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Crestview news bulletin
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028411/00115
 Material Information
Title: Crestview news bulletin
Portion of title: Bulletin
Crestview news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Okaloosa Publishing Co.,.
Place of Publication: Crestview Fla
Creation Date: June 3, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crestview (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okaloosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okaloosa -- Crestview
Coordinates: 30.754167 x -86.572778 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 9, no. 37 (Sept. 5, 2001); Title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002758666
oclc - 48122675
notis - ANN6621
lccn - 2001229458
System ID: UF00028411:00115
 Related Items
Preceded by: Crestview news leader

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main continued
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Classifieds
        page 8
        page 9
    Main: Sports
        page 10
    Hurricane Information
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
Full Text




Saturday, June 3,


WEATHER ............... 2
RELIGION ..... ......... 4
BUSINESS ............... 6
KIDS PAGE ...............8
PUBLIC NOTICES ....... 11
SPORTS ............ 10-11
CLASSIFIEDS .........12-14





E


CRESTVTFW
12/12/06
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA-HISTORY
205 SMA
PO BOX 1107007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611


WS nuLr


City urges residents to conserve water


Here is a common faucet-
mounted water timer. This
Gilmour Mechanical Water
Timer costs around $13 at
most area hardware stores.


Adam Ziglar
News Bulletin Reporter
Because of extensive
drought conditions, the
Crestview Department of
Public Services is asking all
businesses and residents
within the city limits to stop
outdoor irrigation during the
hours of 3 p.m. and 9 p.m.
The restriction is an exten-
sion of an original request
made on April 17. Then, the
city restricted water use
between the hours of 6 a.m.
and 6 p.m.


"We didn't know which
timeframe we were receiving
most of the impact," said
Wayne Steele, assistant direc-
tor of public services. "We've
since narrowed that down.
This is the timeframe that'
impacts the system the
most."
The city also urges resi-
dents to use the odd-even
method of water use.
For example, houses end-
ing in odd numbers should
only water lawns on odd cal-
endar days outside the
restricted hours.


Steele especially urges res-
idents south of the interstate
to adhere to the restriction.
"Right now, there is only
one well south of the inter-
state," he said. "It is heavily
impacted when there is a lot
of outside water usage."
The city's eighth well is
currently under construction
and should be online later
this year. Located near
Antioch Elementary School,
the well will provide enough
water for residents for years
SeeWATER, page 3


^aam .igiar/i ne News Bulletin
Looking for help from above literally the marquee at
Woodlawn Baptist Chuch said it all.


S trummin


Blues


Adam Ziglar/The News Bulletin ;
Cagen Williams, 15, plays the blues on his Gibson Les Paul guitar. A prodigy of sorts, he is starting to play gigs in the area.

15-year-old has already reached elite status as a blues guitarist


* Armed with.upcoming gigs and
an arsenal of amplifiers, Cagen
Williams is a local 15-year-old blues
guitar prodigy.
Adam Ziglar
News Bulletin Reporter
The fuzzy sound of an amplified guitar
ekes through the cracks of the Williams' front
door.
"Cagen is practicing," his mom Sylvia
says, her voice barely audible even in the
front yard.
She opens the front door and a punch


drunk gust of sound stumbles outside.
Pepper spraying the air, the sound tum-
bles around the yard and is lost when the
door shuts.
The Williams' home is in an off-the-beat-
en-path Airport Road neighborhood.
Opening the door to his practice room,
Cagen is encircled by an audience of guitar
amplifiers.
Wearing tethered sandals and worn out
blue jeans, he methodically paces the
mahogany floor, his head bowed, eyes
closed. He's held spellbound by the music.
"Cagen," his mom calls over the amplified
wash.
Slightly embarrassed, the bashful 15-year-
old in braces turns off an accompaniment


track that provides the rhythm underbelly
for the deftly executed lead guitar runs and "
fills he makes up as he goes along.
"I'm sorry," he apologizes sheepishly,
before craning the guitar strap over his head
and setting his Gibson Les Paul on its stand.
The tubes in his Fender amp hum. He sits on
the brick hearth to answer questions about
his gift.
Cagen has been playing guitar just over
two years.
One weekend when he was a seventh
grader, his parents bought a not-too-expen-
sive ax with a built-in speaker. After all, most
13-year-old kids shuffle through hobbies like
See BLUES, page 3


Laurel Hill


matriarch


passes away

E Pearl Tyner was 97 when she
died in a Crestview nursing home
on Wednesday morning.
Ken Nielsen
News Bulletin Reporter
One of Laurel Hill's great matriarchs,
Pearl Tyner died Wednesday morning at
the Parthenon in Crestview. She was 97.
-. -Her. -health ...-
had been fail-
ing her lately ,h
and she had
spent the past
week at the
Fort Walton
Beach Medical
Center until
Tuesday, when
she was
moved to
Parthenon
Health Care-in Pe rlTyner was 97
Crestview.
Her great-nephew Charles Tyner, had
been her right hand man, friend and con-
fidant. He was also her personal chauf-
feur, and loved it.
"She loved my new red truck and was
real proud to ride around in it," said
Tyner. Up until recently Charles and Pearl
would enjoy lunch together every day
either at the Tropical Palm Restaurant on
Main Street or they would travel to the
Florala Buffet.
"One of things that I think I will miss
the most will be our morning coffees.
Every morning Pearl and I would sit on
her porch and have coffee while she
planned out her day."
Pearl was financially savvy and had
made many profitable investments. "Her
daddy told her years ago that if you want-
ed to be someone you had to have stock in
IBM," said Charles. "So she saved up and
purchased some. It turned out to be a
great decision on her part."
She often donated monies to local
churches and invested in the college schol-
arships of many local students.
A graduate of Laurel Hill School, Tyner
enrolled in Florida State College for
See TYNER, page 3


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Adam Ziglar/The News Bulletin
Richard Brown chisels away on an iron sandstone rock, making a life-size cub bear at the Baker Block Museum. The
cub statue, along with its mother, will remain at the museum.


ear crossing


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Today's Weather


The Baker Block Museum's newest addition
includes two hand-carved bear statues hewn
from large rocks.
Adam Ziglar started carving on the mama
News Bulletin Reporter bear nearly two weeks ago,
completing it on Monday. He
Richard Brown's bear stat- is now working on the cub,
ues are becoming more life- which is considerably small-
like as the days go by. er then the mama bear.
After the curators at the The jagged, sandy rock is
Baker Block Museum asked slowly taking shape. With
him to carve two bears for each chisel, each clack of the
the heritage park, he simply hammer and sweeping
said, "Put them where you motion of the file, the bear's
want and I'll carve." legs and round back slowly
.^JTwo lag,iron sandstone ,?,lme intqocus
rocks were placed to the west Brown, who moved here
"Wiflie niiseum and Brown from Michigan several years

1.1ff 11 "'M 1 A


You only need a few tools to start a rock-carving hobby.
Chisel used for roughing out and removing material
quickly. There are different chisels for rounding and finishing
to smooth rough edges.
Hammers used to drive pitching tools in removing large
chunks. The hammer is also used for carving small details.
Pitching tool used for knocking large chunks off the
rock.
Rasps and Rifflers used to shape softer stones.


ago, is a caretaker of the Bone
Creek campgrounds in Holt.
The 69-year-old former
computer programmer has
been sculpting,-for about 15
years.


He has also carved four
bears at Bear Lake and an
obscurely-hidden mythical
woodland creature: called a
. gnome that stoically guards
the Munson campgrounds.


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Aoam Ligar/I ne News ulluleun
In the background, behind the completed mother bear, Allen Paul, a Baker resident, watches Richard Brown chisel
away at a large iron rock, making a statue of a cub bear.


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SATURDAY, JUNE 3,2006


CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN


DAGEr 0









5~AII~lAY.IINF l Of CESTIEWNEW BULETN PGE


Book signing set for
Coast Guard author
The Crestview Robert L. F.
Sikes Public Library will host a
book talk and signing for Martha
LaGuardia-Kotite, a U. S. Coast
Guard Academy graduate and
author of the book (to" be released
June 1st) "So Others May Live:
Coast Guard Rescue Swimmers:
Saving Lives, Defying Death."
The program will be at 10 a.m.,
Friday, July 7, with refreshments
served beginning at 9:30 a.m. The
library is located at 1445
Commerce Drive (behind the Post
Office). Call 682-4432.
"So Others May Live" is the
untold story of the history of the
U.S. Coast Guard helicopter rescue
swimmer. There are 12 heroic sto-
ries which chronicle a representa-
tion of the greatest maritime res-
cues attempted since the inception
of the program in 1985. These
feats, told through the eyes of the
hero, reveal an understanding of
how and why the rescuer, with
flight crew assistance, risks his or
her life to reach out to save a
stranger. The events unfold in
diverse geographic areas and envi-
ronments: oceans, hurricanes, oil


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rigs, caves, sinking vessels, floods,
Niagara Falls and in the aftermath
of one of our country's worst nat-
ural disasters, Hurricane Katrina.
The author was born in New
Orleans and grew up in Destin,
graduating from Fort Walton
Beach High School. More informa-
tion about the author may be
found at
www.mlaguardiakotite.com.

Master Gardener to
lecture at 'First Tuesday'
"Groundcovers for the
South," by local author and
Master Gardener Marie Harrison
will be the topic of the June 6
First Tuesday Lecture at the
Crestview Robert L. F. Sikes
Public Library.
The 10:30 a.m. lecture and
PowerPoint presentation will dis-
cuss material from Harrison's latest
book by the same title which will
also be available for purchase at the
lecture.
The library is located at 1445
Commerce Drive (behind the Post
Office).
Refreshments will be served
beginning at 10 a.m. Call 682-4432.


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BLUES, from page
going through their closet on
a school morning.
Next year, he'll be an 11th
grader at Fort Walton Beach
High School.
"He's 15, but he has the
mind of a 25 year old," Sylvia
says, searching for his busi-
ness card that provides con-
tact numbers, an e-mail
address and boldly states:
Cagen Williams. Blues
Guitar.
Last weekend he played at
the Gulf Place Bike Rally in
Santa Rosa Beach.
Dodging the applause of
hundreds of bikers, he
crunched through several
meaty Stevie Ray Vaughan
songs.
At the peak of his set, the
crowd cheered, "One more
song, one more song!"
He also played on a local
"stage" at Crestview's 90th
anniversary celebration on
Main Street in April.
Unfortunately, a sudden
storm forced him to post-
pone his performance.
He only played for a
minute before the downpour
ended his set. But it wasn't a
total loss.
"I don't think you can be
off when you play in front of
people," he said. "Sharing
music with any group of
people for any amount of
time is exciting."
Cagen also worked his
mojo Friday. He played at the
Outpost, a fish house in
Freeport off U.S. Highway
331.
*Gigs are sparse at the
snoment, but4he's optimistic
about the fture.
"I'd love to play around
town or travel the state," he
says.
"Anything beyond that
would be amazing."
Currently, he's helping his
father, Joel, build a music
room in the family barn loft.


Cagen wants to form a
band. But finding other like-
minded musicians his age is
a challenge.
"Not a lot of people my
age like to play the blues," he
says, a bit discouraged.
"It seems like when peo-
ple play blues they play with
a lot of feeling."
Cagen's idol is Stevie Ray
Vaughan, who pioneered the
blues revival of the 1980s.
He also listens to artists
who predate him by more
than 70 years musical
architects like Muddy
Waters, Albert King, Robert
Johnson and Son House -
artists whose unrealized
script for American blues


music has remained
immersed in a grave of
obscurity.
For now, he keeps practic-
ing, racing his fingers up and
down the guitar neck, weav-
ing around the tacked-down
rhythm track.
He has a bright red
Berkley School of Music
sticker stuck to his guitar
case.
"Yea, I'd like to go there,
but I haven't had much luck
with lessons," he says.
Neither did most of the
people whose pictures plas-
ter his bedroom walls.
Posters include artists like
Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix and
Jimmy Page another gui-


tarist who picked up his first
guitar at 13. For the most
part, they were all self-
taught.
When the calls do come he
wants to be ready.
"Hearing the reactions
from strangers it helps
him to know that he has
something people want to
hear," Sylvia says.
The next two years of high
school will most likely pass
in typical fashion except
for the occasional gig.
But the gigs probably
won't be on a school night.
For booking inquiries, e-mail
Cagen Williams at cagen-
williams@yahoo.com.


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Women, which went on to
become Florida State
"University. She made consid-
drable contributions to the
school. a
'AccordiI g to Charles
Tyn'I"T'arl and ier sister
Mayme Tyner donated 200
acres at the intersection of
State Road 85 and Airport
road to the university. It's
value was estimated to be
over $3 million. The sisters
also established the Mack
and Effie Tyner scholarship
chairs at the University.
There is also a study hall at
the University named after
Pearl Tyner. When the foot-
ball stadium added new

WATER, from page
to come.
"It will significantly
increase the water on the
south end," Steele said. "That
will take care of our immedi-
ate needs for the next five or
six years."
Steele said that the water
restriction is not likely to be
lifted unless the area receives
a significant, consistent
amount of rain.
"It's important that people
comply to this issue," Steele
said. "It does cause an incon-
venience for everyone."


lighting recently, Pearl donat-
ed to that project and there is
a lighting tower at the stadi-
um with a plaque bearing her
name.
PastoYr Do'ni CRadeinhad
befriended her during his
days as a teenager working
on her farm.
"She had this 50's model
truck with a granny low gear
in it. Mayme would be turn-
ing the hay and Pearl would
be right behind with the bail-
er. Larry Adams and myself
would put the truck between
the rows, set the steering
wheel straight and then jump
out, and while it creeped up
the rows Larry and I would


throw the hay up on it. We knew the name of every cow
got paid $5.00 a day and and bull that she had on that
lunch." farm, and the names of their
Cadenhead said that the off spring And she had hun-
Tyner sisters' mother w6uld dreds," ch-iklu Cadehhead.
prepare the lunch. In 1999 she -was honored
"It consisted of two slices by the City of Laurel Hill as
of bread and a slice of the Citizen of the Year. More
baloney between it and one than one hundred Okaloosa
glass of warm lemonade." residents attended the cere-
Cadenhead wasn't mak- mony in the city's high
ing fun or belittling Miss school auditorium.
Pearl. He respected her She was inducted into the
tremendously. He just want- Okaloosa County Wbiaiih's
ed to make the point of the Hall of Fame in 2000.
type of no-nonsense hard A memorial service will be
working businesswoman held later this month at the
Tyner was. Whitehurst-Powell Funeral
Cadenhead said her mind Home. That date has yet to be
worked like a machine. "She announced.


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Adam Ziglar/The News Bulletin
The City of Crestview's Parks and Recreations Department waters the grass at Twin Hills
Park at 1 p.m. on Friday. The city is requesting that residents restrict outdoor water
usage between the hours of 3 p.m. and 9 p.m.

Yardwate ingi ce c


* Local Master Gardener decodes
the secret to a well-watered yard.

Watering the lawn can be tricky business,
given the quirks of Florida's climate.
If a yard is watered too late, the humid
terra firma becomes a hotbed for certain fun-
guses.
"Research has shown that afternoon
watering should not be done," said Sheila
Dunning, commercial horticultural agent for
the University of Florida's Okaloosa County
Extension Office.
"Early morning as close to sunrise as pos-
sible is the best time to water you want to
thoroughly water your yard by 9 a.m."
Depending on water pressure, water
applications need to run anywhere from 20
minutes to an hour to get out the appropriate
amount of water to penetrate through the
sand and hit the root system between one-
half and three-quarters-of-an-inch of water.


"If you're only putting out a quarter of an
inch, it stays too close to the surface, evapo-
rates very quickly and the root system does-
n't get the advantage of it," Dunning said.
Dew Point: The temperature at which air
becomes saturated and produces dew.
Ideally, the dew point is between 4 a.m. and 7
a.m.
"The dew point temperature is when
every bit of water that is out there is available
to the plants," Dunning said.
"They're not losing anything to evapora-
tion. That's the most efficient time when that
temperature is reached."
Watering a lawn in the afternoon and
late evening provides very few benefits to a
yard, Dunning said.
In the local humid climate, water stays on
the ground all night, resulting in an active
fungus.
"You start losing grass because it's dying
from a disease," she said. "We really don't
want to do that in our Florida climate."


Adam Ziglar/The News Bulletin
Cagen Williams, soon to be a high school junior, wants to form a band, but is having
trouble finding other youngsters of his calibre of musical talent.


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PAGE 3


SATURDAY. JUNE 3.2006














B Burden Bearing: How to treat those in a weak condition


Brethren,
if a man be
overtaken in
a fault, ye
which are
spiritual,
Michael Green restore such
an one in the spirit of meek-
ness; considering thyself, lest
thou also be tempted. Bear
ye one another's burdens,
and so fulfil the law of
Christ. Galatians 6:1-2
Have you watched any of
the reality television pro-
grams recently? These shows
consistently rank at the top
of weekly television ratings.
One of the appeals of such
programming is the intense
competition between the
individuals. Contests of
physical strength and mental
prowess are often showcased
with rewards and accolades
for the winners. The losers
are oftentimes ridiculed and


ostracized because of their
weakness.
Not only is this attitude
prevalent in 'reality televi-
sion' but also in other
aspects of our culture.
Professional athletes take
great joy in trash talking
when they get the best of an
opponent. Bullying and
division between youths in
our nation's schools has
reached a critical level. Much
of this is learned from our so
called heroes/stars of today.
What should be our response
to such an attitude? What
does the Bible say about how
we are to treat those that are
in a weak condition?
The Apostle Paul
instructs the Galatian
brethren to bear one anoth-
er's burdens. This is in stark
contrast to today's philoso-
phy of only the strong sur-
vive. As Paul ends his letter


to the Galatian church, he
provides a series of practical
teachings in chapter 6. It is
no coincidence that the prin-
ciple of burden bearing is the
first teaching to this church.
If we are to be effective
teachers, diligent workers
and humble servants in the
kingdom of God, then we
have to manifest an attitude
of restoration towards our
fellow Christians and show a
willingness to bear the bur-
dens of others.
In our opening verse (V.1)
Paul teaches Christians the
lesson of how we are to treat
others who make a mistake.
Popular philosophy says that
we should use other people's
mistakes/weaknesses
against them. The Bible says
that we are to restore those
that are overtaken in a fault.
This means that when some-
one stumbles along the way


in their Christian walk, then
we ought to be ready to give
them a helping hand instead
of exploiting their weakness.
You will notice that Paul
warns all Christians to con-
sider their own nature lest
they be tempted. This indicts
us all because we all have
our faults. We all fall short!
When we look at ourselves
in light of the standard of
God's word we quickly
notice that we miss the mark
by a mile. We lift up those
that are weak because we are
also susceptible to tempta-
tion.
Not only are we to
restore the one that is over-
taken in a fault, we are also
to help them bear their bur-
den (V.2). This means that
we are to go the extra mile
with our brother/sister in
Christ and help them in their
time of weakness.


Oftentimes this is when they
are the most vulnerable. We
are not to exploit those that
are in crisis, but assist them
in carrying their burden.
Christ has taken away the
eternal condemnation of the
sins of His people (Romans
8:1), but we are called to help
them with their struggles in
this world. When we take
this attitude we fulfill the
righteous law of Christ.
What is the law of Christ?
John 13:34 tells us. "A new
commandment I give unto
you, that ye love one anoth-
er; as I have loved you, that
ye also love one another."
We are to love one another
during the easy times and
the difficult. The love spoken
of by Christ in these verses is
an active love. When we bear
the burdens of others we are
actively manifesting love
towards another.


In John 13:35, Jesus teach-
es that all men will know
that we are his disciples
when we have love for one
another. As Christians we all
should be aware that it is not
a t-shirt, bumper sticker or a
piece of jewelry that makes
one a Christian. The distin-
guishing mark of the Lord's
servants is that they bear up
those that are overtaken in a
fault and manifest love
towards one another as he
loves us. It is my prayer that
we would put away the 'real-
ity show' philosophy of the
strong lording over the week
and humbly assist one anoth-
er in times of need.
Michael Green, Jr. is pastor
of Palm Chapel Primitive
Baptist Church (www.palm-
chapel.org) in Crestview, FL.
Pastor Green .can be contacted
at (850) 689-3383 or by e-mail at
pastor@palmchapel.org.


* CHURCH SERVICES


Please turn in your Located at 951 S. Ferdon Blvd.,
church news briefs to the Crestview. Sunday services include
News Bulletin by 5 PM on 9:15 a.m. bible study; 10:30 a.m.
the Thursdays prior to publi- worship and praise service; 5:30
the Thursdays prior to pub- p.m. worship and praise, Awana for
cation. Kids. For additional information call
Apostolic 682-5525 or visit the church website
Apostolic Life Tabernacle and www.centralcrestview.com.
Pastor Shane Chessor cordially Emmanuel Baptist Church,
invite you to worship with them. 3252 East James Lee Blvd.,
Sunday Worship, 10:00 AM, 6:00 Crestview. Phone: 682-9416. Email
PM. Located Hwy. 90W. 1 mile from address: ebc@ebccrestview.com.
city limit sign turn left onto Shoffner Teaching Pastor Mark Seagle.
Blvd. then left on Pinewood to 3136 Celebration services: 6 p.m.
Pinewood Dr., Crestview. For more Saturday, Sunday at 8:45 AM and
information call the church at 689- 10:30 AM.
2422. Jungle Jubilee for nursery,
Apostolic/Pentecostal Preschool/The Zone (Children's
Hester Cornerstone Ministries Church) K-5th Graders during all
is located at 1599 Hester Church celebrations. .
Road in Baker. Sunday services 2 Evening celebrations throughout
p.m. Sunday School, 3 p.m. wor- the community Life groups for
ship. Bible Study Tuesday, 6:30 adults. On Campus Sunday Night
p.m.; prayer meeting Thursday at 7 Safari for preschoolers, G-Force for
p.m. Call 682-5367 for information. K-5th Graders. Fuel 247- Worship
Assemblies Service/Small Groups (Youth). All
Campton Assembly of God Sunday evening opportunities are
Church is located at 6924 Hwy 85 from 5-7 p.m.
North in Laurel Hill. Evelenar Baptist Church: 2820
The Sunday service is at 10:30 Carver Avenue, Crestview. Rev.
AM. For more information call the Benjamin T. Randolph. Sunday
church at 652-4581 or Pastor Kelly Services 9:30 AM Sunday School,
at 423-0375. 11 AM morning worship, and at 3
Frd t AssBvd Coretsie*4Offieo ,. ev.ry 1stSurtd yisthiiTl6our ofi
Ferdon -Blvd; .Cresfvie,, Office 'Power. Phone. 682-2218.
hours 'Monday through Friday, 9-4. First Baptist Church of
Pastor Mark English. Crestview: 798 N. Pearl Street
Sunday: 8:30 AM early morning (across Hwy. 90 from courthouse,
worship, 10 AM Sunday School; 11 behind Burger King. Pastor Alan
AM morning worship; and a 6 PM Kilgore. Phone 682-2544.
evening service. X-cel Youth Sunday services 8:45 Welcome
Ministry 3 p.m., X-ceed Children's Center opens/9:00 Sunday
Ministry 4 p.m. SchooV10:30 morning worship, chil-
Women's Bible Study Monday, at dren's worship/ 4:00 Student
10 a.m. and 6 p.m., Men's Bible Leadership; Youth Choir / 5:0o0o
Study Monday at 6 p.m. Teen girls Youth discipleship; Youth Ensemble;
Bible Study 6:15 p.m. every 2nd & Ladies, Men, Children and
4th Tuesday of the month. Preschool Bible Studies; Book Club/
Monday, Women's Bible Study 6 PM evening worship.
10 a.m. and 6 p.m., Men's Bible First Baptist Church of Holt:
Study 6 p.m. 532 Hwy 90 West, PO Box 38, Holt,
Tuesday Choir Practice 6:30 FL 32564. Phone 537-6170. Pastor
p.m. David Wheat.
Special needs bus available for Sunday services: 9 AM Small
11 a.m. service. Call the church at Group Bible Study. 10:15 AM Praise
682-3518 for pickup. and Worship Service.
Golan Assembly of God: 6612 Goodhope Baptist Church,
Hwy. 189 N., Baker. Phone 537- 1895 Owen Cotton Road off Hwy.
3043. Pastored by Rev. James E. 189, Baker, in the Escambia Farms
Paul. Sunday services: Sunday community. Pastor Jim Skates,
School 9:45 a.m., morning worship Worship Leader Randy Batson.
at 11 a.m., and evening worship at 6 Phone: 537-8720 or 537-8740.
p.Milligan Assem bly of God Services: Men's prayer 9:30
Milligan5408 Hwy. 4, Baker. Ph Godne 537 a.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m., wor-
5408 Hwy. 4, Baker. Phone 537 ship 11 a.m.. Evening Services:
4945. Senior Pastor Wayne Discipleship training 5 p.m. worship
Johnson, Youth Pastor Robby Kolb. 6 p.m.
Sunday services: Sunday School Live Oak Baptist Church, locat-
9:30 a.m., worship 10:30 a.m., ed off Hwy. 85 South near Shoal
Kingdom Kids 10:30 a.m. evening River Country Club. Rev. Bill White.
service 6 p.m. Regular Sunday services are
North Central Assembly of God: at Bible study at 9:45 AM, morning
Di in8 Bible study at 9:45 AM, morning
158 N. Woodlawn Drive in worship service at 11 AM. An addi-
Crestview. Phone: 689-0209 or 537- tional Bible study class is at 5 PM,
7115. Minister A. Paul Hinton. followed by evening worship at 6
Sunday services Sunday School at PM.
10 a.m., morning worship at 11 Living Faith Baptist Church:
a.m., evening worship at 6 p.m. 837 West James Lee Blvd.,
Shady Grove Assembly of God: Crestview. Pastor Chaplain David
Sunday services begin at 9:45 AM Pettis. Sunday services Sunday
with Sunday School, followed by School 10 AM and worship at 11 AM
10:45 AM and 6 PM worship ser- Discipleship Training 6 PM, and
vices. Shady Grove is located at evening worship 7 PM Children's
1189 Shady Grove Church Road in Church Sunday morning. Phone -
Baker, just off Hwy. 189. 682-4371.
Welcome Assembly of God Magnolia Baptist Church:
located on Hwy. 393 in the Dorcas Located at 3198 Hwy 602, Laurel
community, invites you to join them Hill. Pastor Roy Mooneyham.
for Sunday services including Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.,
Sunday School at 9:45 AM and wor- Sunday Morning Worship, 11:00
ship services at 10:45 and 6 PM. a.m. with children's church for 3-5
Women's and men's ministries and nursery for under 3. Evening
meet 2nd and 4th Thursdays, with a Worship 6:00 p.m. For further infor-
6 PM meal. Call 682-1683 if you nation, call 652-2900 or 652-3149.
need directions. New Life Missionary Baptist
Baptist Church: Pastor Sanford Hayes. 285
Beaver Creek BC services: Duggan Ave., Crestview. Sunday
Beaver Creek Baptist Church, locat- School 9:30 a.m. Morning worship
ed six miles West of Baker, has 11 a.m. on Sunday.
Sunday School at 10:00 AM, morn- Palm Chapel Primitive Baptist
ing worship at 11:00 AM, and Church: 201 Cadle Dr., Crestview.
Children's Church at 11:15 AM. Elder Michael Green, Jr., Pastor.
Calvary Baptist Church: 612 E. Sunday 10:30 AM. Call 689-3383 for
Chestnut Ave., Crestview. Pastor: more information.
Rev. Rhett Everage. Sunday ser- PIlgrim Rest Baptist Church:
vices 8:45 a.m. continental break- Pastor, Dr. Jerry Haley. 5595 Hwy. 4
fast; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; South, Baker, FL.. Phone (850) 537-
10:45 a.m. morning worship; 11 9221. FAX (850) 537-6798.
a.m. youth worship; 6 p.m. evening Sunday services: Morning wor-
service. Nursery provided for chil- ship 8:30 and 11 AM. Bible study
drentral Baps 9:45 AM. Youth H20 worship 5 p.m.
Central Baptist Church:


Discipleship training 5:30 PM. School 11 a.m.
Evening worship 6:30 PM. Phone (334) 858-3515. On Route
Pyron Chapel Baptist Church: 331 near the Florida line in -Florala,
6498 Wm. Gary Johnson Road, Ala. Call (334) 858-3515 for more
Baker. Interim Pastor Neil G. specific directions.
Thompson. Methodist
Sunday services: Bible Study, 9:45 Baker First United Methodist:
a.m-.; worship at 11:00 a.m.; Bible located just north of the traffic light
book study at 5:30 p.m. Phone: in Baker. Their new pastor is Rev.
368-0238. Richard M. Hughes. Sunday School
Valley Road Baptist Church: begins at 10 a.m., worship service is
1018 Valley Road, Crestview. Phone at 11 a.m. You will be warmly wel-
850-682-4513. Rev. Philip Mark. comed here
Times for Sunday Services: Bible First United Methodist: 599
Study 9:45 a.m., morning worship Eighth Avenue, Crestview, The Rev.
,11 A.M, Discipleship training 5 p.m., Bruce Sheffield is Senior Pastor, and
and evening worship 6 p.m. Dr. R. Lee Thigpen, Lay Leader
Woodlawn Baptist located at (FUMC).
824 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, Traditional services at 8 a.m., in
Pastor Patrick Pfrimmer. the Christ Chapel, and at 11 a.m., in
Sunday School meets at 9 AM the Main Sanctuary. Contemporary
with morning worship at 10:30 AM. service in the Christ Chapel at 9:30
A service for the hearing impaired is a.m. Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. and
also offered on Sunday morning. 11 a.m.
Sunday evening service is at 6 PM, For information, call 682-2018,
and the Youth Choir meets at 5 PM. during normal business hours.
Call the church at 682-2924 for Hopewell United Methodist
information. Church:' Rev. Elaine Hagenbuch.
Catholic Services 1st & 3rd Sunday of the
Our Lady of Victory Catholic month at 8:45 a.m., Sunday School
Community, 550 Adams Drive, at 10 a.m.
Crestview. Telephone 682-4622. Located 5 miles west of Laurel Hil)
Ministers: Father. Steven "O'Connor on New Ebenezer Road, just ovdr
-aHd Fatie5r` rencio Lag-ura.. Times e AL state line. (850)%6524474 or
for services: Sut r'ai se at 8, -(334) 8$8- 15 :
9:30 and 11 a.m. Monday, Tuesday, Mount Zion African Methodist
Thursday, and Friday 8 a.m. Mass. Episcopal (AME) Church, 502
Saturday 5 p.m. McDonald Street, in Crestview. Rev.
Special events: RCIA (Rite of Matthew Ewing. Regular services
Christian Initiation for Adults) class include: Sunday- church school
every Monday from 7 to 9 p.m. 9:30 AM, praise service 10:45 AM,
Church of and worship service 11:00 AM;
McDonald Street Church of Tuesday services include: 6 PM
Christ: at 744 South McDonald' prayer meeting, and men's bible
Street in Crestview, with Minister study at 7 PM. For information, call
Bro. Henry Herbert and Youth 682-7799. '
Minister, Bro. Daniel Jackson. 10 New Bethel United Methodist
a.m. Bible class on Sunday, fol- Church, located at 5894 Hwy. 85
lowed by 11:15 a.m. worship. North. Sunday services are 10 AM
Evening worship at 6 p.m. on Sunday School, and 11 AM and 6
Sunday. For more information, call PM worship.
682-6230. St. Mark United Methodist
Church of Christ Airport Road: Church, 2250 P.J. Adams Pkwy. in
Sunday Bible study at 9 AM, wor- .Crestview, offers the following ser-
ship services at 10 AM, Sunday vices: 9 a.m. Sunday School, 10
worship at 6 PM, Minister Jason a.m. Sunday morning worship. A
Green. nursery is available for all services.
Crestview Church of God, Pastor Clergyman is Rev. Glenn McCall.
Larry Collins. Sunday school 10 11 Call 682-5280 for more information.
AM; morning worship 11 AM 12 Nazarene
PM; and 6-9 PM evening service on Aplin Road Church of the
Sunday. Call 682-3045 for more Nazarene: 395 Aplin Road,
information. Crestview. Rev. Gary Monk. Sunday
Church of New Covenant, School 9:45 a.m., morning worship
Pastors Charles, Sr., ,and Maxine 10:45 a.m., and evening service at 6
Whisnand invite you to attend their p.m. 682-7995.
services, located at 3191 North Nondenominational
Newman Avenue in, Crestview. Mount Olive Community
Sunday services include Adult Church: Pastor D.L. Lyons invites all
Bible Study and Children's Church interested to Sunday Services at 10
at 10 AM, followed by Praise Hour at a.m., Tuesday Ladies' meeting at 7
11 AM. Call 682-8433 for more p.m. with Marie C. Lyons, and
information. Thursday Bible study at 7 p.m. with
Church of the Resurrection: 66 Pastor Dennis. The church is locat-
8th Street, Shalimar FL. The Rev.. ed at 5661 Mt. Olive Road in
Canon Michael G. Carr. Sunday ser- Crestview. Directions approxi-
vices at 10 AM, morning prayer on mately 7 miles east on Hwy. 90, turn
1st, 3rd; 5th; and holy communion left on Mt. Olive Road, 2 miles. Call
on 2nd and 4th Sundays. 682-6218 for more information.
Episcopal Pentecostal
Church of the Epiphany: Auburn Pentecostal Church:
Located at 424 Garden St., Independent Pentecostal church at
Crestview behind the Teachers 6144 Hwy. 85 North, Crestview.
Credit Union. Pastor: Rev. Ron Williamson.
Children's Sunday School 9:15 Sunday Services: Sunday School
-a.m. Holy Eucharist 9:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., morning worship and
Nursery is available. The first children's church 10:30 a.m.,
Sunday of the month there will be a evening and youth services at 6
Potluck Brunch following the ser- p.m. Nursery available for all ser-
vice. vices. Phone: 6826357; fax 689-
Interim Vicar is the Rev. George 4402.
A. Gilbert, Jr. Office hours are Calvary Apostolic Church:
Tuesday 9 a.m. 4 p.m. Call 689- 1010 Bay Street, Crestview. Sunday
1410 for more Information. All are 10 a.m. worship service with
welcome. Sunday School. Sign language
Lutheran available at all services. Pastor
Our Savior Evangelical Lutheran Charles Braneff, Jr. Church phone:
Church LCMS: 178 W. North (850) 423-1198. Pastor's phone:
Avenue in Crestview. Rev. Vance G. 682-6191.
Tech. Sunday services include First Pentecostal Church of Jesus
Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m., Christ: Sunday services for First
and a traditional worship service Pentecostal are at 10 AM and 6 PM.
with Holy Communion for all ages at Pastor Wilbur Hawkins. Located at
10:30 A.M. 997 East Chestnut Ave. in
Private confession and absolu- Crestview. Call (850) 682-3497 for
tion every Friday from 9 a.m.-noon. more information.
First Lutheran Church of Presbyterian
Florala: at 24512 5th Avenue (US First Presbyterian Church: 492 N.
331) in Florala AL, pastored by Rev. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, pastored
Jack Betz. 9:30 a,m. worship, fel- by Rev. Frank Beall. Sunday School,
lowship 10:30 a.m., and Sunday 10 AM; worship 11 AM. For more


information, call 682-2835.
Unitarian
Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship of the Emerald Coast
(UUFEC): located at 1295 Bayshore
Drive, Valparaiso, Florida. Minister:
The Reverend Rodney Debs.
Service is held at 10:30 AM each
Sunday. For further updates, check .
http://www.uufec.com, the Verbal"
Chalice, Wick, or please call the
Fellowship at 678-7197, or 243-
5247.
Unity Way of Life UnityCenter:
Pastor Rev. George A. Schmidt,
Ph.D., the Way of Life Unity Center
is located at 1797 Hurlburt Road in
Fort Walton Beach.
Sunday services: 9:30 AM and
11 AM Celebration Services. Youth
Education programs along with
childcare are only provided at the 11
AM service. All are welcome.
For information, call the office at
864-1232 (hours by appointment).
There 'is also a Metaphysical
Bookstore (864-5945) open
Supdays from 9 AM to 1 PM, and
th e Dial-A-Thought line, 864-9139.
Other
Eglin Air Force Base Chapel:
Protestant Sunday Worship
Services/Religious Education -
0806("-Adional in We's ale
Chapel; 0930, Tradticia.nr.b .Ws
Gate Chapel; 0930 Gospel in Chapel
Center; 1000 Contemporary at the
Cherokee Elementary School
Auditorium; Sunday School classes
are available for ages 3 through
adult. Call 882-8527. For more infor-
mation, call Chaplain Sarah Shirley
at 883-9736.
Eglin Air Force-Base-Chapel:
Catholic Weekend Mass Schedule
- 1700 hours, Sat. in the West Gate
Chapel; 0745 hours, Sun. in the
Chapel Center; 1115 hours, Sun. in
the West Gate Chapel. For Religious
Education, call 882-7320
All military and their families are
invited to join us at our many diverse


services. We have services for
Catholic, Protestant, Jewish and
Islamic faith groups, as well as
activities for all ages. Call the chapel
at 882-2111 for times and locations.
Christian Life Center: Pastor
Jason Palmer. Prayer is held Sunday
at 2 PM, with Sunday services and
Sunday School at 2:30. Christian
Life Center is located at 410
Wingard Street; call (850) 305-0198,
for more Information.
Healing Stream Ministries:
Pastor Jonathan Griffin. Saturday
services are being held. The ministry
is located at the corner of E.
Robinson and Church Street in
Crestview. Call Pastor Griffin at 682-
5455 for more information.
The Chapel, an independent
worshipping community, has ser-
vices every Sunday morning at 7:30
AM with Chaplain Hayward
Chapman, and at 9 AM with
Chaplain Chuck Chapman.Services
are held at 1093 S. Ferdon Blvd. in
Crestview. Phone: (850) 682-9887 or
(850) 423-0526.
The Awakening Ministries,
Inc., a not-for-profit Christian music
ministry, meets every Saturday from
2-7 PM under the pavilion, Kit Drive,
Crestview. Their phone number is
689-1259. For more nf~~pation call
or ,,;_; -: .ep
awakeningministries@praize.com.
Iglesia Hispana Bethel: Te inbi-
ta a los servicios de adoracion a
nuestro sefor Jesus.
Ordon de servicios: Martes ora-
cion 7:00 PM; Viernes servicio evan-
gelistico 7:30 PM; Domingo escuela
Dominical 11:00 AM; Domingo ser-
-vicio evangelistico 6:30 PM a..',
Estamos uvicados en la 544
Main Street, Crestview FL, 32536.
Telefones (850) 423-0325 y cellular
543-4292.
NEW BEGINNINGS The church
is at 412 West James Lee Blvd. in
Crestview. The Sunday service
begins at 10:30 a.m.


CHURCH ANNOUNCEMENTS


Please turn in your church news brief to the News Bulletin by
5 PM on the Thursdays prior to publication.
EVENTS
VBS AT FBC OF MILLIGAN: Vacation Bible School will be
held june 12-16 from 8:3j0 a.m. to.11:45 a.m, at the First Baptist
Church of Milligan; Children ages 4 years thouigh'6th grade may
come experience thrilling Bible stories, awesome crafts, motivating
music, and snacks, puppets, and fun recreation.
On Sat., June 10, a 'Tun Time" and preregistration for VBS will
be held at the church,from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. For more information
call 682-6277.
VALLEY ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH: Will be hosting Youth
Ultimale Challenge. The event will be June 26th June 30 from
6:00 until 8:00.p.m. Students in 7th 12th grades are invited to
attend.
SOUTHWIDE BAPTIST CHURCH: Will be holding a VBS
Carnival from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on June 3. Enjoy food, fun,
games and register for Vacation Bible School. VBS will be held June
5 9 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for ages 3 through 5th grade. Youth
Vacation Bible School will be held June 5 8 at 6:30 p.m. for grades
6 12. The church is located at 1307 County Highway 27 in
DeFuniak Springs. For more information or to arrange transporta-
tion call 850-892-3835.
VALLEY ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH: Will be hosting a free
VBS Block Party on June 3 from 10-00 a.m. until 1.00 p.m. Children
ages kindergarten through 6th grade are invited. There will be
games, fire safety, project ID-A-Kid and many more. Vocational
Bible School will be June 4 9,6:00 8:30 p.m. The church is locat-
ed at 1018 Valley Road, Crestview.
PYRON CHAPEL BAPTIST CHURCH: Will be having a
Homecoming on June 4. Regular morning services followed by
dinner, then special music groups and other activities. Everyone is
invited to attend. The church is located at 6498 Wm Gary Johnson
Road, Baker.
MARY ESTHER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: invites all
children from 3 years old to 5th graders to become Treasure Seekers
at their summer Vacation Bible School, Adventure of the Treasure
Seekers: Exploring God's Promises.
The action begins June 12 and ends June 16 from 5:00 8:00 p.m.
There will be a free snack supper from 5:00-5:20 and then daily
"Discovery Digs" for children to explore the Scriptures and find
God's promises. This program offers fun, interactive activities that
combine the world of archaeology with the discovery of treasures
in the Bible. Children will also be involved in a mission project, sing
great Treasure Seekers tunes, create some memorable crafts, and
make many new friends.
The church is located at 703 Miracle Strip Parkway, Mary Esther.
For more information, call Kelly Hoskins at 243-7595.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FREE BIBLE CORRESPONDENCE COURSE: Airport Road
Church of Christ is offering a free Bible correspondence course. Call
682-4025 for more information. The radio program airs Monday
through Saturday at 5:45 a.m. on WAAZ, 104.7 FM.


SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 2006


CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN


PAGE 4











SATURDAY, JUNE 3,2006 CRESiVIEW NEWS BULLETIN PAGE 5


Moving season is upon us


Knights honor war dead


TALLAHASSEE Now that
school is out in Florida, the prime
season for moving has begun,
and a little care can go a long Way
in making a move go smoothly,
according to Florida Agriculture
and Consumer "Srvices
Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson.
"Putting your treasured fami-
ly belongings in the care of a
moving company can be a diffi-
cult and expensive task,"
Bronson said. "But by gittlng a
few -estimates, checking out the
companies and understanding
your rights in the trmniactibn, the
odds that you'll have a trouble-
free move increase signrcantly."
Understate law, all. intrastate


moving companies must be regis-
tered with Bronson's Division of
Consumer Services. Consumers
are encouraged to call the toll-
'free hotline at -
- 1-SHEL.PFLA (1-800-435-
7352) to chec4 the registration
and complaint" histories of the
company or companiess being
considered..
Interstate moves -- those
involving moves from Florida to
another state, or from another'
state to Florida are exempt
from state law and are overseen
by the U.S. Department of
Transportation's Federal -Motor
Carrier Safety Administration,
which can be reached at 1-888-
368-7238.


Among safeguards embodied
in the law governing intrastate
moves are:
All such movers must be
registered.
Companies are required to
carry a minimum of $10,000 in
insurance to cover any damage to
the furniture and other families'
belongings that they are hauling.
Moving companies are
required to provide a written esti-
mate of the total cost of the move
before a contract with the con-
sumer is signed, and it is a third-
degree felony for companies to
withhold a consumer's house-
hold goods provided that the
price called for in the estimate is
paid.


Members of Crestview Knights of Columbus Council 7968 participated in the Memorial
Day ceremonies at Live Oak Park Memorial Cemetery. The annual event is cosponsored
by the DAV, the AMVETS, the American Legion and the VFW. (photo submitted)


Host families needed

for 06-07 school year


WheeledI Walker Sale!


AVAILABLE IN:


Burgundy "Y
Hunter Green
Black

250LB weight
capacity

Folds for
Transport P1


COMES WITH:

Padded Seat
W& Basket
Loop Brake
Handles

Locking Brakes

Padded Backrest

PVC
Handgrips

CaSh,


Pacific Intercultural
Exchange is looking for car-
ing families to host high
school students from vari-
ous countries for the 2006-
2007 academic school year.
There are few opportunities
in this world where an indi-
vidual can take an active
hand in making the world a
better place. This is such an
opportunity. It is the time of
year when the holidays are
approaching and Americans
everywhere are considering
opening their hearts to their
friends and neighbors. P.I.E.
asks local families to consid-
er showing one of these for-
eign teens what American
generosity is all about.
Students from many coun-
tries have been staying with
families all over the United
States since August, and
now a new group of interna-
, tional neighbors woldd like
to add a little more to the
community and leave in
June with American pas-
sion, pride and sense of val-
ues.
There is no such thing as
a typical host family.
Whether you are a single
parent, retired, have small
children, teens, or no chil-
dren at all, anyone can have
a great experience hosting
an exchange student.
All the students are pre-
screened: they speak
,English, have medical insur-


ance, and their own spend-
ing money for an incidental
costs. All these students
require is a loving family to
share their experience with-
in our beautiful country.
Help them learn the mean-
ing of "Life, Liberty, and the
Pursuit of Happiness."
P.I.E. is looking for host
families in this area. Those
who are interested are urged
to contact P.I.E. right away
at 877-534-3144. Experience
is not necessary, as an orien-
tation and support will be
provided.

Southern
Mississippi
Spring 2006
Commencement
HATTIESBURG /GULF-
PpRT, Approximately, 1,600
students from the University of
Southern Mississippi were can-
didates for degrees May 12 and
13 during spring 2006 com-
mencement exercises.
Southern Miss Provost Dr.
Jay Grimes conferred under-
graduate, graduate and special-
ist's degrees during two cere-
monies at Reed Green
Coliseum on the university's
Hattiesburg campus. A com-
mencement ceremony was also
held for Southern Miss Gulf
Coast May 13 at the Mississippi
Coast Coliseum in Biloxi.
Matthew Joseph Zasada, of
Crestivew, received a Bachelor
of Science in Bus Adm.


In Service
Benjamin Rich joins the
United States Army
Benjamin J. Rich has joined
the United States Army under
the Delayed Entry Program.
The program gives young men
and women the opportunity to
delay entering active duty for
up to one year.
The enlistment gives the
new soldier the option to learn
a new skill, travel and become
eligible to receive as much as
$50,000 toward a college educa-
tion. After completion of basic
military training, soldiers
receive advanced individual
training in their career job spe-
cialty prior to being assigned to
their first permanent duty sta-
tion..
The recruit qualifies for a
$7,000 enlistment bonus.
Rich will report to Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C., for
basic training on June 22,2006.
He is the son of Gary and
Suzanne Rich of Crestview, Fla.
Clarence Williams joins
the United States Army
Clarence J. Williams has
joined the United States Army
under the Delayed Entry
Program. The program gives
young'.men-?and' women the
$opportuifity 'to delay entering
active duty foFrup to one year.
The enlistment gives the
new soldier the option tolearn
a new skill, travel and become
eligible to receive as much as
$50,000 toward a college educa-
tion. After completion of basic
military training, soldiers
receive advanced individual
training in their career job spe-
cialty prior to being assigned to
their first permanent duty sta-
tion.
Williams will report to Fort
Benning, Columbus, Ga., for
basic training on June 20,2006.
He is the son of Linda A.
Price of Baker, Fla., and
Clarence F. Williams of
Crestview, Fla.


RESPIRATORY SERVICES OF NWF, INC.
694 East James Lee Blvd. Crestview (850) 689-5499
333D Racetrack Road Ft. Walton Beach (850) 864-5498
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Main Bank
302 N. Wilson St.
682-5111


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Crestview Comers Plaza
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Jean Moore
\ May 12, 1941 May 23, 2006
Jean Moore, age 65, of Crestview, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, May 23, 2006. She was born May
12, 1941 in Fayette County, Ala. and had lived in
Crestview for the past 25 years.
Mrs. Moore was preceded in death by a son,
Marty Dewayne Moore, Sr.
Survivors include 5 sons, Alvin Middleton,
Roy Middleton, Bobby Joe (Angela) Moore all of
Crestview, Edward (Sally) Middleton of Fayette,
and Billy Gene (Gina) Moore of Pensacola, Fla.; 2
daughters, Deborah Ann (Tony) Lassiter of Pace,
Fla., and Catherine Sue (Walt) Deweese of
Crestview; daughter-in-law, Janet Moore of
Crestview; 1 brother, Curt Howton of Fayette; 22
grandchildren, numerous great-grandchildren
and other relatives.
The family received friends Thursday from
6PM until 8PM at the funeral home. Brackney
Funeral Service, Crestview, was in charge of
arrangements.
Glenese Lundy
Dec. 10, 1929 May 28, 2006
Glenese Lundy, age 76 of Baker, passed away
Sunday, May 28, 2006 at Baptist Hospital in
Pensacola. She was born on December 10, 1929 in
Florala, Alabama. Glenese was a longtime resi-
dent of Baker and Crestview and was an assistant
manager at Great Day store for twenty-seven
years.
Her survivors include her husband of 57 years,
John Lundy of Baker, FL.; three sons, Tim Lundy
and Judy of Desoto, TX., Roger Lundy of
Rockport, TX. And Robert Lundy and Maria of
Baker, FL.; one daughter, Rhonda Davis of
Crestview, FL.; seven grandchildren, Christina
Reeves, Alison Lundy, Cynthia Davis, Deanna
Davis, April Davis, Donna Lundy and Michael
Lundy; three great-grandchildren, Brayden
Lundy, Kurt Reeves and Kris Reeves; her Uncle
Charles Pettus and Alma of Pensacola, FL.; and
special cousins Coreen Busbee of Pensacola, FL.
and Betty Jo Hayes of Andalusia, AL.
A time of visitation was held on Tuesday, May
30,2006 at Whitehurst-Powell Funeral Home. The
funeral services will be conducted at 10:00 a.m. on
Wednesday, May 31, 2006 from the chapel of
Whitehurst-Powell Funeral Home with Reverend
Joel Carden officiating. Burial will follow at
Goodhope Congregational Church Cemetery.


Winifred Stanley
Dec. 9, 1921 May 29, 2006
Winifred Stanley, 84, of Crestview, passed
away at her home Monday, May 29,2006. She was
born December 9,1921 in Wilkerson Bluff, FL. and
was a lifelong resident of the Crestview area. Mrs.
Stanley was a member of First Baptist Church of
Crestview.
Winifred was preceded in death by her hus-
band Cleo Stanley.
Survivors include 2 sons, Steve (Stanette)
Stanley of Baker and Jimmy (Sue) Stanley of
Melbourne; 1 daughter, Elaine (Zane) Sunday of
DeFuniak Springs; 9 grandchildren, numerous
great-grandchildren and many nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services were held on Thursday, June
1, in the chapel of Brackney Funeral Service with
Rev. James Paul officiating. Burial followed in
Pilgrim Rest Cemetery.
The family received friends on Wednesday,
May 31, at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to
Covenant Hospice.
Daniel Britt
Nov. 23, 1950 May 30, 2006
Daniel Stephen Britt, age 55, of Crestview
passed away May 30, 2006 at LaFourche Parish,
Louisiana. Daniel was born in Marion, Indiana on
November 23, 1950 to William C. and Nadine
Cassidy Britt. He had been a resident of the
Northwest Florida area for the past twenty-one
years. Mr. Britt was employed with Petroleum
Helicopters Inc. as a pilot and was a United States
Army Veteran. During his military career he was
a CW2/W2 and flight instructor. He was also a
member of the Pilot's Association.
Survivors include his wife, Yong Hui Britt of
Crestview; daughter Dawn and husband Jeremiah
Grantham of Pompano Beach, FL.; mother,
Nadine Britt Knaus of Deerfield, FL.; brothers,
Howard C. Britt and William F. Britt of Pompano
Beach, FL., and Timothy C. Britt and Linda of
Coconut Creek, FL., sister, Lucinda Roushar of
Coconut Creek, FL.; nephews, Andrew, Travis and
William Britt; nieces, Kim and Brigid Britt.
A time of visitation will be held Saturday, June
3, 2006 from 2-3 p.m. at Whitehurst-Powell
Funeral Home with services to follow at 3:00 p.m.
with Reverend Father Steven O'Connor officiat-
ing.


OBITUARIES


CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN


PAGE 5


SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 2006









PAGE 6 CRESiVIEW NEWS BULLEliN SATURDAY, JUNE 3,2006


Read the sayings below.
1 Which ones, do you think,
had to do with the Calfornia
Gold Rush?


"Go West, young man, go West!"

"Eureka !"

"'I've seen the elephant.L"
SForNn
L Forty-Niners (
": ": ,-^ -. --T-^-^ -A B 1M^-


Swedish immigrant, John Sutter, left his debts and troubles
behind and came to California to build an empire. In short
order he did just that. Land was plentiful in this unpopulated
province. He received a land grant of 50,000 acres and went
into business. Lots of them. Sutter's Fort had herds of cattle,
sheep and horses, blacksmith and carpentry shops, flourmills
and bakeries. On January 24, 1848, his partner, James
Marshall, was inspecting the new sawmill. He found two pea
size nuggets in the American River. Gold! As word spread
through out Sutter's Fort, California and eventually the world,
everything changed. Gold Fever had struck hard. Go west,
young man, go west, was a familiar cry. Farmers abandoned
fields, shopkeepers locked up the store and sailors abandoned
ship. Sutter and Marshall soon lost their empire as workers
took off to seek their fortune.


Whether by land or sea, getting to California was
no easy task. Both journeys took about 6 months. The
voyage by ship meant crossing the stormy Cape of S.
American and the harsh life aboard ship. Traveling
over land meant weather delays, harsh conditions and
danger. The journey was a true adventurei/which left
the men with many stories to tell. The saying, I have
seen the elephant, meant a miner had ,experienced it
all. Upon reaching California, the miner had to stake a
claim and begin panning or digging Jor gol in the
streams and rocks and hills. Suppli n were
often scarce. Prices were sky hig A ingl eg could
cost as much as $3.00. Some -Niners, (a(fey
came to be called for the
year they headed to California),
got rich, most never did. Bdt,
America would never bethe same.
The Gold Rush opened up the west
and turned Californig'into our 31't state. gI
l\\x 'x K \N \i2J^.. N N \ N \ \ \N
S.L(vi Strauss made
his fortune on the
2/California Gold Rush,
but he didn't strike
I gold. He began making
; heavy clothing from
tent canvas. The miners
loved these rugged
2 pants. That was the
beginning of his blue
jeans empire...Levis!


ble because 1849
; not rust, it .
mmered A pinch of gold = $1.00
it has 1 ounce of gold = $16.00
e. (200 pinches of gold would be a
OIB normal family income for one year)


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newspapers for your class. Teacher Tips are Texas Teacher and writes '"The
available on the newspaper website. Parent -School Connection" column.
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Word Wonder Answers: 1.hamster,2.retriever,3.rod,4.rule,5.finch,6.smith,7.fish8.leaf


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& 'V


PAGE 6


SATURDAY, JUNE 3,2006


CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN











PAGE 7


CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN


SPORTS BRIEFS


ANNOUNCEMENTS
MGA TOURNEY: The Men's Golf
Association will hold a Hot June Shoot
Out on June 10 at Foxwood Country
Club. Individual' stroke play in five
flights. Players flighted by handicap
index. Shotgun start at 8 a.m. Payout to
top three gross and top three net in each
flight. Entry fee is $10 ($ for skins
game). Players must be members of
Foxwood Country Club and of the
Men's Golf Association, and have a ver-
ifiable USGA handicap. Golfers must
sign up by 4 p.m. June 9 to play.
SOCCER TRYOUT: The Force
soccer club will hold open tryouts for
the 2006-07 season June 12, 13 and 15
at the Twin Oaks soccer complex in
Niceville. Boys and girls ages U8 to
U10 should attend from 6-7 p.m. Ages
Ull to U14 should attend from 5:30-7
p.m. Ages U15 to U18 should attend
from 7-8:30 p.m. Force coaches will be
available to review player skills and
determine eligibility for club member-
ship. A $10 tryout fee is required.
Players are reminded to bring cleats, a
soccer ball, shin guards and water.
Additional information can be obtained
by visiting www.nwfsoccer.com.


SOCCER CAMP: The City of
Crestview will hold a British Soccer
Camp June 12-16 at Country View Park.
Camps run from 9-11 a.m. daily from
ages 4-5, from 9 a.m.-noon daily for
ages 6-9, and from 6-9 p.m. for ages 10-
18. Registration is now $94 for ages 4-5,
and $103 for ages 6-18. Fee includes
ball and T-shirt. Register online at
www.challengersports.com. For infor-
mation, call (850) 682-4715.
BASKETBALL CAMP: Final
applications are now being evaluated for
the Ten Star All Star Summer Basketball
Camp. The camp is by invitation only
for boys and girls ages 10-19. Past par-
ticipants include several current and for-
mer NBA stars. College scholarships are
possible for players selected to the All-
American team. Camp locations include
Brisbane Park, Fla., Prescott, Ariz.,
Thousand Oaks, Calif., Sterling, Colo.,
Bridgeport, Conn., Gainesville, Ga.,
Champaign, Ill., North Manchester, Ind.,
Towson, Md., Ypsilanti, Mich.,
Glassboro, N.J., Schenectady, N.Y.,
Hickory, N.C., Lebanon, Tenn.,
Commerce, Texas, Blacksburg, Va.,
Lyndonville, Vt., and Beloit, Wisc. For a


free brochure, call (704) 373-0873
before July 15.
STETSON CAMPS: Stetson
University will host several boys bas-
ketball camps this summer. The
Shooting Camp is June 9-11. The
Position Camp is June 11-15. The High
School Team Camp is June 24-25. The
Individual Camps are June 26-30 and
July 23-28. For more information, con-
tact Sebastian Singletary at (386) 822-
8101, or email ssinglet@stetson.edu.
More information is available on the
Internet at www.stetson.edu/hoop-
scamp.
FISHING FOR A CURE: The Gulf
Power Transformers Charity Bass
Tournament will be held today at Black
Creek Lodge in Freeport. Prizes and
cash awards are offered. Bass Pro Shops
is sponsoring the weigh-in and is pro-
viding door prizes. Entry fee is $100 per
boat. $10 Big Bass per boat. Cash pay-
out is 70 percent of entries. Proceeds
benefit the American Cancer Society.
Contact Pam Wood at (850) 833-4862
for details.
BOATING CLASSES: A '"Boat
Smart" course will be offered in Fort
Walton Beach on June 12 and continue


on Mondays through July 17.
Completion of the course satisfies state
license requirements for boaters born
after Sept. 30, 1980, and may entitle
boat owners to discounts on boat insur-
ance. Class instruction is free, with a
nominal charge for classroom materials.
Classes are from 7-9 p.m. at The
Anchorage, 404 Green Acres Road in
Fort Walton Beach. For details, call
(850) 315-0686 or visit the
www.fwsps.com Web site.
ENTERPRISE-OZARK BAS-
KETBALL CAMP: Enterprise-Ozark
Community College will host several
basketball camps this summer. A camp
for boys in girls in grades K-3 will be
held June 26-29 from 9 a.m.-noon each
day. Cost is $50. A camp for boys who
will be in grades 4-12 will be held July
17-20 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. each day. Cost
is $65. Perimeter Players camp for boys
and girls who will be in grades 6 and up
will be held July 24-26 from 1:30-6 p.m.
each day. Cost is $65. Post Players camp
for boys and girls in grades 6 and up will
be held July 27-29. Camp is from 1:30
p.m.-6 p.m. on July 27-28, and from 9
a.m.-noon on July 29. Cost is $65.
Camps will take place at the EOCC


gym. For details, contact John Ayers at
(334) 347-2623 x2303, or (334) 806-
5928.
YOUTH TRACK: The Hershey's
Track and Field Games will take place
from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. June 8 at the
University of West Florida in Pensacola.
Boys and girls ages 9-14 are eligible to
participate in this free event. Events
include the 50, 100, 200, 400, 800,
1600, 4x100 relay, standing long jump
and softball throw. Participants may
enter three events (maximum two run-
ning or field events). Prizes to top fin-
ishers in each age group. Winners may
advance to state and regional competi-
tions, and could ultimately qualify for
the North American Final Meet in
Hershey, Pa. Pre-registration is pre-
ferred. To register or for more informa-
tion, contact the Escambia County Park
and Recreation Department at (850)
475-5220.
BAKER PHYSICAL: Baker
School will conduct sports physical for
Gator athletes who will be in grades 6-
12 next year. Physicals will be conduct-
ed June 8 at 6 p.m. in the Baker School
fieldhouse. This is a change from the
previously scheduled date. Athletes


should bring $10 for cost of the physi-
cal.
CHS SOCCER CAMP: The
Crestview boys soccer program will
conduct a summer soccer camp June 5-
9. The camp is for youths in grades K-7.
Cost is $50 per child ($40 for two or
more children). Camp runs from 8 a.m.-
noon each day.
TWIN HILLS CAMPS: Twin Hills
Park will offer summer camps for soc-
cer, tennis and "Mommy and Me
Aerobics." Tennis camp is for ages 7-13.
"Mommy and Me Aerobics" has age
groups from age 2 and up. Camps start
June 5. Cost of camps is $45 apiece. Call
(850) 682-4715 or visit Twin Hills Park
for more information.
ALLIGATOR TROT 5K: The
Alligator Trot 5K run is set for 9 a.m.
June 17 at Florala State Park in Florala.
Walkers are welcome. This is the area's
only two-state race. The first 100
entrants are guaranteed a race T-shirt.
For more information, see the race Web
site at www.geocities.com/alligatortrot,
or contact race director Karen Johnson
at (850) 834-2032 or
alligatortrot@yahoo.com.


DARTS
CDL Spring Standings
1st Division
Hit Men 175
Jaguars 124
Bad Boys 120.5
Black Widows 115
Stray Dogs 85
High in
Bob Brich 120
Ellen Hashek 61
High Out
Brian Soals 115
Lisa 6t.Grone 36
High In Season
Keith Howell 148
Ellen Hashek 116
High Out Season
Steve Hinrichs 120
Adam Kelly 120
Lisa LaGrone 104
Men's MVP Points & Tons
Eddie Norris 310, 37; Bob Brich 303, 46;
Steve Hinrichs 272, 34; Bobby Gainey 237,
35; Terry Cuchens 237, 26; Andy Baxter 220,
27; Adam Kelley 219, 31; Brooks Taylor 212,
24; Keith Howell 192, 21; Mark Benoit 190,
19; John Hashek 188, 22; Brian Soals 178,
22; Kevin Fitzgerald 172, 24; Ray Knudson
171, 22; Chuck Gagner 165, 22; Scott
Decker 144, 17;' Kevin Johnson 109, 13;


George Brych 91, 16; Shane LaGrone 90, 20;
Jeramiah Taylor 69, 4; Shawn Cuchens 18, 1;
Tony Brych 11,1; Lee Hollard 29,1.
Women's MVP Points & Tons
Ellen Hashek 159, 5; Judy Fitzgerald
135, 9; Jean Decker 72, 8; Usa LaGrone 29,
6.
2nd Division
Stars & Stripes 100.5
' Hat Trick 84
' Go For The Gusto 74
Devils 42.5
SHigh In
Walt Montford 102
Jenny Montford 58
High Out
Jon Burris 48
Misty Foresythe 36
High In Season
J.T. Thomas 120
Bill Brumbauch 120
Jenny Montford 86
High Out Season
Ron Meyer 118
Jenny Montford 107
Men's MVP Points & Tons
Mike Miller 231, 60; J.T. Thomas 184, 35;
Rich Wesche 160, 35; Rodney Brackett 159,
30; Bill Brumbauch 148, 12; Ron Meyer 147,
36; Phil Phillips 145, 9; J.D. Way 136, 26;
John Berenics 118, 10; Jon Burris 116, 14;


Dan Cowan 100, 12; Jack Miller 97, 10; Walt
Montford 83, 6; Al Zimmerman 76, 13; Bill
Glade 41, 6; Terry Thomas 36, 4; Darryl
Brooks 24, 2; Kevin Sullivan 19, 2; Mike
Gavin 10, 0.
Women's MVP Points & Tons
Emily Wesche 77, 6; Misty Forsythe 69,
7; Dixie Way 51, 2; Jenny Montford 15, 2.
Special Scores
Andy Baxter (March 9) 180
Bob Brich (March 23) 180
Bob Brich (March 30) 180
Eddie Norris (April 10) 180
Eddie Norris (April 10) 8 Dart 301
Andy Baxter (April 13) 180
Scott Decker (April 13) 180
Eddie Norris (April 20) 180
Mike Miller (April 27) 180
George Brych (May 4) 9 Dart 301
Kevin Johnson (May 11) 180
Announcements
Division I
Low Ton Brian Soals, Shane
LaGrone 115
High Ton Brian Soals, Shane
LaGrone, Bob Brich (2) 140
Division II
Low Ton Walt Montford 102
High Ton Dan Cowan, J.D. Way 140
Captain's Meeting at the VFW on June
13 at 7 p.m.


c www.crestviewnewsbu Iletin.com


METS, from page 10


had the means and the his-
torical impetus to acquire
2004 American League Cy
Young Award winner Johan
Santana from the Minnesota
Twins.
A particularly vicious
response questioned Sikes'
credentials, and went on to
suggest that Mets fans listen
to another team's "former
batboy" and his hot trade
rumors.
Sikes generated emotions
of a different kind with a
heartfelt entry after the
death of Brittany Head, a
member of Sikes' 2005-06
CHS girls soccer team.
Head played for the
Bulldogs after coming to
Crestview from Louisiana in
the aftermath of Hurricane
Katrifia. She died in an auto
accident soon after return-
ing to Louisiana.
"The more personal my
writing is, the more my
readership seems to like it,"
Sikes said.
Sikes hbpes his blog and
his book will "humanize"
the athletes who played for
baseball's most famous
team of the late 1980s.


w welp people see them as people and not as stars.
Recapture what it was like to be there."

BOB SIKES
- Crestview teacher on what readers can expect M is
writings about the New York Mets of the late 1_s


"It will help people see
them as people and not as
stars," he gaid. "Recapture
what it was like to be
there."
Sikes attended the Mets'
2006 spring training in Port
St. Lucie and interviewed
several members of the 1986
team for chapters in the
book.
He saw familiar faces like
catcher Gary Carter, first
baseman Keith Hernandez,
pitcher Ron Darling and
third baseman Howard
Johnson.
Sikes found the conversa-
tions relaxed compared to the


the pressure-packed environ-
ment that was the Mets' club-
house in the late 1980s.
"It was indeed surreal to
experience it again and
write about it," Sikes said.
Sikes has just one regret
regarding his writing pur-
suits. The time commit-
ments compelled him to
step down as Crestview's
girls soccer coach after four
seasons.
"It was a difficult deci-
sion to let the girls go," he
said. "For four years they
were a very important part
of my life and I'm going to
miss them badly."


090 Announcements
092 Auctions
094 Meetings
096 Personal
098 Training
100 EMPLOYMENT
102 Drivers
104 General Help
106 Home Business
108 Hotel/Motel/Restaurant
110 Labor
112 Management
114 Medical
116 Office Work
118 Part Time
120 Professional
122 Retail
124 Sales & Telemarketing
126 Skills / Trade
128 Positions Wanted
300 SERVICES
305 Auto
310 Business Opportunities
315 Business Services
320 Child Care
325 Domestic
330 Equipment Repair
335 Financial Services
340 Home Repair
345 Lawn Care


350 Senior Care
355 Sewing & Alterations
360 Miscellaneous
450 OKALOOSA FOR RENT
452 Apartments
454 Commercial
456 Homes
458 Land
460 Mobile Homes
462 Rooms
464 Roommate Wanted
466 Vacation / Resort
550 OKALOOSA FOR SALE
552 Apartments
554 Commercial
556 Homes
558 Investments
560 Land
562 Mobile Homes
564 Vacation / Resort
700 PETS / ANIMALS
702 Boarding
704 Livestock
706 Livestock Supplies
708 Pets
710 Pet Supplies
712 Lost & Found
800 GENERAL MERCH.
802 Antiques


804 Apparel
806 Appliances
808 Arts & Crafts
810 Computers
812 Farm Equipment
814 Furniture
816 Jewelry
818 Lawn Equipment
820 Lumber & HardWal*
822 Musical Instruments
824 Office Equipment
826 Sporting goods
828 Electronics
829 Garage Sales
830 Misc. For Sale
832 Misc. Wanted
900 TRANSPORTATION
902 Auto Supplies
904 Cars
906 Boats
908 Farm Equipment
910 Motorcycles
912 Motor Homes
914 Recreational
916 Sport Utility
918 Trucks
920 Vans
922 Other
980 Tanning


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CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN


SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 2006


- OPEN HOUSE!!


Come see this beautiful 3 bedroom,
2 bath, 1608 sqft home located at
321 Springwood Circle. $210,000


100% REALTY
ROBYN CRONIN, REALTOR

850-240-5017


104
General Help
L.A. TANS is BARTENDER
pleased to wel- NEEDED for more
come April, Dawn info call,682-2110
Tiffannie, Morgan
and Nichole, for- $ ABSOLUTELY
merly of Stepha- THE BEST $
nie's House of Temporary Staff-
Styles. L.A. Tans ing Co. In this
is a full service sal- area. Labor Find-
on on Main Street ers needs youl
across from the Highest Pay, Best
Topical Palm re- Assignments.
sturant. For you $6.50-$12.00 per
convienence, all of hour paid daily.
out hair an nail Positions open
service as well as daily. Have A
our prices remain Car? Earn extra
the same. We now $$. Open 5:30A.M.
have tanning beds 6-B Hollywood
and work late by Blvd., FWB. Never
appointment, a fee. 850-243-
Come see our 2699
beautiful new sal-
on or call for an AIRCRAFT REFU-
appointment 682- ELER, experienced
0648 in the general avia-
tion field. Apply in
THE FAMILY and person Sunshine
friends of Eddie Aero Industries,
Merritt would like to 5545 John Givens
thank the City of Road, Crestvlew,
Crestview and the FL. Bob Sikes Air-
surrounding area for port 682-6811
their support during AUTO MECHANIC
our "smoked pork needed, must have
collar" fun raiser, 12- own tools,. Apply
13 May. The event rson ools,. Apply In
was,a huge sucA~E erson at Cr0Westvlew
due to the character es .
of people of Crest- Crames Leew lv
view. The love and Cresle.
concern of our corn- CRESTVIEW NEWS
munity" shined BULLETIN
through, raising a Now hiring for our
significant amount Inserter positions.
for Eddie and his hours are; Mon. 9am
family while he till? -Tue. 6:30 pm
awaits a heart and till? & every other
lung transplant in Friday 9:30 pm til?
Birmingham. Apply in person at
It is with pride and 295 W, James Lee
humility that we the Blvd. Crestview.
family and friends of EXPERIENCED
Eddie, thank you for GRILL
your care and sup- Cook and cashier.
port. You are truly Apply in person at
"our neighbors!". Mickey's Grocery
We thank you again 6407 Hwy 189
from the bottom of North. Baker, Flori-
our hearts! ,i- c-S,7_o or


WE WOULD like to
thank everyone for
the prayers, kind-
ness, thoughts, gifts.
and food during, the
recent sickness and
death of our loved
one. Special thanks
ot Emerald Coast
hospice and Tony
with Sun Care Res-
piratory Service
The T.J. Woods
Family

A&


ca. -U' f WWo
FLORAL
DELIVERY
Person needed also
must be willing to
learn the florist busi-
ness and accept all
responsibilities in-
volved. Call for ap-
pointment 682-5926
NEWS
RACK
DELIVERY
Persons needed to
deliver the Crestvlew
News Bulletin twice
weekly to stores and
news racks. Work
Tuesday and Friday
nights. Must have
own transportalon
and insurance.
Salary, plus gas
allowance. Apply In
person at 295 W.
James Lee Blvd.
Crestview, Florida.
No phone calls
please, equal oppor-
tunity employee.


* Sprinkler Systems
" Landscape Design
Landscape Lighting

682-4998
LICENSED & INSURED
email: weirrigateu@yahoo.com


$100 OFF
FULL SPRINKLER SYSTEM
WrrH THIS CoUPON
OFFER EXPIRES JUNE 1, 2006
L, .


104
General Help
NOW HIRING at
Body-B-Healthy. Po-
sitions in food serv-
ice also sales in Nu-
trition dept. Apply in
person at Body-B-
Healthy 2227 S. Fer-
don Crestview
NOW HIRING ware-
house preppers/
drivers, some Sat
No Sunday. Will
train. Drug
test/background
check required. Ap-
ply In person, Ashley
Furniture Home
Store Crestview.
OKALOOSA
HOUSE
CLEANING
"Doing more than
the rest"
Residential
Apartments
Offices
Move-Ins or Outs
Deep Cleaning
Routine Cleaning
A TOP TO BOTTOM
PROCESS
Licensed, Insured,
and Bonded. Call
Chuck Chapman.
850-758-8891 or
850-682-9887 .
WACHENHUT 'SE-
CURITY: Now hiring
Security Officers for
Santa Rosa Beach
at Watercolor and
Watersound. hiring
at $9.75 hr. HS/GED
required. We will
provide, training for
Class "D" Security
License. We are of-
fering a $200. hiring
bonus to all appli-
cants hired before
06/15/06, detail to
be discussed during
interview. Call 800-
5 2 7 5 9 4 1
EOE/M/F/DN
YARD HELP want-
ed raking, moving,
edging, weed, pull-
ing. Has all equip-
ment needed. Call
682-6213
FUMC CRESTVIEW
is seeking a Bass
and Lead Guitarist
for Its Contemporary
Worship service.
please call Bryan at
682-2018 if interest-
ed.
NEED DRIVER with
a clean Class B & E
Ucense, position in-
cludes some physi-
cal labor. Apply in
person at Crestview
Wholesale, 984 W.
James Lee Blvd.
Crestview.
NOW HIRING All
positions, PT/FT.
Kitchen help pay
DOE. Apply in per-
son, at Coach &
Four 114 John King
Rd. Crestview
WANTED MATURE
responsible male or
female to live in care
for senior person
682-2989

108
Hotel/Motel
& Restaurant


108
Hotel/Motel
& Restaurant

CRACKER BAR-
REL OF DESTIN
Now hiring all posi-
tions. Cooks, serv-
ers, cashiers. Apply
in person or call
269-3344. Located
at foot of Mid-Bay
Bridge. Good bene-
fits and up to 3 rais-
es in 1st year.
110
Labor
HELP WANTED
Lawn Maintenance
Landscape experi-
ence preferred. Will
train. Drivers license
required! Crestview
area. Call 259-7745
or 305-2319
114
Medical
CNA'S NEEDED
11am to 7pm 3 to
11, 7am to 7pm on
weekends Call 423-
1228
LICENSED METAL
HEALTH PROFES-
SIONAL. This posi-
tion is a contracted
position to provide
mental health serv-
ices. Must be li-
censed in Florida.
Salary is negotiable.
Contact Kathy
Grimes @ Okaloosa
County Head Start
(850) 651-0645 :-
NURSE NEEDED:
position is a part-tine
contracted position
to provide health
screenings and
health services train-
ing. This person
must have a mini-
mum of a Bachelors
degree in Nursing
(RN) and be Li-
censed in Florida.
Salary is negotiable.
Contact Kathy
Grimes Okaloosa
County Head Start
(850) 651-0645
OPHTHALMIC
TECH Crestview.
Growing practice
Fax # 850-515-1520
120
Professional
COMPUTER TECH-
NOLOGY SPE-
CIALISTJ This posi-
tion is a part-time
contracted position
to assist in maintain-
ing agency's com-
puter systems. Per-
son must be capable
of providing techni-
cal assistance on in-
temet, website, mul-
tiple servers and
sites. Salary is ne-
gotiable. Contact
Kathy @ Okaloosa
County Head Start
(850) 651-0645
PART TIME front of-
fice. 32hrs week.
Answer phones,
take orders, and oth-
er office duties as
needed. Apply in
person at Crestview
News Bulletin, 295
W. James Lee Blvd.
NO PHONE CALLS
WESTLYANN
C.C.C. now hiring
full time teachers
CDA required VPK
experience preferred
Good starting DOE
682-7319


siu DIarm- i
Joshua Dillard Owner
3106 E. Chestnut Ave. Crestview, FL

^^ ^ Interior / Exterior
New Construction
Repaint Specialist
Pressure Washing
Wallpaper Removal

850-305-4865


120
Professional
BARBER AND or
massage Therapists
for growing shop
537-8470 or 376-
7676
STEPHANIE'S
HOUSE of Styles lo-
cated at 401 North
Ferdon Blvd. Crest-
view Fl. Needing
hairdressers and ex-
perienced Nail Tech.
Apply in person.
TRACTOR TRAIL-
ER Driving Instruc-
tors needed part and
full time for our Mil-
ton, Fl. facility. Mini-
mum requirements:
3 yrs. OTR, excel-
lent safety record,
meet all DOT re-
quirement, high
school grad or GED
with good verbal
skills. Competitive
pay and benefits
package. Call David
@ 1-800-363-7364,
fax resume to (478)
994-0946 or Emile
personnel @cdiservi-
ces.cc
TWIN HILLS' Learn-
ing Center has an
opening for a care
giver/teacher. Call
689-1663

124
Sales &
Telemarketing
A TERRIFIC Oppor-
tunityl $100,000 +
Earning potential,
benefits, pension,
401(k) BCBS Insur-
ance. Call 1-800-
257-5500
PART TIME
SALES REP.
Needed I; In
Crestview and sur-
rounding area. 20
hours weekly.
Hourly position
with mileage paid.
Must have de-
pendable car, Driv-
ers License and in-
surance and also
internet access
and computer
skills. E-Mail re-
sume to:
bp537@charter.ne
t Mail resume to
Sell-Thru Service
216 Loop Dr. Sli-
dell La. 70458

126
Skills/Trade
A & P Mechanic:
Sunshine Aero Ind.
Is looking for a li-
censed A & P me-
chanic in the local
area of Crestview Fl.
applicant must have
own tools and be
motivated to perform
multi task on general
aviation air craft.
Please apply in per-
son to Sunshine
Aero Ind. 5545 John
Givens Rd. Crest-
view, FI. (850) 682-
6811
LOCAL ELECTRI-
CAL Cooling &
Heating Company
needing a Full-Time
residential & com-
mercial A/C techni-
cian with a great atti-
tude. Please apply
@ 875 Bay Street,
Crestview Fl. 32536
or contact Melissa
@ (850) 682-4511


126
Skills/Trade
A/C SERVICE Tech
needed, must have
experience with
service calls and in-
stallation. Benefits
including paid vaca-
tions and Holidays
available. $500. sign
on bonus to fully
qualified applicant
competitive salary
DOE. Apply in per-
son at Crestview
Electric 900 W.
James Lee Blvd.
Crestview.


315
Business Services
MOBILE HOMES
transports. Call 682-
2075.
DUMP TRAILER
Don't tear up your
yard or crack your
driveway with a
dumpster. Get a
dumpster on wheels
from Lawn Tek
Call Brad @
,865-3266
PANHANDLE'
COMMERCIAL
CLEAN
Now serving Escam-
bia, Santa Rosa and
Okaloosa Counties.
New construction,
Condo, move out
and Churches.
Please call Jennifer
850-346-6995.
Licensed & Insured
QUILL & Pen Nota-
ry service 24 hours
7 days a week. Will
travel.
Verify Signatures,
Wills, Contracts,
Deed's
Affidavits, Power of
Attorney./Marriage
850-346-0274
Sand or Dirt deliv-
ered no job too Big
or too Small 682-
2075

WEDDING ARCH-
ES, candle arches,
candelabras, unity
candle stand, availa-
ble for rent. Contact
Ann Kolmetz 850-
689-3302

320
Child Care
AIRPORT ROAD
Learning Center has
opening, licensed
Call after 5:00pm
683-0925
REGISTERED
CHILD provider now
accepting children 2
yrs and older. Call
Paula 803-3812
325 Domestic

MCCURLEY
CLEANING
Service. Family
owned and operat-
ed. Licensed and
insured. Reasona-
ble rates. Residen-
tial & new construc-
tion. Call for appt.
on estimate. 585-
5311.


2001 JAYCO TRAILER


I Slide, 2 pop-outs, A/C, Gas stove, Refr/freezer,
Bathroom w/shower, Microwave, TV, Oak Cabinets.
Very good condition. Must Sell. 602-2244


I. ..A


337
Concrete
A-1 CONCRETE
Tear out old drive-
ways, some stamp
work, brick work
foundations.No job
too small or no job
too large, Licensed
and insured. 850-
200-2815
BARNHILL
CONSTRUCTION
INC.
Bamhill Construction
Inc Custom residen-
tial building Remold-
ing, door removal,
porches, decks. No
job too small, 25
years in the busi-
ness. 423-0255
JD MATTHEWS ce-
ment work LLC Li-
censed & Insured.
Cell 850-546-0368,
Hm. 850-652-3111
CONCRETE CON-
STRUCTION- Drive-
ways, Foundations,
& patios. Reasona-
ble prices, Free esti-
mates, 30 years ex-
perience. Licensed
& Insured 685-7488
DOUGLAS
HENDERSON
Masonry 25 years
experience Long
time resident of
Okaloosa Co. Drive-
ways patios, brick
block, stone, & stuc-
co. 850-537-8932 /
546-0363
LATHAM
CONCRETE
Works Since. 1977,
Robert Latham Ma-
sonry, Contractor-Li-
censed, Insured. All
Types of Concrete
Work. House Slabs,
Driveways, Addi-
tions. 3000 PSI Mix
Used on Every Job.
Free Estimates.
682-0137.


340
Home Repair
CRESTVIEW
CARPENTRY
Cabinets, additions,
remodeling. Quality
dependable work.
Custom wood work-
ing, 25 years experi-
ence. Licensed and
insured. Call Wes
689-1575 We also
do handicap ramps
GUTTERS
FOR
LESS
5" / 6" seamless gut-
ter 32 different col-
ors.
FREE
ESTIMATES
(850) 398-2137 -
(850) 546-1462

RANDY LITTLE
PROGRESSIVE
PAINTING.
Interior, Exterior,
Free Estimates.
Specialize in
repainting. Will
beat all bids.
Pressure
washing service
Licensed & Insured.
682-7375/240-,
8443.


340
Home Repair
HANDY D'S 25
years experience,
no job too small.
Home repairs and
improvements, if you
want it done call
537-9066
KWC DRYWALL &
Painting. Ceiling re-
spray, fire and water
restoration, trim and
tile 682-1774
MIKE GOLLES
PAINTING
Interior, exterior,
also. Pressure
Washing. Licensed
& Insured. Free
estimates. Ph.
682-5347. Senior
citizen discounts.










W I N D -TIN A M
CONST. For all
home repair,
Decks, Fences,
Carports, Utility
sheds, patios, trim,
window & door re-
placement, Free
estimates Good
Service. Licensed
and insured. Call
today! 537-8810 or
850-306-5387
WEBB'S
HANDYMAN.
SERVICE
Quality home main-
tenance repairs and
improvements. Free
estimates. Licensed
and insured. 537-
9955/259-68170

342
Landclearing
NORTHWEST
FLORIDA
LANDCLEARING
Fill-Dirt, Leveling,
Site-work. Licensed
and insured 537-
3421


Lawn Care
BECKS OUTDOOR
services, mowing,
trimming one time or
year round. 537-
8757
DAVE'S LAWN
Care. Free esti-
mates. To schedule
viewing of lawn and
estimate 850-758-
8335







J&K TREE Service
reasonable" rates.
call today. Free Esti-
mates. Licensed
and Insured. Call
537-7412.


57"~ Sa~4& Oeaws


2564 KINGSTON KD.,
Brand New, 1400sqft,
3BD/2BA, 2 car garage
$20Q,0QO
$190,000 o 974-2533


345
Lawn Care



D.S. MOZER
TREE SERVICE
All phases of tree
work &
stump grinding
Commercial
&
Residential
Fully insured
Free
Estimates
Call
John Allen
850-225-1718

LAWN MAINTE-
NANCE Lic. & In-
sured. Residential or
commercial. Free
estimates 826-2298
DIRT FOR Sale up
to 5 yards delivered
for $75. 758-1477

LAWN TEK, LLC
Lawn Maintenance
Professionals
Competitive rates,
Quality work, Free
estimates. Call
865-3266 or
682-7316
Licensed
Insured
Owner
Brad Overly
LOT CLEARING
and demolition.
Cheap! 682-2075.
QUALITY LAWN
care by licensed re-
sponsible teen.
Call 850-585-4451








mat es'.'] PI][
689-3429or.[.


RASBURY LAWN
SERVICE
General Cleanup
Mowing, Trim-
ming
Lie. & Ins.
Free Estimates
682-1302
S&P LAWN Service.
Dependable Quality
Service. 682-9780
or 902-5669
STEVE'S LAWN
care servicing you
lawn care needs.
Free estimates, Hm.
850-689-3062 Cell
850-699-8809
TROYCE JOHN-
SON Cell 850-232-
1221 Lawn Mainte-
nance Mowing Trim-
ming Paving and
other Odd Job's
Painting ETC.
WALKER LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Mowing, Trimming,
Pruning,One time or
year round. Li-
censed and insured.
537-4419 Referen-
ces Available

355
Sewing &
Alterations

SEWING
MACHINE
&

VACUUM
CLEANER
REPAIRS
Call 682-3041 or
664-2245


CrestWiew
Homes And
Surrounding
Areas
NICE, LEVEL 3 ACRES
in Baker area ready
for you to build
your dream home
on. Approximately
300 feet on a paved
county road so it
provides easy
access. Get back
to country living
now. $134,000
SPACIOUS HOME SITS
on 2 acre lot with
lots of shade trees.
All rooms in home
are large, bathroom
has marble
vanities. Multiple
entry kitchen. Don't
miss seeing this
lovely home.
$289,900
LOT OF HOUSE FOR
little money. This
older home has
1630 sq feet, 3/2 &
very near middle
school and
elementary school.
New refrigerator
and stove. Storage
shed has electricity.
$179,000
SPACIOUS NEW HOME
looking for a new
family. 2400 sq ft, 4
bdrm, 2 baths.
Close to schools
and shopping in
north end of Cview.
Don't miss this
lovely home.
$268,000
BEAUTIFUL DOUBLE
wide modular
home, centrally
cooled and heated,
1.84 acres, features
Include gas
fireplace and family
room/den, Ige
formal living and
dining room and so
much more.
$130,000
WELL MAINTAINED,
like new dbl wide
mobile home. Mstr
bath has garden
tub, separate
shower, double
vanity and his and
her walk in closets.
Easy commute to
Eglin. $129,900


Outstanding T




Agency One, Inc.
682-8309 or 678-8919
Toll Free (800) 239-8309
301 S. Ferdon Blvd.
Crestview, FL 32536
EACH OFFICE
INDEPENDENTLY
OWNED AND
OPERATED
www.gerrihouse.com

360 --
Miscellaneous
GEORGE TRACY
POOL SERVICE
30 years experi-
ence. Monthly and
special cleaning. Li-
censed and Insured
8 2 6 1 7 8 4.
NEED DIRT!
Sand ect. Call
Spuds Hauling 850-
902-5098
SOUTH ALABAMA
Metal Sales
We specialize in
painted metal roof-
ing, pole barns, met-
al trusses, metal
purlins,Insulation &
portable Buildings
888-656-1882
TRACTOR WORK
all type 682-7492
cell 546-1218
TRIPLE- E
Enterprises
Land clearing,
demo. loader &
backhoe work. Li-
cense and insured
850-865-0826


452
Apartments For
Rent

ONE BIR Apt water
Garbage sewage
furnished $425. mo.
$400. DD no pets 1
yr. lease 850-834-
4767


Crestview

Well Drilling




416' WAYR WhS

Ucense #3191

682-4998
LICENSED & INSURED


RIG fHER, RIGHT NOW, RIGHT PRICE.

BUtTEiN tfOLR, CLASSIFIED, Now ON THE WEB AT WWW.CRESTVIEWNEWSBULLETIN.COM
'." ":,, --' :',-" : "' .* "F' .. ... I


PAGE 8













SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 2006 CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN PAGE 9


* Must See Home Must See Home









1 Acre waterfront property with 3BR/2BA home, built in 2000,
fireplace, carpet allowance, new paint throughout, 18'x31'
deck overlooking lake. Located at 321 Quail Ridge Road
in DeFuniak Springs, FL $2~O,9W $198,000.
CROWN INVESTMENT PROPERTIES. INC.
1154 US Hwy 90 West, DeFuniak Springs FL 32433
Broker Joe Johnson
Phone: 850-892-4677 FAX: 850-892-4697

James Chessher


For friendly service
and exceptional
deals, stop by and
talk with James
about the new or


rHEV r' used vehicle you've
been dreaming of.

Mf AN MERCAN Rau0tm0d
A r A 4 Your Siverado Headquarters Locally Owned & Operated
4150 S. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview
in 682-2731


452
Apartments For
Rent
CRESTVIEW INN
Motel $40 daily
$225 weekly
Furnished efficiency
$225 weekly 682-.
4466
CRESTVIEW INN
Motel $45 daily
$250 weekly
Fumishled efficiency
$250 weekly 682-
4466
ONE BEDROOM
Furnished apt. $700.
$300. DD a month
including utilities NO
pets. Call 682-3166
456
Homes For Rent
1550 SQ.FT. BRICK
Home 3Br. 2Bath,
double car garage
on large lot $1150. a,
month Pet Ok with
non refundable de-
posit. Available ap-
prox. 7-15-06 850-
652-2285 / 305-
6486/978-1600
3 BDR/1BTH.
House in Baker
$650. Mo.,,lor,-l"es
garbage aqge pest
control. references
required. No pets
537-3609
3 B R ./1 5 BA
FENCED yard $750.
+ DD, S.C. discount
for military. (850)
902-2383
CENTURY 21
Moulton Re.alty'
(850) 682-3849
Rentals:
304 Crooked Pine
3bdrm/2.5bth, Brand
New,$1100, mth/
$1100. Dep.
107 Swaying Pine
3bdrm/2.5bth Stack
W/D $1000Mth/$600
Dep.
2878 Atoka Trail
3bdrm/2bth, South I
S1* 0
$1250.mth/$1250.D
ep.
4733 Meadow Lake
Dr. 4bdrm/2.5bth
Lake front
$2300Mth/$2300
Dep.
121 Trenton Ave.
3bdrm/2bth Behind
W a I Mart
$950.mth/$950..Dep
N. Crestview 3/2/2
like new $915./.
month no pets/ No
smoking Call 315-
1057
NORTH CREST-
VIEW 3/2 home
$800 rent. $1000
deposit. No smok-
ing. lyr lease. 865-
2593.
5/2/2 NEW home
2000 +sq.ft. w/appls.
cr.ck. No Pets/smok-
ing $1,500. month,
available now. 729-
1171 / 855-8219
BRAND NEW town-
house 3 Bdr. 2.5
bath behind hospital.
$1,000. a month
902-5331 or 689-
4371


456
Homes For Rent
3BR/2BA 2CG Brick
home, Days ,night &
weekends 682-
5533...-


556
Homes
NEWLY REMOD-
ELED 2 Bdr. one
bath, great starter
home for investment
nrr nrt f Convemn-


S 458 iently located
Land For Rent $89,900. Ph. 585-
8460
ONE ACRE land,
septic tank and wa- '562
ter. Located in Au- Mobile Homes
burn community
689-2771 cmi FOR SALE 1997
14x70 3 bdr/2 ba, 1
460 acre 3 miles north of
Mobile Homes Crestview High
For Rent School $89,000.
830-2665
3BD HOUSE in Milli- 8
gan $850. Rent, 560
$850.. No smoking, Land
No pets. 68Z-1972
3BD/ 2BA Mobile on 1 ACRE wooded lot
1 acre lot. $700.' mo. Silver Hills Road
deposit & referen- 150x300 $95,000.
ces. 537-6222 499- ph. 585-8948
7412 BY OWNER 22
AVAILABLE FIRST acres Zoned Com-
week in June mercial between
2Bd./1BA on 1/2 Bontifay & Chippley.
acre. $500. month 1/2 mile frontage on
1st/last deposit. 689- Hwy 90 and 1/2 mile
1985 frontage on RR.
Price $350,000.
462 Call' Richard 850-
Rooms FQr R- 7-26. .; ;i .
SH-ARE H-RW" /ANTED""I "Ac4e
SHARE- HOUSE- land reasonable' In
Large room N.W. lorida 682-
$145. week New NW. Florida 682-
home, cable, phone, 4615/865-1060
utilities included 562
$10. deposit for Mobile Homes
cleanup. 537-9258,
cell (850)221-0320 2.24 SEMI-WOOD-


554
Commercial

ZONED C-1 Com-
mercial 407 Texas

$699,700. Approxi-
mately 4000
- square feet; in-
cluding two addi-
tional lots. Shari
Gross 850-376-
5406 or Cathy Ri-
ley 850-699-1914
Keller Williams Re-
alty Emerald
Coast.

556
Homes
1/2 ACRE CORNER
LOT 2/Ba 2/Bd.
Brick home, fenced
back yard, new car-
pet, tile, kitchen cab-
inets, also includes
side by side refriger-
ator washer & dryer.
$189,000 Call 682-
8566 leave mes-
sage.
REAL ESTATE:
wwwTeamWalton.c
om for colored pic-
tures and new list-
ings "click on the hot
new listing button"
Keller Williams Real-
ty Emerald C oast
850-951-4899


ED buildable acres
,with small spring,fed
pond on paved road
with 2001 single
wide Fleetwood 2/2
new wood flooring,
new jacuzzi tub, new
paint, new fixtures,
septic, Auburn wa-
ter, move in ready -
must see. 5761
Highland Hills Rd.
off of Mount Olive
Rd. Centrally locat-
ed between Hwy 85
& Hwy 285 off Hwy
90. Will go quickly
at $99,000. Moti-
vated sellers. Call
for appt. to show
689--2029 (leave
message with A-1
Plumbing Inc,


704
Livestock
PUREBRED
BEEF-
MASTER
Heifers 2yrs old.
Bred to registered,
Red Angus Bulls.
$1200. each. Call
850-834-3881.


OCRESTVIEW


NEWS BULLETIN


Er 1

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or mail to the address above with payment and photo attached.
WRITE YOUR AD BELOW, ONE WORD PER
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704
Livestock
AQHA DUN gelding
heavy built cutting
bloodline. Good rop-
ing prospect. Retir-
ing must sell 537-
4079
PIGS 100 to 200 Ibs.
on feet, ready for
Bar-B-Q. Call eve-
nings 682-4761

708


Pets
YORKIE PUPP
$600, 682-1972


Antiques
RON'S ANTIQL
Furniture, gli
ware, clocks & c
repair. Buy/Sale/
states Mon. Fri,
/ Sat. 9-2. 213
Main St. 689-1
or 305-2441
806
Appliances
JACK LA-LAN
Power Juicer $
OBO Good condi
537-5343 Call a
5:00pm
QUALITY US
Appliances; Was
Dryers, RefrigE
tors, & Sto
w/warranty. Bats(
Appliances. PAP
& REPAIR 209
Main St. 682-114
813
Farm & Garde
BROOKS FARM
Hwy 4 adjacent
post office. C
Squash, gr
beans, onions. 0
Sat May 20th 5
5373
814
Furniture
CRAFTMATIC
JUSTABLE bed
gle with vibrato
50. Call 682-4292
DAY BED, ta
with four chairs,
fa, rocker reclii
formal dining gro
misc. 682-0348
FLEXSTEEL SO
& Love seat v
custom made s
covers, good co
tion. 683-9170

814
Furniture


Close to 1-10
alssinsESBk .r


By Owner 4 bedroom, 2 bath; 2-Story; 2 car garage;
fireplace, Jacuzzi. Large corner lot near I-10/Hospital.
27 Regent Road. $219,900
826-1288


99 Ford Escort







99 Model Ford Escort Station Wagon.
EXTRA clean No Smoking No Pets. Dark green.
34.5 MPG Highway driving. 73,500 miles
$3,950 689-6600


814'
'IES Furniture
SOLID WOOD Fur-
niture, -Boys cap-
tain's bedroom suite
$450., -roll top desk
$250., bookcases
$75. ea., antique up-
right piano. $650.
682-5778
TWO CEDAR
Chests. one old sol-
id cedar, one mod-
ern design $50.
each. 689-1174
d-.WOOD TABt-'tiVth
....fold d tvlWfM At
chairs "a'nd- hina
cabinet, all for only
ES $200. in good condi-
aUS tion.537-8996/541-
lock 1786
Es- 818
9-5 ,Lawn Equipment
N.
007 OLDER MODEL
1000 Cub Cadet rid-
ing mower/ garden
tractor, excellent
condition, 51 cut-
|E'S ting width, with new
$75. battery, new disc
ition brakes, & hew tires
after $1050. 682-6551
820
SED Lumber & Hardware
,her,
her, FOR SALE approxi-
yes mately 3000 feet of
on's mahogany remnants
ITS $1,000. 683-1644
N. 822
9. Musical
Instruments
n ALTO SAXO-
PHONE Great con-
on edition $350. 682-
t to 7890
'orn
een 829
pen Garage Sales
537-
JUNE 10 7am 124
Oakcrest Drive
household items,
Avon products 20 to
40% discount.
sin- TUPPERWARE
r $ NEW Catalog,
monthly special Re-
placement order.
ble Call Jackie 682-
so- 4305. or 689-4744
ner,
830
Miscellaneous
:FA For Sale
with
slip- GENERATOR LIKE
ndi- new Coleman 4000
watt, gas, 8/hp used
twice on cart,
wheels $400. 398-
2404


FOR SALE BY OWNER


A picture is worth a thousand words.
Sell your merchandise in the pages of the
Crestview News Bulletin and News Extra.


1997
NISSAN
QUEST
A/C, 6 CD Changer,
Sunroof, Luggage
Rack, Loaded,
Excellent
Family Car
000-0000



This is the actual Size of your ad
1 col. by 2 inchesin the classi-
fied section
Your FSBO Ad runs
for 8 Issues 4 Weeks


'750

For an additional
for $7.50 you can park
b o urca.truck bot.


only


trailer on our lot for
the four week peri-
od.


Selling For Health Reasons
FOR SALE 18FT COBIA BOWRIDER
115HP MERCURY OUTBOARD
GALVANIZED TRAILER
GOOD CONDITION
$3,500
This is the actual Size of your
ad 2 col. by 2 inches in the
classified section
Your FSBO Ad runs
for 8 Issues 4 Weeks




for

For an additional $7.50 you can park
your car, truck, boat, trailer on our lot for
the four week period.


t-/ /aw- / a ~ s

3 ea l;s', y r .

Dennis Mann
Lic# BK700875 Broker, Owner
2907 Crescent Ave 3/2 New Construction ~
$189,900 Builder pays up to $5,000 towards closing costs. *
480 Stillwell Rd Low maintenance 3/2 corner lot,
privacy fenced back yard. PRICE REDUCED
7017 WiV:t. :d A ... -. A n ^, .Vwtu,,.1;^ i L.n66t.


27Uf TlLtIa ve -s 3/a leW LonstructliUIonU -ILUUsqt
830 Jayde Estates READY TO MOVE IN Homes under
Miscellaneous $210,000. Builder pays up to $5,000 towards closing costs.
For Sale *Builder pays up to $5,000 in up grades from builder's list.*
3153 Airport Rd Crestview 5/3, 24x24 Florida room
DOLL COLLEC- 8142 8th St. Laurel Hill 3/2 New Construction -
TION. 76 nice col- many upgrades READY TO MOVE IN *
lectables from 3" to Eden Square 2 ~ I Acre lots
27" in one lot. Make 5372 Fairchild Rd 4/2,1 acre New Construction ~
offer, 689-1174 $199,900. Builder pays up to $5,000 towards closing costs. *
TABLE SAW 10 4587 Top Flight- 4/2 over 2000sqft on golf course
with extras $100.,
recliner sofa 95" Dennis Mann Realty 850-682-1218
green, 2yrs old 802 N. Wilson St.
$400. 682-4121 Crestview, FL 32536 850-974-4476
TWO LIVEOAK
Cemete lots for ,..9Q2 .. .. 904- ..
sale,;alb4P,,-;T A Auto SUiiawli (i;A:i Cr1,-. ..
leave message if-no ?
answer 97-02 JEEP Hard 1997 MITSUBISHI
top, tan /tinted win- Galant 4 door, A/C 4

G Gconditon 689-2008 dows. $2,000 firm.
B m:$550. OBO 537-2801 after 6pm.
DIAMOND PLATEDn
*$ tool box 18" deep. FERDON
Fits small pick-up MOTORS
S *S truck Call after 5:00 "Monday Only
$175. 537-5343 Specials"
GREAT GAS
FOUR UNIROYAL MILES!!!
Tiger- Paws tires 1996 Dodge neon,
4 P215/70-R16 Less 4 door auto CD,7
F-.than 1.000 miles A/C (will work
Many .$50. each 537-5343 needs charge)
Call after 5:00pm. Was $1,175 N
904 NOW ONLY $750,
Cars QUICK CATIIIIIIII
8321984 BUICK LeSa- 1994 Cougart
832 bre 85k, 8 cylinder, "XR7" Auto, leath-
Miscellaneous 309 engine $1,500. er, AC, Windows,
Wanted Looks and runs Locks, Cruse, CD
good. 682-3166 Was $2200 NOW
t ONLY $1100.
Rotweler 1993 BUICK road (Across from Wa-
Master loaded Cold terfront Rescue
A/C highly main- Bargain Center)
trained, great condi- 682-0621
0Itotitler. tion. $2,200. firm
Has shots. 537-9874/699-1538
letiCia 1993 NISSAN Alti- 905
l jl, ma for sale. Cold Auto Repair
Agreatily A/C., 26 MPG COMPLETE AUTO
dl $1,300. OBO (850) Painting includes
i 305-7599 Body work and ma-
$350(11) FOR SALE 1988 trials $400. Free
Ford Mustang $700. pick up and delivery.
682I f ,8 Call 682-1270 682-2075.


PARK

IT ON

OUR

LOT.
Safe secure and highly
visible, our lot offers
none stop high traffic
Sssibilut for a low one
ninme fee %hen ',ou place
your FSBO ad in she
Cres-' iet News
Bullenn
Call
850-682-6524
for more
information.
To use our i.o ,c.rtu mst e a
current paid FSBO rcusicLmer


Covenant
HOSPICE/
a spealuindofunng t szm Iq84
ADDING LIFE TO DAYS...

CRESTVIEW
RN-PRN
Case Manager
Social Worker
Administrative Assistant
Health Information Tech.
Performance Improve.Analyst
Certified Nursing Asst/HHA-PRN


NICEVILLE
Clinical Education Preceptor
Great FT Benefits!
Drug-Free Workplace
Equal Opportunity Employer


Apply/Mail to:
370 Redstone Dr.
Call: 850-682-3628 or


"APPLY 1OLINE !
www.covenanthospice.org


1997 FORD Expedi-
tion 4x4 Maroon 95K
miles $8,000. OBO
259-5907/ see at
main Street Automo-
tive.
918 Trucks

1972 CHEVY
TRUCK 383 stroker
engine step side,
runs great $3000.
OBO 598-6288
1985 F-150 5.0 Liter
new tires, brakes,
muffler, fuel injec-
tions, battery.
$1,500. firm. 537-
9874/699-1538


920
Vans
1990 MARK III
Chev. Van 7a series..
clean $1,100. 683-
1231
2000 FORD ,
WINDSTARSE'
loaded rear air; VHS'
entertainment,. jsys
tem, power lotlkwin-'
dows & driversiseat.
Can be seen:: at
Baker parts 537i-
3131 day 537-7600
eve. $6,500. s oOb'
miles .


1993 Travel Supreme 36', 5th wheel, very
clean, 2 Slide-outs. Will park in lot.
$15,000 537-8718


1988 Sedan BOVIlle
TmiN*infe CElaif...


Auto Supplies


FOR SALE





5815 Hilary St BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. No AGENTS.
Brick Home, 3BR/2BA, Split floor plan, 2C/G, Lg.Screen
Room w/12'x20' deck, Lg. eat-in kitchen, Formal DR.
Excellent location on the corner in a quiet cul-de-sac. Too
many extras to list. Must See!' 284,000
850-974-0018


Customized, Fully Loaded, New royal blue paint job,
CD player, Rebuilt transmission. Extra set of 4 new
tires with original Cadillac hub caps. 156,000 miles
$3,200 (OBO) 423-0888











4634 Dove Way. 2006, home, 3bed/2bath,
2-car garage. Up-graded carpet, flooring, light fixtures,
door knobs, hinges & Hardi siding. Owner will carry 10%
$153,000 $149,000 305-6414


2005


3 Bedroom
2 Bath

Large Master bedroom with garden tub; filtered
water; 12xl4 Shed. Call Ron or Eve.
$42,000 850-423-0313



CYPRESS BENCH


423-9736


BARGAINS 8 SAVINGS 8 MORE... OH MY.

BULLETN-BOARD CLASSIFIED, Now ON THE WEB AT WWW.CRESTVIEWNEWSBULLETIN.COM


PAGE 9


SATURD4Y, JUNE 3, 2006


CRESTVIEW NEWS BULLETIN


I















CRETV/tEW NEWS BiUREIUN


.... .. ., ,,


S 77 7 UN 3 S00 P.( E1


NEWS &
NOTES


Baseball



CHS teacher keeps Mets memories alive


Baker physical
Baker School will conduct
sports physical for Gator
athletes who will be in
grades 6-12 next year.
Physicals will be conducted
June 8 at 6 p.m. in the Baker
School fieldhouse. This is a
change from the previously
scheduled date. Athletes
should bring $10 for cost of
the physical.

OWC coach
Heather Wolbers has
been named Okaloosa-
Walton College's new soft-
ball coach.
Wolbers replaces
Michelle Krassinger, who
resigned after the 2006 sea-
son.
Wolbers served as an
assistant coach at OWC last
season. She also played for
the Raiders in 1997 and
1998.
OWC finished 35-20 last
season (4-14 Panhandle
Conference).

CHS soccer
The Crestviev boys soc-
cer program will conduct a
summer soccer camp June
5-9. The camp is for youths
in grades K-7. Cost is $50
per child ($40 for two or more
children). Camp runs from 8
a.m.-noon each day.

Twin Hills camps
Twin Hills Park will offer
summer camps for soccer,
tennis and "Mommy and Me
Aerobics." Tennis camp is for
ages 7-13. "Mommy and Me
Aerobics" has age groups
from age 2. and up. Camps
start June 5. Cost of camps
is $45 apiece. Call (850)
682-4715 or visit Twin Hills
Park for more information.

Alligator Trot 5K
The Alligator Trot 5K run
is set for 9 a.m. June 17 at
Florala State Park in Floiala.
Walkers are welcome. This is
the area's only two-state
race. The first 100 entrants
are guaranteed a race T-
shirt. For more information,
see the race Web site at
www.geocities.com/alliga-
tortrot, or contact race direc-
tor Karen Johnson at (850)
834-2032 or
alligatortrot@yahoo.com.

Running results
The News Bulletin will
feature a spotlight on the
area running scene in an
upcoming edition. If you
competed in a running or
walking event during the
2006 calendar year and
would like to see your results
in the newspaper, please
contact News Bulletin Sports
Editor Kyle Wright at (850)
682-6524, or email
wright @ crestviewbulletin.c
om.

Auto racing
Emerald Coast Dragway
in Holt will conduct Pro Tree
Bracket Racing tonight,
along with NHRA Bracket
Racing. Free entry in the Pro
Tree competition for those
entered in a Bracket class.
Gates open at 3:30 p.m.
Time trials begin at 4:30 p.m.
Races start at 7:30 p.m.

CNB Online
Crestview News Bulletin
articles and photographs
now can be seen at the
paper's new Web site,
www.crestviewnewsbul-
letin.com. Sports stories are
updated on the site on
Wednesday and Saturday
afternoons. Additional photos
from area sporting events
can be seen online by click-
ing on the Photo Gallery link.
To purchase photos from the
site, contact the News
Bulletin at (850) 682-6524.


Sikes writing book

about 1986 World

Series champions
Kyle Wright
News Bulletin Sports Editor

Every New York Mets vic-
tory this year sends Bob,
Sikes on a trip down memory
lane.
Sikes uses his laptop com-
puter to take Mets fans
around the country on the
journey with him.
Sikes, a teacher at
Crestview "High School, is
working on a narrative mem-


oir of the 1986
World Series
champion
New York
Mets titled
Getting Paid to
Watch. Sikes
served as an
assistant SIKES
trainer with
the dub from 1985-1991.
He also started a blog -
www.gettingpaidtowatch.co
m where he uses his lyri-
cal writing style to connect
current Mets news with
events from his time with the
franchise.
"Some (blogs) report
news and spread rumors,"


Sikes said. "My own is one
of storytelling and commen-
tary."
Sikes started working on
his book about five years
ago. He stepped up his
efforts as the 20th anniver-
sary of the team's 1986 World
Series title approached.
Sikes put a morsel of his
work in cyberspace early


this year when some time for an innings-eating start-
reading political blogs led ing pitcher in early May,
him to the ,w v.basebqO aes wrote about .how an
musmgs.contW b site. ssrtment of pitching
Sikes got calls from pub- injuries .derailed the 1987
fishing contacts within days Mets' defense of their world
of his first posting. Further title.
contacts resulted in work Sikes conveyed the same
with the NY Sports Day Web message one might find in
site (www.nysportsday.cQm), the typical Web chat room:
and then the www.getting- "We need pitching!" But he
paidtowatch.com site. did it in a scholarly way that
A typical Sikes posting gave readers a nugget of
will lead with an anecdote baseball history to enjoy.
from his time with th6 Mets. Sikes' writings draw a
He then links those memo- wide range of responses.
ries with the current team's : e generated a firestorm
news of the day.. When he suggested the Mets
An example: When the
2006 Mets showed a need See METS, page 7


Baseb;a


keeps


is ich


Kyle Wright/The News Bulletin
CHS varsity baseball coach Tim Gillis (top right) looks on as youngsters play a game
Wednesday during the Crestview baseball program's youth camp.


campers


Over 70 youths in

Crestview program
Kyle Wright
News Bulletin Sports Editor

Word of the Crestview
High School baseball team's
successful 2006 season
reached the ears of even the
youngest Bulldog fans.
The CHS coaches and
players say many of the 70-
plus youngsters who turned
out for this week's youth
baseball camp at the high
school know about the
Bulldog varsity's stellar 23-6
season that ended in the
Region 1-5A title game.
"Even some of the young
guys coming up from mid-
dle school, they know what
is expected," CHS varsity
coach Tim Gillis said. "The


guys in the past have set a
good precedent, and they
want to keep that going."
Gillis wants his young
players to enjoy themselves
during the CHS camp. They
can worry about wins and
losses when they get older.
"They have a blast," Gillis
said. "It's really fun for me. I
enjoy seeing that time of life,
seeing the joy and excite-
ment in their faces."
Austin Rogers, who just
finished fifth grade, attend-
ed the camp last summer
and looked forward to
returning this year.
"It's fun," Austin said.
"You learn new stuff and
you get to play baseball. We
get to use the batting cages
and play other games."
The campers, ranging in
age from 5 to 13, participate
in baseball games and activi-


ties. Gillis hands out prizes to
the contest winners. He also
gives out a "Sportsmanship
Award" each day.
Crestview's returning
varsity and junior varsity
players serve as camp coun-
selors, giving the youngsters
a chance to mingle with their
heroes..
. "It means a lot to m'
hillis said. "The younger kids
really pay attention to every-
thing these older kids do."
Junior-to-be Augie Willis
gets a chuckle watching the
young Dawgs romp on the
big field. He remembers par-
ticipating in a similar camp
as a youngster.
"It's just fun being out',
here with the little guys,"
Willis said. "Everybody
comes out here and spends a.
couple of hours with the-
kids, and it's pretty fun."


e ed World Seies titles-_ i
S:the last 10 s.
It's a wo a\vhere
Rodriguez stars' r"ile
Atlanta Braves and Pedro
Martinez pitches for the.
New York Yankees.
It's a world where sur-
prise champions have
emerged in recent years
and the Atlan.ta Brayes
can't win in the postsea-
son. .. ....
(Oops. Apparently some
things stay the same in
every world).
It's Strat-O-Matic base,
ball, a world inhabit wib':
11 of my friends every sudn-
mer.
Strat-O-Matic baseball
uses real-life statistics to
simulate games, series and
entire seasons.
Don't confuse Strat-0-
Matic with regular fantasy
or Rotisserie baseball.
Fantasy baseball leagues
require players to predict
future performances. Strat-
O-Matic baseball allows
fans to replay the past.
Think you could have.
managed the New York.
Yankees to at least one
World Series title between
2001 and 2005? Strat--
Matic baseball gives you.
the chance.
Think you could lead
theTampa Bay Devil Rays
into playoff contention?
Strat-O-Matic baseball lets
-you try. ';
The-Strat@O-Matic A
league I comf:ate in started
in 1991. The. fo tiatiq'
.the league gave stru .
to some of my friends'
addiction tobaseball i'
general and Strat-O-Matic
in particular .
Our league's Web site
features a detailed record
book. A list of award win-
ners. A Hall of Fame.
The game.has some
flaws. If a player hits one
home run in five at-bats
during a real-life season,
that same player will hit.
100 home runs in 500 at-
bats during a 162-game
Strat-O-Matic season:
Armando Rios holds our
league single-seshbn hon"'
run record with 101. The
Immortal Mark Quinn .
crushed 74 homers andr
won the league MVP aw*d
in 2000.


Passing

Shots

Kyle
.Wright

Who needs steroids
When 'ou can have juiced
dice? .
I get an e-mail every day
between April and
September l.ceu- ..
updated on the fortunes of
my Cincinnati Reds.
My record as a manager
reminds many of the
, '.immortal Casey Stengel.
'Not the Casey Stengel who
managed the New York
Yankees to seven World
Series titles in the 1940s and
1950s. The Casey Stengel
^ho managed the 1962
, New York'mets'toa 40-120
record.
I handicapped my fran-
chise by trying to retain as
many real-life Cincinnati
players as possible until the
year 2001.
I scrapped that
approach for a
"Moneyball" philosophy in
2003, but a controversial
.realignment.a few years
ago stuck me in our
league's toughest division.
"If all goes well, I might
field a contender by 2008.
I now live 843 miles
away from our league
commissioner and most of
the other league owners,
.but baseball helps me stay
in touch from five states
away.
A wedding invitation or
a birth announcement often
includes a trade offer.
(Actually, it's usually the
other way around).
Two of my friends and
fellow league owners
greeted me in the receiving
line after my own wed-
ding.
I'll never forget the
moment. Neither will my
wife.
"Congratulations," they
both said. "And who would
you want in exchange for
Adam Dunn?".

Kyle Wright is the News
Bulletin Sports Editor. He can
be reached at (850) 682-6524,
or by email at
kwright@crestviewbulletin.com.


Inside


r.


Buy, sell, trade and look for jobs in the News Get information about upcoming local sports Read about Cagen Williams of Crestview, a
Bulletin Classifieds. PAGES 8-9 activities and events. PAGE 7 15-year-old guitar prodigy. PAGE 1


Shortage causes City to urge residents to
restrict their water use PAGE 1


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Strmwatch


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Page06 2 Jn 200leti 6ne'


WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY: WEAR-TV's Garman predicts ...


Ken Nielsen
News Bulletin Reporter

Meteorologist Christian
Garman is originally from
Colorado, but he does call.
Pensacola home. Born in 1974,
Garman was living in the city of
five flags by the time he was four
years old, and he's never left.
Garman graduated from the
University of West Florida with a
Bachelor of Arts in
Telecommunications, and earned a
second degree, a Bachelor of
Science in Geosciences from
Mississippi State University in
2005. Thanks to several years of
experience, Garman has also
earned the National Weather
Association's Seal Of Approval.
Garman joined the Channel
Three News team in December
1995 as a production assistant. In
May of 1996 he made his on-air
debut by filling in for the weekend
weather anchor.

KN: Is a meteorologist
something that was a life long
dream?
CG: I have always had a
love for television and show
business. I had not considered
a career in weather until I was
hired at WEAR as a produc-
tion assistant. An opportunity
came along for me to fill in as
a weather anchor, and that's
when I decided that this could
be a career. So enrolled at
Mississippi State University to
get a degree in Meteorology
through their distance learning
program.

KN: When hurricanes enter
the gulf, do u get excited? Does
your adrenaline start to flow
.like an athlete's before the big
game?
CG: I am most certainly not
one of "those" guys. I dread a
hurricane coming into the Gulf
as much as everyone else
around here. Just leads to ter-
rible inconveniences and in
many cases, tragedy. I would
be happy if we didn't deal
with a tropical system for
another 5 years.

KN: How many hurricanes
have you experienced?
CG: I have lived in


Pensacola since 1979, so I've
been through my share. I was
here for Frederick, which is
one many people still talk
about. I was a WEAR viewer
for Erin and Opal, and I've
covered many. Including
Danny in '97, Georges in '98,
and of course Ivan and Dennis.

KN: What do you do during
the storms?
CG: Of course, it is very
busy at the station. We begin
special cut-ins about a day and
a half early, depending on
what watches and warnings
are issued. Everyone brings 2
or 3 changes of clothes, and
you just grab a couple of hours
sleep here or there, when you
can.
Do you ever get out in the
storm for location shoots?
I do not go on location.
The reporters are in the field,
but we keep the 3 meteorolo-
gists in the building. There is
so much data to analyze, it's
vital that we stay at the sta-
tion.

KN: How long is your
shift? Do you try to go home
or do you move into the news
room?
CG: We basically work 12
hour shifts, but it always turns
out to be longer than that. It's
really tough to sleep because,
like almost everyone else in
the area, you are really anx-
ious. Wanting the next piece
of information from the
Hurricane Center.


KN: Which is the most
memorable hurricane that you
have reported?
CG: Ivan, to be sure. It hit
overnight, and we could really
hear the winds slamming the
building. That was significant,
because the studio is built to
withstand those strong winds.
It was the first time I had cov-
ered a hurricane where I could
really tell how hard it was
blowing outside. Of course,
the next morning, we all found
out the damage that those
winds caused.

KN: What is the most
memorable incident that you
recall during your storm cov-
erage?
CG: I took a call from
someone around 2:30 in the
morning during Ivan. He was
in south Santa Rosa County
and his house was filling up
with water. He wanted me to
tell him what to do. It was a
very helpless feeling, because
there was not much to tell him.
Getting up onto the cabinets
was about the only option. He
told me he owned a boat, that
was in his front yard, anchored
to a tree. He was considering
climbing out the window and
swimming to the boat, so he
would have a way to move his
family. It was before we had
all heard so many other sto-
ries, and was really the first
glimpse into what we may be
dealing with the morning after.
And sure enough, there were


hundreds of other stories just
like that one.

KN: Last year we went
through the entire alphapet
and then some. Why are we
experiencing so many storms?
CG: All of the experts
believe we are in the middle of
a very active cycle that started
in 1995. Some estimates sug-
gest that it will stay this busy
for another 10 to 20 years, as
depressing as that may be.

KN: What is your predic-
tion for the 2006 season?
CG: I don't think there is
any way we will see 28 named
storms, which we had last
year. But, I do think the active
cycle will continue.
Somewhere on the order of 15
named storms, including 8 or 9
hurricanes, 3 or 4 being
Category 3 or higher.

KN: During a major storm,
what agencies and resources
are you pluged into that help
bring the necessary informa-
tion to your viewers?
CG: Of course we are in
constant contact with the
National Weather Service in
Mobile. They service South
Alabama and Northwest
Florida and they do a terrific
job. It's wonderful to have
such a great relationship with
them during a tropical event,
because they are in constant
contact with the National
Hurricane Center in Miami.
We will often be tipped off 30
minutes to an hour early of
what the new forecasted track
of sustained winds may be.
We also have reporters embed-
ded within every county's
emergency operations center.


Those reporters get any new
information for any county
back to the anchors very
quickly, and the info goes out
to the public.

KN: Anything new planned
for WEAR TV 3's coverage
this hurricane season?
CG: Our hurricane weather
network continues to grow.
This is a relationship we have
with radio stations across the
area that will broadcast our
coverage. This is significant of
course, because radios become
our strongest means of com-
municating with the public as
power outages start to occur.

KN: If there is one thing
that you would like to tell
people along the Gulf Coast as
this season begins?
CG: There is a staggering
number that some 68% of peo-
ple still don't prepare for a
hurricane. It's so easy to pick
up the items you may need in
the event of a storm now,
before there is a threat. It
becomes nearly impossible to
find the things we need once a
threat is out there. I wish
more people would take the
time to get ready. It would
make those final 2 or 3 days
before a storm so much more
manageable.

KN: At what point will
WEAR go live full time during
a storm?
CG: Our policy is to go into
24 hours of coverage when the
National Hurricane Center
issues a Hurricane Warning for
our area. If we are under a
Tropical Storm Warning or
Hurricane Watch, we do cut-
ins, but not full time coverage.


JERRY L. PARKER, SR.
Agent
IKNOW WHERE YOUR PoLCIES ARE!
If you have to evacuate in a
r t hurricane be sure you have your
S insurance policies with you.
OKALOOSA INSURANCE AGENCY
301 N. Ferdon Blvd.
Crestview, FL 32536
Bus (850) 682-2519 Fax (850) 689-3375


WEAR-TV Channel 3's Christian Garman


Page 2


June 3, 2006







Page 3


June 3, 2006


0F Stom ac/h rsve .NwIule


This is a product of
The Crestview News Bulletin
Publisher
Jim .Knudsen .
Office Manager
Lynn Gann
Managing Editor
Steve Andrews:-.
?- Photgraphers/Reporters
- Kyle Wight; sportss editor) .
Ken Nielsen .
S Adam Ziglai: .
Secretary
Sharon,
Production Chief
Viola Owens
Production Assistants,
Renee Bell
.Advertising Sales
Jennifer Knudsen
Jeremy Cadle.
Distribution :
Tye Salo





Expert Forecast..............2...

Important Numbers ...........3

Hurricane Katrina.......`...4-5

Eye of the Storm...;.... ..'-7

Tracking Map...............8-9

Red Cross .................1041i

Commentary......-..........13

Hurricane Dennis ..........14

Hurricane Ivan.................15


Phone Numbers You Should Know:


Emergency Management 850-651-7560
Fire Department 911
Emergency Medical Services 911

Sheriff Emergencies 911
Animal Welfare 850-803-7299
Mosquito Control 850-651-7394
Health Department 850-833-9245
FEMA 1-800-525-0321 or 660-8005
Red Cross 850-432-7601
FI Dept. of Emergency Management 850-413-9900

Citizen Information Line when EOC is activated -
850-651-7560
Crestview
Public Works
682-6132
Baker Fire
537-2487
Crestview Fire
682-6121
Laurel Hill Fire
652-4441


For Insurance Needs:
Allstate Floridian
800-547-8676
Clarendon National Insurance Company
800-216-3711
FEMA
800-621-FEMA (3362)
Fidelity National Property and Casualty Insurance Company
800-725-9472
Fireman's Fund
888-347-3428
Florida Farm Bureau General Insurance Company
800-330-3327
GMAC Insurance (Auto Claims)
800-468-3466
Hartford Insurance Company of the Midwest
800-637-5410 or 800-243-5860
Progressive
800-888-7764
Prudential Property & Casualty Insurance Company
800-437-3535
State Farm Fire & Casualty Company
800-732-5246 or 800-SF-CLAIM
Tower Hill Group
800-216-3711
Travelers (Personal)
800-252-4633
USF&G homeowners claim
800-631-6478


We at Wise wancmeH (at everyeoe h0oave
a sa6.e H ic4ane Seascon. ee sze 4ome depf4u hint4:

Check and start your generator regularly, and add Fuel Stabilizer
to keep gas from becoming stale.
Keep extra oil, filters, and spark plugs on hand, so you don't get
caught in a shortage after a storm.
Be sure to have all equipment serviced early.
We carry a full line of Stihl Chainsaws, and supplies.
Generators of various sizes, gas cans and other necessities to
keep your electricity running.

The more prepared we are, the more we are able to cope
during and after the storms. So come by our shop and
stock up on your Hurricane Equipment today.


STIHL

lsry Z:

171111,311 ; 1, i, 49


Nothing Runs Like a Deere


WISE EQUIPMENT SALES & SERVICE
1147 FERDON BLVD. SOUTH
CRESTVIEW, FL 32436
(850) 682-3366








200. -tr wtc h Crsve- esBlei


June 3, 2006


What if Hurricane Katrina had attacked the Panhandle?


Cal Zethmayr
News Bulletin Correspondent

Millions of words have been
reported and hundreds of
thousands of pictures have
been printed since the devasta-
tion of Hurricane Katrina last
August.
Fortunately for Okaloosa
County we "missed the bullet"
as they say but this area cer-
tainly felt much of the impact
from the after storm effect of
people evacuating to this area,
and the overall economic rami-
fications to our area construc-
tion industry.
Now as we enter Hurricane
Season 200.6, major efforts are
being made to inform and edu-
cate our citizens to get pre-
pared early in the season and
to know what to do if one of
this years major storms does
aim for the northwest Florida
coastline.
One only needs to look at
the Friday August 26, 2005 11
a.m. advisory No. 13 graphic
from the National Hurricane
Center to realize how close we
came to being the center of that
storm last year.
When the Okaloosa County
Emergency Operations Center
activates for an approaching
Hurricane or Tropical Storm
Crestview radio stations
WAAZ-FM 104.7 and WJSB-
AM 1050 staff the EOC center
and broadcast live reports
before, during and after the
storm event.
The Okaloosa EOC is cur-
rently located in a couple of
rooms at the Shalimar Annex
and a category 3 or higher
storm could flood and damage
that area of the county. The
EOC will be moving to a new
facility on the OWC campus in
Niceville in a few years. But
what would the EOC have
done if a major storm was
headed for our county?
Over the past years the
backup location for the EOC
has been on the second floor of
the Okaloosa County
Courthouse in Crestview. The
number of people that need to
be safely housed in that space
and the reality that a category 4
or greater storm would proba-


bly cause severe damage to the
Courthouse prompted a
change of plans for this year
and the years ahead until the
new EOC is opened in
Niceville.
The new terminal building
at the Okaloosa Regional
Airport was built to withstand
major hurricane force winds. It
has backup generator power,
and if a major storm were
heading this way the airport
operations would be suspend-
ed.
Dino Vallini, Okaloosa
Public Safety Director and
Randy McDaniel, Okaloosa
County Director of Emergency
Operations developed a plan
to use a large conference room
area at the Airport Terminal as
the backup for the EOC.
On May 17, the Okaloosa
EOC conducted an all day hur-
ricane exercise. This included
having all of the EOC volun-
See KATRINA, page 5


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Page 4


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Page 5


June 3, 2006


KATRINA, from page 4
teers relocate to the Airport Terminal
and re-establish the EOC there. New
computer and telephone circuits have
been installed in the conference
rooms for the EOC use. It took less
than half an hour for all the partici-
pants to pack up their notebook com-
puters and phones, drive to the air-
port, and get setup and ready to oper-
ate.
McDaniel said, "we were very
pleased with the cooperation of the
staff at the airport and with organiza-
tional work we had put into getting
this backup EOC location ready. It
will mean that Okaloosa County
Emergency Operations should be
able to do its job even if one of those
major storms does head our way.
Our exercise on the May 17 used
Hurricane Ivan as the basis for
reviewing what each agency that
staffs the EOC would do at every
phase of the storm."
Cal Zethmayr is a broadcaster for
Crestview stations WAAZ-FM and
WJSB-AM and will be the person report-
ing from the Okaloosa EOC during any
storm events this year.


IlkFOOD ______1Bi^


"Where Cortesy, Convenience, and Price All Meet"
rhnnew


s.lIn.Z


Coming soon

to Baker...


Mr. Cheap Butts
180 US Hwy 90 West Drive-up Window


CIL STORES
"Where Coauresy, Convenience, and Price All Meet

WILL BE COMING TO THE

BAKER AREA SOON, OFFERING

QUALITY CHEVRON GAS,

DIESEL & OFF-ROAD DIESEL,

DISTRIBUTED BY EUBANKS OIL

OUT OF BLOUNTSTOWN, FL.


* Fill up your gas containers now. The gas will still be good
when, or if a storm hits.

* We will be open until it becomes unsafe.

* It is not about the money we make, it's about being there
for the community.

* After the hurricane, we will be open with or without power
whenever conditions are safe.


Randy
McDaniel,
Okaloosa
County
Director of
Emergency
Operations,
speaks at a
May 17
meeting
about the
county's
plans for
any
upcoming
storms.
Cal Zethmayr
The News
Bulletin


2006 Stormwatch/The Crestview News Bulletin


I






June 3, 2006


Pa'ge6 Crestv. Ne-w ,- 11


The'eve


te storm:


"Katrina & Biloxi: A story

of resolve and resilience"


* Tom Nebel, a regional filmmaker, had his eye on
Hurricane Katrina when he documented the powers
of destruction and resolve in the film, "Katrina &
Biloxi: A story of resolve and resilience."


Adam Ziglar
News Bulletin Reporter
Tom Nebel walked along
the Biloxi, Miss. shoreline, trac-
ing a line of sight with his Sony
digital video camera.
The water, flaccid and life-
less, seemed too tired to con-
tinue to move -the splintered
wood, glass shards and pow-
dery pink insulation back and
forth.
Shingled boards quivered
on the water's surface, hit the
rain-pocked spongy sand, then
helplessly submitted to the
pull of the sea.
The sky, hovering low and
ominous, was still swollen and
bruised.
Hurricane Katrina was
already hundreds of miles
north of Biloxi. The 120-mile
swath of sideways-spraying
rain and wind mowed over the
land and moved north, dissi-
pating as it went.
Nebel, a filmmaker from
Navarre and former meteorol-
ogist for WTVY, a television
station in Dothan, Ala., is the


general sales manager for
Cumulus Broadcasting in Fort
Walton Beach. He arrived in
Biloxi three days after Katrina
beat the coast to a pulp.
He was there to document
the Atlanta Fire Department's
efforts, who lent a hand to the
Biloxi firefighters in the
cleanup efforts. Nebel and 60
firefighters worked their way
to the epicenter of disaster.
Upon arriving, Nebel saw
surreal sights that make for
Hollywood film sets.
The intense summer sun
boiled on the roofs of the city's
seafood canneries.
"Things were rotting and
stinking," Nebel recalls. "It
was surreal. Everything was so
much bigger and widespread
than you could imagine.
"It was creepy and eerie."
As a chief meteorologist for
eight years, Nebel has covered
nearly a dozen hurricanes and
other disasters, including the
time in 1994 when Elba, Ala.'s
levees broke, burying the city
See EYE, page 7


Special to The News Bulletin
Tom Nebel poses for a picture with The Weather Channel's
storm chaser Jim Cantore. In the DVD, Cantore is interviewed
about Katrina's impact on Biloxi.


Special to The News Bulletin
Tom Nebel poses for a picture in Biloxi. In the background, a bridge crumbles in the gulf, a
typical sign of the disaster left behind by Hurricane Katrina.


We'll be here

for you before

and after the

storm for all

your needs.



CONSOLIDATED


A*E
Hardware


Mike Glover, Manager


682-6148
702 N. Ferdon Blvd.
Hours: Mon Sat 7-7 Sun 9-5


Page 6








June 3, 2006

EYE, from page 6
in a bowl of murky water.
Never before had he experi-
enced anything like the
destruction seen at Biloxi.
Block after block was
chewed up and regurgitated
by the storm. Antebellum
homes that have overlooked
U.S. Highway 90 for more than
a hundred years were crum-
pled like notebook paper.
"The great majority of all
the historic structures were
destroyed," he said.
Jefferson Davis's Beauvoir
home was nearly destroyed.
"From a journalism stand-
point, sometimes devastation
and disaster brings out the
good in people and communi-
ties," he said. "We wanted to
preserve that. After seeing that,
it really changed the whole
vision of the documentary."
In the film, Nebel interviews
Biloxi residents who stayed in
their homes during the storm.
As the waters rushed
through the town, moving
through neighborhoods sever-
al hundred yards inland, indi-
viduals climbed on box tops in
their attics and craned their
heads above brown water.
Some were not tall enough to
get above the water.
Others scaled to rooftops.
Lifeless bodies floated face-
down through city streets
where children normally
played.



Prior to Katrina, the 300-
year-old city was breaching
unparalleled barriers of pros-
perity.
"We were enjoying the most
prosperous time in the city's
300-year-old history," said
Vincent Creel, the public affairs


Page 7


Special to The News Bulletin
Tom Nebel uses his hand-held Sony digital video camera to capture damage wrought by Hurricane Katrina.


manager for the city.
In 1992, casino gambling
was legalized. As a result,
15,000 jobs were created. The
number of visitors increased
from 1 million to 8 to 10 million
annually. The city added more
than 20,000 hotel rooms.


by


Iggs & Strufltai
WMP POWER PRODUCTS


Creel spoke briefly to the
News Bulletin about Katrina's
impact as a film crew with the
ABC News television show
Nightline prepared for an inter-
view with him for an upcom-
ing show.
Rehearsing his interview
with Nightline over the phone,
he reminisced about the morn-
ing when he watched cascades
of water flow down the streets
and lap against City Hall.
A lifelong Biloxi resident, he
remembers using a handheld
camera to film the water as it
rose up the steps of City Hall, a
stout, gothic three-story build-
ing.
Nebel used a lot of the
footage for the documentary.
"It was surreal," Creel
remembers, trying to recall


poignant memories that are too
difficult to regurgitate.
"To be in my office on
August 29 at eight in the morn-
ing seeing water come up the
street into city hall.
"It was lapping on the front
porch of city hall. We are 22
feet above sea level. We're two
blocks away from the water-
front."
The winds' duration
seemed unending.
"It was like a tsunami,"
Creel said.
***

Despite widespread
destruction and the confirmed
loss of 53 Biloxi residents,
Nebel's documentary details
the resilience of a city on the


verge of a renaissance.
"The community has a real
vision to rebuild," Nebel said.
"It's been very moving to
see how people have begun to
move forward," Creel said.
"People have begun to
rebuild and move forward.
"We just couldn't be more
proud."

Want to watch?
You can order the DVD
online by visiting the City of
Biloxi Web site,
www.biloxi.ms.us.
Proceeds from the sale of
the documentary are helping
the rebuilding process.
Wal-Mart recently paid the
city $240,000 to sell the DVD in
24 stores along the Gulf Coast.


-2006 Stormwatch/The Crestview News Bulletin









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Page10$-. .- Jun e.3, 2i006


Risky business: hurricane shelters are


* Sheri Frost of the American Red Cross explains
the difference between risk and host shelters and
the importance of volunteering.


Adam Ziglar
News Bulletin Reporter

Okaloosa County currently
has less than 5,000 shelter
spaces available, according to
the American Red Cross.
Maybe more, if Baker
School is up and ready for the
2006 hurricane season.
Risk shelters are available,
but officials urge area resi-
dents to evacuate early.
"Space is very limited,"
said Sheri Frost, senior direc-
tor of military affairs and
branch operations for the
American Red Cross of
Northwest Florida.
"We only have a few thou-


sand spaces for evacuees," she
said.
"Folks need to evacuate
early; these spaces are going
to fill quickly."
There are two types of shel-
ters, Frost said.
Risk shelters, like Davidson
Middle School, are available
to residents who have no place
to go during a storm.
Currently, there are 13 host
shelters in Okaloosa County.
Central Baptist Church is a
good example.
The Red Cross releases the
names of host shelters after a
storm.
Last year, when Hurricane
Katrina drove thousands of


American Red Cross
residents east and west, many
camped on the gymnasium
floor of the church's multipur-
pose facility, The Rock.
These shelters do not have
strict requirements because
they are not used during a
storm.
However, they do need suf-
ficient floor space, multiple
bathrooms and a group of vol-
unteers who will willingly
work with the Red Cross.
"We're currently in the
process of recruiting more
churches for host shelters,"
Frost said.


Risk
Shelters
Antioch Elementar
Davidson Middle
Kenwood Element;
Baker School

If you are h
to a she
Tips before yoi
First, let a friend
know where you're
Eat a good mea
go.

Shelter supply
Identification
ance papers
A gallon of wat
Food: A three-


in short supply
______ supply of ready-to-eat food.
^I' You will not be able to cook.
Snacks
Available Medicines you need and
space Medic Alert tags
y 1,731 Blankets and pillows or a
2,701 sleeping bag
ary 271 Beach chair or chaise
N/A lounge
Flashlights, radio and bat-
teries
leading Changes of clothing, soap,
Iter: deodorant
Small games, books, mag-
u go: azines, cards
d or relative Baby needs: Disposable
headed. diapers, formula, etc.


I before you


list
and insur-

er.
or four-day


Things to not bring:
Do not bring, pets (unless
they are service animals), alco-
holic beverages, smoking
materials, heavy luggage or
several pieces of luggage,
valuables or weapons.


1- Map U Generator'

- Pet Supplies (Food, Kennel, etc.) Q Sunscreen, Bug Repellent -0 Lantern and/or Ca dles

J Charcoal, Lighter Fuel L3 Tools and Supplies QL) Pain Reliever

Highway 85 South, Crestview, Florida 682-8001 Open 7 days a week


Page 10


June 3, 2006







JuneatliTh 3,stie 206 6 .-. ae


74 hearet o a Red Crs44 vantaeer ..


m Volunteers share heart and hands
during disaster recovery.


Adam Ziglar
News Bulletin Reporter

When Hurricane Katrina
sent hundreds of evacuees
scrambling east and west,
many found refuge in
Crestview.
Within the span of 30 days,
the Northwest Florida
American Red Cross chapter
spent the budget of a small
country $33 million.
More than 1,600 volunteers
helped feed, clothe and shelter
more than 3,000. More than
632,000 meals were served.
More than 43,000 cases passed
across the makeshift desks of
caseworkers who were in
triage at the center of relief.
"I worked during the recov-
ery efforts at the World Trade
Center on 9-11. I worked the
Oklahoma City Bombing. The
Red Cross has never spent that
much in 30 days except the
Oklahoma City Bombing," said
Sheri Frost, senior director of
military affairs and branch
operations for the American
Red Cross of Northwest
Florida.
"That was an unprecedent-


ed event."
Diane Connors, coordinator
of disaster volunteers for the
Red Cross, is a walking human
resource department.
She recruits volunteers,
helps find their niche, makes
sure volunteers get well-
deserved recognition and
processes records.
"Last year was an eye-open-
er for all of us," she said,
remembering the flood of sup-
port that was provided during
one of the busiest storm sea-
sons on record.
This year, Connors will
coordinate the more than 290
volunteers who will aid those
who find refuge in Okaloosa
County shelters.
This year, the Red Cross will
add a disaster field supply cen-
ter with 30,000-square feet for
command headquarters.
This year, feeding vehicles
will move in prior to a storm
because a large portion of
Okaloosa County potentially
becomes landlocked by
washed out bridges and rising
water.
Connors, who has worked
during several other hurri-


N The Red Cross
performs a background
check on all volunteer
applicants. Once completed
and approved, volunteers
will undergo training to learn
how to respond to the needs
of residents during and after
a disaster situation.

canes (including Ivan), has vol-
unteered with the Red Cross
for the past 17 years.
History has proven here that
coordination is key, especially
when churches and other
organizations offer host shel-
ters after a storm.
"Be part of the solution,"
she quips. "Become a part of
us. This is what we do every-
day."
Connors says that it is
important that volunteers are
trained by the Red Cross.
"It helps so much that
you're trained properly," she
said. "We have no boundaries;
we are American people help-
ing all people.
"Everyone is equal in our
eyes."


Adam Zigler/The News Bulletin
In the photo at left, Carissa Stanley (left) and Diane
Connors prepare supplies for this year's hurricane season.
Connors is the Red Cross coordinator for disaster volun-
ters. In the photo above, Diane Connors sits at her desk, a
command center during times of disaster.


June 3, 2006


Page 11





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June 3, 2006


Page 12








June 3, 2006


NE".200 Strwt h Crsve New Bulletin


My first year living in the South ...

I'm already a hurricane veteran


Thirteen months ago, I did-
n't know Jim Cantore from
Jim Brown.
Thought terms like "Cat 1"
and "Cat 5" referred to ath-
letes at the University of
Kentucky and their jersey
numbers.
Assumed a "storm surge"
referred to a run of points for
Seattle's WNBA team.
Now, after just over a year
in the Florida Panhandle, I
know better.
Many of my Indiana
friends and relatives recoiled
in horror when I told them I
planned to move from the
Hoosier State to Florida last
spring.
"What about the hurri-
canes?" they asked.
"Well, the people there said
they only get one about once
every 10 years," I replied.
Thanks for the superb fore-
cast, folks.
Fortunately, the only hurri-
cane-related damage I experi-
enced over the last 13 months
took place on my phone bill.
Let me explain.
I don't get an overwhelm-
ing number of calls from the
folks I knew up north.
It's OK. Life keeps every-
body busy. And the lack of
calls keeps the cell phone bill
under control.
Once The Weather Channel
announces the formation of a
tropical storm in the Atlantic
or Caribbean, however, my
phone starts ringing like
church bells on a Sunday.
"Are you going to die?" is
the usual question from my
friends in the north.
It's OK. The images they
get in Indiana depict hurri-
canes as a mixture of torna-
does combined with tsunamis
combined with Noah's Flood.
All of that I still assume to
be true, by the way.
The images they get in
Indiana also imply that a hur-
ricane unleashes that mix of


S~Passing

Shots

Kyle
Wright


devastation over a five-state
radius. When Hurricane
Katrina crashed into
Louisiana and Mississippi,
many of my friends and fami-
ly assumed we sustained sim-
ilar damage in Crestview.,
That, mercifully, was not
true.
I spent my first hurricane
scare Dennis huddled in
the News Bulletin basement
with our publisher, Jim
Kundson, and his wife
Jennifer.
When Dennis blew through
after causing minimal dam-
age, I thought I had earned
the right to crow a little bit.
"Not bad for my first real
hurricane," I said.
Jim and Jennifer gave me a


look that said, "This boy does-
n't know what a real hurricane
is."
So, I know I don't look for-
ward to experiencing my first
"real" hurricane.
But I also now know not to
head for the hills every time a
tropical depression forms in
the Caribbean.
I have learned to respect
the forces of nature, but not to
live in constant fear of them.
Some of my Indiana
friends and family still say
they don't understand why
anyone would live in an area
"where you have a hurricane
every other weekend."
But they also think a "trop-
ical wave" is a cheer fans per-
form at Miami Heat basket-
ball games.
After a just over a year of
hurricane education, I know
better.

Kyle Wright is the News
Bulletin Sports Editor. He can
be reached at (850) 682-6524, or
by email at kwright@crestview-
bulletin.com.


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Page 13







R o .- ..4 ,, q, '


June 3, 2006


A look back at Hurricane Dennis- July 10, 2005


Ken Nielsen
News Bulletin Reporter

Fortunately, Hurricane
Dennis was more of a menace
than a disaster for north
Okaloosa County residents.
What began as a tropical
depression on July 4 rapidly
grew in strength, and fore-
casters predicted that Tropical
Storm Dennis had the poten-
tial to become a major hurri-
cane.
After ravaging Cuba with
140 mph winds, the storm
weakened for a brief time as it
crossed that country's moun-
tainous terrain.
However, once back over
water Dennis rapidly reinten-
sified on the afternoon of July
9 as it entered the gulf.
The storm continued mov-
ing north-northwest and into
the Gulf of Mexico.
By the morning of July 10,
the now Category 4 hurricane
was headed straight for the
Florida Panhandle.
More than 1.4 million peo-
ple from the Florida
Panhandle to Alabama,
Louisiana and Mississippi
were under evacuation
orders. Landfall was expected
Sunday afternoon anywhere
from the Florida Panhandle to
southeast Louisiana.
At 6am CDT July 10, the
center of Hurricane Dennis
was located near latitude 28.2
north, longitude 86.2 west.
She was moving north-north-
west at about 15 mph.
The National Weather
Service reported maximum
sustained winds near 145
mph, making Dennis a
Category 4 hurricane on the
Saffir-Simpson Scale.
Landfall occurred at Santa
Rosa Island, between
Pensacola and Navarre Beach
on July 10 at 2:25 p.m., 50
miles west of where Ivan
struck ten months earlier.
"I believe we were very for-
tunate and dodged a real bul-
let," said Crestview deputy
fire chief Cedric Peterson.
"We were prepared for much
worse."
Damage locally was mostly


Dennis left 680,000 customers
without electricity in four
southern states.

Gulf Power reported that 67,877
customers in Okaloosa County
lost power. It took nearly three
weeks before all power had
been restored.

CHELCO reported 9,354 of its
customers had lost power.

Damage in the United States
was estimated at more than
$2.23 billion, with $1.115 billion
of insured damage.

Dennis caused at least 10 tor-
nadoes in the U.S., although
only one of them reached F1
status. The storm dropped over
10 inches of rain in some areas
of Alabama and Georgia

to trees and roofs, with a few
reports of downed power
lines.
The most significant dam-
age in Crestview occurred to
the Econo Lodge on south
Ferdon Boulevard, which lost
its entire roof.
"What's ironic is that I had
just received the insurance
check for roof damage caused
by Ivan the day before Dennis
hit," said Harry Melton owner
of the Econo Lodge. "We were
planning to get repairs under-
way when the storm came."
Though the pictures and
video of the hotel's damage
provided by the News
Bulletin to national news
services looked extreme, it
was only cosmetic. Melton
said that only a few hotel res-
idents were displaced.
"We have a permanent pre-
stress concrete roof under-
neath the metal roof," said
Melton. "So though the dam-
aged looked horrific on the
news, it was really more cos-
metic than anything else."
The storm lost strength
over the day and was a tropi-
cal depression by early on
July 11. It finally dissipated on
July 13, with advisories ceas-
ing a full three days after
landfall.


Page 14








June 3, 2006


2006

A look back at Hurricane Ivan Sept. 16, 2004


Ken Nielsen
News Bulletin Reporter

Ivan formed as a Cape
Verde-type hurricane in early
September and became the
strongest hurricane of the 2004
Atlantic hurricane season.
Ivan reached Category 5
strength and became the ninth
most intense Atlantic hurricane
on record with winds reaching
170 mph and minimum central
pressure of 910 millibars. It
was the only Category 5 storm
of the 2004 season.
Just before it made landfall
around 2 a.m. Sept. 16, near
Gulf Shores, Ala., Ivan's eye-
wall weakened, with its south-
western portion all but disap-
pearing. Its wind speed when it
slammed on shore was at 130
mph.
Ivan's destruction in north
Okaloosa County was tremen-
dous and widespread. Not
since Hurricane Opal struck
the Gulf Coast in 1995 had
Okaloosa County residents
experienced such devastation,
power outages and mayhem.
Emergency relief operations
were slow in getting organized,
and communities like Baker,
Blackman and Laurel Hill
found themselves without
food, water, and ice and com-
munications.


Worked more than 6.1 million hours.

Provided more than 19 million meals after and during
hurricanes.

Staffed shelters that assisted more than 368,000
Floridians.

Sorted and delivered countless tons of supplies.

Provided the labor to install 21,000 "blue roofs."

* Raised $21 million for the Florida Hurricane Relief fund
established by Governor Bush to meet the needs of
survivors and rebuild communities.


Radio stations in Fort
Walton Beach were announc-
ing that food, water, and ice
available at the Spanish Trail
Park on north Ferdon
Boulevard at 8 a.m.
Residents began to line up
before the sun rose for needed
supplies. Tempers began to
flare as word was released that
no supplies would be arriving
until later in the day.
The only thing pumping at
local gas stations was people's
blood pressure. Lines extend-
ing more than 1/2 mile were
common at the two stations in


town that had gas. Residents
from as far away as Pace, Fla.
and Andalusia, Ala. were trav-
eling to Crestview in a search
for the precious commodity.
The Crestview Police
Department had to place offi-
cers at each station as the fuel
availability situation grew
worse.
Damage throughout the
county was extensive.
Emergency rescue crews had a
difficult time reaching many of
the residents in the Baker,
Blackman, and Laurel Hill area.
Local volunteer residents


were taking to the back roads
with chain saws, cutting their
way to friends and neighbors.
Many businesses in down-
town Crestview received con-
siderable damage, most
notably Nice-Val Furniture and
the Tropical Palm Restaurant.
Both businesses were closed for
nearly a year.
Another business,
Crestview Farm and Garden,
located on Ferdon Boulevard
in the center of town, was com-
pletely destroyed. The busi-
ness had been there since 1962.
Owner Ben Martin and his
wife Esther were inside their
home which was next to the
business, during the storm.
"The banging noise from the
metal roof on the store kept me
awake," said Ben Martin. "I got
up and went into the living
room to watch the Weather
Channel. I was surprised but
we still had power. It must
have been around 2:30 a.m."
Martin watched television
for about a half hour and the
power went out.
"Just as I got up to go back
to bed and try to get some
sleep, a large oak tree along-
side our house was blown
down on the roof right above
me. As I moved away the tree
slid into the chimney, and
caused it to break. This huge
piece of he chimney came
crashing through the roof and
landed right in the spot where
I had been sitting just seconds
before."


The next day Martin, the
retired pastor of the local
Mennonite Church, recalled
standing in his living room and
peering up through the hole in
the roof. "I guess God was
looking out for me."
The Martins' home and
store was so severely damaged
that they were never able to
rebuild or reopen. The skele-
ton of those buildings still rests
on the side on Ferdon
Boulevard.
Ivan caused 25 deaths in the
United States, including 14 in
Florida. Thirty-two more
deaths in the United States
were indirectly attributed to
Ivan.
The storm spawned numer-
ous tornadoes along the
Florida Panhandle.
Blountstown, Marianna and
Panama City Beach suffered
three of the most devastating
tornadoes.
Along with the 14 deaths in
Florida, Ivan is blamed for
eight in North Carolina, two in
Georgia, and one in
Mississippi.
Ivan caused an estimated
$13 billion in damage in the
United States alone, making it
the third costliest hurricane on
record at the time, being very
near Hurricane Charley's $14
billion -but well below
Hurricane Andrew's $26 bil-
lion.
In 2005, Hurricane Katrina
caused $75 billion in damage,
putting Ivan to fourth place.


Page 15








During a hurricane, natural gas
appliances shouldn't require anything.
Natural gas lines are underground, so there is no need
to take any special precautions. In addition, Okaloosa
Gas monitors our natural gas system and will shut off
the gas If It becomes necessary.

If evacuation Is ne.es&saiy, don't worry
about natural gas appliances.
When evacuating, It w net necessary to stop natural
gas service to indoor appliances before leaving. For
outdoor applances, consider turning the shut-of
valve toe o position while away.


r*A


a, 'II.


9 U' r-j '
*," **f AyT'UR


When returning from evacua
natural gas appliances first.
Check around the house and applanm.
of natural gas first. This should be
attempting to turn on or operate
appliance. Natural gas has a
sulur odor. If the are
appliances contact Okalonosa
there wem no problems


If the electricity is
as appliances wi
Mostmul gam P
appitnce wi^il Ml 'S
-s of electriolty.
seasorf n
Natural Gas Pwebf
return electrlclty
withIn 30second
provide eletcy
power source lhas l
ary to check .ke opefa
generation r VONs 11


t.~.


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