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 Material Information
Title: Okeechobee news
Uniform Title: Okeechobee News
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Okeechobee News
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee Fla
Publication Date: July 15, 2007
Frequency: daily
regular
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Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
Coordinates: 27.241667 x -80.833056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Daily Okeechobee news

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_Okeecobee NPws
S9 LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
O0 BOX 117007

3.AINESVILLE FL 32611 7007


Vol. 98 No. 196 Sunday, July 15, 2007


Inside
Clewiston woman
killed by husband
FLORIDA KEYS -- Authorities
with the Monroe County Sheriff's
Office have arrested Manuel Pri-
eto Arenas in connection with
the shooting death of his wife,
Clewiston woman Maria Elene
Proenza.
Investigators say Maria Pro-
enza was gunned down in the
Florida Keys last Friday while her
mother watched in horror.
Page 3

Memorial service
for Benoit's wife, son
DAYTONA BEACH (AP)-
- Wrestling dignitaries were
among those paying respects
Saturday at memorial services
for the wife and 7-year-old son
of professional wrestler Chris
Benoit.
Former wrestler Marc Mero,
known as "Johnny B. Badd,"
and Jim Ross, the World Wres-
tling Entertainment announcer
known as J.R., both attended the
services. Page 14

Richmond museums
offer 2 Civil War views
RICHMOND, Va. (AP)-More
than 140 years after Civil War
cannons fell silent, two muse-
ums are offering very different
views of the war between the
states. Page 15

Briefs
Okeechobee
burn ban is lifted
According to Chief Nick Hop-
kins of the Okeechobee County
Fire Department the burn ban in
Okeechobee County has been
lifted. For information call (863)
763-5544.


burn ban limited
According to the Glades
County Division of Emergency
Management parts of Glades
County are still under a burn
ban. For information, call (863)
946-6020.

New watering
limits in effect
The Okeechobee area is now
under Phase III water restric-
tions.
Lawn watering is now limited
to one day a week from 4 until
8 a.m. and 5 until 7 p.m. for low
volume hand watering.
Addresses with odd numbers
are permitted to water on Sat-
urdays and addresses with even
numbers are permitted to irrigate
on Sunday.
More information is available
by calling (800) 250-4200; or, by
going to the South Florida Water
Management website at www.
sfwmd.gov.

Drought Index
Current: 235
Source: Florida Division
of Forestry
Local Burn Ban: None

Lake Levels


9.1 feet
Last Year: 12.27 feet


Source: South
Florida Water
Management
District. Depth
given in feet
above sea level.


Index
Classifieds ....... ... .. 11-13
Community Events................... 4
Crossword................................. 9
O bituaries............................... 6
O pinion................................... 4
Speak Out ........................ ..... 4
Sports.................................. 14
TV ......................................... ..... 9
W weather ..................................... 2
See Page 2 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.


Community Links. Individual Voices.


I 5I I 1I lIlI I II
8 16510 000255 2


Bush deflects war criticism


By Deb Riechmann
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP)--Presi-
dent Bush took his critics to
task Saturday for using the poor
marks the Iraqi government re-
ceived on a progress report this
week as reason to argue that the
war is lost.
Bush acknowledged the Iraqis
received "unsatisfactory" marks
on eight benchmarks, including
failure to prepare for local elec-
tions or to pass a law to share oil
revenues among Sunnis, Shiites
and Kurds. But the president said


"satisfactory" grades the Iraqis re-
ceived in eight other areas -- like
providing three Iraqi brigades for
the military offensive under way
and providing $10 billion of their
money for reconstruction -- were
cause for optimism.
"Our strategy is built on the
premise that progress on se-
curity will pave the way for po-
litical progress," Bush said in
his weekly radio address. "This
report shows that conditions
can change, progress can be
made, and the fight in Iraq can
be won."


He said the last of more than
20,000 additional troops he or-
dered to Iraq just recently ar-
rived, and U.S. troops deserve
more time to carry out the of-
fensive.
"Changing the conditions
in Iraq is difficult, and it can be
done," he said. "The best way
to start bringing these good men
and women home is to make
sure the surge succeeds."
In the Democratic response
to Bush's radio address, Bran-
don Friedman, a former infantry
officer in the U.S. Army's 101st


Trident Cadets: cool refreshments, high seas fun


Submitted photo/OCSO Youth Development Program
Kirby Dobbs enjoys a watermelon snack at the beach, while visiting the Navy UDT
SEAL Museum in Fort Pierce, as part of the NSW Trident Cadet Program Summer Ori-
entation Camp, sponsored by the Okeechobee County Sheriff's Office.


Submitted photo/OCSO Youth Development Program
Rough weather provided an opportunity for participants in Naval Special Warfare
(NSW) Trident Cadet Program Summer Orientation Camp. The camp, sponsored by
the Okeechobee County Sheriff's Office, is part of the OCSO youth development pro-
gram, and includes a total of six week-long sessions for children ages 7-12. The camp
includes orientation of water safety, safe boating, swimming and a chance to see NSW
equipment.


Airborne Division who served
in Afghanistan and Iraq, said it's
past time for a transition to diplo-
matic efforts in Iraq that Demo-
crats have long demanded.
"The fact is, the Iraq war has
kept us from devoting assets we
need to fight terrorists world-
wide -- as evidenced by the fact
that Osama bin Laden is still on
the loose and al-Qaida has been
able to rebuild," Friedman said.
"We need an effective offensive
strategy that takes the fight to
our real enemies abroad. And
the best way to do that is to get


our troops out of the middle of
this civil war in Iraq."
On Friday, two of the Senate's
most respected Republicans -
- John Warner of Virginia and
Richard Lugar of 'ndiana -- cast
aside Bush's pleas for patience
on Iraq and proposed legislation
demanding a new strategy by
mid-October to restrict the mis-
sion of U.S. troops.
Their measure would require
Bush to submit by Oct. 16 a plan
to "transition U.S. combat forces
, See WAR - Page 2


Couple gives up



seafaring life


By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
At an age when most couples
are thinking about slowing the
pace of life and contemplating
retirement, one Okeechobee
couple embarked on a seafar-
ing adventure.
In 2000, Jack and Sue Crowe,
at ages 54 and 57, respectively,
decided to join the Merchant
Marines.
At that time, they were both
between marriages. Jack said
they were best friends. He
called her his only friend in the
world.
Jack had served three tours
of duty in Vietnam with the U.S.
Navy and then game home to
support his family by becom-
irg a ,..iri.'r He has ad.,Jgth',,
who followed in her father's
footsteps and has been in the
Navy for 11 years.
Sue had been in the insur-


ance business for over 20 years
and had owned her own insur-
ance agency.
He is from Georgia, she is
from New Jersey and they met
in North Carolina.
The adventure began in
Okeechobee when Jack ran
into an Army veteran who de-
scribed the Merchant Marines.
In the Navy, Jack had served as
a boatswain's mate -- a critical
skill in the Merchant Marines.
He was out of work at the
time and decided to give it a
try. He thought it would be a
good opportunity to see the
world and get paid for it. Jack
did not think Sue would join
him. He told her that when his
ship came into an oversea port,
he \ oul'l fly her there to meet
him.
However, to his surprise, his
best friend decided to join him.
See Seafaring - Page 2


Government on



alert- possible



attacks to come


By Katherine Shrader
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Na-
tional security officials worry
about a possible attack against
the United States in the nionths
ahead even though the govern-
ment's leading terrorism ex-
perts have not found concrete
information about an immi-
nent strike.
Homeland Security Secre-
tary Michael Chertoff spoke
this past week of his "gut feel-
ing" that the nation faces an
increased risk of attack this
summer.
President Bush's instincts
point in the same direction.
"My head also tells me that al-


Qaida's a serious threat to our
homeland," he said at a news
conference Thursday. "And
we've got to continue making
sure we've got good intelli-
gence, good response mecha-
nisms in place."
As early as this coming week,
the administration is expected
to release an unclassified ver-
sion of a new National Intelli-
gence Estimate -- spy agencies'
most authoritative type of ap-
praisal -- on al-Qaida's resur-
gence and the group's renewed
efforts to sneak operatives into
the United States.
A look at what the govern-
ment says it is most worried
See Alert - Page 2


Can small properties


house big animals?


Backyard
Barnyard

By MaryAnn Morris
INI/Florida
Having a farm in your own
backyard may be a lifelong
dream or be based on remem-
brances of vacations to a rela-
tive's farm as children. And it
can be so - if you plan. Uncle
Al and Aunt Susie may have
had a far different scenario in
Idaho than backyard farmers
in Florida will encounter.
But if you want animals on
relatively little land as opposed
to many hundreds of acres,


space is a consideration. And
the smaller the plot - the big-
ger the consideration. Local
laws often govern the number
and breed of animal you may
keep on your land and private
deed restrictions can also be a
consideration.
Also, to some extent - the
bigger the animal, the bigger
the consideration.
For instance, can you keep
a horse, or a cow on an acre or
two? But where will you store
feed? How much feed will
you need to store? How much
room does it take up? What
kind or storage considerations?
See Animals - Page 2


INI/Katrina Elsken
On large ranches, cows have plenty of room to graze, as well as sources of water. Backyard
farmers should consider the amount of space needed for each animal before they buy any
livestock. '


.ax


I �Wl






2 Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


WAR
Continued From Page 1
from policing the civil strife or
'sectarian violence in Iraq" to a
h'arrow set of missions: protecting
Iraqi borders, targeting terrorists,
protecting U.S. assets and training
'fraqi forces. The bill suggests the
'.Jan be ready for implementation
'.y next year.
L Senate Majority Leader Harry
1.eid balked at the proposal be-


Seafaring
'Continued From Page 1
"This might be something I
pan do," Sue thought.
, She said it was something any-
ody could do if they can pass a
- hysical.
As they were undergoing rigor-
6ous physical exams, the reality of
,the hardship of life at sea and the
lack of medical services began to
fsink in. It was then that Jack real-
,ied he wanted to make his best
friend his wife, so he proposed
.and she accepted.
;: They both underwent exten-
sive training. Sue helped Jack
study for his exams and he taught
4her the knots he had learned in'
'the Navy.
i- Sue worked in the galley on'
4ier first two ships. She got tired
-of that and transferred to the deck
force. Onboard a metal hulled
�hip there is a constant battle
)against rust caused by the salt air.
'She spent a lot of time chipping
rust and repainting the deck. She
-tlso steered the ship, operated the
Yadar and moored and unmoored
the ship.
Sue described the experience
as challenging.
"It was struggle to fit in and
still act like a lady," she said of her
experiences with predominately
Male crews.
Their travels took them to Eng-
Jand, Scotland, Norway, Spain
~n>i the eastern U.S. seaboard.
i, In March of 2000 they reported
their first ship, the Cape May
-a passenger liner. They also
served on three ships of the Mili-
ay Sealift Command. These are
avy owned, non-combat ships
manned by civilian crews.
Part of their training included


Alert <'*
fL'.oninued From Page 1
Uout and what it is doing to thwart
potential attacks:

transportation
fChertoff is asking people to be
:n watch for suspicious behavior
q activities in transit systems or
piher public places. "When you
dee something, say something," he
bften says. That means picking up
Hie phone to alert local authorities
bt federal law enforcement about
lything out of the ordinary, such
a suspicious person, package or
While.
j Just before the July 4 holiday,
lthe Transportation Security Admin-
istration dispatched VIPR teams
E(Visible Intermodal Protection and
Response) to airports and mass
transit systems in Washington, Bal-
timore, New York, Boston, Phila-
lelphia, Houston, Los Angeles and
Pan Francisco.
, They include canine teams,
agency officers trained in behavior
Observation, additional air mar-
4hals, surface transportation secu-
fity inspectors and local police.
j Federal air marshals already had
olstered their presence on domes-
lic and international flights since
last August, when international
Authorities foiled a plot to blow up
about 10 U.S.-bound jetliners com-
ng from London. That stepped-up
presence continues today.
L The department also sent out
bulletins to state and local officials
about routine steps they can take
and new precautions after the
largely botched car-bomb plot in
Britain late last month.
i Any more precautions expected
this summer? "It can change at a
tnoment's notice," said Chertoff's
Spokesman, Russ Knocke.

ITreasury
The Treasury Department is
keeping close watch for fresh clues
bn sources of financing for terror-
ist groups. Yet counterterrorism of-
ficials say that attacks do not have



Animals
Continued From Page 1
closed containers? Inside stor-
pge? Do you own a vehicle you
�an use to pick up feed and hay or
will that have to be purchased or
will you have to arrange for feed
fo be delivered?
-" That raises -- or drops -- the
next consideration. Manure.


cause it would not require Bush
to implement the strategy. He said
he prefers legislation the Senate
will vote on next week that would
order combat troops out of Iraq
by next spring.
Bush spokesman Tony Fratto
said the White House would re-
view the Warner-Lugar measure.
"But we believe the new way
forward strategy -- which be-
came fully operational less than a
month ago -- deserves the time to
succeed," he said.


Through top aides and in pri-
vate meetings and phone calls,
Bush has repeatedly asked Con-
gress to hold off demanding
change until September, when
the top U.S. commander, Gen.
David Petraeus, and U.S. Ambas-
sador Ryan Crocker, deliver a
fresh assessment of progress.
The Warner-Lugar proposal
came as the Pentagon conceded
a decreasing number of Iraqi
battalions are able to operate on
their own.


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda

Seagoing couple
The Crowes, Jack and Sue, have some interesting sea sto-
ries to tell about serving together in the Merchant Marines
at a time when most people would think of retiring.


anti-terrorism. Jack said this was
something that would be useful
to everyone in this day and age.
They were taught to be alert and
recognize suspicious activities.
About five weeks before Sept.
11, 2001, they were in New York
and Jack fulfilled one of his life
long ambitions -- to see the Statue
of Liberty. They have a picture of
the New York skyline taken at that
time showing the Twin Towers of
the World Trade Center.
At that time, they knew ter-
rorists were plotting something
against the U. S.
"It's not a matter of 'if' but
'when' something will happen,".
Jack told Sue.


;;to:besexpensive:,The SeptL .�Goom-
n minsion estii.atedl the 201iii a.uacks
cost $400,000 to $500,000.
"By exploiting financial intel-
ligence, the Treasury can, map ter-
rorist networks and reveal who is
sending money to al-Qaida, He-
zbollah and like-minded terrorist
groups," department spokeswom-
an Molly Millerwise said. "These ef-
forts allow us to detect and disrupt
the flow of finances to terrorists,
making it harder and riskier for
them to store and move money."
The Sept. 11 strikes in New York
and Washington hit the country's
financial nerve center and symbol
of capitalism. Since then, regula-
tions have been tightened to better
guard the financial system against
abuse from terrorist financiers and
others.

Environmental
Agencies
These agencies report a high
level of vigilance but few if any spe-
cific changes because of the latest
worries.
With 4,000 law enforcement of-
ficers, the Interior Department says
it is keeping busy. It is charged with
protecting one of every five U.S.
acres. "We ask our employees al-
ways to be vigilant," spokeswoman
Tina Kreisher said.
The officers have bolstered se-
curity along borders, at sites such
as the Statue of Liberty, the Liberty
Bell, Independence Hall and the
Washington Monument, and at
national assets such as Bureau of
Reclamation dams and the roads
that lead to them.
The Environmental Protection
Agency is the lead for hazardous
materials response and works
closely with industry. Under a gov-
ernment mandate, chemical mak-
ers are taking stock of chlorine,
anhydrous ammonia (the basic
ingredient for most nitrogen fertil-
izers) and other "chemicals of con-
cern" that could -- if stolen -- cause
damage by release or explosion.

Energy and Nuclear
Nuclear power plants long have


The average horse produces
10 tons of manure a year. Will you
haul it off? Compost it and put it
on the garden?
With enough acreage to pas-
ture your animals, some of those
questions are answered. Horse
manure will dry out then a lawn
mower set high will spread it to
provide organic fertilizer back
on the pasture. The price is right,
too!


The couple was in New Or-
leans on Sept. 11, 2001, which
happened to be Sue's birthday.
Shortly afterward they were on
an intelligence gathering ship, the
USNS Loyal, bound for Scotland.
When Jack reported onboard the
Loyal, he was logged onboard as
"able bodied Seamen Crowe and
wife.",
Because of security problems,
the Loyal ended up moored at a
Norwegian Navy base rather than
in Scotland. The Crowes were
part of a civilian crew that oper-
ated the ship while intelligence
operations were conducted by
military people onboard.
Being married did have one


been-viewed.as a top target of ter-
.rorists,:and have lightenejd secuilirv
since Sept. ,1. But the latest con-
cerns have not led to significant
changes or alerts. "We are paying
close attention to what the intelli-
gence community is reporting and
will act accordingly," Nuclear Regu-
latory Commission spokesman El-
iot Brenner said.
At the Energy Department,
which oversees the government's
nuclear weapons facilities, includ-
ing its national research labs, se-
curity requirements have been
revamped since 2001, especially in
the protection of nuclear materials.
Thousands of miles of oil and
natural gas pipelines as well as re-
fineries also have been regarded as
potential terrorist targets. But with
no specific threat, the industry's
response to the latest concerns has
been simply to remain cautious.

Agriculture
The Agriculture Department is
most concerned about devastating
animal or plant diseases that could
be introduced intentionally into the
United States. These include avian
influenza and others that could
move from animals to humans.
The department has worked
with farmers and shippers to edu-
cate them on prevention against
tampering, asking them to make
sure supplies are locked, for ex-
ample, and asking truckers never
to leave shipments unattended.
The department also is work-
ing with veterinarians to make sure
they are knowledgeable about ex-
otic diseases that may appear in
animals.
Other concerns include the
misuse of agricultural pesticides
and the entry of suspicious people
through U.S. border farms, which
often are expansive and largely un-
protected.

Food and Drug
The Food and Drug Administra-
tion is helping foster the develop-
ment and acquisition of vaccines,
diagnostic tests and drugs that can
be used against attacks including
anthrax, botulism, radiological


Do the area veterinarians
make "house calls?" What do
they charge? Can you go together
with neighbors who also own
large animals and split the cost?
If you have a horse or two same
questions about the farrier.
If you have an acre or two or
three, will barnyard activities be
welcome in the neighborhood?
Are there deed restrictions that
prohibit some types of animals?


At a news conference Friday,
the outgoing chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Peter
Pace, said the number of battle-
ready Iraqi battalions able to fight
independently has dropped from
10 to six in recent months despite
an increase in U.S. training ef-
forts. Pace said the readiness of
the Iraqi fighting units was not
an issue to be "overly concerned"
about because the problem was
partly attributable to losses in the
field.


advantage. Ol board a ship, ev-
erything is cramped and space is
at a premium.lThey were the only
married couple onboard the Loy-
al at that time. They were each
assigned a stateroom. They lived
in his stateroom and used hers for
storage. Sue said their marriage
stood the test of five months in
that small stateroom.
They tried to have their work-
ing hours -- or watches as they
are called at sea -- to coincide so
they could have time off together.
That was not always possible.
One time onboard the Loyal they
had trouble getting shore leave
together. When a relief was found
for Jack, the entry in the ship's log
read "able bodied Seaman Crowe
and his wife left together."
In addition, the couple served
* onboard the USNS Linthal, an
oiler that supplied fuel to Navy
ships. There were two other mar-
ried couples onboard that ship.
They also served onboard the
USNS Comfort, a hospital ship.
In 2002, Sue began to have
second thoughts about the sea-
faring life.
"At 60, I decided I better look
at things differently," she said.
She was also beginning to
have health problems. During her
time at sea she became a great-
grandmother. Sea life is extremely
hard on family relations.
Sue said that if it were 10 years
earlier she might have stayed at
sea.
Jack decided that that if Sue.
could go to sea with him, he
could stay home with her.
Now the couple resides in
Okeechobee where he has re-
sumed his career as a painter.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.
com. Reporter Pete Gawda may be
reached at pgawda@newszap.com.


agents, smallpox and plague.
In a declared emergency, the
FDA can authorize the use of unap-
proved medical products to diag-
nose, treat or prevent illnesses due
to biological, chemical, radiological
or nuclear attack. The agency has
the authority to investigate the sus-
pected tampering of the products
it regulates -- a list that includes
drugs, vaccines, blood, medical de-
vices and food.
With the FBI and the Agriculture
and Homeland Security depart-
ments, the FDA has begun assess-
ing various foods _ from a list of
roughly 30 to determine their vul-
nerability to attack at various points
in the production process. In 2005-
06, for instance, the FDA visited yo-
gurt, baby food, bagged salad and
other producers.
The FDA considers foods pro-
cessed in large batch sizes, or in-
gredients subsequently mixed with
large amounts of product, the most
vulnerable to terrorism.

Defense
There has been no overall
change in protection measures for
domestic military installations. Indi-
vidual commanders have authority
to increase inspections or patrols
when necessary. Checks of traffic
going into some Washington-area
bases have gotten more rigorous
this summer, for example.
Basic security at military installa-
tions has been at the next-to-lowest
level for more than four years. Pro-
tective measures added in recent
years include entry barriers, road
closures, surveillance cameras and
armed guards, and programs to en-
courage service members arid their
families to report signs of possible
terrorist planning.
Military bases are acknowl-
edged to be vulnerable, particularly
those close to urban areas and civil-
ian roadways. Naval bases have the
added problem of securing water-
fronts and surrounding waterways.
Editor's note: Associated Press
writers Jeannine Aversa, John Hei-
Iprin, H. Josef Hebert, Mary Clare
Jalonick, Andrew Bridges and Lo-
lita C. Baldor contributed to this
report.


What about any odors? Check it
out.
But most of all, talk to your Ag-
ricultural Extension Agent. That
is the person and the organiza-
tion all farmers rely on for up to
the best, up to date information
about raising animals or crops on
the large or small place.
In Okeechobee County call
(863) 763-6469 to speak to an
agent.


Okeechobee Forecast
Sunday: Partly cloudy with scattered afternoon showers and thun-
derstorms. The high will be around 90. The wind will be from the
southeast 5 to 10 mph. The chance of rain is 50 percent.
Sunday night: Partly-cloudy with a slight chance of showers and
thunderstorms through midnight. The low will be in the lower 70s.
The wind will be from the east around 5 mph. The chance of rain is
20 percent.

Extended Forecast
Monday: Partly cloudy with scattered afternoon showers and thun-
derstorms. The high will be in the lower 90s. The wind will be from
the east 5 to 10 mph. The chance of rain is 40 percent.
Monday night: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of evening show-
ers and thunderstorms. The low will be in the lower 70s. The chance
of rain is 20 percent.
Tuesday: Partly cloudy with scattered showers and thunderstorms.
The high will be in the lower 90s. The chance of rain is 40 percent.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of evening show-
ers and thunderstorms. The low will be in the mid 70s. The chance
of rain is 20 percent.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy with scattered showers and thunder-
storms. The high will be around 90. The chance of rain is 50 percent.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of evening
showers and thunderstorms. The low will be in the lower 70s. The
chance of rain is 20 percent.
Thursday: Partly cloudy with scattered showers and thunder-
storms. The high will be in the lower 90s. The chance of rain is 40
percent.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of evening
showers and thunderstorms. The low will be in the lower 70s. The
chance of rain is 20 percent.
Friday: Partly sunny with scattered showers and thunderstorms.
The high will be around 90. The chance of rain is 30 percent.

Lotteries
MIAMI (AP)--Here are the winning numbers selected Friday in
the Florida Lottery: Cash 3 4-5-3; Play 4 8-1-6-8; Mega Money 11-38-
29-40, Mega Ball: 5

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Okeechobee News
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Okeechobee, FL 34974
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News Briefs

VFW Post sponsors Operation Shoebox
(' t.1 I HOBEE -- Big Lake VFW Post #10539 is looking for all fam-
ily members -- sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, fathers or mothers
-- of those serving in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan or the Persian Gulf.
The post is sponsoring Operation Shoebox and would like to send
packages to active military personnel from Okeechobee.
P1 r,.- call (863) 697-2930, or e-mail Cheryl@oacenterprises.com.

R.O.A.D. office has moved
(OE' 1-IOBEE -- The Recovering Okeechobee After Disaster
(R.O.A.D.) office has moved to 200 N.W. Second St., in Okeechobee.
For information regarding the agency, call the office at (863) 357-
4177. The fax number is (863) 357-1977.

Corps hosting meetings on new lake plan
OKEECHOBEE -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be holding
a series of public meetings dealing with the new water control plan for
Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades Agriculture Area.
The Corps will hold a meeting in Okeechobee on Tuesday, Aug. 14,
at the Okeechobee County Civic Center on U.S. 98 N. The meeting will
begin at 7 a.m.
The plan will be presented at this time, and Corps representatives
will be on hand to receive comments from the public.
For information, contact Barry Vorse at (904) 232-2236.
Revisions to the Water Control Plan can be found online at http://
www.saj.usace.army.mil/h2o/index.htm.

Today's Weather


I� , I







Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007 OTHER AREA NEWS 3


Glades area homeless counted


By Nena Bolan
Special to the Okeechobee News
MOORE HAVEN - Does a per-
son have to live under a bridge,
or push their belongings around
in an old shopping cart to be
considered homeless?
This image of homeless-
ness is not always an accurate
one. According to the Florida
Heartland Rural Consortia for
the Homeless (FHRCH), an in-
dividual is homeless if they lack
a fixed, regular and adequate
nighttime residence, or have a
temporary nighttime residence.
This definition is specified in
Florida Statute 420.621.
Another media image of the
homeless portrays them clus-
tered in urban settings. This is
not accurate either. Inland rural
areas are frequently overlooked
by government agencies and
charities for the homeless be-
cause of the focus on metropoli-
tan areas.
Erica Villafuerte is the presi-
dent of Hendry/Glades Homeless
Coalition, a member of FHRCH,
and that has been in existence
for about a year. Ms. Villafuerte
is also the director of SHIP and
is familiar with the needs of
residents who have inadequate
shelter in Glades County.
She realizes that people may
be surprised to know there are
homeless people in Glades
County. This is partly due to the
stereotype of urban recluses liv-
ing under a bridge. There are
"dwellings" within the county
that simply are not adequate
shelters -- storage sheds, lean-
tos, breezy shacks and rusted-
out travel trailers.
FHRCH researches, data on
the homeless and their charac-
teristics. An estimate of the total


Sanchez


to run for


Congress

Commissioner:
"Enough is enough"

By Naji Tobias
Special to the Okeechobee News
BELLE GLADE - In an an-
nouncement that seemed to sur-
prise many in the Glades area,
Belle Glade Commissioner Ray
Torres Sanchez has announced
that he will run for congress next
year.
The commissioner, formerly
mayor, has served in the Belle
Glade city commission for three
years.
Commissioner Sanchez is slat-
ed to run against U.S. Represen-
tative Alcee Hastings in the 23rd
District of Florida.
Commissioner Sanchez said
that he would aggressively ad-
dress issues such as gang vio-
lence, youth mentoring and child
care.
Commissioner Sanchez said
that gang violence is a serious
problem, specifically in the Belle
Glade area, where police follow
the trail of several gangs operat-
ing in the city.
"I'm tired of seeing the city
being run down by the violence
and drugs that exist here", said
the commissioner. "We need to
step in to give law enforcement
what they need to combat these
issues."
Commissioner Sanchez hopes
to lobby the county and state
legislators for increased finan-
cial support for the Palm Beach
County Sheriff's Office (PBSO) to
improve the quality of life in the
area for residents.
Among other issues, the com-
missioner said he is would like to
look into implementing an afford-
able child care program for work-
ing parents and would like to see
more dollars pumped into recre-
ational outlets in the Glades.
"1 believe that we should invest
time in our children by providing
them with more recreational and
educational opportunities," said
Mr. Sanchez. "The kids are our
future. We must invest now or we
will pay later."
Commissioner Sanchez, who
is strong supporter of FEMA and
that agency's handling of post-
hurricane recovery efforts locally,
said that he would work with


politicians regarding preparations
for future natural disasters. The
commissioner, however, has not
yet laid out an outline for how the
issue will be addressed.
"I want it to be known that it's
important to realize that I will rep-
resent one voice for all people, as
I intend to take all of the citizens'
concerns to Washington D.C.,"
Mr. Sanchez said.


INI/Nena Bolan
Erica Villafuerte is the president of Hendry/Glades Homeless Coalition, and the director of
SHIP. Her office is in the Glades County courthouse on the first floor near the lobby stairway.
Her direct phone line is (863) 946-6004.


number of homeless in Glades
County was completed in Janu-
ary 2007. FHRCH is required
to compile data on homeless
populations that are served in
its six-county, area, including
Glades County.
On this single day of research,
61 people were documented as
homeless by checking with local
resources; social service agen-
cies, the Glades County Sheriff's
Office and Angela Snow, direc-
tor of emergency management;
as well as actual footwork in the
community.
Erica Villafuerte would like
concerned residents to know
that much more time and input
is needed to make really accu-
rate estimates.


She and the members of
Hendry/Glades Homeless Coali-
tion are seeking help from local
schools, churches, law enforce-
ment and advocates for the
needy. They may be able to help
refer families and individuals to
the coalition for help.
According to Ms. Villafuerte,
some people end up homeless
when their mobile home park
is closed, when .FEMA obliga-
tions are finished, when repairs
to storm damaged homes are
delayed and when they are try-
ing to exit a domestic violence
situation.
In addition to identifying the
homeless and preventing more
homelessness, the coalition
wishes to provide transitional


housing and programs that pro-
vide training, credit counseling
and education.
At this time, Erica Villafuerte
is working with the suggested
idea of creating a transitional
shelter that would also serve the
county as an emergency shelter
during storms and other com-
munity emergencies. At present,
there is no emergency shelter
within the city of Moore Haven.
This one facility could have mul-
tiple uses.
"Our biggest focus is making
residents aware that some in-
land rural people are homeless
and in our community," Erica
Villafuerte said.
Staff Writer Nena Bolan can be
reached at nenabolan@yahoo.com.


D>ENTURE
l.OW M- JIA'LiO3Nfr'


Clewiston woman


killed by husband


Victim's mother
witnesses
.daughter's death

By Ideybis Gonzalez
Clewiston News
FLORIDA KEYS - Authorities
with the Monroe County Sheriff's
Office have ar-
rested Manuel '
Prieto Arenas in
connection with
the shooting '
death of his wife,
Clewiston worn- i
an Maria Elene
Proenza.
Investiga- Manuel
tors say Maria Prieto
Proenza was Arenas
gunned down in
the Florida Keys last Friday while
her mother watched in horror.
She was reportedly visiting her es-
tranged husband when she was
shot twice in the stomach and
once in the neck.
Arenas faces charges of capital
premeditated murder and second
degree felony possession of a
weapon by a convicted felon.
According to a report of the
incident, deputies arrived at the
address on Hibiscus Lane just af-
ter 7 a.m. after receiving a call that
a shooting had just taken place.
They found Maria Proenza, a
Clewiston resident who was em-
ployed by the local Wal-Mart, in a
pool of her own blood. Paramed-
ics pronounced her dead at the
scene.
Her mother, shaken and morti-
fied, tried to gather herself enough
to talk to investigators.
The mother, Maria Lastra, had
been traveling with her daughter
when they arrived at the location,
and said that her daughter was
shot after she was confronted by
her husband. Mrs. Lastra said her


daughter was there to retrieve her
belongings and make arrange-
ments for the ownership of a
trailer.
The victim was standing ih
front of her gold-colored truck
when the man reportedly said,
"You want the motor home? You
can have it."
Gunfire then hit the woman
several times.
Investigators determined that
the woman had been shot three
times, twice in the stomach, and
again after she fell to the ground,
she was wounded in the neck.
Her shaken mother called it
"overkill."
The scene was also witnessed
by a mother and son who were
waiting nearby for the school bus
to arrive. The woman told investi-
gators that she heard what sound-
ed like fireworks going off and
turned around to hear a woman
screaming.
Although stunned at what had
occurred, the woman, who was
struck hit by the suspect's vehicle
as he backed up - and came in di-
rect eye contact with him - man-
aged to write down the license
plates of the vehicle as it sped off.
Investigators later found the
vehicle abandoned in a nearby
apartment complex, and retrieved
a bullet lying in plain view inside
the truck, according to the infor-
mation.
Later that day, at approxi-
mately 5:30 p.m., Arenas turned
himself in after several telephone
conversations with officials.
The victim's mother remem-
bered seeing her daughter clutch
her stomach after she was wound-
ed. Sitting in the passenger's seat
of the vehicle, Ms. Lastra heard
her daughter gasp.
"Porque?" her daughter cried,
Spanish for "Why?"
Several people huddled around
the mother to console her.


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OTHE ARE NEW


.Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007







4 OPINION Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


Speak Out
Have an opinion or a question about a public issue? Post
it anytime at the Okeechobee issues forum at http://www.
newszapforums.com/forum58. It is a hometown forum so
visit the page as often as you would like and share your com-
ments (but no personal attacks or profanities, please). You
can also make a comment by calling our Speak Out 24-hour
opinion line at (863) 467-2033, fax (863) 763-5901 or sending
e-mail to okeenews@newszap.com. You can also mail sub-
missions to Okeechobee News, P.O. Box 639, Okeechobee,
Fla. 34973. Comments will be published in the newspaper as
space permits.
FUNDING: I was reading in the paper where the South Florida Wa-
ter Management District had all their bills up on the muck restoration
on the lake. Well I just added it up and it came to $6,700,000. They had
$11,000,000 to spend. What happened to the rest of the money? Did it
go to the Okeechobee Schools?
. Editor's Note: We contacted the South Florida Water Management
District and were told that there are a lot of activities involved that
were not muck removal activities. However, these activities were relat-
ed to improving the lake and were paid for from that $11 million total.
Those activities included the spraying of herbicide on 4,000 to 5,000
acres of torpedo grass that were burned in the fire that started in Buck-
head Ridge and went to Harney Pond Canal. Also, trees were planted
around the southwest section of the lake. Finally, that money helped
pay for dredging muck out of the marina opening at the Pahokee Ma-
rina, as well as the removal of muck from canals in Belle Glade.

LAKE: This is a surprisingly accurate discussion of some of the
problems of the lake without a lot of personal opinions and attacks. I
have a couple questions though regarding some of the content. The
sugar folks are still back pumping? Didn't they stop back pumping
from the south several years ago? The other question is regarding the
Kissimmee River. As I read the reports the water quality from the Kis-
simmee River is not as bad as the Taylor Creek and Nubbin Slough
areas. It seems to me from what I've read that the filling in of the canal
is to restore the marshes for waterfowl and fish but not because of
poor water quality. But no matter how the lake is managed it won't
please everyone. When they put the dyke around it I think it became
more of a reservoir than a lake. If you look at some of the old maps
and surveys of Okeechobee it shows the lake marsh going all the way
up to the tree line by Wal-Mart.
Editor's Note: According to the South Florida Water Management
District while backpumping into the south end of Lake Okeechobee
had been curtailed, it was used on a regular basis during the drought
in 2001. Backpumping helped to hold the water level of the lake. We
were also told that due to the concerns of many people the SFWMD
governing board will be addressing this issue. As to your other ques-
tion, your take on the water quality of the river is correct. Allowing
the water to flow through marshes is an environment enhancement
program and will do a lot to improve the quality of the water coming
down the river. This program is part of the Kissimmee River Restora-
tion project.

Public issues forums
Join the discussion of important issues at newszap.com. Topics include:
*Belle Glade/South Bay issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum51
,Clewiston issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum52
,Hendry County issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum54
*Moore Haven/Glades issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum57
POkeechobee city/county issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum58
* Pahokee issues:http://www.newszapforums.com/forum59
Go to newszap.com, click on your community and then on "community
forums and links."


Community Events

Vacation Bible school planned
Avalanche Ranch is this year's theme for vacation Bible school
'at Treasure Island Baptist Church, 4209 U.S. 441 S.E., from 5:30
,until 8:30 p.m., July 16-20. Activities will be for grades kindergar-
ten through sixth grade. Everyone is invited. For information, call
* (863) 763-0550.

Community Action advisory board to meet
* The Treasure Coast Community Action Agency advisory board
will meet Wednesday, July 18, at 2 p.m. in the conference room at
'437 N. Seventh St. in Fort Pierce. For information, call the St. Lucie
,County Community Services Division at (772) 462-1777.

Fundraiser benefits The Pregnancy Center
The Pregnancy Center of Okeechobee will hold a fundraiser at
the KOA Kampground on U.S. 441 S. from 6 until 9 p.m. on Thurs-
day, July 19. The purpose of the event is to raise funds to re-open
the center at 1505 S. Parrott Ave. Tickets for the steak or chicken
d..inner are $25 per person or $125 per table. The guest speaker
-will be Tim DeTellis. For information, contact Laurie Garner at
.(863) 634-8523.

Church plans to hold Bible school
Fountain of Life Church, 1302 S.W. 32nd St., will host a vaca-
tion Bible school for youth between the ages of 4 and 13 begin-
,ning Monday, July 30, through Saturday, Aug. 4, from 6 until 9
-p.m. For information, call Carol at (863) 763-6602.



Okeechobee News

Our Purpose...
The Okeechobee News is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida.
Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspaper to pur-
sue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no
dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on profit margins below
industry standards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independent's
mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First
* Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the community's deliber-


action of public issues.

We Pledge ...
* To operate this newspaper as a
public trust
* To help our community become a
better place to live and work,
through our dedication to consci-
Sentious journalism.
To provide the information citizens
need to make their own intelligent
decisions about public issues.
* To report the news with honesty,
accuracy, purposeful neutrality,
fairness, objectivity, fearlessness
,. and compassion.
* To use our opinion pages to facili-
tate community debate, not to
dominate it with our own opinions.
* To disclose our own conflicts of
interest or potential conflicts to our
readers.
* To correct our errors and to give
each correction to the prominence
it deserves.
, To provide a right to reply to those
we write about.
To treat people with courtesy,
respect and compassion.


Advertising Director: Judy Kasten

News Editor: Eric Kopp

National Advertising: Joy Parrish

Circulation Manager: Janet Madray

Independent Newspapers, Inc.
* Joe Smyth, Chairman
* Ed Dulin, President
* Tom Byrd, Vice President of
Newspaper Operations
* Katrina Elsken, Executive
Editor
MEMBER
OF: .. > ,o



� Okeechobee News 2007
For More Information See
At Your Service On Page 2


Letters to the Editor


Okeechobee News/File photo

From the photo archives
While cleaning out the old photography darkroom at the
Okeechobee News office, staffers came across a num-
ber of old photos. Some of these photos were taken by
staffers; others were apparently brought in by community
members. No information is available with the photos, but
readers can share any information they might have. Some
of these have been posted at http://photos.newszap.com/
pages/gallery.php?gallery=310113. Or go online to www.
newszap.com, click on "Okeechobee," click on "Florida
photos," and then click on "Okee News Archives." To com-
ment on a photo, open the photo and post your comments
below.



Upcoming Events

Sunday
AA. meeting from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the Church of Our Sav-
iour, 200 N.W. Third St. It will be an open step meeting.
AA. open 12 step meeting from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the Church
of Our Savior, 200 N.W Third St.

Monday
AA. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. This will be an open meet-
ing.
Okeechobee Senior Singers will meet at 9 a.m. at the
Okeechobee Presbyterian Church, 312 North Parrott Ave. Everyone
who enjoys singing is invited to join the group. For information or to
schedule an appearance, contact Patsy Black at (863) 467-7068.
The Okeechobee Historical Society meets at noon at 1850
U.S. 98 N. Join us with a covered dish for lunch, followed by a busi-
ness meeting. The dues are $10 per person, per year, and are due
in September. For information, call Betty Williamson at (863) 763-
3850.
Narcotics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. for open discussion at
Buckhead Ridge Christian Church, 3 Linda Road. For information call
(863) 634-4780.
Nar-anon Helps the family of the drug user attain serenity and a
more normal home life, regardless of whether or not he or she has
stopped using. We meet every Friday at 8 p.m. at the Buckhead Ridge
Christian Church, 3 Linda Road For information, call (863) 467-9833.

Tuesday
Rotary Club of Okeechobee meets each Tuesday at noon at
Golden Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. The meetings are open
to the public. For information, contact Chad Rucks at (863) 763-
8999.
Alanon meeting will be held at the Church of Our Savior, 200
N.W Third St., at 8 p.m.
AA. Closed discussion meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the Church
of Our Savior, 200 N.W. Third St.
Family History Center meets from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 310 S.W Sixth St. Anyone
interested in finding who your ancestors are is welcome to attend.
There is Census, IGI (International Genealogical Index), Social Secu-
rity Death Index and military information available. For information,
call Robert Massey at (863) 763-6510.
The Camera Club meets every other Tuesday from 5:30 until
6:30 p.m. Learn types and uses of film; speeds and technology; and,
how to see your world and capture it on film. Class is basic through
extensive. Registration is $20, ;aJd each class is $10. Call Bobbi at
(863) 467-2614 for information. �Some of the proceeds will go to-
wards Big Lake Mission's Outireach. .
The Widow and Widow2iyrs Support Group meets at 8:30
a.m. at the Clock Restaurant, 1111 S. Parrott Ave., for breakfast. For
information, call (863) 763-5881 or (863) 357-0297.
Gospel Sing every Tuesday beginning at 7 p.m. The public is
invited to participate with vocal and/or instrumental music. For infor-
mation, contact Douglas Chiropractic Center at (863) 763-4320.
The Gathering Church Overcomers Group meets at 7:30
p.m. in the Fellowship Hall, 1735 S.W. 24th Ave. This is a men's only
meeting. For information, call Earl at (863) 763-0139.
The Okeechobee Lions Club meets at 7 p.m. at the Golden
Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. Anyone interested in becom-
ing a member is welcome. For information, contact Elder Sumner at
(863) 763-6076.
Bible study at the Living Word of Faith Church, 1902 S. Parrott
Ave., at 7 p.m. Informal and informative discussions bring many Bi-
ble truths to life. Everyone is invited.
Grief and Loss Support Group meets every Tuesday at 10 a.m.
at the Hospice building located at 411 S.E. Fourth St. in Okeechobee.
Everyone is welcome. For information, contact Enid Boutrin at (863)
467-2321.
Community Country Gospel will meet at 7 p.m. at the church
next to Douglas Clinic on North Park St. Any individual or group that
enjoys old time gospel music is invited to participate. For informa-
tion, contact Dr. Edward Douglas at (863) 763-4320.
AA. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W. Second St. This will be an open meet-
ing.
The Lighthouse Refuge support group meets at Believers Fel-
lowship Church, 300 S.W. Sixth Ave. from noon until 2 p.m. then
from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m. Women who need emotional support or
someone just to care are welcome. For information call the hot line
(863) 801-9201 or (863) 697-9718.

Wednesday
Martha's House support groups meet each Wednesday. Span-
ish groups meet from 7 until 8 p.m. at the Okeechobee Christian
Church, 3055 S.E. 18th Terrace. Ana Romero is the group facilitator.
Another group meets in the Okeechobee County Health Department,
1798 N.W Ninth Ave., from 5 until 6 p.m. with Irene Luck as the
group facilitator. There is another meeting from 6 until 7 p.m. with
Shirlean Graham as the facilitator. For information, call (863) 763-
2893.
AA. meeting from noon until 1 p.m. at the First United Methodist
Church, 200 N.W Second St. It's an open meeting.
AA. meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the Sacred Heart Catholic
Church, 701 S.W. Sixth St. It will be a closed discussion.
The Okeechobee Jaycees invites everyone to their meetings
each month at the American Legion Post #64,501 S.E. Second St., at
7:30 p.m. They are always looking for new people and new ideas. For
information, call Margaret Bowers at (863) 763-7399 or 610-9176.
NA. meeting at 8 p.m. at the Just For Today.Club of Okeechobee,
2303 Parrott Ave., The Lake Shops Suite K. For information call (863)
634-4780.

Thursday
Cancer Support Group will meet on the third Thursday of the
month to help and encourage women who have been diagnosed
with cancer. The meeting will be held at the American Red Cross of-
fice at 323 N. Parrott Ave. from 5:15 until 6:15 p.m. For information,
call Janet Topp at (863) 824-2899.
AA. Closed big book meeli8 4 i2 rom 8 p.m. until 9 p.m. at Church
of Our Savior, 200 N.W Thin! _________


Thanks
On July 7, 2007, the Taylor
Creek Bass Club and Biig 0' Teen
Anglers Inc. -- with the help of
our community -- came together
and did an awesome job of clean-
ing up and filling three industrial
sized dumpsters.
I would truly like to thank all of
you who either came or donated
items to help us with this cleanup.
We could not have done it with
out the support of our extended
family, Okeechobee County.
There are so many of you I
wish to thank so if I leave anyone
out please accept my apology.
First, the Okeechobee News,
you have covered this event from
day one.
Publix (Kevin Folson); Winn-
Dixie (Linda Ashby); U-Save
(Johnny Gant); Kentucky Fried
Chicken (Tommy and Chris);
Superior Water Works (David
Straight); Pogey's Family Res-
taurant (Doug and Sandy Vest);
DOT (Ben Sheppard); Waste
Management (Russell Roland);
All Clean (Duey); Okeechobee
County Sheriff's Office (Sgt. De-
loney); County Commissioner
Marvin Wherrell; Cooks (Mike
Frost and Rodney Mellette);
Okee-Tantie Park (Susan Baker);


Weigh-In Master (Richie De-
itz); the Okeechobee Magazine
(Mike White); State Law Enforce-
ment Officer (Joe Brooks); Lake
Okeechobee Outfitters (Captain
Bryan Honnerlaw and wife);
County School Board Member
(Kelly Owens); Okeechobee
News: (Lorna Jablonski); Fam-
ily Pierce (Stephanie, Cade and
Grady); Okeechobee Times and
Penny Saver (Phyllis Dwyer and
Tanya Harden); WOKC AM,
Okeechobee, WAFC Clewiston;
Taylor Creek Bass Club (Charles
Eaton and Family); WAVW, Stu-
art, Treasure Coast PBP (Rachael
Simmons); Air Boat Club (Jack
Bylsma); RN (Margaret Miller);
Boys Scouts (Tammy Jansen);
and, Boars Head Meats Show
Case Treasure Coast Division
(Linda Bringger).
So as you can see it took a tre-
mendous amount of volunteers
and sponsors to make this event
productive. To Taylor Creek Bass
Club and Big 0' Teen Anglers
Inc. -- job well done. Be proud of
what you set out to do and did it
well.
And to all of the volunteers -
- thanks.

Charlie Hays


Community Events
t
Business woman's lunch meeting set
A business woman's networking and luncheon meeting will be
held Friday, July 20, at the Golden Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrot
Ave. Networking.will begin at 11:30 a.m. and will be followed by
lunch at noon. Those attending are asked to bring give-away items,
flyers, brochures, business cards and either a friend or business
associate who wants to see their business grow. For information,
contact Robin Delgado at (863) 467-7100; or, by e-mail at www.
flainjurylawyer.com.

Benefit to help needy and homeless
Style Studio custom motorcycle shop and Tattoos with Style will
present a benefit to help Okeechobee's needy and homeless on
Saturday, July 21. There will be a hog roast, 50/50, door prizes and
DJ California Fats. All proceeds will go to Big Lake Missions Out-
reach. For information, call (863) 357-5944.

Collaborative Council meeting set for July 24
The Community Collaborative Council, a part of the Shared Ser-
vice Network, will meet Tuesday, July 24, at 10 a.m. in the board
room of the Okeechobee School Board Office, 700 S.W. Second
Ave. Immediately following the CCC meeting, there will be a brief
planning meeting for those interested in partnering in a local Health
and Safety Fair.

VFW hosting karaoke league
VFW Post #4423 will host a summer karaoke league on July 28,
Aug. 11, Aug. 25, Sept. 8 and Sept. 22 from 7:30 until 9:30 p.m. The
league is open to the public.' Everyone is eligible to enter including
karaoke hosts and members of bands. For information call David
Lee at (863) 697-9002, or Bill at (863) 763-0828.

Cattle drive and ranch rodeo slated
Okeechobee Cattleman's Association and Okeechobee Main
Street will celebrate the National Day of the American Cowboy on
Saturday, July 28. Festivities begin with a cattle drive west of his-
toric Flagler Park that will travel east on S.R. 70 to the Okeechobee
County Agri-Civic Center. There is no admission to this family event.
Activities at the Agri-Civic Center include cowboy poetry, music,
cowboy art, vintage wagons, barbecue and more. The ranch hand
rodeo will begin at 2 p.m. For information, call program manager
Karen Hanawalt at (863) 357-MAIN (6246).

Ranch hosting July 28 barn dance
Saturday, July 28, MI-CIN Ranch, 1000 N.E. 50h Drive, will host
a barn dance from 7 until 11 p.m., following the Cattle Drive and
festivities at the Agri-Civic Center. There will be a cow horse exhi-
bition, and a roping exhibition by D.R. Daniels. The event will be
catered by Dominique's Bar and Grill. There will be a cake walk
and much more. Tickets are $10 per person, and all proceeds will
go to Hospice of Okeechobee. For information call Mike at (561)
635-1267, or Cindy at (561) 236-8990.

Church plans city prayer time
Every Friday throughout the month of July, the Haven of Rest
Church will host a prayer and fasting time to pray for the city of
-Okeechobee from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. For
information, contact Pastor Tom and Rachel at (863) 357-3053.

SFWMD to host public meeting Aug. 4
There will be a meeting on Saturday, Aug. 4, from 10 a.m. until
noon at the South Florida Water District (SFWMD) Okeechobee Ser-
vice Center, Bank of America Building. The purpose of this meeting
is to provide an opportunity for SFMWD to meet with community
members that are interested in using the restored Kissimmee River
Valley region for public use and recreation. Learn about the Kissim-
mee River Restoration Project and recreational opportunities avail-
able for you on SFWMD land. For information, call Jeff McLemore
at (800) 250-4200, ext. 3022.

Parenting classes planned
Parenting classes for parents with children of any age will be held
each Monday in August at 7 p.m. at New Endeavor High School.
There is no fee for the nine-week class. For information, contact at
Lori Jaquith (863) 462-5000 or (863) 697-6320.

SFWMD stages photo contest
The South Florida Water Management District's Okeechobee
Service Center is seeking Lake Okeechobee area photographs for
the 2008 Lake Okeechobee calendar. Winning images will be pub-
lished as the featured monthly photos. Applications will be taken
until July 31 and entry forms and complete contest rules are avail-
able at www.sfwmd.gov/okee - select Info & Education. This con-
test is open to amateur photographers only. Individuals may submit
up to three photos. For information, call (863) 462-5260.


I I


Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


OPINION








Okehoe News Sudy uy1,20 GIUTR


Fruit fly found in Valrico kLivestock news a
I ConInAunity Links. Individual Voices.


VALRICU -- Florida Agriculture
and Consumer Services Commis-
sioner Charles H. Bronson and
U.S. Department of Agriculture
officials has announced that state
and federal agricultural inspectors
are working aggressively to set
fruit fly traps in the Valrico vicin-
ity in response to finding a single
male fruit fly related to the Orien-
tal fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis
complex). The fly was found in
a trap hanging in a sweet orange
tree the week of July 9, during a
routine inspection.
With a wide host range of over
100 different fruits and vegeta-
bles, fruit flies are one of the most
potentially destructive pests in the


world. Most of Florida's crops, in-
cluding citrus, fall within the host
range, which makes it imperative
to act quickly and decisively when
any species of fruit fly is found.
Adult female fruit flies will depos-
it several eggs under the skin of a
host fruit or vegetable. The larvae
hatch from the eggs and tunnel
through the pulp, turning it into a
rotting mass.
Commissioner Bronson said
inspectors with the Florida De-
partment of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services and USDA have
already begun intensive trapping
in an 81-square-mile area sur-
rounding the location where the
male fly was detected. The traps


are baited with a metnyl eugenot
lure that is particularly attractive
to male Oriental fruit flies. De-
partment inspectors routinely
check about 6,200 traps in Hills-
borough County, including 1446
baited with methyl eugenol.
Once intensive trapping deter-
mines whether this fly is simply a
hitchhikers or part of a larger pop-
ulation, agriculture officials will
recommend a course of action.
Because methyl eugenol lures are
so effective, if more flies are de-
tected, eradication efforts may be
confined to simply applying the
lure high on tree trunks and utility
poles until the male population is
decimated.


Bronson announces sweep of


Seminole County businesses


Florida Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson announced
that investigators from his depart-
ment have begun a countywide
sweep of health studios, tele-
marketers and sellers of travel in
Seminole County to make sure
they are registered with the state
and complying with regulations
governing contracts and vacation
certificates.
The proactive inspections,
which began today, are designed
to enhance the consumer protec-
tions offered by Bronson's depart-
ment to Florida residents.
"It is critical that these busi-
nesses are properly registered and
providing consumers contracts
and travel certificates with proper
disclosures," Bronson said. "Busi-
nesses that fail to comply with
those requirements are not treat-
ing consumers fairly and enjoy a
competitive advantage over those


that follow the rules."
The blitz is expected to con-
tinue for two or three days and
will involve visits to each of the
140 registered sellers of travel,
health studios and telemarketers
in the county, as well as visits to
any unregistered businesses that
investigators detect during their
sweep.
Under Florida law, sellers of
travel, health studios and telemar-
keters are required to be regis-
tered with the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices, and those that do not face
initial fines of up to $1,000. The
law also requires specific lan-
guage on health studio contracts,
as well as vacation certificates.
This week's sweep will be
the first of it's kind undertaken in
Seminole County by the depart-
ment in recent years. In the past,
investigators visited Bay, Collier,
Orange and Hillsborough coun-


ties in a similar effort, and addi-
tional counties are expected to be
visited in the future.
Bronson explained the impor-
tance of these types of entities
being registered, saying that au-
thorities cannot track problems
at such facilities or perform au-
dits at them if his department is
unaware of their existence. By
registering them, officials can
keep tabs on these businesses
and assist consumers in instances
where the consumer was treated
unfairly or services paid for were
not provided.
The Commissioner encour-
ages all consumers who have a
question or complaint against
these types of businesses to call
his department's toll-free hotline
at 1-800-HELPFLA (1-800-435-
7352) or visit the Division of Con-
sumer Services website at http://
www.800helpfla.com.


June 1, 2007
Cows
Breaking $51.00
Cutter $45.00
Canner $35.00

Bulls
1000-1500 $56.00
1500-2000 $58.00


Calves
Cows
Strs
Hfrs
Bulls
Yrlngs
Mix
Total

Med #1
150-200
200-250
250-300
300-350
350-400
400-450
450-500
550-600
600-650
Med #2
150-200
200-250
250-300
300-350
350-400
400-450


Monday
637
128


$54.50
$53.00
$46.00

$58.00
$67.00


Tuesday
1431
343
51
108
48


106
28
913 2045


Steers

165-170
145-165
137-152
125-130
117-124
107-115
102-110
99-106
Steers

125-152
120-150

105-127
109-115


Hfrs
150-190
128-150
120-125
115-120
107-116
100-109
95-103
89-92
91- 92
Hfrs
135-190
125-132
114-125
100-115
94-109
90-100


Well the market started back
like fireworks leftover from the
4"' of July. Everything was higher
and we had a pretty big run for
the first week back. Most calves
were $3.00 higher, and cows and
bulls were $1 - $2.00 higher.
W 5 Cattle, Loxahatchee
topped the calf market with a
high of $2.00. Alderman and De-
loney, Okeechobee topped the
cow market with a high of 57.00
Todd
P.S. Bring in your brand to put
on our brand board


4-I~ -'


Sales:
Monday
at 12 p.m.

Tuesday
at 11 a.m.


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EXTRA MONEYS


Farmer struggles to grow hemp on reservation


Fight with DEA
leaves him broke

By Chet Brokaw
Associated Press Writer
MANDERSON, S.D. (AP)
- Alex White Plume hoped his
family could make a living grow.
ing hemp when he first planted
seeds on an Indian reservation
here, but years of fighting with
federal drug officials have left
him in financial trouble.
The White Plume family
planted hemp on the Pine Ridge
Indian Reservation from 2000 to
2002, but never harvested a crop.
Federal agents conducted raids
and cut down the plants because
U.S. law considers hemp, a cous-
in of marijuana, to be a drug even
though it contains only a trace of
tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, a
banned substance also found in
marijuana.
"We had all these plans of
grandeur and independence,
to lead the way with industrial


hemp," White Plume said. "None
of it worked out."
White Plume plans to sell
much of his ranching operation
this fall. He said he probably can
keep his house and at least some
of the buffalo that graze among
the pine-dotted ridges that give
the reservation its name. His
horses, a truck with license
plates reading "HEMP" and other
equipment likely will be sold to.
pay off some of his debts.
Even though White Plume
lost a court case last year, he is
ready to resume the cultivation
of hemp if the federal govern-
ment ever allows it. The plant,
which is used to make rope, oils,
lotion, cloth and other products,
could help boost the economy of
the Oglala Sioux Tribe's poverty-
stricken reservation, where un-
employment is estimated to be
as high as 85 percent, he said.
In 1998, the tribe passed a
measure legalizing the growing
of hemp on the reservation in the
southwest corner of South Da-
kota. The law should have been



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enough to allow hemp farm-
ing because of the sovereignty
granted to the Lakota by treaties,
White Plume said.
He planted hemp on his land
in 2000, planning to make money
by selling the seed to others, but
Drug Enforcement Administra-
tion agents cut down his plants
a few days before he intended
to harvest them. The DEA also
seized plantings by his brother
and sister.
"All that left us in debt and
demoralized, trying to figure out
what to do because our sover-
eignty was directly attacked,"
said White Plume, a former pres-
ident of the Oglala Sioux Tribe.
He never was charged with a
crime, but the DEA sued him and
got a court order to bar him from
growing hemp. He argued that
the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868
gave the Sioux the right to grow
hemp.
The 8th U.S. Circuit Court


of Appeals ruled against White
Plume, saying the treaty did not
give tribal members the right to
grow the plant. Hemp is subject
to federal drug laws, which re-
quire a DEA permit to grow it,
the court said.
"We are not unmindful of the
challenges faced by members of
the Tribe to engage in sustain-
able farming on federal trust
lands. It may be that the grow-
ing of hemp for industrial uses
is the most viable agricultural
commodity for that region," the
three-judge panel wrote.
The court also noted that
hemp is used to make many use-
ful products, and the DEA regis-
tration process imposes a bur-
den on anyone seeking to grow
hemp legally.
"But these are policy argu-
ments better suited for the con-
gressional hearing room than the
courtroom," the judges wrote.


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Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


AGRICULTURE







6 Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


Students inducted into National Honor Roll


I Lynbrook, N.Y. - Thirteen
students from Okeechobee cov-
ered by the Okeechobee News
qualified for induction into the
2006-2007 National Honor Roll.
The National Honor Roll
recognizes high-achieving high
school and middle school stu-
dents.
" "Young people such as our
inductees, who work hard to at-
tain academic success, deserve
to be congratulated," said Lynn
Romeo, Publisher of the Nation-
al Honor Roll. "Honoring their
achievements provides motiva-
tion and encourages them to
continue to strive toward their
goals. We're proud to include
them in the National Honor
Roll."
Here are the Students that
qualified: Florencio S. Arana

Obituaries

Edmund H. Jordan, Jr.
* Edmund H. Jordan, Jr. 84 of
Hilltown, Twp., Pa. and a win-
ter visitor of Okeechobee since
1985 passed away Tuesday, July
10, 2007 in Grand View Hospi-
tal, West Rockhill Twp. Born
in Philadephia, Pa., he was the
son of the late Marietta (Lamb)
and Edmund H. Jordan, Sr. Mr.
Jordan and his wife, Helen S.
(Sankey) celebrated their 35th
anniversary in February.
a Mr. Jordan was a U.S. Army
veteran of WWII, where he
served as a paratrooper with the
517" Airborne Divisioin Combat
Team. After the unit retired, they
stayed together as an organiza-
tion with which he was very ac-
tive.
Mr. Jordan was employed as
an operating engineer at various
places through the Local #542
Operating Engineers in Phila-
delphia for more than 30 years
prior to his retirement in 1985.
In his free time, he enjoyed
woodworking and making cre-
ative crafts from wood, metal
and just about anything.
In addition to his wife, Helen
he is survived by two sons; Ken-
neth (Fran) Jordan of Quaker-
town, William (Cari) Jordan of
St. Cloud; daughter Mary Eliza-
beth (Angelo) Scavello of West
Ch-iester, three stepdaughters,
Patricia (Larry) Ramsey-Ma-
comber of Fairport, N.Y. Michelle
(Arthur) Hansen of Lancaster,
N.Y., Yvonne Ramsey(James
School) of Perkasie, stepsons,
Steven Clinton(Trudi) Ramsey
of Lansdale, Dwayne (Corrine
Bundi) Ramsey of Hilltown, 17
grandchildren, and six great-
grandchildren; brother, William
(Eleanor) Jordan of New Castle,
Del., and sister, Lousie MacClain
of Concordville.
Family will receive friends
from noon to 1 p.m prior to the
services, Saturday, July 21, 2007
at.1 p.m. in St. Peter's Lutheran
Church, 1530 Augsburg Drive,
Line Lexington, Pa. 18927. In
lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made in Mr.
Jordan's name to The Salvation
Army, 533 Swede St. Norris-
town, Pa. 19401 or to St. Peter's
Lutheran Church.
All arrangements are made
by the Sadler-Suess Funeral
Home.

Jeff Edward Troendle
SJeff Edward Troendle, 32,
of Sarasota and formerly of
Okeechobee, died July 13, 2007
at the Doctors Hospital in Sara-
sota. He was born Nov. 2, 1974
and enjoyed fishing, auto me-
chanics, and auto racing.
' He is survived by his son, Jon-
athin D. Troendle, father, Mark
S. Troendle (Tracy Lynne) and
mother, Tina Marie Troendle all
of Okeechobee. In addition he is
survived by brothers, Jonathin
M. Troendle of Orlando, and Jo-
seph S. Troendle of Okeechobee;
step sister, Mandy D. Elfers of
Lorida, grandmother, Patricia
A. Sergeant of Owego, N.Y. and
great grandmother, Betty J. Glo-
vasky of Okeechobee.


Jr., Kayla S. Benson, Johnathan
Escobar, Amanda Hall, Rachel
Holt, Whitney N. Jones, Calvin
L. Jones Jr., Cecillya Lancaster,
Brandy Pence, Sean Petry, Ray-
mond Renick, Erica Rodriguez
and Heather Rogers.
The National Honor Roll offers
several benefits that can contrib-
ute to the success of its student
members. For students in the
2006-2007 school year, National
Honor Roll set aside $25,000 to
be shared among 25 of its quali-
fying inductees. All members
are entitled to compete for these
National Honor Roll Awards for
Academic Achievement, which
will be awarded in December.
National Honor Roll's College
Admissions Notification Service
notifies the admissions offices
of as many schools as the in-


Eds,2a1 UH~


flit I


ductees designate that they have
been accepted into the National
Honor Roll and that they are
interested in obtaining informa-
tion about those colleges. (A
copy of the student's biography
is sent to the colleges along with
the notification.) Each United
States senator and state gover-
nor receives a complimentary
copy of the National Honor Roll
Commemorative Edition, along
with a list of the students from
their state who have been in-
ducted into the National Honor
Roll. Additional complimentary
copies of the book are sent to.
selected school libraries across
the country.
The National Honor Roll
contacts potentially qualifying
students after reviewing infor-


nation about their academic
performance. Each student is
asked to submit information
about his/her GPA, interests,
activities and future goals. Only
students, with a B or better av-
erage are eligible to be listed in
the National Honor Roll. Two-
thirds of the inductees in the
2006-2007 National Honor Roll
averaged and A-or better; one-
third averaged B through B+. 24
percent were Senior's (Class of
2007); 27 percent were Junior's
(Class of 2008); 24 percent
Sophomores (Class of 2009);
19 percent Freshmen (Class of
2010); and 6 percent were from
the class of 2011.
For more information, visit
www.nationalhonorroll.org.


.v to the



. ' . -....


.I ,Z


Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda

Sound advice
This bit of advice was seen on a banner in front of North Elementary School.


Independence takes more than one day


In the United States of America
we celebrate the anniversary of our
Independence Day each 4th of July.
The other night a young new re-
porter said that this was the day we
won the war for independence.
We were taught in school that
July 4"' 1776 was the day the 13 col-
onies declared their independence
from Great Britain. The Boston Tea
Party was in December 1773; this
was the beginning of our quest
for this independence. The battles
raged on various fronts all across
the 13 Free and Independent States
until late 1782.
I woke up this morning to this
essay brewing in my head. We all
have our own independence days.
We don't just wake up one morn-
ing and we are free of the stress
that is holding us in bondage. We
have to declare at least to ourselves
that we don't want to live this way
another day and set out on our
journey to find the peace that we
so deserve.
In our perfectionism we just
want it to wave our magic wand
and have our houses in order, but
that is not the real world. We have
to go through the struggles to feel
the value in what we are doing.
This is why it is so important for us
to be a part of the independence
process! We have to be the one
taking charge of our homes.
Let's face it; if someone came in
and got rid of all of our clutter we
would still be living in CHAOS with-
in just a few days! This is because
we had not established the simple


The
Flylady , -

by MarIa ", .
Cilley ' ,


habits to keep the clutter from com-
ing back. It takes time and practice
to establish these simple habits
and string them into routines. The
smallest habits help us to win this
battle on a daily basis!
Just last night I was talking to
Eric Dodge. He was telling me how
much having a before bed routine
had changed his life. He said that
he could no longer go to bed with-
out putting his clothes out for the
next day and straightening up his
hot spots. I explained to him that
I felt that the Before Bed Routine
was the most important one of the
day! He agreed with me because if
he only does his Before Bed Rou-
tine his life runs smoothly.
Our routines free us from the
bondage of CHAOS! Your Indepen-
dence Day was the day you decid-
ed to join us in our quest for Peace!
Every day we have a choice! We
can get up and do our routines or
we can allow CHAOS to continue
to reign in our lives! Every day is
a new day! We can jump in right
where we are and take the babys-
teps of our daily habits to celebrate
the victory of each day!


Now I am in tears. My sweet
darling told me a little proverb. For
the want of a nail a horseshoe was
lost. For the want of a horseshoe,
a horse was lost. For the want of a
horse, a horseman was lost. For the
want of a horseman the battle was
lost and thus the country was lost.
I looked it up and it is a nursery
rhyme and it was also quoted by
Benjamin Franklin. How appropri-
atethat we come full circle in our
thoughts. Ben also signed the Dec-
laration of Independence.
"For the want of a nail, the shoe
was lost; for the want of a shoe the
horse was lost; and for the want
of a horse the rider was lost, being
overtaken and slain by the enemy,
all for the want of care about a
horseshoe nail." Benjamin Franklin
So you see even the simplest
of habits can make a difference in
the way your day progresses. Every
habit is a nail to hold your routines
together to form the foundation for
peace in your life!
You can do this! You have to
start someplace! Go shine your
sink! That can be your Declaration
of Independence!
For more help getting rid of your
CHAOS; check out her website and
join her free mentoring group at
www.FlyLady.net or her book,
"Sink Reflections," published by
Bantam and her New York Times
Best Selling book," Body Clutter,"
published by Fireside. Copyright
20'07; Marla Cilley; Used by permis-
sion in this publication.


Same Family * Same Service


Proven Excellence


2 Generations of Continued Service
Since 1980

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Visitation will be held on
Tuesday, July 17, 2007 from 4
p.m. until service time at 6 p.m.
in the Buxton Funeral Home
Chapel, 110 N.E. Fifth St. with
Paul M. Buxton officiating.
All arrangements are under
the direction and care of Buxton
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110 N.E. Fifth St.


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Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007 7


Stopping earnings guidance, a mistake?


By Rachel Beck
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) -- It's a farce
to think that doing away with
corporate earnings guidance will
stop investors from betting on
company profits.
Calls are coming from all sides
-- corporate America, industry
groups, former securities regula-
tors and even some shareholders
-- to end the practice of compa-
nies releasing earnings-per-share
forecasts each quarter.
That would be a mistake.
When companies provide guid-
ance, they are putting their pro-
verbial necks on the line, which
resonates with investors more
than the estimates from Wall
Street analysts that tend to often
mimic the corporate line.
Giving investors less informa-
tion on which to base their earn-
ings expectations could introduce
more volatility into financial mar-
kets, and could potentially let
companies bury potentially bad
news for longer.
The issue surrounding earn-
ings guidance isn't new, but has
been gaining momentum in re-
cent months. It first surfaced ear-
lier this decade after the business
scandals at Enron, WorldCom and
others were in part blamed on ex-
ecutives cooking their company's
books to meet their quarterly
earnings-per-share estimates.
According to critics of guid-


ance, those cases highlight why
investors place too much empha-
sis on whether companies beat,
meet or miss their profit estimates,
down to the last penny per share.
That leads corporate managers
to perform creative accounting
to get ahead, maybe by moving
sales up or delaying charges.
In December 2002, Coca-Cola
Co. made headlines when it an-
nounced that it would stop pro-
viding quarterly or annual earn-
ings-per-share guidance. Other
big names have followed, includ-
ing AT&T Corp., Google Inc. and
McDonald's Corp.
Two-thirds of companies give
guidance, according to a 2006
survey by the National Investor
Relations Institute of 654 of its
members. That's down from 77
percent in 2003.
Now the push is on to get
the rest of corporate America to
stop offering guidance. In recent
weeks, some prominent groups
with big-name backing have
made public statements about the
need to end the guidance game.
Among them was the Commit-
tee for Economic Development,
a Washington think-tank whose
members include former Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission
Chairman William Donaldson
and former New York Federal
Reserve Bank head William Mc-
Donough.
"Quarterly guidance is at best


a waste of resources and, more
likely, a self-fulfilling exercise that
attracts short-term traders," the
committee said in a report issued
in late June. It called on corpo-
rate board directors to change
the short-term earnings culture
and lashed out at hedge funds
for trading on the gap between
forecast and reported results.
"Companies that drop quarterly
guidance have one fewer reason
to manage earnings."
That echoes views made in a
June report from the nonprofit As-
pen Institute, a group made up of
U.S. chief executives, labor unions
and other business organizations.
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce,
which represents U.S. businesses
big and small, also has been lob-
bying for companies to shift away
from issuing quarterly estimates
with a single earnings per share
forecast to just providing annual
guidance with a range of project-
ed earnings numbers.
Certainly, their reasons for
wanting to stop earnings guid-
ance does make some sense,
but those might not outweigh
the benefits of continuing such
practices. For one, Wall Street re-
search analysts, who help guide
investors on what stocks to buy or
sell, could be more prone to err in
their earnings forecasts when the
guidance goes away, according to
a study from October out of Uni-
versity of Washington.


That study also found that the
market tends to react negatively
to news that a company no lon-
ger will provide guidance, and
those that drop guidance could
face more "systematic risk."
Companies that don't issue
guidance also have more oppor-
tunity to keep bad news under
wraps for a lot longer -- even
though securities law requires
them to make timely disclosures
of material news -- probably hop-
ing that it disappears before they
have to report earnings. That
could give insiders at the com-
panies more opportunity to buy
and sell shares before the news is
released.
The corporate scandals also
showed that transparency in fi-
nancial dealings matters. Doing
away with guidance could make
the quarterly earnings seasons an
even more surprising -- and thus,
volatile -- time in the market.
The second-quarter earnings
season is just beginning. Inves-
tors and analysts for the most
part have an idea of what earn-
ings could look like this time, and
surely those who meet or beat
their estimates will be rewarded
or punished accordingly.
Should the anti-guidance bri-
gade get their way, the quarterly
reporting period could become
even more chaotic. When inves-
tors think about that, guidance
sounds pretty good.


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By Rachel Beck
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) -- Say good-
bye to easy money - and watch
out for the far-reaching effects.
The drying up of the free-flow-
ing cheap-debt spigot has been
battering the housing market
for months, and it's now spilling
over to other parts of the financial
world, like leveraged takeovers.
"There is no denying it. It is
ugly out there," wrote the influ-
ential credit-market watchers at
Standard & Poor's Lever-
aged Commentary & Data.
Now that buyout shops are
struggling to get their debt-laden
deals done, it could stall Wall
Street's record-setting rise since
stock investors have relied on
takeover activity to drive up share
prices.
Same goes as companies face
higher debt costs, which poten-
tially could crimp their profits,
steer them away from heavily
financed activities like stock buy-
backs and slow their hiring.
As for housing, things have
gone from bad to worse in recent
days as credit-rating agencies an-
nounced they will downgrade bil-
lions of dollars in bonds backed
by risky subprime home loans.
Not only will that further
tighten lending standards, but it
is sure to rattle the large banks
that supplied much of that debt. It
will also hurt pension and mutual
funds and other institutions that
own those investments through
securities issued as collateralized
debt obligations.
Of course, such a turn of events
shouldn't come as a surprise. Low
interest rates and a global liquid-
ity deluge made cheap borrowing
a gluttonous affair, largely allow-
ing anyone who needed financ-
ing -- for homes, cars, corporate
takeovers and more -- to borrow
with ease.
Today's environment isn't all


doom and gloom yet, and there-
are few signs that we are descend-
ing into an economy-wide credit
crunch. But certainly the party-
like atmosphere is gone. Debt is
quickly becoming more expen-
sive, and everyone who wants ac-
cess to it will feel that pinch.
That's why the institutional
loan traders cited in the S&P
report sized up the current state
of their market as a "meltdown."
The reference came as S&P
reported that a composite index
tracking a group of loans -- con-
sidered to be the most liquid
names in the market -- fell to its
lowest point in four years.
Those looking to raise money
to finance the recent private-
equity deals are getting a front-
row view of the turbulence. Just
months ago, there were more
than enough eager buyers of the
bonds and loans sold to support
highly leveraged takeovers. But
now investors are pushing back,
demanding higher rates and pro-
tections from potential risk.
In some cases, investors are
asking for so much that the bond
offerings never even make it to
market. ServiceMaster Co.'s un-
derwriters called off a $1.15 bil-
lion sale of junk bonds earlier
this month after investors balked
at provisions in the bonds that
would have let the company cov-
er some of its interest expense by
issuing more debt.
That forced the lawn-care and
pest-control company to obtain
a bridge loan -- which provides
short-term financing before long-
term debt financing is secured --
directly from the underwriters. A
$2.85 billion loan issue still needs
to get done as part of the $5.5
billion takeover by private-equity
firm Clayton, Dubilier & Rice and
others, according to KDP Invest-
ment Advisors Inc.
In the case of Tribune Co., the
media conglomerate is feeling the


heat from its lenders, who want
better terms, and stock investors,
who seem to be betting its take-
over by real estate tycoon Sam
Zell might not get done.
The Chicago-based company
had to make some concessions
to raise $7 billion of new debt. It
agreed to repay $1.5 billion of that
amount in 24 months, not the
seven years it originally proposed.
That will put a significant burden
on the company after the take-
over by real estate tycoon Sam
Zell, according to CreditSights
analyst Jake Newman, who calls
the situation at Tribune "extreme
leverage."
Tribune, which still needs


to raise $4.2 billion in a second
round of debt financing, will use
most of the money it raises this
year to repurchase 126 million
of its shares for $34 each and re-
finance bank debt as part of the
takeover.
Tribune's stock investors ap-
pear worried about the deal's
prospects, as evidenced by the 11
percent spread between the ten-
der offer price and the $30 a share
where it now trades. That's due to
their nervousness about the buy-
out market in general as well as
the decline in the company's fun-
damentals that could make pay-
ing for all this debt tough, New-
man said.


Submitted photo/OCSO Youth Development Program

'Studying hard'
Omar Jiminez (left) and Andrew Dobbs study and work on
the State of Florida FWC Safe Boating Course, as part of
the curriculum of the NSW Trident Cadet Program Sum-
mer Orientation Camp. The camps, offered in six week-
long sessions, are sponsored by the Okeechobee County
Sheriff's Office.


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8 Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


Study ties diabetes drug to heart risks


Side effect
reports triple

By Marilyn Marchione
AP Medical Writer
In the month after a surpris-
ing analysis revealed possible
heart risks from the blockbuster
diabetes drug Avandia, reports of
side effects to federal regulators
tripled.
The sudden spike is a sign that
doctors probably were unaware
of the drug's possible role in their
patients' heart problems and
therefore may not have reported
many such cases in the past, sev-
eral experts said.
It also shows the flaws of the
safety tracking system and sug-
gests that a better one might have
detected a potential problem be-
fore the drug had been on the
market for eight years.
Avandia is used to control
blood sugar, helping more than
6 million people worldwide man-
age Type 2 diabetes, the kind that
is linked to obesity. These people
already are at higher risk for heart
attacks, so news that the drug
might raise this risk by 43 percent
was especially disturbing.
In the 35 days after May 21,
when the New England Journal
of Medicine published the analy-
sis on the Internet, reports of
heart attacks, deaths and hospi-


talizations leaped. The sharp rise
in reports of heart problems ap-
pears in data obtained by The As-
sociated Press through a Freedom
of Information Act request to the
federal Food and Drug Adminis-
tration.
Only five heart attacks were
reported in the 35 days before the
study, compared with 90 in the
same period afterward. Heart-re-
lated hospitalizations went from
11 to 126. The reports involve
rosiglitazone, sold as Avandia and
Avandamet.
Reporting a drug's side effects
is voluntary, and only a crude in-
dication rather than a scientific
measure of how many problems
patients are actually having. The
FDA relies on this unenforced sys-
tem once a drug is on the market.
Critics say it leads to haphazard
oversight in which problems can
be missed because doctors don't
connect the dots between a drug
and symptoms they see in an indi-
vidual patient.
With Avandia, the published
analysis likely led to more cases
being reported, said Vanderbilt
University diabetes specialist Dr.
Alvin C. Powers.
"Now, patients and their doc-
tors are much more aware of the
possible link between Avandia
and cardiovascular disease. This
is good _ this is going to help
us going forward to determine
whether or not this drug is safe,"


he said.
The drug's manufacturer, Brit-
ish-based GlaxoSmithKline PLC,
insists that the drug is safe and
effective.
"This is a very well-known
phenomenon," where news re-
ports lead to increased reporting,
said company spokeswoman
Mary Anne Rhyne. "It's good that
there's awareness of the reporting
system, but drawing conclusions
on such data is inappropriate."
The FDA plans hearings on
safety concerns about the drug
on July 30. In the meantime, dia-
betes experts have advised users
of the medication to talk to their
doctors and not to immediately
discontinue it.
The side effects reported range
from as minor as a blister to as
serious as sudden cardiac death.
Most of the reports the AP re-
viewed seemed to involve serious
side effects, and rosiglitazone was
listed by the FDA as the "primary
suspect" rather than other medi-
cines the patient may have been
taking.
There was a total of only 50
adverse event reports in January
and 73 in February. From April
16 to May 21, when the study
was published, 121 events were
reported, including 11 deaths. In
the 35 days after the study, 357
events were reported, including
38 deaths.
"You really can't infer anything


about incidence rates from that,"
because the spike in reports is
likely due to the "publicity effect"
of the study, said Dr. David Gra-
ham, an FDA drug safety expert.
Dr. David Nathan, chief of
diabetes care at Massachusetts
General Hospital, agreed, saying
it was "not conceivable" that only
five people among the 1 million
Americans taking Avandia had
heart attacks in the month pre-
ceding the May 21 study, as the
FDA reports suggest.
"It just heightens the concern
about the poor reporting we
have," said Nathan, who has re-
ceived speaker fees from Glaxo
and other drug companies. Pow-
ers and Graham have no financial
ties to any diabetes drug makers.
The issue has roiled the medi-
cal community and sparked con-
gressional probes into whether
the FDA is properly investigating
safety issues. The FDA issued a
"safety alert" about the drug only
after the May 21 study came out,
even though Glaxo had informed
the agency of its own analysis of
heart risks nearly a year before-
hand and possibly as early as
2005.
Avandia's label warns about
possible heart failure and other
heart problems when taken with
insulin. The drug also raises LDL,
or bad cholesterol, and can cause
fluid retention and weight gain.


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Study shows obese kids face unhappy lives


By John Christofferson

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) --
Overweight children are stigma-
tized by their peers as early as age
3 and even face bias from their
parents and teachers, giving them
a quality of life comparable to
people with cancer, a new analy-
sis concludes.
Youngsters who report teasing,
rejection, bullying and other types
of abuse because of their weight
are two to three times more likely
to report suicidal thoughts as well
as to suffer from other health is-
sues such as high blood pressure
and eating disorders, researchers
said.
"The stigmatization directed
at obese children by their peers,
parents, educators and others is
pervasive and often unrelenting,"
researchers with Yale University
and the University of Hawaii at
Manatoa wrote in the July issue
of Psychological Bulletin.
The paper was based on a
review of all research on youth
weight bias over the past 40 years,
said lead author Rebecca M. Puhl
of Yale's Rudd Center for Food
Policy and Obesity.
It comes amid a growing
worldwide epidemic of child obe-
sity. By 2010, almost 50 percent of
children in North America and 38
percent of children in the Europe-
an Union will be overweight, the
researchers said.
While programs to prevent
childhood obesity are growing,
more efforts are needed to pro-
tect overweight children from


abuse, Puhl said.
"The quality of life for kids
who are obese is comparable
to the quality of life of kids who
have cancer," Puhl said, citing
one study. "These kids are fac-
ing stigma from everywhere they
look in society, whether it's me-
dia, school or at home."
Even with a growing percent-
age of overweight people, the
stigma shows no signs of subsid-
ing, according to Puhl. She said
television and other media con-
tinue to reinforce negative stereo-
types.
"This is a form of bias that is
very socially acceptable," Puhl
said. "It is rarely challenged; it's
often ignored."
The stigmatization of over-
weight children has been docl-
mented for decades. When chil-
dren were asked to rank photos
of children as friends in a 1961
study, the overweight child was
ranked last.
Children as young as 3 are
more likely to consider over-
weight peers to be mean, stupid,
ugly and sloppy.
A growing body of research
shows that parents and educators
are also biased against heavy chil-
dren. In a 1999 study of 115 mid-
dle and high school teachers, 20
percent said they believed obese
people are untidy, less likely to
succeed and more emotional.
."Perhaps the most surprising
source of weight stigma toward
youths is parents," the report
says.
Several studies showed that


overweight girls got less college
financial support from their par-
ents than average weight girls.
Other studies showed teasing by
parents was common.
"It is possible that parents may
take out their frustration, anger
and guilt on their overweight
child by adopting stigmatizing
attitudes and behavior, such as
making critical and negative com-
ments toward their child," the
authors wrote, suggesting further
research is needed.
Lynn McAfee, 58, of Stowe, Pa.,
said that as an overweight child
she faced troubles on all fronts.
"It was constantly impressed
upon me that I wasn't going to
get anywhere in the world if I was
fat," McAfee said. "You hear it so
often, it becomes the truth."
Her mother, who also was
overweight, offered to buy her
a mink coat when she was 8 to
try to get her to lose weight even
though her family was podr.
"I felt I was lettirn#'everybody
down," she said.
Other children would try to
run her down on bikes to see if
she would bounce. She had a
hard time getting on teams in the
playground.
"Teachers did not stand up for
me when I was teased," McAfee
said.
A study in 2003 found that
obese children had much lower
quality of life scores on. issues
such as health, emotional and so-
cial well-being, and school func-
tioning.
"An alarming finding of this


research was that obese children
had (quality of life) scores com-
parable with those of children
with cancer," the researchers re-
ported.
Sylvia Rimm, author of "Rescu-
ing the Emotional Lives of Over-
weight Children," said her sur-
veys of more than 5,000 middle
school children reached similar
conclusions.
"The overweight children felt
less intelligent," Rimm said. "They
felt less popular. They struggled
from early on. They feel they are
a different species."
Parents should emphasize a
child's strengths, she said, and
teachers should pair up students
for activities instead of letting chil-
dren pick their partners.
McAfee, who now works for
the Council on Size and Weight
Discrimination, said her child-
hood experiences even made her
reluctant to see a doctor when
she needed one. She recalled one
doctor who said she looked like a
gorilla and another who gave her
painkillers and diet pills for what
turned out to be mononucleosis.
"The amount of cruelty I've
seen in people has changed me
forever," McAfee said.
The Yale-Hawaii research re-
port recommends more research
to determine whether negative
stereotypes lead to discrimina-
tory behavior, citing evidence that
overweight adults face discrimi-
nation. It also calls for studying
ways to reduce stigma and nega-
tive attitudes toward overweight
children.


PLUS: Buy it/Sell it Classifieds
and Advertising Opportunities for
Page Banners, Tiles, and Sponsored Links


Health Briefs


Narconon helps
with drug addiction
Do you need help with drug
addiction? If so, call Narconon at
1-800-556-8885.

Volunteers are
needed at Hospice
Hospice of Okeechobee, Inc.
has volunteer opportunities avail-


able in Okeechobee assisting the
patient care and administrative
teams to provide Hospice ser-
vices to Okeechobee area resi-
dents. Permanent and part-time
volunteers provide direct patient
support services such as com-
panionship, telephone contacts,
letter reading, main caregiver
relief and other non-medical as-
sistance. They also assist Hospice
in fund raising, clerical and of-
fice support. Age is not a barrier.


For information, visit Hospice of
Okeechobee at 411 S.E. Fourth
St., Okeechobee, or call (863)
467-2321.

Volunteers wanted
for hospital auxiliary
Would you like to make a dif-
ference in the lives of others? Raul-
erson Hospital Auxiliary has many
opportunities of service for adults
seeking volunteer work. Volun-


teer as little as four hours a week
or as many as 20 hours. Morning,
afternoon, and evening shifts are
available. Many opportunities
currently exist. Please contact the
lobby desk at Raulerson Hospital
for a Volunteer Application. For
information, call (863) 763-2151,
ext. 3312. The hospital's Volun-
teen Program (ages 14-17) is a
summer program beginning in
June.


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Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


Dear Abby



Boyfriend's dog a danger to child


*DEAR ABBY: I have started
seeing a guy I love very much. I'll
call him "Mitch." We spend a lot
of time together. I have stayed with
him while my 2-year-old son, "Ca-
leb," visits his daddy.
I recently introduced Caleb to
Mitch, and last weekend we both
stayed at Mitch's place. The prob-
lem is, Mitch has a large dog that
is very territorial and protective and
isn't used to company. The dog,
"Crusher," has shown aggression
toward me, but it was nothing we
couldn't handle. However, the dog
is now being aggressive toward
Caleb. On a couple of occasions,
Crusher charged my son and left
scratches.
Mitch and I have resorted to sep-
arating the two when Caleb is over.
By "separating," I mean we have


brought a few of Caleb's toys and
his TV to set up in a room just for
him. The problem is, Caleb is in the
room with the door closed most of
the time, while Crusher runs free in
the house.
Abby, my son's life was turned
upside down when my husband
and I divorced. Now he has had
to adjust to the fact that when he's
with Mitch and me, he must be car-
ried around for fear of the dog. I
haven't come out and asked Mitch
to get rid of Crusher, or even to limit
him when we are in the house. Is
this something I have a right to
ask?
Mitch has been a bachelor all his
life, and I'm afraid if I confront him
about this he will feel I am making
him choose between me and his
dog. Please give me some advice.


- Torn in Two in Oklaho-
ma

DEAR TORN: It is your duty as
Caleb's mother to make sure that
he is safe at all times. Your little boy
is only 2 and can't speak on his
own behalf. Shutting a child alone
in a room "most of the time" isn't
protecting him - it is neglect. If
you do not confront your boyfriend
about his dangerous animal, you
are choosing him and his dog over
your son!
The wrong critter is being con-
fined. When Caleb was attacked
the first time, your boyfriend should
have volunteered to confine his dog.
That he didn't is appalling. That you
said nothing is worse. As a mother,
your child's interests must come
before your love interest.


Today in History


By The Associated Press
Today is Sunday, July 15, the
196th day of 2007. There are 169
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
On July 15, 1971, President
Richard Nixon startled the coun-
try by announcing he would visit
the People's Republic of China.
On this date:
In 1870, Georgia became the
last Confederate state readmitted
to the Union.
In 1870, Manitoba entered
confederation as the fifth Cana-
dian province.


In 1916, Boeing Co., originally
known as Pacific Aero Products,
was founded in Seattle.
In 1948, President Harry Tru-
man was nominated for another
term of office by the Democratic
National Convention in Philadel-
phia.
In 1964, Sen. Barry M. Gold-
water of Arizona was nominated
for president by the Republican
National Convention in San Fran-
cisco.
In 1965, U.S. scientists dis-
played close-up photographs of
the planet Mars taken by Mariner
4.
In 1976, a 36-hour kidnap or-


deal began for 26 schoolchildren
and their bus driver as they were
abducted near Chowchilla, Calif.,
by three gunmen and imprisoned
in an underground cell. The cap-
tives escaped unharmed.
In 1979, President Carter de-
livered his "malaise" speech
in which he lamented what he
called a "crisis of confidence" in
America.
Thought for Today: "Love is
not enough. It must be the foun-
dation, the cornerstone -- but not
the complete structure. It is much
too pliable, too yielding." -- Bette
Davis, American actress (1908-
1989).


At the Movies


The following movies are now showing at the
Brahman Theatres III.
Movie times for Friday, July 13, through Thurs-
day, July 20, are as follows:
Theatre I -''Harry Potter - The Order of the
Phoenix" (PG) Showtimes: Friday at 7 and 9 p.m.
Saturday arid Sunday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. only.
Monday at 3 and 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
Theatre II- "Transformers" (PG- 13) Showtimes:
Friday at 7 and 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 2,


4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
Theatre III - "Ratatouille" (PG) Showtimes:
Friday at 7 and 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 2,
4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Wednesday and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7, and 9
p.m.
Tickets are $5.50 for adults; children 12 and un-
der are $4.50; senior citizens are $4.50 for all mov-
ies; and, matinees are $4.
For information, call (863) 763-7202.


Los Angeles Times Sunday Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris andl oycc Nichols Lewis


"OR ELSE" By 90 Rugrat
RANDOLPH ROSS 92 Presley's "In the


ACROSS
1 Hope was often
found in one
8 Southwestern
poplars
14 Got slick
20 Like Babe
21 Citta on the Po
22 Smiling word
23 Placated
24 Rain-bringers of
Greek myth
25 Portrayer of the
most ruthless
Ewing son
26 Give speeches
ending in "Th-th-
th-that's all.
folks!"?
26 Sends, as a
Morse
message
29 Actor Cariou
30 Ivory alternative
31 Take to a higher
power?
32 Bisected fly?
33 Many
37 Adversity
expertise?
42 Ball costar
44 The Bee Gees'
Somebody-
45 Ordinary John
46 Advertised
auditions
49 Street
performers
51 Better, as
weather
55 _ ejemplo
56 Florida's Eola,
Concord, Porter,
et al.?
60 "` aest'?"
61 Michael
Jackson boast.
in a 1987 hit
63 Sermon
responses
64 Road closer,
maybe
66 Orbital extrermo
68 Touch-screen
gadget, briefly
69 Houston of
Texas
72 Magic
73 Uses one's
claws on
75 Impish ocular
shine
77 River to the
Rhone
78 Limerick land
79 Alpine apple
site?
84 PaIme l :
movie prize
85 Kids might
choose them
87 u. .i", ,. .
88 Chanting group


95 Surgery start
96 Shop for Eric
Blair's birthday?
101 Bart and Brenda
104 Marvell work
105 Anger
106 God attended
by Valkyries
108 Confident sign
109 Red figure
111 Lke planets
after the big
117 .. n r,- mark
118 Where to find
some Carolina
banks
119 Illuminated from
behind
120 - ..,'
fole
121 Grain threshers
122 "General
Hospital" actress
123 Day prefix
124 Soft touch
125 Best-selling


DOWN
1 Support
2 More tart
3 Trouble for
Suze on a
cruise?
4 Sean Connery,
e.g
5 Bring on board
6 Like Nash's
lama
7 "Look what !P
(cry of success)-
8 In realty
9 Not about to
betray
10 Not give ....
11 Skirt length
12 Heist unit
13 Stranded
traveler's signal.
perhaps
14 Sleepy Hollow
name
15 School
supervisor
16 Thought
patterns'?
17 Lower in rank
18 Olympics cheer
19 Marker maker


7/1 5107 xwordeditor~aol.corm


27 Seoul-based
automaker
28 Calendar col.
31 Sassiness
34 Mover that
hopefully
doesn't shake
35 Does
36 . :, .
reminder
38 "Stand and
Deliver" star
39 Deter
40 Strong-language
indicator
41 Melting agents
43 Scatter
supreme
46 Some soporifics
47 Victim of
Vesuvius
48 Desk item
50 When the
regular NFL
season begins
52 ..-" .
5 3 . h. , . .
54 Lists
57 Nancy Drew's
beau


58 Evidence that 91 Knotty game?
may reopen a 93 Masonry tools
case 94 Peculiarity
59 Error indicator 96 Slipped away
62 Go along with 97 She came
65 Designed ashore at
67 in elephant Kingsdown,
69 35mm camera England
type 8/6/1926
70 Org. spawned 98 Colorful
by the swimmers
Manhattan 99 2002 British
Project Open champ
71 Half a fish 100 Order to Fido
74 Prefix with light 102 Tightens, as
75 ". Travel On", skates
1958 folk song 103 Italian sonnet
76 1929 Literature finish
'Nobelist 107 Singer Jones
80 Plymouth 110 Cafe addition
fireplace 111 Big name in old
81 Canadian-born scary movies
political satirist 112 1953 Welles
82 Blueprint detail role
83 Info in AAA 113 Drooling tloon
TripTiks canine
86 College founded 114 Chard lover's
in 1257 prefix
89 1934 gp. with a 115 Tirade
Blue Eagle 116 Sitter's bane
poster 118 U.S. Army E-3


,02(H)7 Tribune Media Services, Inc.


*ARIES (March 21-April
19): You should be planning a fun
day with lots of challenging events.
This is a great day to put your best
foot forward. Don't let anyone
who is not on your side irritate you.
Someone at home will not be easy
to deal with.
*TAURUS (April 20-May 20):
You could be caught in the middle
of a discussion. Try not to take sides
or you may end up being blamed.
Listen, observe and back away. A
change of plans will turn out to be
to your advantage.
*GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
You will be tempted to play both
ends against the middle but it will
lead to problems with the very
people you don't want to upset.
Approach today with a fun-loving
attitude -- agreeable and willing to
try new things.
*CANCER (June 21-July
22): Your charm will bring about
some interesting talks with some-
one who will influence youth future.
Travel today will lead to something
or someone very interesting. Your
past will be a good reference for a
decision you have to make now.


* LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Your colorful, entertaining way of
doing things will grab the interest
of someone who will help you. Get
involved in activities that challenge
you. You will have a powerful influ-
ence on everyone you meet today.
*VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Look for the unique and the un-
usual and you will find your com-
fort zone today. Avoid anyone who
is overindulgent or blowing things
out of proportion. Stick to people
who are willing to talk things
through.
*LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
You should do things that you en-
joy with the people who can of-
fer you the type of adventure you
thrive on. A little creative touch on
your part will have everyone look-
ing to you for more input. Don't let
a jealous friend or relative rain on
your parade.
*SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Your emotions will be hard
to control but, if you busy yourself
with a project or share your ideas
with experienced individuals,
peace and satisfaction will unfold
as the day progresses. There is so


much to explore.
*SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Something or someone
will catch your interest. An oppor-
tunity to make financial gain is ap-
parent. An old debt will be repaid
or a gift or winning will come your
way.
*CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): A few minor adjustments and
you can make things happen to-
day. A good investment will pay off
and a change in direction will give
you a new lease on life. Talks with
a partner will lead to better under-
standing.
*AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You'll be torn between what
you want to do and what you
should do. A relationship will be
on the line if you don't compro-
mise. It will be worth your while to
bend a little.
*PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): There is something brewing
that may make your life difficult if
you overreact or are too quick to
criticize. Instead, observe before
making your move. Spend time
fixing up your home or working
on a project.


SUNDAY MORNING JULY 15, 2007
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:10:11:30

o WPTV News (N) (cc) News (N) (cc) Today (N) (s) (cc) Meet the Press (cc) News (cc) Paid Talk About Money
0 WPEC Paid Health Paid |Paid Paid Bus. Rpt. CBS News Sunday Morning (s) Nation Paid |Paid
6g WTCE Dickow John F. Rod Parsley (cc) Ed Young Merritt Franklin David J. Hagin Ed Young Coral Ridge Hour
a WPBF Wall St Our In Touch-Dr Good Morning Paid Paid Matthews This Week Decorat-
E) WFLX Paid Right- Feed Reel Coral Ridge Hour Fox News Sunday Power Pt Paid Paid Vi-
C WTVX Paid. Paid SoFlorida Paid Paid |Paid Paid Paid BInTune WHADD Real Life Animals
P WXEL George S. Noddy Big Ditty Sesame Street Siing Crafts WealthTr-Ances- Boomers Visionar-
I A L_,1 -E.-_NI
AMC Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid Movie: *** Brubaker (1980) (Robert Redford, Yaphet Kotto) Shootout Mad Men
ANIM Animal Miracles (s) |Backyard Good Who Gets the Dog? K-9 to 5 Breed Ultimate Dog Animals Animals
A&E Paid |Paid Bio.: Townshend Bio.: Osbourne Biog.: Simmons Serial Killer The Yosemite Killer
BET BET Morning Inspiration Jones Gospel Video Gospel (cc) Meet BIk
CNN Investigations CNN Sunday Morning Housecall Sunday Morn. Reliable Sources (cc) Late Edition
CRT Paid Paid Paid The Bean Paid Paid Paid |Paid Get Thin Paid Reshape Riches
DISC Paid Paid Paid Paid J. Osteen Paid Polar Bear Batt Lion Battlefield (cc) Wolf Battlefield (cc)
DISN Doodle- JoJo Wiggles Higgly Einsteins Einsteins Mickey Mickey Tigger Handy Sprites Charlie
El Hip Hop Paid Britney Spears Singer Britney Spears. Best Best Daily 10 The Soup El News Weekend
ESP2 Fishing Adven- Driven |Skies Whitetail Adven- Outdoors Driven NASCAR Now(Live) NHRA |King
ESPN SportsCenter (cc) SportsCenter (cc) SportsCenter (cc) SportsCtr Lines Reporters SportsCenter (Live) (cc)
EWTN Thomas Letter Chaplet Rosary Sunday Mass Litany Book- Rome Faith Carpenter Holy Rsry
FAM In Touch-Dr Fam. Mat. Fam. Mat. Step-Step Step-Step Full Hse. Full Hse. Boy Boy ' Grounde- Grounde-
HGTV Paid Paid Ground Yard Yard Land- Land- Land- Curb Curb Secrets Get Sold
HIST History History Heaven History Business Generatn The States (cc) The States (cc) The States (cc)
LIFE Paid The Bean Frederick Price Hour of Power (cc) Get Thin Health Army Wives (cc) Movie: Jersey Girl
NICK Rocket Phantom Lazy- OddPar- Neutron Neutron Sponge Sponge OddPar- OddPar- School Drake
SCI Paid Paid Paid Pad Paid Paid Movie: Bloodsuckers (2005) (Joe Lando) Dark Prince-Dracula
TBS Movie: *** Something's Gotta Give (2003) (cc) Movie: Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason Movie: *** Spanglish (2004)
TCM Movie: ***/2 Captains Courageous (1937) Movie: *** Ship of Fools (1965) (Vivien Leigh) (cc) Movie: **/2 Once Upon a Time
TLC Paid Paid Paid Paid. Paid Get Thin In a Fix (cc) While You Were Out Trading Spaces (cc)
SPIKE Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Trucksl Trucks! Hrsepwer |Hrsepwer Hrsepwer |Muscle
TNT LAPD Movie: ** 2 The Devil's Advocate (1997) (Keanu Reeves) (cc) Movie: *** The Sixth Sense (1999) (Bruce Willis) (cc)
UNI Control Caliente Tu Desayuno Alegre: Fin jPinky Carmen Bill Que Locura Festival del Humor
USA Coach (s) Coach (s) Paid Changing Ed Young J. Osteen Movie: ** Honey (2003) (Jessica Alba) (cc) Movie: Barbershop

HBO Movie: Kicking & Screaming (s) Movie: ** Fantastic Four (2005) (s) 'PG-13' lCount Trans. Movie: The Devil Wears Prada
SHOW (4:45) Movie: Fanny *1/2 Air Bud: Golden Receiver |Movie: *** Manito (2002)'NR' Movie: Bullets Over Broadway |No
TMC Movie: Eyes of an Angel (1994) Movie: **'2 Vice Versa (1988) |Movie: Shake, Rattle and Rock! IMovie: The Hired Hand (1971)


SUNDAY AFTERNOON JULY 15, 2007

12:00 12:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30

a WPTV Paid 3 2 1 Pen Veggie Paid Triathlon (s) (cc) Golf: American Century Championship - Final Round. (Live) (s) (cc)
SB WPEC Paid Paid Motorcycle Racing Cycling France. (cc) PGA Golf: John Deere Classic - Final Round. From Silvis, III. (Live)
ED WTCE Love AR Evans M Finley Conley White Hindson Bishop P. Cornerstone (cc) |Rod P. Dickow
6 WPBF Paid Paid HomeTeam (s) (cc) Paid Brit. Open Pre. WNBA Basketball: All-Star Game. (Live) (cc)
( WFLX Seinfeld Seinfeld Jim |Raymond Paid Paid Paid Paid Movie: Stopl Or My Mom Will Shoot (1992)
a WTVX Movie: ** Double Impact (1991) Movie: **1/2 The Stickup (2001) Smallville (s) (cc) All of Us Girl-
SWXEL Independent Lens (s) (cc) Head- Power of Art Power of Art Florida InnerVWS Think One

AMC Movie: *** 2 Easy Rider (1969) (cc) Movie: **** One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) Movie: U.S. Marshals
ANIM 7 Deadly Strike Profiles of Nature Wild Kingdom The Most Extreme, the Best of the Best Behaving Badly
A&E BTK Speaks Movie: *** Bridget Jones's Diary (2001) Harry Potter-Secrets Angel Angel Criss Angel
BET Lift Every Voice (cc) Movie: *1/2 Hot Boyz (1999) (Gary Busey) Movie: Hustle and Heat (2003) (cc) Parkers Parkers
CNN Late Edition This Week at War Investigations In the Money (cc) CNN Live Sunday CNN Live Sunday
CRT Holly- |Holly- North |North North North North |North North |North North North
DISC Giant Squid: Caught Crab Fishing Man vs. Wild Lost Pharaoh Sphinx Unmasked Nefertiti Resurrected
DISN Kim Replace |Movie: Read It and Weep (2006) |Kim SuiteLife Montana So Raven |Phil Cory |Cory
El Movie: **'A Office Space (1999) 50 Most Outrageous TV Moments Celebrity Weddings Celebrity Divorces
ESP2 Auto Racing ATV Racing Tour (N) On the Block (N) Golf: Jamie Farr Owens Corning Classic. (cc) Horse Racing (Live)
ESPN SportsCtr |Baseball Softball: World Cup --Canada vs. U.S. Bowling Bowling |Bowling Bowling Baseball Tonight
EWTN Sunday Mass Litany |Haydn's Creation Joy Chaplet Mysteries IThe World Over Holy PGod
FAM Sabrina Movie: ** Summer Catch (2001) (cc) Movie: ** Never Been Kissed (1999) (Drew Barrymore) Movie: Beautiful Girl
HGTV My House Potential Kitchen Kitchens Decorat- Decorat- |Mission IMission Dime Dime Grills, Patios
HIST The States (cc) The States (cc) Modern Marvels "Engineering Disasters" (cc) Mega Disasters (cc) Mega Disasters (cc)
LIFE (11:00) Movie Movie: *** Mystic Pizza (1988) (cc) Movie: *** Pretty Woman (1990) (Richard Gere) (cc) Pretty
NICK Nicktoon INicktoon Nicktoon |Nicktoon |Sponge |Sponge Neutron |OddPar- |Avatar ITEENick Sponge Amanda
SCI (11:00) Movie John Carpenter Presents Vampires Movie: *'/2 Village of the Damned (1995) Movie: Mortuary (cc)
TBS (10:30) Movie MLB Baseball: Pittsburgh Pirates at Atlanta Braves. Turner Field. Movie: Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994)
TCM Movie: ***'2 The Awful Truth (1937) (cc) Movie: ** Bathing Beauty (1944) (cc) Movie: **,/2 Muscle Beach Party (1964)
TLC Trading Spaces (cc) Little People Little People Little People Little People |Little People
SPIKE Xtreme |Trucksl ' Movie: *** Clear and Present Danger (1994) (Harrison Ford) Movie: ** Road House (1989), Kelly Lynch
TNT Movie: *** Mission: Impossible 2 (2000) (Tom Cruise) INASCAR, TNT Green NASCAR Racing: Nextel Cup
UNI Festival del Humor Republica Deportiva |Primer Impacto Locura Noticiero Republica Deportiva Copa Am6rica
USA (11:00) Movie Movie: Barbershop 2: Back in Business Movie: ** Happy Gilmore (1996) (cc) (DVS) Along Came Polly

HBO Movie Movie: ** Doctor Dolittle (1998) The Adventures of Pluto Nash Movie: ** Monster-in-law (2005) 'PG-13' Assume
SHOW (11:45) Movie: No Looking Back |Movie: ** Texasville (1990) (Jeff Bridges) In Pot We Trust (iTV) |Movie: Dirty Dancing
TMC ~ Movie: ** The Manitou (1978) (Tony Curtis) |Sunday Driver (2005) Movie: Waking the Dead (2000) IMovie: Irish Jam (2006) 'PG-13'


SUNDAY PRIME TIME JULY 15, 2007
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

o WPTV News(cc) NBC Dateline NBC (N) (s) (cc) Law & Order (s) (cc) Law & Order: SVU News(cc) Sports-
g WPEC News News (cc) 60 Minutes (s) (cc) Big Brother 8 (s) (cc) Cold Case "Blackout" Without a Trace (s) News (cc) Sports
E) WTCE Jakes Meyer Youseff |Hayford J. Osteen lAuthority Believers IChanging Movie: The Apocalypse (2002)
f9 WPBF News (N) ABC Home Videos Extreme-Home Housewives Brothers and Sisters News (N)
) WFLX Paid Paid Movie: **1/2 The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) (Jeff Goldblum) News (N) idol Rewind
g WTVX The Chris Reba (s) |Reba (s) 7th Heaven (s) (cc) Supernatural (s) (cc) Will Will Sex & Sex &
6B WXEL Contrary Great Globe Trekker (s) Nature (cc) (DVS) Mysteryl (N) (s) (cc) (DVS) Queen Austin City Limits (s)

AMC (5:00) Movie: ** U.S. Marshals (1998) Movie: **** The Godfather (1972) A mafia patriarch tries to hold his empire together. (cc)
ANIM Planet Earth (cc) Wild Kingdom (N) Africa's Outsiders Born Different (cc) Animal Videos Wild Kingdom
A&E Angel Angel Angel Angel Dog Dog Simmons Simmons Simmons Simmons The First 48 (cc)
BET Wayans Wayans Wayans JamieF. Jamie F. Jamie F. BaBaldwinaldwin BIk Meet BET Inspiration
CNN Lou Dobbs CNN Live Sunday Investigations Larry King Live CNN Sunday Night Investigations
CRT The Investigators Beach |Cops (s) Cops (s) Cops (s) Cops (s) Cops (s) Beach Patrol The Investigators
DISC Nefertiti Resurrected Great Pyramid King Tut's Mystery Secrets of Egypt's Lost Queen (N) Lost Mummy
DISN Suite Life Suite Life Montana |Suite Life Montana |Suite Life Cory ICory ICory 7Cory Suite Life Montana
El Best Best El News Weekend The Life and Death of Anna Nicole Anna Nicole Smith. Anna Nicole
ESP2 Series of Poker Series of Poker ESPY Preview NHRA Drag Racing: Mopar Mile-High Nationals Final Eliminations.
ESPN MLB Baseball: St. Louis Cardinals at Philadelphia Phillies. (Live) (cc) 2007 ESPY Awards Los Angeles. (N) (cc) Back- SportsCtr
EWTN Bene- |Life Father Groeschel Father Corapi Chester- Rosary What Every |Life on the Rock
FAM (5:00) Movie Movie: *** Grease (1978) (John Travolta) (cc) Movie: *** Grease (1978) (John Travolta) (cc)
HGTV Weekend |Renovatn If Walls |House To Sell Secrets |Get Out Way Out (N) Bought |First Dream |What Get
HIST Mega Disasters (cc) ice Road Truckers Dogfights "Kamikazes" (cc) Ice Road Truckers The Universe Earth.
LIFE (5:30) Movie: *** Pretty Woman (1990) Side Order of Life State of Mind "Pilot" Army Wives (N) (cc) Side Order of Life
NICK School INaked Drake |Jordan Zoey 101 Unfab Videos |Rose- Rose- |Rose- Rose- |Rose-
SCI (5:00) Movie From Dusk Till Dawn 2 From Dusk Till Dawn 3: Hangman Destination Truth (s)
TBS Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me Movie: * Mr. Deeds (2002) (Adam Sandier) Movie: * Mr. Deeds (2002) (Adam Sandier)
TCM Movie: ** Clambake (1967) (Elvis Presley) Movie: *** Treasure Island (1934) Movie: **2w Mackenna's Gold (1969)
TLC Little People Little People Little Peopleo oLittle People Little People Little People
SPIKE CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn
TNT NASCAR Racing: Nextel Cup Movie: ***'/ Minority Report (2002) (Tom Cruise) (cc) IMovie: Minority Report (2002)
UNI (5:00) Copa America Copa Festival Buscando a Timbiriche, la Nueva Banda Impacto INoticiero
USA (5:00) Movie: Along Movie: ** 50 First Dates (2004) (cc) The 4400 (N) (cc) The Dead Zone (cc) Law & Order: SVU

HBO Movie: ** Fantastic Four (2005) (s) 'PG-13' Big Love (s) (cc) John-Cincin. Entou- Con- Devil-Prada
SHOW (5:15) Movie |Movie: **'2 Bad News Bears (2005) (cc) Dexter "Crocodile" Meadowlands (cc) Meadowlands (cc)
TMC Movie -Movie: All In (2007)'NR' |Movie: **l/ Lord of War (2005) (s) 'R' (cc) Movie: ** Asylum (2005)'R' |Romper


Horoscopes







10 Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


release dates: July 14-20


Changing Times on the Range


The Life of a Cowboy


Have you ever dreamed of being a
cowboy or a cowgirl? It sounds like a
romantic life: being out on the range,
independent, sleeping outdoors with
the stars as your blanket.
Sometimes it's easy to forget that this
romantic life comes with a lot of work.
But in spite of the long hours, most
cowboys think this is a wonderful life.
The Mini Page looks at what the
cowboy's life is like today.
Who is a cowboy?
Today being a cowboy can mean
everything from being a rodeo entertainer,
to riding a horse in competition, to
working on a ranch with cattle.
Most full-time cowboys think of
cowboying both as a job and as a life
they love. Most have skills with
horses, roping and cattle.
Experts say if kids are raised in the
cowboy lifestyle, then it gets in their
blood. When they grow up, they will
always think of themselves as cowboys
or cowgirls.


I 4n1 t-n Iem Ilu iluws ie r siter at a uAunry
fair in Maryland. Kids may begin working
on the family ranch when they are 5 or 6.


The Mini Page"
Guide to the
Constitution
The popular nine-part series on the
Constitution, written in collaboration
with the National Archives, is now
packaged as a colorful 32-page
softcover book. The series covers:
* the preamble, the seven articles
and 27 amendments
* the "big ideas" of the document
* the history of its making and
the signers


Out on the range
What a cowboy's life is like depends
on the land. On ranches in prairie
states, such as Nebraska or parts of
Texas, the land is flat. Cowboys can
use pickup trucks or all-terrain
vehicles (ATVs) to go out on the range.
Sometimes cowboys might even
herd their horses into a trailer or
truck and drive them to the pasture.
Then they let the horses out and ride
them while checking on the cattle.
In mountainous areas such as Idaho
and Nevada, motorized vehicles may
not be practical. To get to the rocky
places where cattle are grazing,
cowboys still need a horse.
In areas such as the Dakotas or
Wyoming, ranchers have to go out to
the range several times a day in the
winter to break ice in the water tanks.
When it snows, they have to deliver
hay to the cattle, since cattle can't get to
grass or corn under the snow.


VIM..

Vam


--------------------------------------------4
To order, send $9.95 plus $3.50 postage and handling for each copy. Send check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to:
Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097.
Please send __ copies of The Mini Page Guide to the Constitution (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at $13.45
eachi, total cost. (Bulk discount information ataiable upon request.) en.smartwarehousing.com
Name:
I Address:
I City State: -ip:Zp
L---------- ------------------------------ --- --------
from The Mini Page by Betty Debnam 2007 The Mini Page Publishng Company Ic.
MIGHTY 0M n JS

All the following jokes have something in common.
Can you guess the common theme or category?

Ted: What type of cowboy steals teapots? 7
Teri: A kettle rustler! t

Tim: Why did the cowboy die with his boots on?
SkT Tammy: Because he didn't want to stub his toe
lit when he kicked the bucket!


Tom: Why did the cowboy put his bunk '
on the fire? could sleep like a log!
Tony: So that he could sleep like a log!


from The Min Page by Betty Dbnm 0 2007 The Mini Pag Publhing Company Inc. TM

Mini Spy...
Mini Spy and Rookie Cookie are having fun as cowgirls.
See if you can find:


29-1(07)


This cowboy rides
under the wide-open
skies of Colorado.
Cowboys and
cowgirls say working
in the beautiful
outdoors is one of
the best things about
the cowboy life.


A cowboy and his horse
All cowboys still rely on horses at
least sometimes. Cowboys often say,
"Two heads are better than one." The
horse knows what it's doing, and the
experienced cowboy lets the horse do
the work of controlling the cattle.
A good cowboy depends on the
"horse sense" of his partner. A good
horse knows how to work with the
cattle. For example, the horse may cut
off certain cows from the herd so the ,
cowboy can check on them and care
for them.


This cowboy, with his horse and dog, drive
a herd of cattle to a new range in Oregon.


from The Min Page by Betty Debnm , 2007 Tho Mini Page PubIhing Company Inc.


^ MRookie Cookie's Recipt
7Chillin' Yogurt Pops
You'll need: This makes a cool snack on those hot summer days.
* 2 (8-ounce) containers low-fat peach yogurt
a 1/2 cup frozen peaches
* 1/2 cup frozen raspberries or strawberries
* 1/2 cup reduced-fat milk
* 6 (3-ounce) small paper cups
* 6 plastic spoons
* blender
What to do:
1. Place yogurt, fruit and milk in blender. Blend for 30 to 60 seconds
until ingredients form a thick liquid.
2. Pour into the paper cups.
3. Place plastic spoon in the middle of each cup, with handle sticking
out.
4. Freeze for 8 hours. Remove for 5 minutes to soften just before eating.
5. Peel away cup from frozen yogurt to enjoy the pop on a stick.
You will need an adult's help with this recipe.
from The Mini Pago byBe Debnam 0 2007 The Mini Page Publishing Copany Inc.


Meet Zac Efron
Zac Efron stars as basketball captain Troy Bolton
in Disney Channel's movie "High School Musical 2."
Zac also appeared in the first "High School Musical."
He has appeared on several TV shows, including
i ' "The Suite Life of Zack & Cody," "Firefly" and "ER."
He starred in the TV movie "Miracle Run."
He is also acting in the movie "Hairspray." He has
acted in many plays as well, including "Peter Pan," "Little Shop of
Horrors" and "The Music Man."
Zac, 19, was born in San Luis Obispo, Calif. He now lives in Los
Angeles. He began taking singing lessons when he was 11. He
plays the piano and is learning how to play the guitar.
He has fun surfing, skateboarding, golfing, skiing, rock
climbing, snowboarding and playing video games. He is working
to restore two cars that he got from his grandfather.
He lives at home with his parents and younger brother. They
have two Australian shepherds and one Siamese cat.
from The Mini Page by Betty Dobnam 0 2007 The Mini Page Publishing Company Inc.


from The Mini Page by Batty Dbnam 2007 e Mini Pag Publishing Company Inc.


More About the Life of a Cowboy


The cowboy family
People used to claim a cowboy's
only friend was his horse. Things are
much better today.
Before World War II, cowboying
was a lifestyle for single males,
usually teenagers. The cowboy had
to be able to go off for days at a time
to follow the cattle. This didn't allow
much opportunity to meet girls or to
raise a family.
Today this has all changed.
Because of vehicles such as pickups,
modem cowboys can cover a lot
more ground more quickly. The
cowboy or cowgirl can go home at
night.
Cowboying has become a family
affair. In many ranch families, both
spouses and the kids work with the
cattle.
In the 1800s, the only cowboys
who actually had homes on the
ranch were the owners or people
doing jobs such as cooking. There
used to be a big separation between
the cattlemen, or owners, and the
hired cowboys.
Today, most owners and hired
cowboys work on the range together.
Hired hands might live with their
families in homes on the range.
Although most hired cowboys are
still men, today there are many
women working on the range, too.

The Mini Page thanks Don Reeves, curator
of The Cowboy Collection, the National
Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in
Oklahoma City, for help with this issue.

Sites to see:
www.nationalcowboymuseum.org/
www.westernfolklife.org

Look in the TV section of your newspaper
for listings of old cowboy movies. How
does the movie cowboy life compare to
the life of today's cowboy?

Next week The Mini Page is about hot air
balloons.


This cowboy and his
son are moving the
herd from one
pasture to another.
Today it is common
for family members
to share the work on
the ranch. Kids grow
up among the
animals.


Modern cowboy tools
Pickups and ATVs are not the
only technology that has changed the
life of the cowboy. Other important
technology includes:
* Cell phones make it much
easier to keep track of cattle
conditions and make sure the
cowboy is OK out on the range.
Sometimes, however, there is no
connection out on the range.
Computer chips
are often placed
in ear tags that
each cow wears.
Or computer
. hips might be
inserted just
under the cow's
skin close to its
head.


* Computer chips identify the
owner of the cattle and contain
important information about the cow.
Early ear tags had only the
number of the cow written on them.
Today's computerized tags can carry
as much information as the cowboy
wants to include. This might be the
cow's medical file, its family tree,
when it was born or whether it is a
good mother.
Cowboys and cowgirls can scan
the chip, just like you scan food in
the grocery store. When they get
home, they can download all the
information to their computers.


Cowboy poets
Cowboys have been writing poetry
and songs since the 1800s. Cowboys
were often alone on the range, and
writing poetry and music was a good
way to pass the time.
I For the past 25 years, cowboy
poetry has become popular with the
public as well. There are hundreds of
cowboy poetry gatherings across the
country each year.
The longest-running such festival is
the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering,
held each winter at the Western
Folklife Center in Elko, Nev.
One teenage cowboy, Oscar Auker,
15, said reciting poetry is a lot of fun.
"A lot of good people come to these
gatherings."
He grew up working with his dad
on different ranches. He is home-
schooled, and first explored cowboy
poetry as part of a school assignment.


Oscar Auker, 12 in this pnoto, recites a
traditional cowboy poem at the National
Cowboy Poetry Gathering. He has been
reciting cowboy poetry there for about
41/2 years.


Please include all of the appropriate registered trademark symbols and copyright lines in any publication of The Mini Page�.


Go dot to dot and color. c,-


13- a A
12. 14 15.16
II10 *" 17 21
4 8' *W. * 18 19
.7


TMfrom The Mini Pago by Beatty Dobnam 2007 The Mini Page Publishing Company Inc.

Gus Goodsport's eport

Supersport: Cullen Jones
Height: 6-5 Birthdate: 2-29-84
Weight: 195 Hometown: New York, N.Y.
Some people figured Cullen Jones would be a basketball player
like many of his African-American peers.
It didn't happen.
He marched to a different drumbeat, making a big splash in
swimming, a sport dominated by white athletes. The long, lean
and lightning-fast Jones started going to the pool at age 8 and expects to be
competing for the United States in the 2008 Olympics.
Jones, whose father, Ronald, played college basketball, was a three-time All-
America swimmer at North Carolina State University, where he majored in
English and minored in psychology. Later he set a world record in the 4x100
relay and held the U.S. mark in the 50-meter freestyle. Recently, he won a gold
medal in the FINA World Championships.
But his goals include more than winning gold medals. Jones wants to create
scholarships that will provide opportunities for African-American and other
minority youth to have swimming club opportunities like he did.
Meanwhile, Cullen will keep splashing and pursuing his Olympic dream.


frmTeMe aeb etyObe 20 e ilPo.Pbibn opn


/ from The Mini Page by Betty Debnam 02007 The Mini Page publhing Company I,
SeS B O BOYS TRY 'N
woWund's FIND
Words that remind us of modern cowboys are hidden in the block
below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally. See if you
can find: RANGE, RIDE, HORSE, LIFE, CATTLE, COW, RANCH,
WORK, HERD, TRUCK, COMPUTER, CHIP, GRAZE, PASTURE,
WINTER, SPRING, CALF, WATER, FEED, FAMILY, POETRY,
TECHNOLOGY, GATHERING.
BEING PR.WHRL FEED LWOCF
COWBOYS AACOE I I VK RETAWA
GREAT SN H K RR D F R K CU R T
TG I LWK D E E E ZA RG I
U EP ESROHELTTAC L
RHC NARV KR E TN I W Y
ER E T UPMOCY RTEOF
G N I RPSG N I R EH TAG
F F LACY GO LONHCET


h. R- D-111, 0 2W7 �' M1.1 P- P.bl-lU C-p-y 1-


I


I-,m n,, Mini Page by 5otY u 0onn rwr I200 � i] M... P9. .......... UC p-y ..


Inc







Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


Toll Free




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i'iI T 1


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Important Information: Pease
read your ad carefully the first
day it appears. In case of an
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ed. We will not be responsible
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insertion, or for more than the
extent of the ad rendered val-
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Advertiser assumes responsi-
bility for all statements, names
and content of an ad, and
assumes responsibility for any
claims against Independent
Newspapers. All advertising
is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves I - r' 1I! to accept or
reject ant , copy, and to
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advise you to check with the
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and/or The Better Business
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Auctions 105
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Card of Thanks 120
In Memorlam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
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Garage-Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 16I'f



LARGE BLACK DOG- female,
vic of Hwy 441 Call to identi-
fy (863)357-3249
PIT BULL- Male, Found near
hospital. Mon. 7/2/07.
Please call to identify.
(863)447-6507


BLACK LAB- 7 yrs old, Crate
trained. Good w/kids & small
dogs. Free to good home.
(863)517-1704 Wayne
BLACK MOUTH CURR, (9),
male & female, 6 weeks old,
to good homes only.
(863)634-7577

FREE BEAGLE- Female-to
good home only.
(863)357-6930

LAB MIX DOGS, 1 brown
male, 1 black female, 11
months old. To good homes,
room to run. (561)719-4178
PUPPIES, Free to good home
only. You pick up.
(863)801-4283
TRUCK TIRES, Mounted on
wheels for off-road use. Free
to good home.
(863)675-1862


More Papers Mean More Readers!

..- Reach more readers when you run
"dl"-i -: ........ 4 ,ii - , i n on..rnI n .-,- in d


yULII dU I eve raiJC papeiJ i i i
4our newspaper network. g
Our newspaper network
consists of eight papers - one 4

daily and seven weeklies. An ad run in all these newspapers will


reach more than 164,000 readers*!


Call Today For Details!
S. l,' .u Pul F :-.:h 1 l Su .,, S mr',I ,: i - - lai rl g - r . - II II t .: l

Rules for placing FREE ads!
SS W S' T-- -..,1.~1 ....^T- -


IU qUality, yuar aU
be for a personal item. (No commercial items, pets or animals)
' Must fit into 1 2 inch
(that's 4 lines. appro:.i.mately 23 characters per line)
' Must include only one item and ,its price
(remember it must be S2,500 or less) 1


Call us!
No Fee. No Catch, No Problem!


S


Career Opportunities with





Horizon Properties
We have have opportunities for
experienced as well as new
agents looking for a career
in Real Estate. As a leader in
the industry with over
150,000 agents, 8,000 of-
fices in 45 countries. We
can help you, by providing
the proper training and build-
ing an effective referral base
by company generated
leads. High School Diplo-
ma/GED Req." Come & see
how you can be part of the
team August 2nd, 2007.
Please call to reserve your
place 863-467-2100


Professional Sates Executive
position available for a busy
new home sales business.
Sales experience a plus. No
real estate license required.
Salary plus commission.
Call (863)763-6376
or (863)357-2700.


ITpecil Nio-ic


EImIplo-me
Ful imI00


CITY OF OKEECHOBEE
ACCOUNT CLERK
The Account Clerk is the assistant to the Accounts Supervisor.
The department is responsible for maintaining and process-
ing the City's financial matters, information, files, payroll and
insurance.
A complete job description and application packet, including
salary and benefits may be printed from the City's web page,
www.citvofokeechobee.com or picked up at City Hall, Office
of the City Clerk, 55 SE 3rd Avenue, Okeechobee, FL 34974,
863-763-3372 ext. 215.
Applications will be accepted until Thursday, July 19, 2007 at
3:00 PM. Resumes must accompany a completed applica-
tion.
Successful candidates are required to pass a pre-employment
substance screening/physical. Drug Free Workplace.
EOE/AAP



Start a new career in the much needed field of
nursing as a Certified Nursing Assistant. Complete the
Hospitality Assistant course/training at Okeechobee
Healthcare Facility and become a CNA in 4 weeks. Next
class begins soon. Instructor RN/experienced teacher has
a very high CNA exam passing rate. Qualified CNAs are
then eligible for LPN training. Good benefits.
Apply In Person For Further Details:
406 N.W. 4th Street * (863) 357-2442


Empoyen
Meical


Empoyen
Medical


Emlymn


Emlymn


Pat ime-


Okeechobee News





The Okeechobee News is currently seeking an
energetic, self motivated PART TIME circulation
assistant.

The right applicant must have:
Cash Handling Experience
Knowledge of local area or ability to read map
Work Night and Weekends
References
The Daily Okeechobee News offers:
Potential for advancement
A unique work environment where
employees are trusted and empowered
Competitive pay and benefits
Benefits Package
Generous time off program
The Daily Okocidobe Neus Is An Equal Opporamityj Employer


FNot nffii~iMo itfv9 ai o i


AGRICULTURAL NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST
OKEECHOBEE SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT
Technically oriented position that will operate in a team envi-
ronment with field personnel from the Natural Resources Con-
servation Services and the FL. Dept. of Agriculture. Perform
on-site and engineering evaluations of soil and water related
projects, water quality sampling, data collection, elementary
survey analysis and report on-site evaluations of construction,
implementation and operation and maintenance pursuant to all
Best Management Practices. Follow up with agricultural pro-
ducers regarding implementation of approved conservation
plans and provide technical assistance relating to operation
and maintenance of management and/or engineered practices.
Provide training and education programs to agriculture indus-
try. Computer knowledge required. Bookkeeping and Quick
Books experience preferred.
Submit resumes by July 27th to Soil & Water Conservation
District, 452 US Hwy 98 N, Okeechobee, FL 34972 or by fax
863-763-6407






HOUSEKEEPING:

Full Time
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
Apply In Person Only At
Business Office, 406 N.W. 4th Street


FOOD SERVICE DIRECTOR
Immediate opening at Okee-
chobee Juvenile Correctional
Facility. Institutional cooking
and hands-on mgmt. exp.
preferred. Competitive Wag-
es and Benefits. Must pass
background check and drug
screen.
Contact Colleen at
(225)326-2341 or fax
resume w/ salary history to
225-273-2165 Attn: #647.
E0E



PRE K TEACHERS: F/T & P/T
positions available. Must be
experienced. Great pay & work
environment. 863-467-5000


SERVERS
Presentable,
personable & hard
working qualities is
a must. Experience
preferred but not
necessary. Hiring
AM & PM for only
the right people.


One man's trash Is anoth-
er man's treasure. Turn
your tPash to treasure
with an ad in the classl-
fieds.


Management
Opportunities!
*Immediate Openings*
Relief Managers
& 3rd Shift Managers
Starting Pay: $11.00/hr.
with potential to make $50k
Full Benefit Package
Monthly Bonus
Unlimited Growth Potential
2nd & 3rd Shift
Sales Associate .
Opportunities!
Starting Pay: $9.00/hr.
2pm-1 Opm & 1 Opm-6am
Advancement Opportunities
Scholarship Program
Weekly Pay Checks
APPLY NOW!
CALL 24 HOURS A DAY!
Management Applicants Call:
1-866-639-4473
Associate Applicants Call:
1-877-622-6222
www.racetrac.com
EOE

STORE MANAGER
Oversee convenience store.
Sell food & groceries. Rec-
oncile accounts & prepare
reports. Maintain equipment
& inventory. Req. 2 yrs exp.
Send resume to:
President
Country Corner Drive Thru
8675 Hwy 441 SE
Okeechobee, FL 34974



EXPANDING TO HENDRY
COUNTY
Home held agency seeking
RN Case Manager, LPN, HHA
& MSW. Top pay! Great place
to work! (863)491-0002 or
1-888-491-0009



READING A
NEWSPAPER MAKES
YOU A MORE INFORMED
ANO INTERESTING
PERSON.
*l^o wbno llwp|r


/ 1-877-353-2424 f(TollFree)j

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OS.
i~F1
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/

/
I" /
:. � J


Monday
Tuesday thru Friday
Saturday
Th.j,- J I .' h'f. . ' ) "-. .i , 1 1 L.h1-.II , m . n
Sunday
r,-,d.j, I0" 1 , ILt I , , i l- - A ., l,., l -


1 -.


Il im i - -ro


HoeImpovmet


We have all your
flooring needs!

T FLORIDA FLOORS & MORE
513 S.W Park Street * (863) 763-7131


NEW PAY RATES
SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL
NURSE SUPERVISOR
Nurses, LPN, PN, RN
FT Days
CNA'S 3-11 & 11-7
BENEFITS

a es ea are ener
230 S. Barfield Hwy.
Pahokee, FL 33476
561-924-5561




Newspaper Carriers Needed
For Okeechobee Area. Call
Mike 800-932-2489 Ext: 3583
Please Leave Message



NEED A BABYSITTER? Will
work with your hours, any-
time. (863)261-5387

Services



Babysitting 405
Child Care Needed'110
Child Care Offered415
Instruction 420
Services Offered425
Insurance 430
Medical Services435





Dan's
Framing, inc.



1900 NE 138th St.
Okeechobee, FL
once 863.357.4145
ta 863.357.9033





Nursing Home Alternative
Will care for your loved
one. Private room from
light assistance to full
assistance. 24 hr. Eight
yrs. exp. References
provided. 863-697-6383



Home of Okepcobee s Onl
OBSCENE RoagiB t fSgidiA



BAR& GRILL
DAllY LUNCH SPECIALS
Al 1 " ' " ' " 11 .'
World Famous
Breasted Chiicken
(863) 467-8232
6315 US Hwy.441 S.E.


JACK'S TOP SOIL
Fill Dirt/Shell Rock
& Bob Cat work.
Call 863-467-4734

Merchandise i



Air Conditioners 505
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Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
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Building Materials50O
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China. Glassware. Etc. 500
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Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740


WINDOW UNIT, Hampton Bay,
good condition. $75
(561)790-6589


WANTED: FLORIDA ART
A.E. Backus, J. Hutchinson
H. Newton, G. Buckner, E.
Buckner, L. Roberts, A. Hair.
R A. McClendon, S. Newton,
BIG $$ (772)562-5567


CHEST FREEZER, Like new.
S150 (863)675-1113
FREEZER: Large w/ Locking
capability. Mint condition.
Great for the hunter. S300
(561)951-6088
RANGE, Electric, Maytag,
White, $75. (863)675-2348
REFRIGERATOR- Sears, 19.4
cu ft, frost free, side by side,
green, good cond., S75
(863)763-1361
STOVE- good shape, $50
(863)447-5985


STOVE, FRIDGE, WASHER &
DRYER- All in good working
condition. $125. or will sep-
arate. (863)467-8965

STOVE- Gas, Magic Chef, 20",
Excellent condition. $125.
(863)467-1530

STOVE- Kenmore, Self clean-
ing, Smooth top, white. Exc.
cond. Moving, Must sell
$250. Neg. (863)634-3841

WASHER & DRYER- Kenmore,
5 mos old, asking $500 for
the pair (863)697-1401

WASHER & DRYER, Whirl-
pool, Heavy duty. Extra Ig.
capacity. Works great. $250.
(863)675-4443

WASHER, Kenmore, 3 yrs.
old, $75. (863)634-3650

WASHER/DRYER- Crosley,
Heavy duty, Very good con-
dition. $150. or best offer.
Call Jim (863)763-3173



SHED, 8x10, insulated, new,
never assembled, costs
$1595, sell $750 or best of-
fer. (863)697-2604



HAIR STRAIGHTENER- Maxi
Glide, used only once. Paid
$140 asking $80
(863)357-8265
Biye's 0530


UTILITY BICYCLE - 3 wheel,
TLC, $30 (863)675-0300
LaBelle






130 MPH PRICING




25x25x9 Ambassador
Verca (2,12) Roof Soffil'Fnsca
' Seional Or 2 Roiirp Doors
2 OGab' iVents
*4'CoqncreleS!ah"
$14,879




30x35x9 Executive
VCrcal (3i12) Roof. SoffitFasoa
R ol2.uDos
1 M 0n D.or. 1 Window.
2 Gable Vets
4" Cici'ts S~ab*
$21,923
'Concrote & Installation by
indopondeint Licensed
Contractors* I



F{ A [::qijeeo!oM Plans,
!,- ; L ',C^t'LI*c *(l ll:' nd Cod.e
METAL SYSTEMS
PLUS, LLC
WA'Si,.metalsyslemsoius.com
"'*t"\ -,:!,'- s,7 , :3 ,B upilsdi cng,,



PLYWOOD (10 sheets): 3/4",
4x6 sheets. S120 will sep.
Call (561)762-4620 Jupiter
area.


Classified








53-2424. ..ABSOLi

I for any personal items for sale under $2,500


tpecil Notice


Empoyen


YY CASTLE
CASTLE The Parenting
CASTLE Professionals
Support our fight for the prevention of child abuse
Call 772-465-6011


Immediate Openings * All Shifts
Full Time/Part Time * RN's & LPN's
Apply In Person To:
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
1646 Hwy. 441 North


Immediate Openings - CNAs
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
All shifts: Full/Part Time. Good Benefits.
Apply In Person To:
406 N.W. 4th Street. (863) 357-2442


Employment -
Full-Time 205
Employment -
Medical 210
Employment -
Part-Time 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Training 227
Sales 230




CAREGIVER NEEDED for my
father. Exp. & ref's a must.
Clean D/L, Bkgrd/Ck. Call She-
ryl aft. 5pm (863)634-1343



ESTIMATOR
Experienced in commercial
& residential for local con-
struction company. Benefits.
(863)467-0831 DFWP

LIVE IN NANNY/HOUSEKEEP-
ER- Needed in Orlando area
to help loving family
(407)914-3472 Joanne


mo


i


I








12 Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


Gutters Plus,
4. LLC
, -' i ,, -.-, , ,.J ,-,, .,,,, l .
It wasn't raining when
Noah built the ark!
Prepare now and let us help.
Hurricane Protection
Seamless Raingutter
Screen Rooms and
Enclosures * Carports
Call today for your
free estimate
(863) 634-3159
Lic. #0CSL2783-01

Shutters &
Gutters, Inc.
Prqfessiorral
Installation ofStorm
Shutters & Seamless
Rain Gutters-
Licensed & Insured

863.763.5650
1551 N.W. 24th Drive
Okeechobee
License #765


CAPTIANS BED- Twin, w/
matching dresser Lt color
wood. Good cond. $200. or
best offer. (863)675-0600
TODDLER BED- Little Tykes
Fire Truck with mattress. Ex-
cellent condition. $75.
(863)675-0600
TRIPLET STROLLER- Do you
need a ride for three? Ingle-
sina, very lightly used. $395
(863)228-0244



CHINA- Lennox dinnerware
pattern, Starlight complete
w/extra pcs for 8 chosen FDR
WH $1995. (863)467-7718


WEDDING DRESS, Size 6,
Strapless, Organza Silk
w/pearls & sequins. $400.
(863)697-1486


FOOTBALL/BASEBALL CARDS
(1000)- Racing & Comic. late
Os early 90s Exc. cond. $300
or best offer!! 863-763-8943



DELL SCHOOL COMPUTER:
Window XR Etc. $150.
(863)517-2782 Tony
GATEWAY- Like new condi-
tion. $150. (863)983-4940
SONY LAPTOP VAIO- PCG-
FXA47 AMD Athlon 4 pro-
cessor. Trade Apple laptop
-- or $650 (772)461-8822



FIREPLACE- Beige, Electric,
Like new. $350. or best of-
fer. (863)467-8161
FIREPLACE- Brand new. $200
or best offer. (863)763-6747


BED FRAME, Queen/King, $25
(863)805-2801
BED, Queen, headboard, foot-
board & rails. $60
(863)805-2801
BED/RM SUITE- 5 piece with
Full size bed, Mattress & box
springs. Like new. $350.
(863)763-3551
BEDROOM SUITE, 6 pc.
Queen, white, w/mattress &
boxsprings, excellent condi-
tion. $200 (863)467-7659
BUNK BEDS, Pine, great con-
dition, with mattresses. $150
(239)842-0040
BUNK BEDS- Wood, includes
mattresses. Badcock brand
w/horse on end. Good cond.
' $150 neg. (863)635-2487
CANOPY BED SUITE- Twin sz,
incIld mirrored dresser, night
stand, desk book case.



CHINA CABINET, Solid wood,
2 pc. w/5 shelves. Hand
Made. 6' tall, 4" wide. Must
see! $500 (863)763-8943
CHINA CABINETS (2), White
w/gold trim, glass doors &
shelves, 74"hx40"wx17"d.
$200/both. (561)790-6589
COFFEE TABLE, Oak w/glass
inlay top. $25
(863)763-7931
COUCH & LOVESEAT, dark
green, leather, good condi-
tion, $150. (863)763-5067
DINING ROOM SET: Broyhill,
with hutch. Paid $1700. Ask-
ing $300.863-467-5756
DINING ROOM TABLE, Broy-
hill, Pine, Knotted Wood. 2
leaves makes 8 ft. long.
$100. (561)951-6088
DINING TABLE- With matching
china cabinet, 4 chairs &
leaf. Good cond. $600 neg.
(863)635-2487
DRESSER- Western Solid


wood. Iron fixtures. Like
new. $200. (863)465-6777
DRESSERS, 1 white, 1 brown.
$80 for both, will separate.
(863)467-5756
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER-
Holds 32" television, made
of solid wood, has drawers.
$175 (239)839-0795
ENTERTAINMENT CTR- 10'x7',
White, Orig. $4000. Will sell
for $300. or best offer.
(863)467-8161
LEATHER CHAIR, Red, 6
months old, excellent condi-
tion, paid $600, asking $400
(863)763-0583
LOUNGE CHAIR, Small, beige,
$25 (863)467-5206


LOFT BEDS with attached
desk, 2 black metal, $70/will
separate. Call
863-763-8572.
LOVESEAT - w/matching chair
& solid wood cocktail table.
Excellent condition. $325
firm. 863-675-5729
MATTRESS & BOXSPRINGS,
New condition, full size. $75
(863)467-5206
MATTRESS- Queen/King. New
in plastic. $189
(561)848-8765
MATTRESS- Twin/full, new in
plastic. $139
(561)848-8765
SLEEPER SOFA- 7ft Carlton,
beige color, excellent condi-
tion, $295 or best offer.
(863)673-2593
SLEEPER SOFA: Floral design.
Excellent condition. $175.
(863)763-5216
SLEEPER SOFA, Gray plaid
queen. $100 (863)763-7931
SWIVEL ROCKER- Green,
good condition. $25
(863)610-0020
TABLE, 40" round, wooden, 2
chairs. $70 (863)697-2704
TABLE, Butterscotch, with leaf
& 6 chairs, great condition.
$150 (239)842-0040



GOLF CART- E-Z Go with
dumper/gas. Good condition.
$2500 (772)341-3707/
(863)467-2104


CARBINE RIFLE, 30 caliber
with 30 round clip, $300.
(863)763-5323
CHARLES DALY PUMP SHOT-
GUN, 31/2" chamber & 22
Single Shot, $375 will sell
separately. (863)763-5323
CZ-52 WALNUT GRIPS- good
condition, .223 tim)3s, $200
(863)697-1443
GUN- Smith & Wesson model
640 Harmless 357 mag.
Stainless. $425
(772)461-8822



CROSS TRAINER: Elliptical
Cardio, Pro-Form brand, ex-
cellent condition. $200.
863-675-3944 Labelle
FITNESS MACHINE- Welder
Crossbow Advantage. One
year old.$300 or best offer
(863)675-3838
MOTORIZED CHAIR, Hover-
round MPV4, exc. cond.,
list price $6200, sell for
$1,000. (863)634-8872
NORDI TRACK weight fitness
system, $300. Call
863-467-1694.
POWER HOUSE: Fitness Ma-
chine w/leg attach. & Body
By Jake Ab Scissors. $400
will sep. (239)324-2550
TOTAL GYM MACHINE- Has
all equipment but needs 1
cable. $100 (863)983-6319
TREADMILL & EXERCISE
BIKE, $300 for both, will sep.
Call (239)324-2550



COOKER, 18 quart, brand new,
$20. Call 863-610-4674.
VERTICAL BLINDS Teal Green,
(5) 47"Wx63'/2"L (2) 81 "Wx
81L wall rods & hardware.
$200 neg. (863)763-8086


RING- Mans, 15. Solitaire in
10 Kt. band. Excellent condi-
tion. $250. (863)763-2458
WEDDING RING SET: Gold
band, diamond solitaire & a
6 diamond wrap. Pd. $1500,




PATIO CHAIRS- 4, Clean.
$6.00. Call (863)357-0344
or 863-610-0754.


ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR, Jaz-
zy, looks & runs like new,
$2500. (863)763-7609


ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR: Med-
ics, "Cadillac of wheelchairs-"
Immaculate, used very little on
carpet only. Paid $5000, asking
only $1000.863-447-0448
POWER CHAIR: Pride Jazzy
#1113 w/joystick. Exc condo.
Small turn radius. New $5800,
Now $1090. (863)763-6907
SCOOTER, Large SpaceSaver
Plus, 2 new batteries, Very
low hours. Like new. $850.
Neg. (863)357-8788
SCOOTER, Electric: Golden
Champion. Comes w/ Vehi-
cle Lift. Like new. $1000. or
best offer. (863)697-3152
SCOOTER: Golden Compan-
ion, Good condition. $650.
(863)634-8581
SCOOTER- Large, Space sav-
er, Exc cond. Pd $5000.


Asking $800.863-983-8037


ADULT MOVIES (150+), VHS,
Adult, XXX, $575. or best of-
fer. (561)633-1371
BOUNCE HOUSE/SLIDE
COMBO: 15x15, Great condi-
tion. $1800 (863)228-2440
or (863)675-1113 LaBelle
DECORATOR ITEMS: Wicker
Mirror, Etc. Palm Tree/Safari
Design. $300 for all, will sep.
Call for info. (863)675-4443
FLAG POOL- 25', W/gold ball
topper. Line, Hooks & flag
included. Will sacrifice. $95.
(863)635-1513 Frostproof


CLASSICAL GUITAR- With
case, good starter guitar.
$75 (863)824-0801
GUITAR CABINET: Custom
Built 77"Tx42"W, 2 solid
doors & shelf, Reduced to
$299. neg. (561)633-1371
GUITAR, New Squier Strat,
w/cover, SP10 Squier Am-
plifier, black, Some music.
$235. (863)357-8788
KEYBOARD, Cord M1, Works
good. Asking $1,500. or best
offer. (863)612-6295 La-
Belle
PIANO & ORGAN- Good condi-
tion $600. Will separate.
863-983-8037
PIANO, Gulbransen, upright,
w/Bench & new damp chas-
er. Price reduced to $200
neg. 863-467-2679 Iv. msg.
PIANO: KIMBALL, Upright w/
Bench. Excellent condition.
$500. (863)763-5216


AMERICAN BULL DOG- 7 mo.,
Male, Up to date with shots.
Reg. w/papers. $200.
(863)673-0232
BASSET HOUND- AKC reg.,
male, tri-colored, 2 yr old
w/chip. Great companion.
$300 (863)357-6930
BLUE TICK PUPPIES: 4
months old, purebred. $300
each. (863)634-3105
CHIHUAHUA PUPS- Not T-
Cups. 11wks, 3 Blondes, 2-
F, 1-M, CKC, Health cert.,
$400 each (863)801-1302
DOG PEN- Brand new 10 x 10
chain link. $150 firm
(863)532-0188
DOG PENS, (4), Large chain
link dog pens & also large
plastic dog crates, $680 will
sell sep. (863)612-0992
GUINEA PIGS (10), $7 males,
$10 females,
(863)843-0141
MACAW, 16 yr. old, blue &
gold, with large cage & out-
side swing. $1200
(863)634-7789
MALTESE DOG: 1 year old
adult, female, small size,
$550. Call (863) 983-1970.
PIT BULL PUPS: UKC, Blue
Fawn & White, 1 M & 4 F.
Vet checked. $550 Champ.
bloodlines. (863)655-2536
PIT PUPPIES, Red Nose, pure-
bred, $250 each. Call
863-634-3721
PIT/CURR MIX, (4), dark
chocolate, males & females,
$50 each. (863)697-3657
PUGS- AKC reg., shots &
wormed, fawn/black,
fawn/silver, $300 - $450
(863)675-1940/ 673-1523
SIAMESE KITTENS: DOB
4/15/07, Seal Point & Seal
Point Snow Shoe.
(863)357-3369
YORKSHIRE TERRIER- CKC
reg. Female, 2yrs old, black
& tan, playful & loving $350
(863)697-0286



HOT TUB- seats 6, good con-
dition, $1000
(863)467-6283 leave mes-
sage


BED IN A BAG: Queen Size,
Raised w/ Memory Foam.
Good for storms. $100. or
best offer. (863)824-8703
ELECTRIC GOLFCART '94- Fair
condition-needs work. $100
(863)228-2123
FISHING ROD, 801b custom
rod w/Penn reel, Murray
brothers. $200
(863)983-4940
POOL TABLE: National, Solid
Slate, 4x8 w/15 cue sticks.
Excellent condition. $500.
(863)675-6563
POOL TABLE- Slate, with ac-
cessories, $250 or best offer
(863)467-6088
TABLE- For boat or motor
home, rectangular, re-
movable, two legs, like new.
$100 (863)697-2033
TREE STANDS (2): For hunt-
ing. $70 negotiable or will
sell separately.
863-763-7609



AMPLIFIER- Kicker SX650 all
digital & Kicker L7 12" sub.
New in box, never installed.
$350 (863)634-2131
BOOM BOX- With 2 speakers.
Like new. $150
(239)657-4348w $
CD PLAYER - Brand new, $30.
Call 863-610-4674.
MASSIVE AUDIO: 6000 watt
amp, barely used, $500 or
best offer (863)634-6476
SPEAKER- 12" and 1000 watt
Rocksford Fosgate Amplifier.
$300 (863)634-9945


RCA- 32", With remote. Works
great. $75. (863)467-8965


GENERATOR: Briggs & Strat-
ton, 250 watts, 120 & 12
volts., 5 hp. $200.
863-675-1754
GENERATOR- Generac, 7550,
ood condition, electric start,
500 (863)697-1443
PORTABLE AIR COMPRES-
SORS (2) 1- 3hp vertical
tank, 1- 2hp 20 gal tank,
$370 or sep (561)676-0427
TABLE SAW MACHINE- $145
(239)657-4348
TOOLBOX, 16 drawer, Snap
On roll cab, air tools, sock-
ets, wrenches, $800 will sell
separately. (863)697-0234


KENMORE VACUUM, Canister
style, like new w/tools. $80
(863)467-7659
VACUUM, Hoover, self-pro-
pelled Wind Tunnel, good
cond., w/manual, belts & at-
tach's. $35. (863)763-6131


ANTIQUE GLASSWARE &
PORCEALINE, Collectibles &
Collections of ALL Kinds.
Call Diana (863)467-8408


Agriculture



Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed'Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845
Lawn & Garden 850
Livestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds/Plants.-'
Flowers 865




ALL AMERICAN BOX BLADE-
3 point hitch. $75
(863)763-7540


SADDLE- HP Western, 17",
with accessories. Like new
condition. $275.
(863)763-0367 or 801-9494
WESTERN SADDLE- Beautiful,
new, leather with silver trim,
18': seat. $295
(863)763-2692



GARDEN TILLER- Honda
GX160, 5.5 HP, rear tine,
heavy duty. $300
(863)674-0098
RIDING MOWER, 2004 1000L
John Deere w/extra blades.
Needs minor work. $400. or
best offer. (863)467-9395
RIDING MOWER- Snapper,
8hp Briggs & Stratton, fresh
30" blade + 1 extra blade.
$250 (863)673-5206
ROTO TILLER- Attach Troy
Built Big Red, 12hp, elec.,
exc. cond. $2800 new, sell
1$1200 neg (863)763-1377


Rentals

Iw RENT

Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses - Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House - Rent 930
Land - Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960



APT. 1BR/1BA & AN EFFC'Y
Located in Viking/Prairie
Both very clean!
Apt $600/mo. Effc'y $500/mo.
Includes utilities.
No pets. 561-329-8205
NW OKEECHOBEE: 2BR, 2BA,
on quiet St. Kids & pets ok.
$850/mo. 1st, last & $500
sec.561-346-1642.
OKEECHOBEE, Backlash RV
Park Apt & RV's 1 br available
on the Rim Canal. Call for de-
tails. (863)763-7783
House -Ret 93


All your rental needs
in one location.
Century 21 Horizon Properties
Landlords & Tenants
Call 863-467-2100
Doublewide, 3BR/2BA, in
BHR, No pets, yearly lease,
$750/mo + $1000 sec. dep.
863-763-4031
Indian Hammock, 1800 sq.
ft., 3/2, w/2 stall barn,
fenced, $2400 mo., 1st, last
& sec. (863)467-0831 ask
for Judy
KINGS BAY,
2BR/1BA, 1 car garage, CBS
House. central a/c & heat,
dishwasherW/D, storm shut-
ters. $900 mo. + $900 sec.
dep. Avail Now 863-467-8434
NEAR TOWN: 3 Bdrm., 2V2
Ba., Avail. Aug. 1st. $1250.
mo. Need 1st, last & $500
sec. dep. (863)763-5323
OKEE., 3/1, Lg carport, New
A/C. In town. $950. mo. +
1st, last & $300. Sec. Non
smoking envi. (863)634-8942
OKEE., 3br, 1ba, Carport,
Yard, W/D, Partly Furnished
$1150. mo + Sec. 1008SW
2nd Ave. (954)658-0108
OKEE-By 15B/Barlows 2br,
lba, CBS, Ige lot, end. patio,
W/D, storage, $875/mo. 1st,
& last (786)201-0306
OKEECHOBEE- 3/2/1 Ever-
lade Estates, tile throughout,
1295/mo, 1st & sec, No pets
561-248-3888/863-599-0156
OKEECHOBEE: 3BR/2BA, CBS,
Kings Bay. $1150 / month.
Call Rick (863)697-3096 or
Sammy (305)775-6579
Okeechobee, brand new 3/2,
avail, now, 1 yr. lease,
$1800 mo., 1st, last & sec.
(863)467-0831 ask for Judy


SalelbleHm


RIM CANAL: Cottage, New.
2/2 Unfurn. w/loft & dock.
Covered prkg. $1200 mo.
Min. 6 mo's. (772)408-3361
SW SECTION, CBS: 3/1, W/D
no pets. $900/mo, $2200 to
move in. 2200 SW Third
Ave., close to Walmart. Call
(772)708-7785 for details.
TREASURE ISLAND:(2)
2br/1ba, unfurn duplex's.
$700/mo + 1st mo dep.
W/D incid. (239)707-5155


OKEECHOBEE, 2 acres for
lease, wood & field fenced
property. (863)634-8658











Okeechobee, FL
Utilities
Included
Please call for
details
(561) 315-8849


BEDROOM with BA, full house
privileges, incl. utils.
$125/wk. 1st/last. Sec. dep.
No pets. 863-467-0624.
INSIDE CITY LIMITS, very
large, nice, fully furnished
room, cable ty, phone w/un-
limited long distance, w/d,
full hse priv. Avail immed.
$150 wk. (863)801-1839
OKEECHOBEE- Kitchen privi-
leges, Cable, W/D, $125/wk,
first & last (863)467-8516


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property - Sale 1010
Condos,'
Townhouses - Sale1015
Farms � Sale 1020
Houses - Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property - Sale 1035
Land - Sale 10-00
Lots - Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property - Sale 1055
Property Inspection 1060
Real Estate Wanted 1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080




SMALL BUSINESS - for sale
due to illness, $70K, $20K
down, owner will finance
balance @ 6%. No reason
you can not make
$50K-$100K the first year.
Working people only, no
desk jockeys
(863)675-8550 ask for Don.



OKEECHOBEE, 2BR/2BA, villa,
remodeled, great condition,
$120,000 or best offer.
(863)697-0414a


BUY NOW! Brand new CBS
4 Bdrm., 2 Bai, 3654 NW 5th
St., $995 mo. $145,000.
(863)484-0809
I BUY & LEASE HOUSES
* ANY AREA
* ANY CONDITION
* ANY PRICE
561-628-7472




Call Lex (561)715-1768.


OKEECHOBEE- 2.22 acres,

Ranch Acres On paved
road. $110,000
(863)697-8919




OKEE, Large lot on 18th hole
of Okee Golf & Country Club,
nice neighborhood. $89,900.
(863)634-3451
VIKING AREA- 3 ac., lot A & B
Track 8. .Asking $60,000.
Please call David @
(863)581-5780



LEX BUYS HOUSES
FOR CASH
(561)715-1768
WWW.LEXBUYSHOUSES.COM


SalelbleHm


Mobile Homes



Mobile Home - Lots 2005
Mobile Home - Parts 2010
Mobile Homes - Rent 20151
Mobile Homes - Sale 2020




A 4/2 on 1/2 ac great fenced
yard, apple , new roof & AC.
Rent, rent to own or buy un-
der appraisal. $1,000 mo.
1st Lst & sec. Century 21
Horizon Properties Diane
Dangremond 734-320-4091
863-467-2100
All your rental needs
in one location.
Century 21 Horizon Properties
Landlords & Tenants
Call 863-467-2100
ANCIENT OAKS 2/1 adorable
carport,shed, 55+. $550.
mo. annual or $1300 mo.
seasonal. 863-441-7233

,
OKEECHOBEE, 2br/2ba with
land, FL room, lease with op-
tion to buy, nice area, a/c.
(863)634-3451
SHORT TERM OR YEARLY -
fully furn., 2br, 2.5ba dbl.
wide, lake access, c/a, w/d,
direct tv, all util. & lawn
maint. incl., very clean,
(863)467-8005
TAYLOR CREEK ISLES - DW
Mobile, 3/2, furnished, C/A,
boat dock, adults only.
$900/mo. & 1st, last, & $500
sec. (954)260-1933
TREASURE ISLAND- 3br, 2ba,
on canal, fenced in, $750
dep, $250/wk, Please call
Missy (863)634-8674



ANCIENT OAKS 2/1 adorable
carport,shed, 55+. $64,500
also for rent $550. month
863-441-7233
~ BANK REPO'S -
MOVE TO YOUR LAND
Mobile Home Angels
561-385-4694


MOBILE HOME: Quiet, 55+
Community. Park Model.
Screened in room. Reduced to
$4500.863-467-2600
MOBILE HOME '88-CORSAIR,
unfurnished, located in Whis-
per Creek 55+ community.
$10,000 or best 'offer.
(239)839-0795
OKEECHOBEE, 2br, 2ba, w/FI
rm, Facing Canal. Adult park.
(863)763-0794
PALM HARBOR HOMES
Certified Modular &
Mobile Home Specialists.
Call for FREE Color Brochures.
(800)622-2832
PALM HARBOR HOMES
Factory Liquidation Sale.
2006 Models MUST GO!
Call for FREE Color Brochures
(800)622-2832

Recreation i



Boats 3005
Campers.'RVs 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories W020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles. ATVs 3035



AIR BOAT, w/180hp Lycoming
engine, trailer, exc. cond.
$6500 (863)673-0783
ALUM BOAT, 13ft., 15hp
Johnson, with roll on trailer,
runs great. $1200 or best of-
fer. (863)763-5631
BOAT- 14' Flat bottom, alum
w/trailer. Mariner 2.5 HP
motor & Minnkota 65 trolling
motor. $800 (863)674-0098
BOAT: PADDLE WHEELER, 12
FT, Mid 80's. Ready to use.
$200. (863)763-3551
BOAT REPAIR! I come to
you... even on weekends.
Cam's Mobile Marine Service
(863)634-3878 Iv. msg.
BOAT, Starcraft, 16 Ft., Semi-
V, 40 hp. Mercury, Trailer.
As Is. $500 or best offer.
(863)763-4643
BOW RIDER - 15FT, 40HP
Merc., also w/trolling motor
and trailer $2500 or best of-
fer (863)467-5906
CANOE- 14', Fiberglass, 3
seats, paddle & PVC stand
included $150.
(863)635-1513 Frostproof
CENTER CONSOLE '92- 17ft,
50 Mariner, new salt water
trolling motor, aluminum trir,
$2000 (863)634-1567
DINGY- 10Ft., Avon, can take
up to 10 HP motor, $275.
Call 863-265-0255
PONTOON BOAT- 24', 90hp
Mere Mariner, W/brand new
control cables. Trailer (new
tires) $4500. (561)315-9703


Mobb-Hom-
Sale


FISHING BOAT: 1756 G3, 17
Ft., Center Console, 5 per-
son, 60 hp Yamaha 0/B, Salt
Water Trolling Motor w/ trail-
er. Garage kept. Only used 9
hrs. $9,500. 561-262-6547
FISHING BOAT- Aluminum,
'1977 Lone Star. Good con-
dition. $450. (863)763-0410
JET BOAT '72- 18ft, 454 Board
30 over, Wright Hull, roller
everything, motor will go in
vehicle, approx 550 hp, De-
mon carb, matching trlr,
$3600 (863)634-1567 or
(863)763-4349
NEW AIR BOAT SEATS- cush-
ions, slips, any color, $200
each (561)644-1957
SAILING DINGY 8 Ft., fiber-
glass. Complete w/sails &
oars. Excellent shape! $590
(863)265-0255
SKEETER BASS BOAT- '89-
16ft, 150-XR2 Merc, New
Minnkota trolling motor,
matching trir, $4000
(863 634-1567 or
(863)763-4349


DUTCHMAN 1994, 27 Ft. w/
Florida Rm. LaBelle area.
Must be moved. $4000. neg.
(989)656-9933/553-7734
FORD '79 RV, 6 cyl., Needs
some work. $750 or best of-
fer. (863)763-7497


DAVIT, for Jet Ski, with cradle,
hand crank, piling mounted,
$200. (863)675-1033
SEADOO GSI '97- with trailer,
runs great, $1700
863)634-1567 or
863)763-4349



FISH FINDER & BOTTOM
FINDER- Hummingbird 400
Series. Like new. $75.
(863)634-1545
PROPELLER- For Evinrude
motor, 17" Pitch. Recondi-
tioned. $50. (863)634-0433



AIRBOAT FLAGS: $10. each,
Orange, Made from flag ma-
terial. Hi quality. Call for
more info. (863)773-2880


KAWASAKI 400, '78, runs
great, $1800 or best offer.
(863)634-1598-
SUZUKI S40 Boulevard 2007,
650 cc, Black. Extra fea-
tures. 500 mls. $4000 or
best offer. (863)610-0045
TRIKE 2005, Suzuki / Lehman,
4500 mIs. $15,000.
(863)227-0336



FOUR WHEEL DRIVE PARTS-
Dana 60-Dana 44 matching,
(2) 205 gear driven transfer
cases, NP 4 spd, $1200 for
all (863)634-1567 or
(863)763-4349
FOUR WHEELER- '98 Suzuki
250, 4x4, Runs good. Needs
a little TLC. $500.
(863)634-0399
HONDA 250F DIRTBIKE, '04,
$2500. (863)634-8734
IRON BUMPERS- front winch
mount & guide grill guard,
$150, Rear round w/hitch
places $100, (4) Core radia-
tor $50 (863)634-1567 or
(863)763-4349
KTM 125 SX DIRTBIKE, '03,
$1800 or best offer.
(863)634-8734
SUZUKI RM250 '05: Dirt bike.
Mint condition, runs good.
$2500. Neg. (863)261-4633
or (863)357-2271
YAMAHA 600 Grizzly 4x4,
1999, runs good, $2200.
(239)229-2974


Automobiles



Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks 4O40
Parts - Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070



BUICK REGAL LS '01, Sun-
roof, On-Star, leather, 98k,
a/c, runs great. $5300.
(863)467-5534
BUICK ROADMASTER '96-
good cond., runs wells,
white, tan Ithr, 4dr, all power,
clean $5800 (863)467-1392
CHEVY CORSICA- '91, White,
Runs, Good shape. $800. or
best offer. (863)261-5101


I Pb ic No ice


CAMRY TOYOTA- '94, 4 cyl.,
A/C, Tilt wheel & Cruise
Good transportation. $2100.
(863)467-1655
CHEVY CELEBRITY, '88, low
miles, runs great, looks ok,
great work car, $800 or best
offer. (863)634-7598
CHEVY NOVA '76, Runs good.
Needs minor body work.
$800 (239)503-5131 Ask
for Ramon, after 5:30pm
DODGE CALIPER 2007 Like
new $13K, 4 Door. Hatch-
back. Call 863-441-7233.
FORD EXPLORER '92- Runs
excellent, needs muffler &
tires. Blue in color. $1500
(863)357-8265
GMC SONOMA '95- Cold A/C,
4 cylinder, manual 5 speed,
runs great, well maintained.
$2500 (772)220-6023
MERCURY 1985, Full Size Sta-
tion Wagon, Runs and Drives
great. $800. (863)357-2370
or (863)634-1324
NISSAN 200SX, '95, 4 cyl.,
auto, great air, like new tires,
new battery, exc. in & out,
$2500. (863)357-0037 Okee
OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS, '87,
2 door. Good on gas, All
power. Exc. cond., $2500 or
best offer. (863)763-6747
TOYOTA CAMRY SE- '07, Red,
6 cyl, Leather, Dual exhaust,
15K mi., Rear spoiler.
$23,000. (863)447-1060


FORD TBIRD '84, Cold a/c,
c/c, 74k. $1300.
(863)634-7789



JEEP WRANGLER, 1989 -
4x4, 97K mi., new tires,
$3,500. Call Cody at
863-697-8531.
JEEP WRANGLER, '98,
am/fm/cd player, w/amp,
subwoofer & sound bar, new
a/c, new tubular bumpers,
alarm & much more, great
shape, $9800 or best offer.
(863)697-3885


I Public Notic


AUTO TRANSMISSION, for
Dodge, around '93, over-
drive, off 318 V8, $350 or
best offer. (863)612-5676
BUMPER- Ranch hand full re-
lacement, fits '03-up Chevy
D pu. $800 negotiable.
(863)697-1692
DODGE PICKUP TOPPER-
Leer Crown, fullsize bed.
Good cond. but needs paint.
$250 neg. (239)369-3269
FLARESIDE F150, tailgate,
chrome bumper & taillights,
$250 will sell separately.
(863)634-7608
FUEL TANK- 150 gal. $100. or
best offer. (863)634-7318
JEEP PARTS- 4.0L engine,
trans. case, 5 spd manual,
new clutch, 3 1/2" lift, seats,
etc. $750 (239)895-3269
REAR AXLE- For Chevy P/U
Truck, complete. $100.
772)359-2923 or
863)467-5401
REAR BENCH SEAT, for Jeep
Wranger, gray with belts &
lockable trunk option, like
new, $100. (772)332-1438
RE-CAP TIRES
(2) 425/65R22.5, 80% rub-
ber, $175 for both or will sell
sep (561)676-0427
RIMS & TIRES (4), from '07
Escalade, 18", alum. alloy, fit
GM trucks, very nice. $700
(863)763-0944
RUNNING BOARDS- Factory,
(Beige) off of '08 Super Duty
Ford rew Cab P/U. $500.
Neg. 863-697-0328 Heather
RUNNING BOARDS- Factory,
Fits '99-'07 Ford Super Duty
Crew Cab P/U. $200.
863-697-0328 Heather
TRUCK BED- 8ft, for 2002
Ford F250, $500 or best of-
fer (863)447-5985
TRUCK CAP - green, for step
side p/u, good cond., asking
$225/neg. (863)357-6315
or 863-634-8731.
TRUCK PARTS- (1) '05 Ford
Banks diesel tuner (1) '04
Dodge Banks diesel tuner
$700 both (239)895-3269


NOTICE OF CONSIDERATION OF PROPOSED ZONING RECLASSIFICATION
NOTICE: A PUBLIC HEARING, will be held before the Okeechobee County Planning
Board on Tuesday, July 24, 2007 at 7:00 pm in the Commission Meeting Room,
Okeechobee County Courthouse, 304 NW 2nd Street, Okeechobee, Florida, to con-
sider a request for a change in zoning from the existing classification of Residential
General (RG) to the proposed classlllcation of Planned Development (PO). The pre-
liminary plan proposes a recreational vehicle resort including approximately 509 RV
sites with vanous amenities. The property owner and applicant is Okeechobee De-
velopment, LLC. The property address is 4143 Highway 441 South and is more
particularly described as follows:
PARCEL A:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 37 SOUTH,
RANGE 35 EAST, OKEECHOBEE COUNTY FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULAR
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33. THENCE S
89030'41" W ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 33, A DISTANCE OF 456.92
FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE WEST LINE OF THE S.R. #15, U.S. HIGH-
WAY 441, RIGHT-OF-WAY (100 FEET IN WIDTH); THENCE S 00'04'10" E ALONG
SAID WEST R/W LINE, A DISTANCE OF 2955.14 FEET; THENCE S 89�30'44" W, A
DISTANCE OF 660.30 FEET; THENCE S 0OW410" E. PARALLEL WITH SAID WEST
R/W LINE OF S.R. #15, A DISTANCE OF 70.00 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE CONTINUE S 0004'10 E, A DISTANCE OF 240.02 FEET; THENCE S
89�4633" W, A DISTANCE OF 1532.48 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE
WEST LINE OF THE AFORESAID SE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, SAID INTERSECTION
POINT MEASURES S 00�06'39" W, A DISTANCE OF 24.38 FEET TO THE N.W. COR-
NER OF THE S 1/2 OF THE N 1/2 OF SAID SE 1/4 OF SECTION 33; THENCE N
00�06'39" E ALONG SAID WEST LINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, A DISTANCE
OF 626.18 FEET TO THE SE 'A OF SECTION 33; A DISTANCE OF 1167.71 FEET;
THENCE S 00'04'10" E, PARALLEL WITH THE AFORESAID WEST R/W LINE OF S.R.
#15, A DISTANCE OF 398.37 FEET; THENCE N 89'30'44" E, A DISTANCE OF
362.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
PARCEL:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN THE S 1/2 OF THE S 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION
33, TOWNSHIP 37 SOUTH, RANGE 35 EAST, OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33, THENCE S
89�30'41" W ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 33, A DISTANCE OF 456.92
FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE WEST LINE OF THE S.R. #15, U.S. HIGH-
WAY 441, RIGHT-OF-WAY (100 FEET IN WIDTH); THENCE S 0004'10" E ALONG
SAID WEST R/W LINE, A DISTANCE OF 2955.14 FEET; THENCE S 89�30'44' W, A
DISTANCE OF 660.30 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE S 89�30'44" W, A DISTANCE OF
362.88 FEET; THENCE N 0004'10" W, PARALLEL WITH SAID WEST R/W LINE OF
S.R. #15, A DISTANCE OF 328.37 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE SOUTH
LINE OF THE AFORESAID NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE S 89�15'31" W ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE OF THE NE 1/4, A DISTANCE OF
1167.71 FEET TO THE CENTER OF SAID SECTION 33; THENCE N 00�06'39" E
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE AFORESAID NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, A DISTANCE
OF 657.99 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF AFORESAID S 1/2 OF THE S
1/2 OF THE NE 1/4; THENCE N 89�19'19" E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID S
1/2 OF E THES1/2 F NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, A DISTANCE OF 1165.63 FEET;
THENCE S 00*04'10" E, PARALLEL WITH THE AFORESAID WEST R/W LINE OF S.R.
#15, A DISTANCE OF 656.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
PARCEL C:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN THE N 1/2 OF THE S 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION
33, TOWNSHIP 37 SOUTH, RANGE 35 EAST, OKEECHOBEE COUNTY FLORIDA,
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33, THENCE S
89�30'41" W ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 33, A DISTANCE OF 456.92
FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE WEST LINE OF THE S.R. #15, U.S. HIGH-
WAY 441, RIGHT-OF-WAY (100 FEET IN WIDTH); THENCE S 00'04'10" E ALONG
SAID WEST R/W LINE, A DISTANCE OF 2955.14 FEET; THENCE S 89"30'44" W, A
DISTANCE OF 660.30 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE S 89�30'44" W, A DISTANCE OF
362.88 FEET; THENCE N 00'04'10" W, PARALLEL WITH THE WEST R/W LINE OF
S.R. #15, A DISTANCE OF 328.37 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE SOUTH
LINE OF THE AFORESAID NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33; THENCE CONTINUE N 00*04'10'
W, A DISTANCE OF 656.68 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE SOUTH LINE
OF THE AFORESAID N 1/2 OF THE S 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4, FOR THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE S 89�19'19" W ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SAID N 1/2 OF
THE S 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 1165.63 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF
SAID NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33; THENCE N 00�06'39" E ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
SAID NE 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 657.99 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
S 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33; THENCE N 8923'06" E ALONG THE NORTH
LINE OF SAID S 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, A DISTANCE OF 1163.54
FEET; THENCE S 00'0410" E, PARALLEL WITH AFORESAID WEST R/W LINE OF
S.R. #15, A-DISTANCE OF 656.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
PARCEL D:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 37 SOUTH,
RANGE 35 EAST, OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33, THENCE S
89�30'41" W ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 33, A DISTANCE OF 1480.10
FEET; THENCE S 00'04'10" E, PARALLEL WITH THE WEST R/W LINE OF S.R. #15,
U.S. HIGHWAY #441, A DISTANCE OF 13.82 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE
S.W. 32ND STREET R/W (50.00 FEET IN WIDTH) FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE S 000410" E, A DISTANCE OF 1299.58 FEET TO THE NORTH
LINE OF THE S 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33; THENCE S 89�23'06" W
ALONG SAID NORTH LINE OF S 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 70.00 FEET;
THENCE N 00'04'10" W, A DISTANCE OF 1300.14 FEET TO AFORESAID SOUTH
R/W LINE OF S.E. 32ND STREET; THENCE N 89'50'29" E ALONG SAID SOUTH R/W
LINE, A DISTANCE OF 70.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
PARCEL E:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 37 SOUTH,
RANGE 35 EAST, OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33, THENCE S
89�30'41 W ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 33, A DISTANCE OF 456.92
FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE WEST LINE OF THE S.R. #15, U.S. HIGH-
WAY #441, RIGHT-OF-WAY (100 FEET IN WIDTH); THENCE S 0004'10" E ALONG
SAID WEST R/W LINE, A DISTANCE OF 2955.14 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE S 89�30'44" W, A DISTANCE OF 660.30 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE
S 89"30'44" W, A DISTANCE OF 362.88 FEET; THENCE S 00'04'10" E, PARALLEL
WITH SAID WEST R/W LINE OF S.R. #15, A DISTANCE OF 70.00 FEET; THENCE N
89�30'44" E, A DISTANCE OF 362.88 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE N 89�30'44" E, A
DISTANCE OF 660.30 FEET TO THE AFORESAID WEST RAY LINE OF S.R. #15;
THENCE N 00OO04'10" W ALONG SAID WEST R/W LINE, A DISTANCE OF 70.00 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
AND TOGETHER WITH THE FOLLOWING
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN THE NW A OF NE /A OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 37
SOUTH, RANGE 35 EAST, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NE CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33, THENCE BEAR S
89130'41" W ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 33 A DISTANCE OF 1550.1
FEET; THENCE BEAR S 0004'10" E A DISTANCE OF 13.82 FEET TO THE SOUTH
LINE OF S.W. 32ND STREET RIGHT-OF-WAY (50.00 FEET IN WIDTH) FOR THE
RO.B.; THENCE CONTINUE S 004'10" E A DISTANCE OF 1300.14 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE S 8923'06" W A DISTANCE OF 1093.54 FEET TO A POINT ON THE
WEST LINE OF THE NE %A OF SAID SECTION 33; THENCE N 00�06'39" E ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF THE NE ,1 OF SAID SECTION 33 A DISTANCE OF 1300 FEET TO
A POINT ON THE SOUTH LINE OF S.W. 32ND STREET RIGHT-OF-WAY; THENCE
BEAR N 89�50'29" E ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY A DISTANCE OF 1089.38 FEET
TO THEOPO.B
In the event that all items before the Board are not hear, the hearings shall be conOn-
ued to Wednesday, July 25, 2007 at 7:00 pm in the Commission Meeting Room,
Okeechobee County Courthouse, 304 NW 2nd Street, Okeechobee, Florida.
A SECOND PUBLIC HEARING will be held before the Board of County Commission-
ers on Tuesday, August 9, 2007 at 9:00 am in the Commission Meeting Room,
Okeechobee County Courthouse, 304 NW 2nd Street, Okeechobee, Florida.
ALL INTERESTED PARTIES HALL HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD AT THE
FIRST AND SECOND HEARINGS. Any person deciding to appeal any decision by
the Board of County Commissioners or Planning Board with respect to any matter
considered at these meetings or hearings will need to'ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings made and that the record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal will be based. County Clerk and Planning and Development
tapes are for the sole purpose of backup for official record of the Clerk and of the
Planning DepartmenL
William D. Royce, Planning Director
Petition L-2007-0104
222776 ON 7/6,15/2007____________






Okanchobee News. Sunday. July 15. 2007


TRUCK TOOL BOX- full size
pickup, aluminum, deep well,
from Tractor Supply, good
cond., $125. (863)763-4992
WHEELS & TIRES- 4, 8 lug,
Aluminum wheels with tires.
$150. or best offer.
(863)634-7318
WINDSHIELD, off a '93 Dodge
Ram van. $75
(863)612-5676


CHEVY 2500- '01, H/D 4x4,
extended cab. Runs strong.
Well maintained. $6500. or
best offer. (863)467-2328
CHEVY SILVERADO 2004 Low
miles one owner, top, long-
bed, two door, tow package
$12K. 863-441-7233
DODGE 1500- '96, 4x4, Lift kit,
Runs good. $3000. or best
offer. (863)467-2328
DODGE PICK UP 1995, Club
Cab, 3/4 To, HD, Cummins
diesel engine. Auto. trans,
4wd, Air, Possi Traction,
$10K Neg 863-673-3496 or
863-675-2473 after 7pm
DODGE RAM 1500- '03, 4x4,
Quad cab, Hemi. Excellent
condition. $16,900.
(863)675-1493


FORD F100 '78- Mark II top-
per, 302 V8, runs good, new
tires, brakes, $950 neg
(386)216-0113 Muse
FORD F150 '96, Shortbed, Ed-
die Bauer, Cold A/C, Runs &
Looks great. 124K, 6 cyl., 5
spd., $3700. 863-673-6819
FORD F250 '89, 7.3 Diesel,
4x4, a/c, 5 spd., utility box,
runs good, $1900
(863)675-1862
FORD F350 '91, Steel flatbed,
gooseneck hookup, diesel, 5
spd manual. $1675
(561)758-4337
GMC SIERRA- '05, 4x4, With
ext. cab. Excellent condition.
$21,500. (863)675-1493
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE La-
redo 1993, Not pretty, but
runs, runs, runs! $750 or
best offer. (863)357-5867
S10- '89, 4X4, V6, 5 spd
manual, New paint & tires.
High mi., but runs good.
$2500. Neg. (863)634-0399
TOPPER- Fiberglass. Fits Ford
F150. Standard cab. 6' bed.
Tan, tinted windows $500.
(772)263-6481
TOYOTA PICKUP '95, 4x4,
Good body & running gear.
Motor blown. $2500.
(863)824-0970


CHEVY SUBURBAN: 1986,
4x4, runs good. $1700. or
best offer. 863-763-0605
JEEP CHEROKEE, '95, white,
$2200 or best offer. MUST
SELL-!!! (863)763-4821
SUZUKI SAMARI 1986, 4x4,
Soft & Bikini Top, 5 spd.,
manual trans. w/ OD. Runs
well. $2200 (561)261-0766


CARGO TRAILER- black, 6x12,
V Nose, new, ramp door,
single axle, $2900
(863)467-1509
OPEN TRAILER- small, 4x8
w/high sides, spare tire,
jack, ramp in back, $600 or
best offer (863)824-8703


CHEVY CONVERSION VAN,
'95, $1200. (863)612-0992
DODGE CARGO VAN '96, 2500
model, V8 auto., p/w, cold
air, ladder racks, great for
work. $1675 (561)758-4337
FORD AEROSTAR '87, V-6,
Motor runs good. Needs
trans. Many new parts. $150
or best offer. (863)763-0967


VW VAN '76 - Rusty, does not
run, 100K + miles, interior
in good cond. $500
(863)467-4258


Public Notices



Public Notice 5005
State Public -
Legal Notice 5500



PUBLIC NOTICE
Public notice is hereby given that Fergu-
son Towing will sel at public Auction,
free from all prior liens, the following
vehicles that remaining unclaimed in
storage with charges unpaid, pursuant
to Florida Statutes 713.78, to the high-
est bidder at 12065 Lakeshore Drive,
Canal Point, FL 33438.
Sale Date: July 29, 2007 @9:OOAM
1995 Ford 2-door Grn
Vin#1FALP6248SH106041
1995 Hyundai 4-door PLE
Vin#KMHVF14N85UB94667
225043 ON 07/15/07

How do you find a job in
today's competitive
market? In the employ-
ment section of the clas-
sifieds


PUBLIC NOTICE
Public notice is hereby given that Fergu-
son Towing will sel at public Auction
free from all pnor liens, the following
vehicles that remaining unclaimed in
storage with charges unpaid, pursuant
to Florida Statutes 713.78, to the high-
est bidder at 12065 Lakeshore Drive,
Canal Point, FL 33438.
Sale Date: July 31, 2007 @9:OOAM
1989 Pontiac 4dr Blu
Vin#1G2AF5N45K6226459
1988 Pickup Whi
Vin#1FTCR14TOJPA86349
1978 Pontiac 4dr Whi
Vin#2J37Y8A108987
1996 Chevy 4dr Dgr
Vin#1GNCSW8T2167879
1993 Pontiac 2dr Red
Vin#1G2WJ14T8PF216725
1994 Chevy Pickup White
Vin#1G2CS194758504861
1996 Dodge 4dr Blue
Vin#183ES27C9TD561971
1985 BMW 4dr BIk
Vin#WBADK8304F9547912
1992 Pontiac 4dr Green
Vin# 1G2HX53L5P1274546
1995 Ford 4dr White
Vin#3FASP13J65R190295
1996 Saturn 4dr Gold
Vin#1G82H5288TZ242044
1993 Ford Van Whita
Vin#1FTDA1407PZB77006
225040 ON 07/15/07
READING A NEWSPAPER
HELPS YOU GET
INVOLVED IN THE
COMMON ITY


I Public Notice


I Pul ic o I


NOTICE OF CONSIDERATION OF PROPOSED ZONING RECLASSIFICATION
NOTICE: A PUBLIC HEARING will be held before the Okeechobee County Planning
Board on Tuesday, July 24, 2007 at 7:00 pm in the Commission Meeting Room.
Okeechobee County Courthouse, 304 NW 2nd Street, Okeechobee, Florida to
consider a request for a change in zoning from the existing classification of Resi-
dential Mixed (Rm) to the proposed classification of Neighborhood Commercial -2
SNC-2) The property owners and applicants are Jerry and Shirtley Weaver and
eggy McKenzie Miller The property address is 2147 Highway 98 North and is
more particularly described as follows
Commencing at the Southeast corner of Section 7, Township 37 South, Range 35
East, run North 020 53' 55" East along the Section line for a distance of 843 62
feet to a point, Thence run North 36'23'35" West for a distance of 903.97 feet for
Point of Beginning. Then continue North 36�23'35" West for a distance of 100
feet, North 53�36'25" East for a distance of 200 feet to a point on the Southerly
right-of-way line of State Road 700 (US 98), Thence run South 3623'35 ' East
along Southerly right-of-way line of said State Road 700 a distance of 100 feet,
thence South 53�36'25" West for a distance of 200 feet to Point of Beginning, Be-
ing tract #12 of PLAYLAND PARK ACRES and recorded subdivision lying and
comprising a part of the South one-half (S 1/2) of Section 7, Township 37 South.
Range 35 East.
In the event that all items scheduled before the Board are not heard, the hearings
shall be continued to Wednesday, July 25, 2007 at 7 00 pm in the Commission
Meeting Room, Okeechobee County Courthouse, 304 NW 2nd Street, Okeecho-
bee, Florida
A SECOND PUBLIC HEARING to consider the request for a change in zoning will be
held before the Board of County Commissioners on Thursday, August 9, 2007 at
9:00 am in the County Commission Meeting Room, Okeechobee County Court-
house, 304 NW 2nd Street, Okeechobee, Florida.
ALL INTERESTED PARTIES SHALL HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD AT
THIS PUBLIC HEARING Any person deciding to appeal any decision by the
Board of County Commissioners or the Board of Adiustments and Appeals with
respect to any matter considered at these meetings or hearings will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made and that the record in-
cludes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal will be based County
Clerk and Planning and Development tapes are for the sole purpose of backup for
official records of the Clerk and of the Planning Department.
William D. Royce, Planning Director
Petition # R-2007-0661
222800 ON 7/6,15/2007


Your new home could be
in today's paper. Have
vou looked for it?


It's never too late to find
the perfect gift. Look for
it in the rlanifieds.


Natural Florida thrives in state's most crowded county


By Mitch Stacy
ST. PETERSBURG (AP)--In
Florida's most crowded county,
not far from a greyhound track
and a busy thoroughfare, kayak-
ers paddle through a labyrinth of
trails that wind for miles under
the dense canopy of a stunning
mangrove forest.
Floating through those dark,
cool tunnels, it's easy to forget
that the gleaming high rises of
downtown Tampa loom just on
the other side of the bay or that
this chunk of Gulf Coast Flori-
da is so developed that there's
hardly any available land left.
That's part of the beauty of
Weedon Island Preserve, one of
the jewels of Pinellas County's
patchwork of protected green
spaces and wildlife conservation
areas. These places account for
more than one-tenth of the total
land area in a 40-mile-long pen-
insula better known for white
sand .beaches and old folks than
visionary efforts to protect its
few remaining slices of natural
Florida.
Given that Pinellas has packed
in 3,300 souls per square mile -


more than 10 times the average
population density of the state
-- keeping development at bay
is an ongoing challenge for the
county's environmental plan-
ners, who have earned national
recognition for their efforts to
preserve and manage its wild
open spaces.
"(Pinellas) is in redevelop-
ment stage now because of this
dense population," said Bruce
Rinker, director of the county's
Environmental Lands Division
who once roamed Amazon rain
forests for his studies. "Our goal
is to try to contrive a model of
urban ecology. And the idea is
that if we can get it right here,
we use that model to help our
neighboring counties."
Pinellas' 925,000 residents
make it the sixth most populous
among Florida's 67 counties.
In size, only one county in the
state is smaller. That combina-
tion makes it one of the most
crowded areas in the southeast-
ern United States.
But there are still places to
get away.
Besides the paddling trails,
the nearly 6 square miles of


Weedon Island Preserve in north
St. Petersburg offer miles of hik-
ing trails and an observation
tower. Gopher tortoises burrow
here while reddish egrets, rose-
ate,spoonbills and other wading
birds fish in saltwater ponds.
Dolphins, sharks and manatees
coexist peacefully with kayak-
ers.
At the top of the county, hik-
ers and equestrians can leave the
surrounding suburbs and get lost
in the pine flatwoods and fresh-
water swamps of Brooker Creek
Preserve. Its 13 square miles are
populated with red-shouldered
hawks, wild turkeys, bobcats,
deer and dozens of threatened
or endangered species.
Two other smaller preserves
and 10 wildlife management ar-
eas are spread throughout the
county, which maintains anoth-
er two dozen public parks and
beach access areas.
In 2005, Pinellas County was
given one of the first County
Leadership in Conservation
awards from The Trust for Pub-
lic Land and the National Asso-
ciation of Counties. Travel writ-
ers from the Chicago Tribune,


Kansas City Star, Detroit Free
Press and other newspapers
have taken notice, too, marvel-
ing at the opportunities here to
see, as one put it, "a different
side of Florida."
Pinellas tourism officials --
who are accustomed to touting
the 35 miles of gorgeous shore-
line and 360 days of sunshine
every year -- are reworking their
literature to play up those back-
to-nature activities.
"People don't necessar-
ily want to sit on the beach for
eight hours a day anymore,"
said G. Lee Daniel, deputy direc-
tor of the St. Petersburg/Clear-
water Convention and Visitors
Bureau. "They want to come to
the beach and enjoy it, but they
also want to get out and have a
lot of different types of experi-
ences. One of the fastest grow-
ing parts of tourism is people
going on vacations to learn, to
really get involved."
A variety of factors converged
to allow Pinellas County to grab
and protect open spaces that
are believed to have a real es-
tate value of around $2 billion
today.


Forward-thinking county
leaders began identifying tracts
for preservation in the early
1970s, and residents have voted
several times to keep a one-
penny sales tax to help buy and
maintain them. The state's pro-
gressive conservation land-buy-
ing program played a role, as
did Progress Energy, the power
company that owns land in the
two largest preserves.
"I think they realized what
was happening, and they kind of
grew into this planning culture
and adopted what I think is the
strongest comprehensive plan
to protect open spaces and ad-
dress ecological systems in the
state," said Sam Brody, a Texas
A&M University professor who
studies environmental planning
in Florida. "I teach their plan
in my classes because it's so
good."
Ernest Cook, senior vice
president of The Trust for Public
Land, a national nonprofit land
conservation group, said Pinel-
las is regularly mentioned in
the same breath with Boulder,
Colo., Portland, Ore., and other
areas that have gained recog-


nition for protecting swaths of
natural land within densely pop-
ulated areas.
"One thing that's unusual
is that their land conservation
program goes way back," Cook
said. "This isn't something they
started in the last five or 10 years.
They woke up to this threat 30 or
more years ago and consistently
invested more funds."
Pinellas continues to grow,
which means Rinker will con-
tinue to fend off regular threats
from those who would like to
chip away at the protected areas
for baseball fields, water-pump-
ing facilities and other uses that
would threaten the delicate bal-
ance of man and nature that is
always at the center of his plan-
ning.
"It's easy to go into the wilds
of the world and hang out there
and study and not be worried
about all the other multidimen-
sional aspects that come from a
human society," he said. "Com-
ing here was a real challenge for
me. It continues to be a chal-
lenge, trying to make the for-
mula work."


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Pbic Notic


public Notic


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14 SPRSOecoeeNwSna, uy1,20


No Man is an Island Memorial service held


,JBy Daniel Shube
My usual vacation consists of
golf, shopping, golf, eating, golf,
partying, golf, golf, golf.
I'm not complaining. However,
'I usually need a vacation by the
'time I return from vacation!
If you are looking for a very
relaxing getaway, may I suggest
Palm Island Resort? While Palm
Island is a short drive from the
south-central area of Florida (per-
haps an hour or so from Arcadia),
surprisingly, few people know
about it. It is in the Port Charlotte
area, 45 miles south of Sarasota,
directly on the Gulf of Mexico.
First of all, it is an island. And,
you cannot drive over a bridge to
Sget there. You arrive in this slice of
,paradise by a ferry/barge. It only
takes a few minutes until you and
your car arrive on the island. Then
;it is a short drive to the Palm Is-
land Resort. The registration area
is where you say goodbye to your
car.
While auto traffic is not allowed
at the resort, I rerited two golf carts
for my family and friends to use.
I recommend you call ahead to
reserve carts, especially during
the warm summer months. It is a
great way to get around the island,
and the kids loved it! Those who
are so inclined can rent bicycles or
walk.
I rented a large, three-bedroom
unit. It had a Gulf view, with bal-
conies on two levels. Unlike some
resorts, Palm Island encourages
dining in. Each villa includes a full
kitchen, with all dishes and uten-
sils. Propane grills are available at
or near every unit.
The breakfast options on the
island are limited, so you should
;stock up. There is a Publix just be-
fore you get to the ferry, so I advise
-making a food run. Do not forget
'some fine wine for the incredible
sunsets. I forgot my corkscrew,
but my unit had one in it!
The Rum Bay Restaurant of-
fers casual dinning for lunch and
dinner. The prices are reasonable
and the food is good. You can also
'take a water taxi off the island to
.Johnny Leverocks, which offers
fine seafood, again at reasonable
prices.


While on the island, there are
many activities, including tennis,
boating and fishing. Large snook
were being reeled in off the beach.
The resort rents non-motorized
equipment, such as rafts, canoes
and kayaks. Boats and jet skis are
offered nearby.
The most popular forms of
spending time seemed to by lay-
ing at the beach or one of several
pools. At the beach, there were
beautiful shells to be harvested.
Dolphins playing in the Gulf, espe-
cially around sunset, were easy to
spot.
Palm Island was very well suit-
ed for families with children. I had
four teens in tow. While they are
the kind that craves action, I felt
comfortable letting them explore
the island without supervision.
I planned to play some golf, yet
I was so in need of total relaxation,
for the first time I can remember, I
passed up the links.
However, if you want to leave
the non-golfers behind, hop back
on the ferry and you will find sev-
eral golf options nearby.
The Rotonda Golf and Country
Club features three championship
courses and an executive course.
The management at Palm Island
suggested Long Marsh as the best
to play. Current greens fees on
Long Marsh are only $42.99 in the
morning, $31.99 after noon and
only $20 after 2:30. The other three
courses are less expensive.
So, if you and your family need
a real break, why not try and is-
land, like Palm Island?
For more information visit
www.palmislandresort.com or
call (800) 824-5412.


Sports Briefs


Looking for
team bowlers
Stardust Lanes is looking for
bowlers for their mixed league
(four bowlers, .two men and
two women). Teams are now
forming to start on Friday, Sept.
7, at 7:30 p.m. Individuals or
teams contact (863)763-4496 or
(863)467-6596.

I.R.C.C. hosts
softball camp
Indian River Community
College, 3209 Virginia Avenue,
Fort Pierce, will host a softball
camp for girls, ages 6 through
13. Camp will meet on July 16
through July 23, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Participants will learn softball
fundamentals and improve skills
to become better players. Soft-
ball games will be played every
day, as well as other sports such
as soccer, kickball and swim-
ming. Campers will be grouped
by age. "Parents Participation
Day" will be conducted on Fri-
days. Call Dale Atkinson, I.R.C.C.
softball coach at (772) 462-7410
or datkinso@ircc.edu. Please
make a note that all registrations
need to be made in the W build-
ing at the Cashier's Window. Do
not mail checks.

YMS hosts
volleyball open gym
Yearling Middle School will
host an open gym starting in July
for any girl interested in playing
volleyball. Any girl that will be


attending YMS in the upcom-
ing school year may participate.
Girls must have a completed
physical form and parental con-
sent form before being allowed
to participate. Forms can be
picked up in the main office of
YMS. Open gym will begin July
5, from 1 to 3 p.m., and continue
every Tuesday and Thursday. For
information contact Melinda
Gray at (863) 697-2795.

O.G. & C.C. junior golf
clinics being held
Okeechobee Golf and Coun-
try Club will offer junior golf
clinics throughout the sum-
mer. The clinics will focus on
the golf basics for the inexperi-
enced, as well as intermediate
training for the more advanced
player. Clinics will include golf
etiquette, rules, putting, chip-
ping, full swing and actual play
on the course. These clinics
will be offered every Tuesday
and Wednesday beginning on
July 10 and concluding on Aug.
15. Clinics will be instructed by
PGA professionals who are on
staff. Classes will begin at 8:30
a.m. and conclude at 12 Noon.
Students may participate in as
'many sessions as desired. Fees
for the clinics will be $25 per stu-
dent per day or $20 per student
if they participate both days. Stu-
dents must be between the ages
of 10 to 16-years-old. There will
a maximum of six students per
session. For information contact
Terry Lanman, head golf pro
and general manager, at (863)
763-6228.


for Benoit's wife, son


By Travis Reed timing
Associated Press Writer ful lady.
DAYTONA BEACH (AP)- oit dieNa
- Wrestling dignitaries were the wre
among those paying respects then hi
Saturday at memorial services area ho
for the wife and 7-year-old son Benoit
of professional wrestler Chris bodies
Benoit. cable o
Former wrestler Marc Mero, Chui
known as "Johnny B. Badd," service
and Jim Ross, the World Wres- but the
tling Entertainment announcer at the l
known as J.R., both attended tling far
the services. Nani
Ross called the deaths "a real and Ma
tragedy" before services began Daytona
at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic The
Church. was a
Nancy was a wrestling stage tainmer
manager who worked under the family-r
name "Woman." She and Benoit those a
met in the 1990s when she was oit file
married to rival wrestler Kevin alleging
Sullivan. As part of a script, Ben- later dr
oit and Nancy were supposed to well as
act as if they were having an af- ing order
fair. She left Sullivan and married Benoit t
Benoit in 2000. furniture
"I've known Nancy for 20 Anab
years. She was always exuber- in the
ant and fun to be around," Ross to won
said. "Always laughing, had a played a
great sense of humor. You know, cology r
was one of the guys. Had great not been

F


in the ring, was a beauti-
cy Benoit and Daniel Ben-
1 three weeks ago when
ostler strangled his family,
himself, in their Atlanta-
me. Authorities say Chris
put Bibles next to their
and hung himself on the
f a weight machine.
rch officials had said the
would be open to media,
family changed its mind
ast minute. Some wres-
ns were allowed in.
cy Benoit's parents, Paul
aureen Toffoloni, live in
ia Beach.
Montreal-born Benoit
World Wrestling Enter-
nt star with a wholesome
nan image. Despite
appearances, Nancy Ben-
1 for a divorce in 2003
"cruel treatment." She
popped the complaint, as
a request for a restrain-
er in which she alleged
threatened her and broke
e.
)olic steroids were found
home, leading officials
der whether the drugs
a role in the killings. Toxi-
results for the three have
n released.


,. ~. j ii::.


Submitted pho


Ito/OCSO Youth Development Program


They really float!'.
Able and Omar Jiminez (left to right) try out the Naval Spe-
cial Warfare combat swimming vests at the Okeechobe
e County Pool. The brothers enjoyed participating in the
NSW Trident Cadet Program Summer Orientation Camp,
sponsored by the Okeechobee County Sheriff's Office.
The kids were fitted and shown how to use the vests pri-
or to going out in boats on the ocean and on the Kissim-
mee River. The emphasis was to ensure they knew how
to maintain buoyancy if they were to fall overboard.


Fairways and
Highways
by Daniel Shube


July 13"' thru July 20th
For Info, Call 763-7202


JI A


Mears runs to car 2:00, 4:15, 7:00 & 9:00.
NASCAR driver Casey Mears runs to his car at the start Tues.,Wed.,Thurs.,
cagoland Speedway, Saturday, July 14, 2007, in Joliet,
II. Mears has the pole position for Sunday's race.


now


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14 SOT


Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007


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Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 15, 2007 15


In Richmond, museums offer two Civil War views


By Natasha Robinson
Associated Press Writer
RICHMOND, Va. (AP)--More
than 140 years after Civil War can-
nons fell silent, two museums are
offering very different views of the
war between the states.
The century-old Museum of the
Confederacy offers a more single-
minded approach to the war. Red,
white and blue battle flags from
different Confederate troops wave
from the ceiling. Three levels of
exhibits feature bullet-riddled uni-
forms, blood-spattered letters from
dying soldiers and maps generals
once used to lead their men. Lo-
cated in downtown Richmond, the
museum bills itself as home to the
world's largest collection of Con-
federate artifacts.
At the upstart American Civil
War Center, located between the
James River and downtown, visi-
tors will find a mixture of old shack-
les that were once chained to slaves
and musty uniforms amid modern
touches. Four television displays
offer presentations throughout
the museum, proposing thinking
points, while introducing perspec-
tives from the Union, Confederacy
and blacks.
Waite Rawls is president of the
Museum of the Confederacy and
offers no apologies for its approach,
which he says inspires debate.
"Because of its beginnings, it's
completely devoted to the Con-
federacy," Rawls said. "Now, as a
research facility and the programs
that we give, it's not a Confeder-
ate memorial -- and let's wave the
Confederate flag and fight the war
all over again."
Founders of the American Civil
War Center are stressing a broader,
less Confederate-centric approach
by focusing on most of the people


Plantation


to close


it's doors
BURROWSVILLE, Va. (AP)
- A 1,400-acre plantation on the
James River where Gen. Ulysses
S. Grant made his crossing in 1864
will close its doors to visitors in
October.
Flowerdew Hundred, in Prince
George County southeast of Rich-
mond, operates as a museum and
historic site. Visitors can view life
from Colonial and Civil War times.
Employees said the plantation
will close to the public Oct. 12. Its
future is unclear.
The plantation is run by the
nonprofit Flowerdew Hundred
Foundation, which had relied on
the largesse of the family of David
A. Harrison III, who died in 2002.
Harrison, a lawyer, investment
banker and philanthropist, pur-
chased Flowerdew Hundred in
1967 and began converting it into
a museum and historic tourist at-
traction.
Marjorie H. Webb, one of Har-
rison's daughters who was also
an executor of his estate and is a
foundation manager, confirmed
that Flowerdew Hundred is in its
final months as a tourism venue.
"It was a family decision, and
we just thought it was the best
thing for the farm and the founda-
tion," she said in a telephone in-
terview from her home in Green-
wich, Conn.
The Flowerdew Hundred Foun-
dation's two most recent federal
tax returns on file show it reported
combined revenues of $1,061,446.
Of that total, $850,000 came from
two gifts from the Harrison Family
Foundation, the Richmond Times-
Dispatch reported.
In the most recent tax year,
ending Nov. 30, 2005, Flowerdew
Hundred reported revenue of
$11,612 from admissions, which
covers less than one-third of the
site's repair costs of $36,164 for
the same year.
"It's very difficult for a small,
private tourist and education at-
traction to make a go of it," said
Catherine Slusser, a deputy director
of the Virginia Department of His-
toric Resources. "Visitor revenues
are never enough. But at the same
time, it's a great shame when a
place with such great potential for
education and such great historic
importance is unable to make it-
self available to the public."
Flowerdew Hundred was es-
tablished in 1617 by Sir George
Yeardley, an early Virginia colony
governor. He named the planta-
tion for his wife, Temperance
Flowerdew. Before it was a plan-
tation, the land was occupied by
Virginia Indians.
After Harrison's purchase, he
oversaw restoration of an 1850s
schoolhouse that serves as a mu-
seum exhibiting archaeological ar-
tifacts excavated on the property.
He also commissioned construc-
tion of a reproduction of the first
known windmill in the early Eng-
lish colonies.
"Flowerdew Hundred is an ex-
tremely important historic site,"
Slusser said, "and the family is tru-
ly to be commended for the effort
it has made over many years. "


affected by the war.
"This is not just another Civil
War museum," said Alexander
Wise, consultant to the museum.
This story, he said, goes beyond
the formula of guns, saddles and
battles to tell how the Civil War ac-
tually changed people's lives.
"It's about the people and the
ideas that motivate them and it
gives you the big picture," Wise
said.
With its vast collection and ex-
hibits, the Museum of the Confed-
eracy still tells a story.
Calvin Holloway came from
Raleigh, N.C., to visit the museum
recently and thought it presented
a great learning opportunity for his
children. He said most people have
focused on slavery as the primary
cause of the Civil War, while Hol-
loway said economic forces were
more at play.
"The South was getting a lot of
push from the northern industry
and I think it was less about race
than it was made out to be," Hol-
loway said.
Portraits and slave auction signs
explain how land, geography and
slavery played a role in the Confed-
eracy -- and eventually split Virginia
into two states -- West Virginia and
Virginia.
The museum stands near the
collection's * original home, the
White House of the Confederacy.
Visitors can see how Jefferson Da-
vis, the Confederacy's president,
and his family lived. That perk may
be short-lived since the museum
is looking to relocate and expand,
Rawls said.
Built in Tredegar Iron Work, a
Civil War era artillery factory, the
American Civil War Center begins
a wall-side timeline with the sign-
ing of the Declaration of Indepen-
dence, builds to the Civil War and


Highway 721 west of Lake
Okeechobee on the Brighton
Seminole Indian Reservation


LO.


culminates in uniting two nations
into the United States as we know
it.
The museum has a display area
where children can play with peri-
od toys and write letters to fictional
soldiers.
Abraham Lincoln and many oth-
ers are quoted on several ceiling-to-
floor banners. Along the stairwell
of the two-level exhibit, a "wall of
faces" shows stone-faced soldiers
and civilians, both black and white,
all affected by the war.
For William Peene and Diana
Jules, a couple visiting from out of
state, the exhibits were eye-open-
ing.
"People need to see what is go-
ing on instead of this close-minded


'We're gonna write what we want
you to believe.' This is factual stuff,"
said Peene.
Another visitor echoed the same
sentiments, and said she felt tricked
by history books she read growing
up in the '60s.
"I was always raised to believe
that the north had always intend-
ed to free the slaves and, as you
go through here, you realize that
wasn't the case -- that it was almost
by accident that it happened," said
Roberta Herron of Minneapolis.
Many visitors had just wandered
in after business trips, but typically
did not plan a trip to either muse-
um. Declining attendance at these
museums follows a national trend.


Okeechobee news/Pete Gawda
Heroes Campaign
Epifanio Juarez, vice president of the First Bank and Trust
of Indiantown, presents a check from the bank to American
Red Cross Branch Manager Debbie Riddle for her orga-
nization's Heroes Campaign. The presentation took place
Friday afternoon, July 13 at the bank.


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American Association of Muse-
ums spokesman Jason Hall traces
the trend to a number of factors -
- busier two-income families, new
technologies, and so on.
"There's a lot more competition
for the public's attention," Hall said.
"There just seems to be a lack of
discretionary time."
Annual visitation to the Museum
of the Confederacy has dropped
from 92,000 to 51,500 since the
early '90s, partially the result of Vir-
ginia Commonwealth University's
sprawling medical college expand-
ing around them, Rawls said.
The museum is planning to re-
locate for more space and easier
accessibility, even if that means


moving outside of Richmond. Of-
ficials are not making their suitors
known publicly, although Lexing-
ton has been announced as a con-
sideration.
The American Civil War Center
isn't close to their projected 60,000
annual visitors nine months into
their opening, and officials would
not say how many visitors had
come so far. The museum had
about 40 visitors by midday one re-
cent day -- a good pace, said a ticket
salesman.
Nearly a century and a half after
Jefferson Davis fled Richmond and
the Civil War ended, two museums
here indicate the divisions of that
war are still not fully healed.


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