The Santa Rosa press gazette

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Material Information

Title:
The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title:
Milton press gazette
Portion of title:
Press gazette
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Milton Fla
Creation Date:
June 8, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates:
30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID:
UF00028408:00986

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Chest pain. It may mean nothing. But it may take ever ything. By PAMELA HOLT 623-2120| @pamelaholtpg pholt@srpressgazette.com Councilman Wesley Meiss threw his hat in the City of Milton mayoral race June 19. Hes hit the ground running, he said, ready to change history. What will be written about the past 20 years? he asked. Pace boomed. New business ex ploded in Pace. What about the city? The city has built a new city hall, rehouse, and a community center during that time. Those things should be expected because those things are needed, he said, We can do more. Meiss said as mayor he plans to bring transparen cy to the city, nancial accountabil ity and have an open door policy to the mayors ofce. Democracy needs to be re stored. The greatest thing George Washington ever did was step down. He knew what power can do. He remembered King George in England and decided one gure head in power for too long is not good for a city or a country, he said. His future plans are to encourage public participation in city meetings by changing meeting times. The average working person cannot attend a 1 p.m. hour-long meeting or a 4 p.m. meeting, he said. Meiss wants to establish term limits to city council seats, includ ing the mayor. He wants to keep the courthouse in its current loca tion, protect Miltons historic core from threat, expand programs for senior citizens and publi cize all city council meetings by Internet streaming and local tele vision services. One of the most important goals he said, I want all non prof it organizations within the city to work together on downtown proj ects with a common goal to better the city, he said. Meiss said he was born, reared and educated in the city of Milton. This is the city I love. I couldve lived anywhere af ter I graduated college, but I chose to stay in Milton, he said. By AARON LITTLE 623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com Thursday night, Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce (SRSO) arrested Jeffrey Denver Campbell, 49 of Gulf Breeze on one count of discharging a rearm in public, two counts shooting into a vehicle and one count of felony criminal mischief over $1,000. On March 9, SRSO responded to the victims home and found a Nissan pickup truck and a Ford SUV damaged by bullet holes, two in the Nissans front passen ger side of the bumper, one in the passenger side head light, and one in the front passenger quarter panel as well as a ight tire accord ing to reports. The Ford had two bullet holes behind the driver side passenger door and one in the side rear win dow, reports also said. Depu ties also reported nding nine .22 caliber shell casings in the roadway near crime scene which were submitted to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for test ing. Reports also said found at the crime scene was a Coors beer can on the back fence with what appeared to be urine in it. On April 8, reports said deputies responded to a criminal mischief, vandal ism call at the same home. The victim, according to re ports, moved out the day be fore and, upon returning to check for mail, found glass broken in the living room and bullet holes across the back of the house. Depu ties reported nding glass shattered across the living room and master bedroom, numerous bullet holes in the walls, bullet fragments on the oors in several rooms, bullet holes on the east side of the exterior of the resi dence, and several broken boards on the privacy fence on the north side of the yard. At this time, the victim re ported an ongoing feud with Campbell, who lived nearby and this was not the rst time his property had been damaged from weapon re. Reports also said the vic tim reported an issue with Cops: Man shoots neighbors house, vehicle WESLEY MEISS By AARON LITTLE 623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com Though American citizens have disagreed about the countrys involve ment in various conicts over the last 20 years, from Operation: Desert Storm to its 13-year involvement in Afghanistans civil war, the common statement people tend to share is this: We support the troops. Whether they supported the wars or not, American citizens say they support American military soldiers, Marines, air men and sailors. Americans were less kind to its Vietnam soldiers in the 1970s. Ken Mabie celebrated his 65th birth day Wednesday, but still vividly recalls his service in Vietnam and his treatment upon returning home. I was drafted at 20, Mabie said. I was a little late because under the Sulli van law, you couldnt go in with a brother already serving. My brother was in Da Nang in the Air Force. I just got out of school when I was drafted. I didnt really set up my life because I knew I was go ing into the Army, he said. Mabie said he ew to Ft. Lee, Va., for jungle training and Ft. Lewis, Wa., for indoctrination before going on to Yokota Air Base, Japan, and then Da Nang. The rst thing I remember was the dry heat, he said. Mabie said he became a combat engi neer with the 18th brigade. We were really the rst ones in be fore the infantry. We set the landing zones for them. We had to clean the area with bulldozers to make the LZ. Mabie focused more on his construc tion work than combat. By AARON LITTLE 623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com Thursdays Santa Rosa County board of commissioners meeting heard a presentation from Florida De partment of Transportation (FDOT) representative Peggy Kelly and Amy Wiwi, Metric Engineering, the con sulting rm handling the Project De velopment and Environment (PD&E) studying the expansion of U.S. 90 from Glover Lane to State Road 87 South in east Milton. I know all of you are familiar with the State Road 87 connector PD&E study. During that study, the traf c count forecast reected that U.S. 90 was quickly nearing its capacity, Wiwi said. She said the purpose of the 87 con nector, alternatives to be presented to the public in September, did re duce trafc in downtown Milton by 20 percent. Meiss announces candidacy for Milton mayor See CRIME A7 FDOT studies U.S. 90 alternatives All studies include Blackwater River Bridge to S.R. 87 South See FDOT A7 We spit in the devils face and laughed. Ken Mabie Vietnam veteran Vietnam and the war at home Remembering See VIETNAM A7 Society ............................................. A2 Opinion ........................................... A4 Diversions ........................................ A8 Lifestyle ........................................... B1 Sports ............................................... B2 Classieds .................................. B5-B6 TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 106 Issue 53 Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com JEFFREY CAMPBELL Men in Action supports local youth | B1 BLACKWATER FOX HUNT B EGINS TODAY PAGE B2 75 cents Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Gazette Santa Rosas Press Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.com Tweet us @srpressgazette and like us on facebook.com

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w w w .sr pr essgaz ett e .c om email: ne w s@srpr essgaz ett e .c om 623-2120 Society A2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Elected OFFICIALS COUNTY GO VERNMENT COUNTY COMMISSION District 1: Vacant District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Road, Milton, FL 32583; phone 983-1877. Email is commcole@santarosa..gov District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla Highway, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. Email is commsalter@santarosa..gov District 4: Jim Melvin, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL; phone 983-1877. Email is comm-melvin@santa rosa..gov District 5: Lane Lynchard, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1877. Email is commlynchard@santarosa..gov The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at 9 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays. The leaders meet in committee at 9 a.m. Mondays preceding the Thursday meetings. Meetings are held in commission chambers of the Administrative Complex on U.S. 90. Phone 983-1877 for information or to reach their of ces. SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFF Wendell Hall, 5755 E. Milton Road, Milton, FL 32588; phone 983-1100. Email is whall@srso.net SANTA ROSA COUNTY CLERK OF COURTS Donald Spencer, P.O. Box 472, Milton, FL 32572; phone 983-1973. Email is santacourtfeed@chjn.net SANTA ROSA COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR Stan C. Nichols, 6495 Caroline St., Suite E, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1800. Email is snichols@srctc. com SANTA ROSA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER Greg Brown, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1880. Email is info@srcpa.org SANTA ROSA COUNTY ELECTIONS SUPERVISOR Tappie Villane, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1900. Email is villane@santa rosa..gov S T A TE G O VERNMENT Rep. Doug Broxson: 5988 Hwy 90, Pensacola State College, Milton Campus, Building 4000, Room 4013, Milton, FL 32583, phone 626-3113. Email is Doug.Broxson@myoridahouse.gov Sen. Greg Evers: 209 E. Zaragoza St., Pensaco la, FL 32502, phone 595-0213. Email is Evers.Greg. web@senate.gov Gov. Rick Scott: PLO5 The Capitol, 400 S. Mon roe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; phone 488-7146. Email is _governor@myorida.com F EDER AL G O VERNMENT HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Rep. Jeff Miller: 336 Cannon House Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; local phone is 479-1183; D.C. Ofce phone (202) 225-4136. Pen sacola ofce address: 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503. Toll free number is 866-3671614. Website: http://jeffmiller.house.gov SENATE Sen. Marco Rubio: 284 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 850-433-2603. Website: www.rubio. senate.gov Sen. Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Sen ate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202-224-5274; fax 202-224-8022. Website: http://billnelson.senate.gov WHITE HOUSE President Barack Obama: The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. Email is president@white house.gov Vice President Joe Biden: Office of the Vice President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. SC H OOL G O VERNMENT SCHOOL BOARD Superintendent: Tim Wyrosdick, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-5000. Email is wyrosdickt@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 1: Diane Scott, 5710 Munson High way, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-0413. Email is scottdl@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton, FL 32570; phone 623-6299. Email is winkleseh@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre, FL 32566; phone 939-2661. Email is colemanmd@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 4: Jennifer Granse, 3266 Abel Ave., Pace, FL 32571; phone 995-8785. District 5: Scott Peden, 3156 Pins Lane, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563; phone 934-0701. Email is pe denst@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays at 5086 Canal St. in Milton. Phone: 983-5000. CI TY G O VERNMENT Milton City Hall, Mayor Guy Thompson, 6738 Dixon St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5400. City Manager is Brian Watkins Town of Jay, Mayor Kurvin Qualls, 3822 Highway 4, Jay, FL 32565, phone 675-2719 Gulf Breeze City Hall, Mayor Beverly Zim mern, 1070 Shoreline Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, phone 934-5100. City Manager is Edwin Buz Eddy Press Gazette BIRTHDA Y CLUB JUL Y BIRTHDA YS Jennifer Diane Jackson July 2 Bethany Martin July 3 OBITUARY Jimmy Allen Rollo, 45, of Milton, died suddenly in Belle Chase, La., on June 22, 2014. He was born July 18, 1968, and was a life-long resident of Milton, Fla. Jimmy worked as an observer of NOAA and the Pelagic Long Line Fisheries for 20 years and was presently working as a long line sherman. He was preceded in death by a stepbrother, Alvin H. Potter. Jimmy is survived by his mother, Louise Rollo; father and step-mother, John C. and Irene Rollo; two sisters, Tina Rollo and Cristy Rollo; a step-brother, Bruce W. Potter; nieces, Kaylee Rollo and Chyanne Rollo; nephew, Brent Short; and great-niece, Marlayna Anderson. He is also survived by his grandchildren, Callie Phillips and Brantley Montgomery; his Grandfather, Jimmy D. Tolbert; aunts Leonia Pittman, Nell Tolbert, Betty Fields, Churyl Davis and Sandra Pace. A funeral was Saturday, June 28, at Lewis Funeral Home Milton Chapel, with Elder Wayne Blocker of the Community of Christ Church ofciating. Burial followed at Serenity Gardens. Pallbearers were Mike Brown, Neil Childers, Mike Dixon, Reginald Slack, Clayton Pace, John Marshall, Bruce Potter, Donnell Stephens and David Mitchell. Jimmy Allen Rollo JIMMY ROLLO Community BRIEFS From staff reports Pace Area Chamber of Commerce meets at noon The Pace Area Chamber of Commerce monthly Networking Luncheon will be at noon today at Grover Ts in Milton, 5887 U.S. Highway 90. Each person will order off the menu and pay the waitress. Door prizes always are welcome. Szymoniak celebrates 30 years in S anta Rosa C ounty Dr. Peter Szymoniak is celebrating serving Santa Rosa County for 30 years July 11 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at the Dragon Fly gallery, 6815 Caroline St. in Milton. Everyone is invited to stop by and say hello. Refreshments will be served. Library hosts Christmas in July book sale Friends of the Milton Library, 5541 Alabama St. in Milton, is having a Christmas in July Book Sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 25 and 9 a.m. until noon July 26. Hardcover books are $1 each, and paperbacks are four for $1. Glass Show to be at Pensacola Fair Grounds The sixth annual Pensacola Looking Glass Show and Sale will be at the Pensacola Fair Grounds, 6655 W. Mobile Highway, Pensacola, Aug. 2 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Aug. 3 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $5 and good for both days. For more information, call Fred or Pam Meyer at 972-672-6213. MHS Class of 1974 reunion registration begins Milton High School Class of 1974 classmates registers now for their 40th class reunion. The reunion festivities will be the weekend of Friday, Aug. 1 through Sunday, Aug. 3. Activities include Friday night Happy Hour at the Milton Garden Club, Saturday night dinner at Tanglewood Country Club, and Sunday picnic at the riverfront home of James Mayeaux. To obtain details and registration information, email any reunion committee member: Paula Eagen at paula.eagen@navy.mil, Al Stephens at dasteph2@bellsouth. net, Vivian (McClellan) Hastings at VHastings@TheFund.com, Bonnie (Ray) Cannon at bonitacannon@ ymail.com or Jean (Plowman) Perry at jean.perry@mchsi.com. S.S. Dixon Primary hosts clothing drive S.S. Dixon Primary will be hosting a back-to-school gentle used clothes drive and accepting donations until July 7. Any family from Santa Rosa County will then be able to shop July 23. We thank you all for your help and willingness to help others that are in need of assistance for Back-to-School clothes. If you have any questions, call S.S. Dixon Primary School at 995-3660. Fundraiser to benet cancer patient Wendi Smith A fundraiser for Wendi Smith will be at 2 p.m. July 19 at Russell Harbor Landing. A 50/50 rafe and silent auction, $10 sh plates and cake sale will take place to raise funds for medical expenses. For more information, call 426-5218 or 777-6272 or visit the Facebook page Reaching out for Wendi. Special to the Press Gazette The following activities are scheduled to occur the week of July 2 at the Mil ton Community Center. All activities are free and open to the public unless a fee is indicated. WEDNESDA Y JUL Y 2 8:30 a.m. to noon Se nior Volleyball. This is a co-ed activity for seniors, and everyone is welcome to come out and enjoy the event or look to become a participant. 9 a.m. to noon Art ist gathering: If you paint, draw or sketch you are invited to the Milton Com munity Center to practice your art among other art ist in a fun and relaxing atmosphere. 2 p.m. Ballroom Danc ing: Learn the popular dance steps to the Samba, Salsa, and other popular ball room dances. Class is $5. 6 p.m. Yoga: An enjoy able exercise class for all skill levels. A relaxing and benecial hour. Class is $5. THURSDA Y JUL Y 3 8:30 a.m. to noon Pick leball: come play a game similar to tennis, but not on nearly as big of a court and not nearly as fast. Pick leball is one of the fastest growing sports in America and you are welcome to come out and give it a try. 6 p.m. Panhandle Writers Group Meeting: Meet with area writers to critique and offer opinions on written works, such as short stories, poems and parts of books. 6:30 p.m. Line Danc ing: Practice your dance steps in the Milton Com munity Center. A fun en joyable way to get some exercise. Class is $5. FRIDA Y JUL Y 4 Closed due to the Fourth of July The Milton Community Center is looking to add more activities and will announce them through this calendar. If you would like to suggest an event or activity, call Bill Gamblin at 983-5466 or email bill.gamblin@ ci.milton..us. Dont forget to check out our website for infor mation regarding all city sports and activities at www.ci.milton..us or con tact the Milton Community Center at 983-5466. Weekly activities at MIL TON COMMUNITY CENTER LWV launches voter registration campaign Special to the Press Gazette The League of Women Voters of the Pensacola Bay Area is launching an exten sive voter registration cam paign in order to engage new voters in Milton and northern Santa Rosa County before the Aug. 26 election. The dead line to register to vote in the primary elections as well as City of Milton and Jay general elections is July 28. A lot of attention is paid to candidates biographies and campaign trail quips. But the real stakes of this election are much higher, said Haley Richards, co-president of LWV Pensacola Bay Area. This election is about everyone standing up for the things that matter most to us and our families. Whether we care most about college af fordability, job opportunities, Americas place in the world or other important issues, we all deserve the chance to weigh in and make it count. That means registering and voting. League volunteers will be registering voters from 3 to 6 p.m. Thursday, July 3, at Milton Pick and Save grocery at 5221 Stewart St. in Milton. LWVs goal is to reach as many new voters as possible before the deadline. Voter registration is a critical step to making sure our voter rolls and our halls of power actually re ect the diversity of our com munities, said Haley Rich ards, co-president of the LWV Pensacola Bay Area. For information about how to register to vote and to learn more about the voting process, visit www.VOTE411. org. To get involved in the Leagues effort, email presi dentlwvpba@gmail.com. Berkleigh Atkinson of Pace is all decked out for safety. Her proud parents are Richard and Lauren Atkinson. S OCIAL S A NT A ROSA PH O T O Baby of the WEEK

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A3 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 By MARI KRUGER Special to the Press Gazette An insightful Milton doctor saved my sons life 18 months ago, and that, in turn, made a Bolivian toddler part of my life. It started in October 2012 as a pre cautionary follow-up appointment for a heart murmur my sons doctor noticed during his one year checkup. She referred us to a cardiologist in Pensacola, which turned into a urry of CT scans, second opinions, and just four weeks later heart surgery in Atlanta to repair an aortic coarcta tion (where the aorta is pinched and blood ow is obstructed). A year later, our blue-eyed toddler is totally ne. I started to wonder how we could help other families facing a childs heart surgery. I contacted Samaritans Purse Childrens Heart Project (CHP), which coordinates surgeries for kids with heart defects in third-world coun ties. Without surgery, the children will die, but their home countries lack re sources to perform complicated pro cedures. They asked me to apply as a volunteer transporter. Transporters facilitate transit between countries and make sure the children and their parents are accompanied at all times as required by their visas. I was so thankful we were blessed with access to the surgery our son needed, and my heart broke for moms without this option. I applied immedi ately to CHP and was accepted this spring, the same day 1-year-old Santi arrived in Canada. Santi is a child I was intended to help. I started pray ing for him and continued to pray as his surgery was delayed by compli cations. This June, with his surgery nally complete, I ew to Canada to meet him. Santi under 20 pounds at 14 months old wasnt shy at all. The tip of a scar peeking above his tiny Tshirt was the only indication hed just had surgery. He snuggled in my lap for part of the long ight and we dis cussed barnyard animals in the inight magazine: Cluck! Moo! Quack! For this we didnt need a translator. A welcome party of church friends and extended family waited alongside the rutted dirt road in Santa Cruz. He is three times bigger! some one cooed. Gloria a Dios! the church pastor said. Glory to God! Santis mom confessed she was afraid to go to North America and risk returning home with empty arms. Her pastor told her to go because Santi had no other hope for survival and to trust God. Was I hearing my own anxiety verbalized? I, too, was haunted by thoughts of an empty car seat, a si lent drive home to Pace. We have a different language, continent and hemisphere, but the exact same fear, trust and God. Santis mom returned with her arms three times as full. We celebrated with traditional patasca, a Santa Cruzan soup of maize, beef and pork. I ew home the next day, thank ful for the discerning Milton doctor who saved my sons life, and led me to Bolivia to pass on the love and support we so recently received. A community caring for each other has far-reaching impact, and I am in awe of the people in this beautiful area we call home. Local woman helps Samaritans Purse Childrens Heart Project SPECIAL TO THE P RE SS GAZETTE Mari Kruger holds 1-year old Santi, who received a much needed heart surgery, in Bolivia. Special to the Press Gazette Department of Veter ans Affairs Vet Center staff members across the region (Biloxi, Miss., Mobile, Ala., Pensacola, Okaloosa Coun ty, and Bay County, Fla.) along with their Mobile Vet Center outreach vehicle, will offer their free readjust ment counseling services to interested Veterans and active duty throughout the region during the month of July. The following upcoming event is part of the Vet Cen ters VA2VETS outreach campaign. July 8 Santa Rosa County, Fla.; Wal-Mart Su percenter, 4965 Hwy 90, Mil ton, at 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Effective immediately, active duty service mem bers who served in a com bat or war zone will be able to get counseling at Vet Centers. The services of fered include: Individual, group, and family readjustment coun seling to assist active duty service members in making a successful transition from combat, to garrison, or civil ian life. Post-traumatic stress disorder treatment and help with other related problems that affect functioning with in the family, work, school or other areas of everyday life. Military sexual trauma counseling for active duty service members of both genders. Service members will be required to provide docu mentation by their third visit indicating they have served in a combat or war zone to continue counseling. A copy of one of the following docu ments will meet this require ment: deployment demobili zation order, enlisted record brief, ofcer record brief, or an award citation indicating service member served in a combat zone. These ser vices are also available to family members of active duty combat service mem bers, as well as any combat Veteran. Vet Center staff respects the privacy of all clients, and holds client information in strict condence. No infor mation will be communicat ed to any person or agency without written consent except in necessary circum stances to avert a crisis. For more information on Vet Center services or hours in the Gulf Coast region, please call the Pensacola Vet Center in at 456-5886. Learn more about VA Vet Centers at www.vet center.va.gov. Veterans can speak condentially with a Vet Center counselor at any time by calling 1-877-WARVETS (877-927-8387). SPECIAL TO THE P RE SS GAZETTE VA Vet Centers VA2VETS to arrive in Milton

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We live in an interconnected world. Energy, cars, televisions, clothes and much more are traded among the countries. There are positives with global trade. If we cant get a good price at home then we can shop elsewhere. Shopping is as easy today as clicking on a computer webpage. Competition keeps everyone on his toes. Ive noticed in the last few years that a lot of my shirts are coming from Mexico, Vietnam and any place except the United States it seems. Years ago, we laughed when we looked at little transistor radios that said made in Hong Kong. We didnt laugh very long as now it seems that everything electronic is made over there somewhere. Competition grows as we import food, furniture, billions of dollars in oil and to be redundant, about everything. As competition stiffens Americans must decide if we are going to compete. If we dont work harder and smarter we wont have anything in America that anybody else wants to buy. If we are buying everything from someplace else then who is buying our stuff made in America? If we are not selling our stuff made here then we will quit making or growing anything. Eventually we wont have any money in this country and China or Japan will not pay our Social Security or medical bills. We need to regain our independence in America. We need to use all of our energy including oil, coal, solar, wind and natural gas. We need to stop buying all foreign oil. We need to grow our own food and catch our own sh. We need to bring our jobs back to America. Its time that we made that attractive to all the corporations that weve lost. It would benet all of us for our jobs to come home. We need to secure our borders. We cant take care of all the illegals coming into this country because we are struggling to take care of ourselves. We need to get control of those who pilfer our government money. This includes public universities who charge exorbitant tuition rates because most of the tuition is either paid by taxpayers or student loans that bury young adults. Medical providers sock it to the system as they bill Medical payers more than most Americans could ever pay. We are spiraling out of control in America. In the meantime our Veterans are dying from poor medical care and our active soldiers worry if theyll even have a retirement or medical care after serving our country. While our country struggles, Congress cant agree on anything except paying themselves more while too many Americans are drowning in the pond of Me, My, Mine and I. America will make it but it will be on the backs of those who are willing to dream, work and compete. Those are the people that carved out this wonderful place of opportunity and liberty over 200 years ago. Those are the same people who will keep this country going. Glenn Mollette is an American columnist and author. Contact him at GMollette@aol.com. Like his facebook page at www.facebook. com/glennmollette. Celebrating the Fourth: Who will keep America going? GLENN MOLLETTE Page 4 www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 A Section OPINI O N President Obama said last January there isnt a smidgen of corruption within his administration. He reiterated the fact this week and said the current scandals are fabricated and phony. How can they be phony and fabricated when the IRS released information saying they did in fact release confidential tax information? Why are not these officials, Lois Lerner included, being prosecuted? If inappropriate criteria is the phrase used describing the scandal, how is the phrase not equal to criminal behavior? You cant have it both ways. We know the IRSs standard operating procedure is to go by the book of tax law. 1.1 million confidential tax documents were released to the Justice Department Criminal Division. Congresswoman Michelle Bachman said the criminal division is designated to investigate employee behavior and Lois Lerner wanted this department to look at behavior of 12,000 non-profits. Phony and fabricated scandals? We think not. Phony and fabricated scandals SPEAK OUT : CALL 623-5887 OUR VIEW COLUMNIST We want you to share your views on the topics on this page or any topic with other readers of Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Your views are important, too. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters must be typed and may be edited for content or to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for verication, if necessary. Send letters to: 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Email: news@ srpressgazette.com SHARE YOUR OPINIONS JOIN THE DISCUSSION The Press Gazette publishes reader comments and opinions posted on our Facebook and Twitter pages. 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Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Halifax Media Group. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570. To report news or for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 623-2120. 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Gazette Santa Rosas Press SUBSCRIPTION RA TES IN COUNTY One year ................................. $39 Six months ........................ $19.50 13 weeks ............................... $9.75 OUT OF COUNTY One year ................................. $62 Six months ............................. $31 13 weeks ............................. $15.50 SENIOR CITIZEN (OVER 62) One year ................................. $32 Six months ............................. $16 13 weeks .................................... $8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. Monday 4:40 p.m. Yes, Im concerned about all these children coming in to this country through Arizona from Mexico and Nicaragua. Why do they bring these kids over here if they dont want to come? What we need is to feed these kids not persecute. T uesday 9:36 a.m. This is George. When our president was elected, I was kind of happy. I thought it was a good deal. Turns out its a bad deal. Hes probably the worst president in the history of the United States. I saw ABC News June 24, 2009, Obama talking about his healthcare. He says, quoting, Maybe youre better off not having the surgery but taking your pain killers. He thinks hes a doctor. I cant believe the audacity of this guy. He picks and chooses whatever he wants to do regardless of the law. Thank you for giving me the opportunity. Good bye. T uesday 1:59 p.m. Chris, this is Mrs. Tippit. I hope that I get this straightened out. I called before and it got messed up. You feel that America is in trouble due to Obama. I think American has been in trouble since the end of Reagan. I think the better route would be to gather the people together like the tea party is trying to do to get the crooked politicians out of ofce, because theres no hope for us whatsoever. Thank you. Thursday 2:17 p.m. This is Bobby. To whomever it was complaining about how narrow the temporary bridge is, Im not sure if they have an eye problem or what. If you look, its just about as wide as the other one. If she thinks its so narrow you can barely get by, I hope I dont meet her in the middle of that bridge. Thank you. Thursday 10:39 p.m. This is Raymond, and I thank you for letting me speak whatevers on their mind. I think Bobby needs to get a grip. You know, if you dont pray for your leaders, you ought to stop talking about them. Saturday 4:03 p.m. This is Marianne. I was very pleased to nd the hurricane tracking chart in the Press Gazette today. Thank you very much. Saturday 8:05 p.m. Hey, this is Dennis. It is time for Congress to step up to the plate, but I do not believe Boehner is up to it. I believe the Republicans need to get him out of the way. Weapons of mass destruction found in Iraq Dear Editor, With the invasion of Iraq by rebels or terrorists, depending on which country they are in, the news media reported on a Iraq ammo depot. The focus of the news report was the depot might fall into the invading forces control. The report showed pictures of degraded chemical weapons, according to our state department, were degraded beyond practical use and may be more dangerous to the invading forces if they tried to salvage them. Wait just a second. I thought there were no weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. Thats what the Democrat liberal left have been yelling for years and using to blame our past President and Vice President for invading Iraq, when in fact they were protecting America after 9/11s loss of life. I agree with Ann Coulter, you cant trust a liberal above the age of 3. Steven M. King Milton EDITORIAL CAR TOON LETTER TO THE EDITOR

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A5 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Fan Feedback vs vs Pr e-game activities st art 30 minut es prior to game 30 min ut es prio r t o game Blue Wa hoos DoubleA Af liates vs Mobile BayBears Montgomery Biscuits *Rates as low as 1.79% APR for 60 months on new car purchases used and renance car purchases 2007 and newer Excludes current Gulf Winds loans Rates and ter ms are based on credit score and subject to change $100 Summer Bonus incentive applies to new Gulf Winds auto loans of $5,000 or more Offer ends August 1, 2014. Monthly payments per $1,000 for 60 months at 1.79% APR is $17.44. Fe derally insured by NCUA. By AARON LITTLE 623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com A rare occurrence hap pened in the ministry of Monsignor Michael Reed of St. Rose of Lima Catho lic Church: he became the Monsignor of the church where he grew up. Reed said he graduated from Milton High School in 1976 and went on to Pen sacola Junior College and Florida State University, then on to the seminary where he received his Master of Divinity degree, and nally Reed said he at tended Catholic University where he earned his de gree in canon law. In 1984, Reed said he received his ordination, and so this year marks his 30th as a Catho lic priest. For the last 14 years, Reed said he was the rec tor for the Cathedral of The Sacred Heart in Pensacola under Bishop John Ricard. However, Bishop Gregory Parkes took over at the Cathedral of The Sacred Heart. Its a normal custom that the new bishop as signs a new rector, Reed said. So, Reed said, he was moved to St. Rose of Lima as monsignor. I remember a lot of people here, Reed said. Ive gotten a positive re sponse from the people who knew me. Reed said he also works together with Father Schamber, who himself also recently celebrated a seven-year anniversary. Reed said at St. Rose of Lima, the church has been able to make major contri butions to the poor, such as its involvement with Fam ily Promise of Santa Rosa Inc., which helps single parents and provides tran sitional housing and food. Reed also has worked with the Santa Rosa Correc tional Institution and the Blackwater River Correc tional Facility. Reed said he also works with Pathways to Change, an organization working with men whod normally go to jail but have the op portunity to attend a sort of boot camp program, and he works with Sister Mar garet Ann Calcutta with the Apostles of The Sacred Heart. Its very successful, he said. The program has showed decreased recidi vism, or returning to jail. Finally, Reed said he also visits eight nursing homes. Reed said his 30 years of experience meeting with people and helping hopefully has made him a better pastor to help oth ers in their hardship and struggle. Even as a kid, my re lationship with God was important. I feel more strongly now. I see it in my life and where Ive served. Hopefully God uses me to make things happen for people, Reed said. One couple, Reed said, he knew for 29 years, and the wife passed away after only eight weeks of nding out she had cancer. Im here for her hus band and family to help with their tragic loss and help with holidays, how theyll be different now. Ive grown a lot. I think I have a greater appreciation for who God is and what he wants for us. St. Rose of Lima is grow ing, Reed said, and is in the middle of a building proj ect. He said theyre moving ahead with an educational building, family life center, and parish hall. When at the Pensacola Cathedral, Reed said there were dy namic adult education pro grams, and he wants the same here. I plan to be here and see it through, he said. AARON LITTLE | Press Gazette Monsignor Reed poses with parishioners with whom he grew up with in Santa Rosa County. Monsignor celebrates 30 years of shepherding I think I have a greater appreciation for who God is and what he wants for us. Monsignor Michael Reed St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church Monsignor Reed stands with Dorothy and Red James, parishioners at St. Rose of Lima.

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Local A6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, July 2, 2014 60 15 96 5 Pl ea se jo in us at a rec ep ti on on Fr id ay Ju ly 11 th fr om 5: 30 8: 00 at th e Dr ag on fl y Ga ll er y 68 15 CA RO LI NE ST RE ET MI LT ON St op in an d sa y he ll o an d en jo y re fr es hm en ts by Ap pe ti te Fo r Li fe Dr Pe te r Sz ym on ia k is Ce le br at in g 30 YE AR S Se rv in g Sa nt a Ro sa Co unt y. PHOTO S P ECIAL TO THE PRE SS GAZETTE Sacred Heart completes expansion, dedicates new tower Special to the Press Gazette Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola host ed a dedication ceremony Friday to mark the completion of the new Bayou Tower, the largest expansion of the hospital in almost 50 years. The expansion adds ve new oors of pa tient care units with 112 private rooms. The addition will allow Sacred Heart to expand services, such as its Joint Replacement Center, and meet the communitys need for more beds for critically ill patients a need driven in part by the hospitals status as a regional Trauma Center. The added units also will allow Sacred Heart to offer private rooms throughout its new tower and the main hospital. The new tower is more than additional beds for our hospital, said hospital Presi dent Henry Stovall. Its about redesigning the care we give and making it the best we can for our patients and their families. The $52-million expansion project began two years ago. The tower ofcially will open for patient care July 19. The guests at Fridays dedication will in clude Bishop Gregory Parkes of the Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee, who will give a for mal blessing of the new units as a place of healing. This addition to Sacred Heart Hospi tal is a blessing for the people of Pensacola and the surrounding areas, which will only enhance the rich tradition of Sacred Heart Health System providing quality and com passionate care in our community, Bishop Parkes said. Floors 4 and 5 of Bayou Tower are inten sive care units with 40 ICU rooms for pa tients with life-threatening conditions. The updated oor plan includes spacious rooms with large interior windows and worksta tions between the rooms to allow physicians and staff to maintain visual contact with criti cally-ill patients. For Sacred Heart, this is a signicant point in our long history of caring for people who need it the most, Stovall said. We are better equipped to care for many different kinds of patients with different needs. Floors 6 and 7 have 25 rooms on each oor for patients treated for cardiac conditions, including those recovering from heart sur gery or cardiac procedures. Each room has a private bathroom, an exterior window, and additional space for family and visitors. The oor plan includes centrally-located nursing stations and large physician work areas. The top oor is dedicated to Sacred Hearts Joint Replacement Center with 22 beds and a large rehabilitation area with a great view. Moving from its current loca tion just off the busy rst-oor hallway in the main hospital, the new center will offer four more beds than the current facility provides, as well as greater patient privacy. Eight hun dred square feet of the new Joint Replace ment Center will be devoted to a rehabilita tion suite. The area will include a therapy kitchen to help patients learn how to safely navigate a kitchen and cook while recovering from joint replacement. A therapy bathroom also will be included to teach patients how to safely utilize a bathroom during recovery. Both public areas and private patient rooms will be decorated in neutral earth tones. All of the new private patient rooms will feature new furniture including recliners and side chairs, as well as large, at-screen TVs. Stovall said the amount of new furni ture, artwork computers, monitors, phones, artwork and other technology was so great that it lled nine tractor-trailer trucks that delivered materials to the new hospital oors. The rooms have several new features de signed to ensure safety and promote a heal ing environment. Each room will have an overhead lift system that can smoothly and safely lift patients out of their beds rather than hav ing nurses lift patients. The lift systems are designed to prevent injuries to patients and staff. Each room has an exterior window so that patients and families can look outside. Stovall said exterior windows can help pa tients mental status by keeping them ori ented to a day-night cycle. Each ICU room will have new equip ment to monitor the patients vital signs and more closely connect patients to their nurs es. When the monitors detect an abnormal change in vital signs, the monitors send an alarm to a specialized phone carried by the patients nurses. The new hospital tower is very exciting because it gives us the opportunity to rec reate the patient experience, said Susan Davis, president and CEO of Sacred Heart Health System. We will be able to add the latest technology and digital medical re cords systems as well as more comfortable private rooms. Every aspect of this project is focused on enhancing the patient experi ence and improving the quality of care. Special to the Press Gazette Executives from mul tiple prestigious health care organizations from China visited Baptist Hospital in June to learn more about the culture and care deliv ered throughout the Baptist Health Care system. The delegation of physi cians and health care ex ecutives read about BHC in the book The Baptist Health Care Journey to Excel lence: Creating a Culture that WOWs. The book was written by Al Stubbleeld, past president and CEO of Baptist Health Care. The book recently was translat ed and now is circulating in China. The delegation made a visit to the Gulf Coast to witness rst-hand the BHC culture, which focuses on team work and patient-cen tered excellence. We were excited when the delegation reached out to us, and we welcomed them to our campuses as our own colleagues. To showcase our culture, we presented to them a series of presentations, focus groups and a guided tour through Baptist Hospital, said Scott Ginnetti, direc tor of people development, Baptist Health Care. The delegation made a gener ous donation to the Baptist Health Care Foundation to show their appreciation. PHOTO S P ECIAL TO THE PRE SS GAZETTE Chinese delegation visits Baptist Health Care NBA Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins talks about diabetes Special to the Press Gazette Several years after retir ing from the Atlanta Hawks, Dominique Wilkins was diag nosed with type 2 diabetes. Once he stopped playing professional basketball, he stopped exercising and eat ing well. Consequently, he started experiencing some common diabetes symp toms, including blurry vision and frequent urination. Diabetes was not new to Wilkins. Unfortunately, he said his father and grandfa ther passed away from dia betes complications. I wanted to get my dia betes under control very quickly. Do whatever was necessary to get it under control, he said. Wilkins decided to start with an ag gressive therapy by chang ing his diet, exercising more and taking medication. You have to treat diabetes as an opponent. Its not a curse or death sentence. My body let me know very quickly, that I needed to get back to work ing out, Wilkins said. Wilkins tests his blood sugar daily. He gets on his treadmill for a 20 minute interval workout and walks one to two miles every day. If he is home and not traveling, he shoots 150 hoops with his sons. His partnership with Novo Nordisk, the makers of Victoza, comes after he nds the perfect balance between medication exercise and diet. I went through trial and error before I found the right medication for me. I also put together a workout regime that was comfortable; I got tired of feeling bad. It was not difcult for me to change my foods, he said. Wilkins em phasizes if you are not mo tivated or focused to make a change, you need a team to help you. Go to the Diabetes DreamTeam.com website to learn how you can build your dream team and start feeling better. You can not sit back and say what woes me, you have to ght back, Wilkins said. To learn more about diabetes, go to http://diabeteshealth.com/ read/2009/01/16/6049/what-isdiabetes. DIABETES HEALTH STATISTICS 26 million people have diabetes in the United States. 90-95 percent of the 26 million have type 2 diabetes. For both type 2 and type 1 people with diabetes, they can live a healthy long life through proper diet exercise and medication.

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A7 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 A door gunners life expectan cy is six seconds, Mabie said, and though he survived being a gun ner, he said the feeling of living six seconds at a time never really left. We spit in the devils face and laughed, he said. When he came home, he found it impossible to nd support out side of his family and fellow veter ans. Mabie said he and his broth ers from Vietnam faced struggles with the public, veterans of past wars and their own character. I came home through Ft. Lew is, and I got out in March instead of August, when we should have. They didnt want us mingling with stateside people. We had a bum deal, he said. Mabie spoke the phrases baby killer and drug addict, terms used against Vietnam veterans as if he could still feel their weight. Mabie said he made a good friend in the 84th construction battalion near the end of 71 named Dexter Gator Mercer. They spit in our faces, Mabie said, when they were travelling. Speaking as a soldier who drafted instead of enlistment, he quoted a common saying at the time. We were the unwilling led by the un qualied doing the unnecessary for the ungrateful. Veterans of past wars treated soldiers returning from Hell as Mabie called it, no better than the public, he said. The VFW [Veterans of For eign Wars] and the American Le gion didnt want us, Mabie said, We were shot down before we returned. Mabie said, If you dont want us, well form our own organiza tion, and so veterans at the time founded the VVA, Vietnam Veter ans of America. The Vietnam me morial in Washington, D.C. didnt appear until 1985, Mabie said, when he went to visit it. The side walk wasnt even nished yet. We were walking on wooden planks, he said. The biggest problems Vietnam veterans had to face within them selves were the lack of a matura tion period and survivors guilt, Mabie said. We went from high school to war. Today, wars are not fought the same way, he said. I was wild when I came home. He said hes now married for the fourth time because of the great change in his attitude. Divorce was a dime a dozen, he said. He said Mercer also had two or three marriages. Some veterans, he said, be came burdens to society as prison ers, and he even lost a friend to sui cide, likely, in part, from survivors guilt. Why did I make it home and my friends didnt? he said. Mabie said he has four to ve men on the Vietnam wall with whom he went to school and wears an earring in his left ear for those brothers. Today, Mabie said, If I had my current wife rst, I would have al ways been with her. She knows me and will analyze me and cares for me. She understands me tooth and nail. It takes a woman that can see the basis of your frustrations. She can make a happy situation out of a bad one. He also said the older veterans grew to accept those from Viet nam, but it wasnt until the late 80s and 90s, especially because the WWII veterans were naturally losing membership as VVA mem bership increased. He also said the veterans who came after him, those from the Gulf wars, were ac cepted more because of what the Vietnam veterans suffered. The VVA, Mabie said, also helps veterans stay out of jail and visits those inside. At the Otisville federal peni tentiary, we had our own section for veterans. Wed go in and have coffee with them and talk and keep them informed. It was all about camaraderie. Mabie still works with Viet nam veterans today as part of the Combat Veterans Motorcycle Association. Every weekend before Vet erans Day, we do a ride, and the money from the registration goes to helping veterans. In 2004, I found there was no VA clinic in Pensacola. The veterans had to go all the way to Biloxi, Mabie said. So when a clinic was established in Pensacola, he said, the Veterans Memorial Foundation set up a con tract with Pensacola Bay Trans portation to provide a ride for vet erans to get to the VA clinic who have no other way to get there. 6015132 CRIME from page A1 Campbells dog to animal control. According to reports, Campbells neighbor said he hadnt heard anything out of the ordinary. Deputies spoke with Campbell who said he did not care about his neighbor or his well being due to previ ous issues and said he didnt own any rearms. Campbell also reported a suspicious Jeep with a taped up driverside window driving down the street. When asked if deputies could search his backyard for any evidence to help nd the person who shot up the back of his neighbors house, Campbell said, Get a warrant, ac cording to reports. Reports said deputies did obtain a warrant for Campbells home and an other on Hickory Shores Blvd, where he was rent ing a room for storage from the home owner. April 16, deputies found a .22 caliber Mossburg International 702 Plinkster along with a Glock stolen from Campbells for mer roommate. June 23, FDLE sent the Santa Rosa County Sher iffs Ofce a report saying the shell casings submitted in March 9 shooting were positively identied as red from Campbells Mossburg International rie. Reports said deputies ar rested Campbell three days later. Estimated damage to the two vehicles totaled $4,000. According to reports, Campbell is currently being held without bond. FDOT from page A1 However, the model shows that U.S. 90 will still fail by the year 2035. The purpose of this project is to nd an improvement to east, west capacity on U.S. 90, Wiwi said. The presentation Wiwi gave would be the same for the July 15 kickoff of the study. According to the map used, the area of study will include the six-mile stretch of U.S. 90 mentioned above as well as a northbound stretch of Dogwood Drive and Stewart Street. Wiwi said the current study is in the Efcient Transportation Decision Making phase, the rst of three, which involves the Department of Environ mental Protection, the Army Corps of Engineers, Fish and Wildlife, elected ofcials, state historic pres ervation ofce, and public involvement. We will be following the National Environmental Policy Act, better known as NEPA, throughout this pro cess, Wiwi said. She said the project will take into account the key issues of preserving historic downtown Milton and Blackwater River and will always include public input. These are the potential corridors, we are looking at today. All alternatives will include improving U.S. 90 from Blackwater River Bridge to State Road 87 South. Alternative one also studies widening the exist ing US 90 through Milton, Wiwi said. She said this rst al ternative would likely not perform well because it affects the historic area and has limited right-ofway, but it will be studied nevertheless. Alternative two includes improving old U.S. 90 as well as Hill Street and following the railroad tracks to the crossing of Blackwater Riv er. Alternative three stud ies a connection at U.S. 90 and 89, Dogwood Drive and continuing east just north of TR Jackson Pre-K con necting up with Hill Street and paralleling the railroad across the river. Alterna tive four studies a possible one-way pair just north of Berry Hill and north of the historic district. Wiwi said until the traf c study is nished, it is unknown whether any of these roads will be twolane, four-lane, or one-way pairs. Our next meeting, Wiwi said, will be the al ternatives meeting, where we start showing the public some of the affects of the al ternatives, and that will be in the winter of this year, following the July 15 kickoff presentation. In addition to meetings, Wiwi said July 1 a website should be available regard ing the project as well as newsletters to property owners near the affected roads, and any other inter ested parties. By the end of the pre sentation, Commissioner Lynchard said, You men tioned a four-year timeline to completion. I wanted to clarify to everyone. Thats a four-year to complete the PD&E study. We wont be cutting the ribbon on a new road in four years. VIETNAM from page A1 These are the potential corridors, we are looking at today. All alternatives will include improving U.S. 90 from Blackwater River Bridge to State Road 87 South. Alternative one also studies widening the existing US 90 through Milton. Amy Wiwi Metric Engineering

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Local A8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, July 2, 2014 SANT A RO SA PRES S GA ZE TT E LIKE US ON FA CEBOO K s rp re ssga ze tt e FOLL OW US ON TW IT TER Fr ank & Ernest Big Na te Gr izz we lls So up To Nuts Mo der ate ly Co nfused ANSWERS Ki t n Ca rlyle (L if es ty li st an d au th or Ha rri et te Co le is pre siden t an d cr ea ti ve dir ec to r of Ha rri et te Co le Me di a. Yo u ca n se nd qu es ti on s to as kh ar ri et te @h ar ri et te co le co m or c/o Un ive rs al Uc lic k, 1130 Wa ln ut St ., Ka ns as Ci ty MO 64106.) SENSE & SENSITIVIT Y by Harriett e Co le READER INTERESTED IN WO MA N WITH A BO YF RIEND DEAR HARRIE TT E: I h av e been ro man tically in te re st ed in a gi rl fo r about six mon ths We ha ve a lot in co mmon, and I fe el mor e co nnec te d to her than I ha ve with an yo ne else I think tha t we wo uld make a gr ea t co uple Unfo rt una te ly she has a bo yfr iend I still ir t with her on oc casion. She doesn t te ll me to st op but she also doesn t re cipr oca te ev en though Iv e to ld her my fe elings Should I gi ve up hope of us being to gether and tr y to be just fr iends or should I pursue the ma tt er fur ther? -Fl ir ty Sy ra cuse New Yo rk DEAR FLIRT Y: If yo u ar e ser iously in te re st ed in this yo ung lady selec t one mor e oc casion to make yo ur in te nt io ns kn ow n to her Te ll her tha t yo u kn ow sh e has a bo yfr iend and yo u do not wa nt to be disr espec tful to their re la tionship Fo r this re ason, yo u wa nt to be clear with her one mor e time bef or e back ing o Te ll her tha t yo u car e deeply fo r her and wa nt to ha ve a ch an ce to pr ov e it to he r. Te ll her tha t yo u think she wo uld be happier with yo u, and be pr epar ed to enu mer ate yo ur re asons fo r think ing this As k her if she is willing to end her re la tionship so tha t she co uld be fr ee to be with yo u. If she sa ys no or if she sa ys nothing tha t is yo ur cue to wa lk aw ay Yo u should not co ntinue to ir t with her Yo u should be re spec tful and keep yo ur distanc e. If ho we ve r, she sa ys she wa nt s to gi ve a re la tionship with yo u a chanc e, te ll her yo u will gi ve her spac e to ma ke a clean br eak fr om her bo yfr iend af te r which yo u will be wa iting fo r her Th en st ep back un til she is re ady Wh at yo u do not wa nt to do is star t a re la tionship with her while she is still in a re lationship with someone else DEAR HARRIE TT E: My bo yfr iend and I ha ve gott en pr ett y ser ious in re ce nt mo nt hs We ha ve ev en begun to talk about getting mar ri ed I lo ve him, and I kn ow he l ov es me But we ha ve one thing tha t is standing in our wa y: We do not pr ac tic e the same re lig ion, and both of us ar e pr ett y re lig ious I go to chur ch ev er y Sunda y, plus I am in vo lv ed in other ac tivities in my chur ch. He has co me a fe w times and is quit e re spec tful but he is Jewish and is ac tiv ely in vo lv ed in his te mple We ha ve not to ld our par en ts about our re lig ious di er enc es Th ey like the tw o of us as a co uple -theor etically -but re gar dless of wha t they sa y, we ar en t sur e ho w to han dle a mar ri age if we ha ve ki ds Should we gi ve up bef or e we get to o in vo lv ed? -Th e Gr ea t Divide Chicago DEAR THE GREA T DIVIDE: Co uples ha ve been kn ow n to wo rk to gether ev en when they do not shar e the same re lig ion. It de nit ely takes some e or t and clar ica tion on both of yo ur par ts as to wha t shar ed va lues yo u ha ve wha t yo u will te ach an y childr en yo u ma y ha ve and ho w yo u will na viga te bo th re lig ions Yo u need to co me to te rm s bef or e talk ing to yo ur par en ts Se ek the co unsel of spir itual advisers on both sides fo r suppor t.

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LIFESTY L E www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 B Page 1 Section By AARON LITTLE 623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com About 15 students from early middle school to age 18 attend a mentoring group called Men In Action Outreach Inc., lead by Morris Smith, the organizations president. The group meets at the Magnolia Educational and Rec reational Center in East Milton, the former elementary school for African American children in the area during segregation. If you need help, theyre there. I always have a fun time, even if its serious. Alijah Spring er, 18, said. We do car washes. We took a satellite dish off of a house. We do it all, Springer, a Milton High School track and eld athlete said. If not for MIA, I wouldnt be in track. Smith said. Alijahs a standup guy. Hes awesome. Smith said Springer called him up to spend time together, and Smith invited him to help cook for a wedding. Part of our mission is to improve self esteem, Smith said. My grades are up, and I get in trouble less, 13-year-old Xavier Hamilton said. Hamilton said he planned on playing basketball, football and running track and eld in high school. MIAs ve program areas are recreation, tutoring, community service, life skills development and career development. Saturdays seminar started at the root of personal development: the mindset. Smith spoke to the assembled youth about attitudes. If youre satised with getting Cs, thats not a successful mind set, Smith said. He went on to talk about ap pearance and goal-setting as steps to success. Dress like where you want to be, the CEO, the boss. Appearance brings out condence, but dont think youre better than someone else. Dont be cocky. Youve got to put suc cess into yourself. You have to have something to measure success. Set goals. Smith used the example of re port cards and graduating from one grade to the next. Act like you know youre going some where, he said. Smith said the next MIA ses sion will cover succeeding in school. We try to do things that make sense to what weve already done. The hands-on part of MIA cov ers a number of facets. Smith said recreation, like playing bas ketball, is part of it, but MIA men tors also tutor the youth in school work, public speaking, mock job interviews and attend classes in higher education. Smith indi cated a college tour is on their schedule. Smiths background seems the kind to build a strong youth lead er. He said he grew up in poverty with three siblings and a mother. He remembers his mother only being able to attend one of his basketball games. God put me through this for the kids, Smith said. Carlton Bouie, a chemical en gineer and Florida A&M graduate from Deland, was a speaker at the seminar. Smith said it was easy to see how background and support make such a difference. He down played his own degree in criminal justice compared to Bouies. Both of my parents were edu cators. I was going to go to school, and I was going to graduate, Bouie said. Attitude, not aptitude, deter mines your altitude. Its about the choices you make, he said. Smith does have support these days from his wife of nine years, Yolanda. I have a vision, and she expresses it, he said. She has a masters in health care manage ment. Shes a walking dictionary, he said, She is my helper, what God meant a woman to be in my life. The youth were all particu larly well dressed because part of Saturdays itinerary was a photo shoot for a calendar. Photogra pher Paza Mitchell Pringle, said it should be out October. PHOTOS BY A A RON LITT L E | Press Gazette Morris Smith, center with the dreadlocks, is surrounded by the other MIA mentors, and speaker Carlton Bouie, on his left. MIA helps youth nd whats missing Seminar teaches positive attitudes drives success Morris Smith and Carlton Bouie both spoke to MIA youth Saturday about the importance of a positive outlook. MEN IN ACTION Men in Action Outreach, led by Morris Smith, focuses on ve program areas: recreation, tutoring, community service, life skills development, and career development. Attitude, not aptitude, determines your altitude. Its about the choices you make. Carlton Bouie chemical engineer and Florida A&M graduate from Deland

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www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 B Section SPORT S PENSACOLA TIDES TIDE REPORT NA VA RRE BEACH TIDES EAST BA Y TIDES BLACKW AT ER TIDES By BECKY BONDURANT Special to the Press Gazette beckysrpgsports@yahoo.com The annual Panther Basketball Camp spon sored by Milton High School will be held July 2124 in the Panther Gymna sium. Area boys and girls ages 6-15 are invited to at tend the camp and receive expert instruction on the fundamentals of handling a basketball, shooting and defensive skills. Contact the Athletic Department at Milton High School for more details at 983-5610. Central School Volley ball Camp will be held July 8-10 at the Central Gym nasium from 8:30-11:30 for future athletes who have completed kindergarten through the fth grade. The camp is $45 per ath lete. Each camper will receive instruction and training about the game of volleyball with actual court time. Snacks will be provided daily, awards will be given at the end of the camp and each camper will receive a camp T-shirt. Contact Michelle Smith at Central School 983-5640. The Shauna Sauls Lau rendine Volleyball Camp for junior varsity and var sity volleyball players will be held July 14-16 at the gymnasium at Central School in Allentown. Ju nior varsity athletes will receive instruction daily from 9 a.m. to noon fol lowed by varsity athletes from 1-4 p.m. The cost per camper is $75. Contact Mi chelle Smith at 983-5640 to register and for more information. MILTON HIGH SCHOOL 2014 YOUTH FOOTBALL CLINIC WHEN: July 9 and 10; football camp begins at 9:30 a.m. and camp ends each day at noon; registration begins at 9 a.m. (adult must sign-in) AGES: Age groups are from 5-13 years old (rst through eighth grade). This camp is designed to teach our youth some basic football fundamentals and positive sportsmanship. We will also have as much fun as possible. Lunch will be provided on each day, and there is no cost for the camp. By BECKY BONDURANT Special to the Press Gazette Fox Hunters, avid out doorsman and their fami lies will converge in the Blackwater River State Forest starting tonight, July 2, to participate in the an nual fox hunt competition. Fox Hunters from several states as far as North Caro lina and Louisiana, along with local sportsmen will be participating in the threeday eld trial and bench show at Blackwaters Cold water Stables. A board of directors who meet regularly to contem plate every detail of the event organizes the 50-year tradition of the annual fox hunt held in Blackwater. It is believed that the hunt has been held at Blackwaters Coldwater Stables for the past 38 years. The event is treasured by many who look forward to the opportunity to showcase their hounds, reunite with friends of whom many only see each other at this yearly event, and spend time with their own families in the beauti ful outdoors. Coldwater Horse Sta bles, part of the 189,848 Blackwater State Forest, is equipped with campsites with electricity, restrooms and showers, horse stalls, kennels, hiking and riding trails and a dining facility. It is bordered to the north by the crystal clear Coldwater Creek. Foxhunters trea sure the scenic woodlands to host their annual foxhunt eld-trail event. Through the efforts of the associations quality event, hundreds of visitors travel to the rural area to participate in the traditional week hunt, bench show and family friendly activities. Dog owners will register their hounds July 2 from 16 p.m., followed by a meet and greet session with of cials from the Florida Wildlife Commission. The bench show will begin at 7 p.m. which includes a time for children and youth to present their dog handling skills. The start of the threeday hunt will begin Thurs day morning, July 3. It is also a day lled with ac tivities for children, youth and families. There will be the traditional tube oat on Coldwater Creek and water slide. The Hallelujah Hounds are scheduled to perform in the evening with family oriented activities to follow throughout the night. Members of the asso ciation will be sponsoring a silent auction at 2 p.m. on Friday July 4, to raise awareness and funds to support the John Ryan Parker Memorial. This fundraiser is being hosted to provide awareness and nancial support for Pediat ric Brain Tumor Research. For the past 35 years plus, the family of infant John Ryan Parker have been participants of the annual hunt. It was expected as it is for most generations of outdoorsmen that John Ryan Parker would learn the art of foxhunting from his father as well as from growing up participating in the annual Blackwater hunt. John Ryan Parker would have joined his fam ily at the Coldwater Stables this week for his rst time, but at 8 months old, he was diagnosed with termi nal brain cancer and soon there after succumbed to the disease. Awards will be present ed Friday afternoon, July 4, recognizing the skilled performance of hounds un der the age of two who have been involved with the pre vious two-day hunt. Partici pants and their families will enjoy their holiday evening celebration at various com munity reworks exhibits. The last afternoon of the hunt Saturday, July 5 awards will be presented for dogs over the age of two. Foxhunting, which knows no age barrier for adults and children, can be traced back to the 19th cen tury. It is a sport demon strating the art and skill of the huntsman as he works for and with his hounds and them with him. Dog owners prepare for the hunt by se lecting the appropriate dog for each meet followed by ensuring that all dogs are collected daily and cared for. The Blackwater Fox Hunt Association selects qualied judges who un derstand the competition as well as the land and are able to recognize excep tional hunting skills. The 50th annual Black water Fox Hunt, July 2-5, promises to provide three days of great dogs, sports manship and fellowship. Page 2 50th annual Blackwater Fox Hunt begins today Area Sport Camps to be hosted this month

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Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B3 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Special to the Press Gazette Weekly Report JUNE 20-26 This report represents some events the FWC handled over the past week; however, it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. N ORTHW E ST R E GIO N E SCAMBIA CO UN TY Investigator Goley was conducting marine resource and boating safety checks at Big Lagoon State Park when he noticed the operator of a vessel showing signs of impairment. After the initial contact, Investigator Goley asked the operator to submit to eld sobriety tasks and he agreed. During the tasks, the operator exhibited signs of impairment to the extent that he was impaired. The subject was placed under arrest for BUI. After arriving at the jail nearly two hours later, the subject provided two breath samples of 0.089 and 0.088 BrAC. Investigator Shafer responded to a complaint of a business being in possession of a venomous reptile without the proper permit. Investigator Shafer contacted the business owner and interviewed him about the matter. The owner admitted to capturing an Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake and placing it in captivity. Investigator Shafer issued the subject a citation for not having the proper permit. Ofcer Cushing was conducting Joint Enforcement Agreement (JEA) patrol near the shore when he conducted a sheries inspection on a vessel with three individuals on board. When asked how many sh they caught, they responded two. He asked them what kind and they said they had two red snapper. The sheries inspection revealed two red snapper, an undersized and out of season greater amberjack and an undersized cobia. Citations were issued to the individuals. The crew of the offshore vessel, FinCat, worked offshore on several occasions in the last week. After several vessel inspections, a citation was issued for no charter license. Also issued were several warnings for undersized red snapper, undersized king mackerel, and possession of greater amberjack during closed season. G U LF CO UN TY Ofcer McMillion was on patrol in the Apalachicola Wildlife and Environmental Area near the Sauls Creek Boat Ramp, when he observed a vessel approaching with two subjects on board. Ofcer McMillion approached the two men and asked them if they had caught any sh. The individuals opened their cooler which was full of sh. Ofcer McMillion asked the two men how many they had caught and they said they didnt know. As Ofcer McMillion began counting the pansh, one of the two men said, Ill save you some time. There are more than a hundred in the cooler. Ofcer McMillion counted a total of 139 pansh, which is 39 sh over the daily bag limit. Citations were issued to both subjects for possession of over the bag limit of pansh. OKALOOSA CO UN TY Ofcer Molnar and Okaloosa County Sheriffs Deputy Culberson were recognized by Sheriff Ashley and Army 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne). They were tasked to use a side-scan sonar on a FWC vessel to nd a lost piece of US Army equipment in the Santa Rosa Sound. The Special Forces Group divers were assigned, post mission, to recover the lost boat motor from an aerial insertion in a two mile operating zone. They spent two days searching without success. Ofcer Molnar and Deputy Culberson located a four to ve foot object for the Special Forces divers to inspect. The item was successfully recovered. The two were each awarded with a certicate and a 7th SFG (Airborne) challenge coin. COP (C OMM UN ITY O RI EN T ED P OLICI N G ) Captain Rondeau attended a ribbon cutting ceremony for the newly opened Mahogany Mill Boat Ramp in Pensacola. The boat ramp project was partnered by FWC, DEP, and Escambia County Marine Resources as one of Deep Water Horizon restoration projects. The event was well attended and multiple people were recognized for their involvement in the project. N ORTH C EN TRAL R E GIO N ALACH U A CO UN TY Ofcer Stanley was contacted by an Alachua County Deputy who witnessed a pickup truck stop abruptly on CR-325 at Grove Park WMA. The passenger jumped out and picked up a gopher tortoise and placed it in the bed of the pickup truck. The deputy stopped the pickup truck several miles down the road and held the occupants until Ofcer Stanley arrived. Ofcer Stanley issued a criminal citation for the possession of gopher tortoise. The driver was also given a warning for driving on a suspended license without knowledge. Ofce Stanley was patrolling a property in Alachua County known for trespassing when he approached two individuals shing at a lake on the property. Neither of the individuals had a valid shing license. A records check showed that both individuals were convicted felons and on probation. One of the individuals had a 9mm pistol in his possession. Infractions were issued for no valid freshwater shing license and criminal citations were issued for trespassing. Charges were led with the state attorneys ofce for the possession of a rearm by a convicted felon. CITRUS COUNTY Lieutenant Loyed responded to a search and rescue in Citrus County WMA. There were three hikers who had been lost and could not nd their way out of the woods. They had been walking for approximately four hours when Lieutenant Loyed spoke with them on the phone and gured out their location by the description of the area where they were lost. He advised the subjects to stay where they were and the three subjects were found within 20 minutes of Lieutenant Loyeds arrival. All three subjects were ne and only needed water and a ride. CLAY CO UN TY Ofcers Justus and Bryan along with Lieutenant Glover received a tip in reference to three subjects taking a deer out of season and posting pictures on Facebook posing with the dead deer. Lieutenant Glover observed the picture on Facebook and was able to identify all three subjects listed in the posting. The ofcers located all three subjects at their residences and conducted interviews to determine if a crime had been committed. Through subsequent interviews it was determined that at approximately 2:30 a.m., the three subjects were riding in one of the subjects vehicle when a deer was spotted off a county road in Clay County and was taken illegally out of season and at night. Charges are pending after all the facts are reviewed by the states attorney ofce. DU VAL CO UN TY Lieutenant Arkin was patrolling the Mandarin Park Boat Ramp when he pulled up alongside a vehicle in the parking area that had just driven in to park. The driver immediately said a curse word and jumped back in the vehicle. In his conversation with the driver, Lieutenant Arkin learned that the individuals drivers license was suspended. Lieutenant Arkin also spoke with the female passenger who gave him a ctitious name. Lieutenant Arkin later discovered the passengers true name and learned that she has a felony warrant for violation of probation with reference to obtaining a controlled substance by fraud. After being read the Miranda Warning, both subjects admitted that they are addicted to prescription drugs. During a consensual search of the vehicle, Lieutenant Arkin found numerous used and unused syringes. Some of the syringes contained an unknown liquid. There were bent metallic spoons with residue, lters, as well as a plastic baggy with residue of a white crystallized powder. All of the drug paraphernalia is being sent to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) for analysis to determine the content of the residue. The driver was cited with a notice to appear for driving while license suspended (DWLS). The passenger was arrested in compliance with the warrant and for giving a ctitious name to law enforcement while being detained. Further charges are pending. N ASSA U CO UN TY Ofcer Grifs was notied by a complainant that a deer was missing from her game farm and there were rumors in the neighborhood that several juvenile individuals shot it and took it from the property. A photo of the harvested deer was subsequently posted on Instagram. Ofcers Grifs and Waldo made contact with the individual in the photo and interviewed him with two other individuals. One individual confessed to shooting the deer and his account of the incident varied from the other two involved who were interviewed previously. The other two individuals were interviewed once more, with one confessing to helping to take the deer, however, the other denied direct involvement. Ofcer Sweat also assisted in several interviews. Charges of grand theft, felony trespass while armed and principal in the rst degree will be led with the state attorneys ofce against the three individuals. COP (C OMM UN ITY O RI EN T ED P OLICI N G ) Ofcer McDonald gave a presentation to approximately 25 children at the Little Red School House in Lake City. The presentation consisted of Ofcer McDonald bringing a small alligator for the children to see as well as talking about the dangers of alligators. Lieutenant Kiss gave a presentation to some elementary school children at Lake City Middle School. The children are participating in a summer program sponsored by the Columbia County Sheriffs Ofce. Lieutenant Kiss brought a boat and discussed numerous aspects of a FWC Ofcers job which includes boating and hunting safety. Approximately 45 children attended the presentation. Ofcer Boone gave a boating safety presentation to the children and adults participating in the Suwannee County Sheriffs Ofce Annual Summer Camp hosted at Branford High School. Ofcer Boone had a patrol vessel on site, and discussed the many aspects of proper boating safety practices. Approximately 40 children and adults were in attendance. Lieutenant Loyed took two Citrus County reporters on a ridealong in Crystal River. He answered many questions about boating safety, scallop season and Operation Dry Water. The two reporters were very thankful for the ride-along and will be writing an article in the near future. N ORTH E AST R E GIO N VOL U SIA CO UN TY Ofcer McDonough, Ofcer Malicoat and Ofcer Bertolami conducted several JEA patrols offshore in federal waters from the 12 meter patrol boat. Numerous vessel stops and inspections were recorded. Two recreational shing vessels were found to be in possession of red snapper during the federal closure. One commercial bandit rig vessel was found to be in possession of red snapper hidden aboard. All vessel operators were issued the applicable federal citations. Ofcer Meurlot was in plain clothes and observed an individual selling saltwater products and shrimp from the back of his pickup truck next to local businesses in the Port Orange area. Meurlot questioned the adult male for the applicable license, however he was unable to provide the saltwater retail products license required by law. He was issued a citation and a notice to appear. Local coastal shoreline sheries compliance inspections resulted in criminal citations issued for possession of undersized mangrove snapper on two occasions and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis. ST. JOHNS COUNTY Ofcers Miller and Hickman were on JEA vessel patrol just after sunrise off the southern coast of St. Johns County. Hickman boarded a 33 foot shrimping vessel out of Duval County which was trawling east of the Butler Beach area of the county. Vessels can trawl for shrimp in near shore (within one mile of the coast) waters only if they are dragging no more than two nets, each of which cant have a mouth circumference greater than 66 feet and no more than 500 square feet of net mesh. The ofcers escorted the shrimp vessel into the ICW and subsequently measured its nets at the temporary dock at the Vilano Beach shing pier. The port net measured 2,550.04 square feet and the starboard net measured 2,710.27 square feet; both in violation of the net ban and considered a agrant violation because of each net being over 2,000 square feet. The ofcers seized the unlawful nets and advised the captain that he would be notied of a court date after consultation with the State Attorneys Ofce for the violation of trawling oversized nets in near shore waters. S E MI N OL E CO UN TY Lieutenant Smith observed a pickup truck headed east on State Road 46, approaching the St. Johns River. Lieutenant Smith observed the truck operating in a reckless manner, at a speed of 80 MPH. Lieutenant Smith stopped the truck at the Cameron Wight Boat Ramp and found the driver to be operating under the inuence of alcohol, with a suspended drivers license. Lieutenant Smith arrested the driver and charged him with DUI, reckless driving, driving while license suspended (DWLS/R), and seven counts of felony violation of probation. PICK UP YO UR COPY TOD AY ITS HERE! A well-designed magazine that guides you through beautiful sites, sounds and places in Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and Wa lton Counties. Av ailable locations : The To urist Development Council Centers, Chamber of Commerce loca tions, NWF Regional Airport, The Fa mily Support Centers at Eglin and Hurlburt real esta te of ces, restaurants, hotels and your local newspa per of ces. FWC REPORT Outdoors

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Local B4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Last Wednesday marked the 64th anniversary of the Korean War, which began when North Korea invaded South Korea on June 25, 1950. That war was truly the frontline of the campaign against communism, and before an armistice was agreed upon three years later, 36,000 American lives were lost in the name of freedom. One need only look at the fault line between North Korea and South Korea. In the North, we see a population of some of the worlds most oppressed people; however, in the South, we see a vibrant economy with a transparent democracy in which men and women live in peace and stability. Therein lies the legacy of our brave men and women who served in the Korean War. I thank them for their steadfast service, and ask that you join me in remembering those we lost in the defense of freedom. VETERANS CORNER House/Senate Veterans Affairs Conference Committee Meeting The House and Senate came together in a bipartisan fashion to work out our differences with the Veterans Access to Care Act of 2014. This Conference meeting was not only a positive rst step in the process of negotiations regarding this legislation, but it also marked the rst time in 15 years that the House and Senate engaged in a formal member conference committee. It is without question that the conferees share the same passion of making the VA a better place for our Nations veterans and the understanding of the urgent need to address the longstanding deciencies at the VA that are negatively affecting the care our veterans deserve and have earned. Oversight Hearing to Examine V A s Use of VHA Physicians to Perform VBA Medical Examinations The House Committee of Veterans Affairs met to examine the relationship between the Veterans Benets Administration and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in the ordering, scheduling, completion and review of compensation and pension (C&P) medical examinations used to make VA disability benets determinations. For years, routine practice at VA has been to assign large numbers of VHA physicians to handle C&P examinations for VBA purposes. However, as VAs delays in care scandal continues to grow, the usefulness of this policy has come into question. The hearing examined the use of VHA physicians to perform C&P examinations and whether they would be better utilized in medical treatment roles. It also explored the potential of expanding VAs existing authority to contract C&P claims out to private providers. VSO Meeting I met with Veterans Service Organizations representatives from the Independent Budget including, Disabled American Veterans, Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA), and Veterans of Foreign Wars, to discuss expanded access to the VA Caregiver Program. As of February 2014, the VA has approved more than 14,200 applications for Caregiver benets, and about 3800 applications were still in process. VA Caregivers provide valuable care and enhance the quality of life for severely wounded veterans; however, an expansion of the program still requires a more thorough review to avoid overloading the current system. While we are currently awaiting a report regarding the implementation and execution of the current Caregiver program by the independent, nonpartisan U.S. Government Accountability Ofce, I appreciate these organizations meeting with me to advocate on behalf of our Nations veterans in support of the program. Constituent Voice I continue to hear from constituents regarding the situation on our southern border, with the mass inux of unaccompanied minors. This is a culmination of the Presidents consistent lack of enforcement of our immigration laws. Without such enforcement, there exists an incentive for illegal immigrants to enter this country illegally. Illegal immigration places additional burdens on the American taxpayer, signicantly threatens our national security, is unfair to those immigrants patiently waiting in line to gain citizenship legally, and places the lives of those illegal immigrants in danger as they embark on perilous journeys attempting to cross our borders. This can all be avoided by securing our borders, reducing the incentive to illegally immigrate here, and enforcing the rule of law. This is why I am proud to cosponsor H.R.4962, The National Border and Homeland Security Act. Led by Congressman Trent Franks (R-AZ), this bill directs Department of Homeland Security to nish construction of fencing along the southern border, and provides for additional infrastructure to assist Border Patrol. It also calls for 6,000 new full-time border patrol agents, requires more federal collaboration with state and local authorities, and requires a biometric entry and exit system at every port of entry to the United States. As I have stated in the past, our rst step must be to secure the border. This bill would help achieve this and is a step in the right direction to fulll the Congressional purpose of protecting the Homeland. LE GA L NO TI CE No ti ce is he re by gi ve n th at th e Ca nv as si ng Bo ar d fo r th e Au gu st 26 20 14 Pr im ar y El ec ti on wi ll me et at 2: 00 p. m. Ju ly 7, 20 14 in th e Sa nt a Ro sa Co un ty El ec ti on s Of c e lo ca te d at 64 95 Ca ro li ne St ., Ro om 10 0, to re vi ew th e cu rr en t Fl or id a El ec ti on La ws an d to es ta bl is h pr oc ed ur es st an da rd s, an d me et in g da te s fo r th e Pr im ar y El ec ti on Th is me et in g is op en to re pr ese nt at iv es of th e po li ti ca l pa rt ie s, th e pr es s, an d th e pu bl ic Ta pp ie A. Vi ll an e Su pe rv is or of El ec ti on s Sa nt a Ro sa Co un ty Fl or id a A message to our Korean War veterans on the 64th anniversary P A M E L A H O L T | PRESS GAZETTE Midway Fire Academy Class, 012, celebrated after receiving their certicates of completion Saturday. Twelve candidates graduated the remaining 50 percent of those who began the program Jan. 2. Midway Fire Academy began in 2005 with 12 applicants and has continued to grow, said Midway Fire District Chief Jonathan Kanzigg. The mission is to produce great entry level reghters, Kanzigg said. He said the candidates endured six months of torture for their training. Graduates: William Anderson, Drew Bufngton, Stephen Clark, Matthew Couch, Kyle Ferres, Katelin Holt, Kevin Murtha, Jonathan Page, Orlando Rivera, Samuel Signer, James Turbull, Jared Williams. Midway Fire Academy graduates 12 firefighters JEFF MILLER R-Chumuckla

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ClassifiedsWednesday, July 2, 2014 Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette |B5

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ClassifiedsB6| Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette Wednesday, July 2, 2014 10739928 8 6 01 5 3 6 8600311 ALLIED FARMS 626-8578 !"" #$ %& '$'$( Training/EducationWant to be a CNA/ Phlebotomist?Don’t want to wait? Express Training Services now offering our nursing asst. exam prep classes in DESTIN Class for 1 week. 850-502-5521 Military Spouses We Are mycaa certifiedexpresstrainingservices.com Next class starts: 07/14/2014 8am -4pm 6/970 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-CA-000119 CHARTERBANK, a FEDERAL SAVINGS ASSOCATION, Successor in interest to the FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, PLAINTIFF, VS. STB ENTERPRISES, LLC, a Georgia Limited Liability Company; SCOTT A. BURRELL DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY given by the undersigned, that Donald C. Spencer, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Santa Rosa County, Florida, will on the 29th day of July, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. during the legal hours of sale on-line at www.santarosa.realforeclose.c om offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash the following described property, in Santa Rosa County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 27, Block B, Grand Navarre, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book F, Pages 52A & 52B, of the Public Records of Santa Rosa County, Florida. Pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered into in the above styled case. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sales, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the date of the sales. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADA Liaison Santa Rosa County 6865 Caroline Street Milton, FL 32570 Phone (850) 623-3159 Fax (850) 983-0602 ADA.SantaRosa@flcourt s1.gov at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this the 13th day of June, 2014. /s/Jack Locklin, Jr. JACK LOCKLIN, JR. Florida Bar No.: 243167 LOCKLIN & SABA, P.A. 4557 Chumuckla Highway Pace, FL 32571 (850) 995-1102 Email: jlocklin@ljslawfirm.com 2nd: shirl@ljslawfirm.com 6/25 & 7/2/2014 6/970 6/983 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Fort Storage located at 4114 Avalon Blvd. Milton, FL 32583 hereby gives notice of a public sale to the highest bidder for cash or credit card on July 18, 2014 at 10:00 AM in accordance with the Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statutes (section 83.801-83.809). Seller reserves the right to withdraw property from sale at any time. This property is being sold to satisfy a landlord lien. Property includes contents of the spaces of the following tenants. Unit #Tenant Name Contents 134Janet Owens Household Items, Bike, Boxes 180Mary HarvilleTable & Chairs, Laptops (2) Boxes 280Ronald WhitfieldF urniture, Encylopedias, Boxes 288Lola Long Beds, TV, Furniture 289Lola Long Kitchen furniture, Washer/Dryer 715Lola Long Exercise Equipment, Furniture, Boxes 529Brandi Jones Fencing, Dog Kennel, Brick Borders 554Jennifer Meade Dinner Table Set, TV 720Brandon Odle Washer/Dryer, Bike, Chains 729Ethel Brewer Organ, Pictures, Boxes 743Richard Kirkpatrick Boxes, Vaccum Cleaner, Carpet Cleaner 744Richard Kirkpatrick Boxes, Boxes, Computers 736Lorrie Bach Washer/Dryer, Furniture, Boxes 936Yhonna HalcombDre sser, furniture, Boxes 6/983 6/982 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicle will be sold to the highest bidder to satisfy the lien on the vehicle for towing and storage fees owed. The sale will be held 10:00 am (cst) on July 18, 2014 at JR’S Paint & Body, 5933 Graham Lane, Milton in Santa Rosa County in the State of Florida. If the owner cares to recover said vehicle they may bring the amount of the charges in cash only before the date and time of sale to JR’S Paint & Body and the vehicle will be surrendered to them. This sale is in accordance with FL Statue 713.78 1993 Nissan Pathfinder VIN: JN8HD17S4PW128015 The registered and/or legal owner(s) are: Owner: Tina Louise Ramirez 218 Stillwell Blvd Crestview, FL 32539 Or, Tina Louise Ramirez 87 W. Tulip Ave Defuniak Springs, FL 32433 Current fees owed are $125.00 for towing, $287.55 for storage charges, and $300.00 for Lien Filing Fees. The total amount due is $712.55 as of June 18, 2014. Storage fees of $31.95 per day continue to accumulate. Towing Company : JR’s Paint and Body, Inc. 7/2/2014 6/982 6/981 The following units and the contents there in will be disposed of on the grounds of Dogwood Storage, 6075 Dogwood Dr, Milton, FL 32570 at 3:00pm on June 17, 2014 to satisfy a lien on the unit for unpaid rent and other fees accrued due to non-payment by tenant. 269 Richard Tranum 009 J. Linton 089 Chris Ray 286 Randy McNaly 103 Laura Dahlberg 308 Laura Dahlberg 6/28 & 7/2/2014 6/981 6/900 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE 1ST JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SANTA ROSACOUNTY, FLORIDA GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO: 14000048CAMXAX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFIC Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTC. ROBINSON; SUSAN I. ROBINSON; UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2 Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SER VICE TO: SUSAN I. ROBINSON whose residence is unknown if she be living; and if she be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOT 11, BLOCK D OF PLANTATION WOODS PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE(S) 11 AND 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SANTAROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LAST KNOW ADDRESS: 8966 Tarrytown Rd Milton, FL32583 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on FRENKELLAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP, Esq. Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is One East Broward Blvd., Suite 1111, Ft. Lauderdale, FL33301 on or before (no later than 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice of action) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at SANTAROSA County, Florida, this 3 day of June, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Donald C. Spencer Circuit Court Seal BY: Brandy Norris DEPUTYCLERK Clerk of Court of Santa Rosa County 6865 Caroline Street, Milton, FL32570 FRENKELLAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP One East Broward Blvd., Suite 1111 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301 Tel: 954) 522-3233 Fax: (954) 200-7770 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADALiaison Santa Rosa County 6865 Caroline Street Milton, FL32570 Phone (850) 623-3159 Fax (850) 983-0602 ADA.SantaRosa@flcourt s1.gov at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 6/25& 7/2/2014 6/900 ONLINE ONLY 2-Day Auction, Furniture Liquidation including Rugs, Tables, Household Items, Furniture & More, Jamestown, NC, Guilford Co. 7/11 at 8am to 7/18 & 7/21 at 1pm. Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.co m Curtis Penton Farms & Berrydale Farmer Mkt. We have tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, & new potatoes. waiting on produce We accept Wic Wholesale and retail (850) 675-4111 L& W Lawn Maintenance Mowing, Trimming, Raking, & Hauling. Milton 850-983-6858 or 850-313-8654 or 313-9545 Education/TrainingBookkeeper BillingBookkeeper/Billing for Nonprofit. Must know Quick books and knowledge of Medicaid Billing. FBI level II Background and drug and alcohol screen required. Bring resume to 6225 Dixie Road-Milton, FL. 850-623-9320. Web ID#: 34293500 Logistics/TransportClass ACDL DriversNeeded Immediatelyin Escambia, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa & Walton Counties$1000 Retention Bonus*Local Panhandle Hauling *Home Nights Apply ONLY online www .perdido trucking.com Perdido Trucking Service, LLCMobile, AL251-470-0355Web ID#: 34290906 AIRLINE JOBS Start Here -Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-210-3935 AVERITT EXPRESS New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post-Training Pay Increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-602-7440 Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer -Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway. com EOE TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS’T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 BE THE 1st Medical Alert Company in your area! Owning your own local distributorship. We do 70% of the work! Unlimited $ return. Investment required. Free Call (844) 225-1200. Rent to Own 1 acre in Allentown (2 bed/2 bath with 24 x 24 block garage-liveable but needs work ) $30,000. Call Jane at 983-2364 J & N COMPLETE LAWN SERVICE Debris Removal Cemetery Lot Cleaning Free Estimate Reasonably Priced Licensed & Insured 850-791-0861 Stewart’s Tractor Works & Land Clearing, Inc. Tree & Stump Removal from trimming to takedown. Debris removal & Storm Clean-Up. Demolition & Hauling. Land Clearing. Backhoe & Trackhoe Work. Heavy Brush & Forestry Mowing, mulching. Tree work done by man lift. 516-1801 or 675-4291 Licensed & Insured Free Estimates PAUL STEWART Pro One Handyman ServiceServicing Santa Rosa Co. Get it done right! Call us 850-776-1823 COKER’S LAWN & TRACTOR SERVICE From trimming to tractor work. Clean-ups, raking, hauling, mowing, bushhogging, dirt work. Reasonable rates, free estimates. (850) 623-0493 (850) 485-7977 Fully Licensed If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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Wednesday July 2, 2014 FREE EDITION TAKE ONE INSIDE: LOOK WHATS IN THE C L ASSIFIEDS! PAGE A 3 SOCIAL SANTA ROS A Santa Rosa County citizens are out in the sun enjoying a game of softball with Panhandle Power, enjoying a sh fry after a Brazilian jujitsu workout, playing some disc golf and swimming with their horses. Some just enjoyed a day at the pool like Chris ONeal tossing Breena Stankard into the air. However, user @tausha_webb reminds others of the consequences of enjoying the sun without enough protection. Ouch! she posted. Remember sunscreen this summer and dont forget to reapply. Pictures uploaded to the free application Instagram with #socialsantarosa in the description will likely appear on the Social Santa Rosa section of the Press Gazettes website and maybe even The Mirror or the Press Gazette itself. @BARREL_RACER_15 @EWESSON13X2 @SRPRESSGAZETTE @SRPRESSGAZETTE @TALIDOR @TAUSHA_WEBB @NWMINDSEYE

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A2 | The Mirror Wednesday, July 2, 2014 GARFIELD CONSUMER REPORTS Whether youre trying to tame an out-of-control closet or youre simply looking for smart ways to stash winter clothes, ShopSmart, the shopping magazine from the publisher of Consumer Reports, has some great tips for you. Theyre cheap, and they really work! You probably have a lot of this stuff around the house. Were talking rubber bands, bungee cords, bookends and even those old paint chips youve squirreled away from your last do-ityourself project. Most people already have everything they need to organize a closet. Its just a matter of knowing how to make it work for you in a new way, said John Trosko, owner of OrganizingLA, which is based in Beverly Hills, California. ShopSmart asked Trosko and other organizing pros for their cheapest storage tricks. Free or super-cheap Hang a corkboard in or near your closet to display your jewelry for easy access. Use decorative pushpins to dress it up. You can nd dozens of cute choices at etsy.com. Stash rolled-up belts, tights and scarves in mason jars. Group the containers in a single color or all clear for a unifying effect. Use the dividers in a plastic shing tackle box for your rings and earrings. Keep the lid attached if you want to grab it and go when you travel, or ditch the lid and just keep the opened box on a shelf. Repurpose that six-bottle wine box. It makes a great shoe cubby for ats, ip-ops and athletic footwear. Turn curtain rods into extra shelving. Use two tension rods to create a shelf above the clothes rod to hold bins and boxes. Or place the rods between closet walls near the oor to keep shoes in order. Stagger for heels, or place level for ats. Keep a tangle of belts rolled up neatly on an unused serving tray. Place it on a closet shelf or under a bed. You can easily pull out the tray like a drawer. Use bookends to organize handbags so they stand upright on a closet shelf. Turn an old towel rack into a storage unit. Hang it on a closet wall, then slip on large S-hooks (from the hardware store) to hold purses or small S-hooks for bracelets and necklaces. You can also hang small baskets from the bar to hold ats and ip-ops. Use those old paint chip samples from the hardware store to label storage boxes. You can write on them with chalk theyre erasable! To shrink a bulky item (think a puffy down vest or jacket) for short-term seasonal storage, roll it up tightly and secure with thick rubber bands to keep it from expanding. Secure a bunch of small bungee cords vertically between wire shelves to contain big, bulky bedspreads and quilts. That will keep them from slipping off the shelf. $25 OR LESS ShopSmart also recommends these low-cost ideas: Use thin, grippy ocked hangers to free up closet space and to make getting dressed in the morning easier. Buy them in different colors to hang clothes in categories such as green for jackets and blue for blouses. When you rst hang your clothes, turn all of the hangers backward. Then when you put stuff back, turn the hangers the right way so that they face out instead of in. At the end of the season, you can clearly see what you havent worn, which makes it easier to purge. Another way to keep foldedup clothes neat and accessible: Pile them into labeled bins. Planning a summer vacation? You can use the bins to fold and stack clothes that you want to take on your trip. Use acrylic shelf dividers to stack T-shirts, jeans and sweaters. They can also prop small handbags upright, and they dont add visual clutter. Double your closets hanging space with a rod expander. No tools are required just hang and adjust it. Follow these tips to store more for less ShopSmart, the shopping magazine from the publisher of Consumer Reports, suggests storing belts neatly rolled up on an unused serving tray. Pity the poor calzone. First cousin to the pizza, about which tens of thousands of words have been written, the calzone is virtually ignored by food scholars. Neither The Oxford Companion to Food nor The Oxford Companion to Italian Food has a single entry for calzone. Even menu writers give it no respect, adding it as an afterthought to the pizza offerings. What is known is that the dough-lled pocket has a long history dating back to ancient Egypt, when it was apparently popular with the pharaohs. The calzone is a relative of Cornish pasties, GermanRussian eischkuekle, Spanish empanadas and Brazilian pastels. Its a distant relative of turnovers, strudels, dumplings and other foods that involve a crust and a lling. Like pizza, the modern-day calzone was invented in Naples. (The word is from the Italian for trouser; the plural should be calzoni but is usually calzones.) While pizza itself has gone way upscale, with wood-red ovens, organic toppings and artisan cheeses, calzone usually shows up in not-verytrendy pizza and fast-food joints. A new book, Patio Pizzeria by Karen Adler and Judith Fertig, gives the calzone its due. With homemade dough and a stufng of three cheeses, artichoke hearts and sausage, this calzone is t for ne company. The Pulled Pork version is a bit on the novelty side for my taste, but the fun part with both recipes is that you cook them on the grill. Note that the dough recommended for this recipe, while extremely easy, needs to be thrown together at least 24 hours in advance of serving. Melissa Clark, a cookbook author and writer for The New York Times, wrote that calzone has many of the perks of pizza. Its easy to make, its a good vehicle for using up odds and ends from the refrigerator, and its a crowd pleaser. I would also add the perk that, like pizza, calzone can be eaten with the hands. But calzone also has some happy benets of its own, Clark wrote. One is that it is usually bursting with cheese, a boon for cheese lovers. Another is the element of surprise. Pizza gives it all up as soon as it lands on the table; serve a calzone to a group and let them anticipate the moment when they nd out whats inside. So give it up for calzone. It might be pizzas poor relation, but its rich in taste. Grilled Calzones with Italian Sausage, Artichoke and Ricotta Yield: 4 calzones For the dough: 2 cups bread our 1 teaspoons salt teaspoon instant or bread machine yeast 1 cup lukewarm water, plus more if needed 1 teaspoon honey 1 tablespoon olive oil All-purpose our for dusting For the lling: 1 cup cooked and crumbled fresh Italian sausage cup ricotta cheese cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese cup grated fontina cheese 1/3 cup artichoke hearts (jarred or canned) 3 tablespoons chopped sundried tomatoes Zest of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice Make the dough: In a medium bowl, stir the our, salt and yeast together. Combine the water, honey and olive oil; stir into the our mixture until the dough comes together. If the dough is dry, add 1 tablespoon of water at a time until the dough is just moist. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature until doubled in size, 24 to 48 hours. Use immediately, or refrigerate for up to 3 days before baking. Let come to room temperature before using. Prepare a medium-hot re in your grill. When ready to grill, divide the dough into 4 portions. Roll them into rounds about 6 inches in diameter on a lightly oured surface. Make the lling: In a food processor or a bowl, combine the sausage, ricotta, Pecorino Romano, fontina, artichoke hearts, sun-dried tomatoes, lemon zest and lemon juice. Pulse to combine. The mixture should be chunky. Spoon equal amounts of the mixture into the center of each circle of dough, spreading to within 1 inch of the edge. Fold over each circle of the dough to form a half-moon. Crimp the dough edges to seal in the stufng. Place the calzones directly on the grill grates or on a hot griddle; grill for about 3 minutes per side, until nicely browned. Serve at once. Pulled Port Calzone Mix 1 cups shredded pulled pork and 1/3 cup spicy barbecue sauce (such as Sweet Baby Rays) together in a bowl. Divide among the four circles of dough. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese over each circle. Fold, crimp and grill as directed above. (Reprinted with permission from Patio Pizzeria, copyright 2014 by Karen Adler and Judith Fertig; Running Press, a member of the Perseus Books Group.) Calzone nally gets some respect S TE V E L EGATO | Patio Pizzeria More than an afterthought on a pizza menu, this delicious grilled calzone will get the respect it deserves. STIR IT UP! BY MARIALISA CALTA

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 The Mirror |A3

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A4| The Mirror Wednesday, July 2, 2014 10739928 8 6 01 5 3 6 8600311 ALLIED FARMS 626-8578 !"" #$ %& '$'$( Training/EducationWant to be a CNA/ Phlebotomist?Don’t want to wait? Express Training Services now offering our nursing asst. exam prep classes in DESTIN Class for 1 week. 850-502-5521 Military Spouses We Are mycaa certifiedexpresstrainingservices.com Next class starts: 07/14/2014 8am -4pm 6/970 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-CA-000119 CHARTERBANK, a FEDERAL SAVINGS ASSOCATION, Successor in interest to the FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, PLAINTIFF, VS. STB ENTERPRISES, LLC, a Georgia Limited Liability Company; SCOTT A. BURRELL DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY given by the undersigned, that Donald C. Spencer, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Santa Rosa County, Florida, will on the 29th day of July, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. during the legal hours of sale on-line at www.santarosa.realforeclose.c om offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash the following described property, in Santa Rosa County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 27, Block B, Grand Navarre, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book F, Pages 52A & 52B, of the Public Records of Santa Rosa County, Florida. Pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered into in the above styled case. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sales, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the date of the sales. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADA Liaison Santa Rosa County 6865 Caroline Street Milton, FL 32570 Phone (850) 623-3159 Fax (850) 983-0602 ADA.SantaRosa@flcourt s1.gov at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this the 13th day of June, 2014. /s/Jack Locklin, Jr. JACK LOCKLIN, JR. Florida Bar No.: 243167 LOCKLIN & SABA, P.A. 4557 Chumuckla Highway Pace, FL 32571 (850) 995-1102 Email: jlocklin@ljslawfirm.com 2nd: shirl@ljslawfirm.com 6/25 & 7/2/2014 6/970 6/983 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Fort Storage located at 4114 Avalon Blvd. Milton, FL 32583 hereby gives notice of a public sale to the highest bidder for cash or credit card on July 18, 2014 at 10:00 AM in accordance with the Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statutes (section 83.801-83.809). Seller reserves the right to withdraw property from sale at any time. This property is being sold to satisfy a landlord lien. Property includes contents of the spaces of the following tenants. Unit #Tenant Name Contents 134Janet Owens Household Items, Bike, Boxes 180Mary HarvilleTable & Chairs, Laptops (2) Boxes 280Ronald WhitfieldF urniture, Encylopedias, Boxes 288Lola Long Beds, TV, Furniture 289Lola Long Kitchen furniture, Washer/Dryer 715Lola Long Exercise Equipment, Furniture, Boxes 529Brandi Jones Fencing, Dog Kennel, Brick Borders 554Jennifer Meade Dinner Table Set, TV 720Brandon Odle Washer/Dryer, Bike, Chains 729Ethel Brewer Organ, Pictures, Boxes 743Richard Kirkpatrick Boxes, Vaccum Cleaner, Carpet Cleaner 744Richard Kirkpatrick Boxes, Boxes, Computers 736Lorrie Bach Washer/Dryer, Furniture, Boxes 936Yhonna HalcombDre sser, furniture, Boxes 6/983 6/982 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicle will be sold to the highest bidder to satisfy the lien on the vehicle for towing and storage fees owed. The sale will be held 10:00 am (cst) on July 18, 2014 at JR’S Paint & Body, 5933 Graham Lane, Milton in Santa Rosa County in the State of Florida. If the owner cares to recover said vehicle they may bring the amount of the charges in cash only before the date and time of sale to JR’S Paint & Body and the vehicle will be surrendered to them. This sale is in accordance with FL Statue 713.78 1993 Nissan Pathfinder VIN: JN8HD17S4PW128015 The registered and/or legal owner(s) are: Owner: Tina Louise Ramirez 218 Stillwell Blvd Crestview, FL 32539 Or, Tina Louise Ramirez 87 W. Tulip Ave Defuniak Springs, FL 32433 Current fees owed are $125.00 for towing, $287.55 for storage charges, and $300.00 for Lien Filing Fees. The total amount due is $712.55 as of June 18, 2014. Storage fees of $31.95 per day continue to accumulate. Towing Company : JR’s Paint and Body, Inc. 7/2/2014 6/982 6/981 The following units and the contents there in will be disposed of on the grounds of Dogwood Storage, 6075 Dogwood Dr, Milton, FL 32570 at 3:00pm on June 17, 2014 to satisfy a lien on the unit for unpaid rent and other fees accrued due to non-payment by tenant. 269 Richard Tranum 009 J. Linton 089 Chris Ray 286 Randy McNaly 103 Laura Dahlberg 308 Laura Dahlberg 6/28 & 7/2/2014 6/981 6/900 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE 1ST JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SANTA ROSACOUNTY, FLORIDA GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO: 14000048CAMXAX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFIC Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTC. ROBINSON; SUSAN I. ROBINSON; UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2 Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SER VICE TO: SUSAN I. ROBINSON whose residence is unknown if she be living; and if she be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOT 11, BLOCK D OF PLANTATION WOODS PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE(S) 11 AND 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SANTAROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LAST KNOW ADDRESS: 8966 Tarrytown Rd Milton, FL32583 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on FRENKELLAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP, Esq. Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is One East Broward Blvd., Suite 1111, Ft. Lauderdale, FL33301 on or before (no later than 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice of action) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at SANTAROSA County, Florida, this 3 day of June, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Donald C. Spencer Circuit Court Seal BY: Brandy Norris DEPUTYCLERK Clerk of Court of Santa Rosa County 6865 Caroline Street, Milton, FL32570 FRENKELLAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP One East Broward Blvd., Suite 1111 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301 Tel: 954) 522-3233 Fax: (954) 200-7770 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADALiaison Santa Rosa County 6865 Caroline Street Milton, FL32570 Phone (850) 623-3159 Fax (850) 983-0602 ADA.SantaRosa@flcourt s1.gov at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 6/25& 7/2/2014 6/900 ONLINE ONLY 2-Day Auction, Furniture Liquidation including Rugs, Tables, Household Items, Furniture & More, Jamestown, NC, Guilford Co. 7/11 at 8am to 7/18 & 7/21 at 1pm. Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.co m Curtis Penton Farms & Berrydale Farmer Mkt. We have tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, & new potatoes. waiting on produce We accept Wic Wholesale and retail (850) 675-4111 L& W Lawn Maintenance Mowing, Trimming, Raking, & Hauling. Milton 850-983-6858 or 850-313-8654 or 313-9545 Education/TrainingBookkeeper BillingBookkeeper/Billing for Nonprofit. Must know Quick books and knowledge of Medicaid Billing. FBI level II Background and drug and alcohol screen required. Bring resume to 6225 Dixie Road-Milton, FL. 850-623-9320. Web ID#: 34293500 Logistics/TransportClass ACDL DriversNeeded Immediatelyin Escambia, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa & Walton Counties$1000 Retention Bonus*Local Panhandle Hauling *Home Nights Apply ONLY online www .perdido trucking.com Perdido Trucking Service, LLCMobile, AL251-470-0355Web ID#: 34290906 AIRLINE JOBS Start Here -Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-210-3935 AVERITT EXPRESS New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post-Training Pay Increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-602-7440 Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer -Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway. com EOE TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS’T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 BE THE 1st Medical Alert Company in your area! Owning your own local distributorship. We do 70% of the work! Unlimited $ return. Investment required. Free Call (844) 225-1200. 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