War II.
The white crosses are
identical, with French flags
chiseled into each save
one: It has an American
flag under the French flag.
Just behind the crosses,
there is a large stone with
a plaque with the names of
23 French resistance fight-
ers who died on August
22, 1944, in service to their
country.
Surmounting this, there
is a simple granite slab with
this inscription in French:
"To the memory of Lt.
Richard Francis Hoy, 111th
Tactical Reconnaissance
Squadron, 12th U.S. A.A.F,
shot down at Les Infruts on
22 August 1944."
A further search of the
area reveals only one ad-
ditional but telling clue,
a small French sign at a
short distance that states:
"Commemorative Memo-
rial dedicated to the Resis-
tance Fighters, 22 August
1944."
This simple marker pos-
es acomplexquestion:What
bond exists between these
23 French and this lone


American, a bond so strong
that he is considered one of
their own?
It was Tuesday, August
22, 1944, and Operation
Dragoon, the invasion of
southern France, had been


under way for a week. At
4:25 p.m., a two-ship forma-
tion of P-51-F6A reconnais-
sance fighters lifted from
the airfield at Borgo, on the
northeastern tip of Corsica,
where the 111th Tactical


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AND ONE AMERICAN: Above, the left front cross in
this French memorial bears an American flag,
commemorating the gallantry for an American flyer
who died during the liberation of France in World
War II. LIBERATOR: At left, Lt. Richard F. Hoy was shot
down while attacking a German convoy that was
also attacked the same day by a French Resistance
unit, which was wiped out during the skirmish. Hoy
was honored by being included in a memorial to the
resistance fighters.


Reconnaissance Squadron
was based. The flight was
led by Lt. Roy Simmons;
his wing man was Hoy, 23
years of age and in Europe
for only one month. Their
mission was reconnais-
sance and interdiction of
German forces fleeing the
Allied advance.
The fighters crossed the
Provence and Marseille
until reaching Saint-Gilles,
where they found and
strafed German truck traf-
fic. They next proceeded to
attack targets in the area of
Nimes and Arles, and then
on to Peyeleau and Millau.
It was south of Millau that
they found a German col-





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umn on the Larzac plateau
fleeing from Rodez, a ma-
jor German garrison town.
The P-51s attacked. It was
late afternoon, 6:50 p.m. lo-
cal time.
During the strafing run,
Hoy's aircraft crashed and
exploded. Upon returning
to Borgo, Simmons report-
ed the aircraft down at the
village of Les Infruts and
the pilot missing. In his
later statement in the ac-
cident investigation report,
Simmons stated that Hoy's
aircraft was hit by German
antiaircraft fire during the
strafing run while a French
eyewitness later reported
that the P-51 hit a telegraph
pole as it fell.
Records show that the
German forces recovered
Hoy's body and dug a crude
grave for his remains and
those of five Germans
killed during the attack.
Months later, a U.S. graves
registration team made its
way to the area to identify
the aircraft and recover
the pilot's body.
The remains subse-
quently were removed to
a temporary burial site
at Draguignan Cemetery,
Saint Raphael, where they
remained for three years
before being positively
identified and returned to
Detroit, Hoy's hometown,
for final burial. This might
have ended this tragic sto-
ry had it not been for one
additional event that oc-
curred on the same August
22, 1944, date at La Pezade,
a thousand yards farther
southeast on the road from
Les Infruts.
On the previous day,
August 21, the call had
gone out to various French
resistance groups, the
maquisards, to sabotage
the mountainous road that
descended from the Larzac
plateau to the south. The
resistance group Maquis
Paul Claie (Cl1), only that
day having occupied the
town of Saint-Affrique, 40
kilometers west and north
of La Pezade, responded,
and a special section of 23
men, some as young as 18
years old and led by 25-
year-old Edouard Pays,
responded. They lacked
training and experience
and were poorly equipped
but were passionately
courageous. These sons of
France took to the danger-
ous task.


The sabotage was com-
pleted on August 22 in what
must have been a full day's
effort. The group then could
have returned to various
safe maquisard camps, but,
in a heroic decision that
would prove fatal, the men
elected to head in the di-
rection of the approaching
Germans. Close to La Pe-
zade, they encountered two
vanguard German trucks
and attacked them.
Almost immediately, the
maquisards were at a dis-
advantage as the Germans
were able to bring two
mortars forward to engage
their attackers. When the
battle was finished, all the
maquisards were either
dead or gravely wounded.
As witnessed by a shep-
herd and later verified by
German prisoners taken
during the following days,
the Germans shot and mu-
tilated the wounded. None
escaped.
The deaths of all the
maquisards, some in a most
horrific manner, sent shock
waves through the area.
The impact was profound.
To venerate these patri-
ots who made the ultimate
sacrifice in defense of their
homeland, the French gov-
ernment set aside a space
for a permanent memo-
rial at La Pezade, at which
honors would be rendered
each August 22. But in the
spirit of grateful apprecia-
tion, the French launched
an effort to find the identity
of the American pilot who
was shot from the sky on
this date and at this place
while engaging what was
doubtless the same Ger-
man convoy. It was a long
and difficult search.
Ultimately, however,
they were successful in
their efforts, and on August
22, 1999, a plaque honor-
ing Hoy was placed atop
the stele honoring the 23
maquisards. The dedica-
tion of this plaque made
Hoy forever an honorary
maquisard, forever with
his comrades who he never
met but for whom he fought
and died. The memorial
now honors 24 maquisards.
If you are fortunate to
find this place of La Pezade
on August 22, then you'll
hear the strains of "The
Marseillaise." But after the
music has died away into
the wind that sweeps the
Larzac plateau, you'll hear
the familiar refrain of the
"Star Spangled Banner"
and watch as the Stars and
Stripes is raised to join the
French tri-color.
With this, we are all
comrades. We are as one.
We remember.

Don Bohler is a retired
Air Force colonel who lives
in Niceville with his wife,
Marie-Claude. They were
recent participants in the
Crestview sister city visit
to Noirmoutier, France.
The memorial mentioned
in his article is close to the
Bohlers' vacation home in
Montpellier, France, and
has been the subject of
Don's research for the past
two years.


Personal Records of 2nd
Lt. Richard Francis Hoy,
obtained by the Freedom of
Information Act, 2008.
Le pilote inconnu du
Larzac by Mr Jean Rob-
in, Sources and date un-
known.
Combatants de la Lib-
ertd by Mr Philippe Rioux,
La Dipeche en sud Avey-
ron Special Libdration.
USAAF Chronology,
Mediterranean: 1944: Part
2.
"In Search of the
Maquis" by Harry Roder-
ick Kedward, page 210.
ArmyAirForces.com
of World War II, Lt. Hoy,
3 (sic) Tac Recon Sqn, 12
USAAE.
Adrosttles.


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Saturday, June 26, 2010


Travel


Crestview News Bulletin I 1 5


A.- p


* I gill **^t
a...


Photos by BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
SALZBURG: Beautiful Salzburg, capital of the Austrian Tirol, is nestled along the banks of the Salzach River. Although the city has sold its soul to tourism, it is well
worth the visit, especially for fans of "The Sound of Music."


'Sound of Music'



tour and power trips


Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com
After more than two
decades of independent
travel in Europe and pre-
senting a seminar on inde-
pendent European travel
for colleges, churches and
other groups, I periodically
answer questions about
travel in Europe for Yahoo!
Answers. Here are two se-
lected questions that have
earned the service's "best
answers" designation.

'Sound of Music Tour'
in Salzburg?
Q: Has anyone taken any
of the official "Sound of Mu-
sic" guided tours they offer
in Salzburg, Austria? I only
have one day in Salzburg,
and the guided tours look
like they run about four
hours! Does it give you a
good tour of the city, or am
I better off on my own?
(I am a big "Sound of
Music" fan. My boyfriend,
however, is not, and while
he's tolerant of my desire
to see some of the sites,
both of us are concerned
about fitting in as much of
Salzburg as we can!)
A: Like you, once I saw
"The Sound of Music" as a
kid, I yearned to visit Salz-
burg and see those gor-
geous places in person.
Salzburg is a beautiful city
that has sold its soul to tour-
ism. Mozart (who was born
there) and "The Sound of
Music" are its two biggest
attractions. Few Austrians,
however, know much nor


really care about the lat-
ter.
I have taken the city tour,
which incorporates many
"Sound of Music" locales.
The best "Sound of Music"
tour, however, was one I did
myself. We rented bicycles
and tooled around town
to see both film sites and
places from the von Trapp
family's life, including Villa
Trapp across the river in
the village of Aigen.
Many "Sound of Music"
tours stretch the truth quite
a bit. They'll tell you the ga-
zebo, abbey courtyard and
cemetery scenes were shot
on location. (They were
shot in Hollywood.) They'll
tell you Leopoldskron Pal-
ace on the lake was the lo-
cation for "Villa Trapp." (It
wasn't; the crew wanted to
shoot there, but the owner
wanted too much money.
However, 20th Century-Fox
built the patio and garden
set, including the famous
"Sixteen Going on Sev-
enteen" gazebo, on city-
owned land next door, then
filmed scenes in which the
villa appears at Frohnburg
Palace two miles away.)
In short, take the city
tour, which gives you an ex-
cellent overview of the city,
then explore around town
on your own. You can book
the tour at the tourist infor-
mation office.
One thing I found per-
sonally moving was to sit
in the Nonnberg Abbey
church where Maria Au-
gusta Kutschera and Capt.
Georg von Trapp were mar-
ried in 1927 (not the cathe-


dral used in the film, which
is in nearby Mondsee).
You can walk to the abbey
from the castle; take the
walkway around the city
side of the hill. The chapel
is through the gate, which
had a fake bell pull installed
for the film (someone stole
it in the 1980s), and across
the courtyard. It is open to
the public, although most
of the abbey is closed to
visitors.
But only one day in Salz-
burg?! For shame! You
must return and spend a
couple days to see it prop-
erly! Promise your BF
you'll spend time at some-
thing he'd like to see if he'll
go back to Salzburg with
you. (Is he a history buff?
Hitler's mountain retreat
is close to Salzburg. You
can spend the night in the
inn next door to where Ad-
olf lived!)

Power plugs in
European trains?
Q: Are there power plugs
in European trains?
A: Yes. In the WCs (bath-
rooms) there are gener-
ally outlets. In most ex-
press trains, especially in
first-class compartments or
seats, there are often out-
lets, as well. You must make
sure your device can oper-
ate on 220V instead of 110V
and you must have a plug
converter as the tines are
different than our American
flat ones. You can get a set
of plug converters from Ra-
dio Shack AAA travel agen-
cies and travel stores.


NOT THE TRAPP'S HOUSE: The 1744 Leopoldskron Palace is usually erroneously shown
on guided tours of Salzburg as the film location for Villa Trapp in "The Sound of
Music." In fact, a palace two miles away was used, although the gazebo and rear
terrace sets were built on municipal land to the left of Leopoldskron.


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1 6 I Crestview News Bulletin


Lifestyles


Saturday, June 26, 2010


BABY Pl i


For some

moms-to-be,

swollen bellies

are canvases to

celebrate

By COURTNEY PERKES
Freedom News Service
Back when pregnant
women wore muumuus to
hide their bumps, a mom-
to-be saved her decorating
efforts for the nursery.
But just as maternity
fashion has changed dra-
matically, some women
have taken to adorning
their bellies as a way of
artistically celebrating the
life growing inside them.
Monica Murphy, 26,
couldn't wait to grow big
enough for an appointment
with artist Lernie Beuler.
Murphy is expecting her
first child, a boy, in early
July.
She lifted her shirt for
Beuler and commented on
her pale abdomen.
That changed quickly as
Beuler drew an elaborate
henna design, starting with
a star around her navel.
"It's so special because
you have your belly, and
you're only going to have it
for a little time," said Mur-
phy, who lives in Fullerton,
Calif.
Beuler makes her own


PHOTOS FROM FREEDOM NEWS SERVICE
At top, artist Justine Serebrin painted this woman's belly in her home. Above, Monica Murphy has her belly painted by henna artist
Lernie Beuler. "It's so special because you have your belly, and you're only going to have it for a little time," Murphy said.


paste from ground henna
leaves. She adds molasses,
lemons from her garden
and essential oils. The fra-
grant concoction looks like
chocolate frosting. Within


48 hours, the paste deep-
ens into a rich, brownish-
orange stain.
"It's like a Polaroid,"
said Beuler, a 42-year-old
Garden Grove, Calif., mom


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of twin teenage girls. "It
just slowly develops."
Throughout the ages,
women around the world
have marked life's major
transitions by painting
their bodies after reach-
ing puberty or before mar-
riage. In the past few years,
a handful of Southern Cali-
fornia artists have begun
marketing belly painting
to pregnant women. They
often paint women for a
baby shower or "blessing-
way," a ceremony to honor
a woman before she gives
birth.
For those who don't want
to hire a professional artist,
belly painting kits are sold
online.
"They're experiencing
this adornment process
that is all a part of celebrat-
ing," Los Angeles artist
Justine Serebrin said. "You
don't get to be pregnant
forever."
Serebrin painted her
first belly in 2007 and fell
in love with the dynamic
energy of mother and baby.
One Halloween in Laguna
Beach, Calif., she painted
a fishbowl on the abdomen
of a mom-to-be dressed as


a black cat. At showers,
she has painted images to
match invitations or with
the baby's projected astro-
logical sign.
"The canvas of a belly
is huge and full of life,"
Serebrin said. "The baby
inside moves and responds
to what you're doing. It's
magical."
Serebrin said her paints
are safe for the baby be-
cause they are made from
aloe, camomile, avocado
oil, cocoa butter and glyc-
erin. The paint comes off
with soap and water. She
typically charges $150 for a
belly painting, which takes
60 to 90 minutes.
Some women find com-
fort in the body art. Kristen
Roberts' friends hired Beul-
er to apply a peacock and
flowers to her belly during
her blessingway ceremony.
When Roberts went into
labor a couple weeks later,
the design remained.
"I think it made me com-
fortable in the hospital,"
said Roberts, 24, whose son
is now 15 months old. "I felt
pretty. I felt decorated. It's
very nurturing."
As Beuler painted Mur-


phy for a demonstration
at a recent health expo
in Brea, Calif., strangers
stopped to watch.
"Can I please take a pic-
ture of your belly because
it's so beautiful?" one wom-
an asked.
Murphy smiled for the
camera.
"I notice the baby's
starting to move around,"
Beuler told her.
"Oh, yeah, he's an active
little guy," Murphy said.
Beuler charges $75 for a
painting that takes 30-45
minutes and will last for a
week or two. On Murphy,
she worked her way out
from the belly button, draw-
ing flowers and butterflies.
"I can't see anything. I
see the top," Murphy said.
Beuler snapped a photo
with her iPhone so Murphy
could decide if she wanted
more.
"Oh, that's really cute,"
she said. "Yay! I like it."
Murphy said although
her tummy hadn't seen
much sun, she planned to
show off her henna during
a trip to Palm Springs, Ca-
lif. "Now I'll have to rock
the two-piece," she said.


* *
NO IN ILLGA


00






Saturday, June 26, 2010


Faith


Crestview News Bulletin I 17


SERVICES from poae 13


Call 682-1683 for directions.
Westside Assembly of
God: 179 Kit Drive, Crest-
view. Sunday services: Sun-
day School 9:45 a.m., worship
10:30 a.m., evening service at
5 p.m.

BAPTIST
Beaver Creek BC ser-
vices: Beaver Creek Baptist
Church, located six miles
West of Baker, has Sunday
School at 10 a.m., morning
worship at 11 a.m., and chil-
dren's church at 11:15 a.m.
Calvary Baptist Church:
612 E. Chestnut Ave., Crest-
view. Pastor: Rev Lewis Wil-
son Jr. Sunday services 8:45
a.m. continental breakfast;
9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:45 a.m. morning worship;
6 p.m. evening service. Nurs-
ery provided for children 5
and under.
Central Baptist Church:
Located at 951 S. Ferdon
Blvd., Crestview. Sunday
services include 9:15 a.m. Bi-
ble study; 10:30 a.m. worship
and praise service; 5:30 p.m.
worship and praise, AWANA
for Kids. For additional infor-
mation call 682-5525 or visit
the Website at www.central-
crestview.com.
Emmanuel Baptist
Church, 3252 East James
Lee Blvd., Crestview. Phone:
682-9416. E-mail address:
ebc@ebccrestview.com. In-
terim Teaching Pastor Ian
Anderson. Celebration ser-
vices: Sunday at 8:20, 9:50 and
11:20 a.m. Discovery Park for
nursery, Preschool/The Zone
(children's church) K-5th
graders during all celebra-
tions. Evening celebrations,
Sunday 5-7 p.m.: Life groups
for adults. On Campus Sun-
day Night for preschoolers,
G-Force for K-5th Graders.
Fuel 247- Worship Service/
Small Groups (Youth).
Evelenar Baptist
Church: 2820 Carver Ave.,
Crestview. Pastor Benjamin
T Randolph. Sunday School
9:30 a.m., worship 11 a.m.
Every first Sunday at 3 p.m.
is the Hour of Power. Phone:
682-2218.
First Baptist Church
of Crestview: 798 N. Pearl
St. (across U.S. Highway
90 from courthouse, behind
Burger King. Pastor Alan
Kilgore. Phone 682-2544.
Sunday services 8:45
Welcome Center opens/ 9
a.m. Sunday School/10:30
a.m. morning worship,
children's worship/ 4 p.m.
Student Leadership; Youth
Choir / 5 p.m. Youth disciple-
ship; Youth Ensemble; ladies,
men, children and preschool
bible studies; book club/ 6
p.m. evening worship.
First Baptist Church of
Baker. Located at 1347 14th
St., Baker (across from the
Baker School football field).
Rev Cliff Morgan
Bible Study at 9 a.m. and
Worship at 10:30 a.m. For
more information you may
call the church office at 537-
2993.
First Baptist Church of
Holt: 532 U.S. Highway 90
W, PO. Box 38, Holt. Phone
537-6170. Pastor Fred H.
Sanford.
Sunday services: 9 a.m.
Sunday School, 10:15 a.m.
and 6 p.m. worship services.
First Baptist Church
of Milligan: 5238 Old River
Rd., Milligan. 682-6277 or 682-
8559. Pastor Ted Jernigan.
Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.,
worship, 11 a.m.; discipleship
training 5 p.m.; evening wor-
ship, 6 p.m.
Goodhope Baptist
Church, 1895 Owen Cot-
ton Road off U.S. Highway
189, Baker, in the Escambia
Farms community. Pastor
Jim Skates. Phone: 537-8720
or 537-8740.
Services: Men's prayer
9:30 a.m., Sunday School
9:45 a.m., worship 11 a.m..
Evening services: Disciple-
ship training 5 p.m. worship
6 p.m.
Live Oak Baptist
Church, located at 4565
Live Oak Church Road in
Crestview (near Shoal River
Country Club).
Sunday services Sunday
School at 9:45 a.m., morning
worship at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.


Evening worship.
Phone: 682-5160. Senior
Pastor Dave Edwards; Asso-
ciate Pastor Dennis Walker.
Living Faith Baptist


Church: 837 West James
Lee Blvd., Crestview. Pastor
Chaplain David Pettis. Sun-
day services Sunday School
10 a.m. and worship at 11
a.m. Discipleship training 6
p.m., and evening worship 7
p.m. children's church Sun-
day morning. Phone 682-
4371.
Magnolia Baptist
Church: Located at 3198
Highway 602, Laurel Hill.
Pastor Danny Starling.
Sunday School at 9:45
a.m., Sunday Morning Wor-
ship, 11 a.m. with children's
church for 3-5 and nursery
for under 3. Evening Worship
6 p.m. For further informa-
tion, call 652-2300.
New Beginnings
Church: The church is at
412 West James Lee Blvd.
in Crestview. The Sunday
service begins at 10:30 a.m.
AWANA for children ages 2-
12 is on Sunday nights from 5
to 7 p.m. at 421 W James Lee
Blvd. in Crestview.
New Life Missionary
Baptist Church: Pastor San-
ford Hayes. 285 Duggan Ave.,
Crestview. Sunday School
9:30 a.m. Morning worship
11 a.m. on Sunday.
Palm Chapel Primitive
Baptist Church: 201 Cadle
Dr., Crestview. Elder Mi-
chael Green, Jr., Pastor. Sun-
day 10:30 a.m. Call 689-3383
for more information.
Pilgrim Rest Baptist
Church: Pastor, Dr. Jerry
Haley. 5595 State Road 4
South, Baker. Phone 537-
9221. FAX 537-6798. Church
website www.pilgrimrest-
baptist.org.
Sunday services includ-
ing morning worship at 8:30
and 11 a.m.; bible study at
9:45 a.m.; adult study, youth
ministry, Disciple Kids and
children's choir at 5:30 p.m.
and evening worship at 6:30
p.m.
Pyron Chapel Baptist
Church: 6498 Wm. Gary
Johnson Road, Baker. Pas-
tor Victor Bettenhausen,
398-0355.
Sunday services: Sunday
School, 9:45 a.m.; worship,
11 a.m.; choir practices, 4:30
p.m.; Bible study and prayer,
5:30 p.m.
Valley Road Baptist
Church: 1018 Valley Road,
Crestview. Phone 682-4513.
Rev Philip Mark. Times
for Sunday Services: Bible
Study 9:45 a.m., morning
worship 11 a.m., discipleship
training 5 p.m., and evening
worship 6 p.m.
Woodlawn Baptist
Church: located at 824 N.
Ferdon Blvd., Crestview,
Pastor Patrick Pfrimmer.
Sunday Bible study meets
at 9 a.m. with morning wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m. A service
for the hearing impaired
is also offered on Sunday
morning. Sunday evening
service is at 6 p.m. and the
Youth Choir meets at 5 p.m.
Call the church at 682-2924
for information.

CATHOLIC
Our Lady of Victory
Catholic Church, 550 Ad-
ams Drive, Crestview. Phone
682-4622. Pastor Fr. John
Cayer. Parochial Vicar--Fr.
Florencio Lagura.
Sunday Masses at 8:30
and 10:30 a.m. Monday
through Friday, Mass at 8
a.m. Saturday Vigil Mass at
5 p.m.
Spanish Mass (2nd and
last Saturday of the month)
at 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF
Live Oak Church of
Christ: Sunday morning
worship 10 a.m. followed by
Bible study at 11 a.m. The
church is located at 1049 S.
Wilson St. Call 682-2697 for
more information.
McDonald Street
Church of Christ: at 744 S.
McDonald St. in Crestview,
with Minister Bro. Henry
Herbert and Youth Minister,
Bro. Daniel Jackson. 10 a.m.
Bible class on Sunday, fol-
lowed by 11:15 a.m. worship.
Evening worship at 6 p.m. on
Sunday. For more informa-
tion, call 682-6230.
Church of Christ Airport
Road: Sunday Bible study at


9 a.m., worship services at
10 a.m., Sunday worship at
6 p.m., pastored by the Rev.
Mark Dillman
Crestview Church of


God, Pastor Larry Collins.
Sunday school 10 11 a.m.;
morning worship 11 a.m. 12
p.m.; and 6-9 p.m. evening
service on Sundays. Call 682-
3045 for more information.
Church of New Cov-
enant, Pastors Charles, Sr.,
and Maxine Whisnand invite
you to attend their services,
located at 3191 North New-
man Ave. in Crestview.
Sunday services include
Adult Bible Study and chil-
dren's church at 10 a.m., fol-
lowed by Praise Hour at 11
a.m. Call 682-8433 for more
information.
Church of the Resur-
rection: 66 8th St., Shalimar
Fla. The Rev Canon Michael
G. Carr. Sunday services at
10 a.m., morning prayer on
first, third, and fifth; and holy
communion on second and
fourth Sundays.

EPISCOPAL
Church of the Epiphany:
Located at 424 Garden St.,
Crestview behind the Teach-
ers Credit Union.
Children's church 10 a.m.
Holy Eucharist 7:30 and 10
a.m. Nursery is available. A
potluck brunch is held on the
first Sunday of the month fol-
lowing the service.
Vicar is the Rev. De Free-
man. Office hours are Mon-
day Friday, 9 a.m. 4 p.m.
Call 689-1410 for more infor-
mation. All are welcome.

INDEPENDENT
Northwest Florida
Church of God: Meets at
158 Woodlawn Ave. in Crest-
view on Saturdays at 11 a.m.
Pastor Carl Dillenback. The
church has a radio presenta-
tion called "Born to Win" at
12:30 p.m. everyday at WTJT,
90.1 FM.

LATTER DAY SAINTS
The Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter Day Saints
is located at 3 Del Cerro
Camino in Crestview. Sun-
day worship services are at 9
and 11 a.m., Phone: 682-6624
or 682-4766.

LUTHERAN
Our Savior Evangelical
Lutheran Church LCMS:
178 W North Ave. in Crest-
view. Rev. Vance G. Tech.
Sunday services include
Sunday School for all ages
at 9 a.m., and a historic wor-
ship service with Holy Com-
munion every Sunday at 10
a.m. and Saturday at 5 p.m.
Call 682-3154 for more infor-
mation.
First Lutheran Church
of Florala: at 24512 5th Ave.
(U.S. Highway 331) in Flo-
rala, pastored by Rev Jack
Betz. 9:30 a.m. worship, fel-
lowship 10:30 a.m., and Sun-
day School 11 a.m.
Phone 334-858-3515. On
U.S. 331 near the Florida line
in Florala, Ala. Call 334-858-
3515 for more specific direc-
tions.

METHODIST
Baker First United
Methodist Church: located
at 5826 N. Highway 189, just
north of the traffic light in
Baker. The Rev Johnathan
J. "J.J." McDaniel, contem-
porary service 9 a.m.; Sun-
day School 10 a.m.; tradition-
al service 11 a.m. Combined
service last Sunday of every
month 10:30 a.m.
Christian Home United
Methodist Church: Approx-
imately 5 miles N.E. of Lau-
rel Hill on Alabama County
Road 6, Parrish Road, Ala.
Phone: 652-4766. Sunday
services: Second and fourth
Sunday at 8:45 a.m. Sunday
School at 9 a.m. Rev. Edward
Britton.
First United Methodist:
599 Eighth Ave., Crestview,
Rev Bruce Sheffield is Se-
nior Pastor, Associate Pastor
Brandon Dasinger and Dr.
R. Lee Thigpen, Lay Leader
(FUMC).
Traditional services at
8 a.m. in the Christ Chapel,
and at 11 a.m. in the Main
Sanctuary. Contemporary
service in the Sanctuary at
9:12 a.m. Sunday school at 8,
9:30 and 11 a.m.
For information, call 682-
2018, during normal busi-


ness hours.
First United Method-
ist Church of Florala: 1319
Fifth St., Florala, Ala. Phone:
(334) 222-3286. Sunday Ser-


vices 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. Rev.
Sam Persons Parkes.
Hopewell United Meth-
odist Church: 987 Gomillion
Road, Ala., five miles west of
Laurel Hill on New Ebene-
zer Road. 652-4474. Sunday
services, First and third
Sunday at 9 a.m., with Sun-
day School at 10 a.m. Rev.
Edward Britton.
Mount Zion African
Methodist Episcopal
(AME) Church, 502 McDon-
ald St., in Crestview. Rev.
Matthew Ewing. Sunday
services: church school 9:30
a.m., praise service 10:45
a.m., and worship service
11 a.m. For information, call
682-7799.
New Bethel United
Methodist Church, 5984
Highway 85N, Crestview and
Reverend Ed Cotten invite
you to worship with them.
Sunday services, 11 a.m. and
6 p.m. Bible study Wednes-
day, 7 p.m. 682-9671.
St. Mark United Meth-
odist Church, 2250 PJ. Ad-
ams Pkwy. in Crestview,
offers the following Sunday
services: 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School and traditional wor-
ship, 11 a.m. contemporary
worship, kids worship and
Sunday School. A nursery
is available for all services.
Clergyman is the Rev. Lisa
Ausley, the Rev. Brice Early
and the Rev. Greg McKin-
non. Call 682-5280 for more
information.

NAZARENE
Crestview Church of the
Nazarene: 395 Aplin Road,
Crestview. Rev. Gary Monk.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.,
morning worship 10:45 a.m.,
and evening service at 6 p.m.
682-7995.

NONDENOMINATIONAL
Fellowship Church of
Praise KTC: Pastor Darlene
Haynes. Sunday services be-
gin at 11 a.m. at Country Inn
& Suites, Rasberry Road,
Crestview.
Sonlight Covenant




Jackson Reunion

Baker Recreational Center


Saturday, June 26th

11 a.m, to 2 p.m.


Crestview: 850.683.8822


Church: Manifesting the
Spirit of Sonship. Pastor and
Founder Alvin E. Smith in-
vites all interested to attend
Sunday services at 11 a.m.
Sunday school starts at 9:45
a.m.
The church is located
at 798 S. Main St., Suite A,
Crestview. Call 689-3129 for
more information.
Good Hope Congrega-
tional Church: Come and
join the congregation for
old-fashion, Southern gospel
music and service. Sunday
school starts at 9:45 a.m.
followed by service at 10:45
a.m.
The church is located
seven miles west of Baker.
Call Pastor Joel Carden at
537-4307 for more informa-
tion.
Mount Olive Commu-
nity Church: Pastor D.L. Ly-
ons invites all interested to
Sunday Services at 10 a.m.,
Tuesday Ladies' meeting at
7 p.m. with Marie C. Lyons.
The church is located at 5661
Mt. Olive Road in Crestview.
Directions approximately
7 miles east on Highway 90,
turn left on Mt. Olive Road, 2
miles. Call 682-6218 for more
information.
Joy Fellowship: 5978 Old
Bethel Road, Crestview, 682-
6219. www.joyfellowship.net.
Pastor Dale and Brenda Wal-
ters. Sunday Services: 9:30
a.m. Sunday School, 10:30
a.m. worship service.

PENTECOSTAL
Auburn Pentecostal
Church: Independent Pen-
tecostal church at 6144 High-
way 85 North, Crestview.
Pastor: Rev. Ron Williamson.
Sunday Services: Sunday
School 9:30 a.m., morn-
ing worship and children's
church 10:30 a.m., evening
and youth services at 6 p.m.
Nursery available for all ser-
vices. Phone: 6826357; fax
689-4402.
Calvary United: 1010
Bay St., Crestview. Sunday -
10 a.m. worship service with


Sunday School. The Rev
Charles BraneffJr., 682-6191.
Church phone: 423-1198.
First Pentecostal
Church of Jesus Christ:
Sunday services for First
Pentecostal are at 10 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Pastor Wilbur
Hawkins. Located at 997
East Chestnut Ave. in Crest-
view. Call 682-3497 for more
information.

PRESBYTERIAN
First Presbyterian
Church: 492 N. Ferdon Blvd.,
Crestview, pastored by Rev.
Mark Broadhead. Sunday
School, 10 a.m.; worship 11
a.m. For more information,
call 682-2835.
Laurel Hill Presbyte-
rian Church: 8115 4th St.
652-2164. Rev Mark Broad-
head, Minister. Sunday wor-
ship service, 9 a.m., Sunday
School, 10 a.m.
1st Presbyterian
Church-PCA, 23500 5th
Ave., Florala, Ala. Services
Sunday at 11 a.m. Rev. Da-
vid McMillan, 334-858-3865.

UNITARIAN
Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship of the Emerald
Coast (UUFEC): located at
1295 Bayshore Drive, Val-
paraiso. Minister: Rev. Rod-
ney Debs. Service is held
at 10:30 a.m. each Sunday.
For further updates, check
www.uufec.com, the Verbal
Chalice, Wick, or please call
the Fellowship at 678-7197, or
243-5247.
Unity Way of Life Unity
Center: Pastor Rev. George
A. Schmidt, Ph.D., the Way of
Life Unity Center is located
at 1797 Hurlburt Road in
Fort Walton Beach.
Sunday services: 9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m. Celebration
Services. Youth Education
programs along with child-
care are only provided at the
11 a.m. service. All are wel-
come.
For information, call the
office at 864-1232 (hours by
appointment).


Ft. Walton Beach Office: 850.362.1220


MEMBER
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Offer valid as of January 21, 2010. Rates subject to change without notice. Penalties for early withdrawals apply to all
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PREMIER COMMUNITY
Bank of the Emerald Coast






1 8 I Crestview News Bulletin


DIGGING INTO THE PAST


borne s f a r-,C ernil n-a n-in-als5--1r-, ile r aOn ifi -i s
cire [pler-ilidu -l Red Rock P..r.:r iiePrk in
Sc,oihierr n i::ri s hii eseri


A museum's desert tour

offers families a chance

to participate in science,

unearth real fossils


William Diepenbrock
Freedom News Service

Just like that, Spencer
Tanguay becomes the cen-
ter of attention. Following
a trail of broken fossils,
the 16-year-old unearths
a thrilling find: two lower
teeth of an ancient horse,
embedded just under the
surface of a rocky canyon
hillside.
Murmurs of congratula-
tions flow from his compan-
ions, fellow fossil-hunters
exploring California's Red
Rock Canyon State Park
in search of evidence of life
long past.
For two days, this is the
pattern: More than 40 fossil-
hunters, some just 10 years
old, fan out through the
state park's distinctive red-
hued hills, scan the rocky
soil for clues and erupt into


sudden shouts that bring
professional paleontologists
to confirm a find.
Tanguay's discovery
is important teeth are
among the best sources of
information about long-ex-
tinct critters and one of
17 significant finds made
during this year's Natural
History Museum of Los
Angeles County fall fossil
hunt.
This is our first fossil-
prospecting trip, a long-
awaited adventure for my
son, Julian, a 10-year-old
fanatic about ancient life.
Red Rock is an ice age
fossil-hunter's paradise,
a stunning area of high
desert where ancient up-
heavals have tilted up vast
cross-sections of lava, ash
and sediment dating back
8 million to 12.5 million
years. But even without the


IW, ,( 7-N r:.,,M& I I
Photos by WILLIAM DIEPENBROCK I Freedom News Service
Above left, Red Rock Canyon State Park offers plenty of desert topography to climb while searching for
bones, teeth and whatnot. Above right, paleontologist David Whistler, who has prospected for fossils in
Red Rock Canyon State Park for 50 years, tells visitors how Joshua trees propagate during a nature hike.


fossils, the camping trip is
worth the desert drive past
clusters of small towns and
clumps of Joshua trees.
Friday evening is a so-
cial revelation: a whole
community of people just
as passionate as my son
about fossils and long-dead
animals. A college student
sets up a slide show on her
laptop, and my son and oth-
er kids race to call out the
scientific names.


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Saturday's revelation is
altogether different.
Red Rock Canyon's sud-
den, stark beauty hits us
when we emerge from our
tent into the early morning
light. The sun peeks over
the rim of the canyon, bath-
ing hillsides in shades of
red, amber and brown.
The museum, which has
hosted the trip since 1998,
swiftly prepares us for the
day. We're told to seek out
the tell-tale smooth shapes
and right angles that her-
ald fossil fragments amid
the jumbles of rocks and
pebbles. We're told to fol-
low the fragments upslope
for the best shot at finding
something significant.
Even in the day's heat,
the majesty of the sur-
rounding hillsides com-
mands our appreciation.
One section looks like a
medieval fortress; others
are carved by wind and
rain into even more fan-
tastical shapes. Patches of
Joshua trees dot the land-
scape, which is also home
to clumps of creosote bush,
buckwheat and Mormon
tea shrubs.
Our first few finds are
exciting, but not of great
scientific merit. Bone frag-
ments and root castings.
Still, I don't see Julian's fer-
vor lagging. And we're as-
sured few prospectors leave
without making a discovery.
Our turn for glory ar-
rives in early afternoon,
when Julian and a girl,
10, dig up a camel shoul-
der bone. This time, they
become the center of at-
tention as the expedition's
leader, paleontologist
David Whistler, bags the
find, identifies it with their
names and marks it with
the site's GPS coordinates.


Spencer Tanguay, 16, found two teeth from an
ancient horse and one from a pronghorn antelope.


That joy carries us into
the evening, when we re-
luctantly retreat to camp.
But it's not long before Ju-
lian is off again, first for a
round of rock climbing, and
then a nature hike, a nature
talk, stargazing, dinner and
s'mores.
Red Rock at night is as
fascinating as by day the
colors disappear, replaced
by the sounds of the wild
desert and a vast ocean of
sky speckled with stars.
Tonight's moon is so bright
we don't need flashlights
to navigate. Telescopes
handily discern lunar seas
and two of Jupiter's larger
moons.
Sunday's prospecting
brings new finds, but not


for Julian. And the Satur-
day discovery has raised
his expectations and whet-
ted his appetite for more -
he's no longer content with
bagging fossil fragments.
He wants something big,
such as the skull of an an-
cient elephant.
The final dig ends too
soon for him he could
have stayed out several
more hours. Apparently,
others feel the same way
- as we drag our heels de-
parting, we run into them at
the nearby visitor's center,
picking over fossil samples
and reviewing the area's
history.
Like us, they are unwill-
ing to give up the desert
just yet.


NE ~*I


Saturday, June 26, 2010


Local






Saturday, June 26, 2010


Local


Crestview News Bulletin I 19


Weather under a watchful eye


Recording

temperature,

rainfall for

National

Weather Service

Roy Waggoner
Freedom News Service
She regularly goes out
to look for fires caused by
dry conditions and even
has spotted a tornado from
her property.
For Camilla Blain,
weather is a serious part
of her daily life. It's why
she signed up to be a daily
cooperative observer with
the National Weather Ser-
vice office.
The program allows
regular people to par-
ticipate in the study of the
weather by recording daily
temperature and precipita-
tion records, all in an effort
to cover more ground than
official weather service sta-
tions alone can provide.
"Weather is an exagger-
ated part of life out here,
whether you are putting up
fencing or going hunting,"
Blain said. "Many times the
activities for the day are
determined by the weather,
which can vary a lot even in
just a small area."
Her business is depen-
dent upon the weather, and
she started taking unoffi-
cial records in 1995 before
weather service workers
approached her to start
taking official records in
1996 at her K-Bar Ranch
Hunting Lodge, southwest
of Odessa, Texas.
"It was a perfect fit,
no question about it," she
said.
As part of an agreement
to submit temperature and
rainfall records at least
once a month, the National
Weather Service placed
equipment on her property
to record those vital pieces
of information.
"The rain gauge is so
detailed, it can record a
dew, while the thermom-
eter can store high and low
temperatures for days,"
Blain said.
However, some pieces
of information are miss-
ing, such as air pressure
or wind speed and direc-
tion. Drops in pressure
can offer clues to the gen-
eral direction a storm
system is headed, and the
pressure trend can at least
point to the possible future
weather.
What Blain really would
like is to be able to measure
wind speed and direction
- a big part of the weather
on her ranch.
"It's a factor that can
make all the difference in
the world on things like
moisture content," she
said.
Most cooperative ob-
servers record their obser-
vations in the evening, but
Blain stays up until mid-


1'~
N -
-~ *N A~~f ~

r1ILJ7 I -~


a
4.--


Photos by CINDEKA NEALY I Freedom News Service
Camilla Blain checks a rain gauge, one of the tools she uses to collect temperature and moisture data for the National Weather Service.


night to make sure every
drop of rain that could pos-
sibly come gets recorded.
"I am the very opposite
of a night person, but that's
how important it is to me,"
she said.
In fact, if she has to be
away from home for any
reason, then she asks an-
other person to come by
and measure any rainfall.
She said the hardest
thing to measure is snow-
fall. Because actual accu-
mulation in one spot de-
pends heavily on wind and
other factors, she has to
measure several times us-
ing a board and measuring
stick. She has to take the
tubes out of the rain gauge
if it snows and measure
the moisture content, as
well as how many inches of
snow fell.
"Luckily, we don't get
too much snow out here,"
she said.
Blain said the weather
in the Permian Basin of
West Texas gets volatile at
times.
"We are on the edge
of a desert, and we rarely
get moisture that doesn't
come with damage from
wind, hail or lightning,"
she said.
For Blain, many of the
interesting aspects of her
job taking daily measure-
ments come from following
trends.
"For instance, while I
would say we are still in a
drought overall, I could go
back and see the August
rainfall one year exceeded
the total rainfall for three
entire years," she said.
"Sometimes the airport
has less than half of what
we get out here, as well."
Some of her most mem-
orable moments involve
the weather, including


the time she saw a funnel
touch down just looking out
her window.
"I just happened to look
outside and saw it touch
down. Since that time,
we've been hit three times
with three strong winds,"
Blain said.
National Weather Ser-
vice Observing Program
Leader Susan Griffin said
the ideal goal is to have one
observer for roughly every
25 miles.
Stations are classified
differently based on what
they record and their
main purpose, with many
used only for recording
precipitation. Blain's is
one of the few private sta-
tions tasked with a daily
record of temperature, as
well.
She said most observers
are adults, and the work
can become a family tradi-
tion due to the need to have
long-standing observa-
tions.
Griffin said the program
is necessary to establish a
true history of weather and
climate around the country,
a scope of study requiring
much more than just the
main weather service of-
fices.
"It's my primary job to
maintain this network to-
day. It's important," she
said.
As for her part, Blain
said she thinks she's be-
coming a small part of
history by her work, even
though observations don't
take more than five to 10
minutes to complete. It's
work that requires a real
love for nature.
"You have to have a real
appreciation for the weath-
er. I think that's why you
become an observer in the
first place," Blain said.


HOW TO BECOME A NOAA DAILY WEATHER OBSERVER
The Cooperative Observer Program (COOP) is the nation's weather and
climate observing network. As a volunteer weather observer, you would maintain
a weather station on your property and provide daily meteorological data, such
as temperature, precipitation and snowfall.
Observers also provide data in near real-time to support forecast, warning
and other public service programs of the National Weather Service. This
data helps define America's climate and is used in agricultural planning and
assessment, engineering, environmental-impact assessments, utilities planning
and litigation.
COOP information: weather.gov/os/coop.


Camilla Blain documents temperature and moisture information data on a
National Weather Service form. Blain has collected data for the weather service
since 1997.



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20 I Crestview News Bulletin


Food


Saturday, June 26, 2010


/


Rubs and marinades kick up the fl


Cathy Thomas
Freedom News Service
Go ahead and rub it in.
Massage that dry rub all
over the exterior of the
bird, beef or boar. Fish and
tofu are good candidates,
too. Sprinkle it on, and use
your fingertips to spread
the mixture of herbs, spices
and salt. Don't be shy.


Now, slam that well-sea-
soned beauty on a heated,
well-oiled grill, and wait a
few minutes.
Smell the smoke. It's a
seductive scent, the aro-
ma of juice melding with
vibrant flavorings as they
drip on the fire, the ex-
posed surface gently cara-
melizing as it cooks.
I asked four experts to


SCrATCH COOKING",
MIotKED MBQ ASK Aoor oUR CAreMtlG
iERVtNG BREAKFASr, MWOH D' MER
Monday Thursday 5:30 a.m. 8:00 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 5:30 a.m. 8:30 p.m.
Sunday 6:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.





6407 Hwy. 189 North, Baker
Just 3 miles north of the Baker stop light.

(850) 537-2566


give tips for using rubs and
inarinades to render delec-
table grilled entrees. Here
is what they had to say:

Pork
Steven Raichlen, grilling
guru and cookbook author,
says pork is particularly de-
licious with spice rubs and
any marinade with a fruity
component.
"It's a fatty meat, and
that equals delicious when

DIG IN: At left, Mojo-
Marinated Pork
Tenderloin,
presented
S on a bed of
S baby greens,
is accompanied
S* / by a rice-black
bean medley and
I sliced oranges.
TANGY: At top,
grilled sweet onion
slices topped with
2 Mojo Marinade
_ are served with
orange slices and
star fruit.

Photos by NICK KOON I
Freedom News Service


ovors in r


t combines with sm ke,"
e says, adding that hisba-
sic barbecue rub is g 'eat
with pork because it has
an element of sweetness.
He says it is especially
good used on fattier cuts,
such as pork ribs and pork
shoulder.
He says the general
rule of thumb is to use a
marinade with leaner cuts
(such as loin or tenderloin)
and a dry rub with fattier
cuts. But rules are meant
to be broken, and he quick-
ly rattled off several excep-
tions.

Beef and chicken
Judith Fertig, who along
with Karen Adler has writ-
ten three grilling cook-
books, says to team beef
with something with an
umami flavor. Even if you
don't recognize the word,
you've probably tasted
umami. It's in soy sauce;
aged cheeses; anchovies;
tomatoes; and, most of all,
mushrooms. Often labeled
the fifth taste (a sensation
distinct from sweet, salty,
bitter and sour), umami
imparts a savory meaty
flavor.


illed meat, poultry, fish


o turn a rub into a
paste, she says to add
some moist ingredients,
such as minced garlic and
a little olive oil. Add some
dried red pepper flakes and
brush it on the beef. Cover
and refrigerate for as little
as one hour, or let it chill
overnight.
As for chicken, she
says, it is naturally kind
of sweet yet bland, so it
needs something with a lit-
tle razzle-dazzle added to
it. In her latest book, "BBQ
Bash" (Harvard Common
Press, $16.95), she gives
a simple recipe for a Chic
Chicken Rub made with
1 tablespoon granulated
garlic, 1 tablespoon lemon
pepper and 1/2 cup kosher
salt.

Fish
Marisa Neal, co-owner
of Santa Monica Seafood,
says rubs and marinades
can play an important role
in fish grilling, especially
when cooking fish filets and
steaks.
As for marinades, she
says a full-flavored fish,
such as tuna or swordfish,
doesn't necessarily need
a marinade, while milder
fish, such as tilapia, can
benefit greatly.
She cautions cooks to
limit marinating time to no
more than 20-30 minutes
to avoid creating an un-
pleasant texture. If using
teriyaki or other soy-based
marinades that are lower
in acid, fish can soak a little
longer.

MOJO-MARINATED
PORK TENDERLOIN
Yield: 4 servings
1/2 cup olive oil
8 large cloves garlic,
peeled, thinly sliced cross-
wise
1 teaspoon ground cum-
in or more to taste
1/2 cup freshly squeezed
lime juice
1/2 cup orange juice
1 1/2 teaspoons coarse
salt, or more to taste
1/2 teaspoon black pep-
per
1/2 teaspoon ground
oregano
1/3 cup water
1/4 cup chopped fresh
cilantro or mint
2 to 3 pork tenderloins (1
1/2 pounds total)
2 large, sweet onions cut
into 1/2-inch thick slices
For serving: 1 navel or-
ange, peeled, sectioned
with membranes removed
or peeled and sliced


Procedure: Prepare
mojo: Heat oil in deep
saucepan over medium
heat. Add garlic and cumin;
cook until garlic is fragrant
and pale golden color, one
to two minutes. Do NOT let
garlic brown too much or
it will be bitter. Cautiously
add lime and orange juice
(it may sputter, so stand
back). Cautiously add salt,
pepper, oregano and water.
Stir and bring sauce to boil.
Taste for seasoning, adding
salt and/or cumin if needed.
Cool to room temperature.
Add cilantro.
Trim tenderloins of sil-
ver skin (sinew on exte-
rior), if present. Place in
single layer in non-reac-
tive 9-by-13-inch baking
pan. Pour half of the mojo
over pork and marinate,
covered, in refrigerator at
least three hours, prefer-
ably overnight, turning oc-
casionally to ensure even
marinating. Refrigerate
remaining mojo to serve
as a sauce.
Preheat grill (if using
gas, preheat to high). Re-
move pork from marinade
and discard marinade
(keeping reserved mari-
nade for sauce). Brush
and oil grill grate. Arrange
tenderloins on grill. Brush
onion with some of the re-
served mojo; skewer them
crosswise on bamboo skew-
ers or toothpicks. Place on
grill. Grill pork and onions
until cooked to taste. The
meat will take three to four
minutes on each of its four
sides, 12 to 16 minutes in
all for medium. To test of
doneness, insert an in-
stant-read thermometer in
the thickest part of meat.
The internal temperature
should be about 155 to 160
degrees. Onions should be
nicely charred after about
four to six minutes per
side.
Transfer meat to cut-
ting board, and let it rest
for three minutes. Slice
tenderloins crosswise on
the diagonal. Fan out slices
on plates or platter and
top with onions (removed
from skewers). Spoon the
reserved mojo, and garnish
with orange segments or
slices. Serve.
Nutritional information
(per serving): Calories 275
(65 percent from fat), pro-
tein 19.9 g, carbohydrates
1.9 g, fat 20.9 g (saturated
7.8 g), cholesterol 79 mg,
sodium 788 mg, fiber 0.2
g.
Source: Adapted from
"How to Grill" by Steven
Raichlen.


NE *I


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Saturday, June 26, 2010


Home


Crestview News Bulletin I 21


Save money, energy during the summer


Special to the News Bulletin
July is approaching,
and recent temperatures
are getting as hot as a
firecracker.
As temperatures rise
throughout the area, Gulf
Power has some tips on
how you can save on
your electric bill:

SET YOUR
THERMOSTAT
AND LEAVE IT
During the summer,
your air conditioner
is the biggest user of
electricity. For many
homes, it accounts for
more than half of the
summer electric bill.
Set your thermostat
at 78 degrees or higher,
and leave it there. For
every degree below that
setting, you'll use 3 to 5
percent more electricity.
Set the thermostat
even higher when at
work or away from
home for long periods
of time, but no more
than five degrees
higher.
Change or clean
your air conditioner
filter regularly. Dirty
filters restrict airflow and
reduce efficiency.
Use your ceiling fan
for more comfort. Only
turn it on when you're in
the room. Ceiling fans
only cool people, not
rooms.
Clear outside AC
units of plants or brush
so they can run more
efficiently.

INSULATE
Increase attic
insulation, which can
save up to 30 percent
on cooling and heating
costs.
Insulation is
measured in R-value,
which is a measure
of resistance to heat
flow. So the higher the
R-value, the better the
insulation value.
Experts recommend
you use an R-value of
R-38 in ceiling areas.
Check your
windows and doors for
air leaks. Install weather
stripping or caulking if
needed.

KITCHEN
Whenever possible,
cook a lot of meals at
the same time. This uses
less energy than when
you cook each meal
separately.
If you're baking,
then avoid opening the
oven door. This lets out


20 percent of the heat.
Use a cooking timer
instead.
Use pots and pans
that match the size of
the burners on your
stove. This allows more
heat to the pan, and
less heat will be lost to
surrounding air.
Try to use the range
instead of the oven.
Better yet, turn on the
microwave or use a
pressure cooker. Both
use less power than a
standard electric range.

REFRIGERATOR
Choose the right
size refrigerator for your
needs. Larger models
use more energy. Open
and close the refrigerator
door quickly. Know what
you want before opening
the door.
Make sure your
refrigerator door seals
are airtight. Check it by
closing a piece of paper
in the door, half in and
half out. If you can pull
the paper out easily, then
you might need to make
some adjustments or
replace the seal.
Keep your food
covered. Moisture
buildup in the
refrigerator makes the
air inside harder to cool.

DISHWASHER
Run the dishwasher,
dryer and stove after the
sun goes down to avoid
adding heat to your
house.
When using the
dishwasher, turn off the
drying cycle if you don't
need dishes right away.
Wait until the
dishwasher is full before
running it. Partial loads
can use just as much
water and power as a
full load.
Scrape dishes
before loading them into
the dishwasher so you
don't have to rinse them.
If they need rinsing, then
use cold water.

LIGHTING
One of the best
ways to save energy
is to turn off lights that
aren't in use.
Use fluorescent
lighting or CFLs when
possible. They last
about 10 times longer
than incandescent
lamps, and they can
produce four times more
light than standard
incandescent lamps for
the same amount of
energy.
Use one large bulb
instead of several small


You can do a few simple things to help keep your power

meter from ringing up big dollars at the end of the month


Photos by MATHEW PELLEGRINO I l.... I I ... .. N r ,
Keep your thermostat at 78 degrees in the
summer and turn the power off to equipment
when it is not in use.


ones in areas where
bright light is needed.
Use smaller lamps
in work areas, such
as sewing areas and
computer desks, so you
don't light the entire
room.
Lighter-colored
walls, drapes, blinds
and upholstery reflect
light. Dark colors absorb
heat and require more
artificial light.

Check with your area
utility provider for more
ways you can help to
reduce your power
usage this summer.


NE ~*I






22 I Crestview News Bulletin


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June 19,2010

Alligator Trot RESULTS

Special to the News Bulletin

Men's standings, running
Overall: Matthew Dobson 16:44.
Master 40+: Scott Winnier 17:14.
Grandmaster 50+: Brian McMahon 19:10.
Senior Grandmaster 60+: Ferrell McDougald
24:30.
9 and younger: Kole Devenney 30:13.
10-12: Austin Franklin 28:22; Ellis McDaniel 28:42;
Luke Hope 29:02.
13-15: Dylan Scott 21:17; Joshua Hope 23:04; Da-
vid Hope 26:51.
16-19: John Scott 20:54; Tyler Mitchell 21:35; Na-
than Hope 23:33.
20-24: Reid Tucker 21:20.
25-29: Phillip Bayer 17:03; Bryan LaLeman 21:12;
Jonathan Welch 27:50.
30-34: Jake Smith 22:58; Benjamin Clark 24:45;
Rick Thompson 26:11.
35-39: Bob Walker 21:17; Kevin Heartsill 22:57;
Kevin Kraczkowski 23:49.
40-44: Krist DeVenney 30:14.
45-49: Dave Hope 18:27; Theron Carter 18:54; Jef-
frey Vinzant 22:38.
50-54: Greg Bilby 20:20; David Waters 22:17; Ken
Williams 23:54.
55-59: Gary Lambert 20:50; John Covington 21:38;
Marc Williams 23:19.
60-64: Anthony Smith 28:29; Richard Murray 31:54;
Charles Lennard 41:54.
65-69: Winston Howell 26:13.
70+: John D. Jackson 34:33; Leon Agullana 43:32.

Men's standings, walking
Overall Male: Ken Wolfe 35:16.
40-49: David Bagley 48:38.
50-59: Danny Hall 39:07; Ed Leven 48:39.
60-69: Loney Whitley 40:42.
70+: Dave DeRuiter 38:43; James McDaniel
52:11.

Women's standings, running
Overall Female: Connie Robertson 20:25.
Master 40+: Cheryl Wolfe 22:45.
Grandmaster 50+: Lisa Locklier 30:44.
9 and younger: Bailey Arnold 39:04; Teya Hope
42:10; Lily McDaniel 56:28.
10-12: Maya Hope 32:50; Callie Wise 54:30.
13-15: Maxine Simpson 21:43; Katrina Bokenfohr
23:49.59; Kristina Bokenfohr 23:49.82.
16-19: Emily Evans 25:55; Chelsey Wanner
27:28.97; Nora Trotman 29:17.
20-24: Leslie Crane 32:37; Crystal Frost 44:46; Ra-
chel Massey 47:13.
25-29: Joy Brewer 23:24; Jennifer Zabik 26:01;
Candice Cox 29:14.
30-34: Amy Peavy 24:09; Christina Barrington
26:43; Jennifer Saunders 27:28.43.
35-39: Heidi Simpson 22:25; Ronda Carter 26:12;
Tammi Croteau 31:10.
40-44: Kimberly Webb 23:55; Valerie Hein 25:58;
Susan Harrison 29:16.
45-49: Carolyn Levesque 26:05; Kim Nusbaum
28:28; Brenda Walker 38:27.
50-54: Nancy Cantreu 33:15; Carol Space 34:10;
Monica Markham 38:19.
55-59: Rhonda Glassburn 34:56; Nicki McMahon
35:25; Peggy Vardaro 35:54.

Women's standings, walking
Overall Female: Carol Crawford 37:32.
14 and younger: Anastasia Scott 54:06; Angela
Carver 54:30.
20-29: Ashlyn Tinklepaugh 37:59; Jennifer Perkins
54:13.
30-39: Christy Knight 38:35; Valerie Hatfield 44:07;
Misty Johnson 44:11.
40-49: Kim Kelley 38:47; Corrine Spence 38:51;
Mellody Hughes 39:39.
50-59: Aimee Shaffer 38:41; Patsy Davis 40:32; Bet-
te Russell 45:31.
60-69: Kathleen Morris 40:08; Bobbie Barnes
48:32; Carolyn Dixon 50:06.
70+: Melba Crews 42:33; Virginia Pridgen 49:18.


TWIN HILLS from page 26


Powell said. "You couldn't
just dig a small hole, be-
cause it would cave in on
you. You had to dig a big
hole to fix the little leak.
"And then you could
never fill back to the way it
was in a situation like that
unless you put a lot of ex-
pensive work into it. And
a lot of times, those things
would happen, and you've
got a game the next day or
a couple of hours later. You
get in there and do what you
can to get it fixed and cover
it up and make it safe to play
on."
Powell also estimates
that the field contained four
or five different types of
grass, with each growing at
a different speed.
"It had gotten from just
a maintenance standpoint
that we had to stay on that
stuff all the time as far as
trying to keep it playable,"
he said. "Especially for soc-
cer, you have to have a good
surface and a consistency."
All of those problems are
being addressed with the
field's facelift.
The renovated field will
have what are known as
sports field specifications
that will allow for quick


drain-off after a rainstorm.
There will be a drainage
system running the length
of the field for rain runoff
on the south side. Runoff
on the north side will go
into the lake or grass and
sand areas just beyond the
field.
A new irrigation system
will be in place, and the new
turf will be Tifton Bermuda
grass.
"Tifton Bermuda is the
most widely advised grass
to use for both this area and
that application," Powell
said. "You can keep it cut
usually about an inch or an
inch-and-a-half high, and it
makes a great surface for
soccer and football."
There also will be new
fencing around the field and
new football goal posts that
adapt to handle soccer nets.
The work, including the
laying of the sod, is set for
completion by July 1 to al-
low the city to water the
field and the grass to take
hold before teams start us-
ing it in August.
"I'm really excited about
it," Powell said. "We've
needed it for several years,
and we are finally getting it
done."


NE *I


Saturday, June 26, 2010


Sports




Crestview News Bulletin 1 23


Pr" COVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA
ememWa coAx m i


YOUR FLORIDA FREEDOM CLASSIFIED CONNECTION


Rea-Esate- Nw&-r-OndAutomtive- Casfes-JobSearh carter wthMoste'


WE'RE AVAILABLE 24 / 7
for all of your buying and selling needs.


TO PLACE AN AD


TO DAy


Call Us:
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800.345.8688
OR


Visit Us Online:
emeraldcoastmarketplace.com


BUY ALMOST

ANYTHING
ON THE EMERALD COAST


4*




drive



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ment
V"
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car & trucks
houses
rentals
garage sales
pets
furniture
appliances
jewelry
instruments
property
boats
electronics
motorcycles
services


-U
~ q~' J


Find & Post
job related items:
> resumes & career opportunities <
relevant to the Florida panhandle


To place an ad, call 850.864.0320 or go to
emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster


I


I -


K K K


Saturday, June 26, 2010


Classifieds


late,








24 | Cresiview News Bulletin














Do it all in the
Bulletin Board Classified.
Runs in Saturday's Crestview News
Bulletin and Wednesday's Crestview News
Bulletin and Bulletin EXTRA.


BULLETIN

BOARD

CLASSIFIED

BUY*SELL*

* TRADE RENT *

HIRE FIND *



Get your


Spam at


the grocers


BULLETIN BOARD
CLASSIFIED, No SPAM,
NO POP UPS,
NO SHIPPING FEES.


To Place Your Ad

Call

850-682-6524




p


If you need Quality In-
terior Carpentry & Trim
and Handyman Ser-
vices @ reasonable
rates with Ref. Please
call Mike Couey.
850-974-2052




Family Home Daycare
Lic F010k001. Opening
for all ages. Please call
850-683-1180




If you need a clean
house call me I can
help!. Please call
603-3701

Do Something
Good For
Tomorrow
RECYCLE

TODAY!


Blades Of
Glory
Lawn Care Service LLC
Res/Comm Lic & Ins
850-240-1855 Randy
Free Estimates
Farm Direct
Centipede, Zoysia, St.
Augustine, Bermuda
We deliver & install.
Call 244-6651
Suncoast Sod Farms




IRONING in my home,
off John King Rd. $2.00
an item 689-2284.

Kingsley's Lark
Building Sales
Wood or Steel framed
building. Carport, RV
Covers. Florida Cert.
Lower prices. Located
in Mossy Head @ 1430
co Hwy 1087 Call
850-217-8555 or
850-892-6855


75


For the first 15
words per
issue


CRESTVI EW





ws leti


$


All of said property be- County Courthousea
ing in the County of Crestew, Florida at
Okaloosa, State of Flor- 10:00 a.m. on July 13
ida. 2010
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to Dated this 1st day of
law, the property de- June 2010.
scribed in the certifi- DONW. HOWARD
cate will be sold to the CLERK OF THE CIR-
highest bidder in the CUITCOURTS
BCC Board Meeting CUBT COUSDC
Room at the Okaloosa By: Lisa Gian DC
County Courthouse, 06-05-10
Crestview, Florida at 06-12-10
10:00 a.m. on July 13, 06-19-10
2010. 06-26-10
2010. 06-26-1 0


Saturday, June 26, 2010


1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1125 Carpools &
Rideshare
1130- Adoplions
1140 Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found


1100
Legal # 101084

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000035 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
628 Assessed to:
STEPHEN M CRAW-
FORD
D es c r i pt io n:
SUNDESTIN INTER-
NATIONAL CONDO
UNIT 1705
Parcel ID#:
00-2S-22-4555-0000-
1705 Opening Bid:
$13,727.10
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10

Legal #101085

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000027 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
405 Assessed to:
GREDAN DEV INC
Description: KELLYS
3RD ADD LOT 8 BLK
11
Parcel ID#:
00-2S-22-1361-0011-
0080 Opening Bid:
$8,123.09
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-


Classifieds



1 1100 I 1100
Ida.
Unless the certificate is Dated this 1st day of
redeemed according to June, 2010.
law, the property de- DON W. HOWARD
scribed in the certifi- CLERK OF THE CIR-
cate will be sold to the CUlT COURTS
highest bidder in the By: Lisa Guia, DC
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa 06-05-10
County Courthouse, 06-12-10
Crestview, Florida at 06-19-10
10:00 a.m. on July 13, 06-26-10
2010.
Legal # 101089
Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010. NOTICE OF APPLICA-
DON W. HOWARD TION FOR TAX DEED
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS TDA Case #: 2010 TD
By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C. 000028 S

06-05-10 Notice is hereby given
06-12-10 that PPTS 1 LLC as
06-19-10 holder of the following
06-26-10 certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Legal #101086 Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
NOTICE OF APPLICA- number and year of is-
TION FOR TAX DEED suance, the name in
which the property is
TDA Case #: 2010 TD assessed and the de-
000030 S scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Notice is hereby given Certificate # 2008 of
that PPTS 1 LLC as 176 Assessed to:
holder of the following DUNES OF DESTIN
certificate, has filed LLC
said certificate for a Tax Description: DUNES
Deed to be issued OF DESTIN 5 LOT 13
thereon. The certificate BLKA
number and year of is- Parcel ID#:
suance, the name in 00-2S-22-067C-OOOA-
which the property is 0130 Opening Bid:
assessed and the de- $47,999.55
scription of the prop- All of said property be-
erty is as follows: ing in the County of
Certificate # 2008 of 57 Okaloosa, State of Flor-
Assessed to: ida.
GREDAN DEV INC Unless the certificate is
Description: DOLPHIN redeemed according to
EST UNIT 7 law, the property de-
Parcel ID#: scribed in the certifi-
00-2S-22-015A-0000- cate will be sold to the
0070 Opening Bid: highest bidder in the
$10,937.12 BCC Board Meeting
All of said property be- Room at the Okaloosa
ing in the County of County Courthouse,
Okaloosa, State of Flor- Crestview, Florida at
ida. 10:00 a.m. on July 13,
Unless the certificate is 2010.
redeemed according to
law, the property de- Dated this 1st day of
scribed in the certifl- June, 2010.
cate will be sold to the DON W. HOWARD
highest bidder in the CLERK OF THE CIR-
BCC Board Meeting CUlT COURTS
Room at the Okaloosa By: Lisa Guia, DC
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at 06-05-10
10:00 a.m. on July 13, 06-12-10
2010. 06-19-10
06-26-10
Dated this 1st day of Legal #101090
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD NOTICE OF APPLICA-
CLERK OF THE CIR- TION FOR TAX DEED
CUlT COURTS
By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C. TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000031 S
06-05-10
06-12-10 Notice is hereby given
06-19-10 that PPTS 1 LLC, as
06-26-10 holder of the following
Legal # 101087 certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
NOTICE OF APPLICA- Deed to be issued
TION FOR TAX DEED thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
TDA Case #: 2010 TD suance, the name in
000033 S which the property is
assessed and the de-
Notice is hereby given scription of the prop-
that PPTS 1 LLC, as erty is as follows:
holder of the following Certificate # 2008 of
certificate, has filed 386 Assessed to:
said certificate for a Tax GREDAN DEV INC
Deed to be issued Description: KELLY
thereon. The certificate HOMES LOT 11 BLK
number and year of is- 1A
suance, the name in Parcel ID#:
which the property is 00-2S-22-1350-001A-
assessed and the de- 0110 Opening Bid:
scription of the prop- $9,101.68
erty is as follows: All of said property be-
Certificate # 2008 of mng in the County of
201 Assessed to: Okaloosa, State of Flor-
GORDON BALL ida.
Description: MAR- Unless the certificate is
BELLA CONDO UNIT redeemed according to
7G W/PARKING # 285, law, the property de-
#286 & STORAGE scribed in the certifi-
#711 cate will be sold to the
Parcel ID#: highest bidder in the
00-2S-22-0703-0000- BCC Board Meeting
07G0 Opening Bid: Room at the Okaloosa
$29,109.32 County Courthouse,
All of said property be- Crestview, Florida at
ing in the County of 10:00 a.m. on July 13,
Okaloosa, State of Flor- 2010.
ida.
Unless the certificate is Dated this 1st day of
redeemed according to June, 2010.
law, the property de- DON W. HOWARD
scribed in the certifi- CLERK OF THE CIR-
cate will be sold to the CUlT COURTS
highest bidder in the By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C.
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa 06-05-10
County Courthouse, 06-12-10
Crestview, Florida at 06-19-10
10:00 a.m. on July 13, 06-26-10
2010.Legal # 101091

Dated this 1st day of NOTICE OF APPLICA-
June, 2010. NOTICE OF APPLICA-
DON W. HOWARD TION FOR TAX DEED
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUITCOURTS TDA Case #: 2010 TD
By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C. 000034 S
06-05-10 Notice is hereby given
Q0612-10 that PPTS 1 LLC, as
06-19-10 holder of the following
06-26-10 certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Legal# 101088 Deed to be issued

NOTICE OF APPLICA- thereon. The certificate
NOTICN FOR TAXLDEE number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
TDA Case #: 2010 TD assessed and the de-
000025 S scnption of the prop-

Notice iserty is as follows:
NotceP iSherebyL g 2ven Certificate # 2008 of
that PPTS 1 LLC as 5 Ase to
holder of the following RAYMOND & TERESA
certificate, has filed STRASBURGERR
said certificate for a Tax D n : TERLING
Deed to be issued SHORES CONDO UNIT
thereon. The certificate 217
number and year of is- Parcel ID#:
suance, the name in 00-2S-22-2861-0000-
which the property is O
assessed and the de-
$22,32474
scription of the prop- All of said property be-
erty is as follows: prope
Certificate # 2008 of Oal sa, State of untyFlor-
451 Assessed to: idao
IrkaZazulak Unless the certificate is
Description: PELICAN r e a rg t

CONDO UNIT 1707 law, the property de-
Parcel ID# scribed in the certifl-
00-2S2220330017 cate will be sold to the
1707 Opening Bid: ghest bidder M the


Legal # 101092

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000026 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
269 Assessed to:
SAM J WILLIAMSON
Description: EMERALD
TOWERS UNIT 905
Parcel ID#:
00-2S-22-1011-0000-
0905 Opening Bid:
$14,508.32
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa Guia, D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10


Legal #101093

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000029 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of 35
Assessed to:
BYRON K BALLARD,
n/k/a BRANCH BANK-
ING &TRUST CO
Description: CARIB-
BEAN DUNES PH II
UNIT 217
Parcel ID#:
00-2S-22-0071-0000-
2170 Opening Bid:
$12,728.06
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10
Legal # 101094

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000032 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of 94
Assessed to:
PATRICIA L SMITH
Description: CALHOUN
S/D DESTIN RE/SUB
OF BLK D LOT 3 BLK B
Parcel ID#:
00-2S-22-0311-000B-
0030 Opening Bid:
$4,861.74
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa Guia D.C

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10
Legal # 101095

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000045 C


| 1100
Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
3176 Assessed to:
THEODIS JACKSON &
ET AL
Description: CREST-
VIEW LOT 1 BLK 85
Parcel ID#:
17-3N-23-2490-0085-
0010 Opening Bid:
$1,143.08
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10
Legal # 101096

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000038 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
1058 Assessed to:
BEBE D HOLLINGS-
HEAD
Description: GARNI-
ERS BEACH LOT 3
BLK1
Parcel ID#:
02-2S-24-1000-0001-
0030 Opening Bid:
$7,165.13
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10
Legal # 101097

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000041 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
849 Assessed to:
BLUEWATER REAL ES-
TATE INVEST
D es c r i pt io n :
CARONDOLET T/H
LOT 18
Parcel ID#:
01-1 S-23-1000-0000-
0180 Opening Bid:
$8,974.54
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Flonrida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa L. Gula, D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10
Legal #101098

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000044 S


erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
846 Assessed to:
BLUEWATER REAL ES-
TATE INVEST
D es c r i pt io n :
CARONDOLET T/H
LOT 12
Parcel ID#:
01-1S-23-1000-0000-
0120 Opening Bid:
$9,290.00


erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
468 Assessed to:
MEXICAN SPECIALTY
FOODS INC
Description: PINE
RIDGE TRACE UNIT
148
Parcel ID#:
00-2S-22-2077-0000-
1480 Opening Bid:
$6,743.12
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10

Legal # 101099

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000036 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
813 Assessed to:
WILLIAM A & BETTY S
POTTER
Des c r i pt ion:
SEASPRAY UNIT 212
D875/969
Parcel ID#:
00-2S-24-3089-212D-
0000 Opening Bid:
$4,729.17
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa Guia D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10
Legal # 101100

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000039 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
1009 Assessed to:
SANDRA ANN DALTON
Description: SHADY
OAKS UNIT 1107
Parcel ID#:
01-2S-24-2475-0000-
1107 Opening Bid:
$2,850.95
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa L. Gula, D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10
Legal #101101

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000042 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-


0110 Opening Bid:
$9,265.13
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting


+1+ +1+ +


All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C.

06-5-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10
Legal # 101103

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000037 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has field
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
1057 Assessed to:
BEBE D HOLLINGS-
HEAD
Description: GARNI-
ERS BEACH LOT 2
BLK1
Parcel ID#:
02-2S-24-1000-0001-
0020 Opening Bid:
$5,454.58
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa Guia, D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10
Legal # 101104

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000040 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
1093 Assessed to:
TRACY ACREE CONST
INC
Description: LLOYD &
HETHERINGTON S/D
LOT 6 BLK A
Parcel ID#:
02-2S-24-1520-OOOA-
0060 Opening Bid:
$6,861.13
All of said property be-
ing in the County of
Okaloosa, State of Flor-
ida.
Unless the certificate is
redeemed according to
law, the property de-
scribed in the certifi-
cate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the
BCC Board Meeting
Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-



06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10
Legal #101105

NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION FOR TAX DEED

TDA Case #: 2010 TD
000043 S

Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-
erty is as follows:
Certificate # 2008 of
845 Assessed to:
BLUEWATER REAL ES-
TATE INVEST
D escriptio n :
CARONDOLET T/H
LOT 11
Parcel ID#:
01-1S-23-1000-0000-


Notice is hereby given
that PPTS 1 LLC, as
holder of the following
certificate, has filed
said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of is-
suance, the name in
which the property is
assessed and the de-
scription of the prop-








Saturday, June 26, 2010


Room at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
Crestview, Florida at
10:00 a.m. on July 13,
2010.

Dated this 1st day of
June, 2010.
DON W. HOWARD
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURTS
By: Lisa L. Guia, D.C.

06-05-10
06-12-10
06-19-10
06-26-10

Legal #101111

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that a public
hearing will be held be-
fore the Board of
County Commissioners
of Okaloosa County,
Florida at the request
of David A. Bailey, on
July 13, 2010, at 6:30
p.m. in the Commis-
sioners' Meeting Room,
at 101 East James Lee
Boulevard, Room 120,
Crestview, Florida, to
consider vacating a
portion of the uno-
pened R.R. Street, lo-
cated in Crestview, de-
scribed as follows:

Commencing at the
Northeast corner of
Section 8, Township 3
North, Range 23 West,
Okaloosa County, Flor-
ida, Thence proceed S
020 12' 04" W, a dis-
tance of 58.95 feet to a
point on the Southerly
right-of-way of
Richburg Lane (60'
right-of-way); thence
proceed along said
right-of-way N 880 23'
11" W, a distance of
344.82 feet to the Point
of Beginning of the par-
cel herein described;

Thence proceed S
14 56' 22" W, a dis-
tance of 214.04 feet to
a point; thence pro-
ceed N 870 47' 58" W, a
distance of 49.35 feet
to a point on the east-
erly right-of-way of In-
dustrial Boulevard (100'
right-of-way); thence
proceed along the said
easterly right-of-way N
13- 41' 34" E, a dis-
tance of 212.48 feet to
a point; thence pro-
ceed S 880 23' 11" E, a
distance of 54.22 feet
back to the Point of Be-
ginning of the parcel
herein described.

Said parcel lying
within the Northeast
Quarter of the North-
east Quarter of Section
8, Township 3 North,
Range 23 West,
Okaloosa County, Flor-
ida and between the
Easterly right-of-way of
Industrial Boulevard
and that property lying
east of Industrial Boule-
vard. Said parcel con-
tains 0.25 acres, more
or less.

If a person decides to
appeal any decision
made with respect to
any matter considered
at such meeting, such
person will need a rec-
ord of the proceeding
and, for such pur-
poses, such person
may need to insure that
a verbatim record of
the proceeding is
made, which record in-
cludes the testimony
and evidence upon
which the appeal is to
be based.

WAYNE HARRIS
Chairman

06-26-10
Legal # 101112

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
OKALOOSA
COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.10 CP 123

IN RE: ESTATE OF
MATTIE L. KENNEDY
A.K.A MATTIE LU-
CELLE KENNEDY
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS

The administration of
the estate of MATTIE L.
KENNEDY A.K.A. MAT-
TIE LUCELLE KEN-
NEDY deceased,
whose date of death
was December 4, 2009,
and whose Social Se-
curity Number is
262-28-3803 is pending
in the Circuit Court for
Okaloosa County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division,
the addresses of the
personal representative
and the personal
representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.

All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent;s estate on
whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against


decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FOR FORTH IN SEC-


TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publi-
cation of this notice is
June 19,2010.

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Paul R. Green
Florida Bar No. 127448
Johnson, Green & As-
sociates
5185 Elmira Street
Milton, Florida 32570

(850)623-3841

Personal Representa-
tive:
Charles David Kennedy
35 North Hill Drive
Carrier, Mississippi
39426

06-19-10
06-26-10

Legal # 101118

THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FIRST JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA,
Plaintiff,


CASE NO.
46-2009-CA-004838
vs.

DIVISION

THOMAS E. BAILEY, et
al,
Defendantss.


AMENDED NOTICE
OF FORECLOSURE
SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an
Amended Final Judg-
ment of Mortgage Fore-
closure dated June 15,
2010 and entered in
Case NO.
46-2009-CA-004838 of
the Circuit Court of the
FIRST Judicial Circuit
in and for OKALOOSA
County, Florida
wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, NA, is
the Plaintiff and
THOMAS E. BAILEY;
are the Defendants, I
will sell to the highest
and best bidder for
cash at
WWW.OKALOOSA.REAL-
FORECLOSE.COM
at 11:00AM, on the 28
day of July, 2010, the
following described
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:

LOT 14, NANTUCKET
COTTAGES, PLUS
SUCH ADDITIONAL
PROPERTY ALL OF
WHICH ARE MORE
ACCURATELY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: COMMENCE
AT THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF LOT 14,
NANTUCKET COT-
TAGES, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 16, PAGE(S)
81, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE
ON THE WEST
BOUNDARY AND THE
SOUTHERLY EXTEN-
SION THEREOF,
SOUTH 07 DEGREES
45 MINUTES 00 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 27.79
FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING;
THENCE NORTH 82
DEGREES 15 MIN-
UTES 00 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 4.04 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 07
DEGREES 45 MIN-
UTES 00 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 28.23 FEET
THENCE SOUTH 82
DEGREES 15 MIN-
UTES 00 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 28.98 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 07
DEGREES 45 MIN-
UTES 00 SECONDS
WEST. A DISTANCE
OF 28.23 MINUTES;
THENCE NORTH 82
DEGREES 15 MIN-
UTES 0 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 24.94 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING.

A/K/A 69 CRYSTAL
BEACH DRIVE 14,
DESTIN, FL 32541

Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any,
other than the property
owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty
(60) days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND
and the seal of this
Court on June 17,
2010.

Don W. Howard
Clerk of the Circuit
Court
By:Viki Jackson
Deputy Clerk

Publish in Crestview
News Bulletin
Invoice To: Florida De-


fault Law Group, PL.
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
F09082661
NMNC-SPECFNMA-
**See Americans with
Disabilities Act
IMPORTANT

In accordance
with the Americans with


Disabilities Act, per-
sons with disabilities
needing special ac-
commodation to partic-
ipate in this proceeding
should contact Court
Administration at 101
James Lee Boulevard
East, Crestview, FL,
32536-3515; telephone
number (850)
689-5000, Extension
7497, prior to the pro-
ceeding. or Shalimar
(850) 651-7497 or at
1250 N. Eglin Parkway,
Shalimar, FL, 32579;
telephone number
(850) 651-7497, prior to
the proceeding.

06-26-10
07-03-10

Legal #101120

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT IN AND FOR
OKALOOSA COUNTY
FIRST JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA
CASE NO,
10-CP-000502

IN RE: THE ESTATE
OF
FAYE J. HART,
Deceased

NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS

The administration of
the estate of FAYE J.
HART, deceased,
whose date of death
was March 14, 2010,
File Number
10-CP-000502 is pend-
ing in the Okaloosa
County Clerk of Circuit
Court, 101 Highway 90,
Crestview, Florida
32536. The names and
addresses of the per-
sonal representative
and the personal
representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.

All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING
THIS TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publi-
cation of this notice is
June 26,2010.

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Connie Roper, Esquire
PO. Box 249
Crestview, Florida
32536
T e e p h o n e:
850-683-3940
F a c s i m i l e :
850-689-8630
Florida Bar No:
0811971

Personal Representa-
tive:
Dennis Stewart
PO Box 2279
Crestview, Florida
32536

06-26-10
07-03-10
LEGAL#120598

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT IN AND FOR.
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE-DIVISION
CASE NO:
10CP000222C

RE IN:
THE ESTATE OF
DARRELL S. JAMES,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS

The administration of
the estate of DARRELL
S. JAMES, deceased
whose date of death
was January 9, 2010, is
pending in the Circuit
Court for Okaloosa
County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the ad-
dress of which is
Okaloosa County Clerk
of Circuit Court, 101
James Lee Blvd. Crest-
view, Florida 32536.
The name and address
of the personal repre-
sentative and the per-
sonal representative's
attorney is set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate on


whom a copy of this
notice is required to he
served must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of


the decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOVICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publi-
cation of this Notice to
Creditors is June 19,
2010.


Personal Representa-
tive:
Daniel Campbell
Attorney for Dennis
James Florida Bar;
0122033 420 East Pine
Avenue Crestview, Flor-
ida 32539

Personal Representa-
tive: Dennis James 510
Hill View Circle Crest-
view, Florida 32536

6/19/2010
6/26/2010

LEGAL#120600

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE
FIRST JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT
IN AND FOR
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL AC-
TION CASE
NO.10DR3134

IN RE: The Marriage of
DONNIE HENRY JR.,
Petitioner/Husband,

and

KRISTIN M. HENRY
Respondent/Wife.

NOTICE OF ACTION
OF DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE

To: Kristin M. Henry
9926 Ferrell Park Lane
Navarre, FL 32566

YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you
are required to serve a
copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to Don-
nie Henry, Jr., Peti-
tioner, c/o Mark S. Ru-
bin, Esq., RUBIN LAW
FIRM, 173 NE Eglin
Parkway, Fort Walton
Beach; Florida 32548,
on or before July 15,
2010, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this
court at the Okaloosa
County Court house,
1250 N. Eglin Parkway,
Shalimar, FL 32579,
before service on Peti-
tioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to
do so, a default will be
entered against you for
the relief demanded in
the petition.

Copies of all court
documents in this ease,
including orders, are
available at the Clerk of
Court's office. You may
review these docu-
ments upon request.

You must keep the
Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified of
your current address.
(You may file Notice of
Current Address, Flor-
ida Supreme Court Ap-
proved Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the
address on record at
the clerk's office.

WARNING: Rule
12.285, Florida Family
Law Rules of Proce-
dure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of
documents and infor-
mation. Failure to com-
ply can result in sanc-
tions, including dis-
missal or striking of
pleadings.

Dated: June 3, 2010

Don W. Howard
Clerk of the Court

By:Sherry Johnson
Deputy Clerk

6/12/2010
6/19/2010
6/26/2010
7/3/2010
LEGAL#120615

AUCTIONS
In accordance with
Florida Statutes, Ad-
vanced Storage, Inc lo-
cated at 5180 S.
Ferdon Blvd. Crest-
view, FL, will offer for
sale to the highest bid-
der the household and
other goods stored in
the below listed units.
Said goods are to be
sold to recover the
rents not paid by the
tenants.
Advanced Storage I

1. S. Kypfer H7

2. C. Solomon A40

3. J. Bernard K3


4. D. Hart M121

5. C. Adams C94, C109

The sale shall take
place on Saturday, July
3, 2010 at 9:00 am -
10:00 am at Advanced
Storage.

6/26/2010
6/30/2010


Classifieds



| 1100
LEGAL#120616

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE
FIRST JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT,
IN AND FOR
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE
NO:2010CP000571S

IN RE: Estate of LIL-
LIAN A. WOODALL,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS
(Ancillary)

The administration of
the Florida Estate of
LILLIAN A, WOODALL,
deceased (the
"Decedent"), File Num-
ber 2010-CP-000571S,,
is pending in the Circuit
Court of Okaloosa
County, Florida, the ad-
dress of which is
Okaloosa County Clerk
of Court Attn: Probate
Division, Okaloosa
County Courthouse,
101 East James Lee
Boulevard, Crestview,
Florida 32536. The
name and address of
the Ancillary Personal
Representative and the
Ancillary Personal
Representative's attor-
neys are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the De-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
Decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the Decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against the
Decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured,
contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file
their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of the first
publication of this No-
tice is June 26, 2010.

ATTORNEY FOR AN-
CILLARY PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
RICHARD N. SHERRILL
Florida Bar No.:
0172812 CLARK,
PARTINGTON, HART,
LARRY, BOND &
STACKHOUSE 125
West Romana Street,
Suite 800 PO. Box
13010 Pensacola, Flor-
ida 32591-3010 Tele-
phone: (850) 434-9200
Fax: (850) 433-9599

ANCILLARY PER-
SONAL REPRESENTA-
TIVE: GERALD L.
JONES 418 Bauxhall
Court Katy, Texas
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6/26/2010
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I MERCHANSlE
3100- Antiques
3110 -Appliances
3120 Arts & Crafts
3130 Auctions
3140 Baby Items
3150 Building Supplies
3160 Business
Equipment
3170 Collectibles
3180 Computers
3190 Electronics
3200 Firewood
3210 Free Pass it On
3220 Furniture
3230 Garage/Yard Sales
3240 Guns
3250 Good Things to Eat
3250 Health & Fitness
3270 Jewelry/Clothing
3280 Machinery/
Equipment
3290 Medical Equipment
3300 Miscellaneous
3310 Musical Instruments
3320 Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 Restaurant/Hotel
3340 Sporting Goods
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell)
-I I I I


Crestview News Bulletin I 25


r 322o0
Cherry Bedroom Set.
Solid Wood, never
used, brand new in fac-
tory boxes. English
Dovetail. Original cost
$4500. Sell for $895.
Can deliver. (954)
302-2423
Leather Living Room
Set. In original plastic,
never used. Ong price
$3000, Sacrifice $975.
Can deliver. Call Bill
(305)420-5982

14 11 1' f 114*
1 3230
Crestview 131 West
North Ave, Saturday
7am until 11 am
Multi Family
Sale
Collectibles, household
items, knick-knacks
and much more!




Blueberries
Triple J Farm. You
pick. $5/bucket. Pre-
picked avail. 685-1850.




Airlines are hiring,
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Call J.G. Wentworth.
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(1-866-738-8536) Rated
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ness Bureau.


4100 -Help Wanted
4130 Employment
Information




Business/Mgmt

I Single Copy
I Manager
I Florida Freedom
I Newspapers/Interactwe is
looking for a
I single copy manager
Ito maintain & growl
i single copy sales for,
the Florida Freedom
I west properties.I
I Candidates will plan
and set goals for the
SSingle Copy sales
I department with em-
Sphasis on individual
sales efforts, goals
Sand objectives, de- I
Ivelop and maintain
I strategies for singleI
copy revenue
I growth, maximizingI
I sales in all areas, fo-
I cus on increasing
frequency of reader-
Iship, building rela-
tionships and enabl-
ling continuous reve-
nue growth, coordi-
I nates and participate
I in on-going sales
training, maintain
I up-to-date knowl-
ledge of retail mar-
I keting trends, cam-
paigns, and news to
I maximize new single
I copy sales opportu-
I cities.

I Florida Freedom I
I offers a comprehen-
sive benefit packageI
including medical,
I dental, vision and lifeI
I insurance, and
401(k) plan.

I High school gradu- I
Sate with sales experi-I
ence. Newspaper
I circulation sales pre- I
I ferred. E-mail re-
i sume to mdeamer
@flafreedom.com or1
I mail to I
| Maria Deamer, Flor-
ida Freedom News-
I papers / Interactive,
I R 0. Box 2949,
I Fort Walton Beach,
FL 32547

I Drug-free workplace,
IEOE
WEOeb id 34104030

Medical/Health

CNA
Health Care Center
of Destin is hiring a
Night Shift CNA on
our A.L.F, CNA
certification required.
Further training
can/will be provided.
Please come by our
facility at
138 Sandestin Lane,
Destin FL, 32550
EOE
Web Id # 34101947

Other

Newspaper
Carriers
Needed
The NWF Daily News
is seeking an individ-
ual interested in pro-
viding great service
to our customers in
the following area:
Crestview
Individual must have
reliable transporta-
tion and be able to
work early a.m.
hours one day a
week. This is an in-
dependent contrac-
tor position with part
time hours and no
collecting necessary.
Apply at Crestview
News Bulletin 295 W
James Lee Blvd,
Crestview, FL 32536


[ 44100
Medical/Health

Masters Level
Therapist
Gulf Coast Youth Ser-
vices has an immediate
opening for Masters
Level Therapists at the
Crestview FL location.
Excellent benefits and
competitive pay based
on exp. Email resumes:
jerry.norris@psysolutions.com
or fax: Attn HR
850-863-0983
Web ID 34104998

Parts Counter Help
Wanted: Experience
helpful, but will train the
right person. Must have
good people skills and
be able to multi-task.
Salary negotiable.
Drug-Free workplace.
Inquire in person at
Wise Equipment 1147
S. Ferdon Blvd. Crest-
view

Sales/Business Dev

Hiring Locally
This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided -
Potential of $60K+
Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension
for those who Qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.





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Pay, Benefits, Rider
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Benefits, Company
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401k, Paid Holidays,
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pay & Benefits! Call a
recruiter TODAY!
(877)484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com

POSTAL &
GOVT JOB
INFO FOR SALE?

Caution

You NEVER have to
pay for information
about federal or postal
jobs. If you see a job
"guarantee", contact the
FTC.
The Federal Trade
Commission is
America's consumer
protection agency.

www.ftc.gov/jobscams
1-877-FTC-HELP

A public service
message from the FTC
and Your Florida
Freedom Newspaper









a .NS,& FIACIAL
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Opportunities
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6100 Business/
Commercial
6110- Apartments
6120- Beach Rentals
6130- Condo/Townhouse
6140- House Rentals
6150 -Roommate Wanted
6160 Rooms for Rent
6170- Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals




Crestview
Office Space
150SFto 7500 SF
Conveniently located
near the new FAMU
Pharmacy School.
Located between
Hwy 85 and Main St.
850-682-0791


6110
Crestview Lg,
2BR/1BA Quiet, Gated,
NO Pets. Call
682-4990/585-5012
$575. mo + $500. DD
Crestview- 1 BR, Furn.
Apartment. Ref/Stove.
$550 month also
Please Call, (850)
259-0267
FWB- 2 br 1 ba, $600
mo + $600 dep, no
pets, 850-420-1517 or
850-398-5757

Publisher's
Notice





vertise "any preference,
limitation or discrimina-
tion based on race,
color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status
or national origin, or an
intention, to make any
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination"
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing cus-
tody of children under
18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation
of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed
that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper
are available on a equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free number for the
hearing Impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPORTUNTf







Crestview- 2BD, ref.

W/D. $600. mo. call
259-0267


mn 766
Crestview
3 br, 2 ba
House for Rent
Quiet neighborhood.
Stove, refrigerator and
dishwasher included.
Laundry room. Deck
overlooking Ige fenced
backyard. $750 month
plus security deposit.
Section 8 accepted.
Panhandle Manage-
ment 850-897-5667
Crestview/Milligan &
Baker- 1, 2, 3 & 4 BR
Homes for Rent. Call
850-682-4070, (850)
830-2061,682-1972.
Laurel Hill 2br 1ba,
partly furn., $450 mo +
$450 dep. plus utilities,
small pet ok. Call
850-652-4155


-A%-
N. Crestview- 2 br, 2
ba, 1000 SF, large gar.
Irg lot, quiet neighbor-
hood, non smoking,
$750 mo 510-589-3444

Teel &
Waters
Real Estate
RENTALS
682-6156

803 Valley Rd,
$750, 2BR, 1.5BA
162 Woodlawn Dr, A
$800, 1BR, 1BA, furn
107 Pointer Lane,
$970, 3BR, 2BA 2CG
5819 Antler Way,
$1,1003BR2BA2cg
593 James Lee Blvd,
$900, Commercial
290 Main Street,
$1,000, Commercial
All properties require
a credit check, one
year lease; no inside
smoking, pet fees
are non-refundable.
Call Debra Frost
682-6156



6170
2 br & 3 br, Mobile
Home on 1 acre lot.
Ref required, call 850
682-1045



Laurel Hill 3BR/2BA
Central heat & air No
pets! Call 652-4463

Special
Senior Discount
Crestview Mobile
Homes (2BR/1BA)
Quiet park mostly
adults. $370. & up
585-8192


7100 Homes
7105 Open House
7110 Beach Home/
Property
7120 Commercial
7130 Condo/Townhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 Waterfront
7180 Investment
Property
7190 Oul-ol-Town
Real Estate
7200 Timeshare




Crestview 3BR/2BA
w/1 large family room
and large lot. Conven-
ient location, price
lowered and ready for
sale. $69,950. Call
850-865-4105


S 7100


LOOK
Individual wants to
buy house for
investment. Please Call
850-651-0987




1st Time Home
Buyer
Government homes for
sale. Easy quick move
in. Call 850-682-3344

Att. Land
Owners
Turnkey home buying/
Purchasing packages.
Use your land or family
land for 3, 4, 5 bed
room homes. Custom
built. Call and let us
help you 850-683-0758

Discounted
4 bedrooms and 3 bed-
room payments rang-
ing from $450-$650.
Call Clayton homes at
850-682-3344

Home For Sale
Easy Quick Must sell
Call 850-683-0758
Newly renovated 14x80
single .25 acre $39k
OBO; Owner will
finance up to 60%;480
Royal Palm 902-1626

Tired of
Renting
Call us and let us help
buy/purchase you a
new home. Call Clay-
ton Homes at
850-682-4284







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Alabama
On the 18th
Green of the
Andalusia
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4 bedroom, 2 bath. 1
acre lot. Lots of extras!
$339,000.00
Bank Forced Liquida-
tion Smoky Mtn Lake
Property/TN. Priced
Pennies on the Dollar!
All reasonable offers
accepted! Amenities!
Closeout Sale! JULY
9-10-11 Call Map &
Pricing. 877-644-4647
x302
VIRGINA Mountain
Cabin: Galax area
Brand new! Great
views, private, fishing in
stocked trout stream! 2
acres, $159,500, call
owner, (866)275-0442


AUTOMOTIVE, MARINE
RECREATIONAL
8100 -Antique & Collectibles
8110- Cars
8120- Sports Utility Vehicles
8130 Trucks
8140 Vans
8150 Commercial
8160 Motorcycles
8170 Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210 Boats
8220- Personal Watercraft
8230 Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine
Supplies
8245 Boat Slips & Docks
8310 Aircraft/Aviation
8320 ATV/0ff Road Vehicles
8330 Campers & Trailers
8340 -Motorhomes



p -


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1988 Notchback
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New Inside and Out
New motor, clutch,
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SPORTS

Saturday, June 26,2010 www. c r e s t v i e w b u lletin. c o m Page 26


News

& NOTES
Twin Hills
sports camps
A variety of sports
camps at Twin Hills Park
this summer wrap up in
early July.
Boys basketball camp
ended Friday.
Soccer camp continues
through July 8 on
Monday, Wednesdays
and Thursdays.
The first tennis camp
ended Friday. The second
session begins Monday
and runs through July 2.
For more information on
times and costs, call the
Twin Hills Park Recreation
Center at 682-4715.

Parks and Recreation
fall sports registration
The Crestview Parks and
Recreation Department is
holding registration for
fall soccer, football and
cheerleading through July
9 at the Twin Hills Park
Recreation Center.
Soccer leagues will be
for U6, U8, U10, U12
and U15.
Football is for ages 6-8
and 9-11.
Cheerleading is open
for ages 4-12.
Cost is $65 per child.

CAYA football
Crestview Area Youth
Association announces
sign-ups for boys and girls
ages 5-12 for football
and cheerleading every
Saturday through July 24
from 9 a.m. to noon at
the Crestview High School
football field house.

Crestview
basketball camp
The Crestview High
School girls basketball
team will host a three-day
camp July 13-15 for girls
and boys ages 7-12 at
the CHS gym.
The camp will run from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily.
Cost of the camp is $50
per child and includes a
snack, water and a T-shirt
for each participant.
For more information,
call coach Donald
Campbell at 428-0734 or
coach Renee Polk at 612-
3465, or e-mail Campbell
at duck4311 @cox.net.

Basketball
tournament
The Crestview High
School girls basketball
team will host a double-
elimination adult
basketball tournament July
10-11 at the CHS gym.
First- and second-place
trophies will be awarded,
and members of the
winning team will receive
T-shirts.
Cost of the tournament
is $150 per team.
Games will be played
with two 20-minute halves
and a running clock. The
last two minutes of each
half will have normal
clock stoppages.
For more information,
call coach Donald
Campbell at 428-0734,
coach Renee Polk at
612-3465 or Mr. Stafford
at 826-0312, or e-mail
Campbell at duck4311 @
cox.net.

Calendar deadlines
If you have an
announcement for our
sports calendar or would
like to submit a story,
please note the following
deadlines.
The deadline for the
Wednesday issue is
9 a.m. Monday. Our
deadline for Saturday is
9 a.m. Thursday.
In the event of limited
space, calendar items are
prioritized by the closest
dates. Other submitted
material is published as
we have available space.


Twin Hills Park football field gets facelift


Randy Dickson
randyd@crestviewbulletin.com
When local youngsters
hit the field for the 2010
football and soccer seasons
at Twin Hills Park this fall,
they will be playing on a
fresh new turf.
"I've been working on
this the last three years,
and it has finally come to
pass," said Chuck Powell,
the Parks and Recreation
Department director. "The
field was not unsafe; it was
safe to play on, but it wasn't
conducive to football or
soccer.
"What I mean by that is
there were some changes
in the elevation in a couple
of places."
While the field wasn't
unsafe for play, it did pres-


RANDY DICKSON | News Bulletin
LEFT:A new turf is scheduled to be in place by July 1 at the Twin Hills Park football field. RIGHT: The new
grade on the field will meet sports field specifications for football and soccer.


ent a number of problems.
One major problem was
that rather than a crown
with the field sloping toward
the sidelines for rain runoff,
the field was more of a bowl,


with rain accumulating in
low places on the field.
The second major prob-
lem has to do with an irri-
gation system that Powell
described as "antiquated."


Some of the main sys- area to make it safe for a
teams were buried six feet guy to get down in the hole
deep, which often meant a to repair an irrigation line
major undertaking to fix a because it was so deep,"
leak.
"We had to dig up a big See TWIN HILLS 22


*


NE










UU

IGUL
|S % .RV
. .......................................-.............U..


CRESTVIEW
News Bulletin
June 26,2010





2010 HURRICANE SURVIVAL GUIDE


Table of contents


Voices of experience


3


4


Hurricane Tracking Chart


Forecasters predict

active hurricane season


Hurricane names for 2010


5


5


6


Kids (and pets) & storms


Powerful tips


ABOUT

THIS

ISSUE

EDITORIAL CONTENT
BRIAN HUGHES,
N lICi AEL
STE\\ART,
ANN SFANN

ART DIRECTION AND LAYOUT
GREG ALLEN

Thank you to all
those who made
this publication
possible.


CRESTVI EW


News Bulletin
To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524.


NEWS INFORMATION
IF YOU HAVE A CONCERN OR COMMENT
ABOUT CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN'S
COVERAGE, PLEASE CALL 682-6524.
PUBLISHER
JASON MOBLEY
EDITOR
MICHAEL STEWART
OFFICE STAFF
DENISE CADENHEAD. OFFICE ASSISTANT
SHERRIES STANLEY .... RECEP./CIRC. ASST.
ADVERTISING INFORMATION
DIANA BAKER ....... AD CONSULTANT
RANDY BEARD ...... SALES MANAGER
MELISSA TEDDER .... MEDIA CONSULTANT
EDITORIAL
BRIAN HUGHES ...... WRITER
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR
ANN SPANN ........ PHOTOGRAPHER
RANDY DICKSON .... SPORTS EDITOR
RENEE BELL ........ TYPESETTING


PRODUCTION
GREG ALLEN ....... PRODUCTION
CIRCULATION INFORMATION
682-6524
THE CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN
IS PUBLISHED TWICE WEEKLY EACH
WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY BY FLORIDA
FREEDOM NEWSPAPERS, INC., AT 295 W.
JAMES LEE BLVD., CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA
32536. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT
CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA. POSTMASTER:
PLEASE SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO
295 W. JAMES LEE BLVD., CRESTVIW,
FLORIDA 32536-3313. ALL MATERIAL
HEREIN IS PROPERTY OF THE CRESTVIEW
NEWS BULLETIN.






I RATES I


In County
13 weeks........................ $9.45
26 weeks...................... $17.85
52 weeks....................... $32.76


Out of County
13 weeks....................... $14.70
26 weeks....................... $23.10
52 weeks....................... $38.01


BE PEARE FO HURRIAN SASN


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DON'T LET THIS
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We service and repair most
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The/
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The Holloway Agency is (from left to right)
Smokey, Cheryl, Elizabeth, and Dusty.
168 W Woodruff (Downtown Crestview)
850.682.1900


MONDAY FRIDAY 9 A.M. 6 P.M.
SATURDAY 9 A.M. 4 P.M.
Darel & Donna Lundy, Owners
594 N. Main St., Crestview, FL
850.682.6835 www.badcock.com


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Most importantly, have a copy of your current insurance policy.
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By Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com

The News Bulletin staff gathered some
helpful hurricane survival tips based on
personal experience and advice we're
glad others have shared with us.

GET CASH
Most credit card processing
equipment at stores and all ATMs
communicate via phone lines and
computer networks, most of which will
fail in a major outage. Many stores,
handymen and contractors do not have
old-fashioned credit card imprinters.

STOCK UP
If it's well stocked, your freezer can
keep foods cold and even frozen up to
three days as long as you don't open and
close the door frequently. If your freezer
is not full, fill the space with plastic
containers of water in advance. Gallon
Ziploc bags of water mold themselves
to available spaces in the freezer. The


frozen water will help keep your food
cold, and as it melts, will provide a
source of clean water.

THINK SAFE
Never cook over your BBQ grill or
camp stove inside your home or in an
enclosed porch. If you set your house
ablaze, firefighters may not be able to
get through debris-strewn streets in
time.

ONLINE RESOURCES
Want help preparing your hurricane
check list? Visit www.floridadisaster.
org/family for great advice and a
downloadable disaster plan that you can
personalize just for your family's needs,
including those of your pets.

PREPARE AHEAD
"Run from the water, hide from the
wind." In the north end of the county,
we're protected from storm surges,
unlike our neighbors down south. They'll
be jamming our roads, particularly


Interstate 10, State Road 85, U.S.
Highway 90, and State Road 189, which
are designated evacuation routes.
With many of our local grocery and
home repair stores located on these
roads, last-minute storm shopping will
be stymied.

PET NEEDS
Make sure your pets' shots are up to
date. Have their paper work handy just
in case you need to verify it at a shelter.
If you evacuate with your pet(s), bring
a portable kennel, plenty of pet food
and water, leash, and a toy or rawhide to
keep them busy.
Stock up on some old newspapers or
puppy pads since it may be sometime
before your pets can go outside.
If you're going to a shelter make sure
your pets are able to come with you, or
entrust them with someone that can take
them with them.

EVACUATION PLANS
Be aware of the strength of the


storm, and if you decide to evacuate,
evacuate early or else you'll be caught
in gridlocked traffic.

KNOW SHELTERS
Davidson Middle School is a
designated hurricane evacuation shelter
and will open if a storm threatens.

COMMUNICATIONS
Make sure your laptop, digital camera
batteries, and cell phone are charged
up.

CLEANING UP
Keep baby wipes on hand in case
bathing/showering is impossible.

PRESCRIPTIONS
Make sure you keep at least a
two-week supply of prescription
medication on hand at all times. Don't
wait for the storm to be announced
before refilling it.





2010 HURRICANE SURVIVAL GUIDE


Atlantic Basin Hurricane Tracking Chart


From the National Hurricane Center, Miami, Florida


(AP) Meteorologists are predicting
an active 2010 hurricane season with
above-normal threats on the U.S.
coastline.
Hurricane Forecaster Joe Bastardi,
with the AccuWeather.com Hurricane
Center, predicts seven landfalls. Five will
be hurricanes and two or three of the
hurricanes will be major landfalls for the
U.S., he predicts.


Bastardi forecasts 16 to 18 tropical
storms in total, 15 of which will likely be in
the western Atlantic or Gulf of Mexico.
In a typical season, there are about
11 named storms, with only two or three
impacting the coast of the United States.
The rapidly weakening El Nino, warmer
ocean temperatures, weakening trade
winds and higher humidity levels will all
contribute to greater storm activity.


Hurricane names for 2010
The National Hurricane Center has issued the following list of
names for hurricanes in 2010:


Alex
Bonnie
Colin
Danielle
Earl
Fiona


Hermine
Igor
Julia
Karl
Lisa
Matthew


Gaston Nicole


Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter


CRUNCHED
BRIAN HUGHES
Crestview News Bulletin
Trees crashed down on
and around this small
wooden home in Bucktown,
a fishing village near New
Orleans, during Hurricane
Katrina.


This is a reduced version of the chart used to track hurricanes at the National Hurricane Center


Forecasters


predict active


hurricane season


20 10 HU RRICAN E SURVIVAL GUIDE







6 2010 HURRICANE SURVIVAL GUIDE


(and pets)





Include your children in storm
planning and aftermath


By Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com

When I was in eighth grade, a blizzard
followed by an ice storm hit our hometown.
The two combined to bring down the
power lines and simultaneously make the
roads impassable for utility repair crews.
On Christmas Eve we decorated the tree
by Coleman lantern and candlelight.
We played Monopoly, drew pictures,
worked activity books and read lots of
books. After supper, we gathered around
the lantern and Mom read stories.
My brother and I recall the three days
without electricity as a grand adventure.
Our folks, naturally, remember it very
differently. It would be years until we
learned how difficult a time it really was
for them.
If you are prepared and maintain your
calm, your children can similarly recall a
big storm and its aftermath as an equally
grand adventure, rather than sharing
your anxieties.
Include the kids in stormpreparations.
What toys and games would they want to
have in their storm kit? Include enough
batteries for hand-held computer games.
Stock up on a few traditional board games.
Your kids will be astounded to find there
are fun games that don't beep and light
up.
Include in your storm kit age-
appropriate activity books, reading
material and art supplies for your kids.
Buy a large storybook suitable for the
whole family. Take turns reading it after
supper each night after the storm.
Your children might have some ideas
of what foods should be included in your
storm pantry. (See The storm gourmet on
this page.) Let them help prepare storm
menus now and assist you with shopping
for ingredients to have on hand.
After the storm, children can also
assist with basic food preparation that
doesn't involve the grill or camp stove.
Children can help out in the


aftermath. My brother and I helped clear
away fallen branches and sticks as Dad
cut them up for firewood.
Our biggest chore was gathering
buckets of snow, which we melted by the
fireplace and used for flushing the toilet.
Your children can help by fetching water
from a nearby stream, pond or your
swimming pool for the same use.
Make sure the route to the water
source is safe for your children to walk,
and escort them the first couple times.
While you're tending to pressing
matters, put the kids in charge of the
pet(s). This will help them feel they are
contributing to the family post-storm
effort, will keep them occupied, and will
free adults and older kids for heavier
tasks.
The family pet may be confused
if familiar landmarks have become
obliterated or altered. Left unattended,
Fido or Puff may even run off.
Put the children in charge of walking
the dog or cat on its leash (yes, even the
cat) to help your furry companions re-
familiarize themselves with their usual
romping grounds.
After the storm, keep the kids away
from damaged areas of the house or from
piles of debris that could fall on them until
an adult can clear it up or stabilize it.
Make sure children understand what
places are safe for them. Keep them well
away from any downed power lines.
If you evacuated and return to
find your home has flooded or has been
damaged, make sure no snakes or rodents
are inside before allowing your children in
for the first time.
No matter the damage or devastation,
try to remain calm around your children.
Kids easily pick up on adults' worries and
anxieties. Assure your kids that everything
will work out fine, and that they can even
help begin to put things right.

Do you have tips for handling children
during and after a storm? Share them at
www.crestviewbulletin.com.


The storm




gourmet


Dining decently when the power goes out


By Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com

After several days of no power,
sweltering heat, being stinky and
struggling to repair both home and lives,
having to stomach one more can of cold
Vienna sausages can push someone
right over the edge.
With just a little advance planning,
post-storm menus can be tasty and
creative. Prepare now. Don't wait for
Jim Cantore to show up in Destin.
Plan your post-storm menus as you
do normal weekly meals. Don't just pitch
random canned food into your shopping
cart.
Stockagoodvarietyofnonperishable
foods. Supplement beans, corn and peas
with canned asparagus, olives, soups,
potatoes, garbanzos, etc. To canned
peaches and fruit salad add mangos,
mandarin oranges and tropical fruit
salad. Toss in a can of coconut milk, too.
(Save money on fancier canned
goods by exploring the food aisles at Big
Lots.)
Plant a small herb garden now to
harvest from whether the lights are
on or not. Basil and mint grow like the
dickens in our summer climate.
Rotate a supply of longer-lasting
fruits and veggies that don't necessarily
need to be refrigerated. Include onions,
potatoes, garlic, cabbage, oranges,
lemons and grapefruits. Promptly
replace them as you use them so you
won't be caught empty handed.
Seasonings and spices give canned
food a kick. Keep a variety on hand, or at
least a jar of seasoned salt.
Bread will go moldy fast. Stock up
on cracker-like "Wasa" flatbread. It lasts
a long time and comes in tasty varieties.
Rice and pasta can be cooked in a
pot over your BBQ grill or a camp stove.
Don't leave them off your grocery list.
Add evaporated or non-fat dry


milk to your storm pantry. Carnation
recommends mixing equal amounts of
water and evaporated milk when using
it.
"Nutrition and nourishment are
particularly important during stressful
times," writes Sarasota author Daphne
Nikolopoulos. "And no one can argue
that an enjoyable meal helps alleviate
stress."
Nikolopoulos' "The Storm Gourmet:
A Guide to Creating Extraordinary
Meals Without Electricity" is both a
useful cookbook and practical storm
preparation guide. It's available from
online sources such as Amazon.com, or
from Pineapple Press, (800) 746-3275,
pineapplepress.com.
Some of her recipes are admittedly
a tad exotic for local palates. (Not many
area cooks whip up tapenade for a church
supper.) But even the fancy dishes
provide inspiration for adaptation.
Don't shun a recipe because it has
a snazzy name. "Salade Niqoise" is
great stuff. Serve it anyway and just tell
your family it's "Tators 'n' Tuna Storm
Salad."
The Storm Gourmet's "Basic Storm
Pantry" shopping list is practical, yet
includes just enough non-mainstream
items to be exotic without being
outrageous.
Jon Robertson's witty "Apocalypse
Chow: Emergency Eating for
Hurricanes, Blackouts, Bachelors and
Other Disasters" also has good storm
preparation tips but features only
vegetarian recipes.
Also adapt family recipes. Can
Aunt Tootie's famous chicken salad be
prepared using canned chicken instead
of fresh?
With a little planning now before
a storm is forecast, your post-storm
cuisine can be much more palatable,
and your meals can be opportunities to
renew and refresh as you work toward
recovery.
























By Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com


BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
TO THE RESCUE: A convoy of power company trucks from an out-of-state utility
head into Mississippi to help restore electricity following Hurricane Katrina.


When a major storm is forecast, your electric
appliances will most likely wind up without juice.
Knowing how to handle electricity and the devices it
powers before and after a storm can prevent injury to
both you and your appliance.
CHELCO offers the following tips for safely dealing
with electricity in storm situations.
* Make sure you have a landline plug-in phone because
cordless units don't work when the power is out.
* Please make one call only to report your power out.
Extra calls jam the switchboards and slow down
repairs. Your cooperation is critical to the success
of the restoration process.
* Treat all downed lines as energized even though
your power may be off.
* Remember, water conducts electricity. Standing
water can electrocute you just the same as a live
wire. Stay away from all downed lines and water
puddles near the lines.
* Keep your freezer door closed once the power goes
off to maintain the cold. If the door is kept closed, a
well-filled freezer can keep most foods frozen two


to three days. A half-full freezer will only last about
one day.
* If you must evacuate, turn off your power to prevent
shorts and possible fires from voltage dips and
surges while the system is being repaired.
* When using a generator, refer to the book that
came with it and follow the manufacturer's
recommendations. Unless a home has been wired
for a generator, use only those generators that
appliances can be plugged into.
* Generators should never be plugged directly into a
wall outlet. Use extension cords and plug appliances
into the generator. If necessary rotate usage. For
example, keep the refrigerator or freezer plugged
in long enough to keep food cold, then switch the
generator to another appliance.
* If generators are installed incorrectly, the result
may be injury or even death for line crews who are
trying to restore power. Current from a generator
that is incorrectly hooked up can flow out of the
home and into the transformer serving the home
(or business). The electricity then enters the local
power distribution system.


Special to the News Bulletin
DOWNED LINES: Use extreme caution around
downed power lines, even if power is out.

* If your power goes out, turn off your major
appliances, especially water heaters and heating/
cooling systems. After power has been restored,
wait about 15 minutes, then turn appliances on one
at a time. If you own a heat pump, check the manual
before turning it back on.
If you evacuate, you may keep up to date on power
restoration progress by checking www.chelco.com.


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