Okeechobee news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028410/01048
 Material Information
Title: Okeechobee news
Uniform Title: Okeechobee News
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Okeechobee News
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee Fla
Publication Date: November 19, 2007
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
Coordinates: 27.241667 x -80.833056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 72823230
alephbibnum - 003642554
lccn - 2006229435
System ID: UF00028410:01048
 Related Items
Preceded by: Daily Okeechobee news

Full Text





****ORI
205 SMA

kCPO OBOX
GAINESV


eechobe..


GIN MIXED ADC 334
U FL LIB OF FL HISTORY


11
VIL


7007 0
LE FL 32611 7007


W& 11 %op3


Vol. 98 No. 323 Monday, November 19, 2007 50� Plus tax


Briefs

Water restrictions
still in effect
Residents in the Lake
Okeechobee ServiceArea (LOSA)
of the South Florida Water Man-
agement District are reminded
that Phase III Water Restrictions
remain in effect. Under Phase
III, most residential water users
in the LOSA are required to limit
outdoor irrigation times to one
day per week and four hours per
day. Residents with odd home
addresses are allowed to water
between the hours of 4:00 a.m.
and 8:00 a.m. EST on Saturdays,
while residents with even home
addresses are allowed to water
between the hours of 4:00 a.m.
and 8:00 a.m. EST on Sundays.
Residents may also hand-water
(no sprinklers, automated or
manual) on their designated day
between 5 and 7 p.m. No do-
mestic water use for outdoor ir-
rigation will be allowed Monday
through Friday.
In addition, residential users
may wash their cars, boats and
other equipment from 5-7 p.m.
and within the specific times and
days where irrigation is allowed.
Residents also are expected to
observe normal water conserva-
tion practices within the home.
The use of water for firefighting,
safety, sanitation, health, medical
and other essential purposes is
not restricted. Organizers of char-
ity car washes and outdoor wa-
ter-based recreational activities
are required to obtain a variance.
Application forms and instruc-
tions are available on the District
website at www. s fwmd. gov.
The Lake Okeechobee Ser-
vice Area coincides with the area
that is served by the Okeechobee
Utility Authority. Only surface wa-
ter uses are restricted. Irrigation
that is from a ground water well
within this area is permitted. Sur-
face water uses include water-
ing from a pond, retention area,
canal or other waterway. For
more information, please phone
the South Florida Water Man-
agement District Okeechobee
Service Center at 462-5260. To
report a violation, please contact
the Okeechobee County Sheriff's
Office at 763-3117.

Drought Index
Current: 354
Source: Florida Division
of Forestry
Local Burn Ban: None

Lake Levels

10.31 feet
Last Year: 12.51 feet
T Source: South
..' Florida Water
-' 1 \ Management
S-.-) District. Depth
' ,{' given in feet
'\^-,! above sea level.


Index
Classifieds .......................... 8-9
Com ics ................................... 7
Community Events................... 4
O pinion................................... 4
Speak Out ............................. 4
'Sports........................................ 5
W eather................. ................ 2

See Page 2 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.


Community Links. Individual Voices.


Ukraine mine blast kills 63


By Sergei Chuzavkov
Associated Press Writer
DONETSK, Ukraine (AP) -
A methane blast ripped through
a coal mine in eastern Ukraine
early Sunday, killing at least 63
miners in the ex-Soviet nation's
worst mining accident in years,
emergency officials said.
More than 360 miners were
rescued but 37 others remained
trapped inside the mine - one
of Ukraine's largest and deepest
- with a raging fire hampering
efforts to save them, officials
said.


The explosion occurred
around 3 a.m. more than 3,300
feet deep inside the Zasyadko
mine in the regional capital
Donetsk,. the heart of the coun-
try's coal mining industry, the
Emergency Situations Ministry
said.
Authorities evacuated 367
miners. Twenty-eight were hos-
pitalized, the ministry said.
Vitaliy Kvitkovsky, a miner in
his thirties, was among those
evacuated. He said he had to
walk over the bodies of his dead
colleagues in order to climb to


the surface.
"The temperature increased
sharply and there was so much
dust that I couldn't see any-
thing," Kvitkovsky said in footage
broadcast on Ukraine's Channel
5 television. "So I was moving
by touch over dead bodies along
the rail track."
The accident - the worst in
Ukraine in seven years - high-
lighted the lack of attention to
safety in a country with some
of the world's most dangerous.
mines.
President Viktor Yushchenko


Free house: becomes home for foster children


Submitted photo
The house that once sat on Northwest Second Street and U.S. 441.

Harvey Sampson and the Big House


By Betty Bockoras
Special to the
Okeechobee News
Anyone around Okeechobee
in the 1970's might remember
the big two-story house on
the corner of NW Second St.
and US Highway 441. David R.
MacNeil and his wife Carrie had
owned it since the 1920's.
But when Barnett Bank
bought the property, the house
had to be either torn down or
moved. That's when Harvey
Sampson came into the pic-
ture. He and his wife Edith had
wanted to start a. children's
home and this house was cer-
tainly large enough to hold as
many youngsters as they could
handle.
Tom Hebel, who-was man-
ager at Barnet Bank at the time,
told Sampson, "If you move
that house you can have it."
Mr. Sampson, now 88 years
old, remembers it like yester-
day.
"I went to a fellow here in
town who moved houses and
asked him what he'd charge."
He recalled. "He looked at the
house and said he could move
it for $25,000.
"I went back and told Tom
See House - Page 2


"


Edith Sampson (shown with her kindergarten class)
taught school in the breezeway.


Local doctor team retires


By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
Medical era in Okeechobee
came to an end on Nov. 1. That
is the retirement date of doc-
tors Cahdido and Gloria Ara-
gon. After 34 years of serving
the people of Okeechobee,
they are calling it quits.
The Aragons have been
planning retirement for the last
year or two. Earlier this year
this brought Dr. Ludmila Mishe-
levich into their practice. When
they saw how things were
working out, they let her take
over the practice.
After all these years of tak-


ing care of others Dr. Candido
thinks it is time to take care
of himself. Health problems
have been a factor in their re-
tirement. He said his work is
stressful, but he misses it. Now
he will have more time to tend
his garden and go fishing.
The Aragons are natives of
the Philippines. Dr. Gloria came
here in 1965 as a single lady to
study medicine. In 1967 she
went back to the Philippines
and returned with Dr. Candido.
They were married in Philadel-
phia.
Because of the political un-
rest in the Philippines at that


time they decided to stay in this
county. Since they were both
doctors and many American
doctors were serving in Viet
Nam, they were allowed to stay
in this country.
The Aragons have been in
Okeechobee since 1974 and
they still live in the same house,
Things were hectic in the early
days. For seven years Dr. Glo-
ria was the only pediatrician
in Okeechobee. They were
both on call in the emergency
room of the old county hospi-
tal. There were no cell phones
at that time and they had no an-


blamed his Cabinet for not do-
ing enough to reform coal min-
ing and ordered an official panel
to investigate the accident and
bring those responsible to ac-
count.
Local authorities declared
three days of mourning for the
dead miners.
Dozens of teary-eyed relatives
gathered at the mine's head-
quarters in Donetsk waiting. for
news on their loved ones. As
grim-faced officials emerged
to announce the names of the
workers found dead, the rela-


tives broke into sobs and cries,
some fainted.
Natalia Piskun, a middle-aged
woman, who waited for news
on her husband believed trapped
inside the mine, said she would
never forgive the mine's director,
if her husband was found killed.
"If, God forbid, he is lost, I
promise I will, if I manage, I will
bite this fat beast on his leg! I
promise, I swear to you," Piskun,
her face distorted by anger and
pain, told AP Television News.
See Mine - Page 2


District plans



to reorganize



at meeting


By Eric Kopp
Okeechobee News
When the Okeechobee
County School Board meets
Tuesday evening one of the
first major items to be handled
will be the reorganization of the
board.
The board will meet Nov. 20
at 6 p.m. in room 303 of their
offices at 700 S.W Second Ave.
and will elect a new chairper-
son and vice-chairperson. The
current chairperson is Joe Ar-
nold.
Prior to re-organizing the


board several students from
Okeechobee High School
(OHS) will be recognized for
their accomplishments, as well
as some students from Yearling
Middle School.
Lori Howard, Jenni Melear
and Eddie Matchett will also
be recognized by the board as
social studies teachers of the
year.
On the other side of the coin,
Superintendent,of Schools Dr.
Patricia Cooper will be recom-
mending that seven students
See District - Page 2


By Chauna Aguilar
Okeechobee News
Through the joint efforts of
the Okeechobee Health Depart-
ment, Shared Services Network
of Okeechobee, Okeechobee
County Fire Rescue and the
Children's Services Council the
Okeechobee Family Health and
Safety Expo will.be held at the
Okeechobee Agri-Civic Center,
4200 S.R. 70 E, on Satuirday, Jan.
26, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m.
The expo will be a fun, edu-


national day for those who at-
tend, young and old. The event
will have booths aimed at many
different age groups from the
children to senior citizens. The
deadline for vendor/agency reg-
istration is no later than Friday,
Nov. 30.
Emergency equipment will
be set up such as police and
sheriff's office vehicles, fire
trucks, ambulances, a helicop-
ter, and brush trucks. Forestry's
See Health - Page 2


UKeecnooee News/iele uawaa
Doctors Candido and Gloria Aragon retired Nov. 1 after serv-
ing the people of Okeechobee for 34 years.


Oo ' , FRONT END ALIGNMENT SPECIAL
5 .59'

Jeep 1 '20 Savings!
e 863-357-0500 * OKEECHOBEE, FL..'- E7-
MEWB -863-357-05060'"oOKEEClHOBEE, FL


Health and



Safety Expo



is a joint effort







2 Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007


By/Audrey Driggers
Soil and Water Conservation
Commission
Just as
croplands can
produce crops
yet yield habi-
tat for wildlife,
south Florida
Flatwoods can
be managed
to produce wood products and
at the same time benefit wildlife.
Managing a Flatwoods with wild-
life in mind is like shooting at a
moving target. As the trees and
other plants grow and change, the
structure, size and species of trees
and other plants changes. That
shift in habitat also means there
will be a shift in wildlife species


Mine
Continued From Page 1
It was the deadliest mine ac-
cident in Ukraine since an explo-
sion at the Barakova mine in the
eastern Luhansk region killed 81
miners in March 2000.
Prime Minister Viktor Yanu-
kovych, a native of the mining
region, visited the site about 450
miles southeast of Kiev, pledging
to help victims' families.
Yanukovych said a safety
watchdog had reported that min-


House
Continued From Page 1
Hebel the price and said 'I don't
have that kind of money,' and
Tom said -- right then and there
-- 'We'll make you a loan.' And
they did. Can you imagine? That
wouldn't happen today," he con-
tinued.
Harvey and is wife Edith at-
tended the Grace Brethren
Church here in town at the time.
(Randy Macomber was the pas-
tor then.) The church owned
20 acres in Bassenger, and they
gave Mr. Sampson one acre for
the house. They named the place
"Crossroads," and according to
Sampson, he had children ready
to move in even before the house
was ready.
"To move the house," Mr.
Sampson said, "We had to cut
it in two and move both halves.
When we got both halves to
+ Bassenger, Edith said, 'Don't put
them all the way together. We'll
have a breezeway.' So that's what
we did."



District
Continued From Page 1
from New Endeavor High School
be expelled. The reasons for the
expulsions include defiance of
authority, possession of alcohol/
drugs on school property and in-
appropriate personal conduct.
Also on tap will be former
Okeechobee County superinten-
dent of schools Phoebe Rauler-
son, who will address the board
on the ready to work program.
The five-member board is also
expected to approve a change
order for the paving/drainage


Health
Continued From Page 1
Smokey the Bear will be in atten-
dance promoting fire safety.
Other organizations such as
Big Brothers Big Sisters, Commu-
nities In Schools, Healthy Start,
Red Cross and the Okeechobee
County Library will also be in
attendance. Each booth will be
geared toward health and safety.
The local schools will be partici-
pating through the OHS Health


Doctor
Continued From Page 1
swering service. So they received
calls at all hours of the night. The
only way they could get any rest
was to leave town. Dr. Gloria
recalled one night when a po-
liceman came to their door and


that live in the Flatwoods at the
time. For example, the seeds and
fruits of shrubs, grasses and forbs
in the early success ional stage,
after a harvest or other major dis-
turbance, are just what songbirds
and small mammals want. On the
other hand, woodpeckers, wood
ducks, bats and other cavity nest-
ers want the dead snags and den
trees of a mature stand. For the
greatest diversity in wildlife, you
want diversity in the size, age and
structure of the habitat. That can
be achieved with selective har-
vesting of single trees, to always
leave a canopy, or by clear cutting
small areas of the Flatwoods (15
acres or less) at different times,
resulting in several success ional
stages of even-aged stands of trees


ers were working in accordance
with norms. "This accident has
proven once again that a human
is powerless before the nature,"
he said.
Experts say Ukraine's mines
are dangerous largely because
they are so deep, typically run-
ning more than 3,280 feet under-
ground. In comparison, most Eu-
ropean coal beds lie at a depth of
1,640 to 1,970 feet.
Methane is a natural byproduct
of mining, and its concentration
increases with depth. More than
75 percent of Ukraine's some 200


CAP looking for senior and cadet members
The Florida Wing of the Civil Air Patrol - United States Air Force Aux-
iliary has formed a CAP unit in Okeechobee. Okeechobee Composite
Squadron 453 currently has 26 members. Senior members and cadets
are being recruited for the unit. Youths between the ages of 12 and 18
are eligible. Senior members are needed to administer the unit and pro-
vide supervision for the cadets. The three main missions of the Civil Air
Patrol are emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs.
Senior members and cadets work side by side to accomplish these mis-
sions. If you are interested in becoming a cadet or senior member con-
tact Gene O'Neill at the Okeechobee Emergency Operations Center, (863)
763-3212.

Help to pay electric bill available
The Salvation Army Okeechobee Service Unit is administering FPL's


within an area. The flush of plant
growth in clear cut areas lasts for
several years. Techniques to im-
prove fish and wildlife habitat in-
clude: 1) Regenerate new growth
in open spaces. This may be done
by prescribed burning, using her-
bicides, or planting seedlings. 2)
Thin stands; remove weak trees.
3) Plan carefully to carry out a
prescribed burn; studies show
most wildlife escape, and the new
plant growth afterwards attracts
wild turkeys, bobwhite quail,
and more. 4) Maintain forested
riparian zones along creeks and
canals, to allow shading and for
wood to fall into the water. The
leaves, limbs, fruit and insects
that fall from the streamside into
the stream build the food supply


coal mines are classified as dan-
gerous due to high methane con-
centrations.
Mines must be ventilated to
prevent explosions, but some rely
on outdated ventilation equip-
ment, officials said. Safety viola-
tions and negligence add to the
problem.
Last year, a blast at the mine
killed 13 workers. In 2002, an
explosion killed 20 and 54 died
in a similar explosion in 2001. In
May 1999, 50 miners were killed
in a methane and coal dust blast


for fish. 5) Leave snags and den
trees. 6) Follow a plan. A variety
of federal, state, and private orga-
nizations give both technical and
financial help in managing forests
for profit and wildlife. For more
information, visit the Wildlife
Habitat Management Institute's
website at
www.whmi.nrcs.usda.gov or
the NRCS home web site at www.
nrcs.usda.gov.
Wildlife Ways, Did you know?
National forests cover only
19% of forested land in the United
States. Non-industrial private land-
owners own 59% of the forested
land; their actions are critically
important to birds, bears, ducks,
and other wildlife that depend on
forestland habitat.


there.
Since the 1991 Soviet col-
lapse, more than 4,700 miners in
Ukraine have been killed. For ev-
ery I million tons of coal brought
to the surface in Ukraine, three
miners lose their lives, according
to official data.
Despite the dangers, there is
growing appetite for Ukraine's
rich coal reserves, particularly
amid rising natural gas prices.
The government has called for
production to be increased by a
third to 80 million tons this year.


Harvey and Edith Sampson (with their foster children) started a children's home with a house
they moved to a lot provided by their church.


Edith was a school teacher
and taught kindergarten to all the
Bassenger kids in that Breezeway.
The couple also took in a total of
32 foster children during the 12
years the children's home was in
operation.
"The Big House," as Mr. Samp-
son still refers to it, was too big for


project at the district's bus garage
and multi-purpose building. The
$21,905.85 change order will hike
the total contract amount for the
project to $816,231.53.
The change order changes the
scope of work to include: cost
for clearing and removing debris
from the fence line on the east
side of the property; a road cross-
ing change; asphalt widening
at the fuel docks; drainage tie-in
at the fuel dock; elevation of the
crown in the back parking lot;
and, deletion of striping and car
stops.
The board is also expected to
reschedule their January 2008


Occupations and for entertain-
ment purposes.
There will be scheduled en-
tertainment throughout the event
with a different performance ev-
ery 30 minutes.
Free health screenings; finger-
printing; prizes; and giveaways
will all be available at the expo.
Each booth is required to have
giveaways such as pens, pencils,
stickers, snacks, etc. and an item
that visitors to each booth have an
opportunity to win via drawing in
addition to displaying and/or shar-
ing health or safety information.


woke them up. People thought
something was wrong because
they could not get in touch with
Dr. Candido. He was so exhausted
that he had fallen asleep with the
telephone on his chest. In 1978
they built the clinic on U. S. 41 N.
where they practiced the rest of
their careers.
The Aragons' three children


them after Edith got cancer and
they couldn't take care of chil-
dren anymore. He sold the place
to Jeff and Debbie Clemons with
the condition that he could have
a house trailer there on the prop-
erty.
Mr. Sampson, now widowed,
still resides there by himself and


meeting from Tuesday, Jan. 8, to
Tuesday, Jan. 29, at 6 p.m.
In other business, the board:
* will hear a presentation from
Dr. Cooper on the fifth grade at
Osceola Middle School;
* will be asked to adopt a
resolution asking the Florida De-
partment of Transportation to
quit claim deed property at the
south entry to OHS to the school
board;
* will be asked to approve
the amendment to board policy
dealing with salary schedules to
correct guidelines for payment to
instructional personnel with ad-
vanced degrees;.


Vendors/agencies must provide
their own table, chairs and other
items necessary for the display.
Electricity will not be available.
Space is still available, both
under the covered roof and out-
side, at this event where they are
striving to educate the community
on health and safety issues. Dona-
tions for the event are also being
accepted. Anyone wishing to do-
nate monetarily or other needed
items to the expo can contact any
of the following individuals. Par-
ticipation is not limited to booth


grew up here in Okeechobee.
The oldest son, Michael is 38.
Their daughter Elizabeth is 36.
The youngest son, George, 31, is
a doctor and is also married to a
doctor.
The full effects of retirement
have not yet sunk in because the
Aragons have been so busy. They
plan to visit their son, Michael, in


his little dog Louie. He can't do
much anymore and he's legally
blind, but he has some wonderful
memories of what God has done
throughout his life.
Editor's note: Share your "recollec-
tions" of your life in Okeechobee
for this weekly feature. Email
stories and photos to okeenews@
okeechobee.com.


* is expected to revise the job
description for warehouseman;
* will discuss the expendi-
ture of school recognition funds
for Central Elementary, North
Elementary, South Elementary,
Yearling Middle School and the
Okeechobee Freshman Campus;
and,
* will be asked to approve the
low bid of $24,980.75 to install a
pump station, greenhouse/garden
irrigation system and low volt-
age wiring for the South Florida
Water Management District and
school board aquaculture project
at OHS. That bid was entered by
Allied Pivot Sales, Inc.


participation.
If you would like to participate,
simply contact Sharon Vinson
(863) 462-5000 ext. 257, Angela
Kelly (863) 462-5781, .Barbara
Godejohn (863) 462-5800, or
Donny Arnold (863) 634-6464
for a vendor/agency registration
form.
The deadline for vendor/agen-
cy registration is no later than Fri-
day, Nov. 30.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.com.
Reporter Chauna Agullar may be
reached at caguilar@newszap.com.


California and spend Thanksgiv-
ing in Mexico.
As the reality of retirement sets
in they plan to spend more time
visiting their children and grand-
children. They have five grand-
children and a sixth grandchild is
due in January. They will also be
able to stay longer when they visit
the Philippines.


Care to Share Program in Okeechobee County. The Care to Share program
is funded by Okeechobee's FPL customers and FPL corporate funds. The
program provides emergency assistance funds to customers who are in a
crisis situation and unable to pay their FPL electric bill. There are rules and
guidelines that must be met to quality. If you are a FPL customer and need
help, call (863) 763-6020 to leave your name and number. Your call will
be returned and an interview will be done over the phone to determine
if you qualify. Interviews with your local Salvation Army are by appoint-
ment only, no walk-ins are accepted.

Discount cards aid youth activities
Communities in Schools and the Police Athletic League of Okeechobee
have discount cards available. The cards are $10 and are good for one
year at selected businesses. Cards can be purchased at CarQuest, 300
N.W Park St. For information, call (863) 462-5863. Proceeds will go to-
ward youth activities in our community.


Six tips to better forest habitat for Fish & Wildlife


Okeechobee Forecast

Monday: Partly sunny with the high in the upper 70s. The
wind will be from the north 5 to 10 mph.
Monday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the lower 60s.
The wind will be from the northeast 5 to 10 mph.

Extended Forecast
Tuesday: Partly sunny with the high in the lower 80s. The
wind will be from the northeast 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the upper 50s.
Wednesday: Partly sunny with the high in the lower 80s.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the upper
50s.
Thursday: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers. The
high will be in the lower 80s. The chance of rain is 20 percent.
Thursday night: Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers.
The low will be around 60. The chance of rain is 30 percent.
Friday: Considerable cloudiness with a chance of showers.
The high will be in the upper 70s. The chance of rain is 30 per-
cent.
Friday night: Considerable cloudiness with a slight chance
of showers. The low will be around 60. The chance of rain is 20
percent.
Saturday: Considerable cloudiness with a chance of show-
ers. The high will be in the upper 70s. The chance of rain is 30
percent.

Lotteries

MIAMI (AP) -- Here are the winning numbers selected Saturday
in the Florida Lottery: Cash 3 7-9-5;Play 4 5-6-8-9 Lotto -- 23-41-
48-35-34-19


Okeechobee News
Published by Independent Newspapers Inc.


To Reach Us
Address: P. O. Box 639;
107 S.W. 17th Street, Suite D
Okeechobee, FL 34974
WobSlte: www.newszap.com
To Submit News
The Okeechobee News welcomes sub-:
missions from its readers. Opinions,
calendar items, stories ideas and pho-
tographs are welcome. Call (863) 763-
3134 to reach our newsroom. Items
may be mailed, faxed or e-mailed.
E-Mall: okeenews@newszap.com
Speakout (863) 467-2033
To Place A Display Ad
Phone: 863-763-3134
E-Mail: okeeadsales@newszap.com
To Place A Classified Ad
Call 877-353-2424 to place a classified
advertisement from home.
Fax 877-354-2424
E-Mail: classads@newszap.com
Billing Department
E-Mall: billteam@newszap.com.

Newszap!
Online News & Information
Get the latest local news at
www.newszap.com


To Start or Stop A Paper
Phone: (8001282-8586
E-mail: readerservices@newszap.com
The Okeechobee News is available
daily via home delivery and is on sale
at rack and store locations throughout
Okeechobee County. Call the office to
find out if your home is within our
present home-distribution boundaries.
Call 800-282-8586 to report a missed
newspaper or poor delivery.
Additional copies of the newspaper are
available for 50 cents daily through
Saturday and 75 cents for Sunday at the
office. Home delivery subscriptions are
available at $29.43 for three months.
Okeechobee News
USPS 406-160
Published Daily by Independent
Newspapers, Inc.
107 S.W. 17th Street, Suite D
Okeechobee, FL 34974
Periodicals Postage Paid at
Okeechobee, FL 34974
POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to Okeechobee News
Circulation Administration
PO Box 7011
Dover, DE 19903


News Briefs

No Thanksgiving Dinner at Grace Brethren
For the first time in many years, there will be no community
wide Thanksgiving Dinner at Grace Brethren Church. The church
itself never sponsored the dinner. The church just provided the
dining room. A separate organization called Grace Ministries
sponsored the event. Apparently that organization has ceased to
exist. Grace Brethren officials state that no one has contacted
them to use their facility and no one seems to know who is in
charge of Grace Ministries or if that organization is still in exis-
tence.

Local court cases now online
Sharon Robertson, Okeechobee County clerk of circuit
court, has announced that the clerk's office web site now offers
Okeechobee County court cases on line.
The information is available 24 hours a day, seven days a
week. The site provides the ability to perform a person or case
search in a variety of ways. Visit www.clerk.co.okeechobee.fl.us
for the index and progress dockets of Okeechobee County public
record court cases.
Questions should be directed to Sharon Robertson at www.
clerk@clerk.co.okeechobee.fl.us.

VFW sponsors Operation Shoebox
Big Lake VFW, Post #10539 is looking for all family members
-- sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, fathers or mothers -- of those
serving in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan or the Persian Gulf. The Post is
sponsoring Operation Shoebox and would like to send packages
to active military personnel from Okeechobee. Please call (863)
697-2930, or e-mail Cheryl@oacenterprises.com.

Today's Weather


Community Events


I


I


L-







Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007 BUSINESS 3


Okeechobee News/Chauna Aguilar '.. . t.,"'-,

IRCC addition is going up
The Indian River Community College Dixon Hendry Campus' Williamson Conference and 9" .'
Educational Center addition is well under construction. The center is scheduled to open
in fall of 2008. The new technologically sophisticated facility will be used for conferences,..... .,. *'-
college courses, seminars, strategic planning sessions, community activities and many
other events.

r r re t Sign of the season
Plan for your future at IRCC This fall display was provided by Quality Air Conditioning.


Career Exploration Day


Working with a career coun-
selor to explore the changing
world of work and the courses
Indian River Community College
offers is a great way to prepare for
valuable careers available here on
the Treasure Coast. Individuals
who want to learn how to choose
a great career will want to attend
the IRCC Chastain Campus Career
Exploration Day on Tuesday, Dec.
4, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Personal IRCC
counselors will be available to


help individuals find the best ca-
reer path and use career profiling
software. Attendees will also be
able to learn about Financial Aid
and register for spring courses.
The IRCC Career Center pro-
vides career assessment tools that
analyze what talents and interests
individuals have and provides rec-,
ommendations regarding suitable
career choices. Career explora-
tion information is also available
regarding the responsibilities and


tasks related to specific careers,
salary ranges and the outlook for
career advancement and future
growth.
IRCC Chastain Campus Career
Exploration Day will be Tues-
day, December 4, 8 a.m. to 7
p.m. at the Robert Morgade Ad-
ministration and Student Services
Center at the IRCC Chastain Cam-
,pus, 2400 S.E. Salerno Road. For
more information, call (772) 419-
5617 or visit www.ircc.edu.


How can you build a business?


Expert guidance
for entrepreneurs


(ARA) - Starting your own busi-
ness takes passion, patience, per-
severance and access to resources.
Knowing how to achieve and ex-
ceed your goals requires the right
advice and support.
According to a recent survey
conducted by CIT, a leading global
commercial finance company and
the Economist Intelligence Unit,
middle market business executives
stated that attributes like "strong
customer relationships" and "hav-
ing a financial institution who
deeply understand their business
or industry" are more important
to their success than just the strong
balance sheet.
"We are challenging the tradi-
tional ways lending institutions ap-
proach customers," says.Chris Reil-
ly, president of CIT Small Business
Lending Corporation (SBL), a unit
of CIT. "Our ingenuity and depth of
experience has made us the largest
independent commercial finance
company in the world. We under-
stand that strong relationships are
at the core of business."
Reilly has a few tips for entrepre-


neurs who are running or planning
to start a business:
* Craft a solid business plan. It's
your roadmap and the key to help-
ing your business succeed. If you
don't'have a business plan, seek
advice from reputable small busi-
ness advisors who know your busi-
ness and can help you create and
update one along the way.
* Build a good relationship with
your bank manager and creditors.
Ask for their help and advice in
building your business and show
a genuine interest in solving prob-
lems.,
* Find a lender who offers more
than just a loan. As your business
grows you'll benefit from the solid
advice and guidance that comes
from a lender that understands the
needs of businesses as they grow
from start-ups to success stories.
Select a lender that can help you
build relationships that will build
on your successes.
* Create a community of en-
couraging people. Develop a net-
work of entrepreneurs that you
see regularly with whom you can
exchange ideas. The relationships
you build with these individuals,
organizations or trade groups will


provide you with an outlet to prob-
lem solve, share successes and
learn from other entrepreneurs..
* Act with determination. If you
have .a good idea, be determined
to stick with it through the start-up
years and don't be disheartened by
the small setbacks that all growing
businesses invariably face.
For more information about
starting a business, small business
lending and advice to business
owners, visit .http://corporate-fi-
nance.cit.com and select Small
Business Lending.


6.5M in client
investment funds
The Florida Department of
Law Enforcement (FDLE) and the
Florida Office of Financial Regula-
tion announce the arrest of Michael
Owen Traynor, 57, in connection
with a multi-jurisdictional theft of
client's investment and insurance
funds totaling approximately $6.5
million. Traynor, a former licensed
investment securities broker and
insurance agent, turned himself
into authorities this afternoon at
his attorney's office in Tampa as a
result of an FDLE warrant charging
him with one count of first-degree
felony grand theft. According to the
FDLE arrest affidavit, between July
1, 2001 and Feb. 28, 2007, Traynor
stole funds from at least 34 of his
clients from Manatee, Sarasota and
Hillsborough counties.
Many of the victims were el-
derly and trusted him as a result of
being fellow church members of
his Manatee congregation.
Traynor was found to have
misrepresented the victims' by pur-
porting that their investment funds
were being invested with one of
three entities:
(1) INTERSECURITIES, INCOR-
PORATED (ISI),
(2) CGU, or
(3) ALLIANZ LIFE INSURANCE
COMPANY. Traynor told the victims
their funds were deposited in either
a freedom money market account
or freedom bond account that paid
a guaranteed interest rate of 8 per-
cent tax-free annually. The investi-
gation revealed that after receiving
funds from the victims, Traynor
provided them with fraudulent ac-
count statements under the letter-
head of the above entities, thus fur-
thering his misrepresentation as to
where victims' funds were located.


The investigation further revealed
that the victims' investment funds
were never forwarded to either of
the entities but kept and used by
Traynor to further his scheme to
defraud. Authorities have charac-
terized the scheme used by Traynor
as a classic Ponzi scheme that used
the funds in three ways:
(1) A portion of the funds were
traced back to earlier investors who
had been victimized through a
similar securities and/or insurance
fraud, but had obtained their funds
before the discovery that a scheme
was being conducted; or
(2) A portion was found to
have been used to pay for expenses
that promoted his overall scheme to
defraud other investors. Traynor
used the victims' own funds to
pay expenses of his business, giv-
ing the appearance that he was
successful;
. (3) And finally, a portion of vic-
tims' funds was also traced back to
Traynor as compensation to him-
self.
FDLE and the Office of Finan-
cial Regulation warn citizens to use
caution when making financial
investments, to ask for receipts or
confirmation of transactions and
to -be sure their checks are made
out to reputable financial organiza-
tions.
Traynor was taken into custody
and held under a$7 million bond
set by Judge Walter R. Heinrich,
Hillsborough County Court. The
case is being prosecuted by the
Florida Office of Statewide Prose-
cution due to the fact the theft took
place in three Florida counties.
For Further Information Con-
tact: Larry K. Long Public Informa-
tion Officer
FDLE-Fort Myers (239) 278-
7170


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda


Learn how to avoid business


failure at IRCC seminar


The Indian River Community
College Business and Technology
Incubator, in partnership with the
Entrepreneur Development Insti-
tute at IRCC and the Economic
Council of Martin County, is host-
ing a FREE seminar,"Avoiding
Business Failure. "Anyone
looking for ways to make
a business successful and
learn preventative actions
to avoid crisis should at-
tend the FREE "Lunch
& Learn" seminar on
Wednesday, November 28,
presented at noon at the Wolf
High-Technology Center at the
IRCC Chastain Campus, 2400 S.E.
Salerno Road. The Entrepre-
neur Development Insti-
tute (EDI) will be provid-


ing snacks, beverages and
dessert.
Guest presenter James T.
"Tom" Gallman graduated cum
laude from the University of West
Florida with a BA in Econom-
ics with minor course studies
in finance and marketing. Tom
worked seven (7) years in bank-
ing in Northwest Florida. He later
was employed by the U. S. Small
Business Administration for over
25 years serving as a specialist in
Liquidations, Lender Relations,
Business Development, Portfolio
Management and Marketing &
Outreach.. Gallman has worked
for the SBA in the Jacksonville,
FL, Charlotte, NC and Nashville,
TN district offices. Additionally,
he has instructed classes for the


American Institute of Banking. He
currently serves as Senior Area
Manager and is the Florida Small
Business Development Center
Project Officer for the SAB Office
located in Fort Pierce.
Seating is limited. To
RSVP and register, go on-
line to www.ircc.edu/ccti. Go
to "TrainingMatrix" and
click on EDI Lunch and
Learn. For more information on
the EDI or other Business Solution
and Employee Training opportu-
nities, call the CCTI at 1-888-283-
1177. For more information about
the IRCC Business and Technol-
ogy Incubator, contact Karen
Schreiner at (772) 419-5690 or by
e-mail at kschrein@ircc.edu.


Save your voice for December.

















Unlimited wireless calling all December.
EMBARQ is giving its wireless customers unlimited wireless minutes
in December - that's more than 44,000 minutes at no extra charge.
Not an EMBARQTM Wireless customer? Now's a great time to become one.
(Domestic voice calling only. EMBARQ"- wireline voice service required.)


Call 866-2EMBARQ or visit embarq. com.
(866-236-2277)

VISITAN EMBARQT STORE SEBRING - 311 U.S. Hwy. 27 N. in the Village Fountain Plaza Shopping Center


EMBARK"
Where Common Sense Meets Innovation"'


Services and coverage not available everywhere. Requires credit approval. Subject to cancellation or change without notice. Terms and conditions apply, see embarq.com. Additional restrictions apply. May not be combined
with certain offers. See store or embarq.com for details. Unlimited December Calling: Direct-dial nationwide voice wireless calls only - international, testing, assisted calls and prepaid wireless calling plans are excluded.
Standard monthly service fee, option fees, taxes and surcharges will apply and existing EMBARQM Wireless customers may not downgrade their wireless plans for December usage. New EMBARQ'M Wireless customers
(wireless activation after 1114107): Must have a qualifying EMBARQ� local wireline service plan during the entire month of December to be eligible for unlimited wireless calling during that month. Without a qualifying plan,
new wireless customers will not receive unlimited wireless calling in December and will be billed according to standard EMBARQ' Wireless plans and prices (including all minutes exceeding their selected plan) and policies.
Service plans: $75 (1-yr. term) or $150 (2-yr. term) early termination and, if not an EMBARQM wireline customer, a $35 activation fee applies per line. A deposit may be required. Unused plan minutes do not carry forward.
Partial minutes are charged as full minutes. Overage charges will apply, other than for eligible Unlimited December Calling. International roaming rates are additional, will vary and may be billed separately. � 2007 Embarq
Holdings Company LLC. All rights reserved. The name EMBARQ and the Jet logo are trademarks of Embarq Holdings Company LLC. EMB1-07-08515


FDLE announces arrest of

broker, insurance agent


Communa. , ik niiulVienwz om


Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007


BUSINESS







4 OPINION Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007


Have an opinion or a question about a public issue? Pos
it anytime at the Okeechobee issues forum at http://wwv
newszapforums.com/forum58. It is a hometown forum s
visit the page as often as you would like and share your com
ments (but no personal attacks or profanities, please). Yo
can also make a comment by calling our Speak Out 24-hou
opinion line at (863) 467-2033, fax (863) 763-5901 or sending
e-mail to okeenews@newszap.com. You can also mail sub
missions to Okeechobee News, P.O. Box 639, Okeechobee
Fla. 34973. Comments will be published in the newspaper a
space permits.

Public issues forums
Join the discussion of important issues at newszap.com. Topics include:
* Belle Glade/South Bay issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum51
*Clewiston issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum52
*Hendry County issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum54
* Moore Haven/Glades issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum57
*Okeechobee city/county issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum5l
* Pahokee issues:http://www.newszapforums.com/forum59
Go to newszap.com, click on your community and then on "community
forums and links."


From the photo archives
While cleaning out the old photography darkroom at the
Okeechobee News office, staffers came across a num-
ber of old photos. Some of these photos were taken by
staffers; others were apparently brought in by community
members. No information is available with the photos, but
readers can share any information they might have. Some
of these have been posted at http://photos.newszap.com/
pages/gallery.php?gallery=310113. Or go online to www.
newszap.com, click on "Okeechobee," click on "Florida
photos," and then click on "Okee News Archives." To com-
ment on a photo, open the photo and post your comments
below.


Community Events

Writers' Workshop at the Library
A Writers' Workshop will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 20 at 6:30 p.m.
in the Library Board Room. Anyone who writes fiction, including main-
stream, mystery, and romance, as well as memoir or poetry is invited
to attend to read and offer constructive criticism to the group. Bring
two pages of your work to read. For information call Jan Day Fehrman
at (863) 357-9980.

Radio Club to host hamfest
The Okeechobee Amateur Radio Club will be hosting a hamfest on
Saturday, Nov. 24 at Freedom Ranch, 11655 Hwy 441 S.E. Okeechobee.
Gate will open at 8 a.m. and close at 4 p:m. There will be free parking,
free tailgate with paid admission, door prizes, coffee and doughnuts
and a catfish dinner as well as drinks, hotdogs, and hamburgers will be
available. Admission is $5. For information call Harry Robbins at (863)
467-7454 or go to www.joshosterman.corrm/hamfest/.

Garden Club to hold meeting
Are you a veggie grower or are flowers your thing? Just learning or
an old hand? Need to learn more or want to share ideas or help others?
This is the club for you. This month Dan Culbert will show you the gar-
dens of Costa Rica on Monday, Nov. 26 at 6 p.m. at The Okeechobee
County Extension Office, 458 Hwy 98. For more information call (863)
763-6469.

Mighty Sprouts to meet
The 4H Mighty Sprouts meeting for the month of November will be
on Monday, Nov. 26 at the County Extension Office from 5 until 7 p.m.
There will be no meeting on Nov. 12 due to the holiday. The class will
be making beautiful magnolia blossom centerpieces for their holiday
tables. If you have any questions about the Mighty Sprouts club, please
call the extension office at (863)763-6469.

Coffee Klatch scheduled
The Okeechobee Chamber of Commerce Coffee Klatch will be
Nov. 29 at 8 a.m. at Soaps & Scents, 118 S.E. Park St. (across from the
Chamber of Commerce).. Refreshments will be provided. For infor-
mation call (863) 357-2368,



Okeechobee News

Our Purpose...
The Okeechobee News is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida.
Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pur-
sue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no
dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on profit margins below
industry standards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independent's
mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First
Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the community's deliber-
ation of public issues. *


We Pledge ...
* To operate this newspaper as a
public trust
* To help our community become a
better place to live and work,
through our dedication to consci-
entious journalism.
* To provide the information citizens
need to make their own intelligent
decisions about public issues.
* To report the news with honesty,
accuracy, purposeful neutrality,
fairness, objectivity, fearlessness
and compassion.
* To use our opinion pages to facili-
tate community debate, not to
dominate it with our own opinions.
* To disclose our own conflicts of
interest or potential conflicts to our
readers.
* To correct our errors and to give
each correction to the prominence
it deserves.
* To provide a right to reply to those
we write about.
* To treat people with courtesy,
respect and compassion.


Advertising Director: Judy Kasten

News Editor: Eric Kopp

National Advertising: Joy Parrish

Circulation Manager: Janet Madray

Independent Newspapers, Inc.
* Joe Smyth, Chairman
* Ed Dulin, President
* Tom Byrd, Vice President of
Newspaper Operations
* Katrina Elsken, Executive
Editor
MEMBER
OF: .



� Okeechobee News 2007
For More Information See
At Your Service On Page 2


st
At.


Learning the real value of water


o By Daniel J. Weiss,
i- Zoe Brown
u Center for American Progress
ir
g "When the well is dry, we
3- learn the worth of water"
e, -Benjamin Franklin
ks
The Nobel Prize-winning Inter-
governmental Panel on Climate
Change's fourth international as-
sessment released earlier this year
predicted that "drought-affected
areas will likely increase" by mid-
century due to global warming.
But recent droughts in the south-
ern portion of the United States
8 suggest that this prediction is al-
ready coming true. The normally
wet Southeast is suffering from
the worst drought of the past 100
years.
The normally wet Southeast is
suffering from the worst drought
of the past 100 years. The most
affected areas are in Alabama,
Georgia, North Carolina, Tennes-
see, and portions of Florida and
South Carolina. In October, the
National Drought Mitigation Cen-
ter classified more than half of this
area as suffering from exceptional
or extreme drought-the two dri-
est categories. Not coincidentally,
the Southeast also experienced
record high temperatures.
The IPCC reported that the
last three decades have seen
"a spring/summer warming of
0.87�C," caused by global warm-
ing, and "earlier spring snowmelt
has led to longer growing sea-
sons and drought." The IPCC also
found that "warming in [U.S.]
western mountains is projected
to cause decreased snowpack,
more winter flooding, and re-
duced summer flows, exacerbat-
ing competition for over-allocated
water resources."
What's more, a new United
Nations report has stated that the
effects of global warming are ex-
acerbated by a growing human
population. As the population
continues to grow, our consump-
tion rate is growing with it, and
consumption now exceeds the
resources available. Recent stud-
ies suggest that some U.S. regions
are already "past peak water," a
milestone that suggests that water
levels could continue to decrease.
"It is wrong to assume that cities
could continue to grow without
experiencing something akin to
a religious awakening about the
scarcity of water," according to
Aurora, Colorado city water man-
ager Peter Binney.
The Mitigation Center predicts
that these dry conditions will con-
tinue at least through the remain-
der of the year. "The prediction
for a warmer than normal winter
is still on course," said Michael
Halpert, head of forecast opera-
tions and acting deputy director
of the National Oceanic and At-
mospheric Administration Cli-
mate Prediction Center. "Our big
concern continues to be the per-
sistence of drought across large
parts of the country's southern
tier. Nearly half of the Southeast
is in extreme drought and water
supplies have reached critical lev-
els in some cities."

The case of Lake Lanier
Georgia, Alabama, and Florida
are currently waging a war over
the shared waters of Lake Lanier
in northern Georgia. Its waters,
which are funneled through feder-
al dams along the Chattahoochee
River, serve as an indispensable
resource for the three states. It
provides water for the 2.8 million
people in the Atlanta metropoli-
tan area, a nuclear power plant
that supplies the power for most
of Alabama, and marine life and
the seafood industry in Florida's
Apalachicola Bay.
The conflict began several
weeks ago when Georgia pressed
federal officials to partially lift the
Endangered Species Act and re-
duce water flow from the lake,
charging that the dispute is a
matter of "man versus mussel,"
referring to the federally protect-
ed mussels of Apalachicola Bay.
Despite Alabama and Florida's
plea to keep current water flow
consistent, it may be too late, as
the entire system's water levels
are down almost 15 feet from
normal and Corps officials predict
that the lake only has about 120'
days of readily available drinking
water left. As the drought persists,
Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue
has mentioned several times the
need for prayer, in addition to wa-
ter conservation. He plans to hold
a prayer service on Nov. 13 to ask
for relief from the drought.


The states' governors met with
officials from the White House,
Interior Department, and Army
Corps of Engineers on Nov. 1 to
discuss a temporary plan that
would determine each state's
share of Lake Lanier's dwindling
waters. The Army Corps of Engi-
neers currently manages the flow
of water from the lake to each of
the three states, releasing more
than a billion gallons a day.

The American Southwest
Arizona is currently entering
into its second decade of extensive
drought. In an arid state where
water is scarce even during years
of above-average precipitation,
the drought has played a large
role in the disastrous wildland
fires the state has experienced in
the past six years. In addition to
Arizona, parts of Idaho, Montana,
Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming
currently face extreme or severe
drought.
In the Southwest, 30 million
people from seven states depend
on the Colorado River as one of
their primary water sources. The
river is at its lowest levels since
measurements began 85 years
ago. Another major western
water sources is also shrinking.
The New York Times reports that
"Lake Mead, the enormous reser-
voir in Arizona and Nevada that
supplies nearly all the water for
Las Vegas, is half-empty, and sta-
tistical models indicate that it will
never be full again."
As water levels drop in the
West, newer Colorado cities
search for new ways to manage
their existing water supply. The
problem these water managers
face goes back almost a century,
when cities like Denver claimed
parts of the Colorado River as
they settled. In return for water
rights from the state of Colorado,
the cities built reservoirs. This
means that older cities have ac-
cess to water from the state's riv-
ers and streams, and newer cities
are forced to purchase existing
water rights from farmers and
mining companies.
Despite their water woes,
growth in many of these cities is
expected to persist. For instance,
in the Colorado city of Aurora,
300,000 people will likely grow
to about 500,000 within the next
couple of decades, while its sup-
ply of water will shrink. As a re-
sult, the city may soon be forced
to pipe water in from the South
Platte River in Nebraska.
In an arid state where water
is scarce even during years of
above-average precipitation, the
drought has played a large role
in the wildland fires.An even
more deeply embedded problem
for western states is that the first
measurements of the Colorado
River were taken in the 1920s,
which was an exceptionally wet
series of years. As a result, the
river was misjudged to have a
significantly more generous aver-
age flow than it truly has, creat-
ing unachievable shares of water
for the seven states that signed a
legal agreement in the 1922 that
divided rights to certain amounts
of water.
Next spring the IPCC plans
to release a report exposing the
areas of the world most vulner-
able to drought and flooding as
the planet warms. Some of these
areas are in the United States, in-
cluding California and the Colo-
rado River basin. Roger Pulwarty,
a climatologist at the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Ad-
ministration, believes that higher
temperatures by themselves will
cause complications for the re-
gion as snowmelt runoff decreas-
es and critical reservoirs lose wa-
ter to evaporation.
The western drought has sig-
nificantly worsened wildfires and
threats to people, homes, and
businesses. Lack of water cre-
ates more fuel for fires by drying
shrubs, bushes, and trees. The
150 days without rain this year in
Southern California added more
fuel to the horrific wildfires that
ripped through the region in late
October. These fires forced more
than 500,000 people to evacuate
from their homes and destroyed
more than 2,000 homes and
buildings. The fires, ranging from
northern Los Angeles County to
the Mexican border, produced so
much smoke that they were vis-
ible in satellite pictures hundreds
of miles from Earth.

The threat to the Great Lakes
The droughts in the Southeast
and Southwest increase the de-


Upcoming Events

Monday
AA. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W. Second St. This will be an open meet-
ing.
Okeechobee Senior Singers will meet at 9 a.m. at the
Okeechobee Presbyterian Church, 312 North Parrott Ave. Everyone
who enjoys singing is invited to join the group. For information or
to schedule an appearance, contact Patsy Black at (863) 467-7068.


sire to import water from other,
wetter basins. These places thirst-
ily eye the Great Lakes, which
are the world's largest body of
fresh surface water. States suf-
fering from drought would like
to transfer water from the Great
Lakes to their region. In response,
the Great Lakes states and two
Canadian provinces proposed
a regional water compact that
would strengthen an existing ban
on out-of-basin transfers of Great
Lakes water. Meanwhile, some
Southern politicians warn the
Great Lakes states that a federal
ban on transfers to other basins
would not be in their best inter-
est, threatening that if they go. for-
ward with it, the Southern states
won't bother buying the water,
but rather, they're "going to be
stealing it."
An inter-basin water transfer
from the Great Lakes to the arid
states of the South and West is not
a solution to drought. The pipes
and pumps required for such a
transfer would cost hundreds of
billions of dollars. In addition, a
regional plumbing system would
require huge amounts of electric-
ity, which would produce more
global warming pollution unless
produced by clean energy. Peter
Annin, author of The Great Lakes
Water Wars, told the Chicago
Tribune that "it doesn't make
economic sense to send Great
Lakes water to the High Plains or
the Southwest, but we know the
thirsty will be calling."

What Can We Do?
Like many environmental
problems, people, water utilities,
and government can all help miti-
gate the impacts of drought and
water shortages. Georgia Gov.
Sonny Perdue will join legislators
and ministers on Tuesday Novem-
ber 13 to pray for rain. Those not
relying on divine intervention find
that using a scarce resource more
efficiently is almost always cheap-
er, faster, and technologically
more feasible than expensive and
grandiose schemes to create more
supply such as pumping water
from the Great Lakes or other far
off places. "With few exceptions,
the cheapest source of water is
that which you don't have to sup-
ply, treat, or transport," says Val
Little of the Water Conservation
Alliance of Southern Arizona.
Using a scarce resource more
efficiently is almost always cheap-
er, faster, and technologically
more feasible than expensive
and grandiose schemes to create
more supply.The effective adop-
tion of water efficiency measures
requires public education, busi-
ness commitment, and govern-
ment will. The average American
citizen uses about 100 gallons of
water each day-almost double
the amount used by Europeans,
who consume about 53 gallons
daily.
Chair of the House Science
and Technology Subcommittee
on Energy and the Environment
Nick Lampson (D-TX) recently
highlighted an Environmental
Protection Agency report that as
much as 3 trillion gallons of water
and $17 billion dollars could be
saved each year if every American
family were to install water-effi-
cient appliances in their homes.
This includes the installation of
low flow showerheads and other
simple devices on toilets and sinks
that reduce the use of water while
maintaining full flow.
Other steps include turning
off the tap when not in use and
installation of native plants on
lawns to replace non-native spe-
cies that require more water. As
Pat Mulroy, head of the Southern
Nevada Water Authority, noted,
"The people who move to the
West today need to realize they're
moving into a desert. If they want
to live in a desert, they have to
adapt to a desert lifestyle."
Water utilities can also in-
crease efficiency. In 1998, Little
started Water CASA to provide
a voluntary means for member
water providers to augment their
individual efficiency programs
and to improve the region's over-
all water conservation efforts.
The program incorporates public
education programs, gray water
reuse, rainwater harvesting, leak
detection, and the use of incen-
tives such as audits and rebates to
help water users save water.
Another efficiency method is
the treatment and reuse of waste-
water in households. Peter Gleick,
head of the Oakland-based Pa-
cific Institute, argues that "treated
wastewater isn't a liability, it's an


asset. We don't need potable wa-
ter to flush our toilets or water our
lawns." He acknowledges that
the current system of water use is
highly inefficient, and that it must
change within this century.
Power plants are voracious wa-
ter users. Nuclear plants use 830
gallons of water per megawatt
hour, and coal plants are right be-
hind at 750 gallons per megawatt
hour. If current power generation
and energy demand trends con-
tinue, power plants will use 7.3
billion gallons a day by 2030. The
Department of Energy reports
that this equals all U.S. water con-
sumption a decade ago. Wind
turbines and solar panels, on the
other hand, require almost no wa-
ter to operate, and could provide
power without threatening water
supplies. Twenty-four states have
renewable ele electricity standards to
require a certain portion of energy
to come from renewable sources
like these. A federal renewable
electricity standard would further
reduce demand for water for elec-
tricity.
Some states, such as Califor-
nia, promote energy efficiency as
the cheapest way to meet water
needs. Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jack-
son International Airport plans to
adjust the automatic sensors in its
bathrooms so they use less wa-
ter. In an airport that has 78 pub-
lic restrooms used by 86 million
people every year, such a small
change could lead to big water
savings. The federal government
should provide resources to states
and cities affected by drought to
assist them with the development
of water efficiency programs de-
signed to meet the needs of the
affected communities.

An ounce of prevention
The potential for future
droughts and water shortages
will only grow over coming de-
cades due to global warming.
Therefore, we must take action
as soon as possible to reduce the
pollution responsible for global
warming. This fall, Congress can
pass an energy bill that includes:
Fuel economy standards of 35
miles per gallon by 2020
A renewable electricity stan-
dard that requires 15 percent of
electricity in 2020 to come from
wind, solar, geothermal, and oth-
er renewable power
A sustainable renewable fuels
standard that significantly reduces
global warming pollution without
adding to water pollution
Energy efficiency standards for
buildings and appliances
Investments in research, de-
velopment, and deployment of
new clean energy technologies,
with resources from the elimina-
tion of tax breaks and subsidies
for big oil.
Together, these measures
would reduce greenhouse gas
-emissions by nearly 20 percent by
2030 compared with business as
usual.
A cap and trade program to
reduce emissions by one-fifth
by 2020 and four-fifths by 2050
would also significantly reduce
the threat of global warming ef-
fects such as drought. Early next
year, the Senate may consider
America's Climate Security Act,
S. 2191, authored by Senators Joe
Lieberman (D-(T) and John War-
ner (R-VA). This bill would make
huge reductions in global warm-
ing pollution, though it should be
enhanced.
The federal government proj-
ects that at least 36 states will face
water shortages within five years
due to a combination of rising
temperatures, drought, popula-
tion growth, suburban sprawl,
and waste. "We have an explod-
ing human population, and we
have a shrinking clean-water sup-
ply. Those are on colliding paths,"
said Mulroy. "People need to real-
ize there is no longer any water-
rich part of the country," Mike
Hayes, associate director of the
National Drought Mitigation Cen-
ter in Lincoln, Nebraska, pointed
out. "It doesn't matter what part
of the country you live in. .With
so many competing interests vy-
ing for the same resource, water
shortages are inevitable, and a
drought like this only exacerbates
the problem."
Over a hundred years ago Mark
Twain said "Whiskey is for drink-
ing. Water is for fighting over." To
avoid this fate, Americans must
use water more efficiently and re-
duce global warming.


Community Events


Mainstreet offers honey hams for Thanksgiving
Okeechobee Main Street is offering Honey Baked Hams for sale
for Thanksgiving. Foods for purchase are spiral hams, whole tur-
keys, turkey breasts, mini-hams, side dishes and desserts. Order
now for pick-up on Tuesday, Nov. 20 at Syble's Flowers & Gifts, 119
S. Parrott Ave. For information call (863) 357-MAIN (6246) or (863)
763-2225.


Speak Out


Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007


OPNO










SCoach Bowden calls Tebow



"quarterback of the future"


(AP photo/J. Pat Carter)
I nren a Ohnoa.fromi Mexic.'�n nnscfor nhotnQ after uinninr, the AflT (hamnironshin '200f7.in


By Brent Kallestad
Associated Press Writer
TALLAHASSEE (AP) -- At his
weekly Sunday morning me-
dia breakfast following home
games, Florida State coach Bobby
Bowden already had Florida quar-
terback Tim Tebow on his mind.
With a 31st straight winning
season and 300 victories safely
tucked away following Saturday's
24-16 win over Maryland, the 78-
year-old Florida State coach de-
scribed the 6-foot-3, 235-pound
Tebow as "the quarterback of the
future."
"I can't believe how good he
is as a sophomore," Bowden said
Sunday. "The guy has broken all
kinds of records."
In Saturday's 59-20 win over
Florida Atlantic, Tebow became
the first player in NCAA history
with at least 20 touchdowns pass-
ing and rushing in the same sea-
son and solidified his bid to be-


come the first sophomore to win
the Heisman Trophy.
Bowden said that Florida's ver-
tical game with Tebow's strong,
accurate arm will be "the ultimate
test" for a Seminole secondary
that has been brutalized much of
the season with long plays.
"Florida will put a lot more
problems on you than Virginia
Tech," Bowden said. "You've got
to know where the other guys are
too."
Virginia Tech defeated Florida
State 40-21 nine days ago.
Saturday's game at Florida's
so-called "swamp" could go some
distance in where the schools
wind up in bowl games.
The 12th-ranked Gators (8-3,
5-3 Southeastern Conference)
may be headed for one of the
state's New Year's bowls, possi-
bly against its former coach Ron
Zook's Illinois club.
Florida State (7-4, 4-4 Atlantic
Coast Conference) could upgrade


its bowl attractiveness with an up-
set in Gainesville.
"Florida's ahead of us right
now, but we're going to catch up
with them," Bowden promised.
"We're gonna get that back.
"When somebody gets the
upper hand it's not the end of
the world because you can come
back," he said.
Florida State players gave
Bowden the game ball Saturday
in honor of his 300th win at the
school and 373rd overall. Bowden
is two wins ahead of Penn State's
Joe Paterno, whose team lost at
Michigan State in its regular sea-
son finale Saturday.
"It's very exciting to be a part
of the history," quarterback Drew
Weatherford said. "He's got a lot
of accomplishments, but we're
just excited to be a part of one of
them."
Florida has won the last three
games in the series.


West Palm Beach, Sunday, Nov. 18. She finished four under par.

1ohan hitc n 41 millhn ha


XYUIkIUCv 11.1, 1 t]W .L .III OIlJIiByMarkLong


By Doug Ferguson
AP Golf Writer
WEST PALM BEACH (AP) - On
the verge of an unlikely collapse,
Lorena Ochoa came through with
a $1 million shot.
Wrapping up a sensational sea-
son, Ochoa overcame a double bo-
gey on the 17th hole with a daring
shot out of the rough and over the
water to 3 feet for birdie Sunday to
win the ADT Championship and
claim the $1 million prize, the rich-
est in women's golf.
She didn't expect so many
nerves so late in a final round at
TFrump International that had been
devoid of drama.
Ochoa was four shots clear with
two holes to play until a three-putt
double bogey on the par-3 17th,
where earlier this week she had
made a quadruple bogey. Natalie
Gulbis made birdie to cut the lead
to one shot, and Gulbis followed
with a hybrid into 15 feet on the
18th.
The 26-year-old Mexican star
never flinched.
Her shot hit the front part.of the
green and didn't stop rolling until it
was 30 inches away. Gulbis missed
her putt, and Ochoa calmly rapped
in her birdie for a 4-under 68 and a
two-shot victory.
"The best shot of my career,"
Ochoa said. "Five years, that was
the best one. All of you saw that."
And that she laughed, looking
up at a gallery that indeed saw a
spectacular finish by the game's
best player.
Despite the close call she could
have done without, and a quirky
format that reset the scores after
the second and third rounds, there
was no disputing the new queen
on the LPGA Tour. That would be
"la reina" in Spanish, pronounced
very similar to Lorena.
It was her eighth victory of the
year, joining Annika Sorenstam and
Nancy Lopez as the only players to
have done that in the last 20 years.
And the big payoff pushed her earn-
ings to over $4 million.
Gulbis, who again showed she
is much more than just a glamour
girl, gave all she had by giving her-
self birdie chances on the last six
holes, but she only converted two
of them. She wound up with a 70,
earning $100,000.
None of the other eight players


who advanced to the final round
broke par.
Paula Creamer was the only
other player under par much of the
balmy day until hitting her tee shot
into the water on the 18th and es-
caping with a bogey to finish with a
70. She got $20,000.
Everyone else cleared the stage
much earlier, certainly after taking
on the diabolical seventh hole, par
3 to a peninsula green. The first five
players found the water, with Kar-
rie Webb going in twice for a qua-
druple bogey. Webb shot 84.
Christina Kim kept talking about
a dream she had this week, unwill-
ing to share it until Sunday. Chances
are, the dream wasn't to shoot 81
in the final round, but that's what
she had.
It was a nerve-racking Sunday,
with what looked like $1 million
cash stuffed into a glass case on the
first tee and a Trump International
course that played as difficult as it
had all week.
Ochoa made it look easy, and
for most of the final round, it looked
like a runaway.
She ran off birdies on the sec-
ond and third hole, hit a risky flop
shot toward the lake on No. 4 and
made the 12-foot par putt, followed
with two more birdies and another
fearless approach on the par-5
ninth set up her fifth birdie to make
the turn in 31. The average score on
the front nine for everyone else was
38.7.


Ochoa had a five-shot lead and
showed no signs of letting up.
The first hint of any drama came
on the 16th, when Ochoa hit into
a bunker and faced 131 yards over
the water to a difficult green. Gulbis
already was 15 feet from the flag,
and Ochoa hit 7-iron to about a
foot inside her.
"It's never easy," her caddie said
after raking the bunker.
One hole later, Ochoa proved
him correct. Her tee shot went over
the back of the green, the rough
keeping it from going into the
stream. Her 20-footer for par ran 6
feet by the hole, and Ochoa missed
that for double bogey.
It ended her streak of 48 con-
secutive holes at par or better, but
of more concern was a one-shot
lead.
With Gulbis in birdie range, the
scene was set for a stunning come-
back - or collapse -with Ochoa
facing a lie in the rough that could
have gone anywhere. But it was
right where she aimed, a career
shot that paid off in a million ways.
Ochoa finished the year with
$4,364,994, having already shat-
tered the LPGA earnings record
set by Sorenstam five years ago
($2,863,904).
Ochoa said she would donate
most of the money to her founda-
tion and building, schools in Mexi-
co.
But first?
'A big celebration," she said.


Sports News In Brief


Bass Club
meeting slated
Taylor Creek Bass Club will
hold its next monthly meeting on,
Dec. 13 at the Buckhead Ridge
VFW Post 9528 beginning at 7
p.m. The club holds its meetings
on the second Thursday of each
month with bass tournaments
being held the following week-
end. New members (especially
non-boaters) are welcome. For
more information contact Dave'
Stout at (863) 467-2255.

U.S.C.G. Flotilla
seeks new members
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-


iary Flotilla 57 in Okeechobee
is seeking new members to be-
come involved in the Auxiliary's
programs.
The Auxiliary is a volunteer
service organization composed
of men and women who ac-
tively support recreational boat-
ing safety and other Coast Guard
missions.
The. Auxiliary also provides
recreational boating safety sup-
port to sate and local authori-
ties.
Members could be involved
in patrols, communications,
administration, seamanship,
piloting/navigation, weather or
search and rescue.
For information, call (863)
763-0165.




News


HOLIDAY--


RUSH DEADLINES



















The Staff Of The Okeechobee News Wishes
Everyone The Happiest Of Holidays!


AP Sports Writer
GAINESVILLE. (AP) - Flor-
ida's Percy Harvin worked out
with teammates Sunday, and
coach Urban Meyer expected the
team's most dynamic receiver
back against rival Florida State.
Harvin's return would give
quarterback Tim Tebow and the
12th-ranked Gators a full com-
plement of receivers for the first
time in more than two months.
"I think we're a pretty spe-
cial group if we're all healthy
and we're all on it," Meyer said
Sunday, a day after his team
beat Florida Atlantic 59-20. "That
helps Tebow obviously and helps
the run game and helps every-
thing."
Florida's receiving corps has
been banged up most of the sea-
son.
Harvin was slowed during fall
practice because of tendonitis in
his knee and in his Achilles' ten-
don. Andre Caldwell sprained a
ligament in his right knee in the
second week of the season and
missed most of the next four
games. Riley Cooper had surgery
last month to repair a broken fin-
ger and went five games without
a catch.


Shortly after Caldwell re-
turned, Cornelius Ingram
sprained an ankle and played
sparingly against Georgia, Van-
derbilt and South Carolina.
Then Harvin's latest problem
came up.
He missed the last two weeks
of practice because of a sinus
infection - all while enduring
painful migraines. He didn't trav-
el with the team to South Caro-
lina, then spent five days in the
school infirmary last week. Doc-
tors performed a CT scan and an
MRI in hopes of diagnosing the
cause of the headaches.
"They've done all kind of tests
on him, and they were trying dif-
ferent medicines and they finally
found the one that knocked the
migraine out," Meyer said. "I
think they tried three or four dif-
ferent IV medicines, and they
found the one that kind of made
it at least bearable."
Harvin was on the sideline
and in the locker room Saturday,
but a more encouraging sign
for Meyer came the following
day when he saw the 5-foot-I11
speedster in the weight room.
"He says he's feeling a lot bet-
ter," Meyer said. "I'm hoping he's
ready to go."


hidden





agenda.


If not, the Gators (8-3) still
might be OK. They have scored
110 points in the two games
without Harvin, thanks mostly to
Tebow and Caldwell.
Tebow threw for 304 yards
and two touchdowns and ran for
120 yards and five scores against
the Gamecocks. The Heisman
Trophy hopeful had 338 yards
passing and three touchdowns
and 31 yards rushing and a score
against the Owls, becoming the
first player in major college his-
tory with 20 touchdowns passing
and rushing in the same season.
Caldwell has been Tebow's
favorite target. The senior caught
11 passes for 148 yards and a
touchdown at South Carolina,
and then followed it with 13
catches for 164 yards against
Florida Atlantic. He also broke
Carlos Alvarez's school record
for receptions, finishing the game
with 177.
"It was a remarkable moment
for me," said Caldwell, who has
33 catches for 415 yards and
three touchdowns the last three
games.
Although Florida should be
healthy at receiver against the
Seminoles (7-4), the Gators could
be without three defenders.


Okeechobee Nt-ws "
* Edwardi ____________


Okeechobee News
Animal facility pact OKd

i,'En.I I[ LWa Council to
- -- elect mayor


Many newspaper owners have a hidden "agenda" - whether'
it is political, economic or to promote the publisher's cronies.


Not us. We're owned by a unique non-profit journalistic trust.


Our ONLY mission is to provide the information and under-
standing citizens need to make intelligent decisions about pub-
lic issues. In doing so, we strive to report the news with hon-
esty, accuracy, fairness, objectivity, fearlessness and compas-
sion.


How are we doing?


Let us know by mailing feedback@newszap.com or calling
your editor.






Okeechobee News


Community Service Through Tournalism


Okeechobee News
N o UCCA Ioses contract


Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007


SPORTS


Fl'







6 Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007



.l . .... , - .." A thirsty Thanksgiving?


Submitted Photo/OFC

2007-08 Elite 11 Students
The 2007-08 Elite 11 Students are (back row, left to right) Sarah Brewer, Jodi Raulerson,
Hayley Belding, Andrew Rogers (center row, left to right) Ricardo Bustos, Abel Chavez,
Isaias Mojica (top row, left to right) Cristin Shelton, Shawn Horvath, Gilberto Limon. (Not
pictured) Ashtyn Brown. These students were selected from a school drawing. The win-
ning students from the Class of 2011 received candy and OFC logo style sunglasses. The
sunglasses' are part of OFC' Mission A- Possible theme for this school year.


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda

+ Native American dress
This display was part of the Yearling Middle School Multicultural Club's celebration of
National Native American Month. The event took place in the school cafeteria on Friday.
Nov. 16. Students learned about the history and tribal government of the Seminoles and
ate traditional Seminole food.
'*


Teaching children about


plagiarism in the internet age


(ARA) - In its relatively short
lifespan, the Internet has changed
the way we do almost everything,
from banking to shopping, reading
to vacationing and much more. An
unprecedented amount of infor-
mation is now available to anyone
with online access, and education
has been changed as much as any
other field as a result.
Today's generation of students
has used the Internet for their en-
tire schooling experience. Whereas
academic research at one time
conjured up images of viewing
microfiche and spending hours
sifting through the library's card
catalogue, it now denotes a student
sitting at a computer and access-
ing thousands of potential sources
with the click of a mouse.
The potential for wide-rang-
ing scholarly work has never been
greater, but the risk of plagiarism
has increased with it. More than ever
before, educators have to stress the
rules of proper academic honesty
to a new generation of students
who may not understand what is at
stake when they research.
Duke University's Center for
Academic Integrity has funded nu-
merous studies to gauge the ease
of Internet plagiarism and the fre-
quency with which it occurs among
students. In 2004, they stated that
"the overwhelming accessibility
of written work ... has propelled
plagiarism to the top of the list of
academic integrity infractions."
The problem, however, does
not seem related to a slippage in
student ethics. A concurrent study
by Josephson Institute of Eth-
ics found that 94 percent of high
school students feel "trust and hon-
esty are essential" in the workplace,
while only 33 percent of students
had used the Internet to cheat in
the previous 12 months. Rather
than revealing a new generation of
students who feel inclined to cheat,
these studies show that the real
problem is the ease with which In-
ternet "research" can become pla-
giarism without students knowing
the difference.
Parents and educators can help
children navigate this problem by
clearly explaining the definition of
plagiarism and the importance of
citing someone else's ideas. The


Calvert School, a renowned home
education provider for over 100
years, recommends five tips for
parents to help prevent their chil-
dren from intentional or uninten-
tional plagiarism.
1. Make it clear to your child that
quotation marks should be placed
around any phrase or sentence that
they take from another person's
book or Web site.
2. Remind your children to state
ideas and concepts in their own
words rather than copying some-
one else's statements. They should
be as careful about copying from
Web sites as they would be about
copying from books. ,
3. Stress the importance of the
writing process. If your child fol-
lows the proper steps of writing
a composition - especially brain-
storming and organizing -- the risk
of plagiarism is greatly reduced.
4. Work with your child to evalu-
ate the quality of a source and stress
good note-taking habits.
5. Encourage your child to keep
a careful list of sources while re-
searching, as well.
For older generations, the above
points may seem like common
sense. Contemporary students may
even recognize the importance of
following these guidelines for book
research, as well. But the ease with
which students come upon online
information, as well as the fact that
the Internet is used for so many
other social and professional func-
tions, make it harder for students to
differentiate between research and
simply surfing the Web.
"Academic research is easier for
today's students than ever before,
so we need to explain the meaning
of plagiarism and, therefore, when
and how to credit the sources of
their information," says Dr. Gloria
D. Julius, Calvert School's chief
learning officer.
"Research projects must begin
with instruction on the selection
of reference material, whether
textbook or computer-based, with
clear examples as to what informa-
tion has to be cited," she says. "The
Internet is a powerful and helpful
research tool. It is our shared ob-
ligation as teachers and parents to


make sure our students and chil-
dren know how to use it responsi-
bly."
The following Web sites may
help you instill good research and
writing habits in your child:
* http://lib.nmsu.edu/instruc-
tion/evalcrit.html
* http://www.kyvl.org/htmVl/
kids/p3_notes/notes.html
* http://www.aresearchguide.
corn/12biblio.html
Courtesy of ARAcontent


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda

Indian

Princess
Jessica Baker, who was
Brighton Junior Miss Prin-
cess in 2003, served tra-
ditional Seminole dishes
,of pumpkin bread and fry
bread to those partici-
pating in Yearling Middle
School's celebration of
National Native American
Month. The celebration
took place in the school
cafeteria on Friday, Nov.
16 and was sponsored by
the school's Multicultural
Club. In addition to eating
traditional Seminole food,
students learned about the
history and tribal govern-
ment of the Seminoles.


Remember all
plants need water

Last week was Farm City
Week, and hundreds of residents
turned out Thursday for one of
the best meals available on this
side of the Lake. Your local Ex-
tension office was scurrying
around helping program orga-
nizers and encouraging local 4-H
Clubs and FFA chapters to meet
and greet everyone from the
Farm to the City. And, our FYN
program assistant, Angela Sach-
son was on hand with an exhibit
about using more drought toler-
ant plants in the landscape.
This week many people will
have a little time to spend around
their Florida Yard. It's a good
time to think about how to deal
with the dry weather expected
here next spring. And in case
you missed it, we have placed the
results of our "Thirsty Test" from
Farm City Week as today's topic.
Water hogs
All plants need water, and
most plants used in Florida Yards
require an adequate amount
of regular watering to get them
started. A number of these plants
will continue to have higher wa-
ter needs throughout the year.
Please consider carefully if
you have the time and money
available to provide for the fol-
lowing "water hogs," especially
as we look forward to a long dry
spring that may set records for
drought.
* Azalea: This shrub is
popular in areas that have good
soils with above average water
holding capacity. They require
little pruning, relatively pest free
and attractive all .year round.
Azaleas are colorful in the spring
when they erupt with lots of red,
pink or white flowers. (There are
some new azaleas that bloom in
both fall and spring, and others
that are grown in containers as
holiday plants.) Another factor
to consider is that these are also
"high-iron" plants. This means
that to get adequate fertilizer
nutrients, the soil pH must be
"slightly-acid." We can test your
soil to see if you have the right
stuff for these shrubs. But if you
see marly shell in your dirt, and
don't plant to keep them moist,
chances are good that azaleas
are not the right choice for your
Florida Yard.
* Hibiscus - The "Chinese
Rose" excels in the warm parts
of the year with hundreds of dif-
ferent kinds of bold and beautiful
blooms. Like the Azalea, it pre-
fers slightly sour soil. Its beauty is
based on a rapid rate of growth,
which means it is a heavy feeder
and requires plenty of moisture.






Local Links
A directory of websites for local
government, teams, organiza-
tions & columnists.

Community Links. Individual Voices.
v. __ _ ________ ___


UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION

Some gardeners call this the "Key
plant for Key pests" because it at-
tracts all kinds of bugs and dis-
eases.
* Impatiens - our standard
flowering groundcover for the
cool part of the year has lots of
colorful flowers - reds, pinks and
whites are the usual colors. But
a careful look at their soft succu-
lent stems tells you it needs lots
of water to stay looking pretty.
* St .Augustine grass - the
standard turf grass in much of
South Florida is well adapted
to Florida Yards. It tolerates
many pests, recovers from being
mowed shorter than 3-inches,
and grows well in sweet alkaline
soils. But it does need water,
on the average a half-inch per
week.
* Willow trees are small
fast-growing native trees found
around freshwater areas. Well
adapted to moist soils, they re-
quire no care if they are natu-
rally part of a Florida Yard. But
if planted in sandy well-drained
areas, watering is essential for
their survival. I
* Yellow Canna is a beau-
tiful "aquatic" flowering plant
that has broad flat leaves. As the
warmer season progresses, it will
clump and sucker, and produces
tall spikes of colorful flowers. If
you are unable to keep the soil
moist, it will fail to produce the
upright flowers that are a fixture
in Florida's tropical summer.
If you plan to use any of these
plants, plant them together in a
hydrozone - an area designed
to be watered more often. This
practice of grouping plants with
similar water needs will help
conserve water. Please plan to
do so if the seduction of these
bright and beautiful flowers is
too much to avoid.
Drought Busters
* Areca Palms are equally
at home in a container or in the
ground. They clump and sucker
and form an attractive topical
look that can handle dry condi-
tions. It the full sun they naturally
turn yellow - don't over fertilize
them to make them green. And
be aware that freezing tempera-
tures will turn the fronds brown.


* Bougainvillea is a sprawl-
ing vining shrub that comes in a
variety of colorful forms - yellow,
white, red, purple, and even pink
blooms are available. It does
have thorns, which can be useful
if a security fence is desired. But
it's included here as a drought
buster because it does best when
it is pruned heavily and kept dry.
* Croton - up north this
plant is a temperamental tropical
houseplant. In the Florida Yard,
its multi-colored leaves work
well in outdoor containers or as
shrubs in the landscape. Keep it
dry for a better show of the reds,
yellows, greens and purples
found on this relative of the poin-
settia.
* Fountain Grass is a me-
dium-tall clumping ornamental
grass. Used as an accent plant,
they can be reddish to purple in
color, although there are several
shades of green available. After
several months of growth, Foun-
tain grass will be topped with at-
tractive seed heads that give it a
floating appearance.
* Lion's Ear is an underuti-
lized exotic plant that is a South
African native. It has golden
flower clusters on upright stems
that will be irresistible to butter-
flies and honeybees, and the foli-
age itself has unique smells that
make it fit in a "scent" garden.
But it does not like to be over
watered.
* Marigolds are heat-and
drought tolerant bedding plants
that might make it through a Flor-
ida summer, but can do equally
well in a dry winter, as long as
Jack Frost stays away. Most Mari-
golds are golden yellow in color.
They are readily available at area
garden centers, and are not that
expensive. Feel free to replace
them if they get too much water-
ing, or keep them dry and they
will give you color during the
long spring drought.
We've placed more informa-
tion on our Okeechobee web
page, http://okeechobee.ifas.
ufl.edu. If you need additional
information on dealing with
drought in your Florida Yard,
please email us at okeechobee@
ifas.ufl.edu or call us at 863-
763-6469. Local residents can
stop by our office at 458 Hwy 98
North in Okeechobee, and visit
our Okeechobee County Master
Gardeners from I to 3 p.m. on
Tuesday afternoons.


111 tn 4 t\ p I . 1 0 01.1

Public Is Invited


Memorial Tribute
" Remember a loved one
who has departed with a special
i Memorial Tribute in this newspaper.
e &, &, M,
Your tribute can be published following the memorial services, or to
commemorate an anniversary ofyour loved one's birth or passing. You
can add a photograph of your loved one, lines from a poem or
scripture, and special art or borders -- and we'll make sure it all comes
together attractively and tastefully.


Visit www2.newszap.com/memorials for sample ads
and an online order form, or call 1-866-379-6397 toll free.







Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007 7


At the Movies Blondie


The following movies are now
showing at the Brahman Theatres
Ill.
Movie times for Friday, Nov. 16,
through Thursday, Nov. 22, are as
follows:
Theatre .1 -"Bee Movie" (PG)
Showtimes: Friday at 7 and 9 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday at 2, 4:15,
7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
Theatre II - "Fred Claus" (PG)
Showtimes: Friday at 7 and 9 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday at 2, 4:15,
7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
Starting Wed. Nov. 21 in
Theatre II "Enchanted" (PG)
Theatre Ill - "Mr. Magorium's
Wonder Emporium" (G) Show-
times: Friday at 7 and 9 p.m..
Saturday and Sunday at 2, 4:15,
7 and 9 p.m., Monday at 3 and
7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
We will be open Friday,
Nov. 23 at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9
p.m.
Tickets are $5.50 for adults;
children 12 and under are $4.50;
senior citizens are $4.50 for all
movies; and, matinees are $4.
For information, call (863)
763-7202.

Today

in History

By The Associated Press


Today is Monday, Nov. 19, the
323rd day of 2007. There are 42
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
On Nov. 19, 1863, President
Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg
Address as he dedicated a national
cemetery at the site of the Civil War
battlefield in Pennsylvania.
On this date:
In 1794, the United States and
Britain signed Jay's Treaty, which
resolved issues left over from the
Revolutionary War.
In 1831, the 20th president of the
United States, James Garfield, was
born in Orange Township, Ohio.
In 1917, Indian Prime Minister
Indira Gandhi was born in Alla-
habad.
In 1919, the Senate rejected the
Treaty of Versailles by a vote of 55-
39, short of the two-thirds majority
needed for ratification.
In 1942, during World War II,
Russian forces launched their win-
ter offensive against the Germans
along the Don front.
In 1959, Ford Motor Co. an-
nounced it was halting production
of the unpopular Edsel.
In 1969, Apollo 12 astronauts
Charles Conrad and Alan Bean
made the second manned landing
on the moon.
In 1977, Egyptian President An-
war Sadat became the first Arab
leader to visit Israel.
In 1984, some 500 people died
in a firestorm set off by a series of
explosions at a petroleum storage
plant on the edge of Mexico City.
In 1985, President Reagan and
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev
met for the first time as they began
their summit in Geneva.
Ten years ago: Iowa seam-
stress Bobbi McCaughey gave birth
to septuplets four boys and three
girls. The space shuttle Columbia
zoomed into orbit on a two-week
science mission.
One year ago: British authori-
ties said they were investigating the
apparent poisoning of Alexander
Litvinenko, a former KGB agent
who had been critical of the Rus-
sian government (Litvinenko died
in London four days later of poloni-
um poisoning). Actor Jeremy Slate
died in Los Angeles at age 80.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Alan
Young is 88. Talk show host Larry
King is 74. Talk show host Dick Ca-
vett is 71. Broadcasting and sports
mogul Ted Turner is 69. Singer Pete
Moore (Smokey Robinson and the
Miracles) is 68. Sen. Tom Harkin,
Democrat-Iowa, is 68. TV journalist
Garrick Utley is 68. Actor Dan Hag-
gerty is 66. Former Health and Hu-
man Services Secretary Tommy G.
Thompson is 66. Fashion designer
Calvin Klein is 65. Sportscaster Ah-
mad Rashad is 58. Actor Robert Bel-
tran is 54. Actress Kathleen Quinlan
is 53. Actress Glynnis O'Connor is
52. Newscaster Ann Curry is 51. Ac-
tress Allison Janney is 47. Rock mu-
sician Matt Sorum (Guns N' Roses,
Velvet Revolver) is 47. Actress Meg
Ryan is 46. Actress-director Jodie
Foster is 45. Actress Terry Farrell
is 44. Actor Jason Scott Lee is 41.
Olympic gold medal runner Gail
Devers is 41. Rock musician Tra-
vis McNabb (Better Than Ezra) is
38. Singer Tony Rich is 36. Country
singer Jason Albert (Heartland) is
34. Country singer Billy Currington
is 34. Dancer-choreographer Savi-
on Glover is 34. Country musician
Chad Jeffers is 32. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Tamika Scott (Xscape)
is 32. Rhythm-and-blues singer Lil'
Mo is 30.
Thought for Today: "It is al-
ways brave to say what everyone
thinks.George Duhamel, French
author (1884-1966).


Dear Abby


Mother is suspicious


of online pursuit


Wizard of Id


Garfield


Beetle Bailey


*DEAR ABBY: Several months
ago, my 35-year-old sister met a
man online. After corresponding
(via telephone and e-mail) for
about two weeks, she moved two
states away to move in with him.
She never saw a picture of him
and had never met him in person
before she moved to be with him.
This man - I believe he's 45
- now wants to communicate
with my 14-year-old daughter. He
tries to chat with her online and
doesn't understand why I think
it is inappropriate. He says he's
"family" now, and I am being
overprotective.
Abby, am I being overprotective
of my daughter? I have never met
or spoken to this man and feel he
has no right to communicate with
my daughter. Please help. - Los-
ing It In Monroe, La.
DEAR LOSING IT: It's your
duty as a parent to protect your
minor child from perceived dan-
ger. You sister's friend is acting
like a pedophile and a stalker. He
isn't "family," and objecting to
your daughter being approached
by a stranger is not being over-
protective.
Since you don't know his back-
ground, contact the police depart-
ment in the city in which he lives
and ask if he has a record. Then
Google him to find out if there's
any information about him online.
And, above all, warn your daugh-
ter not to trust him because, from
your description, the man could
be dangerous.

*DEAR ABBY: I have been
seeing a very nice man for about
four months. He lives with his 23-
year-old daughter.
He loves when I cook for him,
and when he asks me to cook I
do it because I enjoy it as a cre-
ative outlet. But every time I make
a dish, his daughter comes along
and adds things to it. I was mak-
ing Sunday gravy, and she added
something to'that. Another time, I
was making pasta primavera, and


she poured a can of beans into it.
I am a very good cook, Abby. I
do not need any help in the kitch-
en. How can I stop her from add-
ing things to the meals I am cook-
ing? - Frustrated In Florida
DEAR FRUSTRATED: The
least confrontational way to ac-
complish it would be to cook for
her father at YOUR house.

*DEAR ABBY: Would you al-
low me to add to your letters shar-
ing acts of kindness? My husband
was deployed to Iraq for a year.
Close to the time of his return, I
went to some businesses in our
community to ask if they would
put welcome home messages in
their windows or on their mar-
quees. The responses I got were
incredible!
An eye doctor even offered to
give our family free eye exams and
glasses/contacts if they were need-
ed. A chiropractor offered to give
my husband a free adjustment. I
was overwhelmed with the sup-
port my family was given, as was
my husband when, on the drive
home, he saw message after mes-
sage of support and welcome.
It was touching to see that the
sacrifices he, and we as a family,
made were appreciated by our
community. - Thankful And
Inspired, Roswell, Ga.
DEAR THANKFUL AND IN-
SPIRED: Your letter touched my
heart, not only for the sacrifices
your husband and family have
made in the line of duty, but also
because of the spirit displayed by
the members of the business com-
munity in your city. We all owe a
debt of gratitude to the brave
young men and women who serve
in our armed forces, and it is one
. that should never be forgotten.
Editor's note: Dear Abby is
written by Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips, and
was founded by her mother, Pau-
line Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


Close to Home


Peanuts


Pickles

RAOW COMAE YOU
PN1Y-IT AVE AN
OW YOOR CAR,
C-RAMPA?


The Last Word in Astrology


By Eugenia Last
*ARIES (March 21-April 19):
Getting angry will be a waste of time.'
Learn from whatever personal experi-
ence you have and move on. A short
trip will open your mind to a geographi-
cal move, a great investment, a better
future.
*TAURUS (April 20-May 20):
Good moves can be made but taking
a little bit different approach will prob-
ably work best. Someone with experi-
ence will lead you in the right direction.
A good talk with someone you are in
a partnership with will bring positive
results.
*GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You
may have great ideas and feel certain
that you can make things work but,
you are better off taking your time.
Moving too quickly or spending too
much will not bring you the results you
want. Love is on the rise.
*CANCER (June 21-July 22): You
can make some fabulous decisions
regarding work, hobbies, children or
even a social event you want to attend.
Now is the time to sign up, be proac-
tive and secure your position. Don't
let someone else's insecurity hold you


back.
*LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Concen-
trate on how you can improve your fi-
nancial situation. You may be confused
about some of the people in your life.
Look for ulterior motives and, if some-
one appears to be hanging around you
for the wrong reason, address the situ-
ation promptly.
*VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You
may feel as if you are in a push-pull
situation. Be analytical and make any
decision required based on fact, not
emotions. You will be able to convince
others to follow you if you have your
facts straight.
'*LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You
can make some physical improve-
ments or find a bargain if you go shop-
ping. You should be talking to people
who may have insight into a career op-
portunity. Anger will be counterproduc-
tive, so avoid anyone who is looking for
a'fight.
*SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):
You've got a whole lot more going for
you than you realize. You are gifted, so
muster up some confidence and you'll
do great. Travel or making changes at
home will lead to greater success.


*SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21): You can't take chances and expect
to get ahead. Your charm may work on
some people, some of the time, but not
today. Do things properly or you may
damage your reputation. Love is look-
ing good but you have to be honest.
*CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):
Focus on work, career and getting
ahead. You've got everything going
for you but, if you become impatient,
angry and impulsive, you will miss out
on something worth pursuing. Pick
your battles wisely or avoid them all
together.
*AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):
Think before you speak. Your emotions
will be running high but, before you
make a promise or delve into some-
thing that may not be completely up-
front, think about the consequences.
Be gracious and patient with others.
*PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):
You'll be very changeable and this may
be misleading to those who have to
deal with you. You are better off work-
ing alone, focusing on finance, getting
your own thing off the ground and
dealing with settlements, legal con-
cerns, children and your health.
� 2007 UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE


Danny reminds his dad that he had forgotten
to pay him for raking the yard.

Wonderword

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle - horizon-
tally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR
LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell
the Wonderword.


DESIGNATED SMOKING AREAS


Solution: 5 letters


E E E YO L P ME Z S E
E C A L P K R OW F OO
S I A Y PU B L I C RN
S F D P B 0 (E)()( 0 Q
T F DR S B E BA I LU


N I F
D S R


NO I INRUPT D I I RAT
ASCV I P I CN STT E I S
RMTAXN I AT CTVTC N


U I T R H


A I


L E E H 0O


A KO E T DN DA L RNGS I


T E N S NDS


GRVMUIA T


S F EO I I E ES I OE L F C


E R C N R L L


I V E V I N E E


R E G U L AT I ON S E DT S
S E J I X V O L U N T A R Y S


� 2007 Universal Press Syndicate www.wonderword.com


11/19


Addiction, Ailments, Airspace, Avoid, Cubby, Driver, Employee,
Fines, Foods, Illegal, Jurisdiction, Lighter, Litter, Live, Office,
Patron, People, Private, Public, Pubs, Quit, Regulations, Relax,
Restaurants, Restriction, Rights, Safety, Secondhand, Sections,
Smoke free, Social, Standing, Test, Toxin, Venue, Voluntary,
Workplace, Zone
Last Saturday's Answer: Promotion
To order THE COLLECTED WONDERWORD, Volume 5,22,23,24 or 25, send $5.95 each (US funds only) payable to Unersal Press Syndicate
plus $3 postage for the fiist book order, 1 p&h tfor each additional book. Send to WONDERWORD, 4520 Main St., Kansas City, Mo. 64 111 0cal
tdl-free, 1-800-255-6734, e t. 6688. Order online at upuzzles.com (Contain 43 puzzles, 9 of which ar e larger, 20x20 size)







8 Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007


Weeks a


.. It's Easy!


All personal items under $5,000

ABSOLUTELY FREE!


Announcements ...... .100
Employment ...... ..... .200
Financial ............. 300
Services .... ......... 400
Merchandise... ... . 500
Agriculture .. . ... . . . 800
Rentals' ... . ......... 900
Real Estate ......... .1000
Mobile Homes ....... 2000
Recreation. ......... 3000
Automobiles . .... . .4000
Public Notices ....... .5000


* All personal items under
$5,000 ABSOLUTELY FREE!
* Price must be included in ad
* Private parties only
* 2 items per household per
issue


619 ~~jj,~\jjJ


'Y-c)


~J:r)
-'/


'izi


iil


)\ \.- j '

" . . .. .


Published 3 weeks' in all of our Florida papers: Caloosa Belle, Clewiston News, Glades County Democrat,
Immokalee Bulletin, Okeechobee News and Advertiser, and The Sun
* Ads will run in Wednesday daily editions and weekly publications.

1or call
1 -877-353-2424 (Toll Free)


S" -I -,

















/ www.newszap.com/classifieds


/ 1-877-353-2424 (Toll Free)


/ For Legal Ads:
legalads@newszap.com
/ For All Other Classified Ads:
classads@newszap.com


/ 1-877-353-2424 (Tol Free)


/ Mon-Fri / Mon-Fri


/ Monday
F. .J.5 1I ..:.:., ., .. . .
/ Tuesday through Friday

/ Saturday
* Th ..1,'. J. , I_ , r,. 1, . I " .I I..: :. - -
/ Sunday
, , . ... .. ....


Announcements


Important Information: Please
read your ad carefully the first
day it appears. In case of an
inadvertent error, please noti-
fy us prior to the deadline list-
ed. We will not be responsible
for more than 1 incorrect
insertion, or for more than the
extent of the ad rendered val-
ueless by such errors.
Advertiser assumes responsi-
bility for all statements, names
and content of an ad, and
assumes responsibility for any
claims against Independent
Newspapers. All advertising
is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept or
-j- reject any or all copy, and to
insert above the copy the word
"advertisement". All ads
accepted are subject to credit
approval. All ads must conform
to Independent Newspapers'
style and are restricted to
their proper classifications;
Some classified categories
require advance payment.
These classifications are
denoted with an asterisk *.
Independent Newspapers will
never knowingly accept any
advertisement that is illegal or
considered fraudulent. In all
cases of questionable value,
such as promises of guaran-
teed income from work-at-
home programs or other offers
to send money in advance for
a product or service - we
advise you to check with the
Attorney General's Consumer
Fraud Line at 1-800-220-5424,
and/or The Better Business
Bureau, 800-464-6331 for pre-
vious complaints.
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
,Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage/Yard Sale 145
Personals 150.
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160


Here's a great chance to get a
jump on storage for all those
new Christmas toys. Made
from a single 4-by-6 sheet of
plywood, this toy chest and
bench makes a great gift for a
special little person on your
holiday list. It measures 32
inches long by 20 inches
deep, and requires only six
pieces in all.
Toy Chest & Bench plan
(No. 248)... $9.95
Children's Furniture Pack
4 plans incl. 248
(No. C79)... $24.95
Catalog (pictures hundreds
of projects)... $2.00
Please add $4.00 s&h
(except catalog-only orders)
To order, circle item(s), clip
and send with check to:
U-Bild
3800 Oceanic Dr., Ste. 107
Oceanside, CA 92056.
Please be sure to include
your name, address, and the
name of this newspaper.
Allow 1-2 weeks for delivery.
Or call (800) 82-U-BILD
u-bild.com
Money Back Guarantee


U aae


E lm


Uaae .


Emplymen
Full Tim


Start a new career in the much needed field of
nursing as a Certified Nursing Assistant. Complete the
Hospitality Assistant course/training at Okeechobee
Healthcare Facility and become a CNA in 4 weeks. Next
class begins soon. Instructor RN/experienced teacher has
a very high CNA exam passing rate. Qualified CNAs are
then eligible for LPN training. Good benefits.
Apply In Person For Further Details:
406 N.W. 4th Street * (863) 357-2442
I
Immediate Openings * All Shifts
Full Time/Part Time * RN's & LPN's
Apply In Person To:
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
1646 Hwy. 441 North
I
HELP WANTED
Ground Maintenance Personnel
Experience helpful but NOT necessary
Apply at:
Okeechobee Golf & Country Club
405 N.E. 131st Lane

Immediate Openings - CNAs
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
All shifts: Full/Part Time. Good Benefits.
Apply In Person To:
406 N. W. 4th Street. (863) 357-2442


SET OF KEYS - Found on Sat.
Nov. 3rd at Waste Manage-
ment. Call (863)357-0824 to
identify.
Shop here first!
The classified ads


CURR DOG - solid white, fe-
male, last seen 11/11 Dixie
Ranch Acres. Reward if
found (863)634-2582



GARAGE SALE
BUCKHEAD RIDGE - Sun &
Mon, Nov 18th & 19th,
10am-4pm, 91 Chobee St.,
garden tools, fishing equip,
Craftsman compressor, Gen-
erator, Car wash machine,
leaf blower, many HH items

Need a few more bucks to
purchase something
deer? Pick up some
extra bucks when you
sell your used items In
the classlfeids.


Emp lament


Employment -
Full-Time 205
Employment .
Medical 210
Employment .
Part-Time 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Training 227
Sales 230




-MEDICAL ASSISTANT-
Needed in busy Cardiology
office. Medical knowledge &
experience needed. Excellent
benefit plan offered. Fax
resume to (863)467-8708
or call (863)467-9400
OFFICE MANAGER
Experience a MUST!
Fax resume to
863-467-1126


I.pca NoticE


I .peca Notice


pI IRcflNiceI


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis


ACROSS
1 Livestock
building
5 Beantown
hoopster, for
short
9 Grower in a pot
14 K thru 12
15 Latin love
16 Continental
banknotes
17 Midday
18 One might be
taken with a
show of hands
19 Go on tiptoe
20 Reese
Witherspoon's
Oscar role in
'Walk the Line"
23 In a perfect world
24 Objective
25 1002, at the
Forum
26 "Grody!"
28 Leave out
32 Grow gray,
perhaps
35 Like long letters
from old friends
37 Covered with
rocks
38 Security
clearance
procedure
41 Actor Haim or
Feldman
42 10:1 or 5:2, e.g.
43 "Ain't _ Sweet?"
44 Swing around
45 Salon goo
46 "Star Wars"
extras
48 "Annabel Lee"
poet
50 More like an
anxious trigger
finger?
54 Ill-fated Civil War
assault at
Gettysburg
58 Egyptian
peninsula
59 Angel's ring
60 "Nuts!"
61 Leo, to Jerry, on
"Seinfeld"
62 Vocalized
63 Lacking width
and depth


33 British jail
34 Stocking hue
36 Modeled, as
clothing
37 Single-malt
liquor
39 "Try not to,
panic"
40 Pepsi ONE, for
one
45 " whiz!"
47 Outline cast by
the sun


64 Ceiling supports
65 Italia's capital
66 Wisecrackers

DOWN
1 1974 mutt movie
2 For all to hear
3 Geneva's river
4 When many
businesses open
5 Devil-may-care
6 Atlanta campus
7 Senator Trent
8 Eucalyptus or
sycamore
9 Joe of "Home
Alone"
10 Insect with lime-
green wings
11 Greek war deity
12 Ark builder
13 Tongue-clucking
sound
21 Adjective for
plastic wrap
22 Rooters' shout
26 Customary
27 Ibsen's "Peer "
29 '"The Simpsons"
watering hole
30 Ruler division
31 Youngster
32 "Sesame Street"'
basics


By Doug Peterson
(c)2007 Tribune Media Services, Inc.


49 Dust Bowl
refugees
50 Koran religion
51 Tehran native
52 Fish-eating
. wader
53 Tears apart
54 Tree with cones
55 Ancient
Andean
56 Son of Odin
57 Poi base
58 Second-stringer


ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:'
HOT PUT TERMR EEDS
I N R�E VERSE RE N D U E
P EACIEP I PIE SI OU SA
BAC AjDA SPLATS
ORTS DENTE RP I
OTOMI NASCARDAD
T H RO WAT PAGEON E
SSOAK NSIPC
FOOTACHS I E ATTACHE
A L PH |A M 10 MS A S HE S
CDE BEACH S AL T
A LN I CsO L E IA N I E
D I TCH LONIGS I NCE
E N OIK I ONTIHIE B E A M
s E E Y AIMIEIsIsIc|A L L S
xwordeditor@aol.com 11/19/07


11/19/07


HIRING
DAYTIME &
EVENING
SERVERS
&
HOSTESS

Min. 1 yr. exp.
Apply in person
between
9am-1pm



Financial i



Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315




NOTICE
Independent Newspapers will
never accept any advertise-
ment that is illegal or con-
sidered fraudulent. In all
cases of questionable val-
ue, such as promises of
guaranteed income from
work-at-home programs - if
it sounds too good to be
true, chances are that it is.
If you have questions or
doubts about any ad on
these pages, we advise that
before responding or send-
ing money ahead of time,
you check with the Better
Business Bureau at
772-878-2010 for previous
complaints.
Some 800 and 900 telephone
numbers may require an
extra charge, as well as
long distance toll costs. We
will do our best to alert our
reader of these charges in
the ads, but occasionally
we may not be aware of the
charges. Therefore, if you
call a number out of your
area, use caution.


Services



Babysitting 405
Child Care Needed410
Child Care Offered415
Instruction 420
Services Offered425
Insurance 430
Medical Services435



Elderly Care - Reg. Nurse
w/35 yrs. exp. has one
opening for 24 hr. care in
nice family home. Call
Susan 863-763-2334.



DEE'S MINOR REPAIR
License # 5698
& Pressure Washing
License #1126
FREE ESTIMATES
(863)467-2917
or (863)261-6425


II


0


r-il


CAEORE


YARD

SALE






Place Your
YARD SALE
ad today!

Get FREE signs,!


Call Classifieds
877-353-2424
1


READING A NEWSPAPER...


'


*-


ISpecial NoticED


1








Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007


I~pecia- Noitic


- ic


MONDAY PRIME TIME


6:00 6:30


7:00


7:30


- i No ic


I-- aI Noi


8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30


1eia Noic 0155


NOVEMBER 19, 2007

10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30


SWPTV News(cc) NBC News Extra (s) Entertain Chuck (N) (s) (cc) Heroes (N) (s) (cc) Journeyman "Emily" (N) News (cc) Tonight
( WPEC News (cc) CBS News News (cc) Millionaire How I Met Big Bang Two Men Rules CSI: Miami (N) (s) (cc) News (cc) Late Show
) WTCE (5:00) Movie: Mary Cameron Jakes Behind Chironna Franklin Duplantis Praise the Lord (cc)
a WPBF News (N) ABC News Fortune Jeopardyl Dancing With the Stars (Live) (s) (cc) Samantha The Bachelor (N) (cc) News (N) Nightline
a WFLX Simpsons Simpsons Family Guy Raymond House (s) (cc) K-Ville "Melissa" (s) (cc) News (N) Raymond TMZ (N) (s)
SWTVX King King Two Men Two Men Chris Aliens Girlfriends The Game Friends (s) Wil-Grace Sex & City Sex&City
I WXEL News-Lehrer Florida Jewish Antiques Roadshow (s) Athens: Dawn Athens: Dawn Charlie Rose (N) (s) (cc)

AMC (5:30) Movie: **'/2 Mission: Impossible (1996) Movie: ** Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life (2003) Movie: ** Meet Joe Black (1998)
ANIM The Most Extreme (cc) Sharks of South Africa Hippo: King Natural World (cc) Animal Cops Houston Sharks of South Africa
A&E Cold Case Files (cc) CSI: Miami "Hard Time" Intervention "Caylee" intervention "Km"(cc) TheFirst 48 (cc) The First 48 (cc)
BET 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live (cc) |Access Movie: **1a Booty Call (1997) (Jamie Foxx) (cc) Movie Sp. GirlfriendsHell Date HellDate
CNN The Situation Room Lou Dobbs Tonight (cc) Out in the Open Larry King Live (cc) Anderson Cooper 360 (cc)
CRT Wildest Police Videos Cops(s) Cops (s) World's Wildest Forensic Suburban Murder by the Book (N) The Investigators (N)
DISC How-Made How-Made MythBusters (cc) Futureweapons Futureweapons FMythBusters (cc) Dirty Jobs (cc)
DISN Suite Life Suite Life Montana Suite Life Movie:** Beethoven's 4th (2001) So Raven So Raven LifeDerek Suite Life Montana
El Keep Up Keep Up E! News Daily 10 Jenna Jameson: The El True Hollywood Story Soup Pres Soup El News Chelsea
ESP2 College Basketball (cc) College Basketball: CBE Classic Semifinal College Basketball: Duke vs. Princeton Gamenight Basketball
ESPN Monday Night Kickoff Monday Night Countdown (Live) (cc). NFL Football: Tennessee Titans at Denver Broncos. (Live) SportsCtr.
EWTN One-Hearts Padre Pio Daily Mass: Our Lady The Journey Home Letter Sprt Rosary Abundant Life The World Over
FAM Movie: *** Love & Basketball (2000) (Sanaa Lathan) (cc) Movie: *** Love & Basketball (2000) (Sanaa Lathan) (cc) The 700 Club (cc)
HGTV Offbeat If Walls MyHouse House To Sell Over Head Color Potential House . Buy Me (s) House First Place
HIST Modern Marvels (cc) Modern Marvels (cc) Modern Marvels "Corn" Gangland (cc) Underworld Indian Warriors
LIFE Reba (s) Reba (s) Still Stnd StillStnd Reba(s) Reba (s) Movie: More of Me (2007) (Molly Shannon) (cc) Will-Grace Will-Grace
NICK Drake Drake Zoey101 School TEENick Drake FullHouse Home Imp. Lopez Lopez Fresh Pr. Fresh Pr.
SCI Stargate SG-1 (cc) Star Trek: Enterprise Star Trek: Enterprise Star Trek: Enterprise (s) Star Trek: Enterprise (s) Virus Bust. Virus Bust'
TBS Friends (s) Raymond Raymond Raymond Family Guy Family Guy Ellen's Really Big Show (N) Ellen's Really Big Show
TCM Movie Movie: The Falcon in San Francisco Movie: *** The Great Waltz (1938) (Luise Rainer) Movie: **'/2 Song of Love (1947) (cc)
TLC Jon & Kate Jon & Kate Little People, Big World Little Little Jon & Kate Plus 8 Kids by the Dozen (cc) Little Little
SPIKE Movie Movie: *** Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) (Pierce Brosnan) (s) Movie: **'/2 The World Is Not Enough (1999) (Pierce Brosnan) (s) (cc)
TNT Law & Order "Return" Law & Order "Sects" (s) Law & Order "Vendetta" Law & Order (s) The Closer (cc) Saving Grace (cc)
UNI Locura Noticiero o Amo a Juan Amar sin Limites (N) Destilando Amor (N) Cristina Impacto Noticiero
USA Law & Order: SVU Law Order: CI Law & Order: SVU WWE Monday Night Raw (Live) (s) (cc) Law & Order: SVU

HBO Movie Movie: ** Doctor Dolittle (1998) (cc) I Am Animal Movie: *'2 John Tucker Must Die (2006) 'PG-13' Morgan. 24 7
SHOW (5:45) Movie: Duane Movie: ** Man About Town (2006) (Ben Affleck) Brotherhood (iTV) (s) Weeds (cc) Weeds (cc) Dexter "Morning Comes"
TMC Movie Movie: Twelve and Holding (2005) Movie: *1/2 Cutting Class (1989) (Donovan Leitch) Movie: Fifty Pills (2006) (s)'R' (cc) JWeather


Ron's Pressure Washing
& Minor Repairs
Roof coating, Repair to
Mobile Homes & more.
No job to big or small. Free
estimates. 863-357-9604 or
cell 863-610-1248
License # 2423

Find It faster. Sell It soon-
er in the classified

Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise your
yard sale in the classi-
fieds and make your
clean un a breeze



JACK'S TOP SOIL
Fill Dirt/ShellRock
& Bob Cat work.
Call 863-467-4734


The most important
20 minutes of your day
is the time spent reading
with your child from
birth to age nine.


Merchandise



Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines 535
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China. Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, Linens & Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment"'
Supplies 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets/Supplies/
Services 670
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740




Need 16 ft. V Hull Boat Trailer.
(863)357-3578


CASH for your heavy industrial
equipment. Excavators,
cranes, dozier's, wheel load-
ers, etc. Free estimates on
demolition jobs.
(386)423-4432


Rentals




Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses - Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House - Rent 930
Land - Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960



KINGS BAY: 2br, 2ba, town
house, $750/mo + $750
sec, No Pets (561)248-5309
or (863)697-8728
Oak Lake Apts., Remodeled
2br, 11/a ba, 2 Story, Washer
Dryer. Patio. $800 mo., 1st,
last + sec. (863)634-3313
OKEECHOBEE - 2BR, 1BA,
$625/mo, $525 sec dep.
(772)260-1765
OKEECHOBEE, 2br, lba, Close
to Town. $850. mo. includes
water. Annual Lease. Call
Vikki @561-255-4377



OVERSIZED 1/1 DUPLEX Extra
back room. $695/mo.
Includes lawn.
(954)290-0861

Grab a bargain from your
neighbor's garage,
attic, basement or clos-
et In today's classileds.


BASSWOOD - New 3/2, large
yard, Pets OK, lawn service,
water service, $950/mo, 1st
& last only. Avail Now
(561)723-0661
BASSWOOD: 2BR/1BA, CBS,
newly renovated, $775/mo.
1st, last & security deposit re-
quired. (561)793-4860
BRAND NEW, 3BR's/2BA's,
lots of tile, garage, $1200.
Lawrence Associates,
1-800-543-2495.
CBS Home, 3BR/2BA, on 5 ac.
w/24x60 barn, asking
$3,000 neg. or to rent for
$1500 mo. (863)634-6113
Charming Country Cottage,
3BR/1.5BA, 15 min. from
town & 2BR/1BA, no pets.
1st, last & sec. Call Debbie
863)467-2982 Mon.-Fri.,
am til 4pm.
OKEE., 3br, 1ba, Carport,
Yard, W/D, Partly Furnished
$1050. mo + Sec. Close to
town. (954)658-0108
Okeechobee, 2Br/1.5ba, car-
peted, ceramic tile, w/appl's
incl. dishwasher, $700 mo.
+ $700 sec. (863)763-8878
OKEECHOBEE: 4/3, on Taylor
Creek, large dock.
$1500/mo. 1st mo & sec.
dep. (561)767-6112
OKEECHOBEE- 4br, 2ba, in
city limits, looking for re-
sponsible renters w/refs.
$1300/mo, (863)634-9139
TREASURE ISLAND, 3/2 Very
clean! On canal. Lg. storage.
$950 mo. + 1st & sec. dep.
863-824-0981



COMMERCIAL SPACE - 750
sq ft. stand alone, available
(863)763-4114
OKEECHOBEE - Office Space
rental. 18'x12' $600. mo.
Utilities included. For ap-
pointment (863)467-1545
Store Front/Office Spaces 2
available in BHR. High traffic,
good for start up business.
Low rate. (863)610-1120


OKEE, Furnished Rm. Single
occ., private entrance, w/d.
$140/wk & deposit, utils incl.
(863)467-0771 after 6pm



BH RIDGE - 2/2, waterfront,
lake access, Ig screen porch,
fenced yard, shed, $700 1st
& $700 Sec (772)370-1095


Real Estate




Business Places -
Sale 10056
Commercial
Property - Sale 1010
Condos/ , ,
Townhouses - Sale 1015
Farms Sale 1020
Houses - Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property - Sale 1035
Land -'Sale 1040
Lots - Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property - Sale 1055
Property Inspectioni1060
Real Estate Wanted 1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080



NEW HOME ON YOUR LOT!
Features 3BRs/2BAs, Ig. LR,
garage, $118k, includes per-
mit fees. Lawrence Asso-
ciates 1-800-543-2495
OKEECHOBEE- 3/1, CBS, Un-
der appraisal. $169,900. Oak
/tile/marble, Space to add
master bath, 24 x13 en-
closed Fla. room & more!!
Grab flyer!! 309 SW 10tlOlh
Ave. (863)357-0391


OKEECHOBEE - 2 duplexes on
one lot, New metal roofs,
CBS, $325,000
(772)260-1765


MobileHomes




Mobile Home - Lots 2005
Mobile Home - Parts 2010
Mobile Homes - Rent 2015
Mobile Homes - Sale 2020




BH RIDGE - 3/2 on Waterfront,
Lake access. Fully furnished.
$900. 1st & $900. Sec.
(772)370-1095
CHOICE OF 3BR, or 2 BR, 2
ba D/W's No pets, yrly lease,
starting @ $600/mo +
$1000 sec. 863-763-4031




OKEECHOBEE - 2/1, newly re-
modeled, central heat/AC, Ig
porches, on 1.5 acres,
wooded & fenced. $800/mo
+ Sec dep. (863)634-3451
OKEECHOBEE 2BR/1BA,
No pets. Fenced yard.
$650/mo. & $550 security.
(863)763-0648
TAYLOR CREEK ISLES, 2br,
2ba, 2 person max. All util.
furnished, including yard.
$1250. mo. (863)634-2561
TREASURE ISLAND, 2br/lba,
Waterfront, Furnished. Non
smk. env. $850 mo.+ 1st,
Last& Sec. 772-285-5856



BANK REPO'S
MOVE TO YOUR LAND
Mobile Home Angels
561-385-4694
JIMS PLACE PARK - 14 x 56,
furn. 2 BR, 2 BA, 10x46 FL
RM, 14x40 Carport w/or
w/out a 16' rigged fibergl.
boat. $26K, w/out boat,
$24K. (863)467-5573.
MOB. HOME- 61', all new on
river, w/dock, 2/3 br, screen
room, extras, $37,000 Must
see inside (863)255-4935
OKEE - 2br, shed, Fla Room,
CA/Heat, W/D, carport, In
Adult park, $10,500
(863)763-1079 /801-3287
PALM HARBOR
4/2 Tile floor, Energy Package,
Deluxe loaded, over
2,200 sq. ft
30th Anniversary
Sale Special
Save $15,000.
Call for FREE Color Brochures
800-622-2832
REPO MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE! Set up & removal
also available. (863)381-1000
SKYLINE - '92, 28x60 DW,
3BR, 2BA, 2LR's. $25K/best
offer. Must move.
(863)634-9148 iv msg


READING A

NEWSPAPER..,

saves you money by
providing information
about best buys.

No wonder newspaper
readers earn morel


I Pulc o ice


I Pbic Notice


NOTICE OF HEARING
Okeechobee County Code Enlorcement
Special Magistrate
The Okeechobee County Special Magistrate will hold a public meeting on Tuesday,
November 20, 2007 at 2:00 p.m. The public meeting will be held at the Okeecho-
bee County Commission Chambers, located at the Okeechobee County Court-
house, 304 NW 2nd Street, Okeechobee. Florida. For more information, contact
Faye Huffman at the Planning and Development Department, 499 N.W. 5th Ave-
nue, Okeechobee, Florida 34972, (863) 763-5548.
All interested parties shall have the opportunity to be heard at this public meeting.
Any person deciding to appeal any decision by the Code Enforcement Special
Magistrate with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made and that the record
includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal will be based. Code
Enforcement tapes are for the sole purpose of backup for official records of the
Department.
Faye Huffman, Secretary to the
Code Enforcement Special Magistrate
2494320 N 11/18,19/07


Automobiles




Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy 'Duty Trucks 4040
Parts - Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070





CHEVY 4WD PICKUP, 2004 -
Heavy duty crew cab, all
power, running boards, bed-
liner, towing package, over-
size off-road tires, $17,500.
Call 863-467-1545.



CHEVY STO '95 - ext cab, 4.3
motor, auto, cold air, $3500
or best offer (863)763-5067

CHEVY SILVERADO - '04,
2500, Heavy duty, Reading Util
bed, Ladder rack, 60,800 mi.
$18,950. (863)467-1545


Public Notices




Public Notice 5005
State Public -
Legal Notice 5500




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2006-DP-069
IN THE INTEREST OF:
A.C. DOB: 6/13/06
Mother of the minor child:
Elizabeth Cox
TO: Prospective father of A.C.,
Jose Hernandez
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT A PE-
TITION UNDER OATH HAS BEEN
FILED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF CHIL-
DREN AND FAMILIES IN THE ABOVE-
STYLED COURT FOR THE.TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL. RIGHTS RELA-
TIVE TO A.C., A FEMALE CHILD,
BORN ON THE 13TH DAY OF JUNE,
2006. THE CHILD WAS BORN IN THE
COUNTY OF OKEECHOBEE, IN THE
STATE OF FLORIDA. YOU ARE COM-
MANDED TO BE AND APPEAR BE-
FORE A JUDGE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION IN THE
ABOVE-STYLED COURT LOCATED AT.
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
312 N.W. 3rd STREET,
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
AT 10:00 A.M. ON THE 10TH DAY OF
DECEMBER, 2007, FOR HEARING
AND TO SHOW CAUSE WHY SAID PE-
TITION SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTI-
TUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS
CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A
PARENT TO THE' CHILD NAMED IN
THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS
NOTICE.
BE ADVISED THAT YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY TO REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU
CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY, ONE
MAY BE APPOINTED FOR YOU.
WITNESS MY HAND AS CLERK OF SAID
COURT AND THE SEAL THEREOF,
THIS 16th DAY OF OCTOBER, 2007.
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF COURT
By: Kathy Arnold
DEPUTY CLERK
248395 ON 11/12,19,26;12/3/07
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2006-DP-069
IN THE INTEREST OF:
A.C. DOB: 6/13/06
Mother of the minor child:
Elizabeth Cox
TO: Prospective father of A.C.,
Javler Delgado
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT A PE-
TITION UNDER OATH HAS BEEN
FILED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF CHIL-
DREN AND FAMILIES IN THE ABOVE-
STYLED COURT FOR THE TERMINAL
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS RELA-
TIVE TO AC., A FEMALE CHILD,
BORN ON THE 13TH DAY OF JUNE,
2006. THE CHILD WAS BORN IN THE
COUNTY OF OKEECHOBEE, IN THE
STATE OF FLORIDA. YOU ARE COM-
MANDED TO BE AND APPEAR BE-
FORE A JUDGE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION IN THE
ABOVE-STYLED COURT LOCATED AT
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
312 N.W. 3rd STREET,
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
AT 10:00 A.M. ON THE 10TH DAY OF
DECEMBER, 2007, FOR HEARING
AND TO SHOW CAUSE WHY SAID PE-
TITION SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTI-
TUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS
CHILD IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A
PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN
THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS
NOTICE.
BE ADVISED THAT YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY TO REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU
CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY, ONE
MAY BE APPOINTED FOR YOU.
WITNESS MY HAND AS CLERK OF SAID
COURT AND THE SEAL THEREOF
THIS 16th DAY OF OCTOBER, 2007
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF COURT
By: Kathy Arnold
DEPUTY CLERK
248396 ON 11/12,19,26;12/3/07


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR OKEECHOBEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2003-DP-088
IN THE INTEREST OF:
H.H. DOB: 2/23/90
A.H. DOB: 12/30/98
Mother of the minor children:
Karen Melvin
TO: Father of H.H., and A.H.,
Michael Holbert
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT A PE-
TITION UNDER OATH HAS BEEN
FILED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF CHIL-
DREN AND FAMILIES IN THE ABOVE-
STYLED COURT FOR THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS RELA-
TIVE TO H.H., A FEMALE CHILD,
BORN ON THE 23RD DAY OF FEBRU-
ARY, 1990, and A.H., A FEMALE
CHILO, BORN ON THE 30TH DAY OF
DECEMBER, 1998. THE CHILDREN
WAS BORN IN THE COUNTY OF OKEE-
CHOBEE, IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA.
YOU ARE COMMANDED TO BE AND
APPEAR BEFORE A JUDGE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE ABOVE-STYLED COURT LO-
CATED AT:
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
312N.W.3rd STREET,
OKEECHOBEE, FL 34972
AT 1:30 RM. ON THE 3RD DAY OF DE-
CEMBER, 2007, FOR HEARING AND
TO SHOW CAUSE WHY SAID PETI-
TION SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED,
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTI-
TUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINA-
TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS
CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A
PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN
THE PETITION ATTACHED TO THIS
NOTICE.
BE ADVISED THAT YOU HAVE THE
RIGHT TO AN ATTORNEY TO REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU
CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY ONE
MAY BE APPOINTED FOR YOU.
WITNESS MY HAND AS CLERK OF SAID
COURT AND THE SEAL THEREOF,
THIS 16th DAY OF OCTOBER, 2007.
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF COURT
By: Kathy Arnold
DEPUTY CLERK
248401 ON 11/12,19,26;12/3/07
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 19TH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2007-DR-485
Joana Perera Hernandez
Pettioner
Sergio Montalvo
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Sergio Montalvo
114 North 13th Ave. Apt 3B
Helros Park, IL 60160
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has
been filed against you and that you are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Joana
Perera Hernandez whose address is
104 SE 10th Ave., Okeechobee, FL
34974 on or before 11/27/2007, and
file and original with the clerk of this
Court at 312 N.W. 3rd Street, Okee-
chobee, FL 34972, before service on
Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If
you fail to do so, a default may be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, a available at
the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office.
You may review these documents
upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified of your current
address. (You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form 12.915)
Future papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record at the
clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285. Florida Family
Law Rules of Procedure, requires cer-
tain automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, includ-
ing dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated: 10/25/2007
SHARON ROBERTSON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/S/Heather Thomas
Deputy Clerk
245940ON 10/29;11/5,12,19/07
REQUEST FOR BIDS
LAWN MAINTENANCE CONTRACT
KING'S BAY HOMEOWNERS' ASSOC.
Service Period: One (1) year, renewable
upon mutual agreement.
Bids Accepted Through: December 21,
2007
Instructions: Bids may be mailed to
King's Bay Homeowners Assoc., 4466
SE 50th Ave., Okeechobee, FL 34974
or they may be hand delivered to drop
box located on King's Bay office door
Service Requirements: This contract will
be for full service lawn and tree main-
tenance of designated areas within
King's Bay. Contract requirements
available at King's Bay Office. You may
call our office lor further Information:
(863) 763-3878.
247632 ON 11/14,16,19/07


READING A

NEWSPAPER SAVES

TIME BY HELPING YOU

PLAN YOUR TIME

WISELY .


I Pulc o ice


Public o ice


Foundation Piecing

Foundation piecing is a technique that allows

quilters to make quilting blocks with complete accu-

racy without having to use templates or tiny pieces of

fabric. Everything you need to know to learn this

time-saving technique may be found in a full-color,

45-page guidebook that includes complete directions

for learning the technique, step-by-step directions for

eight quilt designs and more,


Foundation Piecing guide (No, AN4175),.. $10.95

Also available:

Learn Hand Piecing in One Day guidebook

(No. AN4174) . ..$8.95

Please add $4.00 s&h


To order, circle itemss, Please be sure to

clip & send w/ check to: include your name,

U.Bild Features address and the name of

3800 Oceanic Dr,, Ste, 107 this newspaper. Allow

Oceanside, CA 92056 1.2 weeks for delivery.


Or call (800) 82-UBILD

1� craftbook,com

SMoney Back Guarantee


I


I I


INVITATION TO BID
FOR PURCHASE OF COUNTY SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 125.35, Florida Statutes, the County
of Okeechobee will receive sealed bids for thie purchase for cash of the following
described real property:
LEGAL DESCRIPTION
A portion of the existing right-of-way (R/W) for N.E. 39th Boulevard (f/k/a "Cemetery
Road" - 100 feet wide), said portion ol existing R/W Is ling within Section 3,
Township 37 South, Range 35 East, Okeechobee County, Florda, and is more
particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Northwest corner of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 3 as
shown on the R/W map for State Road No. 15, Section 91020-2506. Sheet 11
of 17, last revision dated 5/8/1998, thence proceed South 89� 37' 51" East along
the North line of said Southwest 1/4, a distance of 493.42 feet to the intersection
with the Southerly R/W line of the aforesaid N.E 39th Boulevard: thence departing
said North line, run South 480 00' 03" West along said Southerly R/W line, a dis-
tance of 136.16 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continue South 480 00'
03" West along said Southerly R/W line, a distance of 470.42 feet to the East
R/W line of State Road No 15 (width varies) per Florida Department of Transpor-
tation Right-of-Way Map for State Road No 15 (US 441) Section 91020-2506,
Sheet 11 of 17, last revision date 5/8/1998; thence departing said Southerly R/W
ine, run North 00� 14' 47" East, a distance ol 135.09 feet to the intersection with
the Northerly R/W line of N.E. 39th Boulevard and the East maintained R/W line of
State Road No, 15 (width varies) per State of Florida Department of Transporta-
tion Maintenance Map for State Road 15, Section 91020-2518, Sheet 2 of 5, dat-
ed 3/15/1976, thence run North 480 00' 03" East along said Northerly R/W line of
N.E. 39th Boulevard, a distance of 619.90 feet to the POINT OF CUSP (from
which a radial line bears North 410 59' 57" West) of a tangent curve n the Wester-
ly line of the new R/W for N.E. 39th Boulevard (per the aforesaid R/W map for
tate Road 15 (U S. 441), Section 91020-2506) said curve being concave to the
Southeast, having a radus of 338.71 feet and a central angle of 450 11' 22",
thence Southwesterly and Southerly along the arc of said curve, a distance of
267.14 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. (Said parcel of land containing 1.15
acres, more or less)
PROPERTY ADDRESS
The location of the subject property is in the Northeast area of Okeechobee County
in Section 3, Township 37 South, Range 35 East. The property is a long narrow
1.15 acre (50,094 square feet) portion of NE 39th Boulevard east of U.S. 441.
The property is referred to as the Old Cemetery Road.
Sealed bids will be accepted in Room 102, Okeechobee County Courthouse, 304
N.W. 2nd Street, Okeechobee, Florida 34972 until 10:00 a.m. on November 26,
2007. Bids will be opened at 10:05 a.m. on November 26, 2007 in Room 102 of
the County Courthouse. The Board of County Commissioners has indicated the
minimum acceptable bid on this property is $125,000.00. The Bidder shall sub-
mr the following bid:
Bidder, submits a bid in the amount of $ representing the total price for the
above described property. As security deposit, the bidder hereby submits and en-
closes security deposit (cashier's check) representing 5% of the total bid
amount. Said bid shall be valid and shall not be withdrawn for a period of sixty
(60) days from the date of the bid opening. In the event closing does not occur
within sixty (60) days fro mthe date of acceptance by the County and full and total
payment of the bid price is not paid to the County within that time period, then the
security deposit shall be forfedited to the County as liquidated damages.
The Board of County Commissioners of Okeechobee county reserves the right to re-
ject any bid for any reason whatsoever, to waive any and all informalities and ir-
regularities, and to accept the bid which in its judgment is in the best interest of
the County.
Clif BeltsJr. Chairman
Board of County Commissioners
Okeechobee County, Florida
Sharon Robertson, Clerk
248223 ON 11/12.19/2007


REQUEST FOR BID (RFB) NO. 6000000142
Removal of Surplus Spoil - Okeechobee County
The Procurement Department of the South Florida Water Management District
(SFWMD), B-1 Building, 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach, Florida 33406,
will receive sealed bids up to 2:30 p.m. opening time on December 19, 2007, The
purpose of this RFB is to solicit bids from qualified respondents for the removal of
approximately 140,000 cubic yards of spoil material in Okeechobee County.
An OPTIONAL Site Visit will be held on Monday, December 3, 2007 from 9:00
a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Transportation will be the responsibility of interested attend-
ees. Casual attire is recommended for the site visits
Sediment analysis conducted by the SFWMD indicates that the sediment might not
be suitable for use in residential areas, but is appropriate for agricultural and'com-
mercial uses. Therefore, the recipient of the bid will be required to provide a
statement of its anticipated use of the maternal.
All bids must conform to the instructions in the RFB. Interested respondents may
obtain a copy of the complete RFB (1) at the above address; (2) by downloading
the solicitation from our website at wwwsfwmd.oov (3) by calling
(561) 682-2715; or (4) by calling the 24-hour BID HOTLINE (00) 472-5290.
The public is invited to attend the bid opening. Further information on the status
of this solicitation can be obtained on our web site - www.sfwmd.gov.
249108ON 11/19/07







Do.ItYourself Ideas


I





10 Okeechobee News, Monday, November 19, 2007


5L. jI


II *4


ALAN ]AY PONTIAC BUICK . MC * SATURN


Of BUICK CENTURY
BEAUTIFUL CONDITION,
ONLY
$6,412


I4 ]" ;


06 GMC SIERRA Exr CAB
CLEAN CLEAN TRUCK,
ONLY
$19,862


05 SATURN ION COUPE
SPORTY FUN,
ONLY
$13,588


04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
31,142 MILES,
CLEAN As A PIN
$l 5,688


05 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GT
Now THIS Is "SPORT",
ONLY
$ 5,983


4


ON GAs
O/ t


04


05 SATURN L300
ALL THE GOODIES,
ONLY
$1 2,966


SATO" I� COUPE
ITS GOT E
ONLY
s$ 0,888


05 BUICK CENTURY
LOADED, ONLY 12,209 MILES,
ONE OWNER
$13,483
B^ ^ ^ ..... ..... '


UMC SIERRA m XT CAB
ONLY 6,592 MILES,
STILL LIKE NEW
$19,828


06 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
ONLY 8,339 MILES,
IMMACULATE
$11,839


07 GMC YUKON
IT's GOT IT ALL!!
15,931 MILES
$29,646


04 JEEP OR, CHEROKEE LIMITED 4x4
ONLY 38,330 MILES, GREAT Tow
BEHIND VEHICLE, MUST SEE
$17,686


D7 GMC SIERRA
HOODED, LOADED,
ONLY 5,802 MILES
$23,864


See The All New Vue
with 1.9% APR
0 oor
:~*~$ 1000 Cash Back


SATURN Supplies FREE
Courtesy Washes For
LIFE With ANY NEW
SATURN Purchase


ROAD


qflWRE� r(i AWNNA - 'LIKE


THEj WA Yd WE� All


ii, I~~;~~1rj!fA LrfILei~jpE:IeIDU~ r ~ fV!~ IAE~
WV ~Af A L.A MJ~ V~i


.* ,. ; --,


at


tllljL


-AIL- -A-


I - �


P AwACNICKGM�Cj
mr-


FT


Im V C I
Mid i




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs