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 Material Information
Title: Okeechobee news
Uniform Title: Okeechobee News
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Okeechobee News
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee Fla
Publication Date: November 26, 2007
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
Coordinates: 27.241667 x -80.833056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Daily Okeechobee news

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Okeec/hob


****ORIGIN MIXED ADC 334
205 SMA U FL LIB OF FL HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611 7007
_ ______.^ - --^ -- ^ ^^^mv


Vol. 98 No. 330 Monday, November 26, 2007 50 Plus tax


Briefs


Early Release Day
Okeechobee County
Schools will observe their sec-
ond student early release day
this week. Early release day
will be Thursday, Nov. 29.
Elementary schools will re-
lease students at 11:30 a.m.;
middle schools will release
at 12:05 p.m.; the Freshman
Campus and New Endeavor
will release at 10:30 a.m.; and
the Okeechobee High School
will release at 10:45 a.m.

Taylor Creek
locks are closed
The S-193 navigation lock
at Taylor Creek will be closed
to boat traffic as of Monday,
Nov. 19, except for emergen-
cies.
For additional information
about the current drought,
water levels or other South
Florida Water Management
District projects, call the
Okeechobee Service Center at
(863) 462-5260 or (800) 250-
4200.

SFWMD hosts
public meeting
A public meeting on the
northern Everglades/Lake
Okeechobee phase II techni-
cal plan will be held Tuesday,
Nov. 27, from 6 until 8 p.m. at
the Okeechobee Civic Center,
1750 U.S. 98 N.
The purpose of the meet-
ing is to allow the public to
comment on the South Florida
Water Management District's
_draftplan.
For a copy of the draft plan,
go to the SFWMD website at
https://my.sfwmd.gov/north-
erneverglades.
For information on the
meeting or draft plan, contact
Temperince Morgan at (561)
682-6534.


Drought Index
Current: 421
Source: Florida Division
of Forestry
Local Burn Ban: None


Lake Levels

10.33 feet
Last Year: 12.39 feet


Source: South
Florida Water
Management
District. Depth
given in feet
above sea level.


State considers road leases


Could sell to
private entities
TAMPA (AP) - Faced with
a $2.5 billion budget shortfall
over the next two years, Florida
leaders are considering selling
50-year leases on some state toll
roads and bridges in exchange
for large sums of cash from pri-
vate investors.
In a preliminary study, the
Florida's Department of Trans-
portation .-estimated a 50-year
lease on Tampa's Sunshine Sky-


way Bridge could be worth $1.3
billion if investors were allowed
to set tolls at "market rates." The
study used the example of the
SunPass toll, which would dou-
ble in the first, fourth and 10th
years of the deal, climbing from
75 cents to $5 within a decade
on the Skyway.
Florida would follow the lead
of other places including Indi-
ana, Chicago and San Francisco,
which have made billions from
similar deals to sell road leases
to private entities. Florida's $8
billion-a-year road construction


budget faces challenges such as
declining gasoline tax revenue
and higher materials costs.
"We won't do it unless it is
good for the state," Gov. Charlie
Crist has said.
Opponents worry Florida
drivers could get a raw deal over
the long-term because private
investors would make big profits
from aggressive toll hikes. And
they fear privatization could hurt
the poor.
"Take Alligator Alley. For
many people, that's the only way
to go from east to west Florida


and vice versa," said Sen. Mike
Fasano, a New Port Richey Re-
publican who is chairman of
the Senate Transportation Com-
mittee. "It would be controlled
by a private entity that could
raise tolls ad nauseam. It could
make it unaffordable for people
to travel."
A law passed this year allows
Florida to lease roads operated by
the Transportation Department,
but not by Florida Turnpike En-
terprise. The turnpike's system's
roads, including the Veterans Ex-
pressway and Suncoast Parkway,


can't easily be leased because
they're all part of a system that's
tied together financially.
That leaves four roads: Alliga-
tor Alley, the Sunshine Skyway in
Tampa Bay, the Pinellas Bayway
and a state-owned stretch of the
BeachLine Expressway (formerly
the Bee Line) in central Florida.
But the upkeep costs of the
Tampa Bay area's toll bridges
would lower the price that inves-
tors would be willing to pay for
them. Officials say Alligator Alley,
See Roads - Page 2


Killers find



Murderabilia




Profitable


By Nathan Crabbe,
GAINESVILLE (AP) -- The
Cross-Country Killer has re-
ceived $330 since January 2005.
The Killer Baby Sitter received
$207. The leader of a vampire
cult received $120.
Despite a law banning fel-
ons from profiting from their
crimes, some of Florida's most
notorious inmates are receiv-
ing deposits in their prison ac-
counts from collectors of their
art, letters and personal items.
Collectors sell the items,
called "murderabilia," for pric-


es that can reach thousands
of dollars. Lawmakers have
banned the sales in five states
and are now pushing for a fed-
eral law.
Florida bans felons from us-
ing their notoriety for profit, but
violations are hard to prove and
rarely enforced. While the state
successfully prevented Gaines-
ville student killer Danny Roll-
ing for profiting from a book
on his crimes, it failed to stem i
the sale of his art and letters
through online auction sites.
See Killers - Page 2


Syrian will


attend summit


By Amy Teibel
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The
Bush administration was able
to declare a clean sweep when
Syria, the last Arab world hold-
out, said Sunday it would attend
this week's high-stakes Mideast
peace conference. Top nego-
tiators awaited a meeting with
Secretary of State Condoleezza
Rice to finalize details.
The White House reacted to
Syria's last-minute announce-
ment by trying to keep the focus


on the broad list of participants.
"We welcome the attendance
of so many countries from the
region around the world,"
said Gordon Johndroe, spokes-
man for President Bush's Na-
tional Security Council. "This
large number signals broad
support for Israeli-Palestinian
peace efforts."
As 16 Arab nations and the
Arab League prepared to sit
down with Israel for the first
time in more than a decade,
See Summit - Page 2


The smell of fresh pine fills
the air at Flagler Park where the
Okeechobee Lions Club has set
up their annual Christmas tree
sale.
The sale started on Wednes-
day, 'Nov., 21 and will continue
until all of the trees are sold.
Hours of the sale are currently
10 a.m. until 7 p.m., but will
shorten as tree sales lessen.
"We started off with 274
trees on Wednesday," stated
Rosemarry Bass, Lion Club
treasurer, around 11 a.m. on Fri-
day, Nov. 23. "We sold 35 trees
the first day and have already
sold 20 Friday morning."
After the 55 trees that were
already sold, the trees that re-
main range from 6 to 8 feet in
height and cost between $65
and $85. The trees that they sell
are all Fraser Firs from North
Carolina, which the Lions Club
started supplying three years


~ g~mis ~rl~ I


A senior at OKeechobee Highn cool, Toner Kelly helps
with the Lions Club Christmas tree sale on Friday, Nov. 23.
He sawed off the end of the tree so that it would absorb
more water when it was taken home by the customers.
ago. they are just as pretty when you
"We had tried using other take them down as when you
trees, but these last longer than put them up."
anything else," stated Mrs. Bass.
"Ifyou keep them watered, then See Trees - Page 2


Index
Classifieds ............................. 8, 9
Com ics ...................................... 7
Community Events................... 4
Crossword.............................. 8
O pinion................................... 4
Speak Out ........................ ..... 4
Sports.................................. 10
TV ........................................... 9
W weather .......................... 2.... 2

See Page 2 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.


Community Links. Individual Voices.




li l 1 1111111 i
8 16510 00024 5


Baking Powder time again!


Edited by
MaryAnn Morris
INI Florida
Some leaders may remem-
ber this from a couple years
ago. As the Christmas baking
season nears, let's remember
the pioneer days or our grand-
mothers and how it was for
them.
Why baking powder in a his-
tory series? It's the Christmas
season: cookie time! What was
baking like during the pioneer
days in Florida?
Editor's note: During the
Depression, in the 1930s the
federal government sponsored
work to create jobs. The Fed-


Recollections
A series about Florida's
pioneers and history





eral Writer's Project was one of
those works. Within the Feder-
al Writer's Project is an account
of very early life in south Florida
taken by Bertha A. Comstockon
December 16, 1938 from Mary
Brennan Burrell who, together
with her husband John, settled


around 1887 in what was to be-
come Immokalee. The account
here was taken from the origi-
nal story in the Federal Writer's
Project.
The story begins: Mary's
family came to South Carolina
from England and then to Madi-
son County in North Florida be-
fore the Civil War. She was 78
years old when her story was
written in 1938, so she would
have been born in 1850. Her
story itself is now 67 years old.
Mary's husband John
bought land 24 miles from
Fort Myers, on the edge of the
Big Cypress, built a house and
See Baking - Page 2


Courtesy photo/Watkins Community Museum, Kansas
Advertisements for "Spoon in the Can" baking powder manufac-
tured by the Yarnell Brothers from the 1880s or 1890s are amus-
ing by today's standards and show just how long ago it was.


...FREE SERVICE PIT STOP

i* No Charge Nitrogen Fill in Tires

* 16 Point Vehicle Inspection
.. . Jeep Top Off All Fluids .

A NSA863-357-0500U� OKEECHoBEE, FL


Annual tree sale: benefits visually impaired


Okeechobee NewsNictoria Hannon
The annual Lions Club Christmas tree sale helps to raise money to help the visually
impaired. (Left to right) Lions Rosemary Bass, Shannon Stripling, Kenneth Bass and
Dot Kinsaul all help with the Lions Club tree sale on Fri0.y Nov. 23. The sale is open
between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.


Christmas tree sale in park
By Victoria Hannon
Okeechobee News . F






2 Okeechobee News, Monday, November 26, 2007


Project works to revitalize Arbor Day


Submitted by:
Audrey Driggers
In January of 2007, more than
4,700 Fourth Grade Foresters all
across Florida rolled up their
sleeves and planted a tree. The
kids became members of Fourth
Grade Foresters of Florida. The
project goal is to help revitalize a
remarkable idea--observation of
Arbor Day in America's schools.
This goal is accomplished by
bringing the schools, businesses
and citizens of each community
together in an effort to send each


Killers
Continued From Page 1
Collectors benefit from a
Florida system in which inmates
can get money mailed from virtu-
ally anyone. Other states limit the
number of people who can send
money, do background checks
on them and place caps on the
amount of money in prison ac-
counts.
Prison records show five Flor-
ida inmates whose items are be-
ing sold online received at least
$767 from collectors since Janu-
ary 2005. The figure represents
just money from well-known col-
lectors and not family members,
who officials say can serve as
conduits for selling items.
Tod Bohannon said the fig-
ure validates his argument that
inmates are not making big prof-
its on selling items. The Geor-
gia-based collector runs a Web
site, Murderauction.com, where
murderabilia items are offered in
eBay-style auctions.
Bohannon said inmates often
have to pay restitution to victims,
spending the rest on toiletries,
snacks and other small items
bought through prisons.
"The real people that are prof-
iting from murderabilia is the
Department of Corrections," he
said.
Andy Kahan, a victims' advo-
cate in Houston, has been lead-
ing the fight against murderabilia
sites. He said inmates should be
prevented from receiving any
money for items, no matter what
the amount.
"Whether it's one cent or a
couple hundred dollars, it's blood
money," he said.
He said Bohannon's site is one
i_ of five major Web sites where
murderabilia is sold. The sites list
items from some of the nation's
best-known criminals, including


Summit
Continued From Page 1
Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni
made it clear they should not ex-
pect to dictate the contours of Is-
raeli-Palestinian negotiations.,
League members grudgingly
agreed a few days ago to send
their foreign ministers to the con-
ference, meant to renew Israeli-
Palestinian peace talks after a
violent, seven-year lull in negotia-
tions. Most members do not have


Baking
Continued From Page 1
moved the family there. It was
then; in 1887, that Mary first had
baking powder. Until then, all "ri-
sin" breads were made with sour
mrilk, preferably heavy buttermilk
and soda. Heavy buttermilk is
that which had stood after being
churned until it was thick. This
was considered the best for bak-
ing. Milk that was merely "sour"
did not give as good results. Clab-
bered milk could be used, but
the best cooks always preferred
heavy buttermilk. However, the
new baking powder created a
furor for "new baking" among
the pioneer women of the Deep
South.
This new product came in a
package done up in stout outer
wrapping; inside were packs of
two kinds of powder, one three
times as large as the other. One
was soda, the other cream of
tartar. The directions were to
use one teaspoonful of cream
of tartar with two teaspoonfuls
of soda. They had to be mixed
well and were put into the batter
after everything else was mixed;
the oven must be ready and the
pan greased to receive the batter.


Roads
Continued From Page 1
the long, flat road through the Ev-
erglades, could be the most lucra-
tive choice for privatization.
Leading Alligator Alley, which
runs between Naples and Fort
Lauderdale, could bring in $500
million to $1.3 billion depending
on how high the toll could rise ei-
ther to $6.75 or a $10 in the first
decade.
For the Skyway, a more po-


fourth grader home with a tree
of their own to plant and care
for.
The project ,
was created
to provide a
simple and in-
expensive way
for any indi-
vidual, business or organization
with the opportunity to sponsor
the Fourth Grade students at an
elementary school in their com-
munity. For $1.59 per student,
individually packaged 12"-18"


Jeffrey Dahmer, Ted Bundy and
Charles Manson.
A self-portrait of Rolling, who
was executed last year for killing
five college students in Gaines-
ville, was being offered recently
for $350.
But most items come from
lesser-known criminals. Collec-
tors say if a murderer committed
crimes notorious enough to earn
them a nickname in the media,
there's usually a market for their
letters or art.
Glen Rogers was dubbed
the Cross-Country Killer for be-
ing convicted of murders in two
states and suspected of killings
in two others. He's on Florida's
Death Row for stabbing a 34-year-
old mother of -two and leaving
her to die in a motel bathroom
after meeting her at a Tampa bar
in November 1995.
Records show at least three
collectors deposited a total of
$330 in his account from Janu-
ary 2005 to October 2007. At
the same time, items from him
were being sold online such as a
jail canteen order for $15 and a
signed card for $45.
Florida prisons ban inmates
from conducting business be-
hind bars. But the Florida Depart-
ment of Corrections has no active
investigations against inmates
for selling murderabilia, spokes-
Swoman Gretl Plessinger said.
She said the department in-
vestigates complaints, but wasn't
aware of inmates getting money
for items.
"We don't know what we
don't know," she said.
The Florida Attorney Gener-
al's Office is not prosecuting any
cases under a law banning felons
from profiting from their crimes,
said spokeswoman Sandi Copes.
She said the corrections depart-
ment has not provided any infor-
mation showing such incidents
are occurring.
"Our office was assured that


ties with the Jewish state.
Syria had threatened to skip
the three-day meetings in An-
napolis, Md., and Washington, if
they did not address the Golan
Heights, a strategic plateau Israel
captured from Syria in the 1967
Mideast war and later annexed.
But with that issue added to the
agenda, the deputy foreign min-
ister, Faysal Mekdad, will partici-
pate, according to Syria's state-
run news agency.
White House press secre-
tary Dana Perino, however, said


Then the new baking powder was
stirred in quickly and thoroughly,
the batter turned into the pan and
put in the oven.
It took a long time to get used
to baking powder, and most
"cracker" women liked the old
way of soda and heavy buttermilk
the best. Now, a large percentage
of "crackers" use ready-to-mix
four, rather than worry with a
recipe that calls for yeast or bak-
ing powder.
"Most old timers from Georgia
and the backwoods" bought the
ready-to-mix flour for both biscuit
and pancakes," Mary said.
"Southern" recipes are all
founded on old style breads, al-
ways served hot and self-rising
baking seem to be lighter than
where you have to mix your bak-
ing powder yourself. As most but-
termilk nowadays (the 1930s) is
not churned, but made with tab-
lets bought at the drugstore. "We
just use self-rising and ready-mix
as a sure means to have good
bakings" said another Southern
woman.
Remember, this was all in a
fireplace or on a wood-burning
stove... No thermostat!
MaryAnn Morris
may be contacted at
mmorris@newszap.com


litically palatable deal would raise
tolls by 50 percent starting in the
first, fourth and 10th years, rather
than doubling it. In a decade,
Skyway drivers would be paying
$3.50 in cash or $2.50 via Sun-
Pass. More price hikes would fol-
low in the next 40 years.
Rep. Gary Aubuchon, R-Cape
Coral, co-sponsored the legisla-
tion this year that allowed the leas-
ing toll roads. It wouldn't make
sense for companies to raise tolls
so high that drivers would avoid
the roads, he said.


evergreen tree seedlings sealed
in polybags will be sent to the
schools. Each package will in-
clude information about Flor-
ida's Arbor Day, planting and
care instructions, and the name
of the sponsor. There is abso-
lutely no cost to the students,
the teachers, the schools or the
school district.
This year Florida's Arbor Day
falls on Jan. 18, 2008 and Florida
has more than 230,000 Fourth
Graders ready to become Fourth
Grade Foresters. For more in-


this was not in fact happening,"
she said.
But collectors freely admit that
they give money to inmates who
provide art.
William Smyers, a collector
who recently moved to New York
from Florida, said inmates typi-
cally don't ask for outright pay-
ment and often get nothing for
items.
"Most inmates are lucky to see
one person send them anything,"
he said.
Smyers said he has written to
more than 40 inmates, including
Rolling before he was executed.
He became interested in writing
serial killers to learn more about
what leads them to commit hei-
nous crimes.
"It's the fascination of what
makes them tick," he said.
He said he valued items from
Rolling and was hesitant to sell
them, but recent financial prob-
lems led him to offer a letter
and thumbprint online.. He said
he's deposited small amounts of
money in Rolling's account and
those of other inmates.
"There wasn't a financial
agreement that I send them any-
thing," he said.
Deposits are easier to make in
Florida than other states, he said.
In Florida, inmates receive de-
posit slips that they can send to
anyone. Collectors fill out limited
personal information on the slips
and send them with a money
order to the corrections depart-
ment, which puts the money in
inmate accounts.
The deposit slips themselves
are even collectibles: a slip from
Rolling was being sold online last
week. Bohannon said he some-
times puts his Web site address
on the back of slips and distrib-
utes them at horror shows.
Other states have more re-
strictive systems for depositing
money in inmate accounts. In
Alabama, inmates are limited to


the Golan Heights issue is "not
specifically on the agenda." Par-
ticipants can raise various issues,
she said. Rice has said the United
States would give room for other
regional conflicts to be aired at
the conference, including the Go-
lan Heights. "If Syria chooses to
come and wants to speak to its is-
sues ... certainly nobody is going
to rule it out of order," she said
last week.
Nonetheless, the absence of
Foreign Minister Walid al-Moal-
lem appeared to indicate that
Syria was not entirely confident
the conference would address its
concerns over the territory.
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud
Olmert saw the appearance of a
high-ranking Syrian official as a
positive development.
"The meetings are clearly
about the Israeli-Palestinian pro-
cess, but could be the beginning
of new avenues to peace in the
Middle East," said the prime min-
ister's spokeswoman, Miri Eisin.
On the flight to Washington
with Livni, Olmert said Israel
would "favorably" consider ne-
gotiations with Syria if conditions
ripened. Israel first wants Syria to


Trees
Continued From Page 1
The sizes and number of trees
that the Lions Club orders each
year is based on the sales of pre-
vious years and what the mem-
bers feel there will be in the larg-
est demand. So the larger trees
that sold slowly last year were or-
dered in a smaller quantity than
in pervious years.
"We didn't order many of the
really big trees this year," stated
Shannon Stripling, a Lions Club.
member that was helping with
the tree sale. "Only a few in the
12- to 14-foot range and they all
sold out the first day. We had one
customer that requested that we
order a 13- to 14-foot tree for her
next year."
When a person purchases a
tree at the Lions Club tree sale,
volunteers give the bottom of the
tree a fresh cut.
"This opens the tree and al-
lows it to absorb more water,"
-stated Mrs. Bass. "That is really
the most important thing about
caring for the tree -- putting it in
water as soon as you can and
keeping it watered."
The sale of trees is overseen


formation on how to sponsor
fourth graders in your commu-
nity, simply call Sarah Henne at
1-866-390-1428 or email her at
sehenne@neb.rr.com.
Now in the era of global
warming and air pollution, tree
planting is even more important
than ever. Trees take carbon
dioxide (C02) out of the atmo-
sphere to help reduce warming
and clean the air we breathe.
Planting trees is a simple, inex-
pensive and easy way to address
the problem.


eight people who can make de-
posits. Each person must give a
name, date of birth and Social Se-
curity number to an inmate, who
then provides the information to
prison officials for a background
check.
Five states California, Michi-
gan, New Jersey, Texas and Utah
have taken additional steps to
stop murderabilia. The states ban
the sale of the items, but Kahan
said enforcement has been lim-
ited and the constitutionality of
the laws has not been tested.
He said a federal law could
provide the best way to regulate
an Internet trade that crosses
state boundaries. Sen. John
Cornyn, R-Texas, introduced leg-
islation in May to bar federal and
state prisoners from placing al-
most any item in the mail for the
purpose of selling it.
Criminals would face fines
and a minimum of three years in
prison to be served consecutively
with any other sentence.
But the law likely wouldn't
pass constitutional muster, said
Jim Tucker, policy counsel with
the American Civil Liberties
Union's Washington office.
After a publisher offered to
pay "Son of Sam" killer David
Berkowitz to tell his story in 1977,
New York became the first of
about 40 states to prohibit crimi-
nals from profiting from crimes.
But the U.S. Supreme Court ruled
in 1991 that the laws violated the
First Amendment.
The court has not ruled on the
constitutionality of subsequent
laws focused on murderabilia.
Tucker said the efforts might
be well intentioned, but speech
cannot be restricted based on
content.
"That's what the First Amend-'
ment is all about we've got to
protect the good with the bad,"
he said.


break out of Iran's orbit and stop
harboring Palestinian and Leba-
nese militants opposed to Israel's
existence.
Surveying past peace efforts,
tivni suggested that a lack of
Arab backing. contributed to the
failure of the last round of Israeli-
Palestinian talks, which collapsed
-amid bloodshed in early 2001.
The Arab world, she said, "should
stop sitting on the fence."
"There isn't a single Palestin-
ian who can reach an agreement
without Arab support," she said.
"That's one of the lessons we
learned seven years ago." But,
Livni added, "it is not the role
of the Arab world to define the
terms of the negotiations or take
part in them."
Rice planned to host the top
negotiators, Livni and Palestin-
ian envoy Ahmed Qureia, on
Sunday evening in an effort to
finalize preparations, according
to Palestinian negotiator Yasser
Abed Rabbo. He hoped to work
out a joint document, but said
an agreement was not essential
because of assurances received
in the U.S. invitation to the con-
ference.


by Lions Club members, but they
also receive outside help. Accord-
ing to Mrs. Bass the club hired
a few people to help with the
physical work of lifting and mov-
ing the trees in addition to hav-
ing volunteers from Okeechobee
High School.
The Lions Club is a non-profit
organization that raises money to
furnish glasses for children and
adults that show financial need.
They also donate to the Lions
Camp for the Blind and Florida
Lions Seeing Eye Dogs.
"We even provided hearing
aids to one young lady," stated
Mrs. Bass. "We have a residency
requirement of two years, but af-
ter that, if an application is quali-
fied, we try to help."
This is the largest fundraiser
that the Lions Club hosts, with
most of the proceeds staying in
Okeechobee County.
"After expenses, usually the
only money that leaves the coun-
ty goes toward large Lions Club
projects like the camp," Mrs. Bass
added.
These camps provide fun rec-
reational activities for the visually
impaired.


News Briefs

Toy drive set for Dec. 1
The Old Men Riders are sponsoring a Toy Drive for Big Lake Mis-
sions Outreach by having a 125 mile bike ride around the lake on
Dec. 1. They are asking businesses, churches and individuals to
sponsor each participating bike. All bikes are welcome. The money
raised will go to Big Lake Missions Outreach. They will meet in the
movie theatre parking lot at 8 a.m. For information call Gene Roden-
berry at (863) 610-1841 or Big Lake Missions Outreach at (863) 763-
5725.

Holiday Tour of Homes planned
The 2007 Holiday Tour of Homes will take place on Friday, Nov.
30, 2007 and Saturday, Dec. 1, 2007 from 6 pm until 9 p.m. both
evenings. Tickets are now on sale at Raulerson Hospital and at Su-
zie's Hallmark Gift Shop in the Publix Shopping Center. Tickets are
available for only $12 for the self tour and $25 for the bus tour. Bus
tour tickets can be purchased at the hospital. For more information,
please call Bill Casian at 824-2702.

Moose Legionnaires hold annual fundraiser
The Okeechobee Loyal Order of Moose, Legionnaires are again
holding their annual Koeze Nut "Fundraiser" for food baskets for
the less fortunate. Order forms and catalogs may be picked up at the
Stitchin' Post, 620 S. Parrott Ave., see Paul at the Lodge, 159 N.W
36th St., (863) 763-4954 or call Paul Diamond P.G. Fund Chairman at
(863) 467-1484 to order.

VFW #9528 Auxiliary sponsors Toys for Tots
The Ladies Auxiliary V.F.W Post 9528 in Buckhead Ridge is spon-
soring Toys for Tots Program. This will be for our local children;
Buckhead Ridge and Okeechobee. New toys may be dropped off at
V.F.W Post 9528 in Buckhead Ridge. No clothing please. For infor-
mation call Annie at (863) 357-0467.

VFW sponsors Operation Shoebox
Big Lake VFW, Post #10539 is looking for all family members
-- sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, fathers or mothers -- of those
serving in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan or the Persian Gulf. The Post is
sponsoring Operation Shoebox and would like to send packages to
active military personnel from Okeechobee. Please call (863) 697-
2930, or e-mail Cheryl@oacenterprises.com.

Today's Weather


Okeechobee Forecast
Monday: Partly sunny with the high in the mid 80s. The wind will
be from the southeast 10 to 15 mph.
Monday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the lower 60s. The
wind will be from the southeast around 5 mph in the evening be-
coming light.
Extended Forecast
Tuesday: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers. The high
will be in the mid 80s. The wind will be from the south around 5
mph shifting to the southeast in the afternoon. The chance of rain
is 20 percent.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers. The
low will be in the lower 60s. The chance of rain is 20 percent.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers. The
high will be in the lower 80s. The chance of rain is 20 percent.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the lower 60s.
Thursday: Partly cloudy with the high in the lower 80s.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the lower 60s.
Friday: Partly sunny with the high around 80.
Friday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the upper 50s.
Saturday: Partly sunny with the high around 80.'


Lotteries
MIAMI (AP) --Here are the winning numbers selected Saturday in
the Florida Lottery: Cash 3 9-9-0; Play 4 1-7-7-3; Lotto 31-5-42-21-
30-23; Fantasy 5 17-11-23-24-18







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Okeechobee News, Monday, November 26, 2007 3


Gallery draws adoptive parents to foster kids


By Kate Santich
ORLANDO (AP) -- In a gal-
lery filled with photographs, 12-
year-old Tara Wilson found the
boy she wanted to become her
brother.
She saw his picture on a wall,
among those of dozens of other
children, most of them shown
smiling or playing. But this boy
did not smile. His head was tilted
down, his face half in shadow.
"Mom," Tara pleaded, "you
have to pick him."
Lucy Wilson sighed. She had
already seen a picture of a child
she wanted an older boy, the sort
most adoptive families passed
up. She had written down his
name.
But to appease her daughter
she looked at the little boy's pic-
ture.
And in that frozen glimpse of
a child's weary soul, she melted.
The 6-year-old boy is now
Donte Jonathan Wilson, the
fourth child of Lucy and Donald
Wilson of Kissimmee. -He was
the 15th child in central Florida
adopted in this first year of a nov-
el matchmaking program called
Heart Gallery.
Now in more than 40 states,
Heart Gallery is a series of mo-
bile photographic exhibitions
showing the portraits of foster
children, whose faces were once
cloaked in secrecy. Because of
privacy concerns, their only pic-
tures were grim, mug-shotlike
images tucked in caseworkers'
files.
"We wanted people to see
beyond the statistics," said Diane
Granito, who launched the first
Heart Gallery in Santa Fe, N.M., in
2001 to increase adoption rates.
"We wanted them to make that
emotional connection. A really


good photographer can capture
something of a child's spirit."
The longing to be part of a
permanent family is a basic hu-
man need. Children in foster care
crave it, even if they cannot ex-
plain it.
"I don't know why I want to
be adopted," said 14-year-old
Frankie, whose photo recently
joined the Heart Gallery of Metro
Orlando. "I just do."
Frankie is one of about 119,000
American children lingering in
foster care more than 11,000
in Florida alone. Because most
couples prefer babies, Frankie
knows that the older he gets, the
more likely he is to reach his 18th
birthday unadopted, free-falling
into adulthood.
Frankie has three brothers
who were adopted. He used to
visit, but his brothers cried each
time Frankie had to leave. The
adults decided it was too trau-
matic.
He doesn't remember his
birth mother, whose parental
rights were severed six years
ago. Recently she asked whether
she could see him. Child-welfare
workers agreed the two could
talk by phone.
"How do you feel about that?"
his caseworker asked.
Frankie looks up, expression-
less. "Happy," he said.
It is an awkward dance, this
whole matching and adoption
process. Some worry that the
children in Heart Galleries will
feel even worse about them-
selves if no one responds to their
picture.
"Children in foster care have
been through enough without
feeling like they have to sell them-
selves," said Rita Soronen, execu-
tive director of the Dave Thomas
Foundation for Adoption.


But proponents say the hun-
dreds of Heart Gallery adoptions
nationwide justify the program
and that any path toward find-
ing a permanent family is fraught
with potential rejection.
"What's the flip side?" said
Gregory Kurth, chief execu-
tive officer of Family Services of
Metro Orlando, the nonprofit
that launched the Heart Gallery
in Orange and Osceola counties.
"Are we just going to forget about
them and let them languish in
foster care?"
All foster children available for
adoption are asked whether they
want to participate. Locally, 80
kids said yes.
Across the nation, the por-
traits are taken by professional
photographers who donate
their time including, in Orlando,
award-winning photographers
Jeff and Kathleen Hawkins, who
adopted a child of their own five
years ago.
And most programs now have
companion Web sites showing
the photos.
That's how Michele and Tom
Collins in Jeffersonville, Pa.,
came to adopt 12-year-old Tif-
fany from Florida.
"My husband and I are older,
and we didn't want a baby or a
toddler," said Michele Collins,
47. "We knew a lot of these
kids go through things we can't
even imagine. But there was
just something in the way Jeff
Hawkins captured Tiffany. ... It's
what we've come to know as the
real essence of her."
The Kodak moments are only
one slice of reality, of course. No
one suggests that adopting a fos-


ter child is easy. There is pent-up
anger, frustration, grief.
There is also the chance to
witness a metamorphosis.
Six-year-old Donte had been
left in the state's custody at age
2 and shuttled to 13 homes in the
ensuing three years. He'd never
had a birthday cake or ridden a
bicycle. He had been adopted
once before only to return to the
foster system when his new mom
was arrested for abusing him.
After a couple of weeks with
the Wilson family, Donte started
to have tantrums. The rage was
leaking out.
"You have to have a. lot of
patience," said Donald Wilson a
surgical nurse like his wife. "You
let them go through their emo-
tions, but you let them know their
behavior is not acceptable."
Though Donte joined the
family for good only in August,
he and his father are already so
close that these days Donald sim-
ply has to look at his son and say,
"You let me down. You can't act
that way." Immediately the child
straightens up.
Tara, the girl who picked him,
recently gave Donte a ratty but
well-loved doll she had dragged
with her everywhere since she
was 1. She put boy clothes on it,
and the family announced that it
should belong to the youngest
in the family. They changed its
name from Nia to Nio.
Donte, whose troubled sleep
had been fractured by night-
mares, took Nio with him to bed
and held it by his side.
"And you sleep good now,
right?" his new mom asked him.
Donte nod ded, grinning.


By Ben Evans
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Every
region of the country has its own
piece of Americana that locals
brag about to visitors.
Increasingly, they are asking
Congress to help spread the word
through a little-known federal
program that designates National
Heritage Areas.
After approving just two
dozen such areas since the early
1980s, Congress adopted 10 last
year. The House signed off on six
more last month, and the wait list
is growing.
Illinois wants recognition for
Abraham Lincoln's early stomp-
ing grounds; New York is bidding
for the area around Niagara Falls.
Alabama is pushing a region
along the Tennessee River where
the Tennessee Valley Author-
ity was born and where "Father
of the Blues" W.C. Handy first
picked a guitar.
Yet for the first time, the pro-
gram is facing resistance on Capi-
tol Hill from budget hawks and
property-rights advocates. The
National Park Service has called
for a freeze on new designations
until lawmakers approve more
formal guidelines for the pro-
gram.
"This is a relatively new model
for conservation," said John Cos-
grove, executive director of the
Alliance of National Heritage Ar-
eas. "More and more community
leaders want to apply it to their
own regional stories."
Modeled after European prac-
tices, heritage areas are billed as a
cost-effective, locally driven alter-
native to government-managed
historic sites. The government
does not buy property, impose
land restrictions or provide staff.
In fact, the heritage program is
expanding in part because little
money is available for new pub-
licly owned park facilities.
Instead, grass-roots groups
'are encouraged to preserve ge-
ography and history within liv-
able communities. A heritage
designation comes with a federal
grant of up to $1 million a year, to
'be matched with local money.
' The local groups have flex-
ibility in managing the areas, and
the 37 existing sites have taken
,various approaches since the first
was named in 1984, designating
a historic canal linking the Great
Lakes and the Illinois River.
While tourism is not necessar-
ily the goal, drawing visitors is a
major incentive, and the heritage
tag has helped turn around many
local economies. A 2004 Michi-
gan State University study found
'that visitors to a heritage area
-celebrating southeast Michigan's
'auto industry spent $123 million
and helped create some 2,100
*jobs.
"The reason for the increased
-demand is that they're success-
ful," said Marge Darby, who has
helped lead a bid for a "Freedom's
Way" heritage area highlighting
early American history in Mas-
sachusetts and New Hampshire.


"They're not just good at help-
ing communities develop their
heritage. They also happen to be
economically beneficial."
With the popularity of the
program growing, critics have
emerged.
"This is backdoor federal
land-use planning," said Ann
Corcoran, who is fighting a "Hal-
lowed Ground" Civil War heritage
designation, around her western
Maryland farm. "Once this is in
place, there will be pressure on
the local governments to plan
their land use around the theme
of heritage preservation."
More than 120 lawmakers
voted against the recent House
bill approving the "Hallowed
Ground" and "Freedom's Way"
areas, as well as others in Illinois,
New York, Alabama and Arizona.
The designations, which await
Senate approval, drew opposition
from groups such as the Ameri-
can Conservative Union and the
Property Rights Alliance.
Along with concerns about
land restrictions, critics say the
federal government has no busi-
ness funding local conservation.
"I believe in preservation. I just
believe in doing it privately," said
Corcoran, who once erected plas-
tic pink flamingos on her farm to
make the point that landowners
are entitled to bad taste. "Why
should some poor schmuck
who's never going to visit an area
pay taxes so that some elitist can
go on a historic tour?"
But with a budget of about
$13 million, heritage areas cost a
fraction of what publicly owned
facilities cost. Although many
heritage area campaigns have
cited threats from development,
supporters argue that the pro-
gram does not lead to land-use
restrictions. A 2004 report from
independent auditors at what is
now the Government Account-
ability Office backed their claim,
saying researchers found no evi-
dence that heritage designations
had directly affected private prop-
erty.
Darby likened the program
to drawing an imaginary line
around an area and marking it as
important.
"The community is the class-
room," she said. "You say to chil-
dren: 'Here's where it happened,
right here. Here's a bullet hole in
this house, and it was a British
bullet, and the man who lived in
this house was shot right here.'"
The Park Service so far has
failed to persuade Congress to
establish formal criteria for heri-
tage areas. As a result, the agency
has withheld its support for new
designations. But officials say
the service strongly supports the
overall program, particularly with
strained budgets for public facili-
ties.
"Getting a park unit is pretty
difficult," said Alma Ripps, a leg-
islative affairs specialist for the
agency. "Heritage areas are less
expensive and are maybe a little
easier, although it's still a very
high standard. ... There has to be
very strong local interest."


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Communities seek National

Heritage Designation Areas


UKeecnooee News/Pete Gawda

A Stroll in the Park
Okeechobee High School Band once again sponsors the
traditional giant Christmas cards in Flagler Park.


Okeechobee News/Chauna Aguilar
Smokey Bear visits NES
Mrs. Hilyer's first grade reading group enjoyed a meet and greet with Smokey Bear on Tuesday, Nov. 20, due to their
participation last year in the fire prevention program. Smokey Bear was held up last year due to the numerous fires that
occurred.




A 6p o







4 OPINION


Okeechobee News, Monday, November 26, 2007


Speak Out
Have an opinion or a question about a public issue? Post
it anytime at the Okeechobee issues forum at http://www.
newszapforums.com/forum58. It is a hometown forum so
visit the page as often as you would like and share your com-
ments (but no personal attacks or profanities, please). You
can also make a comment by calling our Speak Out 24-hour
opinion line at (863) 467-2033, fax (863) 763-5901 or sending
e-mail to okeenews@newszap.com. You can also mail sub-
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Go to newszap.com, click on your community and then on "community
forums and links."


Community Events

Civil War re-enactment planned
The seventh annual Civil War re-enactment about the raid on
Fort Pierce will be held Dec. 1 & 2 at the Savannas Recreation Area,
1400 E. Midway Road, in Fort Pierce. On Saturday, camps will be
open to the public from 9 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. and battles will be
held throughout the day with the main battle being staged at 2 p.m.
On Sunday, camps will be open to the public from 9 a.m. until 3
p.m., with the main battle starting at 1 p.m. Other activities include
living history demonstrations, Sutler's Row, Civil War camps, Ladies
Tea, blacksmith and more. Admittance costs are $3 for adults and
$1 for children. Kids under the age of 6 will be admitted free. For
information: contact Anita Errico-Smith at (772) 465-7608, or by e-
mail at civilwargal@cs.com; or, Lou Rausch at (772) 359-6541, or,
Greyriderl863@aol.com. All proceeds from the event will go to the
St. Lucie County Sheriff's Explorer Post #400.

11th annual fashion show and luncheon
Tickets are now available for the 11th Annual Fashion Show and
Luncheon sponsored by Okeechobee Chapter No. 128, Order of
the Eastern Star. The event will be held Saturday, Dec. 1, at the KOA
Resort. The event features a delicious luncheon and our spectacular
Tea Cup Auction with an abundance of beautiful gifts and gift bas-
kets to be won. The doors will open at 11 a.m. and lunch will be
served at 11:45 a.m. Tickets are $10 per person. No tickets will be
sold at the door. This is the holiday event of the season you won't
want to miss so reserve your ticket by calling our Ticket Chairman,
Dolores Anchors at (863) 467-1392 or any member of Okeechobee
Chapter No. 128.

Red Cross class dates slated
The Okeechobee American Red Cross will be offering the fol-
lowing classes in December at their Branch office: Thursday, Dec.
6 - First Aid Basics at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 12 - Infant/Child CPR
at 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13 - Adult CPR at 6 p.m. To register or for
more information call (863) 763-2488.

Church holds cookie sale
The Okeechobee Presbyterian church, 312 N. Parrott Ave., will
hold its annual Christmas cookie sale on Dec. 8, from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. in the fellowship Hall. For more information contact Anne
Brough (863) 763-4228 or Betsy Cheney (863) 357-0465.

Annual golf tournament planned
Communities In Schools/Police Athletic League will sponsor their
eighth annual golf tournament on Saturday, Dec. 1. The event will
be held at the Okeechobee Golf & Country Club and will get under
way at 8 a.m. with a shotgun start. The entry fee is $45 per person
or $180 per team. There will be awards and prizes given to teams
finishing first, eighth and next to last. There will also be a chicken
and barbecue ribs lunch. Hole and tee sponsorships are still avail-
able. For information, call (863) 462-5863 or (863) 697-6541

Amateur Radio club has guest speaker
The Okeechobee Amateur Radio Club will be hosting a talk by
Dennis Decker of the Melbourne office of the National Weather Ser-
vice, after the regular monthly meeting. His topic will be "Storm-
Based Warnings and their impact on SKYWARN." The meeting
will be at 7 p.m. on Dec. 3 at the American Red Cross Office, 323
N. Parrott Ave. Okeechobee. Anyone who is interested in weather
warnings is welcome to attend. For information Call Harry Robbins
at (863) 467-7454.

VFW sponsors Operation Shoebox
Big Lake VFW, Post #10539 is looking for all family members
-- sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, fathers or mothers -- of those
serving in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan or the Persian Gulf. The Post is
sponsoring Operation Shoebox and would like to send packages to
active military personnel from Okeechobee. Please call (863) 697-
2930, or e-mail Cheryl@oacenterprises.com.



Okeechobee News

Our Purpose...
The Okeechobee News is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida.
Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pur-
sue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no
dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on profit margins below
industry standards. All after-tax surpluses ate reinvested in Independent's
mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First
Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the community's deliber-
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We Pledge ...
* To operate this newspaper as a
public trust
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better place to live and work,
through our dedication to consci-
entious journalism.
* To provide the information citizens
need to make their own intelligent
decisions about public issues.
* To report the news with honesty,
accuracy, purposeful neutrality,
faimess, objectivity, fearlessness
and compassion. 4
* To use our opinion pages to facili-
tate community debate, not to
dominate it with our own opinions.
* To disclose our own conflicts of
interest or potential conflicts to our
readers.
* To correct our errors and to give
each correction to the prominence
it deserves.
* To provide a right to reply to those
we write about.
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respect and compassion.


Advertising Director: Judy Kasten

News Editor: Eric Kopp

National Advertising: Joy Parrish

Circulation Manager: Janet Madray

Independent Newspapers, Inc.
* Joe Smyth, Chairman.
* Ed Dulin, President
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Newspaper Operations
* Katrina Elsken, Executive
Editor
:MEMBER
OF: V1.oki



� Okeechobee News 2007
For More Information See
At Your Service On Page 2


Okeechobee News/File photo

From the photo archives
While cleaning out the old photography darkroom at the
Okeechobee News office, staffers came across a num-
ber of old photos. Some of these photos were taken by
staffers; others were apparently brought in by community
members. No information is available-with the photos, but
readers can share any information they might have. Some
of these have been posted at http://photos.newszap.com/
pages/gallery.php?gallery=310113. Or go online to www.
newszap.com, click on "Okeechobee," click on "Florida
photos," and then click on "Okee News Archives." To com-
ment on a photo, open the photo and post your comments
below.



Upcoming Events

Monday
A.A. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W. Second St. This will be an open meet-
ing.
Foster Parent Orientation will be hosted by the Hibiscus
Children's Center on the last Monday of every month from 6 until 7
p.m. The orientation is for those interested in fostering or adopting
in Okeechobee County. This meeting requires no RSVP and is a
question/answer forum. It will be at the IRCC Okeechobee Cam-
pus, 2229 N.W. Ninth Ave. For information, call the Foster Care Pro-
gram at 1-(800) 403-9311.
Narcotics Anonymous meets at 7 p.m. for open discussion at
the Just for Today club, 2303 S. Hwy 441, Suite K. For information
call (863) 634-4780.
Okeechobee Senior Singers meet at 9:30 a.m. at the
Okeechobee Presbyterian Church, 312 North Parrott Ave. Everyone
who enjoys singing is invited. For information or to schedule an
appearance for your organization or group, contact Marge Skinner
at (863) 532-0449.
Artful Appliquers is a recently formed chapter in Okeechobee.
This chapter meets at the Turtle Cove Clubhouse, 10 Linda Road,
Okeechobee on Mondays from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Turn left at the
Moose lodge and go around the curve just past the church. Bring a
lunch and join us for a fun day of applique. Everyone is welcome.
For more information please contact Karen Graves at (863) 763-
6952.
Nicotine Anonymous (NICA)is starting a new club with meet-
ings to be held at the Just For Today club, 2303 U.S. Hwy 441 S.E.,
Suite K, on Mondays from 8:30 until 9:30 p.m. For information, call
Steve Condit Sr. at (863) 801-3110.
Tuesday
Rotary Club 'of Okeechobee meets each Tuesday at noon
at Golden Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. The meetings are
open to the public. For information, contact Chad Rucks at (863)
763-8999.
New AA Meeting in Basinger: There is now an AA meeting in
Basinger on Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. in the Basinger Christian Breth-
ren Church on 700-A, north off U.S. 98. Beginners are welcome.
Alanon meeting will be held at the Church of Our Savior, 200
N.W. Third St., at 8.p.m.
A.A. Closed discussion meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the Church
of Our Savior, 200 N.W. Third St.
Grief and Loss Support Group meets every Tuesday at
10 a.m. at the Hospice Building located at 411 S.E. Fourth St. in
Okeechobee. Everyone is welcome. For information, contact Enid
Boutrin at (863) 467-2321.
Family History Center meets from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. at
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 310 S.W. Sixth St.
Anyone interested in finding who your ancestors are is welcome
to attend. There is Census, IGI (International Genealogical Index),
Social Security Death Index and military information available. For
information, call Robert Massey at (863) 763-6510.
Widows and Widowers support group meets at 8:30 a.m. at
the Clock Restaurant, 1111 S. Parrott Ave., for breakfast. For infor-
mation, call (863) 467-9055.
Gospel Sing every Tuesday beginning at 7 p.m. The public is
invited to participate with vocal and/or instrumental music. For in-
formation, contact Douglas Chiropractic Center at (863) 763-4320.
The Gathering Church Overcomers Group meets at 7:30
p.m. in the fellowship hall, 1735 S.W. 24th Ave. This is a men's only
meeting. For information, call Earl at (863) 763-0139.
Bible study at the Living Word of Faith Church, 1902 S. Parrott
Ave., at 7 p.m. Informal and informative discussions bring many
Bible truths to life. Everyone is invited.
Community Country Gospel will meet at 7 p.m. at the church
next to Douglas Clinic on North Park St. Any individual or group
that enjoys old time gospel music is invited to participate. For infor-
mation, contact Dr. Edward Douglas at (863) 763-4320.
AA. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. This will be an open meet-
ing.
Wednesday
Martha's House support groups meet each Wednesday. Span-
ish groups meet from 7 until 8 p.m. at the Okeechobee Christian
Church, 3055 S.E. 18th Terrace. Ana Romero is the group facilitator.
Another group meets in the Okeechobee County Health Depart-
ment, 1798 N.W Ninth Ave., from 5 until 6 p.m. with Irene Luck as
the group facilitator. There is another meeting from 6 until 7 p.m.
with Shirlean Graham as the facilitator. For information, call (863)
763-2893.}
AA. meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at Sacred Heart Catholic
Church, 701 S.W. Sixth St. It will be a closed discussion.
NA. meeting at 8 p.m. at the Just For Today Club of Okeechobee,
2303 Parrott Ave., The Lakes Shops Suite K. For information call
(863) 634-4780.
Thursday
AA. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United


Methodist Church, 200 N.W. Second St. This will be an open meet-
ing.
Tantie Quilters meets every Thursday from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m.
at the Historical Society Museum on U.S. 98 N. For information call
Margaret at (863) 467-8020, or Belinda at (863) 357-0166.
AA. Closed big book meeting from 8 p.m. until 9 p.m. at Church
of Our Savior, 200 N.W Third St.
Family History Center meets from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. at
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 310 S.W Sixth St.
Anyone interested in finding who your ancestors are is welcome
to attend. There is Census, IGI (International Genealogical Index),
Social Security Death Index and military information available. For
information, call Robert Massey at (863) 763-6510.
Christian Fellowship Prayer group meets at 9:30 a.m. in the
fellowship hall at 412 N.W Sixth St. For information, call (863) 763-
5996.


Community Events

Parenting classes offered
Free parenting classes are held every Monday from 7 until 8 p.m.
at New Endeavor High School. Classes include topics about chil-
dren from birth to teens. For information or to have an interpreter
available call Lori Jaquith at (863) 697-6320 or (863) 462-5000, ext.
282.

Festival of Trees scheduled
Hospice of Okeechobee will again sponsor the Festival of Trees.
The event features a display of 100 ornately decorated trees and
other Christmas items. Admission to the Festival of Trees and The
Country Store is free. Hours are 9 a.m. until 7 p.m. weekdays, and'
noon until 5 p.m. on the weekends. The Festival of Trees will be
running from Monday, Nov. 26, until Sunday, Dec. 2. It is held at
the Blue Volunteer Building next to The Hamrick Home, 411 S.E.,
Fourth St. For information, contact Cathy at (863) 467-2321 or (863)
697-1995.

Garden Club to hold meeting
Are you a veggie grower or are flowers your thing? Just learning
or an old hand? Need to learn more or want to share ideas or help
others? This is the club for you. This month Dan Culbert will show
you the gardens of Costa Rica on Monday, Nov. 26 at 6 p.m. at The
Okeechobee County Extension Office, 458 U.S. 98. For informa-
tion, call (863) 763-6469.

Mighty Sprouts to meet
The 4-H Mighty Sprouts meeting for the month of November -
will be on Monday, Nov. 26, at the County Extension Office from 5
until 7 p.m. There will be no meeting on Nov. 12 due to the holiday.
The class will be making beautiful magnolia blossom centerpieces
for their holiday tables. If you have any questions about the Mighty
Sprouts club, please call the extension office at (863)763-6469.

Orchid club host guest speaker
The Okeechobee Orchid Club will host guest speaker, Gary
Bailey, on Monday, Nov. 26, at 7 p.m. at the Extension Office, 458 -
U.S. 98 N. Mr. Bailey has been growing orchids for twelve years,
assisting commercial growers in many of the big shows. He will
speak on the best way to care for your orchid when you first bring it
home. If you have a plant that is not doing well, bring it to the meet-
ing and Mr. Bailey will help you analyze your orchid's problem. For
information, please call the extension office at (863) 763-6469.

Mainstreet holds monthly mixer
Okeechobee Main Street's November Mixer will be hosted by
Syble's Flowers and Gifts on Tuesday Nov. 27 from 5 until 7 p.m.
The Mixer will feature the mega 50/50, door prizes and light re-
freshments. The public is invited. Join us at Syble's located at 119
South Parrott Ave. For more information, contact Program Manager ,
Karen Hanawalt at (863) 357-MAIN (6246).

Carrie Sue Ayvar will be at Library
Carrie Sue Ayvar, Storyteller and Chautauqua Scholar, will por-
tray, "Doc Anner: Petticoat Doctor of the Everglades, 1876-1959" at
the Okeechobee County Library on Friday, Nov. 30 at 7 p.m. This
program is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council and is
free and open to the public. The Okeechobee Historical Society will
provide old-fashioned refreshments following the program.

Toy drive for Big Lake Missions Outreach
The Old Men Riders are sponsoring a Toy Drive for Big Lake
Missions Outreach by having a 125 mile bike ride around the lake
on Dec. 1. and is asking businesses, churches and individuals to
sponsor each participating bike. All bikes are welcome. The mon-
ey raised will go to Big Lake Missions Outreach. We will meet in
the movie theatre parking lot at 8 a.m. For information, call Gene
Rodenberry at (863) 610-1841 or Big Lake Missions Outreach at
(863) 763-5725.

Hospice offers lunch to medical staff
Hospice of Okeechobee will be serving lunch to all medical staff
in Okeechobee on Thursday Nov. 29, from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. The
event is free and lunch will be served at the Festival of Trees at the
Blue Volunteer Building next to The Hamrick Home on 411 S.E.
Fourth St. Your Hometown Hospice staff would like to thank you for
all that you do to help those in need of medical care in our commu-
nity. To RSVP, contact Cathy at (863) 467-2321 or (863) 697-1995.

Hospice plans yard sale
Hospice will have a special week-long yard sale from Monday,
Nov. 26, until Friday, Nov. 30, from 9 a.m. until noon. In addition,
you will have the opportunity to view the beautiful Christmas trees .-
that are part of the Festival of Trees. Admission to the Festival of
Trees is free. The yard sale will be held outdoors near the Blue Vol- .
unteer Building next to Hospice of Okeechobee, 411 S.E. Fourth
St. For information, contact Cathy at (863) 467-2321 or (863) 697-
1995.

Heritage Financial offers homebuyers classes
A first-time Homebuyer Education class is being offered on Nov.
28 from 6 until 7 p.m. at Heritage Financial Services located at 309
S.W. Park St. Okeechobee. Please call to reserve your seat at (863)
467-8899. The class will cover the residential application process
and credit guidelines needed to obtain loan approval. A fee of $25
will be charged to cover the prequalification and credit report cost.

Coffee Klatch scheduled
The Okeechobee Chamber of Commerce Coffee Klatch will be ;'
Nov. 29 at 8 a.m. at Soaps & Scents, 118 S.E. Park St. (across from- -
the Chamber of Commerce). Refreshments will be provided. For
information, call (863) 357-2368.

Library book club meets
Friends of the Okeechobee Library Book Club will meet at 7
p.m. in the Library Board room on the following dates to discuss '
the title for the month. This meeting is open and free to the public. .
Meetings and topics are as follows: Thursday, Nov. 29, "The Glass,
Castle, by Jeanette Wall," and Thursday, Dec. 20, "The Humming-
bird's Daughter," by Luis Alberto Urrea. The group will meet at '
6:30 for our annual Christmas tea with the discussion at 7 p.m. on"
Thursday, Jan. 24, "Mademoiselle Benoir," by Christine Conrad. For "'
information call Jan Fehrman at (863) 357-9980.

4-H plans yard sale
The Okeechobee 4-H County Council will be holding a fundrais-
er yard sale on Saturday, Dec 1. The yard sale will be in the parking
lot of Mims Veterinary Hospital at 275 S.W 32nd St., Okeechobee.
The sale will run from 8 a.m. until noon.


Free Parenting classes offered
FreIe I',' mi; classes are held every Monday from 7 p.m. until
8 p.m. at New Endeavor High School. Classes include topics about,
Sluiln ii from birth to teens. For more information or to have an
interpreter available call Lori Jaquith at (863) 697-6320 or (863)
462 5000 ext. 282.

Healthy Start meeting slated
The board of directors of the Okeechobee Healthy Start Coali-
tion will meet Wednesday, Dec. 5, at 11:30 a.m. as part of the board
workshop/meeting. For information, call executive director Kay Be-
gin at (863) 462-5877.





I


y










Web auctions helps fuel growth in live auction industry


By Vicki Smith
Associated Press Writer
WAYNESBURG, Pa. (AP) -- His
chanting is rhythmic and rapid, a
staccato string of numbers that
quickly grows hypnotic as auc-
tioneer Kevin Teets scans the
audience, eyes darting between
buyers on opposite sides of the
room.
Perched in the front row is
Dave Kauffman, who has come
220 miles from Marysville, Ohio,
in search of vintage, remote-con-
trol model airplanes and acces-
sories.
Within hours, Kauffman has
so many planes and parts, to be
resold at flea markets and online,
that it takes five trips to load his
hatchback at the Greene County
Fairgrounds.
"I can tell from the first sale if
it's going to be a good night," he
said. "Tonight was a very good
night."
Although auctioneers initially
considered the Internet a threat,
its growth and development of
searchable Web sites like Auc-
tionZip have contributed to a
boom in the live-auction indus-
try, with one-time rivals forming
partnerships that produce bigger
audiences for sellers, often by si-
mulcasting live auctions on the
Web.


Credit crisis
rocks takeovers
By Rachel Beck
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) --_ When a
buyout shop chooses to pay $100
million ,just to walk away from
a committed deal, that tells you
how deep today's financial crisis
is running.
Private-equity firm Cerberus
Capital Management wants out
of its $4 billion offer for United
Rentals Inc., which just days ago
thought it was about to be bought
for $34.50 a share.
Cerberus isn't even trying to
fight paying the termination fee
by blaming deteriorating credit
conditions for its change of heart.
Instead, Cerberus, simply says; it.
wasn't "prepared", to continue
with the acquisition, and will pay
the penalty to end the deal.
Not business-as-usual for
dealmaking. Private-equity firms
are famous for frugality - they
don't like overpaying for their tar-
gets and are intently focused on
capturing as much profits as they
can.
Cerberus apparently feels
that the $100 million spent now,
while giving it nothing in return,
could save it from losing at least
as much later should that invest-
ment not go as expected.
What's particularly shocking
is that Cerberus seems willing to
risk its reputation to do this after
working hard to build itself into
a top-tier dealmaker with bold
acquisitions that included the
takeover of troubled automaker
Chrysler.
Times are desperate. Tight-
ening lending conditions and a
weak economy are proving to be
a toxic cocktail for dealmakers,
forcing them to go to extremes to
exit certain acquisitions.
That means investors, who
months ago were worried that
takeover premiums for their
shares would not being high


AP photo/Gene J. Puskar
Auctioneer Kevin Teets, of Farimont, W.Va., with Joe R. Pyle
Auctions of Mount Morris, Pa., holds an auction Nov. 2, in
Waynesburg, Pa. The volume of goods and services sold at
live auctions totaled $257 billion in 2006, a surge of 7 percent


over 2005
Buyers emboldened by suc-
cess on eBay and other sites are
seeking live sales in search of


lower prices and the thrill of com-
peting in person.
Sales of goods and services at


enough, should now be fretting
over whether they will get paid
at all since plenty of deals won't
likely get done.
United Rental's investors
didn't see this situation coming.
The stock was trading just below
the $34.50 offer price for the first
two weeks of November, indicat-
ing that shareholders believed the
Cerberus takeover was about to
close. United Rental's business
has been considered healthy, and
it's quarterly earnings beat ana-
lysts' expectations.
But on Nov. 14, the news hit
that the takeover was in jeopardy.
Cerberus sent a letter to the Green-
wich, Conn.-based equipment
rental company that offered two
options: Renegotiate the terms of
the deal or the private-equity firm
would opt out and pay the $100
million fee to United Rentals.
Cerberus chose not to cite
a "material adverse change,"
or MAC, for its change of mind.
That's the ploy some buyout
shops have used to try to walk
away from deals without paying a
breakup fee.
United Rental's shares plunged
more than 30 percent to about
$23 a piece on the news and now
trade slightly below that.
In recent days, the mudsling-
ing has intensified between the
sides. United Rental filed a law-
suit on Monday, claiming that
Cerberus is directly violating the
deal agreement and acting in bad
faith by trying to lower the price.
Cerberus responded that it was
within its right to withdraw from
the buyout and pay the liability
capped at $100 million.
This highlights one broken
deal. Many more are also unrav-
eling due to the credit market
turmoil, including the acquisition
of shoe retailer Genesco and the
buyout of student-loan lender Sal-
lie Mae. Cerberus last month cited
the poor debt-market environ-
ment when it withdrew a $6.2 bil-
lion offer for Affiliated Computer
Services.


Justices to decide if


401(k) plan can be sued


By Pete Yost
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) -- James
LaRue says he lost $150,000 when
his instructions to his employer
on where to invest money in his
retirement plan were ignored.
Now the Supreme Court will
decide whether a federal pen-
sion-protection law gives LaRue
the right to sue to recover his loss-
es. Arguments in the case were
scheduled for Monday.
LaRue, who used to work at
a management consulting firm,
is among the 42 million work-
ers who contributed to a 401(k)
retirement plan, one of 250,000
across the country. At issue in
LaRue's case are the limits to
lawsuits under the Employee
Retirement Income Security Act.
It regulates private-sector retire-
ment plans holding over $5.5 tril-
lion in assets, including $2 trillion
in 401(k) plans.
Unlike traditional pension
plans, participants in 401 (k) plans
do not know how much money
they will receive in retirement. It
depends on how well their cho-
sen investments have performed.
ERISA was designed to safe-

-f


guard pension fund money from
misappropriation.
It is less clear what action an
individual account holder can
take against a retirement plan
when the conduct at issue is less
than criminal.
LaRue says that in 2000 and
2001 he requested changes in his
investment allocations in mutual
funds that were available to par-
ticipants in his company's 401 (k)
plan. He says the requests were
not honored.
"I wanted to sell stocks and
move to cash because I thought
the market would head down. I
was right," LaRue said in a tele-
phone interview.
LaRue sued in 2004, saying he
had tried to avoid going to court
and instead sought to reach a
settlement with his former em-
ployers. He was unsuccessful, as
it turned out.
Business groups assign a dif-
ferent motive to the delay in fil-
ing the second suit, saying LaRue
was waiting to see how the mar-
ket performed. If the value of his
investment went up, he made
money. If it went down, he would
recover his losses in court.


live auctions totaled $257 billion
in 2006, a surge of 7 percent over
2005.
A study for the Kansas-based
National Auctioneers Associa-
tion found residential real estate
auctions have grown 39 percent
since 2003, agricultural real es-
tate grew 33 percent, and sales of
commercial and industrial prop-
erty surged 27 percent. Car auc-
tions increased by 10.5 percent
and charity auctions rose 16.5
percent.
"I don't know where the auc-
tion industry would be without
the Internet," said Teets, of Fair-
mont, W.Va. He turned profes-
sional three years ago and made
the top 12 at the 2007 bid-calling
world championships in San Di-
ego.
"The Internet has educated
the buyers. It's educated the
sellers. It's opened a lot of these
small sales up," said Teets, 31,
who works for Joe R. Pyle Auc-
tions of Mount Morris, Pa.
Earlier this year, the 6,000-
member National Auctioneers
Association teamed up with
Gemstar-TV Guide International
to launch Auction Network,
which produces Webcasts of
auctions.
"The Internet has been the
greatest thing that ever happened


CPSC delivers the ABC's of


As gift-givers shop for that
perfect toy this holiday season,
the U.S. Consumer Product
Safety Commission (CPSC) is
emphasizing the importance of
shopping safely. Knowing your
ABC's of toy safety will make for
happy holidays: (A) awareness,
and knowing the (B) benefits,
for (C) consumers - (Awareness
Benefits Consumers).
Awareness is not only know-
ing there are a CPSC and what
the agency does to protect con-
sumers but also being aware of
what poses the greatest risks.
The leading causes of toy-related
fatalities include choking and as-
piration of toy parts.
The increased scrutiny of toys
and the CPSC has led to B, or
benefits, to consumers. CPSC has
increased the agency's inspec-
tions of toys and is taking the ac-
tion needed to remove violative
products from the marketplace.


More companies are testing their
products and reporting possible
safety problems.
"CPSC recalled 61 toys involv-
ing more than 25 million product
units in 2007, underscoring CP-
SC's daily commitment to keep-
ing consumers safe 365 days a
year," said Acting CPSC Chair-
man Nancy Nord. "Toys today
are undergoing more inspection
and more intense scrutiny than
ever before."
Finally C, consumers should
stay informed and be aware of
recalls by signing up to receive
direct e-mail notification of re-
calls at www.cpsc.gov. CPSC has
launched a "Drive to 1 Million"
to sign up at least 1 million con-
sumers to receive this direct no-
tification.
Consumers can also be more
aware by shopping with CPSC's
Top Safe Shopping Tips for this
year:


* Ride-on Toys - Riding toys,
skateboards and in-line skates
go fast and falls could be deadly.
Helmets and safety gear should
be sized to fit.
* Small Parts - For children
younger than age three, avoid
toys with small parts, which can
cause choking.
* Magnets - For children un-
der age six, avoid building sets
with small magnets. If magnets
or pieces with magnets are swal-
lowed, serious injuries and/or
death can occur.
* Projectile Toys - Projectile
toys such as air rockets, darts and
sling shots are for older children.
Improper use of these toys can
result in serious eye injuries.
* Chargers and Adapters
- Charging batteries should be
supervised by adults. Chargers
and adapters can pose thermal
burn hazards to children.
To choose appropriate toys


to the auction industry," said NAA
president Tommy Williams, an
Oklahoma real estate auctioneer.
"It made us reinvent ourselves."
Auctioneers were slow to em-
brace the Internet because it was
considered competition, said Ina
Steiner of Natick, Mass., editor of
AuctionBytes, a trade publication
for online merchants.
But now, even rural residents
often have sufficient Web service
to compete and sellers realize
that customers have choices far
beyond eBay. There are specialty
sites like Bid4Assets for real es-
tate and IronPlanet for construc-
tion equipment.
"General consumers, they go
to sites like eBay," Steiner said.
"But they might go to Google.
Google's the great equalizer. If an
auction site is savvy and has a list-
ing optimized for Google, people
can find them."
The intersection of live and
virtual auctions promises nearly
limitless opportunity, and a few
companies have already found
niches by pairing traditional
auction houses with the online
world.
Julian Ellison moved from
London to New York in 1999 to
launch LiveAuctioneers, a We-
bcasting project. In 2002, he
persuaded San Francisco-based


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Standard monthly service fee, option fees, taxes and surcharges will apply and existing EMBARQM Wireless customers may not downgrade their wireless plans for December usage. New EMBARQM Wireless customers
(wireless activation after 1114107): Must have a qualifying EMBARQO local wireline service plan during the entire month of December to be eligible for unlimited wireless calling during that month. Without a qualifying plan,
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Buyout firms paying


to get out of deals


eBay to partner on live Web auc-
tions.
At the time, eBay had 25 mil-
lion users; today it boasts 275
million. Ellison has ventures with
638 auction houses worldwide
and annual sales approaching
$100 million.
"A lot of our auction houses
that we started doing business
with were on their knees," he
said. "Some have said to me:
'You guys have absolutely saved
our bacon.'
The changing world also cre-
ates opportunity for individuals,
and the NAA is beginning to see
more women and minorities en-
tering the profession. The world
champion bid-caller, former real
estate investor Denise Shearin of
Brandywine, Md., is the first black
auctioneer to hold the title.
Shearin, who went pro in
March 2006, was initially capti-
vated by the chanting but quickly
learned there's more to the busi-
ness, requiring constant re-edu-
cation about values, intensive
marketing efforts and sophisti-
cated people skills.
"Like so many other business-
es, you get out of it what you put
into it," she said. "If you really en-
joy it, 50, 60 and 70 hours a week
really do go by very quickly and
fairly easily."


toy safety

for children:
* Be a label reader. Look for
toy labels that give age and safety
recommendations and use that
information as a guide.
* Select toys to suit the age,
abilities, skills and interest level
of the intended child. Look for
sturdy construction, such as
tightly-secured eyes, noses and
other potential small parts.
* For all children under 8,
avoid toys that have sharp edges
and points.
Once the gifts are open:
* Immediately discard plastic
wrappings on toys before they
become dangerous play things.
* Keep toys appropriate for
older children away from young-
er siblings or neighbors.
* Pay attention to instructions
and warnings on battery char-
gers. Some chargers lack any de-
vice to prevent overcharging.


Okeechobee News, Monday, November 26, 2007


BUSINESS






6 Okeechobee News, Monday, November 26, 2007


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda

Thanks for the assistance
This giant card thanks those who helped with the annual display of giant Christmas Cards
in Flagler Park.


SFWMD meets in communities


West Palm Beach - Sev-
eral times a year, a long-stand-
ing practice at the South Florida
Water Management District
(SFWMD) sends its monthly
Governing Board meetings out
of agency headquarters in West
Palm Beach and into South Flor-
ida's local communities. The
District announced that it will
hold four of its twelve 2008 Gov-
erning Board meetings off-site to
bring the agency's policy-setting
forums into South Florida com-
munities and improve access for
constituents across the District's
16 county region.
"An agency that covers 18,000
square miles has a fundamen-
tal responsibility to meet with
the citizens it serves," said Eric
Buermann, SFWMD Governing
Board Chairman. "Like other
state boards and commissions,
as well as the Governor's Office,
we periodically hold meetings
throughout the state. I'm proud
of this approach, because it all
adds up to good government."
During calendar year 2008,
off-site meetings are currently
scheduled for Miami in January,
Lee County in June, the Florida
Keys in November and a work-
shop day in Highlands County
this spring. The 2008 budget al-
located $40,000 for the meetings,
a fraction (0.003 percent) of the
agency's annual $1.283 billion
budget. The Grand Bay Miami
and Miami City Hall will host the
two-day Governing Board meet-
ing in Miami, which will take"
place on January 8 and 9.
This year, the Governing
Board held its monthly meet-
ings in four off-site locations:
Naples, Okeechobee, Orlando
and Key Largo, in addition to
eight monthly meetings at agen-
cy headquarters and a strategic
planning workshop in Palm
Beach Gardens. All are open to
.the public and broadcast on the
web to reach a wider audience


and improve accessibility for
constituents.
"We welcome an opportuni-
ty to host a local meeting of the
South Florida Water Manage-
ment District Governing Board,"
said Rob Teegarden, Vice Presi-
dent of the Water Business Unit
of the Orlando Utilities Commis-
sion. "The diverse nature of Flor-
ida's water resources requires
that the Governing Board mem-
bers become familiar with a va-
riety of issues. In Central Florida,
the overarching issue is the need
for us all to work together across
community and water manage-
ment district boundaries for the
benefit of the region."
Last week the Board held
its November meeting in Key
Largo, where agency-wide busi-
ness also included in-depth dis-
cussion of local issues: funding
for Florida Keys water quality
improvement projects, a com-
plex water use permit for Mi-
ami-Dade County and the status
of environmental restoration in
Florida Bay.
"These on-the-road meetings
noticeably increase public in-
volvement with water resource
issues and vastly improve ac-
cess to the workings of govern-
ment," said Governing Board
Vice-Chairman NicolAs Gutir-
rez, who presided over the No-
vember session during Mr. Buer-
mann's medical-leave absence.
"The meetings also allow our
Board members to better under-
stand regional concerns and to
hear.what is on the minds of the
citizens we serve in distant com-
munities. That wouldn't hap-
pen if we never left West Palm
Beach."
Close to 100 people attended
the Key Largo meeting, includ-
ing local dignitaries from the
Florida Keys and Miami-Dade as
well as Florida Representative
Ron Saunders, a resident of Key
West. Mahy expressed apprecia-


tion for the opportunity to attend
policy-making meetings in their
local community.
"I want to thank you very
much for being here in the
Florida Keys," said Debbie Har-
rison, a Keys resident and South
Florida Regional Director of the
World Wildlife Fund. Harrison
spoke to the Board during public
comment about Florida Bay wa-
ter quality and the importance of
ecosystem restoration projects
in the southern Everglades.
The District's November
Governing Board meeting in
Key Largo coincided with an
Executive Order last week from
Governor Charlie Crist citing that
"an open and accessible govern-
ment is the key to establishing
and maintaining its people's
trust and confidence in their
government and its ability to ef-
fectively serve its citizens."
Each two-day monthly meet-
ing is comprised of a workshop
day, where Governing Board
members hear staff reports,
review issues and hear public
comment, and a meeting day,
where discussion and voting
takes place, along with addition-
al public comment. Agendas for
both days are posted in advance
on the District's web site, www.
sfwmd.gov.
Each of the District's nine
Governing Board members is
appointed by Florida's governor
to a four-year term and serves
on the Board without pay. Travel
and expenses while on agency
business are covered by the
District, at the same mileage
and per diem rates as agency
employees. Hours spent attend-
ing meetings, speaking with
stakeholders and District staff
and researching complex water
management issues are volun-
tary. Monthly voting by the nine-
member Board sets policies for
the entire agency, with actions
pertaining to water permits and
orders, rulemaking, environ-
mental restoration projects, land
acquisition and management,
budgetary items and other top-
ics.
For more information on
the District's Governing Board
and 2008 calendar, visit www.
sfwmd.gov.


Our Native Christmas Pine
By Dan Culbert
Extension Horticulture Agent
Okeechobee County


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In R YSWVIOOL CNLYLHOLUM


Christmas is one of my favor-
ite times of year, as I get to write
about all kinds of unusual plants
for the holidays. All kinds of
greenery has made it's way into
this special time of year, and one
of the first and most significant
plants is the Christmas Tree.
I suspect that you will under-
stand my bias towards Real Live
trees - perish the thought that a
fake tree ever graces our house-
hold. There are many local ven-
dors of cut trees that came from
northern tree farms. Some of
these tree sales are important as
fundraisers for our community.
But if you really want to support
local farmers, consider using a
Florida-grown Christmas tree.
Yes, Virginia, there are Florida-
grown Christmas trees. Unfortu-
nately for us, it will involve some
travel to more northern areas of
the Sunshine State, and with the
high price of fuel and busy sched-
ules, it might not be a popular
choice.
Low Maintenance Pine
In certain areas of Florida, it
is possible to notice some spots
with a slightly higher elevation
and deep sugar-sandy soils. These
Scrub habitat areas have forests of
turkey oaks, palmettos and other
plants have survived many years
of regular natural forest fires. A
dominant tree in these parts is the
Sand pine, Pinus clausa. I'm told
there are several forms of this 25
to 40 feet tall tree, the Ocala Sand
pine and the Choctawhatchpe
sand pine.
The Ocala sand pine is still be
seen in parts of the county, and
used to be quite noticeable on the
coastal Florida dunes and ridges.
They have short bundles of nee-
dles that are two to 4 inches long,
much shorter than our more com-
mon Slash Pine. The cones are
short and stubby, and stay on the
tree for many years, waiting for a
forest fire to heat them up before
releasing their seed.
Because of their extreme
drought and salt tolerance and at-
tractiveness to wildlife, Sand Pine
can be a nice addition to a Florida
Yard. The trunks on Sand Pine are
rarely straight,- it usually grows
with part of the crown missing
or leaning. Some may think this
makes it a poor landscape choice,
but this "knarley look" makes it a
unique accent tree.
Sand Pines did not do well in
recent hurricanes, and need to be
planted away from buildings to
reduce fire hazards. Availability'
of potted Sand Pines is possible
through some wholesale nurs-
eries, and another source is the
Florida Division of Forestry who
sells bundles of seedlings to prop-
erty owners.
Speaking of property owners:
if you have a spot that is high and
dry, and would like a novel cash
crop, consider planting that va-
cant land to Sand Pines. In three
short years, with a little work, you
to can open a Real live Christmas
Tree Farm. The Florida Christmas
Tree Growers Association has
some nice photos of how it is
done at their website: http://www.
flchristmastrees.com/FCTA.htm


UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA

IFAS EXTENSION

And if you would like to find
out a place to take the family to
cut your own Sand Pine, the Flor-
ida Department of Agriculture has
a list of 18 farms that are ready
for your visit. It appears that the
closest spots will be in Lake and
Hernando Counties. Call us if you
want the list.

Christmas tree contests
For the past few years, the Na-
tional Christmas Tree Association
has sponsored several fun events
to encourage Live Tree fun. Here
is what they have on-line for this
year: The NCTA is introducing
an exciting new contest for the
2007?
Christmas season -- Create a
video and post it on telling why
a Real Christmas Tree is the best
choice this holiday season. Up-
load your video by Dec. 15, 2007
to the U-tube website. It will be
judged based on accuracy, cre-
ativity, persuasiveness & popu-
larity. Cash prizes up to $500 will
be awarded. Right now, there are
only three entries, so get filming
and then go to http://www.you-
tube.com/group/getreal
Trees for Troops program
sends trees to our active armed
service personnel. Donations
can be made, rebates for certain
product purchases can be ap-
plied to help out, and messages


to the troops can be submitted.
Last year nearly 12,000 troops
and their families received trees
at 25 bases and in 17 countries,
up from 4,300 trees in 2005. Next
weekend, one NCTA member in
Ft. Meyers will be actively par-
ticipating in this program. Or,
you can call or go on-line to get
more information: www.Trees-
forTroops.org.
Attack of the Mutant Artificial
Tree is a fun, interactive game
created for the NCTA by Kewlbox
to increase awareness and ben-
efits of having a Real Christmas
tree. Played more than 1 million
times, this on-line game is a fun
way for kids of all ages to face off
against fake trees: http://realtrees.
kewlbox.com/.
* Ghosts of Christmas (Ar-
tidles) Past" '' * I . '.
. If you need more information
on the many different kinds of
holiday plants or want to know
more about the folklore and tradi-
tions associated with them, goto
our county Extension website and
take a look. And if you have any
special holiday plants that I have
not covered, please let me know
and I will see what I can find. I've
placed more information on our
Okeechobee web page,http://
okeechobee.ifas.ufl.edu. If you
need additional information on
sand pines and Christmas Trees,
please email us at okeechobee@
ifas.ufl.edu or call us at (863) 763-
6469. Local residents can stop by
our office at 458 Hwy 98 North
in Okeechobee, and visit our
Okeechobee County Master Gar-
deners from I to 3 p.m. on Tues-
day afternoons. GO GATORS!


Endangered snail kite to get fast-food relief


WEST PALM BEACH -- The
South Florida Water Manage-
ment District is supporting in-
novative research to learn if
native apple snails can be cul-
tured in large enough numbers
to help replenish them in the
wild. The snails are the pri-
mary food source for Florida's
endangered snail kite.
Apple snail populations are
at risk from the extended water
shortage, making it more diffi-
cult for snail kites to find regu-
lar meals in Lake Okeechobee
and the Everglades.
"This is an outstanding proj-
ect that shows promise of mak-
ing a real difference in the very
near future," said South Florida
Water Management District
Governing Board Member Me-
lissa Meeker. "Snail kites are
a vital part of the Greater Ev-
erglades ecosystem, and the
impact of drought on this en-
dangered species is a.serious
concern. District support for
this research exemplifies our
commitment to environmental
restoration in South Florida."
Depending on water levels,
scientists hope to be able to
release some of the captive-
raised snails this spring into
Lake Okeechobee, Lake Isto-
poga or Everglades wetlands.
With brown shells serving as
perfectly crafted camouflage,
apple snails are hard to spot in
the dark, marshy habitat where
they spend most of their lives
below the waterline. Despite
the challenge, snail kites are
experts at swooping low over
the water to pluck the snails
out of the dark waters. These


Photo courtesy of SFWMD website
Photo courtesy of SFWMD website


trow-sized birds of prey have a
hooked bill designed to pull the
snails from their shells. A snail
kite eats an average of 2.5 ap-
ple snails an hour when feed-
ing, according to a study by the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
More than 3,000 snails are
being raised in the Aquaculture
Development Park at Harbor
Branch Oceanographic Insti-
tute, with scientists exploring
the best way to raise them in
captivity for eventual release in
the wild. Long-term study will
include the survival and repro-
duction rates of captive snails
that have been introduced to
the wild, and how best to es-
tablish a breeding stock of
snails.
District scientists started the
study in August by collecting
more than 30 apple snail egg
clutches from Lake Kissimmee.


Additional clutches, more than
200, were collected in October.
Hatchlings from the first clutch-


es quickly reached adulthood
and produced their own eggs.
Those eggs began hatching in
November.
"Harbor Branch is proud to
lend its expertise in aquaculture
in support of the South Florida
Water Management District's ef-
fort to restock apple snails and
restore the favorite food source
of the endangered snail kito"
said Dr. Megan Davis, Harbor
Branch marine ecologist. "Now
that we can grow apple snails
without relying on wild stock,
we are reasonably certain that
we can increase the apple
snail population around Lake
Okeechobee."
(For more news from
South Florida
Water Management Distrit,
see the link-at
http://www2.newszap.com/
locallinks/florida/index.htrm.)


Me Memorial Tribute
Remember a loved one
' who has departed with a special
Memorial Tribute in this newspaper.


Your tribute can be published following the memorial services, or to
commemorate an anniversary ofyour loved one's birth or passing. You.
can add a photograph of your loved one, lines from a poem or.
scripture, and special art or borders -- and we'll make sure it all comes
together attractively and tastefully.


Visit www2.newszap.comn/memorials for sample ads
and an online order form, or call 1-866-379-6397 toll free.


Courtesy of flchristmastrees.com
Because of their extreme drought and salt tolerance and at-
tractiveness to wildlife, Sand Pine can be a nice addition to a
Florida Yard.


--from

* ... yic
K' . - , Frn . -


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda

Flying reindeer
Santa's reindeer are featured on this card in Flagler Park
sponsored by EYDC.







Okeechobee News, Monday, November 26, 2007 7


At the Movies _Blondie


The following movies are now
showing at the Brahman Theatres

Movie times for Friday, Nov. 23,
through Thursday, Nov. 29, are as
follows:
Theatre I -"Enchanted" (PG)
Showtimes: Friday at 7 and 9 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday at 2, 4:15,
7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
Theatre II - "Fred Claus" (PG)
Showtimes: Friday at 7 and 9 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday at 2, 4:15,
7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
Theatre III - "Mr. Magorium's
Wonder Emporium" (G) Show-
times: Friday at 7 and 9 p.m..
Saturday and Sunday at 2, 4:15,
7 and 9 p.m., Monday at 3 and
7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
We will be open Friday,
Nov. 23 at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9
p.m.
Tickets are $5.50 for adults;
children 12 and under are $4.50;
senior citizens are $4.50 for all
movies; and, matinees are $4.
For information, call (863)
763-7202.

Today

in History

By The Associated Press
- Today is Monday, Nov. 26, the
'-330th day of 2007. There are 35
'days left in the year.
' Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
' Nov. 26, 1607, is believed to
,be the birth date of London-
born clergyman John Harvard,
the principal benefactor of the
original Harvard College in Cam-
bridge, Mass.
On this date:
, In 1825, the first college so-
�cial fraternity, Kappa Alpha, was
formed at Union College in Sche-
nectady, N.Y.
In 1832, public streetcar ser-
vice began in New York City. The
Sfare: 121/2 cents.
In 1933, a judge in New York
ruled the James Joyce book
"Ulysses" was not obscene and
could therefore be published in
the United States.
In 1942, President Roosevelt
ordered nationwide gasoline ra-
tioning, beginning Dec. 1.
In 1943, during World War II,
-the HMT,,Rohna,; a British trans-
.port ship carrying American sol-
diers, was hit by a German mis-
*sile off Algeria; 1,138 men were
,killed.
In 1949, India adopted a con-
stitution as a republic within the
British Commonwealth.
In 1950, China entered the Ko-
rean War, launching a counterof-
.fensive against soldiers from the
United Nations, the United States
. and South Korea.
In 1965, France launched its
first satellite, sending a 92-pound
,capsule into orbit.
. In 1973, President Nixon's
personal secretary, Rose Mary
Woods, told a federal court 'that
she had accidentally caused part
,of the 18/2-minute gap in a key
Watergate tape.
In 1986, President Ronald
Reagan appointed a ,commis-
sion headed by former Sen. John.
'Tower to investigate his National
,Security Council staff in the wake
of the Iran-Contra affair.
_ Ten years ago: Under heavy
international pressure, Iraqi Presi-
dent Saddam Hussein said he
would allow visits to presidential
palaces where U.N. weapons
..experts suspected he might be
,hiding chemical and biological
,weapons. In a small but symbolic
step, the United States and North
Korea held high-level discussions
at the State Department for the
first time.
Five years ago: WorldCom
and the government settled a
civil lawsuit over the company's
"$9 billion accounting scandal. A
'United Nations report said that
'for the first time in the 20-year his-
tory of the AIDS epidemic, about
as many women as men were in-
fected with HIV.
One year ago: In New York
. City, an angry crowd demanded
Sto know why police officers killed
'Sean Bell, an unarmed man, on
'the day of his wedding by firing
dozens of shots that also wound-
ed two of Bell's friends. In Turkey,
tens of thousands- of protesters
denounced Pope Benedict XVI as
an enemy ofIslam two days be-
fore the pontiff's scheduled visit.
Rafael Correa won Ecuador's


presidential runoff.
Today's Birthdays: Impres-
sionist Rich Little is 69. Singer
Tina Turner is 68. Singer Jean
Terrell is 63. Pop musician John
McVie is 62. Actress Jamie Rose
is 48. Country singer Linda Davis
is 45. Blues singer-musician Ber-
nard Allison is 42. Country singer-
musician Steve Grisaffe is 42. Ac-
tress Kristin Bauer is 34.
Thought for Today: "Love
your neighbors, but don't pull
down the fence." -- Chinese prov-
erb.


- WHAT KINO GROWNUPS OON'T YOU MEAN YOU JUST
OF SONGS 00 SING SONGS , STARE ANO THINK
You Guys SING - ON THEIR I ABOUT WHAT YOU
ON YOUR WAV / k, WAY TO I HAVE TO 00 ALL
TO WORK, - WORK, OAY LONG?
MR. B.? ELMO 1


Wizard of Id


Garfield


*SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):
Reserve judgment and you will avoid
having to apologize. Emotional mat-
ters will crop up and someone may
try to corner you into discussing mat-
ters better avoided. The chance to
meet someone new through work or
a colleague is looking good.
*CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If
you are feeling confused, insecure
or just uncertain about a partnership,
observe the dynamics of this union
and how the person reacts to differ-
ent situations. Money can be made
but it is apparent someone may try to
borrow from you as well.
*AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You
can learn a great deal by talking to
people with experience or who have
something to offer you. Open your
heart and your suggestions to a group
that can use your expertise. This is a
perfect day for give-and-take.
*PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Stick
to basics and you will surpass your
expectations. A little will go a long
way financially, physically and emo-
tionally. You can make some positive
life changes. An opportunity to meet
potential partners will arise if you net-
work.
� 2007 UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE


Cathy

THE BI&&EST SHOPPING
WEEKEND O THlE EAR S
OVER, AND THE FIGURES
/RE BEING T/ALLIED.


WUHfT'S5
ITEM
HOT
FOR
zool
?.o0?'?


Peanuts


Pickles


The Last Word in Astrology


By Eugenia Last
*ARIES (March 21-April 19): You
can't take what's said too seriously
today. Someone you are close to will
probably be insensitive to your situ-
ation. Problems with someone you
work with may lead to a change in
your position.
*TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Share
your thoughts with people you trust
but don't reveal how you,feel about
someone you work with. Gossip may
lead to setbacks. Get involved in
something that will benefit others or
help the environment.
*GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Use
your head and you will win but don't
let someone anger you and get in the
way of your productivity. Accept the
opportunity to join forces with some-
one who will help you better see what
you want in the future. Consider an
updated look or image.
*CANCER (June 21-July 22): You'll
be emotional, feisty and ready to pick
a fight. Stick to your own devices and
get things out of the way and you will
be avoid trouble. A new activity will
inspire you but don't get taken in by a
different lifestyle, cult or group.


*LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don't get
involved in gossip. Stick to the things
you enjoy doing and the people you
like to spend time with. A change in
the way you earn your living or with
an investment you have will help you
out financially.
*VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don't
jeopardize a chance to get ahead be-
cause someone you are emotionally
attached to doesn't want you to make
a change. Consider your own needs,
not someone else's. A problem with
overspending could arise if you don't
stick to a budget.
*LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You can
get what you want, have your way
and make changes that will guide
you toward a better emotional situ-
ation. Don't let an older relative or
friend discourage you from following
your dream. Love is on the rise.
*SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): High
energy, drive and determination
should help you get to the bottom
of things. You can finish off projects
or promote, present or push others
to support, invest or purchase what
you have to offer. A little charm and
mystery will help you attract the right
people.


Dear Abby


Reach out to others


during holidays


DEAR READERS: Thanksgiv-
ing dishes are back in the china
cabinet, and the last of the left-
overs are finished. The party
season is starting, and Christmas
carols fill the air. While this is an
exciting and joyful time for a lot of
us, for many individuals the holi-
days can be an intensely difficult
time, triggering feelings of stress,
loneliness and loss,
If a person is prone to depres-
sion, these feelings can be magni-
fied.
How can anyone feel de-
pressed at this time of year, you
ask? The reasons are many: Peo-
ple who are separated from their
families often feel isolated be-
cause they are unable to celebrate
in the traditional way. Families
who have lost a loved one during
the year often feel his or her ab-
sence especially at this time. Oth-
ers become depressed because
they imagine that everyone else is
enjoying a warm, idealized family
experience, while they are on the
outside looking in. ,
Even people who enjoy the
holidays can find them stressful.
At this time of year people are
stretched for time, energy and
money - particularly the latter.
They may feel embarrassed be-
cause they can't celebrate the way
they would like to, or celebrate in
the style they have in years past.
Some ways to ward off the
holiday blues:
* Keep expectations reason-
able. Do not take on more ac-
tivities than you can comfortably
handle - financially or other-
wise.
*Don't overspend. Plan a holi-
day budget and live within it, re-
gardless of the temptation.
*Do not run up credit card
debt, or January will be like a se-
rious hangover.
*And speaking of hangovers:
Watch your alcohol intake. Re-
.member, although alcohol ap-
pears to be a mood elevator, it is
actually a depressant. If you have
a problem with alcohol, get what-

Close to Home


ever support you need to make it
through the holidays.
And finally, if you are feeling
down and in need of an instant
"upper," the surest way to accom-
plish it is to do something nice for
someone else. Call someone who
lives alone and invite that person
to dinner. Better yet, say, "I'm
coming to get you, and I'll see
that you get safely home." (Some
older people no longer drive at
night, and those who do might
prefer not to be behind the wheel
after dark.) Give it a try! You'll be
glad you did.
And another reminder: We
have so much for which to be
grateful - our health, our san-
ity, our freedom. For those of you
with a little time to spare, how
about showing our gratitude to
our wounded veterans by visit-
ing a veteran's hospital and rais-
ing the spirits of those who have
served our country? As I said
before, the quickest way to lose
those holiday blues is to extend a
hand to someone who could use
one. Try it and you'll see what I
mean.
Love, ABBY

*DEAR ABBY: I keep read-
ing that having sex regularly will
improve your health and extend
your life. However, my wife of 34
years has lost all interest in sex
and keeps pushing me away. So
what do I do? Am I justified in
taking on a lover on the side, dis-
creetly, of course? - Consider-
ing It, San Mateo, Calif.
*DEAR CONSIDERING IT:
I, too, have read that engaging in
sex regularly can improve one's
health and extend one's life.
However, rather than asking me
for permission, you should ad-
dress that question to your wife.
If it's all right with her, it's all right
with me. But if she says no, please
remember that the stress of carry-
ing on an illicit affair could shorten
your life, and if she catches you it
could be fatal.


Wonderword
HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle - horizon-
tally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR
LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell
the Wonderword.


WAFFLES


Solution: 9 letters


B' E L G I AN J AMT () L R T

A WOT FOSAB I �E I E E
T FU EGO YUL (pE L FT E
TV NN I DR R K HPTSW
E AG I N NUMAHWPNAS
RN EAG CPCSC KAAO G


AI C R E R B R U N


CH R T N


G LNGR EU LKUUOUM I


U LTCS T T BU L


BNANP


S A N A H T AS T EOE T E P
GK N I EUAPANBY S V O
N E C A A B R CO F FE EOT
I G G A N L I O K O R G R L R
C DOUNAPOU R CGAR A
I E P A H S B K N K T S A E Y
� 2007 Universal Press Syndicate www.wonderword.com 11/26
Apple, Banana Batter Beat, Belgian Blueberry, Brunch, Buck-
wheat Burn Butter, take, Candy, coffee, Cook Curl,-Edge,
Eggs, Fast, Flat, Fork, Forms, Ginger, Grain, Grub, Honey, Huge,
Icin , Inch, Jam, Lift, Lounae, Lunch, Milk Oven, Plain, Pour,
Res aurant, Salt, Scoop, Shape, Snack, Soft, S oon, Stack,
Sugar, Sweet, Syrup, Taste, Toaster, Toppings, Tray, Vanilla,
Warm, Yeast, Yolk
Last Saturday's Answer: Archipelago


CNOT SINCIF WF
STA;RTPP I5rfAYIN(&J


Beetle Bailey







8 Okeechobee News, Monday, November 26, 2007


I-:


weeks
ia d .^ , W, WW W m-9. ,


All personal items u


.. It's Easy!


nder $5,000


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Agriculture ...........
Rentals..............
Real Estate .........
Mobile Homes ........ .
Recreation . ........ ..
Automobiles ......... .
Public Notices .........


.100
.200
.300
.400
.500
.800
.900
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000


ABSOLUTELY FREE!









-W M., 04_IVO'd
Published 3 weeks' in all of our Florida papers: Caloosa Belle, Clewiston News, Glades County Democrat,
Immokalee Bulletin, Okeechobee News and Advertiser, and The Sun
* Ads will run in Wednesday daily editions and weekly publications.


or call
1-877-353-2424 (Toil Free)


* All personal items under
$5,000 ABSOLUTELY FREE!
* Price must be included in ad
* Private parties only
* 2 items per household per
issue


Announcements


Important Information: Please
read your ad carefully the first
day it appears. In case of an
inadvertent error, please noti-
fy us prior to the deadline list-
ed. We will not be responsible
for more than 1 incorrect
insertion, or for more than the
extent of the ad rendered val-
ueless by such errors.
Advertiser assumes responsi-
bility for all statements, names
and content of an ad, and
assumes responsibility for any
claims against Independent
Newspapers. All advertising
is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
- :-,.: I- , r..hi to accept or
,'j,-,:l ,-,, ,:, a:ll copy, and to
insert above the copy the word
"advertisement". All ads
accepted are subject to credit
approval. All ads must conform
to Independent Newspapers'
style and are restricted to
their proper classifications.
Some classified categories
require advance payment.
These classifications are
denoted with an asterisk *.
Independent Newspapers will
never knowingly accept any
advertisement that is illegal or
considered fraudulent. In all
cases of questionable value,
such as promises of guaran-
teed income from work-at-
home programs or other offers
to send money in advance for
a product or service - we
advise you to check with the
Attorney General's Consumer
Fraud Line at 1-800-220-5424,
and/or The Better Business
Bureau, 800-464-6331 for pre-
vious complaints.
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage/Yard Sale 145
Personals . 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160


(D,











po



a


Uarag./


QUAKER PARROT- Green,
blue, yellow, ring on leg, vic
of Capt. Henry Dr.
(239)839-2721
SHELTIE - F.
Looks like collie.
Hwy. 68 E. & NE 48th Ave.
(Hilolo Rd.). on 11/18. 863-


CLEAN UP
Will pick up your junk!
Heavy & Farm Equipment-will
pay CASH. Call Michael @
(863)634-4780
Shop from a gift catalog
that's updated regulaly:
the classifleds.

Emplomet


Employment -
Full-Time 205
Employment -
Medical 210
Employment -
Part-Time 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Training 227
Sales 230



A/C SERV TECH needed.
Dependable, Clean DL, Good
Pay, Benefits, 401K, Min
3 yrs exp. EOE DFW.
Experienced need only apply.
Call (863)763-8391
DRIVER WANTED : Needed
Chauffer to drive legally blind
Okee man during daylight
hours. 7 days a wk. Can hire
separate drivers: 1 -wk/days &
1 -wk/ends. Criminal & good
driving record checked. Call
Don of Oakland Farms
863-467-2930 for info & appt.
-SALES MANAGER-
Local building company seeks
Sales Manager. Must have
proficient computer skills in-
cluding C.A.D. Minimum 10
years construction industry ex-
perience. Excellent interper-
sonal and presentation skills.
Strong written and verbal
skills. Financing and estimat-
ing knowledge a plus.
Send resume to RO. Box 991,
Okeechobee, FL 34973.
Reading a newspaper
helps you understand
the world around you.
No wonder newspaper
readers are more suc-
cessful people


Uarg.


HIRING
DAYTIME &
EVENING
SERVERS
& HOSTESS
Min. 1 yr. exp.

COOK
$12-$15
to start

Apply in person
between
9am-lpm


The classifieds are the
most successful sales-
person In town.

Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise your
yard sale In the classi-
fleds and make your
clean un a breeze


igpecia Notice


SI -m
EmploIymen
yFull Time


I.pca Noti *


Emplymen
Ful Tme 005


Start a new career in the much needed field of
nursing as a Certified Nursing Assistant. Complete the
Hospitality Assistant course/training at Okeechobee
Healthcare Facility and become a CNA in 4 weeks. Next
class begins soon. Instructor RN/experienced teacher has
a very high CNA exam passing rate. Qualified CNAs are
then eligible for LPN training. Good benefits.
Apply In Person For Further Details:
406 N.W. 4th Street * (863) 357-2442

Immediate Openings - CNAs
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
All shifts: Full/Part Time. Good Benefits.
Apply In Person To:
406 N.W. 4th Street. (863) 357-2442


Need a few more bucks to
purchase something
deer? Pick up some
extra bucks when you
sell your used Items In
the classlfelds.


One man's trash Is anoth-
er man's treasure. Turn
your trash to treasure
with an ad In the classl-
fineds.


I.pecia Notice


[ plymn
- II im


Emlymn


I. I gIc


Empoyen


Employment
Medca


How do you find a job In
today's competitive
market? In the employ-
ment section of the clas-
siflieds


When doing those chores
Is doing you In, It's thne
to look for a helper in
the classifieds.


S EAY, JST 0 TO


/ www.newszap.com/classifieds


/1-877353-2424 (Ton Free)


/ For Legal Ads:
legalads@newszap.com ..
/ For All Other Classified Ads:
classads@newszap.com


/ 1-877-353-2424 (Toil Feel
w* mS 0 mi


/ Mon-Fri
Bam 53p


/ Mon-Fri
8 0 6"pm


Fr-day I ' n.- cn I,. :,do


Tuesday through Friday
i i .T to. r-. dcv : ubl,,:otor
Saturday
Th..d,3' I 12 r,.:.r ' ," S. p.'bl'Cs-hOn
Sunday
FIdor l1) rm if, S'un"v Publ.calior,


- . - .


Business
Oporuitiesii~~iij


FAlTlb -I


READING A
NEWSPAPER...
makes you a more informed
and interesting person. No
wonder newspaper readers
are more successful!



DEE'S MINOR REPAIR
License # 5698
& Pressure Washing
License #1126
FREE ESTIMATES
(863)467-2917
or (863)261-6425



JACK'S TOP SOIL
Fill Dirt/Shell Rock
& Bob Cat work.
Call 863-467-4734


Merchandise


Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines535
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware. Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, Linens & Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 619
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment/
Supplies 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets/Supplies/
Services 67Q0
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680'
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 69Q
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740



WANTED TO BUY
Glassware, Porcelain &
Pottery.
Collections of all kinds.
Just call Diana & ask!
(863)467-8408

Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses - Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House - Rent 930,
Land - Rent 935,
Resort Property 'k
Rent 945)
Roommate 950:
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space - '
Rent 960



Oak Lake Apts., Remodeled
2br, 1/2 ba, 2 Story, Washer
Dryer. Patio. $800 mo., 1st,
last + sec. (863)634-3313
OKEECHOBEE - 28R, 1BA
$625/mo, $525 sec dep.
(772)260-1765
Okeechobee, 2Br/1.5ba, car-
peted, ceramic tile, w/app[s
incl. dishwasher, $700 mo.
+ $700 sec. (863)763-8878


BRAND NEW, 3BR's/2BAs,
lots of tile, garage, $1200.
Lawrence Associates,
1-800-543-2495.


I CATGOIE


1


YARD

SALE





Place Your
YARD SALE
ad today!

Get FREE signs!

Call Classifieds
877-353-2424


Immediate Openings * All Shifts
Full Time/Part Time * RN's & LPN's
Apply In Person To:
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
1646 Hwy. 441 North


Busy Doctor's Office
in need of Medical Assistant
(MA), front desk and nurse
Please fax resume to (863) 357-4539


0s


I


I A I I


I


0 0 1 ll.ON


1, Caregivers


~4q~








Okeechobee News, Monday, November 26, 2007


-~ea Notice


-~eca No - I


MONDAY PRIME TIME


S6:00 6:30


7:00


-~ea Noice-155


8:00 8:30


i-i -eci Noice


9:00 9:30


il Notic0155


NOVEMBER 26, 2007
10:00 110:30 11:00 11:30


WPTV News (cc) NBC News Extra (s) Entertain Chuck (N) (s) (cc) Heroes (N) (s) (cc) Journeyman (N) (cc) News (cc) Tonight
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1' WPBF News (N) ABC News Fortune Jeopardyl Dancing With the Stars Samantha Underbelly October Road (s) (cc) News (N) Nightline
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AMC Movie: **'2 Santa Claus: The Movie (1985) Movie: ** Raising Helen (2004) (Kate Hudson) (cc) Movie: **/2 Speechless (1994)
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HGTV Offbeat If Walls My House House To Sell Over Head Color Potential House Buy Me (s) House First Place
HIST UFO Files (cc) Modern Marvels (cc) Modern Marvels "Metal" Gangland: Brotherhood Underworld Modern Marvels (cc)
LIFE Reba(s) Reba(s) Reba (cc) Reba (cc) Reba (s) Reba (s) Movie: **/2 Beauty Shop (2005) (Queen Latifah) Will-Grace Will-Grace
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TLC Flip House |Flip House Little People, Big World Little | Little Jon & Kate Plus 8 Quint-essential (cc) Little
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TNT Law & Order (s) Law & Order (s) The Closer (cc) The Closer (Part 1 of 2) The Closer (Part 2 of 2) Cold Case "Revenge"
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HBO (5:30) Movie: You, Me and Dupree To Die in Jerusalem (s) (cc) Movie: *** /2 The Departed (2006) (Leonardo DiCaprio) 'R' (cc) 24 7
SHOW Movie IMovie: **/2 The Lost City (2005) (Andy Garcia) iTV.'R' Brotherhood (iTV) (s) Dexter "Morning Comes" Paul Mooney
TMC Movie: .** Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai IMovie: ** Into the Blue (2005) (Paul Walker) (cc) Movie: The Hillz (2004) (Rene Heger) Hideous K


BUCKHEAD RIDGE,
Waterfront 3 Bdrm., 11/2 Ba.
2 Story w/Lake Okeechobee
access & boat ramp. Wrap
around porch. Fenced yard.
- Pets welcome! $1000
mo. + 1st, last & sec.
561-346-3620
CBS Home, 3BR/2BA, on 5 ac.
w/24x60 barn, asking
.$3,000 neg. or to rent for
41500 mo. (863)634-6113
DIXIE RANCH ACRES, 2BR,
-1BA, $800 mo. 1st, last &
$500 sec. dep. Call for info.
-8am-5pm. (863)357-6700
ON CANAL, 3BR, 2BA,
-available December 1st. Call
(606)875-6270
ON THE CANAL - 3 BR, 2 BA
Fenced yard. $1000. mo.
(248)672-1528
TREASURE ISLAND, 3/2 Very
clean! On canal. Lg. storage.
$950 mo. + 1st & sec. dep.
863-824-0981


-I

OKEECHOBEE - Office Space
rental. 18'x12' $600. mo.
Utilities included. For ap-
pointment (863)467-1545

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE
SPACE FOR LEASE
2,000 sq. ft. Excellent
location, ready to occupy.
Call for info (863)634-3040
or (863)467-9608



OKEE, Furnished Rm. Single
occ., private entrance, w/d.
$140/wk & deposit, utils incl.
(863)467-0771 after 6pm



SEASONAL ONLY - Waterfront
Houses. Immaculate. Fully
furnished. New construction.
(765)348-8270


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property - Sale 1010
Condos/
Townhouses - Sale1015
Farms - Sale 1020
Houses - Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property - Sale 1035
Land - Sale 1040
Lots - Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property - Sale 1055
Property Inspection1060
Real Estate Wanted 1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080


DIXIE RANCH - 1 acre, 208 x
208. Big oak trees. Hi & Dry.
7 mIs from town off 87th Ct.,
2nd lot in on the right.
$50,000. (561)968-0468
NEW HOME ON YOUR LOT!
Features 3BRs/2BAs, Ig. LR,
garage, $118k, includes per-
mit fees. Lawrence Asso-
ciates 1-800-543-2495
NEWLY RENOVATED - 4/3, all
new inside & out, must see!
In Okee Estates. 2100 sq ft.
$210,000 (863)634-6186
OKEECHOBEE- 3/1, CBS, Un-
der appraisal. $169,900. Oak
/tile/marble, Space to add
master bath, 24 x13 en-
closed Fla. room & more!!
Grab flyer!! 309 SW 10th
Ave. (863)357-0391

Love the earth Recycle
your used Items by sell-
Ing them In the classi-
fleds.


OKEECHOBEE - 2 duplexes on
one lot, New metal roofs,
CBS, $325,000
(772)260-1765


LAND FOR SALE OR RENT -
15i/2 Acres Electricity/Water.
Surrounded by homes &
pastures. 786-344-8810
When you want something
sold, advertise In the
classified.

Mobile Homes



Mobile Home - Lots 2005
Mobile Home - Parts 2010
Mobile Homes - Rent 2015
Mobile Homes - Sale 2020


CHOICE OF 3BR, or 2 BR, 2
ba D/W's No pets, yrly lease,
starting @ $600/mo +
$1000 sec. 863-763-4031
DOUBLE WIDE TRAILER - 2
Bdrm., 2 Ba. On 10 acres.
$1200 mo. Call
(863)763-2838
QUIET AREA - 2/2, m/h, Ig
screened porch, util. rm, 1/2
acre, nice trees, 70E. $750
+ sec includes lawn service.
(863)467-7415
TAYLOR CREEK ISLES, 2br,
2ba, 2 person max. All util.
furnished, including yard.
$1250. mo. (863)634-2561
WATERFRONT PROPERTY
Okee 3br, 2ba, Lake access,
No pets. $925 mo 1st & sec.
dep. (561)927-8211



BANK.REPO'S
MOVE TO YOUR LAND
Mobile Home Angels
561-385-4694
OKEE - 2br, shed, Fla Room,
CA/Heat, W/D, carport, In
Adult park, $10,500
(863)763-1079/801-3287
PALM HARBOR
4/2 Tile floor, Energy Package,
Deluxe loaded, over
2,200 sq. ft
30th Anniversary
Sale Special
Save $15,000.
Call for FREE Color Brochures
800-622-2832
SKYLINE - '92, 28x60 DW,
3BR, 2BA, 2LR's. $25K/best
offer. Must move.
(863)634-9148 Iv msg


Automobiles



Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks4040
Parts - Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070




CHEVY 4WD PICKUP 2004 -
Heavy duty crew cab, all
power, running boards, bed-
liner, towing package, over-
size off-road tires, $17,500.
Call 863-467-1545.


CHEVY SILVERADO - '04,
2500, Heavy duty, Reading Util
bed, Ladder rack, 60,800 mi.
$18,950. (863)467-1545

Grab a bargain from your
neighbor's garage,
attic, basement or clos-
et In today's classlfleds.


Public Notices



Public Notice 5005
State Public �
Legal Notice 5500



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2003-DP-088
IN THE INTEREST OF:
H.H. DOB: 2/23/90
A.H. DOB: 12/30/98
Mother of the minor children:
Karen Melvin
TO: Father of H.H., and A.H.,
Michael Holbert
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT A PE-
TITION UNDER OATH HAS BEEN
FILED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF CHIL-
DREN AND FAMILIES IN THE ABOVE-
STYLED COURT FOR THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS RELA-
TIVE TO H.H., A FEMALE CHILD,
BORN ON THE 23RD DAY OF FEBRU-
ARY, 1990, and A.H., A FEMALE
CHILD, BORN ON THE 30TH DAY OF
DECEMBER, 1998. THE CHILDREN
WAS BORN IN THE COUNTY OF OKEE-
CHOBEE, IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA.
YOU ARE COMMANDED TO BE AND
APPEAR BEFORE A JUDGE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE ABOVE-STYLED COURT LO-
CATED AT:
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
312 N.W. 3rd STREET,
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
AT 1:30 P.M. ON THE 3RD DAY OF DE-
CEMBER, 2007, FOR HEARING AND
TO SHOW CAUSE WHY SAID PETI-
TION SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTI-
TUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS
CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A
PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN
THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS
NOTICE.
BE ADVISED THAT YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY TO REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU
CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY ONE
MAY BE APPOINTED FOR YOU.
WITNESS MY HAND AS CLERK OF SAID
COURT AND THE SEAL THEREOF,
THIS 16th DAY OF OCTOBER, 2007.
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF COURT
By: Kathy Arnold
DEPUTY CLERK
248401 ON 11/12,19,26;12/3/07
Shop here first
The classified ads

Looking for a place to
hang your hat? Look no
further than the classi-
fleds.


I PublicNotice50051


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2006-DP-069
IN THE INTEREST OF:
A.C. DOB: 6/13/06
Mother of the minor child:
Elizabeth Cox
TO: Prospective father of A.C.,
Javler Delgado
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT A PE-
TITION UNDER OATH HAS BEEN
FILED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF CHIL-
DREN AND FAMILIES IN THE ABOVE-
STYLED COURT FOR THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS RELA-
TIVE TO A.C., A FEMALE CHILD,
BORN ON THE 13TH DAY OF JUNE,
2006. THE CHILD WAS BORN IN THE
COUNTY OF OKEECHOBEE, IN THE
STATE OF FLORIDA. YOU ARE COM-
MANDED TO BE AND APPEAR BE-
FORE A JUDGE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION IN THE
ABOVE-STYLED COURT LOCATED AT:
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
312 NXW. 3rd STREET,
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
AT 10:00 A.M. ON THE 10TH DAY OF
DECEMBER, 2007, FOR HEARING
AND TO SHOW CAUSE WHY SAID PE-
TITION SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTI-
TUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS
CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A
PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN
THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS
NOTICE.
BE ADVISED THAT YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY TO REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU
CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY, ONE
MAY BE APPOINTED FOR YOU.
WITNESS MY HAND AS CLERK OF SAID
COURT AND THE SEAL THEREOF,
THIS 16th DAY OF OCTOBER, 2007.
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF COURT
By: Kathy Arnold
DEPUTY CLERK
248396 ON 11/12,19,26;12/3/07

Your new car could be In
today's paper. Have you
looked tfor It?

How fast can your car
go? it can go even faster
when you seNl It In the
classilleds.

Buying a cap? Look In the
classifleds. Selling a
car? Look in the classi-
fleds.


IP bi - I


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2006-OP-069
IN THE INTEREST OF:
A.C. DOB: 6/13/06
Mother ot the minor child:
� Elizabeth Cox
TO: Prospective father of A.C.,
Jose Hernandez
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT A PE-
TITION UNDER OATH HAS BEEN
FILED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF CHIL-
DREN AND FAMILIES IN THE ABOVE-
STYLED COURT FOR THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS RELA-
TIVE TO A.C., A FEMALE CHILD,
BORN ON THE 13TH DAY OF JUNE,
2006. THE CHILD WAS BORN IN THE
COUNTY OF OKEECHOBEE, IN THE
STATE OF FLORIDA. YOU ARE COM-
MANDED TO BE AND APPEAR BE-
'ORE A JUDGE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION IN THE
ABOVE-STYLED COURT LOCATED AT:
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
312 N.W. 3rd STREET,
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
AT 10:00 A.M. ON THE 10TH DAY OF
DECEMBER, 2007, FOR HEARING
AND TO SHOW CAUSE WHY SAID PE-
TITION SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTI-
TUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS
CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A
PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN
THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS
NOTICE.
BE ADVISED THAT YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY TO REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU
CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY ONE
MAY BE APPOINTED FOR YOU.
WITNESS MY HAND AS CLERK OF SAID
COURT AND THE SEAL THEREOF,
THIS 16th DAY OF OCTOBER, 2007.
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF COURT
By: Kathy Arnold
DEPUTY CLERK
248395 ON 11/12,19,26;12/3/07




READING A
NEWSPAPER MAKES
YOU A MORE INFORMED
AND INTERESTING
PERSON.

4D o wonder newspaper
readers are more popularly


Small towns of East Texas sometimes hide fugitives


By Paul J. Weber
Associated Press Writer
FRANKSTON, Texas (AP)
-- Living near the dense pine
woods where some believe Big-
foot still covertly skulks, escaped
convict Deborah Ann Gavin Mur-
phey perhaps thought she, too,
wouldn't be found.
When she was arrested by
U.S. marshals earlier this month,
it was 33 years after she slipped
out of a Georgia prison. For
someone on the lam since 1974,
the 53-year-old Murphey could
hardly have picked a better geo-
graphical spot to hole up.
"It does seem that fugitives
congregate here," said Corey
Britt, a deputy with U.S. Mar-
shals Joint East Texas Fugitive
Task Force.
Murphey was arrested Nov. 7


at the cottage-style house where
she lived with her husband,
raised two kids and napped af-
ternoons before her shifts as
a night nurse at a hospital in
nearby Tyler. She is fighting ex-
tradition to Georgia, where she
was sentenced to prison for the
armed robbery of a store.
The arrest evoked memories
of the 2005 capture in East Tex-
as of an Oklahoma fugitive who
disappeared with the wife of an
assistant prison warden 10 years
earlier. Authorities found them
living on a chicken farm near
Campti, just east of the Louisi-
ana border.
Not everyone buys the notion
that this thickly wooded swath
of Texas is a favorite destination
for those running from the law.
Yes, 112 fugitives were nabbed
by U.S. Marshals in Tyler during


the past year, but that's far fewer
than the number captured in
Dallas or Fort Worth.
Anderson County Sheriff Greg
Taylor dismisses the idea that
the region's remoteness makes
being a fugitive any easier.
"We've got the same tech-
nology as everyone else," Tay-
lor said. "We're not behind the
piney curtain anymore."
Maybe not. But Archie Mc-
Donald, a professor at Stephen
F. Austin University in Nagodo-
ches and executive director of
the East Texas Historical Asso-
ciation, believes the region's ter-
rain, culture and attitudes offer
a near-perfect environment for
laying low.
"East Texas, they respect your
privacy if that's what you want,"
McDonald said. "Basically, we
are a live-and-let-live people."


The region's reputation as a
criminal safe haven goes back to
the Louisiana Purchase, when a
boundary dispute between the
U.S. and Spain left a strip of land
known as the Neutral Ground. It
remained a refuge for outlaws
until 1812, when Spanish and
American soldiers finally ousted
them.
Deborah Ann Gavin was a
modern-day outlaw after she es-
caped the low-security Georgia
Women's Correctional Institu-
tion.
She eventually settled in this
rural and sparsely populated
area though her husband, Rich-
ard Murphey, bristles at media
portrayals of his wife as some
Bonnie Parker-like bandit who
spent three decades constantly
looking over her shoulder.
Indeed, other than chang-


ing her last name when she got
married, Murphey wasn't exact-
ly living off the grid. She enrolled
in school to get her nursing de-
gree, watched her son play de-
fensive end on Friday nights for
the Frankston Indians and was
often photographed when her
quarter horses won races in
nearby Sulphur Springs.
Nor was Frankston a delib-
erately obscure choice to settle
down; Richard Murphey simply
moved back to his hometown
after he and Deborah met near
Dallas in the 1970s.
"Usually a teacher can tell
.if kids are having trouble at
home," said Jerry Beard, who
taught the Murpheys' children at
Frankston High School. "There
was no indication that she might
be wanted for armed robbery.
None of us knew."


Richard Murphey said his wife
told him "bits and pieces" of her
past over the years, but he never
pressed for details. He said she
was not involved in the robbery
and was asleep in the backseat
when police surrounded a car
linked to the case.
"We were just everyday peo-
ple," he said. "We haven't been
running."
If they were, count the Texas
Bigfoot Research Conservancy
among those impressed with
Murphey's choice. Eighty per-
cent of sasquatch sightings the
group receives are from the
eastern third of the state.
"I could hide out really well
there," said Daryl Colyer, a field
investigator .with the group.
"There are some places in East
Texas where I believe I could
evade forever, if I had to."


Community Events


Okeechobee High School Scholarship Drive
College costs continue to increase each year and the students
of Okeechobee are always in need of financial assistance. The
Okeechobee High School Scholarship Program is currently recruiting
to increase the amount of scholarship funds available to these stu-
dents. If you or your business would like to offer a scholarship in your
name, or if you have any questions regarding scholarship contribu-
tions, please contact Bill R. Black at (873) 462-5025 ext. 3113. The
scholarship commitment deadline is Jan. 11, 2008 so new scholar-
ships can be included in the scholarship booklets. If this is not conve-
nient for you please call and we will work out the details.

Help to pay electric bill available
The Salvation Army Okeechobee Service Unit is administering FPL's
Care to Share Program in Okeechobee County. The Care to Share pro-
gram is funded by Okeechobee's FPL customers and FPL corporate
funds. The program provides emergency assistance funds to custom-
ers who are in a crisis situation and unable to pay their FPL electric bill.
There are rules and guidelines that must be met to quality. If you are a
FPL customer and need help, call (863) 763-6020 to leave your name
and number. Your call will be returned and an interview will be done
over the phone to determine if you qualify. Interviews with your local
Salvation Army are by appointment only, no walk-ins are accepted.

Discount cards aid youth activities
Communities in Schools and the Police Athletic League of
Okeechobee have discount cards available. The cards are $10 and are
good for one year at selected businesses. Cards can be purchased at
CarQuest, 300 N.W Park St. For information, call (863) 462-5863. Pro-
ceeds will go toward youth activities in our community.

Advocacy group seeking members
The Florida Local Advocacy Council in this area has openings for
membership. The members of the volunteer council protect and ad-
vocate for a better quality of life for Floridians with unique needs.
Volunteers are appointed by the governor for a four-year term. Local
meetings are held on the second Tuesday of the month in Fort Pierce.
Call Penina Popper at (800) 342-0825 for information; or, visit www.
floridasac.org,


Group providing animal rescue
Florida Wildlife Rescue Service of Okeechobee is currently provid-
ing rescue, pick up and transport of sick, injured, orphaned or other-
wise impaired wildlife.
Anyone who finds a wild animal in need of help is encouraged to
give us a call. A volunteer transporter, licensed by the Florida Fish &
Wildlife Conservation Commission, will be more than happy to help
you and the animal.
This is a free service to the community and to wildlife.
For information, call (863) 634-1755 or (863) 357-7955.

Parent education classes offered
The Okeechobee County Healthy Start Coalition will be offering
parenting education classes for infants to age 3. All pregnant women
and parents are encouraged to attend. Each participant will receive a
gift. This adults-only parenting class consists of six, one-hour classes.
You must attend all six classes to get a certificate of completion. We
now have day and evening classes available. No child care will be
available. Call (863) 462-5877 for registration.

CAP looking for senior and cadet members
The Florida Wing of the Civil Air Patrol - United States Air Force
Auxiliary has formed a CAP unit in Okeechobee. Okeechobee Com-
posite Squadron 453 currently has 26 members. Senior members and
cadets are being recruited for the unit. Youths between the ages of 12
and 18 are eligible. Senior members are needed to administer the unit
and provide supervision for the cadets. The three main missions of
the Civil Air Patrol are emergency services, aerospace education and
cadet programs. Senior members and cadets work side by side to ac-
complish these missions. If you are interested in becoming a cadet or
senior member contact Gene O'Neill at the Okeechobee Emergency
Operations Center, (863) 763-3212.

Martha's House collecting cell phones
Martha's House is collecting used cell phones to return for money.
Martha's House can also have them 9-1-1 activated for participants. If
you have any used cell phones to donate call (863) 763-2893, or drop
them off at their administrative office at 103 N.W Fifth St.


My Aunt's House seeking volunteers
My Aunt's House, Inc. a 501 (c) (3) organization is looking for two
to three volunteers to work in our Closet any day, or days, Monday
through Friday during the hours of 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. We are also
looking for a volunteer to become the director and a board member
of The Clothes Closet. The volunteer should communicate well with
the public and should be able to seek support from city and county
officials, business executives and other organizations. Work days and
hours are flexible. Call (863) 634-2306 for information.

Career Center helps in job search
The One Stop Career Center, 209 S.W. Park St., has services avail-
able at no charge to help people in their search for the right employee
or job. For more, visit their web site at www.tcjobs.org; or, call (863)
462-5350.

Center offers service to children
The Family Outreach Center at Sacred Heart offers a service to
youth and children by giving free classes in martial arts. The classes
are currently taught four days a week on Monday, Wednesday and
Friday, from 6 until 8 p.m. and on Saturday from 5:30 until 7:30 p.m.

U.S.C.G. Flotilla seeking new members
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 57 in Okeechobee is seeking
new members to become involved in the Auxiliary's programs.
The Auxiliary is a volunteer service organization composed of men
and women who actively support recreational boating safety and oth-
er Coast Guard missions.
The Auxiliary also provides recreational boating safety support to
sate and local authorities.
Members could be involved in patrols, communications, adminis-
tration, seamanship, piloting/navigation, weather or search and res-
cue.
For information, call (863) 763-0165.

Huckabee supporters to meet
Are you a Mike Huckabee supporter? Huckabee supporters are go-
ing to meet as a local group. Go to www.meetup.com for information,
For information call (863) 634-3525 or (863) 801-1414.


REQUEST FOR BIDS RFB) 6000000147
GOLDEN GATE NO.1 SCOUR REPA RS, COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA
The Soulth Flonda Water Management District will receive sealed bids through the
Procurement Olfice, 8-1 Bldg., 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach, Flonda
33406, for Golden Gate No. 1 Scour Repairs, Collier County, FL on Thursday,
January 3, 2008 at 2:30 .m. local time, at which timely submitted bids will be
opened and publicly read. Provide all labor, materials and equipment necessary to
repair a scour hole and install new erosion protection in the canal downstream of
the Golden Gate No. 1 Gate Structure. Work includes but is not limited to: removal
of existing rock riprap and filter fabric; installation of new erosion protection; ex-
cavation of canal bottom and dressing canal banks ; new ilter fabric, bedding
stone layer, rock riprap; and tremie concrete. An OPTIONAL pre-bid conference
will be held at Big Cypress Basin Service Center on Thursday, December 13,
2007 at 10:00 a.m. 2640 Golden Gate Parkway, Ste. 205, Naples, FL 34105 For
directions call (239) 263-7615. A site visit will immediately follow.
All bids must conform to the instructions in the Request for Bidders (RFB). Interest-
ed respondents may obtain a copy of the complete RFB by obtaining a CD for
$5.00 at the above address, by calling (561) 682-6391, or by calling the 24-hour
BID HOTLINE 800-472-5290. The public is invited to attend the bid opening. In-
formation on the status of this solicitation can be obtained at our web site -
www.sfwmd.gov.
250165 ON 11/26/07









Parks & Recreation Soccer Teams


Submitted photos
GCR Transport 10 & under division soccer team with Coach Randy Torres, ( in no particular
order) are: Rodolfo Torres, Erik Gaitan, Ozmani Robles, Celeste Howell, Abel Jimenez, Jr.,
Valentin Perez, Gerardo Garcia, April Hogenkamp, Juliana Sanchez, Margarita Martinez, Laz-
aro Nunez, Jr., Shannon Mayes, Sebastian Rebollo, and Desiree Torres.


Raulerson's Jams and Jellies 8 & under division soccer team members are (in no particular
order) Brittany McCoy, Ruben Rodriguez, Giovanny Garcia, Jose Rodriguez, Jesus Mojica,
Daniel Campos, Pedro Perez, David Solorzano, Alejandro Brucio, Jacob Aleman, Deoante
Garner, Artha Jonassaint, Brooke Tart, and Taylor Tart. Coaches are Ruben Rodriguez, and
Doug McCoy.


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' '.'t-. , 1 ." " " ; � ' "a- *.,* * *..-. " '

Okeechobee Strikers 10 and under division soccer team members are (in no particular or-
der) Logan Laskey, Cole Owens, Jacob Emmick, Kailin Brown, Ross Laskey, Omar Cardoso,
Sean Chauhan, Michael Hawthorne, Josiah Villeda, Mark Russelburg, Cristian Cruz, Alanah
_ Mosley, Mariah Mosley, Clayton Arnold, and Savannah Vasquez. Coaches are Doug Laskey
and Jeff Emmick.


Kassella Construction 8 & under division soccer team members are (in no particular order)
Sarah Leitner, Gabe Greseth, Mitchell Johnson, Ramiro Borja, Carter Kassella, Brandon Cole,
Miguel Sanchez, Matthew Huddleston, Hannah Phillips, Alyssa Howard, Ariana Robshaw,
Devin Harden, and Dakota Hart. Coaches are Andy Kassella and Delbert Howard.


Stitchin' Post 6 & under division soccer team members are ( in no particular order) Scott
Yates, Tanner Shore, Jace Selph, Kaylee Bell, Cason Cooper, Gavin Driggers, Brandon Mitch-
ell, Erick Ayala, Kevin Dryden, Amber Sheffield, Edward Lauth, and Jonah Palomino. Coaches
are Brian Dryden and Mike Palamino.


W 22x9 Gear
Alloy Wheels
2 Falken Tires 305/140R22
'6 * 10.2" DVD Flipdown


$3,25000 Plus Free Wash and Wax


* Car and Truck Accessories * Lift kits * Leveling Kits
* Train horns * Cold Air Intakes * Custom Bumpers
* Custom Exhaust * Custom Wheels & Tires
* Custom Welding Fabrication
* Grill Guards * Brush Guards - ...


415 NE Park Street * Okeechobee, FL
S..al&..pb,, ..in., (863) 763-8866 - Fax (863) 763-8968
i Rhino Linings Website: www.fly-n-hi-ent.com1..
Email us at richsampson@fly-n-hi-ent.com or patrickbernard@fly-n-hi-ent.comn
r7 =,;* ."" ^s!I;s^ "l~ *!~ K !.


Your paper,



not ours.


Okee chob)'ee
- COI~fLqO gr, ~~a,


Okee-tho)bee Okeechobee News


Ocond term


Animal facility pact OKd


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Okeechobee News


Community Service Through Tournalism


Okeechobee News, Monday, November 26, 2007


SPORTS


AJIJ.11.� Wt hp,], Council to
MST-PLACE
elect mayor




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