Group Title: Okeechobee News.
Title: Okeechobee news
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028410/01140
 Material Information
Title: Okeechobee news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Okeechobee News
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee Fla
Publication Date: February 1, 2009
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
Coordinates: 27.241667 x -80.833056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028410
Volume ID: VID01140
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 72823230
alephbibnum - 003642554
lccn - 2006229435
 Related Items
Preceded by: Daily Okeechobee news

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

01140 ( PDF )


Full Text











(EECHOBEE


EWS


Vol. 100 No. 14 Sunday, February 1, 2009 75 Plus tax


Briefs
Change a child's life
this year
The time of year has come
to plan for the future. What
do you want to accomplish
in 2009? Make a resolution to
change the life of an abused
child forever. The Guardian
ad Litem Program needs vol-
unteers to help lead children
out of the dark and sometimes
frightening realities of the court
and foster care system, and into
safe, permanent homes. The
Guardian ad Litem program
will be training volunteers from
Okeechobee, Indian River,
Saint Lucie, and Martin Coun-
ties on Feb. 3, 5, 10 & 12, 9
a.m. until 4 p.m. in the Guard
ian ad Litem Program Office,
584 N.W. University Blvd., Suite
600, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34986.
Call 772-785-5804 for more in-
formation.

Flag football teams
forming
Parks and Recreation an-
nounces the formation of an
Adult Flag Football League.
Registration begins on Feb. 2,
with games scheduled to open
the week of Feb. 23. Games
will be played on week nights
between 7-9 p.m. at the Sports
Complex. For more informa-
tion, please call Parks and Rec-
reation at 863-763-6950.

Free prostate cancer
screening
The Okeechobee Cancer
Center and Tristan Pangilinan,
M.D., Board Certified Urolo-
gist will sponsor a free prostate
cancer screening on Tuesday,
Feb. 3 from 4 until 6 p.m. at
301 N.E. 19th Drive, Okeecho
bee. Call now to schedule an
appointment, 863-357-0039.

Drought Index

Current: 663
Source: Florida Division
of Forestry
Local Burn Ban: None


Lake Levels

13.44 feet
Last Year: 10.08 feet

S onsored By:


Pogey's Family Restaurant
1759 S. Parrott Ave.
763-7222
Source: South Florida Water
Management District. Depth
given in feet above sea level


Ethanol plant planned on Lykes land


Variety of sugar
cane to be turned
into fuel

By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
There may soon be a new in-
dustry in the area that would not
only employ more people but
would help cut this country's de-
pendence on foreign oil.
Verenium Corporation, a pio-
neer in the development of next
generation cellulosic ethanol, re-
cently announced its partnership


with Lykes Brothers to build the
first ever, commercial scale cel-
lulosic ethanol facility in nearby
Highlands County.
The plant would be located
on Lykes Brothers property on S.
R. 70 just west of the intersection
with the northbound section of
S.R. 721.
One of the good things about
this method of ethanol produc-
tion is that it does not use corn
or other food sources as raw
material. Lykes Brothers will be
growing a variety of cane that is
not used for sugar. The ethanol
produced will be blended with


gasoline to make it go further.
According to Kelly Linden-
boon, Verenium's vice president
for corporate communications,
Verenium partnered with Lykes
Brothers because they are a well
known and established land
owner. She said they have talk-
ing with Lykes Brothers for some
time.
"We foresee great potential
for fuel production from bio-
mass," asserted Howell Fergu-
son, CEO and Chairman of the
Board of Lykes Brothers, "and
we believe that it will offer sig-
nificant benefits for the U. S.


and for agriculture throughout
Florida. It is exciting to join in
a project using cellulosic etha-
nol technology pioneered at the
University of Florida Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences,
and we are very pleased to work
with Verenium on this project."
Verenium is anticipating it will
take 18 to 24 moths to construct
the plant. They are in the process
of finalizing the necessary per-
mits. The corporation is expect-
ing the plant to be in production
in late 2011. About 400 people
will be employed in the con-
struction of the plant. The plant


itself will generate 140 new jobs.
About half of these jobs will be
in farming and the other half in
operation of the plant. Plant op-
eration will require a good deal
of technical capability. However,
Verenium will provide training
for plant employees.
"This plant, the first of many
we anticipate building in the
years ahead, will help fulfill the
U. S. government's mandate for
advanced, sustainable biofuels to
meet America's energy needs,"
said Carols A. Riva, Verenium's
president and chief executive
See Lykes Page 2


Teacher of the


year soon to be


announced


By Chauna Aguilar
Okeechobee News
The Okeechobee County
Teacher of the Year selec
tion process has began and
the following is the last article
with additional details of three
Teachers of the Year from the
school district.
For Okeechobee High
School, Vicki Goggans was
awarded as the Teacher of the
Year. Mrs. Goggans received her
associates degree from Indian
River Community College and
her bachelors degree in math-
ematics education from the
University of Central Florida.
She has been with the
Okeechobee County School


system for 15 years where
she is currently teaching tenth
through twelfth graders geom-
etry, liberal arts math and al-
gebra lB. She has been at the
high school for two years and
previously worked at Osceola
Middle School, Yearling Middle
School and began her career at
OHS.
Mrs. Goggans strives to show
her students that she has re-
spect for them as a person and
that her respect is not based on
how much math they know.
Her primary goal is of course to
help her students gain success
in mathematics. She has found
that one of the best ways to get
See Teacher Page 2


Vensil applies



for county


commission


By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
Jim Vensil, 64, director of the
Okeechobee Substance Abuse
Coalition, has thrown his hat
in the ring for consideration for
the county commission seat
vacated by the death of Marvin
Wherrell.
That makes a total of nine
people vying for the governor's


appointment to the position.
Applying earlier were nursing
home administrator Andrew
McKillop, paving contractor Jo-
seph Hoover, real estate sales-
person Melissa Lee Arnold,
building contractor Theodore
Kelchner, environmental spe-
cialist Isaiah Mosley, licensed
contractor Noah Wilcox, busi-
See Vensil Page 2


By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
A 145 acres site on S.E. 38th
Avenue across from the Trea-
sure Island Fire Station has
been the site of two battles. The
first battle, fought on Christmas
Day, 1837 and commemorated
this weekend, was the largest
battle in the Seminole Wars
and marked the beginning of
the end of hostilities between
the U.S. and the Seminoles.
The second battle, to convert
the site to a state park, is still in
progress.
In 2006 the state purchased
145 acres of the battle site at 85
percent of the appraised value.
However, the "Second Battle of
Okeechobee" began much ear-
lier. First, the exact site had to
located.
In 1974 Bob Carr, executive
director of the Archeological
and Historical Conservancy,
came to Okeechobee as a grad-
uate student and did an arche


logical survey of the area. He
discovered that the site was not
registered with the state. In ad-
dition, there was no evidence
as to where the battle was ac-
tually fought and there were no
artifacts of the battle.
"What we thought would
be easy turned out to be a 20-
year quest," he stated during an
Oct. 19, 2006 press conference
on the site.
Mr. Carr visited eight or 10
families who claimed to have
artifacts, but none of them
dated back as far as the Battle
of Okeechobee. He wondered
how people could be living
here and never find anything
from the battle.
Archeological discoveries
and maps discovered by Bill
Steele, historian for the Semi-
nole Tribe, in Missouri helped
in the location of the site. Many
of the troops in the battle were
Missouri Volunteers.
Among the artifacts found
were a bayonet, an old Indian


knife, musket balls and uniform
buttons left behind.
Mr. Carr said the Daughters
of the American Revolution
marker on U.S. 441 S.E. is in
the right place only because
Seminole Chief Billy Bowlegs
said his mother told him that
was the battle site.
Part of the confusion came
about because Lake Okeecho-
bee was not on the official
maps of the day.
Eventually the efforts of
Mr. Carr and Mr. Steele gained
support from the community
including the Okeechobee His-
torical Society, Okeechobee
Battlefield Friends, who spon-
sor the annual re-enactment,
and former State Representa-
tive Richard Machek. The site
became a registered national
landmark, but until the state
purchased the land, there was
no public access to the site.
"It's been a long time com-
See Battle Page 11


Index


Classifieds............................ 9-11
Community Events.................... 6
Crossword............................. 1
Obituaries.... ....... ........ .... 6
Opinion 4
School News............................. 7
Speak Out 4
Sports 12
Sudoku ...... ......... ..... 1. 11
Weather 2

See Page 2 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.

newszap.com
FreeSpeech FreedMs




111 111 1111111
8 16510 00025


Students to go to regional science fair


By Chauna Aguilar
Okeechobee News
The District Science fair
showcased 131 senior division
projects (9-12th grade) and 313
projects in the Junior Division
(seventh and eighth grade).
Of those projects, there are 97
Okeechobee County students
who are eligible to participate
in the Heartland Regional Sci-
ence Fair.
Those who won first and
second place will go on to re-
gional competition which will
be held on Wednesday, Feb. 18
and Thursday, Feb. 20, at DeSo-
to Middle School, in Arcadia.
From regional competition,
16 students are selected to go


on to the State competition as
well as two from the region to
be selected to go on to the In-
ternational competition in May.
Judges for the district com-
petition included: Joe Arnold,
Okeechobee County School
Board; Sharon Suits, Director of
Assessment and a State Science
Fair Director;
Jill Holcomb, Former Chem-
istry Teacher and past Interna-
tional Science Fair representa-
tive; Kay Duke, science teacher
at OFC; John Barnett, Boyle En-
gineering; Matt Buxton, Bux-
ton Funeral Home; Jim Vensel,
businessman and Kiwanis's
member;
Debbie Clements, Pat Hogue,
and Pat Miller, UF Extension


Service; Kara Butts and Sara
May, USDA; Gary Ritter, Robert
Boney and Raulie Raulerson of
South Florida Water Manage-
ment District; Bill Suits; Randy
Burnham, dairyman; and Dr.
Candace Davis, Okeechobee
Veterinary Hospital.
Best in Show projects were
determined by the judges re-
viewing all first place projects
in each category.
Christopher Boney, an
eighth grader from Yearling
Middle School won the Junior
Division Best of Show in the
Biological Sciences for his proj-
ect entitled, "Different Water Ef-
fects on Plant Growth," a two-
See Students Page 11


Okeechobee News/Chauna Aguilar
The following students won Best of Show in their catego-
ries for the District Science Fair 2009 (left to right) Chris-
topher Boney, Ryan Reister, Ashley Hassan, and Celena
Letcher.


Seminole War: Re-enactment this weekend


Okeechobee News/Teresa Mataushek
The Battle of Okeechobee which took place on Christmas day, 1835 was re-enacted on
Saturday, Jan. 30. The battle took place on state-owned property in Treasure Island.
Festivities will continue on Sunday, Feb. 1 from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. with another simula-
tion of the battle taking place at 1 p.m. on Sunday.


Battle of Okeechobee continues


Qtadss





2 Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009


Teacher
Continued From Page 1

them there is to develop relation-
ships with her students by getting
to know them and letting them
know her.
As an educator, she believes
that she cannot expect her stu
dents to continue to seek and ac-
quire new knowledge without set-
ting the same high expectations
for herself. She works to enhance
her professional development by
staying involved in all workshops
and councils on mathematics that
she can.
While math is not text-driven,
there are many ways that she
integrates literacy into her class-
room including a thematic word
wall that focuses on both Latin
and Greek prefixes that denote
numerical amounts.
Mrs. Goggans works with
struggling math students and
helps convince them that they
can achieve and that they can
learn math.
The Teacher of the Year can-
didate for New Endeavor High
School is David Brent Stuart. Mr.
Stuart Indian River Community
College with his associates degree
while on a full baseball scholar-
ship. He continued his education
at the University of Florida where
he received his bachelors degree
in sociology, while also on a full
baseball scholarship.
He has been with the district
for 12 years and for the last eight
he has worked at NEHS as the
high school discipline program
where he teaches math, science,
English and social studies to stu-
dents in ninth to twelfth grade.


Lykes
Continued From Page 1

officer. "The facility will serve as
a blueprint for how we develop
future projects. This milestone is
just the beginning."
Verenium had previously op-
erated pilot and demonstration-
scale plants in Jennings. LA.
The project has been awarded
a $7 million grant under Florida
Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices Commissioner Charles H.


Vensil
Continued From Page 2
ness owner Terry Burroughs
and general contractor Mitchell
Hancock.
Mr. Vensil, a Republican, has
lived in Okeechobee since 1989
and has a BS in professional ad-
ministration from Barry Univer-
sity. For several years he served as
director of Rebuilding Okeecho-
bee After Disaster (ROAD) and is a
substitute teacher with Okeecho-
bee schools. He unsuccessfully
ran twice for city council.
There is no time limit for sub-
mitting an application but the gov-
ernor wants to move as quickly as
possible according to Sterling Ivey
of the governor's appointments
office. Mr. Ivey said the governor
will accept applications from


Okeechobee
Forecast
Today: Mostly sunny, with a
high near 64. North wind 5 to 10
mph becoming east.
Tonight: Mostly cloudy, with
a low around 52. East northeast
wind around 5 mph.
Extended Forecast
Monday: A 50 percent chance
of showers and thunderstorms.
Mostly cloudy, with a high near 75.
South wind between 5 and 15 mph.
Monday Night: A chance of
showers. Mostly cloudy, with a
low around 52. West southwest
wind between 5 and 10 mph.
Chance of precipitation is 40%.
Tuesday: Sunny, with a high
near 61. West northwest wind be-
tween 10 and 15 mph, with gusts
as high as 25 mph.
Tuesday Night: Mostly clear,
with a low around 32. Northwest
wind between 5 and 10 mph.


To Reach Us
Address:
107 S.W 17th Street, Suite D
Okeechobee, FL 34974
Wobsite: www newszap.com
To Submni News
The Okeechobee News welcomes sub-
missions from its readers. Opinions,
calendar items, stories ideas and pho-
tographs are welcome. Call (863) 763-
3134 to reach our newsroom. Items
may be mailed, faxed or e-mailed
E-Mail: okeenews@newszap.com
Slea khou (863) 467-2033
To Place A Display Ad
Phone:863-763-3134
E-Mail: okeeadsales@newszap.com
To Place A Classified Ad
Call 877-353-2424 to place a classified
advertisement from home.
eFa 877-354-2424
E-Mail: classads@newszap.com
Billing Department
E-Mall billteam@newszap.com

Newsmzp!


Cdj h JAL
Lriim a


* Felonl &
MIdmearinor
* Drug
Offenses
* Bond
Reduction
* Violation of
Probation
* DUv/Traffic
* Domestic
Violence
* Warrants


To Start or Stop A Paper
Phone: 18001282-8586
E-mail: readerservices@newszap.com
The Okeechobee News is available
three times a week via home deliv
ery and is on sale at rack and store
locations throughout Okeechobee
County. Call the office to find out i1
your home is within our present
home-distribution boundaries
Call 800-282-8586 to report a missec
newspaper or poor delivery.
Additional copies of the newspaper are
available for 50 cents Wednesday and
Friday and 75 cents for Sunday at the
office Home delivery subscriptions are
available at $18 00 for three months
Okeechobee News
USPS 406-160
Published Sunday, Wednesday and
Friday by Independent Newspapers, Inc
107 S.W. 17th Street, Suite D
Okeechobee, FL 34974
Periodicals Postage Paid at
Okeechobee, FL 34974
POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to Okeechobee News
Circulation Administration
PO Box 7011
Dover, DE 19903


* Alimony
* Modifications
* Visitation
* Custody
Disputes


Correction


Vicki Goggans
Mr. Stuart sets high expecta-
tions for his students which are
evident by the posted grading
policy (Quality, Quantity, Effort
and Essays). Poor quality work
will be returned to students to be
re-done. A lack of effort is taken
seriously with the proper admin-
istration or parents.
Excellence equals focus plus
effort plus attention plus time is
displayed on his wall to remind
all his students and visitors that
he takes this vision for the county,
"Achieving Excellence" very seri
ously.
According to Mr. Stuart, it is ab-
solutely evident that the most suc-
cessful students are the best read-
ers and writers, no matter what
the topic or subject. He strives to
infuse literacy and practice of lit-
eracy skills in order to better his
students.
Beyond the normal high
school subjects, he also teaches
personal skills which is about
character, morals, work ethics,
family life and social skills.

Bronson's "Farm to Fuel" initia-
tive, designed to stimulate the de-
velopment of a renewable energy
industry in Florida.
"The message today is that
Florida's agricultural industry can
produce fuel crops on a major
commercial scale without sacri-
ficing food crops," Commissioner
Bronson said. "This is a major
step forward for our 'Farm to Fuel'
program and hopefully will serve
as a catalyst for additional invest-
ment by companies interested in
producing renewable energy in
Florida."

persons of any party affiliation
and there is no age requirement.
However, the applicant must be a
registered voter. Mr. Ivey said the
governor is looking for someone
who has integrity and can repre-
sent the citizens well.
Besides Mr. Vensil, four other
applicants, Mr. Burroughs, Mr.
Mosley, Mr. Mckillop and Mrs.
Arnold have a bachelors degree
or higher. Mr. Kelchner, Mr. Bur-
roughs and Mr. Hoover have
served on volunteer boards or
committees for the county. Some
of the applicants have no civic
involvement at all listed on the


David Brent Stuart
While his students are in his
classroom because of an expul-
sion, suspension or retained ninth
grade, he tries to make their stay
at NEHS a little interesting. One
of his students explained that Mr.
Stuart currently has students help-
ing refurbish old bicycles for those
who cannot afford a bicycle.
Due to the diverse array of
subjects and grade levels, Mr. Stu-
art successfully breaks up what
would otherwise be sterile com-
puter based content by constantly
engaging them with challenging
real world, real life experiences.
The Teacher of the Year candi-
date for Okeechobee Freshman
Campus is Elisabeth Fox. Mrs. Fox
received her associates degree
from Indian River Community
College and her Bachelors degree
in English from Florida Atlantic
University. Mrs. Fox has been
with the district for four years, all
at OFC. She has been in her cur-
rent position as the reading coach
for two years.
As a reading coach, Mrs. Fox

The Environmental Protec-
tion Agency says that cellulosic
ethanol's high oxygen content re-
duces carbon dioxide better than
other fuels.
In addition to using non-food
crops, Verenium claims that using
cellulosic biomass as the raw ma-
terial for ethanol costs less, uses
marginal lands and requires less
fertilizer and water.
In June of 2008 Alico, a land
management company in cen-
tral and southwest Florida, an-
nounced that it had abandoned
plans for an ethanol facility in

questionnaires. While higher
education, and civic involvement
might be assets, they are not nec-
essarily a requirement to be a
commissioner since many people
have been elected to the office
without college degree or prior
civic involvement.
This vacancy is a little different
since it was caused by a death.
Most vacancies the governor is
asked to fill are caused by wrong
doing of the incumbent.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.com.
Reporter Pete Gawda can be reached
at pgawda@newszap.com.


wants the students to know that
when she is in the classroom,
she is there to help them com-
prehend the lesson, provide scaf
folding and model lessons for the
teacher. She is a resource for the
students and teachers to utilize.
At OFC she works with over
450 students school-wide and
their 24 teachers. She provides
workshops for the school to help
further develop her teachers and
allow them to tap into her as a
resource.
While a lot of her job involves
helping the teachers, she has
made it her first priority to work
with small pull-out groups in all
content areas where she uses in-
numerable strategies for improv-
ing comprehension.
The Teacher of the Year will
be announced at the Tuesday,
Feb. 10, board meeting at the
Okeechobee School Board room
at 6 p.m.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.com.
Reporter Chauna Aguilar can be
reached at caguilar@newszap.com.


It has come to our attention
that some quotes were inaccurate-
ly reported in a story in the Friday,
Jan.30, edition of the Okeechobee
News under the headline: James
found guilty; faces life. First, while
Nathan James was convicted of
aggravated battery, robbery with
a nrearm and possession of a fire-
arm by a convicted felon he does
not face a mandatory life sentence
as reported. It should have been
stated that he could face up to a
sentence of life in prison. Sec-
ondly, in a quote by Assistant State
Attorney Don Richardson, he was
quoted as saying "I don't think
there's any doubt Nathan James
robbed him (William Curry), but
I don't think he meant to kill him."
The quote should have read: "The
jury's verdict reflected that he
robbed him but did not mean to
kill him." Finally, Mr. Richardson
was quoted as saying "But I guess
the jury believed him (Curry's
testimony)." That quote should


LaBelle because of the risk in-
volved. 9S ; .
Post your opinions in the Public W
Issues Forum at www.newszap.com. 86 L I
Reporter Pete Gawda can be reached
at pgawda@newszap.com.
U=f UI~~inW


-FELONIES -MISDEMEANORS
-DUI/DWLS -JUVENILE
-DRUG OFFENSES -APPEALS
-PROBATION VIOLATIONS
-DOMESTIC VIOLENCE


If

Reduce
For


Skin


Why
Every 67 minutes son
Regular exams by a Board










\i~


nC,


Tou Could

SYour Risk
Developing


Cancer,

Not Do It?

neone dies from Melanoma.
certified Dermatologist are crucial.



nathan Sanders, M.D., J.D.


-<*-*
Tim Ioannides,M.D.



www.tcdermatology. corn


have read: "The jury believed him
(Curry)." We apologize for the in-
accuracies and any confusion they
ma have caused.
n the story in the Friday news-
paper headlined, "High School Ro-
deo at Agri-Civic Center," a name
was accidentally left off the list
of the Okeechobee High School
Rodeo Team Members. The list
should have included Kayla Davis.

Lotteries
Florida Lottery Here are
the numbers selected Thursday
in the Florida Lottery: Cash 3:
0-4-2; Play 4: 8-2-2-4; Fantasy
5: 4-11-14-25-30; Mega Money:
1-12-26-37 MB 10; Florida Lot-
to: 7 10 12 27 35 51; Powerball:
5-10-18-23-32 PB4 x4; On Friday,
Cash 3: 071; Play 4: 2-5-8-9.


-DIVORCE
-CHILD
-ADOPTION


-CUSTODY
SUPPORT
-ALIMONY


-PATERNITY -MODIFICATION
-DEPENDENCY
-PROPERTY SETTLEMENT
SE HELB5. ESPANOL

-GENERAL LITIGATION
-EVICITIONS
-FORECLOSURES
-QUIET TITLE
-CONTRACTS
-SUBROGATIONS


AMERIC'I SIETY
FOR [ooe











[ .,," S .[P,

Muua acete*

OKECHBE


TREASURE COAST DERMATOLOGY
Specializing in the Treatment of Skin Cancer


"The Lord is my Rock and my fort. He is the one who saves me" 2 Samuel 2:22
3e t New this Fall


t


VI'!AyfCE,


Child
uppodrt

(OHL OHLE Support


ATTORNEYS AT LAW


CLYDE KILLER


Surrenders FO RE ST.E PSOSECU"D J


ohleandohle@aol.com 24 hours, 7 days a week

(863) 467-t07-3r

414 NW 3rd Street Okeechobee


Ronnie Cauley
Grades K 5


2nd grade


tion program


Indoor


Music
* Fieldtrips
* A-Beka Curriculum
*AND small class sizes.


Now


Enrolling

* Preschool
Ages 1 4 yrs
* Kindergarten
* First Grade
*Second Grade


Call for

Information

(863)

763-1847

Building
Solid
Foundations


Christian Academy
A Ministry of FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 401 SW 4th Street License #ACSI 25062


LAW OFrICES
of
GLENN J. SNEIDER, LC
200 SW 9th Street
Okeechobee, FL 34974
www. snelderlaw.com
863-467-6570


Okeechobee News
Published hy Ind ep nt Newslaners Inc.


Now Serving Okeechobee


Awl ~~~------------ ----- ------------------- ---------- '-)a


I





Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009 3



Inmate facing more burglary charges


By Eric Kopp
Okeechobee News
A man sitting in the Okeecho-
bee County Jail on burglary charg-
es was arrested Friday, Jan. 30, on
additional felonies in connection
with a November 2007 burglary
Jason Thomas Adams, 24,
N.W Fourth Ave., was arrested
on charges of possession of a fire-
arm by a convicted felon, dealing
in stolen property (two counts),
grand theft and defrauding a
pawnbroker (two counts).
Since Adams was arrested
Friday morning by Detective Ted
Van Deman of the Okeechobee
County Sheriff's Office (OCSO)
his bond had not been set as of
newspaper deadline.
Adams was originally arrested
Nov. 25, 2008, for his alleged con-
nection with the burglary of a
home belonging to a 79-year-old
Okeechobee woman. He was
charged with grand theft, criminal


mischief over $1,000, aggravated
assault with a motor vehicle and
armed burglary. His bond was set
at $136,000.
Also arrested in connection
with that case
was Jennifer
Kristine Conner,
24, of the same
address.Shewas
charged with
grand theft and
armed burglary.
Her bond was
set at $110,000.
Detective Van Jason Adams
Deman arrested
Adams Friday after learning that
he was a convicted felon.
According to the detective's
arrest affidavit, Adams was found
guilty on a felony charge of pos-
session of a controlled substance
without a prescription on Oct. 8,
2007, by Judge Sherwood Bauer
Jr. The detective then submitted
a written request to the Florida


Board of Clemency to see if Ad-
am's rights had been restored.
But, he later received a letter
from the Florida Parole Commis-
sion that the man's rights had not
been restored.
The affidavit states that fol-
lowing the burglary of the el-
derly woman's home, investiga-
tors applied for and received a
search warrant for the residence
where Adams and Conner were
living. During the execution of
that search warrant investigators
found a Remington .22 caliber
rifle that had been reported sto-
len from a N.W 35th Ave. home
around Nov. 19, 2008, stated the
report.
Detective Van Deman said
the rifle was found in the master
bedroom under a mattress. The
victim was called and identified
the rifle. The victim also identified
jewelry that was photographed at
a local pawn shop, the detective
added.


If you go ...
What: Okeechobee City Council
When: 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 3
Where: Council Chambers,
Okeechobee City Hall, 55 S.E.
Third Ave.

By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
Instead of the traditional Ford
Crown Victoria, City of Okeecho-
bee Policemen may soon be pa-
trolling the streets in Dodge Char-
gers.
The purchase of police cars
will be the big item at Tuesday's
city council meeting. The council

Arrest Report
The following individuals were
arrested on felony or driving un-
der the influence (DUI) charges by
the Okeechobee County Sheriff's
Office (OCSO), the Okeechobee
City Police Department (OCPD),
the Florida Highway Patrol (FHP),
the Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC) or
the Department of Corrections
(DOC).
Francis Parker Oswald, 58,
Pollywog Pt., LaBelle, was arrest-
ed Jan. 27 by FWC Officer Daniel
Caron on a charge of driving un-
der the influence. He was released
on his own recognizance.
William Brandon Bailey, 22,
N.W. 110th St., Okeechobee, was
arrested Jan. 27 by Deputy Corpo-
ral Paul Ferrell on a felony charge
of possession of a controlled sub-
stance. He was also arrested on a
misdemeanor charge of posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia. He
was released on his own recog-
nizance.
Nicholas Ryan Pierce, 23, S.E.
22nd Court, Okeechobee, was ar-
rested Jan. 28 by Deputy Brian
Cross on an Okeechobee County
warrant charging him with viola-
tion of probation driving while
license suspended/revoked ha-
bitual offender. He is being held
without bond.
Jose Olivarez, 33, Harney
Pond Road, Okeechobee, was ar-
rested by Deputy Lieutenant Keith
Murrish on a warrant charging
him with possession of a weapon
by a convicted felon. His bond
was set at $20,000.
Jeffrey James Varnadoe, 31.
N.W Fifth St., Okeechobee, was
arrested Jan. 28 by Officer S. Mor-
gan on a charge of grand theft.
His bond was set at $2,500.
Teresa Lynn Hite, 41, S.E.
14th Terrace, Okeechobee, was
arrested Jan. 28 by Officer Law-
rence Parzygnat on a charge of
driving while license suspended/
revoked habitual offender. Her
bond was set at $2,500.
Jose Romero, 17, N.W 36th
St., Okeechobee, was arrested
Jan. 29 by Deputy G. Popovich
on an Okeechobee County war-
rant charging him with the felony
of robbery. He was also arrested
on a warrant charging him with
the misdemeanor of possession
of marijuana under 20 grams. His
bond was set at $22,500.
Tobey Kathleen Long, 64,
N.W 34th St., Okeechobee,
was arrested Jan. 29 by Detec-
tive Rosemary Farless on a Polk
County warrant charging her with
grand theft (three counts). Her



Public Forums
Local Issues


Post your opinions
online at
www.newszap.com


Jewelry taken in that burglary
included a 14 carat gold chain
with a large 14 carat gold cruci-
fix pendant valued at $2,500; a
14-carat gold woman's chain and
pendant valued at $800; and, a
mobile phone valued at $200.
The detective said on at least
two occasions Adams pawned
jewelry items and signed docu-
ments stating that the items were
his to sell. These items, said De-
tective Van Deman, were identi-
fied by the owner and returned to
the rightful owner.
Detective Van Deman said the
crucifix and mobile phone have
not been recovered.
Adams was also arrested Jan.
7, 2009, by OCSO Detective Rick
Durfee on warrant charging him
with dealing in stolen property
(two counts) and giving false in-
formation to a pawnbroker (two
counts). Those charges stem from
an Oct. 7, 2008, burglary in which
Adams is accused of taking a lap-


Police patrol cars may have new look


By Eric Kopp
Okeechobee News
An Okeechobee teenager is
listed as being in critical condi-
tion at a Melbourne hospital fol-
lowing a head-on automobile
crash Wednesday, Jan. 28, on
County Road 700 A in Okeecho-
bee County.
Savannah M. Joiner, 18, was
airlifted to Holmes Regional
Medical Center following the
8:30 a.m. crash, stated a Florida
Highway Patrol accident report.
A passenger in the 1997 Ford
pickup being driven by Ms.
Joiner -- Michael T. Ramsey, 17
-- was uninjured.
The driver of the second ve-


will consider a lease-purchase
agreement for 17 traditional 2009
Ford Crown Victoria police cars
with full wheel covers and left
hand spotlights. In addition, the
resolution provides for five 2009
Dodge Charger police cars with
V6 engines and spotlights.
Police Chief Denny Davis said
that the Dodge Chargers will be
used for road patrol in an effort
to get better gas mileage. The
Okeechobee County Sheriff's Of-
fice now uses Chevrolets in an
effort to get better gas mileage.
However, Chief Davis said that
the Chevrolets the sheriff's of-
fice uses have front wheel drive.
He said front wheel drive vehicles


bond was set at $3,000.
Melissa Alane Smith, 24,
N.W Fifth St., Okeechobee, was
arrested Jan. 29 by Deputy Mar-
cus Collier on Okeechobee Coun-
ty warrants charging her with the
felonies of violation of probation -
grand theft, violation of probation
- petit theft, violation of probation
- possession of drug parapher-
nalia and violation of probation
- drug offender probation posses-
sion of controlled substance. She
was also charged with resisting a
law enforcement officer without
violence. She is being held with-
out bond.
Curtis William King, 43, N.E.
Sixth St., Okeechobee, was ar-
rested Jan. 29 by Deputy Brian
Cross on an Okeechobee County
warrant charging him with grand
theft. His bond was set at $2,500.
Fernando Seca, 20, N.W.
Seventh St., Okeechobee, was
arrested Jan. 29 by Deputy Don-
nie Holmes on an Okeechobee
County warrant charging him
with the felonies of violation of
probation battery and violation
of probation criminal mischief.
He is being held without bond.
Aaron Joe Gaucin, 20, N.W.
First St., Okeechobee, was arrest-
ed Jan. 29 by Detective Ted Van
Deman on a warrant charging
him with felony battery. His bond
was set at $5,000.
This column lists arrests and
not convictions, unless otherwise
stated. Anyone listed here who
is later found innocent or has
had the charges against them
dropped is welcome to inform
this newspaper. The information
will be confirmed and printed.


will not hold up under road patrol
conditions.
Of the 17 new Fords, one will
go to the fire chief, one to the city
administrator and one to the code
enforcement officer.
The police department usually
purchases 24 cars at a time.


hide, Everardo Alaniz, 59, is said
to be in serious condition at St.
Mary's Hospital in West Palm
Beach, stated the report.
Trooper K. Wallace, the FHP
crash investigator, stated in
his report that Ms. Joiner was
southbound on CR 700 A when
she tried to pass a southbound
tractor-trailer. The report goes
on to state that she entered the
northbound lane and struck a
1993 Toyota pickup driven by
Mr. Alaniz.
Ms. Joiner was cited for im-
proper passing, stated Trooper
Wallace's report.
The report also states that
everyone involved was wearing
their seatbelts.


top computer, a guitar, a cordless
drill and about $100 in change.
Detective Durfee said the drill
and laptop are still missing and
that the change had been spent.


The guitar was found in
ams' residence during that
vember 2008 search.


1/2 Price to All Active Duty Military Personnel
$60 $75 for inside car storage
1.75 LoBelle
1HWY 80 Avo us 4 rleaes
SWest of Le$50
a m ^sq & S $50
eigh Acres 'a\-


wft"


The council will also be dis-
cussing annual evaluations for
city administrator Brian Whitehall
and city attorney John Cook.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.com.
Reporter Pete Gawda can be reached
at pgawda@newszap.com.


Okeechobee's Most Wanted


The following six people are
among Okeechobee's Most Want-
ed persons. There are active war-
rants for each of them. The criteria
for making Okeechobee's Most
Wanted top five is based on the se-
verity of the crime in conjunction
with the age of the warrant.
If you have any information
on the whereabouts of any of
Okeechobee's Most Wanted you
can call the Treasure Coast Crime
Stoppers at 1 (800) 273-TIPS
(8477). If you call Treasure Coast
Crimes Stoppers, you have the op-
tion of remaining anonymous. You
can also receive a reward if the in-
formation results in an arrest.
Angie Borjas aka Steven-
son, 29; DOB: 03/08/1979, Poss.
of Methamphetamines, Poss. of
Drug Paraphernalia.
Wilbert Perez-Borja, 25,
H/M, Poss Cannabis more than 20
Grams; possession with intent to
sell.
Jason Hormuth, 28, DOB:
02/27/1980, VOP Dealing in sto-
len property.
Antonie Faust, 22, Burglary
w/assault. Bond: $100,000
Emilio Serrano, 46, Sale of
cocaine, Poss cocaine with intent
to sell.
Samuel Medrano, 21, DOB
4/21/1987, VOP- Simple Battery,
Criminal Mischief w/Property
Damage. No Bond


Angle Borjas Wilbert
AKA Perez-Borja
Stevenson


aouth Antonie Faust
Hormuth


Emilio Samuel
Serrano Medrano


r All Unit Sizes
Available
from 5X5
up to 10X30

Alarmed Units Security Cameras
Air Conditioned Units
On-Site Manager Outside Storage


CULTJURIZEDJI

The American Soul &
Rock & Roll Choir
Tuesday, February 10
at 7:30pm
Tickets: $25 Adults
$21 Seniors
$10 Students & Children


The US Air Force
Academy Band
Wild Blue Country

Wednesday, February
11 at 7:30pm

FREE!


DOI and
Do Ia e~a I n
CulturajA ce--
Center
o6 -993-1160
Pbcc.edu/dollyhand.xcml E3 c
77 College Drive, Belle Glade ...1


MORE SUCCESS IN OKEECHOBEE!
B -


-ML D --- HATHII ll
77 Ios AmO sTinll Wams 75s usAO sTIU LONm!
Financing Gift
Available Certificates
414 S. PARROI AVE SUITES

WEIGHT LOSS N3"57."67
Centers LE's MAKE A NEW YOU!


Keep Your Air Conditioner

in Tip-Top Shape


CZ


Or EXPIRES
"69003/30/09


With Our 1 Point Clean & Check
Your entire system will be made ready for
summer! It will help lower your energy bills,
extend the life of your system and improve
your indoor air quality.
Don't wait for an emergency...
CALL US TODAY

Committed To Total Customer Satisfaction
For Over 24 Years
7 Days a Week...24 Hours a Day
4 ^ Air Conditioning & Refrigeration


2 (863) 763-8391

0 312 S.W. 2nd St., Okeechobee I-


urt
First
Month


Two injured in


head-on crash


As





4 OPINION Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009


Speak Out/Public Forum
Speak Out has moved online, where it is quicker and
easier to share your ideas and converse with others. Go to
www.newszap.com, click on the community name and your
local or state Public Forum. There, you can create new
topics or comment on existing topics. What follows is a sam-
pling of some of the discussions currently taking place.
Thanks for participating!
Restaurants
NEW AND DIFFERENT: The new restaurant in town is a breath
of fresh air. It has provided jobs for many young people in town. Let's
not be critical so soon. They need an opportunity to work out all the
kinks. I am happy to see them here and wish them the best of luck.
Something different always scares some residents of Okeechobee
and it's time to lighten up. Choices are a good thing.
CHOICES: I am not sure which restaurant the Speak Out com-
ment was about, as I know of three new restaurants in the Okeecho-
bee area. I think it is great we have more choices. We need more
choices. Competition is good for the customers because if one has
poor service, doesn't keep the place clean or charges too much, we
can go somewhere else. Good luck to all of the new restaurants.
GOOD SERVICE: If the new restaurants provide good food, good
service and keep the place clean, I think they will do great. I give any
new restaurant a month or so to work out the startup problems and
then give it a try. Any place will have some problems to work out
when they first open. I wish all of the new restaurants well. If you stay
open at least two months, you will see me try a meal there.
DECIDE FOR YOURSELF: I think any new business is worth a
chance. I don't listen to what others say. I try it and decide for myself.
But if I have a bad experience, I am not likely to come back. Any
business needs to think about that. Any time a customer has a bad
experience, you have lost a customer. Can you afford to lose even
one customer?

Battle of Okeechobee
WHY RE-ENACT: I have a question. Not being from here and all,
but why would you want to re-enact a war that was lost? From my
understanding both sides claimed victory but after viewing the stats, it
looks like the Seminoles won. "26 U.S. soldiers, including the majority
of Taylor's officers and NCOs, were killed, with 112 wounded, against
11 Seminoles killed and 14 wounded. No Seminoles were captured,
although Taylor did capture 100 ponies and 600 head of cattle." If it is
to honor those men that died, that's honorable and understandable
but why the whole re-enactment? Just doesn't make sense to me.
HISTORY: I think the reason we re-enact historic battles is to
draw attention to that part of our history and teach another genera-
tion about it. Re-enactments are a lot more exciting and interesting to
the kids than reading about it in a history book. I always take the kids
to the re-enactment. Every year they learn at little more about that
period of our history.
HISTORY: In the re-enactment event, not only will you see a battle
re-enactment but you'll also witness period settlers and military and
Indian camps. Not to mention all the great food that will be available.
The Seminole Indians take great pride in the fact that they were never
conquered. During that period it was the charge of the U.S. Military
to capture all the Native Americans in Florida and ship them out. The
failure of the U.S. Military in this case was the beginning of the end of
the Indian Wars although Zachary Taylor claimed victory even though
he never accomplished his mission. I guess he marketed himself so
well we elected him President.
NEVER SURRENDERED: The Seminole Wars were the "Viet-
nam" war of the day. The U.S. government tried but failed to remove
all of the Seminoles to reservations further west because it could not
contend with the terrain and with the costs of the war. The Seminoles
are the only tribe of which I am aware that never fully surrendered.

Okeechobee Police Department
HANDICAPPED PARKING: Fifty percent of all of these people
who are parking in the handicapped spots doing the illegal parking in
the striped 'no parking' areas don't even have a handicapped plac-
ard. I watched one the other day in the Wal-Mart parking lot. He was
around 30 with a 10 yr old son. When I mentioned the law to him,
he laughed and said big deal. Now that's a good way to raise your
child. Daddy does it so why can't I? Remember, children learn what
they live.

State law restricting the volume
LOUD NOISE: I didn't even live on a waterway and I had the
problem with the neighbor driving his airboat around in the backyard
when it rained. And it was LOUD. I also have a problem with ATVs
with no mufflers running by my house late at night. After 10 p.m.,
residential areas should be quiet so the working folks can get some
sleep.
Should elected officials take drug tests?
DRUGS: I believe the elected officials should be tested... and those
tests should be randomly repeated just like they are in the public work
place. Now, with that said, we need to decide what if any drugs are
allowed. ALL prescriptions, you might say. Well remember that many
people in stressful jobs are medicine cabinet junkies. This is why they
are not tested. The chances are they wouldn't pass. They wouldn't
pass to get a job like Joe the plumber, average guy, with some of the
scripts they chuck down like Skittles, and some of them have little
cases filled with lots of pretty colored tablets. Just think, where would
the country be if it were found to have a large number of elected of-
ficials released from their duties for excessive prescription drug use
or for doctor shopping.
SOBER: What's fair is fair ... daily sobriety tests should be included
as well! Everyone must blow after passing through the metal detec-
tors!
ALCOHOL: I think it might be a good idea to require elected of-
ficials take a test to make sure they are sober before they vote on any
issues. The only explanation I can come up with for some of the deci-
sions made over the years is that someone was intoxicated.
Stimulus bill
BUDGET: If the president had the line item veto, it would be a
major hit to lobbyists. It appears as though the Congressional Demo-
crats can't take a hint from past budgets. They are nearly as bad as
the corporate execs who have wasted some of the bailout money
on bonuses and office refurbishing. There are some good spending
items in this bill, however. I hope the Republicans aren't short-sighted
or partisan to shoot down things that work too. Also this bill includes
more tax cuts than those garnered by the Bush administration -- so all
of this talk about liberal/socialist spending is only half the story.


Sunglasses winner
Dr. Christine V. Brennan from Brennan Eye Care congratu-
lates Billy Bob Wehde for being the winner of a pair of
designer sunglasses from a drawing that was held at the
Health and Safety Expo on Saturday, Jan. 17, at the Agri-
civic Center.


Reflections from the Pulpit


Rev. Calvin H. Fryar
Pastor, Brighton Baptist Church
"But if we walk in the light,
as he is in the light, we have fel-
lowship one with another, and
the blood of Jesus Christ his Son
cleanseth us from all sin. If we say
that we have no sin, we deceive
ourselves, and the truth is not in
us. If we confess our sins, he is
faithful and just to forgive us our
sins and to cleanse us from all un-
righteousness." (I John 1:7-8)
"For they have healed the hurt
of the daughter of my people
slightly, saying, Peace, peace;
where there is no peace. Were
they ashamed when they commit-
ted abomination? Nay, they were
not at all ashamed, neither could
they blush: therefore shall they
fall among them that fall: in the
time of their visitation they shall
be cast down, saith the LORD."
(Jeremiah 8:11-12)
Dr. O.J. Nease tells of a sad
mistake relative to transfusion.
You know the former method of
transfusion was to place a well
person beside the sick one, insert
a tube into the arm of the well
person and one into the arm of
the sick one, and then, through
a mechanical process, pump the
blood from the well to the sick
person. But on one occasion the
device did not work properly, and
in some way the pumping was
reversed from what was expect-
ed. They pumped the blood full
of deadly germs into the arm of
the well person. Awhole pint had
been transferred before it was
known. The results were disas-
trous. It looks as though the devil
has succeeded often in these days
in injecting the deadly poison of
deception and damning coun-
terfeits. William Moses Tidwell,
"Pointed Illustrations"
Satan has poisoned the hu-
man race with his lies. The poi-
son has robbed man of all reason
and peace of mind. There was
no hope, only death. But God
promised a blood transfusion to
cure the destructive illness which
plagued all mankind.
Because of this terrible dis-
ease, mankind has turned the
beautiful world which God gave
him into a vast wilderness a
world of thorns. Satan, with the
help of man's disease, has turned
our lives upside down.
We have seen endless wars,
blood thirsty tyrants, murder and
endless hatred. Where will it end?
How can we find a cure for such
things?
I have heard of some queer
ways of doctoring sick people. In
Peking, China, it is said, they have
a brass mule for a doctor! This
mule stands in one of their tem-
ples and sick people flock there
by the thousands to be cured.
How can a brass mule cure any-
body you ask? Sure enough, how
can he? And yet these poor igno-
rant people believe it.
We cannot trust our fellow
man because the disease causes
him to treat his fellow man with
deceit and violence.
Young Anderson and old Pat-
terson had grocery stores in the
same block. Eggs were the sub-
ject of their frequent price wars,
with Anderson one time lower-
ing the price of eggs by one half.
The next day Patterson had met
the price. So, on the third day An-
derson lowered the price another
third. This pattern continued until
finally Anderson went to the older
man in despair and said "I surren-
der. We've both been selling eggs
at a loss for a long time." "Not
me," laughed Patterson, "You
see, I've been buying my eggs
from you."
Two American Indians were
talking things over in a fox hole
between air raids during World
War II. "The way I figure it," one


said, "is that when they smoked
the peace pipe in 1918, nobody
inhaled!"
This poison is often undetect-
ed until it is too late.
There are a thousand or more
varieties of mushroom that are
good to eat ... The most dreaded
of the poisonous mushrooms are
two members of the Amanita
group. One is the death cup, and
the other is the fly amanita.
The death cup grows in the
woods from June until fall. Its
poison acts like the venom of a
rattlesnake, as it separates the
corpuscles in the blood from the
serum. No antidote is known for
the poison of the death cup. The
only hope for anyone who has
eaten it is to clean out his stom-
ach promptly with a stomach
pump. It is small wonder that one
variety is know as the destroying
angel.
The death cup has often been
mistaken for the common mush-
room. A person should not make
this mistake if he observes care-
fully. The poisonous plant has
white gills white spores, and the
fatal poison cup around the stem.
The plant that is safe to eat has
pink gills, brown spores, and no
cup. Many of the mistakes come
from picking it in the button stage,
for it does not show all these dif-
ferences until it has grown larger
- Steve Farrar, "Family Survival in
the American Jungle, 1991, Mult-
nomah Press pp. 17-18.
The deadly disease is ignored
by those who should know bet-
ter.
A good example of how the
disease affects us is the story
which I read of a school teach-
er. She lost her life savings in a
business scheme that had been
elaborately explained by a swin-
dler. When her investment dis-
appeared and her dream was
shattered, she went to the Better
Business Bureau. "Why on earth
didn't you come to us first?" the
official asked. "Didn't you know
about the Better Business Bu-
reau?"
"Oh, yes," said the lady sadly.
"I've always known about you.
But I didn't come because I was
afraid you'd tell me not to do it." -
Source unknown
The folly of human nature is
that even though we know where
the answers lie God's Word we
don't turn there for fear of what
it will say.
God's Word has explained
our disease and revealed the
only cure. That cure according to
God's Word is "the blood of Je-
sus Christ his Son." (I John 1:7)
It "cleanseth us from all sin." (I
John 1:7) God has not only sup-
plied us with a cure for our mal-
ady, He has delivered us from the
fear of violence which character-
ize this terrible disease. He did
this by sending His Son to give
us a transfusion of His holy and
sinless blood. God has given the
only cure at Calvary.
A young lady was dying, and
one Scripture which she had
heard in health came to her at this
time. "He was wounded for our
transgressions, he was bruised for
our iniquities: the chastisement
of our peace was upon him; and
with his stripes we are healed."
(Isaiah 53:5) And she was led by
the Holy Spirit to rest in Him on
whom it spoke for salvation. A
friend said to her one day, "You
suffer much, I fear." "Yes she
said," but," pointing to her hand,
"there is no nail there. He had the
nails; I have the peace." Laying
her hand on her brow, she said,
"There are no thorns here. He
had thorns; I have peace." Touch-
ing her side she said, "There is no
spear here. He had the spear; I
have the peace." "Young People's
Delight"


Okeechobee News

Our Purpose...
The Okeechobee News is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida.
Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pur-
sue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no
dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on profit margins below
industry standards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independent's
mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First
Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the community's deliber-
ation of public issues.


We Pledge ...
* To operate this newspaper as a
public trust
* To help our community become a
better place to live and work,
through our dedication to consci-
entious journalism.
* To provide the information citizens
need to make their own intelligent
decisions about public issues.
* To report the news with honesty,
accuracy, purposeful neutrality,
fairness, objectivity, fearlessness
and compassion.
* To use our opinion pages to facili-
tate community debate, not to
dominate it with our own opinions.
* To disclose our own conflicts of
interest or potential conflicts to our
readers.
* To correct our errors and to give
each correction to the prominence
it deserves.
* To provide a right to reply to those
we write about.
* To treat people with courtesy,
respect and compassion.


Advertising Director: Judy Kasten

News Editor: Katrina Elsken

National Advertising: Joy Parrish

Circulation Manager: Janet Madray

Independent Newspapers, Inc.
* Joe Smyth, Chairman
* Ed Dulin, President
* Tom Byrd, Vice President of
Newspaper Operations
Katrina Elsken, Executive
Editor
MEMBER
OF: sfsoRl



Okeechobee News 2007
For More Information See
At Your Service On Page 2


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda

Twenty years of service
Robert Banfield, left, lieutenant firefighter/EMT, has been
with the county for 20 years. At the Thursday, Jan. 22,
meeting of the Okeechobee County Commission, chair-
man Clif Betts, right, presented Mr. Banfield with a certifi-
cate honoring his service. Mr. Banfield began employment
with the county in 1988 as an assistant mechanic. While
he was working he went to school and obtained his Fire-
fighter/EMT certification. Mr. Banfleld became a firefight-
er/EMT with fire/rescue in 1989. During his tenure with the
county he obtained EMT, Medic, Fire Officer I, Dark Water
Diver and Inspector certification. He earned the rank of
lieutenant firefighter/EMT in 1989 and became a lieutenant
firefighter/medic in August of 1996.


Community Calendar

Sunday, Feb. 1
AA. meeting from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the Church of Our Saviour,
200 N.W Third St. It will be an open step meeting.
AA. open 12 step meeting from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the Church
of Our Savior, 200 N.W. Third St.
Just for Today Club of Okeechobee, 101 N.W Fifth Street,
Okeechobee, (Behind Napa Auto Parts) A.A. weekend noon meeting
Open Discussion. The Just for Today Club of Okeechobee is not affili-
ated with any 12 step fellowships.

Monday, Feb. 2
Just for Today Club of Okeechobee, 101 N.W Fifth Street,
Okeechobee, (Behind NapaAuto Parts) NA. Sickest Of The Sick Open
Discussion at 7 p.m. The Just for Today Club of Okeechobee is not af-
filiated with any 12 step fellowships.
AA. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W. Second St. This will be an open meeting.
Okeechobee Model Airplane Club will meet at the Peace
Lutheran Church, 750 N.W 23rd Lane at 7 p.m. For information,
contact Robert Rosada at 863-467-5440.
Okeechobee Senior Singers meet at 9:30 a.m. attheOkeechobee
Presbyterian Church, 312 North Parrott Ave. Everyone who enjoys
singing is invited. For information or to schedule an appearance for
your organization or group, contact Marge Skinner at 863-532-0449.
Artful Appliquers is a recently formed chapter in Okeechobee.
This chapter meets at the Turtle Cove Clubhouse, 10 Linda Road,
Okeechobee on Mondays from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Turn left at the
Moose lodge and go around the curve just past the church. Bring a
lunch and join us for a fun day of applique. Everyone is welcome. For
more information please contact Karen Graves at 863-763-6952.

Tuesday, Feb. 3
Rotary Club of Okeechobee meets each Tuesday at noon at
Golden Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. The meetings are open
to the public. For information, contact Maureen Budjinski at 863-484-
0110.
Just for Today Club of Okeechobee, 101 N.W Fifth Street,
Okeechobee, (Behind Napa Auto Parts) NA. Nowhere Left To Go
Group Open Discussion at noon. NA. Sickest Of The Sick Group Open
Discussion. The Just for Today Club of Okeechobee is not affiliated
with any 12 step fellowships.
New AA. Meeting in Basinger: There is now an A.A. meeting in
Basinger on Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. in the Basinger Christian Brethren
Church on 700-A, north off U.S. 98. Beginners are welcome.
New Beginning's meeting of Narcotics Anonymous will be
held on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. at Believers Fellowship
Church, 300 S.W Fifth Ave. It will be an open discussion meeting. For
more information call Monika Allen at 863-801-3244.
Al-Ateen meeting will be held at the Church of Our Saviour, 200
N.W Third St., at 8 p.m. For more information, please call Amy at 863-
763-8531 or Dan 561-662-2799.
Al-Anon meeting will be held at the Church of Our Saviour, 200
N.W Third St., at 8 p.m.
A.A. Closed discussion meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the Church of
Our Savior, 200 N.W Third St.
Family History Center meets from 1 until 5 p.m. at the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 310 S.W. Sixth St. Anyone interested in
finding who your ancestors are is welcome to attend. There is Census,
IGI (International Genealogical Index), Social Security Death Index
and military information available. For information, call The Family
History Center at 863-763-6510 or Richard Smith at 863-261-5706 for
special appointments.
Gospel Sing every Tuesday beginning at 7 p.m. The public
is invited to participate with vocal and/or instrumental music. For
information, contact Douglas Chiropractic Center at 863-763-4320.
Widows and Widowers support group meets at 7:30 8 a.m.
at the Clock Restaurant, 1111 S. Parrott Ave., for breakfast. For
information, June Scheer at 863-634-8276
The Gathering Church Overcomers Group meets at 7:30
p.m. in the fellowship hall, 1735 S.W 24th Ave. This is a men's only
meeting. For information, call Earl at 863-763-0139.
The Okeechobee Lions Club meets at 7 p.m. at the Golden
Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. Anyone interested in becoming
a member is welcome. For information, contact Elder Sumner at 863-
763-6076.
Bible study at the Living Word of Faith Church, 1902 S. Parrott
Ave., at 7 p.m. Informal and informative discussions bring many Bible
truths to life. The public is invited.
Grief and Loss Support Group meets every Tuesday at 10 a.m.
at the Hospice Building, 411 S.E. Fourth St. Everyone is welcome. For
information, contact Brenda Nicholson at 863-467-2321.
Community Country Gospel will meet at 7 p.m. at the church
next to Douglas Clinic on North Park St. Any individual or group that
enjoys old time gospel music is invited to participate. For information,
contact Dr. Edward Douglas at 863-763-4320.
A.A. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. This will be an open meeting.
The First United Methodist Church, 200 N.W. Second St., will
be hosting God's Time -- a morning of free organized Christian
activities that includes play, instruction and interaction for parents
and their pre-school children. The event will be held each Tuesday
from 9:30 a.m. until noon. Child care will be provided for infants
during the class. For information, call 863-763-4021.
Haven of Rest Church, 2947 S.W Third Terr., holds meetings
for persons with alcohol and drug related problems at 6 p.m. For
information call 863-357-3053.
Compulsive overeaters are invited to weekly meeting, Overeaters
Anonymous (OA) meets at the Okeechobee Presbyterian Church,
312 N. Parrott Avenue on Tuesdays, 6 until 7 p.m. (Use 4th Street
entrance.) Overeaters Annonymous is not a diet club. There are
no dues, fees or weigh-ins. The only requirement for membership is a
desire to stop eating compulsively. For more information call Loretta
at 863-763-7165 or 863-697-0206.
The Lighthouse Refuge Support Group is for women who are
hurting, homeless or been abused. They meet on the first and third
Tuesday of every month from noon until 2 p.m. at First Baptist Church,
401 S.W. Fourth St., and on the second and fourth Tuesday of every
month from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the Red Cross, 323 N. Parrott Ave.
For more information call Donna Dean at 863-801-9201 or 863-357-
2106.





Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009 5



Investor to purchase controlling interest in local bank


Investor Wilbur L. Ross has an-
nounced that he will acquire the
majority shares of First Bank and
Trust Company of Indiantown. The
agreement allows Mr. Ross to ac-
quire 68.11 percent of the shares
in the community bank, subject to
regulatory approval.
The bank has branches in Lake-
port, Okeechobee and Palm City. As
of Dec. 31, 2008, the financial insti-
tution had assets of $83 million and
equity of $8.1 million.


Brother


Mr. Ross reached the agreement
with Linda M. Post, widow of the
former chairman of First Bank and
Trust Company of Indiantown. Mr.
Post's family founded the bank in
1959. Mrs. Post will remain a direc-
tor of the bank and will be named
chair emeritus, retaining 22.75 per-
cent interest in the bank.
"This is one of the few banks in
Florida that has avoided the credit
crisis very effectively," Mr. Ross said.


"Because it is well positioned to
grow, I am prepared to provide the
institution with additional capital
so that it can continue to thnve and
continue to serve as a stalwart finan-
cial institution in the communities it
serves."
Mr. Ross has made his interest in
purchasing a financial institution in
Florida well-known and has exhibit-
ed a strong commitment to investing
in the financial industry not only in


Florida but throughout the nation.
"We are thrilled that an expe-
rienced and successful investor
like Mr. Ross has agreed to join
our bank to help us continue
the institution's success and
commitment to the community
which we have had for the last 50
years," said Mrs. Post. "Mr. Ross
embodies many of the same prin-
ciples that form the foundation of
this institution: growth, exem-


- sister team carry on family trade

By Pete Gawda Ann has never had her owr
Okeechobee News business before. In the past she
Tailoring runs in the Marcellino either worked for someone else


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda
Vinny Marcellino works on a biker's vest while his sister, Ann,
alters a wedding gown at Ann-Vinny's Tailor Shop.


family. i ne brother sister team or
tailors who run Ann-Vinny's Tailor
Shop are third generation tailors.
Their father and grandfather were
tailors who worked at Central Tai-
lor Shop in Cambridge, Mass, in
the early 1900s. They both grew
up sewing and have been follow-
ing that trade all their lives.
Vinny has had his own tailor
shops before, He ran a shop in
Boca Raton for 18 years before
coming to Okeechobee. He was
working in another location in
Okeechobee when he decided to
move to the present address and
go in business with his sister.


or did sewing at home. She didn't
like retirement so she decided to
go back to work with her broth-
er.
While Vinny alters men's cloth-
ing, Ann does women's clothes,
weddings gown, drapes, valences
and home decor.
Their shop is located at 2303
S. Parrott Ave., Suite H. The hours
are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday or by appoint-
ment. The telephone number is
863-467-7800.


Area teenagers in foster care need help


play service and an unwavering
commitment to our customers,


depositors and the communities
we serve."


By Chauna Agullar
Okeechobee News
Chamber members gathered
for their monthly luncheon on
Jan. 14, at Golden Corral where
they heard from Christina Kaiser
from United for Families about
what they do for Okeechobee in-
cluding their Road to Success pro-
gram for children who are aging
out of the foster care system.
Teenagers aging out of the
foster care system is a growing
problem in Florida and through-
out the nation. Children who are
not adopted before they turn 18
years old are historically cut off
from services that have been their
only way of life.
These teenagers that have
been in the foster care system
for sometimes a good portion of
their lives don't have any family to
fall back on. They become basi-
cally "homeless" when they turn
18 years old and are considered
adults by the state.
United for Families (UFF) the
lead child welfare agency for
Okeechobee and the Treasure
Coast, organizes community
based care for children in the de-
pendency system. Because these
services are provided through a
private organization, UFF also
does fundraising to create addi-
tional programs to fill in gaps in
what the state funding offers the
children and their families.


Okeechobee News/Chauna Aguilar
Christina Kaiser from Unit-
ed For Families spoke at
the Chamber of Commerce
luncheon about the many
programs that they offer to
children in the dependency
system including the Road to
Success program. This art-
work was created by a child
in the foster care system who
is learning to put the family
back in their "empty house."
UFF coordinates all services
from a case management basis
which is contracted locally to the


Children's Home Society. UFF
also provides placement services
for foster care. Through this case
management, families are sent to
appropriate counseling and any
other services they may need.
In the UFF Road to Success
program, children ages 13 to 23
in the foster care system, receive
services to get them prepared for
independence. These teens are
taught skills such as balancing a
check book and even simply how
to open a checking account. They
are also taught basic skills of just
how to keep themselves out of
trouble.
Once they turn 17, they go
through intensive counseling
one-on-one. They are assisted
with applying to college and ap-
plying for financial aid. They are
also shown what is entailed in
getting their own apartment or
house. Mrs. Kaiser explained
that there have been teens that
she has worked with who didn't
know that they had to turn on the
power separately from just rent-
ing the apartment.
The one-on-one counselor
provides a basis of stability for
these teens.
UFF receives funds from the
state and federal government for
the bare bones of the programs
that they offer to families. In ad-
dition, UFF raises funds to be able
to provide additional programs to
continue to better the lives of chil-


dren and families that are in the
system.
In addition to the Road to
Success program, UFF also has
a mentor program for foster par-
ents which provides a local vet-
eran foster parent as a contact
to new foster parents for support
in their times of need. This men-
toring program has decreased
instances of children bouncing
from one foster home to the next
by over 30 percent.
For more information about
UFF call 1-800-868-0332.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.com.
Reporter Chauna Agullar can be
reached at caguilar@newszap.com.


rea Breakfast.LunciDinn ee

CaN- OrdersTo Go 1111 S. ParrottAve. Hours:
7 Day Brkft Buffeti i Sun-Thur: 6=-Opm
man oiAvaILSeats50 467-2224 mSat sim-ipm
*neCoup onfper vi l MstPreset Coupon tosererienotiderg.Ns d afler
dale nolloluon or wlany dter Aler a


I' I :i I I

We surgically insert and restore Implants in the same office!
Enjoy the relaxing benefit of conscious oral sedation...As
Seas as taking a pill.
100% financing available at 0% interest
IMPNT Stabilize loose dentures or partial, replace missing teeth
DENTURE Stabilize loose dentures or partial, replace missing teeth!


EPlENmE


School district praised: 'Success in Literacy' program


WINTER HAVEN -- Senator JD
Alexander has praised Okeecho-
bee schools for being in the top
25 percent of all school districts
in the state for the Reading First
program. The district was rec-
ognized in a ceremony with the


Florida Department of Education
and Education Commissioner Dr.
Eric J. Smith on Wednesday, Jan.
14. The ceremony was part of
Florida's ongoing Celebrate Lit-
eracy! week.
"Each day, Florida's schools


play a crucial role in preparing
tomorrow's leaders," said Sena-
tor JD Alexander. "It is important
these schools are recognized for
their hard work and achievements
in programs like Reading First. I
am encouraged to know that the
students of Okeechobee County
are excelling in the area of reading
and are participating in a program
that will further give them the
tools for success later in life."
Florida Reading First serves
570 schools within 45 districts.
Reading First schools are given a
variety of resources and training
through the federal Reading First
program to help them achieve two
goals: 1) increase the percentage
of students reading at or above
grade level; and 2) reduce the per-
centage of students with serious
reading difficulties. Reading First
grants assists Florida school dis-
tricts implement proven methods
of reading instruction to prevent
reading difficulties in grades K-3.


Lisa Jensen, a 14-year em-
ployee of Riverside Bank, was
named Vice President, Public
Relations and Communications.
She will handle the manage-
ment of all public relations and
media relations activities, inter-
nal and external communica-
tions, event management and
grand openings.
Ms. Jensen began her bank-
ing career at Riverside in 1993 as
a Corporate Trainer. During her
tenure she has held positions in
Human Resources, Lending and
most recently as Vice President,
Retail Project Manager. She is
currently president of her Flori-
da School of Banking class and
will graduate later this year. She
holds a Bachelor's Degree in


Education from
Warner South-
ern College in
Lake Wales.
"Riverside
Bank is fortu-
nate to have
such an ener-
getic and enthu-
siastic person Lisa
as Jensen," said Jensen
Scott Williams,
Sr. Vice President and Chief Mar-
keting Officer. "She is familiar
with all aspects of the banking
business and I have no doubt
her success will continue in this
new role as she assumes our
forthcoming public relations ef-
forts."


-aUmal


Im mS -


WmmN


SDigital X-Rays, 90% less radiation.


Strtn At
49

e FulM- t


LASER 888-FL-IMPLANT
6 APPEARANCE IMPLANT & 888-FL-IMPLANT
ENTISTRV 6390 W. Indiantown Road Jupiter
________ X Chasewood Plaza near RJ Gators
For Free Implant Report Dial (888) 692-1325 or www.freeimplantreport.com
Implantoloy is not a recogned special by New ratrent ogram only The pabent andany other h p s responble
In performed an a reout, of and netton 72 hours of respond-


CHOOSE LOVE


Submitted photo/Wolfgang Jewelers

Christmas give-away
As a thank you to its valued customers, Wolfgang Jewel-
ers gave away three watches. Customers who purchased
$100 or more before Dec. 24, 2008, were eligible to en-
ter the drawing. The watches were presented to Jeffrey
Strlebel, Randall T. Edwards, and Don Piper. Yolanda and
Wolfgang Cortez presented the watches.


BIG LAKE HOSPICE has been a wonderful

choice for my mother and us Mother is

able to continue living at home with the

care she needs They have done more

than care for her, they have shown love

and compassion forourwhole family

Big Lake Hospice is not just about dying
it is more about living and coping with a

terminal illness of someone you love.
-JuDeane Garrett
Daughter of Mary Helen




BIG LAKE
H OS P I C E
Your Homeown Choice

0707 354 3 Hwy 441 S, Okeechobee, FL 34974 wwwBigLakeHospiceorg


- Dentists have over 130 years combined dental experience in


Palm Beach County. With over 13,000 crownslimplants insertions.


New Public Relations professional

named at Riverside Bank


- Biohorizon, Lifecore, Biolock -All made in the USA.


Dr. Wade Harrouff is a graduate of Misch Institute, University


of Tennessee, University of Pittsburgh and Graduate of Implant Program at
Atlantic Dental Research Clinic. Also, trained in France and Germany.


- Lifetime warranty from manufacturer of implants.


11Mlurillvierd~ihli:1


1





6 Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009


Community Events


Speckled Perch
Festival Feb. 7 & 8
The 41st Annual Speckled
Perch Festival will be held Feb. 7
& 8, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Fla-
gler Park. The parade starts on
Saturday at 10 a.m. Admission to
the festival is free. There will be
live music, a fish fry, a mechani-
cal bull, a rock climbing wall. Arts
and crafts booths will include
handmade jewelry, wood works,
wood carvings, Art work & paint-
ings, The Pickle Lady, Yard d6cor,
clothing and handbags, many
different food vendors, fresh
squeezed lemonade and much,
much more!
For more information on Fes-
tival and Booth availability con-
tact:
The Chamber of Commerce
at 863-763-6464 or commerce@
strato.net

'Washington Youth
Tour' opportunity
Glades Electric Coopera-
tive will be sponsoring two high
school juniors to receive a one
week, all expenses paid to Wash-
ington, D.C. If you are interested
in applying, please contact your
high school guidance counselor
or your local Glades Electric Of-
fice. If you have any questions,
please contact Lisa Stark, Busi-
ness Development Coordinator at
1-800-226-4024 ext. 6233.

Red Cross class
times announced
The Okeechobee Service Cen-
ter of the American Red Cross will
be holding the following the fol-
lowing Health & Safety classes in
February:
Wednesday, Feb. 4 Infant/
Child CPR/AED at 6 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 20 Adult CPR/
AED at 6 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 23 First Aid
Basics at 6 p.m. All classes are
held at their Service Center, lo-
cated at 323 N. Parrott Ave. To
register, or for more information
call 863-763-2488.


American Legion
Pageant announced
The annual "Miss American
Legion Post 64" beauty pageant
will be held on Thursday, Feb. 5,
at 8 p.m. at the American Legion
Hall. Young ladies must be in the
9th-12th grades and attend either
Okeechobee High School or the
Freshman Campus, as well as
having never been married and
have no children. There is NO en-
try fee and the winner will receive
a beautiful crown, custom ban-
ner, a bouquet of flowers a tro-
phy and $50 cash. First and Sec-
ond Runner-ups will also receive
trophies, flowers and cash prizes.
"Miss American Legion 2009" will
be furnished with a convertible
for all parades so she may proudly
represent American Legion Post
64. Applications may be picked
up at the American Legion Hall.
For more information please call
Myra Partridge 634-4193 or Shelly
Sickels 863-467-0790.

Volunteers needed for
child advocates
Volunteer Guardians ad Litem
give a voice to children who are
victims of child abuse and are in-
volved in court proceedings. The
Guardian ad Litem Program will
be offering free training for volun-
teers and new classes will begin
in February and March. Training
involves thirty hours and will be
held at our Saint Lucie West office
on various days.
You can be that voice for an
abused child! The Guardian ad
Litem Program needs Volunteers
to represent Abused Aban-
doned & Neglected Children in
Saint Lucie, Martin, Indian River
and Okeechobee Counties! They
deserve a voice!
For dates and times of all train-
ing please contact Pattra F Dodd
at 772-871-7225.


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda

Twenty five years of

service
Arthur Borgstrom, left, was recognized at
the Jan. 22 Okeechobee County Commis-
sion meeting by chairman ClIf Betts, right,
for 25 years' service to the county. Mr.
Borgstrom, a Lieutenant Firefighter/Medic
with fire/rescue began his employment
with the county in November of 1983 as a
firefighter/EMT. During his tenure with the
county, Mr. Borgstrom obtained his Medic
and Fire Officer I certification and earned
the rank of Lieutenant Firefighter/Medic in
December of 1992.


n rewzap com
Fre Speech FreeAds


Online Guestbook
All Obituaries now include Online Guestbooks
where family and friends can share reflections,


Author to speak on
'Wacky' history
Native Floridian, Author and
veteran reporter for the Palm
Beach Post News will present,
"Florida's Wacky History and
Why You Should Care." The pro-
gram will help to answer ques-
tions on some the state's pecu-
liarities on Friday, Feb. 6, at 7 p.m.
at the Okeechobee County Public
Library. The program is provided
by the Florida Humanities Council
and is free and open to the pub-
lic. Okeechobee Friends of the
Library will provide light refresh-
ments after the program. Come
and join us for this entertaining
and enlightening program.

Valentine's Teen
Dance Party
A Valentine's Day Teen Dance
Party will be held on Sunday, Feb.
15, at Pier II from 6-10 p.m. Ages
12-15 are welcome. The cost is
$7. A live D.J. will play the latest
hip-hop! Admission includes din-
ner. All proceeds will benefit the
Okeechobee Communities in
Schools. For more information,
call Teresa Chandler at 863-697-
6819.

Landscaping with
Native Plants
In Florida we are lucky to have
many native plant species which
are very ornamental. Including
low-care native plants in your
landscape is a way to reduce
maintenance as well as beautify.
Native plants are also attractive to
Florida birds and butterflies.
During this workshop you can
design your space and create a list
of native plants you want to com-
plement your own landscape.
Leave with a detailed plan for
your garden and a Florida Friend-
ly native plant. The workshop will
take place on Feb. 10, from 1-2:30
p.m., or 5:30-7 p.m. Okeechobee
County Extension Service 458
Highway 98 North, Okeechobee
Space is limited and pre-regis-
tration is required. Call 863-763-
6469 to sign up.


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda

Big Day
Thursday, Jan. 22 was a big day for Clay-
ton Stone, left. At the Okeechobee County
Commission meeting on that date, chair-
man Clif Betts, right, recognized Mr. Stone
for 20 years' service to the county. The
commission also issued a proclamation
honoring Mr. Stone for his outstanding
service and dedication upon his Jan. 23,
retirement. Mr. Stone, a firefighter/medic,
came to OKeechobee County from the Divi-
sion of Forestry in October of 1988. During
his tenure with the county he obtained EMT
and Medic certification. He earned the rank
of firefighter/medic in August of 1991.


Church to present
'Fireproof' movie
Cornerstone Baptist Church
will present, "Fireproof," a mar-
riage strengthening movie for
couples on Saturday, Feb. 14, at
6:30 p.m. Childcare will be pro-
vided. The church is located at
18387 441 North. Please call the
church office to reserve childcare
space. There is no charge for the
movie or childcare. For more in-
formation, please call 863-763-
3338.

Boy Scouts selling
discount cards
The Boy Scout Troop 964 are
selling Scout Honor Discount
cards until mid February. For only
$20 you can get savings of up to
50 percent from over 200,000 lo-
cations across the United States.
Some locations here in Okeecho-
bee that offer the discounts are:
Big Lake Eye Care, The UPS Store,
Beltone, Roto Rooter Plumbers,
and more. For more information
or to purchase one of these dis-
count cards call Alison Hudson at
863-634-8628.
Obituaries
Obituaries should be submit-
ted to the Okeechobee News by
e-mailing obits@newszap.com.
Customers may also request
photos and links to online guest
books. A link to the obituaries is
available at www.newszap.com.

Cheryl Ann
Osterman, 64
OKEECHOBEE Cheryl Ann Os-
terman, of Okeechobee, died Thurs-
day, Jan. 29, 2009, in her residence.
She was 64.
Born May 26,
1944, in Daven-
port, Iowa, she
had been a resi-
dent of Okeecho- I
bee since the I
early 1960s.
She is survived
by her son, Josh (Angela) Osterman;
grandchildren, Joshua Osterman II,
Alysa Osterman; daughter, Leihann
Street all of Okeechobee; cousins,
Janie Queen of Orlando, Deborah
Brock of Okeechobee, Sue Carlson
of Okeechobee, Virginia Fry of
Houston, Texas, and William Cook
of Leaf River, Ill.
A memorial service will be held at
a later date.
All arrangements are under the di-
rection and care of the Buxton Fu-
neral Home and Crematory, 110 NE
5th St., Okeechobee.
Cordell D.
Jumper Sr., 49
BRIGHTON Cordell D. Jumper
Sr., of the Brighton Reservation, died
Thursday, Jan. 29, 2009, in Rauler-
son Hospital. He was 49.
Born Sept. 12, 1959, in Hollywood,
he had been a lifetime resident of
Brighton and was a member of the
1st Indian Baptist Church of Brigh-
ton.
He is preceded in death by his
sons; Corey Jumper, Cordell Jumper
Jr.; father, Billy Jumper; and brother,
James Jumper.
His is survived by son, Cordey
Jumper of Brighton; daughters,
Thomasine Jumper, Pamela Jumper
both of Brighton, Codene Wigfall
(Andre) of Okeechobee; brother,
Roy Jumper of Brighton; sisters,
Joyce Piz (Matt) of Okeechobee,
Claudia Olivarez (Joe) of Brighton;
and mother, Agnes Jumper of Brigh-
ton. In addition he was survived by
nine grandchildren.
A graveside service was held on
Saturday, Jan. 31, 2009, in the Orto-
na Cemetery.
All arrangements are under the di-
rection and care of the Buxton Fu-
neral Home, 110 NE 5th St.,
Okeechobee.


_.I.f r Patricia Louise Goolsby,
SLicensed Real Estate Broker
RYICo. 634-5588 t^
FULL SERVICE REALTOR patgoolsby@embarqmail.com
Vicki Anderson 863-634-4106 Eric Anderson 863-634-4107





COUNTRY LIVING Great place to bnng your hors- WATERFRONT Beautiful fully upgraded DWMH.
es and have fun. Plenty of storage space. YOU Pela Windows double panes throughout Too many
DON'T WANT TO MISS OUT N THIS ONE featuresto include. MUSTSEE THIS BEAUTY MLS
PRICED TO SELL!!! MLS #200723, $175,000. #201548, $149,900. Call Vicki at 863-6344106
Call Vicki at 863-34-4106.




REDUCED 5 + ACRES BRING YOUR HORS- WATERFRONT JUST BRING YOUR TOOTH-
ES Frame Adorable 2/2 house on 5+ acres, 2nd BRUSH!! Turn key 3/2 DWMH. Furnished wilg
kitchen w/separate entrance. Nice open area. workshop and shed.. DON'T LET THIS ONE
Fully furnished. MLS #93200, $199,000. Call GETAWAY MLS 201290, $89,900. Call Vicki
Vicki at 863-6344106, at 863-6344106.


rvcn m Au LHanc Auca very nice well-Kepi
DWMH on canal that goes directly to the
Kissimmee River. Well-established park. MLS
#200067, $125,000. Call Vicki at 863-634-4106.


r.aUiruL, arM.Ajua .H.JUUu nume mr.i J.
acres Beautiful ee Fri orhd Deck wit pool
Indudes a nice vacan lt wih plenty of tees. MLS
1200986, $299000. Call Vfid at 8063-344106.


Cowboys for Christ
to meet
Cowboys for Christ plan to
meet on Thursday, Feb. 17, at the
Basinger Civic Center. Everyone is
invited. Come join us for fellow-
ship and prayer, "It's not just for
Cowboys."
If you need additional informa-
tion, please call Doyle McDuffie at
863-763-2285.


Church to hold
benefit yard sale
Lakeport Christian Church on
Highway 78 in Lakeport will hold
a huge yard sale on Friday, Feb.
6, from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. and
on Saturday, Feb. 7, from 8 a.m.
until noon. For more information,
please call Barbara at 863-946-
1472.


New CBS Homes
3/2 cathedral ceil-
ings, tile throughout,
S\wood cabinets, plant
SM I shelves, appliances,
$113,000. inc. lot.
(Reduced price if built on your lot)
Contact (863) 634-0571
Lic# Crc1328235


Blanche "King"
Feb. 3, 1912 Jan. 3,


Lamb
1988


S"Our Mothers Love"
She give so much to us. Her warm and tender care
er time and gentle wisdom and the way she was
talys there.
But the one thing that we will cherish the most is her LOVE.
Thank-you for giving and sharing for listening and caring and for
being such a wonderful mother.
Remembering you on your birthday.
We Lo ad Miss You Ka4e, Rosak & Gkne Lamb


CONTRACTORS INSURANCE

General Liability, Commercial Auto,
Equipment, Worker's Compensation
Call us or stop by for a quote.








If you are 62 or older and need financial
relief, comfort and an easier life, ask me if
a "REVERSE MORTGAGE",
is right for you!

863-634-8378, Donna Tourek
REVERSE MORTGAGE SPECIAUsr
"Your Local Aiddison Moigage Group es
m EMAL: doau naaddisomorgage.com


DREAMOATCHER REALTY
Maureen Kleiman, Lic. Real Estate Broker 863-357-5900


Desirable River Lake Estates SW area
3bd, 2 bth CBS home on 10 fenced home- 3/2/2 recently updated. New car-
acres. Pond, barn and pasture. Move in pet, new DW. Close to town and schools.
condition. Steal this one at $237,500 Very nice home waiting for you! $175,000


(863


Hazellief & Prevatt Realt Co.
David Hazellief 863-610-1553 Betty Hazellief 863-6 44
Sharon Prevatt 863-634-7069Dee Reeder 863-610-2485


I **



CC. m.


ACREAGE I LOTS


*Big 'O" RV Park vacant lot or with home
:5+/- acres @ NE 24th St. MLS# 201364
*5+/-acres Sunset Strip Airpark @ SW 13th
St. MLS# 201396


*Basswood lots from $15,000-$33,000
*7 Acres HWY 68 $110,000
*Dark Hammock 2 10+/-acre parcels with
MH or without your choice


6-35 2 4 .7 1,D
nettoFr Staio & ae Cont Buldn .


1200 South Parrott Ave.
www.century21okeechobee.com Email:century21okeechobee@earthlinknet


Ift o.9C6tul1


ammil


5D07-H KINGS BAY SHORT SALE'
3ER12BA CBS home an a '7x" 'of Home
has ceramic tile and carpet flocre and app
ances Bui1t2D03 paved dnve way and in=


11111111111.11111W EV

5027-M:Spot in the Sun 3/2 Mobile home on
lt2 acre split plan floor open front and back
100x128 built
REDUCED!


VH"3^^. *_ 0





Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009 7



North Elementary students prepare for FCAT


Fourth Grade
The fourth grade students at
North Elementary School are get-
ting ready for the FCAT! Students
are busy with mock FCAT Writes
papers every Friday, and are con-
stantly working to improve their


writing by adding more specific
details, using better vocabulary
words, and creating more engag-
ing essays!
Reading is going well, too! We
are using many different resourc-
es to learn how to determine ex-
actly what a question is asking,


Submitted photo/North Elementary
Gabe Greseth uses the internet to find out more about George
H. W. Bush, who is the subject of his project.


and where to find the best an-
swer. We have been working on
brain-based versus book-based
questions all year long! Students
are also working
to improve their
short- and ex-
tended-response
answers by an-
swering all the
parts of the ques-
tion, as well as
by citing specific
details and other .,
evidence from the
story whenever
possible!
Our math classes just enjoyed
a visit from Tom Ramsey, who is
our school's consultant for Aca-
letics. This program is used to en-
sure that students are more than
ready for FCAT Math! In fact, we
are working on reaching 1200
exposures to various problems
from every math strand! That
means we'll have answered 1200
questions about math by FCAT-
which only has 40 math ques-
tions!
The fourth grade teachers
would like to take this opportu-


nity to thank all of the parents
who came to our Parent Night
on Jan. 22. We were thrilled by
the turnout! We loved discussing
everything from
the resources we
have available
for home use to
improved math
tricks, such as the
ten multiplication
facts that every
child needs to
Know and a bet-
S -ter way to make
flashcards. We
are all so excited to hear how
students are already using these
tricks at home!
Mr. Gaatz' science class is
'electrified' by their study of en-
ergy and electricity! Students are
learning all about energy, but are
focusing on electricity. They are
discovering static electricity, and
are doing investigations about
current electricity. Students have
been creating circuits using bat-
teries and will be discovering why
some materials are conductors,
while others are insulators. Stu-
dents will also be making switch-


es using various materials!
Mr. Stanley's class has been
busy this year. In addition to get-
ting ready for the tests we'll take,
we've begun literature circles, as
well as started writing reports.
Students have loved reading our
first literature circle selection, "Be
a Perfect Person in Just Three
Days" and have enjoyed the activ-
ity centers that tie into the book's
message. Also, after learning how


to use the internet for research
while creating their Powerpoint
presentations for Christmas tradi-
tions around the world, students
are once more using the laptop
lab to create reports on various
American presidents. After learn-
ing to create an outline to orga-
nize their information, students
will not only type their reports,
but will also create a podcast to
present to the class.


The Law Office Of Gerald Lefebvre
S Personal Injury Trial Attorney
Voted a "Super Lawyer" by his peers in 2007,
according to the Florida Super Lawyers Magazine
Awarded an "AV" Peer Review Rating by Martindale-
"' Hubbell (highest rating)
S State and Nationally Board Certified Civil Trial Lawyer
Certified Circuit Civil Mediator

8 S SM S6111 1S ,01 1111


KidSmart computers donated to Head Start kids


OKEECHOBEE -- IBM is donat-
ing 600 KidSmart Young Explorer
computer learning centers to pre-
school programs nationwide, in-
cluding East Coast Migrant Head
Start Project OKEE I and OKEE II
Centers, to help children with dis-
abilities and their classmates build
skills for future academic success.
The donation is being made to
PACER Center, a national organi-
zation for parents and profession-
als working with children with
disabilities, such as autism, vision
loss or other learning disabilities
and physical impairments. PACER
will work with groups including
the National Head Start Associa-
tion and federally-funded Parent
Centers to deploy the computer
learning centers and training,
expecting to reach nearly 20,000
children in the next year.
IBM's KidSmart program, now
in its 10th year, includes the Young
Explorer, a computer housed in
brightly-colored, kid-hardened Lit-
tle Tikes furniture and equipped
with award-winning educational
software to help children learn
and explore concepts in math,
science and language. The com-
puter centers can also help chil-
dren learn important socializa-
tion skills such as how to work
together and sharing. Exploration
and socialization skills are impor-
tant to prepare children for future


success in school, help level the
playing field and ensure all chil-
dren have access to educational
tools. The KidSmart program also
includes teacher and parent train-
ing material critical for education.
The KidSmart website: http://
www.kidsmartearlylearning.org/,
provides information for teachers
and parents on early childhood
learning and technology.
IBM developed the KidSmart
program a decade ago to help re-
duce the digital divide, especially
in urban areas, where it was be-
coming apparent that children
from less affluent backgrounds
could benefit from access to
specialized technology tools and
educational materials to better
prepare them to enter school.
Since then, more than 100,000
teachers have been trained on
how to use the programs effec-
tively in the classroom. IBM es-
timates that millions of children
worldwide have used a Young
Explorer. Based on the success of
the program in the United States,
IBM expanded the program to 60
countries around the world with
tremendous success and translat-
ed the educational software into
30 languages. In several countries
such as Vietnam, China, India
and Jordan, it has become fully
integrated into national education
programs and has served as the


Submitted photo/ECMHSP Okee II Center
Eager learners gather round to see the newest in learning
tools at the East Coast Migrant Head Start Center in Okeecho-
bee. Both Okeechobee Centers benefitted from the 600 corn-


puters donated nationwide.
model for teacher training.
For more information about
IBM, please visit: www.ibm.com.
For more information about
PACER, please visit www.PACER.
org.
For more information about
(East Coast Migrant Head Start
Project), visit (www.ecmhsp.org)
or call 863-467-6930 or 863-467-
0702.


Pemayetv Emahakv Charter School Honor Roll


Pemayetv Emahakv
Charter School
Honor students in grades one
through five are congratulated
on their academic achievements
for the second nine weeks of the
2008-09 school year.
Honor students include:
First grade
Bronze Award (3.0-3.4
GPA)
Marcie Osceola, Nyah David-
son, Myron Billie, Redheart Billie,
Robert Harris, Sage Motlow, Mal-
colm Jones, Tucker Johns.
Silver Award (3.5-3.9
GPA)
Keira French, Jacee Jumper,
Eecho Billie.
Gold Award (4.0 GPA)
Kamani Smith, Madisyn Os-
ceola, Katie Beck, Ozzy Osceola,
Mallorie Thomas, Dante Thomas,
Aniya Gore.
Second Grade
Bronze Award (3.0-3.4
GPA)
Andrew Fish, Aidan Tommie
Silver Award (3.5-3.9
GPA)
Krysta Burton, Aleina Micco,
Kyle Palmisano, Oscar Yates,
Gage Riddle, Satie Rico


Gold Award (4.0 GPA)
Keelie Billie, Joseph Nichols,
Kano Puente, Raeley Matthews.
Third Grade
Bronze Award (3.0-3.4
GPA)
Elijah Billie, Bly Davidson, Mi-
chael Girtman, Joseph Osceola,
Brian Bishop, Chloe Chalfant,
Dalton Girtman, Easton Moss,
Rylee Smith, Morgan King.
Silver Award (3.5-3.9
GPA)
Shalynn Josh, Jalynn Jones,
Rudy Juarez, Brady Rhodes,
Layne Thomas.
Gold Award (4.0 GPA)
Aiyana Tommie, Dyami Nel-
son, Camryn Thomas
Fourth Grade
Bronze Award (3.0-3.4
GPA)
Robert Fudge, Ruben Burgess,
Diamond Shore, Drayton Billie,
Demetrius Clark, Courtney Gore,
Martina Herrera, Crysten Smith.
Silver Award (3.5-3.9
GPA)
Andrew Dobbs, Sean Osceola,
Odessa King, Kelton Smedley.
Gold Award (4.0 GPA)
Trevor Thomas, Bailey Ted-
ders, Jaden Puente, Erik Garcia.


Pritchard's GMAC
n LLtdlll RealEstate

1804 S. Parrott Avenue Okeechobee

(863) 357-4622

DRASTICALLY REDUCED
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
Hwy 441 N.,
5800 sq ft building
on 2.5 acres
Lots of possibilities
Can be ran as two
separate businesses
NOW ONLY
E-- $429,000
Call Sena Treadway
*' -for more info
.,* 697-3207


Fifth Grade
Bronze Award (3.0-3.4
GPA)
Tyra Baker, Allison Gopher,
Elizabeth Johns, Rumor Juarez,
Rayven Smith, Tamea Allen, Har-
ley Johns, Brydgett Koontz, Trista
Osceola, Lahna Sedatol.
Silver Award (3.5-3.9
GPA)
Keyana Nelson, Cheyenne
Nunez, Donovan Osceola, Boyd
Brown, Jaron Johns, Kalgary
Johns, Zeke Matthews.
Gold Award (4.0 GPA)
Josh Greenbaum, Zach Hud-
son, Melany Williams, Kailin
Brown.


Osceola Middle

Honor Roll


Editor's note: The following
students are on the second nine
weeks honor roll at Osceola
Middle School. They were
accidentally left off the honor roll
list which ran in the Wednesday
newspaper.

Sixth Grade
Silver Honors 3.5 GPA
Brandon Shockley
Gold Honors 4.0 GPA
Emily Alicea, Pablo Alverez,
Payton Byrd, Sean Chauhan, Kylie
Daniel, Michael Daniel, Kirby
Dobbs,
Tyler Elliott, Logan Evans, April
Floyd, Sebastian Fulleda, Sandra
Hernandez, Glenn Jarriel, Katya
Kolbassinskaya, Baldemar Me-
drano, Brittany Milrot, Aalia Mur-
phy, Carmela Olivares, Fernando
Perez, Megan Perona, Lucas Pine-
do, Otto Ramirez, Lynn Romer,
Christen Sheffield, Isabelle Shel-
don, Jacalyn Sutton, Jason Viens,
Tammie Ward, Natasha Williams.


1981 SWM-L located on nice fenced lot n BRING YOUR FISHING POLE! 32 mobile
Treasure Island, new appliances, with a 18x30 screen room, carpet & vinyl, 2car
asher/dry beautiful Florida Room with carport, ADT alarm system and banned water
newly updated ndows, 2 carports, fur- soer. On lake access canal with a covered
mshed iced to sell, boat slip with boat it, seawall and dock.
#=212$54,9 fMrlamillllilln #201975 $68.000 Iooo n Iwidll


BAT H AK


GORGEOUS 2/2 Trpl e Wde w/tray ceilings, AFFORDABLY PRICED!! Newer build 2006
modn, eat in ba, surround n CB 2 in Basswod. Split foo plan, file
stucco interior walls. many more upgrades lflong. St on your back porch ad enroy the
3x14 screen porchWh woodloorsto setback wrings Ceat starter home. Short Sale!
and enjoy thie evenings. Thisis a place to see! I 202222 1,000
201O531 $149,000 *M I .. M





BEAUTIFUL 2006 3/2 HOME in Kings 5 + acres w/2 CBS homes, beauully main-
Bay Very open and looks brand new tainted, 1 duplex/ 2 mobile homes Property is
HOA includes pool, tennis courts, club uly paradise, Beautful trees. Let the rentals
house, and yard maintenance. #202200 help make YOU money. Call for yourappont-
$167,000 l m #ent#20064 $1,250,000 .i





BeaL 5 acres on main home CBS consutm 200 DWMPI on fenced and crossed
tion and 8 m lehome rental uns6 are une~- acres. Hme has new dtchencabinets,
ly reed and 2 are vacant Seler is movated, new wood ooring, garden tub, and is just out-
Liesed MH park so unit can be replaced as sde of town! Call today for your showngl!
needed. #201605 $250,000 01613 $192,000
Se labia Elsaol Now IAvailablel
NO TRANSACTION FEES!
863-763-8222 3126 wi 441 Okeechebee


3 BR, 2 Baths on your

lot from $89,000
and up

Other models available. CBS construction,
wood cabinets, tile in LR, kitchen and baths,
carpet in bedrooms. Pick your colors.
Upgrades available.

$119,000, lot included


Roland MosSl CGC151161s

Lou DoMicco, LLC CGC1506855
(863) 763-7998
(863) 634-7722 (863) 763-7552


BEST IN THE AREA"


Talll i: il: 11111: 111;





8 Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009


Master Gardeners: 'Going green' in 2009


By Dan Culbert,
Extension Horticulture
Agent
Okeechobee Branch Service
Center
The "new" year is a month
old, and many a resolution has
fallen by the wayside. But it's not


too late to act on a suggestion
from your local Extension office
- consider being a Florida Master
Gardener!
Many folks have resolved to
be more environmentally con-
scious in the New Year. Some
have decided it's time to learn


Submitted to the Okeechobee News/South Florida Water
Management District

Weather radio winner
Gary Ritter, right, head of South Florida Water Manage-
ment District's Okeechobee Service Center, presents
Noram Ceja with a weather radio she won at a drawing
held at the Health and Safety Expo Saturday, Jan. 17, at
the Okeechobee County Agri-Civic Center.


some new skills that can help
open up job opportunities. Oth-
ers have resolved to help others
or to get back in touch with the
community. All of this and more
can be yours as a Florida Master
Gardener. Here are the basics:
Master Gardeners are volun-
teers trained by UF that help peo-
ple in the community. In return
for 70 hours of training, Master
gardeners agree to provide 75
hours in a year of help back to the
community.
You don't have to know a
while lot about gardening that's
what the training program is go-
ing to teach. What is needed is a
desire to learn and a willingness
to help others.
After the training class, volun-
teers will work alongside UF Ex-
tension agents and other veteran
Master Gardeners at times that
they are available.
A training class is now form-
ing in Okeechobee, to begin on
Wednesday Feb. 11, at the local
Extension office. It will meet from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for 11 weeks. In-
struction will be provided by UF
experts via a video conference
system, and will be supplemented
by locally develop field trips and
hands-on experiences to help vol-
unteers understand horticulture.
Trainees receive a "notebook"
full of current information about
gardening that they can use on
their own and as a volunteer, or
possible use this to help get ready
for new employment opportuni-


Okeechobee Livestock Market Report


January 26 and 27, 2009


Cows
Breaking
Cutter
Canner

Bulls
1000-1500
1500-2000

Calves
Cows
Str
Hfrs
Bulls
Yrlngs
Mix
Total


$51.00
$44.00
$32.00

$
$55.00

Monday
827
99
9
5
26
28
0
994


$55.00
$53.00
$43.00

$
$61.00

Tuesday
1404
331
1
21
39
116


170-190
200-250
250-300
300-350
350-400
400-450
450-500
550-600
600-650

Med #2
150-200
200-250
250-300
300-350
350-400
400-450


Small #1
1912 220-235
250-300


125-165
120-155
117-130
105-110
100-102
91-103
88-104
84-89

Steers
92-110
95-122
90-115
80-105
80-101
78-91


Med #1 Steers Hfrs 300-350 107-117


350-400
450-500
550-600


Calf prices were quite a bit lower
this week. Hopefully, its only
due to bad winter storms in the
midwest, or it could be signs of
economic troubles our country
is in. Either way, calves were off
$6-8. Slaughter cows sold good,
maybe $1 or 2 higher.
Steve Seims of Avon Park, topped
the calf market with the high of
$1.85. Lundy Farms of Moore
Haven topped the cow market
with the high of .59.


See ya next week, Todd


UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA

IFAS EXTENSION

ties.
On completion of the training
class, a name tag and polo shirt
will also be provided in return to
a program fee of $110. Once the
volunteer gives back 75 hours,
they even get $25 back too!
For more details, persons can
view an on-line "Sprouting kit" on
the internet: http://okeechobee.
ifas.ufl.edu/Master%20Gardeners/
MG.Sprouting.Kit.htm. Residents
can stop by the Extension office
and pick the "kit" up or call to
have one mailed.
Applications are due by
Wednesday, Feb. 4. More infor-
mation is on our Okeechobee
web page, http://okeechobee.
ifas.ufl.edu. If you need additional
information on Master Garden-
ing, please email us at okeecho-
bee@ifas.ufl.edu or call us at
863-763-6469. Local residents can
stop by our office at 458 Hwy 98
North in Okeechobee, and visit
our Okeechobee County Master
Gardeners from 1 to 3 p.m. on
Tuesday afternoons.


' ill i]IIl l 'pII i II [r I (J Ik"I I nIt[M ,


Sales:
Monday
at 12 p.m.

Tuesday
at 11 a.m.


Ok eeoe Lietc Market
U.. 98 Noth Okehoe (83 6332


Although, it's hard to miss the bad news
about housing and mortgages these
days,it is actually one ofthe best times to
buy a home. Interest rates are the lowest
they've been in decades, home prices
are the lowest in years and Seacoast
National Bank is open for business
and making residential mortgage loans.

In fact, we've been in business for
over 80 years. We did not participate
in payment-option ARMs (adjustable
rate mortgages), sub-prime loans or
other 'exotic' mortgage loans you read
about today and which so many other
mortgage lenders are struggling with.
Instead, we sat out the irrational lending
frenzy and built our internal resources
to better serve our customers and home
buyers today and in the future.

ARM(ed) But Not Dangerous
The events of the last few years have
created the perception that all ARMs
(Adjustable Rate Mortgages) are
dangerous they're not. There are
times when an ARM is the right loan
for the situation. For instance, a couple
purchasing a home that plans to sell and
upgrade in a fewyears would most likely
benefit from a shorter term ARM loan.
It's a matter of applying common sense
lending practices and selecting the right
loan to fit the needs of the borrower.

New Lock & Shop Service
We recently introduced our "Lock and
Shop" service at Seacoast that allows
prospective home buyers to be pre-
approved for a mortgage and lock in
the rate on an Adjustable Rate
Mortgage (ARM) at the time of


1 UU Ul s ~ First Treament ;
Good till May 15, 2009
. . . . . . . . . . . . .1
SKIN LASER RESTYLANE BOTOX
(all FDA approved)



Botanical Cosmeceuticals (Skin Care Products & Sunscreens)
Make Your Botox, Laser & Restylane Appointment Today!


Leland M. Heller, M.D.
1713 Hwy 441 N., Suite E Okeechobee, FL 34972

467-8771


application for up to 90 days. You can
then shop for a home with the peace
of mind that the rate will not increase
while you shop. If rates go down before
you close on the loan, so does your rate.
You can also choose to change the loan
to a fixed rate option at closing.


Interest rates are the lowest
they've been in decades,
home prices are the lowest in years
and Seacoast NationalBank
is open for business and making
residential mortgage loans.



Technology & Convenience
A common misconception is that an
online-only lender will save a home
buyer money. Although the Internet
is ideal for gathering information, the
drawbacks of working with an online-
only lender outweigh the advantages.
To complement our loan services,
Seacoast has convenient online tools
for home buyers including a mortgage
calculator and application for those
who want online convenience. However
you choose to apply, local, dedicated
mortgage loan officers are available to
assist you with the application process
in person at your home or office, at a
Seacoast office or over the telephone.
Seacoast's professional mortgage
lenders are prepared to understand your
current economic and housing needs, to
answer your questions and make quick
local decisions. We disclose all terms
and conditions up front, and provide
a single point of contact throughout
the process, so there are no surprises at
closing. Our promise to you is simple -
whether you apply online or in person,
there's nothing "mechanical" about the
way you'll be treated as a customer.

Come to Seacoast feel good about
your bank.


Seacoast
NATIONAL BANK

500 N. Parrott Avenue
467-4663
1409 S. Parrott Avenue
467-5330
www.seacoastnational.com


Mark Atom Smith
President
Big Lake Region


NASDAQ SBCF


Money to Lend




Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009 9


The QHP Advantage Plan
Does That and More...


at One of Pu Seias


Okeechobee County


C
1111


oc
S.
O0
eb


k Restaurant
Parrott Aven


3


ech
,10


obe
-2


e
PM


Village
301


ue


Ok
Feb


quare Restaurant
W Park Street


ech
,12


obee
- 1 PM


REF #:ON020109


Call Toll Free
1-866-747-9017
TTY: 1-866-455-6010


Quality Health Plans


An HMO with a Medicare contract available to anyone enrolled in Part B and entitled to Part A of Medicare through
age or disability who continues to pay any applicable Medicare premiums. Members must use network providers
except for emergency, urgently needed, or out-of-area dialysis services. Your monthly Part B Premium paid by you
is returned to you in your Social Security check. A sales representative will be present with information and
applications. Responding to this ad or attending one of our seminars will constitute permission for us to call you.
Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1,
2010. Please contact Quality Health Plans for details. For accommodation of persons with special needs call
1-866-747-2700, 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday Friday. H5402 QHP0973FU(12/08)





10 Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009


click on classified


/ For Legal Ads:
legalads@newszap.com
/ For All Other Classified Ads:
classads@newszap.com


Seiam otc


All personal items under $5,000 ABSOLUTELY FREE!

Submit Your Free Classified Ad Today

at WWW.NEWSZARCOM Click on Classifieds
Published 3 weeks' in all of our Flonda papers: Caloosa Belle, Clewiston News, Glades County Democrat,
Immokalee Bulletin, Okeechobee News, and The Sun
Ads will run in the Wednesday Okeechobee News and weekly publications.


Employmenti
Full Tme 020


SAll personal items under $5,000
ABSOLUTELY FREE when placed online
* Ads phoned in subject to charge.
* Price must be included in ad
* Private parties only
* 2 items per household per issue


Employmen


A CASTLE STAFF A0NOUHTANT
/CA TLE The Parenting
CASTLE Professionals . ---,.....=.


Support our fight for the prevention of child abuse
Call (863) 467-7771


Announcements



Important Information: Please
read your ad carefully the first
day it appears. In case of an
inadvertent error, please noti-
fy us pnor to the deadline list-
ed. We wil not be responsible
for more than 1 incorrect
insertion, or for more than the
extent of the ad rendered val-
ueless by such errors.
Advertiser assumes responsi-
bility for all statements, names
and content of an ad, and
assumes responsilbldty for any
claims against Independent
Newspapers, All advertising
Is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all copy, and to
insert above the copy the word
"advertisement'. All ads
accepted are subject to credit
approval. All ads must conform
to Independent Newspapers'
style and are restricted to
their proper classifications.
Some classified categories
require advance payment.
These classifications are
denoted with an astensk .
Independent Newspapers will
never knowingly accept any
advertisement that is illegal or
considered fraudulent. n all
cases of questionable value,
such as promises of guaran-
teed income from work-at-
home programs or other offers
to send money in advance for
a product or service we
advise you to check with the
Attorney General's Consumer
Fraud Line at 1.800-220-5424,
and/or The Better Business
Bureau, 800-464-6331 for pre-
vious complaints.
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage/Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160



SAMMY the cat was last seen
in the vie of Eagle Bay Dr,
Oak Lake Est area. Orange
tabby with a bushy tail. Call
(863)532-9079



HUGE YARD SALE 805 SW
15th st- Feb 6 & 7, Fri & Sat
9am 3pm, Clothes, home
accessories, patio furniture,
tools, hardware, locksets
and more...Look for the bal-
loons.

Empmen1 meit


Employment -
Full-Time 205
Employment -
Medical 210
Employment -
Part-Time 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Training 227
Sales 230




HEALTHCARE
SPECIALIST
Lincare, leading national res-
piratory company seeks
Healthcare Specialist. Re-
sponsibilities: Disease Man-
agement Program, clinical
evaluations, equipment set-
up & education. Be the doc-
tor's eyes in the home
setting. RN, RRT, CRT li-
censed as applicable. Great
personality with strong work
ethic needed. Competitive
salary, benefits & career
paths. Drug Free Workplace,
EOE. Please fax resume to
Angel, 863-763-5191 or call
(863)763-7337


CUSTOMER
SERVICE REP
Must have:
Attention to detail
Excellent organizational,
verbal and written skills
Strong customer serv-
ice and communication
skills are needed in
order to handle cus-
tomer orders, provide
information and resolve
issues. Computer expe-
dence required.
Fax resume to
863-467-0045
or e-mail
astacy@rooftile.com
EOEIDFWP

EXPERIENCED PLUMBER -
Needed for all phases. DFWR
Valid Drivers License. Apply in
person @ 2232 NW 32nd Dr.
-RECEPTIONIST NEEDED-
in a busy cardiology office.
Medical knowledge & exp.
needed. Exc. benefit plan
offered. Fax resume to
863-467-8708 or
call 863-467-9400
Tire Repair and Auto Repair
experienced only apply. Drug
Free Work Place
863-512-6673
When doing those chores is
doing you in, it's time to
look for a helper in the
classified.



Christian Preschool has
openings for Food
Prep/Kitchen Position
and Classroom Substitutes.
Call (863)763-8800

Financial



Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315




INVESTORS NEEDED 10 to
12% Return, Dan Lakes a
state general contractor and
realtor. Need investors to se-
cure 1st mortgage on prop-
erties $40,000 to $80,000
Please Call (561)635-8478

NOTICE
Independent Newspapers will
never accept any advertise-
ment that is illegal or con-
sidered fraudulent. In all
cases of questionable val-
ue, such as promises of
guaranteed income from
work-at-home programs if
it sounds too good to be
true, chances are that it is.
If you have questions or
doubts about any ad on
these pages, we advise that
before responding or send-
ing money ahead of time,
you check with the Better
Business Bureau at
772-878-2010 for previous
complaints.
Some 800 and 900 telephone
numbers may require an
extra charge, as well as
long distance toll costs. We
will do our best to alert our
reader of these charges in
the ads, but occasionally
we may not be aware of the
charges. Therefore, if you
call a number out of your
area, use caution.
Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise
your yard sale in the
classified and make
your clean up a breeze!


to 3 yrs accouurng
experience, salary
based on experience.


Services



Babysitting 405
Child Car Needed 410
Child Car Offered415
Instruction 420
Services Offered 425
Insurance 430
Medical Services435




BRIGHT
FUTURES
Pienhri. Chld
1ssd an d A
ama
ees.* -c

'fle aM
nWK -


lwdapreschool.c


I





F

E
U,






p


DEE'S MINOR REPAIR
& Pressure Washing
Cool Sealing, Painting,
Carpentry & Much Morel
No Job Too Big or Small.
(863)467-2917
or (863261-6425
Uigser 569S#1126
? NEED HELP ?
CALL GEORGE CARTER
Painting, Repairs, Car-
pentry
Power Washing
FREE CONSULTATION
(863)763-4775


Merchandise



Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines535
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, Linens & Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment/
Supplies 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets/Supplies/
Services 670
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740



COUCH, newly reapolstered,
sage green with a light blue
stripe $900 (863)763-8956



STAIR GLIDE STAIR LIFT 15
ft, Rail new power cord,
new seat $1500 Call
(863)467-2482
How do you find a job
in today's competitive
market? In the
employment section
of the classified







Lamps $17, 100 Barstools
$39 up, 50 Desks $97 up,
3Pc Drpleaf Dinette $197,
50 Table and 4 Chairs $397
up, 200 Recliners $297 up,
50 2pc Sofa & Loveseat
sets $687 up, 50 TV Ent.
Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed set $297 up, 50
4Pc Bedroom sets $387 up,
3Pc Livingroom tables
$97up, 100 headboards
$79 up.








PUPPIES for sale, $50, call
for information
(863)634-1897


Health Foods
Vitamins, Minerals

Nature's Pantry
417 W S Park St (863) 467-1243


Shop from a gift catalog
that's updated regulaly:
the classified.


Earn some extra cash.
Sell your used items in
the classified


a 1 -m|l 1 1n d


DBBt 11 1


Rent or Rent w/Option to Buy
5 acres in Okeechobee 3 Br
1Ba, Ig living rm, kit. & dining
rm, 1 car garage w/fenced
pond. Zoned Ag. $900. me. +
last & sec. dep. Call Kamal
(561)792-9431 6am-11pm


LAND FOR LEASE -10 acres
Animal grazing. Great Oaks
Est., Lot #9. Highlands
County, (954)772-7230


Wednesday February 4th 4 p.m.



45 ACRES

with

30 ACRE LAKE

& TREE PLANTATION





* Clear and shallow lake Mining rightsfor sand extraction


TERMS' Sells REGARDLESS OF PRICE! Cash to Bid
* 10% Buyer's Premium Broker Participation Available Call to Qualify!


CASH PAID FOR OLD
BOTTELS call Tom
(813)310-5100 Cell

Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House Rent 930
Land Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960



FOR RENT- 2 bed 1.5 bath
Apartment $800 mth. Must
See! (863)763-7552 or
(863) 634-7722
HWY 441 SE 1/1 Icludes
electric and direct tv $650
mo. + Security
(561)723-6183
OKEE., Huge, Clean, 2br, 2ba
$725 mo. & 2br, 1ba $600
me. New kitch. New carpet
& paint. Call 772-215-0098
OKEECHOBEE lbr efficiency,
cable & elec not included,
$1/wk, (863)467-4253
SPECIAL-MOVE-IN, 1/2
Month Rent for 1st Month
w/$500 Sec. 2/1.5 carpet
tile, fridge- Iblk N. of Wal-
Mart. (863)763-8878


VIKING/PRAIRIE Efficiency.
Very clean $600/mo. In-
cludes utilities. No pets. Call
561-329-8205


CITY OF OKEE., 3br, 2ba,
Clean. Great neighborhood.
1201 SE 8th Dr., $950. mo.
+ Sec. dep. (863)634-1554
COUNTRY CLUB HILLS- 2BR,
2BA on wooded lot. Hot Tub.
Must see to appreciate. 1st
& last. Call 863-885-1347
DIXIE RANCH 2BR/1BA
$700 mo. 1st last & $500
Sec. Call (863)357-6700 be-
tween 9am-5pm.
IN OKEECHOBEE CITY: 4 Br/
2Ba, $1100 mo. + 1st, last,
sec. & refs. Call Barry for
more info. 772-216-1461
OKEE 2/1 CBS by 15B
furnished, carpeting, new
a/c, enclosed porch, with
W/D. Shed, $875/mo inclds
water (786) 201-0306
OKEECHOBEE 4br, 2ba,
great neighborhood, tile
throughout, $1195/mo, 1st
& sec move in
(561)248-3888 or
(863)599-0156
OKEECHOBEE, 3br, ba, Lg
yard, inside city limits, $800.
mo. + Util. 1st & Last mo.
sec. dep. (863)990-3294
OKEECHOBEE, 3br, 2ba, with
garage. C/Air Lazy 7 area.
1st, last & sec.
863-467-2541
PARTIALLY FURNISHED -
3/2, only $850 + $500 sec.
1 sm. pet considered, pay
own electric. (863)697-0214


ROOMMATE to share home in
Kings Bay $100 per wk.
Share water & elect.
(863)610-0517



NEW SMYRNA BEACH, FL -
Race week at Daytona, Con-
do, sips 6, 2br, on the beach
& pool. $800 for the week
Rent or Buy. (302)335-0416

Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property- Sale 1010
Condos/
Townhouses Sale1015
Farms Sale 1020
Houses Sale 1025
Hunting Property1030
Investment
Property Sale 1035
Land Sale 1040
Lots Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property Sale 1055
Property Inspction 060
Real Estate Wanted1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080




PARK MODEL, '94 12x40 &
12x20 Florida room, in Buck-
head Ridge Resort, $18,500.
(863)763-7196


We are now able to do all phases
of mechanical work. Full time
mechanic on duty. Stop by and
give us a try!!!!
ST. LUCIE BATTERY & TIRE
198 US Hwy 98N Okeechobee (863) 357-2431 www.slbt.com


I uooile 4005


Autooil 4


LAKE MOTORS
147 Hwy 441 SE Okeechobee
B. Pka..A 863-467-5243se habla espafiol


'02 Acura 3.2 CL .........'5495
Loaded, m ro leather #U5044
'01PT Cruiser ..........3995
LE tnnfl, aeI. auto #6529
'02KaSedona XVan ....'4495
Low .l. ianI. a. aded #
'02 landrovr Discover SB '5995
44, ato, V, Iaded #U1501
'0 Toyola .......s'4995
2dr, TulOM, tln.ll e i#U63
03 GCSonona King ab..3995
i3dr 6 tillu, I-ac. l meatli.si3 topper
"i -
.i I ,,-" II ,, .. ,,, . ,h s95


















INDIAN HAMMOCK New 3/2
two story on 2.89 acres,
$275000. Also have a 2.85
acres lot $59,00. Okeecho-
bee 3th st N. 2/1/1 CBS
$65,000 Canal Point ridge
facing lake 3/1 on hal acre
$70,000. And 3/2 $85,000
Realtor/Owner
(561)635-8478



BHR Furn Modular home 3/2
w/FI Room, Incl 3 HD TV's.
Just updated plumbing,
elect, new sod & sprink sys,
fenced, boat ramp, dock,
con drive, car port, shed.
$138.500 OBO
(561)81 8-2348
DOUBLEWIDE ON RIM CANAL
- 2001, 3/2, 1600 SF,
Screened porch, Boat slip &
or (912) 557-4176






Mobile Home- Lots 2005
Mobile Home Parts 2010
Mobile Homes Rent 2015
Mobile Homes Sale 2020




BEST VALUE IN TOWN! For
Rent: 2/1 apartment. Uni
newly remodeled. Located
12 miles north of Okeecho-
bee on Equestrian Ranch.
Monthly water, trash & lawn
maintenance included. No
Pets! $495 Move in spe-
cial. M-F (863)467-2982
HWY 441 SE 1/1 Includes
electric and direct tv $750
mo. + Security
(561)7236183
KISSIMMEE RIVER ESTATES -
2/1, 2 Car garage, $500 MO
(863)467-8062
WATERFRONT. 2br/1ba, com-
pletely furnished, non smk.
env., no pets $750 mo.+1st
& sec. 772-285-5856



BANK REPO'S
MOVE TO YOUR LAND
Mobile Home Angels
561-721-2230


'99 wuler 30M .......'3295
V6lstter #U5t72
'01 Ford Tarus .........'3995
6 y]., t, ow des #1t005
'99 Subar Ouback ......'3995
AmD, add. autlao,a #2t
203 Taurus ............'4995
'02 E150 Cargo an .......'4695
6. AC
'0 MiLsubishi Gallant.....'4495
4 oI], tio AC.
'94 35 12 Pssenger Van .'3995
'95 DeVlle \ ......... '3695



LAKE ACCESS WATERFRONT
- SWMH, 1/1 with additional
room, on rental lot. Call for
details, leave msg
(863)763-8054
OKEECHOBEE Near 15A. 2BR,
2BA w/Covered Car Port &
Shed. On rented lot $15,000
(863)634-4698

Recreation



Boats 3005
Campers/RVs 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles/ATVs 3035



SHAMROCK CUDDY CABIN
1987 Excellent condition,
V8 Ford Inboard, low
hours,Top, depthfinder, ra-
dio,Trailer. Fresh water run
$11500. (863)824-0801


MALLARD -2002, 26 ft, travel
trailer, sleeps 3, good cond,
very clean $3900 or best of-
fer (518)469-0990


KAWASKI Red 2001 Mean
Streak 1500, great shape,
runs perfect $5500
(863)610-7725

Automobiles



Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks4040
Parts Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070



CHEVY CAVALIER 1996 Au-
tomatic, Air $1900
(812)989-3022


CHEVROLET SILVERADO
2004 White extended cab
truck/145,000 runs good,
a/c, auto. Tinted windows,
V-8, air bags, anti-lock
brakes $6500/or best offer.
(239)590-5721


OLDSMOBILE 1993, 7 pas-
senger, cold ac, heat new
tires, Good shape $1550
(863)467-4256


iEpecil Notie 015


Health Care


Healt Car


I ars/epir 44


Pars/Rpars 04


- Sal 104


I an -Sae




Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009 11


Public notices



Public Notice 5005
State Public *
Legal Notice 5500





NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF
INDIAN RIVER STATE COLLEGE WILL
MEET WITH THE AREA LEGISLATIVE
DELEGATION FOR A LEGISLATIVE
BRIEFING ON WEDNESDAY, FEBRU-
ARY 4, 2009, AT 12:00 PM., IN
ROOM 231 IN THE SENATE CONFER-
ENCE ROOM. THE CAPITOL, TALLA-
HASSEE, FLORIDA. ANY PERSONS
SEEKING TO APPEAL THE DECISIONS
OF THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO
ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS
MEETING WILL NEED A RECORD OF
THE PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH
PURPOSE MAY NEED TO ENSURE
THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE
PROCEEDING IS MADE
309431 ON 2/1/09







R DIING A
NEWSPAPER MAKES
YOU A MORE INFORMED
AND INTERESTING
PERSON.


a) wonder nempaolp
readers are mo popular


) $NP Alli$


EXPIRED PERMITS WITH NO FINAL INSPECTION
2007 BUILDING CODES TAKE EFFECT MARCH 1, 2009. ANY
PERMIT WHICH HAS EXPIRED ON OR BEFORE FEBRUARY
28, 2009, WILL BE NULL AND VOID WHEN THE NEW CODES
TAKE EFFECT. TO CONTINUE TO PERFORM WORK A NEW
PERMIT APPLICATION MUST BE SUBMITTED. A WRITTEN RE-
QUEST TO EXTEND A PERMIT MAY BE SUBMITTED TO THE
BUILDING OFFICIAL TO BE HANDLED ON A CASE-BY-CASE
BASIS. SECTION 105.4.1.2 OF THE FLORIDA BUILDING CODE
AUTHORIZES THE BUILDING OFFICIAL TO REQUIRE ANY
WORK COMPLETED BE REMOVED FROM THE BUILDING SITE
IF A NEW PERMIT COVERING THE CONSTRUCTION IS NOT
OBTAINED WITHIN 180 DAYS OF THE DATE THE PERMIT BE-
CAME NULL & VOID.
308830 ON 2/1,8/09

NOTICE OF MEETING OFTHE
COQUINA WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS FOR COQUINA WATER CONTROL DISTRICT WILL
HOLD A MEETING ON WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009 AT 9:00 A.M. AT THE
ADMINISTRATION AMNEX BUILDING, OKEECHOBEE COUNTY EXTENSION OFFICE
SMALL CONFERENCE ROOM, 458 HIGHWAY 98 N., OKEECHOBEE, FL. A COPY OF
THE PROPOSED AGENDA MAY BE OBTAINED UPON REQUEST FROM THE UNDER.
SIGNED. IF ANY PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION BY THE BOARD
WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING; THAT PER-
SON WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR SUCH PURPOSES
THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE TAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PRO-
CEEDINGS, WHICH INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE
APPEAL IS TO BE BASED, IS MADE. MY PERSON WISHING TO SPEAK AT THE
MEETING MUST HAVE THEIR NAME AND TOPIC PLACED ON THE AGENDA ONE
WEEK BEFORE THE DATE OF THE MEETING. ALL PROPERTY OWNERS WITHIN
THE DISTRICT ARE INVITED TO ATTEND.
IN ACCORDANCE WTH E AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, PERSONS
NEEDING A SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION OR AN INTERPRETER TO PARTICIPATE IN
THE PROCEEDINGS SHOULD CONTACT THE DISTRICT'S OFFICES BY CALLING
863763-4601 AT LEAST TWO 12) DAYS PRIOR TO THE DATE OF THE MEETING.
OTIC: COQUINA WATER C ROL DISTRICT HAS AN ONGOING AUATIC
SPRAYING PROGRAM, DISTRICT WIDE.
WILLARD M. BYARS
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
17429 NW 242ND STREET
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
(863)763-4601 OR (863)634-3166
30919 ON 2/1/09

NOTICE OF VACANCIES
PLANNING BOARD/
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS AND APPEALS
The Board of County Commssioners of Okeechohee County, Florda Is seeking In-
terested persons or appointment to the Okeechobee County Planning Board/Board
of Adjfutments and Appeals. The appointment of two or mere regular or alternate
members is for a three year term. Incumbents whose terms are expiring may reap-
ply for a new term.
TIhl Board conducts public hearings and renders decisions on special exception
variances and appeals; conducts public hearings prior to malng recommendation
to the Board of County Commissioners on changes in zoning and amendments to
the County's land development regulations and comprehensive plan; considers and
approves certain site plans and development orders, and peremis other daes as
established he Coty's land development regulations. The Board Is also desig-
naoed as he Local Planning Agency lor the Coanty. Bard members are appointed
to represent the public interest and must be residents of Okeechoee Couny.
Applications may be obtained from the County Administrator's Office on the second
flor of the Okeechoee County Judicial Center at 312 NW 3rd Street, Okeechoee,
Florida. Applications may also he downloaded from wmnw.o.othoneens. Conm-
pleted applicafons, along wilh proof of residency in Okeechobee County, must be
submitted to the Conty Administrator's Office no later tan 4:00 p.m. on Wednes-
day, February11,2009,
Applications submitted shall be valid for these or other vacant positions that may
occur on the Planning Board/Board of Adjustments and Appeals or other citizn
boards during the nex 12 months.
CIll Bes, Jr., Chairman
Board of County Commissloners
Sharon Robertson, Clerk
Board of Conty Commissioners
309171 ON 2/1/09


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2007-DP-06
IN THE INTEREST OF:
S.B. DOB: 10/19/07
Father of the minor child:
Mario uran
TO: Father of S.., Maro Duran
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT A PE.
TUITION UNDER OATH HAS BEEN
FILED BY TOE DEPARTMENT OF CHIL-
DREN AND FAMILIES IN THE ABOVE.
STYLED COURT FOR THE TERMIA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS RELA-
TIE TO S.B., A FEMALE CHILD,
BORN ON THE 19h DAYOF OF TO-
BER, 2007. THE CHILD WAS BORN IN
THE COUNTY OF OKEECHOBEE, IN
THE STATE OF FLORIDA. YOU ARE
COMMANDED TO BE AND APPEAR
BEFORE A JUDGE OF THE CIRCUIT
CURT, JUVENILE DIVISION IN THE
ABOVE-STYLED COURT LOCATED AT:
OKEECHOBEE JUDICIAL CENTER
312 NH.W. 3RD STREET, OKEECHOBEE,
FL 34972
AT 2:30 PM., ON THE 6TH DAY OF
April, 2009, IN COURTROOM D" FOR
HEARING ANDTO SHOW CAUSE WHY
SAID PETITION SHOULD NOT BE
GRANTED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTI.
TUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS
CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A
PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN
THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS
NOTICE.
BE ADVISED THAT YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY TO REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU
CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY, ONE
MAY BE APPOINTED FOR YOU.
WITNESS MY HAND AS CLERK OF SAID
COURT AND THE SEAL THEREOF,
THIS 16TH DAY OF OCTOBER, 2008.
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF COURT
By: KImberly Sarros
DEPUTY CLERK
306333 ON 1/25,2/1,8,15/2000



^^^^^^^


Students
Continued From Page 1

year project.
Ryan Reister, a seventh grader from
YMS won the Junior Division Best of
Show in the Physical Science with his
project entitled, "The Music in Sci-
ence."
In the Senior Division sophomore
Celena Letcher won Best of Show in
the Biological Sciences with her project
entitled, "Regeneration of Brown Pla-
naria."
Freshman Ashley Hassan won the
Senior Division Best of Show in the
Physical Sciences with her project en-
titled, "Does Pond Water Make a Differ-
ence."
The following are the first, second
and third place winners of the junior
division in each category
Behavioral, Biochemistry, Medi-
cine and Health, Zoology: first place-
Sarah Davis, Brandon McKee, Monica
Hernandez, Hannah Sadler; second
place-Bryan Levins, Ismael Santuchi;
third place-Emily Murrow.
Botany: first place-Jessica Suit, Jes-
sica Wisener, Justin Osceola, Audrey
Metcalf, Christopher Boney; second
place-Amber Sumrall, Kylie Shirley,
Khrysta Herndon, Haley Burkhalter;
third place-Rhiannon Robshaw, Thania
Liberato, Lucas Richey, Jacqueline


O'Connor, Frank Adamo, Jose Duran,
Jacob Greseth and Nicholas Flood.
Chemistry: first place-Brendon Jo-
nassaint, Krista Pope, Rachel Roehm,
Dalton Hodges; second place-Saman-
tha Norris, Kyle Nichols, Benjamin
Levins, Katie VanBeek, Destinee Villar-
real, Krista Ward, Kyla Hargraves, Tyler
Chartier; third place-Nelida Perez, Kyle
Kelso, Nicholas Kielbasa, Angelina Ruiz,
Jaisalyn Santiago, Nicolas Suarez, Anali
Torres, Ashton Armstrong and Tabatha
Henry.
Consumer Science: first place-
Raela Ridley, Jessica Humphrey; second
place-McKenzie Richey, Caitlyn Strip-
ling, Lorraine Lutjen; third place-Zak
Kemple, Nikki Tomlinson, Selina San-
chez, Selena Bowman and Erica Ruiz.
Earth and Space Science, En-
gineering, Environmental, Math-
ematics: first place-Markita Skeen,
Samantha Rivero, Darby Jones, Dayla
Ferneau; second place-Paola Prado,
Garrett Thomas, Kailey Hoover, Katlyn
Haymond, Sierra Story; third place-
Ashalee Dreher, Avery Plemons, Allyson
Trimble, Christian O'Connor, Tad Nor-
man, Brandon Vickers and Eric Voss.
Physics: first place-Julianne Meives,
Jenna Rath, Brent Baughman, Ryan Re-
ister; second place-Brandon Alverez,
Jennifer Arellano, Kasandra Baker, Mi-
chael Carter, Macy Gamiotea, Maria Jai-
mes, Brandi Perona, Diego Rodriguez,
Savannah Treadway, Jordan Watts,
Brandon Ball, Zachary Wingfield; third


place-Tuff Durrance, Stephen Geary,
Carson Harris, Jessica Jaimes, Carissa
Licata, Brandon Parramore, James
Steiert, Patsy Thomas, Maci Thomas,
Darin Walker, Korey Walters and Terry
Williams.
The following are the first, second
and third place winners of the senior
division.
Behavioral, Biochemistry, Medi-
cine and Health, Zoology: first
place-Juan Lugo, Shyanne Prescott,
Joey Barletto, Kelsi Burnham, Celena
Letcher, Joy Burnham; second place-
Mishal Mehta, Daniel Jansen, Josh Lea;
third place-Tadarrell Smith, Margaret
McKane and Emily Raulerson.
Botany: first place-Sam Harrell,
Courtney Lopez, Shelby Pollock, Stanly
Ngo; second place-Lauren Halliday,
Brenda Aguirre, Brittany Serrano, Jen
Ranftle; third place-Erika Klinger and
Jonathon Kemp.
Chemistry: first place-Alec Hert,
Megan Premorel; second place-Joseph
Chandler, Kyle Foster; third place-Tiffa-
ny Rowlett.
Consumer Sciences: first place-
Taylor Fulford, Sara Brewer; second
place-Marie Renfranz, Elizabeth Turner,
Kayla Harrison; third place-Megan Mc-
Nabb, Allyson Matthews; Brittany Ru-
nyon; Noah Pulitzer, Raychel Rabon
and Jose Wallace.
Computer, Engineering, En-
vironmental, Mathematics: first
place-Max Norman; Tyler Finney; Ash-


Central students celebrate 100th day of school


Kindergarten News
We have made it through 100 days of
school!! The 100th day of school was on
January 28. Kindergarten celebrated the day
with a "Wacky Wednesday." The students
rotated to other kindergarten classes and
worked on special 100th day projects such
as 100 Fruit Loops necklaces, 100 framed
glasses, cowboy hats with 100 stickers, and
chains with 100 links. In the afternoon, stu-
dents enjoyed a 100th day refreshment. Us-
ing pretzel sticks and donuts, they made the
number 100. Kindergarten also worked on
projects at home to bring in on this special
day. Students brought in projects made out
of 100 sticks, 100 Cheerios, 100 beans, and
100 Skittles just to name a few.
First grade
On Friday, Jan. 23 Kindergarten had the
pleasure of going to the Dolly Hand Theatre
to see the play Rainbow Fish. The students
worked on the letter Rr that week and en-
joyed hearing stories about Rainbow Fish
read by their teacher. Kindergarten will be
watching another play, Puss 'n Boots, at the
Okeechobee High School this week.
Mrs. Vaughn's class had a great 100th
day of school. Our class started the day by
reading 100 books. We wrote our numbers
to 100. We wrote 100 words that we know.
We counted to 100 frontwards, backwards,
and by 2s, 5s, and 10s. We finished our day
by making a necklace out of 100 pieces of
cereal. We are all 100 days smarter. Most of
our class is finishing the Hot Pencils timed
tests. Our class has been working on us-
ing the verbs were and was correctly. We
learned about our new President Barak
Obama and were able to watch when he
was sworn in as president. We learned that
it was a historical event we were a part of.
We are looking forward to our trip next
week to see Puss-n-Boots. Congratulations
to our Students of the week: David Adams,
Austin Allen, BTran Garcia, Anallely Mal-
donado, and Ta'Makia Jones. Happy Birth-
day to: Saul Momdragon.
Mrs. Bostwick's class at Central Elemen-
tary School has been learning about differ-
ent types of birds and the importance of re-
cycling. The students are very aware of the
importance of keeping our planet clean for
the sake of all living things! We have been
exploring gravity and magnetism in science.
Students have also been learning more
about verbs and writing persuasive papers
and ads. We have been exploring number
patterns in math and are now working on


addition and subtrac- li with jeans and white
tion facts to 12. Students , a rockin' good time!!
of the Week these past -^ Students of the w
few weeks were Trina tro and Leandra Agu
Wiggins-Williams and -- Second grade
Anthony Jimenez. Con- Mrs. Greseth's c
gratulations, kiddos! their money unit an
Keep up the good work! that they are starting
Miss Shineldecker's students are really doing a super job
working hard. We can't believe that we've ence, they have been
made it through 100 days of school already. resources and how
On Wednesday, January 28th we celebrated have been talking ab
the 100th day of school. Students counted important it is for th
100 pennies, marbles, beans, and many Earth. In Reading th
other spectacular things to share. We cel- reading about people
ebrated by counting out 100 M&Ms and 100 gratulations to Bren(
pretzels for snacks. We even made sure to iela Caballero for ge
include exercise by doing 100 jumping jacks Book Challenge! Wa
(10 intervals of 10). They were so excited to Miss Miller's sec
learn that we only had 80 days of school left joyed learning aboul
in first grade. WOW!! and the Chinese Ne
We've been making our brains work in been working hard c
overtime in reading lately. Our stories are you know how to m
getting longer and tougher. The long O and two coins? In science
U sounds have been a major focus for us. ing about the differ
In grammar we are still working very hard how the earth chang
on verbs. We've been using the past tense Congratulations t
verbs was and were along with the present of the Week: Jayda t
tense verbs have and has. It's very confus- Paislea Plant, and An
ing, but I want to say they are being SUPER
TROOPERS by working so hard. Great Job!!
Social studies we've been discussing Battle
President Obama and Martin Luther King,
Jr. Their minds have been so curious about Continued Froi
both of these individuals.
In math we've been practicing our addi- ing," Representati
tion and subtraction facts. We just learned a May 25, 2006 p
how to start adding three digit numbers. For nouncing the pure
example: 3+2+1+6. It's amazing to see noted that if the pi
how far along they've come. preserved, houses
Wednesday, Jan. 28 was writing display ally been built on t
day. Our students were so excited to dis- "The lesson is t
play their hard work on their Three Little perseverance," Mr
Pigs story. They were proud of their work "The creation
and so was I. Lately we've been writing in cae the public an
our journals. They have enjoyed making up largest and fierce
stories themselves. Their writing abilities lares and fece
have sure come a long way. Next we will be nole Wars," Shaw
working on writing and illustrating our very Okeechobee attl
own books. Sept. 13, 2007 mee
Friday, Jan. 6, is Central's 50th Anniver- bee County Board
sary Our school has been open for 50 years "This really rep
and our staff and students are excited to history of Okeech
celebrate by traveling back in time to the maintain," Gary R
'50s. We are planning on dressing like staff bee Battlefield Fri
and students did back when the
school first opened. Girls will be Crossword Puzzle
wearing poodle skirts and boys


St-shirts. It's sure to be

reek were: Janelle Cas-
ilar. Good Job girls!

lass has wrapped up
d is now really excited
g time. So far they are
of telling time. In Sci-
Slearning about natural
to protect them. They
out recycling and how
em to take care of our
ey have been enjoying
e helping animals. Con-
len Bostwick and Dan-
etting 200 steps in 100
y to go!
ond graders have en-
tMartin Luther King Jr.
w Year. We have also
)n counting money. Do
lake 75 cents with only
e we have been learn-
ent kinds of rocks and
es.
o the following Students
Howell, Jasmine Lamb,
drew Simmons.


n Page 1

ive Machek said at
press conference an-
:hase of the land. He
property had not been
would have eventu-
he battleground.
hat you have to have
Carr added.
of the park will edu-
d commemorate the
t battle in the Semi-
'n Henderson of the
field Friends told the
ting of the Okeecho-
of Commissioners.
resents a part of the
obee we are trying to
itter of the Okeecho-
ends told that same


Congratulations to Jasmine Lamb, Jesus
Gomez, and Axel Galvan for reaching 100
steps! Remember to keep reading every
night for 15 minutes to earn those steps!:)
Second Grade B.A.S.E. students at C.E.S.
would like to thank Jenny Pung for teaching
them about recycling! Jenny Pung, Commu-
nity Outreach Representative from Waste
Management came to Mrs. Johns' and Sra.
Rodriguez's classes to share a Christmas
craft made from recycled paper. She helped
the kids create a paper chain from ticket
strips from the scale house at the Land-
fill. The kids were able to use the craft to
practice math skills such as measurement,
graphing, and estimation. All the kids en-
joyed this activity and learned a lot about
helping the environment.
Second Grade B.A.S.E is looking forward
to the '50s day on Feb. 6. We can't wait to
dance at the sock hop!
Kaitlyn McKay is still leading in A.R.
points! Congratulations to Deborah Nichols
for reaching 300 steps in 100 Book Chal-
lenge! That is 75 hours of reading. WOW!
Everyone needs to read every night for 15
minutes!
Keep counting change and practice tell-
ing time at home.

commissioner's meeting.
For the second year in a row, the re-
enactment has been held on the state
property. Previous reenactments had
been held near King's Bay on private
property.
City councilman Dowling Watford,
a member of Okeechobee Battlefield
Friends, said that the process of con-
verting the land into a state park is still
in the works, but has been delayed be-
cause of budget cuts.
The first of two required public
meetings was held Sept. 25, 2007. The
goal of the meeting was to explain the
planning process and begin gathering
information necessary to proceed in
planning the park. The second public
meeting has been delayed because of
budget cuts.
Post your opinions in the Public Issues
Forum at www.newszap.com. Reporter
Pete Gawda can be reached at pgawda@
newszap.com.


a a


a111


-- ** Copyrighted Materia



l Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Aan -


a a


ley Hassan; Trent Johnson; second
place-Judson Harris; third place-Wesley
Mims.
Physics: first place-Tim Gray, Sam
Kenworthy, Karli Bowers; second
place-Robert Stafford, Savanna Whit-
lock, Richard Donegan, Makenzie Tom-
linson, Justin Morgan, Isabella Penido;
third place-Ryan Born, Timothy Farrell
and Whitney Sweet.
The district would like to thank
teachers involved in the science fair:
Magi Cable, Mary Kneidel, Brynne Em-
ley and Peggy Dubose from Osceola
Middle School; Cindy Letcher, Melinda
Gray, Ron Altice, Rosemary Palmero
and Brian Mecurio from Yearling Middle
School; Dan Thomas and Richonda
Manson from Okeechobee Freshman
Campus; and Wendy Reister and Dan
Biebel from Okeechobee High School.
The district would also like to show
their appreciation to Waste Manage-
ment of Okeechobee which provided
funds to purchase the certificates, rib-
bons and Best of Show trophies for the
district science fair.
Ninety-seven Okeechobee students
will go on to represent the county at the
regional science fair. Good luck to all.
Post your opinions in the Public Issues
Forum at www.newszap.com. Reporter
Chauna Aguilar can be reached at cagul-
lar@newszap.com.





12 Okeechobee News, Sunday, February 1, 2009


28 years going strong


Taylor Creek Bass Club


Outdoors
Share your news and photos
for this column by email to
okeenews@newszap.com


Taylor Creek Bass Club recent-
ly celebrated their annual awards
banquet at Pogey's Family Res-
taurant. Following a superb meal
of chicken or prime rib, President
and MC for the evening, Chan
Garrett, turned to Tournament
Director, Bill Seitz for awards pre-
sentation. Darrell Brackin won
"Angler of the Year". This is the
club's most significant fishing
award as it requires consistent
top-level performance through-
out the entire year regardless of
water, weather or fishing condi-
tions. Darrell's advice to the other
members of the club, who might
seek this award in the future, was
to "just keep your bait in the wa-
ter". The next two awards for "An-
nual Big Fish" and "Classic Win-
ner" went to Jim Wilson (8.29
lbs.) and Ernie Johnson (Classic
Total = 16.11) lbs. respectfully.


Each year the club gives an
award to the angler who caused
the most humorous on-water
event. Past awards have been
given for running aground, falling
overboard, locking the tow ve-
hicle with engine running while
boat launching and many other
anomalies. This year the award
was given for dancing on the
front deck of a boat after landing
a significant fish. Unfortunately,
several rods needed replacing
after the performance. In keep
ing with necessary security, the
recipient of this award will not be
named.
The club's most prestigious
award, "The Hank Morley
Award" is given each year to the
member who has done the most
for the club during the year. The
2008 winner, Bill Seitz, managed,
coordinated and directed all of


the club's tournament activities
in a year of low water and mini-
mal fish by locating and arrang-
ing tournaments on many lakes
other than Okeechobee. Addi-
tionally, he coordinated and sup-
ported many aspects of the 23rd
annual "Lee McAllister Memorial
Kid's Day Fishing Festival" held at
the Agri-Civic Center, and was a
captain for the "Big O" Teen An-
glers".
Needless to say the 25-mem-
ber, B.A.S.S affiliated club en
joyed a great evening at the ban-
quet and looks forward to the
2009-fishing year. The club has
a long history of youth, commu-
nity, and environmental service.
These efforts remain the focal
point of the members when they
are not fishing. Funding for the
events is raised through the club
sponsored Bill Sprigle Memo


Softball team plans for continued success


By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
Why stop at two straight dis
trict championships when you
can have three ... or even seven
straight?
The Okeechobee High School
Girls' Softball Team got back to
work this month for the upcom
ing season. They never really left
as the girls play travel ball in the
fall and work out throughout the
year.
Gone are college players like
Mary Huff, Jordan Marcum, and
Lauren Throop. Back are Naomi
Stevens, Taylor Douglas, Megan
Clements, and a new generation
of stars.
"We expect to be competitive
again and a district champion
ship is a realistic goal," Brahmans
Coach Kim Hargraves said. Her
team was 19-5 last year. They
won the district championship
by mercy rule and reached the
regional semifinal. They have
become the only outdoor sport
at the high school to win back to
back district championships.
A number of Hargraves former
players are playing college ball
this year. They include Huff and
Throop who are at St. Petersburg
College. Kelley Smiley, nominat-
ed for pre season all American,
is still at Indian River State Col-
lege (IRSC), and is being highly
recruited by Florida State. Alicia
Claxton is also at IRSC. Those
four girls will play this Sunday in
Fort Pierce in a double header
which starts at 12 noon.
Other Brahman alumni in col-
lege this year include Kelci Breaux
at Brevard Community College,
and Rachel Lowe at Stetson Uni-
versity.
A number of the current Lady
Brahmans have the potential to
go as far as or even further than
their predecessors.


Douglas will return to play first
base, pitch and catch. She is only
a sophomore.
Stevens will be back to cap-
tain the infield at short stop. She
showed tremendous ability as a
freshman.
Ashtyn Brown will likely take
over for Huff at second base. Me
gan Clements could see time at
third base and catcher.
Others in the mix are Taylor
Kinman, and Victoria Blevins.
Courtney Wilson figures to
start in LF, with Sam Harrell start-
ing in CF and Emily McCullough
in right field.
Leanna Cotton will see time at
first base and third base.
This year's team has athletic
ability and versatility. If there is
one difference this year it is on
the pitcher's mound. The Brah-
mans were spoiled in the past
few years. Breaux and Huff were
both dominant during their se-
nior campaigns. This year some
younger girls will have to carry
the load.
In the mix on the mound are
Katarina Suarez, Taylor Doug-
las, and Courtney Wilson. Some
other girls will also get a chance.
Suarez will likely bat in the middle
of the lineup and serve as the des-
ignated hitter. In softball the cor-
rect term to use for DH is DP or
designated player.
"We have a young group
of girls this year. They've been
spoiled a little as the older girls re-
ally led them very well. Now some
of these younger girls will have to
step up and take over that role.
We may have a couple of lead
ers this year or they may lead col-
lectively. Overall, if the girls put it
together and play together I don't
think there is a district team that is
close to us," Hargraves said.
Other top teams in the district
this year include Jensen Beach
and Suncoast. Coach Hargraves


will get help from Heather Stillians
and Scooter Gillis. The JV squad
is coached by Gina Davis and Ty-
rone Smith.
Hargraves said the girls must
work as hard as ever to continue
the success at OHS, "We did ex-
tremely well in the fall without
our full team, but the girls can't
get comfortable. If they want to
win a district title they have to
earn it."
Members of the varsity squad
are Samantha Harrell, Victoria
Blevins, Taylor Kinman, Taylor
Douglas, Courtney Wilson, Cindy
Wine, Katarina Suarez, Emily
McCullough, Frances Bosworth,
Naomi Stevens, Megan Clem-
ents, Leanna Cotton, and Ashtyn
Brown.
The girls open the season on
Feb. 5 and 6, when they play in the
Palm Beach Gardens High School
Pre Season classic. Okeechobee
is scheduled to play St. Lucie West
Centennial and the hosts Palm
Beach Gardens, a defending state


champion. The girl's varsity home
opener will be held on Feb. 13. A
ball drop fund raiser will also be
held. For more information call
Coach Hargraves at 863-634-6322
or the high school office at 863-
462-5025.


rial Benefit Tournament and the
sale of sponsorship ads on our
club equipment trailer. TCBC is
the prime sponsor of the "Big
O" Teen Anglers" of Okeecho
bee for kid's 10-18 years of age.
This October (2009) the club will
hold it's 24th annual "Lee McAl-
lister Memorial Kid's Day Fishing
Festival". During the festival, kids
4-17 have the opportunity to fish
a stocked pond, and participate
in a national Bassmaster Cast-
ing Kid's Contest" (pitch, flip
and cast). Prizes are awarded to
all participants. Past Community
projects have included manag-
ing/operating tournament weigh-
ins for local sponsor charity
events, personal care kits for the


elderly and donations to Hospice
of Okeechobee. Environmen-
tal projects have resulted in the
removing of over 30,000 lbs of
debris from the Kissimmee River
shoreline, placing trash bins at
many of Lake Okeechobee's boat
ramps and installing public boat
dock access ladders.
TCBC is actively seeking new
members, both boaters and es-
pecially non-boaters. Meetings
are held on the second Thursday
of each month at the Buckhead
Ridge VFW Post 9528. Monthly
tournaments are held on the fol-
lowing weekend.
For additional information,
please contact Dave Stout at 863-
467-2255.


.. .~Visi Our


(Breast ugmentation $3,499


Tummy Tuck


$4,750


Good until the end of February


Call us to schedule your consultation in Jupiter!


(561) 747-1232 or (888) 9-ALLURE
www.allureplasticsurgery.com


Okeechobee News/Charles Murphy
Taylor Douglas will be one
of the teams top hitters this
season.


Ma fORNS
SUE ..i.* Li U M. yii.t.if i swtjna


Submitted photo/Okeechobee Freshman Campus

Students of the Week
On Tuesday, Jan. 27, Okeechobee Freshman Campus principal, Carol Revels, drew
names to determine the most recent Top 12 students for the 2008-2009 school year. The
students were entered into the drawing if they received five positive signatures in the last
three weeks. The winning students from the class of 2012 received a book or t-shirt and
candy. In the top row from left to right are: Richard Donegan, Karli Rowell, Emily Rauler-
son. In the bottom row standing from left to right are: Kelsi Brown, Corbin Davis, Stormin
Youngblood, Daniel Eng. Seated from left to right are: Daniel Jansen, Natasha Bayless,
Andrea Strark, Dwayne Sheffield. Not pictured Timmy Farrell.


4443 SW Martin Hwy., Palm City,
Seom: :772-221-1510 Tell Re: 8
FLORIDA'S ONLY http;/www.myspace.conmextremepei
cGRIOSCARRRIER vwww.extreme-performance


n. Fri 8am-i6pm
Sat. 8am-2pm



FL 34990 '.
7-221-1 9
formance07 i
e.biz


Boy'


soccer team gets revenge


By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
Turn about is fair play. Just
ask the Okeechobee High School
Brahman Boys' Soccer Team.
Okeechobee defeated Forest
Hill, 2-0, in the semifinal match
of the District 14-4A tournament
Wednesday night at Jensen Beach
High School. The win propels the
Brahmans into the championship
match on Friday against the hosts
Jensen Beach. More importantly,
it also qualified Okeechobee for
a trip to the state regional next
week. It will be Okeechobee's
first taste of post season play un-
der current coach Lonnie Sears.
Ivan Torres and Eddie Guer
rero had goals for Okeechobee.
Alan Najera had an assist. Pablo
Caballero had four saves in net.
Okeechobee improved to (9-5-4)


on the year while Forest Hill end
ed their season at (12-5).
Coach Sears said the kids got
a lot of satisfaction from this vic-
tory, "It wasn't a surprise. We
knew we had the talent to do
something this year. They execut-
ed, and were confident. If we do
those things, we can win."
Okeechobee switched their
defensive alignment late in the
year and it has really made an
impact on their overall perform
mance. Najera and Oscar Garcia
were moved to full back. The
pair has helped Okeechobee shut
out three of their past four oppo
nents.
"Our defense has been tough.
It gives our midfielders more op-
tions. Both Alan and Oscar are
very talented and can clear the
ball well," Sears said.
Offense continued to be a


worry in recent matches. How
ever Sears said he decided that
the team can only win low scor-
ing games and must have some
of their best players on defense.
"We didn't have much fire
power anyway this year, but the
boys knew they could do it," he
said.
Forest Hill ended Okeecho-
bee's season last year with a sur-
prisingly easy, 6-0 victory in the
semifinal match. Okeechobee
earned revenge with this defeat
on Wednesday.
"It's like any sport. If you con-
trol the ball and make good deci
sions, you can be successful," he
stated.
If Okeechobee wins Friday they
will host a game next Tuesday. If
not they will travel most likely to a
school in the Melbourne area.


E I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs