<%BANNER%>

UF00028408 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Santa Rosa press gazette
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! DOWNLOADS
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00743
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Publication Date: 01-11-2012
Frequency: semiweekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00743
 Related Items
Preceded by: Milton press gazette

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

75 cents Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Gazette Santa Rosas Press Lifestyle ........................................ B1 Speak Out ..................................... A2 Sudoku .......................................... A2 Opinion ........................................ A4 Sports ............................................ A8 Classieds ..................................... B4 TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 104 Issue 3 Printed on recycled paper Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.com Tweet us @srpressgazette and friend us on facebook.com Speak Out Let Santa Rosans know what you think Inside | Page A2 srpressgazette.com 623-5887 By Bill Gamblin news@srpressgazette.com Santa Rosa County Commissioners are expected to give the current bus system, with some minor modications, the thumbs-up for one more year at their meeting on Thursday. Monday morning, commissioners heard three plans from Santa Rosa County Transportation Planner Nancy Model which included: Continuing the service as it is for one more year Creating express morning and afternoon routes with normal service during middle part of the day Discontinuing the service in 60 days I feel we have listened to what you, the commissioners want, and what the public needs with the express routes, Model said at Mondays meeting. With this plan, we have cut the hour and 55-minute turnaround time to just 55 minutes. Transportation ofcials are looking to do this by starting in East Milton and limiting the number of stops on the route to just eight key locations. This would be done for one round-trip and a second trip along the route to Pensacola each morning and afternoon. Commissioners Jim Williamson and Don Salter said they were concerned about other public needs during the day, which Model said the plan addressed. We will run a normal route during the day so people can get to doctor appointments, the store and other needs, Model said. We have had a year to look at this and gather data, so I feel we can better predict our needs. Salter said that since they had proposed stopping the service, he has heard from several people by email and telephone. Groups like the Town of Jay and the Rural Health Association have public transportation as their number one priority along the north end of Santa Rosa County, Salter said. I am also in support of the fact we have reduced the cost to the county to $16,000. I would like to see us work on performance goals and look at the efciency level while I sup port this one more year. According to Julie Piersol with the Florida-Alabama Transporta tion Planning Organization there Express bus service in works By Bill Gamblin news@srpressgazette.com Saturday will start the celebra tion of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s Birthday Celebration in Santa Rosa County. With Monday being an ofcial federal holiday to honor the slain civil rights leader, events lead ing up to the federal holiday have been set and will culminate with a day full of activities including a parade and block party. The weekend will get kickoff with a prayer breakfast hosted by the St. John Divine Missionary Baptist Church and held at the Bagdad Community Center on Pooley Street in Bagdad. Leon Daggs, owner of Hub City Ford in Crestview will be the guest speaker at this breakfast set to be gin at 9 a.m. and tickets are avail able at $10 a person. On Sunday, the Santa Rosa County Fellowship Churches Pastors and Ministers Wives Or ganization will hold the annual Commemorative Program at Mt. Pilgrim African Baptist Church on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Milton. Rev. Joseph Marshall of the St. John Divine Missionary Baptist Church in Pensacola will be the guest speaker at this program set to being at 6 p.m. Monday, Stewart Street will be lled with oats and walkers for the annual MLK Day Parade. The parade is set to begin at 10 a.m. and will begin at Milton High School and then travel south on Stewart Street to Elva Street. There is a $30 parade fee per King festivities begin Saturday By Mathew Pellegrino mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com A vehicle struck a teenager as she was sitting down on a curb at the intersection of Saints Lane and Falcon Drive Monday morn ing in Milton. The 15-year-old was later tak en to Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola after the incident with minor injuries. The accident occurred at around 8:05 a.m. on Monday. According to the Florida Highway Patrol report, Amanda Dawn Ray was sitting down on the paved edge of the southbound lane on Saints Lane. During that time, a truck driv en by 25-year-old James Russo was eastbound on Falcon Drive approaching the intersection of Falcon Drive and Saints Lane when he failed to see Ray on the side of the road. As Russo turned right from Falcon Drive onto Saints Lane, he told ofcers that a sneeze distracted him and that he struck Ray with the right front of his ve hicle the FHP report stated. Russo was charged with careless driving following the incident. Milton teenager struck by car, sustains minor injuries See BUS SERVICE A3 See KING A3 By Mathew Pellegrino mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com Three years ago last Friday, Santa Rosa Historical Society President Wesley Meiss was standing inside the Imogene Theatre, basking in what he calls the glory of Santa Rosa County. The theatre had long been, and still is, a long-standing image of the good times in Milton. As Wes will tell you, the theatre had offered plenty of entertainment for Santa Rosa County residents and visitors alike. That night, the entertainment was swing dancing. But the dancing came to a ring halt when the president, who was elected just a year earlier in 2008, started to smell smoke. It was puncturing through the windows, through the brick, Meiss said. The president, who was ill-equipped in re training, did the only thing he could do at the time he called for help. The old girl is back Above the inside of the new Imogene Theatre is supposed to resemble how it may have looked back in 1913, when it was rst built. Left Santa Rosa Historical Society President Wesley Meiss talks to those gathered while a photo of the 2009 Imogene re stands out in the background on a projector. M A THEW PELLEGRINO | Press Gazette See OLD GIRL A3 SOCCER: PACE GIRLS KEEP KICKIN ALONG SPORTS, A8

PAGE 2

Local A2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012TELEPHONE N UMBERS All ofces ................. 850-623-2120 Classieds ................ 850-623-2120 Fax ........................ 850-623-2007S UBSCRIP T ION RA T ES One year (in county) ......................... $39 Six months (in county).................$19.50 13 weeks (in county).................... $9.75 One year (out of county) ....................$62 Six months (out of county).................$31 13 weeks (out of county)..............$15.50 Senior Citizen (over 62) One year (in county)........................$32 Six months (in county) ......................$16 13 weeks (in county) .........................$8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.C OPYRIGH T N O T ICE The entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570.S AN T A R OSAS PRESS GAZE TT E ST AFFJim F letcher Publisher 850-393-3654 jetcher@srpressgazette.comC arol B arnes Ofce Manager 850-623-2120 cbarnes@srpressgazette.comBill G amblin Editor 850-377-4611 bgamblin@srpressgazette.comDebbie C oon Field Service Rep. 850-393-3666 dcoon@srpressgazette.comA be C lark Field Service Rep. 850-910-0902 aclark@srpressgazette.comTracie S melstoys Account Retention Specialist 850-623-2120 tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com S anta R osas P ress G azette 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570A T YOUR SERVICEM iss a paper? Circulation Jim Fletcher 850-623-2120 Want to subscribe? 850-623-2120 To buy back issues 850-623-2120 To place a classied ad 850-623-2120 To buy a display ad Debbie Coon 850-623-2120 To buy a photograph 850-623-2120 I nternet www.srpressgazette.com O fce H ours 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday To get news in the paper Bill Gamblin 850-623-2120 or 850-377-4611 E-mail : news@srpressgazette.com Short items: news@srpressgazette.com Church News: church@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries: news@srpressgazette.com Sports: sports@srpressgazette.com COUN T Y GOVERNMEN T COUNTY COMMISSION District 1: Jim Williamson, 4351 Berryhill Road, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-williamson@santarosa..gov District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Road, Milton, FL 32583; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-cole@santarosa..gov District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla Highway, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-salter@santarosa..gov District 4: Jim Melvin, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commmelvin@santarosa..gov District 5: Lane Lynchard, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-lynchard@santarosa..gov The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at 9 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays. The leaders meet in committee at 9 a.m. Mondays preceding the Thursday meetings. Meetings are held in commission chambers of the Administrative Complex on U.S. 90. Phone 983-1877 for information or to reach their ofces.S T A T E GOVERNMEN T Rep. Doug Broxson: 2990-C Gulf Breeze Parkway, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563, phone 9165436. E-mail is Doug.Broxson@myoridahouse. gov Sen. Greg Evers: 5334 Willing St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5550. E-mail is Evers.Greg. SO2@senate.gov Gov. Rick Scott: PLO5 The Capitol, 400 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; phone 4884441. E-mail is _governor@myorida.comFE D ERAL GOVERNMEN T HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Rep. Jeff Miller: 2439 Rayburn House Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; local phone is 479-1183; D.C. Ofce phone (202) 225-4136. Pensacola ofce address: 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503. Toll free number is 866367-1614. Website: http://jeffmiller.house.gov SENATE Sen. Marco Rubio: B40A Dirksen Senate Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202-224-3041; fax 202-228-0285. Sen. Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Senate Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202-224-5274; fax 202-224-8022 Website: http://billnelson.senate.gov WHITE HOUSE President Barack Obama: The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. E-mail is president@ whitehouse.gov Vice President Joe Biden: Ofce of the Vice President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. Elected OFFICIALSSCHOOL GOVERNMEN T SCHOOL BOARD Superintendent: Tim Wyrosdick, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-5000. E-mail is wyrosdickt@mail.santarosa. k12..us District 1: Diane Scott, 5710 Munson Highway, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-0413. E-mail is scottdl@mail.santarosa.k12. .us District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton, FL 32570; phone 623-6299. E-mail is winkleseh@mail.santarosa. k12..us District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre, FL 32566; phone 939-2661. E-mail is colemanmd@mail.santarosa. k12..us District 4: JoAnn Simpson, 5059 Faircloth St., Pace, FL 32571; phone 994-5446. E-mail is simpsonjj@mai.santarosa. k12..us District 5: Scott Peden, 3156 Pins Lane, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563; phone 934-0701. E-mail is pedenst@mail.santarosa.k12. .us The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth Thursdays at 5086 Canal St., in Milton. The Santa Rosa School Board phone is 983-5000.CI T Y GOVERNMEN T Milton City Hall, Mayor Guy Thompson, 6738 Dixon St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5400. City Manager is Brian Watkins Town of Jay, Mayor Kurvin Qualls, 3822 Highway 4, Jay, FL 32565, phone 675-2719 Gulf Breeze City Hall, Mayor Beverly Zimmern, 1070 Shoreline Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, phone 934-5100. City Manager is Edwin Buz Eddy If you have a short comment you would like to make, call the Speak Out line at 623-5887. Monday, 9:30 a.m. Hello, this is Walter over by Garcon. A few weeks ago, I read an article in the Santa Rosa Press Gazette titled District scoping out building experts. It started out that the school district is hammering down on saving money, as they voted to search for a certied building code administrator, so they wouldnt have to rely on the county inspections. I guess I dont get it. How is paying a permanent, high-dollar job for someone going to save money? And whats worse than that, whats wrong with using the county inspectors? They are good enough for the rest of us. Then again, the taxpayers arent paying their bills. Thank you. Saturday, 11:39 a.m. Hi, Im calling on Marias comment in the Press Gazette on Jan. 7. She is right, there is a problem there. We take care of an educationallychallenged cancer survivor, and when he got his $4.85 increase on his disability in January, they took $12 from his food stamps. He can work part-time, but if he works, theyll take his disability and his Medicaid. Thats wrong. And its not President Obama you need to call; its the Florida Department of Children and Families. Thats Gov. Rick Scott. Its not Obama, its your governor. Yall voted him in, I didnt vote for him. Thursday, 10:11 p.m. Yes, this is Nita. I want to thank the person who robbed me and took my rent money. I guess you needed it more than I did. But now Ill probably be out on the streets. Thanks. I have no other resources, thank you very much. Thursday, 9:24 p.m. Coming home from Pensacola tonight shortly after 6 p.m. by way of Avalon Boulavard, I was using the left lane towards the new stop light with the arrows. I noticed that nobody stops at the red arrow stop light, in the right lane. I think a cop should sit at that light and enforce the law, before someone gets killed. Just saying. Thursday, 12:03 p.m. I really enjoy Ron Harts columns. What a funny take on things. Smart and quick, he really makes me laugh at the goings on in Washington. Thursday, 9:10 a.m. Heres an idea. How about we put the much needed courthouse in the recently closed Food World. The County has experience converting abandoned buildings into useful spaces. Thats 45,000 sq.ft. with more to come when K-mart closes. Enough parking to meet everyones needs. Infrastructures there and when complete, with the Avalon and 90 improvements, trafc is not an issue. Lease space to those that need it close to the courts in the building and make enough money to service any debt for the purchase. Attorneys, recorders, bondsmen, all of the people who use the courthouse might even contribute for a change. Facade and interior improvements done modestly and we have solved a 20-year-old problem with little public expenditures. Please provide a color photograph if possible. All information must be typed. Wednesdays paper please submit by Friday at 3pm. Saturdays paper submit by Wednesday at noon www. Sudoku-Puzzles .net Sudoku, Kakuro & Futoshiki Puzzles Sudoku 9x9 Medium (134185211) 8 5 7 6 2 1 3 6 8 2 7 8 9 3 4 2 7 3 9 1 4 9 8 4 7 3 5 6 www.sudoku-puzzles.net Solution: www.sudoku-puzzles.net SOLUTION FIND US ONLINE Check out Santa Rosa Press Gazette on Facebook, or tweet us @srpressgazetteSRMC Births November 2011 Kristen and Timothy Spielman, a daughter, Emilynn Rose Spielman, born Nov. 30. Michelle and Joseph Brouhard, a son, Jaydan Matthew Brouhard, born Nov. 30.SRMC Births December 2011 Annifa and Sergio Gonzalez, a daughter, Dulce Anabel Elaine Hernandez Gonzales, born Dec. 2. Jordynn Smith and James T. Cooper, a daughter, Rylee Lou Cooper, born Dec. 3. Lisa and Kent Walsh, a daughter, Kathryn Amanda Walsh, born Dec. 5. Kristin Snow and Randall Odom, a son, Randall Jason Odom II, born Dec. 8. Michelle Moore and Earl Salter, a son, Haidyn Eugene Salter, born Dec. 8. Krystal McCullough and Christopher George, a son, Leath Michael George, born Dec. 9. Angela Pipes, a daughter, Karissa Nicole Reese, born Dec. 9. Miranda and William Parker, a daughter, Kylei Michelle Parker, born Dec. 13. Brittany and Troy Kurek, a son, Atticus Matthew Kurek, born Dec. 13. Katherine and Kenneth Murtha, a son, Brice Edward Jackson Murtha, born Dec. 14. Amanda and James Demontmollin, a son, Vincent James Demontmollin, born Dec. 15. Elizabeth Taylor, a daughter, Addison Rose Krossman, born Dec. 14. Brittany and Michael Nichols, a daughter, Makayla Danielle Nichols, born Dec. 15. Rebecka King and Richard Fields, a daughter, Kayla Alexia Fields, born Dec. 16. Donna Sims, a son, Malakhi Jamorian Andrew Sims, born Dec. 19. Crystal Wilson and Joseph Majzun, a son, Joseph Brenden Majzun, born Dec. 20. Cordia and Jesse Nixon, a son, Joseph Lee Nixon, born Dec. 20. Kathleen Pratt, a daughter, Eileen Faye Pratt, born Dec. 20. Hannah LeAnn Thames, a daughter, Vallyn Chevelle Brogdale, born Dec. 21. Amanda Sorensen and Stephen Roberts, a daughter, Abegale Kae Roberts, born Dec. 21. Billie Kelley, a son, Hunter Lee Ennger, born Dec. 22. Melissa and Randy Scheiwe, a daughter, Aubrey Quinn Scheiwe, born Dec. 22. Amanda Thompson and Michael Jones, a son, Sebastian LaValle Jones, born Dec. 27. Leslie and Jason Mishoe, a daughter, Rylie Ann Mishoe, born Dec. 28. Birth ANNOUNCEMENTS Special to the Press Gazette Milton is the next stop for the International Coin Collectors Associations world tour. During this event, which runs through Jan. 14 at the Holiday Inn Express, the ICCA will be purchasing coins, paper currency, gold and silver on behalf of their global network of collectors, dealers and reneries. This special event is free and open to the public. We hope to spend at least $200,000 while we are in town by purchasing peoples old coin collections, vintage bank notes and scrap gold, silver and diamonds, said Mark Cooper, spokesman for the International Coin Collectors Assocaition. We buy a lot of class rings, mismatched earrings and broken necklaces. Just a small handful of gold can add up to hundreds of dollars very quickly. I encourage everyone to clean out their drawers, lock boxes and jewelry boxes, and bring their items to our show for a free evaluation and perhaps walk out a little richer. Traveling from small towns to large cities, the ICCA hosts hundreds of events each year where local residents bring in their precious metals, diamonds and paper currency to earn extra cash. While meeting one-on-one with each guest, the ICCA specialists review, research and evaluate the items and will make an offer to purchase all gold coins, silver coins made before 1970 and paper currency printed prior to 1934. The offer depends on the silver or gold content, the collectability, rarity and condition of the items. If the price is right for you, ICCA will pay you on the spot with no hidden fees. The ICCA event will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. each weekday and from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. Coin collectors come to Milton Speak OUT

PAGE 3

Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A3 Wednesday, January 11, 2012 On Friday, Meiss played the tape of the dispatch call placed to the local ofce when he thought the Imogene, and later found that the building next to the Imogene, was on re. Fire, re re! The Imogene is on re, Meiss voice could be heard over the phone on the call made to dispatch at around 7 p.m. Jan. 6, 2009. The shock in Meiss voice could be heard over the phone, as he was asked by the operator to remove himself from the building. But Meiss, a history teacher at Hobbs Middle School, was not about to lose his old girl without a ght. In the phone call, Meiss mentioned to the operator there was a hose by the Imogene. He hinted using the hose to put out whatever re there was. But before he could speak anymore, the building beside the Imogene burst into ames. To this day, reghters are not sure what caused the blaze that scarred the inside of the Imogene. But all of that didnt matter when Meiss unveiled the newly renovated Imogene to a crowd of almost 200 on Friday three years after the devastating re. Originally known as the Milton Auditorium, the tallest building in Milton opened back on Oct. 13, 1913, and was the rst building to have electricity in Milton. Meiss described how locals would sit across the street on the courthouse lawn and look at the scrolling marquee that ickered on the Imogenes sign. Not long after, the theatre was sold to a local man, who later renamed the theatre after his 11-year-old daughter named Imogene. Following the renaming of the theatre, downtown Milton went through what Meiss considered a major boom in entertainment. After the grand reopening on Friday, he imagined the same thing would happen again for Miltonians. I believe ten years from now, our downtown will be booming, it will be alive, Meiss said. John Reble, re chief for the Milton Fire Department was the rst of 15 departments to arrive on scene that night three years ago on Friday. As Meiss sat across the street on the courthouse lawn that night looking at what he thought was the end of the Imogene, Reble walked over to Meiss and told him it wasnt over. It was a momentous night for all of us, Reble said. That was the re of my careerand hopefully the last big re of my career. Reble, a former Santa Rosa Historical Society president, said if it wasnt for the reghters that came out that night, and the rain that helped speed up the reghting efforts a few hours later, there might not have been an Imogene standing today. At the gala on Friday, Reble and his department were given a plaque for the reghting effort they put forth three years earlier. Along with Milton Fire Department, six other local departments were recognized for their hard work that helped save the Imogene. It was the reghters that took direction to go in there and put their lives on the line, Reble said. I kept telling myself, were not losing her, were not losing this building. After reghters were able to extinguish the re, all that was left of the Imogene were her wooden oors, most of her stage, and the hard brick structure. Following the re, Meiss did not back down from the tragedy, and immediately started applying for grants to help bring back the Imogene Theatre to her glory days, which in this case was in 1913. After earning numerous grants, the SRHS was able to hire Sanborn Builders and Quina-Grundhoeffer Architects to help rebuild what was left of the Imogene. And the nished product was awless. As a gentle reminder of how tough the Imogene Theatre was the night of the re, construction workers left burn marks in parts of the Imogenes wooden oors. Meiss said he hopes to announce future acts to the theatre and perhaps an expansion. 2077464 is enough of the federal grant left to fund the pro gram for at least two more years. Commissioners biggest concern is assuring the funding was available in the future as well as monitoring stops and eliminating those not utilized. In other business, com missioners agreed to defer the decision on the economic development contract with TEAM Santa Rosa until the Jan. 23 committee meeting. Commissioners put on Thursdays agenda the pos sible payment of $34,877 to the City of Milton for milling, resurfacing and restriping of Canal Street, which is main tained by the county. The City of Milton has received a Community De velopment Board Grant to improve Canal Street south of Highway 90, which will include sidewalks, burying utilities and other improve ments. The county dollars would be used if they milled and paved the road, which is part of the grant. Bob Cole, whose district includes Milton, talked about earmarking some of his Dis trict 2 funds to this project to help extended the sidewalk from where it is scheduled to end approximately onehalf block longer to the old L&N Depot. Cole had mentioned more sidewalk improvements south of the CSX crossing, but that could be cost prohib itive because of right of way issues, three bridges that would be crossed and other safety concerns according to Santa Rosa County Adminis trator Hunter Walker. vehicle, oat or walking unit and the fee must be received by Jan. 14. A $10 late fee will be charged for entries received after the deadline. The event hosted by the Santa Rosa County Fellow ship Churches Pastors and Ministers Wives Organi zation will start lining up at 8:30 a.m. at Milton High School. At 11 a.m. Monday, there will be a MLK Block Party hosted by the Santa Rosa County NAACP. The block party will be held on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Milton and will feature food, games and entertainment in a family environment. Booth rental for this even is $25. This year those attend ing any of the events are en couraged to bring canned foods and non-perishable items with them to help with this years MLK Day of Service project. The food items collect ed will be donated to area needy families on behalf of the Santa Rosa County Fel lowship Churches. This year there will not be a Habitat Home dedicat ed as in years past. There was a change over at Habitat for Human ity and they also had to ap ply for a federal grant to help us with the purchase of some property, said Caro lyn McCray, who is heading up the MLK Block Party on Monday. We should have everything back in place to dedicate another home on Dr. Kings Birthday next year. City and county ofces and the post ofce will be closed Monday in observa tion of the holiday. BUS SERVICE from page A1 KING from page A1 OLD GIRL from page A1 Photos by MATHEW PELLEGRINO | Press Gazette Locals gather in the staging area of the Imogene on Friday for its big unveil gala by the Santa Rosa Historical Society. Right Henry Botts, who performed on the Imogene stage decades ago when he was 14 years old with Bill Monroe, known as the father of bluegrass, celebrates the grand reopening of the Imogene.

PAGE 4

Opinion A4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012 OUR VIEW We want you to share your views on the above topic(s) or any topic with other Santa Rosas Press Gazette readers. Your views are important, too. Send your letters to : L E TT ER S T O TH E E D I T OR 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Letters must be typed and may be edited for content for to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for verication, if necessary. S HARE YOUR OPINION S When Ronald Reagan was president, he had to raise the debt ceiling to $1 trillion. Obama is currently trying to raise it to $16.3 trillion, up $1.2 trillion from last year when he raised it the last time and caused our rst-ever credit downgrade. To put Reagans total debt of $1 trillion into perspective, in 2009 the Democratic Congress and Obama spent $1.4 trillion more than the government took in, which was 40% more than our total debt back then. Obama thinks he solves our spending problem when he raises our debt limit. He is like a Police Chief saying he solved his towns drunk driving problem by raising the allowable DUI arrest blood alcohol level from .08 to .12. Republicans took back the budgeting process when they won a majority in the House in 2010. The last year Democrats had the checkbook, spending went from $ 2.98 trillion in 2008 to $3.52 trillion in 2009. In 2010 it seems spending leveled off at $3.45 trillion not great, but it is the trajectory we should worry about. Political spending is always cloaked in some grand rhetoric. Bush had his slam dunk wars, and Obama touts helping the middle class. But they all breathlessly come to us with the conjured-up imperative of the day to spend money. Obama bellows from swing state pulpits, Pass my bill now! Heres an economics lesson for the kids out there: never buy a Rolex from a man who is out of breath. Democrats cry that some 825,000 non-essential government employees will not get paid if the debt ceiling is not raised. Perhaps that is our problem; we are paying 825,000 non-essential workers. Washington takes money by force (taxes) from the most productive part of society, the job creators (business), and redistributes it to the least productive part of society. Almost all of our bubbles are created by Washington. The Community Reinvestment Act and Fannie Mae mandated that mortgage loans be made to those who could not repay them. Congress pushed subprime loans, which went from 7% of Fannie Maes total loan holdings in 2003 to over 20% in 2006. With implicit federal backing, Fannie and Freddie, GSEs (Government Sponsored Enterprises), were by far the largest buyers of the sub-prime loans. Before the collapse they owned $1 trillion in these risky mortgages. Competing with Fannie Mae in that market was like wrestling with a gorilla: you dont quit when you want, you quit when he wants. Ever the imperialist, Obama spent $4 million of taxpayer money to take a twoweek vacation, again ying separately from his family 5,800 miles to a $5.9 million, rented, Hawaiian beachfront home. Upon arrival, he played golf; to be fair, we cannot expect him to break his normal Washington routine on his rst day of vacation. Christmas vacations left only 12 out of 535 members in Congress when the payroll tax cut was extended last week. It was a productive week; how much better off would we be if none of the 535 members was in Washington? It would kill business in D.C., especially bail bondsmen, hookers and liquor stores, but it would be great for the rest of the country. To paraphrase P.J. ORourke, the mystery of government is not how it works, but how to make it stop. With the (still) Democrat-controlled Senate unwilling to put forth a budget for more than 900 days now, and Obama acting above it all and offering no concrete proposals other than class-envy, eat the rich rhetoric, gutsy leaders like Paul Ryan step up. Yet, when he offered sensible budget-cutting solutions, he was vilied, predictably by Obama and the left, but inexplicably by Newt Gingrich. Paul Ryan and Ron Paul are right, but people just do not want to hear the truth. When Ron Paul and others correctly warn about spending and offer solutions, they are universally mocked by the left, the media and Hollywood (which are one in the same). Most cognitive people long for the days when Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher ran the U.S. and Europe. Keen interest and Oscar buzz have preceded the opening of The Iron Lady, with Meryl Streep as Prime Minister Thatcher. She should win the best actress award, because a Hollywood liberal playing a tax-cutting, antiunion, free-market, rightwing woman whose policies led a nation to economic growth deserves the highest award for acting. Ron Hart is a syndicated op-ed humorist, award-winning author and TV/radio commentator. Email Ron@RonaldHart. com or visit www. RonaldHart.com COLUMNS E-conning the public, Washington spending, and other shell games RON HAR TThe H art Beat By Jim Hightower Last years many political downers have prompted promising uprisings at Americas grassroots, including a strong national coalition for repealing corporate personhood. Its a new year, at last. I say at last because 2011 was a rough ride, politically. Heres a summary of the bigger bumps: non-stop Congressional gridlock, Donnie Trumps short-lived presidential candidacy, the workingclass depression, Obamas serial surrenders to raw Republican partisanship, Newt Gingrichs presidential bid, the reemergence of Wall Streets Gordon Gekko arrogance, right-wing governors gone wild, Rick Oops Perrys campaign for the White House, more tax breaks for corporations and, at years end, there were signs that both Sarah Palin and The Donald might still run for president after all. (That could set up a titanic clash of big hairdos.) Yet we shouldnt despair about last years many political downers, for they have prompted a series of promising uprisings at Americas grassroots. Progressives in states like Wisconsin, Ohio, Montana, Colorado, and Mississippi (yes, Mississippi) have fought hard to roll back the tea partys excesses. The Occupy eruption all across the country has lifted spirits, revitalized grassroots organizing, and put some real move into social movements as we head into 2012. In January, for example, a strong and savvy coalition will mobilize a nationwide campaign for repealing corporate personhood and the Supreme Courts infamous Citizens United ruling. Also, the rise of the non-corporate economy is booming, with millions of Americans turning to coops, credit unions, farmers markets, fair trade shops, and other local enterprises that ordinary people control, not absentee proteers. Plus, strong, genuinely populist candidates are running for Congress this year, including Elizabeth Warren in Mass., Tammy Baldwin in Wis., Norman Solomon in Calif., Ilya Sheyman in Ill., and Eric Griego in N.M. We have important work to do, so dont moan about 2011. Organize in 2012. Jim Hightower is a radio commentator, writer, and public speaker. Hes also editor of the populist newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown. Dont moan about 2011, organize in 2012 We have never disagreed with the need for a new courthouse. There are probably a lot of things that need to be replaced or xed as much as our governmental building, but this one building is where a lot of our business takes place. In some ways, it is even more important than the location at which our county ofces are located (you know, the complex behind McDonalds.) This is where the Supervisor of Elections, Property Appraiser, Tax Collector and the like are housed, too. Wait, when there was a need for a better building for these ofces, they used available space which came with parking. Not all of us were here, but if stories and word of mouth serves us correctly Jim Williamson was a county commissioner when the county purchased the current building and refurbished it. (It had once been home to Delchamps, TG&Y and more.) What do you think a courthouse should be? Well, it is hard to imagine, but there is now a building with 45,000-plus square feet available with great access to the new Avalon Blvd. and the best part is it is for sale and includes lots of parking. If you havent gured out the idea, were thinking about what was once Food World the location next to K-Mart. Now, some of you are probably thinking we have lost our mind, but we are trying to be frugal and practical. First off, it is a one-oor building that can be remodeled and refurbished, which is exactly what Santa Rosa did with the current County annex site. We need a building with the ability to be secured and isolate from the public from those who are accused of crimes. This is something that can be built into the plans of the refurbish. There is no need to worry about parking. Theres loads of it. And the best part of it all is that the building is available and we feel the county could do the complete project at a fraction of the cost. Milton could extend its boundaries so the courthouse stayed inside the municipality. Heck, if a person comes to court and is not dressed appropriately, the judge could send them next door to buy some clothes. Of course, we say that in jest, but we do believe the location deserves consideration. The main thing is to help defray the cost of such an undertaking, like the county, and to follow its past frugal decision and to do the same thing here. Another interesting fact is that it could be refurbished and opened much faster without all of the permitting that would be associated with new construction. And hey, it keeps Santa Rosa from building a major county ofce in an industrial park which is intended for industry. How many companies would want to locate in the park if they knew would-be criminals were being tried every day? Not every company handles major items we would consider dangerous, but there are accidents and even what many would consider minor could be major in the eyes of others. Commissioners, you are worrying about what the public will think. We are asking the public for you and hope you listen because this could be accomplished much more cheaply than the present idea and better yet much faster. From what we hear, no one likes East Milton or the Industrial Park and time is running out with the City of Milton to tear down those portables. Time for a Solomon x to the courthouse

PAGE 5

Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A5 Wednesday, January 11, 2012 601 1836

PAGE 6

Local A6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012

PAGE 7

By Paula Kelley Florida Freedom Newspapers Emerald Coast Dragway in Holt has closed its gates. After a two-year legal bat tle and hundreds of thousands of dollars, it is with mixed emotions that we announce Emerald Coast Dragway is closing, racetrack owners Richard and Kelly Stephens announced in a written state ment carried by several online racing sites. When we pur chased the track three years ago we were unaware of the tracks true nancial situation and all the major improve ments needed. After investing our life savings, and ghting for a business that we are very passionate about, we have de cided to move on. The track, located adjacent to Interstate 10 on Garner Landing Road, was popular with locals and attracted rac ers from out of town as well. Tim and Sonya Tindle, own ers of Tindle Racing Team, sold Emerald Coast Dragway to the Stephens, who could not be reached for comment, in September 2008. They stopped making payments to us in June 2009 and their explanation in the December press release makes it sound like we dont have the track, but we do, So nya Tindle said. The circuit court said it belongs to Tindle Raceway Holdings and it does. And we have shown it to sev eral prospective buyers and we hope to have good news for racing fans in the very near fu ture perhaps as soon as next week, she said. Emerald Coast Dragway had just added a new drifting course to the facility in Sep tember. The gure eight was to be completed in the spring of 2012. In 2006, the track proved itself one of the quickest eighth-mile tracks anywhere in the world, with one of the rst three-second pro-modi eds run by Alabamian Joey Moore. Glenn Price raced the Em erald Coast Dragway track many times over the past few years and said that as a businessman he understands how hard it is for small-town tracks to stay open and make a prot. With insurance, fuel costs rising, wages, maintenance and equipment and track upkeep, you have it stacked against you going in, Price said. Then you have to charge admission and, for an average family with a couple of kids, the parents cant spend $100 to go to the races every weekend. I personally just dont see how it will ever reopen unless someone has more money than sense and that is sad. My family loves racing. But buy ing a track in todays world is like buying a pig in a poke. There has been specula tion on online racing forums that Johnny Jordan, who ran Emerald Coast Dragway for four years prior to the pur chase by the Stephens, would reopen the track. Jordan said, however, he was not in the mix to lease, manage or purchase the facility. Its a long drawn out story but that is a great track and I hope Tim and Sonya (Tindle) have everything worked out soon and that it reopens, Jor dan said in a phone interview. A Sports Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A7 Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Tide REPORT Pensacola Bay Thursday, Jan. 12 12:04 AM CST High tide 0.93 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 8:47 AM CST Moonset 9:59 AM CST Low tide -0.35 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 8:52 PM CST Moonrise Friday, Jan. 13 12:51 AM CST High tide 0.68 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 9:23 AM CST Moonset 9:54 AM CST Low tide -0.14 Feet 5:08 PM CST Sunset 9:54 PM CST Moonrise Saturday, Jan. 14 1:50 AM CST High tide 0.38 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 9:17 AM CST Low tide 0.04 Feet 9:59 AM CST Moonset 4:33 PM CST High tide 0.43 Feet 5:09 PM CST Sunset 10:57 PM CST Moonrise Sunday, Jan. 15 12:54 AM CST Low tide 0.07 Feet 4:30 AM CST High tide 0.09 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 6:53 AM CST Low tide 0.08 Feet 10:37 AM CST Moonset 4:27 PM CST High tide 0.65 Feet 5:10 PM CST Sunset East Bay Thursday, Jan. 12 12:47 AM CST High tide 1.11 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 8:46 AM CST Moonset 11:15 AM CST Low tide -0.42 Feet 5:06 PM CST Sunset 8:50 PM CST Moonrise Friday, Jan. 13 1:34 AM CST High tide 0.81 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 9:22 AM CST Moonset 11:12 AM CST Low tide -0.17 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 9:53 PM CST Moonrise Saturday, Jan. 14 2:33 AM CST High tide 0.46 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 9:58 AM CST Moonset 10:35 AM CST Low tide 0.05 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 5:18 PM CST High tide 0.52 Feet 10:56 PM CST Moonrise Sunday, Jan. 15 2:12 AM CST Low tide 0.09 Feet 5:13 AM CST High tide 0.11 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 8:09 AM CST Low tide 0.10 Feet 10:36 AM CST Moonset 5:08 PM CST Sunset 5:10 PM CST High tide 0.78 Feet Blackwater River Thursday, Jan. 12 2 1:43 AM CST High tide 1.11 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 8:47 AM CST Moonset 11:45 AM CST Low tide -0.42 Feet 5:06 PM CST Sunset 8:51 PM CST Moonrise Friday, Jan. 13 2:30 AM CST High tide 0.81 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 9:22 AM CST Moonset 11:42 AM CST Low tide -0.17 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 9:53 PM CST Moonrise Saturday, Jan. 14 3:29 AM CST High tide 0.46 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 9:58 AM CST Moonset 11:05 AM CST Low tide 0.05 Feet 5:08 PM CST Sunset 6:14 PM CST High tide 0.52 Feet 10:57 PM CST Moonrise Sunday, Jan. 15 2:42 AM CST Low tide 0.09 Feet 6:09 AM CST High tide 0.11 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 8:39 AM CST Low tide 0.10 Feet 10:36 AM CST Moonset 5:08 PM CST Sunset 6:06 PM CST High tide 0.78 Feet Navarre Beach Thursday, Jan. 12 2 6:15 AM CST Low tide -0.15 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 8:46 AM CST Moonset 5:06 PM CST Sunset 8:50 PM CST Moonrise 9:37 PM CST High tide 0.84 Feet Friday, Jan. 13 6:14 AM CST Low tide -0.01 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 9:22 AM CST Moonset 2:38 PM CST High tide 0.43 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 5:11 PM CST Low tide 0.37 Feet 9:47 PM CST High tide 0.61 Feet 9:53 PM CST Moonrise Saturday, Jan. 14 6:16 AM CST Low tide 0.12 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 9:58 AM CST Moonset 2:40 PM CST High tide 0.61 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 7:41 PM CST Low tide 0.35 Feet 9:23 PM CST High tide 0.36 Feet 10:56 PM CST Moonrise Sunday, Jan. 15 6:04 AM CST Low tide 0.18 Feet 6:44 AM CST Sunrise 10:35 AM CST Moonset 2:46 PM CST High tide 0.82 Feet 5:08 PM CST Sunset PJ-SPAD1212120051 2077496 Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D., Natural Health Consultant Angel Hill, Ph.D., Natural Health Consultant Dennis Reynolds, M.Ed., Herbal Information Specialist DeAnn Hammond: Natural Health Advisor A LTERNATIVE H EALTH F OOD S TORE 6010144 As seen on Dr. Oz. Up to 9.4% belly fat loss according to a 16-week Ohio State University study. Available in delicious Berry or Tangerine flavor. Jumpstart your weight loss, supercharge your energy level and flush away toxins and waste. Berry Energize liquid in the morning and Citrus Eliminate liquid at night. Boost metabolism of fats and sugars with a detoxifying blend of 29 whole herbs. Quit Smoking! 3-part herbal internal cleanse to help reduce your desire to smoke. 2-part homeopathic to reduce tobacco cravings, calm nervous tension, relieve irritability and detoxify. Angel Hill, Ph.D. is now conducting Natural Health Assessments. Call to schedule an appointment. A New Year, a New You Lose Weight Taken in mid-September, the Emerald Coast Dragway offered racing in several classications. COUR T E S Y O F J U STIN F OU NTAIN Popular Holt racetrack closes

PAGE 8

By Bill Gamblin sports@srpressgazette.com Central High School on Saturday was the center of basketball as homecoming was just part of a packed house that saw the Jaguars sweep Bethlethem in a boy-girl basketball doubleheader. Bethlehem looked to put a damper on the evening in the rst quarter as they jumped out to an early lead before Central would rally to win 79-66 and complete the sweep. Zach Wright and Gavin Richardson were the one two punch as they scored 25 and 24 points respectively as Central improved to 6-8 on the season. Richardson would record a doubledouble as he grabbed 19 rebounds in the win. After falling behind 13-9, the Jags came to life outscoring Bethlehem and its full court press 20-11 to take a 29-24 lead it would never relinquish. Bryce Kareski added 18 points to put three Jags in double digits as Central had two starters injured from a loss to Pensac ola Catholic earlier in the week. On Thursday the boys lost to Paxton at home 61-43. In the loss Wright had 17 points. In the girls game, it was a very physical contest despite Central winning 55-29 over Bethlehem. The Lady Jags (9-7) jumped out to an 11-3 lead before exploding in the second quarter to lead at intermission 34-7. Makayla Simmons nished with 22 points while Sarah Forsythe added 10 in the win. We have come a long way and have played as a team since the second half of the tournament in Jay, said Central head coach Kristen Wright. The girls are get ting the condence and are starting to feel they can play with anyone now. They proved that point on Thursday by defeated Paxton 43-42. The Lady Jags rallied with in the fourth quarter by outscoring Paxton 17-8 in the fourth quarter. I think I had a few heart attacks in the fourth quarter because the game went back and forth at the end, Wright said. Forsythe led Central with 18 points while Simmons nished with 10. The Lady Jags win ended a 50 plus game district winning streak for Paxton. In other boys action, Milton defeated Escambia on Satur day night 58-54. Milton (12-3) outscored the Gators 20-11 in the fourth quar ter to secure the win and im proved to 12-3. Haylen Washington scored 18 and Isaiah Jones chipped in 13 to lead Milton. On Friday Milton defeated Pace 46-36 in a game that had been scheduled for Saturday. Ryan Nocacic led Milton with 13 points and Bobby Green chipped in 11. Tyler Armstrong led Pace with 22 points in the loss. In girls action, Milton needed overtime Saturday night to defeat Escambia 43-35. Escambia rallied to force the ex tra frame where Milton outscored the Lady Gators 8-1. Cierrah Jackson led Milton with 21 points in the win. On Thursday Pace defeated Milton 47-33. The Lady Patriots outscored Milton 26-10 in the second half. Taron Bright led Pace with 16 points while Sara Foster added 10. Milton was led by Dejhanae Barnes with 10. Baker defeated Jay 56-46 on Thurs day. The Lady Gators had to rally in the second half and outscored the Lady Royals 33-14 in the win. Hillary Hendricks led Jay (9-6) with 17 points while Becca Calloway and Tessa Hendricks added 13 and 12 points respectively. www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, January 11, 2012 A Page 8 Section SP O RT S SPORTS SIDELINE Gospel Projects Baseball Registration Registration for Tee Ball, Girls Fast-Pitch Softball and Boys Baseball will begin Jan. 17. You can register from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon day through Friday and from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday at the Santa Rosa Christian School. Gospel Projects Youth Ath letic Club provides programs for children ranging in ages from 3-and-a-half to 14 and beginning this spring will be afliated with USSSA Recre ation play. If you would like more in formation or are interested in coaching, umpiring or sponsoring a team, call Tod Brainard at 623-4671. All returning players from last year must register this year. GPYAC reserves the right to close registration in any league before the Feb. 18 deadline if numbers dictate. Pace High School Patriot Alumni Day Pace High School will host its fourth annual Patriot Alum ni Day and 30 inning game on Feb. 4 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pace High School Base ball Stadium. There will be an alumni homerun derby, 30 in nings of baseball and homerun derby with prizes for the chil dren. Admission $5 for ages 13 and up, while Pace students are free with a student ID. Patriot Yard Sale Pace High Baseball Boosters will have a yard sale starting at 8 a.m. until everything is gone Satur day, Feb. 4. The sale will be at the left eld entrance to the ballpark. Homecoming sweep BILL G A M B LIN | Press Gazette Makayla Simmons battled against a host of defenders to get a shot off Saturday as she led Central with 22 points in the 55-29 win over Bethlehem. Central boys, girls defeat Bethlehem BILL G A M B LIN | Press Gazette Lana Chechak dribbles near mid-eld as the Pace offense sets up for another attack against Pensacola. Pace girls continue to kick along By Bill Gamblin sports@srpressgazette.com Despite a series of knee injuries, the Lady Patriots of Pace continue to move along this soccer season. Friday night, the Lady Pats (15-2) defeated Tate 6-0 at home. Mary Katherine Taylor scored a hat trick and an assist in the win, while Taylor Burkhart, Lana Chechak and Christy Gash also found the back of the net. Hannah Abrams and Eleana Colvin each nished the game with two saves each. The Lady Patriots nished the game with four shots on its net minder Katelyn Burkhart. On Thursday only a short offensive burst was needed as Pace did away with the Pen sacola Lady Tigers. In a span of a minute and a half, Pace jumped out to a 3-0 lead. When the nal whistle sounded Pace had registered a 4-1 win with Burkhart making ve saves in the win. In other girls action it was Washington defeating Milton 1-0 Friday night as Jenna Wade managed to stop one of two shots on goal in the loss. Milton nished the game with 10 shots on goal but none of them could nd the back of the net. In boys action Friday, Milton defeated Walton County 8-0 at home. Jeff Ranson registered a hattrick for the Panthers who are now 6-8-2 on the season and Kai Greene chipped in two goals. Quinton Dobbs made one save in the shutout win. We have come a long way and have played as a team since the second half of the tournament in Jay. Kristen Wright Central head coach 3 Patriots named to Class 6A All-State By Bill Gamblin sports@srpressgazette.com Three Pace seniors got great news over the week end as they were named to the Class 6A All-State foot ball team by the Florida Sportswriters. Leading the way for Pace on the rst team was senior receiver Patrick Maddox. Maddox, who has own under the radar when it comes to college teams, caught 46 passes this sea son for Pace and accounted for 1,014 yards with seven touchdowns and one two point conversion. Maddox also saw some action in the backeld as he rushed for 40 yards on ve carries. Ironically Maddoxs 1,056 total yards was second on the team behind junior run ning back J.C. Curry who ac counted for 1,474 yards with 61 coming as a receiver. Making the second team was offensive lineman Mi chael Campbell who helped anchor an offensive line with four other juniors that went 10-3 on the season in 2011 that ended with a loss in the Class 6A Region 1 Finals. Honored with a selection on the third team was senior Austin Houser who was a defensive juggernaut in the secondary as he nished the year with 30 tackles, but led the Patriots with seven in terceptions including his big night in the Class 6A Region 1 Seminals against Pensaco la High School. Other players from Santa Rosa County to make the Class 6A All-State squad were Navarre running back Dwayne Carter on the second team and Na varres Brad Leggett as a wide receiver on the third team. P A TRICK MADDOX MICHAEL CAMPBELL AUSTIN HOUSER Honored with a selection on the third team was senior Austin Houser who was a defensive juggernaut in the secondary as he nished the year with 30 tackles, but led the Patriots with seven interceptions including his big night in the Class 6A Region 1 Seminals against Pensacola High School. BILL G A M B LIN | Press Gazette A Pace ford makes a crossing pass Thursday during the rst half against Pensacola.

PAGE 9

LIFESTY L E www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, January 11, 2012 B Page 1 Section HAIR TODAY GONE TOMORROW By Bill Gamblin news@ srpressgazette. com Rush Hendricks has gotten used to turning heads. While at Jay High School, he did it as an athlete playing football, basketball and baseball. After that he was turning heads because the clean cut kid they had watched growing up had let his hair grow out, and to nd out what he was doing, you had to ask him. That is the way Hendricks was raised by his parents, Rick and Nina Hendricks. Friday night, Rush washed his mane one nal time and allowed his mother to collect his donation for Beautiful Lengths, an organization which takes donations like Hendricks and turn them into wigs for cancer patients. I havent cut my hair since two days before my ofcial visit to the University of South Alabama, Hendricks said Friday. Next weekend would have been two years I have been letting my hair grow out. Two other tight ends on the team (Kevin Helmes and Ryne Baxter) and I have not been cutting our hair and now mine is long enough to donate it. I think they are more upset I am getting it cut than anyone else. Another reason behind his donation is a friend of the family, Linda Ryan. Ryan was Brant Hendricks host mom while in Deland, Fla., for the NorthSouth All-Star Baseball Game before he graduated and moved on to play baseball for the University of Alabama. We have gotten to know them and become friends over the years, Nina said. She was in remission when Brandt stayed with them and now she is going through her third bout with cancer. If there is one person who is sad to see Rush cut his hair it was Nina. His hair is so pretty, Nina said. But if he is tired of it and it is becoming more difcult to care for then I understand. Rushs father, on the other hand, was happy to see his son with shorter hair but was immune to his sons new appearance after his hair was cut. It he makes the grades and stays out of trouble he can do what he wants to do, Rick said. The grades are the easy part for Hendricks, who has made the Deans list ve straight semesters in a row since enrolling at South Alabama. After growing his hair for 2 years, Rush Hendricks cuts it off for charity P hotos by BILL GAM B LIN | Press Gazette Nina Hendricks measures Rushs hair to make sure it meets the eight inch requirement by Beautiful Lengths. When all was said and done Rush Hendricks had cut seven pony tails of hair for his donation. Hendricks is feeling the pain as his mother, Nina, gathers his hair. Hendricks is all smiles as he prepares for the nal ponytail to be cut Friday night. After the unveiling, Hendricks and his sister, Tessa, smile for a photo. Some of Hendricks ponytails measured just shy of 12 inches in length, and they only have to be 8 inches in length to make a donation. Hendricks kept talking about getting his hair cut the rest of the way after his mother nished collecting the donation. Tessa Hendricks seemed a little envious of brother Rushs hair before he donated it to Beautiful Lengths, which will turn his donated hair into wigs for cancer patients. I havent cut my hair since two days before my ofcial visit to the University of South Alabama, Hendricks said Friday. Next weekend would have been two years I have been letting my hair grow out.

PAGE 10

City of Milton meetings Miltons Technology Committee will meet at 8 a.m. Jan. 9 in Conference Room B at Milton City Hall. Local Board for Emer gency Food and Shelter Funding will meet on Jan. 12 at 2 p.m. in Conference Room B at Milton City Hall. Miltons Public Works Committee will meet at 8 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 16 in Conference Room B of City Hall. The Milton Finance Committee will meet Jan. 19 at 10 a.m. in Confer ence Room B at Milton City Hall. The City of Milton Ordi nance Review Committee will meet at 8 a.m. Thurs day, Jan. 19, in Conference Room B at Milton City Hall. The City of Milton Parks and Recreation Committee will meet at 8:30 a.m. Mon day, Jan. 23 in Conference Room B of City Hall. Miltons Benevolent Cemetery Board will meet at 3 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23 in Conference Room B of City Hall. For more information, contact the city managers ofce at 983-5411. All meet ings are open to the public. Morning Glory Circle of the Milton Garden Club meeting On Jan. 12, at 9:30 a.m. the Morning Glory Circle of the Milton Garden Club will hold their monthly meeting at the Garden Center, 5256 Alabama Street, Milton. Co-Chairman, Mary Hay les, will introduce Physical Therapist and Teacher, El lie Pong, as guest speaker. Ms. Pong will present an amusing and informative discussion of a home gar deners personal trials and tribulations in the Florida Panhandle during the past 6 years. Participants will have illustrated booklets and up to date information on a few pest and disease problems that seem ram pant in this area. There will be innovative ideas shared that support gardening on a shoestring and how to avoid the use of toxic prod ucts. The presenter will share samples of products that may interest others with the same gardening challenges. Lunch will be served after the program. This is an opportunity for all those interested in be coming a member or learn ing more about the Milton Garden Club to come and join us. For additional in formation, please call 9947974 or 626-2003. Free Christmas Tree Mulch Now Available Many people in Santa Rosa County recycled their Christmas trees this year, and they have now been ground and the mulch is available on a rst come, rst serve basis at the Green-Up Nursery at 6758 Park Ave. in Milton. The mulch is in the parking lot, and people must bring their own trailer, container or pick-up to get it along with a shovel or pitch fork to load with. For more information, call the Santa Rosa Clean Community System at 6231930 or visit www.srclean. org. Milton Great Books Dinner and Discussion Club On Saturday, Jan. 14, the Milton Great Books Dinner and Discussion Club will discuss a short story by No ble Prize in Literature win ner, Nadine Gordimer. The setting is South Africa, and the meal will feature South African cooking. Call Con nie OConnor 564-0498 for directions to 5736 Zinnia in Milton. Autism Pensacola announces Kids for Camp application period At 6 p.m Jan. 17., Autism Pensacola (API) will host an informational meeting to begin the 2012 applica tion period for Kids for Camp. This meeting will be held at the Pollak Train ing Center of Arc Gateway, 1000 E. Faireld Drive in Pensacola at the corner of 10th and Faireld. Child care is available for chil dren of all ages, including teens and young adults, with reservations. Please email reservations@au tismpensacola.org with the subject line January meet ing childcare no later than Jan. 14 to reserve a spot. Kids for Camp is a six-week summer learning lab for children with autism and their friends ages 3-22. This day camp is held in partner ship with Escambia County schools, Sacred Heart Au tism Training Center, UWF and other area agencies. Applications for camp will be available at the meeting or online after Jan 17. All applications are due Feb. 21. For more information, call API at 434-7171 or Su san Byram, executive di rector, at 450-0656. Dogwood Circle, Milton Garden Club Soup and Salad Friday The Dogwood Circle, Milton Garden Club will host its 20th Annual Soup and Salad on Jan. 13, 2012, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 5256 Alabama St. in Mil ton. The Circles cooks are making their tasty soups, Traditional Potato Cheese, Chili, Chicken Tortilla, and Minestrone served with a crisp salad, tea/coffee and homemade desserts. You and your friends will enjoy this lunch so dont miss it as it happens once a year. There will be lots of door prizes, which are given away to the lucky drawn ticket numbers. The cost is, adults $7, children ages 3-12 $3.50 and under 3 eat free. Take-out orders avail able for you to pickup, just call 626-2003. English as a Second Language Classes Santa Rosa Adult School is offering English as a Second Language classes to aid the growing popu lation of non-native Eng lish speakers in the area. The classes will provide life skills that are needed in reading, writing, and speaking English. The pro grams goal is to help stu dents function effectively in their daily routines. Classes are $30 per term with proof of Florida residency for the last 12 months. The classes are $120 per term without proof of residency. Classes are from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. The next term begins Jan. 23. However, students may enroll at any time during the term. All classes will be at the Adult Learning Center, 6751 Berryhill St., Milton. For more information, call 983-5165 or 983-5710. Purple Heart Chapter Meeting The Military Order of The Purple Heart, Chap ter/Unit 566 will meet at 11 a.m. Jan. 21 at the West Milton Church of Christ on U.S. Highway 90. The guest speaker will be Cindy Brad ford. She will be speaking on Homeless Veterans. The Ladies Auxiliary Mili tary Order of The Purple Heart will be serving a meal following the meeting for a donation. All Purple Heart Recipients and their spouses are welcome and encouraged to attend. Call Commander Eustice Shiv er at 994-3880 for more in formation. Local B2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012 ...a weekly column answering your questions with Biblical answers about life. Ask the Preache r Dear A.C., Thank you for your kind words about my column. King Solomon wrote Ecclesiastes. It was written during a time life. He had wandered away from the freshness of his relationship with the Lord God who had blessed him with his wealth and power. Although there is much wisdom and warning to be gleaned from this book, and although the Word of God by word of ultimate truth of God Himself. You often hear the misguided and incorrect interpretation of life spoken by a man who had wondered far from God. Ecclesiastes is a journal or a diary of man on a spiritual satisfaction or purpose in life. Solomon often referred to life as The particular verse you refer to is Ecclesiastes 9:11. mined the time and the exact places where men should live! God has a purpose for your time and place, A.C.! I believe it is true that God is actively involved in our lives. I do not believe however that he ordains every detail that happens to us. We are free agents in many ways. We make choices. Those choices impact our lives and futures and God holds us accountable for our choices. We are eternally accountable for the choice of choosing or rejecting his offer of salvation through the blood of His Son, Jesus Christ. Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church in Milton. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree from Florida State University and a Master of Divinity Degree from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been the Pastor of HHBC since 1987. For 10 years he has also served as an International Youth Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention, preaching to multiplied thousands all over the U.S. and Canada. For more information about HHBC call 623-8959 or 626-8951 or fax, 623 197 If you have a question for ASK THE PREACHER send it to: ASK THE PREACHER, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351 Hickory Hammock Rd, Milton, FL, 32583 Photos by M ATHE W P ELLEG RI N O | Press Gazette Central High School held its basketball homecoming parade on Central School Road Friday afternoon to kick off a weekend which included the Jaguars sweep of Bethlehem High School on Saturday night. More photos can be found online at www.srpressgazette.com and click on staff photos. JAGUARS ROLL INTO HOMECOMING FUN News Briefs

PAGE 11

The following arrests were made beginning Dec. 18 through Dec. 2011. Dec. 18 Drasutis, Harry Alan; Male; 19; 11824 Old Course Rd., Cantonment, Fla.; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Hill, Brian Bartlett; Male; 34; 1411 Joseph Circle, Gulf Breeze; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Trafc Offense DUI and Damage Property. Kelly, Shawn Patrick; Male; 41; 6101 College Park way, Pensacola; Trafc Of fense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Serna, Ruben Lariz; Male; 38; Holiday Inn, Mont gomery, Ala.; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Webb, Donald Lee; Male; 56; 2717 Summertree Lane, Gulf Breeze; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Coppedge, Jr., David Wayne; Male; 15; 5770 Her mitage Circle, Milton; Dam age Property Criminal Mis chief $1,000 or More; Bur glary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Moegenburg, Noah Ber; Male; 18; 930 West Beach Blvd., Gulf Shores, Ala.; Larceny Grand Theft $5,000 Less Than $10,000; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Un armed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Wease, Spencer Stan hope; Male; 17; 4632 Gunter Rd., Milton; Burglary Dwell ing Structure or Convey ance Armed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Larceny Grand Theft of Fire arm (2 counts). Dec. 19 Campbell, Kelly Suzanne; Female; 33; 5013 Guernsey Rd., Pace; Battery on Ofcer, Fireghter, EMT, Etc. DeJong, David Edward; Male; 33; 1829 S. Chicago Ave., Mineapolis, Minn.; Fraud Swindle Defraud In keeper Under $300; Damage Property Criminal Mischief $200 and Under; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed. Gibbs, James Cameron; Male; 22; 7471 N. Palafox Rd., Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Harsanje, Michael Vin cent; Male; 35; 2722 Baylen Court, Navarre; Cruelty To wards Child Transmit Infor mation Harmful to Minors (4 counts). Peterson, Keith Madi son; Male; 34; 1829 Fifth Ave. South, Minneapolis, Minn; Fraud Swindle Defraud In keeper Under $300; Damage Property Criminal Mischief $200 and Under; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed. Schieber, Tyler James; Male; 19; 8141 Menorca St., Navarre; Fraud False Owner Information Pawned Items $300 or More; Dealing in Sto len Property (3 counts). Shoemaker, Christian Pe ter; Male; 21; 8977 Eagle Nest Dr., Navarre; Damage Prop erty Criminal Mischief $1,000 or More; Burglary Dwelling or Structure Cause Damage Over $1,000; Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree Sec ond Offense; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Dam age Property Criminal Mis chief Over $200 Under $1,000; Burglary Unoccupied Struc ture Unarmed; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Waldron, Jerrod Bryan; Male; 23; 20769 SE Sherry Ave. (Absconded), Blount stown, Fla.; Probation Vio lation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Shoemaker, Christan Pe ter; Male; 21; 8977 Eagle Nest Dr., Navarre; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Dec. 20 Castleberry, Shanna Olga Maria; Female; 26; 8166 Toledo St., Navarre; Drug Possession Listed Chemi cal With Intent To Manufac ture Controlled Substances; Drugs Produce Metham phetamine; Drug Posses sion Controlled Substance Without Prescription Includ ing Meth. Dolan, Jeremy Brooks; Male; 31; 2496 Highway 98 W, Mary Esther, Fla.; Assault on Ofcer, Fireghter, EMT, Etc.; Felony Probation Viola tion. KeKennedy Jr., Clifford Eugene; Male; 47; Wishbone Circle, Cantonment, Fla.; Drug Possession Listed Chemical For Manufacture of Controlled Substance. McDaniel, Nolan Ray; Male; 23; 4964 Lambert Lane, Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Adams, Waylon Lee; Male; 23; 2542 Bluewater Dr., Navarre; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While Li cense Suspended Habitual Offender. Grobsky, Alexander Mat thew; Male; 14; 3131 Laurel Dr., Gulf Breeze; Damage Property Criminal Mischief Church Synagogue Mosque or Religious Article. Krueger, Matthew Todd; Male; 38; 1 Porti no Dr., Pensacola; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation Within 10 Years. Wilson, Matthew Hunter; Male; 18; 311 W. Burgess Rd., Pensacola; Grand Theft; Trespassing. Pugh, Oliva Dee; Female; 60; 437 Fairpoint Dr., Gulf Breeze; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Krueger, Matthew Todd; Male; 38; 1 Portino Dr., Pen sacola; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Dec. 21 Feerick, Seth David; Male; 18; 1165 Sterling Point Dr., Gulf Breeze; Fraud False Owner Info Pawned Items $300 or More (4 counts); Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Dealing In Stolen Property; Fraud Impersonating Indi vidual Attempt to Use Iden tication of Another Person Without Consent (4 counts); Forgery Alter Public Record, Certicate, Etc. (4 counts). Ausherman, Christopher Brice; Male; 21; 144 Stearns St., Gulf Breeze; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Blevins, Shawn Riley; Male; 22; 6428 Julia Dr., Mil ton; Battery (D/V) Touch or Strike; Resist Ofcer Ob struct Without Violence; Ob structing Justice Intimidate, Threaten, Etc. a Victim, Wit ness, or Informant. Chappel, Tyler James; Male; 20; 14064 Palm St., Ma deira Beach, Fla.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Deason, Jared Dwane; Male; 45; 78 Brenda Lane, Mary Esther, Fla.; Out of State Fugitive From Justice. Hudson, Marcail Lefay; Male; 34; 5949 Queen St., Mil ton; Battery (D/v) Commit Domestic Battery By Stran gulation. Owens, Daryl David; Male; 27; 4074 Garcon Point Rd., Milton; Aggravated Bat tery (D/V) Person Uses A Deadly Weapon. Mayer, Blair Holt; Male; 42; 160 Knotts Place, Destin, Fla.; Grand Theft; Embezzlement Make False Entry in Corporate Books (7 counts). Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B3 Wednesday, January 11, 2012 The Santa Rosa County Inland Potable Water Wellfield Protection Workgroup will hold a meeting to review the boundaries and background material addressing ground water protection for public dissemination to the Zoning Board and Board of County Commissioners. Public input will be accepted during this meeting. The meeting will be conducted as follows: Please direct questions to Paul Miller at 850-981-7075 or Paulm@santarosa.fl.gov line of any email correspondence. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodations will be made to provide access to the workshop. Please make requests to Mr. Miller at least 48 hours in advance. 6010471 SHERIFFS REPORT KEY MVOP misdemeanor violation of probation FVOP felony violation of probation Agg aggravated Poss possession Meth methamphet amine DUI driving under the inuence DWLSR driving while license suspended or revoked FTA failure to appear FTR failure to register SF sentenced felony SM sentenced misde meanor LEO law enforcement ofcer DV Domestic Violence

PAGE 12

Local B4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Classifieds B4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012

PAGE 13

Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B5 Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Classifieds Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Santa Rosas Press Gazette | B5 12/1048 NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a WRIT OF EXECUTION issued in Circuit Court of Santa Rosa County, Florida, on the 10th day of November, 2011 in the cause wherein Blanche M. Johnson was Plaintiff and State Farm Florida Insurance Company was Defendant, being Case No. 05-368CA01 in said court, I, Wendell Hall, As Sheriff of Santa Rosa County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff, Blanche M. Johnson in and to the following described real property, to wit: DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY 2672 Settlers Colony Blvd. Gulf Breeze, Florida Lot 5, SETTLERS COLONY AT VILLA VENYCE, FIRST ADDITION, TOWNHOUSES SUBDIVISION, Santa Rosa County, Florida, according to plat thereof recorded in Plat Book C at Page 121 of the public records of said County. 2674 Settlers Colony Blvd Gulf Breeze, Florida Lot 6, SETTLERS COLONY AT VILLA VENYCE, FIRST ADDITION, TOWNHOUSES SUBDIVISION, Santa Rosa County, Florida, according to plat thereof recorded in Plat Book C at Page 121 of the public records of said County. And on the 24th day of January, 2012 I shall offer this property for sale, at the east front door of the Santa Rosa Criminal Justice Facility, 5755 East Milton Rd, Milton, Florida, Santa Rosa County, Florida, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. on or as soon thereafter as possible. I will offer for sale all the said plaintiffs, Blanche M. Johnson right, title and interest in the aforesaid real property, at public auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above-described execution. WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Deputy James E. Chessher James E. Chessher Deputy Sheriff IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN DISABILITIES ACT, PERSONS NEEDING A SPECIAL ACCOMODATION TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHALL CONTACT JANICE PLATT (850) 983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SALE DATE. 12/21, 28, 1/4 & 1/11 12/1048 1/8 PUBLIC NOTICE SANTA ROSA BAY BRIDGE AUTHORITY The Santa Rosa Bay Bridge Authority Meeting is scheduled forWednesday January 18, 2012 in the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Conference Room C, at 5:30 p.m. (cst) located at 6025 Old Bagdad Highway Milton, Florida. For further information call (850) 981-2718. Please use rear entrance. 1/11 1/8 1/9 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SHI Gulf Breeze LLC, c/o AEW SHI, LP (Legal), Two Seaport Lane, Boston, MA 02110, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of The Blake at Gulf Breeze, with its principal place of business in the County of Santa Rosa, State of Florida, intends to file an Application for Registration of Fictitious Name with the Florida Department of State. 1/11 1/9 12/1070 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA FAMILY LAW DIVISION CASE NO.: 2011-DR-1055 DIVISION: B RE: The Matter of MARCUS ARON BROWN, Petitioner/Father, and VICTORIA LYNN BURKETT, Respondent/Mother. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: VICTORIA LYNN BURKETT Last known address of: 1225 Fretz Road, Pensacola, FL 32534 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Verified Petition to Determine Paternity and for Other Related Relief has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on Ann E. Meador, Esquire, Attorney for Marcus Aron Brown, Petitioner, at 900 N. Palafox Street, Pensacola, FL 32501, on or before January 25, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this court before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file a Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedures, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on December 16, 2011. CLERK OF THE COURT CIRCUIT COURT SEAL BY:Richelle Germann Deputy Clerk 12/28, 1/4, 11, 18 12/1070 1/7 NOTICE OF SALE Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on January 26, 2012 at 10 A.M. AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED 2000 DODGE VIN# 1B4HS28ZXYF111026 Located at: 6141 HIGHWAY 90 WEST, MILTON, FL 32570 SANTA ROSA Any person(s) claiming any interest(s) in the above vehicles contact: Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc., (954) 920-6020 ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC # AB-0001256 1/11(1) 1/7

PAGE 14

Local B6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE 850-995-8778 Sale prices good through Jan 1117, 2012 MON TUE THUR FRI SAT SUN Angel Soft Bath Tissue 5 46 24 pk Sweet Sue Chicken Dumplings 1 84 24 oz S a l e J a n u a r y 1 1 1 7 2 0 1 2 Florida Strawberries 1 73 1 lb bag Red Diamond Coffee 7 68 34.5 oz Ronco Spaghetti 89 16 oz Lance Home Pack Crackers 1 55 8 pack Jiffy Corn Muffin Mix 48 8 oz Bryan Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna 98 12 oz Johnsonville Smoked Brats 2 47 14 oz Bar S Jumbo Frank 90 16 oz Sea Best Tilapia Fillets 14 93 5 lb bag Farmland Stack Pack Bacon 4 34 24 oz Land O Frost Bistro Ham or Turkey 1 93 8 oz Boneless Bottom Round Beef Roast 2 88 lb Farmland Sliced Boneless Pork Loins 1 98 lb Hillshire Farm Smoked Sausage 2 08 14 oz Family Pack Bottom Round Beef Steaks 3 11 lb Fresh Express Hearts of Romaine Salad 2 55 10 oz Gwaltney Mild or Hot Roll Sausage 98 12 oz OnCor Family Pack Chicken Nibbler or Dyno Bites 3 78\ 35 oz Green Giant Iceberg Lettuce 84 head Florida Navel Oranges 2 16 4 lb bag Vlasic Kosher Spears 1 74 24 oz Vigo Yellow Rice 39 5 oz Alpo Dog Food 7 01 16 lb Georgia Red Tomatoes 51 15 oz Van Camp Baked Beans 1 26 27 oz Natures Crystal Spring Water 1 86 12 pk 16.9 oz Maxwell House Coffee Original Roast 8 95 34.5 oz Pet Evaporated Milk 89 12 oz

PAGE 15

FREE FREE Wednesday January 11, 2012 FREE EDITION TAKE ONE S arah Comito rolls out of bed before dawn most days and slips quietly out of her house. Before her rambunctious toddler wakes up, she heads off to work as a waitress in an upscale weight-loss resort in Malibu. The hour-long commute is exhausting, but the 33-year-old is thankful to make the trip when she remembers where she and her husband were four years ago: living in a tent in a nearby river bottom, strung out on methamphetamine. Now Comito fears the progress they have made since then could be lost as California cuts her from a vital child care assistance program, more than doubling the cost of her sons day care to $600 a month. On a $10 hourly wage, she said shed be better off quitting her job and staying home with her son while her husband works as a professional tree cutter. But if she stops working, they cant make rent. The only thing I can do is attempt to prepare for the worst, Comito said, while watching 3-year-old Matthew dart across the yard at the couples workingclass apartment complex in Oxnard. For years, child care assistance programs offered low-income parents such as Comito a lifeline. But state legislatures dealing with multibillion dollar budget de cits during the recession have been targeting child care subsidies as one way to help balance their state budgets. The cuts have come at just the time many parents need that help the most because full-time, well-paying jobs are in such short supply. In the last scal year, combined state and federal funding for child care assistance fell by 2 percent to $12 billion, according to a 46-state analysis by the National Conference of State Legislatures. Federal stimulus money gave a temporary boost to the subsidies, but nearly all that money stopped in 2011. At the same time, states reduced their general fund spending for child care programs by 7 percent during the current scal year, including a 25 percent decline in California, 30 percent in Hawaii and 10 percent in Michigan. In the scal year that ended June 30, 22 states reported declines in their budgets for child care subsidies, according to the state legislative group. But providing child care assistance to low-income families, a central tenet of the countrys 1996 welfare overhaul, is seen as critical to getting people back to work at a time when the country is struggling to reduce unemployment. The goal of the programs is to subsidize the cost of day care to help keep poor parents, many of them single mothers, working. Over time, the subsidy is scaled back as parents advance in the labor force and wean themselves off government assistance. Some parents give up jobs and turn to the welfare system if they cant nd affordable child care, but that isnt an option for those who have already used up their entitlements, said Danielle Ewen, a past director of child care and early education for the Center for Law and Social Policy. For those families, there is absolutely no safety net and we dont know what is happening to their kids, but it is absolutely scary to think, Ewen said. It becomes a very desperate, horrible cycle for poor families who are doing everything they can possibly do to become self-suf cient. The cuts have taken different forms. Some states have lowered the income ceiling to determine child care eligibility. Others have capped the number of families that receive assistance and created endless waiting lists or slashed the reimbursement rate paid to day care providers who accept poor children. Parents are coping in different ways. Some have asked their bosses to cut their wages so they continue to qualify for subsidized care. Others have scaled back hours to reduce the time their children are in day care. Some say they are thinking about quitting and going onto welfare. Grace Dixon, a service manager for affordable housing in the eastern San Francisco Bay area city of Alameda, said she has paid as much as she can to day care providers for her 1-year-old daughter and 4-year-old son since she was cut off from assistance in July and saw her child care charges nearly triple to $1,500 a month. What do they want us to do not to work and to get on welfare? Would that be better? And then their taxes are paying for me to sit at home and be on the couch? the 29-year-old college graduate asked. Advocates say some parents will leave their children in dangerous, unsupervised settings when they feel they have no other choice. What you see are very stressed and desperate moms, said Helen Blank, director of leadership and public policy at the National Womens Law Center. Some of them pay huge amounts for child care, and they cant afford to pay enough for food or they lose their house. The scenario plays out differently in different states. In Michigan, the state reduced its budget for subsidized child care this year by lowering the reimbursement rate paid to day care providers. Advocates say the change has made it tough for low-income parents to nd day-care providers willing to take them. Some providers have no incentive to participate especially the highquality providers, said Pat Sorensen, vice president for policy at Michigans Children, an advocacy group. In North Carolina, of cials have extended a waiting list for subsidized child care. The state reduced its funding for child care subsidies by 15 percent this year and has seen the list grow to 50,000 children this year, up from 27,000 children four years ago, according to the state Division of Child Development and Early Education. With this years budget cuts, those numbers have just gone crazy, said Sheila Hoyle, executive director of the Southwestern Child Development Commission, which manages a 600 child-waiting list for seven western North Carolina counties. The cuts to child care subsidies come as cash-strapped states pare back spending in many areas, including education and health services. Weve been going in the right direction to raise the quality of our day care centers and early childhood education, and I think those programs are important. But you have to balance in your budget the money you have, said Nelson Dollar, a Republican state representative in North Carolina who is co-chairman of an appropriations committee. For children, the cuts can mean the difference between a stable, educational child care experience and being shuttled among different providers, family and friends with little consistency. When parents cannot nd affordable care, they often leave children with a neighbor or friend even if they dont trust them. Or they might leave them at home with an older sibling. Theres an impact on that childs development, said Bruce Liggett, executive director of Arizonas Child Care Association, which represents the states licensed providers. Theyre not learning as they would in a child care center and theyre not going to get to kindergarten ready to learn. Its hard to know how many children have been affected by the recent cuts and in what ways. In Arizona, more than 48,000 children were covered by child care subsidies at the beginning of this year. Now, fewer than 29,000 are, Liggett said. Many in Arizona are on a waiting list. Ann Herron, 25, said she signed up as soon as her son was born 2 years ago, but assistance is nowhere in sight. A single mother, Herron said she cant afford to send her son to a day care center, so she has different friends watch him for minimal pay while she works as caregiver at a group home. Its hard on her not knowing who will look after him a month from now. But the Phoenix woman said its also hard on her son, who has little, if any, contact with other children. When he is around kids because he hasnt been around kids he acts crazy. Hes hitting and stuff, Herron said. It is just me and him. State child care cuts force hard choice on parents A ght for funding AP Sarah Comito, a recipient of child care aid, and her, son Matthew, 3, at their home in Oxnard, Calif. Advocates of welfare reform in California often cite one statistic as they have pressed for cuts and changes to the program in recent years: The state has one-eighth of the nations population but one-third of all welfare recipients.

PAGE 16

A2 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, January 11, 2012 P hotos by AP Liz Jenkins, historian and retired educator, cleans the marker of her favorite aunties grave to prepare it for photographing in Archer. A grave at St. Joseph Cemetery in Archer is photographed recently. The number of graves in Alachua County is not known, and probably will never be known. Florence Van Arnam, a Daughters of the Revolution member, cleans off a grave to prepare it for photographing at St. Joseph Cemetery. Tombstone hunters aim to keep history relevant, up-to-date by photographing graves GAINESVILLE (AP) On many Saturdays, a band of people, from grannies to youngsters, root around Alachua County cemeteries. Its not some Twilight saga-inspired mission or a gothic-themed scavenger hunt. Instead, they do it to preserve history and to make that history easier to access on the Internet. Armed with cameras in addition to equipment for cutting through brush they are taking photos of every headstone and marker they can nd and putting them online. Our aim is to photograph every grave marker in Alachua County. In 10 years, they will be 10 years older, and no telling what will have happened to them, said Jim Powell, who leads to effort. There is a lot of history being lost. We just thought that if we take a snapshot of it now, in the future we will have that history. Powell works with historical records for the Alachua County Clerk of the Court Of ce, which is the of cial recordkeeper for the county. Clerk Buddy Irby has long been keen on preserving records and making them publicly available, earning him high marks from individuals and organizations that use the records for a variety of needs from legal action to tracing family ancestry. While Powell hunts up graves on his own time, Irby said the photographs will be a valuable asset to the historical record of the county. All of this is important, especially to people researching their family genealogy and building the history of Alachua County, Irby said. Its a great project. We get so many inquiries from throughout the nation about records we may have here. The number of graves in the county is not known, and probably will never be known. Newnansville Cemetery on County Road 235 near Alachua may be the oldest, Powell said, while Evergreen Cemetery off Southeast 22nd Avenue is one of the largest at least 20,000 markers have been photographed there. But far more dif cult to locate and photograph are the many small, rural graveyards throughout the county. Some are so overgrown that nding the cemetery itself takes perseverance, and then even more dedication to nd the graves within the cemetery. Others are just small family plots that have been lost over time. Still others were part of settlements often African-American that are now little more than a memory to old-timers. Some have only depressions in the ground indicating graves that no longer have markers if they ever did. Ironically, Powell and his volunteers are using the newest technology to nd the oldest cemeteries. One of the early ones we did, we found by using an old map and transferring it through a computer to GPS, Powell said. It was the Trapp family only about ve or six stones. It was a black family, and one of them was in the International Order of Odd Fellows, a fraternal organization, and also the Knights of Pythias. It is history that was here you realize that there was a big enough fraternal organization in that area that was black. What are we missing in our history? Powell is accompanied on his Saturday outings by volunteers often his granddaughters and members of the Alachua County Historical Commission and Daughters of the American Revolution. It turns out the girls have a bit of a competitive streak when it comes to photographing headstones. Both say they can photograph them better than their granddad. They said they also enjoy the community service aspect of the work. It makes me feel like Im making a difference helping people nd their family, Taylor Grif th, 12, said on a break from photographing graves at the St. Josephs Church cemetery near Archer. The oldest Ive seen was someone who died in 1795, or something like that. (The person) was 2 years old. Another frequent volunteer is Florence Van Arnam, 83. She is the fth generation of her family to live in Alachua County and is a member of the DAR and the historical commission. Van Arnam said that putting photos of grave sites online is valuable not only to genealogists but also to elderly or homebound people who want to see the markers to remember a loved one. I think its good to save the past. So many of the stones weve seen are illegible. Theyll be gone soon, she said. The primary website for the photos is wizardofar.org The photos will eventually be archived with the University of Florida, as in this initial example. Preserving history Taylor Grif th photographs a once-hidden gravestone in the woods of St. Joseph Cemetery. On many Saturdays, a band of people root around Alachua County cemeteries, taking photos of every headstone and marker they can nd and putting them online. French man ordered to stay away from actress Kirsten Dunst LOS ANGELES (AP) A judge has ordered a French man to stay away from Kirsten Dunst and not attempt to contact the actress for at least the next three years. Superior Court Judge Carol Boas Goodson issued the order against Jean Christophe Prudhon, of Dijon, France, after a hearing Monday in Los Angeles. The Spider-Man star did not attend the proceedings but wrote in a sworn declaration that she is frightened of Prudhon after he recently tried to reach her at her mothers home. In letters led with the court, Prudhon wrote that he sold his home in France, so he could travel to meet the star even though she has not responded to more than 50 missives he has sent. The order against Prudhon also protects Dunsts mother. KIRSTEN DUNST

PAGE 17

BEVERLY HILLS, Ca lif. (AP) Its an irony that acid-tongued Violet, aka the dowager count ess of Grantham, would savor: One of TVs hottest romances is playing out among English nobility, with nary a cell phone or laptop in sight and, most shockingly, on PBS. Downton Abbey devo tees had eagerly awaited the dramas season two return Sunday, when the romance of Matthew and Lady Mary resumes its rocky course as World War I scars Europe. Theres also fallout from the war within Marys family digs, the stately mansion that gives the series its name. Consider it Yorkshire 90210, but with writercreator Julian Fellowes witty dialogue and rich characters, stunning pe riod costumes and (gener ally) chaste love affairs. Michelle Dockery and Dan Stevens, who play the star-crossed young couple, said they are both delighted and surprised at the series international success. Its huge in Australia, Dockery said. And Spain, added Ste vens. The 11 Emmy nomi nations and six trophies, including best miniseries, earned by the period dra mas rst season were a thrill: For a show like this to get that kind of attention over here, its great, he said. Success has created a burden of secrecy regard ing the fate of young law yer Matthew, unexpected heir to Downton under Englands early 20th-cen tury inheritance laws, and Mary, who could keep her familys hold on the estate by marrying him. In season one, the will ful Mary had rejected, ac cepted and rejected again smitten Matthew, and then she was rebuffed. Now both have turned elsewhere for love, while war and other historical events toy with their fates. Dockery, 30, and Stevens, 29, project such on-screen chemistry that people who know better confuse ction with fact. There was a great pic ture of me and Dan at the Derby (the famed horse race) and even my boy friend said, It kind of looks like youre together, Dock ery said, smiling. Fans were desperate to know what happened next. Not least my own wife, said Stevens, interviewed on a California visit before season two aired in the U.K. Shes forever trying to nd the scripts and is desperate to read them. Spouse Susie Hariet now knows the story so far, with the season just concluded in Britain (a third season has been announced). But U.S. viewers who avoid spoilers online must wait for the drama to unfold over seven weeks, through Feb. 19. Downtowns younger generation matures quick ly during wartime, with Matthew tested as an army ofcer slogging through trench warfare in France. It was a real delicious challenge to take on, such a far cry from the rst sea son for me. I was caked in mud for half the series, Stevens said. For a lot of us, it feels like a graduation in terms of what was asked of us, emotionally, and the intensity of the story lines. The stakes were higher and everything is notched up one or two pegs. Santa Rosa Free Press| A3 Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Imagine this: American Idol without Seacrest? PASADENA, Calif. (AP) Both Fox and Ryan Seacrest say they want Seacrest to stay as host of Ameri can Idol after this year. Whether that will happen was unclear Sunday even as both sides promoted this months launch of the 11th season of the countrys most popular television show. Its a tough negotiation and one that will come to conclusion, I think, pretty quickly, Fox Entertain ment President Kevin Reil ly said. Seacrest is not signed beyond this season and is also involved in talks with corporate owners of NBC Universal, where he has a contract at E! Entertain ment. There have been several reports that NBC is considering Seacrest as a potential replacement if Matt Lauer decides to leave the Today show. Seacrest had little to say Sunday about the pos sibility of moving into a new morning job. While such talk is at tering, he said, that job will be that persons job as long as that person wants the job. American Idol contin ues to be a TV steamroller. Yet network TV is in tough economic straits, and many millions of dollars are tied up in contracts with Seacrest and judges Jenni fer Lopez, Steven Tyler and Randy Jackson. As for Seacrests con tractual status, the key word Sunday was imag ine. Its very hard to imag ine the show without Ryan, Reilly said. We certainly want to keep him. Theres no creative discus sion there whatsoever. It is a deal issue. Said Seacrest: Ive done this for the last de cade. I love doing it, so I cant imagine not being on every week. Added Fox alterna tive show chief Mike Dar nell: We love Ryan and I cant imagine the show without him. The next few weeks will show whether love trans lates to a deal. Darnell said that after major changes on Idol last year with the addi tions of Tyler and Lopez and some revamping of the middle weeks of the com petition, this year there will be relatively minor tweaks. Two big challenges when competitors reach the Hol lywood stage will be re quiring them to sing some 1950s era songs, and sing with the accompaniment of only one instrument. And a healthy rivalry seems to be building with NBCs moderately success ful new competition The Voice, as Idol panelists made a handful of snarky remarks about the other show. We will denitely nev er, ever rip off Star Trek like The Voice did with spinning chairs, Jackson said. American Idol returns Jan. 18. AP From left to right, American Idol Judges Steven Tyler, Jennifer Lopez, Randy Jackson and host Ryan Seacrest participate in the American Idol panel Sunday at the Fox Broadcasting Company Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena, Calif. Fox to start Saturday night cartoons PASADENA, Calif. (AP) Long known for its Sunday night cartoons headlined by The Simp sons, Fox is planning to offer new animated ma terial late on Saturday nights and on an experi mental new digital chan nel. The network said Sunday that the new ef fort will be led by Nick Weidenfeld, the former head of program devel opment for the Cartoon Networks Adult Swim series. The cable network has run a popular series of late-night cartoons on weekdays that has successfully reached a young male audience that TV executives consider valuable and elusive. Saturdays 90-min ute cartoon block would begin at 10 p.m. Fox hasnt programmed ag gressively in late nights and hopes the new series will provide some competition for NBCs Saturday Night Live, said Kevin Reil ly, Fox entertainment president. It will start in January 2013. Reilly, during a news conference, offered hints but left an air of mystery around the future of some popular Fox prime-time shows like House, Glee, Fringe and Terra Nova. Fox appreciates its Sunday cartoons like The Simpsons, which will soon air its 500th epi sode. But success there left relatively little room for experimentation. There has been a lot of talent and a lot of prod uct that weve wanted to pursue over the years that did not t the primetime mold, Reilly said. The digital channel would be available on line, through cable on demand, as mobile appli cations and on game con soles, and its somewhat experimental, Reilly said. It would allow Fox to take chances on programming of different lengths, he said. Reilly conceded hes put off some decisions on prime-time shows that have doubts about their future. One is the long-running medi cal drama House, which Reilly said months ago was probably in its last year. He said he will meet soon with the shows producers to decide; he did say its very unlikely any of the shows characters would be spun off into a new se ries. He praised producers of Fringe for helping Fox drum up some in terest in its Friday night schedule. But he noted the show is expensive to produce and at its current ratings, its a money-loser for the network. Please dont start the letter-writing campaign right now, Reilly said. I cant take that. The prehistoric adven ture series Terra Nova is doing moderately well, but Fox had been hop ing for more. Reilly said the show has struggled creatively in its rst sea son and will face tough competition for a time slot. If we had more holes on our network, we would be thrilled to lock that in, he said. Were going to decide very soon. Glee will be back next season, despite some early ratings troubles, he said. The current high school stu dents will be graduating, said Reilly, who left un answered how many of those cast members will be returning. AP Cast members Efren Ramirez, left, and Jon Heder, right, participate in a panel discussion Sunday for the Fox animated television show Napoleon Dynamite at the Fox Broadcasting Company Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena, Calif. Lions Gate nears $400 million deal for Twilight maker LOS ANGELES (AP) Lions Gate is close to buy ing Summit Entertainment, the maker of the teen hit Twilight series for about $400 million in cash and stock. Thats according to two people Sunday who were briefed on the matter. They were not authorized to speak publicly and request ed anonymity. Talks on a deal are in the late stages and could be nalized this week. Summit also has about $300 million in debt linked to its movies. That debt is expected to be paid off quickly, especially after the last movie in the series, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2, hits theaters in November. The Hollywood blog Deadline reported the news earlier. The deal would create a studio among the larg est in Hollywood and bring together under one roof Twilight and another expected popular teen se ries The Hunger Games, which Lions Gate is set to release in March. Like the vampire se ries that has attracted young audiences in hordes worldwide, The Hunger Games is being propelled by a hugely popular series of novels, these ones writ ten by Suzanne Collins. The pairing would give Lions Gate added strength in international distribu tion, enlarge its library of older movies to sell to home video and TV channels and allow it to add Summits cash immediately to its books. It can also amortize the cost of the deal over time. For Summits owners, the deal represents another big payout following a spe cial dividend of around $200 million that accompanied a $750 million renancing in March 2011. The biggest winners will be Summits management, including co-chairmen Rob Friedman and Patrick Wachsberger, which owns about 30 percent of Sum mit, and Summits major ity owner Suhail Rizvis, of Rizvi Traverse Manage ment. Friedman and Wa chsberger are expected to continue to run Summit as a Lions Gate subsidiary. Lions Gate Entertain ment Corp. already has a strong TV studio, which makes popular series such as Mad Men, Weeds, Nurse Jackie and is the key distribution partner of comedian Tyler Perry, in cluding his shows House of Payne and Meet the Browns. But the studio had been distracted recently by a lengthy shareholder battle with activist investor Carl Icahn, who nally agreed last year to sell most of his shares and focus his atten tion elsewhere. Both studios are based in Santa Monica, Calif. Love and war rage as PBS Downtown Abbey returns for 2nd season

PAGE 18

A4 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Classifieds B4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012

PAGE 19

Santa Rosa Free Press| A5 Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Classifieds Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Santa Rosas Press Gazette | B5 12/1048 NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a WRIT OF EXECUTION issued in Circuit Court of Santa Rosa County, Florida, on the 10th day of November, 2011 in the cause wherein Blanche M. Johnson was Plaintiff and State Farm Florida Insurance Company was Defendant, being Case No. 05-368CA01 in said court, I, Wendell Hall, As Sheriff of Santa Rosa County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff, Blanche M. Johnson in and to the following described real property, to wit: DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY 2672 Settlers Colony Blvd. Gulf Breeze, Florida Lot 5, SETTLERS COLONY AT VILLA VENYCE, FIRST ADDITION, TOWNHOUSES SUBDIVISION, Santa Rosa County, Florida, according to plat thereof recorded in Plat Book C at Page 121 of the public records of said County. 2674 Settlers Colony Blvd Gulf Breeze, Florida Lot 6, SETTLERS COLONY AT VILLA VENYCE, FIRST ADDITION, TOWNHOUSES SUBDIVISION, Santa Rosa County, Florida, according to plat thereof recorded in Plat Book C at Page 121 of the public records of said County. And on the 24th day of January, 2012 I shall offer this property for sale, at the east front door of the Santa Rosa Criminal Justice Facility, 5755 East Milton Rd, Milton, Florida, Santa Rosa County, Florida, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. on or as soon thereafter as possible. I will offer for sale all the said plaintiffs, Blanche M. Johnson right, title and interest in the aforesaid real property, at public auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above-described execution. WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Deputy James E. Chessher James E. Chessher Deputy Sheriff IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN DISABILITIES ACT, PERSONS NEEDING A SPECIAL ACCOMODATION TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHALL CONTACT JANICE PLATT (850) 983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SALE DATE. 12/21, 28, 1/4 & 1/11 12/1048 1/8 PUBLIC NOTICE SANTA ROSA BAY BRIDGE AUTHORITY The Santa Rosa Bay Bridge Authority Meeting is scheduled forWednesday January 18, 2012 in the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Conference Room C, at 5:30 p.m. (cst) located at 6025 Old Bagdad Highway Milton, Florida. For further information call (850) 981-2718. Please use rear entrance. 1/11 1/8 1/9 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SHI Gulf Breeze LLC, c/o AEW SHI, LP (Legal), Two Seaport Lane, Boston, MA 02110, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of The Blake at Gulf Breeze, with its principal place of business in the County of Santa Rosa, State of Florida, intends to file an Application for Registration of Fictitious Name with the Florida Department of State. 1/11 1/9 12/1070 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA FAMILY LAW DIVISION CASE NO.: 2011-DR-1055 DIVISION: B RE: The Matter of MARCUS ARON BROWN, Petitioner/Father, and VICTORIA LYNN BURKETT, Respondent/Mother. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: VICTORIA LYNN BURKETT Last known address of: 1225 Fretz Road, Pensacola, FL 32534 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Verified Petition to Determine Paternity and for Other Related Relief has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on Ann E. Meador, Esquire, Attorney for Marcus Aron Brown, Petitioner, at 900 N. Palafox Street, Pensacola, FL 32501, on or before January 25, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this court before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file a Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedures, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on December 16, 2011. CLERK OF THE COURT CIRCUIT COURT SEAL BY:Richelle Germann Deputy Clerk 12/28, 1/4, 11, 18 12/1070 1/7 NOTICE OF SALE Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on January 26, 2012 at 10 A.M. AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED 2000 DODGE VIN# 1B4HS28ZXYF111026 Located at: 6141 HIGHWAY 90 WEST, MILTON, FL 32570 SANTA ROSA Any person(s) claiming any interest(s) in the above vehicles contact: Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc., (954) 920-6020 ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC # AB-0001256 1/11(1) 1/7

PAGE 20

A6 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, January 11, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE 850-995-8778 Sale prices good through Jan 1117, 2012 MON TUE THUR FRI SAT SUN Angel Soft Bath Tissue 5 46 24 pk Sweet Sue Chicken Dumplings 1 84 24 oz S a l e J a n u a r y 1 1 1 7 2 0 1 2 Florida Strawberries 1 73 1 lb bag Red Diamond Coffee 7 68 34.5 oz Ronco Spaghetti 89 16 oz Lance Home Pack Crackers 1 55 8 pack Jiffy Corn Muffin Mix 48 8 oz Bryan Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna 98 12 oz Johnsonville Smoked Brats 2 47 14 oz Bar S Jumbo Frank 90 16 oz Sea Best Tilapia Fillets 14 93 5 lb bag Farmland Stack Pack Bacon 4 34 24 oz Land O Frost Bistro Ham or Turkey 1 93 8 oz Boneless Bottom Round Beef Roast 2 88 lb Farmland Sliced Boneless Pork Loins 1 98 lb Hillshire Farm Smoked Sausage 2 08 14 oz Family Pack Bottom Round Beef Steaks 3 11 lb Fresh Express Hearts of Romaine Salad 2 55 10 oz Gwaltney Mild or Hot Roll Sausage 98 12 oz OnCor Family Pack Chicken Nibbler or Dyno Bites 3 78\ 35 oz Green Giant Iceberg Lettuce 84 head Florida Navel Oranges 2 16 4 lb bag Vlasic Kosher Spears 1 74 24 oz Vigo Yellow Rice 39 5 oz Alpo Dog Food 7 01 16 lb Georgia Red Tomatoes 51 15 oz Van Camp Baked Beans 1 26 27 oz Natures Crystal Spring Water 1 86 12 pk 16.9 oz Maxwell House Coffee Original Roast 8 95 34.5 oz Pet Evaporated Milk 89 12 oz



PAGE 1

75 cents Wednesday, January 11, 2012 GazetteSanta Rosas Press Lifestyle . ........................................ B1Speak Out . ..................................... A2Sudoku ..........................................A2Opinion . ........................................ A4Sports ............................................A8Classieds . ..................................... B4TABLE OF CONTENTS Volume 104 Issue 3 Printed on recycled paper Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 news@srpressgazette.com Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.com Tweet us @srpressgazette and friend us on facebook.com Speak OutLet Santa Rosans know what you thinkInside | Page A2 srpressgazette.com623-5887By Bill Gamblinnews@srpressgazette.com Santa Rosa County Commissioners are expected to give the current bus system, with some minor modications, the thumbs-up for one more year at their meeting on Thursday. Monday morning, commissioners heard three plans from Santa Rosa County Transportation Planner Nancy Model which included: Continuing the service as it is for one more year Creating express morning and afternoon routes with normal service during middle part of the day Discontinuing the service in 60 days I feel we have listened to what you, the commissioners want, and what the public needs with the express routes, Model said at Mondays meeting. With this plan, we have cut the hour and 55-minute turnaround time to just 55 minutes. Transportation ofcials are looking to do this by starting in East Milton and limiting the number of stops on the route to just eight key locations. This would be done for one round-trip and a second trip along the route to Pensacola each morning and afternoon. Commissioners Jim Williamson and Don Salter said they were concerned about other public needs during the day, which Model said the plan addressed. We will run a normal route during the day so people can get to doctor appointments, the store and other needs, Model said. We have had a year to look at this and gather data, so I feel we can better predict our needs. Salter said that since they had proposed stopping the service, he has heard from several people by email and telephone. Groups like the Town of Jay and the Rural Health Association have public transportation as their number one priority along the north end of Santa Rosa County, Salter said. I am also in support of the fact we have reduced the cost to the county to $16,000. I would like to see us work on performance goals and look at the efciency level while I sup port this one more year. According to Julie Piersol with the Florida-Alabama Transportation Planning Organization there Express bus service in worksBy Bill Gamblinnews@srpressgazette.com Saturday will start the celebra tion of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s Birthday Celebration in Santa Rosa County. With Monday being an ofcial federal holiday to honor the slain civil rights leader, events lead ing up to the federal holiday have been set and will culminate with a day full of activities including a parade and block party. The weekend will get kickoff with a prayer breakfast hosted by the St. John Divine Missionary Baptist Church and held at the Bagdad Community Center on Pooley Street in Bagdad. Leon Daggs, owner of Hub City Ford in Crestview will be the guest speaker at this breakfast set to be gin at 9 a.m. and tickets are avail able at $10 a person. On Sunday, the Santa Rosa County Fellowship Churches Pastors and Ministers Wives Or ganization will hold the annual Commemorative Program at Mt. Pilgrim African Baptist Church on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Milton. Rev. Joseph Marshall of the St. John Divine Missionary Baptist Church in Pensacola will be the guest speaker at this program set to being at 6 p.m. Monday, Stewart Street will be lled with oats and walkers for the annual MLK Day Parade. The parade is set to begin at 10 a.m. and will begin at Milton High School and then travel south on Stewart Street to Elva Street. There is a $30 parade fee per King festivities begin SaturdayBy Mathew Pellegrino mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com A vehicle struck a teenager as she was sitting down on a curb at the intersection of Saints Lane and Falcon Drive Monday morning in Milton. The 15-year-old was later tak en to Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola after the incident with minor injuries. The accident occurred at around 8:05 a.m. on Monday. According to the Florida Highway Patrol report, Amanda Dawn Ray was sitting down on the paved edge of the southbound lane on Saints Lane. During that time, a truck driv en by 25-year-old James Russo was eastbound on Falcon Drive approaching the intersection of Falcon Drive and Saints Lane when he failed to see Ray on the side of the road. As Russo turned right from Falcon Drive onto Saints Lane, he told ofcers that a sneeze distracted him and that he struck Ray with the right front of his ve hicle the FHP report stated. Russo was charged with careless driving following the incident. Milton teenager struck by car, sustains minor injuriesSee bBUS SERVICE A3 See KING A3By Mathew Pellegrinompellegrino@srpressgazette.com Three years ago last Friday, Santa Rosa Historical Society President Wesley Meiss was standing inside the Imogene Theatre, basking in what he calls the glory of Santa Rosa County. The theatre had long been, and still is, a long-standing image of the good times in Milton. As Wes will tell you, the theatre had offered plenty of entertainment for Santa Rosa County residents and visitors alike. That night, the entertainment was swing dancing. But the dancing came to a ring halt when the president, who was elected just a year earlier in 2008, started to smell smoke. It was puncturing through the windows, through the brick, Meiss said. The president, who was ill-equipped in re training, did the only thing he could do at the time he called for help. The old girl is back Above, the inside of the new Imogene Theatre is supposed to resemble how it may have looked back in 1913, when it was rst built. Left, Santa Rosa Historical Society President Wesley Meiss talks to those gathered while a photo of the 2009 Imogene re stands out in the background on a projector. Ma A THEW PELLEGRINO | Press GazetteSee OLD GIRL A3 SOCCER: PACE GIRLS KEEP KICKIN ALONG SPORTS, A8

PAGE 2

LocalA2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012TELEPHONE NN UMBERSAll ofces ................. 850-623-2120 Classieds ................ 850-623-2120 Fax ........................ 850-623-2007SS UBSCRIPt T ION RAt T ESOne year (in county) ......................... $39 Six months (in county).................$19.50 13 weeks (in county).................... $9.75 One year (out of county) ....................$62 Six months (out of county).................$31 13 weeks (out of county)..............$15.50 Senior Citizen (over 62) One year (in county)........................$32 Six months (in county) ......................$16 13 weeks (in county) .........................$8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.CC OPYRIGHt T NN Ot T ICEThe entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570.SS ANt T A RR OSAS PRESS GAZEttTT E StST AFFJim FF letcherPublisher 850-393-3654 jetcher@srpressgazette.comCC arol BB arnesOfce Manager 850-623-2120 cbarnes@srpressgazette.comBBill GG amblinEditor 850-377-4611 bgamblin@srpressgazette.comDebbie CC oonField Service Rep. 850-393-3666 dcoon@srpressgazette.comAA be CC larkField Service Rep. 850-910-0902 aclark@srpressgazette.comTracie SS melstoysAccount Retention Specialist 850-623-2120 tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com SS anta RR osas PP ress GG azette 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570At T YOUR SERVICEMM iss a paper? Circulation Jim Fletcher 850-623-2120 Want to subscribe? 850-623-2120 To buy back issues 850-623-2120 To place a classied ad 850-623-2120 To buy a display ad Debbie Coon 850-623-2120 To buy a photograph 850-623-2120I I n ternet www.srpressgazette.comO O f ce HH ours 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday To get news in the paper Bill Gamblin 850-623-2120 or 850-377-4611 E-mail : news@srpressgazette.com Short items: news@srpressgazette.com Church News: church@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries: news@srpressgazette.com Sports: sports@srpressgazette.com COUNCOUN TY Y GOVERNMENGOVERNMEN TCOUNTY COMMISSION District 1: Jim Williamson, 4351 Berryhill Road, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-williamson@santarosa..gov District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Road, Milton, FL 32583; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-cole@santarosa..gov District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla Highway, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-salter@santarosa..gov District 4: Jim Melvin, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL; phone 983-1877. E-mail is commmelvin@santarosa..gov District 5: Lane Lynchard, 6495 Caroline St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-lynchard@santarosa..gov The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at 9 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays. The leaders meet in committee at 9 a.m. Mondays preceding the Thursday meetings. Meetings are held in commission chambers of the Administrative Complex on U.S. 90. Phone 983-1877 for information or to reach their ofces.SS TA A TE E GOVERNMENGOVERNMEN T Rep. Doug Broxson: 2990-C Gulf Breeze Parkway, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563, phone 9165436. E-mail is Doug.Broxson@myoridahouse. gov Sen. Greg Evers: 5334 Willing St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5550. E-mail is Evers.Greg. SO2@senate.gov Gov. Rick Scott: PLO5 The Capitol, 400 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; phone 4884441. E-mail is _governor@myorida.comFEFE DERAL ERAL GOVERNMENGOVERNMEN THOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Rep. Jeff Miller: 2439 Rayburn House Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; local phone is 479-1183; D.C. Ofce phone (202) 225-4136. Pensacola ofce address: 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503. Toll free number is 866367-1614. Website: http://jeffmiller.house.govSENATE Sen. Marco Rubio: B40A Dirksen Senate Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202-224-3041; fax 202-228-0285. Sen. Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Senate Ofce Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone 202-224-5274; fax 202-224-8022 Website: http://billnelson.senate.govWHITE HOUSE President Barack Obama: The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. E-mail is president@ whitehouse.gov Vice President Joe Biden: Ofce of the Vice President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414. Elected OFFICIALSSCHOOLSCHOOL GOVERNMEN GOVERNMEN TSCHOOL BOARD Superintendent: Tim Wyrosdick, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-5000. E-mail is wyrosdickt@mail.santarosa. k12..us District 1: Diane Scott, 5710 Munson Highway, Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-0413. E-mail is scottdl@mail.santarosa.k12. .us District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton, FL 32570; phone 623-6299. E-mail is winkleseh@mail.santarosa. k12..us District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre, FL 32566; phone 939-2661. E-mail is colemanmd@mail.santarosa. k12..us District 4: JoAnn Simpson, 5059 Faircloth St., Pace, FL 32571; phone 994-5446. E-mail is simpsonjj@mai.santarosa. k12..us District 5: Scott Peden, 3156 Pins Lane, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563; phone 934-0701. E-mail is pedenst@mail.santarosa.k12. .us The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth Thursdays at 5086 Canal St., in Milton. The Santa Rosa School Board phone is 983-5000.CICI TY Y GOVERNMEN GOVERNMEN T Milton City Hall, Mayor Guy Thompson, 6738 Dixon St., Milton, FL 32570, phone 983-5400. City Manager is Brian Watkins Town of Jay, Mayor Kurvin Qualls, 3822 Highway 4, Jay, FL 32565, phone 675-2719 Gulf Breeze City Hall, Mayor Beverly Zimmern, 1070 Shoreline Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, phone 934-5100. City Manager is Edwin Buz Eddy If you have a short comment you would like to make, call the Speak Out line at 623-5887. Monday, 9:30 a.m. Hello, this is Walter over by Garcon. A few weeks ago, I read an article in the Santa Rosa Press Gazette titled District scoping out building experts. It started out that the school district is hammering down on saving money, as they voted to search for a certied building code administrator, so they wouldnt have to rely on the county inspections. I guess I dont get it. How is paying a permanent, high-dollar job for someone going to save money? And whats worse than that, whats wrong with using the county inspectors? They are good enough for the rest of us. Then again, the taxpayers arent paying their bills. Thank you. Saturday, 11:39 a.m. Hi, Im calling on Marias comment in the Press Gazette on Jan. 7. She is right, there is a problem there. We take care of an educationallychallenged cancer survivor, and when he got his $4.85 increase on his disability in January, they took $12 from his food stamps. He can work part-time, but if he works, theyll take his disability and his Medicaid. Thats wrong. And its not President Obama you need to call; its the Florida Department of Children and Families. Thats Gov. Rick Scott. Its not Obama, its your governor. Yall voted him in, I didnt vote for him. Thursday, 10:11 p.m. Yes, this is Nita. I want to thank the person who robbed me and took my rent money. I guess you needed it more than I did. But now Ill probably be out on the streets. Thanks. I have no other resources, thank you very much. Thursday, 9:24 p.m. Coming home from Pensacola tonight shortly after 6 p.m. by way of Avalon Boulavard, I was using the left lane towards the new stop light with the arrows. I noticed that nobody stops at the red arrow stop light, in the right lane. I think a cop should sit at that light and enforce the law, before someone gets killed. Just saying. Thursday, 12:03 p.m. I really enjoy Ron Harts columns. What a funny take on things. Smart and quick, he really makes me laugh at the goings on in Washington. Thursday, 9:10 a.m. Heres an idea. How about we put the much needed courthouse in the recently closed Food World. The County has experience converting abandoned buildings into useful spaces. Thats 45,000 sq.ft. with more to come when K-mart closes. Enough parking to meet everyones needs. Infrastructures there and when complete, with the Avalon and 90 improvements, trafc is not an issue. Lease space to those that need it close to the courts in the building and make enough money to service any debt for the purchase. Attorneys, recorders, bondsmen, all of the people who use the courthouse might even contribute for a change. Facade and interior improvements done modestly and we have solved a 20-year-old problem with little public expenditures. Please provide a color photograph if possible. All information must be typed. Wednesdays paper please submit by Friday at 3pm. Saturdays paper submit by Wednesday at noon www.Sudoku-Puzzles.netSudoku, Kakuro & Futoshiki PuzzlesSudoku 9x9 Medium (134185211) 8 5 7 6 2 1 3 6 8 2 7 8 9 3 4 2 7 3 9 1 4 9 8 4 7 3 5 6 www.sudoku-puzzles.netSolution: www.sudoku-puzzles.net SOLUSOLUTIONION FINFIND USUS ONLINEONLINECheck out Santa Rosa Press Gazette on Facebook, or tweet us @srpressgazetteSRMCSRMC BBirths N November 2011Kristen and Timothy Spielman, a daughter, Emilynn Rose Spielman, born Nov. 30. Michelle and Joseph Brouhard, a son, Jaydan Matthew Brouhard, born Nov. 30.SRMCSRMC BBirths December 2011Annifa and Sergio Gonzalez, a daughter, Dulce Anabel Elaine Hernandez Gonzales, born Dec. 2. Jordynn Smith and James T. Cooper, a daughter, Rylee Lou Cooper, born Dec. 3. Lisa and Kent Walsh, a daughter, Kathryn Amanda Walsh, born Dec. 5. Kristin Snow and Randall Odom, a son, Randall Jason Odom II, born Dec. 8. Michelle Moore and Earl Salter, a son, Haidyn Eugene Salter, born Dec. 8. Krystal McCullough and Christopher George, a son, Leath Michael George, born Dec. 9. Angela Pipes, a daughter, Karissa Nicole Reese, born Dec. 9. Miranda and William Parker, a daughter, Kylei Michelle Parker, born Dec. 13. Brittany and Troy Kurek, a son, Atticus Matthew Kurek, born Dec. 13. Katherine and Kenneth Murtha, a son, Brice Edward Jackson Murtha, born Dec. 14. Amanda and James Demontmollin, a son, Vincent James Demontmollin, born Dec. 15. Elizabeth Taylor, a daughter, Addison Rose Krossman, born Dec. 14. Brittany and Michael Nichols, a daughter, Makayla Danielle Nichols, born Dec. 15. Rebecka King and Richard Fields, a daughter, Kayla Alexia Fields, born Dec. 16. Donna Sims, a son, Malakhi Jamorian Andrew Sims, born Dec. 19. Crystal Wilson and Joseph Majzun, a son, Joseph Brenden Majzun, born Dec. 20. Cordia and Jesse Nixon, a son, Joseph Lee Nixon, born Dec. 20. Kathleen Pratt, a daughter, Eileen Faye Pratt, born Dec. 20. Hannah LeAnn Thames, a daughter, Vallyn Chevelle Brogdale, born Dec. 21. Amanda Sorensen and Stephen Roberts, a daughter, Abegale Kae Roberts, born Dec. 21. Billie Kelley, a son, Hunter Lee Ennger, born Dec. 22. Melissa and Randy Scheiwe, a daughter, Aubrey Quinn Scheiwe, born Dec. 22. Amanda Thompson and Michael Jones, a son, Sebastian LaValle Jones, born Dec. 27. Leslie and Jason Mishoe, a daughter, Rylie Ann Mishoe, born Dec. 28. Birth ANNOUNCEMENtTSSpecial to the Press GazetteMilton is the next stop for the International Coin Collectors Associations world tour. During this event, which runs through Jan. 14 at the Holiday Inn Express, the ICCA will be purchasing coins, paper currency, gold and silver on behalf of their global network of collectors, dealers and reneries. This special event is free and open to the public. We hope to spend at least $200,000 while we are in town by purchasing peoples old coin collections, vintage bank notes and scrap gold, silver and diamonds, said Mark Cooper, spokesman for the International Coin Collectors Assocaition. We buy a lot of class rings, mismatched earrings and broken necklaces. Just a small handful of gold can add up to hundreds of dollars very quickly. I encourage everyone to clean out their drawers, lock boxes and jewelry boxes, and bring their items to our show for a free evaluation and perhaps walk out a little richer. Traveling from small towns to large cities, the ICCA hosts hundreds of events each year where local residents bring in their precious metals, diamonds and paper currency to earn extra cash. While meeting one-on-one with each guest, the ICCA specialists review, research and evaluate the items and will make an offer to purchase all gold coins, silver coins made before 1970 and paper currency printed prior to 1934. The offer depends on the silver or gold content, the collectability, rarity and condition of the items. If the price is right for you, ICCA will pay you on the spot with no hidden fees. The ICCA event will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. each weekday and from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday.Coin collectors come to Milton Speak OOUtT

PAGE 3

LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A3Wednesday, January 11, 2012On Friday, Meiss played the tape of the dispatch call placed to the local ofce when he thought the Imogene, and later found that the building next to the Imogene, was on re. Fire, re re! The Imogene is on re, Meiss voice could be heard over the phone on the call made to dispatch at around 7 p.m. Jan. 6, 2009. The shock in Meiss voice could be heard over the phone, as he was asked by the operator to remove himself from the building. But Meiss, a history teacher at Hobbs Middle School, was not about to lose his old girl without a ght. In the phone call, Meiss mentioned to the operator there was a hose by the Imogene. He hinted using the hose to put out whatever re there was. But before he could speak anymore, the building beside the Imogene burst into ames. To this day, reghters are not sure what caused the blaze that scarred the inside of the Imogene. But all of that didnt matter when Meiss unveiled the newly renovated Imogene to a crowd of almost 200 on Friday three years after the devastating re. Originally known as the Milton Auditorium, the tallest building in Milton opened back on Oct. 13, 1913, and was the rst building to have electricity in Milton. Meiss described how locals would sit across the street on the courthouse lawn and look at the scrolling marquee that ickered on the Imogenes sign. Not long after, the theatre was sold to a local man, who later renamed the theatre after his 11-year-old daughter named Imogene. Following the renaming of the theatre, downtown Milton went through what Meiss considered a major boom in entertainment. After the grand reopening on Friday, he imagined the same thing would happen again for Miltonians. I believe ten years from now, our downtown will be booming, it will be alive, Meiss said. John Reble, re chief for the Milton Fire Department was the rst of 15 departments to arrive on scene that night three years ago on Friday. As Meiss sat across the street on the courthouse lawn that night looking at what he thought was the end of the Imogene, Reble walked over to Meiss and told him it wasnt over. It was a momentous night for all of us, Reble said. That was the re of my careerand hopefully the last big re of my career. Reble, a former Santa Rosa Historical Society president, said if it wasnt for the reghters that came out that night, and the rain that helped speed up the reghting efforts a few hours later, there might not have been an Imogene standing today. At the gala on Friday, Reble and his department were given a plaque for the reghting effort they put forth three years earlier. Along with Milton Fire Department, six other local departments were recognized for their hard work that helped save the Imogene. It was the reghters that took direction to go in there and put their lives on the line, Reble said. I kept telling myself, were not losing her, were not losing this building. After reghters were able to extinguish the re, all that was left of the Imogene were her wooden oors, most of her stage, and the hard brick structure. Following the re, Meiss did not back down from the tragedy, and immediately started applying for grants to help bring back the Imogene Theatre to her glory days, which in this case was in 1913. After earning numerous grants, the SRHS was able to hire Sanborn Builders and Quina-Grundhoeffer Architects to help rebuild what was left of the Imogene. And the nished product was awless. As a gentle reminder of how tough the Imogene Theatre was the night of the re, construction workers left burn marks in parts of the Imogenes wooden oors. Meiss said he hopes to announce future acts to the theatre and perhaps an expansion. 2077464 is enough of the federal grant left to fund the pro gram for at least two more years. Commissioners biggest concern is assuring the funding was available in the future as well as monitoring stops and eliminating those not utilized. In other business, com missioners agreed to defer the decision on the economic development contract with TEAM Santa Rosa until the Jan. 23 committee meeting. Commissioners put on Thursdays agenda the pos sible payment of $34,877 to the City of Milton for milling, resurfacing and restriping of Canal Street, which is main tained by the county. The City of Milton has received a Community De velopment Board Grant to improve Canal Street south of Highway 90, which will include sidewalks, burying utilities and other improve ments. The county dollars would be used if they milled and paved the road, which is part of the grant. Bob Cole, whose district includes Milton, talked about earmarking some of his Dis trict 2 funds to this project to help extended the sidewalk from where it is scheduled to end approximately onehalf block longer to the old L&N Depot. Cole had mentioned more sidewalk improvements south of the CSX crossing, but that could be cost prohib itive because of right of way issues, three bridges that would be crossed and other safety concerns according to Santa Rosa County Adminis trator Hunter Walker. vehicle, oat or walking unit and the fee must be received by Jan. 14. A $10 late fee will be charged for entries received after the deadline. The event hosted by the Santa Rosa County Fellow ship Churches Pastors and Ministers Wives Organi zation will start lining up at 8:30 a.m. at Milton High School. At 11 a.m. Monday, there will be a MLK Block Party hosted by the Santa Rosa County NAACP. The block party will be held on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Milton and will feature food, games and entertainment in a family environment. Booth rental for this even is $25. This year those attend ing any of the events are en couraged to bring canned foods and non-perishable items with them to help with this years MLK Day of Service project. The food items collect ed will be donated to area needy families on behalf of the Santa Rosa County Fel lowship Churches. This year there will not be a Habitat Home dedicat ed as in years past. There was a change over at Habitat for Human ity and they also had to ap ply for a federal grant to help us with the purchase of some property, said Caro lyn McCray, who is heading up the MLK Block Party on Monday. We should have everything back in place to dedicate another home on Dr. Kings Birthday next year. City and county ofces and the post ofce will be closed Monday in observa tion of the holiday. BUS SERVICE from page A1 KING from page A1 OLD GIRL from page A1 Photos by MATHEW PELLEGRINO | Press GazetteLocals gather in the staging area of the Imogene on Friday for its big unveil gala by the Santa Rosa Historical Society. Right, Henry Botts, who performed on the Imogene stage decades ago when he was 14 years old with Bill Monroe, known as the father of bluegrass, celebrates the grand reopening of the Imogene.

PAGE 4

OpinionA4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012 OUR VIEW We want you to share your views on the above topic(s) or any topic with other Santa Rosas Press Gazette readers. Your views are important, too. Send your letters to : LE E TTER ER S TO O THE E EE DI I TOR OR 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Letters must be typed and may be edited for content for to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for verication, if necessary. SHARE YOUR OPINIONs SWhen Ronald Reagan was president, he had to raise the debt ceiling to $1 trillion. Obama is currently trying to raise it to $16.3 trillion, up $1.2 trillion from last year when he raised it the last time and caused our rst-ever credit downgrade. To put Reagans total debt of $1 trillion into perspective, in 2009 the Democratic Congress and Obama spent $1.4 trillion more than the government took in, which was 40% more than our total debt back then. Obama thinks he solves our spending problem when he raises our debt limit. He is like a Police Chief saying he solved his towns drunk driving problem by raising the allowable DUI arrest blood alcohol level from .08 to .12. Republicans took back the budgeting process when they won a majority in the House in 2010. The last year Democrats had the checkbook, spending went from $ 2.98 trillion in 2008 to $3.52 trillion in 2009. In 2010 it seems spending leveled off at $3.45 trillion not great, but it is the trajectory we should worry about. Political spending is always cloaked in some grand rhetoric. Bush had his slam dunk wars, and Obama touts helping the middle class. But they all breathlessly come to us with the conjured-up imperative of the day to spend money. Obama bellows from swing state pulpits, Pass my bill now! Heres an economics lesson for the kids out there: never buy a Rolex from a man who is out of breath. Democrats cry that some 825,000 non-essential government employees will not get paid if the debt ceiling is not raised. Perhaps that is our problem; we are paying 825,000 non-essential workers. Washington takes money by force (taxes) from the most productive part of society, the job creators (business), and redistributes it to the least productive part of society. Almost all of our bubbles are created by Washington. The Community Reinvestment Act and Fannie Mae mandated that mortgage loans be made to those who could not repay them. Congress pushed subprime loans, which went from 7% of Fannie Maes total loan holdings in 2003 to over 20% in 2006. With implicit federal backing, Fannie and Freddie, GSEs (Government Sponsored Enterprises), were by far the largest buyers of the sub-prime loans. Before the collapse they owned $1 trillion in these risky mortgages. Competing with Fannie Mae in that market was like wrestling with a gorilla: you dont quit when you want, you quit when he wants. Ever the imperialist, Obama spent $4 million of taxpayer money to take a twoweek vacation, again ying separately from his family 5,800 miles to a $5.9 million, rented, Hawaiian beachfront home. Upon arrival, he played golf; to be fair, we cannot expect him to break his normal Washington routine on his rst day of vacation. Christmas vacations left only 12 out of 535 members in Congress when the payroll tax cut was extended last week. It was a productive week; how much better off would we be if none of the 535 members was in Washington? It would kill business in D.C., especially bail bondsmen, hookers and liquor stores, but it would be great for the rest of the country. To paraphrase P.J. ORourke, the mystery of government is not how it works, but how to make it stop. With the (still) Democrat-controlled Senate unwilling to put forth a budget for more than 900 days now, and Obama acting above it all and offering no concrete proposals other than class-envy, eat the rich rhetoric, gutsy leaders like Paul Ryan step up. Yet, when he offered sensible budget-cutting solutions, he was vilied, predictably by Obama and the left, but inexplicably by Newt Gingrich. Paul Ryan and Ron Paul are right, but people just do not want to hear the truth. When Ron Paul and others correctly warn about spending and offer solutions, they are universally mocked by the left, the media and Hollywood (which are one in the same). Most cognitive people long for the days when Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher ran the U.S. and Europe. Keen interest and Oscar buzz have preceded the opening of The Iron Lady, with Meryl Streep as Prime Minister Thatcher. She should win the best actress award, because a Hollywood liberal playing a tax-cutting, antiunion, free-market, rightwing woman whose policies led a nation to economic growth deserves the highest award for acting. Ron Hart is a syndicated op-ed humorist, award-winning author and TV/radio commentator. Email Ron@RonaldHart. com or visit www. RonaldHart.com COlLUMNsSE-conning the public, Washington spending, and other shell games RRON HaARt TThe HH art BeatBy Jim HightowerLast years many political downers have prompted promising uprisings at Americas grassroots, including a strong national coalition for repealing corporate personhood. Its a new year, at last. I say at last because 2011 was a rough ride, politically. Heres a summary of the bigger bumps: non-stop Congressional gridlock, Donnie Trumps short-lived presidential candidacy, the workingclass depression, Obamas serial surrenders to raw Republican partisanship, Newt Gingrichs presidential bid, the reemergence of Wall Streets Gordon Gekko arrogance, right-wing governors gone wild, Rick Oops Perrys campaign for the White House, more tax breaks for corporations and, at years end, there were signs that both Sarah Palin and The Donald might still run for president after all. (That could set up a titanic clash of big hairdos.) Yet we shouldnt despair about last years many political downers, for they have prompted a series of promising uprisings at Americas grassroots. Progressives in states like Wisconsin, Ohio, Montana, Colorado, and Mississippi (yes, Mississippi) have fought hard to roll back the tea partys excesses. The Occupy eruption all across the country has lifted spirits, revitalized grassroots organizing, and put some real move into social movements as we head into 2012. In January, for example, a strong and savvy coalition will mobilize a nationwide campaign for repealing corporate personhood and the Supreme Courts infamous Citizens United ruling. Also, the rise of the non-corporate economy is booming, with millions of Americans turning to coops, credit unions, farmers markets, fair trade shops, and other local enterprises that ordinary people control, not absentee proteers. Plus, strong, genuinely populist candidates are running for Congress this year, including Elizabeth Warren in Mass., Tammy Baldwin in Wis., Norman Solomon in Calif., Ilya Sheyman in Ill., and Eric Griego in N.M. We have important work to do, so dont moan about 2011. Organize in 2012. Jim Hightower is a radio commentator, writer, and public speaker. Hes also editor of the populist newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown.Dont moan about 2011, organize in 2012 We have never disagreed with the need for a new courthouse. There are probably a lot of things that need to be replaced or xed as much as our governmental building, but this one building is where a lot of our business takes place. In some ways, it is even more important than the location at which our county ofces are located (you know, the complex behind McDonalds.) This is where the Supervisor of Elections, Property Appraiser, Tax Collector and the like are housed, too. Wait, when there was a need for a better building for these ofces, they used available space which came with parking. Not all of us were here, but if stories and word of mouth serves us correctly Jim Williamson was a county commissioner when the county purchased the current building and refurbished it. (It had once been home to Delchamps, TG&Y and more.) What do you think a courthouse should be? Well, it is hard to imagine, but there is now a building with 45,000-plus square feet available with great access to the new Avalon Blvd. and the best part is it is for sale and includes lots of parking. If you havent gured out the idea, were thinking about what was once Food World the location next to K-Mart. Now, some of you are probably thinking we have lost our mind, but we are trying to be frugal and practical. First off, it is a one-oor building that can be remodeled and refurbished, which is exactly what Santa Rosa did with the current County annex site. We need a building with the ability to be secured and isolate from the public from those who are accused of crimes. This is something that can be built into the plans of the refurbish. There is no need to worry about parking. Theres loads of it. And the best part of it all is that the building is available and we feel the county could do the complete project at a fraction of the cost. Milton could extend its boundaries so the courthouse stayed inside the municipality. Heck, if a person comes to court and is not dressed appropriately, the judge could send them next door to buy some clothes. Of course, we say that in jest, but we do believe the location deserves consideration. The main thing is to help defray the cost of such an undertaking, like the county, and to follow its past frugal decision and to do the same thing here. Another interesting fact is that it could be refurbished and opened much faster without all of the permitting that would be associated with new construction. And hey, it keeps Santa Rosa from building a major county ofce in an industrial park which is intended for industry. How many companies would want to locate in the park if they knew would-be criminals were being tried every day? Not every company handles major items we would consider dangerous, but there are accidents and even what many would consider minor could be major in the eyes of others. Commissioners, you are worrying about what the public will think. We are asking the public for you and hope you listen because this could be accomplished much more cheaply than the present idea and better yet much faster. From what we hear, no one likes East Milton or the Industrial Park and time is running out with the City of Milton to tear down those portables.Time for a Solomon x to the courthouse

PAGE 5

LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A5Wednesday, January 11, 2012 601 1836

PAGE 6

LocalA6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012

PAGE 7

By Paula Kelley Florida Freedom NewspapersEmerald Coast Dragway in Holt has closed its gates. After a two-year legal bat tle and hundreds of thousands of dollars, it is with mixed emotions that we announce Emerald Coast Dragway is closing, racetrack owners Richard and Kelly Stephens announced in a written state ment carried by several online racing sites. When we pur chased the track three years ago we were unaware of the tracks true nancial situation and all the major improve ments needed. After investing our life savings, and ghting for a business that we are very passionate about, we have de cided to move on. The track, located adjacent to Interstate 10 on Garner Landing Road, was popular with locals and attracted rac ers from out of town as well. Tim and Sonya Tindle, own ers of Tindle Racing Team, sold Emerald Coast Dragway to the Stephens, who could not be reached for comment, in September 2008. They stopped making payments to us in June 2009 and their explanation in the December press release makes it sound like we dont have the track, but we do, So nya Tindle said. The circuit court said it belongs to Tindle Raceway Holdings and it does. And we have shown it to sev eral prospective buyers and we hope to have good news for racing fans in the very near fu ture perhaps as soon as next week, she said. Emerald Coast Dragway had just added a new drifting course to the facility in Sep tember. The gure eight was to be completed in the spring of 2012. In 2006, the track proved itself one of the quickest eighth-mile tracks anywhere in the world, with one of the rst three-second pro-modi eds run by Alabamian Joey Moore. Glenn Price raced the Em erald Coast Dragway track many times over the past few years and said that as a businessman he understands how hard it is for small-town tracks to stay open and make a prot. With insurance, fuel costs rising, wages, maintenance and equipment and track upkeep, you have it stacked against you going in, Price said. Then you have to charge admission and, for an average family with a couple of kids, the parents cant spend $100 to go to the races every weekend. I personally just dont see how it will ever reopen unless someone has more money than sense and that is sad. My family loves racing. But buy ing a track in todays world is like buying a pig in a poke. There has been specula tion on online racing forums that Johnny Jordan, who ran Emerald Coast Dragway for four years prior to the pur chase by the Stephens, would reopen the track. Jordan said, however, he was not in the mix to lease, manage or purchase the facility. Its a long drawn out story but that is a great track and I hope Tim and Sonya (Tindle) have everything worked out soon and that it reopens, Jor dan said in a phone interview. A SportsSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A7Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Tide REPORTPensacola BayThursday, Jan. 12 12:04 AM CST High tide 0.93 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 8:47 AM CST Moonset 9:59 AM CST Low tide -0.35 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 8:52 PM CST Moonrise Friday, Jan. 13 12:51 AM CST High tide 0.68 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 9:23 AM CST Moonset 9:54 AM CST Low tide -0.14 Feet 5:08 PM CST Sunset 9:54 PM CST Moonrise Saturday, Jan. 14 1:50 AM CST High tide 0.38 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 9:17 AM CST Low tide 0.04 Feet 9:59 AM CST Moonset 4:33 PM CST High tide 0.43 Feet 5:09 PM CST Sunset 10:57 PM CST Moonrise Sunday, Jan. 15 12:54 AM CST Low tide 0.07 Feet 4:30 AM CST High tide 0.09 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 6:53 AM CST Low tide 0.08 Feet 10:37 AM CST Moonset 4:27 PM CST High tide 0.65 Feet 5:10 PM CST SunsetEast Bay Thursday, Jan. 12 12:47 AM CST High tide 1.11 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 8:46 AM CST Moonset 11:15 AM CST Low tide -0.42 Feet 5:06 PM CST Sunset 8:50 PM CST Moonrise Friday, Jan. 13 1:34 AM CST High tide 0.81 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 9:22 AM CST Moonset 11:12 AM CST Low tide -0.17 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 9:53 PM CST Moonrise Saturday, Jan. 14 2:33 AM CST High tide 0.46 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 9:58 AM CST Moonset 10:35 AM CST Low tide 0.05 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 5:18 PM CST High tide 0.52 Feet 10:56 PM CST Moonrise Sunday, Jan. 15 2:12 AM CST Low tide 0.09 Feet 5:13 AM CST High tide 0.11 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 8:09 AM CST Low tide 0.10 Feet 10:36 AM CST Moonset 5:08 PM CST Sunset 5:10 PM CST High tide 0.78 FeetBlackwater RiverThursday, Jan. 122 1:43 AM CST High tide 1.11 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 8:47 AM CST Moonset 11:45 AM CST Low tide -0.42 Feet 5:06 PM CST Sunset 8:51 PM CST Moonrise Friday, Jan. 13 2:30 AM CST High tide 0.81 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 9:22 AM CST Moonset 11:42 AM CST Low tide -0.17 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 9:53 PM CST Moonrise Saturday, Jan. 14 3:29 AM CST High tide 0.46 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 9:58 AM CST Moonset 11:05 AM CST Low tide 0.05 Feet 5:08 PM CST Sunset 6:14 PM CST High tide 0.52 Feet 10:57 PM CST Moonrise Sunday, Jan. 15 2:42 AM CST Low tide 0.09 Feet 6:09 AM CST High tide 0.11 Feet 6:46 AM CST Sunrise 8:39 AM CST Low tide 0.10 Feet 10:36 AM CST Moonset 5:08 PM CST Sunset 6:06 PM CST High tide 0.78 FeetNavarre BeachThursday, Jan. 122 6:15 AM CST Low tide -0.15 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 8:46 AM CST Moonset 5:06 PM CST Sunset 8:50 PM CST Moonrise 9:37 PM CST High tide 0.84 Feet Friday, Jan. 13 6:14 AM CST Low tide -0.01 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 9:22 AM CST Moonset 2:38 PM CST High tide 0.43 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 5:11 PM CST Low tide 0.37 Feet 9:47 PM CST High tide 0.61 Feet 9:53 PM CST Moonrise Saturday, Jan. 14 6:16 AM CST Low tide 0.12 Feet 6:45 AM CST Sunrise 9:58 AM CST Moonset 2:40 PM CST High tide 0.61 Feet 5:07 PM CST Sunset 7:41 PM CST Low tide 0.35 Feet 9:23 PM CST High tide 0.36 Feet 10:56 PM CST Moonrise Sunday, Jan. 15 6:04 AM CST Low tide 0.18 Feet 6:44 AM CST Sunrise 10:35 AM CST Moonset 2:46 PM CST High tide 0.82 Feet 5:08 PM CST Sunset PJ-SPAD1212120051 2077496 Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D., Natural Health Consultant Angel Hill, Ph.D., Natural Health Consultant Dennis Reynolds, M.Ed., Herbal Information Specialist DeAnn Hammond: Natural Health AdvisorALTERNATIVEHEALTHFOODSTORE 6010144 As seen on Dr. Oz. Up to 9.4% belly fat loss according to a 16-week Ohio State University study. Available in delicious Berry or Tangerine flavor. Jumpstart your weight loss, supercharge your energy level and flush away toxins and waste. Berry Energize liquid in the morning and Citrus Eliminate liquid at night. Boost metabolism of fats and sugars with a detoxifying blend of 29 whole herbs.Quit Smoking! 3-part herbal internal cleanse to help reduce your desire to smoke. 2-part homeopathic to reduce tobacco cravings, calm nervous tension, relieve irritability and detoxify. Angel Hill, Ph.D. is now conducting Natural Health Assessments.Call to schedule an appointment.A New Year, a New YouLose Weight Taken in mid-September, the Emerald Coast Dragway offered racing in several classications. COURt T Es S Y Of F JU U STIN FOU OU NTAIN Popular Holt racetrack closes

PAGE 8

By Bill Gamblin sports@srpressgazette.com Central High School on Saturday was the center of basketball as homecoming was just part of a packed house that saw the Jaguars sweep Bethlethem in a boy-girl basketball doubleheader. Bethlehem looked to put a damper on the evening in the rst quarter as they jumped out to an early lead before Central would rally to win 79-66 and complete the sweep. Zach Wright and Gavin Richardson were the one two punch as they scored 25 and 24 points respectively as Central improved to 6-8 on the season. Richardson would record a doubledouble as he grabbed 19 rebounds in the win. After falling behind 13-9, the Jags came to life outscoring Bethlehem and its full court press 20-11 to take a 29-24 lead it would never relinquish. Bryce Kareski added 18 points to put three Jags in double digits as Central had two starters injured from a loss to Pensac ola Catholic earlier in the week. On Thursday the boys lost to Paxton at home 61-43. In the loss Wright had 17 points. In the girls game, it was a very physical contest despite Central winning 55-29 over Bethlehem. The Lady Jags (9-7) jumped out to an 11-3 lead before exploding in the second quarter to lead at intermission 34-7. Makayla Simmons nished with 22 points while Sarah Forsythe added 10 in the win. We have come a long way and have played as a team since the second half of the tournament in Jay, said Central head coach Kristen Wright. The girls are get ting the condence and are starting to feel they can play with anyone now. They proved that point on Thursday by defeated Paxton 43-42. The Lady Jags rallied with in the fourth quarter by outscoring Paxton 17-8 in the fourth quarter. I think I had a few heart attacks in the fourth quarter because the game went back and forth at the end, Wright said. Forsythe led Central with 18 points while Simmons nished with 10. The Lady Jags win ended a 50 plus game district winning streak for Paxton. In other boys action, Milton defeated Escambia on Satur day night 58-54. Milton (12-3) outscored the Gators 20-11 in the fourth quar ter to secure the win and im proved to 12-3. Haylen Washington scored 18 and Isaiah Jones chipped in 13 to lead Milton. On Friday Milton defeated Pace 46-36 in a game that had been scheduled for Saturday. Ryan Nocacic led Milton with 13 points and Bobby Green chipped in 11. Tyler Armstrong led Pace with 22 points in the loss. In girls action, Milton needed overtime Saturday night to defeat Escambia 43-35. Escambia rallied to force the ex tra frame where Milton outscored the Lady Gators 8-1. Cierrah Jackson led Milton with 21 points in the win. On Thursday Pace defeated Milton 47-33. The Lady Patriots outscored Milton 26-10 in the second half. Taron Bright led Pace with 16 points while Sara Foster added 10. Milton was led by Dejhanae Barnes with 10. Baker defeated Jay 56-46 on Thurs day. The Lady Gators had to rally in the second half and outscored the Lady Royals 33-14 in the win. Hillary Hendricks led Jay (9-6) with 17 points while Becca Calloway and Tessa Hendricks added 13 and 12 points respectively. www.srpressgazette.comWednesday, January 11, 2012 APage 8Section SP O RTs S SPORTS SIDELINEGospel Projects Baseball RegistrationRegistration for Tee Ball, Girls Fast-Pitch Softball and Boys Baseball will begin Jan. 17. You can register from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon day through Friday and from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday at the Santa Rosa Christian School. Gospel Projects Youth Ath letic Club provides programs for children ranging in ages from 3-and-a-half to 14 and beginning this spring will be afliated with USSSA Recre ation play. If you would like more in formation or are interested in coaching, umpiring or sponsoring a team, call Tod Brainard at 623-4671. All returning players from last year must register this year. GPYAC reserves the right to close registration in any league before the Feb. 18 deadline if numbers dictate.Pace High School Patriot Alumni DayPace High School will host its fourth annual Patriot Alum ni Day and 30 inning game on Feb. 4 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pace High School Base ball Stadium. There will be an alumni homerun derby, 30 in nings of baseball and homerun derby with prizes for the chil dren. Admission $5 for ages 13 and up, while Pace students are free with a student ID.Patriot Yard SalePace High Baseball Boosters will have a yard sale starting at 8 a.m. until everything is gone Satur day, Feb. 4. The sale will be at the left eld entrance to the ballpark. Homecoming sweep BILL Ga A Mb B LIN | Press GazetteMakayla Simmons battled against a host of defenders to get a shot off Saturday as she led Central with 22 points in the 55-29 win over Bethlehem.Central boys, girls defeat Bethlehem BILL Ga A Mb B LIN | Press GazetteLana Chechak dribbles near mid-eld as the Pace offense sets up for another attack against Pensacola.Pace girls continue to kick alongBy Bill Gamblinsports@srpressgazette.com Despite a series of knee injuries, the Lady Patriots of Pace continue to move along this soccer season. Friday night, the Lady Pats (15-2) defeated Tate 6-0 at home. Mary Katherine Taylor scored a hat trick and an assist in the win, while Taylor Burkhart, Lana Chechak and Christy Gash also found the back of the net. Hannah Abrams and Eleana Colvin each nished the game with two saves each. The Lady Patriots nished the game with four shots on its net minder Katelyn Burkhart. On Thursday only a short offensive burst was needed as Pace did away with the Pen sacola Lady Tigers. In a span of a minute and a half, Pace jumped out to a 3-0 lead. When the nal whistle sounded Pace had registered a 4-1 win with Burkhart making ve saves in the win. In other girls action it was Washington defeating Milton 1-0 Friday night as Jenna Wade managed to stop one of two shots on goal in the loss. Milton nished the game with 10 shots on goal but none of them could nd the back of the net. In boys action Friday, Milton defeated Walton County 8-0 at home. Jeff Ranson registered a hattrick for the Panthers who are now 6-8-2 on the season and Kai Greene chipped in two goals. Quinton Dobbs made one save in the shutout win. We have come a long way and have played as a team since the second half of the tournament in Jay.Kristen Wright Central head coach3 Patriots named to Class 6A All-StateBy Bill Gamblinsports@srpressgazette.com Three Pace seniors got great news over the week end as they were named to the Class 6A All-State football team by the Florida Sportswriters. Leading the way for Pace on the rst team was senior receiver Patrick Maddox. Maddox, who has own under the radar when it comes to college teams, caught 46 passes this sea son for Pace and accounted for 1,014 yards with seven touchdowns and one two point conversion. Maddox also saw some action in the backeld as he rushed for 40 yards on ve carries. Ironically Maddoxs 1,056 total yards was second on the team behind junior run ning back J.C. Curry who ac counted for 1,474 yards with 61 coming as a receiver. Making the second team was offensive lineman Mi chael Campbell who helped anchor an offensive line with four other juniors that went 10-3 on the season in 2011 that ended with a loss in the Class 6A Region 1 Finals. Honored with a selection on the third team was senior Austin Houser who was a defensive juggernaut in the secondary as he nished the year with 30 tackles, but led the Patriots with seven in terceptions including his big night in the Class 6A Region 1 Seminals against Pensaco la High School. Other players from Santa Rosa County to make the Class 6A All-State squad were Navarre running back Dwayne Carter on the second team and Na varres Brad Leggett as a wide receiver on the third team. Pa A TrRICkK MaddMADDOX MMIChaHAEL CaCAMpbPBELL AUsSTIN HOUsSErR Honored with a selection on the third team was senior Austin Houser who was a defensive juggernaut in the secondary as he nished the year with 30 tackles, but led the Patriots with seven interceptions including his big night in the Class 6A Region 1 Seminals against Pensacola High School. BILL Ga A Mb B LIN | Press GazetteA Pace ford makes a crossing pass Thursday during the rst half against Pensacola.

PAGE 9

LIFESTYl L E www.srpressgazette.comWednesday, January 11, 2012 BPage 1Section HAIR TODAY GONE TOMORROWBy Bill Gamblinnews@ srpressgazette. com Rush Hendricks has gotten used to turning heads. While at Jay High School, he did it as an athlete playing football, basketball and baseball. After that he was turning heads because the clean cut kid they had watched growing up had let his hair grow out, and to nd out what he was doing, you had to ask him. That is the way Hendricks was raised by his parents, Rick and Nina Hendricks. Friday night, Rush washed his mane one nal time and allowed his mother to collect his donation for Beautiful Lengths, an organization which takes donations like Hendricks and turn them into wigs for cancer patients. I havent cut my hair since two days before my ofcial visit to the University of South Alabama, Hendricks said Friday. Next weekend would have been two years I have been letting my hair grow out. Two other tight ends on the team (Kevin Helmes and Ryne Baxter) and I have not been cutting our hair and now mine is long enough to donate it. I think they are more upset I am getting it cut than anyone else. Another reason behind his donation is a friend of the family, Linda Ryan. Ryan was Brant Hendricks host mom while in Deland, Fla., for the NorthSouth All-Star Baseball Game before he graduated and moved on to play baseball for the University of Alabama. We have gotten to know them and become friends over the years, Nina said. She was in remission when Brandt stayed with them and now she is going through her third bout with cancer. If there is one person who is sad to see Rush cut his hair it was Nina. His hair is so pretty, Nina said. But if he is tired of it and it is becoming more difcult to care for then I understand. Rushs father, on the other hand, was happy to see his son with shorter hair but was immune to his sons new appearance after his hair was cut. It he makes the grades and stays out of trouble he can do what he wants to do, Rick said. The grades are the easy part for Hendricks, who has made the Deans list ve straight semesters in a row since enrolling at South Alabama. After growing his hair for 2 years, Rush Hendricks cuts it off for charityP hotos by BILL GAMb B LIN | Press GazetteNina Hendricks measures Rushs hair to make sure it meets the eight inch requirement by Beautiful Lengths. When all was said and done Rush Hendricks had cut seven pony tails of hair for his donation. Hendricks is feeling the pain as his mother, Nina, gathers his hair. Hendricks is all smiles as he prepares for the nal ponytail to be cut Friday night. After the unveiling, Hendricks and his sister, Tessa, smile for a photo. Some of Hendricks ponytails measured just shy of 12 inches in length, and they only have to be 8 inches in length to make a donation. Hendricks kept talking about getting his hair cut the rest of the way after his mother nished collecting the donation. Tessa Hendricks seemed a little envious of brother Rushs hair before he donated it to Beautiful Lengths, which will turn his donated hair into wigs for cancer patients. I havent cut my hair since two days before my ofcial visit to the University of South Alabama, Hendricks said Friday. Next weekend would have been two years I have been letting my hair grow out.

PAGE 10

City of Milton meetingsMiltons Technology Committee will meet at 8 a.m. Jan. 9 in Conference Room B at Milton City Hall. Local Board for Emer gency Food and Shelter Funding will meet on Jan. 12 at 2 p.m. in Conference Room B at Milton City Hall. Miltons Public Works Committee will meet at 8 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 16 in Conference Room B of City Hall. The Milton Finance Committee will meet Jan. 19 at 10 a.m. in Confer ence Room B at Milton City Hall. The City of Milton Ordi nance Review Committee will meet at 8 a.m. Thurs day, Jan. 19, in Conference Room B at Milton City Hall. The City of Milton Parks and Recreation Committee will meet at 8:30 a.m. Mon day, Jan. 23 in Conference Room B of City Hall. Miltons Benevolent Cemetery Board will meet at 3 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23 in Conference Room B of City Hall. For more information, contact the city managers ofce at 983-5411. All meet ings are open to the public.Morning Glory Circle of the Milton Garden Club meetingOn Jan. 12, at 9:30 a.m. the Morning Glory Circle of the Milton Garden Club will hold their monthly meeting at the Garden Center, 5256 Alabama Street, Milton. Co-Chairman, Mary Hayles, will introduce Physical Therapist and Teacher, El lie Pong, as guest speaker. Ms. Pong will present an amusing and informative discussion of a home gar deners personal trials and tribulations in the Florida Panhandle during the past 6 years. Participants will have illustrated booklets and up to date information on a few pest and disease problems that seem rampant in this area. There will be innovative ideas shared that support gardening on a shoestring and how to avoid the use of toxic prod ucts. The presenter will share samples of products that may interest others with the same gardening challenges. Lunch will be served after the program. This is an opportunity for all those interested in be coming a member or learn ing more about the Milton Garden Club to come and join us. For additional information, please call 9947974 or 626-2003.Free Christmas Tree Mulch Now AvailableMany people in Santa Rosa County recycled their Christmas trees this year, and they have now been ground and the mulch is available on a rst come, rst serve basis at the Green-Up Nursery at 6758 Park Ave. in Milton. The mulch is in the parking lot, and people must bring their own trailer, container or pick-up to get it along with a shovel or pitch fork to load with. For more information, call the Santa Rosa Clean Community System at 6231930 or visit www.srclean. org.Milton Great Books Dinner and Discussion ClubOn Saturday, Jan. 14, the Milton Great Books Dinner and Discussion Club will discuss a short story by No ble Prize in Literature win ner, Nadine Gordimer. The setting is South Africa, and the meal will feature South African cooking. Call Con nie OConnor 564-0498 for directions to 5736 Zinnia in Milton.Autism Pensacola announces Kids for Camp application periodAt 6 p.m Jan. 17., Autism Pensacola (API) will host an informational meeting to begin the 2012 applica tion period for Kids for Camp. This meeting will be held at the Pollak Training Center of Arc Gateway, 1000 E. Faireld Drive in Pensacola at the corner of 10th and Faireld. Childcare is available for chil dren of all ages, including teens and young adults, with reservations. Please email reservations@autismpensacola.org with the subject line January meet ing childcare no later than Jan. 14 to reserve a spot. Kids for Camp is a six-week summer learning lab for children with autism and their friends ages 3-22. This day camp is held in partner ship with Escambia County schools, Sacred Heart Au tism Training Center, UWF and other area agencies. Applications for camp will be available at the meeting or online after Jan 17. All applications are due Feb. 21. For more information, call API at 434-7171 or Su san Byram, executive director, at 450-0656.Dogwood Circle, Milton Garden Club Soup and Salad FridayThe Dogwood Circle, Milton Garden Club will host its 20th Annual Soup and Salad on Jan. 13, 2012, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 5256 Alabama St. in Mil ton. The Circles cooks are making their tasty soups, Traditional Potato Cheese, Chili, Chicken Tortilla, and Minestrone served with a crisp salad, tea/coffee and homemade desserts. You and your friends will enjoy this lunch so dont miss it as it happens once a year. There will be lots of door prizes, which are given away to the lucky drawn ticket numbers. The cost is, adults $7, children ages 3-12 $3.50 and under 3 eat free. Take-out orders available for you to pickup, just call 626-2003. English as a Second Language ClassesSanta Rosa Adult School is offering English as a Second Language classes to aid the growing popu lation of non-native Eng lish speakers in the area. The classes will provide life skills that are needed in reading, writing, and speaking English. The pro grams goal is to help students function effectively in their daily routines. Classes are $30 per term with proof of Florida residency for the last 12 months. The classes are $120 per term without proof of residency. Classes are from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. The next term begins Jan. 23. However, students may enroll at any time during the term. All classes will be at the Adult Learning Center, 6751 Berryhill St., Milton. For more information, call 983-5165 or 983-5710.Purple Heart Chapter MeetingThe Military Order of The Purple Heart, Chap ter/Unit 566 will meet at 11 a.m. Jan. 21 at the West Milton Church of Christ on U.S. Highway 90. The guest speaker will be Cindy Brad ford. She will be speaking on Homeless Veterans. The Ladies Auxiliary Mili tary Order of The Purple Heart will be serving a meal following the meeting for a donation. All Purple Heart Recipients and their spouses are welcome and encouraged to attend. Call Commander Eustice Shiv er at 994-3880 for more in formation. LocalB2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012 ...a weekly column answering your questions with Biblical answers about life.Ask the Preacher Dear A.C., Thank you for your kind words about my column. King Solomon wrote Ecclesiastes. It was written during a time life. He had wandered away from the freshness of his relationship with the Lord God who had blessed him with his wealth and power. Although there is much wisdom and warning to be gleaned from this book, and although the Word of God by word of ultimate truth of God Himself. You often hear the misguided and incorrect interpretation of life spoken by a man who had wondered far from God. Ecclesiastes is a journal or a diary of man on a spiritual satisfaction or purpose in life. Solomon often referred to life as The particular verse you refer to is Ecclesiastes 9:11. mined the time and the exact places where men should live! God has a purpose for your time and place, A.C.! I believe it is true that God is actively involved in our lives. I do not believe however that he ordains every detail that happens to us. We are free agents in many ways. We make choices. Those choices impact our lives and futures and God holds us accountable for our choices. We are eternally accountable for the choice of choosing or rejecting his offer of salvation through the blood of His Son, Jesus Christ. Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church in Milton. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree from Florida State University and a Master of Divinity Degree from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been the Pastor of HHBC since 1987. For 10 years he has also served as an International Youth Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention, preaching to multiplied thousands all over the U.S. and Canada. For more information about HHBC call 623-8959 or 626-8951 or fax, 623 197. If you have a question for ASK THE PREACHER send it to: ASK THE PREACHER, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351 Hickory Hammock Rd, Milton, FL, 32583 Photos by Mathe ATHE W Pelleg ELLEG RIn N O | Press GazetteCentral High School held its basketball homecoming parade on Central School Road Friday afternoon to kick off a weekend which included the Jaguars sweep of Bethlehem High School on Saturday night. More photos can be found online at www.srpressgazette.com and click on staff photos. JAGUARS ROLL INTO HOMECOMING FUN News Briefs

PAGE 11

The following arrests were made beginning Dec. 18 through Dec. 2011.Dec. 18Drasutis, Harry Alan; Male; 19; 11824 Old Course Rd., Cantonment, Fla.; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Hill, Brian Bartlett; Male; 34; 1411 Joseph Circle, Gulf Breeze; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Trafc Offense DUI and Damage Property. Kelly, Shawn Patrick; Male; 41; 6101 College Park way, Pensacola; Trafc Of fense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Serna, Ruben Lariz; Male; 38; Holiday Inn, Mont gomery, Ala.; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Webb, Donald Lee; Male; 56; 2717 Summertree Lane, Gulf Breeze; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Coppedge, Jr., David Wayne; Male; 15; 5770 Her mitage Circle, Milton; Dam age Property Criminal Mis chief $1,000 or More; Bur glary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Moegenburg, Noah Ber; Male; 18; 930 West Beach Blvd., Gulf Shores, Ala.; Larceny Grand Theft $5,000 Less Than $10,000; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Un armed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Wease, Spencer Stan hope; Male; 17; 4632 Gunter Rd., Milton; Burglary Dwell ing Structure or Convey ance Armed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Larceny Grand Theft of Fire arm (2 counts).Dec. 19Campbell, Kelly Suzanne; Female; 33; 5013 Guernsey Rd., Pace; Battery on Ofcer, Fireghter, EMT, Etc. DeJong, David Edward; Male; 33; 1829 S. Chicago Ave., Mineapolis, Minn.; Fraud Swindle Defraud In keeper Under $300; Damage Property Criminal Mischief $200 and Under; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed. Gibbs, James Cameron; Male; 22; 7471 N. Palafox Rd., Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Harsanje, Michael Vin cent; Male; 35; 2722 Baylen Court, Navarre; Cruelty To wards Child Transmit Infor mation Harmful to Minors (4 counts). Peterson, Keith Madi son; Male; 34; 1829 Fifth Ave. South, Minneapolis, Minn; Fraud Swindle Defraud In keeper Under $300; Damage Property Criminal Mischief $200 and Under; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed. Schieber, Tyler James; Male; 19; 8141 Menorca St., Navarre; Fraud False Owner Information Pawned Items $300 or More; Dealing in Sto len Property (3 counts). Shoemaker, Christian Pe ter; Male; 21; 8977 Eagle Nest Dr., Navarre; Damage Prop erty Criminal Mischief $1,000 or More; Burglary Dwelling or Structure Cause Damage Over $1,000; Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree Sec ond Offense; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Dam age Property Criminal Mis chief Over $200 Under $1,000; Burglary Unoccupied Struc ture Unarmed; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Waldron, Jerrod Bryan; Male; 23; 20769 SE Sherry Ave. (Absconded), Blount stown, Fla.; Probation Vio lation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Shoemaker, Christan Pe ter; Male; 21; 8977 Eagle Nest Dr., Navarre; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs.Dec. 20Castleberry, Shanna Olga Maria; Female; 26; 8166 Toledo St., Navarre; Drug Possession Listed Chemi cal With Intent To Manufac ture Controlled Substances; Drugs Produce Metham phetamine; Drug Posses sion Controlled Substance Without Prescription Includ ing Meth. Dolan, Jeremy Brooks; Male; 31; 2496 Highway 98 W, Mary Esther, Fla.; Assault on Ofcer, Fireghter, EMT, Etc.; Felony Probation Viola tion. KeKennedy Jr., Clifford Eugene; Male; 47; Wishbone Circle, Cantonment, Fla.; Drug Possession Listed Chemical For Manufacture of Controlled Substance. McDaniel, Nolan Ray; Male; 23; 4964 Lambert Lane, Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Adams, Waylon Lee; Male; 23; 2542 Bluewater Dr., Navarre; Nonmoving Traf c Violation Drive While Li cense Suspended Habitual Offender. Grobsky, Alexander Mat thew; Male; 14; 3131 Laurel Dr., Gulf Breeze; Damage Property Criminal Mischief Church Synagogue Mosque or Religious Article. Krueger, Matthew Todd; Male; 38; 1 Porti no Dr., Pensacola; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation Within 10 Years. Wilson, Matthew Hunter; Male; 18; 311 W. Burgess Rd., Pensacola; Grand Theft; Trespassing. Pugh, Oliva Dee; Female; 60; 437 Fairpoint Dr., Gulf Breeze; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Krueger, Matthew Todd; Male; 38; 1 Portino Dr., Pen sacola; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs.Dec. 21Feerick, Seth David; Male; 18; 1165 Sterling Point Dr., Gulf Breeze; Fraud False Owner Info Pawned Items $300 or More (4 counts); Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Dealing In Stolen Property; Fraud Impersonating Indi vidual Attempt to Use Iden tication of Another Person Without Consent (4 counts); Forgery Alter Public Record, Certicate, Etc. (4 counts). Ausherman, Christopher Brice; Male; 21; 144 Stearns St., Gulf Breeze; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Blevins, Shawn Riley; Male; 22; 6428 Julia Dr., Mil ton; Battery (D/V) Touch or Strike; Resist Ofcer Ob struct Without Violence; Ob structing Justice Intimidate, Threaten, Etc. a Victim, Wit ness, or Informant. Chappel, Tyler James; Male; 20; 14064 Palm St., Ma deira Beach, Fla.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/ Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Deason, Jared Dwane; Male; 45; 78 Brenda Lane, Mary Esther, Fla.; Out of State Fugitive From Justice. Hudson, Marcail Lefay; Male; 34; 5949 Queen St., Mil ton; Battery (D/v) Commit Domestic Battery By Stran gulation. Owens, Daryl David; Male; 27; 4074 Garcon Point Rd., Milton; Aggravated Bat tery (D/V) Person Uses A Deadly Weapon. Mayer, Blair Holt; Male; 42; 160 Knotts Place, Destin, Fla.; Grand Theft; Embezzlement Make False Entry in Corporate Books (7 counts). LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B3Wednesday, January 11, 2012 The Santa Rosa County Inland Potable Water Wellfield Protection Workgroup will hold a meeting to review the boundaries and background material addressing ground water protection for public dissemination to the Zoning Board and Board of County Commissioners. Public input will be accepted during this meeting. The meeting will be conducted as follows: Please direct questions to Paul Miller at 850-981-7075 or Paulm@santarosa.fl.gov line of any email correspondence. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodations will be made to provide access to the workshop. Please make requests to Mr. Miller at least 48 hours in advance.6010471 SHERIFFsS RREPORT KEYMVOP misdemeanor violation of probation FVOP felony violation of probation Agg aggravated Poss possession Meth methamphet amine DUI driving under the inuence DWLSR driving while license suspended or revoked FTA failure to appear FTR failure to register SF sentenced felony SM sentenced misde meanor LEO law enforcement ofcer DV Domestic Violence

PAGE 12

LocalB4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012 ClassifiedsB4| Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012

PAGE 13

LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B5Wednesday, January 11, 2012 ClassifiedsWednesday, January 11, 2012 Santa Rosas Press Gazette |B5 12/1048 NOTICE O F SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a WRIT OF EXECUTION issued in Circuit Court of Santa Rosa County, Florida, on the 10th day of November, 2011 in the cause wherein Blanche M. Johnson was Plaintiff and State Farm Florida Insurance Company was Defendant, being Case No. 05-368CA01 in said court, I, Wendell Hall, As Sheriff of Santa Rosa County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff, Blanche M. Johnson in and to the following described real property, to wit: DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY 2672 Settlers Colony Blvd. Gulf Breeze, Florida Lot 5, SETTLERS COLONY AT VILLA VENYCE, FIRST ADDITION, TOWNHOUSES SUBDIVISION, Santa Rosa County, Florida, according to plat thereof recorded in Plat Book C at Page 121 of the public records of said County. 2674 Settlers Colony Blvd Gulf Breeze, Florida Lot 6, SETTLERS COLONY AT VILLA VENYCE, FIRST ADDITION, TOWNHOUSES SUBDIVISION, Santa Rosa County, Florida, according to plat thereof recorded in Plat Book C at Page 121 of the public records of said County. And on the 24th day of January, 2012 I shall offer this property for sale, at the east front door of the Santa Rosa Criminal Justice Facility, 5755 East Milton Rd, Milton, Florida, Santa Rosa County, Florida, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. on or as soon thereafter as possible. I will offer for sale all the said plaintiffs, Blanche M. Johnson right, title and interest in the aforesaid real property, at public auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above-described execution. WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Deputy James E. Chessher James E. Chessher Deputy Sheriff IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN DISABILITIES ACT, PERSONS NEEDING A SPECIAL ACCOMODATION TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHALL CONTACT JANICE PLATT (850) 983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SALE DATE. 12/21, 28, 1/4 & 1/11 12/1048 1/8 PUBLIC NOTICE SANTA ROSA BAY BRIDGE AUTHORITY The Santa Rosa Bay Bridge Authority Meeting is scheduled forWednesday January 18, 2012 in the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Conference Room C, at 5:30 p.m. (cst) located at 6025 Old Bagdad Highway Milton, Florida. For further information call (850) 981-2718. Please use rear entrance. 1/11 1/8 1/9 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SHI Gulf Breeze LLC, c/o AEW SHI, LP (Legal), Two Seaport Lane, Boston, MA 02110, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of The Blake at Gulf Breeze, with its principal place of business in the County of Santa Rosa, State of Florida, intends to file an Application for Registration of Fictitious Name with the Florida Department of State. 1/11 1/9 12/1070 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SANTA R OSA COUNTY, FLORIDA FAMILY LAW DIVISION CASE N O.: 2011-DR-1055 DIVISION: B RE: The Matter of MARCUS ARON BROWN, Petitioner/Father, and VICTORIA LYNN BURKETT, Respondent/Mother. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: VICTORIA LYNN BURKETT Last known address of: 1225 Fretz Road, Pensacola, FL 32534 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Verified Petition to Determine Paternity and for Other Related Relief has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on Ann E. Meador, Esquire, Attorney for Marcus Aron Brown, Petitioner, at 900 N. Palafox Street, Pensacola, FL 32501, on or before January 25, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this court before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file a Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedures, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on December 16, 2011. CLERK OF THE COURT CIRCUIT COURT SEAL BY:Richelle Germann Deputy Clerk 12/28, 1/4, 11, 18 12/1070 1/7 NOTICE OF SALE Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on January 26, 2012 at 10 A.M. AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED 2000 DODGE VIN# 1B4HS28ZXYF111026 Located at: 6141 HIGHWAY 90 WEST, MILTON, FL 32570 SANTA ROSA Any person(s) claiming any interest(s) in the above vehicles contact: Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc., (954) 920-6020 ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC # AB-0001256 1/11(1) 1/7

PAGE 14

LocalB6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE850-995-8778 Sale prices good through Jan 1117, 2012 MON TUE THUR FRI SAT SUN Angel Soft Bath Tissue54624 pk Sweet Sue Chicken Dumplings18424 oz S a l e J a n u a r y 1 1 1 7 2 0 1 2 Florida Strawberries1731 lb bag Red Diamond Coffee76834.5 oz Ronco Spaghetti8916 oz Lance Home Pack Crackers1558 pack Jiffy Corn Muffin Mix488 oz Bryan Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna9812 oz Johnsonville Smoked Brats24714 oz Bar S Jumbo Frank9016 oz Sea Best Tilapia Fillets14935 lb bag Farmland Stack Pack Bacon43424 oz Land O Frost Bistro Ham or Turkey1938 oz Boneless Bottom Round Beef Roast 288lb Farmland Sliced Boneless Pork Loins198lb Hillshire Farm Smoked Sausage20814 oz Family Pack Bottom Round Beef Steaks311lb Fresh Express Hearts of Romaine Salad25510 oz Gwaltney Mild or Hot Roll Sausage9812 oz OnCor Family Pack Chicken Nibbler or Dyno Bites378\35 oz Green Giant Iceberg Lettuce84head Florida Navel Oranges2164 lb bag Vlasic Kosher Spears17424 oz Vigo Yellow Rice395 oz Alpo Dog Food70116 lb Georgia Red Tomatoes5115 oz Van Camp Baked Beans12627 oz Natures Crystal Spring Water18612 pk 16.9 oz Maxwell House Coffee Original Roast89534.5 oz Pet Evaporated Milk8912 oz

PAGE 15

FREE FREEWednesday January 11, 2012 FREE EDITION TAKE ONE Sarah Comito rolls out of bed before dawn most days and slips quietly out of her house. Before her rambunctious toddler wakes up, she heads off to work as a waitress in an upscale weight-loss resort in Malibu. The hour-long commute is exhausting, but the 33-year-old is thankful to make the trip when she remembers where she and her husband were four years ago: living in a tent in a nearby river bottom, strung out on methamphetamine. Now Comito fears the progress they have made since then could be lost as California cuts her from a vital child care assistance program, more than doubling the cost of her sons day care to $600 a month. On a $10 hourly wage, she said shed be better off quitting her job and staying home with her son while her husband works as a professional tree cutter. But if she stops working, they cant make rent. The only thing I can do is attempt to prepare for the worst, Comito said, while watching 3-year-old Matthew dart across the yard at the couples workingclass apartment complex in Oxnard. For years, child care assistance programs offered low-income parents such as Comito a lifeline. But state legislatures dealing with multibillion dollar budget de cits during the recession have been targeting child care subsidies as one way to help balance their state budgets. The cuts have come at just the time many parents need that help the most because full-time, well-paying jobs are in such short supply. In the last scal year, combined state and federal funding for child care assistance fell by 2 percent to $12 billion, according to a 46-state analysis by the National Conference of State Legislatures. Federal stimulus money gave a temporary boost to the subsidies, but nearly all that money stopped in 2011. At the same time, states reduced their general fund spending for child care programs by 7 percent during the current scal year, including a 25 percent decline in California, 30 percent in Hawaii and 10 percent in Michigan. In the scal year that ended June 30, 22 states reported declines in their budgets for child care subsidies, according to the state legislative group. But providing child care assistance to low-income families, a central tenet of the countrys 1996 welfare overhaul, is seen as critical to getting people back to work at a time when the country is struggling to reduce unemployment. The goal of the programs is to subsidize the cost of day care to help keep poor parents, many of them single mothers, working. Over time, the subsidy is scaled back as parents advance in the labor force and wean themselves off government assistance. Some parents give up jobs and turn to the welfare system if they cant nd affordable child care, but that isnt an option for those who have already used up their entitlements, said Danielle Ewen, a past director of child care and early education for the Center for Law and Social Policy. For those families, there is absolutely no safety net and we dont know what is happening to their kids, but it is absolutely scary to think, Ewen said. It becomes a very desperate, horrible cycle for poor families who are doing everything they can possibly do to become self-suf cient. The cuts have taken different forms. Some states have lowered the income ceiling to determine child care eligibility. Others have capped the number of families that receive assistance and created endless waiting lists or slashed the reimbursement rate paid to day care providers who accept poor children. Parents are coping in different ways. Some have asked their bosses to cut their wages so they continue to qualify for subsidized care. Others have scaled back hours to reduce the time their children are in day care. Some say they are thinking about quitting and going onto welfare. Grace Dixon, a service manager for affordable housing in the eastern San Francisco Bay area city of Alameda, said she has paid as much as she can to day care providers for her 1-year-old daughter and 4-year-old son since she was cut off from assistance in July and saw her child care charges nearly triple to $1,500 a month. What do they want us to do not to work and to get on welfare? Would that be better? And then their taxes are paying for me to sit at home and be on the couch? the 29-year-old college graduate asked. Advocates say some parents will leave their children in dangerous, unsupervised settings when they feel they have no other choice. What you see are very stressed and desperate moms, said Helen Blank, director of leadership and public policy at the National Womens Law Center. Some of them pay huge amounts for child care, and they cant afford to pay enough for food or they lose their house. The scenario plays out differently in different states. In Michigan, the state reduced its budget for subsidized child care this year by lowering the reimbursement rate paid to day care providers. Advocates say the change has made it tough for low-income parents to nd day-care providers willing to take them. Some providers have no incentive to participate especially the highquality providers, said Pat Sorensen, vice president for policy at Michigans Children, an advocacy group. In North Carolina, of cials have extended a waiting list for subsidized child care. The state reduced its funding for child care subsidies by 15 percent this year and has seen the list grow to 50,000 children this year, up from 27,000 children four years ago, according to the state Division of Child Development and Early Education. With this years budget cuts, those numbers have just gone crazy, said Sheila Hoyle, executive director of the Southwestern Child Development Commission, which manages a 600 child-waiting list for seven western North Carolina counties. The cuts to child care subsidies come as cash-strapped states pare back spending in many areas, including education and health services. Weve been going in the right direction to raise the quality of our day care centers and early childhood education, and I think those programs are important. But you have to balance in your budget the money you have, said Nelson Dollar, a Republican state representative in North Carolina who is co-chairman of an appropriations committee. For children, the cuts can mean the difference between a stable, educational child care experience and being shuttled among different providers, family and friends with little consistency. When parents cannot nd affordable care, they often leave children with a neighbor or friend even if they dont trust them. Or they might leave them at home with an older sibling. Theres an impact on that childs development, said Bruce Liggett, executive director of Arizonas Child Care Association, which represents the states licensed providers. Theyre not learning as they would in a child care center and theyre not going to get to kindergarten ready to learn. Its hard to know how many children have been affected by the recent cuts and in what ways. In Arizona, more than 48,000 children were covered by child care subsidies at the beginning of this year. Now, fewer than 29,000 are, Liggett said. Many in Arizona are on a waiting list. Ann Herron, 25, said she signed up as soon as her son was born 2 years ago, but assistance is nowhere in sight. A single mother, Herron said she cant afford to send her son to a day care center, so she has different friends watch him for minimal pay while she works as caregiver at a group home. Its hard on her not knowing who will look after him a month from now. But the Phoenix woman said its also hard on her son, who has little, if any, contact with other children. When he is around kids because he hasnt been around kids he acts crazy. Hes hitting and stuff, Herron said. It is just me and him.State child care cuts force hard choice on parentsA ght for funding APSarah Comito, a recipient of child care aid, and her, son Matthew, 3, at their home in Oxnard, Calif. Advocates of welfare reform in California often cite one statistic as they have pressed for cuts and changes to the program in recent years: The state has one-eighth of the nations population but one-third of all welfare recipients.

PAGE 16

A2 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, January 11, 2012Photos by APLiz Jenkins, historian and retired educator, cleans the marker of her favorite aunties grave to prepare it for photographing in Archer. A grave at St. Joseph Cemetery in Archer is photographed recently. The number of graves in Alachua County is not known, and probably will never be known. Florence Van Arnam, a Daughters of the Revolution member, cleans off a grave to prepare it for photographing at St. Joseph Cemetery.Tombstone hunters aim to keep history relevant, up-to-date by photographing gravesGAINESVILLE (AP) On many Saturdays, a band of people, from grannies to youngsters, root around Alachua County cemeteries. Its not some Twilight saga-inspired mission or a gothic-themed scavenger hunt. Instead, they do it to preserve history and to make that history easier to access on the Internet. Armed with cameras in addition to equipment for cutting through brush they are taking photos of every headstone and marker they can nd and putting them online. Our aim is to photograph every grave marker in Alachua County. In 10 years, they will be 10 years older, and no telling what will have happened to them, said Jim Powell, who leads to effort. There is a lot of history being lost. We just thought that if we take a snapshot of it now, in the future we will have that history. Powell works with historical records for the Alachua County Clerk of the Court Of ce, which is the of cial recordkeeper for the county. Clerk Buddy Irby has long been keen on preserving records and making them publicly available, earning him high marks from individuals and organizations that use the records for a variety of needs from legal action to tracing family ancestry. While Powell hunts up graves on his own time, Irby said the photographs will be a valuable asset to the historical record of the county. All of this is important, especially to people researching their family genealogy and building the history of Alachua County, Irby said. Its a great project. We get so many inquiries from throughout the nation about records we may have here. The number of graves in the county is not known, and probably will never be known. Newnansville Cemetery on County Road 235 near Alachua may be the oldest, Powell said, while Evergreen Cemetery off Southeast 22nd Avenue is one of the largest at least 20,000 markers have been photographed there. But far more dif cult to locate and photograph are the many small, rural graveyards throughout the county. Some are so overgrown that nding the cemetery itself takes perseverance, and then even more dedication to nd the graves within the cemetery. Others are just small family plots that have been lost over time. Still others were part of settlements often African-American that are now little more than a memory to old-timers. Some have only depressions in the ground indicating graves that no longer have markers if they ever did. Ironically, Powell and his volunteers are using the newest technology to nd the oldest cemeteries. One of the early ones we did, we found by using an old map and transferring it through a computer to GPS, Powell said. It was the Trapp family only about ve or six stones. It was a black family, and one of them was in the International Order of Odd Fellows, a fraternal organization, and also the Knights of Pythias. It is history that was here you realize that there was a big enough fraternal organization in that area that was black. What are we missing in our history? Powell is accompanied on his Saturday outings by volunteers often his granddaughters and members of the Alachua County Historical Commission and Daughters of the American Revolution. It turns out the girls have a bit of a competitive streak when it comes to photographing headstones. Both say they can photograph them better than their granddad. They said they also enjoy the community service aspect of the work. It makes me feel like Im making a difference helping people nd their family, Taylor Grif th, 12, said on a break from photographing graves at the St. Josephs Church cemetery near Archer. The oldest Ive seen was someone who died in 1795, or something like that. (The person) was 2 years old. Another frequent volunteer is Florence Van Arnam, 83. She is the fth generation of her family to live in Alachua County and is a member of the DAR and the historical commission. Van Arnam said that putting photos of grave sites online is valuable not only to genealogists but also to elderly or homebound people who want to see the markers to remember a loved one. I think its good to save the past. So many of the stones weve seen are illegible. Theyll be gone soon, she said. The primary website for the photos is wizardofar.org. The photos will eventually be archived with the University of Florida, as in this initial example. Preserving history Taylor Grif th photographs a once-hidden gravestone in the woods of St. Joseph Cemetery. On many Saturdays, a band of people root around Alachua County cemeteries, taking photos of every headstone and marker they can nd and putting them online. French man ordered to stay away from actress Kirsten DunstLOS ANGELES (AP) A judge has ordered a French man to stay away from Kirsten Dunst and not attempt to contact the actress for at least the next three years. Superior Court Judge Carol Boas Goodson issued the order against Jean Christophe Prudhon, of Dijon, France, after a hearing Monday in Los Angeles. The Spider-Man star did not attend the proceedings but wrote in a sworn declaration that she is frightened of Prudhon after he recently tried to reach her at her mothers home. In letters led with the court, Prudhon wrote that he sold his home in France, so he could travel to meet the star even though she has not responded to more than 50 missives he has sent. The order against Prudhon also protects Dunsts mother. KIRSTEN DUNST

PAGE 17

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) Its an irony that acid-tongued Violet, aka the dowager countess of Grantham, would savor: One of TVs hottest romances is playing out among English nobility, with nary a cell phone or laptop in sight and, most shockingly, on PBS. Downton Abbey devotees had eagerly awaited the dramas season two return Sunday, when the romance of Matthew and Lady Mary resumes its rocky course as World War I scars Europe. Theres also fallout from the war within Marys family digs, the stately mansion that gives the series its name. Consider it Yorkshire 90210, but with writercreator Julian Fellowes witty dialogue and rich characters, stunning period costumes and (generally) chaste love affairs. Michelle Dockery and Dan Stevens, who play the star-crossed young couple, said they are both delighted and surprised at the series international success. Its huge in Australia, Dockery said. And Spain, added Stevens. The 11 Emmy nominations and six trophies, including best miniseries, earned by the period dramas rst season were a thrill: For a show like this to get that kind of attention over here, its great, he said. Success has created a burden of secrecy regarding the fate of young lawyer Matthew, unexpected heir to Downton under Englands early 20th-century inheritance laws, and Mary, who could keep her familys hold on the estate by marrying him. In season one, the willful Mary had rejected, accepted and rejected again smitten Matthew, and then she was rebuffed. Now both have turned elsewhere for love, while war and other historical events toy with their fates. Dockery, 30, and Stevens, 29, project such on-screen chemistry that people who know better confuse ction with fact. There was a great picture of me and Dan at the Derby (the famed horse race) and even my boyfriend said, It kind of looks like youre together, Dockery said, smiling. Fans were desperate to know what happened next. Not least my own wife, said Stevens, interviewed on a California visit before season two aired in the U.K. Shes forever trying to nd the scripts and is desperate to read them. Spouse Susie Hariet now knows the story so far, with the season just concluded in Britain (a third season has been announced). But U.S. viewers who avoid spoilers online must wait for the drama to unfold over seven weeks, through Feb. 19. Downtowns younger generation matures quickly during wartime, with Matthew tested as an army ofcer slogging through trench warfare in France. It was a real delicious challenge to take on, such a far cry from the rst season for me. I was caked in mud for half the series, Stevens said. For a lot of us, it feels like a graduation in terms of what was asked of us, emotionally, and the intensity of the story lines. The stakes were higher and everything is notched up one or two pegs. Santa Rosa Free Press| A3Wednesday, January 11, 2012Imagine this: American Idol without Seacrest?PASADENA, Calif. (AP) Both Fox and Ryan Seacrest say they want Seacrest to stay as host of American Idol after this year. Whether that will happen was unclear Sunday even as both sides promoted this months launch of the 11th season of the countrys most popular television show. Its a tough negotiation and one that will come to conclusion, I think, pretty quickly, Fox Entertainment President Kevin Reilly said. Seacrest is not signed beyond this season and is also involved in talks with corporate owners of NBC Universal, where he has a contract at E! Entertainment. There have been several reports that NBC is considering Seacrest as a potential replacement if Matt Lauer decides to leave the Today show. Seacrest had little to say Sunday about the possibility of moving into a new morning job. While such talk is attering, he said, that job will be that persons job as long as that person wants the job. American Idol continues to be a TV steamroller. Yet network TV is in tough economic straits, and many millions of dollars are tied up in contracts with Seacrest and judges Jennifer Lopez, Steven Tyler and Randy Jackson. As for Seacrests contractual status, the key word Sunday was imagine. Its very hard to imagine the show without Ryan, Reilly said. We certainly want to keep him. Theres no creative discussion there whatsoever. It is a deal issue. Said Seacrest: Ive done this for the last decade. I love doing it, so I cant imagine not being on every week. Added Fox alternative show chief Mike Darnell: We love Ryan and I cant imagine the show without him. The next few weeks will show whether love translates to a deal. Darnell said that after major changes on Idol last year with the additions of Tyler and Lopez and some revamping of the middle weeks of the competition, this year there will be relatively minor tweaks. Two big challenges when competitors reach the Hollywood stage will be requiring them to sing some 1950s era songs, and sing with the accompaniment of only one instrument. And a healthy rivalry seems to be building with NBCs moderately successful new competition The Voice, as Idol panelists made a handful of snarky remarks about the other show. We will denitely never, ever rip off Star Trek like The Voice did with spinning chairs, Jackson said. American Idol returns Jan. 18. APFrom left to right, American Idol Judges Steven Tyler, Jennifer Lopez, Randy Jackson and host Ryan Seacrest participate in the American Idol panel Sunday at the Fox Broadcasting Company Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena, Calif.Fox to start Saturday night cartoons PASADENA, Calif. (AP) Long known for its Sunday night cartoons headlined by The Simpsons, Fox is planning to offer new animated material late on Saturday nights and on an experimental new digital channel. The network said Sunday that the new effort will be led by Nick Weidenfeld, the former head of program development for the Cartoon Networks Adult Swim series. The cable network has run a popular series of late-night cartoons on weekdays that has successfully reached a young male audience that TV executives consider valuable and elusive. Saturdays 90-minute cartoon block would begin at 10 p.m. Fox hasnt programmed aggressively in late nights and hopes the new series will provide some competition for NBCs Saturday Night Live, said Kevin Reilly, Fox entertainment president. It will start in January 2013. Reilly, during a news conference, offered hints but left an air of mystery around the future of some popular Fox prime-time shows like House, Glee, Fringe and Terra Nova. Fox appreciates its Sunday cartoons like The Simpsons, which will soon air its 500th episode. But success there left relatively little room for experimentation. There has been a lot of talent and a lot of product that weve wanted to pursue over the years that did not t the primetime mold, Reilly said. The digital channel would be available online, through cable on demand, as mobile applications and on game consoles, and its somewhat experimental, Reilly said. It would allow Fox to take chances on programming of different lengths, he said. Reilly conceded hes put off some decisions on prime-time shows that have doubts about their future. One is the long-running medical drama House, which Reilly said months ago was probably in its last year. He said he will meet soon with the shows producers to decide; he did say its very unlikely any of the shows characters would be spun off into a new series. He praised producers of Fringe for helping Fox drum up some interest in its Friday night schedule. But he noted the show is expensive to produce and at its current ratings, its a money-loser for the network. Please dont start the letter-writing campaign right now, Reilly said. I cant take that. The prehistoric adventure series Terra Nova is doing moderately well, but Fox had been hoping for more. Reilly said the show has struggled creatively in its rst season and will face tough competition for a time slot. If we had more holes on our network, we would be thrilled to lock that in, he said. Were going to decide very soon. Glee will be back next season, despite some early ratings troubles, he said. The current high school students will be graduating, said Reilly, who left unanswered how many of those cast members will be returning. APCast members Efren Ramirez, left, and Jon Heder, right, participate in a panel discussion Sunday for the Fox animated television show Napoleon Dynamite at the Fox Broadcasting Company Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena, Calif.Lions Gate nears $400 million deal for Twilight makerLOS ANGELES (AP) Lions Gate is close to buying Summit Entertainment, the maker of the teen hit Twilight series for about $400 million in cash and stock. Thats according to two people Sunday who were briefed on the matter. They were not authorized to speak publicly and requested anonymity. Talks on a deal are in the late stages and could be nalized this week. Summit also has about $300 million in debt linked to its movies. That debt is expected to be paid off quickly, especially after the last movie in the series, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2, hits theaters in November. The Hollywood blog Deadline reported the news earlier. The deal would create a studio among the largest in Hollywood and bring together under one roof Twilight and another expected popular teen series The Hunger Games, which Lions Gate is set to release in March. Like the vampire series that has attracted young audiences in hordes worldwide, The Hunger Games is being propelled by a hugely popular series of novels, these ones written by Suzanne Collins. The pairing would give Lions Gate added strength in international distribution, enlarge its library of older movies to sell to home video and TV channels and allow it to add Summits cash immediately to its books. It can also amortize the cost of the deal over time. For Summits owners, the deal represents another big payout following a special dividend of around $200 million that accompanied a $750 million renancing in March 2011. The biggest winners will be Summits management, including co-chairmen Rob Friedman and Patrick Wachsberger, which owns about 30 percent of Summit, and Summits majority owner Suhail Rizvis, of Rizvi Traverse Management. Friedman and Wachsberger are expected to continue to run Summit as a Lions Gate subsidiary. Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. already has a strong TV studio, which makes popular series such as Mad Men, Weeds, Nurse Jackie and is the key distribution partner of comedian Tyler Perry, including his shows House of Payne and Meet the Browns. But the studio had been distracted recently by a lengthy shareholder battle with activist investor Carl Icahn, who nally agreed last year to sell most of his shares and focus his attention elsewhere. Both studios are based in Santa Monica, Calif. Love and war rage as PBS Downtown Abbey returns for 2nd season

PAGE 18

A4 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, January 11, 2012 ClassifiedsB4| Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, January 11, 2012

PAGE 19

Santa Rosa Free Press| A5Wednesday, January 11, 2012 ClassifiedsWednesday, January 11, 2012 Santa Rosas Press Gazette |B5 12/1048 NOTICE O F SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a WRIT OF EXECUTION issued in Circuit Court of Santa Rosa County, Florida, on the 10th day of November, 2011 in the cause wherein Blanche M. Johnson was Plaintiff and State Farm Florida Insurance Company was Defendant, being Case No. 05-368CA01 in said court, I, Wendell Hall, As Sheriff of Santa Rosa County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff, Blanche M. Johnson in and to the following described real property, to wit: DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY 2672 Settlers Colony Blvd. Gulf Breeze, Florida Lot 5, SETTLERS COLONY AT VILLA VENYCE, FIRST ADDITION, TOWNHOUSES SUBDIVISION, Santa Rosa County, Florida, according to plat thereof recorded in Plat Book C at Page 121 of the public records of said County. 2674 Settlers Colony Blvd Gulf Breeze, Florida Lot 6, SETTLERS COLONY AT VILLA VENYCE, FIRST ADDITION, TOWNHOUSES SUBDIVISION, Santa Rosa County, Florida, according to plat thereof recorded in Plat Book C at Page 121 of the public records of said County. And on the 24th day of January, 2012 I shall offer this property for sale, at the east front door of the Santa Rosa Criminal Justice Facility, 5755 East Milton Rd, Milton, Florida, Santa Rosa County, Florida, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. on or as soon thereafter as possible. I will offer for sale all the said plaintiffs, Blanche M. Johnson right, title and interest in the aforesaid real property, at public auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above-described execution. WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Deputy James E. Chessher James E. Chessher Deputy Sheriff IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN DISABILITIES ACT, PERSONS NEEDING A SPECIAL ACCOMODATION TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHALL CONTACT JANICE PLATT (850) 983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SALE DATE. 12/21, 28, 1/4 & 1/11 12/1048 1/8 PUBLIC NOTICE SANTA ROSA BAY BRIDGE AUTHORITY The Santa Rosa Bay Bridge Authority Meeting is scheduled forWednesday January 18, 2012 in the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Conference Room C, at 5:30 p.m. (cst) located at 6025 Old Bagdad Highway Milton, Florida. For further information call (850) 981-2718. Please use rear entrance. 1/11 1/8 1/9 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SHI Gulf Breeze LLC, c/o AEW SHI, LP (Legal), Two Seaport Lane, Boston, MA 02110, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of The Blake at Gulf Breeze, with its principal place of business in the County of Santa Rosa, State of Florida, intends to file an Application for Registration of Fictitious Name with the Florida Department of State. 1/11 1/9 12/1070 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SANTA R OSA COUNTY, FLORIDA FAMILY LAW DIVISION CASE N O.: 2011-DR-1055 DIVISION: B RE: The Matter of MARCUS ARON BROWN, Petitioner/Father, and VICTORIA LYNN BURKETT, Respondent/Mother. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: VICTORIA LYNN BURKETT Last known address of: 1225 Fretz Road, Pensacola, FL 32534 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Verified Petition to Determine Paternity and for Other Related Relief has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on Ann E. Meador, Esquire, Attorney for Marcus Aron Brown, Petitioner, at 900 N. Palafox Street, Pensacola, FL 32501, on or before January 25, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this court before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file a Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedures, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on December 16, 2011. CLERK OF THE COURT CIRCUIT COURT SEAL BY:Richelle Germann Deputy Clerk 12/28, 1/4, 11, 18 12/1070 1/7 NOTICE OF SALE Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on January 26, 2012 at 10 A.M. AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED 2000 DODGE VIN# 1B4HS28ZXYF111026 Located at: 6141 HIGHWAY 90 WEST, MILTON, FL 32570 SANTA ROSA Any person(s) claiming any interest(s) in the above vehicles contact: Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc., (954) 920-6020 ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC # AB-0001256 1/11(1) 1/7

PAGE 20

A6 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, January 11, 2012 4025 HWY 90 PACE850-995-8778 Sale prices good through Jan 1117, 2012 MON TUE THUR FRI SAT SUN Angel Soft Bath Tissue54624 pk Sweet Sue Chicken Dumplings18424 oz S a l e J a n u a r y 1 1 1 7 2 0 1 2 Florida Strawberries1731 lb bag Red Diamond Coffee76834.5 oz Ronco Spaghetti8916 oz Lance Home Pack Crackers1558 pack Jiffy Corn Muffin Mix488 oz Bryan Reg or Thick Sliced Bologna9812 oz Johnsonville Smoked Brats24714 oz Bar S Jumbo Frank9016 oz Sea Best Tilapia Fillets14935 lb bag Farmland Stack Pack Bacon43424 oz Land O Frost Bistro Ham or Turkey1938 oz Boneless Bottom Round Beef Roast 288lb Farmland Sliced Boneless Pork Loins198lb Hillshire Farm Smoked Sausage20814 oz Family Pack Bottom Round Beef Steaks311lb Fresh Express Hearts of Romaine Salad25510 oz Gwaltney Mild or Hot Roll Sausage9812 oz OnCor Family Pack Chicken Nibbler or Dyno Bites378\35 oz Green Giant Iceberg Lettuce84head Florida Navel Oranges2164 lb bag Vlasic Kosher Spears17424 oz Vigo Yellow Rice395 oz Alpo Dog Food70116 lb Georgia Red Tomatoes5115 oz Van Camp Baked Beans12627 oz Natures Crystal Spring Water18612 pk 16.9 oz Maxwell House Coffee Original Roast89534.5 oz Pet Evaporated Milk8912 oz