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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00689
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Publication Date: 07-06-2011
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00689
 Related Items
Preceded by: Milton press gazette

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Wednesday, July6,2011 Find breaking news at www.srpressgazette.com 75cents





Garcon Point to remain open


By Bill Gamblin
news@srpressgazette.com
The Garcon Point Bridge
is not looking to close any-
time soon, but the state is
not rushing to the aid of the
financially troubled bridge
which connects Garcon
Point to Tiger Point with a


3.5 mile span.
Thursday, Florida De-
partment of Transportation
(FDOT) Secretary Ananth
Prasad announced there
will be no state bailout of the
financially ailing Santa Rosa
Bay (Garcon Point) Bridge.
"Make no mistake,
we will not bailout this


investment by the bond-
holders," Prasad said.
"However, let me be clear:
FDOT will continue to safe-
ly operate and maintain the
Garcon Point Bridge."
The struggles of this
bridge have been well-
publicized of late as it was
known the Santa Rosa Bay


Bridge Authority did not
have the funds to make the
July 1 bond payment.
In April, the Bank of New
York Mellon issued a notice
of default to the SRBBA and
its attorney Roy Andrews.
The letter noted that the
SRBBA trustee withdrew
$230,396.99 from the reserve


account to pay the Jan. 1 3.8 perce
debt service payment. 2010.
This withdrawal resulted The S]
in a deficiency and should ingissues
have been replenished in as it does
12 monthly payments to re- board me
plenish the amount taken. quorum 1
The troubled bridge, has business.
seen traffic decrease by
3.9 percent and revenue See (


nt in fiscal year
RBBA is also hav-
with its meetings,
not have enough
embers to have a
to conduct board


GARCON A6


SCHOOL PRAYER DISPUTE



Resolution nears


By Katie Tommen
Florida Freedom Newspapers
The legal battles over
religion's place in Santa
Rosa County Schools could
be nearing an end.
After several weeks of
discussions, the parties in-
volved in the present and
previous lawsuits have
reached a tentative agree-
ment that could enable
them to settle the case with-
out a trial.
"This litigation has cer-
tainly been a distraction for
us, as it occupies an inor-
dinate amount of time that
we feel like would be best
served providing education-
al services to our students,"
said Santa Rosa County Su-
perintendent of Schools Tim
Wyrosdick. "Now we can
move forward with peace
being made between the
ACLU and Liberty Counsel.
I feel like we are no longer
the battleground between
the two."
The American Civil Lib-
erties Union filed the first
lawsuit against the school
district in August 2008 on be-
half of two Pace High School
students who claimed that
religion was being forced
on them at school. The case
ended the following May


when the school district
signed a consent decree in
which it agreed to stop reli-
gious promotion.
About a month later the
Liberty Counsel, on behalf
of Christian Educators As-
sociation International, filed
a motion to intervene in the
case, but a federal judge in
Pensacola struck it down.
The Liberty Counsel took
that case to the llth Circuit
U.S. Court of Appeals in At-
lanta, where it is pending.
Then in May 2010, the
Liberty Counsel sued the
school district on behalf of
two dozen students, teach-
ers, parents and commu-
nity leaders. The lawsuit
claimed the consent decree
that ended original lawsuit
violated their First and 14th
Amendment rights. That
case was set for trial later
this month.
To date, the school
district has spent almost
$400,000 in legal fees on the
prayer issue.
Under the proposed res-
olution, parts of the origi-
nal consent decree would
be modified to remove any
confusion about what is and
is not permitted. Also, all
pending lawsuits would be
See PRAYER A6


County administrators to

be graded in 2012-13


By Mathew Pellegrino
mpellegrino @srpressgazette.com
As teachers prepare for
their new evaluations, ad-
ministrators have a tough
road ahead, as well. The dis-
trict is implementing new
administrative evaluations.
Per a state mandate, these
evaluations must be in place
by the 2012-13 school year.
Much like the teacher
evaluations, administrators
will have 50 percent of their
evaluation score based on
student test scores. Prin-


cipals at schools will have
their scores based on the
average grade of their
student's FCAT and end-
of-course exam scores.
Administrators, assistant
superintendents for the dis-
trict, the community school
director, and the director
of workforce education will
all have 50 percent of their
grade based on district-wide
school grade averages.
Other administrators
will have a more complex
See GRADED A6


Jim Fletcher
Publisher
623-2120
news @srpressgazette.com


SPrinted on
recycled
paper


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Opinion ................................ ...... A4
Faith........................................... A5


Sports............................... ... A8
Lifestyle ........................................ B1
Classifieds..................................... B4


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A2 I Santa Rosa's Press Gazette


Local


Wednesday, July 6, 2011


East Milton HONOR ROLL 4TH WEEKS


"A" HONOR ROLL
1ST GRADE
David Bell, Angelica
Guimond, Kyrsten Jackson,
Chloe Malicoat, Kya Petitt,
Ashly Crumel, Savannah
Harper, Jazmin Kowalski,
Coy Lackey, Triniti Ard,
Kamiya McShane, Brandon
Thrasher, Logan Helton,
Nick Booker, Shaliyah
Dunn, Megan Galloway,
Jake Orren, Morris Smith,
Kiersten West, Makayla
Elliott, Sajah Benton,
AngeliqueTaylor, Morgan
Ashley, Xander Barnette,
Caden Barnes, Gracie
Collins, Brianna Nolan

2ND GRADE
Devon Ronnlof, Bailie
Droweinga, Raja Leach,
Dominic Lucas, Destiny
Ross, Hunter Cline, Riley
Poggi, Sophie Richards,
Timothy Rogers, Curry
Silcox, Sharie James

3RD GRADE
Jackob Braun, Jasmine
Nowling, Rae O'Ceallaigh,


Brianna Ward, Ashlee
Wilson, Makayla Martin,
Makayla Wallace, Erin
Brown, Sawyer Joiner,
Imani Lewis, Cansis Goebel,
Aidan Grundin, Brae
Phillips, Zaphanae Vargas,
Jack Hensel, Ava Waldrop,
Katelyn Arland, Callie Black,
Luke Boothe, Jadyn Davis,
Bryan Hyler, Sarina Petitt,
Nichole McMinn, Makayla
Martin, Makayla Wallace

4TH GRADE
Daniel Williams, Kendall
Allen, Joel Washington,
Niaya Wells, Taylor
Downing, Gage Burney,
Chandler Mathews,
Nickolas Cuevas,

5TH GRADE
Michayla Galloway,
Cheyane McCoy, Ales-
sandra Rogers, Cameron
Stearns, Dylan Kimmons,
Katy Hedrick, Kristian Goe-
bel, Jerrett Stapleton, Lacey
Holmes, Kimberly Rogers,
Tyrone Smith, Kayla Cash,
Makayla Greene, Nick
Hensel, Daniel Jarvis, Jacori


Johnson, Bailey Phillips, Em-
ily Richards, Chase Sivley,
Patrick Kiley, Isabelle Per-
rone, Kyndal Vise, Meghan
Gomillion, Amber Rolin


"A/B" HONOR ROLL
1ST GRADE
Jayden Fink, Isabella
Warihay, Rebecca Cannon,
Ryeann Pollard, Alexander
Lavinder, Jordan Baggish,
Chedrick Carnegia, Chloe
Chipley, Sara Ramey,
Jaylen Snellgrove, Devon
Wendell, Daniel Winfield,
Dakota Fuller, Destinee Bell,
Coralin Perrone, Maddix
Hicks, Julie Lawson, Tiffany
Blacketer, Justin Barber,
Jacob Nail, Nathaniel Gid-
dings, Isabelle Alli, Juan
Guerra, Cydney Maynard,
Zachary Blodgett, Kaitlyn
Greenhalgh, Coleton Hen-
derson, January Hughes,
Charles Lowery, Chris-
topher Whiddon, Hale
Wood, Tres Clamp, Jillian
Davis, Zeriona Flores, Justin
Frazier, CJ Holmes, Chloe
Lake, Garrett White


2ND GRADE
Lauren Bishop, Caleb
Braxton, Shanya Dukes,
Makenzie Elliott, Kami
Harrison, McKenzie Leathers,
Holly Nance, Kyleigh
Peterson, Hunter Schmidt,
Chloe West, Isaac Black,
Za'Khia Carter-Dixon, Ella
Easley, Faith Ganus, Sammy
Grosjean, Lynnsey Holzapfel,
Clayton Johnmeyer, Kyla
Shannon, Hunter Black,
Alexis Hartmann, Madison
Leathers, Kyler Morris,
Camille Ramey, Brianna
Wells, Garrett Peters, Austin
Porter, Seth Spaagaren, JC
Wilson, Phillip Alexander,
Lane Cain, Landon
McCauley, Elise Cason,
Matthew Williamson

3RD GRADE
Sara Busbee, Pehton
Parker, Callie Black, Luke
Boothe, Jadyn Davis, Bryan
Hyler, Sarina Petitt, Nichole
McMinn, Lee Battle,
Cameron Hyde, Keiontae
Johnson, Colton Joiner,
Duncan Pardue, Kaitlynn
Lowe, Austin Watson,


Keifer O'Connor, Garrett
Allen, Jordan Bishop,
Kristian Germain, Danielle
Harris, Brandon Helms,
Joe Rowland, Makayla
Arland, Mason Cline,
Malia Hall, Benji Harris,
Brent Hoeser, Kaylynn
Richburg, Cameron Brewer,
Zachary Braun, Christopher
Gomillion, Tajavion Allen,
Carthon Bell, Bruce Carter,
Henry Lowery, Nevaeh
Petitt, Adreyan Pierce, Tyla
Clark

4TH GRADE
Fred McKenzie,
Cameron Popely, Bethany
Johnmeyer, Oaklee Riley,
Emieigh Keener, Kelsey
Dyal, Drew Allen, Izzy
Evan, Kasey Hoyland, Chris
Kingry, Myles Manning,
Caleb Shelton, Ashley
Babcock, Nikki Beckjorden,
Tristan Bradshaw, Chris
Brown, Danielle Carter,
Cheyenne Edge, Justin
McCauley, Christy O'Neal,
Tyler Smith, Blake Turner,
Dakota Eddins, Callie
Ganus, Jonathan Moore,


Sierra Pollard, Richard
Walther, Nicky Wells,
Jadia Danks, Marquise
McRoy, Jordan Harris, Ricky
Richburg, Jordan Williams

5TH GRADE
Zeke Grosjean, Maegan
Williams, Charles Barnes,
Brooklyn Blackwell, Alexis
Hamilton, McKenzie
Murphy, Grant Powell,
Daniel Diaz, Austin Eddings,
Briana Lowery, Kaysandra
Mann, Cayla McCoy,
Liseth Medina, Nicholas
Rodrigues, Andre Russell,
Jessica Slaton, Skyler Speck,
Ireland McDowell, Savana
McGowin, Rylee Porter,
Monica Roberson, Zachary
Stokes, Alexis Bryant,
Hayley Cauley, Branden
Goebel, Briana Mills, Jack
Orren, Allanah Simmons,
Bethany Black, Zach Mann,
Haley Reynolds, Melissa
Cronce, lan Harris, Zander
Majors, Christian Coates,
Kimberly McCranie, Heather
Hinkle, Ranayshia Mitchell,
Tommy Whitman, Dustin
Crane, Devin Sanders


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on Facebook,
or tweet us @
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District working to secure tablet policy


By Mathew Pellegrino
mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com

Following a purchase
of 90 Apple iPad 2's for
their administrators,
the Santa Rosa County
School District is work-
ing quickly to initiate
an electronic tablet
policy agreement that
will attempt to restrict
personal use on the tab-
lets.
"Board property is
not for personal use
and will not be for per-
sonal use, I just want to
make that clear," super-
intendent Tim Wyros-
dick said at the June 23
school board meeting.


All 86 administrators
will begin training with
the iPad 2's sometime
at the end of June or
early July according to
Vicki Beagle, director of
in-service and instruc-
tional technology with
the district.
"It is important we
implement this policy
before they become a
part of our school prop-
erty," Wyrosdick said.
The $45,000 worth of
iPads will be used to as-
sist administrators in
evaluating teachers in
conjunction with a pi-
lot teacher evaluation
method the district will
be using starting in the


2011-12 school year.
Beagle said the
district chose to pur-
chase the iPads mainly
because the program
that they use to evalu-
ate teachers can be ac-
cessed directly through
the tablet. The district
teamed up with a Salt
Lake City company
called TrueNorthLogic
that has an application
that can be accessed
through the iPad that
administrators could
use to keep track of
teacher evaluations.
Fifty percent of a
teacher's evaluation
will be based on admin-
istrator observations.


Elected OFFICIALS


COUNTY GOVERNMENT
COUNTY COMMISSION
* District 1: Jim Williamson, 4351 Berryhill
Road, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail is
comm-williamson@santarosa.fl.gov
* District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Road,
Milton, FL 32583; phone 983-1877. E-mail is
comm-cole@santarosa.fl.gov
* District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla
Highway, Pace, FL 32571; phone 983-1877. E-mail
is comm-salter@santarosa.fl.gov
* District 4: Jim Melvin, 6495 Caroline St.,
Milton, FL; phone 983-1877. E-mail is comm-
melvin@santarosa.fl.gov
* District 5: Lane Lynchard, 6495 Caroline
St., Milton, FL 32570; phone 983-1877. E-mail is
comm-lynchard@santarosa.fl.gov
The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at
9 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays. The
leaders meet in committee at 9 a.m. Monday
preceding the Thursday meetings. Meetings are
held in commission chambers of the Administrative
Complex on U.S. 90. Phone 983-1877 for
information or to reach their offices.

STATE GOVERNMENT
* Rep. Doug Broxson: 2990-C Gulf Breeze
Parkway, Gulf Breeze, FL 32563, phone 916-
5436. E-mail is Doug.Broxson@myfloridahouse.
gov
* Sen. Greg Evers: 5334 Willing St., Milton,
FL 32570, phone 983-5550. E-mail is Evers.Greg.


S02@flsenate.gov
* Gov. Rick Scott: PL05 The Capitol, 400 S.
Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; phone 488-
4441. E-mail is fl_governor@myflorida.com

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
* Rep. Jeff Miller: 2439 Rayburn House Office
Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; local phone is
479-1183; D.C. Office phone (202) 225-4136.
Pensacola office address: 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite
13, Pensacola, FL 32503. Toll free number is 866-
367-1614. Website: http://jeffmiller.house.gov

SENATE
* Sen. Marco Rubio: B40A Dirksen Senate
Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone
202-224-3041; fax 202-228-0285.
* Sen. Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Senate
Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; phone
202-224-5274; fax 202-224-8022 Website:
http://billnelson.senate.gov

WHITE HOUSE
* President Barack Obama: The White House,
1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500;
phone 202-456-1414. E-mail is president@
whitehouse.gov
* Vice President Joe Biden: Office of the Vice
President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.,
Washington, D.C. 20500; phone 202-456-1414.


SCHOOL GOVERNMENT
SCHOOL BOARD
* Superintendent: Tim Wyrosdick, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL
32570; phone 983-5000. E-mail is wyrosdickt@mail.santarosa.
kl2.fl.us
* District 1: Diane Scott, 5710 Munson Highway, Milton, FL
32570; phone 983-0413. E-mail is scottdl@mail.santarosa.kl2.
fl.us
* District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton, FL
32570; phone 623-6299. E-mail is winkleseh@mail.santarosa.
k12.fl.us
* District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre, FL
32566; phone 939-2661. E-mail is colemanmd@mail.santarosa.
k12.fl.us
* District 4: JoAnn Simpson, 5059 Faircloth St., Pace, FL
32571; phone 994-5446. E-mail is simpsonjj@mai.santarosa.
k12.fl.us
* District 5: Scott Peden, 3156 Pins Lane, Gulf Breeze, FL
32563; phone 934-0701. E-mail is pedenst@mail.santarosa.kl2.
fl.us
The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. the
second and fourth Thursdays at 5086 Canal St., in Milton. The
Santa Rosa School Board phone is 983-5000.

CITY GOVERNMENT
*Milton City Hall, Mayor Guy Thompson, 6738 Dixon St., Milton,
FL 32570, phone 983-5400. City Manager is Brian Watkins
* Town of Jay, Mayor Kurvin Quails, 3822 Highway 4, Jay, FL
32565, phone 675-2719
* Gulf Breeze City Hall, Mayor Beverly Zimmern, 1070 Shoreline
Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, phone 934-5100. City Manager is
Edwin "Buz" Eddy


0
Santa Rosa's Press Gazette
6629 Elva St. Milton, FL 32570
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
All offices ................. 850-623-2120
Classifieds ................ 850-623-2120
Editorial Fax .............. 850-623-9308
All other faxes ........... 850-623-2007

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year(in county) ......................... $39
Sixmonths(in county).................$19.50
13weeks (in county)....................$9.75
One year(outof county) ...................$62
Sixmonths(outofcounty).................$31
13weeks(outof county)..............$15.50
Senior Citizen (over 62)
Oneyear (incounty)........................ $32
Sixmonths(incounty)...................... 16
13weeks (incounty)......................... $8
Home delivery subscribers may be
charged a higher rate for holiday editions.


Jim Fletcher
Publisher
850-393-3654
jfletcher@srpressgazette.com

Carol Barnes
Office Manager
850-623-2120
cbarnes@srpressgazette.com


Miss a paper?
Circulation
Jim Fletcher
850-623-2120

Want to subscribe?
850-623-2120

To buy back issues
850-623-2120

To place a classified ad
850-623-2120


Bill Gamblin
Editor
850-377-4611
bgamblin@srpressgazette.com

Debbie Coon
Field Service Rep.
850-393-3666
dcoon@srpressgazette.com

AT YOUR SERVICE
To buy a display ad To get news in the paper
Debbie Coon Bill Gamblin
850-623-2120 850-623-2120 or 850-377-4611
E-mail: news@srpressgazette.com
To buy a photograph Short items: news@srpressgazette.com
850-623-2120
Church News:
Internet church@srpressgazette.com
www.srpressgazette.com
Weddings, engagements
Office Hours and anniversaries:
8 a.m. to 5 p.m., news@srpressgazette.com
Monday through Friday
Sports: sports@srpressgazette.com


COPYRIGHT NOTICE and cannot be reproduced in any form
* The entire contents of Santa Rosa's for any purpose, without prior, written
Press Gazette, including its logotype, are permission from Santa Rosa's Press
fully protected by copyright and registry Gazette.


* Santa Rosa's Press Gazette (USPS
604-360) is published twice weekly
on Wednesday and Saturdays for $39
per year (in county) by Florida Freedom


Newspapers Inc. Periodicals postage paid at
Milton, Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to: Santa Rosa's Press Gazette,
6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570.


::,X *


Speak OUT


Friday, 3:04 p.m.
Hi, I am busy watching the wedding of the Prince
of Monaco and his beautiful new wife. Everything is
so lovely; the ceremony is lovely; and the family is
lovely. I can imagine Grace Kelly and Prince Ranier
looking down and smiling because of how beautiful
everything is. America needs to quit watching the
bad news. Watch the good news, and be happy. This
is Maria with happy news for the Santa Rosa Press
Gazette.

Friday, 10:57 a.m.
Yeah, how does a sexual predator get to go to jail
for 90 days and have it postponed until he gets out of
college after the first semester? Then, instead of 90
days, he is in jail for only 30 days and then released.
What kind of system do we have here?

Thursday, 8:34 a.m.
Hi this is Judy. Is Michelle Obama trying to out-
spend her husband by taking a one-week vacation
to South Africa, which costs the taxpayers over
$700,000? Is this why her husband is wanting to raise
our taxes so they can take more trips.

If you have a short comment you would like to
make, call the Speak Out line at 623-5887.


SANTA ROSA'S PRESS GAZETTE STAFF


~YI






Wednesday, July 6, 2011


Local


Santa Rosa's Press Gazette I A3


DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION - THREE RIVERS CHAPTER


PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE PRESS GAZETTE
Left, seated are Janice Malone, 2nd Vice Regent; Barbara Makant, State Regent; Rosa Seymour, Chapter Regent; Suzanne Terry, Vice Regent; Melanie McKenney,
Chaplain Standing are Gail Allred, Librarian; Pam Koleck, Historian; Frances Williams, Registrar; Cheryl Kelley, Treasurer; Ann Wallace, Corresponding Secretary.
Right, Rosa Seymour, Regent; Mary Grace Reeves; and Janice Malone, Vice Regent.



Group holds annual meeting in Bagdad


Special to the Press Gazette
The Daughters of the
American Revolution, Three
Rivers Chapter held its An-
nual Meeting in May at the
Bagdad United Methodist
church in Bagdad, Fla.
Members participating
in the ritual were Melanie
McKenney, Chaplain; Rosa
Seymour, Regent; Linda
Smith soloist; Mary Ellen
Shugart, Chairman of the
Flag of the United States of
America; Gail Allred, His-
torian; Cheryl Kelley, Trea-
surer; Cheryl Nugent; Jan-
ice Malone, Vice Regent;
and Frances Williams,
Membership Chairman.
State Regent, Barbara
Makant of Tallahasse was
their honored guest and
installed the new Chap-
ter Officers for 2011-2013.
The new officers are Rosa
Seymour, Regent; Susan
Terry, Vice Regent; Janice
Malone, 2nd Vice Regent;
Melanie McKenney,


-.
Joyce Nichols,
A.R.N.P.


State Regent, Barbara Makant; Deonia Copeland, Rosa Seymour (behind podium) Tina Ervin, and Sophia Freeman.


Chaplain; Sue Lundin, Re-
cording Secretary; Ann Wal-
lace, Organizing Secretary;
Cheryl Kelly, Treasurer;
Frances Williams, Regis-
trar; Pam Koleck, Historian;
and Gail Allred, Librarian.


State Regent Makant also
inducted three new Chapter
Members who are Sophia
Freeman, Deonia Copeland,
and Tina Ervin.
Elaine McDaniel re-
ceived a certificate from the


State Registrar for proving
a new Patriot this year.
Regent Rosa Seymour,
presented the Chapter's
Community Service to
Mary-Grace R. Reeves.
Reeves was chosen


because of her outstanding
service to the community.
In August 2008, Reeves at
13 years of age initiated
a youth literacy program
called the American Girl
Book Club for girls ages 7 to
14 in Pensacola. As a library
volunteer, Reeves noticed a
void in programs targeting
young girls. Because the
library was understaffed,
Reeves volunteered to
create the American Girls
Book Club.
Reeves demonstrates
determination and leader-
ship. By securing com-
munity grants, members
are loaned the "book of the
month" from the Ameri-
can Girl series. After the
meetings, the books are do-
nated to Ronald McDonald
House. Reeves develops
a "curriculum" relating to
the assigned book's period
of American History, often


A "




Joshua Davis, M.D.
Family Medicine


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* Same Day Appointments
and Walk-Ins Welcome
* Open Weekdays
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* Saturday
7 a.m. to 2 p.m.
* 30+ Years Experience
in Pace


Pat Hill,
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introducing guests with
artifacts from America's
past. In two and one-half
years, the American Girl
Book Club has grown to
include 35 girls. The mem-
bers' interest in reading
has skyrocketed and they
have improved their social
skills. The founders of the
American Girl company,
Ms. Pleasant Rowland and
author Valeria Tripp have
personally recognized
Reeves with hand-written
letter commending Reeves
for her entrepreneurship
and community service.
Three Rivers was honored
to present this award to
Reeves.
Just after the certifi-
cate and pin were awarded
to Reeves, State Regent
Makant presented Three
Rivers, a certificate for
First Place in Community
Service Awards. There are
101 chapter in Florida and
each chapter can submit
two Community Service
Awards each year. This cer-
tificate means that Reeves
was chosen from all the
chapter's submissions.
Other business of the
day was the presentation
of four new prospects, two
transfers and one Associ-
ate member to Three Riv-
ers. The chapter has a to-
tal of 157 members at the
end of the 4 one-half years
of its organizing.
If you are interested in
membership into Daugh-
ters of the American
Revolution and Three
Rivers Chapter, call Rosa
Seymour at 477-2019 or
email rosasey@bellsouth.
net.


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A4 I Santa Rosa's Press Gazette


O inion

Opinion


Wednesday, July 6, 2011


YOUR VIEW


Red-light camera


feud reveals


ulterior motives


By Fergus Hodgson

By their very name,
public servants claim
to work for their fellow
community members.
The recent stand-offs
over red-light cameras,
however, indicate that
many such officials have,
to put it gently, conflicting
interests.
Twenty-five states
and Washington D.C. use
red-light cameras and
the U.S. Conference of
Mayors last week agreed
to a resolution (p188) in
support of nationwide use.
While a desire for safety is
the repeated refrain, this
does not comport with the
actions of the programs'
administrators; nor does
it follow from constituent
wishes.
Research on the
safety impact is strangely
divided, to such a degree
that one can't help
but suspect meddling
behind the scenes. The
Insurance Institute
for Highway Safety, for
example, claims the
cameras reduce fatal red-
light-running crashes by
24 percent and promotes
expanded use. But a
University of South
Florida study contends
that rather than improve
motorist safety, red-light
cameras significantly
increase crashes and are
a ticket to higher auto-
insurance premiums.
Fortunately, we need
not rely on this muddy
research to assess the
motives at play. Even if
public officials do believe
there is a safety benefit
- however doubtful that
might be - their actions
indicate their chief motive
is, as many suspect,
revenue generation.
The National Motorists
Association notes that
there are many ways
to increase traffic-light
safety without prosecution
of drivers. For example,
research from the Texas
Transportation Institute
suggests that increasing
the amber light by one
second reduces collisions
by 40 percent. In fact, they
found that the average
run-in occurs when the
light has been red for half
a second or less, while
almost every right-angle
crash occurs after more
than five seconds.
So, have cities taken
this painlessly applicable
finding and extended the
amber-light timing? Au
contraire. At least six U.S.
cities have been convicted
of shortening the yellow
light to catch more people
on the red. The Texas
study found a one-second
cut from international
standards would increase
violations by 110 percent.
Rirther examination
also revealed that the vast
majority of tickets are for
rolling right-hand turns
- 75 percent in the case
of Los Angeles. A Safer


Streets L.A. investigation
describes the risk of these
turns, which draw $466
fines, as minuscule.
"The average number
of rolling-right-turn
collisions each year was
approximately 45 out of
approximately 56,000
collisions annually in
the city of L.A. This
represents just 0.079
percent of all accidents, or
1 in 127,000; less than the
odds of getting struck by
lightning."
In a recent radio
interview, a caller
questioned me as to the
legal right drivers have to
make rolling right-hand
turns. He alleged that 90
percent of drivers do it.
While I did not dispute
that it is technically a
violation of the law, the
actions of 90 percent
of drivers - even with
the risk of prosecution
- indicate people know it
is not dangerous.
Additionally, if the goal
were the noble one of
safety, transparency and
constituent support would
abound. Regrettably, the
administrators resist
both.
New Orleans, where I
write from, typifies this.
The mayor and sheriff
have publically claimed
that revenue is not a
consideration and that
greater safety is their
sole concern. However,
they will not release even
superficial data regarding
the nature of the fines
and the outcome of
prosecutions. They have
also lobbied aggressively,
and successfully, against
state level legislation that
would put the program
to a vote of the people.
(That's right; these
officials hire lobbyists at
both the state and federal
levels.)
New Orleans has
344,000 people has more
than 40 red-light cameras,
from which its 2011
budget (p51) projects
revenue of $18 million.
That's a 419 percent
increase in three years
and, at $145 per ticket, it
corresponds to more than
10,000 tickets per month.
Disdain among
residents, however,
has been spilling over.
A New Orleans-based
Democratic state
representative, Jeff
Arnold, led the failed
initiative to mandate
resident approval.
Additionally, this month,
a group of self-described
anarchists covered two
cameras with garbage
bags, and in October one
camera suffered from an
arson attack.
Like elsewhere, the
tension between the city's
officials and its residents
is only going to heighten,
as are the less-than-sin-
cere justifications.
Fergus Hodgson is
Policy Advisorfor The Fu-
ture of Freedom Founda-
tion (wwww.ffforg).


SHAREYOUROPINIONS

We want you to share your views on the
above topic(s) - or any topic - with other
Santa Rosa's Press Gazette readers. Your
views are important, too.

Send your letters to :

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
6629 Elva St.
Milton, FL 32570

Fax: 850-623-9308


Drama: New York queens go all out


New York
lawmakers
worked late into
the night to OK
gay marriage.
Gays in the East
Village disco-
danced and HART
sang into the Ron i
wee hours of the
morning - and
then when they heard
the news, they really got
excited.
The vote was close:
29 voted Nay and 33
voted "Fabulous!"
There had not been
that much drama in the
gay community since
the Tony Awards. Soon
gay weddings will be
as common in N.Y as a
Donald Trump nuptial.
The next day was
the Gay Pride Parade
(good luck finding a dog
groomer), which followed
the Puerto Rico Day
Parade. Because of its
high taxes, New York City
has become a parade-
based economy.
Former N.Y Governor
David Paterson got the
gay ball rolling when he
said he would support a
bill to legalize same-sex
marriage. Ex-Governor
Eliot Spitzer and N.Y
resident Bill Clinton
came out in favor, as did
liberal ex-Congressman
Anthony Weiner. It had


to be nice to have
men who so value
marriage on your
side.
New Hampshire
already legalized
gay marriage;
i.K its motto is now
rt "Live Free or Bi."
Maine has toyed
with it, after years
of having the state's top
touched inappropriately
by Canada. I am still not
sure why Iowa legalized
gay marriage; maybe to
just create something
to do in that state. As
confusing as that is, my
guess is that somehow
ethanol subsidies were
involved.
This vote upsets
the religious right, but
if recognizing same-
sex marriages goes
well, maybe someday a
Baptist will be allowed to
recognize another Baptist
in a liquor store.
Even George Bush
was willing to recognize
civil union - which,
like marriage, is an
arrangement focused on
the pragmatic mutual
business interests of both
partners. New Yorkers
saw how well this type of
arrangement has worked
for Bill and Hillary
Clinton.
There is no residence
requirement, so folks


from out of state can
get all gay married in
New York. Now wedding
planners in Alabama
can plan their own
weddings in New York.
And Alabama will miss
out on the business the
weddings would bring,
because you know these
guys will go all out.
The details of gay
marriage remain to be
worked out. For example,
when two men are
driving, who says he is
not lost and who insists
they should ask for
directions?
Personally, I do not
care what gay people do
as long as they do not try
to do it to me. Mine is a
live-and-let-live view, so
long as you don't harm
others.
It is funny to see some
Republicans harp on the
importance of states'
rights and the Tenth
Amendment, but then
reverse themselves on
gay marriage when states
vote in the affirmative.
The GOP is spending
trillions trying to put Al
Qaeda out of business;
with the Defense of
Marriage Act, they are
now going after IKEA.
The supposedly
"minimal government,
minimal intrusion,"
hard right wing of the


GOP believes that being
gay is a choice, and
therefore something to
be regulated. What they
need to understand is
that their hypocritical
view defies logic and
science. You know what
is really a choice? Voting
Republican.
People are married
in church and get their
marriage licenses at
courthouses - clearly
the purview of religion
or local governments,
not the Feds. The federal
government couldn't
organize a rehearsal
dinner.
To those who fret
about this, let it go. We
as a nation face much
bigger issues than two
consenting, adult women
registering for wedding
gifts at Home Depot and
combining their ceramic
cat collection. After
Massachusetts legalized
same-sex unions, the
first lesbian marriage
quickly ended in divorce,
citing irreconcilable
similarities.

Ron Hart is a syndi-
cated op-ed humorist,
award-winning author
and TV/radio commenta-
tor. Email Ron@Ronald-
Hart.com or visit www.
RonaldHart.com.


OUR VIEW


Should the rule book get thrown out the window?


Now that we are two
days past America's
235th birthday, there are
some interesting facts we
should ponder.
Our government
passes laws and bills
everyday, but there seems
to be a group which feels
it is exempt from them.
An example of this is
the new health care law,
or Obama-care.
Isn't it ironic we have
to follow these rules, yet
those in Washington,
D.C., (who passed the bill
in the first place) do not
have to go by these same
provisions?
But these are not the
only groups passing laws
that are not followed/
enforced.
The State of Florida
has many such laws on its
books.
For example, it is
illegal to skateboard
without a license.
It is also illegal to tow
anything with a bike.
Remember seeing
those bicyclists going
down the Blackwater
Trail or Highway 90 with


a trailer in tow behind
them?
Do you realize women
could get in trouble if we
had a hair-dresser cop?
Why?
Because Florida law
says it is illegal for a
woman to fall asleep
under a hair dryer.
And if you go to
Sarasota, you better not
sing while on the beach
or even going to the
beach because it is illegal
to sing while wearing a
bathing suit.
Some of the laws are
just as stupid in Alabama.
Don't tell Boo Weekley,
but bear wrestling
matches are prohibited.
Of course he wishes
Orangatan matches were
illegal here at home.
But this is the tip of
the iceberg, because
putting salt on a railroad
track may be punishable
by death.
Here in Santa Rosa
County, we have some
rather interesting rules
as well.
Last week, we learned
that if your dog is in heat


you must keep her inside.
The person who called
us about this discovery
also stated she called four
veterinarians and none
knew of the ordinance.
Of course, why should
this law surprise you, we
have many laws that our
county is too afraid to
enforce.
One of these is our
favorite dead horse: The
sign ordinance.
On Thursday, a
member of our staff
witnessed an individual
posting signs along
Highway 90.
A Santa Rosa County
Deputy Sheriff's car
drove right past the man
who was busing putting
the sign in the right of
way. The back end of the
car was open and it was
full of signs destined to be
placed, perhaps, in other
right-of-way locations.
Why didn't the deputy
at least stop and ask what
was going on and if he
had permission from the
county to place the signs?
It is a law in Santa
Rosa County, but it is not


enforced.
The Board of County
Commissioners set a
precedent in expecting
our Sheriff's Department
to enforce ordinances.
When they passed the
gun ban in the south end
of Santa Rosa County,
they expected the
Sheriff's Department to
enforce it.
So they expect the
Sheriff's Office to
enforce the rest of our
ordinances.
Yet these laws are not
enforced.
We should expect more
of our leaders.
They should look at
the laws they have on the
books and decide if they
are going to enforce them
or not. Those they choose
to not enforce should be
removed.
These laws were
passed for a reason ,and if
it was important enough
to make a law it should be
enforced as one.
Currently we have a
235 year old nation with
a lot of laws and a lot of
disorder.


-*g






Wednesday, July 6, 2011


Faith


Santa Rosa's Press Gazette I AS


Ministry helps build ramps for the handicapped


By Mathew Pellegrino
mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com
Stan Holmes remembers the
last good deed he did.
Outside of a total stranger's
house, he hammered away
on a project that would allow
the resident, who was trapped
inside his house, to get outside
for the first time in almost six
months.
Holmes is the vice president
of the Woodbine Outreach
Riding Disciples (WORD), a
religious motorcycle group.
He and his team help build


ramps for Ray of Hope, a ramp
ministry that provides people
with handicap accessible
ramps.
"I just remember the look
on her face after she was able
to get outside after almost six
months," Holmes said. "The
generous work we provide for
the community allows these
people to have better mobility."
So far, Ray of Hope has
built 298 ramps for people in
Escambia and Santa Rosa
counties. This month, the team
is planning to celebrate their
300th ramp.


Ray of Hope is an
organization that has been
building ramps for people in
need for almost nine years,
according to Holmes.
Most of the ramps are
paid for by donations through
Woodbine United Methodist
Church in Pace, among other
charitable donations.
"We try to build a ramp
for anybody that needs one,"
Holmes said. "Luckily, we've
had money to help us get this
far."
In June, the ramp ministry
in conglomeration with WORD


helped raise even more money
for their projects through the
first annual Ride for Ramps
Poker Run.
The ride took about 40
motorcyclists through the more
scenic routes of Santa Rosa
County to spread awareness of
the nonprofit organization.
What makes Ray of Hope so
extraordinary says Holmes are
the volunteers that dedicate
their time to build the ramps
for people they may have never
met before in their life.
"We have a lot of generous
volunteers who spend their


time doing this for other
people," Holmes said.
WORD is a religious
motorcycle group that's original
intent was to spread the word
of the Bible to the community
according to Holmes.
"We continue to give our
support to the ramp ministry so
we can keep on helping others
in need," Holmes said.
Those wishing to acquire
more information on Ray of
Hope or to request a ramp be
built can contact Holmes and the
rest of the Ray of Hope team at
rayofhope316@hotmail.com.


Family Support
Group to host
seminar July 16
Secular Family
Network support group
is sponsoring a seminar
with Dale McGowan,
author of "Parenting
Beyond Belief" and
"Raising Freethinkers."
The seminar will
be at the Unitarian
Universalist Church of
Pensacola July 16, from
10 a.m. -2 p.m. The cost
of the seminar is $20
per adult and is open to
the public with a paid
registration.
Childcare will be
available upon request
and participants can
register at the door,
but must pre-register
by July 9 is childcare is
needed.
For more
information about
SFN e-mail
secularfamilynetwork@
gmail.com.

Dr. Paul Thigpen
seminar at
Holy Name of Jesus
On July 15, Dr. Paul
Thigpen, an author of 37
books, will present a free
talk at 7 p.m. on "How
I Discovered the 'Fill
Gospel': A Pentecostal


Pastor Comes Home to
Rome"
Dr. Paul Thigpen will
aslo present "Are you
Saved? The Catholic
Response" July 16 from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. during
a special appearance
at Holy Name of Jesus
Catholic Church in
Niceville. Registration for
this is $20.
Both seminars will
be in Father Butler
Parish Life Center at
the church. For more
information, call 6780-
3413 or 543-2275.

Summerfest Jam
Five local bands will
be in concert July 23 and
competing for a grand
prize at Summerfest
Jam. Summerfest Jam
will be held at the Dixon
Primary School outdoor
physical education field
on Highway 90. This free
event is a family friendly
event with free food,
drinks and snow cones,
along with two huge
water slides for the big
kids and one smaller one
for smaller kids. Bring
a blanket or chairs and
enjoy an afternoon of
music from noon to
4 p.m.
For more information
call 719-659-2856 or e-mail
depeck87@hotmail.com.


Baptist Health Care Foundation awards scholarships


Special to the Press Gazette
Baptist Health Care Foun-
dation recently awarded 16
educational scholarships.
Recipients were recognized
at the Baptist Hospital de-
partment leader meeting
June 23. This year's recipi-
ent for the $2,500 Luther and
Kathy Taylor Nursing Schol-
arship is Cristiane Barros.
The following individuals
each received $1,000 from
Baptist Employee Helping
Hands:
Jefferson Davis
Community College
William Morris - Nurs-
ing
Pensacola State College
Amber Cumberlander
- Nursing
Alicia Hatchett -
Nursing


Jack Hess - Nursing
John Maddox - Emer-
gency Management
Juliette Pro - Nursing
Natalie Roberts - Nurs-
ing
TYacy Saint - Radiogra-
phy
Melissa Tate - Nursing
April Toyne - Business
Chelsea Welch - Nurs-
ing
Troy University
Allison Ragghianti -
M.S., Counseling/Psychol-
ogy
Jennifer Vaughn - M.S.,
Counseling/Psychology
University of
South Alabama
Cindy Lawrence - Nurs-
ing
University of West Florida
Brittney Abercrombie
- Nursing


BHC Foundation Scholarship Recipients who were
able to attend Baptist Hospital department leader
meeting: Natalie Roberts, April Toyne, Juliette Pro,
Jack Hess and Cindy Lawrence.


The Foundation is proud
to offer the scholarships to
help students achieve their
educational and career
goals that can be applied in
the health care industry.
Employees, their depen-
dents, and residents of the
community are eligible to


apply for the annual scholar-
ships that are given based
on academic excellence,
demonstrated aptitude and
extracurricular activities.
Support scholarships
through Baptist Health Care
Foundation by calling 850-
469-7906.


SABRINA KAESTLE, Au.DI
-OC OR. F .A DIO O.


Business


Here


Call Debbie Coon 393-3666
or Greg Cowell 910-0902


k A


:� *


Faith BRIEFS


Ask the Preacher

...a weekly column answering your
questions with Biblical answers about life.

Dear Pastor Gallups, "I am confused about all this
ANGEL stuff that is all over the place. Exactly what
does the Bible have to say about angels and what they
really are?"
S.D. - Pace

Dear S.D. - The Bible has MUCH to stay about
angels! Any answer you need about this topic is found
in God's Word. Also, you will find several very
good books on this topic in the Christian bookstores by
competent, Biblically sound authors.
Angels are created beings. They have not always
been around, but they have been here since BEFORE
the earth or man was created. The book of Job makes
this clear. They exist and operate primarily in the
"spiritual" (God's dimension) realm but can operate in
our realm as well. The Bible declares that there are
multitudes, perhaps millions or billions of angelic
beings. Only three angels are known by an actual
name in the Bible; Michael, Gabriel and Lucifer or
Satan.
Yes, Satan is an angelic creation. Ezekiel declares
that he was a "cherub", to be exact. Satan "fell",
because of his sin of pride and arrogance and took a
large number of the angelic beings with him in his
rebellion. We now kLi.:\ his as the demonic world or
realm.
It is also interesting to note that the Bible
ALWAYS presents angels in the masculine form. Isn't
it interesting that almost EVERY time that the "world"
presents an angel, they are presented in the female
form or as a fat little baby! (From Greek mythology).
The Bible says in the book of Hebrews that the
angels are sent as ministering spirits to God's children.
They are also, fellow servants of the Most High God,
along with human children of God. The Bible makes
clear that angels are NOT to be prayed to or depended
upon for strength and encouragement. They are not to
be "called up" or "summoned". They certainly are not
to be worshipped in ANY fashion whatsoever. They
are not to be given any glory other than what the Word
clearly gives them as a part of God's creation.
I pray that you will serve Jesus with all your being
and thank Him for ALL of His wonderful creation, of
which the angels are just a small but special part

Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church. in Milton. He has a Bachelor of
Science degree from Florida State University, and a Master of Divinity from The New Orleans
Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been pastor of HHBC since 1987. He serves as an
International Youth Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention preaching all over the U.S and
Canada. For more information about HHBC, call 623-8959 or 626-8951, fax: 623-0197.
If you have any questions forAskThe Preacher, send it to: Ask The Preacher, Hickory Hammock
Baptist Church, 8351 Hickory Hammock Road, Milton, Florida 32583-paid advertisement


S"-.


- -Ba~ii~Jb�C


~YI


I






A6 I Santa Rosa's Press Gazette


Local


Wednesday, July 6, 2011


PRAYER from page Al


dropped, and the Liberty
Counsel would get refunded
for legal fees and other costs
associated with the case.
"This is kind of a global
resolution to all of this," said
Benjamin Stevenson, the
ACLU attorney who filed
the original lawsuit against
the school district.
The proposed changes
to the consent decree would
modify language to ensure
that terms of the agreement
could not be misconstrued,
Stevenson said.


"It was never unclear, but
now it's doubly clear," Ste-
venson said. "You can say,
'God bless you,' after some-
one sneezes in the district."
One of the other most
significant changes in the
language - and one impor-
tant to the school district,
Stevenson said - is the
addition of wording that ex-
plicitly states that although
district staffers cannot not
lead a prayer or religious
activity, they can remain
still and clasp their hands


"as a show of respect" when
a prayer is said in their
presence.
All the modifications
were made by the plain-
tiffs from the original law-
suit and the school district.
They will be the ones to ask
the court to adopt the new
language, Stevenson said.
The Liberty Counsel has
agreed to drop the case in
the Court of Appeals and
the pending one in Pensac-
ola if the changes are made
to the consent decree.


"Our ultimate goal from
the very beginning has been
to restore the freedoms ...
that were stolen by the orig-
inal consent decree," said
Mathew Staver, the founder
of the Liberty Counsel.
Staver said he believed
the school district and the
ACLU opted to settle be-
cause they did not have a
strong case. But he added
that the terms of the settle-
ment resolve the Liberty
Counsel's clients' issues, so
it is a positive outcome.


"It's a huge victory,"
Staver said. "A great relief to
the clients we represent."
The end of litigation will
also be a relief to the school
district. Wyrosdick said he
did not want another trial
because the issue was tear-
ing the community apart.
"Our goal, really, was to
provide peace and to ensure
that peace is somewhat per-
manent," he said.
From Wyrosdick's per-
spective, neither side won;
they just found common


ground acceptable to every-
one.
"It washes all of this off
so we really start clean," he
said.
It will be awhile before
the issue is officially put to
rest. The Santa Rosa Coun-
ty School Board is sched-
uled to discuss and vote on
the settlement at its meet-
ing Tuesday afternoon. If
the board approves it, the
amended consent decree
will be given to a federal
judge for a ruling.


GRADED from page Al


system, such as the SED-
NET coordinator, who will
have that part of their evalu-
ation based on Florida Alter-
native Assessment scores
and ESE student scores in
reading, math, writing and
science.
To level the playing field,
administration such as
principals and support co-
ordinators will issue certain
district staff's evaluations
formally and informally.
Thirty percent of the
evaluation will be based on
leadership skills they por-
tray, which are a vital part
of their job description.
"We are not asking any-
thing less from our admin-
istrators than we are asking
from our teachers," said
Lewis Lynn, Jr., assistant
superintendent for human
resources.
The leadership grading
scale will include questions,
such as:
*What decision making
strategies does this admin-
istrator have?
*How familiar is this
administrator with the tech-
nology and communication


ADMINISTRATOR
REPORT CARD
50% student test scores
25% Education
Accomplished practice
5% parent surveys
5% student surveys
5% support card surveys
5% administrator's
financial goals
5% Professional
Development Plan

tools he or she is given?
*What kind of vision does
the administrator have for
the school/district?
Starting next year, all 86
administrators in the Santa
Rosa County school district
will have their evaluations,
much like the teacher eval-
uations, based on student
and parent surveys.
"This is something we
are testing out right now
to see how effective it is,"
Lynn said about the survey
for teachers and adminis-
trators.
The administrators
will also have 5 percent of
their evaluations based on


financial goal surveys.
"They want to make sure
we have a plan to keep them
out of the red," Lynn said.
The district will take
ideas from the financial
plans to use at budget meet-
ings and to help them plan
for when times get tough.
This year the district
was faced with an $11 mil-
lion budget cut compared to
last year from the state.
The crisis forced the dis-
trict to re-shift 60 teacher
positions in the district's
middle and high schools.
Much like teachers, ad-
ministrators will have to
develop a Professional De-
velopment Plan that will ac-
count for 5 percent of their
evaluation grade.
Their weighted score
will be added up, and an
"effectiveness level" will be
determined for the adminis-
trator.
Like teachers, adminis-
trators will also have their
evaluations based on par-
ent and student surveys
that will be administered in
September and May of each
school year.


-J


GARCON POINT BRIDGE


. V , h�H f._ .B-B- .-"- . . . �z-U
A view of the Garcon Point
Bridge, which defaulted on --
iis bonding issue on July 1.


Year
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011*


Vehicles
1,236,605
1,383,516
1,465,967
1,626,487
1,694,940
1,573,832
1,362,196
1,297,378
1,238,471
516,084


Revenue
$3,034,508.73
$3,552,103.29
$4,135,775.26
$5,179,501.29
$5,253,415.30
$5,194,681.46
$4,813,280.62
$4,554,595.07
$4,331,173.22
$1,877,482.65


*Figures are good through May 2011


GARCON from page Al


This issue has been
a concern for District 1
Representative Doug
Broxson, who has been
working with the State
of Florida and the Santa
Rosa Board of County
Commissioners.
"They used flawed
numbers in trying to jus-
tify the bridge," Brox-
son said. "They used the
numbers with the Mid-
Bay Bridge (in Destin)
when they established
projections.
"It also doesn't help
to keep board members
when they are being
called to testify before the
Securities and Exchange
Commission because
they have defaulted on
the bonds due to a lack
of revenue or could face
a possible lawsuit from
those who purchased the
bonds."
Back in 1996, the Santa
Rosa Bay Bridge Author-
ity issued bonds to fi-
nance the construction of
the bridge. These bonds
have been downgraded by
Moody's Investors Servic-
es from Ca to Caa3.
Ca is Moody's second
lowest municipal bond
rating and is given to bor-
rowers with extremely
weak credit ratings.
Fitch Ratings on Fri-
day cut its underlying rat-
ing on outstanding Santa
Rosa revenue bonds to a
'D' from a 'C.'
A'D' rating is reserved
for a bankruptcy filing,
payment default, or coer-
cive debt.
Those who purchased
the bonds in 1996 vary
from banks to individu-
als who were looking to
invest into the municipal
bond market.
It is difficult to say
who or whom could be fil-
ing lawsuits against the
SRBBA because of this
default.
"There are several dif-
ferent people and faces
involved in this bond is-
sue," Broxson said. "It
is unknown what will
happen, but I have been
trying to see and make
sure there is nothing that
will effect the state of
Florida or Santa Rosa
County.
"When I saw this go-
ing on, we started pour-
ing over the bonding
document which was over
1,000 pages."
The Santa Rosa Bay
Bridge Authority bond de-
fault is not expected to ad-
versely affect the State's
ability to sell bonds or the
interest rates on State
financings, said Ben Wat-
kins, the Director of the
State's Division of Bond
Finance.
"It's unfortunate that
the financial performance
has been significantly
below the feasibility con-
sultant's projections and
that the bonds are not
being paid when due, but


this should not impact the
state," Watkins said.
The bonds are pay-
able solely from the toll
revenues of the bridge.
The bonds are not a gen-
eral debt of the Authority,
Santa Rosa County, or the
State of Florida. The bond
documents clearly ad-
vised investors that nei-
ther the State of Florida
nor Santa Rosa County
would have any responsi-
bility for payment of the
bond debt.
The Department op-
erates and maintains the
bridge under a Lease Pur-
chase Agreement (LPA)
with the Santa Rosa Bay
Bridge Authority. The
bridge costs $1 million
annually to operate and
maintain. Under the LPA,
the Department pays this
cost from its own funds.
"Even though the
bridge bonds are in de-
fault, the citizens of
Florida and our visitors
can rest assured that the
bridge will remain open
and the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation
will continue to operate
and maintain it to the
highest standards," said
Garrett Walton, Chair-
man, Florida Transporta-
tion Commission.
Since 2006 it appears
the bottom has fallen
out of the Garcon Point
Bridge.
In 2006, the bridge,
which connects north
and south Santa Rosa
County, hit its peak in traf-
fic and revenue. Traffic
numbers from the Santa
Rosa Bay Bridge Author-
ity indicated just under
1,695,000 cars. That year
the bridge collected just
over $5,253,000.
During the period of
the increase, the region
suffered from Hurricane
Ivan in September 2004,
and it was not until De-
cember 2006 when the
East Bound lanes of 1-10
had finally opened follow-
ing the Hurricane. Since
then, the traffic as been
on a steady decrease.
Just after Hurricane
Ivan in October 2004,
the bridge saw its big-
gest month collecting
$641,533.95 in revenue
while 134,044 vehicles
used the bridge.
The highest traffic
numbers came in July
2006, when just over
160,000 cars used the
bridge, and they collected
$494,932.46.
Back in January the
Santa Rosa County Board
of County Commissioners
approved Nancy Model,
Santa Rosa County's
Transportation Planner,
to apply for a grant to help
with the cost of bonding
issue.
Unfortunately the
grant money has not
come, and a decision
might not come until Oc-
tober of this year.


"Back in 2007, the
Santa Rosa County Com-
missioners gave us ap-
proval to seek a PPPV
Grant for the bridge, but
when we went to apply
the funds were not avail-
able," Model said. "Now
they are seeking requests,
and we are getting ev-
erything together for the
Jan. 18, 2011 deadline."
Santa Rosa County is
applying for a matching
grant where the Santa
Rosa Bay Bridge Author-
ity would have to put up
20 percent, while the fed-
eral government would
put up 80 percent.
Model is hoping this
grant not only could help
the bridge authority to
lower fees, but also in-
crease traffic to help the
board make its bond pay-
ment, while not having to
dip into a quickly deplet-
ing reserve fund.
"If we can get this
grant, my goal is to lower
the toll to $1 or 75 cents
per trip," Model said. "I
am still working on the
numbers, but if we can
lower the fee with the
grant, then maybe we can
increase the traffic on the
bridge to make the pay-
ment without having to
raise the toll."
While Model is look-
ing at increasing traffic,
she is watching another
traffic corridor of major
concern to not only Santa
Rosa County, but also
members of the Florida-
Alabama Traffic Planning
Organization (TPO).
"If this grant comes
about, we will also see how
the traffic on the bridge
effect traffic on Highway
98 in Gulf Breeze and into
Pensacola," Model said.
While traffic numbers
and revenue is one con-
cern of the SRBBA, an-
other concern is the au-
dit the Joint Legislative
Auditing Committee set a
Sept. 1 deadline for.
According to the min-
utes of the meeting, the
SRBBA does not have
the funds for an audit and
asked Andrews to send a
letter to the Joint Legisla-
tive Auditing Committee
in response to their dead-
line.
From January to
May the Garcon Point
Bridge has averaged
103,217 trips per month
withrevenue of $375,496.53
per month.
Traffic averages are
down by 5,000 cars per
month this year while rev-
enues are down by almost
$5,000.
July was the best
month in 2010 when
124,000 plus vehicles used
the bridge accounting for
$440,600-plus dollars in
revenue.
During July, President
Barack Obama was in
the Pensacola area, and
the Blue Angels held its
annual air show.


*


NOW_ _





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Wednesday, July 6, 2011


Local


Santa Rosa's Press Gazette I A7


Bus accidents down across Santa Rosa County


Durham awarded
182 safe driver
license plates
to drivers who
did not get in an
accident during
the 2010-11
school year


By Mathew Pellegrino
mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com

Durham Bus driv-
ers are doing their job.
They're keeping Santa
Rosa County school chil-
dren safe.
The school bus service
provider presented its an-
nual report to Santa Rosa
County school board mem-
bers at the June 23 school board
meeting.
According to the data Dur-
ham compiled over the course
of several years, the service pro-
vider's drivers had 25 percent
fewer preventable accidents
than they did last year.
The number of unprevent-
able accidents only rose by one.
In total over the course of the
2010-11 school year, the service
provider claimed there were 56
total accidents, four of which
were unpreventable.


During the 2009-10 school
year, Durham employees were
cited 79 times for incidents.
These incidents ranged from
backing into mailboxes to minor
fender benders.
This year, Durham awarded
182 safe driver license plates to
drivers who did not get in an ac-
cident during the 2010-11 school
year. The plates are handed out
annually to drivers who drive the
whole school year accident free.
Last year, Durham handed
out 160 of these license plates.
But safety wasn't the only
thing school board members
were pleased about.
The bus company cut back
dramatically on its fuel con-
sumption. Despite the spike in
gas prices, Durham employees
utilized almost 50,000 gallons
less in diesel fuel this year than
in the 2009-10 school year.
Durham did use 2,200 gal-
lons more in unleaded fuel, but


where the usage really hurt
them was on the price.
During the 2010-11 year,
the bus service provider paid
nearly $3.20 a gallon for diesel,
almost a dollar more than the
2009-10 school year's average.
Unleaded gas prices rose al-
most 70 cents in 2010-11 from
previous years.
The jump meant that the
bus service spent almost
$130,000 more in 2010-11 on
diesel than they did in 2009-10.
If Durham had paid $3.20 a gal-
lon for the 2009-10 school year,
the company would have spent
almost $40,000 more dollars on
gasoline.
The company has been utiliz-
ing more group drop off routes
and less drop offs in front of a
child's home so the busses have
a shorter idle time.
Durham will be getting an
additional 15 drivers for the up-
coming 2011-12 school year to


accommodate for the nearly 198
bus routes the provider's driv-
ers take up every day.
One thing that is concern-
ing the provider is the number
of people who fail to adhere to
state school mandated bus stop
laws.
This year, in Santa Rosa
County alone, school bus driv-
ers reported two separate inci-
dents where drivers passed on
the right side of school busses
when the busses were drop-
ping children off. This con-
cerned Durham employees
because the door that drops
children off is on the right side
of the bus.
A handful of other instances
were reported where motorists
did not obey bus stop laws, but
Durham said they are working
one-on-one with law enforce-
ment officers to help stop the
traffic violations from occur-
ring.


Number of county transit riders increases as heat rises


By Mathew Pellegrino
mpellegrino@srpressgazette.com

As a heat wave strikes
the region, drivers are
ditching their keys for a ride
on the county's pilot transit
program. The transit car-
ries passengers along High-
way 90, the county's busiest
roadway.
For Nancy Model, the
county transportation plan-
ner, the number of riders is
adding up as the program
moves into the hot summer
months.
"I know the first month
was a little rough for the
program, but is the county
continuing to see regular
ridership on the buses, or
are we having spikes in rid-
ership and lows?" Model
asked.
The answer to that ques-


tion is easy. Since the pro-
gram kicked off on Dec. 7,
2010, ridership has almost
quadrupled compared to the
number of riders the transit
system saw in May.
The transit system saw
167 riders in December
2010. That number nearly
doubled in January.
The county estimated
that the project would cost
approximately $33,140 to
run over a 12-month period.
From December to Febru-
ary, the county spent rough-
ly $4,000 on the program.
"The county also pro-
vides in-kind services that
are not charged to the grant
such as making and install-
ing bus stop signs, route de-
velopment, marketing, etc,"
Model said.
Those services for the
first three months totaled


$9,067 according to Model,
but the numbers are still
subject to review.
The bus, which costs $1
to ride travels over into Es-
cambia County and stops
at the corner of University
Parkway and Nine-Mile
Road. Model said accord-
ing to the bus drivers, the
county connection is the
most popular stop on the
bus route that goes from
East Milton to Pensacola.
Model said a lot of rid-
ers are asking for a better
connection to NAS Whiting
Field, since many carpool to
the base.
"Most of the comments
have been to ask for expand-
ed service - along SR 87 to
NAS Whiting Field, along
US 98, and more frequent
runs," Model said.
The county will ask com-


missioners in September if
the pilot program is worth
keeping. Federal funds
already secure the transit
system for a second year. If
approved, nearly 25 percent
of the passengers will have
a cheap ride to and from
work. Model said that ap-
proximately 25 percent of
the riders are going to and
from their jobs.
Model said she is glad to
see that many people riding
the bus for that reason.
"The purpose of the pro-
gram was job access, and
the transit service is helping
riders with job access."
The bus is scheduled
to run until the end of No-
vember, but the county will
make the ultimate decision
on whether to extend the
service another year before
then.


RIDERSHIP
December (2010): 167
January: 281
February: 296
March: 412
April: 431
May: 510


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SPORTS


A
Section


Wednesday, July 6,2011 w w w. s r p r e s s g a z e t t e. c o m Page 8


FT ISH /l NG


By Frank Sargeant
Florida Freedom Newspapers
In the dreams of every
angler, there leaps a
thousand-pound blue
marlin.
For most of us, that will
remain simply a dream. But
for those fortunate enough
to finance an offshore trip in
Florida's Panhandle waters
anytime between May
and October, it is always a
possibility.
We know because Captain
Tom Browning and crew,
fishing out of Destin, proved
it few years back with a
monster billfish that scaled
1,046 pounds. And though that
blue remains the biggest ever
for Florida, several fish in the
700-pound range have been
caught since.
The offshore fish are what
biologists call "pelagics" or
ocean roamers. They ride the
Gulf Loop Current up out of
the Caribbean in May, stay in
the DeSoto Canyon and off
the Mississippi Delta through
the summer, and complete
the loop in fall as water
temperatures start to fall
back into the 70s offshore.
In addition to the blue
marlin, there are white
marlin, sailfish, wahoo,
yellowfin tuna and dolphin in
the mix, as well as swordfish
- mostly caught at night by
specialists - all marking
Panhandle waters as some
of the best big game fishing
territory anywhere in the
nation.
The fishing begins roughly
50 miles offshore most of the
time, around the 100-fathom
(600-foot) curve. Basically,
skippers run south until they
hit the clear blue of offshore
water - and the edge where
it meets the green inshore
water is often a great spot
to start trolling for weedline
species like dolphin. (Let us
stipulate here, for non-fishing
readers, we are not talking
about hooking Flipper; the
dolphin is AKA the mahi-


Heat up the grill! This yellowfin is headed for the cle
table - and for the barbecue.


mahi, a peacock of a fish in
neon blue, gold and green, not
the friendly marine mammal
in sedate gray.)
The fishing areas are
well-known despite being so
far from land; the Elbow, the
Spur, the Nipple, the Steps
and the Squiggles are all
part of the lexicon of offshore
skippers, named for unique
bottom characteristics at
each.
This is not small boat
country; most experienced
offshore anglers consider
a 35-footer the minimum
for safety; twin engines
are a must, as is satellite
communications gear and a


life raft.
Because few of us ca
afford boats of that size
equipage, charter boats
are the way to go for m
Fortunately, Panhandle
ports have plenty of opt
with Destin one of the r
active bluewater towns
nation.
It is, unfortunately, r
cheap to go blue water
fishing; because of the
staggering costs of fuel
charter fees are necess
high, typically $1200 to
per day, on top of which
are generally expected
the crew 10 to 15 percel
However, the cost of


F UN


day's charter can be split
by up to six (on most boats)
anglers, which cuts the tally
back to a reasonable level for
those who can stand to share
"chair time," the hours spent
actually sitting in the fighting
chair and waiting for the
strike.
Billfishing is a game of
patience, and more often than
not, those who can spend only
. 4 a single day chasing marlin
Sor sails will be disappointed.
However, if you can be
satisfied with 100-pound
yellowfin tuna, 50-pound
wahoo and 40-pound dolphin
- all highly edible creatures
- you are likely to feel richly
rewarded for the offshore
adventure.
Getting so far offshore is a
Street in itself; you might see a
school of hundreds of oceanic
dolphin driving tuna, or sit on
the bowsprit and watch these
black-and-white mammals
play in the bow wake just a
few feet below. You might
see a whale shark lazing
q along at the surface, sucking
in hundreds of gallons of
plankton at each gulp. Flying
fish sail away like transparent
Butterflies. And just looking
into water so clear that
you can see a hundred feet
SID RICE straight down is a lifetime
aning treat for landlubbers.
If you do luck into a marlin,
do not expect to tie it to the
roof of the station wagon for
an the trip home. Billfish are
and usually released after a few
s photographs; they are scarce
ost. -mostly due to incidental
commercial long-line kills
lions, - and highly valued by the
most charter skippers who depend
in the on them as the poster-
children of their advertising.
lot One of the best online
sources for more on
blue water fishing in the
1, Panhandle is Captain
sarily John Holley's site, www.
$1500 catchbigmarlin.com.
Syou Other skippers at
to tip Panhandle fishing centers
nt. offer blue water trips, as
Sa well.


Tide REPORT


PENSACOLA BAY
Thursday, July 7
5:52 a.m. CDT Sunrise
6:16 a.m. CDT High tide 0.91 feet
12:28 p.m. CDT Moonrise
3:07 p.m. CDT Low tide 0.49 feet
7:54 p.m. CDT Sunset

Friday, July 8
12:07 a.m. CDT Moonset
1:30 a.m. CDT 1st Quarter moon
5:53 a.m. CDT Sunrise
6:03 a.m. CDT High tide 1.16 feet
1:33 p.m. CDT Moonrise
4:24 p.m. CDT Low tide 0. 18 feet
7:54 p.m. CDT Sunset

Saturday, July 9
12:47 a.m. CDT Moonset
5:53 a.m. CDT Sunrise
6:24 a.m. CDT High tide 1.40 feet
2:39 p.m. CDT Moonrise
5:25 p.m. CDT Low tide -0.06 feet
7:54 p.m. CDT Sunset

Sunday, July 10
1:31 a.m. CDT Moonset
5:54 a.m. CDT Sunrise
7:07 a.m. CDT High tide 1.60 feet
3:45 p.m. CDT Moonrise
6:26 p.m. CDT Low tide -0.24 feet
7:53 p.m. CDT Sunset


EAST BAY
Thursday, July 7
12:06 a.m. CDT Low tide 0.57 feet
5:51 a.m. CDT Sunrise
7:01 a.m. CDT High tide 1.09 feet
12:27 p.m. CDT Moonrise
4:23 p.m. CDT Low tide 0.58 feet
7:53 p.m. CDT Sunset
Friday, July 8
12:06 a.m. CDT Moonset
1:30 a.m. CDT 1st Quarter moon
5:52 a.m. CDT Sunrise
6:46 a.m. CDT High tide 1.40 feet
1:32 p.m. CDT Moonrise
5:40 p.m. CDT Low tide 0.22 feet
7:53 p.m. CDT Sunset
Saturday, July 9
12:46 a.m. CDT Moonset
5:52 a.m. CDT Sunrise
7:09 a.m. CDT High tide 1.68 feet
2:38 p.m. CDT Moonrise
6:43 p.m. CDT Low tide -0.07 feet
7:52 p.m. CDT Sunset

Sunday, July 10
1:30 a.m. CDT Moonset
5:53 a.m. CDT Sunrise
7:50 a.m. CDT High tide 1.92 feet
3:43 p.m. CDT Moonrise
7:44 p.m. CDT Low tide -0.29 feet
7:52 p.m. CDT Sunset


BLACKWATER RIVER
Thursday, July 7
12:36 a.m. CDT Low tide 0.57 feet
5:51 a.m. CDT Sunrise
7:57 a.m. CDT High tide 1.09 feet
12:27 p.m. CDT Moonrise
4:53 p.m. CDT Low tide 0.58 feet
7:54 p.m. CDT Sunset
Friday, July 8
12:06 a.m. CDT Moonset
1:30 a.m. CDT 1st Quarter moon
5:52 a.m. CDT Sunrise
7:42 a.m. CDT High tide 1.40 feet
1:33 p.m. CDT Moonrise
6:10 p.m. CDT Low tide 0.22 feet
7:54 p.m. CDT Sunset
Saturday, July 9
12:46 a.m. CDT Moonset
5:52 a.m. CDT Sunrise
8:05 a.m. CDT High tide 1.68 feet
2:38 p.m. CDT Moonrise
7:13 p.m. CDT Low tide -0.07 feet
7:53 p.m. CDT Sunset

Sunday, July 10
1:30 a.m. CDT Moonset
5:53 a.m. CDT Sunrise
8:46 a.m. CDT High tide 1.92 feet
3:44 p.m. CDT Moonrise
7:53 p.m. CDT Sunset
8:14 p.m. CDT Low tide -0.29 feet


NAVARRE BEACH
Thursday, July 7
4:17 a.m. CDT High tide 1.07 feet
5:51 a.m. CDT Sunrise
12:26 p.m. CDT Moonrise
3:26 p.m. CDT Low tide 0.63 feet
4:22 p.m. CDT High tide 0.63 feet
7:21 p.m. CDT Low tide 0.59 feet
7:52 p.m. CDT Sunset
Friday, July 8
12:06 a.m. CDT Moonset
1:30 a.m. CDT 1st Quarter moon
4:23 a.m. CDT High tide 1.30 feet
5:51 a.m. CDT Sunrise
1:32 p.m. CDT Moonrise
3:22 p.m. CDT Low tide 0.33 feet
7:52 p.m. CDT Sunset
Saturday, July 9
12:46 a.m. CDT Moonset
4:36 a.m. CDT High tide 1.51 feet
5:52 a.m. CDT Sunrise
2:37 p.m. CDT Moonrise
3:59 p.m. CDT Low tide 0.05 feet
7:52 p.m. CDT Sunset
Sunday, July 10


1:30 a.m.
5:05 a.m.
5:52 a.m.
3:43 p.m.
4:46 p.m.
7:52 p.m.


CDT Moonset
CDT High tide 1.68 feet
CDT Sunrise
CDT Moonrise
CDT Low tide -0.17 feet
CDT Sunset


*


Sports LINE

3-on-3 Basketball
Tournament: The Jaguar
Athletic Boosters will
host a 3-on-3 basketball
tournament Saturday, July
23 at the Central School
gymnasium. The entry fee
is $40 per team (four-man
roster). Registration will
begin at 11 a.m. the day
of the event, and the first
games will tip at noon. Call
365-0594.
Gene Chizik Book
Signing in Pensacola: SEC
Conference and National
Championship winning
coach Gene Chizik will be
at the Pensacola Barnes &
Noble on July 9 from
10 a.m. to noon to sign
copies of his new book "All
In: What It Takes to Be the
Best."
Capt'n Fun Bushwacker 5K:
Capt'n Fun's Bushwacker
5K Run will be Aug. 6, at
7:30 a.m., and is sponsored
by the Capt'n Fun Runners
to benefit Big Brothers
Big Sisters of Northwest
Florida.
Register online at
www.active.com, or mail
registration forms to
Big Brothers Big Sisters
of Northwest Florida.
Runners may also register
in person through Aug. 1 at
Running Wild.
Call 850-939-8073 or 850-
433-5437.
Patriot Football Camp: Pace
High School is holding
its 17th annual football
camp July 25 - 27 at Pace
High School. The camp
runs from 5:30-8 p.m.
each day. The camp will
focus on offensive and
defensive techniques as
well as stretching and
weightlifting. The camp
is open to boys ages 7 to
14. The cost of the camp is
$75 and includes a camp
T-shirt and pizza party on
the final day of the camp.
Call 995-3600 or 994-8653.
Panthers Basketball
Camp: Milton High future
Panthers basketball camp
will be July 18 through
July 22. The camp will run
from 3-6:30 p.m. daily. Fee
for the camp is $65 and
$75 for the child to receive
a camp basketball. The
camp is for boys and girls
ages 6 to 14. Call 983-5600,
ext. 115.
ABATE Bike Nite: Join the
Gulf Coast Chapter of
ABATE every Wednesday
from about 6:30-9 p.m.
for Bike Night at Famous
Dave's in Pensacola. Enjoy
specials, live music, bike
games with prizes.












LIFESTYLEE B
Section

Wednesday, July 6,2011 www.srpress g azette.com Page 1




















i II Fire and Rescue Station on Pace Patriot Blvd on .June 25
\While many turned out to get their child safety seats inspected and checked for
proper installation, there are many items to remember according to the National
Highway Traffic Safety Administration Iihen it comes to state laws and tips recom-
mendations Here's "hat you should know,


Florida Alabama
Less than three years ot age child Less than one years of age or less
restraint is required than "26 pounds iII a rear-tacing instant
An adult safety belt is permissible seat; to -4 tor 20 to -41 pounds' in for-
if the child is greater than 57 inches 1"ard-tacing child safety seat; xthe
K4-feet. 9-inches' in rear seat anid can l iut not yet 6 inii a booster seat
Luse lap belt it lap shoulder belt is uin- An adult safety btelts are permnis-
available. sible 6 to 14.
The fine for the first offense is $50 Fine is $25 for tlie first oftense
plus points plus points


(oCar Seat Recommendations for childrenn
Select a car seat based on your child's age and size, and choose a seat that fits in
VYour vehicle and use it eer time
" N ,&a Aliways refer to your specific car seat manutactlrers instruIctions: read the ve-
S'. ^hicle on lers manual on hBot to install the car seat using the seat belt or LATCH
-system: an(d check height an(d \eight limits
To maximize satet keel) your child in the car seat tor as long as possible, as long
as the child fits witnthin tle manufacturer's height and weight r squirtements.
- "' -. S Keet) our child in the back seat at least th'rou h atge 12.s


AGE
BIRTH - 12 MONTHS
Your child under age I should alN avs ride in a rear-tracing cart seat
Their aire different types of rear-facing cat seats Inntt-only seats can only be
used rear-facing. Consetrtible and 3-in-I car seats typically have higher height and
Weight limits for tile rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing
for a longer period of time
1-3 YEARS
Keep your child reartacing as long as possible It's the best way to keep him or
-her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches
the top height or eight mit allowed by Your' catr seat's manufacturer. Once your
child outgrows the rear-facing car seat. your child is ready to travel in a torward-tac-
1m2 car seat with a harness
4-7 YEARS
Keep your child in a tortard-tacing car seat with a harness until he or she reach-
es the top higlit or \ eight limit allowed bylyour car seat's manufacturer Once your
child outgrouts the forward-facing .car seat with a harness, it's time to travel in a
booster seat, but still in the Iback seat
8 - 12 YEARS
Keel) your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt
properly. For a seat belt to fit properly thl lap belt must lie snugly across the upper
thighs. not thle stomach The shoulder belt should lie snug across thi shoulder and
chest and i not cross the neck or facr Ftememb' your (hild should still ride in the
back seat because it's sater there

Description (restraint type)
.A FEAR-FACING (AR SEAT is the best seat for your younLI g child to use It has
a harness and in a crash, cradles and moves with your child to reduce thile stress to
the child's fragile neck and spinal cord

A FOR\VARD-FACING CAR SEAT has a harness and tether that limits Your
child's forward movement during a crash
.A BOOSTER SEAT positions tile seat belt so that it fits properly oetr tHie stroln-
A.:" "et parts of your child's I)od.
f" tte p A SEAT BELT should lie across thle tllper thighs and I)e snug across there shoul-
"de' and chest to restrain the child stately in a crash It should not rest on the stom-


Photos by BILL GAMBLIN I Press Gazette


*






B2 I Santa Rosa's Press Gazette


Local


Wednesday, July 6, 2011


News BRIEFS


Rep. Broxson hosts
forums on wiring
State Representative
Doug Broxson, R-District
1, is hosting a series of
constituent forums to ad-
dress aluminum wiring
and how it affects prop-
erty insurance. Repre-
sentatives from Citizens
Property Insurance will
conduct the forums to ex-
plain the recent changes
to property insurance
policies on homes with
aluminum wiring. "This
issue is one that affects
many of our constituents
in Northwest Florida,"
stated Rep. Broxson. "I
encourage anyone who
has questions regarding
these changes to attend
and hear from Citizens
first hand."
The meetings will be
held on July 7 at the Jay
Community Center at 2
p.m.; July 7 at Pensacola
State College Milton Cam-
pus Room 4902 at 6 p.m.;


and on July 8 at 1 p.m. in
Baker at the Blackman
Community Center.

Santa Rosa TDC
There will be two open-
ings on the Santa Rosa
County Tourist Devel-
opment Council for the
2012 year which begins
on Oct. 1, 2011. If you are
interested in serving on
this Board please supply
the following information
to the Tourist Develop-
ment Council by Sept. 1,
2011. Tourism experience,
knowledge and back-
ground while also demon-
strate involvement at the
committee level. You must
be involved in a tourist re-
lated industry.
Please send informa-
tion and contact informa-
tion to: Kate Wilkes, Ex-
ecutive Director; Santa
Rosa County Tourist De-
velopment; 8543 Navarre
Parkway; Navarre, Fla.
32566


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Central Santa Rosa
Republicans to meet
The Central Santa Rosa
County Republican Club
will be holding its monthly
meeting on July 7 at the
Red Barn on Highway 90
Milton. A no host meal will
start at 5:30 p.m. with meet-
ing to follow at 6:45 p.m.
This month's guest speak-
ers will be: The Honorable
Don Gaetz and Greg Brown,
County Tax Collector. The
public is cordially invited.
For more information call
994 0853 or 292 8264.


of Santa Rosa County
will hold its next monthly
meeting and Dutch Treat
Dinner at The Club at Hid-
den Creek, 3070 PGA Blvd.
in Navarre at 6:30 p.m.
on July 5. The featured
speaker will be Florida
House Representative of
the First District Doug
Broxson
For additional informa-
tion please contact Mor-
gan Lamb, President of
the Republican Club of
Santa Rosa County at (850)
939 2409.

SRC Democrats


Registration is Open Monthly Yard Sale
fnr 0nilntnru Pra-KI


Registration is open for
free Voluntary Pre K (VPK)
for the 2011-2012 school year
that begins August 22,2011.
Children with a birth
date between Sept. 2, 2006
and Sept. 1, 2007 are eligible
for this free program of-
fered by the State of Florida
through the Early Learn-
ing Coalition of Escambia
County. Parents may select
from more than 100 pro-
gram locations in Escambia
County.
The documents needed
for VPK enrollment are: the
child's birth certificate or
immunization record, the
parent/guardian valid photo
ID, and proof of residency
(a utility bill or lease agree-
ment).
For more information
call: 595.5400 or stop by the
office at the Early Learning
Coalition at 3636 D North L
Street, Suite A, Pensacola,
Fla. 32505.

Hadji Shrine Country
Western Dance
Hadji Shrine Country
Western Dance featuring
the C and L Express Band
will be July 9, 2011 from 7
pm - 11 pm, at 800 West
Nine Mile Road, Pensacola
FL. Public is invited! Cost
is $7 per person and tickets
are available in advance or
at the door. It is BYOB and
is hosted by the Hadji Rid-
ers and Misfits Units. For
more information call 850-
623-5550 or 850-476-9384.

Seniors' Breakfast
Holley Navarre Seniors
Association will host a pan-
cake breakfast on Saturday,
July 9, from 7 - 10:30 a.m.
at the EH Pullum Senior
Center. This is open to the
public and all ages are wel-
come. Prices range from $2
to $5 and include made from
scratch pancakes, sausage
or bacon, and coffee. Blue-
berries and orange juice
can be added to your order.
Proceeds from the event
will be used to fund senior
programs in Navarre. The
EH Pullum Senior Center
is located at 8476 Gordon
Goodin Lane across from
the Navarre Library. Call
936-1644 for more informa-
tion.

Republican Club
announces meeting
The Republican Club


The Santa Rosa County
Democrats Monthly Yard
Sale will be held July 9,
from 8:30 a.m. - 1 p.m., at
5746 Stewart Street, Mil-
ton. Items for sale will
include toys, stuffed ani-
mals, books, kitchen items,
glassware, tools, technol-
ogy, and many miscella-
neous items. In addition,
there will be furniture and
garden equipment for sale.
For information on de-
livery of items for dona-
tion, call DEC Headquar-
ters, 10:00 A. M. - 12 P M.,
Monday, Wednesday, or
Friday, 623-2345, or contact
Seegar Swanson, 936-8704,
Monday - Saturday.

Seniors Open House
and Resource Fair
Holley Navarre Seniors
Association will host an
Open House and Resource
Fair on Saturday, July 16
from 9 am to 1 pm. This free
event is open to the public.
Santa Rosa Medical Cen-
ter will provide free health
screenings. This will be a
fun and informative event
with medical and retail ven-
dors, education segments
including information on
the Davinci Robot, acupunc-
ture, magnet therapy, door
prizes, and food. For more
information, call 936-1644.

Santa Rosa Tea Party
Patriots meeting
TheSantaRosaTeaParty
Patriots will hold its monthly
meeting on July 11 at 6 p.m.
in the Milton Community
Center. The guest speaker
will be Paul Henry who will
discuss red light cameras.
Henry has a law enforce-
ment background, having
served as a Florida Deputy
Sheriff and State Trooper
for over 25 years until he
retired. Paul worked many
levels and positions within
the FHP from road patrol
trooper to traffic homicide
investigator, then sergeant
with homicide squad over-
sight. His last 5 years were
as a lieutenant in criminal
investigations, where he
investigated numerous in-
ternal, ID Theft, commer-
cial vehicle theft, and driver
license/title fraud cases.
Paul will give a presentation
on the background of Red
Light Cameras, why they
exist and what is happening
all over the country and the
State of Florida regarding


these cameras.

Bagdad Lecture
Series continues
The 2011 Bagdad Mu-
seum Lecture Series con-
tinues with a look at the
architecture of the historic
homes of Bagdad. Michael
Johnson President of the
Bagdad Village Preserva-
tion Association, building
contractor and designer
of historic reproductions,
takes an in-depth look at
why historic homes of Bag-
dad were built as they were.
Living in an historic home
and having restored 8 his-
toric Bagdad homes, Mr.
Johnson will discuss eco-
nomic, social, and environ-
mental issues surrounding
historic restorations and
the availability of local ma-
terials which dictated his-
toric techniques and meth-
ods of construction.
The presentation will
be held Saturday, July
9th, 10:00 a.m. at the Bag-
dad Village Museum, 4512
Church Street, Bagdad,
with refreshments follow-
ing. There is no cost and all
are welcome. For more in-
formation on the lecture se-
ries or the Bagdad Village
Preservation Association,
call 850-983-3005 or visit the
association's web site at
www.bagdadvillage.org.

Blood donors
are needed
Northwest Florida
Blood Services announces
elevated need for blood
types: B Negative, O Nega-
tive, O Positive and A Nega-
tive. Blood donors with any
of these types are asked
to help build the supply of
blood needed for patients
in local hospitals. Current-
ly, there is an increased
need for these blood types.
Blood donors are asked
to come to the centers lo-
cated Pensacola at 1999
East Nine Mile Road from
8 a.m. - 6 p.m. and 2209 N.
9th Avenue from 8 a.m. - 6
p.m. In Ft. Walton Beach
at 405NE Racetrack Road
from 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Eligibilityrequirements:
16 years old with parental
consent, weigh 110 pounds,
picture ID and be in good
health. Actual draw time
is 5 to 7 minutes. Donors
receive a wellness check,
free cholesterol screening
and will learn blood type.
Call 850-473-3853 for in-
formation and check the
website at www.nfbcblood.
org.

Green-Up Extends
Crepe Myrtle Sale
Green-Up Santa Rosa
has announced it will ex-
tend its Annual Crepe
Myrtle Sale through the
end of July. Crepe Myrtles
are considered one of the
hardiest, drought tolerent
trees throughout the south.
They bloom all summer
and grow fast. One-gallon
plants are $5.99, three-gal-
lon plants are $9.99 and
seven-gallon plants are
$19.99. Colors include red,


pink, white and lavender.
Green-Up is a program
of the Santa Rosa Clean
Community System and
proceeds go toward public
plantings within the com-
munity. Currently, they are
working on the new innova-
tion recycling station in Mil-
ton and the beautification
of a new recycling drop site
in Pace. For more informa-
tion, call 623-1930 or visit
our web site at srclean.org.

Choral Society
auditions
The Choral Society of
Pensacola - Northwest
Florida's premier sym-
phonic chorus - will hold
auditions for new singers on
Saturday, August 6,2011, in
Room 801 of the Pensacola
State College Ashmore Fine
Arts Auditorium, 1000 Col-
lege Blvd. Auditions will be
held from 10 a.m. to noon.
Choral Society Artis-
tic Director, Xiaolun Chen,
will conduct the auditions,
which take place in a very
relaxed and non-threaten-
ing atmosphere.
Call Mr. Chen at 850-484-
1810 for more information.
Auditions on other days can
be arranged by special ap-
pointment.

SBDC presents
"Starting a Business"
The Small Business De-
velopment Center at the
University of West Florida,
located at 401 E. Chase
Street, Suite 100 in Pensac-
ola, is presenting "Starting
a Business" on Thursday
morning, July 14,2011, from
9 a.m. to Noon. Attendees
will learn about taxation,
financing, insurance, and
legal forms of business. At-
tendance fee is $35 for the
public and free for students
and faculty members of the
University of West Florida
who present a Nautilus
card. Since our funding
agency requires a minimum
number of attendees, we
cancel workshops that don't
meet these requirements.
Pre-registration is strongly
recommended. Call 850-
595-0063 to register.
SBDC workshops, semi-
nars, and conferences pro-
vide practical, up-to-date
information on business
topics ranging from the ba-
sics to more advanced busi-
ness management skills.
Instructors include SBDC
Certified Business Ana-
lysts, faculty from higher
education, government ex-
perts, and private-sector
professionals.
The Small Business De-
velopment Center at the
University of West Florida is
a partnership program with
the U.S. Small Business Ad-
ministration and is a mem-
ber of the Florida Small
Business Development
Center Network, a non-prof-
it network of college and
university-based centers.
The organization provides
high quality management
counseling, entrepreneurial
training, and information
access and transfer to area
business people.


S.S. Dixon Intermediate School HONOR ROLL


3RD GRADE
A HONOR ROLL
Abigail Bane,Haley
Bondurant, Katie Brabham,
Grace Hadder, Katie Hilliard,
Blake Watts
A/B HONOR ROLL
Ellison Ferro, Meredith
Gilleland, Brittany Jordan, Holly
Pate, Melanie Wetherbee,
Chloe Channell, Kenna
McKinley, Christian Ottley,
James Richardson, Luke Siyufy,
McKenna Townsend, Seth
Wade, Bailey Waller

4TH GRADE
A HONOR ROLL
Elise Schultz, Rebecca
Carroll, Caleb Confusione,
Emily Gagliano, Mohammad
Qureshi, Rachel Shropshire,
Connor Zameska, Perri Fortune,
Nick Guadagnoli, Cole Jenkins,
Maggie Kriner, Madison Lacoste,
Grace McCammon, Emily
Seibel, Alysa Cook, Heather
Inman, Blake Moore, Zachary
Sahin, Ryan Snow, Trent Booker,
Andrew Penton, Dalton Hemby,


Jakob Kasper, Timothy McAlpin,
Brittany McCollough, Matthew
White
A/B HONOR ROLL
Ryleigh Baker, Hannah
Green, Alexia Hinote, Bradley
Jumonville, Preston Price,
Britney Robinson, Alex Stinson,
Ryan Bell, Jennifer Dean,
Danielle Gibson, Nathan
Hatcher, Zachary Higgins,
Alexis Lazzaretto, Hans
Maybach, Wesley McCall, Riley
McPheeters, Kristin Stinson,
Haley Baggett, Harmony Barry,
Morgan Crisco, Andrew Henry,
Robby Higginbothem, Blake
Jarman, Barry Murphy, Dalton
Porter, Keith Reynolds, Robert
Wright, Caden Buractaon,
Dalton Clark, Molly Goodson,
Kenzie Hughes, Chase Lastinger,
Alexis Miiller, Morgan Powell,
Grant Peaden, Eric Rhoades,
Dehlia Balliet, Hunter Barnhill,
Hannah Carroll, Leilani Colon,
Patrick Fitzgerald, Evan Fowler,
Emma Lasure, Allen Martin, Ella
Maybach, Seth Neal, Karla
Salazar, Britney Sanders, Emma
Schneider, Kip Smith, Logan
Taylor, Chayla Burgess, Katie


Dezenzo, Destiny Kleinsmith,
Seth McDonald, Bonnie
Touchton, Tyler Watson, Zack
Wisher, Hayden Tadlock,
Joseph Morgan, Michalynne
Walker

5TH GRADE
A HONOR ROLL
Macayla Bass, Caleb Bryant,
Rio Crimaudo, Michael Ennis,
Jacob Hensley, Ale Ottley, Briana
Riley, Peter Russo, Matthew
Spata, Preston Taylor, Makayla
Thomas, Emily Christiansen,
Haley Cobb, Evan DeVane,
Sam Faulkner, Valarie Godwin,
Marissa Godwin, Marissa
Jacobsen, Jordon McGee,
Noah Needles, Ben Quarles,
A.J. Rabinowitz, Bennett
Shell, Anna Whitfield, Alexa
Lacoste, Terrian Spears, River
Cody, Caidyn Davis, Catherine
Lambert, Nicholas Pruse, Lauren
Hackett, Taylor Labertew, Taylor
Walker, Dalton Childs, Morgan
Davis, Alondra Figueroa, Tony
Gerencser, Gabby Groton, Zach
Howell, Spencer Lovett, Alec
Smudde, Matthew White


A/B HONOR ROLL
Justyn Shelby, Christian
Allen, Victoria Anderson,
Jimmy Bianca, Brandon Barnes,
Adrienne Dodson, Mallory
Higgins, Natalie Leanza,
Haley Neal, Evan Osburn,
Will Stewart, Emmett Davy,
Chris Farkas, Zach Haines,
Bryna Henderson, Elizabeth
Wilson,Danielle Dodson,
Damileon Faust, Christopher
Jarrell, Sebrina Mabire, Aubrey
Morin, Morgan Pendygraft,
Collin Scott, Joseph Verda,
Seanna Bonifay, Jacob Crow,
Yasmin DaSilva, Madison
Dillard, Abigail Fuller, Claire
Huber, Alyssa LeMay, Zach
Stanford, Lexie Stockdale, Nicole
Tislow, Alexis Van Norman,
Jack Webb, Josh Zajac, Leanne
Vandiver, Collin Stranzl, Josh
Robinson, Tristan Pace, Michelle
Lee, Kyle Krogol, Hunter
Klemens, Aileen Dao, Isabel
Carden, Michael Wimmer,
Haley Bartell, Clay Burkart,
Madison Carter, Michael Clark,
Marleigh Cobb, Albert Fox,
Taylor Hart, Sydnie High, Keith
Thomas, Riley Ward


* *


~YI






Wednesday, July 6, 2011


Sheriff's Renort


Santa Rosa's Press Gazette I B3


KEY
MVOP - misdemean-
or violation of probation
FVOP - felony viola-
tion of probation
Agg - aggravated
Poss - possession
Meth - methamphet-
amine
DUI - driving under
the influence
DWLSR - driving
while license suspended
or revoked
FTA - failure to ap-
pear
FTR - failure to reg-
ister
SF - sentenced felony
SM - sentenced mis-
demeanor
LEO - law enforce-
ment officer
DV - Domestic Vio-
lence

The following arrests
were made beginning
June 1 through June
2011.

June 1
Anthony, Rogers Lewis;
Male; 33; 1819 El Paso Trl,
Gulf Breeze; Sex Offender
Violation Fail to Comply
with Registration Law.
Duncan, Nancy Eliza-
beth; Female; 29; 39 Sandal
Wood St., Pensacola; Non-
moving Traffic Violation
Driving While License Sus-
pended first offense; Drug
Possession Controlled Sub-
stance without Perscrip-
tion (including meth) two
counts; Drug Equipment
Possession and or Use.
Holmes, Mitchell Layne;
Male; 50; 1792 Bay Pine Cir-
cle, Gulf Breeze; Marijuana
Possession Possession
Marijuana Over 20 Grams;
Drug Equipment Posses-
sion and or Use.
Lewis, Antwun Deshon;
Male; 36; 1413 East Bobe
St., Pensacola; Damage
Property Criminal Mischief
$1,000 or more; Carrying a
Concealed Weapon Electric
Weapon or Device; Mari-
juana Possession Not More
than 20 Grams; Resist Offi-
cer Obstruction without Vi-
olence; Contempt of Court
Violation Injunction Repeat
Sex Date Violation.
Maniccia, Ryan Keith;
Male; 39; 4332 Seaport Rd.,
Pace; Aggravated Assault
with Deadly Weapon with-
out Intent to Kill (D/V).
Moses, Richard Gray;
Male; 45; 6580 Baxley Rd.,
Milton; Larceny Grand
Theft Over $200 and Less
than $5,000.
Powers, Oscar Lee;
Male; 20; 960 Johnson Rd.,
Perdido, Ala.; Probation
Violation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Prince, Michael Men-
doza; Male; 42; 5263 Gulf
Breeze Parkway, Gulf
Breeze; Larceny Grand
Theft $300 less than $5,000.
Rogers, Bobby Joyce;
Male; 31; 2419 Basswood Dr.,
Navarre; Battery Second or
Subsequent Offense (D/V).
Short, Stephen Shi;
Male; 41; 4336 Chantilly Way
Milton; Sex Offender Viola-
tion Fail to Report Vacating
Permanent Residence; Sex
Offender Violation Fail to
Comply with Registration
Law.
Stokes, William Evan;
Male; 27; 1908 Brentco
Rd., Cantonment; Larceny
Grand Theft $300 less than
$5,000.
Williams, Keith Brian;
Male; 40; 4700 Evelyn St.,
Pace; Aggravated Assault
with Deadly Weapon with-
out Intent to Kill (D/V).
Estess, Shane Bradley;
Male; 14; 4629 Dean Dr.,
Pace; Synthetic Narcotic
Possession with intent to
Sell, Manufacture, or De-
liver Schedule I or II.
Holland, David Wayne;
Male; 41; 4180 Stephens Rd.,
Pace; Nonmoving Traffic
Violation Driving While Li-
cense Suspended Habitual
Offender.
Perry, Shelly McPherson;
Female; 29; 6523 Skyline Dr.,
Milton; Nonmoving Traffic
Violation Driving While Li-
cense Suspended First Of-


fense; Drug Equipment Pos-
session and or Use; Drug
Possession Controlled Sub-
stance without Prescription
(including Meth); Smuggle
Contraband Introduce into
Detention Facility.
Smegelski, Jason Stuart;


Male; 30; 8209 Newcastle Ct.,
Milton; Nonmoving Traffic
Violation Driving While Li-
cense Suspended Habitual
Offender.

June 2
Anthony, Roger Lewis;
Male; 33; 1819 El Paso Trl.,
Gulf Breeze; Cruelty To-
wards a Child Transmit
Information Harmful to
Minors; Sex Offender Vio-
lation Fail To Report Email
Address Instant Message
Name.
Blackman, John Kevin;
Male; 38; 2871 Jay Rd.,
Brewton, Ala.; Marijuana
Possession with Intent to
Sell or Manufacture or De-
liver Schedule I; Drug Pos-
session Control Substance
without Prescription (in-
cluding Meth); Drug Equip-
ment Possession And or
Use; Smuggle Contraband
Introduce Into Detention
Facility
Braswell, Michael An-
thony; 20; 4527 Marcel Dr.,
Pensacola; Probation Vio-
lation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Brouwer, Christopher
James; Male; 25; 6564 Ro-
bie Rd., Milton; Probation
Violation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Dixon, Chadwick Clay;
Male; 31; 6715 Munson
Highway, Milton; Probation
Violation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Frasier, Kirby Darnell;
Male; 48; 2785 Fox Hall Ln.,
College Park, Ga.; Out of
State Fugitive From Jus-
tice.
Garza, Frances; Female;
30; 124 Mill Run, Lake Mary,
Fla.; Out of State Fugitive
From Justice.
Luthhardt, Lori Lynn;
49; 9804 Tracie Rd., Milton;
Probation Violation Felony
or Commit Continual Un-
known Felony/Misdemean-
or/Juvenile Non Criteria.
Rogers, Bobby Joyce;
Male; 51; 2419 Basswood
Dr., Navarre; Probation
Violation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Barboza, Christopher
Cody; Male; 27; 9 Clark Rd.,
Hurlburt Field, Fla.; Traf-
fic Offense DUI Alcohol or
Drugs; Traffic Offense DUI
and Damage Property.
Register, Bryan Everett;
Male; 21; 3142 Bobby Jones
Dr., Pace; Traffic Offense
DUI Alcohol or Drugs.
Buckhalter, Jr., Thomas
Leon; Male; 26; 4536 Old
Guernsey Rd., Pace; Non-
moving Traffic Violation
Drive While License Sus-
pended Habitual Offender.
Parker, Sharla Jean; Fe-
male; 36; 6845 Roundup Ln.,
Milton; Damage Property
Criminal Mischief $1,000 or
More.
Harmon, Eric Lee; Male;
23; 21 Morerity St., Ft. Walton
Beach, Fla.; Traffic Offense
DUI Alcohol or Drugs.

June 5
Chappel, Tyler James;
Male; 20; 14084 Palm St., Ma-
deira Beach, Fla.; Probation
Violation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Cole, Robert Brian;


Male; 42; 1211 Fairfield Dr.,
Pensacola; Larceny Grand
Theft $300 Less Than
$5,000.
Duffy, Nikita Dawn; Fe-
male; 23; 5433 Byrom St.,
Milton; Probation Violation
Felony or Commit Contin-
ual Unknown Felony/Mis-
demeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Gantt, Cameron Scott;
Male; 18; 8749 Laredo St.,
Navarre; Lewd Lascivious
Behavior Offender 18 Years
of Age or Older Victim Less
Than 16 Years of Age (2
counts).
Khune, Thomas Scott;
Male; 41; 5045 Ridgeway
Blvd., Milton; Probation
Violation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Mayo, Matthew Paul;
Male; 18; 2114 Paloma St.,
Navarre; Probation Vio-
lation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
McLean, Daniel Lee;
Male; 56; 6684 Coldwater
Church Rd., Milton; Drug
Possession Controlled Sub-
stance Without Prescrip-
tion (including Meth); Drug
Equipment Possession and
or Use.
Moses, Richard Gray;
Male; 45; 6580 Baxley Rd.,
Milton; Battery Second or
Subsequent Offense; Drug
Equipment Possession and
or Use.
Riggs, Margaret Lynn;
Female; 51; 1515 Whisper
Bay Blvd., Gulf Breeze; Cru-
elty Toward Child Abuse
without Great Harm (D/V).
Seal, Dillon Boardman;
Male; 21; English Turn Dr.,
Pace; Burglary Unoccupied
Dwelling Unarmed; Lar-
ceny Grand Theft $300 Less
Than $5,000; Burglary Unoc-
cupied Dwelling Unarmed;
Larceny Petit Theft Second
Degree First Offense.
Taylor, Allen Jerome;
Male; 36; 404 Hill St., Mil-
ton; Fraud False Owner
Information Pawn Items
Less Than $300; Dealing In
Stolen Property; Larceny
Grand Theft $300 Less Than
$5,000.
Thompson, Gregg; Male;
33; 4619 Carmel Circle, Pace;
Battery Touch or Strike (D/
V); Obstruct Police Deprive
of Means, Protection, or
Communication.
Martin, Quentin Eugene;
Male; 53; 2646 Barefoot
Creek Cir, Navarre; Grand
Theft.
Adams, DiquanMarkese;
Male; 16; 945 Montclair, Pen-
sacola; Burglary Unoccu-
pied Conveyance Unarmed;
Larceny Grand Theft $300
Less Than $5,000; Burglary
Dwelleing,Structure, or
Conveyance Armed; Bur-
glary Unoccupied Convey-
ance Unarmed; Larceny
Grand Theft $300 Less Than
$5,000; Larceny Petit Theft
First Degree $100 Less
$300; Vehicle Theft Grand
Theft of Motor Vehicle; Bur-
glary Unoccupied Convey-
ance Unarmed; Larceny
Grand Theft $300 Less Than
$5,000; Burglary Unoccu-
pied Conveyance Unarmed;
Burglary Unoccupied Con-
veyance Unarmed; Larceny
Petit Theft First Degree
$100 less $300.
Bunten, Cody Blaine;
Male; 22; 1444DA South
Blvd., Silver Hill, Fla.; Ag-
gravated Battery Cause
Bodily Harm or Disability.
Fullerton, Chad Mar-
cus; Male; 23; 5704 Bentley
Cir., Milton; Larceny Grand
Theft $300 Less Than $5,000;
Dealing In Stolen Property;
Fraud Give False Informa-
tion to Second Hand Owner
Under $300; Burglary Unoc-
cupied Structure Unarmed;
Larceny Grand Theft $300
Less Than $5,000; Dealing
In Stolen Property.
Fullerton, Samantha Ma-
rie; Female; 22; 5704 Bentley
Cir., Milton; Burglary Unoc-
cupied Structure Unarmed;
Larceny Grand Theft $300
Less Than $5,000; Dealing
In Stolen Property.
May, Dakota William;
Male; 17; 4632 Reese Dr.,
Gulf Breeze; Battery Com-


mit Felony Battery.
O'Brien, Elizabeth Anne;
Female; 32; 2320 Glamis Dr.,
Pensacola; Larceny Petit
Theft Second Degree First
Offense; Drug Possession
Controlled Substance With-
out Prescription (including
Meth) (2 counts).


*


Townley, Matthew Todd;
Male; 21; 19820 County Road
64, Loxley, Ala.; Aggravated
Battery Cause Bodily Harm
or Disability.
Hawkins, Marilee Es-
ther, Female; 43; 2215 Jack-
son St., Pensacola; Traffic
Offense Refuse To Submit
DUI Test After License Sus-
pended; Traffic Offense DUI
Alcohol or Drugs.
Green, Morris Junior,
Male; 60; 6449 Arbor Lane,
Gulf Breeze; Traffic Offense
DUI Alcohol or Drugs (2
counts).
Locklear, Bruce Wayne;
Male; 35; 3175 Notre Dame
Dr., Gulf Breeze; Traffic
Offense DUI Alcohol or
Drugs.

June 6
Daughdrill, Steven De-
wayne; Male; 52; 822 Octave
St., Diberville, Miss.; Fraud
Conceal Information to Ob-
tain Prescription.
Howard, Rose Marie;
Female; 21; 2125 Janet St.,
Navarre; Probation Viola-
tion Felony or Commit Con-
tinual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Kirkland, Thomas Ford;
Male; 19; 8435 Chisholm, Es-
cambia, Fla.; Traffic Offense
DUI Alcohol or Drugs.
Berge, Dean Allen, Male;
53; 1063 Circle Ln., Gulf
Breeze; Traffic Offense DUI
Alcohol or Drugs; Traffic
Offense DUI with Property
Damage.
Holland, Joshua David;
Male; 29; 11541 Highway
87 N, Milton; Probation
Violation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria (2 counts).
Santini, Antonio; Male;
52; 1836 Falmingo Ln., Na-
varre; Battery Commit Do-
mestic Battery by Strangu-
lation.

June 7
Addison III, Thomas
Hubbard; Male; 22; 5041
Ridgeway Blvd., Milton; Ag-
gravated Assault with Dead-
ly Weapon Without Intent
to Kill; Damage Property
Criminal Mischief Over $200
under $1,000; Resist Officer
Obstruct Without Violence.
Childress, Joseph Lee;
Male; 43; 6440 Howard Ave.,
Milton; Burglary Unoccu-
pied Structure Unarmed;
Larceny Grand Theft $300
Less Than $5,000.
Cooley, Douglas Arron;
Male; 43; 106 Savannah
St., Pensacola; Nonmoving
Traffic Violation Drive While
License Suspended Third
or Subsequent Offense;
Larceny Petit Theft Second
Degree First Offense.
Finch, Johnny Elmer,
Male; 32; 4245 Mosby St.,
Pace; Aggravated Battery
Cause Bodily Harm or Dis-
ability (D/V); Trespassing
Property Not Structure or
Convey; Vehicle Theft Grand
Theft of Motor Vehicle.
Gostomski, David Glenn;
Male; 24; 8434 Racing Ln.,








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Navarre; Probation Vio-
lation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Harris, Donald Wayne;
Male; 45; 4233 Mosby St.,
Pace; Probation Violation
Felony or Commit Contin-
ual Unknown Felony/Mis-
demeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Gostomski, David Glenn;
Male; 24; 8434 Racing Ln.,
Navarre; Probation Vio-
lation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Johnson, Aaron Neil;
Male; 32; Larceny Grand
Theft $300 Less Than
$5,000.
Kreutz, Glory Ann; Fe-
male; 18; Maddox Rd., Mil-
ton; Battery On Officer,
Firefighter, EMT, Etc. (2
counts); Damage Property
Criminal Mischief Over $200
under $1,000; Resist Officer
With Violence (2 counts);
Resist Officer Obstruct
Without Violence.
Laliberte, John Allen;
Male; 21; 6443 Maddox Rd.,
Milton; Probation Violation
Felony or Commit Contin-
ual Unknown Felony/Mis-
demeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Mason, Robert Adam;
Male; 31; no address given;
Damage Property Criminal
Mischief $200 and Under;
Resist Officer Obstruct
Without Violence; Obstruct-
ing Justice Intimidate
Threaten etc. Victim Wit-
ness Informant.
Perry, James Randall;
Male; 22; 127 Ruberia Ave.,
Pensacola; Probation Vio-
lation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Ward, Susan Esther; Fe-
male; 52; 4556 Belleville Ct.,
Milton; Probation Violation
Felony or Commit Contin-
ual Unknown Felony/Mis-
demeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Zarahn, Shawnda Ev-
elyn; Female; 33; 6097 Lan-
sing Dr., Milton; Marijuana
Possession With Intent To
Sell Manufacture or Deliver
Schedule I; Drug Equip-
ment Possession and or
Use.
Hadder, Michael Jay;
Male; 52; 6491 Outer Dr.,
Milton; Fraud Employer
Not Get Workers Compen-
sation Insurance Under
$20,000.
Forst, Clinton James;
Male; 33; 4120 Cooley Dr.,
Pace; Traffic Offense DUI
Alcohol or Drugs.
Fuller, Alicia Darlene; Fe-
male; 32; 3172 Birdseye Cir.,
Gulf Breeze; Traffic Offense
DUI Alcohol or Drugs.
Stone, Andrew Bradley,
Male; 21; 5886 Admirals Rd.,
Milton; Traffic Offense DUI
Alcohol or Drugs.
Moore, Jerry Allen;
Male; 53; 5623 Tom Sawyer
Rd., Milton; Traffic Offense
DUI Alcohol or Drugs.


June 8
Bailey, John Daniel;
Male; 27; 3303 East Blount
St., Pensacola; Traffic Of-
fense DUI Alcohol or Drugs;
Traffic Offense DUI and
Damage Property; Neglect
Child Without Great Harm;
Moving Traffic Violation
Reckless Driving First Of-
fense.
Cole, Jr., James William;
Male; 40; 102 L Street, Pen-
sacola; Damage Property
Criminal Mischief $200 and
Under (three counts); Bur-
glary Unoccupied Structure
Unarmed (fourcounts); Lar-
ceny Grand Theft $300 Less
Than $5,000 (four counts).
Jenkins, Donna Renea;
Female; 46; 5857 Vestavia
Ct., Pensacola; Failure to
Appear for Felony Offense.
Latham, Teresa Ann; Fe-
male; 51; 5327 State Coach
Tr., Gulf Breeze; Probation
Violation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Resendiz-Cruz, David;
Male; 23; 8626 James St.,
Milton; Fraud Possession
Similitude ID Card; Fraud
Attempt to Use ID of An-
other Person Without Con-
sent; Cocaine Possession;
Fraud False ID Given To
Law Enforcement Officer;
Obstructing Justice Intimi-
date, Threaten, Etc. a Vic-
tim, Witness, or Informant.
Faass, Claudette Marie;
Female; 43; 5708 Meadow
Rd., Milton; Probation Vio-
lation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.
Lowery,JohnDana; Male;
56; 3268 Ridge Rd., Brewton,
Ala.; Larceny Grand Theft
$300 Less Than $5,000.
Moss, David Randall;
Male; 13; 5488 Woodlawn
Rd., Milton; Burglary Unoc-
cupied Structure Unarmed;
Larceny Petit Theft Second
Degree First Offense.
Rutherford, Dustin RJ;
Male; 16; 7918 Kamie Ct.,
Milton; Burglary Unoccu-
pied Structure Unarmed;
Larceny Petit Theft Second
Degree First Offense.
Bailey, John Daniel;
Male; 27; 3303 East Blount
St., Milton; Traffic Offense
DUI Alcohol or Drugs; Traf-
fic Offense DUI and Dam-
age Property.

June 9
Pitts, James Bartt; Male;
49; no address given; Traf-
fic Offense DUI Alcohol or
Drugs; Traffic Offense Re-
fuse to Submit to DUI Test
After License Suspended.
Morrell, Jr., Delbert;
Male; 40; 6418 Simpson Dr.,
Milton; Nonmoving Traffic
Violation Driving While Li-
cense Suspended Habitual
Offender.
Lavin, Joey Alexander;
Male; 23; 198 Elm Rd., DeFi-
niak Springs, Fla.; Probation
Violation Felony or Commit
Continual Unknown Felony/
Misdemeanor/Juvenile Non
Criteria.


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B4 I Santa Rosa's Press Gazette


Classifieds


Wednesday, July 6, 2011


0' COVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA




emermid axi






market


Nortriwest Florwca Daily News News Herala Destin Log Crestview News Bulletin Walton Sun The Star Holmes County Times Advertiser WashIngton County News Santa Rosa's Press Gazette TIe :T:mes









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for all of your buying and selling needs.


ffaffi . etplace- I


o- LLUAL-"


IT^ I .t . 3f i \roo ,, , I oo1 ,


(850) 434-9200 claims with this Court
' Fax- (850) 208-7100 WITHIN THE LATER
Attorneys for OF THREE MONTHS
S* Co-Personal Repre- AFTER THE DATE OF
sentatives THE FIRST PUBLICA-
ANNOUNCE IENTS TION OF THIS NOTICE

1110 - Classited Notices KEEGAN TRUST THE DATE OF SERV-
1120 - Public Notices/ By /s/STEPHEN G. ICE OF A COPY OF
Announcements TIMBERLAKE THIS NOTICE ON
1125 -Carpools & Stephen G. Timberlake, THEM.
Rideshare Senior VP
1130 - Adoplions SenoVP
1140 -Happy Ads Co-Personal Repre- All other creditors of
1150-Personals sentative the decedent and other
P A 1160 -Lost persons having claims
1170 - Found /s/BETSY ROBINS or demands against
Betsy Robins, decedent's estate, in-
Co-Personal Repre- cluding unmatured,
TO 10 sentative contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file
6/496 062911 their claims with this
070611 court WITHIN THREE
IN THE CIRCUIT 6/496 MONTHS AFTER THE
COURT FOR SANTA DATE OF THE FIRST
ROSA COUNTY, FLOR- PUBLICATION OF
IDA THIS NOTICE.
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2011-CP-158 7/520 ALL OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL
IN RE: ESTATE OF IN THE CIRCUIT BE FOREVER BARRED
A D V E R TE ROBERT D. WILLIAMS, COURT IN AND FOR
Deceased. SANTA ROSA The date of first publi-
COUNTY FL cation of this Notice is
NOTICE TO CREDI- PROBATE DIVISION Wednesday, July 6,
TORS File Number: 2011,
S2010-CP-291
The administration of Division: Attorney for Personal
the estate of Robert D. Representative:
I Williams, deceased, In Re The Estate Of: /s/GERALD MCKENZIE
whose date of death Eugenla A. Gentry, GERALD McKENZIE
was April 15, 2011 is Deceased Attorney for Personal
pending in the Circuit Representative
Court for Santa Rosa NOTICE TO CREDI- 301 North Barcelona
County, Florida, Pro- TORS Street
bate Division, the ad- Pensacola, FL 32501
dress of which is PO. The administration of (850)438-7285
Box 472, Milton, FL the estate of EUGENIA Florida Bar Number:
32572. The names and A. GENTRY, deceased, 869384
addresses of the File Number
co-personal represent- 2010-CP-291, is pend- Personal Representa-
1 0nta Qoga rIDre atives and the Ing in the Circuit Court tive:
co-personal represent- for Santa Rosa County, /s/JOSEPH CURTIS
atves' attorney are set Florida, Probate Divi- ANTONE
Ge forth below. sion the address of JOSEPH CURTIS AN-
which is: Clerk of the TONE
All creditors of the de- Court, Probate Division, Personal Representa-
cedent and other per- PO. Box 472, Milton, tive
sons having claims or Florida 32572. The 5173 Zachary Boule-
demands against names and addresses vard
C S S I decedent's estate on of the personal repre- Pensacola, Florida
whom a copy of this sentative and the per- 32526
notice is required to be sonal representative's
Served must file their attorney are set forth 070611
SV*SS IF IE D claims with this court below. 071311
WITHIN THE LATER 7/520
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER All creditors of the de-
THE TIME OF THE cedent and other per- '. i
, FIRST PUBLICATION sons having claims or ' .,4
OF THIS NOTICE OR demands against 'j J
30 DAYS AFTER THE decedent's estate, in-
I DATE OF SERVICE OF eluding unmatured,
IA COPY OF THIS NO- contingent or unliqul-
STICE ON THEM. dated claims, on whom
a copy of this notice is
the decedent and other
persons having claims 1.7M IW [:,
or demands against Z 1 7ZU Wills
decedents estate must Divorce 149, Wil30
file their claims with this Centipede- Name Change '49
W, court WITHIN 3 St. Augustine FREE Typing, Call for
MONTHS AFTER THE Farn Direct Worksheet(850)434-7524
DATE OF THE FIRST sDeliv1
PUBLICATION OF 1850N."W"St
THIS NOTICE. 434-0066 (1 blk N. of Fea Market)
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WITHIN TI-I1
"^ ^ i l A TIME PERIODc i T il
FORTH IN SEI_.TI .1I
733.702 OF THE l-''l
IDA PROBATE . *:
SWILL BE F lF,,l. i- l-
BARRED.


Tired of Red Tape? Le-
gal Form Processor
Complete education in
Business Admin. 25
years experience. No-
tary Public- completion
of any and all legal
forms, SSI, Property
Deeds, Divorce, etc.
Prices vary. References
available. 850-626-0629



Stewart's Tractor
Works & Land
Clearing, Inc.
Tree & Stump Removal
from trimming to take-
down. Debris removal
& Storm Clean-Up.
Demolition & Hauling.
Land Clearing. Back-
hoe & Trackhoe Work.
Heavy Brush & Forestry
Mowing. Tree work
done by man lift.
516-1801 or 675-4291
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
PAUL STEWART


1100
7/521
PUBLIC SALE
MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL PROP-
ERTY WILL BE SOLD
TO SATISFY RENT
LIEN ON July 26, 2011
at 11:00 A.M.
UNIT WILL BE SHOWN
JUST PRIOR TO BIDD-
ING. WE RESERVE
THE RIGHT TO REF-
USE ANY BIDS.
UNITS LISTED AS FOL-
LOWS:
Unit 752 Dawn Rojas:
Boxes, Misc.
Unit 531 Andreyanna
Murchy: Totes, Bags,
Misc.
STORAGE MASTER
4636 WOODBINE RD
PACE, FL 32571
070611
071311
7/521


Legal 6/497
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE
Fort Storage located at
4114 Avalon Blvd. Mil-
ton, FL 32583 hereby
gives notice of a public
sale to the highest bid-
der for cash only on
July 15, 2011 at 10:00
am in accordance with
the Florida Self Storage
Facility Act Statutes
(sect i o n
83.801-83.809). Seller
reserves the right to
withdraw property from
sale at any time. This
property is being sold
to satisfy a landlord
lien.
Property includes con-
tents of the spaces of
the following tenants.
Unit # Tenant Name
Contents
917 Cheryl L. Jones
Furniture, toys, boxes,
lamps
189 Ricky Triplett
washer/dryer, refrigera-
tor, TV
535 Crystal Gates tool
box, plastic totes
725 Cody Cun-
ningham table
w/chairs, microwave,
exercise machine
727 Charlie V Nail
boom box w/speakers,
TV, Entertainment cen-
ter
739 Joanne Harding
Refrigerator, Plastic
Totes, monitor
937 Angel Rivas Furni-
ture, plastic totes,
boxes
743/744 Richard Kirk-
patrick Furniture,
Bikes, TV's
753 Shelia Rushing
Furniture, Refrigerator,
Washer/Dryer
062911
070611
6/497


1100
7/522
Notice Under Ficti-
tious Name Law Pur-
suant to Section
865.09, Florida Stat-
utes
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the under-
signed, desiring to en-
gage in business under
the fictitious name of
Momma Bakes Cakes
located at 3021 Wal-
lace Lake Road, in the
County of Santa Rosa,
in the City of Pace,
Florida 32571 intends
to register the said
name with the Division
of Corporations of the
Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee,
Florida.
Dated at Pace, Florida,
this 30th day of June,
2011
Angela Gray, Dustin
Gray
070611(1)
7/522


1110


Incorrect
Insertion
Policy

For Classified
In-column Ad-
vertisers

All ads placed by
phone are read back
to the advertiser to
insure correctness.
The newspaper will
assume correctness
at the time of the
read-back procedure
unless otherwise in-
formed.

Please your ad.

Advertisers are re-
quested to check the
advertisement on the
first insertion for cor-
rectness. Errors
should be reported
immediately.
Your Florida Free-
dom newspaper will
not be responsible
for more than one in-
correct insertion, nor
will it be liable for
any error in adver-
tisements to a
greater extent than
the cost of the space
occupied by the er-
ror.
Any copy change,
during an ordered
schedule constitutes
a new ad and new
charges.
We do not
guarantee position
of ANY ad under
any classification.


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Wednesday, July 6, 2011


PETS& ANIMALS
2100- Pets
2110 - Pets: Free to
Good Home
2120 - Pet Supplies
2130 - Farm Animals/
Supplies
2140 - Pets/Livestock
Wanted
2150 -Pet Memorials



Lab mix puppies in Mil-
ton $50. each. Shots
and wormed. 8 weeks
old. Vet checked. Dark
brown to tan.
850-382-0239


MERCHANDISE
3100-Antiques
3110 -Appliances
3120 -Arts & Crafts
3130 -Auctions
3140 - Baby Items
3150 - Building Supplies
3160 - Business
Equipment
3170-Collectibles
3180 -Computers
3190 - Electronics
3200 - Firewood
3210 - Free Pass it On
3220 - Furniture
3230 - Garage/Yard Sales
3240 - Guns
3250 - Good Things to Eat
3260 - Health & Fitness
3270 - Jewelry/Clothing
3280 - Machinery/
Equipment
3290 - Medical Equipment
3300 - Miscellaneous
3310 - Musical Instruments
3320 - Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 - Restaurant/Hotel
3340 - Sporting Goods
3350 - Tickets (Buy & Sell)


3220
Brand Name Queen
Size Pillowtop Set, still
in plastic, with mfr war-
ranty. Delivery avail.
$160.850-471-0330
Brand New King Mat-
tress w/foundations pil-
lowtop factory sealed,
w/warranty, can deliver.
$265.850-255-0123
Full Size Mattress &
Box, new, never used,
with warranty. $140.
850-255-0123
Memory Foam Mat-
tress, Still new in Box.
Queen$375, & King
$475 850-471-0330


3230


2 FAMILYYARD SALE
6330 Cottage Woods
Drive. Sat., July 9th
7am - 1 pm


Do Something


Good For


Tomorrow


7 3230 | 3250
Curtis Penton Farms
-and Berrydale Farmer
Mkt. We accept Wic
Milton Coupon (850) 675-4111
5547 Andromeda Dr.
6:30 - 12 noon 3300
Baby bed, mattress,
hlghchalr, stroller, LOTS OF STUFF!
misc. and table saw Collectors only!
(850) 686-7586
STwo grave lots at Se-
renity Gardens. $500
each. 623-9037
Sat., July 9th
7am until 11am
5272 Lonesome / - '


Dove Lane
(Hunters Ridge Sub.)


L _3240
GUN SHOW
Santa Rosa County
Auditorium, Milton,
FL July 9th/10th
9am - 5pm call
(850) 957-4952 or
(850)261-8407
General
Admission $6.


4100- Help Wanted
4130 - Employment
Information


-4%0b P


4100
Experienced cleaning
person needed. Must
have own vehicle.
Non-smoking environ-
ment. 994-1785 (leave
message).
Now Hiring!
Are You Making Less
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Covenant Transport
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*Immediate Jobs
Placement Assistance
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en'irn ' 'iy.'4 'l,i,.C.[Tr. u'lll


Classifieds


4130 | |"6110j

OTR DRIVERS- Food Publisher's
Grade Tank Drivers. Notice


CDL-A w/tank endorse-
ment, Good MVR &
Hazmat within 90 days
required. Up to 42cpm
w/additional mileage
incentives & benefits.
(877)882-6537 or www.
oakleytransport.com


6100 - Business/
Commercial
6110 - Apartments
6120 -Beach Rentals
6130-Condo/Townhouse
6140 - House Rentals
0150 - Roommate Wanted
6160- Rooms for Rent
6170 -Mobile Home/Lot
6180 - Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 - Timeshare Rentals
6200 - Vacation Rentals


AN OPEN LETTIFR OP APOLOGY FROM THE ECONOMY

I'm sorry
To state the obvious, it hasn't been pretty the last few years, especially for the job market
I'm aware of the anger, and I don't blame you This whole thing got away from me But I think its time we made
a fresh start
Here's what I propose:
1 If you have a job and you're happy with it, good for you Keep it up
2 If you're not happy in your job, its time to rethink things I'm not telling you to quit on the spot But maybe
there's a better job out there for you
3 If you've taken a job that under normal circumstances you wouldn't have, my hat's off to you You did what
you had to do But now maybe it's time to go back to doing what you do best
4 If you don't have a job, again, I'm sorry I know looking for a job can be, to put it nicely, challenging
But know this it's not you, its me And if the recovery is here, I think you can lead the way
So to everyone who's been affected the last few years, which is pretty much everyone, I accept complete
responsibility But now the ball is in your court You have permission to move on with your life
It's time to move forward, find a job you love and get back to work ;" or3
Sicerely,





The Economy has made it tough on everyone the last few years. But it's time to move forward.
Visit emeraldcoastjobseast.com/monster to find the right job for you. Let's do this.


_____ - monster"


EMPL YER OF C VOICE





ITE/\
U a




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1RE.CYC~ILE






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516-1801 or 675-4291

Fre E U i lnEW- T i
S P-UL STEW -RT


All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to the Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to ad-
vertise "any preference,
limitation or discrimina-
tion based on race,
color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status
or national origin, or an
intention, to make any
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination"
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing cus-
tody of children under
18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation
of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed
that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper
are available on a equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


-LEn








,'- ...,,


Santa Rosa's Press Gazette I B5


1 6110
Large, waterfront,
Mother-in-law, 2/1,
stone, new appliances,
furnished, private park-
ing, covered patio,
CH&A, bar, fireplace,
private.ALL UTILITIES,
EVEN CABLE FUR-
NISHED. $895. Must
see!! Also, available
handicapped apt. Call
981-8663 for app.
Milton
1 bedroom furnished
apartment. CH&A. 1st
mth $99 + deposit of
$250. $450 mth after
1st mth. (850) 377-0420



3/2 nice, brick house
located at 4025 Over-
look Circle, Pace. $700
dep, $700 rent. (850)
698-8337 - please leave
a message or feel free
to text.
Milton
4/2 home on 5 acres.
$1,000 month, $1,000
sec. dep. 626-8959 or
377-6787 (cell) Call
Barbara Cumbie
Milton, FL
3/2, near Tanglewood.
Large fenced yard.
$800 month, $800 se-
curity. 781-729-7425
Pace area
3/2 with central heat &
air, stove & refrigerator.
Approx. 1,050 sq. ft. liv-
ing area. No pets. Call
623-4409

NifE[IM


CLUES ACROSS

1. A fencing sword
6. Agreement between two
states
10. Cut wood
14. The jejunum to the cecum
15. Common market people
17. Woven purse style of MA
19. Young goat
20. Den of a wild animal
21. Sea catfish genus
22. Rosenberg prosecutor Roy
23. Liberal rights organization
24. Tossed or flung
25. Shrimp sauteed in butter &
garlic
28. Veras are one type
30. Hail (nautical)
31. & Hammer
33. Football's Flutie


S 6140
Old Florida Charm
3 br/ 1 ba, CH&A, tile
floors screened porch.
$650 mth. $650 dep.
623-8365



Pace, Cross Roads 3/2
brick, fenced, fireplace,
greenhouse, 2 car grg,
new carpet, AC, paint,
wtr htr & range; land-
scaped; security sys-
tem; lawn care pro-
vided; no pets or smok-
ing; $1100
(850)607-4556


6170
1 mile south of Whiting
Field, 6483 Howard
Ave. 2/1, total electric,
fenced yard, covered
entry, garbage incl.
Rent $375, deposit
$300 623-8753
2 bedroom. Front and
back porch. Private lot.
Fenced yard. 623-5145


Your land or
family land is
all you need
to buy
a new home.
Call
850-682-3344


6170
3/1 FEMA mobile
home. Privacy, fenced
yard with front porch.
Avail. 7/1/11. (Will work
with you regarding de-
posit). East Gate Mo-
bile Home Ranch
626-8973

Clean 3/2 double wide.
$550 month, $300 dep.
OR 2/1, $375 month,
$300 dep. No pets.
675-6614







AUIMWMINE
RECREATION
8100 -Antique & Collectibles
8110 - Cars
8120 - Sports Utility Vehicles
8130 - Trucks
8140- Vans
8150 - Commercial
8160 - Motorcycles
8170 - Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210- Boats
8220 - Personal Watercraft
8230 - Sailboats
8240 - Boat & Marine
Supplies
8245 - Boat Slips & Docks
8310 - Aircraft/Aviation
8320 - ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 - Campers & Trailers
8340 - Motorhomes




2005 John Deere 4520
Tractor with front
loader, backhoe, fork-
lift, & post hole digger.
225 hp. Excellent con-
dition. $39,000
623-9037


34. Bus fees
36. Streetcar (Br.)
37. Runs PCs
38. Cola name
39. French river
40. Winged fruit
42. Ripened plant ovules
44. Uniform
45. Am. Martial Arts Soc.
46. Kosher NYC bakery
48. Early Cubist painter Juan
49. Boxer Muhammad
52. "Twilight" actor
55. Worker who coats ceilings
56. Of the dowry
57. Vertical spar supporting
sails
58. Mark for deletion
59. Enlighten


CLUES DOWN
1. Fall below the surface 28. Form a sum
2. Jai __, sport 29. W.C.s (Br.)
3. Curved segment 30. They __
4. A sunken groove 32. Woman (French)
5. Rivalrous 34. Sylvan
6. Beijing 35. Kwa
7. Hungarian Violinist 36. Belongs to CNN founder
Leopold 38. Play boisterously
8. Cathode-ray tube 39. Seaboard
9. Genus nicotiana plants 41. Most specified
10. Most electropositive metal 42. Existentialist writer Jean
11. Hawaiian head lei Paul
12. Small integers 43. Utter sounds
13. W. states time zone 46. Fr. naturalism writer Emil
16. Negotiation between enemies 47. Son of Lynceus
18. Songwriter Sammy 48. Kelt
22. Horsefly 49. __ Spumante
23. Wimbledon champion Arthur 50. Bread unit
24. US band conductor John 51. Inwardly
Philip 52. Revolutions per minute
26. French capital 53. Pakistani rupee
27. Formerly Persia 54. Wynken, Blynken &


Coker's Lawn &
Tractor Service

From trimming to tractor work

SBushhogging ~ Dirt Work
m Clean-ups ~ Raking

Haauling ~ Mowing

Reasonable Rates - Free Estimates
(850) 623-0493
Cell- 485-7977
Licensed & Insured


To Advertise In

The Business & Service Directory





623-2120








cjRRY GROCERY OUTLET
Pace Location Only * 4025 Hwy 90
We Sell at Our Cost Plus a 10% Surcharge Added at the Register


So 0 0 0 0o o d uly 6 - J ly 1 2 , 2 0 1 1


California Juicy
Sweet Large
Red Plums

98 .



CoffeeMate
393.
35.3 oz


Tyson Tray
Pack Breast
Tenders

74lb


Johnsonville
Smoked
Brats

23oz
^M 14 oz


Mickleberry
1/4 Sliced
Ham

288b
Faygo


Faygo
Drinks
256
12 pk 12 oz


Valleydale
Sliced
Bacon
968
9 3 Ib pkg


Fresh Express
Romaine
Garden
Salad
1161oz
12 oz


ST ORE HOURS:ll M - 9PMJe7 JAYA WEEK


roceryt
Outlet
Sale prices good through July 6 - July 12, 2011
BBa BBLI *gBj KTr�i T311


Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses.

4025 HWY 90 * PACE
850-995-8778
vl-Sl~M EBT WIC


*


Black Angus
Boneless
Sirloin Tip
Toast
280
Ib


Blackwell
Angus Family
Pack Chuck
Tenders
262 lb


Black Angus
Boneless
Sirloin Tip
Steaks

281lb


Jumbo Pack
Fryer
Wings
130b


Farmland
Sliced
Boneless
Porkloins
2321b
Ib


Nathan's
Beef
Franks

7126 oz


Thank You
Brand
4x6 Cooked
Ham or Turkey

1801 oz
10 oz


Lee Mild or
Hot Roll
Sausage
I31
1 lb roll


New Crop
Red
Potatoes

235
5 Ib pkg


Vine Rip


Vine Ripe
Tomatoes

881


Blue Bunny
Ice Cream
27056
56 oz


Favorite
Potato Chips
921
6 oz


Mueller
Spaghetti
or Elbow
Macaroni

1 32 oz


Folgers
Coffee
813.
33.9 oz


Bengal Ant
and Roach
Spray
586,
9oz


Natures
Crystal Spring
Water

278
24- 1/2 Itr


Allen Italian
Green Beans

74 5 oz


Sparkle
Towels
96
8 roll


Minit Lite
Instant
Charcoal

556.7 Ib


Lipton
Tea Bags
47
24 count


Mondo
Fruit Drinks

846pk


Crystal
Hot Sauce
I07
S 12 oz


I


I


~YI


B6 I Santa Rosa's Press Gazette


Local


Wednesday, July 6, 2011







N


T


A


R


C


q


A


Wednesday * July 6, 2011 FREE EDITION - TAKE ONE


FDA panel:


Revoke drug's


breast cancer


approval

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) - A panel
of cancer experts has ruled for a sec-
ond time that Avastin, the best-sell-
ing cancer drug in the world, should
no longer be used in breast cancer
patients, clearing the way for the gov-
ernment to remove its endorsement
from the drug.
The unprecedented vote Wednes-
day by the Food and Drug Adminis-
tration advisory panel comes less
than a year after the same panel
reached the same conclusion.
The six members of the FDA on-
cology drug panel voted unanimously
that Avastin is ineffective, unsafe and
should have its approval for breast
cancer withdrawn.
"I think we all wanted Avastin to
succeed, but the reality is that these
studies did not bear out that hope,"
said Natalie Compagni-Portis, the
lone patient representative on the
panel.
The vote is not binding, and FDA
Commissioner Margaret Hamburg
will make the final decision sometime
after July 28. The drug is approved
for multiple cancers and still will be
available for breast cancer, though
insurers are expected to drop cover-
age if it loses FDA approval.
The FDA began steps to remove
Avastin's breast cancer approval in
December, but drugmaker Roche
took the rare step of appealing that
decision and lobbied the agency and
Congress for a second hearing.
The dramatic, contentious tone of
See CANCER DRUG A2


Report: 1 in

3 Americans

suffers from

chronic pain

WASHINGTON (AP) - Nearly a
third of Americans experience long-
lasting pain - the kind that lingers
for weeks to months - and too often
feel stigma rather than relief from a
health care system poorly prepared
to treat them, the Institute of Medi-
cine said Wednesday.
The staggering tab: Chronic pain
is costing the nation at least $558
billion a year in medical bills, sick
days and lost productivity, the report
found. That's more than the cost of
heart disease, the No. 1 killer.
All kinds of ailments can trig-
ger lingering pain, from arthritis to
cancer, spine problems to digestive
disorders, injuries to surgery. Some-
times, chronic pain can be a disease
all its own, the report stressed.
Whatever the cause, effective
pain management is "a moral im-
perative," the report concludes, urg-
ing the government, medical groups
and insurers to take a series of steps
to transform the field.
"We're viewing this as a critical
issue for the United States," said Dr.
Philip Pizzo, Stanford University's
dean of medicine, who chaired the
months-long probe.
For too long, doctors and society
alike have viewed pain "with some
prejudice, a lot of judgment and
unfortunately not a lot of informed
fact," he said.
The toll isn't surprising, said Dr.
Doris K. Cope, pain chief at the Uni-
versity of Pittsburgh Medical Cen-
ter, who paused between patients
Wednesday to read the report. The
population is getting older and less
fit, and more survivors of diseases
like cancer live for many years with
side effects from treatments that
saved them.
Too many patients think a pill is
the answer, she said, when there are
multiple different ways to address
pain including physical therapy,
See PAIN A2


There'sa difference
between trying to see something
and isolating it, and looking at the
whole body and understanding the
real interactions between it all."
Kerry Abaco
doctor of Oriental medicine



.R.. ..


^-^j~I


MP- -



Acupuncture

treatment part of

holistic medicine s ,

By Tony Simmons
Florida Freedom Newspapers
PANAMA CITY - A female patient lies
on her back upon a cushioned treatment
bed. The light is dim, and soft music
plays.
The doctor gently taps the first of
several needles into specific pressure
points on her lower legs, then in a
pattern across her midriff, and finally Dr. Kerr)
places "press tacks" inside the curve end of tF
of her ears. He stimulates the needle small ne
points by turning them, and he leaves the "she
her to relax alone for a few minutes. weeks.
The patient, Ines Hargraves of
Panama City, 60, has been seeing Kerry
Abaco for traditional Chinese medical or hands
treatments for at least eight years, she acupoint
said. Initially, she was suffering from * Her
depression, fibromyalgia and insomnia, natural e
Now she returns
once a month "to get
a little touch," she ACUPUNCTUR
said. She is pain-free Who: Kerry Abaco, doct
and uses "no more of oriental medicine
sleeping pills." She Where: 2633 Hwy 77
credits the application Suite B, Panama City
of traditional Chinese Details: 841-0700 or
medicine where PanamaCityAcupuncture.co
Western prescription
drugs failed.
"There's a difference


between trying to see something and
isolating it, and looking at the whole
body and understanding the real
interactions between it all," said Abaco,
a "doctor of Oriental medicine."
Traditional Chinese medicine has
been developed over 5,000 years of
clinical observation and experience,
Abaco said. It doesn't treat symptoms.
It treats root causes of ailments. His
approach combines:
* Acupuncture (using hair-fine
needles at specific points on the surface
of the body to stimulate physiological
changes);
* Acupressure (using fingers


oxygenal
Abacc
Master o
at the Na
Medicine
Integrati
was chose
doctor ai
honors.
"I hav
to heal,"
passion t


Abacc


Photos by TERRY BARNER I Florida Freedom
y Abaco places a press tack in the ear of patient Ines Hargraves at the
he acupuncture session June 14 in Panama City. The press tack is a
edle mounted on an adhesive bandage and placed in an area called
n men" for relaxation and stress relief. It can stay in for up to three


apply to pressure to the
s);
bology (using plants and
elements either as single
substances, blends, pills
S or teas);
S* Chinese massage
[or (manipulating the flow
of "chi" or energy flow
of the body);
* Cupping (in which
glass cups are used to
om form a vacuum on the
skin, drawing old blood
to the surface that is
replaced below by fresh,
;ed blood).
Studied in a four-year
of Science degree program
itional College of Integrative
e (now the Florida College of
ve Medicine) in Orlando. He
sen to intern with a medical
nd graduated with academic
'e been blessed with being able
he said. "I have a very large
;o help."

A typical visit
Said within 10 miles of any


point on the map are people who are
needlessly suffering, people he believes
he could help or possibly cure, whether
from diabetes, a stroke, depression, pain
or any number of other ailments. He can
treat the bite of a brown recluse when
other doctors would amputate, he says.
He can turn a breech baby without ever
touching the infant at all.
"There are so many things that
Chinese medicine does that people don't
know," he said.
A patient's first consultation is
generally preceded by a telephone
conversation that helps the doctor get a
handle on the symptoms and develop an
idea of treatment. "You know what you
can fix and what you can't," Abaco said.
"You have to know the absolute base
cause of an issue before you can fix it."
A patient complaining of headaches,
for instance, might hear questions
specifying where the pain is and
whether he sighs a lot. Abaco said that's
to determine if the pain is actually
related to a liver issue; he would treat
the liver to get rid of the headaches, not
prescribe a pain reliever that masks the
ache.
During the first face-to-face visit,
See ACUPUNCTURE A2


The shelves in one room of Abaco Acupuncture are lined with jars of herbs also used in medicinal treatment. At
right, acupuncture needles rest in Ines Hargraves' calves.


-*(-:


A









CANCER DRUG from page Al


the two-day hearing underscored
the difficulty of removing an option
for cancer patients, even when
backed by scientific evidence.
Immediately after the final
vote, patients in the audience
erupted in shouts against the
FDA and its experts.
"What do you want us to take?
We have nothing else!" shouted
Christi T'rnage of Madison, Miss.
Turnage said her cancer has been
undetectable for more than two
years since starting therapy with
Avastin.
A spokesman for the Abigail
Alliance, which advocates for ac-
cess to experimental medicine,
said the vote should be overruled.
"This was a kangaroo court,"
said Steven Walker, the group's
co-founder. "There wasn't one dis-
senting thought up there, let alone
one dissenting vote."
If the FDA follows through,
Roche could lose up to $1 billion in
revenue for its best-selling prod-
uct, which generates more than
$6 billion per year. Avastin is FDA-
approved for various types of co-
lon, lung, kidney and brain cancer,
which are not part of the debate.


Doctors still will be allowed to pre-
scribe Avastin for breast cancer,
though insurers might not pay for
it. When administration fees are
included, a year's treatment of
Avastin can cost $100,000.
Roche argued the drug should
remain available while it conducts
more research on which patients
benefit most from the injectable
drug. The drug is approved for
breast cancer that has spread to
other parts of the body, generally
considered incurable.
"The data tell us it is better for
women diagnosed with metastatic
breast cancer to have Avastin as
an approved treatment option,"
said Hal Barron, Roche executive
vice president.
Wednesday's vote came after
two days of hearings that often re-
sembled a courtroom trial, com-
plete with testimony, cross-exami-
nation and a final jury verdict. In
a public comment period Tuesday,
Avastin patients and their families
took the role of witnesses against
the FDA.
"Make no mistake, this hear-
ing is a death trial, not of Avastin
but of these women who rely on


NDCg"






. AVASTN1S
(bevacizumab) sepo
For Intravenous Use









Avastin to say alive," said Terry
Kelley, whose wife takes Avastin
for breast cancer. "You are each
personally responsible for the
consequences of your own vote."
Panelists said Avastin's ability


to slow tumor growth, measured
through medical imaging, has not
translated into meaningful benefit
for breast cancer patients.
"I think as treating clinicians
we have to ask ourselves: What
are we doing in terms of help-
ing patients? Simply delaying a
change in a CT scan for a month
or two is not significant unless it's
accompanied by other improve-
ments in how the patients are
doing or overall survival improve-
ment," said panelist Dr. Wyndam
Wilson of the National Cancer In-
stitute.
The FDA granted Avastin ac-
celerated approval in 2008 based
on one study in which it slowed
growth of breast cancer tumors
for more than five months when
combined with chemotherapy.
But that delay shrunk to less
than three months in follow-up
studies when the drug was paired
with other types of chemotherapy.
Across all studies, patients taking
Avastin did not live any longer and
suffered side effects like infection,
high blood pressure and blood
clots.
Most cancer experts say the


drug should remain available for
patients who are already respond-
ing well, even if its approval is
withdrawn.
"I think the FDA is doing the
right thing since the drug has
some serious complications," said
Dr. Stephanie Bernik of Lenox Hill
Hospital in New York. "However,
there are definitely patients who
are benefiting from the drug, and
if the FDA completely withdraws
approval, those patients may find
it hard to get access."
One potential option to keep
the drug available would be for
Roche to pay for it when patients
have no other option. The com-
pany already provides the drug
for free to patients who meet cer-
tain financial criteria or don't have
health coverage.
The Avastin review will have
broad repercussions for patients
and the pharmaceutical industry.
With the removal last year
of a leukemia drug from Pfizer,
and now the proceedings over
Avastin, analysts say the FDA is
poised to crack down on drugs
whose effectiveness hasn't been
confirmed in later studies.


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ACUPUNCTURE from page Al


he'll note posture, face color and
smells, check pulses and the tongue,
"at which point I've basically done
an MRI," he said, noting that these
signs reveal secrets about the
condition of internal organs.
For instance, these signs
might tell him the best fix for a
bad shoulder is to work on the
patient's digestion problem.
"What is on the inside of the
body will be reflected on the
outside," he said. "They will be
amazed. 'How did you know?'
they'll say. I remember being that
way."
Results vary. Typically, the
first treatment brings some relief
and possibly complete relief,
Abaco said, but one visit might
not be enough. Each successive
treatment builds on the ones
before. Some conditions respond
immediately, while others might
not see results for a few days after
the treatment.

Treatments
Abaco originally became
interested in Chinese medicine
after traveling through the Far
East about 30 years ago. He had a
physical problem that affected his
right arm, which eventually "hung
uselessly" at his side, he said. Three
medical doctors suggested surgery,
and a friend suggested acupuncture.
"I said, 'Get a grip. I've got a
real problem,' " he recalled. Two
treatments later, he had full use of
the arm, he said.
Abaco doesn't watch much TV
he says, and he was startled not
only to see prescription medications
advertised on television recently, but
especially to hear the ads list the
numerous potential side-effects.
"Why would you take a sleeping



PAIN from page Al

stress reduction, weight loss and
teaching coping skills. Patients who
take control of their pain fare better,
but too many have unrealistic expec-
tations.
"Pain is not simple," Cope said.
"We as physicians need to be heal-
ers and educators as well as techni-
cians. We certainly don't want to be
pill mills."
Doctors worry about overpre-
scribing narcotic painkillers, and
law enforcement's steps to fight the
serious problem of prescription drug
abuse can be one barrier to pain care.
But the institute countered that it's
far more likely for a pain patient to
get inadequate care than for a drug-
seeker to walk out with an inappro-
priate prescription. Though newer,
better medicines are needed, those
narcotic painkillers are a safe and
effective option for the right patient,
the report said.
But barriers to good care extend
far beyond that issue, said the panel,
which analyzed research and the re-
ports of more than 2,000 patients and
caregivers about pain's toll.
Because pain can't be seen like
bleeding, felt like a lump, X-rayed
like a broken bone or heard like a
skipped heartbeat, health workers
who wrongly believe the intensity of
pain should correlate to a specific
medical finding might diminish or
even dismiss a patient's complaint,
the report found.
In fact, pain is highly subjective.
Two people with the same injury
might feel different degrees of pain
depending on genetic factors that
affect pain tolerance, what other ill-
nesses they have, stress or depres-


TERRY BARNER I Florida Freedom Newspapers
A model of an enlarged ear shows pressure points where acupuncture
needles are applied. Kerry Abaco also stocks herbs that are used in
medical treatment.


pill that has a side effect of suicidal
thoughts?" he said.
However, the herbs he uses have
side-effects, too: "You may leave
here feeling a little happier. Other
side effects? I can't think of any."
Abaco said he wishes there were
another name for the instruments
called "needles" because the name
has a negative connotation. His
needles are not hollow metal tubes
with sharpened ends used to pierce
skin and inject fluids.
"You can fit 10 of my needles in
the opening of any Western medical
needle," Abaco said. "They're so
fine, you won't feel it. One of a


hundred people will experience
some discomfort or pain."
The reaction to the needles will
vary from patient to patient but is
rarely painful. Many find the process
soothing and might fall asleep
during treatment, he said.
Abaco said he was fortunate that
his initial clientele when he began
his career with Chinese medicine
were children. They taught him to
be especially gentle.
"If you hurt a child, they don't
come back," he said. "I follow a
true spiritual path. I treat the way I
would want my own children to be
treated."


REPORT RECOMMENDATIONS
* Health providers should perform and document formal pain
assessments of patients, a step toward proper treatment.
* Medicare, Medicaid, workers' compensation programs and
private health plans should cover individualized pain care.
* Pain specialty groups should create collaborations with
primary care doctors to improve patient care and counseling.
* The government and health organizations should better
educate patients and the public about pain, to help eliminate
stigma.
* The National Institutes of Health should increase pain
research, including designating one of its centers as the lead
institute for pain.
* Training programs for doctors, nurses, dentists and other
health professionals should include pain education.
* By the end of next year, the Health and Human Services
Department should create a strategy for dealing with pain as a
public health problem and reducing barriers to care.


sion, and even whether they feel sup-
port or criticism from health workers
or their families.
Care must be tailored to each pa-
tient. Yet too few doctors are trained
in its management, the report said,
citing a study that found stand-
alone pain courses aren't required
in most medical schools. Also, insur-
ance might not cover time-consum-
ing counseling in pain-management
techniques, consultations with spe-
cialists or even non-drug care.
Pizzo called the finances some-
times perverse: Some insurance pays
for an operation for low back pain but
not much cheaper and often more ef-
fective physical therapy.
And prompt care for acute pain,
like that from surgery or a broken
bone, is important as well. Seri-


ous pain that isn't properly treated
sometimes can hijack the nervous
system and essentially rewire it for
pain, leaving misery after the con-
dition that caused the initial pain is
resolved.
The report concluded at least
116 million adults suffer long-lasting
pain, consistent with some previous
estimates, but couldn't say how many
cases are severe or disabling.
The economic costs, however, are
sure to attract attention in Congress,
which mandated the report as part of
the new health care law. The report
found health care for pain costs $261
billion to $300 billion a year, while lost
productivity adds another $297 billion
to $336 billion. The federal Medicare
program accounts for a quarter of
those health bills.


*


~YI


A2 I Santa Rosa Free Press


Wednesday, July 6, 2011






Santa Rosa Free Press I A3


Job seekers wait in a line June 15 at a job fair in Southfield, Mich. Two years after economists declared thE
end of the Great Recession, the rebound is the weakest since the 1930s and the most lopsided.


But ifthe Great Recession is
long gone from Wall Street and
corporate boardrooms, it lingers
on Main Street: Unemployment
has never been so high this long
after any recession since World
War II. The average worker's
hourly wages, after accounting

for inflation, were 1.6 percent
lower in May than a year
earlier. Rising gasoline and
food prices have devoured any

pay raises for mostAmericans.
The jobs that are being created

AP pay less than the ones that
vanished in the recession.


The economic recovery turns 2


The Associated Press

This is one anniver-
sary few feel like
celebrating.
Two years after econo-
mists say the Great Reces-
sion ended, the recovery
has been the weakest and
most lopsided of any since
the 1930s.
After previous reces-
sions, people in all income
groups tended to benefit.
This time, ordinary Ameri-
cans are struggling with job
insecurity, too much debt
and pay raises that haven't
kept up with prices at the
grocery store and gas sta-
tion. The economy's mea-
ger gains are going mostly
to the wealthiest.
Workers' wages and
benefits make up 57.5 per-
cent of the economy, an
all-time low. Until the mid-
2000s, that figure had been
remarkably stable, about
64 percent through boom
and bust alike.
Executive pay is includ-
ed in this figure, but rank-
and-file workers are far
more dependent on regular
wages and benefits. A big
chunk of the economy's
gains has gone to investors
in the form of higher corpo-
rate profits.
"The spoils have re-
ally gone to capital, to the
shareholders," said David
Rosenberg, chief econo-
mist at Gluskin Sheff + As-
sociates in Toronto.
Corporate profits are
up by almost half since the
recession ended in June
2009. In the first two years
after the recessions of 1991
and 2001, profits rose 11
percent and 28 percent, re-
spectively.
And an Associated
Press analysis found that
the typical CEO of a major
company earned $9 million
last year, up a fourth from
2009.
Driven by higher prof-
its, the Dow Jones indus-
trial average has staged
a breathtaking 90 percent
rally since bottoming at
6,547 on March 9, 2009.
Those stock market gains
go disproportionately to
the wealthiest 10 percent of
Americans, who own more
than 80 percent of out-
standing stock, according
to an analysis by Edward
Wolff, an economist at Bard
College.


B ut if the Great Re-
cession is long
gone from Wall
Street and corporate

On June 9,
a "bank-
owned
view price
reduced,"
lot is
chained
and
locked but
advertised
for sale in
Seattle.


b(
M

ne
pe
an
W
af


Weak recovery after Great Recession
Two years after the Great Recession ended, the economy's
meager gains are going mostly to the nation's wealthiest.
Another sign of the times is the labor share of the economy has
fallen to an all-time low.
Labor share, quarterly
6 8 p e rc e n t .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
RECOVERY
6 6 ............. iK .............. . 4 - P E R IO D S .........................................................................................................................................................................
66.. . . .P..RI S .............. . ............. .......... ... .Q 2011

57.5 %.
6 2 ..................... ..................... I


'81 '85 190 '95
1 naneman rnhx


'10


uneimpioymient, mllullmy May 2011
1 2 p e rc e n t .................................................................................................................................................................... 9 .1 %
RECOVERY
10 A 4 PERIODS 1
10 .- -.--.. .. ..... . ... ...

6...


are suffering because of
the way the economy ran
into trouble and how com-
panies responded when
the Great Recession hit.
Soaring housing prices
in the mid-2000s made mil-
lions of Americans feel
wealthier than they were.
They borrowed against
the inflated equity in their
homes or traded up to
bigger, more expensive
houses. Their debts as a
percentage of their an-
nual after-tax income rose
to a record 135 percent in
2007.
Then housing prices
started tumbling, helping
cause a financial crisis in
the fall of 2008. A recession
that had begun in Decem-
ber 2007 turned into the
deepest downturn since
the Great Depression.


economists Ken-
4 El. neth Rogoff of
SHarvard Univer-
2 .......y 71......rT...........7...... 1.. 1.I......I. Y..r.. . I sity and Carmen Reinhart
'81 '85 '90 '95 '00 '05 '10 of the Peterson Institute
Corporate profit, quarterly for International Econom-
$2.0 trillion ...........................................................................................................ics analyzed eight t centu -
RECOVERY ries of financial disasters
1.5 PERIODS - 1 around the world for their
2009 book "This Time Is
1.0 Different." They found
Q01 2011 that severe financial cri-
S0.5 ses create deep recessions
$1.7 trillion and stunt the recoveries
0 that follow.
.. ...... . ......... .......... ..... ......... ..... .. This recovery "is abso-
lutely following the script,"
SOURCES: Bureau of Economic Analysis; Bureau of Labor Statistics AP Rogoff said.
Federal Reserve num-
oardrooms, it lingers on less. Before the recession, percentofpersonalincome bers crunched by Haver
:ain Street: she spent 16 years work- in the last three months of Analytics suggest that
* Unemployment has ing as a mortgage proces- 2010 before coming down Americans have a long way
ever been so high - 9.1 sor in Southern California, a bit this year. Almost 45 to go before their finances
percent - this long after earning as much as $6,500 million Americans are on will be strong enough to
ny recession since World in a good month, a pace of food stamps, another re- support robust spending:
ar II. At the same point about $78,000 a year. cord. Despite cutting what they
'ter the previous three But her employer was Ordinary Americans owe the past three years,


recessions, unemployment
averaged just 6.8 percent.
* The average worker's
hourly wages, after ac-
counting for inflation, were
1.6 percent lower in May
than a year earlier. Rising
gasoline and food prices
have devoured any pay
raises for most Americans.
* The jobs that are be-
ing created pay less than
the ones that vanished
in the recession. Higher-
paying jobs in the private
sector, the ones that pay
roughly $19 to $31 an hour,
made up 40 percent of the
jobs lost from January
2008 to February 2010 but
only 27 percent of the jobs
created since then.


athleen Terry is
one of those who
had to settle for


buried in the housing
crash. She found herself
out of work for two and
a half years. As her sav-
ings dwindled, the single
mother had to move into
a motel with her three
daughters.
They got by on wel-
fare and help from their
church and friends. Terry
started taking a 90-min-
ute bus ride to job training
courses. Eventually, she
found work as a secretary
in the Riverside County,
Calif., employment office.
She likes the job but earns
just $27,000 a year. "It's
a humbling experience,"
she said.
Hard times have made
Americans more depen-
dent than ever before on
social programs, which
accounted for a record 18


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the average household's
debts equal 119 percent of
annual after-tax income.
At the same point after the
1981-82 recession, debts
were at 66 percent; after
the 1990-91 recession, 85
percent; and after the 2001
recession, 114 percent.
Because the labor mar-
ket remains so weak, most
workers can't demand big-
ger raises or look for bet-
terjobs.
"In an economic cycle
that is turning up, a labor
market that is healthy and
vibrant, you'd see a large
number of people quitting
their jobs," says Gluskin
Sheff economist Rosen-
berg. "They quit because
the grass is greener some-
where else."
Instead, workers are
toughing it out, thankful
they have jobs at all. Just
1.7 million workers have
quit their job each month
this year, down from 2.8
million a month in 2007.

T he toll of all this
shows in consumer
confidence, a mea-
sure of how good people
feel about the economy.
According to the Confer-
ence Board's index, it's at
58.5. Healthy is more like
90. By this point after the
past three recessions, it
was an average of 87.
How gloomy are Ameri-
cans? A USA Today/Gallup
poll eight weeks ago found
that 55 percent think the
recession continues, even
if the experts say it's been
over for two years. That in-
cludes the 29 percent who
go even further - they say
it feels more like a depres-
sion.


OVER 150 PROPERTIES * MANY SELLING ABSOLUTE!
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SlCl TlONE EvENTS n ,',',,'1 '.. ' , i 'i l .r i" cn.,-r. 'l if i',,',j ' ii i a ; 'ni', i P.i,,

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I Business Network

International
m


Tri cities chapter meets
every Thursday at 7am
at Oops Alley
3721 Hwy. 90, Pace, Florida 32571
Any questions contact
Debbie Coon at


393-3666
www.tricitiesbni.com r


n ...................... - ......................... ........... ........................


-===>rr ree r


Wednesday, July 6, 2011


...... ..







A4 I Santa Rosa Free Press


Wednesday, July 6, 2011


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(Canta Qosa'8 Pres
Gazette





CLASSIFIED!


1100- Legal Advertising
1110 - Classified Notices
1120 - Public Notices/
Announcements
1125 - Carpools &
Rideshare
1130- Adoptions
1140 -Happy Ads
1150 - Personals
1160 - Lost
1170 - Found


1100
6/496
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR SANTA
ROSA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2011-CP-158
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBERT D. WILLIAMS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS
The administration of
the estate of Robert D.
Williams, deceased,
whose date of death
was April 15, 2011 is
pending in the Circuit
Court for Santa Rosa
County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the ad-
dress of which is PO.
Box 472, Milton, FL
32572. The names and
addresses of the
co-personal represent-
atives and the
co-personal represent-
atives' attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.


1 1100
(850) 434-9200
Fax -(850) 208-7100
Attorneys for
Co-Personal Repre-
sentatives
REGIONS MORGAN
KEEGAN TRUST
By /s/STEPHEN G.
TIMBERLAKE
Stephen G. Timberlake,
Senior VP
Co-Personal Repre-
sentative
/s/BETSY ROBINS
Betsy Robins,
Co-Personal Repre-
sentative
062911
070611
6/496



7/520
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT IN AND FOR
SANTA ROSA
COUNTY FL
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number:
2010-CP-291
Division:
In Re The Estate Of:
Eugenia A. Gentry,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDI-
TORS
The administration of
the estate of EUGENIA
A. GENTRY deceased,
File Number
2010-CP-291, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court
for Santa Rosa County,
Florida, Probate Divi-
sion the address of
which is: Clerk of the
Court, Probate Division,
PO. Box 472, Milton,
Florida 32572. The
names and addresses
of the personal repre-
sentative and the per-
sonal representative's
attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured,
contingent or unliqul-
dated claims, on whom
a copy of this notice is
served must file their



Centipede-
St. Augustine
Farm Direct
We Deliver
434-0066


1 1100
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against
decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured,
contingent or unliqul-
dated claims, must file
their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
The date of first publi-
cation of this Notice is
Wednesday, July 6,
2011,
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
/s/GERALD MCKENZIE
GERALD McKENZIE
Attorney for Personal
Representative
301 North Barcelona
Street
Pensacola, FL 32501
(850) 438-7285
Florida Bar Number:
869384
Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/JOSEPH CURTIS
ANTONE
JOSEPH CURTIS AN-
TONE
Personal Representa-
tive
5173 Zachary Boule-
vard
Pensacola, Florida
32526
070611
071311
7/520
L' t. r- I. IF.- '.r

"71

I '. -





Divorce 149, Wills 30
Name Change $49
FREE Typing, Call for
Worksheet (850) 434-7524
1850N.'W"St.
(1 bi. N.of FleaMarket)


ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WITHIN iHE i-
TIME PERIOD&: ii--T
FORTH IN Si -i-:-rj -
733.702 OF THE il,',HI
IDA PROBATE ': '-iI
WILL BE F:'Ri.
BARRED.


To Advertise call 623-2120 for details.


NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE, Dependable
ANY CLAIM FILED Housekeeper
TWO (2) YEARS OR Over 20 years of
MORE AFTER THE experience!
DECEDENT'S DATE OF Ref. Available
DEATH IS BARRED. 995-0009
The date of first publl- Dependable, hard
cation of this notice is working, honest
June 29, 2011. woman looking for ad-
ditional houses to clean
GARYW. HUSTON in Milton & Pace area.
Florida Bar No. 044520 25 years experience.
Clark, Partington, Hart, References available
Larry, Bond & upon request. Prices
Stackhouse vary. 850-626-0629
125 W. Romana Street,
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PO. Box 13010 0LT
Pensacola, FL 6. --.
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TRACTOR SERVICE
From trimming to trac-
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raking, hauling, mow-
work. Reasonable
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(850) 623-0493
(850) 485-7977
Licensed & Insured


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Complete education in
Business Admin. 25
years experience. No-
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of any and all legal
forms, SSI, Property
Deeds, Divorce, etc.
Prices vary. References
available. 850-626-0629



Stewart's Tractor
Works & Land
Clearing, Inc.
Tree & Stump Removal
from trimming to take-
down. Debris removal
& Storm Clean-Up.
Demolition & Hauling.
Land Clearing. Back-
hoe & Trackhoe Work.
Heavy Brush & Forestry
Mowing. Tree work
done by man lift.
516-1801 or 675-4291
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
PAUL STEWART


|IuLets|I


1100 1100 I


7/521
PUBLIC SALE
MISCELLANEOUS
PERSONAL PROP-
ERTY WILL BE SOLD
TO SATISFY RENT
LIEN ON July 26, 2011
at 11:00 A.M.
UNIT WILL BE SHOWN
JUST PRIOR TO BIDD-
ING. WE RESERVE
THE RIGHT TO REF-
USE ANY BIDS.
UNITS LISTED AS FOL-
LOWS:
Unit 752 Dawn Rojas:
Boxes, Misc.
Unit 531 Andreyanna
Murchy: Totes, Bags,
Misc.
STORAGE MASTER
4636 WOODBINE RD
PACE, FL 32571
070611
071311
7/521


Legal 6/497
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE
Fort Storage located at
4114 Avalon Blvd. Mil-
ton, FL 32583 hereby
gives notice of a public
sale to the highest bid-
der for cash only on
July 15, 2011 at 10:00
am in accordance with
the Florida Self Storage
Facility Act Statutes
( s e c t i o n
83.801-83.809). Seller
reserves the right to
withdraw property from
sale at any time. This
property is being sold
to satisfy a landlord
lien.
Property includes con-
tents of the spaces of
the following tenants.
Unit # Tenant Name
Contents
917 Cheryl L. Jones
Furniture, toys, boxes,
lamps
189 Ricky Triplett
washer/dryer, refrigera-
tor, TV
535 Crystal Gates tool
box, plastic totes
725 Cody Cun-
ningham table
w/chairs, microwave,
exercise machine
727 Charlie V Nail
boom box w/speakers,
TV, Entertainment cen-
ter
739 Joanne Harding
Refrigerator, Plastic
Totes, monitor
937 Angel Rivas Furni-
ture, plastic totes,
boxes
743/744 Richard Kirk-
patrick Furniture,
Bikes, TV's
753 Shelia Rushing
Furniture, Refrigerator,
Washer/Dryer
062911
070611
6/497


7/522
Notice Under Ficti-
tious Name Law Pur-
suant to Section
865.09, Florida Stat-
utes
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the under-
signed, desiring to en-
gage in business under
the fictitious name of
Momma Bakes Cakes
located at 3021 Wal-
lace Lake Road, in the
County of Santa Rosa,
in the City of Pace,
Florida 32571 intends
to register the said
name with the Division
of Corporations of the
Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee,
Florida.
Dated at Pace, Florida,
this 30th day of June,
2011
Angela Gray, Dustin
Gray
070611(1)
7/522


1110


Incorrect
Insertion
Policy

For Classified
In-column Ad-
vertisers

All ads placed by
phone are read back
to the advertiser to
insure correctness.
The newspaper will
assume correctness
at the time of the
read-back procedure
unless otherwise in-
formed.

Please Z your ad.

Advertisers are re-
quested to check the
advertisement on the
first insertion for cor-
rectness. Errors
should be reported
immediately.
Your Florida Free-
dom newspaper will
not be responsible
for more than one in-
correct insertion, nor
will it be liable for
any error in adver-
tisements to a
greater extent than
the cost of the space
occupied by the er-
ror.
Any copy change,
during an ordered
schedule constitutes
a new ad and new
charges.
We do not
guarantee position
of ANY ad under
any classification.


EsrU SbfSniETIlfG.N MEW
bTlWUEIMEWSPRPEl-


Driver -


Does The Idea of Working
For Yourself Interest You?

Does Averaging $1.80/Mile
For All Miles Interest You?

Does OWNING Rather Than
Leasing Interest You?

INTERESTED?

If So, Check Out Our
S0 DOWN TRACTOR
PURCHASE PROGRAM!

888-240-4808
www.millerdriving.com
Owner Operator \\' 1c ,nm'.
Must have CDL) w/Tankcr &
IHaznmat Endorsements


* *


~YI







Wednesday, July 6, 2011


Santa Rosa Free Press I AS


2100- Pets
2110 - Pets: Free to
Good Home
2120 - Pet Supplies
2130 - Farm Animals/
Supplies
2140 - Pets/Livestock
Wanted
2150 - Pal Memorials



Lab mix puppies in Mil-
ton $50. each. Shots
and wormed. 8 weeks
old. Vet checked. Dark
brown to tan.
850-382-0239

'I-- �.


I oMER DISE
3100 - Antiques
3110 -Appliances
3120 - Arts & Crafts
3130 - Auctions
3140 - Baby Items
3150 - Building Supplies
3160 - Business
Equipment
3170 - Collectibles
3180 - Computers
3190 - Electronics
3200 - Firewood
3210- Free Pass it On
3220 - Furniture
3230 - Garage/Yard Sales
3240 - Guns
3250 - Good Things to Eat
3260 - Health & Fitness
3270 - Jewelry/Clothing
3280 - Machinery/
Equipment
3290 - Medical Equipment
3300 - Miscellaneous
3310 - Musical Instruments
3320 - Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 - Restaurant/Hotel
3340 - Sporting Goods
3350 - Tickets (Buy & Sell)



Brand Name Queen
Size Pillowtop Set, still
in plastic, with mfr war-
ranty. Delivery avail.
$160.850-471-0330
Brand New King Mat-
tress w/foundations pl-
lowtop factory sealed,
w/warranty, can deliver.
$265.850-255-0123
Full Size Mattress &
Box, new, never used,
with warranty. $140.
850-255-0123
Memory Foam Mat-
tress, Still new in Box.
Queen$375, & King
$475 850-471-0330






2 FAMILY YARD SALE
6330 Cottage Woods
Drive. Sat., July 9th
7am -1 pm


Do Something


Good For


Tomorrow


I 3230 1 3250
Curtis Penton Farms
and Berrydale Farmer
-4 w- Mkt. We accept Wic
Milton Coupon (850) 675-4111
5547 Andromeda Dr.
July 8th & 9th
6:30 -12 noon 3300
Baby bed, mattress, O
highchair, stroller, LOTS OF STUFF!
misc. and table saw Collectors only!
(850) 686-7586
STwo grave lots at Se-
renity Gardens. $500
each. 623-9037
Sat., July 9th
7am until 11am
5272 Lonesome l
Dove Lane
(Hunters Ridge Sub.)


3240
GUN SHOW 4100 - Help Wanted
Santa Rosa County 4130 - Employment
Auditorium, Milton, Information
FL July 9th/1 Oth . -P1
9am - 5pm call --
(850) 957-4952 or lt. l [TH r
(850) 261-8407 EWIS1.
General
Admission $6.


Experienced cleaning
person needed. Must
have own vehicle.
Non-smoking environ-
ment. 994-1785 (leave
message).
Now Hiring!
Are You Making Less
Than $40,000 Per Year?
Covenant Transport
Needs Driver Trainees
Now! No experience re-
quired
*Immediate Jobs
Placement Assistance
*OTR, Regional, & Lo-
cal Jobs
CALL FOR MORE IN-
FORMATION
1-866-280-5309
0 '1U.. .'"1 ;nl '.
�- 1



', _ .


4130 1| 6110
OTR DRIVERS- Food bliher's
Grade Tank Drivers. Notice


CDL-A w/tank endorse-
ment, Good MVR &
Hazmat within 90 days
required. Up to 42cpm
w/additional mileage
Incentives & benefits.
(877)882-6537 or www.
oakleytransport.com








EIU ESTATE FOR REN
6100 - Business/
Commercial
6110 - Apartments
6120 - Beach Rentals
6130 - Condo/Townhouse
6140 - House Rentals
6150 - Roommate Wanted
6160- Rooms for Rent
6170 - Mobile Home/Lot
6180 - Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 - Timeshare Rentals
6200 - Vacation Rentals


AN OP-ME LETTER OF APOLOGY FROM THE ECONOMY


To state the obvious, it hasn't been pretty the last few years, especially for the job market
I'm aware of the anger, and I don't blame you This whole thing got away from me But I think it's time we made
a fresh start
Here's what I propose:
1 If you have a job and you're happy with it, good for you Keep it up
2 If you're not happy in your job, its time to rethink things I'm not telling you to quit on the spot But maybe
there's a better job out there for you
3 If you've taken a job that under normal circumstances you wouldn't have, my hat's off to you You did what
you had to do But now maybe its time to go back to doing what you do best
4 If you don't have a job, again, I'm sorry I know looking for a job can be, to put it nicely, challenging
But know this it's not you, its me And if the recovery is here, I think you can lead the way
So to everyone who's been affected the last few years, which is pretty much everyone, I accept complete
responsibility But now the ball is in your court You have permission to move on with your life
It's time to move forward, find a job you love and get back to work a" r
Sincerely,


x .


The Economy has made it tough on everyone the last few years. But it's time to move forward.
Visit emeraldcoastjobseast.com/monster to find the right job for you. Let's do this.


~lr.iaO monster'





EMPL YER OF Ci ICE



uTEF ,I -F.E





DELIVER

EXCELLENCE


RECYCLE
tohl 6-dlie ucs frorcsoergs.Oh, the-free


TODAY! i
BUSINESS SERVICESrI'Amnan
^^I'm part of what's NEW Come join us today.










A SNEWsurion Compan


To Advertise In

The Business & Service Directory





623-2120


� __________


All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to the Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to ad-
vertise any preference,
limitation or discrimina-
tion based on race,
color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status
or national origin, or an
intention, to make any
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination"
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing cus-
tody of children under
18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation
of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed
that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper
are available on a equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




-., . ,. .1 . ,* , ,

. -

S-


Large, waterfront,
Mother-in-law, 2/1,
stone, new appliances,
furnished, private park-
ing, covered patio,
CH&A, bar, fireplace,
private.ALL UTILITIES,
EVEN CABLE FUR-
NISHED. $895. Must
see!! Also, available
handicapped apt. Call
981-8663for app.
Milton
1 bedroom furnished
apartment. CH&A. 1st
mth $99 + deposit of
$250. $450 mth after
1st mth. (850) 377-0420



3/2 nice, brick house
located at 4025 Over-
look Circle, Pace. $700
dep, $700 rent. (850)
698-8337 - please leave
a message or feel free
to text.
Milton
4/2 home on 5 acres.
$1,000 month, $1,000
sec. dep. 626-8959 or
377-6787 (cell) Call
Barbara Cumble
Milton, FL
3/2, near Tanglewood.
Large fenced yard.
$800 month, $800 se-
curity. 781-729-7425
Pace area
3/2 with central heat &
air, stove & refrigerator.
Approx. 1,050 sq. ft. liv-
Ing area. No pets. Call
623-4409




RNASJ
R N A 8

E A G A

A MAN

C AS

T SI


A

N D

T E

*C


M

SLA

PAC

AC H

0

S


CLUES ACROSS

1. A fencing sword
6. Agreement between two
states
10. Cut wood
14. The jejunum to the cecum
15. Common market people
17. Woven purse style of MA
19. Young goat
20. Den of a wild animal
21. Sea catfish genus
22. Rosenbcrg prosecutor Roy
23. Liberal rights organization
24. Tossed or flung
25. Shrimp sauteed in butter &
garlic
28. Veras are one type
30. Hail (nautical)
31. _& Hammer
33. Football's Flutie


6140
Old Florida Charm
3 br/ 1 ba, CH&A, tile
floors screened porch.
$650 mth. $650 dep.
623-8365


-?W-
Pace, Cross Roads 3/2
brick, fenced, fireplace,
greenhouse, 2 car grg,
new carpet, AC, paint,
wtr htr & range; land-
scaped; security sys-
tem; lawn care pro-
vided; no pets or smok-
ing; $1100
(850)607-4556


S 6170
1 mile south of Whiting
Field, 6483 Howard
Ave. 2/1, total electric,
fenced yard, covered
entry, garbage incl.
Rent $375, deposit
$300 623-8753
2 bedroom. Front and
back porch. Private lot.
Fenced yard. 623-5145


Your land or
family land is
all you need
to buy
a new home.
Call
850-682-3344


R I


6170
3/1 FEMA mobile
home. Privacy, fenced
yard with front porch.
Avail. 7/1/11. (Will work
with you regarding de-
posit). East Gate Mo-
bile Home Ranch
626-8973

Clean 3/2 double wide.
$550 month, $300 dep.
OR 2/1, $375 month,
$300 dep. No pets.
675-6614









8100 - Antique& Collectibles
8110- Cars
8120 - Sports UtllityVehicles
8130 - Trucks
140 - Vans
8150 - Commercial
8160 - Motorcycles
8170 -Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210- Boats
220 - Personal Watercraft
8230 - Sailboats
8240 - Boat & Marine
Supplies
8245 - Boat Slips & Docks
8310 - Aircraft/Aviation
8320 - ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 - Campers & Trailers
8340 - Motorhomes


8150
2005 John Deere 4520
Tractor with front
loader, backhoe, fork-
lift, & post hole digger.
225 hp. Excellent con-
dition. $39,000
623-9037


C

T U E

USE

AEL

L


olx


34. Bus fees
36. Streetcar (Br.)
37. Runs PCs
38. Cola name
39. French river
40. Winged fruit
42. Ripened plant ovules
44. Uniform
45. Am. Martial Arts Soc.
46. Kosher NYC bakery
48. Early Cubist painter Juan
49. Boxer Muhammad
52. "Twilight" actor
55. Worker who coats ceilings
56. Of the dowry
57. Vertical spar supporting
sails
58. Mark for deletion
59. Enlighten


CLUES DOWN
1. Fall below the surface 28. Form a sum
2. Jai _, sport 29. W.C.s (Br.)
3. Curved segment 30. They _
4. A sunken groove 32. Woman (French)
5. Rivalrous 34. Sylvan
6. Beijing 35. Kwa
7. Hungarian Violinist 36. Belongs to CNN founder
Leopold 38. Play boisterously
8. Cathode-ray tube 39. Seaboard
9. Genus nicotiana plants 41. Most specified
10. Most electropositive metal 42. Existentialist writer Jean
11. Hawaiian head lei Paul
12. Small integers 43. Utter sounds
13. W. states time zone 46. Fr. naturalism writer Emil
16. Negotiation between enemies 47. Son of Lynceus
18. Songwriter Sammy 48. Kelt
22. Horsefly 49. ___ Spumante
23. Wimbledon champion Arthur 50. Bread unit
24. US band conductor John 51. Inwardly
Philip 52. Revolutions per minute
26. French capital 53. Pakistani rupee
27. Formerly Persia 54. Wynken, Blynken &


X< *


S K 0 D

R E B E

V I R

s O

D G

ERSA


~TRA


RD BOA


E A N E SO IA A V 0

L A D S I IC E SE


/Coker's Lawn &
Tractor Service

From trimming to tractor work

& Bushhogging ~- Dirt Work
LClean-ups ~ Raking

u Hauling ~ Mowing

Reasonable Rates - Free Estimates
(850) 623-0493
Cell- 485-7977
Licensed & Insured


~YI


I - - I


I - I








,*ji GROCERY OUTLET
Pace Location Only * 4025 Hwy 90
We Sell at Our Cost Plus a 10% Surcharge Added at the Register


Black Angus
Boneless
Sirloin Tip
Toast
280


Farmland
Sliced
Boneless
Porkloins
2321b
Ib


Lee Mild or
Hot Roll
Sausage
I31
1 Ib roll


California Juicy
Sweet Large
Red Plums

98'



CoffeeMate
393
35.3 oz


Mickleberry
1/4 Sliced
Ham
288b
ag


Faygo
Drinks
256
12 pk 12 oz


New Crop
Red
Potatoes
235

5 Ib pkg


Blue Bunny
Ice Cream
270 z
56 oz


Black Angus
Boneless
Sirloin Tip
Steaks
281lb


Valleydale
Sliced
Bacon
968
3 Ib pkg


Fresh Express
Romaine
Garden
Salad
1161oz
12 oz


Jumbo Pack
Fryer
Wings
130


Thank You
Brand
4x6 Cooked
Ham or Turkey
1801 oz
10 oz


Allen Italian
Green Beans

7415 oz


ST ORE HOURS:ll M - 9PMJe7 JAYA WEEK


grocery
S Outlet
Sale prices good through July 6 - July 12, 2011
BBBB IIBLI *gjK~ iy|M|1


Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses.

4025 HWY 90 * PACE
850-995-8778
" ISMW-1 aEBT WIC


*


Tyson Tray
Pack Breast
Tenders

b74b
I l


Blackwell
Angus Family
Pack Chuck
Tenders
262,lb


Johnsonville
Smoked
Brats

23oz


Nathan's
Beef
Franks

2 16 oz


Vine Rip


Vine Ripe
Tomatoes

881


Favorite
Potato Chips

926 oz


Mueller
Spaghetti
or Elbow
Macaroni

4 32 oz


Folgers
Coffee
813.
33.9 oz


Bengal Ant
and Roach
Spray
5869o
9oz


Natures
Crystal Spring
Water

278
24- 1/2 Itr


Sparkle
Towels
96
8 roll


Minit Lite
Instant
Charcoal

356.7 Ib


Lipton
Tea Bags
47
24 count


Mondo
Fruit Drinks

84' pk


Crystal
Hot Sauce
I 07
S 12 oz


I


I


~YI


A6 I Santa Rosa Free Press


Wednesday, July 6, 2011




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