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UF00028408 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Santa Rosa press gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00803
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Publication Date: 09-12-2012
Frequency: semiweekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00803
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Preceded by: Milton press gazette

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75 cents Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Gazette Santa Rosas Press Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.com Tweet us @srpressgazette and friend us on facebook.com Jeannie Runyon is a so cial studies teacher at Ava lon Middle School and is a Pensacola Runners Asso ciation board member and a member of the Pea Ridge Running Club. Q: What brought you to Santa Rosa County? A: Family Q: What ctional charac ter would you say you are the most like? A: Im not sure Q: What was your most embarrassing moment you now laugh about? A: I do lots of stuff now that I look back at and laugh at. I couldnt pick just one. Q: Name three things you will always have in your refrigerator. A: Fruit, bread and milk Q: What would we hear on the radio during a road trip when we started your vehicle? A: Country music Q: What is the last book you read? A: House Rules by Jodi Picoult Q: Which would you enjoy more: dinner and a movie, a ball game or a good book? A: Dinner and a ball game Q: Where would your ideal vacation spot be? A: A tropical beach Q: Who, living or dead, has had the greatest inu ence on you and why? A: My grandmothers Q: What is your greatest personal accomplishment? A: I cant think of any Q: If you could talk to any historical gure over dinner, who would it be and why? A: George Washington. Id like to know what he thinks of our government now. Jeannie Runyon IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WITH Obituaries ..................................... A2 Speak Out ..................................... A3 Sudoku .......................................... A3 Opinion ........................................ A6 Sports ............................................ A10 Classieds ..................................... B6 TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 104 Issue 65 Printed on recycled paper Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com By MATHEW PELLEGRINO 313-8296 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com The news about Walmart delay ing its groundbreaking in Milton has Santa Rosans choosing sides. The delay have bolstered com ments from several sides. There are those who want to see a Walmart come to the Milton area, as well as those whod rather shop at the Pace Walmart and oth ers who would rather stick to the mom and pop shops. The Press Gazette learned last week that Walmart decided to pull the plug on their proposed Milton store for at least another year. The news, rang well with some Santa Rosans, and not so well with others. Jonathan Hartley of Milton said that he doesnt want to see another Walmart in Santa Rosa County. We have plenty of good hard ware stores here already, all we need is an Everman or Publix, Hartley said. Others like Elyse Winters who lives in Pace said it would actu ally be benecial for the area, even though she doesnt live in Milton. I would say its a good thing more jobs right? Elyse said. And we surely need that here. For those who live in East Mil ton, a Milton Walmart would al most be considered a blessing. Melanie Bell, who lives in East Milton said that the store would save her a long commute to Pace to go shopping. (It) would be great for those of us in East Milton and beyond to have something closer than Pace or Crestview, Bell said. It doesnt mean you have to shop there if you prefer local. I personally shop as often as I can at places like Halls Hardware & Lumber and The Grocery Store to support locally owned businesses. A Walmart in Milton would likely bring other businesses as well which would be great for our local economy. Statewide yard sale returns to Florida By MATHEW PELLEGRINO 313-8296 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com Another persons trash could be your treasure. This weekend, Flea Across Florida is returning to High way 90. The 272-mile yard sale that starts in Live Oak allows ven dors and yard sale enthusiasts to set up booths along historic Highway 90 and at local flea markets to sell their goods. Anyone that has items to sell can participate in this event. The event is being held this Friday through Sunday all along Highway 90. Originally, the 272-mile flea market was only held once a year in September. The event was held in the spring for the first time back in April because of its growing popularity. Dealers like the Copper Possum in East Milton, and the Pea Ridge Flea Market in Pea Ridge are packed during the three-day sale. Sales usually run from sun up to sun down. By MATHEW PELLEGRINO 313-8296 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com Ten children were injured in an accident involving a school bus heading to Bennett Russell Elementary School on Monday morning. The accident happened around 8:10 a.m. in front of Bealls on Highway 90 in Milton. According to Milton Police ofcer Mark Tinnirella, the No. 624 bus was stopped for the red light at Highway 90 and Parkmore Plaza Drive. The ofcer said when the bus was stationary, a child came up to talk to the bus driver, and the driver became distracted. The driver saw trafc moving and started to drive, not realiz ing that the trafc had stopped again after accelerating. The bus then rear-ended an SUV. The collision sent the driver of the SUV, a female, to the hospital. The scene reduced trafc in the west lanes of Highway 90 down to one lane for about an hour during the incident while medical personnel attended to the children on board. Feelings mixed on new Walmart See WALMART A8 Children injured in bus accident See ACCIDENT A8 272 miles of Little ea markets popped up all along Highway 90 last year.P RE SS G A Z ETTE F I L E P HOTO S See FLEA A8 FOOTBALL: ARE A TE A MS HE A D HOME FOR G A MES SPORTS, A10 Let Santa Rosans know what you think Speak Out Inside | Page A3 srpressgazette.com 623-5887

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Local A2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012TELEPHONE N UMBERS All ofces ................. 850-623-2120 Classieds ................ 850-623-2120 Fax ........................ 850-623-2007S UBSCRIP T ION RA T ES One year (in county) ......................... $39 Six months (in county).................$19.50 13 weeks (in county).................... $9.75 One year (out of county) ....................$62 Six months (out of county).................$31 13 weeks (out of county)..............$15.50 Senior Citizen (over 62) One year (in county)........................$32 Six months (in county) ......................$16 13 weeks (in county) .........................$8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.C OPYRIGH T N O T ICE The entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Halifax Media Group. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570.S AN T A R OSAS PRESS GAZE TT E ST AFFJim F letcher Publisher 850-393-3654 jetcher@srpressgazette.comC arol B arnes Ofce Manager 850-623-2120 cbarnes@srpressgazette.comBill G amblin Editor 850-288-0037 bgamblin@srpressgazette.comC armen Joseph Media Sales Consultant Cell: 850-624-2515 cjoseph@srpressgazette.comA be C lark Media Sales Consultant 850-910-0902 aclark@srpressgazette.comTracie S melstoys Account Retention Specialist 850-623-2120 tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com S anta R osas P ress G azette 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570A T YOUR SERVICEM iss a paper? Circulation Jim Fletcher 850-623-2120 Want to subscribe? 850-623-2120 To buy back issues 850-623-2120 To place a classied ad 850-623-2120 To buy a display ad Carmen Joseph 850-623-2120 To buy a photograph 850-623-2120 I nternet www.srpressgazette.com O fce H ours 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday To get news in the paper Bill Gamblin 850-623-2120 or 850-288-0037 E-mail : news@srpressgazette.com Short items: news@srpressgazette.com Church News: church@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries: news@srpressgazette.com Sports: sports@srpressgazette.com Elected OFFICIALSCOUN T Y GOVERNMEN T COUNTY COMMISSION District 1: Jim Williamson, 4351 Berryhill Road, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-wil liamson@santarosa..gov District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Road, Milton, FL 32583; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commcole@santarosa..gov District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla Highway, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commsalter@santarosa..gov District 4: Jim Melvin, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-melvin@santa rosa..gov District 5: Lane Lynchard, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commlynchard@santarosa..gov The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at 9 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays. The leaders meet in committee at 9 a.m. Mondays preceding the Thursday meetings. Meetings are held in commission chambers of the Administrative Complex on U.S. 90. Phone 983-1877 for information or to reach their of ces. SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFF Wendell Hall, 5755 East Milton, Road, Milton, FL 32588; phone 983-1100. E-mail is whall@srso.net SANTA ROSA COUNTY CLERK OF COURTS Mary Johnson, P.O. Box 472, Milton, FL 32572; phone 983-1987. E-mail is santacourtfeed@chjn.net SANTA ROSA COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR Stan C. Nichols, 6495 Caroline St., Suite E, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1800. E-mail is snichols@srctc. com SANTA ROSA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER Greg Brown, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1880. E-mail is info@srcpa.org SANTA ROSA COUNTY ELECTIONS SUPERVISOR Ann Bodenstein, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1900. E-mail is Bodenstein@ santarosa..govS T A T E GOVERNMEN T Rep. Doug Broxson: 2990-C Gulf Breeze Park way, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563, phone 916-5436. E-mail is Doug.Broxson@myoridahouse.gov Sen. Greg Evers: 598 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crest view, FL 32536, phone 689-0556. E-mail is Evers. Greg.SO2@senate.gov Gov. Rick Scott: PLO5 The Capitol, 400 S. Mon roe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; phone 488-4441. E-mail is _governor@myorida.comFE D ERAL GOVERNMEN T HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Rep. Jeff Miller: 2439 Rayburn House Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; local phone is 479-1183; D.C. Ofce phone (202) 225-4136. Pen sacola ofce address: 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503. Toll free number is 866-3671614. Website: http://jeffmiller.house.gov SENATE Sen. Marco Rubio: 317 Hart Senate Of fice Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 850-433-2603. Website: www.rubio.senate. gov Sen. Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Senate Of fice Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202224-5274; fax 202-224-8022. Website: http:// billnelson.senate.gov WHITE HOUSE President Barack Obama: The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. E-mail is president@white house.gov Vice President Joe Biden: Office of the Vice President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414.SCHOOL GOVERNMEN T SCHOOL BOARD Superintendent: Tim Wyrosdick, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-5000. E-mail is wyrosdickt@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 1: Diane Scott, 5710 Munson High way, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-0413. E-mail is scottdl@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton, FL 32570; phone 623-6299. E-mail is winkleseh@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre, FL 32566; phone 939-2661. E-mail is colemanmd@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 4: JoAnn Simpson, 5059 Faircloth St., Pace, FL 32571; phone 994-5446. E-mail is simpsonjj@mai.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 5: Scott Peden, 3156 Pins Lane, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563; phone 934-0701. E-mail is pe denst@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays at 5086 Canal St. in Milton. Phone: 983-5000.CI T Y GOVERNMEN T Milton City Hall, Mayor Guy Thompson, 6738 Dixon St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5400. City Manager is Brian Watkins Town of Jay, Mayor Kurvin Qualls, 3822 High way 4, Jay, FL 32565, phone 675-2719 Gulf Breeze City Hall, Mayor Beverly Zim mern, 1070 Shoreline Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, phone 934-5100. City Manager is Edwin Buz Eddy Please provide a color photograph if possible. All information must be typed. Wednesdays paper please submit by Friday at 3pm. Saturdays paper submit by Wednesday at noon IRS PROBLEMS? S. RICK FAIRCLOTH. EA., ATA, ATP 6013398 E A E A THE TAX PROFESSIONALS Obituaries Susan Rene Collins Hart, 58, passed away peacefully the morning of Sept. 7, 2012. She was born Sept. 9, 1953, in Bossier City, La., and grew up in Pace. Hart graduated from Milton High School Class of 1971. Hart was predeceased by her parents, Jane and Jerry Collins, and her baby boy, Kenneth Hart. She is survived by two children, Sarina Collins Bradley and Richie Hart, and was blessed with seven precious grandchildren, Courtney, Summer, Trey and Taylor Bradley, and Kayla, Katie, and Kolby Hart, and very special friends, Ginger Penton, Stephanie Penton and baby Berkley. The family will receive friends Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, from 6 -7 p.m., followed by a Celebration of Life Memorial Service at Pace Community Church, 4310 N. Spencer Field Road, in Pace. In Lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Covenant Hospice, www.covenanthospice. org. Lewis Funeral Home Milton Chapel entrusted with arrangements. Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www. srpressgazette.com.Susan Rene Collins Hart 1953 2012 Sylvia Jean Archer Craft, 43, left us Sept. 6, 2012 to be with her mother in the arms of the Lord. She was born in Brewton, Ala., Feb. 3, 1969. She attended W.S. Neal High School in East Brewton, Ala., and Jefferson Davis Community College in Brewton. She was employed by Exam One and Quest Diagnostics in Pensacola as a phlebotomist and had also worked as a teachers assistant at T.R. Jackson Pre-K Center in Milton. Craft had a very kind and loving spirit that was felt by anyone who came in contact with her. She was also a loving and devoted mother to her son, Brandon. She is preceded in death by her mother, Betty Black Archer, who passed away in 2004. She is survived by her son, Brandon Craft of Milton; her father and step-mother, Earlie Thomas and Mary Archer of Sterling, Ak.: two sisters, Cynthia Antonelli (Tony) of Autaugaville, Ala., and Kyra Smith of Cantonment, Fla.; three brothers, Timothy Archer (Kathy) of Plano, Texas, Dale Archer of East Brewton, and David Archer (Tina) of Milton; loved ones Dylan Craft and Amber Devaney; nieces and nephews Lyndsie, Amber, Caleb, Anthony, Rebekah, Timothy, Angel, Carla, Marianne, Kerri, and Kristin; numerous grandnieces and nephews; and countless friends and co-workers. A memorial service will be held to honor her and for friends and family to share their memories of the short time we had with her. All are welcome to attend. The details of the service will be posted on the Lewis Funeral Home website. www. lewisfuneralhomes.net The family would like to thank Joyce Goldenberg/Covenant Hospice, Baptist Manor, and Unihealth Post-Acute Care for the care and love they gave to her during her stay there. Lewis Funeral Home in Pace will be handling arrangements Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www. srpressgazette.com.Sylvia Jean Archer Craft 1969 2012 S YLVIA JEAN A RCHER C RAF T Larry R. McCullough, 78, of Pace, passed away Sept. 7, 2012. He was born April 4, 1934 in Indiana to the late William David McCullough and Ruth Bernhardt McCullough. Mr. McCullough retired after 30 years of service from the United States Navy as a Master Chief having served on the USS Eisenhower and the USS Independence. He was an avid golfer, loved the races, enjoyed walking, his Harley Davidson motorcycle and his beloved cats. Survivors include the love of his life for 53 years, Betty J. McCullough; two sons, Monte McCullough of Pace, and Mark McCullough of Crestview, Fla.; two brothers, Don Homer (Isla) McCullough of Center Point, Ind., and Jack (Nancy) McCullough of Brazil, Ind.; a sister, Winnie (Jack) Knust of Cory, Ind.; and a number of nieces, nephews and friends A Celebration of Life will be Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 at 1 p.m. in the Chapel of National Cremation & Burial Society. Interment will follow in Memory Park Cemetery. The family will receive friends at the funeral home Wednesday from 11 a.m. until the service hour. National Cremation & Burial Society of Milton has been entrusted with the arrangements. Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www. srpressgazette.com.Larry McCullough 1934 2012 LARRY M c CULLOUGH Ron Leon Werner, 67, departed this life on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012, in Oklahoma City, Okla., at the age of 67. Werner was born Nov. 10, 1944 in Reading, Penn. He was the son of Francis and Pauline (Swartz) Werner, was a resident of Prague, Okla. He married Wanda Collier on Dec. 28, 1964 in Allentown, Fla. After retiring from the US Air Force, Ron and Wanda settled in Prague where he enjoyed the last several years touching the community at the Prague Bakery. Ron was preceded in death by his father. Werner was survived by his wife, Wanda; two sons, Danny and Bonnie Werner of Wellington, Col., and William Werner of Prague; two daughters, Ronda Werner of Prague and Candi Werner and her ance David Nootbaar of Paden, Okla.; his mother Pauline Werner of Fla.; one brother Barry and Hilda Werner or Florida; two sisters, Betsy and Ken Dodson and Suzie and Joey Saba both of Florida; grandchildren, Jessica Werner, DNae Werner, McKenna Werner, Alyssa Werner, Melissa Foote, Jenny Hay, Michelle Bond and Amy Opperman; great granddaughter Sianna Jordan and six other great grandchildren Memorial services were held on Sept. 8, 2012, at First Baptist Church in Prague with Bro. Tim Emmons ofciating. Services were under the direction of Parks Brothers Funeral Service in Prague. Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www.srpressgazette.com.Ron Leon Werner 1944 2012 RON LEON WERNER S AN T A R OSA P RESS G AZE TT EFIND U S O N F ACE B OO K @ srpressgazetteF OLLO W U S O N T WI TTER

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A3 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 2080928 Speak OUT If you have a short comment you would like to make, call the Speak Out line at 623-5887. Longer comments are better suited as a letter to the editor. Monday, 8:47 a.m. This is Janet. I would like to say that people should see the movie Obamas America 2016. They are playing it at The Ridge in Pea Ridge. Most people dont know it is playing, and it gives an account of his life. Thank you to The Ridge for playing this movie. Monday, 8:21 a.m. It amazes me how people think Jimmy Carter was such a good president when he opened our borders and let tuberculosis in, and lying Bill Clinton, we all know what he was doing in our White House and got on television and lied to all of us about it. And the only thing Barack Hussein Obama has given us is this great change that nobody wants. I just dont understand some peoples thinking. Fay. Monday, 7:09 a.m. Yeah, this is Mary. I am calling back with the message you could not get. We are almost ready to choose a new leader. The late Adrian Rogers said there were certain qualities that every leader should have. No. 1 is godliness; No. 2 is wisdom; No. 3 is honesty; No. 4 is discrimination; No. 5 is sexual morality; No. 6 is soberness serious thinking. I thought this would be of interest to the people. Sunday, 1:04 p.m. I would like to make a shout out to the Milton Police Department. They have been patrolling Russell Harber Landing and Carpenters Park to the point where they have just about ran out all of the hoodlums. Saturday, 8:34 p.m. A friend of mine from Georgia sent me an article in their local paper on the worst executive orders made by Barack Hussein Obama, June 15, 2012, and it is really scary. We need to take America back for the people. Dolores. Saturday, 7:03 p.m. Bush did his job on Katrina? Tony, maybe you should check the facts on each administrations handling of hurricanes Katrina and Isaac to see how real leaders like Obama handle national emergencies, terrorists, nancial collapse of the American economy, an auto industry meltdown and health care coverage for all Americans who want it, as well as discrimination against women and minorities. A y-over three days later and Heck of a job Brownie just doesnt cut it! Pete. Saturday, 6:51 p.m. Gene says its time to stop blaming Bush. Imagine that someone steals your identity, maxes out your credit cards and doubles your debt, then he and his lawyers and family and friends refuse to help you repair the damage, and whats even worse, they stand in your way when you try to x things, even though youre nancially ruined and on the edge of bankruptcy. How long before you stop blaming that guy that created all your problems? Fact is, we will blame Bush until every problem he created or caused is xed. Saturday, 4 p.m. Maria, you must have been sleeping for the past three and half years. Well, I think it is time to wake up and face reality: no jobs, losing homes, $500 billion from Medicare, I guess to support his trips. He stood there and lied just like four years ago. Oh he did make one of his promise right? Change, that is what we have in our pockets now. I sure dont want what we have had the last three and half years. Saturday, 3:35 p.m. Yeah, this is Bobby. I was reading the comment from Bruce in Pace about the ashing lights. I dont see a big deal about this. And when you bring up tailgating, the next time you drive and someone gets too close look down at your speedometer. If you are going 10 miles under the speed limit then speed up. If you are in the left lane and there are cars behind you then get over to the slow lane. Beside people are not hurting you if they get close to your bumper. If they get too close, and they hit you then it is their fault. Saturday, 10:25 a.m. This is Mary. As I was reading in Wednesdays Free Press, there was an article on Obama with his beer distillery in the White House. What will he have next? Will he have his children run the thing? His wife is out there pushing these healthy meals. It makes me think if someone like that should be the leader of our nation. Saturday, 9:40 a.m. I see where a young man with Down syndrome was kept off an airplane like he would bring it down last week. They dont even notice all these people who are angry or could have ulterior motives when they y. What kind of people are running the plane? Do they have something against a child with Down syndrome? Friday, 10:51 a.m. Hey, this is Gene in Pace. I just heard the Democrats are talking about another stimulus package. Who are they going to give it to? Republicans most of the time want to give it to the American people. Under Obama the stimulus went to people like Sylodyna, Chrysler, Chevy and others. Granted (George) Bush did help out the banks, but we had a Democratic house, so Wall Street was helped out by the Democrats. Obama needs to give the money to the people so they can decide who they would want to help. All Obama did was help the people who put him in ofce instead of the American people. Friday, 8:50 a.m. Hi, this is Jess. I would like to talk about the lady who oversees the Navarre Fishing Pier. It seems like she does what she wants to. She closed the pier for a wedding and then ignored her bosses and kept it open during the hurricane. It doesnt sound like to me she is hurting for money. Is she trying to set the county up for a lawsuit? She doesnt know if someone was going to put their kid on the rail and then get washed into the tide or what would happen. She needs to go; this is her third strike. www. Sudoku-Puzzles .net Sudoku, Kakuro & Futoshiki Puzzles Sudoku 9x9 Very hard (137762908) 9 2 7 6 1 1 8 4 2 2 1 7 5 1 3 6 9 1 8 3 7 6 5 9 1 7 4 8 www.sudoku-puzzles.net Solution: www.sudoku-puzzles.net SOLUTION FIND US ONLINE Check out Santa Rosa Press Gazette on Facebook, or tweet us @srpressgazette

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Local A4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Special to the Press Gazette In observance of World Rabies Day, the Santa Rosa County Health Department and Santa Rosa County Ani mal Services will host the second annual Rabies Drive Thru Vaccination Clinic for dogs and cats, Sept. 28, from 4-7 p.m. at the Santa Rosa County Animal Shelter, 4451 Pine Forest Road in Milton. Local veterinarians, Dr. Michael Mongue of Pace Veterinary Clinic, Dr. C. Da vid Summerlin and Dr. Amy Harper of The Ark Animal Hospital, will administer the injections to dogs and cats. The fee is $10. Pets and owners will remain in the vehicle at all times. No oth er services will be available at the clinic. A certicate of vaccination and rabies tag will be provided for each pet vaccinated. We at the health de partment, and I know Ani mal Services as well, are extremely grateful to these veterinarians for taking time away from their own prac tices to provide this valuable service to the community, said Mary Beverly, epidemi ologist with the Santa Rosa County Health Department. Last year, 197 dogs and cats were vaccinated. We are hoping to exceed that number this year. Rabies is a disease that affects the brain. The virus is carried in the saliva of in fected animals and is usual ly transmitted to people and other animals through a bite or scratch. In the U.S., more than 90 percent of rabies cases occur in wild animals, such as raccoons, foxes, skunks and bats, but domes ticated animals can carry it as well. Unvaccinated pets that are kept outside, or are allowed to roam freely, are at high risk for contracting the virus, if they come into contact with wild animals. Rabies is fatal to humans and animals, but rabies in humans can be prevented if rabies vaccine is admin istered as soon as possible after exposure. Treatment consists of an injection of immune globulin, directly into the wound if the indi vidual has been bitten or scratched, followed by a series of four injections of rabies vaccine in the deltoid (the large muscle in the up per arm) over a period of about two weeks. Post ex posure shots can be expen sive, anywhere from $1800 to $2500, and insurance may not cover all the cost. In 2011, post exposure rabies shots were recommended for 36 people in Santa Rosa County who had contact with animals that may have been infected with rabies. Most of the animals were dogs and cats whose vacci nation status was unknown. An animal suffering from rabies may appear sick or lethargic, have problems swallowing, or drool or sali vate excessively. A wild ani mal may appear tamer than usual and some animals may have no visible symptoms. There is no treatment for animals that have been ex posed to rabies and euthana sia is usually recommended. One of the safest and easiest way to protect pets against rabies is through vaccination by a licensed veterinarian. Vaccinate pets against rabies and keep their shots up-to-date. Follow your vet erinarians recommenda tion for revaccination. Do not leave pets outside unsupervised. Bring in pet food at night and secure trash can lids with fasteners. Cover bird feeders. Most squirrel-proof coverings also deter wild animals. Children should never chase or attempt to catch or touch a wild or unfamiliar animal, and should tell an adult if a wild or strange ani mal tries to approach them. If bitten, or scratched by a wild animal or stray domesticated animal, wash the wound immediately with soap and water. This is the rst line of defense against rabies! Seek medical atten tion immediately and report the incident to the Santa Rosa County Health Depart ment at 983-5275 between the hours of 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or after hours call 418-5566. For more information on rabies, visit www.cdc.gov/ra bies/. If you see a suspicious animal in your yard or neigh borhood, call animal control at 983-4680. If a dead wild animal is on your property, contact the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com missions regional ofce at 265-3676, or their 24-hour law enforcement hotline at (888) 404-3922. For more information about the clinic, call Mary Beverly at the Santa Rosa County Health Department at 983-5200, ext. 105. 8985519 She deserves to be cool! CALL 850-939-3325 Ask us about rebates and tax credits! www.koolbreeze.com Press Gazette Staff Report The teen driver who left the scene of a trafc fatal ity Friday night on Farm Life Road has been charged. Robert William Chapman, 16 of Milton, was charged with leaving the scene of an accident involving a death. According to the Florida Highway Patrol, Chapman turned himself into the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce and the FHP two hours after the crash. He was arrested on the charges and delivered to the Juvenile Justice Center in Pensacola. According to an FHP press release, Chapman was headed north on Farm Life Road when the front of his vehicle struck Ricky Shane Weldon, 20 of Milton, around 8:10 p.m. Weldon, who was walking north northbound in the center of the northbound lane of Farm Life Road, was moments later struck by Courtny Fleming, 21 of Milton, as Weldon was lying prone in the southbound lanes. Fleming reportedly drug Weldon 25 feet before com ing to a stop. Special to the Press Gazette Three Santa Rosa County teachers recently participated in Discovery Edu cation Summer Institute. Jeffery Baugus, a teacher at Wood lawn Beach Middle School; Scott Erick son, a teacher at Milton High School; and Kristina Spencer, a teacher at Holley Navarre Intermediate School, joined more than 100 educators from across the U.S., Canada and Romania in Bozeman, Mont. for a professional development and networking event hosted by Discovery Educations Dis covery Educator Network (DEN). The six-day DEN Summer Institute, held July 21-26, featured a variety of speak ers and hands-on workshops designed to empower educators to invigorate curriculum and engage students using the latest innovations in teaching and learning. The event also provided an opportunity for educators to connect, collaborate and share resources, ideas and strategies with fellow educators from around the world. The DEN Summer Institute was ex clusive to educators recognized by Dis covery Education as STAR Discovery Educators. STAR Discovery Educators are active members of the DEN and proven leaders in transforming teach ing and learning. The DEN is a global community of more than 200,000 edu cators who are passionate about teach ing with technology and digital media, sharing resources, collaborating and networking. Through blogs, virtual conferences and in-person events like the Summer Institute, the DEN con nects educators and supports them in leveraging digital media and technol ogy to engage students and improve achievement. As STAR Discovery Educators, Jeffery, Scott and Kristina have dem onstrated their leadership and commit ment to using technology and digital resources to enrich classroom learn ing experiences, said Lance Rougeux, vice president of learning communities and instructional implementation for Discovery Education. Through their participation in the DEN Summer In stitute, Jeffery, Scott, and Kristina have gained new skills and ideas to apply in their classrooms and share with fel low Santa Rosa County School District educators to help students gain critical technology skills and improve student engagement and achievement. Reed Timmer, extreme weather enthusiast from the Discovery Chan nel series Storm Chasers, kicked off the event by sharing his experience lming and collecting data from some of the most powerful storms on record. He also highlighted the importance of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education and discussed what inspired him to pursue a career in STEM. Education authors David Warlick and Wes Fryer and 2011 Mon tana Teacher of the Year Paul Ander sen also spoke to participants during the event. In addition to hearing from speak ers, Baugus, Erickson and Spencer participated in workshops, collaborat ed with fellow educators on a variety of educational technology projects, and shared ideas and best practices with their peers. They also had an opportu nity to visit Yellowstone National Park and Old Faithful with renowned wildlife photographer Daniel J. Cox. After participating in the DEN Summer Institute, Baugus, Erickson, and Spencer will return to Santa Rosa County School District in the fall with numerous classroom-ready multime dia projects as well as new strategies and techniques to integrate technology and digital media into instruction to invigorate curriculum and transform teaching and learning. For more information about the DEN Summer Institute, visit www.dis coveryeducation.com/DEN/summerinstitute.cfm. Discovery Education transforms classrooms, empowers teachers and captivates students by providing high quality, dynamic, digital content for grades K-12 and community colleges. Discovery Education is the global leader in standards-based digital me dia, professional development, assess ment tools and a passionate educator network to support districts in acceler ating student achievement. Discovery Education services are in more than half of all U.S. schools and 35 countries around the world. Local teachers participate in Discovery Education Summer Institue Police charge teen with leaving scene of fatal crash Drive-thru rabies vaccination clinic to be offered

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A5 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 SEPT. 12 Singles Conference at Deliverance Tabernacle Christian Center, 1780 W. Detroit Blvd, Pensacola Navy League Santa Rosa Council Meeting at noon at SRC Chamber of Commerce, 5247 Stewart St, Milton, 32570 PTAC at UWF Presents Service Disabled Veteran Small Business What Do I Do? from 9 a.m. to noon and again from 1-4 p.m. at 401 E Chase St, Ste 100, Pensacola South End Tourism Development Planning Meeting from 1-4 p.m. at Navarre Visitors Center, 8543 Navarre Parkway, Navarre Miracle Jeans Day SEPT. 13 Friends of the Milton Library Monthly Meeting at 1 p.m. at Milton Library, 5541 Alabama Street Singles Conference at Deliverance Tabernacle Christian Center, 1780 W. Detroit Blvd, Pensacola SEPT. 14 Singles Conference at Deliverance Tabernacle Christian Center, 1780 W. Detroit Blvd, Pensacola Parkinsons Support Group Meeting 1-2 p.m. at West Florida Rehabilitation Institute, 8391 N. Davis Highway, Pensacola SEPT. 14-16 Flea Across Florida along Highway 90 SEPT. 19 Tourism Development Council Meeting at 3 p.m. at Navarre Visitors Center, 8543 Navarre Parkway, Navarre Blackwater Pyrates Meeting at 6:30 p.m. at Nichols Seafood, 3966 Avalon Boulevard, Milton 32570 PTAC UWF Presents How To Market To The Government from 9 a.m. to noon and again from 1-4 p.m. at 401 E Chase St, Ste 100, Pensacola SEPT. 20 Santa Rosa Republican Executive Committee at 6:30 p.m. at Red Roof Inn, 2672 Avalon Blvd., Milton SEPT. 21-23 Deluna Festival at Casino Beach, Pensacola Beach SEPT. 22 Church of God Ministries International Meeting from 1-3 p.m. at SRC Chamber of Commerce, 5247 Stewart St., Milton Womens Enrichment Ministry Craft Fair from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. at Immanuel Baptist Church, 4187 Highway 90, Pace SEPT. 24 Main Street Milton Board of Directors Meeting at 5:30 p.m. at T.W. Jones House Education Center, 4966 Henry Street, Milton SEPT. 25 SBDC UWF Presents IRS Resource Tools from 9 a.m. 12 Noon at 401 E. Chase Street, Ste. 100, Pensacola SEPT. 26 SBDC at UWF Offers Business Planning for Success Workshop from 6-9 p.m. at 401 E. Chase Street, Suite 100, Pensacola SEPT. 27 SBDC at UWF Presents Starting a Business from 9 a.m. to noon at 401 E. Chase Street, Suite 100, Pensacola MOAA Whiting Field Chapter Monthly Meeting at 6 p.m. with place to be determined SEPT. 29 Milton Heritage Tour from 9 a.m. 4 p.m. at Arcadia Mill, 5709 Mill Pond Lane, Milton Third annual All Gods Creatures Blessing of the Pets & Fall Market from 9 a.m. to noon at First Presbyterian Church, Fellowship Hall, 5203 Elmira St, Milton 32570 Santa Rosa Arts Associations annual Art Show from 9 a.m. 4 p.m. at Santa Rosa County Auditorium, 4530 Spikes Way, Milton The Santa Rosa County Commissioners will hold a special meeting September 17, 2012, at 3:30 p.m. to interview two legal firms for County representation on oil spill related issues. The meeting will be held in the Commissioners Board Room at the Santa Rosa County Administrative Center, 6495 Caroline Street, in Milton. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in apublic hearing you are entitled to the provision of certain assistance. Please contactKathy Jordanat (850) 983-1855 orat 6495 Caroline Street, Miltonat least one (1)weekprior to the date of the public hearing. 6012833 Greg Lewis of Milton was the winner of the shotgun rafe held by the East Milton Youth Association. Joining Lewis was East Milton president John Babb and softball director Phil Baggett. The gun rafe was sponsored by Scotts Outdoors in Jay. SUBMITTED PHOTO Calendar of EVENTS EAST MILTON PRESENTS SHOTGUN TO RAFFLE WINNER

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Page 6 There are very few adults who do not recall what they were doing (or where they where) on Sept. 11, 2001. Thats a date that can only be paralleled by Dec. 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Each attack was by a group that, for whatever reason, did not like America at the time. In the days after these attacks, there was no Democrat vs. Republican, no Liberal vs. Conservative, no Christian vs. atheist, nor any other social divide. We were all Americans. We felt the pain of the event. In 2001, as the news coverage showed the planes flying into the World Trade Center, we were one. We were the United States and her people. Despite all the diversity (or, perhaps, because of it) we came together. We rallied and supported our troops, remembered the victims of the tragedy and united. The big question everyone must ponder today is what has happened in the 11 years that followed? As we close in on the November elections, America finds itself about as divided as the infamous Hatfields and McCoys. Have we changed that much? Has our situation changed? We dont think so. Our nation has progressed in many ways. America did not create an internment camp for those of the Muslim faith like they did the JapaneseAmericans following Pearl Harbor. While our so-called leaders try to divide and conquer the public to hold on to their positions of power, we wonder about the hierarchy we value as a nation. First, we are all neighbors. Secondly, we are Santa Rosans. Next, we are Americans and, finally, we are Floridians. Are you going to agree with everyone you come in contact with? Probably not. Thats what makes our country the great place it is. We are allowed the freedom to be ourselves, and with that freedom and diversity, be reminded that each of us has a small part in the overall picture. Our inalienable rights are to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Those who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001, gave that up to some who didnt agree with us. If we are not careful, we will soon become no better than those countries that oppose us. A day we cannot forget OUR VIEW We want you to share your views on the above topic(s) or any topic with other Santa Rosas Press Gazette readers. Your views are important, too. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Letters must be typed and may be edited for content for to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for veri cation, if necessary. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, September 12, 2012 A Section O PINION Anyone who reads (understands) the many writings about education reform should note that almost none mention its greatest enemy: Federal Department of Education. Both Republican and Democrat platforms, put forth at their recent theatrical performances, fail to address this enemy of education. I have asked hundreds of times for anyone to show me the word education in the Constitution. It is not even alluded to as an enumerated power. But, it is covered by the 10th Amenment. For the educationallychallenged, the U. S. Constitution is the supreme law of the land. Created by wise, educated men who believed very strongly in a small, limited government, they deliberately left education out of the document, covering it in the 10th Amendment. The Northwest Ordinance (still law!), Article III, declares knowledge (education to the wise Founding Fathers) to be the responsibility of the states! Numerous empty arguments have been put forth to defend the multi-billion dollar boondoggle. The feds bribe the states with federal money, which should have never left the states to begin with. The government does not have money. They take it from citizens. To Democrats and Republicans and the educationally-challenged voters: Local control does not mean federal control! We will have to have separation of federal and education before any meaningful reform can take place. Bill Bledsoe Milton, Fla. Hypocrisy from both parties on education LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Last Wednesday afternoon while shopping at Walmart in Pace I laid my wallet down on a vegetable counter and walked off without it. About 10 minutes later a call summoned me to the service desk. My wallet was returned intact. I would like to say thank you and God bless you for returning my wallet with everything in it. Dorothy Richardson Milton, Fla. Pace shopper says thanks for returned wallet The Democratic National Convention, held in Charlotte, N.C., is playing out as scripted this week. It was good to see that the Democrats chose the U.S. as the host country for their event again this year, narrowly defeating bids from France and Venezuela. The convention is in full swing. All delegates are issued funny hats, pre-painted signs showing their personal emotions, talking points, and their very own U.S. business owner to smack around, vilify, tax, and regulate until he moves his plant to Costa Rica. The size and scope of the DNC had to be scaled back considerably. At first the Dems thought they needed the Charlotte Motor Speedway, capacity 165,000, to hold all of Obamas loving fans. When they realized that the mainstream press corps is not that big, they looked for smaller venues. Now they are at the less ambitious Time Warner Cable Arena, where cable installers promise to show up to lay the cable some time between 8 AM and 5 PM this week or next. Time Warners motto is We have laid more cable around North Carolina than John Edwards and Bill Clinton combined. The Democrats have been plagued by money problems. The campaign is spending more than it brings in (not the Democrats I know!), and they cannot seem to organize their own convention. They are almost to the point of asking Mitt Romney and Bain Capital to come in and bail out the campaign, to take a controlling interest so they can get it back on track, and to help turn around their Democratic convention like he did an equally corrupt and poorly-run event, the Olympics. If they keep backing off the ambitious size of this convention and moving events to smaller venues, they might end up just doing a conference call from the La Quinta Inn outside of Charlotte. Conspicuously absent from the DNC this year is Hillary Clinton, but Bill Clinton is there. I think they have a marital agreement to not be in the same city more than 3 days a year. The more likely reason is that Hillary is going to resign as Secretary of State if Barack Obama is reelected. However, if she does step down from the Obama administration, she might invite legal troubles and be charged with leaving the scene of a crime. It is great that Bill Clinton will be harangued into endorsing Barack Obama in his speech an historic event. Let me remind you, a whole generation of American kids have not seen Bill Clinton look into a camera, fight off a tear, bite his lower lip, and baldly lie to the American people. As has been drummed into us, it is sexist when Republican push people like Dr. Condoleezza Rice into only secretary jobs, like Secretary of State. In fact, according to the Democrats, everything Republicans do is racist. Political opponents cannot sort their laundry without Attorney General Eric Holder filing some sort of racial suit against them. These conventions are carefully scripted, made-for-TV events. The issue here is that Obama does not make himself available to any real media that would ask any substantive questions. But to be fair, Obamas PR team has been busy flying around to swing states, grandstanding and demagoguing the issues. Obamas press team just havent had time to supply NBC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, ABC, etc. with softball questions to ask the president. We did hear a good bit about the White House fluff piece on how our President has his staff brew his own beer. You know, just like you and me, our Average Joe President (the one with a story just like ours: born in Hawaii to an absent Kenyan socialist dad, raised in Indonesia, attended an elite private high school and then got into Ivy League schools with average grades, and became Community Organizer-in-Chief), likes beer. Asking him about his favorite chili recipe (which a New Mexico radio station did recently), and raving about being so downto-earth that he brews his own beer, is the only hardball journalism we are going to get out of Obamas adoring media hordes. Obama even offered the White House press corps some of his beer, but they demurred and said they would prefer to just keep drinking his Kool-Aid. A syndicated oped humorist, award winning author and TV/ radio commentator, you can reach him at Ron@ RonaldHart.com, Twitter @RonaldHart or at visit RonaldHart.com HART TALK Ron Hart Democratic National Convention less hope and more rope a dope These conventions are carefully scripted, made-for-TV events. The issue here is that Obama does not make himself available to any real media that would ask any substantive questions. But to be fair, Obamas PR team has been busy ying around to swing states, grandstanding and demagoguing the issues. By Jim Hightower What do you call a mix of black liquor, biofuels, diesel and a generous splash of tax subsidies? If you have Sen. Mike Crapo of Idaho shake this cocktail vigorously and serve it in a golden goblet provided by corporate lobbyists, Ive got the answer: Koch Brothers Moonshine. Black liquor, a byproduct of the papermaking process, is an alcoholic sludge that paper mills use to fuel their operations. Fine creative, even. But then, the paper giants turned from creative to cabal, teaming with Crapo and other practitioners of the legislative black arts to turn their sludge into a slick tax loophole. In 2007, Crapo and a covey of corporate lobbyists quietly made their liquor eligible for a subsidy meant to help wean America off oil by encouraging the production of a biofuelgasoline mix to power cars and trucks. Not so fine. One, vehicles cant use mill sludge as a fuel. Two, rather than mixing biofuel into their sludge, the paper-makers add diesel! So these sneaks are siphoning billions of dollars from a clean fuels program by making a dirty fuel dirtier. Whos profiting from this load of moonshine? Right at the top are the infamous, far-rightwing Koch brothers. These secretive, multibillionaire political extremists have long been financing everything from dozens of corporate front groups to the tea party in their relentless effort to impose their plutocratic agenda on our country. One major way they pay for this onslaught is by tapping directly into the blatant corporate welfare of the black liquor loophole. The Koch industrial empire includes Georgia Pacific, one of Americas largest paper-makers and its the happy recipient of as much as a billion bucks a year from this perverted biofuel subsidy. A dirty windfall from a dirty fuel is underwriting dirty politics. The whole thing stinks. Jim Hightower is a radio commentator, writer and public speaker. Hes also editor of the populist newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown. The Koch Brothers moonshine a windfall for dirty politics

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A7 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 By MATTHEW LAMB Press Gazette Correspondent If you have never heard bluegrass music, you have been missing out on one of the most cultural musical genres of the century. If you have never heard High Cotton bluegrass band music, you are in for a surprisingly sweet sound. Every week High Cot ton gets together in Mike Blantons living room to practice their set and dis cuss where they are going to be playing next. Beyond that, there isnt much conversation. When there is conversation, its only about one thing: Bluegrass. The rst time I saw De liverence I knew I wanted to sound like that, Blanton said. The Beverly Hillbil lies also had a good sound that really liked. Mike Blanton, who plays banjo, started the band 30 years ago with fellow musi cian Don Copeland. But Copeland, who is now an experienced acous tic guitarist, didnt exactly call himself a musician back then. I could only play three chords when I rst started. If it hadnt been for Mike, I never would have played music, Copeland said. Otis Pollitt, who plays bass for the band has a different dynamic than Copeland. Pollitt has been a musi cian for more than 60 years but didnt start with the band until a couple of years ago. Pollitt never forgot his start in music. I was 12 years old when I started playing for peo ple, Pollitt said. Back then, if you wanted to see a movie and didnt have any money, you would have an act on stage before the movie started. My act was guitar. The band speaks to each other as though they are all one family. The familial unity is ac tually one of the things that makes the band so darn good to listen to. Amanda Cook is one of the younger members of the group and is a big ad vocate of staying together like a family. Cook started playing mandolin in 2006 and often adds a tempered harmony sound to the bands music. Female singers are rare, said Cook. I think thats why we have such a unique sound. So unique that High Cotton was named Florida Bluegrass Champions in 2009. They won two tro phies, one for instrumenta tion and one for voice. The band goes to the Pickin In The Pines fes tival every year to try and win the award again. They have even re leased their own album which can be purchased by going to their website at highcottonbluegrass.com. Pollitt encourages peo ple to listen to bluegrass as much as they can. He says its more than what your used to listening to. Bluegrass will lift you up. It will lift your soul, Pollitt said. ...a weekly column answering your questions with Biblical answers about life. Ask the Preache r Pastor Gallups, When I look at the Aurora Colorado DearW.R., How can a young man, enrolled in a PhD program, walk into a packed out theater with the desire to randomly destroy as many lives as possible and then booby trap his apartment in the hopes of destroying even more lives in the aftermath? Everyone is looking for that another regulation enacted, another drug invented or another public service announcement can be aired. And so, the talking heads line up night after night to debate gun control, bullying, public security, video game violence, and mental illnesses. They are hoping The problem is that they are not asking the right questions. They are not talking about the core of the problem. They are painfully avoiding the presenting issue. The presenting issue is the crux of the message of my entire book (The Magic Man In The Sky: Effectively Defending The Christian Faith) as well as the Bible itself. The message is that we are not a mere animal with purely instinctive responses to life and oursurrounding environment. Humans are created in the image of God. We have the ability to think, create, invent, communicate, write books, build computers and Internet systems, and land on the moon. Humans are emotional, social, psychological, physical, and spiritual beings. We are amazingly complex creations. We might spend a lifetime caused him to step overthe line of common moraliBecause, it is a certain fact that had this disturbed young man had a contextual biblical worldview if he had a living relationship with God, his creator, through Jesus Christ if the young man walked in the love and teachings of Jesus Christ and genuine Biblical faith, I am convinced that this horror would have never happened. Our culture is spiritually starving and quickly becoming spiritually and biblically bankrupt. We often wonder and analyze what it is that we are doing I am convinced the problem is what most of us are not doing Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church in Milton. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree from Florida State University and a Master of Divinity Degree from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been the Pastor of HHBC since 1987. For 10 years he has also served as an International Youth Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention, preaching to multiplied thousands all over the U.S. and Canada. For more information about HHBC call 623-8959 or 626-8951 or fax, 623 197 If you have a question for ASK THE PREACHER send it to: ASK THE PREACHER, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351 Hickory Hammock Rd, Milton, FL, 32583 High Cotton is seen performing at the Pickin in the Pines festival where they were named the Florida Bluegrass Champions in 2009. The group won trophies for instrumentation as well as voice.PHOTOS BY MATTHEW LA M B | Press Gazette Correspondent Picking High Cotton Local musicians make music, memories together

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Local A8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Several hotels and motels across Highway 90 are offering special rates for those participat ing or travel-shopping in the Flea Across Florida. Kim Macarthy the owner of Copper Possum Antique Mall in East Milton said that shoppers are usually seen shopping up a storm during the event. Originally, Flea Across Florida was held once a year, but Macarthy said that the event grew in popu larity, and they decided to hold it twice a year. Ive been wanting for some thing like this to happen for years, Macarthy said. It really helps out the local economy. Particularly the downtown econ omy Macarthy said. Alyssa Schepper, the owner of Alyssas Antique Depot on Chu muckla Highway in Pace said that the event has already maxed out her booth rentals for this Saturday. We are at our max right now, Schepper said. Schepper started participating in Flea Across Florida last fall, and said that crowds do pick up during the busy weekend, but mostly the out-of-towners. It denitely drew people from out of town, Schepper said. (In the past) we had a lot of people say this is their rst time in the area, and that they would be back. I did hear someone (at a past Flea Across Florida) say they were from Jacksonville, and one from Tampa. There were several people that came from Alabama. Macarthy said she opens her doors early during the Flea Across Florida event and rents out booth outside of her store on Highway 90 near the old Addies Restaurant building. Organizers like Macarthy are still seeking participants to take part in this event. Individuals, church groups, civic groups, and businesses are encouraged to par ticipate in the sale. Items to be sold can range from garage sale items to retail items, as well as arts and crafts. Alyssa Schepper with Alyssas Antique Depot would not return phone calls from the Press Gazette as of press time. Alyssas Antique Depot in Pace and the Copper Possum Antique Mall in Milton will be handling reg istration for the Milton and Pace areas. For more detailed informa tion or to register, please contact Kim Macarthy (Copper Possum Antique Mall) at 554-3906 or Alyssa Schepper (Alyssas Antique Depot) at 994-9114. Walmart met with the City of Milton back in 2007 and purchased property on Highway 87 North just south of Whit ing Field. According to the City of Mil ton planning and zoning director Randy Jorgenson, the retail giant has already pulled sewer permits on the property and Florida Department of Transporta tion permits. The retail store still has a development order in place until Novem ber 2014. Kara Dixon, who lives about a half an hour north of the Pace Walmart said that having a mega store closer to her house would make it easier on her gas budget. Being on one income, we shop there (at Pace), and having one closer to home would be great, Dixon said. If prices were cheaper elsewhere we would shop there. Others like Deborah Callaway Mason of Milton said lower prices would still not inuence her to shop at the superstore. Id rather shop our local stores we have, Callaway said. Keri Litchhult who doesnt even live in Milton, said that when she thought about moving to the area, not having a super store was one of the selling points. When I was thinking about moving down there, one of the key factors was that you didnt have a Walmart, Litchhult said. Stick with mom and pop stores. Despite what many said, Don Ciesi olka said that jobs really seem to be the bigger picture in the Walmart epidemic. I say do it Walmart.they will have to hire a lot of people, hundreds of people who need work will once again be able to get back and join the workforce, Ciesi olka said. Why does Walmart keep put ting it off? We dont want it, we need it. Others like Gerry Swetsky said it could be bad for the smaller stores in the area. Be warned, if this happens, its a death knoll for locally owned business es, Swetsky said. It happened in my home town in Pennsylvania. Despite the delay, with the develop ment order still in place, Walmart can come build at any time until 2014, even though they are taking a short break. WALMART from page A1 PHOTOS BY MATHEW PELLEGRINO | Press Gazette The bus driver rear-ended this SUV in front of the Bealls/Big Lots parking lot in Milton on Monday morning. The driver of the SUV was transported to the hospital with unknown conditions. Below: Medical personnel tend to children as they come off of the school bus. All of the children that were injured were sent to Santa Rosa Medical Center for fur ther evaluation. The incident was the second bus accident involving a Santa Rosa County Durham school bus driver since the start of the school year three weeks ago. The last bus accident in volved a motorcycle striking a school bus on Highway 90 in Pace. The bus was attempting to cross Highway 90 from Sports Drive in Pace when it crossed the path of a motorcyclist. The biker sustained serious injuries. The bus had an accident free driver license plate for 2009-10. The plate indicates that the driver was not in volved in any accident for that school year. According to Bob Downin, general manager for Durham School Services for the Santa Rosa County School System, the school district reviews all accidents involving school buses and retrains employees after accidents. Downin told the Press Gazette this during the last school bus incident. He did not return phone calls as of press time. Durham operates more than 12,000 school buses and serves more than 300 school districts in 29 states across the country. Jud Crane, the Santa Rosa County School districts direc tor of purchasing and contract administration was at the hos pital with the injured children shortly after the incident and referred the Press Gazette to Durham School Bus Services for comment. No one was available for comment. FLEA from page A1PRESS G AZETTE FILE PHOTO Little ea markets popped up all along Highway 90 last year. ACCIDENT from page A1

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A9 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 6515813 Vegetables 10 lbs 5 lbs Purplehull, Purplehull w/snaps, Zipper, Crowder, Blackeye, Lady Creme or English Peas . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Speckled Butterbeans. . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Baby Limas (Petite) Southern Butter Peas . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Ford Hook Limas . . . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Cut Okra, Cut Squash, Snap Beans, Broccoli .$21.00 . $13.00 Baby Boiling Okra, Season Blend . . . . .2lb Bag . . $6.00 Turnip Greens, Collard Greens . . . . . .3Lb Bag . . $6.00 Super Sweet Cut Corn . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 New Items . . . . . . . 10 lbs . . 5 lbs California Blend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13.00 Navy Beans . . . . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Pinto Beans . . . . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Shoepeg Field Corn . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Fruit 5 lbs Sliced Peaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00 Blackberries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00 Pineapple Chunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00 Whole Strawberries. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00 Mixed Fruit (Peaches, Pineapple & Strawberries) . . .$15.00 9 am 1 pm at 9 Mile Road Location 2 pm 4 pm at Five Point SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH All Items are Fresh, Clean, Cut, Shelled and Packaged Now Accepting All Major Credit Cards & EBT 228-990-5605 bandhveggies@yahoo.com Tides Pensacola Bay Thursday, September 13, 2012 4:00 AM CDT Moonrise 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 9:46 AM CDT High tide 1.54 Feet 5:13 PM CDT Moonset 6:56 PM CDT Sunset 7:11 PM CDT Low tide 0.49 Feet Friday, September 14, 2012 5:00 AM CDT Moonrise 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 10:57 AM CDT High tide 1.42 Feet 5:50 PM CDT Moonset 6:54 PM CDT Sunset 7:20 PM CDT Low tide 0.67 Feet Saturday, September 15, 2012 1:00 AM CDT High tide 0.88 Feet 4:49 AM CDT Low tide 0.82 Feet 6:02 AM CDT Moonrise 6:33 AM CDT Sunrise 12:21 PM CDT High tide 1.28 Feet 6:27 PM CDT Moonset 6:53 PM CDT Sunset 7:10 PM CDT Low tide 0.88 Feet 9:10 PM CDT New moon Sunday, September 16, 2012 12:04 AM CDT High tide 1.04 Feet 6:34 AM CDT Sunrise 6:43 AM CDT Low tide 0.67 Feet 7:06 AM CDT Moonrise 2:09 PM CDT High tide 1.13 Feet 6:20 PM CDT Low tide 1.04 Feet 6:52 PM CDT Sunset 7:06 PM CDT Moonset 11:54 PM CDT High tide 1.25 Feet East Bay Thursday, September 13, 2012 3:59 AM CDT Moonrise 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 10:31 AM CDT High tide 1.85 Feet 5:11 PM CDT Moonset 6:55 PM CDT Sunset 8:29 PM CDT Low tide 0.58 Feet Friday, September 14, 2012 4:59 AM CDT Moonrise 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 11:42 AM CDT High tide 1.70 Feet 5:49 PM CDT Moonset 6:53 PM CDT Sunset 8:38 PM CDT Low tide 0.81 Feet Saturday, September 15, 2012 1:45 AM CDT High tide 1.06 Feet 6:01 AM CDT Moonrise 6:05 AM CDT Low tide 0.98 Feet 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 1:04 PM CDT High tide 1.53 Feet 6:26 PM CDT Moonset 6:52 PM CDT Sunset 8:26 PM CDT Low tide 1.05 Feet 9:10 PM CDT New moon Sunday, September 16, 2012 12:47 AM CDT High tide 1.25 Feet 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 7:05 AM CDT Moonrise 8:01 AM CDT Low tide 0.80 Feet 2:52 PM CDT High tide 1.36 Feet 6:51 PM CDT Sunset 7:04 PM CDT Moonset 7:36 PM CDT Low tide 1.25 Feet Blackwater River Thursday, September 13, 2012 3:59 AM CDT Moonrise 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 11:27 AM CDT High tide 1.85 Feet 5:12 PM CDT Moonset 6:55 PM CDT Sunset 8:59 PM CDT Low tide 0.58 Feet Friday, September 14, 2012 5:00 AM CDT Moonrise 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 12:38 PM CDT High tide 1.70 Feet 5:49 PM CDT Moonset 6:54 PM CDT Sunset 9:08 PM CDT Low tide 0.81 Feet Saturday, September 15, 2012 2:41 AM CDT High tide 1.06 Feet 6:02 AM CDT Moonrise 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 6:35 AM CDT Low tide 0.98 Feet 2:00 PM CDT High tide 1.53 Feet 6:26 PM CDT Moonset 6:52 PM CDT Sunset 8:56 PM CDT Low tide 1.05 Feet 9:10 PM CDT New moon Sunday, September 16, 2012 1:43 AM CDT High tide 1.25 Feet 6:33 AM CDT Sunrise 7:05 AM CDT Moonrise 8:31 AM CDT Low tide 0.80 Feet 3:48 PM CDT High tide 1.36 Feet 6:51 PM CDT Sunset 7:05 PM CDT Moonset 8:06 PM CDT Low tide 1.25 Feet Navarre Beach Thursday, September 13, 2012 3:58 AM CDT Moonrise 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 7:48 AM CDT High tide 1.56 Feet 4:07 PM CDT Low tide 0.67 Feet 5:11 PM CDT Moonset 6:54 PM CDT Sunset 10:57 PM CDT High tide 0.92 Feet Friday, September 14, 2012 1:06 AM CDT Low tide 0.89 Feet 4:59 AM CDT Moonrise 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 9:04 AM CDT High tide 1.48 Feet 3:47 PM CDT Low tide 0.79 Feet 5:48 PM CDT Moonset 6:53 PM CDT Sunset 10:37 PM CDT High tide 1.00 Feet Saturday, September 15, 2012 2:32 AM CDT Low tide 0.80 Feet 6:01 AM CDT Moonrise 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 10:24 AM CDT High tide 1.36 Feet 3:43 PM CDT Low tide 0.90 Feet 6:26 PM CDT Moonset 6:52 PM CDT Sunset 9:10 PM CDT New moon 10:25 PM CDT High tide 1.13 Feet Sunday, September 16, 2012 3:42 AM CDT Low tide 0.69 Feet 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 7:04 AM CDT Moonrise 11:46 AM CDT High tide 1.23 Feet 3:45 PM CDT Low tide 0.98 Feet 6:50 PM CDT Sunset 7:04 PM CDT Moonset 9:15 PM CDT High tide 1.31 Feet Special to the Press Gazette This past spring, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission (FWC) biologists tagged 136 trophy largemouth bass greater than 8 pounds in Floridas public waters. Each trophy bass had a yellow plastic dart tag inserted into the back of the sh just below the dorsal (back) n. Each tag has a unique number that identi es a monetary reward val ue and information on how to report catches. Tagged bass came from 41 lakes and rivers that var ied in size, water quality, hab itat types, sh populations and angler demographics. Angler catch and harvest rates vary between lakes and rivers, so this approach allows for a more informed statewide estimate. After six months, results are already revealing. So far, 21 percent of tagged trophy bass have been caught and reported, and 83 percent of them were released alive. Anglers shing in tourna ments accounted for 22 per cent of reports. Thirty per cent of trophy sh reported were caught on live shiners. Interestingly, 28 percent of tagged bass heavier than 10 pounds have been caught, but just three of seven (43 percent) of those were re leased. This shows bigger bass are equally suscep tible to capture but suffer increased harvest. Most an glers harvested trophy bass to have a skin-mount made, rather than for food. The most recent cap ture was a sh stocked by the FWC as a ngerling but weighed more than 10 pounds when it was caught and released in Lake Talquin. Another recent tagging study by the FWC and University of Florida revealed that 20 percent to 35 percent of all largemouth bass longer than 14 inches were caught annually by an glers. Since trophy bass typi cally take six to 10 years to reach that size, its evident that recycling plays an im portant role. Although catch rates of individual trophy bass may be about the same as for smaller sh, there are fewer trophy sh. This information will pro vide an important baseline for when TrophyCatch (see below) launches in October. The FWC will continue the statewide tagging study for the next ve years to esti mate changes in catch-andrelease rates of trophy sh and angler participation. Anglers should look for tagged sh. The plastic tags are 5-inch yellow streamers with Trophy printed on them, followed by a number, reward value and contact information. Over time, tags may get covered by algae, which can be rubbed off to reveal tag information. If you catch a tagged sh, cut the tag as close to the skin of the sh as possible and return the tag to the FWC. Anglers may release or harvest tagged bass as they normally would, de pending upon local harvest regulations; however, only released bass are eligible for separate TrophyCatch recognition and rewards. For details or to report tags, call sheries research biologist Jason Dotson at 850-363-6037. This tagging study was initiated partially to imple ment the Black Bass Man agement Plan that was developed with input from biologists, anglers and stakeholders that the FWC approved in June 2011. An glers indicated that greater opportunities for trophy-size sh should be an important component of the plan. So the FWC made trophy large mouth bass management a priority and plans to launch a trophy bass documenta tion program called Trophy Catch in October. Trophy bass tagging study already revealing

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www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, September 12, 2012 A Section SP O RTS Page 10 By BILL GAMBLIN 288-0037 | @SRPG_Bill sports@srpressgazette.com Kyle Troup had gured out Avalon Bowling Center except for lanes 17 and 18, but that didnt matter as he snapped a two-year winless streak to claim the third annual Fran Bohlman Memorial Title at Avalon Bowling Center. Heading into the position round 39 pins separated the top three bowlers Wesley Newman, Troup, and Richard Langton. By the time the pins had fallen Newman saw his 12 pin advantage turn into a 76 pin de cit. Troup, who had battled with Newman all Sunday for the top spot, bowled a 267 to Newmans 179. I started out the day in third place after a terrible eight games yesterday, Troup said. Then this morning I won my rst ve games and jumped into the lead. That is when I faced Wesley on lanes 17 and 18 and he took the lead back. While Newman struggled to nd the pocket in the position round, Langton bowled a 256 to move up to the second spot. Another second place, Langton said when he was presented with the runners-up check. I have lost to Sam (Zurich) and now second to Kyle. I enjoy coming here I would just like to move up one more spot; maybe next year. The top local nisher was Charles E. Cliffford of Fort Walton Beach, who nished ninth, with a pin count of 4,364 for an average of just over 218 pins a game. Miltons Robert Kuzirian claimed the seniors title despite failing to qualify for the top 12 on Sunday with a pin count of 1590, which was 57 pins out of the money. South Region PBA pro Jerry Bohlman, whos mother the tournament is named in the honor of, nished 25th overall wand was just under 100 pins from cashing. Bohlman bowling a 157 on Saturday, which accounted for 43 of those pins he missed by. Troup, who only wins when his legendary bowling father Guppy Troup is not around, rode the roller coaster of emotion on Sunday in the position round. That last game I tried to pay attention to my game and count down the frames, Troup said. This time I couldnt shake the nerves, but I worked through them. When you miss a shot there are times you go through this emotional roller coaster and I just tried to focus on my game to make sure I took care of business on my end for the win. PBA South Region director Sam Zurich announced Sunday the fourth annual Fran Bohlman Memorial had been booked for October 2013. Kickoff meeting for Fire Truck Pull The annual Ronald McDonald House Charities Fire Truck Pull is Oct. 13. This family friendly event will take place in downtown Pensacola at Seville Quarter. Teams of 20 people will compete to pull a re truck 50 feet in the least amount of time. There will be a kickoff meeting at Red Lobster on Ninth Avenue on Friday, Sept. 14, from 11:30 a.m. 1 p.m. This meeting will serve as a chance for individuals, groups, clubs or businesses interested in forming a team to get information and register for the event. Lunch will be available for purchase during the meeting. MHS Soccer Golf Tournament The Milton High School Soccer program will host a four-man scramble golf tournament Saturday at Stonebrook Golf Club. The cost is $65 per player and includes a round of golf, range balls, dinner and prizes. For more information or to sign up, call MHS girls soccer coach Jeff Klug at 449-0803. Catching Sharks This month, the Emerald Coast Saltwater Seminar Series presented by North Light Marina and Yamaha will discuss catching sharks. From inshore targets of bull shark, blacktip and spinners to offshore monsters such as mako, tiger and hammerheads, all aspects of shark shing will be covered starting at 7 p.m. at Northlight Marina in Niceville on Sept. 19. Whether you want to target them from the beach or a boat, our experts have you covered. A free buffet will be offered starting at 6:30 p.m., and there is no cost to attend. For more information, visit saltwaterevents.com or call Sonny at 384-7737. Annual Down Syndrome Motorcycle Ride The fourth annual Down Syndrome Motorcycle Ride is Oct. 13 hosted by Christs Descendents. The ride starts at the Harley Davidson on Hwy 29 in Pensacola. Registration begins at 9 a.m. with rst bike out at 10 a.m. $10 per bike, $5 for lunch and $5 for 6 raf e tickets. The ride stops at Stokes Victory Polaris where there will be a cookout and a huge raf e. For more information, call 255-0254. 19th annual Chamber Golf Classic Tournament The Santa Rosa County Chamber of Commerce will host its 19th annual Tournament on Oct. 5 at Stonebrook Golf Club. Sponsorship opportunities remain available at this time. For more information on this event or to register call 623-2339. Ghost Chase 5K The University of West Florida will host a Ghost Chase 5K on Oct. 13 at 9 a.m. Community members and students are encouraged to register for this 3.1 mile trail run on the beautiful University of West Florida campus. Community members wishing to participate in the can register on Active.com. Early bird registration is $15 before Oct. 6. The cost then increases to $20. The Ghost Chase 5K is free for UWF students. Students can register at uwf.edu/recreation. Overall and divisional winners will receive prizes. Halloween costumes are encouraged, and the best costume will receive a prize. Snacks and refreshments will be served at the race. Limit of 150 participants. Benny Russell Hall of Fame nominations Nominations are now being accepted for Pace High Schools Bennett C. Russell Athletic Hall of Fame. The induction will be pregame of the Nov. 2 Homecoming football game. The Russell Hall of Fame was established in 2003 to honor former Pace High School athletes who distinguished themselves on and off the playing eld. Nominees must be a former Patriot Athlete who has been out of school at least 10 years, an honorable individual who re ects the strong character of Benny Russell, and have proven themselves as a positive role model in the community. Nominations will be accepted through Sept. 28 and may be picked up at any Pace High School Of ce or at www.pacehighschool.net. Sports BRIEFS Troup strikes his way to Bohlman Memorial title Top 15 nishers 1. Kyle Troup 4644 2. Richard Langton 4606 3. Wesley Newman 4568 4. Randy Weiss 4563 5. Jason Sterner 4508 6. Connor Pickford 4419 7. David Circle 4409 8. Dale Eagle 4400 9. Charles Clifford Jr. 4364 10. Brandon Bivens 4353 11. Matt Taylor 4316 12. David Shinn 4217 13. Aaron Childree 1652 14. Walter Williams Jr. 1652 15. Jeffery Evans 1647 Other area bowlers 19. Robert Kuzirian 1590 24. Mike Christenson 1562 25. Jerry Bohlman 1558 26. Travis Pittman 1557 28. Bill Ziegler 1550 29. Tony Myers 1540 32. Michael McHaley 1510 33. Michael Mabrie 1497 34. Elbert Womble 1461 39. Philip Warr 1398 41. Scott Baehr 1363 44. Jacob Lee 1217 BILL GAMBLIN | Press Gazette Kyle Troup ended a two-year winless streak on Sunday as he won the 2012 Fran Bohlman Memorial at Avalon Bowling Center. By BILL GAMBLIN 288-0037 | @SRPG_Bill sports@srpressgazette.com Week three of high school football will see some big tests across Santa Rosa County. Jay saw some mistakes hurt them in game two of 2012 with a 52-14 loss at Holmes County, but they are hoping to start 2012 at home in a positive way as they host Sneads at 7 p.m. We want to get a win here at home, said Jay head coach Kent Smith. It will be nice to be back home and play in front of our fans who are very supportive of the team and program. Sneads has some real good skill players and they play real well as a team. Ricky Co eld was a bright spot for the Royals last week in the loss as he rushed for 163 yards and one touchdown. We made some mistakes early, but we tried to come back, Smith said. We learned from last Friday that we are not where we want to be. Jay quarterback Tate Upton scored the other touchdown in the third quarter. The Royals will play their rst home game and that should provide a big boost for a still young squad in Jay. In Pace the Patriots will face a big test against the Navarre Raiders. The Patriots (2-0) are coming off a big game against Niceville where they capitalized on four turnovers in the 28-17 win in enemy territory. Pace was led by J.C. Curry who scored on a 62-yard pass from Bryce Moore and then his second touchdown came when he converted an Eagles turnover into a 24-yard run to give the Pats the lead for good 21-17. Ryan Santoso took two Eagles turnovers and converted them into six points himself with eld goals from 30 and 42 yards out respectively. And sophomore Quaide Weimerskirch scored his fourth touchdown of the early season with a 14-yard run in the nal minutes of the game. Pace will host Navarre on Friday at 7:30 p.m. Navarre is still reeling from a last second 25-24 loss to Pensacola High, who rallied from 12 points behind with less than seven minutes in the fourth quarter. Milton had struggled getting its offense moving in the rst game of the season, but that was not the case at home against Panama City Rutherford. The Panthers (1-1) took it to the Rams in convincing fashion with a 31-3 win. Offensively this was the most complete game Milton had in some time as it operated out of a three and four receiver set most of the night. Cody Lowe was on his game as he found Dejon Funderburk in the rst half for a 36 yard strike and Isaiah Jones in the fourth quarter for a 40 yard touchdown to put the game way out of reach. While the passing game clicked, so did the running game. William Barnes scored on a four yard run to open the game and Andre Flakes took his spot in the Wild Panther scheme and rumbled 85 yards for a score. Milton now has the task of traveling to Fort Walton Beach on Friday to face the Vikings (2-0) at 7:30 p.m. Area games of interest Week 3 Milton at Fort Walton Beach, 7:30 p.m. Navarre at Pace, 7:30 p.m. Sneads at Jay, 7 p.m. Chipley at Northview, 7 p.m. Pine Forest at Niceville, 7 p.m. West Florida at Tate, 7:30 p.m. Choctaw at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Pensacola at Pensacola Catholic, 7:30 p.m. Escambia at Rutherford, 7:30 p.m. Week 2 Scores Pace 28, Niceville 17 Milton 31, Rutherford 3 Holmes Co. 52, Jay 14 Pensacola Catholic 14, Gulf Breeze 7 Pensacola 25, Navarre 24 West Florida 39, Washington 0 Fort Walton Beach 27, Tate 7 Crestview 35, Escambia 7 Marianna 48, Northview 42 (OT) Pine Forest 72, Arlington Country Day 0 Godby 28, Choctaw 21 Freeport 41, South Walton 7 Baker 55, Rocky Bayou 33 Arnold 44, Amite Co. (Miss.) 0 Vernon 38, Wewa 6 William Barnes runs around the right end for a big gain in Miltons 31-3 win over Rutherford on Friday. Milton will take on Fort Walton Beach on Friday at 7 p.m. BY BILL GAMBLIN | Press Gazette DISTRICT 1 6-A Team Overall District Pace 2-0 0-0 Pine Forest 1-0 0-0 Pensacola 1-0 0-0 Milton 1-1 0-0 Tate 0-1 0-0 Washington 0-2 0-0 Escambia 0-2 0-0 DISTRICT 2 6-A Ft. Walton 2-0 0-0 Crestview 2-0 0-0 Navarre 1-1 0-0 Niceville 1-1 0-0 Mosley 1-1 0-0 Choctaw 0-2 0-0 DISTRICT 1 5-A West Florida 2-0 0-0 Bay 2-0 0-0 Gulf Breeze 1-1 0-0 Arnold 1-1 0-0 Rutherford 0-2 0-0 DISTRICT 1 1-A Baker 2-0 0-0 Jay 1-1 0-0 Northview 1-1 0-0 Freeport 1-1 0-0 Jay, Pace teams head home

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www.crestviewbulletin.com Section SP O RTS Section B INSIDE More local news Thursday High school volleyball Choctaw at Crestview: F, 4 p.m.; JV, 5 p.m.; V, 6 p.m. Central at Baker: JV, 4:30 p.m.; V, 5:30 p.m. Jay at Laurel Hill: JV, 4:30 p.m.; V, 5:30 p.m. Junior varsity football Baker at Freeport: 6 p.m. Baker at Bozeman: 6 p.m. Freshman football Middle school football Lewis at Davidson: 6:30 p.m. Shoal River at Bruner: 6:30 p.m. Friday High school football Bolles at Crestview: 7 p.m. Holmes County at Baker: 7 p.m. GOLF Knights of Columbus tournament The Crestview Knights of Columbus Council 7968 will host a four-person scramble golf tournament Oct. 8 at Foxwood Country Club. The tournament is scheduled to start at 8 a.m. Cost is $40 for Foxwood members and $50 for nonmembers. Joann Murray Tournament The inaugural Joann Murray Memorial Golf Tournament is set for Oct. 13 at Foxwood Country Club. The four-person scramble tournament will begin with a 1:30 p.m. shotgun start. The tournament will bene t Making Strides Against Breast Cancer. Cost is $200 per team. For more information, call B.J. Thomhave at 682-2012 or Terri Cloyd at 496-9352. Christian Thomhave Memorial The 11th annual Christian Thomhave Memorial Golf Tournament will take place Oct. 26 at Foxwood Country Club with a noon shotgun start. Cost of the two-person scramble is $44 per player and $34 for Foxwood members. The tournament bene ts Northwest Florida State College. Six ights will comprise the event, with cash prizes awarded in each ight. For more information, contact B.J. Thomhave at 682-2012, 826-2012 or bj@foxwoodcc. com. By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com BAKER Nobody can accuse Baker football coach Matt Brunson of running up the score on an outmanned opponent. Brunson has always been a coach who takes his foot off the gas and empties his bench when a game is hand. The second quarter of Fridays game against Rocky Bayou Christian might or might not have set a school record for scoring, but it was one for the books. The Gators ran 16 plays and scored six touchdowns in the quarter. D.J. Thomas had 93 of his team-best 143 yards in the second and scored two of his three touchdowns as the Gators torched the Knights for 42 points in the period. Bakers starters had most of the second half off, but by then the Gators led 55-20. When the nal horn sounded at Doug Grif th Memorial Stadium, the nal score was 55-33. The Gators had four scoring plays of more than 40 yards. Joining Thomas in the Gators big play category were Adam Crowson with a 46-yard run and Richard Stroheker with a 60-yard touchdown run and an Coach: Win over Holmes County would get Baker some recognition By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com BAKER It will be an earlyseason football battle of the unbeatens Friday, when Holmes County visits Doug Grif th Memorial Stadium to take on Baker. The Blue Devils (2-0) are riding high, having beaten Blountstown 20-0 in their opener on Aug. 31 and disposing of Jay 52-14 last week. Baker also is 2-0 with wins over South Walton and Rocky Bayou Christian. Baker coach Matt Brunson knows the Gators will have their hands full against Holmes County, which was ranked No. 4 in the state in Class 1A a week ago and is expected to move up this week following a loss by Northview. The bottom line is we are 20 and we are getting ready for a very good football team, he said. I think, thus far, in our season we had a very spirited classic with Jay, we beat a tough South Walton team in week one, we got an up-and-coming Rocky Bayou team in week two and now we play the No. 3 team in Class 1A. Theyve got a two-headed monster, offensively, with Kodi Russ, who is a running back and free safety (on defense) and Junior Miles. Russ is a great player, (and with) the Miles kid at quarterback, and an outside linebacker, thats kind of a Hall of Famers past and future By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com Crestview High School will honor inductees in the inaugural Crestview Athletic Hall of Fame on Friday. There will be a luncheon for the individual inductees Friday afternoon. Individual and team inductees will be recognized at Jack Foster Stadium during the Crestview-Bolles School football games half-time ceremonies. I applaud Crestview head football coach and athletic director Kevin Pettis for promoting the idea of a hall of fame and pushing for the halls reality. Too often, people promote an idea and then let the idea wither on the vine. It is important to celebrate athletes past, present and future achievements both on and off the eld. Athletes from the past can serve as a standard for todays athletes and those boys and girls just now discovering the joy of sports. Moreover, todays high school athlete is the young man or young woman whom local kids look up to and dream of being like. I never saw Tom Hammonds play basketball in person, but I did see him play on TV a few times. It isnt a stretch to say that Hammonds is the best basketball player to come out of Okaloosa County. John Bale played baseball at Crestview and stuck around the Major Leagues for seven years, pitching for Toronto, Baltimore, Cincinnati and Kansas City. I did see Eric Flinchum wrestle for the Bulldogs and remember some of his exploits on the way to winning a Class 1A state championship in the 189-pound back in 2002. Flinchum turned in the best individual season in Bulldog wrestling history that year, going a perfect 36-0 with 27 pins. Ive also had the opportunity to get to know some of the other inductees in this years class. I never saw Tim Gillis play baseball, but Ive gotten to know him pretty well in his role as the Bulldog baseball coach. Dexter Day is my contemporary of sorts. He graduated from Crestview in 1978, and I graduated from Gulf Breeze in 1976. In talking with Dexter, Ive discovered we share a limited number of memories. He was probably on the eld when Crestview beat my Dolphin squad the last game of the 1975 season, but I wont hold that against him. Im sure, as I talk with these men and the other hall inductees, I will hear stories about the way things were way back in their day. These folks and countless others have helped build the history that is Crestview High School athletics. Crestview has a rich history of sports that grows with the exploits of each new season which raises the question of who, among the current Bulldog athletes, will one day be in the Hall of Fame. Yes, the future Hall of Famers are todays athletes as they add their own chapter to the storied Bulldog tradition. Crestview enters Bolles game undefeated after win over Escambia By RANDY DICKSON 682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Fresh off a 35-7 win over Escambia last Friday, the Crestview football team (2-0) faces its toughest test of the young season, as defending Class 4A state champion The Bolles School, of Jacksonville, visits Jack Foster Stadium for the 7 p.m. kickoff. Adding to the big nights excitement is that the Bulldogs will recognize members of the inaugural Crestview High School Sports Hall of Fame at halftime. We are excited to have these guys back to honor what we have done in the past, Crestview head coach and athletic director Kevin Pettis said. We are a product of what we have done, and we are excited about getting that started. It is going to be a packed house, and weve got a lot of people ying in for the Hall of Fame. Its the rst ever Hall of Fame, and so Im excited about that and the kids will be, too. Pettis knows excitement will only carry the team so far against a rugged Bolles squad (2-0) that is coached by Corky Rogers, the most successful coach in state history, with more than 400 wins under his belt. You know, Corky is the winningest coach in the country, and he does a great job, Pettis said. They run the Wing-T and they just try to out-formation you and put themselves in the best situation to run their plays. Theyve got great players and great coaches, and we are excited about having them in the Jack. We are going to pack the Jack, and we are excited about having them. Im glad we dont have to make that trip. Crestview traveled to Jacksonville last year to play Bolles and lost 31-0 in a game that was closer than the nal score indicated. The Bulldogs had 213 yards in total offense to Bolles 197, but four turnovers and injuries to key players like Dakota Dean NORTH END ZONE Randy Dickson Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Page B1 Thursday High school volleyball SPORTS SHORTS See SHORTS B3 Gators looking for respect Gators running game key to win RANDY DICKSON | News Bulletin D.J. Thomas turns the corner on his way to a threetouchdown performance against Rocky Bayou Christian on Friday. See BAKER B3 WEEK IN PREVIEW Bulldogs hope for Hall of Fame win RANDY DICKSON | News Bulletin ABOVE: Crestview tailback Micah Reed and his brother, Emmanuel, will be counted on to come up big if the Bulldogs are to upend defending Class 4A state champions Bolles on Friday. LEFT: Tyler Henderson will try to lead an opportunistic Crestview defense to a win over Bolles on Friday. Henderson had two interceptions and returned one for a touchdown in the win over Escambia last week. See BULLDOGS B3 See GATORS B3

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Local B2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Special to the Press Gazette For children who have experienced abuse or ne glect, a pair of brand new pajamas can bring a little comfort to what often is a frightening and confusing situation. So for the fourth con secutive year, Families First Network of Lakeview is conducting a campaign to collect new, unworn pajamas for children un der its supervision. The Tucking Kids in Safe and Sound pajama drive. The pajamas will be dis tributed to children during the holiday season. Collection boxes for pa jama donations will be at all FamiliesFirst service centers and placed at vari ous locations throughout Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton counties. Needed are new pajamas in infant through adult sizes, which are for larger children. FamiliesFirst Network is responsible for the safe ty, stability and well-being of abused and neglected children in Northwest Florida. Under a contract with the state of Florida, FamiliesFirst provides foster care and related services for children who cannot safely remain with their families. The drive ends Oct. 13. To learn more, contact FamiliesFirst Networks foster home development staff by calling 453-7766. Right: Milton Rotary President Bubba Drinkard presents the ever sought Rotary pen to Robin Punkyo and Greg Brown. The Club received an update on what is going on with Gulf Power from Mrs. Punkyo and an overview of some of the amendments that will be voted on in November in the state of Florida. The Milton Rotary Club meets each Tuesday at Red Barn Bar-B-Que at noon and we invite you to join us.SUBMITTED PHOTO S Campaign seeks pajamas for abused, neglected children ROTARY HONORS SPEAKERS Left: Milton Rotary President Bubba Drinkard is seen presenting the world famous Rotary pen to Martha Zimmerman and Jenea Highll of the Santa Rosa Health Department. They told the club about the Healthy Start Program and how the program works along with how many people are helped each year with the program. For more information please contact Martha or Jenea at the Santa Rosa County Health Department. FamiliesFirst Network of Lakeview is conducting a campaign to collect new, unworn pajamas for children under its supervision. The Tucking Kids in Safe and Sound pajama drive.

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B3 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 KEY MVOP misdemeanor violation of probation FVOP felony violation of probation Agg aggravated Poss possession Meth methamphetamine DUI driving under the in uence DWLSR driving while license suspended or revoked FTA failure to appear FTR failure to register SF sentenced felony SM sentenced misdemeanor LEO law enforcement of cer DV Domestic Violence The following arrests were made beginning Aug. 26 through Aug. 30, 2012. Aug. 26 Busbee, Christopher Steven; Male; 33; 5578 Allie Rae St., Milton; Burglary Dwelling, Structure or Conveyance Armed; Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense; Aggravated Assault With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Aggravated Battery Cause Bodily Harm or Disability; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Curnow, Roger Thomas; Male; 58; 7820 Parkwood Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Davenport III, Robert Elmo; Male; 30; 6580 Baxley Rd., Milton; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Vehicle Theft Grand Theft of Motor Vehicle; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. DeMott, Jeremy Adam; Male; 20; 5914 Congress St., Gulf Breeze; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Juan Doe 12-5169 (AKA Daniel Aguilar); Male; 32; 3129 Constitution St., Navarre; Aggravated Assault With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Aggravated Battery Person Uses a Deadly Weapon. Economy, Lauren Nicole; Female; 25; 2500 Trailwood Dr., Cantonment, Fla.; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use. Flowers, Myron Eugene; Male; 37; 761 Piney Lane, Cantonment, Fla.; Hit and Run Leave Scene of Crash Involving Damage to Property; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Third of Subsequent Offense. Garner, Christian Marcel; Male; 33; 5603 Shell Rd., Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria (2 counts). Jordan, Thornton Zachary; Male; 50; 4335 Oak Lane, Milton; Aggravated Assault (DV) With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence. King, Benjamin Wayne; Male; 33; 108 Oak Park Dr., Columbia, Tenn.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. McMillan, Vance Auris; Male; 29; 1810 West Cervantes St., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Moody, Courtney Danielle; Female; 24; 5017 Neal Jones Rd., Jay; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000 (2 counts). Peaden, Derrick Lynn; Male; 35; 4337 Sunshine Park Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria (2 counts). President III, Charles Michael; Male; 19; 1592 N. Highway 52, Monks Corner, S.C.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/ Juvenile Non Criteria. Sagona, Michael Louis; Male; 26; 218 Black n Cove, Slidell, La.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Vowell, Jr., Rocky Lee; Male; 27; 9853 Bridlewood Rd., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended First Offense; Pass Counterfeited Bank Bill, Check, Draft, or Note; Obstruct Police Divulge Police Radio Info to Aiud Suspect; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession and or Use. Wallace, Richard Phillip; Male; 33; 6896 Kapoc Dr., Badgad, Fla.; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Making False Report of Commission of Crime. Hendler, Clayton Lee Wayne; Male; 13; 3115 Woods Way, Gulf Breeze; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed (14 counts); Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense (2 counts); Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000 (9 counts); Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Stockstill, Robert Dell; Male; 27; 4134 Railroad St., Pace; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Fail to Register Motor Vehicle; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Neeley, Rose Ann; Female; 42; 7790 Rube Pace Rd., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Ellis, Edwina Latice; Female; 30; 6746 Jackson Lane, Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. LaPointe, Deborah Lynn; Female; 51; 6335 Heronwalk Dr., Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Pinella, Kiara; Female; 21; 3211 Logan Dr., Pensacola; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Rollins, Paul Allen; Male; 60; 3991 Bay Point Dr., Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Aug. 29 Barnett, Ronald Bruce; Male; 52; 1258 Summit Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation Within 10 Years; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Carrying Concealed Weapon Firearm. Broxson, Taylor Haskell; Male; 31; 8444 Rynes Circle, Navarre; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Harmon, Kelly Susan; Female; 46; 8783 John Hamm Rd., Milton; Battery (DV) On Person 65 Years of Age or Older. Hatcher Jr., Anthony Dwayne; Male; 27; 1375 Rainbow Ave., Pensacola; Burglary Unoccupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300; Dealing In Stolen Property (3 counts); Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Marshall, Shantel Patricia; Female; 24; 1068 Trammel St., Pensacola; Larceny Retail Theft $300 More Cordinate Others. Oxner, Joshua Dewayne; Male; 27; 7459 Westgate Dr., Milton; Battery (DV) Commit Domestic Battery by Strangulation. Preston, Daniel; Male; 37; 7819 NW228th St. (Union Correctional Institute), Raiford, Fla.; Lewd Lascivious Behavior Commit Sex Act in Presence of Correctional Facility Employee. Willey III, John Robert; Male; 21; 1543 Cypress Bend Trail, Gulf Breeze; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Wu, Guoqing; Male; 48; 3131 Bernath Drive, Milton; Conditional Release Violation Pre Trial Release Condition Violation for Domestic Violation; Obstructing Justice Intimidate, Threaten, Etc., a Victim, Witness, or Informant; Obstructing Justice (DV) Retaliate Against Informant, Victim, or Witness Without Injury. Moore, Kirk Treandas; Male; 18; 6682 Brock Ave., Milton; Resist Of cer Flee Elude LEO with Lights or Siren Activated; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence. Tyson, Mark Anthony; Male; 22; 1520 Kyle Dr., Pensacola; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Baker, John Kendall; Male; 44; 9400 Biloxi Springs Rd., Biloxi Springs, Miss.; Traf c Offense Refuse to Submit to DUI test After License Suspended; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation in More Than 10 Years. Barnett, Ronald Bruce; Male; 52; 1258 Summit Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Vioaltion Within 10 Years. Ingram, Robert David; Male; 45; 5944 Highway 18, Montevallo, Ala.; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Breland Jr., George Terry; Male; 45; 1300 Liahona Trial, McDavid, Fla.; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Burgess, Robert Paul; Male; 32; 5769 Eagle Dr., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Hardy, Robert William Cleveland; Male; 35; 6461 Walnut St., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Jasperson, Gordon Lynn; Male; 69; 1142 Laguna Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Aug. 30 Day, Anthony Thomas; Male; 47; 5732 Berry St., Milton; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Larceny of Credit Card; Fraud Illegal Use of Credit Cards Use More Than Two Times in Six Months to Obtain Goods, Money $100 or More. Goggin, Joshua Steven; Male; 33; 6951 Sash Pine Rd., Pensacola; Cocaine Possession. Locke, Shawna Denee; Female; 43; 5391 Nagel Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/ Juvenile Non Criteria. McLean, Daniel Lee; Male; 59; 7999 Red Dr., Milton; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Fail to Register Motor Vehicle; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Attach Registration License Plate Not Assigned (2 counts); Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Waldrop, Jimmy Thomas; Male; 35; 4440 Sleepy Hammock Dr., Milton; Aggravated Assault (DV) With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Cruelty Toward Child Act That Could Result in Physical or Mental Injury. Weishuhn, Joseph Lee; Male; 32; 4207 Burbank Dr., Milton; Drug Possession Listed Chemical for Manufacture of Controlled Substance. Burley, Charles Fredrick; Male; 18; 1840 Mercy Lane, Milton; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Thomas, Patricia Lakeisha; Female; 28; 7001 Redondo Dr., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Gun Show September 15th & 16th Fort Walton Beach Fort Walton Beach Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2088404 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING or News Tips WELCOMED E-mail IDEAS to: news@srpressgazette.com Call 623-2120 Sheriffs REPORT SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE

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Local B4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Milton Bass Quickburger Krystal's Firehouse Subs Ace's Ciscos Hardees Big T Momma's Place Walgreens CVS Santa Rosa County Offices McDonalds Dollar General (Milton) Big Lots Raceway K Mart Tom Thumb (Avalon) Tom Thumb (Mulat) McDonalds (Avalon) Circle K (I10) Redroof Inn Tom Thumb (I10) BP(Hwy 90) Milton Bakery Pic N Sav Whataburger Circle K (Stewart) Dollar General (Stewart) Milton Mini Mart Tom Thumb (Hwy 87N) Circle K (Dogwood) Tom Thumb (Willard) The Other Place Dollar General (Dogwood) Winn Dixie (Milton) Coin Laundry Smoke House Milton Continued Smoke House Tom Thumb (Dogwood) Naval Housing Santa Rosa Medical Center Rx Express Tom Thumb (Glover) Red Barn J & J of N.W. Fl. Bagdad Dollar General (Bagdad) Tom Thumb (Bagdad) Circle K (Bagdad) East Milton Tom Thumb (Hwy 87S) BP(Hwy 87S) Grocery Store Dollar General (E. Milton) Local Yokel Tom Thumb (Wardbasin) Pace Tom Thumb (Bell) CiCi's pizza Murphy's Express Ryan's Whataburger (Pace) Walmart (west reg 1&3) Walmart (east reg 35&33) Village Inn Publix Tom Thumb (Hwy 90) La Fiesta Dollar General (Pace) Santa Rosa County Tax Office Winn Dixie (Pace) Pace Continued Hardee's (Pace) Korner Kwik Grocery Outlet (east entrance) Grocery Outlet (west entrance) Walgreen's Circle K (Hwy 90) CVS Sacred Heart McDonalds (Woodbine) Tom Thumb (Woodbine) Circle K (Woodbine) Tom Thumb (5Pts) Dollar General (Berryhill) Tom Thumb (5Pts) Jay/Berrydale Expressit (Jay) Whataburger (5Pts) Greer's Dollar General Farmer's Country Market Berrydale Kwik Mart Munson Ruth's Munson Store Short Stop Pensacola Tom Thumb (Scenic)

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Local B2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Special to the Press Gazette For children who have experienced abuse or ne glect, a pair of brand new pajamas can bring a little comfort to what often is a frightening and confusing situation. So for the fourth con secutive year, Families First Network of Lakeview is conducting a campaign to collect new, unworn pajamas for children un der its supervision. The Tucking Kids in Safe and Sound pajama drive. The pajamas will be dis tributed to children during the holiday season. Collection boxes for pa jama donations will be at all FamiliesFirst service centers and placed at vari ous locations throughout Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton counties. Needed are new pajamas in infant through adult sizes, which are for larger children. FamiliesFirst Network is responsible for the safe ty, stability and well-being of abused and neglected children in Northwest Florida. Under a contract with the state of Florida, FamiliesFirst provides foster care and related services for children who cannot safely remain with their families. The drive ends Oct. 13. To learn more, contact FamiliesFirst Networks foster home development staff by calling 453-7766. Milton Rotary President Bubba Drinkard presents the ever sought Rotary pen to Robin Punkyo and Greg Brown. The Club received an update on what is going on with Gulf Power from Mrs. Punkyo and an overview of some of the amendments that will be voted on in November in the state of Florida. The Milton Rotary Club meets each Tuesday at Red Barn Bar-B-Que at noon and we invite you to join us.SUBMITTED PHOTO S Campaign seeks pajamas for abused, neglected children ROTARY HONORS SPEAKERS Milton Rotary President Bubba Drinkard is seen presenting the world famous Rotary pen to Martha Zimmerman and Jenea Highll of the Santa Rosa Health Department. They told the club about the Healthy Start Program and how the program works along with how many people are helped each year with the program. For more information please contact Martha or Jenea at the Santa Rosa County Health Department. FamiliesFirst Network of Lakeview is conducting a campaign to collect new, unworn pajamas for children under its supervision. The Tucking Kids in Safe and Sound pajama drive.

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B3 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 KEY MVOP misdemeanor violation of probation FVOP felony violation of probation Agg aggravated Poss possession Meth methamphetamine DUI driving under the in uence DWLSR driving while license suspended or revoked FTA failure to appear FTR failure to register SF sentenced felony SM sentenced misdemeanor LEO law enforcement of cer DV Domestic Violence The following arrests were made beginning Aug. 26 through Aug. 30, 2012. Aug. 26 Busbee, Christopher Steven; Male; 33; 5578 Allie Rae St., Milton; Burglary Dwelling, Structure or Conveyance Armed; Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense; Aggravated Assault With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Aggravated Battery Cause Bodily Harm or Disability; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Curnow, Roger Thomas; Male; 58; 7820 Parkwood Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Davenport III, Robert Elmo; Male; 30; 6580 Baxley Rd., Milton; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Vehicle Theft Grand Theft of Motor Vehicle; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. DeMott, Jeremy Adam; Male; 20; 5914 Congress St., Gulf Breeze; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Juan Doe 12-5169 (AKA Daniel Aguilar); Male; 32; 3129 Constitution St., Navarre; Aggravated Assault With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Aggravated Battery Person Uses a Deadly Weapon. Economy, Lauren Nicole; Female; 25; 2500 Trailwood Dr., Cantonment, Fla.; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use. Flowers, Myron Eugene; Male; 37; 761 Piney Lane, Cantonment, Fla.; Hit and Run Leave Scene of Crash Involving Damage to Property; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Third of Subsequent Offense. Garner, Christian Marcel; Male; 33; 5603 Shell Rd., Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria (2 counts). Jordan, Thornton Zachary; Male; 50; 4335 Oak Lane, Milton; Aggravated Assault (DV) With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence. King, Benjamin Wayne; Male; 33; 108 Oak Park Dr., Columbia, Tenn.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. McMillan, Vance Auris; Male; 29; 1810 West Cervantes St., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Moody, Courtney Danielle; Female; 24; 5017 Neal Jones Rd., Jay; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000 (2 counts). Peaden, Derrick Lynn; Male; 35; 4337 Sunshine Park Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria (2 counts). President III, Charles Michael; Male; 19; 1592 N. Highway 52, Monks Corner, S.C.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/ Juvenile Non Criteria. Sagona, Michael Louis; Male; 26; 218 Black n Cove, Slidell, La.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Vowell, Jr., Rocky Lee; Male; 27; 9853 Bridlewood Rd., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended First Offense; Pass Counterfeited Bank Bill, Check, Draft, or Note; Obstruct Police Divulge Police Radio Info to Aiud Suspect; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession and or Use. Wallace, Richard Phillip; Male; 33; 6896 Kapoc Dr., Badgad, Fla.; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Making False Report of Commission of Crime. Hendler, Clayton Lee Wayne; Male; 13; 3115 Woods Way, Gulf Breeze; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed (14 counts); Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense (2 counts); Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000 (9 counts); Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Stockstill, Robert Dell; Male; 27; 4134 Railroad St., Pace; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Fail to Register Motor Vehicle; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Neeley, Rose Ann; Female; 42; 7790 Rube Pace Rd., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Ellis, Edwina Latice; Female; 30; 6746 Jackson Lane, Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. LaPointe, Deborah Lynn; Female; 51; 6335 Heronwalk Dr., Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Pinella, Kiara; Female; 21; 3211 Logan Dr., Pensacola; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Rollins, Paul Allen; Male; 60; 3991 Bay Point Dr., Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Aug. 29 Barnett, Ronald Bruce; Male; 52; 1258 Summit Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation Within 10 Years; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Carrying Concealed Weapon Firearm. Broxson, Taylor Haskell; Male; 31; 8444 Rynes Circle, Navarre; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Harmon, Kelly Susan; Female; 46; 8783 John Hamm Rd., Milton; Battery (DV) On Person 65 Years of Age or Older. Hatcher Jr., Anthony Dwayne; Male; 27; 1375 Rainbow Ave., Pensacola; Burglary Unoccupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300; Dealing In Stolen Property (3 counts); Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Marshall, Shantel Patricia; Female; 24; 1068 Trammel St., Pensacola; Larceny Retail Theft $300 More Cordinate Others. Oxner, Joshua Dewayne; Male; 27; 7459 Westgate Dr., Milton; Battery (DV) Commit Domestic Battery by Strangulation. Preston, Daniel; Male; 37; 7819 NW228th St. (Union Correctional Institute), Raiford, Fla.; Lewd Lascivious Behavior Commit Sex Act in Presence of Correctional Facility Employee. Willey III, John Robert; Male; 21; 1543 Cypress Bend Trail, Gulf Breeze; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Wu, Guoqing; Male; 48; 3131 Bernath Drive, Milton; Conditional Release Violation Pre Trial Release Condition Violation for Domestic Violation; Obstructing Justice Intimidate, Threaten, Etc., a Victim, Witness, or Informant; Obstructing Justice (DV) Retaliate Against Informant, Victim, or Witness Without Injury. Moore, Kirk Treandas; Male; 18; 6682 Brock Ave., Milton; Resist Of cer Flee Elude LEO with Lights or Siren Activated; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence. Tyson, Mark Anthony; Male; 22; 1520 Kyle Dr., Pensacola; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Baker, John Kendall; Male; 44; 9400 Biloxi Springs Rd., Biloxi Springs, Miss.; Traf c Offense Refuse to Submit to DUI test After License Suspended; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation in More Than 10 Years. Barnett, Ronald Bruce; Male; 52; 1258 Summit Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Vioaltion Within 10 Years. Ingram, Robert David; Male; 45; 5944 Highway 18, Montevallo, Ala.; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Breland Jr., George Terry; Male; 45; 1300 Liahona Trial, McDavid, Fla.; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Burgess, Robert Paul; Male; 32; 5769 Eagle Dr., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Hardy, Robert William Cleveland; Male; 35; 6461 Walnut St., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Jasperson, Gordon Lynn; Male; 69; 1142 Laguna Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Aug. 30 Day, Anthony Thomas; Male; 47; 5732 Berry St., Milton; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Larceny of Credit Card; Fraud Illegal Use of Credit Cards Use More Than Two Times in Six Months to Obtain Goods, Money $100 or More. Goggin, Joshua Steven; Male; 33; 6951 Sash Pine Rd., Pensacola; Cocaine Possession. Locke, Shawna Denee; Female; 43; 5391 Nagel Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/ Juvenile Non Criteria. McLean, Daniel Lee; Male; 59; 7999 Red Dr., Milton; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Fail to Register Motor Vehicle; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Attach Registration License Plate Not Assigned (2 counts); Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Waldrop, Jimmy Thomas; Male; 35; 4440 Sleepy Hammock Dr., Milton; Aggravated Assault (DV) With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Cruelty Toward Child Act That Could Result in Physical or Mental Injury. Weishuhn, Joseph Lee; Male; 32; 4207 Burbank Dr., Milton; Drug Possession Listed Chemical for Manufacture of Controlled Substance. Burley, Charles Fredrick; Male; 18; 1840 Mercy Lane, Milton; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Thomas, Patricia Lakeisha; Female; 28; 7001 Redondo Dr., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Gun Show September 15th & 16th Fort Walton Beach Fort Walton Beach Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2088404 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING or News Tips WELCOMED E-mail IDEAS to: news@srpressgazette.com Call 623-2120 Sheriffs REPORT SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE

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Local B4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Milton Bass Quickburger Krystal's Firehouse Subs Ace's Ciscos Hardees Big T Momma's Place Walgreens CVS Santa Rosa County Offices McDonalds Dollar General (Milton) Big Lots Raceway K Mart Tom Thumb (Avalon) Tom Thumb (Mulat) McDonalds (Avalon) Circle K (I10) Redroof Inn Tom Thumb (I10) BP(Hwy 90) Milton Bakery Pic N Sav Whataburger Circle K (Stewart) Dollar General (Stewart) Milton Mini Mart Tom Thumb (Hwy 87N) Circle K (Dogwood) Tom Thumb (Willard) The Other Place Dollar General (Dogwood) Winn Dixie (Milton) Coin Laundry Smoke House Milton Continued Smoke House Tom Thumb (Dogwood) Naval Housing Santa Rosa Medical Center Rx Express Tom Thumb (Glover) Red Barn J & J of N.W. Fl. Bagdad Dollar General (Bagdad) Tom Thumb (Bagdad) Circle K (Bagdad) East Milton Tom Thumb (Hwy 87S) BP(Hwy 87S) Grocery Store Dollar General (E. Milton) Local Yokel Tom Thumb (Wardbasin) Pace Tom Thumb (Bell) CiCi's pizza Murphy's Express Ryan's Whataburger (Pace) Walmart (west reg 1&3) Walmart (east reg 35&33) Village Inn Publix Tom Thumb (Hwy 90) La Fiesta Dollar General (Pace) Santa Rosa County Tax Office Winn Dixie (Pace) Pace Continued Hardee's (Pace) Korner Kwik Grocery Outlet (east entrance) Grocery Outlet (west entrance) Walgreen's Circle K (Hwy 90) CVS Sacred Heart McDonalds (Woodbine) Tom Thumb (Woodbine) Circle K (Woodbine) Tom Thumb (5Pts) Dollar General (Berryhill) Tom Thumb (5Pts) Jay/Berrydale Expressit (Jay) Whataburger (5Pts) Greer's Dollar General Farmer's Country Market Berrydale Kwik Mart Munson Ruth's Munson Store Short Stop Pensacola Tom Thumb (Scenic)

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B5 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 City of M ilton meetings Miltons public safety committee will meet Sept. 18 at 9 a.m. in conference room B at Milton City Hall. Miltons city council will meet in reconvened session Sept. 20 at 5:01 p.m. in the council chambers at Milton City Hall to adopt the citys budget and millage rate for the upcoming scal year. Miltons parks and recreation committee will meet Sept. 24 at 8:30 a.m. in conference room B at Milton City Hall. Miltons public works committee will meet Sept. 27 at 8 a.m. in conference room B at Milton City Hall. For more information, call the city managers ofce at 983-5411. All meetings are open to the public.Jay H istorical Society meeting The Jay Historical Society will meet Thursday from 6:30 8 p.m. at the museum in downtown Jay. The guest speaker will be Vic Campbell, a local author and historian. Campbell is currently researching local history and has lots to share with us. He is from Chumuckla and authored history books about our area. Mr. Jim Campbell will hopefully be with us at the meeting also. Mr. Jim has spent many hours researching Santa Rosa County cemeteries and can answer questions regarding topics such as where the cemeteries are located and has lists of tombstones and military markings.N ewcomer Club meeting Newcomers Club of Greater Pensacola meets monthly on the second Wednesday of the month at 9 a.m. at the Pensacola Yacht Club; games, luncheon/meeting cost $14. Newcomers is open to all women who have resided in Pensacola two years or less. Monthly activities include: Book Club, Bridge, Bunco, Bowling, Chefs night out, to name a few. Please call 530-3926 or email vzubke@yahoo.com for more details.M orning Glory meeting The Morning Glory Circle of the Milton Garden Club, Inc. will hold their next monthly meeting Sept. 13 at 9:30 a.m. at 5256 Alabama Street. It is their rst meeting with their new ofcers and they are looking forward to a great year with a lot of interesting programs. The September program will be Trees of Northwest Florida by a member of the Santa Rosa Forestry Service. For additional information please call 675-6744.K iwanis P ancake B reakfast The Kiwanis Club of Milton is having its Annual Pancake Breakfast on Sept. 15 from 8 10 a.m. at Ollies Neighborhood Grille on Hwy. 90 in Milton. The breakfast will include pancakes, sausage, coffee, milk and orange juice for a $6 donation. The funds raised are to benet childrens charitable projects in Santa Rosa County. For tickets or additional information please call 686-2176.P urple H eart meeting Chapter/Unit 566 Military Order of the Purple Heart will hold its meeting on Saturday, Sept. 15 at 11 a.m. at 5300 Hwy. 90 West in Pace. This is the West Milton Church of Christ. A guest speaker from Pensacola Veterans Park will join us and a meal will be served after the meeting for a donation. All Purple Heart recipients and their spouses are encouraged to attend. For more information please call 994-3880.E ast M ilton P ark P layground P roject meeting There will be a meeting Sept. 16 at 4 p.m. at the East Milton Park Gym as groups are looking to make improvements to East Milton Park with new playground and a possible splash park. The town hall meeting is planned to see how many are serious about the issue before bringing it up to Santa Rosa County Commissioner Bob Cole. For any question or concerns call 797-6733. S R C REA resumes meetings The Santa Rosa County Retired Educators will meet Sept. 17 at 9:45 a.m. in the Russell Center on the campus of Locklin Technical Center. There will be a reception at this time honoring the newly retired educators. All are encouraged to attend. The book sale will continue as last year. Bring books to donate for the sale as well as buy some new ones to read. For more information call 623-6250.Santa R osa D emocrats P ot Luck Santa Rosa County Democrats will hold a Pot Luck Dinner Meeting on Sept. 18, at the United Way Building, 6576 Caroline St., in Milton (next to McDonalds). The dinner will begin at 6:00 p.m. and the program at 6:45 p.m. All attendees will have the opportunity to participate in the open-mike program to address any issues of concern. Members of the public are invited to attend. For additional information, call 936-8704.Libertarian P arty of O kaloosa County The Libertarian Party of Okaloosa County will hold its monthly meeting Sept. 19 at 7 p.m., in the Beef OBradys Restaurant, 2509 South Ferndon Blvd. in Crestview. For more information call 217-6590.Steps for A utism Autism Pensacolas Steps for Autism is a family-friendly autism awareness event that will raise funds for autism safety initiatives in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. Steps for Autism will be held Sept. 22. Currently, Autism Pensacola is seeking sponsors, team leaders and volunteers to plan this event. The next planning meeting will be held on July 24, at 6 p.m. in the API ofce, 3916 N. 10th Avenue, Pensacola. Join us and make a difference! Local N onP rots P artner for H eritage T our Arcadia Mill Archaeological Site, the Santa Rosa Historical Society, the West Florida Railroad Museum, and the Bagdad Village Preservation Association have partnered together to offer a unique cultural experience to our local community. The Milton Heritage Tour will be a progressive excursion that will delve into Miltons diversied history and culture. The tour will be held on Sept. 29, and stops will include Arcadia Mill Archaeological Site, the West Florida Railroad Museum, the Imogene Theater, and the Bagdad Village Preservation Association Museum. The outing will begin at 9 a.m. with a tour of Arcadia Mill, located at 5709 Mill Pond Lane, Milton, FL 32583. The tour will then proceed to the West Florida Railroad Museum for a tour and lunch in the Globe Coffee House L & N dining car. After lunch, the tour will move to the Imogene Theater, the Bagdad Village Preservation Association Museum and it will conclude at Arcadia Mill. Transportation and a boxed lunch are included in the price of $20 per person. Tickets will be available for purchase until Sept. 17. To purchase tickets or for more information call 6263084, ext. 102.A rtfest invitation The Santa Rosa Arts Association Inc. will be hosting Artfest on Sept. 29 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Santa Rosa County Auditorium. Artfest will feature original art and crafts by gulf coast artists. There will be door prizes, music, and live demonstrations throughout the day. Hot food and baked goods will also be available. Line dance classes The Santa Rosa Community School will start line dance classes. This 13-week session will be at Hobbs Middle School on Glover Lane in Milton. Beginner classes will begin at 6 p.m. with an intermediate classes starting at 7:15 p.m. You dont need a partner to participate and everyone is welcome. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. For more information call 723-4052 or 623-4235. Constitution and Coffee The Constitution and Coffee group will meet each Saturday at 7 a.m. at the Coffee Break on Woodbine Rd. in Pace. All are welcome to come and listen or participate in the discussion of our federal constitution and the current events that impact our lives. Meetings last about an hour and are very informal. For more information call 981-1536.M ilton class of 1962 reunion The Milton Class of 1962 would like to invite its classmates from 1961 and 1963 to join us in a celebration of the 50th anniversary of graduation. A festive weekend of fun activities is planned for Oct. 12-13. Planned activities include attending the MHS homecoming football game against Gulf Breeze on Oct. 12, touring Milton High School and the city and a bar-b-que dinner and social gathering on Oct. 13. Register as soon as possible to ensure you will be able to reconnect with all of your old friends and meet new ones. Call 6233344 or email teammhs62@ att.net for more details and registration procedures.T ri-County Community Council changes hours The Tri-County Community Council, Inc., Services Department on Elva St. in Milton will now be closed on Fridays. Ofce hours will remain 8 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday Thursday. Low income home energy assistance applications will continue to be taken on Mondays. All other services to low income families will be provided Tuesday Thursday. For more information contact the ofce at 981-0036.R epublican H eadquarters in need of volunteers The Santa Rosa County Republican Executive Committee announces the opening of its Campaign Headquarters at 5211 Highway 90 in Pace. The ofce is directly in front of McCombs Electric and the phone number is 626-2150. Kay Addison, Santa Rosa County Republican Executive Committee Chair, invites all Republican candidates to utilize the ofce space for their campaign. Ofce hours are 10 a.m. 4 p.m. daily and volunteers are needed in the ofce.A ddiction help meetings The Most Excellent Way support group for people seeking help overcoming alcohol, drugs and other addictive behaviors meets every Friday night at 7 p.m. at East Side Baptist Church, 4884 Ward Basin Road. For more information on this meeting and other area meetings, call 626.1481. Volunteer advocates needed Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of dedicated advocates who protect the rights of elders who live in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. The programs local councils are seeking additional volunteers to identify, investigate and resolve residents concerns. Special training and certication is provided. Anyone interested in protecting the health, safety, welfare and rights of long-term care facility residents who often have no one else to advocate for them can call toll-free 888-831-0404 or visit http:// ombudsman.myorida.com. News BRIEFS

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ClassifiedsB6| Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! References Available 850-995-0009 Professional house cleaner. 15 years experience. References available. 850-418-0411 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 COKER’S LAWN & TRACTOR SERVICE From trimming to tractor work. Clean-ups, raking, hauling, mowing, bushhogging, dirt work. Reasonable rates, free estimates. (850) 623-0493 (850) 485-7977 Licensed & Insured Stewart’s Tractor Works & Land Clearing, Inc. Tree & Stump Removal from trimming to takedown. Debris removal & Storm Clean-Up. Demolition & Hauling. Land Clearing. Backhoe & Trackhoe Work. Heavy Brush & Forestry Mowing. Tree work done by man lift. 516-1801 or 675-4291 Licensed & Insured Free Estimates PAUL STEWART 9/970 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NUMBER: 2012-CP-247 IN RE: ESTATE OF BARBARA ELLEN WHITTAKER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Barbara Ellen Whittaker, deceased, whose date of death was May 26, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Santa Rosa County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Santa Rosa County Courthouse, 6865 Caroline Street, Milton, Fl 32570. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedent’s Estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedent’s Estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. 9/966 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12000199CPMXAX IN RE: ESTATE OF JASMINE CELESTE WUESTHOFF, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JASMINE CELESTE WUESTHOFF, deceased, whose date of death was April 25, 2012, File Number 12000199CP MXAX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Santa Rosa County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P. O. Box 472, Milton, Florida 32572. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: September 5, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/ ERIC W. WUESTHOFF Eric W. Wuesthoff 5603 Windrun Place Milton, Florida 32571 (850) 313-1485 Attorney/Registed Agent: /s/ TYLER L. GRAY Tyler L. Gray Florida Bar No. 0059738 Law Offices of Jeremiah J. Talbott, P.A. 900 East Moreno Street Pensacola, Florida 32503 (850)437-9600/(850)437-0 906 (fax) 09/05 & 09/12 9/966

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ClassifiedsWednesday, September 12, 2012 Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette |B7 ALLIED FARMSWe Deliver & Install Call us first, Save Time Call us last, Save MoneyHwy. 87 So. Milton626-85788600311 HYDROSEED Centipede St. Augustine BermudaBailed Pine Straw FREE RENT IN EXCHANGE FOR MOBILE HOME REPAIRS. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch. Call 626-8973 Navarre, 1.5br, 1bath. No pets. One mile from WalMart, Carport/Deck $475/mo 850-651-8185 Small, 2 bedroom mobile home. Ideal for single or couple. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch 626-8973 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $16,800, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 Suzi 2009 has 400 Miles -Like New w/ Helmet $10,000 Call 994-4187 16 ft Boston Whaler Dauntless, Shorland’r Trailer 90 HP Johnson Motor Bimini Top, 2000 yr Model excellent Condition $10k 623-1127 SURROGATE MOMS NEEDED! Most generous compensation and benefits program offered anywhere, starting at $25,000. Healthy, non-smoking, 21-39, prior birth without complications, no criminal background. Confidential, compassionate services. Reasonable expenses will be paid. OpenArmsConsultants.co m Training/EducationWant to be a CNA?Don’t want to wait? Express Training Services now offering our nursing asst. exam prep classes in DESTIN Class for 1 week. 850-502-5521 Military Spouses We Are mycaa certifiedexpresstraining services.com Next class 9/10/2012 3 br 1 ba brick home. Lg den, utility room,, front screened porch, lg fenced yard $825 mth $600 deposit. 4508 Elmtree 438-1660. 2 Br/2 Ba Beautiful bathroom with garden tub. Total Elec. Spacious kitchen. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch 850-626-8973 2BR 2 Bath Private Lot Galt City Road $500 month Rent $350 Deposit. Non Smoking environment. No pets Call 572-2477 FEMA 3 br/1 ba total electric. Some allow small pets, some fenced yards, some dishwashers, some icemakers. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch. 623-8973 ATTENTION: Drivers! Drive 4 Us Top Pay & CSA Friendly Equip 401K & Great Insurance Need CDL Class A Driving Exp (877) 258-8782 Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877) 882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Drivers -Daily or Weekly Pay! $0.01 raise per mile after 6 months. Refigerated & Dry Van Freight. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. (800) 414-95-69. www.driveknight.com Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase / Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated Class A-CDL 1yr. Exp. In last 3 Call (800) 695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com DRIVERS/ CLASS A Flatbed, GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39¢/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800) 5725489x 227, SunBelt Transport EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Medical Billing Training! Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placemnet assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888) 872-4677 MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placemnet assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www.centuraonline.com Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. Promotional prices start at $19.99 a month for DISH for 12 months. Call Today and ask about Next Day installation. (800) 407-7851 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964 Exp. cleaning person needed. Must have own vehicle. to drive to jobs. Must be avail. Mon.-Fri.. Non-smoking environment. Background check required 994-1785 Logistics/TransportExperienced CDL-A DriversJoin Our Dedicated Fleet of Professional Drivers TODAY in the Pensacola, FL Area. -Odometer Mileage Pay ($50,000 plus per year) Dedicated Product Out & Back Stop & Detention Pay Home WeeklyTypically 48 Hrs. Premium-Free Family Health insurance MUST HAVE Minimum of 2 Yrs. Verifiable Tractor/Trailer Exp. J & M Company Call Neal or Bill 800.477.6555 M-F, 7am-5pm Web ID#: 34222647 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Online Training with SC Train gets you job ready ASAP! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed. (888) 212-5888 Couch & Love Seat, Brand New $1,000 Tan color. Call 623-1127 GUN SHOW Fort WaltonFAIRGROUNDS September 15th & 16th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL23330 to 56654 Curtis Penton Farms & Berrydale Farmer Mkt. OKRA Eggplants, tomatoes & hot peppers. We accept Wic Wholesale and retail (850) 675-4111 4 Piece, Red American Tourister Luggage $75, Swivel office chair, black $25, Rotary lawn mower $20, Wrought iron outdoor stair rail 63” X 17” $30 & Quilters lamp with magnifying glass $35. Ph (850) 626-2023 For Sale NEW Briggs & Stratton Portable Generator. 5550 watts, 8550 starting watts. $500. 623-5644 Looking for 1954 and 1955 Milton High School yearbooks. Call 623-9016 Cotton & Associates ESTATE SALE Sep 13-14-15 (8-3) 6274 Robin Hood Rd, Milton (turn on Maid Marion Rd. at SR Co. Extension Office) Contents of home and large detached garage -Furniture, glass & porcelain, jewelry, coins, books, and book cases, record albums, Barbies, TVs, appliances, camera equipment, Kindle, computers, John Wayne prints, Johnson Pacific floorsafe, gas grill, chain hoist and garage shop tools, motor cycle stand, plumbing supplies, file cabinets, Garrnin, va’rious electronics, Play Station games, Heywood Wakefield desk, mountain bikes, electric organ, ‘06 Mustang GT*(29K miles), ‘95 Suburban* (104K miles) and much more. *Automobiles are subject to prior sale. See details, photos & map link www CottonAuctionsAppraisal s.com 9/991 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON October 3, 2012 at 11:00 AM UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit: 509 Michael Brown: small shop vac, extension cords, propane gas bottle, Misc. STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 9/12 & 9/19 9/991 Turn your art into cash! FREE ART APPAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Sept 15 & 16. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 international Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, Fl 32819. Call 1-866-537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignmnets taken based on consideration. 9/990 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 09001238CAMXAX WELLS FARGO BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. SCOTT A. NEAL, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORE CL OSURE SALE (Publish in Santa Rosa Press Gazette ) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 09001238CAMXAX of the Circuit Court of the 1st Judicial Circuit in and for Santa Rosa County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK., Plaintiff and SCOTT A, NEAL, Defendant, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Santa Rosa Courthouse 6865 Carolina.St. Milton, FL 32572, at the hour of 11 a.m. Central on the 3 day of October, 2012, the following property: LOT 137, BLOCK B, LIGHTHOUSE POINTEE UNIT III, BEING A PORTION OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 27 WEST, SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK G, PAGE 55, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 31 day of August, 2012. CIRCUIT COURT SEAL CLERK OF THE COURT MARY M. JOHNSON By: Mary English As Deputy Clerk Publish in Santa Rosa Press Gazette Submitted by: Kelley & Fulton, P. A., 1665 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. Suite 1000, West Palm Beach FL 33401 IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sheila Sims, Chief Deputy Court Administrator. Office of Court Administration at (850) 595-4400 at the M. C. Blanchard Judicial Center, 5th Floor, Pensacola FL 32502 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 9/12 & 9/19 9/990 9/986 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of “Boomerang Antiques and More” located 5227 Willing Street in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 5th day of Sept, 2012. NAME OF OWNER Booerang USA Inc. 9/12 & 9/15 9/986 ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO(2)YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 5, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: Dan Stewart-Atty for Sandy Milburn Florida Bar Number 319392 4519 Hwy. 90,Pace, Fl 32571-2043 Telephone: (850) 994-4887; Fax: (850) 994-4541 Personal Repre sentative: SANDY MILBURN, 113 Bear Drive, Gulf Breeze, Fl 32561 9/5 & 9/12 9/970

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Local B8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE 850-995-8778 Sparkle Towels 4 97 8 roll Castleberry Hot Dog Chili 52 10 oz Lipton Tea Bags 1 53 24 ct Sunshine Cheez-Its 1 93 7 oz Delmonte Ketchup 1 12 24 oz Sale Good Through September 5-11, 2012 California Juicy Sweet Large Plums 1 00 lb Faygo Drinks 2 56 12 12oz cans Blue Bunny Ice Cream 2 77 56 oz Libby Green Beans, Gold Corn or Sweet Peas 52 15 oz Tampico Fruit Drinks 1 65 gal Zeigler Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna 1 64 16 oz Ball Park Jumbo Franks 1 65 lb Hillshire Farm Ultra Thin Ham or Turkey 2 45 9 oz Farmland Reg, Black Pepper or Applewood Bacon 4 80 24 oz Hillshire Farm Smoked Pork or Kielbasa Sausage 2 11 14 oz Bar S 4x6 Cooked Ham 1 78 16 oz Blackwell Angus Eye-O-Round Roast 2 83 lb Blackwell Angus Boneless Chuck Steaks Family Pack 2 93 lb Fresh Fryer Jumbo Pack Drumsticks or Thighs 1 06 lb Farmland Family Pack Sliced Boneless Pork Chops 2 48 lb California Sweet Large Fresh Peaches 1 12 lb Butterball Sliced Turkey Bacon 2 23 12 oz Aqua South Catfish Fillets 18 29 4 lb box Dole Russet Baking Potatoes 3 95 20 lb FreshExpress American Salad 2 32 10 oz Vlasic Kosher Dills 1 91 46 oz Sauers Mayonnaise 1 95 32 oz Blackburn Grape Jelly 1 29 32 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Collard, Turnips or Mixed Greens 89 27 oz Van Camp Baked Beans 1 38 28 oz

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CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) If your lunch still consists of a bowl of Campbells tomato soup and a grilled cheese sandwich, chances are you grew up using a typewriter. Generations of Americans have moved on from Campbells condensed chicken noodle and tomato soups in search of heartier varieties with more sophisticated avors. Now, the worlds largest soup company is racing to do the same. Campbell Soup Co. last year began a quest that led executives to a diverse group of cities including Portland, Ore. and London to gure out how to make soups that appeal to younger, nicky customers. In the year ahead, the 143year-old company plans to roll out 50 products such as Moroccan Style Chicken and Spicy Chorizo. The ingredients may surprise those used to a plain bowl of chicken soup: tomatillos, coconut milk and shitake mushrooms. The new soups also wont look like the big, gelatinous chunks that came in the steel cans that built Campbell into an iconic brand. These soups come in plastic pouches that are easy to open and heat up in a microwave in less than three minutes. The remake could be a do-or-die task for Campbell. Overall canned soup consumption is down 13 percent over the past decade, according to the research rm Euromonitor International, as fresh soups have become more widely available at supermarkets and restaurants. And Campbell now has about 53 percent of the market, down from 67 percent a decade earlier. Campbells changes also illustrate how dif cult it is for brands that appeal to older customers to become relevant to Millennials. This group, de ned as those ages 18 to through early 30s, is heavily sought after by companies and marketers. But Millennials have little in common with their parents, whether its their tastes, eating habits or cooking methods. I grew up with salt, pepper and ketchup, said Chuck Vila, who heads Campbells customer insights division, which surveys the marketplace for trends. These guys are playing around with really interesting spices from around the world. George Veszpremy, a 32-year-old music director at a radio station in Boston, has fond memories of his mother sending him to school in the morning with a thermos of Campbells chicken noodle. As a kid, you eat it and its great. It served the purpose at the time, said Veszpremy, noting that the soups were a cheap way for his single mother to give him a quick, comforting meal. But looking back, he said he realizes that the soup wasnt the best quality the noodles were soggy and thin, the chicken pieces were minuscule and there were no vegetables. Veszpremy said his tastes have evolved: He sticks to homemade or the soup bar at the supermarket. HEATING UP SALES Campbell is counting on its new soups to keep its brand relevant. While the company makes other products like Pepperidge Farm baked goods and V8 vegetable juices, soups account for half its revenue. Still, executives remain cautiously optimistic about the fate of the new lineup. When the company reported its quarterly results earlier this week, Campbell executives said they expect sales growth in scal 2013. But that increase is expected to come from Campbells recent acquisition of a premium juice company, not from its soups, broths and sauces unit. In the latest quarter, the Camden, N.J.-based companys pro t increased 27 percent as soup sales rose for the rst time in two years. But that was partly the result of grocers running promotions and stocking up on low inventories as Campbell prepares to raise prices. The company was also up against an easy comparison; in the year-ago period, soup sales had fallen by 9 percent and the results were weighed down by restructuring charges. As for the new products that are expected to be widely available at stores later this month, CEO Denise Morrison said the company should have a better read on how theyll fare after its scal rst quarter. The consumer will let us know if we can be more exuberant, she said. Executives are pushing on in the meantime. When the company embarked on its revival efforts about a year ago, Vila, head of the companys insights division, said they wondered if they had lost an entire generation of consumers. It turned out it wasnt that simple; he said that consumers are still open to giving Campbell another chance, but that its up to the company to deliver. We havent captured them in terms of food, but weve hung onto them, Vila said. They have memories of Campbell. Theyre outdated, but theyre there. SOUPS ON Campbell Soup looks beyond iconic cans FREE FREE Wednesday September 12, 2012 FREE EDITION TAKE ONE Left: New limited edition Campbells tomato soup cans with art and sayings by artist Andy Warhol are displayed. Above: Campbells new Skillet sauces are displayed AP PHOTOS BOISE, Idaho (AP) The Boise Co-op eliminated thousands of slow-selling items, sweeping away the claustrophobic effect that accompanied too many offerings. The Wheatsville Food Co-op in Texas is opening its second store after 40 years. And in California, the Davis Food Coop turned to a designer to revamp its look. Its no coincidence food cooperatives across the U.S. are making big changes. Many are preparing for the arrival of a Whole Foods or Trader Joes, two organicand specialty-food industry giants that are opening new stores nationwide. Some co-ops are even dispatching camera-toting, intelligence-gathering crews to poach ideas from the big guys. With demand for organic, natural and specialty food continuing to outpace other segments in the grocery industry, coops say they must improve their stores, identify trends and appeal to a changing audience as the competition moves in. Whole Foods Market Inc. aims to triple stores to 1,000, including in Boise and Davis, Calif.; German-owned Trader Joes is expanding, too, with a 19 city comingsoon list. Co-ops had it easy for years when customers had few other places to go, said Robynn Shrader, head of the 125member, 164-store National Cooperative Grocers Association. Its more complicated being a retailer today. The modern co-op movement dates back to the 1970s, when customer-owned food stores including in Boise, Davis, Calif., and Austin, Texas were organized to provide an alternative to national grocery chains. Despite typically higher prices, shoppers often feel as if theyre buying more than groceries, that they are supporting a lifestyle. They emphasize community roots and, though theyve evolved from when nearly everything came in big bulk bins, they still stock an average of 20 percent local products, compared to 6 percent at conventional stores, according to a study released in August by Shraders group. About 80 percent of co-ops produce is organic, compared to 12 percent for conventional grocers. During the years, demand for natural, organic foods has only grown. The Organic Trade Association reports 2011 sales rose 9 percent to $31.4 billion. Brent Hueth, director of the Center for Cooperatives at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, said hed expected an increasingly crowded landscape of organic purveyors, including from conventional stores, to be tougher on co-ops. That hasnt materialized. Demand is growing faster than supply, Hueth said. Its not saturated yet. AP Boise Co-op pet food buyer Zach Jones poses in the stores new space dedicated to natural pet food and supplies. Opening up a separate storefront for the fastgrowing pet food segment is one way the co-op is gearing up for increased competition from Whole Foods Market. Food co-ops bracing for giant rivals

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A2 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, September 12, 2012 The Associated Press The harassment faced by U.S.-based climate scientists has been well documented in the mediabut not the harassment of scientists in Europe, Canada or the rest of the world. Thats because there hasnt been much to report. While outspoken scien tists of human-caused cli mate change in the United States endure torrents of freedom of information re quests, hate mail and even death threats from skeptics, their counterparts abroad have been free to do their work without fear. Jochem Marotzke, man aging director of the Max Planck Institute for Me teorology in Hamburg, said there is no systematic at tempt by a political camp to target climate scientists in Germany. I get the odd crit ical email from a skeptic, but would not classify anything as personally aggressive, said Marotzke. Very differ ent from the U.S. scene.I feel for my American col leagues and what theyve had to deal with, said Tim Lenton, an earth system scientist who specializes in climate tipping points at the University of Exeter in the UK. Lenton said he has nev er had to fend off skeptic at tacks against his work or his integrity. British scientists arent immune to attacks, but it is a very different level than compared to what is happening in the U.S. InsideClimate News contacted scientists work ing on climate change in Europe, Canada and Japan and learned that virtually everyone believes that the harassment is specic to the United States. They said that it could have long-term con sequences for public under standing of global warming. The harassment has an intimidating effectespe cially on young scientists, said Stefan Rahmstorf, head of earth system analysis at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany.;Rahmstorf said that watching colleagues be harassed often deters them from speaking to media or the public about their re search, which skews the debate. Already, there is evi dence of the U.S. public be ing swayed, said Tony Lei serowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication. Climategate, for in stance, the 2009 hacking of emails from the University of East Anglias Climatic Research Unit in the UK, had a signicant impact on public opinion, he said. During that scandal, U.S. skeptics pounced mainly on emails written by Michael Mann, director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University, as evidence that he and others were overstating the human inuence on global warm ing. In a yet-to-be-published Yale study, nearly 13 percent of on-the-fence Americans in 2010 said climategate re duced their trust in climate science and in scientists, Leiserowitz said. Since then, Mann was cleared of any wrongdoing, and the scientic consensus has strengthened virtu ally all working U.S. climate researchers believe human activity is causing the cli mate to warm. By BARRY WILNER AP Pro Football Writer NEW YORK Laser technology to help ofcials. Computer chips in the football. Devices that measure the impact of a hit or the speed of a ball carrier heading to the end zone. Streamlined, yet safer equipment. A 400-pound player. More teams in the playoffs. More international matchups. More prime-time games. NFL 2017, quite possibly. Americas most popular and protable sport, a $9 billion dollar industry that gures to be worth more than $14 billion in ve years, still will feature 100-yard elds, 11 players on each side of the ball, and Green Bay cheeseheads by then. Otherwise, experiencing the NFL season and offseason could change drastically, whether youre on your couch, at the local tavern or in the stands. So look for a longer draft, possibly rotating to league stadiums. Expect huge video boards in those stadiums capable of providing instantaneous information for the fan and the fantasy player along with highlights from every game, peeks at what the referee sees when reviewing challenged plays, even views of the locker room. Dynamic ticket pricing. Another outdoor Super Bowl in a cold weather city. A franchise in Los Angeles, perhaps even two. All of that possibly, perhaps probably, is ahead for the NFL. Our philosophy is to always look for ways to improve, Commissioner Roger Goodell said. Our goals are to continually evolve the game to make it better and safer, serve our fans in new ways, and represent the NFL with integrity. We do that by emphasizing quality and innovation, including the latest technology as it applies to everything from equipment to medical care to the stadium experience. And it all could come crashing down if the thousands of people involved in concussion lawsuits against the league win their cases. You never want to understate the potential impact of class-action lawsuits, said Marc Ganis, president of Chicago-based sports business consulting rm Sportscorp Ltd., and a keen observer of the leagues business side. Having said that, we must keep in mind that if the concussion lawsuits are found for the plaintiffs, we are talking about effectively eliminating football in the U.S. They will have to say football inherently is too dangerous a game to play because it inherently causes concussions. That could be the impact of these lawsuits. Thats a doomsday scenario. More likely, the NFL will be around and will remain this nations No. 1 sport. With labor peace assured for another nine years, pro football is wellpositioned to continue its prosperity. One of the biggest challenges to remaining No. 1 in 2017 will be making every game for 17 weeks an event, no matter where it is being viewed. Making the stadium experience as enriching as what fans get at home is a challenge now, and will be even more so in ve years. Consider how the fans in their decked-out living rooms, watching on high-denition TVs, have access to every game through DirecTVs Sunday Ticket and the Red Zone channel. They have all kinds of statistical info at ngertips, particularly for their fantasy teams. And they can get everything on a smart phone or tablet. By 2017, maybe even sooner, they will enjoy all of that and more at the ballpark. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers announced this week they hired an outside company to enhance the in-stadium experience through free Wi-Fi, a new replay system, and bolstered customer service. Fans can take advantage of wireless access to use the teams ofcial mobile app, as well as the Bucs tablet and smartphone application that will give them special features when used at Raymond James Stadium on game day. Fully powered Wi-Fi will be available at all stadiums much sooner than in ve years, said Redskins general manager Bruce Allen. Stats and highlight packages from NFL Films, too. The monstrous, crystal-clear scoreboard at Cowboys Stadium will be replicated elsewhere, providing a better variety of replays, real-time statistics and get this instant measurements of how much force Ray Lewis, if he is still playing at age 42, used to bring down a runner. Or how many miles per hour A.J. Green was running when he caught that bomb from Andrew Dalton. NFL vice president of business operations Eric Grubman sees cameras in locker rooms or tunnels beneath the stadium or coaches facilities supplying video for the folks on hand. I dont look at it as trying to match or duplicate the home experience, said Steelers President Art Rooney. The idea is create an in-stadium experience that is unique and different from the home experience. Its always going to be unique in terms of instadium live experience. You wont ever equal that, with thousands of fans cheering along with you, no matter how much you turn up the sound at home. Turning up technology for action on the eld is ahead, too. Most intriguing is possibly having a computer chip in the football that, through lasers or some other electronic wizardry, will indicate if the ball has crossed the goal line. On-eld ofcials replacements or otherwise probably cant wait for that. Denitely. Were almost there, NFL senior executive vice president Ray Anderson said. Giants general manager Jerry Reese agrees. Thats something I could denitely see by 2017, he said. The rst-down line that has become a staple of all NFL broadcasts should become a xture for fans at the stadium through the same technology, too. Chain gangs might disappear, as well, if measurements can accurately be determined through high-tech enhancements. Lasers or computer chips could extend 100 feet up Anderson said, to determine if a kick goes through the uprights. Theres so many things we can and will do with technology the way it is and will be, Anderson said. Game of the Future: A look at NFL 2017 America only nation where climate scientists face organized harassment GUATEMALA CITY (AP) Jess and Ryan Bubba Hooker had been mar ried less than a year when they decid ed to go to Guatemala on a mission trip in June 2007. The day he met Daniel, Bubba had been working on the plumbing in the orphanage when he took a break and found the boy. The child was 18 months old but looked younger, sitting stranded in a walker. He was the youngest kid in the orphanage, the frailest, too, with his pigeon chest and little legs that turned out. Bubba knelt beside the little boy and they began to play. That night in bed, he told his wife, I think I met our son. They immediately told the or phanage director and started the paperwork. Two months later, Guatemalas thriving adoption industry fell apart. The countrys vibrant business came to a halt after an August 2007 raid on what was considered the countrys most reputable adoption agency, used by many Americans. An investigation exposed a system of fake birth certicates and DNA sam ples, of mothers coerced into giving up children. Some claimed their children were kidnapped for sale. Adoptive par ents paid up to $30,000 for a child in a country where the average person earns $5,000 a year. The Guatemalan government was forced to overhaul its adoption laws. The U.S. suspended all new adoptions from Guatemala. By the beginning of 2008, a new council had to be established to clean up proceedings, including verifying the identity of birth mothers and their will ingness to give up their children. The old system was abolished. Daniel was among 3,032 children caught in limbo. Finally, in May 2009, the Hookers recieved a call conrming a meeting with the adoption councils head, Jai me Tecu. After hours in the waiting room with Daniel and Jess mom, Judy, they were ushered into an ofce overlooking the south of the capital. Im sorry, Tecu said, your case is not registered with the Solicitor Gener als ofce. It is not ofcial. Everything had to be investigated anew. Daniels birth mom needed to be found, tested for a DNA match and give consent for the adoption. The case also had to be transferred to a court in the district where Daniel was born. The Hookers created a routine be tween regular trips to the Radisson in Guatemala and life back home in Maryville, Tenn. Jess took advantage of holidays at the high school where she worked, while Bubba, a real estate developer, set his own schedule so he could visit Daniel every two or three months. When Daniel was already 4 and there was still no end in sight, Jess gave birth to a daughter, Ellyson. On their visits at the Radisson when Jess was pregnant, Daniel would touch her belly and say, Sister. And then came some luck. In early 2011, the Guatemalan adop tion asco came to the attention of U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, who served on the Senate appropriations subcommittee on the State Departments foreign op erations and related programs, which dealt with foreign adoptions. Landrieu discovered there was no list of people whose cases had been dropped due to Guatemalas adoption ban. The U.S. had forbidden new adop tions from Guatemala, but the pending cases were something else. Of the original 3,032 cases interupt ed at the end of 2007, ofcials found 180 cases of children waiting to be adopted. The rst was Daniels. Landrieus team worked with the U.S. Embassy and Guatemalan ofcials to broker an agreement that would al low certain cases to go forward if they met the criteria of both Guatemalan of cials and the U.S. State Department. Last December, the Hookers got a call saying they were one of 44 families whose cases would move forward. It would still be another eight months before they embarked on Aug. 21, hoping to become the rst of those families eligible to collect their child under the new agreement. On Sept. 3, Jess, who had own in with Ellyson and her mother to Guate mala City, sat inside the Hookers room at the Radisson staring at the latest document. She couldnt believe it. Her computer chimed, and she made her way over to it. Someone in Tennessee was calling her on Skype. It was her brother. Before Jose could say hello, she hovered over the camera and covered it with a thin sheet. The paper read: Daniel Ryan Hooker born in Quiche, Guatemala, on December 2006 son of Jessica Russell Hooker and Ryan Hooker. Jess brother, Jose, had been ad opted 22 years earlier from the same orphanage. As the family walked through the doors of the Louisville airport late Saturday night, friends cheered, then joined them in prayer. WERE HOME!!!!!! We did it! We made it! And we cant believe it! the family wrote in an emailed message to friends on Sunday. AP Judy Russell, left, Jessica Hookers mother, poses for a family portrait with Jessica, center, Jessicas husband, Ryan Hooker, right, and their children, Ellyson and Daniel. U.S. couple tests Guatemala adoption law

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A3 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 HONOLULU (AP) Coconut bras arent Hawaiian. Neither are grass skirts. Tiki bars? Theyre from California. Yet theyre all among the most recognizable symbols of a Hawaiian vacation. Now, many resorts in Hawaii are hoping to change those im ages, edging away from these kitschy marketing inventions and toward real-life Hawaiian traditions that can make the trip to the islands more special for travelers. Driving the movement, in part, is economics. Tourism leaders know Hawaii needs to highlight what makes the islands unique to compete with other sun-and-surf destinations like Florida, Mexico and Thailand. But the turn is also the latest sign of a Native Hawaiian renais sance with more locals studying Hawaiian language, reviving tra ditional styles of hula and learn ing ancient skills like using stars to navigate the ocean. Its about having that sense of place understanding who went before us, understanding that Waikiki is a place where we are so deep seated in our culture. And now, theres this resurgence to share it with our guests, said Kehaulani Kam, cultural services director at Starwood Hotels and Resorts Waikiki. The trend may help improve the dim view many Native Hawai ians have of tourism, the states largest industry and biggest em ployer. A 2010 state survey found nearly 60 percent of them dont believe it helps preserve their language and culture. The disdain was captured in a Saturday Night Live skit in 2009 that drew protests from state of cials and praise from others as good satire. In it, Dwayne The Rock Johnson and Fred Armisen play two underpaid entertainers in grass skirts at a Kauai restau rant. Johnson performs a sloppy dance resembling hula and Ar misen strums the ukulele. Both sing in gibberish that tourists may think is Hawaiian. Tourists watching the perfor mance drink tropical cocktails and gush about how happy they are to be in Hawaii, oblivious to the facade. The misconceptions come from the way Hawaii is marketed and presented to outsiders. Trav elers, who see vacation brochures with photos of grass skirts, co conut bras, Samoan re-knife dancing and Tahitian hula danc ers, naturally get the impression these are Hawaiian traditions. The prominence of many of the images can be traced to the arrival of tiki bars in Hawaii from California. Trader Vics and Don the Beachcomber restaurants start ed the bars on the mainland in the 1930s displaying replicas of Polynesian deities and artifacts from around the Pacic. Trader Vics opened its rst Honolulu storefront in 1941, and Don the Beachcomber followed after World War II. Around that time, in the 50s is, nighttime shows here shifted from being just Hawaiian, which they had been previously, to Poly nesian. Thats when you get a knife dancer, torch guys, Tahitian hula, said DeSoto Brown, a his torian at Bishop Museum. The Hawaii Tourism Author ity is distributing a new guide to advertisers, travel reporters and others involved in disseminating information about Hawaii that at tempts to clarify what is and isnt Hawaiian. The agency wants people to identify a re knife dance as Sa moan and Tahitian hula as Ta hitian when they use photos of various performances. If people want to show Hawaiian hula, they should be sure thats whats de picted in the images. Keliihoalani Wilson, the agen cys cultural director, said the aim isnt to knock other Polynesian traditions, but avoid confusion. Its all positive stuff. No scold ing. Just helping, Wilson said. For Lori Sablas, the cultural director at the Kaanapali Beach Hotel on Maui, it is about accu racy. My mandate is: How do Hawaiians think? How do Ha waiians act? Lets not change it. Lets not make it up, she said. That means they grow taro called kalo in Hawaiian, its the starchy vegetable used to make the traditional dish called poi on the property and prominently display canoes, pahu drums and other traditional artifacts. It also means mandatory classes, on company time, for staff on Hawaii culture. The hotels more than 200 employees went on boat rides to neighboring Lanai, the rural island recently bought by the worlds sixth richest man, Oracle Corp. CEO Larry Ellison. They saw rare native sandal wood trees, heard a Lanai legend about a man who was banished there because he didnt listen to his father and learned about the long-lost art of using stars, waves, birds and other cues from nature to travel between islands. Some corporate executives might question the investment return on such classes. But Sa blas said employees give better, more condent service when they understand Hawaii. If our employees really get the connection of what a special place they live in and a special place they work at, they, in turn, will convey it to every guest, she said. The Walt Disney Co., a master of creating make-believe worlds, has taken the concept farther. The global entertainment giant chose Hawaii as the location for its rst major stand-alone resort that isnt a theme park. Instead of building a Cinder ella castle, Disney designed the hotel Aulani around the idea of telling guests about Native Ha waiian culture. One of the hotels bars the Olelo Room has Hawaiian words on the wall, and its bartenders and wait staff speak Hawaiian. At night, a storyteller regales guests with Hawaiian legends around a re pit. In Waikiki, the century-old Moana Surfrider, now a Westin hotel and part of the Starwood chain, last year started inviting guests to a sunrise ceremony to greet the new moon. A kahu, or caretaker, says a prayer and leads guests to wade into the ocean from the beach in front of the hotel. The act cleans es them of the pilikia, or prob lems, they have from the previous month and they ask for strength to take on whats to come. Sometimes, 100 people show up at 5:30 a.m., general manager Craig Anderson said. These people are on vaca tion. They dont have to wake up early but they choose to because they want to experience that, he said. Its not a helicopter ride. Its not a surf lesson. Its a cul tural experience. Nix the tiki bar: Hawaii tourism gets authentic AP celebration of Polynesian music song and dance in Honolulu in this 2005 le photo. Fire knife dancing is often mistaken for Hawaiian even though its a Samoan invention. Hawaii resorts are increasingly turning to Hawaiis actual rich traditions to make trips special for travelers.

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A4 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Classifieds B6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! References Available 850-995-0009 Professional house cleaner. 15 years experience. References available. 850-418-0411 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 COKERS LAWN & TRACTOR SERVICE From trimming to tractor work. Clean-ups, raking, hauling, mowing, bushhogging, dirt work. Reasonable rates, free estimates. (850) 623-0493 (850) 485-7977 Licensed & Insured Stewarts Tractor Works & Land Clearing, Inc. Tree & Stump Removal from trimming to takedown. Debris removal & Storm Clean-Up. Demolition & Hauling. Land Clearing. Backhoe & Trackhoe Work. Heavy Brush & Forestry Mowing. Tree work done by man lift. 516-1801 or 675-4291 Licensed & Insured Free Estimates PAUL STEWART 9/970 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NUMBER: 2012-CP-247 IN RE: ESTATE OF BARBARA ELLEN WHITTAKER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Barbara Ellen Whittaker, deceased, whose date of death was May 26, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Santa Rosa County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Santa Rosa County Courthouse, 6865 Caroline Street, Milton, Fl 32570. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents Estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. 9/966 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12000199CPMXAX IN RE: ESTATE OF JASMINE CELESTE WUESTHOFF, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JASMINE CELESTE WUESTHOFF, deceased, whose date of death was April 25, 2012, File Number 12000199CP MXAX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Santa Rosa County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P. O. Box 472, Milton, Florida 32572. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: September 5, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/ ERIC W. WUESTHOFF Eric W. Wuesthoff 5603 Windrun Place Milton, Florida 32571 (850) 313-1485 Attorney/Registed Agent: /s/ TYLER L. GRAY Tyler L. Gray Florida Bar No. 0059738 Law Offices of Jeremiah J. Talbott, P.A. 900 East Moreno Street Pensacola, Florida 32503 (850)437-9600/(850)437-0 906 (fax) 09/05 & 09/12 9/966

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(888) 212-5888 Couch & Love Seat, Brand New $1,000 Tan color. Call 623-1127 GUN SHOW Fort Walton FAIRGROUNDS SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Text FL23330 to 56654 Curtis Penton Farms & Berrydale Farmer Mkt. OKRA Eggplants, tomatoes & hot peppers. We accept Wic Wholesale and retail (850) 675-4111 4 Piece, Red American Tourister Luggage $75, Swivel office chair, black $25, Rotary lawn mower $20, Wrought iron outdoor stair rail 63 X 17 $30 & Quilters lamp with magnifying glass $35. Ph (850) 626-2023 For Sale NEW Briggs & Stratton Portable Generator. 5550 watts, 8550 starting watts. $500. 623-5644 Looking for 1954 and 1955 Milton High School yearbooks. Call 623-9016 Cotton & Associates ESTATE SALE Sep 13-14-15 (8-3) 6274 Robin Hood Rd, Milton (turn on Maid Marion Rd. at SR Co. Extension Office) Contents of home and large detached garage -Furniture, glass & porcelain, jewelry, coins, books, and book cases, record albums, Barbies, TVs, appliances, camera equipment, Kindle, computers, John Wayne prints, Johnson Pacific floorsafe, gas grill, chain hoist and garage shop tools, motor cycle stand, plumbing supplies, file cabinets, Garrnin, various electronics, Play Station games, Heywood Wakefield desk, mountain bikes, electric organ, 06 Mustang GT*(29K miles), 95 Suburban* (104K miles) and much more. *Automobiles are subject to prior sale. See details, photos & map link www CottonAuctionsAppraisal s.com 9/991 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON October 3, 2012 at 11:00 AM UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit: 509 Michael Brown: small shop vac, extension cords, propane gas bottle, Misc. STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 9/12 & 9/19 9/991 Turn your art into cash! FREE ART APPAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Sept 15 & 16. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 international Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, Fl 32819. Call 1-866-537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignmnets taken based on consideration. 9/990 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 09001238CAMXAX WELLS FARGO BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. SCOTT A. NEAL, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORE CL OSURE SALE (Publish in Santa Rosa Press Gazette ) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 09001238CAMXAX of the Circuit Court of the 1st Judicial Circuit in and for Santa Rosa County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK., Plaintiff and SCOTT A, NEAL, Defendant, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Santa Rosa Courthouse 6865 Carolina.St. Milton, FL 32572, at the hour of 11 a.m. Central on the 3 day of October, 2012, the following property: LOT 137, BLOCK B, LIGHTHOUSE POINTEE UNIT III, BEING A PORTION OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 27 WEST, SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK G, PAGE 55, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 31 day of August, 2012. CIRCUIT COURT SEAL CLERK OF THE COURT MARY M. JOHNSON By: Mary English As Deputy Clerk Publish in Santa Rosa Press Gazette Submitted by: Kelley & Fulton, P. A., 1665 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. Suite 1000, West Palm Beach FL 33401 IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sheila Sims, Chief Deputy Court Administrator. Office of Court Administration at (850) 595-4400 at the M. C. Blanchard Judicial Center, 5th Floor, Pensacola FL 32502 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 9/12 & 9/19 9/990 9/986 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Boomerang Antiques and More located 5227 Willing Street in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 5th day of Sept, 2012. NAME OF OWNER Booerang USA Inc. 9/12 & 9/15 9/986 ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO(2)YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 5, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: Dan Stewart-Atty for Sandy Milburn Florida Bar Number 319392 4519 Hwy. 90,Pace, Fl 32571-2043 Telephone: (850) 994-4887; Fax: (850) 994-4541 Personal Repre sentative: SANDY MILBURN, 113 Bear Drive, Gulf Breeze, Fl 32561 9/5 & 9/12 9/970

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A6 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, September 12, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE 850-995-8778 Sparkle Towels 4 97 8 roll Castleberry Hot Dog Chili 52 10 oz Lipton Tea Bags 1 53 24 ct Sunshine Cheez-Its 1 93 7 oz Delmonte Ketchup 1 12 24 oz Sale Good Through September 5-11, 2012 California Juicy Sweet Large Plums 1 00 lb Faygo Drinks 2 56 12 12oz cans Blue Bunny Ice Cream 2 77 56 oz Libby Green Beans, Gold Corn or Sweet Peas 52 15 oz Tampico Fruit Drinks 1 65 gal Zeigler Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna 1 64 16 oz Ball Park Jumbo Franks 1 65 lb Hillshire Farm Ultra Thin Ham or Turkey 2 45 9 oz Farmland Reg, Black Pepper or Applewood Bacon 4 80 24 oz Hillshire Farm Smoked Pork or Kielbasa Sausage 2 11 14 oz Bar S 4x6 Cooked Ham 1 78 16 oz Blackwell Angus Eye-O-Round Roast 2 83 lb Blackwell Angus Boneless Chuck Steaks Family Pack 2 93 lb Fresh Fryer Jumbo Pack Drumsticks or Thighs 1 06 lb Farmland Family Pack Sliced Boneless Pork Chops 2 48 lb California Sweet Large Fresh Peaches 1 12 lb Butterball Sliced Turkey Bacon 2 23 12 oz Aqua South Catfish Fillets 18 29 4 lb box Dole Russet Baking Potatoes 3 95 20 lb FreshExpress American Salad 2 32 10 oz Vlasic Kosher Dills 1 91 46 oz Sauers Mayonnaise 1 95 32 oz Blackburn Grape Jelly 1 29 32 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Collard, Turnips or Mixed Greens 89 27 oz Van Camp Baked Beans 1 38 28 oz



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75 cents Wednesday, September 12, 2012 GazetteSanta Rosas Press Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.comTweet us @srpressgazette and friend us on facebook.com Jeannie Runyon is a social studies teacher at Avalon Middle School and is a Pensacola Runners Association board member and a member of the Pea Ridge Running Club. Q: What brought you to Santa Rosa County? A: Family Q: What ctional character would you say you are the most like? A: Im not sure Q: What was your most embarrassing moment you now laugh about? A: I do lots of stuff now that I look back at and laugh at. I couldnt pick just one. Q: Name three things you will always have in your refrigerator. A: Fruit, bread and milk Q: What would we hear on the radio during a road trip when we started your vehicle? A: Country music Q: What is the last book you read? A: House Rules by Jodi Picoult Q: Which would you enjoy more: dinner and a movie, a ball game or a good book? A: Dinner and a ball game Q: Where would your ideal vacation spot be? A: A tropical beach Q: Who, living or dead, has had the greatest inuence on you and why? A: My grandmothers Q: What is your greatest personal accomplishment? A: I cant think of any Q: If you could talk to any historical gure over dinner, who would it be and why? A: George Washington. Id like to know what he thinks of our government now. Jeannie RunyonIN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WITH Obituaries. .....................................A2Speak Out. .....................................A3Sudoku..........................................A3Opinion. ........................................A6Sports............................................A10Classieds. .....................................B6 TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 104 Issue 65 Printed on recycled paperJim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com By MATHEW PELLEGRINO313-8296 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com The news about Walmart delaying its groundbreaking in Milton has Santa Rosans choosing sides. The delay have bolstered comments from several sides. There are those who want to see a Walmart come to the Milton area, as well as those whod rather shop at the Pace Walmart and others who would rather stick to the mom and pop shops. The Press Gazette learned last week that Walmart decided to pull the plug on their proposed Milton store for at least another year. The news, rang well with some Santa Rosans, and not so well with others. Jonathan Hartley of Milton said that he doesnt want to see another Walmart in Santa Rosa County. We have plenty of good hardware stores here already, all we need is an Everman or Publix, Hartley said. Others like Elyse Winters who lives in Pace said it would actually be benecial for the area, even though she doesnt live in Milton. I would say its a good thing more jobs right? Elyse said. And we surely need that here. For those who live in East Milton, a Milton Walmart would almost be considered a blessing. Melanie Bell, who lives in East Milton said that the store would save her a long commute to Pace to go shopping. (It) would be great for those of us in East Milton and beyond to have something closer than Pace or Crestview, Bell said. It doesnt mean you have to shop there if you prefer local. I personally shop as often as I can at places like Halls Hardware & Lumber and The Grocery Store to support locally owned businesses. A Walmart in Milton would likely bring other businesses as well which would be great for our local economy.Statewide yard sale returns to FloridaBy MATHEW PELLEGRINO 313-8296 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.comAnother persons trash could be your treasure. This weekend, Flea Across Florida is returning to Highway 90. The 272-mile yard sale that starts in Live Oak allows vendors and yard sale enthusiasts to set up booths along historic Highway 90 and at local flea markets to sell their goods. Anyone that has items to sell can participate in this event. The event is being held this Friday through Sunday all along Highway 90. Originally, the 272-mile flea market was only held once a year in September. The event was held in the spring for the first time back in April because of its growing popularity. Dealers like the Copper Possum in East Milton, and the Pea Ridge Flea Market in Pea Ridge are packed during the three-day sale. Sales usually run from sun up to sun down. By MATHEW PELLEGRINO313-8296 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com Ten children were injured in an accident involving a school bus heading to Bennett Russell Elementary School on Monday morning. The accident happened around 8:10 a.m. in front of Bealls on Highway 90 in Milton. According to Milton Police ofcer Mark Tinnirella, the No. 624 bus was stopped for the red light at Highway 90 and Parkmore Plaza Drive. The ofcer said when the bus was stationary, a child came up to talk to the bus driver, and the driver became distracted. The driver saw trafc moving and started to drive, not realizing that the trafc had stopped again after accelerating. The bus then rear-ended an SUV. The collision sent the driver of the SUV, a female, to the hospital. The scene reduced trafc in the west lanes of Highway 90 down to one lane for about an hour during the incident while medical personnel attended to the children on board. Feelings mixed on new Walmart See waWALMartART A8Children injured in bus accidentSee ACCident IDENT A8 272 miles of Little ea markets popped up all along Highway 90 last year.Pre RE SS Ga A Zette ETTE Fi I Le E Photo HOTO S See FLea EA A8 FOOTBALL: AREa A TEa A MS HEa A D HOME FOR Ga A MES SPORTS, A10 Let Santa Rosans know what you think Speak OutInside | Page A3 srpressgazette.com623-5887

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LocalA2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012TELEPHONE NN UMBERSAll ofces ................. 850-623-2120 Classieds ................ 850-623-2120 Fax ........................ 850-623-2007SS UBSCRIPt T ION RAt T ESOne year (in county) ......................... $39 Six months (in county).................$19.50 13 weeks (in county).................... $9.75 One year (out of county) ....................$62 Six months (out of county).................$31 13 weeks (out of county)..............$15.50 Senior Citizen (over 62) One year (in county)........................$32 Six months (in county) ......................$16 13 weeks (in county) .........................$8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.CC OPYRIGHt T NN Ot T ICEThe entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Halifax Media Group. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570.SS ANt T A RR OSAS PRESS GAZEttTT E StST AFFJim FF letcherPublisher 850-393-3654 jetcher@srpressgazette.comCC arol BB arnesOfce Manager 850-623-2120 cbarnes@srpressgazette.comBBill GG amblinEditor 850-288-0037 bgamblin@srpressgazette.comCC armen JosephMedia Sales Consultant Cell: 850-624-2515 cjoseph@srpressgazette.comAA be CC larkMedia Sales Consultant 850-910-0902 aclark@srpressgazette.comTracie SS melstoysAccount Retention Specialist 850-623-2120 tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com SS anta RR osas PP ress GG azette 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570At T YOUR SERVICEMM iss a paper? Circulation Jim Fletcher 850-623-2120 Want to subscribe? 850-623-2120 To buy back issues 850-623-2120 To place a classied ad 850-623-2120 To buy a display ad Carmen Joseph 850-623-2120 To buy a photograph 850-623-2120I I n ternet www.srpressgazette.comO O f ce HH ours 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday To get news in the paper Bill Gamblin 850-623-2120 or 850-288-0037 E-mail : news@srpressgazette.com Short items: news@srpressgazette.com Church News: church@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries: news@srpressgazette.com Sports: sports@srpressgazette.com Elected OFFICIALSCOUNCOUN TY Y GOVERNMENGOVERNMEN TCOUNTY COMMISSION District 1: Jim Williamson, 4351 Berryhill Road, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-williamson@santarosa..gov District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Road, Milton, FL 32583; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commcole@santarosa..gov District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla Highway, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commsalter@santarosa..gov District 4: Jim Melvin, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-melvin@santarosa..gov District 5: Lane Lynchard, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commlynchard@santarosa..gov The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at 9 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays. The leaders meet in committee at 9 a.m. Mondays preceding the Thursday meetings. Meetings are held in commission chambers of the Administrative Complex on U.S. 90. Phone 983-1877 for information or to reach their ofces.SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFFWendell Hall, 5755 East Milton, Road, Milton, FL 32588; phone 983-1100. E-mail is whall@srso.netSANTA ROSA COUNTY CLERK OF COURTSMary Johnson, P.O. Box 472, Milton, FL 32572; phone 983-1987. E-mail is santacourtfeed@chjn.netSANTA ROSA COUNTY TAX COLLECTORStan C. Nichols, 6495 Caroline St., Suite E, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1800. E-mail is snichols@srctc. comSANTA ROSA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERGreg Brown, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1880. E-mail is info@srcpa.orgSANTA ROSA COUNTY ELECTIONS SUPERVISORAnn Bodenstein, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1900. E-mail is Bodenstein@ santarosa..govSS TA A TE E GOVERNMEN GOVERNMEN T Rep. Doug Broxson: 2990-C Gulf Breeze Parkway, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563, phone 916-5436. E-mail is Doug.Broxson@myoridahouse.gov Sen. Greg Evers: 598 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536, phone 689-0556. E-mail is Evers. Greg.SO2@senate.gov Gov. Rick Scott: PLO5 The Capitol, 400 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; phone 488-4441. E-mail is _governor@myorida.comFEFE DERAL ERAL GOVERNMEN GOVERNMEN THOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Rep. Jeff Miller: 2439 Rayburn House Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; local phone is 479-1183; D.C. Ofce phone (202) 225-4136. Pensacola ofce address: 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503. Toll free number is 866-3671614. Website: http://jeffmiller.house.govSENATE Sen. Marco Rubio: 317 Hart Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 850-433-2603. Website: www.rubio.senate. gov Sen. Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202224-5274; fax 202-224-8022. Website: http:// billnelson.senate.govWHITE HOUSE President Barack Obama: The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. E-mail is president@whitehouse.gov Vice President Joe Biden: Office of the Vice President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414.SCHOOLSCHOOL GOVERNMEN GOVERNMEN TSCHOOL BOARD Superintendent: Tim Wyrosdick, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-5000. E-mail is wyrosdickt@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 1: Diane Scott, 5710 Munson Highway, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-0413. E-mail is scottdl@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton, FL 32570; phone 623-6299. E-mail is winkleseh@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre, FL 32566; phone 939-2661. E-mail is colemanmd@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 4: JoAnn Simpson, 5059 Faircloth St., Pace, FL 32571; phone 994-5446. E-mail is simpsonjj@mai.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 5: Scott Peden, 3156 Pins Lane, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563; phone 934-0701. E-mail is pedenst@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays at 5086 Canal St. in Milton. Phone: 983-5000.CICI TY Y GOVERNMEN GOVERNMEN T Milton City Hall, Mayor Guy Thompson, 6738 Dixon St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5400. City Manager is Brian Watkins Town of Jay, Mayor Kurvin Qualls, 3822 Highway 4, Jay, FL 32565, phone 675-2719 Gulf Breeze City Hall, Mayor Beverly Zimmern, 1070 Shoreline Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, phone 934-5100. City Manager is Edwin Buz Eddy Please provide a color photograph if possible. All information must be typed. Wednesdays paper please submit by Friday at 3pm. Saturdays paper submit by Wednesday at noon IRS PROBLEMS? S. RICK FAIRCLOTH. EA., ATA, ATP 6013398EA. EA THE TAX PROFESSIONALS ObituariesSusan Rene Collins Hart, 58, passed away peacefully the morning of Sept. 7, 2012. She was born Sept. 9, 1953, in Bossier City, La., and grew up in Pace. Hart graduated from Milton High School Class of 1971. Hart was predeceased by her parents, Jane and Jerry Collins, and her baby boy, Kenneth Hart. She is survived by two children, Sarina Collins Bradley and Richie Hart, and was blessed with seven precious grandchildren, Courtney, Summer, Trey and Taylor Bradley, and Kayla, Katie, and Kolby Hart, and very special friends, Ginger Penton, Stephanie Penton and baby Berkley. The family will receive friends Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, from 6 -7 p.m., followed by a Celebration of Life Memorial Service at Pace Community Church, 4310 N. Spencer Field Road, in Pace. In Lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Covenant Hospice, www.covenanthospice. org. Lewis Funeral Home Milton Chapel entrusted with arrangements. Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www. srpressgazette.com.SSusan RRene CCollins HHart1953 2012Sylvia Jean Archer Craft, 43, left us Sept. 6, 2012 to be with her mother in the arms of the Lord. She was born in Brewton, Ala., Feb. 3, 1969. She attended W.S. Neal High School in East Brewton, Ala., and Jefferson Davis Community College in Brewton. She was employed by Exam One and Quest Diagnostics in Pensacola as a phlebotomist and had also worked as a teachers assistant at T.R. Jackson Pre-K Center in Milton. Craft had a very kind and loving spirit that was felt by anyone who came in contact with her. She was also a loving and devoted mother to her son, Brandon. She is preceded in death by her mother, Betty Black Archer, who passed away in 2004. She is survived by her son, Brandon Craft of Milton; her father and step-mother, Earlie Thomas and Mary Archer of Sterling, Ak.: two sisters, Cynthia Antonelli (Tony) of Autaugaville, Ala., and Kyra Smith of Cantonment, Fla.; three brothers, Timothy Archer (Kathy) of Plano, Texas, Dale Archer of East Brewton, and David Archer (Tina) of Milton; loved ones Dylan Craft and Amber Devaney; nieces and nephews Lyndsie, Amber, Caleb, Anthony, Rebekah, Timothy, Angel, Carla, Marianne, Kerri, and Kristin; numerous grandnieces and nephews; and countless friends and co-workers. A memorial service will be held to honor her and for friends and family to share their memories of the short time we had with her. All are welcome to attend. The details of the service will be posted on the Lewis Funeral Home website. www. lewisfuneralhomes.net The family would like to thank Joyce Goldenberg/Covenant Hospice, Baptist Manor, and Unihealth Post-Acute Care for the care and love they gave to her during her stay there. Lewis Funeral Home in Pace will be handling arrangements Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www. srpressgazette.com.SSylvia Jean AArcher CCraft1969 2012 SS YLVIA JEAN A A RCHER C C RAFt TLarry R. McCullough, 78, of Pace, passed away Sept. 7, 2012. He was born April 4, 1934 in Indiana to the late William David McCullough and Ruth Bernhardt McCullough. Mr. McCullough retired after 30 years of service from the United States Navy as a Master Chief having served on the USS Eisenhower and the USS Independence. He was an avid golfer, loved the races, enjoyed walking, his Harley Davidson motorcycle and his beloved cats. Survivors include the love of his life for 53 years, Betty J. McCullough; two sons, Monte McCullough of Pace, and Mark McCullough of Crestview, Fla.; two brothers, Don Homer (Isla) McCullough of Center Point, Ind., and Jack (Nancy) McCullough of Brazil, Ind.; a sister, Winnie (Jack) Knust of Cory, Ind.; and a number of nieces, nephews and friends A Celebration of Life will be Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 at 1 p.m. in the Chapel of National Cremation & Burial Society. Interment will follow in Memory Park Cemetery. The family will receive friends at the funeral home Wednesday from 11 a.m. until the service hour. National Cremation & Burial Society of Milton has been entrusted with the arrangements. Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www. srpressgazette.com.LLarry MMcCCullough1934 2012 LLARRY M McCC ULLOUGHRon Leon Werner, 67, departed this life on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012, in Oklahoma City, Okla., at the age of 67. Werner was born Nov. 10, 1944 in Reading, Penn. He was the son of Francis and Pauline (Swartz) Werner, was a resident of Prague, Okla. He married Wanda Collier on Dec. 28, 1964 in Allentown, Fla. After retiring from the US Air Force, Ron and Wanda settled in Prague where he enjoyed the last several years touching the community at the Prague Bakery. Ron was preceded in death by his father. Werner was survived by his wife, Wanda; two sons, Danny and Bonnie Werner of Wellington, Col., and William Werner of Prague; two daughters, Ronda Werner of Prague and Candi Werner and her ance David Nootbaar of Paden, Okla.; his mother Pauline Werner of Fla.; one brother Barry and Hilda Werner or Florida; two sisters, Betsy and Ken Dodson and Suzie and Joey Saba both of Florida; grandchildren, Jessica Werner, DNae Werner, McKenna Werner, Alyssa Werner, Melissa Foote, Jenny Hay, Michelle Bond and Amy Opperman; great granddaughter Sianna Jordan and six other great grandchildren Memorial services were held on Sept. 8, 2012, at First Baptist Church in Prague with Bro. Tim Emmons ofciating. Services were under the direction of Parks Brothers Funeral Service in Prague. Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www.srpressgazette.com.RRon LLeon Werner1944 2012 RRON LLEON WERNER SS ANt T A R R OSA P P RESS G G AZEtt TT EFIND Us S o O N Face ACE Boo OO K @srpressgazetteFollo OLLO W Us S o O N TWI WI TTER

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A3Wednesday, September 12, 2012 2080928 Speak OUTIf you have a short comment you would like to make, call the Speak Out line at 623-5887. Longer comments are better suited as a letter to the editor. Monday, 8:47 a.m. This is Janet. I would like to say that people should see the movie Obamas America 2016. They are playing it at The Ridge in Pea Ridge. Most people dont know it is playing, and it gives an account of his life. Thank you to The Ridge for playing this movie. Monday, 8:21 a.m. It amazes me how people think Jimmy Carter was such a good president when he opened our borders and let tuberculosis in, and lying Bill Clinton, we all know what he was doing in our White House and got on television and lied to all of us about it. And the only thing Barack Hussein Obama has given us is this great change that nobody wants. I just dont understand some peoples thinking. Fay. Monday, 7:09 a.m. Yeah, this is Mary. I am calling back with the message you could not get. We are almost ready to choose a new leader. The late Adrian Rogers said there were certain qualities that every leader should have. No. 1 is godliness; No. 2 is wisdom; No. 3 is honesty; No. 4 is discrimination; No. 5 is sexual morality; No. 6 is soberness serious thinking. I thought this would be of interest to the people. Sunday, 1:04 p.m. I would like to make a shout out to the Milton Police Department. They have been patrolling Russell Harber Landing and Carpenters Park to the point where they have just about ran out all of the hoodlums. Saturday, 8:34 p.m. A friend of mine from Georgia sent me an article in their local paper on the worst executive orders made by Barack Hussein Obama, June 15, 2012, and it is really scary. We need to take America back for the people. Dolores. Saturday, 7:03 p.m. Bush did his job on Katrina? Tony, maybe you should check the facts on each administrations handling of hurricanes Katrina and Isaac to see how real leaders like Obama handle national emergencies, terrorists, nancial collapse of the American economy, an auto industry meltdown and health care coverage for all Americans who want it, as well as discrimination against women and minorities. A y-over three days later and Heck of a job Brownie just doesnt cut it! Pete. Saturday, 6:51 p.m. Gene says its time to stop blaming Bush. Imagine that someone steals your identity, maxes out your credit cards and doubles your debt, then he and his lawyers and family and friends refuse to help you repair the damage, and whats even worse, they stand in your way when you try to x things, even though youre nancially ruined and on the edge of bankruptcy. How long before you stop blaming that guy that created all your problems? Fact is, we will blame Bush until every problem he created or caused is xed. Saturday, 4 p.m. Maria, you must have been sleeping for the past three and half years. Well, I think it is time to wake up and face reality: no jobs, losing homes, $500 billion from Medicare, I guess to support his trips. He stood there and lied just like four years ago. Oh he did make one of his promise right? Change, that is what we have in our pockets now. I sure dont want what we have had the last three and half years. Saturday, 3:35 p.m. Yeah, this is Bobby. I was reading the comment from Bruce in Pace about the ashing lights. I dont see a big deal about this. And when you bring up tailgating, the next time you drive and someone gets too close look down at your speedometer. If you are going 10 miles under the speed limit then speed up. If you are in the left lane and there are cars behind you then get over to the slow lane. Beside people are not hurting you if they get close to your bumper. If they get too close, and they hit you then it is their fault. Saturday, 10:25 a.m. This is Mary. As I was reading in Wednesdays Free Press, there was an article on Obama with his beer distillery in the White House. What will he have next? Will he have his children run the thing? His wife is out there pushing these healthy meals. It makes me think if someone like that should be the leader of our nation. Saturday, 9:40 a.m. I see where a young man with Down syndrome was kept off an airplane like he would bring it down last week. They dont even notice all these people who are angry or could have ulterior motives when they y. What kind of people are running the plane? Do they have something against a child with Down syndrome? Friday, 10:51 a.m. Hey, this is Gene in Pace. I just heard the Democrats are talking about another stimulus package. Who are they going to give it to? Republicans most of the time want to give it to the American people. Under Obama the stimulus went to people like Sylodyna, Chrysler, Chevy and others. Granted (George) Bush did help out the banks, but we had a Democratic house, so Wall Street was helped out by the Democrats. Obama needs to give the money to the people so they can decide who they would want to help. All Obama did was help the people who put him in ofce instead of the American people. Friday, 8:50 a.m. Hi, this is Jess. I would like to talk about the lady who oversees the Navarre Fishing Pier. It seems like she does what she wants to. She closed the pier for a wedding and then ignored her bosses and kept it open during the hurricane. It doesnt sound like to me she is hurting for money. Is she trying to set the county up for a lawsuit? She doesnt know if someone was going to put their kid on the rail and then get washed into the tide or what would happen. She needs to go; this is her third strike. www.Sudoku-Puzzles.netSudoku, Kakuro & Futoshiki PuzzlesSudoku 9x9 Very hard (137762908) 9 2 7 6 1 1 8 4 2 2 1 7 5 1 3 6 9 1 8 3 7 6 5 9 1 7 4 8 www.sudoku-puzzles.netSolution: www.sudoku-puzzles.net SOLUTUTION FIND UUS ONLINECheck out Santa Rosa Press Gazette on Facebook, or tweet us @srpressgazette

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LocalA4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012Special to the Press GazetteIn observance of World Rabies Day, the Santa Rosa County Health Department and Santa Rosa County Animal Services will host the second annual Rabies Drive Thru Vaccination Clinic for dogs and cats, Sept. 28, from 4-7 p.m. at the Santa Rosa County Animal Shelter, 4451 Pine Forest Road in Milton. Local veterinarians, Dr. Michael Mongue of Pace Veterinary Clinic, Dr. C. David Summerlin and Dr. Amy Harper of The Ark Animal Hospital, will administer the injections to dogs and cats. The fee is $10. Pets and owners will remain in the vehicle at all times. No other services will be available at the clinic. A certicate of vaccination and rabies tag will be provided for each pet vaccinated. We at the health department, and I know Animal Services as well, are extremely grateful to these veterinarians for taking time away from their own practices to provide this valuable service to the community, said Mary Beverly, epidemiologist with the Santa Rosa County Health Department. Last year, 197 dogs and cats were vaccinated. We are hoping to exceed that number this year. Rabies is a disease that affects the brain. The virus is carried in the saliva of infected animals and is usually transmitted to people and other animals through a bite or scratch. In the U.S., more than 90 percent of rabies cases occur in wild animals, such as raccoons, foxes, skunks and bats, but domesticated animals can carry it as well. Unvaccinated pets that are kept outside, or are allowed to roam freely, are at high risk for contracting the virus, if they come into contact with wild animals. Rabies is fatal to humans and animals, but rabies in humans can be prevented if rabies vaccine is administered as soon as possible after exposure. Treatment consists of an injection of immune globulin, directly into the wound if the individual has been bitten or scratched, followed by a series of four injections of rabies vaccine in the deltoid (the large muscle in the upper arm) over a period of about two weeks. Post exposure shots can be expensive, anywhere from $1800 to $2500, and insurance may not cover all the cost. In 2011, post exposure rabies shots were recommended for 36 people in Santa Rosa County who had contact with animals that may have been infected with rabies. Most of the animals were dogs and cats whose vaccination status was unknown. An animal suffering from rabies may appear sick or lethargic, have problems swallowing, or drool or salivate excessively. A wild animal may appear tamer than usual and some animals may have no visible symptoms. There is no treatment for animals that have been exposed to rabies and euthanasia is usually recommended. One of the safest and easiest way to protect pets against rabies is through vaccination by a licensed veterinarian. Vaccinate pets against rabies and keep their shots up-to-date. Follow your veterinarians recommendation for revaccination. Do not leave pets outside unsupervised. Bring in pet food at night and secure trash can lids with fasteners. Cover bird feeders. Most squirrel-proof coverings also deter wild animals. Children should never chase or attempt to catch or touch a wild or unfamiliar animal, and should tell an adult if a wild or strange animal tries to approach them. If bitten, or scratched by a wild animal or stray domesticated animal, wash the wound immediately with soap and water. This is the rst line of defense against rabies! Seek medical attention immediately and report the incident to the Santa Rosa County Health Department at 983-5275 between the hours of 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or after hours call 418-5566. For more information on rabies, visit www.cdc.gov/rabies/. If you see a suspicious animal in your yard or neighborhood, call animal control at 983-4680. If a dead wild animal is on your property, contact the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commissions regional ofce at 265-3676, or their 24-hour law enforcement hotline at (888) 404-3922. For more information about the clinic, call Mary Beverly at the Santa Rosa County Health Department at 983-5200, ext. 105. 8985519She deserves to be cool!CALL 850-939-3325Ask us about rebates and tax credits! www.koolbreeze.com Press Gazette Staff ReportThe teen driver who left the scene of a trafc fatality Friday night on Farm Life Road has been charged. Robert William Chapman, 16 of Milton, was charged with leaving the scene of an accident involving a death. According to the Florida Highway Patrol, Chapman turned himself into the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce and the FHP two hours after the crash. He was arrested on the charges and delivered to the Juvenile Justice Center in Pensacola. According to an FHP press release, Chapman was headed north on Farm Life Road when the front of his vehicle struck Ricky Shane Weldon, 20 of Milton, around 8:10 p.m. Weldon, who was walking north northbound in the center of the northbound lane of Farm Life Road, was moments later struck by Courtny Fleming, 21 of Milton, as Weldon was lying prone in the southbound lanes. Fleming reportedly drug Weldon 25 feet before coming to a stop.Special to the Press GazetteThree Santa Rosa County teachers recently participated in Discovery Education Summer Institute. Jeffery Baugus, a teacher at Woodlawn Beach Middle School; Scott Erickson, a teacher at Milton High School; and Kristina Spencer, a teacher at Holley Navarre Intermediate School, joined more than 100 educators from across the U.S., Canada and Romania in Bozeman, Mont. for a professional development and networking event hosted by Discovery Educations Discovery Educator Network (DEN). The six-day DEN Summer Institute, held July 21-26, featured a variety of speakers and hands-on workshops designed to empower educators to invigorate curriculum and engage students using the latest innovations in teaching and learning. The event also provided an opportunity for educators to connect, collaborate and share resources, ideas and strategies with fellow educators from around the world. The DEN Summer Institute was exclusive to educators recognized by Discovery Education as STAR Discovery Educators. STAR Discovery Educators are active members of the DEN and proven leaders in transforming teaching and learning. The DEN is a global community of more than 200,000 educators who are passionate about teaching with technology and digital media, sharing resources, collaborating and networking. Through blogs, virtual conferences and in-person events like the Summer Institute, the DEN connects educators and supports them in leveraging digital media and technology to engage students and improve achievement. As STAR Discovery Educators, Jeffery, Scott and Kristina have demonstrated their leadership and commitment to using technology and digital resources to enrich classroom learning experiences, said Lance Rougeux, vice president of learning communities and instructional implementation for Discovery Education. Through their participation in the DEN Summer Institute, Jeffery, Scott, and Kristina have gained new skills and ideas to apply in their classrooms and share with fellow Santa Rosa County School District educators to help students gain critical technology skills and improve student engagement and achievement. Reed Timmer, extreme weather enthusiast from the Discovery Channel series Storm Chasers, kicked off the event by sharing his experience lming and collecting data from some of the most powerful storms on record. He also highlighted the importance of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education and discussed what inspired him to pursue a career in STEM. Education authors David Warlick and Wes Fryer and 2011 Montana Teacher of the Year Paul Andersen also spoke to participants during the event. In addition to hearing from speakers, Baugus, Erickson and Spencer participated in workshops, collaborated with fellow educators on a variety of educational technology projects, and shared ideas and best practices with their peers. They also had an opportunity to visit Yellowstone National Park and Old Faithful with renowned wildlife photographer Daniel J. Cox. After participating in the DEN Summer Institute, Baugus, Erickson, and Spencer will return to Santa Rosa County School District in the fall with numerous classroom-ready multimedia projects as well as new strategies and techniques to integrate technology and digital media into instruction to invigorate curriculum and transform teaching and learning. For more information about the DEN Summer Institute, visit www.discoveryeducation.com/DEN/summerinstitute.cfm. Discovery Education transforms classrooms, empowers teachers and captivates students by providing high quality, dynamic, digital content for grades K-12 and community colleges. Discovery Education is the global leader in standards-based digital media, professional development, assessment tools and a passionate educator network to support districts in accelerating student achievement. Discovery Education services are in more than half of all U.S. schools and 35 countries around the world. Local teachers participate in Discovery Education Summer Institue Police charge teen with leaving scene of fatal crashDrive-thru rabies vaccination clinic to be offered

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A5Wednesday, September 12, 2012 SEPT. 12 Singles Conference at Deliverance Tabernacle Christian Center, 1780 W. Detroit Blvd, Pensacola Navy League Santa Rosa Council Meeting at noon at SRC Chamber of Commerce, 5247 Stewart St, Milton, 32570PTAC at UWF Presents Service Disabled Veteran Small Business What Do I Do? from 9 a.m. to noon and again from 1-4 p.m. at 401 E Chase St, Ste 100, PensacolaSouth End Tourism Development Planning Meeting from 1-4 p.m. at Navarre Visitors Center, 8543 Navarre Parkway, Navarre Miracle Jeans Day SEPT. 13 Friends of the Milton Library Monthly Meeting at 1 p.m. at Milton Library, 5541 Alabama Street Singles Conference at Deliverance Tabernacle Christian Center, 1780 W. Detroit Blvd, Pensacola SEPT. 14 Singles Conference at Deliverance Tabernacle Christian Center, 1780 W. Detroit Blvd, Pensacola Parkinsons Support Group Meeting 1-2 p.m. at West Florida Rehabilitation Institute, 8391 N. Davis Highway, Pensacola SEPT. 14-16 Flea Across Florida along Highway 90 SEPT. 19 Tourism Development Council Meeting at 3 p.m. at Navarre Visitors Center, 8543 Navarre Parkway, Navarre Blackwater Pyrates Meeting at 6:30 p.m. at Nichols Seafood, 3966 Avalon Boulevard, Milton 32570 PTAC UWF Presents How To Market To The Government from 9 a.m. to noon and again from 1-4 p.m. at 401 E Chase St, Ste 100, Pensacola SEPT. 20 Santa Rosa Republican Executive Committee at 6:30 p.m. at Red Roof Inn, 2672 Avalon Blvd., Milton SEPT. 21-23 Deluna Festival at Casino Beach, Pensacola Beach SEPT. 22 Church of God Ministries International Meeting from 1-3 p.m. at SRC Chamber of Commerce, 5247 Stewart St., Milton Womens Enrichment Ministry Craft Fair from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. at Immanuel Baptist Church, 4187 Highway 90, Pace SEPT. 24 Main Street Milton Board of Directors Meeting at 5:30 p.m. at T.W. Jones House Education Center, 4966 Henry Street, Milton SEPT. 25 SBDC UWF Presents IRS Resource Tools from 9 a.m. 12 Noon at 401 E. Chase Street, Ste. 100, Pensacola SEPT. 26 SBDC at UWF Offers Business Planning for Success Workshop from 6-9 p.m. at 401 E. Chase Street, Suite 100, Pensacola SEPT. 27 SBDC at UWF Presents Starting a Business from 9 a.m. to noon at 401 E. Chase Street, Suite 100, Pensacola MOAA Whiting Field Chapter Monthly Meeting at 6 p.m. with place to be determined SEPT. 29 Milton Heritage Tour from 9 a.m. 4 p.m. at Arcadia Mill, 5709 Mill Pond Lane, Milton Third annual All Gods Creatures Blessing of the Pets & Fall Market from 9 a.m. to noon at First Presbyterian Church, Fellowship Hall, 5203 Elmira St, Milton 32570 Santa Rosa Arts Associations annual Art Show from 9 a.m. 4 p.m. at Santa Rosa County Auditorium, 4530 Spikes Way, Milton The Santa Rosa County Commissioners will hold a special meeting September 17, 2012, at 3:30 p.m. to interview two legal firms for County representation on oil spill related issues. The meeting will be held in the Commissioners Board Room at the Santa Rosa County Administrative Center, 6495 Caroline Street, in Milton. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in apublic hearing you are entitled to the provision of certain assistance. Please contactKathy Jordanat (850) 983-1855 orat 6495 Caroline Street, Miltonat least one (1)weekprior to the date of the public hearing.6012833 Greg Lewis of Milton was the winner of the shotgun rafe held by the East Milton Youth Association. Joining Lewis was East Milton president John Babb and softball director Phil Baggett. The gun rafe was sponsored by Scotts Outdoors in Jay.SUBMITTED PHOTO Calendar of EEVENTsS EEAsST M M ILTON PREs SENTsS s S HOTGUN TO RAFFLE WINNER

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Page 6There are very few adults who do not recall what they were doing (or where they where) on Sept. 11, 2001. Thats a date that can only be paralleled by Dec. 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Each attack was by a group that, for whatever reason, did not like America at the time. In the days after these attacks, there was no Democrat vs. Republican, no Liberal vs. Conservative, no Christian vs. atheist, nor any other social divide. We were all Americans. We felt the pain of the event. In 2001, as the news coverage showed the planes flying into the World Trade Center, we were one. We were the United States and her people. Despite all the diversity (or, perhaps, because of it) we came together. We rallied and supported our troops, remembered the victims of the tragedy and united. The big question everyone must ponder today is what has happened in the 11 years that followed? As we close in on the November elections, America finds itself about as divided as the infamous Hatfields and McCoys. Have we changed that much? Has our situation changed? We dont think so. Our nation has progressed in many ways. America did not create an internment camp for those of the Muslim faith like they did the JapaneseAmericans following Pearl Harbor. While our so-called leaders try to divide and conquer the public to hold on to their positions of power, we wonder about the hierarchy we value as a nation. First, we are all neighbors. Secondly, we are Santa Rosans. Next, we are Americans and, finally, we are Floridians. Are you going to agree with everyone you come in contact with? Probably not. Thats what makes our country the great place it is. We are allowed the freedom to be ourselves, and with that freedom and diversity, be reminded that each of us has a small part in the overall picture. Our inalienable rights are to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Those who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001, gave that up to some who didnt agree with us. If we are not careful, we will soon become no better than those countries that oppose us. A day we cannot forget OUR VIEW We want you to share your views on the above topic(s) or any topic with other Santa Rosas Press Gazette readers. Your views are important, too. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Letters must be typed and may be edited for content for to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for veri cation, if necessary. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS www.srpressgazette.comWednesday, September 12, 2012 ASection OPINIONAnyone who reads (understands) the many writings about education reform should note that almost none mention its greatest enemy: Federal Department of Education. Both Republican and Democrat platforms, put forth at their recent theatrical performances, fail to address this enemy of education. I have asked hundreds of times for anyone to show me the word education in the Constitution. It is not even alluded to as an enumerated power. But, it is covered by the 10th Amenment. For the educationallychallenged, the U. S. Constitution is the supreme law of the land. Created by wise, educated men who believed very strongly in a small, limited government, they deliberately left education out of the document, covering it in the 10th Amendment. The Northwest Ordinance (still law!), Article III, declares knowledge (education to the wise Founding Fathers) to be the responsibility of the states! Numerous empty arguments have been put forth to defend the multi-billion dollar boondoggle. The feds bribe the states with federal money, which should have never left the states to begin with. The government does not have money. They take it from citizens. To Democrats and Republicans and the educationally-challenged voters: Local control does not mean federal control! We will have to have separation of federal and education before any meaningful reform can take place. Bill Bledsoe Milton, Fla. Hypocrisy from both parties on education LETTERS TO THE EDITORLast Wednesday afternoon while shopping at Walmart in Pace I laid my wallet down on a vegetable counter and walked off without it. About 10 minutes later a call summoned me to the service desk. My wallet was returned intact. I would like to say thank you and God bless you for returning my wallet with everything in it. Dorothy Richardson Milton, Fla. Pace shopper says thanks for returned wallet The Democratic National Convention, held in Charlotte, N.C., is playing out as scripted this week. It was good to see that the Democrats chose the U.S. as the host country for their event again this year, narrowly defeating bids from France and Venezuela. The convention is in full swing. All delegates are issued funny hats, pre-painted signs showing their personal emotions, talking points, and their very own U.S. business owner to smack around, vilify, tax, and regulate until he moves his plant to Costa Rica. The size and scope of the DNC had to be scaled back considerably. At first the Dems thought they needed the Charlotte Motor Speedway, capacity 165,000, to hold all of Obamas loving fans. When they realized that the mainstream press corps is not that big, they looked for smaller venues. Now they are at the less ambitious Time Warner Cable Arena, where cable installers promise to show up to lay the cable some time between 8 AM and 5 PM this week or next. Time Warners motto is We have laid more cable around North Carolina than John Edwards and Bill Clinton combined. The Democrats have been plagued by money problems. The campaign is spending more than it brings in (not the Democrats I know!), and they cannot seem to organize their own convention. They are almost to the point of asking Mitt Romney and Bain Capital to come in and bail out the campaign, to take a controlling interest so they can get it back on track, and to help turn around their Democratic convention like he did an equally corrupt and poorly-run event, the Olympics. If they keep backing off the ambitious size of this convention and moving events to smaller venues, they might end up just doing a conference call from the La Quinta Inn outside of Charlotte. Conspicuously absent from the DNC this year is Hillary Clinton, but Bill Clinton is there. I think they have a marital agreement to not be in the same city more than 3 days a year. The more likely reason is that Hillary is going to resign as Secretary of State if Barack Obama is reelected. However, if she does step down from the Obama administration, she might invite legal troubles and be charged with leaving the scene of a crime. It is great that Bill Clinton will be harangued into endorsing Barack Obama in his speech an historic event. Let me remind you, a whole generation of American kids have not seen Bill Clinton look into a camera, fight off a tear, bite his lower lip, and baldly lie to the American people. As has been drummed into us, it is sexist when Republican push people like Dr. Condoleezza Rice into only secretary jobs, like Secretary of State. In fact, according to the Democrats, everything Republicans do is racist. Political opponents cannot sort their laundry without Attorney General Eric Holder filing some sort of racial suit against them. These conventions are carefully scripted, made-for-TV events. The issue here is that Obama does not make himself available to any real media that would ask any substantive questions. But to be fair, Obamas PR team has been busy flying around to swing states, grandstanding and demagoguing the issues. Obamas press team just havent had time to supply NBC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, ABC, etc. with softball questions to ask the president. We did hear a good bit about the White House fluff piece on how our President has his staff brew his own beer. You know, just like you and me, our Average Joe President (the one with a story just like ours: born in Hawaii to an absent Kenyan socialist dad, raised in Indonesia, attended an elite private high school and then got into Ivy League schools with average grades, and became Community Organizer-in-Chief), likes beer. Asking him about his favorite chili recipe (which a New Mexico radio station did recently), and raving about being so downto-earth that he brews his own beer, is the only hardball journalism we are going to get out of Obamas adoring media hordes. Obama even offered the White House press corps some of his beer, but they demurred and said they would prefer to just keep drinking his Kool-Aid. A syndicated oped humorist, award winning author and TV/ radio commentator, you can reach him at Ron@ RonaldHart.com, Twitter @RonaldHart or at visit RonaldHart.com HART TALKRon HartDemocratic National Convention less hope and more rope a dope These conventions are carefully scripted, made-for-TV events. The issue here is that Obama does not make himself available to any real media that would ask any substantive questions. But to be fair, Obamas PR team has been busy ying around to swing states, grandstanding and demagoguing the issues. By Jim Hightower What do you call a mix of black liquor, biofuels, diesel and a generous splash of tax subsidies? If you have Sen. Mike Crapo of Idaho shake this cocktail vigorously and serve it in a golden goblet provided by corporate lobbyists, Ive got the answer: Koch Brothers Moonshine. Black liquor, a byproduct of the papermaking process, is an alcoholic sludge that paper mills use to fuel their operations. Fine creative, even. But then, the paper giants turned from creative to cabal, teaming with Crapo and other practitioners of the legislative black arts to turn their sludge into a slick tax loophole. In 2007, Crapo and a covey of corporate lobbyists quietly made their liquor eligible for a subsidy meant to help wean America off oil by encouraging the production of a biofuelgasoline mix to power cars and trucks. Not so fine. One, vehicles cant use mill sludge as a fuel. Two, rather than mixing biofuel into their sludge, the paper-makers add diesel! So these sneaks are siphoning billions of dollars from a clean fuels program by making a dirty fuel dirtier. Whos profiting from this load of moonshine? Right at the top are the infamous, far-rightwing Koch brothers. These secretive, multibillionaire political extremists have long been financing everything from dozens of corporate front groups to the tea party in their relentless effort to impose their plutocratic agenda on our country. One major way they pay for this onslaught is by tapping directly into the blatant corporate welfare of the black liquor loophole. The Koch industrial empire includes Georgia Pacific, one of Americas largest paper-makers and its the happy recipient of as much as a billion bucks a year from this perverted biofuel subsidy. A dirty windfall from a dirty fuel is underwriting dirty politics. The whole thing stinks. Jim Hightower is a radio commentator, writer and public speaker. Hes also editor of the populist newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown. The Koch Brothers moonshine a windfall for dirty politics

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A7Wednesday, September 12, 2012By MATTHEW LAMBPress Gazette Correspondent If you have never heard bluegrass music, you have been missing out on one of the most cultural musical genres of the century. If you have never heard High Cotton bluegrass band music, you are in for a surprisingly sweet sound. Every week High Cotton gets together in Mike Blantons living room to practice their set and discuss where they are going to be playing next. Beyond that, there isnt much conversation. When there is conversation, its only about one thing: Bluegrass. The rst time I saw Deliverence I knew I wanted to sound like that, Blanton said. The Beverly Hillbillies also had a good sound that really liked. Mike Blanton, who plays banjo, started the band 30 years ago with fellow musician Don Copeland. But Copeland, who is now an experienced acoustic guitarist, didnt exactly call himself a musician back then. I could only play three chords when I rst started. If it hadnt been for Mike, I never would have played music, Copeland said. Otis Pollitt, who plays bass for the band has a different dynamic than Copeland. Pollitt has been a musician for more than 60 years but didnt start with the band until a couple of years ago. Pollitt never forgot his start in music. I was 12 years old when I started playing for people, Pollitt said. Back then, if you wanted to see a movie and didnt have any money, you would have an act on stage before the movie started. My act was guitar. The band speaks to each other as though they are all one family. The familial unity is actually one of the things that makes the band so darn good to listen to. Amanda Cook is one of the younger members of the group and is a big advocate of staying together like a family. Cook started playing mandolin in 2006 and often adds a tempered harmony sound to the bands music. Female singers are rare, said Cook. I think thats why we have such a unique sound. So unique that High Cotton was named Florida Bluegrass Champions in 2009. They won two trophies, one for instrumentation and one for voice. The band goes to the Pickin In The Pines festival every year to try and win the award again. They have even released their own album which can be purchased by going to their website at highcottonbluegrass.com. Pollitt encourages people to listen to bluegrass as much as they can. He says its more than what your used to listening to. Bluegrass will lift you up. It will lift your soul, Pollitt said. ...a weekly column answering your questions with Biblical answers about life.Ask the Preacher Pastor Gallups, When I look at the Aurora Colorado DearW.R., How can a young man, enrolled in a PhD program, walk into a packed out theater with the desire to randomly destroy as many lives as possible and then booby trap his apartment in the hopes of destroying even more lives in the aftermath? Everyone is looking for that another regulation enacted, another drug invented or another public service announcement can be aired. And so, the talking heads line up night after night to debate gun control, bullying, public security, video game violence, and mental illnesses. They are hoping The problem is that they are not asking the right questions. They are not talking about the core of the problem. They are painfully avoiding the presenting issue. The presenting issue is the crux of the message of my entire book (The Magic Man In The Sky: Effectively Defending The Christian Faith) as well as the Bible itself. The message is that we are not a mere animal with purely instinctive responses to life and oursurrounding environment. Humans are created in the image of God. We have the ability to think, create, invent, communicate, write books, build computers and Internet systems, and land on the moon. Humans are emotional, social, psychological, physical, and spiritual beings. We are amazingly complex creations. We might spend a lifetime caused him to step overthe line of common moraliBecause, it is a certain fact that had this disturbed young man had a contextual biblical worldview if he had a living relationship with God, his creator, through Jesus Christ if the young man walked in the love and teachings of Jesus Christ and genuine Biblical faith, I am convinced that this horror would have never happened. Our culture is spiritually starving and quickly becoming spiritually and biblically bankrupt. We often wonder and analyze what it is that we are doing. I am convinced the problem is what most of us are not doing Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church in Milton. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree from Florida State University and a Master of Divinity Degree from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been the Pastor of HHBC since 1987. For 10 years he has also served as an International Youth Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention, preaching to multiplied thousands all over the U.S. and Canada. For more information about HHBC call 623-8959 or 626-8951 or fax, 623 197. If you have a question for ASK THE PREACHER send it to: ASK THE PREACHER, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351 Hickory Hammock Rd, Milton, FL, 32583 High Cotton is seen performing at the Pickin in the Pines festival where they were named the Florida Bluegrass Champions in 2009. The group won trophies for instrumentation as well as voice.PHOTOS BY MATTHEW LAm M B | Press Gazette CorrespondentPicking High CottonLocal musicians make music, memories together

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LocalA8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012Several hotels and motels across Highway 90 are offering special rates for those participating or travel-shopping in the Flea Across Florida. Kim Macarthy the owner of Copper Possum Antique Mall in East Milton said that shoppers are usually seen shopping up a storm during the event. Originally, Flea Across Florida was held once a year, but Macarthy said that the event grew in popularity, and they decided to hold it twice a year. Ive been wanting for something like this to happen for years, Macarthy said. It really helps out the local economy. Particularly the downtown economy Macarthy said. Alyssa Schepper, the owner of Alyssas Antique Depot on Chumuckla Highway in Pace said that the event has already maxed out her booth rentals for this Saturday. We are at our max right now, Schepper said. Schepper started participating in Flea Across Florida last fall, and said that crowds do pick up during the busy weekend, but mostly the out-of-towners. It denitely drew people from out of town, Schepper said. (In the past) we had a lot of people say this is their rst time in the area, and that they would be back. I did hear someone (at a past Flea Across Florida) say they were from Jacksonville, and one from Tampa. There were several people that came from Alabama. Macarthy said she opens her doors early during the Flea Across Florida event and rents out booth outside of her store on Highway 90 near the old Addies Restaurant building. Organizers like Macarthy are still seeking participants to take part in this event. Individuals, church groups, civic groups, and businesses are encouraged to participate in the sale. Items to be sold can range from garage sale items to retail items, as well as arts and crafts. Alyssa Schepper with Alyssas Antique Depot would not return phone calls from the Press Gazette as of press time. Alyssas Antique Depot in Pace and the Copper Possum Antique Mall in Milton will be handling registration for the Milton and Pace areas. For more detailed information or to register, please contact Kim Macarthy (Copper Possum Antique Mall) at 554-3906 or Alyssa Schepper (Alyssas Antique Depot) at 994-9114. Walmart met with the City of Milton back in 2007 and purchased property on Highway 87 North just south of Whiting Field. According to the City of Milton planning and zoning director Randy Jorgenson, the retail giant has already pulled sewer permits on the property and Florida Department of Transportation permits. The retail store still has a development order in place until November 2014. Kara Dixon, who lives about a half an hour north of the Pace Walmart said that having a mega store closer to her house would make it easier on her gas budget. Being on one income, we shop there (at Pace), and having one closer to home would be great, Dixon said. If prices were cheaper elsewhere we would shop there. Others like Deborah Callaway Mason of Milton said lower prices would still not inuence her to shop at the superstore. Id rather shop our local stores we have, Callaway said. Keri Litchhult who doesnt even live in Milton, said that when she thought about moving to the area, not having a superstore was one of the selling points. When I was thinking about moving down there, one of the key factors was that you didnt have a Walmart, Litchhult said. Stick with mom and pop stores. Despite what many said, Don Ciesiolka said that jobs really seem to be the bigger picture in the Walmart epidemic. I say do it Walmart.they will have to hire a lot of people, hundreds of people who need work will once again be able to get back and join the workforce, Ciesiolka said. Why does Walmart keep putting it off? We dont want it, we need it. Others like Gerry Swetsky said it could be bad for the smaller stores in the area. Be warned, if this happens, its a death knoll for locally owned businesses, Swetsky said. It happened in my home town in Pennsylvania. Despite the delay, with the development order still in place, Walmart can come build at any time until 2014, even though they are taking a short break. WALMART from page A1PHOTOS BY MATHEW PELLEGRINO | Press Gazette The bus driver rear-ended this SUV in front of the Bealls/Big Lots parking lot in Milton on Monday morning. The driver of the SUV was transported to the hospital with unknown conditions. Below: Medical personnel tend to children as they come off of the school bus. All of the children that were injured were sent to Santa Rosa Medical Center for further evaluation. The incident was the second bus accident involving a Santa Rosa County Durham school bus driver since the start of the school year three weeks ago. The last bus accident involved a motorcycle striking a school bus on Highway 90 in Pace. The bus was attempting to cross Highway 90 from Sports Drive in Pace when it crossed the path of a motorcyclist. The biker sustained serious injuries. The bus had an accident free driver license plate for 2009-10. The plate indicates that the driver was not involved in any accident for that school year. According to Bob Downin, general manager for Durham School Services for the Santa Rosa County School System, the school district reviews all accidents involving school buses and retrains employees after accidents. Downin told the Press Gazette this during the last school bus incident. He did not return phone calls as of press time. Durham operates more than 12,000 school buses and serves more than 300 school districts in 29 states across the country. Jud Crane, the Santa Rosa County School districts director of purchasing and contract administration was at the hospital with the injured children shortly after the incident and referred the Press Gazette to Durham School Bus Services for comment. No one was available for comment. FLEA from page A1PRESS GG AZETTE FILE PHOTOLittle ea markets popped up all along Highway 90 last year. ACCIDENT from page A1

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A9Wednesday, September 12, 2012 6515813 Vegetables 10 lbs 5 lbsPurplehull, Purplehull w/snaps, Zipper, Crowder, Blackeye, Lady Creme or English Peas . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Speckled Butterbeans. . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Baby Limas (Petite) Southern Butter Peas . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Ford Hook Limas . . . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Cut Okra, Cut Squash, Snap Beans, Broccoli .$21.00 . $13.00 Baby Boiling Okra, Season Blend . . . . .2lb Bag . . $6.00 Turnip Greens, Collard Greens . . . . . .3Lb Bag . . $6.00 Super Sweet Cut Corn . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00New Items . . . . . . . 10 lbs . . 5 lbsCalifornia Blend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13.00 Navy Beans . . . . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Pinto Beans . . . . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00 Shoepeg Field Corn . . . . . . . . .$23.00 . $14.00Fruit 5 lbs Sliced Peaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00 Blackberries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00 Pineapple Chunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00 Whole Strawberries. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00 Mixed Fruit (Peaches, Pineapple & Strawberries) . . .$15.009 am 1 pm at 9 Mile Road Location 2 pm 4 pm at Five PointSATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15THAll Items are Fresh, Clean, Cut, Shelled and PackagedNow Accepting All Major Credit Cards & EBT228-990-5605 bandhveggies@yahoo.com TidesPensacola Bay Thursday, September 13, 2012 4:00 AM CDT Moonrise 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 9:46 AM CDT High tide 1.54 Feet 5:13 PM CDT Moonset 6:56 PM CDT Sunset 7:11 PM CDT Low tide 0.49 Feet Friday, September 14, 2012 5:00 AM CDT Moonrise 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 10:57 AM CDT High tide 1.42 Feet 5:50 PM CDT Moonset 6:54 PM CDT Sunset 7:20 PM CDT Low tide 0.67 Feet Saturday, September 15, 2012 1:00 AM CDT High tide 0.88 Feet 4:49 AM CDT Low tide 0.82 Feet 6:02 AM CDT Moonrise 6:33 AM CDT Sunrise 12:21 PM CDT High tide 1.28 Feet 6:27 PM CDT Moonset 6:53 PM CDT Sunset 7:10 PM CDT Low tide 0.88 Feet 9:10 PM CDT New moon Sunday, September 16, 2012 12:04 AM CDT High tide 1.04 Feet 6:34 AM CDT Sunrise 6:43 AM CDT Low tide 0.67 Feet 7:06 AM CDT Moonrise 2:09 PM CDT High tide 1.13 Feet 6:20 PM CDT Low tide 1.04 Feet 6:52 PM CDT Sunset 7:06 PM CDT Moonset 11:54 PM CDT High tide 1.25 Feet East Bay Thursday, September 13, 2012 3:59 AM CDT Moonrise 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 10:31 AM CDT High tide 1.85 Feet 5:11 PM CDT Moonset 6:55 PM CDT Sunset 8:29 PM CDT Low tide 0.58 Feet Friday, September 14, 2012 4:59 AM CDT Moonrise 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 11:42 AM CDT High tide 1.70 Feet 5:49 PM CDT Moonset 6:53 PM CDT Sunset 8:38 PM CDT Low tide 0.81 Feet Saturday, September 15, 2012 1:45 AM CDT High tide 1.06 Feet 6:01 AM CDT Moonrise 6:05 AM CDT Low tide 0.98 Feet 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 1:04 PM CDT High tide 1.53 Feet 6:26 PM CDT Moonset 6:52 PM CDT Sunset 8:26 PM CDT Low tide 1.05 Feet 9:10 PM CDT New moon Sunday, September 16, 2012 12:47 AM CDT High tide 1.25 Feet 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 7:05 AM CDT Moonrise 8:01 AM CDT Low tide 0.80 Feet 2:52 PM CDT High tide 1.36 Feet 6:51 PM CDT Sunset 7:04 PM CDT Moonset 7:36 PM CDT Low tide 1.25 Feet Blackwater River Thursday, September 13, 2012 3:59 AM CDT Moonrise 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 11:27 AM CDT High tide 1.85 Feet 5:12 PM CDT Moonset 6:55 PM CDT Sunset 8:59 PM CDT Low tide 0.58 Feet Friday, September 14, 2012 5:00 AM CDT Moonrise 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 12:38 PM CDT High tide 1.70 Feet 5:49 PM CDT Moonset 6:54 PM CDT Sunset 9:08 PM CDT Low tide 0.81 Feet Saturday, September 15, 2012 2:41 AM CDT High tide 1.06 Feet 6:02 AM CDT Moonrise 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 6:35 AM CDT Low tide 0.98 Feet 2:00 PM CDT High tide 1.53 Feet 6:26 PM CDT Moonset 6:52 PM CDT Sunset 8:56 PM CDT Low tide 1.05 Feet 9:10 PM CDT New moon Sunday, September 16, 2012 1:43 AM CDT High tide 1.25 Feet 6:33 AM CDT Sunrise 7:05 AM CDT Moonrise 8:31 AM CDT Low tide 0.80 Feet 3:48 PM CDT High tide 1.36 Feet 6:51 PM CDT Sunset 7:05 PM CDT Moonset 8:06 PM CDT Low tide 1.25 Feet Navarre Beach Thursday, September 13, 2012 3:58 AM CDT Moonrise 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 7:48 AM CDT High tide 1.56 Feet 4:07 PM CDT Low tide 0.67 Feet 5:11 PM CDT Moonset 6:54 PM CDT Sunset 10:57 PM CDT High tide 0.92 Feet Friday, September 14, 2012 1:06 AM CDT Low tide 0.89 Feet 4:59 AM CDT Moonrise 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 9:04 AM CDT High tide 1.48 Feet 3:47 PM CDT Low tide 0.79 Feet 5:48 PM CDT Moonset 6:53 PM CDT Sunset 10:37 PM CDT High tide 1.00 Feet Saturday, September 15, 2012 2:32 AM CDT Low tide 0.80 Feet 6:01 AM CDT Moonrise 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 10:24 AM CDT High tide 1.36 Feet 3:43 PM CDT Low tide 0.90 Feet 6:26 PM CDT Moonset 6:52 PM CDT Sunset 9:10 PM CDT New moon 10:25 PM CDT High tide 1.13 Feet Sunday, September 16, 2012 3:42 AM CDT Low tide 0.69 Feet 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 7:04 AM CDT Moonrise 11:46 AM CDT High tide 1.23 Feet 3:45 PM CDT Low tide 0.98 Feet 6:50 PM CDT Sunset 7:04 PM CDT Moonset 9:15 PM CDT High tide 1.31 Feet Special to the Press Gazette This past spring, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) biologists tagged 136 trophy largemouth bass greater than 8 pounds in Floridas public waters. Each trophy bass had a yellow plastic dart tag inserted into the back of the sh just below the dorsal (back) n. Each tag has a unique number that identies a monetary reward value and information on how to report catches. Tagged bass came from 41 lakes and rivers that varied in size, water quality, habitat types, sh populations and angler demographics. Angler catch and harvest rates vary between lakes and rivers, so this approach allows for a more informed statewide estimate. After six months, results are already revealing. So far, 21 percent of tagged trophy bass have been caught and reported, and 83 percent of them were released alive. Anglers shing in tournaments accounted for 22 percent of reports. Thirty percent of trophy sh reported were caught on live shiners. Interestingly, 28 percent of tagged bass heavier than 10 pounds have been caught, but just three of seven (43 percent) of those were released. This shows bigger bass are equally susceptible to capture but suffer increased harvest. Most anglers harvested trophy bass to have a skin-mount made, rather than for food. The most recent capture was a sh stocked by the FWC as a ngerling but weighed more than 10 pounds when it was caught and released in Lake Talquin. Another recent tagging study by the FWC and University of Florida revealed that 20 percent to 35 percent of all largemouth bass longer than 14 inches were caught annually by anglers. Since trophy bass typically take six to 10 years to reach that size, its evident that recycling plays an important role. Although catch rates of individual trophy bass may be about the same as for smaller sh, there are fewer trophy sh. This information will provide an important baseline for when TrophyCatch (see below) launches in October. The FWC will continue the statewide tagging study for the next ve years to estimate changes in catch-andrelease rates of trophy sh and angler participation. Anglers should look for tagged sh. The plastic tags are 5-inch yellow streamers with Trophy printed on them, followed by a number, reward value and contact information. Over time, tags may get covered by algae, which can be rubbed off to reveal tag information. If you catch a tagged sh, cut the tag as close to the skin of the sh as possible and return the tag to the FWC. Anglers may release or harvest tagged bass as they normally would, depending upon local harvest regulations; however, only released bass are eligible for separate TrophyCatch recognition and rewards. For details or to report tags, call sheries research biologist Jason Dotson at 850-363-6037. This tagging study was initiated partially to implement the Black Bass Management Plan that was developed with input from biologists, anglers and stakeholders that the FWC approved in June 2011. Anglers indicated that greater opportunities for trophy-size sh should be an important component of the plan. So the FWC made trophy largemouth bass management a priority and plans to launch a trophy bass documentation program called TrophyCatch in October.Trophy bass tagging study already revealing

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www.srpressgazette.comWednesday, September 12, 2012 ASection SP O RTSPage 10By BILL GAMBLIN288-0037 | @SRPG_Bill sports@srpressgazette.com Kyle Troup had gured out Avalon Bowling Center except for lanes 17 and 18, but that didnt matter as he snapped a two-year winless streak to claim the third annual Fran Bohlman Memorial Title at Avalon Bowling Center. Heading into the position round 39 pins separated the top three bowlers Wesley Newman, Troup, and Richard Langton. By the time the pins had fallen Newman saw his 12 pin advantage turn into a 76 pin de cit. Troup, who had battled with Newman all Sunday for the top spot, bowled a 267 to Newmans 179. I started out the day in third place after a terrible eight games yesterday, Troup said. Then this morning I won my rst ve games and jumped into the lead. That is when I faced Wesley on lanes 17 and 18 and he took the lead back. While Newman struggled to nd the pocket in the position round, Langton bowled a 256 to move up to the second spot. Another second place, Langton said when he was presented with the runners-up check. I have lost to Sam (Zurich) and now second to Kyle. I enjoy coming here I would just like to move up one more spot; maybe next year. The top local nisher was Charles E. Cliffford of Fort Walton Beach, who nished ninth, with a pin count of 4,364 for an average of just over 218 pins a game. Miltons Robert Kuzirian claimed the seniors title despite failing to qualify for the top 12 on Sunday with a pin count of 1590, which was 57 pins out of the money. South Region PBA pro Jerry Bohlman, whos mother the tournament is named in the honor of, nished 25th overall wand was just under 100 pins from cashing. Bohlman bowling a 157 on Saturday, which accounted for 43 of those pins he missed by. Troup, who only wins when his legendary bowling father Guppy Troup is not around, rode the roller coaster of emotion on Sunday in the position round. That last game I tried to pay attention to my game and count down the frames, Troup said. This time I couldnt shake the nerves, but I worked through them. When you miss a shot there are times you go through this emotional roller coaster and I just tried to focus on my game to make sure I took care of business on my end for the win. PBA South Region director Sam Zurich announced Sunday the fourth annual Fran Bohlman Memorial had been booked for October 2013.Kickoff meeting for Fire Truck PullThe annual Ronald McDonald House Charities Fire Truck Pull is Oct. 13. This family friendly event will take place in downtown Pensacola at Seville Quarter. Teams of 20 people will compete to pull a re truck 50 feet in the least amount of time. There will be a kickoff meeting at Red Lobster on Ninth Avenue on Friday, Sept. 14, from 11:30 a.m. 1 p.m. This meeting will serve as a chance for individuals, groups, clubs or businesses interested in forming a team to get information and register for the event. Lunch will be available for purchase during the meeting.MHS Soccer Golf TournamentThe Milton High School Soccer program will host a four-man scramble golf tournament Saturday at Stonebrook Golf Club. The cost is $65 per player and includes a round of golf, range balls, dinner and prizes. For more information or to sign up, call MHS girls soccer coach Jeff Klug at 449-0803.Catching SharksThis month, the Emerald Coast Saltwater Seminar Series presented by North Light Marina and Yamaha will discuss catching sharks. From inshore targets of bull shark, blacktip and spinners to offshore monsters such as mako, tiger and hammerheads, all aspects of shark shing will be covered starting at 7 p.m. at Northlight Marina in Niceville on Sept. 19. Whether you want to target them from the beach or a boat, our experts have you covered. A free buffet will be offered starting at 6:30 p.m., and there is no cost to attend. For more information, visit saltwaterevents.com or call Sonny at 384-7737.Annual Down Syndrome Motorcycle RideThe fourth annual Down Syndrome Motorcycle Ride is Oct. 13 hosted by Christs Descendents. The ride starts at the Harley Davidson on Hwy 29 in Pensacola. Registration begins at 9 a.m. with rst bike out at 10 a.m. $10 per bike, $5 for lunch and $5 for 6 raf e tickets. The ride stops at Stokes Victory Polaris where there will be a cookout and a huge raf e. For more information, call 255-0254.19th annual Chamber Golf Classic TournamentThe Santa Rosa County Chamber of Commerce will host its 19th annual Tournament on Oct. 5 at Stonebrook Golf Club. Sponsorship opportunities remain available at this time. For more information on this event or to register call 623-2339.Ghost Chase 5KThe University of West Florida will host a Ghost Chase 5K on Oct. 13 at 9 a.m. Community members and students are encouraged to register for this 3.1 mile trail run on the beautiful University of West Florida campus. Community members wishing to participate in the can register on Active.com. Early bird registration is $15 before Oct. 6. The cost then increases to $20. The Ghost Chase 5K is free for UWF students. Students can register at uwf.edu/recreation. Overall and divisional winners will receive prizes. Halloween costumes are encouraged, and the best costume will receive a prize. Snacks and refreshments will be served at the race. Limit of 150 participants.Benny Russell Hall of Fame nominationsNominations are now being accepted for Pace High Schools Bennett C. Russell Athletic Hall of Fame. The induction will be pregame of the Nov. 2 Homecoming football game. The Russell Hall of Fame was established in 2003 to honor former Pace High School athletes who distinguished themselves on and off the playing eld. Nominees must be a former Patriot Athlete who has been out of school at least 10 years, an honorable individual who re ects the strong character of Benny Russell, and have proven themselves as a positive role model in the community. Nominations will be accepted through Sept. 28 and may be picked up at any Pace High School Of ce or at www.pacehighschool.net. Sports BRIEFS Troup strikes his way to Bohlman Memorial title Top 15 nishers 1. Kyle Troup 4644 2. Richard Langton 4606 3. Wesley Newman 4568 4. Randy Weiss 4563 5. Jason Sterner 4508 6. Connor Pickford 4419 7. David Circle 4409 8. Dale Eagle 4400 9. Charles Clifford Jr. 4364 10. Brandon Bivens 4353 11. Matt Taylor 4316 12. David Shinn 4217 13. Aaron Childree 1652 14. Walter Williams Jr. 1652 15. Jeffery Evans 1647 Other area bowlers 19. Robert Kuzirian 1590 24. Mike Christenson 1562 25. Jerry Bohlman 1558 26. Travis Pittman 1557 28. Bill Ziegler 1550 29. Tony Myers 1540 32. Michael McHaley 1510 33. Michael Mabrie 1497 34. Elbert Womble 1461 39. Philip Warr 1398 41. Scott Baehr 1363 44. Jacob Lee 1217 BILL GAMBLIN | Press GazetteKyle Troup ended a two-year winless streak on Sunday as he won the 2012 Fran Bohlman Memorial at Avalon Bowling Center. By BILL GAMBLIN288-0037 | @SRPG_Bill sports@srpressgazette.com Week three of high school football will see some big tests across Santa Rosa County. Jay saw some mistakes hurt them in game two of 2012 with a 52-14 loss at Holmes County, but they are hoping to start 2012 at home in a positive way as they host Sneads at 7 p.m. We want to get a win here at home, said Jay head coach Kent Smith. It will be nice to be back home and play in front of our fans who are very supportive of the team and program. Sneads has some real good skill players and they play real well as a team. Ricky Co eld was a bright spot for the Royals last week in the loss as he rushed for 163 yards and one touchdown. We made some mistakes early, but we tried to come back, Smith said. We learned from last Friday that we are not where we want to be. Jay quarterback Tate Upton scored the other touchdown in the third quarter. The Royals will play their rst home game and that should provide a big boost for a still young squad in Jay. In Pace the Patriots will face a big test against the Navarre Raiders. The Patriots (2-0) are coming off a big game against Niceville where they capitalized on four turnovers in the 28-17 win in enemy territory. Pace was led by J.C. Curry who scored on a 62-yard pass from Bryce Moore and then his second touchdown came when he converted an Eagles turnover into a 24-yard run to give the Pats the lead for good 21-17. Ryan Santoso took two Eagles turnovers and converted them into six points himself with eld goals from 30 and 42 yards out respectively. And sophomore Quaide Weimerskirch scored his fourth touchdown of the early season with a 14-yard run in the nal minutes of the game. Pace will host Navarre on Friday at 7:30 p.m. Navarre is still reeling from a last second 25-24 loss to Pensacola High, who rallied from 12 points behind with less than seven minutes in the fourth quarter. Milton had struggled getting its offense moving in the rst game of the season, but that was not the case at home against Panama City Rutherford. The Panthers (1-1) took it to the Rams in convincing fashion with a 31-3 win. Offensively this was the most complete game Milton had in some time as it operated out of a three and four receiver set most of the night. Cody Lowe was on his game as he found Dejon Funderburk in the rst half for a 36 yard strike and Isaiah Jones in the fourth quarter for a 40 yard touchdown to put the game way out of reach. While the passing game clicked, so did the running game. William Barnes scored on a four yard run to open the game and Andre Flakes took his spot in the Wild Panther scheme and rumbled 85 yards for a score. Milton now has the task of traveling to Fort Walton Beach on Friday to face the Vikings (2-0) at 7:30 p.m.Area games of interest Week 3 Milton at Fort Walton Beach, 7:30 p.m. Navarre at Pace, 7:30 p.m. Sneads at Jay, 7 p.m. Chipley at Northview, 7 p.m. Pine Forest at Niceville, 7 p.m. West Florida at Tate, 7:30 p.m. Choctaw at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Pensacola at Pensacola Catholic, 7:30 p.m. Escambia at Rutherford, 7:30 p.m. Week 2 Scores Pace 28, Niceville 17 Milton 31, Rutherford 3 Holmes Co. 52, Jay 14 Pensacola Catholic 14, Gulf Breeze 7 Pensacola 25, Navarre 24 West Florida 39, Washington 0 Fort Walton Beach 27, Tate 7 Crestview 35, Escambia 7 Marianna 48, Northview 42 (OT) Pine Forest 72, Arlington Country Day 0 Godby 28, Choctaw 21 Freeport 41, South Walton 7 Baker 55, Rocky Bayou 33 Arnold 44, Amite Co. (Miss.) 0 Vernon 38, Wewa 6 William Barnes runs around the right end for a big gain in Miltons 31-3 win over Rutherford on Friday. Milton will take on Fort Walton Beach on Friday at 7 p.m.BY BILL GAMBLIN | Press GazetteDISTRICT 1 6-ATeam Overall District Pace 2-0 0-0 Pine Forest 1-0 0-0 Pensacola 1-0 0-0 Milton 1-1 0-0 Tate 0-1 0-0 Washington 0-2 0-0 Escambia 0-2 0-0DISTRICT 2 6-AFt. Walton 2-0 0-0 Crestview 2-0 0-0 Navarre 1-1 0-0 Niceville 1-1 0-0 Mosley 1-1 0-0 Choctaw 0-2 0-0DISTRICT 1 5-AWest Florida 2-0 0-0 Bay 2-0 0-0 Gulf Breeze 1-1 0-0 Arnold 1-1 0-0 Rutherford 0-2 0-0DISTRICT 1 1-ABaker 2-0 0-0 Jay 1-1 0-0 Northview 1-1 0-0 Freeport 1-1 0-0 Jay, Pace teams head home

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www.crestviewbulletin.comSection SP O RTS Section BINSIDEMore local newsThursday High school volleyball Choctaw at Crestview: F, 4 p.m.; JV, 5 p.m.; V, 6 p.m. Central at Baker: JV, 4:30 p.m.; V, 5:30 p.m. Jay at Laurel Hill: JV, 4:30 p.m.; V, 5:30 p.m. Junior varsity football Baker at Freeport: 6 p.m. Baker at Bozeman: 6 p.m. Freshman football Middle school football Lewis at Davidson: 6:30 p.m. Shoal River at Bruner: 6:30 p.m. Friday High school football Bolles at Crestview: 7 p.m. Holmes County at Baker: 7 p.m.GOLF Knights of Columbus tournament The Crestview Knights of Columbus Council 7968 will host a four-person scramble golf tournament Oct. 8 at Foxwood Country Club. The tournament is scheduled to start at 8 a.m. Cost is $40 for Foxwood members and $50 for nonmembers. Joann Murray Tournament The inaugural Joann Murray Memorial Golf Tournament is set for Oct. 13 at Foxwood Country Club. The four-person scramble tournament will begin with a 1:30 p.m. shotgun start. The tournament will bene t Making Strides Against Breast Cancer. Cost is $200 per team. For more information, call B.J. Thomhave at 682-2012 or Terri Cloyd at 496-9352. Christian Thomhave Memorial The 11th annual Christian Thomhave Memorial Golf Tournament will take place Oct. 26 at Foxwood Country Club with a noon shotgun start. Cost of the two-person scramble is $44 per player and $34 for Foxwood members. The tournament bene ts Northwest Florida State College. Six ights will comprise the event, with cash prizes awarded in each ight. For more information, contact B.J. Thomhave at 682-2012, 826-2012 or bj@foxwoodcc. com. By RANDY DICKSON682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com BAKER Nobody can accuse Baker football coach Matt Brunson of running up the score on an outmanned opponent. Brunson has always been a coach who takes his foot off the gas and empties his bench when a game is hand. The second quarter of Fridays game against Rocky Bayou Christian might or might not have set a school record for scoring, but it was one for the books. The Gators ran 16 plays and scored six touchdowns in the quarter. D.J. Thomas had 93 of his team-best 143 yards in the second and scored two of his three touchdowns as the Gators torched the Knights for 42 points in the period. Bakers starters had most of the second half off, but by then the Gators led 55-20. When the nal horn sounded at Doug Grif th Memorial Stadium, the nal score was 55-33. The Gators had four scoring plays of more than 40 yards. Joining Thomas in the Gators big play category were Adam Crowson with a 46-yard run and Richard Stroheker with a 60-yard touchdown run and an Coach: Win over Holmes County would get Baker some recognitionBy RANDY DICKSON682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com BAKER It will be an earlyseason football battle of the unbeatens Friday, when Holmes County visits Doug Grif th Memorial Stadium to take on Baker. The Blue Devils (2-0) are riding high, having beaten Blountstown 20-0 in their opener on Aug. 31 and disposing of Jay 52-14 last week. Baker also is 2-0 with wins over South Walton and Rocky Bayou Christian. Baker coach Matt Brunson knows the Gators will have their hands full against Holmes County, which was ranked No. 4 in the state in Class 1A a week ago and is expected to move up this week following a loss by Northview. The bottom line is we are 20 and we are getting ready for a very good football team, he said. I think, thus far, in our season we had a very spirited classic with Jay, we beat a tough South Walton team in week one, we got an up-and-coming Rocky Bayou team in week two and now we play the No. 3 team in Class 1A. Theyve got a two-headed monster, offensively, with Kodi Russ, who is a running back and free safety (on defense) and Junior Miles. Russ is a great player, (and with) the Miles kid at quarterback, and an outside linebacker, thats kind of a Hall of Famers past and futureBy RANDY DICKSON682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com Crestview High School will honor inductees in the inaugural Crestview Athletic Hall of Fame on Friday. There will be a luncheon for the individual inductees Friday afternoon. Individual and team inductees will be recognized at Jack Foster Stadium during the Crestview-Bolles School football games half-time ceremonies. I applaud Crestview head football coach and athletic director Kevin Pettis for promoting the idea of a hall of fame and pushing for the halls reality. Too often, people promote an idea and then let the idea wither on the vine. It is important to celebrate athletes past, present and future achievements both on and off the eld. Athletes from the past can serve as a standard for todays athletes and those boys and girls just now discovering the joy of sports. Moreover, todays high school athlete is the young man or young woman whom local kids look up to and dream of being like. I never saw Tom Hammonds play basketball in person, but I did see him play on TV a few times. It isnt a stretch to say that Hammonds is the best basketball player to come out of Okaloosa County. John Bale played baseball at Crestview and stuck around the Major Leagues for seven years, pitching for Toronto, Baltimore, Cincinnati and Kansas City. I did see Eric Flinchum wrestle for the Bulldogs and remember some of his exploits on the way to winning a Class 1A state championship in the 189-pound back in 2002. Flinchum turned in the best individual season in Bulldog wrestling history that year, going a perfect 36-0 with 27 pins. Ive also had the opportunity to get to know some of the other inductees in this years class. I never saw Tim Gillis play baseball, but Ive gotten to know him pretty well in his role as the Bulldog baseball coach. Dexter Day is my contemporary of sorts. He graduated from Crestview in 1978, and I graduated from Gulf Breeze in 1976. In talking with Dexter, Ive discovered we share a limited number of memories. He was probably on the eld when Crestview beat my Dolphin squad the last game of the 1975 season, but I wont hold that against him. Im sure, as I talk with these men and the other hall inductees, I will hear stories about the way things were way back in their day. These folks and countless others have helped build the history that is Crestview High School athletics. Crestview has a rich history of sports that grows with the exploits of each new season which raises the question of who, among the current Bulldog athletes, will one day be in the Hall of Fame. Yes, the future Hall of Famers are todays athletes as they add their own chapter to the storied Bulldog tradition.Crestview enters Bolles game undefeated after win over EscambiaBy RANDY DICKSON682-6524 | @BigRandle randyd@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW Fresh off a 35-7 win over Escambia last Friday, the Crestview football team (2-0) faces its toughest test of the young season, as defending Class 4A state champion The Bolles School, of Jacksonville, visits Jack Foster Stadium for the 7 p.m. kickoff. Adding to the big nights excitement is that the Bulldogs will recognize members of the inaugural Crestview High School Sports Hall of Fame at halftime. We are excited to have these guys back to honor what we have done in the past, Crestview head coach and athletic director Kevin Pettis said. We are a product of what we have done, and we are excited about getting that started. It is going to be a packed house, and weve got a lot of people ying in for the Hall of Fame. Its the rst ever Hall of Fame, and so Im excited about that and the kids will be, too. Pettis knows excitement will only carry the team so far against a rugged Bolles squad (2-0) that is coached by Corky Rogers, the most successful coach in state history, with more than 400 wins under his belt. You know, Corky is the winningest coach in the country, and he does a great job, Pettis said. They run the Wing-T and they just try to out-formation you and put themselves in the best situation to run their plays. Theyve got great players and great coaches, and we are excited about having them in the Jack. We are going to pack the Jack, and we are excited about having them. Im glad we dont have to make that trip. Crestview traveled to Jacksonville last year to play Bolles and lost 31-0 in a game that was closer than the nal score indicated. The Bulldogs had 213 yards in total offense to Bolles 197, but four turnovers and injuries to key players like Dakota Dean NORTH END ZONERandy DicksonWednesday, September 12, 2012 Page B1 Thursday High school volleyball SPORTS SHORTSSee SHORTS B3 Gators looking for respectGators running game key to winRANDY DICKSON | News BulletinD.J. Thomas turns the corner on his way to a threetouchdown performance against Rocky Bayou Christian on Friday. See BAKER B3 WEEK IN PREVIEW Bulldogs hope for Hall of Fame winRANDY DICKSON | News BulletinABOVE: Crestview tailback Micah Reed and his brother, Emmanuel, will be counted on to come up big if the Bulldogs are to upend defending Class 4A state champions Bolles on Friday. LEFT: Tyler Henderson will try to lead an opportunistic Crestview defense to a win over Bolles on Friday. Henderson had two interceptions and returned one for a touchdown in the win over Escambia last week.See BULLDOGS B3 See GATORS B3

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LocalB2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Special to the Press GazetteFor children who have experienced abuse or neglect, a pair of brand new pajamas can bring a little comfort to what often is a frightening and confusing situation. So for the fourth consecutive year, FamiliesFirst Network of Lakeview is conducting a campaign to collect new, unworn pajamas for children under its supervision. The Tucking Kids in Safe and Sound pajama drive. The pajamas will be distributed to children during the holiday season. Collection boxes for pajama donations will be at all FamiliesFirst service centers and placed at various locations throughout Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton counties. Needed are new pajamas in infant through adult sizes, which are for larger children. FamiliesFirst Network is responsible for the safety, stability and well-being of abused and neglected children in Northwest Florida. Under a contract with the state of Florida, FamiliesFirst provides foster care and related services for children who cannot safely remain with their families. The drive ends Oct. 13. To learn more, contact FamiliesFirst Networks foster home development staff by calling 453-7766.Right: Milton Rotary President Bubba Drinkard presents the ever sought Rotary pen to Robin Punkyo and Greg Brown. The Club received an update on what is going on with Gulf Power from Mrs. Punkyo and an overview of some of the amendments that will be voted on in November in the state of Florida. The Milton Rotary Club meets each Tuesday at Red Barn Bar-B-Que at noon and we invite you to join us.SUBMITTED PHOTOs SCampaign seeks pajamas for abused, neglected children ROTARY HONORsS sSPEAKERsSLeft: Milton Rotary President Bubba Drinkard is seen presenting the world famous Rotary pen to Martha Zimmerman and Jenea Highll of the Santa Rosa Health Department. They told the club about the Healthy Start Program and how the program works along with how many people are helped each year with the program. For more information please contact Martha or Jenea at the Santa Rosa County Health Department. FamiliesFirst Network of Lakeview is conducting a campaign to collect new, unworn pajamas for children under its supervision. The Tucking Kids in Safe and Sound pajama drive.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B3Wednesday, September 12, 2012 KEY MVOP misdemeanor violation of probation FVOP felony violation of probation Agg aggravated Poss possession Meth methamphetamine DUI driving under the in uence DWLSR driving while license suspended or revoked FTA failure to appear FTR failure to register SF sentenced felony SM sentenced misdemeanor LEO law enforcement of cer DV Domestic Violence The following arrests were made beginning Aug. 26 through Aug. 30, 2012. Aug. 26 Busbee, Christopher Steven; Male; 33; 5578 Allie Rae St., Milton; Burglary Dwelling, Structure or Conveyance Armed; Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense; Aggravated Assault With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Aggravated Battery Cause Bodily Harm or Disability; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Curnow, Roger Thomas; Male; 58; 7820 Parkwood Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Davenport III, Robert Elmo; Male; 30; 6580 Baxley Rd., Milton; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Vehicle Theft Grand Theft of Motor Vehicle; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. DeMott, Jeremy Adam; Male; 20; 5914 Congress St., Gulf Breeze; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Juan Doe 12-5169 (AKA Daniel Aguilar); Male; 32; 3129 Constitution St., Navarre; Aggravated Assault With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Aggravated Battery Person Uses a Deadly Weapon. Economy, Lauren Nicole; Female; 25; 2500 Trailwood Dr., Cantonment, Fla.; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use. Flowers, Myron Eugene; Male; 37; 761 Piney Lane, Cantonment, Fla.; Hit and Run Leave Scene of Crash Involving Damage to Property; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Third of Subsequent Offense. Garner, Christian Marcel; Male; 33; 5603 Shell Rd., Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria (2 counts). Jordan, Thornton Zachary; Male; 50; 4335 Oak Lane, Milton; Aggravated Assault (DV) With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence. King, Benjamin Wayne; Male; 33; 108 Oak Park Dr., Columbia, Tenn.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. McMillan, Vance Auris; Male; 29; 1810 West Cervantes St., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Moody, Courtney Danielle; Female; 24; 5017 Neal Jones Rd., Jay; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000 (2 counts). Peaden, Derrick Lynn; Male; 35; 4337 Sunshine Park Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria (2 counts). President III, Charles Michael; Male; 19; 1592 N. Highway 52, Monks Corner, S.C.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/ Juvenile Non Criteria. Sagona, Michael Louis; Male; 26; 218 Black n Cove, Slidell, La.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Vowell, Jr., Rocky Lee; Male; 27; 9853 Bridlewood Rd., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended First Offense; Pass Counterfeited Bank Bill, Check, Draft, or Note; Obstruct Police Divulge Police Radio Info to Aiud Suspect; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession and or Use. Wallace, Richard Phillip; Male; 33; 6896 Kapoc Dr., Badgad, Fla.; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Making False Report of Commission of Crime. Hendler, Clayton Lee Wayne; Male; 13; 3115 Woods Way, Gulf Breeze; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed (14 counts); Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense (2 counts); Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000 (9 counts); Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Stockstill, Robert Dell; Male; 27; 4134 Railroad St., Pace; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Fail to Register Motor Vehicle; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Neeley, Rose Ann; Female; 42; 7790 Rube Pace Rd., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Ellis, Edwina Latice; Female; 30; 6746 Jackson Lane, Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. LaPointe, Deborah Lynn; Female; 51; 6335 Heronwalk Dr., Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Pinella, Kiara; Female; 21; 3211 Logan Dr., Pensacola; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Rollins, Paul Allen; Male; 60; 3991 Bay Point Dr., Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Aug. 29 Barnett, Ronald Bruce; Male; 52; 1258 Summit Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation Within 10 Years; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Carrying Concealed Weapon Firearm. Broxson, Taylor Haskell; Male; 31; 8444 Rynes Circle, Navarre; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Harmon, Kelly Susan; Female; 46; 8783 John Hamm Rd., Milton; Battery (DV) On Person 65 Years of Age or Older. Hatcher Jr., Anthony Dwayne; Male; 27; 1375 Rainbow Ave., Pensacola; Burglary Unoccupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300; Dealing In Stolen Property (3 counts); Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Marshall, Shantel Patricia; Female; 24; 1068 Trammel St., Pensacola; Larceny Retail Theft $300 More Cordinate Others. Oxner, Joshua Dewayne; Male; 27; 7459 Westgate Dr., Milton; Battery (DV) Commit Domestic Battery by Strangulation. Preston, Daniel; Male; 37; 7819 NW228th St. (Union Correctional Institute), Raiford, Fla.; Lewd Lascivious Behavior Commit Sex Act in Presence of Correctional Facility Employee. Willey III, John Robert; Male; 21; 1543 Cypress Bend Trail, Gulf Breeze; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Wu, Guoqing; Male; 48; 3131 Bernath Drive, Milton; Conditional Release Violation Pre Trial Release Condition Violation for Domestic Violation; Obstructing Justice Intimidate, Threaten, Etc., a Victim, Witness, or Informant; Obstructing Justice (DV) Retaliate Against Informant, Victim, or Witness Without Injury. Moore, Kirk Treandas; Male; 18; 6682 Brock Ave., Milton; Resist Of cer Flee Elude LEO with Lights or Siren Activated; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence. Tyson, Mark Anthony; Male; 22; 1520 Kyle Dr., Pensacola; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Baker, John Kendall; Male; 44; 9400 Biloxi Springs Rd., Biloxi Springs, Miss.; Traf c Offense Refuse to Submit to DUI test After License Suspended; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation in More Than 10 Years. Barnett, Ronald Bruce; Male; 52; 1258 Summit Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Vioaltion Within 10 Years. Ingram, Robert David; Male; 45; 5944 Highway 18, Montevallo, Ala.; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Breland Jr., George Terry; Male; 45; 1300 Liahona Trial, McDavid, Fla.; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Burgess, Robert Paul; Male; 32; 5769 Eagle Dr., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Hardy, Robert William Cleveland; Male; 35; 6461 Walnut St., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Jasperson, Gordon Lynn; Male; 69; 1142 Laguna Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Aug. 30 Day, Anthony Thomas; Male; 47; 5732 Berry St., Milton; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Larceny of Credit Card; Fraud Illegal Use of Credit Cards Use More Than Two Times in Six Months to Obtain Goods, Money $100 or More. Goggin, Joshua Steven; Male; 33; 6951 Sash Pine Rd., Pensacola; Cocaine Possession. Locke, Shawna Denee; Female; 43; 5391 Nagel Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/ Juvenile Non Criteria. McLean, Daniel Lee; Male; 59; 7999 Red Dr., Milton; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Fail to Register Motor Vehicle; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Attach Registration License Plate Not Assigned (2 counts); Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Waldrop, Jimmy Thomas; Male; 35; 4440 Sleepy Hammock Dr., Milton; Aggravated Assault (DV) With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Cruelty Toward Child Act That Could Result in Physical or Mental Injury. Weishuhn, Joseph Lee; Male; 32; 4207 Burbank Dr., Milton; Drug Possession Listed Chemical for Manufacture of Controlled Substance. Burley, Charles Fredrick; Male; 18; 1840 Mercy Lane, Milton; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Thomas, Patricia Lakeisha; Female; 28; 7001 Redondo Dr., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Gun ShowSeptember15th & 16thFort Walton Beach Fort Walton Beach Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2088404Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING or News Tips WELCOMEDE-mail IDEAS to: news@srpressgazette.comCall 623-2120 Sheriffs REPORT SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE

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LocalB4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Milton Bass Quickburger Krystal's Firehouse Subs Ace's Ciscos Hardees Big T Momma's Place Walgreens CVS Santa Rosa County Offices McDonalds Dollar General (Milton) Big Lots Raceway K Mart Tom Thumb (Avalon) Tom Thumb (Mulat) McDonalds (Avalon) Circle K (I10) Redroof Inn Tom Thumb (I10) BP(Hwy 90) Milton Bakery Pic N Sav Whataburger Circle K (Stewart) Dollar General (Stewart) Milton Mini Mart Tom Thumb (Hwy 87N) Circle K (Dogwood) Tom Thumb (Willard) The Other Place Dollar General (Dogwood) Winn Dixie (Milton) Coin Laundry Smoke HouseMilton ContinuedSmoke House Tom Thumb (Dogwood) Naval Housing Santa Rosa Medical Center Rx Express Tom Thumb (Glover) Red Barn J & J of N.W. Fl.Bagdad Dollar General (Bagdad) Tom Thumb (Bagdad) Circle K (Bagdad)East Milton Tom Thumb (Hwy 87S) BP(Hwy 87S) Grocery Store Dollar General (E. Milton) Local Yokel Tom Thumb (Wardbasin)Pace Tom Thumb (Bell) CiCi's pizza Murphy's Express Ryan's Whataburger (Pace) Walmart (west reg 1&3) Walmart (east reg 35&33) Village Inn Publix Tom Thumb (Hwy 90) La Fiesta Dollar General (Pace) Santa Rosa County Tax Office Winn Dixie (Pace)Pace ContinuedHardee's (Pace) Korner Kwik Grocery Outlet (east entrance) Grocery Outlet (west entrance) Walgreen's Circle K (Hwy 90) CVS Sacred Heart McDonalds (Woodbine) Tom Thumb (Woodbine) Circle K (Woodbine) Tom Thumb (5Pts) Dollar General (Berryhill) Tom Thumb (5Pts)Jay/Berrydale Expressit (Jay) Whataburger (5Pts) Greer's Dollar General Farmer's Country Market Berrydale Kwik MartMunson Ruth's Munson Store Short StopPensacola Tom Thumb (Scenic)

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LocalB2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Special to the Press GazetteFor children who have experienced abuse or neglect, a pair of brand new pajamas can bring a little comfort to what often is a frightening and confusing situation. So for the fourth consecutive year, FamiliesFirst Network of Lakeview is conducting a campaign to collect new, unworn pajamas for children under its supervision. The Tucking Kids in Safe and Sound pajama drive. The pajamas will be distributed to children during the holiday season. Collection boxes for pajama donations will be at all FamiliesFirst service centers and placed at various locations throughout Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton counties. Needed are new pajamas in infant through adult sizes, which are for larger children. FamiliesFirst Network is responsible for the safety, stability and well-being of abused and neglected children in Northwest Florida. Under a contract with the state of Florida, FamiliesFirst provides foster care and related services for children who cannot safely remain with their families. The drive ends Oct. 13. To learn more, contact FamiliesFirst Networks foster home development staff by calling 453-7766.Milton Rotary President Bubba Drinkard presents the ever sought Rotary pen to Robin Punkyo and Greg Brown. The Club received an update on what is going on with Gulf Power from Mrs. Punkyo and an overview of some of the amendments that will be voted on in November in the state of Florida. The Milton Rotary Club meets each Tuesday at Red Barn Bar-B-Que at noon and we invite you to join us.SUBMITTED PHOTOs SCampaign seeks pajamas for abused, neglected children ROTARY HONORsS sSPEAKERsSMilton Rotary President Bubba Drinkard is seen presenting the world famous Rotary pen to Martha Zimmerman and Jenea Highll of the Santa Rosa Health Department. They told the club about the Healthy Start Program and how the program works along with how many people are helped each year with the program. For more information please contact Martha or Jenea at the Santa Rosa County Health Department. FamiliesFirst Network of Lakeview is conducting a campaign to collect new, unworn pajamas for children under its supervision. The Tucking Kids in Safe and Sound pajama drive.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B3Wednesday, September 12, 2012 KEY MVOP misdemeanor violation of probation FVOP felony violation of probation Agg aggravated Poss possession Meth methamphetamine DUI driving under the in uence DWLSR driving while license suspended or revoked FTA failure to appear FTR failure to register SF sentenced felony SM sentenced misdemeanor LEO law enforcement of cer DV Domestic Violence The following arrests were made beginning Aug. 26 through Aug. 30, 2012. Aug. 26 Busbee, Christopher Steven; Male; 33; 5578 Allie Rae St., Milton; Burglary Dwelling, Structure or Conveyance Armed; Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense; Aggravated Assault With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Aggravated Battery Cause Bodily Harm or Disability; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Curnow, Roger Thomas; Male; 58; 7820 Parkwood Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Davenport III, Robert Elmo; Male; 30; 6580 Baxley Rd., Milton; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Vehicle Theft Grand Theft of Motor Vehicle; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. DeMott, Jeremy Adam; Male; 20; 5914 Congress St., Gulf Breeze; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Juan Doe 12-5169 (AKA Daniel Aguilar); Male; 32; 3129 Constitution St., Navarre; Aggravated Assault With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Aggravated Battery Person Uses a Deadly Weapon. Economy, Lauren Nicole; Female; 25; 2500 Trailwood Dr., Cantonment, Fla.; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use. Flowers, Myron Eugene; Male; 37; 761 Piney Lane, Cantonment, Fla.; Hit and Run Leave Scene of Crash Involving Damage to Property; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Third of Subsequent Offense. Garner, Christian Marcel; Male; 33; 5603 Shell Rd., Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria (2 counts). Jordan, Thornton Zachary; Male; 50; 4335 Oak Lane, Milton; Aggravated Assault (DV) With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence. King, Benjamin Wayne; Male; 33; 108 Oak Park Dr., Columbia, Tenn.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. McMillan, Vance Auris; Male; 29; 1810 West Cervantes St., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Moody, Courtney Danielle; Female; 24; 5017 Neal Jones Rd., Jay; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000 (2 counts). Peaden, Derrick Lynn; Male; 35; 4337 Sunshine Park Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria (2 counts). President III, Charles Michael; Male; 19; 1592 N. Highway 52, Monks Corner, S.C.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/ Juvenile Non Criteria. Sagona, Michael Louis; Male; 26; 218 Black n Cove, Slidell, La.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Vowell, Jr., Rocky Lee; Male; 27; 9853 Bridlewood Rd., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended First Offense; Pass Counterfeited Bank Bill, Check, Draft, or Note; Obstruct Police Divulge Police Radio Info to Aiud Suspect; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession and or Use. Wallace, Richard Phillip; Male; 33; 6896 Kapoc Dr., Badgad, Fla.; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Making False Report of Commission of Crime. Hendler, Clayton Lee Wayne; Male; 13; 3115 Woods Way, Gulf Breeze; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed (14 counts); Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense (2 counts); Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000 (9 counts); Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Stockstill, Robert Dell; Male; 27; 4134 Railroad St., Pace; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Fail to Register Motor Vehicle; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Neeley, Rose Ann; Female; 42; 7790 Rube Pace Rd., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Ellis, Edwina Latice; Female; 30; 6746 Jackson Lane, Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. LaPointe, Deborah Lynn; Female; 51; 6335 Heronwalk Dr., Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Pinella, Kiara; Female; 21; 3211 Logan Dr., Pensacola; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Rollins, Paul Allen; Male; 60; 3991 Bay Point Dr., Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Aug. 29 Barnett, Ronald Bruce; Male; 52; 1258 Summit Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation Within 10 Years; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Carrying Concealed Weapon Firearm. Broxson, Taylor Haskell; Male; 31; 8444 Rynes Circle, Navarre; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Harmon, Kelly Susan; Female; 46; 8783 John Hamm Rd., Milton; Battery (DV) On Person 65 Years of Age or Older. Hatcher Jr., Anthony Dwayne; Male; 27; 1375 Rainbow Ave., Pensacola; Burglary Unoccupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300; Dealing In Stolen Property (3 counts); Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Marshall, Shantel Patricia; Female; 24; 1068 Trammel St., Pensacola; Larceny Retail Theft $300 More Cordinate Others. Oxner, Joshua Dewayne; Male; 27; 7459 Westgate Dr., Milton; Battery (DV) Commit Domestic Battery by Strangulation. Preston, Daniel; Male; 37; 7819 NW228th St. (Union Correctional Institute), Raiford, Fla.; Lewd Lascivious Behavior Commit Sex Act in Presence of Correctional Facility Employee. Willey III, John Robert; Male; 21; 1543 Cypress Bend Trail, Gulf Breeze; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Wu, Guoqing; Male; 48; 3131 Bernath Drive, Milton; Conditional Release Violation Pre Trial Release Condition Violation for Domestic Violation; Obstructing Justice Intimidate, Threaten, Etc., a Victim, Witness, or Informant; Obstructing Justice (DV) Retaliate Against Informant, Victim, or Witness Without Injury. Moore, Kirk Treandas; Male; 18; 6682 Brock Ave., Milton; Resist Of cer Flee Elude LEO with Lights or Siren Activated; Resist Of cer Obstruct Without Violence. Tyson, Mark Anthony; Male; 22; 1520 Kyle Dr., Pensacola; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Baker, John Kendall; Male; 44; 9400 Biloxi Springs Rd., Biloxi Springs, Miss.; Traf c Offense Refuse to Submit to DUI test After License Suspended; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation in More Than 10 Years. Barnett, Ronald Bruce; Male; 52; 1258 Summit Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Vioaltion Within 10 Years. Ingram, Robert David; Male; 45; 5944 Highway 18, Montevallo, Ala.; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Breland Jr., George Terry; Male; 45; 1300 Liahona Trial, McDavid, Fla.; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Burgess, Robert Paul; Male; 32; 5769 Eagle Dr., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Hardy, Robert William Cleveland; Male; 35; 6461 Walnut St., Milton; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Jasperson, Gordon Lynn; Male; 69; 1142 Laguna Lane, Gulf Breeze; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Aug. 30 Day, Anthony Thomas; Male; 47; 5732 Berry St., Milton; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Larceny of Credit Card; Fraud Illegal Use of Credit Cards Use More Than Two Times in Six Months to Obtain Goods, Money $100 or More. Goggin, Joshua Steven; Male; 33; 6951 Sash Pine Rd., Pensacola; Cocaine Possession. Locke, Shawna Denee; Female; 43; 5391 Nagel Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/ Juvenile Non Criteria. McLean, Daniel Lee; Male; 59; 7999 Red Dr., Milton; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Fail to Register Motor Vehicle; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Attach Registration License Plate Not Assigned (2 counts); Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Waldrop, Jimmy Thomas; Male; 35; 4440 Sleepy Hammock Dr., Milton; Aggravated Assault (DV) With Deadly Weapon Without Intent to Kill; Cruelty Toward Child Act That Could Result in Physical or Mental Injury. Weishuhn, Joseph Lee; Male; 32; 4207 Burbank Dr., Milton; Drug Possession Listed Chemical for Manufacture of Controlled Substance. Burley, Charles Fredrick; Male; 18; 1840 Mercy Lane, Milton; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Thomas, Patricia Lakeisha; Female; 28; 7001 Redondo Dr., Pensacola; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender. Gun ShowSeptember15th & 16thFort Walton Beach Fort Walton Beach Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2088404Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING or News Tips WELCOMEDE-mail IDEAS to: news@srpressgazette.comCall 623-2120 Sheriffs REPORT SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE

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LocalB4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Milton Bass Quickburger Krystal's Firehouse Subs Ace's Ciscos Hardees Big T Momma's Place Walgreens CVS Santa Rosa County Offices McDonalds Dollar General (Milton) Big Lots Raceway K Mart Tom Thumb (Avalon) Tom Thumb (Mulat) McDonalds (Avalon) Circle K (I10) Redroof Inn Tom Thumb (I10) BP(Hwy 90) Milton Bakery Pic N Sav Whataburger Circle K (Stewart) Dollar General (Stewart) Milton Mini Mart Tom Thumb (Hwy 87N) Circle K (Dogwood) Tom Thumb (Willard) The Other Place Dollar General (Dogwood) Winn Dixie (Milton) Coin Laundry Smoke HouseMilton ContinuedSmoke House Tom Thumb (Dogwood) Naval Housing Santa Rosa Medical Center Rx Express Tom Thumb (Glover) Red Barn J & J of N.W. Fl.Bagdad Dollar General (Bagdad) Tom Thumb (Bagdad) Circle K (Bagdad)East Milton Tom Thumb (Hwy 87S) BP(Hwy 87S) Grocery Store Dollar General (E. Milton) Local Yokel Tom Thumb (Wardbasin)Pace Tom Thumb (Bell) CiCi's pizza Murphy's Express Ryan's Whataburger (Pace) Walmart (west reg 1&3) Walmart (east reg 35&33) Village Inn Publix Tom Thumb (Hwy 90) La Fiesta Dollar General (Pace) Santa Rosa County Tax Office Winn Dixie (Pace)Pace ContinuedHardee's (Pace) Korner Kwik Grocery Outlet (east entrance) Grocery Outlet (west entrance) Walgreen's Circle K (Hwy 90) CVS Sacred Heart McDonalds (Woodbine) Tom Thumb (Woodbine) Circle K (Woodbine) Tom Thumb (5Pts) Dollar General (Berryhill) Tom Thumb (5Pts)Jay/Berrydale Expressit (Jay) Whataburger (5Pts) Greer's Dollar General Farmer's Country Market Berrydale Kwik MartMunson Ruth's Munson Store Short StopPensacola Tom Thumb (Scenic)

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B5Wednesday, September 12, 2012 City of M M ilton meetingsMiltons public safety committee will meet Sept. 18 at 9 a.m. in conference room B at Milton City Hall. Miltons city council will meet in reconvened session Sept. 20 at 5:01 p.m. in the council chambers at Milton City Hall to adopt the citys budget and millage rate for the upcoming scal year. Miltons parks and recreation committee will meet Sept. 24 at 8:30 a.m. in conference room B at Milton City Hall. Miltons public works committee will meet Sept. 27 at 8 a.m. in conference room B at Milton City Hall. For more information, call the city managers ofce at 983-5411. All meetings are open to the public.Jay H H istorical Society meetingThe Jay Historical Society will meet Thursday from 6:30 8 p.m. at the museum in downtown Jay. The guest speaker will be Vic Campbell, a local author and historian. Campbell is currently researching local history and has lots to share with us. He is from Chumuckla and authored history books about our area. Mr. Jim Campbell will hopefully be with us at the meeting also. Mr. Jim has spent many hours researching Santa Rosa County cemeteries and can answer questions regarding topics such as where the cemeteries are located and has lists of tombstones and military markings.NN ewcomer Club meetingNewcomers Club of Greater Pensacola meets monthly on the second Wednesday of the month at 9 a.m. at the Pensacola Yacht Club; games, luncheon/meeting cost $14. Newcomers is open to all women who have resided in Pensacola two years or less. Monthly activities include: Book Club, Bridge, Bunco, Bowling, Chefs night out, to name a few. Please call 530-3926 or email vzubke@yahoo.com for more details.MM orning Glory meetingThe Morning Glory Circle of the Milton Garden Club, Inc. will hold their next monthly meeting Sept. 13 at 9:30 a.m. at 5256 Alabama Street. It is their rst meeting with their new ofcers and they are looking forward to a great year with a lot of interesting programs. The September program will be Trees of Northwest Florida by a member of the Santa Rosa Forestry Service. For additional information please call 675-6744.KK iwanis P P ancake B B reakfastThe Kiwanis Club of Milton is having its Annual Pancake Breakfast on Sept. 15 from 8 10 a.m. at Ollies Neighborhood Grille on Hwy. 90 in Milton. The breakfast will include pancakes, sausage, coffee, milk and orange juice for a $6 donation. The funds raised are to benet childrens charitable projects in Santa Rosa County. For tickets or additional information please call 686-2176.PP urple H H eart meetingChapter/Unit 566 Military Order of the Purple Heart will hold its meeting on Saturday, Sept. 15 at 11 a.m. at 5300 Hwy. 90 West in Pace. This is the West Milton Church of Christ. A guest speaker from Pensacola Veterans Park will join us and a meal will be served after the meeting for a donation. All Purple Heart recipients and their spouses are encouraged to attend. For more information please call 994-3880.EE ast M M ilton P P ark P P layground P P roject meetingThere will be a meeting Sept. 16 at 4 p.m. at the East Milton Park Gym as groups are looking to make improvements to East Milton Park with new playground and a possible splash park. The town hall meeting is planned to see how many are serious about the issue before bringing it up to Santa Rosa County Commissioner Bob Cole. For any question or concerns call 797-6733. SR R CREA REA resumes meetingsThe Santa Rosa County Retired Educators will meet Sept. 17 at 9:45 a.m. in the Russell Center on the campus of Locklin Technical Center. There will be a reception at this time honoring the newly retired educators. All are encouraged to attend. The book sale will continue as last year. Bring books to donate for the sale as well as buy some new ones to read. For more information call 623-6250.Santa R R osa D D emocrats P P ot LuckSanta Rosa County Democrats will hold a Pot Luck Dinner Meeting on Sept. 18, at the United Way Building, 6576 Caroline St., in Milton (next to McDonalds). The dinner will begin at 6:00 p.m. and the program at 6:45 p.m. All attendees will have the opportunity to participate in the open-mike program to address any issues of concern. Members of the public are invited to attend. For additional information, call 936-8704.Libertarian P P arty of O O kaloosa CountyThe Libertarian Party of Okaloosa County will hold its monthly meeting Sept. 19 at 7 p.m., in the Beef OBradys Restaurant, 2509 South Ferndon Blvd. in Crestview. For more information call 217-6590.Steps for A A utismAutism Pensacolas Steps for Autism is a family-friendly autism awareness event that will raise funds for autism safety initiatives in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. Steps for Autism will be held Sept. 22. Currently, Autism Pensacola is seeking sponsors, team leaders and volunteers to plan this event. The next planning meeting will be held on July 24, at 6 p.m. in the API ofce, 3916 N. 10th Avenue, Pensacola. Join us and make a difference! Local N N on-P P rots P P artner for H H eritage T T ourArcadia Mill Archaeological Site, the Santa Rosa Historical Society, the West Florida Railroad Museum, and the Bagdad Village Preservation Association have partnered together to offer a unique cultural experience to our local community. The Milton Heritage Tour will be a progressive excursion that will delve into Miltons diversied history and culture. The tour will be held on Sept. 29, and stops will include Arcadia Mill Archaeological Site, the West Florida Railroad Museum, the Imogene Theater, and the Bagdad Village Preservation Association Museum. The outing will begin at 9 a.m. with a tour of Arcadia Mill, located at 5709 Mill Pond Lane, Milton, FL 32583. The tour will then proceed to the West Florida Railroad Museum for a tour and lunch in the Globe Coffee House L & N dining car. After lunch, the tour will move to the Imogene Theater, the Bagdad Village Preservation Association Museum and it will conclude at Arcadia Mill. Transportation and a boxed lunch are included in the price of $20 per person. Tickets will be available for purchase until Sept. 17. To purchase tickets or for more information call 6263084, ext. 102.AA rtfest invitationThe Santa Rosa Arts Association Inc. will be hosting Artfest on Sept. 29 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Santa Rosa County Auditorium. Artfest will feature original art and crafts by gulf coast artists. There will be door prizes, music, and live demonstrations throughout the day. Hot food and baked goods will also be available.Line dance classesThe Santa Rosa Community School will start line dance classes. This 13-week session will be at Hobbs Middle School on Glover Lane in Milton. Beginner classes will begin at 6 p.m. with an intermediate classes starting at 7:15 p.m. You dont need a partner to participate and everyone is welcome. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. For more information call 723-4052 or 623-4235.Constitution and CoffeeThe Constitution and Coffee group will meet each Saturday at 7 a.m. at the Coffee Break on Woodbine Rd. in Pace. All are welcome to come and listen or participate in the discussion of our federal constitution and the current events that impact our lives. Meetings last about an hour and are very informal. For more information call 981-1536.MM ilton class of 1962 reunionThe Milton Class of 1962 would like to invite its classmates from 1961 and 1963 to join us in a celebration of the 50th anniversary of graduation. A festive weekend of fun activities is planned for Oct. 12-13. Planned activities include attending the MHS homecoming football game against Gulf Breeze on Oct. 12, touring Milton High School and the city and a bar-b-que dinner and social gathering on Oct. 13. Register as soon as possible to ensure you will be able to reconnect with all of your old friends and meet new ones. Call 6233344 or email teammhs62@ att.net for more details and registration procedures.TT ri-County Community Council changes hoursThe Tri-County Community Council, Inc., Services Department on Elva St. in Milton will now be closed on Fridays. Ofce hours will remain 8 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday Thursday. Low income home energy assistance applications will continue to be taken on Mondays. All other services to low income families will be provided Tuesday Thursday. For more information contact the ofce at 981-0036.RR epublican H H eadquarters in need of volunteersThe Santa Rosa County Republican Executive Committee announces the opening of its Campaign Headquarters at 5211 Highway 90 in Pace. The ofce is directly in front of McCombs Electric and the phone number is 626-2150. Kay Addison, Santa Rosa County Republican Executive Committee Chair, invites all Republican candidates to utilize the ofce space for their campaign. Ofce hours are 10 a.m. 4 p.m. daily and volunteers are needed in the ofce.AA ddiction help meetingsThe Most Excellent Way support group for people seeking help overcoming alcohol, drugs and other addictive behaviors meets every Friday night at 7 p.m. at East Side Baptist Church, 4884 Ward Basin Road. For more information on this meeting and other area meetings, call 626.1481. Volunteer advocates neededFloridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of dedicated advocates who protect the rights of elders who live in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. The programs local councils are seeking additional volunteers to identify, investigate and resolve residents concerns. Special training and certication is provided. Anyone interested in protecting the health, safety, welfare and rights of long-term care facility residents who often have no one else to advocate for them can call toll-free 888-831-0404 or visit http:// ombudsman.myorida.com. News BRIEFsS

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ClassifiedsB6| Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! References Available 850-995-0009 Professional house cleaner. 15 years experience. References available. 850-418-0411 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 COKERS LAWN & TRACTOR SERVICE From trimming to tractor work. Clean-ups, raking, hauling, mowing, bushhogging, dirt work. Reasonable rates, free estimates. (850) 623-0493 (850) 485-7977 Licensed & Insured Stewarts Tractor Works & Land Clearing, Inc. Tree & Stump Removal from trimming to takedown. Debris removal & Storm Clean-Up. Demolition & Hauling. Land Clearing. Backhoe & Trackhoe Work. Heavy Brush & Forestry Mowing. Tree work done by man lift. 516-1801 or 675-4291 Licensed & Insured Free Estimates PAUL STEWART 9/970 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NUMBER: 2012-CP-247 IN RE: ESTATE OF BARBARA ELLEN WHITTAKER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Barbara Ellen Whittaker, deceased, whose date of death was May 26, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Santa Rosa County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Santa Rosa County Courthouse, 6865 Caroline Street, Milton, Fl 32570. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents Estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. 9/966 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12000199CPMXAX IN RE: ESTATE OF JASMINE CELESTE WUESTHOFF, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JASMINE CELESTE WUESTHOFF, deceased, whose date of death was April 25, 2012, File Number 12000199CP MXAX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Santa Rosa County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P. O. Box 472, Milton, Florida 32572. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: September 5, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/ ERIC W. WUESTHOFF Eric W. Wuesthoff 5603 Windrun Place Milton, Florida 32571 (850) 313-1485 Attorney/Registed Agent: /s/ TYLER L. GRAY Tyler L. Gray Florida Bar No. 0059738 Law Offices of Jeremiah J. Talbott, P.A. 900 East Moreno Street Pensacola, Florida 32503 (850)437-9600/(850)437-0 906 (fax) 09/05 & 09/12 9/966

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ClassifiedsWednesday, September 12, 2012 Santa Rosas Press Gazette |B7 ALLIED FARMSWe Deliver & Install Call us first, Save Time Call us last, Save MoneyHwy. 87 So. Milton626-85788600311 HYDROSEED Centipede St. Augustine BermudaBailed Pine Straw FREE RENT IN EXCHANGE FOR MOBILE HOME REPAIRS. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch. Call 626-8973 Navarre, 1.5br, 1bath. No pets. One mile from WalMart, Carport/Deck $475/mo 850-651-8185 Small, 2 bedroom mobile home. Ideal for single or couple. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch 626-8973 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $16,800, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 Suzi 2009 has 400 Miles -Like New w/ Helmet $10,000 Call 994-4187 16 ft Boston Whaler Dauntless, Shorlandr Trailer 90 HP Johnson Motor Bimini Top, 2000 yr Model excellent Condition $10k 623-1127 SURROGATE MOMS NEEDED! Most generous compensation and benefits program offered anywhere, starting at $25,000. Healthy, non-smoking, 21-39, prior birth without complications, no criminal background. Confidential, compassionate services. Reasonable expenses will be paid. OpenArmsConsultants.co m Training/EducationWant to be a CNA?Dont want to wait? Express Training Services now offering our nursing asst. exam prep classes in DESTIN Class for 1 week. 850-502-5521 Military Spouses We Are mycaa certifiedexpresstraining services.com Next class 9/10/2012 3 br 1 ba brick home. Lg den, utility room,, front screened porch, lg fenced yard $825 mth $600 deposit. 4508 Elmtree 438-1660. 2 Br/2 Ba Beautiful bathroom with garden tub. Total Elec. Spacious kitchen. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch 850-626-8973 2BR 2 Bath Private Lot Galt City Road $500 month Rent $350 Deposit. Non Smoking environment. No pets Call 572-2477 FEMA 3 br/1 ba total electric. Some allow small pets, some fenced yards, some dishwashers, some icemakers. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch. 623-8973 ATTENTION: Drivers! Drive 4 Us Top Pay & CSA Friendly Equip 401K & Great Insurance Need CDL Class A Driving Exp (877) 258-8782 Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877) 882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Drivers -Daily or Weekly Pay! $0.01 raise per mile after 6 months. Refigerated & Dry Van Freight. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. (800) 414-95-69. www.driveknight.com Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase / Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated Class A-CDL 1yr. Exp. In last 3 Call (800) 695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com DRIVERS/ CLASS A Flatbed, GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800) 5725489x 227, SunBelt Transport EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Medical Billing Training! Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placemnet assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888) 872-4677 MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placemnet assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www.centuraonline.com Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. Promotional prices start at $19.99 a month for DISH for 12 months. Call Today and ask about Next Day installation. (800) 407-7851 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964 Exp. cleaning person needed. Must have own vehicle. to drive to jobs. Must be avail. Mon.-Fri.. Non-smoking environment. Background check required 994-1785 Logistics/TransportExperienced CDL-A DriversJoin Our Dedicated Fleet of Professional Drivers TODAY in the Pensacola, FL Area. -Odometer Mileage Pay ($50,000 plus per year) Dedicated Product Out & Back Stop & Detention Pay Home WeeklyTypically 48 Hrs. Premium-Free Family Health insurance MUST HAVE Minimum of 2 Yrs. Verifiable Tractor/Trailer Exp. J & M Company Call Neal or Bill 800.477.6555 M-F, 7am-5pm Web ID#: 34222647 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Online Training with SC Train gets you job ready ASAP! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed. (888) 212-5888 Couch & Love Seat, Brand New $1,000 Tan color. Call 623-1127 GUN SHOW Fort WaltonFAIRGROUNDS September 15th & 16th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL23330 to 56654 Curtis Penton Farms & Berrydale Farmer Mkt. OKRA Eggplants, tomatoes & hot peppers. We accept Wic Wholesale and retail (850) 675-4111 4 Piece, Red American Tourister Luggage $75, Swivel office chair, black $25, Rotary lawn mower $20, Wrought iron outdoor stair rail 63 X 17 $30 & Quilters lamp with magnifying glass $35. Ph (850) 626-2023 For Sale NEW Briggs & Stratton Portable Generator. 5550 watts, 8550 starting watts. $500. 623-5644 Looking for 1954 and 1955 Milton High School yearbooks. Call 623-9016 Cotton & Associates ESTATE SALE Sep 13-14-15 (8-3) 6274 Robin Hood Rd, Milton (turn on Maid Marion Rd. at SR Co. Extension Office) Contents of home and large detached garage -Furniture, glass & porcelain, jewelry, coins, books, and book cases, record albums, Barbies, TVs, appliances, camera equipment, Kindle, computers, John Wayne prints, Johnson Pacific floorsafe, gas grill, chain hoist and garage shop tools, motor cycle stand, plumbing supplies, file cabinets, Garrnin, various electronics, Play Station games, Heywood Wakefield desk, mountain bikes, electric organ, Mustang GT*(29K miles), Suburban* (104K miles) and much more. *Automobiles are subject to prior sale. See details, photos & map link www CottonAuctionsAppraisal s.com 9/991 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON October 3, 2012 at 11:00 AM UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit: 509 Michael Brown: small shop vac, extension cords, propane gas bottle, Misc. STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 9/12 & 9/19 9/991 Turn your art into cash! FREE ART APPAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Sept 15 & 16. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 international Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, Fl 32819. Call 1-866-537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignmnets taken based on consideration. 9/990 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 09001238CAMXAX WELLS FARGO BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. SCOTT A. NEAL, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORE CL OSURE SALE (Publish in Santa Rosa Press Gazette ) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 09001238CAMXAX of the Circuit Court of the 1st Judicial Circuit in and for Santa Rosa County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK., Plaintiff and SCOTT A, NEAL, Defendant, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Santa Rosa Courthouse 6865 Carolina.St. Milton, FL 32572, at the hour of 11 a.m. Central on the 3 day of October, 2012, the following property: LOT 137, BLOCK B, LIGHTHOUSE POINTEE UNIT III, BEING A PORTION OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 27 WEST, SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK G, PAGE 55, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 31 day of August, 2012. CIRCUIT COURT SEAL CLERK OF THE COURT MARY M. JOHNSON By: Mary English As Deputy Clerk Publish in Santa Rosa Press Gazette Submitted by: Kelley & Fulton, P. A., 1665 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. Suite 1000, West Palm Beach FL 33401 IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sheila Sims, Chief Deputy Court Administrator. Office of Court Administration at (850) 595-4400 at the M. C. Blanchard Judicial Center, 5th Floor, Pensacola FL 32502 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 9/12 & 9/19 9/990 9/986 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Boomerang Antiques and More located 5227 Willing Street in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 5th day of Sept, 2012. NAME OF OWNER Booerang USA Inc. 9/12 & 9/15 9/986 ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO(2)YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 5, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: Dan Stewart-Atty for Sandy Milburn Florida Bar Number 319392 4519 Hwy. 90,Pace, Fl 32571-2043 Telephone: (850) 994-4887; Fax: (850) 994-4541 Personal Repre sentative: SANDY MILBURN, 113 Bear Drive, Gulf Breeze, Fl 32561 9/5 & 9/12 9/970

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LocalB8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE850-995-8778 Sparkle Towels4978 roll Castleberry Hot Dog Chili5210 oz Lipton Tea Bags15324 ct Sunshine Cheez-Its1937 oz Delmonte Ketchup11224 oz Sale Good Through September 5-11, 2012 California Juicy Sweet Large Plums100lb Faygo Drinks25612 12oz cans Blue Bunny Ice Cream27756 oz Libby Green Beans, Gold Corn or Sweet Peas5215 oz Tampico Fruit Drinks165gal Zeigler Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna16416 oz Ball Park Jumbo Franks165lb Hillshire Farm Ultra Thin Ham or Turkey2459 oz Farmland Reg, Black Pepper or Applewood Bacon48024 oz Hillshire Farm Smoked Pork or Kielbasa Sausage21114 oz Bar S 4x6 Cooked Ham17816 oz Blackwell Angus Eye-O-Round Roast283lb Blackwell Angus Boneless Chuck Steaks Family Pack293lb Fresh Fryer Jumbo Pack Drumsticks or Thighs106lb Farmland Family Pack Sliced Boneless Pork Chops248lb California Sweet Large Fresh Peaches112lb Butterball Sliced Turkey Bacon22312 oz Aqua South Catfish Fillets18294 lb box Dole Russet Baking Potatoes39520 lb FreshExpress American Salad23210 oz Vlasic Kosher Dills19146 oz Sauers Mayonnaise19532 oz Blackburn Grape Jelly12932 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Collard, Turnips or Mixed Greens8927 oz Van Camp Baked Beans13828 oz

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CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) If your lunch still consists of a bowl of Campbells tomato soup and a grilled cheese sandwich, chances are you grew up using a typewriter. Generations of Americans have moved on from Campbells condensed chicken noodle and tomato soups in search of heartier varieties with more sophisticated avors. Now, the worlds largest soup company is racing to do the same. Campbell Soup Co. last year began a quest that led executives to a diverse group of cities including Portland, Ore. and London to gure out how to make soups that appeal to younger, nicky customers. In the year ahead, the 143year-old company plans to roll out 50 products such as Moroccan Style Chicken and Spicy Chorizo. The ingredients may surprise those used to a plain bowl of chicken soup: tomatillos, coconut milk and shitake mushrooms. The new soups also wont look like the big, gelatinous chunks that came in the steel cans that built Campbell into an iconic brand. These soups come in plastic pouches that are easy to open and heat up in a microwave in less than three minutes. The remake could be a do-or-die task for Campbell. Overall canned soup consumption is down 13 percent over the past decade, according to the research rm Euromonitor International, as fresh soups have become more widely available at supermarkets and restaurants. And Campbell now has about 53 percent of the market, down from 67 percent a decade earlier. Campbells changes also illustrate how dif cult it is for brands that appeal to older customers to become relevant to Millennials. This group, de ned as those ages 18 to through early 30s, is heavily sought after by companies and marketers. But Millennials have little in common with their parents, whether its their tastes, eating habits or cooking methods. I grew up with salt, pepper and ketchup, said Chuck Vila, who heads Campbells customer insights division, which surveys the marketplace for trends. These guys are playing around with really interesting spices from around the world. George Veszpremy, a 32-year-old music director at a radio station in Boston, has fond memories of his mother sending him to school in the morning with a thermos of Campbells chicken noodle. As a kid, you eat it and its great. It served the purpose at the time, said Veszpremy, noting that the soups were a cheap way for his single mother to give him a quick, comforting meal. But looking back, he said he realizes that the soup wasnt the best quality the noodles were soggy and thin, the chicken pieces were minuscule and there were no vegetables. Veszpremy said his tastes have evolved: He sticks to homemade or the soup bar at the supermarket.HEATING UP SALESCampbell is counting on its new soups to keep its brand relevant. While the company makes other products like Pepperidge Farm baked goods and V8 vegetable juices, soups account for half its revenue. Still, executives remain cautiously optimistic about the fate of the new lineup. When the company reported its quarterly results earlier this week, Campbell executives said they expect sales growth in scal 2013. But that increase is expected to come from Campbells recent acquisition of a premium juice company, not from its soups, broths and sauces unit. In the latest quarter, the Camden, N.J.-based companys pro t increased 27 percent as soup sales rose for the rst time in two years. But that was partly the result of grocers running promotions and stocking up on low inventories as Campbell prepares to raise prices. The company was also up against an easy comparison; in the year-ago period, soup sales had fallen by 9 percent and the results were weighed down by restructuring charges. As for the new products that are expected to be widely available at stores later this month, CEO Denise Morrison said the company should have a better read on how theyll fare after its scal rst quarter. The consumer will let us know if we can be more exuberant, she said. Executives are pushing on in the meantime. When the company embarked on its revival efforts about a year ago, Vila, head of the companys insights division, said they wondered if they had lost an entire generation of consumers. It turned out it wasnt that simple; he said that consumers are still open to giving Campbell another chance, but that its up to the company to deliver. We havent captured them in terms of food, but weve hung onto them, Vila said. They have memories of Campbell. Theyre outdated, but theyre there. SOUPS ONCampbell Soup looks beyond iconic cans FREE FREEWednesday September 12, 2012 FREE EDITION TAKE ONE Left: New limited edition Campbells tomato soup cans with art and sayings by artist Andy Warhol are displayed. Above: Campbells new Skillet sauces are displayedAP PHOTOSBOISE, Idaho (AP) The Boise Co-op eliminated thousands of slow-selling items, sweeping away the claustrophobic effect that accompanied too many offerings. The Wheatsville Food Co-op in Texas is opening its second store after 40 years. And in California, the Davis Food Coop turned to a designer to revamp its look. Its no coincidence food cooperatives across the U.S. are making big changes. Many are preparing for the arrival of a Whole Foods or Trader Joes, two organicand specialty-food industry giants that are opening new stores nationwide. Some co-ops are even dispatching camera-toting, intelligence-gathering crews to poach ideas from the big guys. With demand for organic, natural and specialty food continuing to outpace other segments in the grocery industry, coops say they must improve their stores, identify trends and appeal to a changing audience as the competition moves in. Whole Foods Market Inc. aims to triple stores to 1,000, including in Boise and Davis, Calif.; German-owned Trader Joes is expanding, too, with a 19 city comingsoon list. Co-ops had it easy for years when customers had few other places to go, said Robynn Shrader, head of the 125member, 164-store National Cooperative Grocers Association. Its more complicated being a retailer today. The modern co-op movement dates back to the 1970s, when customer-owned food stores including in Boise, Davis, Calif., and Austin, Texas were organized to provide an alternative to national grocery chains. Despite typically higher prices, shoppers often feel as if theyre buying more than groceries, that they are supporting a lifestyle. They emphasize community roots and, though theyve evolved from when nearly everything came in big bulk bins, they still stock an average of 20 percent local products, compared to 6 percent at conventional stores, according to a study released in August by Shraders group. About 80 percent of co-ops produce is organic, compared to 12 percent for conventional grocers. During the years, demand for natural, organic foods has only grown. The Organic Trade Association reports 2011 sales rose 9 percent to $31.4 billion. Brent Hueth, director of the Center for Cooperatives at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, said hed expected an increasingly crowded landscape of organic purveyors, including from conventional stores, to be tougher on co-ops. That hasnt materialized. Demand is growing faster than supply, Hueth said. Its not saturated yet. APBoise Co-op pet food buyer Zach Jones poses in the stores new space dedicated to natural pet food and supplies. Opening up a separate storefront for the fastgrowing pet food segment is one way the co-op is gearing up for increased competition from Whole Foods Market.Food co-ops bracing for giant rivals

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A2 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, September 12, 2012 The Associated PressThe harassment faced by U.S.-based climate scientists has been well documented in the mediabut not the harassment of scientists in Europe, Canada or the rest of the world. Thats because there hasnt been much to report. While outspoken scientists of human-caused climate change in the United States endure torrents of freedom of information requests, hate mail and even death threats from skeptics, their counterparts abroad have been free to do their work without fear. Jochem Marotzke, managing director of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, said there is no systematic attempt by a political camp to target climate scientists in Germany. I get the odd critical email from a skeptic, but would not classify anything as personally aggressive, said Marotzke. Very different from the U.S. scene.I feel for my American colleagues and what theyve had to deal with, said Tim Lenton, an earth system scientist who specializes in climate tipping points at the University of Exeter in the UK. Lenton said he has never had to fend off skeptic attacks against his work or his integrity. British scientists arent immune to attacks, but it is a very different level than compared to what is happening in the U.S. InsideClimate News contacted scientists working on climate change in Europe, Canada and Japan and learned that virtually everyone believes that the harassment is specic to the United States. They said that it could have long-term consequences for public understanding of global warming. The harassment has an intimidating effectespecially on young scientists, said Stefan Rahmstorf, head of earth system analysis at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany.;Rahmstorf said that watching colleagues be harassed often deters them from speaking to media or the public about their research, which skews the debate. Already, there is evidence of the U.S. public being swayed, said Tony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication. Climategate, for instance, the 2009 hacking of emails from the University of East Anglias Climatic Research Unit in the UK, had a signicant impact on public opinion, he said. During that scandal, U.S. skeptics pounced mainly on emails written by Michael Mann, director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University, as evidence that he and others were overstating the human inuence on global warming. In a yet-to-be-published Yale study, nearly 13 percent of on-the-fence Americans in 2010 said climategate reduced their trust in climate science and in scientists, Leiserowitz said. Since then, Mann was cleared of any wrongdoing, and the scientic consensus has strengthened virtually all working U.S. climate researchers believe human activity is causing the climate to warm. By BARRY WILNERAP Pro Football Writer NEW YORK Laser technology to help ofcials. Computer chips in the football. Devices that measure the impact of a hit or the speed of a ball carrier heading to the end zone. Streamlined, yet safer equipment. A 400-pound player. More teams in the playoffs. More international matchups. More prime-time games. NFL 2017, quite possibly. Americas most popular and protable sport, a $9 billion dollar industry that gures to be worth more than $14 billion in ve years, still will feature 100-yard elds, 11 players on each side of the ball, and Green Bay cheeseheads by then. Otherwise, experiencing the NFL season and offseason could change drastically, whether youre on your couch, at the local tavern or in the stands. So look for a longer draft, possibly rotating to league stadiums. Expect huge video boards in those stadiums capable of providing instantaneous information for the fan and the fantasy player along with highlights from every game, peeks at what the referee sees when reviewing challenged plays, even views of the locker room. Dynamic ticket pricing. Another outdoor Super Bowl in a cold weather city. A franchise in Los Angeles, perhaps even two. All of that possibly, perhaps probably, is ahead for the NFL. Our philosophy is to always look for ways to improve, Commissioner Roger Goodell said. Our goals are to continually evolve the game to make it better and safer, serve our fans in new ways, and represent the NFL with integrity. We do that by emphasizing quality and innovation, including the latest technology as it applies to everything from equipment to medical care to the stadium experience. And it all could come crashing down if the thousands of people involved in concussion lawsuits against the league win their cases. You never want to understate the potential impact of class-action lawsuits, said Marc Ganis, president of Chicago-based sports business consulting rm Sportscorp Ltd., and a keen observer of the leagues business side. Having said that, we must keep in mind that if the concussion lawsuits are found for the plaintiffs, we are talking about effectively eliminating football in the U.S. They will have to say football inherently is too dangerous a game to play because it inherently causes concussions. That could be the impact of these lawsuits. Thats a doomsday scenario. More likely, the NFL will be around and will remain this nations No. 1 sport. With labor peace assured for another nine years, pro football is wellpositioned to continue its prosperity. One of the biggest challenges to remaining No. 1 in 2017 will be making every game for 17 weeks an event, no matter where it is being viewed. Making the stadium experience as enriching as what fans get at home is a challenge now, and will be even more so in ve years. Consider how the fans in their decked-out living rooms, watching on high-denition TVs, have access to every game through DirecTVs Sunday Ticket and the Red Zone channel. They have all kinds of statistical info at ngertips, particularly for their fantasy teams. And they can get everything on a smart phone or tablet. By 2017, maybe even sooner, they will enjoy all of that and more at the ballpark. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers announced this week they hired an outside company to enhance the in-stadium experience through free Wi-Fi, a new replay system, and bolstered customer service. Fans can take advantage of wireless access to use the teams ofcial mobile app, as well as the Bucs tablet and smartphone application that will give them special features when used at Raymond James Stadium on game day. Fully powered Wi-Fi will be available at all stadiums much sooner than in ve years, said Redskins general manager Bruce Allen. Stats and highlight packages from NFL Films, too. The monstrous, crystal-clear scoreboard at Cowboys Stadium will be replicated elsewhere, providing a better variety of replays, real-time statistics and get this instant measurements of how much force Ray Lewis, if he is still playing at age 42, used to bring down a runner. Or how many miles per hour A.J. Green was running when he caught that bomb from Andrew Dalton. NFL vice president of business operations Eric Grubman sees cameras in locker rooms or tunnels beneath the stadium or coaches facilities supplying video for the folks on hand. I dont look at it as trying to match or duplicate the home experience, said Steelers President Art Rooney. The idea is create an in-stadium experience that is unique and different from the home experience. Its always going to be unique in terms of instadium live experience. You wont ever equal that, with thousands of fans cheering along with you, no matter how much you turn up the sound at home. Turning up technology for action on the eld is ahead, too. Most intriguing is possibly having a computer chip in the football that, through lasers or some other electronic wizardry, will indicate if the ball has crossed the goal line. On-eld ofcials replacements or otherwise probably cant wait for that. Denitely. Were almost there, NFL senior executive vice president Ray Anderson said. Giants general manager Jerry Reese agrees. Thats something I could denitely see by 2017, he said. The rst-down line that has become a staple of all NFL broadcasts should become a xture for fans at the stadium through the same technology, too. Chain gangs might disappear, as well, if measurements can accurately be determined through high-tech enhancements. Lasers or computer chips could extend 100 feet up Anderson said, to determine if a kick goes through the uprights. Theres so many things we can and will do with technology the way it is and will be, Anderson said.Game of the Future: A look at NFL 2017 America only nation where climate scientists face organized harassment GUATEMALA CITY (AP) Jess and Ryan Bubba Hooker had been married less than a year when they decided to go to Guatemala on a mission trip in June 2007. The day he met Daniel, Bubba had been working on the plumbing in the orphanage when he took a break and found the boy. The child was 18 months old but looked younger, sitting stranded in a walker. He was the youngest kid in the orphanage, the frailest, too, with his pigeon chest and little legs that turned out. Bubba knelt beside the little boy and they began to play. That night in bed, he told his wife, I think I met our son. They immediately told the orphanage director and started the paperwork. Two months later, Guatemalas thriving adoption industry fell apart. The countrys vibrant business came to a halt after an August 2007 raid on what was considered the countrys most reputable adoption agency, used by many Americans. An investigation exposed a system of fake birth certicates and DNA samples, of mothers coerced into giving up children. Some claimed their children were kidnapped for sale. Adoptive parents paid up to $30,000 for a child in a country where the average person earns $5,000 a year. The Guatemalan government was forced to overhaul its adoption laws. The U.S. suspended all new adoptions from Guatemala. By the beginning of 2008, a new council had to be established to clean up proceedings, including verifying the identity of birth mothers and their willingness to give up their children. The old system was abolished. Daniel was among 3,032 children caught in limbo. Finally, in May 2009, the Hookers recieved a call conrming a meeting with the adoption councils head, Jaime Tecu. After hours in the waiting room with Daniel and Jess mom, Judy, they were ushered into an ofce overlooking the south of the capital. Im sorry, Tecu said, your case is not registered with the Solicitor Generals ofce. It is not ofcial. Everything had to be investigated anew. Daniels birth mom needed to be found, tested for a DNA match and give consent for the adoption. The case also had to be transferred to a court in the district where Daniel was born. The Hookers created a routine between regular trips to the Radisson in Guatemala and life back home in Maryville, Tenn. Jess took advantage of holidays at the high school where she worked, while Bubba, a real estate developer, set his own schedule so he could visit Daniel every two or three months. When Daniel was already 4 and there was still no end in sight, Jess gave birth to a daughter, Ellyson. On their visits at the Radisson when Jess was pregnant, Daniel would touch her belly and say, Sister. And then came some luck. I n early 2011, the Guatemalan adop tion asco came to the attention of U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, who served on the Senate appropriations subcommittee on the State Departments foreign operations and related programs, which dealt with foreign adoptions. Landrieu discovered there was no list of people whose cases had been dropped due to Guatemalas adoption ban. The U.S. had forbidden new adoptions from Guatemala, but the pending cases were something else. Of the original 3,032 cases interupted at the end of 2007, ofcials found 180 cases of children waiting to be adopted. The rst was Daniels. Landrieus team worked with the U.S. Embassy and Guatemalan ofcials to broker an agreement that would allow certain cases to go forward if they met the criteria of both Guatemalan ofcials and the U.S. State Department. Last December, the Hookers got a call saying they were one of 44 families whose cases would move forward. It would still be another eight months before they embarked on Aug. 21, hoping to become the rst of those families eligible to collect their child under the new agreement. On Sept. 3, Jess, who had own in with Ellyson and her mother to Guatemala City, sat inside the Hookers room at the Radisson staring at the latest document. She couldnt believe it. Her computer chimed, and she made her way over to it. Someone in Tennessee was calling her on Skype. It was her brother. Before Jose could say hello, she hovered over the camera and covered it with a thin sheet. The paper read: Daniel Ryan Hooker born in Quiche, Guatemala, on December 2006 son of Jessica Russell Hooker and Ryan Hooker. Jess brother, Jose, had been adopted 22 years earlier from the same orphanage. As the family walked through the doors of the Louisville airport late Saturday night, friends cheered, then joined them in prayer. WERE HOME!!!!!! We did it! We made it! And we cant believe it! the family wrote in an emailed message to friends on Sunday. APJudy Russell, left, Jessica Hookers mother, poses for a family portrait with Jessica, center, Jessicas husband, Ryan Hooker, right, and their children, Ellyson and Daniel. U.S. couple tests Guatemala adoption law

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A3Wednesday, September 12, 2012 HONOLULU (AP) Coconut bras arent Hawaiian. Neither are grass skirts. Tiki bars? Theyre from California. Yet theyre all among the most recognizable symbols of a Hawaiian vacation. Now, many resorts in Hawaii are hoping to change those images, edging away from these kitschy marketing inventions and toward real-life Hawaiian traditions that can make the trip to the islands more special for travelers. Driving the movement, in part, is economics. Tourism leaders know Hawaii needs to highlight what makes the islands unique to compete with other sun-and-surf destinations like Florida, Mexico and Thailand. But the turn is also the latest sign of a Native Hawaiian renaissance with more locals studying Hawaiian language, reviving traditional styles of hula and learning ancient skills like using stars to navigate the ocean. Its about having that sense of place understanding who went before us, understanding that Waikiki is a place where we are so deep seated in our culture. And now, theres this resurgence to share it with our guests, said Kehaulani Kam, cultural services director at Starwood Hotels and Resorts Waikiki. The trend may help improve the dim view many Native Hawaiians have of tourism, the states largest industry and biggest employer. A 2010 state survey found nearly 60 percent of them dont believe it helps preserve their language and culture. The disdain was captured in a Saturday Night Live skit in 2009 that drew protests from state ofcials and praise from others as good satire. In it, Dwayne The Rock Johnson and Fred Armisen play two underpaid entertainers in grass skirts at a Kauai restaurant. Johnson performs a sloppy dance resembling hula and Armisen strums the ukulele. Both sing in gibberish that tourists may think is Hawaiian. Tourists watching the performance drink tropical cocktails and gush about how happy they are to be in Hawaii, oblivious to the facade. The misconceptions come from the way Hawaii is marketed and presented to outsiders. Travelers, who see vacation brochures with photos of grass skirts, coconut bras, Samoan re-knife dancing and Tahitian hula dancers, naturally get the impression these are Hawaiian traditions. The prominence of many of the images can be traced to the arrival of tiki bars in Hawaii from California. Trader Vics and Don the Beachcomber restaurants started the bars on the mainland in the 1930s displaying replicas of Polynesian deities and artifacts from around the Pacic. Trader Vics opened its rst Honolulu storefront in 1941, and Don the Beachcomber followed after World War II. Around that time, in the 50s is, nighttime shows here shifted from being just Hawaiian, which they had been previously, to Polynesian. Thats when you get a knife dancer, torch guys, Tahitian hula, said DeSoto Brown, a historian at Bishop Museum. The Hawaii Tourism Authority is distributing a new guide to advertisers, travel reporters and others involved in disseminating information about Hawaii that attempts to clarify what is and isnt Hawaiian. The agency wants people to identify a re knife dance as Samoan and Tahitian hula as Tahitian when they use photos of various performances. If people want to show Hawaiian hula, they should be sure thats whats depicted in the images. Keliihoalani Wilson, the agencys cultural director, said the aim isnt to knock other Polynesian traditions, but avoid confusion. Its all positive stuff. No scolding. Just helping, Wilson said. For Lori Sablas, the cultural director at the Kaanapali Beach Hotel on Maui, it is about accuracy. My mandate is: How do Hawaiians think? How do Hawaiians act? Lets not change it. Lets not make it up, she said. That means they grow taro called kalo in Hawaiian, its the starchy vegetable used to make the traditional dish called poi on the property and prominently display canoes, pahu drums and other traditional artifacts. It also means mandatory classes, on company time, for staff on Hawaii culture. The hotels more than 200 employees went on boat rides to neighboring Lanai, the rural island recently bought by the worlds sixth richest man, Oracle Corp. CEO Larry Ellison. They saw rare native sandalwood trees, heard a Lanai legend about a man who was banished there because he didnt listen to his father and learned about the long-lost art of using stars, waves, birds and other cues from nature to travel between islands. Some corporate executives might question the investment return on such classes. But Sablas said employees give better, more condent service when they understand Hawaii. If our employees really get the connection of what a special place they live in and a special place they work at, they, in turn, will convey it to every guest, she said. The Walt Disney Co., a master of creating make-believe worlds, has taken the concept farther. The global entertainment giant chose Hawaii as the location for its rst major stand-alone resort that isnt a theme park. Instead of building a Cinderella castle, Disney designed the hotel Aulani around the idea of telling guests about Native Hawaiian culture. One of the hotels bars the Olelo Room has Hawaiian words on the wall, and its bartenders and wait staff speak Hawaiian. At night, a storyteller regales guests with Hawaiian legends around a re pit. In Waikiki, the century-old Moana Surfrider, now a Westin hotel and part of the Starwood chain, last year started inviting guests to a sunrise ceremony to greet the new moon. A kahu, or caretaker, says a prayer and leads guests to wade into the ocean from the beach in front of the hotel. The act cleanses them of the pilikia, or problems, they have from the previous month and they ask for strength to take on whats to come. Sometimes, 100 people show up at 5:30 a.m., general manager Craig Anderson said. These people are on vacation. They dont have to wake up early but they choose to because they want to experience that, he said. Its not a helicopter ride. Its not a surf lesson. Its a cultural experience.Nix the tiki bar: Hawaii tourism gets authenticAPcelebration of Polynesian music song and dance in Honolulu in this 2005 le photo. Fire knife dancing is often mistaken for Hawaiian even though its a Samoan invention. Hawaii resorts are increasingly turning to Hawaiis actual rich traditions to make trips special for travelers.

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A4 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, September 12, 2012 ClassifiedsB6| Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! References Available 850-995-0009 Professional house cleaner. 15 years experience. References available. 850-418-0411 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 COKERS LAWN & TRACTOR SERVICE From trimming to tractor work. Clean-ups, raking, hauling, mowing, bushhogging, dirt work. Reasonable rates, free estimates. (850) 623-0493 (850) 485-7977 Licensed & Insured Stewarts Tractor Works & Land Clearing, Inc. Tree & Stump Removal from trimming to takedown. Debris removal & Storm Clean-Up. Demolition & Hauling. Land Clearing. Backhoe & Trackhoe Work. Heavy Brush & Forestry Mowing. Tree work done by man lift. 516-1801 or 675-4291 Licensed & Insured Free Estimates PAUL STEWART 9/970 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NUMBER: 2012-CP-247 IN RE: ESTATE OF BARBARA ELLEN WHITTAKER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Barbara Ellen Whittaker, deceased, whose date of death was May 26, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Santa Rosa County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Santa Rosa County Courthouse, 6865 Caroline Street, Milton, Fl 32570. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents Estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. 9/966 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SANTA R OSA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE N O. 12000199CPMXAX IN RE: ESTATE OF JASMINE CELESTE WUESTHOFF, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JASMINE CELESTE WUESTHOFF, deceased, whose date of death was April 25, 2012, File Number 12000199CP MXAX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Santa Rosa County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P. O. Box 472, Milton, Florida 32572. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: September 5, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/ ERIC W. WUESTHOFF Eric W. Wuesthoff 5603 Windrun Place Milton, Florida 32571 (850) 313-1485 Attorney/Registed Agent: /s/ TYLER L. GRAY Tyler L. Gray Florida Bar No. 0059738 Law Offices of Jeremiah J. Talbott, P.A. 900 East Moreno Street Pensacola, Florida 32503 (850)437-9600/(850)437-0 906 (fax) 09/05 & 09/12 9/966

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H S Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed. (888) 212-5888 Couch & Love Seat, Brand New $1,000 Tan color. Call 623-1127 GUN SHOW Fort WaltonFAIRGROUNDS SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Text FL23330 to 56654 Curtis Penton Farms & Berrydale Farmer Mkt. OKRA Eggplants, tomatoes & hot peppers. We accept Wic Wholesale and retail (850) 675-4111 4 Piece, Red American Tourister Luggage $75, Swivel office chair, black $25, Rotary lawn mower $20, Wrought iron outdoor stair rail 63 X 17 $30 & Quilters lamp with magnifying glass $35. Ph (850) 626-2023 For Sale NEW Briggs & Stratton Portable Generator. 5550 watts, 8550 starting watts. $500. 623-5644 Looking for 1954 and 1955 Milton High School yearbooks. Call 623-9016 Cotton & Associates ESTATE SALE Sep 13-14-15 (8-3) 6274 Robin Hood Rd, Milton (turn on Maid Marion Rd. at SR Co. Extension Office) Contents of home and large detached garage -Furniture, glass & porcelain, jewelry, coins, books, and book cases, record albums, Barbies, TVs, appliances, camera equipment, Kindle, computers, John Wayne prints, Johnson Pacific floorsafe, gas grill, chain hoist and garage shop tools, motor cycle stand, plumbing supplies, file cabinets, Garrnin, various electronics, Play Station games, Heywood Wakefield desk, mountain bikes, electric organ, 06 Mustang GT*(29K miles), 95 Suburban* (104K miles) and much more. *Automobiles are subject to prior sale. See details, photos & map link www CottonAuctionsAppraisal s.com 9/991 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON October 3, 2012 at 11:00 AM UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit: 509 Michael Brown: small shop vac, extension cords, propane gas bottle, Misc. STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 9/12 & 9/19 9/991 Turn your art into cash! FREE ART APPAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Sept 15 & 16. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 international Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, Fl 32819. Call 1-866-537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignmnets taken based on consideration. 9/990 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE N O.: 09001238CAMXAX WELLS FARGO BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER T O WACHOVIA BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. SCOTT A. NEAL, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORE CL OSURE SALE (Publish in Santa Rosa Press Gazette ) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 09001238CAMXAX of the Circuit Court of the 1st Judicial Circuit in and for Santa Rosa County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK., Plaintiff and SCOTT A, NEAL, Defendant, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Santa Rosa Courthouse 6865 Carolina.St. Milton, FL 32572, at the hour of 11 a.m. Central on the 3 day of October, 2012, the following property: LOT 137, BLOCK B, LIGHTHOUSE POINTEE UNIT III, BEING A PORTION OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 27 WEST, SANTA R OSA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK G, PAGE 55, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 31 day of August, 2012. CIRCUIT COURT SEAL CLERK OF THE COURT MARY M. JOHNSON By: Mary English As Deputy Clerk Publish in Santa Rosa Press Gazette Submitted by: Kelley & Fulton, P. A., 1665 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. Suite 1000, West Palm Beach FL 33401 IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sheila Sims, Chief Deputy Court Administrator. Office of Court Administration at (850) 595-4400 at the M. C. Blanchard Judicial Center, 5th Floor, Pensacola FL 32502 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 9/12 & 9/19 9/990 9/986 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Boomerang Antiques and More located 5227 Willing Street in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 5th day of Sept, 2012. NAME OF OWNER Booerang USA Inc. 9/12 & 9/15 9/986 ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO(2)YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 5, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: Dan Stewart-Atty for Sandy Milburn Florida Bar Number 319392 4519 Hwy. 90,Pace, Fl 32571-2043 Telephone: (850) 994-4887; Fax: (850) 994-4541 Personal Repre sentative: SANDY MILBURN, 113 Bear Drive, Gulf Breeze, Fl 32561 9/5 & 9/12 9/970

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A6 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, September 12, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE850-995-8778 Sparkle Towels4978 roll Castleberry Hot Dog Chili5210 oz Lipton Tea Bags15324 ct Sunshine Cheez-Its1937 oz Delmonte Ketchup11224 oz Sale Good Through September 5-11, 2012 California Juicy Sweet Large Plums100lb Faygo Drinks25612 12oz cans Blue Bunny Ice Cream27756 oz Libby Green Beans, Gold Corn or Sweet Peas5215 oz Tampico Fruit Drinks165gal Zeigler Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna16416 oz Ball Park Jumbo Franks165lb Hillshire Farm Ultra Thin Ham or Turkey2459 oz Farmland Reg, Black Pepper or Applewood Bacon48024 oz Hillshire Farm Smoked Pork or Kielbasa Sausage21114 oz Bar S 4x6 Cooked Ham17816 oz Blackwell Angus Eye-O-Round Roast283lb Blackwell Angus Boneless Chuck Steaks Family Pack293lb Fresh Fryer Jumbo Pack Drumsticks or Thighs106lb Farmland Family Pack Sliced Boneless Pork Chops248lb California Sweet Large Fresh Peaches112lb Butterball Sliced Turkey Bacon22312 oz Aqua South Catfish Fillets18294 lb box Dole Russet Baking Potatoes39520 lb FreshExpress American Salad23210 oz Vlasic Kosher Dills19146 oz Sauers Mayonnaise19532 oz Blackburn Grape Jelly12932 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Collard, Turnips or Mixed Greens8927 oz Van Camp Baked Beans13828 oz