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Title: Okeechobee news
Uniform Title: Okeechobee News
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Okeechobee News
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee Fla
Publication Date: July 21, 2007
Frequency: daily
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Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
Coordinates: 27.241667 x -80.833056 ( Place of Publication )
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Daily Okeechobee news

Full Text



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Vol. 98 No. 202


Saturday, July 21, 2007


Inside

Farm Bureau home
insurance rate
increase rejected
TALLAHASSEE (AP)--The
state will deny a planned home
insurance rate increase by Flor-
ida Farm Bureau's two property
insurance companies, which
have about 140,000 homeown-
ers policies, the Office for Insur-
ance Regulation said Friday.
Page 6

Jupiter wrestling
team on 4-year
probation
JUPITER (AP)--A state
champion high school wres-
tling team has been placed on
four years of administrative
probation after a Florida High
'School Athletic Association in-
vestigation into allegations of
steroid use and illegal recruit-
ment. Page 10

Briefs

Okeechobee
burn ban is lifted
According to Chief Nick Hop-
kins of the Okeechobee County
Fire Department the burn ban
in Okeechobee County has
been lifted. For information call
(863) 763-5544.

Glades County
burn ban limited
According to the Glades
County Division of Emergency
Management parts of Glades
County are still under a burn
ban. For information, call (863)
946-6020.

New watering
limits in effect
The Okeechobee area is
now under Phase Ill water re-
strictions.
Lawn watering is now lim-
ited to one day a week from 4
until 8 a.m. and 5 until 7 p.m.
for low volume hand watering.
Addresses with odd num-
bers are permitted to water on
Saturday and addresses with
even numbers are permitted to
irrigate on Sundays.
More information is avail-
able by calling (800) 250-4200;
or, by going to the South Flori-
da Water Management website
at www.sfwmd.gov.


Drought Index
Current: 238
Source: Florida Division
of Forestry
Local Burn Ban: None

Lake Levels


9.12 feet
Last Year: 12.22 feet
Source: South
Florida Water
Management
District. Depth
given in feet
above sea level.


Index
Classifieds .......................... 15-17
Comics ... .........................14
Community Events............... 4
Crossword........................... 15
Obituaries...................... 6
O pinion.................................... 4
Speak O ut .................................. 4
Sports.................................. 10
TV ........................................ 16
W eather..................................... 2

See Page 2 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.


Community Links. Individual Voices.




a 16510 00024 5


Bill lowers co


U.S. Senate passes
the College Cost
Reduction Act of '07

By Victoria Hannon
Okeechobee News
Federal lawmakers were hard
at work early Friday morning.
Around 12:30 a.m. a final vote
was called on The College Cost
Reduction Act of 2007, H.R.2669,
in the U.S. Senate. The vote was
a resounding yes for more af-


fordable college educations with
three-fourths voting in favor of
the measure.
While only 18 senators voted
against the bill, the senators from
Florida were divided.
Holding to his belief that the
bill set bad policies, Senator Mel
Martinez (R-'FL) voted against it.
"The way that the bill is writ-
ten, it discourages private lenders
from competing in the student
loan market," stated Ken Lund-
berg, spokesperson for Sen. Mar-
tinez. "It also puts the taxpayers


on the hook for bad debt."
The bill, with the new amend-
ments, does state that after the
debtor has made 120 monthly
payments and worked in a high-
need field for 10 years that "the
secretary shall cancel the obliga-
tion to repay" for the remainder
of any Federal Direct Loans that
they have out -- provided that the
borrower submitted documen-
tation that their annual income
was less than one-tenth of the
balance of principal and interest
due at time of cancellation.


Firecracker Pageant: supports fire rescue volunteers


Submitted pnotos/Bobbl Poole
The 12th annual Okeechobee County Fire Rescue volunteers Firecracker Pageant was
held Saturday, July 14 at the Okeechobee High School auditorium where the (left to
right) Junior Miss Firecracker Morgan Crawford, Miss second alternate Brittany Neth-
ers and Miss Firecracker Cassie Murray participated.
_ --4 i


O.


The younger children also got involved in the 12th annual Firecracker Pageant where
the (left to right) Little Master Firecracker Kiowa Garcia, Petite Miss Firecracker Mariah
Aguirre and the Toddler Miss Firecracker Rylee Giles won their respective age divi-
sions.


e costs


Senator Bill Nelson (D-FL),
conversely, felt that a $17 billion
increase in funds was worth it.
Sen. Nelson was among the 78
senators that voted for the bill.
"Sen. Nelson believes that
it will help young people go to
college," stated Bryan Gulley, a
spokesperson for the senator.
While the bill has passed the
House and Senate it still needs
to be sent to a joint committee
to try and fine tune the amend-
ments added by the Senate be-
fore it is sent again to both hous-


es of Congress for another vote.
After that step it will be sent to
the president.
"Sen. Martinez is a supporter
of the Pell Grant," stated Mr.
Lundberg. "He is hopeful that
something better will come out
of conference."
The amendments that were
added in the Senate include an
increase in the timeline in which
the interest rates of loans will be
lessened. Since the original bill
See Costs - Page 2


Sign rule




passed on




to council


By Chauna Aguilar
Okeechobee News
City planners met on Thurs-
day, July 19, and passed several
land development regulations
(LDR) on to the Okeechobee
City Council with their recom-
mendation.
The City Planning Board/
Board of Adjustments and Ap-
peals considered the complete
rewrite of the sign ordinance.
This ordinance was being re-
written largely in part due to is-
sues that arose with billboards
in the city's central business


district, where they are not al-
lowed.
In response to this misin-
terpretation of the ordinance,
which was deemed a staff mis-
take, a mandatory denial of the
application to erect a billboard
submitted by Centennial Build-
ers of Lee County was issued.
This error and the rescinding
of the permit caused a lawsuit
to be filed due to expenses in-
curred by the developer.
The Okeechobee City Coun-
cil placed a moratorium on the
See City - Page 2


Panel reviews


school vouchers


and class sizes


By Bill Kaczor
Associated Press Writer
TALLAHASSEE (AP) -- Two
hot-button education issues
--class size limits and private
school. vouchers -- were dis-
cussed Friday by the Florida
Taxation and Budget Reform
Commission, which has the
power to put state constitution-
al amendments on the ballot.
One of the panel's com-
mittees heard proposals that
would loosen class size restric-
tions voters approved in 2002


and reverse a 2006 Florida Su-
preme Court ruling that struck
down one of the state's vouch-
er programs.
Similar proposals narrowly
failed in the Legislature last
year after contentious and
sometimes emotional debate.
Lawmakers avoided both is-
sues during this year's regular
session.
Leaders of associations rep-
resenting local school boards
and superintendents asked the
See Schools - Page 2


County welcomes new


assistant director at EM


By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
Okeechobee County Emer-
gency Management '(EM) Di-
rector Gene O'Neill now has a
full-time assistant to help him
bring "order out of chaos," as
states the department's man-
tra.
Michael Faulkner reported
for duty last month as deputy
EM director. He was born and
raised in Washington, D.C., and
has a degree in disaster and cri-
sis management from the Uni-
versity of Central Missouri at
Warrensburg, Mo. Mr. Faulkner
said that this is an area of aca-
demic study that has grown up
in the last 10 years and now
several colleges offer such de-


grees.
Before coming here he
worked with the Red Cross in
Tulsa, Okla., as planning and
preparedness coordinator.
He has never bden through
a hurricane but has been
through several large disasters
in Oklahoma He was involved
with an ice storm there which
covered seven counties, and
caused deaths and damage to
structures. When the ice melt-
ed there was flooding from the
runoff.
However, Mr. Faulkner said
all emergency response op-
erations are basically the same.
The planning and resource
concepts are the same, but the
details are different.
When asked why he came'


to Okeechobee Mr. Faulkner re-
plied that it was the right job in
the right area.
"Everything in this job is
exactly what I want for my ca-
reer," he said.
Also, he has relatives in Polk
and Lake counties.
Mr. O'Neill said there are a
number of areas that can be
developed now since he has
the help. Previously he ran all
EM operations assisted only by
volunteers.
As deputy emergency man-
agement director Mr. Faulkner
will assist in emergency man-
agement projects, acting in the
areas of mitigation, preparation,
response and recovery. He will
See EM - Page 2


Okeechobee news/Pete Gawda
New Emergency Management deputy director Michael Faulkner
will be helping Okeechobee County Emergency Management
Director Gene "O'Neill bring "order out of chaos."


- iV






2 Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


Housing slowdown raises jobless rate EM


TALLAHASSEE (AP) -- The
slowdown in the housing mar-
ket showed up in Florida's June
unemployment figures, state of-
ficials said Friday.
With an increasing number of
construction workers out of jobs,
the unemployment rate increased
to 3.5 percent, up from May's 3.4
percent, the Florida Agency for
Workforce Innovation reported.
"The soft housing market is


Costs
Continued From Page 1
called for the extra money spent
on the increase in Federal Finan-
cial Aid to be offset by the low-
ered amount that the government
was paying in interest of subsi-
dized loans this causes a conflict.
Another amendment was added
to remedy the problem by allo-
cating $5 million in funds to the
Department of Education for the
increase in the national budget.
This bill, if passed, will be the
largest increase in Federal Aid for
college students since the GI bill
was passed in 1944.
The bill is divided up into
several parts that deal with is-
sues ranging from increasing the
amount offered through the Fed-
eral Pell Grant and offering assis-
tance to students studying to be-
come teachers, to strengthening
minority-serving institutions.
The passage of this bill would
raise the amount of money set
aside each year for the Federal
Pell Grant from $840 million in
2008 to $2.5 billion in 2017. This
would increase the amount that
an individual student could re-
ceive in a year by "$200 for each


City
Continued From Page 1
sign ordinance, which is in effect
until September, in order to com-
pletely rewrite the ordinance that
will now be brought before the
council with some additional sug-
gested changes.
The city would like the new
ordinance to be approved prior to
the moratorium expiration in or-
der not to have to extend it.
The Planning Board sent the
sign ordinance on to the council
with directive to include chang-
es detailed by city planner Jim
Laure's memorandum to the
city attorney as follows: murals
should be included in the defini-
tions as they are defined in the
existing ordinance; to include a
'special business sales event' tem-
porary sign allowed other than
with a new business for a limited
period of time; and, to look at the
nonconforming section as ways
to enforce businesses to update
to the current code.
The board also added addi-
tional restrictions to completely
prohibit off-premises signs or


Schools
Continued From Page 1
commission's Governmental Ser-
vices Committee to modify the
existing class size amendment.
They argued it is too rigid and
diverts money into adding more
classrooms, including portables,
that could be better spent on
increasing teacher salaries and
meeting other school needs.
Representatives of the Collins
Center for Public Policy asked the
commission to offer an amend-
ment or recommend legislation
that would give the Legislature un-
restricted authority to pass vouch-
er programs. They let students
attend parochial and other private
schools at public expense.
Collins officials argued private
schools often are innovative and
that vouchers can actually save


certainly having an effect on our
construction employment," said
agency director Monesia Brown.
Construction employment fell
by 18,000 jobs and for the first
time since 1992 has experienced
four consecutive months of de-
clines.
Just last week, state econo-
mists said the slowdown may last
a little longer in Florida and the
slump may be worse than previ-


of the award years 2008-2009 and
2009-2010; $300 for award year
2010-2011; $500 for award year
2011-2012 and each subsequent
award year," as stated in the bill.
There are currently 336,909
Florida students that receive the
Pell Grant to help them attend
college, and approximately 2,500
of the students currently attend-
ing Indian River Community Col-
lege (IRCC) are receiving the Pell
Grant.
The bill would also slowly low-
er the interest rate on subsidized
student loans. While interest rates
now range up to 8 percent, the
lenders would be required to cut
back that rate to 3.40 percent by
the time current eighth graders go
to college in 2012.
In these subsidized loans the
government pays off the interest
of the loan until the student is fin-
ished with their degree and can
start paying off the loan.
People that have already grad-
uated will also benefit from this
legislation which authorizes loan
forgiveness for those graduates
who are currently employed in ar-
eas of national need. These areas
of need include nurses, librarians,
teachers and first responders. The
forgiveness extends to cover up to
$5,000 over five years.


billboards within the city limits,
to add a restricted height limit to
signs in order to beautify and uni-
fy the businesses in the city, and
any other additional ideas that
each individual board member
wishes to forward in writing to
the general services coordinator,
Betty Clement.
The first reading will go before
the City Council on Tuesday, Aug.
7. The final reading will be Tues-
day, Aug. 21.
In other business, the board is
recommending that the council
amend the Lars in regard to the
procedure for the review and ap-
proval of applications for plats.
The proposed procedure will
require the city's technical review
committee (TRC) to still approve
the pre-application, the planning
board to approve the preliminary
application and the City Council to
approve the final application. This
will allow each entity to approve
the platting procedure at the vari-
ous levels instead of requiring the
council to approve both of the fi-
nal steps.
City planners also recom-
mended another amendment to
the Lars that will omit the require-


taxpayers .money.
Committee Chairman Roberto
"Bobby" Martinez, also a member
of the State Board of Education,
said afterward that he strongly
favored lifting restrictions against
vouchers.
"It is prudent public policy to
give the Legislature the legal flex-
ibility to explore these programs,"
Martinez said.
He said he hadn't expected
the class size proposal but would
keep an open mind on it.
Attempts to revive both issues
surprised the Florida Education
Association. The statewide teach-
ers union has strongly supported
the existing class size amendment
and led the legal challenge against
the stricken voucher program.
"I felt like I was in a time
warp," FEA spokesman Mark
Pudlow said.
Pudlow added "the people


ous projections.
"We've begun to see construc-
tion employment begin to finally
drop ... at fairly substantial rates,"
said Frank Williams, a legislative
economic analyst.
And while June's unemploy-
ment numbers confirmed those
concerns, Florida still reported an
increase in new jobs overall for
the 58th consecutive month and
its unemployment rate was a full


An issue that this bill deals
with directly, which has been an
item of concern for Floridians, is
the percentage hike in tuition.
On June 27, Governor Charlie
Crist passed into law a bill that
has approved a 40 percent rise
in tuition cost over the next three
years. The bill that will soon go
before the Senate supports the
creation of competitive grants to
be awarded to those institutions
that have the smallest percent
increase in tuition from one year
to the next. It states that it "shall
award grants on a competitive ba-
sis to institutions of higher educa-
tion that, for academic year 2008-
09 or any succeeding academic
year, have an annual net tuition
increase (expressed as a percent-
age) for the most recent academ-
ic year for which satisfactory data
is available that is equal to or less
than the percentage change in
the higher education price index
for such academic year."
In addition to increasing the
amount of need-based aid for
those schools, they will also be
eligible for bonus grants to fur-
ther increase the amount of aid
that they can give their student's
financially.
The national average for tu-
ition increase according to the


ment for the planning board to
approve specific proposed devel-
opments after the TRC has already
approved them. This amendment
will also remove the duty of au-
thorizing temporary use permits
from the planning board.
The board is also recommend-
ing amending section 70-338,
which would now require a wait-
ing period of one year instead of
60 days after the denial of any
petition for a comprehensive
plan or land development regula-
tions amendment, zoning district
boundary change, appeal of an
administrative' decision,' special'
exception use or variance.
Besides all the LDR changes,
the board is recommending ap-
proval for a change in future land
use from commercial to multi-
family and a special exception
for a .488-acre property located
at 103 N.E. 11th St. submitted by
Muhammad Nordic in order to
place an assisted living facility on
the property.
The board is recommending
denial for the rezoning of prop-
erty located at 314 S.E. Seventh
St. from residential mobile home
(RMH) to residential single fam-


have spoken" on class size and
there was no need to revisit that
issue.
Claims that vouchers save
money are "pie in the sky" and
there's no evidence students do
better because private schools
that are not required to meet the
same testing and accountability
standards as public schools, Pud-
low said.
The Supreme Court ruled a
voucher program that had been
a key part of former Gov. Jeb
Bush's public school accountabil-
ity system violated a constitutional
provision that requires a uniform
system of public schools.
Bush also was a key player in
the class-size dispute. He cam-
paigned against the 2002 citizen
initiative, arguing that reducing
class sizes would be too expen-
sive.
The amendment limits classes


point below the national number
of 4.5 percent.
Gov. Charlie Crist said he was
working to get insurance compa-
nies to drop property rates under
a January law and that Floridians
would be able to vote for a plan to
reduce property taxes next year.
"If we stay on those two eco-
nomic issues, we can fire up the
economy and provide more jobs
for our people," he said.


Florida Board of Governors was
6 percent between the 2005 and
2006 school years. Florida's three
largest universities have recently
received permission to raise tu-
ition up to 15 percent each year
until they reach that 40 percent
increase.
More importantly for some of
Okeechobee's graduates is the
creation of the TEACH grant that,
with the possibility of a bonus
grant, would allow students pur-
suing a career in education to re-
ceive up to $4,500 per year to go
towards their education.
There are currently 139 stu-
dents enrolled at IRCC's Hendry
Dixon Campus in Okeechobee
that are seeking degrees in educa-
tion.
The bill originated in the
House of Representatives, where
it passed on July 11.
"Every Floridian deserves the
opportunity to pursue his or her
dream," stated U.S. Representa-
tive Tim Mahoney (D-16), who
represents the district in which
Okeechobee is located. "The Col-
lege Cost Reduction Act of 2007
would help hundreds of thou-
sands of Florida residents gain ac-
cess to higher education that they
otherwise would not afford."


ily submitted by Vikki Aaron on
behalf of property owner Ronald
Celli to allow for construction of a
site-built home.
This property is within an
RMH district where, if developed
as a single family home, it could
allow future developers to try to
upgrade all of the mobile homes
in the park or subdivision to sin-
gle family residences where there
are sometimes smaller lots than
required for a single family resi-
dence.
However, the board chose to
recommend yet another change
to the Lars that would add a per-
missible use to the RMH district
and allow site-built homes on
lots exceeding 10,000 square feet.
This would permit density issues
that might arise if special excep-
tions were allowed to be granted
to future properties.
These issues will go before
the City Council at their regularly
scheduled meeting on Tuesday,
Aug. 7, in their chambers at City
Hall.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.com.
Reporter Chauna Aguilar may be
reached at caguilar@newszap,com.


to 18 students in kindergarten
through third grade, 22 in fourth
through eighth grade and 25 in
high school beginning with the
2010-11 school year.
In the meantime it is being
phased in. The limits currently
must be met on a school average
basis. Local school officials are
seeking an amendment to make
that the ultimate standard or re-
vert back to a districtwide aver-
age.
Bill Montford, chief executive
officer of the Florida Association
of District School Superinten-
dents, told the -committee the
existing amendment would force
schools to create a new class if
the limit is exceeded by just one
student.
"The real difficulty is when the
principal shows up at that class
and has to remove some chil-
dren," Montford said.


Firecracker Pageant winners


Submitted photos/Bobbi Poole
Local children participated in the 12th annual Firecracker
Pageant on Saturday, July 14, at the Okeechobee High
School auditorium where (left to right) Little Miss Fire-
cracker Alyssa Gonzalez, Baby Master Firecracker Quade
Urbina and Baby Miss Firecracker Peyton Hodges won their
respective categories.


The Okeechobee High School auditorium hosted the Fire-
cracker Pageant where (left to right) Toddler Master Fire-
cracker Jayton Howard, Master Firecracker Clayton Arnold
and Overall Little Miss Firecracker Isabella Cruz took home
trophies taller than themselves.


Continued From Page
be speaking to various groups,
putting out literature on disaster
preparedness and recovery and
reviewing disaster plans.
Another area of responsibility
for Mr. Faulkner will be working
with businesses to help them
prepare for and recover from
hurricanes. One of his goals will
be to help businesses get back
in operation as soon as possible
after a hurricane.
He will also be in charge of
training and exercises. In the
coming days he will also be re-
ceiving more training.
Mr. Faulkner said he is on a
learning curve right now.
"The more I learn, the more
I can pass on to other folks," he
said.
To better respond to emer-
gencies, Mr. Faulkner plans to
become certified in ham radio.
He is looking forward to
moving into the new emergency
operations center which will,
hopefully, be operational within


the next two years. Mr. Faulknar
said the new facility will provide
more flexibility to respond to
emergencies.
During hurricanes the emer-
gency operations center is op-
erational 24 hours a day and
manned by a staff of volunteers,
However, Mr. O'Neill cannot be
on duty 24 hours a day. Now, he
will have a relief. During emer-
gencies they will each work 12
hour shifts, ensuring profession-
al management at all times.
Mr. Faulkner hopes for a 30-
year career of peace and quiet
but he admitted that that is not
going to happen.
He has a wife, no children
and pack of dogs and a cat.
The Faulkners love it here in
Okeechobee.
"It's exactly what we'want-
ed," he said. "It's incredibly
friendly."
He and his wife found the
people to be very welcoming.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.
com. Reporter Pete Gawda may be
reached at pgawda@newszap.com.


Today's Weather


Okeechobee Forecast
Saturday: Considerable cloudiness through late morning, then
scattered afternoon showers and thunderstorms. The high will be
around 90. The wind will be from the west around 5 mph, then
shifting to the east at 5 to 10 mph in the afternoon, The chance of
rain is 50 percent.
.. Saturday night: Considerable cloudiness, with scattered show-
ers and thunderstorms through midnight. The low will be in the
lower 70s. The wind will be from the'southeast around 5 mph, then
shifting to the southwest after midnight. The chance of rain is 30,
percent.
Extended Forecast
Sunday: Considerable cloudiness, with scattered showers
through late morning. Then, numerous afternoon showers and
thunderstorms. The high will'be in the lower 90s. The wind will be
from the south around 5 mph, then shifting to the southeast at 5 to'
10 mph in the afternoon. The chance of rain is 60 percent.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy, with scattered evening shower,
and thunderstorms. The low will be in the lower 70s. The chance oa
rain is 40 percent.
Monday: Partly cloudy, with scattered showers and thunder2
storms. The high will be in the lower 90s. The chance of rain is 406
percent.
Monday night: Partly cloudy, with a chance of evening shower-s
and thunderstorms. The low will be in the lower 70s. The chance of,
rain is 30 percent.
Tuesday: Partly cloudy, with scattered showers and thunder-'
storms. The high will be around 90. The chance of rain is 50 per?
cent. *
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy, with a chance of evening shower|
and thunderstorms. The low will be in the lower 70s. The chance o6
rain is 30 percent. ,
Wednesday: Partly cloudy, with scattered showers and thurn
derstorms. The high will be around 90. The chance of rain is 40'
percent.


Lotteries

MIAMI (AP) -- Here are the winning numbers selected Thursday
in the Florida Lottery:
Cash 3, 1-3-3; Play 4, 3-9-8-5; Fantasy 5, 35-5-9-23-25.


Okeechobee News
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Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007 3


PETA tells NFL to 'Sack Vick'


By Dave Goldberg
AP Football Writer
NEW YORK (AP)-- While
commissioner Roger Goodell
was meeting with officials of the
ASPCA, about 50 people urged
the NFL to "Sack Vick" Friday
in a demonstration outside the
league's headquarters follow-
ing the indictment of Michael
Vick on dogfighting charges.
_' "Sack Vick!" chanted the
demonstrators, organized by
People for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals as they walked
peacefully in front of the Park
Avenue building. Many held
dogs who had the "Sack Vick"
signs on their backs and one
woman brought a pit bull, the
breed killed in the dogfighting
operation the Atlanta quarter-
back is accused of sponsoring.
The leaders of the demon-
stration focused on Goodell's
cne-year suspension of Tennes-
see's Adam "Pacman" Jones un-
d'er the NFL's personal conduct
policy, although Jones has not
been convicted of any crime.
"We think they should do
the same with Michael Vick,"
said Dan Shannon, an assistant
director of campaigns for PETA.
I'We don't think their 'wait and
tee' attitude goes far enough. If
they suspended Pacman Jones,
they can suspend Vick."
: The NFL said after Vick was
indicted Tuesday, it was watch-
Ing legal developments in the
case. Vick is scheduled to be
arraigned Thursday in federal
court in Richmond, Va.
' "Michael Vick's guilt has not
yet been proven, and we believe
that all concerned should allow
fhe legal process to determine
the facts," the league's state-


AP photo/Bebeto Matthews
PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) protesters carry signs and shout slogans
calling for the suspension of Atlanta Falcons football player Michael Vick, outside the NFL's
headquarters in New York, Friday, July 20. Vick was indicted by a federal grand jury on Tues-
day for his alleged involvement with dogfighting.


ment said. "The matter will be
reviewed under the League's
Personal Conduct Policy.
Sherry Ramsey, a staff at-
torney for the Humane Society
of the United States, said he
was disappointed at the league
"wait and see attitude.
"There is a precedent in the
Jones suspension," she said.
Ramsey said her organiza-
tion wrote to the NFL in May,
offering to work with the league
help educate players about
dogfighting. She said it did not
receive a reply.
However, two letters written
June 21 by the NFL to the Hu-
mane Society, provided to The


Associated Press by the league,
said warnings on animal fight-
ing and animal cruelty now are
being included in the annual
briefings by the league security
staff to players. Those briefings
will take place at all 32 training
camps this summer.
"We are in total agreement
that there is no place for ani-
mal cruelty and illegal animal
fighting and take very seriously
the allegations of dog fighting
against Michael Vick," Peter
Abitante, Goodell's personal
assistant, wrote nearly a month
before Tuesday's indictments.
"We certainly do not con-
done this activity and will not


tolerate cruelty or mistreatment
of animals. If Mr. Vick or any-
one associated with the NFL is
found to have violated state or
federal law, the commissioner
has stated publicly that he will
impose significant discipline
under our personal conduct
policy."
Earlier this year, the NFL be-
gan working with the American
Society for the Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals on programs
and public service announce-
ments to educate players and
the public on the importance of
caring properly for animals.


Florida man given death sentence for 1986 murders


: ASH FLAT, Ark. (AP) --A Florida
man convicted of capital murder in
the New Year's Eve 1986 slaying
of an Arkansas couple has been
sentenced to die by injection.
Jurors took about an hour
Thursday to decide on the death
penalty for Steven Wertz, 56, of
Kissimmee, on Wednesday, they
had deliberated about 40 minutes
before returning verdicts of guilty
on both counts of murder he
faced.
: 7The" only' penalty for capital
murder aside from execution is
life in prison without parole, under


Arkansas law.
After the sentence was pro-
nounced Thursday, Wertz an-
nounced to the courtroom: "I did
not do this."
Wertz was accused in the 1986
shooting deaths of Terry and Kathy
Watts, who were found dead at
their home. Co-defendant James
Snyder Jr., 39, of Georgetown, Ky.,,
who faces two counts of being an
accomplice to capital murder, is to
be tried later.
' Police say the couple were
killed in front of their infant son
as the result of a custody dispute


involving the 5-year-old daughter
of Terry Watts. At the time of the
Watts' slaying, Wertz was mar-
ried to the girl's mother, and they
were living at Cushing, Okla.
On Dec. 18,1986, an Oklahoma
judge gave custody of the daugh-
ter to Terry Watts, but allowed the
child to remain with her mother
for visitation through the holidays.
She was to be returned to her fa-
ther Jan. 2.
Investigators said the killer
used a shotgun and shot through
the Watts' front window, wound-
ing Terry Watts in the chest. Terry


Watts' throat also was slashed.
Kathy Watts was found dead in
her bedroom; she was shot once
in the head and once in the chest.
The couple's 1-year-old son,
Joshua, was found unharmed near
his father's, body. After the killings,
he was raised by his grandmother.
Circuit Judge Harold Erwin set
an execution date of Sept. 4. He
said he knew that the execution
would be postponedwhile Wertz
appeals, but said he was required
by law to set an execution date.


Baby found in trash bin

in apartment complex


JACKSONVILLE (AP) -- Po-
lice were searching Friday for
the mother of a newborn baby
who was found in a trash bin
at an apartment complex.
"We don't know who
she is," said Ken Jefferson, a
spokesman for the Jackson-
ville Sheriff's Office.
The infant girl was being
treated for dehydration at Bap-
tist Medical Center and was ex-
pected to recover, police said.
Authorities said the baby was
only hours old and was still had
her umbilical cord attached.
Julia Carrion said she was
taking out trash at about 5 p.m.
Thursday when she heard cry-


ing and saw movement in the
trash bin.
"I couldn't believe it was a
baby in there," she told WJXT-
TV.
She called for help from
neighbors and then called 911.
Neighbor Raschell Mc-
Dowell grabbed the baby and
wrapped it in a shirt.
Sheriff's investigators were
questioning residents at the
Beachwood Apartment com-
plex to try to locate the moth-
er.
Florida has a safe haven law
that allows parents to leave un-
wanted newborns at any hos-
pital or fire station.


By Shannon McCaffrey
Associated Press Writer
ATLANTA (AP)-- Genarlow
Wilson's fate now rests with the
seven justices of Georgia's top
court.
The Georgia Supreme Court
heard arguments Friday on
whether the young man serv-
ing a 10-year prison term for
consensual oral sex with a fel-
low teenager should be freed.
The courtroom was packed with
dozens of Wilson supporters
and television news cameras.
A decision could come in
weeks.
Wilson's lengthy sentence
has drawn the national spotlight
and spurred angry protests. The
attention prompted Georgia leg-
islators in 2006 to change the
state sentencing law that placed
Wilson behind bars for a de-
cade.
On Friday, his lawyer B.J. Ber-
nstein, urged the justices to up-
hold a Monroe County judge's
ruling that called Wilson's sen-
tence "a grave miscarriage of jus-
tice" and ordered him released.
She said the sentence violates
the constitutional ban on cruel
and unusual punishment.
"Every day that a defendant
spends in jail is a precious day in
their life," Bernstein said.
A lawyer with the state coun-
tered that the judge overstepped
h-r. bJouridi.'" h h'he effeciikeli
re-sentenced Wilson in June.
Senior Assistant Attorney Gen-


eral Paula Smith told the justices
that if the ruling stands it could
be used as ammunition by some
1,300 child molesters looking for
a ticket out of prison.
"We urge you to look beyond
the confines of this case," Smith
said.
The justices seemed to be
wrestling with how to provide
Wilson relief without undermin-
ing the law.
"We have a responsibility to
enforce the law," Justice Robert
Benham said. "Should we do
that the expense of fairness?"
As Smith urged the justices to
remember Wilson's 15-year-old
victim she was interrupted by
Chief Justice Leah Ward Sears.
"But today it's a misdemean-
or," Sears said of the crime.
The 1995 law Wilson violated
was changed in 2006 to make
oral sex between teens close in
age a misdemeanor, similar to
the law regarding teen sexual
intercourse. But the Supreme
Court later upheld a lower
court's ruling which said that the
2006 law could not be applied
retroactively.
Wilson was convicted of ag-
gravated child molestation fol-
lowing a 2003 New Year's Eve
party at a Douglas County hotel
room where he was videotaped
having oral sex with a 15-year-
old girl. Wilson was 17 at the
time. He was also charged with
raping another 17-year-old 'girl
at the party but a jury acquitted
him.


Your news





is our news.


Okeechob:=ec Okm 01
Co'J~aSecond rnYu


p

i


Okeechohee News
- Aiir~lI~dliy pact K


%ATW..To am (.aLn, Il iCa


Some newspapers seem to take pleasure in the bad news. Not us.


We do print "bad" news. (It IS newsworthy when things go
wrong, and citizens need to know about problems.)


Still, we give most of our attention to good news - the kind you
clip and tape to your refrigerator door. (This isn't difficult. The
vast majority of what happens in our community IS good.)


How are we doing?


Let us know by mailing feedback@newszap.com or calling your
editor.





Okeechobee News


Community Service Through Journalism


Georgia Supreme Court

hears appeal of teen sex case








4 OPINION Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


Speak Out
Have an opinion or a question about a public issue? Post
it anytime at the Okeechobee issues forum at http://www.
newszapforums.com/forum58. It is a hometown forum so
visit the page as often as you would like and share your com-
ments (but no personal attacks or profanities, please). You
can also make a comment by calling our Speak Out 24-hour
opinion line at (863) 467-2033, fax (863) 763-5901 or sending
e-mail to okeenews@newszap.com. You can also mail sub-
missions to Okeechobee News, P.O. Box 639, Okeechobee,
Fla. 34973. Comments will be published in the newspaper as
space permits.
WELLS: I'll begin by saying that while some of the information
in the article given by Frank DeCarlo, of American Water Systems is
partially accurate, some of it is partially inaccurate. The affects of this
drought and other droughts in the past are not as immediately seen in
the ground water sources, although there are effects that can be seen
none the less. In many wells around our county there have been signifi-
cant drops in the static water table. This can be tested by measuring the
distance from the surface of the ground down to the top of the water
in the well. While we have only in rare cases seen drops in the water
table equalling that of the drops in the lake, there have been consistent
and substantial drops in wells drilled into the surficial and intermedi-
ate aquifers. Many local residents have found it necessary to have a
new well constructed as a result of these changes. Aquifers are not all
primarily made up of limestone rock, in fact in our area the aquifers
most wells are drilled into are primarily comprised of shell, medium
and large sand. These water-bearing formations are also in some cases
lined by semi-poreous native clays. These clays partly serve as a protec-
tive layer between surface and subsurface water sources, while the two
sources are still connected, and feed off one another. Water is a forever
cyclical part of our everyday life. Highschool environmental sciences/
ecology/physics teaches that matter is neither created nor destroyed, it
simply changes forms. Water in one form or another is always present,
harvesting it in a useful manner may become more of a challenge caus-
ing us to be more creative and innovative in our practices. We do have
a need for conserving the quantities of water we have readily available
to us. We should also give very special attention to the issue of pollution
of our water sources. There are several ways we can do this. We can
be conscious of the compounds we allow to enter any body of water
as many of these compounds have an adverse affect on the usefulness
of our water sources. We can avoid making changes in the natural pro-
cesses occurring that help eliminate the contaminates that are picked
up from the surface. Water well contractors can take seriously the af-
fect they have on water sources and construct wells in conformity with
codes that are designed to protect the aquifers from intermingling or
mixing together. Protective barriers are naturally occurring and serve a
very important purpose. We should take special caution when choos-
ing to straighten a river, drain a lake and, for you well drillers, choosing
not to grout a well. The effects of these choices sometimes have dev-
astating affects on the surface and subsurface water sources we have
become greatly reliant upon.

CREDIT: In regard to the Speak Out on Thursday about credit checks
for job applicants I agree, because I am living it. My nephew who is a
hard worker with a management, customer service background for the
last 20 years cannot find a job in this town. I think he has put applica-
tions in every store here. Do those who do the hiring not realize that
being out of work constitutes no money coming in, which means bills
are sometimes late? What does not-so-good credit have to do with the
quality of work a person can do? Does having good credit mean you
are a more upstanding citizen or a more reliable employee then the
person who may have been late a few times on a charge card? Lastly,
I have noted that these places have an ad in the paper; I suppose they
hired someone unreliable because a few weeks later the same ad is in
the paper. They must have hired the person with the great credit rating.
Open up your eyes Okeechobee you are missing out on the reliable,
caring and hard working employees you should be hiring.

+ HARRY POTTER: We have war, gangs, people hurting people all
across America, young people cannot get housing these days, job mar-
kets are closed, the rich are making more money and the poor are get-
ting poorer. I would like to say this, how can they put anything on prime
time news about Harry Potter? Who cares about Harry Potter? It's a
disgrace. We have a lot more to worry about than this stupid stuff.

OFFENDERS: I was at the Fire Cracker pageant at the high school
Friday night. And low and behold sitting right down front with the DJ
was a convicted sex offender. I thought the sheriff's office was sup-
posed to keep those guys away from our kids, but I guess they want to
leave it up to us. I urge parents to keep your kids away from them and
keep them safe.
Editor's Note: This is a complicated situation but to put it very sim-
ply, not all sex offenders have conditions in their probation that pro-
hibits them from attending different functions. The best thing is for
you to contact either Michele Bell or Connie Curry at the Okeechobee
County Sheriff's Office with your questions. They can be reached by
calling (863) 763-3117.

CREDIT CHECK: This is in regard to the job application -- I totally
agree there shouldn't be a credit check as means to determine whether
or not you get the job. If we gave more people a chance on what there
job experience is other than what their credit score is, we would have
a lot less people collecting food stamps and going to the state for help.
They wouldn't need the state's help if they were given the opportunity
to go to work. Wake up employers, give the people who actually want
to work, a job. And, help them become better citizens.

ANIMAL ABUSE: This is about the fighting dogs and pit bulls and
so on: the people that get convicted for fighting dogs can get up to six
years in jail. Well, what about the people that hurt animals and don't
get in trouble for animal abuse. I think that they should start out at six
years as a minimum.



Okeechobee News

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� Okeechobee News 2007
For More Information See
At Your Service On Page 2


Letters to the Editor


Too much sorrow
As I drive around today I feel
so much sadness here. Today is
the day of two funerals for chil-
dren in our community.
Please let us be in prayer for
their families as their loss is more
than we can comprehend, unless
we walk in their shoes.
Okeechobee as a family, all
suffers the loss over all this sad-
ness and death. It affects each of
us , and we can only try to con-
sole the families.
I was in the ninth grade when
three friends of mine were killed
on 1-95 on a Saturday night. To
this day I can hear the mothers
sobbing. No one can console
that.
We, as a town, who loves our


children dearly can pray, support,
give and listen. Each of us can do
something.
May we all be in thanks if your
child is healthy, happy, being ed-
ucated, enjoys sports, has a new
job, etc. Bless their smiles of hap-
piness.
Thank God your child has his/
her feet under your dinner table.
Thank God they play the stereo
too loud or laugh out loud.
Three families, right here with
us, are not enjoying their children
right now. Have mercy on them.
Our hearts are with you, even if
they don't know who we are.
May God bless each of you in
this very sad time. God is with
you.

Bobbi Poole


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Upcoming Events

Saturday
A.A. meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at Grace Christian, 701 S. Par-
rott Ave. It will be a closed discussion.
Okeechobee Christian Cycles will meet every Saturday
at 7:30 a.m. at the Clock Restaurant, 1111 S. Parrott Ave. A ride
will follow a short business meeting. Anyone is welcome to ride
twice before joining. For information, contact: Roland Spencer at
(863) 697-2247; Debbie Izzo at (863) 634-6257; or, Holly Stewart
at (863) 610-1251.
Narcotics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. for an open discus-
sion at the Just For Today Club of Okeechobee, 2303 Parrott Ave.,
The Lake Shops Suite K. For information call (863) 634-4780.

Sunday
A.A. meets from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the Church of Our Sav-
iour, 200 N.W. Third St. It will-be an open step meeting.
A.A. open 12 step meeting from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the
Church of Our Savior, 200 N.W. Third St.

Monday
A.A. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. This will be an open
meeting.
Foster Parent Orientation will be hosted by the Hibiscus
Children's Center on the last Monday of every month from 6 until
7 p.m. The orientation is for those interested in fostering or adopt-
ing in Okeechobee County. This meeting requires no RSVP and
is a question/answer forum. It will be at the IRCC Okeechobee
Campus, 2229 N.W. Ninth Ave. For information, call the Foster
Care Program at 1-(800) 403-9311.
Narcotics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. for open discussion
at Buckhead Ridge Christian Church, 3 Linda Road. For informa-
tion call (863) 634-4780.
Okeechobee Senior Singers meet at 9:30 a.m. at the
Okeechobee Presbyterian Church, 312 North Parrott Ave. Every-
one who enjoys singing is invited. For information or to sched-
ule an appearance for your organization or group, contact Marge
Skinner at (863) 532-0449.
Nar-anon Helps the family of the drug user attain serenity
and a more normal home life, regardless of whether or not he
or she has stopped using. We meet every Friday at 8 p.m. at the
Buckhead Ridge Christian Church, 3 Linda Road For information,
call (863) 467-9833.

Tuesday
Rotary Club of Okeechobee meets each Tuesday at noon
at Golden Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. The meetings are
open to the public. For information, contact Chad Rucks at (863)
763-8999.
Alanon meeting will be held at the Church of Our Savior, 200
N.W. Third St., at 8 p.m.
A.A. Closed discussion meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the
Church of Our Savior, 200 N.W. Third St.
Grief and Loss Support Group meets every Tuesday at
10 a.m. at the Hospice Building located at 411 S.E. Fourth St.
in Okeechobee. Everyone is welcome. For information, contact
Enid Boutrin at (863) 467-2321.
Family History Center meets from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 310 S.W. Sixth St. Any-.
one interested in finding who your ancestors are is welcome to
attend. There is Census, IGI (International Genealogical Index),
Social Security Death Index and military information available.
For information, call Robert Massey at (863) 763-6510.
Widows and Widowers support group meets at 8:30 a.m.
at the Clock Restaurant, 1111 S. Parrott Ave., for breakfast. For
information, call (863) 357-0297.
Gospel Sing every Tuesday beginning at 7 p.m. The public is
invited to participate with vocal and/or instrumental music. For
information, contact Douglas Chiropractic Center at (863) 763-
4320.
The Gathering Church Overcomers Group meets at 7:30
p.m. in the fellowship hall, 1735 S.W. 24th Ave. This is a men's
only meeting. For information, call Earl at (863) 763-0139.
Bible study at the Living Word of Faith Church, 1902 S. Par-
rott Ave., at 7 p.m. Informal and informative discussions bring
many Bible truths to life. Everyone is invited.
Community Country Gospel will meet at 7 p.m. at the
church next to Douglas Clinic on North Park St. Any individual or
group that enjoys old time gospel music is invited to participate.
For information, contact Dr. Edward Douglas at (863) 763-4320.
A.A. meeting'will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First
United Methodist Church, 200 N.W. Second St. This will be an
open meeting.
Wednesday
Martha's House support groups meet each Wednesday.
Spanish groups meet from 7 until 8 p.m. at the Okeechobee Chris-
tian Church, 3055 S.E. 18th Terrace. Ana Romero is the group fa-
cilitator. Another group meets in the Okeechobee County Health
Department, 1798 N.W. Ninth Ave., from 5 until 6 p.m. with Irene
Luck as the group facilitator. There is another meeting from 6 un-
til 7 p.m. with Shirlean Graham as the facilitator. For information,
call (863) 763-2893.}
A.A. meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at Sacred Heart Catholic
Church, 701 S.W Sixth St. It will be a closed discussion.
N.A. meeting at 8 p.m. at the Just For Today Club of Okeechobee,
2303 Parrott Ave., The Lakes Shops Suite K. For information call
(863) 634-4780.

Thursday
Tantie Quilters meets every Thursday from 9 a.m. until 2
p.m. at the Historical Society Museum on U.S. 98 N. For infor-
mation call Margaret at (863) 467-8020, or Belinda at (863) 357-
0166.


From the photo archives
While cleaning out the old photography darkroom at the
Okeechobee News office, staffers came across a num-
ber of old photos. Some of these photos were taken by
staffers; others were apparently brought in by community
members. No information is available with the photos, but
readers can share any information they might have. Some
of these have been posted at http://photos.newszap.com/
pages/gallery.php?gallery=310113. Or go online to www.
newszap.com, click on "Okeechobee," click on "Florida
photos," and then click on "Okee News Archives." To com-
ment on a photo, open the photo and post your comments
below.



Community Events

Benefit to help needy and homeless
Style Studio custom motorcycle shop and Tattoos with Style will
present a benefit to help Okeechobee's needy and homeless on
Saturday, July 21. There will be a hog roast, 50/50, door prizes and'
DJ California Fats. All proceeds will go to Big Lake Missions Out-
reach. For information, call (863) 357-5944.

Orchid group meeting slated
The Okeechobee Orchid Group will meet Monday, July 23, at
7 p.m. at the Okeechobee County Extension Office, 458 U.S. 98 N.
The meeting is open to all who are interested in, or curious about,
orchids. Wendy Watts will demonstrate construction of a PVC-pipe
garden trellis at the Okeechobee County Garden Club Meeting on
Monday, July 23, at 6 p.m. at the County Extension Office. New
members and interested gardeners are invited. For information,
contact Angela Sachson at (863) 763-6469.

Believers Church plans Bible school
Believers Fellowship Church, 300 S.W. Sixth Ave., will host a va-
cation Bible school for children 5 years through the sixth grade July
23-27 from 6 until 8:30 p.m. Registration will begin at 5:30 p.m. on
Monday, July 23. This year, participants will experience a jungle ad-
venture through the rain forest of South America. For information,
call (863) 763-6848, (863) 763-2938 or (863) 634-4327.

Collaborative Council meeting set for July 24
The Community Collaborative Council, a part of the Shared Ser-
vice Network, will meet Tuesday, July 24, at 10 a.m. in the board
room of the Okeechobee School Board Office, 700 S.W Second
Ave. Immediately following the CCC meeting, there will be a brief
planning meeting for those interested in partnering in a local Health
and Safety Fair.

Red Cross offers first aid course
The American Red Cross will offer a basic first aid class on Thurs-
day, July 26, beginning at 6 p.m. The class will take place at the"
American Red Cross office located at 323 N. Parrott Ave. The cost
of the class is $30. For information, contact Debbie or Julie at (863)
763-2488.

Fort Drum church plans Bible school
Fort Drum Community Church will host a vacation Bible school'
July 30-Aug. 3 from 6 until 8 p.m. Registration will be on July 28
from 3 until 5 p.m. Come for the fiesta and fun and bring your
swimsuits for some water fun. Snacks will also be available. There
will be an awards presentations on Aug. 5. For information, to reg-
ister by phone or if you need transportation, call the church at (863)
467-1733 or Judy at (863) 357-1581.

VFW men's group host dinner on July 28
The Mens Auxiliary at VFW Post #10539 will host a dinner on'
Saturday, July 28, at 5 p.m. that will include open-faced roast beef,,.
mashed potatoes, steamed vegetables and dessert. Tickets are'
available in advance for a $7.50 donation per ticket. Members and.'
guests are welcome. For information, call the VFW at (863) 763-
2308.

VFW hosting karaoke league
VFW Post #4423 will host a summer karaoke league on July 28,
Aug. 11, Aug. 25, Sept. 8 and Sept. 22 from 7:30 until 9:30 p.m. The
league is open to the public. Everyone is eligible to enter including
karaoke hosts and members of bands. For information call David
Lee at (863) 697-9002, or Bill at (863) 763-0828.

Cattle drive and ranch rodeo slated
Okeechobee Cattleman's Association and Okeechobee Main,
Street will celebrate the National Day of the American Cowboy'
on Saturday, July 28. Festivities begin at 10 a.m. with a cattle drive'
west of historic Flagler Park that will travel east on S.R. 70 to the
Okeechobee County Agri-Civic Center. There is no admission to this
family event. Activities at the Agri-Civic Center include cowboy po-
etry, music, cowboy art, vintage wagons, barbecue and more. The
ranch hand rodeo will begin at 2 p.m. For information, call program
manager Karen Hanawalt at (863) 357-MAIN (6246).

Ranch hosting July 28 barn dance
Saturday, July 28, MI-CIN Ranch, 1000 N.E. 50"t Drive, will host'
a barn dance from 7 until 11 p.m., following the Cattle Drive and
festivities at the Agri-Civic Center. There will be a cow horse exhi-
bition, and a roping exhibition by D.R. Daniels. The event will be
catered by Dominique's Bar and Grill. There will be a cake walk
and much more. Tickets are $10 per person, and all proceeds will
go to Hospice of Okeechobee. For information call Mike at (561)
635-1267, or Cindy at (561) 236-8990.


� I


Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


OPINION









Reflections from the Pulpit


Reverend Jim Dawson
Assistant Pastor,
First United Methodist Church
Living in Okeechobee, Florida
,and ministering to the youth of
our town for the past eight plus
years has led me to some conclu-
sions about the state of our youth.
I would like to share with you an
observation about our Christian
youth that I have noticed over
these years.
' The Bible, which is in my opin-
ion the only true source of raising
children that is credible, says in
Proverbs 22:6, "Train up a child
in the way he should go, and
yvhen he is old he will not depart
from it." This seems to address
the number one problem of why
children seem to be acting out in
a variety of inappropriate ways.
The United States of America
is becoming one of the few soci-
eties in the world that finds itself
incapable of passing on its moral
teachings to young people. Chil-
dren are not being trained from
birth in the way they should go
and the result of it is a sharp de-
cline in morality and the ability
to distinguish between right and

Religion News


Lutheran Church-
Missouri Synod
re-elects president
' ST. LOUIS (AP) -- The head
of the Lutheran Church-Missouri
Synod, Gerald Kieschnick, will
serve a third term as president of
the 2.5-million member church.
' Kieschnick was re-elected at
the church's convention in Hous-
ton. He received 644 votes, or 52
percent of the delegates' vote.
The Rev. John Wohlrabe Jr. of
Virginia Beach, Va., came in sec-
ond with 42 percent of the vote.
Half of the church's voting
delegates are ordained pastors
and the other half are lay church
members, church spokeswoman
Vicki Biggs said.
Kieschnick, 64, has been
president of the St. Louis-based
church since 2001. The Houston
native is a graduate of Concordia
Theological Seminary, which was
once located in Springfield, Ill.,
and is now in Fort Wayne, Ind.
Kieschnick previously served
10 years as president of the Lu-
theran Church-Missouri Synod's
Texas District and worked with
the Lutheran Foundation of Tex-
as.
He has served as pastor of
three congregations, one in Mis-
sissippi and two in Texas. He and
his wife, Terry, have two grown
children.
The Lutheran Church-Mis-
souri Synod was founded in
1847 and claims more than 6,000
congregations, ownership of
radio stations, two seminaries,
10 colleges and universities and
the largest Protestant parochial
school system in America.

Muslim women told to
remove head scarves
for license photo
CINCINNATI (AP) -- Two Mus-
lim women had the right to con-
tinue wearing their head scarves
when sitting for a driver's license
photo, the Ohio Bureau of Motor
Vehicles said.
Clerks at separate bureau of-
fices in southwest Ohio were
wrong to insist that the women


wrong.
I believe that one of the prime
reasons this generation is setting
new records for dishonesty, dis-
respect, sexual promiscuity, al-
cohol and drug abuse, violence,
suicides, and other pathologies,
is because they have lost their
moral underpinnings; their foun-
dational belief in morality and
truth have been eroded. They
don't seem to know right from
wrong. Our children are being
raised in a society that has largely
rejected the notions of truth and
what is right. Truth has become
a matter of taste; morality has
been replaced by individual pref-
erence.
Our youth are confused about
truth. Many of our young people
are struggling with the concept of
truth and how to apply it to their
own life and experience. Our kids
are confused about what truth
is and who defines it; they are
uncertain about what truths are
absolute and what makes them
absolute. Many of our youth sim-
ply do not understand or accept
absolute truth - and that is, "that
which is true for all people, for all
places and for all times."


remove the scarves, also known
as hijabs, which are expressions
of faith and modesty, said Tom
Hunter, spokesman for the De-
partment of Public Safety, which
oversees the motor vehicles bu-
reau.
The women's photos were
shot again for free.
"It was just a misunderstand-
ing on the part of BMV employees
as to what the policy was," Hunt-
er said. "We want to be respectful
to all people and all cultures."
No one was disciplined, Hunt-
er said, but an e-mail was sent to
the state's 216 registrar offices in
May reminding employees that
head coverings, such as hijabs,
are allowed.
People sitting for driver's li-
cense photographs can't wear
head coverings, according to
Ohio policy. But there are excep-
tions for wigs or hairpieces that a
person customarily wears, along
with headwear for religious rea-
sons and medical treatments.
However, nothing can cover a
person's face.
"I wear it for religious beliefs,"
said Mariam Bashir, 33, of Ma-
son, Ohio, who said she was one
of the women asked to remove
her head scarf when she went to
renew her driver's license at the
BMV office in Loveland.


If our children are going to
learn how to determine right
from wrong, they must know
what truths are absolute and
why. They need to know what
standards of behavior are right
for all people, for all places,
and for all times. They need to
know who determines what is
truth and why. When our youth
are equipped with the proper
"truth view," they are better
able to identify what truths are
absolute and what makes them
absolute... and they will have a
fighting chance to make the right
choices, because when youth do
not accept truth as being abso-
lute they will become more likely
to lie, cheat or get drunk. They
are seeing their choices through
faulty lenses; meaning, they have
embraced a world view about
truth that blinds them to the dif-
ference between the counterfeits
and the real thing.
Without solid convictions
about truth, however, our chil-
dren will buy the counterfeits
almost every time. It's like a
downward spiral. When they
reject truth as an objective stan-
dard, their life becomes distort-


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ed. When their view becomes
distorted, they easily accept the
counterfeits. When they accept
the counterfeits, they begin to
make wrong choices. When they
make wrong choices, they suffer
the consequences. The choice
is, quite literally, truth or conse-
quences.
It is a frightening prospect to
raise our children in the midst of
a "perverse and crooked genera-
tion." King David's words are as
relevant today as they were when
he first asked," If the founda-
tions be destroyed, what can the
righteous do?" (Psalm 11:3 KJV).
There are no easy answers, but
there is hope. It is not too late to
reinforce your children's crum-
bling foundations. That is if you
are willing to set aside the "quick
fix" mentality and face the stark
reality of what we as Christian
parents have allowed to go on in
our homes over a long period of
time.
We can equip our children to
counter the cultural war that ex-
ists today. It begins with the par-
ents who are in need of a biblical
rebirth in Christian values in their
own lives so that they can cor-


- ; .. -


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rectly "train up a child in the way at a time.
he should go." I hope to see you and your
You and I may not be able to children at church this Sunday.
turn this perverse culture around, Have a Spirit-filled week and may
but we can turn our Christian God's blessing be upon you in all
youth and families around - one things that you do.



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Work hard, Pray hard
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Maureen Kleiman, Lic. Real Estate Broker * 863-357-5900


"Where the Difference is Worth the Distance"
We still sing the old inspired hymns.
We still preach the old infallible Book.

Arlen Cook, Pastor
51 NW 98th St. * Okeechobee, 34972 * (P.O. Box 1541, Zip 34973)
Church: (863) 763-3584 * Home: (863) 763-7165


Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


RELIGION


.~~~...~ . L .I..� .1� ... i..







6 Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


State increases penalties for environmental rule breakers


By David Royse
Associated Press Writer
TALLAHASSEE (AP) -- Penal-
ties will be increased for major
environmental violations in an
attempt to stop companies from
thinking of low fines as simply
a cost of doing business, the
state's top environmental offi-
cial said Wednesday.
Department of Environmen-
tal Protection Secretary Michael
Sole said the stiffer penalties will
be handed down by the agency
for the most serious violations,
likely being applied in about 10
percent of enforcement actions
taken by the agency.


For example, the minimum
penalty for improper storage,
treatment or disposal of hazard-
ous waste will go from $100 to
$500 and the maximum will in-
crease from $25,000 per day to
$32,500 per day under the new
guidelines. In a few cases, fines
for such hazardous waste viola-
tions could go as high as $50,000
a day under the new rules, Sole
said.
Additionally, Sole said the
agency would start actually col-
lecting true per day fines in more
cases. In the past, a per day fine
has often been levied on the
first day of a violation, but much
smaller penalties have been as-


sessed on subsequent days until
the violation stops, Sole said.
"The changes to DEP's guide-
lines provide a stronger deter-
rent for the most egregious vio-
lations, ultimately reducing the
number of significant infractions
that occur," Sole said in a state-
ment released by the agency.
"I want to change the idea that
penalties are 'a cost of doing
business,' by emphasizing the
agency's tough stance against
violators."
Another key difference in the
way penalties will be handled
involves whether a company's
violation of environmental rules
results in an economic benefit,


Sole said. That can already be
factored in when calculating a
penalty, but rarely is.
From now on, such economic
benefits will result in higher pen-
alties, Sole said. For example, if
starting work before complet-
ing a permit results in speeding
up the opening of a new de-
velopment, saving a developer
$10,000, the ultimate penalty
would likely go up by $10,000
to erase that savings, the agency
said in its new guidelines.
Environmental activists have
complained for several years
that DEP's approach to enforc-
ing pollution rules has been too
lax.


"Businesses have long known
that if they do pay a penalty it's
going to be minimal," said Mark
Ferrulo, director of the advocacy
group Environment Florida. "It
often pays to pollute in Florida,
where it's actually cheaper to
pay the fines than to invest the
money in cleaning up the source
of pollution."
Ferrulo said that new Gov.
Charlie Crist had a strong re-
cord on the environment and on
enforcing environmental laws
when he was attorney general,
and that he thought the current
move toward tougher enforce-
ment at DEP was partly a reflec-
tion of that.


"Environmental enforcement
has always had a carrot but it's
never had a stick, and I think
it's great news that DEP is now
going to carry a bigger stick,','
Ferrulo said. "Because we're
talking about direct impacts oi
public health that many of these
violations have."
Besides hazardous waste
cases, new higher penalties will
also be in effect in cases where
violations are intentional or cas-
es where companies are repeat
violators, cases that cause what
the agency considers significant
harm to the environment, and
violations that go on for a long
time.


Farm Bureau home insurance rate increase rejected


TALLAHASSEE (AP)--The state
will deny a planned home insur-
ance rate increase by Florida Farm
Bureau's two property insurance
companies, which have about
140,000 homeowners policies,
the Office for Insurance Regula-
tion said Friday.
Florida Farm Bureau said it
likely will challenge the state's
denial of its proposal to increase
rates by as much as 30 percent
on average for some customers,
based on what the company said
is its need to purchase additional
backup coverage against the pos-
sibility of a catastrophic hurri-
cane.
Insurance regulators held a
rate hearing last week on the pro-
posed increases by Florida Farm
Bureau Casualty Insurance Co.
and Florida Farm Bureau General
Insurance Co.


Legislators passed a new law
in January that required compa-
nies to file for lower "presumed"
rates based on what they would
save by buying cheaper backup
coverage through the state's Hur-
ricane Catastrophe Fund. Based
on that requirement, Farm Bu-
reau companies filed for a rate
decrease of about 24 percent.
But later when the company
calculated its actual expected
costs after it had purchased rein-
surance, it filed for a new higher
rate, up about 30 percent from
the lower "presumed" rate.
Company officials say the
proposed rate is still about 1.6
percent lower on average than
previous rates for most custom-
ers. The only customers seeing a
huge increase are those who had
already started paying the lower
"presumed" rate because they re-


newed their coverage in between
the two filings.
Insurance Commissioner Kev-
in McCarty said regulators believe
Farm Bureau is carrying too much
private backup reinsurance.
"What we discovered from the
testimony at the hearing was that
the company made a business
decision to reinvest $6 million in
added reinsurance rather than
passing the savings on to their
policyholders," McCarty said.
"The intent of the law that came
out of the January special legisla-
tive session was to give compa-
nies less expensive reinsurance
from the state and to pass on that
savings to their policyholders."
Florida Farm Bureau officials
said the organization was sim-
ply being prudent to make sure
it would be able to pay claims in
the event of a major storm.


"FFB has consistently tried to
purchase reinsurance to (protect
against) roughly a 1 in 250 year
event," the Farm Bureau said in a
statement. "Therefore, when the
2004 and 2005 storms hit we were
able to keep our promises to our
members and remain solvent.
Florida Farm Bureau CEO Bill
Courtney said the company was
doing everything it could to keep
insurance affordable, and pointed
to a new state insurance premium
comparison Web site to show it.
"Of the 23 companies listed,
our rates rank low, if not very low,
in an overwhelming number of
the 67 counties," Courtney said.
"In Polk County our rates are over
$900 lower than the company
with the highest premiums, in
Hillsborough we are over $2,300
less, and in Escambia we beat the
highest rates by over $4,000."


Organize your business for success with IRCC seminar


The Indian River Community
College Business Incubator in
partnership with the Entrepre-
neur Development Institute at
IRCC and the Economic Council
of Martin County cordially invites
you to a FREE seminar, "Organiz-
ing Your Business for Success."
Anyone interested in tips on ef-
fective business organization is in-
vited to attend the FREE "Lunch &
Learn" seminar, on Tuesday, July
24, 2007, presented at noon at
the Wolf High Technology Center,
IRCC Chastain Campus, 2400 SE
Salerno Road. The Entrepreneur
Development Institute '.EDil \ill
-+ le providing snacks, beverages
and dessert.


This one hour "Lunch and tions and answers throughout the
Learn" seminar will cover ev- presentation.
erything from "how and why to The guest presenter is Mark
structure your business initially" Brechbill, CPA, founder of Mark
to "maximizing efficiencies" to Brechbill, Certified Public Ac-
"what to know when it comes countants. He also sponsors and
time to sell." The discussion will hosts a series of call-in radio pro-
include LLCs vs. corporations; grams entitled "Treasure Coast
budgeting and cash flow plan- Solutions" that answers listeners'
ning; business accounting (what questions pertaining to business,
is the difference between cash financial planning, real estate,
and income); developing banking construction and community
relationships; and answering the activities. Prior to founding the
question, "How afraid should I firm in 1994, Mr. Brechbill spent
be of the IRS and are there others over thirteen years in the bank-
out there I should be more afraid ing industry. He began his career
ofP" and "\What can and will go-'in public accounting with Arthur
wrong'"' The format is lecture'-Andersen'& Co. Brechbill has a
with open discussion and ques- bachelor's degree in accounting


IRCC automotive program open house planned


Get ready to jumpstart your
career options in one of the
fastest growing career fields
on the Treasure Coast. Anyone
interested in preparing for a
career as an automotive tech-
nician or manager is invited to
a free Open House on Tuesday,
July 31, at 6:30 p.m. at the In-
dian River Community College
Main Campus at 3209 Virginia
Avenue in Fort Pierce to find
out more about this in-demand
career field.
IRCC offers automotive
training that builds increas-
ingly sophisticated skills in all
aspects of automotive repair,
maintenance and service. Stu-
dents can complete courses
in transmissions, steering and
suspension, braking, engine
overhaul and more. IRCC pro-
grams are certified in all eight
categories by the National In-
stitute of Automotive Service
Excellence (ASE), and students

Obituaries

Robert Lee Doherty
Robert Lee Doherty, age 83
died Tuesday, July 17, 2007 in
the Hamrick Home Hospice.
Born October 26, 1923 in Chi-
cago, Ill., he had been a resident
of Okeechobee for the past 12
years.
He is survived by many loving
friends.
There are no services
planned.
All arrangements are under
the direction and care of Buxton
Funeral Home and Crematory,
110 N.E. Fifth St., Okeechobee.


gain valuable skills for ASE cer-
tification.
Students can begin the Au-
tomotive Technology program
at any time or choose the de-
gree program in Automotive
Service Management. Upon
completion, graduates are
ready for employment in a vari-
ety of positions in dealerships,
independent repair shops, or
fleet maintenance facilities.
The Automotive Technology
program meets in the Auto Lab
at Martin County High School,
and students can take advan-
tage of flexible scheduling.
The degree program is offered
at the IRCC Main Campus.


"IRCC offers top-quality educa-
tion at reasonable cost with
small classes and personal
attention," says Donna Rivett,
IRCC Administrative Direc-
tor of Industrial Technology.
"There are many opportunities
for financial aid to help people
get the training they need to
launch a new career, and we
encourage people to find out
more at this Open House."
The Open House will meet
in Building B, Room 111 at the
Main Campus. For more infor-
mation, call the IRCC Informa-
tion Call Center toll-free at 1-
866-866-4722 or visit www.ircc.
edu.


Microchips for your pet could

be your best investment, yet!


COLLEGE STATION - If you're
pet is your best friend, microchips
should be, too.
Microchips are responsible
for thousands of happy reunions
between owners and pets every
year. With the large amount of
lost pets taken to shelters, micro-
chips could also keep your pet
from being euthanized or sold to
a new owner.
"Microchips are only about the
size of a grain of rice," says Patty
Hug, a veterinary technician at the
College of Veterinary Medicine
& Biomedical Sciences at Texas
A&M University. "They are made
to last the entire life of the pet, so
once it's inserted, no upkeep or
replacements are necessary."
Microchips are injected
through a fairly large needle. Cats


tend to cope with the injection
easily, but dogs often need seda-
tion during the procedure, says
Hug. She says the best time to
install the microchip is while the
pet is being spayed or neutered.
The pet is already under anesthe-
sia, so it won't feel any pain.
On cats and dogs, the micro-
chip is placed near the scruff
where there is a lot of skin. Micro-
chips aren't only used in cats and
dogs. Almost any animal bigger
than the microchip can have one
placed somewhere on its body.
Pet birds can store microchips
in their breasts and large fish can
hold them under their dorsal fins,
Hug adds. Horses, cattle, sheep
and other animals can have mi-
crochips injected in case they
find their way out of their pasture.


from Western Illinois University,
is licensed as a CPA in Florida,
and is a member of the FICPA and
AICPA.
Seating is limited. To RSVP or
to obtain more information, call
Karen Schreiner at (772) 419-
5690 or email kschrein@ircc.edu.
For more information on the EDI
or other business solution and
employee training opportunities,
call the IRCC Corporate and Com-
munity Training Institute at 1-888-
283-1177.

-, i

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A ThOlugit To
f H ememiDer

We were reading about the
Seven Wonders of the World.
Of all these great and wonder-
ful things, only the remains of
one, the pyr-
.. . amids of
Egypt, are
.R" standing.
After a
" . ' description
of each,
these words
appear:
By Paul Destroyed in
Buxton wars, or no
trace remains.
I wonder how wonderful
they were to have gone the way
of time -- and no longer exist on
the face of the earth.
There are many wonders of
the word that exist day after
day. Those wonders are love,
dedication, concern, loyalty
and a hundred other acts that
are performed by men. Instead
of diminishing, these grow and
make life wonderful for others.
Thought to Remember:
Give lasting qualities to others,
these only remain.




Funeral Home & Crematory
110 N.E. 5th St., Okeechobee
863-763-1994


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Carpet, Upholstery, Tile & Grout Cleaner
'J 4LE ' 467-1809 * 610-0756
Edward R. Jones * Est 1991- Lic#2178


Pri tchard


G .AC


1804 S. Parrott Avenue * Okeechobee

(863) 357-4622



Okeechobee Mortgage
your Home town, _Mortgage Company
* 100% Financing
- �* First Time Homebuyers
SNew Construction
S ._ JillPharr Turlington * Lot Loans
Broker Lie. #326924 * Debt Consolidation
* Self Employed? OK! No
Income Verification
* Mobile Homes to 95%
401 SW 2nd St. * (863) 763-8030


MOTOR ROUTES


AVAILABLE


Call Janet Madray, Circulation Manager


863-763-3134


Okeechobee News


S Breakfast unch - Dinner

" 2 SENIOR DINNERS
EVERY TUESDAY EVENING * i
| 5 II or ANYTIME with this coupon! I

I Includes: Vegetable, Potato, '
* - a * * ISoup/Salad & Roll/Biscuit
Come visit . ....-- .. . .-' ~ .-'i.s w ' . - -.. -o.-s^- -r.g -.-..,"
Okeechobee's 1111 S. Parrott Ave. * (863) 467-2224 BREAKFAST BUFFET 7 DAYS
Friendliest Restaurant! _: Call n An Order TO GOI * Open: 6am - 10pm Sun - Thurs. 6am 11pm Fri. & Sat. BANQUET ROOM AVAILABLE


4 Memorial Tribute
Remember a loved one
', who has departed with a special
Memorial Tribute in this newspaper.

Your tribute can be published following the memorial services, or to
commemorate an anniversary ofyour loved one's birth or passing. You
can add a photograph of your loved one, lines from a poem or
scripture, and special art or borders -- and we'll make sure it all comes
together attractively and tastefully.
&, f. &-
Visit www2.newszap.com/memorials for sample ads
and an online order form, or call 1-866-379-6397 toll free.





Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007 7


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SDriveAxie -- Co tioning . a variey of plans to with y ur pr'-owned purchase your buying e:perieince last,
-, Br.kes--*A12 Month Road Side Assistance meet your needs bring itack within 48 hours/50b simple, friendly and fair
* Steering Covers Towing, Lock-out Rental regardless of pasi miles for an,exchange. If you're W
--Elecrical Car And Trip Interruption. circumstances' not appy we re not happy, -
. ri~ r /. l ' iL ' . , -iad ir ii.c I., 1 ,1 +. l , r - ,ii ni rii I.. 'ro,- "'ii i'i *o.l.' c' :*i.i. ... . i . . , fpl:j-AI'i rf.,lil.-,l' i-im- C r I' i l.' ' i ji:7t' l .irlr-i iS.' Tjrr.vri.
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8 Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


NOW GET FINANCING


FOR UP TO


60 MONTHS.


PLUS GET UP TO$1,000 BONUS CASH

ON SELECT MODELS.


2007 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB�/
REGULAR CAB


* AVAILABLE MDS FUEL-SAVING TECHNOLOGY6
* LONGEST-LASTING( MOST DURABLE') LINE OF
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* FULLY BOXED FRAME RAILS WITH
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APR +
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FOR 60 MONTHS(1


00
CASH


ALL-NEW 2008 DODGE AVENGER


* 2.4-LITER WORLD ENGINE
* CHILL ZONETM BEVERAGE STORAGE BIN
* SUPPLEMENTAL SIDE-CURTAIN AIR BAGS'41

FINANCING BONUS CA500
FINANCING' BONUS CASH


2007 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN


S25-MPG HIGHWAY)3
* STOW 'N GO� SEATING AND STORAGE
* 5-STAR GOVERNMENT CRASH TEST RATING15

R 1+$1000
FINANCING OWNER
FOR 60 MONTHS(1) LOYALTY CASH


2007 DODGE CALIBER


* SLIDING ARMRESTw/CELL PHONE/MP3 PLAYER HOLDER
* 5-STAR GOVERNMENT CRASH TEST RATING'5
* SUPPLEMENTAL SIDE-CURTAIN AIR BAGS'4


OIAPR
FINANCING'0


2007 DODGE NITRO


* 24-MPG HIGHWAY')
* ELECTRONIC STABILITY PROGRAM
* 5-STAR GOVERNMENT CRASH TEST RATING '
STARTING AT

$19,260
AFTER 750 CASH ALLOWANCE


2007 DODGE CHARGER


* 2.7-LITER V6 ENGINE
* 5-STAR GOVERNMENT FRONTAL
CRASH TEST RATING"'5
* 5-LINK INDEPENDENT REAR SUSPENSION

FACPR +'500
FINANCINGO> BONUS CASH


DODC EE

DODGE.COM

(1) 0% APR for 60 months equals $16.67 per month per $1,000 financed for qualified buyers with 10% down through Chrysler Financial. Not all buyers will qualify. (2) $500-$1,000 bonus cash, depending on model. (3) Based on 2007 EPA estimates. (4) Always
sit properly in the seats with seat belts fastened. (5) Star ratings are part of the U.S. government's SaferCar program (safercar.gov). (6) 14 city/18 hwy 2007 EPA estimated mpg. (7) Based on R. L. Polk & Co. Vehicles in Operation registration statistics 1986-
2005. (8) Durability based on longevity. (9) MSRP excludes tax. (10) Financing for qualified buyers. Not all buyers will qualify. Dodge and Stow 'n Go are registered trademarks of DalmlerChrysler Company LLC. Chrysler Financial Is a division of DalmlerChrysler.


ZERO

PLUS





Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007 9


iLNf iYFORD LINCOLN MERCURY
vramms, oi" adwr l s & far T7EJ: MIA V VaMa l Ii U' ls#'" F


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SPORT TRAC XLT
STK#A'97008
WAS S$25,980
THUs WEEKE tKE �-


F-250 4X2
STX# 980019, AUTO, REVERSE SENSING!
WAS S26,430
T0 P-- -o-. --


F-mSO4X4 REGCAB
STKO 970241, TRAILER TOW PKG. 17"T' ALUM WHEELS!
WAS $27,760O
s", ^^02y^O"1m


ESCAPE XLT
WAS $25,a60
THMS WEEKEND ONLY


AM Nr '


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ON E PRE-OWNED, VEHICLE*
ON QUALIFYING NEWAND PRE-OWNED VEHICLES SEE DEALER FOR EXCLUSIONS. SEE LIFETIME WARRANTY CONTRACT FOR COMPLETE DETAILS ON POWERTRAIN COVERAGE.


WSAS $4z31.55


F.- 0 FX2 SPORT SUPERCAB
STK# 970270, PWR MOONROOF, 5.4L, V8!
WAS $3.330
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IU 1 Sr i


AP photo/Matt Dunham

Woods at British Open
Tiger Woods of the United States play a shot from under a tree next to the 10th green
during the second round of the British Open Golf Championship at Carnoustie, Scotland,
Friday July 20.


Jupiter Christian School's


wrestling
JUPITER (AP)--A state cham-
pion high school wrestling team
has been placed on four years of
administrative probation after a
Florida High School Athletic As-
sociation investigation into alle-
gations of steroid use and illegal
recruitment.
The association also accepted
Jupiter Christian School's self-
imposed $7,500 fine. But the as-
sociation increased the school's
probation recommendation from
two to four years. Under adminis-
trative probation, the team is al-
lowed to compete but remains
under strict state scrutiny.
"That was important for our
wrestlers, particularly those not
implicated in the recruiting is-
sues," said James Foster, chair-

Summer adult

softball league

results
The following are the results
of the Okeechobee County Parks
and Recreation men's and wom-
en's summer softball league for
the week of July 6-July 9.
July 6: Wayne Carr Trucking
def. OCI 24-14; Williams Masonry
� def. Waste Management 21-10;
Polar A/C def. Source One 17-11.
In the women's league, the Lady
Seminoles def. Dan's Framing 15-
5; John's Towing def. Nationwide
Insurance 15-0; and, The Tropics
def. Seacoast National Bank 19-
14.
July 7: Fly-N-Hi Hurricanes
def. Staffords/Cobras 19-9; Beef
0 Brady's def. Barney's 24-23;
Big Lake Title Co. def. Lefebvre
Accident Team 22-17; Avant &
Avant def. More 2 Life 25-11; and,
A-Shaping def. Sundance Trails
Ranch 14-13.
July 8: White's Lawn Care def.
Lowery's Pits 21-5; Polar A/C def.
Williams Masonry 14-3; Waste
Management def. OCI 27-11. In
the women's league, Seacoast
National Bank def. Nationwide
Insurance 17-14; Dan's Framing
def. Waste Services 16-12.
July 9: Beef 0 Brady's def.
Avant & Avant 22-20; A-Shaping
def. Lefebvre Accident team 24-12
and Big Lake Title Company def.
Fly-N Hi Hurricanes 13-10.


team on probation


man of the school board.
The wrestling team won the
2006 state Class A champion-
ship.
The association alleged that
the father of a school wrestler ille-
gally recruited a new team mem-
ber. That wrestler has agreed not
to compete next season, and the
father's contact with the -team
has been restricted, Foster said.
The association earlier dis-
missed allegations that the
school illegally recruited two
football players and that its wres-
tlers had been using illegal ana--
bolic steroids and human grown
hormones.
The school has also offered to
allow 10 percent of its football,
baseball and wrestling athletes


to undergo drug testing. The as-
sociation will initiate a statewide
random drug testing program
this year for only 1 percent of a
school's football, baseball and
weightlifting teams.
Head wrestling coach Robin
Ruh, who started the program in
1998, voluntarily resigned from
the team, though he will con-
tinue coaching boys track, Foster
said.
"He stepped down on his
own," Foster said. "He was not
asked to resign. This was not a
disciplinary measure. The school
did not do this. He did it volun-
tarily."
The association did not return
a phone message left Friday by
The Associated Press.


Former Engineered Support CEO turns himself in


ST. LOUIS (AP)-- The for-
mer chief executive officer of
defense contractor Engineered
Support Systems Michael Sha-
nahan Sr., and his son turned
themselves in to federal au-
thorities Friday, a day after both
were charged in a federal in-
dictment with securities fraud.
"I'm kind of still in shock,"
Shanahan told reporters after
emerging from a white sport
utility vehicle, according to STL-
today.com, the Web site for the
St. Louis Post-Dispatch. "We
never intentionally did anything
wrong."
"This is new to me," he said.
"We're just going to stand and
fight it as best as we can fight
it."
Shanahan Sr. is also the for-
mer owner of hockey team St.
Louis Blues. He and his son,
Michael Shanahan Jr., both
face 12 counts of securities vio-
lations, fraud and conspiracy.
Shanahan Jr. was a member of
the'board of directors at Engi-
neered Support.
Also charged is Gary Ger-
hardt, former chief financial of-
ficer at Engineered Support, a
suburban St. Louis-based com-
pany acquired by DRS Technol-
ogies Inc. in 2006.
Federal regulators accuse the
men of backdating stock op-
tions between 1996 and 2002 in
a scheme they claim enriched
executives and board members
by nearly $20 million.
Assistant U.S. Attorney Mi-
chael Reap said the men were
able to "place their bets be-
fore the race" by retroactively
choosing option grant dates
that coincided with low points
in the company's stock. That
allowed them to make greater


I Go to newszap.com to
download and print
I coupons online! i


profits when they exercised the
options, according to the in-
dictment.
Reap said Shanahan Sr. re-
ceived about $7.8 million in
illegal proceeds, his son got
$80,000 and Gerhardt got $1.8
million.
Attorneys for Gerhardt, who
first was charged in March, said


auditors for the company knew
of the stock trading practices
and that it was not considered
illegal.
The Securities and Exchange
Commission filed, a civil suit
against the Shanahans last
week. Attorneys for the Shana-
hans say they will use a defense
similar to that of Gerhardt.


Landscape & Irrigation Installation
Professional Lawn & Landscape Maintenance
Serving The Lake Okeechobee Area Nearly 3 Decades
Licensed & Insured


Sports Briefs

Looking for
team bowlers
Stardust Lanes is looking for
bowlers for their mixed league
(four bowlers, two men and two
women). Teams are now forming
to start on Friday, Sept. 7, at 7:30
p.m. Individuals or teams contact
(863)763-4496 or (863)467-6596.

O.G. & C.C. junior golf
clinics being held
Okeechobee Golf and Country
Club will offer junior golf clinics
throughout the summer. The clin-
ics will focus on the golf basics
for the inexperienced, as well
as intermediate training for the
more advanced player. Clinics
will include golf etiquette, rules,
putting, chipping, full swing and
actual play on the course. These
clinics will be offered every Tues-
day and Wednesday beginning
on July 10 and concluding on
Aug. 15. Clinics will be instructed
by PGA professionals who are on
staff. Classes will begin at 8:30
a.m. and conclude at 12 Noon.
Students may participate in as
many sessions as desired. Fees for
the clinics will be $25 per student
per day or $20 per student if they
participate both days. Students
must be between the ages of 10
to 16-years-old. There will a maxi-
mum of six students per session.
For information contact Terry
Lanman, head golf pro and gen-
eral manager, at (863) 763-6228.


Publix Salad Blend..... .........G FRI
Spring Mix, American, European, Italian, Hearts of Romaine,
or Caesar Salad Kit, Just Add Your Favorite Salad
to Make a Convenient Meal, 5 to 14-oz bag
SAVE UP TO 3.19






- *9-


......... " General Mills UYoE

Publix Jumbo Franks Cereal .....GET ON
No Fillers, 16-oz pkg. (Limit one Cinnamon Toast Crunch, 17-oz,
with other purchases of 10.00 or more, Golden Grahams, 16-oz, Honey
excluding all tobacco & lottery items.) Nut Cheerios, Reese's, Lucky
SAVE UP TO 1.30 Charms, Cookie Crisp, or Kix,
S. 10 to 13-oz box (Limit two deals
P U b I I X. on selected advertised varieties.)
SAVE UP TO 4.21


Public
WHERE SHOPPING !S A PLEA SU R E."'


Carrot Bar Cake.........................39 9
Delicious Cake Filled With Carrots and Walnuts,
Topped With Soft Cream Cheese Icing,
From the Publix Bakery, 20-oz size
SAVE UP TO 1.00


Juicy Juice
100%
Premium
Juice . . . . . .


BUY ONE RDI
.. .GET ONEFIXt


64-oz bot. or
Harvest Surprise,
46-oz bot.,
Assorted Varieties
SAVE UP TO 3.39


Kraft
Barbecue
Sauce .... . ..
Assorted Varieties,
16.25 or 18-oz bot.
(Limit two deals


BUY ONEFrDI
.GET ONEI I


on selected
advertised varieties.)
SAVE UP TO 1.27


Prices effective Thursday, July 19
through Wednesday, July 25, 2007.
Only in the Following Counties: Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach,
Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River, Okeechobee and Monroe.
Prices not effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity Rights Reserved.
www. public. com/ads


F DISPLAY SYSTEMS
(863) 447-0853
. . 2-story on 2 acres in airpark. 4Bd,
; r'- 'S 3.5Ba, with swimming pool.
SB Master suite includes his and her
bathrooms, sauna, jacuzzi, large
walk-in shower, sitting rm and
breakfast area, walk-in closet,
and/or guest rm, enclosed patio,
Ig laundry rm, kitchen w/break-
fast bar and separate seating area,
Normal dining and living rms,
beautiful foyer, Ig pantry, and
many, many storage areas.
Private, electric gate and lots of
beautiful trees. Reduced by
owner - $375,000


A - A, R .0 F THE P :S SUR


'~i:1' ~


199:

1 Ib
Boneless Skinless
Chicken Breast
Pub i. Premium, All-N3tural,
97'c Fat-Free Grade A
SAVE UP TO 2.20 LB


I' I � I I


Okeechobee. News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


-irn nTR


ppr;A-'Tw,�- ,


I


,1.





Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007 11


'1*



4





\








'I


7516B


SAN AMERICAN EVOLUTION


/ '


AtU


7


1998
DODGE
CARAVAN


7378A


1989
FORD BOX
TRUCK
DIESEL
7299C1


2004
CHEW
TAHOE


1997
CHEVY


7316B




PRE-O ED UNDER $5,000
1993 Dodge Caravan 7210A ..,.............................. 1,995
1999 Dodge Caravan 7378A ................................. $2,995
2002 Chevy S-10 V6, auto,a/c, b-liner C4117A ...... $3,995
1989 Ford E Box Van Diesel 7299C1 ...................$4,995
2001 Ford F-150 XL Ex Cab, bedliner 7312A ............. $4,995
2000 Chevy Express 1500 LS Pass Van 7402A ...... $4,995
2002 Chevy S-10 Pickup Auto, A/C 7497A ................$ 4,995
2002 Chevy Cavalier 7747A .................................... 4,995
1999 Jeep Cherokee 4Dr. 7331a ........................... 4,995
PRE-OWNED UNDER $10,000 i/A
1998 Toyota Camry 7630B.....................................................5,995
1999 Oldsmobile Bravada 7719A .................................... $5,995
2001 Ford Explorer Sport 7635C......................................5,995
2000 Dodge Dakota Sport, X-Cab 6cyl a/c7455A ..... $5,995
1999 Oldsmobile Intrigue OLS 7536A ................. 5,995 \
2000 Buick Lasabre Special Edtion 7644A ......... 5,995
2004 Pontiac Montana Ext Mini-Van 6312A .......... 6,995
2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser (Clean) 7182B ............ $6,995
2001 Chevy Blazer 2Dr 7011A .............................. $6,995
2003 Chevy Cavalier 6308A ..................................7,995
2003 Oldsmobile Silhouette ExL mini van 6514A ..... $7,995
1999 Chevy Tahoe LT, Loaded 7352A ................. $7,995
2001 Chevrolet Silverado 709 .............................8,995
2003 VW Jetta (Wotfsburg) C4094A ................................$9,995
1999 Chevrolet Silverado LS, x-cab, Loaed 7588A ..... 9,995




.!, li. .. . .' . u . . -A . . .. ,
w'�a(^Lj'iy 4^b iru-^ yf l^ ' C

^. VI;SUT U$ ATlS~ jii


1998

MARQUE
7291A


) 2001
FORD EXPL.
SPORT
*^ 7635C


'AlfK.



611b Irr


PRE-OWNED OVER $10.000
2002 Chevrolet S-10 LS, X-Cab, 6cyi a/c7675A! ........ $10,995
2007 Chevy Cobalt GM Certified 04114 ................12,995
2002 Chevy Monte Carlo SS 7300A ...............12,995
2005 Chevy Venture VanP411o .......................12,995
2004 Toyota Camry LE P4121 ......................... 13,995
2005 Chevrolet Express Cargo Van P410o ..... $14,995
2004 Toyota Camry LE 4Dr P4121 ...................14,995
1995 Chevy Corvette Low Miiles (Red) 7353A 1 ..$14,995
2007 Chevy Impala LT (sunroof) C4115 ......... 16,995
r'- 2004 Chevy Tahoe 6319A.................................8,995
~ 2007 Chevy Uplander, GM Cert C4118 .......,18,995
2003 Chevy Tahoe 7351A.................................8,995
2004 Chevy Ex Cab LS Loaded 7635B ...... $18,995
2003 Ford F-150 Ext Cab 4x4 7345D1............. .19,995
2006 Chevy Trailblazer EXT C4o00 ................$19,995
2006 Nissan Frontier CrewCab 7522A .........$20,995
2007 Chevy Trailblazer LS C470l ..................22,995
2005 Chevy Silverado sportsie, XcabZ 71 7636A 23,995
2007 Chevy Silverado crewCabGM Cet'rt41204 23,995
2006 Nissan Murano S 7387B .......................23,995
2005 Lincoln Aviator SUV,Loaded 7675A .... $24,995
2005 Chevy Suburban 4x4,GM Cert. 7080A......$26,995
2006 Chevy Tahoe 4x4, Sunroof C4103................... $27,995
2005 Chevy Tahoe GM Cert. 7630A .......................... 27,995
2005 Chevy Crew Cab Z71 7628A4......................... 28,995
S2005 Chevy Crew Cab 2500HD4x4, Diesel 7669A. 31,995

7~t


7


2000
BMW
740 IlL
SUNIROONF


� L-


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I






12 Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


-F LLSE VIE E LT R, 1.-IE6PA 7 wiljl;j8


-g~I~54&IhIr l NarSj~ 1MuJ~ - wu3Jf


S --495ee-NOW $13,000 M I Imaculate 3a2 LB M o u p..Ts
1.25 Acres adjacent to renovated, new paint in & out, new udi new metal roof, new Ihu
Kissimmee River. 2/1 mobile doors,carpet & vinyl floor caneshutters,newly pa exei
with bi barn and huge screen covering,New electrical fixtures or & inteorwith a b ba,
room. Asking $95,000. Call &plumbing fDMues. Moveweady. flcrdst ay9361
Melissa 610-2280 Call Ebert 863.34-7460. #93546 Mia 86361 80. $159,000
Elbert Batton * Licensed Real Etae
fumberland 1"" . MeS^2r80
* Usa Motnea . .. 863697-1261
Office realty group, LLC .: 86y "-10-1639
863-763-8851 www.cumberland-realty.com .JonaanBe . 86%634-275


DonRenfranz,nc.'sTaylr Creek Real Estate


Donald A. Renfranz
Realtor / Lic. Real Estate Broker
863-634-4596
donaldrenfranz@hotmail.com


Vicki and Perry Green
Sales Associates
863-467-6516 or 863-610-0962


300 NW 5th Street, Okeechobee, FL 34972-2565
Phone: (863)763-7312 * Fax (863)763-7312


#93289 -
REALLY
AFFORD-
ABLE GET-
AWAY OR
WINTER
SPOT! Neat 1
bdrm "Park"


- ,-


model in 6 1
Ancient Oaks RV Resort-a resbicted conummu-
nitv! Includes ground-level addition, furnish-
ings! You own the lot, reasonable maintenance
fees! Cheap Price = Quick Sale @ $ 54,500!


#92465
AFFORD-
A B L E
INVEST-
MFNT IN


rmr


THE ISLES!
Doublewiide
2/2 includes WIL TAKE $79,900 AS IS!
car p o r t, WAS ORIGINALLY $135,000!
screened patio overlooking pond, work-
shop, paved drive, central air-more! Very
livable, could use a few repairs. Sewer
assessment already paid, new owner pays
hook-up expense! Asking just $921500L


BEST-PRICED 10 ACRE
PARCELS! ONLY 3 LEFT!


#93439 BEST-
PRICED IN .
THE WHOLE
NEIGHBOR-
HOOD ON
SE 35TH
Ave.! And C .'
this cute PRICE BLASTED TO JUST $72,000!
Lake-access
waterfront 2 bdrm. mobile is better than
many of them! Screened patio, dock, big car-
port, lots of citrus! Furniture list! You'll like
the interiors! Move-in ready! Only $82,-000


Surprisingly nice

Praire 1+ acre

parcel at

15784 NW 262nd St.!

Only $20,000


OK ACRES /10 ACRE PARCELS!
Seller Financing Available!
Please call Donald A. Renfranz / Realtor


Financing Terms: With 20% Cash down payment Sellers will hold
a First Mortgage of balance payable in monthly payments of prin-
S-cipal & interest @ 8.00% a.p.r. based on 15 yr amortization, to come
to term (balloon payment) at the end of 3rd year from date of note.
ALL DEVELOPER-OWNED OK ACRES LOTS ARE NOW PRICED
AT $180,000 EACH! CALL DONALD A. RENFRANZ DIRECTLY FOR LOT AVAILABILITY!
RESTRICTED AGAINST COMMERCIAL USE


"These offering are subject to prior sale, errors, omission or withdrawal without notice. Information
s r s believed accurate, but not warranted."
' A, "I


Ao^.


sto


Call

863.76.33134

To Advertise!


�-


...in the pages of the
Lake Okeechobee
Real Estate Magazine

Look for this month's issue on newsstands now!


5e&Hmf40







Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007 i,


Home's


ofSthe

Week


"SECOND TO NONE"






SERVICE * INTEGRITY * EXPERIENCE
104 N.W 7th Ave.* www.Tucker-Group.com


- ES


cense eal Estate Brokers
* B H. Tucker. P.A.. Lic. Real Estate Broker
* Brandon D. Tucker. P.A.. Lic. Real Estate Broker


* Lori Mixon 634-1457
* Jeri Wilson 634-6056
* John Pell, G.R.I. 697- 0413
* William S. "Bill" Keene, Sr., 634-6797


r


A LASTING IMPRESSION In Blue Heron. RNCANALACREAGEk88ACRES-3pacels
4/35 tA-slory 5200 TLA home marble tire- ea w2175FlofR~icaafronlag Behid200
:aces. palaous master suie A*et bar & exe + - Acres oftree arm. 30-50 Q rsetlylerretal
ose room. screened-n pool & p.iaare water vu hanger Prne for 3 Parcels 537,00 #127G Call
5649,000 204 Call LOa 1863) 634-1457 Jen 863i64-6005




WHERE ONLY THE BEST WILL DO! 20C4 COUNTRY CLASSIC 1987 33 spit plan w/ 2864
CBS 3/2.5 w/ office (3700 SF) in R-Bar on 2 TLA+Hugebonus room on3Aes off EagleBa
Acres. 10' Ceilings, 8' Doors, Crown Molding, Stone& e rFil Whi
MapleCabinets, Security System, 30x32 Garage. Stallarn Tac & Feed room. $459,000 #209 Call
$474,000 #211 Call Lori (863) 634-1457 Lor (863)634-1457


We're Not Your Typical Home Builder
Over 180 Floor Plans To Choose From!
Many Financing Options Available
3 Homes Available For Immediate Occupancy
Located on Captive Lake
S.E. 27th Street in Taylor Creek Isles

' 010% FINANCING
.'TO QUAlIFIER BUYER




Georgetown Elite ' I..j i _
* Owner Suite w/Access To a Sundeck
*Split Plan
Large Bedrooms 7 !
* 2 Car Garage
Stylish Large Kitchen i
* 9' Ceilings No - . :
* Dining Room .
* Breakfast Nook


$ (


'-I


DUIIlL L II JUI LL U I IUI: ______ _.-_: _. __. __ll
6 Home Plans To Choose From! Concrete Block Construction! 863 357-2700
-4 -I 863 357-27 00 ......
,1.-l '." IT .i -i. "1.1 [_". ,, j - . .,L
discover0* *. " " " ",, H, .....
Discover how we can make your home buying dream a reality.
Over 4 Decades Of Quality!








www.centur21okeechobee.com

David Hazellief * 863-610-1553 Sharon Prevatt * 863-634-7069
Betty Hazellief * 863-610-0144 Dee Reeder 863-610-21485



.-:4


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O WHAT DO I .NEED

TO DO BEFORE MAKING A

PURCHASE OFFER?


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kl-:-r-� pr;wr' �.*/ I h�- pri,:;- �n 3H-)r-j I.j p3V for a h.:,Mr.- v�, I I I -I on
factor
1. your income;
2. the amount of cash you have available for the down payment, closing
costs and cash reserves required by the lender;
3. your outstanding debts;
4. your credit history;
5. the type of mortgage you select; and
6. current interest rates.
w. a,-. � ou .: if,, h a,
H, 17, C-� II � .1.
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ho.i an1 aaraaq II~4i :,.t -,rjrnit iiwe ar.a in421-. .,.home hlar, litSOf POlEntails fireplaces
I.onrs' Crt-a! ronm is7the l3rrl g arde. ti, .tIal~j' i. i ~~L, 11i.I.."r')ei-'Ac 1.Are builli19.q Lbrge eai ncliEIn pi, 91' aa�IhEOgarage Ic~r Ivc fenced i.3rd order.
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RPCTnlINMTTAI I OnTq/IACRTFA(U


$1.
h. r r


FIND OUT HOW


You Can Advertise Here!


863. 763. 3134


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14 Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


At the Movies Blondie


The following movies are now
showing at the Brahman Theatres
IIl.
Movie times for Friday, July 20,
through Thursday, July 26, are as
follows:
Theatre I -"Harry Potter -
the Order of the Phoenix" (PG)
Showtimes: Friday at 7 and 9 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday at 2, 4:15,
7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
Theatre II - "Transformers"
(PG-13) Showtimes: Friday at 7
and 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. Monday at
3 and 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9
p.m.
Theatre III - "Hair Spray" (PC)
Showtimes: Friday at 7 and 9
p.m., Saturday and Sunday at 2,
4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3
and 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9
p.m.
Tickets are $5.50 for adults;
children 12 and under are $4.50;
senior citizens are $4.50 for all
movies; and, matinees are $4.
For information, call (863)
763-7202.

Today

in History

By The Associated Press
Today is Saturday, July 21, the
202nd day of 2007. There are 163
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
On July 21,1861, the first Battle
of Bull Run was fought at Manas-
sas, Va., resulting in a Confederate
victory.
On this date:
In 1899, author Ernest Heming-
way was born in Oak Park, Ill. Poet
Hart Crane was born in Garretts-
ville, Ohio.
In 1925, the so-called "Mon-
key Trial" ended in Dayton, Tenn.,
with John T. Scopes convicted of
violating state law for teaching
Darwin's Theory of Evolution. The
conviction was later overturned
on a technicality.
In 1930, President Herbert
Hoover signed an executive order
establishing the Veterans Adminis-
tration.
In 1944, American forces land-
ed on Guam during World War II.
In 1949, the U.S. Senate ratified
the North Atlantic Treaty.
+_ In 1955, during the Geneva
summit, President Dwight D.
Eisenhower presented his "open
skies" proposal under which the
U.S. and the Soviet Union would
trade information on each other's
military facilities and allow aerial
reconnaissance.
In 1961, Capt. Virgil "Gus" Gris-
som became the second Ameri-
can to. rocket into a sub-orbital
pattern around the Earth, flying
aboard the Liberty Bell 7.
In 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts
Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz"
Aldrin blasted off from the moon
aboard the lunar module.
In 1980, draft registration be-
gan in the U.S. for 19- and 20-year-
old men.
Ten years ago: The USS Con-
stitution, which defended the U.S.
during the War of 1812, set sail
under its own power for first time
in 116 years, leaving its temporary
anchorage at Marblehead, Mass.,
for a one-hour voyage marking its
200th anniversary. The actual an-
niversary was in October 1997.
Five years ago: Telecom-
munications giant WorldCom Inc.
filed for bankruptcy protection,
about a month after disclosing it
had inflated profits by nearly $4
billion through deceptive account-
ing.
One year ago: Mako, the Ja-
pan-born actor who used his Os-
car nomination for the 1966 film
"The Sand Pebbles" to push for
better roles for Asian American
actors, died in Somis, Calif., at age
72.
Today's Birthdays: Jazz
musician-critic Billy Taylor is 86.
Singer Kay Starr is 85. Movie direc-
tor Norman Jewison is 81. Actor
Paul Burke is 81. Former Attorney
General Janet Reno is 69. Actress
Patricia Elliott is 65. Actor David
Downing is 64. Actor Edward Her-
rmann is 64. Actor Leigh Lawson
is 62. Actor Wendell Burton is 60.
Actor Art Hindle is 59. Singer Yu-
suf Islam (formerly Cat Stevens) is
59. Cartoonist Garry Trudeau is 59.
Comedian-actor Robin Williams is
56. Comedian Jon Lovitz is 50. Ac-
tor Lance Guest is 47. Actor Matt
Mulhern is 47. Comedian Greg
Behrendt is 44. Rock musician
Koen Lieckens (K's Choice) is 41.


Rock singer Emerson Hart (Tonic)
is 38. Country singer Paul Brandt is
35. Actress Ali Ldndry is 34. Actor
Josh Hartnett is 29. Reggae singer
Damian Marley is 29. Country sing-
er Brad Mates (Emerson Drive) is
29. Singer Blake Lewis ("American
Idol") is 26. Actress Vanessa Len-
gies is 22. Actor Jamie Waylett
("Harry Potter" films) is 18.
Thought for Today: 'All our
words from loose using have lost
their edge." -- Ernest Hemingway
(1899-1961).


Wizard of Id


Garfield


Beetle Bailey


Cathy


Peanuts

50 ERE I AM RIDIN6
ON THE BACK OF MY MOMS
BICYCLE ON THE WAY TO
THIE DRY CLEANERS..


Dear Abby


Mother tells man


to marry her or go


*DEARABBY: I have been dat-
ing "Richard" for three years. We
began dating when my daughter
was 1. He is great with her, and
with me. The only problem is he
doesn't want to get married.
I love him, but I'm not getting
any younger and I want to be
married. I want another child and
a stable family for my daughter.
Richard says he is afraid that the
stress of dealing with the both of
us would drive him crazy. I gave
him an ultimatum - marry me
or let me move on. Was I wrong
to do that? - Having Second
Thoughts in Missoula, Mont.
DEAR HAVING SECOND
THOUGHTS: If Richard has been
able to tolerate the "stress" of deal-
ing with you and your daughter
for three years, then he isn't afraid
the stress of dealing with the two
of you will drive him crazy. He's
afraid of commitment.
There is nothing wrong with
wanting another child and a stable
family for you and your daughter.
And if Richard isn't man enough
to provide those things for you,
then yes, you were right to give
him the ultimatum.

* DEAR ABBY: My parents and
I go out to dinner once a month.
Mother eats slower than the rest
of us, and no one in our family
minds. She was still enjoying her
dinner when the server came to
clear our plates. He stood there
watching her eat, then offered us
dessert! My father and I believe it
was very rude.
This has happened to us a
number of times. Are restaurants
really encouraging their wait staff
to rush patrons along by doing
this? - Annoyed in Vermont
*DEAR ANNOYED: Many
restaurant managers feel that
the more often they can "turn"
a table, the better their bottom
line will be. It also gives the serv-
ers the opportunity to earn more
tips. However, for your server to


have made you feel rushed was
tactless.
Because you felt you were be-
ing rushed, you should have told
the server, "Thank you, but we
prefer to wait until everyone has
finished eating before you clear or
we order dessert."
P.S. Not every patron feels the:
way you do about this. Some din-.
ers prefer to have their dirty plate;
taken away and to be served cof-.
fee while the slow eaters finish
their meals.

*DEAR ABBY: I would like to
know if there is a "proper" way to
hold a pen or pencil while writing.
My grandmother and my mother.
seem to think that penmanship'
is much neater when you hold it
between your middle and index-
fingers. I, however, naturally hold
it between my middle and ring,
fingers.
They both tried to teach me-
to write the way they do, but I
couldn't even write my name. If
you could help, I'd be grateful.
- Kaela in Red Oak, Texas
DEAR KAELA: The "proper"
way to hold a pen or pencil is
the way your mother and grand-
mother do. It is the way they
were taught in penmanship class
in grammar school, and it's the,
way you should have been taught
by your teachers. Had you been
taught correctly from the begin-.
ning, you would have mastered'
the technique at a time when it
was easy to learn.
However, because you write
neatly holding the pen the way
you do, I see no reason why you
'should worry about what is prop-,
er at this late date. Do what works-
for you, and obviously this does
Editor's note: Dear Abby is
written by Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips, and
was founded by her mother, Pau-
line Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


Close to Home


Pickles


The Last Word in Astrology


By Eugenia Last
*ARIES (March 21-April 19): Follow
through with your plans. Someone you
are close to may not agree with what
you are doing. Money is in the picture
and will come to you in mysterious
ways. Put it somewhere safe until you
really need it.
*TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Prepare
to socialize or discuss serious personal
issues with someone you love. An op-
portunity may appear to be too good.
Double-check before you decide to
invest in something or someone you
know little about.
-GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You'll
have a good feeling about someone
you work with or for. Follow your gut
feelings and contact someone from
your past who can offer you something
good in the future. A little imagination
will go a long way today.
*CANCER (June 21-July 22): Not ev-
eryone will agree with you or want to
be with you today but, at least you will
know where you stand. Regroup and
reset your priorities. Let go of anyone
and anything no longer of use to you.


- LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A few creative
changes at home will please someone
who is important to you. Plan a short trip
to old familiar places. Getting together
with people from your past or attending
a reunion will bring back memories and
help you gain greater insight.
-VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A little
work behind the scenes on something
you want to present in the not-too-dis-
tant future will pay off. Working at home
may not please someone you live with
but, the promise of doing something
special late in the day will help the situ-
ation.
-LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don't
spout off if someone bugs you. A cre-
ative idea you have will fly if you put in a
little extra work and develop it further. A
trip or getting together with neighbors
and friends will raise your confidence.
-SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You
can persuade others to see things your
way. A change of friends or partners will
be to your advantage. Travel and com-
munication will lead to greater financial
benefits but don't give away too much
in the process.


*SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):
Your open-mindedness will help you
drum up interest but, if you exaggerate,
you may disappoint someone you re-
ally want to get to know better. Travel
will be costly, so talk online or over the
phone.
-CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Now
is not the time to address emotional is-
sues. You will be able to come up with
an interesting means of handling a le-
gal, financial or medical concern. You
may have to make a move or change to
get things back on track professionally
and personally.
-AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Use
your head and you will come up with a
viable solution as well as please some-
one who has helped you and stood
by you in the past. An opportunity to
help others is apparent and will lead to
greater self-esteem.
*PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): What
you- want to do may be stifled if you
don't have the means to finish. Cash
will not be made readily available, leav-
ing you to rely on creative accounting
and budgeting on your part. A change
in a partnership may leave you baffled.
� 2007 UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE


"You forgot one of the essential facts of
putting-the ball always breaks
toward the water."


Wonderword
HOW TO PIAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle - horizon-
tally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR
IErTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell
the Wonderword.


HONG KONG DISNEYLAND


TDNALYSA

Y R I A F S E S


TNA

I U R


Solution: 6 letters.


FSCS
CTNA


PNAOST E K CORBOLD

E LON I AMACRA I R T V

C G URSS I OE I T I YOE


A Y E T T P C S D C MSB

P LSUO I O EA EOLO

S I M GR B RNRRAO

CMU@T I T R T I TN K

I A S L T R SOACDS
T F I AR A T E E T I S
I UC Z OE I N N I M I H


L LA L


C L ASS


0LOHCT


M N


I CBOAT


I TS KRAPN I


P C I TCA L AGN I N I DC


� 2007 Universal Press Syndicate www.wonderword.com


7/21


Adventure, Astro, Attractions, Autopia, Boat, Bold, Classic, Color,
Cruises, Dining, Exotic, Fairy, Family, Fantasyland, Full, Galactic,
Goofy, Intrigue, Island, Main, Mickey, Minnie, Modern, Music,
Orbitron, Park, Plaza, Pluto, Politics, Resort, Rockets, Scenic,
Shop, Site, Space, Stitch, Storybooks, Tomorrowland, Tour,
Transportation


I








Okeechobee Nes Sauray Juy2.071


lass wifb .ieds w m

.. ....... ..S


1


53


Announcements Merchandise| Mobile HOM


Employment l Agriculture Recreation
UlLL~aI __;{___5____iiig


Financial


Automobiles t

ilili -~F


Services Real Estate
rF, iA lnHITITI~i


R~iII Ak


AnIouncements


Important Information: Please
read your ad carefully the first
day it appears. In case of an
inadvertent error, please noti-
fy us prior to the deadline list-
ed. We will not be responsible
for more than 1 incorrect
insertion, or for more than the
extent of the ad rendered val-
ueless by such errors.
Advertiser assumes responsi-
bility for all statements, names
and content of an ad, and
assumes responsibility for any
claims against Independent
Newspapers. All o,- *.. -
is subject to .,. :. :
approval. The publisher
! h.'- I'qi, to accept or
A- t , r . ....0
"advertisement". All ads
accepted are subject to credit
approval. All ads must conform
to Independent Newspapers'
style and are restricted to
their proper classifications.
Some classified categories
require .advance payment.
These classifications are
denoted with an asterisk *,
Independent Newspapers will
never knowing accept any
advertisement that is illegal or
considered fraudulent, In all
cases of questionable value,
such as promises of guaran-
teed income from work-at-
home programs or other offers
to send money in advance for
a' product or service - we
advise you to check with the
Attorney General's Consumer
Fraud Line at 1.800-220-5424,
and/or The Better Business
Bureau, 800-464-6331 for pre-
vious complaints.
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage/Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160



LARGE BLACK DOG- female,
'vic of Hwy 441 Call to identi-
'fy (863)357-3249


PAPILLON PUPPY- 9 wks old,
'36 Terrace SE near Ever-
'glades Elem. 7/16. Wh/br
w/bl ears. Reward
,(850)758-7103


BLACK LAB- 7 yrs old, Crate
trained. Good w/kids & small
dogs. Free to good home.
(863)517-1704 Wayne
BLACK MOUTH CURR, (9),
, male & female, 6 weeks old,
,to good homes only.
*(863)634-7577
CHICKENS (4) Roosters (3) &
Ducks (4). Free to good
homes only. (863)763-6762
Otter Creek.
LAB MIX DOGS, 1 brown
male, 1 black female, 11
months old. To good homes,
room to run. (561)719-4178
TRUCK TIRES, Mounted on
wheels for off-road use. Free
to good home.
(863)675-1862



BIG SALE!H
OKEECHOBEE- Fri & Sat, July
20th & 21st, 8:30 am - 3
pm, 501 NE 5th Street. Lon-
gaberger baskets, Childs
Capt. Bed, Small Sect Sofa,
Playstation w/games, lots of
Jr. clothes, great for back to
school


U."e


OKEE., Sat. 7/21, 8am-?,
1310 SW 5th Ave. (Park on
side street). Antique couch,
chair & table. Bedroom set,
Boys clothes & To Many
Items to mention
mad.Fe=azii) .
SALE
OKEECHOBEE, 213 NW 13TH
Street, Fri. 7/20, Sat. 7/21 &
Sun. 7/22. Baby items,
household items, computer
desk, furniture, tv's & much
more! Don't miss out!


Okeechobee
849 SW 20th Ave
Sat., July 21st
8am to??


-, 11Lt4iL q , At
OKEECHOBEE, 906 NE 28th
Terrace, Sat. 7/21 & Sun. 7/22
9am-2pm. Household items,
clothing, & much more!



OKEECHOBEE, Fri. & Sat.,
July 20th & 21st, 8am-?,
1402 N.E. 39th Blvd.
(Evergreen Cemetery Rd.)
- Huge 3 Family Sale-





Employment -
Full-Time 205
Employment -
Medical 210
Employment -
Part-Time 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Training 227
Sales 230



ESTIMATOR
Proficient in estimating
commercial projects &
experience with
estimating.software. Must
be able to read blueprints.
(863)467-0831 DFWP
ROOFERS
Sub-Crews wanted. All types
of roofing. Okeechobee
Area. Call 863-763-9119


U..ge


Full time lead teacher

Requirements:
* CDA Certified or work-
ing toward certification
* HS Diploma or GED
Lic. through ACSI
Lic #192508


FITNESS CENTER
FRONT DESK
6am - 8am Monday thru Friday
Call 863-357-6900.
Licensed Real Estate Agents
needed for Okeechobee of-
fice. Call 863-467-3670



Patient Care
Coordinator needed
in Okeechobee
No Experience
Necessary
Good Communication
Skills
Mon - Fri, 9am - 4pm
Off Holidays
Call (772) 569-0444 for appt.
EOE
Professional Sales Executive
position available for a busy
new home sales business.
Sales experience a plus. No
real estate license required.
Salary plus commission.
Call (863)763-6376
or (863)357-2700.



EXPANDING TO HENDRY
COUNTY
Home held agency seeking
RN Case Manager, LPN, HHA
& MSW. Top pay! Great place
to work! (863)491-0002 or
1-888-491-0009
MEDICAL ASSISTANT/FRONT
DESK, exp. not necessary,
competitive pay, 30 hrs./wk.,
possible FT. Send resume to
PO Box 2744, Okeechobee,
FL 34973.


24 f ABSOLUTELI
" for any personal items for sale under $2,500


:3 More Papers Mean More Readers!'

Reach more readers when you run
IM -R". your ad in several papers in


our newspaper network.
Our newspaper network
consists of eight papers - one
daily and seven weeklies. An ad run in all these newspapers will
reach more than 164,000 readers*!


Call Today For Details!
* Sources: Pulse Research Market Survey; Simmons Market Research; INI Market Research Center
Rules for placing FREE ads!
To qualify, yo ur ad - ..


SMust be for a personal item. (No commercial items, pets or animals)
' Must fit ,nto 1 2 inch
(that's 4 lines, approximately 23 characters per line)


S Must include only one item and its price
(remember it must be S2.500 or less)
Call us!
No Fee, No Catch, No Problem!


\ \/
; ..! T '" " ' "" /


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis


ACROSS
1 Charge
7 Choral
exercises
15 Cabin addition,
perhaps
16 Driven
17 Tramp's
category?
18 Proving ground
19 Sunnyvale
setting: Abbr.
20 Island north of
Zanzibar
22 Whiskered one
23 Early John
Barrymore talkie
role
25 Surfer's pursuit
27 Vim
30 Like some
nightmares?
32 _ Valley:
Reagan library
site
33 Mike Myers title
role
34 Response to a
pointer
36 Event in which
midnight plays
an important
role
40 Measure
41 16th-century
Portuguese
mathematician
Pedro
42 Sotto _
43 Training group
48 Slender runner
49 Boors
50 Spruce
51 That, in Jerez
53 Breaks
55 The Ottoman
Emp. fell shortly
after it
56 Enforcement
group based in
Lyon
59 Quite elevated
61 Ancient Jews
living outside of
Palestine,
collectively
62 Placekicker Jim
who scored 10
points in the Jets'
Super Bowl III
victory


63 Oregon doesn't
have one
64 Deteriorates

DOWN
1 Childhood bud
2 Arkansas River
tributary
3 Like a hastily
assembled
search party,
usually
4 German
connector
5 Prevent
6 Final phase
7 Unwind
8 1998 Masters
champion
9 Hi-fi spinners
10 Bring
11 Jewelry designer
Peretti
12 More gaudy
13 Procure
14 Suffix with pept-
21 Getty Center
architect
24 Soup order
26 Dependent
country
28 Replica: Abbr:
29 'That's rough"


31 Make sure not to
see
32 Fall, e.g.
35 Particular, briefly
36 Big D team
37 Harum-scarum
38 Kind of ills
39 Old-fashioned
fights
44 Canadian sci-fi
writers' award
45 Back up
46 Nebraska native


47 Maj. Winchester
portrayer on
"M*A*S*H"
49 Finds fault
52 Zaire's Mobutu
Seko
54 Aspersion
56 Pleasure
seekers?
57 "Third Watch"
actress Long
58 Kitchen container
60 For


ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
MUMS ABC ATBATS
ATOP WAR PURSES
RAT ODE ETO I LE
cHcOL|AT E MOSE

BAH SIP AN G I S
EROS BLT NORMA



TEARAT ASH
STRAWBERRY Y T 0 R T
CABALS TEA ER I E
ORA C L E NAG ENDS
MA R TYR ATE PSST
xwordeditor@aol.com 7/21/07


By Karen Tracey
(c)2007 Tribune Media Services, Inc.


7/21/07


READING A NEWSPAPER...


Emlymn
Ful Tie I'l


/ 1.877-353-2424 oItF ree)

/ 1-877-354-2424 flFr..j

,/ For Legal Ads:
legalads@newszap.com

/ For All Other Classified
Advertising:
classods@newszap.com


I-
/ Mon-Fri
S a,,3 - ' p M


/ Mon-Fri
8 a.r - 6 p.m |


Monday
F,.d , I. n..n t fm d ,, p bl';,ti.rCa
Tuesday thru Friday I J
I 1 i.r forrE tl do,': publ.cmon
Saturday ,i,
Thur'jv 12 noor for Suturd publication X
Sunday
Fnd., 10 u .-r Ic. rIddS - Ni,Chio l


Emlymn
Ful Tie 005


Start a new career in the much needed field of
nursing as a Certified Nursing Assistant. Complete the
Hospitality Assistant course/training at Okeechobee
Healthcare Facility and become a CNA in 4 weeks. Next
class begins soon. Instructor RN/experienced teacher has
a very high CNA exam passing rate. Qualified CNAs are
then eligible for LPN training. Good benefits.
Apply In Person For Further Details:
406 N.W. 4th.Street * (863) 357-2442


Emlymn


Emlymn
Meical


Immediate Openings - CNAs
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
All shifts: Full/Part Time. Good Benefits.
Apply In Person To:
406 N.W. 4th Street. (863) 357-2442

Immediate Openings * All Shifts
Full Time/Part Time * RN's & LPN's
Apply In Person To:
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
1646 Hwy. 441 North


Emlymn


Emlymn
Meical


I I Ii ' Ll

HOUSEKEEPING:

Full Time
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
Apply In Person Only At
Business Office, 406 N.W. 4th Street


READING A
NEWSPAPER
HELPS YOU
UNDERSTAND
THE WORLD
AROUND YOU. #


Toll Free


Place Your
YARD SALE
ad today!

Get FREE
signs and
inventory sheets!

Call Classifieds
877-353-2424


AGRICULTURAL NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST
OKEECHOBEE SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT
Technically oriented position that will operate in a team envi-
ronment with field personnel from the Natural Resources Con-
servation Services and the FL. Dept. of Agriculture. Perform
on-site and engineering evaluations of soil and water related
projects, water quality sampling, data collection, elementary
survey analysis and report on-site evaluations of construction,
implementation and operation and maintenance pursuant to all
Best Management Practices. Follow up with agricultural pro-
ducers regarding implementation of approved conservation
plans and provide technical assistance relating to operation
and maintenance of management and/or engineered practices.
Provide training and education programs to agriculture indus-
try. Computer knowledge required. Bookkeeping and Quick
Books experience preferred.
Submit resumes by July 27th to Soil & Water Conservation
District, 452 US Hwy 98 N, Okeechobee, FL 34972 or by fax
863-763-6407


DEADINE


I-


_ ..T. ...~c.^l---~- --


mm-m"-


m


m


I _


II I


ISeasonal


ISeasonal


15


O~keechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


.............. 1 J; I


~








Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


I~e ia - ic


I-pca Noti -


SATURDAY MORNING_


6:00 6:30


SWPTV News (N) (cc)


7:00


News (N)(cc)


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00


IToday (N) (s) (cc)


lmotice0


[pi -mI


JULY 21, 2007
9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30


News (cc) Do It


Animal Wild Am.


( WPEC Paid Paid Madeline Sabrina Trollz (El) Horse- Saturday Early Show (N) (s) (cc) |Cake (cc) Revolu-
a WTCE Cherub Faithville Kingdom Heroes of the Bible Pahapp Charity |Bear Club Dooley |Nanna Bedbugs Maralee
9 WPBF Latin Lif House Steel Kids Good Morning Golf: British Open -- Third Round. From Carnoustie, Scotland. (Live)
( WFLX Paid Tackle Eye-Fla. Safari Trk Winx Pinata Pinata Turtles Turtles Chaotic Sonic X Yu-Gi-Oh!
ga WTVX Paid Paid Krypto Krypto Loonatics Tom Shaggy JohnnyT Legion Batman Xiaolin Johnny T
{ WXEL GED GED Cross- Fla. Face Beads Scrap- America Sews Sit-BeFit Taste Gourmet Cucina

AMC Movie: The Lawless Nineties Movie: **** Rio Grande (1950) Movie: **1/2 Night Passage (1957) (cc) Chey-
ANIM Dog Show: "Animal Planet Dog Championships 2006" Portland, Ore. Good Breed Pet Star (cc) Meerkat Meerkat
A&E Paid |Riches Bio.: Dahmer |Biography: Wuornos Flip This House (cc) Sell Sell Sell Spender
BET BET Morning Inspiration Parkers Parkers Parkers Parkers Baldwin Run
CNN Investigations CNN Saturday Morning Housecall Saturday House Saturday Morn. Saturday Morn.
CRT Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid |Paid
DISC Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Extreme Engineering Extreme Engineering Build It Bigger
DISN Doodle- JoJo Wiggles Higgly Einsteins Einsteins Mickey |Mickey Tigger Handy Sprites Charlie
El Bloomberg TV Movie: Four Weddings and a Funeral E! News Weekend Daily 10 The Soup Best Talent
ESP2 Whitetail Outdoors Bass IFishing Ocean |Fishing Bassmasters (N) Hot Rod Evern- Hot Rod Gearz (N)
ESPN SportsCenter (cc) SportsCenter (cc) SportsCenter (cc) SportsCenter (cc) SportsCenter (Live) (cc)
EWTN Saints Doctors Chaplet Rosary Daily Mass Angels God EWTN Family Celebration (Live) Family
FAM Paid Paid Fam. Mat. Fam. Mat. Step-Step Step-Step Full Hse. Full Hse. Boy Boy Grounde- Grounde-
HGTV Paid Paid Before Dream Rescue House Spaces Land- Land- Ground Over Sweat
HIST History Vietnam Heavy Metal (cc) UFO Files (cc) Wild West Tech (cc) American Eats (cc) The Universe (cc)
LIFE Paid Paid Paid Married Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Side Order of Life
NICK Neutron Phantom Lazy- OddPar- Neutron Neutron Sponge Sponge OddPar- El Tigre Avatar |Avatar
SCI Paid Paid , Paid Paid Paid Paid The Twilight Zone (s) Movie: ** Epicenter (2000) (Gary Daniels)
TBS Dawson's Creek (s) Harvey Harvey Movie: ** Now and Then (1995) (cc) Movie: ** Boys (1996) (Winona Ryder)
TCM Movie: **** Fury (1936) (Sylvia Sidney) Movie: *** Angels With Dirty Faces (1938) Movie: ** Alias Boston Blackie |Cartoon
TLC Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Clean Sweep (cc) Home Made Simple |Moving Up (cc)
SPIKE Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Reality Racing Movie: *1/2 Johnny Mnemonic (1995)
TNT Law & Order (s) Golf: British Open -- Third Round. (Live) (cc) Movie: *** Charlie's Angels (2000) (cc) Charmed (s) (cc)
UNI Control ICaliente Tu Desayuno Alegre: Fin Pinky Carmen |Bill LenteL- |Trato Mochila Azul
USA Coach Coach IPaid Paid Paid Paid Movie: ** Legionnaire (1998) Movie: Into the Sun

HBO Movie: *** Doc Hollywood (1991) 'PG-13' Movie: *** The Devil Wears Prada (2006) Movie: How to Eat Fried Worms Sports
SHOW 1(5:30) Movie: Honey IMovie: ** Audrey Rose (1977) 'PG' (cc) Movie: ***/2 Diva (1981) iTV. 'R' | In Pot We Trust (iTV)
TMC Movie: ** CrissCross (1992) 'R' | Movie: **,2 Beat the Drum (2003) 'NR' (cc) Movie: **1/2 Beauty Shop (2005) (s) 'PG-13' |Holiday


SATURDAY AFTERNOON JULY 21, 2007
12:00 12:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30

S WTVR Wiese Dragon 3 2 1 Pen Veggie Paid Action Sports Cleveland. (Live) (s) (cc) Beach Volley.
( WPEC Paid tPaid Paid Paid Action Sports Hawaii LPGA Golf: World Match Play Champ. Horse Racing (Live)
@ WTCE Fun Food Friends Bibleman lGoliath Kids Club McGee Stories News Jacob News Church Praise
) WPBF (9:00) Golf: British Open -- Third Round. (Live) NASCAR Emperor Replace ISo Raven So Raven IBrit. Highlights
( WFLX Baseball |Paid Sports |Paid |Idol Rewind Paid IMLB Baseball: Regional Coverage
g WTVX Movie: **/2 Man on Fire (2004) (Denzel Washington) Movie: *** Waiting to Exhale (1995), Angela Bassett 170s Show 70s Show
(a WXEL Garden Garden Work- House Ask This Home- Wdwright Real MotorWk Painting Painting Watercol

AMC (11:30) Movie: *** Cheyenne Autumn (1964) (Richard Widmark) Movie: **** The Untouchables (1987) (Kevin Costner) Insomnia
ANIM 7 Deadly Strike Planet Earth (cc) Planet Earth (cc) Meerkat Meerkat Interns Ilnterns Miami Animal Police
A&E Movie: ***1/2 A Few Good Men (1992) (Tom Cruise) (cc) IMovie: ***1/2 The Hunt for Red October (1990) (cc) |Sell
BET Access |106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live Top 25 Countdown (cc) Rap City Top 10 (cc)
CNN CNN Live Saturday In the Money (cc) CNN Live Saturday Investigations CNN Live Saturday CNN Live Saturday
CRT Power-Justice The Investigators The Investigators The Investigators Psychic |Psychic North Forensics
DISC MythBusters (cc) Dirty Jobs Dirty Jobs Dirty Jobs Dirty Jobs (cc) Dirty Jobs (cc)
DISN Kim [Replace Movie: The Haunted Mansion Montana Suite Life Montana So Raven Phil Montana Montana
E! Movie: **1/2 Office Space (1999) |Katie Katie Girls Girls Hip Hop Wives Rock Star Wives
ESP2 ATV Racing Tour (N) Softball: 2007 World Cup Final ATP Tennis: Countrywide Classic NASCAR Racing: Busch Series
ESPN Bowling 1Bowling |Bowling Bowling Series of Poker ISeries of Poker Series of Poker Horse Racing (Live)
EWTN EWTN Family Celebration (Live) Faces Wrks Gospel . EWTN Family Celebration (Live) Family Ceeb IGroes-
FAM Sabrina Sabrina Sabrina Sabrina Movie: ** Maid to Order (1987) (cc) Movie: ** Sleepover (2004) (Alexa Vega)
HGTV 'ai rd pCu(rbc Shave Baths Decorat- |Decorat- Mission d Get It Divine |Divine Color reDesign
HIST The Universe Earth. The Universe (cc) Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers Mega Disasters (cc)
LIFE State of Mind "Pilot" Movie: **s/2 Aurora Borealis (2005) (cc) Movie: Vanished Without a Trace (1999) View of Terror (2003)
NICK Nicktoon Nicktoon Nicktoon |Nicktoon Sponge |Sponge Neutron |OddPar- |Avatar |TEENick Sponge |Drake
SCI Movie: **/2 H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds Movie: *** V The Day After (1983) (Jason Robards) (cc) Tornado: Nat.
TBS Movie: **% A Knight's Tale (2001) (PA) (Heath Ledger) (cc) |Movie: ** Road Trip (2000) (cc) ** Without a Paddle
TCM Movie: **e/2 Shalako (1968) (Sean Connery) Movie: *** Jack the Giant Killer (1962) Movie: ** Thunder Road (1958) (cc)
TLC Trading Spaces (cc) What Not to Wear What Not to Wear A Model Life Moving Up (cc) The Real Estate Pros
SPIKE Hrsepwer Muscle Xtreme Trucks! Movie: ** Fire Down Below (1997) CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn
TNT Charmed (s) (cc) Charmed (s) (cc) Charmed (s) (cc) Charmed(s) (cc) Movie: * Panic Room (2002) (cc)
UNI Mochila Azul Bajo el Mismo Techo La Parodia Alfonso Villapando; Alicia Machado.) Primer Impacto
USA (11:00) Movie: Into Movie: * Desert Heat (1999), Pat Morita (cc) Movie: * Half Past Dead (2002) (cc) Sudden Death (1995)

HBO Sports Movie: *** Batman Begins (2005) (Christian Bale) (cc) Big Love Big Love Movie: *** The Devil Wears Prada (2006)
SHOW In Pot Movie: **/2 Diggstown (1992) 'R' (cc) Movie: **2 The Longest Yard (2005) (cc) |When Stand Up Stood Out'R'
TMC (11:35) Movie: Last Holiday |Movie: ** The Amityville Horror (1979) 'R' Jiminy Glick in Lalawood (2004) |Movie: Rize (2005)


SATURDAY PRIME TIME JULY 21, 2007
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

0 WPTV News (cc) NBC Ent. Tonight Singing America's Got Talent (s) (cc) Medium (s) (cc) News (cc) Sat Night
B WPEC News (cc) News Paid Paid The Unit (s) (cc) 48 Hours Mystery (s) 48 Hours Mystery (s) News (cc) CSI
D WTCE (5:00) Church Praise Coral Ridge Hour In Touch-Dr Hour of Power (cc) Billy Graham Classic Theater Travel Rd
a WPBF News ABC Fortune Jeopardy Movie: **/ The Princess Diaries (2001) (Julie Andrews) (s) (cc) News (N) Park Day
D WFLX (3:30) MLB Baseball Cheers Sports Cops (cc) Cops (cc) |Most Wanted |News (N) Mad TV Fred Willard.
SWTVX Friends Friends King King Movie: ** Meet Joe Black (1998) (Brad Pitt, Anthony Hopkins) Without a Trace (s)
SWXEL Legends |Music Lawrence Welk Great Performances at the Met "Eugene Onegin" (s) (cc) Breaking the Curse

AMC (5:30) Movie: ***V 2 Insomnia (2002) (cc) Movie: **1/2 There's Something About Mary (1998) Movie: *** Dave (1993)
ANIM Funniest Animals Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey Movie: Ghost Cat (2003) (Michael Ontkean) Homeward Bound
A&E Sell iSell Sell Sell |Flip This House (cc) Flip This House (cc) |Match tMatch American Justice
BET 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live BEToAwards'07 From Los Angeles. (cc) Hell Date | Baldwin
CNN Lou Dobbs This Week at War Investigations Larry King Live CNN Saturday Night Investigations
CRT Forensic Forensic Forensic |Forensic Forensic |Forensic Evidence evidence Evidence Evidence Holly- |Holly-
DISC Dirty Jobs MythBusters (cc) Tomb Builders Secrets of Egypt's Lost Queen Man vs. Wild
DISN Life Life Montana |Suite life Montana |Life Replace Emperor So Raven Life Suite Life Montanae
E! True The Soup E! News Weekend Celebrity Weddings Girls Girls Saturday Night Live The Soup Talent
ESP2 NASCAR Gearz Car Auction Countdn NASCAR Racing: Busch Series -- 250. From Madison, Ill. (Live) Drag
ESPN SportsCenter (Live) (cc) |David Beckham Soccer: Chelsea at Los Angeles Galaxy. (Live) (cc) SportsCenter (Live)
EWTN Angelica |EWTN Family Celebration (Live) Solanus Casey: Priest, Porter |Rosary 5Fr. John Corapi The Journey Home
FAM Movie: ** A Cinderella Story (2004) (cc) Movie: **� Legally Blonde (2001) (cc) Movie: **/2 Legally Blonde (2001) (cc)
HGTV Remix |Remix 24 Hour House To Sell |Kitchen Color |Divine TDime |Dime Get It |Chal-
HIST Mega Disasters (cc) Human Weapon (cc) Movie: **� Flight 93 (2006), Ty Olsson (cc) Decoding the Past The mystery of cults. (cc)
LIFE (5:00) Movie: View Movie: Too Young to Marry (2007) (cc) Side Order of Life State of Mind "Pilot" Army Wives (cc)
NICK School |OddPar- OddPar- Sponge |Movie: The Last Day of Summer (2007) (cc) Videos Full Hse. Full Hse. Full Hse.
SCI (5:00) Movie Movie: Magma: Volcanic Disaster (2006) ovie: Atomic wist er (2002) (cc) Movie: Tornado! (cc)
TBS (5:00) Movie King King Movie: ** The Chronicles of Riddick (2004) (PA) (cc) Movie: *** Signs (2002) (cc)
TCM Movie: *** Foul Play (1978) (Goldie Hawn) Movie: ***12 Pride and Prejudice (1940) Movie: The Importance of Being Earnest
TLC Property Ladder Flip Flip Property Ladder (N) Flip That |Flip The Real Estate Pros |Property Ladder
SPIKE CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn Movie: *** Sin City (2005) (Jessica Alba, Devon Aoki) Enter
TNT Movie: **� Underworld (2003) (cc) Movie: ** Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001) |Movie: ***/2 Minority Report (2002) (cc)
UNI Locura Noticiero La Hora Pico SSbado Gigante . Impact Noticiero
USA (5:00) Movie: Sudden Movie: Mercenary for Justice (2006) (cc) Movie: Second in Command (2006) (cc) Burn Notice (cc)

HBO Movie: ** Monster-in-Law (2005) 'PG-13' Movie: ***� Little Miss Sunshine (2006) Bill Maher-Dec. John-Cincin.
SHOW Movie: *** Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) Meadowlands (cc) Movie: *� In the Mix (2005) (cc) |Movie: The Longest Yard (2005)
TMC Movie | Movie: ** The Baxter (2005) (s) Movie: **/2 Last Holiday (2006) 'PG-13' Movie: Beauty Shop (2005) (cc) 3-Way R'




READING A 1


I IecalNoi


NOTICE
Independent Newspapers will
never accept any advertise-
ment that is illegal or con-
sidered fraudulent. In all
cases of questionable val-
ue, such as promises of
guaranteed income from
work-at-home programs - if
it sounds too good to be
true, chances are that it is.
If you have questions or
doubts about any ad on
these pages, we advise that
before responding or send-
ing money ahead of time,
you check with the Better
Business Bureau at
772-878-2010 for previous
complaints.
Some 800 and 900 telephone
numbers may require an
extra charge, as well as
long distance toll costs. We
will do our best to alert our
reader of these charges in
the ads, but occasionally
we may not be aware of the
charges. Therefore, if you
call a number out of your
area, use caution.


Services



Babysitting 405
Child Care Needed 410
Child Care Offered415
Instruction 420
Services Offered 425
Insurance 430
Medical Services435



Ron's Pressure Washing
& Minor repairs .
Roof coating, Repair to
Mobile Homes & more.
No job to big or small. Free
estimates. 863-763-7675 or
cell 863-261-1565
License # 2423


Merchandise



Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines535
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer 'Video 580
Crafts. Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes. Linens & Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment,'
Supplies 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps.Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies.'
Equipment 665
Pets/'Supplies/
Services 670
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television,'Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740




CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONER:
Package unit, with heat, 07
model. $1575.
561-447-0339


SCALES, antique, weighs up
to 5,000 grams, $225.
(863)467-4328


FREEZER: Large w/ Locking
capability. Mint condition.
Great for the hunter, $300
(561)951-6088
RANGE, Electric, Maytag,
White, $75. (863)675-2348
REFRIGERATOR, GE: Side By
Side, Ivory color. Great con-
dition. $100. (863)697-2087
STOVE, FRIDGE, WASHER &
DRYER- All in good working
condition. $125. or will sep-
arate. (863)467-8965
STOVE- Gas, Magic Chef, 20",
Excellent condition. $125.
(863)467-1530
STOVE- good shape, $50
(863)447-5985


ST D MO I


CHAIR, Leather, Burgundy, 6
months bid, excellent condi-
tion, paid $600, asking $400
(863)763-0583
CHINA CABINET, Solid wood,
2 pc. w/5 shelves. Hand
Made. 6' tall, 4" wide. Must
see! $500 (863)763-8943
CHINA CABINETS (2), White
w/gold trim, glass doors &
shelves, 74"hx40"wx17"d.
$200/both. (561)790-6589
COFFEE TABLE, Oak w/glass
inlay top. $25
(863)763-7931
CURIO CABINET, $75 or best
offer. (863)634-9017


-.6-


BROADCAST STATIONS


Newspaper Carriers Needed
For 0keechobee Area. Call
Mike 800-932-2489 Ext: 3583
Please Leave Message


Financial



Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315

Bus i Ie
Opporunitis. 030


I I


helps you understand the -
world around you. / ^.


STOVE, Kenmore, electric,
with new circuit board &
burners. $100
(863)467-2507
STOVE- Kenmore, Self clean-
ing, Smooth top, white. Exc.
cdnd. Moving, Must sell
$250. Neg. (863)634-3841
WASHER & DRYER: Frigidiare.
Like new. $300 for both, will
sep. (863)261-4809
WASHER & DRYER- Kenmore
70/80 Series 1 year old. Like
New with 2 year warranty
$600. 720-284-4018
WASHER & DRYER, Whirl-
pool, Heavy duty. Extra Ig.
capacity. Works great. $250.
(863)675-4443
WASHER, Kenmore, 3 yrs.
old, $75. (863)634-3650


HAIR STRAIGHTENER- Maxi
Glide, used only once. Paid
$140 asking $80
(863)357-8265
SALON EQUIPMENT
2 Black Wet Stations w/bowls,
mirrors & appliance holders. 2
All Purpose Styling Chairs. 3
Reception Chairs. Used only
3 months. $1500/all.
(863)357-3568



FRENCH DOORS: 1 pair, In-
terior, 2.0, 10 glass panes
per door. Solid wood. Natu-
ral. $100. (863)763-2763
PLYWOOD (10 sheets): 3/4",
4x6 sheets. $120 will sep.
Call (561)762-4620 Jupiter
area.


CAPTIANS BED- Twin, w/
matching dresser. Lt color
wood. Good cond. $200. or
best offer. (863)675-0600
STEP 2 FIREHOUSE BED- with
mattress. Good condition.
$75. (863)697-2704
TODDLER BED- Little Tykes
Fire Truck with mattress. Ex-
cellent condition. $75.
(863)675-0600
TRIPLET STROLLER- Do you
need a ride for three? Ingle-
sina, very lightly used. $395
(863)228-0244



CHINA- Lennox dinnerware
pattern, Starlight complete
w/extra pcs for 8 chosen FDR
WH $1995. (863)467-7718


MEN'S CLOTHING- 12 pairs
Brand Name shorts 38 to 42.
clean & good cond. $40. Will
sep (863)634-7765 Okee


ELVIS COLLECTION: Many
items, Rare items, items from
Graceland, memorabilia. $500
neg. (863)467-0627
FOOTBALL/BASEBALL CARDS
(1000)- Racing & Comic, late
Os early 90s Exc. cond. $300
or best offer!! 863-763-8943



COMPUTER, Dell, 2 mos. old,
17" flat monitor, photo all in
1 printer, mouse, pad, sell
for $850. (863)467-9868
COMPUTER XP, Complete,
with all in one printer, cus-
tom built. $150.
(863)763-7950
DELL- Brand new, Never
used. Windows installed
Complete. $250. or best of-
fer. (239)324-2386 LeBelle
DELL SCHOOL COMPUTER:
Pentium 4, Window XR Etc.
$150. (863)517-2782 Tony
GATEWAY- Like new condi-
tion. $150. (863)983-4940
ROUTER, Linksys wireless-G
Broadband, w/speed boost-
er, 2.4-GHz 802.11g, $50.
(863)634-0245
SONY LAPTOP- With all origi-
nal disks-trade for pistol or
$600 (772)461-8822



FIREPLACE- Beige, Electric,
Like new. $350. or best of-
fer. (863)467-8161
FIREPLACE- Brand new. $200
or best offer (863)763-6747


BED FRAME, Queen/King, $25
(863)805-2801
BED, king size, with frame
exc. cond., $300.
(863)763-6747
BED, Queen, headboard, foot-
board & rails. $60
(863)805-2801
BEDROOM SET- King size,
with dresser w/mirror & 2
nightstand's. Like new.
$600. (863)697-2704
BUNK BEDS- Wood, includes
mattresses. Badcock brand
w/horse on end. Good cond.
$150 neg. (863)528-0901
CANOPY BED SUITE- Twin sz,
incid mirrored dresser, night
stand, desk book case.
$350. (863)763-0669


COUCH, LOVESEAT & 2 END
TABLES, $350 or best offer.
(863)634-9017
DINING ROOM SET: Broyhill,
with hutch. Paid $1700. Ask-
ing $300. 863-467-5756
DINING ROOM TABLE, Broy-
hill, Pine, Knotted Wood. 2
leaves makes 8 ft. long.
$100. (561)951-6088
DINING ROOM TABLE, Wood-
en w/ 4 chairs. Like new.
Paid $500. Asking $300.
(863)697-0424
DINING TABLE- With matching
china cabinet, 4 chairs &
leaf. Good cond. $600 neg.
(863)528-0901
DOUBLE FUTON- Wooden
w/roll out drawer. Perfect
condition. $450.
(863)675-1936 LaBelle
DRESSER, 3 drawer & night
stand Good condition. $80.
Will separate.
(863)467-4095
DRESSERS, 1 white, 1 brown.
$80 for both, will separate.
(863)467-5756
ENTERTAINMENT CNTR, Wall
Unit, Light color w/glass drs.
Fits 29" TV. 6'Tx54"W. Good
cond. $100. (863)763-2763
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER-
Holds 32" television, made
of solid wood, has drawers.
$175 (239)839-0795
ENTERTAINMENT CTR- 10'x7',
White, Orig. $4000. Will sell
for $300. or best offer,
(863)467-8161
GLASS TABLE TOR Safety,
heavy plate glass w/beveled
cut edges, octagon, 5'x5'.
$50 (863)674-5753
LOFT BEDS with attached
desk, 2 black metal, $70/will
separate. Call
863-763-8572.
LOUNGE CHAIR, Small, beige,
$25 (863)467-5206
LOVESEAT - w/matching chair
& solid wood cocktail table.
Excellent condition. $325
firm. 863-675-5729
MATTRESS & BOXSPRINGS,
New condition, full size. $75
(863)467-5206
MATTRESS- Queen/King. New
in plastic. $189
(561)848-8765
MATTRESS- Twin/full, new in
plastic. $139
(561)848-8765
SLEEPER SOFA- 7ft Carlton,
beige color, excellent condi-
tion, $295 or best offer.
(863)673-2593
SLEEPER SOFA: Floral design.
Excellent condition. $175.
(863)763-5216
SLEEPER SOFA, Gray plaid
queen. $100 (863)763-7931
SOFA & LOVESEAT- Hunter
green leather. Excellent
Quality. $750.
(863)763-4088
SOFA, Leather, Like New &
Kitchen Island, Stainless steel
and solid wood. Great cond.
$370. Will sep. 720-284-4018
SWIVEL ROCKER- Green,
good condition. $25
(863)610-0020
TRUNDLE BED, New, with new
mattresses, sheets & bed
pads. $200 (863)467-2507


Do-It-Yourself Ideas


Farm Play Set
Old MacDonald himself
wouldn't be able to resist this
do-it-yourself farm playset.
The big red barn is filled with
horses, cows, pigs, sheep,
chickens and ducks. There's
even a tractor and wagon
with bales of hay. Just trace
the pieces onto wood, cut out,
assemble and paint. The barn
measures 21 in. long by 15
in. wide by 14 in. tall.

Farm Play Set plan
(No. 898) . . $9.95
Wooden Toys Package
3 other plans
(No. C125) ... $19.95
Catalog (pictures hundreds
of projects) . . . $2.00
Please add $4.00 s&h
(except catalog-only orders)

To order, circle item(s), clip
and send with check to:
U-Bild
3800 Oceanic Dr., Ste. 107
Oceanside, CA 92056.
Please be sure to include
your name, address, and the
name of this newspaper.
Allow 1-2 weeks for delivery.

Or call (800) 82-U-BILD
u-bild.com
Money Back Guarantee


WHAT NOT SHELF- Corner,
Can hang or placed on floor.
Approx. 4' to 5' Exc cond.
$15. (863)467-7659



GOLF CART- E-Z Go with'
dumper/gas. Good condition.-
$2500 (772)341-3707/'
(863)467-2104
GOLF EQUIP: Complete set of
clubs, cart & bag, 1-9, pitch-
ing wedge, putter, 1 doz golf
balls. $50. 863-675-6178 .


CZ-52 WALNUT GRIPS- good
condition, .223 timbs, $200
(863)697-1443
GUN- Smith & Wesson model
640 Harmless 357 mag.,
Stainless. $425-
(772)461-8822



CROSS TRAINER: Elliptical
Cardio, Pro-Form brand, ex-
cellent condition. $200.
863-675-3944 Labelle
FITNESS MACHINE- Weider
Crossbow Advantage. One
year old.$300 or best offer
(863)675-3838
NORDI TRACK weight fitness
system, $300. Call
863-467-1694.
POWER HOUSE: Fitness Ma-:
chine w/leg attach. & Body,
By Jake Ab Scissors. $400,
will sep. (239)324-2550
TOTAL GYM MACHINE- Has
all equipment but needs 1
cable. $100 (863)983-6319,
TREADMILL & EXERCISE
BIKE, $300 for both, will sep.
Call (239)324-2550
WEIGHT BENCH - 300 Idbs'"
Phoenix, good condition,
$150/best offer. Call-
863-697-2087.



GOODMAN AIR Handler
w/heat kit, brand new, 1.5 to'
2 ton, never been installed,
$550. Call 863-801-3174.



COOKER, 18 quart, brand new,
$20. Call 863-610-4674.


RING- Mans, 15. Solitaire in
10 Kt. band. Excellent condi-
tion. $250. (863)763-2458
WEDDING RING SET: Gold
band, diamond solitaire & a
6 diamond wrap. Pd. $1500,
Sell $500. (863)763-8828



PATIO CHAIRS- 4, Clean.
$6.00. Call (863)357-0344
or 863-610-0754.


ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR, Jaz-
zy, looks & runs like new,
$2500. (863)763-7609
MOTORIZED CHAIR, Hover-
round MPV4, exc. cond.'
list price $6200, sell for4
$1,000 neg. (863)634-8872








Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007 Il


ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR: Med-
ics, "Cadillac of wheelchairs!"
Immaculate, used very little on
carpet only. Paid $5000, asking
only $1000. 863-447-0448
POWER CHAIR: Pride Jazzy
#1113 w/joystick. Exc cond.
Small turn radius. New $5800,
Now $1090. (863)763-6907
SCOOTER, Electric: Golden
Champion. Comes w/ Vehi-
cle Lift. Like new. $1000. or
best offer. (863)697-3152
SCOOTER: Golden Compan-
'ion, Good condition. $650.
,(863)634-8581
SCOOTER- Large, Space sav-
er, Exc cond. Pd $5000.
Asking $800. 863-983-8037


ADULT MOVIES (150+), VHS,
.Adult, XXX, $575. or best of-
,fer. (561)633-1371
DECORATOR ITEMS: Wicker
Mirror, Etc. Palm Tree/Safari
Design. $300 for all, will sep.
Call for info. (863)675-4443
FLAG POOL- 25', W/gold ball
topper. Line, Hooks & flag
included. Will sacrifice. $95.
(863)635-1513 Frostproof
PATRIOT MAGNIFIER, close
circuit TV for visually im-
paired, w/accessories,
$1500 neg. (863)467-5058



CLASSICAL GUITAR- With
case, good starter guitar.
$75 (863)824-0801
DRUM SET, 13 pc., Pearl Ex-
port Series, emerald green
w/accessories. $800
(863)467-5906
GUITAR CABINET: Custom
Built 77"Tx42"W, 2 solid
doors & shelf, Reduced to
$299. neg. (561)633-1371
GUITAR, New Squier Strat,
w/cover, SP10 Squier Am-
plifier, black, Some music.
$199. (863)357-8788
KEYBOARD, Cord M1, Works
good. Asking $1,500. or best
offer. (863)612-6295 La-
Belle
P(ANO & ORGAN- Good condi-
tion $600. Will separate.
863-983-8037
PIANO: KIMBALL, Upright w/
Bench. Excellent condition.
$500. (863)763-5216


AMERICAN BULL DOG- 7 mo.,
Male, Up to date with shots.
Reg. w/papers. $200.
(863)673-0232
CHIHUAHUA PUPS- Not T-
Cups. 12wks, 3 Blondes, 2-
F, 1-M, CKC, Health cert.,
$200. each (863)801-1302
DOBERMANS: AKC, Lg. Bred.-
Shots/Wormed. Docked &
Dewclaws done. $550 & up.
Ready 8/30. (863)763-6703
DOG PEN- Brand new 10 x 10
chain link. $150 firm
(863)532-0188
DOG PENS, (4), Large chain
link dog pens & also large
plastic dog crates, $680 will
sell sep. (863)6f2-0992
FRONTLINE PLUS, For cats.
10 vials. $100
(863)674-5753
LOVEBIRDS, Mated, with large
cage & nesting box. $100
(863)697-8731
MALTESE DOG: 1 year old
adult, female, small size,
$550. Call (863) 983-1970.
PIT BULL- Blue, 4 weeks old.
Purebred, $350.
(863)673-5513
PIT PUPPIES, Red Nose, pure-
bred, $150 each, ready to
go. Call 863-634-3721
PIT/CURR MIX, (4), dark
chocolate, males & females,
$50 each. (863)697-3657
SIAMESE KITTENS: DOB
4/15/07, Seal Point & Seal
'Point Snow Shoe.
(863)357-3369
WHOOPS! German Shepherd /
Chesapeake Bay Puppies: 7
wks. old. Adorable, must
see. $200. (239)246-6739
YORKSHIRE TERRIER- CKC
reg. Female, 2yrs old, black
& tan, playful & loving $350
(863)697-0286



HOT TUB, "Hot Springs", exc.
cond., You Move! $1500.
, (863)763-4987


ELECTRIC GOLFCART '94- Fair
condition-needs work. $100
(863)228-2123
FISHING ROD, 801b custom
fod w/Penn reel, Murray
brothers. $200
(863)983-4940 $0
TREE STANDS (2): For hunt-
Ing. $70 negotiable or will
sell separately.
]63-763-7609



AMPLIFIER- Kicker SX650 all


digital & Kicker L7 12" sub.
New in box, never installed.
$350 (863)634-2131
BOOM BOX- Sanyo,
AM/FM/CD/Cassette player.
24"L x 9"W $30
(863)763-0625
CB PLAYER - Brand new, $30.
Call 863-610-4674.
MATT JUGGERNAUTS (2),
.15", in a box. $700 or best
offer. (863)634-6476
PIONEER STEREO, York &
Bose speakers. Oldies but,
still plays good. $150.
(863)634-3659
SPEAKERS, Custom 4 12"
box, nice Ig port, very loud, 3
Memphis HP (M3) subs.
$350 (863)634-7157


RCA- 32", With remote. Works
great. $75. (863)467-8965


GENERATOR- Coleman 6250
surge 550 run watts. W/220
volt ext. cord. Approx 2hr run
time. $450. (863)467-6372
GENERATOR- Generac, 7550,
good condition, electric start,
500 (863)697-1443
PORTABLE AIR COMPRES-
SORS (2) 1- 3hp vertical
tank, 1- 2hp 20 gal tank,
$370 or sep (561)676-0427
TOOL BOX- Aluminum single
lid, excellent condition. $100
firm. (863)635-5186
TOOLBOX, 16 drawer, Snap
On roll cab, air tools, sock-
ets, wrenches, $800 will sell
separately. (863)697-0234
WELDER, Portable & Air com-
pressor. Mounted on trailer.
$1500. neg. 561-758-4337



KENMORE VACUUM, Canister
style, like new w/tools. $80
(863)467-7659


ANTIQUE GLASSWARE &
PORCEALINE, Collectibles &
Collections of ALL Kinds.
Call Diana (863)467-8408


Agriculture



Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed 'Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845
Lawn & Garden 850
Livestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds/Plants/
Flowers 865




TIRE, For Farm Tractor, Pulley.
Good shape. $50.
(863)467-0987
TRACTOR, Small, diesel, 3
cyl. w/turf tires & 5 Ft. box
blade. Runs excellent. $3500
or best offer. (863)634-5820


HORSE TRAILER- '99, Bee 2
horse bumper pull trailer.
Good condition. $3500. or
best offer. (863)634-5820
SADDLE- HP Western, 17",
with accessories. Like new
condition. $275.
(863)763-0367 or 801-9494



CRAFTSMAN LAWN TRAC-
TOR- 42" cut, good deck,
new blades, needs little carb.
work. $350 (863)983-2255
GARDEN TILLER- Honda
GX160, 5.5 HP, rear tine,
heavy duty. $300
(863)674-0098
LAWN MOWERS, 1 Scag, 48"
cut, $5000 & 50" cut Dixie
Chopper, $4500.
(863)227-0533
MOWER: Swisher, 44", pull
behind, 10.5 B&S, runs
great, $400 or trade for a 4'
bush hog. 863-675-1816
RIDING MOWER, 2004 1000L
John Deere w/extra blades.
Needs minor work. $400. or
best offer. (863)467-9395
RIDING MOWER- Craftsman,
42", 19hp, w/bagger, $450
(863)675-0016
RIDING MOWER- Snapper,
8hp Briggs & Stratton, fresh
30" blade + 1 extra blade.
$250 (863)673-5206
ROTO TILLER- Attach Troy
Built Big Red, 12hp, elec.,
exc. cond. $2800 new, sell
$1200 neg (863)763-1377


SADDLE, Deluxe, custom
Veech rancher, seat size
16.5, $800. (863)467-2104


Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses - Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House - Rent 930
Land - Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945


Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960



BEAUTIFUL
SAMATHA'S GARDEN
APARTMENTS
Behind Capt. D's. 2br/2ba,
$900 mo. + 1st, last & $600.
sec. dep.863)634-578,0 or
(863)467-9250 '
NW OKEECHOBEE: 2BR, 2BA,
on quiet St. Kids & pets ok.
$850/mo. 1st, last & $500
sec. 561-346-1642.


BRAND NEW, 3BR's/2BAs,
lots of tile, garage, $1200.
Lawrence Associates,
1-800-543-2495.
DIXIE RANCH, 3BR/1BA, Cen-
tral air & heat.
863)763-7622 or
863)697-8325
Indian Hammock, 1800 sq.
ft., 3/2, w/2 stall barn,
fenced, $2400 mo., 1st, last
& sec. (863)467-0831 ask
for Judy
OKEE.: (2) 2br/lba, unfurn
duplex's. $650/mo + 1st mo
dep. 3624 SE 35th Ave.
(239)707-5155
OKEE., 3br, 1ba, Carport,
Yard, W/D, Partly Furnished
$1150. mo + Sec. 1008 SW
2nd Ave. (954)658-0108



SGreat Location!
OFFICE
SPACE
* Downstairs
Close proximity to new
court house. 863-763-4740



BEDROOM with BA, full house
privileges, incl. utils.
$125/wk. 1stVlast. Sec. dep.
No pets. 863-467-0624.



MOORE HAVEN- New '07,
55+ Comm., D/W, 2br/2ba
on river Bring boat/yacht!
Beautifully landscaped. Wa-
ter & Electric at dock.
$1200. mo. (786)290-1542


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property - Sale 1010
Condos'
Townhouses - Sale 1015
Farms - Sale 1020
Houses - Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property - Sale 1035
Land - Sale 1040
Lots - Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property - Sale 1055
Property Inspection1060
Real Estate Wanted1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080




Oak Lake Apts., Remodeled
2br, 11/2 ba, 2 Story, Fenced
patio, $860 mo., 1st, last +
$800 sec. (863)634-3313


BUY NOW! Brand new CBS
. 4 Bdrm., 2 Ba., 3654 NW 5th
St., $995 mo. $145,000.
(863)484-0809
NEW HOME ON YOUR LOT!
Features 3BRs/2BAs, Ig. LR;
garage, $118k, includes per-
mit fees. Lawrence Asso-
ciates 1-800-543-2495
RENT TO OWN: New 3/2/1 in
Basswood. 1700 sf., gar.
$1200. mo. + 1st, last &
sec. dep. 561-718-2822



Southern Alabama Hunting
Club, 2,238 acres, 3 spots
available for '07-'08 season,
dues are $1,000 yr. Call
(863)634-4983 for more info


BASSWOOD
For sale by owner.
Price reduced!
(863)467-2712 or 634-3580
BUCKHEAD RIDGE, Vacant,
Lake access, canal lot, with
seawall & boat ramp, beautiful
view $76,500 (772)349-9738


Mobile Homes



Mobile Home - Lots 2005
Mobile Home - Parts 2010
Mobile Homes - Rent 2015
Mobile Homes - Sale 2020




AN AMAZING OPPORTUNITY
Waterfront, Clean & Quiet,
Okeechobee Nicest. From
$750. mo. (772)215-0010
ON RIM CANAL: 3 BR, 2 Ba.,
$850 mo. + $500 sec. dep.
Pay own electric. No Pets
863-697-0214
SW, 2BR/1BA, w/d, porch,
$500 mo. & 1BR 1BA cot-
tage, tile, full kit., porch,
$450 mo., city water incl.,
1st last & sec.


(561)346-4692



-BANK REPO'S-
MOVE TO YOUR LAND
Mobile Home Angels
561-385-4694
MOBILE HOME '88-CORSAIR,
unfurnished, located in Whis-
per Creek 55+ community. In
LaBelle area. $10,000 or best
offer. (239)839-0795
MOBILE HOME '94- 3 Br, 2
BA, 1674 sq. ft. on almost 1
acre in Moore Haven. Behind
high school. Call Rey for
more info. (480)226-7564


PALM HARBOR HOMES
Certified Modular &
Mobile Home Specialists.
Call for FREE Color Brochures.
(800)622-2832
PALM HARBOR HOMES
Factory Liquidation Sale.
2006 Models MUST GO!
Call for FREE Color Brochures
(800)622-2832


Recreation



Boats 3005
Campers.'RVs 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles. ATVs 3035



AIR BOAT, w/180hp Lycoming
engine, trailer, exc. cond.
$6500 (863)673-0783
ALUM BOAT, 13ft., 15hp
Johnson, with roll on trailer,
runs great. $1200 or best of-
fer. (863)763-5631
BOAT- 14' Flat bottom, alum
w/trailer. Mariner 2.5 HP,
motor & Minnkota 65 trolling
motor. $800 (863)674-0098
BOAT: 15/2 FT., Aluminum, V-
Haul, 20 hp Johnson, Tr.,
Brand new Minkota Trolling
Motor. $600. 863-357-4837
BOW RIDER - 15FT, 40HP
Merc., also w/trolling motor
and trailer $2500 or best of-
fer (863)467-5906
CANOE- 14', Fiberglass, 3
seats, paddle & PVC stand
included $150.
(863)635-1513 Frostproof
CENTER CONSOLE '92- 17ft,
50 Mariner, new salt water
trolling motor, aluminum trlr,
$2000 (863)634-1567
DINGY- 1OFt., Avon, can take
up to 10 HP motor, $275.
Call 863-265-0255
FISHING BOAT: 1756 G3, 17
Ft., Center Console, 5 per-
son, 60 hp Yamaha 0/B, Salt
Water Trolling Motor w/ trail-
er. Garage kept. Only used 9
hrs. $9,500. 561-262-6547
FISHING BOAT- Aluminum,
'1977 Lone Star, with trailer.
Good condition. $450.
(863)763-0410
JET BOAT '72- 18ft, 454 Board
30 over, Wright Hull, roller
everything, motor will go in
vehicle, approx 550 hp, De-
mon carb, matching trir,
$3600 (863)634-1567 or
(863)763-4349
LAKE AND BAY '03, "Boca
Grande" 20 Ft., '03 Yamaha
225 hpdi VMax, 80 hrs. War-
ranty 'til '09, Custom tandem
Boat Master trir. All like new.
$34,900. 239-691-4004
NEW AIR BOAT SEATS- cush-
ions, slips, any color, $200
each (561)644-1957
PONTOON BOAT, 20 ft., 48hp
Evenrude, $2250 or best of-
fer. (863)467-2712 or
(863)634-3580
PONTOON BOAT- 24', 90hp
Merc Mariner, W/brand new
control cables. Trailer (new
tires) $4500. (561)315-9703
SAILING DINGY 8 Ft., fiber-
glass. Complete w/sails &
oars. Excellent shape! $590
(863)265-0255
SKEETER BASS BOAT- '89-
16ft, 150-XR2 Merc, New
Minnkota trolling motor,
matching trir, $4000
863)634-1567 or
863)763-4349
SPORTSCRAFT- Tri hull- walk
thru windshield, 60hp Mari-
ner outboard, galv trailer,
$650. (863)467-8038
V BOTTOM - 16', Alum., 35hp
Merc., Trolling mtr New trailer.
Runs great. Needs wood repair
$1000. (561)261-0766


CAMEO-CARRIAGE, '99, 32',
all fiberglass, Ir, dr, elec.
slide, Ig. a/c exc. cond.,
$12,900. (561)346-4692
DODGE '89, Motor home, high
top, stove, fridge, shower,
good motor, body, tires.
2500 (561)602-0602
DUTCHMAN 1994, 27 Ft. w/
Florida Rm. LaBelle area.
Must be moved. $4000. neg.
(989)656-9933/553-7734


DAVIT, for Jet Ski, with cradle,
hand crank, piling mounted,
$200. (863)675-1033
SEADOO GSI '97- with trailer,
runs great, $1700
863)634-1567 or
863)763-4349



FISH FINDER & BOTTOM
FINDER- Hummingbird 400
Series. Like new. $75.
(863)634-1545
PROPELLER- For Evinrude


motor, 17" Pitch. Recondi-
tioned. $50. (863)634-0433


KAWASAKI 400, '78, runs
great, $1800 or best offer.
(863)634-1598
KAWASAKI KZ1000 '82-
Runs and looks real good.
Asking $1800. or best offer
(863)634-3344
SUZUKI S40 Boulevard 2007,
650 cc, Black. Extra fea-
tures. 500 mls. $4000 or
best offer. (863)610-0045
TRIKE 2005, Suzuki / Lehman,
4500 mis. $15,000.
(863)227-0336


FOUR WHEEL DRIVE PARTS-
Dana 60-Dana 44 matching,
(2) 205 gear driven transfer
cases, NP 4 spd, $1200 for
all (863)634-1567 or
(863)763-4349
FOUR WHEELER- '98 Suzuki
250, 4x4, Runs good. Needs
a little TLC. $500.
(863)634-0399
IRON BUMPERS- front winch
mount & guide grill guard,
$150, Rear round w/hitch
places $100, (4) Core radia-'
tor $50 (863)634-1567 or
(863)763-4349
SUZUKI RM250 '05: Dirt bike.
Mint condition, runs good.
$2500. Neg. (863)261-4633
or (863)357-2271


Automobiles



Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks4040
Parts - Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers -1065
Vans 4070



BUICK REGAL LS '01, Sun-
roof, On-Star, leather, 98k,
a/c, runs great. $5300.
(863)467-5534
BUICK ROADMASTER '96-
good cond., runs wells,
white, tan Ithr, 4dr, all power,
clean $5800 (863)467-1392
CADILLAC SEVILLE '93- Pearl
white, great cond, leather in-
terior, good on gas. $2500
or best offer (863)357-3639
CAMRY TOYOTA- '94, 4 cyl.,
A/C, Tilt wheel & Cruise
Good transportation. $2100.
(863)467-1655
CHEVROLET CAMARO '94,
Burgundy, 5 spd, V6, 127k.
$2000 or best offer.
(239)560-4604
CHEVY CELEBRITY, '88, low
miles, runs great, looks ok,
great work car, $800 or best
offer. (863)634-7598
CHEVY CORSICA- '91, White,
Runs, Good shape. $800. or
best offer. (863)261-5101
CHEVY NOVA '76, Runs good.
Needs minor body work.
$800 (239)503-5131 Ask
for Ramon, after 5:30pm
FORD EXPLORER '92- Runs
excellent, needs muffler &
tires. Blue in color. $1500
(863)357-8265
GMC SONOMA '95- Cold A/C,
4 cylinder, manual 5 speed,
runs great, well maintained.
$2500 (772)220-6023
MERC GRAND MARQUIS '90-
5.0, runs great, All power.
good rubber, $1200. or best
offer. (863)467-6805
MERCURY 1985, Full Size Sta-
tion Wagon, Runs and Drives
great. $800. (863)357-2370
or (863)634-1324
MITSUBISHI 3000GT, '94,
red, exc. cond., 55k mi., gar-
age kept, w/cover, beautiful,
$8,000. (863)763-3547
NISSAN 200SX, '95, 4 cyl.,
auto, great air, like new tires,
new battery, exc. in & out,
$2500. (863)357-0037 Okee
TOYOTA CAMRY SE- '07, Red,
6 cyl, Leather, Dual exhaust,
15K mi., Rear spoiler.
$23,000. (863)447-1060


DODGE CHARGER '76, Sport
coupe, great condition, all
original. $500 firm.
(863)801-4519



JEEP WRANGLER, 1989 -
4x4, 97K mi., new tires,
$3,500. Call Cody at
863-697-8531.


AUTO TRANSMISSION, for
Dodge, around '93, over-
drive, off 318 V8, $350 or
best offer. (863)612-5676
BUMPER- Ranch hand full re-
placement, fits '03-up Chevy
HD pu. $800 negotiable.
(863)697-1692
CARTOP CARRIER- In excel-
lent condition. $65
(863)635-5186
CHEVY 3/4 TON P/U '54, with
6 cyl & 4 spd trans., runs
good. $800 (863)763-1370
DODGE PICKUP TOPPER-
Leer Crown, fullsize bed.
Good cond. but needs paint.
$250 neg. (239)369-3269
DUMP TRUCK '77, Allison
auto transmission, does not
run. $400 (863)763-1370
ENGINES, (2), diesel, single
cyclinde, 1 dolly, (6) 750.16
tires, $750 will sell sep..
(863)763-2378/801-3190


FIBERGLASS TOPPER for full
size truck, fits most beds,
key lock, exc. cond.
$600/neg. 772-519-2256.
FLARESIDE F150, tailgate,
chrome bumper & taillights,
$250 will sell separately.
(863)634-7608
FUEL TANK- 150 gal. $100. or
best offer. (863)634-7318
JEEP PARTS- 4.OL engine,
trans. case, 5 spd manual,
new clutch, 3 1/2" lift, seats,
etc. $750 (239)895-3269
REAR BUMPER, for '94 Mazda
Pickup, new, still boxed,
$400 new, sell for $275.
(863)763-6449


RE-CAP TIRES
(2) 425/65R22.5, 80% rub-
ber, $175 for both or will sell
sep (561)676-0427
RIMS & TIRES, 24", 6 lug, fits
Chevy & Nissan Titan,
$2500 (863)673-2314.
RIMS & TIRES (4), from '07
Escalade, 18", alum. alloy, fit
GM trucks, very nice. $700
(863)763-0944
RIMS (4)- 15X10 inch, univer-
sal 5-4/3/4 by 5-4/1/2 with
tires. Good cond. $300 firm.
(239)675-0088 before 9pm
RUNNING BOARDS- Factory,
Fits '99-'07 Ford Super Duty
Crew Cab P/U. $200.
863-697-0328 Heather
RUNNING BOARDS, for late
model Ford F150, asking
$125. (863)467-4328
TIRES, (4), brand new, 13",
$175 or best offer.
(863)467-8856 Iv. name &
phone #.
TOW DOLLY, Kar Kaddy, circa
1984, exc. cond., newly
painted & rewired, good
tires. $600 (863)946-0697
TRANSMISSION, Turb 700,
rebuilt, $350 or best offer.
(863)467-8856 Iv. name &
phone #
TRUCK BED- 8ft, 'for 2002
Ford F250, $500 or best of-
fer (863)447-5985
TRUCK CAP - green, for step
side p/u, good cond., asking
$225/neg. (863)357-6315
or 863-634-8731.
TRUCK PARTS- (1) '05 Ford
Banks diesel tuner (1) '04
Dodge Banks diesel tuner.
$700 both (239)895-3269
TRUCK TOOL BOX- full size
pickup, aluminum, deep well,
from Tractor Supply, good
cond., $125. (863)763-4992
TRUCK TOPPER for '80-'96
"Ford longbed, double drs &
toolboxes, great condition.
$425/neg. 863-801-3174.
WHEEL: From 2007 Dodge
Ram, 8 lug, polished alumi-
num. $400. or best offer.
(863)697-0424
WINDSHIELD, off a '93 Dodge
Ram van. $75
(863)612-5676


Chevy 1500 '89- 8 ft bed
w/camper top. $500 or best
offer. (863)983-2255
CHEVY- '90, Shortbed, Auto.,
A/C, Runs great. $800.
(863)261-3358
DODGE PICK UP 1995, Club
Cab, 3/4 To, HD, Cummins
diesel engine, Auto. trans,
4wd, Air, Possi Traction,
$10K Neg 8673-3496 or
863-675-2473 after 7pm
DODGE RAM 1500- '03, 4x4,
Quad cab, Hemi. Excellent
condition. $16,900.
(863)675-1493
FORD F100 '78- Mark II top-
per, 302 V8, runs good, new
tires, brakes, $950 neg
(386)216-0113 Muse
FORD F250 '89, 7.3 Diesel,
4x4, a/c, 5 spd., utility box,
runs good, $1900
(863)675-1862
FORD F350, '88, 18' car haul-
er, Warren winch, cold air,
cd, runs great, $5500.
(863)357-1784/634-2454
GMC SIERRA- '05, 4x4, With
ext. cab. Excellent condition.
$21,500. (863)675-1493
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE La-
redo 1993, Not pretty, but
runs, runs, runs! $600 or
best offer. (863)357-5867
TOPPER- Fiberglass. Fits Ford
F150. Standard cab. 6' bed.
Tan, tinted windows $500.
(772)263-6481
TOYOTA PICKUP '95, 4x4,
Good body & running gear.
Motor blown. $2500.
(863)824-0970


CHEVY SUBURBAN: 1986,
4x4, runs good. $1700. or
best offer. 863-763-0605
CHEVY TAHOE '01, 88k miles,
tan leather int., fully loaded,
4wd, exc. cond. Must see.
$15,500 (863)467-9902
JEEP CHEROKEE, '95, white,
$2200 or best offer. MUST
SELL!!! (863)763-4821


DUMP TRAILER '01, 7x12,
double axle. $2500 firm.
(863)697-2032
UTILITY TRAILER - Tandem
axle, like new, $1,250/best
offer. Call 954-605-4340.


DODGE CARGO VAN '96, 2500
model, V8 auto., p/w, cold
air, ladder racks, great for
work. $1675 (561)758-4337
DODGE GRAND Caravan,
1997 - very good shape, all
power, a/c, $2,500. Call
863-763-8225.
FORD AEROSTAR '87, V-6,
Motor runs good. Needs
trans. Many new parts. $150
or best offer. (863)763-0967


MITSUBISHI VAN '87- Low
miles, dependable, seats 8
or can move seats . $1000
or best offer. (863)357-3639
REAR SEATS, (2), for '87 Ply-
mouth, gray, good shape,
$175. (863)763-6449 or
jvaguilar@earthlink.net
VW VAN '76 - Rusty, does not
run, 100lK + miles, interior
in good cond. $500
(863)467-4258

How do you find a job in
today's competitive
market? In the employ-
ment section of the clas-
sifieds


Community Events


SFWMD to host public meeting Aug. 4
There will be a meeting on Saturday, Aug. 4, from 10 a.m. until
noon at the South Florida Water District (SFWMD) Okeechobee Ser-
vice Center, Bank of America Building. The purpose of this meeting is
to provide an opportunity for SFMWD to meet with community mem-
bers that are interested in using the restored Kissimmee River Valley
region for public use and recreation. Learn about the Kissimmee River
Restoration Project and recreational opportunities available for you on
SFWMD land. For information, call Jeff McLemore at (800) 250-4200,
ext. 3022.

Cancer support group to meet
The Okeechobee Cancer Support Group will meet the first Thurs-
day of every month beginning Aug. 2. Each meeting will be held from
5:30 until 6:30 p.m. at the First Baptist Church, 401 S.W. Fourth St.,
room 113. Cancer patients, survivors and supporters are all invited.
The group will share stories and encourage each other as we take
this journey. This support group will provide participants with infor-
mation, resources, support, guest speakers and devotional time and
will help comfort during either your battle or you loved one's battle
with cancer. For information, call the First Baptist Church at (863) 763-
2171.

Main Street plans fundraiser
On Saturday, Aug. 11, Okeechobee Main Street, Inc., will be host a
100 Target Fun Shoot at Quail Creek Plantation. Check-in begins at 8
a.m. and the course will open at 8:30 a.m. The event is open to team
and individual shooters. There will be drawings, door prizes and a
barbecue lunch. For information, call the Okeechobee Main Street at
(863) 357-MAIN (6246).

Red Cross to host water instructor course
The American Red Cross will conduct water safety instructor cours-
es on Aug. 11, 17, 18, 24 and 25. The fee is $160. Applicants must be
at lest 15 years of age. To register, call (863) 763-2488.

Main Street plans next mixer
Buxton Funeral Home and Crematory, 110 N.E. Fifth St., will host
Okeechobee Main Street's Monthly Mixer on Wednesday, Aug. 15,
from 5 until 7 p.m.. There will be door prizes and light refreshments.
The special mega 50/50 tickets.will be available. One lucky ticket will
be drawn at the December mixer. The public is invited. For informa-
tion, contact Karen Hanawalt, program manager, at (863) 357-MAIN
(6246).

Poker run to benefit Hospice
A poker run in memory of Carl and Robin will be held Saturday,
Aug. 25, beginning at Port Mayaca Cemetery at 9 a.m. The fee is $5
per hand. Prizes will be awarded. Proceeds will benefit Okeechobee
Hospice. For information, call Deanne at (772) 260-6801 or Dee at
(863) 634-0492.

Parenting classes planned
Parenting classes for parents with children of any age will be held
each Monday in August at 7 p.m. at New Endeavor High School. There
is no fee for the nine-week class. For information, contact at Lori Ja-
quith (863) 462-5000 or (863) 697-6320.

Church hosting Worldview Weekend
The First Baptist Church, as host church, will sponsor Worldview
Weekend on Oct. 12 and 13 at Osceola Middle School, 825 S.W 28th
St. Speakers representing Worldview Weekend will be Ken Ham, Da-
vid Barton, Bob Cornuke, Brannon Howse and Ron Carlson. The pro-
gram is appropriate for ages 11 and up. Tickets can be obtained from
Debi at (863) 634-3525 or the First Baptist Church at (863) 763-2171;
or, online at www.worldviewweekend.com.

Church hosting fellowship activities
The Fort Drum Community Church will be holding a men's fellow-
ship breakfast at Ruck's Pit every other Saturday starting at 6:30 a.m.,
and a women's fellowship every other Monday starting at 6:30 a.m.
For information or if you need transportation to and from these activi-
ties, call (863) 467-1733.

Class of '57 members sought
Members of the class of '57 from first grade to graduation or other,
please contact Martin Vickers at (423) 727-5631, Reba Platt at (863)
763-8906 or Faith Hawk at (863) 467-6083.

OHS class of '88 planning reunion
The Okeechobee High School class of 1988 has begun making
plans for their 20th reunion. Any members of the class of '88 are asked
to e-mail your name, address and phone number to Larry Peterson,
class president, at ohs l988reunion@yahoo.com. We will update you
after each planning committee meeting. Also, if you have any ideas or
would like to be on the committee let us know in your e-mail.

Church offering help to quit drugs
The Haven of Rest Church, 2947 S.W. Third Terrace, will hold a free
drug deliverance class each Friday during the month of May beginning
.at 6 p.m. Anyone wanting to quit using drugs, or anyone who knows
someone who needs help quitting drugs is welcome. For information,
call (863) 357-3053.

Senior Services offering assistance
Okeechobee Senior Services is currently taking applications for the
EHEAEP grant. You must be 60 and over to qualify for assistance with
electric bills and you must have a shut off notice. Call Kim at (863)
462-5180 for the required documentation needed to apply.

Reunion for OHS class of '98 planned
Any and all graduates from the Okeechobee High School class
of 1998 are asked to please submit your contact information to.ohs-
98grads@yahoo.com. Include your maiden name if appropriate, ad-
dress, phone number, etc. We are in the process of planning our 10-
year reunion. More details will be published as they are available.

Free summer program offered
A Child's World Childcare and Preschool will be offering a free
summer program for 4-year-old children. Space will be limited so reg-
ister early. To qualify for the program the following requirements must
be met: the child must have turned 4 by Sept. 1, 2006; the child could
not have participated in a VPK program during the school year; and,
the parent must obtain certificate of eligibility from the Early Learning
Coalition located at the One Stop Career Center. For information, call
Malissa at (863) 763-5453.

Book Club will meet
The summer read for the Friends of the Okeechobee Library Book
Club is "A Fine Balance" by Rohinton Mistry. The group will meet


Thursday, Sept. 27, at 7pm in the library board room. At that time the
group will discuss "A Fine Balance" and also select titles for the rest of
the fall season. The club will not meet in July and August. For informa-
tion, call Jan Fehrman at (863) 357-9980.

VFW sponsors Operation Shoebox
Big Lake VFW, Post #10539 is looking for all family members --
sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, fathers or mothers -- of those serv-
ing in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan or the Persian Gulf. The Post is spon-
soring Operation Shoebox and would like to send packages to active
military personnel from Okeechobee. Please call (863) 697-2930, or
e-mail Cheryl@oacenterprises.com.






8 Okeechobee News, Saturday, July 21, 2007


60-DY I TY N


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