Group Title: Santa Rosa press gazette
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00394
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate Title: Milton press gazette
Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Santa Rosa press gazette
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Milton Newspapers
Place of Publication: Milton, Fla
Publication Date: October 22, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028408
Volume ID: VID00394
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKH2012
oclc - 33399204
alephbibnum - 001994926
lccn - sn 95047208
 Related Items
Preceded by: Milton press gazette

Full Text




< Special section celebrating Whiting Field's 65th birthday Cl


eSanta Dosa's Press


..spaper for over a century!


Wednesday, October 22, 2008 w w w. srpressgaz ette. com 50 cents




Bob Solarski to face fewer charges


Prosecutors dismiss three of five charges against suspended anchorman


By BILL GAMBLING
bganiblini@sipressgazette.com

Suspended WEAR anchorman
Bob Solarski received some good
news prior to scheduled arraign-
ment today in Escambia County
Court.
Three of the five charges Solar-
ski was facing following a traffic
mishap back on Oct. 1 have been
dropped against the 46-year-old
Gulf Breeze resident.
Solarski is still charged with
driving under the influence with
property damage and resisting
arrest without violence.
The State Attorney's office did
not pursue the charges of leaving
the scene of the crash stemming
from the accident apparently, be-
cause Solarski's actions did not


fit the statute, ac-
cording to Assis-
tant State Attorney
Greg Marcille.
Other charges
dismissed were
criminal mischief
because they are
BOB covered in the DUI
SOLARSKI charge from when
Solarski crashed
into two vehicles in
the Sears Auto Center parking lot
at University Mall on Davis High-
way according to Marcille.
Solarski's blood-alcohol level
was 0.296 and 0.30 on separate
breath tests, an arrest report said.
The legal threshold for drunken
driving in Florida is 0.08.
Witnesses spotted Solarski
driving erratically about 7:30
p.m. back on Oct. 1 in the park-


ing lot of the Sears Auto Center.
At least three witnesses report-
ed seeing Solarski push a car
into a pickup with his SUV, the
report said. One witness, Don
Muzik, reported seeing Solarski
push an Acura sedan and Ford
pickup for about five minutes.
The Acura sustained front and
rear-end damage, the sheriff's
report said. The pickup sus-
tained front-end damage, which
was estimated at more than
$200.
According to the report, So-
larski's vehicle then jumped a
curb and he drove into a differ-
ent parking lot on the east side
of the Sears department store,
about 200 yards from the scene
of the crash. When deputies re-
sponded to the scene, they no-
ticed Solarski, "slumped back in


the driver's seat and it appeared
as if he was passed out," the re-
port said.
A deputy asked Solarski to
get out of the vehicle, but Solar-
ski refused multiple times. He
was finally pulled from the ve-
hicle, fell to the pavement and
was placed in handcuffs.
Deputies discovered an open
bottle of vodka on the rear pas-
senger floorboard of Solarski's
vehicle, and smelled alcohol
on Solarski's breath when he
was arrested, the report said. A
Florida Highway Patrol trooper
called to the scene said "Solar-
ski had rammed the (Acura)
sedan twice and it appeared to
be intentional the second time,"
the sheriff's report said.
A week after his arrest Solar-
ski was suspended by WEAR-TV,


but he remains an employee of
the station.
"He will remain off the air as he
progresses through treatment,"
General Manager Carl Leahy said
in a prepared statement. "We ap-
preciate the outpouring of support
from the community and the staff
and share in their expressions of
concern that Bob have a speedy
recovery.
The management of WEAR-TV
supports Bob and his family dur-
ing this difficult time and we are
hopeful that he can return to the
anchor desk at WEAR in the not
too distant future."
Since the incident, Solarski
has remained free after posting
a $5,000 bond.
Reporters Andrew, Gant and
Jeni Senter contributed to this
report.


BEACHES TO WOODLANDS 2008


Photos by BILL GAMBLIN I Press Gazette
TOUR FUN: The Blackwater Heritage Trail Century Bike
Ride got things started early Saturday morning with close
to 200 bikes at the Milton Community Center. At right,
the Santa Rosa County Sheriff's Posse put on a team rid-
ing exhibition during the Horse Fair at East Milton Park.
Below, several different demonstrations of riding were
offered including barrel racing and an approach for
those considering this sport.



Tour concludes


Press Gazette Staff Reports

The final weekend of the
5th Annual Beaches to Wood-
lands Tour Oct.
24-26 offers the
opportunity to
enjoy spooky
thrills and have
fun while learn-
ing about the
fascinating his-
tory of Santa
Rosa County.
On Friday
and Saturday,
ghost tales will
come to life in
historic down-
town Milton
during Santa
Rosa Historical Society's
"Ghost Walk." Ghouls in pe-
riod dress re-enact notable
legends and events along


the one-mile guided route
through the historic district,
where Main Street Milton also
plans to host some haunted
fun both nights.
The group
will present
HAYWIRE, a
haunted house
where the
"BAD" doctor
is in and par-
ticipants can
see what hap-
pens when an
insane asylum
goes wrong.
The group will
present an en-
core Oct. 28-31.
Young fami-
lies will want to gobble up
the fun at The Zoo Northwest
See TOUR A4


WEEKEND FOUR OCT. 24-26"h

($) Historical Society's "GhostWalk'
Starts at Imogene Theatre 6866
Caroline St.
850-626-9830
Fr... Oct 24th & Sat. Oct. 25". 6 to
10 p.m
$ 10 adults. $5 children 5-12 years
Approx. 90 min. tours depart every
15 minutes, starting at 6 p.m.
See EVENTS A4


Former Milton


coach Helms


dies at 76


By BILL GAMBLING
bganmblin@srpressgazette.com

Former Milton bas-
ketball coach John Alien
Helms, 76, passed away
Saturday due to complica-
tions from cancer.
Helms coached the Pan-
thers from 1973 to 1983 and
then again from 1984 to
1991.
During his tenure as a
basketball coach, he also
served as an assistant foot-
ball coach at Milton High
School working with the of-


fensive linemen under the
direction of Hurley Man-
ning.
"He was a beloved coach
and a great psychologist,"
said Bill Brownell, who
was a basketball manager
under Helms at Milton.
"He was a great coach and
person."
Helms led the Panthers
to the Final Four in Class 3A
on two different occasions -
1973 and 1982 and led Mil-
ton to the post season on six
different occasions in 1973,
See HELMS A4


NAS Whiting Field 65th

Birthday Celebration


The "Crown Jewel of Na-
val Aviation" invites the pub-
lic to join in its 65t birthday
celebration on October 25
from 9 a.m.
until 4 p.m.
NAS Whit- It is un
ing Field ,.
will open its thatNl
gates in an Field is c
invitation to
the public to OUr m7
enjoy a host
of activi- security
ties includ-
ing flight capabili
demonstra- fighting
aircraft won0
displays, a
fire fighter
challenge, Larry
arts & crafts president of t
vendors, in- CountChmb
formational ny b
displays, a
children's activities area,
and live entertainment.
Santa Rosa County Cham-
ber of Commerce 2008 Presi-
dent Larry Strain says Whit-
ing Field holds tremendous
value to the community.
"It is undeniable that NAS
Whiting Field is critical to
our national security and to
the capabilities of our fight-


1C
1





S


h
e


ing men and women. It is also
a critical part of our com-
munity. Approximately 4000
people work on base. That in-
cludes 1800
students,
leniable 850 military
1, i staff' 440
vv ting government
critical to civilian em-
ployees and
tional 860 contract
employees.
,nd to the These are
* of our our friends
les ofour and neigh-
rmen and bors, work-
inggoodjobs
ienl. and earning
good livings.
All told, NAS
Strain Whiting
e Santa Rosa Field has a
r of Commerce greater than
$230 million
economic
impact every year," Strain
says on the chamber web-
site.
Strain details some of the
impact of NAS Whiting Field,
"Every Navy, Marine Corps,
and Coast Guard Helicop-
ter Pilot takes training at
NAS Whiting Field. Nearly
See WHITING A4


Jim Fletcher
Publisher
623-2120
fletcher@pressgazcttc.com


Printed on
recycled
paper


TABLE OF C
Obituaries ................... .........A2
Religion... .......................... B3
Opinion ................... ......... A6


OAUTEUTC


Tide repo........................... AFREEDOM
Clssifieds........................ 5-B7 RI s- C)11" t
NEWSPAPERS...INTERACTIVE
Sports........ .............. A8


Volume
Issue56 IR s
1E1'-1


h~TTS~i 11~6~4R~~i~i~l~BBW~J~~BJ(!iBn~~Srm~YL LI ~YC


w -,,, ..


-ul


A#*'%-


vw)






A2 I Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Local


Wednesday, October 22, 2008


Breaking news online

at srpressgazette.com.






Nominal Opening Bids Start at $1,000
-. .''" OCT 15th -30th
-.-i a 300+ Florida Properties
-4 *.il MANY PROPERTIES AVAILABLE
.FOR ONLINE BIDDING!
5% Buyer's Premium
May Apply
williamsauction.com 800.801.8003WI LAMS &WILLIAMS
[t FL RE LIC BK3003737 DEAN C WILLIAMS BROKER. W&W RE LIC 1032049. AUC LICAU3278 MONTE W
LOWDERMAN AUCTIONEER, W&WAUC LIC AB-0"760


Bloaaers Wa d


Community

minded writersed Internet!

any age offer Ends December 15,2008!
propose e Standard Installation
blog
Ideas.


Call
Bill Gamblin
623-2120
or email
bgamblin5srpressgazetteAo



6629 Elva St. M sztort




Save Big on


High-Speed Internet!

Everything You Need for $99.95 (plus S&H)
Hurry Offer Ends December 15, 2008!
Includes Free Standard Installation!


U.,~
A



Jr


M5WILDBLUE.

www.wildblue.com
1-800-948-2218


.L e ito WildBlue terms and conditions.
It www,wildblue.cornmlegal for details
and the Fair Access Polcy. 0 2008
WildBlue Communicalions, Inc.


Mary Lynette Cranford
Ellis, age 79, went to be with
the Lord on Tuesday, October
7, 2008, in Milton, Florida,
after a battle with cancer.
Lynette was born on
her family's farm April 1,
1929, three miles east of
Spearsville, Louisiana, in
the Mt. Union Community.
She was the tenth child in a
loving family of six boys and
six girls.
She graduated from
Spearsville High School in
1945 and attended Louisiana
Tech until she married
Ernest Ray Cranford in 1946
who had grown up seven
miles from her.
She moved to Bagdad,
Florida, in 1955 when her
husband accepted a job at
Escambia Bay Chemical,
now Air Products. In 1956, the
Cranfords moved to Milton.
Lynette began working for
Drs. Rufus Thames and John
Holley in 1968 as a clerk/
receptionist until 1990 when


she retired.
She was a member of
Ferris Hill Baptist Church
for forty-eight years, but in
2004 became a member of
First Baptist Church, Milton,
and claims many friends in
both churches.
She is survived by her
daughter-Carol Ann
(Steve) Jones, and son-
Kenny (Vicki) Cranford, all of
Milton; four grandchildren-
Angie (Mark Padgett) Jones,
Milton, Chad (Kim) Jones,
Baton Rouge, Jenni (Scott)
Holtman, Virginia Beach,
Virginia, and Jeffrey Ray
Cranford, Milton; five great-
grandchildren- Kameron
Zane and Blaine Erik
Padgett, Stephen Patrick,
Andrew Cranford, Lillian
Elizabeth Jones, and
Alyssa Cranford Holtman;
a dear sister, Lois Elkins,
Spearsville, Louisiana;
three sisters-in-law-Hazel
West, Vidor, Texas, Helen
Ramsey, Spearsville, LA, and


Elizabeth Cranford, West
Monroe, LA; one brother-
in-law-Clyde Tyndall,
Mesquite, TX; twenty-six
nieces and nephews; two
special friends for more than
50 years, Lavelle and Dean
Williams of Milton.
She was preceded in
death by her husband-Ray
Cranford, in 1974; parents-
Firman and Mollie West,
Spearsville, LA; her father-in-
law and mother-in-law-Lem
and Tiny Cranford, Laran,
LA; six brothers- Oran
(Lovie) West, Dr. Wilmer
(Zenobia) West, Eric (Mary)
West, Conway West, Kenneth
West (killed in World War
II), Rex (Wanda) West; four
sisters-Dorothy (John)
Salzer, Iris Tyndall, Lavern
(Jim) Pine, Sylvia West;
brothers-in-law-Raymon
and Rudeen Cranford; five
nephews and one niece.
In 1994 she was married
to Gene Ellis who preceded
her in death in 2006.


Pallbearers were Buddy
Hinote, Robert Smith, Curtis
Williams, Richie Sulcer,
Jonathan Creel, and Doug
Dillon.
Honorary Pallbearers
were Billy and Lemerle
Birdsong, Mary Ellen Jones,
Billy and Emily Spencer,
Barry Holbert, Betty Sulcer,
Toni Heisler, Ann Stephens,
Jo Sheffield, LethaMcCaskill,
and the Martha Sunday
School Class of First Baptist
Church.
Visitation was Saturday,
October 11, 2008 at 10 a.m.
at First Baptist Church,
Milton, with the funeral
following at 11 a.m. Burial
was at Serenity Gardens in
Milton, Florida. Dr. David
Spencer and Rev. Jim
Waters, both of First Baptist
Church, Milton, conducted
the services.
Let the family know you
care. Sign the guest book
under news/obituaries at
www.srpressgazette.com.


f SO' Visit Jacksonville and cruise out on Carnival Cruise Lines.
V W ier1loi.da gimns. Book Uour cruise out of Jacksonville and make mor of your
a""""""" "nom trip. Here you'll be able to spend your pre-cruise days dining at
exquisite restaurants, exploring the Zoo and Gardens or strolling through one of our distinctive
museums. With so much to do here, you're sure to love the land as much as the sea.


,. ,
Call ou'.a I -:ai mea i ar er r aond bm' yu.r aiy a IaIn r>uricjworle Ub vision ..
w*w.vlsitjackeonville.com/cruise for great alue packages and aolbmttes e '


Sunday, 7:57 p.m.
Hello this is Marion.
Speed kills on the river as
well as on the highway. No
wake zones are a help, but
we need to do more. All
boats have equal rights to
the river froni canoes to the
big boats. Speed limits in the
congested areas that were
enforced would enable us to
prevent injuries or worse. I
have never heard of a boat
with brakes. Have you?
Thank you.

Sunday, 10:45 a.m.
Yes this is Thomas from
Pace. I want to talk about
gay marriages. To me per-
sonally it makes me sick to
my stomach to see two men
or two women kissing in
public. I don't believe in it.
Vote no on Amendment two
and God bless America. '


Sunday, 10:09 a.m.
Yes this is Wanda. Thank
goodness for the media. Now
we don't have to vote be-
cause we already know who
will be in the White House.

Saturday, 10:10 a.m.
This is Billy. I see the bow
hunters are out and have
climbed their little trees for
the first day of bow season.
You thinkyou are sportsmen,
but what kind of sportsman
would kill a doe with a spot-
ted fawn close by. The FWC
is very unwise to let this sea-
son start so early in the year.
Bow season should start at
the same time as gun season
and black powder season.
All of those seasons should
come at the same time with
everyone hunting in his or
her respective areas and
get it over with. Five months


is too long. This is not the
season for real sportsmen
to shoot does with spotted
fawns.

Friday, 11 a.m.
This is Tom Scott. I would
like to thank all of the citi-
zens (pro and con) who took
time out to attend the NO
WAKE hearing on Thursday.
The discussion was good
and several groups stayed
after the hearing to discuss
their thoughts for the future
of our river. The fact that we
can come together, discuss
our views, and seek out so-
lutions is what makes Milton
strong. Once again thanks to
all.

Thursday, 6:47 p.m.
This is Sandra. Does
it make sense to contract
out bus services but still


have a transportation ad-
ministrator? People, do
the research. There was a
recent outside audit by a
firm recommended from
Tallahassee that recom-
mended eliminating this
position since it was not
needed. Two teachers'
salaries could benefit from
us not needing this one
person. Also the busses
are new, but are they safer.
Durham reported 16 acci-
dents for the month at the
last school board meeting.
That is more than the other
contractor reported for the
whole school year last year.
And yes, Laidlaw reported
accidents as little as a dol-
lar. Thank you.

If you have a short com-
ment you would like to
make, call the Speak Out
line at 623-5887.


University of West Florida releases crime report


By JENI SENTER
jscnter@sipressgazette.com

The University of West
Florida police department
released its annual secu-
rity report which shows
a total of 134 on-campus
crimes for 2007. This figure
reflects an increase over
the previous year's total of
128 crimes.
UWF Chief of Police John
Warren says the university
is a safe place and is com-
mitted to maintaining a safe
and secure environment for
all members of the campus
community.
"Safety is everyone's re-
sponsibility. As a university
we work very hard to pre-
vent crime, fire, accidents,


and illness, but nothing we
do is as important as what
you (the public) do. We en-
courage the community to
utilize the crime prevention
programs offered by UWF to
enhance community safety
and security for all," says
Warren.
The report shows the
highest number of crimes as
liquor law violations result-
ing in disciplinary action re-
ferrals (102 instances). Oth-
er crimes with their number
of occurrences include: at-
tempted forcible sex offense
(1), aggravated assault (1),
burglary (8), motor vehicle
theft (4), liquor law arrests
(4), drug law arrests (4),
drug law violations resulting
in disciplinary action refer-
rals (9), and illegal weapons


violations resulting in disci-
plinary action referrals (1).
The UWF police depart-
ment offers several crime
prevention programs: The
Emergency Bluelight Pro-
gram, Operation Identifica-
tion, and Operation Book-
stamp, as well as a method
for individuals to report
crimes and other incidents
on a voluntary, confidential,
or anonymous basis called
"Silent Witness."
The Emergency Bluelight
Program involves the place-
ment of emergency lights in
all the parking lots on cam-
pus and placed throughout
the walkway areas. These
lights provide direct contact
with the UWF police com-
munications center.
Operation Identification


provides free engraving of
valuables with driver's li-
cense numbers by the UWF
police department and a
free sticker alerting poten-
tial thieves to participation
in this theft prevention pro-
gram.
Operation Bookstamp
also serves as a theft deter-
rent. Students bring their
textbooks to the UWF police
department to be stamped
with official police stamps
and registered into a data-
base system.
The UWF police depart-
ment website at uwf.edu/po-
lice provides various safety
tips and program informa-
tion including: safety alerts,
emergency notices, safety
tips, daily crime log, and a
sexual offender list.


~uT LN~ve~R.inO500P5~ aNaNaglense rA~ '.~ Trtsn.~,. "2.' .'.~s' ,P' .~? aIIAer~.b~eI MW5~&~fl'U ~D ndTht'~ 3in~~4~UeI~UinAW ~


Obituaries


Lynette Cranford Ellis
1929-2008


BABY OF THE WEEK


TYLER LEE MARTIN


Speak OUT


AN F

'' ''I


The key to advertising success



^c >



1-866-742-1373

www.florida-classifieds.com


I~









Sheriff's REPORT


The following felony'v
report for Santa Rosa Countyfl
Sheriff': Report is fiomn Oct.
7, to Oct. 13. 2008.
Gullette, Jerry Lee; Male;
42; 4845 Hawkins Dr. Pace;
Failure to Appear for Felony
Offense. 10/7/08
Kelso, Donald Jeffrey;
Male; 44; 4417 South Spencer
Field Rd, Pace; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/7/08
Menefee, Scott Earl; Male;
36; 8420 Misty Lake Dr,
Milton; Possess of Weapon
or Ammo By Convicted Fla
Felon. 10/7/08
More, Jarrett Dewayne;
Male; 18; 8833 Sand Pine
Dr, Navarre; Marijuana-
Producing Sched I. 10/7/08
Birchmore IlI, Henry
Harold; Male; 38; 4933 East
Spencer Field Rd, Pace; Possess
Cocaine, Narcotic Equip-
Possess And Or Use. 10/7/08
Blodgett, Eric Allen;
Male; 61; 4310 Iron Gate Rd,
Pensacola; Aggrav Asslt W/
Deadly Weapon W/O Intent
to Kill. 10/7/08
Gregory, Christopher
James; Male; 29; 5433 Borden
Rd, Milton; Battery-2nd or
Subseq Offense. 10/7/08
Ross. Brooke Michelle;
Female; 25; 8301 Rambler
Dr, Pensacola; Drive While
Lic Susp Habitual Offender.
10/7/08
Vahlberg, Ryan Lynn;
Male; 13; 7090 Nelson St,
Navarre; Lewd Lascv-Molest
Child 12YOA Up To 16YOA
By Less 18YOA, Lewd Lascv
Behavior-Conduct By Person
Less Than 18 YOA, Lewd
Lascv Behav-Exhibit By Pers
Less 18 YOA Victim Less 16
YOA. 10/7/08
Warrick. Jr.. Jeffery
Randall; Male; 20; 11192
Chumuckla Hwy., Jay;
Probation Violation-Felony.
10/7/08
Spears, Amanda Danielle;
Female; 23; 13093 Munson
Hwy, Milton; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/8/08
Walker. II. David Wayne;
Male; 45; 7231 Manatee
Rd, Navarre; Possess
Marijuana with Intent to
Sell, Manufacture, Deliver,
Possess Cocaine With Intent
to Deliver. 10/8/08
Crown, Edward Joseph;
Male; 53; 504 Eventide Dr,
Gulf Breeze; Racketeering
(2 cts.), Possess Marijuana
With Intent, Trafficking in
Marijuana. 10/8/08
Cuff. Jr., Anthony James;
Male; 38; 5582 Mulberry St,
Flower Branch, GA; Fugitive
From Justice. 10/8/08
Davison, Joshua Jerome;
Male; 20; 2812 North
Alcaniz, Pensacola; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/9/08
Lambeth. Jr., Thomas;
Male; 58; 3432 Kossuth Ave.,
Milton; Sex Asslt-Vict Over
12 YOA Physical Force No
Damage. 10/8/08
Green, II, Robert Thomas;
Male; 21; 4150 James
Jernigan Rd, Jay; Marijuana
Producing-Schedule I.
10/9/08


* 0

1/ CE T sM
Civil Trial


Former U.S.Marine


Logan, Nicholas Provost;
Male; 23; 191 Camelia St,
Gulf Breeze; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/9/08
Minnick, Roger William;
Male; 20; 216 W Main St.,
Midway, OH; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/9/08
Montova. Jr., Martin
Martinez; Male; 21; 115 Vine
St, Pensacola; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/9/08
Neblett. Morris NMN;
Male; 51; 1275 Mohogany
Mill Rd, Pensacola; Public
Order Crimes-Engage
Contracting Busn W/O Certif
Subseq Viol, Fraud-Swindle
Hire or Lease WIT Defraud
$300 or Over. 10/9/08
Powers. Jr.. Cecil
Lewis; Male; 36; 4899 Lynn
Drive, Pace; Sex Offender
Violations-Fail to Report
Name or Residence Change.
10/9/08
Zapata, Connie Lynn:
Female; 47; 8121 Segura
St, Navarre Pkwy; Fraud-
Swindle Obtain Property
Under $20,000. 10/9/08
Cutcher, Kathleen
Carolyn; Female; 44; 6851
Chuck Wagon Ln, Milton;
Aggrav Battery-Person Uses
A Deadly Weapon. 10/9/08
Ard, James Michael;
Male; 4080 Driskell Rd,
Milton; Aggrav. Battery-
Cause Bodily Harm or
Disability (domestic
violence). 10/10/08
Brooks. Joseph Dupree;
Male; 34; 6211 Montgomery
Ave,Pensacola;Drugs-Health
or Safety Store Anhydrous
Ammonia in Unlawful
Container, Amphetamine-
Traffic or Methamphetamine
14 Grams or Over, Narcotic


Equip-Possess And Or Use,
Narcotic Equip-Possess
Manufacture Deliver, Drugs-
Possess Listed Chemical Wit
Manufacture Cntrl Subs.
10/11/08
Goodvear. Christopher
Douglas; Male; 41; 2850 Boat
ClubLn,Navarre; DUIAlcohol
or Drugs 3rd Violation W/In
10 Years, Flee/Elude Police-
Fail to Obey LEO Order to
Stop, Refuse to Submit to
DUI Test, Fail to Register
Motor Veh, Drive While
Lic Susp Habitual Offender,
Resist Officer-Obstruct W/O
Violence. 10/10/08
Howell. April Althea;
Female; 48; 4356 Gait City
Rd, Milton; DUI. 10/10/08
Gutierrez,Tammie Lynette;
Female; 38; 5060 Bodega
Dr, Milton; Damage Prop-
Crim Misch Over $200 Under
$1,000, Burglary Unoccupied
Structure Unarmed, Larc-Petit
1st Off. 10/10/08
Henretty, Scott Phillip;
Male; 34; 701 Roanne Lane,
Pensacola; Failure to Appear
for Felony Offense. 10/10/08
Jackson. Jackie Christine;
Female; 31; 7333 Pine Forest
Rd, Pensacola; Drugs-Possess
New Legend Drug W/O
Prescription (2 cts.), Drugs-
Possess Meth W/Intent to
Sell Manufacture Deliver (2
cts.), Drugs-Possess Cntrl
Sub W/O Prescript (3 cts.),
Marijuana Possess Not More
Than 20 Grams, Drugs-Health
or Safety Store Anhydrous
Ammonia in Unlawful
Container, Amphetamine-
Traffic or Methamphetamine
14 Grams or Over, Narcotic
Equip-Possess And Or Use,
Narcotic Equip-Possess


CD RATES TOO LOW? LET'S TALK.


DanelR Greer
Financial Advisor
6259 Hwy 90
Parkmore Plaza
Milton, FL 32570
850-983-1471


mw.edwardjones.com o emb sIPc

MAKi1INGSNS FINVEST ING4


VISIT OUR LOCATION AT
21 NEW WARRINGTON RD. T
PENSACOLA, FL 32507 .Ikoy
850-455-4529 troy.edu UNIVERSY



*ames waid aylov
S 'ctodez27, 1922- jeduiauf 13, 2004
f 9( 9 could' Iaue a live, l uui, a d iea,' would
come uin.a 9 prayf to, cqod, mwi(/i a/ alnu/ ireartb a
yes1teda.y and yio ad. A tfIousaaidit wads can I
ying, ou dlack,; 9 lotc tecanise' 9 /are9 tied.
Scitet/I iwal/ a'tAomsandi teas; 9 know because 9
habwe, ic'e adcl you' teftk 1eliinidlmemoaues mnuf
mAean is& sutilt 6olel Iron' ur/len yaour' elet me,' and,
h appyt raeim loie& too,; dut 9 neueri anted ueriinas.
anV -y 9wane/you gad,
S'd like, to' wiv yiou( a9(appy 93i4lddayl gad,
9 lovet you andmiss, you.
9?est 9, 9eace,

91v W3oalp W


LESSER AIFIRM, PAi

CIV L T IA SP CIA IS


* Auto Accidents
* Insurance Claims
* Injury Claims


* ,Construction Law
* Contract Disputes
* Real Estate Disputes


Florida / Alabama


850*433m7800



The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon adverlisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience. S


t n,.T1'JT* '


Manufacture Deliver, Drugs-
Possess Listed Chemical
WIT Manufacture Cntrl
Subs. 10/11/08
Moore, Ronald Charles;
Male; 32; 2851 Joe Pruitt Rd,
Navarre; Veh Theft-Grand
3rd Degree. 10/10/08
Morrill, Mical Shane;
Male; 48; 5611 Sunray
St, Milton; Burglary-
Unoccupied Structure
Unarmed, Larc-Petit 1st
Degree Property $100 to
Under $300. 10/11/08
Ray, Colleena Joe;
Female; 18; Harvell St,
Milton; Asslt-Intent Threat To
Do Violence (3 cts) Damage
Prop-Crim Misch $200 and
Under, Burgl-With Asslt or
Battery (3 cts.). 10/12/08
Snowden, George Paul;
Male; 36; 5014 Kings Oak,
Pace; Drive While Lic Susp
Habitual Offender, Attached






4915 Highway 90 Pace
850-995-1600



Max Payne (PG13)
1:45 4:20 7:00 9:15
Sex Drive (R)
1:30 4:15 7:05 9:30
Fireproof (PG)
1:00 4:05 6:55 9:20
*Body of Lies (R)
1:05 3:55 6:50 9:20
*The Express (PG)
3:50 9:00
Quarantine (PG)
1:40 4:10 7:10 9:25
*City of Ember (PG)
1:15 6:45
Beverly Hills Chihuahua (PG)
1:20 4:30 7:00 9:10
Eagle Eye (PG 13)
1:10 4:00 6:55 9:25
*1S'SHOWING WVILLBE ON Thurs. Oct. 23

High School Musical 3 (G)
1:15 4:00 7:00 9:25
Saw 5 (R)
1:30 4:10 7:10 9:30
Pride and Glory (R)
1:05 3:50 6:45 9:15


Registration License Plate
Not Assigned. 10/11/08
Wilson. Roxanne Marie;
Female; 41; 4625 Centerpoint
Dr., Pensacola; Larc-Theft is
$300 or More But Less Than
$5,000. 10/10/08
Feaster, Philip Jason;
Male; 24; 8600 Hwy West,
Pensacola; Fugitive From
Justice. 10/08
Barnes, Brittni Shiya;
Female; 14; 4532 Limit St,
Milton; Asslt-Intent Threat
To Do Violence, Damage
Prop-Crim Misch $200 and
Under, Burgl With Asslt or
Battery, 10/12/08
Cannaday, Shanna
Kimberlee; Female; 42; 5445
Berryhill Rd, Milton; Larc-
Theft is $300 or More But
Less Than $5,000. 10/12/08
Chisholm, Lloyd Earl;
Male; 17; 3362 Bob Tolbert
Rd, Navarre; Obstructing


Justice-Intimidate Threaten
Etc Vict Witness Informant.
10/10/08
Daniels, Kadeshia
Lakeyssa; Female; 14; 4472
Momingside Ln, Milton;
Asslt-Intent Threat To Do
Violence, Damage Prop-
Crim Misch $200 and Under,
Burgl With Asslt or Battery.
10/12/08
Fralic, Adam Michael;
Male; 26; 8938 Sunset Dr,
Navarre; Perjury In An
Official Proceeding. 10/10/08
Fuston. Jr., Robert
NMN; Male; 6450 Fleet Ave,
Milton; Probation Violation-
Felony. 10/12/08
Palombo. Francis
Cleveland; Male; 17; 1795
IvaleaCircle,Navarre;Damage
Prop-Crim Misch $200 and
Under, Burgl Unoccupied
Structure Unarmed, Larc Petit
1st Off. 10/10/08


You deserve to hear all that life has to offer.
You will hear the difference when you visit the area's
most qualified and experience professional. Helping your
family and friends hear AND understand since 1994
Hearing test and counseling
Hearing aid fittings & demonstrations
Titnnitus management for noises in the ear or head
Custom ear protection for hunting,
swimming & musicians


John R. Carter, AuD
Board Certified Doctor ofAudiologist
Call today and start
hearing better!
850-994-0942



HEARING SOLUTIONS
oftde EmerafdCoast,.
4493 Woodbine Road Pace, FL 325,71


Dan McKenzie

McKenzie GMC Pontiac & Buick



SALUTES


MRS. ANITA SPURLOCK
The unbridled devotion to family, friends,
and community and the dedication and commit-
ment to others, shown over the years by Mrs.
Anita Spurlock, paints a picture of a life that
has meaning far beyond itself. She is one of
those individuals whose life is an open book of
deeds and accomplishments we so admire and
only wish to emulate.
Anita Stuart Miller Spurlock was born in
Bolivar, Louisiana and lived in Shreveport and
Kenner, Louisiana before coming to Milton in
1955 with her late husband, Emmett Martin
Spurlock, and family when Escambia Bay
Chemical in Pace began production. Later in
i h1971 she moved to Valley Forge and Allentown,
Pennsylvania for a 10-year period when Mr.
Spurlock was transferred to the main office of
Air Products.
Mrs. Anita Spurlock Early on Anita attended Sophia Newcombe
College, of Tulane University, majoring in art.
But she achieved her most outstanding distinc-
tion from her home-family-community based activities of Florida homemaking and com-
munity living which earned her the distinction as Florida Mother of the Year in 1969. She
has been active in the Milton Garden Club, is a 50-year member of the Shakespeare Club,
was a member of the Historical Society, PTAs unlimited, Band Boosters, and Quarterback
Clubs as well as a host of other activities and programs too numerous to relate.
She has been blessed with four children, four grandchildren, and two great grand-
daughters. Most of all she has been a wife, mother, mother-in-law, and grandmother,
always supportive of her family and community. She has traveled around the world with
her sister and to Europe many times. She especially loves the mountains with the fall
leaves, the beaches, and has always loved and collected dolls for herself and her grand-
daughters. And cook? It's one of her most outstanding gifts!
The Spurlock home on Willard Norris Road built in 1964 had one of the first in-
ground pools in Milton where the Red Cross taught swimming lessons for many years.
Anita is a legend in her own time, and we salute her for all her productivity and diversity
which have given new meaning to life for many who have benefited from her generosity
and good deeds. Thank you, Anita, for sharing your life so generously. You have always
been one of us, whether present or not. This is a salute of our appreciation to you for your
services!



McKenzie
PONTIAC GMC BUICK

Hwy 90 at 89, Milton
623-3481

"3 ,; ;;- i..i~. r-:, ~i ~U, WP~L 4


* Federal Criminal Defense


Santa Rosa Press Gazette I A3


T Local


WednesdayOctober 22 2008


7






T .nocal


A4 I Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, October 22, 2008


OUT FOR A STROLL:
Saturday's Art Stroll
in Historic Bagdad
was just a great
opportunity for
people to get out,
enjoy the weather,
and talk.

BILL GAMBLING I Press Gazette


I HURRY IN FOR


OCTOBER 23 27, 2008


II
,H i Laws's^fH


Girtj


PINK iIB0&GLAS INiiULATlid '
TeIar.r.--.- ."r M
i ------- B


VIA MAIL-IN REBATE WITH $300 OR MORE PURCHASE OF ALL IN-SIUCK

OWENS CORNING FIBERGLASS INSULATION
Limit one per household. Valid 10/23/08 10/27/08. See store for details.


SPECIAL -:,i
VALUE!
now
$1118 was
$1244
15/32" x 4' x 8' 3-Ply
Sheathing Plywood #12192


^ Kidde

*SMOKE ALARMS
*CARBON MONOXIDE
ALARMS
*FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
Discount taken.at register. Offer valid
10/23/08 10/27/08. See store for details.


Pricing for commodity items
may vary due to market
conditions. We reserve the
right to limit quantities.


Discount taken at register. Offer valid 10/23/08 -
10/27/08. See store for details.


SPECIAL
VALUE!
now

$169
was
$189


BOSTTCH
2-HP (Peak) 6-Gallon
2" Brad Nailer Combo Kit
*Includes 25' hose, and fittings
*3.4 SCFM @ 40 PSI
#236550;252879;299318


SPECIAL
VALUE! HonM
now
$49 $was
5 + 2 Day Programmable
Thermostat
#39500


mIIII:


Let's Build Something Together-







* Professional-grade power tools
and accessories
New high-performance cordless and
corded power tools lines
now available at Lowe's


PORTER 0 CABLE.


$169
18-Volt Lithium Ion
Compact Cordless
Drill/Driver
#37116


ALL SPECIAL ORDER
RELIABILT &
MILLENNIUM
INTERIOR DOOR
SLABS AND
PRE-HUNG UNITS
Discount taken at time of order. Does not
include installation. Offer valid 10/23/08 -
10/27/08. See store for details.


SPECIAL
VALUE!
now

$119
was $129
32" or 36"
6-Panel Steel
Fntn Donnor Unit


__ __ _ 4 I


F- I


SPECIAL Weatherstripping
SPECIALfor a tight seal
VALUE! Pricing for Pricing for SPECIALVALUE .Ready for lockset
OW commodity items commodity items anddeadbolt
now may vary due to may vary due to now and deadbolt
was7 aS rket conditions. matconditions. was *Primed and ready Locksets sold separately.
P2n o- We reserve the right $ 94 We reserve the right $ to paint
$2 n $319 to limit quantities. to limit quantities. $75-to -inst all
2" x 4" x 8' Top Choice 2" x 4" x 92-5/8" Kiln-Dried 4' x 50' Chainlink Fence door with tramll
Treated Lumber #46905 Whitewood Select Stud #6003 Fabric #85190 door with frame

^- .SPECIAL
-U -^ .. ..,VALUE! f
HrJ Isf K^ ^' now /*T
%Off $69
U Georgia-Pacfic I was $92
DensArmdr Plus* <.. 1 \
SPECIAL SPECIAL 8' Fiberglass
SVALUE! i i VALUE! Stepladder
OW225 lb. lIoad
4 I now n ow capacity
.'Ish- J C- C -,- nww as
S258" 80 35 978 *Medium duty/
$28 40 lbs- commercial
1,I ii1' l QUIKRETEO Concrete Mix 50' 12/3 Contractor Cord *Includes Tool-Tra-Top*
8 "* #04030 #242027 #94571

I0r SB S 1L IL P1f
SERg^U


Prices may vary after 10/27/2008 it there are any market variations. "Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on 10/16/2008 and may vary based on Lowe's Everyday Low Price policy. See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve thend
to limit quantities. 'Ask for 10% off your first single-receipt in-store purchase charged to your new Lowe's Accounts Receivable or Lowe's' Business Account when you open your new account in any Lowes store and make your first purchase between 1022/2(
through 10/27/2008. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase and cannot bhe used in conjunction with any other coupon or discount. This coupon is good for a single-receipt purchase and of any In-stock or peal order merchandise only up to $5000
r,.- -...j -i i. I ii..... I i.... li lt stered, copied, transferred, orsold through any online auction. Limit one coupon per rbsness. Not valid on sales via Lowes.com,
-. i. i i i r .r i- I. i i i... .i c Coupon valid for onetimeuse only. Offer is notvalid or accounts opened priorto 10/22/08. Excludes LowesO Consumer Credit
i i. .. ,,,i .i i .. i, ; to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to correct any error. Prices and promotions apply to US loce-
i '. ; 1 ,,1 L 1 1 .0.1 : .1 L ,: I.. 11, i .. i .. I iidemarks of LF, LLC. (6456)


Local ghost tales come to life
in this Santa Rosa
Historical Society one-mile
guided downtown walking tour.
Refreshments served.

($) Main Street Milton's Haunt-
ed House
Historic Downtown Milton
850-626-6246 or www.main-


along the Blackwater River.
Whiting Field recently sought
to re-use excess equipment,
valued at approximately
$75,000, by donating it to com-
munity organizations.


-,. -'-. flas'rumir"1'Jw l u,~wedwu~mmuY3In'imnN'j *


HU -.-::' f- Fiiil
"c Lne --7"' a-- 4


TOUR from page Al


J-jv"Ll


a


streetmilton.org
Fri., Oct. 24th & Sat, Oct. 25",
starting at 7 p.m.
$5 per person
Main Street Milton Presents:
HAYWIRE
Clowns, monsters and evil
around every turn.
(also open Oct. 28"- 31").

EAST MILTON
"Talk Tractor" Saturday Octo-
ber 25th in front of the Copper
'Possum Antique Mall. A gathering
of local vintage tractors on display.
Time: 8:00am until at the Cop-
per 'Possum Antique Mall 7060
Hwy 90 East Milton
For more information, contact
Willard Beasley at 626-0444, or
The Copper'Possum at 626-4492


TIGER POINT
($) The Zoo's "Zoo Boo"
5701 Gulf Breeze Pkwy.
850-932-2229
Sat., Oct. 25th, I to 3 p.m.
Enjoy over 1400 animals and
family-friendly
Halloween activities!

PACE
($) Batters Box Batting Cages
& Mini-Golf
5566 Woodbine Rd.
850-995-9295
Weekdays 2-8 pm; Sat. 12 to
9 pm; Sun. 12-8 pm.
"Spooky Golf" weekends in.
October.

ONLINE
Santa Rosa Virtual Museum
Project
Milton Library, 5541 Alabama St
850-484-1458 or www.santa-
rosavirtualmuseum.com
Fri., Oct. 24* from I to
4 p.m.
Share old local photos and
memories! Volunteers
will be on hand to scan photo-
graphs
and interview residents to doc-
ument Santa Rosa
County's rich history for this
Pensacola Junior College project.

TOUR
from page Al
Florida's "Zoo Boo" on Sat-
urday. Children in costume
receive a discount off admis-
sion and can enjoy fun Hal-
loween activities while visit-
ing over 1400 animals at the
attraction. The Zoo is also
holding "Nightmare on the
Safari" adventures on the 24th
& 31st from 6-10 p.m. Addi-
tionally, Batter's Box in Pace
is also holding their annual
"Spooky Golf" each weekend
throughout October.
Though the harvest of fun-
filled fall festivals is coming to
an end, many of the Tour ven-
ues can be enjoyed through-
out the year, so pick up a
copy of the Tour guide while
they are still available at local
chambers. For more informa-
tion, visit www.BeachesTo-
Woodlands2008.com or call
1-800-480-SAND (7263).


WHITING
from page Al
43 percent of all Chief Na-
val Aviation Training flight
hours, 16 percent of all U.S.
Navy flight hours and 3 per-
cent of all military flight
hours are flown from Whit-
ing Field. There are more
than 270 aircraft on board
the base and 1800 students
receive their training there
each and every year."
Santa Rosa County Cham-
ber of Commerce Executive
Director Donna Tucker is ex-
cited to be a part of the birth-
day celebration.
"We are very proud to be
a part of this event and to be
able to show our apprecia-
tion to such an integral part
of our community for over 65
years," says Tucker.
According to the Chamber
website, Whiting Field has
impacted the community so-
cially, as well as economically.
Whiting Field has partnered
in the community through in-
volvement in adopt a school
programs, adopt a highway
efforts, and clean up efforts


I I l






Wednesday, October 22, 2008


Local


Santa Rosa Press Gazette I AS


SUBMITTED PHOTO
TRIP FOR VETERANS: World War II Veteran Frank Swanert helps Santa Rosa
County Commissioner with a push during last week's trip of the Emerald Coast
Honor Flight. There is one more Honor Flight trip planned for later this year and
is expected to depart from Okaloosa County.



Honor Ceremony for Daniel


McCall set for October 24


On October 24 at 2 p.m.
in the Veterans Park in Mil-
ton, the American Ideals
Foundation will present an
honor ceremony to the fam-
ily of Marvin "Duke" Mc-
Call who lost his grandson,
Sgt. Daniel McCall, in Iraq.
The foundation presents
these honor ceremonies
at no charge to families of
fallen soldiers all over the
United States.
Robert Moffa, the found-
er and organizer of the cer-
emony, will arrive in Milton
by motorcade on October
23 at around 4 p.m. The
famous artist Greg Crum-
bly and other staff will ac-
company him. They will be
parked in a motor home

Veterans

NEWS
Hello Veterans! Here's
some interesting information
regarding possible chemical
and biological exposure. If
you suspect or know of any CB
exposure this article maybe
of particular interest to you.
TheDepartmentofDefense
has launched a website on
chemical-biological warfare
exposurestoeducatethepublic
and chemical and biological
(CB) testing conducted from
the early 1940s through the
mid-1970s. This website can
provide service members,
veterans, their families and
the public information on what
happened during CB testing
conducted years ago that
potentially affected the health
of those who served. This
Web site provides information
on the tests conducted by
DoD that possibly resulted
in CB exposures only, and
for privacy reasons, it does
not contain the names of the
veterans exposed.
Since the end of World
War II, DoD periodically
evaluated the threat of CB
and the ability of U.S. forces
to fight on a chemical and
biological battlefield. Service
members were present
during some programsbut
not test subjects and in other
programs they were volunteer
human subjects. This testing
of biological agents on human
subjects ended in 1969 and
testing of chemical agents on
human subjects ended in 1975.
DoD is investigating these
exposures that occurred as
much as 30 to 60 years ago.
The names discovered
by DoD reside in three
databases the World War
II database, the Project 112/
SHAD database, and the
Cold War database. DoD
shares these databases with
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA) as well.


near the Veterans Memo-
rial in Milton.
The ceremony will begin
at 2 p.m. on Friday October
24 and will consist of the
presentation of the flag by
the ROTC Honor Guard
of Pace High School. Con-
gressman Jeff Miller and
Commissioner Don Salter
will be guest speakers. A
special footnote by Dr. Rob-
in McCall will be presented
as well.
Mary Crumbly, presi-
dent of the foundation, will
talk and the founder Robert
Moffa is expected to speak
at the event also.
A special military coin
and a special "Portrait of
Life" by Greg Crumbly will


be presented to the McCall
family.
Robert Moffa has writ-
ten a piano composition
called "A Military Hero"
that will be played and poet
Gary Schumacher will read
a poem he wrote about the
fallen hero.
At the end of the cer-
emony, Donna Ashley will
help the family release but-
terflies that represent love,
new life, and new begin-
ning.
This ceremony, which is
not a church or memorial
service, is a way to keep the
memory of fallen soldiers
alive so families can have a
legacy to honor their loved
ones.


Sacred Heart Medical Park at Pace is proud to offer
medical care for the Pace and Milton communities.
When you need convenient care that's close to
home, choose Sacred Heart.
Sacred Heart Medical Group
Family Medicine
Laura Harrison, MD
Daniel Hickman, MD
Mark Josephson, MD
Robert Kincaid, DO
Matthew Kinzelman, MD
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Dina Navarro, DO
Sacred Heart Rehabilitation
Ann L. Baroco Center for Breast Health
Sacred Heart Lab Express
Sacred Heart X-Ray & Imaging Services
The Medical Park also offers easy access to many
other physicians and outpatient services, including:
Pace Surgery Center
Gastroenterology Associates
The Surgery Group
Allergy & Asthma Center of Northwest Florida, PA
Pensacola Orthopaedics
Pensacola PM&R
T. Joseph Dennie, MD, PA, Orthopedic Surgeon
Southeast Vascular Group
Comprehensive Pain Management
Cardiology Consultants


For more details
about services at
the Medical Park,
call 416-1600.


+LSacred Heart
Medical Park
at Pace


:.l
TeBsCareCoesFrmth Har


GUARDIANS FOR HONOR FLIGHT


An Oiffr of



gfratt intern!


4.25%

Annual Percentage Yield

9 months


4.50%

Annual Percentage Yield

14 months


If you are looking to safely invest your money
and earn a brisk return in the short term,
look no further.


Peo s First
Th ioedas Communty Bank
The best bank in the neighborhood.
Pace Banking Center
4952 Highway 90
(850) 995 7425
Available to anyone who has or opens a Peoples First checking account; $2,500 minimum investment; limited-term offer; rate is
subject to change at any time; a penalty will be imposed for early withdrawal; fees could reduce earnings on the account. FDIC
SAnnual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of 10.06.08 FDIC


) ~.
4 '>~ SeiT. c.- ~ ~inn n -*~u~~ ncva~iv8*muu~uunun ninSre~nn~.uT~,ni ~ sec'n~nI~sunuusi~,FwnYwmnsau (


I


Gold Wing Riders collect cell

phones for calling cards for troops

The Gold Wing Road
Riders, Milton Chapter, met ,:-
recently at the Red Barn .
Bar-B-Que and presented .
AT&T with 500 cell phones
in exchange for 500 phone
cards for the troops in Iraq.
The cards will be delivered
by Dana Cervantes with Cat
Country Radio to the troops
in Iraq in November 2008.
Cervantes will be traveling to
Iraq again this year and has PORTABLE CLASSROOM
agreed to deliver the cards. SEALEDIBID AUCTION
The Gold Wing Riders would
like to thank the following for SANTA ROSA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
their help: The Red Barn BBQ SCHOOL SURPLUS
Restaurant, Vaughns Pools The Santa Rosa County School Board has declared two
(Walter & Jane), Solutia Plant portable classrooms surplus and bids for purchase are solicited
(Mary & Charlie Odom), from the public. These classrooms are located at W. H. Rhodes
Huals Bikes to Custom Trikes Elementary School, Milton, FL and Pea Ridge Elementary
(Rick, Denise & Amanda), School, Pace, FL. They may be viewed and inspected on the
Mike Jernigan & The dates listed below. Please contact the school administration
Pensacola Fire Department,
eones oaFirbeow p Baut O offices for permission to enter campuses.
Coles Barbershop, Bug Out
Service, Bell Steel, the Joy W.H. Rhodes Elementary School: (850) 983-5670
Fellowship Senior Group at Pea Ridge Elementary School: (850) 995--3680
Northridge Church (Diamond
Family), Heidi Riley for Dates: Inspection & Bid Submission
collecting from Lowell F.F. Monday thru Thursday, November 3-6, 2008
Club of Lowell, MA and AG Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Edwards of Peabody, MA; Bid Submission deadline: 9:00 a.m., November 7, 2008
members of the Gold Wing Location: Administrative Support Complex
Riders Association in our 6544 Firehouse Rd Milton, Florida
sister chapters; special thanks
to Kimberly Shell, Program FOR MORE INFORMATION and
Coordinator for Cell Phones
for Soldiers. Each calling cardSA esCONDITIonS T
has a label on it letting the
troops know that GWRRA, Surplus Warehouse/Textbook Depository
FL l-Q, Milton, FL has sent (850) 983-5143
these cards, "Because We or go to website: www.santarosa.kl2.fl.us/surplus
Care."










A6 ) Santa Rosas Press Gazette


Opinion


Wednesday, October 22, 2008


OUR VIEW


Welcome to


the nightmare

It is election time and on Monday, Santa
Rosans were able to begin casting ballots,
thanks to Florida's early voting laws.
As the expected 50 percent of Santa Rosa
travels to the polls to pick America's leader
for the next four years, the political rheto-
ric has gotten very funny, but the funniest
(and most scary) thing we've heard so far
follows the antics of radio "shock jock"
Howard Stern.
Yes, the enemy of the FCC and public
decency has actually done something con-
structive.
Stern went to Harlem and asked the pub-
lic for whom they would be voting.
Stern aired some of the clips on his show
and it was enlightening.
Most of those he asked said they were for
Barack Obama.
Stern took his questioning one step fur-
ther by asking them about issues...in par-
ticular, about Obama's policies.
When he questioned them about the
"policies," he used the platform planks of
John McCain.
Basically, Stern tested their knowledge
of the subject by asking people how they
felt about Obama wanting to keep a mili-
tary presence in Iraq. (Actually, a McCain
position.)
The public supported Obama on this
stance.
Actually, Obama wants to pull the mili-
tary out of Iraq and the Middle East.
Stern then asked the people how they felt
about Sarah Palin being the Vice President
if Obama wins in November. For those of
you who don't know, Palin is McCain's run-
ning mate...NOT Obama's.
The public said they were thrilled to have
her as America's next Vice President.
Of course, Obama has Joe Biden as his
running mate.
What are we trying to point out?
Well most of the voting public knows very
little about the candidates and are basically
poised to vote-not on issues, but whomev-
er the media says is going to win.
This is frightening.
It is your choice, but it is also your re-
sponsibility to be an educated voter.
Unfortunately, many people spin issues
and facts to make themselves look good or
take an issue and bend it to their advan-
tage.
When this happens, it also influences our
thoughts and feelings.
The worse offenders are those of the na-
tional media.
Here is to making our own choices and
picking our own leaders and not letting the
media picking them for us.
The best thing we can suggest is to look
at the issues and pick what you feel is the
strongest issues for you, personally, and the
nation as a whole. Don't leave the choice
of the next president up to the major net-
works.
It also wouldn't hurt if we all spent a little
time educating ourselves before we go cast
a vote.



SHAREYOUROPINIONS

We want you to share your views on the
above topic(s) or any topic with other Santa
Rosa's Press Gazette readers. Your views
are important, too.

Send your letters to :

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
6629 Elva Street
Milton, FL 32570

Fax: (850) 623-9308

Letters may be edited for content for to fit


the available space. For a letter to be published,
you must sign your name and include your
phone number and address so we may contact
you for verification, if necessary.


f,.
I.


9 #


6 4% -*
*NOVA &&.1 -


Copyrighted Material


.* Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers



r^ ,
OL


t


O W


VIEWPOINT


E-Con of the USA


By RON HART
I played golf this weekend
with a friend who told me
that this stock market crash
is worse than a divorce.
"How so?" I asked. He said,
"You end up with half of your
net worth and you still have
your spouse."
This has clearly been a
confusing time for many who
face the first major financial
downturn -- or perhaps re-
cession -- of their lives. The
tendency is to blame whom
the media tell you to blame
for it. Thus, McCain and
the hapless Republicans are
wrongfully bearing the brunt
of the blame for this natural
purging of the excesses in
the housing market of the
last 10 years.
Amazingly, the financial
crisis has pushed Barack
Obama some 8 points ahead
in the polls. All this guy has
to do is sit there and not be
George Bush and he gains
ground. And nobody can sit
there and do nothing better
and with more style than
Barack Obama. Obama is
a finely tailored empty suit.
He is a guy who somehow
represents bold and de-
cisive "change" to 53% of
Americans by having never
authored any meaningful
legislation and simply voting
"present" (on the occasions
that he was) on most issues.
For all the unenlightened
things Bush has done, this
financial mess is not his do-


ing. Most
of it can
be laid
squarely
at the
feet
of the
Demo-
crats,
who
made
Ron Hart a sup-
Columnist posed,
quasi-
govern-
ment business like Fannie
Mae into a social program
that fueled its misguided lu-
nacy by plying Senators like
Barack Obama and Chris
Dodd with wads of money
and promises of a chicken
in every pot and an Escalade
in every garage.
Congressman Barney
Frank, Chairman of the
Uouse Ways and Means
Committee, said, even as
late as this year, that Fan-
nie Mae and Freddie Mac
were not taking substantial
risks that could lead to fi-
nancial disaster. Dodd and
Frank pushed for more sub-
prime loans to help their
Democratic constituents
who could not afford to pay
the money back in the case
of any downtick in housing
values or an uptick in unem-
ployment.
It was funny to watch
the Presidential Debate
last week and to hear both
Obama and McCain say that
they wrote a letter to the


government warning
Fannie Mae. Now how
they possibly ever im.
that a letter written to
ernment would not be
upon immediately?
among us has ever h
well-crafted letter of
cern to a government e
not result in an imme
and decisive response?
Each presidential
didate was trying to E
out his position that hi
ter was ignored earlier
his opponent's. Perhaps
can soon determine
was the more inept in
empty gesture and the
default, we should elec
other. I, for one, cannot
until this same govern
is running our health
system. I look forward
2012 when I have to n
letter to the Departme
Healthcare Allocation
questing treatment fo
car crash injuries.
It now seems that
cause Obama does not
any better and McCa
trying to appease the a
in America, we som
have become convi
that this mess is a fail
the free market system
stems from a lack of re
tion. In reality, just th
posite is true. There a
businesses in America r
regulated than our
Government-Sponsored
titles known as Fannie
and Freddie Mac, ui
they are banking (WA


- 101

about and insurance (AIG), regu-
could lated by the same crack ethi-
agine cal stalwarts in our govern-
i gov- ment.
acted Four years ago, that mor-
Who al authority and one of the
iad a faces of political arrogance,
con- Eliot Spitzer, called a press
entity conference to run out guess
Idiate who? -- the chairman of AIG,
Hank Greenberg. Green-
can- berg was no less than the
stake guy who owned billions in
s let- AIG stock and would proba-
than bly have navigated this com-
is we pany, in which he had a ma-
who jor financial stake, through
i this the current mess. Instead,
n, by Spitzer replaced Greenberg,
;t the a man he had it in for, with
;wait cronies, who then proceeded
ment to run the complex and heav-
care ily regulated company right
rd to into the ground. It turns out
iail a Greenberg, who had his net
int of worth tied up in AIG stock,
re- would actually have cared
r my if the share price went to
zero.
be- This race will soon get
know emotional and will lose all
in is sense of logic. I guess it
anger began when the liberal ac-
ehow tivist group ACORN reg-
inced istered fake voters in key
ire of battleground states. In one
Sand case, fraudulent voters were
gula- given the names of some
e op- of the Dallas Cowboys. This
re no was stupid. If ACORN did
more not want to get caught, they
own, should have used names
I.En- that no one in our country
Mae would recognize today, like
less the authors of the Federalist
MU) Papers.


Your VIEWPOINTS


Remembering Paul

Remembering Paul New-
man, it was in the 1970's we
raced at Sears Point Race-
way (aka Infineon Raceway).
We raced a-Sedan Camaro
and Paul raced a Datsun Z.
It was an SCCA (Sports
Car Club of America) race.
He was not in the class with
us. In one race you may have
four different classes.
I remember watching
his pit crew work on his car.
He was the only one with a
real pit crew. The rest of us
had friends that would come
help if you were lucky. I re-
member thinking how lucky
he was to have real help.
All the guys envied him
for his crew more than any-
thing. Most of all of the guys
were shade tree racers and
did not have the big money
for a crew. But they had the
love for racing and they all
had a great time.
SCCAraces hadnotcaught
on as a big spectator sport
yet. So Paul was able to walk
around and not be bothered,
he was just one of the guys.
Time sheets showed how


fast of laps you have. Your
best lap time will tell you
what position you have at
the start of the race.
I remember going to get
our time sheet and Paul
was walking along side of
me getting his time sheet.
We chatted and I said, "I
am surprised that you don't
have someone get your time
sheet for you."
He said, "I drive the car
and I like to be the first one
to see the time sheet."
He was very friendly, yet he
did not sign autographs and I
never saw a racer ask him.
I do remember a young
boy with a cast on his arm
go up and ask him for an
autograph and he id sign it.
I was surprised he signed it
knowing that a parent had to
send the boy to him.
Who would have thought in
the 1970's that Paul Newman
would still be racing when he
was 82 years young! We have
lost a very good racer, and a
great person and actor. That
will be remembered forever.
PAMELA JIL JONES
Pace, Flo.


Fear for country

As a senior citizen, I
fear for my country as we ap-
proach the election. I worry
about my children, grand-
children and all the children
of coming generations. The
economic greed, theft and
mismanagement of this ad-
ministration has plunged
us into near ruin. John Mc-
Cain's economic plan is more
of the same. Can we survive
four more years of that?
Barack Obama propos-
es a very carefully crafted
sound economic plan for
America, which can be seen
on his website.
The Democratic Party
created, implemented and
nurtured the Social Security
Program and the Medicare
andMedicaidPrograms over
fierce and continuous oppo-
sition from the Republicans.
Now the Republicans want
to dismantle them.
The Wall Street Journal
reported on 10/07/08 that "
John McCain plans to cut
Medicare and Medicaid by
over a trillion dollars." He is
also on record as supporting


a partial privatization of So-
cial Security and is open to
cutting benefits and raising
the retirement age to bal-
ance the program.
Senator Obama has vot-
ed to preserve and strength-
en Medicare and Medicaid
at every opportunity. He has
voted to restore funding to
these programs and has voted
against budgets that cut these
programs. He is against priva-
tization of Social Security, cut-
ting benefits or raising the
retirement age. Th help fix the
ailing system, Barack Obama
proposes a 2-4% tax on all in-
comes above $250,000.
On these critically im-
portant issues to Seniors,
there are great differences
between the candidates. John
McCain wants to give huge
tax cuts to the rich at the ex-
pense of these programs. He
believes that the wealth will
then "trickle down" to the rest
of us.
Barack Obama is com-
mitted to protecting and pre-
serving these precious pro-
grams for Seniors.
CLIFF CLELAND
DEKALB, ILL.


Nblo.


~'"":







Wednesday, October 22, 2008


Sports


Santa Rosa Press Gazette I A7


Sports SIDELINE

Softball Meeting: The City of Milton Parks and
Recreation Department is holding four public meet-
ings to discuss the possibility of a girl's fast-pitch
softball league. Meetings will be held at the Milton
Community Center, 5629 Byrom Street, and will be-
gin at 6 p.m. on October 27, November 10, 17 and 24.
Parents who want their daughters ages 8 to 14 to play,
should attend. Individuals interested in coaching or
helping organize the program are also welcome. For
additional information, contact John Norton at 983-
5466 ext. 203.

Golf Invitational: The Tanglewood Ladies Golf
Association will be holding its Invitational on Oct. 23.
The event will start at 9 a.m. with two person teams
playing best ball. Cost is $55 per players. If interested
contact the pro shop and sign up early.

Dance Fundraiser: The Milton High School Lady
Panther Softball will have a Halloween Dance for
Middle Schoolers on Friday, October 24 in the Mil-
ton High School Cafeteria from 6:00 p.m. until 10:00
p.m. There will be a costume contest! Security AND
Chaperones will be provided. There will be Hotdogs,
Hamburgers, French fries, sodas, and snacks avail-
able for purchase. For more information please con-
tact Robin Vickers at 982-9785.

Golf Scramble: the Milton High School Base-
ball Booster Club is sponsoring a golf tournament
on Oct. 25 at Tanglewood Country Club. This three
person scramble cost $225 per team and will tee off
at 8 a.m. Registration include golf, lunch, beverage
carts, range balls, and prizes. Cash prizes for first,
second, and third place. Prizes for the longest drive,
closest to the pin, hole in one and every player wins
a door prize. For more information, call 293-2735 or
261-5117.

Bowl for the Cure: Oops Alley is hosting Bowl
for the Cure on Oct. 26. The cost is $20 for two hours
of fun, new friends, fellowship, and raising money to
fight breast cancer. This is open to all bowlers and
non-bowlers. Last year the Greater Pensacola USBC
raised over $4,600 for the Susan G. Komen Founda-
tion. There will also be a raffle for a Bowl for the Cure
Bowling ball and many more things including recog-
nizing any breast cancer survivors and co-survivors.
For more information call 623-6807.

Halloween Golf Tournament: Naval Air Station
Whiting Field will hold a golf tournament Oct. 31 at
the base course to benefit Whiting Field's annual
Christmas Party. Active duty personnel, retirees,
family members, and players from the local commu-
nity are all invited to participate. Sign in will begin at
9 a.m. with tee-off at 10 a.m. The event will cost $30
per person and will be a four-man scramble format.
For more information or to register call 377-7734.

Haunted Hay Ride: The East Milton Youth Asso-
ciation will hold it's second annual Haunted Hay Ride
and Halloween Carnival Oct. 31. Game booths and
candy for trick-or-treaters will be available. The carni-
val gets underway at 7 p.m. and the haunted hay ride
will start at dark. The hay ride will cost $2 per person.
For more information, call 723-6103.

Miracle Strip Volleyball Academy is seeking
players for the 2009 Club season. Girls 8-18 of all skill
levels are invited to participate. A Player/Parent in-
formation meeting will be held Thursday, November
6th, 6:00pm at the HealthPlex on Hwy 77 and Bald-
win. Are you interested? Contact Robin Smith at
850-784-9899 or MSVAvolleyball@hotmail.com

Garcon Point Bridge Run: The Santa Rosa Edu-
cation Foundation is partnering with Mediacom to an-
nounce its inaugural "Connecting Education in Santa
Rosa County" Garcon Point Bridge Run. The special
event for children and adults supports programs like
Take Stock in Children scholarships, teacher grants,
Little Red Schoolhouse Teacher Supply Depot, and
recognition of teachers and student countywide.
The five-mile run-walk will be Nov. 15 at 7:30 a.m.
A general entry fee is $15 for children and $20 for
adults. Registration is available on-line at active.com
or you can print a registration form at www.santa-
rosa.kl2.fl.us/sref

Rodeo: The Dixie Darters Drill Team will be host-
ing a rodeo Nov. 22 at the East Milton Recreation
Park. The Little Wranglers Rodeo events will begin
at 2 p.m. and include Barrel Race, Goat Untying,
Pole Bending, Steer riding, flag race, goat tying, and
team roping.
The rodeo is set to begin at 7 p.m. and will include
team roping, chute doggin', barrel racing, goat tying,
pole bending, and bull riding.
Tickets are $8 at the gate and kids six and under
are free. Pre-sale tickets will go on sale Nov. 1 and
will be $6.
For more information call 957-0784. Registration
deadline for events is Nov. 14.

Futbol Club of Santa Rosa Fall Soccer Regis-
tration: Registration is currently ongoing for the fall
recreational season, online registration is available
at the FCSR website www.fcsantarosa.com. Regis-
tration fees range from $100 to $125, there is an ad-
ditional fee for team jersey. Individuals interested in
coaching or assisting can sign up on the volunteer
page while registering their child or emailvicepresi-
dent@fcsantarosa.com. More information on the
recreational and select soccer programs is available
on the club website.

Pace Library Sports Raffle: Friends of the Pace
Library will be raffling off various sports items to add
a children's activity room to the Pace Library.
Some of the items you could win include a Eli Man-
ning signed Giants football, an Emmitt Smith signed
Cowboys helmet, a Travis Fryman signed baseball,
Boo Weekley signed hat and picture, Haley Millsaps


signed hat and picture, Danny Wuerffel signed mini-
helmets, and much more.
Ticket sales are underway for $10 each or six for
$50. The raffle ends Nov. 29.

More activities can be found at www.srpressga-
zette.com. Look for the box called 'Things to Do'.
There you can check on activities by zip code or
activity. And you are also more than welcome to en-
ter your events there as well.


Fish and Wildlife REPORTS


This report represents
some events the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) handled
over from Oct. to Oct. 16 in the
Northwest Region;' however,
it does not include all actions
taken by the Division of Law
Enforcement.

ESCAMBIA COUNTY

On Oct. 9, Officer Keith
Clark checked a charter ves-
sel fishing in Pensacola Bay
and found one subject using
an undersized red snapper
for bait. The charter captain
was issued a citation for the
violation.

On Oct. 9, Officers Monte
Moye and Royce Johnson
assisted Northwest Florida
Water Management staff with
re-posting an area along the
Escambia River that changed
from a dog hunt area to a still
hunt area.

SANTA ROSA COUNTY

Over the past two weeks,
Officers Joe Murphy, Gary
Ridaught, David Jernigan,
Steve Hoomes, and Ben Pine-
da assisted FWC biology staff
members Barbara Schmeling,
Andrew Jernigan and Kevin
MacDonald as they re-posted
the Hutton Unit and areas of
the lower Yellow River Wild-
life Management Area.

OKALOOSA COUNTY

On Oct. 13, Officer Matt
Webb investigated a derelict
vessel that was submerged
in Santa Rosa Sound. The


owner was identified and will
be contacted about removal of
the vessel.

Over the past two weeks,
Officers Danny Arnette and
Van Barrow assisted FWC
biology staff Barbara Schmel-
ing, Andrew Jernigan and
Kevin MacDonald in re-post-
ing areas of the Yellow River
Wildlife Management Area.

WASHINGTON COUNTY

Officer Larry Morris
checked two subjects fishing il-
legally in the Choctawhatchee
River at the Highway 90
bridge. The subjects were
fishing without a license and
catching game fish with a cast
net. Citations were issued.

HOLMES COUNTY

In June 2008, Officer Larry
Morris responded to an alli-
gator complaint and took into
evidence one illegally killed,
3?foot-long alligator. The in-
vestigation continued until fur-
ther leads pointed to a suspect.
A Bonifay police officer con-
tacted FWC a few days later
with further suspect informa-
tion. Officer Jim Brooks joined
the investigation and assisted
Officer Morris with interviews
and witness statements. On
October 13, Officer Brooks di-
rect filed a misdemeanor viola-
tion with the State Attorney's
office charging a Bonifay resi-
dent with illegal possession/
take of alligator.

JEFFERSON COUNTY

Lt. Kent Harvey and Of-


ficers Jeff Babauta and
Dale Wilcox responded to a
call for assistance from the
Monticello Police Depart-
ment on Oct. 13 around 11
p.m. Two subjects attempt-
ed an armed robbery at a
local convenience store and
fled on foot. Officer Babauta
and K-9 Mack tracked the
individuals to an area adja-
cent to the store where it is
believed the subjects were
picked up by a getaway ve-
hicle. K-9 Mack was able to
locate an article that may be
pertinent to the case and the
Monticello Police Depart-
ment seized it as evidence.
This was the second armed
robbery attempt that day in
Monticello.

On Oct. 14, a complaint
was received of floating jugs
with an alligator attached to
them on Lake Munson. Of-
ficer Billy Kemp located the
jugs and the alligator. Sur-
veillance was set up with Of-
ficers Ben Johnson and Chris
Jones and FWC Investiga-
tions assisting. At approxi-
mately 5:40 p.m. a small craft
was launched from the park
on Lake Munson. An Inves-
tigations lieutenant observed
two subjects checking and
pulling the jugs. The alliga-
tor had managed to get off the
line. The two subjects contin-
ued to hunt alligator in the
area. The two subjects were
able to catch and harvest an
alligator approximately 11
feet in length. At the ramp,
there was a check of permits
and agent's license. The al-
ligator was tagged and a per-
mit was produced, however
one of the subjects did not
have an agent's license or a


helper's license. The subject
was issued a citation for not
having an agent's or helper's
license. He was also issued
a warning for attempting to
take an American alligator
and for putting out the jugs
the following day. The permit
holder was issued a warning
for hunting early.

LIBERTY/GADSDEN
COUNTIES

On Oct. 4, Officer David
Brandon and Hank Forehand
checked a dove field south of
Quincy and found one subject
to be over-the-bag limit and
one who did not have a hunt-
ing license. Proper citations
were issued for both viola-
tions.

On Oct. 5, Officer David
Brandon and Hank Forehand
checked a dove field west of
Quincy and found three sub-
jects hunting over cracked
corn. Citations were issued
for taking migratory birds
over a baited area.

On Oct. 4, at approximate-
ly 6 p.m., Officer Benjamin
Johnson was checking dove
shoots in the Gadsden County
area. One subject was cited
for an unplugged shotgun and
four more were issued writ-
ten warnings for no migratory
bird permits.

On Oct. 10, Officer Benja-
min Johnson was patrolling
near the Chattahoochee boat
ramp when a boat engine
burst into flames. Officer
Johnson was able to extin-
guish the fire. Fortunately
there were no injuries.


Women's winter football association announced


The National Women's
Football Association has
announced the formation of
the Women's Winter Football
Association.
The association initially
will be made up of several
leagues established in the
state of Florida. Leagues
are being formed in North
Florida (the panhandle),
East Coast, West Coast,
South Florida and Central
Florida. Teams can join
whichever league is the
best for them geographi-
cally and will play only those
teams. Each league will
host it's own championship
and make it's own rules.
By creating several winter
leagues, the NWFA feels it
can substantially reduce the
cost of travel and encourage
cross town rivalries. There


will be no overnight travel
and cities can host more
than one team. Anyone 16 or
older will be allowed to par-
ticipate. The new teams are
also being offered to player
groups for ownership and in-
terested parties should con-
tact the NWFA for details.
There is no cost to own a
team. Instead there are an-
nual dues to be a part of the
Women's Winter Football As-
sociation.
While the NWFA will still
run women's football on a
national level in the Spring,
these winter leagues will
give women who want to
play football an opportunity
to do so at a time of year
that is better for attract-
ing fans and team support.
"It's always been a struggle
for Florida teams to attract


players, sponsors and fans
since the weather was so hot.
Now, with the opportunity
to play when the weather's
gorgeous and the snowbirds
are in town, we think they'll
see a big increase in their
bottom lines," states NWFA
CEO, Catherine Masters.
Tryouts are scheduled for
the end of the month for the
North Florida league. The
dates and location for try-
outs are: October 25, Nov. 01,
and Nov. 08.
Location: Mowatt Mid-
dle School 1903 W. Hwy. 390
Lynn Haven Fla. (Suburb of
Panama City Fla.) Times:
9am-llam CST
Directions: from the East
i.e.: Tallahassee take Hwy.
20 to a left on Hwy. 231; take
Hwy. 231 to a right onto
Hwy. 390; there's a BP Tom


Thumb, and Burger King at
that intersection. Take Hwy.
390 all the way in; you'll
cross Hwy. 389, Hwy. 77 and
the school will be on your
left; turn at the PETRO sta-
tion left onto Mowatt School
Rd.
From the West:.take Hwy.
98 across bridge to a left
onto 23rd. St. at gulf Coast
Community College; take
23rd. to a left onto Hwy. 390
as you pass Winn Dixie.
Take Hwy. 390 past airport;
across Jenks Ave to a right
onto Mowatt School Rd. as
you go underneath school's
crosswalk.
For additional information,
please call Dave Freeland at
(850) 319-7568 or the NWFA's
national office at (615) 860-
4084 or visit www.Women-
sRegionalFootball.com.


Friday, October 24,2008 Friday, October 24, 2008 Friday, October 24, 2008 Friday. October 24,2008
2:50 AM Moon rise 2:51 AM Moon rise 2:49 AM Moon rise 2:50 AM Moon rise
6:57 AM Sun rise 6:58 AM Sun rise 6:55 AM 1.36 Feet 6:57 AM Sun rise
9:03 AM 1.44 Feet 8:19AM 1.20 Feet 6:56 AM Sun rise 9:59AM 1.44 Feet
3:39 PM Moon set 3:40 PM Moon set 1:30 PM 0.83 Feet -3:39 PM Moon set
5:52 PM 0.73 Feet 4:35 PM 0.61 Feet 3:39 PM Moon set 6:07 PM Sun set
6:07 PM Sun set 6:08 PM Sun set 6:07 PM Sun set 6:22 PM 0.73 Feet
11:16PM 0.98 Feet 9:02 PM 1.14 Feet


Saturday, October 25,2008
12:00AM 1.17 Feet
3:49 AM Moon rise
6:22 AM 0.92 Feet
6:57 AM Sun rise
11:29AM 1.2IFcet
4:08 PM Moon set
4:42 PM 0.99 Feet
6:06 PM Sun set
10:55 PM 1.43 Feet

Sunday, October 26, 2008
3:47 AM Moon rise
5:58 AM Sun rise
6:45 AM 0.56 Feet
3:37 PM Moon set
5:05 PM Sun set
9:40 PM 1.72 Feet


Saturday, October 25, 2008
3:50 AM Moon rise
5:05 AM 0.76 Feet
6:58 AM Sun rise
10:45 AM 0.93 Feet
3:25 PM 0.82 Feet
4:09 PM Moon set
6:07 PM Sun set
10:11 PM 1.19 Feet

Sunday. October 26, 2008
3:48 AM Moon rise
5:28 AM 0.47 Feet
5:59 AM Sun rise
3:38 PM Moon set
5:06 PM Sun set
8:56 PM 1.44 Feet


Saturday. October 25,2008
1:07 AM 0.94 Feet
3:49 AM Moon rise
6:57 AM Sun rise
9:00AM 1.18 Feet
1:13 PM 0.95 Feet
4:08 PM Moon set
6:06 PM Sun set
8:44 PM 1.28 Feet

Sunday, October 26. 2008
1:42 AM 0.73 Feet
3:47 AM Moon rise
5:58 AM Sun rise
9:44 AM 1.05 Feet
12:04PM 1.00 Feet
3:37 PM Moon set


Saturday. October 25.2008
12:56AM 1.17 Feet
3:49 AM Moon rise
6:52 AM 0.92 Feet
6:58 AM Sun rise
12:25PM 1.12Feet
4:08 PM Moon set
5:12 PM 0.99 Feet
6:06 PM Sun set
11:51 PM 1.43 Feet

Sunday. October 26, 2008
3:48 AM Moon rise
5:59 AM Sun rise
7:15 AM 0.56 Feel
3:37 PM Moon set
5:05 PM Sun set
10:36PM 1.72 Feet













SPORTS


A
Section


Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2008 www. srpressgaz ette. c o m Page 8





Freeport edged by Jay, 22-16


By TINA HARBUCK "We didn't make the most ty," said Bell. "They have Jay's Steve Brabham over to tailback," said Bell. left in the first half. Hen-
Florida Freedom Newspapers of our opportunities," said a really good quarterback completed 9-of-11 passes for "He has been doing a really dricks ran in the 2-point con-
Freeport coach Jim Ander- who can take a bad play and 233 yards and three touch- good job and he had close to version for a 14-3 lead.
son as he walked off the field make something out of it. downs. Dale Barlow was on 90 yards in the game. Freeport knocked the ball
FREEPORT vMissed c with the rain still drizzling. Defensively they do a lot of the receiving end of all three. "He has been playing two loose twice but failed to capi-
opportunities proved costly "We just didn't do well stunting. The first was a 61-yard strike ways and really helping us talize on either turnover.
torhey l ost to the visiting Jay enough ... we could have "We have got to work on for a touchdown late in the out." To start the third, Free-
theyals 22-16 Friday night on done better." containing him and block the first quarter. The next came Freeport had 111yards on port came out and put to-
a soggy field. The loss puts Freeport stunting they should do de- in the second quarter on an the ground with Binder lead- gether a seven-play drive for
For the Royals it wasn't at 4-2 overall and 3-1 in dis- fensively." 87-yard catch-and-run to the ing the way with 85 yards and the score. Weeks hit Farmer
pretty, but they got the job trict play, while Jay moves Freeport had several end zone. The final score one touchdown. Nathan Hen- for a 40-yard gain setting the
done despite all the turn- to 3-3 overall and 2-0 in the chances to capitalize on Jay came in the fourth quarter drickson rushed for 34 yards. Bulldogs up for a 2-yard run
overs. district, mistakes, with the Royals on a 13-yard catch in the end Through the air, Cole by Binder for the score as
"We turned the ball over Jay will now get ready to fumbling the ball away five zone. Weeks was 8-of-18 for Free- Jay led 14-9.
five times," said Jay head host Liberty County on Fri- times. Jay also managed to out- port with 125 yards. In the fourth, Jay capped
coach Elijah Bell. "I reckon day. Freeport's Billy Burnett run the Bulldogs, tallying 179 Freeport got on the board off an eight-play drive with
it was because of the wet As the Royals have made recovered three fumbles, yards on the ground. Andrew first with a 29-yard field goal Brabham and Barlow con-
and sloppy ball, but it was some changes since the off one in the end zone for a Oliver rolled up 74 yards and by Justin Farmer. necting for a 13-yard touch-
raining on the Freeport side week, the Bulldogs from touchdown, and Joe Hahr Rush Hendricks lived up to But Jay answered in two down. Hendricks ran in the
as well." Liberty County could pose a and Cody Binder each had his name with 59 yards rush- plays on the first strike from 2-point conversion and Jay
But turnovers almost problem for Jay. one fumble recovery ing. Brabham. was up 22-9, but Burnett's
stopped the Royals once "We have always had a But where the Bulldogs "One of the changes we Brabham and Barlow fumble recovery got Free-
again in a district game. rough go with Liberty Coun- got beat was through the air. have made is moving Andrew connected again with 10:46 port as close as it would get.


Panthers claw Dolphins 37-10


By B ILL GAMBLING
sports@srpressgazette.com

GULF BREEZE Milton had
a point to prove and against Gulf
Breeze they had the perfect plat-
form to do just that.
After falling to district and
county rival Pace one week ear-
lier and being held to less than 100
yards for the night, the Panthers
did a little struggling as its offense
exploded onto the scene for 409
yards in a 37-10 triumph.
The Panthers jumped out to a
17-0 lead before Gulf Breeze start-
ed to capitalize on a few Milton
miscues.
Miscue one came with 3:14
remaining in the first half as the
Panthers were forced to punt,
but the snap sailed over Mauricio
Barber's head as he scrambled to
kick the ball out of bounds to make
it 17-2.
Gulf Breeze then seized the
momentum and took the free kick
down the field to score with 8.9 sec-
onds remaining before the half as
Kyle Schnackenberg found Cody
Warford for a seven yard strike on
third and goal to make the score
17-10 after Schnackenberg called
his own number for the two-point
conversion.
Then the Dolphins made a huge
mistake despite the limited time
before halftime.
Avante Jennings, a sophomore
seeing action due to Milton's in-
jury bug, fielded the kick off at the
Milton 14 and was off to the races
to score a touchdown as Milton
went up 24-10.
"I saw an opening in the middle
of the field," said Jennings. "I knew
the team would block them.
"They took the momentum
from us and we turned it on them
just before halftime."
Milton (3-4, and 0-1 in District
1-4A) came out after the break and
capitalized on the Dolphins' mis-
cues as they took the first drive
to the end zone after recovering
one of Gulf Breezes five fumbles to
move the ball into the wind against
a stiff head wind and ran the clock
out before Barber misfired on a 34


BILL GAMBLING I Press Gazette
GAINING GROUND:Dedrick Simmons runs around the left end of the Panthers offense Friday night at he
finished the game with 73 yards on 10 carries as Milton defeated Gulf Breeze 37-10. Simmons broke
a long run of 50 yards late in the first half.


yard field goal attempt.
But the Panthers defense was
ready to go to work as they forced
Gulf Breeze to punt from their own
end zone.
The snap was good, but the
Panthers rush was better as Vic-
tory Josey corralled the loose foot-
ball to score and make it 30-10 in
favor of the Panthers.
"Tonight we made far too many
penalties, but we didn't let that
stop us," Milton head coach Mike
McMillion. "We kept moving for-
ward and make the big plays.
"Tonight it was a team attitude
and effort as we did what we need-
ed to for the win."
The final score of the game
came when Matt Floyd rumbled
for 40 yards to ice the game at 37-
10.
On the night Milton utilized a
platoon system with Floyd and
Mikey McMillion seeing action
under center as they combine to


Lightning warning in effect for St. Louis


By BILL GAMBLING
spoits@srpressgazette.com

The Pensacola Lightning is look-
ing to win their second consecutive
Southern Division Championship in
the NAFL.
On Saturday the Lightning (12-1)
defeated the previously unbeaten
Nashville Storm 19-14 and in doing
so advancing on to the Elite 8 of the
North American Football League
National Championship.
Special teams were the key for
the Lightning in this low scoring af-
fair.
Seth Cumbie, a former Pace
Patriot who played college ball at
Southern Miss, and John Joiner re-
turned blocked field goal attempts

* .1


for touchdowns.
Jacob Matlock, another former
Eagle, who plays for the Lightning
added two field goals for the win.
Next up for the Lightning will be
the St. Louis Bulldogs and a poten-
tial berth in the National Final Four
of the NAFL.
The other games in the Elite 8'
are the Central Penn Piranha and
the Connecticut Giants, the St. Paul
Pioneers and the Indianapolis Tor-
nados, and the British Columbia
Spartans and the San Diego Thun-
der.
If the Lightning defeats the Bull-
dogs they will face the winner of the
St. Paul and Indianapolis game at
site to be determined, with a chance
to go to the National Championship
to be played in Atlanta, Ga.


go 10-of-16 through the air for 124
yards and a touchdown.
"During practice this week they
both had a great week and both did
a good job," said Mike McMillion.
"Both are team players and were
unselfish and I think we came out
as a better overall team."
Milton's first score of the game
came Barber kicked a 21-yard field
goal to go up 3-0 with 4:49 remain-
ing in the first quarter.
Their next possession saw De-
drick Simmons rumble 50 yards to
set up Stephen Cox on an 18 yard
run with 2:44 remaining in the first
quarter.
The third score came when
Floyd found Jennings for six on a
27-yard pass with 6:45 remaining
in the first half.
Milton will be getting ready for
an off -week this Friday and for
the Panthers it could not come at
a better time.
"I am hoping the timing of the


off week is just right as it will give
us a chance to heal and polish our
schemes.
"Right now we are a little beat
up, but getting a win is definitely
a good thing heading into the off
week."
Milton will returned to action
on Oct. 31 when they visit Crest-
view and then the next week they
will face Tate in what could deter-
mine the runner-up in District 1-
4A depending on the results of this
Friday's game at Pace.
Defensively the Panthers held
Gulf Breeze to just 117 yards of
total offense, but in the same to-
ken they kept some drives alive as
they were flagged for 94 yards on
11 penalties.
Floyd and Mikey McMillion
both passed for 62 yards on the
night, while Floyd led all rushers
with 80 yards on 12 carries. Sim-
mons was next with 73 yards on 10
carries.


Pelicans bring back familiar

face to procure players


Press Gazette Staff Reports

Three weeks after the Pen-
sacola Pelicans named Talmadge
"T" Nunnari as the next Field
Manager, the team announced
today James Gamble as the new
Player Procurement Director for
the 2009 season.
Gamble returns to the Peli-
cans organization after two-years
in which he focused on opening
and operating baseball training
academies in south Florida, Loui-
siana, and New York. He will be
responsible for scouting, recruit-
ing, and signing players along
with Nunnari.


"James knows how to find the
caliber of players we need to suc-
ceed," said Nunnari. "He has
relationships with scouts and
coaches all over the country and
is well respected in the baseball
industry."
The Lafayette, LA native has
worked with the Pelicans be-
ginning since their inception in
2002 in the Southeastern League
of Professional Baseball where
Gamble served as the League
Commissioner. In 2003, Gamble
began working the Pelicans as the
player procurement director. The
following season, Gamble added
the duties of pitching coach.


Courtesy of ANDREW FERGUSON
PIT STOP: Pace's James
McGreevey makes a big
stop during the Patriots
game Friday night in
Niceville. Pace came up
on the short end of the
shootout, but they are now
focused on Friday night as
they will host the Tate
Aggies in what could
decided the District 1-4A
title.


Niceville


wins


shootout


over Pace

By TRAVIS DOWNEY
Florida Freedom Newspapers

NICEVILLE All week,
John Hicks spoke of the
Niceville offense as one that
had yet to reach its fullest
potential as it entered Friday
night's contest against 4A
power Pace, who, in the mind
of the Eagles' coach, fielded
one of the better defenses his
team had seen.
Six hundred and 42 yards
and 56 points later, Niceville
had a 56-41 win at a soggy
Eagle Stadium and a perfect
7-0 record on a season that is
shaping up to be something
special.
Happy now, coach?
Rick Whiddon passed for
215 yards, Stephan Haynes
ran for 129 yards and three
touchdowns, and Kody Wil-
liams hauled in five passes
for 133 yards.
Still, none had the night
Roy Finch did.
Finch gashed the Patriots'
defense for 205 yards rush-
ing and four touchdowns,
the first of which came on a
76-yard jaunt down the Pace
sideline on the Eagles' first
snap from scrimmage while
the last came on a crucial
fourth-and-1 at the Patriots
35-yard line that the junior
took the distance to seal the
win.
"He's a great, great back,"
Pace coach Mickey Lindsey
said. "I ain't seen one better.
"They are very good on
offense, but our guys never
quit and I feel that was a big
high for us."


;~nTr~pnrr El~S--dUA~~PP ~-'-. a m i m


i ... h..- ..--.. II~ 1. ~ r~TC. '7~ .~.~~"\L.-.F.









LIFSTYLES


Wednesday, October 22, 2008


www. srpressgaz ette. com


Walking through a world of art in


By BILL GAMBLING
bgamblin@srpressgazette.com
Saturday was the third annual Bagdad Art
Stroll as several hundreds enjoyed a leisurely
walk to see the works of various artisans and
craftspeople.
Many of the front porches along the route fea-
tured the art of local artists from paintings, pho-
tography, jewelry, clothing, books, ceramics, and
even quilts.
This event also featured the annual Artful
Bowl Lunch, a fundraiser for the Bagdad Village


Preservation Association, which is also working
to establish and maintain the Bagdad Museum
Complex on Church Street and the village gift
shop.
The museum itself is a collection of artifacts
and displays depicting almost 200 years of ship-
building, turpentine making, and lumbering his-
tory.
Several artists and vendors displayed their
wares and many turned out to enjoy a very pleas-
ant and sunny day in Bagdad's Historical District
among the Spanish moss hanging from the live
oaks and Southern Magnolias which dot the area.


FUN IN BAGDAD: Clockwise from below, musician Gary Simmons walked
around the stroll route playing his guitar and harmonica to entertain the
several hundreds who turned out for Saturday's event in Historic Bag-
dad. Below right, the Wooden Boat Show drew a lot of attention as
craftsmen displayed their boats. Bottom right, Sheila Hilwig's quilting
was on display at the Sheffield House on Forsyth Street. Bottom left,
homemade goodies were just some of the things you could find at the-
Bagdad United Methodist Church's Fellowship Hall. Below left, Buddy
Hinote turned in his tie for a T-shirt as he was helping out a friend at the
Red Barn Bar-B-Q booth. Top left, Marvel Knoblock talks to someone
who is inquiring about her special plates she designs.
Photos by BILL GAMBLIN I Press Gazette


gqF^T^ BF ,, ~'ar P -^ mwy -so


B
Section


Page l


Hi str l


Ba dad






B2 I Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Community


Wednesday, October 22, 2008


Ck Ak Iley
,c-Sports Grill
J5 Tasty Foo

) Happy Ho
dMon-gf 4.7


Open 7 days a weel
inside

Big Scieei
ur Sports Viewvin
Video Games-Dar


Retail Display
is Monday, Nov. 24th at noon
Our office will be closed for Thanksgiving Day







Baptist Family Medicine Pace

Open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Great before or after work or school.
Accepting new patients of all ages.
Call 995-4244 for appointments.

Joshua Davis, M.D. Joyce Nichols, A.R.N.P.


You'll Love the Way Baptist Cares for You

L BAPTIST (850) 995-4244
I HEALTH CARE www.eBaptistHealthCare.org
Baptist Hospital Gulf Breeze Hospital Jay Hospital Atmore Community Hospital
Lakeview Center Baptist Manor Baptist Medical Paik Nine Mile
Baptist Medical Park Navarre Andrews Insitute Baptist LifeFlight


www.srpressgazette.com


k

Annual Ghosts of
n1 Milton Walking Tour
g There will be a Ghosts
ts of Milton Walking Tour Fri-
day, and Saturday, Oct. 24 &
il 25. Tours will leave every 15
minutes beginning at 6 p.m.
Tours begin at the Imogene
Theatre, Hwy. 90, downtown
Milton. Cost is $10 per adult
and $5 for children 5 to 12
years of age; little ones in
strollers are free (checks
or cash, no credit cards
please). This is not a Haunt-
ed House Tour but a fun way
to learn about Milton's past.
It is 1-mile walk through the
historical district, led by
ghostly tour guides. Tour
will last approximately 90
minutes and ends with re-
freshments at the Imogene
Theatre. Contact Wesley
Meiss at 626-9856 or Pamela
Holt at 665-1294 for more in-
formation.

Dedication at T.R.
Jackson
The dedication of the me-
morial plaque for Principal
T.R. Jackson will be held at
T.R. Jackson Pre-K Center,
4950 Susan Street, Milton
on Saturday, October 25, at 4
p.m. The public is invited.

ACT/SAT Workshop
A workshop to assist stu-
dents in the Escambia and
Santa Rosa County High
Schools who will be taking
the December 6th SAT and
the Dec. 13th ACT Tests will
consist of 6 sessions cover-
ing both the ACT and the
SAT.
Workshop dates and
times are as follows: Wed.,
Nov. 12 6 to 8 p.m.; Thurs.,
Nov. 13 6 to 8 p.m.; Fri.,
Nov. 14 6 to 8 p.m.; Mon.,
Nov. 17 6 to 8 p.m.; Tues.,
Nov. 18 6 to 8 p.m.; Wed.,
Nov. 19 6 to 8 p.m.
This workshop is earlier
- this year due to the many
activities students have the
first part of December. Reg-
istration for this workshop


must, be postmarked by
Friday, Oct. 31, 2008. All ma-
terials, snacks and drinks
are furnished. Students will
need to bring calculators.
Any questions? Please con-
tact Mrs. Hart via email:
Amhartl966@aol.com or
cell: 615-595-2401.

City of Milton Meeting
The Milton Benevolent
Cemetery Board will meet
Monday, October 27, at 2 p.m.
in Conference Room B of
City Hall, 6738 Dixon Street.
For further information on
this meeting, call 983-5411.
All meetings are open to the
public.

Boating Safety
Class offered
Flotilla 1-8, the newest
Flotilla in the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary, will offer
"About Boating Safety" class
at the Milton Community
Center on Saturday, Nov.
1. This 8-hour class covers
basic legal requirements for
boaters, boating safety, ele-
ments of boat handling, as
well as how to handle some
common boating emergen-
cies. There is an examina-
tion at the end of the class. A
passing score will make the
boater eligible for a State
of Florida Boating ID card,
a requirement for boaters
under 21 years of age to op-
erate a boat alone in state
waters.
The class will begin at 8
a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 1 in
the Gracey Room of the Mil-
ton Community Center, 5629
Byrom Street in Milton. The
class costs $30 per person, or
$30 per family (up to 4) shar-
ing a book. To register, or
with any questions, contact
John McKinley at 983-6953.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary Flotilla 1-8 is proud to
serve as the "Guardian of
the Blackwater."

Car Wash Fundraiser
The Central High School


Cheerleaders will have a Car
Wash to raise funds on Sat-
urday, October 25th from 9 to
12 at the Texas Roadhouse.
Come and help out!

Panhandle Community
Theatre events
Friday, November 7th -
6:30 p.m. The Story Tellers
share folktales from the Old
Post Office Dock as part of
First Friday Fest.
Saturday, November 8th
- 8:00 a.m. until Mov-
ing storage room! Bring a
truck, car, boxes, bags and
help us load up keepables,
weed out get-rid-ables, and
donate donatables. You
don't have to stay all day,
just come give whatever
time you can.
Friday, November 28th
- Lighting Ceremony for
Downtown Milton PCT has
been asked to provide char-
acters to dress in Dicken's
Style and stroll the historic
district greeting people in a
proper English sort of way.
Monday and Tuesday,
December 1 & 2 6:30 p.m.
- Auditions for "On Golden
Pond" currently scheduled
at the Imogene.
Friday, December 5th
- Gallery Night Downtown
Milton Again, characters
to stroll the historic district
dressed as Dicken's Christ-
mas characters.
Date and location TBD
- "Twas the Night Before
Christmas" bring the
family and enjoy a reading
of this traditional holiday
poem.

UWF SBDC Announces
Workshops
The University of West
Florida Small Business De-
velopment Center, located
at 401 E. Chase St, Ste.
100 Pensacola, is holding
a "Marketing Matters for
Small Business workshop
on Wednesday evening, Nov.
12 from 6 to 9 p.m. Attendees
will learn practical, cost-ef-


Make-A-Wish Foundation


to host training class


Special to the Press Gazette

Become a certified Wish
Granter volunteer for the
Make-A-Wish Foundation
at the Wish Granter
Training class. The Make-
A-Wish Foundation is
in tremendous need for
volunteers in the Escambia
County and the surrounding
areas. The Wish Granter
Training class will be from
9:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Nov.
8 at the West Florida Public
Library located at 200 W
Gregory St. in Pensacola.
Wish Granters
are essential to the
Foundation's ability to grant
the wishes of children with
life-threatening medical
conditions. A Wish Granter
will meet with the family
and the wish child to get
the required paperwork
completed and determines
the child's true wish. Wish
Granters work in teams of
two, to make that wish a
reality. The training class
will teach how to handle all


of these duties and more.
Spots are still available
to attend this training.
Participants must beat
least 21 years old. A $20
fee is required, which
covers the cost of training
materials, ID badge and
the required background
check. Lunch will be
provided. Participants
must complete a volunteer
application and training
registration form. Both
forms can be found online
at EASE www.wishcentral.
org. In order to reserve
a place at this training
register as soon as possible
as space is limited. For
more information contact
Alina Schreiber, Volunteer
Coordinator, at alina.
schreiber@suncoastwish.
org. or at (813) 288-2600.
The Make-A-Wish
Foundation@ grants the
wishes of children with
life-threatening medical
conditions to enrich the
human experience with
hope, strength and joy.


ULike To Say YES!


Personal Loans from


$500 to $2500


ihone Applications Welcome


4371 Fifth Avenue
Pace, FL 32571
( (850)994-9737
WWWsecurity-finance.com


Born in 1980 when a group
of caring individuals helped
a young boy fulfill his dream
of becoming a police officer,
the Foundation is now
the largest wish-granting
charity in the world, with 67
chapters in the U.S. and its
territories. With the help of
generous donors and nearly
25,000 volunteers, the
Make-A-Wish
Foundation grants more
than 12,600 wishes a year
and has granted more than
164,000 wishes in the U.S.
since inception.
The Central and
Northern Florida chapter
of the Make-A-Wish
Foundation@ includes 54
counties serving two-thirds
of the state. It encompasses
the northeast region,
including Jacksonville; the
northwest region, including
Pensacola, Panama City,
and Tallahassee; the central
region serving Orlando and
the surrounding counties;
the Suncoast Sarasota
region, including Charlotte,
Manatee, Hardee, and
DeSoto counties; the
Spacecoast region serving
Brevard county; and the
Suncoast region in Tampa
Bay and the surrounding
counties. For more
information about the
Make-A-Wish Foundation,
Suncoast region, visit
www.wishcentral.org and
discover how you can share
the power of a wish.


'A r \W-N ; ',M 'V'.-* +


News BRIEFS


DEADLINES for the
Saturday, Nov. 29th Edition

Legal Notices. Classifieds & Line Ads


is Friday, Nov. 21st at 5pm


0 K



















Golan



EVENTSI



11 c

..' RBeach


Northwest


Florida


with your

: event



at


URIDRIN@linFREEDOMAcom

One e-mail will get your event out
to the Florida Panhandle


fective strategies for mar-
keting a small business. The
fee for attending is $35 for
the public and free for stu-
dents and faculty members
of UWF who present a Nau-
tilus card.
There will also be a class
for "Starting A Business" on
Thursday morning, Nov. 13
from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. At-
tendees will learn about tax-
ation, financing, insurance,
and legal forms of business.
Attendance fee is $35 for the
public and free for students
and faculty members of
UWF who present a Nauti-
lus card.
"QuickBooks & Sales/
Use Tax" will be offered
Thursday morning, Nov. 6
from 9 a.m. to noon. Attend-
ees will learn how to set up
QuickBooks to get the most
help in collecting, report-
ing and paying sales tax.
During this advanced work-
shop, you will learn how to
track deductions and learn
tips to prepare for a sales
tax audit. Fee is $50. Call to
register.
"Market to the Govern-
ment Who Me?", a work-
shop, will be offered Nov.
4 from 9 a m. to noon. The
workshop is free, however,
pre-registration is recom-
mended. To register call
Michelle Putfark at 473-
7826 or Diane Miller at 473-
7830. Presented by Laura
Subel, PTAC Program
Manager

Composer/Pianist
Robert Moffa to
present free concert
There will be a free con-
cert presented by Compos-
er/Pianist Robert Moffa on
Saturday evening, Oct. 25,
at 7 p.m. at the Milton High
School Auditorium. The
public is invited. This con-
cert is dedicated to all vet-
erans and fallen hero, Sgt.
Daniel McCall. Veterans
please wear your uniform
or part of it. You will be hon-
ored.


1 :,:liiasl ,I:.~~-:7;:: i::.'.~:r.:,:l( i ii .;l;t:,i:r:;`~):; ~.r:d,~ ):.:;::::::Ii:2':::l~:~::li..:i:i; ll ':!i :'..\t( ',::;..' ~~l:::1':i 'P'); :;J~-






Santa Rosa Press Gazette I B3


Immanuel Baptist UPDATE


What about Halloween? I think
more than any other secular
holiday, Halloween is the most
debated among Christians. Should
we participate? Should we let the
kids dress-up and make believe
they are someone else? Should we
let them go Trick-or-Treating? What
harm does it really do, if any?
Much research has been done
regarding Halloween and its origin.


Most agree that the day originated
from a pagan Celtic celebration of
their new year. From that point, the
opinions and beliefs vary.
It's safe to say that we no
longer celebrate as the Celtics
did. The Americanized version of
Halloween is all about the children.
The costumes, the decorations, the
candy, all these things are aimed at
entertaining the kids. Most of it is


harmless fun. available to ensure our kids are
However, for people who believe exposed to Godly environments.
in Jesus as the one and only Savior, At Immanuel Baptist Church,
some things are not so harmless. we have Trunk or Treat. Church
The Bible tells us to glorify God members decorate their vehicle
in all we do (1 Corinthians 10:31). trunks with fun themes and give
By using the Bible as our guide candy to costumed children. Some
and listening for the Holy Spirit to members put together games for
convict us, we can enjoy Halloween the kids to play. This year we will
as a day of fun for our kids. have a pet parade and story time
There are alternatives for entertainment. There will also


be hayrides. In addition, the teens
of the church will host a Chilidog
fundraiser. There are lots of fun
things planned.
Everyone is invited to Trunk or
Treat at Immanuel Baptist Church.
The event will be located in the
church parking lot from 6 pm until
8 pm on Friday, October 31st. This
event is free. For more information,
call the church office at 994-6152.


Kornerstone BRIEFS


Homecoming at
Dixonville Community
of Christ Church
It is homecoming time at
the Dixonville Community
of Christ Church (formerly
known as The Reorganized
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints). On Octo-
ber 26, 2008, we will be cel-
ebrating 98 years of worship
at this location. There will be
a song service beginning at
10:30 a.m. followed by a Spirit
filled message from Seventy
Wayne Ellis, at 11:00. We look
forward to seeing old friends
and making new friends. Pot
luck lunch will be served af-
ter the service. Please join
with us to celebrate.

20th Annual Arts,
Crafts & Marketplace
Festival
First United Methodist


Church of Pace will be hav-
ing their 20th Annual Arts,
Crafts & Marketplace Festi-
val on Saturday, November
8, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Ev-
eryone is invited to come on
out!
There will be unique
crafts, items and yummy
baked goods. And also, did
we happen to mention an ex-
tensive lunch menu? Back
by popular demand, our De-
licious Cheeseburger Soup
and Glenda Webb's famous
chili! New vendors as well
as many of your old favorites
come together to market
their talents at this sold-out
show. Vendors will be located
inside and outside our facili-
ties area. Monies collected
from baked goods, lunch and
facilities are used for com-
munity outreach programs
sponsored by our United
Methodist Men, United
Methodist Women and youth
department. We hope to see


you there! Do your holiday
shopping with us and beat
the rush! The church is lo-
cated at 4540 Chumuclda
Hwy., one block behind CVS.
For more information, call
850/994-5608 or email at
www.pacefume.org.

Trunk or Treat
at Wallace
Wallace Baptist Church
will host it's first Trunk-or-
Treat on Oct. 31st from 6:30
p.m. 8:00 p.m. in the park-
ing lot of the church at 6601
Chumuckla Highway. Come
and enjoy candy, food, a cake
walk and music all free.
Have questions? Call the
church office 994-8278.

Woodbine Baptist
Events
Woodbine Baptist Church
Youth will have a Yard Sale
from 7 a.m. to 12 noon on


Saturday, Oct. 25. All pro-
ceeds will be used for the
Youth Mission Camp.
Woodbine's Annual Fall
Festival will be held Friday,
Oct. 31st from 5 to 8 p.m.
Public is invited for fun,
games, and food. Everyone
is invited to these events.

Pleasant Home
Celebration
Pleasant Home Baptist
Church is having its annual
homecoming celebration
Sunday, October 26 begin-
ning at 10 a.m. There will
be special music during the
morning worship service at
11 a.m. Immediately after
worship services, there will
be a covered dish dinner on
the grounds. Public is invited
to attend. For more informa-
tion call Pastor Oaks at 626-
9384. The church is located
at 8500 Pleasant Home Road,
off Indian Ford Rd. Holt.


November Angel Food Menu available


"It's A Blessing!" makes
units of food available to
you through Angel Food
Ministries on a monthly
basis. You may purchase as
many units as you want at
only$30.00 perunit. Each unit
that you purchase allows you
to buy the specials. Milton's
host site is the First United
Methodist Church, located
at 6830 Berryhill Street.
Sign-up dates are October
28, 29 and 30 from 11 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. at the church office.
On Oct. 29 (Wed.), sign-up time
is from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the
Fellowship Hall. Pick-Up date
and time will be Saturday,
Nov. 22 from 8 to 9:30 a.m. in
the Fellowship Hall. Call (850)
623-6683 for more information.
One or more specials available
only with the purchase of
either the Regular box or
Senior box.

November Menu
(Regular Box) ($30.)
tentatively is:
1.5 lb. New York Strip
Steaks (4 x 6 oz.), 3 lbs. IQF


Split Chicken Breasts, 2 lbs.
Baby Back Pork Ribs,, 2 lbs.
Chicken Chunks,, 28 ozs.
Jumbo Charbroiled Beef
Patties w/Gravy, 1 Ib. Smoked
Sausage, 1 lb. Ground
Turkey, 1 lb. Green Beans,
1 lb. Diced Sweet Potatoes,
10 oz. peanut butter, 15 oz.
Cranberry Sauce, 7 oz. Beef-
flavored Rice & Vermicelli,
20 oz. Shoestring Fries, 2 %
Reduced Fat Shelf Stable
Milk, 6 oz. Pancake Mix, 1 Doz.
Eggs and 1 Dessert Item.

Thanksgiving Box
($30)
Quantities are limited-so
place order soon
7 lb. Perdue Roasting Hen,
2 lb. Heat & Serve Mashed
Potatoes, 2 lb. Heat & Serve
Corn, 2 1b. Heat & Serve Green
Beans, 17 oz. Cornbread
Stuffing, 4.5 oz. Brown Gravy
Mix, 15 oz. Cranberry Sauce, 8
Dinner Rolls, Dessert Item.

Senior Box
($28.00) (All ten individual


meals are fully-cooked and
labeled complete with heating
instructions just heat and
serve. Each meal has no
added sodium, is low in fat,
and is nutritionally balanced
for seniors with 3 oz. of
protein, 2 vegetables or fruit,
and a starch.)
Sweet & Sour Chicken
Slow roasted chicken chunks
served in a Sweet & Sour
Sauce over Steamed Rice.
Spaghetti with Meat
Sauce served with a rich
traditional meat sauce with
Italian Green Beans, Diced
Pears, Oatmeal Cookie.
Chili Con Carne with
Ground Beef served with
elbow macaroni, carrot coins
and Beets With Onions.
Chicken with Creole
Sauce Tender Chicken Pieces
served with Classic Creole
Sauce, Mashed Potatoes,
Peas W/Mushrooms, and
pineapple chunks.
Ground Beef Teriyaki
Stir Fry-Seasoned ground
beef w/Teriyald flavored
sauce over Pennne Noodles,
accompanied by Lemon


Pepper Green Beans, Sugar
cookie.
Chicken Ala King -
Lucious Chicken in traditional
Ala King-style sauce served
over rice, with seasoned
green beans and sliced beats.
Beef Cabbage
Casserole Seasoned Ground
Beef interlaced with delicious
Cabbage leaves, served with
creamed potatoes, and green
peas with carrots.
Chicken Rice Pilaf -
Tender White Chicken served
over white rice pilaf with
broccoli cuts with diced red
peppers, and a chocolate chip
cookie.
Turkey Tetrazzini -
Diced Turkey in a luscious
cream sauce w/mushroom
pieces served over spaghetti
w/onions, seasoned diced
tomatoes.
Chicken Stew Slow
cooked White Chicken with
Diced Potatoes and diced
tomatoes folded into a
chicken flavored broth served
over rice with sliced celery
and carrot coins, a southern
biscuit, and a dessert.


Breaking news online at

www. srpressgazette.com.




SiAsk the Preacher

...a weekly column answering your
questions with Biblical answers about life.

Dear Pastor Gallups, "I have seen your DVD...the
7 Trumpets of Revelation. It is very interesting and
seems pretty unarguable. I understand that you first
came across your discoveries starting with Trumpet
number Three (Rev. 8:11) ...about "Wormwood" and
your connecting it to Chernobyl, Ukraine. Have there
been any to dispute this connection?"
Y. S. Milton
Dear Y. S.,
Thank you so much for watching my 7 Trumpets DVD.
For our other readers you can get this DVD through
our church office and/or you can watch a 10 minute
dramatic montage video clip of all 7 Trumpet prophe-
cies at our website by going to the following web
address...http://www.hickoryhammockbaptist.org/dv
dindex.html. Click on item number 18 in that list.
Additionally, we have just recently produced anoth-
er DVD entitled, "The Name Of The Star Was
Wormwood." This is a very detailed look at the whole
issue of language translation and the indisputable evi-
dence surrounding this astounding fulfillment of
prophecy.
Now, to address your original question. Yes... there
have been some to dispute this connection.
Interestingly enough, it seems to always be disputed by
"unbelievers" in the Lord Jesus or the Bible. I can
understand why they would want to dispute this amaz-
ing discovery...because it testifies profoundly to the
accuracy of the Bible and thus to the necessity of the
surrender of one's life to Jesus Christ as Lord.
The bottom line is this... the English word
Wormwood (Revelation 8:11) translates to the
Ukrainian word "Chomobyl" or in Russian -
Chernobyl. This can be verified with an English to
Ukrainian Dictionary easily found on the web. It is also
a fact that the Ukrainian Bible has this passage translat-
ed with "The name of the star was 'Polyn"' Polyn is
the synonym for Chomobyl in Ukrainian. We do not
have an English word for Polyn.
The prophecy of Revelation 8:11 states that some
type of explosion occurs that pollutes water and rivers
and kills many'people and the event is called
"Chornobyl" or "Chernobyl" or "Wormwood", depend-
ing upon the language used. In 1986, the Chernobyl
nuclear plant exploded killing thousands and radiating
millions. It polluted the waters and rivers of Europe
and is still a concern of global proportions today.

Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church. in Milton. He has a Bachelor
of Science degree from Florida State University, and a Master of Divinity from The New Orleans
Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been pastor of HHBC since 1987. He serves as an
International Youth Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention preaching all over the U.S. and
Canada. For more information about HHBC. call 623-8959 or626-8951. fax: 623-0197. If you have
any questions for Ask The Preacher, send it to: Ask The Preacher. Hickory Hammock Baptist
Church. 8351 Hickory Hammock Road. Milton. Florida 32583-paid advertisement


k THE HEARING DOCTOR

"The Doctor of Audiology Serving Santa Rosa County for 10 Years"
* Free Hearing Test
* Sales, Service and Repairs on all Makes and Models /


of Hearing Aids
All Insurance Accepted


Sabrina Kestrle Petertan.i,
At.D., BC-ABA


; Avenue

RMACY, Inc.




3-2222

rood Driveo Milton, FL 32570
Vinn Dixie Shopping Center)













A.


626-4327
..':;..'::' Berryhill Medical Plaza 5937 Berryhill Rd.


a. ,' il s \ :k c,,5i .- .-~s.~:. hl i6;ll ~ r d :'


Park

PHA


62


5440 Dogw
(V


"The people you KNOW and TRUST with your prescriptions."





Wednesday, October 22, 2008


Kornerstone


:.
~c~*a.
a.


\(


rip tatIon ii

Id amui cieaf,






B4 I Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Community


Wednesday, October 22, 2008


Study shows effect of Florida education reform


By JENI SENTER
jsenter@stpressgazette.com
According to a study
released by the Goldwater


Sears

Home Improvement
V Air Conditioning
& Heating
V Windows
V Garage Doors
V/ Entry Doors
V Vinyl Siding
V Kitchen Remodeling
Eddie Smith
850-232-7809 i


Institute that examines the
10-year impact of education
reforms, remarkable
improvement in Florida's test
k\yhtifl l- I


6crmfus ues
and F~oor Covings
Custom Rugs, Hardwood & Ceramic Tile Inlays
Seagrass, Sisal, Carpet and Binding


76Stewart Street

















(); tio 14 23b IWAe

Gctober 24 ind 25




www.santarosahistoricalsociety.com


Sign Up for FREE
Smoking Cessation
Classes! H
WHO: A
The class is open to all residents
of Santa Rosa County
WHEN:
Classes begin Thursday, November 6 p.m.
Midway: Class 11:00am to 12:00pm city.cm
every Thursday for 6 weeks
Milton: Class 5:30pm to 6:30pm es!!
every Thursday for 6 weeks
WHERE:
Santa Rosa County Annex Building
(across from Health Department)
MIDWAY (11:00am 12:00pm)
Santa Rosa County Health Department
MILTON (5:30pm 6:30pm)
Smokeless tobacco users welcome.
WHERE:







Santa Rosa Countyou would like more
information,
(across from Hease call Julie Klein at
MIDWAY (11:00am 983-5200.pm)

In conjunction with West Florida Area Health Education Center
In conjunction with west Florida Area Health Education Centerb


scores was found.
Jeb Bush campaigned
for governor on a clear and
bracing set of education
reforms in 1998. Having
won office, he immediately
pursued a dual-track strategy
ofeducationreform: standards
and accountability for public
schools, and choice options
for dissatisfied parents.
Bush said in his 1999
State of the State Address:
"Together, let's send an
unmistakable message for
our childreln-in Florida,
failure is no longer an option.
Education will remain my top
priority until we can honestly
say that our system no longer
leaves any child behind.
I will never waiver in my
dedication to transforming
our public schools into
centers of excellence."
Florida lawmakers
followed these reforms
with additional measures,
including instruction-based
reforms; the curtailing of
"social promotion," which
advances students to higher
grades regardless ofacademic
achievement; merit pay for
teachers; and additional


ACCOUNTING PLUS+
"A smart solution for
small businesses"
COLETTE PERRY
OWNER / ACCOUNTANT
Comprehensive Accounting
designed for your business
OFFICE 626-7299
CELL 291-7607
accountingplus@mchsi.com



C|a% ARRANGEMENTS

To ooi, p/sa c oeic r sit.:

850r9944474
FayardSquare
4273 Woodbine Rd.
Pace, FL 32571


choice measures.
Dan Lips, Senior Fellow,
with the Goldwater Institute,
and Matthew Ladner, Vice
President for Research at
Goldwater say that between
1992 and 1998, Florida's
already-low fourth-grade
National Assessment of
Educational Progress
(NAEP) reading scores were
declining.
In 1999, when these
reforms were enacted, nearly
half of Florida fourth-graders
scored "below basic" on the
NAEP reading test, meaning
that they could not read at
a basic level. But by 2007,
less than a decade after the
education reforms took
effect, 70 percent of Florida's
fourth-graders scored basic
or above.
Florida's Hispanic
students now have the
second-highest statewide
reading scores in the nation,
and African-Americans
score fourth highest, when
compared with their peers.
In fact, the average Florida
Hispanic student's score
is higher than the overall
average score for all students


in Alabama, Alaska, Arizona,
Arkansas, California, Hawaii,
Louisiana, Mississippi,
Nevada, New Mexico,
Oklahoma, Oregon, South
Carolina, Tennessee, and
West Virginia.
Florida Hispanic students
eligible for a free or
reduced- price lunch under
federal poverty guidelines
also outscore the statewide
averages of some of these
states, including Arizona.
Florida's African-
American students outscored
two statewide averages for
all students in 2007 and were
within striking distance of
several more.
Lips and Ladner say
in their report that Florida
students' performance on a
national norm-referenced test
provides additional evidence
that the FCAT test score
gains are real.
"Between 2001 and 2007,
Florida administered the
Stanford 9 (2001-2004) and
Stanford 10 (2005-2007)
exams. On both tests, Florida
students demonstrated
progress in a majority of
grade levels in both reading


and math."
Lips and Ladner report
that Florida's success proves
that with the right set of
reforms, demography is not
destiny in K-12 education.
"Florida students are
improving academically
at a higher rate than are
students across the country.
Importantly, children
from minority populations
are making the greatest
improvements-proof' that
Florida is making progress
in reducing the achievement
gap," say the researchers.
"The comprehensive
education reforms Florida
policymakers have
implemented over the
past decade appear to be
having a positive impact.
Specifically, initial evidence
suggests that ending social
promotion, increasing school
accountability, andexpanding
parental choice in education
are contributing to improved
academic achievement and
public school performance.
Policymakers across the
country shouldstudyFlorida's
model and implement similar
systemic reforms," they say.


MEETING: (L to R) Bertha
Christian, Pace Pea Ridge
Homemaker, Mike .
Donahoe, Santa Rosa
County Extension
Directory/Pest Agent;
Back/Forward Kaye
Johnson, Wallace
homemaker, Dawn Juul,
Wallace Club; Jean Home,
Skyliners Club; Beverly
Norton, Skyliners Club,
Beverly Norton, Skyliners
Club; and Mary White,
Pace Pea Ridge Club. Not
shown: Beckie Ward, Doris
Engberg, both of Skyliners,
and Melba Barley of Pace
Pea Ridge Club.



srpressgazette
.coMn


HOME DEPOT SAFETY EVENT














Photos by JENI SENTERI Press Gazette
ON THE HORN: Home Depot hosted a safety event on
October 4 from 9 a.m. until noon. The Pace volunteer
fire department participated along with the Santa
Rosa County Sheriff's Department and other safety
representatives from the county. The volunteer fire
department allowed children to turn on the sirens and
sound the horn on the fire truck. This child had a blast
pulling the cord to sound the horn. At left, the
Southwest Panhandle Search and Rescue K9 team
was on hand at the Home Depot in Pace for the
safety event. Rescue dogs enjoyed visits from the
public in the store.


. j 1a | Business Network

m m International



Tri cities chapter meets every Thursday

morning at 7am at Steven's Market Deli,

3988 Hwy. 90; Pace, Florida 32571. We encourage

area business professionals to visit our networking

meeting. Any questions contact Debbie Coon at



393-3666
www.tricitiesbni.com


VOTE. NOV 4


Danny


Holt
For Tax Collector
www.DannyHolt2008.com
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Danny Holt, o
Democrat for Santa Rosa County Tax Collector


---------~-~-~.I


~. ~~'~ ...;,~1"!~i3 -i~~. .r.~r.TTi.~:~ulr~_~(~;*~~Sn~/[ri7~ Iii3rr ~T..k~.?'*..'F7;~i;dEI~PG~u' t 1SS~.SF~i~lb.F~~i~:~.Z$P13i`?;:~?~3 nn~ s~sa ,~e~" IsraP o~m~






Wednesday, October 22, 2008


Local


Santa Rosa Press Gazette I B5


II


EMPLOYMENT


II I


II I


II~III


'AUTO,MARINE,R\
****- -****-


S-" AXilaa


IT


1`

1*,


PAYS





TO





ADVERTISE





u IN





STHE





ASSIFIette





CLASSIFIED!


. \,


chases must be paid for at time
of purchase in cash or credit
o card only,
All purchased items are sold as
it i, where is and must be re-
ANNOIUNCEMENS, .1 .-. i 11.,.
1100 Legal Advertising -
1110 Classified Notices .:' t : i.-.I
1120 Public Notices/ 101 108
Announcements 101808
1125 Carpools & 102208
Rideshare 102508
1130 Adoptions L/1Y1
1140- Happy Ads Legal 10/1226
1150 -Personals
1160- Lost IN THE FIRST CIRCUIT
1170- Found COURT IN AND FOR
p ,- u SANTA ROSA COUNTY,
FILE NO. 57-2008-CP-192
-F. 1:1 IF OF
i.it TIBBITTS,
Legal 10/1189 Deceased.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS
THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR SANTA -. ., -; : I: the estate
ROSA COUNTY FLORIDA ci fi.. r.t. deceased,
JUVENILE DMIION whose dolte at death was
CASE NO. 02-DP-417 '' File Number
I1N T1 192. is Fendina in
IN THE INTEREST QF: f,'. r -' ., l-.-: 5.-M
-lwich i


12/13/1999 O
MINOR CHILDREN
TO: Raul Baxain, Biological
Father
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT-
FIED that a F i.'. .. under oath
has been I. -j .,. the above
styled Court for the termination
of parental rits of J. A B., a
female child, n n Escambia


adoption, and you are hereby
commanded to be and appear
before the Honorable Marci L.
Goodman, Judge of the Circuit
Court in and for Sanita Rosa
County Florida, at the Santa
Rosa Count Ccrth,,,'- n ih
20Mh my '" : da *ty a'4
at 2O00 p.m *:., ,',.i
appear o 2 the dale and at the
time specihted or send a written
response to the Court prior to
that time.
YOUR FAILURE TO APPEAR
OR RESPOND SHALL BE
TREATED AS A CONSENT
TO TERMINATION OF PA-
RENTAL RIGHTS AND YOU
SHALL PERMANENTLY
LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
AS A PARENT TO THE
CHILD NAMED IN THE PETI-
TION FOR TERMINATION
OF PARENTAL RIGHTS.
WITNESS my hand as the Clerk
of said Couri and Ihe Seal
thereof this 29 day of Septemn
ber, 2M08
CLERK OF COURT
SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
CIRCUIT COURT SEAL
By: Nicki Norton
Deputy Clerk
100808
101508
102208
102908
10L1189
Legal 10/1191


""-. ::.. e -n.: Probate,


ney ore set orth below.
All creditors of the decent


Iii. tr i sf ii i .
i.-i ji t F i H F i le i '.J I

in t 16 1f. t 4 t
E. 4. i i r.',:.I .: 1- N

All other creditors of the dece
dent and other persons having
claims or demands againsO
decedent's estate MUST 1'i
THEIR CLAIMS WITH "1-1
COURT WITHIN 3 MONIES
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO,
TWICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANC'ii j- THE
TIME PERIOD *:fi r':'I'IM
ABOVE ANY CLIss HlIl'
TWO fl YEARS C + r ":-'C -I
TER THE DECEDErli : C-ir
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is Oclober 15,
2008.
Attorney for Personal Represent-
atolive:
/s/ Gerald L. Hemness
Gerald L. Hemness
Florida Bar No. 67695
309 N. Parsons Avenue
Brandon, FL 33510
Tel. (8131 661-5297
Attorney tr Petitioner
Personal Re resentative:
(s/ Joseph Reiler

Petilioner


AWustinAd 101508
102208
Security Self Storae at 439 10L124

I 1 : 'iiI .L' Legal 10/1254
pm on .. where said will re-
property l.-. L:.: stored. Pur ceive sehl b s until



Do Something ..... .. .:
'- i i i. I .:j1 .; : I: .
F t **, i ;1. : .. ... ..i : *
Good For .. .. .;...
and mus bo a corlified and li-

Tomorrow


T a i i 5 d
~ a a ra Irard op'II y can be picked


To Advertise call 623-2120 for


\ .-vu'C' u-toR2'""


t
,PXr1.'114" J:


* .


We Deliver & Install
Centipede
St. Augustine
Bermuda
Balled Pine Straw

Call us Ilrot, Save Tmoe
call us last, Save Money
Hwy. 87 So. Miton

626-8578


Lti 'I. H-.11 I--otedat SEVERABILTY- AND PRO-
.. Flo FlVDINGFOR AN EFFECTIVE
S.: a: to j.dress DATE.
bids to the attention of the Pur-
chasing Department. The bids This Ordinance may be in-
will bo opened in Conference spected by the public prior to
Room B at City Hall the above scheduled meeting at
the Office of the Clerk of
For more information, please Courts, BOCC Spport Services
contact the City's Purchasin Department, 64A5 Caroline
Dpportment at (8 983-9.548Y Street, Milton, Florida.All iter-
Te City of Milton reserves the ested 1- -
riht to efuse any and all bids. that : :
192208 any J.-:.-. -
102208 Board of County Commissioners
IOL-254 with respecl to any matter com-
ing before said board at said
meeting ii is their individual re-
sponsibility to insure that a rec-
Legal 10/1255 ord of lhe proceedings they ore
Sappealin9 exists an for such

NA, "F. .- 5 whichrec-
.j ll .-D I.. j. t i( testimony
The .i'.-,;, and adoption of and the evidence upon which
the :l: i..a .proposed Ordi their appeal is to be based. In-
nance by he ord of County rested parties may appear at
Commissioners of Santa Rosa the meeting and be heard with
County is scheduled f, :. 0 respect to these proposed ordi-
. o.mber 1m 3 .n m nuances.


a~.Coveme J,
the Commissioners meeting

Ion, 'Florido.


102208
102208


Legal 10/1256


TO WHOM IT MAY CON
CERN:
Please be advised thai on thi
1lth day of November 2001
.- .I m.. CDT, at the Cii
i'. ..-:.l .-.eetin q room at th(
: .r, jl H .t 8673 8 D ixon Street
o,. .r, of Milton, Florida


ORDINANCE NO. 1299-O0
AN ORDINANCE AMEND
ING ORDINANCE NO
1273-08 BY AMENDING
THE SCHEDULE OF BUSI
NESS TAXES TO MAKE r
CONSISTENT WITH ORDI
NANCE NO. 1108, REEN
ACTING ALL OTHER PROVI
SIONS OF ORDINANCE
NO. 1273-08 AND PRO
VIDING AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.
This Ordinance is on file in th.
City Clerk's office for inspec


AN ORDINANCE OF
SANTA ROSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AMENDING OR-
DINANCE 2005-37& PRO- I li Stl v]'
VIDING FOR AMENbMENT Divorce 'l9, Wills '30
TO THE DEFINITION OF IN- 0 I ce 1 ills
DUSTRY FOR PURPOSES Name Change '49
OF APPLYING FOR AN Centipede-
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FREE ng, Call for
CREDIT; AMENDING SEC- Sr-Augustine
ON i7 TO ESTABUISH EU- Farm Direct Worksheet (850) 434-7324
GIBLE INDUSTRY: PRO- r T 18A' St.
VIDING FOR CODIFICA- We Deliver 1850 N. "W" S
TION; PROVIDING FOR 434-0066 S (1 blk. N. of Flea Market) j


BEAUTY SHOP
In Bagdad.
30 years experience.
Caters to senior citizens.
House calls to shut-ins.
Affordable prices.
623-8415







Dependable
Housekeeper
Seeking
additional clients.
Over 15 years
of experience
References available
upon request
Call: 994-6236






PAUL NELSON
DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
*24 Hour Truck Rental
*Dirt & Rock Sales
*Fill Dirt/Clay
*Brown Dirt
*Driveway Material
Phone 850-994-4458
Cell 850-698-4920
Owner Operator








Gas is upl Bread is upl
HELP
If I had enough money
and gas to drive around
all day looking for a job,
I wouldn't need a job.
Unfortunately, I do need
work, NOWI Handy-
man, I can do almost eve-
rything. Electrical skills
and plumbing skills are
limited. Please give me
the opportunity to help
myself. Thanks. Call
Frank 346-4789


Coker's Lawn &
Tractor Service
From trimming to tractor
work. Clean-ups, raking,
hauling, mowing,
bushhogging, dirt work.
Reasonable rates,
free estimates.
(850)623-0493
(850)485-7977
Licensed & Insured.
MR. MIKE'S
LAWNSERVICE .
Affordable Lawn Care
and Maintenance.
Free estimates.
CommerciaV
Residential.
Call us today
Mike Pickard, Sr.
850-516 6914
850-623-1081




Private Piano
Instruction
Did you know? Studies
show that students can
improve academic suc-
cess through the disci-
pline of music instruction.
Piano lessons offered in
the Milton area in experi-
enced teacher's home.
Cost Is $15 per lesson.
Children or beginner
adults. References avail-
able. Interested? Contact
Faye Morrison at
981-3112 for more info
or to schedule lessons.




New Hope
Painting &
Wallpapering
*Drywall repairs & patch
work
*Pressure cleaning
(homes, decks, patios,
& sidewalks)
*Carpentry work (crown
molding, paneling,
install cabnits, build
decks, trim, base &
case)
*Residential
Interior/exterior.
Family owned business,
over 30 years.
Call the Ericksens today
(850) 723-2550 or
623-6034


HOME UPGRADES
ALL TYPES OF HOME
REPAIRS AND *
REMODELING
-Full Kitchen and
Bath Remodels.
-Built-In Entertainment
Centers.
-Built-in Wall Units
and Bookcases.
-Wooden Decks
and Fences.
-Custom Trim: Crown,
S Base, Etc.
-Hardwood Floors
and Tile.
-Replacement Doors
and Windows.
-Drywall.Wall Texture,
Painting.
LicenseO and insuied
1. ^.T.- J id-:n: : J -1I
850;830-9396







Stewart's Tractor
Works & Land
Clearing, Inc.
Tree & stump removal,
debris removal & storm
cleanup, bush hogging &
discing, backhoe work,
demolition & hauling.
516-1801 or
675-4291
Licensed & Insured










TNT Metal
Building, Inc.
R.V. & Boat covers, gar-
ages, portable sheds,
CARPORTS
Call for best
prices in town
Galvanized Steel
Many sizes/colors
Free delivery & setup.
Single carport $595,
Double only $695
(850) 983-2296
(850) 206-4008


110I 7II 0


';' -'
.:- *



9i~t, -i '


i IhiT.





r

d~s~ o )lg o~eC 4~94 i X i


cL~~1~p4: iI~P~a~


j I~~..~.(F~;: -. ..~ .. -~'t


MOM- -







B6 I Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Local


Wednesday, October 22, 2008


lion. Any inlosteid pally mayJ
appeal at the meIting and by
iroor .i .5 t to Ihe pro-

his thle 15th day of Octobei,
2008.


102208
102208
10125U6

Lega! 10/1257


TO WHOM IT MAY CON-
CERN:


JHMGD376675048761
I shall offel lhis property for
soale, at east iont dooi of the
Santa Rosa Criminal Justice F-
ci lty, 5755 East Milton Rd Miu-
ton, Florid, Santa oar
1000 a. n the 25thh day at
November, 2008 Or as soon
thereofler as possible. I wil of-
fer or sale all there said
righl, ite and interest in he
afo resaid personal proper at
pu blic au tion and w1 sell th
some, subject to taxes, all
prior liens, encubrunces
and Ludgments it any to
the highest and best bid-
proceeds to be applied as far
as may be to the payment of
costs and the satisfaction of the
above described execution.


The use of said lind will bo liv-
ited tlo induItial/heavy coanisem
cial use wit Ie epIoy ment of
a minimu number of' 50 sew
em ployees, id pavina above
average o e .:.r, oaver
age wa rate i id by En-
grind rove caps-
tal inv slment a in excess of
$10 million.
All bids mus be in wring and
delivered by hand Fed. xo
mail to the Santa Rosa County
Procurement Department, 6495
aronn Street. Se pG, Milton,
Floridg, 32570; and must be re-
ceived by 1000 a.m., Novem-
ber 25 2008; at which time
bids will be opened and read
aloud. All interested parties re
invited to attend. Bids are to be
sealed and inly labeled
"BID- SALE OF PROP-


Please be advised that number 2008 WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF OF ter the iime seffor the bid open-
at 5:01 p.m., CDT, at the City SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLOt- ing will be reacted and re-
Council 5 p room at i the turned unopened to the bidder.
Council meeting room am the
City Hall 678 Dixo Street, By /s/ Larry W. Matroni Santa osa County will retain
n the Ci of Milton Frida W Mroni the rihi of first refusal in the
actment an Ordinance whose i- ty Sheriff e sold. Sano Rsa Cought re
tie is as follows: IF YOU HAVE A DISABILITY RE- serves the right to negotiate a
ORDINANCE NO. 198-.08 QUIRING SPECIAL ACCOM- higher sales price withlhe high
R NMODATIONS OR TO AR- esT responsive bidder. Sano
AN ORDINANCE ESTB- RANGE TO VIEW THE PROP- Rosa County reserves the rit
LiSHING CERTAIN RUL ERTY PLEASE CONTACT JAN- to award more than one bid if
FOR THE CITY OF MILTON ICE PLATT 18501 983-1281 AT determines such to be in the
CEMETERY, PROVIDING LEAST SEVEN 171 DAYS PRIOR best interest of Santa Rosa
FOR PENALTIES FOR VIO- TO THE SALE DATE. County.
SEVEOAPRILITYREPEALING 102208 Each bidder will submit a mini-
ALL ORDINAiCES IN CON- 102908 mum o $500.00 earnnsi
FUCTHEREWITHANDPRO- 110508 money d wch
VIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE 11/1208 non be awardleid t purch bsed
DATE. ________The deoi wi be credited
This Ordiance is on file in the against eo/s amount.
City Clerk s office foi inspec- t C /1259 ai reserves the
tion, Any interested party pay I riNP to waive intormatities ir
appear a the meeting and be bds with or without cause, to
hrd wih respectI a bids, or to accept the
posed Ordinance. Pursuant to Section 193122, bid tha i determines toaccbe in
This the 15h day of October, Florida Statutes, t best interest of the County
2008. S- OSA Conty, ereby ach bider making paprchare
ei Nobles ANTA ROSA County was ceri- awarded he d, it will enter
City er i to te ax Collector on the into a purchase agreement de-
Circuil Court Seal 1 ay at October 2008, for scribedbherein within thirty days
102208 coectn of taxes, of the bid event. The purcse


102208
NOTICE OF SHERIFF' GO SAL 102208 By order a he Board of County
10/159 apCommissioned of Santa Rosa
NOTICE is hereby aiven that ---- County, Florida.
pursuant to WRIT OF EXECU- | | i
TION issued in the County Legal 10/1260 102208
Court fat Santa Rosa Cpunty, 102208
ra nhL 91 ty e TY ^
Florida, on the 9th d y at Sep-_ ___ ___
member, 2008, in the cause
wherete Asset Acceptance, oLC Notice is hereby given that the
was t V
wan plointil andar~beio VNo. Santo Rosa County Boaq
065C2150 in said courtI ty.m ine-
Santo Rosa Count Florida chose o property located in the
have levied upon all he Florida.t Sana tosa Industrial Park ATy NTION
edand in1e thedjfend- PPR Appximlately 11 To any and all persons
ants, Mary Valdez inand to the RIP) ac pr bid M ps depict who have had contactt or
following described personal RIP is up for bid or depict-
follow it:odescribe pe a ina the available land are avail- experienced problems
pr to wit: able at the Santa Rosa County with Children & Family
DESCRIPTION OF PROP- I County Commirss ne abuse investigations, par-
c 6495 aoline Sirer
ERTY Milton, Florida 32570. Tele- ticularly with Tamara
2007 HONDA FIT S1877. number (850) Tallmadge, please con-
VIN # -1877. tact 850-910-1817


PETS & ANIMALS
2100- Pets
2110- Pets: Free to
Good Home
2120-Pel Supplies
2130 Farm Animals/
Supplies
2140 PetsfLivestock
Wanted
2150 Pe Memorials


2100
AKC Mini Schnau-
zers. Home grown with
kids & cats. Smart, loving
companions. Shots &
health certificates from
Scenic Hills Vet. $350
each. Patti 723-3012


3100 -Antiques
3110 -Appliances
3120-Arts & Crafts
3130 -Auctions
3140 Baby Items
3150 Building Supplies
3160- Business
Equipment
3170- Collectibles
3180 Computers
3190 Electronics
3200 Firewood
3220 Furniture
3230 Garage/Yard Sales
3240 Guns
3250 Good Things to Eat
3260 Health & Fitness
3270 Jewelry/Clolhing
3280 Machinery/
Equipment
3290 Medical Equipment
3300 Miscellaneous
3310 Musical Instruments
3320- Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 Restaurant/Hotel
3340 Sporting Goods
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell)


3220
A Brand Name King Pil-
lowtop set. New In plas-
tic w/war. $200 Can
deliver. 850-255-3050
All Brand New Queen
Pillowtop Set. In plastic
w/warrr. $165.00
Delivery available
850-255-3050
Bed A 100% all new Full
size mattress set in plastic
w/warr. $119.00
850-255-3050

For Sale
Love seat sofa, multi
colors, like new
$135.00. Wing back
chair, maroon color,
like new $75.00. Blue
rocker chair, good con-
dition $50.00. (5)
Drawer chest of draw-
ers, excellent condition,
Ivory color $75.00. 2
drawer end table, Ivory
color $25.00. 2
drawer metal file cabi-
net $25.00. Several
Longaberger baskets.
Big discount. Battery
charger 10 amp, good
condition $25.00. Set
of 4 stack tables
$65.00. 623-2490


Do Something

Good For

Tomorrow


RECYCLE



TODAY!


3230
GARAGE SALE
Fri. & Sat., 7am-?
5224 Parkway Drive
(off Hamilton Bridge Rd.)
Tools, glassware, books,
collectibles, fishing gear.

HUGE
YARD SALE
October 24th & 25th
9 am-?, at 6438
Arlington Drive in Milton.
Antiques bed with new
mattress & box springs,
antique, Singer sewing
machine, fax machine,
printer, scanner, ladies
clothes-size 22-24, ladies
shoes-size E-11W.
MUCH, MUCH MORE!
Selling out!

MILTON ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
CLOTHES CLOSET
Open To The Public
October 24th
9am until 2pm
6163 Dogwood Road
Come and be blessed
with beautiful clothing
from the Lord

MILTON
ESTATE SALE
6569 College Drive, Sat
10/25 from 8 a.m.-12
noon.

MULTI-FAMILY
MOVING SALE
Fri.-Sat.
7:30am-1:30pm
Furniture, baby clothes,
tons of nice things, some-
thing for EVERYBODY
6260 Foxglove Road
in Milton

WOODBINE
BAPTIST CHURCH
YOUTH
YARD SALE
7am until 12pm
Saturday, Oct. 25th
4912 Woodbine
Road in Pace
All proceeds go to
Youth Mission Camp.

YARD SALE
Fri., October 25th
6525 DeUsa Road
in Milton. Ladies
plus size, toys, jackets,
shoes, skates,
toddler clothes, etc.
7am until ?

YARD SALE
Friday, Saturday
and Sunday
7am-?
4144 McVlckers
Lane In Pace
250 TABLES
Farm equipment, motors,
LOTS OF MISC.1


3230
YARD SALE
Saturday, Oct. 25th
7am-1 pm
5430 Pine Blossom
Road In Milton
(off Anderson Lane)
Computer, etc., clothes,
VHS 250 DVD's,
electronics, crystal,
LOTS MORE
983-8548

YARD SALE
Saturday, Oct. 25th
8am until ?
4153 Ward Basin Rd.
(South of Interstate 10)



3250
Double D Farms
PUMPKINS AND
FALL DECORATIONS
FALL PRODUCE
Peas, Squash, Greens,
etc. with more to come
8858 Hwy 89 North at
Allentown, Florida.
Closed Sundays.
983-6925 or
293-9752



3280
FARM EQUIPMENT
Wood chipper MPD, 8
hp. $100./6ft. ser-
rated disc $400. / cattle
hay ring $50. / calf
feeder stall $40 / supple-
ment tank-lick for cattle
$40. / dirt mover & ca-
ble for tractor $50. /
metal trailer $75. / 1
1/4 inch Pecan wood,
make offer. 994-6223





Double D Farms
PUMPKINS AND FALL
DECORATIONS
FALL PRODUCE
Peas, Squash, Greens,
etc. with more to come
8858 Hwy 89 North at
Allentown, Florida.
Closed Sundays.
983-6925 or
293-9752

FOR SALE
table & 5 chairs $75. /
coffee table & 2 end ta-
bles $50. / Lazyboy re-
cliner $45. / 2 bread
machines $10 each. /
Theromak vacuum
cleaner $95. / console
sterio $30. / dresser &
chest of drawers and one
night stand $100.
994-6223


3300
WANTED
Wheel horse garden
tractor with implements.
Please call
(850) 449-7482



| 3340
Pool Table
Very good condition.
Asking $175. Call 850
682-3535 for more info.



3350




NASCAR Tickets to
Atlanta Motor Speedway
for 10/28/08
2 tickets in Grandstand
Champions Section 247
Row 47. Includes bus
shuttle from downtown
hotel. $330. Call
850.994.0324


4100 Help Wanted
4110- Restaurants/Clubs
4120- Sales
4130 Employment
Information


4100
Driver Trainees
Needed. No CDL?
No Problem! Earn up to
$900/wk. Home week-
ends with TMC. Com-
pany endorsed CDL
Training.
1-866-280-5309
Driver Trainees
Needed. No CDL?
No Problem Eam up to
$900/wk. Home week-
ends with TMC. Com-
pany endorsed CDL
Training.
1-866-280-5309
FIRST MONTH
1/2 PRICE WITH
12 MONTH LEASE.
3/2 brick home.
1.5 acres with fenced
backyard. $1,050 month
deposit & lease required.
10174 Munson Hwy.
ERA Bill Wallace
Realty
850-623-5330


NOWI


PART-TIME OFFICE

PERSONNEL NEEDED

for a very busy office.

Must be able to

multi task, data entry

and customer service.

Experience a plus. .

Please fax resume to

626-7544


4100
Granny NANNIES
is looking for a mature,
responsible Office Assis-
tant to work on an as
needed basis. If you're
looking for occasional
work, this is the perfect
opportunity for you! Du-
ties will consist of basic
administrative tasks.
Please fax your resume to
850-995-0554, email to
grannynannies2@
bellsouth.net or mail to
4000 Highway 90, Ste.
G, Pace, FL 32571

HELP WANTED
GRAPHIC ARTIST to pro-
duce outdoor advertising.
Computer skills neces-
sary. Will train moti-
vated, energetic individ-
ual. Send resume to: Bill
Salter Advertising, P.O.
Box 422, Milton, FL
32572

HOUSEKEEPER
NEEDED.
Honest & dependable.
Please call 957-4147

MYSTERY SHOPPERS
Earn up to $150.00 a
day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge
retail and dining estab-
lishments. Experience not
required., please call
1-877-679-6772


5100- Business
Opportunities
5110- Money to Lend



5100

Drivers

NEWSPAPER
CARRIERS
The Northwest Florida
Daily News is seeking
carriers in this area:

Navarre
Applications accepted
at the Northwest Flor-
ida Daily News, 200
Racetrack Rd., NW,
Mon-Fri 9am 4pm.
See John Eaton or
call 850 685-8048

No Collection
Required
Requires valid driver li-
cense, clean driving
record, dependable
transportation and
proof of auto insurance.

NORTHWEST FLORIDA


Daily

News


lWFV-A
6100- Business/
Commercial
6110 Apartments
6120- Beach Rentals
6130 Condo/Townhouse
6140 -House Rentals
6150 Roommate Wanted
6160 Rooms for Rent
6170- Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals


1 -- -...:, r;--r;. n 'e'e,.. .. '----r;,. -'-.'C rjL'.,--! I 'Tk.i'5aa ~;~SiI~B~~~LgU I~. l~T~ !;tA'. v-.T. ,sitZl'e .'. 'ttNO~BDeL~ts~~EyWIsG~l;d +-


BUSINESS SERVICES







/HOME UPGRADES Coker's Lawn &
a- -i -.. sm-efl- Tractor Service
Full Kitchen and Bath Remodels From trimming to tractor work
SBuilt-in Entertainment Centers
Built-In Wall Units and Bookcases u Bushhogging Dirt Work
Wooden Decks and FencesClean-upsRaking
Custom Trim Crown, Base Etc. "W v, ^ Clean-ups* Raking .. .
Hardwood Floors and Tile Hauling Mowing <
Replacement Doors and Windows
Drywall, Wall Texture, Painting ,, Reasonable Rates* Free Estimates
Licensedand Insured -
www.homeupgradesnow.com -.- (850) 623-0493 Cell: 485-7977 0
(850) 830-9396 Licensed & Insured ,*^







PAUL NELSON Buildings / Garages
DUMP TRUCK SERVICE z All Steel Construction
-Truck Rental *Dirt & Rock Sales Dee Sertup Trim Ancnors
*Fill Dirt/Clay -Brown Dirt
*Driveway Material
Licensed & Insured
Residential & Commericial 809 32
Owner Operator 1 1 A Q: 85 -206-4008
Phone: 850-994-445806-4008
Cell: 850-698-4920 Financing Available



NEW HOPE PAINTING\ Rib, 1^0B^9
& WALLPAPERING 1 .

Interior ~ Exterior ~ Residential Affordable Lawn Care

~ Dry Wall Pressure Cleaning and Maintenance

Wallpapering Carpentry Work Commercial Residential

Call the Ericksens today! Mike Pickard, Sr.
723-2550 623-6034 850-516-6914
If no answer, please leave message \ 850-623-1081







s ee&Stump Removal
^ti tt ri@'li(& ca inDebris Removal & Storm Clean-up
Bush Hogging & Discing Dirt Work
Special Occassions I Demolition & Hauling
Business Meetings Land Clearing & Backhoe Worlk
Full Kitchen, 516-1801 or 675-4291
Tables, Chairs Li 4 er.- u L in-ura jr
Call 623-5390 PAL ErR
or 626-1422 PL STEWAT



To Advertise
In The Business & Services Directory

V~Peedat& 623-2120


DEADLINES for the


Saturday, Nov. 29th Edition



Legal Notices, Classifieds &

Line Ads


is Friday, Nov. 21st at 5pm


Retail Display


is Monday, Nov. 24th at noon



Our office will be closed for

Thanksgiving Day


I






Wednesday, October 22, 2008


Local


Santa Rosa Press Gazette I B7


OFFICE SPACE
Office/retail space for
lease. Sm./Med. sizes
available. Reasonable
rates. Great Highway
90 location, Milton. Ask
about 1st month free of-
fer. Call Steve @ (850)
341-1952


.110
APT. FOR RENT
New carpet. Very clean
1 bedroom. Non-smoking
environment. No pets
$500 month, $250 dep
626-0366
Milton
2 bedroom, 1 bath.
All ceramic tile, stove,
fridge and laundry
room. Nice yard. Non-
smoking environment.
$590 month, includes
water & sewer. Call
626-2928
Near Whiting
2 bed, 1 bath du
plex. $485 month
$485 dep. Call Don
Cumbie Realty
626-8959/377-6787


6120
For Rent
By Owner
By owner listing network
www.BeachRealty.net



3 bedrooms, 1 1/2
baths. Nice home with
fireplace on 1 acre.
Good location. $800
month, $600 deposit.
623-8357
6250 Starhill Dr. 3/2, 1
car garage. Split bed-
rooms. $825/$825. No
Pets. Janet Coulter Realty
206-3666
COMPLETELY UP-
DATED.
3bed/2full bath.
All electric, brick home.
6415 Misty Lake Drive.
Great in-town location
with the feel of country
living. No pets. Lease/
References required.
$900 rent /$750 dam-
age dep. 850-593-6015
after 5pm
FWB- 3br, 2 be Newel
construction house w,
fenced yard available for
lease Oct. 1st. Great lo-
cation to both bases
Terms negotiable. $1200
mo. Call 850 699-2189
HOUSE FOR RENT
OR SALE
in College Park behind
Milton High School. 3
Bedrooms, 2 baths. For
rent $600 month,
Deposit $400. For Sale
$75,000.
6491 College Dr.
623-4842
Jay
3 bedrooms, 1 bath.
Large living room with
fireplace insert. Sits on
one acre. Extra storage
buildings. $680 deposit,
$680 month. Day (850)
686-1493/ Evening
(850) 626-3661 (ask for
Susan)
Milton
3 bedrooms, 2 baths
on one acre with 2 car
garage, fireplace. 6332
Greenwood Drive.
$1,100. month (neg.),
$800 deposit. (850)
623-3339
Milton
5324 Hamilton
Bridge Road. 3/2,
over 1500 s.f. with
screened porch, all tile
floors and new HVAC on
1 acre. $950 month,
$800 dep. Call
572-2454 to preview
MILTON HOUSES
FOR RENT
6406 Skyline Drive
$595. month. Fenced
yard, 3 bedrooms, 1
bath. $400 deposit.
6295 Cottage
Woods
4 bedrooms, 3 baths.
$950. month. Two car
garage, fenced yard.
Call Blumac Realty
981-1631
Milton
NEW LISTING
3/BR Clean & quiet;
large kitchen, laundry,
den, livingroom, study,
lots of storage & closets,
carport. $650/mth
626-2606
Milton
Newer home near
Whiting. 3 Bedroom, 2
bath, with an extra large
room. No Pets. $795
month. $600 deposit.
Available immediately.
221-6015. 7255 Birdie
Lane.


ME NG P


Milton/ E. MILTON
Pine Blossom area. 3/2 mobile home.
FOR RENT OR SALE Minutes from 110, quiet
Newly remodeled area with fenced yard.
Large, brick, 3 bed- Non-smoking environ-
room home with central ment. $550. Lease, refer-
heat & air and two ences & deposit.
story storage building. 623-9623 or 418-0783
In quiet neighborhood. East Milton
No pets. $1000 month 14 Wide 2 bedroom,
Plus deposit. 1 bath on; 1 acre lot.
850-638-8526 $350 month. $150 de-
(after 5pm) posit. Water & Garbage
SMunson included. 623-8162
g 2BR brick home in East Milton
;. quiet country Munson One acre lot, dead end
D. area. New appliances, lane. Older model, 3
Water & trash included, bedrooms, 2 bath.
- No pets. Non-smoking $350 month, $100 de-
environment. $625 plus posit. Water & garbage
deposit. 957-2205 included. 623-8162
North Milton Furnished. All utill-
House for rent. 6843 ties Included.
Chuckwagon Lane. Central heat & air.
3 bed, 1.5 bath. Total 2 bedrooms, 1 bath.
electric. $750 month, Nice lon 1/2 acre.
$300 dep. Baycrest Re- Newly remodeled.
- alty 994-7918 Non-smoking envi-
- Pace ronment. pets $150
, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath per week/Last $200
n house with fenced back security dep.
. yard and 1 car garage. 623-9112
No pets. Please call
(850) 377-0420 Milton
1 Mile south of Whit-
3 bedrooms, 2 bath ing Field. 2 bedrooms
3 bedrooms, 2 bath with air, covered entry &
split design. New range allelectric. Justremod-
and fridge. Fenced yard, eled, washer hook-up.
12X20 storage shed $37/mth, $300/dep.
Quiet neighborhood. unfurnished. Includes gar-
Water/sewer included. bage pick up. No pets.
Yard are pr pick up. No pets.
-Yard care provided. 623-8753
$800. month. $650 dep.
Call 384-4693 Milton
Pace 2 bedrooms/2 bath.
3/BR 2/BA, double car Marlborough Village.
garage with fenced back 6233 Morgan Road. No
yard. Available now. pets. $500 month, $250
Military clause honored. deposit. Baycrest Realty
Pets allowed with pet fee 994-7918
of $300. $895 month. Milton
- $800. deposit. Call 6162 Carroll Road.
850-501-0273 or Total electric. Large 2/2.
529-7899 Water & garbage pro-
Pace vided. Private lot. $450
3578 Acy Lowery Rd. month, $300 dep. Call
Spacious brick home with 572-2477 to preview.
a large, enclosed pool.
3.5 acres. Sbr/4.5 MilEO F
bas 6 F5 MOBILE HOMES FOR
bts 1SF RENT. 368-7506 or
$1,595. per month. 368-7506 or
Call 478-4607 98-7_________
Eric Gleaton Realty, Inc. Milton
Pollard Mobile Home
Park. 1 bed, 1 bath. To-
Nfj TDll Y tal electric. Water & gar-
bage furnished. $375.
rent, $200 dep. Baycrest
Pace Realty 994-7918
SExecutive Milton
Home for Rent Quiet Clean Park
Woodbine Springs Rent includes water, gar-
Plantation. 4ba, 2ba, bage and lawn service.
2200sqft, never rented, No Pets.
large fenced yard with 2/2 for $450/month.
sprinkler system, lawn 2/2 for $350/month
care included. Must Call 698-4582
seel $1800/mo. MOBILE HOME RENTAL.
Please call 2/1 in quiet park. Sewer
850-463-4337. and garbage included.
No pets. $365 plus
Pace deposit. 626-1552
Quiet street close to
everything. Newer 3br N. Milton
2ba home, 1208sqft, 2 bed/i bath.
fenced yard. Pets con- 14 X 60. 6549 Stanley
sidered. Perfect for Circle. Private lot.
young family or retired No pets. $500 month,
couple. $800/mo. Call $250 deposit. Baycrest
850-426-6044 Realty 994-7918
www.simplechoice- Navarre/Okaloosa Co.
homes Trailer lots for rent
.com $200/mo. 598-0027
Pace/Pea Ridge OFF AVALON
3 bedrooms/1.5 2 bedroom mobile home
baths, Clean brick with covered entry. All
1350 sq ft., fenced, new electric, C H & A. Just
HVAC, stove, refrig., and remodeled. Water/ gar-
paint. All tile, non- smok- age included. $475
ing, small pets consid- month, $300 dep. (dep.
ered. $775 month/$750 & 1/2 of months rent to
deposit. 623-8675 move in) 623-8753 or
before 7pm. 983-8020
Pea Ridge Pace
3 bedroom/2 bath. Nice, 3 bedrooms, 2
Brick house, single gar- full baths with addi-
age on large lot. $750 tional 20 X 20 family
month, $750 deposit, room. Shady 1/2 acre.
$200 pet depsoit. $650 month, $500 secu-
698-8337 rity deposit. 994-0155
WHY RENT??? Pea Ridge
New Site Built Homes 3 bedroom/2 bath
from the $100's. Low on private lot with
Interest Rates! large shed. $500 month,
800- 678-4647 $500 deposit, $200 pet
".I I deposit. 698-8337
N 4 Springhill
1 6160 Completely Furnished
ROOMS FOR RENT trailer 14x70 3/BR
on Glover Lane. Refriger- 1/BA nice. Buddy Hardy
ator, microwave and ca- Rd. 5 ml from Coldwater
ble included. $50 per Riding Stables & 8 miles
week (no security de- from Whiting Field back
posit) Call 206-1299 gate, on acreage adja-
cent to Blackwater for-
est. No pets, non- smok-
ing environment.
| u6170 $550mo $500dep. Ref-
2 bedroom, 2 bath. erences needed.
All electric, completely re- 623-8920
built 2002, excellent con-
dition. Large private lot, TO RENT OR BUY
$500 month, $400 de- 2005, 3 bedroom FEMA.
posit. 994-8271 Make reasonable offer.
2/2 ui,,it, -7-e-- East Gate Mobile Home
$445 month. First month Ranch.626-8973
free with 12 month lease. W. Milton
Corner lot, CH & A, Ro- 3/2, 14X80. Total
man tub. Water, gar- electric. No pets.
bage and sewer pro- 5715RldgewayCourt.
vided. $395. deposit. $625 month, $300 dep.
Milford Road. 375-4515, BaycrestRealty
623-9902 994-7918


CREEP A PS|O0 LA

L APEL FAW N Y M

EM I'ILE TRIO RE

ABC DREAM F IN

N 0 S H AR G w A C
NI---HAINrtoWBH

AII ~ MARZ


I R A T EAT ON


I T G 0f


I ES FFIA B


P AICETR AMO V


M OU R NM T R U


TI H E


6170
WANTED
Someone to clean up &
paint double wide mobile
home on corner lot for
rent. East Gate Mobile
Home Ranch 626-8973







REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
7100 Homes
7105 Open Houses
7110 Beach Home/
Property
7120- Commercial
7130 Conio/Townhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7160 Mobile Homes
7170 Waterlront
7180 Investment
Property
7190 Out-ol-Town
Real Estate
7200 Timeshare


7100
1933sf 3/2/2 from
$159,900. Great Room,
Built on your lot. Other
homes from the low
$100s. Great Financing.
800- 678- 4647


1 WetedI


FWB
Kenwood
Subdivision
Beautiful brick 3 br, 2
ba, 2 cg. Located close
to bases on quiet half
acre comer lot. Built in
1994, kitchen recently
updated with stainless
steel appliances, comer
FP wall brick hearth,
vaulted ceilings, fresh
paint, security system,
updated electronic irri-
gation, large screened
porch under roof, chain
link back yard perfect
for pets. $299,000.
Call 850 226-6754


R eled'
FWB
Kenwood
Subdivision
Beautiful brick 3 br, 2
ba, 2 cg. Located close
to bases on quiet half
acre comer lot. Built in
1994, kitchen recently
updated with stainless
steel appliances, comer
FP wall brick hearth,
vaulted ceilings, fresh
paint, security system,
updated electronic irri-
gation, large screened
porch under roof, chain
link back yard perfect
for pets. $299,000.
Call 850 226-6754


| 7100



V~out
Navarre -
2 story, 4 br, 21/2 ba,
2150sf home on large
natural lot. 9' ceilings,
separate living & dining
rooms, eat-in kitchen. Lg.
whirlpool tub and
separate shower in mas-
ter bath. Beautiful, quiet
waterfront neighborhood.
Priced to sell at the re-
duced price of $260K..
Call 850 261-0322, or
685-8048 leave msg.


Quick Pre-Quall
You can pre-qualify in 15
minutes. Great homes
from the $100s on your
lot. 800-678-4647


7110 9
For Sale
By Owner
By ownIr listing network
www.BeachRealty.net


7150
Chumuckla
14 acres, great deer
hunting with food plot.
Connects to 50,000
acres mang. area. Can
divide. Owner financing
or will trade for house,
property, boat, etc.
$140,000. (850)
623-1288
Jay
6 to 23 acres, good deer
hunting, beautiful creek
frontage, large, hard-
wood trees. 2.5 miles
from downtown Jay.
Owner financing.$6,900
per acre and up.
(850)623-1288


o8110 8120


$ Cash $
for Junk Cars!
Will pick up. Running
Not! Call 585-5004


8100 Antique & Collectibles
8110-Cars
8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
8130-Trucks
8140- Vans
8150- Commercial
8160- Motorcycles
8170- Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210- Boats
8220- Personal Watercraft
8230 Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine
Supplies
8245 Boat Slips & Docks
8310- Alrcralt/Avlation
8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330- Campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes

W.."i tE


or


2000 MERCURY
Grand Marquis LS,
66,000 miles. New tires
& brakes. Very clean.
One owner. $7,500.
Call (850) 623-3082

CASH PAID
for junk cars or trucks.
Running or not.
Call: 983-9527
or 723-5048

Mercedes C230
Kompressor
Even though I really
like this car, I need
to sell it quickly
AT, 4 cyl supercharged,
moon roof, 51,700 mi.,
6 disc CD, Bose Premium
Sounds. Loaded! Garage
kept. Still under full Mer-
cedes warr. til Jan. 9th
(other manufacturer war-
ranties are longer). Will
sacrifice at $17,800.
850 502-6094.


Ford Explorer
V8 1996
Fully loaded including
AC and tow pkg. Blue
body paint in prime
cond. $2900 obo Call
Brian 850 377-4681



Jeep Rubicon
2006
6 speed manual, 29K mi,
ext war, CD changer, sat-
ellite radio, white w/ blk
soft top (619) 204-1406







1996 F150. Cleanest,
best looking 4 X 4 in
Santa Rosa County. Me-
tallic Candy Apple red.
67K miles. $4,000.
ALSO, 1992
Towncar. Extra clean,
runs great. $2,000.
623-1945


FEATURES THAT ARE
STANDARD IN THIS MODEL
Cathedral Ceiling in Great Room
Custom Cabinets with Raised Bar
Ceramic Tile Flooring
Insulated Windows & Exterior Doors
Architectural Shingles
Vinyl Exterior Trim
Marble Vanity Tops
Quiet & Efficient Electric Heat Pump
Plywood Roof Decking
SStemwall Slab Foundation
NO 18 .I .10 year Limited Warranty

Al.ic 00s qft. t 249 q. f


Will build on Slab or Piers

c^n-yciurZl^3Ybuilde-r


Over 50 Years In Business
Visit our website www.steelehomes.cc


SS.STEELE
AND COMPANY, INCORPORATED

6705 N. Pensacola Blvd. 477-7880
Toll Free (888) 231-1255


27 Different Floor Plans to Choose
From '60,900 to 1136,900
A sample of our homes...
Saqft Price I Sq ft Pric


Bellehaven
Chadwick
Stratford
Norwood
Mayfair
Hampton
York


CROSSWORD 1


ACROSS DOWN


1. Links gp.
4. Slip a Mickey Finn to
8. Utah lily
12. Midwest state: abbr.
13. Vague impression
14. Well-informed


15. Mon. follower
I R 16. Specks of thread
17. Repast
C A 18. Like Cassius' look
20. Unattractive
A P 22. Lewis or Belafonte
24. Pond
N S 25. Chignon component
26. Citadel
30. The Maid (Bette Davis
E N film)
31. Greyhound vehicles
G 0 32. Yeah's kin
33. Excavated
G E 35. Actor Will
36. Cheering sounds
S S 37. Unpleasant
38. Chicago suburb
41. Cindy Bear's beau
E R 42. Inits. on a memo
43. Software purchaser
V E 45. Seaman
48. Site of Galileo Airport
I L 49. Hormel concoction
50. "Bali __
TE 51. #1 hit of 1960
S 52. Things to lend or bend
A T 53. Feat of Clay


1. Cistern
2. African antelope
3. William IV's queen
4. Lama
5. Devastate
6. Footed vase
7. Amassed
8. A Place
9. Dueling tool
10. Gretzky's quest
11. Merely
19. Make mistakes
21. Fido's feast
22. Like horses after the farrier's
visit
23. Golfer Irwin
24. Malone of the hoopworld
26. Structure of surprises
27. Vision
28. Fat
29. Chipper
.31. He went over the mountain
34. Remit in advance
35. Practical joke
37. Standards
38. Mushroom lids
39. an earthquake, or
merely a shock?" (2 wds.)
40. Juan's house
41. Candle, on a birthday cake
44. Masseuse's "office"
46. Table wood
47. Memoirs, informally


'60,900
s64,600
s69,500
574,500
'75,200
'78,700
'85,200


Lexington 1812 '90,400
Pinebrook 1833 1102,200
Townsen 1691 O93,100
Fleetwood 1949 '96,800
Executive 2215 1112,900
Regency 2495 1136,900
2&3 BDR Duplex's available


MODLS6PEN0MO-FR :00-5:0-
SAT.9:05:00 SU. COSE


Coc o-vt R o nd See

Jerry Mitchel
General Sales Manager

08 Pontiac G6 GT Sedan 5k
Like New Must See .$16,988
08 Chevy Aveo LS Sedan.
Real Gas Saver Only 17k .1 2,988
05 Chevy Malibu Max LS
Nice Gas Saver .10,988
06 Ford F350 Larait Crew Cab Diesel
4x4 Dually Loaded 19,988
03 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
Sun Roof Quad Seats Loaded & Nice .1 2,988
05 Dodge Durango
Leather Loaded .. .12,988
04 Jeep Wrangler Sport
Auto A/C 48k ..... .12,988
98 Toyota Camry
4 door .......... 4,988
01 Lexus RX300
4 dr Utility Loaded & Clean$1 3,988
04 Ford F450 Ext Cab Lariat
Diesel Western Hauler Alum Body
38k Extra Clean 23,988
96 Chev 3500 Dually
Ext Cab Pickup 454-5sp A/C 90k
Good Truck ..... .. .7,988
01 Chev 2500 Ext Cab
Duramax Diesel 4WD LS Pkg
Extra Clean .'.15,988
04 Chev Avalanche 4x4
Sun Roof Leather Loaded .15,988
05 Dodge Reg Cab Hemi SLT
36k .......... .... 9,988
00 Ford Lariat Super. Cab 4x4
StepSide Leather Loaded Only .$7,988


www.McVayMotors.com
850-477-3860

6511 North W Street
at Marcus Point
Pensacola, FL


I L I I E R I T R E


I PSO BA I TI APR

T I E D I T C H TAS

TEDS B AHS S W E


L. LiC #VnRIVC 0R4-S-4


D EE L EST EDI T' R AN


I


--I


-1


ce


F


F


11 : %''III f .,'11-7"ItX^&*I*C, 'f '11,V;I IN" I




B8 | Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, October 22, 2008


Local


le GROCERY OUTLET
Pace Location Only 4025 Hwy 90
We Sell at Our Cost Plus a 10% Surcharge Added at the Register
SA elEiTGOOD OCTIBER 222008' 'Ti RUiO:CTOBER220


Whole
Boneless
Ribeyes
398

Sliced Free

Kellys Sliced
Smoked
Bacon

183 oz


Flanders
Beef
Patties
532
5 Ib box

Fresh Express
Premium
Romaine
Salad


Gwaltney
Jumbo
Franks

79'


Breaded
Breast
Tenders

4 Ib bag


Yoo Hoo
Chocolate
Drink
203.
6 pk-8 oz


Cystal
Hot Sauce

476oz


Family Pack
Pork Steaks

I45l
I lb


Angus Select
Eye Round
Beef Roast
244,


Thank You
Sliced 4x6
Cooked Ham
or Turkey
180
10 oz

U.S. #1
"New Crop"
Russet Baking
Potatoes

48b


Allen
Italian
Green Beans
69
28 oz


Cap'n Crunch
Cereal

116 oxz


groceryy

SALE PRICES GOOD THRU OCT 7th
022 L20 124\ W3 72570 F=26 2!7 F98


Cost includes freight, fee, and any associated expenses.

4025 HWY 90 PACE
850-995-8778
TS v isA~ EBTWIC


V 4 ~L~r..i:,K;lIllPtrl* u 'a~U


Gwaltney
Reg or Thick
Sliced Bologna

16 oz


Florida Juicy
Sweet Oranges
or Tangerines


Family Pack
Country Style
Ribs


Hinsdale
Corn Dogs
37
*16Oz


U.S. #1"New
Crop" Baking
Size Sweet
Potatoes

18B50
8 401lb-Box


Blue Bell
Ice Cream
370
64 oz


Dutch Farms
Mild Cheddar
Cheese


Golden Flake
Potato Chips
25o
5 Oz


Crystal Gyser
Spring
Water,
404
35 -.5 Itr


Luzianne
Tea Bags

24 ct


Bruce
Cut Yams


Peanut Patch
Boiled
Peanuts

737ot
o 7.35 oL


Coors Lite
& Miller Lite
15s75
S 24-pk


a a II


STORE HOURS: 7AM m 9PM 9 7 DAYS A WEEK


^'*\:,S^.f.- .- -H




Pen Air Federal Credit Union
leads the charge in saying...


-'-N 9'I
A- --.,,-.---
Y; -~L-V 3t ~
It Is
~~I1 -.(s i(~":~L-'~


)"' C) -^ .1 ./
''' ^;^


ci! iii


in


mr


Tr


RO

L)


kj L
" `


-34"
g3

Sir.


Sp
ibershi


*ed.


.~ : -i Li~( ~ .'~ ~-i l~. :3t; qW0.Qi 1 rr~*ri rawrfl~rU U W SE'S W 6,~ *


'a I,...,


-_^ ^-d


U2


Ill1l/


711IM


r


VI


7tA


- kmu m


(
4


w


w '"
^S3 '!1
'"fE^'A,


)-. ~,


1;-,.
r .'.-*





C2 I Santa Rosa Press Gazette


October 22, 2008


Whiting


U


0


THE TV PACKAGE THAT BEATS CABLE
( Over 150 Channels
f FREE Professional Installation
Local channels included"


SCBse FFOX


c LU


All prices reflected included an $18 bill credit for 12 months atftei rebate, plus an
I. in I' ii 1 I.r ,..i ., 11 I I *ii i I .i ,, program Valid


MORE CHANNELS, MOVIESANDVALUE!
SOver 200 Channels
f FREE HD DVR Receiver Upgrade-
$199.00 value!
Rf FREE Professional Installation
LIMITED TIME, FOR 3 MONTHS
FREE HB + staz + Cowm
7canes5 12chaIMIis 9Chanixb

Local channels included'
CBSePOJX ^ 0. j CWU


WATCH WHATYou WANT. WHENYOUWANT.
Rf Over 200 Channels
f DVR Service Included
f FREE HD DVR Receiver Upgrade-

Rf FREE Professional Installation
LIMITED TIME, FOR 3 MONTHS
FREE HBO + stz + M
?7a>rels 1Caaieis *thanaels

Local channels included'
SCBS* FOx i m a


f Over 130 of the best channels in High-Def-3 times
more than cable!U
f Lower cost-per-channel than cable.
f The undisputed leader in sports.


0f Higher customer satisfaction ratings than cable
eight years in a row.
Rf 100% digital picture & sound on every channel.


DIGITAL READY
NO TRANSITION REQUIRED


00mDOLBY
DIGITAL


NO equipment to buy! NO start-up costs!


MtiC
ESCAMBIA RIVER
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE. INC.
RURAL SERVICES, INC.


ESCAMBIA RIVER RURAL
SERVICES INC


800-692-7010


Your Local Authorized DIRECTV Dealer
Ib ...i I il.'i" m i 1 i l* >' I l,| ,rI .i i 'i, i !.i ''i .i. i i i1, .! r Ii I '.p | | in/oilo si second and each additional re ever


DIRECT.
SATELLITE TELEVISION
PREFERRED DEALER


Credit caid not required in MA & PA .Among the largest national cable & satellite IV [p,...i, I mii .I. .I.... .. i ... .. i .. ... .1, ..' M ). 111 11. I I 1 1111 .. ,I, .. i .1 .. ..I'i. ,1 1 r* .1 i 1111 1. :" ii l- I. ., 1. .-1' ",; in major metropolitlan areas Actual number of N0 channels varles by provider and market. 3 lM
.fiopiriiurti AMIfB ulIili I in I IIinr .i M 1"i mlBIiuiiii 11p. 'Ju i i ,;,,,inl... Q. ,, !.F. d,, ..'I I I l I I 111111 1 1 l n .. ii .. '."., Visit directvcom lo enroll in thlieDIREC1VAutiio Bil Pay programn.BRequies valid e-mail address, Upon DIRECTVSystemactivation.,customerwill receiveredemption instructions(Inicluded In customers
first DIRECTV bill, a separate mailing, ofr. in the state of New York. from retailer and must comily with the terms at the instructions. In order to receive ull t23 bill credit customer must enroll in DIRECTV Auto bill pay prior to offer redemption. Rebate begins 6-8 weeks after receipt of rebate form online or telephone, Timing of promotional price depends on redemption
date aCount m ust b i li n 'good st ad ing, ,1, i, ,a,1,,, ,1 1 I,, l -0, i n ,,, I ., i, 1. 1 I. I 1 1i;,1 i1 .. .I 1 ,11 ,, a .I ,d I. ,1 I 1. | 1 ..',,, I. 1 1. ,1 1. 1,. 1.1p .i... I,.. II Al lt I n N I -,1 4N,'i l H l VIt INil 1l pr' 1 -iq .lifnf i ml Hivlinifi 1 11 i iim rillt 0( i A ilifi i lB iMiFi Tit.[ .|lP I I 1 N l ii ,N lRV'. IlilW irlHi (W ) |r1 ir I
IS SUBSCRIBING WiLL AUTOMATICALLY CONTINUE ON riE 13TH MONTH [4TH MONTH FOR IHBO/SAR/SHOWrlME AT THE THEN-PREVAILINGRATES, INCLUDING THE $4.99/MO. LEASE EE FOR THE ?7NDAND EACH ADDITIONAL RECEIVER, DIRECIVSystem has a feature whices access to channels. In certainmark-i 11 ,,111 |i. r 1,|i. .., **INIAI R[AlIl .l0i l (I "t1'"TIl
D VR and HT Access l .... ,fee ., 1 |,|, | .1 ,1y .T-- A : ., j,,, ,, 1 .i. 1 1 ,, ". i" i,, ,,d H I I.. I I i'A p ii q ,, -, I.. I M i I 1- l i ,,,1 1 1 i ., .,1 .. ., bi, r .1i.ii, ,.i, i .1 ,11 ,, I I- 11-n L Iil I 4 1I-I I I I I.p1, 1. .1 6 Jt.1. d 1)" ? .. 114i. i-,,i1i i i il i .... n i. l. .i. ., -" ) i ." i,'i. l .i n ,. l, -l ii llull ..I. ,I11 11 l
ADVANCED EQUIPMENT REBATE PER OIRECIV ACCOUNT INSTALLATION: Standard professional installation only. Custom installation extra. SYSTEM LEASE: Purchase of 16s consecutive months 24 months or advanced eceiversl of any DIRECIV base programming package 2999/mm. or ative or qualifying international services bundle required, FAILURE TO ACTIVATE ALL OIRECIV SYSTEM
EOQUIPMENTIN ACCORDANCE WITH THEEQUIPMENTLEASEADDENOUM MAY RESULTINACHARGE6OFt$150PER RECEIVER NOTACTIVATED. IFYOU FAILTO MAINTAINYOUR PROGRAMMING,DIRECTVMAYCHARGEAPRORAITED FEEOF UPTO M ,. RECEIVERSAREIATALLTIMESPROPERTYOF nIRECTVANDDMUST BERETURNEDUPONCANCELLATION OFSERVICE ORADDITIONAL
FEES HAY APPLY. VISIT directv.com OR CALL 1-00-OIRECTV FOR DETAILS. Programming, pricing. tenrns and conditions subject to change at any time Pricing residential. Taxes not included. Receipt of DIRECIVprogramming subject to DIRECIVCustome Agomeemenit; copy provided at directvcomlegal and In frist bill. @2008 DIRECIV. Inc. DIRECIVand the Cyclone Design logo. CHOICE. CHOICE
XIIIA and PLUS DVR are tuadenmaiks of DIREC1V. Inc All other rademarks and service marks are llie property of their respective owners.

I I iM Ills 'I,* -------






October 22, 2008


Wh itinp


Santa Rosa Press Gazette I C3


July 16, 1943:The adventure gets underway


By CHIEF PHILLIP M. EGGMAN

It was 1943 a signifi-
cant year for the Navy's avi-
ation community. The Unit-
ed States' war machine was
in full production. In fact, by
year's end, 11 fleet and four
light carriers were commis-
sioned. The Navy was in des-
perate need of pilots to man
the aircraft that would sup-
port these new ships.
This need had been an-
ticipated from the beginning
of the United States' entry
into World War II. Only eight
days after Japan's devastat-
ing attack at Pearl Harbor
on December 7, 1941, the
Secretary of the Navy ex-
panded pilot training from
800 student pilots per month
to 2,500. By the end of 1943,
the Navy was producing
20,000 naval aviators annu-
ally
Years before the war, a
Naval officer by the name
of Kenneth Whiting saw the
value of placing airplanes on
ships. A visionary in his own
right, young Whiting, known
today as the "Father of the
Aircraft Carrier," learned
to fly from Orville Wright at
Dayton, Ohio, in 1914. He
was then designated as Na-
val Aviator #16.
Whiting's vision of Naval
aviation was centered on
what he called the airplane
carrier. He and a small cir-
cle of compatriots believed
that the battleship would no
longer be the centerpiece
of naval strategy and that
future sea battles would be
waged and won from the
air.
In 1919, Whiting request-
ed that the collier USS Jupi-
ter be converted into an ex-
perimental carrier, renamed
USS Langley after Samuel
P Langley's experiments in


aviation. Whiting served as
her executive officer when
she was commissioned and
later helped plan and outfit
the carriers USS Lexington
and USS Saratoga.
Captain Whiting re-
mained dedicated to the
cause of putting planes at
sea until his death in April
of 1943 less than three
months before the Navy
named a new auxiliary air
station in honor of his many
contributions to Naval Avia-
tion.
Naval Auxiliary Air Sta-
tion Whiting Field would be
the Naval Air Training Cen-
ter's sixth auxiliary air sta-
tion-built to help meet the
urgent need to train pilots
through its unique design
of two independent airfields
under one command.
The Navy purchased
the 3,060 acres north of the
then-small township of Mil-
ton at a cost of just $45,000.
Two weeks before the com-
missioning ceremony, which
took place on July 16, 1943,
a unit of Squadron Three
brought in their SNJ "Tex-
an" aircraft from Saufley
Field and moved onto South
Field. Squadron Three was
soon joined by another unit
from Chevalier Field, Pen-
sacola.
But the new base was no
paradise. Construction was
not completed at the time
of commissioning. Only one
hangar was operational.
Roads were in place, but un-
paved. Ditches overflowed
with water from the heavy
rains. There was sand in the
air, mud up to the knees and
pigs ran on the runways.
By November, North
Field was completed and be-
came the home of Squadron
Eight and its SNB "Expedi-
tor" aircraft which had all
been moved to Whiting from


Corry Field by year's end.
Meanwhile, the busi-
ness of Naval aviation train-
ing continued in full force
at Whiting Field. In 1944,
Squadron Eight reached its
zenith in the number of stu-
dents to complete their SNB
training.
After World War II, Whit-
ing Field continued its basic
SNJ curriculum. From May
1948 to October 1956 over
18,000 students completed
the training.
A brief overview of events
through Whiting Field's 65-
year history include:
July 1945 Whiting Field
became a prisoner of war
camp, established through
the efforts of the Naval Air
Basic Training Command,
Pensacola, and the Army
at Camp Rucker, AL. The
camp provided manual labor
details for construction and
soil erosion projects, with
the labor performed by Ger-
man prisoners. The first 100
prisoners (eventually, there
were 225), arrived on July
12 from Camp Rucker and
were placed in an area near
North Field.
1946 Medium and
heavy bombers, including
PBY-1 and the PB4Y, were
brought to Whiting from
NAS Hutchinson, Kansas,
and NAS Miami. That same
year, Whiting Field was up-
graded from a Naval Auxil-
iary Air Station (NAAS) to
a full-fledged Naval Air Sta-
tion. The station reverted
back again to an NAAS in
1948.
1949-1950 The famed
Blue Angels, flying the F-
9F Panther, as well as the
Navy's first jet training unit
(JTU) made their home at
Whiting.
1955-Primary training
continued with the advent of
the T-34B Beechcraft "Men-


tor."
October 1956 The in-
strument tactics phase of
basic flight training was
moved to Whiting Field and
Saufley Field took over pri-
mary training. Soon after,
,the North American T-28
"Trojan" would replace the
T-34B.
May 1960 Basic Train-
ing Groups Two, Three, and
Six were re-designated and
commissioned as Training
Squadrons Two,Three, and
Six.
1965-1971 New con-
struction during this period
included a two strip between
North and South Field. The
maintenance hangar at
North Field was completed
in 1968 as was a new aca-
demic training facility. Sikes
Hall and new officer quar-
ters were completed in 1969.
Two new control towers and
a 500-seat movie theater
were added in 1971.
January 1972 NAS
Whiting Field became the
headquarters for Command-
er Training Air Wing FIVE.
January 1973 Heli-
copter Training Squadrons
Eight (HT-8) and Eighteen
(HT-18) moved to Whiting
from Ellyson Field. South
Field became a helicop-
ter base for the UH-1 heli-
copter trainer, later to be
replaced by the TH-57 Jet
Ranger.
April 1977 The T-34C
procedure training cockpit
was accepted into the syl-
labus, and in the fall of that
year, the station began its
transition to the T-34C Tur-
bo Mentor as the primary
trainer.
April 1983 The last T-28
departs Whiting Field after
28 years of service and 3.4
million hours of training stu-
dent aviators. The last flight
of the UH-1 -Huey trainers


PHOTO COURTESY OF NAS WHITING FIELD
HARD WORK: It was July 1, 1943 when this photo was
taken. There was a great deal of work to be done-
turning a muddy cow pasture into what would one day
be the world's busiest airfield.


was logged in September of
that year.
Since its commissioning
65 years ago, NAS Whiting
Field's primary mission has
been to support pilot train-
ing. As a major primary
and intermediate training
facility and the sole heli-
copter training activity for
the Navy, Marine Corps,
and Coast Guard, over 1,000
student naval aviators are
trained in the primary and
intermediate phase of fixed-
wing aircraft and advanced
phases of helicopter train-
ing annually.
Today, North Field con-


tinues to support fixed wing
operations and South Field
is home for helicopter opera-
tions.
Between these two sepa-
rate and distinct airports
and 13 Navy Outlying Land-
ing Fields, (NOLFs), NAS
Whiting Field has become
"the Busiest Naval Air Com-
plex in the World."
As Rear Admiral George
D. Murray said when he de-
livered the principal address
at Whiting Field's commis-
sioning 65 years ago, "If
Ken Whiting could see the
field that bears his name, he
would love it."


NAS Whiting Field's Commanding Officers Through the Years


August 07 Present
EEnrique Sadsad, CAPT
August 04-August 07
Joan M. Platz, CAPT
August 01-August 04
W B. Watkins, CAPT
June 98 August 01
D. W Nelms, CAPT
July 95-June 98
Richard L. Dick, CAPT
July 93-July 95
L. K Tande, CAPT
July 91-July 93
J.E. Eckart, CAPT
July 89-July 91
Kenneth G. Johnson,
CAPT
March 87-June 89
Paul E. Pedisich, CAPT
February 84-March 87
Carlton L. Lavinder, Jr.,
CAPT
October 83-February 84
Robert E. Jones, CAPT
May 82-October 83
Giles R. Norrington, CAPT
August 80-May 82
Charles L. Tinker, CAPT


,August 77-August 80
Robert W McKay, CAPT
August 76-August 77
Douglas W Payne, CAPT
May 75 August 76
Joseph Kenneth Hassett,
CAPT
August 74-May 75
Thomas P McGinnus,
CAPT
January 72-August 74
Joseph Rezzarday, Jr.,
CAPT
June 68-July 70
Clarendon H. Sigley,
CAPT
July 67-June 68
Richard H. Mills, CAPT
June 65-July 67
Jospeh C. Zirkle, CAPT
July 63-June 65
Paul J. George, CAPT
May 62-June 63
Robert E. Taylor, CAPT
July 60-May 62
Ned L. Broyles, CAPT
May 59-July 60
Charles S. Moffett, CAPT


April 57-May 59
Daniel J. Harrington,
CAPT
July 55-April 57
John J. Lynch, CAPT
June 53-July 55
Paul Masterson, VADM
July 51-June 53
Leroy C. Simpler, RADM
June 50-July 51
Francis E. Bardwell,
CAPT'
October 48-June 50
Leonard 0. Fox, CAPT
May 47-October 48
Richard K Gaines, CAPT
May 46-May 47
Edward E. Renfro, ADM
December 45-May 46
Isaac J. Heizler, CDR
April 45-December 45
Robert A. Rosasco, CDR
December 43-April 45
Sanford LaMartine Meade,
CAPT
July 43-December 43
George Samuel Gillespie,
CDR


Thousands came for dedication ceremony


By JIM FLETCHER

It was 11 a.m., Friday,
July 16, 1943.
More than 5,000 people
packed the big hangar at
South Field.
While the group con-
tained many notable indi-
viduals, most were common
citizens of Santa Rosa, come
to see the opening of Whit-
ing Field.
The ceremonies were
brief less than 45 minutes
start to finish. But a relation-
ship was forged that is still
in tact 65 years later.
Under cloudy skies, a
band began the program,
playing "God Bless Ameri-
ca." Captain WP Williams
gave a brief invocation and
then, Rear Admiral G.D.
Murray spoke.
Later Commander H.B.
Crow (Commanding Officer
of Naval Air Station, Pensac-
ola) would begin the trans-
fer of command ceremonies
which placed Whiting Field
under its first officer: Com-
mander G.S. Gillespie (Unit-
ed States Navy Reserve, re-
tired).
Next the band struck
"The Star Spangled Banner"


and a drill team conducted a
brief "Commando drill."
Whiting, the Naval Air
Training Center's sixth (and
largest) Auxiliary Air Sta-
tion came into service with
the distinction of being the
only Naval Auxiliary Station
which was "certain" to be on
every student's training syl-
labus, "whether an officer,
aviation cadet, or enlisted
man in the Navy, Marine
Corps, or Coast Guard,"
Navy officials noted.
In fact, Squadron Three,
which began operations
from Whiting's South Field,.
was the only squadron
aboard the Training Center
teaching instrument flying,
a "must" in the training of a
naval aviator.
The Navy wrote, "In the
past, a student was always
attached to the Naval Air
Station at one time or anoth-
er during his colirse, but now
it is entirely possible that he
may never be attached to
the main station.
"He goes first to one of
Squadron Two's units at
Ellyson or Saufley Fields,
advances to Whiting Field
for his instrument train-
ing, then could complete his


course at either Bronson or
Barin Fields."
The words brought smiles
to the faces of the many who
stood during the opening
ceremonies. There were
plenty of importantt" pres-
ent for the event.
Included in the group:
Mrs. Kenneth Whiting-
Widow of Captain Kenneth
Whiting, USN (Ret.).
Miss Moria Whiting-
Daughter of Capt. Whiting.
Hon. Aretmus L. Gates-
Assistant Secretary of the
Navy for Air, Navy Depart-
ment, Washington, D.C.
Governor S. L. Holland,
Governor of Florida.
Congressman Robert L.
(Bob) Sikes-3rd District,
Florida.
Congressman Pat Can-
non-4th District, Florida.
Congressman Harry R.
Sheppard, (California)- Na-
val Subcommittee, House
Appropriations Committee,
Washington, D.C.
Congressman Jamie L.
Whitten (Mississippi)-Na-
val Subcommittee, House
Appropriations Committee,
Washington, D.C.
Congressman Noble J.
PLEASE SEE CEREMONY I 4C


www.srpressgazette.com






City of Milton

Florida


Proudly Salutes NAS Whiting Field

on your 65th Anniversary

eo 65 U-vc4 tei Nwvt -Ne,fd...





To Our friends of NavaCAir Station 'Wfiting yielCd

It is with great pride that the City'of!MiCton congratulates !KavaC
Air Station ,'Vhiting fieCd on the occasion of its Sixty-fifth
Anniversary.

Throughout i'a listwry, or A. I' cfiiti iitdhas iwe'n all important
part of this Cit The miforns of df Wa.nrs infuisetinto our economy
through yayirol atnidoutkiys at a.'Wfhitity 'iehiCdLstlngqisli the
instafCation as the most significant singe mfiet loerfur ecoHnoic


T7W impact of the men ,ai'i woImelt1J 4.S '2 li e'Vit who
votll ueecr countless howi .tschooit ?rted ploLt7T it^ c itrs,
Ii, Ilingllig the great .-mrI an CCeapy, cipan-p6up #ioVe'(7 an l I
(r.i' i suchi rograi. /ili a s sign ificat' impa cron f-i of L''U
iltilei en and those n fio miai e 'nMilton andStanta i lt- y our
'Ui'lo ,,.

Tir so ire but a couple f tdhe verij reaCreasoLns' ave sucl
pYuh in tLing a part o '1 5V'iWhittmg fielCd- it seen a pireat
Sinor'isiur for everyone, and we Cook.foranrd to acontiniuation
ofr that i *icuan1nshijp.

To ri, mi-'i ain women of XjAS VWhiting" fietk wve tank you flor*
your cdedicaai,'i so i vice to our country andcfor beinL a part of oar
community. I pray that God's bCessings -vwiC e upon you and your
ffamiCLies in an1that you do andwfierever you go.

Sincerely,



Guy Thompson
,Mayor


T T LAX ux..b






C4 Santa Rosa Press Gazette


wVlitini1


October 22, 2008


Renbarger may have made first landing


Before there was a Whit-
ing Field, there was a pas-
ture-like area straddling
a hill north of Milton. On a
warm day in May of 1942,
something historical hap-
pened there.
Lost now in the mist of
history is that day's unusual
events. Still, 15 years ago,
as Whiting approached its
50th anniversary, it was all


still fresh in the mind of Paul
Renbarger.
From August 1941
through November 1942 he
was the radioman on Rear
Admiral Alva Douglas Bern-
hard's PBY-5A seaplane. The
admiral commanded Patrol
Wings Atlantic and Five,
Renbarger said back in 1993.
However, in May 1942,
Bernhard took an "admin-


istrative" trip to Pensacola.
"Much to our surprise, in-
stead of landing at Pensaco-
la, his pilot, Lt. Byng, circled
this hilly farm field which
fenced a very large area,"
Renbarger said.
The young sailor and
the rest of the crew were
taken by surprise. "Imag-
ine the shock to our crew
when he cleared this fence


from the north and landed
on this grassy hill. Admiral
Bernhard was met by two
or three cars full of 'Navy
Brass' which drove away the
admiral and his staff.
"The crew was left there
to guard the plane," Ren-
barger said and noted he
couldn't remember if there
were any cows around. "But
it seemed to be one gigantic


pasture," he added.
The plane's crew was left
in the dark about the reason
for the trip, the retired sailor
said. However, one year lat-
er, it was known.
"We may have been the
first plane to land at NAS
Whiting Field before it was
built," Renbarger said.
The PBY-5A that Bern-
hard landed in was the first


production of this type, the
Milton man said. With built-
in wheels which could re-
tract into the hull, it could
come down on land or water.
Renbarger said Admiral
Bernhard's plaque hangs in
the Naval Aviation Museum
on NAS Pensacola as one of
the early Navy pilot. He was
a 1909 graduate of the U.S.
Naval Academy.


Seii Stg oS.4 Wia *lEW Sime 1957
US Hwy 90 Milton 623-3371.



Old Milltown Storage Inc.
I /He 9'i a/#At JeoCJjo,. :


CEREMONY from page C3


Johnson (Indiana)-Naval
Subcommittee, House Ap-
propriations Committee,
Washington, D.C.
Rear Admiral Ben Mor-
rell (CEC), USN-Chief of the
Bureau of Yards and Docks,
Navy Department, Washing-
ton, D.C.
Rear Admiral A.C. Read,
USN-Chief of Naval Air
Technical Training, Chicago,
IL.
Rear Admiral Ezra G. Al-
len, USN-Office of the Sec-
retary of the Navy, Navy De-
partment, Washington, D.C.
Rear Admiral A.C. Ben-
nett, Commandant, 8th Na-
val District, New Orleans,


Air Commodore D.V
Carnegie, Her Majesty's
Royal Air Force-Director of
Flying Training, Air Minis-
try, London, England.
Harvey Emery-Special
Assistant to the Secretary
of the Navy for Air, Navy De-
partment, Washington, D.C.
Thomas A. Johnson-
Chairman of the Florida
State road Department.
Captain Joseph F. Bolger,
USN-Navy Department,
Washington, D.C.
Johnson was there from
the State Road Department
to announce that, as part of
the opening of Whiting Field,
the highway from Milton to
Brewton, AL (Highway 37)


would be straightened.
Admiral Murray told the
group that Miltonians and
Santa Rosans should view
Whiting as "their field."
"We want you people to
feel that way about it," Mur-
ray said "because we are
going to be with you in great
numbers; we want to get
along with you and want you
to get along with us.
"You may rest assured
that we shall do our part in
every possible way to keep
our relations on a friendly
and amicable basis, be-
cause it will take such
pleasant relations to make
a success of this part of our
war effort."


With that, the ceremo-
nies were over and Whiting
Field spokesmen asked ci-
vilians to leave as quickly as
possible "so that as-yet un-
finished construction work
could proceed without inter-
ruption."
While Whiting had been
built in near-record time,
there were still several
small details remaining to
be completed when the facil-
ity opened.
In fact, four months later,
the Navy announced an-
other $143,000 would be fun-
neled to Whiting to pay for
construction of additional
barracks and installation of
radar training facilities.


NAS Whiting Field:A history etched


in mud, sweat, courage, dedication


Whiting Field, hacked out
of pine thicket and farmland,
stands today as a monument
to what Americans can do
when pushed.
Named for Captain Ken-
neth Whiting, the "Father
of the Aircraft Carrier," the
field would occupy 3,060
acres north of Milton and
cost $45,000, a bargain even
in those days.
In less than 60 days in
1943, the Navy air training
facility was started and fin-
ished. Within 80 days from
the start of construction the
runways were operational.
Shortly thereafter, Navy and
Marine Corps pilots shipped
out to fight historic air bat-


tles over the Atlantic and
Pacific. By the end of 1943,
officials reported the Navy
was producing 20,000 naval
aviators annually.
The dark days of World
War II were brightened by
the arrival of those brave
men trained at Whiting Field
in Santa Rosa County.
Since then, thousands
of men, and women, wear-
ing hard-earned gold wings,
have passed through the
gate on the hill to fly over
Korea, Vietnam, Grenada,
Beirut, Kuwait and Iraq,
places in harm's way.
Many of them will never
hear of Whiting Field's 65th
Anniversary. They perished


in the air, on carriers, and in
prisoner of war camps.
Many young pilots served
out their enlistment and
returned to civilian life to
become pillars of their com-
munities across this country.
Ted Williams, perhaps the
greatest hitter to play the
game of baseball, was an in-
structor here. U. S. Senator
John McCain, a prisoner of
war in North Vietnam, was a
student at Whiting.
NAS Whiting Field has
been the temporary home to
many heroes and honorable
figures. Some didn't achieve
fame until after their mili-
tary duty, however.
Not to be forgotten are the


men and women who helped
lay the field, constructed the
buildings, manned the main-
tenance shops and kept the
planes and helicopters fly-
ing. They are legion, too.
Many of the military and
civilians have strolled from
the scene to lead quiet lives
in quiet places, far from the
maddening crowd.
But all carry special
memories of Whiting Field
that range from amusing to
bizarre to horrible. In this
special issue, a tribute to
Naval Air Station Whiting
Field, are some remem-
brances, photographs, and if
lucky, a recaptured feeling of
a moment long gone.


Prissy Peacock

, Consfignment
.MO- O


Ladies Apparel
& Accessories

626-8081
5374 Stewart St. Milton


14M Shop Consignment



ALTERNATIVE HEALTH

FOOD STORE gl

5533 Hwy. 90 Pea Ridge 994-3606
Cmwe by ond see MUo New G(tmn Free Food Section
"Where educated natural health choices are made."
Vitamins Minerals Herbs Organic Foods
Natural Health Books
Mon.-Fri.: 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.,
Sat.: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D, Natural Health Consultant
Dennis Reynolds, Herbal Specialist
Deanna Gilmore, Manager / Herball Specialist


Capt. Kenneth Whiting: Namesake had a vision of carriers


Capt. Kenneth Whiting:
Career of pushing for naval
flight led him to be called the
'Father of Carriers"
Who was Captain
Kenneth Whiting?
A distinguished pioneer
in the fields of aviation and
submarine operations,
Whiting was born in
Stockbridge, Massachusetts,
on July 22,1881.
Appointed to the U.S.
Naval Academy, Annapolis,
Maryland from the Sixteenth
District of New York in 1901,
he graduated on January
30, 1905: He served the
two years at sea that were
then required by law before
he was commissioned
Ensign on January 3,1907.
Advancing progressively
in rank, he attained that
of Captain to date from
July 1, 1929 before he was
transferred to the Retired
List on June 30, 1940.
Following graduation
from the Naval Academy in
1905, Ken Whiting joined the
USS West Virginia and, in
July of 1907, was detached
and ordered to Asiatic
Station. He served on'the
USS Concord until May 1908
when he transferred to the
USS Supply with additional
duty at the Naval Station,
Guam, Marianas Islands.
Between August and
October 1908, he was
again assigned to the USS
Concord. He next reported
aboard the USS Shark for
duty in connection with
fitting-out submarines at
the Naval Stati6n, Cavite,
Philippine Islands.
He assumed command
of the USS Porpoise
when that submarine was
commissioned November
20, 1908 and while aboard
her, performed a feat to
demonstrate a means of
escape from a submarine
that becomes disabled and
sinks to the bottom of the
sea.
Shutting himself in


CAPTAIN KENNETH WHITING
one of the torpedo tubes
of the Porpoise while the
submarine lay at the bottom
of Manila Bay, by his orders,
the port at the outer end of
the tube was opened and he
swam to the surface.
Relieved of command of
the Porpoise in September
1910, he assumed command
of the USS Tarpon operating
with the Second Submarine
Division, Atlantic Torpedo
Fleet. Reporting in January
1911, to the Newport News
Shipbuilding Company, he
had fitting-out duty on the
USS Seal and later on the
US G-1, assuming command
of the latter upon her
commissioning, October 28,
1912.
On June 29, 1914, he
reported to the Wright
Company, Dayton, Ohio, for
flight training under Orville
Wright, and on September
26, 1914, was designated
Naval Aviator #16.
Completing his instruction,
he became Officer in Charge
of the Naval Aeronautic
Station, Pensacola, Florida,
then the only Naval Air
Station in the United States.
He remained there until
November 1916 when he
joined the USS Washington
(redesignated December
1, 1916 the USS Seattle)
and commanded a unit of
seaplanes aboard her until


May 1917 with additional
duty from January of that
year as Destroyer Force
Aviation Officer and Aide
of the Staff of Commander
Destroyer Force.
During May and the
early part of June 1917,
he was aboard the USS
Neptune, after which
he had special duty in
connection with aeronautics
in France. On June 1, 1918,
he assumed command of
the United States Naval
Air Stations Nos. 14 and 15
at Killingholme, England.
He was awarded the Navy
Cross for "exceptionally
meritorious service in a
duty of great responsibility
during the World War as
Commanding Officer of
the first United States
Aeronautical detachment to
reach France, and later in
command of the important
United States Naval Air
Station at Killingholme,
England."
Returning to the United
States in February 1919,
he was assigned to the
Division of Naval Aviation,
Office of the Chief of
Naval Operations, Navy
Department, Washington,
D.C. He remained there
until September 1, 1921,
when he transferred to the
newly-established Bureau
of Aeronautics. He next
had fitting-out duty on the
USS Langley at the Navy
Yard, Norfolk, Virginia, and
when that aircraft carrier
was commissioned, March
20, 1922, he joined her as
Executive Officer.
In July of 1924, the now
43-year-old Whiting, again
reported to the Bureau of
Aeronautics and served
as Assistant Chief of the
Bureau and later as Head
of the Aircraft Carriers
Divisions. He was ordered,
in September of 1926, to
the Brown Boveri Electric
Company in Camden New
Jersey where the USS


Saratoga was being built.
He was Executive Officer
of that carrier from her
commissioning, November
16, 1927 until May of 1929
and in September of that
year, joined the Staff of
Commander Aircraft
Squadrons, Battle Fleet, as
Chief of Staff and Aide.
He served as
Commanding Officer of the
Naval Air Station, Naval
Operating Base, Hampton
Roads, Virginia, from
August 1930 until June 1932.
Following instruction at
the Naval War College and
the Naval Torpedo Station,
Newport, Rhode Island,
he assumed command
on June 15, 1933 of the
USS Langley. Relieved of
command of that carrier in
December of that year, he
reported to the Newport
News Shipbuilding and Dry
Dock Company to fit out
the USS Ranger. Detached
before her commissioning,
he remained there for
duty in connection with
the development of plans
and specifications for the
USS Yorktown and the USS
Enterprise.
For a year (June of
34 until July of 35) he
commanded the USS
Saratoga, after which
he became Commander
Aircraft Squadrons and
Attending Craft with
additional duty in command
of the Fleet Air Base at
Pearl Harbor, Territory of
Hawaii. In September of
1937, he assumed command
of Patrol Wing 2, continuing
his command of the Fleet
Air Base, Pearl Harbor until
June 3, 1938.
At the age of 62, Kenneth
Whiting died at the National
Naval Medical Center,
Bethesda, Maryland on
April 24, 1943.
He was survived by his
wife, Edna Mae Whiting of
New York.


* -r,. ...* -i.. ,-...:. .... '~.....* .~S,.i': ihW~B(CI 'I ~s;~ elP~~ +


Catch up on the latest

local sports news online

at srpressgazette.comL








Oif 4 16
`3iatbNN^ i~ke^.'


* ,


I


Appliance


. >'






Oct 2, 2i


Mystery Housing



65 years later, no word on what happened to complex


By JIM FLETCHER

Whiting Field hadn't even
begun operations when word
was released that a "major
housing project" was soon
to begin.
65 years later, stories
about that project have folks
scratching their heads, won-
dering what ever happened
to the project.
The June 24, 1943 issue of
the Milton Gazette reported
it had learned "construction
work is scheduled to start
on the Whiting Field public
housing program within the
next ten days."
The project was to include
300 family dwelling units in
45 separate buildings. There
was to be two large dormi-
tory buildings (each contain-
ing 12 single and 12 double
units).
In addition, there .was
to be a large community
cafeteria, two community
recreation centers and club
buildings as well as "sev-
eral buildings to house retail
stores of various kind for the
community."
The project was sched-
uled to be built "at a point


off Highway 37, where Whit-
ing Field's boundaries join
Clear Creek and where the
community can make use of
Whiting Field's sewer sys-
tem and sewage disposal
plant."
Officials at Florida's De-
partment of Transportation
say, in 1943, Highway 37
ran from Brewton to Milton
along what is now termed
Highway 87 to Point Baker
where it then followed the
route now covered by High-
way 89.
Knowing the project
was planned for the area
where Clear Creek meets
Whiting's boundaries along
Highway 87, spokesmen at
Whiting speculate the proj-
ect must have been planned
for "somewhere very near
the main entrance."
Perhaps the project nev-
er actually started?
No, on July 22, local me-
dia reported the federal
government had awarded
the contract for the multi-
million dollar facility to A.J.
Honeycutt a construction
firm in Birmingham. Re-
ports also indicate the firm
was already on site and con-


struction had begun.
Charles Ahearn, a repre-
sentative of the Federal Pub-
lic Housing Authority was
quoted in the Milton Gazette
as saying "the project will be,
completed in 75 days."
Some have speculated
the project must have been
what was later called Magda
Village, but Whiting officials
say that's not possible.
First, Lieutenant Com-
mander John J. Magda, for
whom Magda Village was
named, did not die until
1951. Second, Magda Village
was officially dedicated on
September 17, 1952 and it is
unlikely after building the
entire Field in less than 90
days that it took nine years
to finish a housing project.
Sitll, the mystery re-
mains. Articles from late
July, 1943 indicate "material
has been placed at the site
for construction and the big
job is to start tomorrow."
In fact, a few days af-
ter the first statement, lo-
cal papers were reporting
Representative Bob Sikes
had obtained funds for "an
additional 200 family dwell-
ing units for civilian person-


nel." That announcement
brought the total homes to
be constructed in the proj-
ect to 500.
While that may remain a
mystery, the next announce-
ment of housing can be
traced. On July 29, reports
spoke of a second project,
"in addition to the 500-home
project." This community
was to be built in the East
Milton area and was to in-
clude 200 houses.
The homes were to be
built by B.M. Henderson
and B.H. Cox-both of whom
were given the green light
from the Federal Housing
Authority to proceed. Many
of those homes still stand in
the East Milton area.
Reports at that time de-
scribed the planned neigh-
borhood as "laid out in
symmetrical fashion, with
hard-surfaced streets and
sidewalks. The houses will
be modern in every respect
and of frame and brick ve-
neer construction."
(By the way, that final
note shared headline space
that day with a story which
proclaimed: "Mussolini Los-
es Job as Italian Dictator.)


Some sailors loved this area, others, well...


By JIM FLETCHER

Some people just love
Milton. Others, well...
In 1943, the Milton
Gazette received a letter
from Capt. Ammon
McClellan, stationed in the
Middle East. McClellan
wrote, "Last night, I was
sitting on the banks of the
Suez Canal with a group of
officers, when they began
talking about the places
they had been stationed
as enlisted men before
becoming officers.
"Four of them said, of all
the places they had been,
they remembered Milton,
FL best. It seems they had
bivouacked there in early
1942 and were treated swell
by your citizens."
As much as those four
loved Milton, a Navy Wave
apparently disliked the area.


An August 1943
paper carried a headline
which read: "Navy Wave
at Whiting Field Not
Impressed With Our Town.
Says Milton Looks Like
Death Valley on a Spree;
Calls Us 'Sand Crabs'"
The article went on to
note:
"A Navy Wave, stationed
at Whiting Field, evidently
has a very low opinion of
Milton and this section of
the country, if a letter she
started but lost can be
believed.
"The letter was dated
Wednesday, July 21, 1943
and was as follows:
'Dearest Millie:
Yesterday, I celebrated
six months in the Navy
and believe me, it was
something. As you probably
will guess, I've been moved
again. They've just built,


or should say, are building,
a new field 40 miles from
Pensacola. So they looked
at me, said you look like the
pioneer type, and here I am.
'It's really quite
ducky-way out in the
Florida swamps where the
crackers, or sand crabs as
we call them, have been
hibernating for the past
hundred years.
'The name of the town,
which is eight miles away, is
Milton, Fla. The main street
looks like a picture of Death
Valley on a spree. There
are about 10 buildings, and
when we went into town,
everyone gawked. Monday
night, we went into the
movies and it was quite
thrilling.
'We saw Lum and
Abner in some screwy
picture.
'The show house is


really terrific. It's upstairs
over the dry cleaners
or something and has a
maximum capacity of about
50 people. They're fussy,
too. When you go upstairs,
they have two large signs
posted:
"'One says: ($25 reward
for anyone giving evidence
leading to the conviction
of persons cutting up on
the seats.) The second one
says: (When you've seen the
show, kindly leave or else go
below and purchase another
admission ticket.)
'The finale was when
the doorkeeper whispered
in our ear as we entered
that the 'ladies are to
sit to the right and the
gentlemens on the left'. We
went into convulsions and
practically got put out.'
That's as far as the Wave
got with her letter.


Whiting's 'darkest day' came on its 10th anniversary


No one likes to talk about
it, but with any air training
facility come crashes.
The first such fatality
came within 60 days of
commissioning. It was
an early Sunday morning
when three officers and one
aviation cadet died in a mid-
air collision one mile east of
Gonzalez near Cantonment.
One plane, attached to
Squadron Three was piloted
by Lt. (jg) William F Smith,
USNR, and his passenger-
student was Aviation Cadet
James A. Mitchell, USNR.
The other plane, from the
Intermediate Instructor's
School based at Chevalier


Field at NAS Pensacola,
was piloted by Lt. (jg)
Joseph F Ahern, USNR and
his passenger was Lt. (jg)
Waldron Q. Dorothy, USNR.
On Sept. 20, 1943, at 2:15
p.m., two training planes
from Whiting Field collided
while flying about two miles
north-west of the field.
Ens. William L. Koch,
USNR and Aviation Cadet
Dennis J. Copeland died in
that crash.
But the worst crash on
record for the naval air
station was suffered on
the 10th anniversary of
its commissioning-July
16, 1953 when a Marine


transport plane crashed
north of Whiting killing 41
reservists and crewmen.
A fair child Packet
burst into a rolling ball of
fire, witnesses said, after
crashing through a clump of,
trees. It scattered burning
wreckage and bodies for
more than 100 yards before
smacking into two parked
vehicles and a barn near
the then-home of Ray
Allen. People who rushed
to the crash site said two
men staggered from the
searing flames to safety. Six
survivors were picked up
by Navy rescue teams, but
one man died in the Whiting


Field hospital four hours
later without regaining
consciousness.
The plane was the
second of its flight to take
off. It climbed, then faltered
and plunged into a clump of
trees about a mile north of
the Whiting Field's runway.
It was in the air for only
one minute. The plane was
taking part in a giant airlift
of 1,600 ROTC students
engaged in summer
training at Corpus Christi,
Texas, and Norfolk, Virginia.
The men were enroute
from Texas to Virginia
for amphibious training,
officials said.


-:rAPOl


HAPPY BIRTHDAY





NAS Whiting Field
4430 Avalon Blvd., Milton, FL 32583

Office- 850-981-8434 *ToU Free: 877-71-FLOOR

Santa Rosa County
Property Appraiser
This office is currently accepting applications for the
2009 Homestead Exemption as well as all other
exemptions.
Initial exemption application must be made in person.


Gregory S. Brown, CFA
6495 Caroline Street, Suite K

Phone: 983-188o
OfficeiHours:
NlondafV-Frida.y
7aaniq400p.m.





Breaking


news online at


srpressgazette.com.


First African-American at station remembers his duties


Clyde Sword claimed to
be the first African-American
stationed at NAS Whiting back
in 1943. In 1993, he was living in
Pensacola with his wife Viola,
and recalled his first duties
as menial: cleaning officers'
rooms, shining their shoes and
making up their beds.
"There was not much out
at Whiting (in 1943)," he said
in his '93 interview. "There
were two paved roads, in the
shape of a cross, the north
and south gate and the east
and west hangars."
Sword noted too the
number of skunks and
unpaved roads in and around
the still-developing area.
"There were a lot of skunks,
and many dirt roads."
Sword, as all enlisted men,
was "well paid"-$30 every
two weeks.
According to him, a few
months after he broke the
color barrier, "other blacks
were sent there (to Whiting)."
Getting there was unique too
as the personnel rode from


M4t the movie, there were two rows of
seats for blacks. On Thursdays, we
(blacks) could go swimming, and on
Friday they would let all of the water
out and scrub the pool."

Clyde Sword, first African American
stationed at NAS Whiting


Pensacola to the new base on
a cattle truck.
Segregation was law in
the 1940s and Sword said in
addition to the swimming
pool, there was a movie. "At
the movie, there were two
rows of seats for blacks. On
Thursday, we (blacks) could
go swimming, and on Fridays
they would let all of the water
out and scrub the pool."
Sword served two tours at
Whiting Field. He enlisted in
the Navy in 1941 and retired
in 1966.
However, his stint wasn't
eventful. Following his first


tour at Whiting Field, the
young black man found
himself on the front row to
one of the bloodiest World
War II battles.
In February 1945, while
serving aboard the USS
Rockbridge, a transport
ship, he helped unload U.S.
Marines to take the volcanic
island of Iwo Jima.
After World War II, Sword
briefly left the service but
reentered and found himself
at Whiting again.
On this tour, he and his
wife became parents of two
children.


U HAULJ
l~S3SSSSSS^Si


"r


.Climate

.Non-climate


.Low rates

..Moving supplies

.15% Military Disc.


FREE TRUCK WITH MOVE INIIII

6075 Dogwood Drive
Milton, FL 3250 ,

WWW.DXXWOODSTORAGEGXM I


Santa Rosa Press Gazette. | CS


Whiting


October 22, 2008


~u
-







C6 I Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Whiting


October 22, 2008


*- wMB~aa lo *a nIflfaM I*I


ib-


- I .- I 1 2


I






October 22, 2008


Whiting


Santa Rosa Press Gazette I C7


(I'----


65 YEARS LATER


Ask him how to correctly
pronounce his name and
Captain Enrique L. Sadsad
will just smile a wry smile
and say, "Happy, happy."
Captain Sadsad,
Whiting's current leader,
was born and raised in
Olongapo City, Philippines.
He entered the Navy in
November 1977 and started
his career as an Aviation
Machinist's Mate and
qualified as a Search and
Rescue Naval Aircrewman.
His initial assignment
was with Helicopter Anti-
Submarine Squadron TEN
(HS-10) in 1978, followed
by a tour with Helicopter
Combat Support Squadron
three (HC-3) in 1981, both
at Naval Air Station North
Island, CA. After earning
a B.S. degree in Aviation
Management from Southern
Illinois University, he was
transferred to Aviation


CAPTAIN ENRIQUE SADSAD

Officer Candidate School
in July 1983. He was
designated a Naval Flight
Officer in December 1984.
His first operational
tour began in September
1985 with Patrol Squadron
fifty(VP-50) at NAS Moffett
Field, CA, where he served
as Assistant Quality
Assurance Officer, COMSEC


Material Security Officer,
and Avionics/Armament
Division Officer. He
qualified as P-3C Instructor
Patrol Plane Navigator/
Communicator, Tactical
Coordinator and Mission
Commander.
Captain Sadsad then
reported to Commander,
Anti-Submarine Warfare
Wing, U.S. Pacific Fleet
(COMASWWINGPAC) as
ASW Operations Center
Schedules and Operations
Officer in August 1989.
During this tour, he
earned an M.S. degree in
Business Organizational
Management from the
University of La Verne.
He joined USS
constellation (CV-64) in
June 1992 and served as
the Assistant Combat
Direction Center Officer,
CDC Training Officer,
and Command Security


It's Sadsad at the helm


Manager. Additionally, he
qualified as Tactical Action
Officer and Anti-Air/Anti-
Surface Warfare Weapons
Coordinator.
Captain Sadsad then
reported to the staff of
Commander, Naval Air
Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet
(COMNAVAIRPAC)
in October 1994 as the
Commander, Patrol
Wings, U.S. Pacific Fleet
(COMPATWINGSPAC)
North Island Detachment
Officer-in-Charge.
In April 1996, he joined
Patrol Squadron forty seven
(VP-47) at NAS Barbers
Point, HI, where he served
as Assistant Aircraft
Maintenance Officer and
Aircraft Maintenance Officer.
Following his
department head tour, he
reported to the Chief of
Naval Operations Military
Personnel Plans and Policy


Division in October 1997
and served as the Aviation
Enlisted Community
Manager and later as Head
ECM.
Captain Sadsad reported
to Training Squadron FOUR
(VT-4) in November 2000 as
the Executive Officer and
took command in November
2001. Under his leadership,
VT-4 was awarded the 2002
Chief of Naval Air Training
(CNATRA) Training
Excellence Award as the
best Primary Training
Squadron in the Navy.
After completing his
command tour, he reported
to Commander, Fleet Air
Keflavik, Iceland in April
2003, as the Executive and
Operations Officer.
Captain Sadsad
joined the staff of
Commander, Striking and
Support Forces NATO
(COMSTRIKFORNATO)


Naples, Italy in 2005
as the Senior US Navy
Representative and the
Commander, sixth fleet
Liaison Officer. In June
2006 he reported to the
Commander, Maritime
Air Naples (CMAN) as the
Chief of Staff, responsible
for all NATO Maritime
Patrol Aircraft operations in
Southern Europe.
He took command of
NAS Whiting Field, Milton,
FL in August 2007.
Captain Sadsad's
personal awards include
the Defense Meritorious
Service Medal, Meritorious
Service Medal (two awards),
Navy Commendation
Medal (four awards), Navy
Achievement Medal, Good
Conduct Medal, as well as
various unit awards.
He joins a long list
of leaders aboard NAS
Whiting.


BUSIEST AIRFIELD IN THE WORLD


Photos by BILL GAMBLIN I Press Gazette
THE WINGS THAT LEAD TO WINGS: If they aren't in the air, they're getting ready to be. At Whiting, the busiest
airfield in the world, take offs and landings are quite common. This shot, taken Thursday shows row after row
of T-34C "Turbo Mentors." Whiting continues a more than 60-year tradition of training the nation's pilots.


IJU LY I lJW4 in .INalkthiiBne$ l .ifWL"'W1 ra
TIMES HAVE CHANGED: This "live motion" simulator for WHITING WORK: Preparing food for all the personnel at
helicopter training allows pilots to actually "feel" the Whiting was a major task. This cook, in 1943, was
results of their actions. hard at the chore. (Courtesy of NAS Whiting Field)


We appredate "65" years of support to the community.




FLORIST AND GIFTS



54 8Srewart S. MikanR FL32578
S3'0 62I3-2758 (88J)4 9-2999








in Milton. Flondco
Quality Christian
Education for Children m
from age 2 through
High School



850-623-4671
6331 Chestnut Drive (off Hwy. 89)
www.SantaRosaChrisnanSchool.com j


INSIDE TODAY'S SIMULATORS: The "instrument panel" is just as complex as inside the real thing. It's a long jump
from the original simulators.


* ,J -


~cu ~aJi~~lsrd~r~;ia~i~ua~~WiW d)iZ~LWIOPiiC;IIr~a~rr~.--~ll--~-~"*"~--




October 22, 2008


C- ISatRoaPesGzteW 13


I
i,


eIl


Our Friends and Neighbors
in Santa Rosa County are
invited to Celebrate
this milestone with us








Local Crafts And Food Vendors
Car Show
Explosive Ordinance Display
Games for Kids
Bounce House & Climbing Wall
Fire Fighter Challenge
5K Fun Run
Navy Band New Orleans' Rock Band
More than 20 Static Aircraft & Pilots
A/C-130 Gunship, P-3 Orion, A/V-8B Harriers,
T-39, T-45, T-6, T-34, H-57,
A/H-i Cobra (outfitted to support the Dept of Forestry),
H-144 Mobile Coast Guard,
CH-46 VA USMC Res, PT-17 and more.


SSixty Five years of training our military's aviators is a
huge milestone," said Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate
Shane Peterson, the coordinator for the celebration. "We!
are looking forward to getting the community together
for some food, good music, and fun. That's what it's all
about. The community is such a big part of our success
and its important to show our local communities that we
are here and appreciative of their support.,,


*( r- !.; ?m inrr~e ~wWYLu *~


Whiting


c8 I Santa Rosa Press Gazette


I


''
l~%~f~~






October 22, 2008


Whiting


Santa Rosa Press Gazette I C9


Cooking Tips for


Your Favorite Catch


FAMILY FEATURES

W ild-caught Alaska seafood is low in saturated fat and naturally
packed with heart-healthy omega-3s.
Serve your Alaska seafood with a savory sauce or dip that only takes min-
utes to prepare. These recipes for Adobo Cream Sauce, Creole Mustard Dip,
Madras Curry Dip and Moroccan Sauce go well with a wide variety of species:
salmon, halibut, cod, Alaska pollock, sole/flounder, surimi, crab (King, Snow
or Dungeness) or weathervane scallops. So it's easy to have a great dinner,
fast, any day of the week.
Seafood is easy to cook. There's no need to thaw tiozen seafood portions
with these techniques, even frozen seafood is fabulous in a flash!
For more recipes and tips, visit alaskascafood.org.
General Tips
Before cooking frozen seafood portions, rinse olf any ice glaze under cold
water; pat dry with paper towel.
Pans, grill and broiler/oven must be hot before you start cooking.
Fish turns from translucent to opaque as it cooks and will continue to cook
after it is removed from the heat source. To check for doneness, slide a
sharp knife tip into the center of the thickest part of a cooking seafood por-
tion, checking for color.
Adjust cook time as needed for thickness of fish and cook just until fish is
opaque throughout.
Sauteing and Pan-Searing
Heat a heavy nonstick skillet or ridged stovetop grill pan over medium-high
heat.
a While the pan heats:
Fresh/thawed fish: Add oil or a combination of oil and butter to the pan.
Frozen fish: Brush both sides of fish with oil olive, canola, peanut,
grapeseed, soy or safflower.
* Place fish in heated pan, skin side up, and cook, uncovered, 3 to 4 minutes
or until browned.
* Turn the fish over, season it with spices, and:
Fresh/thawed fish: Continue to cook, uncovered, an additional 3 to 4
minutes.
Frozen fish: Cover the skillet tightly and reduce the heat to medium.
Continue to cook an additional 6 to 8 minutes.
* For very thick portions, finish in oven preheated to 400F until opaque.
Roasting and Broiling
* Preheat broiler/oven to medium-high heat (4500F).
* Brush both sides of fish with oil.
* Place seafood on spray-coated broiling pan or foil-lined baking sheet.
* Cook 12 to 15 minutes for frozen seafood or 8 to 10 minutes for fresh/
thawed fish.
* Flip only very thick portions.
Grilling
* Thoroughly clean and preheat the grill to medium-high heat (4500F).
* Oil both the grill and the seafood to prevent sticking.
* Marinate or season the seafood.
. Grill 12 to 15 minutes for frozen seafood or 8 to 10 minutes for fresh/
thawed fish, turning once during cooking.
Steaming
* Bring about one inch of water/seasoned liquid to a boil.
* Turn off heat; place Chinese bamboo steamer basket, wire basket or vege-
table steamer in pan.
* Line steamer with lettuce, onion, herbs or citrus (without covering all of
the holes) to keep seafood from sticking; add seafood.
* Return liquid to a boil.
a Cover loosely and steam 5 to 7 minutes for frozen seafood or 4 to 5 min-
utes for fresh/thawed fish.
Poaching
a Add water/court-bouillon
to large pan and simmer.
* Turn off heat.
a Add seafood to liquid, skin
side down seafood should
be mostly covered by the
poaching liquid.
* Return heat to a simmer -
liquid should simmer, not
boil.
a Cover pan tightly. Cook
7 to 9 minutes for frozen
seafood or 4 to 6 minutes
for fresh/thawed fish.




Fishing for
the Future:
Alaska's
Sustainable
Fishing
Practices

S Since 1959, Alaska's con-
stiruion has mandated
tha311i all tilh be ilit1ed
developed and maintained
on Ibhe suildinetd )ield
principle" Only Alaska
S can claim a trad. record
ofnearl' 5(i lear- 1ol R
state-mandated sustain-
able hrests. .
Science is the loundtio t
of 'Alajskaj's sustainable
management policies.
Ala.ka's lisheries meet
and exe'ed the sustijn-
ability standards estab-
lished by the Food and
Agriculture Cirganriiztion
of the United Nations (FAO),
Alaska's exemplary fisheries management involves collaboration between state,
federal and international organizations to maintain standards :is well as public
participation and strict laws/enforcement.


Adobo Cream Sauce


Moroccan Sauce


Moroccan Sauce
Makes about 1 1/2 cups
Alaska pollock, cod, halibut, salmon, crab and
scallops are best paired with this sauce.
11/2 tablespoons minced fresh garlic
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 cup unsalted butter
2 tablespoons harissa paste (or Spanish
paprika)
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice*
Sea salt and freshly cracked black
pepper, to taste
2 tablespoons coarsely chopped Italian
parsley
2 tablespoons almonds, if desired
Place garlic, olive oil and butter into small sauce-
pan over low heat. Cook until garlic begins to
soften, about 10 minutes. Whisk in harissa paste
and lemon juice; continue cooking 2 to 3 minutes
more. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Garnish with parsley and almonds, if desired.
*1 to 2 tablespoons sherry may be substituted for
lemon juice.

Creole Mustard Dip
Makes about 1 1/2 cups
This assertive mustard sauce is a winner with
wild Alaska salmon, halibut, cod, crab and
Alaska pollock.
2 egg yolks
3 tablespoons vinegar
1 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon yellow mustard
2 to 3 teaspoons Creole seasoning,
or to taste
1 green onion, sliced
1/2 cup chopped fresh dill
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
Whisk egg yolks and vinegar together in small
bowl or blender until light yellow in color.
Continue whisking, or with blender motor
running, slowly add olive oil until emulsified and
ingredients are thoroughly blended. Stir in
mustard, Creole seasoning, green onion, dill and
parsley; blend or whisk just until blended. Cover
and refrigerate until ready to serve.


Adobo Cream Sauce
Makes about 2 cups
This lively cream sauce is best served with
Alaska pollock, cod, halibut, scallops and crab.
I package (8 ounces) light cream cheese,
softened
1/4 cup mayonnaise
1 can (6 ounces) vegetable juice (tomato'
or spicy)
1/4 cup coarsely chopped onion
2 tablespoons canned chipotle chiles in
adobo sauce*
1/2 to 1 tablespoon creamy horseradish
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
Combine cream cheese, mayonnaise, vegetable
juice, onion, chiles and sauce, horseradish, and
celery salt in blender or bowl of food processor.
Blend or pulse until almost smooth; cover and
refrigerate until ready to serve.
*Sriracha sauce (made from sun-ripened chiles)
may be substituted for canned chiles in adobo
sauce.

Madras Curry Dip
Makes about I 1/2 cups
This slightly sweet, golden sauce is ideal with
Alaska pollock cod, crab and scallops.
1 cup plain Greek-style yogurt
3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
(about 1 lime)
1 tablespoon curry powder
2 to 3 tablespoons mango chutney
1 teaspoon minced garlic
2 to 3 tablespoons fresh chopped
cilantro
1 green onion, sliced
1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce, or to taste
Whisk yogurt, lime juice and curry powder
together in small bowl. Stir in chutney, garlic,
cilantro, green onion and hot sauce until blended.
Cover and refrigerate until, ready to serve.


* ~Z1*~.~JOi'~ ~ ~ ~ ~ /~ .~,5~,f~ ~ A ~sss~ ca ~ ~ \ .w~ '~.' *~'~ '..s~ ~


~d~


:'l~,~~bGYi~(-~l~orsun~716a~i~







C10 I Santa Rosa Pres e


Whitinz


October 22, 2008


% I CI I\Va 1 1-


Eating We


FAMILY FEATURES



your life? If you're one of the nearly
75 million Americans who have
diabetes or pre-diabetes, it can.
According to the Centers for Disease Control
(CDC) diabetes is a group of diseases marked
by high levels of blood glucose resulting from
the body not producing or properly using
insulin, a hormone that converts sugar,
starches and other food into energy needed
for daily life. The good news is that diabetes
can be managed with diet, exercise and
medication (if needed). Some easy-to-
follow meal planning tips include:
* Veg Out: Choose from the rainbow of
colors available to maximize vegetable
variety.
* Fiber Up: Look for foods that are
fiber-rich, such as oatmeal, fruit and
fiber-enriched pasta.
* Eat Lean: Choose skinless turkey or
chicken breast, fish and lean cuts of
meat (identified by "loin" or "round").
a Drink Free: Drink water and calorie-
free beverages instead of those
sweetened with sugar.
* Be Consistent: Three meals with an
occasional healthy snack help keep
blood glucose regulated and prevent
overeating.
"Keeping blood glucose levels as close to
normal as possible is the main goal for people
with diabetes. And food choices certainly play
a significant role in that," said Tami Ross, RD,
LD, CDE and 2008 Diabetes Care and Education
Diabetes Educator of the Year. "The good news
is that there are now more food products on the
market than ever before to help people with
diabetes in their quest to maintain blood glucose
levels without sacrificing taste."
One such product is Dreamfields pasta,
which has twice the fiber, fewer
digestible carbohydrates and a 65
percent lower glycemic index than
traditional pasta. Its delicious taste
and nutritional benefits make it a
fla'rfi.il noriishinr padsa that's 1-
good for the entire family#-,
To create a healthful eating plan
for your individual needs, consult
with a qualified health care profes-
sional such as a registered dietitian
or certified diabetes educator. For
more information on diabetes visit
www.diabetes.org. For delicious r'? '1
pasta recipes, visit
www.dreamfieldsfoods.com.



No-Boil Lasagna
Preparation Time: 30 minutes ['
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Standing Time: 15 minutes
Makes 8 main dish servings
1 pound 90% lean
ground beef
2 cups sliced mushrooms
1/2 cup chopped onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 jar (26 ounces) __
no-fat-added marinara
sauce
1 can (14.5 ounces) diced
tomatoes with basil, Nle\ican Spaghetti Pie
garlic and oregano, undrained
1/4 cup water Prepiiin c iu
1 container (15 ounces) no-fat ricotta i'I"'. Timei -2' InuiiiiIC
cheese Simiding Time 5 iiniinuire
1/4 cup egg substitute OR 1 egg, beaten la 4 Iijli JOii 'fl,'
1/2 teaspoon salt (optional) 8 uunrc. uncooked Dr
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper Spaelimkrti
10 uncooked Dreamfields lasagna I lableipoon canola oi
noodles 14 cup rgg substitute C
1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese 1 2 pound 9Q)" lean gr
1 1/2 cups shredded part-skim mozzarella or ground turkey I
cheese 1:2 cup chopped reen I
1. Preheat oven to 3750F. Heat large skillet I cup prepared a.liaI
over medium heat. Brown ground beef until I cuP Iroten hllehe k
no longer pink, about 7 minutes, stirring to Nonlsick cooking ip
break up beef; drain. Add mushrooms, onion I'. cup %lircdded reduce
and garlic; cook 3 minutes, stirring occasion- lt'rew
ally. Stir in marinara sauce, diced tomatoes (liri rl tomraton, cu
and water; simmer, uncovered, 10 minutes. Fresh cilaniro' opti
2. In medium bowl stir together ricotta, egg I PrIdi.i ,-n 1. ..0 F Coil
substitute, salt and pepper. .lL.:idig n pji.i.g dire.
3. In deep (12 x 10 x 2 1/2-inch) lasagna pan, P[eruri 1 ..min p.i ii'.
or baking dish, spread 2 1/2 cups meat .'g -iih.rule
sauce. Place 4 noodles lengthwise and one 2 kdiiiiilc. ILI iiidiui f
noodle crosswise (break to fit) in a single iediumrn h.rd Brion ruru
layer, pressing noodles lightly. Spread half I;lpp r unril kct ib r.. I n
of ricotta mixture over noodles. Sprinkle perpir is ndr, ailingg i
with 1/4 cup Parmnnesan and 1/2 cup mozza- i.ii Sih in 'Il.i .niit cuill
rella. Spread 2 1/2 cups meat sauce over 1 Liic,,, ii.mI Jteep dili pil
cheese. Layer remaining noodles, ricotta itrni', tl'...s sp.glhii.t mi ti
mixture and Parmesan. Spread with remain- and up sid tc ui piL pidic. I
ing meat sauce. mixture.
4. Cover with aluminum foil. Bake at 3750F 4. Bake in 350F oven 25 to
for 40 minutes. Uncover; sprinkle with until hIeated through. Top
remaining mozzarella. Continue baking stand 5 to 10 minutes. Scr
10 minutes. Let stand 15 minutes, tomatoes and cilantro, if d
Nutrition information per serving (1/8 of Nutrition information per s
recipe): 405 calories, 31 g protein, 22 g digest- recipe): 414 calories, 27 g pr
ible carbohydrates*, 11 g total fat, 5 g satu- ible carbohydrates*, 13 g tot;
rated fat, 49 mg cholesterol, 855 mg sodium, rated fat, 44 mg cholesterol,
6 g total dietary fiber 7 g total dietary fiber
*If traditional pasta is used in this recipe there *If traditional pasta is used ii
are a total of 44 g carbohydrates, are a total of 56 g carbohydnr


With Diabetes


Nearly 6 million people
don't know they have
diabetes.


Symptoms include:
1" Excessivethitst ''
S* Extreme hunger
a Frequent urination
Unplanned weight loss
Increased fatigue
Initability
Blurry vision


If you feel you are at risk, see your doctor
right away.

Types of diabetes
Type 1 diabetes
The body fails to produce insulin. the
hormone that "unlocks" the cells of the
body, allowing glucose to enter and
fuel them.
Type 2 diabetes
This results from the bod 's inability
to properly use insulin, combined with
relative insulin deficiency. Some can
control type 2 diabetes with diet, weight-
loss and exercise. Others take one or
more medications, including insulin.
Pre-diabetes
Blood glucose levels are higher than normal
but not high enough for a diagnosis of
diabetes


reamfirlds

ili
)R I egg. beaten
found beefl
breast
bell pepprr

ernel corn
ray
rd-lat Cheddar

ri up ioptioiali
onall

irji. drain
i li oil Sit in

,1ilie Ir .:, Ir
nd boe ind hell
)g r pink aand
brejk uip beel.

pl1 i % i ih ool.irig
wirc o,,r hronom
up witLlh i

30 minutes or
vith cheese. Let
ve with cherry
desired.
serving (1/4 of
otein, 19 g digest-
il fat, 4 g satu-
583 mg sodium,

n this recipe there
ites.


Garlic-Cream Penne
and Chicken
Preparation Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Makes 4 main dish servings
4 medium skinless, boneless chicken
breast halves (about 1 pound
total)
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
8 ounces (about 2 cups) uncooked
Dreamfields Penne Rigate
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 large zucchini (10 to 12 ounces),
halved lengthwise and sliced
2 cups sliced mushrooms
2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup reduced-sodium chicken
broth
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1/2 of 8-ounce tub fat-free cream cheese
1/4 cup dried tomatoes (not packed in
oil), chopped
1 to 2 tablespoons snipped fresh
parsley
2 tablespoons shredded Parmesan
cheese (optional)
1,. Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper. Grill
chicken on rack of uncovered grill over.
medium heat 12 to 15 minutes until chicken
is no longer pink (1700F), turning once.
2. Cook pasta according to package directions;,-
drain. Return to pan; cover and keep warm,
3. Meanwhile, heat oil in large skillet over
medium heat. Cook zucchini, mushrooms
and garlic 5 minutes or until vegetables are
crisp-tender, stirring occasionally. Add to
pasta.
4. In small bowl whisk together broth and flour.
Add to warm skillet with cream cheese.
Whisk until smooth and bubbly. Cook and
stir I minute. Stir in tomatoes. Add pasta
to pan; toss to coat. Divide pasta mixture
among four plates, Cut chicken into thin
slices; arrange over pasta. Sprinkle with -
parsley and Parmesan cheese, if desired.
Note: Chicken can be broiled instead of
grilled.',
Nutrition information per serving (1/4 of
recipe): 425 calories, 43 g protein, 14 g digest-
ible carbohydrates*, 8 g total fat, 2 g saturated
fat, 77 mg cholesterol, 620 mg sodium,
7 g total dietary fiber
*If traditional pasta is used in this recipe there.
are a total of 51 g carbohydrates.


~.~~'~r.':R~"r*~E~F~p~~-~


ig;
I.i.
I


~L~~~1
I.;r~.n ~1~I.
''~ '


..., 1. -, Jt- i-.r 1 .14 1*~ '.' ~ '





October 22, 2008 Whitin2 Santa Rosa Press Gazette I C 1 1


I l


6I 1


LIKE NEW 2008
DODGE CALIBER SXT


$0
Certified
Price:


2008 DODGE
RAM SLT CAB 4X4
Auto, Power Sun Roof, Tow
Pka.. Flex Fuel! #4108044


40,525 $21

2008 DODGE
GRAND CARAVAN SXT
Leather, Sunroof, Sirius Satellite 0
Radio, Loaded! #3408003 Aw


'00 DODGE RAM 1500 591
V8, Auto, Trailer Tow!................................. 5,91 2
'01 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SPORT ,
Quad Seats, 54K Miles!............................. $7,994
'01 DODGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB
Looks Great!........................... .................. $8 6 7 3
'03 DODGE CARAVAN SXT
Quad Seats, Full Power, 51 K Miles!........... $8,927
'03 VOLVO S60
4 door, Auto! ............................................. 7,8 37i
'06 DODGE NEON SXT
CERTIFIED, Auto, New Tires, 35K Miles! ... $9,833
'04 CHEVY MALIBU LT
Auto, 6 Cyl., Pwr Winds, Only 24K Miles!....... $9,995
'08 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER 4
Auto, 13K Miles! SAVE GASI.. ......12,985
'03 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR
V8, Auto, Leather, 35K Miles .................13,971
'06 FORD FUSION SE
V6, Sharp, 23K Miles!............................. 14,205
'05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Auto, V6, 27K Miles, Must See!........... $14,785
'06 DODGE CHARGER 3.5L SE
New Tires, 40K Miles............................. 14 ,9
'07 MAZDA 3 4 DOOR I 1.5 732
Auto, 4 Cyl., Sharp! .. ....................... ,


NEW 2008 JEEP
WRANGLER UNUMITED SAHARA
3 Piece Hard Top, Dual Top,
MUST SEE! #5108005


S


30


2008 CHRYSLER
PACIFICA TOURING
Auto, Leather Trimmed Seats,
Infinity Surround Sound! #8008001


'06 BUICK RENDEZVOUS CXL 2
Leather, 3rd Seat, Sunroof! ............................... $15 ,912
'06 JEEP WRANGLER X 4
Auto, 4x4, RWL Tires, 11UK Miles! ........... 16,714
'08 DODGE MAGNUM SXT
Full Power, 11K Miles! ............................. 16,954
'06 DODGE DURANGO 4X4 LIMITED 6,4 57
Leather! ........................................... 16 9 5 7
'07 HONDA ACCORD SE $
Auto, V6, Gas Saver! ........................... 17,993
'06 JEEP UNLIMITED SOFT TOP $48,905
M ust See!..............................................
'08 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVT. 1 o 908
CERTIFIED, touring Edition, Fun! ........... "1,908
'06 FORD MUSTANG GT
Auto, Leather! ....................................... $19,873
'08 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT .
Stow-n-Go, Like New! ............................ $19,986
'07 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING 1 806
Leather, 15K Miles!.................................. 18,806
'07 DODGE CHARGER RT n
CERTIFIED, Leather, Roof, 20K Miles!.....U20,961
'05 DODGE RAM SRT-10
CERTIFIED, Quad, Auto! ........................ $24,935
WITH MANY MORE TO CHOOSE!


oit] li1


* r


Santa Rosa Press Gazette | CI 1


g nitilif\


October 22, 2008


WAS34315
3413151


IL


Il


i,


I~rl =I
rr r~~


k, .;,. + t 1 in .V.I. ; l-. i. ,.'1 .;i---.> -.-.*;H -.I-4. -..--". -'.. i, .. -. *


29,1


~S~ilS




Cl 2 I Santa Rosa Press Gazette


October 22, 2008


WhitinE


II


1I


NEW 2008 DODGE
CHARGER
Autt, AM F-MA,'CD,
MuSt S 4560800
MBBPI82SM ~~ rn~~~=3


NEW 2008 JEEP
GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo, Auto. '3 71V6 Nickl/-
Equipped! I49Q8OG3
MPSRP'.:30dSQ


RT iTl


^ISBBO,

teSB"18,890
Military E


C-


NEW 2008 JEEP
WRANGLER RUBICON
4/4,k Au to s 6 D l6 I f JVU
M*iP 3 Radil, #858'J 2
MORP! UsfdRSs S


I 'l1
RNt


Military
Prioea'


6872


Mlitary"p
I -0-AF

NEW 2008 CHRYSLER
300 TOURING
3 G H O V, Leather -Ttrrrisi'.
Bucket eatsl #2818004
MSURP: '3 710
win4
AT a/


Military'
Prioe:


0,480


a mlM


982


41 tlJ


' LIKE NEW 2008
DODGE AVENGER SE
'\UL.\ fbli|6b ''-j .'e Li 3'^ f1IP Il


Certeife Price
Starting at


r LIKE NEW 2007
CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LX
Must see l A


Certified Price
Starting at,


5,908A


51837


'00 DODGE RAM 1500
, Autlore T lowi $5,912
'01 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SPORT
OrUd UbFlS. Y Mlli $7,994
'01 DODGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB
LCookerali $8,673
'03 DODGE CARAVAN SXT
OuaJ &et, Full Pru we, G1c M Ise' $8,927
'03 VOLVO S60
4 looi, Auoi $7,837
'06 DODGE NEON SXT
CeTIFIED, Au Tire 'K H* Tlrs $9,833
'04 CHEVY MALIBU LT
Aulo 6$ 0., Pwr Windst, Only 24Y MilWi $9,995
'00 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
Auto, 1 Y MJIY SAVE GAS! $12,985
'03 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR
VS. Aulo, Lealthfi.i SY Miles' $13,971
'06 FORD FUSION SE
VI iarp1. 'KMilesl $14,205
'05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
aulo' '.^ Y riesiteMiust Sel! $14,785
106 DODGE CHARGER 3.5L SE
leiw Tire., 4(r (.1iles $14,913
'07 MAZDA 3 4 DOOR I
Auto, 4 .rl.p!. $5.... .$15,732


'00 BUICK RENDEZVOUS CXL
Lealt,'S. '/J se! w.uw ..
106 JEEP WRANGLER X
ki,1) 4/4. PVL Tye I1Y I3lHeJ
'08 DODGE MAGNUM SXT
FUm mPowI 1 fMW.
'06 DODGE DURANGO 4X4 UNITED
'07 HONDA ACCORD SE
julo Av, cs 41',ls
'06 JEEP UNLIMITED SOFT TOP
'OS CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVT.
CERTIFD iu'ing &ioi, Fur,'
'06 FORD MUSTANG GT
A4ul), LesIer.
'08 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT
,'-low0yv ii-4 e fleyv'
'07 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING
Lesulte V 1'Ate .)
'07 DODGE CHARGER RT
.0BRllFIDG LEstR i, A ot, 2C' (Aie'0
'O5 DODGE RAM SRT-10
cERTIFOI.'1, j'uJ Aut!'


WITH MANY MORE TO CHOOSE!


ll


eIll


*I


- -*4'- '* ..,. ,.~. .... i.,~ -A..-.p ,x~~r :tt.a ~-4t~ .3J a d' lFIY.


'a
Wi


"Ji


$15,912
$16,714
$16,954
$16,957
.$17,993
$18,905
$18,908
$19,873
.$19,986
$18,806
$20,961
$24,935


I :_I


WA ~. __...~


,~F~6~R~PB"P~rP~13


.~i~p~l*Piplil~'~~tUrLBll~'h~~lSr~LY1M


;nu


a1




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs