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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028411/00464
 Material Information
Title: Crestview news bulletin!
Portion of title: Bulletin
Crestview news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Okaloosa Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Crestview, Fla
Creation Date: November 25, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crestview (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okaloosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Okaloosa -- Crestview
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 9, no. 37 (Sept. 5, 2001); Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 9, no. 40 (Sept. 26, 2001).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 48122675
lccn - 2001229458
System ID: UF00028411:00464
 Related Items
Preceded by: Crestview news leader

Full Text





C RESTV


S1 J ] ] kY ../ UJJL ./ W / .U. 1 Teeing offfor charity, A6

Wednesday, NOVEMBER 25, 2009 www.crestviewbulletin.com 50(


For the latest
breaking news, visit
CRESTVIEWBULLETI N.COM


INSIDE


A spot of tea

A4


Playing
kindergarten

A5


Welcoming
champs

B1


WEATHER


~( I.;--


High 69
Low 43


cloudy becoming sunny
Sunrise 6:21 a.m.
Sunset 4:45 p.m.

TABLE OF
CONTENTS
WHAT'S HAPPENING ............ A 2
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT........ A 5
OPINION............................ A 0
SCHOOL ............................. All
SPORTS ................................ B1
CLASSIFtEDS......................... B 6

Award Winning 4EW
Newspaper B|
Florida Preis Association
Better Weekl) Newspaper Contest �

FREEDOM
i'" i '() i i t) .A
NEWSPAPERS INTERACTIV-
Phone: 850-682-6524
Web site: crestviewbulletin.com
Fax: 850-682-2246
34th Year * Number 91
20 Pages * 2 Sections


Photos by ANN SPANN I CrestviewNews Bulletin
MEALS TO GO: Volunteers Pearl Bess, Kim McKinnie and Linda Trawick prepare meals
for senior citizens at the Citizens of Crestview Outreach program.



Serving the community

Citizens Outreach holds Thanksgiving dinner


Ann Spann
anns@crestviewbulletin.com
When volunteers filled
tables with food for a recent
Thanksgiving feast, it
marked the sixth holiday
season that the Citizens
of Crestview Outreach
program has served the
community.
But the program is not
limited to the holidays,
and volunteers reach out
in a variety of ways to help
others year-round.
"I am just so thankful
that we can help; people
give to us, and we give
back to the people," said
Pearl Bess, a member of
the Concerned Citizens
group that teams with
Okaloosa County Minority
HIV Aids Task Force and
local volunteers to make
the outreach program a
success.
The volunteers work
together to serve a meal
on the second and fourth
Tuesday of each month near
the intersection of Martin
Luther King Boulevard and
Booker Street. People are
made aware of the program
through word of mouth and
local churches, according
to Concerned Citizens
President Catherine Dortch.
An average of 100 plates
are served each time the
group prepares a meal,


MEAL DELIVERY: Jessie Leavins picks up meals for seniors
at the Crestview Housing Authority from Outreach
volunteers Pearl Bess and Catherine Dortch.


with about 30 of those going
to senior citizens, many
who live at the Crestview
Housing Authority.
"The seniors at the
housing authority are our
biggest supporters," Bess
said. "They help us fund
the food program to keep it
going."
At the Thanksgiving
meal, the senior citizens'
plates were prepared first,
and volunteers delivered
them throughout the
community. Others served
those who had waited
patiently in line for their
meal. Unlike most weeks
when the food is served
near the street in carryout
containers, picnic tables
were provided in a nearby
vacant lot for the holiday


feast that came complete
with turkey, dressing and all
the trimmings.
"Pearl had a vision
that this would be a sit-
down meal with a time of
fellowship,' explained Aids
Task Force chairperson
Tonsiaweda Hayes, whose
organization provides
money, food and volunteer.
time to the program.
The outreach program
operates from a small
building on Booker Street,
where meals are served and
donated clothing is available,
free to anyone in need.
The use of the building and
vacant lot is a donation from
Bess' brother, Jessie Larry.
Both Bess and Larry were
See OUTREACH A3


Classmates


welcome teen


who lost arm

Michael Stewart
michaels @ crestviewbulletin.com
Ten days after a Nov. 10 wreck that cost
Holt resident Jacob Mashburn his right
arm, he attended a Thanksgiving dinner at
his school in Crestview.
. A loud cheer went up from the group of
60-plus students gathered Friday afternoon
in a courtyard at Emerald Coast Career
Institute when Principal Christy Corbin
announced that Jacob, 17, would soon ar-
rive.
"I'm really excited to see him," Jacob's
classmate Danielle Jackson, 16, said.
Jacob lived up to his reputation as the
class cut-up, joking about the accident that
changed his life.
"I still haven't gotten a handle on shower-
ing. I haven't figured out how to wash this
arm," Jacob said with a laugh, holding up his
remaining arm.
Stitches crisscrossed Jacob's right shoul-
der where his arm was amputated by sur-
geons at Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola
after the truck he was a passenger in struck
two pecan trees and a pole on John Road in
Holt.
A Florida Highway Patrol report states
the truck, driven by Holt resident Cody My-
ers, 18, was traveling at a high speed upon
impact. The truck struck with such forces it
ripped the cab from the body.
See TEEN A3
f -- ---- *** -


MICHAEL STEWART I Crestview News Bulletin
Holt resident Jacob Mashburn, 17,
reads a card presented to him by his
classmates at Emerald Coast Career
Institute in Crestview. Jacob attended a
Thanksgiving dinner at the school after
losing his arm in an automobile accident.


A bagful of safe-shopping tips


CPD offers advice for Black Friday
Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com
When your focus is on snagging bargains be-
fore another shopper clears the shelf of this year's
must-have, your mind isn't always on assuring your
safety or that of the goodies you.already snapped
up and stashed in your car. Just in time for the day
after Thanksgiving, traditionally the busiest shop-
ping day of the year, the Crestview Police Depart-
ment has issued a list of safety precautions for
shoppers.
"Combine the joys of Black Friday shopping
with the bleak economic outlook, and you could say
See FRIDAY A3


HOLIDAY SHOPPING
SAFETY TIPS
Black Friday, the day
hard-core shoppers live
for, is fast approaching!
Shoppers all over America
will descend upon retailers
with sales fliers in hand,
searching for great deals.
Please consider these six
shopping tips to keep you
and your family safer during
this holiday season.
See TIPS A3


GRAPHIC BY BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
ROB ME! Piling your shopping in full view on the
back seat tempts potential thieves to make you a
victim. Don't create crimes of opportunity; stow
your shopping out of sight in the trunk.


Join the Crestview Chatter

Your online community.

forums.crestviewbulletin.com






A2 I Crestview News Bulletin


Local


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


Sheriff's Office: Struck woman nearly kills boyfriend with utility knife


Michael Stewart
michaels@crestview
bulletin.com

A .Crestview woman is
accused of nearly killing
her boyfriend by cutting
his throat and stomach
with a utility knife after he
reportedly punched her in
the face.
Penny Mesue Casey,
37, is charged with felony
aggravated battery with a


deadly weapon.
Her boyfriend, Crest-
view resident William
Grace, 38, was treated at
North Okaloosa Medical
Center and later charged
with domestic violence in
the incident that occurred
about 8 p.m. on Nov. 16.
According to an Oka-
loosa County Sheriff's re-
port, Casey, Grace and an-
other woman had just left
a party in a car belonging


They were headed east
! on U.S. Highway 90 when
Grace pulled over in a se-
U ' � eluded area south of Grady
i l Johnson Road and got out
to urinate.
SCasey got out of the
MM truck as well, and the two
PENNY M. WILLIAM continued to argue, ac-
CASEY GRACE cording the arrest report.
"Caseywas struck in the
to Grace's employer when face by Grace," the report
Casey and Grace began to states. "Casey returned to
argue. the vehicle and retrieved a


utility knife. She returned
to Grace's location and cut
him in the throat and abdo-
men area."
The wound to Grace's
throat was so severe "it
almost cost him his life,"
doctors at the hospital told
an investigator.
The cut to Grace's
stomach had to be closed
with staples.
After the incident,
Casey attempted to drive


away in the car owned
by Grace's employer,
but it was stuck in the
sand, according to the re-
port.
Casey and the other
woman in the car at the
time of the incident report-
edly walked away, leaving
Grace at the scene, the re-
port stated.
Both Casey and Grace
have had prior domestic.
violence arrests.


What's HAPPENING


From staff reports

NORTH OKALOOSA
CORRECTION, LEG-
ISLATIVE DELEGA-
TION MEETING: The
Dec. 15 meeting of the
Okaloosa County Legisla-
tive Delegation is at 3:30
p.m. in the Crestview City
Hall council chambers
at 198 N. Wilson St., not 5
p.m. as previously stated.
Members of the delegation
include Representatives
Marti Coley, Ray Sansom,
Greg Evers and Brad
Drake, and Senators Don
Gaetz and Durell Peaden.
To be placed on the agen-
da, call Rep. Drake's office
at 850-892-8431.
THRIFTIETTE BAN-
QUET: Everyone is invited
to the Friendly Thriftiette
Club Christmas Banquet
Saturday, Dec: 12, at 7 p.m.
at the Carver-Hill School
Center in Crestview. The
dinner costs $8 per person.
The guest speaker is Min-
ister Faye Allen. Details:
Sis. Runette Thomas, 682-
3020.
ONLINE PERMIT-
TING: Permits or in-
spections can now be
researched on Okaloosa
County's Web site. Users
can search for existing
permits and gather parcel
Information, as well as es-
timate fees of new permits


for building and planning
permits, fire inspections,
code enforcement, and
health and safety inspec-
tions.
For more information,
visit www.okaloosafl.com
or www.co.okaloosa.fl.us/
dept_growth_mgmt.html.
Additionally, any depart-
ment can now be accessed
by calling the new 311 line
within the county for infor-
mation and assistance.
BLOOD DRIVES: The
Northwest Florida Blood
Center is sponsoring the
following drives in North
Okaloosa County:
Nov. 28, Wal-Mart
Crestview, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Every donor will receive a
gift card.
There is an elevated
need for blood types O
Negative and B Nega-
tive. Northwest Florida
Blood Services is your
community blood center,
providing blood to patients,
families and friends in lo-
cal hospitals across the
Panhandle. Blood is used
to help patients with can-
cer, heat bypass, in surger-
ies and emergencies. To
plan a 2010 blood drive,
call Robert Strickland at
850-473-3853 for scheduling
information.
NWFSC EVENTS:
events for Northwest
Florida State College are
listed below.


* Tour of Greece with
Dr. David C. Simmons (Ph.
D. humanities) and Profes-
sor D. Ann Waters (Ed.S.
art history) from May 8-18
is being planned. Anyone
from the community is
welcome join us. For more
information, please coritact
Professor Waters: waters
@nwfsc.edu or 729-5302.
HEALTH CARE
BILL AVAILABLE FOR
REVIEW: The proposed
Affordable Health Care
for America Act is avail-
able for citizen review at
the Crestview library, Fort
Walton Beach Library
and all Okaloosa County
libraries. The copies have
been made available by
Congressman Jeff Miller's
office.
GRIEF AND THE
HOLIDAYS: Emerald'
Coast Hospice invites you
to call them at 689-0300
and schedule your Grief
and the Holidays Seminar,
where Hospice will provide
you with ways to make it
through the season.
Nurses can receive 1.2-
contact hours, and social
workers will receive 1.0
contact hours. Details: Call
689-0300 and ask for Chap-
lain Jim Vail.
COATS FOR KIDS AT
CHRISTMAS: Anyone
who would like to par-
ticipate in the collecting
of coats for area children


may do so by dropping off
used coats (good condi-
tion) or new coats through
Dec. 5. Crestview drop-off
locations include Hori-
zons of Okaloosa County,
Premier Community
Bank-Crestview, Publix in
Crestview.
Other Okaloosa loca-
tions include Bank of
America, BankTrust,
BB&T (former Colonial
Bank), BBVA Compass
Bank, Beach Community
Bank, Belk at Santa Rosa
Mall, Century Link (for-
merly Embarq), Coastal
Bank and Trust, Covenant
Hospice, Eglin Chapel, Eg-
lin Federal Credit Union,
First City Bank, Okaloosa
District Office, Premier
Community Bank, Publix,
The Village of Baytowne
Wharf, Trustmark Bank,
Twin Cities Hospital, Whit-
ney National Bank, Publix
in Destin.
ART CONTEST: The
Ladies Auxiliary to the
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 5450 in Crestview is
looking for artistic stu-
dents in grades 9-12 to
participate in the Young
Patriotic Art Contest. Stu-
dents have several months
to create patriotic art that
could earn them college
scholarship money worth
thousands. The deadline
to enter is March 31, 2010.
Details: LAVFW President


Lynn Mobley, 537-3375 or
978-0685.
CHILD INSURANCE
REGISTRATION: Paula
Jackson of Families Count
is offering assistance to
local residents who want
to register their children
for Florida KidCare insur-
ance. Walk-ins are ac-
cepted every Tuesday and
Thursday from 8-10 a.m. at
Jobs Plus on Wilson Street
in Crestview. If you would
rather arrange a different
time, call her at 850-685-
4086. Please bring proof of
income and Social Security
numbers for every mem-
ber of your household.
CRESTVIEW DOG-
WOOD GARDEN CLUB:.
Members meet the first
Monday of each month
from September through
May. Anyone interested in
learning more about gar-
dening is invited to visit or
join. Please call 682-2691 or
682-3639.
SOUP KITCHEN UP-
DATE: A fourth lunch has
been added to the soup
kitchen list. In addition to
being open Mondays and
Friday, 11 a.m. to noon at
First Presbyterian Church,
492 N. Ferdon Blvd., and
Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 1
.p.m. at First Assembly of
God Church, 400 S. Ferdon
Blvd., Community of Christ
Church at 398 W First
Ave. in Crestview is open
Thursday from 11a.m. to
noon. Come enjoy a free
meal and friendly compa-
ny, or come meet the staff
and sign up to help. All are
welcome and appreciated:
In addition, the YMCA
on Wilson Street in Crest-
view now offers showers
for homeless people Mon-
days and Fridays from 5-6
p.m. This service is pro-
vided through Opportunity
Inc.
Immanuel church
members are in need of
bikes, which they repair
and issue to the home-
less. Please call 423-0711
if you can assist with this
service. '
WEIGHT WATCHERS
meets every Thursday at


Episcopal Church of the
Epiphany, 424 Garden St.,
Crestview. Registration
and weigh-in begin at 5
p.m.; meeting follows.
GFWC WOMAN'S
CLUB ACTIVITIES: The
GFWC Woman's Club of
Crestview Inc.'s clubhouse
is at 150 Woodlawn Drive in
Crestview.
* Christmas in Crest-
view Tour of Homes will
be held on Sunday, Dec.
6, from 1-5 p.m. Four local
homes will be beautifully
decorated for the holidays,
and refreshments will be
served at the festively
decorated clubhouse. Do-
nation of $10 ($5 for under
12 years old.) All proceeds
go to club charities. For
advance tickets or info, call
682-6824. Tickets will also
.be available at the club-
house on day of tour.
AMERICAN GIRLS
BOOK CLUB: The Crest-
view public library on
Commerce Drive behind
the post office is hosting an
American Girls Book Club.
The club meets every third
Saturday of the month
from 10 a.m. until noon'in
the Story Room. Members
talk about the book and
.discover more about life at
different times in Ameri-
can history. Activities, arts
and crafts, and interesting
snacks are part of each
session.
Join in by signing up in
Youth Services for each
meeting; get the book from
the library or purchase
it, and finish reading the
month's selected book be-
fore the meeting.
FIRST TUESDAY
LECTURE: 1st Tuesday
Lectures are held once a
month at 10:30 a.m. at the
Crestview public library on
Commerce Drive.
The Dec. 1 presentation
by Dr. Anne Hawe Holt of
Tallahassee is called "Lock
'em Up ... or Not: The His-
tory of Florida Prisons,
1868-1925."
RED CROSS CLASS-
ES are offered in Okaloosa
County. Visit www.yourred
cross.org to register.


CRESTV IEW



News Bulletin
To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524.


NEWS INFORMATION
IF YOU HAVE A CONCERN OR COMMENT
ABOUT CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN'S
COVERAGE, PLEASE CALL 682-6524.
PUBLISHER
JASON MOBLEY
EDITOR
MICHAEL STEWART
OFFICE STAFF
DENISE CADENHEAD . OFFICE ASSISTANT
SHERRIE STANLEY ... RECEP./CIRC. ASST.
ADVERTISING INFORMATION
DIANA BAKER. ...... AD CONSULTANT
RANDY BEARD ...... SALES MANAGER
MELISSA TEDDER .... MEDIA CONSULTANT
EDITORIAL
BRIAN HUGHES. ..... WRITER
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR
ANN SPANN........ PHOTOGRAPHER
RANDY DICKSON .... SPORTS EDITOR
RENEE BELL ........ TYPESETTING


In County
13 weeks......................... $9.45
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52 weeks......................... $32.76


PRODUCTION
GREG ALLEN ....... PRODUCTION
CIRCULATION INFORMATION
682-6524
THE CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN
IS PUBLISHED TVICE WEEKLY EACH
WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY BY FLORIDA
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Out of County
13 weeks.........................$14.70
26 weeks.........................$23.10
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C R I S 1 V I ' W '

News Bulletin a)


I





Wednesday, November 25, 2009


Local


Crestview News Bulletin I A3


TEEN from page Al


Neither Jacob nor Myers was
wearing a seat belt, and they
were ejected from the truck.
A friend of Jacob's videotaped
the wreckage after the accident
and played the footage for the
injured teen for the first time.
"A frame, a tire, an engine -
what's left of the engine - and
a tailgate, that's all that's left,"
Jacob said, shaking his head
while watching the images play
across the screen of a hand-
held video camera. "Oh, dude,
that's the cab. It's a good thing
we weren't wearing our seat
belts, or we would have been
crushed."
Myers suffered a broken leg
and cuts requiring stitches. He
had been released from the
Okaloosa County Jail three days
before the wreck after serving a
month of a 45-day sentence for
driving while his license was
suspended.
Jacob said he doesn't recall
much from the wreck.
"I remember the white pole
we broke in two," he said. "That's
the last thing I saw."


hrnoos Dy MILInAEL IICWAKI I Crestview News Bulletn
Holt resident Jacob Mashburn, 17, laughs as his fellow
classmates at Emerald Coast Career Institute in Crestview
present him with a card they had made after he lost his arm in
an automobile accident.


Gathered around picnic
tables, students were served
turkey, ribs and a smorgasbord
of side dishes. While some sat
eating, many gravitated toward
Jacob's table, where he was pre-


sented with a large neon green
card made by his classmates.
"They have just been so good
to him," Jacob's mother, Lisa
Griffin, said of them.
A group of about 10 students


visited Jacob while he was in the
hospital. Several of his friends,
including Taylor Harper, 17,
and Jacob Case, 16, vowed to
cut their hair in Mohawks if Ja-
cob kept his pledge to adopt the
hairstyle to remove -hair from
the stitches around his scalp.
Case, Jacob's best friend for
years, said he was worried the
accident would get Jacob down
but was glad to see him in good
spirits.
"When I saw him, I knew he
would be OK," Case said.
Latia Moore, 15, said she was
"devastated and shocked" when
she heard of the accident but
was relieved to find that "he is
still the same old Jacob."
Jackson and William Murray,
17, said the accident has defi-
nitely made them more aware of
the dangers of driving. The ac-
cident was on the mind of Jack-
son's mother, Mary Jackson, as
well.
"It's a scary thought to know
that they are soon going to be out
there on the roads," she said.
Jacob will have to undergo


four to six weeks of therapy at
a hospital in Tampa after he
has completely healed. Shriners
Hospitals for Children, which
specializes in burns, spinal cord
injuries and rehabilitation for
children, has accepted Jacob's
case to help fit him with a pros-
thetic, Griffin said.
But the medical bills are
.mounting.
And Jacob knows it will be a
while before he can return full,
time to school and his friends.
"He is bound and deter-
mined he is going to come back
to school as soon as he can,"
Corbin said. "That says volumes
about the kid."
Jacob feels the phantom pain
in his arm many amputees expe-
rience and said he is still "trying
to do normal stuff" that came
easily before.
But that's not what appears
to be foremost on his mind as he
sat talking with his classmates,
their conversation punctuated
with laughter.
"It's good to be back with my
friends," he said with a smile.


FRIDAY from page Al


there will be folks looking
for great deals, even if it
means taking yours," said
Lt. Kent Buckner of CPD's
Community Policing divi-
sion.
"It's just the general,
common-sense stuff,"
Buckner said, "like keep-
ing things locked up in
the trunk instead of in the
passenger compartment
of the vehicle, and out of
sight."
Got an SUV with an
easy-to-look-into rear lug-
gage compartment? "Peo-
ple could put a blanket or
something to cover their
shopping," Buckner sug-
gested.
As the holidays ap-
proach, there are grinches
on the prowl who take ad-
vantage of shoppers who
don't take a few basic pre-
cautions, Buckner warns.
Also be sure to take steps
to discourage thieves even
after Santa has left his
bounty and you're waist-
deep in torn wrapping pa-
per.
"Common-sense pre-
cautions include not put-


Trust your
instincts.

Ifsomething
doesn'tfeel right,
it probably isn't.

Lt. Kent Buckner,
Crestview Police Department

ting the TV box out by the
street when you get your
new TV for Christmas,"
he said. "People advertise
their new stuff, and there
are plenty of opportunists
who drive around neigh-
borhoods looking for those
things."
When at the mall, shop-
ping downtown or explor-
ing your favorite big-box
stores, keep these safety
tips in mind to help keep
your Black Friday fun and
safe.
"Trust your instincts,"
Buckner said. "If some-
thing doesn't feel right, it
probably isn't."


TIPS from page Al


1. Women, consider
leaving your purse at
home. All too often,
police encounter
women who left their
purse unattended in-a
shopping cart while
looking for a great
deal. It takes a matter
of seconds for a thief
to walk away with your
personal identification,
as well as anycash
you planned to spend
on those great deals.
Keeping your cash,
credit cards and
identification in your
pockets) makes it more
difficult for a thief to
grab.

2. Shopping with a
friend or in a group just
makes sense. Arriving
and leaving a store
together will make it less
likely a thief.will make
you a target. Thieves
thrive on opportunity,
and having a shopping
buddy will lessen your
chances of becoming a
target of opportunity.

3. Avoid an early
morning trip to the
ATM on Black Friday.
Making arrangements
to have cash on hand
in advance lessens your
odds of becoming a
victim at the ATM.

4. If you must be up
and out the door before
daybreak, be aware
of your surroundings.


Never stand in front
of a store by yourself.
Darkness, combined
with being alone, will
make your chances
of becoming a victim
greater.

5. Don't fight over
those great deals.
Maintain your cool,
and avoid. physical
confrontations with
other customers. Be
polite, even if it means
you don't get the great
deal you were looking
for. Your safety is worth
much more than a gift.

6. Leave packages
out of sight when
traveling from store
to store. Storing the
day's treasures in the
trunk, out of sight, will
discourage opportunists
from breaking in to
your vehicle. Once you
have your treasures at
home, crush boxes and
dispose of them out of
sight. Having the box for
your new computer or
television sitting along
the roadway in front of
your house advertises to
an opportunist you have
a new item.

Please do not
be afraid to report
suspicious activities
or persons to law
enforcement. Contact
the Crestview Police
Department at 682-
2055.


Photos by ANN SPANN I Crestview News Bulletin
THANKSGIVING: Volunteers serve a Thanksgiving feast at the Citizens of Crestview Outreach program.


OUTREACH from page Al


influenced by their late
mother, Mary Johnson,
whose example of giving
and helping others led
them to a life of giving to
their community.
The group operated
with donated water from a
neighbor's home for many
years but has recently
saved enough money
to install water and
restrooms inside their
building.
"It was a happy day
when we got our water
and restrooms," Bess said
with a smile.
Volunteers have
seen an increase in
the numbers served by
the outreach program
during these difficult
economic times. They
stress that anyone who
walks up is welcome.
While Bess was shy about
placing a donation jar
on the table during the
Thanksgiving meal, she


OUTREACH: Peggy Andrews and Dee Williams prepare meals that will be
delivered to local senior citizens for a Thanksgiving meal.


did acknowledge that the
organization operates
solely on donations from
individuals and a few local


church groups.
"I love doing this,"
said volunteer Dorcas
Scott, who recently


learned about the
program. "It's just an
awesome blessing for the
community."


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Wednesday, November 25, 2009


Photos by BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
IN MEMORY: City and Covenant Hospice staff at the planting of a red top maple tree in Dogwood Park on
South Main Street. From left, Covenant Community Health Educator Sharon Wise, Chaplain Gerald Munday,
Crestview Mayor David Cadle, Covenant Hospice Director Pat Dingess, Covenant Community Health
Educator Carolyn Williams, and Crestview Public Works staff members Paula Pigott and Donny Baggett.




Rooted in memory of loved ones


Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com
It mightbejust a small sap-
ling with deep red fall foliage,
but its meaning is towering.
On Nov. 17, a small group
gathered in Dogwood Park at
the foot of South Main Street
to witness the planting of a
new red top maple tree. Do-
nated by the Flower Basket
florist, the tree was planted in
memory of loved ones served
by Covenant Hospice.
"In observance of National
Hospice Month, we thought
we would go ahead and plant
a tree to help folks remember
their loved ones instead .of
having ourusual open house,"
explained Covenant Hospice
Director Pat Dingess.


After city Public Works
workers Paula Pigott and
Donny Baggett reverently
planted the tree, they joined
hospice staff and Mayor Da-
vid Cadle as Covenant Hos-
pice Chaplain Gerald Munday
offered a brief prayer.
"We thank you, Lord, for
Covenant Hospice, for 25
years of caring for people in
our community," Munday
prayed.
Cadle then read a mayoral
proclamation that proclaimed
November "Hospice Month in
Crestview."
"I appreciate you all so
very, very much," said Cadle,
whose late father had re-
ceived hospice care in his fi-
nal days. "My family and I all
do."


PLANTING: Crestview Public Works staff members
Paula Pigott and Donry Baggett plant a red top
maple tree in memory of community members'
loved ones who have been served by Covenant
Hospice.


Natn r ! Gm. The Comfortable Choice
















.-- " .. - -- - . . .- ," "
-.,~ ..Natural G'as


i


Photos by BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
RIBBON CUTTING: The Baron's Tea House celebrated its
ribbon-cutting with the Crestview Area Chamber of
Commerce on a lucky Friday, Nov. 13.


Crestview tea parlor changes hands


Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com
Afternoon tea. It's some-
thing that sounds, well, ve-
ddy English. Maybe a little
frivolous. Perhaps a bit lav-
ish. Certainly a bit foreign to
Crestview.
But when times are
tough, folks are stressed and
life is just too darn hectic,
tea drinkers insist that tak-
ing time to relax over a cup
of Earl Grey, Orange Spice,
Ginger Bounce or Lady Han-
nah's Fruit Tea is just the
ticket to soothing the spirit.
It offers time to fall back and
regroup, they enthuse.
Add a fantastic variety of
sandwiches or home-baked
quiches, and you've not only
rejuvenated, but also you've
had a darned good lunch.
Local lovers of the Ivy
Leaf Tea Parlor on West
James Lee Boulevard were
devastated earlier this year
when they learned their
favorite haunt might close
down. They rallied their
forces - and thrust Erica
Teets into the fray. She and
her husband, Kurt, bought
the Ivy Leaf from previous
owner. Elaine Broome, and
tea - and hat swapping,
more on that in a moment
- resumed.
Renamed the Baron's Tea
House, the parlor celebrated
its Crestview Area Chamber
of Commerce ribbon cutting
on Friday, Nov. 13, a day that
proved luckyfor lovers of af-
ternoon tea.
Erica Teets is quick to
point out there's more to
Baron's than just the fancy
Victorian tea. The tea parlor
also offers breakfastpastries,
soups, quiches and after the
New Year - sooner, if we're
lucky - that two-handed
New Orleans gastronomical
sandwich extravaganza, the
muffuletta.
The Baron's Tea House,
named by the Teets' 5-year-
old daughter, Richelle, after
Baron Humbert von Gik-
kingen in the Disney/Studio


Ghiblifilm "The CatReturns,"
maintained the Ivy Leaf's
Victorian ambience. It might
look a little too froufrou for the
menfolk until they try it.
"The tea caf6 is gender-
neutral," Erica Teets assures
gentlemen patrons. "In fact,
we have lots of men who
come in for the sandwiches.
The other day I had two men
come in just for lunch, and
they enjoyed it."
In addition to the spacious
tea caf6, the parlor includes
the Victorian tearooms, a
banquet room in the back
that's perfect for business or
club meetings and showers,
and a gift shop. The side and
front porches are great for
relaxing in nice weather.
Now about those hats:
When the parlor first opened,
Broome festooned the Victo-
rian tearooms with an as-
sortment of ladies' hats and
accessories, and in a frivo-
lous mood one day, some
patrons started dressing up
in them. It rapidly became a
tradition. As many of the la-
dies brought their husbands
to tea, Broome had to add
men's toppers, as well.
"For the ladies, we have
the hats and scarves and
boas to dress up in, and we
have the hats for gentlemen,
as well," Teets assured.
"Sometimes we have teen-
age boys come in with their
families, and they dress up
well. A lot of the ladies and
young girls, they like that."
Tea is an escape, Teets
said. One hesitates to call it a
civilized escape because that
might frighten some folks
away, but it is. It's a complete
change of pace and some-
thing exceptionally different
to do in northern Okaloosa
County. The Baron's local
proponents, including News
Bulletin columnist Estelle
Rogers, add that because it
refreshes the body and the
soul, it's needed now more
than ever.
Give it a try, they ericour-
age. Wearing a silly hat is
optional.


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CRESTVIEW'S TEA MATRON: The Baron's Tea House owner
Erica Teets fills a plate with an assortment of foods
prepared for guests at the parlor's ribbon cutting.


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Wednesday, November 25, 2009


Arts & Entertainment


Crestview News Bulletin | AS


Opal Westmoreland's

photography on exhibit at library


BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
'KINDERGARTEN' PHILOSOPHY: The cast of the Crestview High School drama program's fall production, "All
I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten," performs the show's final scene. From left, Jessica
McMillan, Victoria Martin, Tristi Bond, Jesse Hinton, Jarick Rivers and Ryan Vance.


CHS goes back to 'Kindergarten'


Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor
Sometimes you feel a little guilty
for laughing during a play when it's
tackling a serious issue. That's why
I love "All I Really Need to Know I
Learned in Kindergarten," which
opened, Thursday night at the gor-
geously renovated Pearl Tyner Audi-
torium at Crestview High School.
The show finds the humor in life,
even in some of its more serious mo-
ments. I love it because, being a se-
ries of vignettes, the real heavy stuff
is punctuated by plenty of levity. I like
laughing in the theater. And I also
love it because it always uses an en-
semble cast, which gives everyone on
the stage a chance to be in the spot-
light. *
The show is the first under the
direction of the school's new drama
teacher, Alison Wilks, whose deft di-
rection provided a tight-knit show
that flowed smoothly from vignette
to vignette. An excellent and ebul-
lient cast of six propels the show from
scene to scene.
Some of the scenes are mono-
logues, while others are small pro-
ductions in themselves. I counted
'at least 18, but I was so caught up
in them, I probably skipped a few.
Props are kept to a minimum. In fact,
some, such as the flatware in a funny
piece about dishwashing, were panto-
mimed.
The cast starred three girls, Tristi
Bond, Victoria Martin and Jessica
McMillan, and three boys, Jesse Hin-
ton, Jarick Rivers and Ryan Vance.
Each had the opportunity to "star" as
the featured performer in some of the
scenes. �
Jarick always can be counted on

Community -

Arts

CALENDAR

Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor

Photography by
Opal Westmoreland
THROUGH DECEM-
BER * Photography by tal-
ented local photographer
Opal Westmoreland is on
exhibit at the Crestview
Public Library, 1445 Com-
merce Drive. Call 682-4432
for further information.

Pawpaw's
Play-Purties
THROUGH DECEM-
BER * From Lionel trains
to an Amos-n-Andy taxi-
cab, check out the toys that .\
made Grandpa's face light
up when he found them
shiny and new 'under the
Christmas tree as a kid.
Visit this free exhibition of
Christmas favorites from
yesteryear from the Baker
Block Museum and the
family attics of News Bul-
letin writer Brian Hughes
in the lobby display cases
of the Crestview Public Li-
brary during regular open-
ing hours. For information,
call the library at 682-4432.

Davidson Christmas
choral concert
DEC. 1 * The Davidson
Middle School Dynamics
and Tempo Select chorus-
es will perform a selection
of Christmas music at First
Baptist Church for their
annual "Just Older Youth" ., ,.
holiday event. For more in- '.
formation and performance
time, call Choral Music Di-
rector Keitha Bledsoe, 683- k
7500, ext 313.


for strong, steady performances. His , itself will give it away, so suffice to say
expertise includes getting into his that Jessica's delightfully nuanced
characters' heads and translating description of events at a society
them to believable stage presence, wedding that goes somewhat awry
In "Kindergarten..." he's given sev- is progressively funnier and funnier,
eral great opportunities to display his demonstrating skillful timing and ap-
craft. A CHS senior, he will be missed preciation of her audience.
after graduation. Easily able to grasp and portray
Newcomer Ryan Vance, a fresh- mature characters, remarkable giv-
man, bears watching. Already expe- en her 15 years, Jessica delighted the
rienced from several pre-high-school opening night crowd with her mea-
productions, he brings vitality to the sured delivery in several lead roles.
stage. His "Cinderella pig," in par- We eagerly await the sophomore's
ticular, was masterfully played'and next appearance on the Pearl Tyner
was a clear audience favorite. Under stage.
Wilks' guidance, I know we will enjoy Tristi Bond and Victoria Martin
watching him develop as an actor carried their rich variety of charac-
during the next three years. ters enthusiastically, adding sparkle
Jesse Hinton, like Jarick, is as per- to their scenes and supporting their
sonable off stage as he is on and nev- fellow performers with reliable pro-
er fails to delight ticket holders with fessionalism.
his enthusiastic grasp of a character. I especially enjoyed Tisti's sensi-
We've enjoyed him in three previous tive portrayal of an elderly woman
productions for the CHS drama pro- explaining the eccentricities of her
gram, and "Kindergarten..." audi- husband (Jarick) to a cynical younger
ences heartily approved his energet- man (Jesse). Victoria, in turn, was a
ic, lusty performance in the vignette hoot as she described in vivid detail
about Beethoven's "Ode to Joy.". the gunk that accumulates in a sink
Just as easily, he turned in a quiet- after the dishes are washed.
ly effective portrayal of an Auschwitz "All I Really Need to Know I
survivorteachingalifelessontoRyan, Learned in Kindergarten" contains
who portrayed his headstrong young some wonderful bits of philosophy
colleague. His aptitude at grasping ("What if cleaning up your own
an Eastern European dialect gave mess was a matter of government
his character an added believability, policy?" or "To love something
A junior, we are fortunate Jesse will and to possess it are not the same
be with Crestview High's drama pro- thing.") from the writings of Dr.
gram another year. Robert Fblghum. Alison Wilks' pro-
The girls were not about to be duction perks merrily along, ably
outdone. In particular, Jessica Mc- aided by a disciplined stage and
Millan has twice had me laughing light crew, and looked fresh and
aloud at her seamless presentation colorful. A few opening night sound
of her Act II opener, "The Mother glitches were quickly overcome, re-
of the Bride." (I caught a rehearsal sulting in a thoroughly enjoyable,
earlier in the week and laughed then, and occasionally thought-provok-
too.) Anything I say about the sketch ing, evening of live theater.


866.948.6104

strongerconnected.comrn/save


Brian Hughes
Arts & Entertainment Editor
If you haven't seen the cur-
rent collection of Opal West-
moreland's stunning nature
photography at the Crestview
Public Library, then you'd
better hurry because "I have
a whole new set coming in
December," the artist prom-
' ised.
For 15 years, Westmore-
land, a second cousin of Gen.
William Westmoreland, has
been taking photos of the
world around her. Only within
the past five years did it occur
to her to share her beautiful
works with the public. When
she entered some photos
at the Pensacola Fair, she
started garnering first- and
second-place ribbons and
people's choice awards.
After moving to Crestview
from her native North Caro-
lina, Westmoreland rapidly
found her favorite photogra-
phy haunts. She likes ven-
turing off the beaten path,
whether it's poking around
the Shoal River, following
hiking trails south of town or
just exploring the banks of
the pond near her Crestview
home. *'
"My camera goes every-
where with me, and I take
pictures of everything," West-
moreland said. "Everything I
look at is in picture mode. My
eyes are set so I think, gee, is
that a picture or not?"
A cosmetologist by trade,
Westmoreland creates artist-
ry of a different type at Hair
World in Northview Plaza, but
'photography is her passion.
"I have a lot of birds and
squirrels in my backyard that
I like to take pictures of," she
said. "I like macro photogra-
phy. I have some pictures of
honeybees close-up."
While walking by the pond
near her home one day, she
found a honeybee "wound up
in plants," a sort of "napping"
position bees adapt on cool
evenings. He became the sub-
ject of one of Westmoreland's
macro-photographs.
Discovering the region
around Crestview affords
Westmoreland's camera a
never-ending wealth of sub-
ject matter.


EMBARK'


CENTURYTL


"I like to go up to Lake
Jackson in Florala, and I took
some pictures last November
when the cypress trees were
changing colors," she said.
"I really enjoy it. It's my es-
cape."
People who view the capti-
vating photos Westmoreland
has on exhibit at the library
might be surprised to know
she took them with a simple
point-n-shoot Kodak Easy
Share digital camera.
"It's only 6 megapixels, but
I get phenomenal pictures
from it," she said.
Like others who have dis-
covered digital photography,
Westmoreland likes the for-
mat's ability to shoot nearly
endless quantities of pictures
imtil just the right one is cap-
tured.
"When I was doing 35 mm,
I would take two or three
rolls, and I would get maybe
10 pictures I could use," she
recalled.
A few tweaks with the im-
aging software that accom-
panied her camera allows
Westmoreland to create �an
entirely new photographic
work of art from an existing
picture. Coming upon a con-
trolled burn in the wetlands
south of Crestview one day,
she snapped some photos of
smoldering tree stumps.
"I fixed it, and it's really
eerie-looking," she said.
The mother of two grown
sons, Bryan and Christopher,
Westmoreland lives with her
mother, Myrtle Westmore-
land. The ladies' home is filled
with Opal's photography.
When she's not doing hair,
she's taking nature walks and
capturing the world she sees
in vivid photography.
"I've always been told I
have a very creative eye, and
I have magic hands," West-
moreland said.
Opal Westmoreland's
photography will be on ex-
hibit through December
at the Crestview Public Li-
brary, 1445 Commerce Drive
(behind the post office), 682-
4432. See her online galleries
at www.taltopia.com/media.
aspx?u+imagelady or www.
viewbug.com/user/images
1667. All photos are available
for purchase.


CenturyLink-
Stronger ConnectedT


ri,,,, r , . I I Oh 4 hhcssAllviq~l, R- 1 [hr l ,,Cmo v~c4o~ i A IN IIIIINJINOrio I .I rN 1 rI lYN. [N im AllOriO m i v pIqIw[ f,0~I .c 0 m. I





A6 I CrePtviPw News Bulletin


L ,ocal


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


DONATION


BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
FRIENDS SHARING AND CARING: Sharing and Caring
President Robin Marston, third from left, receives
a check from, from left, Friends of the Crestview
Library President Pam Crowley, Treasurer Nancy
Moxcey and Book Sale Chairman Dot Moxcey.
The Friends of the Crestview Library presented
Sharing and Caring of Crestview a check for
$250 to thank the food bank for allowing the
organization to use some of its storage space at
the Sharing and Caring facility. "We store books
there for the semi-annual, Friends of the Library
book sale," explained Moxcey. Sharing and
Caring uses such cash donations to buy food from
local grocers for disadvantaged area families
to supplement non-perishable food donations
received from individuals, churches and other
organizations.


Teeing off for Sharing & Caring


Golf tourney knocks a


hole-in-one for food bank


Brian Hughes
brianh@crestviewbulletin.com
It was a good day for
golf Friday at Foxwood
Country Club in Crest-
view. For 24 players in the
second annual Sharing &
Caring Golf Tournament,
it wasn't just about teeing
off, however. It was also a
good day to raise money
for the local food bank.
Playing in six teams,
between their registra-
tion fee and raffle, the ef-
fort raised roughly $1,000
toward purchasing food
for area needy families.
"The first tournament
was successful, and this
one has been, too," said
a satisfied Crestview
City Councilman Charles
Baugh Jr., who helped or-
ganize the event.
The golf tournament,


coordinated by Mark Sea-
mans and Timothy Ander-
son, was the culminating
event in a weeklong drive
for Sharing & Caring
that began-the preceding
weekend with an effort by
Ron Gautney, the Main
Street Association and
the Spanish Trail Cruis-
ers Club.
"Ron did the first leg of
the surge," smiled Baugh.
Prior to the golf tourna-
ment, 300 pounds of non-
perishable food donations
for Sharing & Caring was
raised by -the Air Force
F-35 Nomads and Joy Fel-
lowship Church.
"These are the 'new',
Nomads," Baugh hastily
clarified, "and they have
promised to continue the
tradition."
Friday's contribution
to the food bank from the


Photos by BRIAN HUGHES I Crestview News Bulletin
TEEING OFF: One of six teams in the Sharing & Caring
Golf Tournament, Jason Henning, David Beale, Kyle
Hart and Mark Medonis, all members of the 96th Air
Base Wing, prepare to tee off.


tournament proceeds was
accepted by President
Robin Marston, First Vice
President Phyllis Russ
and Second Vice Presi-
dent Madge Timmons.
"He's like an honor-
ary member of Sharing &
Caring," raved Marston of
Baugh.,


"I'm a stealth member,"
the councilman laughed.
After their lunch, the
players gathered outside
of the Foxwood clubhouse,
where Baugh assured
them, "Thanks to you,
there are 900 families who
will have a better Thanks-
giving. God bless you!"


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ORGANIZERS: Tournament organizers and members
of Crestview's Sharing & Caring pose before the
second annual golf tournament. From left, Crestview
City Councilman Charles Baugh Jr., Sharing &
Caring First Vice President Phyllis Russ, organizer
Mark Seaman, Sharing & Caring President Robin
Marston, Second Vice President Madge Timmons
and organizer Timothy Anderson.


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c s I v I u e

News Bulletin


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Wednesday, November 25, 2009


Local


Crestview News Bulletin I A7


Check it OUT


Heather Nitzel
Youth Services Librarian.
'Robert Sikes Public Library
Happy Thanksgiving! The library is
closed tomorrow and Friday. I hope you
enjoy good food with people you love!

PROGRAMS
Tomorrow is Thanksgiving! At Story
Time today, we will tell stories, sing
songs and make a turkey! Children ages
3 to 5, join us at 10:15 a.m. for a delightful
time! Sign-in begins at 10 a.m. Next week,
on Wednesday, Dec. 2, or Thursday, Dec.
3, our stories and activities will focus on
koalas, kangaroos, wombats and more!
We'll finish up by making a koala.
For children under three and their
caregiver, Lap Sit is Monday, Nov. 30
and Tuesday, Dec. 1. Sign-in begins at
10 a.m., and stories and songs about
piggies start at 10:15 a.m.!
If you are 12 to 17, play Wii between
2 and 4 p.m. Friday! Teen Anime Club
meets Tuesdays at 4:30 p.m.
In Early Release Craft Time
on Wednesday, Dec. 2, we'll recycle
Christmas cards to make a Christmas
wreath! Children ages 6 and up are
encouraged to register at the front desk.
We'll hold a craft for registered children
until 2 p.m. and then make crafts with
kids present in the library while supplies


last! Start your craft anytime between 1
and 2 p.m. Finish by 3 p.m.

STAFF PICKS
"Kit Learns a Lesson" by Valerie
Tripp. (J Fic Tri) Kit hopes dad will find
a new job soon! When he does, things
in the Kittredge household can go back
to the way they were before dad lost


his business. Kit
won't have to get up
early every morning
before school to help
mother with chores
for the bothersome
boarders, the people
who pay to live in the
Kittredges' house.
Best of all, Kit will have
more time to write
newspapers for dad,
like she used to. But
when Kit helps deliver
her class' Thanksgiving
food basket to a soup
kitchen, she realizes the
Depression has changed
some things permanently
- and she learns a


surprising lesson about
being thankful.
"Over the River
and Through the Woods" by Lydia
Maria Child. (E Kit Gur) Illustrated
poem and music describe the joys of a
Thanksgiving visit to grandmother's
house.

JUST ASK
Any questions? Just ask Jean, Sandra,
Anna, Marie, Sengdara, Tracey, Janice,
Audrey, Sharon, Mike or Heather. We will
be happy to assist you.


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QUOTE OF THE WEEK
"It takes a great man to make a good
listener." Arthur Helps

HOW TO CONTACT US
In person -- 1445 Commerce Drive
(behind the Post Office)
By phone - 682-4432
On the Web - www.cityofcrestview.
org/library.htm


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A8 I Crestview News Bulletin


Local


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


Shaquavia Hardy
Crestview News Bulletin
Born in Moab, Utah, and
raised in the quaint town of
Wilsonville, Neb., Lenora
Schilz grew up accustomed
to the true meaning of neigh-
borly hospitality. 0
Her mother and father
owned a farm and a small
family operated cafe named
after the town. The life of a
farmer's child was demand-
ing.
"We were busy literally
24/7, mowing, moving hay,
we even got to drive at a re-
ally young age," Schilz said.
Schilz has three sisters
and four brothers. She at-
tended Wilsonville High
School where her entire
senior, class consisted of 10
people. A friendly and warm-
hearted people person, she
was nominated homecom-
ing queen of her high school
and graduated in the class of
1974.
Schilz went on to McCook
Junior College where she
pursued a degree in political
science. To this day, she still
possesses a passion for gov-
ernment and follows politics'
avidly.
She admires former Unit-
ed Kingdom Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher because
she "stuck by her principles,


[and] she was a very strong
woman."
While in college, Schilz
was introduced through
friends to her husband, Mike
Schilz, who was pursuing
a degree in medical tech-
nology. The two married in
1976. Fast-forward 33 bliss-
ful years, and the Schilz's
are happily married with
two successful children,
Justin Schilz, a Marine air
traffic controller for the De-
partment of Defense, and
Jael Jones, a deputy clerk
for juvenile court in Bristol,
Tenn. They also have two
grandchildren, Marshall and
Brylee.
Lenora Schilz enjoys sew-
ing and baking and is known
for her coconut cr6me pies.
Living in Crestview since
she left North Carolina, she
thoroughly enjoys the town.
"It is just a friendly
place," she said of the town
she has grown to love.
"Meet Your Neighbor"
highlights area residents
and is a new feature that
will run periodically in the
Crestview News Bulletin.
If you have someone you
would like to see featured in
"Meet Your Neighbor," e-mail
News Bulletin Editor Mi-
chael Stewart at michaels@
crestviewbulletin.com.


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN
Elvis, impersonated by Jerome Jackson, was a big hit with sock hop
attendees at Emerald Coast Hospice on Oct. 17.


Emerald Coast Hospice hosts

sock hop for senior citizens


CRESTVIEW - Emerald Coast Hospice
on Redstone Avenue in Crestview held a
free Sock Hop for senior citizens on Oct.
17. Elvis impersonator Jerome Jackson
from Dothan, Ala., was the main event.
Staff members and volunteers assisted
residents from local nursing homes as
needed.
It's hard to tell who had more fun,
the staff or residents. One of the favor-
ite parts was that the residents from
the nursing homes were picked up and
taken to the sock hop by Bay Limos.


Walkers didn't stop anyone from danc-
ing on this dance floor. Elvis stayed
around and signed autographs and
took pictures with everyone.
Guglielmo's donated delicious pizza
for the sock hop, and Walmart donated
a large cake for everyone to share.
"Emerald Coast Hospice can't wait
to have another one next year. This one
was a blast. It just feels great to give
back to this wonderful community we
serve in," said Joye Garrett, an LPN at
Emerald Coast Hospice.


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TIP OF
THE WEEK

Okaloosa County
Sheriff's Crime Preven-
tion Unit Tip of the Week
Women's
Self-Defense Tips
National statistics in-
dicate three out of four
women will fall victim to
at least one violent crime
during their lifetime, but
there are things women
can do to help themselves
not to be a victim.
* Trust your instincts:
Women are very intuitive;
go with your gut. If a situ-
ation does not feel right,
then leave.
* Know what message
you're sending out: Pay
attention to your sur-
roundings, get out your
keys and park in well
lighted areas.
* Never walk alone
at night or any time in
isolated areas: Preda-
tors love these locations;.
avoid them.
* If you live alone:
Make sure that all your
mail is addressed by just
your first initial followed
by your surname.
* Don't do anything
to cloud your judgment,
such as drinking exces-
sive amounts of alcohol
or taking mind altering
drugs. Never leave any
food/drink unattended
where it might be tam-
pered with.
* If you are ap-
proached:
1: Let the person know
you are aware of their
presence.
2: Save yourself. Don't
depend on other people
to save you.
3: Fight back.
4: Carry pepper spray.
Also wasp spray works
just as well.
Okaloosa County
Sheriff's Office non-
emergency number: 850-
651-7400


Lenora Schilz


I





Wednesday, November 25, 2009


Local


Crestview News Bulletin I A9


FWC arrests 12 on illegal purchase, possession of foxes and coyotes


Florida Wildlife Commission
Special to the News Bulletin
At the conclusion of a
10-month undercover in-
vestigation Tuesday night,
the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) arrested
12 people for the illegal
purchase and possession
of live foxes and coyotes,
and the unpermitted use
of these animals in fenced
enclosures for the pur-
pose of allowing dogs to
pursue them. In addition
to undercover work, the
investigation involved aer-
ial surveillance as the sus-
pects moved from county
to county, transporting the
animals to enclosures.
Permits are required
to possess these ani-
mals, and it is unlawful.
to purchase foxes or
-coyotes from an unli-
censed person. In addi-
tion, the enclosures must
be permitted and meet
state requirements. Large
fenced enclosures; often
several hundred acres,
have been established and
permitted on private lands
to provide areas where
dogs can chase foxes and
coyotes without crossing
landowner boundaries
and creating trespass
situations. The owners of
these enclosures typically
charge patrons a fee to al-
low their dogs to track the
animals inside the fenced
enclosures.
During the investiga-
tion, FWC officers posed
as suppliers of foxes and
coyotes that were illegally
possessed and sold the
animals to the suspects.
The undercover officers
told the suspects that
they did not have the
proper permits to sell the
animals.
"Over the past year, we
have received numerous
complaints regarding the
enclosures," said FWC
Chairman Rodney Bar-
reto. "Last September,
the other commissioners
and I directed the FWC to
conduct a comprehensive
review of this practice
and examine the agency's
permitting process and
report back to us. This
investigation is something
we will weigh when we
make decisions about the
future operation of these
enclosures."


On Sept. 22, the FWC
enacted a moratorium on
permitting this activity
any further. The mora-
torium was the result of
complaints on permitted
facilities and subsequent
inspections conducted by
FWC officers. The morato-
rium applies to all applica-
tions for releasing foxes
or coyotes in new fenced
enclosures, all pending
applications for new per-
mits and all applications
for re-issuance of permits
for enclosures where
permits have lapsed.
There are currently six
permitted enclosures in
the state.
SWith a valid permit, a
person may import foxes
into the state and release
them into private fenced
enclosures only if the ani-
mals are vaccinated and
have been quarantined.
The trapping of foxes for
this purpose in Florida
is prohibited. Only those
foxes from states'that
have been rabies-free for
a year are allowed into
the state. It's illegal to kill
gray or red foxes, and it
is illegal to possess gray
or red foxes without a
permit.
The importation of
coyotes into Florida is
prohibited. However, a
valid permit allows for
coyotes to be trapped in
Florida and relocated to
private enclosures.
Translocation of wild-
caught foxes and coyotes
can spread disease and
parasites. It is believed
that in 1994 a strain of
rabies was introduced
into Florida as a result of
coyotes being transported
from Texas to Florida.
Rabies, distemper and a
tapeworm (Echinococcus
multilocularis) can infect
foxes and coyotes and
spread fo other mammals.
In addition to citizens'
complaints, officials with
the Alabama Depart-
ment of Conservation and
Natural Resources also
notified the FWC that
foxes and coyotes were
being illegally transported
'into Florida for fenced
enclosures. Alabama of-
ficers had learned of the
illegal activities in Florida
after conducting their own
investigation of similar
activities. The FWC began
its undercover operation


last January and investi-
gated 12 facilities through-
out the state.
Twelve suspects were
arrested (see below)
and 46 citations issued.
Most of the citations
are for second-degree
misdemeanors. A second-
degree misdemeanor
carries a penalty of up to
$500 and up to 60 days in
jail. One suspect, Edgar
R. Bryan (DOB 10/23/35)
is a convicted felon who
served 25 years in prison
for first-degree murder
and is on parole.
Of the 12 enclosures
investigated, eight were
involved in illegal activity.
Suspects at two permitted
facilities made illegal pur-
chases. Six other facilities
were identified as having
no permits.
"I would like to com-
mend our FWC officers
for a job well done," Bar-
reto said. "The difficult
and often dangerous
work these officers com-
pleted shows clearly that
some individuals operate
outside the boundaries of
the law, and they are now
facing charges."
Prior to the morato-
rium, to get a permit for
an enclosure, an ap-
plicant vas required to
have a minimum of 100
acres within the enclo-
sure, and the enclosure
had to meet fence-height
requirements and include
areas for the foxes and
coyotes to escape from.
the dogs. Those who
currently possess an
enclosure permit are also
required to have their
animals vaccinated, arid
the animals must be kept
in a safe, sanitaryand hu-
mane manner. Addition-
ally, the facility owners
are required to show the
source, date of acquisi-
tion pnd date of release
of foxes and coyotes into
a high-fenced facility. The
facilities are subject to
unannounced inspections
by the FWC.
Following is the list
of those arrested in this
covert operation. The
county is the location
of the violation. The
charging statute is ES.
379.4015(2) (a) (2). For
classifications of captive
wildlife, go to MyFWC.
com/Rules, and click on
"Captive Wildlife."


Calhoun County
Edgar R. Bryan, DOB
10/23/35
Charges: 3 Counts
- Purchase of coyote
from an unpermitted per-
son, ES. 68A-6.0023(7)
3 Counts - Failure to
vaccinate prior to release,
ES. 68A-9.002(1)

Okaloosa County
William McCurdy, DOB
10/20/44
Charges: 3 Counts
- Purchase of coyote
from an unpermitted per-
son, ES. 68A-6.0023(7)
2 Counts - Purchase of
fox from an unpermitted
person, ES. 68A-6.0023(7)
2 Counts - Possession
of fox without permit, 68A-
24.002(2) (c)
3 Counts - Possession
of Class II animal (coyote)


without a permit, FS. 68A-
6.0011(1)
Larry Moore, DOB
01/20/48
Charges: Purchase of
coyote from an unpermit-
ted person, ES. 68A-
6.0023(7)
Possession of Class II
animal (coyote) without a
permit, ES. 68A-6.0011(1)

James F Melton, DOB
10/31/39
Charges: Purchase of
coyote from an unpermit-
ted person, ES. 68A-
6.0023(7)
Possession of Class II
animal (coyote) without a
permit, ES. 68A-6.0011(1)

Frankie C. Beverly,
DOB 07/17/49
Charges: Purchase of
coyote from an unpermit-


ted person (Okaloosa),
ES. 68A-6.0023(7)
Failure to control ani-
mal diseases (Bay), FS.
585.145(2)

Bay County
Billy Melvin Jr., DOB
11/15/59
Charges: Purchase of
coyote from an unpermit-
ted person, ES. 68A-
6.0023(7)
Possession of Class II
animal (coyote) without a
permit, ES.-68A-6.0011(1)

James Lovett, DOB
11/14/59
Charges: Purchase of
coyote from an unpermit-
Sted person, ES. 68A-
6.0023(7)
Possession of Class II
animal (coyote) without a
permit, ES. 68A-6.0011(1)


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A10 I Crestview News Bulletin


Opinion


Wednesday, November 25,2009


HUBBUB
Here is a sampling of what people had to say about re-
cent north Okaloosa County news topics. Comments were
collected from the crestviewbulletin.com Web site.

Topic: Arts & Entertainment Editor Brian Hughes
lamented for the days of the "classic" James Bond on
the occasion of 007's recent birthday.
I agree! I miss those good old days when a Bond movie
had a story. And I agree about the color issue. What's next?
Will Bond 23 be in sepia?

What has happened to the classic supporting players
like Boothroyd and Moneypenny? OHMSS is one of my
favorites as well.

I need to weigh in for the womenfolk here. Bond films
appeal to us too. I appreciate that the Bond Girls are almost
always independent and resourceful and not the pretty
playthings they are accused of being.

They should put James Bond back into the '60s and
keep him there. Keep that '60s color, look and atmosphere.
The Indiana Jones films are great period pieces that don't
need "updating" to keep their relevance. Bond could be the
same.

Cool idea! Keep the Russkies, SMERSH and of course
SPECTRE as the bad guys and keep all those cool'60s
gadgets and bring back Q!

Topic: The 11th Annual Crestview Run for the Toys
motorcycle event raises more than $5,000 and a trailer
full of toys for needy kids.
Too bad they'll end up making the children deaf while
in the process of delivering them their toys. Loud Pipes
Destroy Lives!

The riders don't deliver the toys, theyjust donate them.
Families First Network, the Lakeview Foundation, Baptist
Health Care, distribute all the toys and gift certificates.

Thanks Ken for putting on another great ride and rais-
ing a bunch of toys and money for these kids.

Topic: A Crestview woman was arrested for ag-
gravated battery after police said she nearly killed her
boyfriend by allegedly slashing his throat and stomach
with a utility knife after he reportedly punched her in
the face.
Just when we are threatening to ruin our north county
reputation with too much civilization we can always count
on a couple local rustics to drag us down a few pegs with
their redneck behavior.

Psycho twit ought to be hung for attempted murder.
Women get away with far too much in this country. Like
when they kill their babies or bare their young with pre-
natal addictions. What happens to them? Not a darn thing.
Women in America are the scum of the earth.

Psycho twit? I say when a cowardly, poor excuse of a
man decides to use a woman as a punching bag, he does
DESERVE whatever he gets. Be it a knife, a gun, a baseball
bat, most women are not physically capable of 'fighting' a
man. Call me old fashioned, but there is slim picking's when
it comes to men being REAL men these days. And WHY is
she locked up when the meth-makin'-momma is out YET
again after cooking' up some more drugs as her poor child
sits by? I think they're lockin' up the wrong dang folks!

Another Crestview love story. Niceville? Fort Walton?
Don't your people love each other? Why don't you have such
heart-warming stories about the citizens of these other
cities?

Profundity

Brian Hughes
brianh@crestvibwbulletin.com


"One cannot think well, love well, sleep

well, if one has not dined well."

VIRGINIA WOOLF
(1882 - 1941)
English novelist, essayist, publisher, feminist
and writer of short stories


C RE S TVI EW



News Bulletin
To report news, for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 682-6524.


NEWS INFORMATION
IF YOU HAVE A CONCERN OR COMMENT
ABOUT CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN'S
COVERAGE, PLEASE CALL 682-6524.
PUBLISHER
JASON MOBLEY
EDITOR
MICHAEL STEWART
OFFICE STAFF
DENISE CADENHEADO. OFFICE ASSISTANT
SHERRIE STANLEY.... RECEP./CIRC. ASST.
ADVERTISING INFORMATION
DIANA BAKER....... AD CONSULTANT
RANDY BEARD ...... SALES MANAGER
MELISSA TEDDER .... MEDIA CONSULTANT
EDITORIAL
BRIAN HUGHES....... WRITER
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR
ANN SPANN ........ PHOTOGRAPHER
RANDY DICKSON .... SPORTS EDITOR
RENEE BELL ........ TYPESETTING


PRODUCTION
GREG ALLEN ....... 'RODLICION
CIRCULATION INFORMATION
682-6524
THE CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN
IS PUBLISHED TWICE WEEKLY EACH
WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY BY FLORIDA
FREEDOM NEWSPAPERS, INC., AT 295 W.
JAMES LEE BLVD., CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA
32536. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT
CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA. POSTMASTER:
PLEASE SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO
295 W. JAMES LEE BLVD., CRESTVIEW,
FLORIDA 32536-3313. ALL MATERIAL
HEREIN IS PROPERTY 01 THE CRESTVIEW
NEWS BULLETIN.


GUEST COLUMN



Community reaches out




to help less fortunate


A few weeks ago, I
challenged the community
to come to the aid of our
Crestview Area Sharing
and Caring facility.
Mrs. Robin Marston,
who is the organization's
president, explained that
over 900 (that's right,
900) families have come
through the facility for
assistance in just one
month.,
Economic conditions
have caused hardships
for many of our neighbors
and I asked for help in
keeping those "Shar-
ing and Caring" shelves
stocked.
Many came to answer
the call and I would like
to thank Mr. Ron Gautney,


Span-
ish Trail
Cruisers,
Attorney
Brad Stu-
art, Elk's
Lodge
2436, J.R.
CHARLES L. Cony-
BAUGH JR. ers Lodge
Guest Columnist Third Ma-
sonic Dis-
trict, Six
Brothers Thrifty Foods,
First National Bank of
Crestview, CH2M HILL,
Joy Fellowship Church,
Crestview Kiwanis Club,
and Crestview Rotary
Club for food and mon-
etary donations totaling
$2,500 and 300 pounds of
food items for the cause.


Additionally, the
Nomad's of both the 9 AF
DET 33, and the 33rdJSF
Wing, raised $1,000 in their
Second Annual Sharing
and Caring Golf Tourna-
ment and over 200 pounds
of non perishables for this
ongoing community-wide
effort.
Thanksgiving and
Christmas are already
upon us and it is wonder-
ful to see all pull together
for those less fortunate in
our communities.
Thanks to the Crest-
view News Bulletin staff
for a great golf tburna-
ment flyer. Our original
flyer couldn't hold a
candle to yours.
Thanks to Mr. Cal Zeth-


mayr, of WJSB-FM, and
Mr. Ken Neilson, of CVC-
TV for donating media
time for the effort.
God bless all who
contributed to the ongoing
efforts to assist the Crest-
view Sharing and Caring
this holiday season and
thanks for their service to
our community.
I challenge the Crest-
view community to help
keep Sharing and Caring's
doors open through the
holiday season and be-
yond. Please contact Mrs.
Marston at 682-4208 to
coordinate donations.
Sincerely,
Charles E. Baugh Jr.,
vice president, Crestview
City Council


FARM BUREAU EDITORIAL



Help celebrate National Farm-City Week


This Thanksgiving Day,
as we gather with fam-
ily and friends to count
our blessings, let's give
thanks for the bounty we
enjoy not just on this holi-
day, but every day. The
safe, plentiful food that is
available to us, and the
products used to produce
the clothing, housing,
medicines, fuel and other
products we use on a dai-
ly basis didn't just appear
in a store. They got there
thanks to a tremendous
partnership of farms and
ranchers, processors, bro-


kers, truckers, shippers,
advertisers, wholesalers
and retailers.
In appreciation of this
farm-city partnership, the
President of the United
States and the Okaloosa
County Commission an-
nually proclaim the week
leading up to and includ-
ing Thanksgiving Day as
National Farm-City Week.
SRural and urban
residents are "Partners
in Progress" who produce
the products, consume
the products and make
them readily available


through an efficient
production and market-
ing chain. Farmers and
ranchers are just the
beginning. Inspectors,
wholesalers, agribusi-
nesses, marketers,
advertisers, retailers and
consumers all play impor-
tant roles in the incred-
ible productivity that has
made our nation's food
and fiber system the envy
of the world.
As we celebrate
Thanksgiving, let's
remember the vital
farm-city partnerships


that have done so rhuch
to improve the quality of
our lives. Rural and urban
communities working
together have made the
most of our rich agricul-
tural resources and have
made significant con-
tributions to our health
and well-being and to the
strength of our nation's
economy. For this, we can
give thanks.

Keith Free,
President
Okaloosa County
Farm Bureau


Returning from the
Post Office, what do I see?
A carnival at Spanish Trail
Park.Where did this come
from?
I had seen nothing in
the paper, nothing in the
Showcase Magazine (free
advertising) or anywhere
else.
I hadn't heard anything
on the radio, but I don't
listen to that 24/7.
Finally, I did see one
small ad in the paper
advertising the Main Street
Association Fll Carnival
with dates, Nov. 3-7,
that's it.
My point is, this is not
the first time I have driven
past Spanish Trail Park
and saw a carnival or other
activities going on, usually
with minimal attendance.
These events seem to
come and go in Crestview,
and few have knowledge of
them. How do the sponsor-
ing organizations expect
support if they don't make
an effort to advertise, in
advance, that there is an
event going on? It seems


Jason Mobley
Publisher
jasonm@crestviewbullelin com


Michael
Stewart
Editor
michaels@crestviewbullelin com


to me the city of Crestview
is still stuck in the mode
that a few organizers
know what's going on, and
they assume everyone
else does too. Maybe it is
mentioned in Church on
Sunday, therefore everyone
assumes everyone in town
knows about it.
Crestview has grown
too much. We are long past
the horse and buggy day
where everyone depended
on "word of mouth" to
spread the news. I would
probably attend some
of these events if I knew
about them, and did not
read about them after the
fact in the paper.
John Miller
Crestview resident
Editor's note: 7b submit
your event announce-
ments, e-mail Crestview
News Bulletin typesetter
Renee Bell at'okpublish-
ing@crestviewbulletin.
cor or editor Michael
Stewart at michaels@
crestviewbulletin.com.
Submissions can also be
sent byfax to 850-682-2246,


Melissa Tedder
Media
Consultant
Melssa@rcrestviewbulletin com


or dropped offin person at
the Crestview News Bul-
letin office at 295 W James
Lee Blvd

Greetings!
With the end of the year
just around the corner, we
hope that you will consider
the missions of the Ameri-
can Red Cross when you
think about your end of the
year charitable gifts.
Each year, the Ameri-
can Red Cross provides
so much to those in need.
Your gifts make that
possible. Last year, your
American Red Cross
helped more than 166
families recover from
home fire disasters. These
families relied on the
American Red Cross to
provide emergency food,
clothing and shelter.
More than 1,600
military families relied
on us to provide emer-
gency communications
announcing births, deaths
and impending crisis. We
taught more than 12,000
people life saving health


Ann Spann
Photographer
anns@crestvlewbulletin com


Greg Allen
Production
Manager
greg@crestviewbullelin com


Randy Beard Diana Baker Randy Dickson Renee Bell
Sales Manager Media Consultant Sports Editor Typesetter
tandyb@nwfdarlynews com dianab@crestviewbullelln com randyd@croslviewbullelin corn okpublishing@crestviewbullen coin


and safety classes. More
than 800 volunteers pro-
vided all these services in
partnership with only five
paid staff.
We know that when
you donate to an organiza-
tion, you do so because
you believe in the mission.
You also believe that the
people providing that mis-
sion will do the most they
can with your donated
dollar. We have lived up to
your trust year, after year,
after year.
The American Red
Cross has taken care of
the families for more than
125 years. Won't you help
us continue that tradition?
Visit our Web site to make
a secure, online donation
or contact our office to find
out how to donate stock,
write a check, or use a
credit card. 800-773-7620.
Thank you and have a
wonderful Thanksgiving
holiday.
Sincerely,
Jerry Kindle
Chief Executive Officer
American Red Cross


Brian Hughes
Writer,
A&E Editor
brianh@crestviewbullelin com


Sherrie Stanley
Receptionist/
Circ. Asst.
rieries@crestviewbullpin cornm


John Parrott
Military News
johnparrot@cox nel


Denise
Cadenhead
Receptionist
denlsec@c r esCv i ewbulleIlln comr


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


Meet the STAFF


In County Out of County
13 weeks........................... $9.45 13 weeks......................... $14.70
26 weeks......................... $17.85 26 weeks......................... $23.10
52 weeks........................ 32.76 52 weeks......................... $38.01


- . - I --------- - - �





Wednesday, November 25, 2009


School


Crestview News Bulletin | Al 1


Baker School HONOR STUDENTS


A Honor Roll
1ST GRADE: Lauren
Adams, Cayden Allen,
Shay Beck, Bayleigh Bur-
lison, Daisy Burns, Raley
Capps, Kaitlyn Church,
Kaylie Gasca, Kaleb Gib-
son, Eley Gillman, Caleb
Hicks, Conner Hohider,
Kaleb Howard, Briley
Lawsop, Ruby McLean,
Zachary Miller, Taylor'
Nixon, Jordan Reichert,
Ryon Sailor, Josh Smith,
Avery Stewart, Dominick
Symonette, Andres Valen-
zuela, Kinsey Van Dyke,
Reanna Vlasic, Emma
Wagner

2ND GRADE: Lily
Caswell, Eli Garrett, Kar-
lee Gray, Jayde Hender-
son, Madison Melanson,
Luke Miller, Abby Morway,
Shepp Plenge, Shannon
Polhlopek, Ryan Smiddy,
Sydney Stewart, Vivien
Symonette, Bryce Taylor,
Deomi Valmus, Lilli Kate
Wilkinson

3RD GRADE: Connor
Arnold, Sarah Colonna,
Michaela Franklin, Hay-
lee Gibbs, Rylee Gibbs,
Madison Nichols, Lindsey
Stewart

4TH GRADE: Saman-
tha Carver, Zac Childs,
Emmy Fountain, Logan
McMahon, Brett Walker,
Dalton Weeks

5TH GRADE: Tressie
Adams, Hannah Cox,
Thomas Crowson, Au-
tumn Eldridge, Jordan
Gatewood, Morgan
Griffitts, Alexandrea
Hayden, Alexis Lehnert,
Bethany McCranie,
Bianca Peters, Logan
Rickmon, Emily


Stewart, Jodie Welch,
Shiana Youngblood

6TH GRADE: Sierra
Brannon, Ryan Frazier,
Tabitha Shultz

7TH GRADE: Rachael
Carver, Seth Forehand,
Hannah Lindsay

8TH GRADE: Sophia
Chaitha, Brandon Engler,
Colton Golloher, Morgan
Lewellen, Jordan Linzy,
Katie Rispone, Alexandria
Roy, Stephen Shaw, Hana
Wadsworth

9TH GRADE: Adam
Crowson, Harley Darby,
Lindsay Gatewood, Alicia
Morris, Blake Phillips,
Meagan Pittman, Haley
Wagner

10TH GRADE: Jayson
Ducharme, Nathaniel Hol-
ley, Margaret Milstead,
Madeline Ray

11TH GRADE: Jacob
Allen, Paige Dabney,
Michael Dingess, Gabri-
ella Reber, Mollie Royal,
Alecia Springle

12TH GRADE: Lauren
Griffith, Colton Henry,
Dakota Hooper, Colten
Jernigan, Raven Lopez,
Ashley McIver, Stefan
Sanguyo, Jennifer Wood

A/B Honor Roll
1ST GRADE: Jesse-
Barrows, Kayelynn Car-
roll, Anna Cates, Vanessa
Chessher, Chris Clester,
Kera Daniels, Alyssa Day,
Angela Gauthier, Ben
Goetzke, Austin Hariel-
son, River Harper, Tyler
Harrington, Zane Hub-
bard, Logan Kauss, David


Legros, Jake Miller, Max
Molnar, Peyton Nelson,
Gabbie Roberts, Jaelyn
Rogers, Chandler Stew-
art, Kalea Ward, Nathan
Welle, Matthew White

2nd GRADE: Jackson
Adams, Garrett Anger,
Kaylee Arne, Nathan Ates,
Jayden Barton, Olivia
Berry, Lacey Boone, Mor-
gan Cross, Sam Crowson,
Phillip Cumbie, Devinee
Czarnecki, Dillon Freder-
icks, Kourtney Gay, Sarah
Hall, Bryce Hayden, Faith
Hutto, Phoenix Jones, Me-
gan Kirchinger, Nathan
Leonard, Eric McQueen,
Wyatt Oglesby, Stepha-
nie Ray, Truly Sackrider,
Carson Sayers, Morgan
Shumway, Pierce Thomp-
son

3rd GRADE: Hayley
Allen, Sarah Andrews,
Anthony Arant, Ken-
trell Balthazar, Colton
Barrow, Lathem Brown,
Chase Brunson, Kristina
Burk, Alex Butler, Bob-
bie Castleberry, Railey
Conner, Brook Clifton,
Jurnee French, Emily
Gelb, Nattalie Goetzke,
Hanna Greenfield, Des-
tiny Hawthorne, Julya
Helton, Bryan Holley,
Bradley Inscore, Kamer-
on Jones, Kalynn Kauss,
Lily Lewis, Lily Parrish,
Kolby Roy, R. J. Rush-
ing, Aiyjanae Simmons,
Julianna Smith, Woody
Williamson

4TH GRADE: Maddy
Adams, Megan Ayala,
A Lena Banks, Jessica
Black, Lane Boone,
Gregory Chaitha, Bran-
don Cobb, C olton Farris,
Addison Gilson, Hannah
Hancock, Connor Hight,


Jesse Joiner, Dylan Kim-
mons, Shawna Lake, Joel
Mathis, Askani McQueen,
Markos Mitchell, Kyle
Parker, Taylor Price,
Hunter Polhlopek, Makina
Potter, Kacie Richards,
Lindsey Sapp, Noah
Shaw, Alisandra Stain-
back, Christopher Steele,
Amanda Teichner, Gabe
Vicari, Wade Walker,
Kayla Wolf

5TH GRADE: Jerrica
Barton, Logan Caden-
head, Valerie Commee,
Gregory Geiger, Ryan
Gelb, Madison Hohider,
Jesse Keefe, Hannah
Kline, Kaitlynn Knox,
Natalie Leonard, Austin
Mayo, Parris Miller, Tara
Reed, Caitlyn Smith, Em-
ily Stuckey, D Nickolas
Thomas, Logan Thomp-
son

6TH GRADE: Ganesh
Ahaus, Tyler Arant, Ash-
ley Black, Allysa Brewer,
Sabrina Corbin, Leslie
Cumbie, Whitli Cunning-
ham, Austin Davis, Lena
Daoud, Chelsea Flford,
Michael Holley, Hayley
Melanson, Cameron Mer-
ritt, Mary Oglesby, Logan
Pittman, Nathan Runyan,
Christian Sanguyo, Anas-
tasia Scott, Wesley Smith,
Jaclyn Tipton, Brandon
White

7TH GRADE: Anna
Bills, Cheyenne Brannon,
Curstin Brown, Triston
Carroll, Haliegh Caston-
guay,-Isabella Chunn, Jes-


sica Dominguez, Amanda
Dotson, Cameron Gordon,
Autumn Herndon, William
Josey, Lara Keefe, Alyssa
Lee, Michelie Mitchell,
Alexis Mitchem, Christina
Morgan, Ashley Nixon,
Kaylen Parker, Maryjel
Quizon, Justin Reichert,
Eugenia Senterfitt, Madi-
syn Ward

8TH GRADE: Erika
Adams, Samantha Arvin,
Rachel Arzaga, Deme-
trius Barbaree, Charity
Barber, Amber Barrow,
Natalie Booker, Eileen
Brown, Ben Crowson,
Kais Daoud, Chris Estes,
Malcolm Griffith, Wil-
liam Griffith, Melissa
Heller, Avery Jernigan,
Berbadette Kelley, Caitlin
Kennedy, Terry Kersey,
Nick Lopez, Chassity
McCranie, Jasmine Mid-
delton, Paige Miller, Dixie
Mobley, Jesse Parker,
Galen Perkins, Landen
Reaves, Savannah Risen,
Julia Robertson, Dustin
Roper, Dylan Scott, Iryna
Slyusar, Katherine Smith,
Javier Steele, Jenna
Stevenson, Richard
Stroheker, Joshua Taylor,
Lauren Teichner, Miran-
da Whatmough, James
Wolf

9TH GRADE: Taylor
Carlisle, Dillon Crawford,
Alexandra Delacruz, Eri-
ca Evers, Shaina Fedorak,
William Harrington,
Michael Lamb, Haley
Levins, Kyle Polhlopek,
Chenoa Powell, Kaitlyn


Richmond, Garrett Sand-
ers, Justin Smart, Jaydin
Vanderford, Dylan Wad-
sworth, Katelyn Wickery,
Kelly Wilson

10TH GRADE: Alicia
Adams, Kirsten Anglin,
Cayla Booth, Savannah
Czarnecki, Rebecca Da-
vis, Dalton Dees, Heather
Howard, Morgan Jones,
Tiffany Kruse, Danielle
Martin, Shirley Mayberry,
Taylor Morgan, Chris
Nixon, Brittany Smith,
Brandon Wehrly, Paul
Workman

11TH GRADE: Audrey
Adams, Leanna Adams,
William Bailey, Cassandra
Cooper, Susan Cunning-
ham, Travis Forrester,
David Frey, Matt Frey, Tif-
fany Hays, Dylan Kersey,
Jacob Lawson, Kameron
Legg, Caleb Lindsay, Su-
san Mayberry, Tyler Mor-
rell, Nathan Pfrimmer,
Victoria Rawlins, Adam
Royal, Rebecca Smart,
Abby Sunday, Caitlin
Turnbull, Logan Wagner,
Robert Youngblood

12TH GRADE: Bre-
anna Bommarito, Kaylee
Bradley, Chris Brinley,
David Cain, Shanna
'Cobb, Chris Dalencour,
Chad Donley, Matthew
Dustin, Rachelle Fen-
ton, Samantha Harville,
Justyn Lewis-Washington,
Danielle Marelli, Stepha-
nie Miller, Kurtis Morton,
John Scott, Andrea Taylor,
Evan Vanderford


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Gone But Not Forgotten
Twelve months ago, you passed away together again
I can't forget that dreadful day I can't tell you Mitchie
I still often cry, I miss you so much how much you meant to me
Your joyous laugh, your loving touch After all, we were raised as family
- Your red mohawk, your painted toes Day after day, I will try to be strong
You were a lot of fun, as we all know A year without you, is way to long
The number 77,engraved in our hearts
In thought and mind, we are never apart (Rest in peace Mitchie)
Our moms and dads, siblings and friends
Will remember you always, until we are The Kertis & Nousiainen family


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Wednesday, November 25, 2009


A12 I Crestview News Bulletin


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Regular Hours:
December Hours:


M-F: 9-6 * Sat. 9-5
M-F: 9-6 * Sat. 9-5 * Sun. 1-5


866 N Ferdon Boulevard
Crestview, FL 32536
Tel: 850-682-3638 * Fax: 850-398-5158
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Easy Financing 12 Months 0% Interest

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SPORTS


B
Section


Wednesday, November'25, 2009 www. crestviewbu lleti n. com Page 1


News

& NOTES

SCHEDULE
Monday
High school girls
basketball
Calvary Christian at
Baker, 4:30 p.m.
Calvary. Christian at
Laurel Hill, 6 p.m.
Middle school boys
basketball
Walton at Shoal River,
6:30 p.m.

Tuesday
High school boys
basketball
Choctaw at Crbstview, JV
5:30 p.m./V 7 p.m.
Northview at Baker, JV 5
p.m./V 7:15 p.m.
Central at Laurel Hill, JV
6 p.m./V 7:15 p.m.
"High school girls
basketball -
Northview at Baker, JV 4
p.m./6 p.m.
Middle school boys
basketball
Shoal River at Ruckel,
6:30 p.m.
Davidson at Lewis, 6:30
p.m.
Middle school girls
basketball
Shoal River at Ruckel, 5
p.m.
Davidson at Lewis, 6
p.m.
Middle school boys
soccer
Davidson at Shoal River,
6:15 p.m.
Middle school girls
soccer
Davidson at Shoal River,
5 p.m.

Wednesday, Dec. 2
High school boys soccer
Crestview at Niceville, JV
5:30 p.m./V 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, Dec. 3
High school boys
basketball
Freeport at Laurel Hill, JV
6 p.m./V 7:15 p.m.
Walton at Crestview, JV
6 p.m./V 7:30 p.m.
High school girls soccer
Crestview at Fort Walton
Beach, JV 5 p.m./V 7
p.m.-
Middle school boys
basketball
Shoal River at Davidson,
5 p.m.
Middle school girls
basketball
Shoal River at Davidson,
6:30 p.m.
Middle school boys
soccer
Ruckle at Davidson, 5
p.m.
Liza Jackson at Shoal
River, 6:30 p.m.
Middle school girls
soccer
Ruckle at Davidson, 6:15
p.m.
Liza Jackson at Shoal
River, 6:15 p.m.

Friday, Dec. 4
High school boys
basketball
Crestview at Niceville, JV
4:30 p.m./V 7:30 p.m.
Poplar Springs at Laurel
Hill, 7:15 p.m.
High school girls
basketball
Poplar Springs at Laurel
Hill, 6 p.m.
High school girls soccer
Crestview at Timber Wolf
tournament, Tallahassee,
TBA

Traveling Eagles
baseball
The Traveling Eagles
Spring 2010 Registration
is now open for baseball
players who are league
age 8 to 14 at www.
travelingeagles.com. The
Eagles are the premier
travel ball program in
the area dedicated to the
development of youth as
more than just the best
baseball players. The
Traveling Eagles have
arranged for the strongest
coaching lineup in the
area consisting of former


See NOTES B2


2003 TEAM: Members of the 2003 CHS
pose with their coach, Jay Sanders.


Photos by ANN SPANN I Crestview News Bulletin
team, Heleana McLaughlin, Renee Polk and Ashley Williams,


Welcome back, Champs


2003 Bulldogs honored - 5-9


Randy Dickson
randyd@crestview
bulletin.com
The past and pres-
ent of Crestview's girls
basketball were united
Thursday as the Bull-
dogs took on Pace in
a nondistrict game on
Alumni Night at the
Crestview High School.
gym.
Members of the 2003
Bulldog District 1-4A
Championship team
were honored in a half-
time ceremony. As fate
would have it, the Bull-
dogs beat the Patriots
to claim the team's last
title.
About the only glitch
in an otherwise perfect
night was the premature
unveiling of the long
district championship
banner as the veil fell off
before the ceremony.
This year's team
wasn't about to let any-
thing else go wrong as
Crestview rolled to a 60-
46 win, giving first-year
coach Donald Campbell
his first win.
Autumn Rogers led
the Bulldogs with 13
points, and Holly Stan-
ford added 10 points.
The game might have
belonged to the current
Bulldogs, but the night
was for Bulldogs past.
The 2002-03 team was
coached by Jay Sanders
and finished the season
with a 15-10 record.


Sanders, who still
teaches at the school
and is an assistant foot-
ball coach, was joined
by former players Ash-
ley Williams, Heleana
McLaughlin and Renee
Polk.
Polk, who played col-
lege basketball at West
Florida, is one of Camp-
bell's assistant coaches.
"It just makes me
feel awesome," Polk
said of seeing the ban-
ner hanging on the wall
high above the gym floor.
"That team there is very
special to me. We were
together since the eighth
grade (at Richbourg).
And some of my team-
mates went to Davidson,'
and we played against
each other.
"To come together
and win the district after
10 years - because I
think the last time they
won, it was in '93 - it
was very special to me."
McLaughlin was
pleased as well.
"It feels good," she
said. "It's been a long
time coming, and it's
well-deserved. I'm proud
of my team, and I'm
proud of my coach. He
did a good job.
"We were hard work-
ers, hard workers. Coach
ran us if we didn't do
what we were supposed
to, but we got it done. I
love that team."
McLaughlin laughed
as she recalled her nick-


TO THE BASKET: Autumn Rogers goes to the basket for
the Lady Bulldogs during their victory over Pace.


name of endearment for
her coach.
"When I first met
him, my name for him
was Big Bird," she said.
"That was my nickname
for him, but he's a very
sweet guy, and I wouldn't
trade it for the world. He


was a very good coach."
Like this year's team,
the 2002-03 Bulldogs had
been through several
coaches before Sanders
took over a year earlier.
Polk credited
See BULLDOGS B2


Baker star headed to Troy


Lauren Griffith signs softball
scholarship with Trojans

Randy Dickson
randyd@crestviewbulletin.com
BAKER - There were plenty of smiles to go
around Friday as Baker softball player Lau-
ren Griffith celebrated signing scholarship
papers with Troy University two days earlier.
Lauren, the daughter of Phillip and Beth
Griffith, gave several reasons for choosing to
sign with the Trojans.
"I like how it's a small-school atmosphere
and yet it's a good DI school," she said. "I
went to some of their camps this summer, and
I got to know coach (Melanie) Davis and her
staff. And I really like their program.
"And I didn't want to get too far from home,
because I wanted to be near my parents and


at a place people could still come watch me'
play"
Griffith is a great all-around player, but
she's best known as a pitcher for the Gators.
She probably won't get to pitch at Troy, and
while she might miss being in the circle, she's
OK with the move.
"Any opportunity I get to play at the DI
level is fine with me," Griffith said. "I'm just
excited to play the utility position.
"I play shortstop and outfield on my travel
team, so it won't be that big of a difference
(not pitching)."
Gator coach John Carlisle arrived at Baker
and took over the softball team when Griffith
was in the eighth grade and has watched her
develop into a top talent.
"This is my fifth year here (at Baker), and
I know in my time here there have been very

See GRIFFITH B2


ANN SPANN I Crestview News Bulletin
Baker's Lauren Griffith delivers a pitch for the
Gators last spring.


Giving


thanks in


the desert

Randy Dickson
randyd@crestview
newsbulletin.com
So here we are with
about to celebrate another
Thanksgiving on Thursday.
I hate
to admit
it, but this
is one of
those years
where it
isn't so
easy to be
NORTH END thankful.
ZONE Like ev-
Randy Dickson eryone else
in Freedom
Communications, I suf-
fered some unexpected
financial blows this year.
But at least I'm fortunate
to still have a job, and I am
thankful for that.
I guess my biggest
struggle right now has to
do with the health of my
dad, Jim Dickson. About
this time last month, he
was diagnosed with Par-
kinson's Plus. I don't know
much about the disease
yet, but from what I've
learned, it's Parkinson's
disease with road rage.
The real kick in the
pants was dad got the
news the day before his
77th birthday last month.
I believe that's one birth-
day present nobody would
want.
It's hard to celebrate
when the prognosis isn't
good. But I can be thankful
for the years I've shared
with the best dad this son
could ever have imagined,
As you read this col-
umn, I'll be in DeLand
visiting my parents and
celebrating Thanksgiving
with them and other fam-
ily members. I am thank-
ful for the time, however
long it might be, that I'll
still have to celebrate a
dad who instructed me in
sports, spiritual matters
and the other important
things in life.
Yes, dad has been a
shining example of what a
Christian man should be to
me, the rest of my family
and most people who have
known him.
There's a Bible verse
in Isaiah that talks about
God providing paths in the
desert and streams in the
wasteland, and sometimes
those paths and streams
are unique to our individu-
al deserts and wastelands.
As I've struggled these
last few weeks with what
dad is going through, and
in some ways, my own
mortality, I've been blessed
to have a job that allows
me to step back from ev-
erything and forget my
worries for a few hours at'
a time.
Whether covering a vol-
leyball match, a football
See DICKSON B2






WA I v Is Ri Snort" --Wenedaoemer2520


ANN SPANN I Crestview News Bulletin
Lauren Griffith is surrounded by family and members.of the Baker staff as she celebrates signing a softball scholarship with Troy University.

GRIFFITH from page B1


few that have gone on, if any, in
any sport, to play at the Division
I level, so that's pretty huge," he
said. "It's bigger than our softball
program. It's the school. It does
the school a lot of pride because
it's coming from a small school
and going to a big school."
Carlisle paraphrased a term
ofteh used when discussing hard-


working basketball players to de-
scribe Griffith.
"She's like a field rat," he said.
"You hear the term gym rat for
kids in basketball and stuff like
that, but she's just a field rat: She
always wants to be out on that
softball field hitting, fielding or
pitching.
"She wants to be doing some-


thing on that softball field to get
better, and here it is (paying off)."
Griffith will carry that field rat
mentality to Troy.
"I know if I want something
bad enough, hard work will pay
off," she said. "I know I just have
to keep working at what I want to
achieve.
"I still need to work on every-


thing. I need to keep working on
the fundamentals: hitting, field-
ing and everything."
Making the transition from
Class 2A high school softball to
the Division I college game can
be tough, but Carlisle is confident
Griffith's drive will allow her to
do well.
"This is just beginning, be-


cause I know when she gets to
that next level, she's not going
to stop," he said. "She has that
desire. She's a very tough com-
petitor, so if somebody is in front
of her, she is going to push that
person in front of her to the point
she's going to take over..
"I lookfor her to do good things
for their program."


DICKSON
from page B1

game or now, a basketball game,
I find a sense of peace in being
around coaches and athletes.
The stadiums and gyms of North-
west Florida are my places of refuge
as these storms of life surround me.
A bad day covering a football
game beats a good day at most jobs
I can think of. So yes, I am thank-
ful for the people of this part of the
county, who have encouraged me
without even knowing it, as well
as those who know what I'm going
through who have been there for me *
to lean on. So many of you are my
streams in the wasteland.
If you ask sports writers what's
the best part of our job, before cov-
ering big games or the occasional
opportunity to rub elbows with
famous athletes, most of us will tell
you the best part of the job is the
relationships we build through the
years with coaches, players, parents
and fans.
I really am thankful for each of
you who has touched my life, even
those who don't always agree with
the way I see things and occasion-
ally make me think.
My cup might not be full this.
year, but as I take time to reflect,
that cup is far from empty.
I am blessed and have much for
which I can give thanks.
Happy Thanksgiving, everyone,
and may your favorite teams win.
Go Vols. Beat Kentucky!


NOTES from page B1

MLB players, former college coaches
and high school coaches. The Eagles
won 18 tournament championships
during 2009. There is no registration
or tryout fee. You can also call
Mike Wells at 897-2293 for more
information.


BULLDOGS from page B1
Sanders with being the stabilizing force the
girls needed to be successful.
"He came in and it was our junior year, and
we already had been through some coaching
changes," Polk said. "He came in and com-
mitted to us, and we committed to him. And it


"They worked
together, and
I think that
also made
them a family,
because they
believed in
what we were
trying to do
and they loved
each other."

Jay Sanders
2002-03 team coach


(winning the district
championship) was
just based off com-
mitment to each
other.
."We were all one
family, and we pulled
together. That was
the biggest thing, just
coming together and'
sticking together."
Sanders has a mu-
tual admiration and
respect for the team.
"It was just a
dream year," he said.
"I don't really know
how to describe it. We
had ups and downs,
but they bought into
what we wanted to'
do, and it just made
things so much
easier.
"Thev worked


together, and I think that also made them a
family, because they believed in what we were
trying to do and they loved each other. And I
felt like they loved me, and that's what made
that thing special."
Seven years later, that love is as strong as
ever.
"I see those girls now a lot, and we always
talk about the bond we had with that group,"
he said. "It was just one of the best coaching
experiences I've ever had."
Campbell was happy to honor the 2003 team
and wants every former player to know they
are welcome in his program.
"Any girl that came back tonight was special
to me," he said. "Word will get out, and they
(former players) will understand that these
girls are working hard.
"They will come back because they will see
we really believe in Crestview High School
basketball girls."


LADY DAWGS: Candice Green


Photos by ANN SPANN I Crestview News Bulletin
drives toward the basket for the Lady Bulldogs.


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-- ---- ----- 111


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


Sports


82 1 Crestview News Bulleltin


I






Wednesday, November 25, 2009


LoT ,ca


Crestview News Bulletin I B3


I


Elaine A. Courtney
Family & Consumer
Sciences Extension Agent


Researchers have fund that the average weight gain over the holidays is 1-2 pounds.


The Holiday season is in full
swing! For many people, this
started with Halloween! Along
with the rush of the holidays,
there is also concern about
keeping healthy during this time.
Many of our traditions and
events for this time of year
involve food. Whether it's
pumpkin pie, chocolate'cookies,
or turkey ... there are lots of
choices available. It's easy to get
overwhelmed by food options for
the holidays and forget about a
healthy lifestyle!
During this time of year, we


tend to be busier with friends,
family and social events. This
leads to less time to exercise
and more time "eating on the
run." There is also an increase
in foods that are rich in calories,
fat, sugar and salt - which we
need to watch! Researchers
have found that the average
weight gain over the holidays is
1-2 pounds, but that people don't
usually lose that weight. So it
adds up over the years!
Here are some ideas to
incorporate into your holiday
festivities, whether it be


Thanksgiving, Hanukkah,
Christmas or Kwanza.
* If you are baking holiday
treats or desserts, prepare
enough for one evert or to give
away. Keeping all those extras
around is quite tempting and can
contribute to weight gain!
* Prepare a low or reduced-
fat dish to take to holiday
gatherings.
* Eat a light healthy snack
before heading out to parties
where food will be the focus. This
will help curb your hunger and
help you make better choices.


* Don't hover around
the buffet table. Make your
selections and then move away
so you're not tempted to nibble!
* Make substitutions in
recipes. Use skim milk or
reduced fat cream cheese.
Reduce and/or replace sugar
with an alternative sweetener
(or half of the sugar). Replace
oils with applesauce. There are
many substitutions that can be
Made that will make dishes rore
healthful and reduce calories.
* Don't forget to take your
"exercise" prescription! Don't let


the holidays interfere with your
plans to walk or exercise. That
is an.important part of healthy
holidays.
* Watch the portions you eat.
If you simply must have some of
Aunt Sue's pecan pie, then cut a
small portion.
S* Eat more fruits and
vegetables! Make half your plate
fruits and veggies. But watch out
for those casseroles that may also
contain lots of fat and calories.
Be more conscious of the
foods you eat, and you'll have
healthy holidays!


They were missed then.

They're missed now.


Now is the time we especially
remember those who served for
our country. They fought to make
a better world for the rest of us,
and we will never forget them.



BRACKNEY
FUNERAL SERVICE
480 E. James Lee Blvd.
Crestview, FL 32539
(850) 683-9898
Locally owned and operated



Jl 1\ 1








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* Accepting papers
Monday - Friday Sam - 5pm
Bring your papers for recycling
to the News Bulletin to support the
Newspapers in Education Program.

n11.
If you have questions contact
Heather Pike or Michelle MacLeod
850.863.1111
www.nwfdailynews.com


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OKALOOSA CARDIOLOGY HOSTS CAC DINNER
S' BENEFIT DINNER: The Have
a Heart for Children
dinner hosted by
Okaloosa Cardiology
and benefiting the
Children's Advocacy
Center was held recently.
One of the highlights
J Iof'the evening included
auctioning a collage
' ,of artwork created by
children served by CAC.
This year, Kieran and
Caroline May won the
" artwork. The true winners
are the children. With the
Mays' support, the center
can continue to provide
services to child victims
of physical and sexual
abuse. Shown from left
are Katelyn Pendleton,
a child abuse survivor,
Caroline May and Kieran
May.
SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN


Extension CONNECTION



Put some health into holidays


15






B4 I Crestview News Bulletin


Local


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


Military BRIEFS


Heisman completes
basic at Lackland
Air Force
Airman 1st
Class Chad
a .. t E. Heisman
graduated
from basic
military
CHAD trainingat
Lackland
HEISiMAN Air Force
Base, San Antonio.
The airman completed
an intensive eight-week pro-
gram that included training
in military discipline and
studies, Air Force core val-.
ues, physical fitness, and
basic warfare principles and
skills.
Airmen who complete
basic training earn four
credits toward an associate
in applied science degree
through the Community

He is the son of Carol
Parsons of Crestview.
Heisman graduated in
1999 from Crestview High
School and received an as-
sociate degree in 2002 from
Fullsail Real World Educa-
tion, Orlando.

Hammack completes
USAF basic,
Air Force
Airman
Tyler C.
Hammack
graduated
from basic
military
training at
TYLER Lackland .
HAMMACK Air Force
Base, San Antonio.
The airman completed
an intensive eight-week pro-
gram that included training
in military discipline and
studies, Air Force core val-
ues, physical fitness, and
basic warfare principles and
skills.
Airmen who complete
basic training earn four
credits toward an associate


in applied science degree
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is the son of John and
Shannon McBeth of Crest-
view and a 2006 graduate of
Crestview High School.

Bobelak
completes basic
Air Force

Airman
Jeffrey A.
Bobelak
graduated
from basic
JEFFREY military
BOBELAK training at
BOBELAK a ta
Lackland
Air Force Base, San Antonio.
The airman completed
an intensive eight-week pro-
gram that included training
in military discipline and
studies, Air Force core val-
ues, physical fitness, and
basic warfare principles and
skills.
Airmen who complete
basic training earnfour
credits toward an associate
in applied science degree
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is the son of John and
Judith Bobelak of Crestview.

Pryor completes
basic at Laikland
Air Force
Airman
Alisha
J. Pryor
graduated
from basic
military
ALISHA J. training at
Lackland
PRYOR Air Force
Base, San Antonio.
The airman completed
an intensive eight-week pro-
gram that included training
in military discipline and
studies, Air Force core val-
ues, physical fitness, and
basic warfare principles and
skills.
Airmen who complete


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SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN
CLOTHING DISTRIBUTION: Members of Patrol Squadron
10 Red Lancers, which include Navy Petty Officer
3rd Class Scott McKenzie of Crestview, organize
boxes of clothing donated by Carters, Inc.


basic training earn four
credits toward an associate
in applied science degree
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
She is the daughter of
Stephen and Charlotte
Pryor of,Crestview and a
2007 graduate of Crestview
High School.

McKenzie and fellow
soldiers continue
deployment
Navy Petty Officer 3rd
Class Scott D. McKenzie,
son of Lastenia and David
W. McKenzie of Crestview,
and fellow sailors of Patrol
Squadron 10 "Red.Lanc-,
ers" (VP-10), Naval Air
Station, Jacksonville, re-
cently completed the fourth
month of their six-month
deployment to the Navy's
Africa Command and Cen-
tral Command, operating
from bases in Quatar, Dji-
bouti and Japan.
While deployed, the
Lancers have conducted
operations in support of
Operations Iraqi Freedom
and Enduring Freedom to
include maritime security
Operations; anti-submarine
warfare; intelligence, sur-
veillance and reconnais-
sance; routine maritime
patrol; and anti-piracy mis-
sions in the Arabian Gulf,


SGulf of Oman, the Arabian
Sea and the Gulf of Aden,
and maintained a 99.5 per-'
cent sortie completion rate.
The Lancers introduced
a contingent from Patrol
Squadron One "Screaming
Eagles" (VP-1) to Central
Command theater of opera-
tions during the Screaming
Eagles' two-day visit from
Widbey Island, Wash. The
Screaming Eagles will
replace the Lancers at the
conclusion of the unit's de-
ployment in December.
In Djibouti, during a
"Non Sibi" day, mean-
ing not for ourselves, the
Lancers helped distribute
10,000 units of clothing
donated by Carter's Inc. of
Atlanta. The influx of 270.
boxes temporarily shut ,
down the camp post office
until the sailors loaded the
donations on a truck and
moved them into storage.
The donations were then
distributed with the assis-
tance of the base staff, U.S.
Embassy personnel and
the Ministry of Women and
Family Affairs.
McKenzie is a 2005
graduate of Crestview High
School and joined the Navy
in February 2009.
For more.informa-
tion and photos of VP-10,
visit www.vpl0.navy.mil and
www.navy.mil.


Helms earns 2nd
lieutenant commission
Dennis K. Helms II has
been commissioned as a
second lieutenant in the
U.S. Army after success-
fully completing the Army
ROTC (Reserve Officer
Training Corps) program
and graduating with a
bachelor's degree from
Florida State University,
Tallahassee.
The new officer will be
branched to a specific corps
in the Army to serve on ac-
tive duty or in the National
Guard or Reserve. The
lieutenant will attend an
officer basic course relating
to his particular military
occupational specialty/job.
Afterward, the officer will
complete advanced training
by attending basic officer
leadership courses for ca-
reer progression purposes.
The ROTC curriculum
prepares students with the
tools, training and experi-
ences to help cadets suc-
ceed as effective leaders in
any competitive environ-
ment. Army officers serve
as leaders, counselors,
strategists and motivators,
who lead other soldiers
in all situations occurring
in ever-changing environ-
ments. As trained problem-
solvers, key influencers and
planners, they are driven to
achieve success with their
team on every mission.
Helms is the son of Den-
nis and Theresa Helms of
Crestview.

Arnold inducted
into Murphy club
Army Staff Sgt. Daniel J.
Arnold has been inducted
into the Sgt. Audie L. Mur-
phy Club, a club formed in
1986 in honor of the Army's
World War II most deco-
rated combat soldier, Audie
Leon Murphy.
The elite organization
is composed of noncom-
missioned officers who
have demonstrated their
inherent leadership quali-
ties and abilities, military
knowledge and skills, and
courage in performance of
assigned duties and respon-
sibilities as characterized
by Sergeant Murphy.
Inductees must be spon-
sored by their first sergeant
and recommended by their
unit commander. The can-
didates are reviewed and
evaluated by a high-ranking
selection board who ques-
tion, test and score soldiers
on their level of knowledge
in a range of subjects that
warrant induction. Of the
few inductees who are
recommended, a very low
percentage are selected
as qualified members. In-
ductees receive the Audie
L. Murphy medallion in
recognition of their accom-
plishment.


Arnold, a maintenance
supervisor squad leader, is
assigned to the 1st Battal-
ion, 29th Infantry Regiment,
Fort Benning, Columbus,
Ga. The staff sergeant has
served in the military for
seven years.
He is the brother of
Heather Welch of Crest-
view.

Edward M. Radford
Army Pvt. Edward M.
Radford has graduated
from basic combat training
at Fort Jackson, Columbia,
S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied
the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values,
and physical fitness, and re-
ceived instruction and prac-
tice in basic combat skills,
military weapons, chemical
warfare and bayonet train-
ing, drill and ceremony,
marching, rifle marksman-
ship, armed and unarmed
combat, map reading, field
tactics, military courtesy,
military justice system,
basic first aid, foot marches
and field training exercises.
Radford is the grandson
of Sammie Radford Sr.
of Crestview and a 2009
graduate of Crestview High
School.

Joshua L. Delos Reyes
Joshua L. Delos Reyes
has graduated from the
Army ROTC (Reserve Offi-
cer Training Corps) Leader
Development and Assess-
ment Course, also known as
Operation Warrior Forge, at
Fort Lewis, Tacoma, -Wash.
The 32 days of training
provide the best possible
professional training and
evaluation for all cadets
in the aspects of military
life, administration and
logistical support. Although
continued military training
and leadership develop-
ment is included in the cur-
riculum, the primary focus
of the course is to develop
and evaluate each cadet's
officer potential as a leader
by exercising the cadet's
intelligence, common sense,
ingenuity and physical
stamina. The cadet com-
mand assesses each cadet's
performance and progress
in officer traits, qualities
and professionalism while
attending the course.
Cadets in their junior
and senior year of college
must complete the leader-
ship development course.
Upon successful completion
of the course, the ROTC
program and graduation
from college, cadets are
commissioned as second
lieutenants in the U.S.
Army, National Guard or
Reserve.
Delos Reyes is the son
of Roland S. Delos Reyes of
Shalimar, and Barbara A.
Stokes of Laurel Hill.


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Shoal River Middle School builders take home five awards


DooleyMack Construc-
tors of Northwest Florida
earned a total of five awards
during the ABC Excellence
in Construction awards cer-
emony held recently at the
University Center Club in
Tallahassee. DooleyMack
Constructors earned an
Excellence in Construction
Eagle Award in the Mega
Project category (over $30
million) for their Walton
High School project which
opened this new school
year. They also received
an Excellence in Construc-
tion Eagle Award for In-
stitutional Projects ($10 to


$20 million) for the Shoal
River Middle School which
opened this school year in
Crestview.
The company also re-
ceived the top Project Safe-
ty Award for general con-
tractors, the Merit Choice
Award for utilizing the most
ABC member subcontrac-
tors and suppliers on a
project and achieved Gold
Level for their Safety Train-
ing and Evaluation Process
(STEP).
The company was rep-
resented at the awards cer-
emony by Vic Mann, opera-
tions manager; Trey Arias,


senior project manager,
Trent Davis, project manag-
er; Mel Bartholow, project
superintendent; and Larry
Guilbault, corporate safety
officer.
Each of these projects
was evaluated and scored
by a team of judges repre-
senting the Rinker School
of Building Construction
at University of Florida,
California Polytechnic State
University and Southeast
Construction Magazine.
The awards highlight a very
successful year for the team
at DooleyMack Construc-
tors of Northwest Florida.


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BULLETIN
AWARD WINNERS: DooleyMack Constructors of Northwest Florida displays their
Excellence in Construction awards earned at the North Florida Associated Build-
ers and Constructors annual awards ceremony. Pictured are (from left to right)
Operations Manager Vic Mann; Corporate Safety Officer Larry Guilbault; Senior
Project Manager Trey Arias; Project Manager Trent Davis; and Senior Superin-
tendent Mel Bartholow.


Bella Vita Photography and ACS announce '13 Small Miracles'


The Emerald Coast has
cast nearly 6,000 votes to
.decide on the 13 images
that will represent the 2010
Small Miracles Calendar
benefiting the American
Cancer Society (ACS).
Local portrait and wed-
ding photographer Angela
Dowling began the project
nearly six weeks ago as a
means of raising cancer
awareness and money for
the ACS, with 100 percent
of all proceeds from session
fees, print sales, votes, and
calendar sales to benefit
the American Cancer Soci-
ety. Throughout two weeks,
Dowling photographed
more than 45 area children
at her studio and the Santa
Rosa Mall for a chance to
be featured in the calendar.


Photos like this one of area residents will be featured
in the Small Miracles calendar, a photo contest fund-
raiser for the American Cancer Society.


Beginning Oct. 15, one im-
age from each session was
selected and placed online
for the community to cast
their votes at $1 per vote.
The Emerald Coast re-
sponded with overwhelm-
ing support and enthusiasm
as the votes rolled in on the


early days of the competi-
tion.
The energy never let,
up, and continued well into
the final days of voting. By
the end of the last day of
voting on Oct. 29, nearly
6,000 votes had been cast
by people from all over the


country. The largest single
voter cast a whopping 1,000
votes!
Friends, family, co-
workers, and even strang-
ers voted for the children
representing the Small
Miracles that can happen
when a community comes
together.
During this time, Dowl-
ing gathered stories from
several of the families, shar-
ing them through her blog,
the Small Miracles Web
site, and even on Facebook
to show the community the
inspirations behind each
child. Stories came flood-
ing in about the families'
battles with cancer - some
winning, some losing. Ironi-
cally, Dowling's own family
was fighting a battle with


cancer at the time. As the
contest began, her grandfa-
ther had just finished a long
battle with bladder cancer,
and her aunt recently in
remission from breast can-
cer was hospitalized, only to
find out the breast cancer
had returned and was ac-
companied by lung cancer.
Unfortunately, her aunt
didn't live to see the final
calendar. The day after vot-
ing ended, so did her aunt's
fight with cancer. She lost
her life, proving how signifi-
cant an impact cancer can
have and how very urgently
a cure is needed.
With .such an over-
whelming response so far,
it was already evident that
Small Miracles do make a
big difference.


Calendars have gone on
sale at the pre-sale price
of $10 pbr calendar. Once
the calendars have been
printed, they will sell for
$12 each. Orders for the cal-
endar have already come
flooding in.
The 13 images that will
be featured in the calendar
can be seen on the Web
site: www.SmallMiracles
Calendar.com, or on Dowl-
ing's Web sites, www.bella
vitaphotos.com and www.
bellavitaphotos.com/blog.
You can also purchase
a calendar on these Web
sites or contact photogra-'
pher Angela Dowling at
850-398-6672. Calendars will
be available for purchase in
retail locations in time for
the holidays.


Owned An Operated
850-423-0700
NewEraHomeSales.cor


-I
m.


EA XHOUs
S5GIFT SHOP


3000 Offone item in the gift shop
on November,27. Just show this ad!
Open December 24 and December 26
Make reservations now for
a special Holiday Victorian Tea.
Try our fresh baked cookies with a clp of tea,
coffee or hot chocolate.

(850) 398-8783
426 WEST JAMES LEE BLVD., CRESTVIEW
www.thebaronsteahouse.com


GENERAL CIVIL LAW * CRIMINAL
BUSINESS LAW * REAL ESTATE LAW


To the CHS faculty, Student Body, and the many
special friends of Jodi and our family.
We thank you for all of the kind words and sincere
support that was extended to Jodi and our family upon
her nomination to the homecoming court and after her
crowning. We are truly humbled by the outpouring.
What a great memory! May God richly bless you all!

GO DAWGS!


NEW ARRIVALS

FOR CHRISTMAS!
WE HAVE LAYAWAY!

ChicKeni " fock sk;





TOY & GIFT STORE
S610S. FERDON BLVD., CRESTVIEW,FL
850-689-4FUN(4386) '

T BRING IN THIS COUPON FOR
$5 OFF ftm
ANY PURCHASE OF M2 OR MORE 4
COUPON APPLIES TO REGULAR PRICED MERCHANDISE ONLY. EXPIRES 12/S/09.


Home Owners

Insurance

getting you Down?


Let us pick you up,
with new
Lowered Rates!,




PALM INSURANCE
GROUP INCORPORATED

682-6199
WWW.PALMINSURANCEGROUP.COM


Crestview News Bulletin I Illi


Wednesday, Novernber 25, 2009


Local







B6 I Crestview News Bulletin


Classifieds


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


COVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA


emYemRId coCast






mYa rkeO

YOUR FLORIDA FREEDOM CLASSIFIED CONNECTION


Northwest Flonda Daily News jNews Herald Decbn Log CrEshiew NewE Bulletin Waltor Sun Trie Star Holmes Couritr Tirnes Averti-er WI3shinl)Cn Cjurl./ Ne hs S3rla Rosa's Press Gazette The Times

, "7 -* m0






WE'RE AVAILABLE 24 / 7

for all of your buying and selling needs.


* CI 1~ �II�) III;:I II1;~II n~MIrI~Ir~


I. -- -.----- 1iri ~mr


- 1120 I 2100 I
1 "13WNow Open!
SAdvertise in Over 100 Crestview Country Ken-
Papers throughout nels & Grooming. Call
Florida. Advertising for rates & info.
UCM S. Networks of Florida, 306-1718 or 902-3647
|ANNOUNCEERTS | Put us to work for You!
1100 - LegalAdvertising .(866)742-1 373 -.
1110- Classified Notices www.florida-classifieds.co.
1120- Public Notices/ m
Announcements (
1125-Carpools &
Rideshare AUCTION - Santa Rosa
1130- Adoptions
110- Happy Ads County,. Florida, De- *
1150- Personals cember 12, Saturday, - !
1160-Lost 11:00 AM - The Moors MERCHANDISE
1170 - Found Golf & Racquet Club 30n - .


Legal # 100908
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT IN AND FOR
OKALOOSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CASE NUM-
BER 2009 DR 2695 S
IN THE MATTER OF
THE ADOPTION OF
Z.N.C. (DOB 02/12/02)
Adoptee.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO BIOLOGICAL FA-
THER, RACHID
NAJAH:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action for step-
parent adoption has
been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your
written defenses, ifarny,
to it on apBesaM,,Leyy,
Esquire, atihpetitioriers'
attorney, whose ad-
dress is 4507 Furling
Lane, Suite 210, Destin,
FL 32541, on or before
December 4, 2009, and
file the original with the
clerk of this court either
before service on the'
petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will
be entered against you
the relief demanded in
for the complaint or pe-
tition.
DON W. HORWARD
CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT
By: Beth McDoanld
Deputy Clerk
DATED on 10-23-09
11/04/09
.11/11/09
11/18/09
11/25/09


Milton, FL. 66 Beautiful
Lots - 20 Lots will sell
ABSOLUTE. Gated
Community, Club-
house, Pool, Tennis
Courts, Workout Cen-
ter. Walking distance to
championship Golf
Course - For More In-
formation (205)822-
4229 Redmont Auction
Eddie Propst AU2051
Bob Vagi Auctioneers
& Realty, Inc. AB177
AU331


AUCTION - Online bid-
ding: 1974 Corvette,
2002 Honda VTX 1800
motorcycle, 2006 La-
redo by Keystone 29ft
fifth wheel RV, furniture,
zero-turn mowers,
chainsaws, weed
eaters, lawn tools, plus
much more: www.
abalauction.com, joe
@abalaLrction.com,
(850)510-2501 AB2387,
AU3239
www abalaucllon.com


t.L :.,-


I PEIS& AN L I
2100- Pels
2110 -'Pets: Free to
Good Home
2120 - Pet Supplies
2130 - Farm Animals/
Supplies
2140 - Pets/Livestock
Wanted
2150 - Pet Memorials


2100
Horse boarding: w/lots
of. woods for trail riding.
We have years of expe-
rience to care for your
horse! Call 978-0619


C R E S i








News Bulletin


>1
- .-. . 9$ !

1' ,


3110 -Appliances
3120 -Arts & Crafts
3130 - Auctions
3140 - Baby Items
3150 - Building Supplies
3160 - Business
Equipment
3170 - Collectibles
3180,-Computers
3190 - Electronics
3200 - Firewood
3210- Free Pass it On
3220 - Furniture
3230 - Garage/Yard Sales
3240 - Guns
3250 - Good Things to Eat
3260 - Health & Fitness
3270 - Jewelry/Clothing
3280 - Machinery/
Equipment
3290 - Medical Equipment
3300 - Miscellaneous
3310 - Musical Instruments
3320 - Plants & Shrubs/
. Supplies
3330 - Restaurant/Hotel
3340 - Sporting Goods
3350 - Tickets (Buy & Sell)



Antiques- Clock Re-
pair: , Grandfathers,
Mantels. Cuckoo. Any,
TypF of Cloc:i, 211 N-



3130
Foreclosed Home
Auction 300+ Florida
Homes Auction: Dec 5
REDC | View Full List-
ings www.Auction.com
RE No. CQ1031187


3150
Metal Roofing Tax
Credit! 40 yr Warranty.
Direct from manufac-
turer. 30 colors in
stock, Quick, turna-
round. Delivery. availa-
ble. Gulf Coast Supply
& Manufacturing,
(888)393-0335 www.
gulfcoastsupply.com





Mattress, King Size,
pillowtop, with founda-
tions, NEW, , factory
sealed factory warranty
$250 call 850-471-0330



Brand Name. 'Pillowtop
Set, Queen, still in plas-
tic, warranty included
$180 . Deliv Avail
850-255-3050



Brand Name All
Leather Sofa and
Loveseat- in crate. Rich
brown, with Lifetime
warranty. In stores:
$1800, only $775.
850-471-0330 can
separate.


850-471-0330



Solid Wood Bunkbeds
w/1 twin Mattress.Ex-
. cellant Condition, great
price!! $150.00 OBO.
incids mattress. Com-
puter desk w/ shelves,
$25.00. 850-398-6230.


Do Something Good
For Tomorrow

RECYCLE

TODAY!


I 3220
Brand Name Pillowtop
set still queen in plas-
tic, warranty included
$165, Delivery avail
255-3050

4CUJII..


A Stitch in Time Saves Nine



..or Ten...or Eleven...


A pair of scissors, thread, and a needle are all it takes to fix a torn hem

before it's completely unraveled. Your veterinarian can-use those same

tools to "fix" your dog or cat and help reduce the pet overpopulation

problem. It's a simple solution to prevent millions of unwanted animals

from being born to a fate that often ends with a needle of another kind.


3300
Airlines are hiring,
Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid
if qualified, Housing
available, CALL Avia-'
tion Institue of Mainte-
nance (888)349-5387



For Sale:, Boat $7,500.
Upright Freezer .$200.
Electric organ $50. Call
682-9254 for more info



.iJ



EMPLOYMENT
4100 - Help Wanted
4130 - Employment
Information


410
IT/Software Dev.

.. Web ..
.Developer

Florida' Freedom is
looking for a Web'
Developer. This
position ;is respon-
sible to design and
develop websites
a n d
database-powered
web applications for
Freedom properties
and external clients,'
and maintain exist-
ing websites and ap-
plications.
Duties include: pro-
viding support on
website issues to
other Production
members as neces-
sary; providing sup-
port to customers on
website/emrail
issues; providing
technical assistance
and development
time estimates to the
Sales department;
adhere to all Produc-
tion processes and
deadlines; and other
duties as assigned
Candidates should:
show proficiency in
Web development
technologies: HTML,
CSS, PHP (or other
server-side scripting
Sa n g u a ge),
Javascript, SQL
(MySQL or equiva-
lent) and be willing
to learn others; profi-
ciency in design/
layout programs:
Photoshop,
Dreamweaver or an
equivalent; be famil-
iar with FTP software
and office productiv-
ity software (Word,
Excel, etc); be able
to hand code HTML;
be able to design
and build relational
databases; have a
working knowledge
of Windows &
Unix/Linux web serv-
ers. Knowledge and
experience with SEO
and SEM a huge
plus.
This associate works
at the Northwest
Florida Daily News
property in Ft. Wal-
ton Beach, FL. Flor-
ida Freedom offers
an excellent benefit
package - including
medical, dental, vi-
sion, life and
long-term disability
insurance, paid holi-
days, vacation and
sick leave. 401(k)
plan, etc.
Send resumes to:
Nathan Land via
e-mail
to: nathan land
@link.freedom.com

FREEDOM
Drug-free workplace
EOE


Prluvidtit by la ic uiialle Smisctir ofth United 'wro


I


I inn


I


I







Wpdnesdnv. November 25. 2009


ClasifiPeds


Cresiview News Bulletin I B7


4100
Business/Mgmt
NORTHWEST FLORIDA

Daily

N y
News
The Northwest Flor-
ida Daily News is
seeking a District
Manager. We are a
38,000 daily circu-
lation serving 3
counties along the
beautiful Gulf Coast
of NW Florida. The
District Manager
oversees independ-
ent distributors in the
delivery of newspa-
pers to subscribers
within a defined geo-
graphical area. You
will handle all route
mgmt aspects with a
a focus on customer
service. HS diploma
or equivalent req'd.
Prior newspaper exp
in circulation and a
Mgmt . background
preferred. Basic
computer skills a
must. Must have
own vehicle, valid FL
Drivers Lic., car ins.
& good driving rec-
ord. We offer com-
petitive compensa-
tion, benefits pkg &
opportunity for pro-
fessional growth and
development. Send-
ing resume and
cover letter to: Dar-
rell Snyder, PO Box
2949, Fort Walton
Beach, FL 32549.

Litter Happens

I. PA...-iAr .


| 4100 4100
Travel, Travel, Travel!
Child Care $500 Sign-on-bonus.
Seeking sharp guys
Now accepting applica- and gals, Rock-n-Roll
tions for employment at Atmosphere, Blue Jean
Learning Tree Day Environment! Call Ally
School Inc. seeking re- (800)716-0048 today
liable mature individual
who enjoy working in
child care. Classroom Sales/Business Dev.


and driving positions.
Applicants must be at
least 18 yrs. of age.
Drivers must be at least
21. Apply in person at
201 Valley Rd.

Driver Trainees
Needed Now at Werner
Enterprises! Earn up to
$700. per Week after
training. Great Benefits!
No Experience needed!
Local 15-day CDL
Training available With
TDI 1-877-214-3624


Insurance

A Terrific
Opportunity!
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
$100,000+ Earning
Potential, Benefits,
Pension, 401(k), BCBS
Insurance for those
who qualify! Call
1-800-257-5500.


Sales Manager
Best Western Crestview
Inn is seeking a moti-
vated, Exp. Sales Man-
ager! Position is Full
Time. Please fax Re-
sume to 850-682-1564
or you can email to
gmbw.dfike@gmail.com,
or you can apply in
person 900 Southcrest
Dr., Crestview.


Sales
Associate
in Crestview, estab-
lished territory, travel
plus commission. Send
resume to PO Drawer
340, Dothan AL 36302.
Web Id 34064276



4130
RV . delivery drivers
needed. Deliver .RVs,
boats and trucks for
PAY! Deliver to all 48
states and Canada. For
details log- on to
www.RVdeliveryjobs.com


/ .' , i .


|BESIFtS4 F1HMIAL|
5100 - Business
. Opportunities
5110 - Money to Lend


S 5100
ALL Cash Vending! Do
you earn $800 in a
day? 25 Local Ma-
chines and Candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033 CALL US:
we will not be under-
sold!


I �


Registered Daycare.
Birth to 2 years. Rea-
sonable Rates. Call
850-682-4964



Holidays are coming!
Need your house
cleaned? Call All
Phase Cleaning ask
for Sherri
850-689-0859
Honest & Dependable
Lady will clean your
houses/apts, specialize
in move-outs!!! Refs
850-398-6230
rTa;e a break & let1
I us do the dirty work,
IHomes, Businesses
& Rentals. 240-9678
I.L -------


Harldd Gaines
Repairs, Remodeling,
- Additions, Concrete/
Parking Lot Work,
Carpentry and Roofing.
Lic. #RG 0005399.
850-862-0383




Qut, Edge, Mow & trim,
Tree & Bush cutting, &
trim extra.Jeff,582-0944
or 398-8266

Farm Direct '
'Centipede, Zoysia, St.
Augustine, Bermuda
We deliver & install.
Call 244-6651
Suncoast Sod Farms


Mike Golles Painting
Int., Ext., pressure
washing ic & Ins -
Free estirfiates..
Ph. 682-5347
Sr. citizen discounts.



Sharping, all types of
knives, chain saw
blades, Jeff, 582-0944
or 398-8266

Do Something
Good For
Tomorrow
RECYCLE

TODAY!


S 5100
PTL OTR Drivers. New
Pay Package! Great Mi-
les! Up to 46cpm. 12
months experience re-
quired. No felony or
DUI past 5 years.
(877)740-6262
www.ptl-inc.com
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Homo.
*Medical, *Business,
* Par aleg a l
*Accounting, *Criminal
Justice; Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid
if qualified. Call
(888)203-3179,
www.CenturaOnline.com


5110
BIG PLANS Being
Held up by the Econ-
omy? Turn Court Set-
tlement, . Annuity, or
Lottery Winnings into
the Cash You Need.
Call . Chris 1816)
582-1193 or chris@
yourcashout.com


6100 - Business/
Commercial
6110 - Apartments.
6120 -Beach Rentals
6130- Condo/Townhouse
6140- House Rentals
6150 - Roommate Wanted
6160 - Rooms for Rent
6170 - Mobile Home/Lot
6180 - Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 - Timeshare Rentals
6200 - Vacation Rentals


C 6100
Crestview
Office Space
Executive Offices in
McClain, Office
Plaza on Hwy 85.
Only 6 units left
Rate includes ALL
utilities, high speed
internet, common
area maintainance
and daily, cleaning.
682-0791


6110
$99 - 1st
Month's Rent
Crestview- Quiet well-
maintained 2 br, 1 ba,
total electric 585-6985.


Wet Noses.
Warm Hearts.


Crestview- 2 BR, 1 BA,
CH/A, newly renovated,
$550 mo + $550 dep.
850-420-1517

Crestview Bent Creek
Apts II Vouchers Ac-
cepted. Rental assis-
tance may be avail. 1 &
2 BR HC & non-HC ac-
cessible apts. 20 Bent
Creek Rd. Crestview,
FL. Call 850 682-5563,
TDD/TTY 711. Equal
Housing Opportunity

Crestview I & II
Apartments
Now accepting applica-
tions for 1 & 2 br HC &
non-HC accessible
apartments for the eld-
erly & disabled. Rental
assistance may be
available. Call 850-
682-5149 TDD/TTY 711
1450 Coremo Drive,
Crestview, FL. Equal
Housing Opportunity

Crestview, Bent Creek
Apartments I, Vouchers
Accepted. Rental assis-
tance may be available. 1.
& 2 BR, HC & non HC ac-
cessible apartments. 209
Bent Creek Rd, Crestview,
FL. Call 850-682-5563,
TDD/TTY 711..Equal Hous-
ing Oppprtunity.


| 6140.



Crestview - Houses for
Rent. Several to
choose from. C'view,.
Holt, & Dorcas areas.
Call scott 850-546-1192

Teel & Waters
Real Estate
RENTALS
682-6156
3819 Golden Acres,
$600, 3BR, 2BA, acre
2919 Aplin Rd,
$700, 3BR, 2BA,
162 Woodlawn Dr. C
$750, 1/1 furished
113 Twin Oak Dr,'
$875, 3BR, 2BA, 2CG
130 Indian Trail Dr,
$875, 3BR, 2BA,
715 Majestic Prince,
$975, 3BR,2BA,
1420 Quail Ridge Dr,
$975, 3BR, 2BA, 1 acre
394 Riverchase Blvd,
$975, 3BR, 2BA,.2CG
1303 Jeffryscott Dr,
$1,000, 3BR, 2BA,2CG
593 James Lee Blvd,
$900, Commercial
391 Riverchase Blvd,
$1,100,4BR, 3BA, 2CG
All properties require
a credit check, one
year lease; no inside
smoking, pet fees are
non-refundable.
CALL DEBRA FROST


6140
Crestview- 3 Houses in
Downtown. 2br & 3br,
concrete block houses,
in between Main St &
Wilson St. just behind
Earl Oyster Bar & Sea-
food. $450-$550 mo +
sec. dep. Some utilities
included. 682-8483

Crestview- 3/4 bd.
2ab, fenced yard, close
to schools. $750.mo,
pre-quailify. call
682-9335 or 865-5106

Crestview, 3 br, 2 ba,
new carpet & tile, no
pets or smoking, $800
mo. + $150 dep
682-9257 or 902-0267

Crestview/Milligan &
Baker- 1, 2, 3 & 4 BR
Homes for Rent. Call
682-4070,830-2061,
682-1972 or 758-7206



6160
Crestview- Roommate
wanted to share quiet
3br brick home. Auburn
area, $400 mo includes
utils. Call 689-8978.



6170
Crestview. - Hudson
Mobile Home Park has
units for rent. 2 BR/1BA
$395. & up. 585-8192



Crestview - MH's for
Rent. Several to
choose from. C'view,
Holt, & Dorcas areas.
Scott 850-546-1192








7100 - Homes
7105- Open House
7110- Beach Home/
Property
7120 - Commercial
7130 - Condo/Townhouse
7140 - Farms & Ranches
7150 - Lots and Acreage'
7160 - Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 - Waterfront
7180 - Investment
Property
7190 - Out-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 - Timeshare


70100
Baker-3bd, 2ba, 1997
,Horton Mod. 1512 SF.
$26,000 obo. 'call
850-902-0482


7100 7100
Crestview - Brick Foreclosed Home
2BR/1BA Garage, Auction 300+ Florida
CH&A, New metal roof, Homes Auction: Dec 5
updated interior, REDC I View Full List-
fenced back yard 202 ings www.Auction.com
8th Ave. $79,500. Call RE No. CQ1031187
334-763-0215
PUBLIC AUCTION 400
+ FEMA Mobile Homes
n DoSmethigL & Campers All selling
O something no reserve DEC 5th
SGonzales, LA www.
G Od For hendersonauctions.com
(225)6862252 LA lih
Tomorrow 136-09

RECYCLE LOOK

TODAY! Individual wants to
TODAY, buy house for invest-
ment. Call 651-0987


Wooded Residential Lots
Spacious Estate Homesites
Homes & Acreage
Panama City Beach, Santa Rosa,
Steinhatchee, Carrabelle, Alligator Point,
Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Newberry
& Overstreet, FL
Bidding Begins
Tuesday, November 17
Ends Tuesday, December 1

Over 460 Properties Available
at RowellAuctions.com
0f ROWEUAUCTIONS, INC.
800-323-8388
AUCTIONS 10%BuyersPremium GALAU-C002594 AU479,AB296
R o al""j 0 E i-o


(HEVPI


7160
Got Land???
0 down for all land owners.
All credit O.K. All Clayton
Homes of Crestview 850-
682-3344

New Home
For Sale
Financing Available, No
Credit or Bad Credit, No
problem. 10 year $450 per
month. Call Clayton
Homes of' Crestview
(850)682 3344

Single Wides
Largest selection in
Florida panhandle. Call
Clayton Homes of
Crestview for pricing
(850)683-0758

Used Home
$15,000. Call Clayton
Homes of Crestview for
details, 850-683-0856


I AUTOMOTMI. M E
8100 -Antique & Collectibles
8110- Cars
8120 - Sports Utility Vehicles
8130 - Trucks
8140 - Vans
8150 - Commercial
1860- Motorcycles
8170 - Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210 - Boats
8220 - Personal Watercraft
8230 - Sailboats
8240 - Boat & Marine
Supplies
8245 - Boat Slips & Docks
8310 - Aircraft/Aviation
8320 - ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 - Campers & Trailers
8340 - Motorhomes


8110
Chrysler 5th Ave 1985.
First $500.00 takes it!
Body in good shape
and runs great. Call
850-585-8290


8120
2004' Dodge Durango
limited edition w/hemi,
loaded $12,500. O.B.O.
Call 850-333-6838


James Chessher
For friendly service and
exceptional deals, stop by
and talk with James about the
new or used vehicle you've
been dreaming of.


zl AN AMBWICIAN RVMuIIXN
Wlird - Your Slverado Headquarters * Locally Owned & Operated
A IIVROLIT 4150 S. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview
682-2731


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* REMOTE DOOR UNLOCK


yyour SILVERADO HEADQUARTERS

j . -,,a.J CRESTVIEW 682-2731 * 4150 SOUTH FERDON BLVD
FT. WALTON BEACH 243-7214

aw ardchevrolet.com

0% financing in lieu of all rebates with well approved credit thru GMAC. Total rebates include declining 60 Day Money Back Guarantee.
"And the oldest 20% of dealers Inventory Rebate. Photos for illustration purposes only.


0% for


2009 SILVERADO EXT.

OR CREWCAB

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B8 I Crestview News Bulletin


Business


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


C R ES'TV I EW NEWS B U LLET I N
'I'.0


FINANCIALLY STABLE
WE ALSO DO TOP QUALITY LINER REPLACEMENTS
L dai , ria r z . T-i tdrwiwm 651 5046 TOurV
"1" A Mi^T 1 as a



TONY&IHAIRI



F U L L S E RV I C E H A I R SALON


Men's Cut $7
Free Shampoo & Style, Free Massage
Women's Cut $12
Free Shampoo, Free Massage
Kid's Cut Under 12 6
Free Shampoo $6
Perm $3
Free Cut & Style. Free Massage y $
Color $30
RedKen Marx,Goldwell Brand $30
Highlights $45
Red en. Matrix, Goldwegl Brand $


Eye Brow Tattoo $80
&Eye Liner Tattoo $80
TOp & Bottom
Lips Liner Tattoo $80
Eye Brow Wax $5
Magic Straight Perm $100
Eyelash Extension $100


MILITARY DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE EVERY DAY
All Stylists have over 12 years experience.
Hours of Operations: Monday through Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
625 A North Ferdon Blvd., Crestview
(Next to the Dollar Tree and across from Moulton's Pharmacy)
(850) 306-1775
Specials good until December 4 2009.


New Installations
Pump Outs- Repairs
Permit Packages Available

Fill Dirt * Land Clearing
Serving
Okaloosa * Walton * Santa Rosa
Counties for more than 30 years
_NowAccepting
BBB
T-
Ph 5062.23 r85.9235


celebrate your z
3 ,this Christmas!
-- Interest Free Layaway Available -
$379
S249 .9 ,"
199


$~ ' 329

A


C


S�ocr$79
i � k i'279
n i -o '529

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let,.,'


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139
$379 I


The/
~ ~oI loway Agency
Auto * Home * Life * Business
" rYi/r completed insurance soure s e wifh mnsurpasrsed service.
168 W. Woodruff (Downtown Crestview)
850.682.1900
www.thehollowayagency.com


Natassia gives blood to feel
like she's making a difference.






+


American
Red Cross


Josh is living proof
that she is.


I


A PRESENT FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY!!


SWIMMING POOL
REE SURVEY, BROCHURE &ADVICE.
FR E 100'S OF REFERENCES.
(NO OBUGATION) ASKABOUT THE UNEQUALED
LIFETIME WARRANTY OF OUR WORKMANSHIP
FINANCE AVAILABLE FOR QUALIFIED BUYERS -
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE LOW INTEREST RATES.
WE ARE A LOCAL FAMILY BUSINESS WITH THE


BIG REPUTATION. OWNER OPERATED &


Custom Designs &Settings
Repairs Engraving � Laser Welding


FINE JEWELRY 850-683-8004
525 E. CedarAve. Crestview, FL bin ,a-r, M-Fam - 6 p.m. -SAT 9A.MPM.M.


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