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Okeechobee news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028410/01370
 Material Information
Title: Okeechobee news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee, Fla
Creation Date: July 28, 2008
Publication Date: 2000-
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 72823230
lccn - 2006229435
System ID: UF00028410:01370
 Related Items
Preceded by: Daily Okeechobee news

Full Text









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V o-KEE


Vol. 99 No. 210


HOBEE NEWS
. *ORIGIN MIXED ADC 334
.. ...-----..-- - 25 SMA U FL LIB OF FL HISTORY
Monday, July 28, 2008 POBOX' 117007
-GAINESVILLE FL 32611


Briefs

OCSO upgrades
phone system
On Tuesday, July 29, the
phone system at the Okeecho-
bee County Sheriff's Office will
be upgraded. As a result, the
phone system will be non-oper-
ational from 5 until 8 p.m. The
only phone line that will still be
working will be the 9-1-1 line.

Club Soccer to hold
fund raiser
A Celebrity Server Night will
be held on Tuesday night, July
29, at Golden Corral to help
raise funds for the Okeechobee
Club Soccer program.
The team will collect do-
nations from 5-8 p.m. at the
restaurant on South Parrott Av-
enue in Okeechobee.
For information on how
you can sponsor or assist the
team please call Celia Fox at
863-697-9614, David McGee
at 863-697-1641, Brian King at
863-610-0084, or Lonnie Sears
at 863-634-1334.
The club is in need of spon-
sors for their activities.

Cypress Hut FOE
4509 holds special
meeting
On Wednesday, July 30 the
Cypress Hut Fraternal Order of
the Eagles 4509 will hold a spe-
cial General Meeting for the Ae-
rie and Auxiliary at Cypress Hut
#4701. The meeting will begin
at 7 p.m. For information call
Bill Huston at 863-763-1187.

Drought Index

Current: 237
Source: Florida Division
of Forestry
Local Burn Ban: None

Lake Levels

10.68 feet
Last Year: 9.11 feet
Sponsored By:

Pogey's Family Restaurant
1759 S. Parrott Ave.
763-7222
Source: South Florida Water
Management District. Depth
given in feet above sea level

Index
Classifieds................................. 7
Com ics ...................................... 6
Community Events.................... 4
Crossword............................. 6
Opinion...................................... 4
Speak Out ............................ ..... 4
Sports........................................ 8
T V .............................................. 4
W eather..................................... 2
See Page 2 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.

newszap.com

Iseb Ill Rll



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Model T: Local man rebuilds classic car
w E w . ~w n.. .., . .,3.. '


OKeechobee News/Pete Gawda
Frank Atkins of Okeechobee raises the hood of his 1936 Ford Model T. Mr. Atkins reas-
sembled this car from a pile of parts in about nine months. This year marks the one
hundredth birthday of the Model T.


'Universal car' is on the road


By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
This year marks the one hun-
dred birthday of the Ford Model
T. Frank Atkins of Okeechobee
is doing his part to keep the
Model T alive. He owns two of
the later versions of the Henry
Ford's "universal car."
The retired military man and
law enforcement officer has a
1926 four door Model T sedan
and a 1923 pickup truck.
The 1926 model was pur-
chased 10 years ago as a pile
of parts. It took nine months
for Mr. Atkins and his wife to
convert that pile of parts into a
running automobile.
"It's not a show car -- drive
it, park, that's what it's for," Mr.
Atkins said. He offered to let this
reporter take the car for spin.
The driver's seat is too
cramped to be entered from
the left side. The driver has to
enter from the right side and
slide across the seat. Once in
the driver's seat, there is very
little leg room. The driver is
cramped up between the dash
in front and the axle speed
shifter on the right.
Driving a Model T has a dif-
ferent feel from driving a mod-
ern car. You really have to work
at it. It takes coordination and
concentration. There are three


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda
This 1923 Model T belongs to Frank Atkins of Okeecho-
bee. It began life as a one seat roadster. The previous
owner added the wooden pickup bed.


pedals on the floor. The right
pedal is the brake and the cen-
ter pedal is pressed to make the
car go in reverse. The left pedal,
in conjunction with a lever on
the left makes the car go for-
ward.
Mr. Atkins has installed
a Ruckstall two speed axle.
While not built by the Ford
Motor Company, the Ruckstall
axle was authorized for Model
Ts and was available at Ford
dealers. The shift lever for the
axle is to the right of the driver.


On the left of the steering col-
umn is a lever that regulates
the spark. On the right side of
the steering column is a hand
throttle. The spark, throttle and
axle speed have to be coordi-
nated. There is no gas gauge.
The only modern accessory is
a tiny digital speedometer Mr.
Atkins installed to the top of the
steering column. There are no
side mirrors and only a small
square rear view mirror. Hand
See Ford - Page 2


Senior services


struggles with


budget cuts


By Victoria Hannon
Okeechobee News
While gas prices have al-
most doubled in the past few
years, funding for many ser-
vices has been cut back.
Organizations that provide
help to the community are feel-
ing the pinch.
Among those affected are
Okeechobee Senior Services.
Senior Services offers con-
gregate dining, in which el-
derly members of the commu-
nity can come together to have


meals and interact socially.
They also offer home making,
personal care and respite care
for their clients.
While all services have been
hurt by funding shortfalls, the
price of gasoline could have the
greatest effect on the Meals on
Wheels program.
"Years ago the program
shifted from Treasure Coast
Food Service to us," said Sheila
Savage, Senior Service Director.
When she took over the pro-
See Senior - Page 2


Mullins retires


from Seacoast


Joe G. Mullins, President, Big
Lake Region of Seacoast Na-
tional retired on July.l, 2008.
Mr. Mullins served as presi-
dent directing the operations
of Seacoast's eight branches in
six counties surrounding Lake
Okeechobee.
Prior to the Seacoast merger
in 2006, Mr. Mullins served as
president and chief executive
officer of Big Lake National
Bank since 1988. Under his


leadership, Big Lake's geo-
graphic scope expanded from
one office in Okeechobee to
nine offices in seven counties,
growing the bank's assets from
$14 million to over $300 million,
forming one of the largest com-
munity banks in the region.
A retirement party was held
for Mr. Mullins at Dark Ham-
mock thanking him for his
See Mullins - Page 2


Submitted photo
Joe Mullins was the guest of honor at retirement party at
Dark Hammock.


Okeechobee player is


hoping to turn pro


By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
Omar Guerrero dazzled and
amazed when he played high
school soccer for Okeechobee.
He now wants to take his show
on the road.
Guerrero will have a try out
with a professional team in
Mexico City in August and is
hopeful he can pursue a career
playing soccer.
Omar's uncle, Javier Tovar,
a professional soccer player
in Mexico, put in a good word
for Omar and he'll have a try-
out with a team in the America
league, which is comprised of
players 20 years and younger.
They are like the minor league
team to the adult professional
leagues in Mexico.
Another Okeechobee play-
er, Oscar Cazada is also playing
professional soccer in Mexico.
He was a former teammate of


Omar.
"I'm not sure what to ex-
pect. It's something I've never
been to. But I'll go out there
confident and do my best," he
said.
Omar said having his uncle
in the league sure helped his
chances of getting a tryout.
"It's nice to have a connec-
tion to speak for you and rec-
ommend you. He has helped
me get this opportunity," he
said.
Guerrero attended Warner
Southern College this past year
and had a successful freshman
campaign. He decided not to
return this fall after a scandal
hit their soccer program this
spring. The team apparently
had used some illegal players
in their matches. They had to
forfeit several of their victories
which cost them a chance for a
national title. The team had ac-


tually won enough matches to
qualify for the national champi-
onship tournament. Guerrero
said the scandal was very dis-
appointing to him. He said he
hopes the next chapter in his
life will be more successful.
"I think actions are a lot
louder than words. I have al-
ways tried to do my best," he
said.
His younger brother, Eddie
Guerrero, will be a junior on
the Brahmans soccer team this
year. Omar said he thinks his
brother also has an opportu-
nity to play professional soccer.
However, Eddie is also one of
the top cross country runners
in the state and he could opt to
pursue that sport instead.
"I think Okeechobee has a
lot of talent here. They have a
lot of good players and they are
See Player - Page 2


Okeechobee News/Charles Murphy
Omar Guerrero, who played high school soccer for
Okeechobee, will try out for a professional spot in Au-
gust..


i 525 NW Ave L Belle Glade NEEDED

I&.. .561 -992-4000 TECHNICIANS AND
SERVICE ADVISOR'S
- ---- __www.9loderotoso I I








2 Okeechobee News, Monday, July 28, 2008


Senior
Continued From Page 1
gram, Ms. Savage asked for per-
manent drivers and vans from the
county due to the unreliability of
volunteers.
In most larger cities this is a vol-
unteer program, but in Okeecho-
bee the volunteer base is smaller,
she explained.
The meals must be delivered
at approximately the same time
each day and must be delivered
every day, so volunteers who may
or may not show up or change
frequently was not a viable op-
tion.
"For some of these people, this
is the only meal that they get each
day," Ms. Savage said.
There are about 165 elderly
members of the community on
this program.
This position is filled by county
employees and county vehicles,
so gas prices have not yet had an
effect on the program. But that
could soon change.
This program delivers five
meals a week to most of its cli-
ents, with a few extra meals going


Ford
Continued From Page 1
turn signals must be used as the
car has no turn signals.
The car has an alternator and
an electric starter, an option on
later Model Ts.
The car is painted black, its
original color. However, it is a
popular misconception that all
Model Ts were painted black.
There were several colors avail-
able, but they were all in very
dark shades close to black.
The truck is not entirely au-
thentic. It was originally a one seat
roadster and the previous owner
added the wooden pickup bed.
The top folds down. There is no
door on the driver's side. Perhaps
that is because the driver would
have to enter on the left side any-
way. The spare tire is mounted
on the left side where the driver's
door would be.
Mr. Atkins bought the truck


to the neediest for the weekends.
"Lots of counties get frozen
food," Ms. Savage said. "I don't
believe in that. We deliver hot
meals."
The meals are subcontracted
through the Sheriff's Depart-
ment.
"They have been really good at
keeping the price low and meeting
the different dietary needs," Ms.
Savage said. The county commis-
sioners pay for 80 percent of the
funding for the Meals on Wheels
program, Ms. Savage said. Grants
on both the state and federal level
pick up the other 20 percent.
While this program has yet
to really be affected by shrinking
budgets, other services that Se-
nior Services offer have not been
so lucky,
Approximately $16,000 has
been cut from what the organi-
zation receives from state grants.
They will not know until January
what cuts they face from the Fed-
eral grants.
"We knew that this was com-
ing," Ms. Savage said. "In antici-
pation, we started cutting back,
not on clients, but on the hours
of service."
This means that where some-


partially assembled from a neigh-
bor about a year and half ago.
Mr. Atkins, who likes to tinker
with machinery, also has a 1940
Buick in mint condition and sev-
eral vintage tractors.
The Model T was the first low-
priced, mass produced automo-
bile with standard interchange-
able parts. The first Model T built
for sale was produced Oct. 1,
1908. Between that date and May
26, 1927, when production of the
car stopped, more than 15 million
Model Ts were produced.
The first Model Ts sold for.
$825. However, due to mass pro-
duction, Ford was able to steadily
lower the price to $260 without
extras.
On Dec. 18, 1999 the Ford
Model T was named "Car of the
Century" by a panel of 133 au-
tomotive journalists and experts
who began with a list of 700 can-
didates in 1996.
"Henry Ford and his Model T
helped reshape the landscape of


America a century ago by mak-
ing the automobile accessible to
the average person, said Bill Ford,
Ford Motor Company executive
chairman.
"Celebrating a hundred years
of the Model T is a great mile-
stone for Ford Motor Company,"
stated Edsel Ford, great-grandson
of Henry Ford and member of the
board of directors of Ford Motor
Company. "No other vehicle has
put its mark on the industry or
world like the Model T, and true
to my great-grandfather's vision,
it was the simple durable car that
millions could afford and that
many still treasure today."
The Model T was the first truly
universal car. By 1921, it account-
ed for almost 57 percent of the
world's automobile production.
"It was kind of the common
car for the common person," said
John Heitman, a history,professor
at the University of Dayton who
has taught classes on automobile
history and its impact on Ameri-


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can life. He claims the Model T is
one of the most historically sig-
nificant cars of the 20th century
and maybe the most important
American car.
The first suburbs were created
as people were able to move fur-
ther from the trolley lines.
"It has a very high ground
clearance. It was easy to repair. It
was so inexpensive that isolation
on the American farm came to an
end," Mr. Heitman said.
Country stores went out of
business as farmers were able to
travel to town. Rural one room
schools became thing of the past
with cheap, reliable transporta-
tion.
See more pictures on page 5.
Editor's note: Some of the in-
formation in this article came
from the Associated Press and
from Ford Motor Company.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.com.
Reporter Pete Gawda can be reached
atpgawda@newszap.com.


7a '-, m 1,


MIrivv.II
ch Free Ads


Mullins
Continued From Page 1
dedicated service and guidance.
Employees displayed their ap-
preciation with shirts that read:
"Joe -- The Man, The Myth, The
Legend."
Mr. Mullins is certainly very
well known in the banking indus-
try for South Florida and will be
missed by many.
Mr. Mullins served on numer-
ous profes-
sional and civic
affiliations in-
cluding Florida
Bankers Asso-
ciation, Com-
munity Bank-
ers Association,
Okeechobee
Industrial De-
ve Ilopment Joe
Authority, and Mullins
was a founding
member and past treasurer of the
Economic Council of Okeecho-
bee. Mr. Mullins also served on the
boards ofthe Okeechobee County
Water and Sewer Task Force, New
Horizons of the Treasure Coast,
Fort Pierce Jaycees, Lions and Ki-
wanis clubs, Okeechobee County
Chamber of Commerce and was
a founding board member, past
treasurer, and past president of
the Wellington Exchange Club of
West Palm Beach.


Player
Continued From Page 2
capable of accomplishing a lot. name for yourself, and build up
'ou have to work hard, make a the program," he said.


Today's Weather


Okeechobee News
Published by Independent Newspapers, Inc.


To Reach Us
Address:
107 S.W. 17th Street, Suite D
Okeechobee, FL 34974
WebslRe: www.newszap.com
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The Okeechobee News is available
daily via home delivery and is on sale
al racy, and store locations throughout
Okeechobee County. Call the office to
find out if your home is within our
present home-distribution boundaries.
Call 800-282-8586 to report a missed
newspaper or poor delivery
Additional copies of the r.evespap-r are
available for 50 cents daily through
Saturday and 75 cents for Sunday at the
office. Home delivery subscriptions are
available at $29.43 for three months.
Okeechobee News
USPS 406-160
Published Daily by Independent
Newspapers, Inc.
107 S.W. 17th Street, Suite D
Okeechobee, FL 34974
Periodicals Postage Paid at
Okeechobee, FL 34974
POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to Okeechobee News
Circulation Administration
PO Box 7011
Dover, DE 19903


NOTICE OF TAX


FOR SCHOOL


CAPITAL OUTLAY


The Okeechobee County School Board will soon consider a
measure to impose a 1.750 mill property tax for capital outlay
projects listed herein.

This tax is in addition to the school board's proposed tax of
5.911 mills for operating expenses and is proposed solely at the
discretion of the school board.

The capital outlay tax will generate approximately $3,865,626 to
be used for the following projects:

CONSTRUCTION AND REMODELING
School Classroom Construction
Remodel School Locker Room

MAINTENANCE, RENOVATION, AND REPAIR
HVAC Replacements and Upgrades
Communications Cabling Projects
Paving Improvements
Drainage Improvements
Carpet Replacement
Flooring Repairs/Replacements
Lighting Replacements/Upgrades
Electrical Upgrades-
Window Replacement Projects
Boiler Replacements

MOTOR VEHICLE PURCHASES
Purchase of (6) School Buses
Maintenance Vehicles

NEW AND REPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT
District-Wide Furniture and Equipment
District-Wide Computer Hardware and Software
Playground Equipment


All concerned citizens are invited to a public hearing to be held
on July 31, 2008 at 6:00 p.m., at the Okeechobee County School
Board Office, Room 303, 700 S.W. Second Avenue, Okeechobee,
Florida.


A DECISION on the proposed CAPITAL OUTLAY.TAXES will
be made at this hearing.


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING


The Okeechobee County School Board will soon consider a
budget for fiscal year 2008-2009.
A public hearing to make a DECISION on the budget
AND TAXES will be held on:



July 31, 2008 at 6:00 p.m.


at


Okeechobee County School Board,
Room 303, 700 SW Second Avenue
Okeechobee, Florida 34974


one may have received two hours
of home care before, it may have
now been cut back to only one
hour.
For the past year, there has
been a freeze on the program,
meaning that they have not been
able to take on new clients.
"There are probably about
8,000 plus people that are 60 or
older in Okeechobee," Ms. Sav-
age said. "We only have around
350 clients."
With co-pays, the cost of food,
water and electricity rising, the
elderly are becoming concerned,
Ms. Savage said.
"They were hurting before
this," Ms. Savage said. "Social Se-
curity didn't meet inflation before
the oil crisis. They are very con-
cerned, very very worried about
what is going on out there."
The average client that
Okeechobee Senior Services
helps only receives $750 to $850 a
month, just barely at the poverty
line.
"If working people think that
they are having a hard time, just
look at the elderly," Ms. Savage
said.
Most of the clients are over
75 and live alone with declining


health. Their family is either non-
supportive or lives somewhere
else.
"Social Security was never
meant to be a total income," Ms.
Savage said. "People should take
a hard look at the elderly around
them and offer to take them to
the store or just stop by and bring
them a hot meal."
She says that most elderly
don't speak out about their needs
because they don't want people
to think that they are no longer
self-sufficient.
"You can't save the world,
but if every person would help
the person right there in front of
them, we would make a pretty
good impact," Ms. Savage said.
Okeechobee Senior Services
are doing what they can to help
those that need it.
"Even though we have been
cut on services and there is a
freeze on, we want people that
need help to call us and we will
direct them or try to come up with
alternatives," Ms. Savage stated.
For more information, please
call 863-462-5180.


in, -O-: Os 10s 20s 30s 40s 502 60is 70; 80- 905s 100s i


Okeechobee Forecast
Today: Partly cloudy through late morning...Then numerous
afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Highs around 90. South
winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 70 percent.
Tonight: Partly cloudy. Scattered evening showers and
Thunderstorms. Lows in the lower 70s. Southwest winds around
5 mph becoming south after midnight. Chance of rain 30 percent.

Extended Forecast
Tuesday: Considerable cloudiness through late morning...Then
numerous afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Highs around
90. South winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 70 percent.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy. Scattered evening showers and
thunderstorms. Lows in the lower 70s. Chance of rain 40 percent.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy with scattered showers and thunder-
storms. Highs in the lower 90s. Chance of rain 50 percent.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy. Isolated evening showers and
thunderstorms. Lows in the lower 70s. Chance of rain 20 percent.
Thursday: Partly cloudy with scattered showers and thunder-
storms. Highs in the lower 90s. Chance of rain 50 percent.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy with isolated showers and thun-
derstorms. Lows in the lower 70s. Chance of rain 20 percent.
Friday: Partly cloudy with scattered showers and thunder-
storms. Highs in the lower 90s. Chance of rain 50 percent.
Friday night: Partly cloudy with isolated showers and thunder-
storms. Lows in the lower 70s. Chance of rain 20 percent.
Saturday: Partly cloudy with scattered showers and thunder-
storms. Highs in the lower 90s. Chance of rain 30 percent.


I


P'n







Okeechobee News, Monday, July 28, 2008 3


PROPOSED MILLAGE LEVY BUDGET SUMMARY
OPERATING FUND:
LOCAL EFFORT 5.163 OKEECHOBEE COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
DISCRETIONARY 0.498
ADDITIONAL DISCRETIONARY 0.250 THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF OKEECHOBEE
DEBT SERVICE FUND: 0.00 COUNTY, FLORIDA ARE 3.0 PERCENT MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES.
CAPTIAL PROJECTS F UNYD: 1.750
TOTAL 7.661 FISCAL YEAR 2008-2009


ESTIMATED REVENUES:

FEDERAL SOURCES
FEDERAL THROUGH STATE
STATE SOURCES
LOCAL SOURCES
OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
TOTAL REVENUES


TRANSFERS IN 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00


TRANSFERS IN
FUND BALANCE JULY 1, 2008

TOTAL REVENUES & BALANCES


OPERATING
GENERAL
FUND

50,000.00
302,898.96
36,142,136.00
14,040,554.00
16,000.00
50,551,588.96


0.00
8,692,864.82

59,244,453.78


DEBT
SERVICE
FUND

0.00
0.00
223,306.16
0.00
0.00
223,306.16


0.00
53,813.10

277,119.26


CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENT
FUND


0.00
0.00
2,579,161.00
3,940,626.00
0.00
6,519,787.00


0.00
5,313,300.29

11,833,087.29


SPECIAL
REVENUE
FUNDS

844.53
8,276,154.18
60,000.00
1,246,840.76
0.00
9,583,839.47


0.00
421,863.35

10,005,702.82


ALL FUNDS


50,844.53
8,579,053.14
39,004,603.16
19,228,020.76
16,000.00
66,878,521.59


0.00
14,481,841,56

81,360,363.15


ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES:
INSTRUCTION 34,213,641.49
PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 1,865,060.80
INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA SERVICES 668,136.87
INST. & CURR. DEVELOPMENT SERV. 672,948.78
INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF TRAINING SERV. 442,170.83
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY 393,685.00
SCHOOL BOARD 564,647.00
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 1,870,416.48
SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 3,366,839.00
FACILITIES ACQUISITION/CONSTRUCTION 200,572.00
FISCAL SERVICES 428,321.00
FOOD SERVICES 0.00
CENTRAL SERVICES 322,053.65
PUPIL TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 3,390.632.00
OPERATION OF PLANT 4,320,678.15
MAINTENANCE OF PLANT 1,321,387.33
ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNOLOGY SRVS 1,360,490.33
COMMUNITY SERVICES 347,500.00
DEBT SERVICE 1,539.34


TOTAL EXPENDITURES


55,750,720.05


11,833,087.29


224,543.75
224,543.75


11,833,087.29


3,346,254.47
1,153,056.87
30,309.93
574,488.75
894,541,33
48,938.56
0.00
110,767.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
3,688,111.13
0.00
83,307.25
11,300.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9,941,075.87


37,559,895.96
3,018,117.67
698,446.80
1,247,437.53
1,336,712.16
442,623.56
564,647.00
1,981,184.06
3,366,839.00
12,033.659.29
428,321.00
3,688,111.13
322,053.65
3,473,939.25
4,331,978.15
1,321,387.33
1,360,490.33
347,500.00
226,083.09
77,749,426.96


TRANSFERS OUT 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 2009 3,493,733.73 52,575.51 0.00 64,626.95 3,610,936.19

TOTAL EXPENDITURES & BALANCES 59,244,453.78 277,119.26 11,833,087.29 10,005,702.82 81,360,363.15

THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD




Total Revenues (Federal, State, Local) Total Current Operating Revenues
� . ' 6&.5D.0 D74., * . ....
45289 149
60,000,000 , . 0 0.000.00
__ ...o.ooo.oo"o --_ -A.-- .- , 1 9
5,000.0000 " -_ _ _-_ ._ .
40,000,000
40,000,000
30,000,000
30,000,000



2007-200. 2002-2003 197 1998 _2007-2000 2002-2003 1997-1998

Capital Projects Revenues Total Debt Service Revenues

12.000.000 I 10.051.754 300.000 264,488


200.000
6,000,000 50,000


-.--0- - ----1 0 0,0 0 0
7 200 0 0 ,00 0 -80,0 0 0

2007-2008 2002-2003 97-0.9 0



- ____018_31____________________________________ .'' 8 343 20

7,1600.00 ---.. . . . . ,
7.00 .0 0. . .. . -, - - 4,000.00 -"



0,51300.0 3,000.00
,.00,00. 2,000.00
,00 0.J 2 0 -0.. ,.,_2 8,0 20.976,000.00.,

6,200.00 1,000.00
2007-2008 2002-2003 1997-199802007-2008 2002-2003 1997-1998


Total Number of Employees


20720 20220 10- 9


Total Number of Instructional Employees


2007-2008


2002-2003


1997-1998


20nn7-2008


2002-2003


Q1997-199








4 OPINION OkeeChobee News, Monday, July 28, 2008


Speak Out
Speak Out has moved online, where it is quicker and
easier to share your ideas and converse with others. Go to
www.newszap.com, click on the community name and your
local or state Public Forum. There, you can create new
topics or comment on existing topics. You can also e-mail
comments to okeenews@newszap.com or call 863-467-2033,
but online comments get posted faster and not all phone calls
can be printed. What follows is a sampling of some of the
discussions currently taking place. Thanks for participating!
HEAVEN: Every one wants to go to Heaven, but no one wants to
die to get there. Well except members of the Taliban. Maybe their faith
is stronger? If religious people truly believe there is a heaven then why
keep yourself alive, why fear death, why struggle to the very end to
survive? Because yee of little faith, your instinct to survive is stronger
than faith, just like every other animal, we are no different. All animals
on the Earth have the same percentage of salt in their blood as is. in the
ocean. Just one of the facts that give credibility to evolution. At least
evolution has some facts to back it up, not all of them yet, but quite
a bit of them. There are no facts of evidence to say there is any God.
Just the word of some men who wrote a book. Then some other men
who wanted the book changed some to make life easier, they called it
the New Book. Of course it took them at least 80 years after the events
to start writing this new book, I guess they wanted to make sure there
would be no one around that could say "Hey I was there then. and I
didn't see any of this happen." Life expectancy was what, about 35
years back then?
DESPERATION: You have probably heard about the bank robber
who passed a note written on one of his personal checks to the tell-
er thereby providing the police with his actual address. That's pretty
dumb. Or...had his house been foreclosed? He will have housing now.
Was he unemployed? He will be making license plates for a very long
time. Is he physically sick? His medical expenses will be covered. Was
he starving? He will get three squares a day. He will have access to a
complete library, exercise equipment, television, movies, clean laun-
dry. Desperation?
COMMUNISM: Communism in its true form is actually a great
idea. It is just the fact that the main country to try it was an enemy of
ours, and was run by corrupt leaders. So therefore was looked at as
evil by the U.S. A lot of other countries see our capitalist ways as evil.
The main reason it does not work is because of human nature. There
are always those who want more than everyone else, as well as those
who do not want to contribute and still want what everyone else is
getting. Star Trek is communist based or at least socialist with every
one working for a common good, no money, and every one has all
they need.
ROADS: I often read people complaining about the roads. I won-
der why you didn't check out the roads before you bought a house.
That is certainly something a person buying a house should look at.
How are the roads? How are the schools in the area? Where is the
nearest hospital? What services are available? How far away is the
nearest sheriff's office? You look at these things before you buy, not
after. And if you are smart, before you buy any property in Florida, you
will check it out during the rainy season.
SPENDING: I am continually amazed by what appears to be a
profound lack of common sense and concern for responsibly spend-
ing taxpayers' money by the new county administrator and the board
of county commissioners. The latest example is the issue of where
the Board will conduct its meetings while the old courthouse is be-
ing renovated? They seem to have settled on doing so at the Health
Department, but with the supposed necessity of spending thousands
of dollars for such things as an audio system, dais (rostrum), new
rug, and other amenities. I would like to know why the Board could
not hold its meetings at the Civic Center Building on Highway 98? It
has enough parking, room size, plenty of folding tables and chairs,
bathrooms, an elevated stage on which they can sit; they could use
a portable sound system, and at no great expense to taxpayers. If the
county is truly facing a budget crisis, then they need to tell the county
administrator that it isltime for him 1io , allk he talk, and stop spending
money, which might also include deferring indefinitely the renovation
of the old courthouse and other expensive capital projects.
RALLY: I see the drug prevention rally is going to be at Okee-Tantie
this year because last year it cost so much to hold it at the Agri-Civic
Center. They used nearly all of their proceeds to pay for the use of the
building and didn't have much left for their programs and scholar-
ships. I think it is a shame the county has to charge so much to use
the Agri-Civic Center for an event that helps the community. I wish the
rally folks good luck this year and I think it will be even better at Okee-
Tantie. Just hope it doesn't rain that day since it will be outdoors.
RULES: Humans will do whatever they want because we have a
mind and free will to choose. This doesn't happen in the animal king-
dom, each of the species in the animal kingdom live out their lives
almost like they read a book of rules and they seldom if ever divert
from it. Humans on the other hand have a different attitude. If it feels
good, looks good, smells good, tastes good, sounds good, then lets try
it. If we enjoyed it we just might try it again. This would include all of
our lives and all areas of the life we live. That is why we have guide-
lines, rules and laws regarding how we choose to live our lives. That
freedom will gets humans in trouble all the time, and that is when the
mind is supposed to take over. Children sometimes get forgiven for er-
rors they make as they grow up and learn, but not always are episodes
forgotten. No matter what might be said, discussed or shown on films
to kids they are just young humans and they will do what they want.
We can tell them best sex, certainly the safest is NO sex. We can attest
to the fact that the next best would be safe sex, where BOTH parties
protect themselves. One consequence of sex is pregnancy. That will
change your life, as well as your parents,' siblings' and grandparents'
lives. The only way to protect them to have tighter guidelines, rules
and laws then adults have to follow, and enforce them with conse-
quences for actions.



Okeechobee News

Our Purpose...
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� Okeechobee News 2007
For More Information See
At Your Service On Page 2


Courtesy photo/Tommy Markham

Looking back ...
This photo shows Lake Okeechobee at the Kissimmee River with a bird's eye view of the old bridge and Okee-Simmee
Fish Camp. It was taken in the 1940s. Do you have an old photo to share? Email it to okeenews@newszap.com.


Community Calendar

Monday, July 28
Just for Today Club of Okeechobee, 101 N.W Fifth Street Okeecho-
bee, FL 34972 (Behind Napa Auto Parts),NA. Sickest Of The Sick (OD)
7 p.m.Open Discussion; SS-Step Study; BT-Basic Text; *The Just for
Today Club of Okeechobee is not affiliated with any 12 step fellow-
ships.
A.A. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. This will be an open meet-
ing.
VFW #10539 Ladies Auxiliary lunch and bingo will start at noon
at the Post, 3912 U.S. 441 S.E. Auxiliary members and their guests are
invited. Please R.S.V.P. to 863-763-2308.
Okeechobee Senior Singers meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Okeechobee
Presbyterian Church, 312 North Parrott Ave. Everyone who enjoys
singing is invited. For information or to schedule an appearance for
your organization or group, contact Marge Skinner at 863-532-0449.
The Genealogical Society of Okeechobee will meet at 1:30 p.m. at
the Okeechobee County Public Library, 206 S.W 16th St. The meet-
ing is open to anyone interested in tracing his or her ancestry. The
annual membership is $10 per person, and $12 for a family. For infor-
mation, call Eve at 863-467-2674; or, visit their web site at http://www.
rootsweb.com/-flgso.
Artful Appliquers is a recently formed chapter in Okeechobee. This
chapter meets at the Turtle Cove Clubhouse, 10 Linda Road, Okeecho-
bee on Mondays from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Karen Graves, Chapter lead-
er would like to extend a warm welcome to any interested persons to
come by.

Tuesday - July 29
Just for Today Club of Okeechobee, 101 N.W. Fifth Street,
Okeechobee, FL 34972 (Behind Napa Auto Parts), N.A. Sickest Of The
Sick, 7 p.m. Open Discussion; SS-Step Study; BT-Basic Text; SP-Speak-
er *The Just for Today Club of Okeechobee is not affiliated with any
12 step fellowships.
AA. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W. Second St. This will be an open meet-
ing.
Rotary Club of Okeechobee meets each Tuesday at noon at,
Golden Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. The meetings are open
to the public. For information, contact Maureen Budjinski at 863-484-
0110.
Just for Today Club of Okeechobee, 101 N.W Fifth Street,
Okeechobee, FL 34972
(Behind Napa Auto Parts), NA. Nowhere Left To Go Group (OD)
at noon, NA. Sickest Of The Sick Group OD-Open Discussion; SS-
Step Study; BT-Basic Text; SP-Speaker *The Just for Today Club of
Okeechobee is not affiliated with any 12 step fellowships. New AA.
Meeting in Basinger: There is now an A.A. meeting in Basinger on
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in the Basinger Christian Brethren Church on
700-A, north off U.S. 98. Beginners are welcome.
Al-Anon meeting will be held at the Church of Our Saviour, 200
N.W. Third St., at 8 p.m.
AA. Closed discussion meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the Church of
Our Savior, 200 N.W Third St.
Family History Center meets from 1 until 5 p.m. at the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 310 S.W. Sixth St. Anyone inter-
ested in finding who your ancestors are is welcome to attend. There is
Census, IGI (International Genealogical Index), Social Security Death
Index and military information available. For information, call Mim
Kapteina at 863-763-6510.
Gospel Sing every Tuesday beginning at 7 p.m. The public is in-
vited to participate with vocal and/or instrumental music. For informa-
tion, contact Douglas Chiropractic Center at 863-763-4320.
Widows and Widowers support group meets at 8:30 a.m. at the
Clock Restaurant, 1111 S. Parrott Ave., for breakfast. For information,
June Scheer at 863-634-8276


Community Events

Orchid Club meeting planned
/ The Okeechobee Orchid Club will meet Monday, July 28, at 7 p.m.
at he Cooperative Extension Office at 458 Highway 98 N. A DVD pro-
duced by the University of Florida on orchid cultivation will be shown.
Harry Hoffner, the club president will be available for orchid consulta-
tion. For more information call the extension office at 863-763-6469.

Ladies Auxiliary Spaghetti Night
The VFW Post 10539 Ladies Auxiliary will hold a Tuesday night
spaghetti night. All you can eat spaghetti, garlic bread and salad for a
$5 donation. The dinner starts at 5:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. For
more information call 863-763-2308.

Join the Red Hatters
For ladies looking for fun and meeting some new lady friends, the
Red Hat Group is looking for ladies to join who want to do things. For
information call 863-763-5836 or 863-357-1944.

Grief support group for parents
A grief and healing group dedicated to helping parents deal with
the loss of a child will meet at the Red Corss Building on Thursday,
nights from 7 to 8:30 p.m. For more information contact Georgene at
863-763-2957.

Cypress Hut FOE 4509 holds special meeting
On Wednesday, July 30 the Cypress Hut Fraternal Order of the
Eagles 4509 will hold a special General Meeting for the Aerie and Aux-
iliary at Cypress Hut #4701. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. For infor-
mation call Bill Huston at 863-763-1187.

Scrapbooking crop gathering planned
An all-day scrapbooking crop will be held on Saturday, Aug. 2,
from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. at the First Methodist Church, 200 N.W Sec-
ond St. All levels of scrapbookers are welcome. Please bring a covered
dish if you care to participate in our pot luck luncheon. Refreshments
will be served and there will be plenty of door prizes. Bring any scrap-
book pages on which you are currently working. For more informa-
tion call Joan at 863-467-0290 or Carolyn at 863-634-1885.
Charity group on radio show
Angel Aloma, executive director for Food for the Poor Inc. will be
the guest speaker on the wwFR 91.7 radio show on Aug. 2, at 7:30
a.m. Discussion will include the crisis in Haiti.

Masonic Lodge sponsors breakfast
The Okeechobee Masonic Lodge #237, F & AM will sponsor a'
complete breakfast on Sunday, Aug. 3, from 8 until 11 a.m.
The Breakfast menu will include biscuits and gravy, scrambled
eggs, ham, pancakes and grits with plenty of hot coffee! The breakfast
is $5 per person and it will be held at the lodge located at 107 N.W.
Fifth Avenue, Okeechobee. For more information, please contact Jim
Green at 863-634-4401 or Kid Gardner at 863-357-0427.

Contractors plan dinner
The Okeechobee Contractors Association Luau Dinner and Dance
is planned for Sept. 12, from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. at the Shrine Club.'
The steak dinner will be served at 8 p.m. Hard Livin' Band will per-
form. Tickets are $30 per person in advance, $50 at the door. For more
information contact Kelli Chapman at 863-634-7226 or Lisa Stark at
863-697-6541. Tickets are also available at Riverside Bank.


MONDAY PRIME TIME JULY 28, 2008
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

0 WPTV News (N) NBC News Extra (N) Entertain American Gladiators (N) Nashville Star (cc) Dateline NBC (s) (cc) News (N) Tonight
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AMC (5:30) Movie: *** A Fatal Attraction (1987) Movie: *** h Mystic River (2003) (Sean Penn, Tim Robbins) Movie: Ladder 49 (2004)
ANIM It's Me or.the Dog Profiles of Nature (cc) Animal Cops Houston Animal Cops Houston Animal Cops Detroit Animal Cops Houston
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BET 106 & Park: BET'sTop 10 Live Hell Date Movie: * How to Be a Player (1997) (cc) Comicview (cc) Hell Date The Boot
CNN The Situation Room Lou DobbsTonight CNN Election Center Larry King Live (cc) Anderson Cooper 360 (cc)
CRT Wildest Police Videos Cops (cc) Cops (cc) Ocean Ocean Ocean Ocean Disorder in the Court II The Investigators
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DISN Suite Life Suite Life Movie: ** Cadet Kelly (2002) (Hilary Duff) (s) Montana Suite Life Wizards Life Derek Suite Life Montana
E! Serial Killer E! News Daily 10 30 Best and Worst Beach Bodies Girls Girls E! News Chelsea
ESPN2 Horn Interruption Football NFL Live Hall of Fame Induction Hall of Fame Series of Poker Series of Poker
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EWTN One-Hearts Faith Daily Mass: Our Lady The Journey Home First Love Rosary Abundant Life The World Over
FAM 8 Rules 8 Rules '70s Show '70s Show Movie: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory The Middleman (N) The 700 Club (cc)
HGTV House Potential My House House To Sell Curb Potential Potential House House Design Star
HIST UFO Files (cc) Modern Marvels (cc) Modern Marvels (cc) Prehistoric Monsters Revealed (N) (cc) History's Mysteries
LIFE Reba (cc) Reba (cc) Still Stnd Still Stnd Army Wives "Loyalties" Movie: ** A Crime of Passion (1999) (cc) Will-Grace Will-Grace
NICK SpongeBob SpongeBob Drake Zoey 101 SpongeBob Fam. Mat. Home Imp. Home Imp. Lopez Lopez Fam. Mat. Fresh Pr.
SCI Stargate SG-1 (s) (cc) StarTrek: Next Gener. StarTrek: Next Gener. StarTrek: Next Gener. StarTrek: Next Gener. Gurren Gurren
TBS Friends (s) Raymond Raymond Raymond Friends (s) Friends (s) Family Guy Family Guy Name Earl Name Earl Bill Engvall Sex & City
TCM Movie: * * Wake of the Red Witch (1948) Mitchell Movie: * * The Marrying Kind (1952) (cc) Mitchell Movie: Meet-St. Louis
TLC What Not to Wear Little Little Take Home Nanny (N) Jon & Kate I Jon & Kate I Jon & Kate Jon & Kate Must Love Kids
SPIKE CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn Movie: ** In Hell (2003) Lawrence Taylor (s) CSI: Crime Scn
TNT Law & Order "Gunplay" Law & Order (s) The Closer (cc) The Closer (N) (cc) Saving Grace (N) (cc) Bones (s) (cc)
UNI Locura Noticiero Querida Enemiga Diablo-Guapos Fuego en la Sangre Cristina Impacto Noticiero
USA Law & Order: SVU Law Order: CI Law & Order: SVU WWE Monday Night Raw (Live) (cc) Burn Notice "Trust Me"

HBO Movie: *s Big Daddy (1999) (cc) In Focus REAL Sports The Recruiter (N) (s) (cc) Movie: *** Knocked Up (2007)
SHOW (5:15) Movie: Material Movie: Moving McAllister (2007) Movie: * The Ex (2006) (Zach Braff) Weeds (N) Diary Weeds Diary
TMC Movie: Movie: * % Live Free or Die (2006) Movie: ** * Mission: Impossible III (2006) (cc) Movie: Paris (2003, Crime Drama) (Chad Allen)'R'


II


Okeechobee News, Monday, July 28, 2008


4 OPINION








Okeechobee News, Monday, July 28, 2008



Email book club sends you daily book excerpts


By Diane Timmons
Okeechobee News
At this time in our lives, many
of us have promised ourselves to
take it easy and find time to read.
But there are so many books on
the shelves, where to start? Have
you ever wished you could read a
few pages of a book to see if it is
really what you are looking for?
I am a member of an email
book club that has allowed me
to get a "taste" of a book before I
purchase it or check it out of the
library. This is also another rea-
son to have an email address.
If you are like me, you will
look forward to this email every
day. The email book club, called
Dear Reader, looks at one book
per week. You get an email each
day Monday through Friday and a
little more of the book is revealed.
I don't mean somebody's review.
I mean actual text from the book
itself. On Monday, the book is
introduced and an excerpt from


Comput ng

For

Seniors
Share your questions
for this column by e-mail to
dtimmons@newszap.com

the first chapter appears in the
email. Then, Tuesday through
Friday you will read more of the
book until by Friday, you will have
read the first 25 pages or so. For


all of you avid readers out there,
this is great. This is enough of the
book to know if you want to read
more. The club also introduces
you to books you would never
have otherwise known existed.
Additionally, you can pick the
kinds of read you are looking for
by genre. Among your choices
are fiction, nonfiction, business,
and more. The book club even
reviews audio books. There are
ten plus choices. No need to
get stuck on one type of book.
You can switch the type of book
any time you want. Or, you can
join more than one type of book
club.
Here is how to sign up. Us-
ing your Internet browser, i.e.,
Internet Explorer or Firefox, go
to the web site www.dearreader.
com. There you will find a short
explanation of the service. Lower
on the screen are the books each
group is reading that week. One is
from fiction, one from mysteries,


etc. You just click on the group
you would like to join. When the
new page comes up, all you have
to do is enter your email address
and youth zip code. The zip code
tells the club which library you
use. Then click "Join the Club."
On the next page you will be
asked to choose your library from
a short list. Finally, a thank you
page is displayed. These book
clubs are hosted by a lady who
lives here in Florida -- over by
Tampa. She puts a short, upbeat
note in each email.
This email book club service is
fully endorsed, in fact sponsored,
by libraries everywhere. There is
a link to your library's web site at
the bottom of each daily email.
There you can ask your library
to reserve the book for you if you
wish.
This is also a "guilt-free" book
club. If you don't like the sound
of a book in Monday's email, just
delete it! You will probably like


Riverside Bank to give away $5,000 in free gas


Riverside Bank has announced
a sweepstakes in which one per-
son will win $5,000 in free gas.
The contest is created in response
to high gas prices and a slumping
economy.
"We understand that many
people in the home towns we
serve are feeling the pinch of the
difficult economy, caused in part


by soaring gas prices. We thought
by holding this sweepstakes,
in the Riverside caring way, we
could ease the pain for one lucky
person," said John Williams, Re-
gional President in Highlands,
Polk and Okeechobee Counties.
The contest begins on Friday,
Aug. 1, and ends on Sept. 30. One
winner will be selected from the


Bank's 61 locations throughout
ten Florida counties - Volusia,
Lake, Brevard, Polk, Indian River,
Highlands, Okeechobee, St. Lu-
cie, Martin and Palm Beach.
To enter the contest, individu-
als should visit any Riverside Bank
branch and complete an entry
form. They do not need to be a
Riverside customer and do not


need to open an account. The
promotion is open to legal resi-
dents of the United States who
are 18 years of age or older as of
Aug. 1, 2008. Employees of River-
side and their immediate families
are not eligible.


Today in History


Today is Monday, July 28, the
210th day of 2008. There are 156
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 28, 1945, a U.S. Army
bomber crashed into the 79th
floor of New York's Empire State
Building, killing 14 people.
On this date:
In 1540, King Henry VIII's chief
minister, Thomas Cromwell, was
executed, the same day Henry
married his fifth wife, Catherine
Howard.
In 1821, Peru declared its inde-
pendence from Spain.
In 1868, the 14th Amendment
to the U.S. Constitution, guaran-
teeing due process of law, was
certified in effect by Secretary of
State William H. Seward.
In 1914, World War I began as
Austria-Hungary declared war on
Serbia.
In 1928, the Olympic games
opened in Amsterdam.
In 1932, federal troops forcibly


dispersed the so-called "Bonus
Army" of World War I veterans
who had gathered in Washington
to demand money they weren't
scheduled to receive until 1945.
In 1945, the U.S. Senate rati-
fied the United Nations Charter
by a vote of 89-2.
In 1965, President Johnson
announced he was increasing
the number of American troops
in South Vietnam from 75,000 to
125,000 "almost immediately."
In 1977, Roy Wilkins turned
over leadership of the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People to Benjamin L.
Hooks.
In 2002, nine coal miners
trapped in the flooded Quecreek
Mine in Somerset, Pa., were
rescued after 77 hours under-
ground.
Ten years ago: During a day of
official mourning, President Clin-
ton praised two slain police offi-
cers at the U.S. Capitol as heroes


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda
The four-cylinder Ford Model T engine was the first au-
tomobile engine to be mass produced on an assembly
line. This engine is in a 1926 Model T belonging to Frank
Atkins of Okeechobee.


whose sacrifice "consecrated this
house of freedom." General Mo-
tors Corp. reached a tentative
agreement with the United Auto
Workers to end an almost two-
month-old strike. Bell Atlantic
and GTE announced a $52 billion
merger deal that created Verizon.
Monica Lewinsky received blan-
ket immunity in exchange for
providing "full and truthful testi-
mony" to a grand jury investigat-
ing President Clinton.
Five years ago: Rebels in Libe-
ria captured Buchanan, the coun-
try's second-largest city.
One year ago: Vice President
Dick Cheney, with a history of
heart problems, had surgery to
replace an implanted device that
was monitoring his heartbeat.
Today's Birthdays: Movie di-
rector Andrew V McLaglen is 88.
Actor Darryl Hickman is 77. The
former president of Peru, Alberto
Fujimori, is 70. Rock musician
Rick Wright (Pink Floyd) is 65.


Former Sen. Bill Bradley, D-N.J.,
is 65. "Garfield" creator Jim Davis
is 63. Singer Jonathan Edwards is
62. Actress Linda Kelsey is 62. TV
producer Dick Ebersol is 61. Ac-
tress Sally Struthers is 60. Actress
Georgia Engel is 60. Rock musi-
cian Simon Kirke (Bad Company)
is 59. Rock musician Steve Morse
(Deep Purple) is 54. Broadcast
journalist Scott Pelley is 51. Actor
Michael Hayden is 45. Jazz musi-
cian-producer Delfeayo Marsalis
is 43. Actress Elizabeth Berkley is
36. Singer Afroman is 34. Coun-
try musician Todd Anderson
(Heartland) is 33. Rock singer Ja-
coby Shaddix (Papa Roach) is 32.
Country singer Carly Goodwin is
27. Actor Dustin Milligan is 23.
Thought for Today: "He who
is learned is not wise; He who
is wise is not learned." From the
Tao (dow) Te Ching, the sacred
book of Taoism.
Copyright 2008 The Associated
Press.


OKeechobee News/Pete Gawda
This year marks the one hundredth birthday of the Ford
Model T. This 1926 Model T belongs to Frank Atkins of
Okeechobee. He assembled the car in about nine months
from a pile of parts.


the one next week.
So when you wonder where is
the fun? Just what can the com-
puter do for me? Sign up for the
email book club and enjoy.
I'll be back every Monday to


show you practical reasons for
getting to know your computer.
Happy computing.
We welcome questions and ideas for
columns. Please email dtimmons@
newszap.com with your suggestions.


Each week I feature a new book and every day.
Monday through Friday IFll email you a portion of that
book.



J K. � .- K -- 'K< --. ,r ,

Enter Y'our Email a- ddr ..ss


Enter olurI Zip Code so
you can receive the club
Shro -i 'iour local library



Join the club


C':'uriesy proio
This screen shot shows just how easy it is to sign up for a
daily email from any of the Dear Reader book clubs available.
Whether you are a fan of mystery, science fiction or romance,
you will surely find one that interests you. Your grandkids
may also be interested in the Teen selection.

In Loving Memory of
Mark Arnold
October 6, 1957 - July 28, 1998
You are not forgotten Loved one .
Nor will you ever be, -
As long as life and memory las
We will remember thee.

Loved and Missed by
The Arnold Family



Dr. William A. Olivos
Board Certified Optimetric Physician
is moving his practice to Fort Pierce, FL










All patients' medical records are
available at the Fort Pierce office.



Affordable Auto
1000 S. Parrott Ave., (863) 467-7510
400 N.W. Park St. (863) 763-6500


BAD CREDIT? NO CREDIT?
Ask about our Guaranteed Financing Acceptance


Do You Have: Yet
Pay Stub X
Phone Bill X
Proof of Residence X


s Do You Have: Yes
Self-Employed OK X
Checking Acct. X
Down Payment X


OKeechobee News/Pete Gawda
The Ford Logo appears on the running board of a 1926
Model T belonging to Frank Atkins of Okeechobee. This
year marks the one hundredth anniversary of the manu-
facture of the first Model T.


If you can answer "YES" to the above,
You "WILL" be accepted !!!




AUTO Visit us online at: AUTO
http://www.myaffordableauto.com


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda
The interior of the Model T is much simpler than the inte-
rior of a modern car. This 1923 Model T belongs to Frank
Atkins of Okeechobee. On the rights side of the dash is
the choke. The round gauge in the middle is an amp me-
ter. On the floor there are three pedals. The right pedal is
the brake. The center pedal is reverse and the left pedal,
used in conjunction with the lever puts the car in forward
gear.


CALL NOW!
863-357-9967 "-" ,J t



Ir" " ) .-. ) '.1 *i i.*'Ar ' I--/^ -;t r:"~. i 3 ^ -* ' X-4 t'<^1 I'VC'^?^^ 1 *O" -h'-'1r **;


I







6 Okeechobee News, Monday, July 28, 2008


BLONDE


WIZARD OF ID


GARFIELD







r I
8 0


BEETLE BAILEY


CATHY


PEANUTS


PICKLES


At the Movies


The following movies are now showing at the
Brahman Theatres III. Movie times for Friday,
July 25, through Thursday, July 31, are as fol-
lows:
Theatre I - "The Dark Knight" (PG-13)
Showtimes: Friday at 7 and 9:35 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday at 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Only. Monday
at 3 and 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
at 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. Only.
Theatre II - "Hellboy I" (PG-13) Showtimes:
Friday at 7 and 9:15 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at
2, 4:15, 7 and 9:15 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7
and 9:15 p.m.
Theatre III - "Space Chimps" (G) Showtimes:
Friday at 7 and 9 p.m.. Saturday and Sunday at
2, 4:30, 7 and 9 p.m., Monday at 3 and 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 2, 4:30 and
7 and 9 p.m.
Tickets are $5.50 for adults; children 12yrs
and under are $4.50; senior citizens are $4.50 and
matinees are $4.00
For more information, please call 763-7202


Dear Abby


Father-in-law needs reality check


CLOSE TO HOME
WvWV. CLosfro om.otvl e-MA I'CLO r.'O eMNEMAC. caM

i/cfr c'



!671
I =, ic


-




"IFor cryin' out loud!
Is there anything they don't own?!"


DEAR ABBY: At 17, 1 learned
I could never have children. I was
devastated. I thought there would
never be a "happily ever after"
for me. I was wrong. I have been
happily married to a wonderful
man for four years. I was honest
with him about my infertility, and
it made no difference to him.
The problem is my father-in-
law. Although my husband has
two sisters, he is the only son
of an only son, and his dad is al-
ways pushing the baby issue. He
says things like, "If I could only
have a grandson before I die," or,
"When are you going to get busy
and have me a baby?" When I
remind him that he has a grand-
son, he says it doesn't matter. He
wants one with HIS last name.
My husband thinks I should
just tell his father the truth -- that
I can't have children -- but I'm
afraid his parents will hate me.
It has been seven years since I
learned I can't have children, and
I still feel an emptiness inside. And
just when I think I can't feel any
worse, my father-in-law's com-
ments make me feel broken and
useless. I could use some advice.
-- CHILDLESS IN ARKANSAS
DEAR CHILDLESS: I agree
with your husband. The two of
you should have a frank talk with
his parents. Explain to his father
that his comments are hurtful and
why. He needs to know the truth.


If you are "hated" after that, the
problem is theirs -- not yours.
P.S. Even if you could have
children, there is no guarantee
that they wouldn't all be girls.
Big Daddy is overdue for a dose
of reality.
DEAR ABBY: My husband,
"Fred," has never been much of
a conversationalist, and since he
stopped smoking five months
ago, his weight has ballooned.
We're both elderly and live on a
lake, so we're quite isolated, es-
pecially during the long winters.
Although Fred sees his doc-
tor regularly, he's stubborn and I
doubt that he has told his doctor
everything, including the possi-
bility that he's experiencing de-
pression. He sits by the hour and
pouts.
This morning, when I tried to
carry on a conversation, he re-
fused to look at me. Finally, I said,
"Do you want me to stop talking
to you?" to which he replied, "Do
whatever you want."
Fred has never been easy to
get along with, but his pouting is
driving me crazy. I go out for lunch
with friends occasionally, but be-
cause Fred doesn't want visitors
here, that's my only respite. Any
suggestions? I'm ... READY TO
BAIL IN MINNESOTA
DEAR READY TO BAIL: If
there is anything unusual about
Fred's behavior, it should be re-


Wonderword


By DAVID
OUELLET


HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle - horizon-
tally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR
LEITERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell
the Wonderword.
YIDDISH WORDS AND PHRASES Solution: 8 letters


k R 0 H
ROH U F
AUF


�A
�N
SI
�G
I U


A EN I K V E L L
E R B L U N J I T


C Z T I VH CS KT T S


H S S
M H C


Z T N
Z E Y
ZEY


SELOMHHLR
T KHNOMEMT
C HS EOOS S A
H S R S Z P K Y Y
HSRSZPKYY

O I E E I IA R L
,T R F E N Do.R. A Y,
C R L D L EMMU
H AU H B HA DN
K N E R CVOTL
A K H S I K A T S


Y H H E A-
EASKT
C Y I HS


�2008 Universal Press Syndicate www.wonderword.com 7/28
Balabusta, Berryer, Bobbemyseh, Broche, Chaya, Fendrayt,
Ferblunjit, Fershlugina, Gelt, Gornisht, Haymish, Kineahora,
Kishka, Kvell, Mazeltov, Narrishkeit, Nudnik, Ongepotchket, Rach-
mones, Rutzer, Schmaltz, Schmatta, Schmo, Schvitz, Shanda,
Shmooz, Shtetl, Spiel, Tchotchka, Tsatskele, Tsoriss, Tummel,
Yentz, Zeyde
Last Saturday's Answer: Transcend
To order THE COLLECTED WONDERWORD, Volume 15,, 2 23, 24, 25 or 26, send $5.95 each (US funds only) payable to Univesal Press
Syndicate plus $3 postage for the first book order, $1 ph for each additional bok. Send to WONDERWORD, 4520 Man St., Kansas City, Mo.
4111 or call toll-ree, 1-800-255-6734, ext. 68. order online at upuzzles.com. (Conlain 43 puzzes, 9 of which are the larger, 20 x20 size)


Crossword

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis


ACROSS
1 Sedans from
Sweden
6 "The best is _ to
come"
9 Gets ready for
vacation
14 Sneezing sound
15 Have a balance
16 D sharp
equivalent
17 "Jacks or better"
is a form of it
19 Skirt style
20 Filled with
amorous longing
22 CBS forensic
drama
23 Type of notebook
25 Kobe native's
neighbor
27 Lowly worker
28 Ooze
31 Atlanta-based sta.
32 "Put me down as
a maybe"
35 Moum
37 Cookie container
38 Series with
Sergeant Friday
40 Byron's "before"
43 Holy Ohio city?
45 River mouth
formations
47 High-speed
connection,
briefly
48 Former West
German capital
50 Touched down
51 Invalidate, as a
law
53 Caught sight of
56 Rowboat
propeller
57 Side with little
legumes
60 Before surgery,
informally
62 Tool that cuts
intricate curves
66 Online shopping
mecca
67 Cereal grain
68 Computer device
associated with
the first parts of
17-, 38- and
62-Across and
11- and 24-Down
69 "1 Am Woman"
singer Helen
70 To and _
71 Used a broom


DOWN
1 Down in the
dumps
2 Opp. of down
3 "I thought so!"
4 Game played in
an alley
5 Lethargy-
6 Country
bumpkins
7 Fleecy females
8 Garr of 'Tootsie"
9 Mountain highs
10 CIO partner
11 Noisemaking
hard-shelled
bug
12 Auntie Em's
home
13 Pub mug
18 Eggs in labs
21 Backed up on a
disk
23 Huge hauler
24 Oddsmaker's
equalizer
26 Off-road transp.
27 Casino area
29 Goad
30 Suffix with north
33 Cholesterol
letters
34 Stereo knob
36 C6zanne's
summer


39 "Without further
41 Speakeasy
bust
42 Body shop no.
44 Cheer for a
matador
46 Stayed out of
sight
47 "Heavens to
Betsyl"
49 Not far from
51 Lasso wielder


52 Answer a
help-wanted
ad
54 _-mo replay
55 Tropical trees
58 Starting with
59 Sign of a past
injury
61 Archaic
63 Seek damages
from
64 Homed viper
65 Freshly painted


ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
T EISITIBIAIN WIHIAIRIF S
EXTIR]EIMIE CH AILL
SCOIO0T ERH EAR S A Y
|rE o1TIAIRIDp E|A E S I N
LEO T DASESIN
ALP SAT ELLEE
sITIUIP JUT TEAS

Ni SHA iAK EO OIoR T
S H AIDiA|K|R o|NjO |Hl|O
LIOTI S IN YENTL
VIEIS HIQ AIGRA
SAL AATNEA UEGT R AN

N OR E TT T lRE T 0P P
xwordeditor@aol.com 07/28/08


By Gall Grabowski
(c)2008 Tribune Media Services, Inc.


07/28/08


ported to his doctor because it
could be a sign of dementia or
other illness. However, if it is just
"more of the same" from this
charmer you married, perhaps
you should ask yourself seriously
whether you're better off with
him or without him, and if this is
how you want to live the rest of
your life.
DEAR ABBY: Why do people
write messages such as "Happy
Birthday" to dead people in obit-
uary columns in newspapers? I
comprehend the idea of memo-
riams, but to wish someone who.
has died a happy birthday or an-
niversary seems ludicrous to me.
Will you point this out to your
readers and comment? -- MYS-
TIFIED IN EASTERN MAINE
DEAR MYSTIFIED: I'm print-
ing your letter, but I wish you
would open your heart a bit and
stop being so judgmental. People
often do this because a special
occasion such as a birthday or
an anniversary makes them long
for the, person who died. They
are still grieving over their loss
and want their loved one to be
remembered.
Dear Abby is written by Abi-
gail Van Buren, also known as
Jeanne Phillips, and was found-
ed by her mother, Pauline Phil-
lips. Write Dear Abby at www.
DearAbby.com or PO. Box 69440,
Los Angeles, CA 90069

Astrology


By Eugenia Last
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Life experience is what you
should be looking for, so be a
little carefree and enjoy what's
being offered. You will meet new
people who have a different out-
look on life and this will lead you
to a better, less complicated life.
4 stars
TAURUS (April 20-May 20):
Someone may feed you informa-
tion that leaves you feeling uncer-
tain. Don't make a decision based
on that. You can make the most
progress by being productive at
work. A past learning experience
will pay off now. 3 -stars
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
You can resolve problems .with
friends, neighbors or family if you
talk seriously about how to make
home life better. Be creative.
Communication is the name of
the game so speak from the heart.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Take a unique approach to work
at home and in your professional
life. A good idea presented today
will get you the backing you need
to follow your dream. Take action
and pull in colleagues or friends
who can fill jobs. Delegate and
win. 3 stars
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You
can talk anyone into helping out
or doing things for you. Show
your ability to be practical, hard-
working and adaptable. Consider
everyone's motives before you
commit to a new partnership. 4
stars
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Don't let your emotions get the
-better of you. A promise made
may not be kept. The less depen-
dent you are, the better. Don't
hesitate to reconnect with some-
one from your past. 2 stars
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
There is a lesson to be learned
but be careful not to let it cost you
too much financially. Use your
intuition and your ability to find
solutions. Stick to a budget, be
aggressive and take the initiative.
5 stars
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):
Don't let love lead you astray. Re-
fuse to let someone talk you into
doing things that will cause you to
fall short professionally. Focus on
work, travel and developing your
ideas. Listen to the advice being
given by someone of experience.
3 stars
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21): If you play someone else's
game instead of your own, you
will become the pawn, not the
leader. Travel plans and hooking
up with someone you like will
help you relax, rejuvenate and re-
evaluate. 3 stars
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Check out a money deal
or investment that looks good.
Question anyone who tries to
convince you to make a change.
Be practical and you will stay on
the right track. Don't share finan-
cially. 3 stars
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You can't let things simmer,
especially in a relationship about
which you've been uncertain. Life
is too short to waste being miser-
able or living a lie. Speak up. 5
stars
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't be fooled by some-
one throwing compliments your
way. Arguments will develop if
you disagree with your partner.
Ask an outsider for direction, not
someone who has his or her own
agenda to fulfill. 2 stars
� 2008 UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE


C^Jsu c~t/o Ca^
xe~ocL, i~n. *�.7^-~
�)i tAzv /7n&Le T
wt2& CLa>fsX.


�S s ON









Okeechobee News, Monday, July 28, 2008


~i] weeks o


... It's Easy.


CATEORI-


Announcements ........ 100
Employment ..........200
Financial ............ .300
Services ............. .400
Merchandise ..........500
Agriculture ...........800
Rentals ..............900
Real Estate ..........1000
Mobile Homes ..... .. 2000
Recreation ...... ... ...3000
Automobiles ......... .4000
Public Notices ........ .000



* All personal items under
$5,000 ABSOLUTELY FREE!
* Price must be included in ad
* Private parties only
* 2 items per household per
issue




Annocements Financial


Important Information: Please
read your ad carefully the first
day it appears. In case of an
inadvertent error, please noti-
fy us prior to the deadline list-
ed. We will not be responsible
for more than 1 incorrect
insertion, or for more than the
extent of the ad rendered val-
ueless by such errors.
Advertiser assumes responsi-
bility for all statements, names
and content of an ad, and
assumes responsibility for any
claims against Independent
Newspapers. All advertising
is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all copy, and to
insert above the copy the word
"advertisement". All ads
accepted are subject to credit
approval. All ads must conform
to Independent Newspapers'
style and are restricted to
their proper classifications.
Some classified categories
require advance payment.
These classifications are
denoted with an asterisk *.
Independent Newspapers will
never knowingly accept any
advertisement that is illegal or
considered fraudulent In all
cases of questionable value,
Such as promises of guaran-
teed income from work-at-
home programs or other offers
to send money in advance for
a product or service - we
advise you to check with the
Attorney General's Consumer
Fraud Line at 1-800-220-5424,
. and/or The Better Business
Bureau, 800-464-6331 for pre-
vious complaints.
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage/Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160



Childcare Offered- Home day-
care openings, newborns &
up, Reg.#R150K0003, rea-
sonable price(863)467-7295




PET CHICKEN - Found in Ous-
ley Estates. Please call
(863)763-6453



AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD -
brown & white, in Okeecho-
bee, small, female, Childs
pet (863)634-7515

LEOPARD CUR DOG - 7 mo
old male, half tail, vic of 78
& 29, please call w/any in-
formation (239)633-2512

Lost: Black sunglasses with
dark blue lenses on 07-21 at
Winn-Dixie. If found please
call to return (863)467-4193

Yellow Lab mix, white w/
cream ears, M, neutered, 45
lbs., Border Collie mix-black
w/ some white, F, 45 Ibs.
Last seen near SR78 West
REWARD Please call
(772)344-5017




Ages 25-40, Singer, guitarist
& drummer for recording
original music in personal
studio, playing gigs ok
(704)249-7965


All personal items under $5,000

ABSOLUTELY FREE!








.-i-LLLL-L /w.L '-J J
.....i~ h/i~ ill.^~ j ".-.'. . . -


rim�


Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315





NOTICE
Independent Newspapers will
never accept any advertise-
ment that is illegal or con-
sidered fraudulent. In all
cases of questionable val-
ue, such as promises of
guaranteed income from
work-at-home programs - if
it sounds too good to be
true, chances are that it is.
If you have questions or
doubts about any ad on
these pages, we advise that.
before responding or send-
ing money ahead of time,
you check with the Better
Business Bureau at
772-878-2010 for previous
complaints.
Some 800 and 900 telephone
numbers may require an
extra charge, as well as
long distance toll costs. We
will do our best to alert our
reader of these charges in
the ads, but occasionally
we may not be aware of the
charges. Therefore, if you
call a number out of your
area, use caution.


Published 3 weeks' in all of our Florida papers: Caloosa Belle, Clewiston News, Glades County Democrat,
Immokalee Bulletin, Okeechobee News, and The Sun
* Ads will run in Wednesday daily editions and weekly publications.
or call


1-877-353-2424 (Toil Free)


'-.




|i� ~


Services



Babysitting 405
Child Care Needed 410
Child Care Offered415
Instruction 420
Services Offered 425
Insurance 430
Medical Services435






ENIRlLING!
. Curriculum
21E3 ,Based
SFamily
- Daycare.
Your ChlM WI Expeene:
Fun-Leaming Activities In A
Classroom Setting Fenced


DEE'S MINOR REPAIR
License # 5698
& Pressure Washing
License #1126
FREE ESTIMATES
(863)467-2917
or (863)261-6425


Place your








CLASSIFIED AD




,II '. .i.ii


044






* Ad Appea

and Onlin

* Reasonab


rs In the Newspaper

e Free of Charge!

le Rates For Private


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* Place Your Ad Online, From

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Merchandise



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Wanted to Buy 740




Portable crib, bedside play
pen/crib,. jumperoo, ocean
wonders swing, $180 for all
will separate (561)601-0078




HP Computers- (2) Monitors,
printers, well maintained, re-
set to factory settings $500
will separate (863)467-4949



Adjustable single bed- (2)
electric, have rails, useable
clean mattresses $650 will
separate (863)467-4949



CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES - 2
Males, 2 Females, Long Hair,
Short Hair. $200
863-634-9645

READING A
NEWSPAPFR


Agriculture



Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed/Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845
Lawn & Garden 850
Livestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds 'Plants/
Flowers 865




RIDING MOWER - Sears
Craftsman, 20 HR 46" cut,
$1,050. Call 863-763-4523


Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses - Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House - Rent 930
Land - Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960



2br/lba, garage, No pets
$650/mo 1st, Last & Sec.
Avail 8/1 (863)467-2302 or
(772)260-6969
BEAUTIFUL SAMANTHA'S
GARDEN APTS - In Town,
2br/2ba, W&D, $850 mo. +
$500. sec. (863)634-5780
TAYLOR CREEK CONDOS:
1br/lba, Furnished. $650/mo,
1st. last & sec. For Details.
561-352-4243




OAK LAKE VILLAS 2BR, 2BA,
Completely furnished. W&D.
$950 mo., 1st last & sec.
Call (863)634-3313
OAK LAKE VILLAS Remodeled
2/2-W&D-Lg. screened patio
2 util. rooms. $850 mo., 1st
last & sec. (863)634-3313



AFFORDABLE NEW HOUSES
3/2/2 & 3/1/1 Bring Pets,
Large Yards. Jacuzzi Tub
$1100 & Up (561)723-2226
BRAND NEW 3/2 in Dixie
Ranch Acres. W&D Hookup.
$1000 mo. 1st, last & sec.
(561)723-6865
Dixie Ranch Acres- 2br/lba
duplex $525 month + $500
dep., 3br/1ba CBS home
$700 month + $600 dep.,
includes water,lawn,garbage,
NO PETS (863)467-9029
IN OKEECHOBEE CITY: 4 Br/
2Ba, $1100 mo. + 1st, last,
sec. & refs. Call Barry for
more info. 772-216-1461
LOG CABIN - Rim Canal
w/Pool & Dock, 2BR-1BA,
Full Furn incl/ Bedding, Linens
& Cookware. W/D & D/W -
Cbl, Wat Incl. (561)234-0277


OKEE. - 2br/lba, unfurnished
duplex. $550/mo + $550
dep. 3624 SE 35th Ave.
(239)707-5155
RANCH SETTING - 2 Bdrm., 1
Ba. Available now! Very
clean, no pets. $525 mo. +
sec. (863)467-1717


-g
COMMERCIAL SPACE In'Plaza
on 441 & 15A. 1400 sq. ft.,
Office, Reception Area &
Workshop. Including
150x100 Sales Lot. Ideal for
Car / Boat/ Golf Cart Sales.
$1800/mo. plus utilities.
Yearly lease. (863)467-6300


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property - Sale 1010
Condos/
Townhouses - Sale1015
Farms - Sale 1020
Houses - Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property - Sale 1035
Land - Sale 1040
Lots - Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property - Sale 1055
Property Inspection 1060
Real Estate Wanted1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080



3br/lba CBS Home, Newly re-
modeled in nice neighbor-
hood $85,000
(863)227-2805 Anytime
4br/2ba CBS, Built in 2005,
large garden tub & shower in
master bedroom $129,500
(863)227-2805 Anytime


Mobile Homes



Mobile Home - Lots 2005
Mobile Home - Parts 2010
Mobile Homes - Rent 2015
Mobile Homes - Sale 2020



A GREAT DEAL - in BHR, dbl
wides, 2/2, $500/mo., 3/2's
$600/mo. No Pets, Leases
+ Sec (863)763-4031
BUCKHEAD RIDGE - 2br, 2ba,
furn or unfurn, 1 month Free,
References required
(863)824-0981
NICE 2 br, 2 ba w/lrg Florida
rm, W/D, part furn, dock
w/lake access on Taylor
Creek, no pets. $750/mo +
last & sec. (866)939-6656 toll
free for appointment.
TREASURE ISLAND -Furn,
2BR, 2BA, Lake access, nice
lot, $700/mo. No deposit. Or
purchase $60,000. Call
954-610-5345



BANK REPO'S
MOVE TO YOUR LAND
Mobile Home Angels
561-721-2230
DOUBLE WIDE 2006 - 3 BR, 2
BA. Set up nicely on 1 acre.
Beautiful yard. $120,000
(863)634-1343 after 5pm.


TOWER LAKES - 2 BR, 2 BA,
On the water. Attached car
port & screened porch. Unat-
tached 1 car garage, fenced
yard, sprinkler system & new
floors. $112,000
(863)983-8715/228-1319


Recreation



Boats 3005
Campers/RVs 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles/ATVs 3035



OKEECHOBEE - 38' RV w/lrg
FL room, many improve-
ments, in RV park. $4999
(561)459-0708



MINI-BIKE - Verucci, 49cc,
slightly used, $1250. Call
863-763-4523


Automobiles



Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks4040
Parts - Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070



FORD F350 LARIAT XLT - '90,
Ext. cab, 2 tone beige/brown.
Cold A/C, Standard. $1500
firm (863)763-3451


FOR SALE- 4 X 6, almost new,
black, single axle, 1 7/8"
hitch, lights, $275 neg.
(863)634-2951


/ www.newszap.com/classifieds


/ 1-877-353-2424 (aol Freel


/ For Legal Ads:
legalads@newszap.com








/ Monday - Friday
bum 5 ps.
DE sADLI NE


Monday
F.rday 12 ioonr tior Mondray plbl.coUion
Tuesday through Friday
I i a m tfoi ,n l d* : public,~a. o
Saturday
ThurOday i noon lor Sa, publcarolo
Sunday
Frda, 10a m for Srnday pjblicoaon


I Pi N II


-i1


I Pb lco i


NORTHSHORE VILLAGE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT
NOTICE OF INITIAL LANDOWNERS' MEETING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the first Landowners' Meeting of the Northshore
Village Community Development District will be held at 11:00 a.m. on August 14,
2008, in the offices of Tucker Group, LLC located at 104 NW 7th Avenue, Okee-
chobee, Florida 34972. The primary purpose of the Initial Landowners' Meeting is
to elect five (5) Supervisors for the Northshore Village Community Development Dis-
trict.
A copy of the Agenda for this meeting may be obtained by contacting the District
Manager at 561-430-4922 and/or 877-737-4922 five (5) days prior to the date of
the meeting. The meeting may be continued as found necessary to a time and place
specified on the record.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made with respect to any matter con-
sidered at this meeting, such person will need a record of the proceeding and such
person may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made at his
or her own expense and which record includes the testimony and evidence on
which the appeal is based.
In accordance with the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person
requiring special accommodations or an interpreter to participate at this meeting
should contact the District Manager at 561-630-4922 and/or 877-737-4922 at least
seven (7) days prior to the date of the particular meeting.
Il.~ll~..o.. ~ r. !i,- i.. . .:1 . . . .


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
TO CONTINUE IMPOSITION AND PROVIDE FOR
SOLID WASTE COLLECTION SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS
PURSUANT TO FLORIDA STATUTES 197.3632, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the
City Council of the City of Okeechobee, Florida, will conduct a public hearing to
consider continuing the imposition of annual solid waste collection special as-
sessments for the provision of residential solid waste collection and disposal ser-
vices within the incorporated area of the City of Okeechobee, Florida.
The hearing will be held at 6:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as possible, on Tuesday,
August 19, 2008 in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 55 SE 3rd Avenue, Okeecho-
bee, Florida, for the purpose of receiving public comment on the proposed as-
sessments. All affected property owners have a right to appear at the hearing and
to file written objections with the City Council within twenty (20) days of this no-
tice. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Council with re-
spect to any matter considered at the hearing, such person will need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is based. City Clerk media are for the sole pur-
pose of backup for official records of the Clerk. In accordance with the American
with Disability t (ADA) and Florida Statutes 286.26, persons needing a special
accommodation or an interpreter to participate in the proceedings should contact
Lane Gamiotea no later than two (2) working days prior to the hearing at
(863) 763-3372. If hearing or voice impaired, call TDO 1-800-955-8770 (Voice)
or 1-800-955-8771 (TTY)
Copies of the Solid Waste Collection, Disposal and Assessment Ordinance No. 784
and all subsequent Assessment Resolutions are available for inspection at the Of-
fice of the City Clerk located at City Hall, 55 SE 3rd Avenue, Room 100, Okeecho-
bee, Florida, Monday to Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. except holidays.
The assessments are a non-ad valorem assessment and will be collected by the Tax
Collector in the same manner as your ad valorem tax bill, to be mailed in Novem-
ber 2008, as authorized by Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes. Failure to pay the
assessments will cause a tax certificate to be issued against the property which
may result in a loss of title.
By: James E. Kirk, Mayor
Attest: Lane Gamiotea, CMC, City Clerk
2845180ON 7/28/08


PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF INDIAN
RIVER STATE COLLEGE WILL HOLD A SPECIAL BOARD MEETING FOR THE SE-
LECTION OF THE PRESIDENT ON MONDAY AUGUST 4, 2008 AT 9:00 A.M. IN
ROOM 207 OF THE S-BUILDING ON THE MAIN CAMPUS OF INDIAN RIVER
STATE COLLEGE AT 3209 VIRGINIA AVENUE, FORT PIERCE, FLORIDA
34981-5596. ANY PERSONS WISHING TO PLACE BEFORE THAT BOARD FOR
CONSIDERATION ARGUMENTS CONCERNING ISSUES OF LAW OR POLICY OR
PRESENT EVIDENCE OF ANY PERTINENT FACT THAT MAY BE IN DISPUTE MUST
NOTIFY THE INTERIM PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE AT LEAST SEVEN DAYS BE-
FORE THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. ANY PER-
SONS WISHING TO APPEAL THE DECISIONS OF THIS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO
ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE
PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VER-
BATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE.
283135 ON 07/28/08


Earn some extra cash.
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WHO-STORY IN THE MAKING.


Find out about movies, sports, cuisine
and far-off places that you've never seen!
So whether you're an elephant, ostrich, or a who.
reading the paper's a great thing to do!
.. It all starts with newspapers
i-"O � rMES�AGG-E -OUAPT nOYOiY B THIS O NEVPAPER f wN'
',J O r^: ADTHENEWSPAPERASSOCIATIONOFAMVERICA TIUAOciC
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8 Okeechobee News, Monday, July 28, 2008



FWC to host summit on FL wildlife & climate change


Florida's wildlife stands at the
forefront of the battle against the
effects of climate change. But
they don't stand alone. The Flori-
da Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) and other
state and federal agencies and en-
vironmental groups are bracing
to fight for their protection, man-
agement and adaptation.
Florida's Wildlife: On the
Frontline of Climate Change, a
summit hosted by the FWC, will
highlight the challenges facing
wildlife managers, governments,
industry leaders and the public in
the next 50 years in the struggle
with climate change. On Aug.
20-22, experts from the FWC and
other state and federal agencies
will converge in Orlando at the


Rosen PLAZA to discuss the pre-
dicted consequences of climate
change on wildlife, while seeking
answers on how to manage and
conserve Florida's wildlife and
habitats wisely.
"This summit has global sig-
nificance, because the effects of
climate change on places like
Florida and Alaska will be a pre-
lude to what's going to happen
elsewhere in the world," said
FWC Chairman Rodney Barreto.
One of the keynote speak-
ers, Dr. Jean Brennan, a climate
change scientist with Defend-
ers of Wildlife, was a member
of the U.S. Delegation at inter-
national negotiations under the
U.N. Framework Convention on
Climate Change. She also served


on the Intergovernmental Panel
on Climate Change (IPCC) and
shares the Nobel Peace Prize
for 2007 for her contribution to
(IPCC). Brennan acknowledges
that Florida's wildlife and habitats
are in a sensitive position when
it comes to the effects of climate
change.
"Florida is extremely vulner-
able with its low elevation," Dr.
Brennan said. "And it's the hard-
est hit with extreme weather such
as hurricanes. The Arctic is seeing
greater temperature changes, but
the biological diversity of plants
and animals in Florida forces the
question: What are you losing?"
The summit will feature pre-
sentations and workshops to
stimulate discussion and offer


solutions to the complexities of a
state growing rapidly in an envi-
ronment changing just as quickly.
On Wednesday, Aug. 20, Dr.
Virginia R. Van Sickle-Burkett
from the United States Geologi-
cal Survey (USGS) will present
reports from the Intergovernmen-
tal Panel on Climate Change. Dr.
Thomas Crisman, from the Uni-
versity of South Florida, will pres-
ent a report on the anticipated
changes in Florida because of cli-
mate change. Dr. Thomas Eason
will present the FWC's report on
Florida's wildlife and its changing
habitats.
A panel discussion in the af-
ternoon will feature specific spe-
cies on the frontline of climate
change, including marine, ter-


restrial and exotic species. The
future of agriculture also will be
on the agenda.
The first day will conclude with
a panel discussion on habitat and
species management, outdoor
recreation, initiatives from the
conservation community, legisla-
tive progress and communication
strategies for public awareness.
Thursday's session will open
with Brennan, who will speak
about management issues of
wildlife and habitat in a changing
climate.
Concurrent workshops, led by
FWC's top scientists, will focus
on marine and inland ecosys-
tems, hunting and fishing, native
wildlife and habitats, invasive
organisms and natural-resource


management and land-use plan-
ning.
The event will continue on
Friday morning with reports from
the workshop facilitators. FWC
Executive Director Ken Haddad
will present the agency's directive
for Florida's wildlife to conclude
the three-day summit.
The early registration fee, prior
to Aug. 4, is $175, which includes
two breakfasts, two lunches and
a reception. After Aug. 4, the fee
is $195. The registration form
may be found at www.ces.fau.
edu/floc/ or by contacting Doreen
DiCarlo at the Center for Environ-
mental Studies at Florida Atlantic
University, 561-799-8553 or 561-
626-1404 (fax).


Tallahassee really is 'the other Florida'


By Daniel Shube
In my final city/college trip with
my son, Spencer, we traveled long
and far to Tallahassee and Florida
State University (FSU).
Our first trip to Orlando and
University of Central Florida
(UCF) was fun. Orlando is always
fun. After all, tourists by the mil-
lions visit Orlando from all over
the world to have fun.
Then we were off to Tampa
and University of South Florida
(USF). I happen to like Tampa. It
is a clean city. Tampa has beach-
es, entertainment, fine dining and
more. The USF campus, to me
at least, seemed friendlier (even
though both UCF and USF are
both quite large).
I've never been to Tallahassee
-- probably because it is a long
drive. However, as soon as we


arrived there it became apparent
that Tallahassee is correctly billed
as "The Other Florida."
Tallahassee's rolling hills, live
oaks (complete with Spanish
moss) and college town atmo-
sphere was so inviting. Throw
in the allure of it being our state
capital and we all fell in love with
this city..
This trip we split up our stay,


first with a downtown experi-
ence.
We took time to visit the Tal-
lahassee Antique Car Museum
(www.tacm.com). They boast
one of the most extensive car
collections in the world. Oldies,
such as the 1860 hearse that car-
ried President Lincoln, the first car
made in America in 1894, three
different Batmobiles and so much
more! There were many different
collections, besides cars as well,
such as boat motors, pinball ma-
chines, electric fans, knives, and
yes, more golf clubs than I have
in my closet!
Speaking of golf clubs (think
I would travel to Tallahassee and
not play golf?), we stayed and
I played at the Southwood Golf
Club (www.stjoegolf.com). The
course, a Fred Couples/Gene


Bates design, is where the FSU
Seminole team often plays.-
Southwood can be a tough
test from the "Boom-Boom" tees
(7,172 yards) however the course
features six sets of tees so every
player can find a distance for their
game. As I play most often in
South Florida, the rolling hills and
uneven lies were a fun change-of-
pace. The beautiful trees and even
the unique homes in the commu-
nity made for a lovely round. The
greens were a little slow, as they
were recently aerified, but should
be speedy when school is back
in session. In spite of a drought
that has plagued the area, the Tift
Dwarf grass has held up nicely.
I also spent the night at one
of five cottages that surround the
Southwood House. The South-
wood House,, built in 1865, has


been restored to its original splen-
dor. It is now available for wed-
dings and other events. The cot-
tage I stayed in was quite new,
yet designed to feel historic. What
a great place to stay with your
spouse or golfing buddies!
So, all that was left was our
visit to FSU. What a great and his-
toric university! We were so im-
pressed with its history and dedi-
cation to learning. Sure, Spencer
was also interested in the fun as-
pect of college life in Tallahassee.
It looks like FSU has moved to the
top of the kid's list. By this time
next year, I may have a 'Nole in
the family and be spending more
time in Tallahassee. I might just
like that!
For more information about
Tallahassee, visit www.seetalla-
hassee.com.


There's a wonderful world around us. Full c
fascinating places. Interesting people. Amazi
cultures. Important challenges. But sadly, 01
kids are not getting the chance to learn abo
their world. When surveys show that half o
America's youth cannot locate India or Iraq (
a map, then we have to wonder what they c
know about their world. That's why we create
MyWonderfulWorld.org. It's part of a free Nati
Geographic-led campaign to give your kids
power of global knowledge. Go there today
help them succeed tomorrow. Start with our f
parent and teacher action kits. And let your k
begin the adventure of a lifetime.
It's a wonderful wort4 Explorel


Okeechobee's Most Wanted

The following five people are Okeechobee's Most Wanted persons.
There are active warrants for each of them. The criteria for making
Okeechobee's Most Wanted top five is based on the severity of the
crime in conjunction with the age of the warrant.
If you have any information on the whereabouts of any of Okeecho-
bee's Most Wanted you can call the Treasure Coast Crime Stoppers at
1 (800) 273-TIPS (8477). If you call Treasure Coast Crimes Stoppers,
you have the option of remaining anonymous. You can also receive a
-reward if the information results in ah arrest.


Steven Cody Crose, 19,
White Male
No known address
Wanted for: grand theft, deal-
ing in stolen property


Delburt Allbritton, 51,
White Male
No known address
Wanted for: failure to register
as a sexual offender


Jose Tagle, 32,
aka Big Nasty
Hispanic Male
Last known address - 2228
S.E. 32nd St., Okeechobee,
Wanted for: lewd & lascivi-
ous battery, interference with
custody of parent and con-
tributing to the delinquency
of a child.


Alieta Aleen, 31,
aka Brian White, Manford
Clifford White
Black Male
No known address
Wanted for: failure to appear
on bail - robbery with other
weapon


Lawrence Baum, 46,
White Male
No known address
Wanted for: aggravated bat-
tery, assault, battery


T it 1 iM AT,* - iMy .Im. I


, O 0 I � r M N a VNI -
,'Felonies * Misdemeanors
,Ws/DWVLs o Drug Offenses
iT .Probation Violations
A-ppeals * Juvenile


57-6570
www.snelderlaw.com
200 SW 9th Street * Okeechobee
O v r7 Y a s

Uomine
Experienc


I.MJM 5e Habla Esparol


(9 1hecchob
,60�f rum/ 6om C \^o OB

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