The Santa Rosa press gazette

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Title:
The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title:
Milton press gazette
Portion of title:
Press gazette
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Milton Fla
Creation Date:
June 8, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates:
30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID:
UF00028408:00952

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FOUR E F R E S an ta Rosa C oun t y F air TICKE T S W ith E v er y Ne w Subscription D r op By O ur O c e F or Details Community ..................................... A2 Opinion ........................................... A4 Diversions ........................................ A8 Sports ............................................... B2 Lifestyles .......................................... B1 Classieds ........................................ B6 TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 106 Issue 24Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com See shipwrecks below Blackwater By AARON LITTLE 623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com Underwater cameras will be used in creating the upcoming Blackwater Maritime Heritage Trail, according to Doug Lasater, president of Bagdad Waterfronts Florida Partnership Inc., who spoke before the Milton City Coun cil on March 3. Lasater said the Web-based trail will focus in phase one of the Blackwater River from the Interstate 10 bridge to Car penter’s Park. Dr. Richard Lewis, vice-president, said the project has been in the works for two years, and he gave a rough estimate of six months for completion. Lewis con rmed the idea for the project will see a website where visitors can travel Blackwater River through images and video above and be low the water, learning area his tory including the Arcadia Mill and numerous shipwrecks below the Blackwater River surface. Lewis echoed what Lasater said at the council meeting: Ship wreck information will be available through the project, but not exact locations. Lewis said those who wish to illegally salvage wrecks CHIPLEY FOILS ROYALS’ PEr R FEc C T SEASON 75 cents Saturday, March 22, 2014 Gazette Santa Rosa’s Press Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.com Tweet us @srpressgazette and like us on facebook.com PAGE B2 $10.8 million owed By PAMELA HOLT623-2120| @pamelaholtpg pholt@srpressgazette.com In conclusion of a longstand ing legal battle, Navarre Beach residents now will pay property taxes on their land, according to the Supreme Court of the State of Florida. Greg Brown, Santa Rosa County property appraiser, who spearheaded this change, said all land and improvements are now taxable to Santa Rosa County. Before now, Navarre Beach residents were required to pay taxes on their buildings, not land. Unsure how their court battle over property taxes would turn out when litigation began in 2006, some residents chose to pay tax es under the promise of a rebate if they ultimately won their suit. Those who did not now will have to pay big bills. Stan Colie Nichols, Santa Rosa County tax collector, said he is relieved to nally have a conclu sion on the matter. He said the Supreme Court deemed the resi dents on Navarre Beach to have equitable ownership — all the rights to their property — as do an inland property owners, and with this comes the responsibil ity of property taxes. Nichols said taxes owed from 2006 until 2013, with penalties and interest, total $10,872,740. Nichols said the county will meet next week to iron out pay ment options, but he said resi dents have received tax notices and are well aware how much they owe. Nichols said it is im portant to note the typical twoyear grace period will not apply to residents who are more than two years delinquent, so it will change the process if they cannot pay their taxes. “Someone else can purchase their certicate, and if they want to immediately le for the deed, they will only have a few months to raise the money. Taxes for 2013 are delinquent on April 1,” Nich ols said. He said the majority of Na varre Beach residents have paid Navarre Beach owners must pay tax By AARON LITTLE 623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com Santa Rosa County’s Tourist Development Coun cil had a regular meeting March 19, during which So nya Negley, grant writer for the Navarre Beach Marine Science Station, presented a grant recommendation for $125,000 to cover, in part, in stallation of an underwater camera to “view underwa ter, the marine life and also the things that are on the reef.” “After much research with NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospher ic Administration),” the NBMSS “came across Blue Eyes Ocean Underwater Camera, which is a selfcleaning, pan, tilt, zoom camera that has scientic nodes on it,” Negley said. She said the camera would accommodate anyone inter ested in the reefs and ma rine life who “can’t go out and snorkel or scuba the reef. There would be a live streaming video of that ma rine life.” She also said the scientic nodes would allow users to test the salinity and quality of the water through the Oceans Classroom pro gram and the camera. “We feel this is the best way to accommodate every one,” she said, regarding special needs individuals interested in seeing into the ocean who otherwise can’t do so. SRC Fair: green eggs, livestock shows, Glow Rage See N aA V a A RRE BE aA CH A11 TDC discusses grant for $73K camera By AARON LITTLE 623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com The Santa Rosa County Fair is opening this year with a ribbon cutting on April 4 for the newly leased fairgrounds from the coun ty, according to Rick Pas chall, Santa Rosa County Fair board member. Kyle Holley, development direc tor at United Way Santa Rosa and fair board mem ber, said the Santa Rosa County Fair is the only one growing among 16 counties in northwest Florida. The fair’s growth is evident not only in the new June Ates Arena that opened December, but also new attractions like Glow Rage, an all-ages dance music experience where attendees may be sprayed with paint, according to Anthony Daughtery, en tertainment coordinator of the fair, and in the new live stock shows appearing at the fair for the rst time. Holley said there will be three shows debuting: a steer show, a heifer show and a breeder pen show. “Imagine a kid leading an animal in the ring,” he said to differentiate the steer and heifer shows from the pen show. He said Locals learn basic CPR Web-based maritime trail available soon See F a A IR A7 “The idea is to create a choose-your-ownadventure-style experience, where someone who may be interested in the lumber industry can nd information about it, or those interested in the Civil War can nd information about the shipyards.” Ben Wells, University of West Florida graduate student See TD CC A9 See M aA RI tT I mM E A9 DANIE IE L T H H AME E S | Contract Photojournalist The American Red Cross CPR class hosted by Milton Community Center was well attended Wednesday evening. First-timer Josh Cuchens, left, said it was important for him to learn basic skills in caring for injured people and how to assess the situation should a need arise. “I wanted to take the class for everyday use and be a better citizen,” Cuchens said. Justin Blackwood, right, said it was a refresher course for him. “I learned some extras I did not know before. I took it for my co-workers, but also for my family,” he said.

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A2 | Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014 Elected OFFICIALS COCOUNTY GOO VERNMENT COUNTY COMMISSION • District 1: Jim Williamson, 4351 Berryhill Road, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. Email is comm-wil liamson@santarosa..gov • District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Road, Milton, FL 32583; phone 983-1877. Email is commcole@santarosa..gov • District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla Highway, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. Email is commsalter@santarosa..gov • District 4: Jim Melvin, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL; phone 983-1877. Email is comm-melvin@santa rosa..gov • District 5: Lane Lynchard, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1877. Email is commlynchard@santarosa..gov The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at 9 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays. The leaders meet in committee at 9 a.m. Mondays preceding the Thursday meetings. Meetings are held in commission chambers of the Administrative Complex on U.S. 90. Phone 983-1877 for information or to reach their of ces. SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFF Wendell Hall, 5755 E. Milton Road, Milton, FL 32588; phone 983-1100. Email is whall@srso.net SANTA ROSA COUNTY CLERK OF COURTS Donald Spencer, P.O. Box 472, Milton, FL 32572; phone 983-1973. Email is santacourtfeed@chjn.net SANTA ROSA COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR Stan C. Nichols, 6495 Caroline St., Suite E, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1800. Email is snichols@srctc. com SANTA ROSA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER Greg Brown, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1880. Email is info@srcpa.org SANTA ROSA COUNTY ELECTIONS SUPERVISOR Tappie Villane, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1900. Email is villane@santa rosa..govSS T A A TE GO O VERNMENT • Rep. Doug Broxson: 5988 Hwy 90, Pensacola State College, Milton Campus, Building 4000, Room 4013, Milton, FL 32583, phone 626-3113. Email is Doug.Broxson@myoridahouse.gov • Sen. Greg Evers: 209 E. Zaragoza St., Pensaco la, FL 32502, phone 595-0213. Email is Evers.Greg. web@senate.gov • Gov. Rick Scott: PLO5 The Capitol, 400 S. Mon roe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; phone 488-7146. Email is _governor@myorida.comFF EDERAL AL GO O VERNMENT HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES • Rep. Jeff Miller: 336 Cannon House Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; local phone is 479-1183; D.C. Ofce phone (202) 225-4136. Pen sacola ofce address: 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503. Toll free number is 866-3671614. Website: http://jeffmiller.house.gov SENATE • Sen. Marco Rubio: 284 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 850-433-2603. Website: www.rubio. senate.gov • Sen. Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Sen ate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202-224-5274; fax 202-224-8022. Website: http://billnelson.senate.gov WHITE HOUSE • President Barack Obama: The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. Email is president@white house.gov • Vice President Joe Biden: Office of the Vice President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414.SCSC H OOL OOL GO O VERNMENT SCHOOL BOARD • Superintendent: Tim Wyrosdick, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-5000. Email is wyrosdickt@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us • District 1: Diane Scott, 5710 Munson High way, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-0413. Email is scottdl@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us • District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton, FL 32570; phone 623-6299. Email is winkleseh@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us • District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre, FL 32566; phone 939-2661. Email is colemanmd@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us • District 4: Jennifer Granse, 3266 Abel Ave., Pace, FL 32571; phone 995-8785. • District 5: Scott Peden, 3156 Pins Lane, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563; phone 934-0701. Email is pe denst@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays at 5086 Canal St. in Milton. Phone: 983-5000.CICI TY GO O VERNMENT • Milton City Hall, Mayor Guy Thompson, 6738 Dixon St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5400. City Manager is Brian Watkins • Town of Jay, Mayor Kurvin Qualls, 3822 Highway 4, Jay, FL 32565, phone 675-2719 • Gulf Breeze City Hall, Mayor Beverly Zim mern, 1070 Shoreline Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, phone 934-5100. City Manager is Edwin “Buz” Eddy Mr. Billy Ray Stokes, born July 15, 1943, passed away peacefully, surrounded by his loved ones, at his home in the Woodlands in Pensacola, Fla., on Thursday March 13, 2014, after a long, hard and brave battle with esophageal cancer. Billy was an avid gardener; you could always nd him in his yard with his owers. Preceded in death by his mother, Grace Ingram Stokes; father, Lester T. stokes; maternal grandparents, Katheryn Stafford Ingram and Samuel C. Ingram; and paternal grandparents, Mattie Cobb Stokes and George C. Stokes. Billy is survived by one brother, Jerry Wayne Stokes and his wife, Janice; three nephews, Donald W. Stokes, Stanley Jackson and Douglas Jackson; two nieces, Connie Stokes and Lori Elder and her husband, Mark; three great-nephews, Ashton Jernigan, Devin Austin and Cory Stokes; one greatniece, Alayna Jackson; a very beloved and devoted friend, like a sister to Billy, Sue Hawthorne; and a loving and devoted friend, Judy Johnson; two very special cousins, Thelma Wendt and Nancy Walters; four very special friends, Jim and Nancy Williamson, and Dan and Natalie Soloway; so many close and dear friends and neighbors; and Billy’s devoted loyal friend and cat buddy, Prince Harry Stokes. A message from Billy: “I would like to say thank you to three very special people from Emerald Coast Hospice, Sherry, Megan and Jason, for all the kindness and love they have showed me and for being there. Also a thank you to the staff at Emerald Coast Hospice for all your kindness and help.” Funeral services for Billy will be 11 a.m. Saturday, March 22, 2014, at the Lewis Funeral Home, Milton Chapel. Chaplin Jason Adams will ofciate. Burial will follow in Milton Cemetery with Lewis Funeral Home directing. Visitation was 6-8 p.m. Friday, March 21, at the funeral home. To honor Billy’s life, there will be a Celebration Gathering after the funeral services, at a venue to be announced. www. lewisfuneralhomes.net.‘ A A Me E SSAge GE Fr R O m M He E A ven VEN ’ Perhaps you aren’t ready yet To have to say good-bye, Perhaps you’ve thought of things You wish you had of said...well so have I. For one thing I’d have told you Not to worry about me, I am with the Lord in Heaven now You knew that’s where I’d be. I’m sorry if you’re feeling sad... I’m so happy now... I’ve asked the Lord to heal the hurt And comfort you somehow. It’s hard at the beginning I know you’ll make it through, I hope it helps to know I’ll be waiting here for you.”Billy Ray SS tokes 1943 2014 BILL y Y RA y Y St ST OK eE S Special to the Press Gazette All Board of County Commission meetings and other county department meetings are in the County Administrative Center Board Room, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, unless otherwise indicated. Marine A A dvisory, A A pril 1: Canceled Tourist Development North End C C ommittee: 8:30 a.m. April 3 at Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce, 5247 Stewart St., MiltonC C ommission C C ommittee : 9 a.m. April 7 Tourist Development S S outh End C C ommittee: 9 a.m. April 9 at Navarre Visitors’ Center, 8543 Navarre Parkway, Navarre Building C C ode Board of A A djustments: 2:30 p.m. April 9 at Public Services Conference Room, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, MiltonC C ommission Regular: 9 a.m. April 10 at Tiger Point Community Center, 1370 Tiger Park Lane, Gulf Breeze Zoning Board Meeting: 6 p.m. April 10 RES S T O O RE C C ouncil: 3 p.m. April 14F F ire Department Executive Group: 6:30 p.m. April 14 at Emergency Operations Center, 4499 Pine Forest Road, Milton Tourist Development C C ouncil Board Meeting: 3 p.m. April 16 at Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce, 5247 Stewart St., MiltonA A viation A A dvisory C C ommittee: 5 p.m. April 16C C ommission C C ommittee: 9 a.m. April 21S S H I I P A A ffordable Housing A A dvisory C C ommittee: 3 p.m. April 22 at Public Services Media Room, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton Bagdad A A rchitectural A A dvisory Board: 8:30 a.m. April 23 at Public Services Conference Room, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton Public S S afety C C oordinating C C ouncil Meeting: 11:30 a.m. April 23 at Sheriff’s Department Training Room, 5755 E. Milton Road, Milton Parks and Recreation: 5:30 p.m. April 23C C ommission Regular: 9 a.m. April 24L L ocal Mitigation S S trategy Task F F orce: 1:30 p.m. April 24 at Public Services Conference Room, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, MiltonC C ommission S S pecial – Rezoning Meeting: 6 p.m. April 24 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a public hearing, you are entitled to the provision of certain assistance. Contact Emily Spencer at 983-1855 or at 6495 Caroline St., Milton at least one week before the date of the public hearing. Agendas and minutes are also available at www.santarosa. .gov. All meetings in the board room are recorded on DVD and available for purchase, and most can be viewed live and/or replayed online. From Staff Reports Milton/Pace Relay for L L ife event The last team meeting for the 2014 Milton/Pace Relay for Life event will be at 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 25 at the Locklin Building behind the Santa Rosa Hospital. All teams, businesses, churches, clubs, civic organizations and individuals wanting to learn about this event are invited. The 2014 Relay for Life will be April 25-26 on the grounds of the Milton Pensacola State College Track. The American Cancer Society is very active in Santa Rosa County, and this event provides assistance to help ght the ght. For more information, call 2662285 or visit RelayForLife. org/MiltonPaceFL.SS pring into Vegetable Gardening S S eries If you have ever considered planting a spring vegetable garden, attend a three-week series to learn all you need to get started. This workshop will be 6-7:30 p.m. Mondays, March 24 to April 7. The cost is $25 per person or $40 per couple and includes handouts and seed samples. Registration is at www. eventbrite.com/e/springinto-vegetable-gardeningtickets-10820332907. Classes will be at UF/IFAS Extension Santa Rosa County, 6263 Dogwood Drive in Milton. Your registration includes these events: March 24: Getting started with a vegetable garden; site selection; soil preparation; square foot gardening method March 31: Seeding and transplanting basics; specics on tomato, pepper, squash and cucumberA A pril 7: General garden maintenance: watering, fertilizing, integrated pest management. For more information, contact Mary Derrick at 623-3868 between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays or at maryd@santarosa..gov. Milton K K iwanis Milton Kiwanis will sponsor its annual Rummage Sale on April 5 in the parking lot of Big Lots. The proceeds of this sale go directly back into the children and youth of the Santa Rosa County. The Milton Kiwanis provides assistance for numerous organizations and activities to provide opportunities that make our younger people into productive citizens and leaders.SAFSAF ER S S anta Rosa annual meeting The SAFER Santa Rosa annual meeting will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 7 at 4115 Soundside Drive off of U.S. 98. Lunch will be served. RSVP at safer@ santarosa..gov. Elections are coming up. For more information, send your contact information.SS anta Rosa AA rt A A ssociation From 10 a.m. to noon today, Santa Rosa Art Association Inc., a nonprot organization, will have a “Polymer Clay Pendant” class in building 4900 on the Milton campus of Pensacola State College. The presenting artist is Sandi Lang, who is showing her artwork at Dragony Gallery and Local Colour in Milton. Kits will be available for a fee under $5. Please bring pasta clay machine and a tissue blade. Everything else will be provided by the artist. A fee of $10 for nonmembers. Guests are very welcome. For more info, call Linda Linzy at 251-987-5473, email beadtician@gmail.com or visit santarosaart association.com. Community br BR I eE FS Community Obituary Press Gazette BI rthdRTHDA y Y C C L ubUB Notice of pub PUB LIC meetMEET I ngNG S SS tephanie Rogers: March 22 A A dron Robinson: March 22 Jesslyn SS ingley: March 22 David Wilkie: March 23 Virginia Dozier: March 24 Tasha Peacock Driscoll: March 25 L L andon Rollins: March 25 C C olin Williams: March 25 S S tephanie Peterson: March 25 Megan CC arpenter: March 25 Brittany Rounds: March 25 K K risten Bigner: March 25 Tyler Tate: March 26 Hannah Thompson: March 26 SpeSPE CIAL tT O theTHE P re RE SS GAzette ZETTE Cub Scout Pack 404 in Milton will be doing a service project for the Santa Rosa Clean Community on March 29 in memory of John Tonkin. The scouts will be picking up trash. The project will begin at 9 a.m. at Milton High School and end at King Middle School around noon. CubCUB SCO utUT S S ervERVIC eE prPR O jeJE C tT Barrett Nichols CC heney Milton resident Grandmother Penny Nichols Wilson welcomed her new grandson Barrett, who nally made an appearance. Barrett was 9 pounds, 14 ounces and 23 inches long. Mom, Nickie, big brother Brooks and Dad, Brad, are thrilled at his arrival. The snow in the Northeast even slowed so they could get to the hospital. Baby of the W eeEE K

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Local Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette| A3 Saturday, March 22, 2014 3700 A u b r e y L a ne P ac e FL 32571 850-396-3102 | w w w .a u b r e y hi l l .c o m A u br e y H ill a l s o o e rs t r a i n i n g boa r di n g a n d le ss on s t o h u n t e r j u m pe r a n d eq u i t a t ion r ide rs. F r om th e s e r iou s s h o w com pe t i t or t o th e beg i n n e r w e w ill m a k e s u r e y ou h a v e a g r ea t t i m e w h ile lea r n i n g!!! S umme r C a m p R un s J un e 2-6, 9-13,16-20 & 23-27 e r s t t hr e e w e e ks f o r a g es 6-14 9a m-2p m e f o ur t h w e e k i s a mini c a m p f o r a g es 3-5 f r o m 9a m-12p m Ple a s e c a l l f o r det a i l s F o l lo w u s o n F aceB o o k a t w w w .face b o o k.co m/a u b r e y hi l le q ues t r i a n A l l A g es Q} =‹ t • t} D[ B B F lor ida r esiden ts with a hear ing loss ar e elig ible t o r ec eiv e a fr ee amplied phone fr om the non-pr ot F lor ida T elec ommunica tions R ela y I nc C or dless and c or ded phones f or persons with mild t o sev er e hear ing loss ar e a v ailable a t 23 distr ibution c en t ers sta t ewide Limit one per cust omer C ONT A C T Y OUR AREA C ENTER FOR DE T AILS C IL D isabilit y R esour c e C en t er 3600 Nor th P ac e Blv d P ensac ola, FL 32505 850-595-5566 (v) C ur r en t FTRI clien ts: I f y our phone isn ’ t w or k ing pr oper ly or y our hear ing has changed or should y ou no longer need y our phone or ar e mo ving out of F lor ida, call FTRI a t 888-554-1151 f or assistanc e THE FAMOUS RIVIEr R A BAND A t T t T HE I I MOGENE t T ONIGHt T A Tribute to Country Music Legends 5 featuring The Famous Riviera Band will be at the Imogene Theatre tonight. Doors open at 5 p.m.; showtime is at 7 p.m. Advanced tickets are $10 and $12 at the door. Tickets for children 6-12 are $5 each, and children younger than 6 are free. Call 261-8289 for advanced tickets and more information.OO N YOUr R MAr R K, GEt T SEt T D D IG The University of Florida-IFAS Milton Campus student club has worked very hard this year to provide unique and quality plants to the UF Student Club Plant Sale at the Emerald Coast Flower and Garden Festival. This is an opportunity for area residents and businesses to support local horticulture and natural resource conservation students raise funds while also get some great deals on a great variety of plants. There will be a variety of plants including camellias, ginger, and many new coleus varieties. The sale will take place on the Pensacola State College-Milton Campus (Avalon Boulevard and U.S. 90, Milton) on Friday, April 4, and Saturday, April 5. For more information about the sale, contact Robin Vickers at 983-7134 or rvickers@ u.edu. Please check out our website at Miltongators.com.VV OLUNt T EEr R COAc C HES NEEDED f F O r R S S PEc C IAL O O LYMPIc C S t T ENNIS Pr R OGr R AM A new Special Olympics tennis program is launching in Milton and volunteer coaches are needed. Knowledge of the sport of tennis is great but not required. Training will be held for one hour per week, on Saturdays (time of day to be determined based on availability of volunteer coaches), and the season will run for about 12 weeks. The beautiful new tennis courts at the Milton Community Center will be utilized for this program. Our program can only exist with the time, energy, dedication and commitment of volunteers. No matter how much or how little time you have to give, when you volunteer, you will be making a difference in the lives of athletes with intellectual and developmental disabilities. To learn more and get involved, contact Jessica at jessicabarrale@ specialolympicsescambia.org or 291-6234, or Alexis at volunteer@ specialolympicsescambia.org.SS PEc C IAL tT O tT HE PrPR ESS GG AZEtt TT E Saturday saw the induction of new members into the Aaron Snowden Chapter of SAR with Dr. Richard Clincy and son Kevin, an ROTC senior at Navarre High School. At right, A ag-raising ceremony was held to commemorate George Washington’s birthday with a new 13-star ag raised over Aaron Snowden’s grave in the cemetery. When it was noticed the United States ag at the entrance was badly frayed, it was also replaced. SS ONS O fF tT HE AA ME rR I cC AN REVOLU tT ION News br BR IE fF S

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Many economists, politicians and pundits assert that median wages have stagnated since the 1970s. That’s a call for government to do something about it. But before we look at the error in their assertion, let’s work through an example that might shed a bit of light on the issue. Suppose that you paid me a straight $20 an hour in 2004. Ten years later, I’m still earning $20 an hour, but in addition, now I’m receiving job perks such as health insurance, an employermatched 401(k) plan, paid holidays and vacation, etc. Would it be correct to say that my wages have stagnated and I’m no better off a decade later? I’m guessing that the average person would say, “No, Williams, your wages haven’t stagnated. You forgot to include your non-monetary wages.” My colleagues Donald Boudreaux and Liya Palagashvili discuss some of this in their recent Wall Street Journal op-ed, “The Myth of the Great Wages ‘Decoupling’” (http:// tinyurl.com/oq7z4a3). They start out saying: “Many pundits, politicians and economists claim that wages have fallen behind productivity gains over the last generation. ... This story, though, is built on an illusion. There is no great decoupling of worker pay from productivity. Nor have workers’ incomes stagnated over the past four decades.” There are two routinely made mistakes when wages are compared over time. “First, the value of fringe bene ts — such as health insurance and pension contributions — is often excluded from calculations of worker pay. Because fringe bene ts today make up a larger share of the typical employee’s pay than they did 40 years ago (about 19 percent today compared with 10 percent back then), excluding them fosters the illusion that the workers’ slice of the (bigger) pie is shrinking.” The second comparison problem is a bit technical, when the consumer price index is used to adjust workers’ pay for in ation while a different measure (the gross domestic product de ator) is used to adjust the value of the nation’s economic output for in ation. Harvard University’s Martin Feldstein noted in a National Bureau of Economic Research paper in 2008 that it is misleading to use different de ators. Boudreaux and Palagashvili point out that when more careful measurements have compared worker pay (including the value of fringe bene ts) with productivity using a consistent adjustment for in ation, they move in tandem. The authors say: “The claim that ordinary Americans are stagnating economically while only ‘the rich’ are gaining is also incorrect. True enough, membership in the middle class seems to be declining — but this is because more American households are moving up.” Many economists and other social scientists determine wellbeing by looking at income brackets instead of people. When one looks at people, he nds considerable income mobility. According to a report by the Department of the Treasury titled “Income Mobility in the U.S. from 1996 to 2005,” there was considerable income mobility of individuals in the U.S. economy during that period (http://tinyurl. com/5sv8799). Using Internal Revenue Service tax return data, the report says that more than half of taxpayers moved to a different income quintile over this period. More than half of those in the bottom income quintile in 1996 had moved to a higher income group by 2005. The mobility also goes in the opposite direction. Of the highest income earners in 1996 — the top one-hundredth of 1 percent — only 25 percent remained in this group in 2005. The percentage increase in the median incomes of those in the lower income groups, between 1996 and 2005, increased more than the median incomes of those initially in the higher income groups. Boudreaux and Palagashvili conclude that “middle-class stagnation and the ‘decoupling’ of pay and productivity are illusions. Yes, the U.S. economy is in the doldrums, thanks to a variety of factors, most signi cantly the effect of growth-deadening government policies like ObamaCare and the Dodd-Frank Act. But by any sensible measure, most Americans are today better paid and more prosperous than in the past.” Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. To nd out more about Walter E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. Page 4 www.srpressgazette.com Saturday, March 22, 2014 A Section O PINION Is there wage stagnation? OUR VIEW COLUMNIST MINORITY VIEWPOINT Walter Williams SPEAK OUT: CALL 623-5887 We want you to share your views on the topics on this page — or any topic — with other readers of Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette. Your views are important, too. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters must be typed and may be edited for content or to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for veri cation, if necessary. Send letters to: 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Email: news@ srpressgazette.com SHARE YOUR OPINIONS JOIN THE DISCUSSION The Press Gazette publishes reader comments and opinions posted on our Facebook and Twitter pages. 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Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570. To report news or for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 623-2120. 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Gazette Santa Rosa’s Press SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY One year ................................. $39 Six months ........................ $19.50 13 weeks ............................... $9.75 OUT OF COUNTY One year ................................. $62 Six months ............................. $31 13 weeks ............................. $15.50 SENIOR CITIZEN (OVER 62) One year ................................. $32 Six months ............................. $16 13 weeks .................................... $8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. Monday, 9:26 a.m. Yes, this is a message warning the citizens of Santa Rosa County. There are a couple of gentlemen going around town with a seal coating business. They will claim that they will seal coat the roof of your house for a certain price, maybe 15 to 20 gallons. Then they get up there and put on 40, 50, 60 gallons and want to charge you triple what they told you, so just be aware. It’s a scam, a seal coating business with two men going around with a truck wanting to seal coat people’s roofs. So I just wanted to let the people know what’s going on, that they need to be aware of these gentlemen with a seal coating business wanting to rip people off. They will double, triple charge you when they’re through. This happened to my parents this month. Tuesday 6:37 p.m. Hi, this is Sharon. I hope all those jerks out there in Santa Rosa county are happy, the ones that couldn’t obey the rules. They got all of our local recycling spots taken away from us. Tuesday, 7:37 p.m. This is Bobby. I just wondered if somebody else thinks like I do about automobile insurance. In my case, it’s me and my wife. We can only drive two vehicles at a time, but if I decide I want four vehicles, I have to buy insurance on all four of them. I don’t think its right. It would probably help the economy, because I would probably have ten cars I could drive if I didn’t have to buy insurance on all of them. So just think about it. If you’re just one person and you buy two cars, then you have to buy insurance on both of them when you can only drive one at a time. One might not be driven but you’re still paying insurance on it. So just think about it. Tuesday, 7:40 p.m. This is Bobby again. I don’t want to hog all your Probation of ces and bail bondsman not classy Dear Editor, In the recent Santa Rosa Press Gazette article regarding restaurants (March 15, “What de nes a bar?”), the mayor said he wants classier facilities downtown. Really? So, classier than the restaurants we already have? I nd that remark to be offensive, and yet I agree with him, partially. Let’s talk about our “classy” businesses in our Historic Downtown Milton or maybe the clientele that they attract. For instance, the County Probation Of ce at the corner of Caroline and Escambia streets. Now, that’s classy, and it’s the reason the Mainstreet Cafe is not open to the public. Some classic problems we endure every month are trespassing, loitering, littering, public urination, public vomiting, illegal parking and witnessing people being arrested that violated probation. The Probation Of ce does not provide public bathrooms, and so their visitors go to neighboring businesses. It’s real “classy” to have these violators come to your business just to “do their business.” Another example is the Bail Bonds business. We lost an acting school that wanted to be downtown because they could not subject the children to the patrons of the Bail Bonds business. But, I’ll get back to the ordinance. The percentage of food sales to alcoholic beverages does not determine whether or not a facility or establishment is “classy.” The business model of the establishment determines that and therefore determines the clientele that they attract. Although I feel I was misquoted, my example of this was Texas Roadhouse. No matter what the percentage of food sales to alcohol sales is, their business model is “family style” and not a bar or nightclub. If the city wants classier restaurants, maybe they should reconsider this ordinance. We could very well be turning away the white tablecloth facility that relies on that 4COP license to provide higher quality. Right now, it just seems to be a way to control competition by discriminating against restaurants that operate under 4COP license. Huge incentives have recently been granted to a new restaurant development that is “single serve” with Solo cups, deli sheets and plastic baskets. Maybe our incentives should re ect the classy types of businesses the city wants to attract instead of keeping businesses out. I think it’s time we take on the issue of public smoking and littering. Smoking is a much bigger problem than alcohol. Secondhand smoke is a killer. Adult citizens as well as children need protection. Why do we allow smoking on cityowned property as well as at city-sponsored events? Cigarette butts are not biodegradable. They clog our sewer systems and pollute our waterways. It costs taxpayers dollars to clean it up. What’s “classy” about smoking these days? Cassandra Sharp Milton time, but I didn’t explain what I meant about the insurance. My idea is you should be able to buy an insurance policy on your driver’s license. That way if my license is insured, it would insure me for any car I drive, if I drive my neighbor’s car or whatever. It would be my insurance. That way everybody would be insured. You wouldn’t have people running around in cars with no insurance. So that’s what I think they should do, tie it to your driver’s license. Thank you. Wednesday, 2:40 p.m. This is Bonnie from East Milton. I don’t really think a lot of us appreciated the comment that Commissioner Salter made about East Milton being the poorest infrastructure that the county has. That was totally wrong on his part. He makes it sound like East Milton is not worth a crap. He needs to restate that. A lot of us in East Milton would rather be in East Milton than anywhere else. Wednesday, 2:45 p.m. I disagree with the article that Charles Walsingham put in Wednesday’s paper on letter to the editor. I do not believe that the courthouse needs to be anywhere near the jail. You’ve got two prisons and a jail in that one area. You do not need the courthouse there. Take the property behind the courthouse or where they put those trailers. Delete them. Build the new courthouse back there. Knock the old courthouse down. You’ve got parking there and parking across the street in front of the churches or where the buildings burned. It does not need to be down by the jail whatsoever, or let it be built in East Milton on highway 90 between the south airport and Ward Basin where the man was going to donate the property. Let it be there where the property was given to the people. We don’t need to buy more land and cost the county and taxpayers more money. It’s been proven that Santa Rosa County has got so many people that live in Santa Rosa County that’s below the poverty line. Let it be built on property that Santa Rosa County already has. We don’t need to put it anywhere near the county jail. Wednesday, 5:31 p.m. This is Bobby. I got my Saturday paper and in the Speak Out column some in the county are criticizing us for voicing our opinion about the courthouse, saying we need to go to the county commissioner meeting, that it wouldn’t do any good to talk about it in the paper. Well, something good did come of it because in the same paper it says now we’re going to vote on it. So everybody speaks a different way. Everybody doesn’t have to go to the county commissioner to emphasize that. The idea wasn’t to change their minds because they already had them made up. It was to let more people know what was going on. So thank you. I don’t really think a lot of us appreciated the comment that Commissioner Salter made about East Milton being the poorest infrastructure that the county has.

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ANGLICAN Trinity by the Fields, 4980 W. Spencer Field Road, Pace APOSTOLIC First Apostolic Church, 5574 Highway 90, Milton Pace Apostolic Church, 4763 Old Guernsey Road, Pace ASSEMBLY OF GOD Bagdad First Assembly of God, 4513 Forsyth St., Bagdad East Milton Assembly of God, 5174 Ward Basin Road, Milton Faith Chapel Assembly of God, 8080 S. Airport Road, Milton First Assembly of God, 6163 Dogwood Dr., Milton Harold Assembly of God, 10495 Goodrange Dr., Milton Jay First Assembly of God, 14047 Alabama St., Jay McLellan Assembly of God, 6050 Three Notch Trail, Milton New Harvest Fellowship Assembly of God, E. Highway 90, Pace New Hope Assembly of God, 9550 Chumuckla Highway, Jay Pace Assembly of God, 3948 Highway 90, Pace Springhill Assembly of God, 9190 Munson Highway, Milton True Worship Assembly of God, 13297 Highway 87 N, Jay Welcome Assembly of God, 8581 Welcome Church Road, Milton Whit eld Assembly of God, 12391 Highway 87 N, Milton BAPTIST Celebration Baptist Church, P.O. Box 4047, Milton Eastside Baptist Church, 6731 Dixon St., Milton Faith Baptist Church, 6423 Hamilton Bridge Road, Milton Iglesia Bautista Libertad, 5536 Highway 90, Milton Liberty Baptist, 6763 Margaret St., Milton Lighthouse Baptist Church, 13050 Highway 89, Jay Mt. Pilgrim Baptist Church, 5103 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Milton Oak Grove Baptist Church, 917 Lakewood Road, Milton BAPTIST – ABA Berryhill Road Baptist, 3095 Berryhill Road, Milton Bethel Baptist Church, 6178 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton Fellowship Baptist Church, 5223 Highway 90, Pace First Baptist Church of East Milton, 8167 S. Airport Road, Milton First Missionary Baptist Church of Pace, 3925 Pace Road, Pace Galilee Missionary Baptist, Highway 90, Milton BAPTIST – INDEPENDENT Bible Baptist Church, 4001 Vern St., Pace Bible Way Baptist Church, 5976 Dogwood Dr., Milton Brownsdale Baptist Church, Chumuckla Highway, Jay Fil Am Baptist Church, 5240 Dogwood Dr., Milton Joy Bible Baptist Church, 8613 Highway 90, Milton Mt. Calvary Baptist Church, 4636 Highway 90, Pace Pine Grove Baptist Church, 7280 Pine Grove Road, Jay Pleasant Hill Missionary Baptist, 5550 Econ na St, Milton Solid Rock Baptist Church, 6760 Eastgate Road, Milton Trinity Baptist Church, 5301 Highway 90, Pace Victory Baptist Church, 4000 Avalon Blvd., Milton West Florida Baptist Church, 5621 Highway 90, Milton BAPTIST – MISSIONARY Mt. Bethel Baptist Church, 175 Limit St., Milton New Macedonia Baptist Church, 4751 Chumuckla Highway, Pace New Providence Missionary Baptist Church, 4175 Popcorn Road, Milton St. John Divine Missionary Church, 5363 Saint Johns St., Milton BAPTIST – PRIMATIVE Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church, 5339 Zero Ln., Milton Mt. Zion Primitive Baptist, 6930 Chaf n St., Milton BAPTIST – SOUTHERN Avalon Baptist Church, 4316 Avalon Blvd., Milton Berrydale Baptist Church, 6703 Highway 4, Jay Billory First Baptist of HolleyNavarre, Highway 87 S., Navarre Blackwater Baptist Church, 11689 Munson Highway, Milton Calvary Baptist Church, 5405 Calvary Church Road, Milton Cora Baptist Church, 12953 Chumuckla Highway, Jay East Side Baptist Church, 4884 Ward Basin Road, Milton Ferris Hill Baptist Church, 6848 Chaf n St., Milton First Baptist Church of Bagdad, 4529 Forsyth St., Bagdad First Baptist Church of Milton, 6797 Caroline St., Milton First Baptist Church of Pace, 3949 Pace Road, Pace First Baptist Of Garcon Point, 17820 Garcon Point Road, Milton Floridatown Baptist Church, 3851 Diamond St., Pace Friendship Baptist Church, 5300 Berryhill Road, Milton Harmony Ridge Baptist Church, 5536 Highway 90, Pace Harold First Baptist Church, 10585 Goodrange Dr., Milton Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8531 Hickory Hammock Road, Milton Immanuel Baptist Church, 4187 Highway 90, Pace James Street Baptist Church, 6658 James St., Milton Jay First Baptist Church, 214 S. Alabama St., Jay Living Truth Church, 8897 Byrom Campbell Road Pace FL 32571 Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church, P.O. Box 4812, Milton New Bethel Baptist Church, 10995 Chumuckla Highway, Jay New Life Baptist Church, 6380 Bayberry St., Milton Olivet Baptist Church, 5240 Dogwood Dr., Milton Pine Level Baptist Church, 3300 Pine Level Church Road, Jay Pine Terrace Baptist Church, 6212 Pine Blossom Road, Milton Pleasant Home Baptist Church, 8500 Pleasant Home, Munson Santa Rosa Baptist Association, 6820 Highway 87 N, Milton Spring Hill Baptist Church, 9214 Munson Highway, Milton Wallace Baptist Church, 6601 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Woodbine Baptist Church, 4912 Woodbine Road, Pace CATHOLIC St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church, 6451 Park Ave., Milton CHARISMATIC New Hope Community Church of Milton, 5283 Goshawk Dr., Milton Shepherd House Ministries, 5739 N. Stewart St., Milton CHURCH OF CHRIST Bagdad Church of Christ, 4413 Garcon Point Road, Bagdad Berryhill Church of Christ, 3679 Berryhill Road, Pace Church of Christ, 4034 Highway 4, Jay Margaret Street Church-Christ, 6745 Margaret St., Milton McLellan Church of Christ, 6285 Three Notch Trail, Milton Pace Church of Christ, 4075 Berryhill Road, Pace Pea Ridge Church of Christ, 4400 Bell Lane, Pea Ridge Susan St. Church of Christ, 600 Susan St., Milton West Milton Church of Christ, 5300 Highway 90, Pace CHURCH OF GOD Church of God of Prophecy Bible Place, 600 Glover Ln., Milton Covenant Church of God, 4645 School Lane, Pace Ferris Hill Church of God in Christ, 5583 Alabama St., Milton CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST Christ Church of Pace, 5536 Highway 90, Pace Church of God at Milton, 4645 School Lane, Pace Church of God in Christ, 5887 Stewart St., Milton World Church of God, 5177 Stewart St., Milton COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Community Church of Christ, 5666 Raymond Hobbs St., Milton EPISCOPAL St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, 6850 Oak St., Milton FULL GOSPEL Full Gospel Community Church, 6199 Gainey Ford Road, Jay Living Faith Church, 7400 Reformation Dr., Milton Milton Victory Ministry, 7235 Highway 90, Milton True Faith Tabernacle, 5166 Old Oak Road, Milton True Grace Fellowship Church, 5178 Willard Norris Road, Milton HOLINESS Cobbtown Holiness Church, 4700 Greenwood Road, Jay Hollandtown Holinesses Church, 1851 Pineview Church Road, Jay INDEPENDENT Chumuckla Community Church, 8008 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Grace Bible Church, 6331 Chestnut St., Milton Relevant Life Church, 4560 Pace Patriot Blvd., Pace Walls of Salvation Church, 6697 Old Highway 90, Milton Word Alive Christian Church, 707 Stewart St., Milton Word Alive Church, 4200 Ebenezer Church Road, Jay INTERDENOMINATIONAL Blessed Assurance Ministries, P.O. Box 58, Milton Christ-Centered Ministries, 8688 A.D. McCall Road, Milton In His Presence Ministries, 218 Stowers Ln., Milton JEHOVAH’S WITNESS Jehovah’s Witness, 5696 Berryhill Road, Milton LDS Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 5737 Berryhill Road, Milton Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 4065 Highway 4, Jay Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1753 Sea Lark Lane, Navarre LUTHERAN Eternal Trinity Lutheran Church, 6076 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton METHODIST Bagdad United Methodist Church, 4540 Forsythe St., Bagdad Christ United Methodist Church, 5983 Dogwood Dr., Milton Chumuckla Community Church, 8008 Chumuckla Highway, Pace First United Methodist Church, 6830 Berryhill St., Milton Jay United Methodist Church, 14093 Alabama St., Jay Mae Edwards UMC, 5052 Mulat Road, Milton Mt. Carmel United Methodist Church, 15030 Highway 89, Jay Pace First United Methodist, 4540 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Pineview United Methodist Church, 1400 Pineview Church Road, Jay Wesley Memorial UMC, 4701 School Lane, Pace Woodbine United Methodist Church, 5200 Woodbine Road, Pace METHODIST – AFRICAN Greater Bethlehem AME Church, 5299 Richburg St., Milton Isaiah Chapel AME Zion Church, 5038 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Milton NAZARENE New Faith Church of Nazarene, 5162 Avenida Del Fuego, Pace NONDENOMINATIONAL Christian Life Church, 4401 Avalon Blvd., Milton Church of the Living God, 3375 Garcon Point Road, Milton Community Chapel, 4300 Pace Lane, Pace Deliverance Tabernacle, 5470 Dogwood Dr., Milton Freedom Fellowship Church of Milton, 723 Munson Highway, Milton Grace Believers Bible Study Church, Holiday Inn Express, Conference Room, 8510 Keshav Taylor Drive, East Milton Harvest Community Church of Jay, 2828 Harvest Road, Jay Heritage Chapel, P.O. Box 248, Milton Hope Corral Cowboy Church, Fidelus Community Center, 13774 State Road 87 N., Jay Indian Ford Victory Fellowship, 8999 Indian Ford Road, Milton Kings Way Christian Center, 3102 Deep Water Cv., Milton Living God’s Standard Communication, 6731 Old Highway 90, Milton Living Word Worship Center, 5573 Stewart St., Milton Milton Worship Center, 11164 Horizon Road, Milton New Harvest Fellowship, 4289 Berryhill Road, Milton New Life Baptist Church, 6380 Bayberry St., Milton New Testament Church, 5277 Glover Ln., Milton Northshore Community Church, P.O. Box 4476, Milton Our Father’s House Inc., 5362 Taf Ln., Milton Pace Community Church, 4310 N. Spencer Field Road, Pace Providence Chapel, 3721 Highway 90, Milton PENTECOSTAL Ebenezer Church Inc., 4200 Ebenezer Church Road, Jay First Pentecostal Church of Bagdad, 4636 Forsyth St., Bagdad Gospel Lighthouse Church, 10001 Chumuckla Highway, Pace United Pentecostal Church of Berrydale, 7580 Highway 4, Jay Whit eld Pentecostal Fellowship Church, 11236 Highway 87 N, Milton PENTECOSTAL – HOLINESS Chumuckla Pentecostal Holiness Church, 2841 Highway 182, Jay Mt. Zion Pentecostal Holiness Church, 5532 Osceola St., Milton New Vision Worship Center, 5573 Stewart St., Milton Roeville Holiness Church, 6648 Munson Highway, Milton PRESBYTERIAN First Presbyterian Church, 5206 Elmira St., Milton Pace Presbyterian Church, 4587 Woodbine Road, Pace Westminster Presbyterian, 6659 Park Ave., Milton SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Milton Seventh Day Adventist, 5288 Berryhill Dr., Milton VINEYARD Bay Area Vineyard Church, 5163 Dogwood Dr., Milton P ACE C OMMUNITY C HURCH 6010456 6010456 HPTD &# %,. !! #/ -+ ,( #/ '-+ ,/ '&'&# --' ##-.#$. ) #.. #+' / ( +& -' (" -. ,%, ) )-%' -' '#&' # F AITH Saturday, March 22, 2014 www.srpressgazette.com Page 5 Section Section A Church DIRECTORY Faith BRIEFS Faith Chapel Assembly of God Spring is in the air as well as the excitement that the celebration of our Lord’s Resurrection brings. Faith Chapel Assembly of God will be presenting a musical production titled “He is Risen” celebrating as well as touching our hearts with the true meaning of Easter. Mark your calendars for the two different opportunities to view this presentation on Friday night, April 18 or Sunday morning, April 20. Friday night’s amazing presentation will begin at 7 p.m. and Sunday morning service at 10:45 a.m. “He is Risen” will be presented in its entirety during both services and offers something for everyone to enjoy as well as nd celebration in. The public is invited and encouraged to attend either service to be reminded of the truth of the Easter season. Faith Chapel Assembly of God is at 8080 South Airport Road, Milton. Bagdad United Methodist Church On Sunday, March 23, we continue our exciting Living Generously program as we follow Frank in his journey, with the theme POOR. Bring family and friends and share in our lively church. We have a 10 a.m. caf and Sunday school; our 8 a.m. New Vision Praise and 10 a.m. family service. Ferris Hill Baptist Church Ferris Hill Baptist Church is looking for a free tent to give to a homeless man in need of shelter. FHBC operates one of Santa Rosa County’s cold weather shelters. Please call the Rev. Brian Nall at 623-3500 if you have an extra. Revival Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church is celebrating revival at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. April 6 and at 7 p.m. April 7 and 8 at 4701 School Lane in Pace. First United Methodist Church of Milton First United Methodist Church of Milton, 6830 Berryhill St. in Milton, holds worship services at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. every Sunday, along with Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. Everyone is welcome. This Sunday, March 23, the Rev. M. Kathryn Knight will deliver her sermon on “Are You Thirsty?” She will be focusing on Exodus 17:1-7 and John 4: 5-42. Pastor’s Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. Wednesdays. For more information and events, call the church of ce at 623-6683. Theology on Tap Weekly Q&A sessions on theology will be at 7 p.m. Thursdays beginning March 27 at Blackwater Bistro. The class is sponsored by First United Methodist Church of Milton, 623-6683. First Presbyterian Church Church services are at 10:30 a.m. each Sunday morning. First Presbyterian Church is at 5203 Elmira St. in historic downtown Milton. This Sunday the message “Living Water” will be delivered by Pastor Jo Kublik. There is a nursery for infants and toddlers. Children’s Church will be the rst Sunday of each month during the church service. Small group study classes are in the Fellowship Hall at 9:30 a.m. Sunday mornings. This is a discussion group focusing on the relationship of the Bible to our lives. A pot luck dinner will follow the service the rst Sunday of the month. All are welcome. Lenten dinners are at 6 p.m. each Wednesday. They are brown bag. Iced tea and coffee will be available. We welcome all visitors and encourage you to attend if you are new in the area or looking for a church family. The Fellowship Hall is available for weddings and group meetings. For more information call 623-2510 or visit www.fpcmilton.org. As the church is an historic building and the oldest church in Santa Rosa County, it is in need of refurbishing. To raise the needed funds we are collecting cans and metal. If you wish to donate, call Betsy Dodson at 983-7803. SPECIAL TO THE PRESS GAZETTE The Rev. Clive Knights and the Rev. Ruth Knights were sworn in as American citizens March 14. REVERENDS BECOME U.S. CITIZENS

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Local A6 | Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014 E F R E S an ta R osa C oun t y F air is A pr il 4-12 P r o R odeo Ex citing R ides G ames V endors F abulous F ood on the M idw a y Liv e En t er tainmen t N igh tly F MX F r ee S t yle M ot or cr oss Sho w & M onst er T ruck R ides Liv est ock Exhibits and Sho w s Laser T ag and M uch M or e! N { v j „ m o y l m ` | | j y o y l j Š j  y o l m „ { y  „ ` l j N { v j „ m o y l m ` | | j y o y l j Š j  y o l m „ { y  „ ` l j N { v j „ m o y l m ` | | j y o y l j Š j  y o l m „ { y  „ ` l j T ha nks T o The P r ess G az ett e ... W e Hav e F re e T ick ets!!! S an ta Rosa C oun t y F air TICKE T S W ith e v er y NE W paid P r ess G az ett e subscription get 4 S an ta Rosa C oun t y F air T ick ets F r ee* N ame A ddr ess Ci t y St at e Z ip P hone Exp D a t e / Subscription Coupon Subscriber Special $ 20 Y ear *4 F r e e S a nta R osa F a ir T ick ets av a ilable at the S a nta R osa P r ess G az ett e O c e with ev er y New $20 P a id Subscription, $32 S enior R enew al or $39 R egula r R enew al in oc e during Ma r ch 24th thr ou gh A pril 12th 2014 #

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Local Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette| A7 Saturday, March 22, 2014 By LINDA AA YERS Special to the Press Gazette Pace Assembly at 3948 U.S. 90 is among the largest congregations in the U.S. Assemblies of God, according the Senior Pastors Joey and Rita Rogers. “Pace Assembly’s mission statement is to fulll the ‘Eternal Purpose’ of God in Christ Jesus locally and globally by reaching the lost, making disciples, and building the Church of Jesus Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit,” Pastor Joey Rogers said. This church is founded on a strong Pentecostal heritage. It started as a small prayer group in a Pace home in 1930 and then in 1932 became organized and chartered with the Assemblies of God. To help fulll the mission, and celebrate Easter, Pace Assembly has an upcoming event, “Jesus… Son of God,” with more than 200 cast members, livestock, live music, LED lighting, sound and special effects. The presentation is produced to be a life-altering experience, a combination of live music and drama. Senior Pastors Joey and Rita Rogers, founders of Gulf Coast Productions, created this incredible portrayal of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The show is at 7 p.m. on April 17, 18, and 19, with doors opening at 6 p.m. General admission is $5, and group seating is available for groups of 10 or more. To reserve group seating, call 202-3100 or email the church at rsvp@paceassembly.org. Pace A A OG E E aster production fullls part of mission By BAR bB ARAH NoNO RRIS Special to the Press Gazette As I remember, and I remember this quite well, Daddy bought a gift made by a man in the displaced people camp on the base of the 501 Engineers just outside Hanau, Germany. These people, millions of them, known as DPs, were housed in camps all over Europe after World War II. They were given food, shelter, clothing, medical treatment and jobs. Within these camps were a number of departments. One such department was a network set up by the allies to help re-unite these people with family and friends who were displaced or enslaved by the Nazis. Another was formed to help return personal items taken from them or from loved ones who was imprisoned in the work camps of the Third Reich. The Nazis conscated all things of monetary value when the people were imprisoned in the work camps and used the items to help nance the Nazi cause. Also taken were items of little importance to anyone other than to the people they belonged to. A letter, book or photo could be the only remaining reminder of their previous lives or of the lives of their loved ones. Daddy said it was most important for these people to have something solid within their grasp, so as to begin and to rebuild their lives, thus the reason for the camps. It was within the camp at the 501 I rst remember seeing the tattoos that changed my life. Regardless of the pain and horror man can inict upon his fellow beings, some good can and does come from the bad. In this case, a beautiful rocking horse was born in November 1948. I remember going with my daddy to the camp on base. There were a number of buildings, almost like a compound, set up for different needs of the people. There was a mess hall, a medical building, housing and over to the side were buildings set up for different work trades for the displaced. Daddy and I were in the woodworking shop, and I saw beautiful furniture: tables, chairs, desks, bookcases, beds, chests and most anything a home would need. As we walked around the shop, looking at the beautifully crafted items, I saw a thin, stooped-shouldered, bushy, white-haired man. He was sanding the body of a rocking horse. Beside him sat a number of nished ones. My eyes must have grown twice their normal size while running to inspect each one of them. Daddy knew without me telling him what I wanted. In fact, as I’m sitting here, the thought came to me that maybe, just maybe, that was why he brought me to that place. He wanted me to help pick one out. I remember looking for a beige one. A beige one like Pet, my granddaddy’s farm horse at Twin Oaks Dairy Farm, but couldn’t nd one. All this bent-over little man had were white ones with black mane and tail and black splotches on the body and grey ones with black trim. Daddy told me later black and white were the only paints the 501 had to give the man other than drab, old army green. Who ever heard of a green horse? We bought a white one with the splotches, black mane and tail. This little rocking horse and the 2-year-old birthday girl, my sister Paula Annette Norris, rode many a mile together in Hanau, Germany. My horse was put to pasture before we came back to the states in 1950. Barbarah Norris is the daughter of Santa Rosa County retired Army Col. Willard Norris, namesake of Willard Norris Road. Rocky HorseSPECIAL TO THE PP REss SS GAZETTE Pace Assembly of God will perform “Jesus...Son of God” at 7 p.m. April 17-19, with doors opening at 6 p.m. General admission is $5. For more information, call 202-3100. By AARAAR O NN L II TTL EE 623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com Floridians are contemplating what new oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico might mean to the state, but Florida’s relationship with oil and natural gas has its roots in the small town of Jay. According to the Jay Historical Society’s website, the town saw land and mineral right purchases during the oil rush of 1970s in Santa Rosa County. Dr. Mary Diamond Findley’s son, Nathan Findley, lived in Jay at the time. Nathan Findley described his mother, employed at Jay School as the “rst female principal from Jacksonville to Pensacola.” He said he remembers going up on the oil decks with his parents. According to Linda Nelson’s article “Reections and a Salute to a Town Called Jay,” available to read on the Jay Historical Society website, the oil rush began in Alabama with discovery of crude at Pollard, Ala., in the 1950s. Humble Oil Company, known today as ExxonMobil, drilled an exploratory well in Flomaton, near Jay, in 1968. This well was known as a wildcat well, meaning the company drilled outside of known oil preserves. Nelson wrote a geologic formation known as Norphlet did yield natural gas from this drilling. Nelson wrote Jay experienced heightened interest in the community over oil speculation, but the few shallow wells drilled at the time yielded nothing. However, Humble Oil Company did not give up, knowing the geologic formations Norphlet and Smackover under the county yielded oil elsewhere. The company obtained a permit to drill to 16,000 feet, deeper than the Alabama wells. Nelson wrote that it took weeks, but a pool of oil turned up beneath Jay, and overnight, some land became priceless. According to Nelson, some of Jay’s roughly 650 residents became millionaires. Nathan Findley said he remembered the parties and the food at the time. He also said he remembered 16-17 kids at the high school received new automobiles. “More students had cars than teachers,” Findley said. He also said he went into the oil business after graduating in 1975, but left shortly after because of back-breaking, militarystyle conditions. He said employers would yell and cuss the workers. Nelson found some residents fared better than others in selling their land. Mary Findley, who said she received her bachelor’s degree at 20, master’s degree at 40 and doctorate at 55, said some of the land ballooned from $5 an acre to $500. She said some residents were wise with their newly acquired wealth, while many were not. Dr. Findley said some traveled while others bought cars. Being on the rim of the oil reserve, Dr. Findley said she’s still receiving a royalty check on her land, but not as much. However, Nelson said the state beneted over all. Taxes and royalties lled state and local coffers. She said Jay maintained its small town atmosphere, with a few more new homes and oil wells sitting between cotton and peanut elds and cattle ranches. Nathan described the town a little differently, saying “some people got rich” with their “noses in the air.” According to an article by Starr Spencer, posted on the website for Platts, an energy company, Jay supplies about 2,500 barrels per day of equivalent oil production. Spencer also sites the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, noting Jay is one of Florida’s largest and oldest oil elds with 93 active wells. Oil wells between cotton and peanut elds The history of Jay oil The oil rush began in Alabama with discovery of crude at Pollard, Ala., in the 1950s. Humble Oil Company, known today as ExxonMobil, drilled an exploratory well in Flomaton, near Jay, in 1968. This well was known as a wildcat well, meaning the company drilled outside of known oil preserves. the pen show will not feature “show cows,” but the kind of cows that will go to market. “Why does the farmer like this one?” he asked, saying it’s a “more clinical” show. Holley said events include a dairy and market goat show, poultry show and a hog show twice the size of last year’s. Prudence Caskey, the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension’s newly appointed agent, said all 47 of the 4-H youth who par ticipated last year will be back. Cas key said those who had baby chicks now have 1-year old hens to show. In addition to the Rhode Island Reds, Silkies and Leghorns coming to the fair, she said Ameraucanas, also known as Easter egg chickens, will make an appearance. Caskey said these chickens do not individually lay different colored eggs, but one hen may lay blue eggs, another hen green eggs. She said her goal is to show the public the variety in poultry: “Not all eggs are white or large.” Caskey said 40 percent of her 4H youth are home-schooled, and she wants to give students who are inter ested in agriculture as much oppor tunity as she can. She said the 4-H youth will be working with students from Florida’s Exceptional Student Education program, attending a spe cial tour of the fair April 9. Tammie Fulmer, Santa Rosa County Fair board, said ESE stu dents will be able to tour the Ag Adventure Barn, the midway, hear a violin performance and see Louie the clown. Fulmer said the barn will provide a hands-on experience of ag ricultural activities, including animal grooming, seed planting, egg collect ing and cow milking. Fulmer said the only simulations in the barn will be the articial dairy cow, provided by the Florida Federation of Fairs and Livestock Shows, and an articial orange tree. Fulmer said the ESE tour is why the barn needs to meet certain educational standards. She said this ESE eld trip is so special because some of these students can not attend regular school eld trips, so the trip is a rare opportunity for them to get out and interact with real animals and farming proce dures while being educated. Holley said the fair has grown in part because of Santa Rosa County’s welcoming of “large-lot lifestyle” families. He said these families may be retirees who may want dis tance, families simply wanting a lot of land and small-time farmers. He said with an increase in these people seeking large areas of land on which to live, most of whom being agricul turally minded, interest in the fair has increased. Holley said phase one of the larger Santa Rosa County Fair vision was the completion of the June Ates Arena, while the rst part of phase two, leasing and opening of the fairgrounds, is underway. He said the second part of phase two will be a building funded by a grant the fair board is seeking from the state under statute 288. According to Santa Rosa County Commissioner Bob Cole, this new building will be suited for indoor fair events as op posed to what happens in the new arena. Cole said 4-H is currently us ing the gymnasium for their indoor events, which would take place in this new building, along with pos sible speaking engagements, indoor concerts and IFAS Extension class es. It also could serve as an evacua tion shelter. Holley did not nish talking about the growth of the fair without men tioning the tenacity of the board and other volunteers, whom he said have worked to improve the land leased to the fair board, a condition of the lease, without any sort of payment other than being allowed to continue leasing the land. FAIR from page A1

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Local A8 | Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014 / &%#%&& ,' 1QF IPD FKL WC R1H H m™ ?i Š™ 5€…‘ z{ tŠ SM ART MONEY BY B RUCE WILLIA MS ASK DOC T OR K b y A n thon y L. K omar o M.D 2% %" & #+&! #%"&&"% %)% "" &! $(&'"!&4 '" &"'"% 4 "% *%'0 & "'"% 4 .''( '4 "! ""% 4 "&'"!4 -1. .56 L ast S atur day ’ s A nsw ers C OPING WITH CHR ONIC F A TIGUE SY NDR OME Q: I w ould like t o k no w wha t became of the beautiful ac tr ess T er esa W r igh t S he w as in a lot of good mo vies -T A ., C ha ttanooga, T enn. A: M ur iel T er esa W r igh t w as bor n O c t 27, 1918, in New Y or k C it y W hile in school she became in v olv ed in thea tr ical pr oduc tions and appear ed in her rst lm, “ T he L ittle F o x es ” in 1941. S he w as nomina t ed f or thr ee A cadem y A w ar ds and she w on onc e f or her suppor ting r ole in “ M rs M iniv er ” W r igh t w as mar r ied t wic e and had t w o childr en. S he died of a hear t a ttack a t age 86 on M ar ch 6, 2005. DID Y OU KNO W? A c tr ess L ana T ur ner said “ M y goal w as t o ha v e one husband and sev en childr en, but it tur ned out t o be the other w a y ar ound ” S he w as mar r ied eigh t times t o sev en di er en t husbands Q: W hen w as t eacher author and lec tur er L eo B uscaglia bor n? W hen did he die? -E .K ., R ushf or d N. Y A: K no wn a ec tiona t ely as “Dr L o v e ” on the campus of the U niv ersit y of S outher n C alif or nia wher e he taugh t F e lic e L eonar do B uscaglia w as bor n in L os A ngeles on M ar ch 31, 1924, t o I talian immig r an t par en ts T he self-appoin t ed cheer leader of the w or ld died of a hear t a ttack in 1998 a t age 74. C a n y o u f i n d t h e h i d d e n w o r d s ? S e a r c h c a r e f u l l y b e c a u s e s o m e w o r d s a r e b a c k w a r d o r d i a g o n a l G R A P H I T E C O L O R E D N U M B E R G R O O V E F E R R U L E P E N C I L C E D A R C A R V E C A S E D S H A P E L A B E L H A R D L E A D R I N G S O F T B O B S L A T S I X h e r e a r e t h r e e m a i n t y p e s o f p e n c i l s c a s e d p e n c i l s c o l o r e d p e n c i l s a n d m e c h a n i c a l p e n c i l s C a s e d p e n c i l s h a v e a c o r e o f d a r k w r i t i n g m a t e r i a l t h a t i s e n c a s e d i n w o o d C o l o r e d p e n c i l s a r e c a s e d p e n c i l s w i t h c o r e s m a d e o f b r i g h t l y c o l o r e d w r i t i n g m a t e r i a l M e c h a n i c a l p e n c i l s u s e r e p l a c e a b l e c o r e s s e c u r e d i n s i d e a m e t a l o r p l a s t i c c a s e T his e dition of S h ort cu ts is spons ore d by W ill F errule M o s t m o d e r n p e n c i l s a r e m a d e b y f i r s t c u t t i n g s e v e r a l g r o o v e s i n t o m u l t i p l e s l a t s o f w o o d T h e g r o o v e s o f o n e s l a t a r e f i l l e d w i t h a g r a p h i t e m i x t u r e T h e s l a t w i t h t h e g r a p h i t e i s t h e n g l u e d t o a n o t h e r s l a t I n d i v i d u a l p e n c i l s a r e t h e n c a r v e d o u t T h e a n c i e n t G r e e k s a n d R o m a n s u s e d p i e c e s o f l e a d t o d r a w l i n e s o n p a p y r u s M a n y e a r l y w r i t i n g t o o l s u s e d l e a d o r s i l v e r t o m a k e m a r k s G r a p h i t e b e c a m e p o p u l a r a f t e r a l a r g e d e p o s i t w a s d i s c o v e r e d i n E n g l a n d i n t h e 1 5 0 0 s P e n c i l c o r e s m a d e w i t h a m i x t u r e o f g r a p h i t e a n d c l a y w e r e f i r s t d e v e l o p e d b y N i c o l a s J a c q u e s C o n t e o f F r a n c e i n t h e l a t e 1 7 0 0 s F or more inf ormation, che ck ou t thes e W e b sit es: www .of f icemus eum.c om/pe ncil_histor y .h tm www .b erol.c o .uk/histor yof pe ncils .h tml h t tp://pe ncils .c om/pe ncil-histor y/ 3/1 0 Mo st pe ncils are made f rom ce dar logs M o s t p e n c i l s m a n u f a c t u r e d a r e 2 B p e n c i l s Y e l l o w i s t h e m o s t p o p u l a r c o l o r f o r p e n c i l s W hat did the ou tla w say to the pe ncil? D ra w! W hat does a pe ncil do whe n it doesn’ t kno w the answer? D ra w a b lank. W hat do you do whe n your pe ncil runs ou t of le ad? W rit e it of f W hy didn’ t anyone trust the pe ncil dra w ing? I t was a lit tle sket chy T he met al ring that h ol ds the eras er at the e nd of a pe ncil is calle d a “f errule ” O ne of the lar gest pe ncils in the worl d is on display at the F ab er -C ast ell buil ding in Malaysia I t is ne arly 2 0 m (6 5 f t .) t all. P e ncils are lab ele d w ith numb ers and let t ers that describ e the type of line that w ill b e p roduce d by the pe ncil’ s c ore 9H is the har dest and p roduces the ligh t est line 9B is the s of t est and p roduces a dar k line Mo st pe ncils are shape d w ith six sides T he he x agonal shape is e asier to grip and ke e p s the pe ncil f rom rolling. T he c ore of a moder n pe ncil does not c on t ain le ad I t is made of a mixt ure of graphit e and clay S of t er pe ncils c on t ain more graphit e in the mixt ure while har der pe ncils hav e more clay I like to dra w at t e n tion to m ys elf C an you help this acc oun t an t f ind his pe ncil? F ind more at : www .sh ort cu tsc omic.c om T his cartoon is nothing to writ e h ome ab ou t D EAR DO C TO R K : I ha v e C F S W ha t is the la t est inf or ma tion about the c ondition, par ticular ly tr ea tmen ts? D EAR REA D ER : F or r eaders who ar e not familiar with the c ondition, C F S stands f or chr onic fa tigue syndr ome F a tigue is a univ ersal human e xper ienc e I n our incr easingly pr essur ed and fast -pac ed liv es man y people f eel tir ed a lot of the time I n fac t fa tigue is one of the most c ommon r easons people visit their doc t or Y et v er y f ew people with fa tigue ar e su er ing fr om C F S I t is r ela tiv ely unc ommon, a ec ting about 4 t o 8 out of ev er y thousand adults in the U S ., and a small fr ac tion of t eenagers and y ounger childr en. P eople with C F S e xper ienc e ongoing sev er e debilita ting fa tigue tha t is not r eliev ed b y r est O ther sympt oms include: I mpair ed memor y or c onc en tr a tion, sor e thr oa t sw ollen glands muscle pain, pain in multiple join ts headaches and e xhaustion f ollo w ing ph y sical ac tivit y W e don ’ t k no w wha t causes C F S P eople with C F S ar e mor e likely than health y people -and people with other fa tigue causing diseases -t o ha v e v ar ious abnor mali ties M an y ha v e chr onic ac tiv a tion of di er en t par ts of the immune sy st em. M an y ha v e pr oblems with their c ells mak ing enough ener gy M an y ha v e biochemical abnor mali ties called o xida tiv e and nitr osa tiv e str ess T hen ther e ar e pr oblems in v olving the br ain tha t ha v e been f ound thanks t o br ain imag ing t echniques ( MRI S P EC T and P E T ). B r ain hor mones of t en r espond di er en tly t o challenges E lec tr ical br ain w a v e studies of t en sho w di er enc es T he aut onomic ner v ous sy st em, the par t of the br ain tha t c on tr ols basic body func tions -such as hear t r a t e blood pr essur e and body t emper a tur e -of t en does not w or k pr oper ly B ut the abnor malities ar e not seen in all pa tien ts with C F S and they c ome and go W ha t is causing these abnor malities r emains unc er tain. A c ombina tion of the f ollo wing str a t eg ies ma y help manage y our sympt oms: -S et pr ior ities M ake a list of things y ou w an t t o ha v e mor e ener gy t o do E limina t e as man y nonessen tial ac tivities as y ou can. B ut be car eful t o guar d against bec oming t oo passiv e -E x er cise B eg in an e x er cise pr og r am in which y ou g r adually incr ease y our ac tivit y lev el T his can e ec tiv ely r educ e the sev er it y of y our sympt oms -C og nitiv e beha vior al ther ap y ( CB T ). CB T is a t ype of psy chother ap y I t helps y ou iden tify and change nega tiv e though ts and beha viors CB T can r educ e sympt oms -T r ic y clic an tidepr essan ts L o w doses of this t ype of an tidepr essan t ma y impr o v e the qualit y of y our sleep r educ e pain, and incr ease ener gy -O ther medica tions Nonst er oidal an ti-inamma t or y drugs (N SAI Ds) and ac et aminophen ( T ylenol) can help r eliev e headaches join t pain and muscle pain. F ish oil capsules (3,000 mg per da y) ma y also help r educ e C F S sympt oms T her e ar e also sev er al e xper imen tal tr ea tmen ts in dev elopmen t T hese include drugs t o tr ea t abnor malities of the aut onomic ner v ous sy st em, t o quiet ac tiv a t ed par ts of the immune sy st em, and an tivir al drugs (f or people with c er tain ac tiv e vir al inf ec tions). I am impr essed b y the pr og r ess made in understanding C F S o v er the past 25 y ears I t w as made possible b y r esear ch c onduc t ed and suppor t ed b y the Na tional I nstitut es of Health, C en t ers f or Disease C on tr ol and P r ev en tion, and pr iv a t e f ounda tions S till w e ha v e a lot mor e t o lear n. DISAPPOINTING RE TURNS M A Y SIGNAL IT ’ S TIME FOR A CHANGE D EAR BRUCE : I ha v e about $3 million in v est ed thr ough a nancial planner and I need y our advic e T his past y ear I ear ned z er o in c ome fr om m y in v estmen ts He said tha t he w as pla ying it saf e with m y money He also said he didn ’ t lose an y of m y money I wr ot e him back and said in a sense he did lose money f or me because the mar ket has soar ed this past y ear He said in r etur n tha t in v esting in the st ock mar ket w as like putting money in a slot machine in L as V egas I had 30 per c en t in the mar ket with him. M y question is should I change t o another nancial planner? I ha v e t o liv e o m y in v estmen ts I think some of these so called nancial planners ar e just good salesmen. -C M ., via email D EAR C M .: C ut v er y quick ly t o the chase: A n y in v estmen t adviser who sa y s putting money in the st ock mar ket is like putting mon ey in a slot machine in L as V egas should be sho wn the door imme dia t ely Y ou ha v e $3 million and no r etur n? E v en a pr iv a t e c onser v a tiv e in v est or should ha v e c ome up with a t least $100,000, and I w ould nev er ha v e been sa tised with a $100,000 r etur n on $3 million. I w ould like t o k no w wha t k ind of f ees he has made f or himself E v en a t 4 per c en t which is a no br ainer y our $3 million should ha v e br ough t in $120,000, and y ou c ould gur e the per c en tage if y ou didn ’ t in v est it all with him. T his guy is a loser and should be dumped instan tly! ** D EAR BRUCE : Ho w much of y our inc ome should y ou spend on mon thly house e xpenses? I hear d tha t it should be 50 per c en t C an y ou t ell me if tha t sounds r igh t? -G.D ., via email D EAR G.D .: I don ’ t k no w wher e y ou hear d 50 per c en t T ha t is w a y out of balanc e S omewher e ar ound 30 per c en t w ould be as high as I w ould go and I w ould like t o sha v e tha t do wn a c ouple of poin ts S pending half of y our inc ome on just house e xpenses is far mor e than most budgets w ould ev er be able t o handle

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Local Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette| A9 Saturday, March 22, 2014 SRSO: An arrest is not an indication of guilt. The determination of guilt and innocence is ultimately the responsibility of the courts. ARCHER, JAMES WALKER, 40, Renee Circle, Milton, moving traf c violation, drugs-possession BISHOP, MICHAEL RAY, 32, Phoenix Drive, Milton, probation violation DAVENPORT, FAITH ANN, 30, Ventura Boulevard, Milton, probation violation GILLEN, JACOB CLIFFORD, 36, Trailer Park Court, Milton, probation violation HOUSER, RICHARD LEWIS, 27, Oglesby Road, Milton, failure to appear LUNDIN, RONNY KAY, 57, Gulf Breeze, damage prop x2, burglary, larceny MATLOCK, KEVIN ROY, 21, Gulf Breeze, probation violation MOORER, SANTON ANTONIO, 38, Pensacola, moving traf c violation, veh theft, larceny, resist of cer MOORIS, TIMOTHY RANDALL, 35, Kings Court, Pace, battery, probation violation PATRICK NATHAN RANDALL, 24, Pace Lane, Pace, fraudfalse statement, larceny, stolen prop-deal in PAYNE, JAMES WESLEY, 21, Gulf Breeze, nonmoving traf c violation, marijuanapossess x2, drug equip-possess PEACE, MICHAEL SHAWN, 34, Windham Road, Milton, aggravated assault with a weapon w w w .sr pr essgaz ett e .c om email: ne w s@srpr essgaz ett e .c om & ## 623-2120 ## "# % $ # $ # #" #"#" # ## " # #"#" Z ‚ … w Z ‚ … w ‰ p q q Z l f ‰ p q q Z l f 5 0 1 B e d r o o m A p a r t m e n t s i w … n f f q c f q  ¦ n Z u c p ` Z z z f c f u … ] Z ‚ f c w u p u ` w s f "## S p e c i a l D e s i g n F e a t u r e s A v a i l a b l e e Flo r id a D ep a r t m en t o f T ra n s p o r t a t io n (FD O T) w i l l h os t a p u b lic inf o r m a t io n m e et in g co n cer nin g a s a f et y s t ud y a lo n g U .S. 90. e s t ud y limi ts ext en d f r o m t h e E s c a m b i a C o un t y lin e t o S t a t e R o ad 87 S o u t h in Sa n t a R os a C o un t y e f o c u s o f t hi s a s s es sm en t i s vu ln era b le r o ad u s er s, s uc h a s p e des t r i a n s a n d b ic y c li s ts, w h o t ra v e l w i t hin t h e 16.2 mi le co r r ido r t hr o ug h P ace P e a R idg e a n d M i l t o n. A s p a r t o f t h e s t ud y exi s t in g f e a t ur es w i l l b e a n a l yze d in co n j un c t io n w i t h cra s h hi s t o r y a n d lo c a l s t a k e h o lder in p u t t o iden t if y p o t en t i a l s a f et y im p r o v em en ts. e m e et in g w i l l b e h e ld ur s d a y A p r i l 3, 2014 f r o m 5:30 p .m. un t i l 6:30 p .m. (CD T) a t t h e Sa n t a R os a C o un t y A udi t o r i um, 4530 S p i k es W a y M i l t o n, FL. i s m e et in g i s b ein g h e ld t o r e cei v e in p u t r e l a t e d s p e ci c a l l y t o p e des t r i a n a n d b ic y c li s t s a f et y w i t hin t h e U .S. 90 s t ud y co r r ido r M a ps, dra w in gs, a n d o t h er inf o r m a t io n w i l l b e di s p l a y e d e m e et in g w i l l b e co n d uc t e d in a n o p en h o u s e f o r m a t (n o f o r m a l p r es en t a t io n i s s c h e d u le d). Flo r id a D ep a r t m en t o f T ra n s p o r t a t io n r ep r es en t a t i v es w i l l b e o n h a n d t o a n sw er q ues t io n s a n d r e cei v e co mm en ts. Pu b lic p a r t ici p a t io n i s s o lici t e d w i t h o u t r ega r d t o race co lo r n a t io n a l o r ig in, a g e s ex, r e lig io n, di s a b i li t y o r fa mi l y s t a t u s. P er s o n s w h o r e q uir e s p e ci a l acco mm o d a t io n s un der t h e A m er ic a n s w i t h Di s a b i li t ies A c t o r p er s o n s w h o r e q uir e t ra n s l a t io n s er v ices (f r e e o f c h a r g e) s h o u ld co n t ac t t h e dep a r t m en t ’ s G en era l C o n s u l t a n t P r o j e c t M a n a g er J imm y S mi t h, P .E., a t (850) 638-3363, a t le a s t s e v en d a ys p r io r t o t h e m e et in g I f y o u h a v e a n y q ues t io n s a b o u t t hi s p r o j e c t o r t hi s m e et in g p le a s e c a l l J imm y S mi t h, P .E., a t t h e n um b er li s t e d a b o v e o r b y em a i l a t jsmi t h@p a n h a n d leg r o u p .co m. Y o u m a y a l s o co n t ac t I a n Sa t t er FD O T Pu b lic I nf o r m a t io n Dir e c t o r t o l l f r e e a t (888) 638-0250, ext. 1205 o r v i a em a i l a t i a n.s a t t er@do t.s t a t e .u s. WELCOMING NE W P AT IEN TS Joshua Davis, M .D. Pat Hill, A.R. N P. Joyce N ichols, A.R. N P. 9 † † { ‘ }  { “  ‹ | ™ † † u †   ˆ ) M onica N all, M .D. W e’re here to help. S E R V I N G S A N T A R O S A A N D E S C A M B I A C O U N T I E S F O R 2 5 Y E A R S S E R V I N G S A N T A R O S A A N D E S C A M B I A C O U N T I E S F O R 2 5 Y E A R S Sheriff’s REPORT Like us on SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE PEACE, MICHAEL SHAWN PAYNE, JAMES WESLEY PATRICK NATHAN MOORIS, TIMOTHY MOORER, SANTON MATLOCK, KEVIN ROY LUNDIN, RONNY KAY HOUSER, RICHARD LEWIS GILLEN, JACOB CLIFFORD DAVENPORT, FAITH ANN BISHOP, MICHAEL RAY ARCHER, JAMES WALKER from the river would not be able to use this project to nd them. Lewis said there would be few if any physical signs or markers along the trail as they would be unattractive. Ben Wells, graduate student at University of West Florida, who is using the project as his master’s thesis, said the project revolves around the cultural and archeological sites along the river. He said the trail will include a photo and video gallery as well as narration over video along the river. “The idea,” Wells said, “is to create a choose-your-own-adventurestyle experience, where someone who may be interested in the lumber industry can nd information about it, or those interested in the Civil War can nd information about the shipyards.” One sponsor for the project is the Blackwater Pyrates, an organization “formed to be of service in the local community” by “helping with projects or needs on or related to the water,” according to the Pyrates’ website. Captain Whitebeard, Walter Schumann, said there are about 13 shipwrecks within this section of the Blackwater River, three of which are visible from the bridge at Shields Point road. Schumann said the location is still unknown of the wreck of the H.M.S. Mentor, a British galleon lost in the Blackwater River in 1781. Wells said still shots will be able to show viewers some of the wreckage in the river, ful lling one of the goals of the project, which is to best protect, preserve and share the wreck sites so boaters, for example, don’t drop anchor and accidentally damage a wreck. He said the trail will serve as both a historical trail and a nature trail with images, video and information on bird nesting areas, sh and alligators; and a base for future trails further along the Blackwater and tributaries. Both Walls and Lewis gave six-month estimates for utilizing the virtual trail. Discussion ensued regarding how much money would come from the funds for the South End committee, the sector under which the NBMSS falls. “I think we really need to start developing attractions, and that’s what this is; this becomes an attraction,” said Laurie Gallup, TDC board member. Mike Loera, TDC board chairman, attending by phone, said the camera itself cost $73,000. Jack Sanborn, TDC board member, said he wanted to see “some Consumer Reports-type reports on a piece of equipment that’s $73,000, because I can see it sitting in a closet two years from now.” Kyle Holley, TDC board member and development director at United Way Santa Rosa, said he wanted to approve the recommendation for the $125,000 at the meeting so as not to lose time and let the county commission check on consumer reports and competitive bids for the camera. Negley said viewers who see something interesting in the camera might want to plan a trip to dive that particular area. She also said, “This would be the rst U.S.-based camera, and wow, what a big deal that’s going to be.” The motion passed to submit the grant request to the county commission without dissent. The request should be heard at the next county commission meeting in April. MARITIME from page A1 TDC from page A1 “I think we really need to start developing attractions, and that’s what this is; this becomes an attraction.” Laurie Gallup TDC board member “... I can see it sitting in a closet two years from now.” Jack Sanborn TDC board member

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Local A10 | Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014 BUNN Y SCR AMBLER S an ta R osa P r ess G az ett e 6629 Elv a S tr eet M ilt on FL 32570 Name T elephon e A ddr ess C ONTEST R ULES 1. C orr ec tly unscr amble the busines s names S cr ambled names ar e separ a t ed b y w or d but w or ds ma y not be in c orr ec t sequenc e 2. S end or bring y our en tr y t o T he S an ta R osa P r ess G az ett e 6629 Elv a S tr eet M ilt on, F lorida 32570 b y 5 pm Sunda y A pril 13, 2014 (mail slot on main door). 3. O nly one winner per househo ld Emplo y ees of T he S an ta R osa P r ess G az ett e and their familie s ar e inelig ible t o win. 4. D r a wing will be held on A pril 14, 2014 a t 1 pm and the winners will be notied b y t elephon e and the y will also be publish ed in T he S an ta R osa P r ess G az ett e on A pril 16, 2014. 5. No phot oc opies ac c ept ed SSPER SORS ’ A TEZ AEGT NA T SA ROPUMC TE L O THENC GY O DIFITRC EE STUC GEB TDU ENDIIS QUO TUBIE SER URZSIP AND SR JVIA NISOGB CEIN SI C WEIT T O ASC ONSIC D ARELME MEOHS SELIW R UF ALEN TPE RMEERPI MOGIGRO N RLPUPE IRLSOFT E TH PUTIL N YUGO RO WDHA ROLIOFG N S ’D B ND A CLL ARE TURES ST CHE SAIEFT LSO GOU ANCNCIT I Y QUE T EINF D AN NE WI SSRPITI NIFSUO LHIL TUQEENR AISE EBR UY A SA U ERIF P A MC T CEIOSY ND A NNT A OL AI IBR UL A MNRCEOI T A ONIUN L AFREED TRICED SHE VER AR T S

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Local Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette| A11 Saturday, March 22, 2014 (850) 995-5905 Open T ues & W ed 9-6pm Thurs & Fri 9-7pm Sat 9-4pm 4430 Hwy 90 suite C (Nettlew ood Plaza) P ace, FL 32571 All Hair cuts $ 9 95 $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 G M E \ ^ ? B UR R I T O E XP R E S S 4 5 14 H ig h w a y 9 0 P a c e F L 3 2 5 7 1 | P h o n e : ( 8 5 0 ) 9 9 4 3 4 0 2 C a n Ac c umu l a t e $ 1 t o g e t F R E E B u r r i t o s ! A s k A b o u t D e t a i l s L i m i t ed Ti m e O f f er C O M I N G S O O N T O $ 1 0 0 O F F o n B u r r i t o E x p r e s s S t ar t ing in A p r i l 2 0 14 Har vestersFCU.com 850.857.4328 (HFCU) 2.99% APR Auto Loans with a 3 month payment vacation! *APR = Annual Per centage Rate. Rates & terms subject to change. Rates available to quali ed applicants only See HFCU for additional details. I t’s Ou r E as ter Sa l e BIG /4T5M P=O5 @G3/@ 8 ƒ Jcjn /ƒnc 3cxx @nn :ƒl} ~ ˆ 8 ƒ Bsx‰} /ƒnc 3cxx 4nhhsn 3} ~ ~ 6629 Elv a S tr eet M ilt on F lor ida 6 0 1 5 4 41 Our F amily Ser ving Y our s for 86 Y ear s! Lewis Fune ral Homes Lewis Fune ral Homes 4777 W Spencer F ield P ace 995-5702 6405 Hwy. 90 W est Milton 623-2243 7794 Na varre Pkwy. Na varre 939-5122 6015298 L o c a t e d I n s id e S u r p i z e s I n s id e C h e c k F B f o r D A I L Y D E A L S 5 0 82 H i g h w a y 9 0 Pa ce 85 0 9 95 0 0 8 9 Fr ee Ta x Retur n Extensions E quity A ccounting E nr olled A gents THE T AX PROFESSIONALS (850) 995-8848 4430 HWY 90 SUITE H | P ACE, FL 32571 S. RICK F AIRCLOTH, EA, A T A, A TP MARCH 3 Cooper, Cody Alen to Delp, Caitlyn Justine Newton, Christopher Randall to Hilligoss, Britney Amber Nassar, Eddie Lee Michael to Brinkmeier, Gabrielle Denise Dupont, Marion Richard to Dupont, Miriam Josephine Faison McMillen, Daniel Lee to Mase, Jenni Lynn Harris Runyon, Michael Harold to Castle, Tracy Michelle Leach Carroll, Cliffton James to Odom, Megan Leigh McDaniel, Jimmie Wayne to Thompson, Amy Lou McElroy, Neil David to Orr, Anna Lynn MARCH 4 Cox, Joshua Ryan Van Alstyne to Turner, Madison Lynn Reiners, Craig Charles to Gragg, Michelle Leigh Ochoa, Reyes Luis Miguel to Whelan, Ashley Marlitt Starrett, John William to Delsanto, April Nitasha Thorsen, Gary Bredal to Lay, Stephanie Louise Brown, Larry Alan to Touchstone, Elizabeth Ann Johnson, Bradley Shawn to Morrell, Paige Lynn MARCH 5 Holland, Seth Ryan to Rollo, Natalie Danielle Miller, Ryan Scott to Penton, Carissa Ann Hall, Jeremiah Kenneth Michael to Toole, Erin Kimberly Duke, Walter Eugene to Guidry, Melanie Ann Sausberry, Nathan to Travis, Sheila Grace MARCH 6 Lehew, Matthew John to Gillis, Whitney Lane Cook, Louis Frederick, Jr. to Alexander, Connie Melenda Lambert, James Eugene to Birchett, Morgan Jean Lopez-Ramirez, Pierre Angelo to Kang, Lunling MARCH 10 Lunsford, Tanner Daniel to Cotten, Amber Briana Clayberger, Joseph Richard, Jr. to Harmon, Danielle Nicole Jahn, Keith Alan to Fourie, Lulu Laurika MARCH 11 Bennett, Benjamin Charles to Hart, Kristen Michelle Schindler, Mark Christopher to Percy, Jessica Nichole Marichovich, Adam Michael to Lindner, Jessica Marie Scott, Christopher Dewayne to Marler, Mallisa Marie Martin, Victor Lee to Shuler, Lovins Feliia Lynn MARCH 12 McGrew, Andrew Maxwell to Lenz, Crystal Rose MARCH 13 White, Dylan Mackenzie to Green, Angelina Michelle Durst, John Vincent to Holley, Stefanie Marie MARCH 14 Mitchem, Michael Shane to Garcia, Antonette Marie Kittle McDonald, Chase Alan to McIlveene, Estes Haley Nicole MARCH 4 Stellitano, Nicholas M and Cooper, Jennifer E Lancaster, Connie Sue and Lancaster, Keith Eric MARCH 5 Mitchell, Carol Ruth and Mitchell, Jeff Drew, LLana and Drew, Bobby Bradley, Delores Jean and Bradley, Jeffery Hawkins, Debra Taylor and Hawkins, Kevin Dale Panzik, Nakita and Mason, Denver I. III Tipton, Linda Leigh and Tipton, Danny Wayne Church, Keith Wayne and Church, Melody Y Bowman, Sheppard Eugene and Bowman, Cheryl Herndon, Morgan R and Herndon, Donald J MARCH 10 Whitman, Amber and Whitman, Charles Van Zile, Richard W and Van Zile, Tonya R Puskarich, Sonya K and Puskarich, David J Miller, Thompson Kristy and Thompson, Shawn Rogers, Elizabeth D and Rogers, Thomas Moore, Jacob W and Moore, Kelly Bream McLaughlin, Sabrina Scherer and McLaughlin, Allen Wayne MARCH 11 Short, Leonard W III and Short, Katherine E Holt, Ashley Deanna and Holt, Charlton Patrick Nobrega, Jason A and Nobrega, Candy L Bragdon, Daniel Joshua and Bragdon, Georgiana Vion MARCH 12 Bliss, Brittany Breanne and Bliss, Jeremy Levi Coder, Joseph William and Coder, Jeanette Marie Vaughn, Jennifer Ann and Vaughn, Jason Edward Moore, Joseph D and Moore, Latitia R Andrews, Dana Ray and Andrews, Nancy Marie Duke, Tasha M and Duke, Steven Bruce Jr Laffrey, Amy Janine and Laffrey, Damon S Philman, Timothy Ray and Philman, Micole Lynn O’Quinn, Cecil R. Jr. and O’Quinn, Angela T MARCH 13 Warren, Jason Samuel and Warren, Kristina Webb, Latisha B and Webb, Daniel P. Scauzillo, Robert James Jr. and Scauzillo, Tracy Lynn Patrick, Deleasa D. and Patrick, Wesley B Post, Gabriel P. and Post, Ashley M. Special to the Press Gazette Every 2 seconds, someone in the U.S. needs a blood transfusion. Blood donations are crucial to the health and well-being of our community. That’s why Wal-Mart invites people in the community to join them for special “Share Your Power” blood drives during March, at select Northern Florida and Southern Georgia area store locations, where you can make a difference by donating blood. Locally, a drive will be 1-7 p.m. Monday, March 24, at Wal-Mart in Milton. All blood donors will receive a $10 Wal-Mart gift card and a wellness checkup including blood pressure, temperature, iron count and a cholesterol screening. Generally healthy people age 16 or older who weigh at least 110 pounds can donate blood. To learn more about the importance of blood donation and how donors can target the power of their blood type, visit oneblood.org or call 1-800-68-BLOOD (1-800-682-5663). There are eight different blood types, and each one holds a unique power to save lives. OneBlood’s Target Your Type program gives donors the ability to learn the power of their blood type and how to donate the specic components of their blood that are most needed by patients at area hospitals. March MARRIAGES March DIVORCES Wal-Mart to host blood drive Monday their taxes since the 2006 litigation. A notice of pro posed taxes went out in August 2006. At that time, Brown sought the opinion of Florida Department of Revenue attorneys, and based on the fact that leases on Navarre Beach are held for 99 years and renewed for 99 years for perpetuity, those taxes can be levied. Earlier this year, U.S. Congressman Jeff Miller sponsored H.R. 2954, the Public Access and Lands Improvement Act, which he says simplies the property rights issue. Cur rent federal law, Miller said, makes it impossible for beach residents and businesses to obtain title to their land. Miller said the legislation would give leaseholders the option of attaining fee simple title to their property. In English law, a fee simple (or fee simple absolute) is an es tate in land, a form of free hold ownership. It is the way real estate is owned in common law countries and is the highest ownership interest possible that can be had in real property. Santa Rosa County Commissioner Jim Melvin said, in his opinion, until the issue of fee simple is re solved, it would be the equi table thing to do to reduce Navarre Beach residents’ lease fees to a dollar. “I’m no attorney, but some people may view it as such,” he said, “to be double taxation to pay a lease fee on top of property taxes.” NAVARRE BEACH from page A1

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Local A12 | Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014

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Spring has sprung Spring is here; it has risen from the throws of winter. It’s time for productivity, accomplishment, goal setting; well, it is for me. Spring is about the only season I want to work in the yard. I want to dig in the dirt and plant flowers, herbs and veggies, drag dead limbs across the yard, rake stuff and clean. I’m sure it’s the only time my husband ever hears me actually say, “Can I help you in the yard?” Spring is also time for festivals, camping, hiking, cleaning, cycling, tennis, antiquing, canning, painting, organizing, garden pruning, running, softball, reading in the swing, and celebrating family. There’s Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Easter, and of course, my birthday. I’m energized by spring, but when summer rolls around the heat exhausts me. Rarely do I venture outside during the heat of summer; however I try to make up for the “down” time in the fall and spring. But I’ve made myself a goal. I’ve challenged myself to organize all storage areas in my home. Closets, cabinets, attic, garage, baskets, chests, you name it, it will be organized. It’s going to take a while but I’m determined. My dear husband keeps everything— even broken small appliances—stored in the garage along with old pillows, greasy mechanic cloths, and basketballs. And he’s not the only one. My daughter, who no longer lives in my house, has formal gowns hanging in the closet she’ll never wear, and ballet tutus from when she was six. And Barbies. Lots of Barbies. Cruel as it may be, these items will be going by the way side soon, because I’m on a roll. Drawers filled with items I’ve never seen before or have any idea what to do with, will be taken to the trash. As serious as I am about recycling, its times like these I wish I didn’t care about the environment or the condition of the landfills because all I want to do is throw stuff away. I’m going for the greasy towels and the nasty pillows. Out of site, out of mind, right? I say all of this to you, dear readers, with courage. Because when I look at my sweet husband holding a broken radio, telling me nicely, “I can fix it,” my heart melts. That’s why I will do it when he’s not looking. By AARON LITTLE 623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com The roller derby season kicks off March 29 at Skate Land Skate Center in Milton with a double header of the Cajun Roller Girls against the Pensacola Roller Gurlz Travel Team and the Emerald Coast Roller Derby (ECRD) against the Pensacola Roller Gurlz Home Team. Doors open at 6 p.m., and the game starts at 7 p.m. Debby “Deb.autry” Meyer of the ECRD said roller derby is the “largest growing sport in the U.S.” and said it’s a female contact sport. Meyer said if people like hockey for the ghts, they should come see roller derby. However, Sarah “Anita B. Cracken” Tavares, also said players are drawn to roller derby to meet independent women and nd a physical challenge. Tavares said the players support each other by helping with kids and Meals on Wheels. Melanie “Sinderblocks” Crooke, an ECRD member since 2010, said other teams might be opponents but not enemies. She said players of different teams socialize often. Tavares, who gained an interest in roller derby after receiving her masters degree in health care administration, said the “diversity is crazy among players.” She said some are teachers, nurses, and social workers. The game starts with a group of players known as blockers going around the track, followed behind by two “jammers,” one from each team. Teams earn points when jammers pass opposing blockers. Blockers help their own team jammer move through the group of blockers and block opposing jammers from passing. Players compared the athleticism of the game to football and basketball, only in this case there’s no object. “I’m the ball,” Christine Blackburn, ECRD player and nurse at the naval hospital, said. with Women’s Roller Derby Rollin’, blockin’, jammin’ PHOTOS BY AARON LITTLE | Press Gazette Season begins March 29 L IFESTYLE www.srpressgazette.com Saturday, March 22, 2014 B Page 1 Section PAMELA HOLT Keeping It Simple

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Freshman Destiny Herring races to rst base in the rst inning of action in a district match-up against Chipley High School. By BECKY BONDURANT Special to the Press Gazette 12-0. Twelve games and no losses until Tuesday, March 19. To the Lady Royals softball team, Tuesday night might have felt like a death in their family but in prospective it might have helped them more than realize right now. Ten minutes before the Royals faced off with the Chipley Tigers from Washington County, Jay’s Head Coach Brian Watson had his girls huddled up and provides them with precise information, “Make sure you play every inning, every play. They are not better than us, run the bases, hit the ball and play the whole seven innings.” The girls stand straight and listen diligently to every word their coach said. Each player wears a bow with sparkles in their hair, after all they are girls, but when they pick up a bat or a glove they are softball players who have won 12 straight games. “Oh, he is hard. He makes very sure we are all doing what we need to do to keep improving and winning,” said junior catcher Samantha Steadham, in reference to Coach Watson. “He keeps us focused and playing hard.” Moments before their huddle the Lady Royals were scattered across the eld, warming up and guided by Watson and his assistants, Jessica Odom and Brian Moye. Their warm up session before game time is organized and serious. “Girls you were awesome warming up today, that says a lot for you,” shares Moye with the team. Chipley stands to the side of the in eld and gives close attention to the team. ‘The weather has been a big distraction this season,” Watson said. “We want to make it to the play-offs and all the way to nals. We have to stay focused on our realistic goals for now.” Senior Royal Pitcher Chasity McCranie has gone 10 straight games on the mound, 10 straight wins. “The winning streak is stressful in the way it makes us want to work harder,” she said. McCranie has been playing softball for nine years and is considering continuing her athletic career for either of two community colleges in Alabama. She has her future planned; she wants to be a physician. Each game McCranie steps onto the eld, she caries the weight on her small shoulders of the winning streak. Against Chipley, McCranie and the Royals suffered its rst loss of the season, the streak ended with a score of 3-1. McCranie, who pitched all seven innings, struck out six batters and allowed three runs. Early in the rst inning, Chipley had one runner on base when a batter sent the ball deep over the left eld fence. Chipley automatically went up by two adding another run later in the game. The Tigers stepped up to the plate with an intensity that could be felt from the rst pitch. For Jay, Dana Blackmon who went 2-for-3 was the only run for the night. Taylor Moore earned a RBI off her hit that scored Blackmon. The winning streak ended for the Lady Royals and McCranie, but in the minds of true competitors their dream is not over. Their loss may be very bene cial to them when the district tournament starts. A Jay parent Diane Tagert re ected on the loss, “No better time for it to happen. It had to come sooner or later. Now it is time to work hard and let the hard work pay off,” she said. The Lady Royals will play a visit to the Chipley Tigers and Tuesday, March 25 for a second round of District 3-1A softball action against the only team who has beat them this season. The Royals return from their spring break vacation with an amazing 12-1 record and are 5-1 in their district. They will have bows in their hair, bats in their hands and a new determination in their swing. www.srpressgazette.com Saturday, March 22, 2014 B Page 2 Section S PORTS PHOTOS BY BECKY BONDURANT | Special to the Press Gazette Above Jay left elder Dana Blackmon grabs a base hit from the Chipley Tigers. At right “If you want it, you know what to do” encourages Coach Brian Moye as his team huddles before the start of their 13th season game. The Royals winning 12 game streak ended against Chipley. The Royal winning streak ends but not their dream The 2014 Jay Royals softball team, kneeling from left: Harley Bradley, Megan Mulford, Emily Dobson, Michaela Stewart, Samantha Steadham and Chasity McCranie. Standing from left: Holly Fagatt, Harley Tagert, Ashlyn Geck, Baleigh Upton, Destiny Herring, Taylor Moore, Sydney Lowery and Dana Blackmon. Bats Bows Bats Bows & Senior pitcher Chasity McCranie throws one across the plate against the Chipley Tigers. Against Chipley, the Royals suffered its first loss of the season, the streak ended with a score of 3-1.

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Local Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette| B3 Saturday, March 22, 2014

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2077822 Gun Show February 23rd & 24th Ft. W alton Beach Fairgr ounds FREE P ARKING Concealed W eapons Class Sat/Sun 1 1am or 2pm Floridagunshow s.com Sat 9-5 Sun 10-4 P ensacola F airgr ounds MARCH 29th & 30th In this business you have to know your audience and what they want. WE DO Strong local news co verage, good ser vice and a great product to sell. W e’ re growing stronger and reaching more readers ever y day Be in the kno w! MORE people r ead The Sant a Rosa Pr ess Gazett e last F ebruar y than in ANY month since 2010. Y ou hav e t o KNO W to GRO W w! Be in the kno Subscribe to The Santa Rosa Press Gazette today Call 850-623-2120 Sports B4 | Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014 BECKY BONDURANT | Special to the Press Gazette Justin Abel has a big night for the Jaguars from the mound as well as at the plate. Jaguars win back-to-back By BECKY BONDURANT Special to the Press Gazette The Jaguars are undefeated in 1-1A district baseball action. Despite the weather, Central High School traveled Monday, March 18, to district rival Jay High School, and proved to be more than the Royals could handle. Central defeated Jay 6-2. From the mound, Central’s Justin Abel pitched his fourth game of the season, lling the mound for all seven innings. Abel had four strikeouts and did not give up any base-onballs. He only allowed four hits for two runs scored. Abel also was in his grove from the plate as well going 2-for-3 with one RBI. Nolan Frady and Darren Smith did not allow the miserable weather to interfere with their swing either. Frady was 2-for-2, had two runs, one RBI, a double and stole two bases. Smith cleared the fence for a home run as well as being 2-for-2 with one run and one RBI. Jay’s Tate Upton went 1-for-3 with the bat and Jay Carnley scored one run and went 1-for-3 from the plate. “We played some good baseball tonight,” Central Coach Mike Phillips said. On Tuesday night, March 19, Central hosted Laurel Hill for another district game. The Hoboes handed the Jaguars its sixth district win 10-0. Dalton Dunlap (2-0) was right at home on the Jaguar mound pitching ve innings with four strikeouts, and only allowing three hits. Abel had another big night swinging the bat going 3-for-3 with 2RBI and one run. Senior Evan Manning came through with 3-for-3 with three runs, two RBIs and a stolen base. Chase Jackson contributed to the night with two RBIs, one run and went 1-for-2 from the plate. The Pensacola Christian Academy Warriors will play the Jaguars at Central on Tuesday night, March 25. Special to the Press Gazette Flippin’ Out Gymnastics in Milton introduced a new competitive sport to our area; the gym started the rst competitive Acrobatic Gymnastics team in the Panhandle. Flippin’ Out Gymnastics is a USA Gymnastics Club Member, and coaches and athletes are registered USA Gymnastics members. The girls on the team attended their very rst competition in New Orleans. The level 5 pair brought home rst place, and the level 6 trio brought home third. The coaches, parents and students at Flippin’ Out are proud of the girls for doing so well at their rst meet. The team will return to New Orleans on April 5 and April 26 for additional meets this season. Look for the Flippin’ Out Acro Team at community events later this year. Flippin’ Out places 1st, 3rd FLIPPIN’ OUT TEAM Level 5 pair: Avery Smith (8), Julia Johnston (8) Level 6 trio: Sydney Stenerson (11), Katie Matteson (11), Madison McArthur (9) Coach: Sara Atsatt Manager: Sara McBride A-FLIGHT First Place +4 Tom Couchman Second Place +1 Ray Salerno Tie Third Place Even Jim Divens Rod Manning Tie Fifth Place -1 Bob Barbaree Jim Gray B-FLIGHT First Place +9 Patrick McCrary Second Place +7 Dave Beard Tie Third Place +5 Chuck Brewster John Boivin STONEBROOK MEN SCORES STONEBROOK WOMEN SCORES GAME: TEAM PUTTS First Place Pat Daniels Betty Lucey Second Place Sharon Reiser Wanda Couchman Third Place Michelle Kilgore Pat Findley Chip-Ins Pat Daniels #9 Like us on SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE

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Local Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette| B5 Saturday, March 22, 2014 6518403 #1 41 04 2014 SIERRA CREW CAB MSRP $41,725 SELL $32,157 SA VE $9568 #1 4053TT 2014 TERRAIN SLE MSRP $27,390 SELL $25,167 SA VE $2223 #1 407 4T 2014 BUICK VERANO MSRP $26,290 SELL $22,990 SA VE $3300 #1 4045TT 2014 ACADIA SL T MSRP $41,315 SELL $36,879 SA VE $4436 #1 3280 2013 BUICK LACROSSE MSRP $34,765 SELL $29,265 SA VE $5500 #1 3359TT 2014 BUICK ENCLA VE MSRP $45,550 SELL $40,950 SA VE $4600 WE WILL W ORK HARD T O MAKE Y OU HAPPY *ALL PRICES + T AX, T AG & FEES. ALL A V AILABLE REBA TES APPLIED Y OU MA Y NO T QU ALIFY FOR ALL REBA TES. SEE DEALER FOR DET AILS. Save Thousands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FOUR E F R E SantaRosaCountyFair TICKETS WithEveryNewSubscription DropByOurOceForDetails Community .....................................A2Opinion ...........................................A4 Diversions ........................................A8Sports...............................................B2Lifestyles ..........................................B1Classieds ........................................B6 TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 106 Issue 24Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com See shipwrecks below BlackwaterBy AARON LITTLE623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com Underwater cameras will be used in creating the upcoming Blackwater Maritime Heritage Trail, according to Doug Lasater, president of Bagdad Waterfronts Florida Partnership Inc., who spoke before the Milton City Council on March 3. Lasater said the Web-based trail will focus in phase one of the Blackwater River from the Interstate 10 bridge to Carpenters Park. Dr. Richard Lewis, vice-president, said the project has been in the works for two years, and he gave a rough estimate of six months for completion. Lewis conrmed the idea for the project will see a website where visitors can travel Blackwater River through images and video above and below the water, learning area history including the Arcadia Mill and numerous shipwrecks below the Blackwater River surface. Lewis echoed what Lasater said at the council meeting: Shipwreck information will be available through the project, but not exact locations. Lewis said those who wish to illegally salvage wrecks CHIPLEY FOILS ROYALS PEr R FEc C T SEASON 75 cents Saturday, March 22, 2014 GazetteSanta Rosas Press Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.comTweet us @srpressgazette and like us on facebook.com PAGE B2$10.8 million owed By PAMELA HOLT623-2120| @pamelaholtpg pholt@srpressgazette.com In conclusion of a longstanding legal battle, Navarre Beach residents now will pay property taxes on their land, according to the Supreme Court of the State of Florida. Greg Brown, Santa Rosa County property appraiser, who spearheaded this change, said all land and improvements are now taxable to Santa Rosa County. Before now, Navarre Beach residents were required to pay taxes on their buildings, not land. Unsure how their court battle over property taxes would turn out when litigation began in 2006, some residents chose to pay taxes under the promise of a rebate if they ultimately won their suit. Those who did not now will have to pay big bills. Stan Colie Nichols, Santa Rosa County tax collector, said he is relieved to nally have a conclusion on the matter. He said the Supreme Court deemed the residents on Navarre Beach to have equitable ownership all the rights to their property as do an inland property owners, and with this comes the responsibility of property taxes. Nichols said taxes owed from 2006 until 2013, with penalties and interest, total $10,872,740. Nichols said the county will meet next week to iron out payment options, but he said residents have received tax notices and are well aware how much they owe. Nichols said it is important to note the typical twoyear grace period will not apply to residents who are more than two years delinquent, so it will change the process if they cannot pay their taxes. Someone else can purchase their certicate, and if they want to immediately le for the deed, they will only have a few months to raise the money. Taxes for 2013 are delinquent on April 1, Nichols said. He said the majority of Navarre Beach residents have paid Navarre Beach owners must pay taxBy AARON LITTLE623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com Santa Rosa Countys Tourist Development Council had a regular meeting March 19, during which Sonya Negley, grant writer for the Navarre Beach Marine Science Station, presented a grant recommendation for $125,000 to cover, in part, installation of an underwater camera to view underwater, the marine life and also the things that are on the reef. After much research with NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), the NBMSS came across Blue Eyes Ocean Underwater Camera, which is a selfcleaning, pan, tilt, zoom camera that has scientic nodes on it, Negley said. She said the camera would accommodate anyone interested in the reefs and marine life who cant go out and snorkel or scuba the reef. There would be a live streaming video of that marine life. She also said the scientic nodes would allow users to test the salinity and quality of the water through the Oceans Classroom program and the camera. We feel this is the best way to accommodate everyone, she said, regarding special needs individuals interested in seeing into the ocean who otherwise cant do so.SRC Fair: green eggs, livestock shows, Glow Rage See Na A Va ARRE BEaACH A11TDC discusses grant for $73K camera By AARON LITTLE623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com The Santa Rosa County Fair is opening this year with a ribbon cutting on April 4 for the newly leased fairgrounds from the county, according to Rick Paschall, Santa Rosa County Fair board member. Kyle Holley, development director at United Way Santa Rosa and fair board member, said the Santa Rosa County Fair is the only one growing among 16 counties in northwest Florida. The fairs growth is evident not only in the new June Ates Arena that opened December, but also new attractions like Glow Rage, an all-ages dance music experience where attendees may be sprayed with paint, according to Anthony Daughtery, entertainment coordinator of the fair, and in the new livestock shows appearing at the fair for the rst time. Holley said there will be three shows debuting: a steer show, a heifer show and a breeder pen show. Imagine a kid leading an animal in the ring, he said to differentiate the steer and heifer shows from the pen show. He said Locals learn basic CPR Web-based maritime trail available soonSee Fa A IR A7 The idea is to create a choose-your-ownadventure-style experience, where someone who may be interested in the lumber industry can nd information about it, or those interested in the Civil War can nd information about the shipyards. Ben Wells, University of West Florida graduate studentSee TDC C A9 See Ma ARItTImME A9DANIE IE L TH H AME E S | Contract PhotojournalistThe American Red Cross CPR class hosted by Milton Community Center was well attended Wednesday evening. First-timer Josh Cuchens, left, said it was important for him to learn basic skills in caring for injured people and how to assess the situation should a need arise. I wanted to take the class for everyday use and be a better citizen, Cuchens said. Justin Blackwood, right, said it was a refresher course for him. I learned some extras I did not know before. I took it for my co-workers, but also for my family, he said.

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A2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014 Elected OFFICIALSCOCOUNTY GOO VERNMENTCOUNTY COMMISSION District 1: Jim Williamson, 4351 Berryhill Road, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. Email is comm-williamson@santarosa..gov District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Road, Milton, FL 32583; phone 983-1877. Email is commcole@santarosa..gov District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla Highway, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. Email is commsalter@santarosa..gov District 4: Jim Melvin, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL; phone 983-1877. Email is comm-melvin@santarosa..gov District 5: Lane Lynchard, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1877. Email is commlynchard@santarosa..gov The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at 9 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays. The leaders meet in committee at 9 a.m. Mondays preceding the Thursday meetings. Meetings are held in commission chambers of the Administrative Complex on U.S. 90. Phone 983-1877 for information or to reach their ofces.SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFFWendell Hall, 5755 E. Milton Road, Milton, FL 32588; phone 983-1100. Email is whall@srso.netSANTA ROSA COUNTY CLERK OF COURTSDonald Spencer, P.O. Box 472, Milton, FL 32572; phone 983-1973. Email is santacourtfeed@chjn.netSANTA ROSA COUNTY TAX COLLECTORStan C. Nichols, 6495 Caroline St., Suite E, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1800. Email is snichols@srctc. comSANTA ROSA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERGreg Brown, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1880. Email is info@srcpa.orgSANTA ROSA COUNTY ELECTIONS SUPERVISORTappie Villane, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1900. Email is villane@santarosa..govSS TA A TE GO O VERNMENT Rep. Doug Broxson: 5988 Hwy 90, Pensacola State College, Milton Campus, Building 4000, Room 4013, Milton, FL 32583, phone 626-3113. Email is Doug.Broxson@myoridahouse.gov Sen. Greg Evers: 209 E. Zaragoza St., Pensacola, FL 32502, phone 595-0213. Email is Evers.Greg. web@senate.gov Gov. Rick Scott: PLO5 The Capitol, 400 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; phone 488-7146. Email is _governor@myorida.comFF EDERAL AL GO O VERNMENTHOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Rep. Jeff Miller: 336 Cannon House Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; local phone is 479-1183; D.C. Ofce phone (202) 225-4136. Pensacola ofce address: 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503. Toll free number is 866-3671614. Website: http://jeffmiller.house.govSENATE Sen. Marco Rubio: 284 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 850-433-2603. Website: www.rubio. senate.gov Sen. Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202-224-5274; fax 202-224-8022. Website: http://billnelson.senate.govWHITE HOUSE President Barack Obama: The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. Email is president@whitehouse.gov Vice President Joe Biden: Office of the Vice President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414.SCSC HOOL OOL GO O VERNMENTSCHOOL BOARD Superintendent: Tim Wyrosdick, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-5000. Email is wyrosdickt@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 1: Diane Scott, 5710 Munson Highway, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-0413. Email is scottdl@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton, FL 32570; phone 623-6299. Email is winkleseh@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre, FL 32566; phone 939-2661. Email is colemanmd@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 4: Jennifer Granse, 3266 Abel Ave., Pace, FL 32571; phone 995-8785. District 5: Scott Peden, 3156 Pins Lane, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563; phone 934-0701. Email is pedenst@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays at 5086 Canal St. in Milton. Phone: 983-5000.CICI TY GO O VERNMENT Milton City Hall, Mayor Guy Thompson, 6738 Dixon St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5400. City Manager is Brian Watkins Town of Jay, Mayor Kurvin Qualls, 3822 Highway 4, Jay, FL 32565, phone 675-2719 Gulf Breeze City Hall, Mayor Beverly Zimmern, 1070 Shoreline Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, phone 934-5100. City Manager is Edwin Buz Eddy Mr. Billy Ray Stokes, born July 15, 1943, passed away peacefully, surrounded by his loved ones, at his home in the Woodlands in Pensacola, Fla., on Thursday March 13, 2014, after a long, hard and brave battle with esophageal cancer. Billy was an avid gardener; you could always nd him in his yard with his owers. Preceded in death by his mother, Grace Ingram Stokes; father, Lester T. stokes; maternal grandparents, Katheryn Stafford Ingram and Samuel C. Ingram; and paternal grandparents, Mattie Cobb Stokes and George C. Stokes. Billy is survived by one brother, Jerry Wayne Stokes and his wife, Janice; three nephews, Donald W. Stokes, Stanley Jackson and Douglas Jackson; two nieces, Connie Stokes and Lori Elder and her husband, Mark; three great-nephews, Ashton Jernigan, Devin Austin and Cory Stokes; one greatniece, Alayna Jackson; a very beloved and devoted friend, like a sister to Billy, Sue Hawthorne; and a loving and devoted friend, Judy Johnson; two very special cousins, Thelma Wendt and Nancy Walters; four very special friends, Jim and Nancy Williamson, and Dan and Natalie Soloway; so many close and dear friends and neighbors; and Billys devoted loyal friend and cat buddy, Prince Harry Stokes. A message from Billy: I would like to say thank you to three very special people from Emerald Coast Hospice, Sherry, Megan and Jason, for all the kindness and love they have showed me and for being there. Also a thank you to the staff at Emerald Coast Hospice for all your kindness and help. Funeral services for Billy will be 11 a.m. Saturday, March 22, 2014, at the Lewis Funeral Home, Milton Chapel. Chaplin Jason Adams will ofciate. Burial will follow in Milton Cemetery with Lewis Funeral Home directing. Visitation was 6-8 p.m. Friday, March 21, at the funeral home. To honor Billys life, there will be a Celebration Gathering after the funeral services, at a venue to be announced. www. lewisfuneralhomes.net.A A Me E SSAge GE Fr R Om M He E Aven VEN Perhaps you arent ready yet To have to say good-bye, Perhaps youve thought of things You wish you had of said...well so have I. For one thing Id have told you Not to worry about me, I am with the Lord in Heaven now You knew thats where Id be. Im sorry if youre feeling sad... Im so happy now... Ive asked the Lord to heal the hurt And comfort you somehow. Its hard at the beginning I know youll make it through, I hope it helps to know Ill be waiting here for you.Billy Ray SStokes1943 2014 BILLy Y RAy Y St STOKeESSpecial to the Press GazetteAll Board of County Commission meetings and other county department meetings are in the County Administrative Center Board Room, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, unless otherwise indicated. M arine A A dvisory, A A pril 1: Canceled Tourist Development North End C C o mmittee: 8:30 a.m. April 3 at Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce, 5247 Stewart St., MiltonC C o mmission C C ommittee : 9 a.m. April 7 T ourist Development S S outh End C C ommittee: 9 a.m. April 9 at Navarre Visitors Center, 8543 Navarre Parkway, Navarre B uilding C C ode Board of A A djustments: 2:30 p.m. April 9 at Public Services Conference Room, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, MiltonC C o mmission Regular: 9 a.m. April 10 at Tiger Point Community Center, 1370 Tiger Park Lane, Gulf Breeze Zoning Board Meeting: 6 p.m. April 10 R ES S TO O RE C C ouncil: 3 p.m. April 14F F i re Department Executive Group: 6:30 p.m. April 14 at Emergency Operations Center, 4499 Pine Forest Road, Milton T ourist Development C C ouncil Board Meeting: 3 p.m. April 16 at Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce, 5247 Stewart St., MiltonA A v iation A A dvisory C C ommittee: 5 p.m. April 16C C o mmission C C ommittee: 9 a.m. April 21S S HI I P A A ffordable Housing A A dvisory C C ommittee: 3 p.m. April 22 at Public Services Media Room, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton B agdad A A rchitectural A A dvisory Board: 8:30 a.m. April 23 at Public Services Conference Room, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton P ublic S S afety C C oordinating C C ouncil Meeting: 11:30 a.m. April 23 at Sheriffs Department Training Room, 5755 E. Milton Road, Milton Parks and Recreation: 5:30 p.m. April 23C C o mmission Regular: 9 a.m. April 24L L o cal Mitigation S S trategy Task F F orce: 1:30 p.m. April 24 at Public Services Conference Room, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, MiltonC C o mmission S S pecial Rezoning Meeting: 6 p.m. April 24 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a public hearing, you are entitled to the provision of certain assistance. Contact Emily Spencer at 983-1855 or at 6495 Caroline St., Milton at least one week before the date of the public hearing. Agendas and minutes are also available at www.santarosa. .gov. All meetings in the board room are recorded on DVD and available for purchase, and most can be viewed live and/or replayed online. From Staff ReportsMilton/Pace Relay for L L ife eventThe last team meeting for the 2014 Milton/Pace Relay for Life event will be at 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 25 at the Locklin Building behind the Santa Rosa Hospital. All teams, businesses, churches, clubs, civic organizations and individuals wanting to learn about this event are invited. The 2014 Relay for Life will be April 25-26 on the grounds of the Milton Pensacola State College Track. The American Cancer Society is very active in Santa Rosa County, and this event provides assistance to help ght the ght. For more information, call 2662285 or visit RelayForLife. org/MiltonPaceFL.SS pring into Vegetable Gardening S S eries If you have ever considered planting a spring vegetable garden, attend a three-week series to learn all you need to get started. This workshop will be 6-7:30 p.m. Mondays, March 24 to April 7. The cost is $25 per person or $40 per couple and includes handouts and seed samples. Registration is at www. eventbrite.com/e/springinto-vegetable-gardeningtickets-10820332907. Classes will be at UF/IFAS Extension Santa Rosa County, 6263 Dogwood Drive in Milton. Your registration includes these events: March 24: Getting started with a vegetable garden; site selection; soil preparation; square foot gardening method March 31: Seeding and transplanting basics; specics on tomato, pepper, squash and cucumberA A p ril 7: General garden maintenance: watering, fertilizing, integrated pest management. For more information, contact Mary Derrick at 623-3868 between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays or at maryd@santarosa..gov. Milton K K iwanisMilton Kiwanis will sponsor its annual Rummage Sale on April 5 in the parking lot of Big Lots. The proceeds of this sale go directly back into the children and youth of the Santa Rosa County. The Milton Kiwanis provides assistance for numerous organizations and activities to provide opportunities that make our younger people into productive citizens and leaders.SAFSAF ER S S anta Rosa annual meetingThe SAFER Santa Rosa annual meeting will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 7 at 4115 Soundside Drive off of U.S. 98. Lunch will be served. RSVP at safer@ santarosa..gov. Elections are coming up. For more information, send your contact information.SSanta Rosa AArt A AssociationFrom 10 a.m. to noon today, Santa Rosa Art Association Inc., a nonprot organization, will have a Polymer Clay Pendant class in building 4900 on the Milton campus of Pensacola State College. The presenting artist is Sandi Lang, who is showing her artwork at Dragony Gallery and Local Colour in Milton. Kits will be available for a fee under $5. Please bring pasta clay machine and a tissue blade. Everything else will be provided by the artist. A fee of $10 for nonmembers. Guests are very welcome. For more info, call Linda Linzy at 251-987-5473, email beadtician@gmail.com or visit santarosaart association.com. Community brBRIeEFS Community Obituary Press Gazette BIrthd RTHDAy Y C CLubUB Notice of pubPUBLIC meetMEETIngNGS SStephanie Rogers: March 22A A dron Robinson: March 22 Jesslyn S Singley: March 22 David Wilkie: March 23 Virginia Dozier: March 24 Tasha Peacock Driscoll: March 25L L andon Rollins: March 25C C olin Williams: March 25S S tephanie Peterson: March 25 Megan C Carpenter: March 25 Brittany Rounds: March 25K K risten Bigner: March 25 Tyler Tate: March 26 Hannah Thompson: March 26 SpeSPE CIAL tT O theTHE Pre RE SS GAzette ZETTECub Scout Pack 404 in Milton will be doing a service project for the Santa Rosa Clean Community on March 29 in memory of John Tonkin. The scouts will be picking up trash. The project will begin at 9 a.m. at Milton High School and end at King Middle School around noon. CubCUB SCOutUTS ServERVICeE prPROjeJECtT Barrett Nichols CCheneyMilton resident Grandmother Penny Nichols Wilson welcomed her new grandson Barrett, who nally made an appearance. Barrett was 9 pounds, 14 ounces and 23 inches long. Mom, Nickie, big brother Brooks and Dad, Brad, are thrilled at his arrival. The snow in the Northeast even slowed so they could get to the hospital. Baby of the WeeEEK

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A3Saturday, March 22, 2014 3700AubreyLane,PaceFL32571 850-396-3102|www.aubreyhill.com AubreyHillalsooerstraining,boardingandlessonstohunter,jumper,and equitationriders.Fromtheseriousshow competitortothebeginnerwewillmake sureyouhaveagreattime whilelearning!!!SummerCampRunsJune2-6,9-13,16-20&23-27erstthreeweeksforages6-149am-2pm efourthweekisaminicampforages3-5from 9am-12pmPleasecallfordetails FollowusonFaceBookatwww.facebook.com/aubreyhillequestrian AllAges Floridaresidentswithahearinglossareeligibleto receiveafreeampliedphonefromthenon-prot FloridaTelecommunicationsRelay,Inc.Cordless andcordedphonesforpersonswithmildtosevere hearinglossareavailableat23distributioncenters statewide.Limitonepercustomer.CONTACTYOURAREACENTERFORDETAILS CILDisabilityResourceCenter 3600NorthPaceBlvd. Pensacola,FL32505 850-595-5566(v)CurrentFTRIclients:Ifyourphoneisntworkingproperlyoryourhearing haschanged,orshouldyounolongerneedyourphoneoraremoving outofFlorida,callFTRIat888-554-1151forassistance. THE FAMOUS RIVIEr R A BAND At T t T H E I I MOGENE t T ONIGHt TA Tribute to Country Music Legends 5 featuring The Famous Riviera Band will be at the Imogene Theatre tonight. Doors open at 5 p.m.; showtime is at 7 p.m. Advanced tickets are $10 and $12 at the door. Tickets for children 6-12 are $5 each, and children younger than 6 are free. Call 261-8289 for advanced tickets and more information.OO N YOUr R MAr R K, GEt T SEt T D D IGThe University of Florida-IFAS Milton Campus student club has worked very hard this year to provide unique and quality plants to the UF Student Club Plant Sale at the Emerald Coast Flower and Garden Festival. This is an opportunity for area residents and businesses to support local horticulture and natural resource conservation students raise funds while also get some great deals on a great variety of plants. There will be a variety of plants including camellias, ginger, and many new coleus varieties. The sale will take place on the Pensacola State College-Milton Campus (Avalon Boulevard and U.S. 90, Milton) on Friday, April 4, and Saturday, April 5. For more information about the sale, contact Robin Vickers at 983-7134 or rvickers@ u.edu. Please check out our website at Miltongators.com.VV OLUNt T EEr R COAc C HES NEEDED f F Or R S S PEc C IAL O O LYMPIc C S t T ENNIS Pr R OGr R AMA new Special Olympics tennis program is launching in Milton and volunteer coaches are needed. Knowledge of the sport of tennis is great but not required. Training will be held for one hour per week, on Saturdays (time of day to be determined based on availability of volunteer coaches), and the season will run for about 12 weeks. The beautiful new tennis courts at the Milton Community Center will be utilized for this program. Our program can only exist with the time, energy, dedication and commitment of volunteers. No matter how much or how little time you have to give, when you volunteer, you will be making a difference in the lives of athletes with intellectual and developmental disabilities. To learn more and get involved, contact Jessica at jessicabarrale@ specialolympicsescambia.org or 291-6234, or Alexis at volunteer@ specialolympicsescambia.org.SS PEc C IAL tT O tT HE PrPR ESS GG AZEtt TT ESaturday saw the induction of new members into the Aaron Snowden Chapter of SAR with Dr. Richard Clincy and son Kevin, an ROTC senior at Navarre High School. At right, A ag-raising ceremony was held to commemorate George Washingtons birthday with a new 13-star ag raised over Aaron Snowdens grave in the cemetery. When it was noticed the United States ag at the entrance was badly frayed, it was also replaced. SSONS OfF tTHE AAMErRIcCAN REVOLUtTION News brBRIEfFS

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Many economists, politicians and pundits assert that median wages have stagnated since the 1970s. Thats a call for government to do something about it. But before we look at the error in their assertion, lets work through an example that might shed a bit of light on the issue. Suppose that you paid me a straight $20 an hour in 2004. Ten years later, Im still earning $20 an hour, but in addition, now Im receiving job perks such as health insurance, an employermatched 401(k) plan, paid holidays and vacation, etc. Would it be correct to say that my wages have stagnated and Im no better off a decade later? Im guessing that the average person would say, No, Williams, your wages havent stagnated. You forgot to include your non-monetary wages. My colleagues Donald Boudreaux and Liya Palagashvili discuss some of this in their recent Wall Street Journal op-ed, The Myth of the Great Wages Decoupling (http:// tinyurl.com/oq7z4a3). They start out saying: Many pundits, politicians and economists claim that wages have fallen behind productivity gains over the last generation. ... This story, though, is built on an illusion. There is no great decoupling of worker pay from productivity. Nor have workers incomes stagnated over the past four decades. There are two routinely made mistakes when wages are compared over time. First, the value of fringe bene ts such as health insurance and pension contributions is often excluded from calculations of worker pay. Because fringe bene ts today make up a larger share of the typical employees pay than they did 40 years ago (about 19 percent today compared with 10 percent back then), excluding them fosters the illusion that the workers slice of the (bigger) pie is shrinking. The second comparison problem is a bit technical, when the consumer price index is used to adjust workers pay for in ation while a different measure (the gross domestic product de ator) is used to adjust the value of the nations economic output for in ation. Harvard Universitys Martin Feldstein noted in a National Bureau of Economic Research paper in 2008 that it is misleading to use different de ators. Boudreaux and Palagashvili point out that when more careful measurements have compared worker pay (including the value of fringe bene ts) with productivity using a consistent adjustment for in ation, they move in tandem. The authors say: The claim that ordinary Americans are stagnating economically while only the rich are gaining is also incorrect. True enough, membership in the middle class seems to be declining but this is because more American households are moving up. Many economists and other social scientists determine wellbeing by looking at income brackets instead of people. When one looks at people, he nds considerable income mobility. According to a report by the Department of the Treasury titled Income Mobility in the U.S. from 1996 to 2005, there was considerable income mobility of individuals in the U.S. economy during that period (http://tinyurl. com/5sv8799). Using Internal Revenue Service tax return data, the report says that more than half of taxpayers moved to a different income quintile over this period. More than half of those in the bottom income quintile in 1996 had moved to a higher income group by 2005. The mobility also goes in the opposite direction. Of the highest income earners in 1996 the top one-hundredth of 1 percent only 25 percent remained in this group in 2005. The percentage increase in the median incomes of those in the lower income groups, between 1996 and 2005, increased more than the median incomes of those initially in the higher income groups. Boudreaux and Palagashvili conclude that middle-class stagnation and the decoupling of pay and productivity are illusions. Yes, the U.S. economy is in the doldrums, thanks to a variety of factors, most signi cantly the effect of growth-deadening government policies like ObamaCare and the Dodd-Frank Act. But by any sensible measure, most Americans are today better paid and more prosperous than in the past. Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. To nd out more about Walter E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.Page 4 www.srpressgazette.comSaturday, March 22, 2014 ASection OPINIONIs there wage stagnation? OUR VIEW COLUMNIST MINORITY VIEWPOINTWalter Williams SPEAK OUT: CALL 623-5887We want you to share your views on the topics on this page or any topic with other readers of Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Your views are important, too. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters must be typed and may be edited for content or to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for veri cation, if necessary. Send letters to: 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Email: news@ srpressgazette.com SHARE YOUR OPINIONSJOIN THE DISCUSSION The Press Gazette publishes reader comments and opinions posted on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Join the discussion at our Facebook page, Santa Rosa Press Gazette, or tweet us@srpressgazette. FIND IT ONLINE Visit www.srpressgazette. com for news, obituaries, sports, photo galleries and more. NEWS INFORMATION If you have a concern or comment about Santa Rosas Press Gazettes coverage, please contact: PUBLISHER Jim Fletcher j etcher@srpressgazette.com EDITOR Pamela Holt pholt@srpressgazette.com OFFICE MANAGER Carol Barnes cbarnes@srpressgazette.com ADVERTISING INFORMATION Debbie Coon dcoon@srpressgazette.com Tracie Smelstoys tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com Lee Gordon lgordon@srpressgazette.com MAIN OFFICE FAX NUMBER 850-623-2007 CLASSIFIEDS 850-623-2120 FIND US ONLINE www.srpressgazette.com TO GETS NEWS IN THE PAPER News tips and short items news@srpressgazette.com Church and faith news news@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries news@srpressgazette.com Sports sports@srpressgazette.com COPYRIGHT NOTICE The entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Halifax Media Group. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570. To report news or for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 623-2120.6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 GazetteSanta Rosas Press SUBSCRIPTION RATESIN COUNTY One year .................................$39 Six months ........................$19.50 13 weeks ...............................$9.75 OUT OF COUNTY One year .................................$62 Six months .............................$31 13 weeks .............................$15.50 SENIOR CITIZEN (OVER 62) One year .................................$32 Six months .............................$16 13 weeks ....................................$8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.Monday, 9:26 a.m.Yes, this is a message warning the citizens of Santa Rosa County. There are a couple of gentlemen going around town with a seal coating business. They will claim that they will seal coat the roof of your house for a certain price, maybe 15 to 20 gallons. Then they get up there and put on 40, 50, 60 gallons and want to charge you triple what they told you, so just be aware. Its a scam, a seal coating business with two men going around with a truck wanting to seal coat peoples roofs. So I just wanted to let the people know whats going on, that they need to be aware of these gentlemen with a seal coating business wanting to rip people off. They will double, triple charge you when theyre through. This happened to my parents this month.Tuesday 6:37 p.m.Hi, this is Sharon. I hope all those jerks out there in Santa Rosa county are happy, the ones that couldnt obey the rules. They got all of our local recycling spots taken away from us.Tuesday, 7:37 p.m.This is Bobby. I just wondered if somebody else thinks like I do about automobile insurance. In my case, its me and my wife. We can only drive two vehicles at a time, but if I decide I want four vehicles, I have to buy insurance on all four of them. I dont think its right. It would probably help the economy, because I would probably have ten cars I could drive if I didnt have to buy insurance on all of them. So just think about it. If youre just one person and you buy two cars, then you have to buy insurance on both of them when you can only drive one at a time. One might not be driven but youre still paying insurance on it. So just think about it.Tuesday, 7:40 p.m.This is Bobby again. I dont want to hog all your Probation of ces and bail bondsman not classyDear Editor, In the recent Santa Rosa Press Gazette article regarding restaurants (March 15, What de nes a bar?), the mayor said he wants classier facilities downtown. Really? So, classier than the restaurants we already have? I nd that remark to be offensive, and yet I agree with him, partially. Lets talk about our classy businesses in our Historic Downtown Milton or maybe the clientele that they attract. For instance, the County Probation Of ce at the corner of Caroline and Escambia streets. Now, thats classy, and its the reason the Mainstreet Cafe is not open to the public. Some classic problems we endure every month are trespassing, loitering, littering, public urination, public vomiting, illegal parking and witnessing people being arrested that violated probation. The Probation Of ce does not provide public bathrooms, and so their visitors go to neighboring businesses. Its real classy to have these violators come to your business just to do their business. Another example is the Bail Bonds business. We lost an acting school that wanted to be downtown because they could not subject the children to the patrons of the Bail Bonds business. But, Ill get back to the ordinance. The percentage of food sales to alcoholic beverages does not determine whether or not a facility or establishment is classy. The business model of the establishment determines that and therefore determines the clientele that they attract. Although I feel I was misquoted, my example of this was Texas Roadhouse. No matter what the percentage of food sales to alcohol sales is, their business model is family style and not a bar or nightclub. If the city wants classier restaurants, maybe they should reconsider this ordinance. We could very well be turning away the white tablecloth facility that relies on that 4COP license to provide higher quality. Right now, it just seems to be a way to control competition by discriminating against restaurants that operate under 4COP license. Huge incentives have recently been granted to a new restaurant development that is single serve with Solo cups, deli sheets and plastic baskets. Maybe our incentives should re ect the classy types of businesses the city wants to attract instead of keeping businesses out. I think its time we take on the issue of public smoking and littering. Smoking is a much bigger problem than alcohol. Secondhand smoke is a killer. Adult citizens as well as children need protection. Why do we allow smoking on cityowned property as well as at city-sponsored events? Cigarette butts are not biodegradable. They clog our sewer systems and pollute our waterways. It costs taxpayers dollars to clean it up. Whats classy about smoking these days?Cassandra SharpMilton time, but I didnt explain what I meant about the insurance. My idea is you should be able to buy an insurance policy on your drivers license. That way if my license is insured, it would insure me for any car I drive, if I drive my neighbors car or whatever. It would be my insurance. That way everybody would be insured. You wouldnt have people running around in cars with no insurance. So thats what I think they should do, tie it to your drivers license. Thank you.Wednesday, 2:40 p.m.This is Bonnie from East Milton. I dont really think a lot of us appreciated the comment that Commissioner Salter made about East Milton being the poorest infrastructure that the county has. That was totally wrong on his part. He makes it sound like East Milton is not worth a crap. He needs to restate that. A lot of us in East Milton would rather be in East Milton than anywhere else.Wednesday, 2:45 p.m.I disagree with the article that Charles Walsingham put in Wednesdays paper on letter to the editor. I do not believe that the courthouse needs to be anywhere near the jail. Youve got two prisons and a jail in that one area. You do not need the courthouse there. Take the property behind the courthouse or where they put those trailers. Delete them. Build the new courthouse back there. Knock the old courthouse down. Youve got parking there and parking across the street in front of the churches or where the buildings burned. It does not need to be down by the jail whatsoever, or let it be built in East Milton on highway 90 between the south airport and Ward Basin where the man was going to donate the property. Let it be there where the property was given to the people. We dont need to buy more land and cost the county and taxpayers more money. Its been proven that Santa Rosa County has got so many people that live in Santa Rosa County thats below the poverty line. Let it be built on property that Santa Rosa County already has. We dont need to put it anywhere near the county jail.Wednesday, 5:31 p.m.This is Bobby. I got my Saturday paper and in the Speak Out column some in the county are criticizing us for voicing our opinion about the courthouse, saying we need to go to the county commissioner meeting, that it wouldnt do any good to talk about it in the paper. Well, something good did come of it because in the same paper it says now were going to vote on it. So everybody speaks a different way. Everybody doesnt have to go to the county commissioner to emphasize that. The idea wasnt to change their minds because they already had them made up. It was to let more people know what was going on. So thank you. I dont really think a lot of us appreciated the comment that Commissioner Salter made about East Milton being the poorest infrastructure that the county has.

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ANGLICAN Trinity by the Fields, 4980 W. Spencer Field Road, Pace APOSTOLIC First Apostolic Church, 5574 Highway 90, Milton Pace Apostolic Church, 4763 Old Guernsey Road, Pace ASSEMBLY OF GOD Bagdad First Assembly of God, 4513 Forsyth St., Bagdad East Milton Assembly of God, 5174 Ward Basin Road, Milton Faith Chapel Assembly of God, 8080 S. Airport Road, Milton First Assembly of God, 6163 Dogwood Dr., Milton Harold Assembly of God, 10495 Goodrange Dr., Milton Jay First Assembly of God, 14047 Alabama St., Jay McLellan Assembly of God, 6050 Three Notch Trail, Milton New Harvest Fellowship Assembly of God, E. Highway 90, Pace New Hope Assembly of God, 9550 Chumuckla Highway, Jay Pace Assembly of God, 3948 Highway 90, Pace Springhill Assembly of God, 9190 Munson Highway, Milton True Worship Assembly of God, 13297 Highway 87 N, Jay Welcome Assembly of God, 8581 Welcome Church Road, Milton Whit eld Assembly of God, 12391 Highway 87 N, Milton BAPTIST Celebration Baptist Church, P.O. Box 4047, Milton Eastside Baptist Church, 6731 Dixon St., Milton Faith Baptist Church, 6423 Hamilton Bridge Road, Milton Iglesia Bautista Libertad, 5536 Highway 90, Milton Liberty Baptist, 6763 Margaret St., Milton Lighthouse Baptist Church, 13050 Highway 89, Jay Mt. Pilgrim Baptist Church, 5103 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Milton Oak Grove Baptist Church, 917 Lakewood Road, Milton BAPTIST ABA Berryhill Road Baptist, 3095 Berryhill Road, Milton Bethel Baptist Church, 6178 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton Fellowship Baptist Church, 5223 Highway 90, Pace First Baptist Church of East Milton, 8167 S. Airport Road, Milton First Missionary Baptist Church of Pace, 3925 Pace Road, Pace Galilee Missionary Baptist, Highway 90, Milton BAPTIST INDEPENDENT Bible Baptist Church, 4001 Vern St., Pace Bible Way Baptist Church, 5976 Dogwood Dr., Milton Brownsdale Baptist Church, Chumuckla Highway, Jay Fil Am Baptist Church, 5240 Dogwood Dr., Milton Joy Bible Baptist Church, 8613 Highway 90, Milton Mt. Calvary Baptist Church, 4636 Highway 90, Pace Pine Grove Baptist Church, 7280 Pine Grove Road, Jay Pleasant Hill Missionary Baptist, 5550 Econ na St, Milton Solid Rock Baptist Church, 6760 Eastgate Road, Milton Trinity Baptist Church, 5301 Highway 90, Pace Victory Baptist Church, 4000 Avalon Blvd., Milton West Florida Baptist Church, 5621 Highway 90, Milton BAPTIST MISSIONARY Mt. Bethel Baptist Church, 175 Limit St., Milton New Macedonia Baptist Church, 4751 Chumuckla Highway, Pace New Providence Missionary Baptist Church, 4175 Popcorn Road, Milton St. John Divine Missionary Church, 5363 Saint Johns St., Milton BAPTIST PRIMATIVE Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church, 5339 Zero Ln., Milton Mt. Zion Primitive Baptist, 6930 Chaf n St., Milton BAPTIST SOUTHERN Avalon Baptist Church, 4316 Avalon Blvd., Milton Berrydale Baptist Church, 6703 Highway 4, Jay Billory First Baptist of HolleyNavarre, Highway 87 S., Navarre Blackwater Baptist Church, 11689 Munson Highway, Milton Calvary Baptist Church, 5405 Calvary Church Road, Milton Cora Baptist Church, 12953 Chumuckla Highway, Jay East Side Baptist Church, 4884 Ward Basin Road, Milton Ferris Hill Baptist Church, 6848 Chaf n St., Milton First Baptist Church of Bagdad, 4529 Forsyth St., Bagdad First Baptist Church of Milton, 6797 Caroline St., Milton First Baptist Church of Pace, 3949 Pace Road, Pace First Baptist Of Garcon Point, 17820 Garcon Point Road, Milton Floridatown Baptist Church, 3851 Diamond St., Pace Friendship Baptist Church, 5300 Berryhill Road, Milton Harmony Ridge Baptist Church, 5536 Highway 90, Pace Harold First Baptist Church, 10585 Goodrange Dr., Milton Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8531 Hickory Hammock Road, Milton Immanuel Baptist Church, 4187 Highway 90, Pace James Street Baptist Church, 6658 James St., Milton Jay First Baptist Church, 214 S. Alabama St., Jay Living Truth Church, 8897 Byrom Campbell Road Pace FL 32571 Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church, P.O. Box 4812, Milton New Bethel Baptist Church, 10995 Chumuckla Highway, JayNew Life Baptist Church, 6380 Bayberry St., Milton Olivet Baptist Church, 5240 Dogwood Dr., Milton Pine Level Baptist Church, 3300 Pine Level Church Road, Jay Pine Terrace Baptist Church, 6212 Pine Blossom Road, Milton Pleasant Home Baptist Church, 8500 Pleasant Home, Munson Santa Rosa Baptist Association, 6820 Highway 87 N, Milton Spring Hill Baptist Church, 9214 Munson Highway, Milton Wallace Baptist Church, 6601 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Woodbine Baptist Church, 4912 Woodbine Road, Pace CATHOLIC St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church, 6451 Park Ave., Milton CHARISMATIC New Hope Community Church of Milton, 5283 Goshawk Dr., Milton Shepherd House Ministries, 5739 N. Stewart St., Milton CHURCH OF CHRIST Bagdad Church of Christ, 4413 Garcon Point Road, Bagdad Berryhill Church of Christ, 3679 Berryhill Road, Pace Church of Christ, 4034 Highway 4, Jay Margaret Street Church-Christ, 6745 Margaret St., Milton McLellan Church of Christ, 6285 Three Notch Trail, Milton Pace Church of Christ, 4075 Berryhill Road, Pace Pea Ridge Church of Christ, 4400 Bell Lane, Pea Ridge Susan St. Church of Christ, 600 Susan St., Milton West Milton Church of Christ, 5300 Highway 90, Pace CHURCH OF GOD Church of God of Prophecy Bible Place, 600 Glover Ln., Milton Covenant Church of God, 4645 School Lane, Pace Ferris Hill Church of God in Christ, 5583 Alabama St., Milton CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST Christ Church of Pace, 5536 Highway 90, Pace Church of God at Milton, 4645 School Lane, Pace Church of God in Christ, 5887 Stewart St., Milton World Church of God, 5177 Stewart St., Milton COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Community Church of Christ, 5666 Raymond Hobbs St., Milton EPISCOPAL St. Marys Episcopal Church, 6850 Oak St., Milton FULL GOSPEL Full Gospel Community Church, 6199 Gainey Ford Road, Jay Living Faith Church, 7400 Reformation Dr., Milton Milton Victory Ministry, 7235 Highway 90, Milton True Faith Tabernacle, 5166 Old Oak Road, Milton True Grace Fellowship Church, 5178 Willard Norris Road, Milton HOLINESS Cobbtown Holiness Church, 4700 Greenwood Road, Jay Hollandtown Holinesses Church, 1851 Pineview Church Road, Jay INDEPENDENT Chumuckla Community Church, 8008 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Grace Bible Church, 6331 Chestnut St., Milton Relevant Life Church, 4560 Pace Patriot Blvd., Pace Walls of Salvation Church, 6697 Old Highway 90, Milton Word Alive Christian Church, 707 Stewart St., Milton Word Alive Church, 4200 Ebenezer Church Road, Jay INTERDENOMINATIONAL Blessed Assurance Ministries, P.O. Box 58, Milton Christ-Centered Ministries, 8688 A.D. McCall Road, Milton In His Presence Ministries, 218 Stowers Ln., Milton JEHOVAHS WITNESS Jehovahs Witness, 5696 Berryhill Road, Milton LDS Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 5737 Berryhill Road, Milton Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 4065 Highway 4, Jay Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1753 Sea Lark Lane, Navarre LUTHERAN Eternal Trinity Lutheran Church, 6076 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton METHODIST Bagdad United Methodist Church, 4540 Forsythe St., Bagdad Christ United Methodist Church, 5983 Dogwood Dr., Milton Chumuckla Community Church, 8008 Chumuckla Highway, Pace First United Methodist Church, 6830 Berryhill St., Milton Jay United Methodist Church, 14093 Alabama St., Jay Mae Edwards UMC, 5052 Mulat Road, Milton Mt. Carmel United Methodist Church, 15030 Highway 89, Jay Pace First United Methodist, 4540 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Pineview United Methodist Church, 1400 Pineview Church Road, Jay Wesley Memorial UMC, 4701 School Lane, Pace Woodbine United Methodist Church, 5200 Woodbine Road, Pace METHODIST AFRICAN Greater Bethlehem AME Church, 5299 Richburg St., Milton Isaiah Chapel AME Zion Church, 5038 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Milton NAZARENE New Faith Church of Nazarene, 5162 Avenida Del Fuego, Pace NONDENOMINATIONAL Christian Life Church, 4401 Avalon Blvd., Milton Church of the Living God, 3375 Garcon Point Road, Milton Community Chapel, 4300 Pace Lane, Pace Deliverance Tabernacle, 5470 Dogwood Dr., Milton Freedom Fellowship Church of Milton, 723 Munson Highway, Milton Grace Believers Bible Study Church, Holiday Inn Express, Conference Room, 8510 Keshav Taylor Drive, East Milton Harvest Community Church of Jay, 2828 Harvest Road, Jay Heritage Chapel, P.O. Box 248, Milton Hope Corral Cowboy Church, Fidelus Community Center, 13774 State Road 87 N., Jay Indian Ford Victory Fellowship, 8999 Indian Ford Road, Milton Kings Way Christian Center, 3102 Deep Water Cv., Milton Living Gods Standard Communication, 6731 Old Highway 90, Milton Living Word Worship Center, 5573 Stewart St., Milton Milton Worship Center, 11164 Horizon Road, Milton New Harvest Fellowship, 4289 Berryhill Road, Milton New Life Baptist Church, 6380 Bayberry St., Milton New Testament Church, 5277 Glover Ln., Milton Northshore Community Church, P.O. Box 4476, Milton Our Fathers House Inc., 5362 Taf Ln., Milton Pace Community Church, 4310 N. Spencer Field Road, Pace Providence Chapel, 3721 Highway 90, Milton PENTECOSTAL Ebenezer Church Inc., 4200 Ebenezer Church Road, Jay First Pentecostal Church of Bagdad, 4636 Forsyth St., Bagdad Gospel Lighthouse Church, 10001 Chumuckla Highway, Pace United Pentecostal Church of Berrydale, 7580 Highway 4, Jay Whit eld Pentecostal Fellowship Church, 11236 Highway 87 N, Milton PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS Chumuckla Pentecostal Holiness Church, 2841 Highway 182, Jay Mt. Zion Pentecostal Holiness Church, 5532 Osceola St., Milton New Vision Worship Center, 5573 Stewart St., Milton Roeville Holiness Church, 6648 Munson Highway, Milton PRESBYTERIAN First Presbyterian Church, 5206 Elmira St., Milton Pace Presbyterian Church, 4587 Woodbine Road, Pace Westminster Presbyterian, 6659 Park Ave., Milton SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Milton Seventh Day Adventist, 5288 Berryhill Dr., Milton VINEYARD Bay Area Vineyard Church, 5163 Dogwood Dr., Milton PACECOMMUNITYCHURCH 6010456 6010456 FAITHSaturday, March 22, 2014www.srpressgazette.comPage 5Section Section A Church DIRECTORY Faith BRIEFSFaith Chapel Assembly of GodSpring is in the air as well as the excitement that the celebration of our Lords Resurrection brings. Faith Chapel Assembly of God will be presenting a musical production titled He is Risen celebrating as well as touching our hearts with the true meaning of Easter. Mark your calendars for the two different opportunities to view this presentation on Friday night, April 18 or Sunday morning, April 20. Friday nights amazing presentation will begin at 7 p.m. and Sunday morning service at 10:45 a.m. He is Risen will be presented in its entirety during both services and offers something for everyone to enjoy as well as nd celebration in. The public is invited and encouraged to attend either service to be reminded of the truth of the Easter season. Faith Chapel Assembly of God is at 8080 South Airport Road, Milton. Bagdad United Methodist ChurchOn Sunday, March 23, we continue our exciting Living Generously program as we follow Frank in his journey, with the theme POOR. Bring family and friends and share in our lively church. We have a 10 a.m. caf and Sunday school; our 8 a.m. New Vision Praise and 10 a.m. family service.Ferris Hill Baptist ChurchFerris Hill Baptist Church is looking for a free tent to give to a homeless man in need of shelter. FHBC operates one of Santa Rosa Countys cold weather shelters. Please call the Rev. Brian Nall at 623-3500 if you have an extra.RevivalWesley Memorial United Methodist Church is celebrating revival at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. April 6 and at 7 p.m. April 7 and 8 at 4701 School Lane in Pace.First United Methodist Church of MiltonFirst United Methodist Church of Milton, 6830 Berryhill St. in Milton, holds worship services at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. every Sunday, along with Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. Everyone is welcome. This Sunday, March 23, the Rev. M. Kathryn Knight will deliver her sermon on Are You Thirsty? She will be focusing on Exodus 17:1-7 and John 4: 5-42. Pastors Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. Wednesdays. For more information and events, call the church of ce at 623-6683.Theology on Tap Weekly Q&A sessions on theology will be at 7 p.m. Thursdays beginning March 27 at Blackwater Bistro. The class is sponsored by First United Methodist Church of Milton, 623-6683.First Presbyterian ChurchChurch services are at 10:30 a.m. each Sunday morning. First Presbyterian Church is at 5203 Elmira St. in historic downtown Milton. This Sunday the message Living Water will be delivered by Pastor Jo Kublik. There is a nursery for infants and toddlers. Childrens Church will be the rst Sunday of each month during the church service. Small group study classes are in the Fellowship Hall at 9:30 a.m. Sunday mornings. This is a discussion group focusing on the relationship of the Bible to our lives. A pot luck dinner will follow the service the rst Sunday of the month. All are welcome. Lenten dinners are at 6 p.m. each Wednesday. They are brown bag. Iced tea and coffee will be available. We welcome all visitors and encourage you to attend if you are new in the area or looking for a church family. The Fellowship Hall is available for weddings and group meetings. For more information call 623-2510 or visit www.fpcmilton.org. As the church is an historic building and the oldest church in Santa Rosa County, it is in need of refurbishing. To raise the needed funds we are collecting cans and metal. If you wish to donate, call Betsy Dodson at 983-7803. SPECIAL TO THE PRESS GAZETTEThe Rev. Clive Knights and the Rev. Ruth Knights were sworn in as American citizens March 14. REVERENDS BECOME U.S. CITIZENS

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LocalA6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014 E F R E SantaRosaCountyFairisApril4-12 ProRodeo ExcitingRides Games,Vendors FabulousFoodontheMidway LiveEntertainmentNightly FMXFreeStyleMotorcrossShow&MonsterTruckRides LivestockExhibitsandShows LaserTag andMuchMore! ThanksToThe PressGazette... WeHaveFreeTickets!!!SantaRosaCountyFairTICKETSWitheveryNEWpaidPressGazettesubscription get4SantaRosaCountyFairTicketsFree* Name Address City State Zip Phone ExpDate /Subscription CouponSubscriber Special$20Year *4FreeSantaRosaFairTicketsavailableattheSantaRosaPressGazetteOce witheveryNew$20PaidSubscription,$32SeniorRenewalor$39RegularRenewal inoceduringMarch24ththroughApril12th2014.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A7Saturday, March 22, 2014 By LINDA AA YERSSpecial to the Press Gazette Pace Assembly at 3948 U.S. 90 is among the largest congregations in the U.S. Assemblies of God, according the Senior Pastors Joey and Rita Rogers. Pace Assemblys mission statement is to fulll the Eternal Purpose of God in Christ Jesus locally and globally by reaching the lost, making disciples, and building the Church of Jesus Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit, Pastor Joey Rogers said. This church is founded on a strong Pentecostal heritage. It started as a small prayer group in a Pace home in 1930 and then in 1932 became organized and chartered with the Assemblies of God. To help fulll the mission, and celebrate Easter, Pace Assembly has an upcoming event, Jesus Son of God, with more than 200 cast members, livestock, live music, LED lighting, sound and special effects. The presentation is produced to be a life-altering experience, a combination of live music and drama. Senior Pastors Joey and Rita Rogers, founders of Gulf Coast Productions, created this incredible portrayal of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The show is at 7 p.m. on April 17, 18, and 19, with doors opening at 6 p.m. General admission is $5, and group seating is available for groups of 10 or more. To reserve group seating, call 202-3100 or email the church at rsvp@paceassembly.org. Pace A AOG E Easter production fullls part of missionBy BARbBARAH NoNORRISSpecial to the Press Gazette As I remember, and I remember this quite well, Daddy bought a gift made by a man in the displaced people camp on the base of the 501 Engineers just outside Hanau, Germany. These people, millions of them, known as DPs, were housed in camps all over Europe after World War II. They were given food, shelter, clothing, medical treatment and jobs. Within these camps were a number of departments. One such department was a network set up by the allies to help re-unite these people with family and friends who were displaced or enslaved by the Nazis. Another was formed to help return personal items taken from them or from loved ones who was imprisoned in the work camps of the Third Reich. The Nazis conscated all things of monetary value when the people were imprisoned in the work camps and used the items to help nance the Nazi cause. Also taken were items of little importance to anyone other than to the people they belonged to. A letter, book or photo could be the only remaining reminder of their previous lives or of the lives of their loved ones. Daddy said it was most important for these people to have something solid within their grasp, so as to begin and to rebuild their lives, thus the reason for the camps. It was within the camp at the 501 I rst remember seeing the tattoos that changed my life. Regardless of the pain and horror man can inict upon his fellow beings, some good can and does come from the bad. In this case, a beautiful rocking horse was born in November 1948. I remember going with my daddy to the camp on base. There were a number of buildings, almost like a compound, set up for different needs of the people. There was a mess hall, a medical building, housing and over to the side were buildings set up for different work trades for the displaced. Daddy and I were in the woodworking shop, and I saw beautiful furniture: tables, chairs, desks, bookcases, beds, chests and most anything a home would need. As we walked around the shop, looking at the beautifully crafted items, I saw a thin, stooped-shouldered, bushy, white-haired man. He was sanding the body of a rocking horse. Beside him sat a number of nished ones. My eyes must have grown twice their normal size while running to inspect each one of them. Daddy knew without me telling him what I wanted. In fact, as Im sitting here, the thought came to me that maybe, just maybe, that was why he brought me to that place. He wanted me to help pick one out. I remember looking for a beige one. A beige one like Pet, my granddaddys farm horse at Twin Oaks Dairy Farm, but couldnt nd one. All this bent-over little man had were white ones with black mane and tail and black splotches on the body and grey ones with black trim. Daddy told me later black and white were the only paints the 501 had to give the man other than drab, old army green. Who ever heard of a green horse? We bought a white one with the splotches, black mane and tail. This little rocking horse and the 2-year-old birthday girl, my sister Paula Annette Norris, rode many a mile together in Hanau, Germany. My horse was put to pasture before we came back to the states in 1950. Barbarah Norris is the daughter of Santa Rosa County retired Army Col. Willard Norris, namesake of Willard Norris Road.Rocky HorseSPECIAL TO THE PP REss SS GAZETTE Pace Assembly of God will perform Jesus...Son of God at 7 p.m. April 17-19, with doors opening at 6 p.m. General admission is $5. For more information, call 202-3100. By AARAARONN LIITTLEE623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com Floridians are contemplating what new oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico might mean to the state, but Floridas relationship with oil and natural gas has its roots in the small town of Jay. According to the Jay Historical Societys website, the town saw land and mineral right purchases during the oil rush of 1970s in Santa Rosa County. Dr. Mary Diamond Findleys son, Nathan Findley, lived in Jay at the time. Nathan Findley described his mother, employed at Jay School as the rst female principal from Jacksonville to Pensacola. He said he remembers going up on the oil decks with his parents. According to Linda Nelsons article Reections and a Salute to a Town Called Jay, available to read on the Jay Historical Society website, the oil rush began in Alabama with discovery of crude at Pollard, Ala., in the 1950s. Humble Oil Company, known today as ExxonMobil, drilled an exploratory well in Flomaton, near Jay, in 1968. This well was known as a wildcat well, meaning the company drilled outside of known oil preserves. Nelson wrote a geologic formation known as Norphlet did yield natural gas from this drilling. Nelson wrote Jay experienced heightened interest in the community over oil speculation, but the few shallow wells drilled at the time yielded nothing. However, Humble Oil Company did not give up, knowing the geologic formations Norphlet and Smackover under the county yielded oil elsewhere. The company obtained a permit to drill to 16,000 feet, deeper than the Alabama wells. Nelson wrote that it took weeks, but a pool of oil turned up beneath Jay, and overnight, some land became priceless. According to Nelson, some of Jays roughly 650 residents became millionaires. Nathan Findley said he remembered the parties and the food at the time. He also said he remembered 16-17 kids at the high school received new automobiles. More students had cars than teachers, Findley said. He also said he went into the oil business after graduating in 1975, but left shortly after because of back-breaking, militarystyle conditions. He said employers would yell and cuss the workers. Nelson found some residents fared better than others in selling their land. Mary Findley, who said she received her bachelors degree at 20, masters degree at 40 and doctorate at 55, said some of the land ballooned from $5 an acre to $500. She said some residents were wise with their newly acquired wealth, while many were not. Dr. Findley said some traveled while others bought cars. Being on the rim of the oil reserve, Dr. Findley said shes still receiving a royalty check on her land, but not as much. However, Nelson said the state beneted over all. Taxes and royalties lled state and local coffers. She said Jay maintained its small town atmosphere, with a few more new homes and oil wells sitting between cotton and peanut elds and cattle ranches. Nathan described the town a little differently, saying some people got rich with their noses in the air. According to an article by Starr Spencer, posted on the website for Platts, an energy company, Jay supplies about 2,500 barrels per day of equivalent oil production. Spencer also sites the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, noting Jay is one of Floridas largest and oldest oil elds with 93 active wells. Oil wells between cotton and peanut eldsThe history of Jay oilThe oil rush began in Alabama with discovery of crude at Pollard, Ala., in the 1950s. Humble Oil Company, known today as ExxonMobil, drilled an exploratory well in Flomaton, near Jay, in 1968. This well was known as a wildcat well, meaning the company drilled outside of known oil preserves. the pen show will not feature show cows, but the kind of cows that will go to market. Why does the farmer like this one? he asked, saying its a more clinical show. Holley said events include a dairy and market goat show, poultry show and a hog show twice the size of last years. Prudence Caskey, the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extensions newly appointed agent, said all 47 of the 4-H youth who participated last year will be back. Caskey said those who had baby chicks now have 1-year old hens to show. In addition to the Rhode Island Reds, Silkies and Leghorns coming to the fair, she said Ameraucanas, also known as Easter egg chickens, will make an appearance. Caskey said these chickens do not individually lay different colored eggs, but one hen may lay blue eggs, another hen green eggs. She said her goal is to show the public the variety in poultry: Not all eggs are white or large. Caskey said 40 percent of her 4H youth are home-schooled, and she wants to give students who are interested in agriculture as much opportunity as she can. She said the 4-H youth will be working with students from Floridas Exceptional Student Education program, attending a special tour of the fair April 9. Tammie Fulmer, Santa Rosa County Fair board, said ESE students will be able to tour the Ag Adventure Barn, the midway, hear a violin performance and see Louie the clown. Fulmer said the barn will provide a hands-on experience of agricultural activities, including animal grooming, seed planting, egg collecting and cow milking. Fulmer said the only simulations in the barn will be the articial dairy cow, provided by the Florida Federation of Fairs and Livestock Shows, and an articial orange tree. Fulmer said the ESE tour is why the barn needs to meet certain educational standards. She said this ESE eld trip is so special because some of these students cannot attend regular school eld trips, so the trip is a rare opportunity for them to get out and interact with real animals and farming procedures while being educated. Holley said the fair has grown in part because of Santa Rosa Countys welcoming of large-lot lifestyle families. He said these families may be retirees who may want distance, families simply wanting a lot of land and small-time farmers. He said with an increase in these people seeking large areas of land on which to live, most of whom being agriculturally minded, interest in the fair has increased. Holley said phase one of the larger Santa Rosa County Fair vision was the completion of the June Ates Arena, while the rst part of phase two, leasing and opening of the fairgrounds, is underway. He said the second part of phase two will be a building funded by a grant the fair board is seeking from the state under statute 288. According to Santa Rosa County Commissioner Bob Cole, this new building will be suited for indoor fair events as opposed to what happens in the new arena. Cole said 4-H is currently using the gymnasium for their indoor events, which would take place in this new building, along with possible speaking engagements, indoor concerts and IFAS Extension classes. It also could serve as an evacuation shelter. Holley did not nish talking about the growth of the fair without mentioning the tenacity of the board and other volunteers, whom he said have worked to improve the land leased to the fair board, a condition of the lease, without any sort of payment other than being allowed to continue leasing the land. FAIR from page A1

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LocalA8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014 SMART MONEYBYBRUCE WILLIAMSASKDOCTORKbyAnthonyL.Komaro,M.D. LastSaturdaysAnswers COPINGWITHCHRONICFATIGUESYNDROMEQ: Iwouldliketoknowwhatbecameof thebeautifulactressTeresaWright.Shewas inalotofgoodmovies.--T.A.,Chattanooga, Tenn. A: MurielTeresaWrightwasbornOct. 27,1918,inNewYorkCity.Whileinschool, shebecameinvolvedintheatricalproductionsandappearedinherrstlm,The LittleFoxes,in1941.Shewasnominatedfor threeAcademyAwards,andshewononce, forhersupportingroleinMrs.Miniver. Wrightwasmarriedtwiceandhadtwochildren.Shediedofaheart attackatage86onMarch6,2005. DIDYOUKNOW? ActressLanaTurnersaid,Mygoalwastohave onehusbandandsevenchildren,butitturnedouttobetheotherway around.Shewasmarriedeighttimestosevendierenthusbands. Q: Whenwasteacher,authorandlecturerLeoBuscaglia born?Whendidhedie?--E.K.,Rushford,N.Y. A: KnownaectionatelyasDr.Loveonthecampusof theUniversityofSouthernCaliforniawherehetaught,FeliceLeonardoBuscagliawasborninLosAngeles,onMarch 31,1924,toItalianimmigrantparents.Theself-appointed cheerleaderoftheworlddiedofaheartattackin1998at age74. Canyoufindthehiddenwords? Searchcarefullybecausesomewords arebackwardordiagonal. GRAPHITE COLORED NUMBER GROOVE FERRULE PENCIL CEDAR CARVE CASED SHAPE LABEL HARD LEAD RING SOFT BOB SLAT SIXherearethreemain typesofpencils-cased pencils,coloredpencilsand mechanicalpencils.Cased pencilshaveacoreof darkwritingmaterialthat isencasedinwood.Co lored pencilsarecasedpencilsw ithcores madeofbrightlycoloredw riting material.Mechanicalpencilsuse replaceablecoressecuredinsidea metalorplasticcase.ThiseditionofShortcutsis sponsoredbyWillFerrule.Mostmodernpencilsare madebyfirstcutting severalgroovesinto multipleslatsofwood. Thegroovesofoneslat arefilledwithagraphite mixture.Theslatwiththe graphiteisthengluedto anotherslat.Individual pencilsarethencarved out. TheancientGreeksandRomansused piecesofleadtodrawlinesonpapyrus. Manyearlywritingtoolsusedleadorsilverto makemarks.Graphitebecamepopularafteralarge depositwasdiscoveredinEnglandinthe1500s. Pencilcoresmadewithamixtureofgraphiteand claywerefirstdevelopedbyNicolas-JacquesConte, ofFrance,inthelate1700s.Formoreinformation,checkouttheseWebsites:www.officemuseum.com/pencil_history.htmwww.berol.co.uk/historyofpencils.htmlhttp://pencils.com/pencil-history/3/10Mostpencils aremadefrom cedarlogs.Mostpencils manufactured are2Bpencils. Yellowis themost popular colorfor pencils.Whatdid theoutlawsay tothepencil? Draw! Whatdoesa pencildowhenitdoesnt knowtheanswer? Drawablank. Whatdoyou dowhenyourpencil runsoutoflead? Writeitoff. Whydidnt anyonetrust thepencildrawing? Itwasalittle sketchy.Themetalring thatholdstheeraseratthe endofapenciliscalleda ferrule. Oneofthe largestpencilsintheworldison displayattheFaber-Castellbuilding inMalaysia.Itisnearly20m (65ft.)tall. Pencilsarelabeled withnumbersandlettersthat describethetypeoflinethatwillbe producedbythepencilscore.9Histhe hardestandproducesthelightestline. 9Bisthesoftestandproduces adarkline. Mostpencils areshapedwithsixsides. Thehexagonalshapeiseasierto gripandkeepsthepencil fromrolling. Thecore ofamodernpencil doesnotcontainlead.Itis madeofamixtureofgraphite andclay.Softerpencilscontain moregraphiteinthemixture, whileharderpencilshave moreclay. Iliketo drawattention tomyself. Canyouhelpthisaccountantfindhispencil?Findmoreat: www.shortcutscomic.comThiscartoon isnothingtowrite homeabout. DEARDOCTORK:IhaveCFS.Whatisthelatestinformationaboutthecondition, particularlytreatments? DEARREADER:Forreaderswhoarenotfamiliarwiththecondition,CFSstandsfor chronicfatiguesyndrome.Fatigueisauniversalhumanexperience.Inourincreasingly pressuredandfast-pacedlives,manypeoplefeeltiredalotofthetime.Infact,fatigue isoneofthemostcommonreasonspeoplevisittheirdoctor.Yetveryfewpeoplewith fatiguearesueringfromCFS.Itisrelativelyuncommon,aectingabout4to8out ofeverythousandadultsintheU.S.,andasmallfractionofteenagersandyounger children. PeoplewithCFSexperienceongoing,severe,debilitatingfatiguethatisnotrelieved byrest.Othersymptomsinclude:Impairedmemoryorconcentration,sorethroat, swollenglands,musclepain,paininmultiplejoints,headaches,andexhaustionfollowingphysicalactivity. WedontknowwhatcausesCFS.PeoplewithCFSaremorelikelythanhealthy people--andpeoplewithotherfatigue-causingdiseases--tohavevariousabnormalities. Manyhavechronicactivationofdierentpartsoftheimmunesystem.Manyhave problemswiththeircellsmakingenoughenergy.Manyhavebiochemicalabnormalitiescalledoxidativeandnitrosativestress. Thenthereareproblemsinvolvingthebrainthathavebeenfound,thankstobrain imagingtechniques(MRI,SPECTandPET).Brainhormonesoftenresponddierently tochallenges.Electricalbrainwavestudiesoftenshowdierences.Theautonomic nervoussystem,thepartofthebrainthatcontrolsbasicbodyfunctions--suchas heartrate,bloodpressureandbodytemperature--oftendoesnotworkproperly.But theabnormalitiesarenotseeninallpatientswithCFS,andtheycomeandgo.Whatis causingtheseabnormalitiesremainsuncertain. Acombinationofthefollowingstrategiesmayhelpmanageyoursymptoms: --Setpriorities.Makealistofthingsyouwanttohavemoreenergytodo.Eliminate asmanynonessentialactivitiesasyoucan.Butbecarefultoguardagainstbecoming toopassive. --Exercise.Beginanexerciseprograminwhichyougraduallyincreaseyouractivity level.Thiscaneectivelyreducetheseverityofyoursymptoms. --Cognitivebehavioraltherapy(CBT).CBTisatypeofpsychotherapy.Ithelpsyou identifyandchangenegativethoughtsandbehaviors.CBTcanreducesymptoms. --Tricyclicantidepressants.Lowdosesofthistypeofantidepressantmayimprove thequalityofyoursleep,reducepain,andincreaseenergy. --Othermedications.Nonsteroidalanti-inammatorydrugs(NSAIDs)andacetaminophen(Tylenol)canhelprelieveheadaches,jointpainandmusclepain.Fishoil capsules(3,000mgperday)mayalsohelpreduceCFSsymptoms. Therearealsoseveralexperimentaltreatmentsindevelopment.Theseincludedrugs totreatabnormalitiesoftheautonomicnervoussystem,toquietactivatedpartsofthe immunesystem,andantiviraldrugs(forpeoplewithcertainactiveviralinfections). IamimpressedbytheprogressmadeinunderstandingCFSoverthepast25years. ItwasmadepossiblebyresearchconductedandsupportedbytheNationalInstitutes ofHealth,CentersforDiseaseControlandPrevention,andprivatefoundations.Still,we havealotmoretolearn.DISAPPOINTINGRETURNSMAY SIGNALITSTIMEFORACHANGE DEARBRUCE:Ihaveabout$3 millioninvestedthroughanancial planner,andIneedyouradvice. ThispastyearIearnedzeroincomefrommyinvestments.He saidthathewasplayingitsafewith mymoney.Healsosaidhedidnt loseanyofmymoney.Iwrotehim backandsaidinasensehedidlose moneyformebecausethemarket hassoaredthispastyear.Hesaidin returnthatinvestinginthestock marketwaslikeputtingmoneyina slotmachineinLasVegas.Ihad30 percentinthemarketwithhim. Myquestionis,shouldIchange toanothernancialplanner?Ihave toliveomyinvestments.Ithink someoftheseso-callednancial plannersarejustgoodsalesmen. --C.M.,viaemail DEARC.M.:Cutveryquicklyto thechase:Anyinvestmentadviser whosaysputtingmoneyinthe stockmarketislikeputtingmoneyinaslotmachineinLasVegas shouldbeshownthedoorimmediately.Youhave$3millionandno return?Evenaprivateconservativeinvestorshouldhavecomeup withatleast$100,000,andIwould neverhavebeensatisedwitha $100,000returnon$3million. Iwouldliketoknowwhatkind offeeshehasmadeforhimself. Evenat4percent,whichisanobrainer,your$3millionshould havebroughtin$120,000,andyou couldgurethepercentageifyou didntinvestitallwithhim.Thisguy isaloserandshouldbedumped instantly! ** DEARBRUCE:Howmuchof yourincomeshouldyouspendon monthlyhouseexpenses?Iheard thatitshouldbe50percent.Can youtellmeifthatsoundsright?-G.D.,viaemail DEARG.D.:Idontknowwhere youheard50percent.Thatisway outofbalance.Somewherearound 30percentwouldbeashighas Iwouldgo,andIwouldliketo shavethatdownacoupleofpoints. Spendinghalfofyourincomeon justhouseexpensesisfarmore thanmostbudgetswouldeverbe abletohandle.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A9Saturday, March 22, 2014SRSO: An arrest is not an indication of guilt. The determination of guilt and innocence is ultimately the responsibility of the courts. ARCHER, JAMES WALKER, 40, Renee Circle, Milton, moving traf c violation, drugs-possession BISHOP, MICHAEL RAY, 32, Phoenix Drive, Milton, probation violation DAVENPORT, FAITH ANN, 30, Ventura Boulevard, Milton, probation violation GILLEN, JACOB CLIFFORD, 36, Trailer Park Court, Milton, probation violation HOUSER, RICHARD LEWIS, 27, Oglesby Road, Milton, failure to appear LUNDIN, RONNY KAY, 57, Gulf Breeze, damage prop x2, burglary, larceny MATLOCK, KEVIN ROY, 21, Gulf Breeze, probation violation MOORER, SANTON ANTONIO, 38, Pensacola, moving traf c violation, veh theft, larceny, resist of cer MOORIS, TIMOTHY RANDALL, 35, Kings Court, Pace, battery, probation violation PATRICK NATHAN RANDALL, 24, Pace Lane, Pace, fraudfalse statement, larceny, stolen prop-deal in PAYNE, JAMES WESLEY, 21, Gulf Breeze, nonmoving traf c violation, marijuanapossess x2, drug equip-possess PEACE, MICHAEL SHAWN, 34, Windham Road, Milton, aggravated assault with a weapon www.srpressgazette.com email:news@srpressgazette.com 623-2120 5 0 1 B e d r o o m A p a r t m e n t s S p e c i a l D e s i g n F e a t u r e s A v a i l a b l e eFloridaDepartmentofTransportation(FDOT)willhostapublicinformationmeetingconcerningasafetystudyalong U.S.90.estudylimitsextendfromtheEscambiaCountylinetoStateRoad87SouthinSantaRosaCounty.efocusof thisassessmentisvulnerableroadusers,suchaspedestriansandbicyclists,whotravelwithinthe16.2milecorridorthrough Pace,PeaRidge,andMilton.Aspartofthestudy,existingfeatureswillbeanalyzedinconjunctionwithcrashhistoryandlocal stakeholderinputtoidentifypotentialsafetyimprovements. emeetingwillbeheldursday,April3,2014from5:30p.m.until6:30p.m.(CDT)attheSantaRosaCountyAuditorium, 4530SpikesWay,Milton,FL.ismeetingisbeingheldtoreceiveinputrelatedspecicallytopedestrianandbicyclistsafety withintheU.S.90studycorridor.Maps,drawings,andotherinformationwillbedisplayed.emeetingwillbeconductedinan openhouseformat(noformalpresentationisscheduled).FloridaDepartmentofTransportationrepresentativeswillbeonhand toanswerquestionsandreceivecomments. Publicparticipationissolicitedwithoutregardtorace,color,nationalorigin,age,sex,religion,disabilityorfamilystatus.Persons whorequirespecialaccommodationsundertheAmericanswithDisabilitiesActorpersonswhorequiretranslationservices(free ofcharge)shouldcontactthedepartmentsGeneralConsultantProjectManager,JimmySmith,P.E.,at(850)638-3363,atleast sevendayspriortothemeeting. Ifyouhaveanyquestionsaboutthisprojectorthismeeting,pleasecallJimmySmith,P.E.,atthenumberlistedaboveorbyemail atjsmith@panhandlegroup.com.YoumayalsocontactIanSatter,FDOTPublicInformationDirectortollfreeat(888)638-0250, ext.1205orviaemailatian.satter@dot.state..us. WELCOMINGNEWPATIENTSJoshuaDavis,M.D. PatHill,A.R.N.P. JoyceNichols,A.R.N.P.MonicaNall,M.D.Wereheretohelp. SERVINGSANTAROSAANDESCAMBIA COUNTIESFOR25YEARS SERVINGSANTAROSAANDESCAMBIA COUNTIESFOR25YEARS Sheriffs REPORT Like us on SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE PEACE, MICHAEL SHAWN PAYNE, JAMES WESLEY PATRICK NATHAN MOORIS, TIMOTHY MOORER, SANTON MATLOCK, KEVIN ROY LUNDIN, RONNY KAY HOUSER, RICHARD LEWIS GILLEN, JACOB CLIFFORD DAVENPORT, FAITH ANN BISHOP, MICHAEL RAY ARCHER, JAMES WALKER from the river would not be able to use this project to nd them. Lewis said there would be few if any physical signs or markers along the trail as they would be unattractive. Ben Wells, graduate student at University of West Florida, who is using the project as his masters thesis, said the project revolves around the cultural and archeological sites along the river. He said the trail will include a photo and video gallery as well as narration over video along the river. The idea, Wells said, is to create a choose-your-own-adventurestyle experience, where someone who may be interested in the lumber industry can nd information about it, or those interested in the Civil War can nd information about the shipyards. One sponsor for the project is the Blackwater Pyrates, an organization formed to be of service in the local community by helping with projects or needs on or related to the water, according to the Pyrates website. Captain Whitebeard, Walter Schumann, said there are about 13 shipwrecks within this section of the Blackwater River, three of which are visible from the bridge at Shields Point road. Schumann said the location is still unknown of the wreck of the H.M.S. Mentor, a British galleon lost in the Blackwater River in 1781. Wells said still shots will be able to show viewers some of the wreckage in the river, ful lling one of the goals of the project, which is to best protect, preserve and share the wreck sites so boaters, for example, dont drop anchor and accidentally damage a wreck. He said the trail will serve as both a historical trail and a nature trail with images, video and information on bird nesting areas, sh and alligators; and a base for future trails further along the Blackwater and tributaries. Both Walls and Lewis gave six-month estimates for utilizing the virtual trail. Discussion ensued regarding how much money would come from the funds for the South End committee, the sector under which the NBMSS falls. I think we really need to start developing attractions, and thats what this is; this becomes an attraction, said Laurie Gallup, TDC board member. Mike Loera, TDC board chairman, attending by phone, said the camera itself cost $73,000. Jack Sanborn, TDC board member, said he wanted to see some Consumer Reports-type reports on a piece of equipment thats $73,000, because I can see it sitting in a closet two years from now. Kyle Holley, TDC board member and development director at United Way Santa Rosa, said he wanted to approve the recommendation for the $125,000 at the meeting so as not to lose time and let the county commission check on consumer reports and competitive bids for the camera. Negley said viewers who see something interesting in the camera might want to plan a trip to dive that particular area. She also said, This would be the rst U.S.-based camera, and wow, what a big deal thats going to be. The motion passed to submit the grant request to the county commission without dissent. The request should be heard at the next county commission meeting in April. MARITIME from page A1 TDC from page A1I think we really need to start developing attractions, and thats what this is; this becomes an attraction. Laurie Gallup TDC board member ... I can see it sitting in a closet two years from now. Jack Sanborn TDC board member

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LocalA10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014 BUNNYSCRAMBLERSantaRosaPressGazette 6629ElvaStreet,MiltonFL32570 Name Telephone Address CONTESTRULES1. Correctlyunscramblethebusinessnames.Scramblednamesare separatedbywordbutwordsmaynotbeincorrectsequence. 2. SendorbringyourentrytoTheSantaRosaPressGazette,6629 ElvaStreet,Milton,Florida32570by5pmSunday,April13,2014 (mailslotonmaindoor). 3. Onlyonewinnerperhousehold.EmployeesofTheSantaRosa PressGazetteandtheirfamiliesareineligibletowin. 4. DrawingwillbeheldonApril14,2014at1pmandthewinnerswill benotiedbytelephoneandtheywillalsobepublishedinTheSanta RosaPressGazetteonApril16,2014. 5. Nophotocopiesaccepted.SSPERSORSATEZAEGTNATSA ROPUMCTELOTHENCGYODIFITRCEE STUCGEBTDU ENDIISQUOTUBIESERURZSIP ANDSRJVIANISOGB CEINSICWEIT TOASCONSICDARELME MEOHSSELIWRUFALEN TPERMEERPIMOGIGRON RLPUPEIRLSOFTETHPUTIL NYUGOROWDHAROLIOFGN SDBNDACLLARETURESSTCHE, SAIEFTLSO GOUANCNCITIYQUET EINFDANNEWISSRPITINIFSUO LHILTUQEENRAISEEBRUYA SAUERIFPAMC TCEIOSYNDANNTAOLAIIBRULAMNRCEOITA ONIUNLAFREEDTRICEDSHEVERARTS

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A11Saturday, March 22, 2014 (850)995-5905 OpenTues&Wed9-6pm Thurs&Fri9-7pm Sat9-4pm 4430Hwy.90suiteC (NettlewoodPlaza) Pace,FL32571 AllHaircuts$995 $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 BURRITOEXPRESS4514Highway90Pace,FL32571|Phone:(850)994-3402CanAccumulate$1 togetFREE Burritos!!! AskAboutDetails LimitedTimeOffer COMINGSOONTO!$1.00OFFonBurrito ExpressStartingin April2014 HarvestersFCU.com 850.857.4328(HFCU)2.99%APR-AutoLoans witha 3monthpayment vacation!*APR=AnnualPercentageRate.Rates& termssubjecttochange. Ratesavailabletoqualiedapplicantsonly. SeeHFCUforadditionaldetails. ItsOur EasterSale BIG 6629ElvaStreet,MiltonFlorida 6015441 OurFamilyServingYoursfor86Years! LewisFuneralHomes LewisFuneralHomes 4777W.SpencerField Pace995-57026405Hwy.90West Milton623-22437794NavarrePkwy. Navarre939-51226015298 LocatedInside SurpizesInsideCheckFBforDAILYDEALS 5082Highway90 Pace 850-995-0089 Free Tax Return ExtensionsEquity Accounting Enrolled AgentsTHETAXPROFESSIONALS(850)995-88484430HWY.90SUITEH|PACE,FL32571S.RICKFAIRCLOTH,EA,ATA,ATP MARCH 3Cooper, Cody Alen to Delp, Caitlyn Justine Newton, Christopher Randall to Hilligoss, Britney Amber Nassar, Eddie Lee Michael to Brinkmeier, Gabrielle Denise Dupont, Marion Richard to Dupont, Miriam Josephine Faison McMillen, Daniel Lee to Mase, Jenni Lynn Harris Runyon, Michael Harold to Castle, Tracy Michelle Leach Carroll, Cliffton James to Odom, Megan Leigh McDaniel, Jimmie Wayne to Thompson, Amy Lou McElroy, Neil David to Orr, Anna LynnMARCH 4Cox, Joshua Ryan Van Alstyne to Turner, Madison Lynn Reiners, Craig Charles to Gragg, Michelle Leigh Ochoa, Reyes Luis Miguel to Whelan, Ashley Marlitt Starrett, John William to Delsanto, April Nitasha Thorsen, Gary Bredal to Lay, Stephanie Louise Brown, Larry Alan to Touchstone, Elizabeth Ann Johnson, Bradley Shawn to Morrell, Paige LynnMARCH 5Holland, Seth Ryan to Rollo, Natalie Danielle Miller, Ryan Scott to Penton, Carissa Ann Hall, Jeremiah Kenneth Michael to Toole, Erin Kimberly Duke, Walter Eugene to Guidry, Melanie Ann Sausberry, Nathan to Travis, Sheila GraceMARCH 6Lehew, Matthew John to Gillis, Whitney Lane Cook, Louis Frederick, Jr. to Alexander, Connie Melenda Lambert, James Eugene to Birchett, Morgan Jean Lopez-Ramirez, Pierre Angelo to Kang, LunlingMARCH 10Lunsford, Tanner Daniel to Cotten, Amber Briana Clayberger, Joseph Richard, Jr. to Harmon, Danielle Nicole Jahn, Keith Alan to Fourie, Lulu LaurikaMARCH 11Bennett, Benjamin Charles to Hart, Kristen Michelle Schindler, Mark Christopher to Percy, Jessica Nichole Marichovich, Adam Michael to Lindner, Jessica Marie Scott, Christopher Dewayne to Marler, Mallisa Marie Martin, Victor Lee to Shuler, Lovins Feliia LynnMARCH 12McGrew, Andrew Maxwell to Lenz, Crystal RoseMARCH 13White, Dylan Mackenzie to Green, Angelina Michelle Durst, John Vincent to Holley, Stefanie MarieMARCH 14Mitchem, Michael Shane to Garcia, Antonette Marie Kittle McDonald, Chase Alan to McIlveene, Estes Haley NicoleMARCH 4 Stellitano, Nicholas M and Cooper, Jennifer E Lancaster, Connie Sue and Lancaster, Keith EricMARCH 5 Mitchell, Carol Ruth and Mitchell, Jeff Drew, LLana and Drew, Bobby Bradley, Delores Jean and Bradley, Jeffery Hawkins, Debra Taylor and Hawkins, Kevin Dale Panzik, Nakita and Mason, Denver I. III Tipton, Linda Leigh and Tipton, Danny Wayne Church, Keith Wayne and Church, Melody Y Bowman, Sheppard Eugene and Bowman, Cheryl Herndon, Morgan R and Herndon, Donald JMARCH 10 Whitman, Amber and Whitman, Charles Van Zile, Richard W and Van Zile, Tonya R Puskarich, Sonya K and Puskarich, David J Miller, Thompson Kristy and Thompson, Shawn Rogers, Elizabeth D and Rogers, Thomas Moore, Jacob W and Moore, Kelly Bream McLaughlin, Sabrina Scherer and McLaughlin, Allen WayneMARCH 11Short, Leonard W III and Short, Katherine E Holt, Ashley Deanna and Holt, Charlton Patrick Nobrega, Jason A and Nobrega, Candy L Bragdon, Daniel Joshua and Bragdon, Georgiana VionMARCH 12Bliss, Brittany Breanne and Bliss, Jeremy Levi Coder, Joseph William and Coder, Jeanette Marie Vaughn, Jennifer Ann and Vaughn, Jason Edward Moore, Joseph D and Moore, Latitia R Andrews, Dana Ray and Andrews, Nancy Marie Duke, Tasha M and Duke, Steven Bruce Jr Laffrey, Amy Janine and Laffrey, Damon S Philman, Timothy Ray and Philman, Micole Lynn OQuinn, Cecil R. Jr. and OQuinn, Angela TMARCH 13Warren, Jason Samuel and Warren, Kristina Webb, Latisha B and Webb, Daniel P. Scauzillo, Robert James Jr. and Scauzillo, Tracy Lynn Patrick, Deleasa D. and Patrick, Wesley B Post, Gabriel P. and Post, Ashley M. Special to the Press GazetteEvery 2 seconds, someone in the U.S. needs a blood transfusion. Blood donations are crucial to the health and well-being of our community. Thats why Wal-Mart invites people in the community to join them for special Share Your Power blood drives during March, at select Northern Florida and Southern Georgia area store locations, where you can make a difference by donating blood. Locally, a drive will be 1-7 p.m. Monday, March 24, at Wal-Mart in Milton. All blood donors will receive a $10 Wal-Mart gift card and a wellness checkup including blood pressure, temperature, iron count and a cholesterol screening. Generally healthy people age 16 or older who weigh at least 110 pounds can donate blood. To learn more about the importance of blood donation and how donors can target the power of their blood type, visit oneblood.org or call 1-800-68-BLOOD (1-800-682-5663). There are eight different blood types, and each one holds a unique power to save lives. OneBloods Target Your Type program gives donors the ability to learn the power of their blood type and how to donate the specic components of their blood that are most needed by patients at area hospitals. March MARRIAGES March DIVORCES Wal-Mart to host blood drive Monday their taxes since the 2006 litigation. A notice of proposed taxes went out in August 2006. At that time, Brown sought the opinion of Florida Department of Revenue attorneys, and based on the fact that leases on Navarre Beach are held for 99 years and renewed for 99 years for perpetuity, those taxes can be levied. Earlier this year, U.S. Congressman Jeff Miller sponsored H.R. 2954, the Public Access and Lands Improvement Act, which he says simplies the property rights issue. Current federal law, Miller said, makes it impossible for beach residents and businesses to obtain title to their land. Miller said the legislation would give leaseholders the option of attaining fee simple title to their property. In English law, a fee simple (or fee simple absolute) is an estate in land, a form of freehold ownership. It is the way real estate is owned in common law countries and is the highest ownership interest possible that can be had in real property. Santa Rosa County Commissioner Jim Melvin said, in his opinion, until the issue of fee simple is resolved, it would be the equitable thing to do to reduce Navarre Beach residents lease fees to a dollar. Im no attorney, but some people may view it as such, he said, to be double taxation to pay a lease fee on top of property taxes. NAVARRE BEACH from page A1

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LocalA12 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014

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Spring has sprungSpring is here; it has risen from the throws of winter. Its time for productivity, accomplishment, goal setting; well, it is for me. Spring is about the only season I want to work in the yard. I want to dig in the dirt and plant flowers, herbs and veggies, drag dead limbs across the yard, rake stuff and clean. Im sure its the only time my husband ever hears me actually say, Can I help you in the yard? Spring is also time for festivals, camping, hiking, cleaning, cycling, tennis, antiquing, canning, painting, organizing, garden pruning, running, softball, reading in the swing, and celebrating family. Theres Mothers Day, Fathers Day, Easter, and of course, my birthday. Im energized by spring, but when summer rolls around the heat exhausts me. Rarely do I venture outside during the heat of summer; however I try to make up for the down time in the fall and spring. But Ive made myself a goal. Ive challenged myself to organize all storage areas in my home. Closets, cabinets, attic, garage, baskets, chests, you name it, it will be organized. Its going to take a while but Im determined. My dear husband keeps everything even broken small appliancesstored in the garage along with old pillows, greasy mechanic cloths, and basketballs. And hes not the only one. My daughter, who no longer lives in my house, has formal gowns hanging in the closet shell never wear, and ballet tutus from when she was six. And Barbies. Lots of Barbies. Cruel as it may be, these items will be going by the way side soon, because Im on a roll. Drawers filled with items Ive never seen before or have any idea what to do with, will be taken to the trash. As serious as I am about recycling, its times like these I wish I didnt care about the environment or the condition of the landfills because all I want to do is throw stuff away. Im going for the greasy towels and the nasty pillows. Out of site, out of mind, right? I say all of this to you, dear readers, with courage. Because when I look at my sweet husband holding a broken radio, telling me nicely, I can fix it, my heart melts. Thats why I will do it when hes not looking. By AARON LITTLE623-2120 alittle@srpressgazette.com The roller derby season kicks off March 29 at Skate Land Skate Center in Milton with a double header of the Cajun Roller Girls against the Pensacola Roller Gurlz Travel Team and the Emerald Coast Roller Derby (ECRD) against the Pensacola Roller Gurlz Home Team. Doors open at 6 p.m., and the game starts at 7 p.m. Debby Deb.autry Meyer of the ECRD said roller derby is the largest growing sport in the U.S. and said its a female contact sport. Meyer said if people like hockey for the ghts, they should come see roller derby. However, Sarah Anita B. Cracken Tavares, also said players are drawn to roller derby to meet independent women and nd a physical challenge. Tavares said the players support each other by helping with kids and Meals on Wheels. Melanie Sinderblocks Crooke, an ECRD member since 2010, said other teams might be opponents but not enemies. She said players of different teams socialize often. Tavares, who gained an interest in roller derby after receiving her masters degree in health care administration, said the diversity is crazy among players. She said some are teachers, nurses, and social workers. The game starts with a group of players known as blockers going around the track, followed behind by two jammers, one from each team. Teams earn points when jammers pass opposing blockers. Blockers help their own team jammer move through the group of blockers and block opposing jammers from passing. Players compared the athleticism of the game to football and basketball, only in this case theres no object. Im the ball, Christine Blackburn, ECRD player and nurse at the naval hospital, said. with Womens Roller Derby Rollin, blockin, jammin PHOTOS BY AARON LITTLE | Press GazetteSeason begins March 29 LIFESTYLE www.srpressgazette.comSaturday, March 22, 2014 BPage 1Section PAMELA HOLTKeeping It Simple

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Freshman Destiny Herring races to rst base in the rst inning of action in a district match-up against Chipley High School.By BECKY BONDURANTSpecial to the Press Gazette 12-0. Twelve games and no losses until Tuesday, March 19. To the Lady Royals softball team, Tuesday night might have felt like a death in their family but in prospective it might have helped them more than realize right now. Ten minutes before the Royals faced off with the Chipley Tigers from Washington County, Jays Head Coach Brian Watson had his girls huddled up and provides them with precise information, Make sure you play every inning, every play. They are not better than us, run the bases, hit the ball and play the whole seven innings. The girls stand straight and listen diligently to every word their coach said. Each player wears a bow with sparkles in their hair, after all they are girls, but when they pick up a bat or a glove they are softball players who have won 12 straight games. Oh, he is hard. He makes very sure we are all doing what we need to do to keep improving and winning, said junior catcher Samantha Steadham, in reference to Coach Watson. He keeps us focused and playing hard. Moments before their huddle the Lady Royals were scattered across the eld, warming up and guided by Watson and his assistants, Jessica Odom and Brian Moye. Their warm up session before game time is organized and serious. Girls you were awesome warming up today, that says a lot for you, shares Moye with the team. Chipley stands to the side of the in eld and gives close attention to the team. The weather has been a big distraction this season, Watson said. We want to make it to the play-offs and all the way to nals. We have to stay focused on our realistic goals for now. Senior Royal Pitcher Chasity McCranie has gone 10 straight games on the mound, 10 straight wins. The winning streak is stressful in the way it makes us want to work harder, she said. McCranie has been playing softball for nine years and is considering continuing her athletic career for either of two community colleges in Alabama. She has her future planned; she wants to be a physician. Each game McCranie steps onto the eld, she caries the weight on her small shoulders of the winning streak. Against Chipley, McCranie and the Royals suffered its rst loss of the season, the streak ended with a score of 3-1. McCranie, who pitched all seven innings, struck out six batters and allowed three runs. Early in the rst inning, Chipley had one runner on base when a batter sent the ball deep over the left eld fence. Chipley automatically went up by two adding another run later in the game. The Tigers stepped up to the plate with an intensity that could be felt from the rst pitch. For Jay, Dana Blackmon who went 2-for-3 was the only run for the night. Taylor Moore earned a RBI off her hit that scored Blackmon. The winning streak ended for the Lady Royals and McCranie, but in the minds of true competitors their dream is not over. Their loss may be very bene cial to them when the district tournament starts. A Jay parent Diane Tagert re ected on the loss, No better time for it to happen. It had to come sooner or later. Now it is time to work hard and let the hard work pay off, she said. The Lady Royals will play a visit to the Chipley Tigers and Tuesday, March 25 for a second round of District 3-1A softball action against the only team who has beat them this season. The Royals return from their spring break vacation with an amazing 12-1 record and are 5-1 in their district. They will have bows in their hair, bats in their hands and a new determination in their swing. www.srpressgazette.comSaturday, March 22, 2014 BPage 2Section SPORTS PHOTOS BY BECKY BONDURANT | Special to the Press GazetteAbove Jay left elder Dana Blackmon grabs a base hit from the Chipley Tigers. At right If you want it, you know what to do encourages Coach Brian Moye as his team huddles before the start of their 13th season game. The Royals winning 12 game streak ended against Chipley.The Royal winning streak ends but not their dreamThe 2014 Jay Royals softball team, kneeling from left: Harley Bradley, Megan Mulford, Emily Dobson, Michaela Stewart, Samantha Steadham and Chasity McCranie. Standing from left: Holly Fagatt, Harley Tagert, Ashlyn Geck, Baleigh Upton, Destiny Herring, Taylor Moore, Sydney Lowery and Dana Blackmon.Bats Bows Bats Bows &Senior pitcher Chasity McCranie throws one across the plate against the Chipley Tigers. Against Chipley, the Royals suffered its first loss of the season, the streak ended with a score of 3-1.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B3Saturday, March 22, 2014

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2077822 Gun ShowFebruary 23rd&24thFt.WaltonBeach FairgroundsFREE PARKINGConcealed WeaponsClassSat/Sun11amor2pmFloridagunshows.comSat9-5Sun10-4 Pensacola FairgroundsMARCH 29th&30th In this business you have to know your audience and what they want. WE DO Strong local news co verage, good ser vice and a great product to sell. Weregrowingstrongerandreachingmorereaderseveryday.Beintheknow!MORE peoplereadTheSantaRosaPressGazettelastFebruarythanin ANY monthsince 2010. YouhavetoKNOWtoGROW. w! Be in the kno SubscribetoTheSantaRosaPressGazettetoday. Call850-623-2120 SportsB4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, March 22, 2014 BECKY BONDURANT | Special to the Press GazetteJustin Abel has a big night for the Jaguars from the mound as well as at the plate.Jaguars win back-to-backBy BECKY BONDURANTSpecial to the Press Gazette The Jaguars are undefeated in 1-1A district baseball action. Despite the weather, Central High School traveled Monday, March 18, to district rival Jay High School, and proved to be more than the Royals could handle. Central defeated Jay 6-2. From the mound, Centrals Justin Abel pitched his fourth game of the season, lling the mound for all seven innings. Abel had four strikeouts and did not give up any base-onballs. He only allowed four hits for two runs scored. Abel also was in his grove from the plate as well going 2-for-3 with one RBI. Nolan Frady and Darren Smith did not allow the miserable weather to interfere with their swing either. Frady was 2-for-2, had two runs, one RBI, a double and stole two bases. Smith cleared the fence for a home run as well as being 2-for-2 with one run and one RBI. Jays Tate Upton went 1-for-3 with the bat and Jay Carnley scored one run and went 1-for-3 from the plate. We played some good baseball tonight, Central Coach Mike Phillips said. On Tuesday night, March 19, Central hosted Laurel Hill for another district game. The Hoboes handed the Jaguars its sixth district win 10-0. Dalton Dunlap (2-0) was right at home on the Jaguar mound pitching ve innings with four strikeouts, and only allowing three hits. Abel had another big night swinging the bat going 3-for-3 with 2RBI and one run. Senior Evan Manning came through with 3-for-3 with three runs, two RBIs and a stolen base. Chase Jackson contributed to the night with two RBIs, one run and went 1-for-2 from the plate. The Pensacola Christian Academy Warriors will play the Jaguars at Central on Tuesday night, March 25. Special to the Press GazetteFlippin Out Gymnastics in Milton introduced a new competitive sport to our area; the gym started the rst competitive Acrobatic Gymnastics team in the Panhandle. Flippin Out Gymnastics is a USA Gymnastics Club Member, and coaches and athletes are registered USA Gymnastics members. The girls on the team attended their very rst competition in New Orleans. The level 5 pair brought home rst place, and the level 6 trio brought home third. The coaches, parents and students at Flippin Out are proud of the girls for doing so well at their rst meet. The team will return to New Orleans on April 5 and April 26 for additional meets this season. Look for the Flippin Out Acro Team at community events later this year.Flippin Out places 1st, 3rd FLIPPIN OUT TEAMLevel 5 pair: Avery Smith (8), Julia Johnston (8)Level 6 trio: Sydney Stenerson (11), Katie Matteson (11), Madison McArthur (9)Coach: Sara AtsattManager: Sara McBride A-FLIGHT First Place +4 Tom Couchman Second Place +1 Ray Salerno Tie Third Place Even Jim Divens Rod Manning Tie Fifth Place -1 Bob Barbaree Jim Gray B-FLIGHT First Place +9 Patrick McCrary Second Place +7 Dave Beard Tie Third Place +5 Chuck Brewster John Boivin STONEBROOK MEN SCORES STONEBROOK WOMEN SCORESGAME: TEAM PUTTS First Place Pat Daniels Betty Lucey Second Place Sharon Reiser Wanda Couchman Third Place Michelle Kilgore Pat Findley Chip-Ins Pat Daniels #9 Like us on SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE

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