2 Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007


Ruble rrad. Il drup ammedment Iul,


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Syndicated Content

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"Copyrighted Material
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Festival s -
Continued From Page 1
be judged at 7:30 p.m.
While Main Street is hoping
for better weather for this year's
event, they need the cooperation
and support from local business-
es, organizations and individuals
in order to make this safe and funim .
event a success for the commu-
nity.
Businesses and organizations
are still needed to set up activity
booths. Individual volunteers can
be utilized at various locations
throughout the event. Main Street
also has available volunteers
available that can work booths
for businesses that wish to set up .,
a game but do not have the per- File photo
sonnel to place in the booth. Volunteers (front row-left to right) Faye Huffman, Hattie Bennett, (middle row-left to right)
Karen Hanawalt, Main Street Teresa Chandler, Corrinena Hawk, Natalie Barr and Melody Hodges for the Main Street Hal-
project manager, is hoping to loween Festival in 2007 helped out in many ways including passing out popcorn and coordi-
have a haunted house or haunted nating the costume contest where they were accompanied by Sheriff Paul May (back).
village in the park that will be cre-
ated by a business or group of in-
dividuals. Other booth space also
remains available. i
Donations of candy will be col-
lected at:: WOKC; Bass Funeral ,.
Home, 205 N.E. Second St.; Sher-
win Williams, 820 E.N. Park St.;
Seacoast National Bank (north
and south locations); American
Red Cross, 323 N. Parrott Ave.;
City Hall, 55 S.E. Third Ave.;
Okeechobee County Sheriff's
Office, 504 N.W Fourth St.; Beef
O' Brady's, 608 S. Parrott Ave.;
Gizmo's Pizza, 3235 U.S. 441 S.E.;
Syble's Florist and Gifts, 119 S.
Parrott Ave.; Accident Law Offices
of Philip DeBerard, 114 N. Parrott
Ave.; Y Drive Thru, intersection of
S.R. 70 and S.R. 710; First Bank
and Trust of Indiantown,205 E. N.
Park St.; and at the Main Street of-
fice, 111 N.E. Second St.
For information about the
festival or to get involved with
the event, please contact Karen
Hanawalt at (863) 357-MAIN
(6246). Interested parties can also
contact Ms. Hanawalt about the
kick-off luncheon.
Post your opinions In the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.com. Charlie Sudena (left) won first place in the 6- to 10-year-old category in the 2007 Okeechobee
Reporter Chauna Aguilar may be Main Street Halloween Fest costume contest where he was presented a bike by Melody
reached at caguilar@newszap.com. Hodges.


Trailer
Continued From Page 1
"Rumber" that is, "lum-
ber" made from recycled
tires. The trailer can have
a steel or aluminum-roof or
a canvas top. You can put
together pretty much what
your budget will allow.
Then you choose the right
axles for what you want to
haul and the weight."
Since there are no gov-
ernment or industry stan-
dards that govern horse
trailer construction, look at
the trailer from your horse's
point of view. Horses are
prey animals that depend
on flight to stay alive. A
trailer is shaky ground and
confines them so they can-
not run away. It is only their
trust of us that encourages
them to get in to a trailer


at all! Be sure all rings,
latches fold flat and cannot
injure the horse.
A trailer needs enough
room for the horse to stand
comfortably and plenty
of ventilation. Padded or
wood paneled sides, chest
rolls and butt rolls can in-
crease safety. If the trailer
is aluminum, watch closely
for minor damage that can
tear or other wise damage
the trailer and cause injury
to your horse.
A Web site called Eq-
uiSpirit was very helpful
and gave us this informa-
tion: 'An inside width of 6
feet with a height of 7 feet
(square sided roof rather
than rounded), and a total
stall length of 10 feet, will
fit a horse from about 14
hands up to about 16 hands.
Add 2 inches to the roof,
and the horse can be up


to 16-3 hands. From 16-3
hands up to 17 hands, you
should add another 2 inches
to the height, and 6 inches
to the length or just add 1'
to the heaa area depending
on the size of your horse."
For a limited budget, a
well-made stock trailer is
a good choice. This type
trailer meets most of Equi-
Spirit's criteria. It is open
and airy. The horses can
easily step up into the trail-
er and turn around to come
walk out headfirst. (Back-
ing out of a step up trailer
is risky. It is not unusual
for a horse to slip under
the trailer when being un-
loaded. What a stock trailer
may lack in amenities it
will make up in durability
and versatility, since it can
be used to transport other
livestock as well. This is
very useful to avoid wait-


ing for the vet to drive out
to your place, since you can
take your animals to him
or her. It can also be used
to haul hay and move your
brother's household into a
new house.
"A gooseneck trailer that
fits into a device installed
in your truck bed puts the
weight evenly between the
axles. When you are try-
ing to get out of a parking
lot after an event, your can
jackknife them and maneu-
ver better than with a bum-
per pull," said Mr. Parcell.
"The most important fac-
tor is that the trailer and
the truck be level. I cannot
emphasize that enough. It
makes a big difference in
safety: the trailer will pull
better and also assist in your
ability to stop your vehicle
and trailer saely."


News Briefs


VFW Post sponsors Operation Shoebox
OKEECHOBEE -- Big Lake VFW Post #10539 is looking for all
family members -- sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, fathers or
mothers -- of those serving in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan or the Per-
sian Gulf.
The post is sponsoring Operation Shoebox and would like to
send packages to active military personnel from Okeechobee.
Please call (863) 697-2930, or e-mail Cheryl@oacenterprises.
com.

Account for Christopher Thomas set up
OKEECHOBEE -- David Thomas and Trish Metzcher have set
up a benefit account in memory of their son Christopher Thomas
who died early Saturday, July 14, in an automobile accident.
The account has been established at Seacoast National Bank.
For those who would like to donate to the family, the account
information is at the bank.
If you have any questions, call Mrs. Metzcher at (863) 634-
5795.

Health Dept. offers tobacco program
OKEECHOBEE -- The Okeechobee County Health Department
(OCHD) is offering a Tobacco Prevention and Education Program
for the community.
The purpose of the program is to reduce adult and youth to-
bacco use, and provide tobacco resources to residents, business-
es and community organizations in the county.
Freedom from smoking classes will be held every Tuesday at
the Okeechobee County Health auditorium, 1728 N.W Ninth Ave.,
from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m.
For information, call (863) 462-5781.

Special benefit account set up
OKEECHOBEE -- A special benefit account has been estab-
lished at Seacoast National Bank, 1409 S. Parrott Ave., for Crystal
(Longen) Vandermolen to help defray medical costs.

Today's Weather


Okeechobee Forecast
Sunday: Partly cloudy, with scattered showers and isolated
thunderstorms. The high will be in the upper 80s. The wind will
be from the east at 10 to 15 mph increasing to 15 to 20 mph in the
afternoon. The chance of rain is 40 percent.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy, with isolated showers. The low
will be in the mid 70s. The chance of rain is 20 percent.
Extended Forecast
Monday: Partly cloudy, with scattered showers and isolated
thunderstorms. The high will be in the upper 80s. The chance of
rain is 30 percent.
Monday night: Partly cloudy, with the low in the lower 70s.
Tuesday: Partly cloudy, with a slight chance of showers and
thunderstorms. The high will be around 90. The chance of rain is
20 percent.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy, with the low in the lower 70s.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy, with a slight chance of showers and
thunderstorms. The high will be in the upper 80s. The chance of
rain is 20 percent.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. The low will be in the lower 70s.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy, with a slight chance of showers
and thunderstorms. The high will be in the upper 80s. The chance
of rain is 20 percent.

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Oke


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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028410/01005
 Material Information
Title: Okeechobee news
Uniform Title: Okeechobee News
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Okeechobee News
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee Fla
Publication Date: October 7, 2007
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
Coordinates: 27.241667 x -80.833056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Daily Okeechobee news

Full Text
















Vol. 98 No. 280


Okeechobee News
*********ALL FOR ADC 320


OCCUPANT
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611 7007


Sunday, October 7, 2007


OHS Sports


Brahmans 40
Cobras 24


Briefs


Airport closing
As of 7 a.m. on Monday, Oct.
8, the Okeechobee County Air-
port will be closed to fixed-wing
aircraft for a minimum of three
days due to the milling and re-
paving at the intersection of the
two runways.

Taylor Creek locks
access restricted
Due to the continued drought
that is causing record low levels
in Lake Okeechobee, the South
Florida Water Management
District will begin restricted op-
eration of the Taylor Creek Navi-
gation Locks (S-193) on Lake
Okeechobee at 8 a.m. on Mon-
day, Oct. 8.

Agri-civic center
open for riding
OKEECHOBEE -- The
Okeechobee County Agri-Civic
Center, 4200 S.R. 70 E., is open
for recreational riding the first
and third Tuesdays of each
month from 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Barrels and poles are avail-
able.
The cost is $10 per person.
Rules, waiver and release forms
are available at the Okeechobee
County Board of County Com-
missioner's .office, 304 N.W
Second St., and the county ex-
tension office at 458 U.S. 78
N. Persons 18 years of age and
younger are required to wear
helmets.
For information, call (863)
763-1666 or (863) 697-9977.

Local court cases
now online
OKEECHOBEE -- Sharon
Robertson, Okeechobee County
clerk of circuit court, has an-
nounced that the clerk's office
web site now offers Okeechobee
County court cases on line.
The information is available
24 hours a day, seven days a
week. The site provides the abil-
ity to perform a person or case
search in a variety of ways. Visit
www.clerk.co.okeechobee.
fl.us for the index and progress
dockets of Okeechobee County
public record court cases.
Questions should be directed
to Sharon Robertson at www.
clerk@clerk.co.okeechobee.
fl.us.

Drought Index
Current: 270
Source: Florida Division
of Forestry
Local Burn Ban: None

Lake Levels


10 feet
Last Year: 13.27 feet
.4? Source: South
Florida Water
S',\ Management
i District. Depth
given in feet
above sea level.


Index
C lassifieds ..........................11-12
Community Events................... 4
Crossword................................. 9
Obituaries............................... 6
O pinion................................... 4
Sports........ ..................... 13
TV ......................................... . 9
W weather ..................................... 2
See Page 2 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.


Community Links. Individual Voices.



8 Il I1l l0 llD ll5
8 16510 00025 2


Bush talks health care compromise


By Kevin Freking
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Presi-
dent Bush signaled a willingness
Saturday to spend more than
what he had recommended for
a popular children's health pro-
gram, but provided no specifics
on how much higher he would
go.
The president on Wednesday
vetoed legislation that would
increase spending for the State
Children's Health Insurance
Program by $35 billion over five
years. Bush has called for a $5


billion increase. Several Repub-
licans in both chambers have
sided with Democratic lawmak-
ers on the issue.
"If putting poor children
first takes a little more than the
20 percent increase I have pro-
posed in my budget for SCHIP, I
am willing to work with leaders
in Congress to find the additional
money," Bush said in his weekly
radio address.
Democratic lawmakers say
votes to override the president's
veto will be held in mid-October.
That effort is not expected to
succeed.


The program provides health
insurance to children in families
with incomes too great for Med-
icaid eligibility but not enough to
afford private insurance.
Bush used his radio address
to once again make the case that
he believes the spending increase
sought primarily by Democrats is
a step "toward their goal of gov-
ernment-run health care for ev-
ery American."
"Government-run health care
would deprive Americans of the
choice and competition that
comes from the private market,"
he said. "It would cause huge


increases in government spend-
ing."
While the government does
heavily subsidize the health cov-
erage offered through the pro-
gram, most SCHIP beneficiaries
get coverage through private in-
surers who contract with states.
That was a point stressed by
Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., major-
ity leader in the House, when he
provided the Democratic radio
address Saturday.
"The truth is, America's larg-
est private insurance lobbying
group supports this bill as do
America's doctors, nurses, chil-


dren's.advocates and, most im-
portantly, 72 percent of Ameri-
cans," Hoyer said.
The president also said the bill
moving through Congress needs
to move adults off the program.
However, his administration has
approved waivers that allowed
some states to cover adults.
"In fact, based on their own
projections for this fiscal year,
Minnesota, Illinois, New Jersey,
Michigan, Rhode Island and
New Mexico will spend more
SCHIP money on adults than
See Health - Page 2




OKMS to


discuss


festival



plans

By Chauna Aguilar
Okeechobee News
Okeechobee Main Street
(OKMS) is finalizing plans for its
third annual Okeechobee Hal-
loween Festival in Flagler Park to
be held on Wednesday, Oct. 31.
Main Street will be holding a
luncheon at the Golden Corral
Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave.,
on Monday, Oct. 5, from 11:30
a.m. until 1 p.m. where they will �
discuss all of the available part-
nership opportunities including
booth ideas and the layout of the
parks.
This community event brings
together the Okeechobee County
Sheriff's Office, Okeechobee City
Police Department, Okeechobee
Board of County Commissioners
and the Okeechobee City Council
with Main Street to make a safe
environment for the children of
Okeechobee to trick-or-treat.
The festival began three years
ago when the community came
together in a very short amount
of time to come to come up with a safe
way for the children to trick-or-
treat due to hurricane debris on
roads.
Last year the festival contin-
ued despite the torrential rains
that fell, where dedicated volun-
teers still ran the various activities
in the park for the families who
didn't let Mother Nature ruin
their trick-or-treat.
The event also has a costume
contest where this year children
will have the chance to win first,
second and third place in the fol-
lowing age groups: infant to 5; 6
to 10; and, 11 to 14.
To register for the contest, par-
ticipants must go to the Seacoast
National Bank booth which will
be located by the stage in the
park. The infant to 5-year-old
contest will be judged at 6:30
p.m.; the 6- to 10-year-old con-
test will be judged at 7 p.m.; and,
the I11- to 14-year old contest will
See Festival - Page 2


By Nena Bolan
INI Florida
BRIGHTON -- A dream has
come true for the Elders of
the Seminole Tribe of Florida.
It was a long time in coming
after their ancestors found ref-
uge in the Everglades following
three wars in the.1800's. More
than 160 years later the Brigh-
ton Reservation planned and
created a charter school that
continues the revival of the
Creek language. Oct. 4 marked
the ribbon cutting ceremony
at Pemayetv Emahakv's grand
opening.
This vision in education
began over 20 years ago, and
in 2003 became a serious mis-
sion for Louise Gopher, direc-
tor of education. A small, suc-
cessful, public school pullout
program began several years


ago whereby Seminole stu-
dents could study their lan-
guage and culture a few hours
a week. Brighton residents and
the culture department were
pleased with the results, but
much more was needed.
In 2005, Ms. Gopher and
tribal officials applied to the
Glades County School District
for sponsorship of a charter
school that followed estab-
lished curriculum, yet supple-
mented daily with classes in
the Creek language or Semi-
nole culture. The school dis-
trict approved the plan and
helps the fledgling school stay
in compliance with the state's
department of education. The
groundbreaking began in the
fall of 2006, and the school
opened its doors to children
on August 20, 2007.
"The school was built in re-


cord time," said Sandra Barker,
charter school CEO, at the cer-
emony.
Pemaytv Emahakv is a mod-
el for Native American schools
and public schools across the
nation. While preserving the
heritage of its students the
school will also provide cur-
rent technology.
According to Russell Brown,
principal, each child has ac-
cess to a laptop computer, and
fourth and fifth graders have
iPods programmed for curricu-
lum. Thanks to new technol-
ogy, students cannot wiggle
out of homework quite so eas-
ily, and family 'members will
be able to monitor their child's
progress.
The ribbon cutting cer-
emony was held in the open
air corridor in the center of
the school. Elders and officials


from each Seminole reserva-
tion were present including
their neighbors, the Miccosuke
Tribe. State and local govern-
ment representatives were in-
vited to attend and learn about
the goals of the charter school.
Newly elected student council
members gave short speeches
and recited the Pledge of Alle-
giance in Creek and English.
As the tribe emerges into
the 211 century, they can truly
hold on to an unconquered
legacy which was preserved
for them by their elders of Old
Florida.
"The elders' role has always
been to educate youth," said
Max Osceola, Hollywood tribal
councilman.
Staff writer Nena Bolan can
be reached at nenabolan@ya-
hoo.com


How do you choose a trailer?


Backyard
Barnyard

By MaryAnn Morris
INI Florida
You have livestock,
horses, cows, pigs, etc.
in your backyard acre-
age. You realize that little
Jeannie wants to join the
4-H horse club with her
backyard horse because
her best friend in school
belongs and has told her
they have a super time
with their horses and
learn a lot. UH-oh! That
means being able to take
the horse to club functions
and shows or just over to
one of Jeanie's friends'


houses so they can ride
together on a weekend.
Where and how to start
looking?
Like buying a car, do
your research-know what
you need before you go
out to buy. What are the
questions you should
ask?
The leader of the 4-H
club might be a good re-
source and so can local
trailer dealers.
However, do not take
anyone's word for every-
thing. Do some research
of your own as if you
were buying a car, but not
quite.
For instance, how
many horses will you be


hauling? Long distance
or local? What vehicle
will you use to pull it? Is
that vehicle rated for the
gross vehicle weight of
your trailer? (GVW- that
is, the weight of the emp-
ty trailer, the horsess,
any feed, tack, grooming
sup plies, etc.) Does the
hitch type and class meet
any state regulations? Is
it roomy enough for the
horses) that you own?
"Most people here buy
stock trailers," said Bill
Parcell, sales manager at
Eli's Trailer Sales." Stock
trailers come in steel or
aluminum, the floor can
be wood, aluminum, or
See Trailer - Page 2


Courtesy photo/Florida Archives
Horse trailers have changed a lot over the years. Today's horse
owners transport horses in covered trailers that are safer for
the horses than the old open trailers. This photo from 1948
shows jockey Pete Bembry loading racehorse Black Kaiser
into a trailer in Sarasota.
"" .. . ' -,* --"". .- . 5'. %'".' ^'.y' ,r:.w �' '.,^S-rq fw',-�'[�7 , i,


Pemaytv Emahakv: Brighton School dedicated


INI/Nena Bolan
Seminole elders and children delight in cutting the ribbon at the new Pemayetv Emahakv charter school on the
Brighton Reservation in Glades County. The ceremony was held October 4. To see a photo gallery go to photos.
newszap.com


School becomes the heart of reservation


-----------







2 Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007


Rubio ready to drop amendment issue


By Bill Kaczor
Associated Press Writer
TALLAHASSEE. (AP) House
Speaker Marco Rubio is ready to
give up efforts to phase out the
popular Save Our Homes Amend-
ment that gives primary hom-
eowners protection against dra-
matic increases in property taxes.
Rubio acknowledged any re-
placement for a previously pro-
posed tax-cutting state constitu-
tional amendment would leave
Save Our Homes intact. A judge
has thrown that amendment off
the ballot.
"It's clear Save Our Homes is a
very popular protection that hom-
eowners enjoy," the West Miami
Republican said Friday. "In a time
when people's taxes keep going
up it's very difficult to go to vot-
ers and convince them that they
should let go of a security blanket
like Save Our Homes."
Budget-cutting and no-fault
auto insurance issues have been
resolved at a special legislative
session ending next Friday with
final but anticlimactic votes on
spending reductions. So, atten-
tion now is turning to property
tax relief.
Rubio, a vocal tax-cutting
advocate, and Senate President
Ken Pruitt, R-Port St. Lucie, have
announced plans for a separate
special session on that issue be-


fore the end of October. Lawmak-
ers need to act by then to meet a
constitutional deadline for putting
a new amendment on the Jan. 29
presidential primary ballot.
Chief Circuit Judge Charles A.
Francis of Tallahassee last month
removed the amendment the Leg-
islature passed at a June special
session because he found the bal-
lot summary misleading and inac-
curate. It says the measure would
protect Save Our Homes benefits
although it actually would remove
them, he ruled.
Save Our Homes limits annual
increases in assessments to no
more than 3 percent for what are
known as homesteads, but that
has shifted tax burden to owners
of other properties including busi-
nesses, second homes and rental
units.
Without such a limit, non-
homestead taxpayers have seen
their tax double, triple or even
more in recent years due to soar-
ing property values.
The Legislature responded to
outcries over those increases in
part by proposing the amend-
ment that eventually would have
replaced the Save Our Homes
limit with a new "super exemp-
tion" for all primary homeown-
ers.
Initially, homeowners would
have gotten a choice. They could


have kept their Save Our Homes
benefits or taken the super ex-
emption. It would have knocked
75 percent off the first $200,000 of
a home's value and 15 percent off
the next $300,000.
That might be a good option at
first for most homeowners, but if
property values that are declining
now in many areas start going up
again it could be a bad bet.
While the amendment would
have resulted in tax savings at first
they couldn't be accurately esti-
mated because there's no telling
how many homeowners would
take the super exemption. The
long-term forecast was even trick-
ier because of uncertainty over
future market values.
Once a home is sold, only the
super exemption could have been
taken. Eventually, that would have
gotten rid of Save Our Homes for
everyone.
The super exemption would
have been a better deal, though,
than homeowners get now when
they sell because they cannot take
their accrued Save Our Homes
benefits to a new house. All they
get is the standard $25,000 home-
stead exemption.
Rubio said any new plan likely
would include an increase in
the homestead exemption and a
"portability" provision that would
allow homeowners to take at least


some part of their existing benefit
with them when they move.
Gov. Charlie Crist made porta-
bility and a doubling of the home-
stead exemption part of his elec-
tion campaign last year and he
hasn't given up on those ideas.
Lawmakers, though, have
been leery of that approach be-
cause it could worsen the gap
between homestead and non-
homestead properties. Some
out-of-state owners of Florida
vacation homes have challenged
SaVe Our Homes on grounds the
higher taxes they pay violate the
U.S. Constitution. A state trial
court has ruled against them but
the case is being appealed.
The state, meanwhile, is ap-
pealing the ballot removal of the
super exemption amendment. If
that decision is reversed, lawmak-
ers themselves could then remove
it if they come up with something
better and more popular.
Polls show the super exemp-
tion amendment falling far short
of the 60 percent needed to pass.
"The truth of the matter is
that voters like Save Our Homes
because it's what they know and
it's what they have," Rubio said.
"I also think there's a general mis-
trust of government at all levels."


does call for gradually giving administration has added more recently said: 'I am not for exces-
Health states less federal matching mon- than 2 million children to the sive spending and strongly op-
ey when covering certain adults. SCHIP rolls since 2001. pose the federalization of health
Continued From Page 1 It also says the administration Hoyer often cited Republicans care. And if the administration's
they do on children," Bush said. cannot grant any new waivers to to make his point that the bill is concerns with this bill were accu-
'"And that is not the purpose of states that want to cover adults bipartisan. rate, I would support a veto.' But
the program." through SCHIP. . "As Senator Pat Roberts, a Senator Roberts added: 'Bluntly
The bill passed by Congress The president noted that his strong Republican from Kansas, put, they are not.'"



Festival
Continued From Page 1
be judged at 7:30 p.m.
While Main Street is hoping
for better weather for this year's
event, they need the cooperation
and support from local business-
es, organizations and individuals
in order to make this safe and fun
event a success for the commu-
nity.
Businesses and organizations
are still needed to set up activity .
booths. Individual volunteers can
be utilized at various locations
throughout the event. Main Street
also has available volunteers
available that can work booths
for businesses that wish to set up .
a game but do not have the per- File photo
sonnel to place in the booth. Volunteers (front row-left to right) Faye Huffman, Hattie Bennett, (middle row-left to right)
Karen Hanawalt, Main Street Teresa Chandler, Corrinena Hawk, Natalie Barr and Melody Hodges for the Main Street Hal-
project manager, is hoping to loween Festival in 2007 helped out in many ways including passing out popcorn and coordi-
have a haunted house or haunted nating the costume contest where they were accompanied by Sheriff Paul May (back).
village in the park that will be cre-
ated by a business or group of in-
dividuals. Other booth space also
remains available.
Donations of candy will be col-
lected at:: WOKC; Bass Funeral " .
Home, 205 N.E. Second St.; Sher-
win Williams, 820 E.N. Park St.; .
Seacoast National Bank (north
and south locations); American
Red Cross, 323 N. Parrott Ave.;
City Hall, 55 S.E. Third Ave.; '
Okeechobee County Sheriff's
Office, 504 N.W Fourth St.; Beef
0' Brady's, 608 S. Parrott Ave.;
Gizmo's Pizza, 3235 U.S. 441 S.E.; ,
Syble's Florist and Gifts, 119 S.
Parrott Ave.; Accident Law Offices
of Philip DeBerard, 114 N. Parrott
Ave.; Y Drive Thru, intersection of
S.R. 70 and S.R. 710; First Bank
and Trust of Indiantown,205 E. N.
Park St.; and at the Main Street of-
fice, 111 N.E. Second St.
For information about the
festival or to get involved with
the event, please contact Karen
Hanawalt at (863) 357-MAIN
(6246). Interested parties can also
contact Ms. Hanawalt about the
kick-off luncheon.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.com. Charlie Sudena (left) won first place in the 6- to 10-year-old category in the 2007 Okeechobee
Reporter Chauna Aguilar may be Main Street Halloween Fest costume contest where he was presented a bike by Melody
reached at caguilar@newszap.com. Hodges.


Trailer
Continued From Page 1
"Rumber" that is, "lum-
ber" made from recycled
tires. The trailer can have
a steel or aluminum-roof or
a canvas top. You can put
together pretty much what
your budget will allow.
Then you choose the right
axles for what you want to
haul and the weight."
Since there are no gov-
ernment or industry stan-
dards that govern horse
trailer construction, look at
the trailer from your horse's
point of view. Horses are
prey animals that depend
on flight to stay alive. A
trailer is shaky ground and
confines them so they can-
not run away. It is only their
trust of us that encourages
them to get in to a trailer


at all! Be sure all rings,
latches fold flat and cannot
injure the horse.
A trailer needs enough
room for the horse to stand
comfortably and plenty
of ventilation. Padded or
wood paneled sides, chest
rolls and butt rolls can in-
crease safety. If the trailer
is aluminum, watch closely
for minor damage that can
tear or other wise damage
the trailer and cause injury
to your horse.
A Web site called Eq-
uiSpirit was very helpful
and gave us this informa-
tion: 'An inside width of 6
feet with a height of 7 feet
(square sided roof rather
than rounded), and a total
stall length of 10 feet, will
fit a horse from about 14
hands up to about 16 hands.
Add 2 inches to the roof,
and the horse can be up


to 16-3 hands. From 16-3
hands up to 17 hands, you
should add another 2 inches
to the height, and 6 inches
to the length or just add 1'
to the head area depending
on the size of your horse."
For a limited budget, a
well-made stock trailer is
a good choice. This type
trailer meets most of Equi-
Spirit's criteria. It is open
and airy. The horses can
easily step up into the trail-
er and turn around to come
walk out headfirst. (Back-
ing out of a step up trailer
is risky. It is not unusual
for a horse to slip under
the trailer when being un-
loaded. What a stock trailer
may lack in amenities, it
will make up in durability
and versatility, since it can
be used to transport other
livestock as well. This is
very useful to avoid wait-


ing for the vet to drive out
to your place, since you can
take your animals to him
or her. It can also be used
to haul hay and move your
brother's household into a
new house.
"A gooseneck trailer that
fits into a device installed
in your truck bed puts the
weight evenly between the
axles. When you are try-
ing to get out of a parking
lot after an event, your can
jackknife them and maneu-
ver better than with a bum-
per pull," said Mr. Parcell.
"The most important fac-
tor is that the trailer and
the truck be level. I cannot
emphasize that enough. It
makes a big difference in
safety: the trailer will pull
better and also assist in your
ability to stop your vehicle
and trailer safely."


News Briefs


VFW Post sponsors Operation Shoebox
OKEECHOBEE -- Big Lake VFW Post #10539 is looking for all
family members -- sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, fathers or
mothers -- of those serving in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan or the Per-
sian Gulf.
The post is sponsoring Operation Shoebox and would like to
send packages to active military personnel from Okeechobee.
Please call (863) 697-2930, or e-mail Cheryl@oacenterprises.
com.

Account for Christopher Thomas set up
OKEECHOBEE -- David Thomas and Trish Metzcher have set
up a benefit account in memory of their son Christopher Thomas
who died early Saturday, July 14, in an automobile accident.
The account has been established at Seacoast National Bank.
For those who would like to donate to the family, the account
information is at the bank.
If you have any questions, call Mrs. Metzcher at (863) 634-
5795.

Health Dept. offers tobacco program
OKEECHOBEE -- The Okeechobee County Health Department
(OCHD) is offering a Tobacco Prevention and Education Program
for the community.
The purpose of the program is to reduce adult and youth to-
bacco use, and provide tobacco resources to residents, business-
es and community organizations in the county.
Freedom from smoking classes will be held every Tuesday at
the Okeechobee County Health auditorium, 1728 N.W. Ninth Ave.,
from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m.
For information, call (863) 462-5781.

Special benefit account set up
OKEECHOBEE -- A special benefit account has been estab-
lished at S-eacoast National Bank, 1409 S. Parrott Ave., for Crystal
(Longen) Vandermolen to help defray medical costs.

Today's Weather


Okeechobee Forecast
Sunday: Partly cloudy, with scattered showers and isolated
thunderstorms. The high will be in the upper 80s. The wind will
be from the east at 10 to 15 mph increasing to 15 to 20 mph in the
afternoon. The chance of rain is 40 percent.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy, with isolated showers. The low
will be in the mid 70s. The chance of rain is 20 percent.
Extended Forecast
Monday: Partly cloudy, with scattered showers and isolated
thunderstorms. The high will be in the upper 80s. The chance of
rain is 30 percent.
Monday night: Partly cloudy, with the low in the lower 70s.
Tuesday: Partly cloudy, with a slight chance of showers and
thunderstorms. The high will be around 90. The chance of rain is
20 percent.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy, with the low in the lower 70s.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy, with a slight chance of showers and
thunderstorms. The high will be in the upper 80s. The chance of
rain is 20 percent.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. The low will be in the lower 70s.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy, with a slight chance of showers
and thunderstorms. The high will be in the upper 80s. The chance
of rain is 20 percent.

Lotteries

MIAMI (AP) -- Here are the winning numbers selected Friday in
the Florida Lottery: Cash 3 1-3-4; Play 4 7-9-3-8; Fantasy 5 15-35-22-
29-30; Mega Money 25-16-34-38, Mega Ball: 6

- ',, , .- ,




Okeechobee News
Published by Independent Newspapers, Inc.


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i






Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007 3

'~ WE DO TRAILER REPAIRS!
All Makes & Models, Axles, Brakes Etc...


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda
Casting their ballots
As Everglades Elementary School Principal Cynthia Weigum, right, looks on, Everglades students mark their ballots in the
election of student council officers held on Friday, Oct. 5. Okeechobee County Supervisor of Elections Gwen Chandler and
some of her poll workers brought the county's voting equipment to the school cafeteria teach students about the voting
process.


Middlebury College gets archive from Hemingway family


By Dave Gram graduated from Middlebury in
Associated Press Writer 1975.
MIDDLEBURY, Vt. (AP) -- No Andrew Wentink, curator of
matter where he lived, Ernest Middlebury's special collections,
Hemingway cared what people calls the Hemingway collection
thought of him back home the most significant acquisition
That's clear from a letter he by the college's archives since it
wrote to his father, Dr. Clarence got Henry David Thoreau's per-
Hemingway, from Paris in 1925. sonal copy of the first edition of
A collection of short stories, "In "Walden," complete with Thore-
Our Time," had won good re- au's margin notes, in 1940.
views in the New York newspa- "To have been in this position
pers. He hoped the local press in at a time when this came to Mid-
his hometown of Oak Park, Ill., dlebury it's hard to get over it, it's
would take note as well, he said, just so exciting," said Wentink.
"so they will hear I am not con- It will take months to get the
sidered a bum in N.Y. at least." letters and photos fully cata-
He added, "I wish the book logued.
would have a good sale in Chi- A public opening isn't expect-
cago and Oak Park as I'd like the ed until next year. The college
people I know to see what the paid for some of the materials
stuff is that I am doing, whether though Wentink wouldn't say
they happen to like it or not." how much; others were provided
The letter is among hundreds as gifts by Hemingway's heirs.
written by Hemingway and other Wentink and Tim Spears,
members of his family including dean of the college at Middle-
mid-19th century journals and bury and a professor of American
Civil War letters written by his studies who teaches a course on
grandfather. The letters and pho- Hemingway, said the materi-
tos of Hemingway and his family als contain clues they think will
at home in Oak Park and at their be important to Hemingway re-
summer place in Michigan were searchers.
recently acquired by Middlebury "Scholars have put a lot of
College from the author's nieces, weight on Hemingway's early
Anne and Hilary.,.. ,; years ... the context of his early
Hilary Hemingway's husband farriil\ history 'is really impor-
, . tant," Spears said. The roots of
Amp, A-WL Hemingway's love for the out-
doors likely were formed during
his childhood summers at the
... . family compound on Walloon
4 .Lake.
'V OT Early photos show the young
Hemingway with a big fish and
, *_ ,. with a toy gun given to him by


his grandfather. "A lot of his short
stories are set in the outdoors,"
Spears said.
Spears said students at the
college and scholars from else-
where soon will have an oppor-
tunity to do original research on
one of the 20th century's great-
est writers.
The archive traces Heming-
way's family history from the
journals written by his grandfa-
ther, Anson Hemingway, in the
1850s through letters between
Hemingway's father and mother,
a once aspiring opera singer, to
the author's death in 1961.
Aside from being of interest
to the writer's fans and literary
scholars, the materials provide
a fascinating glimpse for a social
historian into the lives of a pros-
perous Midwestern family during
that period, Spears said.
One item contained in the pa-
pers is a first chapter to Heming-
way's 1926 novel "The Sun Also
Rises," which he cut from the
final version at the urging of his
friend and fellow writer, F. Scott
Fitzgerald.
Archivist Tom Staley, director
of the Harry Ransom Center at
the University of Texas at Austin,
which has.its own extensive col-
lection 'of Hemingway papers,,
said the carbon copy of that'
omitted chapter was a particu-
larly fine catch for Middlebury.
"It's always very interesting
to see what the author left out,"
Staley said. "It really tells you
what their values are ... How do
you proceed by elimination?"
"It looks like they got a very


good collection there," Staley
said. "It matches very well with
the other collections."
Hilary Hemingway, daughter
of Hemingway's brother, Leices-
ter, joined with her sister Anne in
providing the materials to Mid-
dlebury. She hopes the letters
will give a fuller picture to future
Hemingway biographers and de-
bunk some mistaken ideas that
have been published.
"You get it as close to the
horse's mouth as you can.
There's an awful lot here that
wasn't available to biographers,"
she said.
The author's niece, who lives
in Florida, said some have con-
cluded from comments Heming-
way made to friends that he didn't
like his mother very much.
"He enjoyed making his im-
age of a tough guy who gave his
mom hell," she said. But he con-
tinued to send his mother letters
and checks throughout her life.
"He was a dutiful son," she said.
"He took very good care of his
family."
Ernest Hemingway, his broth-
er and his father all had at least
two things in common, Hilary
Hemingway said.
Each develo'peI' diabeles-
late in life, and later cornrnitedl
suicide. It's only been in recent
years that medical science has
discovered the strong links be-
tween diabetes and depression,
she said, adding that she hoped
the result would be a new un-
derstanding of what some have
called "the Hemingway curse."


4558 US 441 SE Okeechobee
(863) 763-5342

IHaulmar. .5I--








REICI MANCINI
Se Habla Espaitol -. Offices in Port St. Lucle
The hiring of an attorney is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to provide you with written information about our qualification and experience.


HEALTH

INSURANCE
For more information and
a FREE QUOTE call
(863) 467-0035 -

Ridge Insurance Agency
605 SW Park Sleet, #208
Okeechobee, F1

A Contracted General Agency for
BlueCross Blueshield
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For Info, Call 763-7202
THEATRE I
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@ 2:00, 4:15, 7:00 & 9:00
I I , . ,- , *I,


Democracy
in action
Juan Lopez, a fourth grad-
er at Everglades Elementa-
ry School, marks his ballot
for student council officers
during an election held at
the school on Friday, Oct.
5. Before voting, students
got a lesson in the vot-
ing process from Super-
visor of Elections Gwen
Chandler who allowed the
school to use the county
voting equipment.


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AR ST.LUCIE INDIANa RIVER OKEECHOEe


44


T h e
'h .uAI.... ~Environmental
byBud Neese Protection
Agency (E.P.A.)
is responsible for implementing provisions of
the Montreal Protocol with regards to the world-
wide phase out of ozone - depleting CFC's.
What does that mean to the average consumer?
It means that the air conditioning refrigerant
most widely used in our homes and businesses
(R-22), will be phased out in the coming years.
Not to panic, R-22 may still be produced for
servicing of equipment until the year 2020.
However, R-22 may be produced for use in new
equipment only until December 31,2009. The
concern, is that replacing only one component of


your system, may leave you in an undesirable
situation. The question is: If R-22 refrigerant is
only available until Dec. 31, 2009 for production
of new equipment, will I still be able to purchase
or "find" the other half of my air conditioning
system after this date? The smart consumer
should consider replacing an entire air condition-
ing system with an alternative refrigerant, such
as, R-410A, an ozone friendly refrigerant. We'll
cover more on this subject, in the next article.
Please fax (467-0839) or email
(lori@qualityacokee.com) any questions or con-
cerns you may have with your air conditioning.
If we use your question in our article we will
give you a FREE diagnostics visit and a written
report detailing the solutions) to your problem.


(BoltiD'


3D-hUDT3!


I ASK AN EXPERT


467ml 545
www.qualityacokee.COM * St. Lic. CAC029420
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Speak Out


Have an opinion or a question about a public issue? Pos
it anytime at the Okeechobee issues forum at http://www
newszapforums.com/forum58. It is a hometown forum sc
visit the page as often as you would like and share your corn
ments (but no personal attacks or profanities, please). Yoi
can also make a comment by calling our Speak Out 24-hou
opinion line at (863) 467-2033, fax (863) 763-5901 or sending
e-mail to okeenews@newszap.com. You can also mail sub
missions to Okeechobee News, P.O. Box 639, Okeechobee
Fla. 34973. Comments will be published in the newspaper at
space permits.

Public issues forums
Join the discussion of important issues at newszap.com. Topics include:
*Belle Glade/South Bay issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum51
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Go to newszap.com, click on your community and then on "community
forums and links."


Okeechobee News/File photo

From the photo archives
While cleaning out the old photography darkroom at the
Okeechobee News office, staffers came across a num-
ber of old photos. Some of these photos were taken by
staffers; others were apparently brought in by community
members. No information is available with the photos, but
- readers can share any information they might have. Some
of these have been posted at http://photos.newszap.com/
pages/gallery.php?gallery=310113. Or go online to www.
newszap.com, click on "Okeechobee," click on "Florida
photos," and then click on "Okee News Archives." To com-
ment on a photo, open the photo and post your comments
below.


Community Events

Community Theatre tickets on sale
By purchasing season tickets at $17 per set, there is a $3 savings.
This-entitles the bearer to the same seat for both shows, including the
musical in November, and the comedy in March. The discount re-
served-seat tickets must be purchased by October 9.
Theatre-goers who wish to secure season tickets should call (863)
763-1307, and leave their name and phone number. A theatre repre-
sentative will then return the call to verify the order, and obtain the
needed information.

Christian educators host special speaker
The Christian Home Educators of Okeechobee will have coffee and
a special speaker on Oct. 9, at 7 p.m. at the Nazarene Church on Wolff
Road, (behind Pizza Hut.) Their special speaker will be Shirley Solis of
Lifetime Books and Gifts, she will be speaking on "Building Character
and strong work ethics in your children." Shirley has five children and
she and her husband have spoken around the U.S. on home schooling
and educational issues. Everyone is welcome. For information call Misty
Lawrence at (863) 763-4387 or Yolanda Cortez at (863) 634-1909.




Okeechobee News

Our Purpose...
The Okeechobee News is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida.
Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pur-
sue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no
dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on profit margins below
industry standards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independent's
mission of journalistic service,. commitment to the ideals of the First
Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the community's deliber-
ation of public issues.


We Pledge ...
* To operate this newspaper as a
public trust
STo help our community become a
better place to live and work,
through our dedication to consci-
entious journalism.
* To provide the information citizens
need to make their own intelligent
decisions about public issues.
* To report the news with honesty,
accuracy, purposeful neutrality,
fairness, objectivity, fearlessness
and compassion.
* To use our opinion pages to facili-
tate community debate, not to
dominate it with our own opinions.
* To disclose our own conflicts of
interest or potential conflicts to our
readers.
* To correct our errors and to give
each correction to the prominence
it deserves.
* To provide a right to reply to those
we write about.
To treat people with courtesy,
respect and compassion.


Advertising Director: Judy Kasten

News Editor: Eric Kopp

National Advertising: Joy Parrish

Circulation Manager: Janet Madray

Independent Newspapers, Inc.
* Joe Smyth, Chairman
* Ed Dulin, President
* Tom Byrd, Vice President of
Newspaper Operations
* Katrina Elsken, Executive
Editor
MEMBER
OF: itKti



� Okeechobee News 2007
For More Information See
At Your Service On Page 2


t
r.
o
1-
uI


Guest Commentary



Fire is personal, so be prepared


r By Judy Comoletti
g It is practically impossible to
- read the newspaper or watch
, the local television news without
s learning about a fire that has de-
stroyed a property, maimed some-
one or even claimed a life. But,
for many, something like a fire is
simply not personal until it hits
close to home, which is exactly
what happened to the people liv-
ing in the nearly 400,000 homes
across the country that reported
8 fires in 2006.
Fire is personal and every-
one must realize that they have
a personal responsibility to not
only prevent fires, but also to be
prepared to escape if one should
occur.
Fire Prevention Week - Oct. 7-
13 -- is the perfect time to take a
few moments to review fire pre-
vention and safety guidelines. For
more than 80 years this aware-
ness campaign has been remind-
ing the public that in many cases
personal actions can directly in-
fluence fire prevention and safety.
This year's theme focuses on
home fire escape planning and


urges everyone to Practice Your
Escape Plan!
What could be more personal
than having tragedy strike in a
place where many people feel
the safest -- their home? Being
vigilant about fire prevention and
safety is important in all areas of
life, but being mindful of these
issues in the home is especially
important. In 2006, 80 percent of
the people that died in fires in the
United States were lost because
of home fires, according to the
National Fire Protection Associa-
tion (NFPA).
A poll conducted for the Na-
tional Fire Protection Association
showed that only 23 percent of
households have developed and
practiced a home fire escape
plan. Although many households
reported having a plan, the ma-
jority had not practiced it. Prac-
ticing a home fire escape plan
is extremely important; if a fire
occurs there may be as little as
two minutes to escape. Having
an escape plan in place that has
been practiced will save precious
moments and make it more likely
that occupants of a home will be


Upcoming Events
Sunday
AA. meeting from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the Church of 'Our
Saviour, 200 N.W Third St. It will be an open step meeting.
A.A. open 12 step meeting from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the,
Church of Our Savior, 200 N.W. Third St.
Narcotics Anonymous woman's step study meeting at 7 p.m.
at the Just for Today club, 2303 S. Hwy 441, Suite K. For more infor-
mation please call. (863) 634-4780.

Monday
A.A. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. This will be an open meet-
ing.
VFW #10539 Ladies Auxiliary lunch and bingo will start at
noon at the Post, 3912 U.S..441 S.E. Auxiliary members and their
guests are invited. Please R.S.V.P. to (863) 763-2308.
Okeechobee Senior Singers meet at 9:30 a.m. at the
Okeechobee Presbyterian Church, 312 North Parrott Ave. Everyone
who enjoys singing is invited. For information or to schedule an
appearance for your organization or group, contact Marge Skinner
at (863) 532-0449.
The Genealogical Society of Okeechobee will meet at 1:30
p.m. at the Okeechobee County Public Library, 206 S.W 16th St.
This meeting is open to anyone interested in tracing his or her an-
cestry. The annual membership is $10 per person, and $12 for a
family. For information, call Eve at (863) 467-2674; or, visit their
web site at http://www.rootsweb.com/-flgso.
Narcotics Anonymous meets at 7 p.m. for open discussion at
the Just for Today club, 2303 S. Hwy 441, Suite K. For information,
call (863) 634-4780.
O.C.R.A. meets at Peace Lutheran Church, 750 N.W 23rd Lane
at 7 p.m.

Tuesday
Rotary Club of Okeechobee meets each Tuesday at noon
at Golden Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. The meetings are
open to the public. For information, contact Chad Rucks at (863)
763-8999.
Christian Home Educators of Okeechobee will meet at the
Grace Christian Church Fellowship Hall, 701 S. Parrott Ave. Any-
one currently home schooling or interested in home schooling is
welcome. For information, call Lydia Hall (863) 357-6729 or Betty
Perera (863) 467-6808.
Alanon meeting will be held at the Church of Our Savior, 200
N.W Third St., at 8 p.m.
A.A. Closed discussion meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the Church
of Our Savior, 200 N.W. Third St.
Grief and Loss Support Group meets every Tuesday at 10
a.m. at the Hospice Building, 411 S.E. Fourth St., in Okeechobee.
Everyone is welcome. For information, contact Enid Boutrin at
(863) 467-2321.
Family History Center meets from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. at
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 310 S.W Sixth St.
Anyone interested in finding who your ancestors are is welcome
to attend. There is Census, IGI (International Genealogical Index),
Social Security Death Index and military information available. For
information, call Robert Massey at (863) 763-6510.
Gospel Sing every Tuesday beginning at 7 p.m. The public is
invited to participate with vocal and/or instrumental music. For in-
formation, contact Douglas Chiropractic Center at (863) 763-4320.
The Widow and Widowers Support Group meets at 8:30
a.m. at the Clock Restaurant, 1111 S. Parrott Ave., for breakfast. For
information, call (863) 467-9055.
The Gathering Church Overcomers Group meets at 7:30
p.m. in the fellowship hall at 1735 S.W. 24th Ave. This is a men's
only meeting. For information, call Earl at (863) 763-0139.
Bible study at the Living Word of Faith Church, 1902 S. Parrott
Ave., at 7 p.m. Informal and informative discussions bring many
Bible truths to life. Everyone is invited.
Community Country Gospel will meet at 7 p.m. at the church
next to Douglas Clinic on North Park St. Any individual or group
that enjoys old time gospel music is invited to participate. For infor-
mation, contact Dr. Edward Douglas at (863) 763-4320.
A.A. meeting will be held from noon until 1 p.m. at the First
United Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. This will be an open
meeting.
The Lighthouse Refuge support group meets at Believers Fel-
lowship Church, 300 S.W. Sixth Ave. from noon until 2 p.m. then
from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m. Women who need emotional support or
someone just to care are welcome. For information call the hot line
(863) 801-9201 or (863) 697-9718.

Wednesday
Martha's House support groups meet each Wednesday. Span-
ish groups meet from 7 until 8 p.m. at the Okeechobee Christian
Church, 3055 S.E. 18th Terrace. Ana Romero is the group facilitator.
Another group meets in the Okeechobee County Health Depart-
ment, 1798 N.W Ninth Ave., from 5 until 6 p.m. with Irene Luck as
the group facilitator. There is another meeting from 6 until 7 p.m.
with Shirlean Graham as the facilitator. For information, call (863)
763-2893.}
A.A. meeting from noon until 1 p.m. at the First United Method-
ist Church of Our 200 N.W. Second St. It's an open meeting.
A.A. meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the Sacred Heart Catholic
Church, 701 S.W. Sixth St. It will be a closed discussion.
NA. meeting at 8 p.m. at the Just For Today Club of Okeechobee,
2303 Parrott Ave. The Lakes Shops Suite K. For information call
(863) 634-4780.


able to get out alive.
Take responsibility by prepar-
ing to escape from a home fire
before a fire occurs. Develop a
plan and practice it. Start by mak-
ing sure that smoke alarms are
installed inside each bedroom
and outside each sleeping area
on every level of the home. Main-
tain smoke alarms and test them
once a month. Being alerted to a
fire is the first step in being able to
escape from one.
Create a home fire escape
plan that identifies two ways out
of each room and a family meet-
ing place outside. Make sure the
plan allows for specific needs
in the household. Some studies
have shown that some children
and some adults may not awaken
to the sound of a smoke alarm
and may need help waking up.
Learn about the needs of house-
hold members before there is an
emergency. Practice the plan at
least twice a year
Be prepared to act -- if the
smoke alarm sounds, go to the
closest exit. If there is smoke on
the way out, turn and use the sec-
ond way out. If exiting through


smoke, get low under the smoke
on the way to the exit. Move
quickly, but stay calm.
Everyone runs the risk of expe-
riencing a fire. News outlets will
continue to report on fires, but the
next time a fire is in the news let it
serve as a personal reminder that
many times fires are preventable
and being prepared to escape
from one can mean the difference
between life and death.
Fire - it is personal.
To learn more about fire pre-
vention and safety, visit http://
www.firepreventionweek.org or
http://www.nfpa.org.
This Fire Prevention Week,
people are taking personal re-
sponsibility by practicing their
home fire escape plans. Families,
schools, businesses and com-
munities are coming together to
participate in The Great American
Fire Drill. Visit http://www.firepre-
ventionweek.org/gafd for more
information.

Editor's Note: Judy Como-
letti is assistant vice-president of
public education for the National
Fire Protection Association.


Community Events

Red Cross offers CPR classes
The Okeechobee American Red Cross will be offering adult and
infant/child CPR classes. Infant/child classes will be Tuesday, Oct. 9.
Adult classes will be held Thursday, Oct. 18. All classes will start at
6 p.m. and will be held at the Red Cross branch office at 323 N. Par-.
rott Ave. To register or for information, call (863) 763-2488.
Early Learning Coalition to meet
The Early Learning Coalition of Okeechobee will be holding a
provider/advisory meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 10 at noon at the
American Red Cross, 323 N. Parrott Ave., Okeechobee. For informa-
tion call (772) 220-1220.
Airboat club plans meeting
The Lake Okeechobee Airboat Association will hold its month-
ly meeting at Beef 0' Brady's Restaurant, 608 S. Parrott Ave., on
Thursday, Oct. 11, at 6 p.m. Preparation for the Speckled Perch Fes-
tival will be the primary agenda item. All members are encouraged
to be present.
Eagles club hosting an operations school
The Cypress Hut Fraternal Order of the Eagles #4509, 4701 U.S.
441 S.E., will host a Florida State Aerie Operations School on Sat-
urday, Oct. 13, for District 7. Registration begins at 8 a.m. at the
club. This school is open to all Aerie and Auxiliary members of any
Fraternal Order of Eagles. A continental breakfast and lunch will be
served. For information call Bill at (863) 763-1187, or the Cypress
Hut Aerie at (863) 467-1154.
VFW has karaoke league
VFW Post #4423 will host a summer karaoke league on Oct. 13
and 27 from 7:30 until 9:30 p.m. The league is open to the public.
Everyone is eligible to enter including karaoke hosts and members
of bands. For information, call David Lee at (863) 697-9002 or Bill
at (863) 763-0818.
Library offers free computer classes
The Okeechobee County Public Library, 206 S.W. 16th St., is of-
fering free computer classes. Learn the basics of computers, set up
an e-mail account and learn how to use it. Registration is required.
Classes are scheduled for Friday, Oct. 12, and Friday, Oct. 26. For
information and to register, call the library at (863) 763-3536.
Church hosting revival for kids
The Pentecostals of Okeechobee, 405 S.W. 10th Ave., will host
a free children revival and puppet show with special guest Bruce
and Jami Borlik and family on Saturday, Oct. 13, and Sunday, Oct.
14. The Borlick family has traveled internationally with their pup-
pet ministry, and is an exciting and fun family. For information, call
(863) 763-7983.
Karey's to host '50s Sock Hop
Karey's Restaurant, 1713 U.S. 441 N., will hold a '50s sock hop
on Saturday, Oct. 13, from 7 until 11 p.m. There will be food, door
prizes, karaoke, a hula hoop contest, etc. Children 5 to 17 years old
are $15, adults $25 and $5 for 50/50 drawing, price includes food
and drink. All proceeds go to the American Cancer Society Mak-
ing Strides Against Breast Cancer. For information contact Crystal at
(863) 634-9483, or Chrissy at (863) 532-1717.
Red Cross plans class on first aid
The Okeechobee American Red Cross will host a class on first
aid basics on Monday, Oct. 15, at 6 p.m. at their branch office at 323
N. Parrott Ave. To register or for information, call (863) 763-2488.
ACS plans annual walk
The American Cancer Society is planning their third annual Mak-
ing Strides Against Breast Cancer 5K Walk on Saturday, Oct. 20. The
walk will be held in Flagler Park with registration beginning at 8
a.m. Teams, sponsorship and volunteers are needed. If you would
like to join in the efforts to prevent breast cancer, call Carrie Heine-
man at (863) 634-6012.
4-H Club to clean saddles
The Bits n' Spurs 4-H Club will have a saddle cleaning fundraiser
on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 9 a.m. until noon at Eli's Trailer Sales,
908 N.W Park St. Club members will clean and oil saddles under
the supervision of adult volunteers. Money raised will be used to
finance club activities and programs. Those who can't bring their
saddles to Eli's Trailer Sales on Oct. 27 can make arrangements to
drop off the saddles in advance. If you have several saddles to be
cleaned, the club may also make arrangements to pick them up.
For more information, contact Paula Daniel at (863) 763-8185.
VFW Post 4423 plans Halloween party
The new Men's Auxiliary of the North VFW Post #4423,300 N.W
341" St., will host a Halloween Party on Wednesday, Oct. 31. There
will be a costume contest with the judging taking place around 9
p.m. There will be prizes for best costume and also for the most
original (creative) costume. Debbie Collins will be hosting karaoke
and dancing from 6 until 10 p.m. The public is invited. If you are not
a member, please sign at the front door as a guest. If you have any
questions, call the Post at (863) 763-0818.

Local club plans toy drive
The Just for Today Club is doing a toy collection for the needy
children of the inmates in the Okeechobee County Jail. All dona-
tions are to be received by Dec. 21. All toys are to be new and un-
wrapped. Please drop off the toys at the Just for Today Club, 2303
U.S. 441 S.E., Suite K. For information, call Stephanie at (863) 763-
4017 or (863) 634-9386.


I


Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007


OPINION







OkehbeNw.Sud coe , 200 AGIUTR

LivestockSales:

Market Report Monday
OclnO 0- at 12 p.m.
R i ijOct. I and Oct. 2, 2007,--" --.


Hefty Heifers
These three heifers belong to local cowboy Jordan Poole. They are all bred and will be
calving soon. He has high hopes that they will be the beginning of his own land and cattle
company.


Commissioner Bronson to present


Environmental Leadership Awards


DAYTONA BEACH -- Flori-
da Agriculture Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson will present
awards to four agricultural opera-
tions in recognition of their lead-
ership in promoting progressive
environmental practices.
The 2007 Commissioner's
Agricultural-Environmental Lead-
ership Awards will be presented
during the Florida Farm Bureau
Federation's annual meeting in
Daytona Beach on Friday, Octo-
ber 12. The awards program is
now in its 14th year and has rec-
ognized a total of 45 winners.
"The Ag-Environmental Lead-
ership Award program spotlights
the environmentally innovative
farming practices of our state's
growers and ranchers," Bronson
said. "Nominees for the awards
.come from different parts of Flori-
da's agricultural industry, but they
all share a commitment to protect
and preserve Florida's resources
while continuing to provide agri-
cultural products for our people."
This year's winners are:
Butler Oaks Farm, in Lorida


(Highlands-Okeechobee)
Gwinn Brothers Farm, in McAl-
pin (Suwannee)
Buck Island Ranch, in Lake
Placid (Highlands)
Fraleigh Nursery Inc., in Madi-
son (Madison)
Nominations for the awards
were received earlier this year by
a screening committee composed
of scientific and technical experts
with the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices, which selected the finalists.
The four winners were then se-
lected from the group of finalists
by a selection committee made
up of representatives from The
Nature Conservancy, the state's
Water Management Districts, the
Florida Farm Bureau, the Florida
Cattlemen's Association, the Flor-
ida Dairy Association, the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection, the Florida Fruit and
Vegetable Association, the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission, Florida's Soil and
Water Conservation Districts, Flor-
ida Citrus Mutual, the Florida For-


estry Association, and the Florida
Nursery, Growers and Landscape
Association.
Contact information: The
2007 Agricultural-Environmental
Awards will be presented during
a breakfast ceremony held during
the Florida Farm Bureau Federa-
tion's annual meeting. The meet-
ing will be held Friday, October 12
at 7:30 a.m. at the Daytona Beach
Hilton, Daytona Beach. For more
information contact Florida Farm
Bureau, (352) 374-1535
Video is available: A DVD out-
lining the accomplishments of
the four winners is available from
the Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services.
News organizations interested
in obtaining a copy of the video
should contact Walt Land or Gary
Seamans at (850) 487-8000.
Articles and photos available:
Feature articles and high-resolu-
tion photographs of each of the
winners can be downloaded
from this link: www.florida-agri-
culture.com/news/10-04-07.htm


Cows
Breaking $42.00
Cutter $41.00
Canner


$50.50
$48.00


Bulls
1000-1500 $51.00 $59.00
1500-2000 $53.00 $60.00


Calves
Cows
Strs
Hfrs
Bulls
Yrlngs
Mix
Total

Med #1
150-200
200-250
250-300
300-350
350-400
400-450
450-500
550-600
600-650
Med #2
150-200
200-250
250-300
300-350
350-400
400-450


Monday
935
128
11
17
36
21
71
1219

Steers
190-210
152-165

137-152
119-132
108-116
108-116
96-101

Steers

125-157
120-135
108-127
101-112
93-113


Tuesday
1438
138
37
3
25
36
14
1691

Hfrs


110-119
104-117
100-113
94-106
90-99
91-96

Hfrs

105-117
100-112
93-105
90-101
87-97


Feeder prices pretty much steady this
week. Some 600# calves were $1-2.00
higher than last week. Butcher cows and
bulls were steady weather and grain prices
could dictate our market for a while. Bob
Herrington, San Mateo topped the calf
market with a high of $2.10. Four B Ranch,
Lake Placid and J.L. Farm, Okee topped
the cow market with a high of 50.50. Bred
heifer sale October 12, Graham Angus bull
sale October, 19, Lemmon Angus bull sale
October 26. North Florida Livestock Market
Lemmon Angus bull sale December 5. P C
A Internet Sales, October 11, 25, November
8, 29 and December 13.
Jeff.


Citrus grower asks Congress to fix ag labor


LAKELAND -- If Congress ers harvesting our crops and help-
doesn't fix the country's agricultur- ing put orange juice on breakfast
allia -or prhl.r'i, tih6usands offf~nm ',ih ..in a:. Ani-rvi"c," Mr. Smoak.
ily farms and the nation's domestic said. "Please, believe me when I tell
food supply are at risk, a Florida you that we want legal workers. I'll
citrus grower told the House Agri- reiterate: We want legal workers."
culture Committee today. Mr. Smoak's grandfather started
Mason Smoak, a third gen- his family's citrus business on 10
eration citrus grower from Lake acres in 1933. The business has
Placid, told members of the House grown to over 3,100 acres of citrus
Agriculture Committee that a legal, and 13,000 acres of cattle ranchland
reliable labor force is imperative for and wildlife conservation areas.
the future of agriculture. Mr. Smoak also told the Com-
Mr. Smoak, an active member mittee having reliable, legal labor
of Florida Citrus Mutual, was in- to harvest crops such as citrus is a
vited to Washington by Congress- national security issue.
man Tim Mahoney of Florida who "If Florida's citrus crop is left in
serves on the Committee. the grove to rot because of a labor
"My family understands it is es- shortage then our Nation's citrus
sential to have legal, reliable work- production will eventually shift en-




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tirely to Central and South America,"
Mr. Smoak said. "The importance
of maintaining a safe, affordable
and abundant domestic food sup-
ply is something many Americans
care deeply about and is something
I know growers care deeply about
also. Shifting food production from
our shores to overseas could com-
promise food security and in-turn
homeland security."
Michael W Sparks, executive
VP/CEO of Florida Citrus Mutual,
said Smoak's comments mirror the
thoughts of thousands of Florida
citrus growers.
"There are thousands of citrus
growers in Florida just like Mason
Smoak whose family businesses
are in jeopardy because they can-


not find the legal labor they need.
The current system is broken from
top to bottom and we need to fix it.
Our industry wants legal workers,"
Mr. Sparks said. "As an industry
we are disappointed that our best
efforts toward comprehensive im-
migration reform failed to pass this
year. We are going to continue to
work hard so that some kind of so-
lution is eventually crafted."
Florida Citrus Mutual, founded
in 1948 and based in Lakeland,
is the state's largest citrus grow-
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people and has a $9 billion eco-
nomic impact. Please visit www.
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AGRICULTURE


Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007






6 Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007


YMS offers afternoon tutorial program


Report Cards " -
Report cards for the first nine- _
weeks go home with students
Friday, October 26. If your child
is having academic difficul-
ties, please contact his teachers
through the agenda book or call
your child's guidance counselor.
Students must pass 5 out of 6
courses for the year in order to
be promoted to the next grade.
In order to pass a course, the stu-
dent must earn a passing grade .
in three of the four grading peri-
ods. Please contact the school so
we can all help make this a suc-
cessful year for your child.
Tutorial programs
Yearling Middle School cur-
rently offers an afternoon tuto-
rial program on Tuesdays and
Thursday from 3:40-5 p.m. We
are planning to expand our tuto-
rial program to include morning
tutorial from 7:10-8:10 Tuesday
through Thursday beginning
Tuesday, October 9. Morning
tutorial students will be able to Congrati
ride the high school bus in the Cody Th
morning and will be shuttled to ica Hern
Yearling on Tuesday, Wednes-
day, and Thursday mornings incorrect.
only.' All students must sign up
in advance to participate in any 0
tutorial programs. Please contact Open G
Dylan Tedders at Yearling Middle Condit
School (462-5056) for a detailed
explanation of the program and Yearlin
activities, fearing op(


Information hotline
Yearling Middle School offers
an Information Hotline to assist
students and parents. Parents
and students will be able to call
the Information Hotline at 462-
5066 and listen to their work as-
signments for the day or week.
Please call our school office if
the Information Hotline seems


tulations to YMS Students of the Week: (back row) Mr. Tedders, Mark Falkenberg,
ompson and Daniel Ruiz; (front row) Linda Bentacourt, Cheyenne Deignan and Mon-
andez. Keep up the good work!


Gym
ioning
.g Middle School is of-
en gym and condition-
, . -. ..1


ing drills during the week on
Monday, Wednesdays, and Fri-
days from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30
p.m. for Yearling and Osceola
students (boys and girls) inter-
ested in sharpening their basket-
ball skills. Students must have
a current school physical and
parent permission to participate.
The open gym and condition-
ing drills are not a team tryout.


Basketball tryouts for girls begin
October 23 and for boys October
31. Students must have a school
physical to try out for the teams
and must have a minimum of a
2.0 grade point average.
Soccer
The YMS Soccer Team upped
their season record to four wins
and three loses this week after
defeating Stuart Middle School
by a score of 7-0. The Yearling
Soccer Team faces the Warriors
from Osceola Middle School at
Yearling on Monday, October 8.
The Soccer match is set to begin
at 4:30 p.m.


Volleyball
The Yearling Varsity Volleyball
Team split this last week win-
ning a match with Murray Middle
School in two games on Monday
and losing to Stuart Middle School
on Wednesday. The Yearling Vol-
leyball Team has won eight games
and lost only one this season. The
Yearling Girls are scheduled to take
on Osceola Middle School (8-0) on
Monday at 4:30 at Yearling Middle
School. The match will be the fi-
nal match of the season for both
teams and will decide the regular
season conference champion. The
Conference Tournament begins on
Wednesday.


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Okeechobee School District Menu


Monday - Oct. 8
Breakfast:
Blueberry mini loaf
Cereal
W.W. toast
Fruit
Lunch:
Ravioli w/ meat sauce
Honey wheat rolls
Breaded chicken
. patty sandwich
-)-' Chef salad
Green beans
Chilled peaches
Fruit
Tossed salad
Tuesday - Oct. 9
Breakfast:
Chicken patty biscuit
Cereal
Cinnamon toast
Fruit
Lunch:
Macaroni & cheese
w/ham
Biscuit
Deli turkey w/ bun


Cottage cheese & fruit
Salad
Broccoli w/ lemon
Fruit cocktail
Fruit
Tossed salad
Wednesday - Oct. 10
Breakfast:
Burrito
Cereal
Cinnamon toast
Fruit
Lunch:
Chili Con Carne & beans
Cornbread
Fish sandwich
Chef salad
Yellow corn
Fruit gelatin
Fruit
Tossed salad
Thursday - Oct. 11
Breakfast:
French toast sticks
Cereal
Cinnamon toast
Fruit


Lunch:
Hamburger
Deli turkey w/ bun
Cottage cheese & fruit
Salad
Potato triangles
Applesauce
Fruit
Tossed salad
Friday - Oct. 12
Breakfast:
Biscuit & sausage patty
Cereal
Cinnamon toast
,Fruit
Lunch:
Cheese pizza
Pepperoni pizza
Baked potato w/ cheese
Yogurt fruit & cheese plate
Baby carrots w/ dressing
Chilled peaches
Fruit
Tossed salad

Elementary menus:
Each breakfast includes: Juice,
choice of entree or cereal and


Obituaries


Helen C. Johnson
Helen C. Johnson, age 83, of
Okeechobee, died Oct. 6, 2007 at
the Hamrick Home. Mrs. Johnson
ws born Sept. 12, 1924 in Wendell,
N.C. to Robert P. Mace and Bessie
Roberts. She was a loving mother
and her hobbies was making jelly
and quilting with her sister, Boots.
She was a member of the Living
Word of Faith Church. She loved
the Lord.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Daniel W Johnson.


Mrs. Johnson is survived by
great-granddaughters, Katlynn
Green, Jennifer Johnson and
grand-daughter Teresa Green of
Okeechobee; sons, Larry and
Jerry Johnson, of Okeechobee
and Lee Roy Johnson of Hender-
sonville, N.C.; sister, Hazel Jones
of Okeechobee; many grandchil-
dren and great-granchildren. She
will always be in our hearts, a very
special lady that will be missed and
loved forever.
Visitation will be Monday, Oct..
8, 2007 at noon at the Living Word


of Faith Church, 1902 South Parrott
Ave.
Funeral services will be held
Tuesday, Oct. 9, at noon at the Liv-
ing Word of Faith Church with Pas-
tor Lee Minton officiating. A burial
will follow at Evergreen Cemetery.
Friends may sign the guest book
at www.bassokeechobeefuneral-
home.com.
All local arrangements are
entrusted to the care of Bass
Okeechobee Funeral Home and
Crematory, 205 N.E. Second Street.


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Each lunch includes: Choice
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Meal prices:
Breakfast:
Regular - $.75
Reduced - $.30
Lunch:
Regular - $1.25
Reduced - $.40


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Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007 7


Land gift helps UF study

state's ecological health


GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- Upside-
down and flat on the sandy
soil, the bucket trap has done
its job.
Surrounded by forest stud-
ded with goldenrods and the
lavender spikes of blazing star,
Lori Wendland slowly and rev-
erently tips the 10-gallon plastic
bucket to one side.
Where she's at is one of the
few pieces of bona fide wild
Florida left -- and the University
of Florida doctor of veterinary
medicine is never exactly sure
what she'll find.
From under the bucket, she
pulls a shell the size of a square
shoebox. Holding it up like an
oversized sandwich, she eye-
balls the gopher tortoise face-
to-face.
"When they're sick, their
eyelids get all puffy and their
noses run -- just like us," She
said. "But that's a rarity at Or-
dway-Swisher. They're away
from all the stuff that people
do that helps makes them sick.
That's one reason why the ar-
ea's so important."
From swamps to sandhills,
the Ordway-Swisher Biological
Station spans one of the rarest
collections of unadulterated
land types in the nation -- a
precious rarity that makes it the
perfect laboratory for measur-
ing effects of environmental
change.
Now, The Nature Conser-
vancy is gifting the 3,000 acres
of the Carl Swisher Memorial
Sanctuary to the University of
Florida Foundation to ensure
that the pristine landscape will
be protected in perpetuity.
The estimated value of this


land gift was included in the
total contributions received
and counted toward the UF's
"Florida Tomorrow" campaign
goal announced at the Sept. 28
kickoff event. The campaign is
an effort to secure private re-
sources to support UF projects
that will benefit the Sunshine
State for years to come.
"There are economically ori-
ented people who have estimat-
ed that the value of the Swisher
tract would be roughly $11 mil-
lion," said John Hayes, chair-
man of UF's wildlife ecology
and conservation department.
"But in terms of the ecological,
scientific and educational value
of the site, it's priceless."
The Ordway-Swisher Bio-
logical Station was so named in
November 2006 as a formaliza-
tion of joint efforts within The
Nature Conservancy's Swisher
tract and the UF Foundation's
Katharine Ordway Preserve.
Toget these areas encom-
pass more than 9,100 acres.
This past summer, the sta-
tion was tagged by the Na-
tional Science Foundation to
be its core site for monitoring
ecological processes and envi-
ronmental change in the south-
eastern United States as a part
of the National Ecological Ob-
servatory Network (NEON).
NEON will be the first na-
tional interdisciplinary research
program to track the status of
the natural world. The designa-
tion ,could mean multimillion-
dollar infrastructure investment
for the station, followed by at
least 30 years of funding.


OHS student attends TRADE WINDS FLIGHT SCHOOL
Tired of Fishing? Golf? Tennis?
Minority Residency Program Private pilot-Career program
Flight training in Okeechobee
n , . _* Local sightseeing
,- wE Discovery Flight: 399
A-. . N .%


During the week of June 24-
28, Mary Flores, a current senior
in the Academy of Finance at
Okeechobee High School, trav-
eled to the University of South
Florida in Tampa to attend the
ninth annual Summer Minority
Residency Program sponsored
by the Florida Institute of Certi-
fied Public Accountants (FIC-
PA).
Ms. Flores was selected from
over 80 applicants throughout
the state to attend this year's
program. The program is de-
signed to increase minority high
school students' awareness of
the accounting profession and
the variety of career opportuni-
ties that the profession has to
offer.
Participants attended semi-
nars on a variety of topics in-
cluding college preparation,
interpersonal and communica-
tion skills, career development,
accounting and finance.
"It (the program) was an un-
forgettable experience," stated
Ms. Flores. "I learned about the
numerous job responsibilities
of accountants in various firms,
produced presentations on
Quickbooks and made a lot of
new friends. It has already had a
tremendous impact on my life."
The students also visited the
Tampa offices of accounting
firms "Ernst & Young LLP and
KPMG LLP, viewed the account-


Make a difference one click at a time


The .. :
Flylady .,

by MarIa
Cilley


A few weeks ago I was in-
troduced to a great idea called
BenefitBar.com. I got a phone
call from Keith Grosz of St. Lou-
is about this tool he had built
to help organizations generate
money to donate charities. Their
mission put more funds out into
the world to help people.
Here is what Keith told me
about the http://www.benefit-
bar.com/: "We created this to
make a difference by raising
dollars and bringing awareness
to charities and non-profits and
education. It became much
more then raising dollars, it be-
came a way to communicate in
a non-intrusive and entertaining
way. Pushing out information
to make someone's day better
'and stay connected with people
you care about."
The minute I saw it I knew
that this would be a great tool
,to help my FlyBabies find what
:they needed and it would also
,help our good friends at Yahoo.
The bar uses the Yahoo
Search feature. - This is what


generates the revenue stream
for the charities. Since Yahoo
saves us a lot of money I felt that
this would be a great way to give
back to them for what they do
.for us with your group email
system.
The beauty of this bar is that
it is free. You can get one too.
They will develop a bar for your
group to raise money for some-
thing that is important to you.
You could use it for your church
group, hospital foundation, fan
club, sports team, school group,
scouts and anything else that
could come to mind. All they ask
is that a portion of the proceeds
go to charity. If your group is a
charity then that is even better!
They made me a sample
bar and took it and developed
it as a tool for my members.
In fact I made it all by myself
with some help from Rick at
Benefitbar and our WebDude
Lee. It is having our website
at your fingertips at the top of
your page. I loved this from
the first time I saw it and we
have only scratched the surface
when it comes to how much fun
we can have with it. I can use it
for announcements, reminders
and just having fun.
We have built these buttons
for the FlyLady.net Benefitbar.
http://www.flylady.net/pages/
flylady benefit bar.asp.
* FlyLady.net
* A tickertape of some re-
minders. You have to see this to


believe it.
* A Go Me! Button
* A FLY SHOP Link
* A FLY Show Link to Blog-
Talk Radio shows
* A Get Started Button
* Email FlyLady
* Today's Mission
* Super Fling to post your
pounds and our favorite Hey-
Tom.net link
I almost forgot a Yahoo
Search Feature in the middle
and a refer button at the end.
This bar does not put any ad-
ware, spyware, or pop-ups on
your computer. That was a relief.
Have fun with my new Toy/Tool.
I had a ball making it. Can you
tell how excited I am about this.
Go check out http://www.ben-
efitbar.comrt for yourself and
your group. They can help you
raise money for your favorite
charity. I have decided to pick a
new charity each month. http://
www.flylady.net/pages/flyla-
dy benefit bar.asp.
For more help getting rid
of your CHAOS; check out
her website and join her free
mentoring group at www.
FlyLady.net or her book,
"Sink Reflections," pub-
lished by Bantam and her
New York Times Best Selling
book, "Body Clutter," pub-
lished by Fireside. Copyright
2007; MarIa Cilley; Used by
permission in this publica-
tion.


- ,-.


Submitted to Okeechobee News/
Daryl Roehm
Okeechobee High School se-
nior Mary Flores (left) took
part in the ninth annual Sum-
mer Minority Residency Pro-
gram sponsored by the Flori-
da Institute of Certified Public
Accountants. The program
took place at the University
of South Florida in Tampa on
June 24-28. Ms. Flores spent
time with event organizer
Brenda Hubbard (right).
ing systems and business opera-
tions of Lakeland Dairy Plant, the
Columbia-an upscale restaurant
in Tampa and the operations of
the Devil Rays at Tropicana Field
in St. Petersburg.
"Mary is the sixth student
from the Academy of Finance
here at OHS to attend this
summer program," said Daryl
Roehm, Academy director. "Her
comments echo that of the pre-
vious students who attended,
solidifying my belief that the
Summer Residency Program
is an extremely well-organized
and very informative event."
Funding for the program was
raised through corporate and in-
dividual sponsors.




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government, teams, organiza-
tions & columnists.
Community Links. Individual Voices.


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8 Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007


Breast cancer research is A


closer to recruitment goal ,/ � -
. I rLm5&L Rrpldftad.innrli.lnner C.


Research Triangle Park, N.C.
- Launched in October 2004, the
Sister Study knew it would take
many years to recruit 50,000
women for the largest research
effort to find the environmen-
tal and genetic causes, of breast
cancer. Now, some three years
later, researchers are pleased
to see 41,000 women enrolled,
with 9,000 more to go.
Conducted by the Nation-
al Institute of Environmental
Health Sciences (NIEHS), one of
the National Institutes of Health,
the Sister Study is committed
to enrolling a diverse group of
women to learn how the things
women come in contact with at
work, at home and in their com-
munities affect their chances of
developing breast cancer. NIEHS
hopes to enroll at total of 50,000
women whose sisters had breast
cancer by spring of 2008.
"Our entire team is delighted
to be that much closer to our re-
cruitment goal of 50,000 wom-
en so that we can begin delving
into the purpose of our research
- finding environmental and ge-
netic causes of breast cancer,"
said Dale Sandler, Ph.D., Chief
of the Epidemiology Branch at
NIEHS and Principal Investiga-
tor of the Sister Study.. "Every
year, thousands of women are
diagnosed with breast cancer
and one day we would like to be
able to tell them why."
"We are extremely thankful
to the 41,000 women who have
enrolled in the Sister Study thus
far," added Dr. Sander. "They
are an extraordinary group of
women. In addition to sharing
their information with us, many
Sister Study participants have
been working in their commu-
nities, distributing information
at breast cancer events, and
sharing their personal stories, to
help us reach our recruitment
goal."
Lourdes Suarez, a Sister Study
recruiter says, "We have over
200 phenomenal participants,
breast cancer survivors, volun-


teer s and doctors from around
the country who have agreed to
tell audiences their reasons for
supporting the Sister Study." She
adds, "Many of the people who
help us are everyday women
who have seen their sisters bat-
tle breast cancer and would like
to make sure that the future gen-
erations of women don't have to
face this disease."
Jean Peelen, a Sister Study
participant and avid spokesper-
son lost her sister Lynn to breast
cancer in 2006 and has another
sister, Lois who is a breast can-
cer survivor.
"In addition to enrolling in
the Sister Study, I speak to peo-
ple about the importance of the
study and how they can be of
assistance," said Jean. "If wom-
en aren't eligible for the Sister
Study, I let them know how they
can still help by passing out bro-
chures to women in their com-
munities, churches, sororities,
labor and professional organiza-
tions, and civic groups."
"One of my daughters, Jen-
nifer, was diagnosed with breast
cancer in December, and I have
six granddaughters," adds the
66 year old government retiree.
"I am compelled to do this so
that researchers can find the
causes of breast cancer before
my granddaughters are endan-
gered."
Women in the U.S. and Puer-
to Rico, age 35 to 74, may be
eligible to join the Sister Study if
their sisters (living or deceased)
had breast cancer. Women who
join the Sister Study must never
have been diagnosed with breast
cancer themselves. Breast can-
cer affects women from every
walk of life, so the Sister Study
is seeking women of all back-
grounds, occupations, ages and
ethnic groups.
"Of the 41,000 participants
to date, only about 5,000 are
women of color, se we are es-
pecially encouraging more Af-
rican-American, Latina, Native
American and Asian women to


enroll so that we can ensure the
results benefit all women," con-
tinued Dr. Sandier. "Your partici-
pation is critical and we want to
learn more about how to protect
your daughters and your grand-
daughters from this devastating
disease."
Available in English and Span-
ish, the Sister Study requires very
little time from its volunteers.
The 10 year observational study
begins with participants answer-
ing questions about diet, jobs,
hobbies and things they've been
exposed to throughout their
lives to determine what may in-
fluence breast cancer risk. Later,
at a convenient time and loca-
tion for the participant, a female
health technician collects small
samples of blood, urine, toenail
clippings and house dust, which
will also help give researchers a
better picture of the woman's
environment and genes.
The Sister Study follows
sound, ethical research prac-
tices, and keeps all personal
data safe, private and confiden-
tial. Women who join are not
asked to take any medicine, visit
a medical center, or make any
changes to their habits, diet or
daily life.
Sister Study partners include
.the American Cancer Society,
NIH's National Center on Minor-
ity Health and Health Dispari-
ties, Sisters Network Inc., the
Susan G. Komen for the cure,
the Y-ME National Breast Can-
cer Organization, and the Inter-
cultural Cancer Council. In addi-
tion to working with it's national
partners, the Sister Study works
with local, regional and national
organizations to inform diverse
women about the study.
To volunteer or learn more
about the Sister Study, visit the
web site www.sisterstudy.org.
or for Spanish visit www.estu-
diodehermanas.org. A toll free
number is also available, 1-877-
4SISTER (877-474-7837). Deaf
or hard of hearing call (866)
889-4747.


SNew Tires at low prices
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Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda
Voting instructions
Before they voted for student council officers on Friday, Oct. 5, students at Everglades
Elementary School were given instructions in the voting process by Okeechobee County
Supervisor of Elections, Gwen Chandler, left, as assistant principal Billy Ball, center, and
Principal Cynthia Weigum, right, look on. Students used the same type ballots and the
same ballot box used by Okeechobee County voters.


TREASURE
















LIFE
Caring for someone who has an advancing illness is physically and
emotionally demanding. This can be particularly true for family members
who are primary caregivers. You can take comfort in knowing
that we can improve the quality of life for all involved

TREASURE COAST
HO S P I C E S


For more information, please call Debi Caldwell, R.N.
Big Lake Branch: (863) 763-0707 * 3543 S. Highway 441, Okeechobee, FL 34974
www.TCHospices.org * Licensed since 1982.


Your paper,




not ours.


Okeechob~ee Ok-eechob~ee


College prnogarr -

T,.


Second term

"PRi i tl . i.n;l [i P.
, ,A ..
: : k.t L., .1_


Okeechobee News
Animal facility pact OKd


,J I"i ~ L "'.A' Council to
ki elect mayor


We pledge to operate our newspaper as a public trust.

We believe journalists are nothing more than guardians of every cit-
izen's right to a free press. We have no authority to compromise, bar-
gain away or dishonor the principles underlying the First
Amendment.

We don't play loose with the facts. We give notice to your opinions,
not ours. We encourage vigorous discussion of public issues, but try
to keep everybody's comments within the bounds of fair play.

How are we doing?

Let us know by mailing feedback@newszap.com or calling your edi-
tor.





Okeechobee News


Community Service Through Journalism


1


I


m


- I I


I


I








Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007 9


Dear Abby


Man regrets missing ex's funeral


DEAR ABBY: I have read your
column for years but can't recall
this topic ever being mentioned.
I'm surprised, as it must occur
frequently in today's society.
I am a 64-year-old male who
was married to a woman I'll
call "Myrtle" at age 19 in 1962.
We raised our four children and
divorced after 25 years of mar-
riage. The divorce was brutal
and vicious. Afterward, I moved
on with my life. I remarried in
1991; Myrtle never remarried.
Well, Myrtle died. The chil-
dren invited me and my wife,
"Peggy," to the funeral. To my
surprise, Peggy said we should


go and "be there for the kids."
However, I told my children I
would not feel comfortable being
there and would send flowers in-
stead. I know my children were
disappointed and wanted Peggy
and me there, as they were kind
of persistent. I did have second
thoughts about it and guilt set in,
but I stayed with my decision.
Now that it's all over, I have
this feeling that maybe I made a
mistake and appeared to be self-
ish, uncaring or whatever. Do
you think I should send them a
card or letter asking forgiveness,
or just leave it alone, as appar-
ently they have accepted it? -


Second Thoughts In Wash-
ington
DEAR SECOND
THOUGHTS: People attend fu-
nerals for two reasons: to pay
respects to the deceased, and
to offer comfort and support to
the grieving survivors. For the lat-
ter reason you should have put
aside your anger and bitterness
and attended Myrtle's funeral.
By all means write your chil-
dren and apologize for not being
there for them when they asked
you to be. Then hope they will
be more forgiving than you have
been.


Horoscopes


* ARIES (March 21-April
19): Travel, intrigue, learning,
seminars, conferences, love and
romance are all in the picture to-
day. Do your thing, exploit your
ideas and push your intentions.
You will get feedback that will
help you move forward.
* TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You have gone full circle
and you know what the answer
is. Now, all you have to do is
execute it. This is a perfect time
to make a few changes that will
position you better personally
and professionally.
* GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You may have to back-
track if you take on too much
or promise something you can't
deliver. Caution may not be your
best attribute but, today it will
be necessary; especially when
emotions or loved ones are in-
volved. Avoid overindulgence,
overspending or overdoing.
* CANCER (June 21-July
22): Get together with friends,
neighbors or relatives. Look
at your options and talk things
over. Someone will make a huge
difference to the way you think
and influence what you decide
to do.


* LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Consider where you are head-
ing professionally, financially
and emotionally. Options are
available but, if you are unwill-
ing to make a move or accept
some of the changes needed to
move forward, you are likely to
continue spinning your wheels.
* VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't let anyone fool you
into believing that he or she can
do something better than you.
Your precision, depth of vision
and ability to finish what you
start will far exceed what any-
one else can offer. Don't worry
about someone who is jealous
of your talents.
* LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't hesitate to look
someone up whom you have
lost touch with but would like to
revisit. Now is the perfect time
to expand on an idea you have
or to find a course that will help
you develop a skill you want to
pursue.
* SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You can now pull every-
thing together and turn it into
something bigger than life.
The projects you have been so
diligently working on can be
launched. Forge ahead.


* SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You are likely to say
something that doesn't go over
well or to get yourself into an
emotional mess by promising
something you can't provide. Fo-
cus on what you can do. Reno-
vate, update your entertainment
center or shop for real estate.
* CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You can check out
property, make changes to your
living quarters or take on a
new, moneymaking venture. An
emotional commitment can be
made, resolved or put into play.
Now is a great time for profes-
sional or personal change.
* AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Don't feel the need to ex-
plain your every move. You have
to be honest and true to yourself
and hope that the people around
you will understand your posi-
tion. If they don't, it may be time
to rid yourself of those relation-
ships.
* PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You'll be torn between
what you want to do and what's
available for you to do. Once you
complete what's being asked of
you, it will be simple to move on
to what you want. Don't let your
emotions get in the way of being
productive.


Los Angeles Times Sunday Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis


"FOUR IS
ENOUGH" By
NORA
PEARLSTONE
ACROSS
1 Hardly
courageous
. 6 Many profs
10 Number near an
APR
14 Gobble (up)
19 Line spoken to
the audience
20 "Violin Playing
as I Teach it"
author Leopold
21 Andy's boy
22 June of "Love
Nest" (1951)
23 Queen's
attendants
26 Store display
suffix
27 _ Poly: San
Luis Obispo sch.
28 Boneheaded
29 Shatner role
30 Beat to the
tape
31 Tops seen on
moguls
33 Secret-message
stuff
35 Racing great
A.J.
36 Main ....
38 Set the pace
39 MMV+V
40 Composer
Saint-
42 Stitch over
43 Attack, cat-style
44 Irr.; . 1,.-i.
45
baseball
nickname, with
"The"
46 Code carriers
47 Walking aids
50 LAX touchdown
51 Inventing middle
name
52 School add-on
53 Neeson of 'Nell"
57 Much-hyped
sports issue
62 Ma's instrument
63 Isn't in a rush
64 Actress Blakley
65 Desdemona's
love
67 Water brand
68 IIt makes
everyone
happy
71 v .,. l...
Abbr.
72 Unbending
73 Theater area
74 Grey Cup sports
gp-
75 Post-Trojan War
epic


79 Some execs
81 Venlura
County's _
Valley
82 Chef's means.
85 City on the
Truckee
86 Thin coats
87 Sacred piece
88 AAA's
opposite?
89 "Can....... now?"'
90 "Dang!"
92 Wagner's Earth
goddess
93 Garb in a 57-
Across
96 Got really
ticked
99 Big chests
100 "Ring bell for
service" sound
101 Power, slangily
103 Monk's title
104 Doesn't have a
thing
105 1929 -:. 'ii.i
spawned a
classic 1952
musical
108 Cheri of "SNL'


109 Queen after
whom
Maryland's
capital is named
110 Like some
pickings
111 Having, as
lunch?
112 V-shaped
fortification
113 Giant of a Giant
114 Old, to Oskar
115 Wander off
course
DOWN
1 Soft minerals
2 "Wicked Game"
singer Chris
3 F II, :.,r,- rin, ,,."
stress
4 Uganda's Amin
5 Wedding hires
6 Poker holdings
7 Beach
attraction for
some
8 Wet, in a way
9 Span. address
10 Whodunit
component


11 General intent,
as of the law
12 Slippery arenas
13 Throw
14 "Want to risk it?"
15 Bistro menu
16 Greed
17 Sends back, as
to a lower court
18 Johnny's lover
,24 Michaelmas mo.
25 "It was obvious"
30 West Indies
sorcery
32 Stop running,
with "out"
33 Steams up
34 Problems
36 Paris governing
group
37 "Gerontion"
poet's
monogram
40 Atom _
41 Medfa element?
42 Pre-test exercise
4 3 C ,t .i l . : ._t, r l .,
briefly
46 Low
47 Advance toward
evening


48 Ohio natives
49 Fall that might
make you slip
51 Speller's words
52 1/60 of a dram
54 Tryst
55 Martin/Tomlin
comedy
56 Like a bright
night
58 Highest Phil.
peak
59 Rival of Tiger
and Vijay
60 Bridal estate
61 Cruise policy,
perhaps
62 Scorch
66 Cal. column
69 Assumption-to-
conclusion
segue
70 List details
76 Relishes
77 Hoods with safe
jobs
78 Stuffed shirt
79 End of a boast
80 "Benevolent'
fellow
81 Fountain order


82 Try to confirm
the presence of,
as a chemical
83 Nonnegotiable
charge
84 Read
86 Mold and
mildew
87 2002 Sandier
remake
90 Lowdown
91 Swinging joints
92 Individually
94 Coastal
opening?
95 Turner
autobiography
96 Words spoken
by someone
under 21?
97 One of
Chekhov's
"Three Sisters'
98 Having a kick
101 Angel played by
Farrah
102 Discrete part
105 Pianist at Rick's
106 Govt. hush-hush
gp.
107 Hogwash


10/7107 xwordeditor@aol.com �2007 Tribune Media Services. Inc.


ANSWER TO TODAY'S PUZZLE


10/7/07


At the Movies


The following movies are now showing at the
Brahman Theatres III.
Movie times for Friday, Oct. 5, through Thurs-
day, Oct. 11, are as follows:
Theatre I -"Game Plan" (PG) Showtimes: Fri-
day at 7 and 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 2,
4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Wednesday and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9
p.m.
Theatre II - "Heartbreak Kid" (R) Showtimes:
Friday at 7 and 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 2,
4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Wednesday and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9


p.m.
, Theatre III - "3:10 to Yuma" (R) Showtimes:
Friday at 7 p.m. only. Saturday and Sunday at 2,
4:15 and 7 p.m. Monday at 3 p.m. only. Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 2, 4:15 and 7 p.m.
Also in Theatre III - "Resident Evil" (R) Show-
times: Friday at 9 p.m. only. Saturday and Sunday
at 9 p.m. only. Monday at 7 p.m. only. Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 9 p.m. only.
Tickets are $5.50 for adults; children 12 and
under are $4.50; senior citizens are $4.50 for all
movies; and, matinees are $4.
For information, call (863) 763-7202.


Today in History


By The Associated Press
Today is Sunday, Oct. 7, the
280th day of 2007. There are 85
days left in the year.
In 1982, the Andrew Lloyd
Webber-Tim Rice musical "Cats"
opened on Broadway. The show
closed Sept. 10, 2000, after a&record
7,485 performances.
In 1985, Palestinian gunmen hi-
jacked the Italian cruise ship Achille
Lauro in the Mediterranean. The hi-
jackers, who killed an elderly Jew-
ish American tourist, surrendered
two days after taking the ship.
In 1991, University of Oklahoma
law professor Anita Hill publicly
accused Supreme Court nominee


Clarence Thomas of making sexu-
ally inappropriate comments when
she worked for him; Thomas de-
nied Hill's allegations.
Today's Birthdays: Singer Al
Martino is 80. Retired South African
Archbishop Desmond Tutu is 76.
Former National Security Council
aide Oliver North is 64. Rock mu-
sician Kevin Godley (10cc) is.62.
Country singer Kieran Kane is 58.
Singer John Mellencamp is 56.
Rock musician Ricky Phillips is 56.
Actress Mary Badham is 55. Ac-
tress Christopher Norris is 54. Rock
musician Tico Torres (Bon Jovi)
is 54. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma is 52. Gos-
pel singer Michael W Smith is 50.


Recording executive and TV per-
sonality Simon Cowell ("American
Idol") is 48. Rock musician Charlie
Marinkovich (Iron Butterfly) is 48.
Country singer Dale Watson is 45.
Pop singer Ann Curless (Expose) is
44. Rhythm-and-blues singer Toni
Braxton is 40. Rock singer-musi-
cian Thom Yorke (Radiohead) is
39. Rock musician-dancer Leeroy
Thornhill is 38. Actress Nicole An
Parker is 37. Rock singer-musician
Damian Kulash is 32. Singer Taylor
Hicks ("American Idol") is 31.
Thought for Today: "There's
many a mistake made on purpose."
-- Thomas Haliburton, Canadian ju-
rist-humorist (1796-1865).


SUNDAY MORNING OCTOBER 7, 2007
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

g WPTV News (N) (cc) News (N) (cc) Today (N) (s) (cc) Meet the Press (N) (cc) News(cc) Mosaic Talk About Money
S9 WPEC Paid Prog. Health Paid Prog. IPaid Prog. Paid Prog. Bus. Rpt. CBS News Sunday Morning (s) (cc) Nation Paid Prog. |All Access
M) WTCE Dickow John F. Rod Parsley (cc) Ed Young Merritt Franklin David J. Kenneth H. Ed Young The Coral Ridge Hour
0 WPBF Wall St Our World In Touch-Dr Good Morning America Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Matthews This Week With George IDecorating
D WFLX Paid Prog. RightConn Animal Ati Animal Ati The Coral Ridge Hour Feed Reel Power Pt Video Auto Fox News Sunday
ED WTVX Paid Prog. Paid Prog. SoFlorida PPaid Prog. Pad Pog Pad PogPad PogPad Prog. Real Life WHADDYA Saved-Bell Saved-Bell
M WXEL Sesame Street (s) (El) Couch Ditty Miffy Noddy Signing Crafts Dragonfly WealthTrk I Believe Secrets

AMC Movie Movie: ** Death Hunt (1981) (Charles Bronson) Movie: *** Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome (1985) Shootout Waterwrld
ANIM Animal Miracles (cc) Backyard iGood Dog Who Gets the Dog? K-9 to5 iBreed Ultimate Dog Animals Animals
A&E Paid Prog. |Paid Prog. Bio.: Zeppelin Biography Private Sessions (cc) Private Sessions (cc) Match Match
BET BET Morning Inspiration Jones Gospel Video Gospel (cc) Sunday Best (cc)
CNN Special Investigations CNN Sunday Morning House Call CNN Sunday Morning Reliable Sources (cc) Late Edition .
CRT Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Bean Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. |Paid Prog. Get Thin Paid Prog. Wealth |Get Ripped
DISC Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Wealth J. Osteen Paid Prog. Living With Wolves (cc) Dirty Jobs (cc)
DISN Doodlebop JoJo Wiggles Higglytown Tigger Tigger Mickey [Mickey Einsteins Handy Sprites ICharlie
El Hip Hop Workout Diana's Last Day Rachael Ray John Stamos Daily 10 The Soup El News Weekend
ESP2 Fishing Adventure Driven Wild Skies Whitetail Adventure Outdoors Driven NASCAR Now (Live) NHRA ATPA
ESPN Football SportsCenter (cc) College Football Final NFL SportsCtr. Lines Reporters SportsCtr. NFL Countdwn
EWTN Carpenter Letter Sprt St. Michael Rosary Sunday Mass Litany Bookmark Rome Faith Domestic Holy Rsry
FAM In Touch-Dr Fam. Mat Fam. Mat. Step-Step Step-Step Full House Full House Sabrina Sabrina Grounded Grounded
HGTV Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Ground Yard Yard Landscape Landscapr Landscapr Curb Curb Secrets Get It Sold
HIST History History History History Historys Generatn True Crime (cc) True Crime (cc) Breaking Vegas (cc)
LIFE Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Dr. Frederick K. Price Hour of Power (cc) Paid Prog. Health Side Order of Life (cc) Movie: The Brothers
NICK ChalkZone Neutron LazyTown Neutron Neutron OddParent Sponge Sponge Tak, Power Barnyard OddParent EEITigre
SCI Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Movie:** Warlock: The Armageddon (1993) Warlock III: The End
TBS Harvey Harvey Movie: ** 28 Days (2000) (Sandra Bullock) (cc) Movie: ** Miss Congeniality (2000) (PA) (Sandra Bullock) (cc) IMLB
TCM Movie: *** South Pacific (1958) (Mitzi Gaynor, Rossano Brazzi) (cc) Movie: Three for the Show (1955) Movie: Three Smart Girls (1936)
TLC Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. While You Were Out While You Were Out Trading Spaces (cc)
SPIKE Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Ultimate Fighter (s) Hrsepwer IHrsepwer Hrsepwer jMuscleCar
TNT Law & Order (s) Movie: **f/ Pay It Forward (2000) (Kevin Spacey) (cc) tMovie: ** l Am Sam (2001) (Sean Penn, Michelle Pfeiffer) (cc)
UNI Control Caliente Tu Desayuno Alegre: Fin de Semana (N) Qud Locura JAl Punto Repfblica Deportiva
USA Coach (s) Coach (s) Wealth Changing Ed Young J. Osteen Law Order: Cl Law Order: ClI Law Order: Cl

HBO Pandemic Movie: ****' The Iron Giant (1999) Inside the NFL (s) (cc) Movie: ** The Break-Up (2006) (cc) Little Rock Central: 50 Years Later
SHOW (5:55) Movie: The Honeymooners Movie: ** Into the Blue (2005) (Paul Walker) (cc) Movie: *** Dirty Dancing (1987) Strange Bedfellows ,'
TMC 1(5:45) Movie: All We Are Saying 'NR' Movie: ** To Walk With Lions (1999) 'PG-13' (cc) Movie: Irish Jam (2006) 'PG-13' (cc) Movie: Unzipped (1995)


SUNDAY AFTERNOON OCTOBER 7, 2007
12:00 12:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30

a WPTV Animal Wild Amer Animal Dragon (El) PGA Golf: Champions Tour Gymnastics: 2007 World Championships. (s) (cc)
* WPEC NFL Today (Live) (cc) NFL Football: Miami Dolphins at Houston Texans. Reliant Stadium. (Live) (cc) NFL Football: Chargers at Broncos
i WTCE Love AR Evans IM Finley Conley |White |King ls Bishop P. Cornerstone (cc) |Rod P. Dickow
0 WPBF Paid Prog. Paid Prog. NASCAR Countdown NASCAR Racing: Nextel Cup - UAW-Ford 500. From Talladega, Ala. (Live) (cc)
@D WFLX Fox NFL Sunday (cc) Paid Prog. iPaid Prog. Paid Prog. IPaid Prog. |American Idol Rewind NFL Football: Buccaneers at Colts
CD WTVX Movie: **'/ Benji the Hunted (1987) (Benji) Movie: *** Kiki's Delivery Service (1989) Half & Half Half & Half Girlfriends The Game
, WXEL Cooking Vanishing The War "FUBAR" (s) (cc) |IThe War "The Ghost Front" (s) (cc) (DVS) The War (s)

AMC (11:30) Movie: **/it Waterworld (1995) (Kevin Costner) Movie: Hidalgo (2004) A Westerner races a horse across the Arabian desert. Last Mohi
ANIM Mad Mike and Mark (cc) |Animal Facts Wild Kingdom (cc) Animal Icons Animals on TV shows. (cc) The Most Extreme (cc)
A&E Movie: ** Ronin (1998) (Robert De Niro, Jean Reno) (cc) |Cold Case Cold Case Files (cc) |Cold Case Files (cc) Cold Case Files (cc)
BET Exalted "Juanita Bynum" Meet Faith IVoice Movie: ** Why Do Fools Fall in Love (1998) (Halle Berry) (cc) IMovie: *** Holiday Heart (2000)
CNN Late Edition This Week at War Special Investigations In the Money (cc) Newsroom Newsroom
CRT Justice Justice Dom. Dunne Hot PursuitlHot Pursuit Hot Pursuit Hot Pursuit Hot Pursuit Hot Pursuit Hot Pursuit Hot Pursuit
DISC Dirty Jobs (cc) Dirty Jobs (cc) Man vs. Wild "Ecuador" MythBusters (cc) MythBusters (cc) MythBusters (cc)
DISN Movie: ** The Cheetah Girls (2003) (Raven) (cc) So Raven |Life Derek Phil |Cory Jonas IMontana Cory |Cory
El The View: True H'wood IThe Soup 101 SNL Moments 101 SNL Moments 101 SNL Moments 101 SNL Moments
ESP2 Evernham Basketball: Toronto Raptors at Lottomatica Virtus Roma. Rome. Polo: 2007 Triple Crown. Santa Barbara, Calif. Horse Racing (Live)
ESPN NFL Countdwn Bowling Reno, Nev. (cc) The Contender The Contender (s) (cc) Boxing: 1993 Bowe vs. Holyfield II. (cc)
EWTN Sunday Mass Litany Mozart Mass in C Minor Joy-Music Chaplet |Rosary The World Over New Revolutn
FAM 7th Heaven (s) (cc) 7th Heaven (s) (cc) 7th Heaven (cc) 7th Heaven (cc) 7th Heaven (s) (cc) 7th Heaven (s) (cc)
HGTV My House IPotential My Kitchen |Kitchens Decorating IDecorating Dime Color Divine IFirst Place Countdown to Fall (N)
HIST (11:00) Breaking Vegas Las Vegas (cc) The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (cc) Godfathers (cc)
LIFE (11:00) Movie: Brothers Movie: Like Mother, Like Daughter (2007) (cc) Movie: Living With the Enemy (2005) (cc) Come Early Morning
NICK Avatar ]Nicktoon Nicktoon INicktoon Sponge ISponge Neutron |OddParent Drake |Drake Drake |Drake
SCI (11:00) Movie Dark Kingdom: The Dragon King (s) (Part 1 of 2) Dark Kingdom: The Dragon King (s) (Part 2 of 2) Movie: Merlin (1998)
TBS MLB Baseball: National League Division Series Game 4 - Teams TBA. If necessary. (cc) IMLB Baseball: National League Division Series - Teams TBA
TCM Movie: **/2 Jailhouse Rock (1957), Judy Tyler Movie: **V2 Written on the Wind (1956) Movie: *** The Misfits (1961) (Clark Gable)
TLC Trading Spaces The Real Estate Pros The New Detectives (cz) The New Detectives (cc) The New Detectives (cc) The New Detectives (cc)
SPIKE Xtreme 4x4 ITrucksl (s) Dangerous Animals Dangerous Animals II CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn
TNT Movie: ** Now and Then (1995) (Christina Ricci) Movie: ** The Prince & Me (2004) (Julia Stiles) Movie: ** A Walk to Remember (2002) (cc)
UNJ Republica Deportiva F(tbol de la Liga Mexicans: Toluca vs. America Los Reyes de la Risa Primer Impacto
USA Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: ClI Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl

HBO Real Time [Wuhl I Movie: ** Cheaper by the Dozen 2 Movie: *1/ Simply Irresistible (1999) 'PG-13' (cc) Five Days (cc)
SHOW Movie Movie: ** The Big White (2005) (Robin Williams) Movie: Grumpy Old Men (1993) (cc) Movie: *** Election (1999) (Matthew Brodenck)
TMC Movie Movie: **/ Y Malice (1993) (s) 'R' (cc) Movie: Warriors of Terra (2006) 'NR' IMovie: Yours, Mine & Ours (2005) Mimic 3: Sentinel (2003)


SUNDAY PRIME TIME OCTOBER 7, 2007
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

a WPTV News (cc) NBC News Football Night NFL Football: Chicago Bears at Green Bay Packers Lambeau Field. (Live) (s) (cc) News (cc)
B WPEC NFL Football: Chargers at Broncos 60 Minutes (s) (cc) Cold Case (N) (s) (cc) Shark (N) (s) (cc) INews (cc) SportsPlus
ED WTCE Jakes Meyer Youseff Hayford J. Osteen Authority Believers Changing Movie: *** David (1997) (Nathaniel Parker)
a WPBF News(N) ABC News Funniest Home Videos Extreme-Home Desperate Housewives Brothers & Sisters (s) News (N)
ED WFLX (4:00) NFL Football (cc) King of Hill Simpsons Simpsons IKing of Hill Family Guy Amer Dad News (N) TMZ (N) (s) (cc)
U) WTVX Gossip Girl "Poison Ivy" CW Now Online Life Is Wild "Pilot" (cc) Next Top Model Will-Grace Will-Grace Friends (s) IFriends (s)
m WXEL (5:30) The War "A World Without War" (s) Nature (s) (cc) (DVS) Mysteryl (N) (s) (cc) (DVS) AR FYI Austin City Limits (s)

AMC (5:30) Movie: The Last of the Mohicans (1992) Movie: *** ; Field of Dreams (1989) Movie: ***'a Field of Dreams (1989)
ANIM Blue Planet Wild Kingdom (cc) The Future Is Wild (cc) Giant Monsters (cc) Wild Kingdom (cc)
A&E Teen Killers-Second Iceman Tapes Iceman-Psych. Iceman Confess The Sopranos Carmela and Tony discuss A.J. (s)
BET Movie Girlfriends Girlfriends Girlfriends Sunday Best (cc) Exalted "Juanita Bynum" American Gangster 2 BET Inspiration
CNN Lou Dobbs This Week Newsroom Special Investigations Larry King Live Newsroom Special Investigations
CRT Hot Pursuit Hot Pursuit Hot Pursuit Cops (s) Cops (s) Cops (s) Cops (s) Cops (s) Bounty Girls Miami The Investigators
DISC MythBusters (cc) MythBusters (cc) Last One Standing Koppel: Breaking Point (N) MythBusters (cc)
DISN Suite Life ISuite Life Montana Suite Life Halloweentown II: Revenge ISo Raven So Raven Life Derek Suite Life Montana
El 101 SNL Moments El News Weekend (N) THS Investigates Kidnapping Abducted children. Kimora: Fab Girls Girls
ESP2 (5:00) Horse Racing NHRA.Drag Racing: Torco Racing Fuels Nationals - Final Eliminations. (cc) Series of Poker Series of Poker
ESPN SportsCenter SportsCenter (Live) (cc) College Football: New Mexico State at Boise State. (Live) (cc) SportsCenter (Live) (cc)
EWTN Benedictn Life Father Groeschel Father Corapi Bridging |Rosary Church-Arts Life on the Rock
FAM 7th Heaven "Holy War" 7th Heaven "Holy War" 7th Heaven (s) (cc) 7th Heaven "We Do" (s) 7th Heaven "Goodbye" 7th Heaven (s) (cc)
HGTV Weekend Property My House House To Sell ISecrets Kitchens & Baths 2007 Property First Place Dream |What Get
HIST (5:00) Godfathers (cc) Shootoutl (cc) Decoding the Past (cc) Siberian Apocalypse Ice Road Truckers (cc) Mega Disasters (cc)
LIFE (5:00) Movie: Come Movie: My Daughter's Secret (2007) (cc) Side Order of Life (cc) Side Order of Life (cc) Medium (s) (cc)
NICK Drake |Drake Naked Brothers Band |Zoey 101 Unfab Fresh Pr. |Home lmp. Lopez Lopez Fresh Pr. Fresh Pr.
SCI (5:00) Movie: Merlin (1998) A medieval sorcerer battles evil and seeks love. Movie: ** Timeline (2003) (Paul Walker, Frances O'Connor) Earthsea
TBS (3:30) MLB Baseball IMLB Baseball: American League Division Series Game 3 -- Teams TBA. (Live) (s) (cc) Inside MLB |King King
TCM Movie: ** Back Frpm Eternity (1956) (cc) Movie: *** The Bad News Bears (1976) (cc) Movie: ** Safe at Homel (1962) (Mickey Mantle)
TLC The New Detectives (cc) World's Tallest People Can't Stop Growing (N) World's Tallest Man (cc) World's Tallest Woman Can't Stop Growing
SPIKE CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn
TNT Movie: *** Save the Last Dance (2001) (cc) Movie: *** Mean Girls (2004) (cc) IMovie: *** Mean Girls (2004) (Lindsay Lohan) Save Last
UNI Locura |Noticiero Nuestra Belleza de Mexico 2007 Buscando a Timbiriche, la Nueva Banda Impacto Noticiero
USA Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law & Order: SVU
HBO Movie: ** The Break-Up (2006) (Vince Vaughn) The Sopranos (s) (cc) Tell Me You Love Me (s) Curb Movie: ** Miami Vice (2006) 'R'
SHOW Movie: ** Into the Blue (200.5) (Paul Walker) (cc) Weeds (cc) Californ Dexter (ilTV) (N) (s) (cc) Brotherhood (iTV) (s) Dexter (iTV) (s) (cc)
TMC Movie Movle: ***'! Unzipped (1995)'R' Movie: *** Sherrybaby (2006) 'R' Movie: ** Waiting ...(2005) (Ryan Reynolds) R' |To Live







10 Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007


By BETTY DEBNAM


It's Fall Migration Time


Ducks Are Heading South


These northern
pintail ducks are on
their way south.
They might begin
their trip as far north
as Alaska.
Many winter in
California.


~* ~--.o4W~ alist--


I I-.-. -Pu..


It's prime flying time

sL of ducks in wetlands or
flying overhead?
Winter is on its way.
Daylight time is
getting shorter.
For ducks and other
animals, it's getting harder to find
food. Ice on the water where ducks
swim and feed is a threat. In the fall,
many ducks are flying night and day
to seek warmer weather.
Some start flying south in August.
October and November are usually the
prime migration months.
The right route
N Scientists aren't sure
how ducks know the
W r-f right route to follow.
They might be living
compasses, using the
same magnetic pull of the Earth to
guide them. They might use the sun
and stars or landmarks as guides.


Duck flyways
eris Ducks usually
2 follow one of four
flyways, or bird
"highways," they
take when flying
south in the
winter and north
in the spring.
At the left is
the Central
Flyway. The others
are the Pacific,
Atlantic and
' Mississippi
flyways. Flyways follow waterways.


The Mini Page�

L *Help for Planet Earth
,, A popular
r i"" resource book
aHep Eth ( containing
S. planet I. - solutions for
problems of
trash, air and
."n. water quality,
I and wildlife
habitat.

To order, send $3.00 total cost (indudes all postage and handling) for each copy. Send check or money order (U.S. funds only)
payable to: Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097.
Please send _ copies of The Mini Page Help for Planet Earth (Item #0-8362-4316-1) at $3.00 each, total
cost (Bulk discount information available upon request) www.smartwarehousing.com
Name:
SAddress: Stt:.
Ity __________h---_____--------- State:.I- Zifp: _-j


Wetland rest stops


Wetlands are areas where water is
very close to or above the surface of
land. They are also called swamps and
marshes. Plants, animals and insects
live in wetlands. Waterfowl depend on
them as places to rest, feed and live.


rom Th Mini Page 0 2007 VUnval Pre Syndiato


fromm Tho Mi Paoe 0 07 Univertsal Press Syndiat


Duck flight facts
S* Ducks do not bump
into one another while
flying. They are very
good fliers.


# * Lone ducks do not
drop out of the flying
flock. They don't stop off
to go to the bathroom. They keep on
flying. The flock usually swoops
down to the ground as a group. To
eat and rest, they stop at wetlands
and fields along the way.

S * Ducks often fly in a V
formation, with one
behind the other. It takes
less energy to fly behind another
duck than to fly alone.

�* Ducks fly in flocks
because there is safety in
numbers. Flying together
also means there are more eyes to
look for food and danger.

�* Ducks fly in larger
groups during fall and
winter migration than
they do at their spring and summer
breeding grounds.

S�* There is not one
leader who flies in front of
the flock all of the time.
They often switch leaders.



The Mini Page thanks Dr. Bob Blohm,
chief of migratory birds, and Dr. Pam
Garrettson of the Population and Habitat
Assessment Section of the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, for help with this story.


Meet "Susie" Mallard. We will give her a
name and tell you a story about her and
her mate. Like all female ducks, her color
is a dull brown. This helps her hide and
blend in with the wetlands. Susie also has
some white and blue on her wing feathers.
At this time of year, Susie is flying
south with other ducks. Male ducks
are flying south, too. The flock might
settle in the warmer wetlands of
Arkansas.
F I


Meet "Drake" Mallard. Like all duck
males, he is more colorful than Susie.
His green head and neck make him
attractive to her.
While wintering in the south,
Susie chooses Drake as her mate. In
the spring, Susie and Drake will
migrate north. Susie will lead Drake
back to the wetland in Canada
where she hatched. He will help
defend their wetland against other
ducks.
Then he will fly away, and Susie
probably will not see him again.
Susie will sit on the nest for three
weeks until her eggs hatch.
Susie and Drake will pick new
mates the next winter.


More duck basics
* There are about 120
different kinds of ducks.
There are more mallards
than any other kind.

* Female ducks are
called hens. Males are
called drakes, and babies
are called ducklings.

* Ducks sometimes
mate with different types
of ducks. The ducklings
usually look a little like both species.
They are called hybrids.


* Duck hens can lay
from six to 12 eggs. Lots
of birds and animals eat
ducklings. When ducklings hatch,
they can't fly, but they are covered
with down, and can walk, swim and
feed themselves. For five to eight
weeks, they follow their mother. This
is called imprinting. When they ___
have fully grown feathers,
they can fly.


* Some ducks, like the
dabbling ducks pictured
above, get their food from
near the top of the water. They eat
plants and insects. Others dive and
swim under water for fish and other
animals.
The Mini Page Staff
Betty Debnam - Contributing Editor
Lisa Tarry - Managing Editor
Lucy Lien - Associate Editor
Wendy Daley - Artist


Please include all of the appropriate registered trademark symbols and copyright lines in any publication of The Mini Page�.


Migrating ducks might: -- - National Wildlife
* fly only a few miles to as many as ' Refuges are special areas
5,000 miles each way. set aside by the U.S.
* fly up to 50 miles per hour. NATIONAL government to protect
* fly a few miles to a couple of REFUGE wildlife and their
hundred miles per day. Some take SYSTEM habitat, or living areas.
their time and often stop a few hours , Most refuges are established to
to rest and sleep. protect migrating birds.


T�MG4" f froomis Mini Pagen 20M7 Unlersal Press Sndirate


Supersport: Corey Lynch
, l Height: 6-0 Birthdate: 5-7-85
Weight: 205 Hometown: Cape Coral, Fla.
-- - Suspense soared, tension mounted, and Michigan's
massive stadium rocked. But Corey Lynch didn't
S'flinch.
S-J IThe Appalachian'State All-American charged in
and blocked the Wolverines' field goal attempt on the last play to
seal a 34-32 victory on Sept. 1. It was one of the biggest upsets in
college football history and a monumental moment for the
Mountaineers, who refused to be outclassed.
Lynch is a big playmaker and two-time All-America defensive
back who has helped lead Appalachian, a small school nestled in
the North Carolina mountains, to two straight Division I-AA
national championships.
At ASU, Lynch is recognized as a role model,'majoring in physics.
This is a peak time for Lynch and his amazing football team.


from he Mini Page 200 Universal Press Syndicate


FATM MIGH MTY
FUNNY'S Rvn il Di(z
All of the following jokes have something in common. Can
you guess the common theme or category? c


Toby: What kind of doctor treats ducks?
Tammy: A quack!


Tim: How do ugly ducks survive?
Trudy: Swan day at a time!


Tom: What time do ducks wake up in the
morning?
Todd: At the quack of dawn!


.- ,A troromhe Mrn, Pags 02007 Un ivn1ai Press Syndlcate
S RaC * TRYD'N
g e ousDuck Migration TFIND

Words that remind us of ducks are hidden in the block below. Some
words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used
twice. See if you can find: MIGRATION, PINTAIL, ALASKA,
FLYWAY, LANDMARKS, COMPASS, WETLANDS, WATERFOWL,
MALLARD, FORMATION, FLOCK, DUCKLING, NEST, FLY, HEN,
HYBRID, DRAKE, EGGS.
KEEPYOUR MI GREAT I ONKBJ FWL
EYES ON THE LAXV NSG G E E W Z O E W
SKIES DF LYWAYJ SMHARTO
QR QRGL JP I NTA I LML F
COM PASS X PMAAAR
PX D L WR EKARDSTNE
G H Y BR I DFLOCK I DT
Z LS KRAMDNALAOSA
F FQG N I L KCUD XKNDW


Go dot to dot and color.


41
.40
42. . 39
43. .o38

44 . 33 3t 3536
'32
45. '31

46
47. / .30

48

49. ' 29

50. *28

52
.53. '26

6*
7 8 9 24
10' 12 23
11 ,a:* .3 22
14 al
15 . 18 19 20
16 7

from The Min Page 0 2007 Universal Press Syndicate


6T Rookie Cookie's Recipe
Granny Smith Apple Dessert
You'll need:
* 4 medium Granny Smith * 1 teaspoon baking powder
apples, peeled and sliced * 1/2 teaspoon salt
* 3/4 cup brown sugar, divided * 6 tablespoons butter or
* 3/4 cup whole-wheat flour margarine, melted
* 1 teaspoon cinnamon * low-fat vanilla ice cream or 3
* 1/4 cup quick oats frozen yogurt (optional)
What to do:
1. Combine sliced apples with 1/4 cup brown sugar. Place in an 8-by-8-inch
baking dish.
2. Mix flour, 1/2 cup brown sugar, cinnamon, oats, baking powder and salt
in a medium bowl.
3. Stir in melted butter or margarine and mix until just blended.
4. Spoon mixture evenly on apples. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 35
minutes until apples are tender.
5. Serve warm. You can top it with low-fat vanilla ice cream or frozen
yogurt. Makes 4 to 8 servings.
*Note: You will need an adult's help with this recipe.

Meet the future in new TV series
9,1T' "The spitfire bird shoots acid
from its nose and lives in the
S| c Antarctic rain forest - 100 million
S. years from now. The toraton might
S"', live then, too: This descendant from
S , the tortoise might become the
largest animal on Earth, weighing
132 tons.
These fantastic creatures appear
on the new Discovery Kids series, "The Future Is Wild."
In this animated series, kids from the 21st century are transported
millions of years in the future to experience life as it might become.
The show is an adventure series with real science behind it. Science
experts who work on the show include climate specialists and mammal
experts. The show deals in a fun way with the serious issues of climate
change.
Another creature that might appear millions of years from now is the
poggle, one of the last mammals still living on Earth. Poggles are small
rodents that rarely move. The poggle is actually livestock, kept by
spiders!
__________________________________nronm Th Mco Page C 2007 Unaleeral P5ess Synedlcase


s







Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007 l


hree weeks Fre ... tws Easy


CAEORE I


Announcements.
Employment . . .
Financial ......
Services .......
Merchandise . . .
Agriculture ....
Rentals .......
Real Estate ....
Mobile Homes . .
Recreation . . . . .
Automobiles . . .
Public Notices ..


. . . . . . .100
. . . . . . .200
. . . .... 300
. . . . ... 400
....... 500
....... 800
....... 900
.... 1. 000
..... 2000
. . . . . .3000
. . . . . .4000
. . . . . .5000


* All personal items under
$5,000 ABSOLUTELY FREE!
* Price must be included in ad
* Private parties only
* 2 items per household per
issue h


Announcements



Important Information: Please
read your ad carefully the first
day it appears. In case of an
inadvertent error, please noti-
fy us prior to the deadline list-
ed. We will not be responsible
for more than 1 incorrect
insertion, or for more than the
extent of the ad rendered val-
ueless by such errors.
Advertiser assumes responsi-
bility for all statements, names
and content of an ad, and
assumes responsibility for any
claims against Independent
Newspapers. All advertising
is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all copy, and to
insert above the copy the word
"advertisement". All ads
accepted are subject to credit
approval. All ads must conform
to Independent Newspapers'
style and are restricted to
their proper classifications.
Some classified categories
require advance payment.
These classifications are
denoted with an asterisk *.
Independent Newspapers will
never knowingly accept any
advertisement that is illegal or
considered fraudulent, in all
cases of questionable value,
such as promises of guaran-
teed income from work-at-
home programs or other offers
to send money in advance for
a product or service - we
advise you to check with the
Attorney General's Consumer
Fraud Line at 1-800-220-5424,
and/or The Better Business
Bureau, 800-464-6331 for pre-
vious complaints.
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage/Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160



MIXED DOG- F 5yrs, spayed,
white short hair, dark tan on
ears, vic of Belmont Woods.
Reward (239)229-4850
REWARD For the return of a
M) & (F) poodle puppies.
lack. $1000. reward for each.
No Questions. (239)848-6696


!4enant


Employment -
Full-Time 205
Employment -
Medical 210
Employment .
Part-Time 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Training 227
Sales 230



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
For General Contractor.
Must have construction exp.
Proficient in Word & Excel.
DFWR Fax resume to:
863-763-6337
BEAUTICIAN - Part Time
For Rehab/Long Term Care
Facility. Great Place to Work!
Glades Health Care Center,
230 S. Bartield Hwy.,
Pahokee FL
561-924-5561
DRUG TESTING &
COUNSELING SERVICES
Drug testing lab.
Lab operator and Lab tech
needed for Okeechobee.
Send resume to:
(561) 967-3484


All personal items under $5,000

ABSOLUTELY FREE!



� "OnH FREE CLASSIfie AD


TDAY AT


m ..COM/CLA .
Published 3 weeks' in all of our Florida papers: Caloosa Belle, Clewiston News, Frostproof News, Glades County Democrat,
Immokalee Bulletin, Okeechobee News and Advertiser, and The Sun
* Ads will run in Thursday daily editions and weekly publications.

or call

1-877-353-2424 (Toll Free)


U..age/
Yard Sales^^^^^


Place Your
YARD SALE
ad today!


Get FREE signs!


Call Classifieds
877-353-2424


a- i , -IaNic


Century 21
Horizon Properties
NOW RECRUITING
F/T & P/T Real Estate
Sales Associates.
Excellent Training Avail-
able
Experienced Agents Valued
Also 2 Group Health Plans
to Choose From
5 OFFICES
Okeechobee, Port St. Lucie
Hobe Sound, Wellington
& Jupiter
863-467-2100
COOK
Now Hiring
Experienced Cook
Apply in person @
Crossroads Restaurant
5050 NE 128th Ave.
Okeechobee, FL
(863)763-8333



Needed for Home
Medical Company.
Delivery of Oxygen,
DME, and patient
education. Will train.
Interested candidates
please fax resumes to
863-763-5191
or call 863-763-7337.
To apply in person, visit
Lincare Inc
210 NE 3rd Ave.
DFWP/EOE
FULL TIME
Manager for local flea market,
must have excellent computer
skills and be available to work
weekends. Retail background
preferred. Good salary and
benefits included. Fax resume
to (863)763-7874 or apply in
person Monday thru Friday
at 269 NW 9th Street,
Okeechobee.
EXPERIENCED BOOKKEEPER
NEEDED
(863)634-7552
Shop here flrstl
The classified ads


a- , m Noic


DRIVERS:
WE NEED YOU FOR
SOMETHING SPECIAL
CLASS A COL REQUIRED
Haul flowers and receive
*Excellent earnings if
you're willing to work
$50,000 Ave. 1st yr.
* $60,000 Ave. after 2 yrs.
SGreat Benefits
*Ali HUB miles paid,
driving or in the bunk.
*Excellent Equipment
*Looking for solos
wanting to team.
If you're tough enough to
haul flowers, call us today
at 1-800-428-0343 Press
Option 1 Palm City or
visit www.armellini.com





EXPERI-
ENCED
AM SERVER

Min. 1 yr. exp.

COOK

Start $12-$15
per hr.

Apply in person
between
9am- 1pm
MAINTENANCE MAN
Duties include taking care of a
40 unit apt. complex. Knowl-
edge of Plumbing, Electrical,
Carpentry, Painting, and A/C.
Some hand tools required.
Drug screen, Background
Check required.
.Apply @
620 S. Barfield Hwy.
Pahokee, Fl. 561-924-8137
SEPTIC INSTALLER
Will train, paid salary based on
experience. Call for more
details Ashley (863)763-0665


~5-,
\f2


1~ Will1 .~~N~1i~ 1ji


Emlymn
Full Tim


Empoyen
Full Tim


I
FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER _ We have the countertops
FloridaCommunity Health Centers, Inc. you're looking for!
in Indiantown, FL seeks experienced FNP
to join our active practice. Must have FLORIDA FLOORS & MORE
current Florida ARNP license. ARNP will " 513 S.W Park Street* (863) 763-7131
see adults and pediatrics. We offer
competitive salary and a comprehensive m services
benefit package. Bilingual helpful. To MedS eraice
apply, submit CV to Dr. F Vazquez, HEALTH IT1
fax (772)597-4194 or e-mail NAVIGATOR Za.
hr(@fchcinc.org. FT This position will Babysitting 405
EOE/DFWP assist with processing Child Care Needed410
hk, innida nd Woo . ht] ide 9,, 6'V.1.4 9 f ...rJ - u-- --ArA1


Accardi-Milrot Dodge Jeep Chrysler
has an immediate opening in its newly renovated parts
department. A rewarding career awaits an individual
who is:
* Willing to learn
* A self starter
* Dependable
* Ambitious
Apply in person to
Bob Pattersorn
Parts Department
Accardi-Milrot Dodge Jeep Chrysler
4224 Hwy 441 South * Okeechobee, FL


Start a new career in the much needed field of
nursing as a Certified Nursing Assistant. Complete the
Hospitality Assistant course/training at Okeechobee
Healthcare Facility and become a CNA in 4 weeks. Next
class begins soon. Instructor RN/experienced teacher has
a very high CNA exam passing rate. Qualified CNAs are
then eligible for LPN training. Good benefits.
Apply In Person For Further Details:
406 N.W. 4th Street * (863) 357-2442

Immediate Openings * All Shifts
Full Time/Part Time * RN's & LPN's
Apply In Person To:
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
1646 Hwy. 441 North

Immediate Openings - CNAs
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
All shifts: Full/Part Time. Good Benefits.
Apply In Person To:
406 N.W. 4th Street. (863) 357-2442


Empoyen


OFFICE / CLERICAL WORK
Must have MS Office
experience, Quickbooks a plus.
Mon -Fri, 8am - 5pm
CEECO 863-357-0798
Earn some extra cash.
Sell your used Items in
the classfileds


Empoyen
Meial,


MENTAL HEALTH
THERAPIST
Okeechobee County. Work
w/children & adolescents for
in-home, school based &
office visits. M-F Master's
degree required. Fax resume
to 772-489-0423
Join al the people who
say, "I sold It in the clas-
slileds."


ivMicauiu aiiu ncHeaiy KiUS
applications in our Indian-
town center. Must have
2 yrs exp. Bilingual helpful.
Fax resume to:
(863) 357-2991
or apply at: FCHC,
1100 N. Parrott Ave,
Okeechobee, FL.
(Ask for Stephanie)
EOE/DFWP



DRIVER NEEDED
F/T Class A CDL required.
Local run. Good pay.
Call (863)467-2982 9a-3p

Need a few more bucks to
purchase something
deer? Pick up some
extra bucks when you
sell your used Items In
the classlfelds.



EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
Will do:
*Remodeling -Repairs
* Decks & Docks
Call (863)467-4959


Financial



Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315




NOTICE
Independent Newspapers will
never accept any advertise-
ment that is illegal or con-
sidered fraudulent. In all
cases of questionable val-
ue, such as promises of
guaranteed income from
work-at-home programs - if
it sounds too good to be
true, chances are that it is.
If you have questions or
doubts about any ad on
these pages, we advise that
before responding or send-
ing money ahead of time,
you check with the Better
Business Bureau at
772-878-2010 for previous
complaints.
Some 800 and 900 telephone
numbers may require an
extra charge, as well as
long distance toll costs. We
will do our best to alert our
reader of these charges in
the ads, but occasionally
we may not be aware of the
charges. Therefore, if you
call a number out of your
area, use caution.

Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise your
yard sale In the classl-
fleds and make your
clean ou a breezel


Child Care UTftered415 I
Instruction 420
Services Offered425
Insurance 430
Medical Services435



Ron's Pressure Washing
& Minor repairs
Roof coating, Repair to
Mobile Homes & more.
No job to big or small. Free
estimates. 863-357-9604 or
cell 863-610-1248
License # 2423

Love the earth Recycle
your used Items by sell-
ing them in the classl-
fleds.


NATURAL VITAMINS
MINERALS - HERBS
HEALTH PRODUCTS
AROMATHERAPY
NATURE'S PANTRY
417 W.S. Park
Call 863-467-1243


Merchandise



Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines535
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, Linens Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing.
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment/
Supplies 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets/Supplies/
Services 670
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy . 740


/ www.newszap.com/class


/ 1-877-353-2424 (Toll Free)


/ For Legal Ads:
legalads@newszap.com
/ For All Other Classified Ads:
classads@newszap.com


/ 1-877-353-2424 fToi Free)


/ Mon-Fri
8am .5pm


/ Mon-Fri
8am, .6pm


[ INE


/ Monday
Friday 12 noon for Monday pubicol.aon
/ Tuesday through Friday
II a m for nert day , publication
/ Saturday
Thursday 12 noon for Sat pubiat'or, M
/ Sunday
Friday 10 am for Surday publ.colion


ld


30x35x9
Vertical Roof, Soffit/Fascia
* 2 Roll-up Doors,
1 Entry Door, 1 Window,
2 Gable Vents, 4" Concrete Slab'
$21,923
*Concrete/Install by Others*
40' Wide, Unlimited Length
S16 Colors
*FLA Engineered Plans.
- Meets/Exceeds Wind Code
METALSYSTEMSPLUS .LLC


VwAnietasystemsp us com


Reading a newspaper
helps you understand
the world around you.
No wonder newspaper
readers are more suc-
cessful people


DOG BOX, Custom built. $250
(863)467-7197
PIT BULL PUPS: Red nose, 3
males, parents on premises.
w/papers, $350 or best of-
fer. 863-610-0685
The classified are the
most successful sales-
person In town.


HUGE PHOTOS
Family, friends, scenery
or pets from your photo.
Elliott's Quick Photo
419 W.S. Park
Call 863-763-5553


WE BUY SCRAP GOLD
Elliott's Pawn
419 W.S. Park
Call 863-763-5553


Agriculture



Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed/Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/ "
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845
Lawn & Garden 850
ULivestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds/Plants/
Flowers 865



SORREL (1) & PAINT (1)- with
trailer, $5500 for all
(863)673-4024


Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses - Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House - Rent 930
Land - Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent. 960



FOR RENT MONTHLY OR
YEARLY- 1BR, 1BA cabin.
$550/mo + sec dep in 55+
park. (863)763-7164
FURNISHED APT- On Water.
Utilities paid. Adult Commu-
nity. No pets Call between
9-4 pm daily (863)357-2044
KINGS BAY: 2br, 2ba, 2 story
apt, No pets; $800/mo. +
$800. sec. (561)248-5309
or (863)697-8728
NW OKEECHOBEE: 2BR, 2BA,
on quiet St. Kids & pets ok.
$750-$850/mo. 1st, last &
$500 sec. 561-346-1642.
Oak Lake Apts., Remodeled
2br, 1. ba, 2 Story, W/D
Fenced patio, $800 mo., 1st,
last + sec. (863)634-3313
OKEECHOBEE- lbr, lba, par-
tially furn., screen porch,
convenient, $750/mo. 1st,
last & Sec., (863)610-0559
OKEECHOBEE- Newly remod-
eled effic, apt., furn., you pay
.utilities, Prefer seasonal rent-
ers. (863)467-4253
TAYLOR CREEK CONDOS:
1br/1ba, partially furnished.
$650/mo, 1st & $800/Sec
For Details. 561-352-4243



Oak Lake Villas, 2br/2ba
$900/month, First,
Last, + $1000 Security.
No Pets. Clean & spacious.
Available immediately.
Call (863) 801-3133
OKEECHOBEE, 2BR/1.5BA,
Twnhs., W&D. No pets. An-
nual lease. $750/mo. 1st &
last. sec. (863)697-1129


BRAND NEW, 3BR's/2BA's,
lots of tile, garage, $1200.
Lawrence Associates,
1-800-543-2495.
BUCK HEAD RIDGE - 2br, 1ba
Nice! On canal. Furnished.
$850. mo. 561-746-0448 or
561-352-5977 for more info.
DIXIE RANCH ACRES, 2BR,
1BA, $825. mo. 1st, last &
$500 sec. dep. Call for info.
8am-5pm. (863)357-6700
DIXIE RANCH ACRES- 3ba,
2ba, Great/Rm, Carport.
$1100. mo.
1-800-543-2495
HOUSES FOR RENT
*3/2 $1200 *2/2 $1350
*3/2/2 $1500 *4/2 $1500
*4/2/2 $1592
Century 21 Horizon
Properties 863-467-2100
OKECHOBEE, 3BR/1BA Du-
plex, washer & dryer hook-
up. (853)763-4414
OKEE., 2 Story, 3BR/2.5BA,
2 car garage, Blue Heron,
golf, waterfront. $1500.
(863)467-1254/357-1918
OKEE., 3br, 2ba, Ig porches on
V/ ac land. Fenced, Central
air/heat, $850. mo. + 1st,
Last/Sec. Neg. (863)634-6839


A CASTLE
CASTLE The Parenting
C SLE Professionals
Support our fight for the prevention of child abuse
Call 772-465-6011


The Okeechobee County Health Department
currently has an opening for a
Senior Community Health Nursing Supervisor
The State of Florida offers a competitive salary and a wide
array of benefit and retirement options. Monday-Friday Work
Schedule: Day Hours (8AM-5PM Core Hours), NO WEEKEND
SCHEDULE; 9 Paid Holidays, 1 Personal Holiday per year;
Paid Time Off Earned Monthly: Annual & Sick Leave;
Retirement Plan, Deferred Compensation, Direct Deposit,
Jury Duty and Bereavement Leave, and other Administrative
Leave Available; Tuition Waiver Program available upon
immediate hire for State Universities and Community Colleges;
Educational Leave with Pay Opportunity and Nursing Student
Loan Forgiveness Program Available
View the job announcement and apply online at
httos://peoolefirst.mvflorida.com/logon.htm.
Requisition # 64061734-51235442-20071001101532
Date Closes 10/15/07
For assistance with the People First website, you may contact
the applicant customer service via telephone at
1-877-562-7287, TTY users call 1-866-221-0268
EEO/AA/VP Employer Drug Testing, Background screening
and fingerprinting required.





I A ^^-A^-*^-!'1'^?1-


Garage/
Yard Sales


I Home Improv


I Home Improv


=1


I







12 Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007


OKEE., Brand new 3br, 2ba,
Gar., NW 6th St. $1100. mo,
1st, Last & Sec. No pets,
(863)634-7895 or 634-7548
OKEE.- CBS, 2br/lba/1lgar.
Remodeled, Laundry, Cent/Air,
Yrd serve. $950 + Sec. Avail
(863)634-4548
OKEE CITY- 2BR, 23A.
$825/mo. W/D, shed & Ig
screened porch, fncd yard.
(561)743-0192 Iv msg.
OKEECHOBEE- 2/1 furn
house, $1000 + dep & 1/1
furn trailer, $750 + dep.,
(863)467-5379
OKEECHOBEE- 2/2, W/D, 6
mo or 1 yr lease, $750/mo,
$1800 to move in. 907 SW
2nd Ave (863)634-0512
OKEECHOBEE- 4br, 2ba, in
city limits, looking for re-
sponsible renters w/refs.
$1300/mo, (863)634-9139
S.E. OKEE: 3 BR, 1 BA., CBS
Home. Annual lease. W&D,
$950 mo. 1st. & last sec.
dep. (863)697-1129
SOUTHEAST SECTION
3BR/2BA, $975 mo. +
$975 sec. dep., $1950 to
move in. (863)634-1554
Your next job could be In
today's classifieds. Did
vou look for it?



Great Location!
OFFICE SPACE
I Downstairs
Close proximity to new
court house. 863-763-4740

OKEECHOBEE- Office space
1400 sq ft, carpeted unit,
next to Medicine Shop, 101
NW 5th St., Rent inclds wa-
ter & garbage pickup, Call
Karen (863)634-9331


On the Water, 1 or 2br, fully
furn., will pay 3 mos. rent in
advance, must be able to get
to the river, preferably Okee-
tantie area. (304)755-8047


OKEECHOBEE- 4br home to
share full hse priv, W/D,
pool, gar, $650/mo incld util
6 mo Ise (561)254-9326


ROOMS FOR RENT
Mobile Home $125 - $150 wk
1 month sec in advance
No pets (561)927-8211


TAYLOR CREEK: 3/2/1 C/Air &
Heat, Waterfront. $1000 mo.
Annual / $1200 monthly, +
electric (863)634-0584
WATERFRONT, 2 BR, M.H.,
C/Air, W&D and Workshop.
Furn. or Unfurn., Long or
Short Term. 863-467-7528
WATERFRONT: 2BR, 11/2 BA
Treasure Island. Fenced yd.
$875 mo. (772)359-6584
mardelvar@comcast.net.


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property - Sale 1010
Condos/
Townhouses - Sale1015
Farms - Sale 1020
Houses - Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property - Sale 1035
Land - Sale 1040
Lots - Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property - Sale 1055
Property lnspection1060
Real Estate Wanted 1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080




BUILDING & LAND
7200 sq ft-
Metal building on 1 + acre of
land, fenced, plenty of parking,
located on N. Industrial Loop,
LaBelle, Florida.
2400 sq ft- Office space under
NC.
4800 sq ft- Warehouse area-3
large bays.
Call (863)675-4342 or
(863)673-1885 for more
information.
HWY 98: Okeechobee Airport
area, 2 Commercial Lots
75 x 150 Feet each.
$49,000. each, or best offer.
raulmarrerojr@yahoo.com
joseraulmarrero.com
Luxury Realty
407-436-5140


BRAND NEW, 2/2 Villa, 1200
sq ft, never lived in, lots of
upgrades. Asking $149,900,
will consider rental. Call
(863)610-0219.


FABULOUS FLA. KEYS- 3/2
non-waterfront, CBS
home/remodeled kitchen.
Large beautifully landscaped
lot. Boat ramp for Subdivi-
sion nearby. $445,000. Cla-
ra, Chaplin RE
(302)395-2095
FOR SALE BY OWNER: CBS,
3/2/2, Fenced. 9107 S.E.
64th Dr., Okeechobee, Off
15A, Hammock Addition, be-
hind Country Corner Store.
$210,000. (863)467-1694
HOUSES FOR SALE
Very large CBS. work/ 2 car
garage. Brand new Florida rm.
addition. Ingrnd spa/
jacuzzi. Make offer today!
Owner financing available I!
$170,000-MLS# 91737
Huge 3 br, 2 bth friendly
neighborhood. Huge front
yard. Brand new carpet and
paint. Rim canal access.
Look at today! Great Starter!
$225,000-MLS# 93558
Corner lot, 133 feet on
canal. Cute 2/2 frml din rm,
pocket doors. Lots of
windows. Tile through out,
Cvrd boat lift, deck, canal to
Taylor Creek
$249,950-MLS# 93558
Well maintained 3/2 CBS
Home. Gated Palm Creek Es-
tates. Open floor plan w/ vault-
ed ceilings. 20 X 11 FL RM
captive lake view.
$279,900-MLS# 91740
Century 21 Horizon
Properties 863-467-2100
NEW HOME ON YOUR LOT!
Features 3BRs/2BAs, Ig. LR,
garage, $118k, includes per-
mit fees. Lawrence Asso-
ciates 1-800-543-2495
OKEECHOBEE- 3/1, CBS, Re-
duced to $172K, Oak, tile &
marble & much more. Mov-
ing/Must sell now! Must see!
309 SW 10th Ave.
(863)357-0391 Appt. Only!
WOOD FRAME HOME: 2 BR, 1
BA., Near Kissimmee River.
C/Air. Large lot w/lots of
trees. 15609 State Rd. 70 W.
$79,000. Additional lot next
to home also for sale for
$35,000. (561)746-5852
Find It faster. Sen It soon-
er In the classifileds


Century 21 Horizon
Properties 863-467-2100
* 2 acres R Bar Est. $95k
* Larodo Shores Waterfront
lot $152k
* 2 acr. Waterfront Rim
Canal $195k-$199k
* 5 acres multi family close
to town $299k
* Taylor Creek Isles
Waterfront lot $109,000


OKEE, 3.8 acres, vacant,
beautiful trees, well, septic.
Buildable for MH or SFR. Ask-
ing $125,000.(863)610-0219
Your new car could be in
today's paper. Have you
looked for It?


MobileHomes



Mobile Home - Lots 2005
Mobile Home - Parts 2010
Mobile Homes - Rent 2015
Mobile Homes - Sale 2020



BH RIDGE- 2/2, waterfront,
lake access, Ig screen porch,
fenced yard, shed, $800/mo,
1st & Sec, (772)370-1095
CHOICE OF 3BR, or 2 BR, 2
ba D/W's No pets, yrly lease,
starting @ $650/mo + $1000
sec. dep. 863-763-4031
DOUBLEWIDE, 3br/2ba, Lo-
cated in Ousley Estates,
Available Now.
(863)357-1517
LABELLE, New 3BR/2BA dbl
wide, w/d, 2.5 acres, fenced.,
owner mows, good credit,
d/w. $1100. (239)910-5115
MOBILES FOR RENT
* 2/2 $850 *2/2 $950
*3/2 $1350
Century 21 Horizon
Properties 863-467-2100
OKEE., D/W 3br, 2ba, $1200.
mo. + 1st & Sec. Avail
10/15. Cr ref. req'd. No in-
side pets. (863)467-6100

',
OKEECHOBEE: 2 Bdrm.,1 Ba.
Mobile Home. Nice lot, fenced
back yard, front porch. Will
lease w/option to buy. $700/
month. Owner financing.
(863)634-3451.



BANK REPO'S
MOVE TO YOUR LAND
Mobile Home Angels
561-721-2230
PALM HARBOR
4/2 Tile floor, Energy Package;
Deluxe loaded, over
2,200 sq. ft
30th Anniversary
Sale Special
Save $15,000.
Call for Free Color Brochures
800-622-2832


MOBILES FOR SALE
2/1 w/lrg add. Cov. carport,
turn. boat docks, lake
access, heated pool, hot
tub, shuffleboard, pool rm.
lots of activities. +55
$59,900-MLS# 94109
1980 DWMH on concrete slab,
furnished, great fenced lot, sea
wall on two canals.
home needs a little TLC.
$96,000-MLS# 93463
Newer mobile /shingled roof in
excell. condit., Taylor Creek
w/direct access to the Lake.
Seawall, boathouse, attach
carport. Completely Furnished!
Move-In Ready!
$109,900-MLS# 93978
2004 turn key, 2/2 in 55+
Seminole Cove, pool and club-
house Catch and release
fish at Lake Seminole.
Maintenance includes, lawn
mowing, and cable TV.
$112,000-MLS# 93437
3/2 w/pool on private 2 lots.
Mobile and one lot for $89,900
Incl. building lot w/well for
$119,900 4 storage sheds.
W/D. fenced. MLS# 94594
Century21 Horizon
Properties 863-467-2100
MOBILES WITHOUT LAND
* 2/1 $29,900
* 2/2 $15,900
* 3/1 $34,900
Century 21 Horizon
Properties 863-467-2100
SW OKEE., 2br, FL/Rm, Cen-
tral air & heat, double car-
port, shed, W/D, Adult Park.
$13,500. (863)763-7927
TREASURE ISLAND, 3br, 2ba
Lake access, quiet area,
$700/mo., 1st, last & sec.
dep. (561)743-4331

Recreation



Boats 3005
Campers/RVs 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles 'ATVs 3035




FOR SALE OR RENT-Mo or yr-
ly, 05 RV. Also lot space avail
in a 55+park. R $425/mo +
sec dep (863)763-7164


YAMAHA YZ250 '02, 2 stroke,
$1700 or best offer.
(863)801-3706


lbert

GOLF CARS " 1Z-o



Sherri Enfinger, Manager * www.gilbert-golfcars.com
Sherri Enfinger, Manager - www.gilbert-gol1fca-rscom I


863 763-6434
315 S. Parrott Avenue * Okeechobee, FL 34974


Automobiles I



Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks 4040
Parts - Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070


MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE-
'95, A/C, New top. New
paint. Runs great. $5000. or
best offer. (863)763-4746

rttilt 4


GMC SURBURBAN- '88, HD
Tow pkg. 454 Big Block Chevy
eng. Runs great. $4200 or
best offer. (863)763-4746


ifm


P5







P(s


--- -- .- -1


r .i ". .."- .



Every Day You Can Fly
Around the World.
Each W and every day, events ar"e happeningv
111(aronb the world,. Aud every day, ke-pinsg oup
with the world by reading a& newspaper is lkue nlying
around the globe on search of knowledge. Knowledge
is power HHave no fear. the newspaper i4 here.
It all starts with, newspapers.
*W .ncrwwEaprfniaco~m


Community Events


Two-day motorcycle rally set for Nov. 10 & 11
A motorcycle rally will be held Saturday, Nov. 10, and Sunday, Nov.
11, at the Okeechobee County Agri-Civic Center, 4200 S.R. 70 E., be-
ginning at 9 a,m. each day. The inaugural event is being sponsored
by the Florida Gang Investigators Association (FGIA) and will feature
a burn out pit, tug-o-war and donut eating contest for adults. There
will also be events for children that include a bounce house, wildlife
area and face painting. There will also be live music, as well as food
and prize giveaways. Tickets are $5 in advance each, and $10 each at
the gate on the day of the event. Children under the age of 12 will be
admitted free. The purpose of the two-day event is to help educate
youngsters about the dangers of joining a criminal street gang and to
raise money for the FGIA that will be used to educate kids about the
dangers of joining a gang. For information, tickets or to sign up a team
to compete in one of the adult contests, contact either Detective Ser-
geant Brad Stark or Michele Bell at the Okeechobee County Sheriff's
Office, (863) 763-3117. Tickets can also be purchased at Style Studio,
1600 S.R. 70 E., and Syble's Flowers, 119 S. Parrott Ave.

Civil War re-enactment planned for Dec. 1 & 2
The seventh annual Civil War re-enactment about the raid on Fort
Pierce will be held Dec. 1 & 2 at the Savannas Recreation Area, 1400 E.
Midway Road, in Fort Pierce. On Saturday, camps will be open to the
public from 9 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. and battles will be held throughout
the day with the main battle being staged at 2 p.m. On Sunday, camps
will be open to the public from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., with the main battle
starting at 1 p.m. Other activities include living history demonstrations,
Sutler's Row, Civil War camps, Ladies Tea, blacksmith and more. Ad-
mittance costs are $3 for adults and $1 for children. Kids under the age
of 6 will be admitted free. For information: contact Anita Errico-Smith
at (772) 465-7608, or by e-mail at civilwargal(cs.com; or, Lou Rausch
at (772) 359-6541, or, Greyriderl863(@aol.com. All proceeds from the
event will go to the St. Lucie County Sheriff's Explorer Post #400.

Program to stop smoking offered
The Okeechobee Health Department Tobacco Prevention and Edu-
cation Program offers "Freedom from Smoking" classes every Tues-
day, at the Okeechobee County Public Library, 206 S.W. 16t" St., from
5:30 until 6:30 p.m. A six-week supply of nicotine patches is available.
To register, call (863) 462-5781.

Nicotine anonymous meeting dates slated
NICA (nicotine anonymous) is starting a new club with meetings to
be held at the Just For Today club, 2303 U.S. Hwy 441 S.E., Suite K, on
Monday from 8:30 until 9:30 p.m. For information, call Steve Condit
Sr. at (863) 801-3110.

Addiction consultation offered
Problems with drug or alcohol addiction in someone you know,
but don't know where to turn? The Drug Rehab Resource service can
give you the help you need. Contact the Drug Rehab Resource at (866)
649-1594 for a free confidential consultation. Or, go to the website at
www.drugrehabresource.net.

Cancer support group to meet
The Okeechobee Cancer Support Group will meet the first Thurs-
day of each month. Each meeting will be held from 5:30 until 6:30
p.m. in room 113 at the First Baptist Church, 401 S.W. Fourth St. Can-
cer patients, survivors and supporters are all invited. The group will
share stories and encourage each other as we take this journey. This
support group will provide participants with information, resources,
support, guest speakers and devotional time and will help comfort
during either your battle or you loved one's battle with cancer. For
information, call the First Baptist Church at (863) 763-2171.

American Cancer Society seeks volunteers
The American Cancer Society is recruiting volunteers who are in-
terested in making a difference in the fight against cancer. Volunteers
with the American Cancer Society's Florida Division participate in pro-
grams that support research funding, educate the community, deliver
services to patients and advocate for policies that help defeat cancer.
To get involved, call the American Cancer Society at (800) ACS-2345.


Church has fellowship activities
.'The Fort Drum Community Church will hold a men's tello'.whip
breakfast at Ruck's Pit every other Saturday starting at 6:30 a.m., and
a women's fellowship every other Monday starting at 6:30 a.m. For
information or if you need transportation to and from these activities,
call (863) 467-1733.

Class of '57 members sought
Members of the class of '57 from first grade to graduation or other,
please contact Martin Vickers at (423) 727-5631, Reba Platt at (863)
763-8906 or Faith Hawk at (863) 467-6083.

OHS class of '88 planning reunion
The Okeechobee High School class of 1988 has begun making
plans for their 20th reunion. Any members of the class of '88 are asked
to e-mail your name, address and phone number to Larry Peterson,
class president, at ohsl988reunion@yahoo.com. We will update you
after each planning committee meeting. Also, if you have any ideas or
would like to be on the committee let us know in your e-mail.

Senior Services offering assistance
Okeechobee Senior Services is currently taking applications for the
EHEAEP grant. You must be 60 and over to qualify for assistance with
electric bills and you must have a shut off notice. Call Kim at (863)
462-5180 for the required documentation needed to apply.


Reunion for OHS class of '98 planned
Any and all graduates from the Okeechobee High: School class
of 1998 are asked to please submit your contact information to ohs-
98grads@yahoo.com. Include your maiden name if appropriate, ad-
dress, phone number, etc. We are in the process of planning our 10-
year reunion. More details will be published as they are available.

Narcotics group to meet Tuesdays
Narcotics Anonymous will begin meeting every Tuesday at noon.
Meetings will be held at the Just For Today Club, 2303 U.S. 441 S.E.,
Suite K. For information, call (863) 634-4780.

VFW sponsors Operation Shoebox
Big Lake VFW, Post #10539 is looking for all family members --
sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, fathers or mothers -- of those serv-
ing in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan or the Persian Gulf. The Post is spon-
soring Operation Shoebox and would like to send packages to active
military personnel from Okeechobee. Please call (863) 697-2930, or
e-mail Cheryl@oacenterprises.com.

Martha's House offers workshop
Martha's House will offer a workshop called Deafening Silence,
which deals with providing services to deaf and hard of hearing sur-
vivors of domestic violence. The date and time will be announced at
a later date according to community interest and response. Contact
Shirlean Graham at (863) 763-2893.


2007-08 Everglades Student Council
On Friday, Oct. 5, students at Everglades Elementary School elected their student council. The newly elected student of-
ficials (left to right, front row) are: G. W. Jarriel, president, Alex Pluskot, vice president, Trey Howard, secretary and Julia
Weldon, treasurer. In the back row, (left to right) are: Cheryl Hollin, student council sponsor, Cindy Weigum, principal and
Patty Coyne Character Counts sponsor.


SI Pulc o ice


i - II


-


N�


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT REVISION
The Florida Department ol Environmental Protection (FOEP) gives notice of its intent
to issue ol a permit revision for McArthur Farms Dairy Barns 1 and 2, to be issued
to McArthur Farms, Inc. The permit revision approves the new Comprehensive
Nutrient Management Plan (CNMP), and authorizes a milk herd increase of 400
cows at each of Ihe McArthur Farms Barns 1 and 2 The dairies are located al
18116 N. US Highway 441 (Barn 1) and 20202 N. US Highway 441 (Barn 2),
Okeechobee. Florida 34972.
The intent to issue and application file are available for public inspection during nor-
mal business hours, 8.00 a.m. to 5:00 p m. Monday through Friday, except legao
holidays, at Southeast 400 N Congress Ave, Suite 200. West Palm Beach, FL
33401-2913.
The Department will issue the permit with the attached conditions unless a timely
petition for an administrative hearing is filed under Sections 120.569 and 120 57.
Flonda Statutes, within fourteen days of receipt of notice. The procedures for pe-
titioning for a hearing are set forth below.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's proposed
permitting decision may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing)under
Sections 120.569 and 120 57, Florida Statutes. The petition must contain the in-
formation set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of
General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Sta-
tion 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000.
Under Rule 62-110.106(4), Florida Administrative Code, a person may request en-
largement of the time for filing a petition for an administrative hearing. The re-
quest must h filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel before
the end of th time period for filing a petition for an administrative hearing.
Petitions filed by any persons other than those entitled to written notice under Sec-
tion 120.60(3), Florida Statutes, must be filed within fourteen days ol publication
of the notice or within fourteen days of receipt of the written notice, whichever oc-
curs first. Under Section 120.60(3). Florida Statutes, however, any person who
has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within
fourteen days of receipt of such notice, regardless ol the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicat-
ed above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition or re-
quest for enlargement of time within fourteen days of receipt of notice'shall
constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determina-
tion (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes. Any subse-
quent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will be only at the
discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with
Rule 28-106.205, Florida Administrative Code.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based
must contain the following information:
(a) The name, address, and telephone number of each petiioner; the name, ad-
dress, and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any; the Depart-
ment permit identification number and the county in which the subject matter or
activity is located;
(b) A statement of how and when each petitioner received notice of the Department
action;
(c) A statement of how each petitioner's substantial interests are affected by the
Department action;
(d) A statement of all disputed issues ol material fact. If there are none, the petition
must so indicate:
(e) A statement of facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification
of the Department action;
(f) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, as well as the rules and stat-
utes which entitle the petitioner to relief; and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action
that the petitioner wants the Department to take.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency
action, the tiling of a petition means that the Department's final action may be dif-
ferent from the position taken by it in this notice. Persons whose substantial in-
terests will be affected by any such final decision of the Department have the right
to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the require-
ments set forth above.
In addition to requesting an administrative hearing, any petitioner may elect to pur-
sue mediation. The election may be accomplished by filing with the Department a
mediation agreement with all parties to the proceeding (i.e., the applicant, the De-
partment, and any person who has filed a timely and sufficient petition for a hear-
ing ). The agreement must contain all the information required by Rule
28-106.404 Florida Administrative Code. The agreement must be received by the
clerk in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, within ten days af-
ter the deadline for filing a petition, as set forth above. Choosing mediation will
not adversely affect the right to a hearing if mediation does no result in a settle-
ment.
As provided in Section 120.573, Florida Statutes, the timely agreement of all parties
to mediate will toll the time limitation imposed by Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes, for holding an administrative hearing and issuing a final order.
Unless otherwise agreed by the parties, the mediation must be concluded within
sixty days of the execution of the agreement. If mediation results in settlement of
the administrative dispute, the Department must enter a final order incorporating
the agreement of the parties. Persons seeking to protect their substantial inter-
ests that would be affected by such a modified final decision must file their pef-
tions within fourteen days of receipt of this notice, or they shall be deemed to
have waived their right to a proceeding under Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes. If mediation terminates without settlement of the dispute, the De-
partment shall notify all parties in writing that the administrative hearing processes
under sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, remain available for dispo-
sition of the dispute, and the notice will specify the deadlines that then will apply
for challenging the agency action and electing remedies under those two statues.
242267 ON 10/7/2007


I .


I Golf Cartsk


1polf Carts







Okeechobee News, Sunday, October 7, 2007


SPORTS 13


High school golfers, are big


hitters on and off the course


'By Daniel Shube
The American Junior Golf As-
,sociation (AJGA) has released
'the names of the HP Scholastic
Junior All-Americans. These are
the top 12 brightest and best
high school golfers in the na-
tion.
To be eligible for the HP
'Scholastic Junior All-America
Team, boys must have placed
in the top 10 of an AJGA event,
while girls needed a top-five fin-
ish. The selections were then
based on grade-point average,
class rank, SAT/ACT scores, lead-
ership skills, community service
and writing ability. Candidates
were required to submit an es-
say or poem no longer than 400
words that creatively focused on
the game of golf.
In past seasons, Florida has
been well represented. This
year, our state was shut out.
,However, these outstanding in-
dividuals will be honored here
.in Florida at the Rolex Junior All-
America Awards Banquet Nov.
18 at The Grande Ballroom at
Ginn Reunion Resort in Reunion
(Orlando). By being named to
,this team, each player is also
'eligible to participate in the Polo
,Golf Junior Classic, one of the
'most prestigious events in junior
-golf, taking place Nov. 17-23 at
the Ginn Reunion Resort.
While the GPA?s and SAT
scores that these students post
,are quite impressive, the win-
'ning essay always strikes a
,chord with me. This year's essay
,winner was senior Erik Mayer of
'Appleton, Wis. Appleton East
;High School.

:Who is the best
.putter you know?
'By Erik Mayer
I'll never forget the day I met
Jerry. It was a typical Wiscorsin
winter day. The snow was fall-
ing and I could see my breath
in the air. Despite the weather, I
was thrilled about spending the
day at the Golf Dome. After the
two-hour drive, I was anxious to
hit balls.
I first noticed Jerrywhile I was
warming up. Jerry was working
with a mini-tour player and the
player seemed to be making ev-
ery putt. Later I learned that Jerry
was not only a putting instructor,
he was an author, inventor, and
a respected businessman. After
the lesson ended, Jerry watched
me hit wedges. Eventually he
asked, "Who is the best putter
you know?" Ben Crenshaw, I an-
swered without hesitation. Jerry
asked again, "Who is the best
putter you know?" As I stopped
to look at Jerry, he said, "You
are." So began our relationship.
That Saturday we worked to-
gether for four hours. As I prac-
ticed putting and chipping, we
talked about life. After the les-
son I felt fantastic about myself,
my future and my golf game.
The next week we worked on
my short game and more impor-
tantly, we worked on my mental
game. "On a scale of 1-10, how
would you rate your putting?"
Jerry asked. Seven, I answered.
"If you believe you are a seven,
you'll never be a 10," Jerry said.
Jerry's passion for the game in-
spired me.
Despite the distance, we
worked together throughout the
summer. Sessions always began
with, "Who is the best putter
you know?" Jerry never let me
pay for a lesson. He emphasized
the importance of giving back to
society and to the game of golf.
As we worked on focus, con-
centration and attitude, we dis-
cussed academics, community
service and my golf aspirations.
Last October, Jerry told me
he had cancer. When his grand-
children asked him if he was go-
ing to die, he told them, "No, I'm
going to fight, but if God needs
a putting lesson.." Throughout
his illness, Jerry and I talked on
his good days. We talked can-
didly about everything from my
dreams to his cancer, but some-
how the conversation always
returned to golf. As we talked, I
felt myself growing up.
Jerry died in May. Although


Jerry is gone, his passion lives
on in the junior golfers, like me,
that he influenced. Thanks to
Jerry, I will always be the best
putter I know.
Here's the 2007 HP Scholas-


Fairways and
Highways
by Daniel Shube

tic Junior All-America Team:
Boys
Spencer Anderson, Pacific
Palisades, Calif., Brentwood
School, GPA 4.49/4.0, Rank in
Class: N/A
Wilson Bowen, Winnetka,
Ill., New Trier High School, GPA
5.13/5, Rank in Class: N/A
Benjamin Cohen, Pitts-
burgh, Pa., Shady Side Academy,
GPA 3.9/4.0, Rank in Class: N/A
Alex Frankel, Atlanta,
Ga., The Lovett School, GPA
94.3152/100, Rank in Class: N/A
Mitchell Gray, Florence,
S.C., West Florence High School,
GPA 4.628/4.0, Rank in Class:
10/317
Tommy Higham, Shelley,
Idaho, Shelley High School, GPA
3.99/4.0, Rank in Class: 1/155
Erik Mayer, Appleton, Wis.,
Appleton East High School, GPA
4.0/4.0, Rank in Class: 1/403
Brinson Paolini, Virginia
Beach, Va., Frank W. Cox High
School, GPA 4.0/4.0, Rank in
Class: 18/487
Mark Pollak, San Anto-
nio, Texas, Tom C. Clark High
School, GPA 101.0455/100, Rank
in Class: 3/550
Stephen Scialo, New City,
N.Y., Clarkstown North High
School, GPA 4.2933/4.0, Rank in
Class: 4/390
Adam Wennerstrom, Aus-


tin, Texas, Lake Travis High
School, GPA 99.944/100, Rank in
Class: 17/394
Michael Yiu, Laguna
Hills, Calif., Laguna Hills High
School, GPA 4.7/4.0, Rank in
Class: 2/490
Girls
Ellie Arkin, Reedsburg,
Wis., Reedsburg Area High
School, GPA 4.0/4.0, Rank in
Class: 1/202
Lila Barton, Dallas, Texas,
Highland Park High School, GPA
3.99/4.0, Rank in Class: N/A
Brooke Bettis, St. Charles,
Ill., St. Charles North High
School, GPA5.58/5.0, Rank in
Class: 6/530
Christine Cho, La Cres-
centa, Calif., Crescenta Val-
ley High School, GPA 4.368/4.0,
Rank in Class: 11/719
Katy Nugent, Wichita,
Kan., Andover High School, GPA
4.0/4.0, Rank in Class: 1/168
Hunter Ross, Manakin-Sab-
ot, Va., The Collegiate School,
GPA 3.99/4.0, Rank in Class: N/
A
Kamryn Ruffin, Pryor,
Okla., Pryor High School, GPA
4.0/4.0, Rank in Class: 1/160
Heather Smith, Fort Worth,
Texas, Southwest Christian High
School, GPA 4.75/4.0, Rank in
Class: 1/75
Julia Thead, Poway, Calif.,
Poway High School, GPA 4.1/4.0,
Rank in Class: 3/730
Stephanie Wagstaff, Ashe-
ville, N.C., A.C. Reynolds High
School, GPA 4.9583/4.0, Rank in
Class: 1/325
Lauren Weaver, Scotts-
dale, Ariz., Cactus Shadows
High School, GPA 4.667/4.0,
Rank in Class: 2/396
Allie White, Lancaster, Ohio,
Lancaster High School, GPA
4.619/4.0, Rank in Class: 3/428


news zJpal.cm


Submitted to Okeechobee News

Watchful eye
Jessica Trent, a cheerlead-
er for the Child's World Ga-
tors of the O.C.R.A. Mighty
Mites football league, con-
centrated on the recent
game against the Lunkers
Sports Grill.


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