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The Santa Rosa press gazette ( June 8, 2013 )

UF00028408 UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00822

Material Information

Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Creation Date: June 8, 2013
Publication Date: 07-06-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00886

Related Items

Preceded by: Milton press gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00822

Material Information

Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Creation Date: June 8, 2013
Publication Date: 07-06-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00886

Related Items

Preceded by: Milton press gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By LYNNE HOUGH 623-2120 lhough@srpressgazette.com MILTON Ofcials from the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce and Santa Rosa Ani mal Services spent Monday afternoon and evening at a home at 4062 Bettian Ave., re moving sick animals. Armed with a search warrant for the home, also known as Kirkham Kattery Rescue Inc. Shelter Exchange, deputies were looking for animals neglected and sick animals. When all was done, 225 cats in the home were removed. Ofcials report the animals were in varying conditions of health. Animal Control In terim Director Dale Hamilton said shelter employees and Veterinarian Dr. Natalie Dy son from the St. Francis Ani mal Hospital in Gulf Breeze were up until well after mid night with the animals, get ting them settled in and eval uating each to determine its condition. By morning, 86 cats had been euthanized. Hamilton said the 86 put down all tested positive for feline leukemia, a fatal disease that is highly contagious. Hamilton said many of the cats were suffer ing and quite ill. It is suspected all of the cats at the shelter were ex posed to feline leukemia be cause they were allowed to roam free in the home, shar ing bowls for food and water. The disease also is spread by grooming, ghting and sneez ing between animals. Sheriffs reports (posted at www.srpressgazette.com) contained disturbing details, including animals with pus coming from their eyes and genitals; some emaciated with hair falling out; and oth ers near death. Hamilton con rmed at least one cat died at the Animal Control Shelter, unaided. The animals are quaran tined at the shelter, according to County Spokesperson Joy Tsubooka. The current priority is a thorough medical evaluation of the remaining cats, she said, adding because of the number of animals brought in, it could take several days to a week to complete the assessments. At this time, it is too early to make plans for adoption or moving of the cats to other shelters, she said. Those de cisions pending on the results of the more thorough health Arsonist gets 40 years By JASON JANDURA 623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com A man that robbed and set the home of two Santa Rosa County law enforcement of cers on re last year was sentenced to 40 years in state prison this week. Everly Scott Lippwe bur gled the home of Deputy Lt. Chris Watson and his wife, Bonita Watson, a Santa Rosa County proba tion ofcer, on April 21, 2012. According to reports, Lippwe then set the home on re, which did not spread and was contained to only one room. The Watson family was out town during the burglary. Lippwe stole guns, bullet proof vests, electronics and jewelry from the residence. He sold the stolen jewelry in Atlanta and negotiated the sale of the guns and vests. He was convicted of mul tiple counts of burglary theft and dealing in stolen property. Joseph Cameron, who also was arrested in the burglary, cooperated with investigators and testied against Lippwe. Cameron already was sen tenced to a 20-year-term in prison for his involvement in the burglary. Kirkham Shelter closed; 86 cats euthanized Society ............................................. A2 Opinion ........................................... A4 Faith ................................................. A5 Sports ............................................... A8 Lifestyle ........................................... B1 Classieds ........................................ B4 TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 105 Issue 54Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com Results pending in toxic school complaints By JASON JANDURA 623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com The Santa Rosa County School Board is investigating complaints regarding the state of Chumuckla Elementary School after a letter claimed the build ing was toxic. Joey Harrell, assistant super intendent, said a state-certied, independent contractor was in the building taking samples last week. The samples have been sent to a laboratory for diagnos tic testing. Results of the tests are pend ing. Depending on when the re sults return, Harrell said, the issue might be addressed at the 9 a.m. July 11 school board meeting. He said he suspects the Fourth of July holiday might have extended the time it took for results to transpire from the laboratory. I gured it would be late, Harrell said. Im not really ex pecting any information until af ter the holiday. The matter was looked into after a letter was sent to the school board, stating allegations of teacher and student sickness. The letter also addressed two teachers at the school that had children with birth defects. One of those children died. The school board had CES tested for toxic mold last year after a teacher told the board of By JASON JANDURA 623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com A one-vehicle accident turned deadly when a 65year-old Mississippi man was killed on Interstate 10 near Ward Basin Road when his van struck a concrete cul vert, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. He was traveling west on Interstate 10 when he began to veer to, leaving the paved roadway. The 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan continued veering, heading southwest across the median. Reports say the van drove through the median, onto the shoulder of the eastbound lanes. The man drove across two lanes of opposing trafc and continued on the shoulder until the left side of the van struck a concrete culvert. According to the report, the man was not wearing a seat belt. It is unknown if alcohol was involved, but re sults are pending. The accident occurred just before noon July 4. The man was transported to West Florida Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The mans name is being held un til the family is notied. This fatal accident follows a streak of motor vehicle ac cidents in the area. Another crash at the same location sent two men to the hospital Wednesday after noon. Witnesses say the driv er of a pickup truck traveling westbound apparently lost control of the vehicle, cross ing the median and coming to rest after striking support columns of the Ward Basin Road overpass. No further details were available.W ARD BASIN AND U.S. 90 Earlier this week, a twocar collision during rush hour sent two to the hospital with minor injuries and caused confusion for morning com muters at the intersection of Ward Basin Road and U.S. 90, according to a Florida High way Patrol report. A black 1997 Ford Explor er driven by Gaiel Eugene Noble, 66, struck a white 1999 GMC Jimmy driven by Betty Jo Fults, 46. The Ex plorer rammed the drivers side front panel of the white Jimmy. The collision dazed Noble, JA S ON JAN D U R A | Press Gazette Lt. Tommy Gunn of the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce removes pet crates from Kirkham Kattery Rescue in Milton. Authorities removed 225 cats from the home. See CATS A7J A S ON J AN D U R A | Press Gazette A string of trafc accidents plagued Santa Rosa County last week, causing minor injuries and thousands of dollars estimated in damage. Accidents plague Santa Rosa County roads; 1 dead See ACCIDENTS A7 EVERL Y SCOTT LIPPWE See TOXIC A7 LIGHT UP THE SKYLY NNE H OU G H | Press Gazette The threat and delivery of rain did not stop July 4th revelers from hanging out at Riverwalk Thursday. Just as the reworks show began, Mother Nature delivered as well. Rain-soaked residents of Santa Rosa stayed for the light show despite the showers. See more photos from the Riverwalk celebration on Page B3 75 cents Saturday, July 6, 2013 Gazette Santa Rosas Press Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.com Tweet us @srpressgazette and like us on facebook.com Ofcers honor the fallen, B1

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Local A2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, July 6, 2013 Special to the Press Gazette Students going into the third through sixth grades are invited to come have summer fun at the Indian Temple Mound Museum! Kids will explore archaeology in a museum setting at real archaeological sites. This years camp is July 15-19. The following topics will be explored during this years camp: Digging Into the Past. Campers will experience a mock excavation and eld archaeology. Partners with the Past. Campers will learn about early Native American life as they analyze artefacts and learn Native American skills. March into the Past. Campers will learn about the Civil War and visit Civil War history sites right here in Ft. Walton Beach. School Then and Now. Campers will experience a day in the life of a student in the historic 100-year old Camp Walton Schoolhouse Museum. History Alive. Campers bring everything they learned together in summary activities from creating an archaeology exhibit in the museum to building a colony. The camp fee is $100 and all snacks and materials are included. Camp runs from 8 a.m. 12:30 p.m. each day. Registration forms are available at the Indian Temple Mound Museum during regular business hours. Heritage Park & Cultural Center is located at 139 Miracle Strip Parkway SE in downtown Fort Walton Beach Florida. The Indian Temple Mound Museum is open from 10 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For further information please call 850-833-9595. The City of Fort Walton Beach Heritage Park & Cultural Center is a community outreach division of the City and is committed to providing area historical educational programming. 6208 St ew ar t Str eet Milt on, FL 32570 850-623-6671 & F ax D ana J ames St one Manag er Lee Devine Assistant St ev e Maddo x Assistant ser enity g ar dens1@y ahoo .com ser enity g ar densmilt on.com Serenity Gardens P lease pr o vide a c olor phot og r aph if possible A ll inf or ma tion must be t yped W ednesda y s paper please submit b y F r ida y a t 3pm. S a tur da y s paper submit b y W ednesda y a t noon 6009922 Special to the Press Gazette 12-year-old Pace resident Nicho las Hanssen was awarded a $1,250 scholarship to attend the National Flight Academy week-long aviation summer camp at NAS Pensacola. Hanssen, a recent sixth-grade graduate, competed against stu dents as old as 17 entering to win a scholarship offered by the academy. Students were challenged with writing four 300-word minimum es says having to do with categories such as how they would share what they would learn within their com munity; Exploration; NFA Ambition and Science, Technology, Engineer ing, and Math; and Leadership. In addition, students had to submit two letters of recommendation from teacher, community leaders, etc. He will be attending the week long over night camp July 21-26. The camp will come to a close with a graduation at 10 a.m. July 26. The camp allows promising fu ture aviators the opportunity to live aboard the virtual Ambition as Avia tion Experimental Pilots within a completely immersive experience. Who says learning cant be fun? Certainly not the leadership team at Ambition, who deliver inspired play in Pensacola. It all starts with the story a heart-pumping, adrenaline-filled mission with squadrons competing to successfully nish a task. Whether it is a race or rescue, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) skills are used in tandem with the equally important 21st-century learning skills includ ing critical thinking, problem-solving, teamwork and communication to ad vance the team. Ambition is next-generation inno vative play. From the theme park-like sight and sound to premier technol ogy available for students, the experi ence is unparalleled. Individuals and groups are both welcomed, providing the opportu nity for an exceptional team-building adventure. We are so very proud of Nicho las accomplishment, Nicholas mother said. It took him 15 hours of research and writing to complete the task. At one point we took a break and visited the Naval Museum to keep him motivated, inspired and on task. This was a huge undertak ing for a kid his age, but denitely worth all his effort. As long as they could remem ber, Nicholas parents said he has dreamed of becoming a pilot in the military. Apparently, he got some of the genes from his family members David Hanssen (dad), who served as a U.S. Marine and grandfather Paul Wikander, who was a pilot who owned and operated a commuter/ charter service in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands for more than 30 years, after getting his start in the U.S. Coast Guard. Nicholas referred to community in his leadership essay like the chain reaction of a domino effect ... I think I am like a domino when it comes to helping my community ... It only takes one person to start to make a difference in life. Nicholas proved his point from his essay that even though I am little or younger com pared to the other kids that I com peted against, I can accomplish big things! Students interested in competing for scholarships may visit the web site at www.nationalightacademy.com for more information on the Ambition Boost Program. CRAB CAKE COOK-OFF Special to the Press Gazette Whos got the best crab cakes in town? You be the judge. Arc Gateway is holding its annual Crab Cake Cook-Off at Seville Quarter on Wednesday, July 10 from 6 to 8 p.m. The event, presented by The Kids Dentist Dr. Stu Bonnin, features all-you-can-eat crab cakes from more than 20 local restaurants, wine tasting, a silent auction and a special showing of ceramic artwork created by Arc Gateway artists. Tickets are $50 and can be purchased online at www.arc-gateway.org/crab-cake-cook-off or by calling 434-2638. Arc Gateway provides services and support to more than 800 children and adults with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in the greater Pensacola area. For more information, visit www. arc-gateway.org By JASON JANDURA 623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com For the past nine years, Milton veteran Tommy Thurman and his wife Linda have been decorating their yard on Alabama Street as a salute to the troops. This is something I can show for all the veterans, Thurman said of his elaborate display of American red, white and blue. I do it strictly for them. This year proved to be no dif ferent, as the 71-year-old and his wife spent hours in the summer sun planting American ags and hanging patriotic memorabilia. The veteran estimates theres anywhere between $800 and $1,500 invested in the exhibit. A few local stores have supported the efforts. I do it for the veterans, Thurman said. I dont do it for myself. Thurman said he is dedicat ing the exhibit this year to Army Staff Sgt. Jesse Thomas who died in Afghanistan June 10. Thomas was killed in the line of duty, serving in the Helmand Prov ince. Thomas was originally from Pensacola, assigned to the 39th Transportation Battalion, 16th Sustainment Command, Kleber Kaserne, Germany. Thurman said he would also like for the public to remember the 19 reghters that died in Ariz. wildres last week. Last year, a ag he ew in his yard was ripped from a agpole and torn apart in a bout of vandal ism. He suspects it was related to a vandalism wave that targeted American ags in Milton and cemeteries. The incident did not deter him from celebrating the veterans and saluting the country. Thur man says he has seen a lot of re sponse from the community. Ac tive-duty military members and veterans have stopped by and taken photos. The ags will be ying for about two more weeks, says Thurman. JASON JANDURA | Press Gazette For the past nine years, 71-year-old Tommy Thurman and his wife Linda have been decorating their yard in patriotic fashion to celebrate and honor military veterans. This year, Thurman is dedicating the display to Sgt. Jesse Thomas who died in Afghanistan June 10 and 19 reghters that died in Ariz. A veteran himself, Thurman says the exhibit is to show respect and compassion for those serving and those that have paid the ultimate price. Press Gazette BIRTHDAY CLUB Brandon Gates July 6 Kevin Hough July 6 Kay Moore July 7 Christopher Johnson July 8 Kayla Ivey July 9 Tonia Grifths July 9 Willa Bell and Jason Martin welcome a boy, William Jason Martin on June 26, 2013. Lameisha Ann Brown and Fyrland Sanon welcome a girl, Jourdyn Avah Brown Sanon on June 28, 2013. Terra Nicole and Daniel Keith Madden welcome a girl, Alyssa Raye Madden, on June 28, 2013. Births Flags honor veterans and reghters 12-year-old Pace resident wins National Flight Academy scholarshipHPCC announces Archaeology Kids Summer Camp 2013

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A3 Saturday, July 6, 2013 W e do n t k n o w a b o u t o t h er p l aces, b u t w e n e v er s t o p lo o k in g f o r m o t i va t e d in di v id u a l s f o r o ur o p en s a les p osi t io n s. W o o dm en o f t h e W o r ld i s co n den t a n d s t r o n g a t s w h y w e c a n a o r d t o b r in g o n n e w r ep r es en t a t i v es t o o er o ur p r o d uc ts t o p e o p le w h o n e e d t h em. I f y o u r e in t er es t e d in a s a les c a r e er w i t h un limi t e d in co m e p o t en t i a l g r e a t b en e ts f o r t h os e w h o q u a lif y a n d a n o p p o r t uni t y t o m a k e a di er en ce in t h e li v es o f o t h er s, t h en W o o dm en o f t h e W o r ld i s in t er es t e d in y o u C o n t ac t m e t o d a y f o r a n in t er v ie w WELCOMING NE W P AT IEN TS Joshua Davis, M .D. Pat Hill, A.R. N P. Joyce N ichols, A.R. N P. M onica N all, M .D. The City of Miltons Finance Committee will meet at 9 a.m. July 18 in Conference Room B at City Hall, 6738 Dixon St. The City of Milton Administration Committee will meet at 10 a.m. July 18 in Conference Room B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon St. The City of Milton Stormwater Management Committee will meet at 9 a.m. July 22 in Conference Room B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon St. The City of Miltons Public Safety Committee will meet at 10 a.m. July 22 in Conference Room B at City Hall, 6738 Dixon St., Milton. The Milton Benevolent Cemetery Board will meet at 3 p.m. July 22 in Conference Room B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon St. The City of Milton Public Works Committee will meet at 8 a.m. July 25 in Conference Room B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon Street. The City of Milton Parks and Recreation Committee will meet at 9 a.m. July 25 in Conference Room B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon St. All meetings are open to the public. For more information on the meeting, contact the City Managers Ofce at 983-5411. Timing your planting to be discussed July 11 Quarterly meeting of the Friends of the Gardens of Northwest Florida Inc. (FOG) will be at 6:30 p.m. July 11 at Pensacola State College Milton Campus on U.S. 90 in Room 4902. William Wendt, who is a wholesale grower in Santa Rosa County and works at the UF Station in Jay, will be guest speaker. His subject will be Timing your Plantings. The meeting is free and open to the public. For more information, call 675-0305. Agency for Persons with Disabilities on meets July 18 Agency for Persons with Disabilities Director Barbara Palmer will be have a Town Hall Meeting from 3-5 p.m. July 18 to discuss the legislative session outcomes and successes and answer any questions or concerns from attendees. It will be at Marcus Point Baptist Church, 6205 N. W St. in Pensacola. Book promotion at Milton Library July 11 Bill Owens will present a lecture on his novelette, For Love of Elvira, A fall from Grace from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 11. The novelette is based on a true story from the early 1900s with connections to Pontotoc, MS and Pensacola. The Milton Library is at 5541 Alabama St., right at the trail. This is not a library sponsored program. Santa Rosa County Tourist Development meeting July 16 The July NE Committee meeting will be at 8:30 a.m. July 16 at the Santa Rosa County Chamber of Commerce All meetings are open to the public. News BRIEFS Milton MEETINGS Special to the Press Gazette Rosa Lee Seymour, Honorary Chapter Regent of the Three Rivers Chap ter, Daughters of the American Rev olution (DAR) was honored last week at the 122 Conti nental Congress in Washington, D.C. She received the Volunteer In formation Special ist (VIS) Volunteer of the Year Award. Seymour was very in strumental in organizing this chapter. The chapter organized in October 2006 with 82 members and has grown to 161 members. She served the chapter as Chapter Regent for six years and was named Honorary Chapter Regent for Life at its May meet ing. She has served as chairman on several Flor ida State Society Committees and National Society Committees. Seymour has volunteered her time and talents to her state and to the national commit tee for more than a decade. She has worked on every aspect of the committee and its proj ects. She has not faltered, even in times of personal crisis. To become a member of the DAR, contact Suzanne Terry rterry3@bellsouth. net for information. ROSA LEE SEYMOUR Special to the Press Gazette Gulf Islands National Seashore Superintendent Dan Brown announced today summer evening programs at Fort Pickens Area. At 7 p.m. July 25, Park Ranger Beckie Mims will lead an hour-long walk at the end of Santa Rosa Is land. The public is invited to participate in this leisurely hike, which will begin at the Fort Pickens Audito rium. Walkers will have the opportunity to explore his toric remnants of Americas coastal defenses and view native ora and fauna. The level of difculty is easy with some soft sand. Partic ipants should wear closedtoed shoes and bring water. At 8 p.m. Aug. 1 and Aug. 8, Park Ranger Beckie Mims will lead an hour-long program on the night skies of Gulf Islands National Sea shore. Meet at the Langdon Beach Gulf side pavilion, which is located two miles west of the Fort Pickens Entrance Station. Bring the entire family and a blanket to sit on. A short 200-yard stroll along the sand leads to an ideal lo cation to spread out a blan ket and enjoy a planetary lineup of our solar system. Relax and learn about the many park species that de pend upon dark night skies for their survival, Superin tendent Dan Brown said. Participants should re member the Fort Pickens Entrance Station closes at sunset. Late arrivals will not be allowed to enter. The programs are free of charge; however, there is an $8 entrance fee to the Fort Pickens Area. For more information, call the Naval Live Oaks Visitor Center at 934-2600 or visit our website at www.nps.gov/guis. Special to the Press Gazette The City of Milton is of fering a $5 discount to all participants who register early for the Riverwalk Run 5K. Individuals can sign up online at www.runsignup. com. The fee is $20, but those who register July 4-7 can use discount code July 4 and save $5. An in-store sign up will be held at Academy Sports and Outdoors from 4-7 p.m. Oct. 3. The cost will be $15 that evening. This years event will be held on Oct. 5 at 5 p.m. in downtown Milton. Rac ers will run or walk along a route of residential streets, a concrete trail and a boardwalk, which will pro vide a quick tour of historic Milton and the Blackwater River. The post-race cel ebration will immediately follow and features music, food, drinks and awards. The Riverwalk Run 5K is presented by Sams Club. Sponsorship oppor tunities are available and start at $150. Proceeds from the event benet pro grams of the City of Mil ton Parks and Recreation Department. For more information, contact Linsey William son at 983-5466 ext. 4208 or at linsey.williamson@ ci.milton..us. Seymour receives DAR Volunteer of the Year Award Register for Riverwalk Run 5K and save $5 Gulf Islands National Seashore announces Night Skies and Sunset Hike

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A word about the 225 seized cats from a non-pro t shelter in Milton: It is simple for the general public to form quick opinions about the people running the shelter, about the sheriffs of ce who initiated a warrant to seize the cats and about animal control of cers who euthanized 86 cats in less than 12 hours. We can judge, and we can hate; we can post negative comments on Facebook, and we can offer our own solutions from afar. But not a single one of us had the responsibility to handle this crisis. None of us saw what of cials are reporting as lthy conditions, very sick animals and indescribable suffering. One or two animals have died at the shelter on their own since arriving. We have the sheriffs report in hand with many details that explain a lot about this case. We spoke with the interim director at Santa Rosa County Animal Services about how his department is handling an in ux of more than 200 cats, with the task of putting down almost half of them. He told us his employees all deal with their job in different ways, but it does take a toll on them. And he said he knows hell be the bad guy for saying, As sick as they are, they really are in a better place. You dont want them lying here suffering. To help the public better understand the gravity of this case, we are going to put the entire Santa Rosa Sheriffs report on our website so you can see for yourself: www.srpressgazette.com. You will nd the story on the front page, in the rotator. We would like to hear back from you after you read it. Please post your comments on our website, and we might use some in our print version of the newspaper. Animal Control not the bad guys Recent opinion polls demonstrate a deepening distrust of the federal government. Thats not an altogether bad thing. Our nations founders recognized that most human abuses are the result of government. As Thomas Paine said, government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil. Because of their fear of abuse, the Constitutions framers sought to keep the federal government limited in its power. Their distrust of Congress is seen in the governing rules and language used throughout our Constitution. The Bill of Rights is explicit in that distrust, using language such as Congress shall not abridge, shall not infringe and shall not deny and other shall-nots, such as disparage, violate and deny. If the framers did not believe Congress would abuse our Godgiven, or natural, rights, they would not have provided those protections. Ive always suggested that if we see anything like the Bill of Rights at our next destination after we die, well know that were in hell. A perceived need for such protection in heaven would be an affront to God. It would be the same as saying we cant trust him. Other framer protections from government are found in the Constitutions separation of powers, checks and balances, and several anti-majoritarian provisions, such as the Electoral College, the two-thirds vote to override a veto and that twothirds of state legislatures can call for reconvening the constitutional convention, with the requirement that three-quarters of state legislatures ratify changes to the Constitution. The heartening news for us is that state legislatures are beginning to awaken to their duty to protect their citizens from unconstitutional acts by the Congress, the White House and a derelict Supreme Court. According to an Associated Press story, about fourfths of the states now have local laws that reject or ignore federal laws on marijuana use, gun control, health insurance requirements and identi cation standards for drivers licenses. Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback recently signed a measure threatening felony charges against federal agents who enforce certain rearms laws in his state. Missouri legislators recently enacted the Second Amendment Preservation Act, which in part reads that not only is it the right of the state Legislature to check federal overreaching but that the Missouri general assembly is duty-bound to watch over and oppose every infraction of those principles which constitute the basis of the Union of the States, because only a faithful observance of those principles can secure the nations existence and the public happiness. The bill further declares that the Missouri General Assembly is rmly resolved to support and defend the United States Constitution against every aggression, either foreign or domestic. The legislation awaits Gov. Jay Nixons signature or veto. Both lower houses of the South Carolina and Oklahoma legislatures enacted measures nullifying Obamacare on the grounds that it is an unconstitutional intrusion and violation of the 10th Amendment. Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, in 1798 and 1799 in the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, said, Resolved, That the several States composing, the United States of America, are not united on the principle of unlimited submission to their general government ... and whensoever the general government assumes undelegated powers, its acts are unauthoritative, void, and of no force. In other words, heed the 10th Amendment to our Constitution: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. Thats the message states should send to Washington during this years celebration of our Declaration of Independence. Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. Page 4 www.srpressgazette.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 A Section OPINION States step up against federal government LETTERS TO THE EDITOR OUR VIEW COLUMNIST MINORITY VIEWPOINT Walter Williams SPEAK OUT: CALL 623-5887 We want you to share your views on the topics on this page or any topic with other readers of Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Your views are important, too. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters must be typed and may be edited for content or to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for veri cation, if necessary. Send letters to: 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Email: news@ srpressgazette.com SHARE YOUR OPINIONS JOIN THE DISCUSSION The Press Gazette publishes reader comments and opinions posted on our Facebook and Twitter pages. 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NEWS INFORMATION If you have a concern or comment about Santa Rosas Press Gazettes coverage, please contact: PUBLISHER Jim Fletcher j etcher@srpressgazette.com EDITOR Lynne Hough lhough@srpressgazette.com EDITORIAL Jason Jandura jjandura@srpressgazette.com OFFICE MANAGER Carol Barnes cbarnes@srpressgazette.com ADVERTISING INFORMATION Debbie Coon dcoon@srpressgazette.com Tracie Smelstoys tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com MAIN OFFICE FAX NUMBER 850-623-2007 CLASSIFIEDS 850-623-2120 FIND US ONLINE www.srpressgazette.com TO GETS NEWS IN THE PAPER News tips and short items news@srpressgazette.com Church and faith news news@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries news@srpressgazette.com Sports sports@srpressgazette.com COPYRIGHT NOTICE The entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Halifax Media Group. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570. To report news or for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 623-2120. 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Gazette Santa Rosas Press SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY One year ................................. $39 Six months ........................ $19.50 13 weeks ............................... $9.75 OUT OF COUNTY One year ................................. $62 Six months ............................. $31 13 weeks ............................. $15.50 SENIOR CITIZEN (OVER 62) One year ................................. $32 Six months ............................. $16 13 weeks .................................... $8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. Cemetery clean-up appreciated internationally Dear editor, Greetings from Toronto, Canada. It is with great interest that I read your article on the students helping with the cemetery clean-up today. How inspirational ... and I hope they realize so many people appreciate their efforts. If you could, please let the chief of their organization know the story has indeed gone international. I am one of Canadas leading genealogists and as such have a Google alert set for anything of cemeteries. Yesterday we celebrated our Canada Day, being 146 years since our Confederation, and may I wish you and yours an amazing 4th of July. God Save the Queen of Canada ...God save the United States of America! J. Brian Gilchrist Toronto Nichols was fair in correcting error Dear editor, Thank you for publishing my letter on June 26. To be fair to Mr. Nichols, I would like to update my situation. I was nally able to speak with Mr. Nichols on Tuesday, June 25, regarding his of ce charging me collection fees on taxes that were assessed to my business in error. Although Mr. Nichols felt the in ated charges were completely allowable, he did agree to dismiss one of the collection warrants against me and the fees he incurred from obtaining the warrant. Ultimately, I will pay the county a few pennies under $185 for the actual taxes of $72.94 I owe. Mr. Nichols concern for my situation was far different from the attitude I received from the employees at the tax collectors of ce. As I mentioned in my previous letter, the rst employee I spoke with was not concerned about the countys error, refused to even consider correcting it and warned that she would ultimately proceed with her warrant and take what she wanted to from my business. Then, when I called to make an appointment to speak to Mr. Nichols, the second employee informed me, I could speak to him if I wanted to but he would not be willing to help me. In contrast, Mr. Nichols was willing to speak with me and come to a conclusion that was acceptable to both parties. Although I still think it is unfair to be charged for an error made by the county, I do appreciate Stan Collie Nichols willingness to try resolve the countys error. I hope my situation will help him nd better ways for his staff to handle the countys errors in the future. Respect for the taxpayer should be the rst goal of every person employed by this county. Patricia Kruger Milton Not all who claim to be Christians are Dear editor, Most people live in denial of the truth. They are right ready to live by a lie, more so then the truth. There are even preachers who talk the talk, but dont walk the walk. There are even professed Christians who are misleading the world, speaking hate from the pulpit. But this is not new under the sun. Some of the most evil folks in the world are self-professed Christians. They have been going to the same church, all of their life, and never giving themselves to Christ, these kinds are workers of evilness. They have the insight for mayhem. They promote the right to bear arms, while young folks are killing each other for no good reason. They push homosexuality, and AIDS still kills. They commit abortions as if they never were a child. It is a shame. But Ill guess, its to be said, Someone has to do it. Raymond Johns Milton THURSDAY, 5:39 P.M. Yes. This is Maria in Milton. I just want to let you know the Zimmerman trial is going too long for taxpayers. They should put the man in jail. He killed a young person for no reason, for the fun of it he want to kill somebody. He found Trayvon Martin and follow him and kill him. He kill a young person for no reason. He did it on his own. Then he suffer, and he suffer, and he did it on his own. And now the judges in the trial, they are insulting this young girl; she is the witness on the phone. Theyre saying you dont know how to read. Theres maybe a million people in America that dont know how to read. Especially the black because nobody give them a chance. Thank you. THURSDAY, 7:19 P.M. Yes, this is for Lynne, who writes Woman on the Edge. I really enjoyed the article Embrace the mess (Page B1, June 26), because I have a black hole in my trunk also. And I kind of felt a little bit better about it after I read this. I just wanted to thank you. It was a very enjoyable article. Thank you. My name is Sharon. FRIDAY, 2:23 P.M. I was calling to ask a question. I was told its not against the law to smoke those electronic cigarettes in a public store. Well, look, I cant smoke my regular cigarette in a public store. And I dont think its fair to smoke those electronic cigarettes cause they do have a nasty smell as well. I would like someone to answer that question if its not against the law to smoke an electronic in a public restaurant or store or something like that. Thank you so much. Sarah. SATURDAY, 6:05 P.M. This is Ian. The Pond Creek Park on Highway 90, boy, we just beauti ed the pretty grass. And all clean picnic tables, bathrooms and all that. Its a shame nobodys using it. They went all out to x up things real nice. I hope people start using it. Bye. SATURDAY, 7:57 P.M. Hi, Jim here. I have two comments. The rst one is, this is the second logging truck to ip over in a years time, give or take a month. When, I ask, is the city, the county and lets not forget the state going to start monitoring Highway 90 for speeders? It will only be after a trucker loses his load and kills a bunch of innocent people. Second, the proposed Riverwalk. The extension will be beautiful when its done. It will be beautiful until the rst hurricane. And has anyone ever noticed the signs that are now in place at the Riverwalk that we have now? Lets add no smoking to that sign. And why in the world can we not use the walkway for shing? A beautiful walkway, on a beautiful river and the city fathers wont let anyone sh off it. Doesnt make sense to me. Thanks, disgruntled citizen. MONDAY, 10:56 A.M. This is Barbara, and Im just calling this morning cause I wanted to leave a good joke for the Pyrates, the Milton Blackwater Pyrates. How much did they charge the Pyrate to get his ears pierced? A buck-an-ear. And next time, guys, I hope you have more ducks cause I didnt have the chance to get one this year, and normally I buy about four. Thank you and yall have a safe and happy fourth of July. Bye. MONDAY, 11:52 A.M. Calling regarding the log truck that overturned on Highway 90 at Dogwood. Im wondering if this truck driver was charged with careless or reckless driving. If he was driving so fast that the logs shifted when he shifted gears, apparently he was driving too fast. And I think he should be charged because there could have been someone hurt very badly. Thank you.

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FAITH Saturday, July 6, 2013 www.srpressgazette.com Section Section A 8602371;;8602371; Christ United Methodist SP Edition 00, Church, 2.0x2 6014293;;6014293; BAHA I FAITH SP Edition 00, Church, 2.0x2 6010456;;6010456; Pace Community Church SP Edition 00, Church, 2.0x2 Church DIRECTORY ANGLICAN Trinity by the Fields, 4980 W. Spencer Field Road, Pace APOSTOLIC First Apostolic Church, 5574 Highway 90, Milton Pace Apostolic Church, 4763 Old Guernsey Road, Pace ASSEMBLY OF GOD Bagdad First Assembly of God, 4513 Forsyth St., Bagdad East Milton Assembly of God, 5174 Ward Basin Road, Milton Faith Chapel Assembly of God, 8080 S. Airport Road, Milton First Assembly of God, 6163 Dogwood Dr., Milton Harold Assembly of God, 10495 Goodrange Dr., Milton Jay First Assembly of God, 14047 Alabama St., Jay McLellan Assembly of God, 6050 Three Notch Trail, Milton New Harvest Fellowship Assembly of God, E. Highway 90, Pace New Hope Assembly of God, 9550 Chumuckla Highway, Jay Pace Assembly of God, 3948 Highway 90, Pace Springhill Assembly of God, 8851 Buddy Hardy Road, Milton True Worship Assembly of God, 13297 Highway 87 N, Jay Welcome Assembly of God, 8581 Welcome Church Road, Milton Whit eld Assembly of God, 12391 Highway 87 N, Milton BAPTIST Celebration Baptist Church, P.O. Box 4047, Milton Eastside Baptist Church, 6731 Dixon St., Milton Faith Baptist Church, 6423 Hamilton Bridge Road, Milton Iglesia Bautista Libertad, 5536 Highway 90, Milton Liberty Baptist, 6763 Margaret St., Milton Lighthouse Baptist Church, 13050 Highway 89, Jay Mt. Pilgrim Baptist Church, 5103 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Milton Oak Grove Baptist Church, 917 Lakewood Road, Milton BAPTIST ABA Berryhill Road Baptist, 3095 Berryhill Road, Milton Bethel Baptist Church, 6178 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton Fellowship Baptist Church, 5223 Highway 90, Pace First Baptist Church of East Milton, 8167 S. Airport Road, Milton First Missionary Baptist Church of Pace, 3925 Pace Road, Pace Galilee Missionary Baptist, Highway 90, Milton BAPTIST INDEPENDENT Bible Baptist Church, 4001 Vern St., Pace Bible Way Baptist Church, 5976 Dogwood Dr., Milton Brownsdale Baptist Church, Chumuckla Highway, Jay Fil Am Baptist Church, 5240 Dogwood Dr., Milton Joy Bible Baptist Church, 8613 Highway 90, Milton Mt. Calvary Baptist Church, 4636 Highway 90, Pace Pine Grove Baptist Church, 7280 Pine Grove Road, Jay Pleasant Hill Missionary Baptist, 5550 Econ na St, Milton Solid Rock Baptist Church, 6760 Eastgate Road, Milton Trinity Baptist Church, 5301 Highway 90, Pace Victory Baptist Church, 4000 Avalon Blvd., Milton West Florida Baptist Church, 5621 Highway 90, Milton BAPTIST MISSIONARY Mt. Bethel Baptist Church, 175 Limit St., Milton New Macedonia Baptist Church, 4751 Chumuckla Highway, Pace New Providence Missionary Baptist Church, 4175 Popcorn Road, Milton St. John Divine Missionary Church, 5363 Saint Johns St., Milton BAPTIST PRIMATIVE Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church, 5339 Zero Ln., Milton Mt. Zion Primitive Baptist, 6930 Chaf n St., Milton BAPTIST SOUTHERN Avalon Baptist Church, 4316 Avalon Blvd., Milton Berrydale Baptist Church, 6703 Highway 4, Jay Billory First Baptist of HolleyNavarre, Highway 87 S., Navarre Blackwater Baptist Church, 11689 Munson Highway, Milton Calvary Baptist Church, 5405 Calvary Church Road, Milton Cora Baptist Church, 12953 Chumuckla Highway, Jay East Side Baptist Church, 4884 Ward Basin Road, Milton Ferris Hill Baptist Church, 6848 Chaf n St., Milton First Baptist Church of Bagdad, 4529 Forsyth St., Bagdad First Baptist Church of Milton, 6797 Caroline St., Milton First Baptist Church of Pace, 3949 Pace Road, Pace First Baptist Of Garcon Point, 17820 Garcon Point Road, Milton Floridatown Baptist Church, 3851 Diamond St., Pace Friendship Baptist Church, 5300 Berryhill Road, Milton Harmony Ridge Baptist Church, 5536 Highway 90, Pace Harold First Baptist Church, 10585 Goodrange Dr., Milton Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8531 Hickory Hammock Road, Milton Immanuel Baptist Church, 4187 Highway 90, Pace James Street Baptist Church, 6658 James St., Milton Jay First Baptist Church, 214 S. Alabama St., Jay Living Truth Church, 8897 Byrom Campbell Road Pace FL 32571 Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church, P.O. Box 4812, Milton New Bethel Baptist Church, 10995 Chumuckla Highway, Jay New Life Baptist Church, 6380 Bayberry St., Milton Olivet Baptist Church, 5240 Dogwood Dr., Milton Pine Level Baptist Church, 3300 Pine Level Church Road, Jay Pine Terrace Baptist Church, 6212 Pine Blossom Road, Milton Pleasant Home Baptist Church, 8500 Pleasant Home, Munson Santa Rosa Baptist Association, 6820 Highway 87 N, Milton Spring Hill Baptist Church, 9214 Munson Highway, Milton Wallace Baptist Church, 6601 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Woodbine Baptist Church, 4912 Woodbine Road, Pace CATHOLIC St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church, 6451 Park Ave., Milton CHARISMATIC New Hope Community Church of Milton, 5283 Goshawk Dr., Milton Shepherd House Ministries, 5739 N. Stewart St., Milton CHURCH OF CHRIST Bagdad Church of Christ, 4413 Garcon Point Road, Bagdad Berryhill Church of Christ, 3679 Berryhill Road, Pace Church of Christ, 4034 Highway 4, Jay Margaret Street Church-Christ, 6745 Margaret St., Milton McLellan Church of Christ, 6285 Three Notch Trail, Milton Pace Church of Christ, 4075 Berryhill Road, Pace Pea Ridge Church of Christ, 4400 Bell Lane, Pea Ridge Susan St. Church of Christ, 600 Susan St., Milton West Milton Church of Christ, 5300 Highway 90, Pace CHURCH OF GOD Church of God of Prophecy Bible Place, 600 Glover Ln., Milton Covenant Church of God, 4645 School Lane, Pace Ferris Hill Church of God in Christ, 5583 Alabama St., Milton CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST Christ Church of Pace, 5536 Highway 90, Pace Church of God at Milton, 4645 School Lane, Pace Church of God in Christ, 5887 Stewart St., Milton World Church of God, 5177 Stewart St., Milton COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Community Church of Christ, 5666 Raymond Hobbs St., Milton EPISCOPAL St. Marys Episcopal Church, 6850 Oak St., Milton FULL GOSPEL Full Gospel Community Church, 6199 Gainey Ford Road, Jay Living Faith Church, 7400 Reformation Dr., Milton Milton Victory Ministry, 7235 Highway 90, Milton True Faith Tabernacle, 5166 Old Oak Road, Milton True Grace Fellowship Church, 5178 Willard Norris Road, Milton HOLINESS Cobbtown Holiness Church, 4700 Greenwood Road, Jay Hollandtown Holinesses Church, 1851 Pineview Church Road, Jay INDEPENDENT Chumuckla Community Church, 8008 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Grace Bible Church, 6331 Chestnut St., Milton Relevant Life Church, 4560 Pace Patriot Blvd., Pace Walls of Salvation Church, 6697 Old Highway 90, Milton Word Alive Christian Church, 707 Stewart St., Milton Word Alive Church, 4200 Ebenezer Church Road, Jay INTERDENOMINATIONAL Blessed Assurance Ministries, P.O. Box 58, Milton Christ-Centered Ministries, 8688 A.D. McCall Road, Milton In His Presence Ministries, 218 Stowers Ln., Milton JEHOVAHS WITNESS Jehovahs Witness, 5696 Berryhill Road, Milton LDS Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 5737 Berryhill Road, Milton Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 4065 Highway 4, Jay Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1753 Sea Lark Lane, Navarre LUTHERAN Eternal Trinity Lutheran Church, 6076 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton METHODIST Bagdad United Methodist Church, 4540 Forsythe St., Bagdad Christ United Methodist Church, 5983 Dogwood Dr., Milton Chumuckla Community Church, 8008 Chumuckla Highway, Pace First United Methodist Church, 6830 Berryhill St., Milton Jay United Methodist Church, 300 S. Alabama St., Jay Mae Edwards UMC, 5052 Mulat Road, Milton Mt. Carmel United Methodist Church, 15030 Highway 89, Jay Pace First United Methodist, 4540 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Pineview United Methodist Church, 1400 Pineview Church Road, Jay Wesley Memorial UMC, 4701 School Lane, Pace Woodbine United Methodist Church, 5200 Woodbine Road, Pace METHODIST AFRICAN Greater Bethlehem AME Church, 5299 Richburg St., Milton Isaiah Chapel AME Zion Church, 5038 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Milton NAZARENE New Faith Church of Nazarene, 5162 Avenida Del Fuego, Pace NONDENOMINATIONAL Christian Life Church, 4401 Avalon Blvd., Milton Church of the Living God, 3375 Garcon Point Road, Milton Community Chapel, 4300 Pace Lane, Pace Deliverance Tabernacle, 5470 Dogwood Dr., Milton Freedom Fellowship Church of Milton, 723 Munson Highway, Milton Grace Believers Bible Study Church, Holiday Inn Express, Conference Room, 8510 Keshav Taylor Drive, East Milton Harvest Community Church of Jay, 2828 Harvest Road, Jay Heritage Chapel, P.O. Box 248, Milton Hope Corral Cowboy Church, Fidelus Community Center, 13774 State Road 87 N., Jay Indian Ford Victory Fellowship, 8999 Indian Ford Road, Milton Kings Way Christian Center, 3102 Deep Water Cv., Milton Living Gods Standard Communication, 6731 Old Highway 90, Milton Living Word Worship Center, 5573 Stewart St., Milton Milton Worship Center, 11164 Horizon Road, Milton New Harvest Fellowship, 4289 Berryhill Road, Milton New Life Baptist Church, 6380 Bayberry St., Milton New Testament Church, 5277 Glover Ln., Milton Northshore Community Church, P.O. Box 4476, Milton Our Fathers House Inc., 5362 Taf Ln., Milton Pace Community Church, 4310 N. Spencer Field Road, Pace Providence Chapel, 3721 Highway 90, Milton PENTECOSTAL Ebenezer Church Inc., 4200 Ebenezer Church Road, Jay First Pentecostal Church of Bagdad, 4636 Forsyth St., Bagdad Gospel Lighthouse Church, 10001 Chumuckla Highway, Pace United Pentecostal Church of Berrydale, 7580 Highway 4, Jay Whit eld Pentecostal Fellowship Church, 11236 Highway 87 N, Milton PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS Chumuckla Pentecostal Holiness Church, 2841 Highway 182, Jay Mt. Zion Pentecostal Holiness Church, 5532 Osceola St., Milton New Vision Worship Center, 5573 Stewart St., Milton Roeville Holiness Church, 6648 Munson Highway, Milton PRESBYTERIAN First Presbyterian Church, 5206 Elmira St., Milton Pace Presbyterian Church, 4587 Woodbine Road, Pace Westminster Presbyterian, 6659 Park Ave., Milton SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Milton Seventh Day Adventist, 5288 Berryhill Dr., Milton VINEYARD Bay Area Vineyard Church, 5163 Dogwood Dr., Milton Faith Chapel Assembly of God Home Folks sing Faith Chapel Assembly of God Church, 8080 South Airport Road in Milton, invites you to its Home Folks singing at 7 p.m. Friday, July 12. Bring nger foods, and enjoy Southern and bluegrass gospel. Dove Brothers at Living Truth Church The Dove Brothers Band Gospel Music Show will be at Living Truth Church and Chumucklas Farmers Opry, 8897 Byrom Campbell Road in Pace, on Friday, July 12. A meal will be served from 4:30-7 p.m., and the concert is 7-9 p.m. Meal and show tickets are $23.50 plus tax. Parking is free. To reserve tickets, call 994-9219. For a Google map, visit http://goo.gl/maps/Eoj5n For more information, visit http://FarmersOpry.com or www. LivingTruthChurch.com. Free VBS at Woodbine Baptist Church Go Tell It on the Mountain, where Jesus Christ is Lord and children learn to place their faith in Him, will be the theme of this years Vacation Bible School at Woodbine Baptist Church for children ages 3 through fth grade. The VBS will run 5-8 p.m. July 29 to Aug. 2. Dinner is included each night. Woodbine Baptist Church is at 4912 Woodbine Road in Pace. Register at the church of ce or at http://woodbinebaptist.org/ by clicking on the Vacation Bible School tab. For more information, call 994-6169. First United Methodist Church of Milton First United Methodist Church of Milton, 6830 Berryhill St. in Milton, will offer services on Closer Than You Think, 2 Kings 5: 1-14 Luke 10: 1-11, 16-20, at 8:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday, July 7. The speaker is the Rev. M. Kathryn Knight. For more information, call 623-6683. Everyone is welcome. First Presbyterian Church Church services are at 10:30 a.m. Sundays at First Presbyterian Church, 5203 Elmira St. in Milton. This Sunday, the message will be ALISTEN! delivered by Pastor Jo Kublik. Bible study classes are at 9:30 a.m. in the Fellowship Hall. There is a nursery for infants and toddlers. If you need transportation, call Warren or Anne Hatten at 626-8855. Calvary Baptist Church Jungle Jaunt VBS Calvary Baptist Church is having Jungle Jaunt VBS. Our motto is Praise Him! Trust Him! Follow Him! The One True God! Featured scripture is Psalm 145, 1-2: I exalt You, my God the King, and praise Your name forever and ever. I will praise You every day; I will honor Your name forever and ever. VBS is 5:30-8 p.m. July 21-26 for ages 3 to sixth grade. For more information, call 623-6569. Harold Assembly of God spaghetti dinner At 5 p.m. July 20, eat in or take out your spaghetti dinner. Donations only. Proceeds go to Womens Ministries Department. Harold Assembly of God is at 10495 Goodrange Drive in Milton. Call 981-1030 for information. Pace Church of Christ Vacation Bible School will be 4:30-8 p.m. July 26 and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 27 at Pace Church of Christ, 4075 Berryhill Road. VBS is for third through fth grades. For more information, call 995-8244. Page 5 DANIEL THAMES | Special to the Press Gazette Members of the Deliverance Tabernacle Christian Center gathered recently for an old-fashioned barbecue with family and friends. Faith BRIEFS Deliverance Tabernacle Christian Center With the purchase of 10 acres on Berryhill Road, not far from the Santa Rosa Medical Center, we expect God by faith to use us for His glory to bless and make a wonderful change in our community. We operate a child care center from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and we enjoy feeding and assisting those who are in need as they embark upon making a positive change in their lives so they can be productive citizens in our community. Everyone is welcome. Bishop is Charles E. Young, and pastor is Christopher Robinson. Together, we as a church family desire to reach out into the community and love and care for Gods creation and make a positive change in the lives of our brothers and sisters for the greater good of all mankind.

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Local A6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, July 6, 2013 SANT A R O S A P R E SS GAZE T TE FI ND U S ON F A CE BO OK sr pr essgaz ett e FOLL OW U S O N T WIT TE R SM ART MONEY B Y BR UC E WILLI AMS ASK DOC T OR K b y A n thon y L. K omar o M.D ( D r. K omar o is a ph y sician and pr of essor a t Har v ar d M edical S chool T o send questions go t o A sk D oc t or K .c om, or wr it e: A sk D oc t or K 10 Sha ttuck S t ., S ec ond F loor B ost on, M A 02115.) L ast S atur day s A nsw ers N O CURE EXIS T S F OR P ARKINSONS, BUT TREA TMENT IS POSSIBLE C an you f ind the hid de n wor ds? S e arch care f ully b e caus e s ome wor ds are back war d or diagonal. T ERMIT E T ONGUE SO LD IER MOUND S A LIV A STICK Y ST RIP E E A TE R GIA N T CLA W F LICK A N TS F EED NEST TA I L BOB H I LL A TE n an t e at er s long snou t stripe d b od y and lar ge bushy t ail make it one of the mo st re c ognizab le animals in the worl d T rue an t e at ers are f ound only in C e n tral and S ou th A merica O ther animals that f e e d on an ts s uch as the aar dv ar k and pangolin, are f ound in A f rica and A sia T his e dition of S h ort cu ts is spons ore d by Lad y A n t Eb ellum. A n an t e at er cat ches ab ou t 2 0 0 an ts at e ach an thill it v isits b e f ore it is driv e n a way by s ol dier an ts I t w ill v isit more than 1 0 0 an thills in a single day A n an t e at er can f lick its tongue in and ou t of its mou th more than 1 3 0 times a minu t e A n an t e at er s tongue is the per f e ct tool f or cat ching an ts b e caus e it is c oat e d w ith a layer of sticky saliv a and hundre ds of back war d-poin ting spikes T wo of the cla ws on an an t e at er s f ron t f e et gro w to b e ne arly 1 5 cm (6 in.) in le ngth. T he an t e at er us es thes e cla ws to dig h oles in to rock-har d an thills and t ermit e mounds F or more inf ormation on an t e at ers che ck ou t thes e b ooks: A n t e at ers by Lorie n Kit e (G rolier E ducational) or Mammals I ns e ctivores and B ats (W orl d of A nimals V 9) (G rolier). Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. Jef f Harris 2013 7/8 A gian t an t e at er may e at more than 3 0 ,0 0 0 an ts in a single day A n an t e at er s tongue is ne arly 60 cm (2 f t .) long. W hat did the an t e at er say to the an t? W hy don t you stick around f or dinner? W hat do you get whe n you cro ss an an t w ith an an t e at er? A sticky sit uation. W hat do you say to a sad an t e at er? W hy the long f ace? D id the an t e at er rememb er the an t s name? N o bu t it was on the tip of his tongue Th e gian t an t e at er is the lar gest spe cies of an t e at er A n adult male may me as ure more than 1.8 m (6 f t .) f rom he ad to t ail. A ntea te r s us ually caus e minimal damage whe n f e e ding at an an thill or t ermit e mound T hey do this s o they can ret ur n to the same nest to f e e d ag ain on another day A nt ea te r s must e at v er y quickly b e caus e it t akes less than a f ew minu t es b e f ore s ol dier an ts arriv e to de f e nd the nest T he an t e at er retre ats to avoid the painf ul b it es and stings inf lict e d by the s ol diers A nt ea te r s f ee d b y using their po wer f ul cla ws to dig a h ole in the side of an an thill or t ermit e mound T he an t e at er the n f licks its long, sticky tongue in to the h ole to cat ch hundre ds of an ts or t ermit es Y oung an t e at ers spe nd mo st of their time riding on their mother s back. T he stripe on the young an t e at er s b od y f orms a c on tinuous line w ith the stripe on the mother s b od y T his help s to hide the young an t e at er f rom p re dators T his cartoon des er v es a s erious tongue-lashing. W e nev er play dinner music around an an t e at er C an you spot all six dif f ere nces b et we e n thes e t wo sce nes? www .sh ort cu tsc omic.c om G AM E A NS W ER S: 1. Mo u th is di f f er e n t 2. E ye s ar e mo v e d 3. Be lt is di f f er e n t 4 Ha t is sh or t er 5 A n t e nn ae ar e di f f er e n t 6. A n t e nn ae ar e sh or t er DE AR DO CT OR K: My hu sb an d w as ju s t di ag no se d wi t h P ar ki ns on s di se as e. Ca n y ou di sc us s it in y ou r co lu mn ? I do n t kn o w an yt hi ng ab ou t it DE AR RE AD ER : P ar ki ns on s di se as e (P D) is a di se as e of t he ce nt r al ne r v ou s sy st em It ca us es pr ob le ms wi t h bo dy mo tio ns an d mo v em en t. PD w or se ns o v er ti me Br ai n ce ll s t al k t o ea c h o t he r b y ma ki ng an d r el ea si ng c he mi ca ls ca ll ed ne ur o tr an sm it t er s. Wh en on e ce ll r el ea se s a ne ur o tr an sm it t er an o t he r pi c k s up t he si gn al On e ty pe of ne ur o tr an sm it t er is do pa mi ne Do pa mi ne is ma de in an ar ea de ep in t he br ai n ca ll ed t he ba sa l g an g li a. Th at is al so wh er e mo v em en ts ar e co or di na t ed Th e do pa mi ne ma de b y ce ll s in t he ba sa l g an g li a is ne ce ss ar y fo r t he ba sa l g an g li a t o fu nc ti on pr op er l y PD de v el op s wh en do pa mi ne -p r od uc in g ne r v e ce ll s (n eu r on s) in t he br ai n di e an d no t en ou gh do pa mi ne is pr od uc ed Th is af f ec ts mo v em en t. (I v e pu t an il lu s tr at io n of t hi s pr oc es s on m y w eb si t e, As kD oc t or K. co m. ) PD us ua ll y be gi ns as a sl ig ht tr em or or s ti f fn es s t ha t is mo s t ob vi ou s at r es t. Wh en t he ha nd s of a PD su f f er er ar e r es ti ng in hi s la p, t he y ma y tr em bl e. Bu t wh en he r ea c he s fo r a cu p of co f f ee fo r in s t an ce hi s ha nd s ma y s t op tr em bl in g. As t he il ln es s w or se ns tr em or s be co me mo r e wi de sp r ea d. PD al so ca us es r ig id it y an d a sl o wi ng of bo dy mo v em en ts A pe r so n s f ac e sl o w l y be co me s e xp r es si on le ss In it ia ti ng a mo v em en t, li k e si tt in g up fr om a c ha ir ma y t ak e ma n y se co nd s t o s t ar t. A pe r so n w al k s sl o w l y wi t h sh or t, q ui c k s t ep s. If y ou r hu sb an d s PD g e ts mu c h w or se he wi ll li k el y ha v e di f cu lt y w al ki ng an d pe r fo r mi ng da il y ac ti vi ti es su c h as dr es si ng or us in g ut en si ls Bu t in so me pe op le PD pr og r es se s v er y sl o w l y Th er e is no cu r e fo r PD bu t sy m p t om s ca n be tr ea t ed wi t h me di ca ti on s. Me di ca ti on ma y no t be ne ce ss ar y at r s t. T r ea tm en t us ua ll y be gi ns wh en sy m p t om s in t er f er e wi t h w or k or ho me li f e, or wh en it be co me s di f cu lt t o w al k or ma in t ai n ba la nc e. Me di ca ti on s us ed t o tr ea t PD ei t he r bo os t le v el s of do pa mi ne in t he br ai n or mi mi c t he ef f ec ts of do pa mi ne Th e mo s t co mm on l y us ed me di ca ti on is le v od op a. It is us ua ll y pr es cr ib ed in co mb in at io n wi t h an o t he r dr ug ca ll ed ca rb id op a. Ot he r me di ca ti on s ca n al so be us ed ei t he r al on e or in co mb in at io n wi t h le v od op a. N ea r l y al l pa ti en ts im pr o v e af t er t he y s t ar t t ak in g le v od op a. Bu t lo ng -t er m us e of t en ca us es si de ef f ec ts an d co m pl ic at io ns De pr es si on is f ai r l y co mm on in pe op le wi t h PD An ti de pr es sa nt me di ca ti on s ca n he lp R eg ul ar e x er ci se an d a ba la nc ed di e t al so ma y he lp t o im pr o v e a pa ti en t s se ns e of w el lbe in g an d bo dy co nt r ol Th e ty pe of e x er ci se ca ll ed t ai c hi ha s be en sh o wn t o he lp Su r g er y is co ns id er ed on l y wh en me di ca ti on s ar e no lo ng er ef f ec ti v e. Su r gi ca l op ti on s in cl ud e de ep br ai n s ti mu la ti on in wh ic h el ec tr ic al s ti mu la ti on is de li v er ed t o t ar g e t ed ar ea s of t he br ai n t o co nt r ol sy m p t om s. An o t he r op ti on in v ol v es de s tr o yi ng pr ec is el y t ar g e t ed ar ea s of t he br ai n t ha t ar e r es po ns ib le fo r t he mo s t tr ou bl in g sy m pt om s. W e ca n do a g r ea t de al mo r e t o he lp pe op le wi t h PD t od a y t ha n wh en I w as in me di ca l sc ho ol Ba se d on t he pr og r es s of r es ea r c h, I e xp ec t mo r e ef f ec ti v e tr ea tm en ts in t he fu tu r e.

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A7 Saturday, July 6, 2013 By JASON JANDURA 623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com Tucked away near the edge of the Blackwater River and close to down town Milton is a refuge for those in need of help. Needs for specialized care range from dealing with speech issues after a stroke to physical rehabili tation after knee surgery or a hip replacement. The Santa Rosa Health and Rehabilitation Center, 5386 Broad St., is capable of handling those needs. The 110-bed facility offers a complete rehabilitation wing with physical, occupational and speech therapy. They provide inpatient and outpatient care as well as long-term nursing needs. We want to continue to nd new ways to improve quality of care we provide, Administrator Greg Brock said. Over the past four years, weve had improvements with clini cal indicators. Brock said they have seen re markable improvements in weight loss, falls and daily activities for the residents. Improvements netted the facility an award in 2012. They were awarded the bronze-level National Quality Award by the American Health Care Association. Santa Rosa Health and Reha bilitation Center was the rst nurs ing facility established in the area and has been operating since 1971. Santa Rosa County is now home to four skilled nursing facilities, three of them in Milton within a two-mile-radius. Weve been through multiple upgrades and renovations, Brock said. Were always looking for ways to improve our therapy programs. The facility found a way to retain its staff of 145, a prevalent issue in long-term care facilities, Brock said. Turnover rates have dramatically improved, falling well below the na tional average, stemming from mod ications in recruitment and efforts to keep employee morale high. We have an extremely low em ployee turnover, which is important in continuity of care, he said. Right now, were at 37 percent. The nation al average is 60-70 percent. He said recruitment was a key factor in staff retention. It is essen tial to make sure staff is well trained and has the proper education and the resources to do the job. Keeping the same, well-trained staff is inte gral for providing a continuance of care for the residents and patients in the building. Activities keep resident morale high and in good spirits. Brock said they have a full calendar every day, with church groups that come in and spend time with the residents, games and gardening activities. Its not just bingo anymore, Brock said. We have radio games. We have this radio that we leased that has games on it throughout the day. A few years ago, the facility spent $5,000 on upgrading a courtyard of the facility, adding in plants and shrubbery. The administrator said the residents had the opportunity to help out and get their hands dirty. Fireghters responded to a house re in the Chantilly neighborhood earlier this week. Ofcials said the re started in a kitchen accident and spread to the rest of the house. Smoke lled the home, forcing the residents to evacuate. They escaped the home with no injuries. JASON JANDURA | Press Gazette evaluation and veterinary recommendations. Hamilton agreed, saying his ofce has been receiv ing calls from concerned citizens asking about adop tions for the remaining animals. He said even if cats test negative for feline leukemia, the disease incu bates in three months and still could spread to other cats before it shows up pos itive on a test. Sheriffs reports indi cate complaints about the condition of the animals from as far back as 2006. Hamilton said despite the numerous complaints against the facility, the fact that they operated as a non prot shelter gave them a certain amount of protec tion -something he says hed like to see changed. Under a 501(c)(3) ex empt, they wouldnt give us entry to the house. We were stuck between a rock and a hard place. Our hands were tied. We contacted the De partment of Agriculture, De partment of Business and Professional Regulations they couldnt do anything. It was not a business. Hamilton said normally, the sheriffs ofce doesnt get involved in animal cases, but this time it was different. Warrants charg ing animal cruelty, neglect leading to illness, conta gious infections and the illegal sale and transfer of prescription drugs brought them to the door of the shelter on Bettian Avenue on Monday. By the time they left about 7:30 p.m., two people, Allen and Ella Kirkham, were handcuffed and taken to jail on arrest warrants. A controlled adoption of two cats from the Kirkhams helped to prove the animals under their care were very sick. The two animals ad opted by sheriffs deputies were immediately taken to a veterinarian, who com pleted a physical on each of the cats. They were found to be infected with feline leukemia, upper respira tory infection, bronchitis, ea infestation, tapeworm infestation and other dis eases. Both animals ended up being euthanized. Hamilton said many of the seized cats at Animal Control appear healthy, but a closer exam shows sores in their mouths, teeth fall ing out and other afic tions. He said it is impos sible at this point to guess how many more will be euthanized and how many can be saved. People see the pho tos of the poor little cat in the crate on the news, and they see us as the bad guy, Hamilton said. But as tough as it is for these ladies to euthanize these animals, but as sick as they are, you just wouldnt want them laying there, suffer ing. They are better off. People here are not heartless. Everyone han dles it in their own way. It is tough. CATS from page A1 By JASON JANDURA 623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com Trafc might be slower along U.S. 90 this upcoming school year as the Florida Department of Transportation reviews vehic ular congestion near the West Florida Baptist Academy. Vice Principal Mike Brown of the academy approached the Board of County Commissioners last week, asking for an enforce able 20 mph school zone. Only by Gods grace, I think, there has not been an accident up to this point, Brown said. All it would take is one accident to realize how big of a problem it is. Access to the school is lim ited, creating a dangerous is sue for commuters, Brown said. Trafc coming from the east must make a U-turn and cross lanes of trafc to enter the school. Trafc leaving the school, attempting to head west, must cross trafc and execute a U-turn to leave. We have a hard time under standing why something has not been done about this, Brown said. I know there is a nancial crunch, but we also know that we should put our children rst. Brown said he is concerned for the safety of the students and the public. The school teaches pre-kindergarten through high school, so younger drivers are commuting to and from school. Their judgment is not al ways the greatest, Brown said. They pull out and dont make the right decision; something devastating could happen. There is an advisory speed limit reduction in the corridor in place at the moment. The zone recommends 45 mph, but Brown said there is no enforcement. I can pretty much guaran tee you that nobody pays atten tion to it, Brown said. Its to tally ignored. And they just y through there at least 55 mph, if not more. The academy has asked the FDOT to look into the matter in the past and has been denied, according to the principal. Ian Satter from the FDOT said they will take a specic look into the situation. The school had been denied requests for a reduced speed area in the past based on a lack of pedestrian activity, a key element in creat ing a school zone. Speed limits typically are there to protect children from hazardous walk ing conditions. The commissioners asked the principal if the school would commit fund any potential projects. That would be a huge ex pense on our part, Brown said. TOXIC from page A1 health issues, Harrell said. A state-certied contractor checked the building and yielded no signs of toxic mold. The portion of the school in question was built in 1922. Rotting window sills were found and replaced by maintenance staff as a result of the mold inspec tion. The windows were rot ting because of age, Harrell said. Harrell said the school board would be proactive to the complaints and ap proach the situation in a logical manner. He said the school board would wait until results to come back from the lab before taking any additional direction. The school board ofcial said there have been no more complaints lodged, thus far, against CES or any other schools in the district. The folks up there in Chumuckla see were re sponding, Harrell said. They see that were look ing into it seriously. ACCIDENTS from page A1 who was not wearing a seat belt and was reported unconscious at the scene by EMS ofcials. The black Ford he was driving continued to roll southbound after the crash on Ward Basin Road, coming to rest in a row of hedges by the Local Yokel. EMS ofcials pulled the drivers out of their vehicles, placed them on backboards and stretchers and transported them to the hospital. Charges are pending against Noble for the accident that caused an esti mated $9,000 worth of damage, ac cording to the report. It is unknown if the crash was alcohol-related. U.S. 90 AND ST. JOHNS ROAD Later Wednesday afternoon, an unmarked Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce Ford F-150 plowed into the back of 2007 Chevy SUV that was stopped in a line of traf c heading east on U.S. 90 near St. Johns Road. The collision caused the SUV to lunge forward into the back of a State of Florida van trans porting eight state prisoners, ac cording to reports. The driver of the unmarked truck, Clifton Dykes Jr., 35, of Mil ton, suffered minor injuries in the crash and was transported to West Florida Hospital. Three of the four people in the SUV suffered minor injuries, in cluding a 1-year-old child, which were all taken to Santa Rosa Medi cal. The driver, 47-year-old Jimmy Day sustained no injuries from the accident. They were from Elkmont, Ala. The rst two vehicles involved in the crash were deemed to be totaled, while the van transporting prisoners had an estimated $5,000 worth of damage. The driver and the eight prisoners in the van were reported to have no injuries. Dykes was charged with care less driving by FHP. West Florida Baptist Academy requests school zone SANTA ROSA HEALTH AND REHABILITATION CENTER What: Inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, skilled longterm nursing care facility Where: 5386 Broad St. Details: 623-4661 Skilled nursing facility remains strong despite competition DANIEL THA M ES | Special to the Press Gazette Gayle Mullis places ags at the grave of her grandson, Samuel James Clary. I place ags out of respect for my family, she said. I know theyre not here physically, but I feel them spiritually. I just want them to know Ill always be here and take care as best I can. IN REMEMBRANCE NONE INJURED IN HOUSE FIRE JASON JANDURA | Press Gazette A patient at Santa Rosa Health and Rehabilitation Center draws. The center was the rst in the county and in 2012 was awarded the bronze-level National Quality Award by the American Health Care Association.

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www.srpressgazette.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 A Section SPORTS Page 8 YOUTH BASKETBALL CAMP AT MILTON HIGH Special to the Press Gazette The Youth Basketball Camp runs on July 22-25. Times are 3-6:30 pm. In the air-conditioned MHS gym. The camp is for boys and girls ages 6-14. Cost is $70. Each camper receives a T-shirt and an ice cream party on the last day. Awards and prizes for all participants. For more information please call 983-5616. Special to the Press Gazette Santa Rosa junior golfers ages 11-18 are invited to compete in the AJGT Coca Cola Stroke Play Championship in Mandeville, LA at the Beau Chene Golf Club on the week of August 2nd, 3rd, 4th. The 3-day, 54-hole tournament is ranked by the Junior Golf Scoreboard and hosted by the Arrowhead Junior Golf Tour. The tournament entry fee is $295 and includes three days of green fees, tee gifts, and Trophies in four age divisions. Recommended accommodations are available at the Country Inn & Suites. Please call 1-985-809-0467 for reservations. The tournament extended registration deadline is Tuesday, July 30, at noon. To enter the event, please call Owen Seiler at 1318-402-2446 or enter online at www.arrowheadjgt.com JUNE 29-30, 2013 A FLIGHT 1.* David Ross +8 +8 +16 2. Ron Posladek +12 +4 +16 3. Tommy Vance +10 +6 +16 4. Benson Ross +3 +9 +12 5. Fred Aubrey +6 +5 +11 6. Kirby Lindsey +5 +3 +8 7. Phil Kean +8 -1 +7 8. Guy Abbate -1 +5 +4 9. Cary Gates +1 +3 +4 10. Peach Waller +4 -1 +3 11. Jerry Kelly +2 -3 -1 12. Bobby Norman E -2 -2 13. Chris Smith -2 -1 -3 14. Billy Spiers E -5 -5 15. Bob Barnett E -6 -6 16. Neil Drennan -6 E -6 17. Louis Turnage -4 -6 -10 B FLIGHT 1. Butch Weaver +10 +8 +18 2. Don Bass +7 +3 +10 3. Benny Hickman +7 +3 +10 4. Coty Odom +3 +6 +9 5. Glenn Montgomery +4 +3 +7 6. Elmer Williams +4 +3 +7 7. Steve Vance -1 +7 +6 8. Garry Perkins +3 +2 +5 9. John Rogers +2 +2 +4 10. Pat Ritchie +5 -3 +2 11. Rey de la Cruz E +1 +1 12. Duncan Weekley -1 +2 +1 13. Dave Fitzgerald -5 +1 -4 14. Dave Geise -2 -3 -5 15. Ryan Barchett -2 -6 -8 16. Jackson Williams -8 -13 -21 17. Larry Hinson -9 -15 -24 C FLIGHT 1. Larry Hadley +2 +13 +15 2. Donovan Anderson +9 +5 +14 3. Mark Cotten +7 +7 +14 4. David Dearing +11 +2 +13 5. Mal Mason +7 +4 +11 6. Jim Arnold +1 +8 +9 7. Eric Sventek +10 -1 +9 8. Joe Altieri +2 +6 +8 9. Kevin McVicker +3 +5 +8 10. Mike Dorcik E +6 +6 11. Dennis Wilkerson +4 +1 +5 12.# Tom Little +7 -6 +1 13. Roy Pierson -3 +3 Even 14. Tom Carter -4 +2 -2 15. Dan Kinkle -2 -5 -7 16. Mark McDonald -5 -3 -8 17. Ray Palmer -6 -2 -8 D FLIGHT 1. Jack Pickett +4 +9 +13 2. Keith Clayton +2 +10 +12 3. Howard Levine +7 +5 +12 4. Greg Schlau +4 +7 +11 5. Mark McDaniel +4 +5 +9 6. Pete Sniezko +1 +4 +5 7. Steve Lowery +3 +1 +4 8. Jack Pio +4 -1 +3 9. Jeremy Walley -1 +2 +1 10. Jim Rainwater +2 -1 +1 11. Jim Shoemaker +1 -2 -1 12. Marshall Fant E -4 -4 13. Dave Acton -5 E -5 14. Bob Neal -3 -4 -7 15. Gerry Brown -9 -1 -10 SUNDAY TOURNAMENT 1. Larry Hadley +13 2. Keith Clayton +10 3T. Jack Pickett +9 Benson Ross +9 NEW SHERIFF 1. Butch Weaver +18 2T. Ron Posladek +16 David Ross +16 Tommy Vance +16 (*) Won 6-hole scorecard playoff (#) Prom Dress Winner Hackers amateur golf tour nal results Junior golfers are welcome Activities can be found at www. srpressgazette.com. Look for the box called Things to Do. There, you can check on activities by ZIP code or type. You are welcome to enter your events there as well. LOOKING FOR SUMMER FUN?

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LIFESTYLE www.srpressgazette.com Saturday, July 6, 2013 B Section Page 1 Autism, up close My great-niece has highfunctioning autism. She is here with her family: my sisters daughter, her husband and their son. They arrived two nights ago. We have kittens and they are taking three of them home to Tennessee. I was holding my favorite kitten and she walked up to me to admire the cat, repeated his name, and walked away. Five minutes later, she did the exact same thing again. It was so cute. Then about a half hour later, she saw him on the oor, didnt recognize him and introduced herself to the kitten like we had never spoken of him. She is so adorable and so smart. She can read extremely well. She is xated on time, speci cally her bedtime, which is 7 p.m. A few minutes after she found the kitten on the oor, she comes over to my computer, and leans down to look at my screen. I was working on the Press Gazette website and didnt want her to read what I was writing, but before I could say anything, she looked at me and asked what time it was. I said it was 9:27. With a very serious voice, she replies quietly, Oh that is bad. I looked at my niece and she says, She is xated on her bedtime. Her daughter walked over to her to tell her it was late and she needed to go to bed. My niece explained to her how they were on vacation and it was okay to go to bed later. About a half hour later, she tells her mom how tired she is and that she would like to go to the hotel and go to bed. Her little brother chimed in and they left a short while after. It is interesting watching her play and interact with the other children. To me, she appears a tiny bit detached and ... happy to do her own thing. She speaks very concisely and asks questions often. The rst time I met her was a year ago. She walked into my kitchen where I was standing and told me, This is your kitchen. I smiled and told her, Yes it is. You cook in here, she says. You cook meals for your family. I con rmed what she said. Then she put her hand on my kitchen table and told me, Is this your table? Is this where you eat with your family? I smiled and told her, Yes it is. Then she walked away. I nd her to be delightful. She is open and expressive. She thinks through what she is going to say, very carefully. It appears, unlike a lot of children, that she listens as carefully as she speaks. I know she is focused at the time you answer her. I am not sure how her retention is, based on the kitten thing. Her particular type of autism is Aspergers. I knew little of it until one of my grown children told me a couple of years ago that he was diagnosed with Aspergers. That week. As an adult. I wanted to argue and tell him that isnt true, but I began to think back over his childhood. I realized it could be possible. I checked the list of symptoms and he has several. Even in adulthood he exhibits many. It seems odd to me that one in 88 children show signs of autism, according to the Centers for Disease Control. It has to have an environmental cause. Whatever causes it, I nd much delight in spending time with my great-niece. Her perspectives are enlightening. Florida Law Enforcement Of cers recognized for their sacri ce By Cindy Sarver Special to the Press Gazette Motorcycles lined up rank-andle, hitting the road for a group ride to the highest point in Florida, to honor law enforcement offers killed in the line of duty. Family members of fallen heroes, law enforcement professionals and friends gathered together at the Britton Hill State Park Fallen Of cer Monument to pay their respects and lay a wreath to those who gave the ultimate sacri ce. The memorial was of ciated by the Walton County Sheriffs Of ce and included a 21-gunsalute performed by their honor guard. The names of the fallen of cers and their respective departments were called out with special recognition given to their family members in attendance. They gathered and held the ceremony at the highest point in Florida, Britton Hill, which stands at an elevation of 345 feet. The three-day-rally was for Cops on Top, an annual memorial climbing event dating back to 2006. Teams have been aiming to honor fallen of cer in their state by climbing their states highest point, according to the organization. Members of the Santa Rosa County Chapter XXXI of the Blue Knights were joined by other active and retired law enforcement ofcers from surrounding counties and other states as well as Green Knights (US military) and Red Knights (Fire Fighters). Representation included Blue Knights Chapters 3, 25, 26, and 31. A total of 47 motorcycles made the ride from Milton to the memorial site outside of Defuniak Springs. President Bill Brandenburg of the local Blue Knights chapter XXXI, President Frank Sarver of the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Of ce Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 123, and Ed Gallant, one of the founders of the Blue Knights International organization, laid a wreath at the monument. Santa Rosa County Deputies Danny Michael Lee Davis, Tom Wilkie, Drew Richards, Tim Lynch, Florida Highway Patrol ofcer Randy Johnson and guests were also in attendance. The Blue Knights were established in 1974 with a group of seven guys from a police department in Bangor, Maine, according to Gallant. They shared a common interest in motorcycles and would ride as a way of relaxing off-duty. Gallant said its a brotherhood. Theres a camaraderie that binds the group together, along with a commitment to community. Gallant said one day, a couple of guys from a Massachusetts police department showed up in blue jumpsuits, asking to be part of the club. That was the moment when the second chapter formed. The Blue Knights are now an international organization---active in 30 different countries and 637 chapters across the United States. The local Blue Knights Chapter XXXI was formed in Santa Rosa County in September 2012. It includes of cers from the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Of ce, the Milton Police Department, Escambia Sheriffs Of ce and the Florida Highway Patrol. The non-pro t local fraternal organization now has 31 active-andretired members who spend most of their weekends riding and raising funds for various charities. They are comprised of local law enforcement, state and federal of cers. They also sponsor the Southwest Panhandle Search and Rescue K9 Emotional First Aid team who recovered 3 US Coast Guardsmen who perished in Mobile Bay, due to a helicopter crash. They do search and rescue for Santa Rosa and local surrounding counties in the Gulf area. They were the 2012 recipient of the FBI Directors Community Leadership Award. The chapter sponsors the annual Santa Fly-In event with proceeds going to the Santa Rosa Kids House. Last year, members of the group surprised hundreds of children when Santa landed at the Peter Prince Airport in East Milton. Special thanks to local supporters and sponsors of the three day rally for Cops on Top. If you are interested in joining/supporting this local chapter contact Blackwater Chapter FL. XXXI, PO Box 4658 Milton, FL. 32572-4658. LYNNE HOUGH Woman on the Edge Honoring the fallen

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Local B2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, July 6, 2013 G a z e t t e San t a R o s a s P r ess Call Now! 850-863-1212 or e-mail customerser vice@nwfdailynews.com T o Subscribe! Subscribe now to the Santa Rosa Press Gazette! DONT MI SS AN ISS UE! Manatee, sea turtle decals celebrate La Florida 500-year anniversary Special to the Press Gazette New manatee and sea turtle decals from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) give people anoth er chance to celebrate the 500-year anniversary of Juan Ponce de Leons arrival on Florida shores and support conservation of these iconic Florida species. The latest editions of the manatee and sea turtle de cals go on sale July 1. Floridians can donate $5 to receive a decal when they are registering a vehicle or vessel or renewing a registration through the mail or in person at county tax collectors ofces across the state. The sale of decals helps support the FWCs manatee and sea turtle research, rescue, rehabilitation, management and education efforts. Manatee and sea turtle decals also can be ordered online at www.myfwc.com/wild lifehabitats/managed/manatee/decals or www.myfwc. com/wildlifehabitats/managed/sea-turtles/decals. Purchasing the Save the Manatee and Helping Sea Turtles Survive specialty Florida license plates also supports conservation of these species. More information on Viva Florida 500 history and events can be found at www.vivaorida.org. Special to the Press Gazette Not everyone can step up to the bow of a boat, lean against the railing, step on a pedal and start netting sh as they oat up to the surface. Although it is illegal and dangerous for anglers to sh with electricity, biologists use electroshing boats to temporarily stun and collect sh for scientic analyses and to help manage the sh ery. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) shery biologists have special training to op erate this equipment safely. Electroshing boats use a generator to create an electric current. The cur rent ows out in an electri cal eld between booms that hang off the front of the boat and its metal hull. The electric eld does not kill sh and can actually attract them toward the booms, before stunning those that swim within 6 to 8 feet. Bi ologists scoop up the sh in nets and place them in an aerated livewell to recover. Several factors contrib ute to how long the sh re mains stunned, including the shs size, the species, water temperature and con ductivity, how close the sh is to the booms and how long the current is applied. In most cases, stunning occurs within seconds of the sh entering the electric eld and lasts less than a couple of minutes once the sh is removed from the eld. Biologists typically iden tify sh by species and count and measure them, including their length and weight. Depending on the study, blood samples may be taken, stomach contents ex amined and tissue samples collected to determine mer cury and pesticide levels or the shs genetic makeup. Occasionally, biologists transport some specimens to the lab or hatchery for further examination or for breeding purposes. Scien tists can also harvest a few to examine their otoliths (earbones), which, once cut and ground into thin slices, show growth rings that re veal their age. In the eld, biologists also collect data to use in conjunction with sh data to evaluate the shery and determine how best to man age the resource. Electroshing tends to be less damaging than methods that entangle or trap sh, such as seines, gill nets, wire traps or trawls. It is an urban myth that elec troshing harms the eggs of female sh. In fact, biolo gists use electroshing to collect brood sh to use at hatcheries as parent sh. Information from elec troshing and other sam pling methods, including angler creel surveys, pro vide much of the informa tion used in quarterly sh ing forecasts. Fisheries biology is a fun possibility for a career, for those who like science, nature and the outdoors. The FWC set up the Florida Youth Conservation Cen ters Network. The FYCCN effort in cludes hosting summer sh camps. The goal is to create life-long anglers and stew ards of aquatic and sheries resources. For the past four years, these camps have expanded from two to 15 locations statewide and can reach 900 children annually. To me, the best part about hunting is not harvesting game but spending quality time outdoors with friends and family. One of the best ways to do that is through dove hunting, which is part of the reason why great dove hunts are in such high demand but often difcult to nd. To help people nd one of these hunts and for other reasons, the FWC created its Special-Opportunity Dove Club Program. It offers hunters the chance of experiencing exceptional dove hunting on the states best public dove elds. Dove Club permits enable one adult and one youth (under age 16) to hunt all scheduled dates for the dove eld of their choice. Permits cost $150 and enable both hunters to take a daily bag limit of birds. There are eight hunts on all these elds except Caravelle Ranch; it has six. All hunts are from noon until sunset and take place on Saturdays, starting Oct. 5 and ending Jan. 11. Last year, 2,841 birds were harvested from six elds. This coming season, there will be six specialopportunity dove elds again scattered throughout the state. Dove Club permits will be issued by random drawing during Phase I. That application period runs through July 17. After obtaining the correct application worksheet by going to MyFWC.com/License and clicking on Limited Entry/Quota Hunts, you can apply for these season passes by lling out a single worksheet (with up to ve dove eld choices) and turning it in at any county tax collectors ofce, license agent or by going online to License.MyFWC. com. During Phase I, hunters may be awarded a permit for only one dove eld. If you are successful in getting drawn, you must pick up and pay for your Dove Club permit at any of the same places mentioned above by Aug. 7. Check for drawing results the fourth week of July by logging in to your customer account at License.MyFWC.com. Any applicant who provides an email address will be notied by the FWC if drawn as well. At MyFWC.com, beginning in late September, hunters will be able to nd the most up-todate information on these six special-opportunity dove elds, as well as Floridas other public dove elds. The website is updated every Thursday throughout dove season. Information includes dove densities, previous weeks harvests and eld conditions. So if youd like to join the FWCs Dove Club, you need to try to do so in July. Remember to introduce someone new to hunting when you can. As always, have fun, hunt safely and ethically, and well see you in the woods! TONY YOUNG Outta the Woods Join the FWCs Dove Club Program FWC uses electrifying way to study sh

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B3 Saturday, July 6, 2013 Northwest Florida Daily News 34 th Annual Marvin DeBolt JUNIOR GOLF CLASSIC WEDNESDA Y & THURSDA Y JUL Y 17-18, 2013 FORT W AL TON BEACH GOLF CLUB PINES OPEN TO BOYS & GIRLS AGES 8 18 JUNIOR CLASSIC GOLF TOURNAMENT OFFICIAL ENTR Y FORM Gr een F ees F ood R efr eshmen ts T our namen t T -Shir t & T r ophies t o winners in all divisions P lus O v er all B o y s & Gir ls T r ophies $85 ENTR Y FEE $60 AGES 8 11 36 HOLES, 18 EACH DA Y EXCEPT 8-11 DIVISIONS WHICH PLA Y 18 HOLES, 9 EACH DA Y T ournament results will be forwarded to NJGS Scoreboard for ranking consideration BENEFITING THE CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTER NO TE: W ednesda y star ting times will be pub lished in T uesda y and W ednesda y Daily N ews Pla y ers c an c all c ourses T uesda y af t ernoon f or star ting times FWB P ines: 833-9529 N A M E : _________________________________________________________ D O B : _______________________________ C E L L : ______________________________________________ S H I R T S I Z E A D U L T S I Z E S : _________________________ A D D R E S S :__________________________________________________________________________________________ C I T Y : __________________________________________________ S T A T E : _______________ Z I P : ___________________ E M A I L : ______________________________________________________________________ P A R E N T C E L L : ____________________________________ C A S H / C H E C K : $_____________ C R E D I T C A R D #: _________________________________________________________ E X P D A T E : _____ / _____ PLEASE CHECK APPR OPRIA TE DIVISION: BO Y S 12-13 BO Y S 14-15 BO Y S 16-18 GIRLS 12-14 GIRLS 15-18 BO Y S/GIRLS 8-9 BO Y S/GIRLS 10-11 M ake checks pa y able t o: T he Childr en s A dv ocac y C en t er M ail t o: 1810 Hun tingt on R oad N ic eville FL 32578 F or mor e inf or ma tion C all M ichele a t (850) 585-8980 or V isit w w w .ecjr golf t our .c om www .ecjrgolftour .com 2091545 Saturday, July 6, 2013 PHOTOS BY LYNNE HOUGH AND DANIEL THAMES | Press Gazette FOURTH FESTIVITIES



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By LYNNE HOUGH623-2120 lhough@srpressgazette.com MILTON Ofcials from the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce and Santa Rosa Animal Services spent Monday afternoon and evening at a home at 4062 Bettian Ave., removing sick animals. Armed with a search warrant for the home, also known as Kirkham Kattery Rescue Inc. Shelter Exchange, deputies were looking for animals neglected and sick animals. When all was done, 225 cats in the home were removed. Ofcials report the animals were in varying conditions of health. Animal Control Interim Director Dale Hamilton said shelter employees and Veterinarian Dr. Natalie Dyson from the St. Francis Animal Hospital in Gulf Breeze were up until well after midnight with the animals, getting them settled in and evaluating each to determine its condition. By morning, 86 cats had been euthanized. Hamilton said the 86 put down all tested positive for feline leukemia, a fatal disease that is highly contagious. Hamilton said many of the cats were suffering and quite ill. It is suspected all of the cats at the shelter were exposed to feline leukemia because they were allowed to roam free in the home, sharing bowls for food and water. The disease also is spread by grooming, ghting and sneezing between animals. Sheriffs reports (posted at www.srpressgazette.com) contained disturbing details, including animals with pus coming from their eyes and genitals; some emaciated with hair falling out; and others near death. Hamilton conrmed at least one cat died at the Animal Control Shelter, unaided. The animals are quarantined at the shelter, according to County Spokesperson Joy Tsubooka. The current priority is a thorough medical evaluation of the remaining cats, she said, adding because of the number of animals brought in, it could take several days to a week to complete the assessments. At this time, it is too early to make plans for adoption or moving of the cats to other shelters, she said. Those decisions pending on the results of the more thorough health Arsonist gets 40 yearsBy JASON JANDURA623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com A man that robbed and set the home of two Santa Rosa County law enforcement ofcers on re last year was sentenced to 40 years in state prison this week. Everly Scott Lippwe burgled the home of Deputy Lt. Chris Watson and his wife, Bonita Watson, a Santa Rosa County probation ofcer, on April 21, 2012. According to reports, Lippwe then set the home on re, which did not spread and was contained to only one room. The Watson family was out town during the burglary. Lippwe stole guns, bulletproof vests, electronics and jewelry from the residence. He sold the stolen jewelry in Atlanta and negotiated the sale of the guns and vests. He was convicted of multiple counts of burglary theft and dealing in stolen property. Joseph Cameron, who also was arrested in the burglary, cooperated with investigators and testied against Lippwe. Cameron already was sentenced to a 20-year-term in prison for his involvement in the burglary. Kirkham Shelter closed; 86 cats euthanizedSociety .............................................A2Opinion ...........................................A4Faith .................................................A5Sports...............................................A8Lifestyle ...........................................B1Classieds ........................................B4 TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 105 Issue 54Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com Results pending in toxic school complaintsBy JASON JANDURA623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com The Santa Rosa County School Board is investigating complaints regarding the state of Chumuckla Elementary School after a letter claimed the building was toxic. Joey Harrell, assistant superintendent, said a state-certied, independent contractor was in the building taking samples last week. The samples have been sent to a laboratory for diagnostic testing. Results of the tests are pending. Depending on when the results return, Harrell said, the issue might be addressed at the 9 a.m. July 11 school board meeting. He said he suspects the Fourth of July holiday might have extended the time it took for results to transpire from the laboratory. I gured it would be late, Harrell said. Im not really expecting any information until after the holiday. The matter was looked into after a letter was sent to the school board, stating allegations of teacher and student sickness. The letter also addressed two teachers at the school that had children with birth defects. One of those children died. The school board had CES tested for toxic mold last year after a teacher told the board of By JASON JANDURA623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com A one-vehicle accident turned deadly when a 65year-old Mississippi man was killed on Interstate 10 near Ward Basin Road when his van struck a concrete culvert, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. He was traveling west on Interstate 10 when he began to veer to, leaving the paved roadway. The 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan continued veering, heading southwest across the median. Reports say the van drove through the median, onto the shoulder of the eastbound lanes. The man drove across two lanes of opposing trafc and continued on the shoulder until the left side of the van struck a concrete culvert. According to the report, the man was not wearing a seat belt. It is unknown if alcohol was involved, but results are pending. The accident occurred just before noon July 4. The man was transported to West Florida Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The mans name is being held until the family is notied. This fatal accident follows a streak of motor vehicle accidents in the area. Another crash at the same location sent two men to the hospital Wednesday afternoon. Witnesses say the driver of a pickup truck traveling westbound apparently lost control of the vehicle, crossing the median and coming to rest after striking support columns of the Ward Basin Road overpass. No further details were available.Wa ARD BaASinIN anAND U.SS. 90Earlier this week, a twocar collision during rush hour sent two to the hospital with minor injuries and caused confusion for morning commuters at the intersection of Ward Basin Road and U.S. 90, according to a Florida Highway Patrol report. A black 1997 Ford Explorer driven by Gaiel Eugene Noble, 66, struck a white 1999 GMC Jimmy driven by Betty Jo Fults, 46. The Explorer rammed the drivers side front panel of the white Jimmy. The collision dazed Noble, JAS S ON JAND D UR R A | Press GazetteLt. Tommy Gunn of the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce removes pet crates from Kirkham Kattery Rescue in Milton. Authorities removed 225 cats from the home.See CATSS A7Ja A Son ON Jan AN Du U Ra A | Press GazetteA string of trafc accidents plagued Santa Rosa County last week, causing minor injuries and thousands of dollars estimated in damage.Accidents plague Santa Rosa County roads; 1 deadSee ACCID DENTSS A7 EVeERlL Y ScottSCOTT LiIPPweWESee TOXIC A7 LIGHT UP THE SKYLYnne NNE Hou OU Gh H | Press GazetteThe threat and delivery of rain did not stop July 4th revelers from hanging out at Riverwalk Thursday. Just as the reworks show began, Mother Nature delivered as well. Rain-soaked residents of Santa Rosa stayed for the light show despite the showers. See more photos from the Riverwalk celebration on Page B3 75 cents Saturday, July 6, 2013 GazetteSanta Rosas Press Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.comTweet us @srpressgazette and like us on facebook.com Ofcers honor the fallen, B1

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LocalA2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, July 6, 2013Special to the Press GazetteStudents going into the third through sixth grades are invited to come have summer fun at the Indian Temple Mound Museum! Kids will explore archaeology in a museum setting at real archaeological sites. This years camp is July 15-19. The following topics will be explored during this years camp: Digging Into the Past. Campers will experience a mock excavation and eld archaeology. Partners with the Past. Campers will learn about early Native American life as they analyze artefacts and learn Native American skills. March into the Past. Campers will learn about the Civil War and visit Civil War history sites right here in Ft. Walton Beach. School Then and Now. Campers will experience a day in the life of a student in the historic 100-year old Camp Walton Schoolhouse Museum. History Alive. Campers bring everything they learned together in summary activities from creating an archaeology exhibit in the museum to building a colony. The camp fee is $100 and all snacks and materials are included. Camp runs from 8 a.m. 12:30 p.m. each day. Registration forms are available at the Indian Temple Mound Museum during regular business hours. Heritage Park & Cultural Center is located at 139 Miracle Strip Parkway SE in downtown Fort Walton Beach Florida. The Indian Temple Mound Museum is open from 10 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For further information please call 850-833-9595. The City of Fort Walton Beach Heritage Park & Cultural Center is a community outreach division of the City and is committed to providing area historical educational programming. 6208StewartStreet Milton,FL32570 850-623-6671&Fax DanaJamesStoneManager LeeDevineAssistant SteveMaddoxAssistant serenitygardens1@yahoo.com serenitygardensmilton.comSerenityGardens Pleaseprovideacolorphotographifpossible. Allinformationmustbetyped. WednesdayspaperpleasesubmitbyFridayat3pm. SaturdayspapersubmitbyWednesdayatnoon6009922 Special to the Press Gazette12-year-old Pace resident Nicholas Hanssen was awarded a $1,250 scholarship to attend the National Flight Academy week-long aviation summer camp at NAS Pensacola. Hanssen, a recent sixth-grade graduate, competed against students as old as 17 entering to win a scholarship offered by the academy. Students were challenged with writing four 300-word minimum essays having to do with categories such as how they would share what they would learn within their community; Exploration; NFA Ambition and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math; and Leadership. In addition, students had to submit two letters of recommendation from teacher, community leaders, etc. He will be attending the week long overnight camp July 21-26. The camp will come to a close with a graduation at 10 a.m. July 26. The camp allows promising future aviators the opportunity to live aboard the virtual Ambition as Aviation Experimental Pilots within a completely immersive experience. Who says learning cant be fun? Certainly not the leadership team at Ambition, who deliver inspired play in Pensacola. It all starts with the story a heart-pumping, adrenaline-filled mission with squadrons competing to successfully nish a task. Whether it is a race or rescue, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) skills are used in tandem with the equally important 21st-century learning skills including critical thinking, problem-solving, teamwork and communication to advance the team. Ambition is next-generation innovative play. From the theme park-like sight and sound to premier technology available for students, the experience is unparalleled. Individuals and groups are both welcomed, providing the opportunity for an exceptional team-building adventure. We are so very proud of Nicholas accomplishment, Nicholas mother said. It took him 15 hours of research and writing to complete the task. At one point we took a break and visited the Naval Museum to keep him motivated, inspired and on task. This was a huge undertaking for a kid his age, but denitely worth all his effort. As long as they could remember, Nicholas parents said he has dreamed of becoming a pilot in the military. Apparently, he got some of the genes from his family members David Hanssen (dad), who served as a U.S. Marine and grandfather Paul Wikander, who was a pilot who owned and operated a commuter/ charter service in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands for more than 30 years, after getting his start in the U.S. Coast Guard. Nicholas referred to community in his leadership essay like the chain reaction of a domino effect ... I think I am like a domino when it comes to helping my community ... It only takes one person to start to make a difference in life. Nicholas proved his point from his essay that even though I am little or younger compared to the other kids that I competed against, I can accomplish big things! Students interested in competing for scholarships may visit the website at www.nationalightacademy.com for more information on the Ambition Boost Program. CRAB CAKE COOK-OOFFSpecial to the Press GazetteWhos got the best crab cakes in town? You be the judge. Arc Gateway is holding its annual Crab Cake Cook-Off at Seville Quarter on Wednesday, July 10 from 6 to 8 p.m. The event, presented by The Kids Dentist Dr. Stu Bonnin, features all-you-can-eat crab cakes from more than 20 local restaurants, wine tasting, a silent auction and a special showing of ceramic artwork created by Arc Gateway artists. Tickets are $50 and can be purchased online at www.arc-gateway.org/crab-cake-cook-off or by calling 434-2638. Arc Gateway provides services and support to more than 800 children and adults with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in the greater Pensacola area. For more information, visit www. arc-gateway.org .By JAsSON JANDURA623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com For the past nine years, Milton veteran Tommy Thurman and his wife Linda have been decorating their yard on Alabama Street as a salute to the troops. This is something I can show for all the veterans, Thurman said of his elaborate display of American red, white and blue. I do it strictly for them. This year proved to be no different, as the 71-year-old and his wife spent hours in the summer sun planting American ags and hanging patriotic memorabilia. The veteran estimates theres anywhere between $800 and $1,500 invested in the exhibit. A few local stores have supported the efforts. I do it for the veterans, Thurman said. I dont do it for myself. Thurman said he is dedicating the exhibit this year to Army Staff Sgt. Jesse Thomas who died in Afghanistan June 10. Thomas was killed in the line of duty, serving in the Helmand Province. Thomas was originally from Pensacola, assigned to the 39th Transportation Battalion, 16th Sustainment Command, Kleber Kaserne, Germany. Thurman said he would also like for the public to remember the 19 reghters that died in Ariz. wildres last week. Last year, a ag he ew in his yard was ripped from a agpole and torn apart in a bout of vandalism. He suspects it was related to a vandalism wave that targeted American ags in Milton and cemeteries. The incident did not deter him from celebrating the veterans and saluting the country. Thurman says he has seen a lot of response from the community. Active-duty military members and veterans have stopped by and taken photos. The ags will be ying for about two more weeks, says Thurman. JASON JANDURA | Press GazetteFor the past nine years, 71-year-old Tommy Thurman and his wife Linda have been decorating their yard in patriotic fashion to celebrate and honor military veterans. This year, Thurman is dedicating the display to Sgt. Jesse Thomas who died in Afghanistan June 10 and 19 reghters that died in Ariz. A veteran himself, Thurman says the exhibit is to show respect and compassion for those serving and those that have paid the ultimate price. Press Gazette B BIRTHDAY CLUBBrandon Gates July 6 Kevin Hough July 6 Kay Moore July 7 Christopher Johnson July 8 Kayla Ivey July 9 Tonia Grifths July 9Willa Bell and Jason Martin welcome a boy, William Jason Martin on June 26, 2013. Lameisha Ann Brown and Fyrland Sanon welcome a girl, Jourdyn Avah Brown Sanon on June 28, 2013. Terra Nicole and Daniel Keith Madden welcome a girl, Alyssa Raye Madden, on June 28, 2013. BirthsFlags honor veterans and reghters 12-year-old Pace resident wins National Flight Academy scholarshipHPCC announces A Archaeology Kids Summer Camp 2013

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A3Saturday, July 6, 2013 Wedontknowaboutotherplaces,butweneverstop lookingformotivatedindividualsforouropensales positions.WoodmenoftheWorldiscondentand strong.atswhywecanaordtobringonnew representativestooerourproductstopeoplewhoneed them. Ifyoureinterestedinasalescareerwithunlimited incomepotential,greatbenetsforthosewhoqualify andanopportunitytomakeadierenceinthelivesof others,thenWoodmenoftheWorldisinterestedinyou. Contactmetodayforaninterview. WELCOMINGNEWPATIENTSJoshuaDavis,M.D. PatHill,A.R.N.P. JoyceNichols,A.R.N.P. MonicaNall,M.D. The City of Miltons Finance Committee will meet at 9 a.m. July 18 in Conference Room B at City Hall, 6738 Dixon St. The City of Milton Administration Committee will meet at 10 a.m. July 18 in Conference Room B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon St. The City of Milton Stormwater Management Committee will meet at 9 a.m. July 22 in Conference Room B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon St. The City of Miltons Public Safety Committee will meet at 10 a.m. July 22 in Conference Room B at City Hall, 6738 Dixon St., Milton. The Milton Benevolent Cemetery Board will meet at 3 p.m. July 22 in Conference Room B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon St. The City of Milton Public Works Committee will meet at 8 a.m. July 25 in Conference Room B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon Street. The City of Milton Parks and Recreation Committee will meet at 9 a.m. July 25 in Conference Room B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon St. All meetings are open to the public. For more information on the meeting, contact the City Managers Ofce at 983-5411. Timing your planting to be discussed July 11Quarterly meeting of the Friends of the Gardens of Northwest Florida Inc. (FOG) will be at 6:30 p.m. July 11 at Pensacola State College Milton Campus on U.S. 90 in Room 4902. William Wendt, who is a wholesale grower in Santa Rosa County and works at the UF Station in Jay, will be guest speaker. His subject will be Timing your Plantings. The meeting is free and open to the public. For more information, call 675-0305.Agency for Persons with Disabilities on meets July 18Agency for Persons with Disabilities Director Barbara Palmer will be have a Town Hall Meeting from 3-5 p.m. July 18 to discuss the legislative session outcomes and successes and answer any questions or concerns from attendees. It will be at Marcus Point Baptist Church, 6205 N. W St. in Pensacola.Book promotion at Milton Library July 11Bill Owens will present a lecture on his novelette, For Love of Elvira, A fall from Grace from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 11. The novelette is based on a true story from the early 1900s with connections to Pontotoc, MS and Pensacola. The Milton Library is at 5541 Alabama St., right at the trail. This is not a library sponsored program. Santa Rosa County Tourist Development meeting July 16The July NE Committee meeting will be at 8:30 a.m. July 16 at the Santa Rosa County Chamber of Commerce All meetings are open to the public. News br BRIEFsS Milton mMEEtTINGsSSpecial to the Press GazetteRosa Lee Seymour, Honorary Chapter Regent of the Three Rivers Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) was honored last week at the 122 Continental Congress in Washington, D.C. She received the Volunteer Information Specialist (VIS) Volunteer of the Year Award. Seymour was very instrumental in organizing this chapter. The chapter organized in October 2006 with 82 members and has grown to 161 members. She served the chapter as Chapter Regent for six years and was named Honorary Chapter Regent for Life at its May meeting. She has served as chairman on several Florida State Society Committees and National Society Committees. Seymour has volunteered her time and talents to her state and to the national committee for more than a decade. She has worked on every aspect of the committee and its projects. She has not faltered, even in times of personal crisis. To become a member of the DAR, contact Suzanne Terry rterry3@bellsouth. net for information. ROsaSA LEE SEYmMOUrRSpecial to the Press GazetteGulf Islands National Seashore Superintendent Dan Brown announced today summer evening programs at Fort Pickens Area. At 7 p.m. July 25, Park Ranger Beckie Mims will lead an hour-long walk at the end of Santa Rosa Island. The public is invited to participate in this leisurely hike, which will begin at the Fort Pickens Auditorium. Walkers will have the opportunity to explore historic remnants of Americas coastal defenses and view native ora and fauna. The level of difculty is easy with some soft sand. Participants should wear closedtoed shoes and bring water. At 8 p.m. Aug. 1 and Aug. 8, Park Ranger Beckie Mims will lead an hour-long program on the night skies of Gulf Islands National Seashore. Meet at the Langdon Beach Gulf side pavilion, which is located two miles west of the Fort Pickens Entrance Station. Bring the entire family and a blanket to sit on. A short 200-yard stroll along the sand leads to an ideal location to spread out a blanket and enjoy a planetary lineup of our solar system. Relax and learn about the many park species that depend upon dark night skies for their survival, Superintendent Dan Brown said. Participants should remember the Fort Pickens Entrance Station closes at sunset. Late arrivals will not be allowed to enter. The programs are free of charge; however, there is an $8 entrance fee to the Fort Pickens Area. For more information, call the Naval Live Oaks Visitor Center at 934-2600 or visit our website at www.nps.gov/guis. Special to the Press GazetteThe City of Milton is offering a $5 discount to all participants who register early for the Riverwalk Run 5K. Individuals can sign up online at www.runsignup. com. The fee is $20, but those who register July 4-7 can use discount code July 4 and save $5. An in-store sign up will be held at Academy Sports and Outdoors from 4-7 p.m. Oct. 3. The cost will be $15 that evening. This years event will be held on Oct. 5 at 5 p.m. in downtown Milton. Racers will run or walk along a route of residential streets, a concrete trail and a boardwalk, which will provide a quick tour of historic Milton and the Blackwater River. The post-race celebration will immediately follow and features music, food, drinks and awards. The Riverwalk Run 5K is presented by Sams Club. Sponsorship opportunities are available and start at $150. Proceeds from the event benet programs of the City of Milton Parks and Recreation Department. For more information, contact Linsey Williamson at 983-5466 ext. 4208 or at linsey.williamson@ ci.milton..us. Seymour receives DAR Volunteer of the Year AwardRegister for Riverwalk Run 5K and save $5Gulf Islands National Seashore announces Night Skies and Sunset Hike

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A word about the 225 seized cats from a non-pro t shelter in Milton: It is simple for the general public to form quick opinions about the people running the shelter, about the sheriffs of ce who initiated a warrant to seize the cats and about animal control of cers who euthanized 86 cats in less than 12 hours. We can judge, and we can hate; we can post negative comments on Facebook, and we can offer our own solutions from afar. But not a single one of us had the responsibility to handle this crisis. None of us saw what of cials are reporting as lthy conditions, very sick animals and indescribable suffering. One or two animals have died at the shelter on their own since arriving. We have the sheriffs report in hand with many details that explain a lot about this case. We spoke with the interim director at Santa Rosa County Animal Services about how his department is handling an in ux of more than 200 cats, with the task of putting down almost half of them. He told us his employees all deal with their job in different ways, but it does take a toll on them. And he said he knows hell be the bad guy for saying, As sick as they are, they really are in a better place. You dont want them lying here suffering. To help the public better understand the gravity of this case, we are going to put the entire Santa Rosa Sheriffs report on our website so you can see for yourself: www.srpressgazette.com. You will nd the story on the front page, in the rotator. We would like to hear back from you after you read it. Please post your comments on our website, and we might use some in our print version of the newspaper. Animal Control not the bad guysRecent opinion polls demonstrate a deepening distrust of the federal government. Thats not an altogether bad thing. Our nations founders recognized that most human abuses are the result of government. As Thomas Paine said, government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil. Because of their fear of abuse, the Constitutions framers sought to keep the federal government limited in its power. Their distrust of Congress is seen in the governing rules and language used throughout our Constitution. The Bill of Rights is explicit in that distrust, using language such as Congress shall not abridge, shall not infringe and shall not deny and other shall-nots, such as disparage, violate and deny. If the framers did not believe Congress would abuse our Godgiven, or natural, rights, they would not have provided those protections. Ive always suggested that if we see anything like the Bill of Rights at our next destination after we die, well know that were in hell. A perceived need for such protection in heaven would be an affront to God. It would be the same as saying we cant trust him. Other framer protections from government are found in the Constitutions separation of powers, checks and balances, and several anti-majoritarian provisions, such as the Electoral College, the two-thirds vote to override a veto and that twothirds of state legislatures can call for reconvening the constitutional convention, with the requirement that three-quarters of state legislatures ratify changes to the Constitution. The heartening news for us is that state legislatures are beginning to awaken to their duty to protect their citizens from unconstitutional acts by the Congress, the White House and a derelict Supreme Court. According to an Associated Press story, about fourfths of the states now have local laws that reject or ignore federal laws on marijuana use, gun control, health insurance requirements and identi cation standards for drivers licenses. Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback recently signed a measure threatening felony charges against federal agents who enforce certain rearms laws in his state. Missouri legislators recently enacted the Second Amendment Preservation Act, which in part reads that not only is it the right of the state Legislature to check federal overreaching but that the Missouri general assembly is duty-bound to watch over and oppose every infraction of those principles which constitute the basis of the Union of the States, because only a faithful observance of those principles can secure the nations existence and the public happiness. The bill further declares that the Missouri General Assembly is rmly resolved to support and defend the United States Constitution against every aggression, either foreign or domestic. The legislation awaits Gov. Jay Nixons signature or veto. Both lower houses of the South Carolina and Oklahoma legislatures enacted measures nullifying Obamacare on the grounds that it is an unconstitutional intrusion and violation of the 10th Amendment. Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, in 1798 and 1799 in the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, said, Resolved, That the several States composing, the United States of America, are not united on the principle of unlimited submission to their general government ... and whensoever the general government assumes undelegated powers, its acts are unauthoritative, void, and of no force. In other words, heed the 10th Amendment to our Constitution: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. Thats the message states should send to Washington during this years celebration of our Declaration of Independence. Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University.Page 4 www.srpressgazette.comSaturday, July 6, 2013 ASection OPINIONStates step up against federal government LETTERS TO THE EDITOR OUR VIEW COLUMNIST MINORITY VIEWPOINTWalter Williams SPEAK OUT: CALL 623-5887We want you to share your views on the topics on this page or any topic with other readers of Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Your views are important, too. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters must be typed and may be edited for content or to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for veri cation, if necessary. Send letters to: 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Email: news@ srpressgazette.com SHARE YOUR OPINIONSJOIN THE DISCUSSION The Press Gazette publishes reader comments and opinions posted on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Join the discussion at our Facebook page, Santa Rosa Press Gazette, or tweet us@srpressgazette. FIND IT ONLINE Visit www.srpressgazette. com for news, obituaries, sports, photo galleries and more. NEWS INFORMATION If you have a concern or comment about Santa Rosas Press Gazettes coverage, please contact: PUBLISHER Jim Fletcher j etcher@srpressgazette.com EDITOR Lynne Hough lhough@srpressgazette.com EDITORIAL Jason Jandura jjandura@srpressgazette.com OFFICE MANAGER Carol Barnes cbarnes@srpressgazette.com ADVERTISING INFORMATION Debbie Coon dcoon@srpressgazette.com Tracie Smelstoys tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com MAIN OFFICE FAX NUMBER 850-623-2007 CLASSIFIEDS 850-623-2120 FIND US ONLINE www.srpressgazette.com TO GETS NEWS IN THE PAPER News tips and short items news@srpressgazette.com Church and faith news news@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries news@srpressgazette.com Sports sports@srpressgazette.com COPYRIGHT NOTICE The entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Halifax Media Group. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570. To report news or for information, subscriptions and advertising, call 623-2120.6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 GazetteSanta Rosas Press SUBSCRIPTION RATESIN COUNTY One year .................................$39 Six months ........................$19.50 13 weeks ...............................$9.75 OUT OF COUNTY One year .................................$62 Six months .............................$31 13 weeks .............................$15.50 SENIOR CITIZEN (OVER 62) One year .................................$32 Six months .............................$16 13 weeks ....................................$8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.Cemetery clean-up appreciated internationallyDear editor, Greetings from Toronto, Canada. It is with great interest that I read your article on the students helping with the cemetery clean-up today. How inspirational ... and I hope they realize so many people appreciate their efforts. If you could, please let the chief of their organization know the story has indeed gone international. I am one of Canadas leading genealogists and as such have a Google alert set for anything of cemeteries. Yesterday we celebrated our Canada Day, being 146 years since our Confederation, and may I wish you and yours an amazing 4th of July. God Save the Queen of Canada ...God save the United States of America! J. Brian GilchristTorontoNichols was fair in correcting errorDear editor, Thank you for publishing my letter on June 26. To be fair to Mr. Nichols, I would like to update my situation. I was nally able to speak with Mr. Nichols on Tuesday, June 25, regarding his of ce charging me collection fees on taxes that were assessed to my business in error. Although Mr. Nichols felt the in ated charges were completely allowable, he did agree to dismiss one of the collection warrants against me and the fees he incurred from obtaining the warrant. Ultimately, I will pay the county a few pennies under $185 for the actual taxes of $72.94 I owe. Mr. Nichols concern for my situation was far different from the attitude I received from the employees at the tax collectors of ce. As I mentioned in my previous letter, the rst employee I spoke with was not concerned about the countys error, refused to even consider correcting it and warned that she would ultimately proceed with her warrant and take what she wanted to from my business. Then, when I called to make an appointment to speak to Mr. Nichols, the second employee informed me, I could speak to him if I wanted to but he would not be willing to help me. In contrast, Mr. Nichols was willing to speak with me and come to a conclusion that was acceptable to both parties. Although I still think it is unfair to be charged for an error made by the county, I do appreciate Stan Collie Nichols willingness to try resolve the countys error. I hope my situation will help him nd better ways for his staff to handle the countys errors in the future. Respect for the taxpayer should be the rst goal of every person employed by this county.Patricia KrugerMilton Not all who claim to be Christians areDear editor, Most people live in denial of the truth. They are right ready to live by a lie, more so then the truth. There are even preachers who talk the talk, but dont walk the walk. There are even professed Christians who are misleading the world, speaking hate from the pulpit. But this is not new under the sun. Some of the most evil folks in the world are self-professed Christians. They have been going to the same church, all of their life, and never giving themselves to Christ, these kinds are workers of evilness. They have the insight for mayhem. They promote the right to bear arms, while young folks are killing each other for no good reason. They push homosexuality, and AIDS still kills. They commit abortions as if they never were a child. It is a shame. But Ill guess, its to be said, Someone has to do it.Raymond JohnsMiltonTHURSDAY, 5:39 P.M.Yes. This is Maria in Milton. I just want to let you know the Zimmerman trial is going too long for taxpayers. They should put the man in jail. He killed a young person for no reason, for the fun of it he want to kill somebody. He found Trayvon Martin and follow him and kill him. He kill a young person for no reason. He did it on his own. Then he suffer, and he suffer, and he did it on his own. And now the judges in the trial, they are insulting this young girl; she is the witness on the phone. Theyre saying you dont know how to read. Theres maybe a million people in America that dont know how to read. Especially the black because nobody give them a chance. Thank you.THURSDAY, 7:19 P.M.Yes, this is for Lynne, who writes Woman on the Edge. I really enjoyed the article Embrace the mess (Page B1, June 26), because I have a black hole in my trunk also. And I kind of felt a little bit better about it after I read this. I just wanted to thank you. It was a very enjoyable article. Thank you. My name is Sharon.FRIDAY, 2:23 P.M.I was calling to ask a question. I was told its not against the law to smoke those electronic cigarettes in a public store. Well, look, I cant smoke my regular cigarette in a public store. And I dont think its fair to smoke those electronic cigarettes cause they do have a nasty smell as well. I would like someone to answer that question if its not against the law to smoke an electronic in a public restaurant or store or something like that. Thank you so much. Sarah.SATURDAY, 6:05 P.M.This is Ian. The Pond Creek Park on Highway 90, boy, we just beauti ed the pretty grass. And all clean picnic tables, bathrooms and all that. Its a shame nobodys using it. They went all out to x up things real nice. I hope people start using it. Bye.SATURDAY, 7:57 P.M.Hi, Jim here. I have two comments. The rst one is, this is the second logging truck to ip over in a years time, give or take a month. When, I ask, is the city, the county and lets not forget the state going to start monitoring Highway 90 for speeders? It will only be after a trucker loses his load and kills a bunch of innocent people. Second, the proposed Riverwalk. The extension will be beautiful when its done. It will be beautiful until the rst hurricane. And has anyone ever noticed the signs that are now in place at the Riverwalk that we have now? Lets add no smoking to that sign. And why in the world can we not use the walkway for shing? A beautiful walkway, on a beautiful river and the city fathers wont let anyone sh off it. Doesnt make sense to me. Thanks, disgruntled citizen.MONDAY, 10:56 A.M.This is Barbara, and Im just calling this morning cause I wanted to leave a good joke for the Pyrates, the Milton Blackwater Pyrates. How much did they charge the Pyrate to get his ears pierced? A buck-an-ear. And next time, guys, I hope you have more ducks cause I didnt have the chance to get one this year, and normally I buy about four. Thank you and yall have a safe and happy fourth of July. Bye.MONDAY, 11:52 A.M.Calling regarding the log truck that overturned on Highway 90 at Dogwood. Im wondering if this truck driver was charged with careless or reckless driving. If he was driving so fast that the logs shifted when he shifted gears, apparently he was driving too fast. And I think he should be charged because there could have been someone hurt very badly. Thank you.

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FAITHSaturday, July 6, 2013www.srpressgazette.comSection Section A 8602371;;8602371; Christ United Methodist SP Edition 00, Church, 2.0x2 6014293;;6014293; BAHA I FAITH SP Edition 00, Church, 2.0x2 6010456;;6010456; Pace Community Church SP Edition 00, Church, 2.0x2 Church DIRECTORYANGLICAN Trinity by the Fields, 4980 W. Spencer Field Road, Pace APOSTOLIC First Apostolic Church, 5574 Highway 90, Milton Pace Apostolic Church, 4763 Old Guernsey Road, Pace ASSEMBLY OF GOD Bagdad First Assembly of God, 4513 Forsyth St., Bagdad East Milton Assembly of God, 5174 Ward Basin Road, Milton Faith Chapel Assembly of God, 8080 S. Airport Road, Milton First Assembly of God, 6163 Dogwood Dr., Milton Harold Assembly of God, 10495 Goodrange Dr., Milton Jay First Assembly of God, 14047 Alabama St., Jay McLellan Assembly of God, 6050 Three Notch Trail, Milton New Harvest Fellowship Assembly of God, E. Highway 90, Pace New Hope Assembly of God, 9550 Chumuckla Highway, Jay Pace Assembly of God, 3948 Highway 90, Pace Springhill Assembly of God, 8851 Buddy Hardy Road, Milton True Worship Assembly of God, 13297 Highway 87 N, Jay Welcome Assembly of God, 8581 Welcome Church Road, Milton Whit eld Assembly of God, 12391 Highway 87 N, Milton BAPTIST Celebration Baptist Church, P.O. Box 4047, Milton Eastside Baptist Church, 6731 Dixon St., Milton Faith Baptist Church, 6423 Hamilton Bridge Road, Milton Iglesia Bautista Libertad, 5536 Highway 90, Milton Liberty Baptist, 6763 Margaret St., Milton Lighthouse Baptist Church, 13050 Highway 89, Jay Mt. Pilgrim Baptist Church, 5103 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Milton Oak Grove Baptist Church, 917 Lakewood Road, Milton BAPTIST ABA Berryhill Road Baptist, 3095 Berryhill Road, Milton Bethel Baptist Church, 6178 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton Fellowship Baptist Church, 5223 Highway 90, Pace First Baptist Church of East Milton, 8167 S. Airport Road, Milton First Missionary Baptist Church of Pace, 3925 Pace Road, Pace Galilee Missionary Baptist, Highway 90, Milton BAPTIST INDEPENDENT Bible Baptist Church, 4001 Vern St., Pace Bible Way Baptist Church, 5976 Dogwood Dr., Milton Brownsdale Baptist Church, Chumuckla Highway, Jay Fil Am Baptist Church, 5240 Dogwood Dr., Milton Joy Bible Baptist Church, 8613 Highway 90, Milton Mt. Calvary Baptist Church, 4636 Highway 90, Pace Pine Grove Baptist Church, 7280 Pine Grove Road, Jay Pleasant Hill Missionary Baptist, 5550 Econ na St, Milton Solid Rock Baptist Church, 6760 Eastgate Road, Milton Trinity Baptist Church, 5301 Highway 90, Pace Victory Baptist Church, 4000 Avalon Blvd., Milton West Florida Baptist Church, 5621 Highway 90, Milton BAPTIST MISSIONARY Mt. Bethel Baptist Church, 175 Limit St., Milton New Macedonia Baptist Church, 4751 Chumuckla Highway, Pace New Providence Missionary Baptist Church, 4175 Popcorn Road, Milton St. John Divine Missionary Church, 5363 Saint Johns St., Milton BAPTIST PRIMATIVE Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church, 5339 Zero Ln., Milton Mt. Zion Primitive Baptist, 6930 Chaf n St., Milton BAPTIST SOUTHERN Avalon Baptist Church, 4316 Avalon Blvd., Milton Berrydale Baptist Church, 6703 Highway 4, Jay Billory First Baptist of HolleyNavarre, Highway 87 S., Navarre Blackwater Baptist Church, 11689 Munson Highway, Milton Calvary Baptist Church, 5405 Calvary Church Road, Milton Cora Baptist Church, 12953 Chumuckla Highway, Jay East Side Baptist Church, 4884 Ward Basin Road, Milton Ferris Hill Baptist Church, 6848 Chaf n St., Milton First Baptist Church of Bagdad, 4529 Forsyth St., Bagdad First Baptist Church of Milton, 6797 Caroline St., Milton First Baptist Church of Pace, 3949 Pace Road, Pace First Baptist Of Garcon Point, 17820 Garcon Point Road, Milton Floridatown Baptist Church, 3851 Diamond St., Pace Friendship Baptist Church, 5300 Berryhill Road, Milton Harmony Ridge Baptist Church, 5536 Highway 90, Pace Harold First Baptist Church, 10585 Goodrange Dr., Milton Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8531 Hickory Hammock Road, Milton Immanuel Baptist Church, 4187 Highway 90, Pace James Street Baptist Church, 6658 James St., Milton Jay First Baptist Church, 214 S. Alabama St., Jay Living Truth Church, 8897 Byrom Campbell Road Pace FL 32571 Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church, P.O. Box 4812, Milton New Bethel Baptist Church, 10995 Chumuckla Highway, JayNew Life Baptist Church, 6380 Bayberry St., Milton Olivet Baptist Church, 5240 Dogwood Dr., Milton Pine Level Baptist Church, 3300 Pine Level Church Road, Jay Pine Terrace Baptist Church, 6212 Pine Blossom Road, Milton Pleasant Home Baptist Church, 8500 Pleasant Home, Munson Santa Rosa Baptist Association, 6820 Highway 87 N, Milton Spring Hill Baptist Church, 9214 Munson Highway, Milton Wallace Baptist Church, 6601 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Woodbine Baptist Church, 4912 Woodbine Road, Pace CATHOLIC St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church, 6451 Park Ave., Milton CHARISMATIC New Hope Community Church of Milton, 5283 Goshawk Dr., Milton Shepherd House Ministries, 5739 N. Stewart St., Milton CHURCH OF CHRIST Bagdad Church of Christ, 4413 Garcon Point Road, Bagdad Berryhill Church of Christ, 3679 Berryhill Road, Pace Church of Christ, 4034 Highway 4, Jay Margaret Street Church-Christ, 6745 Margaret St., Milton McLellan Church of Christ, 6285 Three Notch Trail, Milton Pace Church of Christ, 4075 Berryhill Road, Pace Pea Ridge Church of Christ, 4400 Bell Lane, Pea Ridge Susan St. Church of Christ, 600 Susan St., Milton West Milton Church of Christ, 5300 Highway 90, Pace CHURCH OF GOD Church of God of Prophecy Bible Place, 600 Glover Ln., Milton Covenant Church of God, 4645 School Lane, Pace Ferris Hill Church of God in Christ, 5583 Alabama St., Milton CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST Christ Church of Pace, 5536 Highway 90, Pace Church of God at Milton, 4645 School Lane, Pace Church of God in Christ, 5887 Stewart St., Milton World Church of God, 5177 Stewart St., Milton COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Community Church of Christ, 5666 Raymond Hobbs St., Milton EPISCOPAL St. Marys Episcopal Church, 6850 Oak St., Milton FULL GOSPEL Full Gospel Community Church, 6199 Gainey Ford Road, Jay Living Faith Church, 7400 Reformation Dr., Milton Milton Victory Ministry, 7235 Highway 90, Milton True Faith Tabernacle, 5166 Old Oak Road, Milton True Grace Fellowship Church, 5178 Willard Norris Road, Milton HOLINESS Cobbtown Holiness Church, 4700 Greenwood Road, Jay Hollandtown Holinesses Church, 1851 Pineview Church Road, Jay INDEPENDENT Chumuckla Community Church, 8008 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Grace Bible Church, 6331 Chestnut St., Milton Relevant Life Church, 4560 Pace Patriot Blvd., Pace Walls of Salvation Church, 6697 Old Highway 90, Milton Word Alive Christian Church, 707 Stewart St., Milton Word Alive Church, 4200 Ebenezer Church Road, Jay INTERDENOMINATIONAL Blessed Assurance Ministries, P.O. Box 58, Milton Christ-Centered Ministries, 8688 A.D. McCall Road, Milton In His Presence Ministries, 218 Stowers Ln., Milton JEHOVAHS WITNESS Jehovahs Witness, 5696 Berryhill Road, Milton LDS Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 5737 Berryhill Road, Milton Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 4065 Highway 4, Jay Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1753 Sea Lark Lane, Navarre LUTHERAN Eternal Trinity Lutheran Church, 6076 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton METHODIST Bagdad United Methodist Church, 4540 Forsythe St., Bagdad Christ United Methodist Church, 5983 Dogwood Dr., Milton Chumuckla Community Church, 8008 Chumuckla Highway, Pace First United Methodist Church, 6830 Berryhill St., Milton Jay United Methodist Church, 300 S. Alabama St., Jay Mae Edwards UMC, 5052 Mulat Road, Milton Mt. Carmel United Methodist Church, 15030 Highway 89, Jay Pace First United Methodist, 4540 Chumuckla Highway, Pace Pineview United Methodist Church, 1400 Pineview Church Road, Jay Wesley Memorial UMC, 4701 School Lane, Pace Woodbine United Methodist Church, 5200 Woodbine Road, Pace METHODIST AFRICAN Greater Bethlehem AME Church, 5299 Richburg St., Milton Isaiah Chapel AME Zion Church, 5038 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Milton NAZARENE New Faith Church of Nazarene, 5162 Avenida Del Fuego, Pace NONDENOMINATIONAL Christian Life Church, 4401 Avalon Blvd., Milton Church of the Living God, 3375 Garcon Point Road, Milton Community Chapel, 4300 Pace Lane, Pace Deliverance Tabernacle, 5470 Dogwood Dr., Milton Freedom Fellowship Church of Milton, 723 Munson Highway, Milton Grace Believers Bible Study Church, Holiday Inn Express, Conference Room, 8510 Keshav Taylor Drive, East Milton Harvest Community Church of Jay, 2828 Harvest Road, Jay Heritage Chapel, P.O. Box 248, Milton Hope Corral Cowboy Church, Fidelus Community Center, 13774 State Road 87 N., Jay Indian Ford Victory Fellowship, 8999 Indian Ford Road, Milton Kings Way Christian Center, 3102 Deep Water Cv., Milton Living Gods Standard Communication, 6731 Old Highway 90, Milton Living Word Worship Center, 5573 Stewart St., Milton Milton Worship Center, 11164 Horizon Road, Milton New Harvest Fellowship, 4289 Berryhill Road, Milton New Life Baptist Church, 6380 Bayberry St., Milton New Testament Church, 5277 Glover Ln., Milton Northshore Community Church, P.O. Box 4476, Milton Our Fathers House Inc., 5362 Taf Ln., Milton Pace Community Church, 4310 N. Spencer Field Road, Pace Providence Chapel, 3721 Highway 90, Milton PENTECOSTAL Ebenezer Church Inc., 4200 Ebenezer Church Road, Jay First Pentecostal Church of Bagdad, 4636 Forsyth St., Bagdad Gospel Lighthouse Church, 10001 Chumuckla Highway, Pace United Pentecostal Church of Berrydale, 7580 Highway 4, Jay Whit eld Pentecostal Fellowship Church, 11236 Highway 87 N, Milton PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS Chumuckla Pentecostal Holiness Church, 2841 Highway 182, Jay Mt. Zion Pentecostal Holiness Church, 5532 Osceola St., Milton New Vision Worship Center, 5573 Stewart St., Milton Roeville Holiness Church, 6648 Munson Highway, Milton PRESBYTERIAN First Presbyterian Church, 5206 Elmira St., Milton Pace Presbyterian Church, 4587 Woodbine Road, Pace Westminster Presbyterian, 6659 Park Ave., Milton SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Milton Seventh Day Adventist, 5288 Berryhill Dr., Milton VINEYARD Bay Area Vineyard Church, 5163 Dogwood Dr., MiltonFaith Chapel Assembly of God Home Folks singFaith Chapel Assembly of God Church, 8080 South Airport Road in Milton, invites you to its Home Folks singing at 7 p.m. Friday, July 12. Bring nger foods, and enjoy Southern and bluegrass gospel. Dove Brothers at Living Truth ChurchThe Dove Brothers Band Gospel Music Show will be at Living Truth Church and Chumucklas Farmers Opry, 8897 Byrom Campbell Road in Pace, on Friday, July 12. A meal will be served from 4:30-7 p.m., and the concert is 7-9 p.m. Meal and show tickets are $23.50 plus tax. Parking is free. To reserve tickets, call 994-9219. For a Google map, visit http://goo.gl/maps/Eoj5n For more information, visit http://FarmersOpry.com or www. LivingTruthChurch.com.Free VBS at Woodbine Baptist Church Go Tell It on the Mountain, where Jesus Christ is Lord and children learn to place their faith in Him, will be the theme of this years Vacation Bible School at Woodbine Baptist Church for children ages 3 through fth grade. The VBS will run 5-8 p.m. July 29 to Aug. 2. Dinner is included each night. Woodbine Baptist Church is at 4912 Woodbine Road in Pace. Register at the church of ce or at http://woodbinebaptist.org/ by clicking on the Vacation Bible School tab. For more information, call 994-6169.First United Methodist Church of MiltonFirst United Methodist Church of Milton, 6830 Berryhill St. in Milton, will offer services on Closer Than You Think, 2 Kings 5: 1-14 Luke 10: 1-11, 16-20, at 8:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday, July 7. The speaker is the Rev. M. Kathryn Knight. For more information, call 623-6683. Everyone is welcome.First Presbyterian ChurchChurch services are at 10:30 a.m. Sundays at First Presbyterian Church, 5203 Elmira St. in Milton. This Sunday, the message will be ALISTEN! delivered by Pastor Jo Kublik. Bible study classes are at 9:30 a.m. in the Fellowship Hall. There is a nursery for infants and toddlers. If you need transportation, call Warren or Anne Hatten at 626-8855. Calvary Baptist Church Jungle Jaunt VBS Calvary Baptist Church is having Jungle Jaunt VBS. Our motto is Praise Him! Trust Him! Follow Him! The One True God! Featured scripture is Psalm 145, 1-2: I exalt You, my God the King, and praise Your name forever and ever. I will praise You every day; I will honor Your name forever and ever. VBS is 5:30-8 p.m. July 21-26 for ages 3 to sixth grade. For more information, call 623-6569.Harold Assembly of God spaghetti dinnerAt 5 p.m. July 20, eat in or take out your spaghetti dinner. Donations only. Proceeds go to Womens Ministries Department. Harold Assembly of God is at 10495 Goodrange Drive in Milton. Call 981-1030 for information. Pace Church of ChristVacation Bible School will be 4:30-8 p.m. July 26 and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 27 at Pace Church of Christ, 4075 Berryhill Road. VBS is for third through fth grades. For more information, call 995-8244. Page 5DANIEL THAMES | Special to the Press Gazette Members of the Deliverance Tabernacle Christian Center gathered recently for an old-fashioned barbecue with family and friends. Faith BRIEFSDeliverance Tabernacle Christian CenterWith the purchase of 10 acres on Berryhill Road, not far from the Santa Rosa Medical Center, we expect God by faith to use us for His glory to bless and make a wonderful change in our community. We operate a child care center from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and we enjoy feeding and assisting those who are in need as they embark upon making a positive change in their lives so they can be productive citizens in our community. Everyone is welcome. Bishop is Charles E. Young, and pastor is Christopher Robinson. Together, we as a church family desire to reach out into the community and love and care for Gods creation and make a positive change in the lives of our brothers and sisters for the greater good of all mankind.

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LocalA6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, July 6, 2013 SANTAROSA PRESSGAZETTEFINDUS ONFACEBOOK srpressgazetteFOLLOWUS ONTWITTER SMARTMONEY BYBRUCEWILLIAMSASKDOCTORKbyAnthonyL.Komaro,M.D.(Dr.KomaroisaphysicianandprofessoratHarvardMedicalSchool.Tosendquestions, gotoAskDoctorK.com,orwrite:AskDoctorK,10ShattuckSt.,SecondFloor,Boston,MA02115.) LastSaturdaysAnswers NOCUREEXISTSFORPARKINSONS, BUTTREATMENTISPOSSIBLE Canyoufindthehiddenwords? Searchcarefullybecausesome wordsarebackwardordiagonal. TERMITE TONGUE SOLDIER MOUND SALIVA STICKY STRIPE EATER GIANT CLAW FLICK ANTS FEED NEST TAIL BOB HILL ATEnanteaterslongsnout, stripedbodyandlarge,bushy tailmakeitoneofthemost recognizableanimalsinthe world.Trueanteatersare foundonlyinCentraland SouthAmerica.Otheranimals thatfeedonants,suchasthe aardvarkandpangolin,are foundinAfricaandAsia. ThiseditionofShortcutsissponsored byLadyAntEbellum. Ananteatercatchesabout200antsat eachanthillitvisitsbeforeitisdrivenaway bysoldierants.Itwillvisitmorethan100 anthillsinasingleday. Ananteatercanflickitstongueinandout ofitsmouthmorethan130timesaminute. Ananteaterstongueistheperfect toolforcatchingantsbecauseitis coatedwithalayerofstickysalivaand hundredsofbackward-pointingspikes. Twooftheclawsonananteatersfront feetgrowtobenearly15cm(6in.)in length.Theanteaterusestheseclaws todigholesintorock-hardanthillsand termitemounds.Formoreinformationonanteaters,checkoutthesebooks:AnteatersbyLorienKite(GrolierEducational)orMammals,InsectivoresandBats(WorldofAnimalsV.9)(Grolier).DistributedbyUniversalUclickforUFS,Inc.JeffHarris20137/8Agiant anteatermay eatmorethan 30,000antsin asingleday. Ananteaters tongueisnearly 60cm(2ft.) long.Whatdidthe anteatersaytotheant? Whydontyoustickaround fordinner? Whatdoyougetwhen youcrossanantwithananteater? Astickysituation. What doyousayto asadanteater? Whythelong face? Didtheanteater remembertheantsname? No,butitwasonthetip ofhistongue.The giantanteater isthelargestspecies ofanteater.Anadult malemaymeasuremore than1.8m(6ft.) fromheadto tail. Anteaters usuallycause minimaldamage whenfeedingatan anthillortermite mound.Theydothis sotheycanreturn tothesamenest tofeedagainon anotherday. Anteaters musteatveryquickly becauseittakeslessthan afewminutesbeforesoldier antsarrivetodefendthe nest.Theanteaterretreats toavoidthepainfulbites andstingsinflictedby thesoldiers. Anteatersfeedby usingtheirpowerfulclawstodig aholeinthesideofananthillortermite mound.Theanteaterthenflicksitslong, stickytongueintotheholetocatch hundredsofantsortermites. Younganteatersspendmostof theirtimeridingontheirmothersback.Thestripe ontheyounganteatersbodyformsacontinuouslinewith thestripeonthemothersbody.Thishelpstohidethe younganteaterfrompredators. Thiscartoon deservesaserious tongue-lashing. Weneverplay dinnermusicaround ananteater. Canyouspotallsixdifferencesbetweenthesetwoscenes?www.shortcutscomic.comGAMEANSWERS:1.Mouthisdifferent.2.Eyesaremoved. 3.Beltisdifferent.4.Hatisshorter.5.Antennaearedifferent.6.Antennaeareshorter. DEARDOCTORK:MyhusbandwasjustdiagnosedwithParkinsonsdisease.Can youdiscussitinyourcolumn?Idontknowanythingaboutit. DEARREADER:Parkinsonsdisease(PD)isadiseaseofthecentralnervoussystem.Itcausesproblemswithbodymotionsandmovement.PDworsensovertime. Braincellstalktoeachotherbymakingandreleasingchemicalscalledneurotransmitters.Whenonecellreleasesaneurotransmitter,anotherpicksupthesignal. Onetypeofneurotransmitterisdopamine. Dopamineismadeinanareadeepinthebraincalledthebasalganglia.That isalsowheremovementsarecoordinated.Thedopaminemadebycellsinthebasal gangliaisnecessaryforthebasalgangliatofunctionproperly. PDdevelopswhendopamine-producingnervecells(neurons)inthebraindieand notenoughdopamineisproduced.Thisaffectsmovement.(Iveputanillustrationof thisprocessonmywebsite,AskDoctorK.com.) PDusuallybeginsasaslighttremororstiffnessthatismostobviousatrest.When thehandsofaPDsuffererarerestinginhislap,theymaytremble.Butwhenhe reachesforacupofcoffee,forinstance,hishandsmaystoptrembling. Astheillnessworsens,tremorsbecomemorewidespread.PDalsocausesrigidity andaslowingofbodymovements.Apersonsfaceslowlybecomesexpressionless. Initiatingamovement,likesittingupfromachair,maytakemanysecondstostart.A personwalksslowly,withshort,quicksteps. IfyourhusbandsPDgetsmuchworse,hewilllikelyhavedifcultywalkingand performingdailyactivitiessuchasdressingorusingutensils.ButinsomepeoplePD progressesveryslowly. ThereisnocureforPD,butsymptomscanbetreatedwithmedications.Medicationmaynotbenecessaryatrst.Treatmentusuallybeginswhensymptomsinterfere withworkorhomelife,orwhenitbecomesdifculttowalkormaintainbalance. MedicationsusedtotreatPDeitherboostlevelsofdopamineinthebrainor mimictheeffectsofdopamine.Themostcommonlyusedmedicationislevodopa.Itis usuallyprescribedincombinationwithanotherdrugcalledcarbidopa.Othermedicationscanalsobeused,eitheraloneorincombinationwithlevodopa. Nearlyallpatientsimproveaftertheystarttakinglevodopa.Butlong-termuse oftencausessideeffectsandcomplications. DepressionisfairlycommoninpeoplewithPD.Antidepressantmedicationscan help.Regularexerciseandabalanceddietalsomayhelptoimproveapatients senseofwell-beingandbodycontrol.Thetypeofexercisecalledtaichihasbeen showntohelp. Surgeryisconsideredonlywhenmedicationsarenolongereffective.Surgical optionsincludedeepbrainstimulationinwhichelectricalstimulationisdeliveredto targetedareasofthebraintocontrolsymptoms.Anotheroptioninvolvesdestroying preciselytargetedareasofthebrainthatareresponsibleforthemosttroublingsymptoms. WecandoagreatdealmoretohelppeoplewithPDtodaythanwhenIwasin medicalschool.Basedontheprogressofresearch,Iexpectmoreeffectivetreatments inthefuture.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A7Saturday, July 6, 2013By JASON JANDURA623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com Tucked away near the edge of the Blackwater River and close to downtown Milton is a refuge for those in need of help. Needs for specialized care range from dealing with speech issues after a stroke to physical rehabilitation after knee surgery or a hip replacement. The Santa Rosa Health and Rehabilitation Center, 5386 Broad St., is capable of handling those needs. The 110-bed facility offers a complete rehabilitation wing with physical, occupational and speech therapy. They provide inpatient and outpatient care as well as long-term nursing needs. We want to continue to nd new ways to improve quality of care we provide, Administrator Greg Brock said. Over the past four years, weve had improvements with clinical indicators. Brock said they have seen remarkable improvements in weight loss, falls and daily activities for the residents. Improvements netted the facility an award in 2012. They were awarded the bronze-level National Quality Award by the American Health Care Association. Santa Rosa Health and Rehabilitation Center was the rst nursing facility established in the area and has been operating since 1971. Santa Rosa County is now home to four skilled nursing facilities, three of them in Milton within a two-mile-radius. Weve been through multiple upgrades and renovations, Brock said. Were always looking for ways to improve our therapy programs. The facility found a way to retain its staff of 145, a prevalent issue in long-term care facilities, Brock said. Turnover rates have dramatically improved, falling well below the national average, stemming from modications in recruitment and efforts to keep employee morale high. We have an extremely low employee turnover, which is important in continuity of care, he said. Right now, were at 37 percent. The national average is 60-70 percent. He said recruitment was a key factor in staff retention. It is essential to make sure staff is well trained and has the proper education and the resources to do the job. Keeping the same, well-trained staff is integral for providing a continuance of care for the residents and patients in the building. Activities keep resident morale high and in good spirits. Brock said they have a full calendar every day, with church groups that come in and spend time with the residents, games and gardening activities. Its not just bingo anymore, Brock said. We have radio games. We have this radio that we leased that has games on it throughout the day. A few years ago, the facility spent $5,000 on upgrading a courtyard of the facility, adding in plants and shrubbery. The administrator said the residents had the opportunity to help out and get their hands dirty. Fireghters responded to a house re in the Chantilly neighborhood earlier this week. Ofcials said the re started in a kitchen accident and spread to the rest of the house. Smoke lled the home, forcing the residents to evacuate. They escaped the home with no injuries.JASON JANDURA | Press Gazetteevaluation and veterinary recommendations. Hamilton agreed, saying his ofce has been receiving calls from concerned citizens asking about adoptions for the remaining animals. He said even if cats test negative for feline leukemia, the disease incubates in three months and still could spread to other cats before it shows up positive on a test. Sheriffs reports indicate complaints about the condition of the animals from as far back as 2006. Hamilton said despite the numerous complaints against the facility, the fact that they operated as a nonprot shelter gave them a certain amount of protection -something he says hed like to see changed. Under a 501(c)(3) exempt, they wouldnt give us entry to the house. We were stuck between a rock and a hard place. Our hands were tied. We contacted the Department of Agriculture, Department of Business and Professional Regulations they couldnt do anything. It was not a business. Hamilton said normally, the sheriffs ofce doesnt get involved in animal cases, but this time it was different. Warrants charging animal cruelty, neglect leading to illness, contagious infections and the illegal sale and transfer of prescription drugs brought them to the door of the shelter on Bettian Avenue on Monday. By the time they left about 7:30 p.m., two people, Allen and Ella Kirkham, were handcuffed and taken to jail on arrest warrants. A controlled adoption of two cats from the Kirkhams helped to prove the animals under their care were very sick. The two animals adopted by sheriffs deputies were immediately taken to a veterinarian, who completed a physical on each of the cats. They were found to be infected with feline leukemia, upper respiratory infection, bronchitis, ea infestation, tapeworm infestation and other diseases. Both animals ended up being euthanized. Hamilton said many of the seized cats at Animal Control appear healthy, but a closer exam shows sores in their mouths, teeth falling out and other afictions. He said it is impossible at this point to guess how many more will be euthanized and how many can be saved. People see the photos of the poor little cat in the crate on the news, and they see us as the bad guy, Hamilton said. But as tough as it is for these ladies to euthanize these animals, but as sick as they are, you just wouldnt want them laying there, suffering. They are better off. People here are not heartless. Everyone handles it in their own way. It is tough. CATS from page A1 By JASON JANDURA623-2120 jjandura@srpressgazette.com Trafc might be slower along U.S. 90 this upcoming school year as the Florida Department of Transportation reviews vehicular congestion near the West Florida Baptist Academy. Vice Principal Mike Brown of the academy approached the Board of County Commissioners last week, asking for an enforceable 20 mph school zone. Only by Gods grace, I think, there has not been an accident up to this point, Brown said. All it would take is one accident to realize how big of a problem it is. Access to the school is limited, creating a dangerous issue for commuters, Brown said. Trafc coming from the east must make a U-turn and cross lanes of trafc to enter the school. Trafc leaving the school, attempting to head west, must cross trafc and execute a U-turn to leave. We have a hard time understanding why something has not been done about this, Brown said. I know there is a nancial crunch, but we also know that we should put our children rst. Brown said he is concerned for the safety of the students and the public. The school teaches pre-kindergarten through high school, so younger drivers are commuting to and from school. Their judgment is not always the greatest, Brown said. They pull out and dont make the right decision; something devastating could happen. There is an advisory speed limit reduction in the corridor in place at the moment. The zone recommends 45 mph, but Brown said there is no enforcement. I can pretty much guarantee you that nobody pays attention to it, Brown said. Its totally ignored. And they just y through there at least 55 mph, if not more. The academy has asked the FDOT to look into the matter in the past and has been denied, according to the principal. Ian Satter from the FDOT said they will take a specic look into the situation. The school had been denied requests for a reduced speed area in the past based on a lack of pedestrian activity, a key element in creating a school zone. Speed limits typically are there to protect children from hazardous walking conditions. The commissioners asked the principal if the school would commit fund any potential projects. That would be a huge expense on our part, Brown said. TOXIC from page A1health issues, Harrell said. A state-certied contractor checked the building and yielded no signs of toxic mold. The portion of the school in question was built in 1922. Rotting window sills were found and replaced by maintenance staff as a result of the mold inspection. The windows were rotting because of age, Harrell said. Harrell said the school board would be proactive to the complaints and approach the situation in a logical manner. He said the school board would wait until results to come back from the lab before taking any additional direction. The school board ofcial said there have been no more complaints lodged, thus far, against CES or any other schools in the district. The folks up there in Chumuckla see were responding, Harrell said. They see that were looking into it seriously. ACCIDENTS from page A1who was not wearing a seat belt and was reported unconscious at the scene by EMS ofcials. The black Ford he was driving continued to roll southbound after the crash on Ward Basin Road, coming to rest in a row of hedges by the Local Yokel. EMS ofcials pulled the drivers out of their vehicles, placed them on backboards and stretchers and transported them to the hospital. Charges are pending against Noble for the accident that caused an estimated $9,000 worth of damage, according to the report. It is unknown if the crash was alcohol-related. UU.SS. 90 AND SST. JOHNS RROADLater Wednesday afternoon, an unmarked Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce Ford F-150 plowed into the back of 2007 Chevy SUV that was stopped in a line of trafc heading east on U.S. 90 near St. Johns Road. The collision caused the SUV to lunge forward into the back of a State of Florida van transporting eight state prisoners, according to reports. The driver of the unmarked truck, Clifton Dykes Jr., 35, of Milton, suffered minor injuries in the crash and was transported to West Florida Hospital. Three of the four people in the SUV suffered minor injuries, including a 1-year-old child, which were all taken to Santa Rosa Medical. The driver, 47-year-old Jimmy Day sustained no injuries from the accident. They were from Elkmont, Ala. The rst two vehicles involved in the crash were deemed to be totaled, while the van transporting prisoners had an estimated $5,000 worth of damage. The driver and the eight prisoners in the van were reported to have no injuries. Dykes was charged with careless driving by FHP. West Florida Baptist Academy requests school zone SSANTA RROSA HHEALTH AND RREHABILITATION CENTERWhat: Inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, skilled longterm nursing care facility Where: 5386 Broad St. Details: 623-4661Skilled nursing facility remains strong despite competition DANIELDANIEL THATHA MES ES | Special to the Press GazetteGayle Mullis places ags at the grave of her grandson, Samuel James Clary. I place ags out of respect for my family, she said. I know theyre not here physically, but I feel them spiritually. I just want them to know Ill always be here and take care as best I can. ININ REREMEEMBRANBRANCEE NNONE INjJURED IN HOUSE FIRE JASON JANDURA | Press GazetteA patient at Santa Rosa Health and Rehabilitation Center draws. The center was the rst in the county and in 2012 was awarded the bronze-level National Quality Award by the American Health Care Association.

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www.srpressgazette.comSaturday, July 6, 2013 ASection SPORTS Page 8 YOUTH BASKETBALL CAMP AT MILTON HIGHSpecial to the Press GazetteThe Youth Basketball Camp runs on July 22-25. Times are 3-6:30 pm. In the air-conditioned MHS gym. The camp is for boys and girls ages 6-14. Cost is $70. Each camper receives a T-shirt and an ice cream party on the last day. Awards and prizes for all participants. For more information please call 983-5616.Special to the Press GazetteSanta Rosa junior golfers ages 11-18 are invited to compete in the AJGT Coca Cola Stroke Play Championship in Mandeville, LA at the Beau Chene Golf Club on the week of August 2nd, 3rd, 4th. The 3-day, 54-hole tournament is ranked by the Junior Golf Scoreboard and hosted by the Arrowhead Junior Golf Tour. The tournament entry fee is $295 and includes three days of green fees, tee gifts, and Trophies in four age divisions. Recommended accommodations are available at the Country Inn & Suites. Please call 1-985-809-0467 for reservations. The tournament extended registration deadline is Tuesday, July 30, at noon. To enter the event, please call Owen Seiler at 1318-402-2446 or enter online at www.arrowheadjgt.com. JUNE 29-30, 2013 A FLIGHT 1.* David Ross +8 +8 +16 2. Ron Posladek +12 +4 +16 3. Tommy Vance +10 +6 +16 4. Benson Ross +3 +9 +12 5. Fred Aubrey +6 +5 +11 6. Kirby Lindsey +5 +3 +8 7. Phil Kean +8 -1 +7 8. Guy Abbate -1 +5 +4 9. Cary Gates +1 +3 +4 10. Peach Waller +4 -1 +3 11. Jerry Kelly +2 -3 -1 12. Bobby Norman E -2 -2 13. Chris Smith -2 -1 -3 14. Billy Spiers E -5 -5 15. Bob Barnett E -6 -6 16. Neil Drennan -6 E -6 17. Louis Turnage -4 -6 -10 B FLIGHT 1. Butch Weaver +10 +8 +18 2. Don Bass +7 +3 +10 3. Benny Hickman +7 +3 +10 4. Coty Odom +3 +6 +9 5. Glenn Montgomery +4 +3 +7 6. Elmer Williams +4 +3 +7 7. Steve Vance -1 +7 +6 8. Garry Perkins +3 +2 +5 9. John Rogers +2 +2 +4 10. Pat Ritchie +5 -3 +2 11. Rey de la Cruz E +1 +1 12. Duncan Weekley -1 +2 +1 13. Dave Fitzgerald -5 +1 -4 14. Dave Geise -2 -3 -5 15. Ryan Barchett -2 -6 -8 16. Jackson Williams -8 -13 -21 17. Larry Hinson -9 -15 -24 C FLIGHT 1. Larry Hadley +2 +13 +15 2. Donovan Anderson +9 +5 +14 3. Mark Cotten +7 +7 +14 4. David Dearing +11 +2 +13 5. Mal Mason +7 +4 +11 6. Jim Arnold +1 +8 +9 7. Eric Sventek +10 -1 +9 8. Joe Altieri +2 +6 +8 9. Kevin McVicker +3 +5 +8 10. Mike Dorcik E +6 +6 11. Dennis Wilkerson +4 +1 +5 12.# Tom Little +7 -6 +1 13. Roy Pierson -3 +3 Even 14. Tom Carter -4 +2 -2 15. Dan Kinkle -2 -5 -7 16. Mark McDonald -5 -3 -8 17. Ray Palmer -6 -2 -8 D FLIGHT 1. Jack Pickett +4 +9 +13 2. Keith Clayton +2 +10 +12 3. Howard Levine +7 +5 +12 4. Greg Schlau +4 +7 +11 5. Mark McDaniel +4 +5 +9 6. Pete Sniezko +1 +4 +5 7. Steve Lowery +3 +1 +4 8. Jack Pio +4 -1 +3 9. Jeremy Walley -1 +2 +1 10. Jim Rainwater +2 -1 +1 11. Jim Shoemaker +1 -2 -1 12. Marshall Fant E -4 -4 13. Dave Acton -5 E -5 14. Bob Neal -3 -4 -7 15. Gerry Brown -9 -1 -10 SUNDAY TOURNAMENT 1. Larry Hadley +13 2. Keith Clayton +10 3T. Jack Pickett +9 Benson Ross +9 NEW SHERIFF 1. Butch Weaver +18 2T. Ron Posladek +16 David Ross +16 Tommy Vance +16 (*) Won 6-hole scorecard playoff (#) Prom Dress WinnerHackers amateur golf tour nal results Junior golfers are welcome Activities can be found at www. srpressgazette.com. Look for the box called Things to Do. There, you can check on activities by ZIP code or type. You are welcome to enter your events there as well. LOOKING FOR SUMMER FUN?

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LIFESTYLE www.srpressgazette.comSaturday, July 6, 2013 BSectionPage 1Autism, up closeMy great-niece has highfunctioning autism. She is here with her family: my sisters daughter, her husband and their son. They arrived two nights ago. We have kittens and they are taking three of them home to Tennessee. I was holding my favorite kitten and she walked up to me to admire the cat, repeated his name, and walked away. Five minutes later, she did the exact same thing again. It was so cute. Then about a half hour later, she saw him on the oor, didnt recognize him and introduced herself to the kitten like we had never spoken of him. She is so adorable and so smart. She can read extremely well. She is xated on time, speci cally her bedtime, which is 7 p.m. A few minutes after she found the kitten on the oor, she comes over to my computer, and leans down to look at my screen. I was working on the Press Gazette website and didnt want her to read what I was writing, but before I could say anything, she looked at me and asked what time it was. I said it was 9:27. With a very serious voice, she replies quietly, Oh that is bad. I looked at my niece and she says, She is xated on her bedtime. Her daughter walked over to her to tell her it was late and she needed to go to bed. My niece explained to her how they were on vacation and it was okay to go to bed later. About a half hour later, she tells her mom how tired she is and that she would like to go to the hotel and go to bed. Her little brother chimed in and they left a short while after. It is interesting watching her play and interact with the other children. To me, she appears a tiny bit detached and ... happy to do her own thing. She speaks very concisely and asks questions often. The rst time I met her was a year ago. She walked into my kitchen where I was standing and told me, This is your kitchen. I smiled and told her, Yes it is. You cook in here, she says. You cook meals for your family. I con rmed what she said. Then she put her hand on my kitchen table and told me, Is this your table? Is this where you eat with your family? I smiled and told her, Yes it is. Then she walked away. I nd her to be delightful. She is open and expressive. She thinks through what she is going to say, very carefully. It appears, unlike a lot of children, that she listens as carefully as she speaks. I know she is focused at the time you answer her. I am not sure how her retention is, based on the kitten thing. Her particular type of autism is Aspergers. I knew little of it until one of my grown children told me a couple of years ago that he was diagnosed with Aspergers. That week. As an adult. I wanted to argue and tell him that isnt true, but I began to think back over his childhood. I realized it could be possible. I checked the list of symptoms and he has several. Even in adulthood he exhibits many. It seems odd to me that one in 88 children show signs of autism, according to the Centers for Disease Control. It has to have an environmental cause. Whatever causes it, I nd much delight in spending time with my great-niece. Her perspectives are enlightening. Florida Law Enforcement Of cers recognized for their sacri ceBy Cindy SarverSpecial to the Press Gazette Motorcycles lined up rank-andle, hitting the road for a group ride to the highest point in Florida, to honor law enforcement offers killed in the line of duty. Family members of fallen heroes, law enforcement professionals and friends gathered together at the Britton Hill State Park Fallen Of cer Monument to pay their respects and lay a wreath to those who gave the ultimate sacri ce. The memorial was of ciated by the Walton County Sheriffs Of ce and included a 21-gunsalute performed by their honor guard. The names of the fallen of cers and their respective departments were called out with special recognition given to their family members in attendance. They gathered and held the ceremony at the highest point in Florida, Britton Hill, which stands at an elevation of 345 feet. The three-day-rally was for Cops on Top, an annual memorial climbing event dating back to 2006. Teams have been aiming to honor fallen of cer in their state by climbing their states highest point, according to the organization. Members of the Santa Rosa County Chapter XXXI of the Blue Knights were joined by other active and retired law enforcement ofcers from surrounding counties and other states as well as Green Knights (US military) and Red Knights (Fire Fighters). Representation included Blue Knights Chapters 3, 25, 26, and 31. A total of 47 motorcycles made the ride from Milton to the memorial site outside of Defuniak Springs. President Bill Brandenburg of the local Blue Knights chapter XXXI, President Frank Sarver of the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Of ce Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 123, and Ed Gallant, one of the founders of the Blue Knights International organization, laid a wreath at the monument. Santa Rosa County Deputies Danny Michael Lee Davis, Tom Wilkie, Drew Richards, Tim Lynch, Florida Highway Patrol ofcer Randy Johnson and guests were also in attendance. The Blue Knights were established in 1974 with a group of seven guys from a police department in Bangor, Maine, according to Gallant. They shared a common interest in motorcycles and would ride as a way of relaxing off-duty. Gallant said its a brotherhood. Theres a camaraderie that binds the group together, along with a commitment to community. Gallant said one day, a couple of guys from a Massachusetts police department showed up in blue jumpsuits, asking to be part of the club. That was the moment when the second chapter formed. The Blue Knights are now an international organization---active in 30 different countries and 637 chapters across the United States. The local Blue Knights Chapter XXXI was formed in Santa Rosa County in September 2012. It includes of cers from the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Of ce, the Milton Police Department, Escambia Sheriffs Of ce and the Florida Highway Patrol. The non-pro t local fraternal organization now has 31 active-andretired members who spend most of their weekends riding and raising funds for various charities. They are comprised of local law enforcement, state and federal of cers. They also sponsor the Southwest Panhandle Search and Rescue K9 Emotional First Aid team who recovered 3 US Coast Guardsmen who perished in Mobile Bay, due to a helicopter crash. They do search and rescue for Santa Rosa and local surrounding counties in the Gulf area. They were the 2012 recipient of the FBI Directors Community Leadership Award. The chapter sponsors the annual Santa Fly-In event with proceeds going to the Santa Rosa Kids House. Last year, members of the group surprised hundreds of children when Santa landed at the Peter Prince Airport in East Milton. Special thanks to local supporters and sponsors of the three day rally for Cops on Top. If you are interested in joining/supporting this local chapter contact Blackwater Chapter FL. XXXI, PO Box 4658 Milton, FL. 32572-4658. LYNNE HOUGHWoman on the Edge Honoring the fallen

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LocalB2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Saturday, July 6, 2013 GazetteSantaRosasPressCallNow!850-863-1212or e-mailcustomerservice@nwfdailynews.com ToSubscribe!Subscribenowtothe SantaRosaPressGazette!DONTMISSANISSUE! Manatee, sea turtle decals celebrate La Florida 500-year anniversarySpecial to the Press Gazette New manatee and sea turtle decals from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) give people another chance to celebrate the 500-year anniversary of Juan Ponce de Leons arrival on Florida shores and support conservation of these iconic Florida species. The latest editions of the manatee and sea turtle decals go on sale July 1. Floridians can donate $5 to receive a decal when they are registering a vehicle or vessel or renewing a registration through the mail or in person at county tax collectors ofces across the state. The sale of decals helps support the FWCs manatee and sea turtle research, rescue, rehabilitation, management and education efforts. Manatee and sea turtle decals also can be ordered online at www.myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/managed/manatee/decals or www.myfwc. com/wildlifehabitats/managed/sea-turtles/decals. Purchasing the Save the Manatee and Helping Sea Turtles Survive specialty Florida license plates also supports conservation of these species. More information on Viva Florida 500 history and events can be found at www.vivaorida.org. Special to the Press GazetteNot everyone can step up to the bow of a boat, lean against the railing, step on a pedal and start netting sh as they oat up to the surface. Although it is illegal and dangerous for anglers to sh with electricity, biologists use electroshing boats to temporarily stun and collect sh for scientic analyses and to help manage the shery. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) shery biologists have special training to operate this equipment safely. Electroshing boats use a generator to create an electric current. The current ows out in an electrical eld between booms that hang off the front of the boat and its metal hull. The electric eld does not kill sh and can actually attract them toward the booms, before stunning those that swim within 6 to 8 feet. Biologists scoop up the sh in nets and place them in an aerated livewell to recover. Several factors contribute to how long the sh remains stunned, including the shs size, the species, water temperature and conductivity, how close the sh is to the booms and how long the current is applied. In most cases, stunning occurs within seconds of the sh entering the electric eld and lasts less than a couple of minutes once the sh is removed from the eld. Biologists typically identify sh by species and count and measure them, including their length and weight. Depending on the study, blood samples may be taken, stomach contents examined and tissue samples collected to determine mercury and pesticide levels or the shs genetic makeup. Occasionally, biologists transport some specimens to the lab or hatchery for further examination or for breeding purposes. Scientists can also harvest a few to examine their otoliths (earbones), which, once cut and ground into thin slices, show growth rings that reveal their age. In the eld, biologists also collect data to use in conjunction with sh data to evaluate the shery and determine how best to manage the resource. Electroshing tends to be less damaging than methods that entangle or trap sh, such as seines, gillnets, wire traps or trawls. It is an urban myth that electroshing harms the eggs of female sh. In fact, biologists use electroshing to collect brood sh to use at hatcheries as parent sh. Information from electroshing and other sampling methods, including angler creel surveys, provide much of the information used in quarterly shing forecasts. Fisheries biology is a fun possibility for a career, for those who like science, nature and the outdoors. The FWC set up the Florida Youth Conservation Centers Network. The FYCCN effort includes hosting summer sh camps. The goal is to create life-long anglers and stewards of aquatic and sheries resources. For the past four years, these camps have expanded from two to 15 locations statewide and can reach 900 children annually. To me, the best part about hunting is not harvesting game but spending quality time outdoors with friends and family. One of the best ways to do that is through dove hunting, which is part of the reason why great dove hunts are in such high demand but often difcult to nd. To help people nd one of these hunts and for other reasons, the FWC created its Special-Opportunity Dove Club Program. It offers hunters the chance of experiencing exceptional dove hunting on the states best public dove elds. Dove Club permits enable one adult and one youth (under age 16) to hunt all scheduled dates for the dove eld of their choice. Permits cost $150 and enable both hunters to take a daily bag limit of birds. There are eight hunts on all these elds except Caravelle Ranch; it has six. All hunts are from noon until sunset and take place on Saturdays, starting Oct. 5 and ending Jan. 11. Last year, 2,841 birds were harvested from six elds. This coming season, there will be six specialopportunity dove elds again scattered throughout the state. Dove Club permits will be issued by random drawing during Phase I. That application period runs through July 17. After obtaining the correct application worksheet by going to MyFWC.com/License and clicking on Limited Entry/Quota Hunts, you can apply for these season passes by lling out a single worksheet (with up to ve dove eld choices) and turning it in at any county tax collectors ofce, license agent or by going online to License.MyFWC. com. During Phase I, hunters may be awarded a permit for only one dove eld. If you are successful in getting drawn, you must pick up and pay for your Dove Club permit at any of the same places mentioned above by Aug. 7. Check for drawing results the fourth week of July by logging in to your customer account at License.MyFWC.com. Any applicant who provides an email address will be notied by the FWC if drawn as well. At MyFWC.com, beginning in late September, hunters will be able to nd the most up-todate information on these six special-opportunity dove elds, as well as Floridas other public dove elds. The website is updated every Thursday throughout dove season. Information includes dove densities, previous weeks harvests and eld conditions. So if youd like to join the FWCs Dove Club, you need to try to do so in July. Remember to introduce someone new to hunting when you can. As always, have fun, hunt safely and ethically, and well see you in the woods! TONY YOUNGOutta the WoodsJoin the FWCs Dove Club ProgramFWC uses electrifying way to study sh

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B3Saturday, July 6, 2013 NorthwestFloridaDailyNews34thAnnualMarvinDeBolt JUNIORGOLFCLASSIC WEDNESDAY&THURSDAYJULY17-18,2013 FORTWALTONBEACHGOLFCLUBPINES OPENTOBOYS&GIRLSAGES8-18 JUNIORCLASSICGOLFTOURNAMENTOFFICIALENTRYFORM GreenFees,Food,Refreshments, TournamentT-Shirt&Trophiestowinnersinall divisions,PlusOverallBoys&GirlsTrophies$85ENTRYFEE$60AGES8-11 36HOLES,18EACHDAYEXCEPT8-11DIVISIONSWHICHPLAY18HOLES,9EACHDAY TournamentresultswillbeforwardedtoNJGSScoreboardforrankingconsideration BENEFITINGTHECHILDRENSADVOCACYCENTERNOTE:WednesdaystartingtimeswillbepublishedinTuesdayandWednesdayDailyNews. PlayerscancallcoursesTuesdayafternoonfor startingtimes.FWBPines:833-9529NAME:_________________________________________________________DOB:_______________________________ CELL:______________________________________________SHIRTSIZEADULTSIZES:_________________________ ADDRESS:__________________________________________________________________________________________ CITY:__________________________________________________STATE:_______________ZIP:___________________ EMAIL:______________________________________________________________________PARENTCELL:____________________________________ CASH/CHECK:$_____________ CREDITCARD#:_________________________________________________________EXP.DATE:_____/_____ PLEASECHECKAPPROPRIATEDIVISION: BOYS12-13 BOYS14-15 BOYS16-18 GIRLS12-14 GIRLS15-18 BOYS/GIRLS8-9 BOYS/GIRLS10-11 Makecheckspayableto:TheChildrensAdvocacyCenterMailto:1810HuntingtonRoad,Niceville,FL32578FormoreinformationCallMicheleat(850)585-8980orVisitwww.ecjrgolftour.com www.ecjrgolftour.com 2091545 Saturday, July 6, 2013 PHOTOS BY LYNNE HOUGH AND DANIEL THAMES | Press GazetteFOURTH FESTIVITIES