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 Material Information
Title: Okeechobee news
Uniform Title: Okeechobee News
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Okeechobee News
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee Fla
Publication Date: July 8, 2007
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
Coordinates: 27.241667 x -80.833056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
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Holding Location: University of Florida
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alephbibnum - 003642554
lccn - 2006229435
System ID: UF00028410:00914
 Related Items
Preceded by: Daily Okeechobee news

Full Text


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*********ALL FOR ADC 320
205 SMA U FL LIB OF FL HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611 7007


Vol. 98 No. 189 Sunday, July 8, 2007 75� Plus tax


Inside
Jr. Golf Clinic
is a success
Waldau's Junior Golf held
their annual Junior Golf Clinic
during the week of June 18 -
June 22, 2007. Twenty young
golfers, ages 8 - 13, partici-
pated in the weeklong clinic
held at the Okeechobee Golf
& Country Club. The purpose
of this popular clinic was not
only teaching the basics of
golf, but to also teach the rules
and etiquette of the sport.
. Jim Waldau, president of
Waldau's Junior Golf, Inc.
started this program over 15
years ago, when he held his
first Golf Party, which was a
gathering for his firefighter
comrades from the City of
.Hialeah Fire Department for
a weekend of golf, party and
fellowship.
. Sports Page 15


Briefs

Okeechobee
burn ban is lifted
According to Chief Nick
Hopkins of the Okeechobee
County Fire Department the
burn ban in Okeechobee
County has been lifted. For
information call (863) 763-
5544.

Glades County
burn ban limited
. According to the Glades
County Division of Emergency
Management parts of Glades
County are still under a burn
ban. For information, call
(863) 946-6020.

New watering
limits in effect
The Okeechobee area is
now under Phase III water re-
strictions.
Lawn watering is now lim-
ited to one day a week from 4
until 8 a.m. and 5 until 7 p.m.
for low volume hand water-
ing.
Addresses with odd num-
bers are permitted to water on
Saturday and addresses with
even numbers are permitted
to irrigate on Sundays.
More information is avail-
able by calling (800) 250-4200;
or, by going to the South Flor-
ida Water Management web-
site at www.sfwmd.gov.

Drought Index
Current: 341
Source: Florida Division
of Forestry
Local Burn Ban: None

Lake Levels

8.92 feet
Last Year: 12.05 feet
Source: South
Florida Water
Management
District. Depth
giaen in feet
above sea level.


Index

Classifieds.......................... 12-13
Com ics ................................ 10
Community Events................... 4
Crossword............................... 10
Opinion.................. ................ 4
Mini Page................ ..............11
Speak O ut................................. 4
S ports ...................................... 15
TV ............................................ 10
W weather .................. ............... 2

See Page 2 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.
- - e , -u M , 6' - "{

Community Links. Individual Voices.



II1 ill II 11111
8 16510 00025 2


Housing sales slow down


By Pete Gawda
Okeechobee News
Even though the housing in-
dustry in Okeechobee seems to
be in a slump, some developers
are planning for the future.
Local builder Ted Kelchner
has noted a significant slow
down in new house construc-
tion. He attributes it to the large
inventory of houses on the mar-
ket. He predicts it will be a year
before we see an increase in
housing sales. He believes a de-


crease in interest might help.
Another realtor, Brandon
Tucker, does not believe that
we have an inventory problem
'here. His theory is that we are
affected by the inventory on
the coast. He thinks that de-
flated new house prices in that
area have discouraged people
who might otherwise move to
Okeechobee. He said that sales
are off 15 to 18 percent of what
they were last year. However,
he added that prices of com-
mercial land in Okeechobee


County have gone up 300 per-
cent.
Realtor David Hazellief said
home sales have been real
slow. He attributes this to the
local economy with its un-
employment. He said that in
the last two years the price of
houses has escalated out of the
reach of first time home buyers.
He also said it is more difficult
to get loans.
Okeechobee Utility Author-
ity (OUA) was anticipating in
excess of 4,000 new sewer con-


Bass clubs & volunteers: Working together


Okeechobee News/Lorna Jablonski
Members of the Big "0" Teen Anglers, Inc. bass fishing club pulled out pieces of old
carpet from an area along the Kissimmee River. Members (left to right) are: Keith Dietz,
Mike Eagle and Garrett Farmer.


Lake, river cleanup goes well


By Lorna Jablonski
Okeechobee News
Between 80 and 100 vol-
unteers from the community
worked their way along the
shoreline of Lake Okeechobee
and up the riverbanks of the
Kissimmee River Saturday
morning collecting trash as
they went as part of the Tay-,
lor Creek Bass Club and Big
"0" Teen Anglers, Inc. "Lake
Cleanup Day" event.
Club members and vol-
unteers from the community
began their day at their es-
tablished base camp at Okee-
Tantie Campground and. Ma-
rina and quickly branched
out in all directions to collect
trash.
This type of event took
place once before in 2000.
Over 30,000 lbs. of garbage
was collected in one day.
Crews of volunteers placed
trash in plastic bags and left
them on River Road. Volun-
teers with trucks then came
along the road and picked up
the trash and hauled it back
to industrial-sized dumpsters
at Okee-Tantie.


Garbage was collected from along the river banks and
piled on River Road to be picked up by volunteers during
the "Lake Cleanup Day" Saturday.


It soon became apparent
that a great deal of the rub-
bish would not fit into gar-
bage bags. Sofas, barbecue
grills, tires, an abandoned
boat, appliances and other
large items were dragged to
waiting vehicles and brought
in. An apparent dumpsite for
broken vehicle windshields


was discovered and cleaned
out.
One young mother, Steph-
anie Pierce, and her two chil-
dren, ages 3 and 5, walked
along river banks at Okee-Tan-
tie collecting trash and haul-
ing it back to the dumpsters.
See Volunteers - Page 2


Horses need more than grass


Backyard
Barnyard

By MaryAnn Morris
INI Florida
So you bought a horse and
you have a safely fenced area
with a source of clean water
where you can turn him out. Is
this enough?
Nutritional requirements
for horses are met or not met
depending on the grasses in
your pasture, the type of soil
you have, how many acres are
available for the horse to graze
and how weedy it is.
New horse owners who
want to learn more about their
horse's nutrition needs can get
help online from the University


of Florida http://solutionsfory-
ourlife.ufl.edu/agriculture/.
In some parts of the United
States, Kentucky, for instance,
soils grow grass that gener-
ally meets the needs of horses
- Kentucky bluegrass is leg-
endary in this respect. While
Florida is home to more than
half a million horses - more
than in any other state except
Texas and California, Florida
grass may not meet a horse's
nutritional needs.
A pasture serves several
purposes for the horse; it is
both an area for exercise and a
source of forage. A high quality
pasture and/or hay can provide
a balanced ration of energy,
protein, minerals, and vitamins
that a horse needs. But, even


on a good quality pasture or
hay, free-choice vitamin/min-
eral mix and water are needed
to adequately meet the horses'
daily nutrient requirements.
According to the Univer-
sity of Florida web site, horses
eat about one to two percent
of their body weight per day.
Thus, an average quarter horse
weighing 1,000 lbs would re-
quire a minimum of 10 to 20
lbs of dry forage or hay per day.
Even on fine-stemmed, leafy,
high quality pastures, be care-
ful that the horses consume ad-
equate amounts of fiber.
In planning for horse pas-
ture, consider the way a horse's
digestive system works. Being
herbivores, horses can graze
See Grass - Page 2


nections from new develop-
ment. However, when it came
time to put up their money,
developers only committed to
about 1,800 units, forcing OUA
to cut back from their planned
expansion of 3 million gallons a
day to 2 million gallons a day.
There are two planned de-
velopments on S.W. 16"' Av-
enue that have apparently
slowed down. One of them is
for sale.
On the other hand, plans
are continuing to be made for


several large housing develop-
ments. Even though there is
no visible progress, the paper
. work approval and permitting
process is still going on for
Freshwater, Eagles Landing,
The Grove and Northshore Vil-
lage
Freshwater, to be located
on both sides of Charles Har-
vey Highway, is a 470 acre tract
with plans calling for 1,202
residential units and 25 acres of
See Housing- Page 2


Sheriff's Office,



agencies work



with local youth


By Lorna Jablonski
Okeechobee News
Okeechobee Sheriff Paul C.
May and his staff, along with
the Florida Sheriff's Youth
Ranches, Inc., Communities in
Schools and the Okeechobee
County School Board are pre-
senting a free, weeklong day
camp that allows children to
participate in various outdoor
activities and to develop posi-
tive self-esteem. The program,
known as "Harmony in the
Streets", is a program for boys
and girls that emphasizes re-
spect for others and promotes
healthy relationships with local
law enforcement officers.
The camp will begin on July
9 and run through July 13 with


60 children in attendance. The
camp is already full and has a
waiting list.
"The camp filled up really
. quickly and has a waiting list,"
stated Okeechobee County
sheriff's, deputy Sergeant Mike
Roberts, who is coordinating
this year's camp. "Jill Rogers
of Communities in Schools is
taking care of registration and
getting meals to the campers
each day."
The campers will be given
a morning snack at the begin-
ning of each day. They will
also be served lunch and will
receive an afternoon snack be-
fore being released at the end of
the day.
See Youth - Page 2


By Brian Skoloff
Associated Press Writer
ON THE KISSIMMEE RIVER
(AP) -- One hard rainfall won't
even come close to solving the
unprecedented drought wither-
ing much of Florida.
Lake Okeechobee, the heart
of the Everglades and a backup
drinking water source for mil-
lions of South Florida residents,
has been hitting a record low
almost weekly. Its main artery,
the Kissimmee River starting
near Orlando, hasn't flowed
south in more than 240 days,
depriving the lake of 50 percent
of its water.
Water managers say the


Kissimmee River basin needs
about 5 feet of rain -- just to
catch up.
The 18-month dry spell
means continued pressure on
the region's utilities to find al-
ternative sources of clean wa-
ter, such as desalinizing sea
water.
It also has put renewed pres-
sure on water managers to has-
ten efforts to engineer nature to
work more naturally.
Florida's natural water sys-
tem has been so manipulated
over the last century to make
way fbr man that the only way
to restore it is to manipulate it
See Drought - Page 2


INI/MaryAnn Morris
Adequate and suitable pasture for horses means enough
room and grass to keep the horses in good condition.


Hard rainfall is



vital to help



relieve drought








2 Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007


Asteroid mission postponed until July 15


CAPE CANAVERAL (AP) The
planned weekend launch of a
spacecraft to explore two of the
solar system's largest asteroids
was delayed to the middle of the
month because of problems with
a tracking ship and aircraft.
NASA had set Monday after-
noon as a new launch time for
the Dawn spacecraft,
which will embark on a years-
long journey to the asteroids Ves-


ta and Ceres, which lie between
Mars and Jupiter. But late Friday,
they announced the spacecraft
would launch July 15.
The spacecraft originally had
been set to launch Saturday but
that was nixed because thunder-
storms and lightning at the launch
pad prevented loading its fuel.
On Friday, the space agency
called off a Sunday launch, too,
because the plane used to track


the spacecraft after liftoff had
mechanical problems, and the
tracking ship wasn't in the correct
location.
Seeking clues about the birth
of the solar system, Dawn will first
visit Vesta, the smaller of the two
bodies, four years from now. In
2015, it will meet up with Ceres,
which carries the status of both
asteroid and, like Pluto, dwarf
planet.


NASA has until the end of Oc-
tober to launch the spacecraft be-
fore the planetary bodies begin to
drift apart. .
"After that, it becomes very
problematic to do both Vesta and
Ceres because they are moving
apart in the sky," said Chris Rus-
sell, the mission's principal inves-
tigator. "It takes about another 15
years before they get back togeth-
er again."


Bush rips democratic lawmakers failures


By Jennifer Loven
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Presi-
dent Bush accused Democratic
lawmakers on Saturday of being
unable to live up to their duties,
citing Congress' inability to pass
legislation to fund the federal gov-
ernment.
"Democrats are failing in their
responsibility to make tough de-
cisions and spend the people's
money wisely," Bush said in his
weekly radio address. "This mo-
ment is a test."
The White House has said the
failure of a broad immigration
overhaul was proof that Demo-
cratic-controlled Capitol Hill can-
not take on major issues. "We
saw this with immigration, and
we're seeing it with some other
issues where Congress is having
an inability to take on major chal-
lenges," said spokesman Tony
Fratto.


Housing
Continued From Page 1
commercial development.
Eagles Landing is scheduled
to be built on U.S. 441 S.E. west
of Nubbin Slough. It will eventu-
ally have 622 dwelling units and
16 acres devoted to retail stores.
The Grove consists of 5,700
acres in the northern part of the
county and upon completion


Volunteers
Continued From Page 1
"We came out to help our
community," stated Ms. Pierce.
+ "Most of what we've been able
to pick up is simply people's
trash. It's garbage that they are
just too lazy to take to the trash
can. I want this place to be nice
for my kids."
"We're picking up trash,"
stated 3-year-old Grady Pierce.
"This place is dirty."
County Commissioner Mar-
vin Wherrell and Okeechobee
School Board member Kelly
Owens were among those help-
ing to pick up the garbage.
While the volunteers worked,
others set up coolers of drinks
to help them cool down. Lunch
was provided to all volunteers


Drought
Continued From Page 1
even more, state officials say.
The Army Corps of Engineers
has already spent millions on
restoration of the Everglades,
the largest such project in the
world.
"You can't just backfill every-
thing and let the water flow like it
used to because we'd be drown-
ing out people, highways, farms
and homes," said Ernie Barnett,
director of policy and legislation
for the South Florida Water Man-
agement District. "We now have
to engineer a solution to mimic


Grass
Continued From Page 1
the same pastures as cattle. But,
the horse is not a ruminant (an
animal such as a cow that stores
food in a four-part stomach to fin-
ish chewing it later as a cud). A
horse has a simpler, less robust
stomach that is more sensitive
to what it eats. Horses lack the
rumen, the large stomach-vat
where cattle and other ruminants
ferment and degrade poor qual-
ity, high fiber, materials through
the action of microorganisms.
Lacking the rumen, given too
much of the wrong thing equals
colic. Colic is a horse-sized belly-
ache that requires the attention of
a veterinarian.
Horses have an adapted and
enlarged colon where the fer-
mentative process occurs. Horses,
therefore, require higher quality,
less fibrous forages that are free
of mold and dust. (http://edis.ifas.


The main reason the immigra-
tion measure died, however, was
staunch opposition from Bush's
own base -- conservatives. The
president could not turn around
members of his own party despite
weeks of intense effort.
The immigration bill was the
top item on Bush's domestic
agenda. With its demise, Bush
was left to focus on the annual
appropriations process and rein-
ing in federal spending.
Twelve annual spending bills
dole out approximately one-third
of the federal budget. They must
be passed each year by Congress,
before the Oct. 1 start of the new
fiscal year, but lawmakers be-
gan considering this year's batch
just in mid-June. The House has
passed half and the full Senate
has not yet taken up any.
"Democrats have a chance to
prove they are for open and trans-
parent government by working to


complete each spending bill in-
dependently and on time," Bush
said. "I urge Democrats in Con-
gress to step forward now and
pass these bills one at a time. "
Democratic leaders say they
are behind because an emer-
gency spending measure funding
the war in Iraq came first. They
also had to pass an omnibus
measure cleaning up last year's
appropriations mess. Then, the
Republicans who then controlled
Congress failed to pass into law a
single spending bill for domestic
agencies save the Homeland Se-
curity Department -- a situation
that brought little complaint from
Bush.
With the Senate and House
now in Democratic hands, this
year's bills are producing skir-
mishes with the White House that
also are causing delays. Almost
every domestic bill already has
attracted a veto threat because it


plans call for 15,000 housing 'Yout
units. Youth


Plans for Northshore Village,
north of S. R. 70 E between the
Okeechobee City Limits and the
L-63 Canal call for 813 single
family homes, 192 apartments
and 16 acres devoted to com-
mercial development.
Post your opinions in the Public
Issues Forum at www.newszap.
com. Reporter Pete Gawda may be
reached at pgawda@newszap.com.


"We're picking up trash,"
stated 3-year-old Grady
Pierce. "This place is
dirty."

by various businesses in town
including the Deerfield branch
of Showcase Provisions of
Boar's Head hot dogs, Kentucky
Fried Chicken, Winn Dixie, Pub-
lix, Superior Water and Pogey's
Family Restaurant. Other busi-
nesses and individuals supplied
ice, equipment, grills and a mo-
tor home to cool down.
As the dumpsters began to
fill, young members of the Big
"0" Teen Anglers, Inc. were
already making plans for next
year's "Lake Cleanup Day".
Hopefully, there will be less
garbage for them to collect.


nature."
One of the district's most
pressing needs is to find stor-
age sites on land north of Lake
Okeechobee, the second-largest
freshwater lake entirely within
the contiguous United States, to
capture water during wet times
so it can be slowly released dur-
ing dry periods.
That process once occurred
naturally before flood control
diversion projects prevented
storm overflow from spreading
out over surrounding wetlands.
Now, when rain falls heavily dur-
ing normal wet years, overflow
polluted with farm and urban
runoff flows south into the lake
and eventually is pumped east


ufl.edu/AA216)
When you know where you
will pasture.your horse, you can
get the pasture soil tested for Ph
and nutrients at the Okeechobee
County Agricultural Extension
Service on U.S. Highway 98.
"Ph testing of your soil is free.
We do these tests on Tuesdays,"
said Pat Hogue, extension agent
"Nutrient testing is by mail from
the University of Florida. The
charge is $7. We can help you
with that, too."
If your soil is deficient in cer-
tain nutrients required for plant
growth, these can be supplied
by the addition of fertilizer that
contains the needed nutrients.
But nothing practical can be
done about the "natural" mois-
ture-holding capability of the soil.
The sandier the soil, the quicker it
drains and the quicker the nutri-
ents will leach out.
Soils on sandy upland sites
that contain some clay or silt are
generally more productive than
those that are nearly pure sand.


Continued From Page 1
Their activities will include in-
spirational talks, aerobics, and
team sports with local coaches,
social time, and interaction with
local law enforcement personnel
in areas such as narcotics, gun
safety, bike safety, internet safety,
crime scene techniques and arts
and crafts. There will also be dem-


exceeds Bush's proposed budget
in certain areas.
All told, Democrats plan
spending increases for annual
agency budgets of about $23 bil-
lion above the White House bud-
get request. Bush put it in terms
of a five-year outlook, and said
their budget plan would be $205
billion bigger than his over that
period, and would include "the
largest tax increase in history" by
allowing some of his tax cuts to
expire as planned.
The president said Democrats
are embracing "the failed tax-
and-spend policies of the past,"
and vowed to stand firm for fiscal
restraint. Republican lawmakers
have pledged to support him and
sustain any vetoes.
"No nation has ever taxed and
spent its way to prosperity," Bush
said. "And I have made it clear
that I will veto any attempt to take
America down this road."


onstrations by the OCSO K-9 unit
and the OCSO motorcycle unit.
The last day of the camp will
be spent at the Okeechobee
Sports Complex swimming pool.
A barbecue will be provided to the
campers, with Sheriff May and Ma-
jor Stephen acting as cooks.
Funding for this local program
has been provided by dedicated
individuals, community-based
groups, and a strong commitment
from Sheriff May.


Stephanie Pierce (rear) and her two children Cade Pierce
(left) and Grady Pierce (right) spent Saturday morning pick-
ing up trash along the Kissimmee River as part of "Lake
Cleanup Day".


and west through rivers into the
ocean.
"If you had a way to capture
it and store it and then, when it's
dry, put it back into the natural
system, mimicking what nature
used to do, that's really what Ev-
erglades restoration is all about,"
Barnett said.
"True restoration is going to
rely on catching the water ear-
lier and cleaning it up before it
gets into Lake Okeechobee,"
said George Horne, the district's
deputy executive director of op-
erations and maintenance.
"The real answer is conser-
vation if we want to continue
to have population growth. And
that means tough growth control


Forage plants that are productive
on well-drained soils such as Ba-
hia grass will be grown on such
sites. Poorly drained areas or low-
lying areas that are flooded for
extended periods during the sum-
mer may be used for forage crops
that are suited or adapted to such
conditions such as bahiagrass or
limpo grass.
How many acres you need for
each horse varies depending on
how good the pasture grass is, the
age and size of the horses) and
the amount of grain and supple-
ments fed and the management
of the pasture.
Pasture "management" could
mean stabling the horses some-
times or moving them to a differ-
ent pasture every 14 to 21 days
to allow pastures to regrow or
recover before further grazing.
Such management plans get the
most from your pastures and
avoids grazing it down to bare
spots, which, in all likelihood, will
regrow in weeds.
In general, if there is more than


decisions and alternative water
supplies," Horne said.
Environmentalists argue that
Florida's drought is exacerbated
by the district's continued ma-
nipulation. They say nature can't
be restored with more manipula-
tion alone, such as simply build-
ing reservoirs to store water.
"If we want to recreate the
Everglades natural drought resis-
tance, which was always there
before the government started
manipulating the system, then
we've got to be able to put wa-
ter back onto the landscape and
that means back into places that
people are using right now," said
Eric Draper, policy director for
Audubon of Florida.


one horse per acre, the pasture's
main use is an exercise area and
feed must be otherwise supplied.
Typically on less productive sites
one mature horse weighing 1,100
lbs. may require two to two and
a half acres of pasture whereas
on productive sites and well-
managed pasture, one to one
and a half acres per horse will be
enough. The number of horses
in a pasture may be increased if
more supplementary feed is pro-
vided or pasture is managed to al-
low recovery periods.
When there is drought, like the
historic drought Florida is current-
ly suffering - horse owners buy
hay. "Horse hay" is a higher qual-
ity than that fed to cows. Horses
can sicken and even die from the
dust and weeds that might be
found in "cow hay."
For more information on soil
sampling, call the Okeechobee
County Cooperative Extension
Service is at (863) 763-6469.


News Briefs

R.O.A.D. office has moved
OKEECHOBEE--The Recovering Okeechobee After Disaster
(R.O.A.D.) office has moved. The new location is 200 N.W. Second
Street., Okeechobee, FL.34972. For information regarding the agen-
cy please call the office number at 863-357-4177. The fax number
is 863-357-1977.

Summer food service program offered
OKEECHOBEE -- Okeechobee County Parks and Recreation will
be participating in the summer food service program through July
27.
Nutritionally balanced meals will be provided to all children re-
gardless of race, color, sex, disability, age, or national origin during
summer vacation when school breakfasts and lunches are not avail-
able. All children 18 years old and younger are eligible for meals at
no charge and there will be no discrimination in the course of the
meal service.
Non-enrolled children at open sites should pre-register for meals
with Okeechobee County Parks and Recreation, either in person at
640 N.W 27th Lane, or by phone at (863) 763-6950, no less than 24
hours in advance.
The programs are only approved for geographical areas of need
where 50 percent or more of the children quality for free and re-
duced price meals during the school year.
The following sites will be participating in the Summer Food Ser-
vice Program: Douglas Brown Community Center, 826 N.E. 16th
Ave.; Okeechobee County Civic Center, 1750 U.S. 98 North; and,
Central Elementary School, 610 S.W. Fifth Ave.
Any person who believes he or she has been discriminated
against in any USDA-related activity should write or call immediate-
ly to: USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Ave.
S.W, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; or call (800) 795-3272 (voice),
or (202) 720-6382 (TTY).

Today's Weather


Okeechobee Forecast.

Sunday: Mostly sunny through late morning then scattered after-
noon showers and thunderstorms. The high will be in the lower 90s.
The wind will be from the south 5 to 10 mph. The chance of rain is
50 percent.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers and
thunderstorms through midnight. The low will be in the lower 70s.
The southeast wind around 5 mph. The chance of rain is 20 percent.

Extended Forecast
Monday: Partly sunny with a chance of afternoon showers and
thunderstorms. The high will be in the lower 90s. The southeast wind
will be from the 5 to 10 mph. The chance of rain is 30 percent.
Monday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the mid 70s.
Tuesday: Partly sunny with a chance of afternoon showers and
thunderstorms. The high will be in the lower 90s. The chance of rain
is 30 percent.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the mid 70s.
Wednesday: Partly sunny with a slight chance of showers and
thunderstorms. The high will be in the lower 90s. The chance of rain
is 20 percent.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of evening
showers and thunderstorms. The low will be in the mid 70s. The
chance of rain is 20 percent.
Thursday: Partly sunny with a chance of afternoon showers and
thunderstorms. The high will be in the lower 90s. The chance of rain
is 30 percent.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy with the low in the lower 70s.
Friday: Partly sunny with a chance of showers and thunderstorms.
The high will be in the upper 80s. The chance of rain is 30 percent.

Lotteries

MIAMI (AP)--Here are the winning numbers selected Friday in
the Florida Lottery: Cash 3 0-1-6; Play 4 1-6-5-5; Fantasy 5 17-7-13-
14-15; Mega Money 41-33-3-29, Mega Ball: 16


Okeechobee News
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Q


MEW







Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007 3


Submited Photo


Multiple squadrons of the Civil Air Patrol joined together for a trip to the Fantasy of Flight.


CAP looking for new members


By Victoria Hannon
Okeechobee News
The Okeechobee Unit of the
Civil Air Patrol - United States Air
-Force Auxiliary (CAP) is looking
for new members.
The Okeechobee Composite
Squadron 453 currently has 26
members and is looking for teens
between the ages of 12 and 18 to
become cadets. The unit is also
recruiting senior members to ad-
minister the unit.
CAP is a leadership program
that encourages young men and
women to meet their potential
through leadership training, tech-
nical education, scholarships and
career education.
"The main purpose for the
youth is to enhance leadership
skills, similar to ROTC and Sea
Cadets," Gene O'Neill, the Deputy
Commander of Squadron 453,
-commented. "Even Boy Scouts,
but it's more advanced than
that."
The Civil Air Patrol was found-
er in December 1941, one week
before the Japanese attack on
Pearl Harbor. Under the jurisdic-
tion of the Army Air Forces, CAP
pilots flew more than a half mil-
lion hours, were credited with
sinking two enemy submarines
and rescued hundreds of crash
'survivors, during Wbrld War 11.
The CAP wa established as'a fed-
erally chartered benevolent civil-


ian corporation in 1946 by Presi-
dent Harry Truman
"We are an auxiliary of the
Air Force and fly on missions ap-
proved by the Congress," stated
Mr. O'Neill.
These missions include pa-
trolling for. illegal immigrants,
terrorist, drug smuggling, and
downed or missing aircraft. It
is this last part that members of
the Okeechobee squadron have
taken part in the most.
There are three positions on
an airplane when they are flying
these missions; pilot, scanner,
and observer. The pilot must be
a Senior Member, but the other
two positions can bee filled with
qualified cadets.
When a plane is downed, the
Emergency Locator Transmit-
ters (ELT) on board goes off. It
is the scanner's job to zero in on
the signal being sent off. The ob-
server looks for the actual plane.
Once they find it they call out the
ground team to provide emergen-
cy services. All of the positions,
on and off of the plane, require
training.
Along with this training, the
CAP also holds Orientation fights
in which they teach members
how to fly the single-engine,
piston aircraft that the Air Force
provides. These flights are cur-
'rently taking place" using a plane
from the coast, but Okeechobee


is in the process of getting its own
plane assigned.
There are dues attached to this
program, but they are minuscule.
Cadets are furnished with a basic
uniform and only pay $22 a year,
which covers everything that they
will need. Senior members are
expected to pay a bit more, at $70
per year, which does not include
uniforms.
The Civil Air Patrol offer more
than $200,000 in college scholar-
ships each year, with around 10
percent of each freshman class
at the Air Force Academy com-
prised of former cadets. While
it is true that some of the cadets
do go on to join the Air Force, .the
scholarships are not only useable
at the Air Force academy. Unlike
the ROTC, this program does not
give a person automatic standing
within the ranks of the Air Force,
but it does prepare a person for
the military setting by teaching
them discipline, drills and some
of the ceremonies.
"I am part of the program be-
cause of the emergency services,"
stated Mr. O'Neill, who is also the
director of Okeechobee's Emer-
gency Management Center. "I can
use the Cadets and Senior Mem-
bers if we have a major disaster
and feel confident because they
have the training."
The CAP takes trips on occa-
sion to locations like flight muse-


4


I


Cadets are joined by Senior Members of the Civil Air Patrol to look into the distance at some-
thing of interest during one of their meetings.


fl�. . , .- . ". .-



Cadets with the Okeechobee Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol practice drills and formations
during a CAP meeting.


ums and bivouacs, which are ba-
sically camping trips. These trips
provide training opportunities as
well as fellowship.
"For some of the longer trips,"
commented Mr. O'Neill. "The Air
Force sometimes provides trans-
portation."
No prior knowledge is needed
in those interested in joining. Meet-
ings of the Okeechobee Squad-
ron of the Civil Air Patrol are held
at the Okeechobee Air Strip every
Tuesday starting at 7 p.m. If any-
one is interested in joining please
contact Gene O'Neill at (863) 763-
3212 or attend a meeting.


uKeecnoDee News/Pete uawaa
Lest we forget
These stones in Veterans' Park remind us of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.


-N
I Z"
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4 OPINION


Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007


Speak Out
Have an opinion or a question about a public issue? Post
it anytime at the Okeechobee issues forum at http://www.
newszapforums.com/forum58. It is a hometown forum so
visit the page as often as you would like and share your com-
ments (but no personal attacks or profanities, please). You
can also make a comment by calling our Speak Out 24-hour
opinion line at (863) 467-2033, fax (863) 763-5901 or sending
e-mail to okeenews@newszap.com. You can also mail sub-
missions to Okeechobee News, P.O. Box 639, Okeechobee,
Fla. 34973. Comments will be published in the newspaper as
space permits.
THANKYOU: Today is July 3, at approximately 6 p.m. it was pouring
down rain on 441 north in front of Eckerds and my truck spun around
and hit a mud hole and I ended up in a ditch and I just wanted to say
thank you to this man in a white pick up truck for pulling me out of the
ditch. I don't know who he was, but he just pulled me out and drove off
and I would just like to say thank you to him.

POETRY: I heard about three weeks ago from a friend that a couple
of my poems were put in your paper, under another name. If you print
my poems please put my copy right on them. Thank you very much.
Editor's note: The Okeechobee News does not usually print po-
etry and we are not aware of any poems in the newspaper
recently. If you can give us the date of the publication, we will
research this.

CAMPAIGN FUNDS: Look at all this money going to waste for po-
litical advertising. It makes me sick. We are electing these people that
claim that they are Americans and they care for our future. Can you
imagine how all that money could save lives, and feed the poor. No,
they spend money to get into the White House, and then use our tax
dollars and retirement money. My vote would go to whoever would do-
nate their campaign funds.

COURT ORDER: I don't know if this will make any sense but here it
goes. A court order is a written request by a judge giving specific instruc-
tion to an individual. If the order is violated, this is a civil action and not
criminal. The only way a person can get jail time is if they are brought
back before the judge enough times that the judge gets tired of them
and decides to "hold them in contempt" at which time jail time can be
sought. Before this can even happen, would you believe they are given
another chance to present their side and show why they should not be
held in contempt. If the truth was told, you can basically wipe your
floors with a protection order. The actual violation of the order "to stay
away" must be violated inthe presence of an officer, or the victim has
to go back to the Judge for another court date. It's like a monkey-circus,
but it's all we have.

ANIMAL CONTROL: I have been thinking about this thread over
the past week. I'll save a long post and just say that the Okeechobee
* Animal Control could really use help. If you have a couple of free hours
a week, go on over there and help them out- they are understaffed and
really need help -- if you love animals, then you will be doing them a
service by helping to care for them, feed them, play with them.

Public issues forums
Join the discussion of important issues at newszap.com. Topics include:
* Belle Glade/South Bay issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum51
- Clewiston issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum52
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* Moore Haven/Glades issues: http://www.newszapforums.com/forum57
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* Pahokee issues:http://www.newszapforums.com/forum59
Go to newszap.com, click on your community and then on "community
forums and links."


Community Events

Vacation Bible School is planned
The Seventh Day Adventist Church, 412 N.W. sixth St. would like to
nvite children ages 3 years through fifth grade to come join them in a
stampede at their vacation bible school.. It will take you on a wild ride
through God's word at Avalanche Ranch. It will be held Sunday, July 8
through Thursday, July 12, from 6 until 8:30 p.m. For more information
)lease contact Carolyn at (863) 357-3680.

Genealogical Society to meet
The Genealogical Society of Okeechobee will be meeting on Monday
uly 9, 2007 at 1:30 p.m. at the Okeechobee Public Library 206 S.W. 16th
t. There is always something for the beginner as well as the more experi-
rnced family history researchers. Visitors are always welcome. For more
information please call Eve Olson at (863) 467-2674.

Vacation Bible School set
Avalanche Ranch is this year's theme for Vacation Bible School. It wil
)e held at Treasure Island Baptist Church, 4209 Hwy 441 S.E., from 5:30
intil 8:30 p.m., July 16 through July 20. Activities will be for grades Kin-
ergarten through sixth grade. Everyone is invited. For more information
)lease call (863) 763-0550

Bassinger Baptist Church to hold VBS
The First Baptist Church of Bassinger, 19836 Hwy 98 North, will be
having Vacation Bible School for youth kindergarten through 121 grade. It
,vill be held Monday, July 9 through Friday, July 13, from 6:30 until 9 p.m.
'Game Day Central, where heroes are made!" will be the theme this year.
,or more information please contact Buelah at 863-763-6517, of Carolyn
it 863-763-4179.Q



Okeechobee News

Our Purpose...
The Okeechobee News is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida.
Independent is owned by a unique Irusl that enables tins newspaper to pur-
sue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community. Since no
dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on profit margins below
industry standards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in Independent's
mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First
Amendment of the U.S. Conshilulion, and support of the community's deliber-
ation of public issues.


We Pledge ...
* To operate this newspaper as a
public trust
* To help our community become a
better place to live and work,
through our dedication to consci-
entious journalism.
* To provide the information citizens
need to make their own intelligent
decisions about public issues.
* To report the news with honesty,
accuracy, purposeful neutrality,
fairness, objectivity, fearlessness
and compassion.
* To use our opinion pages to facili-
tate community debate, not to '
dominate it with our own opinions.
* To disclose our own conflicts of
interest or potential conflicts to our
readers.
* To correct our errors and to give
. each correclionto the prominence
it deserves.
* To provide a righi to reply to those
we write about
* To treat people wail counesy,
respect and compassion.


Advertising Director: Judy Kasten

News Editor: Eric Kopp

National Advertising: Joy Parnsh

Circulation Manager: Janet Madray

Independent Newspapers. Inc.
* Joe Smyth, Chairman
* Ed Dulin, President
STom Byrd, Vice President of
Newspaper Operations
* Katrina Elsken, Executive
Editor
MEMBER
OF: 1,



,;* Okeechobee Nets 2007
For More Information See
At Your Service On Page 2


Okeechobee News/File photo

From the photo archives
While cleaning out the old photography darkroom at the
Okeechobee News office, staffers came across a num-
ber of old photos. Some of these photos were taken by
staffers; others were apparently brought in by community
members. No information is available with the photos, but
readers can share any information they might have. Some
of these have been posted at http://photos.newszap.com/
pages/gallery.php?gallery=310113. Or go online to www.
newszap.com, click on "Okeechobee," click on "Florida
photos," and then click on "Okee News Archives." To com-
ment on a photo, open the photo and post your comments
below.



Upcoming Events

Sunday
A.A. meeting from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the Church of Our
Saviour, 200 N.W. Third St. It will be an open step meeting.
A.A. open 12 step meeting from 7:30 until 8:30 p.m. at the
Church of Our Savior, 200 N.W. Third St.

Monday
A.A. meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. at the First
United Methodist Church, 200 N.W. Second St. This will be an
open meeting.
VFW #10539 Ladies Auxiliary lunch and bingo will start at
noon at the Post, 3912 U.S. 441 S.E. Auxiliary members and their
guests are invited. Please R.S.V.P. to (863) 763-2308.
Okeechobee Senior Singers meet at 9:30 a.m. at the
Okeechobee Presbyterian Church, 312 North Parrott Ave. Every-
one who enjoys singing is invited. For information or to schedule
an appearance for your organization or group, contact Marge
Skinner at (863) 532-0449.
The Genealogical Society of Okeechobee will meet at
1:30 p.m. at the Okeechobee County Public Library, 206 S.W.
16th St. This meeting is open to anyone interested in tracing
their ancestry. The.annual membership is $10 per person, and
$12 for a family. For information, call Eve at (863) 467-2674; or,
visit their web site at http://www.rootsweb.com/-flgso.
Narcotics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. for open discussion
at Buckhead Ridge Christian Church, 3 Linda Road. For informa-
tion call (863) 634-4780.
O.C.R.A. meets at Peace Lutheran Church, 750 N.W. 23rd
Lane at 7 p.m.
Nar-anon Helps the family of the drug user attain serenity
and a more normal home life, regardless of whether or not he
or she has stopped using. We meet every Friday at 8 p.m. at the
Buckhead Ridge Christian Church, 3 Linda Road For informa-
tion, call (863) 467-9833.

Tuesday
Rotary Club of Okeechobee meets each Tuesday at noon
at Golden Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. The meetings
are open to the public. For information, contact Chad Rucks at
(863) 763-8999.
Christian Home Educators of Okeechobee will meet at
the Grace Christian Church Fellowship Hall, 701 S. Parrott Ave.
Anyone currently home schooling or interested in home school-
ing is welcome. For information, call Lydia Hall (863) 357-6729
or Betty Perera (863) 467-6808.
Alanon meeting will be held at the Church of Our Savior,
200 N.W Third St., at 8 p.m.
A.A. Closed discussion meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the
Church of Our Savior, 200 N.W. Third St.
Grief and Loss Support Group meets every Tuesday at 10
a.m. at the Hospice Building, 411 S.E. Fourth St., in Okeechobee.
Everyone is welcome. For information, contact Enid Boutrin at
(863) 467-2321.
Family History Center meets from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. at
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 310 S.W. Sixth St.
Anyone interested in finding who your ancestors are is welcome
to attend. There is Census, IGI (International Genealogical In-
dex), Social Security Death Index and military information avail-
able. For information, call Robert Massey at (863) 763-6510.
Gospel Sing every Tuesday beginning at 7 p.m. The public
is invited to participate with vocal and/or instrumental music.
For information, contact Douglas Chiropractic Center at (863)
763-4320.
The Widow and Widowers Support Group meets at 8:30
a.m. at the Clock Restaurant, 1111 S. Parrott Ave., for breakfast.
For information, call (863) 357-0297.
The Gathering Church Overcomers Group meets at 7:30
p.m. in the fellowship hall at 1735 S.W 24th Ave. This is a men's
only meeting. For information, call Earl at (863) 763-0139.
Bible study at the Living Word of Faith Church, 1902 S. Par-
rott Ave., at 7 p.m. Informal and informative discussions bring
many Bible truths to life. Everyone is invited.
Community Country Gospel will meet at 7 p.m. at the
church next to Douglas Clinic on North Park St. Any individual or
group that enjoys old time gospel music is invited to participate.
For information, contact Dr. Edward Douglas at (863) 763-4320.
A.A. meeting will be held from noon until 1 p.m. at the First
United Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. This will be an
open meeting.
The Lighthouse Refuge support group meets at Believers
Fellowship Church, 300 S.W. Sixth Ave. from noon until 2 p.m.
then from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m. Women who need emotional sup-
port or someone just to care are welcome. For information call
the hot line (863) 801-9201 or (863) 697-9718.


Wednesday
Martha's House support groups meet each Wednesday.
Spanish groups meet from 7 until 8 p.m. at the Okeechobee
Christian Church, 3055 S.E. 18th Terrace. Ana Romero is the
group facilitator. Another group meets in the Okeechobee Coun-
ty Health Department, 1798 N.W Ninth Ave., from 5 until 6 p.m.
with Irene Luck as the group facilitator. There is another meeting
from 6 until 7 p.m. with Shirlean Graham as the facilitator. For
information, call (863) 763-2893.}
A.A. meeting from noon until 1 p.m. at the First United Meth-
odist Church of Our 200 N.W Second St. It's an open meeting.
A.A. meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at the Sacred Heart Catholic
Church, 701 S.W. Sixth St. It will be a closed discussion.
N.A. meeting at 8 p.m. at the Sports Complex pavilion, 580
N.W. 27th Lane, next to the pool. For information call (863) 634-
4780.


Community Events

OSAC training group to meet
The Okeechobee Substance Abuse Coalition's community out-
reach/training committee will meet Monday, July 9, from 9 until
10 a.m. The meeting is open to anyone interested in participating.
For information on the meeting location, call Lydia Jean Williams at
(863) 634-9015.
OSAC panel to meet on July 9
The Okeechobee Substance Abuse Coalition's community re-
source committee will meet Monday, July 9, from 11:30 a.m. until
12:30 p.m. This is a brown bag lunch meeting and is open to anyone
interested in participating. For information on the meeting location,
contact Deputy Keith Stripling at (863) 763-6064 or Lydia Jean Wil-
liams at (863) 634-9015.
OSAC board will meet July 10
The Okeechobee Substance Abuse Coalition's advisory board will
meet Tuesday, July 10, from 11 until 11:45 a.m. at the First United
Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. The meeting is open to all
board members. For information, call Lydia Jean Williams at (863)
634-9015.
OSAC plans monthly meeting
The Okeechobee Substance Abuse Coalition's monthly meeting
will be held Tuesday, July 10, from 11:45 a.m. until 12:45 p.m. at the
First United Methodist Church, 200 N.W. Second St. Everyone is wel-
come and lunch will be served. All parents and PTO members from
Okeechobee's public and private schools are encouraged to attend
and assist in developing a county-wide prevention plan. For informa-
tion, contact Lydia Jean Williams at (863) 634-9015.
Children's council to meet July 12
The Children's Services Council will meet on Thursday, July 12, at
5 p.m. in the conference room of the Okeechobee County School
Board Office at 700 S.W Second Ave. For information, contact Cath-
leen Blair at (863) 462-5000, ext. 255.
Church plans city prayer time
Through out the month of July, every Friday,July 13, the Haven of
Rest Church will be having a prayer and fasting time to pray for our
city of Okeechobee. Everyone is welcome and the time will be from
7:30 until 8:30 p.m. For more information please contact Pastor Tom
and Rachel at 863-357-3053.
Scrapbooking party is planned
A scrapbooking crop party will be held on Friday, July 13, from 6
until 10 p.m. at the First Methodist Church, 200 N.W Second St. All
levels of scrapbookers are welcome. Last month Carolyn Jones gave
a demonstration on brag bags. Bring 3-4 paper bags to this crop and
she will help you create your own. She will also be available to assist
you with your scrapbooking questions and supplies. Several of our
members attended the scrapbooking convention in Ft. Lauderdale
on June 29 and 30. They will present a "show and tell" of some of the
new products and information that they received at the convention.
Refreshments will be served and there will be door prizes. Bring any
scrapbook pages on which you are currently working. For informa-
tion call Carolyn at (863) 634-1885 or Joan at (863) 467-0290.
Summer Karaoke League at VFW
We are going to host a Summer KARAOKE LEAGUE in July
14, 28, August 11, and 25th, and September 8th and 22nd from 7:30 to
9:30 p.m. The league is open to the public. Everyone is eligible to
enter including Karaoke Hosts and members of bands. The league
will be held from 7:30 to 9:30. For more information call David-Lee
at 863-697-9002 or Bill at the VFW at 863-0818.
Poker run will benefit Hospice
There will be a poker run held in memory of Perry Young on Sat-
urday, July 14. There will be a $5 entry fee and all proceeds will be
donated to Hospice of Okeechobee and The Hamrick Home: Our
first stop will be at noon at the Eagles 4137. There will be an auction
following the run at the Cypress Hut Eagles on U.S. 441 S.E. For infor-
mation, contact Lorraine Watson at (863) 763-2997.
Benefit beauty pageant is planned
The 12th annual Mr. & Miss Firecracker Fundraiser Beauty Pag-
eant will be held Saturday, July 14, at 6:30 p.m. at the Okeechobee
High School lecture hall, 2800 U.S. 441 N. Funds raised will go to the
Okeechobee County Fire/Rescue volunteers to be used to purchase
needed equipment. Age groups for girls will be 0 months to 21 years.
Ages for boys will be 0 months to 9 years. Categories are beauty,
photogenic, most beautiful/handsome, best dressed and the cover
queen/king for the program book. Deadline to enter is Sunday, July
8, at 5 p.m. No exceptions. Applications may be picked up at Kid's
Corner, the Chamber of Commerce, Flower Petals, Photos by Bobbi
and the Okeechobee Fire Rescue Station. For information call Donny
Arnold at (863) 634-6464; Pat Yeates at (863) 634-6985; or, Margie at
Fire/Rescue during business hours at (863) 763-5544.
Fundraiser benefits The Pregnancy Center
The Pregnancy Center of Okeechobee will hold a fundraiser at the
KOA Kampground on U.S. 441 S. from 6 until 9 p.m. on Thursday,
July 19. The purpose of the event is to raise funds to re-open the
center at 1505 S. Parrott Ave. Tickets for the steak or chicken dinner
are $25 per person or $125 per table. The guest speaker will be Tim
DeTellis. For information, contact Laurie Garner at (863) 634-8523.
Benefit to help needy and homeless
Style Studio custom motorcycle shop and Tattoos with Style will
present a Benefit to help Okeechobee's needy and homeless on Sat-
urday July 21. There will be a hog roast, 50/50, door prizes and live
DJ California Fats. All proceeds will go to Big Lake Missions Outreach.
For more information please call (863) 357-5944.

CCC meeting planned
The Community Collaborative Council, a part of the Shared Ser-
vice Network, will hold a meeting, Tuesday, July 24, at 10 a.m. in the
Board Room of the Okeechobee School Board Office. Immediately
following the CCC meeting, there will be a brief planning meeting for
those interested in partnering in a local Health and Safety Fair.

Cattle Drive and Ranch Rodeo slated
Okeechobee Cattleman's Association and Okeechobee Main
Street will celebrate the National Day of the American Cowboy on
Saturday July 28". Festivities begin with a cattle drive west of historic
Flagler Park traveling east on state road 70 to the Agri-Civic Center.
There is no admission to this family event. Activities at the Agri-Civic
Center include cowboy poetry, music, cowboy art, vintage wagons,
barbecue and much more. The ranch hand rodeo will begin at 2:00.
For more information please call Program Manager, Karen Hanawalt
at 863-357-MAIN (6246).

Church plans to hold Bible school
Fountain of Life Church, 1302 S.W. 32nd St., will be offering Vaca-


tion Bible School to youth between the ages of 4 through 13. The
school will be held Monday, July 30, through Saturday, Aug. 4, from 6
until 9 p.m. For information, call Carol at (863) 763-6602.

Kissimmee River Stakeholders to meet
There will be a meeting on Saturday, Aug. 4 from 10 a.m. to 12
p.m. at the South Florida Water District (SFWMD) Okeechobee Ser-
vice Center, Bank of America Building. The purpose of this meeting
is to provide an opportunity for SFMWD to meet with community
members that are interested in using the restored Kissimmee River
Valley region for public use and recreation. Learn about the Kissim-
mee River Restoration Project and recreational opportunities avail-
able for you on SFWMD land. If you have any questions about the
meeting call Jeff McLemore at (800) 250-4200, extension 3022.









S. . - Lightning kills 60 hogs


'".4,.MM











Okeechobee News/Victoria Hannon
Cows deal with the rain
These cows experience the effects of the recent rains more than their human counterparts.


Farmers relieved after

heavy rains save crops


By Bruce Schreiner
Associated Press Writer
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) _ For
western Kentucky grain farmer
Bill Clift, last week's heavy rains
came just in time for his drought-
stressed corn crop.
"We were a week or maybe
10 days at the most away from
a complete disaster," Clift said
Monday. "Prospects look a lot
better now that it's rained."
Clift's parched fields in
Caldwell, Crittenden and Lyon
counties got about 2 inches of
rain, breaking a dry spell that
settled in in May.
Farmers elsewhere in Ken-
tucky also benefited from rains
that could prop up yields in the
autumn and possibly rejuvenate
stagnant pastureland and hay
fields to feed hungry cattle.
Rainfall across Kentucky was
normal or above normal last
week, said.Tom Priddy, a Univer-
sity of Kentucky extension agri-
cultural meteorologist.
It was a welcome reprieve for
farmers contending with a chal-
lenging growing year featuring
a late spring freeze followed by
prolonged drought.
"For agriculture, it was a huge
boost, very timely," Priddy said
of the rains.
Despite the precipitation, rain-
fall levels remain well below nor-


mal, and the eastern half of Ken-
tucky remains in severe drought.
Still, last week's rains pulled
western Kentucky out of a severe
drought and into the moderate
category, Priddy said.
Sixty percent of the corn crop
was rated either good or excel-
lent in the latest weekly report
issued Monday by the National
Agricultural Statistics Service's
Kentucky field office. The previ-
ous week, 49 percent of the corn
crop was rated good or excel-
lent.
The latest report said 61 per-
cent of the soybean crop was in
good or excellent shape, up from
50 percent in the two catego-
ries a week earlier. Also, slightly
more tobacco -- a more drought-
resistant crop -- was considered
in good or excellent condition in
the latest report.
Until last week, Clift worried
his 1,500 acres of corn would
produce yields of 50 bushels per
acre or less. Some of his crop
might have died if it had stayed
dry for another week, he said.
Last year, he had his best corn
yields ever -- about 180 bushels
an acre.
Now, he estimated that his
latest corn crop might result in
yields of 120 to 130 bushels per
acre, though more rain is needed
- as his crop goes through cru-


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FARMERSBURG, Iowa (AP) -
- A lightning strike knocked out a
generator and power to a confine-
ment building, killing 60 hogs, of-
ficials with the Iowa Department
of Natural Resources said.
Kevin Baskins, an agency
spokesman, said a storm late


Tuesday night or early Wednes-
day morning knocked out power
to the building, cutting off air cir-
culation and causing the hogs to
suffocate.
The confinement is owned by
Clark Wikner of Farmersburg, in
northeast Iowa's Clayton County.


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Big Bird
This wood stork was seen perched on a railing overlook-
ing the situation at Seminole Cove. These birds can have a
wingspread of up to five and a half feet.


cial development stages -- "to
max out the yield that we have
left."
Clift said he'll need everything
he can get out of his crops to
keep ahead of high production
costs, which are due largely to
the high prices of fuel and fertiliz-
er. Also, he had to replant about
a third of his corn that was killed
by the late-spring freeze.
In Shelby County, just east of
Louisville, rainfall amounts last
week ranged from an inch to 3


inches, said county agricultural
extension agent Brittany Edelson.
Some of the drier areas received
less precipitation, she said.
The rains will be enough to
stave off dismal corn yields of 70
to 80 bushels an acre, Edelson
said. She predicted, however,
that yields will likely still be well
off the 140- to 150-bushel county
average. The amount of rainfall in
the next couple of weeks will go
far in determining the outcome
of the corn crop, she said.


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Okeechobee News/Lorna Jablonski

Trash mounts
Mountains of trash were hauled from the banks of the Kis-
simmee River Saturday by volunteers from the community.
In 2000, this event brought in over 30,000 lbs. of garbage.


Okeechobee News/ Lorna Jablonski

Cold drinks for cleanup crew
Volunteers from the Taylor Creek Bass Club and the Big
"0" Teen Anglers, Inc. were busy Saturday morning at
Okee-Tantie Campground preparing ice chests full of cold
drinks for the 80-100 volunteers who turned out to help
with "Lake Cleanup Day".


Options for paying for college


(ARA) - Do you have a son
or daughter heading for college
this fall? Along with the requisite
cell phone, CD/DVD player and
'wardrobe, are they prepared for
the costs and financing decisions
when heading off to one of more
than 4,200 colleges and universi-
ties in the United States?
As reported by the U.S. Census,
more than 17.6 million students
were enrolled in the nation's col-
leges and universities last fall. So
you're not alone in making some
tough financial decisions.
During the 2005-2006 academ-
ic year, The College Board reports
that the estimated average annual
cost of attendance was $31,916
at a four-year private college,
$15,566 at a four-year public col-
lege and $11,692 at a two-year
college. As the saying goes, pay-
ing for college is like buying a
car every year -- the decision is
whether it's new or used.
Every year, the federal govern-
ment makes more than $81 bil-
lion available to help 10 million
families and students finance a
postsecondary education at one.
of the more than 6,200 colleges,
universities and trade schools that
participate in the programs au-
thorized by the U.S. government.
As noted by these statistics,
paying for their education and
managing spending are.critical to


a student's success in school.
Scholarships and


Web site also features a power-
ful scholarship search engine that
contains 1.68 million scholarships


work study program and awards wort h$b7. 6 million.
The Federal Work Study pro-
To find scholarship oppor- gram gives students the opportu-
tunities, start your search early nity to earn money for school and
-- December or January for the gain valuable work experience.
next school year -- and utilize the It's available to both undergradu-
resources around you. Begin with ate and graduate students with
your high school guidance coun- financial need. The amount you
selor for a list of possible resourc- can earn depends on several fac-
es. Next, check with the college tors: need, other aid received and
financial aid office. Most state and availability of school funds.
many colleges offer scholarships.
Think small -- competition can be Student loans --
tough for large awards. Smaller
awards ($1,000 and less) typically covering the big costs
have less competition and are Student loans are some of the
easier to obtain. Finally, the Inter- most commonly used financial
net and organization Web sites tools. Student loans are funds bor-
are excellent places to search. Re- rowed from a financial institution
member, this information should or federal or state government.
always be free. Education loans must be repaid.
For example, at www.usbank. There are at least three types of
com/studentbanking, you can ap- education loans.
ply to be one of 30 high school A Federal Perkins Loan is a fed-
seniors to receive a $1,000 U.S. eral loan program administered
Bank Internet Scholarship. Over by colleges. It's available to both
the past 11 years, U.S. Bank has undergraduate and graduate stu-
awarded more than $290,000 dents and is based on need and
in scholarship funding for this the- availability of government
program. Scholarship award re- funds. The annual interest rate is
cipients are selected through a 5 percent. Repayment begins nine
random drawing process. You months after the student leaves
must be planning to attend an ac- school or is less than a half-time
credited two- or four-year college student.
full time next fall. The U.S. Bank Federal Stafford (student)


Loans and Federal PLUS (par-
ent) Loans are available through
financial institutions, such as U.S.
'Bank, that participate in the FFEL
program or through the federal
government in the direct loan pro-
gram. Fixed rates are 6.8 percent
for Stafford loans and 8.5 percent
for PLUS loans.
Financial institution (or "sup-
plemental") loans are for students
(or their parents) who attend par-
ticipating colleges and graduate
schools. They are not based on
need. As you determine the best
way to finance your education, re-
member to consider the full range
of student financial aid options
available to you. Supplemental
loans are often used to supple-
ment federal student loans when
they are not sufficient to cover the
full cost of education. U.S. Bank
offers a number of supplemental
loans where students can borrow
up to the entire annual cost of at-
tendance, minus other financial
aid received, at competitive inter-
est rates.
Information on U.S. Bank stu-
dent loans can be found on the
Web at www.usbank.com/stu-
dentloans or by phone at (800)
242-1200. Even if you think you
won't qualify for college finan-
cial aid, try anyway. You might be
pleasantly surprised .,


Martyred attitudes are hard to break


We come from a very long line
of martyrs. This is a bad habit this
is hard for us to kick. Even when
we think we have let go of our
martyred attitudes they have a
way to reaching up and biting us.
This can cause a whole new set of
problems if we are not careful.
We don't have to be the mar-
tyr any longer. I know this seems
really strange, because we some-
times don't even know it when
we do this. We have always put
everyone in our homes first; be-
lieve it or not this comes naturally
to us. Here is how we can tell if
we have let go of our martyrdom;
when you make the choice to al-
low someone to put their needs in
front of yours and we get in a bad
mood over it. We have choices in
everything and this includes being
pouty and short with our family.
Sometimes what we are feel-
ing is not just martyrdom; it can
be anger at ourselves for not step-
ping up and saying what we really
want. Since we don't realize that it
is anger; we can lash out at those
around us. This is when we have
a tendency to transfer the anger
from ourselves to others. I want us
to look at. why we are mad in the
first place.
What are you really getting
upset over. We say it is because
we are always last, but the truth
may be that our perfectionism has
reared its ugly head once again.
We don't like making mistakes
that we should have thought of in
the first place. Then the whole day
begins to fall apart in our mind.
We had everything planned then
the plans got changed for what
ever reason. We have a hard time
converting to plan B. This is all be-
cause we did not put our needs
into the equation. We are always
putting everyone else first. Let's
face it; we are the event coordina-
tor for our family. We have been
juggling schedules for as long as
we can remember.
Now I want you to look at this
from your family' prospective.
They love you! They want-you to
be happy, but they cannot read
your mind. If you don't tell them
and share your burdens with them
how are they going to know that
you feel like you are always last. A
few days ago there was an essay
about being a pleaser. When are
we going to wake up and realize
that when you please everyone
around you but you then everyone
suffers! You know what we always
say, "If momma ain't happy; ain't
nobody happy. Your family wants
you to be happy! They are willing


I-
The
Flylady -, ,

by Marla
Cilley


to do what ever it takes to make
you feel loved, but you have to
let them love you! When you are
upset and say you are feeling like
you always come last then that
hurts their feelings. Especially
when you say it to them in, anger
or with that martyred attitude that
we can throw around. I know they
may be your feelings and shar-
ing them is good; but I want you
to realize you are feeling this way
and take the necessary babysteps
to stop this from becoming a full
blown confrontation. They have
you up on a pedestal for all you do


for them; they are willing to help,
but you have to say it. This is why
it is important for us to take a few
minutes to take care of ourselves.
Your family does not know your
sacrifices unless you tell them.
Life is one plan B after another.
Our routines give us the founda-
tion to help us adjust. We are also
very creative people and when we
don't use our routines and under-
stand how they may have to adjust,
then we feel like we have lost con-
trol. We don't always have to be in
control; our perfectionism puts us
in this place of always needing to
be the one in charge. If we don't
have a routine then we don't really
know what our own needs are;
do we? This is why we leave our
needs out the equation. We are so
used to being selfless that we have
forgotten about ourselves.
I will never forget when I left my
son's father. The first words out of
his mouth were, "but I'm happy."
Of course he was because I made


Same Family * Same


sure of it to keep him from blow-
ing up over the least little thing.
Don't fall into the trap of being the
pleaser. Because in the long run;
you are the one that is going to feel
hurt even when it is your choice.
It is up to you to tell your family
what you need. They cannot read
minds. This cannot be done with
the martyred attitude either. You
don't have to do it all; even though
you feel more in control when you
do. Reach out and allow your fam-
ily to reach back with a hug.
Martyred Attitudes Keep us
from FLYing!
For more help getting rid of your
CHAOS; check out her website and
join her free mentoring group at
www.FlyLady.net or her book,
"Sink Reflections," published by
Bantam and her New York Times
Best Selling book, "Body Clutter,"
published by Fireside. Copyright
2007: Maria Cilley; Used by per-
mission in this publication.-


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Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007 7


Is your heart beat irregular?


(ARA) - Do you get an occa-
sional fluttering in your chest, or
sometimes experience a racing
heart beat or slow heart beat that
comes on suddenly then goes
away just as fast as it came? For
most people, these occasional, ir-
regular heart beats are common
and harmless especially if your
heart is otherwise normal. How-
ever when these irregular heart
beats (or heart rhythms) are com-
bined with a diagnosis of heart fail-
ure, they can be serious and if left
untreated can make heart failure


worse.
If you've been experiencing
these symptoms with some regu-
larity, make an appointment with
a doctor who will check to see if
you're suffering from heart failure,
a condition in which the heart
doesn't pump blood through the
body as well as it should.
Diagnosing Heart
Rhythm Problems
The first thing your doctor will
do is order an electrocardiogram
(ECG) which records the electrical


activity in your heart. ECG adhe-
sive patches (electrodes) will be
placed on your chest, arms and
legs. The patches are attached to
wires and connected to a machine
that records the electrical activity
in your heart on graph paper.
If no explanation for your heart
rhythm irregularities turn up on
the ECG, your doctor may ask you
to wear a Holter Monitor, a small
portable device used to make a
tape recording of your heart beats
over a longer period of time. Pa-
tients typically wear the device for


24 to 48 hours and keep a diary of
their symptoms. After the test is
done, the tape is sent to the lab for
analysis and an explanation for the
heart beat irregularities may be-
come apparent. Most importantly,
expect to have pictures of your
heart made, especially an echocar-
diogram or 'sono' of your heart. If
your heart function is otherwise
normal, nothing else may be re-
quired but if weakened or abnor-
mal heart function is noted, there
may be a need to do more testing
and consider certain therapies.


Eyestrain and headaches at work?


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Easy tips for relief

(ARA) - Eyestrain is a common
occurrence. A typical workday for
many of us involves, working long
hours on a computer in a brightly
lit office building. As the day pro-
gresses, your eyes begin to suffer.
"Eyestrain is a condition that
much of society experiences on
a day-to-day basis," says Aurelia
Koby, president and cofounder
of IMAK, a company dedicated to
healthy living through orthopedic
and ergonomic products. "Work
environments can be harsh on
the eyes. Recognizing the prob-
lem and implementing some sim-
ple therapeutic techniques can
provide relief."


Eyestrain can be identified by
several key signs and symptoms:
* Sore or tired eyes
* Itching or burning sensations
in the eyes
* Sensitivity to light
* Dry or watery eyes
* Headaches
* Sore neck muscles
* Difficulty focusing
There are some simple steps
you can take to minimize eye-
strain and keep your visual sys-
tem balanced while at work.
Computer
Position your computer slight-
ly below eye level. This will help
minimize strain on the eyes and
the neck. If your job requires


you to type from copy, position
the text at the same level as the
screen.
Adjust the screen brightness
so it is most comfortable for you.
If you suffer from heavy eyestrain,
remember that some computer
programs allow you to switch to
colors that are less intense than
the common black on white pro-
gramming. Choose a softer back-
ground color or even switch so
that you have a black background
with white text and figures.
Light
Examine the lighting in your
office space. Overhead lights can
be harsh and often are brighter
than necessary. Consider turning


some of the lights off for a more
comfortable lighting situation.
Another good idea is to have
an adjustable shaded lamp for
use in the office. Aim it where you
operate your computer, but make
sure it doesn't cause a reflection
on the screen. Eliminate glare by
tilting the computer or getting an
anti-reflective screen.
Rest
Throughout the day, give your
eyes a chance to rest. Take several
minutes every hour to look away
from the computer and readjust.
Consider standing up and walking
around. Blink often to refresh the
eyes and use artificial tear drops if
necessary.


Drink up! Facts about your favorite beverages


(ARA) - It's a simple fact. As
the weather heats up, your thirst
for fun, refreshing drinks increas-
es. We all know it's important to
stay hydrated, especially when
we're outside working or enjoy-
ing ourselves under the hot sun.
But with so many choices and so
much news swirling around about
what's safe and what's healthy,
choosing the right beverages for
you and your family's lifestyle can
seem complicated.
"There's a lot of inaccurate
information out there about bev-
erages and the role they play in
overall health and well being,"
says registered dietician and nu-
trition-culinary expert Kim Ga-
leaz. 'It's important for people to
'have the facts so they can make
informed choices."
Here are five common bev-
erage myths that you may have
heard. Quench your thirst for
knowledge and you'll find that
you have even more healthy op-
tions for refreshment and enjoy-
ment.
1. MYTH: Only water hydrates.
Contrary to popular belief, water
isn't the only beverage that hy-
drates. In fact, most beverages,
including soft drinks, tea, coffee,
sports drinks and milk are at least
85 percent water. And that Diet
Coke you enjoy in the afternoon?
It's more than 99 percent water!
Choose beverages that you
enjoy. Several studies show that
children and adults consume
about 45 to 50 percent more liq-
uid when it's flavored versus plain
water.
2. MYTH: Caffeine dehydrates.
While caffeine can have a mild,
short-term diuretic effect in in-
dividuals who don't normally
consume caffeine, studies have
shown that this is not the case for
people who regularly consume
caffeine. In fact, a report on water
needs released in 2004 by the In-
stitute of Medicine found that all
beverages, including those with
caffeine, contribute to hydration
needs.
Enjoy your morning coffee.
Moderate caffeine consumption


for adults -- the amount contained
in 2 to 3 cups of coffee or 5 to 6
cans of caffeinated soft drinks -
- has not been associated with
adverse health effects or dehydra-
tion.
3. MYTH: Low-calorie and no-
calorie sweeteners aren't safe.
According to taste researchers,
sweetness is one of our first flavor
preferences, yet some people be-
lieve the secret to losing weight is
eliminating sweetness from their
diets. That's not necessary. Low-
calorie and no-calorie sweeteners
have been thoroughly tested and
used throughout the world for
many years, and are approved by
the FDA.
Reduce your caloric intake
without feeling deprived by drink-
ing light, low-calorie and no-calo-
rie versions of your favorite bever-
ages. -
4. MYTH: Carbonated soft
drinks cause tooth decay. While
all common sugars, including


those in bread, cereal, juice and
soft drinks, can contribute to the
development of cavities if they
stay in contact with the teeth,
your teeth are exposed to a bev-
erage for only a short amount of
time. Also, the saliva that con-
stantly bathes the teeth prevents
erosion from acidic drinks like
orange juice and soft drinks. Due
to improved dental hygiene, tooth
decay has declined significantly
over the last 20 years, even as
soft drink consumption has in-
creased.
Bite back. Visit your dentist
regularly and follow recommen-
dations for daily dental hygiene.
The widespread use of fluoride
in drinking water, toothpaste and
mouthwash has greatly improved
dental health, making teeth more
resistant to acid attack from
plaque bacteria.
5. MYTH: All adults must drink
8 cups of water a day for good
health. While there is no scientific


evidence to support this long-held
belief, many people still refer to
this as the standard. The Institute
of Medicine estimates that Ameri-
cans get an average of 80 percent
of their daily fluids from water
and other beverages and about
20 percent is provided by foods.
Larger people require more fluids.
The 1OM recommends 13 cups of
fluids daily for adult males and 9
cups for adult females.
Get the facts. The specific
amount of fluid you need each
day depends on many factors,
including your gender, age and
weight, your environment, your
health, and your activity level.
One way to determine your needs
is by using a hydration calculator
like the one available at www.
makeeverydropcount.com. Enter
some simple information and
you'll receive all the information
you need to quench your thirst
this summer.


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Okeechobee News/Pete Gawda

Record low lake level
What looks like a grassy field was once an area covered with enough water to float boats up to these docks. The record
low level of Lake Okeechobee has left these docks completely landlocked.



West sizzles, little relief ahead from heat wave


By Matt Gouras
Associated Press Writer
HELENA, Mont. (AP) -- If a re-
cord-breaking heat wave doesn't
lift soon, cattle rancher Sharon
McDonald may see her hay crop
turn to dust.
Oppressive temperatures
eased a bit Friday in some parts of
the West, but McDonald's central
Montana ranch baked under tri-
ple-digit heat. Forecasters report-
ed little relief in the days ahead,
saying the weather system that
brought the high temperatures
could last well into next week.
In Montana, where cattle out-
number residents by more than 2
to 1, livestock and people sought
shade and drought-weary farmers
watched for damage to grain.
"We are trying to get our hay
up before it disintegrates," said
McDonald, a rancher near Mel-
ville. "It just gets crispy and just
falls apart."
Extreme heat plagued much
of Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Oregon
and Washington state.
+ Air conditioners -- and even
swamp coolers -- were predict-
ably hot sellers at the hardware
store.
"I'm telling you, it has been
nuts," said Dennis VanDyke, a
manager at Power Townsend in
Helena. "The only thing I am get-
ting calls for is air conditioners."
VanDyke said some people
prefer sw rip coolers, which use
a fan and the condensation of wa-
ter to cool the air, over the more
power-hungry air conditioning
units.
"They are being bought faster
than we can put them on the


By Paul J. Weber
Associated Press Writer
DALLAS (AP) -- The sky was
mercifully clear over much of Tex-
as on Saturday after three weeks
of drenching rain, as search teams
combed the swollen Trinity River
for a missing rafter.
The death toll from storms
that have battered Texas since last
month climbed to 15 with the re-
covery of two other flood victims
elsewhere in the state.
The 26-year-olfd missing man
was on a rubber raft that capsized
Friday on the Trinity.
"We don't know if he's still
trapped in that low-head dam or
whether he went downstream,"
Fort Worth fire department
spokesman Kent Worley said.
A companion had to swim
about 300 yards against the swift
current to safety, but Worley said
that man never saw his friend af-
ter their raft flipped. Neither men
wore a life jacket.
Elsewhere across the region,
rivers in Oklahoma and Kansas
have been receding, revealing
millions of dollars in damage to


shelves," he said.
In Montana, temperatures
above 100 degrees are usually not
seen until August. The normal July
high in Helena is 83 degrees -- not
the high 90s seen Friday. Triple-
digit records were set or tied in
several Montana cities, including
Great Falls and Billings at 104 de-
grees each. The mercury reached
105 in the north-central Montana
town of Havre and at the Gallatin
Field Airport near Bozeman.
In Utah, high school teacher
Lois Wolking said she was escap-
ing the summer heat by head-
ing indoors. Temperatures were
down a few degrees in Salt Lake
City on Friday, but still hovered
around 100.
'A swamp cooler, Netflix and
reading is how we're surviving,"
the 58-year-old East High teacher
said.
Boise, Idaho reached 105 de-
grees Friday, and some found it
too hot to play at a public water
fountain.
"We'll probably leave soon.
Two or three o'clock is about my
limit before I want to get in some
air conditioning," mother Monica
Player.said as children ran through
jets of water.
Temperatures were expected
to ease slightly in Southern Califor-
nia. Phoenix saw a modest drop,
a somewhat cooler 112 degrees
compared to 115 on Thursday.
With the approach of Arizona's
summer rainy season, humidity
levels have started climbing along
with power demand.
Heat remained an issue along
.the border. The bodies of six
suspected illegal immigrants


thousands of homes and busi-
nesses, besides the 1,000 or so
damaged in Texas. Authorities
found a man believed to be the
flood's first fatality in Kansas.
On Saturday, President Bush
issued a federal disaster declara-
tion for Oklahoma, freeing federal
funds to aid two counties ravaged
by the flooding.
Along the Oklahoma-Texas
state line, Lake Texoma was
about an inch below the top of
a 640-foot-high concrete spillway
Saturday, with waves lapping over
the top, the Army Corps of Engi-
neers said. The corps has been
pumping an estimated 27,000 cu-
bic feet of water per second into
the Red River to help steady the
lake's level.
The lake, with a normal level
of 619 feet, is expected to crest
about 6 inches higher than the
spillway Monday.
There was only a 20 to 30 per-
cent chance of storms in Okla-
homa on Saturday and Sunday,
forecaster Erin Maxwell said early
Saturday.
"The activity over the weekend


have been found since Monday
in southern Arizona deserts, all
likely victims of heat illness while
trying to walk into the U.S. from
Mexico. The toll, while high, is
not unusual during hot spells in
the region.
In eastern Oregon, which set
15 record highs on Thursday,
temperatures largely dropped to
the high 90s. In the center part
of the state, population growth
and a burgeoning demand for air
conditioning meant a rise in elec-
tricity demand. The Bonneville
Power Administration said it' was
worried fires could damage trans-
mission lines and cause outages.
Officials said the fire season
could turn fearsome following
the dry heat.
"It's an early start and a hot
start," said National Weather Ser-
vice meteorologist Chris Velver in
Great Falls.
The National Forest Service
reported at least 16 fires over 500
acres in size burning throughout
the West, including three new
ones that sparked Thursday.
The agency said fire danger
was most extreme in Arizona,
California, Oregon and Utah _ al-
though a "red flag" warning was
posted for much of the West.
In Wyoming's Grand Teton
National Park, rangers used a
helicopter Thursday evening to
rescue a backcountry hiker after
he suffered symptoms of heat
exhaustion and acute mountain
sickness.
In California, heat was mostly
confined to inland regions, with
triple-digit readings in the Sacra-
mento and San Joaquin valleys.


probably wouldn't impact Lake
Texoma levels too dramatically,
but there's another low pressure
system coming next week," Max-
well said. "That's just the way the
weather pattern has been this
year."
In South Texas, the body of a
6-year-old boy swept away by the
swollen Brazos River was found
Friday on a beach about 15 miles
from where he was washed into
the Gulf of Mexico, said Freeport
Police Chief Jeff Pynes.
The boy was at a family gath-
ering on Bryan Beach, where the
Brazos River feeds into the Gulf of
Mexico about 60 miles south of
Houston, when members of the
group were swept away on the
river, Pynes said. The boy's father
and another relative were rescued
clinging to trees Tuesday.
The Brazos was carrying every-
thing from cars to refrigerators to
trees, and the current was strong
it was pushing 20 miles out into
the Gulf on Friday, officials said.
The river is "in really bad shape
and very, very dangerous," Pynes
said.


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The mercury topped 100 in the
Woodland Hills area of Los Ange-
les' San Fernando Valley and in
the high desert cities of Lancaster
and Palmdale, while out east by
the Colorado River, the little city
of Needles sweltered in 115-de-
gree heat.
But temperatures in most of
Los Angeles and the populous
Southern California coastal zone
were in the 70s and low 80s, while
San Francisco and Monterey Bay
cities were even cooler.
In Montana, temperatures
could start to fall by Saturday,
forecasters said.
But the heat will hover over
most of the far West through at
least the end of next week, said
Kelly Redmond, a regional clima-
tologist for the National Weather
Service. He said it could migrate
further inland and cover more of
the West, including Colorado, as
the week goes on.
"It looks like it is going to stay
place for a good long while," he
said.
Editor's note: Associated Press writ-
ers Tim Fought in Portland, Ore.;
Arthur H. Rotstein in Tucson, Ariz.;
and Rebecca Boone in Boise, Idaho,
contributed to this report.


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Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007 9


Jobless rate holds at low 4.5 percent im
By Jeannine Aversa 190,000 for May. It was sufficient as much as they like. hasn't been that significant over- g 1 nl
to hold the unemployment rate at Federal Reserve Chairman Ben all," said Brian Bethune, econo-
AP Economics Writer 14.5 percent, where it has stood for Bernanke and his colleagues keep mist at Global Insight. "Business-
three months. a close eye on wages for any signs es' appetite to hire is generally still 1 --
WASHINGTON (AP)0 Emplo- Nsewa hiringini education, that they might generate inflation pretty good taloba."d ommui Links ndvidu
ers added 132,000 jobspaychecks health care, food services and Out-of-control inflation shrinks Of the 132,000 total jobs add- Community Links. Individual Voices. P0---- -


grew solidly and the unemploy-
ment rate stayed at a low 4.5
percent in June, fresh evidence
that the once listless economy is
regaining energy.
The new snapshot of condi-
tions across the country, released
by the Labor Department on
Friday, showed that companies
have a respectable -- albeit not
ravenous -- appetite to hire and
that there are opportunities for
job seekers willing to pursue the
hunt.
For the national economy, the
modest pace of hiring is consis-
tent with business activity that is
picking up speed -- but not too
much -- and suggests consumers
will have the financial wherewith-
al to withstand the sting of high
gasoline prices. All that bodes
well for the country's economic
health.
"It is beginning to look as if
the early year economic malaise
was really just the pause that
refreshed," said Joel Naroff of
Naroff Economic Advisors. "Job
growth in June was decent but
nothing spectacular."
The tally of 132,000 new
jobs was lower than the robust


government helped drive overall
job growth. Construction com-
panies also expanded employ-
ment even as they coped with
fallout from the housing slump.
Those gains swamped job cuts in
manufacturing, retailing, real es-
tate, legal services, banking and
elsewhere.
Employment gains for April
and May turned out to be stron-
ger, a development that also re-
inforced economists' belief that
the, economy rebounded in the
second quarter. Employers added
75,000 more jobs in those two
months combined than the gov-
ernment estimated a month ago.
Workers saw modest wage
gains in June.
Average hourly earning rose
to $17.38, a 0.3 percent increase
from May. Over the past 12
months, wages grew by 3.9 per-
cent.
Wage growth supports con-
sumer spending, a major ingredi-
ent in healthy overall economic
activity. Wage growth is probably
outpacing inflation, economists
estimate. Still, workers pinched
by high gasoline prices may not
feel their paychecks are growing


paychecks, erodes purchasing
power and eats into the value of
investments.
The Federal Reserve last week
noted that there have been im-
provements on some inflation
readings but made clear that it
is not letting down its guard. The
biggest danger to the economy is
if inflation doesn't recede as an-
ticipated, the Fed said.
Fed policy-makers have
enough faith in their inflation
forecast, though, that they left a
key interest rate last week at 5.25
percent, where it has been for a
year. Economists believe rates
could stay where they are for the
rest of this year.
Companies have continued to
hire at a decent pace even as the
economy has endured a period of
sluggishness. But the strain of the
ailing housing market and prob-
lems in the automotive industries
have clearly been felt.
In the first half of the year,
job growth averaged 145,000 a
month. That was weaker than the
average monthly gain of 189,000
for 2006.
"There has been a slight scale-
back in the pace of hiring but it


ed in June, 40,000 came from
the government. The remaining
92,000 were from private employ-
ers.
Economic growth nearly
stalled in the first three months of
this year, with business expansion
slumping to a pace of just 0.7 per-
cent, the worst in more than four
years. The ailing housing market
was a main factor.
The economy rebounded in
the April-to-June quarter, expand-
ing at a pace of around 3 percent
or better according to some pro-
jections. The government's es-
timate will be released later this
month.
Across the country, the length
of job hunts was little changed.
The average time the 6.9 mil-
lion unemployed people spent in
their job searches was 16.8 weeks
in June, up slightly from 16.7 in
May.
"This is a time to be looking to
join the job market and be part of
the job market," Commerce Sec-
retary Carlos Gutierrez said in an
interview. "This suggests this is a
very good time for our economy
and for people to take full advan-
tage of it."


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By Randolph E. Schmid
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP)--Could
mail one day go the way of many
pizza chains, where customers
can pick it up or pay extra for
home delivery?
Will the mail still arrive six
days a week? Will the govern-
ment still be involved?
The Postal Service is facing
big questions as it struggles to
cope with rising costs and major
changes in the way people com-
municate.
Nations' nail systems vary.
England's Royal Mail, for ex-
ample, is a government-owned
business, while Germany's
Deutsche Post is a publicly trad-
ed stock company. All are much
smaller operations than the U.S.
Postal Service, which handles
more than 40 percent of the
world's mail.
Few doubt there will be ad-
justrrents in the U.S., but what
those will be remains to be
seen
Ir 1993, Postmaster General
Mar-in Runyon drew a barrage
of criticism for suggesting mail
delivery might be cut to four
days a week.
'hat was a bombshell then,
bu it's something postal experts
sai may still be a possibility.
"If you have hard copy deliv-
erf, you might have it six days a
w ek, or three days a week or
oie day a week," William Bur-
ris, president of the American
PRstal Workers Union, said in an
interview.
And, he added, it may not
yven be delivered; the recipient
nay have to go retrieve it.
Already, hiring private de-
livery contractors is an issue,
prompting informational picket-
ing by letter carriers in Florida
to protest contracting out new
routes in developing areas.
"I think within the next six
to eight months the Congress
of the United States is going to
decide an issue that's going to
determine whether or not we
have a reliable, efficient postal
service in the future," said Wil-
liam H. Young, president of the
National Association of Letter
Carriers.
"What I'm referring to is the


decision that's been made at the
highest levels of the Postal Ser-
vice to give all the new growth,
and the new deliveries that are
springing up, to private contrac-
tors," he said.
But such changes may be
necessary, says Gene Del Polito,
president of the American As-
sociation for Postal Commerce,
which represents advertising
mailers.
If the Postal Service is to sur-
vive, it will to have to consider
outsourcing more of its activi-
ties, he said.
It's conceivable, Del Polito
said, "that a postal system in
the future could evolve into
something which I would call
the master contractor, where it
maintains its government iden-
tity by the government being
the master contractor but that it
puts things out competitively on
bid...."
"At the end of the day, what
you need is a universal mail de-
livery system, you don't need
a universal mail delivery enter-
prise," Del Polito said.
Burrus points out that "the
world is changing dramatically
in terms of instant communi-
cations. We as a species have
discovered the ability to have
instant communications. That's
not consistent with hard copy.
1 would suspect that over time
hard copy will play less and less
of a role in our communica-
tions."
Not so sure is Rep. John
McHugh, R-N.Y., who believes
hard copy will always have a
place in the mainstream.
"Clearly, the way Americans
communicate on a day-by-day
basis is changing," he said, cit-
ing computers and cell phones.
But there will still be core re-
quirements such as hard copy
that the post office will be need-
ed for, said McHugh, a longtime
congressional leader on postal
issues.
Tony Conway, a longtime
postal manager who now heads
the Alliance of Nonprofit Mail-
ers, said he expects the Postal
Service to "evolve, probably into
more of a focus on the strength
of the organization, which is
its delivery network. That's the


heart and soul of the organiza-
tion, no current private carrier
can compete with it."
But, he added, "it may or
may not be a government orga-
nization."
"The $64,000 question is how
to keep the delivery network af-
fordable," Conway said, noting
the decline of first-class mail.
The only significant growth
area is standard mail, which is
primarily advertising, he said,
and as the cost of postage rises,
"at what point do you start los-
ing that volume growth."
"The days of reckoning are
coming sooner than people
probably now appreciate," Con-
way said. The post office is add-
ing 2 million new delivery points
every year, raising costs on a
declining revenue base. "That's
not a pretty financial model."
And both postal service and
mailers fret about "do not mail"
bills proposed in several state
legislatures. Designed to mimic
the "do not call" rules, the bills
would allow people to opt out
of receiving what many call
"junk mail."
Since that mail, advertising
and solicitations, is the main
postal growth area, passage
of such bills would strike a fi-
nancial blow at the post office,
perhaps forcing it to raise rates
again.
That worries Del Polito.
"We're already seeing signs
that we're at the point now
where people are seriously
measuring the effectiveness of
mail against alternative mecha-
nisms, such as e-mailing or re-
tailing or telemarketing to your
known customer base, shifting
to direct response TV or any of
the other channels that previ-
ously one would have looked
at and said, 'God, these are ex-
pensive venues.' Now, all of a
sudden, they're looking at them
and they're saying, 'Well, the
cost of those venues are coming
down but the cost of mail is go-
ing up.'"
That means there are a lot of
unknowns about what the sys-
tem will look like in the future,
he said.
"Sooner or later we're prob-
ably going to have to make a de-


cision as a nation as to whether
or not the core services that are
provided for free are going to be
done the way that they are to-
day, or whether they're going to
be offered in a more restricted
capacity and in a more cost ef-
ficient capacity," he said.
For example, he suggested
the possibility of requiring cen-
tralized delivery and allowing
the consumer pay something
extra to get actual delivery ser-
vice to the door.
"Now, when you do that, that
means you must also give the
consumer the opportunity to say
what I want to get and what I
don't want to get, and that could
change the nature of the postal
system," Del Polito said.
Burrus noted that last year's
postal reform legislation set up
a system to pay down the post
offices' $70 billion to $80 billion
unfunded health care liability.
Once that is done, he said he
expects pressure for privatiza-
tion to increase, perhaps with
some legislators calling for lim-
ited or partial privatization.
American society guarantees
delivery of messages to people
wherever they live, but if pri-
vate companies are allowed to
skim off the easiest, least costly
routes, the government cannot
subsidize delivery only to the
expensive places to reach, he
said.
Dan Blair, chairman of the
Postal Regulatory Commission,
agrees that there will be chang-
es.
"It certainly will be different
from the post office we know
today. If you look at the post of-
fice of 50 years ago, it was sig-
nificantly different from the one
we have today, so it will evolve
just like other government insti-
tutions."
"It will be interesting to see
what it will look like, even in
10 years," he added. "We don't
know where it's going to end
up, but people will always need
hard copy delivery."
Postmaster General John
Potter has repeatedly said he is
"bullish" on the mail, but the
post office declined to make
him available for an interview
on the future of the service.


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THE ULTIMATE COMMUNITY WEBSTTE


- I )
I"
I.







10 Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007


Dear Abby



Plans to move spark melodrama


*DEAR ABBY: My husband,
"Gregg," and I have been married
seven years. We have two chil-
dren. Gregg was recently laid off,
and after doing some research, we
decided we'd like to move to Tex-
as where my brother-in-law and
his family live. There is more ca-
reer opportunity for us there, and
we have been actively researching
careers and housing.
The problem is my father and
stepmother are against us moving
even two hours away, let alone
halfway across the country. We
have not told them of our plans
yet, but even a casual mention of
a long-distance move brought my
father to anger and tears for fear
that he won't see his only grand-
children and me. His wife made it
worse, claiming I was "selfish" for
wanting to move away.
Abby, my parents have made
their life choices. They have settled
down and are happy with their
small-town life. How can I get
them to understand that this is
what we need to do without them
making us feel guilty? - Conflict-
ed In South Dakota
DEAR CONFLICTED: As long
as you allow your father and step-
mother to make you feel guilty,
they'll use guilt to influence the
decisions you make. Having a
spouse who has been laid off and
having difficulty finding employ-
ment is a compelling reason to
make a move, particularly if there


are greater opportunities some-
where else.
My advice to you is to make a
list - as long as possible - of the
advantages your children will have
in a larger community, with better
educational and cultural exposure,
family members around their age
they can interact and bond with,
etc. Refer to it when your father
and stepmother react as you know
they will. Let them know they're
welcome to visit as often as they
get lonely for the little ones, then
follow through with your plans.

*DEAR ABBY: My husband
and I have a problem that is per-
plexing both of us.
I'm a bartender and work in
a very upscale restaurant. A girl
who works in my husband's office
keeps insisting that she and my
husband go on a "dinner date" to
my restaurant. She thinks it would
be cute for me to wait on them.
My husband has no interest in
this girl other than professional
and finds it annoying that she con-
stantly pressures him to go on this
"date." It has become a source of
stress on him.
How can we let her know that
this is really "trashy" and it's not
going to happen? (She even of-
fered to buy the dinner!) - Ap-
palled In Astoria, Ore.
DEAR APPALLED: Your hus-
band's co-worker is either com-
pletely lacking in common sense
or she has a geranium in her crani-


um. Continually asking someone
on a "date" - married or not - is
sexual harassment. Your husband
should tell her that fact and ask her
to drop the subject - and if she
doesn't, his employer should be
informed so he/she, or the direc-
tor of human resources, can put a
stop to a possible lawsuit.

A THOUGHT FOR THE DAY:
The object of life is not to be "hap-
py." The object of life is to make
society a better place in which to
live. Every one of us has some-
thing to offer. In the words of G.B.
Stern: "Both optimists and pes-
simists contribute to our society.
The optimist invents the airplane
and the pessimist the parachute."
Editor's note: Dear Abby is
written by Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips, and
was founded by her mother, Pau-
line Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

What teens need to know
about sex, drugs, AIDS and get-
ting along with peers and parents
is in "What Every Teen Should
Know." To order, send a business-
sized, self-addressed envelope,
plus check or money order for $6
(U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby - Teen
Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Mor-
ris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is in-
cluded in the price.)
� 2007 Universal Press Syndicate


At the Movies


The following movies are now showing at the
Brahman Theatres 111.
Movie times for Friday, July 6, through'Thursday,
July 12, are as follows:
Theatre I -"Transformers" (PG-13) Showtimes:
Friday at 7 and 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 2,
4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. only. Monday at 3 and 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and
9 p.m.
Theatre II - "Ratatouille" (PG) Showtimes: Friday
at 7 and 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 2, 4:15, 7 and
9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.


Theatre III - "Evan Almighty" (PG) Showtimes:
Friday at 7 and 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 2,
4:15, 7 and 9 p.m. Monday at 3 and 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
Starting Wednesday, July 11
Harry Potter -- The Order of the Phoenix
Showtimes: Wednesday and Thursday at 2, 4:30,
7 and 9:45 p.m.
Tickets are $5.50 for adults; children 12 and un-
der are $4.50; senior citizens are $4.50 for all mov-
ies; and, matinees are $4.
For information, call (863) 763-7202.


Los Angeles Times Sunday Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis


"REAR WHEELS"
By DAVID
+ SULLIVAN
ACROSS
1 Thames gallery
5 Sparrow player
9 Gobi setting
13 Home of the
Green Wave
19 Epps of "House"
20 Memo leadoff
21 Mug
22 Ready for
shipping
23 Croupier's tool
24 One of the
fliTrn,a']u. Ij
Coens
25 Minuscule pest
26 Display so as to
impress
27 Country divided
in 1993
30 Libertarians they
aren't
31 1956 Moses
portrayer
32 Entry on an
online form
33 Y features
34 Symbol of old
E rti royl,,31ty
35 Car , _..:.,.h "
36 An aardvark has
an elongated
one
38 Blind
component
42 Been introduced
44 Ran (off)
46 Architect of the
Barcelona
basilica La
Sagrada Familia
49 Layered ice
cream treat
51 Chicken
general?
52 Patent seed
53 Hack
54 aone
55 Bk. between
Nehemiah and
Job
57 Discernment
60 Figure follower
62 Alice Town's
island
65 Computer input
67 Offer from Fido
68 B'way hit sign
69 Cylindrical
container
71 Partial shout
72 Circus Circus
and New York-
New York
76 Abdominal
network
80 Calculus
calculations
81 nous
83 Acid
84 Capone
nemesis
87 Animation frame
88 Marine menace


90 Natl. 121 Apple player
S'.. _', ..,j . * 122 Put on a happy
.* r,- - n - ,-. r t1 face
sponsor 123 Pinball taboo
92 Columnar rocks 124 MLK part: Abbr.
.',,,.:].r,, .: 125 Sainiled fifth-
. - �* r century pope
94 Beach Boys #1 126 Items in
hit sconces
98 Closed sac 127 Tofu beans
99 Like a hobby 128 2006 Disney
100 Joy Adamson film, and the
lioness ends of the
101 Easy type of 1- h :i
question ,r :
102 Elite Eight org. puzzle
104 Father of Dada 129 Actress Somrnmer
106 Navel buildup
108 Attached, as DOWN
ribbon 1 "Frankenstein"
110 Only president prop
born in New 2 Floor
Hampshire 3 Comes to bat,
113 Cajun music e.g,
116 New Jersey 4 Raises
borough in 5 Mustard option
which the New 6 1961 space
York Giants play chimp
home games 7 Chopin piece
118 Continental 8 Hastert's
travel pass successor
119 "Tosca" highlight 9 .......score:
120 100 Iranian neonatal
dinars evaluation


Popular orange
soda
Parent's
ultimatum
Terrier of film
Trying to look
taller, informally,
with 'on"
Render
impotent
Cards manager
Have hair
day
Joint point
Palimony
payers
Become active
Weekend
mecca for
Angelonos
Like many tours
setter
Not i'!. ujp .
Ex-NBAor Jerry
who cowrote
"The Memory
Book"
"It's .. !"
High country
Yahoo! rival
Superfund
enforcer: Abbr.
Impressive
combo


47 "Was it you?"'
answer
48 Fuel additive"
50 Magoo's
affliction
51 Craving
56 Atlanta-based
sta.
58 "Diana" singer
59 Series of jagged
peaks
61 Hawaiian priest
63 Pre-release
demand
64 Old Spain
invader
66 Velodromes,
e.g.
70 Coll. entrance
criterion
72 Hidden supply
73 Staggering
74 Vends
75 Hidden
77 ". countrymen.
78 Tr ., . country
79 Power mower
- 115 -i
82 .il=a J.-r,, is
85 I ,-,i .-,r 1 . 1 ,
Ungar
86 Cred, report
itemrn


89 18th-century

91 Short timo off?
93 Flight unit
95 Lager
alternative
96 Most populous
Canadian
province
97 How a snorer
sleeps
98 Saloon
103 "CBS Evening
News" anchor
105 Submit a 1040X
107 More
standoffish
109 Floride and
110 ' . ,
goods
111 Swindler
112 Rock's Van
Halen
113 Liveliness
114 Arizona's
southwestern-
most county
115 Hardly the life of
the party
116 Chow
117 "Love-rock"
musical


ANSWER TO TODAY'S PUZZLE


MET TORIE AN]T ONI|OIGIAUPI D
S P UJMONNI ITS DoDEA A S
| oA | H T A s T D A W ' a T
cASS A O OL P LEX Ts
IIIA S ENiEs RA INL NU S s
HEP M RHON T R AC I F N

EL|A iYESN N|C AA A P
-i A . 7 1 H E 1E .
E U RA IL A R IA R IA L I POD
�M L TI L INT I LNEIT 0 iE
AP EW sA 7/8L/0
7/8/07


Horoscope

By Eugenia Last
*ARIES (March 21-April
19): You will make a little cash
through an investment or some-
thing you sell. A garage sale will
help you rid yourself of clutter but
don't sell something that doesn't
actually belong to you.
*TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Communication, travel and
taking in cultural events that will
open your eyes to different life-
styles should be penciled in. You
may not get along with everyone
but, if you keep your opinions to
yourself, you won't have a prob-
lem.
*GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Take a closer look at the
things that need to be done
around home. Do a little renovat-
ing or decorating. An older rela-
tive will be appreciative if you
include him or her in your plans
today.
*CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't reveal how you feel
or you will hurt someone's feel-
ings or, even worse, end up in
trouble with family, friends or
neighbors. Instead, busy yourself
with projects that will help oth-
ers or improve the look of your
residence.
*LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


You have everyone wondering
what you'll do next -- a few will
be waiting to see if you falter.
Pick and choose your compan-
ions and friends wisely today. A
bad combination of people will
lead to arguments.
*VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Be careful not to upset the
applecart at home and in your
personal life. A secret connection
may not be all that you thought
it was. Look for property or any
chance to make some money
through an investment, winning
or collecting an old debt.
*LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Partnerships will pay off as long
as you pull your weight. A twist
in a personal relationship will
make you think twice about set-
tling down with someone if you
are single or stabilizing your life
with your partner, if you are not.
*SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): A combination of boredom,
desire and much-needed change
will come into play. Money is on
its way. Don't trust someone with
your personal possessions.
*SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You aren't likely to
notice the little things going on
around you. Someone you least
expect will probably take advan-


tage of you if you are overspend-
ing, overdoing or overindulging.
Protect your assets and your
reputation.
*CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You've got everything
figured out today so put your
plans in motion. This is a great
day to talk to someone you want
to plan for the future with. The
more open you are regarding
what you want, the more help
you will get.
*AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You will be confused by
what you hear or see today.
Ask questions if you aren't .sure
where you stand. Clear the air
rather than allowing yourself to
become jealous, upset or to say
something that you may regret
later.
*PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Mix and mingle today.
Someone you meet along the
way will have a lead on a proj-
ect or interest you've been con-
templating. A little will go a long
way, so don't feel that you have
to overspend or overdo to make
an impression.
� 2007 Universal Press Syndi-
cate
More horoscopes at
newszap.com


SUNDAY MORNING JULY 8, 2007
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

a WPTV News (N) (cc) News (N) (cc) Meet the Press (cc) Tennis: Wimbledon -- Men's Final. From Wimbledon, England. (cc)
( WPEC Paid Health Paid IPaid Paid Bus. Rpt. CBS News Sunday Morning (s) Nation Paid IPaid
6 WTCE Dickow John F. Rod Parsley (cc) Ed Young Merritt Franklin David J. Hagin Ed Young Coral Ridge Hour
SWPBF Wall St Our In Touch-Dr Good Morning Paid Paid Matthews This Week Decorat-
@ WFLX Paid Right- Feed Reel Coral Ridge Hour Fox News Sunday Power Pt Paid Paid Vi-
J WTVX Paid Paid Latino Paid Paid |Paid Paid Paid B InTune WHADD Real Life Animals
c WXEL George S. Noddy Big Ditty Sesame Street Signing Crafts WealthTr- Ances- =Boomers Visionar-

AMC Movie Movie: 2 High Anxiety (1977) Movie: **** Young Frankenstein (1974), Peter Boyle Shootout Mad Men
ANIM Animal Miracles (cc) Backyard |Good Who Gets the Dog? K-9 to 5 Breed Ultimate Dog Animals Animals
A&E Paid Paid Biography "Brian Wilson" (cc) Biography Movie: The Hunt for Red October (1990)
BET BET Morning Inspiration Jones Gospel Video Gospel (cc) Meet |Bik
CNN Investigations CNN Sunday Morning Housecall Sunday Morn. Reliable Sources (cc) Late Edition
CRT Paid Paid Paid The Bean Paid Paid Paid |Paid Get Thin Hip Hop Ripped IRiches
DISC Paid Paid Paid Paid J. Osteen Paid Barracudas (cc) Killer Crocs Crocodile Crime (cc)
DISN Doodle- JoJo Wiggles Higgly Einsteins Einsteins Mickey |Mickey Tigger . Handy Sprites Charlie
El Hip Hop Paid Movie: Four Weddings and a Funeral True H'wood Daily 10 Best El News Weekend
ESP2 Fishing Adven- Driven Skies Whitetail |Adven- Outdoors Driven Hot Rod King NHRA |Auto
ESPN SportsCenter (cc) SportsCenter (cc) SportsCenter (cc) SportsCtr Lines Reporters SportsCenter tive) (cc)
EWTN Boundary Letter Chaplet Rosary Sunday Mass Litany Book- Rome Faith Carpenter Holy Rsry
FAM In Touch-Dr Fam. Mat. Fam. Mat. Step-Step Step-Step Full Hse. Full Hse. Boy Boy Grounde- Grounde-
HGTV Paid Paid Ground Yard Yard Land- Land- Land- Curb Curb Secrets Get Sold
HIST History History Heaven History Business Generatn Modern Marvels (cc) D-Day: The Lost Evidence (cc)
LIFE Paid The Bean Frederick Price Hour of Power (cc) Paid Health The Other Mother: Moment
NICK Rocket Phantom Lazy- OddPar- Neutron Neutron Sponge Sponge OddPar- |OddPar- |School jDrake
SCI Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid The Twilight Zone (s) Movie: *** Misery (1990) (James Caan)
TBS (5:00) Movie Movie: Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood (2002) |Movie: *** Father of the Bride (1991) (cc) |Fatherll
TCM Movie: ***/2 That's Entertainmentl (1974) (cc) Movie: ***1/2 Brigadoon (1954) (cc) IMovie: Lord Love a Duck (1966)
TLC Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Get Thin In a Fix (cc) While You Were Out Trading Spaces (cc)
SPIKE Work Paid Ripped Paid Paid Paid Muscle Muscle Muscle |Muscle Hrsepwer Muscle
TNT Movie Chases Movie: ** 3000 Miles to Graceland (2001) (cc) Movie: **/2 Vertical Limit (2000) (Chris O'Donnell) (cc)
UNI Control Caliente Tu Desayuno Alegre: Fin Pinky Carmen Bill IQuO Locura Festival del Humor
USA Coach (s) Coach (s) Hip Hop Changing Ed Young J. Osteen Movie: *V2 Bring It On Again (2004) Movie: Coyote Ugly

HBO Movie: The Little Rascals (1994) Movie: ** / The Ringer (2005) License Movie: **V2 You've Got Mail (1998) (s) 'PG Prairi
SHOW (5:45) Movie: Air Bud: Gold. Movie: **/2 Magic in the Water Movie: ** Madison (2001)'PG' |Movie: Mind the Gap (2004) ''
TMC (5:45) Movie: Vice Versa (1988) Movie: *1/2 The Next Best Thing (2000) (cc) IMovie: ** Clean Slate (1994) |American Presideet

SUNDAY AFTERNOON JULY 8,2007
12:00 12:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30

a WPTV (9:00) Tennis: Wimbledon -- Men's Final. From Wimbledon, England. Golf: U.S. Senior Open -- Final Round. From Kohler, Wis. (Live) (s)
B WPEC Paid Xterra Auto Racing: American Le Mans Series PGA Golf: AT&T National-- Final Round. From Bethesda, Md. (Live)
D WTCE Love AR Evans M Finley |Conley |White Hindson Bishop P. Cornerstone (cc) IRod P. |Dickow
P WPBF Paid Paid Movie: What Lies Above (2004) Paid IndyCar Racing: Watkins Glen Indy Grand Prix. (Live)
) WFLX Seinfeld Seinfeld Formula One Racing: British Grand Prix. (s) Paid The Bean Movie: ***V2 Shallow Grave (1995)
C WTVX National Lampoon's Going the Distance IMovie: **/2 Mumford (1999) (Loren Dean) Smallville "Kinetic" All of Us Girl-
c WXEL Cooking Wilson Six Days in June (s) (cc) Independent Lens (s) Florida InnerVWS Think One

AMC Movie: **' National Lampoon's Vacation Movie: **'2 Fletch Lives (1989) (cc) Movie: **12 Guarding Tess (1994)

A&E Movie Cold The First 48 (cc) The First 48 (cc) The First 48 (cc) ]The First 48 (cc) The First 48 (cc)
BET Lift Every Voice (cc) Don't Trip ... He Ain't Through With Me Yetl Movie: *'/2 Gang of Roses (2003) (cc) Parkers [Parkers
CNN Late Edition This Week at War investigations In the Money (cc) CNN Live Sunday CNN Live Sunday
CRT Justice IJustice Murder by the Book Missing Missing Missing |Missing Missing Missing Missing |Missing
DISC MythBusters (cc) Man vs. Wild Man vs. Wild Dirty Jobs (cc) Dirty Jobs (cc) Dirty Jobs (cc)
DISN Kim |Replace Movie: Kronk's New Groove (cc)lKim Suite Life Montana So Raven Phil Cory |Cory
El The Life and Death of Anna Nicole Anna Nicole Smith. Sunset Sunset Sunset Sunset Celeb Confess
ESP2 Auto MLL Lacrosse: All-Star Game. Boston. (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Minor League Baseball: Futures Game. (cc)
ESPN SportsCtr Baseball Champ Car World Series Bowling Bowling Bowling |Bowling Hot Dog
EWTN Sunday Mass Litany |JS Bach |Jesus Joy Chapet Mysteries The World Over Holy |God
FAM Sabrina Sabrina Movie: *** Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002) (Daniel Radcliffe) (cc) Harry Potter
HGTV My House Potential Kitchen Kitchens Decorat- Decorat- Mission IMission |Dime Dime Sizzle Summer
HIST Mail Call Band of Brothers (s) Band of Brothers (s) (cc) Band of Brothers (s) (cc) Band of Brothers (s) |Brothers
LIFE Movie: *12 Dirty Little Secret (1998) Movie: The Only Witness (2003) (cc) Movie: A Stranger at the Door (2004) (cc)
NICK Nicktoon Nicktoon |Nicktoon INicktoon Sponge Sponge |Neutron |OddPar- Avatar |TEENick Sponge |Amanda
SCI Movie Movie: ** Dragonfly (2002) (Kevin Costner) Movie: **V2 K-PAX (2001) (Kevin Spacey) (cc) The Frighteners (cc)
TBS (11:30) Movie: Father-Part II |Movie: **'2 Serendipity (2001) (cc) Movie: Something to Talk About (1995) (cc) |My Best
TCM Movie IMovie: ***,2 This Happy Breed (1944) Movie: **** Marty (1955) Movie: ***'/2 The Best Man (1964)
TLC Trading Spaces (cc) This House Must Go |Flip It Fast (cc) Flip That House (cc) Flip That House (cc) The Real Estate Pros
SPIKE Xtreme ITrucksl Movie: ** /2 Samourais (2002), Mai Anh Le Movie: **'/2 Iron Monkey (1993) *** Shaolin Soccer
TNT Movie: ,*/2 The Glimmer Man (1996) (cc) IMovie: ** On Deadly Ground (1994) (cc) Movie: Under Siege 2: Dark Territory (1995)
UNI Festival del Humor Republica Deportiva Locura Noticiero Copa Am6rica: Cuartos de Final. (En Vivo)
USA (11:00) Movie Movie: *** American Pie (1999) (cc) Movie: **1/2 American Pie 2 (2001) (cc) American Wedding

HBO (11:30) Movie: Prairie Home Movie: Ice Age: The Meltdown Movie: Rumor Has It ... (2005) Movie: **k*'2 King Kong (2005)
SHOW (10:45) Movie Movie: *** The Spanish Prisoner (1998) Movie: All We Are Saying (2005) Movie: Happy Endings (2005)
TMC (11:10) Movie Movie: **V2 Last Holiday (2006)'PG-13' Movie: Mimic 3: Sentinel (2003) Movie: ** Deceiver (1998)'R'

SUNDAY PRIME TIME JULY 8, 2007
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

a WPTV News (cc) NBC Dateline NBC (N) (s) (cc) Law & Order (s) (cc) Law & Order: SVU News (cc) Sports-
gB WPEC PGA Golf News (cc) 60 Minutes (s) (cc) Big Brother 8 (s) (cc) Cold Case (s) (cc) Without a Trace (s) News (cc) Sports
ED WTCE Jakes Meyer Youseff |Hayford J. Osteen jAuthority Believers |Changing The Lazarus Phenomenon
S WPBF News (N) ABC Home Videos Extreme-Home Housewives Brothers & Sisters News (N)
C WFLX Jim Raymond War King-Hill Simp- |Amer Dad Family [Family News (N) Idol Rewind
E WTVX The Chris Reba (s) Reba(s) 7th Heaven (s) (cc) Supernatural (s) (cc) Will Will Sex & |Sex &
c( WXEL Contrary Great Globe Trekker (s) Nature (cc) (DVS) Mysteryl (N) (s) (cc) (DVS) Garden Austin City Limits (s)

AMC Movie: *** Bounce (2000) Premiere. Movie: **2 There's Something About Mary (1998) There's Something About Mary
ANIM Planet Earth (cc) Wild Kingdom (N) Chased by Sea Monsters (cc) Giant Monsters (cc) Wild Kingdom
A&E The First 48 (cc) The First 48 (cc) Dog |Dog |Simmons Simmons Harry Potter-Secrets Gene Simmons
BET Wayans Wayans Wayans IBET Awards '07 From Los Angeles, (cc) BET Inspiration
CNN Lou Dobbs CNN Live Sunday Investigations Larry King Live CNN Sunday Night Investigations
CRT Anatomy of Crime Beach |Cops (s) Cops (s) Cops (s) Cops (s) Cops (s) Speeders Speeders The Investigators
DISC Dirty Jobs (cc) Dirty Jobs (cc) Dirty Jobs (cc) Dirty Jobs Dirty Jobs (cc) Dirty Jobs (cc)
DISN Suite Life |Suite Life Montana |Suite Life Suite Life |Cory Movie: Eddie's Million Dollar Cook-Off (cc) Suite Life Montana
El Celeb Confess El News Weekend 25 Most Memorable Swimsuit Moments |Simple ISunset Girls Girls
ESP2 Baseball IStrongest Arena Football: Divisional Playoff-- TBA at Force INHRA Drag Racing: O'Reilly Thunder Valley Nationals
ESPN SportsCenter (Live) Baseball Tonight MLB Baseball: Atlanta Braves at San Diego Padres. PETCO Park. SportsCenter (Live)
EWTN Bene- |Life Father Groeschel Father Corapi IChester- |Rosary Dawn of America Life on the Rock
FAM (5:00) Movie: Harry Potter-Azkaban Movie: *** Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004) (cc) Whose? Whose?
HGTV Weekend IRenovatn If Walls |House To Sell ISecrets Home & Housewares Bought First Dream What Get
HIST Band of Brothers (s) Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers Ice Road Truckers Underworld
LIFE Movie: Mom at Sixteen (2005) (cc) Movie: *',2 The Glass House (2001) (cc) Army Wives (N) (cc) Grey's Anatomy (s)
NICK School INaked Drake |Jordan Zoey 101 |Unfab Videos Fresh Pr. Fresh Pr. Fresh Pr. Fresh Pr. Fresh Pr.
SCI (5:00) Movie Movie: *** Casper (1995) (Christina Ricci) Movie: **'2 Bruce Almighty (2003) (Jim Carrey) (cc) Heroes
TBS (5:45) Movie: My Best Friend's Wedding Raymond |Raymond Raymond |Raymond Raymond |Raymond |My Best Friend's
TCM Movie: *** Lover Come Back (1961) (cc) Movie: ** 2 Little Women (1949) (cc) (DVS) Movie: *** Little Men (1940), Kay Francis
TLC The Real Estate Pros The Real Estate Pros The Real Estate Pros The Real Estate Pros The Real Estate Pros The Real Estate Pros
SPIKE (5:00) Movie: Shaolin Movie: ***', Hero (2002) (Jet Li) Movie: *** Kung Fu Hustle (2004) *** Kung Fu Hustle
TNT Movie: *** Under Siege (1992) (cc) |Movie: *** The Bourne Supremacy (2004) IMovie: *** The Bourne Supremacy (2004)
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TMC Movie: **2 Pitch Black (2000) (s) 'R' (cc) |Movie: *** The American President (1995) Movie: **'2 Last Holiday (2006)'PG-13'







Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007 11


28-1 (07)


release dates: July 7-13


By BETTY DEBNAM


Hey, Kids! These Parks Are Your Parks!


National Parks Aplenty

Is your family planning to go to a � KIDSI BECOME
national park this summer? With a A JUNIOR
total of 391 national parks, there is RANGER.
probably one near you. \
These parks are run by the
National Park Service.
Congress passed a bill setting up
the Park Service in 1916.
The Park Service's job is to "conserve
(our country's) scenery and natural
and historic objects and wildlife" for
visitors to enjoy.
In just nine years, it will celebrate -
its 100th birthday. NATIONAL PARKS, such as the Grand Canyon, offer
The Park Service is getting ready many activities, sights and even places to stay or camp.
for the celebration by making our ---


parks even more fun and
educational for kids.
MONUMENTS help us
remember a main point of
historical interest. The
Statue of Liberty is in New
York Harbor.


Types of national parklands
MEMORIALS NATIONAL HISTORIC SITES
honor people AND PARKS . ."
and events. This . . remind us of our
is Abraham . history. This is
Lincoln's Golden Spike
boyhood home Historic Site
in Indiana. in Utah.


SEASHORES AND LAKESHORES
offer scenic places for water
sports. This is Assateague Island
in Maryland.


TRAIL SYSTEMS give us long
footpaths to
hike on. This
is the '*
Appalachian
Trail, which
runs from
Maine to
Georgia.


* MILITARY BATTLEFIELDS and parks.
* RECREATION AREAS, usually for water sports.
* PRESERVES, where limited hunting and fishing are allowed.
* PARKWAYS, to drive on and enjoy nature along the way.


The Mini Page�
Flags of Our States Poster


From


Alabama Missouri Wyoming
/ * Full-color flags from all * Display size is 221/2 inches by
50 states 2&1/2 inches
* Date each state entered * Ideal for the classroom
the union or home
----------------------------------------------
To order, send $4.95 plus $2.75 postage and handling (folded and mailed flat) or $4.95 plus $4.25
postage and handling (rolled in a tube). Send check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to:
SAndrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206.
Please send _____ copies of The Mini Page Flags of Our States poster (Item #5637-0) at $7.70
each (folded) or $9.20 each (tube). (Bulk discount information available upon request.) Toll-free
number: 1-800-591-2097. www.smartwarehousing.com
Name:
Address:
City: _______ State: Zip: ____
L-------------------------------- ------------
from The Mini Page by Betty Dbnam 2007 To Mini Pg Publishing Company

FUNNY'S ~JivliYnl 0
All the following jokes have something in common.
Can you guess the common theme or category? - 7

Ethan: What is the difference between a man
painting a small shed and an animal losing
its hair?
Ellen: One coats his shed, and the other sheds its
coat!
WET Erin: What kind of coat is always wet when
PAINT!!! you put it on?
.,, o ~Evan: A coat of paint!

Ellis: What kind of coat would an octopus
need?
Eve: A coat of arms!

Sfrom To Mini Page by Boty ebnam 2007 Th Mini Page Publishing Company nc.
TPARSMTRY 'N
PARKS FIND
Words that remind us of national parks are hidden in the block
below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some
letters are used twice. See if you can find: WILDLIFE,
SEASHORES, TREES, RANGER, RIVERS, PLANTS, PARKWAYS,
PARKLANDS, NATIONAL, PARKS, NATURE, MONUMENTS,
HISTORIC, MEMORIAL, FUN, ANIMAL, CONGRESS.
SMQ RMSSYENH LSMES
BUT DELAWARE ROK I ES F P I F DWE R E
HAS A NATIONAL A Z N E V I E S A N J AM U A
PARK. NAR U LETRAR N FOTS
. g GTN DMOR LG I KGRAH
ER L GRE KSMNGW I NO
R I E I ERNAT I ONA L R
WSC DAC LTKX UC LY E
WP L PLANTS F PARKS


WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS
give us scenic places to boat
on and to walk the banks.
This is the Delaware River in
Pennsylvania.


from The Mini Pago by Bot Debnam 0 Inc.


from The Mni Page by Btty Debnam 0 2007 Th Mini Page Publshing Company Inc.


How National Parks Work


Service's purpose
The National Park Service's job is
to keep our parks in such good shape
that visitors will enjoy them in the
future.
Kids are important to our national
parks. If you start visiting while you
are young and become interested in
the many things to see and do,
someday you will bring your children,
and they in turn might bring theirs.
The history


\ ' . ,. . ,e'. .. .

Look at this 1878 photo of the soldiers
stationed in our first national park,
Yellowstone. You can see where the idea
for the ranger uniforms came from.
Before the Park Service was set
up, there were already a few
national parks. They were managed
by the U.S. Army.
In the late 1800s, the Army hired
some mountain people who knew the
Yellowstone area to help out.
Harry Yount is
thought to be the
first ranger. He
was the park's
gamekeeper.


Staff who's who


Each park has a
superintendent who is
in charge.
Parks also have
maintenance workers
who keep the park clean


and in good shape.


When you visit a park, you can usually
tell who the rangers are by their
uniforms and gold badges. Sometimes
they wear a cap.
Some park rangers are
interpretive rangers I!
who help visitors
discover the parks by
telling and showing them about it.
Law enforcement rangers
protect the park and visitors.
Park scientists and historians
study the parks and find out the
best ways to protect their animals,
plants and buildings.
The country is divided into seven
regions. Each region has a regional
director who helps the
superintendents in their area.
The director of the National
Park Service has offices in
Washington, D.C. She has a big staff
to help her do her job.


Mary Bomar has
been director of the
National Park Service
since 2006.
She has been part of
the Park Service for
many years.


.





'5


Kids in the parks


Junior Rangers
Many parks are
offering Junior
Ranger programs.
Kids are given
activities to complete
and share with a
park ranger. Then
they will receive a
Junior Ranger patch
or badge and a
certificate.
S'_ .,' Site to see:
www.nps.gov/
learn/home.htm

Web Rangers
Kids
who might
not be able
to visit
parks in
person can
go to a
special site designed to take them to
some of the parks. Kids who have
visited a park in person can learn
even more on the Web.
Site visitors can print out a
workbook, complete it, and mail it to
the park. Then they will receive a
Junior Ranger badge and a
certificate.
Site to see: www.nps.gov/webrangers


Please include all of the appropriate registered trademark symbols and copyright lines in any publication of The Mini Page�.


, - -yTM from The Mini Pago by Betty Debnam 2007 The Mini Page Publishing Company Inc.

Goldie Goodsport's Report
Supersport: Amanda Blumenherst
Height: 5-9 Birthdate: 11-4-86
Hometown: Scottsdale, Ariz.
Amanda Blumenherst is an honor student majoring in
- " history at Duke University. She also is making history on
!p. -. the golf course.
The "Amazing Amanda" recently led the Blue Devils
H da "*Awa women's team to a third straight national title. She won the
Honda Award as the nation's top female collegiate golfer. Blumenherst
also has captured two consecutive National Player of the Year honors.
Blumenherst posted a Duke record 71.0 stroke average this year. She
finished in the top 10 in all 10 tournaments she entered and placed in the
top five in five of the events.
In 2006, Blumenherst also competed in the professional U.S. Open,
finished 10th and tied for low amateur honors. It seems she has been
playing golf forever, having started at age 4.
While golf demands much of her time, Blumenherst is stellar in the
classroom, having posted a 3.75 grade-point average on a 4.0 scale. A
junior, she wants to play on the LPGA Tour after graduating. And why
not? She's already playing like a pro.


Go dot to dot and color this animal found in national
parks out west.

SN . 0'
N N
















. . �
00L






re
0











r- *I 0
- c * * *
M in

from roe Mini Pago by Betty Dobnm 0 2007 The Mini Page publishing Company In.

^ooe Rooki Cookie's Recipe

Trail Mix Campwich
These sandwiches are easy to make and give you lots of
You'll need:
* 8 ounces light cream cheese
* 2 (1-ounce) fruit-and-nut bars (from box of 6), crumbled
* 4 tablespoons dried cranberries or raisins
* 6 tablespoons shredded, chopped carrots
S12 slices multigrain bread
What to do:
1. Mix cream cheese, crumbled fruit-and-nut bars,
cranberries and carrots.
2. Spread 2 tablespoons of cream cheese mixture on 6 slices
of bread.
3. Top with 6 remaining slices to make sandwiches. Serves 6.
*You will need an adult's help with this recipe.
from The Mini Page by Betty Debnam 2007 The Mini Page Pubiling Company Inc.


Meet Bindi Irwin
The "Bindi the Jungle Girl," on the Discovery Kids
- 8.ouncesdSue Ii ee snewsees,

channel. In this show, Bindi introduces kids


was a conservationist who was best known as
the "Crocodile Hunter." Her mother, Terri
Irwin, is a veterinary technician who runs the Australia Zoo. Bindi has
one brother.
Bindi grew up appearing on her dad's TV show and helping him
investigate wildlife. She even helped him capture crocodiles.
She is home-schooled and loves to write. She gives time and money to
different charities, including Wildlife Warriors Worldwide and the
Australian Wildlife Hospital.
She has a pet rat named Candy that rides on her shoulder when she
goes in-line skating. She also has a dog named Diamond.
Bindi is taking piano lessons and surfing lessons. She also sings and
dances with a group, The Crocmen. They have made a DVD to
encourage kids to exercise and appreciate wildlife.
from Te Mini Page by Betty Debnam 2007The Mini Page Publishing Company Inc.







12 Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007


Classified








53-2424 .imsd00
narnof personalI items for sale under $2 500


Announcements , Merchandise : Mobile Homes





Employment Agriculture Recreation





Financial Rentals Automobiles





Services Real Estate Public Notices '

[ij7ij ITii Tl AMA


Announcements


Important Information: Please
read your ad carefully the first
day it appears. In case of an
inadvertent error, please noti-
fy us prior to the deadline list,
ed. We will not be responsible
for more than 1 incorrect
insertion, or for more than the'
extent of the ad rendered val-
ueless by such errors.
Advertiser assumes responsi-
bility for all statements, names
and content of an ad, and
assumes responsibility for any
claims against Independent
Newspapers. All : i.. .
is subject to ,. ..
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept or
-(- reject any or all.copy, and to
insert above the copy the word
"advertisement". Ail ads'
accepted are subject to credit
approval. All ads must conform
to Independent Newspapers'
style and are restricted to
their proper classifications.
Some classified categories
require advance payment.
These classifications are
denoted with an asterisk
Independent Newspapers will
never knowing accept any
advertisemer : '
considered -i ' 1 . - '. .
cases of questionable value,
such as promises of guaran-
teed income from work-at-
home programs or other offers
to send money in advance for
a product or service - we
advise you to check with the
Attorney General's Consumer
Fraud Line at 1 .800220.5424,
and/or The Better Business
Bureau, 800.464-6331 for pre,
vious complaints.
Auctions I ).
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140I
Garage/Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 1 fU



CHIHUAHUA, Injured w/Ten-
nessee rabies tag. Call to
identify. (863)357-3225
PIT BULL- Male, Found near
hospital. Mon. 7/2/07.
Please call to identify.
(863)447-6507


SHEPHERD MIX- missing
since 6/18 Double J Acres.
Little girl waiting for me.
(863)673-4881 / 675-4880


FREE BEAGLE- Female-to
'good home only.
(863)357-6930
KITTENS- Free to Good Home
Only! 6 wks old. Male & Fe-
male. Cute! (863)801-3561
PUPPIES, Free to good home
only. You pick up.
(863)801-4283
RED SHEPHERD MIX, Male,
Under 1 yr. old. Very friend-
ly. Needs room to run. Good
home only. (863)697-0845
UPRIGHT PIANO- White com-
puter desk and beige love-
seat. You must pickup.
(863)675-4773 after 6 pm



YARD SALE TODAY!!!!!!
Fort Drum, 30240 NW 24th
Drive, in Pinelands
Tools, furniture, clothing,
boats, records &
miscellaneous.
(772)342-3203


I~e iaNo ic


I.pca Noti


y zy CASTLE
ASTL The Parenting
CASTLE Professionals
Support our fight for the prevention of child abuse
Call 772-465-6011

Employment
Emlymn Ful Time 020


Employment -
Full-Time 205
Employment -
Medical 210
Employment -
Part-Time 21 5
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Training 227
Sales 230



A Hi-tech company needs:
TECH SUPPORT
w/good hardware,
computer/Internet skills.
Pick up application
@ 100 SW 15th St. or
Fax resume to 863-467-0816
BOOKKEEPER NEEDED- must
have valid driver license and
references required. D/F/W.
Call days 863-634-7552
Nights 863-763-5321
EXPERIENCED MECHANIC
For Heavy Construction
Company. Call (561)793-0322
Ext. 106 or Fax Resume
(561)793-0322
FOOD SERVICE DIRECTOR
Immediate opening at Okee-
chobee Juvenile Correctional
Facility. Institutional cooking
and hands-on mgmt. exp.
preferred. Competitive Wag-
es and Benefits. Must pass
background check and drug
screen.
Contact Colleen at
(225)326-2341 or fax
resume w/ salary history to
225-273-2165 Attn: #647.
EOE

LIVE IN NANNY/HOUSEKEEP-
ER- Needed in Orlando area
to help loving family
(407)914-3472 Joanne.
Loving Caring Christian lady
needed to live in and care for
our special mother. Salary
neg. Call 863-801-1715.
Send resume to 676 NE 28th
Ave., Okeechobee, FL 34972
*MANAGER IN TRAINING
-ASSISTANT MANAGER
Hibbett Sports is hiring in
Okeechobee. Apply at: 2105
S.Parrott Ave., Okeechobee,
FL. 34972. Hibbett Sports
conducts drug testing.
www.hibbett.com
MATURE HOUSE KEEPER
NEEDED- Live on ranch,
must have valid driver li-
cense and references re-
quired. D/F/W. Call days
863-634-7552 Nights
863-763-5321
MEDICAL OFFICE
F/T Help needed. Please fill out
application form at our office
or mail resume to:
304 NE 19th Dr,
Okeechobee FL 34972
PRE K TEACHERS: F/T & P/T
positions available. Must be
experienced. Great pay & work
environment. 863-467-5000
Professional Sales Executive
position available for a busy
new home sales business.
Sales experience a plus. No
real estate license required.
Salary plus commission.
Call (863)763-6376
or (863)357-2700.


RAULERSON HOSPITAL
Has immediate openings for
HOUSEKEEPERS
If you are a hard working
team player interested in
employment at Raulerson
Hospital, please come to
Human Resources and
complete an employment
application.
1796 Highway 441 North
Okeechobee, FL 34972
RECEPTIONIST
Well organized, Mature person
needed. A/R, & A/P position.
Knowledge of Quickbooks &
automotive oriented a must.
Fax resume & Salary
requirements to
863-467-7351. DFWP
STORE MANAGER
Oversee convenience -store.
Sell food & groceries. Rec-
oncile accounts & prepare
reports. Maintain equipment
& inventory. Req. 2 yrs exp.
Send resume to:
President
Country Corner Drive Thru
8675 Hwy 441 SE
Okeechobee, FL 34974
Zibeco Construction Corp
is seeking a
SITE SUPERINTENDENT
Must have a minimum of 3
yrs. experience and be able to
work along side framers &
finish carpenters.
Please call Michelle @
(863)467-3000 Mon.-Fri.,
9am-4pm for appointment.
Zibeco Construction Corp
Seeks TRIM CARPENTERS /
FRAMERS, Must have a
minimum of 2 yrs. experience.
Starting pay $12 to $15/hour
Call Shaun @ (863)634-7428
Monday-Friday, 9am-4pm




NEW PAY RATES
SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL
NURSE SUPERVISOR
Nurses, LPN, RN
FT Qays
CNA'S 3-11 & 11-7
BENEFITS

Glades Health Care Center
230 S. Barfield Hwy.
Pahokee, FL 33476
561-924-5561
RENAL CARE CENTER
. Has opening for a
part-time/per-diem RN and
Patient Care Technician.
Benefits and training provided.
Apply at 201 SW 16 St. or call
Janet at (863)467-7654

RN & LPN
Full & Part Time
7a - 7p- Weekdays &
Weekends avail
UNIT MANAGER
Must have previous LTC
exp. Previous mgnt., with
strong communication skills

APPLY IN PERSON
Palm Terrace of Clewiston
301 South Gloria St.
Clewiston, FL 33440
Or Call Raquel at
Ph: 863-983-5123
EOE/DFWP


More Papers Mean More Readers!

" ""-. Reach more readers when you run
your ad in several papers in

our newspaper network.
Our newspaper network
consists of eight papers - one


daily and seven weeklies. An ad run in all these newspapers will
reach more than 164,000 readers*!

Call Today For Details!
* Sources: Pulse Research Market Survey; Simmons Market Research; INI Market Research Center
Rules for placing FREE ads!
To qualify, your ad ' '
. Must be for ., personal te. ro commercial items, pets or animals) :
p,-J rvlust fit into 1 2 inch
(that's -4 lines. approximately 23 characters per line)
S.lust include only one itern and its price . .'
A. (remember it must be S2.500 or less) . "


Call us!
No Fee, No Catch, No Problem!


Emlymn
Full Tim


Epiloymen
iFull Time


GENERAL MANAGERS - Train in Okeechobee for
relocation.
Immediate openings available. $40k plus benefits to
start.
ASSISTANT MANAGERS - Looking for persons
interested
in a career in restaurant management. Good people
skills & experience in restaurants a must.
$30-$35k based on exp.
SERVERS - Presentable, personable & hard working
qualities is a must. Exp. preferred but not
necessary. Hiring AM & PM for only the right people.

CITY OF OKEECHOBEE
ACCOUNT CLERK
The Account Clerk is the assistant to the Accounts Supervisor.
The department is responsible for maintaining and process-
ing the City's financial matters, information, files, payroll and
insurance.
A complete job description and application packet, including
salary and benefits may be printed from the City's web page,
www.citvofokeechobee.com or picked up at City Hall, Office
of the City Clerk, 55 SE 3rd Avenue, Okeechobee, FL 34974,
863-763-3372 ext. 215.
Applications will be accepted until Thursday, July 19, 2007 at
3:00 PM. Resumes must accompany a completed applica-
tion.
Successful candidates are required to pass a pre-employment
substance screening/physical. Drug Free Workplace.
EOE/AAP

FEED MILL INDUSTRIAL, MECHANICAL,
MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR
Needed, we offer benefits, and pay is
based upon your experience.
Please contact:
Syfrett Feed Company
3079 NW 8th Street, Okeechobee
863-763-5586



Start a new career in the much needed field of
nursing as a Certified Nursing Assistant. Complete the
Hospitality Assistant course/training at Okeechobee
Healthcare Facility and become a CNA in 4 weeks. Next
class begins soon. Instructor RN/experienced teacher has
a very high CNA exam passing rate. Qualified CNAs are
then eligible for LPN training. Good benefits.
Apply In Person For Further Details:
406 N.W. 4th Street * (863) 357-2442


HORSE EXERCISER - P/T
Experienced English pleasure
rider for exercising horses
needed 3 days a week. Morn-
ings only. Call M-F 6am-3pm
(863)763-4723



NEED SOMEONE TO CLEAN?
Call (863)467-06241 I will
clean your home/office. Bond-
ed w/ ref's. Okeechobee Area



P !&7


Services



Babysitting 405
Child Care Needed 410
Child Care Offered415
Instruction 420
Services Offered '125
Insurance 430
Medical Services435





Dan's
Framing, inc.


Danny Lopez
1900 NE 138th St.
Okeechobee, FL
ofnce863.357.4145
fa 863.357.9033




Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise your
yard sale in the classi-
lieds and make your
clean un a breeze!


Em


a ,


Raulerson Hospital has an immediate
opening for a full time Administrative As-
sistant/Medical Staff Secretary. This po-
sition provides primary clerical support to
Director of Administrative Services as fol-
lows: Must have strong organizational,
communication, general clerical skills in-
cluding medical terminology. Must be
proficient in computer skills including but
not limited to Microsoft Word and Excel.
Must maintain confidentiality, security
and integrity of physician, patient and or-
ganizational data: Medical staff office ex-
perience preferred but not required.
For consideration, send your resume to:
Raulerson Hospital
Attn: Human Resources
1796 Hwy. 441, RO. Box 1307
Okeechobee, FL 34973
FAX 863-824-2771

Immediate Openings - CNAs
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
All shifts: Full/Part Time. Good Benefits.
Apply In Person To:
406 N.W. 4th Street. (863) 357-2442


Immediate Openings * All Shifts
Full Time/Part Time - RN's & LPN's
Apply In Person To:
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
1646 Hwy. 441 North


Ron's Pressure Washing
& Minor Repairs &
Lawn Service
Roof coating, Repair to
Mobile Homes & more.
No job to big or small. Free
estimates. 863-763-7675
or cell 863-261-1565
New Lic. # 2423



Nursing Home Alternative
Will care for your loved
one. Private room from
light assistance to full
assistance. 24 hr. Eight
yrs. exp. References
provided. 863-697-6383



H .. . rO ,,, !. ', Only
r 0.C IO ,. . Ifdwl



BAR & GRILL
PAILY mUNCH SPECtAIS


World Famous
Broasted Chicken
(863) 467-8232
6315 US Hwy.441 S.E.



JACK'S TOP SOIL
Fill Dirt/Shell Rock
& Bob Cat work.
Call 863-467-4734


Buying a car? Look in the
classified. Selling a
car? Look in the classi-
fieds.


READING A







ISEL
1N8f 9 S


reader enjoy lif more!


/


/ 1-877-353-2424 fTof Fre;i

/ 1-877-354-2424 (ToHFre)

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legalads@newszap.com


/ For All Other Classified
Advertising:
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I Mon-Fri
1 8ar 5pr


/ Mon-Fri


DEADINE


Monday
Fidny 12 r.,n far ll.nrlo L .' A lZ I n
Tuesday thru Friday
I11 o rn Io ned drfs pabc'.,min
Saturday
Erndayrloa 12 ,i an to .rdy plahf
Sunday
FrdDr 10 on r.i, Sunder puti .blmon


il
;VISAh


i----------------------------________________


Merchandise



Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines535
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins./Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, Linens & Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment!
Supplies 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets/Supplies/
Services 670
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740




AMANA, central air & heat,
$500. (863)227-4417 ask
for Mary


ROCKER, $100
(863)634-0888
WANTED: FLORIDA ART
A.E. Backus, J. Hutchinson
H. Newton, G. Buckner, E.
Buckner, L. Roberts, A. Hair,
R A. McClendon, S. Newton,
BIG $$ (,772)562-5567


CHEST FREEZER, Like new.
$150 (863)675-1113
COMMERCIAL FREEZER- 2dr,
reach in, good for ice stor-
age, glass doors, $1500
(863)673-0920
FREEZER: Large w/ Locking
capability. Mint conditiondition.
Great for the hunter. $300
(561)951-6088
HOT WATER HEATER- 40 gal.
with pan. Electric. Brand new
$175. (863)467-4497
REFRIGERATOR- Sears, 19.4
cu ft, frost free, side by side,
green, good cond., $75
(863)763-1361
REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER
Whirlpool, side by side,
w/ice maker, good cond.
$250 (863)467-8294
STOVE- Whirlpool, asking $75
(863)675-0969
WASHER & DRYER- Kenmore,
5 mos old, asking $500 for
the pair (863)697-1401
WASHER & DRYER- Kenmore,
70/80 series, 1 yr old. Like
new with 2 yr warranty
$700. Neg. (720)284-4018


WASHER- Kenmore & Maytag
dryer. Full size, Like new.
$225. (561)371-1027 "
WASHER/DRYER- Crosley,
Heavy duty, Very good con-.
dition. $150. or best off '.
Call Jim (863)763-3173 ,
WASHER/DRYER- Stackable,
Apt. size, Like new. Asking
$350. or best offer. Call
Rose @ (772)419-8370



SHED, 8x10, insulated, new,
never assembled, costs
$1595, sell $750 or best of-
fer (863)697-2604


ADULT BIKES, mens & wom-
ens, $40 for pair.
(772)332-1438
SCOOTER, 2 wheel, electric;
with charger, lights, horn
mirror & directional. $150
(863)697-8731
UTILITY BICYCLE - 3 wheel,
TLC, $30 (863)675-0300
LaBelle





1 MPH PRICING




25x25x9 Ambassado?
Vertical (212) Root, SofftFascia
1 SNeoonal or 2 Roll-u Ooors,
1 Man Doo, I Window,
2 Gate Vents
4 oncrete Stab
$14,879




30x35x9 Executive
enical t3 12) Roo. iSoffttFascia
2 Roli-up Dooms.
1 Man Door, 1 Window,
2 Gable Vents
4' Concrete Slab"
$21,923
*Concrote & Installation by
Independent Licensed
Contractors*


Up to 35' wide, unlimited length
FLA Engineered Plans,
Meets/'Exceeds Wind Code
METAL SYSTEMS
PLUS, LLC
www.metalsystemsplus.com
Pnce plus sales tas'county fees
Photos fcr display purposes only
METAL SHED- 8x16, 6ft high;
with doors at both ends,
$350 (561)741-4647



Gutters Plus,
., LLC

It wasn't raining when
Noah built the ark!
Prepare now and let us help.
Hurricane Protection
Seamless Raingutter
Screen Rooms and
Enclosures - Carports'
Call today for your
free estimate
(863) 634-3159
Lic. ffOCSL2783-01
SHOWER STALL- Fiberglass,
Never installed. w/vanity &
sink. $150. Will separate.
(561)371-1027


4 J


Toll Free


1


If


I









Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007


Emiplin t


Emlymn


Okeechobee News






The Okeechobee News is currently seeking an
energetic, self motivated PART TIME circulation
assistant.

The right applicant must have;
Cash Handling Experience
Knowledge of local area or ability to read map
Work Night and Weekends
References
The Daily Okeechobee News offers:
Potential for advancement
A unique work environment where
employees are trusted and empowered
Competitive pay and benefits
Benefits Package
Generous time off program
The Daily Okeedrobee News Is An Equal Opportunity Employer


10 S..1t vtSi te A Okeie, FL* 3497
NO.HOECAL ES!


Shutters &
Gutters, Inc.
Professional
Installation ofSlormr
Shutters & Seamlness
Rain Gutters
Licensed, & Insured

863.763.5650
1551 N.W. 24th Drive
Okeechobee
License #765
STAIRS/5 STEPS: for Modular
Home. Fiberglass w/Dbl.
hand rail. Good condition.
$125. 863-467-7197


BABY JOGGER, all aluminum,
made by Kool Stride, $100.
,(863)983-4940
LG ROCKING HORSE- with
sound, good condition, $60
or best offer (863)824-2696
after 7pm
TODDLER BED- Babcock,
wood, mission style. Like
new w/toddler mattress.
$60 firm. (772)263-1178


WEDDING DRESS, Size 6,
Strapless, Organza Silk
w/pearls & sequins. $400.
(863)697-1486


DOLL- Cabbage Patch, '1984,
Good condition. $50.
(863)801-4949
HUMMEL FIGURINES (8)-
_$450 (863)467-8161



DELL COMPUTER SYS: Pen-
Utium 4, XP Pro, monitor, key-
Sboard, mouse & speakers.
$225. 1863)517-2782 Tony
Desktop computer for sale Ex-
; cellent condition $75.00 Call
P63-763-8391.
LAPTOP- (2) Dell, Good
shape, loaded, $600 for both
or will sell separate
(863)674-0212
SONY LAPTOP VAIO- PCG-
, FXA47 AMD Athlon 4 pro-
: cessor. Trade Apple laptop
'.or $650 (772)461-8822


KILN- Paragon ceramic, Good
condition. $200.
. (863)675-0550 LaBelle



FIREPLACE- Brand new. $200
or best offer (863)763-6747


pED/RM SUITE- 5 piece with
SFull size bed, Mattress & box
-ssprings. Like new. $350.
(863)763-3551
Bedroom Set: Qu. sz. head &
foot board, dresser, dbl. mir-
ror, 2 nt stands, Light brown,
$1500. 863-763-8562
BUNK BED- wooden, like new
condition, $250
(863)983-4940
BUNK BEDS, Pine, great con-
dition, with mattresses. $150
(239)842-0040
CANOPY BED SUITE- Twin sz,
S-ncd mirrored dresser, night
standn, desk book case.
"$350. (863)763-0669
CHINA CABINET- dark wood,
asking $125 (863)467-6088
COMPUTER DESK- Black,
Proes wood. Good condition.
$20, ' .i-. t ii:.7 or

COMPUTER DESK- Large.
pomrer, With Hutlchi & lots of
f.l, or "Stufl", Gontly used.

COUCH &' IIESEAT, dark
Sgromni, l iltir, floodi condi-
tion, $2OO, (803)763-5067
OOUCH- askIng $75
, (191, . 11 ,, ,
DINING ROOM [ABLE, Broy-
hill, Pine, Knotted Wood. 2
leaves makes 8 ft. long.
$100, (561)951-6088


DINING ROOM TABLE- w/4
chairs. Solid Oval wood.
Chairs are cream print fabric.
$200 (863)357-2412
DRESSER- Western Solid
wood. Iron fixtures. Like
new. $200. (863)465-6777
LOVESEAT - w/matching chair
& solid wood cocktail table.
Excellent condition. $325
firm. 863-675-5729
MATTRESS, BOXSPRING &
FRAME, queen size, $100 for
all or best offer
(863)763-7217
PINE DESK- large, $120 or
best offer (863)634-4888 .
RECLINER ROCKER- Dark
green, Lazy Boy. Good con-
dition. $75 (863)610-0020
SECTIONAL- New, dark
brown, Bassett, w/2 reclin-
ers, asking $1000
(863)763-3660
SLEEPER SOFA- 7ft Carlton,
beige color, excellent condi-
tion, $395 (863)673-2593
SOFA & 2 WINGBACK
CHAIRS, ivory, Egyptian
cotton, needs some clean-
ing, $300. (863)763-0583
SWIVEL ROCKER- Green,
good condition. $25
(863)610-0020
TABLE, Butterscotch, with leaf
& 6 chairs, great condition.
$150 (239)842-0040
TABLE- For boat or motor
home, rectangular, re-
movable, two legs, like new.
$100 (863)697-2033



GOLF CART, Club Car, 48 volt,
Excellent condition. $2400
(863)763-5299/610-1282


FIRE SAFES (2) & METAL
LOCKING GUN CABINET-
asking $350 for all or will
sell sep (863)674-0613
FIREARMS LIBRARY: Com-
plete hand gun and long gun
info- 32 leather bound vol-
umes. $200. 863-697-2033
RIFLE- 300 Win. Mag. Rueger
M77 Bolt action, Special trig-
ger & pad. L/H Lots of am-
mo. $600. (239)823-5092
TAURAS PT1911, 45 cal., 2
magazines. $500 firm.
(863)634-9494



AB -MACHINE, $50
(863)634-0888
FITNESS MACHINE- Welder
home fitness. Includes arm
and leg attachments. $125
(863)357-2412
WALKER - ProForm Air Walker
XT Precision Resistance ex-
irciser, $45. Call
(863) 357-4195.
WEIGHT BENCH- 3 attach-
ments, no weights $35.
(863)484-0267
WEIGHT BENCH XTX- 300 Ibs
set & Pro Form XP 300
Workout Ctr. Like new $375,
(720)284-4018



VIRTICAL BLINDS Teal Green,
(5) 47"Wx63'/2"L (2) 81"Wx
1 "L wall rods & hardware.
$200 neg. (863)763-8086




ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR: Med-
ics, "Cadillac of wheelchairs!"
Immaculate, used very little on
carpet only. Paid $5000, asking
only $1000. 863-447-0448
POWER CHAIR: Pride Jazzy
#1113 w/joystick. Exc cond.
Small turn radius. New $5800,
Now $1090. (863)763-6907
SCOOTER: Golden Compan-
ion, Good condition. $650.
(863)634-8581
SCOOTER, SpaceSaver Plus,
Large 2 new batteries, disas-
sembles for transport, like
new. $850 (863)357-8788


ADULT MOVIES (150+), VHS,
Adult, XXX, $575. or best of-
fer. (561)633-1371


ADULT DVDS- New 10, $75.
Call Dawn @
(863)634-3783 Serious in-
quiries Only.
BOUNCE HOUSE/SLIDE
COMBO: 15x15, Great condi-
tion. $1800 (863)228-2440
or (863)675-1113 LaBelle
BOXES- Priority mailing, all
sizes. 400 plus boxes. $60
or best offer. (772)336-8034
CLOTHES POLES- 2, Galva-
nized, Excellent condition.
$40. (863)675-0550 LaBelle



CLASSICAL GUITAR- With
case, good starter guitar.
$75 (863)824-0801
GUITAR CABINET: Custom
Built 77"Tx42"W, 2 solid
doors & shelf, Reduced to
$299. neg. (561)633-1371
GUITAR, Gibson, 1940s arch-
top, $600 (863)697-2210
GUITAR, Gibson/Cromwell,
1940's arch-top. $400
(863)697-2210
GUITAR, New Squier Strat,
w/cover, SP10 Squier Am-
plifier, black, Some music.
$235. (863)357-8788
GUITAR- Takamine EG330C,
1999 model, asking $500
can be seen at Jennings
Hdwe (863)675-2311
PIANO, Gulbransen, upright,
w/Bench & new damp chas-
er. Price reduced to $200
neg. 863-467-2679 Iv. msg.


BASSET HOUND- AKC reg.,
male, tri-colored, 2 yr old
w/chip. Great companion.
$300 (863)357-6930
BLUE PIT PUPPIES (2) Males,
4 wks. old, AKC Parents on
premises. Shots & Wormed.
$500 each. (863)634-1298
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES: 9 wks.
old, 2 Males, $350.
(863)983-1970
DOG PENS (3)- Must sell to-
gether. 1 10x10x6, 2
8x10x6. Galvanized. $400
(863)634-6601/256-3629
DOG PENS, (4), chain link, 8
large plastic sky kennels,
$680 will sell separately.
(863)612-0992
GUINEA PIGS (10), $7 males,
$10 females.
(863)843-0141
MACAW, 16 yr. old, blue &
gold, with large cage & out-
side swing. $1200
(863)634-7789
PIT BULL PUPPY, 6 wk old
brindle w/ UKC Papers, Chi-
huahua, 5 mo. old, Pure Bed
w/no tail & Chihuahua/Pe-
kingese Mix, 6 months old.
Call (863)673-2314
PUGS- AKC reg., shots &
wormed, fawn/black,
fawn/silver, $300 - $450
(863)675-1940/ 673-1523



TOILET, complete, 1 yr old,
$30. (863)467-6868



HOT TUB- 4 person. Like new.
$900 (863)467-8161
HOT TUB- seats 6, good con-
dition, $1000
(863)467-6283 leave mes-
sage



SEWING MACHINE, Singer,
Portable. Excellent condition.
$100. (863)467-9892


BED IN A BAG: Queen Size,
Raised w/ Memory Foam.
Good for storms. $100. or
best offer. (863)824-8703
FISHING RODS: (Over 60)
Some with Reels & Some
with out. $250 for all. Call
(863)467-1865 for appt.
POOL TABLE: National, Solid
Slate, 4x8 w/ 15 cue sticks.
Excellent condition. $500.
(863)675-6563
POOL TABLE- Slate, with ac-
cessories, $250 or best offer
(863)467-6088


HOUSEKEEPING:

Full Time

Okeechobee Health Care Facility
Apply In Person Only At
Business Office, 406 N.W. 4th Street


BOOM BOX- With 2 speakers.
Like new. $150
(239)657-4348
MASSIVE AUDIO: 6000 watt
amp, barely used, $500 or
best offer (863)634-6476
SPEAKER- 12" and 1000 watt
Rocksford Fosgate Amplifier.
$300 (863)634-9945
SPEAKERS, Bass canon, 2
port with JL speaker sub-
woofer $50 (863)763-2230


GENERATOR: Briggs & Strat-
ton, 250 watts, 120 & 12
volts., 5 hp. $200.
863-675-1754
PORTABLE AIR COMPRES-
SORS (2) 1- 3hp vertical
tank, 1- 2hp 20 gal tank,
$370 or sep (561)676-0427
TABLE SAW MACHINE- $145
(239)657-4348
TOOLBOX, 16 drawer, Snap
On roll cab, air tools, sock-
ets, wrenches, $800 will sell
separately. (863)697-0234



VACUUM, Hoover, self-pro-
pelled Wind Tunnel, good
cond., w/manual, belts & at-
tach's. $35. (863)763-6131

Agriculture

FIl I-.

Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed/Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845
Lawn & Garden 850
Livestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds/Plants/
Flowers 865




ALL AMERICAN BOX BLADE-
3 point hitch. $75
(863)763-7540


HILASON TREELESS SAD-
DLE- variable 15-17", brand
new, sturdy & strong. 30 lbs.
$350 firm (772)263-1178
HORSE TRAILER, '91 Goose-
neck, needs some body
work, floor good cond.,
$900 neg. (863)201-3492
SADDLE- HP Western, 17",
with accessories. Like new
condition. $275.
(863)763-0367 or 801-9494
SADDLE, New, 10", Pony Sad-
die, complete w/bridle &
pad. $200 863-634-7480
SADDLE, New, 15", Neoprene,
$200. 863-634-7480



BUSH HOG- Howse 4ft, like
new. $500 or best offer-will
trade up or down for 3 pt fin-
ish mower. (305)299-1203
RIDING MOWER, 2004 1000L
John Deere w/extra blades.
Needs minor work. $575 or
best offer. (863)467-9395
ROTO TILLER- Attach Troy
Built Big Red, 12hp, elec.,
exc. cond. $2800 new, sell
$1200 neg (863)763-1377


Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses - Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House - Rent 930
Land - Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960



APT.1BR/1BA & ANEFFC'Y
Located in Viking/Prairie
Both very clean!
Apt $600/mo. Effc'y $500/mo.
Includes utilities.
No pets. 561-329-8205
OKEECHOBEE, Backlash RV
Park Apt & RV's 1 br available
on the Rim Canal. Call for de-
tails. (863)763-7783
TAYLOR CREEK CONDOS:
1br/1ba, partially furnished.
$650/mo, 1st, last & sec
Call for details. 561-352-4243



OKEE.- 2br/2ba Oak Lake Villa
#47. Remodeled, W/D $900
mo. 1st, last & sec Call 561-


762-7660 or 561-743-0192


All your rental needs
in one location.
Century 21 Horizon Properties
Landlords & Tenants
Call 863-467-2100
AN AMAZING OPPORTUNITY
Waterfront, Clean & Quiet,
Okeechobee Nicest. From
$750. mo. (772)215-0010
BASSWOOD /Okee: 2BR, 1BA
on 3704 NW 36th Ave., Lg.
yard & shade tree. $700 mo.
+ $300 sec., 863-532-9182
Doublewide, 3BR/2BA, in
BHR, No pets, yearly lease,
$750/mo + $1000 sec. dep.
863-763-4031
FORT DRUM, 3br, 2ba, on 5
acres, horses & pets ok,
beautiful secluded home in
Pinelands. Avail. immed.
30240 NW 24th Dr.
$850/mo. 1st & security.
772-342-3203 / 342-3712
Indian Hammock, 1800 sq.
ft., 3/2, w/2 stall barn,
fenced, $2400 mo., Ist, last
& sec. (863)467-0831 ask
for Judy
OAK PARK, 3396 SW 18th St.,
2br/1ba, completely renovat-
ed, Ig. backyard. $900/mo.
& sec. (863)634-6580
OKEE ESTATES, 3/2, CBS,
C/Air, Shaded Corner Lot,
Carport & Shed. $950 mo.
+ sec. 863-697-0234
OKEECHOBEE- 3/2/1 Ever-
lade Estates, tile throughout,
1295/mo, 1st & sec, No pets
561-248-3888/863-599-0156
Okeechobee, brand new 3/2,
avail, now, 1 yr. lease,
$1800 mo., 1st, last & sec.
(863)467-0831 ask for Judy
WATERFRONT, 3BR/1.5BA, Ir,
dr, fam. rm., total update,
$960 mo., 1st, last & sec &
ref's. (561)346-4692


OKEECHOBEE. Kitchen privi-
leges, Cable, W/D, $125/wk,
first & last (863)467-8516


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property - Sale 101C
Condos,'
Townhouses - Sale 1015
Farms - Sale 1020
Houses - Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property - Sale 1035
Land - Sale 1040
Lots - Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property - Sale 1055
Property Inspection1060
Real Estate Wanted 1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080




OKEECHOBEE, 2BR/2BA, villa,
remodeled, great condition,
$120,000 or best offer.
(863)697-0414 .


BUY NOW! Brand new CBS
4 Bdrm., 2 Ba., 3654 NW 5th
St., $995 mo. $145,000.
(863)484-0809


DESPERATE

To SELL Your HOME?





FAST CASH OFFERS?




LAZY 7, 8600 SW 9th Street,
3BR/2BA, 1 car garage,
priced to sell! $189,000.
(863)634-3922 after 4pm
OKEE ESTATES, 3/2, CBS,
C/Air & Heat, Shaded Corner
Lot, Irrigation Well, Carport &
10x16 Shed. 863)697-0234
OKEECHOBEE- Handyman
Special! 3br, 2ba, in Bass-
wood Est., Needs work.
3633 NW 24th Ave. $69,000
Call Lex (561)715-1768.


OKEECHOBEE- 2.22 acres,
cleared and fenced, Lazy 7
Ranch Acres. On paved
road. $110,000
(863)697-8919




OKEE, Large lot on 18th hole
of Okee Golf & Country Club,
nice neighborhood. $89,900.
(863)634-3451



LEX BUYS HOUSES
FOR CASH


(561)715-1768
WWW.LEXBUYSHOUSES.COM


IGeneral Con


I enra * It


We have the countertops
you're looking for!

T FLORIDA FLOORS & MORE
513 S.W Park Street * (863) 763-7131


LAKESHORE RESORT- LAKE
PLACID, FL., New 2BD cottag-
es on Lake Placid, 300' white
sand beach, dock & addl.
amenities. Call (863)441-2659
Nightly, wkly & mthly, rentals
also avail. Call (863)465-2135
www.lakeshoreresortrentals.com



WATERFRONT LOT, With
income from single wide, new
seawall, owner financing.
$105,000 (863)357-3639


Mobile Homes



Mobile Home Lots 2005
Mobile Home - Parts 2010
Mobile Homes - Rent 2015
Mobile Homes - Sale 20'0




AWNINGS, Crank out win-
dows w/screens, doors
in/out, ceiling fans all for
$600 or sep (863)357-7757

it


OKEECHOBEE, 2br/2ba with
land, FL room, lease with op-
tion to buy, nice area, a/c.
(863)634-3451
PLATTS BUFF, 3br, 2ba,
14'x80', 61/2 ac., $900 mo.,
1st, last & ref's. Horses & chil-
dren welcome (863)467-6960
TREASURE ISLAND, 1 & 2
BR, No pets. $600. Sec.
dep. + $700/mo rent. $950
to move in. (863)824-2246
WATERFRONT- 2/1, very pri-
vate, single wide, $599/mo,
C/A, Refrig & Stove, 1st, last
& Sec req. (863)357-3639



- BANK REPO'S -
MOVE TO YOUR LAND
Mobile Home Angels
561-385,4694

7 . - - "" -*'ul-, -
MOBILE HOME: Quiet, 55+
Community. Park Model.
Screened in room. $5000.
863-467-2600
MOBILE HOME, in park, 2
sheds, remodeling done,
needs work, $6500.
(863)467-0954 Iv. msg.
PALM HARBOR HOMES
Certified Modular &
Mobile Home Specialists.
Call for FREE Color Brochures.
(800)622-2832
PALM HARBOR HOMES
Factory Liquidation Sale.
2006 Models MUST GO!
Call for FREE Color Brochures
(800)622-2832


Recreation



Boats 3005
Campers 'RVs 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles' ATVs 3035



AIR BOAT, w/180hp Lycoming
engine, trailer, exc. cond.
$6500 (863)673-0783
BOAT: PADDLE WHEELER, 12
FT, Mid 80's. Ready to use.
$200. (863)763-3551
BOAT REPAIR! I come to
you... even on weekends.
Cam's Mobile Marine Service
(863)634-3878 Iv. msg.
BOAT, Starcraft, 16 Ft., Semi-
V, 40 hp. Mercury, Trailer.
As Is. $500 or best offer.
(863)763-4643
DINGY- 11ft, Avon, can take
up to 10hp motor, $275
(863)234-1994
FISHING BOAT- Aluminum,
'1977 Lone Star. Good con-
dition. $450. (863)763-0410
JON BOAT, 18ft., 115hp Mer-
cury outboard, center con-
sole, trolling motor. $1500
(863)634-9494
KAYAK- Inflatable, 2 person,
good condition with paddles.
Paid $150 asking $100
(863)824-0801
PONTOON BOAT, 20', with
trailer, 48hp Evinrude motor,
$1500. (863)634-4106
SPORTSCRAFT- Tri hull- walk
thru windshield, 60hp Mari-
ner outboard, galv trailer,
$650. (863)467-8038
VIRP '79, 15', Bow Rider, open
front, 40hp Merc. outboard,
runs good, $2500.
(863)801-4709


CAMPER TOP - Fiberglass,
teal green, for stepside pick
up truck, asking $225 or
best offer. (863)357-6315
DODGE CAMPER- '78, incl.
Fridge, stove & bed. Fair
condition. Runs, 318 motor.
$700. (863)342-42900
FORD '79 RV, 6 cyl., Needs
some work. $750 or best of-
fer. (863)763-7497
TRAVEL TRLR- 32ft, elec, AC,
fridge & water heater, great
hunting camper, needs some
work $2000 (863)467-1310



FISH FINDER & BOTTOM
FINDER- Hummingbird 400
Series. Like new. $75.
(863)634-1545
PROPELLER- For Evinrude
motor, 17" Pitch. Recondi-
tioned. $50. (863)634-0433



AIRBOAT FLAGS: $10. each,
Orange, Made from flag ma-
terial. Hi quality. Call for
more info. (863)773-2880



HONDA 250F DIRTBIKE, '04,
$2500. (863)634-8734
KTM 125 SX DIRTBIKE, '03,
$1800 or best offer.
(863)634-8734
SUZUKI LTZ 400 '03- good
condition, all original, low
hours, $3500 or best offer
(863)983-6342
SUZUKI RM250 '05: Dirt bike.
Mint condition, runs good.
$2500. (863)261-4633 or
(863)357-2271
YAMAHA 600 Grizzly 4x4,
1999, runs good, $2200.
(239)229-2974


Automobiles



Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4)10
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks4-1040
Parts - Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070



BUICK ROADMASTER '96-
good cond., runs wells,
white, tan lthr,.4dr, all power,
clean $5800 (863)467-1392
BUW i525, '90, runs good,
cold a/c, sunroof, premium
wheels, $1500.
(863)677-4550
CADILLAC FLEETWOOD, '96,
decent shape, long life left,
$3,000 or best offer.
863-634-5914
CAMARO Z28 '80- Automatic,
pw windows. Restoration
project. $975 firm
. (863)634-6601/256-3629
DODGE STRATUS RT- '97,
White, 4 cyl, 5 spd, Fixed
for racing. Needs Clutch.
$1500. Neg. (239)324-2379
MERCEDES BENZ SEL- '85,
Runs good. Will get you
where you need to go!
$900. 772-263-0013
OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS, '87,
2 door. Good on gas, All
power. Exc. cond., $2500 or
best offer. (863)763-6747


FORD TBIRD '84, Cold a/c,
c/c, 74k. $1300.
(863)634-7789


BUMPER- .Ranch hand full re-
placement, fits '03-up Chevy
HD pu. $800 negotiable.
(863)697-1692
CARPET- OE style, fits '07 Su-
perduty crew cab w/4x4 fl.
shift. Charcoal gray. Brand
new. $300 (863)697-0328
FLAME GRILL, for Chevy Sil-
verado, attachements includ-
ed, $20. (863)763-2230
REAR AXLE- For Chevy P/U
Truck. complete. $100.
772)359-2923 or
863 467-5401
REAR BENCH SEAT, for Jeep
Wranger, gray with belts &
lockable trunk option, like
new, $100. (772)332-1438
RE-CAP TIRES
(2) 425/65R22.5, 80% rub-
ber, $175 for both or will sell
sep (561)676-0427
RIMS & TIRES, (6), 8 lug,
800/ 16.5, $300 will sell
separately. (863)612-5676
SEATS- for 2006 Ford F150
PU truck, asking $500
(954)701-7358


I PbliNo ic i


1�


IjfuarIc o ice


IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE NINETTENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2007-CP-83
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FREDERICK DANIEL SCURLOCK,JR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
FREDERICK DANIEL SCURLOCK, JR.,
deceased, whose death was Septem-
ber 15, 2006, and whose social se-
curity number was 262-34-0081, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Okee-
chobee County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 312 NW
3rd Street, Okeechobee, Florida
34972. The names and addresses of
the personal representatives and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demand
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
TO THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate must
file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT 30 FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice
is July 1st, 2007,
Personal Representative:
Norma J. Lucas
13015 S.E. 46th Street
Okeechobee, Florida 34974
(863) 467-8521
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Shelly A. McKay, Esq.
207 SW 2nd Avenue
Okeechobee, Florida 34974
S863) 467-0911
21982 ON 7/1,8/07


&


Emlymn


J&J BUILDING CONTRACTORS
LICENSE #QB49109
S' "- Screen Rooms � Carports 4
Room Additions * Florida Rooms I
Garages * Seawalls
Ernest Lancaster (8631) 634-2044


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY - OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA
POSTING DATE, July, 2007
CLOSING DATE: July 18, 2007 or Until Position Is Filled
Okeechobee Utility Authority, local water and wastewater provider for approximately
9,000 customers in Okeechobee, Florida is seeking an experienced Executive
Secretary to perform secretanal and administrative duties, prepare letters, plan
and schedule meetings and appointments, conduct research and disseminate in-
formation by using telephone, mail services, Web sites and email and travel ar-
rangements and maintain filing system including maintaining official records of
Okeechobee Utility Authonty. The executive Secretary is also responsible for
scheduling and attending meetings and taking minutes and handling matters and
issues pertaining to the Board of Directors.
The position requires advanced level experience in MS Word and Excel. The ideal
candidate will have at least 5+ years experience in a secretarial role to senior
and/or high-profile executive and uses independent judgment to set priorities and
adjust as necessary to assure divisional deadlines and goals are met, providing
accurate, timely and effective executive secretarial functions for OUA's Executive
Director and other administrators. A pre-employment drug screening will be re-
quired.
The salary range is $28,492 - S42,738. Okeechobee Utility Authority offers an ex-
tensive benefit package that includes life and medical insurance. Relocation as-
sistance is not available for this position.
Qualified applicants may send their letters of interest and resumes to:
Mr. John Hayford, Executive Director
Okeechobee Utlity Authority
100 SW 5th Avenue
Okeechobee, Flodda 34974-4221
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER/DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
222547ON 7/6,7,8/07


i^esonl 032


i^easna-I 0232


I Home Impro


I Home Impr, v tI


RUNNING BOARDS- Factory,
(Beige) off of '08 Super Duty
Ford Crew Cab P/U. $500.
Neg. 863-697-0328 Heather

TIRES & RIMS (4) Aluminum,
Mag, 5 lug. For Dodge Ram
Pickup. $200 or best offer.
(863)612-5676

TONNEAU COVER - Fiber-
glass, for '04 Ford F150 p/u,
painted blue, has lock,
$500/neg. 863-697-3759.

WHEELS & TIRES- 4, 8 lug,
Aluminum wheels with tires.
$150. or best offer.
(863)634-7318



CHEVY 2500- '01, H/D 4x4,
extended cab. Runs strong.
Well maintained. $6500. or
best offer. (863)467-2328

CHEVY S10 PICKUP, '85, 2
wheel drive, auto, runs
great, white, $600 or best
offer. (863)801-4519

DODGE 1500- '96, 4x4, Lift kit,
Runs good. $3000. or best
offer. (863)467-2328

DODGE DAKOTA '92, Ext. cab,
V6 Magnum. Runs good.
$2000 (863)467-4650

DODGE RAM 1500- '03, 4x4,
Quad cab, Hemi. Excellent
condition. $6900.
(863)675-1493

FORD F100 '78- Mark II top-
per, 302 V8, runs good, new
tires, brakes, $950 neg
(386)216-0013 Muse

FORD F150 '96, Shortbed, Ed-
die Bauer, Cold A/C, Runs &
Looks great. 124K, 6 cyl., 5
spd., $3700.1863-673-6819

GMC SIERRA- '05, 4x4, With
ext. cab. Excellent condition.
$25,500. (863)675-1493

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE La-
redo 1993, Not pretty, but
runs, runs, runs! $750 or
best offer. (863)357-5867

S10- '89, 4X4, V6, 5 spd
manual, New paint & tires.
High mi., but runs good.
$2500. Neg. (863)634-0399

TOPPER- Fiberglass. Fits Ford
F150. Standard cab. 6' bed.
Tan, tinted windows $500.
(772)263-6481



JEEP CHEROKEE, '95, white,
$2200 or best offer. MUST
SELL!!! (863)763-4821

SUZUKI SAMARI 1986, 4x4,
Soft & Bikini Top, 5 spd.,
manual trans. w/ OD. Runs
well. $2200 (561)261-0766



EQUIPMENT TRAILER- Flat-
bed. 2 & 5/16 ball. Bumper
pull. 16', 2 axles. Like new.
$2500. (863)467-6960

GOOSENECK TRAILER
In Okeechobee '05, 32'-flat
bed-equip. ramps included
$7,000-call 800-924-4686

OPEN TRAILER- small, 4x8
w/high sides, spare tire,
jack, ramp in back, $600 or
best offer (863)824-8703



CHEVY CONVERSION VAN,
'95, $1200. (863)612-0992

CHRYSLER '02 Town & Coun-
try, 100K, 6 cyl, CD, A/C,
New tires. Exc. cond. $6000.
Must see! (863)675-5816.

FORD ECONOLINE- '89, Work
van, No A/C. Runs good.
$600. 863-484-0267


Public Notices



Public Notice 5005
State Public -
Legal Notice 5500




PUBLIC NOTICE
Awesome Self Storage, 6489 US 441 SE,
Okeechobee, FL 34974 will dispose of
stored items on July 16,2007.
Owners unit#
Samantha Alexander 647
Wayne Ballard 76
Mana (Saochez) Chapman 657
Johnny & Michelle Henderson 449
Brandon Gabbard 640
Denise Large 435
Wes & Michelle Ripley 345
Deanne Roberson 420
Perry Sweet 656
222140 ON 07/01,08/07







14 Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007



Charter school divides county along racial lines


By Dorie Turner
Associated Press Writer
GREENSBORO, Ga.(AP)--The
interstate, not the railroad, divides
social class and race in east Geor-
gia's Greene County.
Lopped almost in half by In-
terstate 20, the haves own mil-
lion-dollar houses along the lake
and the have-nots live in trailers
in abandoned, run-down towns.
There's not much in between
aside from hard feelings.
Now a place long divided by
demographics and geography is at
odds again over the opening of a
charter school that some residents
say intentionally excludes the
county's black and low-income
students. The proposed school
gives enrollment preference to
children living near Lake Oconee,
the predominantly white, affluent
section of the county south of In-
terstate 20.
"What this creates is racial
segregation de facto," said the
Rev. Roi Johnson, pastor of New
Springfield Baptist Church in Si-
loam, one of the county's small
towns.
Supporters of the school,
which would be called Lake


Oconee Academy, say it's not
meant to discriminate, but to
draw more middle-class families
to the county. They say it will cre-
ate a neighborhood school for
children who now live more than
10 miles from the closest public
school.
"We believe if we have a com-
munity-based school in this area,
the people will move here," said
Rabun Neal, president of the up-
scale Reynolds Plantation devel-
opment and lead petitioner for
the charter school.
Blacks make up 40 percent
of the county -- which is about
75 miles east of Atlanta -- but the
majority of them live north of
the highway in Greensboro and
Union Point. The 2,100-student
public school system, however, is
70 percent black, and more than
three-quarters of students are eli-
gible for free or reduced lunches.
The charter school would
serve students primarily from the
tony Lake Oconee developments
-- including Reynolds Plantation
and Reynolds Landing, resort-
style communities with a Ritz-
Carlton Lodge. Ten percent of the
school's planned 400 seats would
be reserved for students outside


the primary attendance zone.
The Greene County school
board signed off on the proposed
charter school late last year, send-
ing it to the state's charter school
committee for approval. The state
committee is expected to approve
the proposal at a July 12 meeting
in time for the school to open in
August in temporary space at a
nearby church.
In the meantime, Johnson and
other county residents -- including
a former chairman of the Greene
County school board -- have
mounted a campaign against the
school.
A group of about 50 residents
held a protest at the state Capitol
in mid-June, wearing shirts read-
ing: "No taxation without repre-
sentation."
So far, the protests haven't had
much effect, and Johnson has ap-
parently worn out his welcome
with the Greene County school
board.
After bringing up the issue
at several meetings, a sheriff's
deputy handed Johnson a letter
banning him from speaking at fu-
ture meetings as he was making a
social call.
"It's gonna get me arrested, I


guess," Johnson said minutes af-
ter opening the note.
Superintendent Shawn Mc-
Collough declined a face-to-face
interview and did not return re-
peated calls for comment.
Greene County school board
chairwoman Janice Gallimore,
who is black, said she supports
opening the school because "it's
the right thing to do for the area."
The naysayers, she said, are act-
ing based on personal quibbles
with school board members.
"We need to put politics aside
and focus on the children and the
community," Gallimore said.
Greene County residents
haven't had to deal with en-
rollment zones which are in
place in many public school dis-
tricts across the state because
the county only has four public
schools, all of which have open
enrollment, said Andrew Broy,
director of charter schools for the
state.
Charter schools, however,
don't have to follow such prac-
tices because they are free from
state and federal regulations and
are required only to meet stan-
dards negotiated between the
school and state officials.


The schools must still meet
state and federal education stan-
dards like the No Child Left Be-
hind law, but have more leeway
in how they get there.
The charter school debate has
strained relations in this town,
which has historically been ra-
cially divided dating back to when
slaves worked the fields of cotton
and corn.
When agriculture began to
decline, so did Greene County's
economy. And that left a large mi-
nority population with meager in-
comes and low education levels,
said University of Georgia demog-
rapher Doug Bachtel.
"Into that environment moved
a lot of affluent white educated
suburbanites who got lake homes
there," Bachtel said. "It has creat-
ed some interesting dynamics in
terms of politics."
The racial divide in the county
is still tangible, and self-segrega-
tion is evident in some places.
At the only doctor's office
in Union Point, the back door
opened into, a small waiting room
filled with blacks while the front
door lead to a larger waiting room
filled with whites. No signs indi-
cated who should sit where, but


it seemed like there was a natural
inclination to separate.
"It's a matter of choice, like
where you go to church," said
Dr. William H. Rhodes. "There
are black churches and white
churches."
Change is coming quickly to
the fast-growing county. Reyn-
olds Plantation wants to draw
more middle-class families by
building affordable homes start-
ing at $150,000 near the charter
school. Neal said he wants the
3,200 workers who staff the Ritz-
Carlton Lodge and other nearby
businesses to be able to afford to
live there.
Still, for parents like Wilmatine
Parks, the new school seems like
an attempt to divide the county.
Parks has a daughter going into
kindergarten and another going
into second grade, but neither are
in the school's attendance zone
since the family lives north of the
interstate.
"To me, they are segregating
the schools," said Parks. "They
don't want their kids to go to
school with the kids up here."


Civil War shipwreck teaches students about science, history


By Sonja Barisic
Associated Press Writer
ON THE JAMES RIVER,
Va. (AP)-- Five 13-year-olds in puffy
orange life jackets crowded inside
the cabin of a small research boat
and stared at a bank of computer
monitors.
Suddenly, a dark gray mass
appeared on one of the screens
-- a sonar image of the wreckage
of the Civil War-era frigate USS
Cumberland. The Confederate ar-
mored ship CSS Virginia rammed
and sank the Cumberland the day
before its famous Civil War battle
with its Union ironclad counter-
part, the USS Monitor.
As members of the Cumber-
land Club, the kids studied arti-
facts from the ship, then helped
researchers beam sonar to the
bottom of the James River near
the coal piers in Newport News,
Va., to check on the condition of
the ship itself.
The U.S. Navy and the Na-
tional Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration hold the sum-
mer enrichment program, which
gives middle-school students a
hands-on feel for what it's like to
be historians, archaeologists and
marine scientists.
"It Was fun to be able to do
things that are important that


kids don't usually get to do," said
Jazmine Brooks of Norfolk, who'll
be in eighth grade in the fall. ,
The Cumberland Club is free
to the students. Most come from
the Norfolk public school system,
which has a high poverty rate,
said Jennifer Hurst, an educator
with The Hampton Roads Naval
Museum in Norfolk, who wrote
the grant application for the pro-
gram. To be selected, students
wrote essays on "Why is history
important?"
Hurst said she expects the
program, now in its second year,
to be held again next summer,
possibly revised to involve a dif-
ferent shipwreck in southeastern
Virginia. She invited this year's 18
members to return next year as
mentors.
Before their river outing, the
students spent a week studying in
classrooms and going to the naval
museum and The USS Monitor
Center at The Mariners' Museum
in Newport News to learn about
conservation and archaeology
techniques and about the history
of the Cumberland.
The ship, launched in 1842,
sailed to a number of Mediter-
ranean ports, served in the Gulf
of Mexico during the Mexican-
American War and patrolled the
coast of Africa to suppress the


slave trade.
The Cumberland was an-
chored off Newport News on
March 8, 1862, when the CSS
Virginia arrived to attack a Union
blockade. The Virginia pushed her
iron ram into the Cumberland's
side and the ship began to sink,
its gun crews continuing to fire.
About 100 men died, including
many of the wounded who were
in the Cumberland's sick bay.
The fight demonstrated the
superiority of armored, steam-
powered ships over traditional
wooden sailing ships.
The next day, the Virginia and
the ironclad Monitor fought a
battle that ended in a' standoff.
The Virginia had torn off most of
its iron spar when it backed away
from the Cumberland, and some
historians think that the Monitor
was saved for further action be-
cause that spar could have pen-
etrated the hull below its armor.
Today, the Cumberland's
wreckage is protected by law,
and federal agents have seized
artifacts that some people have
looted from the site. The Cumber-
land Club students got to handle
some artifacts from the Cumber-
land that belong to the Hampton
Roads Naval Museum.
On one afternoon, the students
split into several groups to exam-


ine the items under the tutelage of
Michael V Taylor, the museum's
preservation officer. They looked
for damage as they turned the
pieces over in their gloved hands,
.then photographed the items for
the museum's records and wrote
up reports describing the objects
and recommending how to con-
serve them.
Most of the items were fairly
easy to identify: a door hinge, a
pulley, a spike.
. Cameron Parsons and David
Hart, 13-year-olds from Virginia
Beach, weren't sure what they
had been given, though. It looked
like two small pieces of wood
held together by three rivets. One
rivet was inscribed "Philada," per-
haps an abbreviation of "Philadel-
phia."
"That's cool," Taylor said. "I
have no idea what it is."
A few minutes later, David, us-
ing a magnifying glass, spotted on
the "Philada" rivet what looked
like an engraving of the scales of
justice. Maybe the artifact was as-
sociated with the ship's legal of-
ficer, Taylor told the boys.
They may get to find out for
sure. NOAA's Office of Ocean Ex-
ploration is providing $1,000 for
enhanced restoration for Cum-
berland artifacts, and the Cum-
berland Club voted to use the


money in part to conserve the
"Philada" piece.
Cameron said he enjoyed
studying the artifacts "because
we're finding real stuff, not rec-
reation stuff that adults set up'for
us."
"And it's fun to see stuff that
people used like a really long time
ago," David added.
The following week, in late
June, the students were divided
into smaller groups of about five
that each spent a day aboard
the Bay Hydrographer, a 56-foot
NOAA research vessel. They even
got a chance to steer the boat,
with help from the skipper, Lt. j.g.
Michael Davidson of the NOAA
Corps.
On the last day, the vessel de-
parted from NOAA's dock in Nor-
folk on the Elizabeth River. During
its hour's journey to the wreck
site, it passed small boats fishing
for croaker, dolphins leaping out
of the water and a destroyer head-
ing for its berth at Norfolk Naval
Station.
The students helped research-
ers use side scan and multibeam
sonar to scan the Cumberland
wreckage, as well as the nearby
wrecks of the Confederate ship
CSS Florida, which accidentally
sank on Nov. 28, 1864, and a third,
unknown ship.


James S. Schmidt, contract ar-
chaeologist with the underwater
archaeology branch of The Naval
Historical Center, will crunch the
data collected. "This is real re-
search" by the students that wol
help protect cultural resources,
he said.
Research in 2004 showed that
the ships were being exposed
naturally and the Cumberland
Club program was an opportui-
nity to return to the site to check
for signs of deterioration, Schmidt
said. So far, it appears as though
storms have shifted sediments
to cover -- and thus protect -- the
wrecks.
The naval museum's Taylor
said he believes the program will
have a lasting impression on thp
students.
While many kids spend their
summers just hanging around,
Taylor said, "Cumberland kids get
to say, 'I went out on an archaeo-
logical expedition with The Naval
Historical Center on a NOAA boat
and we went to the wrecks of the
Cumberland and the Confeder-
ate Florida. You know, they're
important wrecks and important
cultural resources.'"
Then, they'll go back to just
being kids.


Okeechobee News/ Lorna Jablonski

Lake Cleanup Day crew
Crews of volunteers helped clean up the lakefront and the banks of the Kissimmee River
Saturday during "Lake Cleanup Day". Members of one of the crews (left to right) are: Keith
Dietz, Kenneth Sprigle, Garrett Farmer, Kyle Fabbro and Mike Eagle.


Okeechobee News/Victoria Hannon

Fenced up
The site of the new Home Depot has been fenced off to keep people off of the property as,
work continues in preparation for the eventual opening of the store.


Community Events


Parenting classes planned
Parenting classes for parents with children of any age will begin
each Monday in August at 7 p.m. at New Endeavor High School.
There is no fee for the nine-week class. For more information
please contact Lori Jaquith (863) 462-5000 or (863) 697-6320.

SFWMD stages photo contest
The South Florida Water Management District's Okeechobee
Service Center is seeking Lake Okeechobee area photographs for
the 2008 Lake Okeechobee calendar. Winning images will be pub-
lished as the featured monthly photos. Applications will be taken
until July 31 and entry forms and complete contest rules are avail-
able at www.sfwmd.gov/okee -- select Info & Education. This con-
test is open to amateur photographers only. Individuals may submit
up to three photos. For information, call (863) 462-5260.

Okeechobee Main Street Fundraiser
On Saturday, Aug. 11, the Okeechobee Main Street, INC. will be
holding their first 100 Target Fun Shoot to benefit beautification
and restoration projects. The even will be held at Quail Creek Plan-
tation. Check in begins at 8 a.m. Course opens at 8:30 a.m. and the
lase shooter by 10 a.m. There will be drawings, door prizes and a
barbecue lunch by the 'Big Kahuna'. For more information please
call the Okeechobee Main Street at (863) 357- MAIN (6246).


Cancer Support Group to meet
Okeechobee Cancer Support Group will meet the first Thurs-
day of every month beginning Aug. 2, 2007. Each meeting will be
held from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. at the First Baptist Church, 401 S.W.
Fourth St., Room 113. Cancer Patients, survivors and supporters
are all invited to attend. Our group will gather to share stories and
encourage each other as we take this journey. This support group
will provide you with information, resources, support, guest speak-
ers, and devotional time and to help comfort during either your
battle or you loved ones battle with cancer. For more information
please contact First Baptist Church at 863-763-2171.

Red Cross to host water instructor course
The American Red Cross will conduct water safety instructor
courses on Aug. 11, 17, 18, 24 and 25. The fee is $160. Applicants
must be at lest 15 years of age. To register, call (863) 763-2488.

Poker run to benefit Hospice
A poker run in memory of Carl and Robin will be held Satur-
day, Aug. 25, beginning at Port Mayaca Cemetery at 9 a.m. The
fee is $5 per hand. Prizes will be awarded. Proceeds will benefit
Okeechobee Hospice. For information, call Deanne at (772) 260-
6801 or Dee at (863) 634-0492.


Church hosting Worldview Weekend
The First Baptist Church, as host church, will sponsor World-
view Weekend on Oct. 12 and 13 at Osceola Middle School, 825
S.W. 28th St. Speakers representing Worldview Weekend will be
Ken Ham, David Barton, Bob Cornuke, Brannon Howse, and Ro'n
Carlson. The program is appropriate for ages 11 and up. Tickets
can be obtained from Debi at (863) 634-3525 or the First Baptist
Church at (863) 763-2171; or, online at www.worldviewweekend.
com.

Class of '57 members sought
Members of the class of '57 from first grade to graduation or
other, please contact Martin Vickers at (423) 727-5631, Reba Platt
at (863) 763-8906, or Faith Hawk at (863) 467-6083.

OHS class of '88 planning reunion
The Okeechobee High School class of 1988 has begun making
plans for their 20th reunion. Any members of the class of '88 are
asked to e-mail your name, address and phone number to Larry
Peterson, class president, at ohsl988reunion@yahoo.com. We will
update you after each planning committee meeting. Also, if you
have any ideas or would like to be on the committee let us know
in your e-mail.








Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007 SPORTS 15


Submitted photo
Group participation photo at the junior golf clinic (front row, left to right) are:Tanner Homer, Kutter Crawford, Kodi Stephen,
'Tyffani Zeller, Mark Lanning, Sarah Gabor, Parker Choate, Preston Arnold, Daniel Waller, Cameron White, Jeremiah
,Rinehart. Participants in the (back row, left to right) are:Britani Bryner, Danial Dunson, Thad Chandler, Ryan Reister, Drew
Arrants, Chance Murphy, Richard Donegan, Tad Norman, Danny Busbin, Bridgette Waldau, Jim Waldau, Dan Lanman.
Those attending but not pictured are: Tyler Platt, Kyle Mullins, Bubba Mullins, Corey White.


Grand prize winner of the golf clubs are: Parker Choate and
Sarah Gabor, presented by Bridgette Waldau.


First place winner team participants are (left to right) Parker Choate, Tyffani Zeller, Sarah
Gabor, Kodi Stephen, Ryan Reister, Dan Lanman, PGA Assistant Professional.


Jr. Golf Clinic is a success


Waldau's Junior Golf held their
annual Junior Golf Clinic dur-
ing the week of June 18 - June
-.2, 2007. Twenty young golf-
,ers, ages 8 - 13, participated in
the weeklong clinic held at the
Okeechobee Golf & Country Club.
The purpose of this popular clinic
was not only'teaching the basics
of golf, but to6"also teach the rules
and etiquette of the sport.
Jim Waldau, president of Wal-
dau's Junior Golf, Inc. started this
program over 15 years ago, when
he held his first Golf Party, which,
was a gathering for his firefighter
comrades from the City 6f Hialeah
Fire Department for a weekend of
'golf, party and fellowship. The
golf party became so popular that
in 1994, with the encouragement
of the golf pro at that time, JR Col-
burn, Jim decided to turn his golf
party into a benefit for junior golf-
ers. The program began to award
college scholarships, as well as
donate to the Okeechobee High
School golf team and young ju-
nior golfers. During the summer
of 2002, Jim Waldau expanded
his program to include an annual
Junior Golf Clinic.
Each day at the clinic included
instruction, practice, and golf
games. Beginners to intermediate
players were taught the aspects
of golf. The rules of golf and golf
etiquette were also taught to the
junior golfers, with fun being the
underlying objective. Waldau's
Junior Golf Clinic also provid-
ed educational literature, daily
goody-bags filled with items used


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LOWtR JAW\BONIE


for golf, and tournament shirts.
Waldau'sJuniorGolfprogram's
main goal is to give the children of
Okeechobee County an early start
in a sport that encourages family
interaction, friendly competition,
possible college scholarships,
and future business networking
opportunities. Mr. Waldau states,
"Starting out right is the key to en-
joying golf. There is more to golf
than just swinging a club. Rules,
etiquette and respect for the game
are important aspects, and our
program is dedicated to exposing
the young players with the proper
and complete lessons of golf.
The highlight of the clinic took
place on the last day when the
entire junior golfers participated
in a golf tournament. Following
the scramble format, all players
were treated to lunch, prior to the
awards ceremony. Many family
and friends looked on as each ju-
nior golfer was awarded a certifi-
cate of participation. First place
went to the team of Kodi Stephen,
Parker Choate, Tyffani Zeller, Sarah
Gabor and Ryan Reister. Second
place awards went to the team of
Richard Donegan, Mark Lanning,
Daniel Waller, Thad Chandler and
Kutter Crawford.
Each junior golfer received
door prizes and two of the prizes
were a new set of golf clubs. The
lucky winners were Sarah Gabor
and Parker Choate. Another
grand prize, won by Mark Lan-
ning, was a professional photo
shoot. This photo shoot, donated
by Rafael Pacheco of Creations in


* Implants Are Surgically Inserted
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Fotografia, also includes a 12 x 18
collage of the junior golfer. Fol-
lowing the lunch and awards, the
golfers, family and friends were
treated to homemade ice cream,
provided by the Marble Slab
Creamery of Okeechobee.
Along with Jim Waldau, many
others helped throughout the
week to instruct the junior golf-
ers. Waldau Junior Golf wishes to
thank the following: Golf instruc-
tors, Dan Lanman, and Bubba
Mullins; Corey White, OHS Stu-
dent and member of OHS golf
team; Britani Bryner, 2007 OHS
graduate with a 4 year letter OHS
golf team and recipient of a Wal-
dau's Junior Golf Scholarship;
Kodi Stephen, 2007 Okeechobee
Junior Golf champion and OGCC
Junior Golf Champion. Waldau's
Junior Golf would also like to
thank the following: Terry Lan-
man, OGCC Club Professional;
George Guydosh, OGCC President,
Stan Mole, Green's Supertendant,
and his crew; Paul in the OGCC
restaurant; Mary Attaway, Rick
Donegan, Donald Waller, Leo
Weaver, Brewer Construction,
Beef O'Bradys, Golf Roundup of
Vero Beach, Marble Slab Cream-
ery, Creation in Fofografia (Ra-
fael Pacheco), Studio of Graphic
Design (Bridgette Waldau), Mike
White with Okeechobee The
Magazine, and all the OGCC golf-
ers who were kind and patient as
they played golf around the activi-
ties of the golf clinic.


S 3 - Dentists have over 70 years combined dental experience in Palm Be
County. 20 years implant experience and over 10,000 crowns/implants insertions.
E3 - Digital X-Rays, 90% less radiation.


- Biohorizon, Lifecore, Biolock - All made in the USA.


* - Dr. Wade Harrouff is a graduate of Misch Institute - University of
Pittsburg and Graduate of Implant Program at Atlantic Dental Research Clinic.
Also, trained in France and Germany.
S E3- Lifetime warranty from manufacturer.


T.A. I : I Wade B.
Aliapoulios, - Harrouff,
D.D.S. D.D.S.
License #DN1847 License #DN10761
versity of New Hampshire in Zoology Graduate University of Tennessee 1977. Author, lecturer who
University Dental School. US Air hasappearedon TV,radioandprint(WPBF/ABC, Palm Beach
Corp. Served as Chair of Council on illustrated and more) as the authority on implants as well as
i.,Formerly of West Palm Beach, h general dentistry. Member of Inlternational Congress of Oral
. Formerly of West h am Beach, he implantology. American Academy of Implant Dentistry &
s practice with Dr. Harrouff. _ Misch Institute of Advanced Implanlology.


Jonothan
M. Royal,
I I D.M.D.
License #DN12061
Graduate of Louisville School of Dentistry in
1989. Practiced privately in Boca Raton and
has recently joined Dr. Harrouff's group. Past
Vice President of South Palm Beach County
Dental Association.


561-741-7142
6390 W. Indiantown Road * Jupiter
Chasewood Plaza near RJ Gators


For Free Implant Report Dial [8881692-1325 Or Log On To www.freeimplantreport.com
Now treatment program only The patient end any other person responsible or payment hav te height to refuse to pay. cancel payment, or be reimbursed for any Lic #DN1076
service. examination or treatment which I performed ns a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for th free. disconted or reduced te
e rvico, oxamlnnlon or trontmont. Implant Surgical Fee. & DN1847


Second place winning team participants (in no particular order) are: Mark Lanning, Daniel
Waller, Thad Chandler and Kutter Crawford,Richard Donegan, Dan Lanman, PGA Assistant
Professional.





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~,


-- ------------------- -------------------


A


with manners?


O'k.techoI,'1


(kt-echimhe Okeechibee News
Second term . Anril tacI1hty pact oKd


A legitimate role for the press is that of "the public's watchdog." Most
citizens can't spend the time necessary to personally observe their
public officials at work, or to determine how well public institutions
are carrying out their public mission.

But too many newspapers these days act more like "mad dogs" than
"watchdogs."

We're proud to be different. We try to carry out our "watchdog" role
as humble representatives of the public, always maintaining a courte-
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How are we doing?

Let us know by mailing feedback@newszap.com or calling your edi-
tor.





Okeechobee News


Community Service Through Journalism


v was about to lose my
S cause of tmy teeth. Dr.
r.ff took care of the
S.. - I received
S. its, a Sinus Lift and
S.. t O.tal Surgery at a
affordable price. I
.i, r Dr. Harrouff and
1,1 recommend him to
S...V.-m who truly pants to
Bill VanDusen, improve the look of his or
Meteorologist her smile!"


Station A
$500

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Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007


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16 Okeechobee News, Sunday, July 8, 2007

fL llTO YOTA SCIOlCON
YO1 ....RE O NNA LIKE THE WAY WE DO BUSINESS' .
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ON QUALIFYING NEW AND PRE-OWNED VEHICLES. SEE DEALER FOR EXCLUSIONS. SEE LIFETIME WARRANTY CONTRACT FOR COMPLETE DETAILS ON POWERTRAIN COVERAGE.
233I DODGEZX i ri 9 i f IF I I P IINII 3 Q fl VLKWAGi





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MALIBU LS TOWN & RANGER XB OPTIMA
ON -L, .r"iL lL COUNTRY A u LiW .liL AUTO, ONE OWNER. ONE FR
1 llCOUNTRY 'i L-Er L fi lLE I' [i'll A' LOWMILES! ONE F' .
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2004 BUICK
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SOLARA
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SLT |
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2004 FORD
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$14,490
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XTERRA
ONLY 14K MILES
SAUTfJ. 1 ,IWNFR'
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,- '- , 2006 VW
GTI
ONLY 9K MILES,
ONE OWNER. RED!
SlQ 7f50


TO ER2NTMOFE ONLY 7K MILES. ONLY 4K MILES.SE
ONLY9KML LESI HEM LOADEDO' PERFECT!I _____L______L_ WMIL_ S
I$20,775 $21,433 $21,995 $22,950 $22,990
I7.. j2004 CADILLAC ,2005 NISSAN 2004 NISSAN04 GMC 2005 NISSAN
SRX I TITANLE TITAN SE DENALI ARMADA LE
I"iJAI)ED . .1 MI -I V i- . LEAT -IER Ll-'AD- -4X4,1-OWNER. FULLY 4x4 [1% rJtA'
" rrnrF , ' a . OiL e M ' :NpInNLY 11 MILEL'' LOADED' 21, MILEr
$24,975 I $25,990 I$22,900 L $27,480 D $33,400
PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG. TITLE, AND $388.50 DEALER FEE. *$5,000 MINIMUM TRADE MINUS DEDUCTIONS FOR EXCESS MILES, WEAR. TEAR, AND RECONDITIONING OR WE MAKE YOUR FIRST PAYMENT. FINANCE DEALS ONLY.

fLUN tarY NISSAN w..
YOU'RE GONNA LIKE THE W4 Y WE DO BUSINESS!
1700 FLARE ROAD 810 ALAN JAV*863-4024280


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*0% FINANCING WITH APPROVED CREDIT ON SELECT IN STOCK MODELS. PAYMENTS PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE, AND $388,50 DEALER FEE. SENTRA PAYMENT FOR 60 MONTH TERM AT 4.9% APR. ALTIMA PAYMENT FOR 60 MONTH TERM AT 2.9% APR. QUEST PAYMENT FOR 72 MONTH TERM AT 3.9% APR.
PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. OFFERS MAY NOT BE COMBINED, 0% IN LIEU OF ALL REBATES, DISCOUNTS, " ,ll-. :r'..1 0 Hi- ,.'IfII - P',. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. OFFERS VALID DATE OF P i ,i: iiri . ljr;I . IJrTHF-WA L irjC 1'Hl EC
Carlos E. Fuentes
ffLN Y NISSAN manager
YOU'RE GOMNA LIKE THIE WAY WE O0 BUSINESS! Se MMa "Nil
700 FAToRE RO 280 a s"t nGcnrhum"n
SU1700 AREa ROAD 800M AN JAY*863-402-4280 carlos.fuentes~atanjay.com


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WAR//AN T




ENGINE
TRANSMISSION
DRIVE AXLE
BRAKES
STEERING
ELECTRICAL
SUSPENSION
AIR CONDITIONING

12 MONTH
ROAD SIDE ASSISTANCE;
COVERS
TOWING,
LOCK-OUT
RENTAL CAR AND
TRIP INTERRUPTION.


To offer terms with a
variety of plans to meet
your needs, regardless
of past circumstances!


If you're not
completely satisfied with your
pre-owned purchase, bring it
back within 48 hours/250, miles
for an exchange. If you're not
happy, we're not happy!


On Every New & Used Vehicle!
An Alan Jay Exclusive
"L L ITIMFr V, Ai-F -M LnIjIHr.T ILOR ('.MPLETE DEOrIL'
.I P BWE T-AIiN [QEF,t.fGE

FAST IPE
D L, A I


In short, we pledge
to make your buying
experience fast, simple,
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'06 CADILLAC : '. 04 CHEVY
SRX IMPALA 41
CEi,,F-ED CADILL.C PW/PDIPS/AC
L.-,Au, u75613940A 79220711A
0too -,%-,n -c- 94 -Ori


ij '06 CHEVY
* CORVETTE
L LO EL', EkCtLLENT
S Coo.r:,' , #R5036C


50 CC 4X4
LOADED
#6U237372A


'03 CHEVY
CAVALIER
4 D:. un AuT, MATIC
A R0416A
$7,695
'05 CHRYSLER
PT CRUISER
ToURIaG. E iomor,
#7L195426A
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.*---I- '00 TROPHY ' .
- 22FT CUTTY
Arc. CABm, WAL. .
Arourul t 6C339851K *I

'05 KIA
FULL P;wea CD. AcjinLrfce
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SSORENTO LX - '- ' SEDONA LX
S AuTOMT',iC 6 CCE. |. .. P R W.oavr, &&
,jj #77331395B r - LJ j LoCKs, 77329888A
$14.995 IV $8.995


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'06 GMC
SIERRA SLT
LEATHER. ONSTAI,
V8, 4x4
S24.Q988R


"04 CHEVY
TAHOE LT
LEAtE. DVD PLA,Ef,
C.rTAr4 CaS,.T Tow PKG


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PP20440

'06 KIA
OPTIMA
V6, 4 DC.4, AuiouMAiC
H 439l n2


FT7I6.1. OWEl A
^^^^^ 20.998 1


'02 GMC
ENVQY
Au , POEwn Wows
& LuCK .Tow PACKAGE
$11 988Qtf


'03 OLDS '. 05 PONTIAC , 04 BUICK
AW- SILHOUETTE VIBE PARK AVENUE
s PREMIER. LEATHER . -de AUTOMATIC, A/C. Auw . LEATHER,
EITERTANIVENT PACKAGE 34 MG A 27.000 MILES
$13.988 109 - $14.988 $19.988
'05 BUICK ... 05 SATURN '04 GMC
S LESABRE LIMITED - " i-lf RELAY YUKON
LEAT-ER. Auto, V6 AuT.. DVD PLAER, Auto. Low MILES,
LOCAL TRADE LOCAL TRADE LOCA TRADE
$17.988 $17.988 $10,988

vleJ '03 HONDA 03 TOYOTA '02 TOYOTA
TU ACCORD AVALON RAV,4
0.%k-* [ $14,755 1151935]cap_ $131970.

'01 CHRYSLER 02 :-�'06 NISSAN
TOWN & COUNTRY BMWLE ALTIMA
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'02 PONTIAC '. 01 MERCURY '05 CADILLAC
AZTEK SABLE LS DEVILLE
L:A TA L.ATMLe ,:, Low ML0E O0 46,000 M:cti, Lt .Ai MAI OF O" t dER.ONLI
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ll $10.,898 I $10,995 $23.998
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Inspection of the emission system of the automobile listed above and the air pollution control devices does not represent a warranty that the automobile meets federal or slate emission control requirements nor is it a substitute for obtaining certification from a valid emission control sta-
tion. The inspector makes no warranty, expressed or implied, with respect to the sufficiency of the air pollution control devices with respect to federal and state guidelines. Inspections performed are limited to determining that the parts and components listed and checked on this sticker
are in proper working condition AT E TIME OF DELIVERY OFTHE VEHICLE TO YOU THE CUSTOMER. Except as stated in the separate Limited Warranty Document, the dealer is not responsible for and does not warranty any matter, component, part, accessory or otherwise, other
than the working condition of these inspected parts and components AT THE TIME OF DELIVERY.The dealer is not responsible and/or liable for defects arising after delivery of the vehicle to you. *A check mark does not mean these components are applicable to this vehicle.


ALAN JAY
CHEVROLET
CADILLAC
441 US 27 NORTH,
SEBRING, FL 33870
863-402-4210


ALAN JAY
CHRYSLER
JEEP KIA
5330 US 27 NORTH
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TOYOTA
SCION
401 US 27 SOUTH
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SATURN
OF SEBRING
440 US 27 NORTH,
SEBRING, FL 33870
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