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Dixie County advocate
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028409/00321
 Material Information
Title: Dixie County advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Rose O. Chavous
Place of Publication: Cross City Fla
Publication Date: 12/30/2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Cross City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Dixie County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dixie -- Cross City
Coordinates: 29.635278 x -83.124722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1922?
General Note: Publisher: Skipper K. Jones, <1994>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 24, no. 15 (Oct. 10, 1946).
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000406453
oclc - 01646526
notis - ACF2718
lccn - sn 95047370
sobekcm - UF00028409_00321
System ID: UF00028409:00321

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Publishing News and events for Dixie County, Every Without Fal, Since July 1,1921
{ 1L. Thursday Decembor 30o 2010
C, ,-, ,,, .1.. [., 2010 Dixie County Advocate Home of the Worlds Only Four-Headed Swamp Cabbage o85 1 pg So
Swww. dcadvoate.net Vol. 88. No. 52 12. pages- 1 Section
I I II I III 1 I


t~~A-~ 3


Snow reported

throughout area


Snow flurries were reported
on Sunday in the First
District, Hatch Bend, and in
some parts of Cross City


Dixie's Unemployment
rate jumps in
November (again)

Dixie's jobless rate jumped
from 12.6% in October to
13.3% in November accord-
ing to a study released from
the Florida Agency for
Workforce Iinovation. The
rate a year ago was 12.5%.
Neighboring Gilchrist and
Levy counties also saw simi-
lar jumpsfnr tbi unemploy-
ment rate. Both the number
of people emiloyed, and the
number of people actually
in the work force dropped
during the month, and the
number of people looking
for work went from 725 to
765.

In November, Dixie County
had the 14th highest jobless
rate in the state. Gilchrist
came in at 51st, and Levy
ranked just behind Dixie, at
16th. Most of the counties
with the lowest unemploy-
ment rates were those with
the highest proportions of
government employment.
The state average for
November was 12%.




Wed 61/28 ./4
12/29
A few clouds. Highs in the low 60s
and lows in the upper 20s.


Thu 6839
12/30
Mix of sun and clouds. Highs in the
upper 60s and lows in the upper
30s.


Fri 7345
12/31
Mix of sun and clouds. Highs in the
low 70s and lows in the mid 40s.


Sat
1/1


75/46
\' \v" \


Few showers. Highs in the mid 70s
and lows in the mid 40s.


Sun 76/41
1/2
Isolated thunderstorms. Highs in
the mid 70s and lows in the low
40s.




alr J '. ..
..,... w ii Iim I m w .



".p .'." j'.


On December 14, 2010, Sher-
iff Dewey Hatcher hosted
the Sheriff's Office's annual
Christmas Party and Sher-
iff's Awards Dinner. During


Christmas Day Wreck leaves one injured


On Christmas morning, a
2003 Chevy SUV driven by
Iverson Tyrone Aiken, 25, of
Cross City was southbound
on NE 50th Street and lost
control. The SUV traveled


onto the East shoulder and, transported to Shands with
struck an address sign. The serious, but not life-threat-
vehicle continued to travel ening injuries.
until it hit an oak tree, rotat- -
ed and overturned. Mr. He was not wearing a seat
Aiken was ejected and was belt.


She says it with FLOWERS


Homebodies rejoice. Al-
though you may feel like
you're the only one staying
home with Dick Clark on
New Year's Eve, an unscien-
tific survey on Facebook
shows that for most people,
staying home is the default
option.

Linda Branch Osteen:
What I have done for the
last 12 yrs, bringing it in on
my couch and half the time
asleep... How old am I 90?
Lol

Tammie Lynn Barber:
Black eye peas, cornbread,
greens and will surely
watch the ball drop on tv.

Sharlene Newman-Jer-
rells: Working

Donna Cravey: Eating
something yummy and
watching a good DVD.

Flossie Riels: I will be at
the camp...and then start
the New Year off with black-
eyed peas & hog jowls,
greens, cornbread and sweet
tea! I would like to wish
everyone a safe, healthy, and
Happy New Year!

Miranda Farmer: Going to
Biloxi!! Fun fun!!

Martin Barber: Will be at
home, in my recliner, watch-
ing a ball game on tv and
waiting for the Gator Game
on Saturday. Wishing all my
friends and family a safe
and HAPPY NEWYEAR!!

Rhonda Purvis: Probably
watching a Survivorman
marathon...keeps me out of
trouble..lol..

Jennie Sue Valentine
Cunningham:I really have
not made any definite plans
* but I do plan to stop smok-
ing, start trying to get back


into school so I can further
my education and find em-
ployment that is rewarding
in what I am doing and of-
fers good health benefits
and some retirement, as I
am not growing younger but
only wiser.

Lisa Borders Smith: Hav-
ing a bon fire and karaoke
party! whoop whoop!

Katherine McKinney: rm
going to Lisa's house. She's
the only one having a party.

Susan Nettles: Checking
the backside of my eyelids!

Gall Salas: As always, bon-
fire in the back yard, put the
granddaughters to bed
about 10:30(they can't seem
to make it to 12) I go to sleep
with them, my Bob tiptoes
in kisses me at midnight, I
snuggle back down with the
girls and my Bob goes back
out with the big kids. Life
doesn't get any better

C Hart Patrick: Patrolling
the streets of D.C.

Amanda Elliott: Block Par-
ty in Nashville:) as long as it
doesn't rain too hard...

Gayle Barringer
Lovelace: Staying home.

Chris Meagley: Going out
to celebrate a friends birth-
day and the new year. We al-
ready Have a D.D. lined up!

Madrea Marie Loy: Well I
know I'm not going to be
drinking...(Madrea & Eli are
expecting a new baby!)

Don Curtis: WORKING!!!
It's all I ever do!

Ruthy Buzbee: Going to be
still recovering from
surgery so my New Years'
plans are down the drain.


"I've always been a giver,
and that's what.I like to do,"
she says. "I am so thankful
for the work that was done
for me and that God has
blessed me with Crystel and
Crystal to help in the shop."

Betty Ann's niece Crystel
also speaks highly of her.
"She's such a blessing to so
many people in her family
and in the community, and I
think this is just wonderful
for her."

Kathy says that Betty Ann is
very deserving of VR's ser-
vices. "No one can express
appreciation like she can.
She has thanked me over
and over. I am so very happy
for her."

Betty Ann explains, "I just
can't put into words how
much this has helped me.
Thanks to Kathy and VR, I
am able to keep working."

Florida's Vocational Reha-
bilitation program is com-
mitted to helping people
with disabilities become
part of America's work-
force. Our employer-focused
website, FLJobConnec-
tions.com, allows businesses
to search at no charge for
employees who are ready to
go to work, as well as to post
available jobs. VR has 111 of-
fices across Florida, and last
year helped 3,874 Floridians
with significant disabilities
find or keep a job. For more
information about VR and
its services,, call (800) 451-
4327 or visit Rehab-
works.org.


Cross City, FL Betty Ann
Beckham places the last red
rose in the bouquet, looks
around her flower shop,
and smiles. "I am so
blessed," she says. "I just
can't put into words how
much easier and better it's
been since they [Vocational
Rehabilitation] fixed up the
flower shop."

Betty Ann, who's owned
Personal Touch Florist for
seven years, has severe low-
er back pain and difficulty
sitting or standing all day.
The pain became worse
over the years, and it began
to keep her from doing what
she loved best creating
beautiful flower arrange-
ments. "I was bending over
all the time and having to
dig things out of boxes on
the floor," she says. She
needed to fix the shop, but
financially was unable to do
it. "I started hurting so bad-
ly; there were days when I
just had to quit."

Fortunately, Betty Ann
learned about Vocational Re-
habilitation (VR) and met
Counselor Kathy Haas.
Kathy knew that VR could
help Betty Ann maintain
employment by making a
few adjustments and modifi-
cations to her
workshop. Sh
arranged for
Rehabilitation
Engineers Gary
Sherman and
Patrick Burke
to design and
install modifi-
cations includ-
ing shelves to
display mer-
chandise, silk
flower holders
for the wall,
cabinets, a
rolling table
and a three-
legged standing
stool. They also
moved the sink and made it
work again.

Betty Ann is thrilled.
"Someone else might say
that it's not a big deal, but it
really is," she says. "Every-
thing they did has helped
me in one way or the other,
and it's also helped my staff
be more efficient. If you
make accommodations for
people with disabilities, it
helps everyone." According
to Kathy, businesses often
see a benefit for all employ-
ees when they make their of-
fices more accessible.

Betty Ann has always had a
knack for floral arrange-
ment. "When I worked at


Anderson Elementary
School, I helped with assem-
blies and programs by being
creative with what we had.
When they had little plays,
whatever they needed for
the play I made it."

About
75% of
Betty
Ann's
business
is for fu-
nerals,'
and for a
time, she
thought
about
getting
out of
that part
of the
business.
But a
friend,
who had
ordered
flowers for her relative's ft-
neral, told Betty Ann that it
really meant a lot to have
someone create the flower
arrangements who knows
and cares so much for the
family. That changed her
mind, and now she knows
that she's doing the families
a service by giving it her
personal touch.

And the personal touch is
what Betty Ann does best.
Betty Ann puts her love and
care into all of her creations
and also enjoys writing per-
sonal notes on her invoices.
She conducts all of her busi-
ness by hand


the events of the evening,
Sheriff's personnel were
recognized for their perfor-
mances during the year and
their dedication to the Sher-
iff's Office.

Also attending were several
of the C.O.P volunteers who
dedicate many hours of ser-
vice each year assisting the
Sheriff's Office in providing
services to the citizens of
Dixie County.

See DCSO, page 3


So, what are you doing

New Year's Eve?
"Staying home" seems to be the winner


DCSO awards


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Thursday, December 30, 2010


www. dcadvocate.net


Viewpoints


The Dixie County Advocate
174 NE 351 Hwy.
P.O. Box 5030' Cross City, FL 32628
Ph. 352-498-3312 Fax (352)498-0420
SPRINTERS & PUBLISHERS
Letters to the Editor, Ads Editorfidcadvocate.net
News Editoradcadvocate.net


$24.99...........................In Dixie County
$29.99...... .....................Elsewhere
Includes Tax
OFFICIAL ORGAN of DIXIE COUNTY
Katherine McKinney........................ Editor
Danielle Ridgeway......................Receptonst/UPS
David Rymen.............Webmaster
Angel Lee................................. Reporter
John Kelley................... Football Reporter
The Dixie County Advocate is owned by
LSA Media, LLC. of Dixie County
Deadline for news and announcements is 5:00 p.m. on Monday Deadline for advertising
and classified ads is 12:00 Noon on Tuesday. Classified ads are $5.00 for 20 words or
less; .10 cents additional word. Classified ads are payable in advance. Please mail ad
with check to the above address. Reproduction by commercial interests or for resale or
'distribution, in whole or in part, is forbidden without the permission of the publisher. Let-
ters to the Editor Policy: In order to provide an open forum on issues and concerns to our
readers, we publish (space permitting) every letter that we receive that is signed by the
writer. Unsigned and anonymous letters that are inflammatory, slanderous, or libelous,
and letters promoting a commercial enterprise or political candidate are not published.
The Advocate reserves the right to edit all submissions. Committed to Accuracy: Errors of
Fact appearing in news columns will be corrected if the error substantially affects the In-
formation contained therein. Call, email or write the Editor to report Errors of Fact. Peri-
odicals postage is paid at Cross City, Florida. POSTMASTER: please return undeliverable
copies Or address changes to PO Box 5030, Cross City, Florida 32628.
THE DIXIE COUNTY ADVOCATE (USPS 158-760) Is published weekly.

Every Week without Fail, Since July 1, 1921


The FCC intrudes yet further

The Washington bureaucracy, perhaps fearing that taxpay-
ers will tire of the X-rays and strip searches they must en-
dure before boarding commercial airliners if we keep re-
minding them of this affront to personal privacy, have come
up with something new and different--well, different to the
extent that you don't have to leave home to experience it.
No, indeed. The intrusions peculiar to the Federal Commu-
nications Commission (FCC) have long pursued us into our
living rooms, our bedrooms, our automobiles, our places of
business and anywhere else we might encounter a radio,
TV or a telephone. A decade into the 21st Century, we find
that abortions are covered by a right to privacy, but nothing
much else is.. ,

This being the case, one might have supposed that there
could be no further extremity of the.human experience that
could be violated by the intrusion of those ubiquitous
mavens of managerial mischief headquartered at 445 12th
Street SW, Washington, DC, the Federal Communications
Commission. A logical assumption? Perhaps, however we
are not dealing with circumstances in which logic applies
when we are considering that bastion of bureaucracy
which, were such a thing possible, could be said to further
corrupt oiur nation's capital. (Split infinitive intentional.)

It was with typical bureaucratic bombast that a trihedral
troupe of troglodytes comprising a majority of the five
member FCC announced that the agency would henceforth
be riding herd on the Internet. Of course, they didn't define
their plot in such explicit terms, stating instead that they
were pursuing "net neutrality" I asked a friend who had
been a commercial fisherman before that enterprise was
compromised by-you guessed it--excessive regulation, if he
know what "net neutrality" was. He said it sounded like
making you cut a lot of big holes in your nets so that half
of the fish could get through without getting caught, adding
that such a regulation wouldn't have been as bad as what
the commercial fishing industry wound up with a few years
back.

But, I digress. "Net neutrality," according to the FCC,
means a government agency has been created for the ex-
plicit purpose of regulating what you get to look at on the
Internet, how much it will cost you to operate a website,
and perhaps even to visit one. This will of course involve
levying taxes on access, purchases and who knows what all
else (trust me, the Washington bureaucrats do), but they
will not produce enough revenue to cover the cost of regu-
lation, for which reason the FCC will be imploring Con-
gress to up the ante so that they can hire more personnel.

The FCC came into being in 1934, primarily to establish a
means of regulating what frequencies could be used, how
close to one another broadcasters using the same frequency
could operate, and how much power a station could utilize.
This was done to avoid the cacophony that would have re-
sulted from too many stations too close to one another
broadcasting with too much power on the same frequency

It was necessary when broadcasting was in its infancy, and
those aspects are still relevant today. But how this worthy
enterprise morphed into fining TV stations millions of dol-
lars because a "wardrobe malfunction" got on the air for a
split-second during a Superbowl broadcast is anybody's
guess.

Well, at least that happened to the television industry,
which was already subject to FCC regulation. I wonder
what's gong to happen when that agency starts making peo-
ple pay to access information on the Internet. Several years
ago, the New York Times decided to charge Internet readers
for access to some of their columnists' daily efforts. It did-
n't work, so the NYT wised up and backed off. But a govern-
ment agency isn't going to care whether it works or not, if
they decide to do it, they'll do it. And like road maps at the
gas station, it will no longer be free.

Good grief, I must be ancient to remember free road maps!
Anyway, Happy New Year.

Mr Prater: The NYT is going back to trying a "pay-wall" on
their content sometime next year, I read. Maybe they're plan-
ning on the FCC to help them out this time.--ed


New Year's Whine: The 10 most annoying things of 2010


Kathy McKinney,


I hate top ten lists, I do. But I am seriously at a loss for what
to write about this week, because what I really want to be
doing is playing with my Christmas-present-to-me iPad, or
maybe knitting with some of the yarn Doug sent. So bear
with me as we wish 2010 a fond farewell with a list of the
things that have just really gotten under my skin in the last
12 months. Don't let it get you down, though, I think 2011 is
going to be much better.

10. Facebook stalkers. Everybody has one or kAows one.
That person who friends you just so they can spy on you and
report your comings and goings to someone or just for, their
own purient interest. This also includes that not-friend you
manage to avoid in Foodland, but who tries to chat with you
every single time you sit down to relax with
your pretend farm. You know the type, the peo-
ple who made it necessary for Facebook chat to
have an offlinee" button. Drop t
Into the


9. Barack Obama and Nancy Pelosi. They are
so far out of favor, they don't rank any higher
than number nine. 2010 was the year bf Jimmy
Carter, 1979 part II. As long as I have a clicker
and a republican majority, I'm not going to let
them bother me more than necessary. That's all
I'm gonna say about that.


of the past.
for It was I
and
that
-Brooks


8. People who hire illegals. Now, I'm all for
everybody who needs work getting it. I'm all for
legal immigration, I love enterprising people
who give up so much to come here and I don't blame them a
bit. They're good people. But I've noticed that the number of
non-English speaking people lining up for aid from United
Christian Services has been extremely high this year. The
people who donate to UCS want their money to go to local
people who need a little help. It's not fair that families who
are brought here from other countries to work on your farm
or in your business aren't getting paid enough by you to sup-
port their families without assistance. If you're going to
lure them here, pay them enough to live on without expect-
ing the good people of Dixie-who can't afford it and who
may have lost their own jobs-to pick up the slack so that you
can make an extra dollar. That's not right.

7. While I'm at it, how about people who are just too dan-
ged lazy to work? I'm not talking about people who can't
work, or people who have been laid off through no fault of
their own. I mean people who have never held down a steady
job in their lives. No, the world doesn't owe you a darned
thing. No, you don't deserve a government check. Being too


Stopping the


Descent


By Howard Rich

At long last there are finally
signs that the American Re-
public's breakneck descent
into full-blown socialist
madness which was fast
approaching terminal veloc-
ity prior to November's elec-
tions could be leveling out.

Does this mean our newly-
elected leaders can pull
America out of its precipi-
tous fiscal nose dive before
it's too late? That remains to
be seen but last week's
lame duck developments in
our nation's capital do offer
a small measure of hope.

Backed by an aggressive
push from the Tea Party
movement, a handful of fis-
cally conservative U.S. Sena-
tors staged a successful re-
volt against a $1.2 trillion
omnibus spending bill. This
1,924-page monstrosity con-
tained more than 6,700 ear-
marks or pork barrel
spending items inserted by
lawmakers.

Supported by Republicans
and Democrats alike, this
massive spending bill repre-
sented everything that


America's voters over-
whelmingly rejected last
month. Not only was its
price tag irresponsibly reck-
less, but the back-slapping
breadth of its unnecessary
add-ons and the sheer arro-
gance associated with its
presumed passage was the
very definition of "business
as usual" in Congress.


Like dozens of omnibus bills
before it, this lavish spend-
ing legislation was an un-
holy amalgamation of un-
necessary special interest-
driven pork. It was also
something that everyone
was going to vote for be-
cause everyone had some-
thing in it.

Fortunately, the same net-
work of limited government
advocates that helped mobi-
lize a taxpayer revolution at
the polls last month joined
together to rally voters once
again. And these voters -
leveraging the power of talk
radio, the internet and good
old fashioned shoe leather in
the halls of Congress made
their voices heard.

"The resulting protests con-
vinced GOPers -even the big
spenders from the Appropri-
ations Committee that they
could no longer play the old
game of swapping earmarks
for campaign cash," wrote
Daniel J. Mitchell, a senior
fellow at The Cato Institute.
"This is a remarkable devel-


sorry to live is not a disability. Go get off your mama's
couch, put down the cigarettes and the clicker, get a danged
job and support your kids. We shouldn't have to.

6. Justin Bieber, Twilight movies, and other teen fads. I
just don't get it. Grow up already. If you're over 25 and
watching this stuff, you should probably think about getting
a life in 2011. One that involves adults.

5. Big fuzzy white dogs who chase cats up under the
house, and squish the ductwork, and make certain newspa-
per editors go for a week, during the coldest week of the
year, with no heat until Debby's hubby can come and fix it
next weekend. You know who you're, big fuzzy white dog.
No milk.bones for you.


he last year
silent limbo


4. Exes who don't pay child support, and
the slow-as-molasses state enforcement sys-
tem that lets them get away with it for years
and years. See #7.


3. Hunters with no respect for property
Let it go, lines. Yes, you. Again, you know who you are. I
Imperfect, heard you running when the bullet whizzed
through my yard and I yelled at the kids to get
thank God in the house. I saw the corn you scattered all
it can go. over my property I found your tree stand on my
back lot line with the bucket you use to climb
s Atkinson the fence. Yes, you, who have torn down my
signs, trespassed on my property, vandalized the
camera I had placed to catch you, and had no
problems firehunting, a few hundred yards
from my bedroom window at 1 am. You, who have decided
that my home is your personal hunting preserve. You make
all the good hunters look bad. You should be hung up on
your own tree stand in California Swamp as mosquito bait
with your buddy, the mailbox bandito. Just sayin'.

2. Mean people. Yellers, screamers, and people who think
it's fine to just vent the blackness and misery of their souls
because the person on the other end of the phone works for
a living. I don't have to take that, and the people who work
with me don't, either. Be decent and civil or go away Go be
fateful somewhere else. Life is too short to be that angry.

....and the most annoying thing of the year is.....
#1 The financial burden the bad economy puts on
everybody. That was an easy one, wasn't it? When the econ-
omy goes bad, everything else follows it down the drain.

What annoyed you the most this year? What are you looking
forward to next year? Email and let me know!


opment and a huge victory
for the Tea Party move-
ment."[1]

U.S. Senate leader Harry
Reid was forced to withdraw
this massive spending bill
without a vote choosing in-
stead to offer up a continu-
ing resolution that funds the
federal government.at exist-
ing levels.

Obviously reducing these ex-
orbitant "existing levels" of
spending is what the next
Congress must focus on
when it convenes in January
And accompanying that bud-
getary effort must be a push
for comprehensive tax relief
- not just a temporary exten-
sion of previous tax cuts.
Having witnessed the costly
failure of government-dri-
ven "stimuli," the next Con-
gress must make a con-
scious decision to abandon
this Keynesian approach
and invest in the American
taxpayer for a change.

In other words, limited gov-
ernment advocates should
not be content with a pair of
"do no harm" quick fixes bn
taxes and spending be-
cause "do no harm" legisla-
tion is not what the situa-
tion calls for.

What is required? Immedi-
ate cuts and a steady, sus-
tained reduction in the size
and scope of the federal gov-
ernment.


JThank



You!

Thank You to

everyone who helped the
two families I wrote about

a few weeks ago.

I'm always amazed by

how generous

people can be.


--ed


On the first count, politi-
cians could shave a trillion
dollars off of the next feder-
al budget by simply limiting
spending to its pre-recession
levels. Assuming you believe
that government should
have never been growing at
a time when Americans' in-
come levels were shrinking,
then these cuts should not
be particularly controver-
sial.

And remember even before
Washington politicians de-
cided to add $4 trillion to the
national debt over the last
three years, the federal gov-
ernment was already ex-
panding far beyond the abili-
ty of taxpayers to sustain its
growth. In fact, in the six
years leading up to the re-
cession the federal deficit
was growing by an average
of more than $520 billion
each year.

Correcting this unsustain-
able expansion is not "aus-
terity," it is simply reducing
rampant excess.

It has been said that mind-
less growth is the ideology
of the cancer cell. Now that
America has been "fiscally
diagnosed," let's hope a new
crop of leaders has the
courage to pursue a cure -
not merely treat the symp-
toms of the disease.
Howard Rich is chairman of Ameri-
cans for Limited Government.


Page 2


;shrircltr~aY-m









Thursday December 30, 2010


Outdoors & Law


R/^ers

by Bonnie Wilson

The Levy County Horse Club
had their annual Christmas
Party at O'Leno River Rise
Horse Park this past weekend. I
was so looking forward to this
because I had taken an extra
day from work to really have a
great time with my horse bud-
dies.

My husband, Dave, and I
left Friday morning and had
plans to stay until Sunday. Wa-
hoo! I could hardly contain my-
self as I packed the motor home
Thursday night and then fin-
ished it very early the next
morning. By 9:00 am we were
headed out the driveway with
horse trailer in tow and every-
thing I could possibly need for
both the horses and us. I was so
looking forward to a great
weekend of trail riding.

We arrived and settled in
after finding stalls for our hors-
es, Coby and Sporty Shortly
thereafter our group started
coming in one by one.

O'Leno's River Rise
Horse Park trails are great'
trails to ride. It's a remarkably
beautiful forest with lots of
trails to choose from. These
trails are easy to follow, as they
are well marked. One of my fa-
vorite trails is the red trail.
This trail goes deep into the for-
est on a single file motion.
Meaning that there is only
room wide enough for one
horse on the trail so you must
follow the leader. It's a winding
trail that has you following a
thick bed of leaves and a few
fallen trees that will have your
horse navigating over or
around and through. But as you
travel thru this magnificent
winding carpeted trail, you will


North Florida High
Intensity Drug Trafficking
Area (HIDTA) Targets


Traffickers in "Operation


see more deer than you would
think possible. I find that I am
simply in awe of such a won-
derful sight. These beautiful
creatures stand in all their glo-
ry staring back at you including
buck's and doe's. Now that is
awesome! I know the guys are
thinking they wish they had
their guns with them but this is
not allowed here and I silently
say a prayer of thanks.

The colors in the forest
this time of year are quite spec-
tacular. Yellow, red, and brown
leaves are falling as a soft gen-
tle breeze blows. I stop my
horse, Coby, for a moment and I
pause in the mist of all this
magnificent beauty. It really
feels incredible. I think I could
do this forever! I really want to.
Retirement sounds better every
day but unfortunately it will
'have to wait a few more years
down the line. But I eagerly
look forward to that time. Until
then I will just grab these in-
credible moments on weekends
and vacations as I ride thru
some of Florida's most beauti-
ful forests and continue to live
in the moment.

Back at the camping
area, we all gathered under the
pavilion and had a magnificent
dinner with all the trimmings
and we also played the Yankee
Christmas Gift Exchange game.
It seems just because you got to
choose a gift, it did not mean
you get to keep it. Someone can
take it away, but the up side is
you get to pick another gift OR
you can take someone's gift. It
was fun and I did enjoy the
game. We also had a scavenger
hunt and that was hilarious! It
seems that some people can get
very ingenious about getting
the entire required list of items
needed. It was a sidesplitting,
bucket load of fun! And if you
would like to join in on this fun
email us at levy2@flahorse.com
. Until next time!.happy trails to
you!



week investigation targeting
North Florida prescription
drug traffickers. Phase one
of the multi-agency opera-
tion began Sept. 1 and cul-
minated with a final arrest
round up and drug seizures
on Dec. 15.


Growing Pains"
"Clearly the increase in ille-
gal use of pharma-
North Florida High Intensi- ceutical drugs is
ty Drug Trafficking Area attacking many
(HIDTA)today announced F Florida communi-
the arrest of 135 individu- ties," said Florida
als and the seizure of DepartmentofLaw
almost 17,000 pre- J oEnforcement
scription pills and SpJacksonvil e
more than $3.6 million Special Agent in
in "Operation Growing Charge Dominick
in "Operation Growing Pape. "Only by a co-
Pains," an aggressive 14- Pape. or nly by a co-
ordinated team ap-
1 proach like this can law en-
B forcement continue to com-
bat this ever increasing
threat."

SThe first phase of the opera-
ll S. II. '1. tion focused on identifying,
AJ..,.. .i,, disrupting and dismantling
SLII f,,' 866-737-7966 prescription drug traffick-
MOVES STAR G ing organizations and crimi-
MOVIES STAm TINGm L nal enterprises responsible
Decetber'25, 2010 for the diversion and the il-
ADMEBSS I legal procurement and dis-
B ACKI pensing of pharmaceutical
TC drugs. A second phase df
this operation is currently
being developed to continue
to attack this growing prob-
Little Fockrs(PG i lem.
min Fri-Sal 7.30
Si,4:-S .7 "-30 According to the 2010 Inter-
Sun 4: im Report by Florida Med-
S ical Examiners on Drugs
Identified in Deceased Per-
sons, during the first six
months of this year, 1,268
people died statewide as a
result of prescription drug
overdose. Seven Floridians
die from a prescription drug
overdose each day. From
2003 to 2009, the number of
drug overdose deaths in
Florida increased by 101.6
percent, and each one in-
volved at least one prescrip-
tion drug.

The North Florida HIDTA is
comprised of city, county,
state and federal law en-
forcement agencies from 10
counties: Alachua, Baker,
Clay, Columbia, Duval, Fla-
gler, Marion, Nassau, Put-
nam and St. Johns. During
2010, the North Florida HID-
TA Annual Drug Threat As-
sessment identified a shift
whereby the diversion of
B fIpharmaceutical drugs esca-
[ ] lated to the region's top drug
threat.


From DCSO, pg 1

In addition to the staff and
C.O.P personnel and their
guests, Holly Reed was on
hand to receive special
recognition and an award on
behalf of her late husband,
Captain Chad Allen Reed Sr.

At the conclusion of the din-
ner, the awards presentation
began with Sheriff Hatcher
presenting the awards for
Correctional Officer of the
Year and Deputy Sheriff of
the Year. These two awards
are presented to employees
assigned to these categories
who have performed excep-
tionally well throughout the
year and have proven to be a
valuable asset in their re-
spective positions. This
year's Correctional Officer
of the Year Award was pre-
sented to Officer A.J.
Northup and the Deputy
Sheriff of the Year Award
was presented to Deputy Mi-
cal Mallory


The third
award of the
evening was
the "Above
and Be-
yond"
award. This
award is giv-
en to the
employee
who does
just what is
stated, and
that is going
above and
beyond their


Horse Club
donates
$6,500.00 to
Shands
Cancer
Center


Submton lytDt
Wilson


The Levy County Horse Club
held their 10th Annual
Breast Cancer Awareness
Benefit Trail Ride on Octo-
ber 23, 2010. The event is
held at the Tidewater Trail-
head in Goethe State Forest
each year in conjunction
with Forest Awareness
Month and Greenways and
Trails Month. This benefit is
for a great cause and what
better reason to be out on the
trails. This year's event
raised $6,500.00 that was do-
nated to Shands Cancer Cen-
ter to be utilized for the use
of local breast cancer pa-
tients. The Levy County
Horse Club has donated a to-
tal of $29,825.00 to date.


The horse club held our an-
nual Christmas
ride/campout/dinner during
the weekend of December
18th, 2010 at which time we
presented the check to Jen-
nifer Adams, Clinical Social
Worker for Shands Cancer
Center. She informed the
club how the funds are so


respective duties and al-
ways being willing to as-
sist others in their respec-
tive assignments. This
employee not only does
what is expected in their
respective position, but is
going that extra step in
providing services to the
citizens of Dixie County
and their coworkers. This
years recipient of the
Above and Beyond Award
was Investigator Julie
Herring.



On a more somber
note, Sheriff Hatcher recog-
nized his depfities that were
involved in the incident with
John Kalisz on the afternoon
of January 14, 2010 when
Captain Chad Reed was
killed in the line of duty.
During this time, Sheriff
Hatcher presented five
deputies with the Sheriff's
Meritorious Service Award


Sheriff Dewey Hatcher & Deputy Mical Mallory


desperately needed and used
for the patients that are in
need.
Such as purchasing their
combs, brushes, wigs, gas for
trips for chemo treatments,
and even an occasional pay-
ment for their electric bill.
All thankfully appreciative
in their time of need.


A single parent that was a re-
cipient of our funds three
years ago went back to
school and is now working
at the Shands Cancer Center
in order to give back and
help others going through
what she herself had under-
gone. Success stories such as
this is what makes it all .
worthwhile for all the plan-
ning, work and local busi-
ness contributions in putting
on such an event to benefit
our neighbors.

Should you be interested in
next year's event or wish to
learn more about our horse
club, you may contact us on
our website at
www.levycountyhorseclub.co
m.


Sheriff Dewey Hatcher, Robert Matthis, Sgt John Simmons
Ricky Downing and Josh Oneal


for demonstrating exception-
al judgment while facing im-
minent danger. Those recip-
ients of the Sheriff's Merito-
rious Service Award were,
Deputies Robert Matthis,
Ricky Downing, Josh Oneal,
Sgt. John Simmons and not
pictured Major Dean Miller.



Sheriff Hatcher pre-
sented three deputies
involved in the January
14, 2010 incident with
the Sheriff's Medal of
Valor for their actions,
during the incident.
The Sheriff's Medal of
'Valor is presented to of-
ficers who exhibit ex-
traordinary bravery or
heroism performed in
the line of duty at ex-
treme, life-threatening,
personal risk. It is
meant to recognize an
officer who has per-
-formed an act of bravery


Pocket Guide to
Florida AnimalTracks
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displaying an extreme
amount of courage while
knowingly facing imminent
danger. The three recipients
of the Sheriff's Medal of
Valor were Inv. Michael
Brannin, Dep. Mical Mallory
and Major Scott Harden.

In closing the
evening's ceremony, Sheriff
Hatcher presented the Sher-
iff's Medal of Honor to Hol-
ly Reed, in honor of her late
husband Captain Chad Reed
Sr. The Sheriff's Medal of
Honor is presented in recog-
nition of those who suffer
great personal injury or loss
of life while performing dis-
playing extraordinary
courage while facing immi-
nent danger of injury or
death. Captain Reed's Medal
of Honor was mounted in a
display with his other
awards and pins of service
received during his EMS,
Firefighting and Law En-
forcement career.


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Nn o r\I/ t'




online at FlodaWildlifeMagazinecom
or calltol-free 1-s86-7-5600.
F:IK H:ZT F~~~ ~'701


Florida, Cedar Key, Suwannee River entrance
N29' 17/W83 09'
Do Day HighTk e HIghlde LowTkide. LowTMde
1 SA 1249pm 2.4 llllpm 3.3 611am -0.6 543pm 1.4
2 Su 134pm 2.5 701am -0.8 637pm 1.3


1202am 3.3


212pm 2.5


744am -0.8


724pm 1.2


4 Tu 1248am 3.3 244pm 2.6 822am -0.8 807pm 1.1
6 We 131am 3.3 313pm 2.6 856am -0.7 847pm 0.9
8 Th 212am s 3.3 340pm 2.6 927am -0.5 926pm 0.8
7 Fr 252am 3.1 406pm 2.7 956am -0.4 1004pm 0.8


12/20/2010, ARWOOD,
CHRISTOPHER ALLEN,
30, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
BATTERY TOUCH OR
STRIKE

12/20/2010, NORTON,
DONALD ALLEN, 62, MC-
GAULEY, TRAFFIC OF-
FENSE DUI & PROPERTY
DAMAGE, TRAFFIC OF-
FENSE REFUSE TO SUB-
MIT DUI, TRAFFIC OF-
FENSE DUI ALCOHOL OR
DRUGS, NONMOVING
TRAFFIC VIOL ATTACH

12/20/2010, HICKMAN,
THOMAS CHRISTOPHER,
18, DOWNING, CON-
TRIBUTING TO THE
DELINQUENCE

12/21/2010, MARIO, PE-
DRO JUAN, 27, DANIELS,
NO VALID

12/21/2010, WILLIAMS,
SHARYL DENISA, 25,
TUMLIN, VOP CT 1 SALE
OF COCAINE


12/22/2010, BENNETT,
MATTHEW JOHN, 27,
SULLIVAN, VOP DWLS

12/22/2010, JUVENILE,
WATSON, THEFT

12/22/2010, HINCKLEY,
DOUGLAS ALLEN, 52,
CRAVEY, OUT OF COUN-
TY WARRANT

12/22/2010, MERTZ,
DWAYNE D, 37, JUDGE
BEAN, HOLD FOR DOC

12/22/2010, CORBIN, RAY-
BURN MATHEW, 25, MAR-
RA, FTA

12/23/2010, CARTER, KEN-
SHA SHARELL, 31,
CLARK, BATTERY

12/25/2010, MARIO, PE-
DRO JUAN, 27, DANIELS,
NO VALID DL

12/26/2010, MERTZ,
DWAYNE D, 37, HOLD FOR
DOC


332am 3.0


432pm 2.8


1024am -0.1


"1044pm 0.7


9 Su 414am 2.7 459pm 2.8 1052am 0.1 1126pm 0.6
10 MO 500am 2.5 529pm 2.9 1122am 0.4
11 TU 555am 2.3 604pm 2.9 1213am 0.5 1156am 0.7
12 We 703am 2.0 647pm 2.9 110am 0.4 1236pm 0.9
13 T 830am 1.9 740pm 2.8 217am 0.4 130pm 1.2
14 Fr 1005am 1.9 844pm 2.9 334am 0.2 244pm 1.5
15 Sa 112Bam 2.0 949pm 3.0 447am :0.1 407pm 1,6
10 Su 1228pm 2.3 1049pm 3.1 547am -0.4 518pm 1.5
17 Mo 113pm 2.5 1144pm 3.3 638am .0.7 617pm 1.4
18 Tu 151pm 2.5 723am -0.9 708pm 1.2
19 We 1235am 3.4 225pm 2.7 804am -1.1 755pm 0,9
20 Th 124am 3.5 256pm 2.8 843am -1.1 840pm 0.7
21 Fr 213am 3.5 327pm 2.9 921am -0.8 926pm 0.5
22 Sa 302am 3.3 357pm 3.0 958am -0.6 1013pm 0.2
23 Su 352am 3.2 429pm 3.1 1035am -0.3 1102pm 0.1
24 Mo 446am 2.8 503pm 3.2 1lllam 0.2 1156pm 0.0
25 Tu 547am 2.5 542pm 3.2 1149am 0.6
26 We 701am 2.0 629pm 3.1 1258am 0.0 1232pm 1.1
27 Th 838am 1.9 729pm 3.0 214am 0.0 127pm 1.3
28 Fr 1037am 1.9 841pm 2.9 342am -0.1 246pm 1.6
29 Sa 1200pm 2.0 956pm 3.0 504am -0.2 417pm 1.6
30 Su 1248pm 2.2 1103pm 3.0 606am -0.4 532pm 1.4
31 Mo 122pm 2.4 1159pm 3.1 653am -0.6 629pm 12

07:2 6 0: 027 07: 21 27 27 072119 0121 127
11:4 17:47 17:48 17:48 1149 17 11?
S1334 02 142 48 14:44 1 0212 1540 16062 032 ,16

0701 014 0822 09127
05 M0847 0.35 M I16 ,MS 09 Ms


11


Wtl. (ideadvocate. net


P'age 3


' bhtbMM J









Thursday, December 30, 2010


TAKE PRECAUTIONS AND
LESSEN FLU RISK THIS
HOLIDAY SEASON

With signs that flu is in-
creasing earlier than usual
in some Florida communi-
ties, Florida Department of
Health (DOH) officials are
urging residents and visi-
tors to. take precautions to
limit their risk of exposure
to seasonal flu.

"The most effective precau-
tions we can take to fight ill-
ness are getting vaccinated
,against the flu virus and
diligently practicing good
hygiene," said Julia Gill,
Ph.D., M.P.H., Disease Con-
trol
Division Director. "This
season, everyone 6 months
and older should get vacci-
nated, even if they got a
seasonal or 2009 H1N1 vac-
cine last season. With the
holidays in full swing and
many people traveling, this
simple precaution can
lessen your risk of exposure
to the virus or
transmission to others."
Seasonal flu is an infection
of the respiratory tract
caused by the influenza
virus. Compared with most
other viral respiratory infec-
tions, such as the common
cold, influenza infection of-


High school students:
Time to enter manatee
art contest

The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) invites high
school art students across
the state to participate in a
contest to create a piece of
manatee artwork that will be
used on the 2011-2012 mana-
tee decal.

Students in grades 9-
12 in Florida should coordi-
nate with their school's art
teacher to submit the art-
work, because each school
may submit no more than
five entries. Home-schooled
students also are eligible to
enter the contest. Contest de-
tails and forms are available
online at
MyFWC.com/Manatee.

Decals depicting man-
atees are available at any
Florida county tax collec-
tor's office by donating $5 or
more to the Save the Mana-
tee Trust Fund. Money from


ten causes a more severe ill-
ness. Symptoms of influen-
za include headache, fever,
cough, body
aches or extreme tiredness.
The following preventive
measures can also, help re-
duce risk of contracting the
flu:

o Get re-vaccinated every flu
season because flu viruses
change each year.

o Persons who are sick with
flu-like illness should stay
home for at least 24 hours af-
ter fever has subsided with-
out the use of fever-reducing
medicine, except to get med-
ical care.

o Persons with a chronic ill-
ness, or who are pregnant,
should contact their health
care provider if they sus-
pect their illness that might
be influenza. Health care
providers can prescribe an-
tiviral medication.


the sale of these decals sup-
ports manatee-protection ef-
forts, such as rehabilitation,
rescue, research, enforce-
ment and public education.
Vehicle owners can support
manatees by including their
donation when they register
their vehicle or vessel.

Manatee Decal Art
Contest Requirements:

All entries must be the
sole, original work of the
artist.

Student artists must at-
tend a Florida public, pri-
vate or home school for high
school, grades 9-12.

Art teachers may submit
no more than five entries per
school. Home-school parents
may submit one student en-
try per home-school group.

The designs should be in
full color, using acrylic,
gouache, oil, silkscreen,
woodcut and/or digital art.
The design may be realistic
or abstract, as long as the
image depicts a recognizable


o Everyone
3UG should cover
, his or her
nose and
mouth with a
tissue when
coughing or
Sneezing and
S-I throw the tis-
sue in the
S trash after
use. It is ad-
visable to
avoid touching one's eyes,
nose and mouth.

o Despite being sick or in
good health, everyone
should wash his or her
hands with soap and water
often. If soap and water are
not available, use an alcohol-
based hand sanitizer.

Regardless of age, persons
with chronic illnesses such
as diabetes, heart disease,
asthma, emphysema, chron-
ic obstructive pulmonary
disease (COPD) and cancer
are at higher risk for
having a more severe case of
influenza or of suffering
from complications caused
by influenza.

In addition, people who have
neurological and develop-
mental disorders and who
are obese are also at in-
creased risk of severe in-
fluenza.


manatee.

Designs must be formatted
to an 11-inch by 8.5-inch hor-
izontal format. The winning
image will be cropped for an
oval or circular border.

Artwork should be affixed
to a backboard and covered
loosely with a protective cov-
ering.


Entries must be postmarked
on or before Jan. 28, 2011.
Failure to follow any of the
requirements will disqualify
entries from being consid-
ered for the contest. FWC
artists and biologists will
judge the entries in Febru-
ary The winning design will
be used to create a final de-
cal for distribution through
county tax collectors' offices
around the state.

To view previous manatee
decals, go to
MyFWC.com/Manatee. For
more information, please
contact Bonnie Abellera at
bon-


West Named Gainesville
Sun's Class 1A-1B
Player Of The Year:
Bears named to all area
teams

Dixie's Mike West picked
up another Player of the
Year Award as he was
named Gainesville Sun's
Class 1A-1B Player Of The
Year. Mike had a big year
offensively for the Bears as
he rushed for 1,710 yards
and hit the end zone for 18
touchdown's. Mike also
had 3 games where he
rushed for more than 200
yards, including a season
high of 2432 yards that came
in the victory over Trenton.
He was a big leader on the
defense as
well for the
Bears. Col-
leges that
are interest-
ed in the big
guy are
SGeorgia
Tech, Jack-
sonville
State, Ten-
nessee State,
Bethune
Cookman,
and Florida
A&M.Also
selected,
were the all
area teams.
Here's a list
of those
players who
made these
teams:


The Library

will be

closed

Thursday,

December 30

for GAOL Day

[for all county

commission

employees

(no time loss acci-

dents for the last

18+ months)]

and Friday,
December 31

for New Years

Holiday.

DIXIE COUNTY
ADULT WELDING
CLASS
Cross City, Dixie County
High School Welding Shop
Beginning Monday January
10, 2011
Monday, Tuesdays and
Thursday 6:00pm to
10:00pm

Earn state certification in
SMAW, MIG, and TIG weld-
ing. Be qualified for jobs
that pay $8.00 $16.00 per
hour..

Please bring a valid Florida
State ID (i.e. Drivers Li-
cense or State ID) and
your Social Security Card
on the first night of class
to register. The fee is
$424.00 for this semester
and is due on the first day
of class. A minimum of 10


students is required. If you
need additional informa-
tion, please call Laura Wig-
glesworth at 352-498-6142.

Dixie District Schools do not dis-
criminate based on race, color,
sex, religion, national origin,
marital status, age or disability.


Class 1A-1B First Team
Offense
Mike West 221 Carries,.
1,710 yards, 18 TD's


December, 2010
:% D. 32 04:j3 P
F-i D k- 3 D- PM
Fri D.I:I ,100PM
Thu I 0ela 03_% p

January, 2011
i Jhu r n i : .:::P-.I
FP JaIn07 4-3U PM
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- Jan 21 E40r PM
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Zack Cassidy hit 6 of 12
Field Goal's with a long of
38 yards, and made 26 of 27
extra points.

Second Team Offense
Sean Miller top offensive
lineman for the Bears

First Team Defense
Junior Washington best
lineman for the Bears, 50
tackles, 2 sacks, 1 fumble re-
turn for touchdown

Second Team Defense
Shawn Spurlin 42 tackles, 2
sacks

Honorable Mention
Duke Dawson (Fr., WR/DB)
Kirby Roberts (Sr., QB/DB)
Colman Davis (Sr., LB)
Everett Quesensberry (Sr.,
DL)


I~lnMd ih Sdrirl


Olft Hop SchAW
Bc-IH^auyi~ zl


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Away


Bro-iun w 'iudllcH-*h Rv;Ij
CNidid High SchcX
Blson MkLkltiHil .Ed-oal


Bt 1id(T4 Ith 5 S. I
TFwel Middin@+pg Sdihool


DIXIE COUNTY ADULT G.E.D.

CLASSES





FREE




GED Classes will be offered at the following two
locations:
Cross City
Dixie County High School Vocation Business Lab
Beginning January 10, 2011
Monday and Thursdays
5:00 PM to 8:00 PM'


Old Town
Dixie County Old Town Education Complex
Bldg. 10, Room 100
Beginning January 11, 2011
Tuesday and Thursdays
5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

You may register for GED classes at the site most conve-
nient to you. Please bring your Social Security card and
valid Florida State ID (i.e. Drivers License or State ID).
If you are between the ages of 16 and 18 you will need a
parent/guardian present to register.

Please contact Laura Wigglesworth at 352-498-6142 for
further information about this program.

Dixie District Schools do not discriminate based on race,
color, sex, religion, national origin, marital status, age or
disability.


School


Page 4


Colman Davis


JV BOYS BASKETBALL SCHEDULE:


IZltY ?J('lk'oca'le. ne/c


40 Trfnm I PAIa-lsch &.TOI










Thursday, December 30, 2010 www. dcadvocate.net


Announcements


Happy birthday David!


trom Iatny & uanielle


LEGAL NOTICE


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DIX-
IE COUNTY, CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO 10-048CA
FLA BAR NO 185453
JRM LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS
MICHAEL A. FILMON, A/K/A MICHAEL
FILMON AND GERALDINE K. FILMON,
A/K/A GERALDINE FILMON, HIS WIFE;
MOLLIE RUTH SPENCER, INDIVIDUAL
AND AS TRUSTEE (OR DULY AP-
POINTED SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE) OF
THE E&M SPENCER LIVING TRUST
DATED 3/29/90, ET AL, DEFENDANTS.
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-styled
cause in the Circuit Court of Dixie Coun-
ty, Florida, I will sell the property situate
in Dixie County, Florida, described as fol-
lows:
Parcel 1: Being at the NE comer of LOT
17, SUWNNEE RIVER HILLCREST
SUBDIVISION as per plat on record (PB
1, PG 63) in the Office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court, DIXIE County, FL: run
West along the North line of Lot 17, a
distance of 137.00 feet to a point; then
run SOuth parallel to the East line of Lot
17, a distance of 159.03 feet to a point;
then run East parallel to the North line of
LOT 17, a distance of 137.00 feet to the
East line of Lot 17; then run North along
the lot line a distance of 159.03 feet to
the Point of Beginning. *
Subject to a 15 foot easement along the
South side of the above-described prop-
erty for purposes of ingress and egress
to adjoining property owners.
Parcel 2: Commence at the NE comer of


of Lot 17 a distance of 137.00 feet to the
Point of Begnnlng. From said Point of
Beginning, continue West along the
North line of Lot 17, a distance of 137.00
feet, then run South parallel to the East
line of Lot 17, a distance of 159.03 feet
to a point; thence run East parallel to the
North line of LOT 17, a distance of
137.00 feet; then run North parallel to
the East line of Lot 17, a distance of
159.03 feet to the point of beginning.
Subject to a 15 foot easement along the
South side of the above-described prop-
erty for proposes of Ingress and egress
to adjoining property owners.
TOGETHER with that certain 1985
PEACH Double-wide Mobile Home #KB-
GASNB523538 AND 3KBGASNA523538
TITLE #41735604 AND 5015030.
AKA 205 NE 817th Street Old Town, FL
32680 Parcel ID Nos 13-09-13-4051-
0000-0171 (Parcel 1) and 13-09-13-
4051-0000-0172 (Parcel 2)
AND Lot 64, of SUWANNEE RIVER
HILLCREST SUBDIVISION, according to
map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat
BOok 1, Page 63, Public Records of Dix-
ie County, FL
PARCEL ID NO 13-09-13-4051-0000-
0640
at Public Sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash on the 18th day of Janu-
ary, 2011 at 11:00 AM except as set forth
hereinafter on the NW Comer of the
Courthouse steps, 214 NE 351 Highway,
Cross City, FL 32628.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTER-
EST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE
PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.


LOT 17 of SUWANNEE RIVER HILL-
CREST SUBDIVISION as per plat on DANA JOHNSON, CLERK OF THE
record (PB 1 PG 63) in the Office of the COURT, KAREN LEVERETT, DEPUTY
Clerk of the Circuit Court, DIXIE County, CLERK
FL; run thence West alona the North line 51.52


SOLDIERS' ANGELS:
"ABSOLUTELY CRITICAL"
MISSION POSSIBLE

May no soldier go unloved,
May no soldier walk alone,
May no solder b forgotten,
Until they all come home. ~
The Soldiers'Angels mission,
as quoted by founder Patti
Patton Bader

As more American service
members deploy or redeploy
with the Global War on Ter-
ror, the Soldiers' Angels
mission becomes even more
critical. Soldiers' Angels
has sent over 200,000 pack-
ages and countless letters to
our troops since it began in
2003.

Patti Patton-Bader was in-
spired to found Soldier's An-
gels when her son wrote
home from Iraq, expressing
his concern that some sol-
diers did not receive any
mail or support from
home. Within a few short
months Soldiers' Angels had
grown from a mother writ-
ing a few extra letters, to an
Internet community with
two hundred thousand an-
gels worldwide.

"It is only through the col-
lective effort of people who
believe and stand for free-
dom that we can continue'
to help these young heroes
who valiantly stand for us,"
says Bader.

Soldiers' Angels has grown
and expanded to include
many programs that sup-
port American service
members and their families,
including letters, care pack-
ages and support to troops
overseas; first responder
packs; laptop computers and


handmade blankets for
wounded troops hospital-
ized or receiving treatment
at military hospitals; items
shipped to overseas soldiers
to give to children in war
zones; memorial trees for
the families of heroes who
have been killed while serv-
ing; and emergency airfare
for service members and
their families who would
otherwise not qualify or
cannot afford the cost of a
flight.

Soldiers' Angels currently
supports tens of thousands
of American service mem-
bers stationed wherever the
American flag is raised. Sol-
diers' Angels is dedicated in
supporting the military dur-
ing and after their deploy-
ment. In the time-honored
tradition of civilian sup-
port of American soldiers,
Soldiers' Angels sponsors a
wide variety of programs.
supporting American sol-
diers and their families. Sol-
diers' Angels' programs in-
clude first responder packs,
general support and laptop
computers to wounded sol-
diers receiving treatment at
American military hospi-
tals; care packages, letters,
and support to deployed sol-
diers; items shipped for de-
ployed soldiers to to chil-
dren in the war zone; and
memorial trees for the fami-
lies of soldiers who have
died in the service of their
country.

There are several ways to
support our troops through
Soldiers' Angels. For more
information please visit our
national website
www.soldiersangels.org, or
contact Soldiers'
Angels at (615) 676-0239 or
soldiersangels@gmail.com.


SPRINGHOUSE

QUILTER'S NEWS

All of us from Springhouse
Quilters hope that you had a
wonderful, safe and healthy
Christmas, and we are hop-
ing that you will also cele-
brate a safe and prosperous
New,Year.

For the month of December,
Springhouse members took a
break to be with family and
friends to celebrate this won-
derful Christmas season.
Beginning in January, we
will be back to quilting;
starting new projects, and
still finishing some of those
from last year.' There will be
some new classes, workshops
and exciting things for mem-
bers. Norma Birman, pro-
gram chairman has been
working on projects and new
ideas for 2011. Pat Hodges,
President, is excited to see
the planning taking place.for
the new year.

So from all of us at Spring-
house, HAPPY NEW YEAR.

Lois Scott, Publicity


Martin

Luther King

Parade

coming

1/17/2010

Looking for par-

ticipants.

Contact Angela

SCarter

498-3750


C-HAPPY 8TH BIRTHDAY
KASEN LEE


LOVE MAMA, TIFFANY,

GEE GEE, MIKE,
AND TACK



Things that make you

go...hmmmm....


Photo by Kenna Frierson.


South Florida spotted

seatrout season opens

Jan. 1

The recreational harvest sea-
son for spotted seatrout will
open in southern Florida on
Jan. 1. Spotted seatrout har-
vest has been closed since
Nov. 1 in this part of the
state to help maintain an
abundant fishery

The reopened areas include
Atlantic coast waters south
of the Flagler-Volusia county
line and Gulf coast waters
south of a line running due
west from the westernmost
point of Fred Howard Park
Causeway, which is 1.17 miles
south of the Pinellas-Pasco
county line.

The maximum daily bag lim-
it for spotted seatrout in
these areas is four fish per


person. In all other Florida
waters north and west of
these areas, the daily limit is
five spotted seatrout per per-
son.

The statewide slot limit for
spotted seatrout is 15-20 inch-
es total length, and anglers
may keep one spotted
seatrout larger than 20 inch-
es as part of the daily bag
limit.

Spotted seatrout may not be
harvested by any multiple
hooks with live or dead nat-
ural bait, and snagging or
snatch-hooking spotted
seatrout is not allowed. Spot-
ted seatrout may be taken
only with hook-and-line gear
and cast nets and must be
landed in whole condition.

The harvest of spotted
seatrout will close during the
month of February in north-
east and northwest Florida
waters.


Page 5


Missing/Lost/Stolen

Family pet, sadly missed. American Bull-Labrador mix.
(Looks more like American Bull.) Black, medium stocky
build, big white star on chest with white tipped paws.
She looks big, but is still just a puppy. If seen or found,
please call 498-6095 or return her to where you picked her
up. (Hwy 351 near Little Red Store.)


mem CiMlv









htiClO Sl


Thursday, December 30, 2010


www. dcadvocate. net


Local


Representative Leonard
Bembry Receives
Significant
Committee Assignments
in the House

TALLAHASSEE, FL State
Representative Leonard Be-
mbry (D-Greenville) was ap-
pointed to the House Appro-
priations Com-
mittee that pro- .
duces the
House's pro-
posed budget in
conforming and
implementing
legislation. The
committee pro-
vides legislative
oversight re-
garding agency
and judiciary
implementation
of the budget, and also re-
views the Governors budget
recommendations, agency
legislative budget request,
and analyzes trust funds.
Additionally, legislation
with a fiscal impact is typi-
cally heard by the House
Appropriations Committee,
or one of its respective sub-
committees. Budgetary is-
sues dealing with Public Ed-
ucation Capital Outlay
(PECO) and state employees
pay, benefits and retirement
issues are also in preview of
the committee.

Bembry was also appointed
to the House State Affairs
Committee that considers
matters relating to the over-
sight and use of state re-
sources, including issues re-
lating to Florida's agricul-
ture and citrus industries,
environmental protection,
conservation of Florida's
natural resources, energy,
utilities and telecommuni-
cations regulations, state
agency governance, ethics


TMI OUTBACK
BOWL
on WZCC

WZCC will be broadcasting
the 25th Anniversary Out-
back Bowl on Saturday Jan-
uary 1, 2011 featuring the
UF Gators vs. the Nittany
Lions of Penn State. This is
also the final UF game
coached by Urban Meyer
and will pit him against leg-


and elections, and
state/federal relations. The
committee's oversight re-
sponsibilities cover the De-
partment of Agriculture
and Consumer Services, De-
partment of Citrus, Depart-
ment of Environmental Pro-
tection, the State's five Wa-
ter Management Districts
and the Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission.
Rep. Bembry's other Ap-
pointments in-
clude Agricul-
ture & Natural
Resources Ap-
propriations
Subcommittee,
Select Commit-
tee on Water
Policy, and K-20
Innovation Edu-
cation Subcom-
mittee.

"There are
many serious issues that we
must deal with in the legis-
lature in these very difficult
economic times, and we
must protect our people and
their livelihood to the great-.
est extent possible. I am
honored to be appointed to
serve on the House Appro-
priations Committee that
will focus on legislation and
issues of critical impor-
tance to the people of North
Florida. I am pleased to
have these opportunities
that will allow me to contin-
ue to be a strong voice for
local residents during these
challenging times" Bembry
stated. "I will be well posi-
tioned in the committee
process to make maximum
impact for our people in
many areas that touch our
lives in the 10 small coun-
ties and 24 small communi-
ties we serve. I am excited
about the possibilities and I
look forward to continuing
to work for our people."


endary coach Joe Paterno.

This will mark the Gators
20th straight bowl appear-
ance and their 4th appear-
ance in the Outback Bowl.
more info
http://www.outbackbowl.co
m/.Our broadcast coverage
will begin at 11am with the
pregame show. This game
will be broadcast over both
stations: AM 940 in
Chiefland and AM 1240 in
Cross City.


THE ADVOCATE

WILL BE CLOSED

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31 FOR

NEW YEAR'S EVE.

CELEBRATE RESPONSIBLY!






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Complete Plumbing Services
Drain Cleaning Water Heater Repairs & Installation
New Construction Remodeling
Service Work Complete Line of Plumbing Fixtures
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Proposed


Deer Harvest


Reporting


System for


Florida


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) approved a
Strategic Plan for Deer Man-
agement in Florida: 2008-2018
in February 2008. An objec-
tive in the strategic plan is to
develop and implement a
method to reliably determine
how many and where deer
are harvested annually This
objective was identified as a
top priority by both FWC
staff and stakeholders. Cur-
rently, harvest estimates are
developed from a survey of
hunters after the season
ends. However, this method
is limited in its abilities to
estimate deer harvest on a
county or regional scale. Ac-
curate harvest and hunter ef-
fort data are often used as in-
dicators of abundance and
are vital to developing a deer
population model for Flori-
da. Having accurate harvest
information would also aid
in developing harvest goals
in the future.

The FWC is proposing to im-
plement a deer hawvest re-
porting system for Florida in
an effort to collect accurate
harvest data. The proposal
would require hunters to
document a harvested deer
using a printed/Commission
provided harvest tag or
home-made tag and report
the harvest using a tele-
phone or computer within a
certain amount of time of
taking a deer. Once report-
ed, a confirmation number
would be provided and would
need to be recorded on the
harvest tag. The proposal
would also require taxider-
mists and meat processors to
maintain a record, including
confirmation numbers, for
all deer brought to the facili-
ty.

Another top priority out-
lined in the Strategic Plan
for Deer Management in
Florida is developing Deer
Management Units (DMUs).
DMUs are being developed to
help manage Florida's deer
populations on a finer scale
than currently possible to in-
crease our ability to meet the
needs and desires of the pub-
lic. DMUs would be smaller
units within hunting zones
and are based on habitats of
similar productivity. Deer
populations withiri DMUs
should have similar charac-
teristics (i.e. reproductive


potential, body size, breeding
chronology, antler potential,
etc). DMUs would be used as
a basis for specific popula-
tion goals, antlerless deer
harvest, potential antler re-
strictions, bag limits, and
data collection. It is impor-
tant to establish DMUs at the
same time as a harvest re-
porting system since hunters
would need to report deer
harvests within DMUs and
harvest levels will be impor-
tant when developing man-
agement goals for individual
DMUs.

Major components of the
project:

An accepted, user friend-
ly, telephone and Internet
system for reporting deer
harvest.
Harvest
tags that
will facili-
tate compli-
ance with a
deer harvest
reporting
program.
An on-
line data re-
porting sys-
tem that
will produce
annual and
seasonal
harvest in-
formation to
staff and
the public.
DMUs
that will be
used for col-
lecting deer
harvest data
and setting
deer man-
agement
goals.

Harvest reporting system de-
tails:

Telephone and internet
based reporting system avail-
able 24 hours a day.
All deer hunters would
be required to use deer
harvest tags. Harvest tags
would be available in the
hunter handbook, could be
printed off the internet, may
be available free of charge
from some license vendors or
could be self-produced.
Hunters would have to
record their first and last
name, customer number,
telephone number, date
the deer was harvested,
county and the sex of the
deer on the harvest tag
prior to field dressing or
moving the deer from the
point of harvest. The har-
vest tag must be securely af-
fixed to the harvested deer
immediately upon arrival at
a residence or camp and pri-
or to loading the deer onto
any conveyance (truck, ATV,
boat, etc.) and shall remain
on the deer until the deer is
processed.
Reporting would be
mandatory for all hunter
harvested deer. A harvest-
ed deer would have to be re-


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91 S.W. 12th Street
Cross City, FL 32628


Phone:
Office (352) 498-0064
Home (352) 498-1939


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ported by midnight the day
after leaving the hunted area
(e.g., WMA, public hunting
area, lease, farm, etc).
Hunters would be required
*to report their deer harvest
prior to dropping it off at a
taxidermist or meat proces-
sor. A confirmation number
would be provided once a
deer has been reported and
this confirmation number
would have to be recorded on
the hunter's deer.harvest tag.
Taxidermists and meat
processors are currently re-
quired to maintain a record
of deer that are dropped off.
Proposed rules would re-
quire the hunter's customer
number and the harvest con-
firmation number to be cap-
tured along with the taker's
first and last name, date of


harvest and address of the
hunter.
Failure to report a deer
would be a Level 1 civil in-
fraction which entails a $50
fine or $100 fine if a second
offense within 36 months.

Required information when
reporting a harvest

Customer number (ex-
empt hunters would be re-
quired to maintain a cus-
tomer number free of
charge)
Date.of harvest
If harvested on private
land, Deer Management Unit
(DMU) and county where
harvested. If harvested on
public land, county and
WMA where harvested.
Method of harvest (mod-
ern gun, muzzleloading gun,
bow or crossbow)
Dog or.still hunting
Type of deer (antlered
buck, button buck or doe)
Total number of points
for antlered bucks

Exempt hunters

As mentioned previously, un-.
der the proposed harvest re-
porting system, exempt .
hunters would need.to obtain
a free customer number
through the Commission's li-
censing system. Many ex-
empt hunters may already
have a customer number if
they apply for quota permits
on areas that do not allow ex-
emptions or may have one
that needs to be "refreshed"
by updating their informa-
tion on file with the Commis-












NEw Pat

Extractona




CA AR I
". f AlI||u I


sion's licensing system. Ide-
ally, exempt hunters would
obtain a free customer num-
ber prior to hunting. Cus-
tomer numbers are impor-
tant because they allow indi-
viduals to be easily identi-
fied in a telephone or inter-
net based reporting system.
All hunters that are not ex-
empt and whom purchased a
license will have a customer
number.

Benefits of having exempt
hunters maintain custom
numbers:

Customer numbers are
unique to an individual, are
created when a customer ob-
tains their first license and
remains the individual's cus-
tomer number throughout
their life. Exempt hunters
would need to obtain a
customer number and re-
new it every five years.
Customer numbers would
be free of charge.
Would allow all ex-
empt hunters to have a
customer number and con-
tact information on file
with the Commission.
Having current con-
tact information on file
would allow the Commis-
sion to survey exempt
hunters when developing
deer management goals,
estimating hunter effort or
any other hunting related
survey. Currently, exempt
hunters are not included
in survey efforts because
they cannot be identified
without a customer num-
ber. Commission staff be-
lieve that getting the opin-
ions of Florida's exempt
hunters are important to
managing deer and other
wildlife and that this seg-
ment of the hunting popula-
tion is not being adequately
represented.
Having exempt hunters
on file would improve com-
munication by allowing the
Commission to contact indi-
viduals to inform them of
proposed changes or oppor-
tunities.
Customer numbers
would allow hunters to
quickly check harvested deer
without having to enter any
personal information during
the reporting process. All of
the information would be on
file.
With a customer number,
law enforcement would be
able to check with the report-
ing system to determine if
an individual reported a
deer. Without a customer
number, it would be difficult
to confirm if an exempt
hunter reported a harvested
deer unless they were re-
quired to provide additional
personal information each
time they reported a harvest
Without a customer num-
ber, there could be a weak
Slink in the reporting system
where non-exempt hunters
report a deer as an exempt or
may claim to have reported a
deer as an exempt which
would be difficult for law en-
forcement to prove other-
wise.
Being able to identify all
hunters through a unique
customer number would also
improve enforcement of dai-
ly bag limits on private lands
and season bag limits that
are in place on many wildlife
management areas.


Page 6


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www. dcadvocate.net


Thursday December 30, 2010


Local


NFBA Holds TWo Public
Meetings In January;
Public Encouraged to
Attend

The North Florida Broad-
band Authority (NFBA) will
hold an Operations Commit-
tee meeting on Thursday,
January 6, at 11 a.m. at the
Courtyard by Marriott, lo-
cated at 3700 SW 42 nd
Street, Gainesville, Florida.
The Committee will review
and discuss technical issues
regarding the deployment of
the broadband effort. The
meeting is open to the pub-
lic.

The ( wFBA) will also hold
its Board of Directors meet-
ing on Wednesday, January
12, at 2 p.m. at the Suwan-
nee River Water Manage-
ment District Office, located
at 9225 County Road 49, Live
Oak, Florida. The public is
encouraged to attend this
meeting to learn more about
how the Middle Mile Broad-
band project will impact
them and their communi-
ties.

NFBA is comprised of 23 lo-
cal governments and is sup-
ported by the North Florida
Economic Development
Partnership ( NFEDP ). The
governments and coinmuni-
ties within NFBA are work-
ing together to improve eco-
nomic opportunity in the re-
gion by building a wide-
spread broadband infra-
structure through a federal
grant under the Broadband
Technology Opportunities
Program (BTOP). The de-
'ployment of this project will
provide affordable high-
quality, high speed Internet
connectivity where it is cur-
Srently unavailable or inac-
cessible within the service
area.

The project will change the
lives of thousands and thou-
sands of people by bringing
Internet capabilities to
more than 154,000 house-


holds, nearly 27,000 busi-
nesses, more thanl,570 criti-
cal facilities and 265 health
care entities within the
North Ceritral Rural Area of
Critical Economic Concern
(NCRACEC).

The project is underway and
is targeted for completion li
2013.

Stephen Fulford, the NFBA
Chairman said, "This pro-
ject is to provide cost-effec-
tive, broadband infrastruc-
ture and high-speed capaci-
ty Internet throughout our
service area."

"Our monthly meetings pro-
vides a great venue for the,
public the potential end
users to come and learn
more about the project and
get their questions an-
swered."

SThe NFBA is a newly
formed government entity,
established specifically for
the purpose of bringing
broadband services to the
North Florida region.

The grant is part of the
Broadband Technology Op-
portunities Program
(BTOP) to expand broad-
band access and adoption
across the United States,
and is part of the American
Recovery and Reinvestment
Act Stimulus Package.
The main purpose of.
the broadband network is to
provide non-discriminatory,
affordable, and scalable
fixed broadband wireless in-
frastructure supporting In-
ternet access for all con-
stituencies as wellasasst
mile providers who imple-
ment local access connec-
tions to the network.

The NFBA is working
to deploy the broadband net-
work at the lowest practica-
ble cost to provide afford-
able high quality, high speed
Internet connectivity where
it is currently unavailable
or inaccessible in the pro-
ject service area.


NOTICE OF ZONING CHANGE.
The Board of Couny Comissions of Dixie County, Florida proposes to amend the Dixie County Ld
Development Regulations, as amended, hereinater referred to as the Land Development Regulations,
within the aea shown on the map below, as followE
LDR 10-2, an application by the Board of County Commissioners, to amend the text of the Land
Development Regulations by amending Section 4.14.5, entitled Special Exceptions Commercial Intenive
(CI) zoning district, to add light manufcturin, assembling processing (including food procesing but
not slaughterhouses), packaging or fabricating in completely enclosed buildings as a special exception.

DIXE COUNTY


CIyLMe
. _Roada


I


A public hearing will be conducted by the Board ofCounty Commtissioners to consider the amendment
and enactment of the ordinance adopting the amendmn.en January 20,2011 at 6:00 p.m., oras soon
thereafter as the matter can be heard in the Board of County Commissioners Meeting Room, County
Courthouse, located at 401 North Cedar Street, Cross City, Florida. The title of said ordinance shall read,
as follows:
AN ORDINANCE OF DIXIE COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE TEXT OF THE LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS OF DIXIE COUNTY, AS AMENDED, PURSUANT TO
AN APPLICATION, LDR 10-02, BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS;
PROVIDING FOR AMENDING SECTION 4.14.5, ENTITLED SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS
COMMERCIAL INTENSIVE (CI) ZONING DISTRICT, TO ADD LIGHT
MANUFACTURING, ASSEMBLING, PROCESSING (INCLUDING FOOD PROCESSING,
BUT NOT SLAUGHTERHOUSES), PACKAGING OR FABRICATING IN COMPLETELY
ENCLOSED BUILDING AS A SPECIAL EXCEPTION; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY;.
REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE
DATE

The public hearing may be continued to one or more future date. Any interested party shall be advised
that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the
public hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation
exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above referenced public hearing.
At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested parties may appear and be heard with respect to the
amendment and the ordinance adopting the amendment,
Copies of the amendment and the ordinance adopting the amendment are available for public inspection at
the Office of the County Clerk, County Courthouse, 401 North Cedar Street, Cross City, Florida, during
regular business hours.
All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced
public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.


Handy Clip and Save:

Your local government


------- --- --------
Commission District 1
SWade E. "Gene" Building, Planning, Zoning I
Higginbotham Denartment


is now available via paperbox

at' the

Old South Family Barbeque
in front of the the Carriage Inn Motel in Cross City


VING FOOD -- NOT JUST GRT
SERVING GREAT FOOD- NOTJUST GREAT BBQ


NEW YEAR'S EVE PARTY FOOD -APPETIZERS TO FULL MEALS
TAKE-OUT ORDERS & CATERING INFO CALL
S* (352) 498-4227

^ wijwjty ii


16840 S. E. HIGHWAY 19 Open 11:00 am 800 pmTuesday Saturday
NET To Tss CAIFRIAGL 8 11 00 am 20 pm Sunday Closed Monday

BREAKFAST SERVICE COMING SOON FRIDAY, JANUARY 7TH @ 6:00am 1.900am


email: higglnboth- John Jenkins
am.wade@mail.dc.statefl.us Phone 352.498:1236
Phone 352.542.9157 jjenkins6450@bellsouth.netI
Fax 352.498.1207 Fax 352.498.1286 .

Commission District 2 Building Inspector I
IMarvin E. Hunt Phone 352.498.1236 I
I email: marvin- Fax 352.498.1288 I
I huntd2@bellsouth.net
I Phone 352.542.8779 County Manager
IlFax 325.498.1207 Mike Cassidy I
I Phone 352.498.1426. I
I Commission District 3 dixiecm51@bellsouth.net I
.1 Mark Hatch Fax 352.498.1471 1
I email: mthatch@msn.com I
I Phone 352.498.5218 Emergency Services I
I Fax 352.498.1207 Tim Alexander I
I Phone 352.498.1240 I
ICommission District 4 Fax 352.498.1244
I Jason Holifleld .l
I email: 911 Services
I jholfieldl@gmall.com Phone 352.498.1240
I Phone 352.498.3035 Fax 352.498.1244
I Fax352.498.1207
I Engineering Bailey, I
| Commission District 5 Bishop & Lane I
I J. Ronnie Edmonds Phone 386.752.5640 ,
I e-mail: ronniemari-
Slyn@bellsouth.net Environmental Services,
SPhone 352.498.5497 Wesley Asbell I
Fax 352.498.1207 Phone 352.498.1360
| Fax 352.498.1363
SElected Officials
SDirectory UF/IFAS Extension Service
Holly Houghton
Clerk of Court Phone 352.498.1237
Dana Johnson hvh@ufl.edu
Phone 352.498.1200 Fax 352.498.1471
dJohnson@dxieclerk.com
Fax 352.498:1201 Finance
Cindy Dey
County Judge Phone 352.498.1205
SFredrick L. Koberlein Fax 352.498.1476
Phone 352.498.1234
Fax 325.498.1477 Health Services
Sable Bolling
Property Appraiser Phone 362.498.1360
Robbie Lee Fax 352.498.1363
Phone 352.498.1212
Fax 352.498.1211 Library
Cindy Bellot
Sheriff Phone 32.498.1219- 1
Dewey Hatcher cbellot@iefi 's o
Phone 352.498.1220-d Fax35.4864 ""; "
Fax 352.498.1226 I
Mosquito Control
Superintendent of Schools Joe P. Ruth
IMark Raines Phone 352.498.1432
I Phone 352.498.6131 Fa 352.498.1429
IFax 352.498.1308
I Payroll
1 Supervisor of Elections Barbara Buzbee I
I Starlet Cannon Phone 352.498.1205 I
I Phone 352.498.1216 .Fax 352.498.1476, I
I dlxiecow soe@belsouth.net I
I Fax 352.498.1218 Public Works
I Howard Reed I
I Tax Collector Phone 352.498.1239 I
I Michelle Cannon I
I Phone 352.498.1213 Purchasing
mcannon@dSiiecountytax.com Denise Lytle I
Phone 352.498.1206
SDepartment Personnel dlytle@dixieclerk.com I
IDirectory Fax352.498.1207

I Airport Services Solid Waste & Recycling I
I Hoyle Tanner Joe P Ruth I
I Phone 352.380.1919 Phone 352.498.1432 I
IFax Fax 352.498.1429
: Attorney, Jennifer Ellison veteran's Affairs
Phone 352.498.7890 Jerry Prater
I jellison@bellsouth.net' Phone 352.498.1246
Fax 386.498.7897 Fax 352.498.1286 I
L.... -- ---THE

THE


chappies- .
bees@wlndstream.net We
invite evei'iyone to attend
meetings to see how'you can.
become involved in helping
to save our bees.
The Dixie County Beekeep-
ers Association meets at
7:00 p.m. on the second
Tuesday of each month at
the Dixie County Public Li-
brary in the Dixie Plaza ad-
jacent to Subway


Page 7


Dixie County Beekeepers
Association to Meet
January 11 at 7:00 p.m.

Cindy Bellot, treasurer of
the newly formed Dixie
County Beekeepers Associa-
tion is
shown ac-
cepting the
Fouider's
Award from
club founder
Chappie Mc-
Chesney
Cindy
earned this
award by be-
ing a leader
in helping to
form the club and spending
many hours of her personal
time to help build the club.
Her selflessneed in support-
ing the new club is what
will make the Dixie County
Beekeepers Association an
asset to our community, the
county, and the surrounding
areas.

The Dixie County Beekeep-
ers Association was founded
to help educate the public of
the need we have for bee pol-
lination and how we can be-
come better stewards of the 2'
earth. The club mentors
new beekeepers, helpslong
time beekeepers keep up
with all the new pests, dis-
eases, pesticides, and other'
harmful things that affect
the welfare of all pollina-
tors. The club works and
supports the folks at the
University of Florida Bee
Lab who are constantly
looking for answers and
testing new products to help
save all pollinators. Educat-
ing the public so everyone
understands the need for
honeybees to pollinate the
foods we depend on for sur-
vival is only one aspect of
the club.

Holeybees provide millions
of dolmtrs:wortb.of pollina.-
tion services each year and
without them our diets
would become very bland..-
When you visit your fa-
vorite grocery store, you
would find very little pro-
duce without the service the
bees provided by pollinating
the crops. We would only
find some corn or wheat or
rice in the produce section
and that would be very bor-
ing. We need bees for polli-
nation of fruits, nuts, veg-
etables, grains to feed our
cattle, and don't forget our
flowers. -

Eachyear we are losing '
high percentage of our bees
and other pollinators for un-
known reasons all around.
the world. Most folks have
heard of colony collapse dis-
order (CCD) where for un-
known reasons all the work-
er bees abandon their hives
and the babies (brood), that
need caring for and just dis-
appear. Scientists around
the world are trying desper-
ately to find a cause Tor the
recent condition affecting
our honeybees. In years
past we have had similar
losses of bees but never on
this scale.

Just a few years ago bee-
keepers did not have to
spend so much time and
money fighting to keep their
hives alive. Recent invaders
are the small hive beetles
and varroa mites that cause.
hives to die out in large:
numbers if' they are not tak-
en care of. The days of set-
ting our hives put and
pulling honey at our leisure


JYIQI)IYYII


are long gone. We now are
in a fight to save our bees
and we need the help of
everyone to accomplish this
task.

Becoming a beekeeper can
help with local pollination
as well as being a deterrent
to the ever.
advancing,
Africanized
honeybees.
We have re-
cent reports
of African-
ized bees in
Georgia ft-
tacking hu-
mans. By
keeping our
European
honeybees healthy and in
large numbers we can help
keep the unwanted Afican-
zed bees at bay. Beekeepers
are your best protection
against allowingthe invad-
ing bees to.take ever an
area. Beekeepers are ever
on the alert for problems
and the beekeepers are the
first to.report unwanted
pests in an area to the state-,
run apiary department.

'The state o4 Florida main-
tains bee ipspectors or"api-
ary inspectors to inspect all
registred bee hives in the
* state every year to make
sure we have no infectious
diseases or other serious
problems with the bees liv-
ing in Florida. Florida law
requires all beekeepers to-
register their hives with the
state, but as is the case with
any government-agency,
they always need more
funds'to do their assigned.
tasks. It is not easy with
lots of new beekeepers
starting out and needing .
help to do it the right way

That is where everyone can
become a part of the solu-
tion. You can helpby join-
ing with the Dixie County
Beekeepers Association and
learn of the problems facing
the pollinators. Attend a,
meeting and ask questions
to the many beekeepers that
make up-the club. We have
beekeepers from those with
over 50 years experience to
the person that does not'
waiitto be a beekeeper but
wants to help.

Everyone iswelcome4toat-
tend and learn how you can
help with the cause of sav-
ing our bees and helping to
insure our diet does not be-'
come bland. Start by think-
ing of what we put out in
our own yards to kill weeds,
pests, or other unwanted in-
sects. When you kill pests in
your home garden you are
also killing beneficial in- -
sects like the honeybees. A
lot of folks dust their gar-
dens and flowers with prod-
ucts like Sevin, which is
lethal to bees. There are
safer ways to eliminate. n-
wanted pests and we en-
coUrage everyone to visit
and learn how to be a better
steward o the earth.

We, the members of the Dix-
ie CountyiBeekeepers Asso-
ciation, welcome new mem-
bers at any time and we es-
pecially thank those like, .
Cindy Bellot that go above
and beyond to support and
help us accomplish our mis-
sion to help save the honey-
bees.

Club contacts are the club
president Roy Griffin352-
578-4251, club treasurer
Cindy Bellot 352-498-1219 or
352-498-5864. There will be
more information coming
on our new website:
httpJ/dixieco Wtybeeassoci
ation.weeblycnam/index.htm
1 or you can get in touch
with Chap ie McChesney
through the Alachua Coun-
ty Beekeepers Club
http://alachuacountybeekee
persclub ning.com/ or email


1










www. dcadvocate. net


Thursday December 30, 2010


41W



0 ~ ru


Servicesp


Moe-is


AtAIrli


Steinhatchee Place Resort furnished I
and 2 bedroom condos fbr rent 600.00-
700.00 and utilities included in price
cable, internet and hot tub in Stein-
hatchee call 1-352-498-7740 (Nov-Feb)
3BR 2Bath House for rent 1st and last
month rent. NO PETS. call 498-3795
224 NE 147 ST / 3br 11/2 bath block
home, fenced yard for rent in cross
city, rent $650.00 / first and last month
required.
352-2100318 Marcy
Doublewide MH 3 BR 2Bath on 2
acres. Central Heat and Air ready
Friday Call 352-542-3377 or 352-578-
4461
3BR 2Bath double wide with family
TIMBERS
APARTMENTS
1,2, AND 3 BR, HC & non-HC accessi-
ble apts. Rental Assistance may be
available. 231 NE 97th St., Cross City,
EL. Call 352-498-3175, TDd/TTY 711.
"This institution is an equal opportu-
nity providerl and employer.'"
3BR House 4 Rent 400.00 498-6048
ROOM FOR RENT. Quiet neighbor-
hood, paved road, right off 29, close to
shopping. $75/week or $275/month.
542-1324.
2BR 11/2 Bath MH 4 Rent call 498-0181

HOUSE FOR RENT. Available Decem-
ber 1, 2-3 bedroom, 1 bath. In Cross
City Wheelchair ramp. 498-3999.
Single person 1BR 1Bath apartment
for rent, animal friendly 400.00 a
month, includes rent, electric and wa-
ter call 352-224-0749

2BR IBath trailer for rent 400.00 a
month plus security deposit call Su-
san Davis 542-9574
4BR house 400.00 month, 2BR house
350.00 month call 352-498-0760 or 356-
2236
3 BR, 1 Bath Good location
$550/month first, last, deposit. 352-498-
0164
4 BR 400.00,3 BR 360.00,2 BR 360.00
498-0760
House for rent in Cross City take sec-
tion A call 498-0164
1BR possible 2BR 11/2 Bath House for
rent 450.00 a month, and deposit,
walking distance to Cross City call
407-227-6778




Bom Keep Fresh cut round rolls, cow
30.00 Horse grade 40.00 call 542-7276
Look New Hay for sale, large rolls, high-
ly fertilized weed free, coastal burmuda
45.00, penscola bahai 35.00 call 352-
949-0222

Hay For Sale, Round Bales
Coastal. $35.00.
Call 352 222-5405.



Free 8 week old Kittens. Call 352-
356-1211


The economy

stinks: Don't

throw your

$$$ away!

FREE


Classifieds


Save


You


Money




Only in


The Advocate



498-3312

A & K NURSERY
Hwy. 19 North
Mon. -Sat. 10-4
Cross City
352-356-1189
COOL SEASON ANNUALS: Pansy,
Dianthus, Snaps, $16.00 for 18
count tray
*** NEW STORE HOURS ****
JANUARY MONDAY SATURDAY


GRAIN FED BEEF- steaks, roasts,
ground beef, and more. USDA in-
spected. No hormones Evergreen
Polled Herefords 352-498-0880. ever-
greenherefordbeef.com
GRAIN FED BEEF- hormone free.
%, 'h or whole, $1.50 per lb, live
weight plus slaughter, cut and wrap.
Evergreen Polled Herefords 352-498-
0880 or 352-542-7135



BEAT tE uBUG


o0


Get our ot



LARGE HEAVY OAK DINING
TABLE with six chairs 300.00 or
OBO or trade for equal value, euea-
ka bagless vacuum cleaner like.
new 75.00 OBO, Hilary tent, sleeps 4
never used 75.00 OBO call 542-8376

30FT TRIPLE ACE L 5TH WHEEL
EVERYTHING WORKS. CAMPER/
HUNTER SPECIAL 1500.00 OR
OBO. CALL 352-745-1407 OR 352-210-
0049

30 ft long, one bedroom, (queen size
mattress compatible), refrig, stove,
microwave, lots of storage,
propane, electric and battery, a/c
works great, table area and sofa
both make out to sleeping areas,
full bathroom.
Asking $3500.00
Call Lynn @ 352-427-1412 or email,
Imhcrn2b@aol.com

Dodge Slant Six 225 Moter, Trans-
mission rearend 250.00 ask for
Mike at 498-5409'

For Sale Kirby Vacuum with all
Attachments, needs belt, for more
info call 542-7404 or 578-5862

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER. Sol-
id wood! 498-3999.

Refridgerator for sale. $75 and up.
498-7425.

HOSPITAL BED. Fully adjustable
with hand remote. $200 OBO. 498-
7311, Steve.

Refrigerator needs paint. $75.00
498-7425

93 Ford Tracer Station Wagon
$2,000 cash or trade for small auto-
matic pickup. 498-7425

2005 GMC 4 Wheel Drive black
with 88,000 miles. $10,000 OBO 352-
210-1665

1974 Green Ford F-250 74,000 origi-
nal miles. $1200 OBO 352-210-1665

3BR 1Bath 14x70 1985 mobile home
8,000.00 with break down setup in-
cluded price negotiable 352-340-
9047

1 Memphis 12in. sub, 700 watt amp,
truck box fits 2subs 130.00 for
everything call for individual pric-
ing 352-340-9047

Grouper Equipment Rods reels out
riggers stretch 25 and 30 and much
more 498-5409

1993 Honda Civic 4 door sedan,
good tires battery, clean interior,
get 32 mpg 225,000 miles, 1,200.00
call Joyce at 498-2886

House's for rent-car's 500.00
pit bull puppies 50.00 call 498-0760
or 356-2236

EPSON Perfection 1670 Photo
ScannerEPSON Stylus Photo 820
Printer
All software included. Barely
used. $30.00 for both. Toshiba
Tecra 8000 14"Monitor LapTop 130
KB Ram, Floppy Drive, 5.59 GB =
HD, Wireless, Windows Profession-
al $150.00 or OBO Call 352.262.1954
or 352.356.7378 for more informa-
tion.

30" Gas range 200.00 or OBO call
498-0774

30 foot hunting camper with new
floor, asking 900.00 for it. call at
352-210-7765

'08 Buick Lucerne; pearl white; 86k
miles; grey leather interior;
23-26 mileage; maintained 542-
4362.

Wanted: Lot or Parcel with DW mo-
bile home. owner financing re-
quired small down balance over 10
years, close at title company Larry
352-490-5656


beige leather couch and love seat
150.00 bow flex 400.00 call 213-2360

Portable generator 6500 watts
400.00 or OBO, oak table with 6
chairs 250.00 or OBO call 542-8367


SHOWERS OF BLESSINGS
CUSTOM WATER TREAT-
MENT NOW LEASING EQUI-
MENTI Get rid of that iron,
odor, and hard water! WATTS
has the water treatment that will
give you clean healthy water to
cook with and to drink for the
entire family. I guarantee our
systems to remove the iron,
odors and give you pure clean
water. No more iron spots or
dingy clothes. Financing avail-
able with little or no money
down and low payments. We
have systems for every budget
including buying or renting
your equipment. For all of your
water problems call your local
WATTS dealer DAVID. B.
DOWNING (352) 356-0474 or (352)
498-2449. We service what we
sell! A member of the Florida
Quality Water.

JIM'S PRESSURE WASH &
PAINT Since 1985. To all previous
& new customers I am offering a
10% discount for the entire
month of December. Merry
Christmas & God bless! Pastor
Jim Hurst (352) 498:3023 or 356-
3831

DIXIE MONUMENTS serving
North Central Florida for 18
years. Open Tuesday-Friday 8-4.
Saturday 8-12 or call for appoint-
ment anytime, located on NE 512
Avenue (behind McCrabb
Church) 7 miles North of Old
Town off Hwy 349. 542-3432 or toll
free 1-877-542-3232 210-2629 ufn

Nina's Hair Care
601 NE 214 Ave. Behind court-
house, Cross City, Fl 32628
352-356-2513 Specials for Sept.
and Oct Call for details
Mention Ad

In-home daycare has 1 full-time
and several after school open-
ings. Please call Rhonda Cassidy
352-213-7178


MOTIVATED SELLER!
FINANCING OPTIONS- Beautiful
lot; 3 bdr mobile
home; near river in Jena; 498-2601
Lovely landscaped 4 acres w/ New
Double wide, party deck on three
sides of home 3BR 3Bath never lived
in, values 170.00 sacrificing @
110,000. F/S by owner. Call Johnny @
352-542-9374 five minutes from his-
toric Suwanee river Annual faxes on
Ty 600.00 priced below market in Dix-
ie County FL
1/2 acre River front, perfect camp set-
up, walk to Gornto Springs State
Park 15,000.00 owner finance 1-850-




UBL
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

Please take notice that the Three
Rivers Regional Library Board will
hold a Board meeting on Thursday
January 13, at 7:00 pm, at the
Lafayette County Public Library, in
Mayo, Florida.

All interested persons are invited to
attend and be heard. Please be ad-
vised, that if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
Board with respect to any matter
considered at such hearing, that
person wil need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, he/she may need to ensure
that's verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made, which record in-
cludes teh testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based.

Persons with disabilities requesting
reasonable accommodations to
participate in this proceeding
should contact (386) 294-1600
(Voice & TDD) or via Florida Relay
Service at 800-955-8771.

52

LEGAL NOTICE: A PETITION
FOR DECLARATORY JUDG-
MENT has been filed in'Dixie
COunty against a 1997 Model Year
Saturn SC Sports Coupe, VIN
1G8ZG127XVZ151363. Anyone with
any claims file them before Janu-
ary 6, 2011.
50,51,52,1






Looking for someone to babysit in
my home 18 months little boy M-F
from 6:45am to 4:00pm. Non smok-
er if anyone interested call 578-
5961


ACROSS
1. Gangland guns
5. Pitched too low
9. Still in the game
14. "Zip- -Doo-Dah"
15. Kennedy
matriarch
16. Sir Arthur
Doyle
17. 1939 epic film
20. Part of GPA
21. Chapter in history
22. Goblet part
23. Sportscaster
Berman
24. Tidal reflux *
27. Shade of blond
29. Prefix with
thermal or metric
30. Art Deco notable
32. NASA affirmative
34. Henpeck
36. President
Clinton's personal
secretary Betty

39. Suggest
40. '60s sci-fi series
42. Herman Wouk
ship
44. Et (and so
forth)
45. Do an usher's
work
47. Malarkey
48. Country club
instructors
52.1-95, e.g.
53. who?"
(arguer's retort)
55. Potpie spheroid
57. Circle section
58. "Rule, Britannia"
composer
Thomas
60. Pacific _nations
62. TV journalist
Couric
64. Chuck Norris
thriller of 1984
68. What "i.e." stands
for
69. Gloomy


1 2 3

4 5 526

7 8 9 5

6 317 9

5 1

2 4 6 5

5 9 7 8

1 6 3 9

4 2 5


American Profle Hometown Content

70. Lawn burrower
71. Yields, as
territory
72. Pained cry
73. Change for a fin

DOWN
1. Group of geese
2. Swooning fan,
say
3. Walk-up dweller
4. Parrot's meal
5. Work wk. ender,
for many
6. Sodom refugee
7. 1975 Wimbledon
champ
8. Penta- minus one
9. Crack fighter pilot
10. Weather map
areas
11. Put through hell
night
12. Former Miss
America Williams


13. Farthest
18. Little piggy's cry,
when tripled
19. Dish that's
"slung"
25. Young Simpson
26. Antiseptic acid
28. Comic-strip Viking
31. "Low-budget," in
brand names
33. '40s-'50s slugger
Ralph
35. Postgame
segment
37. Pushers'
customers
38. Prevent, in
legalese
40. Part of LPN
41. Seeger or
Sampras
42. Like Limoges
collectibles
43. On both sides of


12M26010

46. Gull relative
49. Meat distribution
in 1943, e.g.
50. Orange-and-
black flier
51. Public outbursts
54. Hairless comic-
strip character
56. Dog-lovers' org.
59. In (actually)
61. Muddy ground
63. Spherical
opening?
65."_ De-Lovely"
66. Not a whit
67. Fuse rating unit


WEATHER THE FOOD STORM


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10:00 -4:00


AVL











The Dixie County Advocate


Thursday December 30, 2010


Stuff to Do
4,


Fruit tree 8 plant sale
Wednesday, Jan 6 (2011) 4:00p to 7:OOp
at Bo Diddley Community Plaza, Gainesville, FL
The Edible Plant Project's spring sale, at the Union Street Farmers'
Market in the Downtown Gainesville Plaza. An eclectic selection of
edible plants, fruit trees, & seeds will be available. This a great time
to plant: warm season vegetables & greens, sugarcane & yuooa or
cassava, which will be available, read more
Price: $2-10
The Edible Plant Project's spring sale, at the Union Street Farmers'
Market in the Downtown Gainesville Plaza. An eclectic selection of
edible plants, fruit trees, & seeds will be available. This a great time
to plant: warm season vegetables & greens, sugarcane & yucca or
cassava, which will be available. The project is a grassroots, all volun-
teer non-profit that promotes edible landscaping and local food abun-
dance in our area. Volunteers are needed, www.edibleplantproject.org


4 p


GUARDIAN
AiDi LITE


New Volunteer Orientation


How Is

Your Voice?

Learn how to be the voice tor
a child who has been abain-
doned, neglected or abused.
No previous experience re-
quired. You can make an
enormous difference in tile life
of a child.


Training is FREE!!!

Join our team of dedicated volunteers today.

Call (386) 36'1-7720, Ext. .103 for more ii...miin..


Downtown Countdown-
New Year's Eve Celebration
Friday, Dec 31 9:00p to Sat-
urday, Jan 1 (2011) 12:30a
at Bo Diddley Community
Plaza, Gainesville, FL
The City of Gainesville De-
partment of Parks, Recre-
ation and Cultural Affairs
will host Downtown Count-
down, a New Year's Eve cel-
ebration concert at the Bo
Diddley Community Plaza.
Headlining the concert is
the Beatles tribute band,
The Impostors, a six-piece
group comprised of some of
the area's most popular mu-
sicians


DAV/DAVA


CHAPTER 63


Country Breakfast & More!
Every 1st and 3rd Saturday at the
Suwannee River Shrine Club


Columbia County




Suwannee County


Wednesday, January 12, 2011
10:00 AM -12:00 PM
Lake City Guardian ad Litem Office


Monday, January 24, 2011
10:00 AM 12:00 PM OR 6:00 PM-8:00 PM
Live Oak Guardian ad Litem Office


SERVING YOU AT OUR MAIN LOCATION
CROSS CITY, HIGHWAY 19
*t*t**********
TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT CALL: (352) 498-1360
MOST MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED
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FREE PREGNANCY TESTS

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Page 9


COME OUT AND HELP US
RAISE THE ROOF BINGO
SUNDAY JANUARY 9, 2011
STARTING TIME 2:00 PM
DOORS OPEN AT NOON

12 REGULAR GAMES @ $50.00*
4 GAMES @ $250.00*
4 GAMES OF 50/50
PAYOUTS BASED ON (40) MINIMUM
NUMBER OF PLAYERS

REGULAR GAMES/SPECIAL PACK $40.00

THERE WILL BE AN INTERMISSION AFTER
2ND SPECIAL GAME WITH PRIZES AND FOOD
AVAILABLE.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
JERRY @ 352-339-0635
DEBBIE @ 724-719-0156
Second Annual Caleb's Pitch Tennis Tournmanent
Friday, Jan 7 (2011) 10:00a
at Jonesville Tennis Center, Gainesville, FL
Caleb's Pitch helps medically-ill children realize their dreams
by experiences with UF athletes. All of the money raised will
go to help the children directly. We have worked around FTL,
USTA Sectionals, and avoided the Superbowl. If you do not
play, you can still help by working various tables, obtaining
raffle donations and sponsors or donating something for the
bake sale. read more Phone: 215-5440
Caleb's Pitch helps medically-ill children realize their dreams
by experiences with UF athletes. All of the money raised will
go to help the children directly We have worked around FTL,
USTA Sectionals, and avoided the Superbowl. If you do not
play, you can still help by working various tables, obtaining
raffle donations and sponsors or donating something for the
bake sale. Entry deadline Thursday, Jan. 6. Register by Dec.
15 to receive $5 off registration fee & guarantee receipt of a
ST-shirt. Singles ($40) Doubles ($60/team) Parent-Child
S($50/team) Mixed ($60/team) Ping-Pong Tournament ($15)
Beach Tennis ($25/team)


~v'.dat'ador'at '.nI'et








Page 10


Thursday December 30, 2010


www. dcadvocate.net


Obituaries and Faith, etc.


r


Lucy Daphine Spivey


LUCY DAPHINE SPIVEY went to be with her Heavenly
Father on December 25, 2010, at her home in Horseshoe
Beach, Florida, surrounded by her loving family and
friends.

Born in Cross City, Florida on May 2, 1940 to Alma Talley,
she was raised in Horseshoe Beach. She married her hus-
band, Jack, the love of her life, in 1956. Just nine days af-
ter they were married, he was drafted into the Army and
was stationed in San Antonio, Texas. After two years of
service, they moved back to Orlando, Florida, where
Daphine went to work for the Orange County Courts. She
worked for 10 years until Jason, Deana, and Aaron were
born and she chose to stay at home and raise them.

They were very active members at their church, Oak Lev-
el Baptist Church in Ocoee, Florida. She
served her church for many years in
various positions. Daphine and
Jack raised their kids in a Christ-
ian home and always taught" .
them Godly values. She served
her community and church
family unselfishly. She, along
with Jack and Aaron, moved
back to Horseshoe Beach in 1994
to help care for her mother, who
was in failing health. She then
became very involved in their
church here, First Baptist Church in
Horseshoe.

She was very affectionately known as "Ma" by her eight
grandsons, and will be remembered as that by her only
granddaughter, Allee. After having had all those boys,
she was beyond excited that she was going to have a little
pink in the family. Allee joined her family just two
months ago.

She had a true love for decorating, cooking and photogra-
phy. Many in the community depended on her to help
with various events and weddings, whether it be decorat-
ing, directing or taking photographs. There was no doubt
as long as she was helping others, she was happy.
She survived by her husband, Jack, of Horseshoe Beach,
Florida; sons, Jason (Amy Michelle), of Winter Garden,
Florida and Aaron (Amy Michelle), of Cross City, Florida;
daughter, Deana Thomas (Gary) of Ocoee, Florida; grand-
sons, Gary II, Riley, Jesse, Benjamin and Ethan Thomas
Cody Spivey, Levi and Wyatt Spivey; and granddaughter;
Allee Spivey

She preceded in death by her Mother, Alma Talley; and an
infant daughter, Jacqueline Denice.

Funeral services were held on Wednesday, December 29,
2010, 10:00 a.m. at First Baptist Church of Cross City with,
Rev. Walt Fowler, Rev. Mike Brown, Rev. Newt Coleman
and Rev. Gene Koons officiating followed by burial at But-
ler Cemetery A visitation was held on Tuesday December
28, 2010, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Rick Gooding Funeral Home.
Arrangements were placed under the care of Rick Good-
ing Funeral Home, Cross City, Florida, (352) 498-5400.


r


Hubert R. Robinson


Hubert R. Robinson, 74 of Chiefland, passed away Dec. 26,
2010 at his home. Born in Warsaw, KY he moved to this
area from Pinellas County in 1986. He
was a plumber and served his coun-
try in the US Army.

He is survived by his wife, Vivian
Robinson of Chiefland, children,
Pam (Arthur) Henderson of Mid-
dlebury, IN, Delores (Junior)
Lloyd of Harrison, OH, Randy
Robinson of South Bend, IN, Tim-
my Robinson of Pinellas Park, FL
,Tammy Jo Philbates of Lenexa,
VA, Hubert R. Robinson of Canon
City, CO, Nicholas Robinson of Lenexa,
VA, step-son Harley Laundry of Brattle-
boro, VT, siblings Mildred Donaldson of Chiefland, Mar-
garet Beatly of IN, Evelyn Rainey of IN, Cecil Robinson
of Ithaca, MI, 9 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren.

Graveside services will be Jan. 3, 2011 at 10:00 AM, at
Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell, FL.
In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Mr. Robin-
son's memory to Haven Hospice of the Tri Counties, 311 u
NE 9th St., Chiefland, FL 32626.

Arrangements are under the care of Hiers-Baxley Funer-
al Services, 1301 N. Young
Blvd., Chiefland, FL 32626,
352-493-0050. On line con- Please st
dolences may be sent Please Stl
through our website at
wwwhiers-baxleycom.

L PV


Jeremiah 29:11

"For I know the

plans I have for

you," says the

LORD. "They are

plans for good

and not for

disaster, to give

you a future and

a hope."


r


Jessica Nicole Standridge


MISS JESSICA NICOLE STANDRIDGE passed away Fri-
day, December 24, 2010 at her home in Old Town after a
long illness. She was 19.
Jessica was born on December
23, 1991. She graduated from
Dixie County High School in
2010 and was dual-enrolled
in Gateway Community
College during high
school. She worked as a .
cashier at Hitchcock's
Foodway in Old Town. A .
member of the Cross City
Pentecostal Holiness
Church, she was active in
the Driven Youth Team. She
enjoyed scrapbooking, swim-
ming and reading her bible.


She is survived by her parents, PaulineaIBRWMis Mills
of Old Town and Marc and Lesley Standridge of Old
Town; brother, T. J. Rhoden of Old Town; sisters, Emily
Denise Mills of Old Town, Kim (Travis) Hewit of High
Springs and Lanaee (James) Hurtubise of Old Town; ma-
ternal grandmothers, Elaine Crise of Cross City and
Catherine Mills of Cross City; paternal grandparents, Jan
Standridge of Cross City and Melvin and Jean Horton of
High Springs. She was preceded in death by her grandfa-
thers, Paul Russell Crise and Buell Standridge.

Funeral services will be held Monday, December 27, 2010
at 2:00 PM at the Rick Gooding Funeral Home Chapel
with Rev. Randy Richardson officiating. Interment will
follow at Old McCrabb Cemetery in Old Town. A visita-
tion will be held Sunday, December 26, 2010 between the
hours of 5 and 7 PM at the funeral home.

Arrangements have been placed under the care of the
Rick Gooding Funeral Home, Cross City, Florida, 352-498-
5400.

L_ -


r


SDavid Richmond Williams

David Richmond Williams, age 66 passed away December
20, 2010 at his home in Steinhatchee, FL.

Mr. Williams moved to Steinhatchee, FL from Atlanta, GA
about 10 years ago. He loved to fish and was a charter
fishing captain for many years. He was also very interest-
ed in genealogy.

He is survived by his wife Frances Williams of Stein-
hatchee, FL. his sons Jeremy and Scott Williams of Eng-
land, his step sons David and Ryan Darnell of Atlanta
GA, (2) grandchildren, his sisters Polly Roper, Helen
Goodwill, and Christine Lamb, all of England.

A family Memorial Service will be planed and announced
at a later date,

L Arrangements were placed under the care of Rick Good-
g Funeral Home Cross City, FL 498-5400.


Faith Funnies


Samuel M. Carnley


Samuel M. Carnley, 61 of Chiefland, FL died in
Gainesville, FL on Dec. 27,2010. Born in Marianna, FL
he came to this area from St. Augustine in 2002. He was
a millwright at a chemical plant.

He is survived by sons Sammy Carnley and Eddie Carn-
ley, both Panama City, FL, sisters Dorothy Griffin of
Blountstown, FL, Karen Foster of Chiefland, FL., his
grandchildren, nieces and nephews, and great nieces
and nephews.

Arrangements are under the care of Hiers-Baxley Fu-
neral Services, 1301 N. Young Blvd., Chiefland, FL 32626,
352-493-0050. On line condolences may be sent through
ur website at www.hiers-baxleycom.


-he New Pastor

A new pastor moved into
town and went out one Satur-
day to visit his community.
All went well until he came
to one house. It was obvious
that someone was home, but
no one came to the door even
after he knocked several
times. Finally, he took out his
card, wrote on the back "Rev-
elation 3:20" and stuck it in
the door. The next day, as he
was counting the offering he
found his card in the collec-
tion plate. Below his message
was a notation "Genesis 3:10."
Upon opening his Bible to the
passage he let out a roar of
laughter.

Revelation 3:20 reads: (Pas-
tors note) "Behold, I stand at
the door and knock. If any
man hear my voice, and
opens the door, I will come
into him, and will dine with
him, and he with me."

Genesis 3:10 reads: "And he
said, I heard thy voice in the
garden, and I was afraid, be-
cause I was naked."

idy the plan of


NATION


~ Romfiins 15111"(NIV) New Prospect Baptist Church Calvary Temple Assembly of God
US 19 Between Cross City & Old Town Suwannee Lumber Road Cross City
11 And again, Jesus sTheAn swerForYo Lie AJiUsForAfAStyFonrALne.
"Praise the Lord, all you Gen- sd..unaySch 10Asg Worsip 1A w iof-10s3
CNhlren's Church 11A- Evening Worship 7P KdCChurh-NAr S. 6-12
tiles, and sing praises to him, all WedEsdy EveningT7P
you peoples." Pastor Billy Robson Pastor Jim Hurst
(352) 498-3711 (352) 4983023
First Baptist Church of Old Town Old Town United Methodist Church Ir e ood Sepherd .Lhra Church
Wlme To Gads Harm Wan ou Came On In' US 19 Old Town
Sunday School 10A Morning Worshp 11A Food PantryOpen 8am-1lls Man Thurs.
Evening Worship P "Come Let Us WorhVpS Adore Him" 4 ial e rlMof 1-a l fr i1
Wednesday Bri Study -7P Sunday Worshi p 0A
Knod & thiedoor iopn. @k & youlnd, al & youwblbe Church School 11A 3 4-43 597
glowe-r9mdry. Wednesday Choir Practice 7P PU>CW tlf r
Pastor Royce Hanshew Pastor Rev. Card Ralnear B ss -
(352) 542-7050 (352) 542-7954 hNi Sr ie fa am-
McCrabb Baptist Church Old Town Church of God %DVERTISE
7 miles north of Old Town on Hwy 349 at CR Wcomes Yobu lb Come & Worship With Us
351A, Church Phone, 542-2207 Sunday School- 100A YOU
Larry Peterson, Pator Sunday Morning Worship- 11:OOA YOUR
Sunday School 9:45 Church 11:00 Sunday Evening Worship :00P R
Sun. discipleship Talnlng 6:00, Wednesday Evening Worhip 700P
Church 7:00 Pastor Troy Hare
SWed Night Bible Study 7:00 (352)542222
For Sunday Van Pickup Call Bro.
Rick Foy, 356-2294 i Scrub Creek Baptist Church Cross City Church of God
Located 6 Miles East on CR 351 Kenneth Street- Cross City
"A Friendly Church With A Weloome SpWT" "Pmoaiakng The Full Gospel For AJ PeoplW
Children's Church- 10:30A- Morning Worship 10:30A
Bible Study 9:45A. Worship Service- 11A Evening Worship 6:30P
Church Training P Evening Wonip 7P Wednesday FamRy Talning Hour Adult& Teen Mnisty,
Wednesday Prayer Meetng 7P Boys Brigade & Gi's Club. -7,OP
Rev. Ed & Sylvia Ivey, Pastor
(352) 498-5535 (352) 498-3280

First United Methodist Church Seventh-Day Adventist Church ( Cars C uakc Rset tesli a ic I
22 NE 138th St* Cross City Cross City Belid Sbwar-b u o CIty
"Open Hearte, Open Minds, Open Doori 'Wcomes Yio Where Jesus i LTrd In the Hert of Dlxie Co. with Dixie Co. at heart
The People ofThUnited MeodChuSabbath School-9:30A MornngWorhip- 11A Sunday School 100 am Momkng Worship 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:45A* Momlng Worshlp 11A Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30P Sunday Evening 600 PM
Wednesday -Adult Choir -7:30P Wed Family Night 00 pm
Pastor Rev. Glenda Brayman Pastor Bill Schnorbus Pastor Randy Alcia Richardson
(352) 498-3420 H (352) 498-3258 C (352) 498-5674 352-498-0736
Faith Baptist Church
Free church news printing CR 55A (Between Cross City & Old Ton)
with your regular ad here s 'd.ySChuho94An. Mom rhip 1A
IQ c Evenlng Worship 7P
SMI-Week BiNl Study Wednesday 7P
Yur church can be here Rev. Jackie Pettrey, Pastor
r for $6.25 per week (352) 542-7103


Lydia Baptist Church "Show, proper respect to
2SMiles West of Cross City on US 19 9
"AChurch YouCen Call Homeeveryone: Love the brother-
MongWoship HA Evening WorhpP hood of believers, fear God,
Wedneday-Prayer Mwtlng P honor the king.
Bible Study, Mission Friends, RA's, Gs
Pastor: Jarrett Thomas 1 Peter 2:17
(352) 498-5617 U


There is one who scatters, and Holy Cross Catholic Mission [Ro 1 18] Lej no d&bt remain
increases yet more. There Is one who HW Su oC outstanding, except te9 South of Cro
Mass.- Sundays.- 11:30 amutstanding, except the
withholds more than Is appropriate, but Confessions- Sundays 0:45-11:15am continuing, debt to love one
gains poverty. The liberal soul shall be CCD Every Wednesday :00-7:15 pm
made fat. He who waters shall be At t. John the Evangelist n Cheland another, for he who loves his
t "d Prth High Scho fellowman has fulfilled the law.
watered also himself. RosryEvryTuesday 3:00 pmfellowman has fulfilled the law.
Proverb 11 2:4-26 (352) 493-9723


t I


Hebrews 5:9, 11:6 John 14:6
Romans 1:16 Acts 4:12
1 Corinthians 15:1-4
Romans 10:9-10 Matthew 10:32-33
Matthew 28:18-19
Romans 6:3-7 John 3:1-5
Acts 2:36-41 Acts 8:30-39
Mark 16:15-16 1 Peter 3:21
Colossians 2:11-13,1:13-14
Galations 1:6-9 2 Thessalonians 1:7-9
Hebrews 4:12 John 12:48
2 CoInthians 5:10 Romans 16:16

We love you and ask that
you pass this on.
God Will Bless You


h* CMlY IL


'


I I


I I








www. dcadvocate. net


featured creature


A leatherback sea turtle digs a nest on a Florida beach while a young boy practices responsible beach behavior by not disturbing the
female's nesting patterns. The leatherback is the largest living turtle, reaching a weight of 2,000 pounds in some cases. (FWC photo)


Helping Florida's sea turtles survive


requires beach responsibility


* Leave only footprints and
keep beaches dark

By FWC STAFF

Ancient creatures of the sea fight a bat-
tle each year to reproduce and survive in a
world not always hospitable to them.
Sea turtles nesting on Florida's beaches
face.an uncertain future, according to the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission's (FWC) scientists. Threats come
from encroachment on nesting beaches by
coastal development and encounters with
pollutants, beach debris and fishing gear.
Five species of sea turtles nest on Florida
beaches, with the loggerhead showing up
in the largest numbers. Green and leather-
back sea turtles also nest in the Sunshine
State. Two other species, Kemp's Ridley and
hawksbill sea.turtles nest infrequently in
Florida but inhabit Florida waters. The FWC
lists the loggerhead as a threatened species
with the other four listed as endangered.
However, the loggerhead's status could
change because of data collected showing
a downward trend since 1998. During the
2007 April to September nesting season,
scientists found the lowest dumber of log-
gerhead nests in 19 years. At the same time,
the number of loggerheads found dead, sick
or injured each year in Florida has more
than doubled during the past decade.
"If we don't do something to reverse this
trend, the loggerhead will also become en-
dangered," said Robbin Trindell, an FWC
Imperiled Species Program administrator.
Nearly 90 percent of the loggerhead
population that nests in the southeastern
United States, nests on Florida's beaches.
This population is one of only two large log-
gerhead nesting populations worldwide.
Sea turtles are air-breathing reptiles
well-suited for sea life with a hydrodynam-
ic-shaped shell, large and powerful front
flippers. These physical characteristics en-
able them to dive deep into the ocean and
to swim long distances.
Female loggerhead turtles begin coming
on shore in the spring with peak months


for laying eggs in June and July. The nest-
ing female digs a hole with her hind flip-
pers and then lays approximately 115 eggs.
After covering the nest with sand, the mas-
sive creature, weighing nearly 300 pounds,
makes her way back to the ocean. A female
might come ashore two to five times during
the nesting season. Amazingly, the females
come back to the same beach where they
hatched decades earlier. The males, once
they make the long crawl after hatching out
of the egg, never return to land.
Major disturbances to sea turtle nest-
ing habits come from seawalls and beach
nourishment projects. Individuals can
help by following safe beach lighting sug-
gestions, filling holes dug for sand castles
and picking up litter.
"Just one light can kill thousands of
turtles over several years," Trindell said.
"Many lights burn all night, without con-
tributing to human safety."
Late in the summer, after an incuba-
tion of 55-70 days, the hatchlings begin
breaking utuof their shells and crawling
out of the nest. Instinct tells the 1- to 2-inch
hatchling to head toward the brightest ho-
rizon and away from dark silhouettes. In
days long gone in Florida, the brightest ho-
rizon shone over the ocean, and the hatch-
lings would move away from the shadows
on the dunes and begin the crawl to the sea.
Nest predators might include raccoons,
ghost crabs and fire ants. In modern-day
Florida, hatchlings must crawl through a
battlefield of debris left by humans. Furni-
ture discarded by beachgoers can obstruct
a nesting female turtle or become a trap
for the hatchlings. Avoiding firework left-
overs strewn along the hatchling's path
can cause exhaustion and delay in getting
to the water. If stranded on the beach when
-the sun rises, the hatchling's chance for
survival diminishes and dehydration and
sun exposure become hazards.
S"We can all help sea turtles survive,"
Trindell said. "If we just take personal re-
sponsibility, we can go a long way to ensure
the sea turtle co-exists with us for many
more years to come."


A loggerhead sea turtle hatchling
heads to the ocean after hatching out
of its nest. The loggerhead is the most
common of Florida's sea turtles. By the
time this hatchling reaches the adult
state, it will have increased its weight
more than 6,000 times. (FWC photo)


To report a dead, sick or
injured sea turtle, call FWC's
24-hour Wildlife Alert at
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


To learn more about sea turtles, visit FWC's Web site at MyFWC.com/seaturtle.


.. -R HLnpLur% TStA T i gl /


Buy a plate or decal and help

sea turtles lay on the beach


The sea turtle hatchling dis-
played on the Florida specialty
license plate does more than
just adorn the bumper of a car.
The purchase of the specialty
tag goes a long way to help pro-
tect this living fossil from ex-
tinction. The fees collected go
directly into sea turtle research
and conservation.
The logger- RFOR
head hatchling
represents b S
hope for a
safe passage
from the nest
to the water, e if
a dangerous en-.
deavor for a 1- to 2-
inch creature.
SPurchasing a specialty tag
helps fund the Sea Turtle Grants
Program, which distributes
funds each year to support sea
turtle research, conservation
and education programs. Ap-
proximately 30 percent is dis-
tributed to the grants program,
which is administered by the
non-profit Caribbean Conser-
vation Corporation. The other
70 percent of the funding gen-
erated by sales of the tag goes


to the FWC's Marine. Turtle
Protection Program to support
research and management ac-
tivities related to sea turtles.
Since 1992, the sea turtle also
has been featured on boat regis-
tration decals that have helped
fund research and conservation
efforts. These decals can be pir-
chased for $5 each, as a
voluntary add-on
to boat regis-
cC tration fees
or from the
FWC's Web
site, MyFWC.
com. The new-
est decal features
a Kemp's Ridley turtle
by FWC artist Liz West.

Sea turtle license plates may be
purchased at any authorized
motor vehicle office, such
as Florida's Department of
Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles, local tax collector's
office or a licensed tag agent
orgo to buyaplate.com.
Decals may be purchased at
www.floridaconservation.
org/seaturtle/Decals/Turtle
Decals.htm.


SEA TURTLES AND LIGHTS WORD SEARCH
Loggerhead, green and leatherback sea turtles nest on the coasts of Florida. To help
the sea turtles, humans can reduce light pollution by turning off unnecessary lights
or shielding lights. They can also allow dune vegetation, such as sea grapes, to
grow and block the light Find the key words listed below in the word find puzzle.
BIRDS DUNE GHOST CRABS
HATCHLINGS LIGHT POLLUTION LOGGERHEAD
NIGHTTIME SHIELD TURN OFF
DISORIENT FIRE ANTS GREEN


LEATHERBACK
SEA GRAPES


LIGHTS
TURTLE


N O I T U L L O P 'T
Q R T U K'F'B O-F T
D M C D S J M YYC Q
L E 0 T P B 'R C 0 J
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M B N T Y P T CJ T
J R C 0 R Y X L:x NM
C S E A G R A P E !S
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NEST
WATER
E G I L R JJG N iV T
J I F :GY J M' FiY iL
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D E H T 'S L R S F J
E V L Y P IiI C F J


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Dedicated to learning

more about ancient

creatures of the sea

* Blair Witherington keeps a close watch on sea turtles


By FWC STAFF


Blair Witherington returned
from Oman; a country in the
Middle East, in April excited
about the future of loggerhead
turtles, despite discouraging
news in Florida .from nesting
counts in 2007.
Witherington, a research scien-
tist with the FWC's Fish and Wild-
life Research Institute (FWRI),
studies sea turtles daily.
"The loggerhead population is
in serious decline," Witherington
said. "Eighty percent of the world's
loggerheads nest on beaches
in Florida and on the island of
Masirah in the Indian Ocean off
the coast of Oman."
In Florida, the loggerhead is
the most common sea turtle. But
worldwide, the loggerhead is rare,


said Witherington, who went to
Masirah to help set up a monitor-.
ing program for the threatened
reptile, similar to what Florida uses
on its 33 index nesting beaches.
"We have made headway
in conservation efforts
for sea turtles."
Witherington coordinates Flor-
ida's Index Nesting Beach Survey,
which is conducted annually from
May 15 to Aug. 31. The process in-
volves volunteers who go out be-
fore sunrise each morning, seven
days a week during the nesting
season. Volunteers monitor nests
laid during the night and report
false crawls signs of a sea turtle's
flippers in the sand but no nest.
"There are indications that
there may be declining numbers
in the loggerhead population in


Masirah as well," Witherington
said. "But we need reliable data to
determine it conclusively."
Witherington received his
Ph.D. from the University of Flori-
da, and his dissertation addressed
the orientation of hatchling sea
turtles and the effect of light on
their journey to the sea.
"If they head in the wrong di-
rection, they die," Witheringtoi
said of the effect of direct lighting
on the beach.
Counties and municipalities in
the majority of the sea turtle nest-
ing areas in Florida now have ordi-
nances in place for lighting man-
agement, something that brings a
smile to Witherington's face.
"This is absolutely a success
story in Florida," he said. "We have
made headway in conservation ef-
forts for sea turtles."
Witherington also .conducts
neo-natal research. For years,
scientists have called the post-
hatchling's first year, "the' lost
year" because no one kncwwhere
the hatchlings went once they
made it to the ocean from the
nesting beach.
Witheringlon and his team


discovered that hatchling logger-
heads and green turtles migrate
out to the floating, open-ocean
sargassum (seaweed) communi-
ty offshore from nesting beaches.
They also found hawksbill arid
Kemp's Ridley sea turtles that are
approximately a year old.
"It's very exciting to find small
Kemp's Ridley because they are
the rarest of sea turtles," he said.
"We usually see large juveniles
or adults swimming in Florida's
waters."
While concerns remain about
the loggerhead's survival, With-
erington believes the work done
by the FWC and other groups,
such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service and the.National Marine
Fisheries Service, will help con-
serve this giant reptile.
"I work with a team of skilled
and well-informed people," he
said. "And the team extends be-
yond the FWC with more than
2,000 people in the state doing
nesting counts and conveying
conservation messages.
"Florida would be much
poorer without our sea turtles,"
Witherington said.


Blair Witherington hblds a Kemp's Ridley sea turtle, one
of the rarest turtles in the world, as he and his team
conduct research off the coast of Florida. (FWC photo)


- A PRODUCT OF THE FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION'S COMMUNITY OUTREACH -


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#2 Gail Yvonne Gordon, Williston
FTA No Vehicle Registration
$500 Bond


Advocate Staff


Fostered

goodwill. And

100 kids.


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S, ':.- FTA DWLS:
S:& $1,000 Bond-


Pass It On:
VALUES.COM Ia'NI'"r"


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