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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028410/01062
 Material Information
Title: Okeechobee news
Uniform Title: Okeechobee News
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Okeechobee News
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee Fla
Publication Date: December 3, 2007
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
Coordinates: 27.241667 x -80.833056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 72823230
alephbibnum - 003642554
lccn - 2006229435
System ID: UF00028410:01062
 Related Items
Preceded by: Daily Okeechobee news

Full Text




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****ORIGIN MIXED ADC 334
205 SMA U FL LIB OF FL HISTORY

I PO BOX 117007

ec,-AIL J VILLE FL 32611 7007


Vol. 98 No. 337 Monday, December 3, 2007 50� Plus tax


Briefs


Water restrictions
still in. effect
Residents in the Lake
Okeechobee Service Area
(LOSA) of the South Florida
Water Management District are
reminded that Phase III Water
Restrictions remain in effect.
Under Phase III, most residen-
tial water users in the LOSA
are required to limit outdoor
irrigation times to one day per
week and four hours per day.
Residents with odd home ad-
dresses are allowed to water
between the hours of 4:00 a.m.
and 8:00 a.m. EST on Saturdays,
while residents with even home
addresses are allowed to water
between the hours of 4:00 a.m.
and 8:00 a.m. EST on Sundays.
Residents may also hand-water
(no sprinklers, automated or
manual) on their designated
day between 5 and 7 p.m. No
domestic water use for outdoor
irrigation will be allowed Mon-
day through Friday.
In addition, residential users
may wash their cars, boats and
other equipment from 5-7 p.m.
and within the specific times
and days where irrigation is al-
lowed. Residents also are ex-
pected to observe normal water
conservation practices within
the home. The use of water for
firefighting, safety, sanitation,
health, medical and other es-
sential purposes is not restricted.
Organizers of charity car washes
and outdoor water-based recre-
ational activities are required to
obtain a variance. Application
forms and instructions are avail-
able on the District website at
www. s fwmd. gov.
The Lake 'Okeechobee
Service Area coincides with
the area that is served by the
Okeechobee Utility Authority.
Only surface water uses are re-
stricted. Irrigation that is from
a ground water well within this
area is permitted. Surface water
uses include watering from a
pond, retention area, canal or
other waterway. For more infor-
mation, please phone the South
Florida Water Management
District. Okeechobee Service
Center at 462-5260. To. report
a violation, please contact the
Okeechobee County Sheriff's
Office at 763-3117.

Drought Index
Current: 471
Source: Florida Division
of Forestry
Local Burn Ban: None

Lake Levels


10.27 feet
Last Year: 12.26 feet
Source: South
Florida Water
Management
District. Depth
given in feet
i.C above sea level.


Teen pregnancy rate high


Programs try
to prevent
teen pregnancy


By Chauna Aguilar
Okeechobee News
With the repeat teenage birth
rate in Okeechobee County sur-
passing the state average by 3.5
percent in 2006, Okeechobee
organizations are being formed
to address the teen pregnancy is-
sues within the community.


In 2006, 20 percent of teen
births in Okeechobee County
were "repeats." These teenage
mothers had already had at least
one child. The state averaged of
16.5 percent for repeat teenage
births.
The Okeechobee Teen Preg-
nancy Prevention Task Force
met Nov. 27, where they heard
a presentation of the new On
Track program and from the
Okeechobee County Health De-
partment on new and available
family planning services.


Mike Davis, the program di-
rector explained the On Track
program which is a joint effort
of Healthy Start, Communities
in Schools (CIS), and the Police
Athletic League (PAL). The On
Track program was formed to
lower the occurrence of teen
pregnancy and repeat teen preg-
nancy in Okeechobee.
The approach of the program
is to partner with parents and
schools to build up and strength-
en the self esteem and self worth
of the teens in order to enable


them to make positive choices
and secure successful futures.
Through the program, teens
have a chance to participate in
monthly small group workshops,
meet with an advocate on a reg-
ular basis, listen to guest speak-
ers and participate in activities
and curriculum geared towards
issues they face as teens.
These programs are geared
toward promoting healthy self
esteem and self image; recog-
nizing positive and negative role
models; peer pressure and how


it effects self esteem; healthy re-
lationships and communication;
career and educational oppor-
tunities; diet and nutrition; self
esteem and its effect on mental
health; and types of abuse.
This program is present in
both middle schools, Yearling
Middle and Osceola Middle, the
Okeechobee Freshman Campus,
Okeechobee High School and
the New Endeavor High School
(NEHS). Through partnership
See Prevention - Page 2


By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
The Brighton Warriors
scored 14 points in the final four
minutes to tie Fort Pierce and
then won, .20-14, in overtime
as they claimed the Tri-County
National Football League 2007
Conference Championship
Saturday night at Okeechobee
High School.
It looked bad for the War-
riors for most of the night as
the Buccaneers (4-5) scored in
the first couple of minutes and
also returned an interception
for a score early in the fourth
quarter.
Brighton Coach Marvin
Roberts said his team didn't get
down.


"The team and the coaches
never gave up," he said. "We
were down and it was looking
bad but those young guys kept
fighting and kept digging and
we got the victory. It was tough
but we came back and got it."
Brighton won the toss but
immediately got behind. The
Buccaneers tried a short kick
off and Brighton mishandled,
the ball allowing Fort Pierce to
recover at the Brighton 42 yard
line. From there Sylvester Hag-
ins took over for Fort Pierce.
He took a quarterback draw
37 yards for a first and goal and
then threw a touchdown pass
on the next play to give Fort
Pierce a 6-0 lead.
Brighton started their first
offensive drive on their 37 and


made one first down on a,30
yard run by Mark Richards. They
managed another first down
but the drive stalled at the Fort
Pierce 22, when Richards was
stopped for a two yard loss.
Fort Pierce drove the ball to
midfield on their next posses-
sion thanks to two first down
runs by Hagins. He found a
wide receiver wide open in the
secondary on a third and 12 but
the receiver couldn't hang onto
the ball.
Brighton's Tommie Jackson
scored on a 48 yard run on the
Warriors (6-0) next drive but
the play was called back by a
holding penalty. The Warriors
drove to the Fort Pierce 31 but
See Brighton - Page 2


Possibility of
staying president

By Will Weissert
Associated Press Writer
HAVANA (AP) -- Fidel Cas-
tro was nominated for a seat
in Cuba's parliament Sunday,
leaving open the option for the
ailing 81-year-old revolution-
ary to stay on as the commu-
nist-run island's president.
A National Assembly seat is
a prerequisite for seeking the
presidency, and if Castro had
failed to be nominated it could
have heralded a decision to re-


move himself from the office
after almost a half century as
Cuba's undisputed leader.
The Cuban leader was
nominated Sunday by city
council officials in his eastern
home province of Santiago, a
step in a multitiered process
that will eventually determine
his political status.
There was no immediate
word on whether Castro will
accept the nomination. If he
wins a parliament seat during
national elections Jan. 20, he
would remain in the running
to retain the presidency of Cu-
See Castro - Page 2


Congress



returns to



discuss budget


Top issue
Iraq battles

By Andrew Taylor
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) _
Democrats are coming Presi-
dent Bush's way in a tussle
over domestic spending after


months of budget gridlock.
Any deal, however, may hinge
on their willingness to provide
additional money for the Iraq
war.
As Congress returns this
week, tensions over war
spending overshadow moves
by Democrats to scale back
See Budget - Page 2


Index
C lassifieds............................. 7, 8
Com ics .................................. 5
Community Events................. 4
Crossword................................. 7
Obituaries .................................. 6
Opinion ................... .... 4
Speak Out.............................. 4
S ports ................................... ..... 3
T V ................................ ............. 8
W weather ................................. 2
See Page 2 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.

i*
Community Links. Individual Voices.




8 16510 00024 5


Unsinkable Laura Matteson


By Beryl Bowden
Edited by
MaryAnn Morris
Laura Matteson first came
to Clewiston in early 1928 to
visit her parents who lived in
the "Celotex town." She en-
tered the student nursing pro-
gram at Good Samaritan Hos-
pital in West Palm Beach. A
few months later she worked
and worried through the long
hours of the 1928 hurricane.
No information of Clewiston's
fate came to West Palm Beach.
She remembered the frantic
work to over patients from the
north to the south wind when
damage to the hospital's roof


caused water to drop into the
patient rooms.
The following year when
"Good Sam" graduated its first
class of nurses, Laura Matteson
was among them. She enrolled
at Antioch College in Ohio dur-
ing the Great Depression, and
worked part time at a tubercu-
losis sanatorium in nearby Day-
ton so she could attend classes.
She returned to her parent's
home in Clewiston in Novem-
ber 1930.
Dr. S.J. Simmons was in
charge of the small hospital in
Clewiston then. His wife and
brother were helping him as
needed. Laura was hired to
work weekends with some pri-


vate-duty nursing on the side.
The work at the hospital
was a new experience. Sat-
urday night was fight night in
the fledgling town and many
cut and bruised bodies came
or were dragged or carried by
friends, to the hospital for re-
pair.
"I sewed up cuts, removed
bits of steel from the cornea of
workers who failed to wear pro-
tective goggles," she recalled.
Her private duty cases had
their challenges, too. There
was a desperate shortage of Courtesy photo/Clewlston Museum
housing. People lived anywhere This photo of a young lady picking fruit was taken sometime
they could find four walls and a in the 1920s was taken near Clewiston and is featured on the
Florida Archives Memory Project web site. Do you have an old
See Matteson - Page 2 photo to share? Email it to okeenews@newszap.com.


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I clamps Pre u.:-re lesl system.
e ep !1 REG. PRICE '79" ' replace up to one gallon
I $20 SAVINGS of :oolant
" - .863-357-0500 ' OKEECHOBEE, FL
Um.......................................................


Fidel Castro



nominated



for parliament


Tri-County football: Warriors win


'*" : I'ctOii :. < '+ *,A'Cf miless Murphy
Brighton Warriors defeated Fort Pierce to win the Tri-County National Football League
2007 Conference Championship on Saturday at Okeechobee High School


Late comeback brings


championship to Brighton







2 Okeechobee News, Monday, December 3, 2007


Conservation District Board began in 1951

By AudreyDriggers
Okeechobee Soil & Water
Conservation District .


There are over 3,000 soil and '
water conservation districts in the
United States. In conjunction with
these districts,
the United
States Depart-
ment of Agri-
culture, Natu-
ral Resources
Conservation
Service assists
individuals, groups and units of Okeechobee Soil and Water
government with natural resources Co oil a re
conservation. Soon after NRCS are: Nano Corona, Jim Harve
was established by Congress in and Nicki Smith.
1935 (it was called Soil Erosion gineering projects with the old
Service then Soil Conservation Yates Sawgrass Popash Area.
Service) the Secretary of Agricul- The issues today's Board faces
ture made known the need for are more focused on water qual-
local divisions of government to ity and quantity, than soil erosion.
handle the responsibility of con- Farmers and ranchers are par-
ducting a conservation program. ticipating in conservation plans
Two years later the President rec- that include Best Management
ommended that all states form Practices (BMP) that are strongly
conservation districts, which Flor- encouraged by the State to im-
ida instituted in 1937. On Jan. 11, prove water quality and provide
1951 a petition was signed and alternative water sources for live-
accepted by the State of Florida stock. Nano Corona, Chairman
to form the Okeechobee Soil and of OSWCD, Okeechobee County
Water Conservation District. The Cattlemen's Association member
first board was elected in March, and local rancher states that we
1951. J.G. Kelley, C.S. Cornelius, (agricultural producers) have al-
C. R. Boyles, Brack Cantrel and ways been implementing BMP's.
C.A. Fulford were among the first As agricultural producers we are
to serve, true environmentalists and need
The first items on the agenda to protect and enhance the en-
were the purchase of a fertilizer vironment. In 1995, long time
spreader, leveling disc and a seed- resident Jim Harvey replaced his
er that was rented to landowners mother Clois Harvey (member
for two dollars per day. OSWCD since 1983) on the board. He is a
also distributed grass seed to lo- local veterinarian and landowner
cal ranchers and worked on en- who has participated in many
conservation practices.


Prevention
Continued From Page 1
with CIS, Florida Atlantic Univer-
sity and the Children's Counsel-
ing Network this program pro-
vides eight monthly workshops
at all of Okeechobee's middle
and high schools.
The On Track program will
also provide mentoring, peer
counseling and various educa-
tional components to address the
scope of issues and challenges of
the youth.
The referrals to the program
can be submitted by parents,
teachers, guidance staff and or-
ganizations that work with the'
youth. Referral forms are also
4- available in the CIS-PAL office,
located at NEHS.
In order to be a part of this
program a mother must be preg-
nant, already have a child or have
had a miscarriage. Fathers are


Brighton
Continued From Page 1
Jackson was stopped on a fourth
and three situation.
The score remained 6-0 Fort
Pierce at the half time break.
Brighton tried an onside kick
to start the second half and was
able to recover on the Warriors
43 yard line. Richards ran the first
play for 16 yards but two plays
later QB Teven Layport fumbled
a handoff and Fort Pierce took
over at the Brighton 47.
Things looked bad for the
Warriors when Hagins ran 25
yards on a quarterback drawn on
a 4th and 12 to bring the ball in-
side the 30. However the defense
stiffened and stopped the Buc-
caneers thanks to a big hit from
Richards on third down.
Fort Pierce next drive began
at the Warriors 38 and solid run-
ning by Marcus Williams moved
the ball to the Warriors nine yard
line for a first and goal. However


also encouraged to participate in
this program.
According to program direc-
tor Mr. Davis, "the program has
been welcomed by the schools,
administration and guidance
counselors.".
The program sticks with the
promotion of abstinence, accord-
ing to school policy, but has re-
sources available to the students
where they can call other organi-
zations such as the Okeechobee
County Health Department who
can answer questions they may
have about other issues, such as
birth control.
The Okeechobee County
Health Department (OCHD),
1728 N.W Ninth Ave., presented
their family planning services
at the meeting as well which is
funded through Title X funding.
The OCHD currently provides
free birth control services to
teens, which do not require pa-
rental consent. They have added


on third and goal, Hagins mis-
handled the hand off and Brigh-
ton recovered at their seven yard
line.
However, disaster happened
two plays later when Layport
dropped back to pass on third
and six and Hagins stepped in
front of the pass. He returned it
17 yards and the conversion gave
the Buccaneers a 14-0 lead.
Coach Roberts said it was a
flat pass and the defense made
a good play on it. However ,he
noted his QB didn't let it bother
him and he came back on the
next drive.
Brighton took over on the Fort
Pierce 48 and quickly went to
work. Richards carried up the left
side for 21 yards. Layport then
went to the air and hit Terry Hall-
back on a 27 yard touchdown
pass and the conversion by Rich-
ards made it 14-8 with three min-
utes left.
Brighton then went to the on-
side kick again and for the second
straight time recovered the foot-


Submitted photo
Conservation District Board members (in no particular order)
y, Glynn Rutledge, Doug Burnham, Audrey Driggers, Gail Lewis


Glynn Rutledge (born and
raised in Okeechobee) serves
as the Secretary-Treasurer since
1998. Mr. Rutledge is partners in
Davie Dairy, Inc. His dairy de-
parted from current conventional
practices in 1987 and construct-
ed the first free-stall milk herd for
waste management, This elimi-
nated a large non-point source
runoff problem from intensively
used pasture. The waste water
from the barns is recycled back
onto the farm. Mr. Rutledge en-
joys managing the dairy's breed-
ing program, as well as one of
the areas first stormwater chemi-
cal treatment facilities located on
the 940 acre dairy.
Doug Burnham joined the OS-
WCD Board in 2005. He is a Uni-
versity of Florida graduate, major-
ing in Food Resource Economics
and partners with his brother
and parents in Burnham Farms,
Inc. Doug's father Aubrey Burn-
ham served on the board for five
years. The newest member to


the additional service to add
same day appointments when a
patient calls in at 8 a.m.
They now keep, four slots
open, two general walk-in ap-
pointments and two medical
walk-in appointments. This al-
lows teenagers who typically do
not readily have transportation
or remember appointments to
be able to be seen the same day
they call with an issue.
The, OCHD provides many
types of birth control that are
free for teens. Maternity care,
pregnancy tests, family planning
services, wellness exams, pap
smears' and breast exams. They
currently have six health nurses
that serve all ten of the' public
schools. All services are com-
pletely confidential where the
teens can make appointments
for themselves.
Upon an initial general walk
in for birth control the teen will
receive two months of birth con-


ball, this time at the Fort Pierce
43. Richards ran three times for
eight yards but on a fourth and
two he broke one up the left side
for 20 yards. and a first down.
Layport ran for six yards and with
under a minute left, Richards car-
ried again up the left side and
dove into the end zone for the ty-
ing score. The conversion failed
forcing the overtime.
"My coach told me to put it
in (to the end zone); I had that
confidence just to do it. I knew
we were going to win," Richards
said.
In overtime each time got the
ball at the 10 yard line with four
plays to score. The Brighton de-
fense stuffed Fort Pierce on four
straight plays pushing them back
to their 15 yard line.
Roberts said.-he felt his team
had the momentum and the de-
fense was flying around and play-
ing well.
"Once they didn't score, their
morale was down and we came
out with our best running play


the Board is Nicki Smith, partner
in Southern Accent Farms with
her husband Allen. Mrs. Smith
may have just joined the Board
in June 2007, but is no stranger
to conservation practices. Our
Okeechobee County Cattlewom-
en's Vice President has been
implementing BMP's such as cul-
verts, fencing and water troughs
for over 6 years.
Audrey Driggers, the Board's
Ag Nutrient Management Spe-
cialist has been on board since
August of 2007. She is a Universi-
ty of Florida graduate majoring in
Wildlife Ecology and Conserva-
tion and has seven years UF/IFAS
Extension Service experience.
Also pictured in the photo is Gail
Lewis, Administrative Assistant to
the Board for eleven years.
The Okeechobee Soil and Wa-
ter Conservation District Board
is diverse with agricultural ex-
perience, yet each member is
dedicated to serving the Lake
Okeechobee area.


trol and a follow up appointment
for a pap smear. OCHD also of-
fers emergency contraception,
non-invasive tests for sexually
transmitted diseases and steril-
izations. They also offer the new
Gardasil Human Papillomavirus
Quadrivalent vaccine free for
children ages 11 and 12.
Family planning services do
not require parental consent for
ages 12 and up.
For more information about
the OCHD or to schedule an ap-
pointment, call (863) 462-5819,
or visit 1728 N.W. Ninth Ave.
For more information about
the On Track program, contact
Mike Davis at (863) 462-5863.
Post your opinions
in the Public Issues Forum
at www.newszap.com.
Reporter Chauna Agullar
may be reached at
caguilar@newszap.com.


and punched it in there," he
added.
Brighton then took over on
offense and went to their money
play, a sweep up the left side to
Richards. He rumbled into the
end zone to set off a wild celebra-
tion.
"I feel good. I thought we
were going to lose at first, but I
told the kids to get into the game
because it wasn't over yet. I guess
we won," Richards noted.
Richards led the way with 19
carries for 140 yards and two
touchdowns. Jonathan Kemp
rushed three times for 11 yards
and Tommie Jackson rushed
seven times for 10 yards. Layport
completed just the one pass in
five attempts, but it went for 27
yards and a touchdown:
"This may be the best game
I've ever been a part of. I've been
in a lot of big games, but to be
down with three minutes left, it
might be the best game ever. I'm
proud of the kids," he noted.


Nubbin Slough major


overhaul work continues


Lake Okeechobee
Scenic Trail closed
December 3-5

Over the next few months,
Okeechobee residents may
notice large cranes atop the
Herbert Hoover Dike at Nub-
bin Slough as employees from
the South Florida Water Man-
agement District's Okeechobee
Field Station perform major
overhaul work on the S-191 wa-
ter control structure. The work
is part of a continuous mainte-
nance program designed to en-
sure that all water control struc-
tures providing flood protection
are in good repair and are work-
ing optimally.
Beginning on November
5, the bay for the Number 1
gate was -"dried in," and the
gate moved off site to be sand-


Castro
Continued From Page
ba's supreme governing body,
the Council of State.
Castro still officially heads
the council, but has not been
seen in public since emergency
intestinal surgery forced him
to cede power to a provisional
government run by his younger
brother Raul in July 2006.
In recent government vid-
eos, the elder Castro has ap-
peared lucid but extremely
frail. Cuban officials say he is
recovering and pn top of politi-


blasted, repaired, and painted.
During removal of this gate, ad-
ditional maintenance needs for
the structure were identified,
and repairs are scheduled for
December 3-5. The gate will be
reinstalled beginning January 7.
This process will be repeated for
gate Number 3, which is antici-
pated to be removed on January
14 and replaced in late February.
Gate Number 2 is slated to be re-
moved on March 3 and replaced
in late May.
To maintain public safety,
recreational users who enjoy
the Lake Okeechobee Scenic
Trail, (LOST) which crosses
over this structure, will be asked
to find an alternate route during
the gate overhauls.
For additional information
about this or any District proj-
ect, please phone the SFWMD
Okeechobee Service Center at
863-462-5260 or 800-250-4200.


cal events.
Members of municipal as-
semblies across the island gath-
ered to nominate candidates for
the 614-member parliament,
which is known here as the Na-
tional Assembly and is chosen
every five years.
Several weeks after a new as-
sembly is chosen, its members
convene to select the Council
of State. Castro has held the
council's presidency since it
was created in 1976. Previously
Cuba's prime minister, he has
been the nation's unchallenged
leader since leading the 1959
revolution.


Today's Weather


-10s -Os Os 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s I10OQ :11W


Okeechobee Forecast
Monday: Considerable cloudiness with a slight chance of afternoon
showers. The high will be in the lower 80s. The wind will be from
the northwest winds 5 to 10 mph. The chance of rain is 20 percent.
Monday night: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers. The
low will be in the lower 50.s. The chance of rain is 20 percent.

Extended Forecast
Tuesday: Mostly sunny with the high in the lower 70s.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the mid 40s.
Wednesday: Partly sunny with the high in the mid 70s.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the lower 50s.
Thursday: Partly sunny with the high in the mid 70s.
Thursday night: Mostly clear with the low in the lower 50s.
Friday: Partly sunny with the high in the mid 70s.

Lotteries

MIAMI (AP) -- Here are the winning numbers selected Saturday
in the Florida Lottery:
Cash 3 5-6-4; Play 4 0-6-4-3; Lotto 19-44-36-16-42-17; Fantasy
5 14-6-10-31-12


Matteson
Continued From Page 1
roof.
She remembered nursing a
sick child for a family living in an
unused railroad caboose. In an-
other, she arrived to tend a sick
child to find the mother tearfully
holding the baby, already blue
from lack of oxygen. Laura took
the child, held it upside down,
and administered a brisk slap to
the child's bottom. The child let
out a yell and color returned to
the child's face, he breathed and
was stable again.
Dr. and Mrs. Simmons moved
to Belle Glade in 1933 and a new
physician,"Dr. O.F. Schiffli came to
take charge of the hospital. Laura
had a full-time nursing job.
The hospital was still in the
small building on the ridge. It was


Budget
Continued From Page 1
plans to add billions of dollars
to operating budgets for federal
agencies and programs.
Democrats reluctantly are
giving up long-sought increases
for education, homeland secu-


both job and home to Laura who
was on call even at night when
there were no patients.
She cooked breakfast and sup-
per on a small oil stove in the hos-
pital kitchen. At noon, she went
across the street to the Clewiston
Inn to pick up the noon meal
cooked for the hospital.
While her weekend work
with Dr. Simmons had taught
her much about handling emer-
gencies; Laura always said that
working with Dr. Schiffli was the
real education. On call 24/7, of-
ten a phone call or a messenger,
usually the town Marshall would
summon her back.
Parker Wilson, the pharma-
cist, was an ever-present help,
Laura remembered. He would
bring medicines or supplies from
the drug store and give a hand
administering ether or whatever
else needed doing. Emergencies
in a small lakeside town called


rity, grants to state and local
governments, health and en-
ergy research, and many other
programs. Some lawmakers
worry they might have to sur-
render altogether as the price
for getting Bush to agree on a
budget for keeping the gov-
ernment running through next
September.


everyone out to help.
The hospital moved into
the former Watanabe Hotel on
Francisco Street, where facilities
were better. A maid and a janitor
took over Laura's housekeeping
chores.
Laura recalled that during one
storm, they moved all patients
to the Inn for safety. Attired in a
bathing suit, ready for anything,
Laura stayed behind at the hospi-
tal with one patient, a man with
an injured arm who was receiving
penicillin every four hours. When
the storm blew in a window, the
patient with one good arm and
Laura with two managed to take
down an inside door and nail it
over the broken window.
With duties both arduous and
many, Laura would race from task
to task without time to change a
blood-spattered uniform or comb
her hair. Not until all patients
were cared for would Laura have


In a different environment,
the Democrats' steps might
have led to efforts to make a
deal with the White House and
Republican colleagues on Capi-
tol Hill.
But disagreements over do-
mestic spending are occurring
alongside a dispute over the war.
Majority Democrats are insist-


time to go up to her room in the
north end of the second floor of
the hospital to read, dabble with
her watercolors or write poetry.
Laura spoke in glowing terms
about Dr. Schiffli and his devotion
to his patients.
"I have seen him go out to take
care of a sick cane cutter when he
had a high fever himself. He was
wonderful to work for and I look
back proudly at the nine years I
worked with him."
Outgoihg and friendly, Laura
Matteson was a tireless worker
who served Clewiston through
some difficult years and enjoyed
every minute of it. Even the time
one of her patients was a horse
she sewed up after he ran into
a barbed wire fence. To Laura,
everyone was a friend and she
would and did do everything she
could for anyone who needed
her.


ing on using the Iraq spending
request to try to force Bush to
embrace the goal of withdraw-
ing most troops by the end of
next year. Those were the terms
when the House passed a $50
billion infusion of money for the
war last month. Bush promised
a veto and Senate Republicans
filibustered the measure.


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107 S.W. 17th Street, Suite D
Okeechobee, FL 34974
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Published by IndependentNewspapers, Inc.







Okeechobee News, Monday, December 3, 2007 SPORTS


Boys hoops defeat Clewiston


By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
David Juene had a double-
double with 22 points and 12 re-
bounds to lead three Brahmans in
double figures as they won their
home opener Saturday night, 60-
46, over Clewiston.
"I feel great because it's a win,"
the 6'7" junior noted, "They were
ready to play so we had to bring it
out to them."
Clewiston actually led 16-
14 after the first quarter, and
trailed only 29-25 at the half.
Okeechobee built an 18 point
lead in the second half and held
a double digit lead for most of the
second half.
"We played a bad first quarter
and the kids didn't do what we
asked,' Coach Jon Enrico said, "It
might have been first game jitters
I don't know. The second quar-
ter we played defense, and shut
down, ran our fast break and got
theiball inside."
There was a pretty good crowd
for a. Saturday night. game but
Enrico admitted he'd like to see
larger turnouts for home games


. ,,,' .. ' -... -


considering the talent he has on
display.
"This is one of the better ath-
letic teams I've coached. I'm ex-
cited for the team. All of the kids
can get out there and run and it's
a lot of fun for them," he added.
Tim Williams, who had a,
rim rattling left handed dunk in
the third quarter, had 12 points.
James Shanks had 10 points and
Lashawn Henderson had nine
points. He also had a breakaway
dunk in the third quarter.
Juene was in control inside
for most of the night. Clewiston
had no one to match his size
and were basically left to shoot
outside jumpers. However the
Tigers were athletic and gave
Okeechobee a stern test.
"Clewiston was a good team,
there 2-0 in their district, there a
team to play with," Enrico noted.


Jonathan Williams had 16
points to lead the Tigers. John
Williams added 12 points.
Williams dunk fired up the
crowd and gave Okeechobee a
37-29 lead late in the third. The
Brahmans held a 41-30 lead after
the third quarter. Juene's tip in of
a missed shot gave Okeechobee
a 44-33 lead moments into the
fourth - quarter and Henderson
found Chris Hall on a nice pass
and layup to extend the lead to
47-33 with six minutes left.
It was basically a lay up drill in
the final period.
"That's the one thing we want-
ed to do, bring the ball down court
quickly, and we do that well," En-
rico noted.
Juene said the team (2-0) is
playing Well now with the return
of three starters from the football
team. He noted it didn't take
much of a transition as the core
group has played together for
three years now.
"Everything is pretty good, it's
back the same way, and its bet-
ter," he noted.
Okeechobee's next game is on
the road at Fort Pierce Central.


Okeechobee News/Charles Murphy

Brighton Warriors win championship
Brighton Coach Marvin Roberts said the Brighton Warriors had to stay tough to come back
strong and win in the final minutes of the game.


To honor Taylor, Redskins use 10 men


By Howard Fendrich
AP Sports Writer
LANDOVER, Md. (AP) - The
message was all too clear: Sean
Taylor is gone forever.
For all of the No. 21 jerseys,
waving towels and handwritten
signs in the stands Sunday, for all
of the flowers at a makeshift me-
morial outside the stadium, for
all of the pre game tributes to the
Pro Bowl safety, the most stark
reminder of Taylor's plight came
when the Washington Redskins
lined up on defense for the first
time since he was shot to death.
Instead of 11 Redskins on the
field, as rules allow, there were
10.
As the Buffalo Bills got ready-
to run their first play midway
through the first quarter, the
man who replaced Taylor in the
starting lineup, Reed Doughty,
stood near coaches on the
sideline with his arms crossed.
After watching while Bills run-
ning back Fred Jackson gained
22 yards, Doughty entered for
the next play - and made the
tackle.
The 24-year-old Taylor died
Tuesday, a day after being shot
at his home in Florida during a
burglary. Four men have been
charged. The shock has yet to


dissipate for Taylor's teammates
and fans, and the grieving pro-
cess continued on game day.
"The only way we can honor
him right now is to go out there
on the field and play. Go out and
play football," Redskins defen-
sive end Phillip Daniels said dur-
ing a pre game video tribute to
Taylor.
Before entering the stadium,
spectators talked about Taylor in
the present tense, as though it all
hasn't quite registered.
"I just love the way he plays,"
said Joshua Skeen of Manches-
ter, Md., wearing a white jersey
with Taylor's No. 21.
Skeen's brother, Jason, wore
No. 36, Taylor's uniform as a
Redskins rookie.
Not surprisingly, those num-
bers were everywhere Sunday,
including on black versions of
the jersey, on handmade T-shirts,
on hats, on wristbands. A trio of
teenage friends each wrote the
number on a cheek. .
While tailgating did carry
on in the parking lots before
the game began - with beer
and grilled food, with chips and
salsa - things were somewhat
more subdued. Stereos didn't
blare. People spoke instead of
screamed.
"Oh, yeah, it's quiet," said


Adrian Moore of Springfield, Va.,
who was wearing a long-sleeve
white shirt with a yellow candle
between the numbers 2 and 1.
"It's a lot more somber than nor-
mal."'
One fan, Joe Yang of Chan-
tilly, Va., painted "Sean Taylor,
Go Skins, R.I.P 21" on two of his
black SUV's windows, and "We
Miss You Sean. Taylor" on the
rear window.
"I just feel like we owe it to
Sean, we owe it to the team, we
owe it to the Redskins," Yang
said. "I just wanted to make sure
that no one should forget."
A short walk away, people ap-
proached a memorial to Taylor
near where the Redskins painted
his number on a patch of grass
near the team store - which
was under orders not to sell
jerseys or other items with his
name this day.
Starting at 7:30 a.m., fans
began arriving to look at the dis-
play, snap a photo of it and leave
objects. The piles were continu-
ally spreading, with flowers in
the team colors of burgundy and
gold, leather footballs, burning
candles, and posters with per-
sonal messages. And on and on
it went: balloons, teddy bears,
hats. One little child lefta piece -
of paper with a poem.


Sports News In Brief


Volunteers needed
at skate park
Communities in Schools need
volunteers to help man the skate
park during concession hours.
Hours are available any day of
the week. We will provide train-
ings and background screenings.
For information, contact Mike
Davis, youth project director, at
(863) 462-5863.

Bass Club
meeting slated
Taylor Creek Bass Club will
hold its next monthly meeting on
-Dec. 13 at the Bickhead Ridge
,VFW Post 9528 beginning at .7
p.m. The club holds its meetings
.on the second Thursday of each
month with bass tournaments
being held the following week-
end. New members (especially
non-boaters) are welcome. For
more information contact Dave
Stout at (863) 467-2255.


OCRA holds
monthly meeting
The OCRA will hold their
monthly 'meeting at Peace Lu-
theran, Monday, Dec. 10 at 7 p.m.
They will be nominating new di-
rectors for 2008. Call (863) 634-
1437 for more information.

U.S.C.G. Flotilla
seeking new members
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary Flotilla 57 in Okeechobee
is seeking new members to be-
come involved in the Auxiliary's
programs.
The Auxiliary is a volunteer
service organization composed
of men and women who ac-
tively support recreational boat-
ing safety and other Coast Guard
missions.
The Auxiliary also provides
recreational boating safety sup-
port to sate and local authorities.
Members could be involved


in patrols, communications, ad-
ministration, seamanship, pilot-
ing/navigation, weather or search
and rescue.
For information, call (863)
763-0165.

Agri-civic center
open for riding
The Okeechobee County Agri-
Civic Center, 4200 S.R. 70 E., is
open for recreational riding the
first and third Tuesdays of each
month from 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Barrels and poles are avail-
able.
The cost is $10 per'person.
Rules, waiver and release forms
are available at the Okeechobee
County Board of County Com-
missioner's office, 304 N.W. Sec-
ond St., and the county extension
office at 458 U.S. 78 N. For infor-
mation, call (863) 763-1666 or
(863) 697-9977.


Sears S UP -


Authorized Retail Dealer
Friendly Service at Your
Local Sears Dealer Store.






PLUS -O INTREST
UNI JAN 2009-.


$39 WITHYOU SEASCR


FF~

-4


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8', 2007


Joy


'I


Help families in need by bringing
non-perishable food into your local
SEARS Authorized Dealer Store
during our 2007 Holiday
Food Drive, now through , ium'
December 31. t


S dO 67j 44d &ore, (Tw #e Joe a. FREE
60oa t, 4kO ard A� ae /
fIV ^AP fi'ec4(1a a1a/ Sea& SteA
3290 HWY 441 SOUTH* OKEECHOBEE * (863) 467-1200
HOURS: SUNDAY 11AM - 4PM * MON. - SAT 9AM-6PM


NOTICE to all Okeechobee Residents



Curbside ' 1'


V rCYVrT T"INGr TT.


IXL .U I %...JL I I !N



will be collected on


Monday Only


Effective Immediately



Waste Management (Hauling Divisioni)


Ii.'


763-4818


Il�r+rrrrrrsur~i~h~;~-~~~iircP�i~a~-i~prr ---rqlllllsls~


Okeechobee News, Monday, December 3, 2007


SPORTS








OPIIO Okehoe NwModyDcmbr3,20


Speak Out
Have an opinion or a question about a public issue? Post
it anytime at the Okeechobee issues forum at http://www.
newszapforums.com/forum58. It is a hometown forum so
visit the page as often as you would like and share your com-
ments (but no personal attacks or profanities, please). You
can also make a comment by calling our Speak Out 24-hour
opinion line at (863) 467-2033, fax (863) 763-5901 or sending
e-mail to okeenews@newszap.com. You can also mail sub-
missions to Okeechobee News, P.O. Box 639, Okeechobee,
Fla. 34973. Comments will be published in the newspaper as
space permits.
CURFEW: We do need a curfew. However, nothing is going to
change if the parents aren't keeping an eye on these minor children to
keep them out of trouble. The curfew should start at home, and the
county wouldn't have to enforce one. Unfortunately, that isnt the case,
especially with alot of parents who have kids who are in gangs and
those kids are just out to cause problems

TEENS: Does Okeechobee really need a curfew for those under
the age of 18? Are the local officials having a lot of problems with
the kids being out late and getting into trouble? Just because Glades
County does something doesn't mean Okeechobee County should do
that too. If there is a problem with teenagers congregating late at night
and causing trouble, maybe we need a curfew. But let's not put the
cart before the horse.

WATER: Despite the recent rains, Lake Okeechobee is desperately
low. We all need to conserve water. Someone needs to make sure the
snowbirds are made aware of this as they arrive. Where they come
from may not be in drought and if they haven't been watching the
Florida news, they might not know about the water restrictions.

DROUGHT: I realize there is a drought and the lake is very low. It
has been that way for a long time. So why are some folks still running
the sprinklers in the middle of the day? You don't need to water the
grass that often and should never water in the heat of the day. It's ter-
rible for the grass and it wastes water.


Public issues forums
Join the discussion of important issues at newszap.com. Topics include:
* Belle Glade/South Bay issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum51
*Clewiston issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum52
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Go to newszap.com, click on your community and then on "community
forums and links."



Community Events

Chamber holds Gun Safety Class
On Dec. 13, there will be a Gun Safety class (hand guns only) at
7 p.m. it will be conducted by Joe Hazellief and Mike O'Connor at
Okeechobee Chamber of Commerce - 55 S. Parrott Ave. There are
openings available.
For more information please contact the Chamber office.
(863)763-6464 for more information. The second session will be on
Dec. 15 at 8:30 a.m.

Library book club meets
Friends of the Okeechobee Library Book Club will meet at 7 p.m.
-in the Library Board room on Thursday, Dec. 20 to discuss the title
for the month, "The Hummingbird's Daughter," by Luis Alberto
j1re.a The group will meet at 6:30 for our annual Christmas tea
with the discussion at 7 p.m. On Thursday, Jan. 24, the group will
discuss"Mademoiselle Benoir," by Christine Conrad. For informa-
tion call Jan Fehrman at (863) 357-9980.

Okeechobee High School Scholarship Drive'
College costs continue to increase each year and the students
of Okeechobee are always in need of financial assistance. The
Okeechobee High School Scholarship Program is currently recruit-
ing to increase the amount of scholarship funds available to these
students, If you or your business would like to offer a scholarship
in your name, or if you have any questions regarding scholarship
contributions, please contact Bill R. 'Black at (873) 462-5025 ext.
3113. The scholarship commitment deadline is Jan. 11, 2008 so
new scholarships can be included in the scholarship booklets. If
this is not convenient for you please call and we will work out the
details.

Help to pay electric bill available
The Salvation Army Okeechobee Service Unit is administering
FPL's Care to Share Program in Okeechobee County. The Care to
Share program is funded by Okeechobee's FPL customers and
FPL corporate funds. The program provides emergency assistance
funds to customers who are in a crisis situation and unable to pay
their FPL electric bill. There are rules and guidelines that must be
met to quality. If you are a FPL customer and need help, call (863)
763-6020 to leave your name and number. Your call will be returned
and an interview will be done over the phone to determine if you
qualify. Interviews with your local Salvation Army are by appoint-
ment only, no walk-ins are accepted.




Okeechobee News

Our Purpose...
The Okeechobee News is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida.
Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pur-
sue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no
dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on profit margins below
industry standards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independent's
mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First
Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the community's deliber-
ation of public issues.


We Pledge ...
* To operate this newspaper as a
public trust
* To help our community become a
better place to live and work,
through our dedication to consci-
entious journalism.'
To provide the information citizens
need to make their own intelligent
decisions about public issues.
* To report the news with honesty,
accuracy, purposeful neutrality,
fairness, objectivity, fearlessness
and compassion.
* To use our opinion pages to facili-
tate community debate, not to
dominate it with our own opinions.
* To disclose our own conflicts of
interest or potential conflicts to our
readers.
To correct our errors and to give
each correctiontAo the prominence
it deserves.
* To provide a right to reply to those
we write about.
* To treat people with courtesy,
respect and compassion.


Advertising Director: Judy Kasten

News Editor: Katrina Elsken

National Advertising: Joy Parrsh

Circulation Manager: Janet Madray

Independent Newspapers, Inc.
* Joe Smyth, Chairman
* Ed Dulin, President
* Tom Byrd, Vice President of
Newspaper Operations
* Katrina Elsken, Executive
Editor
MEMBER
OF: ,,.oRI



� Okeechobee News 2007
For More Information See
At Your Service On Page 2


Letters to the Editor


Car repairs
more difficult
Millions of car owners trust
independent repair shops to pro-
vide affordable and competitive
automotive repair service. Unfor-
tunately, the ability of motorists to
choose where to get their vehicle
repaired could be seriously chal-
lenged in the future.
Vehicles engine, safety and en-
tertainment systems are becom-
ing increasingly sophisticated,
with virtually every vehicle system
either monitored or controlled by
computers. Servicing these vehi-
cles will require that independent
shops have full access to the same
information and tools that the car
companies make available to their
franchised dealer network.
However, in many cases the
car manufacturers are already
making it difficult to obtain the in-
formation and tools needed to re-
pair today's vehicles, and we fear
that the future will only become
worse. Absent full access, local
repair shops might not be able to
compete, thus creating a repair
monopoly where affordable and
convenient repairs currently avail-
able to car owners is sacrificed to
increase profits for the dealer ser-
vice bays and big car companies.
Car companies say it is in their
best interest to make information


and tools available to independent
repair shops, but the truth is that
they and their franchised dealers
are making more money servic-
ing vehicles than they are selling
new cars. Therefore, despite their
lip service, they have little incen-
tive to work with .the independent
service industry to ensure that we
can compete on a level playing
field with their dealers.
That's why the future health of
a competitive automotive repair
industry is dependent upon the
immediate passage by Congress
of the Motor Vehicles Owners'
Right to Repair Act. This legisla-
tion requires that car manufac-
turers make available to inde-
pendent service shops the same
information and tools that they
provide to their dealerships. After
all, shouldn't the car owner make
the choice of where they have
their vehicle repaired and not the
car company?
I urge everyone who owns a
car to contact their elected official
in support of Right to Repair leg-
islation. Go to www.righttorepair.
org for additional information and
to send a letter in support of this
legislation.
Sincerely,
Kathleen Schmatz
President and CEO
Automotive Aftermarket
Industry Association
Bethesda, Maryland


Courtesy photo/Florida Archives

Looking back ...
This photo from the Florida State Archives Memory Project
was taken at a rodeo in Okeechobee in November 1949.
Do you have an old photo to share? Email it to okeenews@
newszap.com or bring it by the Okeechobee News office,
107 SW 17th Street, Suite D, during regular office hours
MondayrFriday.



Upcoming Events

Monday, Dec. 3
A.A. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. This will be an open meet-
ing.
Okeechobee Model Airplane Club will meet at the Peace
Lutheran Church, 750 N.W. 23rd Lane. For information, contact Da-
vid Fox at (863) 763-3296.-
Narcotics Anonymous meets at 7 p.m. for open discussion at
the Just for Today club, 2303 S.' Hwy 441, Suite K. For information
call (863) 634-4780.
Okeechobee Senior Singers meet at 9:30 a.m. at the
Okeechobee Presbyterian Church, 312 North Parrott Ave. Everyone
who enjoys singing is invited. For information or to schedule an
appearance for your organization or group, contact Marge Skinner
at (863) 532-0449.
Artful Appliquers is a recently formed chapter in Okeechobee.
This chapter meets at the Turtle Cove Clubhouse, 10 Linda Road,
Okeechobee. on Mondays from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Turn.left at the
Moose lodge and go around the curve just past the church. Bring a
lunch and join us for a fun day of applique. Everyone is welcome.
For more information please contact Karen Graves at (863) 763-
6952.'
Nicotine Anonymous (NICA)is starting a new club with meet-
ings to be held at the Just For Today club, 2303 U.S. Hwy 441 S.E.,
Suite K, on Mondays from 8:30 until 9:30 p.m. For information, call
Steve Condit Sr. at (863) 801-3110.
AA meetings Buckhead Ridge Christian Church, 3 Linda Road,
holds open meetings for Alcoholics Anonymous on Monday nights
from 7 to 8 p.m. for substance abuse. They also have Al-Anon meet-
ings on Monday nights from 7 until 8 p.m. to help family and friends
of alcoholics. For information call Chris at (863) 467-5714.
Tuesday, Dec. 4
Rotary Club of Okeechobee meets each Tuesday at noon
at Golden Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. The meetings are
open to the public. For information, contact Chad Rucks at (863)
763-8999.
New AA Meeting in Basinger: There is now an AA meeting in
Basinger on Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. in the Basinger Christian Breth-
ren Church on 700-A, north off U.S. 98. Beginners are welcome.
Alanon meeting will be held at the Church of Our Saviour, 200
N.W Third St., at 8 p.m.
A.A. Closed discussion meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the Church
of Our Savior, 200 N.W. Third St.
Family History Center meets from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. at
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 310 S.W. Sixth St.
Anyone interested in finding who your ancestors are is welcome
to attend. There is Census, IGI (International Genealogical Index),
Social Security Death Index and military information available. For
information, call Robert Massey at (863) 763-6510.
Camera Club meetings will be every other Tuesday, from 5:30
until 6:30 p.m. Learn types aria uses of film, speeds and technology
and how to see your world and capture it on .film. Class is basic
through extensive. Registration is $20 and each class is $10. Call
Bobbi at (863) 467-2614 for information. Some of the proceeds will
go towards Big Lake Mission's Outreach.
Gospel Sing every Tuesday beginning at 7 p.m. The public is
invited to participate with vocal and/or instrumental music. For in-
formation, contact Douglas Chiropractic Center at (863) 763-4320.
The Widow and Widowers Support Group meets at 8:30
a.m. at the Clock Restaurant, 1111 S. Parrott Ave.; for breakfast. For
information, call (863) 467-9055.
The Gathering Church Overcomers Group meets at 7:30
p.m. in the fellowship hall, 1735 S.W 24th Ave. This is a men's only
meeting. For information, call Earl at (863) 763-0139.
The Okeechobee Lions Club meets at 7 p.m. at the Golden
Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. Anyone interested in becom-
ing a member is welcome. For information, contact Elder Sumner
at (863) 763-6076.
Bible study at the Living Word of Faith Church, 1902 S. Parrott
Ave., at 7 p.m. Informal and informative discussions bring many
Bible truths to life. The public is invited.


Save gas by shopping
in local businesses
Now that the Holiday shop-
ping season is in full gear,
please take a moment to con-
sider the many fine stores and
businesses in our community.
Everyone is concerned about
the economy and the rising
cost of fuel. By shopping local-
ly you support local business
owners, boost our economy
and save gas! Look over your
shopping list and ask yourself
before heading over to one of
the coastal mega-malls, "Can I
purchase this locally and help
my community?" Odds are that
the answer will be yes!
Most businesses offer gift
certificates; many have items
that are unique and can only
be purchased in Okeechobee.
Consider making a donation
to a local charity in the name
of that person on your list who
has everything. By spending lo-
cally you will receive outstand-
ing customer service, avoid the
crowds, save gas money and
experience a joyous, stress free
Holiday season!
Karen Hanawalt
Program Manager
Okeechobee Main Street


Holiday decorations
are appreciated
Dear City Hall,
Thank you for giving to
the community so many man
hours to decorate our park,
tree, and especially Santa and.
his brand new beautiful house.
I have been watching the men
work almost every day around
town, putting up all sorts of
decorations, and the park last
night was beautiful. To again
see the children waiting with
anticipation to see Santa's kind
face emerge from the fire truck,'
and parents holding their little
ones on their shoulders to get a'
better view, is still magical.
I find myself whispering
to myself, "he's coming, he's
coming to see us" It is a joy
to be in this community with
the families participating in the
festivities, and observing their
proud faces as they watch the
children sing in the choir. Bless
their hearts.
Thank-you, City, for coordi-
nating every thing, every year
for the community to enjoy.
May each of you have a Joy-
ous Christmas and a Blessed
New Year.
Praising,
Bobbi Poole


Community Events

Amateur Radio club has guest speaker
The Okeechobee Amateur Radio Club will be hosting a talk by
Dennis Decker of the Melbourne office of the National Weather Ser-
vice, after the regular monthly meeting. His topic will be "Storm-
Based Warnings and their impact on SKYWARN." The meeting
will be at 7 p.m. on Dec. 3 at the American Red Cross Office, 323
N. Parrott Ave. Okeechobee. Anyone who is interested in weather
warnings is welcome to attend. For information Call Harry Robbins
at (863) 467-7454.

Mother's Morning Out planned
The First United Methodist Church, 200 NW Second St., will be
hosting a free Mother's Morning Out for the month of December.
Beginning Dec. 4, parents can leave their children (age 6 months to
4 years) from 9:30 a.m. to noon with certified sitters. Registration
is required and limited to the first 1:2 children. The church is also
hosting a "Meditation Room" that will be available from 11 a.m.
through 3 p.m. week days where anyone can come to de-stress. For
more information call 863-763-4021.

Big Brother/Big Sister book collection
Dec. 6, books for Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Okeechobee, from
5 until 7 p.m. Bring a new children's book valued at $10. For more
or make a $10 donation at Beef 0' Brady's, for info call: (863)824-
2227.

Post holds annual ham dinner
On Dec. 9, from noon till 3:30 p.m. Buckhead Ridge Veterans of
Foreign Wars #9528 will be holding their annual ham dinner. Tick-
ets are not needed, but they are asking a $7 donation. The Post will
honor Deputy of the Year, Richard Ermeri, Firefighter of the Year,
David Cline, Sr., Emergency Management of the Year Employee,
Angela Renee Snow, Emergency Medical Services of the Year, John
Biggs. For information call Commander Henry Zaskowski (863)
467-2882.

Scrapbooking party planned
A Christmas scrapbooking party will be held on Friday, Dec. 7,
from 6 until 10 p.m. at the First Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second
St. All levels of scrapbookers are welcome. Carolyn Jones will be
available to assist you with your scrapbooking questions and sup-
plies. Refreshments will be served and there will be door prizes.
Bring any scrapbook pages on which you are currently working.
Please R.S.VP Carolyn at (863) 634-1885 or Joan at (863) 467-0290
if you will be attending this event.

Free Parenting classes offered
Free parenting classes are held every Monday from 7 p.m. until
8 p.m. at New Endeavor High School. Classes include topics about
children from birth to teens. For more information or to have an
interpreter available call Lori Jaquith at (863) 697-6320 or (863)
462-5000 ext. 282.

Huckabee supporters to meet
Mike Huckabee supporters are meeting as a local group. Go to
www.meetup.com and find our local group to join and be a part of
it. For information, call (863) 634-3525 or (863) 801-1414.

Healthy Start meeting slated
The board of directors of the Okeechobee Healthy Start Coali-
tion will meet Wednesday, Dec. 5, at 11:30 a.m. as part of the board
workshop/meeting. For information, call executive director Kay Be-
gin at (863) 462-5877.

F.O.E. #4137 plans Benefit
F.O.E. #4137 at 9985 Hwy 441 N. is planning a benefit for Jo-
wana Mincey on Saturday, Dec. 8 all proceeds will go for Jowana's
medical bills. She is a member and bartender at the Eagles Club.
There will be a turkey shoot at 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. The donation
is $3 a shot. There will be live entertainment by Jimmy and Debbie
Harper and country music legend Alice Detrick.
There will be rib, chicken and fish dinners served for a donation
of $6. The music and food will be in the afternoon.
There will be an auction after 5 p.m. Donations for the auction
will be greatly appreciated. Items for the auction can be dropped
off at the Eagles club. For more information call the club at (863)
763-2552. Everyone is welcomed.

Chamber members hold monthly luncheon
Vicky Nowlan, of the South Florida Water Management, will be
the guest speaker at this month's Chamber Membership meeting
luncheon on Dec. 12 at the Golden Corral Restaurant at noon. She
will be speaking on the drought overview and the impact these
conditions have on the community. Please join us for this infor-
mative luncheon. For more information call the Chamber office at
(863) 763-6464.

Masonic Lodge sponsors Rib dinner
The Okeechobee Masonic Lodge, 107 N.W. Fifth Ave. will be
sponsoring a rib dinner with a traditional barbecue menu on Dec.
15 from 4 until 7 p.m. tickets are $7 each for adults and $3.50 for
children under 10. Children plates are not available for take out.
The dinner is open to the public. For information call Kip Gardner
at (863) 357-0427.


I


Okeechobee News, Monday, December 3, 2007


OPINION







Okeechobee News, Monday, December 3, 2007 5


At the Movies Blondie


The following movies are
now showing at the Brahman
Theatres Ill.
Movie times for Friday, Nov.
30, through Thursday, Dec. 6, are
as follows:
Theatre I -"American Gang-
ster" (R) Showtimes: Friday at 7
and 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. Monday
at 3 and 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7
and 9 p.m.
Theatre II - "Fred Claus" (PG)
Showtimes: Friday at 7 and 9
p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 2,
4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3
and 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9
p.m.
Theatre III - "Enchanted"
(PG) Showtimes: Friday at 7 and
9 p.m.. Saturday and Sunday at 2,
4:15, 7 and 9 p.m., Monday at 3
and 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9
p.m.
Tickets are $5.50 for adults;
children 12 and under are $4.50;
senior citizens are $4.50 for all
movies; and, matinees are $4.
For information, call (863)
763-7202.


Today

in History
By The Associated Press
Today is Monday, Dec. 3, the
337th day of 2007. There are 28
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
On Dec. 3, 1967, surgeons in
Cape Town, South Africa, led by
Dr. Christiaan Barnard performed Beetle B
the first human heart transplant YOUR
on Louis Washkansky, who lived SOEM c
18 days with the new heart. EEM l
On this date: WELL
In 1818, Illinois was admitted TRAINEI
as the 21st state.
In 1828, Andrew Jackson was
elected president of the United
States by the Electoral College. N
In 1857, English novelist Jo-
seph Conrad was born in Berdy-
chiv, Poland.
In 1925, "Concerto in F," by
George Gershwin, had its world
premiere at New York's Carnegie
Hall, with Gershwin himself at Cathy
the piano.
In 1947, the Tennessee Wil- .R
liams play "A Streetcar Named 7
Desire" opened on Broadway. " .
In 1953, the musical "Kismet" !
opened on Broadway. famlI
In 1960, the musical "Camelot"
opened on Broadway. (iristi
' In 1967, the 20th Century Phort
Limited, the famed luxury train, Shoo
completed its final run from New
York to Chicago.
In 1979, 11 people were killed
in a crush of fans at Cincinnati's
Riverfront Coliseum, where the
British rock group The Who was Peanuts
performing.
In 1984, thousands of people LOOK, I
died after a cloud of methyl iso-
cyanate gas escaped from a pes- I WA5I
ticide plant operated by a Union SUPPER 04
Carbide subsidiary in Bhopal, --
India. 'J
Ten years ago: President
Clinton hosted his first town
hall meeting on America's race'
relations in Akron, Ohio. South
Korea struck a deal with the In-
ternational Monetary Fund for a
record $55 billion bailout of its 1 27.
foundering economy.
Five years ago: Thousands Pickles
of personnel files released under
a court order showed that the 9/ 14O H
Archdiocese of Boston went to HAIR W�
great lengths to hide priests ac- W@R�
caused of abuse, including clergy
who had allegedly snorted co-
caine and had sex with girls as-
piring to be nuns. U.N. weapons
inspectors made their first un- 'y
announced visit to one of Iraqi
leader Saddam Hussein's presi-
dential palaces.
One year ago: Venezuelan a.
President Hugo Chavez won re-
election, defeating Manuel Ro-
sales. Marat Safin had 16 aces
in beating Jose Acasuso 6-3, 3-6, T
6-3, 7-6 (5) in the fifth and decid- he L
ing match on, giving Russia a 3-
2 decision over Argentina for its By Euge
second Davis Cup crown. *ARIES (Ma
Today's Birthdays: Country for new way
singer Ferlin Husky is 82. Singer or experience
Andy Williams is 80. Movie direc- a target for
tor Jean-Luc Godard is 77. Singer ones so spei
Jaye P. Morgan is 76. Actress Mary be your inter
Alice is 66. Rock singer Ozzy Os- eTAur U
bourne is 59. Actress Heather careful where
Menzies is 58. Country musician don't donate
Paul Gregg (Restless Heart) is 53. day. A probl
Actor Steven Culp is 52. Actress indulgence c
Daryl Hannah is 47. Actress Juli- Focus on rr
anne Moore is 47. Actor Brendan better job or
Fraser is 39. Singer Montell Jor- you own.
dan is 39. Actor Royale Watkins *GEMINI (M
emotional i.,
is 38. Actor Bruno Campos is 34. scoping out
Actress Holly Marie Combs is 34. should be o
Actress Lauren Roman is 32. Ac- cal change
tress Anna Chlumsky is 27. Actor pliments anc
Brian Bonsall is 26. Actor Michael Nurture a relay
Angarano is 20. to you.
Thought for Today: "Facing *CANCER
it, always facing it, that's the way and choose
to get through. Face it." - Jo- etisowsp
seph Conrad, English novelist point where
0857-1924). change in y


Garfield


'alley


Last Word in Astrology


nia Last


arch 21-April 19): Look
's to stimulate your mind
:e new things. You will be
an argument with loved
nd very little time at home.
nd development should
it.
(April 20-May 20): Be
e you put your cash and
, lend or pay for others to-
em with someone's over-
or overspending will arise.
making money, getting a
r even selling something

May 21-June 20): Love,
issues, having fun and
possibilities for the future
n your agenda. A physi-
will bring in some com-
d boost your confidence.
ationship that means a lot

(June 21-July 22): Pick
what's important to you
through. Don't let a love
stress you out to the
you are unproductive. A
our vocation will turn out


better than you thought.
*LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You should
be preparing to do your thing and ex-
cel at whatever it is you want to pur-
sue. Fun and games should be part of
your plan. Mix business with pleasure.
Your love life is looking pretty decent
and the opportunity to make a move
is evident.
*VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You
have to watch what you say. You will
be taken the wrong way or will face
opposition if you are too pushy. Un-
certainty regarding partnerships may
alarm you at first but, once you take
a closer look, you will see the benefits
more clearly.
*LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You can
communicate but don't argue, even if
someone tries to goad you into taking
sides. Do your best to be the balance
between those who don't agree. Your
ability to be insightful and keep the
peace will lead to your own advance-
ment.
*SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Some-
one may try to restrict your progress
but, if you work quietly behind the
scenes, you can get things done with-
out drawing too much attention. Once
you have completed what's neces-


Dear Abby


Visiting daughter



ignores parents


Wizard of Id


*DEAR ABBY: My daughter,
"Mara," now 27, recently married
a wonderful young man.. After
they had dated for a few years, she
moved to his state of residence
and attended graduate school
there. It became their home.
When they come to visit us
for a weekend, Mara constantly
makes plans to see her old high
school and college friends, get
her hair done at her favorite sa-
lon, or attend someone's birthday
party, wedding or .bridal shower.
In the 48 hours they're here, we
see them less than four hours.
I have tried asking Mara not to
text while she's talking to me, or if
we could plan something for, just
the four of us. Am I wrong to ex-
pect a little quality time with my
daughter and her husband? I feel
neglected and sometimes wish
they hadn't come at all. What do
you think? - Second Banana
In Pennsylvania
DEAR SECOND BANANA:
Clear the air with your daughter
and ask her to block out some
quality time with you and your
husband during her visits. You're
not being neglected; you are be-
ing taken for granted and prob-
ably treated the way she has al-.
ways treated you.
Try this: The next time she
calls to say she's coming in for
a visit, tell her it isn't convenient
because you have already made
other plans. If you're not quite
as available, Mara may wake up,
to the fact that you and her dad
won't be around forever.
*DEAR ABBY: My parents.
moved to Florida 10 years ago.
The rest of my family lives more
than four hours away. We are not
close to my husband's family, but
we do have my friends whom we
talk to often.
. The holidays are approaching,
and I dread them because we
have nowhere to go. I have tried
asking people what they're doing
and mentioning that we aren't
doing anything, but they don't get
Close to Home


Self-conscious about working outat the gym,
Lenora always brought her cute-tush facade.

Wonderword
HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle - horizon-
tally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR
LEITERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell
the Wonderword.


STAR TREK CONVENTIONS


Solution: 8 letters


ESK F K C A L CM O E


RC YTR
NH NO 0


AP I T E E MV


L N

G E


I SS V D VT I AW


E E WAKUEUN I FORMS


sary, it will be hard for anyone to stand
in your way.
*SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):
Take the initiative and create your own
position. If you have to make extra
cash, you can incorporate a service
you have into a side enterprise. This is
not the best time to discuss personal
matters or to argue with anyone in au-
thority.
*CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):
Don't be fooled by your emotions.
You may find yourself listening to poor
advice. Do not get involved in a joint
financial venture. Listen to the voice
of experience, not what your heart is
telling you.
*AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You
can take care of financial, legal and
health issues today. A new contract
can be put in place and money should
be coming your way. You will get all
the help you need if you ask.
*PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You
will face opposition if you are too
open about your intentions. Do some-
thing physically challenging and you
will feel good and gain greater confi-
dence. A new hobby can turn into a
lucrative pastime.
0 2007 UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE


0SS


S N
P E
O T
C F
K A
E A


AR I D
SF TO
S @GO
S H ( F
I V I @
ESOP


I 0 N


EO
V S
S I


ESOSSSYT I CTNTP


STN E.MN


I AT R E TN E


� 2007 Universal Press Syndicate www.wonderword.com


12/3


Accessories, Aliens, City, Comedy, Contest, Crowd, Drive, Enter-
tainment, Episode, Event, Fans, Food, FriendshipM3alas, Gallery,
Games, Generations, Genre, Gift, Guests, Kirk;i:Logos, Media,
Meet, Motel, Music, News, Party, Performance, Photos, Props,
Schedule, Science, Seats, Show, Signs, Souvenirs, Space, Spock,
Stars, Tickets, Tour, Trivia, Uniforms, Videos, Visit, Wait
Last Saturday's Answer: Heavy Chevy


the hint that we'd like to be invited
to their home. I would be happy
to bring a dish or two - or even
cook the whole meal if it meant
we wouldn't have to be alone.
What can I' do? For me, the
holidays are so depressing. Please
help. I can't face another lonely
holiday. - Lonely In Cedar
Rapids, Iowa
DEAR LONELY: How about
hosting a holiday feast at your
own home? Invite your friends
and ask them to bring a potluck
dish.
And by the way, the surest
cure for the holiday blues is to do
something for someone else. This
year that might include stopping
by a rest home and delivering a
batch of holiday cookies, or help-
ing out at a shelter. I guarantee
that if you do, you'll be too busy
to be lonely, and by the time you
leave, you'll be counting your
blessings.
*DEAR ABBY: My landlord is
a nudist. When my friends drop
by to visit late at night, they have
sometimes seen him outside in
the nude and were freaked out
by it. My boyfriend is also uncom-
fortable with it.
I don't know how to confront
my landlord. He's. the best one
I ever had, an(' I'm just a ten-
ant. How should I address this? I
don't want to have to move out.
- Challenged In Houston
DEAR CHALLENGED: Ask
your friends not to drop by with-
out calling first. And when you
know someone will be coming
over, ask your landlord to please
cover up because his nudity is
shocking to somV of your visitors.
You do not have'to be confronta-
tional. If he's as bice as you say he
is, he will accommodate you.
DearAbby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known asJeanne
Phillips, and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips. Write
Dear Abby at. www.DearAbby.
corn or P.O. Bo, 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069.


. I %-I







6 Okeechobee News, Monday, December 3, 2007


Surround yourself with holiday greens


By Dan Culbert
Extension Horticulture Agent
Last week our office had a deep
whiff of fresh-cut evergreens. No,
we have not set up our fresh-cut
Christmas tree, but instead re-
ceived a shipment of fresh - cut
green holiday wreaths.
Paula Daniels, one of our lo-
cal 4-H club leaders holds a fund-
raiser with her Bits-n-Spurs Horse
club members. They take orders
in the fall for fresh-evergreen holi-
day decorations. The boxes have
now arrived in Okeechobee. So
if you see one of those beautiful
fresh evergreen wreaths hanging
on the door of a home or busi-
ness, know that they are a sup-
porter of our local 4-H program.
If you missed out on these
pre-ordered holiday items, a visit
to any one of a number of gar-
den centers, florist shops or retail
stores will put you in front of all
kinds of wreaths and cut green
decorations. Today's column will
give some background on the
mystery of wreaths plus help you
pick out a quality product. And,
based on some recent emails,
your wreath choice may have a
big impact on local environmen-
tal quality.
Folklore & History
of Wreaths
First off, what's with these
round-shaped rings of holiday
greens? I checked a few sources
that all point to the Greeks and
Romans who first awarded prizes
made of rings of plant materials.
Athletes received Laurel wreaths;
military hero's earned wreaths
made from olive branches, while
the aristocracy added jewels to
"wreaths" of precious metals,
creating a crown. (Corona in Lat-
in means wreath.) These signs of
victory would be hung on doors
- and this is the basis of hanging
wreaths on doors.
Wreaths are a circle, without
beginning or end, that can sym-
bolize eternity and hope. Dur-
ing winter, ancient Europeans
brought these circular shaped
bundles of evergreens- indoors,


UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION

afid added candles as signs of
hope for the return of spring. The
green colors and circular shape
symbolized everlasting life.
Early Christians adopted these
symbols. By the 16th century,
Catholics and Protestants used
these symbols to celebrate their
Advent hopes by creating "Ad-
vent wreaths". These are rounded
sprigs of evergreens with -four
candles (three purple, one pink)
that are lit once each week thor-
ough the Advent season. A central
candle is lit on Christmas Eve.
Wreaths use many different
types of vegetation. To Christians,
the prickly holly may be a re-
minder of the Cross, and decora-
tions of nuts, pinecones and other
seedpods symbolize resurrection
and life. During the Victorian era,
lavish holiday arrangements were
created using such greens such
as ivy, hemlock, yew, laurel, and
bay.
In the 1800's, an American
custom was to use evergreens
boughs as memorials, weaving
the branches into wreaths, Christ-
mas stars, and crosses for graves.
Later in the season, these decora-
tions would be removed from the
cemeteries by family members
and brought home.
This tradition of using wreaths
to decorate gravesites contin-
ues today. A national campaign
began 15 years ago, when a
wreath maker in Maine took extra
wreaths to the Arlington National
Cemetery in Washington, DC.
Wreaths across America is now
a national effort to do the same
all over the country. On Saturday,
December 15th, at noon (EST),
wreathes will be provided locally
at the South Florida VA National
Cemetery in Lake Worth and
Royal Palm Memorial Gardens in
West Palm Beach.
In the early 1900's natural foli-
age and greens had become less


available in some areas, so artifi-
cial Christmas foliage was begun
to be used. Realistic plastic holly,
evergreen, and berries were
among these early reproductions,
and in the early 1960's, silk and
vinyl decorations were used as
life like Christmas decorations.
Dangerous Exotic
Decorations
Today it seems that markets
are encouraging the use of dif-
ferent, exotic plant materials in
holiday decorations. This past
week I received several e-mails
about the use of "tallowberries
and pepperberries" in Christmas
wreaths and other holiday deco-
rations. While they may look at-
tractive and seasonal, these are
a problem: these are the seed of
two terribly invasive plants that
are impacting our own Florida
Yards.
The white "popcorn-like" tal-
lowberries are seed of the Chi-
nese Tallow tree. Pepperberries
are the small red clusters of the
Brazilian peppertree or it Cali-
fornia cousin, the Peruvian pep-
pertree. We know what pepper-
trees will do in southern Florida.
Ask anyone in Northern Florida
or any other southeastern state
about the popcorn tree - they will
tell the same sad story of trees
taking over our native lands. This
is why it is illegal to sell either of
these in Florida.
Imagine a Christmas wreath
that is discarded in the back com-
post pile. The pepperberries and
tallowberries can sprout and cre-
ate problems. Some of our con-
cerned park managers have been
trying to find out if these products
contain real or artificial examples
of these seed, or if they are real,
if they have been freeze-dried or
otherwise treated to make them
incapable of growing. My advice
to person buying these decora-
tions - ask the vendor if these
seed can grow - and if they can't
tell you, take your business else-
where.
And a final word of cau-
tion about the artificial versions
- there has been some concern


Orchid advice
Local orchid growers, Gary Bailey and Harry Hoffner advise a member of the Okeechobee
Orchid Club on how best to treat her orchid's problems. Mr. Hoffner is the new president
of the Okeechobee Orchid Club which meets the fourth Monday of each month at 7 p.m.
at the Extension Office.


Saltwater Aquariums: Do some


research before taking the plunge


Watching fish swim in a clear
tank can be a relaxing experience
and give unique displays of some
of nature's most beautiful crea-
tures, but sometimes people take
the plunge and begin a saltwater
aquarium without realizing what
they are getting themselves into.
Like any other pet, saltwater
and tropical pets require respon-
sible care. Diving into a little re-
search can make owning a salt-
water aquarium a rewarding and
gratifying experience, but there
are a few things that every indi-
vidual should know before mak-
ing this significant investment,
says Dr. Jill Heatley of Texas A&M
University's College of Veterinary
Medicine & Biomedical Scienc-
es.
First, she, says, saltwater
aquariums do not come in one-
size-fits-all. There are varying
tank sizes sold that are made for
different types and numbers of
fish. "The smaller the aquarium
size, the harder it is to maintain.
Larger aquariums tend to be
more stable," she explains. The
larger tanks seem to regulate
themselves better and tend to be
less likely to cause fish illness.
One of the most fundamental
aspects of maintaining a healthy
living environment for saltwater
fish is water quality, often referred
to as pH. Heatley says saltwater
organisms require a narrow pH
between 8.2 and 8.3. This is a
much smaller pH range when
compared to freshwater aquari-
ums that can shift between six
and nine. Maintaining this pH is
vital to keep the saltwater organ-
isms alive. To keep the water at
optimum pH, aquarium owners


should purchase a water test kit
and a filter.
"Before I place fish in my salt-
water tank, I always cycle my tank
many times over the course of a
couple of weeks while checking
the pH daily," Heatley adds. Cy-
cling of saltwater is done to allow
"good" bacteria to buildup in the
water before the fish or inverte-
brate are exposed. These bacte-
ria are necessary for the organ-
isms to survive.
Heatley also suggests after
cycling is complete, aquarium
owners start with only one fish in
the aquarium. This fish will serve
as a "test fish" to ensure that the
water conditions are optimum.
The fish will also add other fun-
damental bacteria to the tank,
which are needed for a healthy
saltwater environment.
Before any fish or invertebrates
are placed in the aquarium, Heat-
ley suggests that aquarium own-
ers purchase a protein fractioner,
also called a protein skimmer,
since saltwater environments are
not stable when large amounts
of protein are present. These de-
vices protect the aquarium from
algal blooms that may prove di-
sastrous for invertebrates.
A sign that your saltwater
aquarium is establishing a pro-
tein buildup is thick 'green goo'
growing on the fish tank. This
buildup can bleach or kill any
invertebrates in the tank if it be-
comes too prevalent. If a salt-
water aquarium is being built
to house invertebrates, it should
also have a light on top because
invertebrates require the light to
stay alive, she notes.
Once the fish are in the wa-


ter, maintenance is not over. It is
necessary to change the water in
the aquariums about every two
weeks to keep organisms healthy.
Usually, only 10 to 20 percent
of the total volume of water is
changed to remove some of the
waste and leftover food.
Also, the pH needs to be mea-
sured every, week to ensure that
the tank is staying at optimum
level, she believes. If the fish in
a saltwater tank become pale or
sluggish, it could be a sign that
. the parameter of the tank is no
longer appropriate.
After the aquarium's water
quality has been adjusted to fit
the preferences of saltwater or-
ganisms, it's time to add fish or
invertebrates. Heatley strongly
suggest researching fish species
that are being considered for the
aquarium. Some species may
grow too large for the tank, some
species may be cannibalistic and
eat other fish, and some species
may only thrive when they are
isolated.
Heatley offers the Pufferfish as
an example of a very aggressive
fish that will "chew" on other
fish. This fish should only live in
isolation or with invertebrates,
since it will eat other fish in the
tank.
"Saltwater aquariums can
prove to be an invaluable addi-
tion to any home, but they do re-
quire some work," Heatley says.
"These breathtaking displays
take time to perfect, but with
a little work and care they can
potentially become a beautiful
piece for any home."


that some imported artificial
greens may contain high concen-
trations of lead-based colorants.
Again, buyers beware.
Fresh Wreath Care
So buy that fresh' green
wreath, and enjoy. To keep it lon-
ger, don't hang it where bright
sunshine will reach the foliage.
Fresh green wreaths last longer if
displayed outside the home - the
inside home environment is drier
and moisture will be drawn out
of the cut greens. Spraying the
wreath daily with a spray bottle
of water will keep it fresher for a
longer period of time. Keep them
cool and shady for the longest
lasting results.
The traditional placement on
the front door may not be the
ideal place, as eventually the
needles will fall on to the door-
step: allowing them to be tracked
indoors. Wreaths can be hung on
bare walls near-the front door for
equally attractive placement. Use
a piece of clear fishing line strung
across a wall - this can provide
a suitable hanger, and fashion a
short piece of a wire coat hanger
bend into an s-shape to hang the
wreath on this invisible string.
After the holidays, wreaths
made of cut greens can be dried
and may continue to .be used un-
til too many needles fall off the
branches. Disassemble and place
the branches in yard trash col-
lection piles, add them to com-
post piles in.your Florida Yard, or
break up the branches and add
it to mulched areas of your land-
scape.
I've placed more information
on our Okeechobee web page,
http://okeechobee.ifas.ufl.edtu. If
you need additional information
on Christmas Wreaths, please
email us at okeechobee@ifas.
ufl.edu or call us at 863-763-
6469. Local residents can stop by
our 'office at 458 Hwy 98 North
in Okeechobee, and visit our
Okeechobee County Master Gar-
deners from 1 to 3 p.m. on Tues-
day afternoons. GO GATORS!




I Go to newszap.com to I
I download and print.
I coupons online! I
L ..... . ..J


Investigate health


clubs before joining


TALLAHASSEE - Consumers
who may be considering giving
a health club membership as a
holiday gift or joining a gym as
part of a New Year's resolution
to get in shape, will want to take
some time to check out the club
before signing a contract. Flor-
ida Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson is urging consumers
to do their homework or their
wallet may be the only thing
that gets lighter.
The department regulates
health clubs under the Health
Studio Act, which provides some
protections for consumers in sit-
uations where the studio is not
complying with Florida law. The
facilities are required to register
with the department, and many
are also required to post a bond
to protect members in case the
club goes out of business.
"We see a lot of new health
clubs starting up each year and
unfortunately, a number of them
close down as well," Bronson
said. "I think gyms are a good
investment in one's health, but
people need to make sure it's a
solid investment."
Currently, there are 1,741
health clubs registered in Flori-
da and during the past year, 339
clubs went out of business.
The law provides consumers
with the right to cancel a con-
tract for several reasons includ-
ing: cancellation within three
days of signing a contract, exclu-
sive of holidays and weekends,
but it must be done in writing;


if the health studio goes out
of business or moves its facil-
ity more than five driving miles
away from the original location
and fails to provide, within 30
days, a facility of equal quality
located within the five miles; if a
person becomes physically un-
able to use a substantial portion
of the services for which they
contracted, until the disability
ends.
Bronson also recommends
consumers follow these tips:
Call the department's helpline
- 1 800 HELP FLA (435-7352)
or 1-800-FL-AYUDA (1-800-
352-9832) - to make sure that
the health studio is registered
and to check its complaint his-
tory.
Find out if the studio has
posted a bond with the depart-
ment, as most clubs that collect
fees in advance are required to
do.
Prior to joining, ask about
the club's cancellation policy in
case you move or become phys-
ically unable to use the facility.
Before signing up, visit the
club during the hours you intend
to use it to determine whether it
is overcrowded.
Find out whether any of the
\amenities, such as racquetball
courts, cost extra.
Bronson emphasized that it
is important to read contracts
thoroughly and make sure that
all promises are made in writ-
ing. Ask questions to make sure
you understand the terms of
your membership contract.


Your time




Is precious.


Okeechoee Okeechobeee Okeechobee News
College programF . -- - --- -"" * - --
S - Second term zAnimal facility pact OKd
....� . .. - - ..... .- -.

*. A , . ... FN I S I.o"iC fi uL Council - o
PI elect mayor
.-
-- -.:: " - 8



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Important Information: Please
read your ad carefully the first
day it appears. In case of an
inadvertent error, please noti-
fy us prior to the deadline list-
ed. We will not be responsible
for more than 1 incorrect
insertion, or for more than the
extent of the ad rendered val-
ueless by such errors.
Advertiser assumes responsi-
bility for all statements, names
and content of an ad, and
assumes responsibility for any
claims against Independent
Newspapers. All advertising
is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all copy, and to
insert above the copy the word
"advertisement". All ads
accepted are subject to credit
approval. All ads must conform
to Independent Newspapers'
style and are restricted to
their proper classifications.
Some classified categories
require advance payment.
SThese classifications are
denoted with an asterisk *.
SIndependent Newspapers will
never knowingly accept any
advertisement that is illegal or
considered fraudulent. In all
cases of questionable value,
such as promises of guaran-
teed income from work-at-
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to send money in advance for
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Auctions 105,
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120'
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage/Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
* Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160



TWO LABS - 11/24, Highway
441 South, Canal Point.
(863)763-9393


READING A
NEWSPAPER...
makes you a more informed
and interesting person. No
* wonder newspaper readers
aore more successful


CURR DOG - Cream color, 12
yrs old, Male, Bob tail, Vic.
Near N 441 Tues. 11/20.
(863)763-8185
GOLDEN RETRIEVER MIX -
Puppy, Basswood area, no
questions asked.
(863)697-3457
GREEN QUAKER PARROT -
Sat. Nov. 17th, Vic. Captain
Hendry Dr. Banded right leg.
(863)675-1050
When you want something
sold, advertise In the
classifIeds.

CLEAN UP
Will pick up your junk!
Heavy & Farm Equipment-will
pay CASH. Call Michael @
" (863)634-4780


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis


ACROSS
1 St. Louis's
Gateway _
5 Give (out)
sparingly
9 Founded, on a
cornerstone:
Abbr.
14 Florida's
Beach
15 Lena or Ken of
film
16 Feudal subject
17 Tied scorewise
18 Fright
19 Slower kind of
mail
20 Like one who
.says "Put up your
dukes!"
23 Island studied by
Margaret Mead
24 'The Raven" poet
25 Dinghy mover
27 Overhead trains
28 Self-defense
method
32 Minstrel's
instrument
33 LP players
34 Stationed
35 Make customer
satisfaction a
goal
38 Drummer Gene
40 Critic Roger
41 Convent
residents
42 Hollywood
boulevard
44 Inside info
47 Dynamite relative
48 Proverbial sword
beater
49 Caribbean island
resort
51 You can summon
hook-and-ladder
trucks from them
56 Noise from a
rickety floor
57 Mixed bag
58 Saucy
59 Baseball's Pee
Wee
60 Con's room
61 Emmy winner
Falco
62 Holiday part-
timers
63 Topple (over)
64 Thoroughfare


DOWN
1 Reluctant
2 Expose
3 Cosmetic
applications
4 1953 John
Wayne movie
5 Tip, as one's hat
6 Bread spread
7 One whose pants
.are on fire?
8 Spellbound
9 Borden's
spokescow
10 Do a medley, say
11 "The _ of the
August Moon":
Pulitzer-winning
1953 play
12 Stir up
13 Lux. neighbor
21 City in central
Washington
22 Enemy
26 Cabernet or
Beaujolais
29 Back, at sea
30 Brazil's capital
before Brasilia
31 Colorado ski -
resort
32 " but not least

33 Hula swivelers


34 Bill for drinks
35 'The Wizard of
Oz" role
36 Oodles of oz.
37 Wide foot size
38 Many a "Sir":
Abbr.
39 Be released from
captivity
42 Red or Black
43 Open with a key
44 Best man's
rental


45 Spain and
Portugal
46 Attached with
sticky stuff
48 Chinese lap
dogs, briefly
50 Lasso wielder
52 Coarse file.
53 On the calmer
side of the boat
54 Stir (up)
55 Hood's gal
56 PC monitor


ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:


S I MONEY WE I L LO R E
I N EL I GIBLE A V E S
MONDEGREEN BE D S
PREACHERS JORJAI
MB EE SETE A I RWAY
M E R SAT I -ANI -'R'S-T
A M E S DA W NOFT I M E
J A P E D P A D Y EMT I SL
U N EQ U AL LED E N T
SCRUPLE C I D SESS
C I TERMS DINAH
U P 0 E B-AS E ME TA L

E TRE PRR IVA T E J E T
S E E ED NOSETONOSE E
xwordeditor@aol.com 12/3/07


By Jack McInturff
(c)2007 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 12/3/07


I READING A NEWSPAPER...


Employment


-mpoim
Full Time 0205


Start a new career in the much needed field of
nursing as a Certified Nursing Assistant. Complete the
Hospitality Assistant course/training at Okeechobee
Healthcare Facility and become a CNA in 4 weeks. Next
class begins soon. Instructor RN/experienced teacher has
a very high CNA exam passing rate. Qualified CNAs are
then eligible for LPN training. Good benefits.
Apply In Person For Further Details:
406 N.W. 4th Street * (863) 357-2442


Immediate Openings * All Shifts
Full Time/Part Time * RN's & LPN's
Apply In Person To:
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
1646 Hwy. 441 North

Immediate Openings - CNAs
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
All shifts: Full/Part Time. Good Benefits.
Apply In Person To:
406 N.W. 4th Street. (863) 357-2442


Emlment



Employment -
Full-Time 205
Employment -
Medical 210
Employment
Part-Time 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Training 227
Sales 230

Employment
Fu ime 0205


RANCH FOREPERSON
Lykes Bros. Inc. Ranch.
Division has an immediate
opening for a Ranch
Foreperson. This position is
responsible foe the
maintenance of a large
cow-calf herd and the
supervision of the assigned
ranch hands: Qualified
applicants should possess
a 2 year college degree in
Animal Science or similar
curriculum or equivalent job
-experience.
Lykes Bros. Inc. offers
competitive wages and
benefit package including
Medical, Dental, Life, AD &
D and LTD insurance plus


A/C SERV TECH needed. paid vacation and holidays.
Dependable, Clean DL, Good Qualified applicants can
Pay, Benefits, 401K, Min apply in person at or send
3 yrs exp. EOE DFW. resume to the Brighton
Experienced need only apply. Ranch Office located at 106
Call (863)763-8391 , SW CR 721, Okeechobee,
FL 34974
EXPERIENCED BOOKKEEPER FL 34974.
wanted. Full/Part time. Lykes Bros. Inc. is an Equal
Quickbooks preferred Fax Employment Opportunity
resume to (863)467-3050 or Employer/ Affirmative
mail to PO. Box 578, Action/ Drug Free
Okeechobee, FL 34973 Workplace, M/F/D/V.


4� Services


HIRING
DAYTIME &
EVENING
SERVERS
& HOSTESS
Min. 1 yr. exp.

COOK
$12-$15
to start

Apply in person
between
9am-1pm


Heavy Equipment/Truck
experience needed for
statewide mfg/dist company.
Benefit package. Drug Free,
EOE. Fax resumes to
(863)763-0358



Find it faster. Sell it soon-
er in thb classitleds


Babysitting 405
Child Care Needed 410
Child Care Offered415
Instruction 420
Services Offered 425
Insurance . 430
Medical Services435



Elderly Care - Reg. Nurse
w/35 yrs. exp. has one
opening for 24 hr. care in
nice family home. Call
Susan 863-763-2334.

Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise your
yard sale In the classl-
fleds and make your
clean un a breeze


Ron's Pressure Washing
& Minor Repairs
Roof coating, Repair to
Mobile Homes & more.
No job to big or small. Free
estimates. 863-357-9604 or
cell 863-610-1248
License # 2423


Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines 535
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes. Linens & Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment/
Supplies . 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets/Supplies/
Services 670
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Gpods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys 9 Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740



AMERICAN PIT - Blue, Born
01/22/07. 1 male & 1 fe-
male. Shots current $500
-w/papers (863)634-6195
BLUENOSE PITBULL PUPPIES
- Vet checked, only males
avail, parents on premises.
$300 each (863)763-3776
RED BONE COON HOUND
PUPS - UKC, Purple ribbon
bred, Health cert. included.
$300 each. (863)697-3810


Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses- Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent ' 925
House - Rent 930
Land - Rent 935.
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960


FURNISHED APT- On Water.
Utilities paid. Adult Commu-
nity. No pets Call between
9-4 pm daily (863)357-2044
Oak Lake Apts., Remodeled
2br, 11/2 ba, 2 Story, Washer
Dryer. Patio. $800 mo., 1st,
last+ sec. (863)634-3313
Okeechobee, 2Br/1.5ba, car-
peted, ceramic tile w/appl's
incl. dishwasher, $700 mo.
+ $700 sec. (863)763-8878


Rental Space Available - 820
sq. ft. per unit, 3 available,
central a/c, $600 per unit +
$25 for water plus tax. Multi
year leases avail. Call
772-201-7473.


BUCKHEAD RIDGE,
Waterfront 3 Bdrm., 1/2 Ba.
2 Story w/Lake Okeechobee
access & boat ramp. Wrap
around porch. Fenced yard,
Pets welcome! $1000
mo. + 1st, last & sec.
561-346-3620
Charming Country Cottage,
3BR/1.5BA, 15 min. from
town & 2BR/11BA, no pets.
1st, last & sec. Call Debbie
S863)467-2982 Mon.-Fri.,
am til 4pm.
N OF OKEECHOBEE- Cottage,
1br, fully turn, elec & satellite
incld, NO pets, $700/mo +
$500 dep. (863)467-1950
OAK PARK 2 Bdrm., 1 Ba. &
DIXIE RANCH 3 Bdrm., 1 Ba.
Call (863)763-7622 or (863)
697-8325 for more info.
OKEE. - Newly remodeled CBS
3br, lba, Carport, Appl., W/D
hookup. $1000. mo. + 1st,
Last Sec. (863)261-5180
OKEECHOBEE - 3704 NW 36th
Ave., Small 2 br, lba, large
yard, $750/mo, $450 Sec
Dep (863)532-9182
OKEECHOBEE- 4br, 2ba, in
city limits, looking for re-
sponsible renters w/refs.
$1200/mo, (863)634-9139



OKEECHOBEE - Office Space
rental. 18'x12' $600. mo.
Utilities included. For ap-
pointment (863)467-1545
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE
SPACE FOR LEASE
2,000 sq. ft. Excellent
location, ready to occupy.
Call for info (863)763-8872
or (863)467-9608


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property - Sale 1010
Condos/
Townhouses - Sale1015
Farms - Sale 1020
Houses - Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property - Sale 1035
Land - Sale 1040
Lots - Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property - Sale 1055
Property Inspection 1060
Real Estate. Wanted 1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080



NEWLY RENOVATED - 4/3, tile
throughout, granite counter
tops, In Okee Estates. 2100
sf $240,000 (863)634-6186
OKEECHOBEE- 3/1, CBS, Un-
der appraisal. $169,900. Oak
/tile/marble, Space to add
master bath, 24 x13 en-
closed Fla. room & more!!
Grab flyer!! 309 SW 10th
Ave. (863)357-0391
OKEECHOBEE
Zero Down. $999. mo.
4br, 2ba CBS Brand New.
Prices $139,900. 3824 NW
7th St. 561-248-3879 or
863-484-0809


S EASY, JST OSO


/ Mon-Fri
8am o p in


Jo








8 Okeechobee News, Monday, December 3, 2007


I-pe a Nti i


*seca No - I


I-pel NoIt i


MONDAY PRIME TIME


Seial Noti -


DECEMBER 3, 2007
10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30


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CROOKED CREEK
Corner Lot. 2.2 acres, $150K
Call Cell# 772-530-2095
or 863-467-6399


READING A

NEWSPAPER..
makes you a more informed
and interesting person. No
wonder newspaper readers
are more successful!


LOT - In Town & 1/2 Acre & 2
Acre parcels West of Okee-
chobee in Lazy 7 area. Call
-- (863)763-7622 for info.


Mobile Homes



Mobile Home - Lots 2005
Mobile Home -Parts 2010
Mobile Homes - Rent 2015
Mobile Homes - Sale 2020




BH RIDGE - 3/2 on Waterfront,
Lake access. Fully furnished.
$950. mo. + $950. Sec.
dep. (772)370-1095
CHOICE OF 3BR, or 2 BR, 2
ba D/W's No pets, yrly lease,
starting @ $600/mo +
$1000 sec. 863-763-4031
DOUBLE WIDE TRAILER - 2
Bdrm., 2 Ba. On 10 acres.
$1200 mo. Call
(863)763-2838
OKEECHOBEE 2BR/1BA,
No pets. Fenced yard.
$650/mo. & $550 security.
(863)763-0648
OKEECHOBEE: Nice, 2br/1ba,
$550/mo + 1st, Last & Sec.
Dep. In town. No pets.
(863)763-6232
TAYLOR CREEK: 2 BR, 2 BA
Furnished, seasonal or annual-
ly, available immediately.
$750/annually, $1200 sea-
sonal (239)707-8327



BANK REPO'S
MOVE TO YOUR LAND
Mobile Home Angels
561-385-4694
MOB. HOME- 61', all new on
river, w/dock, 2/3 br, screen
room, extras, $37,000 Must
see inside (863)255-4935
OKEE - 2br, shed, Fla Room,
CA/Heat, W/D, carport, In
Adult park, $10,000
(863)763-1079/80'1-3287
PALM HARBOR HOMES
4/2 Tile Floor, Energy Package
Deluxe loaded, over
2,200 sq.ft.
30th Anniversary Sale Special
Save $15,000.
Call for FREE Color Brochures
800-622-2832


Recreation



Boats 3005
Campers/RVs 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles ATVs 3035



AIR BOAT - 220 GPU, Laser
hull. Power shift prop. $5200
or best offer. (561)348-0276


Automobiles



Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks4040
Parts - Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070



FORD ESCORT ZX2 '99 - Cold
air, tinted windows, rear
spoiler, Pioneer stereo, great
mpg. $1200 (863)467-0094


TRUCK TOPPER - with side
tool boxes Fits Chevrolet
trucks $1000.
(863)467-2887 or 763-7801


CHEVY SILVERADO - '04,
2500, Heavy duty, Reading Util
bed, Ladder rack, 60,800 mi.
$18,950. (863)467-1545


UTIL. TRAILER - '05, Covered
Trailer, 12', Single axle,
$2500. or best offer.
(863)467-2887 or 763-7801


Public Notices




Public Notice 5005
State Public -
Legal Notice 5500



TIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2003-DP-088
IN THE INTEREST OF:
H.H. DOB: 2/23/90
A.H. DOB: 12/30/98
Mother of the minor children:
Karen Melvin
TO: Father of H.H., and A.H.,
Michael Holbert
Residence and Address Unknown

fmel'. IHi l i ,lirlI.iA if liHi.
DREN AND FAMILIES IN THE ABOVE-
STYLED COURT FOR THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS RELA-
TIVE TO H.H., A FEMALE CHILD,
BORN ON THE 23RD DAY OF FEBRU-
ARY 1990, and A.H., A FEMALE
CHILD, BORN ON THE 30TH DAY OF
DECEMBER, 1998. THE CHILDREN
WAS BORN THE COUNTY OF OKEE-
CHOBEE, IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA.
YOU ARE COMMANDED TO BE AND
APPEAR BEFORE A JUDGE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE ABOVE-STYLED COURT LO-
CATED AT:
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
312 NW. 3rd STREET,
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
AT 1:30 P.M. ON THE 3RD DAY OF DE-
CEMBER, 2007, FOR HEARING AND
-i. i .., a1 W ,,A IH. 1.11 PETI-
- iri' LLH nIA i .1 :E Arj I1
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTI-
TUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS
CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A
PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN
THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS
NOTICE.
BE ADVISED THAT YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY TO REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU
CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY, ONE
MAY BE APPOINTED FOR YOU.
WITNESS MY HAND AS CLERK OF SAID
COURT AND THE SEAL THEREOF,
THIS 16th DAY OF OCTOBER, 2007.
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF COURT
By. Kathy Arnold
DEPUTY CLERK
248401 ON 11/12,19,26:12/3/07

One man's trash Is anoth-
er man's treasure. Turn
your trash to treasure
with an ad In the classi-
fleds.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
JUVENILE DI VISION
CASENO.:2006-DP-069
IN THE INTEREST OF:
A.C. DOB: 6/13/06
Mother of the minor child:
Elizabeth Cox
TO: Prospective lather of A.C.,
Javier Delgado
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT A PE-
TITION UNDER OATH HAS BEEN
FILED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF CHIL-
DREN AND FAMILIES IN THE ABOVE-
."..1Ir COURT FOR THE TERMINA-
tinOu f PARENTAL RIGHTS RELA-
TIVE TO A.C., A FEMALE CHILD,
BORN ON THE 13TH DAY OF JUNE,
2006. THE CHILD WAS BORN IN THE
COUNTY OF OKEECHOBEE, IN THE
STATE OF FLORIDA. YOU ARE COM-
MANDED TO BE AND APPEAR BE-
FORE A JUDGE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION IN THE
ABOVE-STYLED COURT LOCATED AT:
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
312 N.W. 3rd STREET,
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
AT 10:00 A.M. ON THE 10TH DAY OF
DECEMBER, 2007, FOR HEARING
AND TO SHOW CAUSE WHY SAID PE-
TITION SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED,
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTI-
TUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS
CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A
PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN
THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS
NOTICE.
BE ADVISED THAT YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY TO REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU
CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY ONE
MAY BE APPOINTED FOR YOU.
WITNESS MY HAND AS CLERK OF SAID
COURT AND THE SEAL THEREOF,
THIS 16th DAY OF OCTOBER, 2007.
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF COURT
By: Kathy Arnold
DEPUTY CLERK
248396 ON 11/12,19,26:12/3107
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2006-DP-069
IN THE INTEREST OF:
A.C. DOB: 6/13/06
Mother of the minor child:
Elizabeth Cox
TO: Prospective father of A.C.,
Jose Hernandez
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT A PE-
TITION UNDER OATH HAS BEEN
FILED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF CHIL-
DREN AND FAMILIES IN THE ABOVE-
STYLED COURT FOR THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS RELA-
TIVE TO A.C., A FEMALE CHILD,
BORN ON THE 13TH DAY OF JUNE,
2006. THE CHILD WAS BORN IN THE
COUNTY OF OKEECHOBEE, IN THE
STATE OF FLORIDA. YOU ARE COM-
MANDED TO BE AND APPEAR BE-
FORE A JUDGE OF THE CIRCUIT
r. ti ii.i rniL I, ir,.I ir| irj HE
$i.''E . ,i.EIiInI.IM lu il.AT~i, Ma
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
312 N.W. 3rd STREET,
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
AT 10:00 A.M. ON THE 10TH DAY OF
DECEMBER, 2007, FOR HEARING
AND TO SHOW CAUSE WHY SAID PE-
TITION SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED,
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTI-
TUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS
CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
IHEt .ATi irji, IME SPECIFIED, YOU
'.lA LiI'. eALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A
'Viri th! IHte CHILD NAMED IN
THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS
NOTICE.
BE ADVISED THAT YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY TO REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU
CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY, ONE
MAY BE APPOINTED FOR YOU.
,m i i I: P,1. , H i l " I: 1L: R 1 1 1: .' " .1l
i lm.llM ri THE .*'AL. T lVhI: .i,
THPI It~ L1, U3. (I f rl-"1 .1'bi
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF COURT
By: Kathy Arnold
DEPUTY CLERK
248395 ON 11/12,19,26;12/3/07














The most important
20 minutes of your day is
the time spent reading
with your child from
birth to age nine.


Pubi Not


Pbic Notice


Submitted Photo

Ready To Work Seminar
Seacoast National Bank sponsors the executive breakfast for the Ready To
Work seminar coordinated by Mike Radebaugh, Director of Career & Tech-
nical Education. Local business leaders were educated on the new program
available in our area this spring. The program assesses skills of applicants
before heading into the work place. Employers interested in the program
should call the IRCC office at (772)-462-7585.




Business leaders says



students lack creativity


By Donna Gordon Blankenship
Associated Press Writer
SEATTLE (AP) --_ Applicants for even the
most technical jobs need more than good
grades and the ability to understand complex
problems, says a group of business leaders
who want to add another essential to the list
of things kids learn in school: creativity.
'A flexible, adaptive, lifelong learner who
can think creatively and solve problems and
frame problems creatively. That's what every-
body's looking for," says Eric Liu, the motiva-
tional speaker and mentoring guru who is the
driving force behind a new Washington orga-
nization called Creativity Matters,
The business people involved in this gov-
ernment-sanctioned but privately financed en-
terprise say Liu has hit upon an interesting and
important concept, but some acknowledge
they're slightly baffled about how it will be ac-
complished.
Can you even teach creativity in the class-
room?
In hopes of getting a positive answer,. the
group is launching an "imagination award"
in partnership with a New York organization
that's pursuing a similar goal.
Students need to be taught to use their
imaginations to solve problems, to connect
the dots, Liu said. Good teachers are already
doing this, he added, but the idea needs to be
given a higher priority, and project-based and
experiential learning should replace some
book work and tests.
Liu cited Aviation High School, a magnet
school near Boeing Field south of Seattle as a
place where this is happening all the time.
Students are learning math and science
and other subjects by learning about flying air-
planes, studying weather, aviation law and the
aerospace industry. From building an airplane
as a class project to internships in the avia-
tion industry, students apply their classroom
knowledge to real world experiences.
If a high school diploma is going to mean-
ingful, it needs to include more than a list of
skills to check off, said Liu, who is on the state
Board of Education committee rewriting the
requirements for a high school diploma.
"We want the diploma to be a promise,
a social contract with whoever gets our kids
next," he said.
Creativity and imagination are both job re-
quirements at the Boeing Co., says Bob Watt,
vice president of government and community
relations.


"We make our living imagining things that
never before existed," he said. "Creativity is at
the heart of what Boeing does."
In addition to trying to hire creative people,
Watt says Boeing encourages its employees to
continue their education and potentially gain
more inspiration by offering to pay their college
tuition to study anything they want, whether
it's related to building airplanes or not.
It's important to teach children both how
to think and that there are different ways to
think, says Bob Drewel, a former president of
Everett Community College who now runs the
Puget Sound Regional Council, an association
of local governments. '
. Public education may have to change to
make room for more creativity, Drewel said,
adding that teachers aren't always given the
time or the freedom to use their creative en-
ergy in a way that inspires children.
Drewel, whose wife was a teacher for 32
years, said education officials may need to start
listening better to teachers when they suggest
other ways to teach subjects. He said class size
may also be an obstacle to creativity.
Regarding how to teach creativity in the
classroom, Drewel said explaining how to do
this is a little like describing what kind of art,
music or poetry a person admires. He rec-
ognizes good teaching when he sees it but
wouldn't be able to give teachers a list of ways
to teach creativity.
The Web site for the new Creativity Matters
organization takes a stab at such a list. The
ideas range from turning students into teachers
to playing interactive games and making sure
mistakes are acceptable in the classroom.
The organization's first initiative, following
a conference in Tacoma in early November,
will be a partnership with the Lincoln Center
Institute of New York to start an "imagination
award" to recognize a public school that best
demonstrates the spirit of imagination and cre-
ativity.
The Lincoln Center Institute recently an-
nounced the first such award for a New York
City school, and Washington is the first place
outside of New York to start a similar pro-
gram.
Other proposals that came out of the Ta-
coma meeting included training for princi-
pals on fostering creativity, more involvement
by Washington arts organizations in public
schools, some new education programs con-
cerning the environment, and a proposal to
continue directing lottery money toward arts
education after the program expires in 2012.


UF/IFAS plans Agribusiness


Management course in Spring '08


FORT PIERCE -- Opportunities to work out-
doors, work with animals and plants and lead
an independent lifestyle are some of the job
aspects and reasons why agribusiness manag-
ers pursue their careers. Along the Treasure
Coast growers work yearlong producing citrus
and vegetables and caring for cattle. Aquacul-
turalists harvest clams along our shorelines
and shrimp from inland ponds. Most of our
agricultural lands are devoted to crops but oth-
er parcels are used for pastures, woodlands,
nurseries and even bee colonies.
According to the National Agricultural Sta-
tistics Service, the 2002 Census of Agriculture
counted 1,375 farms in operation along the
Treasure Coast: 477 in St. Lucie County, 480 in
Indian River County and 418 in Martin County.
But agricultural organizations are not lim-
ited to farms. Chemical companies that pro-
duce pesticides and fertilizers and large farm
equipment distributors are all part of the
region's oldest, venerable industry. Grocery
stores are also within the family of agribusi-
ness and, so too, are golf courses.
To successfully manage an agribusiness op-
eration, management skills are required. And
to meet that need, Jane Bachelor, a University
of Florida/lFAS Indian River Research and Edu-
cation Center agribusiness lecturer, is offering
Agribusiness Management for spring semester
2008. The course will begin Jan. 9 and will be
held each Monday evening from 5:30 to 8:30
p.m. until mid-April. The course is not only an
introduction to the Bachelor of Science degree


in Agribusiness Management program, but is
also offered as one of four courses pertaining
to a Certificate of Agribusiness Management.
"Course topics will be presented in a logi-
cal sequence built around four functions of
management-planning, organizing, control-
ling and directing," said Bachelor. "Everything
a manager does is related to efficiently, effec-
tively maximize long-term profits by profitably
satisfying customers' needs."
Bachelor said the course will include such
key topics as introductory finance and man-
agement, the application of economic princi-
ples, budgeting techniques and management
strategy for agribusiness firms. The course
will also introduce students to entrepreneur-
ship, the importance of interpersonal oral and
written communication skills in industry, and
the role of ethics and morality in the business
environment.
Jane Bachelor is a UF lecturer and a senior
human resources, sales, marketing and man-
agement professional with considerable expe-
rience working in Fortune 200-500 companies
and working with independent business as a
management consultant.
To enroll in Agribusiness Management or
for more information about UF courses and
degree programs offered at the Fort Pierce lo-
cation contact Jackie White at (772) 468-3922,
Ext, 148, or by e-mail at: jkwhite@ufl.edu. For
inquiries specifically about the co'ur'contact
Jane Bachelor at (772) 468-3922, Ext. 151, or
by e-mail at: jbach@ufl.edu


6:00 6:30


7:00


7:30


8:00 8:30


9:00 9:30


a Notice


NOTICE OF THE MEETING OF THE
COQUINA WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
THE BOARD OF n p.IPieOPi FOR nOUIiAJA WATER nCOnTRnL DISTRICT WILL
i:iL:i . r llnrinjC _t _ir . 1i '. , O ,Ui'Ith1m I, i; ' J i 9,Z00 A.M. IN THE
lr,:l. Ii;i:, I u,:ri rir- f. .tI.1c i rIl ,I)', 'EliE, H I i 'i i ,, II .l EXTENSION OF-
Ci:[ .r -i.i ,1 . 1. : 1if i : 1:1,:,,11. 5':.r ' Hii '..-., i ri 1 , EECHOBEE, FL. A
.61 ti iA F,,I : , i.L, E . r. iRD .'bilimi ii H.h REQUEST FROM
THE i.niitVr:i'i:[li l, i v iA , lil-..1 In Lil [w'L Tl 5 ip ALt ANY DECISION BY
TiE 0I:HI: 11Hi 'IIH 'i;: :]:i i, .rc, t iNT , l Ni ,i I:i, oH aISUCH MEETING;
THAT PERSON WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR SUCH
PURPOSES THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDINGS, WHICH INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED, IS MADE. ANY PERSON WISHING
TO SPEAK AT TEE MEETING MUST HAVE THEIR NAME AND TOPIC PLACED ON
THE AGENDA ONE WEEK BEFORE THE DATE OF THE MEETING. ALL PROPERTY
OWNERS WITHIN THE DISTRICT ARBINVITED TO ATTEND.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, PERSONS
NEEDING A SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION OR AN INTERPRETER TO PARTICIPATE
IN THE PROCEEDINGS SHOULD CONTACT THE DISTRICT'S OFFICES BY CALL-
ING (863)763-4601 AT LEAST TWO (2) DAYS PRIOR TO THE DATE OF THE
MEETING.
NOTICE: COQUINA WATER CONTROL DISTRICT HAS AN ONGOING AQUATIC
SPRAYING PROGRAM, DISTRICT.WIDE.
WILLARD M. BYARS
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
17429 NW 242ND STREET
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
0863)763-4601 OR (863)634-3166
94 54 ON 12/3/07


--~-~i�- I


f~S




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