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UF00028408 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Santa Rosa press gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00759
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Publication Date: 04-04-2012
Frequency: semiweekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00759
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Preceded by: Milton press gazette

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75 cents Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Gazette Santa Rosas Press Obituaries ..................................... A2 Speak Out ..................................... A2 Sudoku .......................................... A3 Opinion ........................................ A4 Sports ............................................ A12 Classi eds ..................................... B8 TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 104 Issue 27 Printed on recycled paper Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.com Tweet us @srpressgazette and friend us on facebook.com ON THE WORD STREET If commissioners decide to build a new courthouse where would you like to see it and why? Speak Out Let Santa Rosans know what you think Inside | Page A2 srpressgazette.com 623-5887 By Bill Gamblin 377 4611 | @SRPG_Bill news@srpressgazette.com Pinwheels bring back memories of innocence, childhood and fun. Many victims of child abuse and neglect have an innocence that is lost. April 1 marks the start of Child Abuse Prevention Month and in Santa Rosa County, lawns at businesses, schools and public of ces will be decorated with pinwheel gardens in recognition. The pinwheels themselves will represent Floridas efforts to prevent child abuse and change the way the state approaches the prevention of child abuse and neglect. The most powerful source of social movement is generated by individual action, said Santa Rosa Kids House facility coordinator Briana Taylor. We challenge Santa Rosa County to help us move this community in the right direction. Gardens like the one being set up Friday at Walmart in Pea Ridge will be set up a various location to help raise awareness to the on-going responsibility to ensure every child has the same opportunity to grow and develop in a healthy environment. With the advent of the Santa Rosa Kids House a new level of security has been added to those victimized, especially children. A lot of people feel a lot more secure coming forward because of public awareness and places like the Santa Rosa Kids House, said Santa Rosa County Sheriff Wendell Hall. People now have a feeling that something will A spin on Child Abuse Prevention Month By MATHEW PELLEGRINO 393-3669 | SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com It is fair time in Santa Rosa County, but this is now what residents have grown accustomed to in recent years. This year the Santa Rosa County Fair is going back to its roots; to its horticultural roots. This year the fair is focusing on horticulture by bringing in more animals and more horticulture acts, which is what the fair is really all about. We had a pretty nice livestock exhibit last year but we have an even bigger one this year, said Rick Paschall, Chairman of the Santa Rosa County fair board. This year the fair is putting on a childrens FILE PHOTOS Some of the sights from recent Santa Rosa County Fairs See FAIR A11 See ABUSE A11 Volunteers from Santa Rosa Kids House plant a pin wheel garden at Walmart in Pea Ridge Friday. BILL GAMBLIN | Press Gazette By Bill Gamblin 377-4611 | @SRPG_Bill news@srpressgazette.com Milton residents turned out Saturday to give their opinion on the citys proposed Milltown Overlay District. About 35 residents and interested parties voiced what they would like to see for the future of the district, which runs from Broad Street west to the Blackwater Heritage Trail, north to Chumuckla Highway and south to Berryhill Road. We missed the rst two meetings because we were out of town, said Milton residents John and Debbie Carpenter. What surprised us is that, after this meeting, the majority rules. We like it the way it is and dont want to see a lot of change. While change is the main concern, Milton Planning and Zoning Director Randy Jorgensen posted a sign for everyone to stress the purpose of the meeting. Many of those at the meeting, like Teresa Derher, were glad just to have a say in the proposal. As long as we have a voice I am happy, Derher said. I just dont think commercial and residential mix. Right now we are a close community on my block and with one piece of property vacant, I dont want people to come in and disrupt what we have. While residents were being heard at Saturdays meeting at Milton City Hall, not everyone was pleased with the meeting. I was hoping for more open discussions, Ted Fraizer said. I have a lot of questions, but (Jorgensen) never paused. There isnt one matter in particular over another, but I do have concerns about historical since there are a lot of 100-year-old houses. Santa Rosa Historical Society President Wes Meiss was in attendance and he understands where several residents stand. I think they would have been happy by expanding the historical district downtown, Meiss said. The Milton residents zone in on downtown at meeting See ZONE A11 Wanting to build it out of town doesnt make sense. Build in somewhere central between Milton and Pace. Douglas Parker I think it needs to stay downtown. Move it temporarily and then rebuild it. We need to keep it there as part of downtowns history. Angela Gehres Take the old one down and put the new one up to standards in its place. Kasey DeAnda See WORD A4 T h e f a i r i s c o m i n g t o t o w n BASEBALL: BLUE WAHOOS LAND IN PENSACOLA SPORTS, A12

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Local A2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012TELEPHONE N UMBERS All ofces ................. 850-623-2120 Classieds ................ 850-623-2120 Fax ........................ 850-623-2007S UBSCRIP T ION RA T ES One year (in county) ......................... $39 Six months (in county).................$19.50 13 weeks (in county).................... $9.75 One year (out of county) ....................$62 Six months (out of county).................$31 13 weeks (out of county)..............$15.50 Senior Citizen (over 62) One year (in county)........................$32 Six months (in county) ......................$16 13 weeks (in county) .........................$8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.C OPYRIGH T N O T ICE The entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570.S AN T A R OSAS PRESS GAZE TT E ST AFFJim F letcher Publisher 850-393-3654 jetcher@srpressgazette.comC arol B arnes Ofce Manager 850-623-2120 cbarnes@srpressgazette.comBill G amblin Editor 850-377-4611 bgamblin@srpressgazette.comC armen Joseph Media Sales Consultant Cell: 850-393-3666 cjoseph@srpressgazette.comA be C lark Media Sales Consultant 850-910-0902 aclark@srpressgazette.comTracie S melstoys Media Sales Consultant 850-623-2120 tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com S anta R osas P ress G azette 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570A T YOUR SERVICEM iss a paper? Circulation Jim Fletcher 850-623-2120 Want to subscribe? 850-623-2120 To buy back issues 850-623-2120 To place a classied ad 850-623-2120 To buy a display ad Carmen Joseph 850-623-2120 To buy a photograph 850-623-2120 I nternet www.srpressgazette.com O fce H ours 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday To get news in the paper Bill Gamblin 850-623-2120 or 850-377-4611 E-mail : news@srpressgazette.com Short items: news@srpressgazette.com Church News: church@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries: news@srpressgazette.com Sports: sports@srpressgazette.com Elected OFFICIALSCOUN T Y GOVERNMEN T COUNTY COMMISSION District 1: Jim Williamson, 4351 Berryhill Road, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-wil liamson@santarosa..gov District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Road, Milton, FL 32583; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commcole@santarosa..gov District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla Highway, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commsalter@santarosa..gov District 4: Jim Melvin, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-melvin@santa rosa..gov District 5: Lane Lynchard, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commlynchard@santarosa..gov The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at 9 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays. The leaders meet in committee at 9 a.m. Mondays preceding the Thursday meetings. Meetings are held in commission chambers of the Administrative Complex on U.S. 90. Phone 983-1877 for information or to reach their of ces. SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFF Wendell Hall, 5755 East Milton, Rd., Milton, FL 32588; phone 983-1100. E-mail is whall@srso.net SANTA ROSA COUNTY CLERK OF COURTS Mary Johnson, P.O. Box 472, Milton, FL 32572; phone 983-1987. E-mail is santacourtfeed@chjn.net SANTA ROSA COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR Stan Collie Nichols, 6495 Caroline St., Suite E, Mil ton, FL 32570; phone 983-1800. E-mail is snichols@ srctc.com SANTA ROSA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER Greg Brown, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1880. E-mail is info@srcpa.org SANTA ROSA COUNTY ELECTIONS SUPERVISOR Ann Bodenstein, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1900. E-mail is Bodenstein@ santarosa..govS T A T E GOVERNMEN T Rep. Doug Broxson: 2990-C Gulf Breeze Park way, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563, phone 916-5436. E-mail is Doug.Broxson@myoridahouse.gov Sen. Greg Evers: 598 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crest view, FL 32536, phone 689-0556. E-mail is Evers. Greg.SO2@senate.gov Gov. Rick Scott: PLO5 The Capitol, 400 S. Mon roe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; phone 488-4441. E-mail is _governor@myorida.comFE D ERAL GOVERNMEN T HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Rep. Jeff Miller: 2439 Rayburn House Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; local phone is 479-1183; D.C. Ofce phone (202) 225-4136. Pen sacola ofce address: 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503. Toll free number is 866-3671614. Website: http://jeffmiller.house.gov SENATE Sen. Marco Rubio: 317 Hart Senate Of fice Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 850-433-2603. Website: www.rubio.senate. gov Sen. Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Senate Of fice Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202224-5274; fax 202-224-8022. Website: http:// billnelson.senate.gov WHITE HOUSE President Barack Obama: The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. E-mail is president@white house.gov Vice President Joe Biden: Office of the Vice President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414.SCHOOL GOVERNMEN T SCHOOL BOARD Superintendent: Tim Wyrosdick, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-5000. E-mail is wyrosdickt@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 1: Diane Scott, 5710 Munson High way, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-0413. E-mail is scottdl@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton, FL 32570; phone 623-6299. E-mail is winkleseh@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre, FL 32566; phone 939-2661. E-mail is colemanmd@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 4: JoAnn Simpson, 5059 Faircloth St., Pace, FL 32571; phone 994-5446. E-mail is simpsonjj@mai.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 5: Edward Gray III, 3156 Pins Lane, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563; phone 934-0701. E-mail is pedenst@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays at 5086 Canal St. in Milton. Phone: 983-5000.CI T Y GOVERNMEN T Milton City Hall, Mayor Guy Thompson, 6738 Dixon St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5400. City Manager is Brian Watkins Town of Jay, Mayor Kurvin Qualls, 3822 High way 4, Jay, FL 32565, phone 675-2719 Gulf Breeze City Hall, Mayor Beverly Zim mern, 1070 Shoreline Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, phone 934-5100. City Manager is Edwin Buz Eddy Please provide a color photograph if possible. All information must be typed. Wednesdays paper please submit by Friday at 3pm. Saturdays paper submit by Wednesday at noon ...a weekly column answering your questions with Biblical answers about life. Ask the Preache r Dear J.S., Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church in Milton. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree from Florida State University and a Master of Divinity Degree from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been the Pastor of HHBC since 1987. For 10 years he has also served as an International Youth Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention, preaching to multiplied thousands all over the U.S. and Canada. For more information about HHBC call 623-8959 or 626-8951 or fax, 623 197 If you have a question for ASK THE PREACHER send it to: ASK THE PREACHER, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351 Hickory Hammock Rd, Milton, FL, 32583 If you have a short comment you would like to make, call the Speak Out line at 623-5887. Longer comments are better suited as a letter to the editor.M onday, 5:22 a.m. Hello, my name is Dale. I am calling about the editorial content of this paper. I agree with its mostly conservative tilt. Lately, there has been a lot of whiners calling in with disagreements and upset with what they see on the editorial page. To them I say go read anything else. If you do not like what you see in this paper, then go away. I do have one problem, and that was on the front page. If Caseys Nursery says they are losing business then they are losing business. That is no place to oppose her. If you have an opinion then put it on the opinion page not the editorial. Editors note: We were not trying to editorialize in the story but present two different aspects. One business unfortunately is losing business while another who says they are making money. Sorry if you took it as an editorial.S unday, 8:30 p.m. I wanted to give you some information with so many negative things being said about the sheriffs office. Last Friday, my mothers home was broken into. Mementos were taken and I did not know what to do. My friends insisted I call the sheriff. I didnt think anything could be done, but my friends pushed me. They sent an officer out to my home to my surprise. He was very thorough and showed a great deal of expertise taking photos, asking questions. I felt bad about calling him, since I did not know the value of what was taken. He assured me they had ways other people do not with investigators on matters like this.S unday, 3:37 p.m. From one registered old-school Republican to another, excellent letter, Bruce Sargent. Your March 31 letter Rope-A-Dope Response exposing the misinform and manipulate tactics of Walter Williams was long overdue. God forbid he should ever teach an economics class to one of my kin. I prefer they get facts and reality in the classroom, not fantasy and hyperbole.S unday, 2:16 p.m. This is Ray. One possible way to help the working man with these high fuel costs would be if the independent road truckers would call a national strike. All stay home for a given time. In my rig, I get four miles to a gallon and at $1 a mile I couldnt make it today. Believe me, I did this once before and I stayed off the road for a period.S aturday, 1:49 p.m. This is Charlie. The only good thing Muslim countries do is kill drug users. All these on methamphetamines kill themselves. They have it right by bringing an early end for those on drugs.F riday, 5:07 p.m. I think it is so sad a young boy had to die. I feel the other boy wanted to kill him. I didnt see a gash, any injuries or a broken nose. I wish the boy had done those things before he died. He had to fight for his life before he was killed. This man trailed the kid. It is a hate crime. There is so much racial stuff in our nation we need to stop it. This is the best country in the world. It is terrible this had to happen to that young boy. This is Maria.F riday, 6:28 a.m. Yes, this is Nita. For the person who drives the maroon SUV who ran off the road and almost hit me as I was walking to Winn-Dixie: You know who you are. I know your face and it is burned into my memory. I hope whatever you were doing was worth it because you almost caused me physical injury and emotional stress. Thanks a lot mister. I would appreciate you paying attention to your driving. Thank you. Speak OUT Marietta McDaniel Smith, 83, of Milton passed away on March 17, 2012. She was born to C.J. McDaniel and Annie Mae McLean on Sept. 1, 1928. She graduated from Milton High School in 1946 and from Massey Draughton Business College in Montgomery, Ala. in 1947. Smith worked as a legal secretary for many years before joining the State Attorneys Ofce where she retired as Ofce Manager in 1998 after 28 years of service. She was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Milton since joining the church at age 16 and was previously a member of the East Milton Presbyterian Church. She also served on a variety of local organizations over the years including the Historical Society, Genealogical Society of Santa Rosa County, Bagdad Village Preservation Association and many others. Smith was preceded in death by her parents and her brother, James McLean. She is survived by her brother Connie McLean; her daughter, Sharon Painter; her son, Michael Smith and wife, Jodi; her daughter Cathy Purdon and husband, David; and the light of her life, granddaughter Catie Purdon. Smith is also survived by her many friends whom she loved as family. Funeral services were Wednesday, March 21, at First Baptist Church, Milton, Fla. Sign the guest book at www.srpressgazette.com.Marietta McDaniel Smith MARIETT A SMITH 1928-2012 Obituary CORRECTION In the Saturday, March 31 edition of the Press Gazette we inadvertently misspelled the name of Byrd Mapoles. The Santa Rosa Press Gazette apologizes for this error.

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A3 Wednesday, April 4, 2012 2075799 Gun Show April 14th & 15th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2075356 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 o r 2 Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING www. Sudoku-Puzzles .net Sudoku, Kakuro & Futoshiki Puzzles Sudoku 9x9 Very easy (138848083) 1 9 7 8 9 3 5 1 7 6 1 3 6 8 5 3 1 1 6 9 5 3 1 2 7 2 7 4 8 4 9 2 6 4 7 8 1 www.sudoku-puzzles.net Solution: www.sudoku-puzzles.net SOLUTION FIND US ONLINE Check out Santa Rosa Press Gazette on Facebook, or tweet us @srpressgazette Special to the Press Gazette Sacred Heart Senior Spirit will present a free seminar entitled, Back to Basics 101: Weight Management & Nutrition for Seniors from noon to 1 p.m. April 12 in the Rehabilitation Center at Sacred Heart Medical Park in Pace. The seminar, presented by Dr. Anthony Huynh, a board-certied baritrician with Sacred Heart Weight Management Center, will teach the basics of weight management, healthy weight loss for seniors, eating healthy on a budget, as well as important vitamins and supplements for the aging body. Dr. Huynh is fellowshiptrained in nutrition and bariatric medicine from Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pa. Dr. Huynh is board certied in bariatric medicine and is a certied nutrition clinician. He is currently accepting new patients at his Sacred Heart ofce located at Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola. Seating is limited and registration is requested. To register, call 416-1620. Sacred Heart Senior Spirit is a free program for persons 55 and older. Benets include free health screenings, seminars, special benets per hospital stay, cafeteria discount, a discounted pre-paid lab coupon program, and a monthly newsletter that includes seniors health and wellness information and a calendar of events. For more information, please call 850-416-1620, visit www.sacred-heart. org/seniorspirit or like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ SacredHeartSeniorSpirit. Weight management, nutrition for seniors DR. ANTHONY HUYNH Special to the Press Gazette Tax season is nearly done, but thats no reason to be done with taxes. The tax return is a roadmap to financial planning, giving insight into investment, retirement and estate planning needs. Tax season gives us a snapshot to use in framing our financial picture, said Hardy Eubanks, CPA/PFS with Eubanks & Rouse, CPAs. With W-2s, 1099s and other paperwork handy, its an important opportunity to assess where we are and to make adjustments that can move us closer to our financial goals. This year, in particular, the need for financial planning is more urgent. Several federal tax provisions are scheduled to expire at the end of the year or take effect at the beginning of 2013 that could influence financial strategies. The tax rate on capital gains, for instance, is scheduled to rise from 15-20 percent. Qualified dividends are set to be taxed as ordinary income. And a new 3.8 percent Medicare tax will be applied to the investment income of higher income and higher net-worth individuals. Its important to understand how these changes could affect your financial situation and to plan now for appropriate investment, retirement and estate strategies, Eubanks added. Year-end could be too late. As a CPA with the Personal Financial Planning (PFS) credential, Eubanks has demonstrated robust knowledge in tax, investment, retirement, estate and insurance planning and commitment to ongoing education. His passion is to work closely with his partners and other business professionals in providing comprehensive financial plans that meet or exceed the clients expectations. Tax time right time for nancial planning Special to the Press Gazette Council on Aging of West Florida will host a Milton Caregiver Support Group meeting at 6 p.m. Thurs day, April 5, at St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church, 6451 Park Ave. There is no cost and the public is in vited. Reservations are not required. The group meets on the rst Thursday of each month at the same time and location. County residency is not required to attend. The support group is designed to reduce stress, increase coping skills, pro vide strategies for effective management of care giving tasks and enable caregivers to provide high quality, inhome care. The programs are sponsored by Council on Aging of West Florida, the State of Florida Depart ment of Elder Affairs and the Northwest Florida Area Agency on Aging. For more information, call 432-1475. Council on Aging of West Florida is a local, in dependent 501(c)(3) notfor-prot organization that has served seniors and their families since 1972. Council on Aging of West Florida helps seniors in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties live healthy, safe and independent lives in their own surroundings. Council on Aging to host support group SUDOKU

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Bullies are a problem Thirteen million kids are bullies nationwide! Thank God for Lee Hirsch, lmmaker of Bully. Mike Huckabee interviewed him (bullied as a child) and the family whose son was punched, shoved and bullied on a school bus. What a tragedy! I recall television reports of similar incidents in the Panhandle. Years ago, an area paper printed a lengthy story about a gay student in Gulf Breeze. Tormented, he didnt want to go to school. I think his mother died; his gutsy father reported the bullying. Shame on students, teachers, principals, et al aware but do nothing! In Bully the mother confronts the principal, receiving no response. Disinterested, the latter brags about her grandchild. Not my nature to physically do so, I would have slapped the principal and any bully observed in the act. God bless those attempting to remove the R rating. Bully should be seen by everyone to motivate those who know situations exist instead of cowardly remaining silent, perpetuating this disgusting practice! I commend Hirsch for congratulating the school allowing him to videotape actual bullying. Most administrations would be defensive, denying bullying was prevalent in their schools. As a fth grader, I was sent to the principals of ce for kicking someone in the chins (mocking my brothers name). I admitted doing it; said Id do it again. Now a Christian, senior citizen, Id rethink it, although I would have lost it with that Bully principal. Students, tell your parents if youre being bullied. God bless us all as only He can and intervene with the heartbreak and suicides bullies cause. Chrys Holley Milton, Fla. All that money for nothing My letter is in reference to the courthouse and it costing a little over $205,000 so far, and not laid the rst brick. My question is, do we really need a huge courthouse that would take up about nine acres of land for the building and parking area? A building of that size sounds like all functions that are carried on in a courthouse would be in one building. Milton, with its population growth, lifestyle, drug addicts and increase in crimes such as murder, rape, and etc. The lottery really was supposed to support and bene t the school system. Now we are one of those wet counties. Prayer has been removed from school to the point it is, in many cases, dangerous to send your children off to school. The system stinks. No rules or regulations will work with humankind other than those, which was made by our Heavenly Father who created us. The needs of the jail, such as a suitable size courtroom, judges, etc. should have been built years ago when the jail was built. Think of the money spent, at the taxpayers expense, transferring prisoners back and forth to the court sessions. The courthouse issue should not be centered on the needs of the jail, but on the residents of Santa Rosa County who will be paying for it in years to come. I repeat: Decisions of this magnitude should be placed on a ballot and the branch of ces placed in different areas of Santa Rosa, or bene cial, as well as much appreciated. I really favor keeping the current courthouse in operation for civil cases, etc. and building the large courtroom facility in East Milton with the location decided by the sheriff. He is responsible for transferring prisoners to and from court sessions. Then just upgrade the branch of ces in the county. No more architectural designs please. Milton does not want to compete with Ponce de Leon. Unless they have changed dramatically, they are, or were, about the size of Bagdad or Jay. My main request to the Santa Rosa County Commissioners: Stop wasting money. Consider the needs of the people who had con dence in you by voting you in. Marion Cumbie Milton, Fla. Last week, the United States Department of Agriculture and the Florida Department of Agriculture were in town, congratulating the schools of Santa Rosa for helping students become healthier. This week, we want to take time to thank the folks that led to that recognition. The latest numbers from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) show the percentage of American children who are deemed overweight has tripled since the 1970s and, today, one in every ve students between ages 6 and 17 is said to be overweight. As our children pack on the pounds, they found their veins getting clogged. For more than a decade, clinical trials have been under way to see if children should be placed on cholesterollowering drugs called statins. Suddenly, U.S. children are beginning to see problems (like high blood pressure, Type-2 diabetes and elevated cholesterol levels) not usually seen until later in life. We certainly have no trouble remembering the school lunches of just a few decades ago. Fried foods were the norm. Sugar was often added to make foods tasty to young palettes, and things like French fries and potato chips often were served as a compliment to the main entre. By the 1970s, most schools were even adding ice cream for children to purchase. We say all of this to note our local school system has every reason to feel motivated and to do its part to make our children healthy. The system has every reason to show youngsters how to lead a healthy lifestyle. And working in concert with physical education teachers, students can learn there is more to an active life than sitting on a sofa engaged in endless hours of video games. When it comes to eating and exercise habits, like so many other things, children learn it at home. Our school system is to be applauded for its effort. Staff members are trying to start an education process early. As one student noted, many fried foods have been replaced with baked foods. Ice cream if often jettisoned in favor of low-fat yogurt. Ketchup is not counted as a vegetable. We wonder how many parents take the time to see what the schools are serving for lunch. (We print that list in this paper every week.) But our responsibility as parents goes beyond keeping an eye on what the schools are feeding our children. We each need to extend the school lesson to the home and the real world. A healthy lunch does little good if a hurried, work-frazzled parent takes the easy way out and simply pushes fast food burgers and fries at the child for the evening meal. Similarly, we parents must realize that while it is convenient, high-sugar cereals are far from the ideal thing to serve our youngsters as we send them out the door on their way to learn. We should all take time to thank our school system for being so forward-thinking when it comes to the health of our children, but we cant let it stop there. In a way, our schools are also teaching us. Were being shown it is possible to be healthy and to get there one step at a time. If our children accept it at school they can, and will, accept it at home. Its our responsibility to make sure the lesson is repeated when our children get there. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Even a parent can learn OUR VIEW www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, April 4, 2012 A Page 4 Section O PINION Our Supreme Court heard three days of oral arguments on the legality of ObamaCare. Neither joint sessions of Congress nor oral arguments are as fun as they sound. The arguments are nuanced ones, cloaked in unnecessarily technical language that no one really understands much like the health care bill itself. Even a New York Times poll says that 72 percent of Americans do not want ObamaCare. The case hinges on the sly wording of what consequence is attached to not complying with the individual mandate, which is the core of this massive intrusion into our daily lives. At rst Obama called it a tax. Later, when he saw that was a legal problem, he called it a penalty. His administration has ipped on this issue more than a meth-house mattress. Washington learned long ago that if you name a bill something that no one could argue with, like The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, you could put pretty much anything you like in a 2,000-ish page bill and pass it before anyone reads it. In a stunning act of hubris which de ned the rst two years of Democratcontrolled, libuster-proof House, Senate and Presidency, thenHouse Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi famously said of the contentious ObamaCare bill as it slithered through, We have to pass the bill so you can nd out what is in it. Much like the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Democrats realized they had a narrow window of opportunity, just two years, to loot the U.S. Treasury, knowing full well the police would soon be there. In this case the police arrived with the landslide shellacking Democrats took in the 2010 elections. Republicans regained control of the House and took the keys to the liquor cabinet away from the less nancially responsible kids. Since then, Obama appointed reliable liberal Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court. He said he was looking for someone with empathy, preferably a bi-racial woman with some experience being a judge. At the time I suggested Paula Abdul. She ts Obamas criteria and clearly, given her success in Hollywood with only one hit song, she has spent a lot of time around old men in robes. Heath care in America remains a concern. We live in a country that celebrates overeating. We cheer the reigning Nathans Hot Dogs eating champion, Joey Chestnut, as he chokes down 60 wieners (beating the record set in the 1980s by Elton John). Why then is the current incentive (dying early from cardiac disease or obesity-induced diabetes) not motivation enough? Throwing everyone into the same insurance risk pool at the same price is not going to help matters. Just to sum up the simple math on the best health care system the world has ever known, the average family has out-of-pocket expenses for health care (after employer-paid insurance and the like) of $2,853 per year. This is 33 percent of what we spend yearly on our transportation. The same U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report says we spend $118 on reading, which goes a long way toward explaining why ObamaCare slipped through. Obama knows his health care law is a loser, so he does what he normally does: nds someone to blame. As a model, he points to Romneys state health care system in Massachusetts, which is a disaster. He really doesnt need to use such a recent data point when there are older models of socialized medicine he can chart the trajectory of his plan against, like North Koreas. Fellow Glorious Leaders, from Hitler through most recently Cubas Castro, have bought the favor of their electorate with generous, socialized medicine meth. I have a vested interest in this battle, and not only as an advocate for liberty, free markets and limited government. My oldest is in her third year of medical school. Medicine should remain a beacon for our best and brightest, who set out upon their careers to help their patients. They should not become petty bureaucrats in the Obama cradle-to-grave socialist state, bound by political expediencies and not by the best outcomes for their patients. If we can be forced to buy government-mandated health insurance under duress of a dubious interpretation of the Commerce Clause, with the validation of the Supreme Court and its Due Process Clause, for a health care bill more characteristic of Santa Claus, what is next? Relish your eeting freedoms. Liberty was nice while it lasted. Ron Hart, a libertarian syndicated op-ed humorist, awardwinning author and TV/radio commentator can be reached at Ron@RonaldHart.com or visit www. RonaldHart.com. Once they get their commerce claws in us... HART TALK Ron Hart OUR VIEW O PINION O PINION WORD from page A1 I dont really care where. Just the old one there is part of our county heritage and doesnt need to be destroyed. Terry Stabler I would still like to see it built in downtown Milton to keep people going through the town and historical element. Miranda Burkhead A more central location. Not downtown Milton or Pace, but a more central location for everyone. Larry Worthington The current location is the best one. I think a nicer and newer courthouse would help downtown Milton. Connie Gaudio I would prefer it to be built by the Navarre exit or somewhere there is a lot of activity so people can see it. Pam Corbin It needs to go to East Milton by 84 Lumber or the Sheriffs Of ce. It would be better out of the way so no one would see the bums going in and out. Joshua Swain We want you to share your views on the above topic(s) or any topic with other Santa Rosas Press Gazette readers. Your views are important, too. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Letters must be typed and may be edited for content for to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for veri cation, if necessary. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A5 Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Special to the Press Gazette The Florida Bar, the states guardian for the in tegrity of the legal profes sion, announces that the Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders disci plined 22 attorneys, which included one from Pensac ola, disbarring ve and sus pending 13. Some attorneys received more than one form of discipline. Two at torneys were placed on pro bation; four attorneys were publicly reprimanded and one attorney was ordered to pay restitution. Elizabeth Ann Amond, 811 W. Garden St., Pensac ola, publicly reprimanded and placed on probation for three years, following a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1996) Amond is further directed to attend a trust accounting workshop. Amond improperly com mingled funds by placing earned and unearned fees in her trust account, failed to provide monthly bank reconciliations to The Flor ida Bars auditor and failed to follow the rule requiring that trust funds held for a specic purpose be applied only to that purpose. (Case No. SC11-1664) Richard Lawrence Brown, P.O. Box 690282, Vero Beach, permanently disbarred, effective imme diately, following a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1993) Brown en gaged in a course of con duct involving the neglect of legal matters and mis appropriation of approxi mately $180,000 of client funds from his trust ac count. He is incarcerated in county jail pending trial on various criminal charges. (Case Nos. SC11-1030 & SC11-1427) Mark F. Dickson, 10940 N.W. 15th St., Pembroke Pines, suspended until fur ther order, effective 30 days from a Feb. 14 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1975) According to a petition for emergency suspension, Dickson appeared to be causing great public harm by misappropriating client trust funds. A Bar audit found that Dickson improp erly commingled funds and converted some of the clients funds for his own personal use. (Case No. SC12-237) William Lee Durden III, 1834 Starwan Road E, Jack sonville, suspended for six months, effective 30 days from a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2002) During a series of controlled telephone conversations, which were recorded by the State Attorneys Ofce investigator, Durden admit ted receiving payment for representing at least one criminal defendant while employed as an assistant public defender. The defen dant had previously been declared indigent and was represented by the public defenders ofce at the tax payers expense during the time of Durdens employ ment. (Case No. SC11-2444) David Nathan Finkel stein, 9000 Blind Pass Road, Apt. B105, Sarasota, sus pended for 20 days, effec tive 30 days from a Feb. 20 court order. Further, upon reinstatement, Finkelstein is placed on probation for one year. (Admitted to practice: 1987) Finkelstein engaged in a pattern of misconduct including: ne glect, lack of diligence, and a lack of communication with clients. He also failed to use proper trust account ing procedures. (Case No. SC11-1469) George Frederick Frank, 5355 Town Center Road, Suite 900, Boca Raton, pub licly reprimanded following a Feb. 20 court order. (Ad mitted to practice: 2009) Frank was arrested and convicted of driving under the inuence and careless driving after a trafc acci dent. (Case No. SC12-231) Eric P. Gifford, 3807 County Road 826, Anna, Texas, disbarred effective immediately, following a Feb. 20 court order. (Admit ted to practice: 2001) Gif ford misappropriated $5,000 of client funds held in trust for a client who is mentally disabled and legally blind. He admitted to using to us ing the funds for personal bills and expenses includ ing private school tuition for his children. (Case No. SC11-1182) Mary Alice Gwynn, 805 George Bush Blvd., Del ray Beach, suspended for 91 days, following a Feb. 16 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1991) In numer ous instances, Gwynn acted dishonestly, incompetently and in bad faith in a clients pending litigation. Gwynn failed to expedite litigation in the best interest of the client. She also led frivo lous claims to harass her opponent and opposing counsel, made false allega tions in testimony, engaged in willful abuse of the judi cial system, and failed to research and verify claims before ling with the court. (Case No. SC08-622) Jeffrey Martin Hanly, 1312 3rd. Street N., Jackson ville Beach, disbarred effec tive immediately following a Feb. 20 court order. (Ad mitted to practice: 2002) An investigation by the Bar as a result of numerous com plaints against Hanly found that Hanly abandoned his law practice and misappro priated trust funds. (Case No. SC11-1217) Mary D. Hansen, 4393 S. Ridgewood Ave., Suite 1, Port Orange, suspended for 91 days effective imme diately, following a Feb. 14 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1981) Hansen was found in contempt for fail ing to comply with the con ditions of a Sept. 22, 2011, suspension order. Hansen did not submit to the Bar a sworn afdavit listing the names and addresses of all persons and entities to which she gave notice of her suspension. (Case No. SC11-2498) Dwayne Bisford John son Sr., 733 Cypress Drive, Apt. A, Lake Park, perma nently disbarred effective immediately, following a Feb. 23 court order. (Admit ted to practice: 1998) John son was found in contempt for failing to comply with the conditions of an Aug. 29 disbarment order. John son did not submit to the Bar a sworn afdavit listing the names and addresses of all persons and entities to which he gave notice of his disbarment. (Case No. SC11-2499) Mark Howard Klein, 2263 N. W. Boca Raton Blvd., Suite 209, Boca Raton, suspended for 90 days following a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1986) Klein was the subject of several disci plinary proceedings. Pend ing complaints involved loan modications where an ongoing pattern of inef fective communication cou pled with failing to perform meaningful services. Klein also pleaded no contest to two misdemeanor charges of assault and battery. (Case No. SC10-2341) Petia Dimitrova Knowles, 5110 S.W. 101 st Ave., Cooper City, suspended until fur ther order, effective 30 days from a Jan. 17 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2005) (Case No. SC10-1019). Anett Lopez, 3140 W. Kennedy Blvd., Suite 107, Tampa, suspended for 10 days, effective 30 days from a Feb. 20 court order. (Ad mitted to practice: 2005) Lopez notarized a clients family law pleadings in his absence, completed im proper notarial certicates and misapplied funds for payments of costs from the client. Lopez failed to prop erly supervise her assistant who handled all deposits for the ofce and was respon sible for ensuring the funds were posted to the proper accounts. A review of Lo pez trust account records revealed that she was not maintaining minimum ac counting procedures. (Case No. SC11-670) Supreme Court disciplines 22 attorneys The remaing eight attorneys can be found online at sprgazette.com

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Local A6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 By Theresa Friday Extension Faculty-Residential Horticulture UF/IFAS Santa Rosa County High in ber, low in calories and cholesterol free, the eggplant is a great edible to add to the summer garden. Although we think of eggplant as a vegetable, botanically it is a fruit. In Northwest Florida, our long hot growing season is perfect for the eggplant. One of the most common problems encountered in growing eggplants is transplanting them into the spring garden too early. Cold temperatures below 50 degrees F injure this crop. Low temperatures tend to harden eggplants and stunt their growth. Since stunted plants recover very slowly, transplants should be set in the garden after the average daily temperature is above 70 degrees F. The best temperatures are between 80-90 degrees F during the day and 7080 degrees F during the night. Plant growth is curtailed at temperatures below 60 degrees F. Gardeners in North Florida can put eggplant into the garden between mid-March and July. If the weather has been continuously warm, most varieties will reach their rst harvest in 80-85 days. Eggplants come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colors. They run from large to lemon size. They may be long, pearshaped, oblong, round or cylindrical. Their colors may be purple, yellow, white, ash, variegated, apple green, etc. Seed catalogs are lled with mouth-watering varieties and colorful options. Varieties that will thrive in Florida include Black Beauty, Dusky, Long, Ichiban and Cloud Nine. Black Beauty is an heirloom variety. Introduced around 1910, this popular variety has rich avored fruits that hold up well. Plump 45 inch diameter fruits are a beautiful, shiny purple-black. This openpollinated type holds its fruit high above the ground. Ichiban is an oriental type eggplant. This hybrid produces heavy yields 9inch long by 1.5-inch wide dark purple eggplants. Very avorful and tender, it is excellent for Oriental dishes and for grilling and roasting. Easter Egg is an unusual variety which produces small, eggsized white fruit which turns yellow at maturity. This edible ornamental plant makes a fun and interesting addition to a childrens garden. Eggplant requires a deep, rich, well-drained soil. Adding organic matter such as compost or aged-manures will help keep this heavy-feeder healthy. The soil should have a pH between 6.0 and 6.5. Always allow the soil to sit for several weeks prior to planting when adding amendments to the garden. A constant, rapid growth is important for quality fruit production from young eggplants. Maintain vigorous growth throughout the growing season by keeping soils uniformly moist. Since eggplants will be in the garden for a long season, supply a sidedressing of a nitrogen-containing fertilizer about once a month. Normally, eggplants are not staked, but a heavy fruit load may require some support later in the season. Often, fruit grown in summer taste extremely bitter. The main cause of bitter fruit is lack of soil moisture. To help prevent bitterness, irrigate during dry weather. The green and white fruited varieties are usually less bitter under these growing conditions than the purple varieties. The fruit may be harvested when they reach at least one-third to two-thirds their fully mature size. High quality fruit will have a high gloss to the skin. If you push in on the side of the fruit with your thumb, it should not spring back. Fruits that are dull, spongy and contain hard or brown seeds are overmature. Overmature fruit are of poor quality and should be cut and discarded to promote longer productivity. When harvesting, cut the tough fruit stems with a knife or clippers to avoid damaging the plant branches. Theresa Friday is the Residential Horticulture Extension Agent for Santa Rosa County. The use of trade names, if used in this article, is solely for the purpose of providing speci c information. It is not a guarantee, warranty, or endorsement of the product name(s) and does not signify that they are approved to the exclusion of others. For additional information about all of the county extension services and other articles of interest go to http://santarosa.ifas.u edu. if you run in both or 15,000 impresions! JUST IN TIME FOR THE SPRING BLITZ C A N V A S S I N G Z I P C O D E S A T U N B E L I E V A B L E P R I C E S April 18 Deadline April 11 May 9 Deadline May 2 Reaching thousands of homes in zip codes... 17,000 + 32571 20,000 + 32570 and 32583 Full Page Includes 4,000 srpressgazette.com Impressions $650 + $150 Color Half Page Includes 2,500 srpressgazette.com Impressions $425 + $100 Color Quarter Page Includes 2,500 srpressgazette.com Impressions $275 + $75 Color 10% Discount Full Page Full Color 15,000 srpressgazette.com Impression s 10,000 Impressions (geo) Blitz the Blitz $ 999 Tracie Smelstoys 850-623-2120 tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com 6629 Elva Street, Milton FL 32570 www.srpressgazette.com Call to reserve your space Easter egg eggplant will amaze the kids

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A7 Wednesday, April 4, 2012

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Stations of the Cross On Good Friday, at 5 p.m. April 6, First United Methodist Church in Milton and St. Marys Episcopal Church will join congregations to walk the Stations of the Cross. The group will depart from First United Methodist Church, 102 Berryhill Road, and walk to St. Marys Episcopal Church, 6849 Oak St. The Stations of the Cross will be read along the way by participants. Upon arrival to St. Marys Church, prayers and a hymn will take place inside the church, with a reception following the service in the Parish Hall. This service is an adaptation of a custom widely observed by pilgrims to Jerusalem and we invite all who wish to participate in this devotion to attend. Easter Block Party True Grace Fellowship Church will hold an Easter Block Party April 7 at the church from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. This free block party will offer loads of activities for all ages including an Easter egg hung, carnival games, bounce house, live music, and much more. Hamburgers and hot dogs will be serviced. Easter Weekend at Bagdad UMC Bagdad United Methodist Church will hold the following services and events on Easter weekend: Good Friday Tenebrae Service: 6 p.m. April 6 Community Easter Egg Hunt: 11 a.m. April 7 Easter Sunrise Service: 6:30 a.m. April 8 Easter Worship Service: 11 a.m. April 8 For more information contact the church ofce at 626-1948. Holy Week at Trinity by the Fields Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday, April 1, and ends with the celebration of Easter one week later, April 8. We will have a Holy Communion service everyday that week except Saturday. We invite you to join us as we follow Jesus through His week of passion, His trial, His walk to the cross, His death, and His triumphant resurrection. Palm Sunday: 10 a.m. Monday Friday Holy Communion: 12:15 p.m. Maundy Thursday Holy Communion: 6:30 p.m. Good Friday Stations of the Cross: 6 p.m. Easter Sunday: 10 a.m. Easter Sunrise Services at Calvary Baptist Calvary Baptist Church, Highway 89 North in Allentown, will conduct Easter Sunrise Services 7:30 a.m. April 8 at around the gazebo. Dan Kirkland will be performing special music followed by a message from Rev. David Shofner. Breakfast will follow at 8:30 a.m. and then a special Sunday school and worship service. True Grace Fellowship Easter Sunday True Grace Fellowship Church will celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ on Easter Sunday, at 11 a.m. April 8. This special service will feature a Human Video presented by True Graces children and youth as well as a message from Pastor Duke Barrow. True Grace Fellowship Church is located at 5178 Willard Norris Road in Milton. For more information call, 623-4795. St. Marys Episcopal Church Easter Services. St. Marys Episcopal Church at 6849 Oak St. in Milton has announced its Easter Celebration plans. Reverend Mathew Dollhausen will lead the following services: Palm Sunday Process with Palms on April 1 at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. services Good Friday April 6 noon service Good Friday Stations of the Cross: 5 p.m. starting at 1st United Methodist and ending at St. Marys Holy Saturday April 7 at 7:30 p.m. Easter Sunday three services: Sunrise service at 6:27 a.m in the garden, as well as services at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. and Easter Egg hunt will be held at 10 a.m. between services. All are invited to attend and share the timeless Liturgy traditions with the love of Christ as our mission and sharing that love with each other. Make Easter meaningful time. Behold the Lamb First United Methodist Church of Pace Choir will present Behold the Lamb on April 8 at the 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. services. First United Methodist Church of Pace is located at 4540 Chumuckla Highway in Pace. For more information call, 994-5608. Easter Sunrise Service The Navarre Community-Wide Easter Sunrise Service will be at 6 a.m., rain or shine, on April 8, at the main parking lot for Navarre Beach under the white tents. The service is sponsored by Navarre BeachSide Church. The Navarre BeachSide Churchs 8:30 a.m. Easter Service will follow at the same location. Navarre BeachSide Church is a nondenomination Christian Church offering contemporary worship. Proudly Serving The Emerald Coast Want Terri c Cooling? Call the Rheem Team Kool Breeze of Northwest Florida, Inc. 850-939-3325 We Will Impress You. 4865650 P U B L I C N O T I C E T h e Es c a m bi a C ons ort i u m c o m pris ed of Es c a m bia C o unt y t he C it y of Pens ac ol a, Sa nt a R os a C ou nt y F l ori da, a nno unc es init i at io n of t he p ubl ic part ic i pa t ion pr oc es s t h at w il l f ac ilit at e t h e pr ep ar at ion of t he Es c a m bia C ons o rt iu m 2 0 1 2/ / 20 1 3 C o ns o lid at ed Pla n/ A nn ua l H o us i ng a nd C o m m u nit y D ev e lo p m e nt Pl an f or t he p eri od Oc t ob er 1, 2 0 1 2 Se pt e m be r 30, 2 0 1 3 T h is proc es s s erv es as a c olla bo rat iv e t o ol f or t h e c o m m uni t y by ide nt if y ing or u pd at ing ex is t in g c on dit io ns in t he C ons o rt iu m s m e m be r jur is dic t io ns w it h r es pec t t o h ous i ng a nd c o m m u nit y dev elo p m ent ne eds g oals an d obj ec t i v es T h e C o ns ort i u m s 20 12 2 0 1 3 An nu al Pl an f o r H ou s ing a nd C o m m u nit y D ev elo p m e nt w ill id ent if y t he c om m un it y s hous in g an d c o m m unit y d ev el op m e nt prio rit ies a n d t arg et s t rat egi es t o ad dr es s pri orit i es es t abl is h e d in t he 201 0 20 14 Es c a m b ia C o ns o rt iu m C o ns o lid at ed Pl an w hic h w ill b e i m ple m ent ed d uri ng t h e nex t F e d eral F is c al Ye ar. T h e 2 0 1 2 / 20 1 3 An nu al Pl an, w h en c o m pl et e, w il l de not e t h e Es c a m bi a C o ns ort i u m s ac t io n pl an f or t h e ut iliz at i on of res ou rc es pr ov i ded t h ro ug h t he F Y 2 0 12 C o m m unit y D ev elo p m ent Bl oc k Gr ant F Y 2 0 12 H O M E I nv es t m ent P art n ers hips Ac t F Y 2 0 1 2 E m er ge nc y S olut i ons Gra nt an d ot he r H U D pr ogr a m s d es ig n ed t o a ddr es s hous in g an d c o m m unit y d ev el op m e nt nee ds T W O P U B LI C H E A R I N G S are be in g s p ons ore d by t he C ons ort iu m t o af f ord c it iz ens t he op port u nit y t o p rov i de inp ut an d rec o m m en dat io ns re ga rdi ng as s is t ed hous in g, ho us in g rel at e d ne eds / prio rit ies s u pp o rt iv e ho us in g nee ds an d n on h ous i ng c o m m un it y d ev el op m e nt n ee ds w it hin t he C o ns o rt iu m T h e T W O p u b l i c h ear i n g s co n cer n i n g t h e d e vel o p me n t o f t h e 2 0 1 2 2 0 1 3 Es ca m b i a C o n s o r ti u m A n n u al Pl a n wi l l b e h el d at 2 :0 0 P. M o n T u e s d a y, A p r i l 2 4 20 12 at t h e Pe n sa c o l a H o u si n g Offi c e, C o n f er e n ce R o o m, 42 0 W e st C h as e Str e et, Pe n sa co l a, F l o r i d a; a n d at 9: 00 A M o n W e d n e s d a y A p r i l 2 5 20 12 i n t h e Sa n t a R o s a C o u n t y P u b l i c Ser vi ce s C o mp l ex, H o u si n g Of fi ce C o n fer e n c e R o o m, 60 51 Ol d B a g d a d H i g h w ay, M i l t o n F l o r i d a T h e Es ca m b i a/ P e n s ac o l a h ear i n g wi l l al s o i n c o r p o r ate i n f o r mati o n r e g ar d i n g t h e A n al ysi s o f I m p e d i me n ts t o F ai r H o u si n g T h e Es c a m bia C o ns ort i u m a dh er es t o t h e A m er ic ans w it h D is a bilit i es Ac t an d w ill m ak e r eas o na bl e m odif ic at io ns f or ac c es s t o s erv ic es pro gr a m s a nd ot he r ac t iv it i es Ple as e c all 85 8 0 35 0 ( C it y ) or 4 58 0 46 6 (Es c a m bi a C o unt y ) [ or T el ec o m m u nic at i ons D ev ic e f or t h e D e af ( T D D ) nu m b ers 5 95 0 10 2 ( C it y ) or 45 8 0 46 4 ( Es c a m bi a C o unt y )] f o r f urt her i nf or m at io n. R e qu es t s m us t be m a de at leas t 48 h ou rs in a dv a nc e of t he ev ent i n ord er t o allo w t i m e t o prov i de t h e re qu es t ed s e rv ic es I n add it ion t o direc t in put p rov i de d du rin g t he p ub lic hea rin gs w rit t en c o m m e nt s or in put re gar di ng loc al h ous in g nee ds or pri orit i es w ill b e ac c e pt e d t hro ug h M a y 4 20 12 a nd m ay be s u b m it t e d t o: Es c a m bi a C o ns ort i u m P. O. Box 18 17 8, Pens ac ol a, F l ori da 3 252 3. F or f u rt he r inf or m at i on, c ont ac t R a ndy W ilk ers o n at 4 58 04 66 (Es c a m bi a C ou nt y ), M arc ie W hit ak er at 8 58 03 50 ( C it y of Pe ns ac ol a), or J anic e Bo on e at 9 81 70 7 6 ( Sa nt a R o s a C ou nt y ). W i ls o n B. R ob ert s o n As ht on J H ay w ar d, I I I J im W illi a m s o n C hai r m an C hai r m a n, Es c a m bia C ou nt y M ay o r Sant a R os a C ou nt y Bo ard of C ou nt y C o m m is s i on ers C it y of Pe ns a c o la Board of C o unt y C o m m i s s ione rs Special to the Press Gazette For the past 12 years, residents from Northwest Florida have made their way to Olivet Baptist Church on Good Friday to enjoy the great southern and country gospel music each year. This year is no different, as many will attend the 13th annual Good Friday Gospel Concert featuring The Hendersons of Milton, Dan Kirkland of Pace, and special guests, New Vision Singers from McKenzie, Ala. The Hendersons, ministering in song for over 22 years, consists of Sonny Henderson, of Milton, his daughter, Lydia Henderson, of Pensacola. Joining the Hendersons for this special event will be Brad Atkinson, of Flomaton, Ala., who was recently a member of The Hendersons. Sonnys wife, Marie, travels with them and serves as sound technician in concerts. The Hendersons recently released their eighth recording on CD, Something Old, Something New and will have them available at the concert. They sing primarily southern and traditional gospel. Their newest release to radio is Just Like That from this newest project. Kirkland travels and sings and is well known in this area who has several recorded projects. He is well liked for his down home sound and he has a way of making the songs come to life where you will want to join in and sing with him. Kirkland also sings a good mix of southern and traditional music. Special guest singers, The New Vision Singers, will come to the concert from McKenzie, Ala., and individually and collectively they have been singing gospel music for several years. The New Vision Singers present a good selection of southern, bluegrass, and traditional gospel music. They are excellent musicians and you will enjoy being in concert with them. This is a very talented family of singers and instrument players. Pastor Frankie Godsey and the members of Olivet Baptist, along with the host group, The Hendersons, invite everyone to come and enjoy this special event each year. No admission fee will be required at the door, but an offering will be received for the expenses of the evening. Doors will open at 6 p.m. for your convenience. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend this special annual event. For further information or directions, contact 850-232-2421, 850-994-1727 or 850-623-2780. Good Friday gospel concert at Olivet Baptist Faith BRIEFS Faith A8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 DAN KIRKLAND

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A9 Wednesday, April 4, 2012

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Local A10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Special to the Press Gazette Each spring, the Santa Rosa Education Foundation invites every school in the Santa Rosa School District to nominate one teacher for the Santa Rosa Rookie of the Year award. All full-time classroom teachers in their third year or less of teaching are eligible for this award. This includes total teaching experience, not just in Santa Rosa public schools. The following school nominees will be recognized at our 17th Annual Rookie of the Year Reception on May 2 at 4:30 p.m. at B.C. Russell Elementary School. 2012 Rookie of the Year Nominees: Avalon Middle, Josh Pape; Bagdad Elementary, Monica Godwin; Berryhill Administrative Complex, Pamela Ardoin; Berryhill Elementary, Sarah Rhoades; Chumuckla Elementary, Gretchen Wiggins; S.S. Dixon Intermediate, Brian Simmons; S.S. Dixon Primary, Jennifer Warner; East Milton Elementary, Amber Hayen; Gulf Breeze Elementary, Tonya Hickman; Gulf Breeze High, Katharine Edwards; Hobbs Middle, Amie Filbert; Holley Navarre Intermediate, Lisa Carothers; Holley Navarre Middle, Laura Steigerwalt; Holley Navarre Primary, Valerie Coleman; T.R. Jackson Pre-K, Marcia Mayo; Jay Elementary, Lindsay Russell; Jay High, Nickolas Gandy; King Middle, Brett Shepherd; Locklin Technical Center, Catherine Dougherty; Milton High, Jeff Dyer; Navarre High, Christine Pacholl; Oriole Beach Elementary, Whitney Morgan; Pace High, Mark Alexander; Pea Ridge Elementary, Daryl Freeman; W.H. Rhodes Elementary, Heidi Hancock; B.C. Russell Elementary, Joshua Simmons; T.L. Sims Middle, Ashley Flowers; West Navarre Intermediate, Hannah Vincent; West Navarre Primary, Amy Woodcock; Woodlawn Beach Middle, Adrianne Zeiger Awards will be presented at 5 p.m. with the reception open until 5:45 p.m. The Santa Rosa Rookie of the Year 2012 will be announced during the awards presentation and awarded a Sara Caudell Scholarship by the Gulf Breeze Area Chamber of Commerce. Ed Foundation announces nominees for Santa Rosa Rookie of the Year 2012 Special to the Press Gazette Congratulations to the 2012 Bunny Scramble winners. Winners of an eight-pound HoneyBaked Ham from the HoneyBaked Ham Company are Berna Faust, Betty Toomey, Tammy Correll, Hollis Kimberl and Nell Allen. This was an awesome promotion and the response was tremendous, said Santa Rosa Press Gazette editor Bill Gamblin. It is the responses to contests like this that make a community newspaper. We appreciate the people with the HoneyBaked Ham Company and all our associate sponsors for the 2012 Bunny Scramble. Bunny Scramble winners announced Photos by Mathew Pellegrino 393-3669 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette. com Despite wet conditions, hundreds ocked to the Spring Festival in Bagdad. The festival took place at the First Pentecostal Church in Bagdad from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. The festival offered food, craft items and vendors who sold clothing and collectibles. Spring Fest in Bagdad

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6514016 Wise Equipment Sales & Service 1147 S. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536 (850) 682-3366 FAIR from page A1 be done with the addition of services offered by the Kids House to help those who have been victimized. Hall says he feels abuse has become more prevelant throughout so ciety as a whole because of negative images on the Internet and in movies, drugs and an increas ing divorce rate, which makes children more vunerable. Previously, child abuse or neglect was not something many talked about. This is not something easily talked about even today, said Adair Cot ton, who is heading up the pinwheel campaign for the Santa Rosa Kids House. By not talking about it or addressing the problem, it has been allowed to ourish. But with efforts like these and the Kids House, the community has become so driven and so acutely aware of the problem. They are helping more. For more information or ways you can help, call 623-1112 or email coordi nator@srkidshouse.org. FAIR SCHEDULE Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A11 Wednesday, April 4, 2012 thing is if we would have done that, we should have done that around 20 years ago since we now have some ranch houses in the area. The thing is, no matter what anyone would want to do in the district, it would have to go before the Milton Historical Board and also approved by the council if they wanted to build a fence, shed, or do any improve ments to a home. Even the matter of how many stories a home should be came into question. I am in favor of a lot be cause what I see is good use of whats available, Mike Davis said. I lived in Spain for four years and the build ings were so close the only place to expand was up. Many people had their business or shop on the ground level and lived above the business. Jorgensen took the votes and is expected to compile the information before pre senting the information to Miltons ordinance commit tee for review and approval. This would be a new dis trict with standards set from the citizens, Jorgensen said. This plan could allow more uses for the property, but those uses would be highly regulative. Current zoning laws in this area of Milton would allow 3.5 homes per acre of land. According to Jorgensen this plan, if approved by the citizens affected, could allow them to decide what goes into their neighborhood. If everybody shows up Saturday and tells me they like things the way they are then I will have a short day, Jorgensen said. But there has been declining property values in the area for some time and properties are aging. This overlay district would not effect current property owners, but it would set a standard for construct if you tear down a building and replace it with another. The city has had two meetings so far on the plan with one drawing 35 resi dents and a second meeting drawing 15. We have had some who support the concept and others who are against it, Jorgensen said. What we will do on Saturday is ask a series of questions and give the residents a chance to decide how they want this district. ZONE from page A1 ABUSE from page A1 Friday, A pril 6, This year the fair is putting on a childrens night Open noon to Midnight / Armbands $20 ONE PRICE ALL DAY! Noon to 5 p.m. 18 and under: FREE 19 and over: $5. 5 p.m. to Close 4 and under: Free 5 18: $5 19 and over: $10Saturday, A pril 7, 2012 Open noon to midnight / Armbands $20 ONE PRICE ALL DAY! 4 and under: Free 5 12: $5. 13 and over: $10.Sunday, A pril 8, 2012 Open noon to 8 p.m. / Armbands $15 / Easter $2 off with church bulletin (valid for one entry into the fair only) 4 and under: Free 5 12: $5. 13 and over: $10.Wednesday, A pril 11, 2012 Open 5:pm-10 p.m./Armbands $12. Exceptional Disabilities Night 5-7 p.m. Individuals with disabilities plus one care giver gets in free from 5pm to 7pm 4 and under: Free 5 and over: $5. Everyones a Kid NightThursday, A pril 12, 2012 Open 5-10 p.m. / Armbands $12 / $2 off for Military & Seniors (60) with ID 4 and under: Free 5 12: $5. 13 and over: $10.Friday, A pril 13, 2012 Open 5 p.m. to midnight / Armbands $15 / Full Rodeo 4 and under: Free 5 12 : $5 13 and over: $10Saturday, A pril 14, 2012 Open noon to Midnight / Armbands $20 ONE PRICE ALL DAY! / Full Rodeo 4 and under: Free 5 12: $5 13 and over: $10 livestock show allowing children from the area to show off their prized livestock. The animals will be judged and awarded based on different categories. Santa Rosa County Fair has never had a live kids showing of animals before, Paschall said. Thats extremely exciting for us. Not only is the fair boosting its horticulture shows, but also, bringing back shows that showed off exotic animals to crowds in the past. Amazing Rainforest is coming back for another year. The exhibit shows off exotic animals and educates crowds on conservation. We also have a new act called Pets Overboard that uses animals that have been rescued from pounds and shelters those cats and dogs put on an acrobatic show, Pashcall said. Paschall noted that the fair is also bringing back an exhibit that was a huge hit two years ago. Thats right, Simon Says the hypnotist is coming back. He was heavily requested, Paschall said. Not only will there be more acts this year, but Paschall said the fair board decided to break the fair up into two weekends, which is another rst. The fair will start on Friday, April 6 and run until East Sunday. Then the fair will be closed Monday, April 9 and Tuesday, April 10. Then it will reopen on Wednesday and conclude Saturday, April 14. Paschall said that not only will there be more livestock exhibit, but everyones favorite past time will be coming to the fair. Thats right, music is coming to the fair. Starting Friday, the Blackwater Music Festival will come to life offering something for everyone on a different night. Rock and roll music will be featured on Friday, country music on Saturday and then on Easter Sunday, the fair will bring Christian music to the fairgrounds. Were trying to make sure we have a big concert on Sunday for church crowd, Pashall said. Also this coming Sunday, Paschall said the Easter egg hunt is retuning for another year, but this year, its going to be bigger and better. Two years ago, Easter Sunday fell when we were having the fair. We had an Easter egg hunt and had 3500 eggs, Paschall said. That wasnt enough. This year, Paschall said he plans on having double that amount of eggs on the fairground. Of course, all of the favorite fair rides will be returning and the food will be just as good this year. The rodeo will also be returning this year for the bull riding fans. Everything is going to be bigger and better than it was last year, Paschall said. The entertainment is much bigger. We are slowly growing.

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www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, April 4, 2012 A Section SP O RTS Page 12 Pensacola Bay Thursday, April 5 12:26 AM CDT High tide 0.75 Feet 5:23 AM CDT Low tide 0.60 Feet 5:24 AM CDT Moonset 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 10:51 AM CDT High tide 0.82 Feet 6:15 PM CDT Moonrise 6:46 PM CDT Low tide 0.12 Feet 7:10 PM CDT Sunset Friday, April 6 6:05 AM CDT Moonset 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 10:52 AM CDT High tide 1.06 Feet 2:19 PM CDT Full Moon 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 7:24 PM CDT Moonrise 7:59 PM CDT Low tide -0.08 Feet Saturday, April 7 6:30 AM CDT Sunrise 6:49 AM CDT Moonset 11:19 AM CDT High tide 1.29 Feet 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 8:34 PM CDT Moonrise 9:14 PM CDT Low tide -0.23 Feet Sunday, April 8 6:29 AM CDT Sunrise 7:37 AM CDT Moonset 11:58 AM CDT High tide 1.47 Feet 7:12 PM CDT Sunset 9:44 PM CDT Moonrise 10:33 PM CDT Low tide -0.31 Feet East Bay Thursday, April 5 1:09 AM CDT High tide 0.90 Feet 5:23 AM CDT Moonset 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 6:39 AM CDT Low tide 0.72 Feet 11:34 AM CDT High tide 0.98 Feet 6:14 PM CDT Moonrise 7:09 PM CDT Sunset 8:04 PM CDT Low tide 0.14 Feet Friday, April 6 6:04 AM CDT Moonset 6:30 AM CDT Sunrise 11:37 AM CDT High tide 1.28 Feet 2:19 PM CDT Full Moon 7:10 PM CDT Sunset 7:23 PM CDT Moonrise 9:17 PM CDT Low tide -0.10 Feet Saturday, April 7 6:29 AM CDT Sunrise 6:47 AM CDT Moonset 12:02 PM CDT High tide 1.55 Feet 7:10 PM CDT Sunset 8:33 PM CDT Moonrise 10:30 PM CDT Low tide -0.27 Feet Sunday, April 8 6:27 AM CDT Sunrise 7:36 AM CDT Moonset 12:43 PM CDT High tide 1.76 Feet 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 9:43 PM CDT Moonrise 11:49 PM CDT Low tide -0.38 Feet Blackwater River Thursday, April 5 2:05 AM CDT High tide 0.90 Feet 5:24 AM CDT Moonset 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 7:09 AM CDT Low tide 0.72 Feet 12:30 PM CDT High tide 0.98 Feet 6:15 PM CDT Moonrise 7:10 PM CDT Sunset 8:34 PM CDT Low tide 0.14 Feet Friday, April 6 6:04 AM CDT Moonset 6:30 AM CDT Sunrise 12:33 PM CDT High tide 1.28 Feet 2:19 PM CDT Full Moon 7:10 PM CDT Sunset 7:24 PM CDT Moonrise 9:47 PM CDT Low tide -0.10 Feet Saturday, April 7 6:29 AM CDT Sunrise 6:48 AM CDT Moonset 12:58 PM CDT High tide 1.55 Feet 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 8:34 PM CDT Moonrise 11:00 PM CDT Low tide -0.27 Feet Sunday, April 8 6:28 AM CDT Sunrise 7:36 AM CDT Moonset 1:39 PM CDT High tide 1.76 Feet 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 9:44 PM CDT Moonrise Navarre Beach Thursday, April 5 2:32 AM CDT Low tide 0.52 Feet 5:23 AM CDT Moonset 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 9:16 AM CDT High tide 0.83 Feet 3:35 PM CDT Low tide 0.16 Feet 6:14 PM CDT Moonrise 7:09 PM CDT Sunset 11:47 PM CDT High tide 0.69 Feet Friday, April 6 2:32 AM CDT Low tide 0.59 Feet 6:03 AM CDT Moonset 6:30 AM CDT Sunrise 8:24 AM CDT High tide 1.04 Feet 2:19 PM CDT Full Moon 4:47 PM CDT Low tide -0.02 Feet 7:09 PM CDT Sunset 7:23 PM CDT Moonrise Saturday, April 7 6:28 AM CDT Sunrise 6:47 AM CDT Moonset 8:45 AM CDT High tide 1.25 Feet 6:04 PM CDT Low tide -0.16 Feet 7:10 PM CDT Sunset 8:33 PM CDT Moonrise Sunday, April 8 6:27 AM CDT Sunrise 7:35 AM CDT Moonset 9:26 AM CDT High tide 1.42 Feet 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 8:23 PM CDT Low tide -0.26 Feet 9:43 PM CDT Moonrise Tide REPORT Bunny Dash 5K On Saturday, April 7 the University of West Florida will host a Bunny Dash 5K at 8:30 a.m. Community members and students are encouraged to register for this 3.1 mile trail run on the beautiful University of West Florida campus. Community members wishing to participate in the Bunny Dash 5K can register at ACTIVE.COM. Early bird registration is $15 before March 31. The cost then increases to $20. The Bunny Dash 5K is free for UWF students. Students can register at www.uwf. edu/recreation. Overall and divisional winners will receive prizes. Snacks and refreshments will be served at the race. There is a limit of 150 participants. Pace area Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament The 13th Annual Pace Area Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament will be April 27 at Stonebrook Golf Course. The Tournament will have a shotgun start at noon. Sponsorship spots and team openings are available. For more information on the tournament call 994-9633. Pace Area Chamber of Commerce/SRMC Fishing Tournament The Pace Area Chamber of Commerce and Santa Rosa Medical Center will be sponsoring a shing tournament for young persons with disabilities April 28 for 9 a.m. noon. This tournament is for young persons with disabilities only and will be conducted from the banks of Donald Moores pond, at 3337 Harvey Lane. Entry for this tournament is free and a semi-pro bass sherman will assist each sherman. Participants will be awarded medallions for prizes. All proceeds from the event will support Vision of Hope. For more information or to sponsor a young person call 994-9633. Vision of Hope Charity Golf Tournament The Vision of Hope will host its rst annual Charity Golf Tournament will tee off at 9 a.m. on June 22 at Stonebrook Golf Club in Pace. For more information on the tournament contact Vision of Hope 554-2988 or email visionofhope @att.net. Sports SIDELINE Bagdad native Bubba Watson watches his shot out of a bunker on the ninth hole during a practice round for the Masters golf tournament Monday, April 2, 2012, in Augusta, Ga. As of press time, Watsons tee time and pairings were unavailable. This will be the fourth Masters appearance for the former Milton graduate who rst appeared in 2008. His best nish was in 2008, his rst tournament, when he nished tied for 20th. By BILL GAMBLIN 377-4611 | @SRPG_Bill sports@srpressgazette.com There is some good news and some disappointing news in baseball for local fans. The good news for former Pace pitcher Bobby Cassevah is that he is looking at his rst full season with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim as he made the active 25-player roster. For Caleb Gindl, another Pace grad, the news is mixed. The No. 15 prospect in the Milwaukee Brewers organization has made the 2011 National League Champions 40-man roster, but will start the season with the teams AAA af liate Nashville Sounds. Gindl has now got his average to over .300 for his minor league career and is being prospected as a fourth out elder in the Brewers near future. Other prospects to watch include former Pace shortstop Adam Bryant, who nished last season with the Beloit Snappers, the A af liate of the Minnesota Twins. Bryant batted .245 in 59 games and could see a promotion to the AA level sometime soon if the Troy University grad continues to show improvement. Another Pace and Troy grad, pitcher Chris Sorce could see a promotion in his future after his 2011 season with the Seattle Mariners high A af liate the High Desert Mavericks. Sorce nished 2011 with a 5.07 ERA and an 8-12 record after a very slow start. Another Mariner who signed last summer, former Milton out elder Charles Jimenez batted .156 in 14 games for the Seattle in the Arizona rookie league, but bounced around some other leagues as a base stealing threat because of his speed. Fellow Milton grad Brandon Allen nished 2011 with the San Franciso Giants af liate, the SalemKeizer Volcanoes. Allen went 2-8 with a 6.04 ERA, but is expected this season to show a great deal of improvement with another year of experience under his belt. WATSON ROLLS TO AUGUSTA AP PHOTO | Charlie Riedel Locals ready for the real season By BILL GAMBLIN 377-4611 | @SRPG_Bill sports@srpressgazette.com Baseball has returned to Pensacola after a one-year absence. The excitement was evident during the run of the Blue Wahoos on Sunday afternoon. Pensacola International Airport was full of excited fans who were awaiting the arrival of the Blue Wahoos, the Double-A af liate of the Cincinnati Reds, from spring training in Arizona. Fans are waiting for the rst pitch on Thursday, when the Blue Wahoos start their season against the Montgomery Biscuits at 7 p.m. at the Blue Wahoos Park It was hard to tell who was more excited Sunday, the fans or owner Quint Studer. Last season would have been hard on me if I didnt know what to expect this year, said Studer, who sold the Pensacola Pelicans in order to buy the Carolina Mudcats of the Southern League. It has been a real good year for us to get a staff in place, as well as a strong foundation for what is to come. The welcome party at the airport Sunday afternoon had a host of individuals and business people. This is great for Pensacola, said Jim Hill, who owns Alternative Health and Foods in Milton. No one realizes the economic boost this will have to Pensacola and the surrounding area. Hill bought season tickets and picked his own seats at Blue Wahoos Park as soon as he heard the Blue Wahoos were coming to the area. The biggest surprise on Sunday was to Blue Wahoos skipper Jim Riggleman. This is neat for the players to see, said Riggleman who has managed the San Diego Padres, Chicago Cubs, Seattle Mariners, and the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals during his career. This speaks to the interest Pensacola has in baseball and how much they love the game. This is just an example of what I think we will see at the park, with great crowds, with a lot of emotions the players can connect with. Being a rst year franchise the Blue Wahoos might come in with a lot of expectations, but Riggleman is very realistic with his goals for 2012. I think in the end all minor league players want to make progress and work together to develop as a team, Riggleman said. They all have a goal to play hard and look to advance to the next level. Blue Wahoos land in Pensacola BOBBY CASSEVAH CALEB GINDL Photos by BILL GAMBLIN | Press Gazette Stewart Roberts gets a big hug from Blue Wahoos mascot Kazoo Sunday at Pensacola International Airport as fans await the arrival of the Pensacola Blue Wahoos. A young man and his father get an autograph before the season starts as the Blue Wahoos arrived at the Pensacola International Airport on Sunday. Blue Wahoos Manager Jim Riggleman shares a moment with fan Terry Williams after arriving at Pensacola International Airport.

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LIFESTYLE www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, April 4, 2012 B Section By MATHEW PELLEGRINO 393-3669 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com Students and parents alike got a funlled day on Saturday thanks to the inaugural Bagdad Bulldog Bash. The event was held at Bagdad Recreational Park and invited Bagdad Elementary School students and their families to join into a handful of activities. The sky cleared up for the start of the festival, but the heat didnt stop the fun. Students paid a cheap rate to acquire tickets they could use at a number of booths. Pie the principal was one of the more popular booths. Bagdad Elementary School children were able to practice using their throwing arms by throwing a pie at their principal Linda Gooch. There were also in atable rides, a coconut toss and face painting to fuel the day. ABOVE: A Bagdad Elementary student attempts to walk on water at one of the attractions at Saturdays Bagdad Bulldog Bash. TOP CENTER: Blake Maloney takes a shot at one of the many games at the festival on Saturday. TOP RIGHT: Children were given all the sugar they could eat and popcorn to go along with it at the festival. RIGHT: Bradlee Gibson, 4, rings a root beer for himself at the festival on Saturday. Page 1 BULLDOG BASH Photos by MATHEW PELLEGRINO | Press Gazette LEFT: Bagdad Elementary School principal Linda Gooch takes a pie in the face from one of her students as part of the activities at the inaugural Bagdad Bulldog Bash. ABOVE: Clayton Culpepper lands a ball in a mini sh tank on Saturday. BELOW LEFT: A father-daughter trio takes a swing at the coconut toss at Saturdays festival. BELOW: A Bagdad Elementary student gets his face painted at the Bagdad Bulldog Bash on Saturday.

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Local B2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 City of Milton meetings City of Miltons City Council will meet in regular session on April 10 at 5 p.m. in the Council Chambers at Milton City Hall. For more information, contact the city managers ofce at 983-5411. All meetings are open to the public. Pace Fire Rescue District Fundraiser The Pace Fire Rescue District is sponsoring a fundraiser this year. This fundraiser goes toward the departments Benevolent Fund, which is set up to help the families who lost their home due to re. It is also used for, during hardship times, re department members and families that the department gives owers, food, etc. This is the only fundraiser the department does each year. The department appreciates all the donations they receive and hope that you will do a portrait or donate to this cause. The fundraiser will go from March to June of this year. If you have any questions you can call the department at 994-6884. Clean Community Announces Great American Clean-Up Schedule The Santa Rosa Clean Community System has announced the upcoming April schedule for the Great American Clean-Up, part of a nation-wide effort of Keep America Beautiful. On April 4 and 5 there will be a Paint Your Heart Out by the One Love group. This group is a effort by area churches to come together and complete community projects in the rst week of April. On April 14, there will be a community wide cleanup in Navarre. Groups and Individuals will meet at the Navarre Park on Highway 98 at the foot of the Navarre Beach bridge. The event will last from 8 a.m. to noon, and will be sponsored by Waste Management. Through out the month, the focus of the Milton and Pace area will be targeted clean-ups and working on the Rivenbark House and Firemans Recycling Station at the corner of Stewart Street and Berryhill Road. This project will be done in partnership with United Way, with a Paint Your Heart Out scheduled for Saturday, April 21. Groups and individuals interested in participating should contact the Clean Community System at 623-1930. Green-Up Celebrates Spring with Sale Green-Up Santa Rosa will kick-off spring with a month long 10 percent off sale on all plants in the nursery. The sale will run through the month of April. There is a wide variety of trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and hanging baskets at the two acre nursery, which is located at 6758 Park Ave. in Milton. Green-Up is a program of the Santa Rosa Clean Community System, and all proceeds go back into the community in support of its programs. Currently, the system is working on the Firemans Recycling Station in Milton and educational gardens at the new Sonnier Education Center. Hours of operation are Tuesday through Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 623-1930. National Active and Retired Federal Employees The National Active and Retired Federal Employees (NARFE), Chapter 917, will hold their regular monthly meeting Thursday, April 5, at 10:45 a.m. at Ryans Restaurant in Pace. All active or retired federal employees are invited to attend. The speaker will be announced later. After a short business meeting there will be a Dutch-treat lunch. For more information call 626 2569. Healthy State Coalition of Santa Rosa County The Healthy Start Coalition of Santa Rosa County, Inc., will meet at 4 p.m. April 9. This will be a general board meeting at its ofce at 5907 Berryhill Road, in Milton. For more information call 626-6751. Santa Rosa Tea Party Patriots to Meet Monday, April 9 at 6 p.m., Pastor Carl Gallups, host of Freedom Friday on WEBY AM Radio, will speak to the Santa Rosa Tea Party Patriots. The meeting will be held at The Milton Community Center on Byrom St. Pastor Gallups will speak on The Obama Fraud and will cover Sheriff Arapaios information, Obamas false birth certicate, the Constitutional and Law Enforcement ramications, and what we can do as patriots and citizens. Come hear the facts before you form an opinion about this subject. Pastor Gallups has well documented his information; you will want to hear it. There will be an opportunity for questions and answers. Invite a friend to attend this special meeting. If you have any questions, please call 994-7548. Wacky Dog Show Primarica Milton will host its rst ever Wacky Dog Show. This event is a fundraiser for the Milton Relay for Life with three divisions of competition best in show, most talented, and two peas in a pod (pet and animal look-a-like contest). The show will be April 14 at 2 p.m. at the Primerica Ofces on Highway 90. Early registration is $8, day of event $12, and pet photos are $6. For more information call 626-7188. Rock Holiness Cemetery Board Meeting Family members and friends of loved ones buried at the Rock Holiness Cemetery are invited to attend the annual meeting on Saturday, April 14 at 10 a.m. at the church located on Upper Creek Road in Flomaton, Ala. The Rock Church is located on the cemetery grounds about one half mile from Highway 31 on the right side of Upper Creek Road, up a steep hill. Look for the sign to the private driveway. Please come. This is an important meeting. We need to elect a new board member. Navarre Spring Fling Call to Vendors The Navarre Garden Club will host our annual Spring Fling on Friday, April 20, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. held at the Navarre Conference Center. We are actively seeking vendors for outside booths. The fee for a space is $40 and will accommodate a 10-foot-by10-foot tent. Space is limited; please call to reserve your. Please contact, Margaret Russell 850-382-1671 or mvrrussell@gmail.com. Purple Heart meeting The Military Order of the Purple will be holding its monthly meeting Saturday, April 21 at 11 a.m., at the West Milton Church of Christ in Pace. A meal will be served following the meeting for a donation. All Purple Heart Recipients and their spouses are welcome and encouraged to attend. Call Eustice Shiver, Commander of Military Order of the Purple Heart Chapter 566 at 994-3880, cell 791-1175 or for the Ladies Auxiliary Military Order of the Purple Heart, President Judy Shiver at 791-1176. Bagdad Village Preservation Association to host Spring Music Gala Following the success of our sold-out Christmas Gala, the Bagdad Village Preservation Association is proud to announce our Spring Music Gala featuring music from the era of Casablanca. Mark your calendars for April 28, an event that promises to be both elegant and delightful. The gala will honor the 70th Anniversary of the Academy Award winning lm starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman. The Bagdad Village Museum will be transformed and you will be welcomed into Ricks Caf Amricain. There will only be one performance on the evening of Saturday, April 28, beginning at 7 p.m. The evening will begin with a champagne and hor doeuver reception with a Moroccan air. Jazz vocalist Kathy Lyons will take you back in time with great music of the 1930s and 40s from Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin, and other greats. The evening will end with a dessert extravaganza. Tickets for this black tie optional event are $35 per person and will be limited to sixty guests. All proceeds will benet the Bagdad Village Preservation Association. To reserve your tickets contact Elaine Willis at 850-6233288. For more information visit www. bagdadvillage.org. BIRTHDAYS: APRIL 4 6 Ruby Laughbaum April 4 Amya Shoto April 5 Kristen Lewis April 6 News BRIEFS

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MVOP misdemeanor violation of probation FVOP felony violation of probation Agg aggravated Poss possession Meth methamphetamine DUI driving under the inuence DWLSR driving while license suspended or revoked FTA failure to appear FTR failure to register SF sentenced felony SM sentenced misdemeanor LEO law enforcement ofcer DV Domestic Violence The following arrests were made beginning March 11-12. March 11 Bell, Barney Dean; Male; 28; 8800 Byron Campbell Rd., Pace; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Chapel, Tyler James; Male; 20; 14064 Palm St., Madeira Beach, Fla.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Collins, Sophia Len; Female; 34; 1200 Tecumseh Trail, Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Hinson, Christopher Lee; Male; 23; WinstonSalem, N.C.; Arson Second Degree. Holmes, John David; Male; 30; 7709 N. Hillburn Rd., Pensacola; Synthetic Narcotics Sell Schedule I or II. Hudson, Latangle Lafay; Female; 32; 7965 Lambert Lane, Milton; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Huie, Steven Wayne; Male; 34; 13328 Highway 89, Jay; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended Second Offense; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use. Lamarche, Gregory David; Male; 32; no address given; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense (3 counts). Lewis, Melisha Lynn; Female; 31; 112 Bayliss Court, Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Lothrop, Trishann Danett; Female; 35; 4145 Ermine Lane, Milton; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300; Larceny Commit Theft Resist Recovery of Property; Larceny Use Antishoplifting Control Device Countermeasure. Pate, Adam Gentry; Male; 26; 8459 Laredo St., Navarre; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Power, Wayne Mitchell; Male; 44; Gentry Farm, Milton; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use; Drug Possession Listed Chemical for Manufacture of Controlled Substance; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended; Marijuana Possession Not More Than 20 Grams. Sanchez, Amarilis Cecilia; Female; 19; 6 Georgia Dr., Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Stuller, Brian Alexander; Male; 19; 601 N. Faireld Dr., Pensacola; Public Order Crimes Criminal Attempt to Solicit Conspiracy Third Degree Burglary; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Taylor, Max Parker; Male; 18; 934 Aquamarine Dr., Gulf Breeze; Public Order Crimes Criminal Attempt to Solicit Conspiracy Third Degree Burglary; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Tooley, John David; Male; 43; 166 Hibbert, Mesa, Ariz.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Urmenyhazi, Haylie May; Female; 21; 3251 Highcraft, Pawtown, N.C.; Arson Second Degree. Warrick, Tyler Blake; Male; 18; 5305 English Oak Dr., Pace; Flee Elude Police Flee With Disregard of Safety to Persons or Property; Assault On Ofcer, Fireghter, EMT, Etc.; Vehicle Theft Grand Theft of Motor Vehicle. Williams, Milton Gregory; Male; 47; 1129 Alachua Ave., Tallahassee, Fla.; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense (2 counts). Benton, Christopher Todd; Male; 41; 1821 Chipindale Rd., Cantonment, Fla.; Dealing in Stolen Property (2 counts). Daniels, Shanita Nicole; Female; 31; 813 Bloodworth Lane, Pensacola; Damage Property Criminal Mischief $1,000 or More. Lapaugh, Michael Gerard; Male; 20; 1452 Whisper Bay Boulevard, Gulf Breeze; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Marijuana Possession Not More Than 20 Grams. Sell, Malissa Lee; Female; 39; 7988 Sleepy Bay Boulevard, Navarre; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Obstruct Police Possession of Concealed Handcuff Key While in Custody; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Meth. Touchstone, Justin Daniel; Male; 19; 7857 Siesta Cove, Milton; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Trafc Offense Refuse to Submit to DUI Test After License Suspended; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended First Offense; Drug Possession Controlled Substance without prescription including meth. Sampson, Aaron James; Male; 21; 31 Sixth St., Shalimar, Fla.; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Gioxaris, Manos; Male; 36; 136 Scottwood Dr., Fort Walton Beach, Fla.; Trafc offense DUI alcohol or drugs. Ray, Tamara Denise; Female; 45; 4836 Galliver Cutoff, Holt, Fla.; Trafc offense DUI alcohol or drugs. Sell, Malissa Lee; Female; 39; 7988 Sleepy Bay Boulevard, Navarre; Trafc offense DUI alcohol or drugs. Touchstone, Justin Daniel; Male; 19; 7857 Siesta Cove, Milton; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Trafc Offense Refuse to Submit to DUI Test after License Suspended. March 12 Addison, Rachel Whitney; Female; 24; 6617 Grace St., Milton; Crimes Against Person Corrupt by Threat Public Servant or Family. Arnold, David Renard; Male; 25; 1112 Magnolia Dr., Tallahassee, Fla.; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended Third or Subsequent Offense. Black, Kardale Lamar; Male; 22; Concordia St., Pensacola; Robbery Carjacking With rearm or Weapon. Blevins, Shirley Ann; Female; 57; 4565 Kelly Lane, Gulf Breeze; Cocaine Possession; Drug Equipment Possession and or Use. Gregory, Ariel; Male; 44; 5850 E. Milton Rd., Milton; Health Safety Prevent Hinder Fireghter or Equipment. Jenkins, Marquise Demetris; Male; 18; 7750 Auntrainer Ave., Pensacola; Robbery Carjacking with Firearm or Weapon. Kluss, Terry Stanley; Male; 44; 4399 Sundance Way, Holt, Fla.; Damage Property criminal mischief $1,000 or more; Burglary dwelling or structure cause damage over $1,000; Larceny take copper other metal interfere damage utility. Martinez, Juan Jose; Male; 18; 2203 Lunetta St., Navarre; Liquor Possession By Person Under 21 Years of Age First Offense; Damage Property Criminal Mischief Over $200 Under $1,000; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Trespassing structure or conveyance; Larceny petit theft Second Degree rst offense; Resist ofcers obstruct without violence; loitering or prowling. 9137678 Ft. Walton (850) 244-0989 Crestview (850) 682-4540 Pensacola (850) 477-4977 Gulf Breeze (850) 934-0077 Pace (850) 994-0662 www.PensacolaPools.com RP#0031244 start saving today! or News Tips WELCOMED E-mail IDEAS to: news@srpressgazette.com Call 623-2120 Law Enforcement Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B3 Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Sheriffs REPORT

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Local B4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 To celebrate 10 years of honoring Best Restored Beaches Across America, the American Shore & Beach Preservation As sociation is asking anyone who loves the beach to pick the Best of the Best Restored Beaches from a list of past restored beach award winners. Santa Rosa County is urging everyone to vote for Navarre Beach as Best Community Beach by cast ing your vote every day from now until April 27 at www.asbpa.org/about_us/ about_us_best_restored_ beach_2012_community. htm. Voters also can visit www.santarosa..gov for a link to the voting site. For more than 40 years, beach restoration has been the preferred meth od of shore protection in coastal communities on the east, west and Gulf coasts. Beach restoration is the process of placing beach-quality sand on dwindling beaches to re verse or offset the effects of erosion. Navarre Beach was one of four beaches nationwide selected for 2010. For this best of the best competition, nomi nees are placed in one of three categories and com pete by region: Urban beaches: This in cludes highly developed beaches, including in tensely developed areas with high-rise condos and resorts. Community beaches: This includes less densely de veloped beaches backed by low-rise or single-fam ily dwellings. Park/habitat beaches: This includes areas that undertake beach nour ishment solely for habi tat restoration and park projects. These can be in remote regions or in the middle of a city. Starting March 30, ev eryone can vote for Na varre Beach online. You can even leave a comment about what makes your fa vorite beach so special to you. You can vote once ev ery 24 hours, all the way to April 27, and you can even see how your favorite beach is doing every time you visit. Once voting closes, we will tally up the results and name a Best-of-theBest Beach in each of the three categories, as well as the top vote-getter in each of seven geographic regions. Winners will be an nounced in mid-May, and they all will be honored at a special ceremony next spring during the ASBPAs annual Coastal Summit in Washington, D.C. Complete descriptions of each of the beaches in the running for Best-ofthe-Best Beach are avail able at www.asbpa.org. The three main reasons for restoration are: Storm protection: a wide sandy beach helps sepa rate storm waves from upland structures and infrastructure. Habitat restoration: nu merous species rely on wide, healthy beaches as a place to live, feed and nest. Recreation: Americas beaches have twice as many visitors annually as all of Americas national parks combined. Every year, there are more than 2 billion visitors to Amer icas beaches. In 2007, beaches contributed $322 billion to the Americas economy. More important ly, for every dollar the fed eral government spends on beach nourishment, it gets an estimated $320 back in tax revenues. During times of eco nomic hardship, the beach can be an even more de sirable vacation destina tion than other domestic and foreign alternatives, offering families and visi tors an accessible and af fordable getaway. It is also an employment and tax generator: More than twice as many people visit Amer icas coasts as visit our state and national parks, all of them combined. Each year, govern ments take in $320 in tax es from beach tourists for every dollar it spends on beach restoration. Well over half of the nations gross domestic product ($7.9 trillion) is generated in 673 coun ties along the oceans and Great Lakes, according to NOAAs National Ocean Economics Program. 2075763 Navarre Beach in running for Best of the Best Restored Beaches Photos by KENNY WILDE R | Special to the Press Gazette Navarre Beach is shown before (left) and after restoration.

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B5 Wednesday, April 4, 2012

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Local B6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 By MATHEW PELLEGRINO 393-3669 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com The University of West Florida could be the cherry tree capital of the south. UWF is now home to 100 rare trees that are iconic to the nations capital. To celebrate the cen tennial of the planting of the rst cherry tree in Washington, D.C., 36 cities across the nation, includ ing Pensacola, were given the opportunity to do some planting of their own. Pen sacola was chosen as the state location for the 2012 Japan-U.S. Cherry Blos som Centennial celebra tion by the Japanese con sulate general in Miami, Eiichi Kawahara. One-hundred cherry trees were donated to the school to be planted. They were planted near the main entrance to the campus in front of the Japan House. Kawahara, the consul general at Miamis Japa nese consulate, said the location for the trees was chosen because of the weather in the area. Kawa hara said the trees dont tend to ourish in the low er part of the state where its much more humid and hot. UWF has been chosen as the only place in the state to mark the anniver sary, said UWF President Judy Bense. The anniversary comes 100 years after President William Howard Taft and rst lady Helen Taft helped plant the rst cherry trees to touch U.S. soil in Wash ington, D.C. A ceremony was held at the schools music hall to commemorate the 100-year celebration and to mark the planting of the trees. I can think of no bet ter place to put these trees than on the campus of the University of West Flor ida, Congressman Jeff Miller said. The trees are not ex pected to bloom this year, but will bloom in the spring of 2013, said Bart Hudson, CEO and president of the Florida House. The university in Pen sacola has been known to open its arms to the Japa nese community. Bense said this is an even stron ger symbol that the bond between the two communi ties is getting stronger. We must prepare our students to live in a global environment, Bense said. The university has al ready opened its arms up to its Japanese friends. It has been home to a foreign exchange program that helps bring Japanese col lege students to the cam pus to experience life in Florida. At the centennial cele bration inside the schools music hall, local represen tatives and nationally rec ognized individuals spoke about the cherry trees they had seen so many times before in Washington, D.C. During the spring when they bloom, the trees our ish their pink and white owers that look similar to the blooms on a Dogwood tree, Bense said. I remember watching the Dogwood trees blos som it almost looks like its snowing, Bense said. Shelly Bolton, a UWF junior, attended the cere mony inside the music hall. She said she once visited Washington, D.C., to see the cherry trees bloom. I know that once these bloom, this campus is going to look beautiful, Bolton said. You dont see these trees every day. Thats why people go to Washington, D.C., to see them. Milton native Jessica Marie Sunday was chosen as Floridas 2011 Cherry Blossom Princess. Sunday lives in Washington, D.C., and came to UWF for the tree planting ceremony. UWF plants cherry trees Photos by MATHEW PELLEGRINO | Press Gazette Above, UWF president Judy Bense speaks to a room full of spectators to announce the planting of cherry trees on Friday. At top, the newly planted cherry trees encompass the Japan House campus and the entrance of the University of West Florida. Above left Fusataka Homma performs Shizuka Gozen in Funabenkei during the cherry tree ceremony at the UWF music hall.

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B7 Wednesday, April 4, 2012 6010894 Pace FL 32571 Next to CiCi s Pizza Surprizes Inside

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ClassifiedsB8| Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com

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ClassifiedsWednesday, April 4, 2012 Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette |B9 The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. (Part-time positions have 401(k) plan options). ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVESThe News Herald and the News Herald.com continue to expand. We are looking for highly motivated, energetic sales people. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Available Positions: Territory Sales Representative Digital Sales RepresentativeRequired Skills  Highly motivated and results driven  Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker  Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others  Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook)  Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions  Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment  Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment  Effective time management and organization skills  Excellent verbal and written communication skills  Keen attention to detail  The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required Experience To be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of outside sales and/or online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience. SALES/RETENTION CLERK We are seeking an eager part-time telephone sales clerk to sell and/or retain home delivery and single copy circulation. Essential duties include providing excellent customer service, pleasant telephone voice, and outbound dialing. Quali ed candidates will have general of ce experience, sales experience and computer skills. High School Diploma or equivalent is required and one year of customer service experience. This is a parttime position with hour pay, plus commission and bene ts.CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVEWe are seeking an ambitious part-time Customer Service Representative who will actively answer phones and participate in the everyday work and special projects. This position is the primary link between current and potential subscribers and the newspaper. You will handle general of ce work and maintain subscriber and non-subscriber database. Quali ed candidate will have a High School diploma or equivalent and one year of customer service experience. Candidate should have a basic understanding of of ce machines such as calculator, printers, fax machine, computer and internet skills and able to sit for 8 hour shifts. On time attendance during scheduled time is critical in this role as well as working some holidays and weekend shifts. Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: The News HeraldCareers Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! References Available 850-995-0009 “Can You Dig It?” We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator. (866)362-6497 J & N LAWN SERVICE Complete Lawn Service & Debris Removal Call For Free Estimate Very Reasonable Price Licensed & Insured 850-791-0861 Stewart’s Tractor Works & Land Clearing, Inc. Tree & Stump Removal from trimming to takedown. Debris removal & Storm Clean-Up. Demolition & Hauling. Land Clearing. Backhoe & Trackhoe Work. Heavy Brush & Forestry Mowing. Tree work done by man lift. 516-1801 or 675-4291 Licensed & Insured Free Estimates PAUL STEWART ALLIED FARMSWe Deliver & Install Call us first, Save Time Call us last, Save MoneyHwy. 87 So. Milton626-85788600311 HYDROSEED Centipede St. Augustine BermudaBailed Pine Straw 8+/-Acs. in East Milton, Hickory Hammock Road Lots: Pond Creek Misty Lake Drive, some waterfront. Call after 4 p.m. 850-593-6015 850-718-6644 (cell) weekends only 20 Acres-Live On Land NOW!! Only $99/mo. $0 Down, Owner Financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. (800)755-8953 www. sunsetranches.com Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 4 BR 1 Bath $695 mo $650 Security CH/A, Gas Heat Ask for Barbara 850-626-8959 Cell 850-377-6787 6012 Savannah Dr Milton. 3 br/1 ba, inside utitilites, CH/A, all elec. No Dogs. $795 mth. $500 dep. 748-1819 2 Br with A/C, front and back porch. Private lot. No Pets. 623-5145 3 bedroom FEMA mobile home. Porch with fenced in yard. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch 626-8973 Clean 2 br/1 ba partly furn. Water & garbage inc. starting at $350 and up a mth/$300 dep. & No Pets. 675-6614 Milton (Bruce Lane) Incl. water, garbage & lawn service. 2/2 for $450 month. 2/2 for $350 month. Senior Discount. 261-8193 or 698-4582 Mobile Home with land, ready to move in, great value. Approx 1500 sq ft, 3Br 2Ba serious offers only, no renters. Call (850)308-6473 Training/Education/Educ ationWant to be a CNA?Don’t want to wait? Express Training Services is now offering our nursing asst. exam prep classes in DESTIN Class for 1 week. 850-502-5521expresstraining services.com Next class 4/09/2012 HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Great Benefits and Pay! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. -Tanker Training Available. Call Today: (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Logistics/TransportExperienced CDL-A DriversJoin Our Dedicated Fleet of Professional Drivers TODAY in the Pensacola Area. ****************** -Odometer Mileage Pay ($50,000 plus per year) -2012 Tractors -Dedicated Product -Out & Back -Stop/Detention Pay -Home Weekly-Typically 48 Hrs. -Premium-Free Family Health insurance MUST HAVE Minimum of 2 Yrs. Verifiable Tractor/Trailer Exp. Teams Welcome to Apply ****************** J & M Company Call Neal or Bill 800.477.6555 M-F, 7am-5pm Web ID#: 34202841 Maintenance position open for 60 bed retirement center, Please have experience in maintenance. Come to 5544 Swanner Road to submit application. MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! $0 Tuition Cost No Credit Check Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required Call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST.com LIVE-WORKPARTYPLAY! Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. (866)574-7454 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165 www. CenturaOnline.com WANTED : 4-ton self contained AC for mobile home needed for the organ player at the church. 626-8973. 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now! Become a driver for Schneider National! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in just 3 weeks! (888)368-1964 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in just 3 weeks! (888)368-1964 Apply Now, 13 Drivers Top 5% Pay & Benefits 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com/driv e Class-A FlatBed Drivers$-Home EVERY Weekend, Run S.E. US REQUIRES 1Yr OTR F.B. Exp, & pay UP TO .39/mile Call (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC Drivers -New Freight for Refrigerated & Dry Van lanes. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Vets welcome. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE All New Happy Jack Kennel Dip II: kills, fleas, ticks, stable flies & MANGE mites without steroids. Biodegradeable. Mannings Feed & Seed (850-623-2426)www.happyjackinc.com 4x8 Red Paver Bricks 50 ¢ each 380-2928 Mahogany Dinning Set Table, Chairs, Hutch & Buffet $2000. Queen Sofa $250. Coffee Table $100. Call 380-2928 BOOK SALE SAT 8 am On The Porch 5152 Pike St. Milton Hwy. 90 & Canal St Choice of Thousands Paper and Hardbacks Fict/NonFict/Bk. List CrestviewUp to 80% offToby Booths Only Indoor/Outdoor Yard Sale in Forever Victorian (398-8899) Main Street. Open Tues-Sat. Showcases, Book cases, Store fixtures AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 3/340 RESOLUTION WHEREAS, Richard Jette, PETITIONED the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, to vacate, abandon, discontinue and renounce any interest and right of the public in and to the following described property to-wit: The west end of Cooley’s Drive in Pace Heights Subdivision lying between lots 9 and 10 as described in Plat Book B, page 14 AND WHEREAS, The Board of County Commissioners determined to have a public hearing for the purpose of considering the advisability of vacating and abandoning said rights-of-way, and WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners have on this the 22nd day of March, 2012, conducted said public hearing in conformity to the said publication of their intent, and WHEREAS, after hearing all comments concerning said vacation of the above described rights-of-way, the Board, being fully advised, and it being determined that the public interest will be best served and protected by vacating and abandoning said rights-of-way, therefore, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, that the said rights-of-way as herein set out and described are hereby vacated and any and all interest to the public shall revert to and be vested in the proper owners thereof. APPROVED AND ADOPTED by a vote of 5 yeas, 0 nays, and 0 absent, of the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, this 22nd day of March, 2012. 4/4/2012 3/340 3/339 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL REBUILD Northwest Florida has issued a Request for Proposal (RFG) for construction management services for its Residential Wind Retrofit Program in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. The full RFP is available on REBUILDS’s web site. http://www.rebuildnwf.org/ 4/4/2012 3/339 3/338 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON April 24, 2012 at 11:00 AM UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit: 419 Jeff Chamell: Refrigerator, golf clubs, boxes & misc. STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 4/4, 4/11, 2012 3/338 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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Local B10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE 850-995-8778 STORE HOURS: 7AM 9PM 7 DAYS AWEEK Sales Prices Good through April 10, 2012 4 5 6 78910 MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT SUN Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses. 8604387 Vlasic Kosher Spears 1 74 24 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Greens 88 27 oz Sunshine Maintenance Dog Food 16 29 50 lb Tampico Fruit Drinks 1 40 1 gal Sale Good Through April10, 2012 Vine Ripe Large Tomatoes 79 lb 2 Liter Pepsi 1 39 Frito-Lay Multi Packs 5 73 20 19-20 oz Blue Bell Ice Cream 4 18 1/2 Gal Shurfine Brown n Serve Rolls 99 12 ct Farmland St Louis Style Pork Spareribs 2 33 lb Hillshire Farm Ultra Thin Ham, Turkey or Chicken 2 93 9 oz pk Cooks 1/2 Spiral Sliced Ham 1 81 lb Bar S Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna 1 18 16 oz Hillshire Smoked Sausage, Pork, Beef or Polish 2 41 14 oz Ball Park Jumbo Franks 1 65 16 oz Boston Butt Pork Roast 2-Pack 1 20 lb Family Pack Country Style Ribs 1 45 lb Cooks Shank Portion Smoked Ham 1 15 lb Fresh Frozen Turkey Breast 1 48 lb Golden Ripe Large Sweet Cantaloupes 1 97 ea Family Pack Pork Steaks 1 45 lb Royal Whole Smoked Hams 1 63 lb US #1 Red Potatoes 1 95 5 lb bag Southern Grown Fresh Snap Beans 77 lb Liberty Gold Pineapple 46 8 oz Pride of Illinois Very Small Sweet Peas 60 15 oz Hungry Jack Mashed Potatoes 1 25 15.5 oz Maxwell House Coffee 8 27 34.5 oz Betty Crocker Cake Mixes 1 06 16-18 oz

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FREE FREE Wednesday April 4, 2012 FREE EDITION TAKE ONE By CINDY McNATT Freedom News Service There is more than one way to roll with succulents. You dont need to plant them in the ground directly. Succulents can tolerate all kinds of situations in gift arrangements and bouquets where theyll be happy for weeks before the fresh owers fade or the plant outgrows its gifty environment. In fact, the eshier succulents with fat stems can live for months in oral foam. I made succulent centerpieces for a wedding a few years back, and the echeverias not only rooted in the foam, they lived a long time with water and an occasional feed. Use succulents like cut owers in all kinds of arrangements from big juicy bouquets, tinier candlestick arrangements, mixed with cut owers in water or oral foam, or planted as singles in unique containers. Theyre ne gifts for your favorite hostess, soonto-be bride, new mother in your life or for the mother you have always had. The recipient needs only to plant the succulent at a later time. BOUQUET We found a rustic urn we liked and lled it with mixed silver succulents and pale pink roses. Saturated oral foam went in the urn rst. Then we tucked in rooted echeveria rosettes, removing them from their pots and poking them in front of the urn. Pink roses went in next. We used silver kalanchoe stems as ller. Once the owers fade, the succulents can be planted in the garden with roots, or in the case of the kalanchoe stems, without roots. The bonus gift: The urn can be reused forever. CANDLESTICKS On close inspection, youll notice these arent candlesticks at all, but champagne utes. We lled them with water, added blue echeveria stems, pale green viburnum owers and miniature agave striata. To nish, we poked white tapers into the narrow neck of the utes. TEACUP This was too easy. We placed saturated oral foam in a small teacup, poked in plump cotyledon stems and lled with white owers. Its a twofer: The teacup keeps on giving and so do the succulents, when planted in the garden. REFRIGERATOR MAGNET Drill the center of a wine cork. Glue a magnet on the backside. Poke a bit of potting soil in the cork and a sprig of your favorite succulent. Needs to be watered at least once a week, and the succulent should be planted outside after a few months. QUICK GIFTS Use candle votives as small containers for succulent gifts. A teaspoon or two of potting soil will keep a succulent cutting happy for a month or two. Longer-stem succulents are happy in water with cut ower companions. The succulents can be planted in pots or the garden after the owers fade. PHOTOS BY KATE LUCAS | Freedom News Service Succulents can be tucked in a vase or even embedded in a cork to make a fridge magnet. At right, champagne utes hold cut succulents and white taper candles, and would look beautiful on a dinner table. Below, a pretty teacup lled with oral foam is the foundation for cut succulents that can later be planted outdoors or potted as indoor houseplants. At top, a rustic urn lled with silvery succulents and pale pink roses makes a gift, centerpiece or display. Hardy plants make long-lasting bouquets and centerpieces, then can go into the garden Seattle plans for a harvestable food forest SEATTLE (AP) A plot of grass sits in the middle of Seattle, feet from a busy road and on a hill that overlooks the citys skyline. But its no ordinary patch of green. Residents hope it will become one of the countrys largest food forests. The park, which will start at 2 acres and grow to 7, will offer city dwellers a chance to pick apples, plums and other crops right from the branch. I think its a great opportunity for the people of Seattle to be able to connect to the environment, said Maureen Erbe, who walked her two dogs next to the plot on a recent overcast day. Would she pluck some fruits from the forest? Heck yes, I love a good blueberry. Youre not from Seattle if you dont like a good blueberry, she said. For health-conscious and locally-grownfood-loving Seattle, the park is a new step into urban agriculture. Cities from Portland, Ore., to Syracuse, N.Y., already have their own versions. In Syracuse, for example, vacant lots were turned into vegetable gardens to be tended by local teens. Seattle already is dotted with community gardens the city helps maintain. Farmers markets also ourish in many neighborhoods, bringing in vendors from around the state to sell everything from tulips to farm-fresh duck eggs to pricey loaves of bread. Residents raise chickens in backyards and plant their own vegetables. The more dedicated ones have goats and forage around the city one woman even eats neighborhood squirrels. When a group of people interested in sustainable gardening brought the idea of a food forest for the Beacon Hill neighborhood to city of cials in 2010, the city-volunteer effort began. That year, city of cials had declared it the year of urban agriculture. The plot is in one of the citys oldest neighborhoods. Next to it is a sports park, a driving range and a lawn bowling club. The food forest would be next to a heavily used road and near many apartment complexes. Seattle gets the big picture and so the focus on local food actions is a collaborative one, said Laura Raymond of the citys community garden program. The department has allocated $100,000 for the rst phase of the park, roughly a 2-acre plot. The land is owned by the citys utility and through an inter-agency agreement will be developed at no land cost. Raymond said the city hasnt veri ed it, but the forest might become the biggest one in the country. Glenn Herlihy, who helped create the parks initial designs, believes it can grow to that size. Herlihy studies permaculture, a land management technique See FOOD FOREST A3

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A2 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, April 4, 2012 PHILADELPHIA (AP) Vertigo, the decidedly more sophisticated and adult imprint of DC En tertainment, kept its mix of the weird, wild and outright fantastic going in March with four series and a new application that lets readers buy comic books online. The dedicated app serves as a gateway for the imprints series of titles that have stretched the boundaries of comic book storytelling with work from Neil Gaiman (Sandman) and Brian Wood (DMZ), along with new titles available digi tally the same day theyre on sale in comic shops. The rst is Fairest, a new title from Bill Will ingham. Its a spinoff from his popular and ongoing Fables series, which focuses on characters from folklore that have been forced to live in New York City among regular humans. Fairest itself ... is taking each of these fair est in all the land charac ters that so heavily popu late Fables and giving each one of them a turn to shine on their own and show what theyre made of in their own adventures and accomplishments and failings, Willingham said of the title, which is illus trated by Phil Jimenez. Thats part of Vertigos goal, to proffer stories that are a step, or ve, ahead of traditional capes and villains. Paul Cornell, whose se ries Saucer Country de buted in March with art by Ryan Kelly, said it was why he pitched his idea about a New Mexico governor running for president who is abducted by aliens. Its X-Files meets The West Wing. Its a po litical thriller with added aliens, he said. Obvi ously Vertigo is its ideal home. Another title is Domi nique Laveau: Voodoo Child, written by au thor Selwyn Seyfu Hinds, which focuses on New Or leans and its mythology. I wanted the book and the characters to feel grounded and rooted in the salt of the earth, he said of the title illustrated by Denys Cowan and John Floyd. Were going to be delving deeper into the grit and grime of the city; the people, the music, the mythology. Dan Abnett takes on Edwardian England, where zombie outbreaks caused the upper crust to embrace vampirism, spawning The New Deadwardians. Although I love sto ries about vampires and zombies, I had, as a professional writer, felt that theyd been done to death, he said. When the Deadwardians popped in my head I just had this vision of this world and knew that unfortunately, I was going to have to pitch someone a vampire story. NEW YORK (AP) Elev en-year-old John Payne has been a student of the Ti tanic since kindergarten. He has scrupulously researched the ship, built a model out of Lego free hand and successfully lob bied his fth-grade teacher in suburban Chicago to let him mark the disasters centennial with a multi media presentation for his class. Whats not to like? Theres mystery, high tech nology and heroes. Sunken treasure, conspiracy theo ries and jarring tales of rich vs. poor. But theres also death, lots of it, and that has some parents, teachers and writ ers of childrens books bal ancing potentially scary de tails with more palatable, inspirational fare focused on survivors, animals on board or the mechanics of shipbuilding. John doesnt ask ques tions about the dead and other darker aspects of what went on that moon less night in the North Atlantic, said his mother, Virginia Tobin Payne. Hes a sensitive kid. We try to temper all of it so it doesnt become an ob session, she said. After the anniversary passes, I hope we can sort of close the book on him looking for more information about it. Barry Denenberg strug gled with how to depict the horror in his new book Titanic Sinks! The sepiatone hardcover, written as a mock magazine, was re leased ahead of the April 14 anniversary and already has made it into schools. The book, from Viking, is intended for kids 9 and older and doesnt hold back much as it blends fact and ction for a meticulous, re alistic feel that draws on the ofcial record. Theres only one little line in the book about how most of the people froze to death. They did not drown, Denenberg said. Hypo thermia is a much longer death. I had to make a deci sion about whats accurate and whats ghoulish. Debbie Shoulders teach es eighth-grade English in Clarksville, Tenn., but her new T is for Titanic al phabet book from Sleeping Bear Press is intended for far younger children. The word died doesnt appear often in the book, she said. We softened it with perished or did not live. The goal was to re member what the people on board contributed, not so much what happened to them. Tracey Friedlander in Bethesda, Md., has a Titan ic-obsessed 9-year-old, but she doesnt shy away from the rough stuff. She thinks the story offers teachers and parents perfect reallife lessons on persever ance, loyalty, the dangers of arrogance and the short comings of technology as kids learn to sort out the complexities of their own lives. Kids like Kade have grown up in the shadows of 9/11, the wars in Afghani stan and Iraq, and a red, yellow, green terrorist alert color code system, Fried lander said. Like most of us, hes trying to make sense of the world around him and the accompany ing human tragedies. The Titanic happens to pres ent an incredible learning opportunity for curious minds. Considered a marvel of shipbuilding, for instance, the luxury liner went down anyway after striking the iceberg on her maiden voy age, offering kids a solid and exciting look at the marriage between technol ogy and human decisionmaking, she said. What of human error? Was the ship traveling too fast? Why, though in line with regulations of the time 1912 did the Titanic set off with only 20 lifeboats for more than 2,200 people. Were poor immigrants in steerage prevented at gun point and by locked gates from boarding lifeboats, in favor of the wealthy? The Titanic, Friedland er said, touches on pre carious circumstances and how someones socioeco nomic class can potentially affect the way their life is valued by others and why thats inappropriate and immoral. John Paynes mom was nervous about him see ing James Camerons 1997 blockbuster, Titanic, when a 3-D version hits theaters in April. Hes seen the edited-for-TV version over and over again. The people who died, who sacriced, I think they were really brave to die like that, he said. I really liked the movie, but the parts I found scary were the parts where Jack (Leonardo Di Caprio) and Rose (Kate Winslet) were trapped in the sinking parts. Karen Heafer, a secondgrade teacher in Lincoln, Neb., has been in the class room for 31 years. She read a ctionalized account of a mascot cat on the Titanic to her students a couple of years ago and considers the story valuable, even half told. I use generalities. We dont go into a specic number of people killed, Heafer said. A lot of them are curious about how the people survived, how long did they have to stay on the water, who found them? Theyre more drawn to the survivors than the ones who drowned. Not so for Will Bous quette III, a 9-year-old at The Browning School in Manhattan. Assistant li brarian Susan Levine in vited Denenberg to the private Upper East Side prep school for boys after choosing his book for her third-grade reading group for fathers and sons. Will was especially touched by the story of Isidor and Ida Straus. The co-owner of Macys depart ment store and his wife of 40 years went down with the ship together after she refused a spot in a lifeboat. It was heart-touch ing, Will said. It made me sad, then it felt sweet. I was greatly surprised. I also didnt realize how cold the water was. I could feel the emotions but I wasnt freaked out. Lucy Sullivan spares no detail during a Titanic unit for her seventh-grade language arts students in Brookeld, Conn. For seven years, she has as signed each real-life Titan ic characters as she slowly lets the tragedy play out in class over a week or so. She arranges their desks by type of ticket she issues them at the begin ning, with rst-class pas sengers assigned prime spots. They journal about the story throughout, learn of the mysterious missing locker key that left a look out without binoculars and watch as she rolls a card board model of the ship around the classroom on a cart to demonstrate the crash itself. At the end, her students discover whether their characters lived or died. When youre replaying something for 12-year-olds, the amount of information that allows you to put this puzzle together minute by minute is very power ful, Sullivan said. Those students who never re ally liked ction nd this to be delicious and those who hate ction and love nonction nd this to be delicious. Why? Its a combina tion of gaudy details and tragic events. It doesnt get any better than that. You own the kids if you use even a small percentage of whats available on this to teach, she said. The effort wasnt lost on her groups this year. Sam Petriccione, 12, calls the Titanic a day that will al ways live in infamy. He added, It shows me that being cocky and arro gant doesnt really pay off. The people in the cockpit were so positive that the ship couldnt sink that they refused to shut down the ship and stop because of the icebergs. Jasmine Davis in Pittsburgh wasnt one of Sullivans students, but she was denitely a Ti tanic-obsessed kid. Shes 23 now but at 9 couldnt get enough of the subject, including Robert Ballards 1985 discovery of the wreck strewn half a mile across the ocean oor. The ocean ographer and marine biol ogists video and photos ig nited interest in the wreck among a new generation of kids. In fourth grade, Davis wasnt allowed to bring school library books to re cess, but I convinced my teacher to let me take this massive novel about the Titanic outside. It was such a big book. How else was I going to nish it? For 20 years, Ballards JASON Project has offered middle school teachers materials and expertise for deeper exploration of the sciences in a variety of dis ciplines, including his own. More than 10 million stu dents have participated, Davis among them. Its hard for a kid to grasp the scope of the Ti tanic, she said. I remem ber seeing the images of the wreck taken by Bal lard when I did the JASON Project. That was really haunting. Childrens writer Mary Pope Osborne began her popular ction series Magic Tree House, along with nonction compan ions, around the time the JASON Project began. I spent the rst 10 years asking kids all over the country what they wanted me to write about. They wanted me to write about the Titanic, but I kept say ing, No, its too sad. Its too depressing. She nally took it on in 1999 with Tonight on the Titanic, her 17th book for 6to 10-year-olds featuring her kid characters Jack and his sister, Annie. It has a mythic power. Its not right next to their lives, Osborne said. Ive had very few children ask me to write about 9/11, for instance. I think 100 years from now they would. Titanic a magnet for kids, ne line for educators DCs Vertigo readies 4 new series, dedicated app AP John Marcus Payne shows his Lego model of the Titanic cruise ship in Glencoe, Ill. Payne has been a student of the Titanic since kindergarten. He has scrupulously researched the ship, built a model out of Lego freehand and successfully lobbied his fth-grade teacher in suburban Chicago to let him mark the disasters centennial with a multimedia presentation for his class. Below childrens book authors have taken a variety of approaches to telling the Titanics story, from leaving out disturbing statistics to softening their language. The word died doesnt appear often in the book. We softened it with perished or did not live. The goal was to remember what the people on board contributed, not so much what happened to them. Debbie Shoulders, author, T is for Titanic

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A3 Wednesday, April 4, 2012 that aims to develop gardens modeled on natural ecosystems that means natural fertilization that comes with decaying vegetation and a variety of plants in one plot. Unlike orchards, which only have one type of tree or shrub, a food forest has many types. Developers use edible trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals. Fruit and nut trees are on the upper level, while berry shrubs, edible perennials and annuals are on the lower levels. Plants to attract insects are also planted for natural pest management. All of these plants work together like a forest ecosystem, but they are edible, Herlihy said. In Pittsburgh, a food forest a quarter of an acre big is in its second year of existence. So far, only a berry bush and a pear tree have yielded fruits. We tell people its not a food forest, its aspiring to be a food forest, said organizer Juliette Jones. I really do believe the longer that were there, once you start to see the trees producing and see the site develop more, it will attract people to get involved. In Seattle, the park will have an area for the food forest, and another area for the smaller community gardens that can be used by families or community groups. One of the goals is to provide affordable healthy food at a time when such items can be too costly for lowincome residents. The rst harvest from the community gardens will happen in spring 2013. The fruit trees and shrubs will take a while to grow. Herlihy expects those harvests to come in about two years. Ultimately, Herlihy envisions thick plots of nut trees, such as walnuts and hazelnuts, next to apple, pears and plum trees. Underneath, there will be huckleberries, salmon berries and even salal, a native shrub. Herbs like rosemary will also be planted. The group plans to install beehives to aid with pollination. Organizers say that they will use the honor system when it comes to how much food people can take. Its simply just good ethics, he said. Help yourself, dont take it all, and save some for anybody else. Unlike orchards, which only have one type of tree or shrub, a food forest has many types. Fruit and nut trees are on the upper level, while berry shrubs, edible perennials and annuals are on the lower levels. Plants to attract insects are also planted for natural pest management. The Associated Press You know you like your cup of Joe in the morning. But are you ready for a cup of Hugh? We are, of course, talk ing about actor Hugh Jackman, who recently launched a coffee and tea company that raises money for charity. Philanthropy is the driv ing force behind Jackmans involvement in the coffee world. In a telephone inter view he talked about being inspired by the late Paul Newman and his company, Newmans Own, which has donated millions to char ity. But its not the only reason. The other factor? Taste. Hey, Im a coffee snob, said Jackman, who could drink coffee all day, be cause I just love it, but limits himself to one or two cups. If Im buying it, I want a great cup of coffee. If you can have a great cup of coffee and the prots of that company are actu ally going back to different charities, I think its a winwin for everybody. Jackmans interest in creating a coffee company was sparked during a tour he took as an ambassador for World Vision, an orga nization that works with children and families. In Ethiopia, he met Dukale, a local coffee farmer, and was struck by how hard he worked to look after his family and by how a little help could make a big dif ference in the lives of cof fee farmers. In a piece of synchron icity, he discovered that a friend, Barry Steingard, who has 25 years expe rience in the coffee and restaurant industry, was planning on getting back in the coffee business. I said, Well, do you need a part ner? Jackman said. So far Laughing Man Coffee & Tea chocolates were also recently added is the rst subsidiary under Jackmans umbrella company, Laughing Man Worldwide. The way it works is 50 percent of the subsidiary prots go to the parent company, which then donates 100 percent of its prots. Educational initiatives are the focus of the coffee company, which has partnered with Har lem Village Academies, the well-regarded charter schools in New York, and WorldVision. And Jackmans not the only java star. Leonardo DiCaprio is partnering with the La Colombe Torrefaction cof fee company to create a special blend, LYON, with net prots earmarked for environmental projects supported by the actors foundation. Meanwhile, Newmans daughter, Nell Newman, partnered with Vermonts Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. to source, roast, package and distrib ute fair trade organic cof fee under the Newmans Own Organics label. Green Mountain allocates at least 5 percent of pre-tax prots to social and environmental projects in the communities where it does business. Celebrity coffees are just a fraction of the over all market. Still, the trend of celebrities working with high-quality roasters to make coffee for a cause can only be a good thing, said Miles Small, owner and editor-in-chief of Cof feeTalk magazine, based in Vashon, Wash. Coffee is, and has al ways been, an instrumental tool in bringing disparate folks together for a com mon cause, he said. Buy ing celebrity coffee with a donation element helps toward achieving the chari table goals of the celebrity and also helps the over 25 million families worldwide whose survival is depen dent on the growing of this not so simple beverage called coffee. In some ways, the coffeecelebrity connection seems a natural. Who hasnt seen umpteen paparazzi shots of stars clutching their Starbucks? But Jackman laughs when asked if Hollywood has a corner on caffeine. Coffee is the world over, he said. Its one of the oldest products known to man, and its one of the greatest crops ever. Tra ditionally, coffee is part of ritual and part of unity and community. In Ethiopia, the fami lies Jackman met roasted, ground, brewed and drank coffee together. Its all part of community and being to gether, he said. I think its kind of a great product and underlines what our com pany is about. AP Glenn Herlihy, left, Briar Bates and Jackie Cramer stand on a grassy slope and talk about how they and other organizers will turn the site into a food forest in view of downtown Seattle. The park will start at 2 acres and grow to 7, offering city dwellers a chance to pick apples, plums and other crops right from the branch. FOOD FOREST from page A1 Coffee is the world over. Its one of the oldest products known to man, and its one of the greatest crops ever. Traditionally, coffee is part of ritual and part of unity and community. Hugh Jackman, Laughing Man Coffee & Tea Celebs brew coffee for a cause HUGH JACKMAN LEONARDO D i CAPRIO NELL NEWMAN AP A variety of products from Hugh Jackmans Laughing Man Coffee & Tea company is available. LOS ANGELES (AP) NBCs talent show The Voice is jumping on Facebooks timeline app bandwagon to give fans another way to vote for their favorite contestants. The new application allows viewers to cast votes for Voice singers and con nect with friends and others watching the show, NBC and Facebook said Friday. Vot ing on live performances began Monday. The Facebook app for The Voice is in tended to create a fully social online vot ing experience, said Vivi Zigler, president of NBC Universal Digital Entertainment. We have been working very closely with Facebook to really build a social voting app that takes advantage of every whiz-bang, bell and whistle that Facebook has built for timeline, Zigler said. In addition to serving as a ballot box and a bridge between viewers, the Voice app will lead users to new con tent, including performance videos and blogs, NBC said. In January, when Facebook unveiled about 60 new apps that let people share the smallest details of their lives on their prole, now known as their timeline, the company said it expected developers to create thousands more. Dubbed frictionless sharing by Face book, the apps allow a users activity to be automatically shared through Facebook although people can limit whos able to see this activity when they sign up for the apps. Nearly 3,000 apps have been launched in two months for websites ranging from The Onion to Nike to foodie site Foodily, Facebook said. Making use of a timeline app for voting is innovative, said Justin Osofksy, direc tor of platform partnerships at Facebook. The Voice features Christina Agu ilera, Cee Lo Green, Adam Levine and Blake Shelton as coaches. NBCs The Voice adds Facebook app for voting

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A4 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Classifieds B8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com

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Mannings Feed & Seed (850-623-2426)www.happyjackinc.com 4x8 Red Paver Bricks 50 each 380-2928 Mahogany Dinning Set Table, Chairs, Hutch & Buffet $2000. Queen Sofa $250. Coffee Table $100. Call 380-2928 BOOK SALE SAT 8 am On The Porch 5152 Pike St. Milton Hwy. 90 & Canal St Choice of Thousands Paper and Hardbacks Fict/NonFict/Bk. List Crestview Up to 80% off Toby Booths Only Indoor/Outdoor Yard Sale in Forever Victorian (398-8899) Main Street. Open Tues-Sat. Showcases, Book cases, Store fixtures AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 3/340 RESOLUTION WHEREAS, Richard Jette, PETITIONED the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, to vacate, abandon, discontinue and renounce any interest and right of the public in and to the following described property to-wit: The west end of Cooleys Drive in Pace Heights Subdivision lying between lots 9 and 10 as described in Plat Book B, page 14 AND WHEREAS, The Board of County Commissioners determined to have a public hearing for the purpose of considering the advisability of vacating and abandoning said rights-of-way, and WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners have on this the 22nd day of March, 2012, conducted said public hearing in conformity to the said publication of their intent, and WHEREAS, after hearing all comments concerning said vacation of the above described rights-of-way, the Board, being fully advised, and it being determined that the public interest will be best served and protected by vacating and abandoning said rights-of-way, therefore, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, that the said rights-of-way as herein set out and described are hereby vacated and any and all interest to the public shall revert to and be vested in the proper owners thereof. APPROVED AND ADOPTED by a vote of 5 yeas, 0 nays, and 0 absent, of the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, this 22nd day of March, 2012. 4/4/2012 3/340 3/339 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL REBUILD Northwest Florida has issued a Request for Proposal (RFG) for construction management services for its Residential Wind Retrofit Program in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. The full RFP is available on REBUILDSs web site. http://www.rebuildnwf.org/ 4/4/2012 3/339 3/338 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON April 24, 2012 at 11:00 AM UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit: 419 Jeff Chamell: Refrigerator, golf clubs, boxes & misc. STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 4/4, 4/11, 2012 3/338 Incorrect Insertion Policy For Classified In-column Advertisers All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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A6 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, April 4, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE 850-995-8778 STORE HOURS: 7AM 9PM 7 DAYS AWEEK Sales Prices Good through April 10, 2012 4 5 6 78910 MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT SUN Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses. 8604387 Vlasic Kosher Spears 1 74 24 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Greens 88 27 oz Sunshine Maintenance Dog Food 16 29 50 lb Tampico Fruit Drinks 1 40 1 gal Sale Good Through April10, 2012 Vine Ripe Large Tomatoes 79 lb 2 Liter Pepsi 1 39 Frito-Lay Multi Packs 5 73 20 19-20 oz Blue Bell Ice Cream 4 18 1/2 Gal Shurfine Brown n Serve Rolls 99 12 ct Farmland St Louis Style Pork Spareribs 2 33 lb Hillshire Farm Ultra Thin Ham, Turkey or Chicken 2 93 9 oz pk Cooks 1/2 Spiral Sliced Ham 1 81 lb Bar S Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna 1 18 16 oz Hillshire Smoked Sausage, Pork, Beef or Polish 2 41 14 oz Ball Park Jumbo Franks 1 65 16 oz Boston Butt Pork Roast 2-Pack 1 20 lb Family Pack Country Style Ribs 1 45 lb Cooks Shank Portion Smoked Ham 1 15 lb Fresh Frozen Turkey Breast 1 48 lb Golden Ripe Large Sweet Cantaloupes 1 97 ea Family Pack Pork Steaks 1 45 lb Royal Whole Smoked Hams 1 63 lb US #1 Red Potatoes 1 95 5 lb bag Southern Grown Fresh Snap Beans 77 lb Liberty Gold Pineapple 46 8 oz Pride of Illinois Very Small Sweet Peas 60 15 oz Hungry Jack Mashed Potatoes 1 25 15.5 oz Maxwell House Coffee 8 27 34.5 oz Betty Crocker Cake Mixes 1 06 16-18 oz



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75 cents Wednesday, April 4, 2012 GazetteSanta Rosas Press Obituaries .....................................A2Speak Out .....................................A2Sudoku..........................................A3Opinion ........................................A4Sports............................................A12Classi eds .....................................B8 TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 104 Issue 27 Printed on recycled paper Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.comTweet us @srpressgazette and friend us on facebook.com ON THEWORDSTREETIf commissioners decide to build a new courthouse where would you like to see it and why? Speak OutLet Santa Rosans know what you thinkInside | Page A2 srpressgazette.com623-5887By Bill Gamblin377 4611 | @SRPG_Bill news@srpressgazette.com Pinwheels bring back memories of innocence, childhood and fun. Many victims of child abuse and neglect have an innocence that is lost. April 1 marks the start of Child Abuse Prevention Month and in Santa Rosa County, lawns at businesses, schools and public of ces will be decorated with pinwheel gardens in recognition. The pinwheels themselves will represent Floridas efforts to prevent child abuse and change the way the state approaches the prevention of child abuse and neglect. The most powerful source of social movement is generated by individual action, said Santa Rosa Kids House facility coordinator Briana Taylor. We challenge Santa Rosa County to help us move this community in the right direction. Gardens like the one being set up Friday at Walmart in Pea Ridge will be set up a various location to help raise awareness to the on-going responsibility to ensure every child has the same opportunity to grow and develop in a healthy environment. With the advent of the Santa Rosa Kids House a new level of security has been added to those victimized, especially children. A lot of people feel a lot more secure coming forward because of public awareness and places like the Santa Rosa Kids House, said Santa Rosa County Sheriff Wendell Hall. People now have a feeling that something will A spin on Child Abuse Prevention Month By MATHEW PELLEGRINO393-3669 | SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com It is fair time in Santa Rosa County, but this is now what residents have grown accustomed to in recent years. This year the Santa Rosa County Fair is going back to its roots; to its horticultural roots. This year the fair is focusing on horticulture by bringing in more animals and more horticulture acts, which is what the fair is really all about. We had a pretty nice livestock exhibit last year but we have an even bigger one this year, said Rick Paschall, Chairman of the Santa Rosa County fair board. This year the fair is putting on a childrens FILE PHOTOSSome of the sights from recent Santa Rosa County FairsSee FAIR A11 See ABUSE A11Volunteers from Santa Rosa Kids House plant a pin wheel garden at Walmart in Pea Ridge Friday.BILL GAMBLIN | Press GazetteBy Bill Gamblin377-4611 | @SRPG_Bill news@srpressgazette.com Milton residents turned out Saturday to give their opinion on the citys proposed Milltown Overlay District. About 35 residents and interested parties voiced what they would like to see for the future of the district, which runs from Broad Street west to the Blackwater Heritage Trail, north to Chumuckla Highway and south to Berryhill Road. We missed the rst two meetings because we were out of town, said Milton residents John and Debbie Carpenter. What surprised us is that, after this meeting, the majority rules. We like it the way it is and dont want to see a lot of change. While change is the main concern, Milton Planning and Zoning Director Randy Jorgensen posted a sign for everyone to stress the purpose of the meeting. Many of those at the meeting, like Teresa Derher, were glad just to have a say in the proposal. As long as we have a voice I am happy, Derher said. I just dont think commercial and residential mix. Right now we are a close community on my block and with one piece of property vacant, I dont want people to come in and disrupt what we have. While residents were being heard at Saturdays meeting at Milton City Hall, not everyone was pleased with the meeting. I was hoping for more open discussions, Ted Fraizer said. I have a lot of questions, but (Jorgensen) never paused. There isnt one matter in particular over another, but I do have concerns about historical since there are a lot of 100-year-old houses. Santa Rosa Historical Society President Wes Meiss was in attendance and he understands where several residents stand. I think they would have been happy by expanding the historical district downtown, Meiss said. The Milton residents zone in on downtown at meetingSee ZONE A11 Wanting to build it out of town doesnt make sense. Build in somewhere central between Milton and Pace. Douglas Parker I think it needs to stay downtown. Move it temporarily and then rebuild it. We need to keep it there as part of downtowns history.Angela GehresTake the old one down and put the new one up to standards in its place.Kasey DeAndaSee WORD A4 T h e f a i r i s c o m i n g t o t o w n BASEBALL: BLUE WAHOOS LAND IN PENSACOLA SPORTS, A12

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LocalA2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012TELEPHONE NN UMBERSAll ofces ................. 850-623-2120 Classieds ................ 850-623-2120 Fax ........................ 850-623-2007SS UBSCRIPt T ION RAt T ESOne year (in county) ......................... $39 Six months (in county).................$19.50 13 weeks (in county).................... $9.75 One year (out of county) ....................$62 Six months (out of county).................$31 13 weeks (out of county)..............$15.50 Senior Citizen (over 62) One year (in county)........................$32 Six months (in county) ......................$16 13 weeks (in county) .........................$8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.CC OPYRIGHt T NN Ot T ICEThe entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570.SS ANt T A RR OSAS PRESS GAZEttTT E StST AFFJim FF letcherPublisher 850-393-3654 jetcher@srpressgazette.comCC arol BB arnesOfce Manager 850-623-2120 cbarnes@srpressgazette.comBBill GG amblinEditor 850-377-4611 bgamblin@srpressgazette.comCC armen JosephMedia Sales Consultant Cell: 850-393-3666 cjoseph@srpressgazette.comAA be CC larkMedia Sales Consultant 850-910-0902 aclark@srpressgazette.comTracie SS melstoysMedia Sales Consultant 850-623-2120 tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com SS anta RR osas PP ress GG azette 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570At T YOUR SERVICEMM iss a paper? Circulation Jim Fletcher 850-623-2120 Want to subscribe? 850-623-2120 To buy back issues 850-623-2120 To place a classied ad 850-623-2120 To buy a display ad Carmen Joseph 850-623-2120 To buy a photograph 850-623-2120I I n ternet www.srpressgazette.comO O f ce HH ours 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday To get news in the paper Bill Gamblin 850-623-2120 or 850-377-4611 E-mail : news@srpressgazette.com Short items: news@srpressgazette.com Church News: church@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries: news@srpressgazette.com Sports: sports@srpressgazette.com Elected OFFICIALSCOUNCOUN TY Y GOVERNMENGOVERNMEN TCOUNTY COMMISSION District 1: Jim Williamson, 4351 Berryhill Road, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-williamson@santarosa..gov District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Road, Milton, FL 32583; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commcole@santarosa..gov District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla Highway, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commsalter@santarosa..gov District 4: Jim Melvin, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-melvin@santarosa..gov District 5: Lane Lynchard, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commlynchard@santarosa..gov The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at 9 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays. The leaders meet in committee at 9 a.m. Mondays preceding the Thursday meetings. Meetings are held in commission chambers of the Administrative Complex on U.S. 90. Phone 983-1877 for information or to reach their ofces.SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFFWendell Hall, 5755 East Milton, Rd., Milton, FL 32588; phone 983-1100. E-mail is whall@srso.netSANTA ROSA COUNTY CLERK OF COURTSMary Johnson, P.O. Box 472, Milton, FL 32572; phone 983-1987. E-mail is santacourtfeed@chjn.netSANTA ROSA COUNTY TAX COLLECTORStan Collie Nichols, 6495 Caroline St., Suite E, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1800. E-mail is snichols@ srctc.comSANTA ROSA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERGreg Brown, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1880. E-mail is info@srcpa.orgSANTA ROSA COUNTY ELECTIONS SUPERVISORAnn Bodenstein, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1900. E-mail is Bodenstein@ santarosa..govSS TA A TE E GOVERNMEN GOVERNMEN T Rep. Doug Broxson: 2990-C Gulf Breeze Parkway, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563, phone 916-5436. E-mail is Doug.Broxson@myoridahouse.gov Sen. Greg Evers: 598 N. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536, phone 689-0556. E-mail is Evers. Greg.SO2@senate.gov Gov. Rick Scott: PLO5 The Capitol, 400 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; phone 488-4441. E-mail is _governor@myorida.comFEFE DERAL ERAL GOVERNMEN GOVERNMEN THOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Rep. Jeff Miller: 2439 Rayburn House Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; local phone is 479-1183; D.C. Ofce phone (202) 225-4136. Pensacola ofce address: 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503. Toll free number is 866-3671614. Website: http://jeffmiller.house.govSENATE Sen. Marco Rubio: 317 Hart Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 850-433-2603. Website: www.rubio.senate. gov Sen. Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202224-5274; fax 202-224-8022. Website: http:// billnelson.senate.govWHITE HOUSE President Barack Obama: The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. E-mail is president@whitehouse.gov Vice President Joe Biden: Office of the Vice President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414.SCHOOLSCHOOL GOVERNMEN GOVERNMEN TSCHOOL BOARD Superintendent: Tim Wyrosdick, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-5000. E-mail is wyrosdickt@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 1: Diane Scott, 5710 Munson Highway, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-0413. E-mail is scottdl@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton, FL 32570; phone 623-6299. E-mail is winkleseh@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre, FL 32566; phone 939-2661. E-mail is colemanmd@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 4: JoAnn Simpson, 5059 Faircloth St., Pace, FL 32571; phone 994-5446. E-mail is simpsonjj@mai.santarosa.k12.fl.us District 5: Edward Gray III, 3156 Pins Lane, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563; phone 934-0701. E-mail is pedenst@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays at 5086 Canal St. in Milton. Phone: 983-5000.CICI TY Y GOVERNMEN GOVERNMEN T Milton City Hall, Mayor Guy Thompson, 6738 Dixon St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5400. City Manager is Brian Watkins Town of Jay, Mayor Kurvin Qualls, 3822 Highway 4, Jay, FL 32565, phone 675-2719 Gulf Breeze City Hall, Mayor Beverly Zimmern, 1070 Shoreline Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, phone 934-5100. City Manager is Edwin Buz Eddy Please provide a color photograph if possible. All information must be typed. Wednesdays paper please submit by Friday at 3pm. Saturdays paper submit by Wednesday at noon ...a weekly column answering your questions with Biblical answers about life.Ask the Preacher Dear J.S., Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church in Milton. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree from Florida State University and a Master of Divinity Degree from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been the Pastor of HHBC since 1987. For 10 years he has also served as an International Youth Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention, preaching to multiplied thousands all over the U.S. and Canada. For more information about HHBC call 623-8959 or 626-8951 or fax, 623 197. If you have a question for ASK THE PREACHER send it to: ASK THE PREACHER, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351 Hickory Hammock Rd, Milton, FL, 32583 If you have a short comment you would like to make, call the Speak Out line at 623-5887. Longer comments are better suited as a letter to the editor.MM onday, 5:22 a.m.Hello, my name is Dale. I am calling about the editorial content of this paper. I agree with its mostly conservative tilt. Lately, there has been a lot of whiners calling in with disagreements and upset with what they see on the editorial page. To them I say go read anything else. If you do not like what you see in this paper, then go away. I do have one problem, and that was on the front page. If Caseys Nursery says they are losing business then they are losing business. That is no place to oppose her. If you have an opinion then put it on the opinion page not the editorial. Editors note: We were not trying to editorialize in the story but present two different aspects. One business unfortunately is losing business while another who says they are making money. Sorry if you took it as an editorial.SS unday, 8:30 p.m.I wanted to give you some information with so many negative things being said about the sheriffs office. Last Friday, my mothers home was broken into. Mementos were taken and I did not know what to do. My friends insisted I call the sheriff. I didnt think anything could be done, but my friends pushed me. They sent an officer out to my home to my surprise. He was very thorough and showed a great deal of expertise taking photos, asking questions. I felt bad about calling him, since I did not know the value of what was taken. He assured me they had ways other people do not with investigators on matters like this.SS unday, 3:37 p.m.From one registered old-school Republican to another, excellent letter, Bruce Sargent. Your March 31 letter Rope-A-Dope Response exposing the misinform and manipulate tactics of Walter Williams was long overdue. God forbid he should ever teach an economics class to one of my kin. I prefer they get facts and reality in the classroom, not fantasy and hyperbole.SS unday, 2:16 p.m.This is Ray. One possible way to help the working man with these high fuel costs would be if the independent road truckers would call a national strike. All stay home for a given time. In my rig, I get four miles to a gallon and at $1 a mile I couldnt make it today. Believe me, I did this once before and I stayed off the road for a period.SS aturday, 1:49 p.m.This is Charlie. The only good thing Muslim countries do is kill drug users. All these on methamphetamines kill themselves. They have it right by bringing an early end for those on drugs.FF riday, 5:07 p.m.I think it is so sad a young boy had to die. I feel the other boy wanted to kill him. I didnt see a gash, any injuries or a broken nose. I wish the boy had done those things before he died. He had to fight for his life before he was killed. This man trailed the kid. It is a hate crime. There is so much racial stuff in our nation we need to stop it. This is the best country in the world. It is terrible this had to happen to that young boy. This is Maria.FF riday, 6:28 a.m.Yes, this is Nita. For the person who drives the maroon SUV who ran off the road and almost hit me as I was walking to Winn-Dixie: You know who you are. I know your face and it is burned into my memory. I hope whatever you were doing was worth it because you almost caused me physical injury and emotional stress. Thanks a lot mister. I would appreciate you paying attention to your driving. Thank you. Speak OOUtTMarietta McDaniel Smith, 83, of Milton passed away on March 17, 2012. She was born to C.J. McDaniel and Annie Mae McLean on Sept. 1, 1928. She graduated from Milton High School in 1946 and from Massey Draughton Business College in Montgomery, Ala. in 1947. Smith worked as a legal secretary for many years before joining the State Attorneys Ofce where she retired as Ofce Manager in 1998 after 28 years of service. She was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Milton since joining the church at age 16 and was previously a member of the East Milton Presbyterian Church. She also served on a variety of local organizations over the years including the Historical Society, Genealogical Society of Santa Rosa County, Bagdad Village Preservation Association and many others. Smith was preceded in death by her parents and her brother, James McLean. She is survived by her brother Connie McLean; her daughter, Sharon Painter; her son, Michael Smith and wife, Jodi; her daughter Cathy Purdon and husband, David; and the light of her life, granddaughter Catie Purdon. Smith is also survived by her many friends whom she loved as family. Funeral services were Wednesday, March 21, at First Baptist Church, Milton, Fla. Sign the guest book at www.srpressgazette.com.MMarietta MMcDaniel SSmith MMARIEttTT A S SMItTH1928-2012 Obituary CORRECCORRECTIONIONIn the Saturday, March 31 edition of the Press Gazette we inadvertently misspelled the name of Byrd Mapoles. The Santa Rosa Press Gazette apologizes for this error.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A3Wednesday, April 4, 2012 2075799 Gun ShowApril14th & 15th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2075356Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 o r 2 Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING www.Sudoku-Puzzles.netSudoku, Kakuro & Futoshiki PuzzlesSudoku 9x9 Very easy (138848083) 1 9 7 8 9 3 5 1 7 6 1 3 6 8 5 3 1 1 6 9 5 3 1 2 7 2 7 4 8 4 9 2 6 4 7 8 1 www.sudoku-puzzles.netSolution: www.sudoku-puzzles.net SOLUTION FIND US ONLINECheck out Santa Rosa Press Gazette on Facebook, or tweet us @srpressgazetteSpecial to the Press GazetteSacred Heart Senior Spirit will present a free seminar entitled, Back to Basics 101: Weight Management & Nutrition for Seniors from noon to 1 p.m. April 12 in the Rehabilitation Center at Sacred Heart Medical Park in Pace. The seminar, presented by Dr. Anthony Huynh, a board-certied baritrician with Sacred Heart Weight Management Center, will teach the basics of weight management, healthy weight loss for seniors, eating healthy on a budget, as well as important vitamins and supplements for the aging body. Dr. Huynh is fellowshiptrained in nutrition and bariatric medicine from Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pa. Dr. Huynh is board certied in bariatric medicine and is a certied nutrition clinician. He is currently accepting new patients at his Sacred Heart ofce located at Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola. Seating is limited and registration is requested. To register, call 416-1620. Sacred Heart Senior Spirit is a free program for persons 55 and older. Benets include free health screenings, seminars, special benets per hospital stay, cafeteria discount, a discounted pre-paid lab coupon program, and a monthly newsletter that includes seniors health and wellness information and a calendar of events. For more information, please call 850-416-1620, visit www.sacred-heart. org/seniorspirit or like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ SacredHeartSeniorSpirit.Weight management, nutrition for seniors DR. AntNTHonONY Hu HUYnNHSpecial to the Press GazetteTax season is nearly done, but thats no reason to be done with taxes. The tax return is a roadmap to financial planning, giving insight into investment, retirement and estate planning needs. Tax season gives us a snapshot to use in framing our financial picture, said Hardy Eubanks, CPA/PFS with Eubanks & Rouse, CPAs. With W-2s, 1099s and other paperwork handy, its an important opportunity to assess where we are and to make adjustments that can move us closer to our financial goals. This year, in particular, the need for financial planning is more urgent. Several federal tax provisions are scheduled to expire at the end of the year or take effect at the beginning of 2013 that could influence financial strategies. The tax rate on capital gains, for instance, is scheduled to rise from 15-20 percent. Qualified dividends are set to be taxed as ordinary income. And a new 3.8 percent Medicare tax will be applied to the investment income of higher income and higher net-worth individuals. Its important to understand how these changes could affect your financial situation and to plan now for appropriate investment, retirement and estate strategies, Eubanks added. Year-end could be too late. As a CPA with the Personal Financial Planning (PFS) credential, Eubanks has demonstrated robust knowledge in tax, investment, retirement, estate and insurance planning and commitment to ongoing education. His passion is to work closely with his partners and other business professionals in providing comprehensive financial plans that meet or exceed the clients expectations.Tax time right time for nancial planning Special to the Press Gazette Council on Aging of West Florida will host a Milton Caregiver Support Group meeting at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 5, at St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church, 6451 Park Ave. There is no cost and the public is invited. Reservations are not required. The group meets on the rst Thursday of each month at the same time and location. County residency is not required to attend. The support group is designed to reduce stress, increase coping skills, provide strategies for effective management of care giving tasks and enable caregivers to provide high quality, inhome care. The programs are sponsored by Council on Aging of West Florida, the State of Florida Department of Elder Affairs and the Northwest Florida Area Agency on Aging. For more information, call 432-1475. Council on Aging of West Florida is a local, independent 501(c)(3) notfor-prot organization that has served seniors and their families since 1972. Council on Aging of West Florida helps seniors in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties live healthy, safe and independent lives in their own surroundings. Council on Aging to host support group sudoSUDOKuU

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Bullies are a problemThirteen million kids are bullies nationwide! Thank God for Lee Hirsch, lmmaker of Bully. Mike Huckabee interviewed him (bullied as a child) and the family whose son was punched, shoved and bullied on a school bus. What a tragedy! I recall television reports of similar incidents in the Panhandle. Years ago, an area paper printed a lengthy story about a gay student in Gulf Breeze. Tormented, he didnt want to go to school. I think his mother died; his gutsy father reported the bullying. Shame on students, teachers, principals, et al aware but do nothing! In Bully the mother confronts the principal, receiving no response. Disinterested, the latter brags about her grandchild. Not my nature to physically do so, I would have slapped the principal and any bully observed in the act. God bless those attempting to remove the R rating. Bully should be seen by everyone to motivate those who know situations exist instead of cowardly remaining silent, perpetuating this disgusting practice! I commend Hirsch for congratulating the school allowing him to videotape actual bullying. Most administrations would be defensive, denying bullying was prevalent in their schools. As a fth grader, I was sent to the principals of ce for kicking someone in the chins (mocking my brothers name). I admitted doing it; said Id do it again. Now a Christian, senior citizen, Id rethink it, although I would have lost it with that Bully principal. Students, tell your parents if youre being bullied. God bless us all as only He can and intervene with the heartbreak and suicides bullies cause.Chrys HolleyMilton, Fla.All that money for nothingMy letter is in reference to the courthouse and it costing a little over $205,000 so far, and not laid the rst brick. My question is, do we really need a huge courthouse that would take up about nine acres of land for the building and parking area? A building of that size sounds like all functions that are carried on in a courthouse would be in one building. Milton, with its population growth, lifestyle, drug addicts and increase in crimes such as murder, rape, and etc. The lottery really was supposed to support and bene t the school system. Now we are one of those wet counties. Prayer has been removed from school to the point it is, in many cases, dangerous to send your children off to school. The system stinks. No rules or regulations will work with humankind other than those, which was made by our Heavenly Father who created us. The needs of the jail, such as a suitable size courtroom, judges, etc. should have been built years ago when the jail was built. Think of the money spent, at the taxpayers expense, transferring prisoners back and forth to the court sessions. The courthouse issue should not be centered on the needs of the jail, but on the residents of Santa Rosa County who will be paying for it in years to come. I repeat: Decisions of this magnitude should be placed on a ballot and the branch of ces placed in different areas of Santa Rosa, or bene cial, as well as much appreciated. I really favor keeping the current courthouse in operation for civil cases, etc. and building the large courtroom facility in East Milton with the location decided by the sheriff. He is responsible for transferring prisoners to and from court sessions. Then just upgrade the branch of ces in the county. No more architectural designs please. Milton does not want to compete with Ponce de Leon. Unless they have changed dramatically, they are, or were, about the size of Bagdad or Jay. My main request to the Santa Rosa County Commissioners: Stop wasting money. Consider the needs of the people who had con dence in you by voting you in.Marion CumbieMilton, Fla. Last week, the United States Department of Agriculture and the Florida Department of Agriculture were in town, congratulating the schools of Santa Rosa for helping students become healthier. This week, we want to take time to thank the folks that led to that recognition. The latest numbers from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) show the percentage of American children who are deemed overweight has tripled since the 1970s and, today, one in every ve students between ages 6 and 17 is said to be overweight. As our children pack on the pounds, they found their veins getting clogged. For more than a decade, clinical trials have been under way to see if children should be placed on cholesterollowering drugs called statins. Suddenly, U.S. children are beginning to see problems (like high blood pressure, Type-2 diabetes and elevated cholesterol levels) not usually seen until later in life. We certainly have no trouble remembering the school lunches of just a few decades ago. Fried foods were the norm. Sugar was often added to make foods tasty to young palettes, and things like French fries and potato chips often were served as a compliment to the main entre. By the 1970s, most schools were even adding ice cream for children to purchase. We say all of this to note our local school system has every reason to feel motivated and to do its part to make our children healthy. The system has every reason to show youngsters how to lead a healthy lifestyle. And working in concert with physical education teachers, students can learn there is more to an active life than sitting on a sofa engaged in endless hours of video games. When it comes to eating and exercise habits, like so many other things, children learn it at home. Our school system is to be applauded for its effort. Staff members are trying to start an education process early. As one student noted, many fried foods have been replaced with baked foods. Ice cream if often jettisoned in favor of low-fat yogurt. Ketchup is not counted as a vegetable. We wonder how many parents take the time to see what the schools are serving for lunch. (We print that list in this paper every week.) But our responsibility as parents goes beyond keeping an eye on what the schools are feeding our children. We each need to extend the school lesson to the home and the real world. A healthy lunch does little good if a hurried, work-frazzled parent takes the easy way out and simply pushes fast food burgers and fries at the child for the evening meal. Similarly, we parents must realize that while it is convenient, high-sugar cereals are far from the ideal thing to serve our youngsters as we send them out the door on their way to learn. We should all take time to thank our school system for being so forward-thinking when it comes to the health of our children, but we cant let it stop there. In a way, our schools are also teaching us. Were being shown it is possible to be healthy and to get there one step at a time. If our children accept it at school they can, and will, accept it at home. Its our responsibility to make sure the lesson is repeated when our children get there. LETTERS TO THE EDITOREven a parent can learn OUR VIEW www.srpressgazette.comWednesday, April 4, 2012 APage 4SectionOPINIONOur Supreme Court heard three days of oral arguments on the legality of ObamaCare. Neither joint sessions of Congress nor oral arguments are as fun as they sound. The arguments are nuanced ones, cloaked in unnecessarily technical language that no one really understands much like the health care bill itself. Even a New York Times poll says that 72 percent of Americans do not want ObamaCare. The case hinges on the sly wording of what consequence is attached to not complying with the individual mandate, which is the core of this massive intrusion into our daily lives. At rst Obama called it a tax. Later, when he saw that was a legal problem, he called it a penalty. His administration has ipped on this issue more than a meth-house mattress. Washington learned long ago that if you name a bill something that no one could argue with, like The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, you could put pretty much anything you like in a 2,000-ish page bill and pass it before anyone reads it. In a stunning act of hubris which de ned the rst two years of Democratcontrolled, libuster-proof House, Senate and Presidency, thenHouse Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi famously said of the contentious ObamaCare bill as it slithered through, We have to pass the bill so you can nd out what is in it. Much like the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Democrats realized they had a narrow window of opportunity, just two years, to loot the U.S. Treasury, knowing full well the police would soon be there. In this case the police arrived with the landslide shellacking Democrats took in the 2010 elections. Republicans regained control of the House and took the keys to the liquor cabinet away from the less nancially responsible kids. Since then, Obama appointed reliable liberal Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court. He said he was looking for someone with empathy, preferably a bi-racial woman with some experience being a judge. At the time I suggested Paula Abdul. She ts Obamas criteria and clearly, given her success in Hollywood with only one hit song, she has spent a lot of time around old men in robes. Heath care in America remains a concern. We live in a country that celebrates overeating. We cheer the reigning Nathans Hot Dogs eating champion, Joey Chestnut, as he chokes down 60 wieners (beating the record set in the 1980s by Elton John). Why then is the current incentive (dying early from cardiac disease or obesity-induced diabetes) not motivation enough? Throwing everyone into the same insurance risk pool at the same price is not going to help matters. Just to sum up the simple math on the best health care system the world has ever known, the average family has out-of-pocket expenses for health care (after employer-paid insurance and the like) of $2,853 per year. This is 33 percent of what we spend yearly on our transportation. The same U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report says we spend $118 on reading, which goes a long way toward explaining why ObamaCare slipped through. Obama knows his health care law is a loser, so he does what he normally does: nds someone to blame. As a model, he points to Romneys state health care system in Massachusetts, which is a disaster. He really doesnt need to use such a recent data point when there are older models of socialized medicine he can chart the trajectory of his plan against, like North Koreas. Fellow Glorious Leaders, from Hitler through most recently Cubas Castro, have bought the favor of their electorate with generous, socialized medicine meth. I have a vested interest in this battle, and not only as an advocate for liberty, free markets and limited government. My oldest is in her third year of medical school. Medicine should remain a beacon for our best and brightest, who set out upon their careers to help their patients. They should not become petty bureaucrats in the Obama cradle-to-grave socialist state, bound by political expediencies and not by the best outcomes for their patients. If we can be forced to buy government-mandated health insurance under duress of a dubious interpretation of the Commerce Clause, with the validation of the Supreme Court and its Due Process Clause, for a health care bill more characteristic of Santa Claus, what is next? Relish your eeting freedoms. Liberty was nice while it lasted. Ron Hart, a libertarian syndicated op-ed humorist, awardwinning author and TV/radio commentator can be reached at Ron@RonaldHart.com or visit www. RonaldHart.com.Once they get their commerce claws in us... HART TALKRon Hart OUR VIEW O PINION OPINION WORD from page A1 I dont really care where. Just the old one there is part of our county heritage and doesnt need to be destroyed.Terry StablerI would still like to see it built in downtown Milton to keep people going through the town and historical element.Miranda Burkhead A more central location. Not downtown Milton or Pace, but a more central location for everyone.Larry WorthingtonThe current location is the best one. I think a nicer and newer courthouse would help downtown Milton.Connie GaudioI would prefer it to be built by the Navarre exit or somewhere there is a lot of activity so people can see it.Pam CorbinIt needs to go to East Milton by 84 Lumber or the Sheriffs Of ce. It would be better out of the way so no one would see the bums going in and out.Joshua Swain We want you to share your views on the above topic(s) or any topic with other Santa Rosas Press Gazette readers. Your views are important, too. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Letters must be typed and may be edited for content for to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for veri cation, if necessary. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A5Wednesday, April 4, 2012Special to the Press GazetteThe Florida Bar, the states guardian for the integrity of the legal profession, announces that the Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders disciplined 22 attorneys, which included one from Pensacola, disbarring ve and suspending 13. Some attorneys received more than one form of discipline. Two attorneys were placed on probation; four attorneys were publicly reprimanded and one attorney was ordered to pay restitution. Elizabeth Ann Amond, 811 W. Garden St., Pensacola, publicly reprimanded and placed on probation for three years, following a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1996) Amond is further directed to attend a trust accounting workshop. Amond improperly commingled funds by placing earned and unearned fees in her trust account, failed to provide monthly bank reconciliations to The Florida Bars auditor and failed to follow the rule requiring that trust funds held for a specic purpose be applied only to that purpose. (Case No. SC11-1664) Richard Lawrence Brown, P.O. Box 690282, Vero Beach, permanently disbarred, effective immediately, following a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1993) Brown engaged in a course of conduct involving the neglect of legal matters and misappropriation of approximately $180,000 of client funds from his trust account. He is incarcerated in county jail pending trial on various criminal charges. (Case Nos. SC11-1030 & SC11-1427) Mark F. Dickson, 10940 N.W. 15th St., Pembroke Pines, suspended until further order, effective 30 days from a Feb. 14 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1975) According to a petition for emergency suspension, Dickson appeared to be causing great public harm by misappropriating client trust funds. A Bar audit found that Dickson improperly commingled funds and converted some of the clients funds for his own personal use. (Case No. SC12-237) William Lee Durden III, 1834 Starwan Road E, Jacksonville, suspended for six months, effective 30 days from a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2002) During a series of controlled telephone conversations, which were recorded by the State Attorneys Ofce investigator, Durden admitted receiving payment for representing at least one criminal defendant while employed as an assistant public defender. The defendant had previously been declared indigent and was represented by the public defenders ofce at the taxpayers expense during the time of Durdens employment. (Case No. SC11-2444) David Nathan Finkelstein, 9000 Blind Pass Road, Apt. B105, Sarasota, suspended for 20 days, effective 30 days from a Feb. 20 court order. Further, upon reinstatement, Finkelstein is placed on probation for one year. (Admitted to practice: 1987) Finkelstein engaged in a pattern of misconduct including: neglect, lack of diligence, and a lack of communication with clients. He also failed to use proper trust accounting procedures. (Case No. SC11-1469) George Frederick Frank, 5355 Town Center Road, Suite 900, Boca Raton, publicly reprimanded following a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2009) Frank was arrested and convicted of driving under the inuence and careless driving after a trafc accident. (Case No. SC12-231) Eric P. Gifford, 3807 County Road 826, Anna, Texas, disbarred effective immediately, following a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2001) Gifford misappropriated $5,000 of client funds held in trust for a client who is mentally disabled and legally blind. He admitted to using to using the funds for personal bills and expenses including private school tuition for his children. (Case No. SC11-1182) Mary Alice Gwynn, 805 George Bush Blvd., Delray Beach, suspended for 91 days, following a Feb. 16 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1991) In numerous instances, Gwynn acted dishonestly, incompetently and in bad faith in a clients pending litigation. Gwynn failed to expedite litigation in the best interest of the client. She also led frivolous claims to harass her opponent and opposing counsel, made false allegations in testimony, engaged in willful abuse of the judicial system, and failed to research and verify claims before ling with the court. (Case No. SC08-622) Jeffrey Martin Hanly, 1312 3rd. Street N., Jacksonville Beach, disbarred effective immediately following a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2002) An investigation by the Bar as a result of numerous complaints against Hanly found that Hanly abandoned his law practice and misappropriated trust funds. (Case No. SC11-1217) Mary D. Hansen, 4393 S. Ridgewood Ave., Suite 1, Port Orange, suspended for 91 days effective immediately, following a Feb. 14 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1981) Hansen was found in contempt for failing to comply with the conditions of a Sept. 22, 2011, suspension order. Hansen did not submit to the Bar a sworn afdavit listing the names and addresses of all persons and entities to which she gave notice of her suspension. (Case No. SC11-2498) Dwayne Bisford Johnson Sr., 733 Cypress Drive, Apt. A, Lake Park, permanently disbarred effective immediately, following a Feb. 23 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1998) Johnson was found in contempt for failing to comply with the conditions of an Aug. 29 disbarment order. Johnson did not submit to the Bar a sworn afdavit listing the names and addresses of all persons and entities to which he gave notice of his disbarment. (Case No. SC11-2499) Mark Howard Klein, 2263 N. W. Boca Raton Blvd., Suite 209, Boca Raton, suspended for 90 days following a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1986) Klein was the subject of several disciplinary proceedings. Pending complaints involved loan modications where an ongoing pattern of ineffective communication coupled with failing to perform meaningful services. Klein also pleaded no contest to two misdemeanor charges of assault and battery. (Case No. SC10-2341) Petia Dimitrova Knowles, 5110 S.W. 101 st Ave., Cooper City, suspended until further order, effective 30 days from a Jan. 17 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2005) (Case No. SC10-1019). Anett Lopez, 3140 W. Kennedy Blvd., Suite 107, Tampa, suspended for 10 days, effective 30 days from a Feb. 20 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2005) Lopez notarized a clients family law pleadings in his absence, completed improper notarial certicates and misapplied funds for payments of costs from the client. Lopez failed to properly supervise her assistant who handled all deposits for the ofce and was responsible for ensuring the funds were posted to the proper accounts. A review of Lopez trust account records revealed that she was not maintaining minimum accounting procedures. (Case No. SC11-670) Supreme Court disciplines 22 attorneysThe remaing eight attorneys can be found online at sprgazette.com

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LocalA6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012By Theresa FridayExtension Faculty-Residential Horticulture UF/IFAS Santa Rosa County High in ber, low in calories and cholesterol free, the eggplant is a great edible to add to the summer garden. Although we think of eggplant as a vegetable, botanically it is a fruit. In Northwest Florida, our long hot growing season is perfect for the eggplant. One of the most common problems encountered in growing eggplants is transplanting them into the spring garden too early. Cold temperatures below 50 degrees F injure this crop. Low temperatures tend to harden eggplants and stunt their growth. Since stunted plants recover very slowly, transplants should be set in the garden after the average daily temperature is above 70 degrees F. The best temperatures are between 80-90 degrees F during the day and 7080 degrees F during the night. Plant growth is curtailed at temperatures below 60 degrees F. Gardeners in North Florida can put eggplant into the garden between mid-March and July. If the weather has been continuously warm, most varieties will reach their rst harvest in 80-85 days. Eggplants come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colors. They run from large to lemon size. They may be long, pearshaped, oblong, round or cylindrical. Their colors may be purple, yellow, white, ash, variegated, apple green, etc. Seed catalogs are lled with mouth-watering varieties and colorful options. Varieties that will thrive in Florida include Black Beauty, Dusky, Long, Ichiban and Cloud Nine. Black Beauty is an heirloom variety. Introduced around 1910, this popular variety has rich avored fruits that hold up well. Plump 45 inch diameter fruits are a beautiful, shiny purple-black. This openpollinated type holds its fruit high above the ground. Ichiban is an oriental type eggplant. This hybrid produces heavy yields 9inch long by 1.5-inch wide dark purple eggplants. Very avorful and tender, it is excellent for Oriental dishes and for grilling and roasting. Easter Egg is an unusual variety which produces small, eggsized white fruit which turns yellow at maturity. This edible ornamental plant makes a fun and interesting addition to a childrens garden. Eggplant requires a deep, rich, well-drained soil. Adding organic matter such as compost or aged-manures will help keep this heavy-feeder healthy. The soil should have a pH between 6.0 and 6.5. Always allow the soil to sit for several weeks prior to planting when adding amendments to the garden. A constant, rapid growth is important for quality fruit production from young eggplants. Maintain vigorous growth throughout the growing season by keeping soils uniformly moist. Since eggplants will be in the garden for a long season, supply a sidedressing of a nitrogen-containing fertilizer about once a month. Normally, eggplants are not staked, but a heavy fruit load may require some support later in the season. Often, fruit grown in summer taste extremely bitter. The main cause of bitter fruit is lack of soil moisture. To help prevent bitterness, irrigate during dry weather. The green and white fruited varieties are usually less bitter under these growing conditions than the purple varieties. The fruit may be harvested when they reach at least one-third to two-thirds their fully mature size. High quality fruit will have a high gloss to the skin. If you push in on the side of the fruit with your thumb, it should not spring back. Fruits that are dull, spongy and contain hard or brown seeds are overmature. Overmature fruit are of poor quality and should be cut and discarded to promote longer productivity. When harvesting, cut the tough fruit stems with a knife or clippers to avoid damaging the plant branches. Theresa Friday is the Residential Horticulture Extension Agent for Santa Rosa County. The use of trade names, if used in this article, is solely for the purpose of providing speci c information. It is not a guarantee, warranty, or endorsement of the product name(s) and does not signify that they are approved to the exclusion of others. For additional information about all of the county extension services and other articles of interest go to http://santarosa.ifas.u edu. if you run in both or 15,000 impresions!JUST IN TIME FOR THE SPRING BLITZ CANVASSINGZIPCODESATUNBELIEVABLEPRICES April 18Deadline April 11May 9Deadline May 2Reaching thousands of homes in zip codes...17,000 +3257120,000 +32570and32583 Full Page Includes4,000 srpressgazette.com Impressions $650 + $150 Color Half Page Includes2,500 srpressgazette.com Impressions $425 + $100 ColorQuarter Page Includes2,500 srpressgazette.com Impressions $275 + $75 Color 10% Discount Full Page Full Color15,000 srpressgazette.com Impressions10,000 Impressions (geo) Blitz the Blitz$999 Tracie Smelstoys 850-623-2120 tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com 6629 Elva Street, Milton FL 32570 www.srpressgazette.comCall to reserve your space Easter egg eggplant will amaze the kids

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A7Wednesday, April 4, 2012

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Stations of the CrossOn Good Friday, at 5 p.m. April 6, First United Methodist Church in Milton and St. Marys Episcopal Church will join congregations to walk the Stations of the Cross. The group will depart from First United Methodist Church, 102 Berryhill Road, and walk to St. Marys Episcopal Church, 6849 Oak St. The Stations of the Cross will be read along the way by participants. Upon arrival to St. Marys Church, prayers and a hymn will take place inside the church, with a reception following the service in the Parish Hall. This service is an adaptation of a custom widely observed by pilgrims to Jerusalem and we invite all who wish to participate in this devotion to attend.Easter Block PartyTrue Grace Fellowship Church will hold an Easter Block Party April 7 at the church from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. This free block party will offer loads of activities for all ages including an Easter egg hung, carnival games, bounce house, live music, and much more. Hamburgers and hot dogs will be serviced.Easter Weekend at Bagdad UMCBagdad United Methodist Church will hold the following services and events on Easter weekend: Good Friday Tenebrae Service: 6 p.m. April 6 Community Easter Egg Hunt: 11 a.m. April 7 Easter Sunrise Service: 6:30 a.m. April 8 Easter Worship Service: 11 a.m. April 8 For more information contact the church ofce at 626-1948.Holy Week at Trinity by the FieldsHoly Week begins with Palm Sunday, April 1, and ends with the celebration of Easter one week later, April 8. We will have a Holy Communion service everyday that week except Saturday. We invite you to join us as we follow Jesus through His week of passion, His trial, His walk to the cross, His death, and His triumphant resurrection. Palm Sunday: 10 a.m. Monday Friday Holy Communion: 12:15 p.m. Maundy Thursday Holy Communion: 6:30 p.m. Good Friday Stations of the Cross: 6 p.m. Easter Sunday: 10 a.m.Easter Sunrise Services at Calvary BaptistCalvary Baptist Church, Highway 89 North in Allentown, will conduct Easter Sunrise Services 7:30 a.m. April 8 at around the gazebo. Dan Kirkland will be performing special music followed by a message from Rev. David Shofner. Breakfast will follow at 8:30 a.m. and then a special Sunday school and worship service.True Grace Fellowship Easter SundayTrue Grace Fellowship Church will celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ on Easter Sunday, at 11 a.m. April 8. This special service will feature a Human Video presented by True Graces children and youth as well as a message from Pastor Duke Barrow. True Grace Fellowship Church is located at 5178 Willard Norris Road in Milton. For more information call, 623-4795.St. Marys Episcopal Church Easter Services.St. Marys Episcopal Church at 6849 Oak St. in Milton has announced its Easter Celebration plans. Reverend Mathew Dollhausen will lead the following services: Palm Sunday Process with Palms on April 1 at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. services Good Friday April 6 noon service Good Friday Stations of the Cross: 5 p.m. starting at 1st United Methodist and ending at St. Marys Holy Saturday April 7 at 7:30 p.m. Easter Sunday three services: Sunrise service at 6:27 a.m in the garden, as well as services at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. and Easter Egg hunt will be held at 10 a.m. between services. All are invited to attend and share the timeless Liturgy traditions with the love of Christ as our mission and sharing that love with each other. Make Easter meaningful time.Behold the LambFirst United Methodist Church of Pace Choir will present Behold the Lamb on April 8 at the 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. services. First United Methodist Church of Pace is located at 4540 Chumuckla Highway in Pace. For more information call, 994-5608. Easter Sunrise ServiceThe Navarre Community-Wide Easter Sunrise Service will be at 6 a.m., rain or shine, on April 8, at the main parking lot for Navarre Beach under the white tents. The service is sponsored by Navarre BeachSide Church. The Navarre BeachSide Churchs 8:30 a.m. Easter Service will follow at the same location. Navarre BeachSide Church is a nondenomination Christian Church offering contemporary worship. Proudly Serving The Emerald Coast Want Terri c Cooling? Call the Rheem TeamKool Breezeof Northwest Florida, Inc. 850-939-3325We Will Impress You. 4865650 P UBLICNOTICE TheEscambiaConsortium,comprisedofEscambiaCounty,theCityofPensacola,SantaRosaCounty, Florida,announcesinitiationofthepublicparticipationprocessthatwillfacilitatethepreparationoftheEscambia Consortium20 12/ /20 1 3 ConsolidatedPlan/AnnualHousingandCommunityDevelopmentPlanfortheperiod October1,20 12 September30,20 1 3 .Thisprocessservesasacollaborativetoolforthecommunityby identifyingorupdatingexistingconditionsintheConsortium's memberjurisdictionswithrespecttohousingand communitydevelopmentneeds,goalsandobjectives. TheConsortium's20 12 20 1 3 AnnualPlanforHousingandCommunityDevelopmentwillidentifythecommunity's housingandcommunitydevelopmentpriorities,an dtargetstrategiestoaddressprioritiesestablishedinthe 2010 2014 EscambiaConsortiumConsolidatedPlanwhichwillbeimplementedduringthenextFederalFiscal Year.The20 12 /20 1 3 AnnualPlan,whencomplete,willdenotetheEscambiaConsortium'sact ionplanforthe utilizationofresourcesprovidedthroughtheFY20 12 CommunityDevelopmentBlockGrant,FY20 12 HOME InvestmentPartnershipsAct,FY20 12 EmergencyS olutionsGrant ,andotherHUDprogramsdesignedtoaddress housingandcommunitydevelopm entneeds. TWOPUBLICHEARINGSarebeingsponsoredbytheConsortiumtoaffordcitizenstheopportunitytoprovide inputandrecommendationsregardingassistedhousing,housingrelatedneeds/priorities,supportivehousing needs,andnon housingcommunity developmentneedswithintheConsortium. TheTWOpublichearings concerningthedevelopmentofthe20 12 20 1 3 EscambiaConsortiumAnnualPlanwillbeheldat 2:00P.M. on Tuesday, April 2 4 ,20 12 atthePensacola HousingOffice,ConferenceRoom,42 0West Chase Street, Pensacola,Florida;andat 9:00A.M. on Wednesday April2 5 ,20 12 inthe SantaRosaCountyPublic ServicesComplex,HousingOfficeConferenceRoom,6051OldBagdadHighway,Milton,Florida The Escambia/Pensacolahearingwillalsoincorpor ateinformationregardingtheAnalysisofImpedimentsto FairHousing. TheEscambiaConsortiumadherestotheAmericanswithDisabilitiesActandwillmakereasonablemodifications foraccesstoservices,programsandotheractivities.Pleasecall858 0 350(City)or458 0466(EscambiaCounty) [orTelecommunicationsDevicefortheDeaf(TDD)numbers 595 0102 (City)or458 0464(EscambiaCounty)]for furtherinformation.Requestsmustbemadeatleast48hoursinadvanceoftheeventinordertoallowti meto providetherequestedservices. Inadditiontodirectinputprovidedduringthepublichearings,writtencommentsorinputregardinglocalhousing needsorprioritieswillbeacceptedthrough May 4 ,20 12 ,andmaybesubmittedto:EscambiaConsortium, P.O. Box18178,Pensacola,Florida32523. Forfurtherinformation,contactRandyWilkersonat458 0466(Escambia County),MarcieWhitakerat858 0350(CityofPensacola),orJaniceBooneat 981 707 6(SantaRosaCounty). WilsonB.Robertson AshtonJ.Hayward,III JimWilliamson ,Chairman Chairman,EscambiaCounty Mayor SantaRosaCounty BoardofCountyCommissionersCityofPensa cola BoardofCountyCommissioners Special to the Press GazetteFor the past 12 years, residents from Northwest Florida have made their way to Olivet Baptist Church on Good Friday to enjoy the great southern and country gospel music each year. This year is no different, as many will attend the 13th annual Good Friday Gospel Concert featuring The Hendersons of Milton, Dan Kirkland of Pace, and special guests, New Vision Singers from McKenzie, Ala. The Hendersons, ministering in song for over 22 years, consists of Sonny Henderson, of Milton, his daughter, Lydia Henderson, of Pensacola. Joining the Hendersons for this special event will be Brad Atkinson, of Flomaton, Ala., who was recently a member of The Hendersons. Sonnys wife, Marie, travels with them and serves as sound technician in concerts. The Hendersons recently released their eighth recording on CD, Something Old, Something New and will have them available at the concert. They sing primarily southern and traditional gospel. Their newest release to radio is Just Like That from this newest project. Kirkland travels and sings and is well known in this area who has several recorded projects. He is well liked for his down home sound and he has a way of making the songs come to life where you will want to join in and sing with him. Kirkland also sings a good mix of southern and traditional music. Special guest singers, The New Vision Singers, will come to the concert from McKenzie, Ala., and individually and collectively they have been singing gospel music for several years. The New Vision Singers present a good selection of southern, bluegrass, and traditional gospel music. They are excellent musicians and you will enjoy being in concert with them. This is a very talented family of singers and instrument players. Pastor Frankie Godsey and the members of Olivet Baptist, along with the host group, The Hendersons, invite everyone to come and enjoy this special event each year. No admission fee will be required at the door, but an offering will be received for the expenses of the evening. Doors will open at 6 p.m. for your convenience. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend this special annual event. For further information or directions, contact 850-232-2421, 850-994-1727 or 850-623-2780.Good Friday gospel concert at Olivet Baptist Faith bBRIefsEFS FaithA8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 DAN KIRKlLAND

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A9Wednesday, April 4, 2012

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LocalA10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Special to the Press Gazette Each spring, the Santa Rosa Education Foundation invites every school in the Santa Rosa School District to nominate one teacher for the Santa Rosa Rookie of the Year award. All full-time classroom teachers in their third year or less of teaching are eligible for this award. This includes total teaching experience, not just in Santa Rosa public schools. The following school nominees will be recognized at our 17th Annual Rookie of the Year Reception on May 2 at 4:30 p.m. at B.C. Russell Elementary School. 2012 Rookie of the Year Nominees: Avalon Middle, Josh Pape; Bagdad Elementary, Monica Godwin; Berryhill Administrative Complex, Pamela Ardoin; Berryhill Elementary, Sarah Rhoades; Chumuckla Elementary, Gretchen Wiggins; S.S. Dixon Intermediate, Brian Simmons; S.S. Dixon Primary, Jennifer Warner; East Milton Elementary, Amber Hayen; Gulf Breeze Elementary, Tonya Hickman; Gulf Breeze High, Katharine Edwards; Hobbs Middle, Amie Filbert; Holley Navarre Intermediate, Lisa Carothers; Holley Navarre Middle, Laura Steigerwalt; Holley Navarre Primary, Valerie Coleman; T.R. Jackson Pre-K, Marcia Mayo; Jay Elementary, Lindsay Russell; Jay High, Nickolas Gandy; King Middle, Brett Shepherd; Locklin Technical Center, Catherine Dougherty; Milton High, Jeff Dyer; Navarre High, Christine Pacholl; Oriole Beach Elementary, Whitney Morgan; Pace High, Mark Alexander; Pea Ridge Elementary, Daryl Freeman; W.H. Rhodes Elementary, Heidi Hancock; B.C. Russell Elementary, Joshua Simmons; T.L. Sims Middle, Ashley Flowers; West Navarre Intermediate, Hannah Vincent; West Navarre Primary, Amy Woodcock; Woodlawn Beach Middle, Adrianne Zeiger Awards will be presented at 5 p.m. with the reception open until 5:45 p.m. The Santa Rosa Rookie of the Year 2012 will be announced during the awards presentation and awarded a Sara Caudell Scholarship by the Gulf Breeze Area Chamber of Commerce. Ed Foundation announces nominees for Santa Rosa Rookie of the Year 2012Special to the Press GazetteCongratulations to the 2012 Bunny Scramble winners. Winners of an eight-pound HoneyBaked Ham from the HoneyBaked Ham Company are Berna Faust, Betty Toomey, Tammy Correll, Hollis Kimberl and Nell Allen. This was an awesome promotion and the response was tremendous, said Santa Rosa Press Gazette editor Bill Gamblin. It is the responses to contests like this that make a community newspaper. We appreciate the people with the HoneyBaked Ham Company and all our associate sponsors for the 2012 Bunny Scramble.Bunny Scramble winners announced Photos by Mathew Pellegrino393-3669 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette. com Despite wet conditions, hundreds ocked to the Spring Festival in Bagdad. The festival took place at the First Pentecostal Church in Bagdad from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. The festival offered food, craft items and vendors who sold clothing and collectibles. Spring Fest in Bagdad

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6514016Wise Equipment Sales & Service1147 S. Ferdon Blvd., Crestview, FL 32536 (850) 682-3366 FAIR from page A1be done with the addition of services offered by the Kids House to help those who have been victimized. Hall says he feels abuse has become more prevelant throughout society as a whole because of negative images on the Internet and in movies, drugs and an increasing divorce rate, which makes children more vunerable. Previously, child abuse or neglect was not something many talked about. This is not something easily talked about even today, said Adair Cotton, who is heading up the pinwheel campaign for the Santa Rosa Kids House. By not talking about it or addressing the problem, it has been allowed to ourish. But with efforts like these and the Kids House, the community has become so driven and so acutely aware of the problem. They are helping more. For more information or ways you can help, call 623-1112 or email coordinator@srkidshouse.org.FAIR SCHEDULE LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A11Wednesday, April 4, 2012thing is if we would have done that, we should have done that around 20 years ago since we now have some ranch houses in the area. The thing is, no matter what anyone would want to do in the district, it would have to go before the Milton Historical Board and also approved by the council if they wanted to build a fence, shed, or do any improvements to a home. Even the matter of how many stories a home should be came into question. I am in favor of a lot because what I see is good use of whats available, Mike Davis said. I lived in Spain for four years and the buildings were so close the only place to expand was up. Many people had their business or shop on the ground level and lived above the business. Jorgensen took the votes and is expected to compile the information before presenting the information to Miltons ordinance committee for review and approval. This would be a new district with standards set from the citizens, Jorgensen said. This plan could allow more uses for the property, but those uses would be highly regulative. Current zoning laws in this area of Milton would allow 3.5 homes per acre of land. According to Jorgensen this plan, if approved by the citizens affected, could allow them to decide what goes into their neighborhood. If everybody shows up Saturday and tells me they like things the way they are then I will have a short day, Jorgensen said. But there has been declining property values in the area for some time and properties are aging. This overlay district would not effect current property owners, but it would set a standard for construct if you tear down a building and replace it with another. The city has had two meetings so far on the plan with one drawing 35 residents and a second meeting drawing 15. We have had some who support the concept and others who are against it, Jorgensen said. What we will do on Saturday is ask a series of questions and give the residents a chance to decide how they want this district. ZONE from page A1 ABUSE from page A1 Friday, A A pril 6, This year the fair is putting on a childrens night Open noon to Midnight / Armbands $20 ONE PRICE ALL DAY! Noon to 5 p.m. 18 and under: FREE 19 and over: $5. 5 p.m. to Close 4 and under: Free 5 18: $5 19 and over: $10Saturday, A A pril 7, 2012Open noon to midnight / Armbands $20 ONE PRICE ALL DAY! 4 and under: Free 5 12: $5. 13 and over: $10.Sunday, A A pril 8, 2012Open noon to 8 p.m. / Armbands $15 / Easter $2 off with church bulletin (valid for one entry into the fair only) 4 and under: Free 5 12: $5. 13 and over: $10.Wednesday, A A pril 11, 2012Open 5:pm-10 p.m./Armbands $12. Exceptional Disabilities Night 5-7 p.m. Individuals with disabilities plus one care giver gets in free from 5pm to 7pm 4 and under: Free 5 and over: $5. Everyones a Kid NightThursday, A A pril 12, 2012Open 5-10 p.m. / Armbands $12 / $2 off for Military & Seniors (60) with ID 4 and under: Free 5 12: $5. 13 and over: $10.Friday, A A pril 13, 2012Open 5 p.m. to midnight / Armbands $15 / Full Rodeo 4 and under: Free 5 12 : $5 13 and over: $10Saturday, A A pril 14, 2012Open noon to Midnight / Armbands $20 ONE PRICE ALL DAY! / Full Rodeo 4 and under: Free 5 12: $5 13 and over: $10livestock show allowing children from the area to show off their prized livestock. The animals will be judged and awarded based on different categories. Santa Rosa County Fair has never had a live kids showing of animals before, Paschall said. Thats extremely exciting for us. Not only is the fair boosting its horticulture shows, but also, bringing back shows that showed off exotic animals to crowds in the past. Amazing Rainforest is coming back for another year. The exhibit shows off exotic animals and educates crowds on conservation. We also have a new act called Pets Overboard that uses animals that have been rescued from pounds and shelters those cats and dogs put on an acrobatic show, Pashcall said. Paschall noted that the fair is also bringing back an exhibit that was a huge hit two years ago. Thats right, Simon Says the hypnotist is coming back. He was heavily requested, Paschall said. Not only will there be more acts this year, but Paschall said the fair board decided to break the fair up into two weekends, which is another rst. The fair will start on Friday, April 6 and run until East Sunday. Then the fair will be closed Monday, April 9 and Tuesday, April 10. Then it will reopen on Wednesday and conclude Saturday, April 14. Paschall said that not only will there be more livestock exhibit, but everyones favorite past time will be coming to the fair. Thats right, music is coming to the fair. Starting Friday, the Blackwater Music Festival will come to life offering something for everyone on a different night. Rock and roll music will be featured on Friday, country music on Saturday and then on Easter Sunday, the fair will bring Christian music to the fairgrounds. Were trying to make sure we have a big concert on Sunday for church crowd, Pashall said. Also this coming Sunday, Paschall said the Easter egg hunt is retuning for another year, but this year, its going to be bigger and better. Two years ago, Easter Sunday fell when we were having the fair. We had an Easter egg hunt and had 3500 eggs, Paschall said. That wasnt enough. This year, Paschall said he plans on having double that amount of eggs on the fairground. Of course, all of the favorite fair rides will be returning and the food will be just as good this year. The rodeo will also be returning this year for the bull riding fans. Everything is going to be bigger and better than it was last year, Paschall said. The entertainment is much bigger. We are slowly growing.

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www.srpressgazette.comWednesday, April 4, 2012 ASection SP O RTS Page 12Pensacola BayThursday, April 5 12:26 AM CDT High tide 0.75 Feet 5:23 AM CDT Low tide 0.60 Feet 5:24 AM CDT Moonset 6:32 AM CDT Sunrise 10:51 AM CDT High tide 0.82 Feet 6:15 PM CDT Moonrise 6:46 PM CDT Low tide 0.12 Feet 7:10 PM CDT Sunset Friday, April 6 6:05 AM CDT Moonset 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 10:52 AM CDT High tide 1.06 Feet 2:19 PM CDT Full Moon 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 7:24 PM CDT Moonrise 7:59 PM CDT Low tide -0.08 Feet Saturday, April 7 6:30 AM CDT Sunrise 6:49 AM CDT Moonset 11:19 AM CDT High tide 1.29 Feet 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 8:34 PM CDT Moonrise 9:14 PM CDT Low tide -0.23 Feet Sunday, April 8 6:29 AM CDT Sunrise 7:37 AM CDT Moonset 11:58 AM CDT High tide 1.47 Feet 7:12 PM CDT Sunset 9:44 PM CDT Moonrise 10:33 PM CDT Low tide -0.31 FeetEast Bay Thursday, April 5 1:09 AM CDT High tide 0.90 Feet 5:23 AM CDT Moonset 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 6:39 AM CDT Low tide 0.72 Feet 11:34 AM CDT High tide 0.98 Feet 6:14 PM CDT Moonrise 7:09 PM CDT Sunset 8:04 PM CDT Low tide 0.14 Feet Friday, April 6 6:04 AM CDT Moonset 6:30 AM CDT Sunrise 11:37 AM CDT High tide 1.28 Feet 2:19 PM CDT Full Moon 7:10 PM CDT Sunset 7:23 PM CDT Moonrise 9:17 PM CDT Low tide -0.10 Feet Saturday, April 7 6:29 AM CDT Sunrise 6:47 AM CDT Moonset 12:02 PM CDT High tide 1.55 Feet 7:10 PM CDT Sunset 8:33 PM CDT Moonrise 10:30 PM CDT Low tide -0.27 Feet Sunday, April 8 6:27 AM CDT Sunrise 7:36 AM CDT Moonset 12:43 PM CDT High tide 1.76 Feet 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 9:43 PM CDT Moonrise 11:49 PM CDT Low tide -0.38 FeetBlackwater RiverThursday, April 5 2:05 AM CDT High tide 0.90 Feet 5:24 AM CDT Moonset 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 7:09 AM CDT Low tide 0.72 Feet 12:30 PM CDT High tide 0.98 Feet 6:15 PM CDT Moonrise 7:10 PM CDT Sunset 8:34 PM CDT Low tide 0.14 Feet Friday, April 6 6:04 AM CDT Moonset 6:30 AM CDT Sunrise 12:33 PM CDT High tide 1.28 Feet 2:19 PM CDT Full Moon 7:10 PM CDT Sunset 7:24 PM CDT Moonrise 9:47 PM CDT Low tide -0.10 Feet Saturday, April 7 6:29 AM CDT Sunrise 6:48 AM CDT Moonset 12:58 PM CDT High tide 1.55 Feet 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 8:34 PM CDT Moonrise 11:00 PM CDT Low tide -0.27 Feet Sunday, April 8 6:28 AM CDT Sunrise 7:36 AM CDT Moonset 1:39 PM CDT High tide 1.76 Feet 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 9:44 PM CDT MoonriseNavarre BeachThursday, April 5 2:32 AM CDT Low tide 0.52 Feet 5:23 AM CDT Moonset 6:31 AM CDT Sunrise 9:16 AM CDT High tide 0.83 Feet 3:35 PM CDT Low tide 0.16 Feet 6:14 PM CDT Moonrise 7:09 PM CDT Sunset 11:47 PM CDT High tide 0.69 Feet Friday, April 6 2:32 AM CDT Low tide 0.59 Feet 6:03 AM CDT Moonset 6:30 AM CDT Sunrise 8:24 AM CDT High tide 1.04 Feet 2:19 PM CDT Full Moon 4:47 PM CDT Low tide -0.02 Feet 7:09 PM CDT Sunset 7:23 PM CDT Moonrise Saturday, April 7 6:28 AM CDT Sunrise 6:47 AM CDT Moonset 8:45 AM CDT High tide 1.25 Feet 6:04 PM CDT Low tide -0.16 Feet 7:10 PM CDT Sunset 8:33 PM CDT Moonrise Sunday, April 8 6:27 AM CDT Sunrise 7:35 AM CDT Moonset 9:26 AM CDT High tide 1.42 Feet 7:11 PM CDT Sunset 8:23 PM CDT Low tide -0.26 Feet 9:43 PM CDT Moonrise Tide REPORTBunny Dash 5KOn Saturday, April 7 the University of West Florida will host a Bunny Dash 5K at 8:30 a.m. Community members and students are encouraged to register for this 3.1 mile trail run on the beautiful University of West Florida campus. Community members wishing to participate in the Bunny Dash 5K can register at ACTIVE.COM. Early bird registration is $15 before March 31. The cost then increases to $20. The Bunny Dash 5K is free for UWF students. Students can register at www.uwf. edu/recreation. Overall and divisional winners will receive prizes. Snacks and refreshments will be served at the race. There is a limit of 150 participants.Pace area Chamber of Commerce Golf TournamentThe 13th Annual Pace Area Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament will be April 27 at Stonebrook Golf Course. The Tournament will have a shotgun start at noon. Sponsorship spots and team openings are available. For more information on the tournament call 994-9633.Pace Area Chamber of Commerce/SRMC Fishing TournamentThe Pace Area Chamber of Commerce and Santa Rosa Medical Center will be sponsoring a shing tournament for young persons with disabilities April 28 for 9 a.m. noon. This tournament is for young persons with disabilities only and will be conducted from the banks of Donald Moores pond, at 3337 Harvey Lane. Entry for this tournament is free and a semi-pro bass sherman will assist each sherman. Participants will be awarded medallions for prizes. All proceeds from the event will support Vision of Hope. For more information or to sponsor a young person call 994-9633.Vision of Hope Charity Golf TournamentThe Vision of Hope will host its rst annual Charity Golf Tournament will tee off at 9 a.m. on June 22 at Stonebrook Golf Club in Pace. For more information on the tournament contact Vision of Hope 554-2988 or email visionofhope @att.net. Sports SIDELINE Bagdad native Bubba Watson watches his shot out of a bunker on the ninth hole during a practice round for the Masters golf tournament Monday, April 2, 2012, in Augusta, Ga. As of press time, Watsons tee time and pairings were unavailable. This will be the fourth Masters appearance for the former Milton graduate who rst appeared in 2008. His best nish was in 2008, his rst tournament, when he nished tied for 20th.By BILL GAMBLIN377-4611 | @SRPG_Bill sports@srpressgazette.com There is some good news and some disappointing news in baseball for local fans. The good news for former Pace pitcher Bobby Cassevah is that he is looking at his rst full season with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim as he made the active 25-player roster. For Caleb Gindl, another Pace grad, the news is mixed. The No. 15 prospect in the Milwaukee Brewers organization has made the 2011 National League Champions 40-man roster, but will start the season with the teams AAA af liate Nashville Sounds. Gindl has now got his average to over .300 for his minor league career and is being prospected as a fourth out elder in the Brewers near future. Other prospects to watch include former Pace shortstop Adam Bryant, who nished last season with the Beloit Snappers, the A af liate of the Minnesota Twins. Bryant batted .245 in 59 games and could see a promotion to the AA level sometime soon if the Troy University grad continues to show improvement. Another Pace and Troy grad, pitcher Chris Sorce could see a promotion in his future after his 2011 season with the Seattle Mariners high A af liate the High Desert Mavericks. Sorce nished 2011 with a 5.07 ERA and an 8-12 record after a very slow start. Another Mariner who signed last summer, former Milton out elder Charles Jimenez batted .156 in 14 games for the Seattle in the Arizona rookie league, but bounced around some other leagues as a base stealing threat because of his speed. Fellow Milton grad Brandon Allen nished 2011 with the San Franciso Giants af liate, the SalemKeizer Volcanoes. Allen went 2-8 with a 6.04 ERA, but is expected this season to show a great deal of improvement with another year of experience under his belt. WATSON ROLLS TO AUGUSTAAP PHOTO | Charlie Riedel Locals ready for the real seasonBy BILL GAMBLIN377-4611 | @SRPG_Bill sports@srpressgazette.com Baseball has returned to Pensacola after a one-year absence. The excitement was evident during the run of the Blue Wahoos on Sunday afternoon. Pensacola International Airport was full of excited fans who were awaiting the arrival of the Blue Wahoos, the Double-A af liate of the Cincinnati Reds, from spring training in Arizona. Fans are waiting for the rst pitch on Thursday, when the Blue Wahoos start their season against the Montgomery Biscuits at 7 p.m. at the Blue Wahoos Park It was hard to tell who was more excited Sunday, the fans or owner Quint Studer. Last season would have been hard on me if I didnt know what to expect this year, said Studer, who sold the Pensacola Pelicans in order to buy the Carolina Mudcats of the Southern League. It has been a real good year for us to get a staff in place, as well as a strong foundation for what is to come. The welcome party at the airport Sunday afternoon had a host of individuals and business people. This is great for Pensacola, said Jim Hill, who owns Alternative Health and Foods in Milton. No one realizes the economic boost this will have to Pensacola and the surrounding area. Hill bought season tickets and picked his own seats at Blue Wahoos Park as soon as he heard the Blue Wahoos were coming to the area. The biggest surprise on Sunday was to Blue Wahoos skipper Jim Riggleman. This is neat for the players to see, said Riggleman who has managed the San Diego Padres, Chicago Cubs, Seattle Mariners, and the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals during his career. This speaks to the interest Pensacola has in baseball and how much they love the game. This is just an example of what I think we will see at the park, with great crowds, with a lot of emotions the players can connect with. Being a rst year franchise the Blue Wahoos might come in with a lot of expectations, but Riggleman is very realistic with his goals for 2012. I think in the end all minor league players want to make progress and work together to develop as a team, Riggleman said. They all have a goal to play hard and look to advance to the next level. Blue Wahoos land in Pensacola BOBBY CASSEVAH CALEB GINDL Photos by BILL GAMBLIN | Press GazetteStewart Roberts gets a big hug from Blue Wahoos mascot Kazoo Sunday at Pensacola International Airport as fans await the arrival of the Pensacola Blue Wahoos. A young man and his father get an autograph before the season starts as the Blue Wahoos arrived at the Pensacola International Airport on Sunday. Blue Wahoos Manager Jim Riggleman shares a moment with fan Terry Williams after arriving at Pensacola International Airport.

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LIFESTYLE www.srpressgazette.comWednesday, April 4, 2012 BSectionBy MATHEW PELLEGRINO393-3669 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com Students and parents alike got a funlled day on Saturday thanks to the inaugural Bagdad Bulldog Bash. The event was held at Bagdad Recreational Park and invited Bagdad Elementary School students and their families to join into a handful of activities. The sky cleared up for the start of the festival, but the heat didnt stop the fun. Students paid a cheap rate to acquire tickets they could use at a number of booths. Pie the principal was one of the more popular booths. Bagdad Elementary School children were able to practice using their throwing arms by throwing a pie at their principal Linda Gooch. There were also in atable rides, a coconut toss and face painting to fuel the day. ABOVE: A Bagdad Elementary student attempts to walk on water at one of the attractions at Saturdays Bagdad Bulldog Bash. TOP CENTER: Blake Maloney takes a shot at one of the many games at the festival on Saturday. TOP RIGHT: Children were given all the sugar they could eat and popcorn to go along with it at the festival. RIGHT: Bradlee Gibson, 4, rings a root beer for himself at the festival on Saturday. Page 1BULLDOG BASHPhotos by MATHEW PELLEGRINO | Press Gazette LEFT: Bagdad Elementary School principal Linda Gooch takes a pie in the face from one of her students as part of the activities at the inaugural Bagdad Bulldog Bash. ABOVE: Clayton Culpepper lands a ball in a mini sh tank on Saturday. BELOW LEFT: A father-daughter trio takes a swing at the coconut toss at Saturdays festival. BELOW: A Bagdad Elementary student gets his face painted at the Bagdad Bulldog Bash on Saturday.

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LocalB2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012City of Milton meetingsCity of Miltons City Council will meet in regular session on April 10 at 5 p.m. in the Council Chambers at Milton City Hall. For more information, contact the city managers ofce at 983-5411. All meetings are open to the public.Pace Fire Rescue District FundraiserThe Pace Fire Rescue District is sponsoring a fundraiser this year. This fundraiser goes toward the departments Benevolent Fund, which is set up to help the families who lost their home due to re. It is also used for, during hardship times, re department members and families that the department gives owers, food, etc. This is the only fundraiser the department does each year. The department appreciates all the donations they receive and hope that you will do a portrait or donate to this cause. The fundraiser will go from March to June of this year. If you have any questions you can call the department at 994-6884.Clean Community Announces Great American Clean-Up ScheduleThe Santa Rosa Clean Community System has announced the upcoming April schedule for the Great American Clean-Up, part of a nation-wide effort of Keep America Beautiful. On April 4 and 5 there will be a Paint Your Heart Out by the One Love group. This group is a effort by area churches to come together and complete community projects in the rst week of April. On April 14, there will be a community wide cleanup in Navarre. Groups and Individuals will meet at the Navarre Park on Highway 98 at the foot of the Navarre Beach bridge. The event will last from 8 a.m. to noon, and will be sponsored by Waste Management. Through out the month, the focus of the Milton and Pace area will be targeted clean-ups and working on the Rivenbark House and Firemans Recycling Station at the corner of Stewart Street and Berryhill Road. This project will be done in partnership with United Way, with a Paint Your Heart Out scheduled for Saturday, April 21. Groups and individuals interested in participating should contact the Clean Community System at 623-1930.Green-Up Celebrates Spring with SaleGreen-Up Santa Rosa will kick-off spring with a month long 10 percent off sale on all plants in the nursery. The sale will run through the month of April. There is a wide variety of trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and hanging baskets at the two acre nursery, which is located at 6758 Park Ave. in Milton. Green-Up is a program of the Santa Rosa Clean Community System, and all proceeds go back into the community in support of its programs. Currently, the system is working on the Firemans Recycling Station in Milton and educational gardens at the new Sonnier Education Center. Hours of operation are Tuesday through Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 623-1930.National Active and Retired Federal EmployeesThe National Active and Retired Federal Employees (NARFE), Chapter 917, will hold their regular monthly meeting Thursday, April 5, at 10:45 a.m. at Ryans Restaurant in Pace. All active or retired federal employees are invited to attend. The speaker will be announced later. After a short business meeting there will be a Dutch-treat lunch. For more information call 626 2569.Healthy State Coalition of Santa Rosa CountyThe Healthy Start Coalition of Santa Rosa County, Inc., will meet at 4 p.m. April 9. This will be a general board meeting at its ofce at 5907 Berryhill Road, in Milton. For more information call 626-6751.Santa Rosa Tea Party Patriots to MeetMonday, April 9 at 6 p.m., Pastor Carl Gallups, host of Freedom Friday on WEBY AM Radio, will speak to the Santa Rosa Tea Party Patriots. The meeting will be held at The Milton Community Center on Byrom St. Pastor Gallups will speak on The Obama Fraud and will cover Sheriff Arapaios information, Obamas false birth certicate, the Constitutional and Law Enforcement ramications, and what we can do as patriots and citizens. Come hear the facts before you form an opinion about this subject. Pastor Gallups has well documented his information; you will want to hear it. There will be an opportunity for questions and answers. Invite a friend to attend this special meeting. If you have any questions, please call 994-7548.Wacky Dog ShowPrimarica Milton will host its rst ever Wacky Dog Show. This event is a fundraiser for the Milton Relay for Life with three divisions of competition best in show, most talented, and two peas in a pod (pet and animal look-a-like contest). The show will be April 14 at 2 p.m. at the Primerica Ofces on Highway 90. Early registration is $8, day of event $12, and pet photos are $6. For more information call 626-7188.Rock Holiness Cemetery Board MeetingFamily members and friends of loved ones buried at the Rock Holiness Cemetery are invited to attend the annual meeting on Saturday, April 14 at 10 a.m. at the church located on Upper Creek Road in Flomaton, Ala. The Rock Church is located on the cemetery grounds about one half mile from Highway 31 on the right side of Upper Creek Road, up a steep hill. Look for the sign to the private driveway. Please come. This is an important meeting. We need to elect a new board member. Navarre Spring Fling Call to VendorsThe Navarre Garden Club will host our annual Spring Fling on Friday, April 20, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. held at the Navarre Conference Center. We are actively seeking vendors for outside booths. The fee for a space is $40 and will accommodate a 10-foot-by10-foot tent. Space is limited; please call to reserve your. Please contact, Margaret Russell 850-382-1671 or mvrrussell@gmail.com.Purple Heart meetingThe Military Order of the Purple will be holding its monthly meeting Saturday, April 21 at 11 a.m., at the West Milton Church of Christ in Pace. A meal will be served following the meeting for a donation. All Purple Heart Recipients and their spouses are welcome and encouraged to attend. Call Eustice Shiver, Commander of Military Order of the Purple Heart Chapter 566 at 994-3880, cell 791-1175 or for the Ladies Auxiliary Military Order of the Purple Heart, President Judy Shiver at 791-1176.Bagdad Village Preservation Association to host Spring Music GalaFollowing the success of our sold-out Christmas Gala, the Bagdad Village Preservation Association is proud to announce our Spring Music Gala featuring music from the era of Casablanca. Mark your calendars for April 28, an event that promises to be both elegant and delightful. The gala will honor the 70th Anniversary of the Academy Award winning lm starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman. The Bagdad Village Museum will be transformed and you will be welcomed into Ricks Caf Amricain. There will only be one performance on the evening of Saturday, April 28, beginning at 7 p.m. The evening will begin with a champagne and hor doeuver reception with a Moroccan air. Jazz vocalist Kathy Lyons will take you back in time with great music of the 1930s and 40s from Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin, and other greats. The evening will end with a dessert extravaganza. Tickets for this black tie optional event are $35 per person and will be limited to sixty guests. All proceeds will benet the Bagdad Village Preservation Association. To reserve your tickets contact Elaine Willis at 850-6233288. For more information visit www. bagdadvillage.org. BIRTHDAYS: AAPRIL 4 6Ruby Laughbaum April 4 Amya ShotoApril 5 Kristen LewisApril 6 News brBRIefsEFS

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MVOP misdemeanor violation of probation FVOP felony violation of probation Agg aggravated Poss possession Meth methamphetamine DUI driving under the inuence DWLSR driving while license suspended or revoked FTA failure to appear FTR failure to register SF sentenced felony SM sentenced misdemeanor LEO law enforcement ofcer DV Domestic ViolenceThe following arrests were made beginning March 11-12.March 11Bell, Barney Dean; Male; 28; 8800 Byron Campbell Rd., Pace; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Chapel, Tyler James; Male; 20; 14064 Palm St., Madeira Beach, Fla.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Collins, Sophia Len; Female; 34; 1200 Tecumseh Trail, Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Hinson, Christopher Lee; Male; 23; WinstonSalem, N.C.; Arson Second Degree. Holmes, John David; Male; 30; 7709 N. Hillburn Rd., Pensacola; Synthetic Narcotics Sell Schedule I or II. Hudson, Latangle Lafay; Female; 32; 7965 Lambert Lane, Milton; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Huie, Steven Wayne; Male; 34; 13328 Highway 89, Jay; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended Second Offense; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use. Lamarche, Gregory David; Male; 32; no address given; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense (3 counts). Lewis, Melisha Lynn; Female; 31; 112 Bayliss Court, Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Lothrop, Trishann Danett; Female; 35; 4145 Ermine Lane, Milton; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300; Larceny Commit Theft Resist Recovery of Property; Larceny Use Antishoplifting Control Device Countermeasure. Pate, Adam Gentry; Male; 26; 8459 Laredo St., Navarre; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Power, Wayne Mitchell; Male; 44; Gentry Farm, Milton; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use; Drug Possession Listed Chemical for Manufacture of Controlled Substance; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended; Marijuana Possession Not More Than 20 Grams. Sanchez, Amarilis Cecilia; Female; 19; 6 Georgia Dr., Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Stuller, Brian Alexander; Male; 19; 601 N. Faireld Dr., Pensacola; Public Order Crimes Criminal Attempt to Solicit Conspiracy Third Degree Burglary; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Taylor, Max Parker; Male; 18; 934 Aquamarine Dr., Gulf Breeze; Public Order Crimes Criminal Attempt to Solicit Conspiracy Third Degree Burglary; Burglary Occupied Dwelling Unarmed; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less $300. Tooley, John David; Male; 43; 166 Hibbert, Mesa, Ariz.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Urmenyhazi, Haylie May; Female; 21; 3251 Highcraft, Pawtown, N.C.; Arson Second Degree. Warrick, Tyler Blake; Male; 18; 5305 English Oak Dr., Pace; Flee Elude Police Flee With Disregard of Safety to Persons or Property; Assault On Ofcer, Fireghter, EMT, Etc.; Vehicle Theft Grand Theft of Motor Vehicle. Williams, Milton Gregory; Male; 47; 1129 Alachua Ave., Tallahassee, Fla.; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense (2 counts). Benton, Christopher Todd; Male; 41; 1821 Chipindale Rd., Cantonment, Fla.; Dealing in Stolen Property (2 counts). Daniels, Shanita Nicole; Female; 31; 813 Bloodworth Lane, Pensacola; Damage Property Criminal Mischief $1,000 or More. Lapaugh, Michael Gerard; Male; 20; 1452 Whisper Bay Boulevard, Gulf Breeze; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Methamphetamine; Marijuana Possession Not More Than 20 Grams. Sell, Malissa Lee; Female; 39; 7988 Sleepy Bay Boulevard, Navarre; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Obstruct Police Possession of Concealed Handcuff Key While in Custody; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Meth. Touchstone, Justin Daniel; Male; 19; 7857 Siesta Cove, Milton; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Trafc Offense Refuse to Submit to DUI Test After License Suspended; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended First Offense; Drug Possession Controlled Substance without prescription including meth. Sampson, Aaron James; Male; 21; 31 Sixth St., Shalimar, Fla.; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Gioxaris, Manos; Male; 36; 136 Scottwood Dr., Fort Walton Beach, Fla.; Trafc offense DUI alcohol or drugs. Ray, Tamara Denise; Female; 45; 4836 Galliver Cutoff, Holt, Fla.; Trafc offense DUI alcohol or drugs. Sell, Malissa Lee; Female; 39; 7988 Sleepy Bay Boulevard, Navarre; Trafc offense DUI alcohol or drugs. Touchstone, Justin Daniel; Male; 19; 7857 Siesta Cove, Milton; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Trafc Offense Refuse to Submit to DUI Test after License Suspended.March 12Addison, Rachel Whitney; Female; 24; 6617 Grace St., Milton; Crimes Against Person Corrupt by Threat Public Servant or Family. Arnold, David Renard; Male; 25; 1112 Magnolia Dr., Tallahassee, Fla.; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended Third or Subsequent Offense. Black, Kardale Lamar; Male; 22; Concordia St., Pensacola; Robbery Carjacking With rearm or Weapon. Blevins, Shirley Ann; Female; 57; 4565 Kelly Lane, Gulf Breeze; Cocaine Possession; Drug Equipment Possession and or Use. Gregory, Ariel; Male; 44; 5850 E. Milton Rd., Milton; Health Safety Prevent Hinder Fireghter or Equipment. Jenkins, Marquise Demetris; Male; 18; 7750 Auntrainer Ave., Pensacola; Robbery Carjacking with Firearm or Weapon. Kluss, Terry Stanley; Male; 44; 4399 Sundance Way, Holt, Fla.; Damage Property criminal mischief $1,000 or more; Burglary dwelling or structure cause damage over $1,000; Larceny take copper other metal interfere damage utility. Martinez, Juan Jose; Male; 18; 2203 Lunetta St., Navarre; Liquor Possession By Person Under 21 Years of Age First Offense; Damage Property Criminal Mischief Over $200 Under $1,000; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Trespassing structure or conveyance; Larceny petit theft Second Degree rst offense; Resist ofcers obstruct without violence; loitering or prowling. 9137678 Ft. Walton (850) 244-0989 Crestview (850) 682-4540Pensacola (850) 477-4977 Gulf Breeze (850) 934-0077 Pace (850) 994-0662 www.PensacolaPools.comRP#0031244 start saving today! or News Tips WELCOMEDE-mail IDEAS to: news@srpressgazette.comCall 623-2120 Law EnforcementSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B3Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Sheriffs REPORT

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LocalB4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012To celebrate 10 years of honoring Best Restored Beaches Across America, the American Shore & Beach Preservation Association is asking anyone who loves the beach to pick the Best of the Best Restored Beaches from a list of past restored beach award winners. Santa Rosa County is urging everyone to vote for Navarre Beach as Best Community Beach by casting your vote every day from now until April 27 at www.asbpa.org/about_us/ about_us_best_restored_ beach_2012_community. htm. Voters also can visit www.santarosa..gov for a link to the voting site. For more than 40 years, beach restoration has been the preferred method of shore protection in coastal communities on the east, west and Gulf coasts. Beach restoration is the process of placing beach-quality sand on dwindling beaches to reverse or offset the effects of erosion. Navarre Beach was one of four beaches nationwide selected for 2010. For this best of the best competition, nominees are placed in one of three categories and compete by region: Urban beaches: This includes highly developed beaches, including intensely developed areas with high-rise condos and resorts. Community beaches: This includes less densely developed beaches backed by low-rise or single-family dwellings. Park/habitat beaches: This includes areas that undertake beach nourishment solely for habitat restoration and park projects. These can be in remote regions or in the middle of a city. Starting March 30, everyone can vote for Navarre Beach online. You can even leave a comment about what makes your favorite beach so special to you. You can vote once every 24 hours, all the way to April 27, and you can even see how your favorite beach is doing every time you visit. Once voting closes, we will tally up the results and name a Best-of-theBest Beach in each of the three categories, as well as the top vote-getter in each of seven geographic regions. Winners will be announced in mid-May, and they all will be honored at a special ceremony next spring during the ASBPAs annual Coastal Summit in Washington, D.C. Complete descriptions of each of the beaches in the running for Best-ofthe-Best Beach are available at www.asbpa.org. The three main reasons for restoration are: Storm protection: a wide sandy beach helps separate storm waves from upland structures and infrastructure. Habitat restoration: numerous species rely on wide, healthy beaches as a place to live, feed and nest. Recreation: Americas beaches have twice as many visitors annually as all of Americas national parks combined. Every year, there are more than 2 billion visitors to Americas beaches. In 2007, beaches contributed $322 billion to the Americas economy. More importantly, for every dollar the federal government spends on beach nourishment, it gets an estimated $320 back in tax revenues. During times of economic hardship, the beach can be an even more desirable vacation destination than other domestic and foreign alternatives, offering families and visitors an accessible and affordable getaway. It is also an employment and tax generator: M ore than twice as many people visit Americas coasts as visit our state and national parks, all of them combined. E ach year, govern ments take in $320 in taxes from beach tourists for every dollar it spends on beach restoration. W ell over half of the nations gross domestic product ($7.9 trillion) is generated in 673 counties along the oceans and Great Lakes, according to NOAAs National Ocean Economics Program. 2075763 Navarre Beach in running for Best of the Best Restored Beaches Photos by KENNY WILDEr R | Special to the Press GazetteNavarre Beach is shown before (left) and after restoration.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B5Wednesday, April 4, 2012

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LocalB6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012By MATHEW PELLEGRINO393-3669 | @SRPG_Mat mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com The University of West Florida could be the cherry tree capital of the south. UWF is now home to 100 rare trees that are iconic to the nations capital. To celebrate the centennial of the planting of the rst cherry tree in Washington, D.C., 36 cities across the nation, including Pensacola, were given the opportunity to do some planting of their own. Pensacola was chosen as the state location for the 2012 Japan-U.S. Cherry Blossom Centennial celebration by the Japanese consulate general in Miami, Eiichi Kawahara. One-hundred cherry trees were donated to the school to be planted. They were planted near the main entrance to the campus in front of the Japan House. Kawahara, the consul general at Miamis Japanese consulate, said the location for the trees was chosen because of the weather in the area. Kawahara said the trees dont tend to ourish in the lower part of the state where its much more humid and hot. UWF has been chosen as the only place in the state to mark the anniversary, said UWF President Judy Bense. The anniversary comes 100 years after President William Howard Taft and rst lady Helen Taft helped plant the rst cherry trees to touch U.S. soil in Washington, D.C. A ceremony was held at the schools music hall to commemorate the 100-year celebration and to mark the planting of the trees. I can think of no better place to put these trees than on the campus of the University of West Florida, Congressman Jeff Miller said. The trees are not expected to bloom this year, but will bloom in the spring of 2013, said Bart Hudson, CEO and president of the Florida House. The university in Pensacola has been known to open its arms to the Japanese community. Bense said this is an even stronger symbol that the bond between the two communities is getting stronger. We must prepare our students to live in a global environment, Bense said. The university has already opened its arms up to its Japanese friends. It has been home to a foreign exchange program that helps bring Japanese college students to the campus to experience life in Florida. At the centennial celebration inside the schools music hall, local representatives and nationally recognized individuals spoke about the cherry trees they had seen so many times before in Washington, D.C. During the spring when they bloom, the trees ourish their pink and white owers that look similar to the blooms on a Dogwood tree, Bense said. I remember watching the Dogwood trees blossom it almost looks like its snowing, Bense said. Shelly Bolton, a UWF junior, attended the ceremony inside the music hall. She said she once visited Washington, D.C., to see the cherry trees bloom. I know that once these bloom, this campus is going to look beautiful, Bolton said. You dont see these trees every day. Thats why people go to Washington, D.C., to see them. Milton native Jessica Marie Sunday was chosen as Floridas 2011 Cherry Blossom Princess. Sunday lives in Washington, D.C., and came to UWF for the tree planting ceremony. UWF plants cherry trees Photos by MATHEW PELLEGRINO | Press Gazette AAbove, UWF president Judy Bense speaks to a room full of spectators to announce the planting of cherry trees on Friday. AAt top, the newly planted cherry trees encompass the Japan House campus and the entrance of the University of West Florida. AAbove left, Fusataka Homma performs Shizuka Gozen in Funabenkei during the cherry tree ceremony at the UWF music hall.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B7Wednesday, April 4, 2012 6010894 Pace FL 32571Next to CiCis PizzaSurprizes Inside

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ClassifiedsB8| Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com

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ClassifiedsWednesday, April 4, 2012 Santa Rosas Press Gazette |B9 The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. (Part-time positions have 401(k) plan options). ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVESThe News Herald and the News Herald.com continue to expand. We are looking for highly motivated, energetic sales people. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Available Positions: Territory Sales Representative Digital Sales RepresentativeRequired Skills Highly motivated and results driven Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook) Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment Effective time management and organization skills Excellent verbal and written communication skills Keen attention to detail The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required Experience To be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of outside sales and/or online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience.SALES/RETENTION CLERK We are seeking an eager part-time telephone sales clerk to sell and/or retain home delivery and single copy circulation. Essential duties include providing excellent customer service, pleasant telephone voice, and outbound dialing. Quali ed candidates will have general of ce experience, sales experience and computer skills. High School Diploma or equivalent is required and one year of customer service experience. This is a parttime position with hour pay, plus commission and bene ts.CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVEWe are seeking an ambitious part-time Customer Service Representative who will actively answer phones and participate in the everyday work and special projects. This position is the primary link between current and potential subscribers and the newspaper. You will handle general of ce work and maintain subscriber and non-subscriber database. Quali ed candidate will have a High School diploma or equivalent and one year of customer service experience. Candidate should have a basic understanding of of ce machines such as calculator, printers, fax machine, computer and internet skills and able to sit for 8 hour shifts. On time attendance during scheduled time is critical in this role as well as working some holidays and weekend shifts.Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: The News HeraldCareers Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! References Available 850-995-0009 Can You Dig It? We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator. (866)362-6497 J & N LAWN SERVICE Complete Lawn Service & Debris Removal Call For Free Estimate Very Reasonable Price Licensed & Insured 850-791-0861 Stewarts Tractor Works & Land Clearing, Inc. Tree & Stump Removal from trimming to takedown. Debris removal & Storm Clean-Up. Demolition & Hauling. Land Clearing. Backhoe & Trackhoe Work. Heavy Brush & Forestry Mowing. Tree work done by man lift. 516-1801 or 675-4291 Licensed & Insured Free Estimates PAUL STEWART ALLIED FARMSWe Deliver & Install Call us first, Save Time Call us last, Save MoneyHwy. 87 So. Milton626-85788600311 HYDROSEED Centipede St. Augustine BermudaBailed Pine Straw 8+/-Acs. in East Milton, Hickory Hammock Road Lots: Pond Creek Misty Lake Drive, some waterfront. Call after 4 p.m. 850-593-6015 850-718-6644 (cell) weekends only 20 Acres-Live On Land NOW!! Only $99/mo. $0 Down, Owner Financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. (800)755-8953 www. sunsetranches.com Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 4 BR 1 Bath $695 mo $650 Security CH/A, Gas Heat Ask for Barbara 850-626-8959 Cell 850-377-6787 6012 Savannah Dr Milton. 3 br/1 ba, inside utitilites, CH/A, all elec. No Dogs. $795 mth. $500 dep. 748-1819 2 Br with A/C, front and back porch. Private lot. No Pets. 623-5145 3 bedroom FEMA mobile home. Porch with fenced in yard. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch 626-8973 Clean 2 br/1 ba partly furn. Water & garbage inc. starting at $350 and up a mth/$300 dep. & No Pets. 675-6614 Milton (Bruce Lane) Incl. water, garbage & lawn service. 2/2 for $450 month. 2/2 for $350 month. Senior Discount. 261-8193 or 698-4582 Mobile Home with land, ready to move in, great value. Approx 1500 sq ft, 3Br 2Ba serious offers only, no renters. Call (850)308-6473 Training/Education/Educ ationWant to be a CNA?Dont want to wait? Express Training Services is now offering our nursing asst. exam prep classes in DESTIN Class for 1 week. 850-502-5521expresstraining services.com Next class 4/09/2012 HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Great Benefits and Pay! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. -Tanker Training Available. Call Today: (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Logistics/TransportExperienced CDL-A DriversJoin Our Dedicated Fleet of Professional Drivers TODAY in the Pensacola Area. ****************** -Odometer Mileage Pay ($50,000 plus per year) -2012 Tractors -Dedicated Product -Out & Back -Stop/Detention Pay -Home Weekly-Typically 48 Hrs. -Premium-Free Family Health insurance MUST HAVE Minimum of 2 Yrs. Verifiable Tractor/Trailer Exp. Teams Welcome to Apply ****************** J & M Company Call Neal or Bill 800.477.6555 M-F, 7am-5pm Web ID#: 34202841 Maintenance position open for 60 bed retirement center, Please have experience in maintenance. Come to 5544 Swanner Road to submit application. MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! $0 Tuition Cost No Credit Check Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required Call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST.com LIVE-WORKPARTYPLAY! Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. (866)574-7454 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165 www. CenturaOnline.com WANTED: 4-ton self contained AC for mobile home needed for the organ player at the church. 626-8973. 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now! Become a driver for Schneider National! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in just 3 weeks! (888)368-1964 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in just 3 weeks! (888)368-1964 Apply Now, 13 Drivers Top 5% Pay & Benefits 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com/driv e Class-A FlatBed Drivers$-Home EVERY Weekend, Run S.E. US REQUIRES 1Yr OTR F.B. Exp, & pay UP TO .39/mile Call (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC Drivers -New Freight for Refrigerated & Dry Van lanes. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Vets welcome. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE All New Happy Jack Kennel Dip II: kills, fleas, ticks, stable flies & MANGE mites without steroids. Biodegradeable. Mannings Feed & Seed (850-623-2426)www.happyjackinc.com 4x8 Red Paver Bricks 50 each 380-2928 Mahogany Dinning Set Table, Chairs, Hutch & Buffet $2000. Queen Sofa $250. Coffee Table $100. Call 380-2928 BOOK SALE SAT 8 am On The Porch 5152 Pike St. Milton Hwy. 90 & Canal St Choice of Thousands Paper and Hardbacks Fict/NonFict/Bk. List CrestviewUp to 80% offToby Booths Only Indoor/Outdoor Yard Sale in Forever Victorian (398-8899) Main Street. Open Tues-Sat. Showcases, Book cases, Store fixtures AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 3/340 RESOLUTION WHEREAS, Richard Jette, PETITIONED the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, to vacate, abandon, discontinue and renounce any interest and right of the public in and to the following described property to-wit: The west end of Cooleys Drive in Pace Heights Subdivision lying between lots 9 and 10 as described in Plat Book B, page 14 AND WHEREAS, The Board of County Commissioners determined to have a public hearing for the purpose of considering the advisability of vacating and abandoning said rights-of-way, and WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners have on this the 22nd day of March, 2012, conducted said public hearing in conformity to the said publication of their intent, and WHEREAS, after hearing all comments concerning said vacation of the above described rights-of-way, the Board, being fully advised, and it being determined that the public interest will be best served and protected by vacating and abandoning said rights-of-way, therefore, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, that the said rights-of-way as herein set out and described are hereby vacated and any and all interest to the public shall revert to and be vested in the proper owners thereof. APPROVED AND ADOPTED by a vote of 5 yeas, 0 nays, and 0 absent, of the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, this 22nd day of March, 2012. 4/4/2012 3/340 3/339 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL REBUILD Northwest Florida has issued a Request for Proposal (RFG) for construction management services for its Residential Wind Retrofit Program in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. The full RFP is available on REBUILDSs web site. http://www.rebuildnwf.org/ 4/4/2012 3/339 3/338 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON April 24, 2012 at 11:00 AM UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit: 419 Jeff Chamell: Refrigerator, golf clubs, boxes & misc. STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 4/4, 4/11, 2012 3/338 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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LocalB10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE850-995-8778 STORE HOURS: 7AM 9PM 7 DAYS AWEEK Sales Prices Good through April 10, 2012 4 5 6 78910 MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT SUN Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses.8604387Vlasic Kosher Spears17424 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Greens8827 oz Sunshine Maintenance Dog Food162950 lb Tampico Fruit Drinks1401 gal Sale Good Through April10, 2012 Vine Ripe Large Tomatoes79lb 2 Liter Pepsi139 Frito-Lay Multi Packs57320 19-20 oz Blue Bell Ice Cream4181/2 Gal Shurfine Brown n Serve Rolls9912 ct Farmland St Louis Style Pork Spareribs233lb Hillshire Farm Ultra Thin Ham, Turkey or Chicken2939 oz pk Cooks 1/2 Spiral Sliced Ham181lb Bar S Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna11816 oz Hillshire Smoked Sausage, Pork, Beef or Polish24114 oz Ball Park Jumbo Franks16516 oz Boston Butt Pork Roast 2-Pack120lb Family Pack Country Style Ribs145lb Cooks Shank Portion Smoked Ham115lb Fresh Frozen Turkey Breast148lb Golden Ripe Large Sweet Cantaloupes197ea Family Pack Pork Steaks145lb Royal Whole Smoked Hams163lb US #1 Red Potatoes1955 lb bag Southern Grown Fresh Snap Beans77lb Liberty Gold Pineapple468 oz Pride of Illinois Very Small Sweet Peas6015 oz Hungry Jack Mashed Potatoes12515.5 oz Maxwell House Coffee82734.5 oz Betty Crocker Cake Mixes10616-18 oz

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FREE FREEWednesday April 4, 2012 FREE EDITION TAKE ONE By CINDY McNATT Freedom News Service There is more than one way to roll with succulents. You dont need to plant them in the ground directly. Succulents can tolerate all kinds of situations in gift arrangements and bouquets where theyll be happy for weeks before the fresh owers fade or the plant outgrows its gifty environment. In fact, the eshier succulents with fat stems can live for months in oral foam. I made succulent centerpieces for a wedding a few years back, and the echeverias not only rooted in the foam, they lived a long time with water and an occasional feed. Use succulents like cut owers in all kinds of arrangements from big juicy bouquets, tinier candlestick arrangements, mixed with cut owers in water or oral foam, or planted as singles in unique containers. Theyre ne gifts for your favorite hostess, soonto-be bride, new mother in your life or for the mother you have always had. The recipient needs only to plant the succulent at a later time.BOUQUETWe found a rustic urn we liked and lled it with mixed silver succulents and pale pink roses. Saturated oral foam went in the urn rst. Then we tucked in rooted echeveria rosettes, removing them from their pots and poking them in front of the urn. Pink roses went in next. We used silver kalanchoe stems as ller. Once the owers fade, the succulents can be planted in the garden with roots, or in the case of the kalanchoe stems, without roots. The bonus gift: The urn can be reused forever.CANDLESTICKSOn close inspection, youll notice these arent candlesticks at all, but champagne utes. We lled them with water, added blue echeveria stems, pale green viburnum owers and miniature agave striata. To nish, we poked white tapers into the narrow neck of the utes.TEACUPThis was too easy. We placed saturated oral foam in a small teacup, poked in plump cotyledon stems and lled with white owers. Its a twofer: The teacup keeps on giving and so do the succulents, when planted in the garden.REFRIGERATOR MAGNETDrill the center of a wine cork. Glue a magnet on the backside. Poke a bit of potting soil in the cork and a sprig of your favorite succulent. Needs to be watered at least once a week, and the succulent should be planted outside after a few months.QUICK GIFTSUse candle votives as small containers for succulent gifts. A teaspoon or two of potting soil will keep a succulent cutting happy for a month or two. Longer-stem succulents are happy in water with cut ower companions. The succulents can be planted in pots or the garden after the owers fade.PHOTOS BY KATE LUCAS | Freedom News ServiceSucculents can be tucked in a vase or even embedded in a cork to make a fridge magnet. At right, champagne utes hold cut succulents and white taper candles, and would look beautiful on a dinner table. Below, a pretty teacup lled with oral foam is the foundation for cut succulents that can later be planted outdoors or potted as indoor houseplants. At top, a rustic urn lled with silvery succulents and pale pink roses makes a gift, centerpiece or display. Hardy plants make long-lasting bouquets and centerpieces, then can go into the garden Seattle plans for a harvestable food forest SEATTLE (AP) A plot of grass sits in the middle of Seattle, feet from a busy road and on a hill that overlooks the citys skyline. But its no ordinary patch of green. Residents hope it will become one of the countrys largest food forests. The park, which will start at 2 acres and grow to 7, will offer city dwellers a chance to pick apples, plums and other crops right from the branch. I think its a great opportunity for the people of Seattle to be able to connect to the environment, said Maureen Erbe, who walked her two dogs next to the plot on a recent overcast day. Would she pluck some fruits from the forest? Heck yes, I love a good blueberry. Youre not from Seattle if you dont like a good blueberry, she said. For health-conscious and locally-grownfood-loving Seattle, the park is a new step into urban agriculture. Cities from Portland, Ore., to Syracuse, N.Y., already have their own versions. In Syracuse, for example, vacant lots were turned into vegetable gardens to be tended by local teens. Seattle already is dotted with community gardens the city helps maintain. Farmers markets also ourish in many neighborhoods, bringing in vendors from around the state to sell everything from tulips to farm-fresh duck eggs to pricey loaves of bread. Residents raise chickens in backyards and plant their own vegetables. The more dedicated ones have goats and forage around the city one woman even eats neighborhood squirrels. When a group of people interested in sustainable gardening brought the idea of a food forest for the Beacon Hill neighborhood to city of cials in 2010, the city-volunteer effort began. That year, city of cials had declared it the year of urban agriculture. The plot is in one of the citys oldest neighborhoods. Next to it is a sports park, a driving range and a lawn bowling club. The food forest would be next to a heavily used road and near many apartment complexes. Seattle gets the big picture and so the focus on local food actions is a collaborative one, said Laura Raymond of the citys community garden program. The department has allocated $100,000 for the rst phase of the park, roughly a 2-acre plot. The land is owned by the citys utility and through an inter-agency agreement will be developed at no land cost. Raymond said the city hasnt veri ed it, but the forest might become the biggest one in the country. Glenn Herlihy, who helped create the parks initial designs, believes it can grow to that size. Herlihy studies permaculture, a land management technique See FOOD FOREST A3

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A2 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, April 4, 2012 PHILADELPHIA (AP) Vertigo, the decidedly more sophisticated and adult imprint of DC Entertainment, kept its mix of the weird, wild and outright fantastic going in March with four series and a new application that lets readers buy comic books online. The dedicated app serves as a gateway for the imprints series of titles that have stretched the boundaries of comic book storytelling with work from Neil Gaiman (Sandman) and Brian Wood (DMZ), along with new titles available digitally the same day theyre on sale in comic shops. The rst is Fairest, a new title from Bill Willingham. Its a spinoff from his popular and ongoing Fables series, which focuses on characters from folklore that have been forced to live in New York City among regular humans. Fairest itself ... is taking each of these fairest in all the land characters that so heavily populate Fables and giving each one of them a turn to shine on their own and show what theyre made of in their own adventures and accomplishments and failings, Willingham said of the title, which is illustrated by Phil Jimenez. Thats part of Vertigos goal, to proffer stories that are a step, or ve, ahead of traditional capes and villains. Paul Cornell, whose series Saucer Country debuted in March with art by Ryan Kelly, said it was why he pitched his idea about a New Mexico governor running for president who is abducted by aliens. Its X-Files meets The West Wing. Its a political thriller with added aliens, he said. Obviously Vertigo is its ideal home. Another title is Dominique Laveau: Voodoo Child, written by author Selwyn Seyfu Hinds, which focuses on New Orleans and its mythology. I wanted the book and the characters to feel grounded and rooted in the salt of the earth, he said of the title illustrated by Denys Cowan and John Floyd. Were going to be delving deeper into the grit and grime of the city; the people, the music, the mythology. Dan Abnett takes on Edwardian England, where zombie outbreaks caused the upper crust to embrace vampirism, spawning The New Deadwardians. Although I love stories about vampires and zombies, I had, as a professional writer, felt that theyd been done to death, he said. When the Deadwardians popped in my head I just had this vision of this world and knew that unfortunately, I was going to have to pitch someone a vampire story. NEW YORK (AP) Eleven-year-old John Payne has been a student of the Titanic since kindergarten. He has scrupulously researched the ship, built a model out of Lego freehand and successfully lobbied his fth-grade teacher in suburban Chicago to let him mark the disasters centennial with a multimedia presentation for his class. Whats not to like? Theres mystery, high technology and heroes. Sunken treasure, conspiracy theories and jarring tales of rich vs. poor. But theres also death, lots of it, and that has some parents, teachers and writers of childrens books balancing potentially scary details with more palatable, inspirational fare focused on survivors, animals on board or the mechanics of shipbuilding. John doesnt ask questions about the dead and other darker aspects of what went on that moonless night in the North Atlantic, said his mother, Virginia Tobin Payne. Hes a sensitive kid. We try to temper all of it so it doesnt become an obsession, she said. After the anniversary passes, I hope we can sort of close the book on him looking for more information about it. Barry Denenberg struggled with how to depict the horror in his new book Titanic Sinks! The sepiatone hardcover, written as a mock magazine, was released ahead of the April 14 anniversary and already has made it into schools. The book, from Viking, is intended for kids 9 and older and doesnt hold back much as it blends fact and ction for a meticulous, realistic feel that draws on the ofcial record. Theres only one little line in the book about how most of the people froze to death. They did not drown, Denenberg said. Hypothermia is a much longer death. I had to make a decision about whats accurate and whats ghoulish. Debbie Shoulders teaches eighth-grade English in Clarksville, Tenn., but her new T is for Titanic alphabet book from Sleeping Bear Press is intended for far younger children. The word died doesnt appear often in the book, she said. We softened it with perished or did not live. The goal was to remember what the people on board contributed, not so much what happened to them. Tracey Friedlander in Bethesda, Md., has a Titanic-obsessed 9-year-old, but she doesnt shy away from the rough stuff. She thinks the story offers teachers and parents perfect reallife lessons on perseverance, loyalty, the dangers of arrogance and the shortcomings of technology as kids learn to sort out the complexities of their own lives. Kids like Kade have grown up in the shadows of 9/11, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and a red, yellow, green terrorist alert color code system, Friedlander said. Like most of us, hes trying to make sense of the world around him and the accompanying human tragedies. The Titanic happens to present an incredible learning opportunity for curious minds. Considered a marvel of shipbuilding, for instance, the luxury liner went down anyway after striking the iceberg on her maiden voyage, offering kids a solid and exciting look at the marriage between technology and human decisionmaking, she said. What of human error? Was the ship traveling too fast? Why, though in line with regulations of the time 1912 did the Titanic set off with only 20 lifeboats for more than 2,200 people. Were poor immigrants in steerage prevented at gunpoint and by locked gates from boarding lifeboats, in favor of the wealthy? The Titanic, Friedlander said, touches on precarious circumstances and how someones socioeconomic class can potentially affect the way their life is valued by others and why thats inappropriate and immoral. John Paynes mom was nervous about him seeing James Camerons 1997 blockbuster, Titanic, when a 3-D version hits theaters in April. Hes seen the edited-for-TV version over and over again. The people who died, who sacriced, I think they were really brave to die like that, he said. I really liked the movie, but the parts I found scary were the parts where Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and Rose (Kate Winslet) were trapped in the sinking parts. Karen Heafer, a secondgrade teacher in Lincoln, Neb., has been in the classroom for 31 years. She read a ctionalized account of a mascot cat on the Titanic to her students a couple of years ago and considers the story valuable, even half told. I use generalities. We dont go into a specic number of people killed, Heafer said. A lot of them are curious about how the people survived, how long did they have to stay on the water, who found them? Theyre more drawn to the survivors than the ones who drowned. Not so for Will Bousquette III, a 9-year-old at The Browning School in Manhattan. Assistant librarian Susan Levine invited Denenberg to the private Upper East Side prep school for boys after choosing his book for her third-grade reading group for fathers and sons. Will was especially touched by the story of Isidor and Ida Straus. The co-owner of Macys department store and his wife of 40 years went down with the ship together after she refused a spot in a lifeboat. It was heart-touching, Will said. It made me sad, then it felt sweet. I was greatly surprised. I also didnt realize how cold the water was. I could feel the emotions but I wasnt freaked out. Lucy Sullivan spares no detail during a Titanic unit for her seventh-grade language arts students in Brookeld, Conn. For seven years, she has assigned each real-life Titanic characters as she slowly lets the tragedy play out in class over a week or so. She arranges their desks by type of ticket she issues them at the beginning, with rst-class passengers assigned prime spots. They journal about the story throughout, learn of the mysterious missing locker key that left a lookout without binoculars and watch as she rolls a cardboard model of the ship around the classroom on a cart to demonstrate the crash itself. At the end, her students discover whether their characters lived or died. When youre replaying something for 12-year-olds, the amount of information that allows you to put this puzzle together minute by minute is very powerful, Sullivan said. Those students who never really liked ction nd this to be delicious and those who hate ction and love nonction nd this to be delicious. Why? Its a combination of gaudy details and tragic events. It doesnt get any better than that. You own the kids if you use even a small percentage of whats available on this to teach, she said. The effort wasnt lost on her groups this year. Sam Petriccione, 12, calls the Titanic a day that will always live in infamy. He added, It shows me that being cocky and arrogant doesnt really pay off. The people in the cockpit were so positive that the ship couldnt sink that they refused to shut down the ship and stop because of the icebergs. Jasmine Davis in Pittsburgh wasnt one of Sullivans students, but she was denitely a Titanic-obsessed kid. Shes 23 now but at 9 couldnt get enough of the subject, including Robert Ballards 1985 discovery of the wreck strewn half a mile across the ocean oor. The oceanographer and marine biologists video and photos ignited interest in the wreck among a new generation of kids. In fourth grade, Davis wasnt allowed to bring school library books to recess, but I convinced my teacher to let me take this massive novel about the Titanic outside. It was such a big book. How else was I going to nish it? For 20 years, Ballards JASON Project has offered middle school teachers materials and expertise for deeper exploration of the sciences in a variety of disciplines, including his own. More than 10 million students have participated, Davis among them. Its hard for a kid to grasp the scope of the Titanic, she said. I remember seeing the images of the wreck taken by Ballard when I did the JASON Project. That was really haunting. Childrens writer Mary Pope Osborne began her popular ction series Magic Tree House, along with nonction companions, around the time the JASON Project began. I spent the rst 10 years asking kids all over the country what they wanted me to write about. They wanted me to write about the Titanic, but I kept saying, No, its too sad. Its too depressing. She nally took it on in 1999 with Tonight on the Titanic, her 17th book for 6to 10-year-olds featuring her kid characters Jack and his sister, Annie. It has a mythic power. Its not right next to their lives, Osborne said. Ive had very few children ask me to write about 9/11, for instance. I think 100 years from now they would. Titanic a magnet for kids, ne line for educators DCs Vertigo readies 4 new series, dedicated app APJohn Marcus Payne shows his Lego model of the Titanic cruise ship in Glencoe, Ill. Payne has been a student of the Titanic since kindergarten. He has scrupulously researched the ship, built a model out of Lego freehand and successfully lobbied his fth-grade teacher in suburban Chicago to let him mark the disasters centennial with a multimedia presentation for his class. Below, childrens book authors have taken a variety of approaches to telling the Titanics story, from leaving out disturbing statistics to softening their language.The word died doesnt appear often in the book. We softened it with perished or did not live. The goal was to remember what the people on board contributed, not so much what happened to them.Debbie Shoulders, author, T is for Titanic

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A3Wednesday, April 4, 2012 that aims to develop gardens modeled on natural ecosystems that means natural fertilization that comes with decaying vegetation and a variety of plants in one plot. Unlike orchards, which only have one type of tree or shrub, a food forest has many types. Developers use edible trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals. Fruit and nut trees are on the upper level, while berry shrubs, edible perennials and annuals are on the lower levels. Plants to attract insects are also planted for natural pest management. All of these plants work together like a forest ecosystem, but they are edible, Herlihy said. In Pittsburgh, a food forest a quarter of an acre big is in its second year of existence. So far, only a berry bush and a pear tree have yielded fruits. We tell people its not a food forest, its aspiring to be a food forest, said organizer Juliette Jones. I really do believe the longer that were there, once you start to see the trees producing and see the site develop more, it will attract people to get involved. In Seattle, the park will have an area for the food forest, and another area for the smaller community gardens that can be used by families or community groups. One of the goals is to provide affordable healthy food at a time when such items can be too costly for lowincome residents. The rst harvest from the community gardens will happen in spring 2013. The fruit trees and shrubs will take a while to grow. Herlihy expects those harvests to come in about two years. Ultimately, Herlihy envisions thick plots of nut trees, such as walnuts and hazelnuts, next to apple, pears and plum trees. Underneath, there will be huckleberries, salmon berries and even salal, a native shrub. Herbs like rosemary will also be planted. The group plans to install beehives to aid with pollination. Organizers say that they will use the honor system when it comes to how much food people can take. Its simply just good ethics, he said. Help yourself, dont take it all, and save some for anybody else. Unlike orchards, which only have one type of tree or shrub, a food forest has many types. Fruit and nut trees are on the upper level, while berry shrubs, edible perennials and annuals are on the lower levels. Plants to attract insects are also planted for natural pest management. The Associated PressYou know you like your cup of Joe in the morning. But are you ready for a cup of Hugh? We are, of course, talking about actor Hugh Jackman, who recently launched a coffee and tea company that raises money for charity. Philanthropy is the driving force behind Jackmans involvement in the coffee world. In a telephone interview he talked about being inspired by the late Paul Newman and his company, Newmans Own, which has donated millions to charity. But its not the only reason. The other factor? Taste. Hey, Im a coffee snob, said Jackman, who could drink coffee all day, because I just love it, but limits himself to one or two cups. If Im buying it, I want a great cup of coffee. If you can have a great cup of coffee and the prots of that company are actually going back to different charities, I think its a winwin for everybody. Jackmans interest in creating a coffee company was sparked during a tour he took as an ambassador for World Vision, an organization that works with children and families. In Ethiopia, he met Dukale, a local coffee farmer, and was struck by how hard he worked to look after his family and by how a little help could make a big difference in the lives of coffee farmers. In a piece of synchronicity, he discovered that a friend, Barry Steingard, who has 25 years experience in the coffee and restaurant industry, was planning on getting back in the coffee business. I said, Well, do you need a partner? Jackman said. So far Laughing Man Coffee & Tea chocolates were also recently added is the rst subsidiary under Jackmans umbrella company, Laughing Man Worldwide. The way it works is 50 percent of the subsidiary prots go to the parent company, which then donates 100 percent of its prots. Educational initiatives are the focus of the coffee company, which has partnered with Harlem Village Academies, the well-regarded charter schools in New York, and WorldVision. And Jackmans not the only java star. Leonardo DiCaprio is partnering with the La Colombe Torrefaction coffee company to create a special blend, LYON, with net prots earmarked for environmental projects supported by the actors foundation. Meanwhile, Newmans daughter, Nell Newman, partnered with Vermonts Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. to source, roast, package and distribute fair trade organic coffee under the Newmans Own Organics label. Green Mountain allocates at least 5 percent of pre-tax prots to social and environmental projects in the communities where it does business. Celebrity coffees are just a fraction of the overall market. Still, the trend of celebrities working with high-quality roasters to make coffee for a cause can only be a good thing, said Miles Small, owner and editor-in-chief of CoffeeTalk magazine, based in Vashon, Wash. Coffee is, and has always been, an instrumental tool in bringing disparate folks together for a common cause, he said. Buying celebrity coffee with a donation element helps toward achieving the charitable goals of the celebrity and also helps the over 25 million families worldwide whose survival is dependent on the growing of this not so simple beverage called coffee. In some ways, the coffeecelebrity connection seems a natural. Who hasnt seen umpteen paparazzi shots of stars clutching their Starbucks? But Jackman laughs when asked if Hollywood has a corner on caffeine. Coffee is the world over, he said. Its one of the oldest products known to man, and its one of the greatest crops ever. Traditionally, coffee is part of ritual and part of unity and community. In Ethiopia, the families Jackman met roasted, ground, brewed and drank coffee together. Its all part of community and being together, he said. I think its kind of a great product and underlines what our company is about. APGlenn Herlihy, left, Briar Bates and Jackie Cramer stand on a grassy slope and talk about how they and other organizers will turn the site into a food forest in view of downtown Seattle. The park will start at 2 acres and grow to 7, offering city dwellers a chance to pick apples, plums and other crops right from the branch. FOOD FOREST from page A1 Coffee is the world over. Its one of the oldest products known to man, and its one of the greatest crops ever. Traditionally, coffee is part of ritual and part of unity and community.Hugh Jackman, Laughing Man Coffee & TeaCelebs brew coffee for a causeHUGH JACKMAN LEONARDO DiCAPRIO NELL NEWMANAPA variety of products from Hugh Jackmans Laughing Man Coffee & Tea company is available. LOS ANGELES (AP) NBCs talent show The Voice is jumping on Facebooks timeline app bandwagon to give fans another way to vote for their favorite contestants. The new application allows viewers to cast votes for Voice singers and connect with friends and others watching the show, NBC and Facebook said Friday. Voting on live performances began Monday. The Facebook app for The Voice is intended to create a fully social online voting experience, said Vivi Zigler, president of NBC Universal Digital Entertainment. We have been working very closely with Facebook to really build a social voting app that takes advantage of every whiz-bang, bell and whistle that Facebook has built for timeline, Zigler said. In addition to serving as a ballot box and a bridge between viewers, the Voice app will lead users to new content, including performance videos and blogs, NBC said. In January, when Facebook unveiled about 60 new apps that let people share the smallest details of their lives on their prole, now known as their timeline, the company said it expected developers to create thousands more. Dubbed frictionless sharing by Facebook, the apps allow a users activity to be automatically shared through Facebook although people can limit whos able to see this activity when they sign up for the apps. Nearly 3,000 apps have been launched in two months for websites ranging from The Onion to Nike to foodie site Foodily, Facebook said. Making use of a timeline app for voting is innovative, said Justin Osofksy, director of platform partnerships at Facebook. The Voice features Christina Aguilera, Cee Lo Green, Adam Levine and Blake Shelton as coaches.NBCs The Voice adds Facebook app for voting

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A4 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, April 4, 2012 ClassifiedsB8| Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A5Wednesday, April 4, 2012 ClassifiedsWednesday, April 4, 2012 Santa Rosas Press Gazette |B9 The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. (Part-time positions have 401(k) plan options). ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVESThe News Herald and the News Herald.com continue to expand. We are looking for highly motivated, energetic sales people. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Available Positions: Territory Sales Representative Digital Sales RepresentativeRequired Skills Highly motivated and results driven Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook) Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment Effective time management and organization skills Excellent verbal and written communication skills Keen attention to detail The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required ExperienceTo be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of outside sales and/or online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience.SALES/RETENTION CLERKWe are seeking an eager part-time telephone sales clerk to sell and/or retain home delivery and single copy circulation. Essential duties include providing excellent customer service, pleasant telephone voice, and outbound dialing. Quali ed candidates will have general of ce experience, sales experience and computer skills. High School Diploma or equivalent is required and one year of customer service experience. This is a parttime position with hour pay, plus commission and bene ts.CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVEWe are seeking an ambitious part-time Customer Service Representative who will actively answer phones and participate in the everyday work and special projects. This position is the primary link between current and potential subscribers and the newspaper. You will handle general of ce work and maintain subscriber and non-subscriber database. Quali ed candidate will have a High School diploma or equivalent and one year of customer service experience. Candidate should have a basic understanding of of ce machines such as calculator, printers, fax machine, computer and internet skills and able to sit for 8 hour shifts. On time attendance during scheduled time is critical in this role as well as working some holidays and weekend shifts.Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: The News HeraldCareers Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! References Available 850-995-0009 Can You Dig It? We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator. 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Mannings Feed & Seed (850-623-2426)www.happyjackinc.com 4x8 Red Paver Bricks 50 each 380-2928 Mahogany Dinning Set Table, Chairs, Hutch & Buffet $2000. Queen Sofa $250. Coffee Table $100. Call 380-2928 BOOK SALE SAT 8 am On The Porch 5152 Pike St. Milton Hwy. 90 & Canal St Choice of Thousands Paper and Hardbacks Fict/NonFict/Bk. List CrestviewUp to 80% offToby Booths Only Indoor/Outdoor Yard Sale in Forever Victorian (398-8899) Main Street. Open Tues-Sat. Showcases, Book cases, Store fixtures AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 3/340 RESOLUTION WHEREAS, Richard Jette, PETITIONED the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, to vacate, abandon, discontinue and renounce any interest and right of the public in and to the following described property to-wit: The west end of Cooleys Drive in Pace Heights Subdivision lying between lots 9 and 10 as described in Plat Book B, page 14 AND WHEREAS, The Board of County Commissioners determined to have a public hearing for the purpose of considering the advisability of vacating and abandoning said rights-of-way, and WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners have on this the 22nd day of March, 2012, conducted said public hearing in conformity to the said publication of their intent, and WHEREAS, after hearing all comments concerning said vacation of the above described rights-of-way, the Board, being fully advised, and it being determined that the public interest will be best served and protected by vacating and abandoning s aid rights-of-way, therefore, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, that the said rights-of-way as herein set out and described are hereby vacated and any and all interest to the public shall revert to and be vested in the proper owners thereof. APPROVED AND ADOPTED by a vote of 5 yeas, 0 nays, and 0 absent, of the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Rosa County, Florida, this 22nd day of March, 2012. 4/4/2012 3/340 3/339 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL REBUILD Northwest Florida has issued a Request for Proposal (RFG) for construction management services for its Residential Wind Retrofit Program in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. The full RFP is available on REBUILDSs web site. http://www.rebuildnwf.org/ 4/4/2012 3/339 3/338 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON April 24, 2012 at 11:00 AM UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit: 419 Jeff Chamell: Refrigerator, golf clubs, boxes & misc. STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 4/4, 4/11, 2012 3/338 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Pleaseyour ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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A6 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, April 4, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE850-995-8778 STORE HOURS: 7AM 9PM 7 DAYS AWEEK Sales Prices Good through April 10, 2012 4 5 6 78910 MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT SUN Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses.8604387Vlasic Kosher Spears17424 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Greens8827 oz Sunshine Maintenance Dog Food162950 lb Tampico Fruit Drinks1401 gal Sale Good Through April10, 2012 Vine Ripe Large Tomatoes79lb 2 Liter Pepsi139 Frito-Lay Multi Packs57320 19-20 oz Blue Bell Ice Cream4181/2 Gal Shurfine Brown n Serve Rolls9912 ct Farmland St Louis Style Pork Spareribs233lb Hillshire Farm Ultra Thin Ham, Turkey or Chicken2939 oz pk Cooks 1/2 Spiral Sliced Ham181lb Bar S Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna11816 oz Hillshire Smoked Sausage, Pork, Beef or Polish24114 oz Ball Park Jumbo Franks16516 oz Boston Butt Pork Roast 2-Pack120lb Family Pack Country Style Ribs145lb Cooks Shank Portion Smoked Ham115lb Fresh Frozen Turkey Breast148lb Golden Ripe Large Sweet Cantaloupes197ea Family Pack Pork Steaks145lb Royal Whole Smoked Hams163lb US #1 Red Potatoes1955 lb bag Southern Grown Fresh Snap Beans77lb Liberty Gold Pineapple468 oz Pride of Illinois Very Small Sweet Peas6015 oz Hungry Jack Mashed Potatoes12515.5 oz Maxwell House Coffee82734.5 oz Betty Crocker Cake Mixes10616-18 oz