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The Santa Rosa press gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00718
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Publication Date: 10-12-2011
Frequency: semiweekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00718
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Preceded by: Milton press gazette

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Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Gazette Santa Rosas Press Tweet us @srpressgazette and friend us on facebook.com Volume 103 Issue 82 Obituaries ..................................... A2 Speak Out ..................................... A2 Sudoku .......................................... A4 Opinion ........................................ A8 Sports ............................................ A12 Classieds ..................................... B10 TABLE OF CONTENTS Printed on recycled paper news@srpressgazette.com Jim Fletcher Publisher 623-2120 Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.com 75 cents By Bill Gamblin news@srpressgazette.com Many in Jay spent the weekend and rst part of the week mourn ing the loss of the towns former Mayor Jeroel D. J.D. Bray. Bray passed away Thursday following an extended illness. In honor of the man who served as mayor of the Town of Jay for 44 years, and two years before that as a city councilman, the Town of Jays ofces were closed Monday and Tuesday. Bray, who has one of the towns two city parks named after him, was born on Christmas Day in 1919 to the late H.H. Hub and Alice Bray. He would later join the Army and was stationed at the Panama Canal, but at the start of World War II, he found himself deployed to Europe as a member of the in fantry. He fought in the Battle of the Bulge. After being discharged, Bray would return home and go to work for the Escambia River Electric Cooperative. Bray would later own a service station in Jay and then go to work for the Santa Rosa County Road Department, where he retired in 1988. During that time, Bray and former Santa Rosa Press Gazette reporter Obie Crain became ac quaintances. He was a ne man, Crain said of the former Town of Jay mayor. He was a hard worker, and when he was with the road department he had the countys interest in mind. He was a very personable in dividual and knew everybody. Funeral services for Bray were held Tuesday at 11 a.m. at the Jay Funeral Home with Pastor Earle Greene ofciating. Burial followed in the Jay Cemetery with Masonic and mili tary services. By Michael Stewart Florida Freedom Newspapers The clang of a hammer on anvil rang out deep in Blackwater River State For est Saturday morning as the smell of kettle corn wafted over Krul Recreation Area. A loud boom from a Civil War-era can non startled many and signaled the be ginning of the Munson Community Heri tage Festival, a two-day annual event that ran through Sunday celebrating life in the Deep South prior to the Industrial Revolution. Located in northern Santa Rosa County off of State Road 4, the festival draws people from throughout North west Florida and lower Alabama. It is a way to show people a lot of stuff from the past and how life used to be in the old days, festival volunteer Jimmie Ates said. Booths and displays ringed the spring-fed lake at Krul Recreation Area, with demonstrations in shoe cobbling, wood-re cooking and hide tanning, to name a few. At one booth, men and women in pe riod-correct uniforms weaved baskets. Nearby, a man stirred clothes in a castiron pot over an open re, dropping lye soap in the steaming hot water. Munson resident Malcolm Reed, 65, was boiling sugarcane juice in an 80-gal lon kettle. Slow-cooked, the two truck loads of sugarcane Reed started out with would produce about 5 gallons of cane Photos and Story By Mathew Pellegrino mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com Starting today, women in Santa Rosa County will have a more convenient and personal place to re ceive vital womens servic es such as mammograms, ultrasounds and biopsies. The Womens Place at Santa Rosa Medical Cen ter held its open house Tuesday night as it ofcial ly opened inside the SRMC medical ofce building next to the main hospital on Berryhill Road in Mil ton. This is a dedicated place for women to come for preventative servic es, said Sherry Pitts who helps head The Womens Center and serves as a personal consultant dur ing a patients visit and procedures. Before, women who needed personal medical services had to go to an of ce that served both men and women, or had to drive to Pensacola for any ser vices. The new Womens Center is dedicated strict ly to women and to make women feel more comfort able when they are under going certain procedures. Phillip Wright, SRMC CEO said that the new addition is a good way to make patients feel more comfortable when they come to receive tests and services. We made the ofce larger and more comfort able for our patients when they come in to be seen, Wright said. Our goal is to make them feel comfort able when they come in. And that goal can be met starting with Pitts, who works alongside women when they are un dergoing cancer-related services, along with other procedures. I help them walk through the entire pro By Bill Gamblin news@srpressgazette.com Despite two meetings on Oct. 6, which focused on its future, TEAM Santa Rosa is trying to continue with its business of locating business. During the Thursday nights public hearing, which was set for members of the public to comment about TEAM, it was learned that companies are look ing at Santa Rosa County despite what many consider a downturned economy. The focus of those looking at Santa Rosa County is the building being va cated by ClearWire by the end of 2011. We have six different companies that are looking at this building as soon as it becomes available, said TEAM Santa Rosa Executive Director Cindy Anderson. In the economic develop ment world, we like to have projects in the pipeline. They might never get out of the pipeline, but we need them to have something to work on. Thanks to the media coverage of the ClearWire situation, we have gotten a lot of exposure. Of the six looking at the building, which is also the subject of a $5 million lawsuit by the buildings owners Ter haar and Cronley, they could bring 60 to 1,000 possible jobs, depending on which group, if any, pick the site in the Santa Rosa County Industrial Park. Wages involving these six projects can range from 100 percent to 150 per cent of the average wage in Santa Rosa County. The six projects involve: Project A European Manufacturer of Auto Parts 60 to 80 jobs Project B Service Center / Health Care Industry 225 jobs Project C Service Center / Informa tion Technology 300 jobs Project D Service Center / Multicontract 1,000 jobs Project E Service Center / Multicontract 500 jobs Project F Service Center / Multicontract 500 jobs Former Jay Mayor Bray dies SRMC opens center dedicated to women Inquiry does not slow down TEAMP HOTOS B Y BILL G A M B LIN | Press Gazette ABOVE: Civil War re-enactors set off a cannon Saturday afternoon as part of the Munson Heritage Festival. RIGHT : Grant Barrow nds out what it was like to be on one end of a two-man saw trying to cut through a nine inch log with Jimmy Ates. See MUNSON A10 See TEAM A10 See SRMC A10 HERITAGE S O U T H E R N SH F E S T I V A L H I G H L I G H T S 20 11 FOOTBALL: MILTON MANHANDLES TATE, 35-17 SPORTS, A12

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Local A2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011TELEPHONE N UMBERS All ofces ................. 850-623-2120 Classieds ................ 850-623-2120 Editorial Fax .............. 850-623-9308 All other faxes ........... 850-623-2007S UBSCRIP T ION RA T ES One year (in county) ......................... $39 Six months (in county).................$19.50 13 weeks (in county).................... $9.75 One year (out of county) ....................$62 Six months (out of county).................$31 13 weeks (out of county)..............$15.50 Senior Citizen (over 62) One year (in county)........................$32 Six months (in county) ......................$16 13 weeks (in county) .........................$8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.C OPYRIGH T N O T ICE The entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570.S AN T A R OSAS PRESS GAZE TT E ST AFFJim F letcher Publisher 850-393-3654 jetcher@srpressgazette.comC arol B arnes Ofce Manager 850-623-2120 cbarnes@srpressgazette.comBill G amblin Editor 850-377-4611 bgamblin@srpressgazette.comDebbie C oon Field Service Rep. 850-393-3666 dcoon@srpressgazette.comA be C lark Field Service Rep. 850-910-0902 aclark@srpressgazette.comTracie S melstoys Account Retention Specialist 850-623-2120 tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com S anta R osas P ress G azette 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570A T YOUR SERVICEM iss a paper? Circulation Jim Fletcher 850-623-2120 Want to subscribe? 850-623-2120 To buy back issues 850-623-2120 To place a classied ad 850-623-2120 To buy a display ad Debbie Coon 850-623-2120 To buy a photograph 850-623-2120 I nternet www.srpressgazette.com O fce H ours 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday To get news in the paper Bill Gamblin 850-623-2120 or 850-377-4611 E-mail : news@srpressgazette.com Short items: news@srpressgazette.com Church News: church@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries: news@srpressgazette.com Sports: sports@srpressgazette.com PUBLIC NOTICE The Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing at 9:30 a.m., on November 10, 2011, in the Board of County Commissioners Meeting Room, 6495 Caroline Street, Milton, Florida 32570, to discuss the advisability of authorizing one or more exclusive franchises for the provision of solid waste collection services in the unincorporated area of Santa Rosa County lying north of the Yellow River. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a public hearing you are entitled to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Kathy Jordan at (850) 983-1855 or at 6495 Caroline Street, Milton at least one (1) week prior to the date of the public hearing. If you have a short comment you would like to make, call the Speak Out line at 623-5887.Sunday, 2:43 p.m. I might sound like a sore head, but I was really disappointed by this years St. Rose of Lima International Festival. It was difcult to nd a place to park, and there was nothing for the kids to really enjoy as far as rides. I hope this was just an odd year, but it has been an event I look forward to going to since I moved to the area. Have a great day.Saturday, 9:17 p.m. This is Billy in Blackwater. I am calling in response to the unnamed person commenting on my call regarding hunting. It is hard to believe a real sportsman would kill a doe. As of Oct. 8, there are newly born and unborn babies. If you kill a doe on Oct. 22, these babies will be left for the coyotes and only be 0 to 14 days old. They cannot survive until 5 months of age. Oct. 22 is too early to start hunting, and Feb. 5 is too late and causes too much stress. Hunting season should be no longer than 30 days, and each hunter can choose how they hunt. My name is Billy Rogers, and this bothers me. Editors note: Mr. Rogers, the person who called was not disagreeing with you about hunting female deer, but was trying to correct you about when you said hunting was to start in your previous call. Saturday, 8:42 a.m. Hello, this is Bob. I recently called in and asked if the video cameras are so high-tech and up to date, why did it take a citizen to alert the city the caution or yellow period was not long enough? The Press Gazette corrected me in that there was no timer in the camera, but the caution or yellow lights were not set right. If they were set right in the rst place, maybe we would not have needed the cameras in the rst place. Thank you. Editors note: Bob, in checking with the Florida Department of Transportation and the city, the cameras were set correctly in the rst place. When the citizen brought forth the report from the state, it was the city who went with those conventions. According to the state, the city didnt have to do that. Thursday, 4:30 p.m. Thank you to everyone who participated in the third annual Riverwalk Run 5K on Oct. 1. The event was a huge success, raising nearly $18,000 for the City of Milton Parks & Recreation Department and attracting approximately 700 people to downtown Milton. A very special thank you goes out to Milton High Schools Student Government Association. Approximately 20 members showed up and volunteered their time registering participants, handing out water and working at the nish line area. Without their support, the event would not have been as successful. Thursday, 11:50 a.m. Yes, the family of the man from New Mexico who died in Yemen due to an American explosion is upset and complaining he was not treated fairly by the American government. He was doing bad, and luckily we killed him before he could kill more people. The family says they did not have the right to kill him, but that he had the right to denounce America and kill others. What is wrong with his parents? I hope people write the president and tell him he did the right thing. This is Maria. Mary Rose Jacobs Bailly, 87, of Bagdad, Fla., went to be with the Lord at home after a lengthy illness on Oct. 8, 2011. Bailly was born on Feb. 6, 1924, and attended Milwaukee, Wis., public schools and the St. Pauls Bible Institute prior to enlisting into the Womens Army Corps. She was married on Aug. 29, 1947, in San Antonio, Texas to Edwin R. Bailly. Mary lived out much of her Christian faith working with children in the church nursery, 4-H Clubs, Girl Scouts and Operation Christmas Child. She was a wonderful cook and generously shared her special cinnamon rolls with her large family, church and friends. She took great pleasure in singing in the church choir and Bagdad Community Center events. Mary was a 20-year breast cancer survivor and energetically walked in numerous Relay For Life events. Her hobbies included crocheting afghans, sewing Raggedy Ann and Andy dolls, walking, shopping for bargains and playing Po-ke-no and Bunco. She loved to travel, and as an 86-year-old WWII veteran was delighted to y to Washington, D.C., on the Emerald Coast Honor Flight. Bailly enjoyed her later years living in an historic home in Bagdad and participating in village events and supporting the Bagdad Village Preservation Association. Mary was also a longtime member of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church. Bailly is survived by her devoted husband of 64 years, Edwin Raymond Bailly of Bagdad; ve daughters and one son and their spouses, Linda Bailly (William) Bain of Pensacola, Rose Bailly (David) Adams of Chipley, David (Luci) Bailly of Bagdad, Edwina Bailly (Steve) Dienes of Pinon, Ariz., Melissa Bailly (Bill) Weidenhammer of Beavercreek, Ohio, and Rebecca Bailly (Michael) Maciel of Aledo, Texas. She is also survived by 12 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. A funeral service will be at 11 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011, at Hickory Hammock Baptist Church with Dr. Greg Robards ofciating. Visitation will be one hour prior to the service. Interment will follow in Lewis Williams Memorial Cemetery. Flowers or memorials may be given in Marys honor to Hickory Hammock Baptist Building Fund, 8351 Hickory Hammock Road, Milton FL 32583.Mary Rose Jacobs Bailly 1924 2011 MARY ROSE JACOBS BAILLY Mrs. Lucy Geraldine Martin, age 88, of DeFuniak Springs, Fla., passed away Oct. 7, 2011. She was born Oct. 2, 1923, in Fort Pierce, Fla. Martin was a resident of Walton County. She was Mormon by faith and a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in DeFuniak Springs. She was a very loving and caring wife, mother and grandmother. Martin was preceded in death by her father and mother; her husband, Malachi Martin; two sons, Calvin and Harley Collinsworth; and one sister, Mae Bruce. Martin is survived by one stepson, Phillip Martin and wife, Phyllis, of Milton; two daughters, Maytha Ollene Rutherford and husband, Johnny, and Corey Jean Dicks; one brother, Bo Adkins and wife, Martha; and one sister, Faye. She is also survived by ve grandchildren, Jane Davis, Samantha Rutherford, Harley Collinsworth, Cal Collinsworth and wife, LaDonna, and Rebecca Collinsworth; and two great-grandchildren, Chelsey and Caleb. A time of visitation will be held from 12:30-1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15, at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel, 230 Park Ave. in DeFuniak Springs. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel with Bishop Bill Everett ofciating. Burial will follow in the Magnolia Cemetery. Floral arrangements are being accepted, or donations may be made to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints at Lakeview Drive, DeFuniak Springs. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements. Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www. srpressgazette.com.Lucy Geraldine Martin 1923 2011 LUCY GERALDINE MAR TIN Robert Bob Joseph Klarich passed away Oct. 6, 2011, at home with his family by his side after a valiant battle with multiple health issues. Klarich was born in Flint, Mich., on Jan. 2, 1933, the second son of Charles and Ruth Klarich. Bob attended Flint schools, graduating from Flint Central in 1951. Also, he attended Flint Community College. He worked for the Flint Journal newspaper while in school and after graduation began a position at Buick Motor Division, a division of General Motors. In 1952, Klarich was drafted into the Armed Forces and opted to enlist in the United States Navy. He was stationed at Ellyson Field in Pensacola and remained there his entire tour of four years as a helicopter mechanic. On Aug. 18, 1953, Klarich and his high school sweetheart, Jacquelyn Day, were married. They were blessed with three daughters. Upon discharge from the United States Navy, Klarich returned to Buick Motor Division and remained there for 38 years in the position of production supervisor, retiring in 1986. After retiring, Klarich purchased a farm in Brown City, Mich., and crop farmed for 16 years, retiring again in 2002, he moved to Pensacola, Fla. After one year, Kllarich and his wife relocated to Milton. Klarich was preceded in death by his parents, Charles and Ruth; and a sister, Shirley. One brother, Charles, survives him. He leaves to cherish his memory his loving wife and sweetheart of 58 years, Jacquelyn; three daughters, Linda (Michael) Forys of North Branch, Mich., Janice (Terry) Mihora of Louisville, Ky., and Karen (Scott) Greenley of Bradenton, Fla.; four grandchildren, Steven (Niki) McKellar of KailuaKona, Hawaii, Sally (Davik) Hansen of Clinton, Utah, Benjamin (Katherine) Mihora of Monroe, Mich., and Marianne (Joshua) Balabon of Brown City, Mich.; and six greatgrandchildren, Olivia and Anna McKellar, Eric and Samantha Hansen, Molly Balabon and Levi Mihora. My Body has returned to dust from where I came. My Spirit has been lifted upon angel wings into the arms of our Lord. A family memorial took place on Oct. 10, 2011. National Cremation & Burial Society has been entrusted with the arrangements. Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www.srpressgazette.com.Robert Joseph Klarich 1933 2011 ROBER T JOSEPH KLARICH Obituaries Speak OUT As of Oct. 8, there are newly born and unborn babies. If you kill a doe on Oct. 22, these babies will be left for the coyotes and only be 0 to 14 days old. They cannot survive until 5 months of age.

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Wednesday, October 12, 2011 6512115 WISE EQUIP SALES & SERVICE A HE A T PUMP TH A T SAVES YOU MONEY? Looks like man has a new best friend. T here are lots of changes you can make around your house to save energy and money. And a free E nergy Checkup from Gulf P ower can show you how. For more information, call 1-877-655-4001 or visit gulfpower.com. E xamples of Available REB A TES: Insulation: 15 per square foot for additional insulation in existing homes Windows: $1 per square foot for qualied windows or lm Water H eating: $700 to install a heat pump water heater H VAC: Discounts up to $215 on routine maintenance, up to $300 for ductwork repair, $150 for fan motor replacement, up to $1,000 for new heat pump or $500 per ton for geothermal systems Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A3 Mathew Pellegrino mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com A woman who fell from her wheelchair at the Santa Rosa County Courthouse is asking the county to dish out almost $1 million in expenses to settle the case that caused her permanent physical damage. In February 2007, complainant Debra Owens fell from her wheel chair on the ramp and suffered a bro ken shoulder and a broken leg. Her leg was later amputated. Owens is asking the county to settle the mat ter outside of court. Owens said a dip in the wheelchair ramp caused her wheelchair to ip over. According to backup documenta tion, Owens is asking for an $800,000 payout from the county for the acci dent. She is also asking the county to make improvements to the court house wheelchair ramp over the next 12 months to avoid future injuries to herself and others. Owens, who lives with other phys ical ailments, said before the 2007 ac cident, she had surgery that left her with no kneecap on her left knee. On Monday, commissioners voted to pay Owens $800,000 for the ac cident, but a nal decision will not come until Thursday at the commis sion regular meeting. Courthouse lawsuit sparks hefty bill Crestview man charged with ofcer impersonation By Bill Gamblin news@srpressgazette.com A Crestview man was arrested Oct. 4 and charged with fraud by imper sonating a law enforcement ofcer. Michael Eugene Wayne, 54, of Crestview, had a warrant issued for his arrest on Sept. 29 through the Florida Department of Agricul ture. According to Sterling Ivey, with the Florida Department of Agri culture, Wayne was observed tak ing pictures of children attending a local rodeo event on Sept. 10 at the Santa Rosa County Fair Grounds/East Milton Park. Wayne reportedly identied himself as a law enforcement ofcer with the Depart ment of Agriculture and Consumer Ser vices and indicated he was taking pictures so that violation of Florida Law could be issued. Ivey indicated there is a state law commonly referred to as Ni coles Law that requires helmets to be worn by minors. Ofcers with the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce responded to the initial complaint and for warded the information to the Florida Department of Agriculture, who sought a warrant for Iveys ar rest. Wayne is free after posting a $2,500 bond. Ivey stressed that Wayne is not an em ployee of the department and is not a law enforcement ofcer with the agency. MICHAEL EUGENE WAYNE FIND IT ONLINE www.srpressgazette.com

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Local A4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Notice is given that the Santa Rosa County Value Adjustment Board (VAB) will meet on Thursday, October 13, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. in ing room located in the Santa Rosa County Administrative Complex at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton, Florida. The purpose of this meeting will be to hear recommendations of the Special Magistrates and either approve or deny those recommendations. The VAB will also certify the tax roll for 2011. 6011684 2037838 www. Sudoku-Puzzles .net Sudoku, Kakuro & Futoshiki Puzzles Sudoku 9x9 Easy (138083709) 2 5 4 1 3 9 5 7 1 8 4 7 3 6 5 1 3 4 1 8 7 2 8 9 4 3 4 8 2 9 6 7 www.sudoku-puzzles.net Solution: www.sudoku-puzzles.net SOLUTION FIND US ONLINE Check out Santa Rosa Press Gazette on Facebook, or tweet us @srpressgazette Baby shower caters to new, expecting mothers Mathew Pellegrino mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com The Healthy Start Coali tion of Santa Rosa County held its fourth annual Healthy Start Baby Shower on Satur day morning inside the Santa Rosa County Auditorium. Hundreds of expecting mothers both young and old and even those who already had young children came out to the event that had vendors set up to answer any baby question mothers or expect ing mothers might have. Escambia County has had its own annual baby shower for new and expecting moth ers in years past, but up until 2008, Santa Rosa County nev er had a venue to hold such an event. On Saturday, the walls of the Santa Rosa County Au ditorium were packed with round tummies and strollers as mothers and fathers pe rused the many pregnancy and parenting-related servic es in Santa Rosa County. Along with information and goodies, rafe draw ings were done periodically throughout the session, and hundreds of dollars worth of baby items were given away to those who attended. Face painting kept many children busy as their parents browsed through the vendors at the baby shower event. Daniel Patrick takes a bite out of a free hat he received at the baby shower while his brother Joseph Patrick looks on. PH OTOS BY MA T H E W P ELLE GR INO | Press Gazette From top, Jada and Alexis Hawthorne of Milton look on at a vendor booth at the fourth annual Healthy Start Coalition Baby Shower. Elizabeth Chepp of Milton tries out her Dr. Seuss hat she received at the annual countywide baby shower. Gabin Scholly of Milton hangs onto his father as he browses tables at the baby shower on Saturday.

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A5 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Special to the Press Gazette The Council for Citizens Against Government Waste (CCAGW) honored Rep. Jeff Miller (R-Fla.) as a Taxpayer Hero for scoring 98 percent on its 2010 Congressional Ratings. Miller had the highest ranking in Florida. The average rating for the entire House was 40 percent; a 9 percentage point increase from 2009, while the Senate averaged 42 percent, a 3 percentage point increase from 2009. As a representative with a score above 80 percent, Rep. Miller consistently voted to reign in deficit spending, reduce the tax burden and make government more accountable to taxpayers. Anyone can talk about cutting waste and taxes. Rep. Miller is of the rare breed who walks the walk by voting to ease the burden of a cumbersome, bloated federal government, CCAGW President Tom Schatz said. For the 111th Congress, second session, CCAGW rated 46 key votes in the House. The Ratings separate the praiseworthy from the proigate by evaluating important tax, spending, and transparency and accountability measures. CCAGW applauds those members of Congress who clung to their waste cutting mission in the face of a recalcitrant spendthrift majority. On behalf of taxpayers, we thank and applaud the Taxpayer Heroes for their votes to cut wasteful spending, reduce taxes, and make government more accountable to taxpayers, Schatz said. Unfortunately, far too many members demonstrated little regard for the consequences of failing to reduce the record $1.3 trillion decit and $14.7 trillion debt, and constituents should admonish them for their poor ratings. The Council for Citizens Against Government Waste is the lobbying arm of Citizens Against Government Waste, the nations largest nonpartisan, nonprot organization dedicated to eliminating waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement in government. To see the entire list of Congressional Rating for 2010, visit www.ccagw.org. Watchdog group names Jeff Miller a Taxpayer Hero Special to the Press Gazette Approximately 240 students from across Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties participated in the Youth Harmony Barbershop Choral Festival at Coastline Calvary Chapel in Gulf Breeze on Oct. 3. Participating choirs included: Milton High School (Sheila Thompsondirector), Pace High School (Valerie Wright, director), Central High School (Lea Anne Goble, director), Navarre High School (Caroline Buechner, director), Fort Walton Beach High School (Mary Jeter, director), Avalon Middle School (Joy Tyner, director), and Woodlawn Beach Middle School (Gina Lavere, director). Emerald Coast Barbershop Society Coordinator Carlton Cox and Santa Rosa Choral Music Coordinator Alicia Coon, worked together in planning the event. Guest clinicians from the iquartet, seventh place international competition winners from Miami Dade, Fla., flew in to work with the students in sectional rehearsals. At the conclusion of the workshop, students joined the Emerald Coast Chorus and the iquartet in a free concert for the public. The purpose of the workshop/festival was to introduce middle school and high school age students to a cappella barbershop-style singing. In the past, barbershop choirs have been sustained by an older population; however, local, state and international competitions have recently seen an influx of participation among young men and women of high school and college age. Emerald Coast Barbershop Society subscribes to the notion that Singing is Life and the goal of the society is to give students a whole new perspective about the joy of singing. SUBMITTED PHOTO Some of the choir students from Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties are seen participating at the Youth Harmony Barbershop Choral Festival at Coastline Calvary Chapel in Gulf Breeze. Santa Rosa music students participate in Barbershop Choral Festival

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Local A6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 C T F SALES & INSTALLATIONS 5749698 Laminate, Wood, Tile, & Repairs TEL: 850.826.1296 CELL: 850.259.0267 PHOTOS BY B ILL GAMBLIN | Press Gazette Friday was a busy day in Milton High Schools Homecoming Celebration. The event was culminated when senior Kyndal Cobb was crowned the 2011 Milton High School Homecoming Queen. Cobb and her court joined hands after her coronation to sing the school song. Prior to Friday nights football game, clubs and classes took to the streets of Milton for the Milton Homecoming Parade. Photos of the homecoming court and the homecoming parade can be found online at www.srpressgazette.com Milton High School Homecoming

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A7 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Local Jay teen awarded college scholarship Special to the Press Gazette Grayson Jernigan has been selected as a recipient of Goulds Professional Dealers Association (GPDA) scholarship presented by Goulds Pumps, ITT Corporation. The $1,000 scholarship was awarded to 14 high school graduates from across the United States and Canada. All 14 recipients of the scholarship are children of Goulds Professional Dealers Association (GPDA) members and their employees. The GPDA is the industrys oldest and largest association comprised solely of more than 7,000 independent water systems professionals. Grayson is the son of Melissa and Charles Ward, Clydes Well Service, Milton. Grayson attended Central High School where he was on Honor Roll. Grayson will be attending Pensacola State College Milton this fall. We started the GPDA Scholarship Program to assist the children of our Goulds Pumps family towards obtaining a college education, said Gerald Abbott, Manager Sales Communications and Programs, ITT Residential and Commercial Water. By helping our dealers children achieve their professional dreams and goals, we insure the future of our industry. In addition, Goulds Pumps has created the Future Professional Dealers of America as an offshoot to GPDA, where young people aspiring to follow in their parents footsteps receive technical information and support to further their studies. Independent dealers also receive extensive technical and product training through GPDA. Since Goulds Pumps established a Pump School for customers in the early 1960s, the company has graduated more than 20,000 independent dealers and distributors. We are proud of the 14 young people chosen as recipients this year. I hope they will follow in the footsteps of many previous GPDA scholarship winners who have gone on to promising careers. We are proud to assist them in helping them pursue their dreams, Abbott said. Since the GPDA scholarship program was formed, over 125 collegians have been awarded scholarships based on demonstrated academic achievement and potential, community service and leadership. ITT Corporation is a high-technology engineering and manufacturing company operating on all seven continents in three vital markets: water and uids management, global defense and security, and motion and ow control. With a heritage of innovation, ITT partners with its customers to deliver extraordinary solutions that create more livable environments provide protection and safety and connect our world. Special to the Press Gazette National Association of Insurance And Financial Advisor Pensacola members, Bud Lovoy and Prudence Caskey, LUTCF, FSS, were among the more than 1,700 NAIFA members in attendance during the NAIFA Association Executive Conference and NAIFA Career Conference and Annual Meeting, Sept. 8-14 in Washington, D.C. Lovoy served as a delegate for NAIFAPensacola. Delegates, part of NAIFAs governing National Council, participated in educational sessions and networking events, and voted on association business, including the election of new ofcers and trustees to the NAIFA Board of Trustees. Mr. Lovoy was also able to meet with Congressman Jeff Miller while in Washington, DC. Caskey, LUTCF, FSS is on the Association Executives Advisory Council. Their mission is to maintain governance that promotes and enhances the image, professionalism, and education of association executives, communicates with the federation, and serves as a liaison to the NAIFA Board of Trustees and Committees. NAIFA-Pensacola is the local association. NAIFA-Pensacola meets every third Thursday at the Pensacola Civic center for lunch. Please nd more about them at www. naifapensacola.com or by calling 390-3512.SPECIAL TO THE P RE SS GAZETTE NAIFA Pensacola board member Bud Lovoy meets with Florida Congressman Jeff Miller in his ofce during the NAIFA Career Conference and Annual Meeting in September. Area NAIFAPensacola members attend conference SPECIAL TO THE P RE SS GAZETTE Grayson Jernigan is the recipient of the $1,000 Goulds Professional Dealers Association scholarship from Goulds Pumps, ITT Corporation.

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We want you to share your views on the above topic(s) or any topic with other Santa Rosas Press Gazette readers. Your views are important, too. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Letters must be typed and may be edited for content for to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for verication, if necessary. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S Opinion A8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 We understand the issues some have with TEAM Santa Rosa. And after listening at two meetings with various ideas being bandied about and discussed, there are some good points and bad points that could come from this review. Everything in this world that involves human input and effort leaves room for some improvement or renement. Unfortunately, there is one that should cause all of us to shudder with fear, the idea of turning over our resources and allowing the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce to lead our economic development efforts. That would be about as good as using the money to light Rush Limbaughs cigars. Over the years, the arguments have been nothing short of maddening when it comes to Santa Rosa County being the redheaded stepchild of Escambia County. The hat is passed for construction of the regional airport and Santa Rosa ponies up, just like it did with bed tax dollars for that eyesore called the Pensacola Civic Center. When Amtrak was moving to the area and needed a local train station, Santa Rosa offered the historic L&N. Escambia County said we should stop trying to think regionally; that THEY were the economic hub. When the government considered closing all department of defense payroll centers and opening ve super centers, Escambia County passed the hat and asked Santa Rosa to join its effort, only to later decide the best location for that center was two miles from the Alabama line near the Greyhound Track. Now, some are talking about wanting to join forces for economic development. How soon some of our Santa Rosa County Commissioners forget the debates over road dollars. A couple of our Santa Rosa County Commission members walked out of a Florida-Alabama TDC meeting because Escambia County members changed the road priorities and pulled all the regional dollars for projects away from Santa Rosa. One of those projects three or four years ago was the widening of Avalon Boulevard. We ended up having to wait for a stimulus package to get that funded in phases. Commissioner Don Salter and others scoffed at the idea Escambia County Commissioner Gene Valentino tried to sell them a year or two ago about pooling resources to build more roads in hopes of getting the money back from the state. We hear commissioners talk about the need to support Santa Rosa County, yet now they want to turn their backs on the local residents and hand the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce our money. Already, our residents generally have to travel to Escambia County for various governmental services because the decision-makers feel things are better in that county. Really? If our commissioners give the $450,000 to $500,000 it currently allocates to TEAM Santa Rosa each year to the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce, do we expect that group to account for the funds any better than TEAM? How will our citizens have a voice or input in the process when the other agencies City of Pensacola and Escambia County would be contributing two or three times as much money. Teaming up with the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce would be about as good as the Santa Rosa County commissioners taking over economic development once again. It appears to be obvious, but many have forgotten why TEAM was created in the rst place. Santa Rosa County fully funded economic development at one time (through the TDC) and had an executive director globetrotting. We wonder what TEAMs critics would say if that happened yet again under county control. There is no way to make some residents happy. What is even worse, there are some people who actually do not understand the role an economic development council plays. First off, an economic development group is not tasked with bringing in a Costco to the old 84 Lumber location, or putting in sidewalks, curbing, proper drainage, or lighting your neighborhoods. Still, thats what at least one resident thought at the recent public hearing. Economic development is to create skilled and basic labor positions so there are jobs available for local youth. More jobs also result in more people moving to our area. With those jobs comes the new stores, restaurants, big box stores and more. What one must remember as long as we keep going to Pensacola to take advantage of these things: Why in the heck would they want to come here to begin with? This debate, started by our Santa Rosa County Commissioner, is a slippery slope. We just hope they use wisdom and forethought before hooking our horse to a Pensacola wagon that already has three broken wheels itself. Sending oil spill money to the Gulf Coast By Jeff Miller This week, I am pleased to join 23 of my colleagues across the Gulf Coast region in introducing legislation that will dedicate the nes paid by the responsible parties for last years Deepwater Horizon oil spill to the Gulf Coast states. Our legislation requires that 80 percent of the money paid by the responsible parties, estimated between $5 billion and $21 billion, comes back to the states affected by the spill, providing for the economic and environmental restoration we so greatly need. The Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities, and Revived Economy of the Gulf Coast Act of 2011 (the RESTORE Act) is a comprehensive piece of legislation that comprises previous bills offered by myself and others to bring the ne money back to Florida and the Gulf Coast region. As you know, last Aprils spill effectively shut down our tourism and damaged our local economy for the better part of a year, and it may be years before we know the spills full effects on our environment. Ultimately, the responsible parties will pay nes levied by the U.S. Justice Department based on the amount of oil spilled into the Gulf. Without legislation in place directing those nes back to the affected states, this money would go directly to the U.S. Treasury Department for use on other government programs. In April, I offered a bill to take part of the nes and return it to the ve affected states for economic restoration and tourism promotion (H.R. 1333). The RESTORE Act introduced this week incorporates many of the proposals in H.R. 1333, as well as ideas from Members of Congress across the coastal delegation. In the end, we took our time to develop legislation that stood the best chance of passage in Congress and met the needs of each of the Gulf Coast states. The RESTORE Act includes several mechanisms for dividing the nes paid by the responsible parties to the states equitably based on the effects of the oil spill on each state. There are essentially four categories of funding. The rst category, or 35 percent of the total, is divided equally among the ve states (Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas) for use in economic restoration, environmental recovery, and tourism promotion. The second category, or 30 percent, is administered by a task force comprised of state and federal ofcials as part of a comprehensive environmental plan for the entire Gulf Coast. The third category, or another 30 percent, is provided to the states based on a weighted formula of population, coastline, and distance from the spill, and can be used for both economic and environmental restoration. The nal category, or 5 percent, is dedicated to developing a Gulf Coast research and science program to promote Gulf protection, sheries, and energy resources. The Senate has introduced a similar bill, S. 1400, which also dedicates 80 percent of the ne monies to the Gulf Coast. Our bill is similar in nature, but we took several steps to improve what the Senate offered and make it more palatable to the House of Representatives and better for Florida. First, our bill provides the states much more exibility to use the ne money for both economic and environmental restoration. Florida suffered devastating economic consequences after the spill while Louisiana had far worse environmental effects. Under our bill, each state will be able to use the ne money as best suited to meet either economic or environmental concerns. Second, the House bill gives Florida in particular much more local control over the ultimate plan developed for our state, allowing the eight affected counties (Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf, Franklin and Wakulla) to have a tremendous amount of inuence over the direction of restoration in Florida. Finally, our bill puts some strict limitations on the power of the federal government in the restoration process. Administrative expenses for executive agencies have been capped at 3 percent, and NOAA may not use any of the research dollars on existing programs or to implement catch share programs. Additionally, none of the funds may be used by the federal government to purchase land. Overall, the House version of the RESTORE Act is a sensible piece of legislation that is businessfriendly and good for the State of Florida, as well as for the entire Gulf Coast. Recent statements by Gulf Coast Senators that their version of the bill must pass as-is or else are little more than the my way or the highway attitude that has unfortunately become pervasive in Washington. I would urge my colleagues in the upper chamber to tone down the rhetoric and work with their House counterparts to pass legislation in both chambers that can be presented to the President. The RESTORE Act is another step in our efforts to force BP and the other responsible parties to restore the Gulf Coast economically and environmentally after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. I look forward to seeing this bill move through the committee process and brought to the House oor for passage. Ultimately, it is the Gulf Coast states, like Florida, that were damaged by the oil spill, and the nes paid should be returned to those states to restore our economy and our ecosystem. Often bearded, smelly and intellectually incoherent, a horde of political activists occupied New York City, making outrageous demands on the U.S. government. You know them as the seasonal ock of intruders called United Nations delegates. The UN provides the slickest political cronies of corrupt, thirdworld countries the opportunity to run amok in our country under the protection of diplomatic immunity. Though they still do not have indoor plumbing in 90 percent of their own countries and their currencies often involve goats and oldest daughters, they somehow nd time to criticize the U.S. They come from kickback-based economies and agree on one thing: the U.S.A. is bad. The City is lousy with these international thugs; good luck getting a bilingual hooker on Craigs List this month. So, as the sixty-fth General Assembly commences and hotels brace for molestation season, allow me to sum up some UN highlights over the years: Colonel Muammar Gadda showed up wearing reective sun glasses in his shiny hair. He applied to the Obama administration as a start-up solar green energy company and was awarded $535 million. I remain mystied by why these crackpot dictators wear Michael Jacksoninspired military outts and sport self-bestowed titles like Colonel Gadda. A colonel in the U.S. must earn the rank, either by selling lots of fried chicken or by managing Elvis career. UN archives have Gaddas rst speech to the General Assembly in 1985, in which he demonstrated how to save money by doing an easy three-step home perm. A secret UN Security Council memo surfaced revealing that it knew about all of the Kardashian weddings ahead of time but failed to stop them. It is widely believed that Italian-American relations were set back fty years when the cast of Jersey Shore went to Italy to lm. The UN is reviewing the tapes made by U.S. soldiers when they invaded Pakistan and killed bin Laden. If further review of the tapes determines that the Navy SEAL raids were not conducted in accordance with international law, the United States will be charged with a timeout. After the raids, Pakistan was so mad at the U.S.A. that it went on Facebook and took us from friend to its complicated. The UN thought Osama bin Laden was a misunderstood guy; they point to his diary found in the raid in which he always dotted the i in indels with a smiley face. Moreover, friends agree, while he was a murderous terrorist, he seldom forgot birthdays. In his opening speech this year, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad bragged that Iran currently leads all other nations in captured hikers. Then, as an aside, he said he felt Ashton Kutcher did a great replacement job in Two and a Half Men. Ahmadinejad called our U.S. Presidents cowboys for invading Libya, Iran and Afghanistan. He might help Obama get reelected with that comment by underestimating just how much we Americans loved the sheriff in Blazing Saddles. Iran banned the mullet haircut. Arkansas has demanded that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton break off all diplomatic relations. Hillary Clinton was also asked to mend the fence between Israel and Obama after his many slights. She broke the ice on her diplomatic mission by reminding Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that her husbands last two girlfriends were Jewish. Hugo Chavez blamed the U.S. and capitalism for global warming. Looks like someone is trying to get noticed for a Nobel Prize! The UN explored replacing the Euro and the U.S. dollar with a currency of value, like an Apple iTunes gift card. The UN Committee on Disasters has been funded $1 billion to study what happened to the Boston Red Sox and Atlanta Braves in September. Astrophysicist Mazlan Othman was paid by the UN (and this is true) to be Earths liaison to future space aliens when they contact mankind. He also looked into a meteors rise, ame-out and its crash to earth last year and found it was just the Obama presidency. The UN did appoint Iran, a country that allows husbands to stone and abuse women, to its Womens Rights panel. Past chairmen include Ike Turner, Ben Roethlisberger and O.J. Simpson. They denied Bill Clintons application to y to Italy and bring U.S. citizen Amanda Knox, recently acquitted for crimes during a sex game, home. Ron Hart, a libertarian syndicated op-ed humorist. He can be reached at Ron@ RonaldHart.com. ON THE HILL Shoot our horse before hooking it up to Escambia Countys wagon OUR VIEW HART TALKR on H art The unwashed masses descend on New York City

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Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A9 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ...a weekly column answering your questions with Biblical answers about life. Ask the Preache r Pastor Gallups, I hear Christians all the time make the claim that Jesus is God. How can this be? I have a close relative who is a part of a religious group that says very emphatically that Jesus never CLAIMED to be God and that he is NOT God. Please help me understand this. J. M. E. Milton. Dear J. M. Why was Jesus crucified? He was not crucified because He was a criminal. He was crucified because He claimed to be The Christ, The Messiah, The Son of the Living God, ALLof which are Old Testament terms for the visitation of God in the flesh on the earth. The ONLYreason Jesus was crucified is because He CLAIMED to be God! The Sanhedrin counsel knew this, that is why they said, he has committed blasphemy! There simply is no denying the fact that Jesus claimed to be God. Either he LIED or he was a LUNATIC or he was the LORD! There are no other choices. If he was a liar or a lunatic then he certainly was not a great teacher or even a good person! How do we know he wasnt a liar or a lunatic? The evidence does not support that he was either of these. Everything he ever claimed that he would do he DID! He sure wasnt a liar. How many lunatics do you know that can open the eyes of the blind, raise the dead, cause the lame to walk again? No, J.M, he wasnt a liar or a lunatic. The evidence says that he was the most honest, sane person who ever walked the face of the earth. But, then, how do we know for sure that He was the Lord? Simple again. There is an EMPTYTOMB to prove that He was and is exactly who He said He was and is, the Lord of Life! It has stood as a testimony to his Lordship for 2000 years. J.M., stay clear of any religious system that denies or takes away from the deity of Jesus Christ. Turn to JESUS with your life and trust him as savior and serve him as Lord. Jesus IS God in the flesh, GOD WITH US! Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church in Milton. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree from Florida State University and a Master of Divinity Degree from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been the Pastor of HHBC since 1987. For 10 years he has also served as an International Youth Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention, preaching to multiplied thousands all over the U.S. and Canada. For more information about HHBC call 623-8959 or 626-8951 or fax, 623 197 If you have a question for ASK THE PREACHER send it to: ASK THE PREACHER, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351 Hickory Hammock Rd, Milton, FL, 32583 Put Your H e a l t h y B u s i n e s s Here Call Debbie Coon 393-3666 or Abe Clark 910-0902 Free Hearing Test Sales, Service and Repairs on all Makes and Models of Hearing Aids All Insurance Accepted Sabrina Kaestle, Au.D., BC-ABA 6008982 Mention this ad and receive 10% off a set of Digital Hearing Aids 6011383 Faith Pets of all shapes and sizes came out to get a blessing at the First Presbyterian Church of Miltons Blessing of the Pets on Saturday, as part of the Beaches to Woodlands Tour. Dogs, cats and even horses were given a blessing by First Presbyterian Church of Milton pastor JoAnn Kublik, who helped host the event which was in its second year. Kublik said the idea of the pet blessing, comes from the acts of St. Francis of Assisi who was an animal lover and believed all creatures were children of God. Bagdad UMC Annual Bazaar Bagdad United Methodist Church will have their Annual Bazaar on Saturday, Oct. 15, 8 a.m. 2 p.m. There will be indoor and outdoor sales of housewares, adult and childrens clothing, collectibles, furniture and much more. Additionally, chicken and dumpling lunches and chili lunches will be available for sale along with a variety of homemade baked goods. Bagdad United Methodist Church is located at 4540 Forsyth Street in the historic village of Bagdad in Milton. For more information, call the church ofce, 626-1948. New Shoes and Clothing Sale New Beginning Free Spirit Church will hold a new shoes and clothing sale on Oct. 15 from 7 a.m. 3 p.m. It is located behind Texas Roadhouse on Highway 90 in Milton. Faith Baptist Church All-Day Preaching and Singing Service Faith Baptist Church located at the corner of Hamilton Bridge Rd. and Dogwood Dr. will host an All-Day Preaching and Singing Service on Oct. 16. The theme for this day is: Our Mission Field: Santa Rosa County. With this in mind, FBC extends an invitation to local pastors of like-faith and their congregations. If you Would like to share your vision for reaching our county Have a preacher boy who would like to have a chance to speak Have a church member who would like to share their testimony Have a group or individual who would like to sing (conservative style) or, just come fellowship with us and get to know our new pastor, Bro. David Rowan. The day will start with regular services: Sunday School 9:45 a.m., Morning Worship & Jr. Church 11:00 a.m. After the Morning Worship, we will break for a potluck luncheon (any one coming to the afternoon services is also invited to lunch). We will reconvene at 2:00 p.m. and go until 7:00 p.m. If you would like to participate in this service, please call the church ofce (Tuesday Friday) at 623-8207. Isaiah Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church Family and Friends Day The annual Family and Friends Day will be held at the Isaiah Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church on Oct. 16. The guest speaker for the 11 a.m. service will be Evangelist Kendra Walker Battle of The Fathers House in Norcross, Ga. The guest speaker for the 3 p.m. program will be Rev. john Philpot, Sr., Pastor of Talbot Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church in Pensacola. You are invited to join as Isaiah Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church rejoice, give praise, and reconnect with our family and friends. Faith Chapel Homecoming Faith Chapel Assembly of God on S. Airport Rd. will hold a home coming on Oct. 16. Pastor Ron Carnley and members of the church invite you to attend. Nu Image in Concert Nu Image will be in concert Oct. 23 from 9:45 -10:45 a.m. at First United Methodist Church on Berryhill St. in Milton. East Milton Assembly of God Homecoming East Milton Assembly of God Church will celebrate its homecoming on Oct. 23 at 10 a.m. There will be dinner on the grounds, worship with Heaven Bound, and soul food provided by Bro. Wes Weekly. East Milton Assembly of God is located at 5174 Ward Basin Rd. Pace FUMC Fall Festival First United Methodist Church of Pace will be holding its annual fall festival on Oct. 23 from 5 7 p.m. There will be fun for the entire family with a hay ride, face painting, games, pony rides, bounce house, free food and more including a pumpkin carving contest. Carve your pumpkin at home and bring it with you for the judging. For more information call 994-5608. Wallace Baptist Church Fall Festival Wallace Baptist Church on Chumuckla Highway in Pace will be hosting its fall festival on Oct. 29 from 5 7 p.m. This free family event includes an evening of Trunk or Treat, food, music, inatable, fun and more. For more information call the church ofce 994-8278 Faith BRIEFS P hotos by M A T HEW P E LL EG R IN O | Press Gazette Even cats came out to receive a blessing on Saturday at the First Presbyterian Church of Milton. Nora Hamilton and her mother Sharon Hamilton play with the K9 Phoenix at the second annual Blessing of the Pets. Many dogs like this one avoided the sun despite the cool conditions on Saturday. Even the big dogs came out to the Blessing of the pets including Tuffy the quarterhorse whose owner Kyle Holley uses to encourage reading and positive behavior at schools around Florida. Dusty the poodle mix was in heaven after receiving a handful of treats at the second annual Blessing of the Pets on Saturday. A scale model of Noahs Ark was on display at the pet event along with local vendors who provide services and food for animals. Threeyear-old Java, a miniature Sheltie stands with her owner, Brenda Anthony of Pace, after receiving a blessing on Saturday. Blessing of the Pets

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Local A10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Along with these projects, there are four others Anderson noted during TEAMs presen tation to the public and the board of county com missioners. Despite an explana tion of its current focus, which is improving the economic well being of a community through ef forts that entail job cre ation, job retention, tax base enhancements and quality of life, some feel that TEAM is focusing in the wrong areas. TEAM does not deal with what we do in Na varre, said Navarre resident Loretta Akin. They need to expand their mission to include tourism and work with the different cham bers. Another county resi dent feels that TEAM needs to focus on more local items. I feel like we need to focus on more sidewalks, curbs, and taking care of our sewage, said Kim Moore. Most of the plac es you look there is dirt and dishevelment. I would like to see a big box store like a Cost co in the old 84 Lumber location and be able to do the things here I have to travel elsewhere for. Jerry Couey, a longstanding opponent of TEAM, feels the county needs to hold the econom ic development groups feet to the fire. TEAM has had the contract for over three years and not once have they followed it, Couey said. They hand out this brochure on job numbers and the numbers are not right. They are not showing the number of jobs lost at ClearWire or Tata. The jobs that Couey was referring to at Clear Wire are expected to be lost in November, while Tata Business Solutions announced its job news just one week before the TEAM Santa Rosa Industry Appreciation Luncheon, which the brochures were already printed for. Couey also challenged a supporter of TEAM ear lier in the day, Floridas Great Northwest. Two months ago, I spoke with Mr. (Don) Kirkland and sent him a freedom of information request concerning the $15 million in federal dol lars they use and all they sent me back was this colorful brochure, Couey said. Also during the meet ing, newly appointed chairman for TEAMs board of directors Dave Hoxeng gave the public some insight to the Clear Wire saga itself. I dont think many people understand what all happened with Clear Wire, Hoxeng said while addressing the board. After they announced an expansion they got a new CEO who basically decid ed to send all their jobs over to the Philippines and Honduras. Before that they had three call centers in Las Vegas and the call center here in Milton. Now they are almost gone in Las Vegas and by the first of the year we will have just a few of the jobs we once had. syrup by days end. Reeds family has been making cane syrup for as long as he can remember, and up until last year, he used to do it pretty regu larly himself. Now Reed only makes cane syrup for special events, mainly to share his knowledge with children. Thats the only reason I do it, Reed said. Sugar cane was used in so many ways. As a sweetener and for baking; for breakfast, we used to have biscuits, syrup and a piece of meat. A recurring theme amongst the demonstra tors was how hard people once had to work to provide basic necessities. Crestview resident Pey ton Knight, 6, found that out rst hand when he part nered up with Jimmy Ates on a two-man crosscut saw, grimacing as they ripped through a 9-inch log. Thats a lot harder than I thought it would be, Pey ton said. Raymon Melvin dis played hand-made tools and drinking cups, each of which required time and effort to make. There were iron axes, fashioned on a forge with re and a ham mer, homemade knives and hand-carved wooden bowls. Its my way of showing people how hard people had to work back then, Melvin said. BILL GAM B LIN | Press Gazette Malcom Reed was showing people the art of making cane syrup as he was busy over the weekend cooking down two truckloads of sugarcane. MUNSON from page A1 The seating area, along with the rooms inside The Womens Center, was designed specically to help patients feel comfortable when they come in for services.M ATHEW PELLE G RINO | Press Gazette Thursday at the Santa Rosa County meeting on Economic Development, the public and commissioners learned that six companies have shown interest into moving into this building once ClearWire vacates it later this year. Depending on which company makes the move it could mean somewhere between 60 to 1,000 jobs to Santa Rosa County. cess, and help take some of that stress off of their shoulders, Pitts said. We go through steps with the patients that used to take numerous weeks and speed up the process for them. The new center offers stereotactic and ultra sound guided biopsies, needle localizations (a presurgical procedure), digital mammograms, sentinel mode marking and general ultrasounds, among other services. And while both Wright and Pitts know how difcult certain preventative and surgical procedures can be for women, the medical center dedicated their time and effort into making The Womens Center one of the most comfortable ofces around. Dr. Pam Sherman, the medical director of The Womens Center, will con tinue her full-time services at her general surgeon practice along with the ser vices she will provide at the new center for women. For information on addi tional services or to set up an appointment, call 6265272. TEAM from page A1 SRMC from page A1 A digital mammogram machine sits inside one of the many rooms inside The Womens Center.

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Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A11 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 The Future Fisherman Foundation (F3) and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) will conduct a train ing seminar for anyone interested in angler and aquatic education training. This years event will be at the 4-H Camp Ocala the weekend of Oct. 22-23. This seminar is open to teachers, 4-H leaders, Boy/ Girl Scout leaders, Future Farmers of America per sonnel and anyone inter ested in getting students involved with shing and aquatic education. Trainers will teach the principles of nationally recognized pro grams such as Hooked on Fishing Not on Drugs. The intent of this semi nar is to give everyone a good working knowledge of sport-shing techniques and aquatic education and instill condence in them to train others in their respec tive organizations, said Mark Gintert, F3 executive director. We also intend to show them a host of other available resources and the next steps for their pro grams once they get estab lished. Biologists from the FWC will cover a wide variety of topics, including local biol ogy, habitat, conservation, equipment operation and life skills. A primary goal of the FWC is to create the next generation that cares by enabling youth and fami lies to reconnect with nature through a variety of active, nature-based recreational activities. Such activities will enable them to live hap pier, healthier and smarter lifestyles while becoming future resource stewards (MyFWC.com/Youth). The FWC is imple menting ways to reach out to schools and other orga nizations that deal directly with students across the state, said Rich Abrams, the FWCs Marine Aquatic Education coordinator. This event will bring together a diverse group of people who share the same goals of getting students involved with the great out doors and learning to be stewards of Floridas aquat ic environments, echoed Steve Marshall, the FWCs Freshwater Angler and Aquatic Education coor dinator. Marshall will help lead the seminar. A travel stipend is available for participants through a Recreational Boating and Fishing Foun dation grant, making the cost minimal. Interested parties should go to Future Fisherman.org to register. Space is limited, so register immediately. Participants will pay upfront for their stay and meals at Camp Ocala (approximately $73 per person), but the Future Fisherman Foundation will reimburse $150 per person in travel expenses for up to three people per organiza tion. Participants will receive the Hooked on Fishing Not on Drugs curriculum, shing equipment instruc tion and many additional educational tools. This will be an in-depth training that will encompass hands-on equipment use, ways to help youth plan for the fu ture, and environmental stewardship activities for which Hooked on Fishing is known. Instructors for the program will be Mark Gintert, executive director of the Future Fisherman Foundation; Jennifer Sa ranzak, FWC marine biolo gist/education specialist in marine sheries; and Steve Marshall, FWC sheries bi ologist in freshwater sher ies (561-292-6050). Wise Equipment Sales & Service 1147 S. Ferdon Blvd. Crestview, FL 32536 (850) 682-3366 6512470 www.foxwoodcc.com GOLF ANYONE? 4927 Antioch Rd., Crestview MUST PRESENT THIS COUPON. EXPIRES DECEMBER 31, 2011 850 6822012 Call Now For Tee Time Round of Golf! Cart Included $ 29 +TAX GOOD ANYTIME MONDAY THROUGH SUNDAY Pensacola Bay Thursday, Oct. 13, 6:48 AM CDT Sunrise 8:09 AM CDT Moonset 10:21 AM CDT Low tide 0.37 Feet 6:18 PM CDT Sunset 7:06 PM CDT Moonrise Friday, Oct. 14, 12:20 AM CDT High tide 2.01 Feet 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 9:03 AM CDT Moonset 11:14 AM CDT Low tide 0.32 Feet 6:17 PM CDT Sunset 7:45 PM CDT Moonrise Saturday, Oct. 15, 12:55 AM CDT High tide 2.07 Feet 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 9:57 AM CDT Moonset 12:21 PM CDT Low tide 0.28 Feet 6:16 PM CDT Sunset 8:29 PM CDT Moonrise Sunday, Oct. 16, 1:36 AM CDT High tide 2.10 Feet 6:50 AM CDT Sunrise 10:49 AM CDT Moonset 1:36 PM CDT Low tide 0.23 Feet 6:15 PM CDT Sunset 9:18 PM CDT Moonrise East Bay Thursday, Oct. 13, 6:48 AM CDT Sunrise 8:09 AM CDT Moonset 10:21 AM CDT Low tide 0.37 Feet 6:18 PM CDT Sunset 7:06 PM CDT Moonrise Friday, Oct. 14, 12:20 AM CDT High tide 2.01 Feet 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 9:03 AM CDT Moonset 11:14 AM CDT Low tide 0.32 Feet 6:17 PM CDT Sunset 7:45 PM CDT Moonrise Saturday, Oct. 15, 12:55 AM CDT High tide 2.07 Feet 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 9:57 AM CDT Moonset 12:21 PM CDT Low tide 0.28 Feet 6:16 PM CDT Sunset 8:29 PM CDT Moonrise Sunday, Oct. 16, 1:36 AM CDT High tide 2.10 Feet 6:50 AM CDT Sunrise 10:49 AM CDT Moonset 1:36 PM CDT Low tide 0.23 Feet 6:15 PM CDT Sunset 9:18 PM CDT Moonrise Blackwater River Thursday, Oct. 13, 12:49 AM CDT High tide 1.94 Feet 6:48 AM CDT Sunrise 8:10 AM CDT Moonset 10:51 AM CDT Low tide 0.37 Feet 6:19 PM CDT Sunset 7:06 PM CDT Moonrise Friday, Oct. 14, 1:16 AM CDT High tide 2.01 Feet 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 9:04 AM CDT Moonset 11:44 AM CDT Low tide 0.32 Feet 6:18 PM CDT Sunset 7:46 PM CDT Moonrise Saturday, Oct. 15, 1:51 AM CDT High tide 2.07 Feet 6:50 AM CDT Sunrise 9:57 AM CDT Moonset 12:51 PM CDT Low tide 0.28 Feet 6:17 PM CDT Sunset 8:30 PM CDT Moonrise Sunday, Oct. 16, 2:32 AM CDT High tide 2.10 Feet 6:50 AM CDT Sunrise 10:50 AM CDT Moonset 2:06 PM CDT Low tide 0.23 Feet 6:15 PM CDT Sunset 9:18 PM CDT Moonrise Navarre Beach Thursday, Oct. 13, 5:44 AM CDT Low tide 0.41 Feet 6:48 AM CDT Sunrise 8:09 AM CDT Moonset 6:18 PM CDT Sunset 7:06 PM CDT Moonrise 9:08 PM CDT High tide 1.62 Feet Friday, Oct. 14, 6:39 AM CDT Low tide 0.37 Feet 6:48 AM CDT Sunrise 9:03 AM CDT Moonset 6:17 PM CDT Sunset 7:45 PM CDT Moonrise 9:43 PM CDT High tide 1.68 Feet Saturday, Oct. 15, 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 7:48 AM CDT Low tide 0.36 Feet 9:56 AM CDT Moonset 6:16 PM CDT Sunset 8:29 PM CDT Moonrise 10:22 PM CDT High tide 1.74 Feet Sunday, Oct. 16, 6:50 AM CDT Sunrise 9:33 AM CDT Low tide 0.35 Feet 10:49 AM CDT Moonset 6:15 PM CDT Sunset 9:18 PM CDT Moonrise 11:03 PM CDT High tide 1.78 Feet 4th Annual SREF Mediacom Garcon Point Bridge Run Santa Rosa Educa tion Foundation (SREF) is pleased to partner with Me diacom Communications Corporation to announce its 4th Annual Connecting Education in Santa Rosa County run/walk across the Garcon Point Bridge. This event supports SREF programs including grants to classroom teachers and school matching grants, free classroom supplies for teachers, Take Stock in Chil dren mentor support and college scholarships, and recognition of excellence in education. This 4.8 mile run/ walk will take place on Oct. 22, at 7:30 a.m. Age division awards will be presented for runners and walkers. Shuttle service from registration and check-in at Lowes Gulf Breeze will begin at 6 a.m. Participants will run/walk from the north end of the Garcon Point Bridge to the south end. Post race activities will include hamburger, hot dogs, and drinks for partici pants. Advance registration is encouraged. Entry fees are $20 for children under 18 and $25 for adults. After Oct. 18, all registration fees are $30. The rst 400 participants will receive an event T-shirt. Registration is available on line at www.active.com. Reg istration forms and sponsor ship opportunities are avail able at www.santarosa.k12. .us/sref/gpbr2011.htm. Sports SIDELINE Tide REPOR T Sports Hooked on Fishing teacher training available

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SP O RT S www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, October 12, 2011 A Section Page 12 P hoto by BILL GAM B LIN | Press Gazette Over 100 runners participated in the St. Rose of Lima 5K Saturday morning in conjunction with the annual St. Rose of Lima International Festival. More photos from this race can be found on-line at www. srpressgazette.com Special to the Press Gazette Saturday the Jay High girls cross country team won the 7th Annual J.D. Mac Invitational at the Bray-Hendricks Park in Jay. Jessica Thornton placed fth with a time of 21:03 to lead the Lady Royals while, Jorja Agrait placed tenth with a time of 21:36. Also nishing in the top twenty were Allison Blair with a time of 22:17, Ally Settle 22:18 and Savannah Brown 22:30. Jay nished the meet with 12 of its top 15 run ners setting new personal records Anabel Shepherd, Haylee Watson, Kendra Weeks, Savannah Brown, Meghan Mayo, Shelby Ed wards, Jorja Agrait, Alexis Mitchem, Jenna Thornton, Kristen Pike, Ally Settle and Jessica Thornton. This marks the rst time the Lady Royals have won the meet. Navarre was second fol lowed by Pine Forest, West Florida Tech and Pensacola Christian Academy round ing out the top ve. Centrals Lady Jags n ished sixth. On Thursday the Lady Jags won the meet hosted by Baker High School, while the boys nished sec ond overall in their meet. Laurel Hill edged Cen tral in the boys division by just ve points. Beth Smith won placed rst in the girls race and became the rst Lady Jag uar in school history to win a cross country meet. Kennedy Fuller nished third for Central while Eri ca Waters nished fourth. In the boys division the top Jaguar was Kyle Fuller who nished fourth. By Matt Brabham PG Sports Correspondent JA Y Jay High foot ball fans arrived at Merle V. North Stadium Friday night hopeful the Royals could give the Northview Chiefs a good game. The night ended as Jay came up on the short end of a 56-7 decision in a district tilt against their nearby ri vals from Century. Despite falling behind 49-0 early on, the Royals were not going to roll over. Tristian Pengenika kept the Royals from being shut out as he blocked a North view punt. The loose football took a Royals (2-3; 0-2 in District 1A) bounce and Justice Gar cia was on the spot to re cover the loose ball for the Royals only touchdown. Conner Weekes added the point after with 10:38 left in the game to make it 49-7. Another bright spot for the Royals is the efforts of Jay running back, Ricky Coeld, who gained 119 yards on the night to put him over the 1,000 yard mark in the rst ve games for the season. So far this season Co eeld is averaging 177 yards a game. Northview got things go ing after they received the opening kick-off and drove down the eld to score in ve plays on a drive that took only one-and-a-half minutes off the clock. After Jay went three and out, Northview quar terback, Brandon Sheets, ran backwards 20 yards on a broken play where he fumbled the ball. Finally, he got a grip on the ball, turned up eld and ran 83 yards untouched by a Royal all the way to the end zone. The Chiefs led 14-0 after the crazy play, which set the tone for the evening. Starting on their 37-yard line, Jay mounted a threat on the second possession after a facemask penalty against the Chiefs. Sophomore quarterback, Tate Upton, found Sammy Johns on a nine yard comple tion and then a screen pass to Allen Perry, which was good for another 13 yards and a Royals rst down. But the drive came up short as the Royals turned the ball over on downs at the Chiefs 36 yard line. The Chiefs took the ball down the eld in 10 plays and Sheets scored again from 10 yards out to advance the lead 21-0. By intermission the Chiefs had built a 42-0 lead, but they had to kick to Jay to start the second half. Coeld took the kickoff 60 yards in what appeared to swing some momentum in the way of the host Roy als, but it was called back because of a block below the waist. Two plays after the Roy als drive stalled Northview, they scored to make it 49-0. This Friday the Royals will travel to Cottondale for a 7 p.m. kickoff. By Bill Gamblin news@srpressgazette.com Homecoming week is known as a time football coaches fear due to all the distractions from the weeklong festivities. Someone forgot to tell the Milton Panthers, who didnt start enjoying the week until they stopped Tate High 35-17. Milton, who improved to 3-3 on the season and 2-1 in District 1-6A, needed little time to get on the score board. After just two plays for the Aggies, Milton had re covered a fumble and with 11:19 remaining in the rst quarter took a 6-0 lead as David Rich scored the rst touchdown of the game on a four-yard run. The Panthers domi nated the game as they amassed 301 yards rush ing. We are starting to get a little better, said Milton head coach Chafan Marsh. The kids are working hard and are getting that enthu siasm and excitement. They keep ghting and are taking it one opponent at a time. On their second pos session, Milton marched from their own 19 to score when Andre Flakes broke loose on a 12-yard run with 4:38 remaining in the rst quarter to make it 12-0 Panthers. By the time the second quarter had gotten under way Milton was up 19-0 and was forcing the Aggies out of their traditional rugbystyle running game. Our defensive staff did a good job preparing for their offense, Marsh said. Once we got the lead built they pretty much had to start throwing the ball and took them out of their game. With 11:24 remain ing before halftime, Rich scored his second touch down of the game and Milton was starting home coming festivities a little earlier than many had planned. Tate would score on a 31-yard eld goal by Ha gen Mancuso with 2:47 re maining in the rst half. After the intermission the Panthers were not done as Kia Green added a 20 yard eld goal to make it 22-3 with 9:12 remaining in the third quarter. Just 10 seconds later, Milton went up 28-3 when DeMichael McQueen took the handoff from the Tate quarterback Jaeln Cun ningham and returned it 10 yards for a touchdown. Flakes would add one more touchdown on a 23yard run to ice the game. Milton nished the night with four rusher that gained over 50 yards, being led by Rich who nished the night with 87 yards. Roy Wise nished the night with 69 yards, Wil liam Barnes gained 55 yards and Paul Young n ished with 50 yards. Young also was three for 111 yards as he com pleted ve of six passes with one interception. Tate was led in rush ing by Isaac Heller with 66 yards, who caught a 43-yard pass for a touch down, while Cunningham scored from one yard out. Milton will travel this Friday to face Gulf Breeze in a non-district game at 7:30 p.m. By Mathew Pellegrino mpellegrino@srpressgazette. com Pace head football coach Mickey Lindsey knew what he was up against Friday night as he walked into Jim Scoggins Stadium on the Pensacola High School campus in Pensacola. The Patriots suffered a 36-13 loss to the Tigers, and Lindsey knew there was only one reason for the loss. They were a better foot ball team, Lindsey said. The 2009 3A state champs who played Mil ton just two weeks before scored 29 points alone in the second half, but it was small mistakes that led to the Tigers victory over the Patriots like the rst touch down of the game scored by Pensacola. After the Patriots were forced to punt with less than nine minutes left in the rst quarter, Ryan Santoso at tempted to punt the ball to the Tigers, but dropped the leather, allowing Pensac olas Kendrell Jenkins to scoop the ball up and bring it down into Patriot territory at the Pace 10-yard line. Following the play, it took less than a minute for the Tigers to put the rst six on the board after Jalen Spencer made a quick pass to Shaquille Bush in the endzone for the touchdown with only 7:44 left in the rst quarter. Paces offense struggled to make a solid play until the second quarter when Devon Varney found himself face to face with a fourth down and only two yards to go on Pensacolas 16-yard line. Varney didnt want to settle for a eld goal, and instead faked the three point kick, falling back and then run ning downeld past Tiger defense for a touchdown with only 2:26 left in the sec ond quarter. Within the rst 16 sec onds of the second half, Pensacola proved why they were state champs after receiving the ball, Spencer threw a quick pass to a wide open Bush downeld who ran the leather 45 yards to the endzone for a wide open touchdown. The Tigers would at tempt a two-point conver sion, but came up empty handed. Pensacola would con tinue their open eld streak with only 4:36 left in the third quarter when Spencer looked to throw downeld from Pensacolas own 25, but faked the pass and ran down the right side line for a 75-yard open run to the endzone making the score 19-7. After the touchdown, Pace wouldnt be able to get it past their own 17-yard line and were forced to punt the ball back over to the Ti gers. The punt return went right into the hands of Mar cus Knight who took the ball directly from the Tiger 40-yard line to the endzone without hesitation for an other Tiger touchdown. We kept giving up the ball, Lindsey said after the game. We just couldnt catch them in the third quarter. By the last quarter, the Patriots had their heads down, but were able to put one more touchdown on the scoreboard with only 6:29 left in the game. From the Pensacola 28yard line, Varney threw a pass downeld to Anthony Tracy for a touchdown making the score 33-13. Pace attempted a twopoint conversion, but the play was no good. With only 2:02 left in the game, Pensacola opted for a eld goal from the Pace 16-yard line sealing the game 36-13. Cross Country teams fare well St. Rose of Lima 5K run The Royals fall to the Chiefs Panthers manhandles Tate 35-17 Milton running back David Rich picks his way through the Aggies secondary as he nished Fridays 35-17 win over Tate with a game high 87 yards and two touchdowns. Isaiah Jones reaches out to fend off a Tate defender in Miltons 35-17 win over the Aggies on homecoming night as the Panthers improved to 3-3 on the season. Tigers pounce on Patriots for a 36-13 winRICKY COFIELD P hotos by M ATHEW PELLE GR INO | Press Gazette The Patriots J.C. Curry attempts to make a pass at Tiger defense in the rst quarter of Friday nights game.

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LIFESTY L E www.srpressgazette.com Wednesday, October 12, 2011 B Section Special to the Press Gazette A pet Halloween costume contest, a chance to ride a real American quarter horse and tour a working ranch, a scenic 5K run and more will showcase the third weekend of events at the eighth annual Beaches to Woodlands Tour of Santa Rosa County. This year the weather and the crowds have just been fantastic, said tour coordinator Karen Harrell. We expect another banner weekend with some great family-friendly events to choose from. Runners of all ages will be participating in the third annual Run for the Reef 5K and One Mile Kids Run on Saturday, Oct. 15, a fundraiser to help build the Navarre Beach Marine Sanctuary. One day the area will feature a near-shore snorkeling area destined to benet locals and tourists alike. Also Saturday, equine enthusiasts will enjoy a chance to ride Tuffy, an American quarter horse, at the Hayes Ranch Open House and Horse Rides, join the Santa Rosa County Horse Assistance Councils Wild Safari Ride or join the group on the trail for the entire weekend with a campout, treasure hunt and other activities. Art lovers will enjoy The Santa Rosa County Art Associations Artfest, a fundraiser to help teachers fund art programs. Also featured Saturday will be a new event, the East Milton Youth Association Talent Show at BDubbs Subs and Suds, and Arcadia Mill Archaeological Site will have a Fall Open House from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to showcase its recent renovation. Also featured is the always popular Navarre Beach Car, Truck and Bike Show, sponsored by the Navarre Area Board of Realtors, and pet lovers from across the region are invited to the Page 1 BEACHES TO WOODLANDS TOUR Depot Days give way to pet contest, 5KP HOTOS B Y M AT PELLE G R I NO | Press Gazette The L and N train station in Milton held their Depot Days on Saturday in conjunction with the Beaches to Woodlands Tour. See B2W A2

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Local B2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 B2W from page B1 eighth annual PetNation Halloween Pet Contest in Navarre. The popular Sweet Season Farms Corn Maze in Milton with a sevenacre corn maze, hay rides, cow train and farmthemed playground will be open until Nov. 6. Also joining the tour this year is the Haystackular Maze at S.S. Dixon Primary School, open weekends throughout October. Other attractions with month-long features include the fall foliage zipline tours at Adventures Unlimited; historic lecture series Secrets of Santa Rosa Archeology & History in Your Own Backyard at Arcadia Mill; birding encounters at the Gulf Breeze Zoo; special Saturday open dates at the Santa Rosa County Historical Museum; free saltwater shing at Avalon Landing RV Park in Milton; weekend hikes with the Florida Trails Association; free tours at Holland Farms; and back for a second year, Kids Fish Free at the Navarre Beach Pier in October. Pottery from the areas only wood-red Anagama kiln and other artwork will be on display Oct. 22 at Holley Hill Pottery. Oct. 22 will serve up a Taste of Navarre, sponsored by the Navarre Area Chamber of Commerce and the 18th annual Juanas Pagodas Charity Chili Cookoff and Volleyball Tournament. One of the areas most grueling athletic events is staged Oct. 22 with the West Florida Wheelmans 13th Annual Fenner McConnell/Matt Wantz Memorial Blackwater Heritage Century Ride, when cyclists compete in 18-, 43-, 62or 100-mile races. Spectators will enjoy the ash of color as the cyclists wind through the Milton portion of the race on the Blackwater Heritage Trail. Ghosts, goblins and zoo animals kick off the Halloween season with the fourth annual Downtown Milton Haunted House and the Zoo Boo at the Gulf Breeze Zoo, both Oct. 2123 and 26-31. The fth weekend features another exciting new event, the Navarre Beach Halloween Volleyball Classic, Oct. 28-30, a professional event with $5,000 in cash prizes being staged at 25 courts set up at Juanas Pagoda and by the Navarre Beach Pier. Also new Oct. 29 is the Santa Rosa Clean Community System Green Up Nursery Thinkin Pink, with nursery items for sale, educational seminars and a variety of booths. The Santa Rosa Historical Society will take visitors on a spooky walk through history at the 11th annual Ghosts of Milton Imogene Theatre tour on Oct. 28-29, one of the most popular events on the tour. Santa Rosa County stretches from the Gulf of Mexico at Navarre Beach north to historic Milton and the small community of Jay near the Alabama border. Fall temperatures drop into the low 80s and 70s for daytime highs and 50s and 60s in the evening. Area vacation rentals at Navarre Beach drop by up to 40 percent off summers high season rates. Also popular are the wooded cabins with replaces at Adventures Unlimited, camping at area RV parks and rustic tent sites at select area state parks. For event details, visit www.thebeachestowood landstour.com or call 800-480-SAND or 939-8666. Book your trip at www. oridabeachestorivers. com.

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B3 Wednesday, October 12, 2011

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Local B4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ANNOUNCING New Stylist SPLITZ ENDZ 850-686-9000 10% Off Your First Visit With Chelsie Miley 6011592 Feathers "Call to schedule your appointment today!" PORTABLE CLASSROOM SEALED-BIDS AUCTION SANTA ROSA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD SCHOOL SURPLUS The Santa Rosa County School Board has declared two portable classrooms surplus and bids for purchase are solicited from the public. These classrooms are located at Munson Elementary School, Munson, FL. They may be viewed and inspected by contacting the School Board's Surplus Warehouse at 850-983-5143 and making an appointment for access. Listed below are the dates available for inspection and bid submission. Dates: Inspection & Bid Submission Wednesday, October 12 through Tuesday, October 18,2011 Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. (weekdays only) Bid submission deadline: 3:00 p.m., October 18, 2011 Location: Administrative Support Complex 6544 Firehouse Rd, Bldg 7, Milton, Florida FOR MORE INFORMATION and SALE CONDITIONS CONTACT: Jesse De Leon Surplus Warehouse/Textbook Depository (850) 983-5143 or email: deleonj@mail.santarosa.k12..us Additional information may be obtained online at: www.santarosa.k12..us/surplus 6011626 Navy League smoked butts fundraiser The Navy League Santa Rosa Council is selling smoked Boston butts for their annual fundraiser. Butts are $30 each and will be available for pickup from 2 6 p.m. on Nov. 22 at the Santa Rosa County Chamber Ofce on Stewart St. Orders are being taken by Navy League of Santa Rosa County members or by calling 623-2339 until 4 p.m. Nov. 18. City of Milton meetings City of Miltons Historic Preservation Board will meet Oct. 13 at 5:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers. City of Milton Sports Advisory Board will meet Oct. 17 at 6 p.m. in Conference Room C at City Hall. City of Miltons Administrative Committee will meet Oct. 20 at 8 a.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. City of Miltons Finance Committee will meet on Oct. 20 at 9 a.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. City of Miltons Ordinance Review Committee will meet Oct. 20 at 10 a.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. City of Miltons Parks and Recreation Committee will meet Oct. 24 at 8:30 a.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. City of Miltons Benevolent Cemetery Board will meet Oct. 24 at 2 p.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. City of Miltons Public Works Committee will meet Oct. 27 at 8 a.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. For further information on the meeting contact the City Managers Ofce at 983-5411. All meetings are open to the public. Morning Glory Circle meeting The Morning Glory Circle of the Milton Garden Club will hold its monthly meeting Oct. 13, at 9:30 a.m, at 5256 Alabama Street, Milton. A program titled How Well Do You Know Your Flowers will be presented by co-chairman, DeAnna Root. Learn facts about a few of over 500 of Floridas native owers: century p;ant, canna lily, blanket ower, purple coneower, amaranth, and spider lily, to name some of the area favorites. A delicious lunch will be served after the program. We welcome all new members. Come and join us. Call 994-5709 if you plan to attend. City of Milton Fire Department open house In conjunction with National Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 9 15, the City of Milton Fire Department will host a Fire Prevention Week Open House on Saturday, Oct. 15, from noon to 3 p.m. at their Fire Station at 5321 Stewart Street. This event will feature tours of the re station and re apparatus, re safety information, displays of re safety equipment, re safety puppet show, activities for children, door prizes and lots of fun for the whole family. We want to show off what our community offers in the way of emergency response, said Fire Chief John E. Reble. Pitman-Pittman family reunion The Pitman-Pittman Family Reunion will be held Oct. 15 at Bear Lake on U.S. Highway 4 between Munson and Baker. The reunion will start at 10 a.m. Bring a covered disk and memorabilia to share. Also this is the last chance for the family cookbook, so bring recipes. Healthy Start Coalition The Healthy Start Coalition of Santa Rosa County, Inc. will meet Oct. 17 at 4 p.m. for its regularly scheduled general board meeting. The meeting will take place at the new ofce location at 5907 Berryhill Road in Milton. For more information call the Healthy Start Coalition at 626-6751. Hope Chest opening Vision of Hope, a non-prot dedicated to assisting individuals with physical and developmental disabilities is proud to announce the grand opening of the Hope Chest. This new thrift shop located at 4630 Woodbine Road in Pace, Florida will open ofcially on Oct. 15, at 9 a.m. Many new and gently used items await you. Your support of the Hope Chest will generate funds for a future facility that will provide training, job coaching, and housing for the special needs individuals of our community. International Essential Tremor Foundation support group The International Essential Tremor Foundation (IETF) is proud to announce a new support group for those affected by essential tremor. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Oct. 19, at Lucia M. Tryon Branch Library, 1200 Langley Ave. Pensacola, Florida. The group will serve individuals in both Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. Individuals interested in attending should contact Paul Stevens at 994-4305 or paulwstevens52@yahoo. com to RSVP. Munson School Reunion The Munson School Reunion will be held Oct. 20 from 10 a.m. 3 p.m. at the Bear Lake Recreation Area pavilion in Munson. The meal is a covered dish. For more information call 449-5373. Dogwood Dulcimer Association The Dogwood Dulcimer Association invites mountain dulcimer enthusiasts Oct. 21 Oct. 23 to a jam and campout at Lake Stone Campground on Highway 4 in Century, Fla. The weekend will get underway with a covered dish supper at 6 p.m. on Oct. 21 with other activities for the remainder of the weekend. This jam is for traditional music and fellowship. For festival information call 626-9981, 982-1997, 478-8193, or email dogwooddulcimers@ yahoo.com. For camping reservations call 259-5555. Polymer Clay workshop The Santa Rosa Art Association will sponsor a Polymer Clay workshop in building 4900 of the Milton Campus of PJC from 10 a.m. noon on Oct. 22. Tuition for non-SRAA members is $10. The presenting artist, Danielle Engert, will have kits on sale for $3 including all supplies required. The workshop will be preceded by the monthly meeting of the Art Association at 9 a.m. in the same location. Guests are always welcomed at the Art Association meetings and workshops. For additional information, call 995-9717. Community, connection, and chili festival A community, connection, and chili festival has been organized for children, youth and adults in the Byrom Street neighborhoods. If you and your family would like to enjoy a fun-lled afternoon, come to this community festival on Oct. 24 from 2 6 p.m. at the Milton Community Center. The festival will offer a variety of activities. There will be African drumming, music, face painting, crafts, hot chili and special performances from children and youth sharing their talents. Also on hand will be performers DJ Mackeville and DJ Boss Man. If you have a special talent to share, would like more information about the event or free character education classes, please call 623-5315. This event is co-sponsored by individuals, organizations, and the Bah Spiritual Assembly of Santa Rosa County, a local, non-prot religious body of the Bah Faith community. Holley Fish Fry Looking for people with deep roots to the Holley community. If you live in Holley or are from Holley, you are invited to the Holley Fish Fry on Oct. 29, from 11 a.m. 2 p.m., at the location of the old Holley Elementary School, which is now the Holley Ball Park on U. S. Hwy. 87 South. This will be a potluck so bring a covered dish, paper plates, forks, drinks, ice, chairs, tables anything. Pass this on to anyone you know that lives in Holley or was from Holley. We want to get together, fry sh and listen to all the old stories from the Holley community. For information call 736-3359 (leave a message and phone number). Shrine Fall Arts and Craft Show Do your Christmas shopping locally at the Hadji Shrine Fall Arts and Craft show! The show is Oct. 29 30 at 800 West Nine Mile Rd. in Pensacola. The show will be open 9 a.m. 5 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. 4 p.m. on Sunday. There will be door prizes throughout both days with breakfast and lunch available for purchase. For more information: Darrell Mashburn 251-223-3869 or kdmashgulftel.com News BRIEFS

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B5 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 The following arrests were made beginning Sept. 18 through Sept. 25. Sept. 18 Buckhault, Arthur Tan ner; Male; 16; Gayneil Ave., Milton; Burglary Unoc cupied Conveyance Un armed. Coffey, Tracy Lynn; Male; 40; 5600 Timberline Dr., Milton; Dealing In Sto len Property. Curtis 3, Ralph William; Male; 30; 4217 Audiss Rd., Milton; Resist Ofcer Flee or Elude Law Enforce ment Ofcer with Lights and Siren Active; Nonmov ing Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Resist Ofcer Obstruct Without Violence. Friday, Rachel Michelle; Female; 26; 14088 Ala bama Highway 14 W, Val ley Grande, Ala.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felo ny/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Furgeson, Carley Chey enne; Female; 43; 3406 Green Briar Ct., Gulf Breeze; Opium or Deriva tive Trafcking Four Grams to Under 30 Kilograms. Grider, Chrystal Lasha Renee; Female; 20; 3245 Struta Ln., Pace; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Morris, Charles Jo seph; Male; 41; 1438 Col lege Parkway, Gulf Breeze; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense; Forgery Of or Alter Public Record, Certicate, Etc.; Fraud Ut ter False Instrument. Mullins, Robert Randall Tucker; Male; 31; 1545 Bell Creek Rd., Jay; Probation Violation Felony or Com mit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Ju venile Non Criteria. Pryor, Cortez Omario; Male; 37; 8239 Groveland Ave., Pensacola; Vehicle Theft Grand Theft of Motor Vehicle. Swick, Dakota Matthew; Male; 16; 1140 Tiger Trace Blvd., Gulf Breeze; Pub lic Order Crimes Commit Third Degree Felony Wear ing Mask or Hood; Damage Property Criminal Mischief Over $200 Under $1,000; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000 (2 counts); Vehicle Theft Grand Theft Of Motor Ve hicle (2 counts); Damage Property Criminal Mis chief $200 and Under; Evi dence Destroying Tamper With or Fabricate Physical Evidence. Tabor, Jesse J; Male; 37; 709 W. Washington St., Owosso, Mich.; Sex Offend er Violation Fail to Register as Required. Wendell, Charles Chris topher; Male; 29; 5036 King Oaks Ct., Pace; Posses sion of Weapon or Ammo by Convicted Florida Fel on; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Lar ceny Petit Theft First De gree $100 Less Than $300. Jones, Summer Dani elle; Female; 29; 5954 Bourne Rd., Theodore, Ala.; Probation Violation Felony. Bass, Saundra Harris; Female; 65; 4775 Fairoaks Dr., Pace; Marijuana Pos session With Intent to Sell, Manufacture, or Deliver Schedule I. Fall Jr., Robert Lee; Male; 58; 5351 Delona Rd., Pace; Fraud False State ment Verify Ownership Regulated Metals Under $300; Larceny Grand Theft $5,000 Less Than $10,000; Vehicle Theft Grand Theft of Motor Vehicle. Oliver, Kelsea Andri enne; Female; 42; 4460 Pine Villa Circle, Pace; Cruelty Toward Child Act That Could Result in Physical Mental Injury. Schultz, Traci Jeanne; Female; 41; 5800 Timber line Dr., Milton; Tresspass ing School Grounds WAS 228.091; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Dealing In Stolen Property. Seaton, Riuta Lucille; Female; 33; 4087 Highway 4, Jay; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Fraud Fail to Redeliver Hired or Leased Property $300 or Over. Wells, Jason Roland; Male; 28; 1771 Jack Branch Road, Cantonment, Fla.; Trafc Offense DUI Alco hol or Drugs Third Viola tion Within 10 Years. Salmeron, Juan Ramon; Male; 27; 6 Milton Rd., Pen sacola; Grand Theft. Harrington, Bryan Ty ler; Male; 23; 8612 Arling ton Place, Navarre; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Parker Jr., Jesse Earl; Male; 24; 1899 Reserve Blvd., Gulf Breeze; Trafc Offense DUI and Damage Property. Sept. 19 Barnett, Tkhari Armon; Male; 18; 4135 Woodville Rd., Milton; Probation Vio lation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felo ny/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Flanakin, Jaclyn Marie; Female; 29; 74 Poquito Dr., Shalimar, Fla.; Probation Violation Felony or Com mit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Ju venile Non Criteria. Kelleher, Robert Charles; Male; 21; 5900 W. Nine Mile Road, Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Un known Felony/Misdemean or/Juvenile Non Criteria. King, Johnathan Tyler; Male; 39; 6438 Colonial Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Contin ual Unknown Felony/Mis demeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Utterback, Bonita Faye; Female; 43; 8265 East Bay Blvd., Navarre; Marijuana Possession Over 20 Grams. Sept. 20 Bareld, Charles Anto ny; Male; 29; 7057 Webster St., Navarre; Public Order Crimes Criminal Attempt to Solicit or Conspire Third Degree Felony; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Dougan, Ruby Sharon; Female; 56; 6062 Jays Way, Milton; Aggravated Battery (DV) On Person 65 Years of Age or Older. Hobbs, Crystal Leigh; Female; 29; 5096 Commu nity Circle, Milton; Trafc Offense Refuse to Submit to DUI Test After License Suspended; Trafc Offense DUI and Damage Prop erty. Torres-Curran, Stepha nie Sue; Female; 37; 1861 Sunrise Dr., Navarre; Traf c Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Sept. 21 Clinger, Michael Ray; Male; 23; 6436 Colonial Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Contin ual Unknown Felony/Mis demeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Coffey, Tracy Lynn; Male; 40; 5800 Timberline Dr., Milton; Burglary Unoc cupied Structure Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Hockett, David Paul; Male; 46; 5228 Yancy Dr., Pace; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While Li cense Suspended Third or Subsquent Offense. Lassiter, Michael Wayne; Male; 26; 1996 Hill ary Thompson Rd., Mil ton; Trespassing Closed Plant Nursery; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense (2 counts); Fraud Utter False Instrument (2 counts). Lockett, Moxley Ed ward; Male; 75; 4727 Lori Ln., Pace; Resist Ofcer Obstruct Without Vio lence; Drug Possession Controlled Substance With Prescription Including Meth; Marijuana Posses sion Not More Than 20 Grams; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use. Milbury, Lauren Nocole; Female; 24; 9599 Redland Rd., Milton; Drug Posses sion Controlled Substance Without Prescription In cluding Meth; Marijuana Possession Not More Than 20 Grams; Drug Equipment Possession And Or Use. Prows II, Keith Edward; Male; 27; 1501 Sonia St. (Absconded), Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Un known Felony/Misdemean or/Juvenile Non Criteria. Starweather, Adam Ron ald; Male; 26; 4967 Attaway Dr., Pace; Drug Possession Controlled Substance With out Prescription Including Meth; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use. Wolfe, Barbara Darlene; Female; 43; 2255 Horn Rd., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Contin ual Unknown Felony/Mis demeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Roger, Bobby Joyce; Male; 51; 2419 Basswood Dr., Navarre; Failure to Ap pear for Felony Offense. Ayo, Christopher Mark; Male; 24; 4409 Alanthus St., Milton; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Gould, Renee Anne; Fe male; 28; 7133 Menton St., Navarre; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Tirado, Efrain; Male; 33; 3612 Golds Bys, Destin, Fla.; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Sept. 22 Hernandez, Alicia Ma rie; Female; 37; 633 Vorray St., Kenner, Ala.; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Rowan, James John; Male; 44; 6476 Sunny Acres Ct., Milton; Probation Vio lation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felo ny/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Schultz, Traci Jeanne; Female; 41; 5800 Timber line Dr., Milton; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Szuck, Rhonda Stanley; Female; 49; 5440 Clayridge Lane, Milton; Dealing In Stolen Property. Etheridge, Beth Ann; Female; 48; 60540 E. Cam bridge Way, Pace; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Sept. 25 Calkins, Derek Crane; Male; 28; 5708 Meadow Rd., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Contin ual Unknown Felony/Mis demeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Carroll, Travis Leigh; Male; 19; 12210 Highway 89, Jay; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Contin ual Unknown Felony/Mis demeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Cheever, Arthur Lee; Male; 18; 2638 Salamanca St., Navarre; Probation Vi olation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felo ny/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Cockrell, Sharon Kaye; Female; 42; 301 Nighten gale St., Gulf Breeze; Drug Possession Controlled Sub stance Without Prescrip tion Including Meth. SANTA ROSA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Sheriffs REPOR T

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Local B6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B7 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Allstate Spicer Lewis Funeral Homes NAPA Auto Parts Rons Place Pawn & Gun Twice is Nice Consignment Press Gazette Return to Health Medical Home and Wellness Center The UPS Store J & D Cleaners Tops Appliances Edward Jones D. Greer Showcase Smoke Shop Blackwater Bistro Capstone Academy Downtown Motors Florida Pest Control & Chemical Company Clarks Lock & Safe is New Look New Prices Come and See 601 1124

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B8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Sports Care for the Mature Athlete is Topic of Sacred Heart Seniors Seminar in Pace Sacred Heart Hospitals Senior Services program will present a free seminar entitled, Sports Care for the Mature Athlete, on Oct. 13 from noon to 1 p.m. in the Rehabilitation Center at Sacred Heart Medical Park in Pace. The seminar will be presented by Dr. Eric Kujawski, a sports medicine physician with Sacred Heart Medical Group. The seminar will cover the different types of injuries and conditions that might affect older athletes, as well as prevention tips and treatment options. Registration is required and seating is limited. To register, call 416-1620 or 1877-416-1620. Avoid the Flu Get a Flu Shot Each year 5 to 20 percent of Americans get the u, resulting in 36,000 deaths. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that people older than age 50 and those with chronic or long-term health conditions receive a u shot. Please join us at one of the six convenient locations to receive your vaccination. The Trivalent seasonal u vaccine that is offered also will include the H1N1 vaccine. For your safety, be prepared to stay at least 20 minutes after receiving your u vaccine. Friday, Oct. 14, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Baptist Medical Park Navarre, 8888 Navarre Parkway Tuesday, Oct. 18, 11:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. Andrews Institute Athletic Performance & Research Pavilion, Conference Room B, 1040 Gulf Breeze Parkway Wednesday, Oct. 19, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Jay Hospital, Royal Room, 14114 Alabama St. Wednesday, Oct. 26, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Atmore Community Hospital, Mayson Auditorium 401 Medical Park Ave. Thursday, Oct. 27, 11:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. Baptist Medical Park Nine Mile, Azalea Room, 9400 University Parkway Flu shots are $30 each and are payable by cash, check (made payable to Baptist Walk-In Care), or credit card (American Express, Discover, MasterCard or Visa). Free for Medicare, Tricare, WellCare, Advantra Freedom, Humana Gold Choice, and Universal Health Care cardholders with your card. Your picture ID is required to receive the vaccination. You must be 18 or older to receive the vaccination. To register for these programs, please call 434.4080. Reservations are required. West Florida Hospitals Mobile Mammography Unit West Florida Hospitals Mobile Mammography Unit will be at the following locations during the week of Oct.10, to offer convenient, high quality mammography services for women age 35 and over. West Florida Hospital les most insurances, including Medicare (Medicare will cover screening mammograms every year with no deductible for those women over 40 who have that coverage). Thursday, October 13 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. & 1:00 3:30 p.m. West Florida Medical Group, 1190 E. 9 Mile Road, Pensacola Saturday, October 15 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. NEX Pensacola Mall, 5600 Highway 98, West, Corry Station, Pensacola A customized 37foot coach containing dedicated mammography equipment, the Mobile Mammography Unit makes getting a mammogram even more convenient. It travels throughout the area bringing quality mammography services to women where they are: at work, club or church meetings, health fairs, West Florida Primary Care ofces and other community locations. The Mobile Mammography Unit provides comprehensive mammography services that feature an all-female staff of nationally certied and licensed technologists and state of-the-art equipment, including Digital Mammography and CAD (Computer Aided Detection). For extra assurance, all mammograms are read by two board certied Radiologists. The Mobile Mammography Unit is also certied by the FDA and accredited by the American College of Radiology. For appointments or more information, call 4943497 or toll-free at 1-888-8942113. Alzheimers Family Services offers Alzheimers support group Alzheimers Family Services provides monthly support groups for family members or friends coping with a loved one with Alzheimers disease. A support group will be held at 1 p.m. on Oct. 13 at the Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce, located at 5247 Stewart St. The support group is free and respite care is available. Support Groups are a means for caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease to exchange ideas, gather information and discuss their concerns with others who are dealing or have dealt with the same issues. To register for this support group or for additional information, call 478-7790 or visit www.AlzFamServ.org. Celebrating thirty years, Alzheimers Family Services is a not-for-prot organization serving individuals and families in Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton counties, Fla. as well as Escambia and Baldwin counties, Ala. West Florida Memory Disorder Clinic to Offer Free Memory Screens Forgetful? Repeating questions? Having trouble nding words? If these behaviors describe you or a loved one, West Florida Hospitals Memory Disorder Clinic may be able to help. The Memory Disorder Clinic will offer FREE memory screens by appointment only from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Oct. 13 and Oct. 27. The screenings will be offered at the ofces of the Memory Disorder Clinic located on the rst oor of the West Florida Rehabilitation Institute, 8391 North Davis Highway, Pensacola. Free valet parking is available. Gradually increasing memory problems might be a result of normal aging, but they can sometimes indicate a more serious condition. In those instances, the MMSE (Mini Mental State Examination) Memory Screena tool utilized by the Memory Disorder Cliniccan help detect them. Though not diagnostic, the MMSE is a brief, standardized measure of mental status and is an indicator of current cognitive mental state. The free, condential screenings take about 30 minutes each, but appointments are required. To schedule an appointment, call 494-3212. West Florida Memory Disorder Clinic to Host Parkinsons Disease Support Group Meeting The Parkinsons Support Group meets on the 2nd Friday of each month from 1:00 2:00 p.m. in the Community Rooms of the West Florida Rehabilitation Institute, 8391 N. Davis Highway in Pensacola. The next meeting is scheduled for Friday, Oct. 14, when the topic will be Open Forum facilitated by Joy Barbee, RN, West Florida Memory Disorder Clinic. The session is FREE and open to all Parkinsons patients and caregivers, but registration is required. To register, call 494-3212. Back Pain and Spinal Fusion Surgery is Topic of Sacred Heart Seniors Seminar in Gulf Breeze Sacred Heart Hospitals SENIOR Spirit! program will present a free seminar on back pain and spinal fusion surgery on Oct. 20, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Rehabilitation Center at The Club in Gulf Breeze. The seminar will be presented by Dr. Barry Lurate, a board-certied orthopedic surgeon with Pensacola Orthopedics and Sports Medicine. Dr. Lurate will give an overview of back pain causes as well as both surgical and non-surgical treatment options. After the presentation, attendees will be able to ask specic questions about their own back pain. As seating is limited, preregistration is encouraged. To register, please call 4161620 or 1-877-416-1620. Sacred Heart to Host Retreat on Communication & Valuing Sexuality for Teens and Their Parents Parents: Would you like to connect better with your teen? Join Sacred Heart Hospital for Teen Talk: Real Love & Real Life, a two-day retreat for 7th and 8th grade boys and girls and their parents at the Sacred Heart Conference Center on Sacred Hearts main campus. The rst session will be held on Saturday, December 3 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., and the second session will be held on Sunday, Dec. 4 from 12:30 5:30 p.m. Attendance at both sessions is required, as new material will be covered each day. Presented by Family Honor, Inc., the retreat will help parents and teens learn to communicate the importance of Gods gift of human sexuality and the wonder of growing up and becoming an adult. Skits, role play, video clips, small group-breakouts, parent-child focused time, and audience participation make this a fast-paced and interesting program for both parents and teens. Topics to be discussed include: Recognizing your true worth Communicating well with family & friends The meaning of real love Fertility appreciation, conception, fetal development Guidelines for future dating Goals that lead to a happy, healthy, holy life! Space is limited and pre-registration is required. Light refreshments will be provided. The cost is $40 per family. To register, please call Sacred Heart at 416-1600. For more information, please call event organizer Cat Ellis at 416-1156. 5957372 Health BRIEFS Local

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B9 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 www.claytonhomesoorida.com *NO PURCHASE NECESSARY A PURCHASE OR SALES PRESENTATION WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCE OF WINNING. Begins 6/21/11 and ends 10/31/11. See dealer for complete details. WIN A HOME IN NOVEMBER WIN A HOME IN NOVEMBER Hwy. 29 North, Cantonment, FL 32533 850-474-9973 Serving Escambia County Florida & Alabama, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Baldwin Counties 6011287

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Local B10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Classifieds B10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! Ref. Available 995-0009 Dependable, hard working, honest woman looking for additional houses to clean in Milton & Pace area. 25 years experience. References available upon request. Prices vary. 850-626-0629 Need houses to clean Reasonable rates. Call for free estimate. Nancy 850-619-2891 Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)359-1690 COKERS LAWN & TRACTOR SERVICE From trimming to tractor work. Clean-ups, raking, hauling, mowing, bushhogging, dirt work. Reasonable rates, free estimates. (850) 623-0493 (850) 485-7977 Licensed & Insured Keep your autos resale value. Four seats cleaned with free fabric protection only $45. Carpets cleaned for $45 with free fabric protection as well. Slightly more for SUV. At your home or business. Auto, RVs, Call Frank at Home. Star Brite Carpet & Furniture Cleaning 463-8810 10/833 NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a WRIT OF EXECUTION issued in the County Court of Santa Rosa County, Florida, on the 18th day of May, 2011 in the cause wherein OSI Funding Corp. was plaintiff and Kenneth O. Benton and Lisa M. Benton were defendants, being Case No. 572001SC1168 in said court, I Wendell Hall, As Sheriff of Santa Rosa County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title, and interest of the defendant, Kenneth O. Benton and to the following described personal property, to wit: DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY 2005 Mazda Tribute, VIN#: 4F2CZ06195KM24758, Color: Silver I shall offer this property for sale, at the east front door of the Santa Rosa Criminal Justice Facility, 5755 East Milton Rd, Milton, Florida, Santa Rosa County, Florida, at the hour of 10.00 a.m. on the 15th day of November, 2011 or as soon thereafter as possible. I will offer for sale all the said defendants, Kenneth O. Bentons, right, title and interest in the aforesaid personal property, at public auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above described execution. WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Rosie Rogers Rosie Rogers Deputy Sheriff IF YOU HAVE A DISABILITY REQUIRING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS OR TO ARRANGE TO VIEW THE PROPERTY, PLEASE CONTACT JANICE PLATT (850) 983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SALE DATE. 10/12, 19, 26, 11/2 10/833 10/832 NOTICE OF SALE Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on October 27, 2011 at 10 A.M. AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED 1997 DODGE VIN# 1B7FL26X1VS223225 Located at: 6141 HIGHWAY 90 WEST, MILTON, FL 32570 SANTA ROSA Any person(s) claiming any interest(s) in the above vehicles contact: Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc., (954) 920-6020 ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC # AB-0001256 10/12(1) 10/832 10/834 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Senior Assist Resources located at 6790 Ventura Blvd in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 6 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) CADDESK, Inc 10/12 10/834 10/821 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON October 25, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit; 69 John Aeppl: Chair, Tv, Boxes, Misc STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 10/5 & 10/12 10/821 10/837 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of DIG IT GEMS AND JEWELRY located at 6436 Robie Road Lot 36 in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 6 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) Samantha Rae Stewart 10/12 10/837

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Local Santa Rosas Press Gazette| B11 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Classifieds Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Santa Rosas Press Gazette | B11 We Deliver & Install Call us first, Save Time Call us last, Save Money Hwy. 87 So. Milton 8600311 HYDROSEED Centipede St. Augustine Bermuda Bailed Pine Straw See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both. Wouldnt you like a job where you can build something, including a better future? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 LET'S GO CAMPING! Conecuh Village in Range, Alabama has a spot for you! Full hook-ups for campers, an eleven bed bunk house (everything furnished, just bring food), free fire wood and tent sites. 623-8415, 382-4147 or 251-248-2086 9.5 Polythylene Water Tender 5hp. Tohotsu Motor Great White Trolling Motor. Numerous extras. $1900 Call 623-3737 Bank Foreclosure! Florida Waterfront Condos! SW Coast! Brand new upscale 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,675sf condo. Only $179,900! (Similar unit sold for $399,900) Prime downtown location on the water! Buy & get $8,000 in flex money for a limited time. Call now (877)888-7571, X63 GA Land Sale 69 AC $995/AC Will not divide. Other tracts available. Visit our website. stregispaper.com (478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co. One Day Only Oct. 22. New lake property release. Offered at up to 60% below market value! Lakefront land on private mountain lake only 1 hr from Atlanta! Lake living from $49,900. 1.5 to 5 acre homesites available. Call (877)535-3307 or www.livelaceola.com. Clean 3 BR/2 Ba CH&A All Elec., Garbage furn. $550mo/$300 Dep. or 2 BR/2 Ba CH&A All Elec. $475mo/$ 300 dep. No Pets 675-6614 QUIET PARK -Like new. 2/2. No pets. Non-smoking environment. Garbage & sewer included. $545 + dep. 626-1552 Loxley, AL For sale by owner beautiful cedar home, 2br/2ba, country atmosphere, city living. 5 min from I-10. Pecan trees, beautifully landscaped, large workshop and garden area. 3/4 acre fenced lot with large porches. Moving. Must see to appreciate. $110,000. 251-964-2511 Publishers Notice All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Clean/private 1 acre 3/2 5324 Hamilton Brdg. Rd. garbage p/u Non-smoking environment No Pets. $950 mth/$800dep. 572-2454 Milton Roommate Wanted $345/mo.-incl. utilities plus cable. Cleanliness Required! Call Terry @ 850-983-4193 day or 850-272-0777 evenings 2 Br/1 Ba with Florida room on corner lot. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch. 626-8973 2 Br/2 Ba on Avalon Blvd. 626-8973 3 FEMA mobile home 3 Br/1 Ba, totaL elec., fenced yard with storage shed. $500 mth. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch 626-8973 Doublewide 1600 sq. ft. 3 Br/2Ba fenced yard. $650 mth/$600 security. Or for sale for $59,900 Owner financing. Milton. Call Barbara Cumbie at 850-626-8959 or 850-377-6787 After school care for 2 year old. Need own transportation. References required. From 1-5 p.m. Weekdays only. 850-626-0134 Drivers -Need 13 Good Drivers Top 5% Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com 6 Figure Income 100,000 RX Discount Cards Placed in 80 Pharmacy Locations @.03 each. You earn $1.50 for each new prescription & $.75 for refills. Accumulating residual income. (877)308-7959 Ext.231 www.freerxadvantage.com Money Making Opportunity Computer a must. Free evaluation & training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939 Think Christmas, Start Now! Own a Red Hot! Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox Or Discount Party Store From $51,900 Worldwide! 100% Turnkey (800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS20.COM $ Access Lawsuit Cash Now! $ As seen on TV.$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Oct 22 & 23rd 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model, or Year. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant Offer: (888)420-3807 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDED I Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 Four grave lots at Serenity Gardens. Lot 7A Section-Faith graves 3 & 4 $350 each. 623-9037 Movie Extras People needed NOW to stand in the background for a major film Earn up to $300 per day. Exp not REQ. CALL NOW AND SPEAK TO A LIVE PERSON (877)435-5877 Sawmills from only $3997-Make Money & Save Money with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/3 00N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N Install/Maint/Repair ASE Master Technician Family owned auto repair facility now hiring. Experience with electrical trouble shooting and engine drivability a must. Certifications required. $50K+, health & dental insurance. Please email resume to headmastertech@ gmail.com Web ID 34179160 Text FL79160 to 56654 Now Hiring! Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year? Covenant Transport Needs Driver Trainees Now! No experience required *Immediate Jobs Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Sales Business is Good and We are Expanding 22 year old National Advertising Company is looking to Hire 1 Experienced Outside Sales Rep for Emerald Coast WEST surrounding areas. Earn $65,000 plus first year High Renewal rate/ Protected territory Training provided We need you Now! Call John (386) 752-2420 Resume to: john.linton@rtui.com Web ID34181053 Text FL81053 to 56654 Advertising that Works. Put your ad in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida for one LOW RATE! Call (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida-classifieds.co m Childless, young, successful woman seeks to adopt. Will provide loving home/doting grandma. Large extended family. Excellent support. Financial security. Expenses paid. Jessica or Adam. 1-800-790-5260. Bar#0150789 Cage Bird Menagerie Parakeets, Canaries, Finches, Cages. Breeder supplies, toys, & gift boutique. 850-708-1536 Milton 5411 Pond View Off Berryhill October 14th & 15th Extra Wide medical equipment, power chair, seat lift recliner, XL and 5X womens clothes and misc. items Multi Family Oct 14 & 15 6546 Kennington Cir. 2 miles north of King Middle School Oct 15 8am until Multi Family Sale, Clothes & Misc Items 5451 Timber Creek Dr., Pace Yard Sale Sat. from 7-1. Treadle sewing machine, material, batting, dishes, what nots, antiques, table saw, 12 inch planer and more. 939 Avalon Blvd. 1 mile before Garcon toll bridge. Cancelled if rain. 10/831 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE : STARRS AUTO REPAIR INC gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 10/25/2011, 7:00 am at 8183 NAVARRE PKWY NAVARRE, FL 32566-6941, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. STARRS AUTO REPAIR INC reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 3C3AY75S75T362583 2005 CHRYSLER 10/12 10/831 10/835 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of WHAT A PANE STAINED GLASS CREATIONS located at 3522 Ashmore Lane in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Pace, Florida 32571 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 5 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) Sharron Ford Paris 10/12 10/835 10/836 To all persons claiming an interest in:1991 222-Islander 225-Baja Samuel E. Kirby will apply to SCDNR for title on watercraft/outboard motor. If you have any claim to the watercraft/outboard motor, contact SCDNR at (803) 734-3858. Upon thirty days after the date of the last advertisement if no claim of interest is made and the watercraft/outboard motor has not been reported stolen, SCDNR shall issue clear title. Case No: 20110930950962 10/12, 19, 26 10/836 Incorrect Insertion Policy For Classified In-column Advertisers All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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Local B12 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 4025 HWY 90 PACE 850-995-8778 STORE HOURS: 7AM 9PM 7 DAYS AWEEK Sale prices good through October 12-18, 2011 12 13 14 15161718 MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT SUN Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses. Crystal Hot Sauce 99 12 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Greens 88 27 oz Gatorade Variety Pack 4 59 8-20 oz S a l e O c t o b e r 1 2 O c t o b e r 1 8 2 0 1 1 Florida Juicy Sweet Tangerines 1 98 3 lb bag Pepsi 3 59 12 pk 12 oz Golden Flake Potato Chips 2 70 10.5-11 oz Nissin Ramen Noodles 1 03 6 3 oz Tide Liquid Detergent 6 20 50 oz Blue Ribbon Ham Steaks 1 74 lb IQF Tilapia Fillets 14 93 5 lb bag Conecuh Smoked Sausage 2 91 16 oz Farmland Reg or Pork & Bacon Roll Sausage 1 76 16 oz Hillshire Farms Ultra Thin Ham or Turkey 2 75 9 oz B-52 Ready to Cook Hot WIngs 8 99 5 lb bag Family Pack Ground Beef 1 71 lb Boston Butt Pork Roast 1 33 lb Family Pack Pork Steaks in Country Style Ribs 1 61 lb Ball Park Franks 1 38 16 oz Fresh Express Hearts of Romaine Salad 2 20 10 oz Farmland Tray Pack Hickory Smoked Bacon 4 65 24 oz Tennessee Pride Sausage Biscuits 5 49 10 pk Michigan Red or Golden Delicious Apples 2 38 3 lb bag Fresh Vine Ripe Tomatoes 82 lb Lipton Tea Bags 1 85 24 ct Folgers Coffee 9 41 33.9 oz Van Camp Baked Beans 1 26 28 oz Castleberry Brunswick Stew 1 86 24 oz Liberty Gold Pineapple 46 8 oz Shurfine Vegetable Oil 7 34 1 gal Alpo Prime Cuts Dog Food 7 01 16 lb

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Wednesday October 12, 2011 FREE EDITION TAKE ONE PHOTOS BY A P Animal trainer Lauren Henry is seen with her dog, Spike, in North Vancouver, Canada. Henry trains hundreds of animals for TV and lm. DOGGIE D IRECTIONL O S ANGELES (AP) Your mutt isnt destined to be a movie star, ther apy dog, bomb-snifng expert, AKC champion or working K9? No worries. He or she can still be a well-behaved pet. A basic obedience class is one way to do it. But a little home-schooling can do wonders. Here, three veteran trainers share the rst ve or six things they think every dog should know. The rst is surprisingly simple. I am often amazed at how many animals do not know their names, said Lauren Henry, co-owner of Talented Animals, with ofces in California and Oregon. She trains hundreds of animals for TV and lm appearances every year and often teaches classes for other trainers and animal owners. They need to know their name so you can get their attention before the next command or bit of information. Dogs hear a lot of noise that they tune out, but when they hear their name they need to respond and look to the person for the rest of the information, she said. Here are some other commands, how-to behaviors and skills every dog should know, according to Henry and two other trainers Jaime Van Wye, who founded Zoom Room, a social petworking club with franchises across the country, and Ron Davis of Camarillo, Calif., a representative for Natural Balance Pet Foods known for his work with Tillman, his skateboarding English bulldog. Pay attention. Henry said this is the behavior on which I spend the most time with any new animal. If they are not paying attention, none of the other commands will matter. After name recognition, they need to learn to keep their attention on the person and not get quickly distracted. Come. The key is repetition and building up a strong reward history, letting the dog know good things happen when it comes, Van Wye said. Dont call them when you know they wont come and if you are mad at the dog and when he gets there you are going to scold him. Make sure good things happen when the dog comes when called. Henry said teaching a dog to come when called is the single biggest lifesaver. Come away from distractions (danger) and come quickly. Down and/or sit. You can keep your dog out of all sorts of trouble with these, Henry said. Keep them from jumping on someone, from chasing. Your dog cannot get into trouble if it is lying next to you. Leave it. It means stop paying attention to that, whatever that is, Van Wye said. We teach it early and start with food. The dog gets rewarded when they pay attention to us. It works with things dogs nd really distracting like other dogs, people, kids, bicycles, cars, cats, whatever the dog wants to pay attention to. Henry said teaching the dog to drop something also is vital if they have picked up something dangerous off the ground. Stay or wait. Teaching a dog to wait at a door when its being opened or wait in the vehicle when you open a car door and not bolt out is denitely critical for safety, Henry said. Stay is important, but most people dont get the stay well enough trained that they should ever trust it in a critical situation. A leash is much safer than relying on a stay. Van Wye also thinks teaching wait is better than stay. Wait is like a pause button. Im saying: Stop moving. You can go when I release you. Its good for in and out of doorways, in and out of cars so they dont run into trafc, if you put their food down. Stay is a more formal command. Wait is hold on a second. Go to bed. Van Wye put this at the top of her list. Its a boundary stay, she said. It works really well if you use a bath mat, an actual dog bed, some kind of hot spot. You tell the dog: You cant get off this. You can do circles, sit, lie down, stand up, turn around or do back ips. I dont care what you do, you just cant get off this. She added, Its a great command if you have more than one animal or if you have ordered pizza and dont want the dog on the table trying to steal it or have people over who dont like dogs. Lets go. This is not a formal heel but an informal loose leash, a command to walk next to me and dont pull on the leash, Van Wye said. I equate it to holding hands with a kid. You can smell, you can look, you can do your own thing as long as you respect that you are on a 6-foot leash and I dont want to have to be pulling you around. You are training for lifestyle more than obedience, Van Wye said. If you want to put the baby in a stroller and a leash on the dog and have coffee at Starbucks, you should be able to do it without the dog barking at people, pulling on the leash or causing a distraction, she said Socialization and play. I dont want a dog that will ght or be aggressive, Davis said. Socialization is greatly overlooked in the dog world. He added that owners should let dogs know when its a good time to play and when its not a good time to play. Playtime is when a dog can be a dog and have his fun, you can let him pounce and do all the things that dogs do. Swim. A dog should know how to swim so they dont panic in the water, Davis said. Sit! The most essential commands every dog should know I am often amazed at how many animals do not know their names. They need to know their name so you can get their attention before the next command or bit of information. Dogs hear a lot of noise that they tune out, but when they hear their name they need to respond and look to the person for the rest of the information. Lauren Henry, co-owner of Talented Animals FREE

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A2 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ORONO, Maine (AP) The University of Maine is whooping it up in honor of the whoopie pie becoming the ofcial state treat. Students and staff are celebrating the designation Wednesday by creating a 4-foot-tall replica of Mount Katahdin out of 1,500 whoopie pies made from scratch by the universitys dining services bakers. The base of the display will use whoopie pies with blue frosting to replicate the Penobscot River. A variety of avors and colors pumpkin, chocolate chip, blueberry, and white cake with chocolate frosting lling will form the rest of Katahdin, which marks the northern end of the Appalachian Trail. A photo session and brief remarks are scheduled for Wednesday afternoon before pieces of the mountain are broken up and served to hungry students. ABOVE Sarah Haas, manager of Street Fare: The Boulder Shelter Bakery, ices cupcakes to be sold at the Boulder Farmers Market in the kitchen of the the Boulder Shelter for the Homeless in Boulder, Colo. AP Pecan pumpkin gingerbread whoopie pies in Concord, N.H. These whoopie pies have a praline cream cheese lling and edges that have been rolled in toasted chopped pecans. AP UMaine celebrates whoopie pie serenity Sweet Boulder bakery makes cupcakes, builds livesBOULDER, Colo. ( AP) On a recent Tuesday, Sarah Haas set out recipes for six kinds of cupcakes, along with bowls and spoons, underneath a shelf of ingredients. The weeks selections were lemon lavender, carrot cake, banana honey mustard, vegan chocolate cake, red velvet and spinach berry. As Haas worked on a master batter that would serve as the base for several of the mini-cupcakes, her baking assistant started to work on the red velvet. I do like baking, Haas assistant said. They laughed at their rst efforts at red velvet. When we rst started, (the red velvet cupcakes) were terrible, Haas said. She nods at her assistant: Her experience got it right. That experience extends from baking red velvet cake with her mother as a child to baking every Tuesday afternoon at the Street Fare Bakery, a small business run from the Boulder Shelter for the Homeless. Haas baking assistant, who asked that her name not be used, is also a client of the shelter, living and working in its Transition program. Six different ways, we made them, she says of how she tested cupcakes with Haas. Hass adds: The secret was that the milk was soured with lemon juice and no soda. Haas assistant is one of nine people who work with her in the program, two in the Transition program and seven in the shelters Housing First program. They make and sell about 1,000 cupcakes a week, currently at the Boulder Farmers Market and through special orders. After the market closes for the season, Haas hopes to develop a catering business as well as sell the cupcakes at other seasonal markets. The program got started this year with a donation of food. Some ingredients, such as eggs, are donated, and Lolitas market gives $50 of ingredients a month, but otherwise the program is self-sufcient. Clients work 4 to 16 hours, as part of their service in exchange for living quarters, or they are paid in-kind with such things as bus passes or gift cards. A Boulder native, Haas began working in the shelter after graduating from college in 2008. She left to go to New York, where she worked in a cupcake bakery. She returned to Boulder and the shelter, where she started the program. Everyone has stories about food, memories of their family with food, Haas says. I had a friend tell me that theres a lot of richness you can get just from ... sharing food with someone, she says. On Tuesday, Haas baking assistant mixes red food coloring paste and boiling water. Sarah told me specically NOT to cook the eggs with the red dye, she says cocking an eyebrow at Haas, who smiles. Haas noted it might sound frivolous to be working on cupcakes at a homeless shelter. But, she adds: That relationship were forming and the work were doing, its kind of important. It lightens up dark and hard to swallow issues. It doesnt matter what youre doing to connect as long as youre working toward that connection. The connection is perhaps a little easier in a warm kitchen full of sweet aromas. When youre homeless, you dont have a kitchen and youre certainly not thinking about baking, Haas says. Her assistant has found her way to the kitchen after a difcult journey, starting with severe depression after her 18-year-old son committed suicide 10 years ago. Although she saw that he was in trouble and worked to get help for him, family disagreements and other issues prevented that from happening, she says. He was a good person who didnt get help when he was asking for help, she says. Now Im going through systems he should have been in. Now Im seeing places where he could have gotten help. Not everyone in the program bakes, Haas says. Shelter clients help with transportation and selling at the farmers market. Its neat to watch people who started at the beginning being timid and fearful, really taking control and being such a public gure, she says. One loyal market customer is Sarah White, a local addictions counselor. All these little cupcakes on stands drew me in, White says. White says she has watched how Haas worked with other market vendors to incorporate items such as local granola and herbs into the cupcakes. Im seeing how much this program has grown by connecting with other local vendors, to see how shes doing that ... the meaningful intention behind what she does, White said. It feels good to know shes probably putting that same energy into the programs and needs at the shelter.

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A3 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Wise Equipment Sales & Service 1147 S. Ferdon Blvd. Crestview, FL 32536 (850) 682-3366 6512471 By Jennifer Forker The Associated Press Fairy gardens hidden beneath stout trees at botanical gardens, or proudly displayed on tabletops at garden centers and in homes are captivating the imaginations of children and adults, providing an escape into a tiny world. Young kids get caught up in the magic, industriously building homes for the fairies they believe are real. Older children enjoy working on the tiny scale: 2-inch plants and diminutive garden furniture. Adults enjoy the creativity, too. You see how real it is for the children, says Donni Webber of Long Beach, Calif. For the parent, it becomes real, too. It takes us all back into that magical time when it was all for real. Webber writes occasionally about fairy gardens on her blog, The Magic Onions. In a recent posting, she announced the winners of a fairy garden contest she sponsored, and posted more than a dozen images of the winning gardens. A fairy garden can be made in most anything an oak barrel, terracotta pot, even old luggage and basins. They also can be planted straight in the garden, on a patch of soil on a tree stump, or hidden beneath a bush. Melissa Michaels, who lives near Seattle, built a tabletop fairy garden in a wooden crate. A decorating consultant, she proudly displays it on her covered porch and on her blog, The Inspired Room. Meg Holloway, of Overland Park, Kan., builds fairy gardens with her 8-year-old daughter, Miranda. Besides creating and maintaining the gardens, the two enjoy hunting for tiny accessories at garage sales and thrift stores. It is very special Mommy time, Holloway says. I really love that. She and Miranda often hide their fairy gardens outside for others to nd. Little kids always notice, says Holloway. Adults always walk on by. The hide-and-seek appeal of fairy gardens has led some public gardens to encourage visitors to build fairy houses in out-ofthe-way spots. The Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay, Maine, for instance, provides two building sites along the shore and in the woods. What you notice a lot is the dads really get into it, says Acting Executive Director William Cullina. They like the construction, building things. So many fairy structures are built, that garden employees periodically go through and knock some down, Cullina said, returning the materials such as sticks, pine cones and rocks to the Gnome Depot. It gets kind of like suburbia after awhile, says Cullina. It sprawls we get fairy sprawl. The Coastal Maine gardens hold an annual fairy festival the rst week of August that draws thousands, says Cullina. Other gardens have a less formal arrangement. Webber and her two children leave simple stick houses, log tables and acorn dishes when they visit an arboretum in California. Other people who walk past and see it, were putting a little magic in their day, says Webber. Getting started is easy. Krystal Keistler-Hawley, area manager for Echters Greenhouse & Gardens in Arvada, Colo., teaches a class on indoor fairy gardens. She says any pot or aquarium will do, but shallow bowls with drainage work best. Use hardy plants with small leaves; herbs such as thyme and smallleaf basils work well, as do succulents, cacti, Irish moss and plants normally used for bonsai. Garden centers also sell miniature owering plants, such as African violets, cyclamen and fuschia. Fill your pot with lightweight, sterile potting soil, leaving space for watering. Mound the soil in places to mimic realistic terrain. Have four sizes of rock on hand for pathways and landscaping. KeistlerHawley recommends small gravel, aquarium rock, larger stones and rock collection specimens they make great boulders. She sinks her tiny owering plants into the soil still in their plastic pots so she can exchange them for all-year blooming. An indoor fairy garden needs light, like any other houseplant, so station it near a window. Its very much like doll houses for adults, says Keistler-Hawley. Its a way to create a mini world, have a visual escape from the day-to-day norm. Heather Fogg of Peoria, Ill., builds fairy gardens out of found objects, such as chipped metal basins and old dresser drawers, and uploads pictures of some of her nished gardens on Flickr. She scatters her mini-gardens among her outdoor gardens, hidden like I imagine fairies would accidentally be found. For children, making the furniture and accoutrements out of found objects is half the fun. But some adults prefer to buy their accessories, which they can do online and at garden centers and specialty shops. Two books offer inspiration: Fairy Houses of the Maine Coast (Down East Books, 2010) by Maureen Heffernan, which asserts that the recent fairy house-building craze began in Maine, and Fairy Houses and Beyond! (Light Beams Publishing, 2008) by Tracy and Barry Kane, which features photographs of elaborate fairy houses. Fairy gardens spark creativity in kids, adults too AP The Inspired Room shows a tabletop fairy garden created by Michaels. Michaels, a decorating consultant who lives near Seattle, created this garden using a wooden crate atop a side table she picked up at Lowes. She used both upright and creeping perennials and decorated the vignette with items picked up at her local garden center. After months on her covered porch, Michaels says the plants are still hardy. This photo shows a fairy garden yurt made from bark and feathers in the woods at the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay, Maine. Fairy Gardens can be grown in boxes and bowls atop tables or secreted outdoors beneath trees, bushes and larger-sized gardens. This photo shows a fairy garden in the woods at the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay, Maine.

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A4 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ANNOUNCING New Stylist SPLITZ ENDZ 850-686-9000 10% Off Your First Visit With Chelsie Miley 6011592 Feathers "Call to schedule your appointment today!" PORTABLE CLASSROOM SEALED-BIDS AUCTION SANTA ROSA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD SCHOOL SURPLUS The Santa Rosa County School Board has declared two portable classrooms surplus and bids for purchase are solicited from the public. These classrooms are located at Munson Elementary School, Munson, FL. They may be viewed and inspected by contacting the School Board's Surplus Warehouse at 850-983-5143 and making an appointment for access. Listed below are the dates available for inspection and bid submission. Dates: Inspection & Bid Submission Wednesday, October 12 through Tuesday, October 18,2011 Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. (weekdays only) Bid submission deadline: 3:00 p.m., October 18, 2011 Location: Administrative Support Complex 6544 Firehouse Rd, Bldg 7, Milton, Florida FOR MORE INFORMATION and SALE CONDITIONS CONTACT: Jesse De Leon Surplus Warehouse/Textbook Depository (850) 983-5143 or email: deleonj@mail.santarosa.k12..us Additional information may be obtained online at: www.santarosa.k12..us/surplus 6011626 By Sue Manning LOS ANGELES (AP) Shelter workers call it the Black Dog Syndrome: Black dogs and cats are of ten the last to be adopted and the rst to be eutha nized. There are no statistics, but theres plenty of anec dotal evidence and many possible explanations, ranging from supersti tions like the notion that black cats are bad luck, to a simple logistical prob lem: Black animals are hard to photograph well, and are therefore hard to advertise. To combat the problem, shelters have come up with a variety of creative measures, from reducing adoption fees to improving the quality of the photos. Overwhelmingly, we hear from the shelter and rescue groups that black dogs, especially the big black dogs, and black cats take longer to get ad opted, said Kim Saunders, vice president of shelter outreach for Petnder.com, the countrys largest online pet adoption database. Some have called Black Dog Syndrome a hoax, but Inge Fricke, di rector of sheltering and pet care issues for the Humane Society of the United States in Washington, D.C., insists it is not a hoax. There is denitely anecdotal evi dence. There havent been any denitive studies to absolutely prove that the phenomenon exists but it is something commonly ac cepted by shelter workers as truth. Some in the adoption business think there may simply be more black dogs and cats than animals of other colors. Others think the animals may be wrong ly perceived as menacing. Mike Arms, president of the Helen Woodward Ani mal Center in Rancho San ta Fe, Calif., blames part of it on typecasting. If you think of any movie with a mean, devil dog, its always a black dog, and if you see a witch in a movie, they always have a black cat. Shelters will change lighting, use light colored blankets, and even dress the animals up to try to get better photos for websites, ads and iers, Fricke said. The easiest way to make a black dog look friendly is to put it in a bright colored bandanna, Arms said. Who pictures a devil dog in a yellow ban danna? Photographer Seth Casteel of Little Friends Photo in Los Angeles says any shelter pet can pose a photo challenge, but black ones top the list. I hear about black Dog Syndrome all the time, said Casteel. A bad picture can make a pet look sick, mysterious or even ominous, he said. To photograph a black dog or cat effectively, you want to capture per sonality, important physical traits and details and have the photo be in focus. The key is lighting and shutter speed, he said. For years, Casteel has spent at least a day a week volunteering at shelters across the country, taking pictures of available dogs and cats of all colors. He just launched a free, nationwide, nonprot pro gram called Second Chance Photos to teach volunteers how to take good photos of shelter pets. Volunteers (amateurs are welcome) can sign up at secondchan cephotos.org. The program also gives shelters some ideas on ways to raise mon ey for cameras and photo editing software. Black pets should be photographed in the shade or on a cloudy day, not in direct sunlight, Casteel said. In the shade, the chal lenge is shutter speed. Your camera may respond by slowing down the shut ter speed to achieve the proper exposure, resulting in a blurry photograph. To remedy this on a point-andshoot camera, change your setting to sports mode, which will give you a faster shutter speed and sharper photos, he said. You can also manually set the shutter speed to 1600, he said. With black dogs, do your best to showcase their unique and positive person ality. You can take the dog on a short run before the photo shoot so that he or she will pant, which looks like a smile, he suggested. A good photographer for shelter pets is worth his weight in gold, Saunders said. If you are thinking about adopting a dog, please dont overlook black dogs. They are every bit as wonderful as lighter colored dogs and make just as loving and faithful companions, said Alyce Russell, volunteer executive director of the Glendale Humane Society. Some shelters hold spe cial adoption events for black pets, with incentives like lower adoption fees and two-for-one adoption days. They also make sure the animals are taken out of their cages to meet po tential owners as a way of encouraging their adop tion. At the Helen Woodward Center, they hold Me and My Shadow adoption spe cials when they get too many black kittens, waiving the fees when a black kitten is adopted with another kit ten. Another simple way of getting black animals adopted is making sure people can get a good look at them. A dog or cat thats been abandoned or abused may cower, and if the ani mal is all black, it may be hard to see inside a cage. For years, many shel ters stopped offering black cats for adoption around Halloween because some cats were being abused. But that thinking is chang ing. Applicants are screened better these days, the cats have microchips and too many cats might be miss ing out on good, forever homes, said Beth Chee at the Woodward center. Once we are sure that you are truly planning to make a lifelong commit ment to a pet, we will ac cept your application, she said. We really encourage shelters and rescues not to stop promoting adoption of those pets at this time of year, Saunders said. On its website, the Oahu (Hawaii) Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals talks about Black Dog Syndrome and asks potential pet parents: Dont judge a pup by its color. Shelters combat Black Dog Syndrome AP This June 26, 2008 photo shows Hazel, a lab mix, in Los Angeles. Casteel spends at least one day a week volunteering at shelters across the country, taking pictures of available dogs and cats of all colors. AP This June 2008 photo shows Winston in Los Angeles. California bans cellphone use by train drivers LOS ANGELES (AP) State regulators have banned California train drivers from using cellphones in the wake of a deadly Los Angeles crash blamed on texting. The California Public Utilities Commission on Thursday unanimously voted to ban use of cellphones, pagers, satellite phones and other personal electronic devices by rail transit personnel. It makes permanent an emergency ban already in place. Cameras will be placed in train operator cabs to enforce the ban. Federal regulators already have such a ban for national rails. The California ban extends that to regional lines such as the Bay Area Rapid Transit District, LA Metro and San Diego trolley. The ban was prompted by a 2008 head-on crash between a Metrolink commuter train and a freight train in Chatsworth. Twenty-ve people died and more than 100 were hurt. Travel BRIEFS Yellowstone hits 3M summer visitors for 3rd year BILLINGS, Mont (AP) Yellowstone National Park administrators are reporting that more than 3 million people visited the park over the summer. That marks the third straight year the park has broken the 3 million visitor mark during the parks peak season from May through September. That was down just over 6 percent from last years record 3.3 million summer visitors. Park ofcials said the high numbers came despite snow and ice that lingered into May and several road closures caused by rockslides and avalanches. By comparison, the park recorded fewer than a quarter-million visitors last year from October to December. The nations rst national park, Yellowstone includes portions of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A5 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 By Lee Reich For The Associated Press With more forethought, Adam might not have bit ten the apple and I might not have planted apple trees. But he did, and I did, and we each must deal with the consequences. For my part, I hadnt re alized that apple trees had so many pest and disease problems until I planted 25 dwarfs. Sure, those problems can be fought with repeat ed sprays of pesticides. But with a little research and planning, an acceptable crop of high quality apples can be harvested using lit tle or no pesticide. Insect thugs The three major insect pests for apples are the apple maggot, plum curcu lio and codling moth. Apple maggots are the worst of the lot, dimpling fruits and riddling them with brown trails of burrowing larvae. Given free rein, they make almost every fruit too dam aged to eat. Thankfully, the apple maggot has an Achilles heel. When this insect emerges as a y about six weeks af ter the trees have bloomed, the females search around for the biggest, reddest ap ples in which to lay eggs. Ms. Maggot can be hood winked with fake apples: red spheres coated with a sticky material called Tan gletrap. Or with sacricial real apples: Buy the rmest, reddest Red Delicious you can nd, force a stiff wire through the core to hang the apple, and coat the fruit with Tangletrap. (Traps of real apples eventually rot, so usually need to be re placed once or twice a sea son.) One trap per dwarf tree, hung at head height in clear view, or four traps per full-size apple tree, should provide an irresistible en ticement to the egg-laying apple maggot. Plum curculio, which is active during the six weeks immediately following bloom, can cause fruit to drop early. The traditional way to thwart it, effective if done diligently, is to spread an old sheet or dropcloth beneath each tree each morning, then give the tree or branches a sharp whack with a padded mallet. Cur culios drop from the tree and play dead, at which point they can be gathered up and destroyed. Letting chickens forage beneath apple trees also offers some control. Spraying is another way to control curculio, but in stead of the usual chemi cal pesticide sprays, use a spray derived from nothing more than kaolin clay. The material, marketed under the name Surround, leaves a white coating on the fruit. Build up a good, powdery base with three sprays just before trees bloom, then spray every seven to 10 days, or after heavy rains. The clay spray also thwarts codling moth, with its signature big, fat worm. This pest is active for much of the season, but even un checked, affects only 25 percent of fruits. Disease The three worst dis eases aficting apple trees are re blight, cedar-apple rust and scab. A combina tion of strategies keeps damage within reasonable bounds. Fire blight disease blackens leaves as if they had been singed by re. The ends of young stems curl over in a characteris tic shepherds crook. Cedar-apple rust defac es leaves, and sometimes fruits, with rusty-colored lesions. Certain pesticides control cedar apple rust, but spraying must begin before blossoms open. For myself, I choose to accept a certain amount of damage rather than suit up for an additional spray session. Apple scab results in corky brown lesions on fruits and leaves. Defense against scab begins in fall; smother fallen apple leaves the source of next years infections beneath a thick mulch of wood chips. You can also defuse leaves that fall on nearby grass by mowing thoroughly. Chopped, the leaves de compose quickly and are rendered harmless. Although apple insects have cosmopolitan tastes, disease organisms are nicky. So another way to control diseases is to plant one of the many dis ease-resistant varieties. One that I grow, Liberty, is resistant to all the major apple diseases. Even without paying particular attention to planting disease-resistant varieties, you can harvest a reasonably good yield of reasonably clean fruit using a combination of cleanup, limited spraying and traps. This is especial ly true in Western states, where some of these pest problems are less severe. Cosmetically, my fruits put on a poor show com pared with the perfect apples you see in markets. But mine are pesticidefree, and the Macouns, Jo nagolds, Spitzenbergs and other select varieties that I grow are simply scrump tious picked at their peaks of perfection. I hope Adams apple was as good. Some sources for traps and sprays are Gardeners Supply Co. (www.garden ers.com), GardensAlive! (www.gardensalive.com) and Gemplers (www.gem plers.com). Apples are tempting, and not just to us PHOTOS BY A P This photo shows a half of an apple with a codling moth inside of it in New Paltz, N.Y. The three major insect pests of apples are apple maggot, plum curculio and codling moth. Agriculture specialist John Machado, with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, spots a wooden crate that a pest had bore into at bottom right, during an inspection in Oakland, Calif. Dozens of foreign insects and plant diseases slipped undetected into the United States in the years after 9/11, when authorities were so focused on preventing another attack that they overlooked a pest explosion that threatened the quality of the nations food supply.

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A6 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Classifieds B10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! Ref. Available 995-0009 Dependable, hard working, honest woman looking for additional houses to clean in Milton & Pace area. 25 years experience. References available upon request. Prices vary. 850-626-0629 Need houses to clean Reasonable rates. Call for free estimate. Nancy 850-619-2891 Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)359-1690 COKERS LAWN & TRACTOR SERVICE From trimming to tractor work. Clean-ups, raking, hauling, mowing, bushhogging, dirt work. Reasonable rates, free estimates. (850) 623-0493 (850) 485-7977 Licensed & Insured Keep your autos resale value. Four seats cleaned with free fabric protection only $45. Carpets cleaned for $45 with free fabric protection as well. Slightly more for SUV. At your home or business. Auto, RVs, Call Frank at Home. Star Brite Carpet & Furniture Cleaning 463-8810 10/833 NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a WRIT OF EXECUTION issued in the County Court of Santa Rosa County, Florida, on the 18th day of May, 2011 in the cause wherein OSI Funding Corp. was plaintiff and Kenneth O. Benton and Lisa M. Benton were defendants, being Case No. 572001SC1168 in said court, I Wendell Hall, As Sheriff of Santa Rosa County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title, and interest of the defendant, Kenneth O. Benton and to the following described personal property, to wit: DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY 2005 Mazda Tribute, VIN#: 4F2CZ06195KM24758, Color: Silver I shall offer this property for sale, at the east front door of the Santa Rosa Criminal Justice Facility, 5755 East Milton Rd, Milton, Florida, Santa Rosa County, Florida, at the hour of 10.00 a.m. on the 15th day of November, 2011 or as soon thereafter as possible. I will offer for sale all the said defendants, Kenneth O. Bentons, right, title and interest in the aforesaid personal property, at public auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above described execution. WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Rosie Rogers Rosie Rogers Deputy Sheriff IF YOU HAVE A DISABILITY REQUIRING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS OR TO ARRANGE TO VIEW THE PROPERTY, PLEASE CONTACT JANICE PLATT (850) 983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SALE DATE. 10/12, 19, 26, 11/2 10/833 10/832 NOTICE OF SALE Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on October 27, 2011 at 10 A.M. AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED 1997 DODGE VIN# 1B7FL26X1VS223225 Located at: 6141 HIGHWAY 90 WEST, MILTON, FL 32570 SANTA ROSA Any person(s) claiming any interest(s) in the above vehicles contact: Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc., (954) 920-6020 ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC # AB-0001256 10/12(1) 10/832 10/834 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Senior Assist Resources located at 6790 Ventura Blvd in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 6 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) CADDESK, Inc 10/12 10/834 10/821 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON October 25, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit; 69 John Aeppl: Chair, Tv, Boxes, Misc STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 10/5 & 10/12 10/821 10/837 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of DIG IT GEMS AND JEWELRY located at 6436 Robie Road Lot 36 in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 6 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) Samantha Rae Stewart 10/12 10/837

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A7 Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Classifieds Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Santa Rosas Press Gazette | B11 We Deliver & Install Call us first, Save Time Call us last, Save Money Hwy. 87 So. Milton 8600311 HYDROSEED Centipede St. Augustine Bermuda Bailed Pine Straw See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both. Wouldnt you like a job where you can build something, including a better future? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 LET'S GO CAMPING! Conecuh Village in Range, Alabama has a spot for you! Full hook-ups for campers, an eleven bed bunk house (everything furnished, just bring food), free fire wood and tent sites. 623-8415, 382-4147 or 251-248-2086 9.5 Polythylene Water Tender 5hp. Tohotsu Motor Great White Trolling Motor. Numerous extras. $1900 Call 623-3737 Bank Foreclosure! Florida Waterfront Condos! SW Coast! Brand new upscale 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,675sf condo. Only $179,900! (Similar unit sold for $399,900) Prime downtown location on the water! Buy & get $8,000 in flex money for a limited time. Call now (877)888-7571, X63 GA Land Sale 69 AC $995/AC Will not divide. Other tracts available. Visit our website. stregispaper.com (478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co. One Day Only Oct. 22. New lake property release. Offered at up to 60% below market value! Lakefront land on private mountain lake only 1 hr from Atlanta! Lake living from $49,900. 1.5 to 5 acre homesites available. Call (877)535-3307 or www.livelaceola.com. Clean 3 BR/2 Ba CH&A All Elec., Garbage furn. $550mo/$300 Dep. or 2 BR/2 Ba CH&A All Elec. $475mo/$ 300 dep. No Pets 675-6614 QUIET PARK -Like new. 2/2. No pets. Non-smoking environment. Garbage & sewer included. $545 + dep. 626-1552 Loxley, AL For sale by owner beautiful cedar home, 2br/2ba, country atmosphere, city living. 5 min from I-10. Pecan trees, beautifully landscaped, large workshop and garden area. 3/4 acre fenced lot with large porches. Moving. Must see to appreciate. $110,000. 251-964-2511 Publishers Notice All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Clean/private 1 acre 3/2 5324 Hamilton Brdg. Rd. garbage p/u Non-smoking environment No Pets. $950 mth/$800dep. 572-2454 Milton Roommate Wanted $345/mo.-incl. utilities plus cable. Cleanliness Required! Call Terry @ 850-983-4193 day or 850-272-0777 evenings 2 Br/1 Ba with Florida room on corner lot. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch. 626-8973 2 Br/2 Ba on Avalon Blvd. 626-8973 3 FEMA mobile home 3 Br/1 Ba, totaL elec., fenced yard with storage shed. $500 mth. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch 626-8973 Doublewide 1600 sq. ft. 3 Br/2Ba fenced yard. $650 mth/$600 security. Or for sale for $59,900 Owner financing. Milton. Call Barbara Cumbie at 850-626-8959 or 850-377-6787 After school care for 2 year old. Need own transportation. References required. From 1-5 p.m. Weekdays only. 850-626-0134 Drivers -Need 13 Good Drivers Top 5% Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com 6 Figure Income 100,000 RX Discount Cards Placed in 80 Pharmacy Locations @.03 each. You earn $1.50 for each new prescription & $.75 for refills. Accumulating residual income. (877)308-7959 Ext.231 www.freerxadvantage.com Money Making Opportunity Computer a must. Free evaluation & training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939 Think Christmas, Start Now! Own a Red Hot! Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox Or Discount Party Store From $51,900 Worldwide! 100% Turnkey (800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS20.COM $ Access Lawsuit Cash Now! $ As seen on TV.$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Oct 22 & 23rd 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model, or Year. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant Offer: (888)420-3807 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDED I Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 Four grave lots at Serenity Gardens. Lot 7A Section-Faith graves 3 & 4 $350 each. 623-9037 Movie Extras People needed NOW to stand in the background for a major film Earn up to $300 per day. Exp not REQ. CALL NOW AND SPEAK TO A LIVE PERSON (877)435-5877 Sawmills from only $3997-Make Money & Save Money with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/3 00N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N Install/Maint/Repair ASE Master Technician Family owned auto repair facility now hiring. Experience with electrical trouble shooting and engine drivability a must. Certifications required. $50K+, health & dental insurance. Please email resume to headmastertech@ gmail.com Web ID 34179160 Text FL79160 to 56654 Now Hiring! Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year? Covenant Transport Needs Driver Trainees Now! No experience required *Immediate Jobs Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Sales Business is Good and We are Expanding 22 year old National Advertising Company is looking to Hire 1 Experienced Outside Sales Rep for Emerald Coast WEST surrounding areas. Earn $65,000 plus first year High Renewal rate/ Protected territory Training provided We need you Now! Call John (386) 752-2420 Resume to: john.linton@rtui.com Web ID34181053 Text FL81053 to 56654 Advertising that Works. Put your ad in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida for one LOW RATE! Call (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida-classifieds.co m Childless, young, successful woman seeks to adopt. Will provide loving home/doting grandma. Large extended family. Excellent support. Financial security. Expenses paid. Jessica or Adam. 1-800-790-5260. Bar#0150789 Cage Bird Menagerie Parakeets, Canaries, Finches, Cages. Breeder supplies, toys, & gift boutique. 850-708-1536 Milton 5411 Pond View Off Berryhill October 14th & 15th Extra Wide medical equipment, power chair, seat lift recliner, XL and 5X womens clothes and misc. items Multi Family Oct 14 & 15 6546 Kennington Cir. 2 miles north of King Middle School Oct 15 8am until Multi Family Sale, Clothes & Misc Items 5451 Timber Creek Dr., Pace Yard Sale Sat. from 7-1. Treadle sewing machine, material, batting, dishes, what nots, antiques, table saw, 12 inch planer and more. 939 Avalon Blvd. 1 mile before Garcon toll bridge. Cancelled if rain. 10/831 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE : STARRS AUTO REPAIR INC gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 10/25/2011, 7:00 am at 8183 NAVARRE PKWY NAVARRE, FL 32566-6941, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. STARRS AUTO REPAIR INC reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 3C3AY75S75T362583 2005 CHRYSLER 10/12 10/831 10/835 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of WHAT A PANE STAINED GLASS CREATIONS located at 3522 Ashmore Lane in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Pace, Florida 32571 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 5 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) Sharron Ford Paris 10/12 10/835 10/836 To all persons claiming an interest in:1991 222-Islander 225-Baja Samuel E. Kirby will apply to SCDNR for title on watercraft/outboard motor. If you have any claim to the watercraft/outboard motor, contact SCDNR at (803) 734-3858. Upon thirty days after the date of the last advertisement if no claim of interest is made and the watercraft/outboard motor has not been reported stolen, SCDNR shall issue clear title. Case No: 20110930950962 10/12, 19, 26 10/836 Incorrect Insertion Policy For Classified In-column Advertisers All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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A8 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, October 12, 2011 4025 HWY 90 PACE 850-995-8778 STORE HOURS: 7AM 9PM 7 DAYS AWEEK Sale prices good through October 12-18, 2011 12 13 14 15161718 MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT SUN Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses. Crystal Hot Sauce 99 12 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Greens 88 27 oz Gatorade Variety Pack 4 59 8-20 oz S a l e O c t o b e r 1 2 O c t o b e r 1 8 2 0 1 1 Florida Juicy Sweet Tangerines 1 98 3 lb bag Pepsi 3 59 12 pk 12 oz Golden Flake Potato Chips 2 70 10.5-11 oz Nissin Ramen Noodles 1 03 6 3 oz Tide Liquid Detergent 6 20 50 oz Blue Ribbon Ham Steaks 1 74 lb IQF Tilapia Fillets 14 93 5 lb bag Conecuh Smoked Sausage 2 91 16 oz Farmland Reg or Pork & Bacon Roll Sausage 1 76 16 oz Hillshire Farms Ultra Thin Ham or Turkey 2 75 9 oz B-52 Ready to Cook Hot WIngs 8 99 5 lb bag Family Pack Ground Beef 1 71 lb Boston Butt Pork Roast 1 33 lb Family Pack Pork Steaks in Country Style Ribs 1 61 lb Ball Park Franks 1 38 16 oz Fresh Express Hearts of Romaine Salad 2 20 10 oz Farmland Tray Pack Hickory Smoked Bacon 4 65 24 oz Tennessee Pride Sausage Biscuits 5 49 10 pk Michigan Red or Golden Delicious Apples 2 38 3 lb bag Fresh Vine Ripe Tomatoes 82 lb Lipton Tea Bags 1 85 24 ct Folgers Coffee 9 41 33.9 oz Van Camp Baked Beans 1 26 28 oz Castleberry Brunswick Stew 1 86 24 oz Liberty Gold Pineapple 46 8 oz Shurfine Vegetable Oil 7 34 1 gal Alpo Prime Cuts Dog Food 7 01 16 lb



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Wednesday, October 12, 2011 GazetteSanta Rosas Press Tweet us @srpressgazette and friend us on facebook.com Volume 103 Issue 82Obituaries. .....................................A2Speak Out. .....................................A2Sudoku..........................................A4Opinion. ........................................A8Sports............................................A12Classieds. .....................................B10TABLE OF CONTENTSPrinted on recycled paper news@srpressgazette.comJim FletcherPublisher 623-2120 Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.com75 cents By Bill Gamblin news@srpressgazette.com Many in Jay spent the weekend and rst part of the week mourning the loss of the towns former Mayor Jeroel D. J.D. Bray. Bray passed away Thursday following an extended illness. In honor of the man who served as mayor of the Town of Jay for 44 years, and two years before that as a city councilman, the Town of Jays ofces were closed Monday and Tuesday. Bray, who has one of the towns two city parks named after him, was born on Christmas Day in 1919 to the late H.H. Hub and Alice Bray. He would later join the Army and was stationed at the Panama Canal, but at the start of World War II, he found himself deployed to Europe as a member of the infantry. He fought in the Battle of the Bulge. After being discharged, Bray would return home and go to work for the Escambia River Electric Cooperative. Bray would later own a service station in Jay and then go to work for the Santa Rosa County Road Department, where he retired in 1988. During that time, Bray and former Santa Rosa Press Gazette reporter Obie Crain became acquaintances. He was a ne man, Crain said of the former Town of Jay mayor. He was a hard worker, and when he was with the road department he had the countys interest in mind. He was a very personable individual and knew everybody. Funeral services for Bray were held Tuesday at 11 a.m. at the Jay Funeral Home with Pastor Earle Greene ofciating. Burial followed in the Jay Cemetery with Masonic and military services.By Michael Stewart Florida Freedom Newspapers The clang of a hammer on anvil rang out deep in Blackwater River State Forest Saturday morning as the smell of kettle corn wafted over Krul Recreation Area. A loud boom from a Civil War-era cannon startled many and signaled the beginning of the Munson Community Heritage Festival, a two-day annual event that ran through Sunday celebrating life in the Deep South prior to the Industrial Revolution. Located in northern Santa Rosa County off of State Road 4, the festival draws people from throughout Northwest Florida and lower Alabama. It is a way to show people a lot of stuff from the past and how life used to be in the old days, festival volunteer Jimmie Ates said. Booths and displays ringed the spring-fed lake at Krul Recreation Area, with demonstrations in shoe cobbling, wood-re cooking and hide tanning, to name a few. At one booth, men and women in period-correct uniforms weaved baskets. Nearby, a man stirred clothes in a castiron pot over an open re, dropping lye soap in the steaming hot water. Munson resident Malcolm Reed, 65, was boiling sugarcane juice in an 80-gallon kettle. Slow-cooked, the two truckloads of sugarcane Reed started out with would produce about 5 gallons of cane Photos and Story By Mathew Pellegrino mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com Starting today, women in Santa Rosa County will have a more convenient and personal place to receive vital womens services such as mammograms, ultrasounds and biopsies. The Womens Place at Santa Rosa Medical Center held its open house Tuesday night as it ofcially opened inside the SRMC medical ofce building next to the main hospital on Berryhill Road in Milton. This is a dedicated place for women to come for preventative services, said Sherry Pitts who helps head The Womens Center and serves as a personal consultant during a patients visit and procedures. Before, women who needed personal medical services had to go to an ofce that served both men and women, or had to drive to Pensacola for any services. The new Womens Center is dedicated strictly to women and to make women feel more comfortable when they are undergoing certain procedures. Phillip Wright, SRMC CEO said that the new addition is a good way to make patients feel more comfortable when they come to receive tests and services. We made the ofce larger and more comfortable for our patients when they come in to be seen, Wright said. Our goal is to make them feel comfortable when they come in. And that goal can be met starting with Pitts, who works alongside women when they are undergoing cancer-related services, along with other procedures. I help them walk through the entire pro-By Bill Gamblin news@srpressgazette.com Despite two meetings on Oct. 6, which focused on its future, TEAM Santa Rosa is trying to continue with its business of locating business. During the Thursday nights public hearing, which was set for members of the public to comment about TEAM, it was learned that companies are looking at Santa Rosa County despite what many consider a downturned economy. The focus of those looking at Santa Rosa County is the building being vacated by ClearWire by the end of 2011. We have six different companies that are looking at this building as soon as it becomes available, said TEAM Santa Rosa Executive Director Cindy Anderson. In the economic development world, we like to have projects in the pipeline. They might never get out of the pipeline, but we need them to have something to work on. Thanks to the media coverage of the ClearWire situation, we have gotten a lot of exposure. Of the six looking at the building, which is also the subject of a $5 million lawsuit by the buildings owners Terhaar and Cronley, they could bring 60 to 1,000 possible jobs, depending on which group, if any, pick the site in the Santa Rosa County Industrial Park. Wages involving these six projects can range from 100 percent to 150 percent of the average wage in Santa Rosa County. The six projects involve: Project A European Manufacturer of Auto Parts 60 to 80 jobs Project B Service Center / Health Care Industry 225 jobs Project C Service Center / Information Technology 300 jobs Project D Service Center / Multicontract 1,000 jobs Project E Service Center / Multicontract 500 jobs Project F Service Center / Multicontract 500 jobs Former Jay Mayor Bray diesSRMC opens center dedicated to women Inquiry does not slow down TEAMpP HOTOS bB Y BILL Ga A Mb B LIN | Press Gazette ABOOVE: Civil War re-enactors set off a cannon Saturday afternoon as part of the Munson Heritage Festival. RI IGHTHT : Grant Barrow nds out what it was like to be on one end of a two-man saw trying to cut through a nine inch log with Jimmy Ates. See MUNSON A10 See Tea EAM A10 See Sr RMcC A10 HERITAGESOUThHERNSHfFESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS20 11 FOOTBALL: MILTON MANHANDLES TATE, 35-17 SPORTS, A12

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LocalA2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011TELEPHONE NN UMBERSAll ofces ................. 850-623-2120 Classieds ................ 850-623-2120 Editorial Fax .............. 850-623-9308 All other faxes ........... 850-623-2007SS UBSCRIPt T ION RAt T ESOne year (in county) ......................... $39 Six months (in county).................$19.50 13 weeks (in county).................... $9.75 One year (out of county) ....................$62 Six months (out of county).................$31 13 weeks (out of county)..............$15.50 Senior Citizen (over 62) One year (in county)........................$32 Six months (in county) ......................$16 13 weeks (in county) .........................$8 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.CC OPYRIGHt T NN Ot T ICEThe entire contents of Santa Rosas Press Gazette, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose, without prior, written permission from Santa Rosas Press Gazette. Santa Rosas Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays and Saturdays for $39 per year (in county) by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Santa Rosas Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570.SS ANt T A RR OSAS PRESS GAZEttTT E StST AFFJim FF letcherPublisher 850-393-3654 jetcher@srpressgazette.comCC arol BB arnesOfce Manager 850-623-2120 cbarnes@srpressgazette.comBBill GG amblinEditor 850-377-4611 bgamblin@srpressgazette.comDebbie CC oonField Service Rep. 850-393-3666 dcoon@srpressgazette.comAA be CC larkField Service Rep. 850-910-0902 aclark@srpressgazette.comTracie SS melstoysAccount Retention Specialist 850-623-2120 tsmelstoys@srpressgazette.com SS anta RR osas PP ress GG azette 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570At T YOUR SERVICEMM iss a paper? Circulation Jim Fletcher 850-623-2120 Want to subscribe? 850-623-2120 To buy back issues 850-623-2120 To place a classied ad 850-623-2120 To buy a display ad Debbie Coon 850-623-2120 To buy a photograph 850-623-2120I I n ternet www.srpressgazette.comO O f ce HH ours 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday To get news in the paper Bill Gamblin 850-623-2120 or 850-377-4611 E-mail : news@srpressgazette.com Short items: news@srpressgazette.com Church News: church@srpressgazette.com Weddings, engagements and anniversaries: news@srpressgazette.com Sports: sports@srpressgazette.com PUBLIC NOTICEThe Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing at 9:30 a.m., on November 10, 2011, in the Board of County Commissioners Meeting Room, 6495 Caroline Street, Milton, Florida 32570, to discuss the advisability of authorizing one or more exclusive franchises for the provision of solid waste collection services in the unincorporated area of Santa Rosa County lying north of the Yellow River. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a public hearing you are entitled to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Kathy Jordan at (850) 983-1855 or at 6495 Caroline Street, Milton at least one (1) week prior to the date of the public hearing. If you have a short comment you would like to make, call the Speak Out line at 623-5887.SSunday, 2:43 p.m.I might sound like a sore head, but I was really disappointed by this years St. Rose of Lima International Festival. It was difcult to nd a place to park, and there was nothing for the kids to really enjoy as far as rides. I hope this was just an odd year, but it has been an event I look forward to going to since I moved to the area. Have a great day.SSaturday, 9:17 p.m.This is Billy in Blackwater. I am calling in response to the unnamed person commenting on my call regarding hunting. It is hard to believe a real sportsman would kill a doe. As of Oct. 8, there are newly born and unborn babies. If you kill a doe on Oct. 22, these babies will be left for the coyotes and only be 0 to 14 days old. They cannot survive until 5 months of age. Oct. 22 is too early to start hunting, and Feb. 5 is too late and causes too much stress. Hunting season should be no longer than 30 days, and each hunter can choose how they hunt. My name is Billy Rogers, and this bothers me. Editors note: Mr. Rogers, the person who called was not disagreeing with you about hunting female deer, but was trying to correct you about when you said hunting was to start in your previous call. SSaturday, 8:42 a.m.Hello, this is Bob. I recently called in and asked if the video cameras are so high-tech and up to date, why did it take a citizen to alert the city the caution or yellow period was not long enough? The Press Gazette corrected me in that there was no timer in the camera, but the caution or yellow lights were not set right. If they were set right in the rst place, maybe we would not have needed the cameras in the rst place. Thank you. Editors note: Bob, in checking with the Florida Department of Transportation and the city, the cameras were set correctly in the rst place. When the citizen brought forth the report from the state, it was the city who went with those conventions. According to the state, the city didnt have to do that.Thursday, 4:30 p.m.Thank you to everyone who participated in the third annual Riverwalk Run 5K on Oct. 1. The event was a huge success, raising nearly $18,000 for the City of Milton Parks & Recreation Department and attracting approximately 700 people to downtown Milton. A very special thank you goes out to Milton High Schools Student Government Association. Approximately 20 members showed up and volunteered their time registering participants, handing out water and working at the nish line area. Without their support, the event would not have been as successful. Thursday, 11:50 a.m.Yes, the family of the man from New Mexico who died in Yemen due to an American explosion is upset and complaining he was not treated fairly by the American government. He was doing bad, and luckily we killed him before he could kill more people. The family says they did not have the right to kill him, but that he had the right to denounce America and kill others. What is wrong with his parents? I hope people write the president and tell him he did the right thing. This is Maria. Mary Rose Jacobs Bailly, 87, of Bagdad, Fla., went to be with the Lord at home after a lengthy illness on Oct. 8, 2011. Bailly was born on Feb. 6, 1924, and attended Milwaukee, Wis., public schools and the St. Pauls Bible Institute prior to enlisting into the Womens Army Corps. She was married on Aug. 29, 1947, in San Antonio, Texas to Edwin R. Bailly. Mary lived out much of her Christian faith working with children in the church nursery, 4-H Clubs, Girl Scouts and Operation Christmas Child. She was a wonderful cook and generously shared her special cinnamon rolls with her large family, church and friends. She took great pleasure in singing in the church choir and Bagdad Community Center events. Mary was a 20-year breast cancer survivor and energetically walked in numerous Relay For Life events. Her hobbies included crocheting afghans, sewing Raggedy Ann and Andy dolls, walking, shopping for bargains and playing Po-ke-no and Bunco. She loved to travel, and as an 86-year-old WWII veteran was delighted to y to Washington, D.C., on the Emerald Coast Honor Flight. Bailly enjoyed her later years living in an historic home in Bagdad and participating in village events and supporting the Bagdad Village Preservation Association. Mary was also a longtime member of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church. Bailly is survived by her devoted husband of 64 years, Edwin Raymond Bailly of Bagdad; ve daughters and one son and their spouses, Linda Bailly (William) Bain of Pensacola, Rose Bailly (David) Adams of Chipley, David (Luci) Bailly of Bagdad, Edwina Bailly (Steve) Dienes of Pinon, Ariz., Melissa Bailly (Bill) Weidenhammer of Beavercreek, Ohio, and Rebecca Bailly (Michael) Maciel of Aledo, Texas. She is also survived by 12 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. A funeral service will be at 11 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011, at Hickory Hammock Baptist Church with Dr. Greg Robards ofciating. Visitation will be one hour prior to the service. Interment will follow in Lewis Williams Memorial Cemetery. Flowers or memorials may be given in Marys honor to Hickory Hammock Baptist Building Fund, 8351 Hickory Hammock Road, Milton FL 32583.MMary RRose Jacobs BBailly1924 2011 MMARY RROSE JACOBS B B AILLYMrs. Lucy Geraldine Martin, age 88, of DeFuniak Springs, Fla., passed away Oct. 7, 2011. She was born Oct. 2, 1923, in Fort Pierce, Fla. Martin was a resident of Walton County. She was Mormon by faith and a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in DeFuniak Springs. She was a very loving and caring wife, mother and grandmother. Martin was preceded in death by her father and mother; her husband, Malachi Martin; two sons, Calvin and Harley Collinsworth; and one sister, Mae Bruce. Martin is survived by one stepson, Phillip Martin and wife, Phyllis, of Milton; two daughters, Maytha Ollene Rutherford and husband, Johnny, and Corey Jean Dicks; one brother, Bo Adkins and wife, Martha; and one sister, Faye. She is also survived by ve grandchildren, Jane Davis, Samantha Rutherford, Harley Collinsworth, Cal Collinsworth and wife, LaDonna, and Rebecca Collinsworth; and two great-grandchildren, Chelsey and Caleb. A time of visitation will be held from 12:30-1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15, at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel, 230 Park Ave. in DeFuniak Springs. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel with Bishop Bill Everett ofciating. Burial will follow in the Magnolia Cemetery. Floral arrangements are being accepted, or donations may be made to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints at Lakeview Drive, DeFuniak Springs. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements. Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www. srpressgazette.com.LLucy GGeraldine MMartin1923 2011 LLUCY G GERALdDINE M MARt TINRobert Bob Joseph Klarich passed away Oct. 6, 2011, at home with his family by his side after a valiant battle with multiple health issues. Klarich was born in Flint, Mich., on Jan. 2, 1933, the second son of Charles and Ruth Klarich. Bob attended Flint schools, graduating from Flint Central in 1951. Also, he attended Flint Community College. He worked for the Flint Journal newspaper while in school and after graduation began a position at Buick Motor Division, a division of General Motors. In 1952, Klarich was drafted into the Armed Forces and opted to enlist in the United States Navy. He was stationed at Ellyson Field in Pensacola and remained there his entire tour of four years as a helicopter mechanic. On Aug. 18, 1953, Klarich and his high school sweetheart, Jacquelyn Day, were married. They were blessed with three daughters. Upon discharge from the United States Navy, Klarich returned to Buick Motor Division and remained there for 38 years in the position of production supervisor, retiring in 1986. After retiring, Klarich purchased a farm in Brown City, Mich., and crop farmed for 16 years, retiring again in 2002, he moved to Pensacola, Fla. After one year, Kllarich and his wife relocated to Milton. Klarich was preceded in death by his parents, Charles and Ruth; and a sister, Shirley. One brother, Charles, survives him. He leaves to cherish his memory his loving wife and sweetheart of 58 years, Jacquelyn; three daughters, Linda (Michael) Forys of North Branch, Mich., Janice (Terry) Mihora of Louisville, Ky., and Karen (Scott) Greenley of Bradenton, Fla.; four grandchildren, Steven (Niki) McKellar of KailuaKona, Hawaii, Sally (Davik) Hansen of Clinton, Utah, Benjamin (Katherine) Mihora of Monroe, Mich., and Marianne (Joshua) Balabon of Brown City, Mich.; and six greatgrandchildren, Olivia and Anna McKellar, Eric and Samantha Hansen, Molly Balabon and Levi Mihora. My Body has returned to dust from where I came. My Spirit has been lifted upon angel wings into the arms of our Lord. A family memorial took place on Oct. 10, 2011. National Cremation & Burial Society has been entrusted with the arrangements. Let the family know you care. Sign the guest book under news/obituaries at www.srpressgazette.com.RRobert Joseph Klarich1933 2011 RROBERt T JOSEPH KLARICH Obituaries Speak OOUtT As of Oct. 8, there are newly born and unborn babies. If you kill a doe on Oct. 22, these babies will be left for the coyotes and only be 0 to 14 days old. They cannot survive until 5 months of age.

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Wednesday, October 12, 2011 6512115 WISE EQUIP SALES & SERVICE A HEAT PUMP THATSAVES YOU MONEY?Looks like man has a new best friend. There are lots of changes you can make around your house to save energy and money. And a free Energy Checkup from Gulf Power can show you how.For more information, call 1-877-655-4001 or visitgulfpower.com. Examples of Available REBATES:Insulation: 15 per square foot for additional insulation in existing homes Windows: $1 per square foot for qualied windows or lm Water Heating: $700 to install a heat pump water heater HVAC: Discounts up to $215 on routine maintenance, up to $300 for ductwork repair, $150 for fan motor replacement, up to $1,000 for new heat pump or $500 per ton for geothermal systems LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A3Mathew Pellegrino mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com A woman who fell from her wheelchair at the Santa Rosa County Courthouse is asking the county to dish out almost $1 million in expenses to settle the case that caused her permanent physical damage. In February 2007, complainant Debra Owens fell from her wheelchair on the ramp and suffered a broken shoulder and a broken leg. Her leg was later amputated. Owens is asking the county to settle the matter outside of court. Owens said a dip in the wheelchair ramp caused her wheelchair to ip over. According to backup documentation, Owens is asking for an $800,000 payout from the county for the accident. She is also asking the county to make improvements to the courthouse wheelchair ramp over the next 12 months to avoid future injuries to herself and others. Owens, who lives with other physical ailments, said before the 2007 accident, she had surgery that left her with no kneecap on her left knee. On Monday, commissioners voted to pay Owens $800,000 for the accident, but a nal decision will not come until Thursday at the commission regular meeting. Courthouse lawsuit sparks hefty billCrestview man charged with ofcer impersonationBy Bill Gamblinnews@srpressgazette.com A Crestview man was arrested Oct. 4 and charged with fraud by impersonating a law enforcement ofcer. Michael Eugene Wayne, 54, of Crestview, had a warrant issued for his arrest on Sept. 29 through the Florida Department of Agriculture. According to Sterling Ivey, with the Florida Department of Agriculture, Wayne was observed taking pictures of children attending a local rodeo event on Sept. 10 at the Santa Rosa County Fair Grounds/East Milton Park. Wayne reportedly identied himself as a law enforcement ofcer with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and indicated he was taking pictures so that violation of Florida Law could be issued. Ivey indicated there is a state law commonly referred to as Nicoles Law that requires helmets to be worn by minors. Ofcers with the Santa Rosa County Sheriffs Ofce responded to the initial complaint and forwarded the information to the Florida Department of Agriculture, who sought a warrant for Iveys arrest. Wayne is free after posting a $2,500 bond. Ivey stressed that Wayne is not an employee of the department and is not a law enforcement ofcer with the agency. MICHAEL E EUGENE WAYNE FININD IIT ONLINENLINEwww.srpressgazette.com

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LocalA4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Notice is given that the Santa Rosa County Value Adjustment Board (VAB) will meet on Thursday, October 13, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. in ing room located in the Santa Rosa County Administrative Complex at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton, Florida. The purpose of this meeting will be to hear recommendations of the Special Magistrates and either approve or deny those recommendations. The VAB will also certify the tax roll for 2011. 6011684 2037838 www.Sudoku-Puzzles.netSudoku, Kakuro & Futoshiki PuzzlesSudoku 9x9 Easy (138083709) 2 5 4 1 3 9 5 7 1 8 4 7 3 6 5 1 3 4 1 8 7 2 8 9 4 3 4 8 2 9 6 7 www.sudoku-puzzles.netSolution: www.sudoku-puzzles.net SOLUTION FIND US ONLINECheck out Santa Rosa Press Gazette on Facebook, or tweet us @srpressgazetteBaby shower caters to new, expecting mothersMathew Pellegrinompellegrino@srpressgazette.com The Healthy Start Coalition of Santa Rosa County held its fourth annual Healthy Start Baby Shower on Saturday morning inside the Santa Rosa County Auditorium. Hundreds of expecting mothers both young and old and even those who already had young children came out to the event that had vendors set up to answer any baby question mothers or expecting mothers might have. Escambia County has had its own annual baby shower for new and expecting mothers in years past, but up until 2008, Santa Rosa County never had a venue to hold such an event. On Saturday, the walls of the Santa Rosa County Auditorium were packed with round tummies and strollers as mothers and fathers perused the many pregnancy and parenting-related services in Santa Rosa County. Along with information and goodies, rafe drawings were done periodically throughout the session, and hundreds of dollars worth of baby items were given away to those who attended. Face painting kept many children busy as their parents browsed through the vendors at the baby shower event. Daniel Patrick takes a bite out of a free hat he received at the baby shower while his brother Joseph Patrick looks on. PHotos OTOS BY MAt T He E W Pelle ELLE GRino INO | Press Gazette From top, Jada and Alexis Hawthorne of Milton look on at a vendor booth at the fourth annual Healthy Start Coalition Baby Shower. Elizabeth Chepp of Milton tries out her Dr. Seuss hat she received at the annual countywide baby shower. Gabin Scholly of Milton hangs onto his father as he browses tables at the baby shower on Saturday.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A5Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Special to the Press GazetteThe Council for Citizens Against Government Waste (CCAGW) honored Rep. Jeff Miller (R-Fla.) as a Taxpayer Hero for scoring 98 percent on its 2010 Congressional Ratings. Miller had the highest ranking in Florida. The average rating for the entire House was 40 percent; a 9 percentage point increase from 2009, while the Senate averaged 42 percent, a 3 percentage point increase from 2009. As a representative with a score above 80 percent, Rep. Miller consistently voted to reign in deficit spending, reduce the tax burden and make government more accountable to taxpayers. Anyone can talk about cutting waste and taxes. Rep. Miller is of the rare breed who walks the walk by voting to ease the burden of a cumbersome, bloated federal government, CCAGW President Tom Schatz said. For the 111th Congress, second session, CCAGW rated 46 key votes in the House. The Ratings separate the praiseworthy from the proigate by evaluating important tax, spending, and transparency and accountability measures. CCAGW applauds those members of Congress who clung to their waste cutting mission in the face of a recalcitrant spendthrift majority. On behalf of taxpayers, we thank and applaud the Taxpayer Heroes for their votes to cut wasteful spending, reduce taxes, and make government more accountable to taxpayers, Schatz said. Unfortunately, far too many members demonstrated little regard for the consequences of failing to reduce the record $1.3 trillion decit and $14.7 trillion debt, and constituents should admonish them for their poor ratings. The Council for Citizens Against Government Waste is the lobbying arm of Citizens Against Government Waste, the nations largest nonpartisan, nonprot organization dedicated to eliminating waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement in government. To see the entire list of Congressional Rating for 2010, visit www.ccagw.org. Watchdog group names Jeff Miller a Taxpayer HeroSpecial to the Press GazetteApproximately 240 students from across Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties participated in the Youth Harmony Barbershop Choral Festival at Coastline Calvary Chapel in Gulf Breeze on Oct. 3. Participating choirs included: Milton High School (Sheila Thompsondirector), Pace High School (Valerie Wright, director), Central High School (Lea Anne Goble, director), Navarre High School (Caroline Buechner, director), Fort Walton Beach High School (Mary Jeter, director), Avalon Middle School (Joy Tyner, director), and Woodlawn Beach Middle School (Gina Lavere, director). Emerald Coast Barbershop Society Coordinator Carlton Cox and Santa Rosa Choral Music Coordinator Alicia Coon, worked together in planning the event. Guest clinicians from the iquartet, seventh place international competition winners from Miami Dade, Fla., flew in to work with the students in sectional rehearsals. At the conclusion of the workshop, students joined the Emerald Coast Chorus and the iquartet in a free concert for the public. The purpose of the workshop/festival was to introduce middle school and high school age students to a cappella barbershop-style singing. In the past, barbershop choirs have been sustained by an older population; however, local, state and international competitions have recently seen an influx of participation among young men and women of high school and college age. Emerald Coast Barbershop Society subscribes to the notion that Singing is Life and the goal of the society is to give students a whole new perspective about the joy of singing.SUBMITTED PHOTOSome of the choir students from Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties are seen participating at the Youth Harmony Barbershop Choral Festival at Coastline Calvary Chapel in Gulf Breeze.Santa Rosa music students participate in Barbershop Choral Festival

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LocalA6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 C T FSALES & INSTALLATIONS5749698Laminate, Wood, Tile, & RepairsTEL: 850.826.1296 CELL: 850.259.0267 PHOTOS BY BB ILL GAMBLIN | Press Gazette Friday was a busy day in Milton High Schools Homecoming Celebration. The event was culminated when senior Kyndal Cobb was crowned the 2011 Milton High School Homecoming Queen. Cobb and her court joined hands after her coronation to sing the school song. Prior to Friday nights football game, clubs and classes took to the streets of Milton for the Milton Homecoming Parade. Photos of the homecoming court and the homecoming parade can be found online at www.srpressgazette.com Milton High School Homecoming

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| A7Wednesday, October 12, 2011Local Jay teen awarded college scholarshipSpecial to the Press GazetteGrayson Jernigan has been selected as a recipient of Goulds Professional Dealers Association (GPDA) scholarship presented by Goulds Pumps, ITT Corporation. The $1,000 scholarship was awarded to 14 high school graduates from across the United States and Canada. All 14 recipients of the scholarship are children of Goulds Professional Dealers Association (GPDA) members and their employees. The GPDA is the industrys oldest and largest association comprised solely of more than 7,000 independent water systems professionals. Grayson is the son of Melissa and Charles Ward, Clydes Well Service, Milton. Grayson attended Central High School where he was on Honor Roll. Grayson will be attending Pensacola State College Milton this fall. We started the GPDA Scholarship Program to assist the children of our Goulds Pumps family towards obtaining a college education, said Gerald Abbott, Manager Sales Communications and Programs, ITT Residential and Commercial Water. By helping our dealers children achieve their professional dreams and goals, we insure the future of our industry. In addition, Goulds Pumps has created the Future Professional Dealers of America as an offshoot to GPDA, where young people aspiring to follow in their parents footsteps receive technical information and support to further their studies. Independent dealers also receive extensive technical and product training through GPDA. Since Goulds Pumps established a Pump School for customers in the early 1960s, the company has graduated more than 20,000 independent dealers and distributors. We are proud of the 14 young people chosen as recipients this year. I hope they will follow in the footsteps of many previous GPDA scholarship winners who have gone on to promising careers. We are proud to assist them in helping them pursue their dreams, Abbott said. Since the GPDA scholarship program was formed, over 125 collegians have been awarded scholarships based on demonstrated academic achievement and potential, community service and leadership. ITT Corporation is a high-technology engineering and manufacturing company operating on all seven continents in three vital markets: water and uids management, global defense and security, and motion and ow control. With a heritage of innovation, ITT partners with its customers to deliver extraordinary solutions that create more livable environments provide protection and safety and connect our world. Special to the Press GazetteNational Association of Insurance And Financial Advisor Pensacola members, Bud Lovoy and Prudence Caskey, LUTCF, FSS, were among the more than 1,700 NAIFA members in attendance during the NAIFA Association Executive Conference and NAIFA Career Conference and Annual Meeting, Sept. 8-14 in Washington, D.C. Lovoy served as a delegate for NAIFAPensacola. Delegates, part of NAIFAs governing National Council, participated in educational sessions and networking events, and voted on association business, including the election of new ofcers and trustees to the NAIFA Board of Trustees. Mr. Lovoy was also able to meet with Congressman Jeff Miller while in Washington, DC. Caskey, LUTCF, FSS is on the Association Executives Advisory Council. Their mission is to maintain governance that promotes and enhances the image, professionalism, and education of association executives, communicates with the federation, and serves as a liaison to the NAIFA Board of Trustees and Committees. NAIFA-Pensacola is the local association. NAIFA-Pensacola meets every third Thursday at the Pensacola Civic center for lunch. Please nd more about them at www. naifapensacola.com or by calling 390-3512.SPECIAL TO THE PP REss SS GAZETTENAIFA Pensacola board member Bud Lovoy meets with Florida Congressman Jeff Miller in his ofce during the NAIFA Career Conference and Annual Meeting in September.Area NAIFAPensacola members attend conference SPECIAL TO THE PP REss SS GAZETTEGrayson Jernigan is the recipient of the $1,000 Goulds Professional Dealers Association scholarship from Goulds Pumps, ITT Corporation.

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We want you to share your views on the above topic(s) or any topic with other Santa Rosas Press Gazette readers. Your views are important, too. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-9308 Letters must be typed and may be edited for content for to t the available space. For a letter to be published, you must sign your name and include your phone number and address so we may contact you for verication, if necessary. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S OpinionA8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011We understand the issues some have with TEAM Santa Rosa. And after listening at two meetings with various ideas being bandied about and discussed, there are some good points and bad points that could come from this review. Everything in this world that involves human input and effort leaves room for some improvement or renement. Unfortunately, there is one that should cause all of us to shudder with fear, the idea of turning over our resources and allowing the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce to lead our economic development efforts. That would be about as good as using the money to light Rush Limbaughs cigars. Over the years, the arguments have been nothing short of maddening when it comes to Santa Rosa County being the redheaded stepchild of Escambia County. The hat is passed for construction of the regional airport and Santa Rosa ponies up, just like it did with bed tax dollars for that eyesore called the Pensacola Civic Center. When Amtrak was moving to the area and needed a local train station, Santa Rosa offered the historic L&N. Escambia County said we should stop trying to think regionally; that THEY were the economic hub. When the government considered closing all department of defense payroll centers and opening ve super centers, Escambia County passed the hat and asked Santa Rosa to join its effort, only to later decide the best location for that center was two miles from the Alabama line near the Greyhound Track. Now, some are talking about wanting to join forces for economic development. How soon some of our Santa Rosa County Commissioners forget the debates over road dollars. A couple of our Santa Rosa County Commission members walked out of a Florida-Alabama TDC meeting because Escambia County members changed the road priorities and pulled all the regional dollars for projects away from Santa Rosa. One of those projects three or four years ago was the widening of Avalon Boulevard. We ended up having to wait for a stimulus package to get that funded in phases. Commissioner Don Salter and others scoffed at the idea Escambia County Commissioner Gene Valentino tried to sell them a year or two ago about pooling resources to build more roads in hopes of getting the money back from the state. We hear commissioners talk about the need to support Santa Rosa County, yet now they want to turn their backs on the local residents and hand the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce our money. Already, our residents generally have to travel to Escambia County for various governmental services because the decision-makers feel things are better in that county. Really? If our commissioners give the $450,000 to $500,000 it currently allocates to TEAM Santa Rosa each year to the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce, do we expect that group to account for the funds any better than TEAM? How will our citizens have a voice or input in the process when the other agencies City of Pensacola and Escambia County would be contributing two or three times as much money. Teaming up with the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce would be about as good as the Santa Rosa County commissioners taking over economic development once again. It appears to be obvious, but many have forgotten why TEAM was created in the rst place. Santa Rosa County fully funded economic development at one time (through the TDC) and had an executive director globetrotting. We wonder what TEAMs critics would say if that happened yet again under county control. There is no way to make some residents happy. What is even worse, there are some people who actually do not understand the role an economic development council plays. First off, an economic development group is not tasked with bringing in a Costco to the old 84 Lumber location, or putting in sidewalks, curbing, proper drainage, or lighting your neighborhoods. Still, thats what at least one resident thought at the recent public hearing. Economic development is to create skilled and basic labor positions so there are jobs available for local youth. More jobs also result in more people moving to our area. With those jobs comes the new stores, restaurants, big box stores and more. What one must remember as long as we keep going to Pensacola to take advantage of these things: Why in the heck would they want to come here to begin with? This debate, started by our Santa Rosa County Commissioner, is a slippery slope. We just hope they use wisdom and forethought before hooking our horse to a Pensacola wagon that already has three broken wheels itself.Sending oil spill money to the Gulf CoastBy Jeff MillerThis week, I am pleased to join 23 of my colleagues across the Gulf Coast region in introducing legislation that will dedicate the nes paid by the responsible parties for last years Deepwater Horizon oil spill to the Gulf Coast states. Our legislation requires that 80 percent of the money paid by the responsible parties, estimated between $5 billion and $21 billion, comes back to the states affected by the spill, providing for the economic and environmental restoration we so greatly need. The Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities, and Revived Economy of the Gulf Coast Act of 2011 (the RESTORE Act) is a comprehensive piece of legislation that comprises previous bills offered by myself and others to bring the ne money back to Florida and the Gulf Coast region. As you know, last Aprils spill effectively shut down our tourism and damaged our local economy for the better part of a year, and it may be years before we know the spills full effects on our environment. Ultimately, the responsible parties will pay nes levied by the U.S. Justice Department based on the amount of oil spilled into the Gulf. Without legislation in place directing those nes back to the affected states, this money would go directly to the U.S. Treasury Department for use on other government programs. In April, I offered a bill to take part of the nes and return it to the ve affected states for economic restoration and tourism promotion (H.R. 1333). The RESTORE Act introduced this week incorporates many of the proposals in H.R. 1333, as well as ideas from Members of Congress across the coastal delegation. In the end, we took our time to develop legislation that stood the best chance of passage in Congress and met the needs of each of the Gulf Coast states. The RESTORE Act includes several mechanisms for dividing the nes paid by the responsible parties to the states equitably based on the effects of the oil spill on each state. There are essentially four categories of funding. The rst category, or 35 percent of the total, is divided equally among the ve states (Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas) for use in economic restoration, environmental recovery, and tourism promotion. The second category, or 30 percent, is administered by a task force comprised of state and federal ofcials as part of a comprehensive environmental plan for the entire Gulf Coast. The third category, or another 30 percent, is provided to the states based on a weighted formula of population, coastline, and distance from the spill, and can be used for both economic and environmental restoration. The nal category, or 5 percent, is dedicated to developing a Gulf Coast research and science program to promote Gulf protection, sheries, and energy resources. The Senate has introduced a similar bill, S. 1400, which also dedicates 80 percent of the ne monies to the Gulf Coast. Our bill is similar in nature, but we took several steps to improve what the Senate offered and make it more palatable to the House of Representatives and better for Florida. First, our bill provides the states much more exibility to use the ne money for both economic and environmental restoration. Florida suffered devastating economic consequences after the spill while Louisiana had far worse environmental effects. Under our bill, each state will be able to use the ne money as best suited to meet either economic or environmental concerns. Second, the House bill gives Florida in particular much more local control over the ultimate plan developed for our state, allowing the eight affected counties (Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf, Franklin and Wakulla) to have a tremendous amount of inuence over the direction of restoration in Florida. Finally, our bill puts some strict limitations on the power of the federal government in the restoration process. Administrative expenses for executive agencies have been capped at 3 percent, and NOAA may not use any of the research dollars on existing programs or to implement catch share programs. Additionally, none of the funds may be used by the federal government to purchase land. Overall, the House version of the RESTORE Act is a sensible piece of legislation that is businessfriendly and good for the State of Florida, as well as for the entire Gulf Coast. Recent statements by Gulf Coast Senators that their version of the bill must pass as-is or else are little more than the my way or the highway attitude that has unfortunately become pervasive in Washington. I would urge my colleagues in the upper chamber to tone down the rhetoric and work with their House counterparts to pass legislation in both chambers that can be presented to the President. The RESTORE Act is another step in our efforts to force BP and the other responsible parties to restore the Gulf Coast economically and environmentally after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. I look forward to seeing this bill move through the committee process and brought to the House oor for passage. Ultimately, it is the Gulf Coast states, like Florida, that were damaged by the oil spill, and the nes paid should be returned to those states to restore our economy and our ecosystem. Often bearded, smelly and intellectually incoherent, a horde of political activists occupied New York City, making outrageous demands on the U.S. government. You know them as the seasonal ock of intruders called United Nations delegates. The UN provides the slickest political cronies of corrupt, thirdworld countries the opportunity to run amok in our country under the protection of diplomatic immunity. Though they still do not have indoor plumbing in 90 percent of their own countries and their currencies often involve goats and oldest daughters, they somehow nd time to criticize the U.S. They come from kickback-based economies and agree on one thing: the U.S.A. is bad. The City is lousy with these international thugs; good luck getting a bilingual hooker on Craigs List this month. So, as the sixty-fth General Assembly commences and hotels brace for molestation season, allow me to sum up some UN highlights over the years: Colonel Muammar Gadda showed up wearing reective sun glasses in his shiny hair. He applied to the Obama administration as a start-up solar green energy company and was awarded $535 million. I remain mystied by why these crackpot dictators wear Michael Jacksoninspired military outts and sport self-bestowed titles like Colonel Gadda. A colonel in the U.S. must earn the rank, either by selling lots of fried chicken or by managing Elvis career. UN archives have Gaddas rst speech to the General Assembly in 1985, in which he demonstrated how to save money by doing an easy three-step home perm. A secret UN Security Council memo surfaced revealing that it knew about all of the Kardashian weddings ahead of time but failed to stop them. It is widely believed that Italian-American relations were set back fty years when the cast of Jersey Shore went to Italy to lm. The UN is reviewing the tapes made by U.S. soldiers when they invaded Pakistan and killed bin Laden. If further review of the tapes determines that the Navy SEAL raids were not conducted in accordance with international law, the United States will be charged with a timeout. After the raids, Pakistan was so mad at the U.S.A. that it went on Facebook and took us from friend to its complicated. The UN thought Osama bin Laden was a misunderstood guy; they point to his diary found in the raid in which he always dotted the i in indels with a smiley face. Moreover, friends agree, while he was a murderous terrorist, he seldom forgot birthdays. In his opening speech this year, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad bragged that Iran currently leads all other nations in captured hikers. Then, as an aside, he said he felt Ashton Kutcher did a great replacement job in Two and a Half Men. Ahmadinejad called our U.S. Presidents cowboys for invading Libya, Iran and Afghanistan. He might help Obama get reelected with that comment by underestimating just how much we Americans loved the sheriff in Blazing Saddles. Iran banned the mullet haircut. Arkansas has demanded that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton break off all diplomatic relations. Hillary Clinton was also asked to mend the fence between Israel and Obama after his many slights. She broke the ice on her diplomatic mission by reminding Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that her husbands last two girlfriends were Jewish. Hugo Chavez blamed the U.S. and capitalism for global warming. Looks like someone is trying to get noticed for a Nobel Prize! The UN explored replacing the Euro and the U.S. dollar with a currency of value, like an Apple iTunes gift card. The UN Committee on Disasters has been funded $1 billion to study what happened to the Boston Red Sox and Atlanta Braves in September. Astrophysicist Mazlan Othman was paid by the UN (and this is true) to be Earths liaison to future space aliens when they contact mankind. He also looked into a meteors rise, ame-out and its crash to earth last year and found it was just the Obama presidency. The UN did appoint Iran, a country that allows husbands to stone and abuse women, to its Womens Rights panel. Past chairmen include Ike Turner, Ben Roethlisberger and O.J. Simpson. They denied Bill Clintons application to y to Italy and bring U.S. citizen Amanda Knox, recently acquitted for crimes during a sex game, home. Ron Hart, a libertarian syndicated op-ed humorist. He can be reached at Ron@ RonaldHart.com. ON theTHE hillHILLShoot our horse before hooking it up to Escambia Countys wagon oOUrR VieIEW HART TALKRR on HH artThe unwashed masses descend on New York City

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Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A9Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ...a weekly column answering your questions with Biblical answers about life.Ask the Preacher Pastor Gallups, I hear Christians all the time make the claim that Jesus is God. How can this be? I have a close relative who is a part of a religious group that says very emphatically that Jesus never CLAIMED to be God and that he is NOT God. Please help me understand this. J. M. E. Milton. Dear J. M. Why was Jesus crucified? He was not crucified because He was a criminal. He was crucified because He claimed to be The Christ, The Messiah, The Son of the Living God, ALLof which are Old Testament terms for the visitation of God in the flesh on the earth. The ONLYreason Jesus was crucified is because He CLAIMED to be God! The Sanhedrin counsel knew this, that is why they said, he has committed blasphemy! There simply is no denying the fact that Jesus claimed to be God. Either he LIED or he was a LUNATIC or he was the LORD! There are no other choices. If he was a liar or a lunatic then he certainly was not a great teacher or even a good person! How do we know he wasnt a liar or a lunatic? The evidence does not support that he was either of these. Everything he ever claimed that he would do he DID! He sure wasnt a liar. How many lunatics do you know that can open the eyes of the blind, raise the dead, cause the lame to walk again? No, J.M, he wasnt a liar or a lunatic. The evidence says that he was the most honest, sane person who ever walked the face of the earth. But, then, how do we know for sure that He was the Lord? Simple again. There is an EMPTYTOMB to prove that He was and is exactly who He said He was and is, the Lord of Life! It has stood as a testimony to his Lordship for 2000 years. J.M., stay clear of any religious system that denies or takes away from the deity of Jesus Christ. Turn to JESUS with your life and trust him as savior and serve him as Lord. Jesus IS God in the flesh, GOD WITH US! Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church in Milton. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree from Florida State University and a Master of Divinity Degree from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been the Pastor of HHBC since 1987. For 10 years he has also served as an International Youth Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention, preaching to multiplied thousands all over the U.S. and Canada. For more information about HHBC call 623-8959 or 626-8951 or fax, 623 197. If you have a question for ASK THE PREACHER send it to: ASK THE PREACHER, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351 Hickory Hammock Rd, Milton, FL, 32583 Put YourH e a l t h y B u s i n e s s HereCall Debbie Coon 393-3666orAbe Clark 910-0902 Free Hearing Test Sales, Service and Repairs on all Makes and Models of Hearing Aids All Insurance AcceptedSabrina Kaestle, Au.D., BC-ABA6008982Mention this ad and receive 10% off a set of Digital Hearing Aids 6011383 FaithPets of all shapes and sizes came out to get a blessing at the First Presbyterian Church of Miltons Blessing of the Pets on Saturday, as part of the Beaches to Woodlands Tour. Dogs, cats and even horses were given a blessing by First Presbyterian Church of Milton pastor JoAnn Kublik, who helped host the event which was in its second year. Kublik said the idea of the pet blessing, comes from the acts of St. Francis of Assisi who was an animal lover and believed all creatures were children of God.Bagdad UMC Annual Bazaar Bagdad United Methodist Church will have their Annual Bazaar on Saturday, Oct. 15, 8 a.m. 2 p.m. There will be indoor and outdoor sales of housewares, adult and childrens clothing, collectibles, furniture and much more. Additionally, chicken and dumpling lunches and chili lunches will be available for sale along with a variety of homemade baked goods. Bagdad United Methodist Church is located at 4540 Forsyth Street in the historic village of Bagdad in Milton. For more information, call the church ofce, 626-1948. New Shoes and Clothing Sale New Beginning Free Spirit Church will hold a new shoes and clothing sale on Oct. 15 from 7 a.m. 3 p.m. It is located behind Texas Roadhouse on Highway 90 in Milton. Faith Baptist Church All-Day Preaching and Singing Service Faith Baptist Church located at the corner of Hamilton Bridge Rd. and Dogwood Dr. will host an All-Day Preaching and Singing Service on Oct. 16. The theme for this day is: Our Mission Field: Santa Rosa County. With this in mind, FBC extends an invitation to local pastors of like-faith and their congregations. If you Would like to share your vision for reaching our county Have a preacher boy who would like to have a chance to speak Have a church member who would like to share their testimony Have a group or individual who would like to sing (conservative style) or, just come fellowship with us and get to know our new pastor, Bro. David Rowan. The day will start with regular services: Sunday School 9:45 a.m., Morning Worship & Jr. Church 11:00 a.m. After the Morning Worship, we will break for a potluck luncheon (any one coming to the afternoon services is also invited to lunch). We will reconvene at 2:00 p.m. and go until 7:00 p.m. If you would like to participate in this service, please call the church ofce (Tuesday Friday) at 623-8207. Isaiah Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church Family and Friends Day The annual Family and Friends Day will be held at the Isaiah Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church on Oct. 16. The guest speaker for the 11 a.m. service will be Evangelist Kendra Walker Battle of The Fathers House in Norcross, Ga. The guest speaker for the 3 p.m. program will be Rev. john Philpot, Sr., Pastor of Talbot Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church in Pensacola. You are invited to join as Isaiah Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church rejoice, give praise, and reconnect with our family and friends. Faith Chapel Homecoming Faith Chapel Assembly of God on S. Airport Rd. will hold a home coming on Oct. 16. Pastor Ron Carnley and members of the church invite you to attend. Nu Image in Concert Nu Image will be in concert Oct. 23 from 9:45 -10:45 a.m. at First United Methodist Church on Berryhill St. in Milton. East Milton Assembly of God Homecoming East Milton Assembly of God Church will celebrate its homecoming on Oct. 23 at 10 a.m. There will be dinner on the grounds, worship with Heaven Bound, and soul food provided by Bro. Wes Weekly. East Milton Assembly of God is located at 5174 Ward Basin Rd. Pace FUMC Fall Festival First United Methodist Church of Pace will be holding its annual fall festival on Oct. 23 from 5 7 p.m. There will be fun for the entire family with a hay ride, face painting, games, pony rides, bounce house, free food and more including a pumpkin carving contest. Carve your pumpkin at home and bring it with you for the judging. For more information call 994-5608. Wallace Baptist Church Fall Festival Wallace Baptist Church on Chumuckla Highway in Pace will be hosting its fall festival on Oct. 29 from 5 7 p.m. This free family event includes an evening of Trunk or Treat, food, music, inatable, fun and more. For more information call the church ofce 994-8278 Faith bBRiefsIEFS Photos by Ma A Thew H EW Pe E LLeg EG Rin IN O | Press Gazette Even cats came out to receive a blessing on Saturday at the First Presbyterian Church of Milton. Nora Hamilton and her mother Sharon Hamilton play with the K9 Phoenix at the second annual Blessing of the Pets. Many dogs like this one avoided the sun despite the cool conditions on Saturday. Even the big dogs came out to the Blessing of the pets including Tuffy the quarterhorse whose owner Kyle Holley uses to encourage reading and positive behavior at schools around Florida. Dusty the poodle mix was in heaven after receiving a handful of treats at the second annual Blessing of the Pets on Saturday. A scale model of Noahs Ark was on display at the pet event along with local vendors who provide services and food for animals. Threeyear-old Java, a miniature Sheltie stands with her owner, Brenda Anthony of Pace, after receiving a blessing on Saturday. Blessing of the Pets

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LocalA10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011Along with these projects, there are four others Anderson noted during TEAMs presentation to the public and the board of county commissioners. Despite an explanation of its current focus, which is improving the economic well being of a community through efforts that entail job creation, job retention, tax base enhancements and quality of life, some feel that TEAM is focusing in the wrong areas. TEAM does not deal with what we do in Navarre, said Navarre resident Loretta Akin. They need to expand their mission to include tourism and work with the different chambers. Another county resident feels that TEAM needs to focus on more local items. I feel like we need to focus on more sidewalks, curbs, and taking care of our sewage, said Kim Moore. Most of the places you look there is dirt and dishevelment. I would like to see a big box store like a Costco in the old 84 Lumber location and be able to do the things here I have to travel elsewhere for. Jerry Couey, a longstanding opponent of TEAM, feels the county needs to hold the economic development groups feet to the fire. TEAM has had the contract for over three years and not once have they followed it, Couey said. They hand out this brochure on job numbers and the numbers are not right. They are not showing the number of jobs lost at ClearWire or Tata. The jobs that Couey was referring to at ClearWire are expected to be lost in November, while Tata Business Solutions announced its job news just one week before the TEAM Santa Rosa Industry Appreciation Luncheon, which the brochures were already printed for. Couey also challenged a supporter of TEAM earlier in the day, Floridas Great Northwest. Two months ago, I spoke with Mr. (Don) Kirkland and sent him a freedom of information request concerning the $15 million in federal dollars they use and all they sent me back was this colorful brochure, Couey said. Also during the meeting, newly appointed chairman for TEAMs board of directors Dave Hoxeng gave the public some insight to the ClearWire saga itself. I dont think many people understand what all happened with ClearWire, Hoxeng said while addressing the board. After they announced an expansion they got a new CEO who basically decided to send all their jobs over to the Philippines and Honduras. Before that they had three call centers in Las Vegas and the call center here in Milton. Now they are almost gone in Las Vegas and by the first of the year we will have just a few of the jobs we once had. syrup by days end. Reeds family has been making cane syrup for as long as he can remember, and up until last year, he used to do it pretty regularly himself. Now Reed only makes cane syrup for special events, mainly to share his knowledge with children. Thats the only reason I do it, Reed said. Sugarcane was used in so many ways. As a sweetener and for baking; for breakfast, we used to have biscuits, syrup and a piece of meat. A recurring theme amongst the demonstrators was how hard people once had to work to provide basic necessities. Crestview resident Peyton Knight, 6, found that out rst hand when he partnered up with Jimmy Ates on a two-man crosscut saw, grimacing as they ripped through a 9-inch log. Thats a lot harder than I thought it would be, Peyton said. Raymon Melvin displayed hand-made tools and drinking cups, each of which required time and effort to make. There were iron axes, fashioned on a forge with re and a hammer, homemade knives and hand-carved wooden bowls. Its my way of showing people how hard people had to work back then, Melvin said. BILL GAMb B LIN | Press GazetteMalcom Reed was showing people the art of making cane syrup as he was busy over the weekend cooking down two truckloads of sugarcane. MUNSON from page A1The seating area, along with the rooms inside The Womens Center, was designed specically to help patients feel comfortable when they come in for services.MM ATHEW PELLEg G RINO | Press Gazette Thursday at the Santa Rosa County meeting on Economic Development, the public and commissioners learned that six companies have shown interest into moving into this building once ClearWire vacates it later this year. Depending on which company makes the move it could mean somewhere between 60 to 1,000 jobs to Santa Rosa County. cess, and help take some of that stress off of their shoulders, Pitts said. We go through steps with the patients that used to take numerous weeks and speed up the process for them. The new center offers stereotactic and ultrasound guided biopsies, needle localizations (a presurgical procedure), digital mammograms, sentinel mode marking and general ultrasounds, among other services. And while both Wright and Pitts know how difcult certain preventative and surgical procedures can be for women, the medical center dedicated their time and effort into making The Womens Center one of the most comfortable ofces around. Dr. Pam Sherman, the medical director of The Womens Center, will continue her full-time services at her general surgeon practice along with the services she will provide at the new center for women. For information on additional services or to set up an appointment, call 6265272. TEAM from page A1 SRMC from page A1A digital mammogram machine sits inside one of the many rooms inside The Womens Center.

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Santa Rosas Press Gazette| A11Wednesday, October 12, 2011 The Future Fisherman Foundation (F3) and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) will conduct a training seminar for anyone interested in angler and aquatic education training. This years event will be at the 4-H Camp Ocala the weekend of Oct. 22-23. This seminar is open to teachers, 4-H leaders, Boy/ Girl Scout leaders, Future Farmers of America personnel and anyone interested in getting students involved with shing and aquatic education. Trainers will teach the principles of nationally recognized programs such as Hooked on Fishing Not on Drugs. The intent of this seminar is to give everyone a good working knowledge of sport-shing techniques and aquatic education and instill condence in them to train others in their respective organizations, said Mark Gintert, F3 executive director. We also intend to show them a host of other available resources and the next steps for their programs once they get established. Biologists from the FWC will cover a wide variety of topics, including local biology, habitat, conservation, equipment operation and life skills. A primary goal of the FWC is to create the next generation that cares by enabling youth and families to reconnect with nature through a variety of active, nature-based recreational activities. Such activities will enable them to live happier, healthier and smarter lifestyles while becoming future resource stewards (MyFWC.com/Youth). The FWC is implementing ways to reach out to schools and other organizations that deal directly with students across the state, said Rich Abrams, the FWCs Marine Aquatic Education coordinator. This event will bring together a diverse group of people who share the same goals of getting students involved with the great outdoors and learning to be stewards of Floridas aquatic environments, echoed Steve Marshall, the FWCs Freshwater Angler and Aquatic Education coordinator. Marshall will help lead the seminar. A travel stipend is available for participants through a Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation grant, making the cost minimal. Interested parties should go to FutureFisherman.org to register. Space is limited, so register immediately. Participants will pay upfront for their stay and meals at Camp Ocala (approximately $73 per person), but the Future Fisherman Foundation will reimburse $150 per person in travel expenses for up to three people per organization. Participants will receive the Hooked on Fishing Not on Drugs curriculum, shing equipment instruction and many additional educational tools. This will be an in-depth training that will encompass hands-on equipment use, ways to help youth plan for the future, and environmental stewardship activities for which Hooked on Fishing is known. Instructors for the program will be Mark Gintert, executive director of the Future Fisherman Foundation; Jennifer Saranzak, FWC marine biologist/education specialist in marine sheries; and Steve Marshall, FWC sheries biologist in freshwater sheries (561-292-6050). Wise Equipment Sales & Service1147 S. Ferdon Blvd. Crestview, FL 32536 (850) 682-3366 6512470 www.foxwoodcc.comGOLF ANYONE?4927 Antioch Rd., CrestviewMUST PRESENT THIS COUPON. EXPIRES DECEMBER 31, 2011850 6822012Call Now For Tee TimeRound of Golf!Cart Included$29+TAX GOOD ANYTIME MONDAY THROUGH SUNDAY Pensacola Bay Thursday, Oct. 13, 6:48 AM CDT Sunrise 8:09 AM CDT Moonset 10:21 AM CDT Low tide 0.37 Feet 6:18 PM CDT Sunset 7:06 PM CDT Moonrise Friday, Oct. 14, 12:20 AM CDT High tide 2.01 Feet 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 9:03 AM CDT Moonset 11:14 AM CDT Low tide 0.32 Feet 6:17 PM CDT Sunset 7:45 PM CDT Moonrise Saturday, Oct. 15, 12:55 AM CDT High tide 2.07 Feet 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 9:57 AM CDT Moonset 12:21 PM CDT Low tide 0.28 Feet 6:16 PM CDT Sunset 8:29 PM CDT Moonrise Sunday, Oct. 16, 1:36 AM CDT High tide 2.10 Feet 6:50 AM CDT Sunrise 10:49 AM CDT Moonset 1:36 PM CDT Low tide 0.23 Feet 6:15 PM CDT Sunset 9:18 PM CDT Moonrise East Bay Thursday, Oct. 13, 6:48 AM CDT Sunrise 8:09 AM CDT Moonset 10:21 AM CDT Low tide 0.37 Feet 6:18 PM CDT Sunset 7:06 PM CDT Moonrise Friday, Oct. 14, 12:20 AM CDT High tide 2.01 Feet 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 9:03 AM CDT Moonset 11:14 AM CDT Low tide 0.32 Feet 6:17 PM CDT Sunset 7:45 PM CDT Moonrise Saturday, Oct. 15, 12:55 AM CDT High tide 2.07 Feet 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 9:57 AM CDT Moonset 12:21 PM CDT Low tide 0.28 Feet 6:16 PM CDT Sunset 8:29 PM CDT Moonrise Sunday, Oct. 16, 1:36 AM CDT High tide 2.10 Feet 6:50 AM CDT Sunrise 10:49 AM CDT Moonset 1:36 PM CDT Low tide 0.23 Feet 6:15 PM CDT Sunset 9:18 PM CDT Moonrise Blackwater River Thursday, Oct. 13, 12:49 AM CDT High tide 1.94 Feet 6:48 AM CDT Sunrise 8:10 AM CDT Moonset 10:51 AM CDT Low tide 0.37 Feet 6:19 PM CDT Sunset 7:06 PM CDT Moonrise Friday, Oct. 14, 1:16 AM CDT High tide 2.01 Feet 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 9:04 AM CDT Moonset 11:44 AM CDT Low tide 0.32 Feet 6:18 PM CDT Sunset 7:46 PM CDT Moonrise Saturday, Oct. 15, 1:51 AM CDT High tide 2.07 Feet 6:50 AM CDT Sunrise 9:57 AM CDT Moonset 12:51 PM CDT Low tide 0.28 Feet 6:17 PM CDT Sunset 8:30 PM CDT Moonrise Sunday, Oct. 16, 2:32 AM CDT High tide 2.10 Feet 6:50 AM CDT Sunrise 10:50 AM CDT Moonset 2:06 PM CDT Low tide 0.23 Feet 6:15 PM CDT Sunset 9:18 PM CDT Moonrise Navarre Beach Thursday, Oct. 13, 5:44 AM CDT Low tide 0.41 Feet 6:48 AM CDT Sunrise 8:09 AM CDT Moonset 6:18 PM CDT Sunset 7:06 PM CDT Moonrise 9:08 PM CDT High tide 1.62 Feet Friday, Oct. 14, 6:39 AM CDT Low tide 0.37 Feet 6:48 AM CDT Sunrise 9:03 AM CDT Moonset 6:17 PM CDT Sunset 7:45 PM CDT Moonrise 9:43 PM CDT High tide 1.68 Feet Saturday, Oct. 15, 6:49 AM CDT Sunrise 7:48 AM CDT Low tide 0.36 Feet 9:56 AM CDT Moonset 6:16 PM CDT Sunset 8:29 PM CDT Moonrise 10:22 PM CDT High tide 1.74 Feet Sunday, Oct. 16, 6:50 AM CDT Sunrise 9:33 AM CDT Low tide 0.35 Feet 10:49 AM CDT Moonset 6:15 PM CDT Sunset 9:18 PM CDT Moonrise 11:03 PM CDT High tide 1.78 Feet 4th Annual SREF Mediacom Garcon Point Bridge Run Santa Rosa Education Foundation (SREF) is pleased to partner with Mediacom Communications Corporation to announce its 4th Annual Connecting Education in Santa Rosa County run/walk across the Garcon Point Bridge. This event supports SREF programs including grants to classroom teachers and school matching grants, free classroom supplies for teachers, Take Stock in Children mentor support and college scholarships, and recognition of excellence in education. This 4.8 mile run/ walk will take place on Oct. 22, at 7:30 a.m. Age division awards will be presented for runners and walkers. Shuttle service from registration and check-in at Lowes Gulf Breeze will begin at 6 a.m. Participants will run/walk from the north end of the Garcon Point Bridge to the south end. Post race activities will include hamburger, hot dogs, and drinks for participants. Advance registration is encouraged. Entry fees are $20 for children under 18 and $25 for adults. After Oct. 18, all registration fees are $30. The rst 400 participants will receive an event T-shirt. Registration is available online at www.active.com. Registration forms and sponsorship opportunities are available at www.santarosa.k12. .us/sref/gpbr2011.htm. Sports SIDeELIneNE Tide RepEPOrR T SportsHooked on Fishing teacher training available

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SP O RTs S www.srpressgazette.comWednesday, October 12, 2011 ASection Page 12Photo by BILL GAMb B LIN | Press Gazette Over 100 runners participated in the St. Rose of Lima 5K Saturday morning in conjunction with the annual St. Rose of Lima International Festival. More photos from this race can be found on-line at www. srpressgazette.com Special to the Press Gazette Saturday the Jay High girls cross country team won the 7th Annual J.D. Mac Invitational at the Bray-Hendricks Park in Jay. Jessica Thornton placed fth with a time of 21:03 to lead the Lady Royals while, Jorja Agrait placed tenth with a time of 21:36. Also nishing in the top twenty were Allison Blair with a time of 22:17, Ally Settle 22:18 and Savannah Brown 22:30. Jay nished the meet with 12 of its top 15 runners setting new personal records Anabel Shepherd, Haylee Watson, Kendra Weeks, Savannah Brown, Meghan Mayo, Shelby Edwards, Jorja Agrait, Alexis Mitchem, Jenna Thornton, Kristen Pike, Ally Settle and Jessica Thornton. This marks the rst time the Lady Royals have won the meet. Navarre was second followed by Pine Forest, West Florida Tech and Pensacola Christian Academy rounding out the top ve. Centrals Lady Jags nished sixth. On Thursday the Lady Jags won the meet hosted by Baker High School, while the boys nished second overall in their meet. Laurel Hill edged Central in the boys division by just ve points. Beth Smith won placed rst in the girls race and became the rst Lady Jaguar in school history to win a cross country meet. Kennedy Fuller nished third for Central while Erica Waters nished fourth. In the boys division the top Jaguar was Kyle Fuller who nished fourth. By Matt Brabham PG Sports Correspondent JAA Y Jay High football fans arrived at Merle V. North Stadium Friday night hopeful the Royals could give the Northview Chiefs a good game. The night ended as Jay came up on the short end of a 56-7 decision in a district tilt against their nearby rivals from Century. Despite falling behind 49-0 early on, the Royals were not going to roll over. Tristian Pengenika kept the Royals from being shut out as he blocked a Northview punt. The loose football took a Royals (2-3; 0-2 in District 1A) bounce and Justice Garcia was on the spot to recover the loose ball for the Royals only touchdown. Conner Weekes added the point after with 10:38 left in the game to make it 49-7. Another bright spot for the Royals is the efforts of Jay running back, Ricky Coeld, who gained 119 yards on the night to put him over the 1,000 yard mark in the rst ve games for the season. So far this season Coeeld is averaging 177 yards a game. Northview got things going after they received the opening kick-off and drove down the eld to score in ve plays on a drive that took only one-and-a-half minutes off the clock. After Jay went three and out, Northview quarterback, Brandon Sheets, ran backwards 20 yards on a broken play where he fumbled the ball. Finally, he got a grip on the ball, turned up eld and ran 83 yards untouched by a Royal all the way to the end zone. The Chiefs led 14-0 after the crazy play, which set the tone for the evening. Starting on their 37-yard line, Jay mounted a threat on the second possession after a facemask penalty against the Chiefs. Sophomore quarterback, Tate Upton, found Sammy Johns on a nine yard completion and then a screen pass to Allen Perry, which was good for another 13 yards and a Royals rst down. But the drive came up short as the Royals turned the ball over on downs at the Chiefs 36 yard line. The Chiefs took the ball down the eld in 10 plays and Sheets scored again from 10 yards out to advance the lead 21-0. By intermission the Chiefs had built a 42-0 lead, but they had to kick to Jay to start the second half. Coeld took the kickoff 60 yards in what appeared to swing some momentum in the way of the host Royals, but it was called back because of a block below the waist. Two plays after the Royals drive stalled Northview, they scored to make it 49-0. This Friday the Royals will travel to Cottondale for a 7 p.m. kickoff. By Bill Gamblin news@srpressgazette.com Homecoming week is known as a time football coaches fear due to all the distractions from the weeklong festivities. Someone forgot to tell the Milton Panthers, who didnt start enjoying the week until they stopped Tate High 35-17. Milton, who improved to 3-3 on the season and 2-1 in District 1-6A, needed little time to get on the scoreboard. After just two plays for the Aggies, Milton had recovered a fumble and with 11:19 remaining in the rst quarter took a 6-0 lead as David Rich scored the rst touchdown of the game on a four-yard run. The Panthers dominated the game as they amassed 301 yards rushing. We are starting to get a little better, said Milton head coach Chafan Marsh. The kids are working hard and are getting that enthusiasm and excitement. They keep ghting and are taking it one opponent at a time. On their second possession, Milton marched from their own 19 to score when Andre Flakes broke loose on a 12-yard run with 4:38 remaining in the rst quarter to make it 12-0 Panthers. By the time the second quarter had gotten underway Milton was up 19-0 and was forcing the Aggies out of their traditional rugbystyle running game. Our defensive staff did a good job preparing for their offense, Marsh said. Once we got the lead built they pretty much had to start throwing the ball and took them out of their game. With 11:24 remaining before halftime, Rich scored his second touchdown of the game and Milton was starting homecoming festivities a little earlier than many had planned. Tate would score on a 31-yard eld goal by Hagen Mancuso with 2:47 remaining in the rst half. After the intermission the Panthers were not done as Kia Green added a 20 yard eld goal to make it 22-3 with 9:12 remaining in the third quarter. Just 10 seconds later, Milton went up 28-3 when DeMichael McQueen took the handoff from the Tate quarterback Jaeln Cunningham and returned it 10 yards for a touchdown. Flakes would add one more touchdown on a 23yard run to ice the game. Milton nished the night with four rusher that gained over 50 yards, being led by Rich who nished the night with 87 yards. Roy Wise nished the night with 69 yards, William Barnes gained 55 yards and Paul Young nished with 50 yards. Young also was three for 111 yards as he completed ve of six passes with one interception. Tate was led in rushing by Isaac Heller with 66 yards, who caught a 43-yard pass for a touchdown, while Cunningham scored from one yard out. Milton will travel this Friday to face Gulf Breeze in a non-district game at 7:30 p.m. By Mathew Pellegrino mpellegrino@srpressgazette. com Pace head football coach Mickey Lindsey knew what he was up against Friday night as he walked into Jim Scoggins Stadium on the Pensacola High School campus in Pensacola. The Patriots suffered a 36-13 loss to the Tigers, and Lindsey knew there was only one reason for the loss. They were a better football team, Lindsey said. The 2009 3A state champs who played Milton just two weeks before scored 29 points alone in the second half, but it was small mistakes that led to the Tigers victory over the Patriots like the rst touchdown of the game scored by Pensacola. After the Patriots were forced to punt with less than nine minutes left in the rst quarter, Ryan Santoso attempted to punt the ball to the Tigers, but dropped the leather, allowing Pensacolas Kendrell Jenkins to scoop the ball up and bring it down into Patriot territory at the Pace 10-yard line. Following the play, it took less than a minute for the Tigers to put the rst six on the board after Jalen Spencer made a quick pass to Shaquille Bush in the endzone for the touchdown with only 7:44 left in the rst quarter. Paces offense struggled to make a solid play until the second quarter when Devon Varney found himself face to face with a fourth down and only two yards to go on Pensacolas 16-yard line. Varney didnt want to settle for a eld goal, and instead faked the three point kick, falling back and then running downeld past Tiger defense for a touchdown with only 2:26 left in the second quarter. Within the rst 16 seconds of the second half, Pensacola proved why they were state champs after receiving the ball, Spencer threw a quick pass to a wide open Bush downeld who ran the leather 45 yards to the endzone for a wide open touchdown. The Tigers would attempt a two-point conversion, but came up empty handed. Pensacola would continue their open eld streak with only 4:36 left in the third quarter when Spencer looked to throw downeld from Pensacolas own 25, but faked the pass and ran down the right side line for a 75-yard open run to the endzone making the score 19-7. After the touchdown, Pace wouldnt be able to get it past their own 17-yard line and were forced to punt the ball back over to the Tigers. The punt return went right into the hands of Marcus Knight who took the ball directly from the Tiger 40-yard line to the endzone without hesitation for another Tiger touchdown. We kept giving up the ball, Lindsey said after the game. We just couldnt catch them in the third quarter. By the last quarter, the Patriots had their heads down, but were able to put one more touchdown on the scoreboard with only 6:29 left in the game. From the Pensacola 28yard line, Varney threw a pass downeld to Anthony Tracy for a touchdown making the score 33-13. Pace attempted a twopoint conversion, but the play was no good. With only 2:02 left in the game, Pensacola opted for a eld goal from the Pace 16-yard line sealing the game 36-13. Cross Country teams fare wellSt. Rose of Lima 5K runThe Royals fall to the Chiefs Panthers manhandles Tate 35-17 Milton running back David Rich picks his way through the Aggies secondary as he nished Fridays 35-17 win over Tate with a game high 87 yards and two touchdowns. Isaiah Jones reaches out to fend off a Tate defender in Miltons 35-17 win over the Aggies on homecoming night as the Panthers improved to 3-3 on the season. Tigers pounce on Patriots for a 36-13 winRICKyY CCOFIELDPhotos by M M ATHEW PELLEgr GR INO | Press Gazette The Patriots J.C. Curry attempts to make a pass at Tiger defense in the rst quarter of Friday nights game.

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LIFESTYl L E www.srpressgazette.comWednesday, October 12, 2011 BSection Special to the Press GazetteA pet Halloween costume contest, a chance to ride a real American quarter horse and tour a working ranch, a scenic 5K run and more will showcase the third weekend of events at the eighth annual Beaches to Woodlands Tour of Santa Rosa County. This year the weather and the crowds have just been fantastic, said tour coordinator Karen Harrell. We expect another banner weekend with some great family-friendly events to choose from. Runners of all ages will be participating in the third annual Run for the Reef 5K and One Mile Kids Run on Saturday, Oct. 15, a fundraiser to help build the Navarre Beach Marine Sanctuary. One day the area will feature a near-shore snorkeling area destined to benet locals and tourists alike. Also Saturday, equine enthusiasts will enjoy a chance to ride Tuffy, an American quarter horse, at the Hayes Ranch Open House and Horse Rides, join the Santa Rosa County Horse Assistance Councils Wild Safari Ride or join the group on the trail for the entire weekend with a campout, treasure hunt and other activities. Art lovers will enjoy The Santa Rosa County Art Associations Artfest, a fundraiser to help teachers fund art programs. Also featured Saturday will be a new event, the East Milton Youth Association Talent Show at BDubbs Subs and Suds, and Arcadia Mill Archaeological Site will have a Fall Open House from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to showcase its recent renovation. Also featured is the always popular Navarre Beach Car, Truck and Bike Show, sponsored by the Navarre Area Board of Realtors, and pet lovers from across the region are invited to the Page 1 BEACHES TO WOODLANDS TOURDepot Days give way to pet contest, 5KPhotos HOTOS bB Y Mat AT pellePELLE Gr R Ino NO | Press GazetteThe L and N train station in Milton held their Depot Days on Saturday in conjunction with the Beaches to Woodlands Tour. See B2W A2

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LocalB2 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 B2W from page B1eighth annual PetNation Halloween Pet Contest in Navarre. The popular Sweet Season Farms Corn Maze in Milton with a sevenacre corn maze, hay rides, cow train and farmthemed playground will be open until Nov. 6. Also joining the tour this year is the Haystackular Maze at S.S. Dixon Primary School, open weekends throughout October. Other attractions with month-long features include the fall foliage zipline tours at Adventures Unlimited; historic lecture series Secrets of Santa Rosa Archeology & History in Your Own Backyard at Arcadia Mill; birding encounters at the Gulf Breeze Zoo; special Saturday open dates at the Santa Rosa County Historical Museum; free saltwater shing at Avalon Landing RV Park in Milton; weekend hikes with the Florida Trails Association; free tours at Holland Farms; and back for a second year, Kids Fish Free at the Navarre Beach Pier in October. Pottery from the areas only wood-red Anagama kiln and other artwork will be on display Oct. 22 at Holley Hill Pottery. Oct. 22 will serve up a Taste of Navarre, sponsored by the Navarre Area Chamber of Commerce and the 18th annual Juanas Pagodas Charity Chili Cookoff and Volleyball Tournament. One of the areas most grueling athletic events is staged Oct. 22 with the West Florida Wheelmans 13th Annual Fenner McConnell/Matt Wantz Memorial Blackwater Heritage Century Ride, when cyclists compete in 18-, 43-, 62or 100-mile races. Spectators will enjoy the ash of color as the cyclists wind through the Milton portion of the race on the Blackwater Heritage Trail. Ghosts, goblins and zoo animals kick off the Halloween season with the fourth annual Downtown Milton Haunted House and the Zoo Boo at the Gulf Breeze Zoo, both Oct. 2123 and 26-31. The fth weekend features another exciting new event, the Navarre Beach Halloween Volleyball Classic, Oct. 28-30, a professional event with $5,000 in cash prizes being staged at 25 courts set up at Juanas Pagoda and by the Navarre Beach Pier. Also new Oct. 29 is the Santa Rosa Clean Community System Green Up Nursery Thinkin Pink, with nursery items for sale, educational seminars and a variety of booths. The Santa Rosa Historical Society will take visitors on a spooky walk through history at the 11th annual Ghosts of Milton Imogene Theatre tour on Oct. 28-29, one of the most popular events on the tour. Santa Rosa County stretches from the Gulf of Mexico at Navarre Beach north to historic Milton and the small community of Jay near the Alabama border. Fall temperatures drop into the low 80s and 70s for daytime highs and 50s and 60s in the evening. Area vacation rentals at Navarre Beach drop by up to 40 percent off summers high season rates. Also popular are the wooded cabins with replaces at Adventures Unlimited, camping at area RV parks and rustic tent sites at select area state parks. For event details, visit www.thebeachestowoodlandstour.com or call 800-480-SAND or 939-8666. Book your trip at www. oridabeachestorivers. com.

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B3Wednesday, October 12, 2011

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LocalB4 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ANNOUNCING New StylistSPLITZ ENDZ 850-686-9000 10% Off Your First Visit With Chelsie Miley 6011592 Feathers"Call to schedule your appointment today!" PORTABLE CLASSROOM SEALED-BIDS AUCTIONSANTA ROSA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD SCHOOL SURPLUS The Santa Rosa County School Board has declared two portable classrooms surplus and bids for purchase are solicited from the public. These classrooms are located at Munson Elementary School, Munson, FL. They may be viewed and inspected by contacting the School Board's Surplus Warehouse at 850-983-5143 and making an appointment for access. Listed below are the dates available for inspection and bid submission.Dates: Inspection & Bid Submission Wednesday, October 12 through Tuesday, October 18,2011 Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. (weekdays only) Bid submission deadline: 3:00 p.m., October 18, 2011 Location: Administrative Support Complex 6544 Firehouse Rd, Bldg 7, Milton, Florida FOR MORE INFORMATION and SALE CONDITIONS CONTACT: Jesse De Leon Surplus Warehouse/Textbook Depository (850) 983-5143 or email: deleonj@mail.santarosa.k12..us Additional information may be obtained online at: www.santarosa.k12..us/surplus 6011626 Navy League smoked butts fundraiserThe Navy League Santa Rosa Council is selling smoked Boston butts for their annual fundraiser. Butts are $30 each and will be available for pickup from 2 6 p.m. on Nov. 22 at the Santa Rosa County Chamber Ofce on Stewart St. Orders are being taken by Navy League of Santa Rosa County members or by calling 623-2339 until 4 p.m. Nov. 18.City of Milton meetingsCity of Miltons Historic Preservation Board will meet Oct. 13 at 5:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers. City of Milton Sports Advisory Board will meet Oct. 17 at 6 p.m. in Conference Room C at City Hall. City of Miltons Administrative Committee will meet Oct. 20 at 8 a.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. City of Miltons Finance Committee will meet on Oct. 20 at 9 a.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. City of Miltons Ordinance Review Committee will meet Oct. 20 at 10 a.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. City of Miltons Parks and Recreation Committee will meet Oct. 24 at 8:30 a.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. City of Miltons Benevolent Cemetery Board will meet Oct. 24 at 2 p.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. City of Miltons Public Works Committee will meet Oct. 27 at 8 a.m. in Conference Room B at City Hall. For further information on the meeting contact the City Managers Ofce at 983-5411. All meetings are open to the public.Morning Glory Circle meetingThe Morning Glory Circle of the Milton Garden Club will hold its monthly meeting Oct. 13, at 9:30 a.m, at 5256 Alabama Street, Milton. A program titled How Well Do You Know Your Flowers will be presented by co-chairman, DeAnna Root. Learn facts about a few of over 500 of Floridas native owers: century p;ant, canna lily, blanket ower, purple coneower, amaranth, and spider lily, to name some of the area favorites. A delicious lunch will be served after the program. We welcome all new members. Come and join us. Call 994-5709 if you plan to attend.City of Milton Fire Department open house In conjunction with National Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 9 15, the City of Milton Fire Department will host a Fire Prevention Week Open House on Saturday, Oct. 15, from noon to 3 p.m. at their Fire Station at 5321 Stewart Street. This event will feature tours of the re station and re apparatus, re safety information, displays of re safety equipment, re safety puppet show, activities for children, door prizes and lots of fun for the whole family. We want to show off what our community offers in the way of emergency response, said Fire Chief John E. Reble.Pitman-Pittman family reunionThe Pitman-Pittman Family Reunion will be held Oct. 15 at Bear Lake on U.S. Highway 4 between Munson and Baker. The reunion will start at 10 a.m. Bring a covered disk and memorabilia to share. Also this is the last chance for the family cookbook, so bring recipes.Healthy Start CoalitionThe Healthy Start Coalition of Santa Rosa County, Inc. will meet Oct. 17 at 4 p.m. for its regularly scheduled general board meeting. The meeting will take place at the new ofce location at 5907 Berryhill Road in Milton. For more information call the Healthy Start Coalition at 626-6751.Hope Chest openingVision of Hope, a non-prot dedicated to assisting individuals with physical and developmental disabilities is proud to announce the grand opening of the Hope Chest. This new thrift shop located at 4630 Woodbine Road in Pace, Florida will open ofcially on Oct. 15, at 9 a.m. Many new and gently used items await you. Your support of the Hope Chest will generate funds for a future facility that will provide training, job coaching, and housing for the special needs individuals of our community.International Essential Tremor Foundation support groupThe International Essential Tremor Foundation (IETF) is proud to announce a new support group for those affected by essential tremor. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Oct. 19, at Lucia M. Tryon Branch Library, 1200 Langley Ave. Pensacola, Florida. The group will serve individuals in both Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. Individuals interested in attending should contact Paul Stevens at 994-4305 or paulwstevens52@yahoo. com to RSVP. Munson School ReunionThe Munson School Reunion will be held Oct. 20 from 10 a.m. 3 p.m. at the Bear Lake Recreation Area pavilion in Munson. The meal is a covered dish. For more information call 449-5373.Dogwood Dulcimer AssociationThe Dogwood Dulcimer Association invites mountain dulcimer enthusiasts Oct. 21 Oct. 23 to a jam and campout at Lake Stone Campground on Highway 4 in Century, Fla. The weekend will get underway with a covered dish supper at 6 p.m. on Oct. 21 with other activities for the remainder of the weekend. This jam is for traditional music and fellowship. For festival information call 626-9981, 982-1997, 478-8193, or email dogwooddulcimers@ yahoo.com. For camping reservations call 259-5555.Polymer Clay workshopThe Santa Rosa Art Association will sponsor a Polymer Clay workshop in building 4900 of the Milton Campus of PJC from 10 a.m. noon on Oct. 22. Tuition for non-SRAA members is $10. The presenting artist, Danielle Engert, will have kits on sale for $3 including all supplies required. The workshop will be preceded by the monthly meeting of the Art Association at 9 a.m. in the same location. Guests are always welcomed at the Art Association meetings and workshops. For additional information, call 995-9717.Community, connection, and chili festival A community, connection, and chili festival has been organized for children, youth and adults in the Byrom Street neighborhoods. If you and your family would like to enjoy a fun-lled afternoon, come to this community festival on Oct. 24 from 2 6 p.m. at the Milton Community Center. The festival will offer a variety of activities. There will be African drumming, music, face painting, crafts, hot chili and special performances from children and youth sharing their talents. Also on hand will be performers DJ Mackeville and DJ Boss Man. If you have a special talent to share, would like more information about the event or free character education classes, please call 623-5315. This event is co-sponsored by individuals, organizations, and the Bah Spiritual Assembly of Santa Rosa County, a local, non-prot religious body of the Bah Faith community.Holley Fish FryLooking for people with deep roots to the Holley community. If you live in Holley or are from Holley, you are invited to the Holley Fish Fry on Oct. 29, from 11 a.m. 2 p.m., at the location of the old Holley Elementary School, which is now the Holley Ball Park on U. S. Hwy. 87 South. This will be a potluck so bring a covered dish, paper plates, forks, drinks, ice, chairs, tables anything. Pass this on to anyone you know that lives in Holley or was from Holley. We want to get together, fry sh and listen to all the old stories from the Holley community. For information call 736-3359 (leave a message and phone number).Shrine Fall Arts and Craft ShowDo your Christmas shopping locally at the Hadji Shrine Fall Arts and Craft show! The show is Oct. 29 30 at 800 West Nine Mile Rd. in Pensacola. The show will be open 9 a.m. 5 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. 4 p.m. on Sunday. There will be door prizes throughout both days with breakfast and lunch available for purchase. For more information: Darrell Mashburn 251-223-3869 or kdmashgulftel.com News BriefsRIEFS

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B5Wednesday, October 12, 2011The following arrests were made beginning Sept. 18 through Sept. 25. Sept. 18 Buckhault, Arthur Tanner; Male; 16; Gayneil Ave., Milton; Burglary Unoccupied Conveyance Unarmed. Coffey, Tracy Lynn; Male; 40; 5600 Timberline Dr., Milton; Dealing In Stolen Property. Curtis 3, Ralph William; Male; 30; 4217 Audiss Rd., Milton; Resist Ofcer Flee or Elude Law Enforcement Ofcer with Lights and Siren Active; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended Habitual Offender; Resist Ofcer Obstruct Without Violence. Friday, Rachel Michelle; Female; 26; 14088 Alabama Highway 14 W, Valley Grande, Ala.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Furgeson, Carley Cheyenne; Female; 43; 3406 Green Briar Ct., Gulf Breeze; Opium or Derivative Trafcking Four Grams to Under 30 Kilograms. Grider, Chrystal Lasha Renee; Female; 20; 3245 Struta Ln., Pace; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Morris, Charles Joseph; Male; 41; 1438 College Parkway, Gulf Breeze; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense; Forgery Of or Alter Public Record, Certicate, Etc.; Fraud Utter False Instrument. Mullins, Robert Randall Tucker; Male; 31; 1545 Bell Creek Rd., Jay; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Pryor, Cortez Omario; Male; 37; 8239 Groveland Ave., Pensacola; Vehicle Theft Grand Theft of Motor Vehicle. Swick, Dakota Matthew; Male; 16; 1140 Tiger Trace Blvd., Gulf Breeze; Public Order Crimes Commit Third Degree Felony Wearing Mask or Hood; Damage Property Criminal Mischief Over $200 Under $1,000; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000 (2 counts); Vehicle Theft Grand Theft Of Motor Vehicle (2 counts); Damage Property Criminal Mischief $200 and Under; Evidence Destroying Tamper With or Fabricate Physical Evidence. Tabor, Jesse J; Male; 37; 709 W. Washington St., Owosso, Mich.; Sex Offender Violation Fail to Register as Required. Wendell, Charles Christopher; Male; 29; 5036 King Oaks Ct., Pace; Possession of Weapon or Ammo by Convicted Florida Felon; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Larceny Petit Theft First Degree $100 Less Than $300. Jones, Summer Danielle; Female; 29; 5954 Bourne Rd., Theodore, Ala.; Probation Violation Felony. Bass, Saundra Harris; Female; 65; 4775 Fairoaks Dr., Pace; Marijuana Possession With Intent to Sell, Manufacture, or Deliver Schedule I. Fall Jr., Robert Lee; Male; 58; 5351 Delona Rd., Pace; Fraud False Statement Verify Ownership Regulated Metals Under $300; Larceny Grand Theft $5,000 Less Than $10,000; Vehicle Theft Grand Theft of Motor Vehicle. Oliver, Kelsea Andrienne; Female; 42; 4460 Pine Villa Circle, Pace; Cruelty Toward Child Act That Could Result in Physical Mental Injury. Schultz, Traci Jeanne; Female; 41; 5800 Timberline Dr., Milton; Tresspassing School Grounds WAS 228.091; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Dealing In Stolen Property. Seaton, Riuta Lucille; Female; 33; 4087 Highway 4, Jay; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Fraud Fail to Redeliver Hired or Leased Property $300 or Over. Wells, Jason Roland; Male; 28; 1771 Jack Branch Road, Cantonment, Fla.; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs Third Violation Within 10 Years. Salmeron, Juan Ramon; Male; 27; 6 Milton Rd., Pensacola; Grand Theft. Harrington, Bryan Tyler; Male; 23; 8612 Arlington Place, Navarre; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Parker Jr., Jesse Earl; Male; 24; 1899 Reserve Blvd., Gulf Breeze; Trafc Offense DUI and Damage Property. Sept. 19 Barnett, Tkhari Armon; Male; 18; 4135 Woodville Rd., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Flanakin, Jaclyn Marie; Female; 29; 74 Poquito Dr., Shalimar, Fla.; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Kelleher, Robert Charles; Male; 21; 5900 W. Nine Mile Road, Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. King, Johnathan Tyler; Male; 39; 6438 Colonial Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Utterback, Bonita Faye; Female; 43; 8265 East Bay Blvd., Navarre; Marijuana Possession Over 20 Grams. Sept. 20 Bareld, Charles Antony; Male; 29; 7057 Webster St., Navarre; Public Order Crimes Criminal Attempt to Solicit or Conspire Third Degree Felony; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Dougan, Ruby Sharon; Female; 56; 6062 Jays Way, Milton; Aggravated Battery (DV) On Person 65 Years of Age or Older. Hobbs, Crystal Leigh; Female; 29; 5096 Community Circle, Milton; Trafc Offense Refuse to Submit to DUI Test After License Suspended; Trafc Offense DUI and Damage Property. Torres-Curran, Stephanie Sue; Female; 37; 1861 Sunrise Dr., Navarre; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Sept. 21 Clinger, Michael Ray; Male; 23; 6436 Colonial Dr., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Coffey, Tracy Lynn; Male; 40; 5800 Timberline Dr., Milton; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Hockett, David Paul; Male; 46; 5228 Yancy Dr., Pace; Nonmoving Trafc Violation Drive While License Suspended Third or Subsquent Offense. Lassiter, Michael Wayne; Male; 26; 1996 Hillary Thompson Rd., Milton; Trespassing Closed Plant Nursery; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000; Larceny Petit Theft Second Degree First Offense (2 counts); Fraud Utter False Instrument (2 counts). Lockett, Moxley Edward; Male; 75; 4727 Lori Ln., Pace; Resist Ofcer Obstruct Without Violence; Drug Possession Controlled Substance With Prescription Including Meth; Marijuana Possession Not More Than 20 Grams; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use. Milbury, Lauren Nocole; Female; 24; 9599 Redland Rd., Milton; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Meth; Marijuana Possession Not More Than 20 Grams; Drug Equipment Possession And Or Use. Prows II, Keith Edward; Male; 27; 1501 Sonia St. (Absconded), Pensacola; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Starweather, Adam Ronald; Male; 26; 4967 Attaway Dr., Pace; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Meth; Drug Equipment Possession And or Use. Wolfe, Barbara Darlene; Female; 43; 2255 Horn Rd., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Roger, Bobby Joyce; Male; 51; 2419 Basswood Dr., Navarre; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Ayo, Christopher Mark; Male; 24; 4409 Alanthus St., Milton; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Gould, Renee Anne; Female; 28; 7133 Menton St., Navarre; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Tirado, Efrain; Male; 33; 3612 Golds Bys, Destin, Fla.; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Sept. 22 Hernandez, Alicia Marie; Female; 37; 633 Vorray St., Kenner, Ala.; Failure to Appear for Felony Offense. Rowan, James John; Male; 44; 6476 Sunny Acres Ct., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Schultz, Traci Jeanne; Female; 41; 5800 Timberline Dr., Milton; Burglary Unoccupied Structure Unarmed; Larceny Grand Theft $300 Less Than $5,000. Szuck, Rhonda Stanley; Female; 49; 5440 Clayridge Lane, Milton; Dealing In Stolen Property. Etheridge, Beth Ann; Female; 48; 60540 E. Cambridge Way, Pace; Trafc Offense DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Sept. 25 Calkins, Derek Crane; Male; 28; 5708 Meadow Rd., Milton; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Carroll, Travis Leigh; Male; 19; 12210 Highway 89, Jay; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Cheever, Arthur Lee; Male; 18; 2638 Salamanca St., Navarre; Probation Violation Felony or Commit Continual Unknown Felony/Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non Criteria. Cockrell, Sharon Kaye; Female; 42; 301 Nightengale St., Gulf Breeze; Drug Possession Controlled Substance Without Prescription Including Meth. SANTA ROs SA COUNTY SHEr RIFFsS OFFIcCE Sheriffs rREPOrR T

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LocalB6 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B7Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Allstate Spicer Lewis Funeral Homes NAPA Auto Parts Rons Place Pawn & Gun Twice is Nice Consignment Press Gazette Return to HealthMedical Home and Wellness Center The UPS Store J & D Cleaners Tops Appliances Edward Jones D. Greer Showcase Smoke Shop Blackwater Bistro Capstone Academy Downtown Motors Florida Pest Control & Chemical Company Clarks Lock & Safe is New Look New Prices Come and See 601 1124

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B8 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011Sports Care for the Mature Athlete is Topic of Sacred Heart Seniors Seminar in Pace Sacred Heart Hospitals Senior Services program will present a free seminar entitled, Sports Care for the Mature Athlete, on Oct. 13 from noon to 1 p.m. in the Rehabilitation Center at Sacred Heart Medical Park in Pace. The seminar will be presented by Dr. Eric Kujawski, a sports medicine physician with Sacred Heart Medical Group. The seminar will cover the different types of injuries and conditions that might affect older athletes, as well as prevention tips and treatment options. Registration is required and seating is limited. To register, call 416-1620 or 1877-416-1620. Avoid the Flu Get a Flu Shot Each year 5 to 20 percent of Americans get the u, resulting in 36,000 deaths. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that people older than age 50 and those with chronic or long-term health conditions receive a u shot. Please join us at one of the six convenient locations to receive your vaccination. The Trivalent seasonal u vaccine that is offered also will include the H1N1 vaccine. For your safety, be prepared to stay at least 20 minutes after receiving your u vaccine. Friday, Oct. 14, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Baptist Medical Park Navarre, 8888 Navarre Parkway Tuesday, Oct. 18, 11:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. Andrews Institute Athletic Performance & Research Pavilion, Conference Room B, 1040 Gulf Breeze Parkway Wednesday, Oct. 19, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Jay Hospital, Royal Room, 14114 Alabama St. Wednesday, Oct. 26, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Atmore Community Hospital, Mayson Auditorium 401 Medical Park Ave. Thursday, Oct. 27, 11:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. Baptist Medical Park Nine Mile, Azalea Room, 9400 University Parkway Flu shots are $30 each and are payable by cash, check (made payable to Baptist Walk-In Care), or credit card (American Express, Discover, MasterCard or Visa). Free for Medicare, Tricare, WellCare, Advantra Freedom, Humana Gold Choice, and Universal Health Care cardholders with your card. Your picture ID is required to receive the vaccination. You must be 18 or older to receive the vaccination. To register for these programs, please call 434.4080. Reservations are required. West Florida Hospitals Mobile Mammography Unit West Florida Hospitals Mobile Mammography Unit will be at the following locations during the week of Oct.10, to offer convenient, high quality mammography services for women age 35 and over. West Florida Hospital les most insurances, including Medicare (Medicare will cover screening mammograms every year with no deductible for those women over 40 who have that coverage). Thursday, October 13 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. & 1:00 3:30 p.m. West Florida Medical Group, 1190 E. 9 Mile Road, Pensacola Saturday, October 15 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. NEX Pensacola Mall, 5600 Highway 98, West, Corry Station, Pensacola A customized 37foot coach containing dedicated mammography equipment, the Mobile Mammography Unit makes getting a mammogram even more convenient. It travels throughout the area bringing quality mammography services to women where they are: at work, club or church meetings, health fairs, West Florida Primary Care ofces and other community locations. The Mobile Mammography Unit provides comprehensive mammography services that feature an all-female staff of nationally certied and licensed technologists and state of-the-art equipment, including Digital Mammography and CAD (Computer Aided Detection). For extra assurance, all mammograms are read by two board certied Radiologists. The Mobile Mammography Unit is also certied by the FDA and accredited by the American College of Radiology. For appointments or more information, call 4943497 or toll-free at 1-888-8942113. Alzheimers Family Services offers Alzheimers support group Alzheimers Family Services provides monthly support groups for family members or friends coping with a loved one with Alzheimers disease. A support group will be held at 1 p.m. on Oct. 13 at the Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce, located at 5247 Stewart St. The support group is free and respite care is available. Support Groups are a means for caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease to exchange ideas, gather information and discuss their concerns with others who are dealing or have dealt with the same issues. To register for this support group or for additional information, call 478-7790 or visit www.AlzFamServ.org. Celebrating thirty years, Alzheimers Family Services is a not-for-prot organization serving individuals and families in Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton counties, Fla. as well as Escambia and Baldwin counties, Ala. West Florida Memory Disorder Clinic to Offer Free Memory Screens Forgetful? Repeating questions? Having trouble nding words? If these behaviors describe you or a loved one, West Florida Hospitals Memory Disorder Clinic may be able to help. The Memory Disorder Clinic will offer FREE memory screens by appointment only from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Oct. 13 and Oct. 27. The screenings will be offered at the ofces of the Memory Disorder Clinic located on the rst oor of the West Florida Rehabilitation Institute, 8391 North Davis Highway, Pensacola. Free valet parking is available. Gradually increasing memory problems might be a result of normal aging, but they can sometimes indicate a more serious condition. In those instances, the MMSE (Mini Mental State Examination) Memory Screena tool utilized by the Memory Disorder Cliniccan help detect them. Though not diagnostic, the MMSE is a brief, standardized measure of mental status and is an indicator of current cognitive mental state. The free, condential screenings take about 30 minutes each, but appointments are required. To schedule an appointment, call 494-3212. West Florida Memory Disorder Clinic to Host Parkinsons Disease Support Group Meeting The Parkinsons Support Group meets on the 2nd Friday of each month from 1:00 2:00 p.m. in the Community Rooms of the West Florida Rehabilitation Institute, 8391 N. Davis Highway in Pensacola. The next meeting is scheduled for Friday, Oct. 14, when the topic will be Open Forum facilitated by Joy Barbee, RN, West Florida Memory Disorder Clinic. The session is FREE and open to all Parkinsons patients and caregivers, but registration is required. To register, call 494-3212. Back Pain and Spinal Fusion Surgery is Topic of Sacred Heart Seniors Seminar in Gulf Breeze Sacred Heart Hospitals SENIOR Spirit! program will present a free seminar on back pain and spinal fusion surgery on Oct. 20, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Rehabilitation Center at The Club in Gulf Breeze. The seminar will be presented by Dr. Barry Lurate, a board-certied orthopedic surgeon with Pensacola Orthopedics and Sports Medicine. Dr. Lurate will give an overview of back pain causes as well as both surgical and non-surgical treatment options. After the presentation, attendees will be able to ask specic questions about their own back pain. As seating is limited, preregistration is encouraged. To register, please call 4161620 or 1-877-416-1620. Sacred Heart to Host Retreat on Communication & Valuing Sexuality for Teens and Their Parents Parents: Would you like to connect better with your teen? Join Sacred Heart Hospital for Teen Talk: Real Love & Real Life, a two-day retreat for 7th and 8th grade boys and girls and their parents at the Sacred Heart Conference Center on Sacred Hearts main campus. The rst session will be held on Saturday, December 3 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., and the second session will be held on Sunday, Dec. 4 from 12:30 5:30 p.m. Attendance at both sessions is required, as new material will be covered each day. Presented by Family Honor, Inc., the retreat will help parents and teens learn to communicate the importance of Gods gift of human sexuality and the wonder of growing up and becoming an adult. Skits, role play, video clips, small group-breakouts, parent-child focused time, and audience participation make this a fast-paced and interesting program for both parents and teens. Topics to be discussed include: Recognizing your true worth Communicating well with family & friends The meaning of real love Fertility appreciation, conception, fetal development Guidelines for future dating Goals that lead to a happy, healthy, holy life! Space is limited and pre-registration is required. Light refreshments will be provided. The cost is $40 per family. To register, please call Sacred Heart at 416-1600. For more information, please call event organizer Cat Ellis at 416-1156. 5957372 Health BrRIEfsFS Local

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B9Wednesday, October 12, 2011 www.claytonhomesoorida.com*NO PURCHASE NECESSARY A PURCHASE OR SALES PRESENTATION WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCE OF WINNING. Begins 6/21/11 and ends 10/31/11. See dealer for complete details.WIN A HOME IN NOVEMBER WIN A HOME IN NOVEMBER Hwy. 29 North, Cantonment, FL 32533 850-474-9973Serving Escambia County Florida & Alabama, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Baldwin Counties6011287

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LocalB10 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ClassifiedsB10| Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! Ref. Available 995-0009 Dependable, hard working, honest woman looking for additional houses to clean in Milton & Pace area. 25 years experience. References available upon request. Prices vary. 850-626-0629 Need houses to clean Reasonable rates. Call for free estimate. Nancy 850-619-2891 Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)359-1690 COKERS LAWN & TRACTOR SERVICE From trimming to tractor work. Clean-ups, raking, hauling, mowing, bushhogging, dirt work. Reasonable rates, free estimates. (850) 623-0493 (850) 485-7977 Licensed & Insured Keep your autos resale value. Four seats cleaned with free fabric protection only $45. Carpets cleaned for $45 with free fabric protection as well. Slightly more for SUV. At your home or business. Auto, RVs, Call Frank at Home. Star Brite Carpet & Furniture Cleaning 463-8810 10/833 NOTICE O F SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a WRIT OF EXECUTION issued in the County Court of Santa Rosa County, Florida, on the 18th day of May, 2011 in the cause wherein OSI Funding Corp. was plaintiff and Kenneth O. Benton and Lisa M. Benton were defendants, being Case No. 572001SC1168 in said court, I Wendell Hall, As Sheriff of Santa Rosa County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title, and interest of the defendant, Kenneth O. Benton and to the following described personal property, to wit: DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY 2005 Mazda Tribute, VIN#: 4F2CZ06195KM24758, Color: Silver I shall offer this property for sale, at the east front door of the Santa Rosa Criminal Justice Facility, 5755 East Milton Rd, Milton, Florida, Santa Rosa County, Florida, at the hour of 10.00 a.m. on the 15th day of November, 2011 or as soon thereafter as possible. I will offer for sale all the said defendants, Kenneth O. Bentons, right, title and interest in the aforesaid personal property, at public auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above described execution. WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Rosie Rogers Rosie Rogers Deputy Sheriff IF YOU HAVE A DISABILITY REQUIRING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS OR TO ARRANGE TO VIEW THE PROPERTY, PLEASE CONTACT JANICE PLATT (850) 983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SALE DATE. 10/12, 19, 26, 11/2 10/833 10/832 NOTICE OF SALE Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on October 27, 2011 at 10 A.M. AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED 1997 DODGE VIN# 1B7FL26X1VS223225 Located at: 6141 HIGHWAY 90 WEST, MILTON, FL 32570 SANTA ROSA Any person(s) claiming any interest(s) in the above vehicles contact: Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc., (954) 920-6020 ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC # AB-0001256 10/12(1) 10/832 10/834 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Senior Assist Resources located at 6790 Ventura Blvd in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 6 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) CADDESK, Inc 10/12 10/834 10/821 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON October 25, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit; 69 John Aeppl: Chair, Tv, Boxes, Misc STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 10/5 & 10/12 10/821 10/837 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of DIG IT GEMS AND JEWELRY located at 6436 Robie Road Lot 36 in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 6 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) Samantha Rae Stewart 10/12 10/837

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LocalSanta Rosas Press Gazette| B11Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ClassifiedsWednesday, October 12, 2011 Santa Rosas Press Gazette |B11 We Deliver & Install Call us first, Save Time Call us last, Save MoneyHwy. 87 So. Milton8600311 HYDROSEED Centipede St. Augustine BermudaBailed Pine Straw See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldnt you like a job where you can build something, including a better future? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 LET'S GO CAMPING! Conecuh Villagein Range, Alabama has a spot for you! Full hook-ups for campers, an eleven bed bunk house (everything furnished, just bring food), free fire wood and tent sites. 623-8415, 382-4147 or 251-248-2086 9.5 Polythylene Water Tender 5hp. Tohotsu Motor Great White Trolling Motor. Numerous extras. $1900 Call 623-3737 Bank Foreclosure! Florida Waterfront Condos! SW Coast! Brand new upscale 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,675sf condo. Only $179,900! (Similar unit sold for $399,900) Prime downtown location on the water! Buy & get $8,000 in flex money for a limited time. Call now (877)888-7571, X63 GA Land Sale 69 AC $995/AC Will not divide. Other tracts available. Visit our website. stregispaper.com (478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co. One Day Only Oct. 22. New lake property release. Offered at up to 60% below market value! Lakefront land on private mountain lake only 1 hr from Atlanta! Lake living from $49,900. 1.5 to 5 acre homesites available. Call (877)535-3307 or www.livelaceola.com. Clean 3 BR/2 Ba CH&A All Elec., Garbage furn. $550mo/$300 Dep. or 2 BR/2 Ba CH&A All Elec. $475mo/$ 300 dep. No Pets 675-6614 QUIET PARK -Like new. 2/2. No pets. Non-smoking environment. Garbage & sewer included. $545 + dep. 626-1552 Loxley, AL For sale by owner beautiful cedar home, 2br/2ba, country atmosphere, city living. 5 min from I-10. Pecan trees, beautifully landscaped, large workshop and garden area. 3/4 acre fenced lot with large porches. Moving. Must see to appreciate. $110,000. 251-964-2511 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Clean/private 1 acre 3/2 5324 Hamilton Brdg. Rd. garbage p/u Non-smoking environment No Pets. $950 mth/$800dep. 572-2454 Milton Roommate Wanted $345/mo.-incl. utilities plus cable. Cleanliness Required! Call Terry @ 850-983-4193 day or 850-272-0777 evenings 2 Br/1 Ba with Florida room on corner lot. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch. 626-8973 2 Br/2 Ba on Avalon Blvd. 626-8973 3 FEMA mobile home 3 Br/1 Ba, totaL elec., fenced yard with storage shed. $500 mth. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch 626-8973 Doublewide 1600 sq. ft. 3 Br/2Ba fenced yard. $650 mth/$600 security. Or for sale for $59,900 Owner financing. Milton. Call Barbara Cumbie at 850-626-8959 or 850-377-6787 After school care for 2 year old. Need own transportation. References required. From 1-5 p.m. Weekdays only. 850-626-0134 Drivers -Need 13 Good Drivers Top 5% Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com 6 Figure Income 100,000 RX Discount Cards Placed in 80 Pharmacy Locations @.03 each. You earn $1.50 for each new prescription & $.75 for refills. Accumulating residual i ncome. (877)308-7959 Ext.231 www.freerxadvantage.com Money Making Opportunity Computer a must. Free evaluation & training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939 Think Christmas, Start Now! Own a Red Hot! Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox Or Discount Party Store From $51,900 Worldwide! 100% T urnkey (800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS20.COM $ Access Lawsuit Cash Now! $ As seen on TV.$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Oct 22 & 23rd 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model, or Year. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant O ffer: (888)420-3807 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDI Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 Four grave lots at Serenity Gardens. Lot 7A Section-Faith graves 3 & 4 $350 each. 623-9037 Movie Extras People needed NOW to stand in the background for a major film Earn up to $300 per day. Exp not REQ. CALL NOW AND SPEAK TO A LIVE PERSON (877)435-5877 Sawmills from only $3997-Make Money & Save Money with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/3 00N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N Install/Maint/RepairASE Master TechnicianFamily owned auto repair facility now hiring. Experience with electrical trouble shooting and engine drivability a must. Certifications required. $50K+, health & dental insurance. Please email resume to headmastertech@ gmail.com Web ID 34179160 Text FL79160 to 56654 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required *Immediate Jobs Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 SalesBusiness is Good and We are Expanding22 year old National Advertising Company is looking to Hire 1 Experienced Outside Sales Rep for Emerald Coast WEST surrounding areas. Earn $65,000 plus first year High Renewal rate/ Protected territory Training provided We need you Now! Call John (386) 752-2420 Resume t o: john.linton@rtui.comWeb ID34181053 Text FL81053 to 56654 Advertising that Works. Put your ad in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida for one LOW RATE! Call (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida-classifieds.co m Childless, young, successful woman seeks to adopt. Will provide loving home/doting grandma. Large extended family. Excellent support. Financial security. Expenses paid. Jessica or Adam. 1-800-790-5260. Bar#0150789 Cage Bird MenagerieParakeets, Canaries, Finches, Cages. Breeder supplies, toys, & gift boutique. 850-708-1536 Milton 5411 Pond View Off Berryhill October 14th & 15th Extra Wide medical equipment, power chair, seat lift recliner, XL and 5X womens clothes and misc. items Multi Family Oct 14 & 15 6546 Kennington Cir. 2 miles north of King Middle School Oct 15 8am until Multi Family Sale, Clothes & Misc Items 5451 Timber Creek Dr., Pace Yard Sale Sat. from 7-1. Treadle sewing machine, material, batting, dishes, what nots, antiques, table saw, 12 inch planer and more. 939 Avalon Blvd. 1 mile before Garcon toll bridge. Cancelled if rain. 10/831 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE : STARRS AUTO REPAIR INC gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 10/25/2011, 7:00 am at 8183 NAVARRE PKWY NAVARRE, F L 32566-6941, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. STARRS AUTO REPAIR INC reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 3C3AY75S75T362583 2005 CHRYSLER 10/12 10/831 10/835 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of WHAT A PANE STAINED GLASS CREATIONS located at 3522 Ashmore Lane in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Pace, Florida 32571 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 5 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) Sharron Ford Paris 10/12 10/835 10/836 To all persons claiming an interest in:1991 222-Islander 225-Baja Samuel E. Kirby will apply to SCDNR for title on watercraft/outboard motor. If you have any claim to the watercraft/outboard motor, contact SCDNR at (803) 734-3858. Upon thirty days after the date of the last advertisement if no claim of interest is made and the watercraft/outboard motor has not been reported stolen, SCDNR shall issue clear title. Case N o: 20110930950962 10/12, 19, 26 10/836 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Pleaseyour ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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LocalB12 | Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 4025 HWY 90 PACE850-995-8778 STORE HOURS: 7AM 9PM 7 DAYS AWEEK Sale prices good through October 12-18, 2011 12 13 14 15161718 MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT SUN Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses.Crystal Hot Sauce9912 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Greens8827 oz Gatorade Variety Pack 4598-20 oz S a l e O c t o b e r 1 2 O c t o b e r 1 8 2 0 1 1 Florida Juicy Sweet Tangerines1983 lb bag Pepsi35912 pk 12 oz Golden Flake Potato Chips27010.5-11 oz Nissin Ramen Noodles1036 3 oz Tide Liquid Detergent62050 oz Blue Ribbon Ham Steaks174lb IQF Tilapia Fillets14935 lb bag Conecuh Smoked Sausage29116 oz Farmland Reg or Pork & Bacon Roll Sausage17616 oz Hillshire Farms Ultra Thin Ham or Turkey2759 oz B-52 Ready to Cook Hot WIngs8995 lb bag Family Pack Ground Beef171lb Boston Butt Pork Roast133lb Family Pack Pork Steaks in Country Style Ribs161lb Ball Park Franks13816 oz Fresh Express Hearts of Romaine Salad22010 oz Farmland Tray Pack Hickory Smoked Bacon46524 oz Tennessee Pride Sausage Biscuits54910 pk Michigan Red or Golden Delicious Apples2383 lb bag Fresh Vine Ripe Tomatoes82lb Lipton Tea Bags18524 ct Folgers Coffee94133.9 oz Van Camp Baked Beans12628 oz Castleberry Brunswick Stew18624 oz Liberty Gold Pineapple468 oz Shurfine Vegetable Oil7341 gal Alpo Prime Cuts Dog Food70116 lb

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Wednesday October 12, 2011 FREE EDITION TAKE ONE PHOTOS BY AP PAnimal trainer Lauren Henry is seen with her dog, Spike, in North Vancouver, Canada. Henry trains hundreds of animals for TV and lm. DOGGIE d D IRECTIONLO O S ANGENGELEES (AP) Your mutt isnt destined to be a movie star, therapy dog, bomb-snifng expert, AKC champion or working K9? No worries. He or she can still be a well-behaved pet. A basic obedience class is one way to do it. But a little home-schooling can do wonders. Here, three veteran trainers share the rst ve or six things they think every dog should know. The rst is surprisingly simple. I am often amazed at how many animals do not know their names, said Lauren Henry, co-owner of Talented Animals, with ofces in California and Oregon. She trains hundreds of animals for TV and lm appearances every year and often teaches classes for other trainers and animal owners. They need to know their name so you can get their attention before the next command or bit of information. Dogs hear a lot of noise that they tune out, but when they hear their name they need to respond and look to the person for the rest of the information, she said. Here are some other commands, how-to behaviors and skills every dog should know, according to Henry and two other trainers Jaime Van Wye, who founded Zoom Room, a social petworking club with franchises across the country, and Ron Davis of Camarillo, Calif., a representative for Natural Balance Pet Foods known for his work with Tillman, his skateboarding English bulldog. Pay attention. Henry said this is the behavior on which I spend the most time with any new animal. If they are not paying attention, none of the other commands will matter. After name recognition, they need to learn to keep their attention on the person and not get quickly distracted. Come. The key is repetition and building up a strong reward history, letting the dog know good things happen when it comes, Van Wye said. Dont call them when you know they wont come and if you are mad at the dog and when he gets there you are going to scold him. Make sure good things happen when the dog comes when called. Henry said teaching a dog to come when called is the single biggest lifesaver. Come away from distractions (danger) and come quickly. Down and/or sit. You can keep your dog out of all sorts of trouble with these, Henry said. Keep them from jumping on someone, from chasing. Your dog cannot get into trouble if it is lying next to you. Leave it. It means stop paying attention to that, whatever that is, Van Wye said. We teach it early and start with food. The dog gets rewarded when they pay attention to us. It works with things dogs nd really distracting like other dogs, people, kids, bicycles, cars, cats, whatever the dog wants to pay attention to. Henry said teaching the dog to drop something also is vital if they have picked up something dangerous off the ground. Stay or wait. Teaching a dog to wait at a door when its being opened or wait in the vehicle when you open a car door and not bolt out is denitely critical for safety, Henry said. Stay is important, but most people dont get the stay well enough trained that they should ever trust it in a critical situation. A leash is much safer than relying on a stay. Van Wye also thinks teaching wait is better than stay. Wait is like a pause button. Im saying: Stop moving. You can go when I release you. Its good for in and out of doorways, in and out of cars so they dont run into trafc, if you put their food down. Stay is a more formal command. Wait is hold on a second. Go to bed. Van Wye put this at the top of her list. Its a boundary stay, she said. It works really well if you use a bath mat, an actual dog bed, some kind of hot spot. You tell the dog: You cant get off this. You can do circles, sit, lie down, stand up, turn around or do back ips. I dont care what you do, you just cant get off this. She added, Its a great command if you have more than one animal or if you have ordered pizza and dont want the dog on the table trying to steal it or have people over who dont like dogs. Lets go. This is not a formal heel but an informal loose leash, a command to walk next to me and dont pull on the leash, Van Wye said. I equate it to holding hands with a kid. You can smell, you can look, you can do your own thing as long as you respect that you are on a 6-foot leash and I dont want to have to be pulling you around. You are training for lifestyle more than obedience, Van Wye said. If you want to put the baby in a stroller and a leash on the dog and have coffee at Starbucks, you should be able to do it without the dog barking at people, pulling on the leash or causing a distraction, she said Socialization and play. I dont want a dog that will ght or be aggressive, Davis said. Socialization is greatly overlooked in the dog world. He added that owners should let dogs know when its a good time to play and when its not a good time to play. Playtime is when a dog can be a dog and have his fun, you can let him pounce and do all the things that dogs do. Swim. A dog should know how to swim so they dont panic in the water, Davis said.Sit! The most essential commands every dog should knowI am often amazed at how many animals do not know their names. They need to know their name so you can get their attention before the next command or bit of information. Dogs hear a lot of noise that they tune out, but when they hear their name they need to respond and look to the person for the rest of the information. Lauren Henry, co-owner of Talented Animals FREE

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A2 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ORONO, Maine (AP) The University of Maine is whooping it up in honor of the whoopie pie becoming the ofcial state treat. Students and staff are celebrating the designation Wednesday by creating a 4-foot-tall replica of Mount Katahdin out of 1,500 whoopie pies made from scratch by the universitys dining services bakers. The base of the display will use whoopie pies with blue frosting to replicate the Penobscot River. A variety of avors and colors pumpkin, chocolate chip, blueberry, and white cake with chocolate frosting lling will form the rest of Katahdin, which marks the northern end of the Appalachian Trail. A photo session and brief remarks are scheduled for Wednesday afternoon before pieces of the mountain are broken up and served to hungry students. ABoOVE, Sarah Haas, manager of Street Fare: The Boulder Shelter Bakery, ices cupcakes to be sold at the Boulder Farmers Market in the kitchen of the the Boulder Shelter for the Homeless in Boulder, Colo.APPecan pumpkin gingerbread whoopie pies in Concord, N.H. These whoopie pies have a praline cream cheese lling and edges that have been rolled in toasted chopped pecans. APUMaine celebrates whoopie pie serenity SweetBoulder bakery makes cupcakes, builds livesBBOULDEER, Colo. (AP) On a recent Tuesday, Sarah Haas set out recipes for six kinds of cupcakes, along with bowls and spoons, underneath a shelf of ingredients. The weeks selections were lemon lavender, carrot cake, banana honey mustard, vegan chocolate cake, red velvet and spinach berry. As Haas worked on a master batter that would serve as the base for several of the mini-cupcakes, her baking assistant started to work on the red velvet. I do like baking, Haas assistant said. They laughed at their rst efforts at red velvet. When we rst started, (the red velvet cupcakes) were terrible, Haas said. She nods at her assistant: Her experience got it right. That experience extends from baking red velvet cake with her mother as a child to baking every Tuesday afternoon at the Street Fare Bakery, a small business run from the Boulder Shelter for the Homeless. Haas baking assistant, who asked that her name not be used, is also a client of the shelter, living and working in its Transition program. Six different ways, we made them, she says of how she tested cupcakes with Haas. Hass adds: The secret was that the milk was soured with lemon juice and no soda. Haas assistant is one of nine people who work with her in the program, two in the Transition program and seven in the shelters Housing First program. They make and sell about 1,000 cupcakes a week, currently at the Boulder Farmers Market and through special orders. After the market closes for the season, Haas hopes to develop a catering business as well as sell the cupcakes at other seasonal markets. The program got started this year with a donation of food. Some ingredients, such as eggs, are donated, and Lolitas market gives $50 of ingredients a month, but otherwise the program is self-sufcient. Clients work 4 to 16 hours, as part of their service in exchange for living quarters, or they are paid in-kind with such things as bus passes or gift cards. A Boulder native, Haas began working in the shelter after graduating from college in 2008. She left to go to New York, where she worked in a cupcake bakery. She returned to Boulder and the shelter, where she started the program. Everyone has stories about food, memories of their family with food, Haas says. I had a friend tell me that theres a lot of richness you can get just from ... sharing food with someone, she says. On Tuesday, Haas baking assistant mixes red food coloring paste and boiling water. Sarah told me specically NOT to cook the eggs with the red dye, she says cocking an eyebrow at Haas, who smiles. Haas noted it might sound frivolous to be working on cupcakes at a homeless shelter. But, she adds: That relationship were forming and the work were doing, its kind of important. It lightens up dark and hard to swallow issues. It doesnt matter what youre doing to connect as long as youre working toward that connection. The connection is perhaps a little easier in a warm kitchen full of sweet aromas. When youre homeless, you dont have a kitchen and youre certainly not thinking about baking, Haas says. Her assistant has found her way to the kitchen after a difcult journey, starting with severe depression after her 18-year-old son committed suicide 10 years ago. Although she saw that he was in trouble and worked to get help for him, family disagreements and other issues prevented that from happening, she says. He was a good person who didnt get help when he was asking for help, she says. Now Im going through systems he should have been in. Now Im seeing places where he could have gotten help. Not everyone in the program bakes, Haas says. Shelter clients help with transportation and selling at the farmers market. Its neat to watch people who started at the beginning being timid and fearful, really taking control and being such a public gure, she says. One loyal market customer is Sarah White, a local addictions counselor. All these little cupcakes on stands drew me in, White says. White says she has watched how Haas worked with other market vendors to incorporate items such as local granola and herbs into the cupcakes. Im seeing how much this program has grown by connecting with other local vendors, to see how shes doing that ... the meaningful intention behind what she does, White said. It feels good to know shes probably putting that same energy into the programs and needs at the shelter.

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A3Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Wise Equipment Sales & Service1147 S. Ferdon Blvd. Crestview, FL 32536 (850) 682-3366 6512471 By Jennifer ForkerThe Associated Press Fairy gardens hidden beneath stout trees at botanical gardens, or proudly displayed on tabletops at garden centers and in homes are captivating the imaginations of children and adults, providing an escape into a tiny world. Young kids get caught up in the magic, industriously building homes for the fairies they believe are real. Older children enjoy working on the tiny scale: 2-inch plants and diminutive garden furniture. Adults enjoy the creativity, too. You see how real it is for the children, says Donni Webber of Long Beach, Calif. For the parent, it becomes real, too. It takes us all back into that magical time when it was all for real. Webber writes occasionally about fairy gardens on her blog, The Magic Onions. In a recent posting, she announced the winners of a fairy garden contest she sponsored, and posted more than a dozen images of the winning gardens. A fairy garden can be made in most anything an oak barrel, terracotta pot, even old luggage and basins. They also can be planted straight in the garden, on a patch of soil on a tree stump, or hidden beneath a bush. Melissa Michaels, who lives near Seattle, built a tabletop fairy garden in a wooden crate. A decorating consultant, she proudly displays it on her covered porch and on her blog, The Inspired Room. Meg Holloway, of Overland Park, Kan., builds fairy gardens with her 8-year-old daughter, Miranda. Besides creating and maintaining the gardens, the two enjoy hunting for tiny accessories at garage sales and thrift stores. It is very special Mommy time, Holloway says. I really love that. She and Miranda often hide their fairy gardens outside for others to nd. Little kids always notice, says Holloway. Adults always walk on by. The hide-and-seek appeal of fairy gardens has led some public gardens to encourage visitors to build fairy houses in out-ofthe-way spots. The Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay, Maine, for instance, provides two building sites along the shore and in the woods. What you notice a lot is the dads really get into it, says Acting Executive Director William Cullina. They like the construction, building things. So many fairy structures are built, that garden employees periodically go through and knock some down, Cullina said, returning the materials such as sticks, pine cones and rocks to the Gnome Depot. It gets kind of like suburbia after awhile, says Cullina. It sprawls we get fairy sprawl. The Coastal Maine gardens hold an annual fairy festival the rst week of August that draws thousands, says Cullina. Other gardens have a less formal arrangement. Webber and her two children leave simple stick houses, log tables and acorn dishes when they visit an arboretum in California. Other people who walk past and see it, were putting a little magic in their day, says Webber. Getting started is easy. Krystal Keistler-Hawley, area manager for Echters Greenhouse & Gardens in Arvada, Colo., teaches a class on indoor fairy gardens. She says any pot or aquarium will do, but shallow bowls with drainage work best. Use hardy plants with small leaves; herbs such as thyme and smallleaf basils work well, as do succulents, cacti, Irish moss and plants normally used for bonsai. Garden centers also sell miniature owering plants, such as African violets, cyclamen and fuschia. Fill your pot with lightweight, sterile potting soil, leaving space for watering. Mound the soil in places to mimic realistic terrain. Have four sizes of rock on hand for pathways and landscaping. KeistlerHawley recommends small gravel, aquarium rock, larger stones and rock collection specimens they make great boulders. She sinks her tiny owering plants into the soil still in their plastic pots so she can exchange them for all-year blooming. An indoor fairy garden needs light, like any other houseplant, so station it near a window. Its very much like doll houses for adults, says Keistler-Hawley. Its a way to create a mini world, have a visual escape from the day-to-day norm. Heather Fogg of Peoria, Ill., builds fairy gardens out of found objects, such as chipped metal basins and old dresser drawers, and uploads pictures of some of her nished gardens on Flickr. She scatters her mini-gardens among her outdoor gardens, hidden like I imagine fairies would accidentally be found. For children, making the furniture and accoutrements out of found objects is half the fun. But some adults prefer to buy their accessories, which they can do online and at garden centers and specialty shops. Two books offer inspiration: Fairy Houses of the Maine Coast (Down East Books, 2010) by Maureen Heffernan, which asserts that the recent fairy house-building craze began in Maine, and Fairy Houses and Beyond! (Light Beams Publishing, 2008) by Tracy and Barry Kane, which features photographs of elaborate fairy houses.Fairy gardens spark creativity in kids, adults too APThe Inspired Room shows a tabletop fairy garden created by Michaels. Michaels, a decorating consultant who lives near Seattle, created this garden using a wooden crate atop a side table she picked up at Lowes. She used both upright and creeping perennials and decorated the vignette with items picked up at her local garden center. After months on her covered porch, Michaels says the plants are still hardy. This photo shows a fairy garden yurt made from bark and feathers in the woods at the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay, Maine. Fairy Gardens can be grown in boxes and bowls atop tables or secreted outdoors beneath trees, bushes and larger-sized gardens. This photo shows a fairy garden in the woods at the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay, Maine.

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A4 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ANNOUNCING New StylistSPLITZ ENDZ 850-686-9000 10% Off Your First Visit With Chelsie Miley 6011592 Feathers"Call to schedule your appointment today!" PORTABLE CLASSROOM SEALED-BIDS AUCTIONSANTA ROSA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD SCHOOL SURPLUS The Santa Rosa County School Board has declared two portable classrooms surplus and bids for purchase are solicited from the public. These classrooms are located at Munson Elementary School, Munson, FL. They may be viewed and inspected by contacting the School Board's Surplus Warehouse at 850-983-5143 and making an appointment for access. Listed below are the dates available for inspection and bid submission.Dates: Inspection & Bid Submission Wednesday, October 12 through Tuesday, October 18,2011 Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. (weekdays only) Bid submission deadline: 3:00 p.m., October 18, 2011 Location: Administrative Support Complex 6544 Firehouse Rd, Bldg 7, Milton, Florida FOR MORE INFORMATION and SALE CONDITIONS CONTACT: Jesse De Leon Surplus Warehouse/Textbook Depository (850) 983-5143 or email: deleonj@mail.santarosa.k12..us Additional information may be obtained online at: www.santarosa.k12..us/surplus 6011626 By Sue ManningLOS ANGELES (AP) Shelter workers call it the Black  Dog  Syndrome: Black  dogs and cats are of ten the last to be adopted and the rst to be euthanized. There are no statistics, but theres plenty of anecdotal evidence and many possible explanations, ranging from superstitions like the notion that black cats are bad luck, to a simple logistical problem: Black animals are hard to photograph well, and are therefore hard to advertise. To combat the problem, shelters have come up with a variety of creative measures, from reducing adoption fees to improving the quality of the photos. Overwhelmingly, we hear from the shelter and rescue groups that b lack  dogs, especially the big black  dogs, and black cats take longer to get adopted, said Kim Saunders, vice president of shelter outreach for Petnder.com, the countrys largest online pet adoption database. Some have called B lack  Dog  Syndrome a hoax, but Inge Fricke, director of sheltering and pet care issues for the Humane Society of the United States in Washington, D.C., insists it is not a hoax. There is denitely anecdotal evidence. There havent been any denitive studies to absolutely prove that the phenomenon exists but it is something commonly accepted by shelter workers as truth. Some in the adoption business think there may s imply be more black  dogs and cats than animals of other colors. Others think the animals may be wrongly perceived as menacing. Mike Arms, president of the Helen Woodward Animal Center in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., blames part of it on typecasting. If you think of any movie with a mean, devil d og, its always a black  dog, and if you see a witch in a movie, they always have a black cat. Shelters will change lighting, use light colored blankets, and even dress the animals up to try to get better photos for websites, ads and iers, Fricke said. The easiest way to m ake a black  dog look friendly is to put it in a bright colored bandanna, Arms said. Who pictures a devil dog in a yellow bandanna? Photographer Seth Casteel of Little Friends Photo in Los Angeles says any shelter pet can pose a photo challenge, but black ones top the list. I hear about b lack  Dog  Syndrome all the time, said Casteel. A bad picture can make a pet look sick, mysterious or even ominous, he said. To photograph a b lack  dog or cat effectively, you want to capture personality, important physical traits and details and have the photo be in focus. The key is lighting and shutter speed, he said. For years, Casteel has spent at least a day a week volunteering at shelters across the country, taking pictures of available dogs and cats of all colors. He just launched a free, nationwide, nonprot program called Second Chance Photos to teach volunteers how to take good photos of shelter pets. Volunteers (amateurs are welcome) can sign up at secondchancephotos.org. The program also gives shelters some ideas on ways to raise money for cameras and photo editing software. Black pets should be photographed in the shade or on a cloudy day, not in direct sunlight, Casteel said. In the shade, the challenge is shutter speed. Your camera may respond by slowing down the shutter speed to achieve the proper exposure, resulting in a blurry photograph. To remedy this on a point-andshoot camera, change your setting to sports mode, which will give you a faster shutter speed and sharper photos, he said. You can also manually set the shutter speed to 1600, he said. With black  dogs, do your best to showcase their unique and positive personality. You can take the dog on a short run before the photo shoot so that he or she will pant, which looks like a smile, he suggested. A good photographer for shelter pets is worth his weight in gold, Saunders said. If you are thinking about adopting a dog, please dont o verlook black  dogs. They are every bit as wonderful as lighter colored dogs and make just as loving and faithful companions, said Alyce Russell, volunteer executive director of the Glendale Humane Society. Some shelters hold special adoption events for black pets, with incentives like lower adoption fees and two-for-one adoption days. They also make sure the animals are taken out of their cages to meet potential owners as a way of encouraging their adoption. At the Helen Woodward Center, they hold Me and My Shadow adoption specials when they get too many black kittens, waiving the fees when a black kitten is adopted with another kitten. Another simple way of getting black animals adopted is making sure people can get a good look at them. A dog or cat thats been abandoned or abused may cower, and if the animal is all black, it may be hard to see inside a cage. For years, many shelters stopped offering black cats for adoption around Halloween because some cats were being abused. But that thinking is changing. Applicants are screened better these days, the cats have microchips and too many cats might be missing out on good, forever homes, said Beth Chee at the Woodward center. Once we are sure that you are truly planning to make a lifelong commitment to a pet, we will accept your application, she said. We really encourage shelters and rescues not to stop promoting adoption of those pets at this time of year, Saunders said. On its website, the Oahu (Hawaii) Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals talks about Black  Dog  Syndrome and asks potential pet parents: Dont judge a pup by its color. Shelters combat Black Dog Syndrome APThis June 26, 2008 photo shows Hazel, a lab mix, in Los Angeles. Casteel spends at least one day a week volunteering at shelters across the country, taking pictures of available dogs and cats of all colors. APThis June 2008 photo shows Winston in Los Angeles. California bans cellphone use by train driversLOS ANGELES (AP) State regulators have banned California train drivers from using cellphones in the wake of a deadly Los Angeles crash blamed on texting. The California Public Utilities Commission on Thursday unanimously voted to ban use of cellphones, pagers, satellite phones and other personal electronic devices by rail transit personnel. It makes permanent an emergency ban already in place. Cameras will be placed in train operator cabs to enforce the ban. Federal regulators already have such a ban for national rails. The California ban extends that to regional lines such as the Bay Area Rapid Transit District, LA Metro and San Diego trolley. The ban was prompted by a 2008 head-on crash between a Metrolink commuter train and a freight train in Chatsworth. Twenty-ve people died and more than 100 were hurt. Travel BRIeEFsSYellowstone hits 3M summer visitors for 3rd year BIBILLIINGS, Mont. (AP) Yellowstone National Park administrators are reporting that more than 3 million people visited the park over the summer. That marks the third straight year the park has broken the 3 million visitor mark during the parks peak season from May through September. That was down just over 6 percent from last years record 3.3 million summer visitors. Park ofcials said the high numbers came despite snow and ice that lingered into May and several road closures caused by rockslides and avalanches. By comparison, the park recorded fewer than a quarter-million visitors last year from October to December. The nations rst national park, Yellowstone includes portions of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A5Wednesday, October 12, 2011 By Lee ReichFor The Associated Press With more forethought, Adam might not have bitten the apple and I might not have planted apple trees. But he did, and I did, and we each must deal with the consequences. For my part, I hadnt realized that apple trees had so many pest and disease problems until I planted 25 dwarfs. Sure, those problems can be fought with repeated sprays of pesticides. But with a little research and planning, an acceptable crop of high quality apples can be harvested using little or no pesticide.Insect thugsThe three major insect pests for apples are the apple maggot, plum curculio and codling moth. Apple maggots are the worst of the lot, dimpling fruits and riddling them with brown trails of burrowing larvae. Given free rein, they make almost every fruit too damaged to eat. Thankfully, the apple maggot has an Achilles heel. When this insect emerges as a y about six weeks after the trees have bloomed, the females search around for the biggest, reddest apples in which to lay eggs. Ms. Maggot can be hoodwinked with fake apples: red spheres coated with a sticky material called Tangletrap. Or with sacricial real apples: Buy the rmest, reddest Red Delicious you can nd, force a stiff wire through the core to hang the apple, and coat the fruit with Tangletrap. (Traps of real apples eventually rot, so usually need to be replaced once or twice a season.) One trap per dwarf tree, hung at head height in clear view, or four traps per full-size apple tree, should provide an irresistible enticement to the egg-laying apple maggot. Plum curculio, which is active during the six weeks immediately following bloom, can cause fruit to drop early. The traditional way to thwart it, effective if done diligently, is to spread an old sheet or dropcloth beneath each tree each morning, then give the tree or branches a sharp whack with a padded mallet. Curculios drop from the tree and play dead, at which point they can be gathered up and destroyed. Letting chickens forage beneath apple trees also offers some control. Spraying is another way to control curculio, but instead of the usual chemical pesticide sprays, use a spray derived from nothing more than kaolin clay. The material, marketed under the name Surround, leaves a white coating on the fruit. Build up a good, powdery base with three sprays just before trees bloom, then spray every seven to 10 days, or after heavy rains. The clay spray also thwarts codling moth, with its signature big, fat worm. This pest is active for much of the season, but even unchecked, affects only 25 percent of fruits.DiseaseThe three worst diseases aficting apple trees are re blight, cedar-apple rust and scab. A combination of strategies keeps damage within reasonable bounds. Fire blight disease blackens leaves as if they had been singed by re. The ends of young stems curl over in a characteristic shepherds crook. Cedar-apple rust defaces leaves, and sometimes fruits, with rusty-colored lesions. Certain pesticides control cedar apple rust, but spraying must begin before blossoms open. For myself, I choose to accept a certain amount of damage rather than suit up for an additional spray session. Apple scab results in corky brown lesions on fruits and leaves. Defense against scab begins in fall; smother fallen apple leaves the source of next years infections beneath a thick mulch of wood chips. You can also defuse leaves that fall on nearby grass by mowing thoroughly. Chopped, the leaves decompose quickly and are rendered harmless. Although apple insects have cosmopolitan tastes, disease organisms are nicky. So another way to control diseases is to plant one of the many disease-resistant varieties. One that I grow, Liberty, is resistant to all the major apple diseases. Even without paying particular attention to planting disease-resistant varieties, you can harvest a reasonably good yield of reasonably clean fruit using a combination of cleanup, limited spraying and traps. This is especially true in Western states, where some of these pest problems are less severe. Cosmetically, my fruits put on a poor show compared with the perfect apples you see in markets. But mine are pesticidefree, and the Macouns, Jonagolds, Spitzenbergs and other select varieties that I grow are simply scrumptious picked at their peaks of perfection. I hope Adams apple was as good. Some sources for traps and sprays are Gardeners Supply Co. (www.gardeners.com), GardensAlive! (www.gardensalive.com) and Gemplers (www.gemplers.com). Apples are tempting, and not just to us PHOTOS BY AP PThis photo shows a half of an apple with a codling moth inside of it in New Paltz, N.Y. The three major insect pests of apples are apple maggot, plum curculio and codling moth. Agriculture specialist John Machado, with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, spots a wooden crate that a pest had bore into at bottom right, during an inspection in Oakland, Calif. Dozens of foreign insects and plant diseases slipped undetected into the United States in the years after 9/11, when authorities were so focused on preventing another attack that they overlooked a pest explosion that threatened the quality of the nations food supply.

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A6 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ClassifiedsB10| Santa Rosas Press Gazette Wednesday, October 12, 2011 Dependable Housekeeper Over 20 years of experience! Ref. Available 995-0009 Dependable, hard working, honest woman looking for additional houses to clean in Milton & Pace area. 25 years experience. References available upon request. Prices vary. 850-626-0629 Need houses to clean Reasonable rates. Call for free estimate. Nancy 850-619-2891 Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)359-1690 COKERS LAWN & TRACTOR SERVICE From trimming to tractor work. Clean-ups, raking, hauling, mowing, bushhogging, dirt work. Reasonable rates, free estimates. (850) 623-0493 (850) 485-7977 Licensed & Insured Keep your autos resale value. Four seats cleaned with free fabric protection only $45. Carpets cleaned for $45 with free fabric protection as well. Slightly more for SUV. At your home or business. Auto, RVs, Call Frank at Home. Star Brite Carpet & Furniture Cleaning 463-8810 10/833 NOTICE O F SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a WRIT OF EXECUTION issued in the County Court of Santa Rosa County, Florida, on the 18th day of May, 2011 in the cause wherein OSI Funding Corp. was plaintiff and Kenneth O. Benton and Lisa M. Benton were defendants, being Case No. 572001SC1168 in said court, I Wendell Hall, As Sheriff of Santa Rosa County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title, and interest of the defendant, Kenneth O. Benton and to the following described personal property, to wit: DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY 2005 Mazda Tribute, VIN#: 4F2CZ06195KM24758, Color: Silver I shall offer this property for sale, at the east front door of the Santa Rosa Criminal Justice Facility, 5755 East Milton Rd, Milton, Florida, Santa Rosa County, Florida, at the hour of 10.00 a.m. on the 15th day of November, 2011 or as soon thereafter as possible. I will offer for sale all the said defendants, Kenneth O. Bentons, right, title and interest in the aforesaid personal property, at public auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above described execution. WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Rosie Rogers Rosie Rogers Deputy Sheriff IF YOU HAVE A DISABILITY REQUIRING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS OR TO ARRANGE TO VIEW THE PROPERTY, PLEASE CONTACT JANICE PLATT (850) 983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SALE DATE. 10/12, 19, 26, 11/2 10/833 10/832 NOTICE OF SALE Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on October 27, 2011 at 10 A.M. AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED 1997 DODGE VIN# 1B7FL26X1VS223225 Located at: 6141 HIGHWAY 90 WEST, MILTON, FL 32570 SANTA ROSA Any person(s) claiming any interest(s) in the above vehicles contact: Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc., (954) 920-6020 ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC # AB-0001256 10/12(1) 10/832 10/834 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Senior Assist Resources located at 6790 Ventura Blvd in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 6 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) CADDESK, Inc 10/12 10/834 10/821 PUBLIC SALE MISCELLANEOUS PERSONAL PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD TO SATISFY RENT LIEN ON October 25, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. UNIT WILL BE SHOWN JUST PRIOR TO BIDDING. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY BIDS. UNITS LISTED AS FOLLOWS: Unit; 69 John Aeppl: Chair, Tv, Boxes, Misc STORAGE MASTER 4636 WOODBINE RD PACE, FL 32571 10/5 & 10/12 10/821 10/837 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of DIG IT GEMS AND JEWELRY located at 6436 Robie Road Lot 36 in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Milton, Florida 32570 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 6 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) Samantha Rae Stewart 10/12 10/837

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Santa Rosa Free Press| A7Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ClassifiedsWednesday, October 12, 2011 Santa Rosas Press Gazette |B11 We Deliver & Install Call us first, Save Time Call us last, Save MoneyHwy. 87 So. Milton8600311 HYDROSEED Centipede St. Augustine BermudaBailed Pine Straw See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldnt you like a job where you can build something, including a better future? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 LET'S GO CAMPING! Conecuh Villagein Range, Alabama has a spot for you! Full hook-ups for campers, an eleven bed bunk house (everything furnished, just bring food), free fire wood and tent sites. 623-8415, 382-4147 or 251-248-2086 9.5 Polythylene Water Tender 5hp. Tohotsu Motor Great White Trolling Motor. Numerous extras. $1900 Call 623-3737 Bank Foreclosure! Florida Waterfront Condos! SW Coast! Brand new upscale 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,675sf condo. Only $179,900! (Similar unit sold for $399,900) Prime downtown location on the water! Buy & get $8,000 in flex money for a limited time. Call now (877)888-7571, X63 GA Land Sale 69 AC $995/AC Will not divide. Other tracts available. Visit our website. stregispaper.com (478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co. One Day Only Oct. 22. New lake property release. Offered at up to 60% below market value! Lakefront land on private mountain lake only 1 hr from Atlanta! Lake living from $49,900. 1.5 to 5 acre homesites available. Call (877)535-3307 or www.livelaceola.com. Clean 3 BR/2 Ba CH&A All Elec., Garbage furn. $550mo/$300 Dep. or 2 BR/2 Ba CH&A All Elec. $475mo/$ 300 dep. No Pets 675-6614 QUIET PARK -Like new. 2/2. No pets. Non-smoking environment. Garbage & sewer included. $545 + dep. 626-1552 Loxley, AL For sale by owner beautiful cedar home, 2br/2ba, country atmosphere, city living. 5 min from I-10. Pecan trees, beautifully landscaped, large workshop and garden area. 3/4 acre fenced lot with large porches. Moving. Must see to appreciate. $110,000. 251-964-2511 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Clean/private 1 acre 3/2 5324 Hamilton Brdg. Rd. garbage p/u Non-smoking environment No Pets. $950 mth/$800dep. 572-2454 Milton Roommate Wanted $345/mo.-incl. utilities plus cable. Cleanliness Required! Call Terry @ 850-983-4193 day or 850-272-0777 evenings 2 Br/1 Ba with Florida room on corner lot. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch. 626-8973 2 Br/2 Ba on Avalon Blvd. 626-8973 3 FEMA mobile home 3 Br/1 Ba, totaL elec., fenced yard with storage shed. $500 mth. East Gate Mobile Home Ranch 626-8973 Doublewide 1600 sq. ft. 3 Br/2Ba fenced yard. $650 mth/$600 security. Or for sale for $59,900 Owner financing. Milton. Call Barbara Cumbie at 850-626-8959 or 850-377-6787 After school care for 2 year old. Need own transportation. References required. From 1-5 p.m. Weekdays only. 850-626-0134 Drivers -Need 13 Good Drivers Top 5% Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com 6 Figure Income 100,000 RX Discount Cards Placed in 80 Pharmacy Locations @.03 each. You earn $1.50 for each new prescription & $.75 for refills. Accumulating residual i ncome. (877)308-7959 Ext.231 www.freerxadvantage.com Money Making Opportunity Computer a must. Free evaluation & training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939 Think Christmas, Start Now! Own a Red Hot! Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox Or Discount Party Store From $51,900 Worldwide! 100% T urnkey (800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS20.COM $ Access Lawsuit Cash Now! $ As seen on TV.$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Oct 22 & 23rd 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model, or Year. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant O ffer: (888)420-3807 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDI Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 Four grave lots at Serenity Gardens. Lot 7A Section-Faith graves 3 & 4 $350 each. 623-9037 Movie Extras People needed NOW to stand in the background for a major film Earn up to $300 per day. Exp not REQ. CALL NOW AND SPEAK TO A LIVE PERSON (877)435-5877 Sawmills from only $3997-Make Money & Save Money with your own bandmill-Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/3 00N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N Install/Maint/RepairASE Master TechnicianFamily owned auto repair facility now hiring. Experience with electrical trouble shooting and engine drivability a must. Certifications required. $50K+, health & dental insurance. Please email resume to headmastertech@ gmail.com Web ID 34179160 Text FL79160 to 56654 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required *Immediate Jobs Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 SalesBusiness is Good and We are Expanding22 year old National Advertising Company is looking to Hire 1 Experienced Outside Sales Rep for Emerald Coast WEST surrounding areas. Earn $65,000 plus first year High Renewal rate/ Protected territory Training provided We need you Now! Call John (386) 752-2420 Resume t o: john.linton@rtui.comWeb ID34181053 Text FL81053 to 56654 Advertising that Works. Put your ad in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida for one LOW RATE! Call (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida-classifieds.co m Childless, young, successful woman seeks to adopt. Will provide loving home/doting grandma. Large extended family. Excellent support. Financial security. Expenses paid. Jessica or Adam. 1-800-790-5260. Bar#0150789 Cage Bird MenagerieParakeets, Canaries, Finches, Cages. Breeder supplies, toys, & gift boutique. 850-708-1536 Milton 5411 Pond View Off Berryhill October 14th & 15th Extra Wide medical equipment, power chair, seat lift recliner, XL and 5X womens clothes and misc. items Multi Family Oct 14 & 15 6546 Kennington Cir. 2 miles north of King Middle School Oct 15 8am until Multi Family Sale, Clothes & Misc Items 5451 Timber Creek Dr., Pace Yard Sale Sat. from 7-1. Treadle sewing machine, material, batting, dishes, what nots, antiques, table saw, 12 inch planer and more. 939 Avalon Blvd. 1 mile before Garcon toll bridge. Cancelled if rain. 10/831 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE : STARRS AUTO REPAIR INC gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 10/25/2011, 7:00 am at 8183 NAVARRE PKWY NAVARRE, F L 32566-6941, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. STARRS AUTO REPAIR INC reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 3C3AY75S75T362583 2005 CHRYSLER 10/12 10/831 10/835 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of WHAT A PANE STAINED GLASS CREATIONS located at 3522 Ashmore Lane in the County of Santa Rosa, in the City of Pace, Florida 32571 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Milton, Florida, this 5 day of October, 2011. (NAME OF OWNER OR CORPORATION) Sharron Ford Paris 10/12 10/835 10/836 To all persons claiming an interest in:1991 222-Islander 225-Baja Samuel E. Kirby will apply to SCDNR for title on watercraft/outboard motor. If you have any claim to the watercraft/outboard motor, contact SCDNR at (803) 734-3858. Upon thirty days after the date of the last advertisement if no claim of interest is made and the watercraft/outboard motor has not been reported stolen, SCDNR shall issue clear title. Case N o: 20110930950962 10/12, 19, 26 10/836 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Pleaseyour ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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A8 | Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday, October 12, 2011 4025 HWY 90 PACE850-995-8778 STORE HOURS: 7AM 9PM 7 DAYS AWEEK Sale prices good through October 12-18, 2011 12 13 14 15161718 MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT SUN Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses.Crystal Hot Sauce9912 oz Margaret Holmes Seasoned Greens8827 oz Gatorade Variety Pack 4598-20 oz S a l e O c t o b e r 1 2 O c t o b e r 1 8 2 0 1 1 Florida Juicy Sweet Tangerines1983 lb bag Pepsi35912 pk 12 oz Golden Flake Potato Chips27010.5-11 oz Nissin Ramen Noodles1036 3 oz Tide Liquid Detergent62050 oz Blue Ribbon Ham Steaks174lb IQF Tilapia Fillets14935 lb bag Conecuh Smoked Sausage29116 oz Farmland Reg or Pork & Bacon Roll Sausage17616 oz Hillshire Farms Ultra Thin Ham or Turkey2759 oz B-52 Ready to Cook Hot WIngs8995 lb bag Family Pack Ground Beef171lb Boston Butt Pork Roast133lb Family Pack Pork Steaks in Country Style Ribs161lb Ball Park Franks13816 oz Fresh Express Hearts of Romaine Salad22010 oz Farmland Tray Pack Hickory Smoked Bacon46524 oz Tennessee Pride Sausage Biscuits54910 pk Michigan Red or Golden Delicious Apples2383 lb bag Fresh Vine Ripe Tomatoes82lb Lipton Tea Bags18524 ct Folgers Coffee94133.9 oz Van Camp Baked Beans12628 oz Castleberry Brunswick Stew18624 oz Liberty Gold Pineapple468 oz Shurfine Vegetable Oil7341 gal Alpo Prime Cuts Dog Food70116 lb