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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028410/00294
 Material Information
Title: Okeechobee news
Uniform Title: Okeechobee news (Okeechobee, Fla. 2000)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Okeechobee News
Place of Publication: Okeechobee Fla
Creation Date: October 24, 2005
Publication Date: 2000-
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Okeechobee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Okeechobee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Okeechobee -- Okeechobee
Coordinates: 27.241667 x -80.833056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 91, no. 111 (Apr. 20, 2000)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 91, no. 182 (June 30, 2000).
 Record Information
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Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003642554
oclc - 72823230
lccn - 2006229435
System ID: UF00028410:00294
 Related Items
Preceded by: Daily Okeechobee news

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
    Main: Opinion
        page 4
    Main: Sports
        page 5
    Main: Continued
        page 6
    Main: Classifieds
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Main: Continued
        page 10
Full Text




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Okeechob ee views


Vol. 96 No. 297 _____


Hurricane
announcements
A daylight to dark curfew
went into effect Sunday, Oct.
23. It will remain in effect from
day to day at the discretion of
Okeechobee County Sheriff
Paul May. All residents are
asked to stay off the streets
during the curfew period
unless on official business.
Okeechobee County
Schools will be closed Mon-
day, Oct. 24 and Tuesday, Oct.
25. Any further closings will be
announced on all West Palm
Beach television stations, on
local radio station WOKC
(1570 AM) and on the IRCC
radio station WQCS (88.9
FM). Announcements will
also be shared with local and
regional newspapers.
A general boil water
notice is in effect for OUA cus-
tomers.
Should hurricane Wilma
affect out area, newspaper
delivery may be delayed. Our
carriers will make deliveries as
soon as it is safe.
The special meeting of
the board of directors of the
Okeechobee Utility Authority
(OUA) scheduled for 8:30
a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25, has
been rescheduled for 8:30
a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 2.
Okeechobee County
offices will be closed Monday,
Oct. 24.
Boat ramps at Scott Dri-
ver, Lock 7 and Okee-Tantie
are closed.
sceola Middle School,
825 S.W. 28th Street, will open
as a shelter beginning at noon
on Sunday, Oct. 23. The spe-
cial needs shelter at the Okee-
chobee County Health Depart-
ment, 1798 N.W. Ninth Ave.,
will open at 9 a.m. on Sunday.
For Spanish speaking res-
idents Yearling Middle School
is open as a shelter and also
the Catholic Church will be
open as a shelter.
Shelters will not admit
sexual predators. Sexual pred-
ators needing shelter should
go to the Okeechobee County
Sheriff's Office, 504 N.W
Fourth St.
The Okeechobee Minis-
terial Association's prayer
walk scheduled for Tuesday,
Oct. 25, has been postponed..
All court proceedings
scheduled for Monday, Oct.
24, have been canceled. If you
have been summoned for jury
duty, call the number listed on
our summons for informa-
tion. For more, monitor the
circuit's website at www.cir-
cuitl9.org.
The Okeechobee County
Agri-Civic Center will be a
staging area for relief supplies
after the hurricane is over.
After the hurricane pass-
es, bulk distribution of water
will take place at the Fort
Drum Diner on U.S. 441 N, the
Okeechobee County Civic
Center on U.S. 98 and in the
parking lot of the former K-
Mart store at the corner of S.
Parrott Ave. and Charles Har-
vey Highway. People are
asked to bring their own con-
tainers
Radio station WOKC
1570 AM will broadcast con-
tinuously from the Okee-
chobee County Emergency
Operations Center beginning
Monday, Oct. 24. They will
stay on the air 24-hours-a-day
as long as necessary.
For more hurricane info-
See page 2

Index

Classifieds ........ 7-9
Comics . . .6
Community Events ... 4
Crossword . ... 7
Opinion . . 4
Speak Out ... ..... .. 4
Sports . . . 5
TV . . . .8
Weather . . .2
See Page 2 for Information about
how to contact the newspaper,.

newszap.cem
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Online news & information


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Scientists: Weather pattern is uncommon R girl C


Number of Major North Atlantic Hurricanes

Category 3, 4, and 5


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Special to Okeechobee News/SFWMD


This graph shows that the number of hurricanes, categories 3, 4, and 5 increase when
the water in the tropical Atlantic Ocean is warmer. We are currently in a warm phase, but
the water in the tropical Atlantic is even warmer than expected.

Rare climate pattern effects lake


By MaiyAnn Morris
Special to Okeechobee News
The current weather pattern
affecting South Florida has not
taken place for the past 50 or 100
years, say scientists.
"We are experiencing an
uncommon event. South Florida
climate varies in cycles, some
that form patterns with long
return frequencies. This certainly
is an event of a magnitude that
normally occurs once every 50 to
100 years. That these weather/cli-
mate factors are happening at
the same time, is a rarity," said Dr.
Jayantha Obeyserkera, Director
of the Hydrologic and Environ-
mental Systems Modeling
Department at the South Florida
Water Management District. Edu-
cated in India and the U.S., Dr.
Obeyserkera has practiced water
resource engineering for over 20
years and taught in five countries:
Dominican Republic, Columbia,
Spain, Sire Lanka and the U.S.
Working with Paul Trimble, a
lead engineer working with
SFWMD for 28 years whose
work in hydrologic and climate


has been verified statistically by
scientists at NOAA's national
research lab in Miami, Dr. Obey-
sekera and his colleagues have
studied past weather patterns
and have closely followed them
since last year's unusual hurri-
cane activity. They now believe
that Florida is seeing a tempera-
ture and rainfall pattern not seen
in many decades.
Statistics from the National
Climate Data Center show that
the Atlantic Ocean has warm and
cold temperature cycles that typi-
cally last several decades. The
last previous warm phase
occurred from the middle 1920s
through the 1960s, when South
Florida also experienced very
wet conditions. This is verified in
the ring patterns in the cut cross-
sections of old trees also. By
studyingthe tree-ring patterns
and information about the cli-
mate in the past, scientists know
that the warm and cold cycles
are a regular part of the global cli-
mate. At this time, however, the
tropical Atlantic Ocean is even
warmer than would be expected


in this cycle. According to the sci-
entists, it is not known if this is
due to global warming or anoth-
er natural variable.
The effect of the warm/cold
cycles on Lake Okeechobee is
also shown by history. Historical-
ly, during warm phases, inflow
into the lake can be double the.
inflow of cold periods.
The National Climate Data
Center's 111-year period of
record that begins in 1895 shows
that the Florida statewide wet
season rainfall from 2001 to 2004
was the largest rainfall of any
other similar four-year period.
August 2004 to July 2005 was the
wettest period on record. Scien-
tists at SFWMD will be monitor-
ing both the climatic and condi-
tions of the watershed on a
weekly basis to be aware of the
current outlook.
"Though seasonal climatic
forecasts may have significant
uncertainties, the water man-
agers need to take actions in
advance when climatic outlooks
indicate a risk of extremely wet
conditions," said Dr. Obeysekera.


)ross


opens s
"Floridians should take
action immediately as Hurri-
cane Wilma, an extremely dan-
gerous and already deadly
storm, barrels towards the
coast. This storm is extremely
dangerous. When evacuations
are issued, people should focus
on protecting themselves and
their families. The American
Red Cross is mobilizing on all
fronts for Hurricane Wilma's
landfall", said Dean Dimke,
Executive Director, American
Red Cross, Greater Palm Beach
Area Chapter.
"The Red Cross is position-
ing hundreds of disaster relief
workers, equipment and sup-
plies from around the country
in safe areas, in order for relief
efforts to begin immediately
after the storm passes. The
American Red Cross is prepar-
ing to shelter tens of thousands
of evacuees", added Dimke.
The following is a list of


shelters
shelters that opened Sunday,
Oct. 23:
Osceola Middle School,
825 SW 28 St, Okeechobee
South Elementary, 2468
SW 7th Ave, Okeechobee
Glades Central High
School, 1001 SW Ave. M, Belle
Glade
Lakeshore Middle School,
425 W Canal Street, Belle Glade
Maple Grove Baptist
Church, 120 E SR 78, Moore
Haven
Buckhead Ridge VFW,
2002 Hwy 78, W Okeechobee
West Glades Elementary,
2500 South CR 731 SW in
Muse/LaBelle
Clewiston Middle School
Gym, 601 Pasadena St, Clewis-
ton
LaBelle Middle School
Gym, Cowboy Way, La
Belle 33975
See Shelters Page 2


Horses help dads


connect with kids


By Katrina Elsken

Gestheme Ranch, in asso-
ciation with Dunklin Memorial
Camp, has started a horse-
back riding program for the
children of men in the Dunklin
Memorial Camp rehabilitation
program.
The horseback riding pro-
gram helps the fathers recon-
nect and bond with their chil-
dren, while working with the
horses in a family activity.
The program started about
three years ago, explained
Karen Jones of Gestheme
Ranch. They currently have
seven horses.
She said approximately 15


to 20 children come out each
Saturday to visit their fathers
and ride horses. The men and
their children learn about the
horses together, she said.
She said the horses are also
ridden by the children of Dun-
klin Memorial Camp staff
members.
The program is currently
limited by the number of avail-
able horses.
Program organizers are
looking for of gentle horses,
suitable for small children to
ride. Donations of saddles, bri-
dles and other tack are also
needed. Donations of hay and
See Horses Page 2


Care needed when trimming trees


By MaryAnn Morris
If a storm leaves broken
trees or large branches in your
yard, take safety precautions
when dealing with the mess.
Broken trees can be sawed
into pieces and stacked for fire-
wood or placed at the roadside
edge of the property for pick
up. Broken or hanging branch-
es can be pruned off. Like any-
thing else, there is a right way
to do this.
Cut as shown on the illustra-
tion, close to the trunk, on a
slant and leave the "collar" as
shown. If it's a long, heavy
branch, cut it off in pieces,
,I,irting at the small end. Before
you cut, look to see where the
tree or branch will fall. Oak
wood, for instance is very
heavy, and even small pieces
can cause injury,
Hatchets, machetes or other
hacking tools leave an ugly, dis-
ease-prone stub. Use a chain
saw, if you know how to use
one, If you have purchased a


new chain saw, practice on
something on the ground
before trying to use one up
over your head. Read the direc-
tions. Think before you cut.
You don't want to become a
post-hurricane injury statistic.
You can also use a hand saw. It
takes longer, but it will do the
job.
Dan Culbert, Extension
Agent, Horticulture, for Okee-
chobee County, advises "Stand
away off with a pencil or other
such object in your hand. Hold
the pencil (or whatever you
have chosen) upright at arms
length and sight along its
length the height of the over-
hanging tree or branch. Move
the top of the pencil right and
left to see where the tree (or
branch) might Ip ',ih l fall to
minimize the chances of dam-
age."
Don't pile branches in ditch-
es or on the road pavement,
Branches will slow Ihe1
drainage tof storm water and


collect trash that can block the
ditch completely. Branches on
road pavement can cause an
accident and slow the progress
of fire trucks, ambulances and
other emergency vehicles.
Remember, when working
in the heat, pace yourself, take
your time and drink 2 to 4 glass-
es of water every HOUR. If you
wait until you're thirsty, you are
already dehydrated. Being
dehydrated puts you at risk for
heat stroke, heat exhaustion
and other heat-related illness-
es. Take frequent "cool-off"
breaks while you work. Do not
work in the mid-day heat. Work
early, work late and use mid-
day for a siesta!
Use insect repellent contain-
ing DEET. Apply lightly to both
clothing and exposed skin.
Information for this article
was provided by the Okee-
ch(abe County Extension
Office and Okeechobee Coun-
ty and1 Universit of Florida
1.,4S.


Special to INI/Edward F. Gilman'IFAS
Remove all dead or damaged wood without cutting into the
"collar" of the branch, close to the trunk of the tree. Cutting
into the collar amounts to cutting into the trunk.


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2 The Okeechobee News, Monday, October 24,2005
\


More hurricane
announcements
The Okeechobee Planning
Board/Board of Adjustments and
Appeals meeting that was sched-
uled for Tuesday, Oct. 25, has
been cancelled and will be
rescheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 1.
The Okeechobee Planning
Board/Board of Adjustments and
Appeals meeting that was sched-
uled for Tuesday, Oct. 25, has been
cancelled and will be rescheduled
for Tuesday, Nov. 1.
The emergency department
at Raulerson Hospital will continue
operation 24 hours a day, however,
visitor access during the storm will
be limited. If you have an outpa-
tient procedure scheduled for early
in the week, please call central
scheduling at 863-824-2839.
All Glades County schools,
government offices and Moore
Haven City Hall will be closed on
Monday, Oct.24.
Per Glades County Sheriff's
Dept., a curfew will go into effect
midnight Sunday from dawn to
dusk until further notice.
The Glades County Emer-
gency Operations Center will be at
a level 1,24-hour operations begin-
ning 7 a.m., Sunday. Glades County
residents can call our rumor con-
trol line at 946-6060 or 6021.
Stay tuned to local radio and
television stations for official emer-
gency information from the Glades
County Emergency Operations
Center.

Loans help replace
storm-damaged homes
OKEECHOBEE The Okee-
chobee Non-Profit Housing, Inc.
has received $500,000 for the
HOME Again Loan Program,
which helps homeowners with
replacement of their hurricane
damaged or destroyed homes.
The HOME Again Program will
help applicants who meet the fol-
lowing criteria:
O* You owned .your home in
Okeechobee County and it was
your primary residence during hur-
ricanes Frances and Jeanne in
2004.
You have been unable to fix
your home due to a lack of insur-
ance or other assistance.
*Your gross household income
is at or below the following levels:
one person in the household -
$24,000; two persons $27,650;
three persons $31,100; four per-
sons $34,550; five persons -
$37,300; six persons $40,100;
seven persons $42,850; and,
eight persons $45,500.
Interviews for applications for
this program are by appointment
only. To make an appointment for
an interview, call Jessie Vazquez at
(863) 467-5525. The Okeechobee
Non-Profit Housing Inc. office is
open 9 a.m. until 4 p.m., Monday
through Friday.

Foley's aide
to visit locally
OKEECHOBEE Ann Decker,
aide to U.S. Representative Mark
Foley (R), 16th Congressional dis-
trict, will hold office hours in room
106 of the Okeechobee County
Courthouse, 304 N.W. Second St.,
from 10 a.m. until noon on
Wednesday, Oct. 26.
Ms. Decker will also be avail-
able by phone at (863) 763-6441.

County plans
fall festival.
OKEECHOBEE The second
annual Okeechobee County fall
festival will be held Oct. 29 and Oct.
30 at the Okeechobee County Agri-
Civic Center, 4200 S.R. 70 E.
Admission.and parking is free
for all spectators and participants.
Gates will open at noon on Sat-
urday and at 1 p.m. on Sunday.
Events slated for Saturday will
include: arts, crafts, specialty mer-
chandise, food and a bounce
house and slide for children. A
trick-or-treat greet for the children
will start at 5 p.m. and end at 7 p.m.
Parents and children alike can
wear costumes.
Main Street will also hold a pet
costume contest on Saturday
evening. For information and entry
applications, contact Main Street at
(863) 357-MAIN.
On Sunday, the Okeechobee
Cattlemen's Association will put on
a ranch rodeo. For information or
entry applications, call (863) 634-
3265.
For vendor and general event
information, call (863) 763-1666.

Legislative body
will meet Nov. 2


OKEECHOBEE State Repre-
sentative Frank Attkisson, 'chair-
man of the Okeechobee County
Legislative Delegation, has
announced that the next meeting
of that group will be Wednesday,
Nov. 2, from 1:30 until 4 p.m. in the
Okeechobee County Board of
County Commissioners chambers,
304 N.W. Second St.
The delegation will hear con-
cerns and ideas for potential legis-
lation. Members of the community,
as well as local and county govern-
ments, may present their concerns
to the delegation at this time.
If you are want to address the
delegation, contact the Rep.
Attkisson's district office at (407)
943-3078 by Oct. 3.


- -

- -


Staff photo/MaryAnn Morris
Picking out chicks
Pete Birkett, age 10, and his sister, Charlotte Birkett, age 6, enjoyed picking chicks to take
home and raise at Chick-Give-Away, part of customer appreciation days at a local busi-
ness, Saturday, October 22.


Shelters
Continued From Page 1
WHO SHOULD GO? Going to
a shelter should be your last
choice. If you must evacuate,
please consider places that may
offer you more comfort and priva-
cy. You may choose to make
arrangements with friends and
relatives who live in a safe area.
Making an advance reservation
with a hotel/motel out of the area
is also a good choice. Remember
to leave as soon as possible after
your notification to avoid traffic!
WHAT TO BRING? If you come
to a shelter, remember to bring
the following: change of clothes,


toilet articles, bedding, pillows,
prescription medication, any spe-
cial dietary food, cards, family
board games, battery powered
radio and a flashlight. Shelters will
have a team of volunteers includ-
ing a nurse to register you and
look after your well being. Foods
served will be simple and condi-
tions may be very crowded.
Remember a shelter is not
designed for comfort, it is
designed to save your life!
WHAT IF I HAVE SPECIAL
NEEDS? For those who are requir-
ing special nursing care, are on
oxygen or any other life support
systems, and need special, indi-
vidual, shelter care, you will need
to contact your local Emergency
Management Office:


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Palm Beach County, call 561-
712-6400
Hendry County, call 863-675-
5255
Okeechobee County, call
863-763-3212
Glades County, call 863-946-
6020
Preparing for a disaster, such
as a hurricane, ahead of time can
help alleviate the stress you may
face during the storm, and ease
the burden on your family and
loved ones. For more information
regarding how individuals and
families can prepare for disasters
visit and to download your Hurri-
cane Evacuation Checklist, go to
our website at: www.redcross-
pbc.org.


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Truck weight restrictions lifted


TALLAHASSEE Florida Agri-
culture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bron-
son announced Thursday that
Gov. Jeb Bush's declaration of a
state of emergency for Hurricane
Wilma extends for 60 days a waiv-
er of weight restrictions normally
in place on commercial vehicles.
It means that trucks, including
those carrying livestock, fresh and
processed fruit and vegetable
products, and timber, can


increase their loads to assist in
hurricane recovery. The weight
limit on the largest trucks has
been increased from 80,000
pounds to 95,000 pounds, and
limits have also been increased to
varying degrees for smaller
trucks.
Vehicles carrying the extra
weight permitted under the exec-
utive order are required to carry a
copy of the Florida Department of
Transportation letter authorizing


the weight increases, as well as
copies of Florida maps that desig-
nate the routes that can be used
to transport the oversized loads.

The executive order signed by
the Governor late Wednesday
also extends for 60 days a suspen-
sion of a state law that requires a
health certificate to accompany
animals being transported from
communities threatened or
impacted by the storm.


Legislators to honor GAL volunteers


In observance of National
Adoption Day, the Guardian ad
Litem Program will be hosting an
event to honor their volunteers.
Area Legislators and Depen-
dency Judges have been invited to
join in the celebration. This event
is the first of its kind for the pro-
gram. All 20 Guardian ad Litem
Programs in the state will be host-
ing similar events. Governor Bush
has also expressed an interest in
attending one of these events.


John and Reve Walsh, founders of
the National Center for Missing
and Exploited Children have been
invited to speak.
Guardian ad Litem volunteers
are everyday people who advo-
cate for the best interest of
abused, neglected and aban-
doned children in court. These
wonderful people are tireless
defenders of the children, who
without them would have no
voice.


t-' .. J I -


If you are interested in becom-
ing a .volunteer, please call
(772)785-5804. With your help
we can help every child find a safe
permanent home.

Admittance to the event will be
by invitation only. The event will
take place on Thursday, Nov. 17
from 9 until 11 a.m. at Club Med
located at 4500 S.E. Pine Valley
Street in Port St. Lucie.


Horses

Continued From Page 1
horse feed are also welcome.
S"We have rodeos once a
month," said Mrs. Jones. "We
would like to teach them calf
roping and barrel racing."
All donations to the program
are tax-deductible. For more
) information, contact Jesse or
Karen Jones at (772) 597-2841.
Dunklin Memorial Camp pro-
S vides a rehabilitation program
for those with drug and/or alco-
hol addictions. The average
length of stay at the camp is 10 to
11 months. The program popu-
lation averages 75 to 80 men.
* --Interaction with families is
important to the rehabilitation
efforts.


--* AI -


Comics

Page 6


Community Events,

Training for GaL volunteers offered
Training sessions for Guardians ad Litem volunteers will be held on
three Fridays in November Nov. 4, 11 and 18. Training sessions will be
from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at St. Bernadette's Catholic Church, 350 N.W. Cal-
ifornia Blvd., in Port St. Lucie. Volunteers must be 21 years of age, submit
an application, submit to a criminal background check, submit to a per-
sonal reference check and attend 30 hours of training that includes court-
room observation and independent study.
VNA hosting free memory screenings
The Visiting Nurses Association (VNA), 208 S.E. Park St., will host free
memory loss screenings on Friday, Nov. 4, from 11 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.
Screenings will be done by appointment. To make an appointment, call
Donna True at 800-861 -7826, ext. 1, or (772) 285-6291. The screenings will
be done by a nurse or social worker from St. Mary's Memory Disorder
Center. Screenings are open to anyone concerned about memory loss.

Hospice planning yard sale
Hospice of Okeechobee will hold a yard sale Friday, Nov. 4, and Satur-
day, Nov. 5, from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. The sale will be held at the Hospice of
Okeechobee Volunteer House at S.E. Fourth Street and Third Avenue,
next to the Hospice Residence. All proceeds benefit patient care in Okee-
chobee. All yard sale donations will be accepted at this location.

Chamber hosting chicken dinner
The Okeechobee County Chamber of Commerce will host a barbe-
cue chicken dinner on Nov. 4 from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. in Flagler Park #2.
A drive-up curbside area will be designated. The dinner will include: bar-
becued chicken (white meat $6 and dark meat $5) with baked beans,
potato salad, roll and a cookie. Tickets are available at the Chamber
office, 55 S. Parrott Ave.; Rustic Ranch Furniture, 123 S.W. Park St; or,
from any Chamber board member. Orders can be faxed to (863) 763-
3531 and paid for when the meal is picked up. For information, contact
the Chamber office at (863) 763-6464.


-4




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The Okeechobee News, Monday, October 24, 2005


Fall brings Florida wildflowers


Submitted to the Okeechobee News/South Elementary
Terrific Kids honored
South Elementary Terrific Kids for the week of Oct. 10-14 are: (Not in any particular order)
Julissa Hernandez, Cheyenne Rhoden, Nicholas Amiet, Justin Shepherd, Jonathan Buck,
Breaira Smith, Brady Rhodes, Alyssa Coleman, Gage Faircloth, Jennifer Gillum, Dylan
Boyer, Brendan Barcia, Greg Hernandez, Henedino Arellano, Conner Varnadore, Zane
Morehead, Jordan Faircloth, Haley Yates, Jenna Wolff, Shyane Adkins, Jesus Jimenez,



Storms cause major damage to boats


Boat Owners Association of
The United States, the nation's
leading organization for recre-
ational boaters, estimates that
damage to recreational vessels as
a result of Hurricane Katrina is
between $650 to $750 million. Of
that amount only about half, or
$300 to $400 million in damage,
was covered by insurance.
Katrina's losses far surpass last
year's four hurricane total of
about $330 million in damages as
well as the $500 million in losses
attributed to 1992's Hurricane
Andrew which until now was
believed to be the single most
costly natural catastrophe to
effect recreational boating. Hurri-
cane Katrina also destroyed an
estimated 75% of the marinas
along 150 miles of the Gulf Coast.
The BoatU.S. Marine Insur-
ance Catastrophe Response Team


is working in all three affected
states of Alabama, Mississippi and
Louisiana. Carroll Robertson, sen-
ior vice president of Claims for
BoatU.S. Marine Insurance, says
that she expects claims activity to
subside in Alabama and Missis-
sippi in the next few weeks as
boats are located, surveyed and
processed for repairs or salvage.
"However, there is still a lot of
work to do in Louisiana," said
Robertson, who adds that the
sheer size and severity of destruc-
tion in the state, in addition to
evacuations and security restric-
tions, have slowed recovery
efforts.
Boat owners insured with
BoatU.S. Marine Insurance
should call 800-937-1937 to report
a loss or damage to their vessel or
go to
http://www.BoatUS.com/insur-


ance/claims.htm
On the heels of Katrina, Hurri-
cane Rita wreaked havoc on
coastal areas of eastern Texas and
the Louisiana bayou on Sept. 24,
and figures for boat losses attrib-
uted to this storm aren't expected
fnr a fewx mnroe weeksP


Boat Ow
The United
leading advo
boaters pro
members w
consumer
group-rate r
gram that in
million boat
more than 5
vessels; disc
and repairs
ing Marinas;
subscription
zine, the mo
ing publicati


National wildlife refuge


By Dan Culbert
As I'm writing this column a
week before the storm, I'm won-
dering if Wilma will have left much
natural beauty in her wake for us to
see. Along the roads in our area, I've
noticed that fall has arrived in the
form of several wildflowers. So to
give us a little rest from all those
weighty cleanup chores, please be
safe and enjoy the visual bouquet as
you travel our beautiful countryside.
Wildflowers are seasonal in
nature, and gardeners sometimes
wonder why certain flowers
appear during certain times of the
year. So, in addition to introducing
a pair of these yellow beauties, this
column will describe how Mother
Nature knows when to lay a yellow
blanket over our fields and forests
in the fall.
Timing is everything, as this is a
matter of survival with many flow-
ers. For seeds to grow, and plants
to rest, they must time their flowers
perfectly with the right amount of
moisture, temperature and humid-
ity for survival. In the fall, a number
of plants have internal mecha-
nisms that get them to flower as
days are getting shorter and tem-
peratures are getting cooler.
The response to flowering in
the fall is shown by plants that are
called short day plants. But a look
at how they do this would better
call them long night plants.
Among the many chemical
processes going on in plants, a pig-
ment is changed from one form to
another during the day. At night, the
process is reversed. The relative
amount of this "phytochome pig-
ment" signals the rest of the plant


either grow more leaves, or start to
form flowers which will led to seed.
In the fall, long night plants
form flowers when the days
become longer than the nights.
This change occurs every year, hot
or cold, hurricanes or not, and the
result will be a blanket of flowers
year after year.
Among fall markers in our area,
besides pumpkin vendors and
football games, is a medium to tall
upright plant that has drooping yel-
low clusters of small yellow flow-
ers. These plants are known as
Goldenrod, and as best as I can tell,
as many as six different species are
found in south central Florida.
Statewide, there are 21 species of
Solidago, the Goldenrods, and
about 70 different Goldenrods are
found in the Eastern US. Some are
endangered; many are found
growing only in certain kinds of
habitats, while others have a wide
range. And their pollen does not
cause hay fever.
One of the most common Gold-
enrods in our area is the Pinebarren
Goldenrod, S. fistulosa. It's com-
mon name may suggest that it is
found in pine forests, but it is quite
adaptable to any sandy, moist soil
- which are very common in our
area. They grow from 2 to 6 feet tall,
and are topped with plume-like
clusters of golden yellow flowers
that arch over. Look closely and you
will see an abundance of insects on
the small flowers.
A second fall flower that is quite
striking is a member of the Sun-
flower family. Most people have a
pretty good idea of what a sun-
flower looks like, but the sunflow-


ers now painting our roadsides yel-
low are generally daisies. And in
fact, both the sunflowers and gold-
enrods are part of the large plant
family called the Composite or
Daisy family.
My sources tell me that there
are as many as 21 sunflower
species in Florida, and hundreds
across the US. But only one
species, the Southeastern Sun-
flower (Helianthus agrestis) forms
such dramatic patches of tall flow-
ering daisies in our area of Florida.
This beautiful plant grows unno-
ticed in wet roadside areas through
the spring and summer, but erupts
into a branched head of 20 to 40
yellow daises. In the middle of the
yellow petals is a tight cluster of
purplish brown true florets. Some-
times they have small touches of
yellow hidden in their flower head.
Insects will pollinate both these
flowers, and the petals fade and
leave bumps of seed capsules. Tiny
seed fall in place or are blown to
another area, where they can lead
to a new colony of these fall wild-
flowers. The mother plant will die
back, fall to the ground, and will
rest until spring when they resprout
and the cycle begins again.
I've placed more information on
our Okeechobee web page,
http://okeechobee.ifas.ufl.edu. If
you need additional information on
wildflowers, please email us at
okeechobee@ifas.ufl.edu or call us
at 863-763-6469. Local residents can
stop by our office at 458 Hwy 98
North in Okeechobee, and visit our
Okeechobee County Master Gar-
deners on Tuesday afternoons from
1 to 5 p.m. on Tuesday afternoons.


Sporting licenses free for seniors


a. f Leaders at the Florida Fish and In an effort to plan proactively exemption, because federal
vners Association of Wildlife Conservation Commission for fish and wildlife conservation matching dollars are, in part, tied tc
States is the nation's (FWC) say they will not recom- programs, FWC began developing the number of paid license holders
locate for recreational mend requiring seniors to pay for a business plan to ensure the finan- "That federal funding is impor
oviding its 620,000 fishing and hunting licenses. cial stability of its programs for the tant, but we believe we can come
Iith a wide array of "Florida's seniors are among the next five years. Throughout this up with a creative solution that wil
services including a FWC's most valued partners. Many process, the agency has been enable us to capture those dollars
marine insurance pro- of them support our fish and wildlife exploring all possible solutions and without having to charge seniors
sures nearly a quarter conservation efforts by donating has worked with Floridians to get directly," Mr. Haddad said.
:s; the largest fleet of their time and contributing money their perspectives on how to deal Haddad added that the agency
;00 towing assistance by voluntarily purchasing licenses," with funding shortfalls. will continue working with resi
counts on fuel, slips, FWC Executive Director Ken Had- A large portion of FWC's budg- dents to ensure Florida's fish and
at over 825 Cooperat- dad said. "We appreciate their et comes from user fees, primarily wildlife conservation programs
boat financing; and a efforts and their continued support. licenses, permits and specialty remain financially stable. The FWC
i to BoatU.S. Maga- We have no intention of placing an license plate fees. One of the sug- does not plan to submit any exemp
ost widely read boat- undue burden on seniors who can't gestions the FWC received was to tion or fee increase proposals dur
on in the U.S. afford to pay." consider repealing the senior ing the 2006 legislative session.

conservation efforts benefit economy


Secretary of the Interior Gale Our national wildlife refuges
Norton has released a report that are not only beautiful places where
shows recreational use on-national fish and wildlife can flourish, they
wildlife refuges generated almost are also economic engines for their
$1.4 billion in total economic activity local communities, providing jobs,
during the 2004 fiscal year. The customers for local businesses,
report, Banking on Nature 2004: The and tax revenue for local govern-
Economic Benefits to Local Com- ments," Secretary Norton said.
munities of National Wildlife Refuge "With 17 new refuges and a 30 per-
Visitation, was compiled by U.S. Fish cent increase in the refuge system
and Wildlife Service economists. budget since 2001, we are ensuring
According to the study, nearly our refuges continue to be places
37 million people visited national of awe and wonder as well as eco-
wildlife refuges in 2004, creating nomic vitality for local communi-
almost 24,000 private sector jobs ties across the country."
and producing about $454 million The report reinforces the travel
in employment income. Addition- industry's belief that ecotourism is
ally, recreational spending on becoming big business, according
refuges generated nearly $151 mil- to Roger Dow, president of the Tray-
lion in tax revenue at the local, el Industry Association of America,
county, state and federal level, who unveiled the report with the

Floridians urged


to use energy wisely


TALLAHASSEE In recognition
of the importance of conserving
energy, Governor Jeb Bush signed
a proclamation recognizing Octo-
ber as Energy Awareness Month.
Florida joins federal and state part-
ners nationwide to celebrate this
year's theme, "Not in Use? Turn Off
the Juice!" which encourages
Americans to conserve energy at
home and in the workplace.
"Florida is encouraging its citi-
zens to conserve energy supplies
and look for alternative sources of
energy," said Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection Secretary
Colleen M. Castille. "Simple lifestyle
changes can save consumers
money, protect the environment
and preserve natural resources."
During Energy Awareness
Month, Florida is encouraging its
citizens to conserve energy and
seek alternative sources for fuel
supplies. State government is lead-
ing by example state office build-
ings have taken steps to conserve
energy by unplugging all non-
essential equipment, turning off all
lights and computers after hours,
turning up thermostats and using
hybrid vehicles when possible.
Florida is harnessing one of the
state's most abundant resources,
sunlight, to produce clean energy in
homes and in schools with reliable,
low maintenance solar systems.
Front Porch Sunshine installs solar-
powered water heaters in under-
served communities to conserve
energy and reduce electricity bills,
while SunSmart Schools provides
electricity to school classrooms
through solar electric systems and
provides an on-site classroom for
students to learn more about solar
power and the benefits of energy
conservation. The SunBuilt pro-
gram encourages builders to install
solar hot water heaters in newly
constructed homes.
Through DEP's Green Lodging
Certification Program, Florida is


encouraging hotels and motels to
conserve natural resources and
prevent pollution. The voluntary
program helps the lodging industry
reduce costs, conserve energy and
earn its Green Lodging designation
by investing in simple and innova-
tive 'green' practices that conserve
water, save energy, improve air
quality and reduce waste. As
reward for designation, Florida rec-
ommends Green Lodgings to com-
panies and trade 'organizations
seeking eco-friendly lodging and
convention facilities. Currently,
Florida is home to nine 'green' certi-
fied hotels, with 15 others enrolled
and working toward designation.
With a growing fleet, the State
of Florida currently owns more
than 1400 alternative fuel vehicles,
shaping the market for fuel-effi-
cient travel and clean air technolo-
gy. More than 22 percent of DEP's
fleet is comprised of clean energy
transportation, with more than 90
hybrid vehicles and more than 290
alternative fuel vehicles.
For more information on ener-
gy conservation in Florida, visit
www.floridadep.org.


Secretary of the Interior. The study
measured the economic impact of
ecotourism, large numbers of peo-
ple traveling substantial distances
for outdoor activities like wildlife
observation and photography, as
well as more traditional refuge pro-
grams like hunting and fishing.
Highlights from the Banking on
Nature 2004 report include:
More than 80 percent of retail
sales came from people who trav-
eled some distance to get to nation-
al wildlife refuges and the recre-
ational opportunities they offer.
Local residents accounted for just
17 percent of total retail sales to
refugevisitors.
The Southeast led the Refuge
System in economic impact. With
nearly 11 million visitors last year,


national wildlife refuges in the
Southeast created more than $451
million in economic activity and
more than 8,500 jobs.
The report shows a consider-
able "consumer surplus" of more
than $1 billion in 2004. Consumer
surplus is a measure of how much
more people are willing to pay for
recreation than it actually costs
them.
Using findings from 93 national
wildlife refuges considered typical
in terms of the nation's recreational
interests and spending habits, the
report analyzed recreational partic-
ipation in and expenditures for
freshwater fishing, saltwater fish-
ing, migratory bird hunting, small
game hunting, big game hunting
and non-consumptive activities,


Community Events

Benefit barbecue is planned
The Good Spirits Lounge, 245 U.S. 441 S.E., will host a barbecue on
Oct. 30 from 2 until 8 p.m. to benefit John and Connie Stanley, who
recently had their mobile home destroyed by fire. Pork, cole slaw, potato
salad, green beans and baked beans will be served. The cost will be $5
per plate. For information, contact the Good Spirits Lounge at (863) 763-
2734.

Swimming pool hours announced
The Okeechobee Sports Complex swimming pool hours of operation
are: Aug. 8 Oct. 30, Tuesday through Friday from 4 until 7 p.m., Saturday
from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 until 5 p.m. The pool is not
open during school hours. For information, contact the pool office at
(863) 467-7667.

Alternative Halloween festival slated
The First Baptist Church and More-2-Life Ministries will host their
annual Fall Fest in Flagler Park #6 on Monday, Oct.,31, from 5:30 until
7:30 p.m. This year's Halloween alternative festival is open to all ages and
appropriate costumes. There will be games, food and candy provided.
For information, call (863) 763-2171.

4-H and FFA Club enrollment under way
All youth planning to participate in the 2006 Okeechobee Youth Live-
stock Show may enroll now but must be enrolled by Oct. 31, and be in
good club standings by attending monthly club meetings to be eligible to
participate in the livestock show.


. .... Memorial Tribute
^ Remember a loved one
rI who has departed with a special
SMemorial Tribute in this newspaper.


Your tribute can be published following the memorial services, or to
commemorate an anniversary ofyour loved one's birth or passing. You
can add a photograph of your loved one, lines from a poem or
scripture, and special art or borders -- and we'll make sure it all comes
together attractively and tastefully.
As, W W
Visit www2.newszap.com/memorials for sample ads
and an online order form, or call 1-866-379-6397 toll free.


including wildlife observation.
Costs considered in the calculation
of the total econoffiic activity
included money spent for food and
refreshments, lodging at motels,
cabins, lodges or campgrounds,
and transportation.
In making its calculations,
Banking on Nature 2004 used the
Fish and Wildlife Service's "2001
National Survey of Fishing, Hunting
and Wildlife-Associated Recre-
ation" and the visitation numbers
from Refuge Management Infor-
mation System. Refuges with
fewer than 1,500 visitors per year
and those in Hawaii and Alaska
(because travel there is so expen-
sive)were excluded from the final
calculations.
The National Wildlife Refuge


System encompasses nearly 100
million acres and 545 national
wildlife refuges. Priority uses of the
National Wildlife Refuge System
are hunting, fishing, photography,
wildlife observation,environmen-
tal education, and interpretation.

For a copy of the report or to
find more information on the
National Wildlife Refuge System,
visit http://www.fws.gov/refuges/.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Ser-
vice is the principal Federal agency
responsible for conserving, pro-
tecting and enhancing fish, wildlife
and plants and their habitats for the
continuing benefit of the American
people.


Buy, sell and trade with the classified
Pages 7- 9





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OKEECHOBEE
(863) 467-2224
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~4~:






The Okeechobee News, Monday, October 24, 2005


OPINION


Speak Out

Have an opinion or a question about a public issue? Post it anytime
at the Okeechobee issues blog at http://newsblog.info/0904. It is a
hometown forum so visit the page as often as you would like and
share your comments (but no personal attacks or profanities, please).
You can also make a comment by calling our Speak Out 24-hour
opinion line at (863) 467-2033, fax (863) 763-5901 or sending e-mail
to okeenews@newszap.com. You can also mail submissions to
Okeechobee News, P.O. Box 639, Okeechobee, Fla. 34973. Com-
ments will be published in the newspaper as space permits.
ANY HAUNTINGS?: With Halloween coming up, I am interested in
any ghost stories about Okeechobee. Does anyone have stories to
share or haunted houses we could check out?

MESS IN VIKING: I live out in the Viking Subdivision at the Prairie. I
am speaking out because the trash situation out here is appalling. We
have been told to put out cans with lids. Every time I put out my cans
with lids they are stolen or run over and they are still being dumped out
by the dogs. I have lost five cans in the last month. The trash is not
being picked up by the Waste Management as a result. The end of the
road is so full of trash it looks like a mini dump site. My husband and
my self have gone and cleaned it up several times but it always returns
to the same dump. Besides making the area look "trashy," it is effecting
the environment with litter and garbage. I do not understand why we
went to all the trouble and expense of clearing lots and fencing them in
for roll off containers to be placed for trash collection and then not
using them. When we did have the roll off containers before, the area
was much cleaner and better maintained. If it is a problem of recycling
I am sure that there can be differently marked containers for recycling
and trash. Then to add insult to injury the people that mow the roads
come along and mow right over all the trash laying at the roads and
scatter it all over the place more then it already is. Something needs to
be done to clean up this mess.

SPEAK OUT ONLINE: Is it true that we can post Speak Out com-
ments online? I think that would be easier than calling them in. If we
post online is it still anonymous? Editor's note: Yes, you can post items
for Speak Out online on our website, at http://www.newszapfo-
rums.com/forum58. Comments about hurricanes and storms may be
posted at http://newsblog.info/storms/. Speak Out comments posted
online are anonymous. You do not have to "log in" to post.

Public issues blogs
Join the discussion of important issues at newszap.com. Topics include:
* Belle Glade/South Bay issues: newsblog.info/0901
* Clewiston issues: http://newsblog.info/0902
* Hendry County issues: http://newsblog.info/0802
*Moore Haven/Glades issues: http://newsblog.info/0903
* Okeechobee city/county issues: http://newsblog.info/0904
* Pahokee issues: http://newsblog.info/0905
Go to newszap.com, click on your community and then on "community blogs
and links."



Community Events

Main Street plans membership meeting
Main Street general membership meeting will be held at the Brah-
ma Bull Restaurant, 2405 U.S. 441 S.E., on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at
noon. Members and the general public are invited. For information,
contact Lydia Jean Williams at (863) 357-MAIN.

Book group's schedule announced
The Okeechobee County Library book discussion group will
begin meeting on Thursday, Oct. 27. The group's schedule is- Thurs-
day, Oct. 27, "Reading Lolita in Tehran" b Azar Nafisi a memoir
and literary criticism by a former Iranian professor who secretly
teaches western literature in her living-room#iThursday, Nov. 17,
"Kite Runner" by Khaled Hosseini. This novel tells the story of Amir,
the son of a wealthy businessman and of his father's servant's son,
Nassan. Amir grows up in 1970s Afghanistan, leaving during the war
and returning there to live as a man.; Thursday, Dec. 15, "Nickels and
Dimes" by Barbara Ehrenreich a journalist records how difficult it
is to sustain oneself on minimum wage.; and, Thursday, Jan. 26,
"Master Butcher's Singing Club" by Louise Erdrich. This is a novel
woven with intrigue, romance and humor, and is an emotionally
complex tale of European immigrants who have settled in the fiction-
al town of Argus, N.D. All meetings begin at 7 p.m. at the Okeechobee
Library, 206 S.W 16th St. For information, call Jan Fehrman at (863)
357-9980.

Church hosting concert
Rayz of the Son will be appearing at Living Word of Faith
Church, 1902 S. Parrott Ave. on Sunday, Oct. 30, at 7 p.m. Mary
Lanier will also be performing. There is no charge for the concert.
Everyone is invited. For information, call the church at (863) 763-
6869.

Bass club plans free fishing tourney
The Taylor Creek Bass Club will sponsor its 20th annual free
Kids' Day fishing Festival on Oct. 30 at the airboat ramp area of
Okee-Tantie Campground and Marina. The event will run from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m. A Bassmaster Casting Kids competition will take
place from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m., followed by a live fishing competi-
tion from 1 until 4 p.m. All children between the ages of 7 andl14
are encouraged to compete in the Bassmaster Casting Kids compe-
tition. Children betweenthe ages of 4 and 14 are invited to com-
pete in the live fishing competition. For information, contact Dave
Stout at (863) 467-2255.





Okeechobee News

Our Purpose...
The Okeechobee News is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida
Independent is owned by a unique Irusl that enables this newspaper to pur-
sJe a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community Since no
dividends are paid the company is able 1o thrive on profit margins below
industry standards All after-lax surpluses are reinvested in Independent's
mission of lournalistic service, commitment to the ideals of the First
Amendment of the U S Constitution, and support of the community's deliber-
ation of public issues


We Pledge ...
* To operate this newspaper as a
public trust
* To help our community become a
better place to live and work.
through our dedication to consci-
entious journalism.
STo provide the information citizens
need to make their own intelligent
decisions about public issues
STo report the news wilh honesty
accuracy, purposeful neutrality.
fairness, objectivity, fearlessness
and compassion
* To use our opinion pages to facili-
tate community debate, not to
dominate it with our own opinions.
* To disclose our own conflicts of
interest or potential conflicts to our
,readers.
* To correct our errors and to give
each correction to the prominence
it deserves
* To provide a right to reply to those
we write about
* To treat people with courtesy,
respect and compassion.


Advertising Director: Judy Kasten
News Editor: Erc Kopp
National Advertising: Joy Parrish
Office Manager: Karmen Brown
Circulation Manager: Janet Madray

Independent Newspapers. Inc.
* Joe Smyth, Chairman
* Ed Dulin. President
* Tom Byrd. Vice President of
Newspaper Operations
Katrina ElsKen, Executive
Editor

MEMBER
OF:

Florida Press
Association
-'F Okeechobee News 2005
For More Information See
At Your Service On Page 2


Letters to the Editor


Main Street promotes
Green Market
Main Street would like to
address the Farmers' Market
vision for Okeechobee. As stated
by Charles Bronson, Commis-
sioner of Agriculture: "Although
there are various types of farm-
ers' markets, they all provide
people of every age to come
together to visit friends and
neighbors and to shop in a
friendly and relaxing atmos-
phere. In addition to being fun,
farmers' markets are a great way
to draw consumers into a revital-
ized area and to keep Florida
families actively involved in agri-
culture."
We researched the Hamrick
Trust that donated the Flagler
Parks to the City. The City over-
sees and authorizes the use of
the parks. This issue was
brought before City Council for
permission to have the Market in
the park. City Council voted affir-
matively. We chose Park #3
because of all the recent renova-
tions including tables, benches,
street lights, electric, the gazebo,
and the new sidewalks. A Farm-
ers' Market should be conve-
niently located and accessible by
the community, and visible from
a distance. Unlike the festivals
that are held in the parks, there
will be no street closings that
would limit parking spaces.
We chose Thursday evenings
for several reasons. First, we did
not want to compete with the
local produce providers that sell
their products at the weekend
flea markets. This Market offers
them another opportunity to sell
their produce. Secondly,
because of our rural nature,
many people do not come to
town on the weekends but could
visit the market on their way
home from work. Evening mar-
kets are very popular. Locally,
Vero Beach and Abacoa are on
Monday and Wednesdays. The
park is lighted as well as the indi-
vidual vendors will have lighting.
This market will have a vari-
ety of items for purchase: veg-
etables, fruits, jellies, pickles,


seafood, meats, Indian breads,
bakery items, etc. Our vision, as
the market grows, is that we will
survey the shoppers to learn
what could be added to the mar-
ket to make it better.
Main Street's goals are to
improve all aspects of the down-
town area, producing tangible
and intangible benefits. Our
motto is "old values new
visions". Farmers' Markets are
reminiscent of a bygone era
-when local markets were the
lifeblood of commercial districts
(old value) and today's Market is
a pleasant shopping alternative
(new vision).
Maureen Burroughs
Okeechobee


Shrimpers
seek support
Corporate and community
support does make a difference!
Florida's shrimpers are con-
tinuing to face multiple chal-
lenges in providing Floridians
with the fresh, wild caught
shrimp they have grown to love.
Imported farm-raised shrimp are
flooding the market and this fuel
intensive industry has absorbed
the rising fuel costs without rais-
ing prices.
Many of the local supermar-
kets and markets are doing what
they can to support this industry
and ultimately the Florida econ-
omy by trying to educate con-
sumers. Many are participating
in the Florida Department of
Agriculture's "Florida Shrimp -
Wild and Wonderful!" campaign
by featuring Florida's tasty
shrimp in their advertising circu-
lars, on the radio or with signage
at their seafood cases.
It is a great boost to the
morale of the shrimpers who are
fighting the odds as they try to
keep this historic Florida indus-
try alive.
Thanks for the support.
Sincerely,
Bob Jones
Southeastern
Fisheries Association


Upcoming Events

Monday
Foster Parent Orientation will be hosted by the Hibiscus
Children's Center on the last Monday of every month from 6
until 7 p.m. The orientation is for those interested in fostering or
adopting in Okeechobee County. This meeting requires no
RSVP and is a question/answer forum. It will be at the IRCC
Okeechobee Campus, 2229 N.W. Ninth Ave. For information,
call the Foster Care Program at 1-(800) 403-9311.

Tuesday
Alanon meeting will be held at the Church of Our Savior,
200 N.W. Third St., at 8 p.m.
Grief and Loss Support Group meets every Tuesday at 10
a.m. at the Hospice Building located at 411 S.E. Fourth St. in
Okeechobee. Everyone is welcome. For information, contact
Enid Boutrin at (863) 467-2321.
Family History Center meets from noon until 3 p.m. at the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 310 S.W. Sixth St.
Anyone interested in finding who your ancestors are is wel-
come to attend. There is Census, IGI (International Genealogi-
cal Index), Social Security Death Index and military information
available. For information, call (863) 763-6510 or (863) 467-
5261.
Widows and Widowers support group meets at 8:30 a.m. at
the Clock Restaurant, 1111 S. Parrott Ave., for breakfast. For
information, call (863) 357-0297.
Rotary Club of Okeechobee meeting at noon at the Golden
Corral Restaurant, 700 S. Parrott Ave. All Rotarians and anyone
else interested are invited. For information, contact Bill Bartlett
at (863) 467-4663,
Gospel Sing every Tuesday beginning at 7 p.m. The public
is invited to participate with vocal and/or instrumental music.
For information, contact Douglas Chiropractic Center at (863)
763) 4320.
The Gathering Church Overcomers Group meets at 7:30
p.m. in the fellowship hall, 1735 S.W. 24th Ave. This is a men's
only meeting. For information, call Earl at (863) 763-0139.
Bible study at the Living Word of Faith Church, 1902 S, Par-
rott Ave., at 7 p.m. Informal and informative discussions bring
many Bible truths to life. Everyone is invited.
Bipolar Bears meets at 11 a.m. at Welcome House, 1925
U.S. 441 S.E. It is a self-help group that offers support and edu-
cation for people who have been diagnosed with clinical
depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, schlzo-affective disorder or
dual diagnosis. For information, call (8L;3) 467-1026,
\Community Country Gospel will meet at 7 p.m. at the
church next to Douglas Clinic on North Park St, Any individual
or group that enjoys old time gospel music Is invited to partici-
pate. For information, contact Dr. Edward Douglas at (863) 763-
4320.

Wednesday
A.A. meeting from 8 until 9 p.m. at Sacred Heart Catholic
Church, 701 S.W. Sixth St. It will be a closed cd::russ.iili
Narcotic Anonymous (NA) meet In the New Horizon build-
ing, 1600 S.W. Second Ave., from 6:30 until 7:30 p,m, For Infor-
mation, call (863) 763-1191.
Lakeside Cruise'n Car Show will meet from 7 until 9 p.m. in
the Wal-Mart parking lot in front of the Gai don Center. Just stop
by to show a car you may have, or check out the cars and \ ?iit
with the car owners while you listen to the great oldies music.
Martha's House offers weekly support groups for individu-
als who are either directly or indli ri'ly f--iitl,,'ii by domestic vio-
lence, other women's Issues are also addressed, One support
group is held every Wednesday at 5 p.m. In the Okeechobee
County Health Department iiitil(oi~iurFi. 1728 N,W. NiIth Ave.
For information, call Irene Luck at l(Wi.) 763 0202, The other
support group Is held each 11liini-.-ily at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, 1057 N Nik I-Ill Ave, For information,
call Shirlean Graham at (8n3) 76023893


Special to the Okeechobee News
Looking back ...
This pair of hunting partners out for a day scouring Okee-
chobee County hammocks are Hardy Walker and Ben
Walker. The photo was provided, courtesy of Juanita Dou-
glas Walker. Do you have any old photos of the Okee-
chobee area or of Okeechobee citizens? If so, bring them
by the Okeechobee News office, 107 S.W. 17th St., and we
can copy them while you wait. Or, you can e-mail the
photo and information about the photo to
okeenews@okeechobee.com.



Community Events

OHS teams selling discount cards
The OHS Brahman boys and girls basketball teams are selling
their annual discount cards for $10 each. The card offers continuous
discounts to 18 various businesses throughout the year. If you would
like to purchase your discount card, contact coach Enrico or coach
Pung at (863) 462-5043.

Habitat for Humanity needs volunteers
Habitat for Humanity, an ecumenical housing ministry working in
partnership with the community and local families in need, is looking
for volunteers to help complete construction on their first house.
Construction experience is appreciated but not required. Work days
are Saturdays and Tuesdays from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. Volunteers are
also needed to work on the following committees: public relations,
fundraising, legal advice, family support and volunteer coordination.
An experienced bookkeeper is also needed. Call (863) 357-1371 for
information.

Regions accepts Red Cross donations
All Regions banks can now accept donations to the American Red
Cross disaster relief efforts. Cash and checks will be accepted at any
Regions bank. Locally, Regions Bank is located at 305 E. N. Park St.
Checks must be written to the American Red Cross Hurricane Katrina
Disaster Relief Fund, and the customer will be given a Red Cross
receipt.

Benefits help available for vets
Veterans and their family members that have been displaced due
to Hurricane Katrina and have moved to the Okeechobee may con-
tact the County Veterans Service officer for benefits assistance at
(863) 763-8124. The County Veterans Service Office is located at 462
U.S. 98 N. in the County Administration Annex. The office is open
Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. until 3:30 p.m., and on Friday from 8 a.m.
until p.m.

Baptist Church opens library
First Baptist Church Library invites everyone to check out books,
tapes, CDs, DVDs and Christian materials. They are open Tuesday
from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m.; Wednesday, from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m.; and,
Sunday from 6 until 6:30 p.m. They are located at 401 S.W. Fourth St.
For information, call (863) 763-2171.

DAR opens essay contest
It is again time for the National Society Daughters of the American
Revolution to sponsor their annual American Essay Contest. The con-
test is open to public, private and parochial schools and those who
are home schooled and will start on the first day of school. The essays
have to be turned in by Dec. 1. This year's subject for grades five
through eight is "Benjamin Franklin- More than a Revolutionary".
Jan. 17, 2006, marks the 300th anniversary of Benjamin Franklin's
birth. "The Santa Maria to the New World and the Apollo Mission to
the Moon: Christopher Columbus and the Astronauts" is the subject
chosen for grades nine through 12. American Essay Contest Certifi-
cates and Excellence in History Medals will be presented to the con-
testants. The winner from each school will receive a monetary
award. For information, call (863) 763-2492.

VNA to give flu shots
The Visiting Nurses Association (VNA) will be giving flu shots start-
ing Oct. 24 in their offices at 208 S.E. Park St. The shots will be given
from 9 until 11 a.m. and from 1 until 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.
They will also be given on Saturday, Oct. 29, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.
There is no charge for Medicare patients. For those who do not have
MeldiKa e, thl chatie \\ill be $30.

Martha's House planning banquet
In observance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Martha's
House will hold their annual appreciation banquet on Tuesday, Oct.
a:', .) l ite Okeechobee County Civic Center on U.S. 98. The banquet is
open to the public and is being held to say thank you to the commu-
nity foyour continued support in the fight against domestic violence.
Dinner will be served at 7 p.m. Please RSVP by calling (863) 763-2893.

Collaborative council meeting planned
The Co.'(1mmnit Collaborative Council of the Okeechobee County
Shared Services Network will hold their monthly meeting Tuesday,
Oct. .;.. at 10 a.m. The meeting will be held in the boardroom of the
Okeechobee County School Board office, 700 S.W Second Ave. The
purpose of the meeting is to allow the community to identify issues,
collaborate and share information regarding services for children and
I I n1 i.unmlic) Guest speakers will be Lonnie Kirsch, homeless liaison
flt' Okeechobee County; Tom Jones and Lindsey Mann, from Eckerd
Yo, u A\llteriilti%.s. and Ken Kenworthy will present the Safe and
Drug Free report. The public is invited. For information, call Sliaron
Vinson at i '. )t 462-5000, ext. 257.


Y







The Okeechobee News, Monday, October 24, 2005 SPORTS 5


Difficult golf courses are good in golf


By Daniel Shube
Today was a good day. The
weatherman predicted a 40%
chance of rain here in South Flori-
da. Lucky for me, I had the pleas-
ure to play in a charity tournament
and it didn't rain a drop. I was
happy to get out to play as Hurri-
cane Wilma is due to hit this week-
end, so who knows what condi-
tion the area courses will be in next
week. I hope for the best.
When the weather is not appro-
priate to go out and play, an excel-
lent idea is to curl up with a good
book. I recently picked-up a copy
of a new golf book called Golf's
100 Toughest Holes by Chris Mil-
lard. I had the opportunity to chat
with Chris tonight on my radio
show (Inside Golf Wednesday
nights at 7pm, 1400ESPN.com).
Golf is a funny game. To some of us
who struggle to post a lower num-
ber each time we play, EVERY hole
might as well be one of golf's
toughest holes!


Fairways and
Highways
by Daniel Shube

I asked Chris if he had the
opportunity to play some of the
worlds best golf courses while
researching the topic. Chris replied,
"I have played many of the holes,
but actually the much of the
research was not that much fun!"
The book is suitable for your
coffee table, a hardcover with 216
pages of beautiful photographs
and anecdotes. Many of the holes
are from courses quite familiar to


Sports Briefs


OHS discount cards
are now being sold
The OHS Brahman boys and
girls basketball teams are selling
their annual discount cards for
$10 each.
The card offers continuous
discounts to 18 various business-
es throughout the year.
If you would like to purchase
your discount card, contact
coach Enrico or coach Pung at
(863) 462-5043.

Lady Brahmans
hoop tryouts slated
Tryouts for the Lady Brahman


girls varsity and junior varsity bas-
ketball teams, originally sched-
uled for Monday and Tuesday,
will be postponed due to Hurri-
cane Wilma. There will be no
school on Monday.
Tryouts will be the ,day after
school resumes, and the follow-
ing day, from 2:30 p.m. until 5
p.m. in the Okeechobee High
School gym.
Girls in grades nine through 12
who are interested in playing
basketball must have a current
FHSAA physical and liability
form completed before trying
out. Forms can be picked up in
the main office.
Contact coach Carey Pung at


you, such as Augusta National, St.
Andrews, Baltusrol, Pebble Beach
and Winged Foot. Florida is well
represented. Millard included the
famous par-3, 17th hole at the TPC
at Sawgrass. What was interesting
is that he told me that the 18th hole
at Sawgrass is also very tough, but
often overlooked due to the
intense focus on the 17th hole. As a
matter of fact, when asked what
makes a hole so tough, Millard stat-
ed, "Much of it is mental. The look
from the tee to the island green at
the 17th at Sawgrass is so impos-
ing, that is what makes it so tough."
Other tough Florida holes
include the finishing hole on the
Blue Monster at Doral and the 4th
hole at Seminole. While you and I
might have difficulty playing Semi-
nole or Augusta, Millard made it a
point to include many golf courses,
such as Doral, that you do not have
to be a member to be able to play.
Millard's favorite story is that of
the Koolau Golf Club (Hole 18).
This course, located in Oahu,


(863) 462-5025 if you have any
questions concerning tryouts.

Bass club sponsors
kids fishing tourney
The Taylor Creek Bass Club
will sponsor its 20th annual Kids'
Day Fishing Festival on Oct. 30 at
the airboat ramp area of Okee-
Tantie Campground and Marina.
This festival will run from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m. A Bassmaster
Casting Kids competition will
take place from 10 a.m. until 1
p.m., followed by a live fishing
competition from 1 until 4 p.m.
All children between the ages


On the bench...
Players on the Rudd Jones Soccer Team take time to chat as they wait for their game to
start. The Okeechobee County Recreation Department sponsors the Youth Soccer
League, which plays Saturdays in the field across from North Elementary School.


Hawaii, may be the most difficult
course in the world. When this
course opened in 1992, it was
awarded a slope rating of 152 (out
of a possible 155). Dean Knuth,
who was at the time the senior
director of handicapping for the
USGA and who was the inventor of
the slope system, heard about this
rating. He couldn't believe it was
accurate, so he was compelled to
go play the course. Knuth, a six-
handicapper, after playing Koolau,
ordered the slope from the back
tees to be increased to 162 off
the charts!
Read this book and you will
want to play as many of these holes
as you can. Why would any golfer
in his or her right mind want to play
holes that are so tough? Because
they exist! A common phrase often
uttered by golfers is "No guts, no
glory." While carding a low score is
satisfying, playing the toughest
holes and courses is exhilarating.
Millard's book will have you itching
to get out and tempt fate.


of 7-14 are encouraged to com-
pete in the Bassmaster Casting
Kids competition. Children
between 4-14 are invited to com-
pete in the live fishing competi-
tion. Both events will be broken,
down into different age groups.
There is no charge for this fun
day of fishing.
Refreshments will be avail-
able to competitors and specta-
tors.
For information contact Dave
Stout, vice-president of the Tay-
lor Creek Bass Club, Inc. at (863)
467-2255.

Links tourney
helps junior golf
The Waldau 14th annual golf
tournament and party to benefit
junior golf will be held Friday,
Nov. 4, at the Fairways Golf
Course at the KOA Campground
and Resort, 4276 U.S. 441 S.
Golfers will have their choice
of either an 11 a.m. or 1:30 p.m.
shotgun start.
The tournament format will
be four-person scramble. Tour-
nament fees are $40 per person
and includes golf, prizes and
entry to Waldau's Dinner and
Dance Party in the KOA Conven-
tion Center starting at 6 p.m.
Space is limited so sign up early.
Pre-payment is required. Partici-
pation in the golf tournament is
not necessary to attend the din-
ner/dance. Dinner/dance tickets
are $20 per person and must be
purchased by Nov. 1. To attend
the dance only, a donation of $10
per person will be accepted at
the door after 7:30 p.m.
For information or to register,
contact Bridgette at (863) 467-
7300.
For more about Waldau's
Junior Golf, Inc., visit their web
site at
www.floridajuniorgolf.org.


FWC sets bird



hunting dates


Attention wingshooters!
Dove hunting, one of Florida's
favorite hunting seasons, began
recently, and other migratory
game bird seasons are just
around the corner.
Hunters may take mourning
and white-winged doves during
three hunting periods
statewide. First phase runs
through Oct. 24, second phase
is Nov. 12-27 and third phase
runs Dec. 10 Jan. 8. Shooting
hours for the first phase are
noon to sunset, and for the sec-
ond and third phases, shooting
hours are one-half hour before
sunrise to sunset. The daily bag
limit is 12, but only four may be
white-winged doves.
Snipe season is Nov. 1 Feb.
15 statewide. The daily bag
limit is eight, and shooting
hours are one-half hour before
sunrise to sunset.
Woodcock are legal to take
statewide Dec. 17 -Jan. 15. The
daily bag limit is three, and
shooting hours are one-half
hour before sunrise to sunset.
Crows are legal game


statewide on Saturdays and
Sunday only through Oct. 30,
then everyday Nov. 11 Feb. 18.
There are no bag or possession
limits, and shooting hours are
one-half hour before sunrise to
sunset.
In addition to having a hunt-
ing license, a migratory bird
permit is also required to take
migratory game birds in Flori-
da. In order to receive this per-
mit, hunters have to fill out a
short questionnaire when they
purchase their hunting license.
The information they provide
helps the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service get a better assessment
on how many birds are harvest-
ed each year.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) suggest hunters peruse
the "2005-06 Migratory Bird
Regulations" brochures and the
"2005-06 Florida Hunting Regu-
lations" handbook at
MyFWC.com/hunting. These
publications also are available
from county tax collectors'
offices and license agents.


Submitted to the Okeechobee News/M.W. Muros
Versatile player
Kelsie Chartier plays on the Rudd Jones Soccer Team in
the eight-and-under division of the Okeechobee County
Recreation Department soccer league. The games are on
Saturday mornings in the field across from North Ele-
mentary School. This past weekend's games were can-
celled due to concerns about the approaching hurri-
canes. Games will resume on Saturday, Oct. 29.


"When'you need a service,

call a professional!"
Call 863-763-3134 or email us at
okecompo@strato.net to place your ad!


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Office: 863-467-0990
Visit Our Websites at:
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410 S.E. 2nd Ave.
863-763-0999
View Listings At www.florida-landco.com


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863.467.8899
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Fax: 763-2219




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208 N. Parrott Ave.
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Fax (863) 763-9753
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1200 S. Parrott 763-2104
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or email
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"A Full Service Real Estate Firml"
104 N.W. 7th Ave.
(863) 763-4010
Corner Of SR 70 West & N.W. 7th Ave.
Email: realestate@tucker-group.com
Website: www.tucker-group.com


Don Renfranz, Inc.'s
Taylor Creek

Real Estate
1881 U.S. Hwy. 441 S.E
Okeechobee, FL 34974
Phone: (863)763-7312
Fax (863)763-7317
Email: taylorre@strato.net
www.taylorcreekrealestate.com


210 NW Park St., Ste. 202
Okeechobee, FL 34972
Office 863-763-3566
Fax 863-763-8617


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77 T ,m I :Tr. 1 o, h mV


IaSeaOr atudaIOkeahla e jws Fo io ealEsatelsig


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SPORTS


The Okeechobee News, Monday, October 24, 2005






6 The Okeechobee News, Monday, October 24, 2005


At the Movies

The following movie is now
showing at the Brahman Theatres
Ill.
Movie times for Friday, Oct. 21,
through Thursday, Oct. 27, are as
follows:
Theatre I "Exorcism of Emily
Rose" (PG-13) Showtimes: Friday
at 7 and 9 p.m.; Saturday and Sun-
day at 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.; Mon-
day at 3 and 7 p.m.; Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 2,
4:15, 7 and 9 p.m.
Tickets are $5 for adults; chil-
dren 12 and under are $4; senior
citizens are $4 for all movies; and,
matinees are $3.50.
For information, call (863) 763-
7202.

Briefs

You can be a
volunteer mentor
Help encourage a middle or
high school student to reach his
or her full potential and become
a volunteer mentor for the Presi-
dent's Challenge to SOAR/Take
Stock in Children Scholarship
program. It's a proven life-
changing program that provides
four-year college scholarships to
deserving sixth and ninth
graders in local communities.
The mentor meets with the stu-
dent one hour per week at
his/her school. Volunteer oppor-
tunities are available in Indian
River, Martin, St. Lucie and
Okeechobee counties. Please
call the Indian River Community
College Foundation at (772)
462-4786.

Halfway House
looks for volunteers
Eckerd Intensive Halfway
House, 800 N.E.72nd Circle N.,
is looking for volunteers to work
with our adolescent boys. If you
have any free time or talents you
would like to share, call Ed
Wimes at (863) 357-0047.

Volunteers are
needed at Hospice
Hospice of Okeechobee, Inc.
has volunteer opportunities
available in Okeechobee assist-
ing the patient care and admin-
istrative teams to provide Hos-
pice services to Okeechobee
area residents. Permanent and
part-time volunteers provide
direct patient support services
such as companionship, tele-
phone contacts, letter reading,
main caregiver relief and other
non-medical assistance. They
also assist Hospice in fund rais-
ing, clerical and office support.
Age is not a barrier. For informa-
tion, visit Hospice of Okee-
chobee at 411 S.E. Fourth St.,
Okeechobee, or call (863) 467-
2321.

Volunteers wanted
for hospital auxiliary
Would you like to make a dif-
ference in the lives of others?
Raulerson Hospital Auxiliary has
many opportunities of service
for adults seeking volunteer
work. Volunteer as little as four
hours a week or as many as 20
hours. Morning or afternoon
shifts are available. Many oppor-
tunities currently exist and new
programs to begin soon. Please
contact the lobby desk at
Raulerson Hospital for a Volun-
teer Application. For informa-
tion, call (863) 763-2151, ext.
3312. The hospital's Volunteen
Program (ages 14-17) begins in
June.

American Red Cross
needs more volunteers
The American Red Cross is
looking for nurses and Action
Team Volunteers to be a part of
our Disaster Action Team (DAT).
DAT is made up of a /group of
trained volunteers who respond
to local disasters. If you would
like to give of your time and tal-
ents to help local citizens in time
of disaster, please call Debbie
Riddle or Candace at the Ameri-
can Red Cross-Okeechobee
branch at (863) 763-2488.

Redirection Center


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needs more volunteers
Do you have a few hours to
spare? Would you like to make a
difference in a child's life? Do
you have a job skill that you
would like to teach others? Do
you belong to a civic organiza-
tion or religious organization
and would like to spread the
word? If you answered yes to
any of these questions, please
contact Tom Jones or Karin
Aldridge at Okeechobee Redi-
rection Center, (863) 357-5905.
We are looking for volunteers to
work a few hours a month with
committed youth.


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Okeechobee News, Monday, October 24, 2005 t


Classified


Toll Free


1


53


Announcements Merchandise Moile Homes





Employment Agriculture I Recreation

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r I I A*In.]


I-A-A2J -i mw.


Financial Rentals Aulomobiles

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Services Real Estate i Public Notices
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24 S.B
fnr nnv n. nAnii iams for Crlp iienAr S 2.0


IUI UllV l lIJV IBI II uII IWI Ji UIIutji OII/,.-VV

More Papers Mean More Readers!
.- Reach more readers when you run

your ad in several papers in,4M
f our newspaper network.


Our newspaper network
consists of eight papers one
daily and seven weeklies. An ad run in all these newspapers will
reach more than 164,000 readers*!

Call Today For Details!
'S ul,' hPi ,-.: : [.-..l .ur I ., 'Sii.,'im :.ri [.lrrl. t H -. I[r. : 1.[ 1 [: l RH -a j:rh' C.-ri r
Rules for placing FREE ads!
To qualify, your ad-
[lust be for a personal item. ([Jo commercial items. pets or animals) '"'
s Must fit into 1 2 inch
(that's 4 lines. approximately 23 characters per line)
Must include only one item and its price .
II. (remember it must be S2.500 or less) -. j


p Call us!
No Fee, No Catch, No Problem!


El


1-877-353-2424 (Dilf r.el
)" J .. ..i~ z


/ 1-877-354-2424 ltiFreei

/ For Legal Ads:
legoads@newszap.com
; For All Other Classified
Advertising:
classads@newszap.com


Mon-Fri


v Mon-Fri
:- .


Monday
Tuesday thru Friday
Saturday
il'Sunda, .'.-, .
Sunday
te.. ., i ,t 3 ,, ,] -: ,l. ,,h


1


Announcements


Please read your ad carefully
the first day it appears. In
case of an inadvertent error,
please notify us prior to the
deadline listed. We will not
be responsible for more than
1 incorrect insertion, or for
more -than the extent of the
ad rendered valueless by
such errors. Advertiser
assumes responsibility for all
statements, names and con-
tent of an ad, and assumes
responsibility for any claims
against Independent
Newspapers. All advertising
is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all copy, and
to insert above the copy the
word "advertisement'. All
adJ accepted aar subject to
.,ditt approval. All ads must
conform to Independent
Newspapers' style and are
restricted to their proper
classifications. Some classi-
fied categories require
advance payment. These
classifications are denoted
with an asterisk *
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage. Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160


CAT- neutered male, call to
describe. (863)357-3225.
EYE GLASSES- prescription,
found on Hwy 70 across
from Post Office
(863)763-3134.
KEYS- set of keys found at
Post Office in LaBelle, call to
identify. (863)675-5786.
LADIES RING found vic. of
Subway in LaBelle. Please
call to identify.
(863)885-1422
MANS RING- found at landfill,
call to identify.
(863)467-7753.


WHITE MALE DOG- brown
eyes, 1-3yrs old, huge, col-
lar, vic of Poseys Corner 70
&128th ave. (772)370-1636
or (863)763-7831.


BLACK LAB- female, about
100 Ibs. spayed, no collar,
vic of Gordy Road & Okee-
chobee Rd. REWARD.
(772)216-3045 or
(772)519-1035/216-2145
CHIHUHUA- REWARD,
REWARD, REWARD
Tan w/black collar. Vie.: Be-
hind Race track gas station.
863-357-2246
RING: Pearl w/diamonds. Lost
@ Michaels. Sentimental val-
ue. $100 Reward.
(863)357-5472


Do-It-Yourself Ideas


Lawn Ornaments
These eight adorable lawn ornaments are sure to sur-
prise and delight everyone. Imagine them in the gar-
den, on the lawn, in a flower bed or even in a child's
room. Ideal for beginning do-it-yourselfers, all that's
required is some scrap lumber, a saw, sandpaper and
paint and sealer (if they're going to be displayed out-
doors). Simply trace the patterns onto wood, cut out,
sand, paint and seal.
The completed lawn ornaments range in size from
12 to 16 inches tall.
The plan includes complete step-by-step instruc-
tions, full-size traceable patterns, materials lists and
painting guides for eight lawn ornaments.
Lawn Ornaments plan (No. 14)... $9.95
Lawn Fun Package (No. C110)
Three other projects ... $19.95
Catalog (pictures hundreds of projects) .. $2.00
Please add $3.00 s&h (except catalog-only orders)
To order, circle item(s), Please be sure to
clip & send w/ check to: include your name,
U-Bild Features address and the name of
P.O. Box 2383 this newspaper. Allow
Van Nuys, CA 91409 1-2 weeks for delivery.
Or call (800) 82-U-BILD
bild.com ..
-0 Money Back Guarantee
u-bild~co


STAFFORDSHIRE Bull Terrier
Dark choc. brindle color, looks
like mini pitbull. Missing form
fenced yard. Please call with
any information. Very large
cash reward. (239)633-6522


ENCYCLOPEDIA, World Book,
Complete set. Free. You haul.
(863)467-2434
FREE BANISTER WOOD.
(863)634-3741
Kittens, Free to good home.
(863)675-1614
RED HEALER 1 yr old, free to
good home, call anytime
(863)697-3346.


LOOK FOR THE CROSS-
WORD PUZZLE IN THE
NEWS SECTION OF YOUR
OKEECHOBEE NEWS. GET
IT DAILY BY SUBSCRIBING!
CALL 1-877-353-2424

LmtllliUent


Employment -
Full-Time 205
Employment -
Medical 210
Employment -
Part-Time 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Training 227
Sales 230



ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT NEEDED:
F/T, Data input processor.
Windows knowledge, phone
skills. Bilingual welcome
$8/hr. CallVan
863-467-2271 or
561-310-4034
Administrative Asst.
wanted for busy local
construction company
to handle multiple
tasks. Skills required
include: General com-
puter knowledge, typ-
Ing, organizational
skills, self-motivated.
(863)763-6376
BOOM TRUCK OPERATOR/
LABORER: Class B CDL req.
863-467-1932 evenings or
561-719-3677 day. EOE.


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Emlymn
FullTime 020


Cooks fully xp'd only
Full Tme. Apply In
person after 11 a.m.
Brahma Bull Restaurant
2405 Hwy. 441 Southeast
Okeechobee

Experienced MatureTeachers
Needed Building Blocks
Academy F/T & P/T
positions avail., Great pay,
working environment &
benefits 863-467-5000


LAKE OKEECHOBEE
FISHING GUIDE WANTED:
Must have own bass boat.
863)946-1742 $750 wk +tips

MANAGEMENT
Hibbet Sports, a full line
sporting goods store, Is hiring
In Okeechobee. Apply at: 2105
South Parrott Ave., Suite 103,
Okeechobee, FL 34972.
Hibbett Sports conducts drug
testing, www.hibbett.com


Immediate Openings CNAs
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
All shifts: Full/Part Time. Good Benefits.
Apply In Person To:
406 N.W. 4th Street. (863) 357-2442


IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SURVEY CREW
PERSONNEL
$20/hr. for Experienced Crew
Chief. 40/hr. Min./Wk. for all
Personnel. Primary job
location in Okeechobee.
Call 863-357-6688

Shop here first!
The classified ads


Local Homebuilder
needs qualified
Salespeople. Must be
self-motivated,
organized & able to work
well with others. Flexible
schedule a must.
Call 863-763-6376


E lm
Full Tim


Superior Water Works, Inc.
is looking for an
INVENTORY CONTROL MANAGER
Full Time, Excellent Benefits and
Compensation Package.
ALSO NEEDED: SERVICE MEN must have CDL Lic.
Apply in person at
Superior Water Works, Inc.,
917 S.W. Park St., Okeechobee FL.


Housekeeping- Full Time
Dietary (Kitchen Help)
Okeechobee Health Care Facility
Apply In Person Only At
Business Office, 406 N.W. 4th Street


PRIDE ENTERPRISES
Looking for Field Supervisor
for sugar cane operation. Exp.
with farm equipment req'd.
Exc. benefit package. Fax
resume to 561-996-8559.


NEW AD
METAL FRAMERS
Exp. only. Willingto travel
PSL/Okee (772)201-8715
When you want some-
thing sold, advertise in
the classified.


00S

*(


Emlymn
Full Tim


Ime


PARTS COUNTER PERSON
MECHANIC AND LABORER NEEDED
Must be 18 years of age. Have transportation and
willing to work in a busy environment.
Apply in person at ARS POWERSPORTS.






RN, LPN &

!Medical Assistant

SWater's Edge Dermatology
Fax Resume to (863) 467-1919


Start a new career in the much needed field of
nursing as a Certified Nursing Assistant. Complete the
Hospitality Assistant course/training at Okeechobee
Healthcare Facility and become a CNA in 4 weeks. Next
class begins soon. Instructor RN/experienced teacher has
a very high CNA exam passing rate. Qualified CNAs are
then eligible for LPN training. Good benefits.
Apply In Person For Further Details:
406 N.W. 4th Street o (863) 357-2442


LARSON DAIRY, INC.
Location: BARN 8
Is hiring a
TRUCK/TRACTOR
MECHANIC.
Includes Various
maintenance jobs.
Knowledge of plumbing and
small electric motors
is required.
Apply in person, or Call Tra-
vis @ (863)634-0102

SIGN-UP BONUS
Now Hiring!
*Tow truck driver
Cashier
*Fuel attendant/stock
person
Training will be provided
for responsible people.
We offer good pay, re-
warding work, benefits
and a substantial mileage
reimbursement. For a
limited time, qualified ap-
plicants who are hired
will receive a $200 sign-
up bonus. Apply at:
Ft. Drum Citgo
mm 184 FL. Turnpike
(863)763-9383
DFWP
Skips BBQ is now opening for
breakfast and hiring a:
BREAKFAST CREW
Manager, Cook, Prep Cook &
morel Experience preferable.
Apply in person
104 SE 6th St
between 10:30am & 2pm
TRUCK DRIVER
CDL LICENSE: Class A,
Year 'Round Employment.
Call (772)465-2626



READING A
NEWSPAPER MAKES
YOU A MORE INFORMED
AND INTERESTING
PERSON.

ao wonder newspaper
readers are more popular



WILL DO BABYSITTING
Reference's Available.
Call (863)763-7876
For more information.


Financial



Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315




NOTICE
Independent Newspapers will
never accept any advertise-
ment that is illegal or con-
sidered fraudulent. In all
cases of questionable val-
ue, such as promises of
guaranteed income from
work-at-home programs if
it sounds too good to be
true, chances are that it is.
If you have questions or
doubts about any ad on
these pages, we advise that
before responding or send-
ing money ahead of time,
you check with the Better
Business Bureau at
772-878-2010 for previous
complaints.
Some 800 and 900 telephone
numbers may require an
extra charge, as well as
long distance toll costs. We
will do our best to alert our
reader of these charges in
the ads, but occasionally
we may not be aware of the
charges. Therefore, If you
call a number out of your
area, use caution.

How do you find a job
in today's competitive
market? In the
employment section
of the classified


th** Nte 15I 9


Place Your
YARD SALE
ad today!

Get FREE
signs and
inventory sheets!

Call Classifieds
877-353-2424


Available from Commercial News Providers"
.w .


FIND IT FAST DIRECTORT


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Okeechobee News, Monday, October 24, 2005


|^3ci j EEI


I-pca Noti -


-~ea Not ic


MONDAY PRIME TIME OCTOBER 24, 2005
S 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

o WPTV News(cc) NBC Extra(s) Entertain Surface "Episode 6" Las Vegas (N) (s) (cc) Medium "Dead Aim" News (cc) Tonight
p WPEC News(cc) News Million- Holly- King How I Met Two Men Practice CSI: Miami (iTV) (s) News (cc) Late
D WTCE Praise the Lord (cc) Cameron Jakes Behind Chironna Franklin Duplantis Praise the Lord (cc)
g WPBF News ABC Fortune Jeopardy Wife Swap (s) (cc) NFL Football: New York Jets at Atlanta Falcons. Georgia Dome. (cc)
g WFLX Drew Simp- Seinfeld Raymond Prison Break "Part 2" Prison Break (s) (cc) News Raymond Seinfeld
SWTVX King King 70s Show 70s Show One All of Us Girl- Half Will |Will Sex & Sex &
s WXEL News-Lehrer Florida Food Florida Folk Festival (s) Antiques Roadshow Charlie Rose (s) (cc)

AMC Movie: Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter Movie: *** Scream 2 (1997) (David Arquette) Movie: **12 Tremors (1990)
ANIM Crocdle-Diaries The Most Extreme Funniest Animals Animal Precinct (N) Animal Precinct (cc) Funniest Animals
A&E City Confidential (cc) Cold Case Files (cc) Gangsta Girls (cc) Gotti nGotti Airline Airline Crossing Jordan (s)
BET 106 & Park: BET'sTo3 10 Live |BET com TBA IMovie: Obstacles (2000) (E-40) BET Parkers In Color In Color
CNN Lou Dobbs Tonight Cooper 360 Paula Zahn Now (cc) Larry King Live (cc) NewsNight-Br. Lou Dobbs Tonight
CRT NYPD Blue (s) (cc) Cops(s) ]Cops(s) The Investigators Forensic |North Power-Justice Evidence Evidence
DISC Motorcycle Mania Motorcycle Mania Roush Racing Monster Garage (cc) American Chopper American Chopper
DISN Sister |Phil So Raven So Raven Movie: ** Halloweentown (1998) (cc) Naturally |Sister So Raven So Raven
E! Taught-Sex E! News E! News Curse of the Exorcist: True Story Little Rascals: THS Girls Girls
ESP2 Holly- QuiteFran ESPN SportsCenter (Live) (cc) Monday N ght Countdown (Live) Figure Skating: Smart Ones Skate America. Figure Skating (cc)
EWTN One |The Bible Daily Mass The Journey Home Saints |Rosary Abundant Life The World Over
FAM 7th Heaven (cc) Smallville "Onyx" (s) Movie: The Hollow (2004) (Kevin Zegers) Whose? Whose? The 700 Club (cc)
HGTV Weekend |Land- Curb IHouse Cash |Dream House |Designed First Rezoned Design IHouse
HIST The Color of War (cc) Modern Marvels (cc) UFO Files (cc) Decoding the Past Digging for the Truth Modern Marvels (cc)
LIFE Golden Golden Movie: The Negotiator (2005) (cc) Movie: Human Traffic NICK Grown Phantom Oddpar- INeutron Sponge |Zoey101 Full Hse. |FreshPr. Fresh Pr. |Cosby Rose- Rose-
SCI (5:00) Movie: Silent Stargate SG-1 (s) (cc) Stargate SG-1 (s) (cc) Stargate SG-1 (s) (cc) Stargate SG-1 (s) (cc) Tales-Crypt
TBS Seinfeld ISeinfeld Raymond Raymond Friends IFriends Friends IFriends Family Family ** National Security
TCM Movie: *** The Thril of It All (1963) (cc) Hitchcock Movie: **** Vertigo (1958) (James Stewart) (cc) |Psycho
TLC Martha (N) (cc) Stories of ER Maximum Disclosure Stories of ER Katrina's Children Maximum Disclosure
SPIKE Police Videos CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn UFC Unleashed (s) The Ultimate Fighter
TNT Alias (s) (cc) Law & Order "Deceit" Law & Order (s) Law & Order (s) Law & Order (s) Without a Trace (s)
UNI Locura INoticiero Piel de Otofo Contra Viento La Esposa Virgen Cristina Impacto INoticiero
USA Rose Red (s) (cc) Law & Order: SVU Law Order: Cl WWE Monday Night Faw (Live) (s) (cc) Movie: The Hunted

HBO (5:30) Movie: Welcome-Moos. Costas NOW (s) (cc) Movie: *** Shrek 2 (2004) 'PG' Movie: ** Fat Albert (2004) 'PG' I, Robot
SHOW (4:35) Movie |Movie: Avenging Angelo (2002) SHO Me |The L Word (iTV) (s) The L Word (iTV) (s) The L Word "Lacuna"
TMC Movie: My Best Friend's Wedding (1997) (s)|Movie: *12 Book of Love (2004) |Movie: Buena Vista Social Club It Runs in the Family


Services



Babysitting -105
Child Care Needed 410
Child Care Offered415
Instruction 420
Services Offered425
Insurance 430
Medical Services435





G' neIn *ot o Ir



O'Connell Construction
License # CBC055264
ERNEST LANCASTER
Screen Rooms, Carports
Room Additions
Florida Rooms
Aluminum Roof Over
(863)634-2044



LOVING COUPLE- to care
for your parent or elder
relative in cozy home. Ex-
perienced Care Giver
w/Refs. (863)467-9439 or
(863)634-8152.

Landscape
Con ractor


Troy's Pressure
Cleaning, Yard
Maintenance &
Yard Fertilizing.
Free Estimates.
(863)467-5534



JACK'S TOP SOIL
Shell Rock &
Bob Cat Work.
Call 863-467-4734


Merchandise

kflilgfa^

Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines535
Building Materials5-10
Business Equipment 545
Carpets 'Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins, Stamps 570'
Collectibles 575
Computer. Video 580
Crafts 'Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, Linens & Fabrici 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health I Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment.'
Supplies 625 :,
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies'
Equipment 665
Pets 'Supplies./
Services 670
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools 8 Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television.Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys 8 Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740




A/C, 3 1/2 ton with air handler,
$250. (863)467-7101
AIR COND- 10 ton, Carrier,
heating & cooling, asking
$1300 (863)763-2663 or
801-1245 cell.
AIR COND. PARTS- Going out
of business, Win A/C repair
shop. Motors, front covers,
etc. Sacrifice $1800 or best
offer. (561)684-9007.
AIR CONDITIONER -'05 York
3.5 ton package unit w/ heat
$1075 (954)309-8659
AIR CONDITIONERS- 8,000
BTU's Works good $60.
(863)467-4366


GLASS INSULATOR COLLEC-
TION-$75 (407)436-1901
POPCORN QUILT- 84x96,
great cond. $500
(407)436-1901.
RESTORATION & REPAIRS
of Antique furniture.
CUSTOM CABINETRY
Quality service.
Call (863)763-4149
or(561)758-4337


CHEST FREEZER-very good
condition $75
(863)467-9347.
FREEZER, UPRIGHT: Ken-
more. Like new. $200.
(863)674-1105
REFRIGERATOR & STOVE -
white, like new condition.
$430 both or trade for home
furniture. (863)675-0386
RINGER WASHER w/ double
tubs. Works good. $50
(863)635-7733
STOVE, MAGIC CHEF, White,
4 Burners, Oven storage
drawer. Works great! $75.
(863)634-0245
WASHER & DRYER: Large ca-
pacity. Like new. $200.
(772)215-9168



SHED- Wolly, 14'x28', 8K
new, Extras. Asking $6000.
(863)634-5753


SCHWINN, 1955- Original
condition, $900.
(863)467-5756.



CLOSET DOORS (2) Sliding,
r. FI & SHOWER DOOR: Glass
I.iliing $30 neg. for all, or will
:.:p 1863)467-1965
DOOR, new pre hung, thermal
i:,le, full glass view, mini
rind in glass, fits 36" open-
""-,, $100. (863)697-1627
FLORIDA ROOM- disassem-
ri' 12x30, fully insulated,
..,iyl windows, 2 doors,
i.2000 neg (863)467-9347
Red Bricks, between 200-300,
1 100 will sell separately.
i,3)697-2032
VINYL SIDING- for a mobile
ri-me, cream color, $100 for
ii 1863)467-6423


BABY CRIBS (2) with drawers
underneath, complete with
.... -rything. $250 will sell
'-,.,arate (863)357-2803
CRIB BEDDING SET Cowboy
i,,i-,n w/lots of extras. Must
,'! Pd $1000+ asking
i. i ii neg. (863)763-6297



PLACE SETTING FOR 8, Ro-
":nirnal China, w/all additional
pi,.es, wheat pattern, $400
-1. 863)357-2233


BOYS WINTER CLOTHES-
1..mo.-2year Excellent con-
,iiion $15. takes all.
1c.3)763-6131
CLOTHES- 0-3 mo. 3 piece
'ouifit. Great for pictures.
Worn 1 time for photographs
$5. (863)763-6131
HALLOWEEN CUSTOMS (4)
Toddler, 4-5 & 7-10 yrs. old.
Size 6 & 7. $30 for all, will
sep. (863)824-8749


BARBIE DOLLS- (3)Special
Millennium Edition, Angel of
Joy, Angelic Inspiration $150
will sep. (863)634-9526
Football & Baseball Card Col-
lection. Mid 80's & 90's
$500 or best offer. Call
(863)763-8943askforTracy



Compaq- Pentium 3 desk pro
Win. XP many programs &
Game video card & DVD
player $200. (866)529-0057
DELL NETWORK COMPUTER-
Win. XP, Word, Games,
Complete $150.
(866)855-0158
IBM COMPUTER- complete
w/17" monitor, Win XRP DVD,
CD burner, $350 or best of-
fer (863)763-2034.


KNIFE MAKING- Acety-
lene/Oxygen tanks, hoses &
gauges, drill presses, multi
grinders, $2000
(863)763-9527


BED, Canopy: King Sz w/ Sim-
mons Beauty Rest xFirm Mat-
tress. Paid over $1600, Asking
$500 (863)357-2110
BED, Craftmatic, Single,
Heats, Elevates & Massages.
$500. (863)763-4248 '
COUCH & KING SIZE BED-
couch is bone leather, $350
for all will sell separate
(863)674-9964.
COUCH & MATCHING CHAIR-
Floral, $150.
(863)675-2648
COUCH, California Style, light
colors, L-shaped, w/formica
corner table, $150.
(863)467-5680
DAVENPORT antique, white.
.Gold Chair & Daybed. $550
for all, will separate.
(863)675-1089


DINETTE SET antique, white,
6 chairs, 2 leaves, full pad,
buffet & china cabinet. $350
(863)675-1089
DRESSER & 2 Night stands.
Good condition. $100.
(863)357-1560
ELECTRIC BEDS, (2), Serta,
twin, new condition, pd
$2000, asking $500 or best
offer. (863)467-9892
QUEEN SLEEP SOFA, never
used, Rd DR Table, w/4
chair, 4 bar stools, tall lamp,
$650 for all (239)707-4404.
SLEEPER SOFA: Beige. Real
Nice. 7 Ft. Long. Like new.
$225. (863)357-2110
SOFA & RECLINER- beige
leather, matching, $250
(863)674-9964.
SOFA- 8', Off white with 4'
loveseat. Good condition.
Antique satin. $450 for both.
(863)675-1914
SOFA, LS & CHAIR- good
condition, like new paid
$750 asking $175
(772)215-9168.
TANNING BED Brand new
Pd $2000 asking $1000
(863)697-3211
TRUNDLE BED- Extra large,
incl dust ruffle, comforter &
2 shams. $150.
(239)246-6071
Twin Sleigh Bed, solid wood,
whitewash, w/mattresses,
$350.863-634-5943
Find it faster. Sell it sooner
in the classified



CLUB CAR, '97- Exc. cond.,
good batt/charger, $1599.
(863)697-1350/763-2063.
EASY GO Good cond. good
battery & charger. $799.
Neg. (863)697-1350 or
(863)763-2063.
GOLF CART, Gas, Teal w/hard
top. Excellent condition. $2500
(863)634-8511


BROWNING 380 AUTO- ask-
ing $400 or will trade
(502)931-8101.
BROWNING B-80 SL, 3" bar-
rel, 1 modified, 1 full, great
shape, $400.
(863)673-4927
BROWNING RIFLE Model
Bar, 270 cal, 3x9 Redhead
scope. Good shape. Asking
$500 (863)467-2171
Desert Eagle, 44 Magnum,
black, $950. (304)667-7855
RUGGER, MINI #14, Early
Pre Ban. Very low serial
number w/30 round mag.
$495 Firm. (863)763-5110
Taurus, 44 Magnum, stain-
less, red dot,-$650.
(304)667-7855



BO-FLEX EXTREME- Mint con-
dition. Powerhouse fitness.
$1300 or best offer.
239-324-2335
CROSS TRAINING GYM Life-
styler 40. 1001bs concor,
40+ exercises, triad leg syst.
$40 (863)763-3365
EXERCISE MACHINE- Ellipti-
cal, Sears, Perfect cond., Pro-
Form Cardio Cross Trainer.
$100. (863)467-1396 Will de-
liver
EXERCISE MACHINES, Life
Style Cardio Fit, Low impact. &
AB Doer, Pro-AM. $85. for
both, will sep. (86.3)763-4952
PRO-FORM 920S, Exercise
Bike w/silent magnetic resis-
tance. Used, but in good
cond. $50 (863)763-3365


LADIES GOLD ANTIQUE
POCKET WATCH- over 100
yrs old, $500 neg.
(863)634-9620. Okeecho-
bee


LIFT CHAIR- excellent condi-
tion, $350 (863)801-5353.


FOUNTAIN Mediterranean.
large, round, 3 tier, grape vine
motif. $650 or best offer
(863)357-7406
FRONT DOOR ORNAMENT -
half moon design, w/ 4 panes
of glass, 2" high, 24" wide.
$30 (863)763-0625
JUKEBOXES, (2), Seeburg,
both play, need adjustment,
full of records, $650 will sell
sep.(863)697-9704
NASCAR BLOW UP CAR -
Rusty Wallace '92. Miller car.
$100 (863)675-1033
WATER SOFTENER & FILTER,
Sears, programmable, whole
house. 2 yrs. old, pd $1257,
sell for $400. (863)467-1860



GUITAR & MANDOLIN Mor-
gan Monroe Flat top guitar &
Kentucky Mandolin KM675
Model $1000 (863)675-0604
PIANO Gulbransen Spinet, in
good condition w/ bench $400
(863)234-9670
SHO-BUD Pedal steel guitar
amp. Works good $300
863)763-9592 or
863)634-0399


BABY WHITE POT BELLY PIG-
$20 in LaBelle area
(863)675-4981.
BANJO Vega Pro 2, 5 string
banjo. 1940's model. W/les-
sons $1500 (863)675-0604
BLACK SILKIE CHICKS, $3
each. (863)675-6214 in La-
Belle area
BLUETICK COONHOUND, fe-
male, 15 mos. old, all shots,
spayed, micro chipped,
$250 neg. (863)697-2082
CHINCHILLA'S 1 Male & 1 Fe-
male w/cage & accessories.
$300 Must go as pair.
(863)634-8118
COCKER SPANIEL, F, 9mo.,
Tan & White w/papers & micro
chip. Needs more time than I
have. $500 (863)983-5189
CURR PUPPIES: $100 each.
Call Hoss @ (863)261-4781
FISH TANK STAND, holds 29
gallon tank, wood, w/stor-
age, $20. (863)634-4098
GOOD SENIOR HOME
, NEEDED- for Affen Pincher,
$200 (863)983-6537.
GREAT DANE- Male, 10 mo.
old. Great with kids. Moving,
need to sell. Papers,Will sac-
rifice $350. (863)697-2717
METAL DOG CRATE- 36x24,
with tray, asking $20.
(863)675-1033.
NANDY CONURE PARROT,
very sweet, $160 with cage.
(863)673-5038
PARROT CAGES- (4) large,
$1100 for all will sell separ-
ate. (863)673-5038.
RED NOSE PIT BULL- male,
$100, call anytime
(863)697-3346.
ZEBRA FINCH: Adorable. $8.
(863)357-3639



ABOVE GROUND POOL Vi-
nyl, 372' deep, 16' around.
Chemicals & accessories in-
cluded. $150 (863)763-0252



HOT TUB- Like new, Excellent
condition, 18 jets, Seats 6
adults $1999.
(863)983-7751


COMPOUND BOW- Bear, Su-
per Magnum, new with case
and access. $175
(502)931-8101 cell.
POOL TABLE w/ accesso-
ries, Slate. $625
(863)357-7406
TELESCOPE Celestron Pro.,
Barlows, target scope, on tri-
pod, serious inquiries only
$225 (863)763-3551


[pi -ot i


Storage Space -
Rent 960



FURNISHED APT- all utilities
paid, mature adults only, No
pets, on water, Call between
9-7 pm daily (863)357-2044


OKEE- 3br, lba, CBS House
with gar. W/D, Nice area.
Near Blue Heron. No pets
$1200. mo. + 1st, last,
$500. sec dep to move in
(863)610-1000


ROOMMATE WANTED: $500
mo., util. incl., full house privi-
leges. 863-697-9074


Sia


PIONEER TOWER SPEAKERS,
(2), for home entertainment
center or stereo, $100 neg.
(863)983-7915
SURROUND SOUND- Avia,
with DVD. $100.
(863)824-8703



Flat Screen TV, Phillips, 32",
$250. (863)634-5943
MAGNAVOX 52" High Defini-
tion, big screen, 6 mos old,
black, mint cond. w/ remote
$800 FIRM (863)673-3134
TV, Magnavox, Color, Con-
sole. 27"? Works & Looks
good. $60. (863)357-1560


GENERATOR, Coleman, 5000
Watts, 10 hp B&S Engine.
Used for 1 Hurricane. Like
new. $425 (863)467-7838



GENERATOR- Makita, brand
new, never used, cost $2000
sell for $1200
(863)467-5756



PRESSURE WASHER 2500
PSI, 6.5 h/p. $150
(863)634-0526


AIR HOCKEY TABLE very
good condition. Accessories
included. $45 (863)467-2573
CHILDREN'S SCOOTERS- 2,
Silver. Adjustable. $20 or will
separate. (863)763-5120
XBOX w/ chip & hard drive.
Complete system & 8 games.
$300 (863)673-5206
Reading a newspaper
helps you understand
the world around you.
No wonder newspaper
readers are more suc-
cessful people!


Agriculture



Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies,
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845
Lawn & Garden 850
Livestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds.'Plants-
Flowers 865




BOX BLADE, 7' wide with 3pt.
hitch, $75. (863)357-2803


AQHA, 5 yr. old, Sorrel Stal-
lion. Registered DOC'O LE-
NA/Peppy Sand Badger.
Some cutting. Working cow
horse. Gorgeous! $7500
(863)634-3223
CIRCLE Y SHOW SADDLE &
Bosal with horse hair reins.
$850. will separate.
(863)675-2106
DRESSAGE SADDLES- 2,
Passier Wintec $650 Will
separate (863)675-2106



LAWN TRAILER- 3x4, 6" tires,
new, $300 (863)357-5754.
LAWNMOWER, 22", Crafts-
man, self-propelled, 5hp,
good cond., runs great, $50.
(863)697-1627
Murray Riding Mower, 30"
cut, 11hp motor, excellent
condition, $300.
(863)763-5976
PUSH LAWN MOWER- Very
good condition. $75.
(863)763-8943
ZERO TURN MOWER, 1994
Scag, 52" cut. $2000 or best
offer. (863)697-0419

Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos.'
Townhouses Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House Rent 930
Land Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms.to Rent 955


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property Sale 1010
Condos.'
Townhouses SaleC015
Farms Sale 1020
Houses Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property Sale 1035
Land Sale 1040
Lots Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property Sale 1055
Property Inspectionl 060
Real Estate Wanted 1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080



NEW!!! Waterfront 3B/R
homes available starting at
$310,000. Close to town.
Split plans, Owner suites,
large kitchens, 2 car garage.
Won't last! (863)763-6376
Waterfront Home, NEW!
2 story, 4 Bed / 2% bath,
energy efficient,
Great Location! Family
room, eat-in kitchen, lots
of storage, 2 car garage,
$325,000. MUST SEE!
(863)763-6376

Mobile Homes



Mobile Home Lots 2005
Mobile Home Parts 2010
Mobile Homes Rent 2015
Mobile Homes Sale 2OJ




OUSLEY ESTATES 3BR,
2BA. Dbl wide. No pets, non
smoking. Available now.
Please call (863)357-1517
Join all the people who
say, "I sold it in the
classifieds"



Beautiful 3br, 2ba. Screened
porch, car port, gar. 12x24
w/s, 1ac. lot, band to band
forest. $129,900 467-4690
LAKE PORT RV PARK: Nice
Trailer w/Deck Room. 2
Bdrm., 1 Ba., On water, lake
access. $7500 possible
owner financing. Call Dawn
@ (239)825-5657
MOBILE HOME, 2 Bdrm., 1
Ba, Set up in Butch's Fish
Camp. Boat slip, Lake access.
Possible owner financing.
$8500. Call Dawn @
(239)825-5657
OKEECHOBEE, 14X70, 2BD,
2BA, New Roof on 2 lots.
2627 NW 1st St. Rent or op-
tion to buy. $83K 697-6397


Do-It-Yourself Ideas


Stenciling for Beginners

Stenciling can be used to decorate almost any sur-
face, and you donehave to be an artist to have fun
and make quality stencil prints. All you need is a
full-color, 27-page guidebook, "Stenciling Made
Easy For Beginners." The book features all of the
information you need to get started, plus step-by-step
instructions for nine, projects. You'll learn tech-
niques such as swirling, pouncing and shading, what
types of paints and brushes to use, how to cut your
own stencils plus much more.
The projects include a French flower bucket, a
wooden planter (pictured above), a canvas vest,
designs for stenciling on walls, a tablecloth and nap-
kins plus four others.

Stenciling Made Easy for Beginners guidebook
(No. P9280)... $8.95
Also available:
How to Stencil If You Think You Can't guidebook
(No. HP2015) ... $5.95
Please add $3.00 s&h


To order, circle item(s),
clip & send w/ check to:


Please be sure to
include your name,


Recreation



Boats 3005
Campers RVs 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles ATVs 3035



ALUMINUM BOAT- 14', w/trlr,
2 motors, 2 trolling motors,
fish finder, anchors, swivel
seats, $2000 (863)635-3627.
ANSWER BOAT 1989 w/Trail-
er, 16%2 Ft. w/40 hp engine.
$2000. (863)674-0067
BASS TRACKER aluminum,
17', 40HR new all galv. trail-
er, excellent condition $1500
(863)517-1273
BASS TRACKER '89, 16Ft., 35
hp Mercury Minnkota. A/T
Tournament Series, 24 volt.
535 s- liriTgbri Live well.
Runs good. Must sell. $2000
(863)763-6065 Ask for Ken
BASSTENDER,'99, 10 ft., live
well, trolling mtr., fits in a
truck bed, fish anywhere,
$500. (863)484-0109
BOAT TRAILER, 14 Ft. Galva-
nized. Good shape. $150.
863-674-1105.
BOAT TRAILER, galvanized,
good shape for 18' boat,
350. (772)342-7304
COBRA BASS SKI BOAT, '17',
140 Johnson Outboard, bi-
mini top, good trlr., Must
Sell, $3500. (863)612-1648
CRIS CRAFT '82 25' cabin
cruiser, all orig. fiberglass, in-
board V8. Only in fresh water.
$8500 (863)357-7406
FIBERGLASS BOAT- 15',
Johnson 60 hp, w/galvanized
trailer, seats 4+ $1800 neg.
Will deliver (863)993-3936
MFG CAREFREE 14Ft. Boat
w/Johnson 35 hp., Bimini Top
CD Stereo & Trailer. Excellent
cond. $1550 (561)644-1590
PONTOON BOAT- '03, 20'
PlayCraft, 50HP Yamaha 4
stroke, trlr w/spare wheel &
tire, stereo cass plyr, indiv
seat covers, trolling mtr,
depth finder, live well, fishing
seats, anchors, bimini top,
one owner, like new, $14000
(863)357-9962
PONTOON BOAT '94 Weeres
Fisherman Deluxe, 20'. 40 hp
Mercury, Trolling motor, trir. &
more. $6000.863-763-2203
POWER WENCH- 12volt, nev-
er used, ball hitch adapter
plate, 10' remote control,
$275 (863)675-8420.
SPORTSCRAFT 151/2 Ft., Tri
Haul, Fiberglass, Exc. cond.,
70 hp Mercury w/trailer. New
tires. $1500 (863)357-1642
TRI HULL BOAT, 16', walk thru
windshield, 60 hp Mariner
outboard motor & 'ir i;.I1:00
firm. (863)467-8038


ELEC MOTOR SCOOTER Bo-
reem Jia series. Like new.
Pd. $450 asking $250 neg.
(863)357-2233 Okee area


HONDA SHADOW 1985, Runs
great, good condition. Gas
saver. $1500. or best offer.
(863)634-7046
HONDA XR50 Kids dirt bike,
new MX Tires, well maintained,
garage kept, low hours $800
or best offer (863)467-6434
YAMAHA Dirt Bike, YZ175
Two stroke, runs but needs
work. $300 (863)763-3110
YUMBO CRUISER '04- 50
miles, dressed out, good be-
ginner bike, 200 cc, $2500
(863)801-5353.



DIRT BIKE KX250, '93, new
brakes, cranks right up, Fast!
$1100 or best offer.
(863)467-6434
Elec. Scooter, w/seat, head-
lights, turn signals, new 24v
charger, extra scooter for
parts, $125. (863)763-3551
GO CART- 2 seater, Camo seat
cover, dark green, good con-
dition $800 (863)635-2348
leave msg.
HONDA FOREMAN '01 4x4.
Good shape, low hours. Runs
good. $4000 or best offer
(863)675-6568 Pls Lv Msg


MISSING- AIRSTREAM '74-
31ft, recent new roof top AC,
vic of West Palm 'Beach
91405, Reward if found
(561)684-9007.


Automobiles



Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks 4040
Parts Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Tralers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070



5TH AVENUE '89- runs good,
needs brakes, $600 neg.
(863)675-4981
CADILLAC BROUGHAM '91 -
Runs great, cold air. $950
(863)467-8013
CHEVY CAVALIER '97 Runs
good, 4 door $1500
(863)763-5178
CHEVY EUROSPORT'88-
$900 or best offer, runs
good, (863)467-0987.
CHEVY LUMINA, '93, good air,
runs good, new tires, 87k
miles, $1900 neg.
(863)467-5680
FORD MUSTANG, 1965, auto,
vinyl top, $7999.
(863)447-0400


U-Bild Features address and the name of
P.O. Box 2383 this newspaper. Allow
Van Nuys, CA 91409 1-2 weeks for delivery.

Or call (800) 82-U-BILD
craftbook.com
SMoney Back Guarantee


I _








The Okeechobee News, Monday, October 24, 2005


FORD TAURUS '95 Engine
runs excellent, dark green,
needs minor trans work. $500
or best offer (863)763-1138
LIMO: 1985 CHRYSLER NEW
YORKER, Runs good. Very
dependable, 4 cyl., auto.
$1200 neg. (863)697-6732
LINCOLN TOWNCAR'93
Cartier, one owner, always
garaged. 102K mi, excellent
cond. $3800 (863)357-7406
MERCURY- '92, Grand Mar-
quis, Good shape, $1500.
(863)635-9458
MERCURY SABLE '93 white,
tinted windows, cruise control.
runs great & great on gas.
$900 (863)983-5597
NISSAN MAXIMA 95: V6, Au-
to., 5 spd., A/C. Good on gas.
Like new. $1500 Firm
(954)260-1933.
OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS, '87,
good on gas, excellent con-
dition, $2500 or best offer.
(863)357-0765
TOYOTA CAMRY '93- needs
work, runs, or good for
parts. $350 or best offer
(863)467-8038.
TOYOTA CELICA '92- con-
vertible, exc cond, $2500
firm (863)697-6634.
VW RAIL BUGGY & PARTS -
needs work. $350 or best of-
fer (863)675-6214



FLAT BED TRAILER- 45ft,
very good condition, asking
$4500 (863)697-8679.
The classified are the
most successful sales-
person in town.


I Pubi o i


BRONCO II '89- good shape,
problem w/trans, eng rebuilt
45K miles, good tires, new
parts $1200 (863)805-8789
FORD BRONCO, '87- 4x4, Full
Size, Runs needs some TLC,
$1200(863)763-8725.
FORD EXPLORER, '98, 4x4,
59k mi., new suspension,
$6900 or best offer.
(863)599-0809
FORD F350, '84, very good
cond., 4 whl. dr., runs,
$2500 or best offer.
(863)261-2938

READING A
NEWSPAPER SAVES
TIME BY HELPING YOU
PLAN YOUR TIME
WISELY '


( owondeewpae
realders enoy life morel


FORD RANGER 1984, 2.8 V6,
4x4, Runs great, owner pur-
chased newer vehicle.
$1300. (863)381-0432



E350 FORD VAN 85- w/6.9
diesel, exc. motor & drive
train, new tires, rusty body,
$1200 neg (561)684-9007.
F350 TRUCKS (3) all w/6.9
diesels, 2 bad motors, 1
good, $1850 or best of-
fer(561)684-9007.


CHEVY BERETTA 1992, Good
for parts. $100
(863)763-3110
CHEVY TRUCK RALLY
WHEELS (5) 8" wide & '69 Ca-
mero 3 core Radiator $120
will sep. (863)634-0526
ENGINE- for '89 Honda Ac-
cord, 2.2, w/tranny, 89K orig
miles $150 (863)697-6731.
FIBERGLASS TOPPER- Leer,
for '97-'03 Ford F150, Step-
side, White, Exc. cond.
$350. (863)610-1000
PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 1988,
Needs work. $200 or best
offer. (863)467-8856
TIRES (4) like new, Firestone
P235/75R16, $225
(863)357-8788.
TIRES- 4, Mickey Thompson,
15" 35x14.50 $300.
863-763-9592 or
863-634-0399
TONNEAU COVER- by ARE fits
Chevy S10 or 6 ft bed truck
Excellent condition $300.
Firm (863)697-6731


TRANSMISSION- Rebuilt GM,
$300 (863)467-8856.
WILD COUNTRY RADIALS -
RVT, 33x12.50x15, on 6 lug
aluminum wheels. $400
(863)634-6504


CHEVY 3/4 350 TBI, '87-
Crewcab, 4x2, runs good,
rusty but trusty, $2000 neg.
(772)215-2066.
CHEVY S10 EXT CAB '91 runs
great, cold a/c, $1500 or
best offer (863)357-2494
CHEVY S10 Pick Up 1985,
Partially restored. Needs to be
finished. Runs good. $1200.
(863)674-0067
Chevy S10 Pickup, '88, runs
good, $1150 or best offer.
(863)467-5534
FORD F100 '76 New tires &
muffler system. Standard
transmission. Runs good.
$650 (863)635-1096
FORD F150 1999, 2 wd., All
power, Single cab. Goose
Neck & Reese hitch. $3800 or
best offer. (772)201-7633


CHEVY S10 BLAZER, '87, 2.8
litre, rebuilt eng. & trans.,
cold a/c, $1000 or best of-
fer. (863)467-6783
SUBURBAN '83- 3/4 ton die-
sel, overhauled transmission,
rungs good $1800
(863)674-0785.


ENCLOSED TRAILER- 12'x5',
converted stock trailer, dbl.
axle, good for storage,
$1200 neg. (863)697-9704


I P lic Notic i


NOTICE OF OUA MEETINGS
NOTICEIuS HEREY GIVENthat It ru Oe:3 chOM.e Utility Authorily.Sicial Session
ongnay scneue or uctoaer o u woie rescneu5uee and wmII convene on
Wednesday, November 2, 2005 at 8:30 AM,, at the Okeechobee Utility Authority
Offices, 100 S.W. 5th. Avenue, Okeechobee, Florda. The purpose of this meeting
is to address the following:
Developer's Agreement
WWTP Expansion
Executive Director
Pruyant to Secion 280.0105, Florida Statutes, if a person decides to appeal ann
vision made y tire ,Authority wo respect to such meetings,e or sa e Wlisneea
a record of proceedings, and for such purpose, may need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceedings is made, which record Includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is based. Such person may provide a court re-
corder, stenographer, oratape recorder for such verbatim record.
BORDER OFTHE OKEECHOBEE
UTILITY AUTHORITY
Landon C. Fortner, Jr.

9M el B jQ


LAWN TRAILERS, (2),
1) 5x10 w/end gate,
1) 5x10 w/dump & end
gate, $1300. (863)357-5754 ,(,nimu'
TRAILER 14', heavy duty,
tandem drop axle, flat deck,
4x4 channel frame, 2x4 box
$1400 neg. (772)342-7304
Trailer, 10x5, drop deck, good ..
cond., heavy duty, $450.
(863)467-4690
UTILITY TRAILER- 5'x10',
Used 1 time. $850.
(863)467-1547

L-'"- .
CHEVY WORK VAN 1988, .7 ,,
Needs transmission work.
$575. (561)644-1590 The most important
Need a few more bucks 20 minutes of your day is
to purchase something the time spent reading
deer? Pick up some
extra bucks when you with your child from
sell your used items in birth to age nine.
the classifeids.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2002-CP-248
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GOLDIE LOUISE DUNBAR-BAKER
f/k/a GOLDIE LOUISE DUNBAR,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order De-.
termining Homestead Status of Real
Property and Order of Summary Ad-
ministration has been entered in the
Estate of GOLDIE LOUISE DUNBAR-
BAKER, f/k/a GOLDIE LOUISE DUN-
BAR, Deceased, File Number 2005-
CP-248, by the Circuit Court for Okee-
chobee County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 312 N.W.
3rd Street, Suite 101, Okeechobee,
Florida 34972; that the decedents date
of death was January 19, 2005; that
the total estate consists of exempt
homestead real property and exempt
personal property; that the name and
addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
JUDY M. MESSINA, 7014 N.W. 38th
Manor, Coral Springs, Florida 33065
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTI-
FIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent oth-
er than those for whom provision for
full payment was made in the Order of
Summary Administration must file their
claims withinthis court WITHIN THE
TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER AP-
PLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED
The date of the first publication of this
notice is October 17, 2005.
Person Giving Notice
Judy M. Messina
7014 N.W. 38th Manor
Coral Springs, Florida 33065
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
CONELY &CONELY, PA.
Post Office Drawer 1367
Okeechbee, Florida 34972
(863) 763-3825
By: TomW. Conely, III
Florida Bar #096482
91592 ON 10/17,24/05


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2002-CP-251
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROY DONALD BAKER,
a/k/a ROY D. BAKER
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Admnlstration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THEABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order De-
termining Homestead Status of Real
Property and Order of Summary Ad-
ministration has been entered in the
Estate of ROY DONALD BAKER, a/k/a
ROY D. BAKER, Deceased, File Num-
ber 2005-CP-251, by the Circuit Court
for Okeechobee County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is
312 N.W. 3rd Street, Suite101, Okee-
chobee, Florida 34972; that the dece-
dents date of death was January 5,
2005; that the total estate consists of
exempt homestead real property and
exempt personal property; that the
name and addresses o those to whom
it has been assigned by such order
are:
JUDY M. MESSINA, 7014 N.W. 38th
Manor, Coral Springs, Florida 33065
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTI-
FIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent oth-
er than those for whom provision for
full payment was made in the Order of
Summary Administration must file their
claims within this court WITHIN THE
TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER AP-
PLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED
The date of the first publication of this
notice is October 17, 2005.
Person Giving Notice
Judy M. Messina
7014 N.W. 38th Manor
Coral Springs, Florida 33065
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
CONELY&CONELY, PA.
Post Office Drawer 1367
Okeechobee, Florda 34972
(863) 763-3825
By: Tom W.onely, III
Florida Bar #096482
915890N 10/17,24/05


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASENO. 2005-CP-250
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HAROLD CHARLES KOELLER,
a//a HAROLD C. KOELLER,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of HAR-
OLD CHARLES KOELLER, Waka HAR-
OLD C. KOELLER deceased, whose
date of death was July 6, 2005, and
whose Social Security Number is
395-26-8616, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Okeechobee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which
is 312 N.W. 3rd Street, Suite 101,
Okeechobee, Florida 34972. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and e personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedents estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OF THIRTY
DAYS OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO
FILED WILL eBE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THEDECEOENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this
notices October 17,2005.
Elaine Koeller
-4i '. MlOrN,,, 4i 'iw.r, Lj)l
CONELY&CONELY, PA.
Post Office Drawer 1367
Okeechobee, Florida 34973-1367
(863) 763-3825
y: om W.Coely Ill
Florida Bar #096482
Attorney for
Personal Representative
91586 ON 10/17,24/05


Community Events


Central Elementary hosts carnival
Central Elementary School will host their annual Halloween Carni-
val on Friday, Oct. 28, from 5 to 8 p.m. Carnival activities will include
games, pony rides, a hay ride and a haunted house. Snacks will be sold
near the outdoor games. In the cafeteria, dinner will be served for $8
for adults and $4 for children. The adult menu includes roast beef and
fried chicken. The children's menu features chicken, pizza or maca-
roni and cheese. Tickets for carnival activities are 50 cents each and
can be purchased in advance from the school office. Tickets will also
be sold at the door.

O.H.S. hosts band festival
The final planning meeting for the Florida Bandmasters Association
Marching Band Festival to be hosted by Okeechobee High School will
be held Tuesday, Oct. 25, beginning at 7 p.m. in the OHS lecture hall.
The actual festival will be Saturday, Oct. 29. The O.H.S. Blazin' Brah-
man Band will perform along with 13 other marching bands from sev-
eral surrounding counties. Food and drinks will be available through-
out the afternoon and evening. Gates will open at 3 p.m. The Osceola
and Yearling Middle School bands will open the event by playing the
Star Spangled Banner at 3:30 p.m. Tickets will be $5 per person. The
O.H.S. BandAlumni (anrdtheir parents).are needed to.make this event
success. f,you cannotrtl,&tn.d the planning meeting but would like to
help, call band director AmyV Wo\o:d at (863) 462-5025 or Karin
Ammons at (863) 763-3131.


Car wash benefits 4-H club
The Spurs and Saddles 4-H Horse Club will hold a fundraising car
wash on Saturday, Oct. 29, in the Wal-Mart parking lot near the gar-
den center from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. The car wash is being held to
raise money for 4-H sponsored horse events. All donations are wel-
comed.

County plans fall festival
The second annual Okeechobee County fall festival will be held
Oct. 29 and Oct. 30 at the Okeechobee County Agri-Civic Center, 4200
S.R. 70 E. Admission and parking is free for all spectators and partici-
pants. Gates will open at noon on Saturday and at 1 p.m. on Sunday.
Events slated for Saturday include: arts, crafts, specialty merchandise,
food and a bounce house and slide for children. A trick-or-treat greet
for the children will start at 5 p.m. and end at 7 p.m. Parents and chil-
dren alike can wear costumes. Main Street will also hold a pet costume
contest on Saturday evening. For information and entry applications,
contact Main Street at (863) 357-MAIN. On Sunday, the Okeechobee
Cattlemen's Association will put on a ranch rodeo. For information or
entry applications, call (863) 634-3265. For vendor and general event
information, call (863) 763-1666.

Civil Air Patrol plans fundraiser
The Okeechobee Civil Air Patrol Composite Squadron is attempting
to raise funds for basic operations of the unit, equipment and uniforms


for cadet members. The squadron will be holding an aircraft wash at
the Okeechobee County Airport from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Oct. 29.
For information on the fundraiser, contact Deputy Commander Gene
O'Neill at (863) 763-3212.

Pet costume contest planned
Okeechobee Main Street is hosting a pet costume contest at the
Oct. 29 Fall Festival at the Okeechobee County Agri-Civic Center on S.R.
70 E. Dress your pet for Halloween and enter them into the contest. For
information, call Lydia Jean Williams at (863) 357-MAIN.

Church plans Oktoberfest celebration
Peace Lutheran Church, 750 N.W. 23rd Lane, will host their 15th
annual Oktoberfest on Saturday, Oct. 29..Lunch will be served from 11
a.m. until 3 p.m. and will include bratwurst, sauerkraut, baked beans,
German potato salad, apple streusel and a beverage. Tickets are $5
each. There will also be a white elephant sale, cake walk, 50/50 draw-
ing, prize giveaways, kids games and a country store. For information,
call (863) 763-5042.

Fundraiser will be held
The Joshua Matute Family Transportation Benefit will hold a
fundraiser in the Okeechobee City Park on Oct. 29. There will be arts
and crafts vendors, food, drink and entertainment. There will also be
a baking contest and jrize giveaways. For information, contact Niki
Salmon at (561) 722-0401, or Hazel Wetherington at (863) 763-3617.


New business owners have common questions


GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- "Take
.This Job and Shove It" is the title of
.a 1977 hit song about the frustra-
-tions of people who lack control
.over their work life. Now, for those
'who dream about being their own
-boss, three University of Florida
economists have come up with a
:list of frequently asked questions
to help aspiring entrepreneurs.
"No matter what kind of busi-
ness you want to start, there are
important questions that need to
.be answered right up front," said
Hank Cothran, an associate in UF's
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences. "These basic questions
measure your readiness to own
-and operate a business."
Mr. Cothran, the lead author of
"Ten Frequently Asked Questions
for Small Business Start-Ups,"
developed the publication in coop-
:eration with David Mulkey, a pro-
-fessor in UF's food and resource
,economics department, and Alien
Wysocki, an assistant professor in
the department. The complete
-.document is available at
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FE571.
"The 10 basic questions are
really just the beginning of a long
series of questions that must be
-addressed by any new business
:owner," Mr. Cothran said. "In addi-
tion, they will also need answers
.about insurance, intellectual prop-
erty issues, employee issues and
independent contractors."
Question No. 1: Do I have what
it takes to operate a business? To
*answer this, make an honest
assessment of your own motiva-
.tion, talents, skills and experience,
Mr. Cothran said. For example, can
you work alone? Are you willing to
.take risks? Can you make good
management decisions? Do you
have the physical and emotional
,stamina to run a business? Do you
get along well with others?
"Because few people have all
.the desirable qualities, look for
ways to compensate for your
weak areas, such'as taking classes,
finding a mentor, hiring capable
people or adding a partner with
the necessary skills," Mr. Cothran
.said.
Question No. 2: What kind of
business should I start? Consult
with local experts and other busi-
ness owners of the product or
service you want to offer, and
check with potential customers to
see if they are willing to pay for it.
Find out what kind of business is
bestforyou.
Question No. 3: What do I do


first? Once you have decided that
starting a business is the right step
for you and you have a doable
business idea, think about a name
and location for the business. Reg-
ister your business with the proper
authorities, obtain the necessary
licenses and permits, and develop
production schedules and market-
ing and pricing plans.
Question No. 4: How should I
organize my business? Most small
businesses are formed as sole
proprietorships, in which business
income is treated the same as per-
sonal income for tax purposes. A
significant disadvantage is that
you, the owner, assume personal
liability for the actions of the busi-
ness.
Other types of business organi-
zations in Florida include general
and limited partnerships, corpora-
tions, and limited-liability compa-
nies. For information on ways to
organize a business, visit the Flori-
da Department of State's Web site
at http://www.dos.state.fl.us/start-
bus/index.html.
Question No. 5: What permits
or licenses do I need? Licensing
and permitting regulations vary
with the type of business and the
city, county and state where the
business is located. Some busi-
nesses face minimal licensing
requirements while others are
tightly controlled. Sources of infor-
mation include UF county exten-
-sion offices, the city or county
clerk's office, small business devel-
opment centers and the local
chamber of commerce. Also,


check with the Service Corps of
Retired Executives, the Small Busi-
ness Administration and Enter-
prise Florida.
Most Florida businesses need
sales and use tax permits, which
are available from the Florida
Department of Revenue's Web site
at
http://www.myflorida.com/dor/ta
xes.
Question No. 6: How do I get
people to buy my product or serv-
ice? Sales happen because of mar-
keting, which identifies customers
and what they Want to buy. Mar-
keting involves six issues, ranging
from the product and how it is pro-
duced to pricing, promotion, distri-
bution and customer perception
of the product or service.
Question No. 7: Why do I need
a business plan? Develop a plan
for yourself as well as your part-
ners, investors and bankers. The
plan should identify the product or
service, the market, the manage-
ment team, where the business
will operate and your business
experience. The plan should
include a market study, promo-
tional strategies, current and pro-
jected balance sheets, income
statements and cash flow analy-
ses.
Question No. 8: What are the
alternatives to help me finance my
business? Commitment of person-
al funds is often the first financing
step. It is an indicator of how seri-
ous you are about the business
and conveys your confidence to
investors. Personal investment


sources of capital include savings,
current cash flow, second job
income, home equity or equity
from other property or assets,
retirement accounts, personal
lines of credit and personal credit
cards. All of these options have
risks. Other, more complex financ-
ing options are also available. Part-
nerships and incorporations must
be established in writing and
appropriate forms must be filed
with the clerk of the court. Busi-
ness loans can be obtained from
several sources, such as commer-
cial banks and credit unions, com-
mercial finance companies, local
development companies, venture


if your


I
8

a


capital firms, and insurance com-
panies. However, venture capital
firms and insurance companies
typically are not useful for owners
of small businesses.
Question No. 9: What records
do I need to keep? The records
needed to manage your business
and the records needed by the IRS
may differ. While the business
owner is interested in where and
how income is generated and
where expenses are incurred, the
IRS requires records that will allow
for the preparation and documen-
tation of a completed tax return.
For yearly tax returns, keep the
records for three years after the fil-


ing of that year's taxes. Records
involving property must be kept
for the entire time the property is
owned, plus an additional three
years minimum.
Question No. 10: Where can I
go for help? There are a wide vari-
ety of local, state and national
resources to help answer these
and other questions. The local UF
county extension service office is a
good place to start. Ask if the office
has a state or national resource
directory for small, micro and
home-based businesses.


kids enjoy cooking and have a favorite

recipe they would like to share


please send it in.

Deadline for entries is Oct. 25, 2005

Please send to:

Holiday Traditions

Okeechobee News

P.O. Box 639

Okeechobee, FL 34973

I One Lucky Participant Will Receive A Nice Holiday Oiftl -


T .;


*.iFF


Put a spin on your holiday baking!!

Okeechobee Holiday Traditions,

an Okeechobee News Special Section,

will be featuring cherished recipes, craft ideas

and holiday traditions of your friends and

neighbors and we want yours, too!

Do your kids cook?

We are welcoming recipes for our

"Kids Cook" portion of this section,


To save time and money by having the ne\ s-
paper delivered to your home, call Reader
Services at 1-877-353-2424 or email
readerservices @newszap.com.

If you're already a subscriber and have
questions or requests about your home
delivery, call Reader Services at
1-877-353-2424 or e-mail ai
readerserv\ices@ ne szap.conm. _Y_. _


Okeechobee New:


I _


~/~P~;-~L~.~n~nd








10 The Okeechobee News, Monday, October 24,2005


Okeechobee County Property


Transactions


Salel Date
7/22/05
7/22/05
7/22/05
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7/27/05
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Salel Price
$79,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$170,000.00
$101,600.00
$121,000.00
$35,000.00
$120,000.00
$0.00
$35,000.00
$100,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$88,000.00
$115,000.00
$8,900.00
$0.00
$220,000.00
$0.00
$25,000.00
$25,000.00
$110,000.00
$10,000.00
$18,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$460,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$25,000.00
$81,600.00
$0.00
$22,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$179,900.00
$25,000.00
$0.00
$78,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$79,000.00
$85,000.00
$85,000.00
$80,000.00
$0.00
$210,000.00
$0.00
$70,000.00
$22,000.00
$26,000.00
$0.00
$3,457,300.00
$0.00
$55,000.00
$0.00
$124,900.00
$0.00
$0.00
$150,000.00
$50,000.00
$0.00,
$30,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00oo
$59,800.00
$0.00
$37,900.00
$8,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$31,000.00
$35,000.00
$177,500.00
$72,500.00
$150,000.00
$0.00


$110,000.00
$100,000.00
$60,000.00
$89,000.00
$0.00
$49,500.00
$228,600.00
$27,500.00
$30,000.00
$175,000.00
$30,000.00
$0.00


Sale2 Date
9/17/02
7/11/05
7/11/05
5/15/98
2/15/96
2/8/05
6/13/05
5/11/05
5/11/05
7/19/05
5/1/88
3/9/05
3/9/05
2/10/03
11/26/03
8/23/02
3/25/03
8/9/04
7/25/05
8/23/04
8/18/95
7/14/04
2/14/05
7/6/01
7/25/05
7/25/05
7/22/04
7/25/05
7/25/05
7/25/05
11/2/04
8/18/97
2/1/88
10/14/04
4/13/05
7/25/05
7/25/05
7/25/05
5/25/05
10/29/01
12/11/03
11/26/03
9/30/03
9/30/03
9/30/03
9/30/03
9/30/03
9/30/03
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9/30/03
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9/30/03
2/6/04
3/4/04
3/22/04
1/12/04
10/1/03
4/30/03
7/25/04
6/9/05
11/11/85
9/21/76
3/2/05
7/22/05
7/15/99
8/18/97
7/15/05
1/5/05
1/5/05
12/14/01
3/15/05
11/1/01
7/27/05
7/21/03
1/29/03
4/26/05
5/9/01
1/5/05
1/6/99
2/28/05
4/1/75
7/27/05
7/24/05
7/8/05
1/6/05
3/24/05
11/6/98
2/20/03
4/16/99
4/16/99


5/31/95
10/8/98
1/5/05
4/8/05
8/1/85
1/10/96
10/18/95
7/28/05
2/22/05
7/1/95
12/29/98
6/10/05


Sale2 Price
$0.00
$90,000.00
$0.00
$40,000.00
$68,000.00
$95,000.00
$10,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$42,500.00
$38,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$52,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$10,000.00
$7,000.00
$6,000.00
$3,200.00
$6,000.00
$74,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$156,100.00
$0.00
$0.00
$1,000.00
$8,500.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$500.00
$25,000.00
$42,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$27,500.00
$37,500.00
$35,900.00
$0.00
$0.00
$82,500.00
$0.00
$0.00
$5,000.00
$6,000.00
$18,000.00
$2,469,500.00
$55,000.00

$0.00
$200,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$110,000.00
$0.00
$25,000.00
$3,300.00
$0.00
$21,500.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$13,500.00
$5,000.00
$0.00
$3,500.00
$0.00
$21,000.00
$0.00
$50,000.00
$0.00
$2,000.00
$0.00


$27,000.00
$100.00
$0.00
$63,000.00
$0.00
$15,000.00
$0.00
$0.00
$30,000.00
$294,300.00
$0.00
$1,000.00


Name
ROWLEY ALBERT R
MCELHANEY LLOYD & NATALIE
MCELHANEY LLOYD & NATALIE
INGRAM JEFFERY
PONCE SILVANO & TEODORA
HACKBARTH ALBERT R III
MILES MICHAEL L
DELK JAMES J
DELK JAMES J
LAROCCA ROBERT & TAMARA
MOCULESKI MYRON S
MILU MARGARET & MURPHY DENISE
MILU MARGARET & MURPHY DENISE
WELKER AMY S
HOCKMAN PHILIP P & SIBYL H
DAUPHINE MYRIAME
LIVE OAK TRUST INC
KIDWELL JOY A & GOODBREAD KEIT
ASHMONT WILLIAM L & BILLINGS L
MARRERO RAUL
MARRERO RAUL
MENENDEZ MELISSA
MARRERO RAUL
NJ HOLDING LLC
SIMONDS ANN M & FARLEY GLORIA
SIMONDS ANN M & FARLEY GLORIA
PARKER GEORGE CHARLES & JANICE
SIMONDS ANN M & FARLEY GLORIA
SIMONDS ANN M & FARLEY GLORIA
COULE TERRI & BASIL J
BUCHANAN ROSCOE A & MARY K
ADAMS MICHAEL W & NANCY L
SIMS SARA
MARTIN JAMES & DIANE
FLORIDA PRAIRIE INC
SIMONDS ANN M & FARLEY GLORIA
SIMONDS ANN M & FARLEY GLORIA
SIMONDS ANN M & FARLEY GLORIA
JUDD LYNETTE L & JEFFERY C
ASMUS PAULINE
YERKES JASON
BRAASCH BRENT D
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERSLTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PARTNERS LTD
LEMOS STANLEY P
SOUSA DAVID H
LEMOS STANLEY P
LEMOS STANLEY P
CASSELS & MCCALL
WHITTAKER RONALD E & KRUEGER R
AKINS VANCE
KROGEN NICOLE
COLLINS JEFFREY L
C H L HOLDINGS INC
COCKFIELD LEE & LORI
OKEECHOBEE PREMIER PROPERTY LL
GARNER SHEILA, ETAL.
SHEPHERD CHARLES E
ROYAL JONATHON & STEPHANIE
LEE MATTHEW
LEE MATTHEW
MOORE GEORGE W & CAROL H
SMITH HERBERT EUGENE & DENISE
FAULKNER JANET M
NIEVES GASPAR (ESTATE) &
ONI LARRY T
COLLINS CAROLYN J
VI AND GLC INC
BRASWELL JOHNNY LYNN'
PECK MICHAEL
JOHNSON GREG L & WILSON NINAT
CHANG SHIN CHANG
THE HELMUTSAUS GROUP LLC
ACREAGE PROPERTIES INC
ACREAGE PROPERTIES INC
SOUTHERN HOMESITES INC
RAPHAEL VICTOR
BAGO-OD JOCELYN
BAILEY GARY T
YU SAI & WANG LISA.
RHUDA RICHARD & JENEANE
LAWSON KATHRYN


RODRIGUEZ ARNULFO
BERNDT ROBERT LEROY & RUTH E
RICE TANYA A
MAMMARELLI KELLY B
STEWART ROBERT N & BARBARA J
FRAZIER GARY & DEBORAH
FRA-MAR ENTERPRISES INC
ONI LARRY T
FABRIZIO STEVEN J & WILLS RON
SANDERS CLAUDIA, ETAL.
GELIN HESIQUE & MANERGE
COULE BASIL J & TERRI


Street St. Type
NE 28TH AVE
NW 276TH ST
NW 276TH ST
NW 92ND CT
SE 32ND AVE
SE 35TH AVE
SE 40TH AVE
SE 25TH DR
SE 25TH DR
NW 260TH ST
SE 50TH AVE
SW 8TH WAY
SW 8TH WAY
NW 240TH ST
SE 33RD ST
NW 304TH ST

NE 80TH AVE
SE 80TH TRL
NW 20TH AVE
NW 29TH AVE
NW 32ND AVE
NW 36TH AVE
HWY 441 SE
NW 304TH ST
NW 306TH ST
SE 128TH AVE
NW 312TH ST


NE 12TH LANE
HWY 78 W
HWY 441 SE
SE 35TH AVE
NW 270TH ST
NW 264TH ST
NW 264TH ST
NW 262ND ST
NW 252ND ST
NW 256TH ST
NE 115TH DR
SE 33RD ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST

SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 11TH ST
SE 12TH DR
SE 12TH DR
SE 12TH 'DR
SE 12TH DR
SE 12TH DR
SE 12TH DR
SE 12TH DR
SE 12TH DR
SE 12TH DR
SE 12TH DR
SE 14TH CT
SE 14TH CT
SE 14TH CT
SE 14TH CT
SE 57TH DR
NE 56TH AVE
NW 30TH LANE
NE 20TH LANE
NW 316TH ST
NW 308TH ST
NE 32ND AVE

NW 3RD ST
HWY 78 W
SE 37TH TERR



SE 8TH DR
SE 60TH DR
NW 16TH AVE
NW 36TH AVE
NW 18TH ST

HWY 441 N
NW 310TH ST
NE 14TH AVE
NW 298TH ST

NW 5TH ST

NW 278TH ST
NW 280TH ST
NW 262ND ST
SE 24TH ST

NW 260TH ST


NE 21ST AVE
SW 13TH -WAY


NE 8TH
NW 11TH
SW 18TH


AVE
AVE
ST


NW 19TH AVE
NW 316TH ST


NW 300TH
NW 280TH


Total Acres
0.183
1.25
1.25
0
0.366
0
0
0
0
1.25
0
0
0
0.87
0
1.25
1.25
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.25
1.25
21.66
1.25
1.25
0
0
0
6.81
0
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
2
0
0.61
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.53
0.5
5.01
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.67
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.62
0
0
0
0
0
9.99
0.501
1
1.25
1.25
0.183
98.76
0.218
0
0.23
1.25
1.25
0.195
0.379
0
0
0
0.344
1.25
2.5
1.25
0.103
1.25
2.5
0
0
1.25
1.25
1.25
0
2.5
1.25
1.25


5.19
0
1.25
0
0.172
0.217
11.43
0
1.25
10.03
1.25
1.25


Use
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
VACANT
SINGLE FAM
SINGLE FAM
MOBILE HOM
MOBILE HOM
MOBILE HOM
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
SINGLE FAM
VACANT
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
PASTURE CL
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
SINGLE FAM
VACANT
SINGLE FAM
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
PASTURE CL
SINGLE FAM
MOBILE HOM
SINGLE FAM
PASTURE CL
PASTURE CL
VACANT
SINGLE FAM
SINGLE FAM
VACANT
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
SINGLE FAM
VACANT
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
VACANT
MOBILE HOM
VACANT
SINGLE FAM
VACANT


MOBILE HOM
MOBILE HOM
PASTURE CL
MOBILE HOM
SINGLE FAM
SINGLE FAM
PASTURE CL
VACANT
VACANT
PASTURE CL
VACANT
VACANT


Information Source: Okeechobee County Property Appraiser Website www.okeechobeepa.com