Group Title: Okeechobee News.
Title: Okeechobee news
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 Material Information
Title: Okeechobee news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Okeechobee News
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee Fla
Publication Date: November 25, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
Coordinates: 27.241667 x -80.833056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
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Volume ID: VID01541
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Vol. 100 No. 141 Wednesday, November 25, 2009


500 Plus tax


Happy Thanksgiving!

Index
Classifieds .................................. 17-19
Community Events............................ 6
Crossw ord....................................... 18
Obituaries............................ ... 6
O p in io n .......................................... 4
Speak Out ....................................... 4
Sports.................................... 14-16,20
W e ath e r ............................................. 2
Lake Levels

13.60 feet
Last Year: 14.34 feet

Al Snored1By:

Pogey's Family Restaurant
1759 S. Parrott Ave.
763-7222
Source: South Florida Water
Management District. Depth given
in feet above sea level.
See page 4 for information about
how to contact this newspaper.

newszap.com
FreeSpeech FreeAds


S11I 1111111 11
a 16510 00024 5


Stimulus funds to


By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
Help is now locally available
for those who have lost their jobs
and are facing eviction. Under the
American Recovery Act, Lamb of
God, a residential addiction recov-
ery center, has received funds for
the Homeless Prevention and Rap-
id Re-housing Program (HPRP).
The process started several
months ago when Lamb of God
signed a contract. Workers had to
be trained and finally, on Monday,
Nov. 23 Lamb of God starting talk-
ing telephone calls for appoint-
ments.


"This is not an easy, free hand-
out," warned Lyle Fried, who is
administering the program. "We
are not here to give handouts. We
need documentation. There is a
lot of paperwork involved."
The program has limited funds
with tight restrictions for their use.
No mortgage payments are pro-
vided under HPRP The program
only provides rental assistance.
However, if someone has had
their home repossessed, the pro-
gram can help with rental hous-
ing. Qualified applicants can also
receive assistance with utility pay-
ments.


help unemployed
To receive help, an applicant involves some type of education,
must be at or below 50 percent job training or working with Work-
of the area median income. That force Solutions.
means that a family of four can "We are not here to give hand-
have a combined income of no outs," Mr. Fried stressed.
more than $23,350. A two person He is expecting more people to
household cannot have an annual qualify than funds are available. So
income over $18,300. If the ap- they will employ a rating system to
plicant is not homeless or in im- set priorities and assess needs. Mr.
manent risk of being homeless, Fried added that everything must
they will be referred to another be documented. The applicants
program. will be required to furnish such
This program is not for the things as lease agreements, check
chronically homeless. stubs, bank statements, and evic-
Each applicant will be consid- tion notices.
ered nn a a-hv-b s hbais Thov "We look at it as a ministry to


must develop a recovery plan that


See Stimulus Page 2


Church prepares Thanksgiving bags
Members of Peace Lutheran Church were busy over the weekend before Thanksgiving putting together 101 Thanksgiving bags
to be given to needy families. Some of the people who worked on the project posed with some of their bags on Monday morn-
ing, Nov. 23. The families receiving the baskets were to pick them up that afternoon. Pictured are left to right, first row, Vanessa
Bowman, Bradley Williams, Christen Frank, Michael Frank, Katherine Ragamat, Leanna Cotton, back row, Drew Achung, youth
and family minister, Leah Suarez, Cortney Crews, Juan Lugo, Karen Cotton and Joey Barletto. The baskets were packed ac-
cording to the size of a particular family. In addition to a turkey, each bag contained potatoes, corn muffin mix, yams, gravy,
stuffing, tea, green beans, cranberry sauce and brownie or cake mix. The bags were furnished by Home Depot. Community
sponsors provided the names of the families to receive the bags. Those community sponsors were: Florida Community Health
Center, Inc, Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, Peace Lutheran Church & Preschool, Big Lake Missions, Suncoast Mental Health
Center, Innovative Treatment Services, G4S and Dr. Guerrero and staff.


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Okeeclhohee 34974
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2 Okeechobee News November 25, 2009



FWC to meet in Clewiston Dec. 9 and 10


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission (FWC) will meet in
Clewiston Dec. 9 and 10 to vote on and dis-
cuss numerous inland and marine issues.
The Wednesday and Thursday sessions at
the John Boy Auditorium, 1200 South WC.
Owen Ave., will begin at 8:30 a.m. both days
and are open to the public.
The Dec. 9 meeting focuses on inland is-
sues. The Commission will consider the final
rule that would allow use of peregrine fal-
cons for falconry in Florida, consistent with
the rules and regulations of the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service.
Commissioners will discuss draft rules
that would change deer hunting seasons
and zone boundaries. The purpose of these
changes is to align season dates with the rut

Okeechobee

Forecast

Today: Mostly cloudy with a high near
80 and showers and possible thunderstorms
likely with a 60 percent chance. Winds will
be calm becoming east northeast around 5
mph.
Tonight: Mostly cloudy with a low
around 64 and a 40 percent chance of show-
ers. Winds will be calm becoming south
southwest around 5 mph.
Extended Forecast
Thursday Thanksgiving Day: Mostly
cloudy with a high near 79 and a 30 percent
chance of showers mainly before 1 p.m.
Winds will be from the west around 5 mph.
Thursday night: Mostly cloudy with a
low around 55 and winds from the north-
west around 5 mph.
Friday: Mostly sunnywith a high near 70.
Winds will be from the northwest around 10
mph.


Lotteries
Florida Lottery Here are the numbers
selected Monday in the Florida Lottery: Cash
3:3-3-9; Play 4: 2-7-7-9; Fantasy5: 7-8-15-21-
34; Mega Money: 24-25-30-41 MB 7; Florida
Lotto: 11-12-15-29-36-42 X 2; Powerball:
7-26-36-49-58 PB4 x5. Numbers drawn Tues-
day, Cash 3: 3-0-0; Play 4: 0-3-6-1.




V Gabriel E.

Breuer, M.D.
Cardiology
Electrophysiology
SCardiovscular diseases
SElectrophysiology studies
Cardiac Catheterization
Implantation of cardiac devices
DOCTORS i i EAT
204 'E PAR STET KECOE
86-6716


(a time of peak white-tailed deer activity),
and thus increase hunter satisfaction.
Commissioners also will consider draft
rule proposals pertaining to hunting on
about 150 wildlife management areas, wild-
life and environmental areas, mitigation
parks and miscellaneous areas.
The first day's full agenda also includes a
discussion of a draft rule change for taking
or removing nuisance wildlife, adding the
possibility of allowing off-site relocation un-
der specific conditions, rather than euthaniz-
ing the wildlife, and requiring trap and snare
inspection at least once every 24 hours.
Other proposed rules would require a
permit to import nonnative wildlife on the
conditional list, including the Northern large-
mouth bass. Another proposed rule would
prohibit importation of quagga mussels.
Commissioners will consider draft rules
revising Florida's listed-species process. The
proposed changes would create one Florida
list for imperiled species that includes any
species listed at the federal level as well as
Florida-designated listed species. The new
draft rules concentrate on sound manage-
ment strategies to ensure no species goes
extinct in Florida.


Stimulus
Continued From Page 1

help the community," said Mr. Fried. From
his standpoint, the amount of paperwork
required makes the program very difficult.
However, he added: "The idea is to help our
economy rebound."
There is no service for walk-ins. Initial
applications are only taken by telephone.
There are only four people handling the pro-
gram and one telephone line, so Mr. Fried
urges patience. If a person is interested they
should call 863-467-2677 between the hours
of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day.
"We ask everybody be patient with us,"
he stressed. If the telephone rings with no
answer, that means the line is in use. It could
take multiple attempts to get through.
When the funds are gone, they are gone.
When the limited amount of money allotted
to the program is spent, the program will be
over.


Commissioners will hear a request to
continue consideration of changes to man-
atee zones in Sarasota County and discuss
potential changes to the permits available to
commercial fishers and professional fishing
guides for higher speed operation in some
manatee zones statewide. Land acquisition
and management issues will also be dis-
cussed. Commissioners will wrap up the
first day with election of a new chairman
and vice chairman for 2010.
Presentations during the second day of
the meeting include a report on options for
future action for reptiles of concern, includ-
ing the Burmese python. Also on Dec. 10, the
Commission will hold a final public hearing
on proposed federal consistency rules to ad-
dress overfishing of grouper in the Atlantic
Ocean off Florida. These rules would de-
crease the aggregate daily recreational bag
limit for all grouper in Atlantic and Monroe
County state waters from five fish to three
fish per person, prohibit the captain and
crew of for-hire vessels from retaining any
species in the aggregate grouper bag limit,
and decrease the aggregate recreational bag
limit for gag and black grouper from two fish
combined to one fish in Atlantic and Monroe
County state waters.
The proposed federal consistency rules
also would prohibit all recreational and com-
mercial harvest of shallow-water groupers
(including gag, black grouper, red grouper,
scamp, red hind, rock hind, coney, graysby,
yellowfin grouper, yellowmouth grouper
and tiger grouper) from Jan. 1 through April
30 in Atlantic and Monroe County state wa-
ters.
In addition, a final public hearing will
take place on a proposed federal consisten-
cy rule that would require dehooking tools
to be aboard commercial and recreational
vessels and used as needed when fishing for
reef fish in Atlantic state waters.
Another final public hearing will take
place on proposed new rules that would be
compatible with an Atlantic States Marine
Fisheries Commission management plan for
Atlantic coastal sharks and enhance current
FWC protective measures for sharks that
inhabit Florida waters. These rules would
prohibit harvest of sandbar, silky and Carib-
bean sharpnose sharks from state waters;
establish a 54-inch fork-length minimum
size limit for all sharks, except Atlantic sharp-


nose, blacknose, bonnethead, finetooth
and blacktip sharks and smooth dogfish;
prohibit removal of shark heads and tails at
sea; allow only hook and line gear to harvest
sharks; and make other technical shark rule
changes.
A final public hearing will also revolve
around proposed rule amendments that
would automatically allow use of new de-
signs of bycatch reduction and turtle exclu-
sion devices in shrimp trawls in state waters
when new designs are certified for use in
adjacent federal waters; restrict the use of
the Florida fisheye to inshore and nearshore
Florida waters, where trawls are limited to
500 square feet; and delete a provision that
allows use of the extended funnel in state
waters. Technical changes to turtle-excluder
device rules are also proposed.
In other marine fisheries action, the Com-
mission will receive reports on permit and
bonefish management issues; consider draft
rules that would prohibit harvest of lemon
sharks from Florida waters and extend the
expiration date of the moratorium on new
spiny lobster commercial dive permits from
July 1, 2010, until July 1, 2015; review and
discuss various federal fishery management
issues; and receive reports on goliath grou-
per and the Marine Recreational Information
Program.
Before adjourning the two-day session,
Commissioners will also examine draft rules
updating boating-restricted areas along the
Florida Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway por-
tion in Palm Beach County.
Its consent agenda for that day includes
approval of division work plans for FWC
divisions of Law Enforcement and Marine
Fisheries Management.
Anyone requiring special accommoda-
tions to participate in the meeting because
of a disability should notify the FWC at least
five days in advance by calling 850-488-6411.
Hearing- or speech-impaired people can
arrange assistance by calling 800-955-8711
(hearing impaired) or 800-955-8770 (voice
impaired).



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'Houdini' sentenced to 50 years in prison


By Eric Kopp
Okeechobee News
On Feb. 6, 2009, Alejandro Perez escaped
from the Okeechobee County Jail and left a
message to law enforcement written down
the left side of his cell door that read: "The
last laugh is the one that counts."
But Perez had no semblance of a smile
on his gaunt face Tuesday, Nov. 24, as Circuit
Court Judge Lawrence Mirman sentenced
him to a total of 50 years in state prison.
Prior to his sentencing, Perez stood shack-
led and surrounded by deputies in front of
the judge and threw himself on the mercy of
the court as he entered a plea of guilty to all
charges against him.
"My future is in your hands," the Miami
native told Judge Mirman.
The judge then pronounced the self-pro-
claimed Houdini guilty of escape and sen-
tenced him to 15 years, which is the maxi-
mum. Perez did receive credit for 193 days
served in the county jail.
In the next case, Judge Mirman found
Perez guilty of possession of contraband in a
county detention facility and sentenced him
to the maximum of 5 years. That sentence,
declared the judge, will run consecutively
with the first sentence.


This conviction stemmed from Perez be-
ing arrested after detention deputies found a
homemade shank under a
mattress in Perez's cell.
"This looks like a poten-
tial murder weapon," said
Judge Mirman of the piece
of chain link fence that had
been sharpened to a point.
In the third case against
Perez-in which he was
Alejandro charged with attempted
Perez escape and criminal mis-
chief-he was again found
guilty and sentenced to a maximum of 15
years on the attempted escape charge and
five years on the criminal mischief charge.
While those two charges will run concur-
rently with each other, the 15-year sentence
will run consecutively with the two other
convictions.
Perez, 46, will receive credit for 311 days
spent in the county jail.
And in the final case-in which Perez
was charged with burglary of a dwelling,
grand theft, possession of burglary tools
and loitering and prowling-he received
the maximum of 15 years on the burglary
charge. He was also sentenced to five years
each on the grand theft and possession of


Okeechobee Arrest Report


burglary tools, with those sentences to run
concurrently with the burglary conviction.
As for the misdemeanor loitering and
prowling charge, Perez was sentenced to 60
days in the county jail. However, that term
was declared fulfilled when Perez was cred-
ited with 326 days for time already served.
Like the other cases, the 15-year sentence
on the burglary charge will run consecutive-
ly with the other sentences.
Assistant State Attorney Ashley Albright
told the judge that the state was seeking a
maximum penalty of 65 years, while Public
Defender Stanley Glenn told Judge Mirman
that he felt like a total of 15 years "would be
fair."
Perez was first arrested in Okeechobee
County on Dec. 16, 2008, after a brazen day-
light burglary of a home on Eagle Bay Drive.
He then tried to escape from the county jail
on Jan. 1, 2009, by breaking out a window.
At 2:21 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 6, 2009, Perez
escaped from the county jail while in the fa-
cility's outdoor recreation yard. Later, deten-
tion deputies found a message from Perez
scrawled above his cell door. It read: "Your
job is to keep me here. My job is to find a
way out of here."
It was signed "Houdini."
Perez was captured in Palm Beach Coun-
ty on Feb. 24 by the United States Marshal's


Service Florida Regional Fugitive Task Force.
He was taken into custody as he crawled out
the bathroom window of a home in a rural
part of that county.
When arrested, Perez was found to be in
possession of 2 grams of cocaine and was
then charged with possession of cocaine.
On April 30, Perez entered a plea of guilty to
that charge. He was then credited with the
61 days he had served in the Palm Beach
County Jail and returned to Okeechobee
County.
Perez has a long criminal history that in-
cludes convictions on such charges as armed
burglary, trafficking in marijuana over 10,000
pounds, driving under the influence and two
separate convictions on cocaine possession
charges.
"The only thing mitigating here is your
behavior in court," said Judge Mirman to the
thin man garbed in his orange county jail
jumpsuit. "'Cause there is a stark contrast
between that and everything else in your
case."
And with that, Judge Mirman took away
Houdini's freedom.


The following individuals were arrested
on felony or driving under the influence (DUI)
charges by the Okeechobee County Sheriff's
Office (OCSO), the Okeechobee City Police
Department (OCPD), the Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP), the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) or the Department of
Corrections (DOC).
Efrain Jesus Tyson, 19, U.S. 441 N.,
Okeechobee, was arrested Nov. 20 by Trooper
T.D. Burk on an Okeechobee County warrant
charging him with the felonies of burglary of a
dwelling, grand theft (two counts) and giving
false information to a pawnbroker. His total bond
on these charges was set at $15,000. Tyson
was later arrested by Deputy Yamil Astacio on
a Highlands County warrant charging him with
dealing in stolen property and giving false in-
formation to a pawnbroker. His bond on these
charges was set at $6,000.
Tracy Allen Hill, 26, S.R. 70 E., Okeechobee,
was arrested Nov. 20 by Deputy Arlene Durbin
on a charge of child abuse. His bond was set at
$5,000.
Freddie L. Jones, 15, N.W. Ninth St.,
Lauderdale Lakes, was arrested Nov. 20 by
Deputy Corporal Chris Hans on a charge of bat-
tery on detention staff. After being booked into

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Board Certified Criminial Trial Lawyer

Now Accepting
Felony Cases
in Okeechobee
County


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the Okeechobee County Jail, Jones was taken
to the Department of Juvenile Justice Detention
Center in Fort Pierce.
Brandon L. Wells, 19, Okeechobee, was ar-
rested Nov. 20 by Officer Kelley Margerum on a
charge of burglary of an occupied dwelling. His
bond was set at $30,000.
Daniel Morvant, 22, N.E. 290th Trail,
Okeechobee, was arrested Nov. 20 by Deputy
Greg Popovich on a St. Lucie County warrant
charging him with aggravated battery. His bond
was set at $20,000.
Armando De Jesus Silva, 30, N.W. 16th
Ave., Okeechobee, was arrested Nov. 21 by
Deputy Yamil Astacio on charges of driving un-
der the influence and no valid driver's license.
His bond was set at $1,000.
Karen Wilkes Treece, 42, N.W. 84th Court,
Okeechobee, was arrested Nov. 21 by Deputy
Yamil Astacio on a charge of driving under the in-
fluence. Her bond was set at $500.
This column lists arrests and not convictions,
unless otherwise stated. Anyone listed here who
is later found innocent or has had the charges
against them dropped is welcome to inform this
newspaper. The information will be confirmed
and printed.







TREASURE COAST

CRIME

STOPPED


Teen accused of attacking mom with crowbar


By Eric Kopp
Okeechobee News
A girl was arrested and booked into the
Okeechobee County Jail after she allegedly
tried to hit her mother with a crow bar and
threatened to kill her.
Layla Huff, 16, N.W 35th Ave., was ar-
rested Monday, Nov. 23, on a felony charge
of aggravated assault. After being booked
into the county jail, Huff was taken to the
Department of Juvenile Justice Detention
Center in Fort Pierce.
According to an arrest report by Deputy
Tammy Serafini, of the Okeechobee County
Sheriff's Office (OCSO), Huff "woke up in a
bad mood and began cursing and yelling"
at her mother. At some point the mother
slapped her daughter in the face, at which
point Huff then slapped her mother.
After the girl had picked up a kitchen


NOTICE TO

OKEECHOBEE

LANDFILL CUSTOMERS

Holiday hours

for

Thanksgiving Day

5 a.m. 12 p.m.


chair and thrown it, her stepdad removed
her from the house, the report continues.
Huff then began to bang on a window
so her mother and stepdad went outside.
Once outside, Huff armed herself with a
crowbar and tried to hit her mother, stated
the report. Another man grabbed the tool
and jerked it away from Huff. This motion
caused the crowbar to hit Huff on the side
of the head and leave a scrape behind her
right ear.
Deputy Serafini stated that at this point
Huff spit in her stepdad's face and threat-
ened to kill her mother "when she got back
from wherever she was going."
Huff was taken to Raulerson Hospi-
tal where the scrape behind her ear was
treated and she was released, stated the
deputy's report.


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November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News




4 Okeechobee News


OPINION


Public Forum/Speak Out


Letters to the editor


Speak Out has moved online, where
it is quicker and easier to share your
ideas and converse with others. Go to
www.newszap.com, click on the com-
munity name and your local or state
Public Forum. There, you can create
new topics or comment on existing
topics. What follows is a sampling of
some of the discussions currently tak-
ing place. Thanks for participating!

Electricity
Is anyone else's power fluctuating
wildly?
We have been having almost daily
power issues. I come home and all of the
clocks are blinking and the satellite boxes
are re-set from power failure.
I think the power outages are part of
life in Florida. We solved the problem by get-
ting battery back-up surge protectors for the
computers, television, clocks, stereo, etc.
If the power flickers, the battery keeps the
power steady for up to 30 minutes. Most of
the outages are just a few seconds but that
flicker is enough to make electrical appli-
ances turn on and off.

H1N1
I am very disappointed that the county
did not give people very much notice about
the H1N1 flu shots. Many people wanted
their older children to have the shot but did
not find out in time. I hope they offer the
shots again soon. I worry that Okeechobee
County is not getting the vaccine the way the
places on the coast are. We always seem to
be the red-headed step child.

EOC
I know the county is taking a lot of criti-
cism about the plans for the new emergency
operations center. But people don't seem to
understand that thhe current EOC is in the
old hospital building, which has asbestos in
the ceilings. During one of the hurricanes in
2004 or 2005, part of the building was dam-
aged by the storm. We were very lucky that
we did not have any bad storms this year, but
we have to be prepared for emergencies.

What are you thankful for?
I am thankful for my own family and for
my church family. It is rare these days to find
a church that acts like a family loving you
no matter what, taking care of each other,
being there when someone needs help.


This Thanksgiving, I am thankful for our
military service men and women who risk
their own lives to protect this country. We
need to remember them in our prayers and
by writing letters and supporting programs
that send care packages to the troops.

Flu shots
The following information is related to
the Seasonal Flu vaccination. The Okeecho-
bee County Health Department will have
additional HINI flu vaccination clinics as
soon as vaccine becomes available. There
is no charge for H1N1 vaccine administered
by the Health Department. The Okeechobee
County Health Department has concluded
its flu shot clinics for this year, those who
have still not taken the shot should contact
their physician. Some vaccine remains at the
health department and will be available by
appointment while it lasts for a $25.00 fee.
Medicare is accepted for the flu shot. Flu sea-
son runs from October through March, often
peaking in February. Each year, between 5
percent and 20 percent of the U.S. popula-
tion will come down with the flu, leading to
36,000 flu-related deaths and 200,000 flu-re-
lated hospitalizations. If more Americans get
their flu shots, those numbers can go down.
High-risk patients are encouraged to get
their Flu shots early for the greatest amount
of protection. That group includes, but is not
limited to: People 65 years and older; People
who live in nursing homes and other long-
term care facilities that house those with
long-term illnesses; Adults with chronic
heart or lung conditions, including asthma;
Adults who needed regular medical care or
were in a hospital dur-
ing the previous year
because of a metabolic
disease (like diabetes),
chronic kidney disease,
or weakened immune
system (including im-
mune system problems
caused by medicines or
by infection with hu-
man immunodeficiency virus (HIV/AIDS);
Women who will be pregnant during the
influenza season: People with any condition
that can compromise respiratory function or
the handling of respiratory secretions (that
is, a condition that makes it hard to breathe
or swallow, such as brain injury or disease,
spinal cord injuries, seizure disorders, or
other nerve or muscle disorders.) For More
Information Please Contact the Okeecho-
bee County Health Department at; 863-462-
5819.


Higher taxes, Stop spending!
All we see that our taxes are going up
every time we turn around, one must ask
when it will stop. The answer is when, We
The People say no more with our vote. The
question is who can we trust when we do
vote? The simple answer to me is not one
in a hundred of those in office. If only we
could find such individuals to run we could
support.
Bynow those of us, some 19,000 accounts
in Okeechobee County who have received
our property tax bills, have you figured out
what kind of increase we received? First the
county has reduced their budget some 10
million for this year. Yet my county only tax
bill went up 10.46 percent; my local tax and
non-ad valorem bill went up 19.83 percent.
In this, my garbage went up 48 percent, this
may be the only real value/service I can see
receiving every week. (This is not based on
City tax structures, only county).
Okeechobee County Commissioners
need to take a position, a tax responsible
position, no new spending. Stop building
government and start reducing cost. No, we
do not need an EOC facility for $3 million
plus any more than we needed the $8 mil-
lion Agri-Civic Center. No, we do not need
to pay administration and department heads
salaries of $75,000 to $150,000 a year when
the average salary in the county is $30,000 a
year or less.
It is way past time for We The People to
keep our incomes to purchase goods and
services from business in our community to
create jobs. A job freeze and spending cut
backs are needed by all aspects of govern-
ment. 2010 will be a big election year for all
of us. I will not support any party only the in-
dividuals who run and most of whom are in
office I will not vote for due to their records.
You need to decide and talk with your fam-
ily and friends about this issue or just keep
paying.
Tom Murphy, Tax payer


Thanks for being a veteran
Dear Grandpa,
I just wanted to take a moment to appre-
ciate you as a veteran. So often we get busy
with our lives and forget about the people
that helped us to make our everyday activi-
ties so great. On any given day I am free to
come and go from place to place without
fear because of the me and women like you
that dedicated yourselves to our country.
When I look at my everyday life, I think
the freedom I appreciate the most is the free-
dom of religion. I appreciate that the most
because I can express it every day. For ex-
ample, I can bring my Bible to school. Also, I
can read it without getting it taken away and
I thank you for that. So again, I appreciate
that you fought for our country.
Love,
Justin Helms

Music to their ears
Okeechobee was truly blessed with a
wealth of outstanding music Saturday night
at the Church of Our Savior. The evening
began in the courtyard with the wonderful
sounds of the Chobee Steelers, Okeecho-
bee's own steel drum band, under the di-
rection of Shirlean Graham and Maggie
Sandoval. This was followed by the Cuvier
Trio from FAU playing a concert of baroque
music featuring a guitar, recorder, flute and
organ. The finale was a terrific arrangement
of the Pachelbel Canon played by the very
talented teaching staff of Okeechobee Music,
Inc. Okeechobee is very fortunate to have
concerts of such high quality. Thank you to
Kevin Kinnaird, Music Director of Church of
Our Savior and all the talented musicians.
We'll hope for many more such concerts.
Jan Fehrman


Hospice to host special yard sale

Hospice of Okeechobee (411 S.E. Fourth Street) dirt cheap (prices start at only 10 cents per item).
will hold a Special Yard Sale on Monday, Nov. 30 While you are there enjoy the Festival of Trees
and Tuesday, Dec. 1, from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. They and shop the Christmas Country Store -there is
have new items i. -ii. . i at extremely reason no charge for admission. Funds raised will benefit
able prices! Shop at our "Christmas Flea Market" patient care, including services at The Hamrick
(outside under the Carport) where every item is Home. For information call 863-467-2321.


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OF: %tia,


Wednesday, November 25, 2009




November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News


Fall ramblings: A season for everything wild


By Rodney Baretto
Chairman
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission
Snowbirds migrating to Florida might
be the most obvious signs of the onset of
fall for some full-time residents of the state,
but wildlife is also keenly reactive to the ac-
companying seasonal changes that include
shorter days and cooler weather. We've
written before about cold fronts and their
effects on migratory birds, but almost all
wildlife responds to fall seasonal changes,
though sometimes in dissimilar fashion. So
do people.
As for birds, Neotropical migrants are set-
ting up shop locally for the winter or fueling
up for a longer trip to the Caribbean or South
America. Local bird feeders are being visited


by many species, and increased numbers of
ducks, other migratory waterfowl and wad-
ing birds dot our large lakes, rivers, beaches
and freshwater ponds and tidal marshes.
As for birds of prey, northern harriers can
be seen actively gliding over marsh areas,
and Cooper's hawks will be on the prowl
for the new feeding opportunities brought
on by the vast migration of smaller bird spe-
cies into Florida. Eagles are engaged in spec-
tacular aerial courtships, while their osprey
cousins rebuild nests, high on a wide variety
of naked perches close to their fishing sites.
Not surprisingly, people react to these
fall migrations too, by putting out backyard
feeders to attract birds. But don't be sur
prised if your backyard bird feeder creates
an ambush point for birds of prey like Coo-
per's hawks. That's Mother Nature -- sort of.


Festival of Trees set to open


Hospice of Okeechobee (411 SE Fourth
Street) will be hosting the annual Festival of
Trees starting Friday, Nov. 27 through Sun-
day, Dec. 6. Open daily with no charge for
admission. Hours are noon 4 p.m. Friday,
Nov 27, followed by noon-4 p.m. on the
weekends and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on week-


days. While you are there enjoying all the
many gloriously decorated Christmas trees,
do not forget to shop the Christmas Coun-
try Store. Funds raised will benefit patient
care, including services at The Hamrick
Home. For information call 863-467-2321.


Safe food handling important during holidays


The Florida Department of Health
emphasizes the importance of safe food
preparation as well as safe food storage
this holiday season. Proper food handling
and proper cooking can reduce the risks of
food-borne illnesses.
"The Department of Health promotes
the importance of safe food preparation
and storage techniques year-round, but
we encourage Floridians to refresh their
knowledge of food safety during the holi-
day season," said State Surgeon General
Ana M. Viamonte Ros, M.D., M.P.H. "For
health and safety reasons, foods should be
cooked thoroughly and leftovers should be
stored properly."
Reduce the risk of contracting food-
borne illnesses by following these tips:
Avoid improper food storage, which
can be a result of inadequate refrigeration
temperature or hot holding temperature.
Safe refrigeration temperature is less than


41 degrees Fahrenheit and safe hot holding
temperature is greater than 140 degrees
Fahrenheit.
Keep uncooked meats away from
other foods to avoid cross contamination.
Cook food thoroughly. For example, a
whole turkey should be cooked at an oven
temperature of 325 degrees Fahrenheit un-
til every part reaches an internal tempera-
ture of 165 degrees Fahrenheit as identified
by a meat thermometer.
Wash your hands and fingernails
completely and thoroughly.
Clean and sanitize all cutting utensils,
countertops and serving areas.
The Florida Department of Health
(FDOH) promotes, protects and improves
the health of all people in Florida. For more
information about food safety, please visit
the following website: www.doh.state.
fl.us/environment/community/food/.


Community Calendar


Wednesday
Martha's House support groups meet each
Wednesday. Spanish groups meet from 7 until 8
p.m. at the Okeechobee Christian Church, 3055
S.E. 18th Terrace. Ana Romero is the group fa-
cilitator. Another group meets in the Okeechobee
County Health Department, 1798 N.W. Ninth
Ave., from 5 until 6 p.m. with Irene Luck as the
group facilitator. There is another meeting from 6
until 7 p.m. with Shirlean Graham as the facilita-
tor. For information, call 863-763-2893.
A.A. meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at Sacred


Heart Catholic Church, 701 S.W. Sixth St. It will
be a closed discussion.
N.A. meeting at 8 p.m. at the Just For Today
Club of Okeechobee, 101 Fifth Ave. For informa-
tion call 863-634-4780.
Bingo at the Buckhead Ridge Moose Lodge.
Food will be served at 5 p.m. and bingo starts at
6 p.m. Public is welcome.

Thursday
Happy Thanksgiving!


Bird feeders also can create health prob-
lems for migrating birds, so don't forget to
clean your bird feeders regularly with a 10-
precent solution of chlorine bleach to help
prevent the spread of disease. We owe it to
these tiny migrating birds, some having sur-
vived a grueling 2,000-mile journey punctu-
ated by bad weather and other life-threaten-
ing issues, not to let them to become victims
of reckless human kindness by feeding them
in unsanitary conditions.
To top off the aerobatic bird festival, ma-
jestic sandhill cranes and white pelicans add
to the variety of air show performers taking
up winter residence.
Remember, there are good reasons not
to feed either of these species, neither of
which benefit from the practice. Deliberately
feeding pelicans at fish-cleaning stations is
illegal. Feeding sandhill cranes anywhere is
illegal.
As for reptiles, including native snakes,
alligators, turtles and a variety of other cold-
blooded animals, the season for high activ-
ity is winding down. Just don't forget that
though the metabolic rates of cold-blooded
animals decrease with temperature, alliga-
tors are still capable of acting as apex preda-
tors, and all cautions in the FWC's "Living
With Alligators" brochure, need to be ob-
served with due respect.
On the other hand, mammals are quite
active during the fall, and that includes the
Florida black bear. Although black bears


Okeechobee News newspaper by
purchasing an e-subscription.
It's less than 50 cents per issue.
You'll receive an email with a live
link to the latest issue.
This will allow you to read the entire
newspaper online -
even when you're traveling.

Please call 1-800-2828586
or subscribe online at
http://circulation.newszap.com


don't hibernate in Florida, they prepare for
it by entering a period of activity in the fall,
called hyperphagia. Hyperphagia is a be-
havior in all black bears that causes them
to feed at twice the normal daily rate they
need to maintain themselves. This behavior
is likely the result of a gene that causes bears
to put on weight in preparation for a hiber-
nation period that in Florida, never comes.
Here, the caution to residents living in bear
country is to secure all trash and pet food
in places and in ways that cannot attract a
bear. Appreciating wildlife from a distance
beats appreciating it from inside your lanai
or garage, especially if it's a bear.
Deer, hogs and squirrels are feeding ac-
tively, and of course, that signals the onset of
hunting season. Hunters were the first con-
servationists, and like all conservationists,
hunters have a vested interest in seeing that
all wildlife, whether it is hunted or not, con-
tinues to proliferate. Obeying the letter and
the intent of the law, and insisting your hunt-
ing partners do the same, is a great starting
place from which to build an appreciation
of all wildlife.
Be you a snowbird, bird watcher, hunter,
all around nature lover, pet owner or just
somebody who appreciates living in the
Sunshine State, fall is a time of thanksgiving
and of wildlife. Enjoy!





Accident Victims...

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Phones answered
24-Hours, 7 days-a-week!


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AC IE TLWOFCSO




6 Okeechobee News November 25, 2009


Community Events

Hamfest in the Woods
Okeechobee Amateur Radio Club will
host a Hamfest in the Woods on Saturday,
Nov. 28 at Freedom Ranch, 11655 U.S. 441
SE. Enjoy a $6 breakfast of eggs, sausage,
gravy, biscuits and coffee. From 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. a cracker cowboy meal of roast beef,
mashed potatoes, beans, slaw, dessert and
drink will be served for $10. In addition to
the hamfest, at 10 am. Gordie Peer, former
western movie stuntman, will be entertain-
ing with whip and rope tricks. There will also
be bluegrass music. RV parking is $30 for Fri-
day night. Please RSVP as space is limited.
RVers wishing to experience Church-in-the-
Woods may stay over Saturday night at no
charge. Sunday lunch is free. Tent campers
are $15. All proceeds from entry fees go to
the Okeechobee Amateur Radio Club. Pro-
ceeds from campers and food sale go to Al-
pha Ministries. For more information email
w4qjp@sstowers.com or call 863-763-9800.
For more information on Alpha Ministries
visit www.alphaministries.org.

December safety classes
The Okeechobee Service Center of the
American Red Cross will be holding the fol-
lowing Health & Safety classes in Decem-
ber:
Tuesday, Dec. 1 First Aid Basics at 6
p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 9 Infant/Child CPR/
AED at 6 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 14 Adult CPR/AED at 6
p.m.
All classes are held at their Service Cen-
ter, located at 323 N. Parrott Ave. To register,
or for more information call 863-763-2488.

Okeechobee County Legislative
Delegation Public Meeting
The Okeechobee County Legislative Del-
egation will hold a public meeting from 1 to
3 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 2 at the Okeecho-
bee County Health Department Auditorium,
1728 NW 9th Ave. The delegation will be
entertaining concerns and ideas for poten-
tial legislation. Members of the community,
as well as local and county government may
address the delegation at this time. You may
address the delegation by signing in when
you arrive and you will be heard on a first
come first serve basis at the end of the meet-
ing if time allows.

Friends of the Library hold
book sale
Friends of the Okeechobee Library Book
Sale will be held on Thursday, Dec. 3, from
10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday, Dec. 4, from 10
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 5, from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the library. This year
books and videos will be sold for a dollar a
pound except on Saturday when they will be
sold for $2 a bag or $5 a box. This is a major
fund-raiser for the Friends of the Okeecho-
bee Library. These funds are used to help
the library. For more information please call
at the library at 863-763-3636.


Fishing Tournament
The monthly Christian Team Trails Fish-
ing Tournament will take place on Saturday,
Dec. 5 at Okee-Tantie Campground and
Marina. Fishermen can register at Oakview
Baptist Church, 677 SW 32nd St., Monday
through Thursday, The cost is $75 per per-
son.

ReStore needs volunteers
Habitat for Humanity is in need of volun-
teers for their ReStore that is open on Satur-
day and Sunday from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. If
you can help call Shirley at 863-467-6484 or
863-801-5077.

Local pet rescue needs help
The Humane Society Pet Rescue of
Okeechobee needs help to keep our shelter
a great place for adoptable pets to stay. We
are also in need of donations to help with
food, vet and other operating expenses. Any-
one interested in helping is asked to contact
Belinda at the shelter at 863-357-1104.

Senior employment
opportunities available
AARP/Senior Community Service Em-
ployment Program (SCSEP) have some
openings in the scsep program. Applicants
must be 55 or older and be within the in-
come guidelines of the program. Please call
772-336-3330.

Low cost spay/neuter
available
Low cost spay/neuter vouchers for dogs
and cats. Participating veterinarians in Vero
Beach. For information, call United Hu-
manitarians Port St. Lucie volunteer: 772-
335-3786. Email: Petscryl@bellsouth.net.
Okeechobee veterinarians are invited to
participate in this low cost spay/neuter pro-
gram.

Raulerson Hospital
announces Ambassadors Club
Raulerson Hospital is inviting Okeecho-
bee Residents to join the Raulerson Hospital
Ambassadors Club. Raulerson Hospital is
your community hospital and we welcome
individual volunteers who would like to
participate in regularly scheduled meetings
where your unbiased feedback will help us
provide excellent patient care during your
stay or a loved one's stay. We are looking
for dedicated individuals, who have either
been a patient or a visitor at Raulerson Hos-
pital. If you would like to participate in this
progressive community program, please
contact Marnie Lauter at 863-824-2702 or by
e-mailing Marnie Lauter at: (marnie.lauter@
hcahealthcare.com) for more information.

Red Hat Ladies invites new members
Join the Red Hat Ladies social group. La-
dies interested in have fun meeting new Red
Hat Ladies are invited to come tour Red Hat
meeting and find out what it's all about. Call
Marilyn for more information at 863-357-
1944 or Mari at 863-763-5836.


Big Brothers support reading
mentor program
Big Brothers Big Sisters, along with Ameri
corp volunteers, will serve all five Okeechobee
elementary schools for the 2009-2010 school
year! The program provides reading mentors
to referred children in grades K 3. BBBS is host
ing a Clay Shoot at Quail Creek Plantation on
Saturday, Oct. 24. I hope you can support this
program and the children in Okeechobee by
sponsoring, donating a drawing item or shoot


ing at this event. Contact Sharon Vinson at
Shared Services at 863-462-5000 ext 257.

Habitat needs resale items
Habitat for Humanity of Okeechobee Coun
ty is getting ready to open a "Restore" and is in
need of resellable items. No clothing! Anything
else for the home, to include household items,
furniture, building materials, electrical, plumb
ing and cabinets. For more information call
863-467-6484 or leave a message at the Habitat
office 863-467-6484.


Obituaries


Obituaries should be submitted to
the Okeechobee News by e mailing
obits@newszap.com. Customers may also
request photos and links to online guest
books. A link to the obituaries is available at
www.newszap.com.


Courtland Palmer Satterley
OKEECHOBEE -Courtland "Pete Palmer
Satterley, age 72, of ('i.. . il 1i died Saturday,
Nov. 21, 2009, in Raulerson Hospital.
Born Aug. 5, 1937, in Brooklyn, N.Y, he had
been a resident for the last 35 years. He was a
member of the Ogdensburg-Acacian Masonic
Lodge #128 in Ogdensburg, New York. Pete
was the nursing supervisor at Raulerson Hospi-
tal for over 15 years. In addition he and his wife,
Irene owned and operated the Buckhead Ridge
Nursing Services until their retirement. He was a
licensed Boat Captain and was known around
(II., . i, i .- as Santa.
He was preceded in death by his wife, Irene
Satterley.
He is survived by his daughter, Pamela Morley
and her husband Timothy of Ogdensburg, N.Y;
sons, Steven Seeley of Ft. Lauderdale, and
Thomas Seeley and his wife Marlene of Ham-
burg, N.J.; grandchildren, Matthew Morley, Marc
Morley, Brooke Morley, Aaron Seeley, Leeah
Satterley; great-grandchildren, Jack Morley, Jor-
dan Morley; sisters, Cathy Taylor of Long Island,
N.Y, and Lynn Young of Tennessee.
There will be no public visitation or service.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may
be made to Big Lake Hospice, 3543 Highway
441S, (i. i. ., Fl 34974.
All arrangements are under the direction and
care of the Buxton Funeral Home and Cremato-
ry, 110 NE 5th Street, (i., ii. .i.. On-line con-
dolences may be made at
www.buxtonfuneralhome.com.

Cynthia Davidson, 44
OKEECHOBEE -Cynthia Davidson, age 44,
of ('i.... i-.l i died Thursday, Nov. 19, 2009,
in the Hamrick Home. She was Sept. 8, 1965, in
Trenton, Mich.
She was preceded in death by her parents, Bil-
ly and Martha Dodd.
She is survived by her daughter, Jennifer Dav-
idson; sons, Michael William Suggs, Clayton
Thomas Davison; aunt, Belva Boyd; companion,
Ray Davis; and two grandchildren, all of Okee-
chobee.
There will be a memorial service at a later
date.
All arrangements are under the direction and
care of the Buxton Funeral Home and Cremato-
ry, 110 NE 5th Street, Okeechobee, Fl. On-line
condolences may be made at www.buxtonfu-
neralhome.com.


Ethel Mae Surles
OKEECHOBEE -Ethel Mae Surles, of Okee-
chobee and Waltham, Maine, died peacefully
surrounded by family, Friday, Nov. 20, 2009.
Born Oct. 27, 1930, in Waltham, Maine, she
had been a resident of Okeechobee for the past
15 years.
Ethel was a beloved mother and Nana, and
devoted her life to nursing. After graduating
from nursing school in Boston, she started her
career at Hurley Hospital in Ellsworth and
worked several years at Maine Coast Memorial
Hospital in Ellsworth, before relocating to Okee-
chobee where she worked at Okeechobee
Health Care Facility until she retired.
She was predeceased by her husbands, Ray-
mond Grindle, and John Surles; son, Ross Grin-
die; daughter, Celeste Cote; sisters, Beulah
Herbest, and Mary Wilbur; and brother, Newell
Hardison Jr.
She is survived by her son, Raymond Grindle
of Aurora; daughters, Cheryle Dyer of Trenton,
Candyce Wilbur and husband Allen of East-
brook, Cathye Folsom of ('i. .. i-i,,. grand-
children, John Hart Jr. and wife Joni, Kimberly
Spratt, Karessa Folsom, Mackenzie Ray and
companion Chris Leland, Jerimy Grindle, Misty
Cornwell and husband Shane, Tara Hart and
companion Timothy Mason, Danielle Flaig and
husband Scott, Paul Cote, Scott Cote, Christie
Grindle and Jamie Grindle; 15 great-grandchil-
dren; a brother, Richard Hardison and wife Eve-
lyn of Waltham; a sister, Lucille Jordan of
Waltham; and a host of nieces, nephews, and
friends. A gathering will be held from 4 to 8
p.m., Sunday, Nov. 29, at Brahma Bull Restau-
rant, ( i., .i I ,. A service will be held at a lat-
er date.
All arrangements are under the direction and
care of Buxton Funeral Home and Crematory,
110 NE 5th St., Okeechobee. Online condolenc-
es may be made at www.buxtonfuneral-
home.com.







with
-an-
Online Guestbook
All Obituaries now include Online Guesbooks
where family and friends can share reflections,








Motorcycle group hits the road to help kids


Led by a retired Army combat veteran, a
group of motorcycle riders has taken to the
road to recruit volunteers to serve as advo-
cates for neglected and abused children in
Treasure Coast courtrooms.
The group was started a few months
ago when Pattra Farthing-Dodd, Volunteer
Recruiter/Trainer for the Guardian ad Litem
Program (GALP) in the 19th Judicial Circuit,
learned that a number of the program's vol-
unteers were riders. She thought it might be
a good way for them to socialize and share
common interests, and she approached vol-
unteer Michael Desouza, owner of a 2008
Vulcan with the idea.
Mr. Desouza, who retired from the United
States Army as a Military Command Sergeant
Major after 22 years of service, including tours
of duty in Vietnam, Grenada and Panama, had


DOT plans


roadway


project


just recently become a Volunteer Guardian ad
Litem, but he didn't hesitate. Within a week,
the group was formed and ready to roll. Mr.
Desouza said, "During my travels I realized
the plight of abused children, regardless of
country or culture. Children always seem to
be suffering quietly, either in war or peace.
My decision to be a GAL Volunteer was never
an option; if I can help one child during my
tenure it is worthwhile to me."
Known as the "Guardian Riders," the
group now has eight members, and rides at
least once a month, usually on a Saturday or
a Sunday. Destinations are predetermined via
email by the team, which meets up at the Fly-
ing J Truck stop in Fort Pierce and heads out
from there for places like Archie's Seabreeze
in South Beach or Lake Okeechobee. Along
the way, they hand out brochures and spread
the word about the program.
"Wherever we go, we meet people who
care about kids, just like we do," said Mr. Des-
ouza, "and the more people we can talk to
about Guardian ad Litem, the more kids we
can help."
In between rides, they meet monthly at
other locations, also selected by consensus,
but the agenda always includes a tasty meal.
For example, their last meeting was at Nor-
ris's Famous Place for Ribs in Port Saint Lu-
cie.
While their immediate objective is to pro-
mote awareness of the Guardian ad Litem
Program, the "Guardian Riders" also have


other goals. Future plans include weekly
meet-ups at Starbuck's on U.S. 1 at Britt Road
and helping with fund-raising efforts-and
the group is developing a special badge for
their jackets.
Florida's Guardian ad Litem Program is
a network of professional staff and commu-
nity volunteers who serve as advocates for
neglected and abused children in the court
system.


There are local Guardian ad Litem pro-
grams in all 20 of Florida's judicial circuits.
Guardian ad Litem volunteers, and the attor-
neys working with them, make sure victims
of child abuse and neglect are protected and
have a safe place to live and the necessary
services to overcome their circumstances.
For additional information, contact Pattra
Farthing-Dodd at 772-871-7225, or visit our
website www. GuardianadLitem.org.

i


'4 '" "tSpecial to the keechobee News
Michael Desouza leads the group of motorcycle riders who serve as advocates
for neglected and abused children in Treasure Coast courtrooms.


IT'S ABOUT RESPECT
IT'S ABOUT DIGNITY
IT'S ABOUT LOVE


tion is planning an intersection project for
U.S. Highway 441 S.E. at S.E. 18th Terrace.
Construction will begin Nov. 30. Drivers are
urged to use caution during this project,
which is anticipated to be complete by the
end of December.
This project will improve the safety and
operation of this roadway. Improvements
include: Additional turn lanes, milling and
resurfacing of the roadway and drainage im-
provements.
For more information, contact DOT rep-
resentative Cindy Clemmons at 863-519-
2362 or email cindy.clemmons@dot.state.
fl.us; or, FDOT Project Administrator Susan
Hindman at 863-386-6112 or email susan.
hindman@ dot.state.fl.us.


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Licensed by the State of Florida since 1984
(239) 482-4673 (800) 835-1673
www.hopehospice.org


November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News





Okeechobee News November 25, 2009


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November 25, 2009 Okeechobee News


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Okeechobee News


0EECI
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10 Okeechobee News November 25, 2009

In the military ... /// /\ ,,"A \\\


Local reservist comes home
Army Reserve Maj. Tamara R. Kurey has
returned to the U.S. after being deployed
overseas at a forward operating base in sup-
port of Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Operation Iraqi Freedom is the official
name given to military operations involving
members of the U.S. armed forces and co-
alition forces participating in efforts to free


and secure Iraq. Mission objectives focus on
force protection, peacekeeping, stabiliza-
tion, security and counter-insurgency opera-
tions as the Iraqi transitional governing bod-
ies assume full sovereign powers to govern
the peoples of Iraq.
Members from all branches of the U.S.
military and multinational forces are also
assisting in rebuilding Iraq's economic and
governmental infrastructure, and training


Special to the Okeechobee News
Recognizing our veterans
North Elementary School honored veterans on Wednesday, Nov. 11. Pictured
left to right are Pat McCoy, Principal; Dan Fennell, American Legion Post 64;
Ron Price, VFW Post 4423 and Denise Carrier, formerly in the U.S. Navy.


and preparing Iraqi military and security
forces to assume full authority and responsi-
bility in defending and preserving Iraq's sov-
ereignty and independence as a democracy.
Kurey, an all source intelligence officer, is
normally assigned to the 338th Military In-
telligence Battalion, San Antonio, Texas. She
has 19 years of military service.
She is the daughter of Andrew G. Kurey
of Decatur, Tenn., and Lela D. Arvant of
Okeechobee.
The major graduated in 1989 from Co-
lonial High School, Orlando and received a
bachelor's degree in 1998 from the Univer-
sity of Arizona, Tucson.



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V You Are Invited to Attenci
The 5th Sunday
Community Service
Sponsored by the Okeechobee
Ministerial Association
Sunday, Nov. 29th
at 6 p.m.
at The Gathering
1735 SW 24th Ave. -
(Eagle Bay Road)

Rev. Mike Brown, Pastor
of The Gathering,
will be preaching
and the Okeechobee
Community Choir and
Okeechobee Presbyterian
Quartet will be singing.

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ANNIVERSARY
RUTH ECKE &
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arl & Ruth Ecke will celebrate
their 50th Wedding Anniversary,
November 21,2009. Several cel-
ebrations have been planned in their
honor. One with their son, John, daugh-
ter-in-law, Judy and friends in Rogers,
Ark. A second one in Okeechobee
with sister, Jean McNeeley, brother, Bill
Becker and wife, Barbara of Antioch,
Ill., and nephew, Dan McNeeley and
wife, Deb of Lakeland, Fla. A third cel-
ebration will be with old friends Mr.
and Mrs. L. Lichter of Chicago and
Mr. and Mrs.. H. Weinmann of Vero
Beach, all three of these couples will
be celebrating their 50th Anniversary.


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Fish Filet $7.50, Dolphin $8.50
Shrimp $9, Catfish $8, Clams $8


Fish Wrap
Seasoned Skipjack fish fillet
tossed in Skipjack sauce,
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November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News


..MALb..


.. 4 4 0A A AW








Tantie Schoolhouse centennial observed


The Okeechobee Historical Society is cel-
ebrating the one hundredth birthday of the
Tantie schoolhouse, Thursday, Dec. 3, at the
Historical Museum. The museum is located
at 1850 Highway 98 North (across from the
Civic Center)
Fourth grade students from Seminole Ele-
mentary School will tour the site in the morn-
ing and the public is invited from 1:00 P M.
until 3:00 P.M. Coffee mugs with a depiction
of the Tantie school on them will be available
for $5.00.


The Tantie Schoolhouse was constructed
in 1909 in what is now Okeechobee. Prior to
the building of this wooden structure, classes
were held in a thatched roof shack with split
log benches for seats Beginning in 1898,
this served the few pupils until this one room
schoolhouse was built in 1909. The settlement
itself was first called "The Bend" (this was ap-
parently a descriptive name for the area be-
cause of the curve of the land border formed


special to me UKeecnoDee iNews/www.Iamartn.com
The Tantie Schoolhouse was constructed in 1909. Prior to the building of this
wooden structure, classes were held in a thatched roof shack with split log
benches for seats.


by the Kissimmee River, Lake Okeechobee rized in 1902, carried the name "Tantie" for
and Taylor Creek). The third teacher to teach a time. Tantie was renamed to Okeechobee
the students in this area was Tantie Huckaby in 1911 which seemed to more acceptable to
and the little village and its post office, autho- the local residents.

OHS finishes fifth at state finals


By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
The Okeechobee boys cross country
team equaled their best finish ever at the
FHSAA Florida Finals Cross Country Cham-
pionships on Saturday at Little Everglades
Ranch in Dade City.
Eddie Guerrero finished 15th overall in
the race with a solid time of 16:22.74. Matt
Mizereck of Leon High School in Tallahas-
see won the race with a blistering pace of
15:21.64
Adrian Leon finished in 48th place with
a time of 16:52. Mauro Dominguez finished
53rd with a time of 16:56. Augustin Leon
finished 73rd with a time of 17:18. Lionel
Jones finished off the team with a 79th
place finish and a time of 17:22.
Shawn Horvath and Adrian Tagle fin-
ished well back in the field.
Leon of Tallahasee won the State Title
with an average time of 16:05. Belen Je-
suit of Miami was second. Okeechobee's
average time was 16:58, six seconds better
than Wiregrass Ranch of Wesley Chapel in
Pasco County, who finished in sixth place.
Coach Julie Bohannon said Okeecho-
bee runners did a great job this year when


you consider they had a coaching change
in the middle of the season, "We were
ranked about 10th in the state and the guys
had a real good showing. They didn't run
their fastest times of the season but they
still ran strong."
Bohannon said there were three false
starts to the race where several runners fell.
One Okeechobee runner also fell in one of
the false starts.
She noted she felt the guys could have
done better but that the false starts took a
lot out of some of the runners, "I'm excited
and proud of their accomplishments. They
just have so much talent. They did very
well."
Bohannon said Lionel Jones did an ex-
cellent job in the final race of his career.
She said he stepped up to the plate and
recorded his fastest time of the year, "He
was out to prove a point. He said many
people didn't think he could hold his own.
He pulled it off thanks to drive and deter-
mination."
Guerrero and Adrian Leon could both
be offered a scholarship to run cross coun-
try. Both will have to choose between cross
country and soccer.


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Ministerial Association hosts 'Fifth Sunday' event


By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
The Okeechobee Ministerial Association
will host Fifth Sunday Community Service
on Nov. 29 at 6 p.m. at The Gathering, 1735
SW 24th Ave. Rev. Mike Brown, pastor of
The Gathering, will preach. The Okeechobee
Community Choir will sign a hymn medley
and three old fashioned Southern Gospel,
shape note songs. The Presbyterian Gospel
Quartet will sing "Peace in the Valley." Other


members of the Okeechobee Ministerial As-
sociation will also participate in this unique
community service. You are invited to come
and worship with your friends and neigh-
bors.
The men of First United Methodist
Church, 200 NW Second St., will sponsor
a smoked chicken dinner on Friday, Dec. 4
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Take out only. Deliv-
ery will be available for 10 or more dinners.
Theywill also serve from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. that
same day with dine in or take out service. The


menu consists
of one quarter
chicken, cole
slaw, baked
beans, roll and
dessert for a
$6 donation. Places of
Tickets are OT 1.
available at W worship
the church of-
fice or orders may be faxed to 863-763-2481
by 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Include contact
name, phone number and address to deliver
dinners.
Buckhead Ridge Christian Church,
1167 Linda Drive, will hold their Annual


Christmas Craft Bazaar and Book Fair on
Saturday, Dec. 5 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.
There will be homemade crafts and baked
good. Lunch will be available. If you have
any questions please call Suelynn Richard-
son at 863-357-6500.
Oakview Baptist Church, 677 SW32nd
St., will present a Christmas music celebra-
tion "The Meaning of Christmas" on Sunday
Dec. 13 at 3 p.m. and again at 6 p.m.
The Okeechobee News welcomes news from area
churches for this column. E-mail okeenews@
newszap.com or call Pete Gawda at 863 763-
3134, extension 4225.


MATT KENSETH, I
Daytona 500 champion (2009)


Submitted photos
(above) Mike Shellen was pleased to donate the Okeechobee Blood Round-
up second-place prize of a half-day guided fishing trip which was won by
Maureen Thomas who plans to take her grandson with her on the trip.

(at right) Denise
Dominguez was
the winner of the
Okeechobee Blood
Roundup grand prize,
a washing machine
donated by Carlos
Bohamon owner of
Okeechobee Sears. A
recent resident from
West Virginia, she did
not have a washer and
was delighted with her
prize.


UNSTOPPABLE.
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Okeechobee News





Okeechobee News November 25, 2009


Board of Realtors


hosts golf tourney


The Okeechobee County Board of Real-
tors held their 16th Annual Golf Tourna-
ment on Saturday, Nov. 7, at the Okeecho-
bee Golf and Country Club.
The first place team was the team of
Richard Donahue, Michael Watson, Tim
McGras, and Tyler Platt sponsored by Exit
Realty Neighbors. Michael Watson had a
hole in one on the Par 4 12th hole. In fol-
low up with Terry, the Club Pro, his ace was
the first reported at the country club on that
hole. The four young men on this team are
members of the Okeechobee High School
Golf Team.
Second place team was the team of Josh
Brewer, Kyle Lanier, Doug McDonald and
Mitchell Briner; A.K.A., the No Names.
The next to last place team was the
"Muth" team comprised of Tammy, Chris,
Amy and Joey.
The Longest Drive Winner was Jonathan
Crawford.
The Okeechobee County Board of Re-
altors would like to thank the following
businesses for their continued support: Pre-
ferred Properties of Okeechobee -Hole in
One Co-Sponsor, United Country Mid-Flori-
da Realty Hole in One Co-Sponsor, Gilbert
Chevrolet; Team Sponsors: Pine Creek, Exit
Realty Neighbors, Southern Styles; Hole
Sponsors: Exit Realty Neighbors, Preferred
Properties, Seminole Design-Build, Tires
Plus Total Car Care, Coldwell Banker Berger
Real Estate, Elbert Batton, Home Inspection,
Vicki Anderson, Realtor, Pristine Proper-
ties International, Century 21 Hazellief and
Prevatt, Platinum Performance Realty, Tay-
lor Creek Real Estate, Safeguard Insurance,
Pier II, Jim Fowler, Realtor, Lake Okeecho-
bee Title, Cleartitle and Legal Services, Sil-
ver Spurs Signs, Lakeshore Title & Escrow,
Custom Graphics and Signs, Daniel Taddeo
Real Estate School, 4C Cattle Company,
Tucker Group, LLC, Absolute Alarm Solu-


tions, CMS Builders; Door Prizes: Okeecho-
bee Steak House, West Palm Beach-Holiday
Inn Express, Best Western Hotel, The Clock
Restaurant, Chloe's Closet, Eli's Western
Wear, Maximum Tanning, Seacoast National
Bank, Badcock Furniture, Raulerson Hospi-
tal, Pueblo Viejo, Brady Ranch, Okeechobee
Store N Lock.
We would like to thank all the golfers
who took the time to come out and join us
in making this event a success. In addition to
the golfers, the great folks at the Okeecho-
bee Golf and Country Club who provided a
wonderful lunch for us and made our event
an enjoyable experience.
No event would be complete without the
dedication of the volunteers who made this
happen. A huge thank you to: Kathy God-
win, Preferred Properties of Okeechobee,
Velva Cannon, Exit Realty Neighbors, Jayla
Townes, Preferred Properties of Okeecho-
bee, Steve Jara, Pristine Properties Interna-
tional, Betsy Sheffield, Preferred Properties
of Okeechobee, Shelly Doyle, Okeechobee
County Board of Realtors, John Woloski,
Exit Realty Neighbors, Jim Fowler, Gil Gul-
brith Real Estate, Savannah Yates, Exit Re-
alty Neighbors, Barbara Yates, Exit Realty
Neighbors, Cindi Fairtrace, Tucker Group,
MaryAnn Windridge, Prudential Realty,
Wendy Bostwick, Preferred Properties of
Okeechobee and Linda Woloski, Exit Realty
Neighbors.
All monies raised will go toward award-
ing scholarships to our high school seniors.
Next year's tournament is set for Nov. 6,
2010.
For more information about Exit Realty
Neighbors, please call 863-484-2596. Exit Re-
alty Neighbors is located at 4253 U.S. 441 S.


USE A LAYER OF "".,-,.
ORGANIC MULCH
AROUND PLANTS To IMPROVE WATER RETENTION.


Walpole Feed
& Supply Co.

763-6905
Hwy 98 North


News
SNews

LuhN 1'


The Staff Of The Okeechobee News
Wishes Everyone Happy Holidays!



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Okeechobee News


November 25, 2009







Swim team heads in right direction


By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
Sarah Annis and Celena Letcher shared
the MVP for girls and Kenny Murphy won
the MVP for the boys swim team at their an-
nual banquet held Thursday at Okeechobee
High School.
Annis, a transfer student from Kansas,
had an immediate impact on the Brahman
girls, as eight swimmers qualified for the re-
gional this year.
The team also set new record times in
several events.
Chelsie Houston and Ben Kielbasa won
the Brahman awards. Derek Borroto won
the boys most improved swimmer award.
Adrianna Mitchell won the girl's award.
Letcher said it felt great to win the MVP,
"I'm very thankful for it. I do try my hardest.
Sarah deserved it to. She came to a brand
new team, and I'm really happy she suc-
ceeded and excelled."
Letcher said she is excited about the
future. Four returning swimmers were ju-
niors this year. She said all of the girls relay
teams made the regional meet. She was also
pleased that a lot of people from Okeecho-
bee came to the regional meet to support
the team.
Annis, a transfer from Junction City,
Kansas, said she enjoyed her short time
in Okeechobee. She will return to Kansas
soon. She said she was very excited to win
the award, and said she would keep in touch
with her teammates.
"I'll encourage them and keep in touch. I
know they will do great," she said.
Murphy set a school record in the 500
race at the district tournament. He said his
goal was to set a record and he felt gratified
that he met his goal, "It's been a real great
season. It was by far the best I've had. We
had a great team with a lot of great people."
"It was a great bunch of kids," Swim
Coach Brian Turner said, "They are what is
right with society. They give us hope for the
future."
Turner said he was mostly pleased that
his program continued to show improve-
ment. He noted many of the swimmers
were determined this year.
Scholar athletes this year included Sarah
Annis, Jason Rucks, Tessa Delcampo, Jaid-
en Barnhart, Ben Kielbasa, Celena Letcher,
Chelsie Houston, and Kenny Murphy.
The relay team of Annis, Letcher, Barn-
hart, and Savannah Asmussen also received
an award for setting a new school record
this year.
Celena Letcher and Kenny Murphy also
received awards for setting new school re-
cords.
Coach Turner said records of the swim
program have been sketchy. He has ap-
pealed to the community if they have knowl-
edge of previous swim records.
He also has secured a record board for
the swim team which will be placed some-
where at school.
Coach Turner predicted big things for the
swim team in the future years, "The girls are
growing and the boys too. We just didn't
have enough time to keep developing this
year. I'm real excited for next year. I wish the
season started tomorrow."


Okeechobee News/Charles Murphy
Chelsie Houston (right) won the Brah-
man award for girls swimming this
year. Also in picture is Brian Turner
swim coach with assistant swim coach
Nikki Unbaugh.










Sarah Annis (right) and Celena Letch-
er (left) shared the MVP award for girls
swim this year with assistant swim
coach Nikki Unbaugh and swim coach
Brian Turner.


Ben Kielbasa (left) took home the
Brahman award for boys swimming
this year. He is honored by swim coach
Brian Turner and assistant swim coach
Nikki Unbaugh.


Kenny Murphy won MVP for the boys
swim team this year. Also in picture is
Brian Turner swim coach with assis-
tant swim coach Nikki Unbaugh.


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Meet Your Local Merchants :http://specialsections.newszap.com/SS/Page.aspx?&secid=56360&pagenum=1
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;tECHOBEE NEWS,

SkEECHOBEE NEWS


November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News







Boys basketball team wins at preseason classic


By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
Duelle Gore got his senior year off to a
great start as he scored 30 points and pulled
down 13 rebounds as Okeechobee High
School's boys basketball team blasted Be-
rean Christian 83-60 at the Beef O'Brady's
Preseason Tip off classic at Okeechobee
High School on Friday night.
Gore said he wanted to thank
the coaches and his teammates
for having confidence in him.
"I want to thank the other players because
they were giving me the ball when they saw
I was open. They trusted me all night," he
said.
The game was back and forth in the first
half as the Bulldogs' John Lantz poured in


Duelle Gore drives past three Bulldog
defenders for two of his 30 points in
Friday game.


FWC announce

public hog hunt

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission announces a notice of
intent to issue permits for the purpose of
controlling the feral hog population and pro-
tecting the ecological values on the Fisheat-
ing Creek Wildlife Management Area, West
of US 27.
Permits will be issued for two hog control
hunts, time periods; Dec. 18-20, and Dec.
25-27. Twenty-five permits will be issued for
each hog control period. Permits will be is-
sued on a first-come, first-serve basis to indi-
viduals 16 years of age or older. Permits will
only be distributed at the Fisheating Creek
WMA check-station at the FEC Campground
located on US Highway 27 in Palmdale, on
Saturday, Dec. 12, beginning at 10 am. Per-
mitees will be allowed to take wild hogs
with no size or bag limit. The use of dogs for
capturing or taking hogs is prohibited. Fire-
arms will be limited to a shotgun with #1
Buckshot or larger.
For additional information you may con-
tact the Fisheating Creek WMA office at 863-
946-1194.


15 of his 17 points, many of them from be-
yond the arc. His shooting helped put the
Bulldogs in front 18-13 after one quarter.
Ricky Nieto scored two baskets early in
the second and Okeechobee continued to
get the ball inside to Gore, who dominated
the glass and had several offensive rebounds.
Okeechobee led 41-36 at the half.
Brahman Coach Bryan Van Camp said he
wasn't surprised with how competitive the
first half was, "They are a disciplined, smart
team. I knew it would be a battle. The first
half was an indication of how I thought the
game would go."
Okeechobee start-
ed to get out on the
fast break more in the
third quarter and Gore
continued to wear
down Berean Chris-
tian inside. Okeecho-
bee led 59-47 after
three quarters.
Austin Willard had
17 points, Ricky Ni-
eto nine points, and
Matt Skipper eight
points in the game.
Okeechobee contin-
ued to dominated in
the fourth quarter as
they outscored the
they outscored the Austin Willard (rig
Bulldogs 2413. basket during Frida


Gore said he hopes to go out with a bang
this year, "We did well with the new offense
tonight. I'm working my hardest this year."
Van Camp echoed those claims. "Duelle
has been this way in practice. He plays hard.
He won't yell at his teammates. We just
expect to get him the ball. He gets in great
position to receive the pass. We'll feed the
ball to whomever is hot and tonight it was
him."
Immokalee defeated Lake Placid 66-55 in
the other game.


Your paper,


notounrs


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kEECHOBEE


NEWS

Community Service
Through Journalism


Okeechobee News


November 25, 2009





November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News


Submit Your Free Online Classified Ad Today at WWW.NEWSIARCOM Click on elassifieds Absolutely FREE!

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MANAGER
Wanted for condo/rv park
with 324 sites. Must
have managerial and
computer skills. A CAM
license is required for the
position. Send cover let-
ter and resume to Board
of Directors at the follow-
ing address.
Big O
Board of Directors
7950 Highway 78 West
Okeechobee, FL 34974

When you want some-
thing sold, advertise in
the classified.

How fast can your car
go? It can go even
faster when you sell
it in the classified.

How do you find a job
in today's competi-
tive market? In the
employment section
of the classified

One man's trash is
another man's treas-
ure. Turn your trash
to treasure with an
ad in the classified.

Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise your
yard sale in the classi-
fieds and make your
clean up a breeze!

Reading a newspaper
helps you understand
the world around you.
No wonder newspaper
readers are more suc-
cessful people!

Need a few more bucks
to purchase something
deer? Pick up some
extra bucks when you
sell your used items in
the classifeids.


Seeking Creative Individual to
Lead Kitchen at a
New Restaurant in Okeechobee
* Knowledge of local market
* Demonstrate ability to deal with food
vendors and food/supplies ordering
* Ability to schedule staff and control labor
* Ability to train all kitchen positions
* Emphasis on quality food, freshness
and presentation
* Emphasis on kitchen security and safety
* Above all: the ability to maintain a clean
and orderly kitchen with emphasis on
Public Health
* Salary: DOE
Emi .*.m~ t .o eareasdta.-.
or ax o 83-471.10 S O


, EDISON STATE
COLLEGE
ADJUNCT JOB FAIR HENDRY/GLADES
December 3, 2009, 3:00 to 6:00pm
1092 E Cowboy Way
LaBelle, FL 33935
Edison is looking for qualified individuals t teach part-
time at our Hendry Glades Center in a variety of course
disciplines to include Chemistry, Sciences, Remedial
Math, Philosophy, History, Business, Finance, Marketing.
Minimum requirements: Doctoral or Master's degree from
a regionally accredited institution of higher education in
the teaching discipline. Please bring transcript copies to
determine eligibility
Please join us at the job fair or to schedule an interview
please call Brooke Bruhn at (863) 674-0408.
https://jobs.edison.edu EA/EO


Love the earth Recycle
your used items by
selling them in the
classified.

Grab a bargain from your
neighbor's garage, attic,
basement or closet in
today's classified.

How fast can your car
go? It can go even
faster when you sell
it in the classified.


Looking for a place to
hang your hat? Look
no further than the
classified.

When doing those chores
is doing you in, it's time
to look for a helper in
the classified.

Buying a car? Look in
the classified. Selling
a car? Look in the
classified.


Employment


Emplymen


Elg.


OKEE. $89,900, 3/2,
New, In Town CBS exc. cond., dbl lot,
Townhouse, 2/1, $695 great neighborhood.
+ until FL&S, lease. Call (863) 801-1739
863-801-3081


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go to
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NOTICE

Independent Newspapers
will never accept any ad-
vertisement that is illegal
or considered fraudulent.
In all cases of ques-
tionable value, such as
promises of guaranteed
income from work-at-
home programs if it
sounds too good to be
true, chances are that it
is. If you have questions
or doubts about any ad
on these pages, we ad-
vise that before respond-
ing or sending money
ahead of time, you check
with the Better Business
Bureau at 772-878-2010
for previous complaints.

Some 800 and 900 tele-
phone numbers may re-
quire an extra charge, as
well as long distance toll
costs. We will do our best
to alert our reader of
these charges in the ads,
but occasionally we may
not be aware of the
charges. Therefore, if
you call a number out of
your area, use caution.

Earn some extra cash.
Sell your used items
in the classified





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Bookkeeping/

Bookeeping/
Secretarial Services
by Linda Seder
Okee area.
(772)801-9687


CLEARING & HAULING
Dump Truck, Back Hoe
& Bobcat Services...
by Jason Summerford
(863)634-7771




JACK'S TOP SOIL
Fill Dirt/Shell Rock
& Bob Cat work.
Call 863-467-4734





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Hybrid Palms. You pick
and I'll Plant. Call Jerry.
863-801-5440





For more listings,
go to
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Basswood 2/1,
$650/mo, $650 sec.
Small pets allowed. Call
(863)697-1623
FURN EFFICIENCY -
TCI, On Lake with
dock, util/cable includ-
ed. No pets, $600/mo
$300 sec.
(863)697-3351
NW OKEE: 2br, quiet St.
Pets ok, $650/$750, 1st,
last & $500 sec.
561-346-1642
TAYLOR CREEK Condos
lbr/lba, Furnished.
$650 mo. + 1st & sec.
dep. 561-352-4243
VIKING/PRAIRIE Effi-
ciency. Very clean!
$600/mo. Incl. utils. No
pets. Call 561-329-8205


I Houses Sale I


3BR/2BA, house with
garage, Kids and pets
welcome. 863-634-9330
or 863-467-2541

BEAUTIFUL, Spacious
4BR 2BA 2 Car Garage.
On golf course. $1700
mo. (863)763-7552

OAK PARK 1601 SW
34th Terrace, 3br, all
appls, $850/mo. $600
sec. No pets,
(863)610-0001

OKEECHOBEE 4br,
2ba, great neighborhood,
tile throughout, $975 &
up/mo, 1st & sec move in
(561)248-3888 or
(863)599-0156

TREASURE ISLAND -
2/2, CBS, waterfront,
lake access, tiled floors,
screened patio, all appls,
$850/mo No deposit.
(954)610-5345



SEASONAL Taylor Creek
Condo, 1 BR, 1 BA,
Lake access. Pool. $1200
mo. (863)634-0663





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Taylor Creek Condo 1
bedroom, fully fur-
nished 2nd floor
$58,000 863-467-2301

Buying a car? Look in
the classified. Selling
a car? Look in the
classified.


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go to
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U--

BHR 3 BR, 1 BA, W&D
Hookup. New carpet.
Screened porch. On ca-
nal. $450 mo. + util.
Call (863)467-9436 or
(863)763-8786

BHR RVs for Rent,
starting $300-$500 &
1BR/1BA Cabin, 55+
park, seasonal or year-
ly. 1st month's rent
free! (863)763-7164

BUCKHEAD RIDGE -
Dbl. Wide 2 BR, 2 BA,
C/Air. $500 mo. 3 BR, 2
BA, C/Air. $600 mo. No
pets. (863)763-4031

Treasure Island 2BR
SW on water, Ig. lot,
$550 mo., 1st last &
sec. 423-237-8948




DW MH renovated,
4BR/2.5BA, 1800 sq. ft.,
fenced 1/2 acre lot,
screened porch, shed,
Pioneer Estate area,
$89,000. Bank finance
avail. (863)610-1600

DWMH 3/2 Central air,
appliances included,
quiet cul-de-sac street,
on leased land, not a
MH park. 3 carports,
large shed $17,000.
863-357-6185.

For Sale: Park Model
w/Fla. Room in Blue Cy-
press. With lots of ex-
tras. Asking $69,900 or
obo. Call 863-532-9222
or 860-610-0218.


PARK MODEL 34X12
w/FL room, w/direct
lake okee access(no
locks) 618-558-0274





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go to
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
NINETEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-CP-220
In re: Estate of
MARTHA CRAVEN YORK
a/k/a MARTHA SUTTON YORK,
a/k/a MARTHA S.YORK,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Ancillary Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Ancillary Summary Administra-
bon has been entered in the Estate
of MARTHA CRAVEN YORK, a/k/a
MARTHA SUTTON YORK, a/ka MAR-
THA S. YORK, Deceased, File Num-
ber 2009-CP-220, by the Circuit
Court for Okeechobee County, Flori-
da, Probate Division, the address
of which is 312 N.W. 3rd Street,
Suite 101, Okeechobee, Florida
34972; that the decedent's date of
death was June 4, 2009; that the to-
tal value of the estate is $59,810.00;
that the names and addresses of
those to whom it has been assigned
by such order are: W. MIKE YORK,
129 Vaughn York Road, Staley,
North Carolina 27355
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIEDTHAT:
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the de-
cedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made
in the Order of Summary Administra-
tion must file their claims within this
court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED
BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTH-
ER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DE-
CEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The first publication of this notice
is November 25, 2009.
Person Giving Nobce:
Jane York Embree
185 Vaughn York Road
Staley, North Carolina C
CONELY&CONELY, PA.
Post Office Drawer 1367
Okeechobee, Flonda 34973-1367
(863) 763-3825
By: Tom Conely III
Florinda Bar #096482
Attorney for Personal Representative
340049 ON 11/25; 12/02/09


Employment
PartTime


Employment
PartTime





Okeechobee News


November 25, 2009


CITY COUNCIL MEETING NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Okee-
chobee will meet in Regular Session on Tuesday, December 1, 2009,
7:00 p.m., immediately following the Annual Ligh ng Ceremony, 6 p.m.,
at City Hall, 55 SE 3rd Ave, Rm 200, Okeechobee, Ronda. The public is in-
vited and encouraged to attend.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE AND BE ADVISED that no stenographic record by
a certified court reporter will be made of the foregoing meebng. Accord-
ingly, any person who may seek to appeal any decision involving the mat-
ters noticed herein will be responsible for making a verbatim record of the
testimony and evidence at said meeting upon which any appeal is to be
based. Please contact City Administration at 863-763-3372, or website
www.cityofokeechobee com to obtain a copy of the agenda.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990
persons needing special accommodation to participate n this proceeding
should contact the City Clerk's Office at 863-763-3372 for assistance.
by: James E. Kirk, Mayor
Lane Gamlotea, CMC, City Clerk
340042 ON 11/25/09

IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE 19TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 2007-CA-153
CITIMORTGAGE, INC., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO PRINCIPAL RESIDENTIAL
MORTGAGE, INC.
PLAINTIFF
VS.
H. MICHAEL PIERCE A/K/A HARRY M. PIERCE; TERM L. PIERCE; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)
RE- NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting the Motion to Re-
set Foreclosure Sale dated 10/28/2009 entered in Civil Case No 2007-CA-153
of the Circuit Court of the 19TH Judicial Circuit in and for OKEECHOBEE
County, Okeechobee, Flonda, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, 2ND FLOOR, at OKEECHOBEE JUDICIAL
CENTER of the OKEECHOBEE County Courthouse, 312 NW 3RD STREET,
Okeechobee, Flonda, at 11:00 a.m. on the 16th day of Dec., 2009 the follow-
ing descnbed property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit:
PARCEL # 1.36-34-33-0A00-00005-0000
THE EAST 1/2 OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTH 34 OF THE NORTH
1/2 OF TRACT 5 SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE 33
EAST, OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
PARCEL # 1-36-34.33-0A00-0005-D000
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE
NORTH' 1/2 OF TRACTS, SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE
33 EAST, OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
PARCEL # 1-36-34-33-0A00-00006-A000
THE EAST 1/2 OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTH
1/2 OF TRACT 6, SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE 33
EAST, OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
PARCEL # 1-36-34-33-0A00-00006-B000
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTH
1/2 OF TRACT 6, SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE 33
EAST, OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale if any other
than the property owner as of the date of the Iis Pendens must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale
Dated this 29th day of Oct., 2009.


SHARON ROBERTSON, CLERK
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Linda F Young
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE REGARDING THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF


1990 It accordance with the Americans With Disabiliies Act, persons needing
a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact
Court Administration no later than seven days prior to the proceeding at 250
NW Country Club Dnve, Port St. Lucie, FL 34986 or call 1-772-8074370 within
two working days of your receipt of this Summons/Notice to Appear If you
are heanng impaired call 1-800-955-8771. If you are voice impaired call
1-800-955-8770, via Flonda Relay Service.
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN, PA.,
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND ROAD, SUITE 400,
PLANTATION, FL 33324-3920
(954) 233-8000
07-81803(CMI)(FNM)
338440 ON 11/18,25/09


LEGAL NOTICE
A public auction will be held at BMJ
Towing, Inc. Lot at 414 South Parrott
Avenue, Okeechobee, Florida 34974
on Friday the 11th day of December,
2009 from 10:00-11:00 A.M. Pursu-
ant to Florida statute 713.78 for un-
paid towing and storage. Year, Make,
Model & Vin's as follows:
Trophy USC 1 BOAT
USCD43FFD595
Terms of sale are cash, and no
checks will be accepted. The seller
reserves the right of final bid. All
sales are final. No refunds will be
made. Said automobiles will be sold
in "AS IS"with no guarantees.
340054 ON 11/25/09

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE BY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT
Notce is hereby given that the un-
dersigned, SHARON ROBERTSON,
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Okee-
chobee County, Florida, will on the
16th day of December, 2009, at
11:00 A.M., at the Okeechobee
County Judicial Center, 312 North-
west 3rd Street, Jury Assembly
Room, Second Floor, Okeechobee,
Flonda 34972, in the City of Okee-
chobee, offer for sale and sell at
public outcry to the highest and best
idder for cash, the following de-
scnbed property situated in Okee-
chobee County, Flonda, to-wit:
LOT 11 AND THE EAST 1/2 OF
LOT 12, BLOCK 99, OKEECHO-
BEE, ACCORDING TO PLAT RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5,


PAGE 5, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF OKEECHOBEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
pursuant to the final decree of fore-
closure as to Count II entered in a
case pending in said Court, the style
of which is:
SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
SAMUEL K. HAZELLIEFand
XIAO QIONG HAZELLIEF,
Defendants.
and the docket number of which is:
2008-CA-475.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTER-
EST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE
PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AF-
TER THE SALE.
WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, this 4th day of
November, 2009.
SHARON ROBERTSON, Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Okeechobee
County, Flonda
BY: Linda F Young
DEPUTY CLERK
Law Office of Cassels & McCall
John D. Cassels, Jr, Esquire
Post Office Box 968
Okeechobee, Flonda 34973
338304 ON 11/18,25/09


Shop here first!
The classified ads


Fuoiic imotice


I ubicNoic


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.2009-CP-6
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TOMAS OLIVERA-SALINAS,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
TOMAS OLIVERA SALINAS, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
February 9,2007, and whose social
security number is (none), is pending
in the Circuit Court for Okeechobee
County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 312 NW Third
Street, Okeechobee, Florida 34972.
The names and address of the per-
sonal representative and the person-
al representative's attorney are set
for the below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedents estate on whom a
copy of this nobce is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
nobce is November 25, 2009
Personal Representative:
MARTIN OLIVERA SALINAS
305 NW Tenth Avenue
Okeechobee, Fl 34972
Attorney for Personal Representatve:
LINDA CARGILL SMITH PA.
Florida Bar No. 306241
1320 S. Federal Hwy, #215
Stuart, FL 34994
772-219-9157
339992 ON 11/25 & 12/2/09

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 09-CP-68
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAVION JONES,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
SAVION JONES, deceased, whose
date of death was February 8,2009,
and whose social security number is
769-44-4478, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Okeechobee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 312 NW Third Street,
Okeechobee, Florida 34972. The
names and address of the personal
representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set for the
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedents estate on whom a
copy of this nobce is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
nobce is November 25, 2009
Personal Representative:
ANGELA YATES
1807 S. Parrott Avenue
Okeechobee, Fl34974
Attorney for Personal Representatve:
LINDA CARGILL SMITH P.A.
Florida Bar No. 306241
1320 S. Federal Hwy, #215
Stuart, FL 34994
772-219-9157
339987 ON 11/25 & 12/2/09


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 08-CP-117
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BRANDON HUMPHREY,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
BRANDON HUMPHREY, deceased,
whose date of death was July 11,
2007, and whose social security
number is 492-98-0057, is ending in
the Circuit Court for Okeechobee
County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 312 NW Third
Street, Okeechobee, Florida 34972.
The names and address of the per-
sonal representative and the person-
al representative's attorney are set
for the below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedents estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is November 25, 2009
Personal Representative:
JONATHAN HUMPHREY
3009 SE 23rd Street
Okeechobee, Fl 34974
Attorney for Personal Representative:
LINDA CARGILL SMITH PA.
Florida Bar No. 306241
1320 S. Federal Hwy, #215
Stuart, FL 34994
772-219-9157
339983 ON 11/25 & 12/2/09

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
NINETEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-CP-217
In re: Estate of
RICHARD GERARD BURKE,
a/k/a RICHARD G. BURKE
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
RICHARD GERARD BURKE, a/k/a
RICHARD G. BURKE, deceased, date
of death October 9, 2009, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Okeechobee
County, Flonda, Probate Division,
the address of which is 312 N.W. 3rd
Street, Suite 101, Okeechobee, Flon-
da 34972. The personal representa-
tive's and the personal
representative's attomey names are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the de-
cedent must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH IN THE FLORIDA STAT-
UTES WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DE-
CEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The first publication of this notice
is November 25, 2009.
Jane G. Burke
Personal Representatve
21102 Poolside Lane
Huntngton Beach, California 92648
CONELY&CONELY, A.
Post Office Drawer 1367
Okeechobee, Florida 34973-1367
(863) 763-3825
By: Tom Conely III
Flonda Bar #096482
Attorney for Personal Representative
340046 ON 11/25;12/02/09


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Special to the Okeechobee News/Jeannie Bramlett


Tuckahoe Motorcycle Club

Tuckahoe Motorcycle Club recently held their Tenth Annual Open house
event. Partial proceeds from this year's event were donated to The ARC of
Okeechobee/Okeechobee Rehabilitation Facility, Inc. Tuckahoe President,
Johnny Estes and club Treasurer/Secretary, Paul Bramlett, presented a check
for $750 to Nancy Zeigler Executive Director of The ARC. Ms. Zeigler thanked
Mr. Estes and Mr. Bramlett for the donation and said it will be used for this
year's fall celebrations. Pictured in photo are (left to right) Tom Gorney, Jean-
nie Bramlett, Board Liaison, Judy Carter, James Kennedy, Brenda Byrd; Sup-
port Service Coordinator, Nancy Zeigler, Paul Bramlett, and Johnny Estes.


I _


Availab


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SyndicatedContent





le from Commercial News Providers"



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November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News


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HOSKINS, TURCO, LLOYD & LLOYD


www.HoskinsTurco.com In/ '\ itS= CAi
212S. ParrottAve. 357-5800
Okeechobee, FL 34974 357-580



Awnings j wwwcustomcanvasshop.com Boat Covers
Repairs j RV Covers
Spealo A N VAS Prs
-s- sm SH*O P LLC BBQ Covers
Enclosures I Biminiframes
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Okeechobee Feed Inc
Your One Stop Feed Store
Bag, Bulk & Liquid
*Tack 763-2123 *Fencing
* Pet Supplies Hardware
1579 Hwy 70 E Okeechobee


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Qaudia's Cookies & Candy
cftu^ g t!g M ade osy
SHomemade Goodies & Decorations
i Homemade Sweetbread
Homemade Cookies & Candy
PHONE ORDER EARLY
863-357-5733





863-467-0418
Tues. Fri. 9-5:30 Sat. 9-3 &
Closed: Sun & Mon.
105 SW 3"AVe. Cheri Stevens



; 6&ades Health Care Center
I Skilled Long & Short Term Care Facility
r7a Cui.. Assistant, C.E.O.
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Other facilitiesin PHONE: 561-924-5561
Gainesville" PHONE: 561-924-5561
& Bradenton www.floridacare.net




Christian Books,
Bibles and Videos

Nature's Pantry
417 W S Park St (863) 467-1243

iiE A'A s- 4.t

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Paralegal mr cleartitle Espanoi
Services s& LgaI ST' I. k.
Struggling to make your mortgage payments? Call us, we can help!
I. 1 ,ii ii,,, i Title Insurance For Sale By Owner Transactions Divorces
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Evictions Quit Claim Deeds Corporations Wills. Power of Attorney Contracts
,S'3128 Hwy 441 South, Okeechobee, FL 863-824-6776


LAKESHORE MARINEINC.
1365 Hwy 441 SE If we can't fix it,
(next to bowling alley) it probably can't
be fixed.
863-763-4080
SERVING OKEECHOBEE Exceptional Service
SINCE 1993 YOU CAN TRUSTt
S 993 SEVE BRANTLEY, OWNER


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419 W.S. Park St. 863.763-5553



We have CHLORINE in (2.5 gallons)
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63-763-3134


Boys soccer


team loses


to Suncoast

By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
Growing pains continue to affect the
Okeechobee High School Brahman boys soc
cer team in the early part of their schedule.
Okeechobee got some reinforcement from
cross country for Monday's match at Suncoast,
but it wasn't enough as Suncoast walked away
with a 3-1 victory in the District 14 4A opener
for both teams.
Brahmans Coach Lonnie Sears said Eddie
Guerrero and Adrian Leon played considerable
minutes in Monday's match, and Leon even
scored Okeechobee's only goal, but it wasn't
enough.
Both had excellent seasons for cross coun
try, which reached the state finals.
"We have everybody back now. We'll get
to start doing some real work in practice. We
missed the cross country guys but they were
rusty and they're not ready to play their usual
soccer just yet," he noted.
Okeechobee also struggled a bit on de
fense as they allowed some soft goals. The
Brahmans also were without their starting goal
keeper. Gustavo Garcia filled in and made a
few mistakes in net.
"He's young and he's not used to playing
the position. He'll get better," Sears added.
Ronald Garcia had two goals and Jarnell
Joseph scored one goal for Suncoast (3-1-1).
Agustin Leon had an assist for Okeechobee.
Garcia had two saves in net for the Brahmans
(1-2).
Coach Sears said he expects Suncoast to be
one of the top teams in the district this year,
"They are pretty good this year. We just quit
possessing the ball and our forwards mis
played the ball a lot at midfield tonight. We
were not real smart with the ball."
Sears said the soccer team would practice
a few times this week to try and get the prob
lems resolved.


Special to the Okeechobee News

Fall Festival
Alex Armstrong and his dad, Jesse
O'Neill enjoyed the North Elemen-
tary School Fall Festival, Friday, No-
vember 13.




Okeechobee News November 25, 2009


Boys hoops blast Lake Placid


By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
Defense was the word of the day as
Okeechobee High School blasted the Green
Dragons of Lake Placid, 73-46 in boy's basket
ball action Saturday night.
Okeechobee took control early and was
never really threatened by the Dragons, who
trailed 24-9 after the first quarter, and 40-15 at
the break.
Brahmans Coach Bryan Van Camp said his
team kept up the intensity on both ends of the
floor, "There are some things we need to im
prove on. Anytime you win a game 73-46 you
did something right."
Van Camp said his team kept working hard
on the defensive end even with a big lead." We
have no intention of embarrassing anyone.
There is no excuse for not playing defense, no
matter what the score is. Your responsibility is
to lock your man down."
He was also pleased with the balanced scor
ing. T.J. Allen had 18 points off the bench in
less than nine minutes of action. Ricky Nieto
added 13. Austin Willard had 11 and Duelle
Gore had 10 points.
Nieto said the team has been motivated in
practice this year and really wants to have a
good season. He said the goal for Lake Placid
was to improve the defense, "We just came in
and focused on defense. We wanted to have
high intensity and play good defense. We try


Ryan Osceola lunges for a loose ball
during the first quarter of Saturdays
basketball game at Okeechobee High
school.
to keep intensity throughout and try to get bet
ter."
Okeechobee led 54-34 after three quarters
and substituted liberally in the second half.
There next home game is Friday, Dec. 8,
against Suncoast.


Sports Network Web site launches
Youth, adult recreation leagues, and sports the players themselves-to deliver information
teams in the Okeechobee area now have an to the people who care about it most.
exciting online sports page and resource they Team representatives can post their sched
can call their own. ules, game stories, statistics, standings and pho
A new web site, Okeechobee Sports Net tos on dedicated web pages on the site. Each
work, is now launched and already being league or team will be provided a username
used by the local sports community. The web and password so they can update anytime,
address is: http://fl.newszap.com/Okeecho from anywhere they have internet access.
beeSportsNetwork. Interested teams and leagues can contact
The site is a partnership between the Renee Hawley by e-mail at rhawley@com
Okeechobee News and Community Sports munitysportsdesk.com. Or call her toll free
Desk, a national sports software company. at 888-853-7904 for a demonstration or to get
Okeechobee Sports Network is designed started right away. To advertise on the site, con
to allow the people who know their league tact Judy Kasten at 863-763-3134 or by email at
best-the rec center directors. coaches. even ikasten 0)strato.net.


TREASURE COAST DERMATOLOGY
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Okeechobee News


November 25, 2009










1~'V'




2 November 25, 2009


Money-saving tips


for memorable


holidays
5he holidays are a time for family and friends to
gather and share the joys of the season. While
5 many families are faced with the need to scale
back their holiday celebrations and expectations, it's
good to know that memorable holidays can be both
frugal and festive. By doing a little extra planning and
reclaiming some of the traditions of simpler times, it's
possible to discover that less really can be more. Make
your holiday season both merry and memorable with
the following money-saving tips:
* Make a plan. Create a plan for holiday spending and
gift giving. List possible gifts, how much you expect to
pay, what you can afford to pay, and alternatives. Once
you determine how much you can afford to spend on
each gift, stick to your plan. Always look for sales and
pay in cash or with debit cards whenever possible.
Compare prices online. Check the shipping charges.
For kids, consider buying one nice gift rather than a lot
of smaller ones.
* Timing is everything. While the best deals on greet-
ing cards can be found after the holidays, some do
go on sale in December. It's also worth remembering
that postcards are less expensive and also cost less to
mail. And if you're handy with scissors, you can trans-


form last year's greeting cards into this year's festive
holiday postcards. In addition, it pays to mail packages
early. The longer you wait, the more it will cost to make
sure that your gifts arrive on time.
* It's a wrap. Wrapping paper, like most other season-
al items, is deeply discounted after the holidays. If you
didn't catch last year's after-Christmas sales, consider
using the comics from your local newspaper as wrap-
ping paper. A roll of white butcher paper and assorted
sizes of paper bags can be transformed into works of
art that double as gift packaging. And last year's holi-
day cards can be cut into wonderful gift tags.
* Nurture nature. Homemade decorations and
ornaments add an old-fashioned touch to the holiday
season. You can bring nature indoors with cornstalks,
pinecones, dried flowers and pumpkins. Trees can be
decked with strings of popcorn and cranberries as well
as holiday cookie cutters, ribbons and bows. If you're
willing to wait, bargains on Christmas trees can be
found in the days leading up to December 25th. You
might also consider investing in a high-quality artificial
tree, which can save you big bucks in the long run.
*Delicious deals. Some grocery stores offer great
deals during the holidays. Check your newspaper and
store fliers for deals on items you need. Use store
brands when making casseroles and side dishes. In
the spirit of sharing, a potluck-style holiday dinner
could be a tradition worth considering. It also relieves
the host of the entire burden of paying for and prepar-
ing the meal. Visit www.GrocerySavingTips.com for
additional coupons and hundreds of money-saving
suggestions.
* Simple pleasures. Holiday entertainment can be


as simple as a drive around town to see the lights.
And don't forget to bring along some blankets and hot
chocolate for the ride. Pull out the board games you
haven't played in years. Learn three new card games
and two new holiday songs. Bake and decorate cook-
ies. Make lasting memories. GG09B740





November 25, 2009 Okeechobee News! Holiday Traditions


Homemade


ornaments a treat


for the


holidays 4


nce the perfect tree
has been selected
and placed in the
home, the next task is
to take out all of the or-
naments collected over the
years and hang them on the tree.
Part of what makes decorating the tree
so memorable is the ornaments that
have been collected over time N many
of them handmade treasures. Looking
through them is a trip down memory
lane, bringing to mind the happy times
these ornaments recall.
Today in a hurried society, it may seem
easier to simply head to the store and
purchase a box full of ornaments for the


Wire Ornaments
Purchase thin craft wire and
small beads of various colors.
Bend the wire into holiday shapes,
such as candy canes and stars.

This can be achieved by wrapping the
wire around cookie cutters as tem-
plates. Thread the beads onto the wire
shape until it is completely covered with
beads. Use a needle-nose pliers to twist
together the two open ends to seal
the ornament shut.
r


rend's Hair & Tanning

863.357.1839


Full
Service


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i l e >l i illt "


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3037 Hwy 70 East, Okeechobee


tree. But spending time creating your
own can be a family event that's a
fun way to spend time together.
Here are a few ideas.

Tie -Dyed Balls ,
Create ornaments that
have the impression of
being tie-dyed. Simply
buy a box of clear glass
ornaments from a
craft store. Pop off
the metal top and
squirt one or two
different colors -
of acrylic paint
into the cen-
ter of the
ball. Re-
place ( .

top and
twirl the ball around until the paint
coats the inside in a marbled pat-
tern. Place on a surface where the
balls won't roll, such as an empty egg
carton, and let dry.


Popsicle StickTreasures

Craft sticks, popsicle sticks, whatever
you call them, these wooden items
can be glued and painted to cre-
ate a number of ornaments
for the tree. Fashion them
into a triangular shape and
paint green for a Christmas
tree. Glue a handful togeth-
er and paint white for a
snowflake. Dust these
ornaments with glitter
for even more spar-
kle on the tree.







SCraft Foam Creations
Pop into any craft store or even toy
store and you will likely find packages
or loose sheets of thin colored foam
that can be cut and designed into ev-
erything from sun visors to doorknob
signs to fun ornaments for the tree.
SP08A232


November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions







Embrace the s irit of .


Italy this holiday season he beauty of
a peek at the cookbooks they offer, or ...


ich in history and culture, Italy
influences many
aspects of living
today. This boot-shaped
peninsula that stretches
out into the Mediterra- _
nean Sea has provided
the inspiration for food,
music, entertainment,
and fashion for hun-
dreds of years. It's often
the backdrop for major
motion pictures, and ni
Italy often personi-
fies magic, glam- I
our and moments
to remember.
For those looking LIN
to reconnect with "0 I'AR
Italian heritage
or just experience
the enchantment
of the rolling hills,
beautiful coast- ambuc
line, and warm eXtfdr
and welcoming
people, here are ""'
some ideas for sur- E -
rounding yourself "
in the spirit of Italy
during this special
time of year.


Culinary Delights
Italian cuisine is some of the most
coveted worldwide. Italians view cook-
ing as an art not a task, and put a bit
of their heart into the recipe. Dining
to Italians is also an experience not
to take lightly. It's a family affair, with
conversation and long hours basking
at the dinner table, especially during
the holidays
Dabbling in Italian cooking is an
easy way to impart the flavor of that
culture into your everyday living.
Choose from pasta dishes to decadent
pastries to seafood specialties. In fact,
for many Southern Italians, Christ-
mas eve is the time to enjoy vigilia di
magro, or The Feast of the Seven Fish-
es, where the holiday is celebrated
with a bounty of seafood.
If you're looking for inspiration,
there are a number of chefs who offer
cookbooks full of scores of delicious
recipes. Some of the more familiar
chefs in this country who have gained
celebrity recognition in recent years in-
clude Giada De Laurentiis, Lidia Mat-
ticchio Bastianich, and Mario Batali.
Visit your local or online bookseller for


tune to the Food Network or PBS for ne gjft Oj a son...
syndicated cooking shows.


Entertaining and
Socializing
Gathering with family and friends
is an integral part of Italian culture.
Music, conversation and delicious
cocktails are often part of the picture.
Including a beverage that personifies
Italy when socializing is another way
to connect with Italian culture.
In 1945, Angelo Molinari, already
a well-respected blender of wines
and spirits, created what was to
become one of Italy's most cel-
ebrated masterpieces a smooth,
rich, full-bodied liqueur he proudly
named Molinari Sambuca. Today,
Molinari Sambu-
ca Extra is
the primary
choice of
Sambuca
lovers every-
where and is,
by far, Italy's
favorite.
The uncom-
4 4. promising quality of
its ingredients and
super-premium qual-
ity and smooth-
Wness contrib-
ute to that
appeal. Mo-
linari is also
dedicated to tra-
dition and has not strayed from the
original recipe.
Sambuca can be enjoyed as an af-
ter-dinner digestive. It's also the per-
fect companion to coffee, particularly
espresso and it is often enjoyed chilled
ice cold, or as part of delicious des-
serts and other recipes. It can be espe-
cially versatile for holiday entertaining
when mixed with seasonal ingredients
to create innovative drinks. Here's a
recipe to get you started.

Beluga
1/3 Molinari Sambuca
1/3 Heavy Cream
1/3 White Creme de Menthe

Shake well with abundant ice. Serve in
a martini glass. Sprinkle coffee powder
on top. Visit www.molinari.it for more
recipes and information on Molinari
Sambuca. For other inquiries, contact
Shaw-Ross International Importers at
954-430-5020.


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Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions


November 25, 2009








Make the holidays harmonious for pets, too


C elebrants all over may look forward to
the holidays for the hustle and bustle they
bring, but the same sentiments may not be ex-
pressed by pets ... if they could talk, that is.
Pets that aren't used to a lot of foot traffic in a
home or loud events could become anxious when
holiday guests arrive and the fun ensues. Further
stress could be added by lack of attention on the
part of pet owners and the changes of the home
environment through the addition of decora-
tions and a Christmas tree.
Christmas and New Years also present
a host of hazards to pets. It's important
to be aware of these dangers to keep pets
safe. Keep these pointers in mind:
* Don't use poisonous plants in your holiday
decor. Holly, ivy, mistletoe, and poinsettias can
be deadly if consumed by most animals. Go with
faux plants instead if you desire the look.
* Keep your pets on a steady diet and resist the
urge to feed them leftovers from holiday din-
ner. Abrupt changes in your dog or cat's diet can
cause stomach distress, vomiting and diarrhea.
* Set aside a quiet space your pets can retreat to
when there's just too much commotion in another
area of the house. However, putting a dog in the
backyard if it is extremely cold is simply off limits.
A dark bedroom away from the activity is best.


don't put lit candles or breakables on areas where
cats like to pounce.
* Involve pets in the festivities by buying a spe-
cial treat that they can enjoy for good behavior
during the holidays. A new chew or chase toy is a
nice idea.
* If you will be traveling during the holidays,
make sure your pets are adequately secured
in the car and not allowed to roam freely. Use
a travel crate or a special seat belt to keep the
animals in place.
With some planning and care, you can ensure
our nets will be comfortable and content during

L 4


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2 -


'Ar --
~j9$f ~.-


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Okeechobee, Fl 34972


(863) 357-6220 )
Fax (863) 357-6230 /
0


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We will be here to serve your surgery and pain management needs throughout the coming years.


November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions








Bake up a Treat for LC E



Holiday Meals ULAALCREEK
PLANTATION


entertaining is a large part of the
holiday season. No matter what
religious or cultural holiday is
celebrated, gathering, reminiscing ...
and eating are often part of the festivi-
ties.
With the influx of people dropping
by and meals to be served this time
of year, the wise host or hostess
should collect recipes to have on
hand that will help feed the crowds
or just make an intimate meal to-
gether more memorable.
As an alternative to store-made
breads or canned rolls and biscuits,
why not try your hand at a tasty and
relatively easy to make homemade
bread? This herbed loaf will comple-
ment a wide range of meals and
there probably won't be a crumb left
over.


Italian Herbed Bread
(Serves 6 to 8)

21/2cups bread flour
1 cup hot tap water
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon white sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 package fast-acting dry
yeast* (see note below about yeast)
Dried Italian seasonings, to taste
Dried rosemary, to taste
1 teaspoon olive woil reserved for
after baking


Sprinkle of Kosher salt reserved
for after baking

In a mixing bowl, combine fast-
acting yeast and hot water. Let
yeast and water sit for 5 minutes.
Add sugar, salt, olive oil, herbs and
flour. Mix until ingredients are well
incorporated.
(For those with bread machines,
follow the directions for the machine
for mixing the dough). Then turn out
onto a floured board. With hands
dusted in flour, knead bread for 5
minutes until dough is soft and no
longer very tacky. *If using fast-act-
ing yeast, follow the instructions for
rising.
Many brands require the dough
to simply sit aside for 10 minutes,
which will replace the first rise with
traditional yeast recipes. If using tra-
ditional yeast, follow the instructions
on the packet for rising and punch-
ing down dough.
When dough has sat or undergone
the first rise, transfer it to a loaf pan
that has been lightly oiled. Set the
pan in a warm spot of the home. Let
the dough rise in the loaf pan until
doubled in size, roughly 2 to 3 hours.
Bake risen dough in an oven
preheated to 400 F for 20 minutes,
or until golden brown. Remove bread
and use a pastry brush to brush olive
oil on top and then sprinkle with Ko-
sher salt. Serve warm. SP08A220


Homemade bread can make your holiday meal that much more memorable.


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions


November 25, 2009








Be safe and sound when stringing holiday lights


ew holiday traditions are as
19 aesthetically appealing as
lighting a house and Christmas tree.
Neighborhood passersby often delight
in a well-lit holiday home, and some
neighborhoods even have contests
among residents as to who can cre-
ate the most festive holiday lighting
display.
But as fun as stringing up and design-
ing a holiday lighting scheme can be,
it can be equally dangerous as well.
Film fans are well aware of Clark
Griswold's hysterical efforts to string
up holiday lights in the comedy clas-
sic "Christmas Vacation." But as odd-
ball and over-the-top as those efforts
were, they've also hit home for many
who have had accidents stringing up
holiday lights in years past.
Consider the fact that Christmas
trees account for roughly 200 fires
annually mostly from electrical
lights or open flames from candles
- causing more than $6 million in
property damage, according to the
U.S. Fire Administration. In addition,
each year plays witness to thousands


of visits to local emergency rooms
resulting from falls that happen when
stringing up holiday lights.
But for every person who visits the
emergency room after a fall, there
are thousands more who make it
through the season safe and sound.
To do just that, consider the following
holiday lighting safety tips, courtesy


of the United States Consumer Prod-
uct Safety Commission (CPSC).
* Check that outdoor lights and
extension cords are designed for
outdoor use, and be sure to look for
the Underwriters Laboratory (UL)
label on the lights. The label indicates
that the product has been tested for
safety hazards.


or any broken or
.... cracked sock-
ets. Damaged sets
are a fire and safety hazard, so
replace any sets with any of the
aforementioned problems.
* Minimize extension cord use, plug-
ging lights directly into the electrical
sockets whenever possible. Check
the fuse box to determine how many
amps your circuit can handle safely.
* Routinely feel electrical cords
around the house and unplug any
that feel too warm.


See LIGHTS Page 8


November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions




8 Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions November 25, 2009


Stringing holiday lights ,., -m7


lights
Continued From Page 7


* Turn off lights when you are
away from home and when
you're asleep. Even if only for
a midday cat nap, unplug all
lights just to be safe.
* Do not strand more than
three light sets together.
* Do not use electric
lights with a metal-
lic tree. Touch alone
can lead to a deadly
electrical shock.
* Prevent wind
damage to bulbs
by securely attach-
ing all outdoor lights
to the house, walls or
other firm objects..
* Do not conceal cords under
floor mats or rugs. This can lead to
trips and falls.
* When hanging lights, always
emphasize safety and have a helper
on hand. The ladder should be sitting
level, and when hanging lights, stand


centered on the rails of the ladder.
When placing the ladder,
both the Occupational
Safety and Health Ad-
ministration and the
CPSC recommend
extending it at least
three feet beyond the
roofline. In addition, for
every four feet the lad-
der extends up, space the
base of the ladder one foot
away from the wall.
4 Keep all lighting deco-
rations out of reach of
children and pets. Chil-
dren may be intrigued by
the lights and be tempted
to play with the wires or the
bulbs, while the family pet
might chew or pull on cords.
Be especially careful with can-
dles. Candles are an obvious fire haz-
ard, so avoid placing them near trees,
decorations and wrapping paper and
do not put them in a place where they
can be knocked down or blown over.
HL09C855


A joyou roam of music ad song, Flowed b

Saturday, November 28 7pD

110 NE Sth St.' Okeechobee 6.

Call 763-1994 for more ifo Public i Inhitedk 1








Don't get unravelled over


wrapping gifts


he countdown to Christmas
has begun and in the race to
get every gift bought, and every detail
right for the ensuing holiday, we often
forget one crucial step: wrapping the
presents.
While some people may shutter at
the idea of spending hours in crowded
stores picking out presents, many oth-
ers cringe at the idea of having to wrap
all of their holiday finds. That's why
it becomes easy to forget about those
sacks of unwrapped gifts hiding in at-
tic eaves or lying low in the trunk of
the car. But being present procrastina-
tors won't get the task done. Wrapping
gifts may take some time, but that
doesn't mean it can't be fun.
Find your niche: Not everyone is a
master gift-wrapper. But maybe there's
a unique flair you place on your gifts
that sets them apart from others ...
a hallmark. It could be a certain type
of paper, or an interesting gift tag.
Discover your niche and embrace it.
For example, professional gift wrapper
Connie Rheas says that in her experi-
ence, "there are certain techniques
that you must follow for a great gift
but in the end, it's all about the bow."
So maybe your niche can be creating
fabulous bows to adorn the gifts you
wrap.
*There's fun in numbers: What's
just about everyone you know doing
this time of year? Shopping for and
wrapping presents and attending par-
ties. Why not marry the activities for
a spectacular evening? Host a gift-
wrapping party. Everyone volunteers to
bring a specific set of supplies and one
person hosts the venue. Have snacks
catered or simply order out for pizza.
With the chatting and working going
on simultaneously, you'll get through
that mountain of gifts in no time.
Skip the paper and go for the bag:
Gift bags can be the time-crunched
gift-wrapper's saving grace. These
bags come in all sizes and require just
about a minute's time of packing to
make gifts look great. What's more,
gift bags can be reused over and over.
To further expand the recycling power
of gift bags, choose solid-color or
holiday-neutral bags so that their reuse
won't be restricted to Christmas.
Delegate: There is a quote by an
unknown author that says, "Some par-


ents could do more for their children
by not doing so much for them." This
may be a good time to put this line
of thinking to the test by enlisting the
help of your children in wrapping pres-
ents. Naturally they shouldn't be given
their own to wrap, but they can help
out with other family members' gifts. It
can be an enjoyable job for them, and
it will lighten your burden.
Set up a wrapping station: Some-
times the anxiety over wrapping gifts
stems from the level of disorganization
with which some people start the task.
Take a few minutes to clear a space
for wrapping. A table or another solid
surface that doesn't require you to
hunch over will be most comfortable.
Lay out your supplies, such as tags,
pens, bows, ribbons, paper, scissors,
gift receipts, etc. so that they are
within easy reach. Gather together the
gifts that are going to each specific
person and wrap them in order. Later
separate the wrapped presents accord-
ing to whether they'll be placed under
the tree or put in the car to travel to a
friend or relative's house.
When all else fails ...: For a small
donation, many stores offer compli-
mentary gift-wrapping. Take advantage
of this service. Shopping on off-hours
will ensure the lines at the wrapping


Employing a few strategies can
make wrapping presents easier and
less stressful. GG08B527


November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions





Okeechobee News! Holiday Traditions November 25, 2009


Christmas


Gifts of


Yesteryear


today's kids have scores of tech-
nological games and gadgets
from which to choose for their holiday
wish list. How much do they differ from
the toys children requested just 10 to
20 years ago?
Here's a look at some of the popular
toys of the 1980s and 1990s.

1980s
If you were a kid growing
up during the age of excess
you were a part of the mass
hysteria explosion for new
toys. Most memorable dur-
ing the '80s was the short-
age of Cabbage Patch
Dolls that coincided
with Christmas
shopping season.
This led to fights
at area stores and
bidding wars over the dolls.
Boys in the '80s were
enthralled by the action
figure craze sparked by fa-
vorite cartoon characters. Teen-
age Mutant Ninja Turtles, He-Man and
Transformers were just some of the
action figures played
with primarily by
boys. However,
girls enjoyed spin-
off series, such as
She-Ra and the co-
ed Thundercats
and subsequent
action figures.
In terms of
dolls, apart from
Cabbage Patch
Dolls, kids could
choose among
Rainbow Brite and
her cohorts, Poppies, Care Bears and
many others.
For those looking for video game
action, the introduction of Nintendo in
the late '80s created mass appeal and
totally eclipsed earlier efforts by Atari.

1990s
Advancing technology in the '90s
and improved marketing campaigns
turned every toy into that "must-have
toy." There are a few toys that stand


/


*


S-- -
j'"*-


TI


out from this decade that kids were
eager to own.

Rollerblades were one of the big
trends of the era. It was no lon-
ger cool to roller skate on four
wheels. Rollerblades took
over, enticing children and
adults alike. Today in-line
skating continues in popu-
larity.
Younger children
had to have Tickle
Me Elmo, which sold
out in stores almost
as fast as Cabbage Patch
Dolls from a decade earlier.
Children today still enjoy other
animated Elmo reincarna-
tions.
Another toy craze that hit the
1990s were Beanie Babies. These
bean-filled collector's items soon be-
came very expensive and their appeal
died off.
Furby was a computerized crea-
ture that actually "learned." It would
acquire words and phrases if you be-
stowed attention on the toy. Furbys re-
quired a lot of attention, feeding and
sleep just like a person. This could
be why their appeal quickly wore off
after the first few years.
In terms of outdoor action, sum-
mertime fun was forever changed by
the Super Soaker, which was more
powerful than any water gun before it.
GGO8B539


-_ -. I


THE

71tNDSHIP OF THOSE
WE SERVE IS THE FOUNDATION
OF OUR
54, GRESS

your valuedbusiness is the cornerstone of
our success. In warm appreciation of your
Iw. we extendour very best wishes to
you for a yearfullof happiness andprosperi-
ty. May the blessings of our LordJesus
Christ continue to pour into your lives.

Woglgang, yo&nfa, WoLgangfr., Xaren &
,riana
Don't forget to stop by and makeyour
wish in Santa's mailbox!



Family Owned & Operated Since 1996
1416 S. Parrott Ave. Okeechobee 357-3795
Hours: Monday Friday 9:30am 5:30pm Saturday 9:30am 4:30pm
LAYAWAY PLANS AVAILABLE


I


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions


November 25, 2009





November 25, 2009 Okeechobee News! Holiday Traditions


Holiday gifting


across the


globe

rhaps no one is a more
familiar with gifting trends
across the globe than the jolly
man who lives at the North Pole.
While you might not be able to fire up
the sleigh and sail through the clouds
this Christmas Eve, there are ways to
mimic the gifting trends of countries
far and wide.


Netherlands
Sending postcards, via snail mail,
for special occasions may not be com-
mon in this e-mail centric world. But
it is still common in the Netherlands.
If putting it in writing is not your style,
you can always offer a floral bouquet.
Flowers are the typical offering when
you are invited to someone's home
in the Netherlands, not surprising for
a country famous for its tulips. The
Dutch also exchange gifts on Sinterk-
laas, or Santa Claus Day, on December
5, which celebrates the actual feast
day of Saint Nicholas for whom Santa
Claus was named. On this day, people
indulge in traditional Dutch cookies
and candies, adults often make little
presents or write poems for one an-
other, and children receive a piece of
chocolate in the shape of their first
initial.


South Korea
During the fall harvest (which ar-
rives in mid-August, depending on
the lunar calendar), families gather to
share a meal. At this celebration, adult
children give money to their parents
and, at day's end, parents pack up
the harvested crops for their children.
Pretty presentation is another lesson
to be learned from South Koreans. Ev-
erything in Korea is gift-wrapped and
the packaging is important, so get out
the bows and streamers, even if you
decide to give Mom and Dad cash this
year.


China
Using red wrapping paper and enve-
lopes will delight those in China, who
think the color brings good fortune
and wards off evil. Traditionally. on the


Chinese New Year, people exchange
red envelopes filled with money.


Israel
Every December, Jews around the
world celebrate Chanukah, the festi-
val of lights or celebration of the Ma-
cabees' victory over the Greeks, who
wanted the Jews to give up their culture
and faith in favor of a Hellenistic life in
166 B.C. After the Macabees won the
war, they needed to rededicate their
temple but only had enough oil for one
day. Miraculously, the oil lasted eight
days. As a result, Jews today light can-
dles on the menorah for each of Ha-
nukkah's eight nights and often they
exchange gifts. Originally, Jews gave
monetary presents to teach children
about sharing and in Israel that senti-
ment remains. Parents often give their
children "gelt," which are coin-shaped
chocolates wrapped in gold foil. Pota-
to latkes and jelly doughnuts are the
holiday's signature foods should you
be invited to a Hanukkah celebration.
The goal of the giver should be to pro-
vide a sweet thought as opposed to a
fancy or expensive gift.


Portugal
In Portugal, and in other parts of Eu-
rope, handmade gifts are often seen
as the most sincere. Although Christ-
mas is the most popular time of year
to exchange gifts, most people bring
homemade baked goods or knitted
tablecloths, shawls or blankets when-
ever visiting someone's home, says
Portuguese American Helder Gil, 26,
of Washington, D.C. Even celebrities
have taken up Portuguese habits like
knitting, proof that even old-fashioned
hobbies can be chic. HL09C869


107 N.W. 6th Ave. (863) 467-0922
- i,,I' & Operated Since 1982 F'ii, iiii e


November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions




Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
-Available from Commercial News Providers"


November 25, 2009








Christmas trees come in all shapes and sizes


choosing the perfect Christ-
mas tree is in many ways like
choosing a favorite music group or a
favorite movie. Opinions vary greatly,
and no choice is every truly better or
worse than another. Some like a tree
that pleases the eye, while others go
strictly for the aroma a given tree can
provide. Families often let kids do the
choosing, which can throw all previous
standards of judgement out the win-
dow.
Those with a deeper interest in
Christmas trees may be interested in
learning there are actually a few dif-
ferent species to choose from.


Fraser Fir
One of the most popular Christmas
trees, Fraser fir is a uniformly pyra-
mid-shaped tree. Strong branches are
turned slightly upward and needles
are dark green, flattened and feature
a groove on the upper side and two
broad silvery-white bands on the lower
surface.


Scotch Pine
The Scotch pine is well-suited to
handle heavy ornaments thanks to its
stiff branches. With excellent needle
retention, the Scotch pine holds up
well throughout harvest, shipping and
display.


Balsam Fir
As a Christmas tree, Balsam fir
has several desirable properties: a
dark-green appearance, long-lasting
needles and attractive form. It also re-
tains its pleasant fragrance. Balsams
are so fragrant that their needles were
once used for stuffing "pine pillows" to
act as a natural deodorant.


Dougla Fir
Since the 1920's, the Douglas fir has
been the primary Christmas tree used
in the Pacific Northwest. The needles
are dark green or blue- green, are soft
to the touch and radiate out in all di-
rections from the branch. They have a
sweet fragrance when crushed.


Blue Spruce
Blue Spruce, or Colorado Blue
Spruce, is an attractive tree often used
for Christmas trees or ornamentals. It
has a narrow, pyramidal shape and
cone-shaped crown. As trees become
older, they often take on a more


irregular appearance. The tree is very
popular thanks to its symmetrical
form and attractive blue foliage. Blue
spruces are often used as living Christ-
mas trees (bought with root ball intact
and planted afterward). SP09A628


Christmas trees come in many shapes and sizes, and the species of tree can
vary greatly


November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions








Caring for that special tree A


perhaps due to the the Christ-
mas season essentially starting
the day after Thanksgiving, more and
more families now purchase their
Christmas trees earlier than ever be-
fore. That means trees take increased
effort to care for to ensure they make
it to the big day. To be certain your
tree holds up through the long Christ-
mas season, consider the following
tree care tips.

Trees, even healthy ones, will
have their share of needle loss. How-
ever, if the tree is faded, if the bark
on branches is wrinkled, or exterior
needles fall off at even the most
gentle touch, the tree is excessively
dry. Be sure to keep the tree watered
to avoid excessive dryness.
Cut trees will absorb water more
readily from their stand if they are
given a fresh cut prior to submerging
the trunk. A tree that has not been
freshly cut will still absorb water, but
at a slower rate. A thick, crusty sap
forms on the end of the trunk and can
hamper water absorption.
According to the National Christ-


mas Tree Association, it is not neces-
sary to add anything to the water of
Christmas trees, like aspirin, bleach
or fertilizer. Plain tap water will ex-
tend the life of a tree for weeks. Other
additives can actually hamper water
absorption and tree moisture levels.
Look for large tree stands that
can accommodate at least a gallon of
water. A tree drinks at least one quart
of water per inch of trunk diameter
per day. A larger stand ensures the
water will last longer between refills.
Also, check water levels regularly.
There are products on the market
that will automatically add water to
tree stands in case you forget.
Many people avoid real Christmas
trees because they feel they are "kill-
ing" a tree and harming the environ-
ment. In fact, Christmas trees are
raised on farms and harvested for
this specific purpose. For every tree
harvested, at least three are planted
in its place. Each year there are
more trees available than the last.
Cut trees can be recycled after the
season and impact the environment
far less than artificial trees made of
non-biodegradable metal and plastic.


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions


November 25, 2009




November 25, 2009 Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions 15
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16 Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions


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Film classics to rev up holiday spirit


families often have their own
19 unique traditions when it
comes to the holidays. Lately, families
have begun to include films in many
of those traditions. That's thanks
largely to the array of classic holiday
films that have consistently put people
in the holiday mood. Families reunit-
ing for the holidays this year have a
host of films from which to choose to
enjoy a night in and a bucket of pop-
corn. When heading to visit family and
friends, consider bringing one of the
following as a gift to make a memo-
rable night with loved ones.
*"National Lampoon's Christmas
Vacation" (1989) Led by an all-star
cast including Chevy Chase and Bever-
ly D'Angelo, the Griswold family Christ-
mas should be merry, but naturally
turns into a hilarious disaster. Look
for appearances by "Seinfeld" veteran
Julia Louis-Dreyfus and legendary co-
medienne Doris Roberts in supporting
roles.
"A Christmas Story" (1983) -
Growing up in 1940s America, young
Ralphie has his heart set on a Red Rid-
er BB gun for Christmas, but it seems
like Mom, teacher and even Santa
are certain he'll "shoot his eye out"


with such a gift. Will Ralphie find his
heart's desire under the tree? Watch
to find out.
"It's a Wonderful Life" (1946) -
When distraught George Baily (Jimmy
Stewart) meets a compassionate an-
gel, he learns what life would have
been like if he'd never existed. Holiday
magic wins out in the end.
"Miracle on 34th Street" (1947)
- Another classic that can't be missed!
When a man claiming to be Santa
Claus is deemed insane, a young law-
yer and a headstrong young girl come
to his rescue.
"A Christmas Carol" (1951) Yet
another movie that has spawned a se-
ries of more recent remakes. This one
stars Alastair Sim as Mr. Scrooge, a
bitter, miserly man who doesn't give
a bah humbug about the holiday sea-
son. But will a haunting by three ghosts
change his mind and ill will?
*"A Charlie Brown Christmas"
(1965) Charlie Brown is depressed
and can't find the Christmas spirit.
When he is put in charge of the school's
holiday pageant and comes in with a
meager Christmas tree, the schoolkids
ultimately learn about the true mean-
ing of Christmas. HL09C772


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November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions


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Okeechobee News! Holiday Traditions November 25, 2009


NOW OPEN! ..........


A holiday party menu should include some traditional family favorites to please
the guests.


Tips for hosting painless holiday parties


whether you're preparing for
a casual family gathering, a
fancy four-course dinner par-
ty or a high-spirited hoe down for 100,
planning a party -- particularly during
the holiday season -i s a big job. Here
are 10 tried-and-true tips for planning
memorable holiday gatherings that
will let you minimize the stress and
maximize the fun.
Plan early and plan often. There's
nothing more frustrating than finding
out that your intended party guests
have other plans. December week-
ends tend to get booked up early, so
it's a good idea to send or e-mail in-
vitations as early as possible. Another
possibility is to schedule your gather-
ing for a time when people tend to be
less busy, such as during the week be-
tween Christmas and New Year's, the
last night of Hanukkah or even New
Year's Day.
Design a realistic menu. If you
plan on enjoying your own party, it
pays to have a menu that includes a
number of items that can be made
ahead of time and then heated or
plated just before your guests arrive.
While it's always fun to try out new
recipes when entertaining, it's best to
experiment with only a few items on
your menu and to leave enough time
for substitutes if you're disappointed
with the results.
Embrace tradition. During the
holiday season, many people warm to
the idea of time-honored traditions, so
don't be afraid to serve up your favor-
ite Christmas Pudding or Aunt Lydia's
legendary potato latkes.


Serve up festive beverages. Make
sure that there is a merry mix of bever-
ages for those guests who don't drink
or those who have had enough. A non-
alcoholic punch or a pot of hot-spiced
cider is always popular and can be
served with rum on the side for guests
who want a little something extra.
Set the scene. While some hosts
like to go all out in the decorating de-
partment, others prefer a more low-
key approach. Either way, make an
effort to create a pleasing ambiance
that appeals to the senses. Put out an
assortment of candles. Put up a pot
of simmering water flavored with cin-
namon, cloves and allspice to fill your
house with a heartwarming aroma. Put
in your favorite holiday tunes. Bask in
the glow of your guests' delight.
Keep kids happy. When planning
a gathering for guests of all ages, it's
helpful to have activities on hand for
the younger crowd. Set aside a space
for kids and set out a variety of toys
and games that will keep them occu-
pied and engaged.
*Get help. When hosting a large
party with guests who may not know
each other, it's important to be on
hand to make introductions and keep
the conversation flowing. If you're
planning on joining the party once your
guests arrive, consider hiring one or
more helpers to serve and clean up.
End on a positive note. Your re-
sponsibilities as a host don't end when
your guests say good night. Make sure
it's a good night for all by arranging for
designated drivers who can see that
your friends in need get home safely.
GG09B739


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863.467.1217
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EN: Tuesday Saturday 10 a.m. 5 p. i,


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions


November 25, 2009




Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions 19


sometimes, it'sthe little
turkeys that can be tough to
manage during Thanksgiving. By giv-
ing your younger guests something to
do while the main course is being pre-
pared, they will stay busy and feel like
they have a role in the big day.
Capture their attention with these
Turkey Cupcakes.

Turkey Cupcakes
Prep Time: 30 min.
Total Time: 1 hour 45 min.
Makes: 24 cupcakes
I box Betty Crocker SuperMoist Dev-
il's Food cake mix
Water, vegetable oil and eggs called
for on cake mix box
2 containers (1 pound each) Betty
Crocker Rich & Creamy milk chocolate
frosting


Turkey Time:

Entertaining the

little ones

1 tube (4.25 ounces) Betty
Crocker white decorating
icing
1 tube (0.68 ounces) Betty
Crocker brown decorating gel
Candy corn
Chocolate candy sprinkles
1. Heat oven to 350 oF (325F F for dark
or nonstick pans). Make and cool cake
as directed on box for 24 cupcakes.
2. Frost cupcakes with frosting. Place
remaining frosting in corner of reseal-
able freezer plastic bag. Snip off small
corner of bag.
3. To decorate each cupcake, pipe 1-
inch mound of frosting on 1 side of cup-
cake to look like head of turkey. Make
eyes with white decorating icing and
brown decorating gel; add candy corn
for beak. To make feathers, pipe frost-
ing on opposite side to hold candy corn;
place candy corn upright on frosting to
look like feathers. Sprinkle chocolate
candy sprinkles near head and at base
of feathers. If desired, add candy corn at
base of cupcake for feet. Store loosely
covered.


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new showroom to see
what we have to offer!
Okeechobee showroom
204 SW 7th Avenue

863-763-7557


We also offer turnkey installations from start
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was born/ .......


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you w th caW/thejoy aY.nd
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Should pets be given as gifts?


ew gifts can light up a child's
eyes around the holidays like
the sight of a new family pet.
When kids awake on Christmas morn-
ing, the sight of a new puppy or kitten
under the tree is one they'll remember
for the rest of their lives.
While pets are valuable additions to
a household, that doesn't mean that
doggy in the window will automati-
cally be a great fit with every family.
Before adding a four-legged friend to
your family this holiday season, ask
yourself the following questions.
Can it wait? The holidays are of-
ten a hectic time of year for families.
Travel plans, holiday parties, school
pageants, etc. can take up time and
increase stress levels as well. That
makes the holiday season a less than
ideal time to add a pet, particularly
a puppy or kitten, to a household.
Puppies and
kittens need
special atten-
tion, more so
than older pets
that are already
housebroken.
Consider
waiting
until
af-

ter
the
holidays
to adopt
a pet. This
doesn't have F "
to take away
from the excite-
ment of giving "i S
a child a pet
on Christmas
morning. Rather, give a child a
gift certificate to an animal shelter
and promise to take them to a nearby
shelter once the stress of the season
dies down.
Can you, the adult, handle the
extra responsibility? As much as Mom
and Dad might emphasize to their
kids that the new member of the fam-
ily is the kids' responsibility, realisti-
cally, most of the duties will end up
falling to Mom and Dad. Far too often,
busy parents adopt pets around the
holidays only to eventually return
them to a shelter down the road. The
excitement of a new pet can wear off
under the weight of the responsibility
pets present. If the family schedule is


I


already too much to handle, the new
pet will be the one who suffers most.
Pets while a valuable addition to
most families aren't for everyone.
To avoid adopting a pet you don't
have enough time to care for, deter-
mine if you truly have the time to
devote to a new addition.
Can your kids handle it? Age
should not necessarily determine
whether or not your child can handle
the responsibility of a pet. Some tod-
dlers might be able to help care for
a pet, while some teenagers might
struggle with the responsibility. A
good way of determining if kids can
handle caring for a pet is to consider
how they've handled responsibility in
the past. A child who has never had
any responsibilities, such as tak-
ing out the trash or cleaning their
room, is probably not ready to
be the primary
caregiver for a
pet. However, a
child who has
handled chores
and demonstrat-
ed an ability to
Adequately
handle
such
re-


spon-
sibilities
over time,
is probably
ready for the
S responsibility of
; caring for a pet.
Can you
handle the
financial respon-
sibility of a pet? More than ever
before, pets are as much a financial
commitment as an emotional one.
Visits to the veterinarian can be ex-
pensive. And as veterinary medicine
has advanced, the costs of caring for
pets have risen. Many veterinarians
are inclined to place pets on diets
that make for healthier and happier
animals, even though such diets can
be expensive. It's also important to
note that pampering pets has be-
come the norm, so kids might want to
provide a certain level of care for their
pets that can get expensive. Consider
these costs, and whether or not you're
willing to pay them, before adding a
pet to the family. GGO8B488


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions


November 25, 2009




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November 25, 2009


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Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions


November 25, 2009




November 25, 2009 Okeechobee News! Holiday Traditions


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Okeechobee
(next to Riverside Bank)
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1241 N. St. Rd. 7* (561) 784.5876
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(954)784.4250 (561)999.0441 (561) 733.8883


November 25, 2009


Okeechobee News/ Holiday Traditions




Okeechobee News! Holiday Traditions November 25, 2009


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Don't send your gold Wawgy to someone on TV


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