Group Title: Santa Rosa press gazette
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00193
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate Title: Milton press gazette
Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Santa Rosa press gazette
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Milton Newspapers
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Publication Date: November 8, 2006
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028408
Volume ID: VID00193
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKH2012
oclc - 33399204
alephbibnum - 001994926
lccn - sn 95047208
 Related Items
Preceded by: Milton press gazette

Full Text







(SanLta Qosa's Press


Mnr TAn-QcrTl0ON TRIBUTE
p .-: .... ,- ',.-. ... o the M military
S[RSTY O L E this edition!
PO BOI LLE L3 1-700-00
GATINESV ILLE FL 32611-700"


City yanks Main Street funds


Mayor says group's duties will be absorbed, there will be no second chance


By PAMELA HOLT
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Even after receiving five
awards from a Main Street
Conference in Fort Pierce,
Florida, Main Street Milton left
the City Council Executive


Meeting Monday night without
its yearly funding of $18,000.
According to the City Council,
it will be absorbed into the
Downtown Redevelopment
Trust Fund.
Main Street Milton's Board
President and Design and


Organization Committees
member, Vernon Compton,
stood before the City Council
and told of the "countless
hours" his volunteers have
spent working on the better-
ment of downtown-a total of
1,300 hours-and pledged to


work together with the City and
put differences aside.
Chris Wilcox, TEAM Santa
Rosa's business manager, who's
"brand new" to the Main Street
Board, says he was immediate-'
ly aware of an "incredible
amount of volunteers"-civic


minded people who care about
their downtown area. He says
the $18,000 investment brings a
-"good return" for downtown
Milton.
Former mayoral candidate
Tom Scott saNs working togeth-
er is going to bring differences.


He says people who work eight
to 12 hours per day and still
volunteer for functions after
hours will do whatever it takes
to bring people to the down-
town area. He encouraged the
Council to continue to fund
See FUNDING, Page 3A.


Lightning starts Pace


house fire Monday


T ji T t' P


.~ I


Turning Five Pointsint Three Points


Turning Five Points into Three Points


I $50-million project
would take about three
years to finish.

By LYNNE HOUGH
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Three years and $50 million dol-
lars; That's what it will take to turn
Five-Points in Pace into "Three-
Points."
County commissioners heard a


. recommendation Monday morning
from Tinrdjle-Oliver & Associates,
Inc., the planning and erngneenng firm
.-overseeing the Five-Points intersec-
tion review at Woodbine Road.
Closing off the current route for
Berryhill and Quintette Roads and
turning each into a cul-de-sac is part of
the plan. Both roadways would be
moved north of Five-Points and joined
at a new location, where a traffic light
would be added.
Two more traffic signals are being


suggested: one north of the Berryhill-
Quintette reAlijnmenl i iur-,,a inltcr-
section; and -'ne .i Tuninel aiid
Gardenview. In addition, tratfic
"calming" devices
are planned for
Ashmore and Cross
Roads subdivisions
to discourage driv-
ers from cutting
through.
See PLAN,
Page 5A


By LYNNE HOUGH
Press Gazette Staff Writer
A house burned during a severe
thunderstorm in Pace Monday night as
firefighters dealt with an out-of-service
hydrant and reports someone was
trapped inside the home.
The call went out shortly before
8:30 p.m. of a house on fire on Royal
Pine Drive-just off East Spencer
Field Road.
Residents at the scene were unsure
where a missing family member was
during the blaze. At 9:32 p.m., E911
dispatchers asked firefighters at the
scene to confirm "enrtrapnment" in the
house, but they were unable to confirm
or deny smnonic-one \as inside.
While hirefighiers worked to deter-
mine ift" someone \ as still inside, it was
dico ercd tihe nearesi fire hydrant did
not work. E911 dispatchers .dxisedJ


firefighters the location of the nearest
hydrant.
A short time later, it was reported
no one was in the house.
TIP volunteers were called out by
firefighters while they worked the fully
engulfed home.
Rural Metro Ambulance para-
medics transported one patient from
the scene.
Pace and Avalon Volunteer Fire
Departments, along with Ferry Pass
from Pensacola, responded to the
scene, according to E911 officials.
Firefighters announced the fire was
out at 11 p.m.
,Gulf Power responded to shut
down electricity to the house. The State
'Fire Marshal's Office was called to the
>Cene 10 it eStii' ae. ; '
Story written by Lviit'e Hough.
Reach her at:
.** ... i:u *:/'*l r(( p' .g.i/'^.<. (' .


An empty structure carcass is about all that was left of this Royal Pine Drive home off East Spencer Field
Monday night. Lightning from a severe thunderstorm is suspected to have caused the blaze.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin



Expect 1-10 lane closures


.

Youngsters took time from chomping tasty sausage to enjoy a little "clowning around" during 'last week-
end's Bratwurst Festival in Pace. The first-ever event of its kind for the Pace Area Chamber of Commerce
offered a host of family events and food.
Press Gazette photo by Lynne Hough


Florida Department of
Transportation officials say the
left lane on the westbound 1-10
bridge will be closed. from 6
p.m. to 6 a.m.-intermittent-
ly-through mid-November.
The closure is due to con-
tinuing concrete work for the
new I-10 bridge over Escambia
Bay. The work will take place
"as weather permits."
Motorists should expect delays
and are asked to use caution and
obey regulatory signs in the
work zone.
FDOT notes, generally,
construction crews utilize the
right shoulder of the existing
eastbound bridge to pour con-


create for the new structure.
However, when the work reach-
es the area across from the steel


grate Acrow bridge panels, that
becomes impossible. Due to
See DELAYS, Page 5A.


Veterans Day parade set


The Santa Rosa County
Veteran's Day Parade will be
held Saturday.
Organizers say the parade
will start on Elva Street (behind
Regions Bank), proceed East to
Stewart Street and then North to
Raymond Hobbs Street and,
finally, West to the Milton High
School football field.
The parade and ceremonies
will honor veterans from the


wars in Bosnia, Afghanistan,
Kuwait, and Iraq. Veterans who
served- in those areas will be
able to ride on a float provided
for them or march in the parade
just behind the float for those
veterans.
The ceremony in the foot-
ball field will start at 11 a.m.
Wreath laying ceremony at
the Santa Rosa Veterans
Memorial Plaza to follow.


^^" '__ The Press
Gazette is
printed on
100%recy-
,, cled paper
S ;'i using envi-

ronmentally-friendly soy-based
ink.


AOFA, PRINTED WITHIN
SOYINK.




I n I
72000 125B5
121H


New 'workforce housing' project up for review


By PAMELA HOLT
Press Gazette Staff Writer
A new workforce housing
project is in review with the
Milton City Council.
Property, located between
Lambert and Long Streets;
Highway 90 and Glover Lane-
located behind Anderson's
Equipment-has been
approved for annexation into
the City.
City Manager, Donna
Adams says preliminary draw-
ings show new commercial
developments along Glover


Lane; an assisted living devel-
opment with 48 units and 48
independent living units; 31 lots
for single resident homes; an
apartment complex with 96
units; and 14 units for patio
town homes.
The wetlands within this
proposed project will remain
pristine, officials say.
"Twenty-six acres are to be
improved," says Adams. She
explains there's a possibility for
three new roads and water and
sewer will be available for the
proposed project.
"It is important to note,


annexation isn't the only thing
that has to happen," says
Adams, "we have to amend our
future land use map and our
comprehensive plan to bring the
area into the City."
However, Adams says she
is excited about the annexation
and the plans for the workforce-
housing plan.
"It's taking an area and
revitalizing it-it can be the
beginning of more areas being
improved and made into work-
force housing. The location is
good for that.
"With Pinnacle Group, the


location .:. .
was the -' S -
problem.
This area
already *
needs an
upgrade. -
If Pin-
n ac le e
chose this
area, it
would've DONNA ADAMS
g o n e Milton City Manager
with a
snap,
says Adams. She emphasizes
the importance of workforce


housing.
The preliminary drawings
created by Prescott Architects
of Destin show a development
with structures of town homes
reminiscent of Watercolor and
Seaside in Walton County.
Milton City Councilman
Buddy Jordan says, from all
indications, this project will fit
the City.
Affordable housing has
been listed as a much-needed
item in the Santa Rosa area.
Story written by Pamela
Holt. Reach her at:
holt@sr-pg.com


1, A it s owU


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850-554-0626
FARMS 850-675-1543
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Oct. 16 till Oct. 22, 2006
Gillman, Paul Dewayne;
Male; 44; 5796 Hosea Gillman
Rd., Jay, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 11/17/06
Huggs, Brandon Loyd;
Male; 22; 7234 Dogwood
Terrace, Pensacola, FL;
Fugitive From Justice. 10/17/06
Marko, Stephen Michael;
Male; 55; 8931 Manassas Rd,
Milton, FL; Failure to Appear
for Felony Offense. 10/17/06
Stewart, Ryan Michelle;
Female; 28; 5509 Kim Drive,
Milton, FL; Fraud-Utter False
Bank Bill Note Check Draft.
10/17/06
Baxley, Rhonda Michelle;
Female; 42; 2289 Chaparel St.,
Navarre, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/17/06
Warren, David L; Male;
54; 200 Thistlewood Drive,
Franklin, KY; DUI Alcohol or
Drugs 2nd Offense. 10/16/06
Keller, Brian James; Male;
17; 6430 Howard Ave., Milton,
FL; Drugs-Possess Control
Substance W/O Prescription.
10/16/06
Mayfield, Sarah Elizabeth;
Female; 17; 2280 Prytania
Circle, Navarre, FL; Vehicular
Theft-Grand 3rd Degree.
10/16/06
Schroth, Karin Marjorie;
Female; 28; 4140 Pace Lane,
Pace, FL; Probation Violation-


Felony. 10/16/06
White, Thomas Colby
Hembree; Male; 18; 3951
Harbors Port Street, Pace, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony.
10/16/06
Church, Christopher R.;
Male; 14; 8364 Miranda St.,
Navarre, FL; Crim Misch-Over
$1,000, Burglary-Of
Unoccupied Dwelling,
Unarmed, Trespassing-
Construction Site. 10/17/06
Ramsey, Justin Tyler;
Male; 13; Crim Misch-Over
$1,000, Burgl of Unoccupied
Dwelling, Unarmed,
Trespassing-Construction Site.
10/17/06
Wentz, Brandon Joel;
Male; 13; 8364 Miranda St.,
Navarre, FL; Crim Misch-Over
$1,000, Burgl of Unoccupied
Dwelling, Unarmed,
Trespassing-Construction Site.
10/17/06
Hughes, Joshua Marcus;
Male; 22; 6097 Cambridge
Way, Pace, FL; DUI. 10/19/06
Robins, Helen Kostevicki;
Female; 55; 810 Ariola Dr.,
Milton, FL; DUI and Damage
Property. 10/19/06
Bonckowski, Matthew
Aaron; Male; 24; 6954 Chipley
St., Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/19/06
Ehling, Charles Arnold;
Male; 59; 3163 Benton Blvd.,


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Your Hometowwn Aavantage.',


Pace, FL; Larc-Theft is $300 or
More But Less Than $5,000 (2
cts.). 10/19/06
Lawson, Ernest William;
Male; 47; 3162 Canopy Dr.,
Milton, FL; Lewd Lasc
Behavior-Molest Victim Less
12 YOA Offender 16 YOA or
Older (4 cts.), Contrib Delinq
Minor-Cause to Become Delinq
Dependent Needy (2 cts.).
10/19/06
Carr, Kelly Blake; Male;
31; 5755 Central School Rd.,
Milton, FL Drive While
License Susp 1st Offense,
Possess Cocaine. 10/19/06
Williams, II, Oratius
Elgebra; Male; 32; 7516 St.
Joseph, Milton, FL; Flee/Elude
Police-Fail to Obey LEO Order
to Stop, Drive While Lic
Suspended, Resist Officer-
Obstruct W/O Violence,
Possess Cocaine, Narcotic
Equip-Possess And Or Use.
10/19/06
Agerton, Susannie
Yvonne; Female; 13; 4248
Scooter Ln, Milton, FL; Crimes
Against Person-Abuse Elderly
or Disabled Adult W/O Great
Harm. 10/19/06
Avant. Stevie Lynn; Male;
42; 11310 Hwy. 22 East, New
Site, AL; Vehicular Theft-
Grand 3rd Degree. 10/22/06
Bates, Ernest Albert; Male;
60; 160 The Trails, Brewton,
AL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 10/20/06
SBoykin, Herbert Edward;
Male; 44; 7870 Amber Ridge
Rd, Pensacola, FL; Failure to
Appear for Felony Offense.
10/22/06
Girdler, David J; Male; 31;
2323 Frontera St., Navarre, FL;
Lewd Lascv Behavior-Victim
12 YOA Up To 16 YOA
Offender 18 YOA (3 cts.)
Gore. Michael Lee; Male;
24; 1981 Truman Dr., Navarre,
FL; Probation Violation-Felony.
10/22/06
Harrell Jr., Henry
Thomas; Male; 41; 5772
Loggerhead Ln, Milton, FL;
Battery-Touch or Strike
(domestic violence),
Obstructing Justice-Intimidate,
Threaten Etc. Vict Witness
Informant. 10/20/06
Jackson, Bruce E; Male;
48; 1868 Fuller Dr., Gulf
Breeze, FL; Possess Cocaine,


Narcotic Equip Possess and Or
Use (4 cts.) 10/21/06
Peterson. Jimmie Randall;
Male; 35; 6485 Wilmar Ave.
Milton FL; Fugitive from.
Justice. 10/21/06
Petitt, Chasity Alexis;
Female; 24; 9160 Loomis St.,,.
Pensacola, FL; Fraud-Poss,
Display Blank Forged Stolen
Dr Lic or ID (5 cts.), Synth,
Narcotic Purchase over 10
Grams Sched I, Possess
Cocaine. 10/20/06
Simmons. Sr, Bobby Joe;
Male; 52; 12715 Scenic Lake:'
Dr, Jay, FL Failure To Appear
for Felony Offense. 10/21/06 .
Elliott, Rodney Milton;'
Male; 40; 8771 John Hamm Rd,,
Milton, FL; Explosives-Using
Project Etc Att Destruct Dvc.'
W/Intent Bodily Harm (2 cts.),
Weapon Offense-Missile Into '
Dwelling Veh Bldg or Aircraft',
(2 cts.), Arson-1st Degree
Dwelling Bldg People Present,.'
Incendiary Device Using .
Posses Mfg Etc W/Intent.
Firebomb. NDG ,
Pooley, Melanie Marie;.
Female; 30; 5917 Hwy, 90,
Milton, FL; Explosives-Using
Project Etc Att Destruct Dvc
W/Intent Bodily Harm (2 cts.),
Weapon Offense-Missile Into
Dwelling Veh Bldg or Aircraft
(2 cts.), Arson-1st Degree.
Dwelling Bldg People Present,.
Incendiary Device Using
Posses Mfg Etc W/Intent
Firebomb. NDG

City groups

set meetings

The City of Milton Parks
and Recreation Committee will
meet Monday, November 27 at
8:30 a.m. in Conference Room
B of City Hall, 6738 Dixon
Street.
Later that day, at 2 p.m., the
Milton Benevolent Cemetery
Board will gather in the same
room of the same building.
All Milton committee-
meetings are open to the public
unless otherwise noted.
For more information on.
either of these meetings, call
the City Manager's office, at-
983-5411.


Wednesday November 8, 200V'


Pane 2-A


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette






,,i... .. W, 20_heSnt Rs Pes aztt


Local


Funding
Continued From Page One.
Main Street.
Other Main Street Board
members, and fellow downtown
residents and business owners,
came to share the need and the
good of the organization, but to
no avail.
Gale Thames, former Main
Street Board member-and
current chair of the new City
Economic Development
Committee-said she felt polit-
ical moves by board members
in a non-profit organization
were jeopardizing I.R.S. stand-
ing.
Thames says, as a non-prof-
it group, Main Street cannot
take part in political activities.
She says she was "very disap-
pointed" when the Main Street
Group had two sitting board
members running for political
office. this year. Thames was
referring to Mac Thetford's run
for City Council and Scott's bid
for the seat of Milton Mayor.
She explained although
they had the right to run for
office, "it would have been
more appropriate had they
stepped down.
"Revitalization can be done
by partnership. But there has
been a violation of rules. A
state organization does not
sanction...political activity."
Meanwhile, Compton says
Main Street members were
aware of the need to keep Main
Street functions separate from
politics.
Compton admitted the
group hasn't "done everything
right, but we're a young organi-
zation and we're learning from
our mistakes."
He says he learned, at the
recent Main Street conference,
it was wrong for board mem-
bers to remain seated in the
organization while running for
political office.
"It was recommended, by
the Florida Main Street organi-
zation, to indeed, step down,"
says Compton.
Milton Mayor Guy
Thompson says he's leery of
trusting the Main Street organi-
zation.
"Four years ago," says


Thompson, "political moves
were made from within the
membership of Main Street.
Vernon Compton asked me to
'wipe the slate clean' and we
did. Here we are again, four
years later, and the same thing
happened. As the saying goes,
fool me once, shame on you.
Fool me twice, shame on me.
"It's coming from the heart.
I have no hidden agenda-it's
out front. My recommendation
tonight sticks. The Council has
to make .up its own mind, but
the City will work with any
organization for the betterment
of the people."
In a unanimous decision,
City Council members withheld
funding from Main Street


Milton.
Compton says he will move
forward with the City of
Milton. The Main Street organ-
izatiori will continue to work
with the city and follow the,
plan.
"Individual projects will
not revitalize downtown
Milton. We need to work
together and we'll extend the
hand-but, it's a two way
street," says Compton, "We
want to put aside differences
and we'll need to win trust
back. We really want to do that
and the City does, too."
Story written by Pamela
Holt. Reach her at:
holt@sr-pg.com


Main Street racks up awards


By PAMELA HOLT
Press Gazette Staff Writer
After returning from the
Florida Main 'Street Annual
Conference in Fort Pierce,
Florida, Vernon Compton and
the members of Main Street
Milton brought home five
awards.
"The one I'm most proud
of," says Compton, "is
Outstanding Private-Public
Partnership."
The Partnership award was
given to Main Street Milton, as
described by the conference
brochure, for joint efforts
between Main Street, the City
of Milton, and the Santa Rosa
Clean Community System.
That partnership dealt with
clean up after Hurricane Ivan.
The program turned to the
Florida Division of Forestry for
help and, this year, a $110,764
Urban and Community Forestry
Grant was awarded to a tree
giveaway program for down-
town property owners.
Main Street was also
awarded merit awards for:
Outstanding Sign/Display
Project, Outstanding Image
Campaign or Promotional
Material, Outstanding Business
for the Mainstreet Caf6.
.Compton was .awarded
Outstanding Local Florida


Main Street Program Supporter.
Story written by Pamela
Holt. Reach her at:
holt@sr-pg.com


Gem Lore
by William EE Cobb
Past President Florida Jewelers
Spokesman for Jewelers of America
Diamonds: In Fabulous
Color
Would you believe that diamonds
come in every color of the rainbow,
from the most gorgeous pinks to
the fabulous blues as well as the
yellows, oranges, browhs, green,
and many more in between!
Skeptical? You can see some of
these for yourself. Some of the
most famous diamonds of the
world are colored diamonds. The
Smithsonian Institute houses the:
world famous Hope Diamond
which is a breathtaking blue.
Tiffany & Co., jewelers located at
57h' Street and 5" Avenue in New
York has on display the magnifi-
cent Tiffany Diamond, 127,5 carats
in a cushion shape and a canary
yellow color, which combined with
its remarkable brilliance makes it
look like bottled sunlight. There
are, of course, many smaller and
much less famous colored dia-
monds. In fact, there are very few
absolutely colorless diamonds (to a
color testing instrument), although
almost all diamonds sold in stores
look colorless to a jeweler's eye as
well as to the customer's eye. Why
not dare to be different? Make life
more interesting! Try a green or
blue or canary yellow diamond.


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The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Pa8e 3-A


SIn


Wadnesdav November 8. 2006


.-2
1 ooo







PAGE 4A




Evaluate teachers

as we would do

with employees
In successful private business, management
gauges its employees on their performance, quali-
ty of work and, just as important, their ability to
improve their specific skills.
Accomplished employees are rewarded in var-
ious ways including raises, bonuses and/or special
perks.
These incentives bring out the best in an
employee who is dedicated to his or her job and
they also contribute to the overall success of the
private business.
This performance-based formula clearly
shows an employer which employee is the most
dedicated, and which employee is an asset or lia-
bility to the private company or business.
Good employees welcome not only chal-
lenges, but also evaluation because they have a
clear picture of how management judges their per-
formance.
In most cases, those employees who are chal-
lenged and excel in their duties not only are fairly
compensated, but are also offered the opportunity
to advance.
With that said, it is difficult for us to under-
stand why government-paid educators are so
opposed to bonuses based on performance, which
is the formula the State is now using to evaluate its
teachers.
The Florida State Board of Education recently
approved the first performance pay linked to a pool
of a whopping $147.5 million of state tax dollars
for teacher merit bonuses.
According to the Special Teachers Are
Rewarded, or STAR program, the top 25 percent of
high-performing teachers would get a one-time,
five-percent bonus.
Some government-paid teachers are complain-
ing. They argue gauging teacher merit isn't easy.
To argue against the STAR program by saying
every teacher who comes to "work" every day is
"special" is, in no way, comparable to performance
evaluation.
And, the argument that singling out teachers
by student-learning standards is unfair is baseless.
Student achievement, at any level of the educa-
tional process, is an excellent way to judge a
teacher's performance.
In reality, just as in the private sector, there are
excellent performing teachers, good teachers,
mediocre teachers and bad teachers. "
In private business, excellent employees stand
above the rest in their performance. Good employ-
ees are appreciated, mediocre employees are toler-
ated and bad employees are fired.
The same should hold true for educators, but
the way the education system is set up, it is almost
impossible to fire a bad teacher and excellent
teachers are often not fully recognized for their
abilities.
Performance evaluation is a way to recognize
the best and also encourage other teachers to strive
to be better.
Overall, the students benefit the most and reap
the rewards of what their teachers can offer.
For that basic reason, we support the state's
STAR program and honestly believe most teachers
will appreciate what it has to offer for not only
themselves, but also their students.

NOVEMBER 8, 2006
G (Santa Dosa's Press

azette
VOL. 99, NO. 64
Serving Milton, Pace, Jay
Holley-Navarre, Gulf Breeze
& surrounding communities
Santa Rosa's Press Gazette (USPS 604-
360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays
and Saturdays for $28 per year (in county) by
Milton Newspapers, Inc., Michael Coulter,
Publisher. Periodicals postage paid at Milton,
Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to: Santa Rosa's-Press Gazette, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, Florida 32570.
Michael Coulter ... .President & Publisher
Jim Fletcher ........Assistant Publisher
Carol Barnes ......Business Manager
Lynne Hough .......Staff Writer
Pamela Holt........Staff Writer
Obie Crain, Jr. ......Special Projects Writer
Bill Gambln ......Sports Editor
Jim Martin ........Advertising Manager
Debbie Coon .......Advertising Exec.
Lori Dempsey ......Advertising Exec.
Toni Coberly .......Bookkeeper
Rosie Farhart .......Archives
Tracie Smelstoys ... .Circulation
................. Pet Page,
................ Classifieds
Kimberley Liberacki .Classifieds,
... ....... . ...Graphic Design
Freddy Coon .......Pressroom Foreman


Gaspar De La Paz .. .Darkroom Technician
Debra Wistner ...... Production Manager
Jean Schuler .......Graphic Designer
Cheryl Baker ....... Typesetting
Gaspar De La Paz .. .Post Press Leader
Bob Farmer, Debra Thomas, Brian Rinehart,
Cleve Hilliard, Josh Wilson
and Sheila Fifield .. .Post-Press
Advertising rates available on request.
Telephone all departments:
(850) 623-2120 623-3616
FAX 623-9308
email: news@sr-pg.com
6629 Elva St., Milton, Florida 32570
Don't Forget to Recycle Your Paper


~, ~::


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ow -. M


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V,1 j


Reader tires of Bush-bashing


FM: CHRYS HOLLEY
Dear Editor:
As children, we used to say, "Sticks and stones
may break ms bones, but names will never hurt me."
I admire our president who ignores all the Bush-
bashing. Personally, I'm sick and tired of it.
Shame on the media for negative reporting about
Iraq. I've heard testimonies from some of our military,
with tow and three tours of duty there-all serving
willingly. The media doesn't report the good things
going on or how much the Iraqis appreciate America.
Thank God for using America to .liberate an
oppressed people, tormented by Saddam-the great-
est weapon of mass destruction.
Why can't liberals and critics realize the war on
terror is a real war?
If we don't fight it abroad, we could be fighting it
over here. It would serve us right for having eyes that
can't see or don't want to see.
Shame on Mexico's Chavez for calling our presi-
dent "Satan."
Satan was at that, UN meeting in the form of"
Chavez and others. Thank God admission to the
Security Council rejected him as a member after at
least 45 ballots.
What better cause for America's withdrawal from
the UN? We foot most of the bill, therefore, we are
subjected to Chavez' rants-the pot calling the kettle
black, along with other UN members and enemies of
the United States.
No political part is America's salvation. Only God
is.
I'm for the present administration whose head, at
least, acknowledges and honors God.
May God bless you all as only He can.,

Loved the Milton Ghost Walk
FM: SHARON GLASS
Dear Editor:
I had the privilege of participating in the Santa
Rosa Historical Society's Annual Ghost of Milton
Walking Tour on October 28. I have been involved in
my own, family research for years and when I read
about this tour in your paper, it caught my interest.
Just before 6 p.m., my best friend and I arrived at
the Imogene Theatre where we purchased our tickets
and were cordially greeted. While we waited for the
tour to begin, we were able to enjoy the museum and
its artifacts.
Our tour started on time and, for the next 75 min-
utes, we walked the streets of downtown Milton and
met those from "Milton's past." I was delighted by
Mrs. Krentzman and Mrs. Read, two ladies who drove
their car into the river many years ago. The story was
funny and it is my understanding no one was hurt.
I was saddened by the story of the casket maker.
It told of the Yellow Fever epidemic and the number
of people who died in Milton.
The World War I soldier knew his stuff and told us
about the Milton Depot. The guns were loudduring a
Confederate. Salt Raid, but the narration was very
interesting.
I met Minnie Mae Mason at her daddy's house,
where she was still waiting for her daddy to come
home. I understand he never did.
On one of the streets, we met the Swamp
Angels-a group of young people who did some
cheering for us as they headed across the bridge to a
ballgame.
Nellie Ollinger, a beautiful bride in her wedding
gown, told us about her life from the steps of the.old
church.
I learned about Beard's Raid and how the
Confederate soldiers burned their own ships and wood
to keep it from the Yankee's hands.
I met Millard Caldwell on the steps of the old post
office. He was quite the politician and even ran for
Governor of Florida.
We heard Martha Beck tell her story from the
electric chair where she died for her part in murdering
many people. She was from Milton.
We saw what a tavern scene would have been like
back in the "wet days" and we were served apple
juice.
Last, but not least, our walk ended at the Imogene
Theatre with cookie, punch, peanuts and bluegrass
music by White Sands and the Panhandle Band.
All of this for $10.
What a nice evening and I learned things about
Milton's history I never knew. If you missed "Ghosts
of Milton's Past" this year, mark your calendars for
next October and bring the whole family.
It is fun, clean and very educating. I would sug-
gest bringing a flashlight-it is a dark walk in some
places.
Thanks again, Santa Rosa Historical Society,
Imogene Theatre and volunteers for such a unique


way of telling the story of Milton's past.

Without money, they can't win
FM: LINDSAY MAYER
Dear Editor:
Three-term Sen, Joe Lieberman finds himself as a
third-party candidate in Connecticut this year. He has
raised at least $15 million. Todd Chretien is also an
independent running for U.S. Senate, but in
California. How much has Chretien raised?
He has raised all of $58,000, and his war chest-
if you can call it that-is far more typical for a third-
party candidate than Lieberman's.
Classic independent and third-party candidates
face a whole host of challenges, from raising money
to getting their names on the ballot to participating in
debates and marketing their platform.
"We're talking about some very high hurdles here
that need to be climbed," said Micah Sifry, author of
the book "Spoiling for a Fight: Third-Party Politics in
America."
The nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics
has found that the 74 federal third-party candidates
still in the running this election cycle have raised a
total of just $3.1 million, according to campaign
finance data available Oct. 19. (This includes only
those candidates who would be new to Congress and
who have reported raising at least some money to the
Federal Election Commission.) Together, Republican
and Democratic candidates-including incumbents
and challengers-have raised 337 times that amount.
"A third-party candidate is at a fundraising disad-
vantage because of this perception that he won't like-
ly win a partisan race," University of California-
Riverside political scientist Martin Johnson said.
"Without a large base of support for door-to-door
campaigning or telephone banks, and less money for
broadcast messages, third-party candidates have more
trouble getting their message out than candidates in
the major parties."
Although the Reform, Libertarian, and Green par-
ties are better known, others like the Peace and
Freedom, Natural Law and Marijuana parties pop up
periodically and can inject a single issue into the larg-
er debate. The only two third-party candidates cur-
rently in Congress both come from Vermont-Sen.
James Jeffords, who will be retiring at the end of this
session, and Rep. Bernie Sanders, who is running to
replace him. In fundraising, minor-party and inde-
pendent candidates are seemingly stuck in a Catch-
22. The candidates need money to educate the public
about their views, but because they rarely have
national-party support, they can only raise money if
the public is already familiar with them.
"In order to win an election, not only do I have to
convince voters I'm the best candidate, I have to let
them know I'm a candidate at all," said Michael
Badnarick, a Libertarian candidate for Texas's 10th
Congressional District and, with more than $393,000
in receipts, the second-largest third-party fundraiser
remaining, in the midterm elections. He comes in
behind Bruce Guthrie, who is running for the
Washington Senate seat, mostly with $1.2 million of
his own money.
Most third-party candidates receive the bulk of
their contributions from individual donors, rather than
from political action committees of corporations,
labor unions and other interests. So far this election
cycle, those 74 remaining ones have received 39 per-
cent of their contributions from individuals, com-
pared to less than 1 percent from PACs and 58 percent
from their own pockets. The Reform Party actually
calls for the elimination of political action commit-
tees as part of its platform.
Eric Eidsness, a Reform Party candidate in
Colorado's 4th Congressional District, uses both an
interactive blog on his website and newspaper edito-
rials to share his opinions on such issues as immigra-
tion, energy dependence and the war in Iraq.
"The great benefit of [being a third-party candi-
date]," Eidsness said, "is I am utterly liberated to
speak from my heart without any restraint whatsoev-
er."
Speaking without restraint, but also without
money, such candidates may find that it's hard to be
heard.





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Syndicated Content %
Available from Commercial News Providers"
3 Waj'


You Spoke Out,,

Santa Rosa... "
Sunday, 7:53 p.m.
I have a couple of questions
for the administrator of the PJd
Milton campus: are we.permitted
to park on the sidewalks or th
grass? Do you feel it may
behoove you to place garbage
containers near the disc golf
course? Maybe then we would
see less litter on the ground. 11
must cost at least as much to pick
up the trash as to buy the contain-
ers.

Saturday, 11:25 a.m.
My name is Mary. I called in
Thursday afternoon to speak out
about Destiny Hawthorne. It was
misprinted. Can you correct it? I
just wanted to thank everyone that
helped her.

Friday, 8:08 p.m.
My name is Pam. I am calling
in response to the comments
made by Elaine. I don't know
exactly what she said, but I am
sure she is far from being an igno-
rant person. If my child had not
been pushed through the system,
he might have actually learned
something. Teachers are supposed
to help up be prepared for life
later on. The teachers need to be
better taught themselves.

Friday, 1:50 p.m.
This is Scott. I just drove
down Glover. It looked like five
guys playing tag and one guy
working. That's our tax dollars
hard at work. I think the project
was supposed to have taken much
less time. This is the reason why
it has taken so long.

Friday, 12:12 p.m.
In response to Patricia
Swanson about 1.2 million voters
losing their right to vote... would
she please respond and explain
why and how they are losing this
right?

Friday, 8:10 a.m.
This is Elaine. I am giving a
response to the other Elaine that
is against the teacher pay raise. I
think they should be compensated
adequately and I don't think they
currently are being compensated
as they should. I think they
deserve what they got and, probar
bly, should have received more. ,


1-



You may Speak Out any
time, day or night. Just call olr
Speak Out line at 623-5887
and leave your message.



We want you to share your
views on the above topic(s)-or
ANY topic-with other Press
Gazette readers. Your views are
important, too.
Send your letters to: LET-
TERS TO THE EDITOR, 6620
Elva Street, Milton, FL 3257Q.
(FAX (850) 623-9308.)
Letters may be edited for con-
tent or to fit the available space.
For a letter to be published, you
MUST sign your name and please
include your phone number and
address so we may phone for ver-
ification, if fiecessary.


NOVEMBER 8,2006





Opinions^






Wednesday November 8, 2006


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Local


.Plan

' Continued From Page One.
Z'indale-Oliver and
.ssocations, Inc. told county
faders the cost would be $50
millionn and would take about
;tiree years to complete.
Commissioners offered.
suggestions for the work to be
completed in phases. County
Budget Director Joel Haniford
said the money would come


from impact fees collected over
the next 10 years.
Commissioners were told
the recommendation was based
on public input-on what resi-
dents have told engineers they
want to see for Five-Points. He
said it would be in the County's
best interest to begin right-of-
way acquisition during the 18-
month period while plans are


being finalized.
Commissioner Don Salter
questioned the need to cul-de-
sac Quintette Road. He was
told it was necessary-that
once Quintette was moved
north, there would be a "sweep-
ing right turn" to keep south-
bound traffic moving off
Quintette.


The engineering firm repre-
sentative told commissioners it
would take 18 months for
design and 18 months for con-
struction of the project, provid-
ed the county completed right-
of-way acquisitions while the
design plans were being creat-
ed.
Salter asked for temporary


relief in the meantime for
Berryhill Road at Chumuckla
Highway, suggesting the instal-
lation of a traffic signal. The
suggestion is being considered.
Commissioner Tom Stewart
pointed out Escambia County
leaders have plans for "their
-end" of Quintette Road. He said
traffic patterns would need to be


rechecked once it was clear
what the western County would
be doing.
"It may change traffic
flows," he noted.
A public hearing is set for
Dec. 11, with a final report
planned for January.
Reach writer at:
hough@sr-pg.com


Campsite discovered


near skeletal remains


By LYNNE HOUGH
Press Gazette Staff Writer
A campsite has been found
within "a few hundred yards" of
human skeletal remains discov-
ered last week.
Sheriff's officials say they
suspect the two are related, but
have not confirmed any evi-
dence at this time.
The remains -were found in
East Milton, about a quarter
mile west of the East Milton

Jingle Bell Jubilee
gets underway
tomorrow in Pace

By PAMELA HOLT
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Let the Christmas celebra-
tions begin.
The 8th Annual Jingle Bell'
Jubilee Christmas Open House
will take place tomorrow
through Saturday, from 10 a.m.
until 6 p.m. at Taylor's Gifts
and Home D6cor, 3660
Highway 90 Pace, Steven's
Market Deli, 3988 Highway 90,
Pace, MLR Fine Jewelry and
Gifts, 4021 Highway 90 Pace
and Expressions of Santa Rosa,
5091 Highway 90, Pace.
Decked out in Christmas
attire, each shop will serve hours
d'oeuvres and give cards to
stamp for a $100 gift drawing.
.Connie Taylor, owner of
Taylor's Gifts and Home Decor,
says, in previous years, cus-
omers from as far as Perdido
Key and Brewton, Alabama vis-
ited her store.
"It's been very successful in
the past," says Taylor, "we're
looking forward to the event."
Story written by Pamela
Holt. Reach her at:
holt@sr-pg.com

Delays

Continued From Page One.
structure and traffic conditions
'bf the Acrow bridge, workers
*are unable to position concrete
trucks on the Acrow panels.
As a result, officials
explain, crews must place their
concrete trucks in the left lane
of the westbound bridge to off-
load concrete into a hopper
located on a barge below. The
concrete is then pumped to the
'deck of the new eastbound
'bridge.
For more information on
-the 1-10 bridge construction,
Visit www.escambiabay-
bridge.com, or call the toll-free
bridge hotline at 866-678-0707.
Story compiled by Lynne
Hough. Reach her at:
hough @sr-pg.com


Road intersection of Hwy. 90
last Thursday.
Sheriff's officials say a sur-
vey crew doing work to prepare
for a new railroad spur found
the skeleton lying on the
ground in the wooded area
north of the train tracks.
Details about the victim
have not been released, other
than the fact that the remains
are of an adult. Sheriff's
Spokesman Sgt. Scott Haines
says a .forensic exam of the
skeleton should be complete in
the next few days.
A tent and some cans were
found at the campsite, which is
located close to CSX railroad
tracks. Haines points out home-
less people travel on the trains
and agrees if the victim turns
out to be a traveler, local
authorities may never discover
an identity.
The area where the remains
were found is earmarked for
future roadwork, including the
expansion of Hwy. 87S for the
north end connector, along with
work to improve access to the
industrial park.







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Obituaries


Butler,
Harry M.
1925 2006
Harry M. Butler, age 81, of
Milton, passed away
Wednesday, November 1, 2006.
Harry was born July 8,
1925 and was a native of
Tonapah, Nevada. He served in
the Navy during World War II
and after retiring from the Navy
he moved to Milton, FL. He
was married to Lou Butler, the
mother of his children.
Survivors include his chil-
dren-John P. Butler, Jimmie
L. Butler, Mary L. Hudgens;
grandchildren-Jason Butler,
Matthew Butler, Traci Peaden,
Chad Hudgens; great-grand-
children-Lindsey Butler,
Morgan Butler, and Jase
Peaden.

Collins,
Frederick Lynn
1955 2006
Frederick Lynn Collins, age
51, of Milton, died on Saturday,
October 28, 2006. He was a
lifelong resident of the Florida
Panhandle (P'Cola). He was a
devoted and loving husband,
father, grandfather, brother and
uncle.
He was preceded in death
by his parents-Cecil and Rosa
Lee Collins, and sister-Donna
Berkley.
He is survived by his wife
of 30 years-Kathy Collins of
Milton, FL; son-Joe (Kelli)
Collins of Foley, AL; daugh-
ters-Stephanie Michelle
(Scott) White of Douglas, GA,
Jamie (John) Lewis of
Martinsville, VA; Stacy; broth-
ers-Steve (Linda) Collins of
Ft. Walton Bch, FL, Doug
(Rosemary) Collins of Mobile,
AL, John Collins of Pensacola,
FL, Tommy (Kelly) Collins of
Pensacola, Timmy (Helen)
Collins of Ridgeway, VA;
brother-in-law-Carl Berkley
ofAtmore, AL; sisters-Glenda
(Gordan) Humphries of Milton,
Pam Stokes of Pensacola,
Virginia Kay (Steve) Hockin of
Anderson, AK; 8 grandchil-
dren-Karlee, Kyle, Kaitlyn,
Kobe, John Michael, Sara
Elizabeth, Chasidy and Chelsey
and numerous nieces, nephews
and cousins.
A. memorial service was
held Wednesday, November 1,
2006 at the Jay Funeral Home.

Klodner,
Audrey
Audrey Klodner, age 66, of
Milton, FL, died on Wednesday,
November 1, 2006 at her home.
She was born in
Framingham, MA and worked
at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard
until she retired.
She is survived by her
daughter-Kathie Klodner of
Milton; grandsons-Justin and
Jason; great grandson-
Damien and other family mem-
bers.
Jay Funeral home is in
charge of arrangements.

Kuyoth,
Marsha Marie
1946 2006
Marsha Marie Kuyoth, age
60, of Milton, FL, died Sunday,
October 29, 2006.


Mrs. Kuyoth was born
October 10, 1946 and was a
loving daughter, wife, mother,
sister, and grandmother.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 25+ years -Don
Kuyoth; son-Kenneth W.
(Janice L.) Graves; daughter-
Patricia Ann Taylor; mother-
Mary Waugh; brother-Ronald
Still of Fries, VA; sister-
Barbara Hall of Fries, VA and 5
grandchildren-Jamie, Patrick,
Kenneth III, Anastasia and
Kylie.
Visitation was on Tuesday,
October 31, 2006 at Jay Funeral
Home. Burial was at the United
Methodist Church Cemetery in
Fries, VA.
Jay Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.

Strickland,
Jessie A.
Jessie A. Strickland, age 84,
of Pensacola, passed away on
Wednesday, November 1, 2006.
Mrs. Strickland was born in
Birmingham, England and had
resided in the Pensacola area
for the past 41 years. She is pre-
ceded in death by her husband,
Ren Eugene Strickland, a son,
Larry Strickland, and a daugh-
ter, Sandra Collins.
Mrs. Strickland is survived
by two sons, James Robert
(Nancy Peters) Strickland of
Pensacola, and Terry (Pat)
Strickland of Pace; five grand-
children, and two great grand-,
children.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Strickland were held at 12:00
noon on Tuesday, November 7,
2006 at the Lewis Funeral
Home in Milton with Rev. John
Kuritz officiating. Burial fol-
lowed in the Barrancas National
Cemetery with Lewis Funeral
Home directing. The family
received friends from 11 a.m.
until 12 noon on Tuesday prior
to the services. Active
Pallbearers were, Josh
Strickland, Zach Strickland,
Richard Collins, and Louis
Soto.

Wyche,
Gereave
1914 2006
Gereave Wyche, age 92, of
Jay, FL, died Thursday, October
19, 2006.
She was a lifelong resident
of Jay, FL and a member of
Pine Level Baptist Church. She
was also a member of The
Order of Eastern Stars, Jay
. Chapter.
She was preceded in death
by her parents-Braxton and
Mattie Marie Conaway; hus-
bands-Jimmy Wyche and
John Hilton Tate; son-Billy
Wyche; daughter-Rhonda
Wyche; brother-Judge
Conaway, and sister-Derevene
Raley.
She is survived by a son-
Richard (Gladys) Wyche of Jay;
daughters-Marcia (Dan)
Sheppard of Jay, Mary (Joe)
Thorpe of Silver Springs;
Renee (Lloyd) Rathon of Silver
Springs; Lenell (Clyde) Burkett
of Atmore, AL; brother-Dr.
Baron Conaway of Arkansas,
and sister-Polly Slagoski of
Denver, CO; daughter-in-law-
Priscilla (Bud) Gates and many
loving cousins.


Visitation was held
Saturday, October 21, 2006
prior to the funeral service,
which began at 11 a.m. at Jay
Funeral Home. Burial followed
at Pine Level Baptist Church
Cemetery.
The family would like to
thank Dr. C. David Smith and
the Jay Hospital Staff for their
care of their beloved mother.
Jay Funeral Home was in
charge of the arrangements.

Norris,
Sylvia Jean Blocker
Mrs. Sylvia Jean Blocker
Norris, age 57, of Fleming Lane
in Brewton, AL, passed away
Wednesday evening, November
1, 2006 at a local nursing facil-
ity after an extended illness.
Mrs. Norris was a native of
Hamburg, Arkansas and a long-
time resident of Milton and
Pensacola, FL before moving to
Brewton, AL. She was a retired
retail sales clerk and a member
of the Faith Chapel Assembly
of God Church.
Survivors include her hus-
band-John Norris of Brewton,
AL; 1. daughter-Wendy
(Scott) Cooper of East
Brewton, AL; 2 brothers-Billy
Blocker of Arcadia, FL, Son
Blocker of Louisiana; 5 sis-
ters-Viola Blocker, Jane
Blocker and Ginger Blocker of
Arkansas, Helen Ikner of
Bo-sier City, LA, and Mildred
Campbell of Pensacola. FL; 1
granddaughter-Emily Ann
Cooper.
She was preceded in death
by her father and mother-John
Wesley and Ethel Blocker;
brother-Richard Blocker, sis-
ter-Emily Ann Cooper.
Visitation will be Sunday,
November 5, 2006 from 1 until
2 p.m. at Williams Memorial
Chapel Funeral Home, Inc.,
Brewton, AL.
Funeral services were held
Sunday afternoon, November 5,
2006 at 2 p.m. at Williams
Memorial Chapel Funeral
Home of Brewton directing.

Whitaker,
William Harry
William Harry Whitaker,
69, of Milton passed away on
Sunday, October 29, 2006 in a
local hospital.
Funeral Services for Mr.
Whitaker were held at 2 p.m. on
Tuesday, October 31, 2006 at
the Lewis Funeral Home of
Milton, with Rev. Fred Rogers
and Rev. Mike Stokes 'officiat-
ing. Burial followed in the
Serenity Gardens Cemetery
with Lewis Funeral Home
directing. The family wishes to
express a special Thank You to
Bro. Mike Stokes, Gaye
Gillespie, and Dr. James Faye
for all the care they gave to Mr.
Whitaker during his illness.

NOTICE TO PATIENTS
Andrew Kramer, MD
will be closing his office
on December-8, 2006.
Patients may request
medical records at
5992 Berryhill Road
Suite 104
Milton FL 32570
or call 850-626-0007


YARD SALE
Sat. Nov. 11th
6:30 1 (2 House-
holds) 5430 Pine
Barron Road Milton,
Berryhill to Ander-
son Patio set, new
Christmas tree, Etc.
Rugs, movies, small
appliances, games,
linens, computer
items, clothes in-
cluding teen, tables.
Household and
more. 983-8548
COMMUNITY
YARD sale, Friday
and Saturday, Nov.
10 & 11, east of Mil-
ton, 10,000 Shangri-
La. Several family's
participating. 3 miles
past Hwy.87 going
east. 623-4842.
3/FAMILIES: BIG
Yard Sale
Old and new items.
Tanglewood Country
Club area. Truluck
Ave. and Cindy
Lane. Fri. & Sat. @
8:00 am
YARD SALE lots of
misc. stuff 6644
Magnolia St. Fri.
10th and sat. 11th. 8
am 12 pm. Cancel-*
led if rain.
YARD SALE
SAT. NOV. 11TH
8:00 AM NOON
WOODBINE BAPTIST
CHURCH
4912 WOODBINE RD.
PACE
LOTS OF GOODIES


RUMMAGE SALE
and Bake Sale for
Bagdad Volunteer
Fire Department
Saturday, Nov. 18,
2006 from 7 am 3
pm at the fire sta-
tion: 7043 Oak
Street, Bagdad.
Phone # 623-8111.
Donations would be
greatly appreciated,
call Debbie @ 626-
3966 and arrange-
ments will be made
to pick up items.

YARD SALE multi-
family yard sale.
Sat., Nov. 11th from
8 am 12 pm, at
5584 Alabama St.
Lots of baby stuff
and toys.
HUGE 2-DAY yard
sale. This Fri. & Sat.
7am until ?
9351 Chumuckla
Hwy in Chumuckla,
just south of Tom
Thumb.
RUMMAGE &
BAKE SALE
Cornerstone Christi-
an Church
1/2 mile East of
Redlight in Jay, FL
Saturday, Nov. 11th
at 7AM
HUGE TWO-FAMILY
Yard Sale
Saturday, Nov. 11.
5140 Cherry Blos-
som Lane, Milton


HUGE SALE
3 1/2 miles out Mun-
son Hwy.. Generator,
air compressor,
hand truck, hydraulic
car jack, lots of hand
and power tools, fur-
niture, glassware,
anvil (1890) Cast
iron Lots of Antiques
items, books and
much more. Fri Sat
8 till. Rain or Shine
PATIO YARD Sale
9th, 10th & 11th of
Nov. 6270 Long St.
Lots of antiques,
dolls, cars, costume
jewerly, old tools. 3
wood chairs, office
chairs, large ladies
clothes, Plus misc.
stuff.

YARD SALE
Multi-family
7094 Hwy 90 East
Sat. 7:30 am until ?
Lots of Stuff! Come
see if we have what
you want.
HUGE YARD sale
November 11, 2006
7am until 1pm
Mt. Carmel UMC
Hwy. 89 N
(Jay/Brewton Rd.)
All proceeds benefit
Relay for Life of Jay.
YARD SALE
Winsor Villas Com-
munity Yard Sale.
Garcon Point Rd.
and Sun Dial Blvd.
Sat. Nov. 11th 7am


NOVEMBER 10TH
and 11th 8a.m.
3p.m. Many more
items added to the '
get rid of sale, anti-
que chairs, chrome
table, table, antique
tables, Christmas
items and many
more. 4691 Geiger
Rd. in East Milton
GARAGE SALE
Saturday Nov. 11,
2006 beginning at 8
am. 2841 Hwy 182,
Chumuckla, Fl.,
house beside Chu-
muckla Pentecostal
Holiness Church.
For info call 994-
5444.
SATURDAY NOV,
11th 8 a.m.- noon
6347 Park Avenue,
Great stuff, great pri-"
ces

YARD SALE Sat.
Nov. 11th From 8'
am 1 pm, 4664-
Shell Rd. Furniture, .
appliances, adult
and children clothes
and toys.
YARD SALE
Sat. Nov. 11th from
7am until ?
4486 Tamarind Dr.
Pea Ridge
Misc., toys, science
fiction books sets.


Just in time for the


HOLIDAYS

A Chance to WIN
(rules apply)

A NEW RAYNOR GARAGE DOOR
with 140 mph wind load

I WINNER SELECTED ON NOVEMBER 17, 2006

Al entrees not selected
wil receive a $ Submit photo to:
\SCvalidtU r Pinckard Garage Doors, Inc.

Sarc 2007 5489 Woodbine Rd Pace, FL 32571
994-7201 I


995--7000

4954 Hwy. 90 Pace
(Across from Wa l-Mart Super Center)
aMDI E P maemXAhO* 6&


YAR.D.,SALES.,-.


Wednesday November 8, 2006,1..,


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Pnna Re -A






wounayuumuBusiness Review
Business Review


Page 7-A


Wamsdv Nnvembe7 8. 2006


It's time to celebrate:

MLR Fine Jewelry & Gifts offering hundreds

of dollars in prizes during three-day event


By OBIE CRAIN
Special Projects Writer -
Roll over. Tiffany's!
Eat your heart out, Sack's
Fifth Avenue!
M.L.R. Fine Jewelry &
Gifts, located at 4021 Highway
90 (Main Street, next to Pic-N-
Save) in Pace, is making tracks!
M.L.R., the premier retail
jewelry and gift shop in the
Pace area, and along the entire
Northwest Florida Gulf Coast
fqr that matter, has a host of
surprises in store for its cus-
tomers and friends this week-
eid that few will want to miss.
It's the store's Open House
scheduled for Thursday through
Saturday, November 9-11, 2006
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day.
Patrons and customers will be
able to register for a $100.00
gift certificate to be given away
each day. Add a 15% off sale
store wide (excluding
Swarovski), and you have one
of the most unmistakably out-
standing events of the season,
anywhere, period.
: It's the 8th Annual Jingle
Bell Jubilee that includes the
affiliation of a number of other
strops teaming up with M.L.R.
Jewelry & Fine Gifts, owned
alid personally managed by
IVtonica L. Rivers, to provide a
funl and entertaining experience
fkr shoppers designed to inau-
gPrate the pre-Thanksgiving.
aid Christmas holiday season.
M.L.R. Jewelers & Fine
gifts will be joined by Taylor's
Gifts and Home Decor at 3660
highway 90, Steven's Market
D'eli and Coffee House
Espresso at 3988 Highway 90,
a4id Expressions of Santa Rosa,
featuring Fresh and Silk
Flowers at 5091 Highway 90
(i1 in Pace) where at the culmi-
nation of the three-day event
p$00.00 gift drawings will be
highlighted at each of the four
shops celebrating the Jingle
Bell Jubilee.
'. But Monica is carrying the
festival occasion a step further!
She is requesting her customers
register for a $100.00 Gift
Certificate to be given away
each day of the Jubilee in her
store. Is that awesome or what!
During the celebration hors
d'oeuvres will be served at each
of the participating stores con-
veniently located on Highway
90. All you as a customer have
to do is visit the shops during
the three-day Jubilee and secure
a personal card that will be
Stamped at each location that
you visit.
"But you have to participate
to win, so be sure you don't
pass up the opportunity.
But to assure yourself you
haven't missed anything the
store has to offer during the past
few weeks, you simply must
visit. You may be surprised out
of your wits at the remarkably
attractive remodeling job that
cwner Monica L. Rivers has
achieved inside.
-' Gone are most of the ranks
of elevated glass shelving that
ised a lot of space. In shelves'
places are long, sleek, well
lighted, and attractive jewelry
cases that allow the customer to
see the merchandise close up.
It's a beautiful place to shop,
and you'll find something of
interest for anyone on you gift-
giving list.
For 21 years now Monica
has served her customers well.
She has made every effort to
assure them that M.L.R. Fine
Jewelry & Gifts has maintained
the highest standards of service
and integrity through a friendly,
knowledgeable staff, and mer-
chandise of the most outstand-
ing caliber.
Monica has worked in the
jewelry, watch, and design trade
for many, many years, begin-
ning as a student at the


Geological Institute of America
in Los Angeles. The results of
her training, personal ambition,
and passion for jewelry design
have made her a credit to the
industry and a creative artist
that has become legendary.
Her love of creating exqui-
site costume jewelry comes sec-
ond only to the devotion to her
family, and the results of her
work are a great testimony to
the serious commitment she has
made to her career.
Technology, of course has
played an important role in the
jewelry repair and design busi-
ness, Monica says, and she's
heavily fortified in that area, a
leader in the field. She's proud
to have one of the most modem
and technologically efficient
laser welders found anywhere,
which enables her to complete
jewelry repair that would hard-
ly be possible with a regular
torch.
"It gives us the ability to
repair heirlooms, costume jew-
elry, and other intricate pieces
that can't be trusted to just any
kind of equipment," Monica
explains. And now she is capa-
ble of taking your designs elec-
tronically by e-mail and design-
ing from them. "Actually, there
aren't many things we can't do
when it come to jewelry design
and repair, and we will gladly
give estimates," she said.
In addition to the various
jewelry and crystal collections,
Fossil wrist watches for men
and women, and many other
mesmerizing creations that will
steal your heart (and not your
checkbook!), she has added the
Bulova watch line, Jody Coyote
earrings, pendants, and
bracelets,' and Start-to-Finish
Diamond Ad-a-Link bracelets.
Give them a call at (850)
994-4581 if you have any ques-
tions about the merchandise or
services they offer. Store hours


are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesd


lay


through Saturday, and parking
is never a problem.
Everybody's talking about
the extravaganza, so make plans
to visit. Remember you have to
register to win. And don't be
surprised if you see a lot of your
friends and neighbors already
in the store when you get there!


Veteran's Day is
Friday. We give a
big salute to all the
area military serv-
ice men and
women today. Look
for the big two-sec-
tion tribute...inside
today's Press
Gazette.





KELLER
WILLIAMS.
R' E A L T Y1


Marsha Beach
"Celebrating 26 Years"
572-5652
-~V-


M.L.R. JEWELRY & FINE GIFTS MAKING TRACKSI-The remarkably attractive remodeling project that
Monica Rivers has completed in the store in recent weeks will certainly be a pleasant surprise for those
who haven't seen it. And the equally exciting Jingle Bell Jubilee coming up this weekend will be a fun
and exciting event. A $100.00 Gift Certificate will be awarded by M.L.R. Fine Jewelry & Gifts each day
during the Jubilee Thursday, Friday, and Saturday of this week. Don't be left out of the prospects!
(Photo by Obie Crain.)



OPEN HOUSE
Thursday thru Saturday November 9-11
10am-6pm







FINE JEWELRY AND GIFTS

Register for $100.00 dollar Gift

Certificate to be given away each day

15% OFF STORE WIDE*

*Excluding Swaroski

Layaway available


3BR/3.5 BA in main Victorian Charmer.
1 BD/1BA, kitchenette in garage apartment,
workshop, gazebo w/ outdoor kitchen
on 1.03 acres, mls# 311950.


Loose 25 Pounds
by December 27th

a Nn Pill nr qhnt


Skateland Skating Center
6056 N. Stewart St. Milton, FL $.570 (850) 61Z-9415


Lots of FUN!
Oreat Exercise!




^eul i all ) ta d ot'
New Public Skateing Session Times:
*Mondays Tiny Tot Stroll-n-Roll 1:00-3:00 p.m. 4
*Tuesday Nite 6:30-8:30 p.m. I
*Wednesdays Tiny Tot Stoll-n-Roll 1:00-3:00 p.m. 0 3
Friday Nites 7:00-11:00 p.m. 06.50
Saturday Afternoon Z:00-5:00 p.m. 4 3.50
Saturday Nites 7:00-10:00 p.m. 5.50
*Su.da y AfterM ) Z:00-4:q .m. 4.00 i
www.skatelal" i10T.oco'14O


SGarden Center

S Pln. Landscape
Plants Mulch Fetilizer

.. COMPLETE LAWN & LANDSCAPE SERVICES
TURF CARE SPECIALTIES
995-9333 4337 Hwy. 90, Pace
S(ACROSS FROM PACE CHAMBER)


ALTERNATIVE HEALTH

FOOD STORE
'Where educated natural health choices are made. "
5533 Hwy. 90 Pea Ridge 994-3606
Mon.-Fri.: 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Sat.: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

^)CELADRIN Soothing cream is an all natural proprietary
product that enhances flexibility and mobility.
, ;Apo SYNTHOVIAL SEVEN Pure liquid Nyaluronic Acid anti-aging
o= formula for overall joint and skin health.
-. ,' AKNE ZYME Promotes healthy skin and reduces the effects of
acne.
OQ H2GO Keeps you regular day after day. Works like fiber without
s the bulk. Safe and gentle.
OSCILLO Relieves the symptoms of flu fever, chills, body aches
i* and pains.


U


Is


Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D., Natural Health Consultant is available to help you by
researching the best possible Alternative Therapy for your specific problem.

HAIR CLEAN 1-2-3TM
Lice remover & killer. Clinically proven. Natural ingredients. Includes Lice Comb.
Theresa Stearly: Herbal Specialist Deanna Gilmore: Manager )
Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D, Natural Health Counselor E-Mail address: GWYHILL @ AOL.com


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette






ganU ..0 li t m .--- I lu aW er----
Comm 1nitv Briefs


Avalon Beach group
plans Nov. 14 meeting
The Avalon Beach
Homeowners' Association, Inc.
will meet on Tuesday,
November 14 in the Mulat Fire
Department building at the cor-
ner of Mulat Road and Sterling
Way. A potluck supper will be
held at 6 PM with the-meeting
to follow. Guest speaker for the
evening will be member Bill
Bass who will share his adven-
tures in the highlands of Peru


and Ecuador. All property own-
ers in the area north of 1-10.
south of Mulat Road on the east
and west sides of Avalon are
invited. and encouraged to
attend. For more information,
contact President 995-7056.

Navy League offering
holiday hams, more
Just in time for the
Holidays.... The Navy League
Santa Rosa Council announces
,their annual Slow Smoked


Boston Butt/Smoked Turkey
Fundraiser. Purchase your 8-9
lb. slow smoked Boston butt or
smoked turkey (ready to eat or
freeze) for only $25.00.
Proceeds support educational
scholarships. awarded by the
Navy League throughout the
year. Order deadline is Friday,
November 17th @ 12 noon.
Orders can be picked up at the
Santa Rosa County Chamber of
Commerce offices l]nocled
5247 Stewart Street, Milton on.


kiJ ALI xxS.XJ J -7 -I J %


Cammunitv Briefs


S IBlueCross BlueShield

of Florida
An Independent Licensee of the
Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association


S's.



t,..'.
'"'~,


"1' '. ,,. .



."5!.
.,l-.


Free Medicare Part D seminar.


Flu Shots at no cost for

Medicare Part B enrollees.*


How can you afford not to go?






Solutia Retirees Take Note.


The 2007 Medicare annual election period is coming soon.To help you
choose the right plan, we're hosting a FREE Medicare seminar that's
open to the public.You'll learn all about our Medicare Part D plans, even

the plans with premiums that are 40% less** We'll also be giving away

FREE flu shots, so don't forget to bring your Medicare Part B member
ID card and a picture ID. For individuals not enrolled in Medicare Part B,

the flu shot will cost $25. Lastly, everyone who attends will get a chance
to win FREE door prizes at no obligation to you.



To register or for more information,

please call Affiliated Insurance at 1-800-451-8737


If you're a person who needs special accommodations at the seminar,

please call us at the phone number above.


Florida residents only. Walk-ins welcome.



November 8, 2006
Two sessions will be offered.


Times

10 a.m. and 2 p.m.


Location

Hadji ShrineTemple

800 West Nine Mile Road
Pensacola, FL


SCAN BLUE HELPYOU ? bcbsfi.com


*Available while supplies last. --Based on a comparison of our lowest Premium Part D Plan in 2006 to our lowest
Premium Part D Plan in 2007. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida contracts with the federal government to administer
the Medicare Part D Prescriptions Drug Benefit in the state of Florida. The person that is discussing plan options with
you is either employed by or contracted with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida. The person may be compensated
based on your enrclii ent in a plan. A sales representative will be present with information and applications. Blue Cross
and Blue Shield of Florida is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.
Ref. #: 7160 S5904 65289 A 1006 S: 10/2006


W. BUSH, President of the United States
of America, do hereby proclaim
November 11, 2006, as Veterans Day and
urge all Americans to observe November
5 through November 11, 2006, as
National Veterans Awareness Week. I
encourage all Americans to recognize the
valor and sacrifice of our veterans
through ceremonies and prayers. I call
upon Federal, State, and local officials to
display the flag of the United States and
to support and participate in patriotic
activities in their communities. I invite
civic and fraternal organizations, places
of worship, schools, businesses, unions,
and the media to support this national
observance with commemorative expres-
sions and programs.
GEORGE W. BUSH


Tuesday, 'November 21st from
10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.
Tickets available at the,
Chamber cash or check only.

Garden Club to offer
'Fall Fashioins Abloom'
The Milton Garden Club,
Dogwood Circle, presents "Fall
Fashions Abloom" on Tuesday,
November 14 at 10 a.m. Brunch
will be served! There is an $8
admission price to the event at
the Milton Garden Club on


5256 Alabama St., in Milton.
For more information, call 626-
1422, 623-6321, or 626-7028.

Blue Angel show set
for Nov. 10 and 11
The Navy's Flight
Demonstration Squadron, the
Blue Angels, will close the
2006 season at their annual
homecoming Air Show aboard
Naval Air Station Pensacola on
November 10th & 11th (Friday
& Saturday).


This year along with the
world famous Blue Angels F/A-
18 Hornet performances, the
Blues' C-130 Hercules trans-
port also known as "Fat Albert"
will demonstrate a Jet Assisted
Take Off (JATO) with the help
of solid fuel rockets.
Other Potential military
performers include the F-22
Raptor, F/A- 1 8F Super Hornet,
F-15 Strike Eagle, and A-10
Warthog. The Sky Soldiers will-
perform a helicopter attack
demonstration and Training Air
Wing SIX will feature a fly-by.
'with wing training aircraft.
Tentatively scheduled for
both days will be extraordinary
aerobatics by performers such.
as Gene Soucy flying the
Showcat with wing walker
Teresa Stokes, Frank Ryder in
his ORECK XL Wolf Cyclone
and Dale Snodgrass piloting liis
F-86 Sabre Jet. -

Healthy Start meet for.
November cancelled
The Healthy Start Coalition
of Santa Rosa has canceled
their Monday, November 13,
meeting.

City committee
to gather Nov. 14
The Milton Organizational'
Assessment Committee will
meet on Tuesday, November
14, 2006 at 9:30 a.m. in
Conference Room B of City
Hall, 6738 Dixon Street. For
further information on the
meeting, contact the City
Manager's office at 9893-541.1..
All meetings are open to the
public.

Team-a-thon kicks off,
2007 Relay season
Pam Webb, Kim Curtis and
Pam Burroughs welcomed
guests to the Milton Relay for
Life Team-A-Thon where area
teams registered, picked thdir
campsite and got all the infor-
mation necessary to have a sud-'
cessful relay. The following
early bird teams are welcomed -
Santa Rosa County Chamber of
Commerce, RSVP and Xerox.
This is a wonderful way to help
in the fight against cancer.
Because Rela\ is a community
gathering rather than an athletic
event, anyone and everyone can
participate. This year's event is
scheduled for April 27-28, 2007
and will, once again, be held at
PJC Milton Campus. To find
out how your team can make an
active role in the fight against
cancer, contact Leann
McCombs at 293-1299 or
mccombsl@mail.santarosa.kl2
.fl.us. On-line registration 'is
also available at www.acsev-
ents.org/relay/fl/milton.

President signs Vets'
Day proclamation .
Through the generations, Americd's
men and women in uniform have defeated
tyrants, liberated continents, and set a
standard of courage and idealism for the
entire world. On Veterans Day, oiur
Nation pays tribute to those who have
proudly served in our Armed Forces.
To protect the Nation they love, our
veterans stepped forward when America
needed them most. In conflicts around
the world, their sacrifice and resolve
helped destroy the enemies of freedom
and saved millions from oppression.' In
answering history's call with honor,
decency, and resolve, our veterans have
shown the power of liberty and earned the
respect and admiration of a grateful
Nation.
All of America's veterans have
placed our Nation's security before their
own lives, creating i debt that we can
never fully repay. Our'veteranis represent
the best of America, and they deserve the
best America can give them.
As we recall the service of our
Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and
Coast Guardsmen, we are reminded that
the defense of freedom comes with great
loss and sacrifice. This Veterans Day, we
give thanks to those who have served free-
dom's cause; we salute the members '6of
our Armed Forces who are confronting
our adversaries abroad; and we honor the
men and women who left America's
shores but did not live to be thanked as
veterans. They will always be remem-
bered by our country.
With respect for and in recognition
of the contributions our service men and
women have made to the cause of peace
and freedom around the world, the
Congress has provided (5 U.S.C.
6103(a)) that November 11 of each year
shall be set aside as a legal public holiday
to honor veterans.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday November 8, 2006


Pane R-A


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SSEM=Nuiiiuuii mAIl


Gazette


A woman...


ON THE



EDGE

By LYNNE HOUGH
Press Gazette Staff Writer
I solve more problems
before I arrive at work than I do
all day after I get here.
But still, I kick myself
because I can never seem to get
to work on time. No matter how
early I get up, no matter how
organized I am, no matter how
many children I'm dropping
off... I never get there on
time... and I would truly rather
be, early.
So this morning I really,
really tried.
There was only one child to
get ready for school-"a
breeze"-I told myself at 7:15
a.m.
But by 7:50, my four-year-
old was a crying heap on the
floor because she was told she
couldn't wear her brand new
shoes to school; her breakfast
was all over the sleeve of the
shirt I dressed her in for school;
and she wanted to stay home
and watch Dora the Explorer.
It doesn't sound like a big
deal, but as I'm watching, the
clock tick...tick.. .tick:..closer
and closer to the time I need to
be at the county commission
meeting... the phone rings. My
son overslept and needs a ride
to school. Get ready, I tell him,
I'll get you after I drop your sis-
ter off at preschool.
By the time I change her
shoes, give her a hug and wipe
away the biggest tears I've seen
in at least two decades...it is
8:15. We head out the door and
she wants to bring all of her
new hair barrettes for her toy of
the day. Only problem is, I have
to put her name on every toy
that goes to the school. There
was no way I was going to write
her name on 25 tiny barrettes.
I told her no.
She took it better than she
did the shoes. She took one bar-
rette and a tiny little doll with
crazy orange hair. I wrote her
name on the bottom of its foot
and, handed her over to her
teacher: no tears, belly fed,
clean shirt, big smile .and
"squeezy hug" to say goodbye.
I picked up my son,
dropped him at school and
drove on to work.
The time? 8:34.
No one seemed to see my
arrival. I blended with the noise
at the front desk, slid quietly
past anyone who would say
"HI!" loudly in my direction,
and got into my seat before any-
one seemed to notice. I even got
to the county commission meet-
ing 10 minutes early.
Now I just hope my boss
doesn't read this column.


WEUNESUAY

November 8,

2006 Section B


It's about education...




Tuffy makes cover




of 2006 phonebook


By LYNNE HOUGH
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Tuffy has been around a while now. And many
people still don't seem to understand what he is
about.
After, this week, the public may have even more
questions.
Tuffy's photo is appearing on the front cover of
the.BellSouth Yellow Pages Companion Book. The
book will be going out to every BellSouth customer
in Santa Rosa, Escambia, and portions of Okaloosa'
County this week-more than 210,000 copies:
BellSouth Regional Sales Manager for
Advertising and Publishing Barb Orton says, "Tuffy
is a genuine treasure to all of us here on the Emerald
Coast, and BellSouth is pleased to feature this local
hero on the cover of our Greater Pensacola
Companion Directory."
While Tuffy is well-known, some inay ask: How
did he get on the phone book and what is the signif-
icance?
First, a little history: Tuffy, A Real American
Quarter Horse Hero, is part of a public/pri% ate part-
nership with a 501C3-the Santa Rosa Educational
Foundation. He is a real, live horse, born in East
Milton at Blue Ribbon Farms-in American Farms.
His mother. Helen, was pregnant with him 'hen
she was purchased at an auction. She was being over-
looked because she is blind in one eye-people
weren't interested in.buying her until the owners of
Blue Ribbon Farms saw her potential.
Little did anyone realize, some of that potential
was in her child: Tuffy.
After his birth Tuffy was adopted by neighbor
Kyle Holley for tile purpose of promoting educa-
'tion-and as an example of perseverance.
Holley, a past president of the Santa Rosa
Educational Foundation, says he had Tuffy in mind
from the beginning as a promotional tool to raise
funds for education specifically in this county.
More specifically, for teacher's grants. Officials
say a grant for teachers is money available for use in
the classroom. Because teachers want quality pro-
grams for their students, many spend money from
their own pockets to provide for their students'
classroom needs over and above what.the school
board offers. Teachers' grants help to alleviate
that necessity. The money comes from state- eu
funded matching grants, so every dollar
given to or raised by the program is dou-
bled.
This is Tuffy's 'third year as an East
Milton Elementary student. He was official-
ly enrolled through the school board, and is the
first horse with that distinction in the nation.
His participation in Santa Rosa County public
schools brings attention to the needs of students,
teachers, and those who support them. He promotes
character education and an anger management pro-
grams adopted by the school.
What most people don't know is what goes on
behind the scenes to bring Tuffy to success.
"It's about teamwork and unselfishness," says
Holley, who explains Tuffy ended up on the
BellSouth telephone book because an employee of
the company saw Tuffy at the Fair. The best
part.. .Tuffy was there in the first place because with
a group of 3rd grade students he sent to the Fair as a
gift.
The employee approached one of Tuffy's people
and was impressed with Tuffy's message. He, in


turn, put Tuffy's people and the Santa Rosa
Educational Foundation in touch with BellSouth
administration.
A partnership was born.
Over the next couple of weeks, hours and hours
were donated by Tuffy, and many volunteers to cre-
ate the -perfect photograph for the BellSouth
Companion cover.
The photo depicts Tuffy walking on the Sound
side of Natarre Beach, with the mainland visible'
in the distance. Several children are walking g with
Tuffy and a small boat is visible.
"It was important for us to shoi unification
with Tuffy," Holley notes. "E' erone working
together."
In trade for Tuffy's image on the front
cover, the Santa Rosa Educational
Foundation received advertising in the
companion book. In addition.
BellSouth's logo' appears on Tuffy's
trailer.
The total (in-kind) value of the,
trade is $35,000. More importantly,
Tuffy Will appear on a book reach-
ing hundreds of thousands of
homes. In some cases, it may be
the only book in the house..
f Tuffy received nothing
for his efforts, except sat-
isfadtion in knowing his
presence made .a dif-
ference.
Tuffy's mes- ;
sage of caring,
sharing, citi-/ -
zenship, com-
munity, per-
severance
a n dg /
anger /


man- 0
agement is B
timeless. The
companion tele-
phone book he appears
on will be around for a
year-long enough, officials
hope, to help reinforce his messages.
Anyone wishing to support Tuffy's
efforts monetarily should make a donation to
the Santa Rosa Educational Foundation. Tuffy
does not accept cash donations-his efforts are to
benefit the Santa Rosa Educational Foundation.
Tuffy merchandise has been developed for,
schools to use as fundraisers and to reinforce positive


For more information about
Tuffy, visit his website at
www.gotuffygo.com or call the
Santa -Rosa Educational
Foundation at (850) 983-5043.


behavior in
school. Trading
cards with Tuffy's
image have. been
designed and are avail-
able to support individual
schools.
A national story has been
published in the American
Horse Magazine about Tuffy; in
addition, Tuffy recently visited
Amarillo Texas to deliver his message
to school students there-the home of
the American Quarter Horse Association.
Tuffy has visited with thousands of stu-
dents, teachers and parents over the past
three years. His people have watched him
develop into a horse that knows his job. He is
accustomed to being around large crowds and
he loves attention. He recently helped open the
games for Milton/Pace game and for the
Navarre/Gulf Breeze.
Tuffy visits schools, festivals, and events
where he is welcome to spread his message.
hough@sr-pg.com


Story written by Lynne
Hough. Reach her at:
hough@sr-pg.com


hough @srAsk com A


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Investment Representative
6259 Highway 90
Milton, FL 32570-1708
(850) 983-1471 |
www.edwardjones.com


Elmi~~u' *


By Molly Parsons
Press Gazette Advice Column
Dear Molly:
After spending 20 years at
home with my family, I have
decided to go back into the
workforce.
My husband "Bill" isn't in
favor of this move because he
feels his quality of life will
decrease. He's still working
during the day and I don't think
he understands. All of my chil-
dren have left home-two in
college and two married and
happy-I have nothing left to
do other than clean house and
piddle around.
How can I make him under-
stand this is good for me and
will be good for him, too?
Sign me as being,

Unhappy


Dear Unhappy:
I see your point and I also
understand his concerns as
well. The biggest part of this
problem, as far as I can tell is
miscommunication.
Is there any way you can
relay to "Bill", his life will
become even better than it is
now? Talk with him about your
decision and I'm assuming
you've told him why.
Ask him about his fears-
exactly how his life will change
with your daytime hours being
consumed-and not your
evening hours with him.
Would you be willing to
quit when he does? Maybe if
you volunteer to do so he'll
understand you're not giving up
on him and making your home.
Being a good homemaker is
a calling-don't ever assume
your life is boring. By being a
good wife and mother, you've


served your family and your
community. Explain to him
you still will be very much
involved with him and your
family. Write and let me know
how it goes.

Dear Molly:
I have a sister, "Susie" who
is very negative about every
aspect of life. Although I love
my sister and I don't take her
pessimistic attitude personally,
her view of life brings me
down. I can't be around her for
more than five minutes.
How can I convey this to
my sister without hurting her
feelings?
Optimistic Sister

Dear Sister:
I applaud your desire to be
closer to your sister and your
ability to know what turns you
away from her. Most people


don't try to pinpoint the reason.
They just stay mad.
As for conveying the infor-
mation, do your best to say to
her, "Susie, you are bringing
me down. Can you find some-
thing good about this?"
Say it often enough to make
her see herself as you do... she
needs to lighten up.

Dear Molly:
I am a mature 15 year-old
girl. Just call me "Christy." I
met a guy "Steve" who told me
he was 18 but I recently found
out he's really 22. My parents
aren't cool with him being 18
and I can't imagine what they'll
do if they find out he's even
older.
The problem is I really love
him and I can't imagine being
without him.
How can I tell my parents


and let them know he's a really,
really nice-guy and I love being
with him?
Christy

Dear Christy:
I'm sure your family loves
you and wants what's best for
you. Dating "Steve" isn't
what's best for you. He's a
legal adult who lied to you.
How could you love a person
who's not willing to tell you the
truth. Steve lied to you about
his age because he knows it's
wrong to date you.
Stay away-far away from
this man. Tell your parents
pronto.


Story written by Molly
Parsons. Reach her at:
,,,. Attn: Molly
Atn: Molly


I








Jay News



Plenty of beauties turn out for Jay pageants


Winners in the Tiny Miss Jay contest, held Oct. 27 in the Jay High Auditorium include: Annabelle
Sheppard, Miss Cooperative; Jaeci Cooley, Third Runner Up; Ally Ashworth, Second Runner Up; Emily
Brown, First Runner Up; and Carsen Arrant, Queen. The event was sponsored by the Friends of the
FCCLA Chapter.
Photo by Tom Carter


Little Miss Jay winners included: Morgan Kelly, Third Runner Up; Chandra Jackson, Second Runner Up;
Emily Ashworth, First Runner Up; Savannah Seavers, Queen; and Ally Settle, Most Cooperative.
Photo by Tom Carter'


The Miss Jay Elementary Contest included 5th and 6th graders. Pictured: Kyra Dunsford, Third Runner
Up; Alexandra Jackson, Second Runner Up; Carlie Owens, Queen and Miss Cooperative; and Beverly
Murphy, First Runner Up.
Photo by Tom Carter


The Miss Jay Junior High event included: Katie Borders, Second Runner Up; Ashton Edwards, Miss
Congeniality; Elizabeth Baker, First Runner Up; Cheyenne Roberts, Queen; and Crystal Brown, Third
Runner Up.
Photo by Tom Carter


To the left, Little Miss Jay 2004
Queen Alexdra Jackson places
the winning crown atop the
head of 2006 Little Miss Jay
Savannah Seavers.
Photo by Tom Carter


















To the right, 2004 Miss Jay
Junior High Paige Lisenby
crowns 2006 Miss Jay Junior
High Cheyenne Roberts.
Photo by Tom Carter.


Pone 2-B I


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday November 8, 2006 -





WeThesdantNovesb Press Gazette Page 3-B


Legals
LEGALAD102506 Ordinance by the Board of SANTA ROSA COUNTY, SIBILITY; PROVIDING inspected by the public coming before said Board Interested parties may ROSA BAY BRIDGE Highway, Milton, Florida.
110106 County Commissioners of FLORIDA; DEFINING FOR PENALTIES; PRO- prior to the above sched- at said meeting, it is their appear at the meeting and AUITHBOIY For further information call
Medical records for 110806 Santa Rosa County, is WORDS AND PHRASES; VIDING FOR SEVERABIL- uled meeting at the Office individual responsibility to be heard with respect to (850) 981-2718.
patients of William N. 111506 scheduled for 9:30 a.m, REGULATING THE ITY; REPEALING AND of the Clerk of Courts, insure that a record of pro- these proposed ordi- The Santa Rosa Bay
Watson M.D. are available 0 December 14, 2006, in the STORAGE OF LITTER REPLACING COUNTY BOCC Support Services ceedings they are appeal- nances. Bridge Authority will con-, 110806
at Watson Alternative Commissioners meeting AND ABANDONED ORDINANCE 2006-26; Department, 6495 Caroline ing exists and for such pur- duct its regular monthly 110806
Health and may be room at the Administrative PROPERTY; REGULAT- PROVIDING FOR CODIFI- Street, Milton, Florida. All pose they will need to 110806 authority meeting at 5:30 11/81.
obtained by appointment. NOTICE OF INTENT TO Complex, 6495 Caroline ING THE DISPOSITION CATION; AND, PROVID- interested parties should insure that a verbatim 110806 p.m., Wednesday,
Please call 850-623-3836. CONSIDER AN ORDI- Street, Milton, Florida. OF LITTER; ESTABLISH- ING FOR AN EFFECTIVE take notice that if they record of the proceeding is 11/880 November 15, 2006, in the
NAG. ING ENFORCEMENT DATE. decide to appeal any deci- made, which record shall Florida Department of
Thank You, AN ORDINANCE RELAT- PROCEDURES; PROVID- sion made by the Board of include the testimony and Transportation (FDOT)
Leslie Watson The reading and adoption ING TO THE CONTROL ING FOR OWNER'S AND These proposed County Commissioners the evidence upon which NOTICE OF MONTHLY Conference Room C, ocat-
of the following proposed OF LITTER WITHIN GENERATOR'S RESPON- Ordinances may be with respect to any matter their appeal is to be based. MEETING OF THE SANTA ed at 6025 Old Bagdad



a Y. G


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Lifestyles Obituaries Sports Business Reviews
* Kornerstone Education Classifieds Business & Service Directory

Church Community Military Editorial ...plus more

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i--J_---J--- |..-L 2 o )nno


I





Page 4-B 1 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday November 8, 2006

Community


Santa Rosa Health & Rehabilitation Center holds 'Hoedown',


Fall is in the air and along
with fall comes the fall festi-
vals, jamborees, carnivals and
in our case the "Hoedown."
Each year at this time, Santa
Rosa Health & Rehabilitation
Center gets prepared for a lot of
music, munchies, and good fun.
Everyone is invited to attend


year 0


-





IO D

Share :


Great grandchildren come to visit Mr. G.E. McGill; they,are I to r:
Superman, Humpty Dumpty and Raggedy Ann.
Submitted photo


and if you did not attend, you
missed a great time!
Thursday night, October
26th, the denim clad "Three C's
Band" played for residents,
families, friends, and employ-
ees of the SRH&RC. The band
looked right at home pickin'
and grinnin'. among bales of
fresh cut clean, smelling hay.


Dotted on and around the hay
was scattered colorful golden
and orange leaves, cotton
stalks, scare crows, flowers, and
bright orange pumpkins.
Everyone enjoyed a variety
of tasty munchies. Children
were dancing, residents were
clapping and family members
were smiling and renewing old


HOW TO REPORT A PROBLEM
WITH AN EREC OUTDOOR LIGHT

If you are aware of an inoperative or malfunctioning outdoor light on Escambia River
Electric Cooperative's lines, please call the co-op so that the outdoor light can be
repaired. When reporting a problem EREC would like the following information so that
we can make the repair and contact you if there should be any questions:.

1) Specific street address of where the outdoor light is located;

2) A description of where the outdoor light is located on the property;

3) A description of the problem with the outdoor light;

4) Sufficient contact information to include your name, address, and telephone number.
Escambia River EC members are asked to provide their account number as well. Optional
information includes your email address.

The information should be reported to Escambia River Electric Cooperative, Inc. at
(850) 675-4521, (800) 235-3848 or via web at www.erec.com.

To ensure proper response to your request, you will be given a service order confirmation
number and will recieve a postcard acknowledging your request. Please keep this
information for future reference.

Thank you for your help.


acquaintances. Numerous door
prizes were given away.
A special thanks goes to the
band members, who made it
possible; Steve and Wayne
Craine, Phil Cohron, and Ray
Grimmer. They did a great job!
Thanks are also being sent to
brothers, Marvin and Avis
Wolfe and their nephew Terry
Owens for all their help.
Submitted article.
Send your news to:
church@sr-pg.com


The Sant Rosa County Chamber of Commerce is
the winner of the October Milton Garden Club
Community Pride award for businesses.


Resident Marjorie Reigel enjoys the Hoedown with her daughter,
Cheryl White and son, Jim Reigel.
Submitted photo


On the individual side, the garden of Joyce Young^.
was the winner of the October Community Pride
Award for residents.


Community Pride winners listed


The Santa Rosa Chamber
of Commerce is an October
winner of the Milton Garden
Club's Community Pride
Award. The Chamber. of
Commerce is located at' 5247
Stewart Street. The landscape is
always neatly tended. This year
and past years, the purple flow-
ering Ruellia [also know as
Mexican petunia] has flour-
ished in front of the chamber's
building. These plants bloom
all summer and core back
every year. They are tough.
dependable plants. The dot' n-
side is that they spread easily) b3
seed and underground runners.
Hoe'er. the large purple fow-
ers are often northh the exuber-
ance of this plant. Check out the
Ruelhlia helore the frost claims
them.


Many people work together
on the Chamber of Commerce's
landscape.
Carrie McNac of B&C
nursery and the Santa Rosa
Clean Community have both
donated plants. Leadership
Santa Rosa Alumni did the
actual planting. McCurdy and
Son's Lawn service does the
landscape maintenance.
Aaron McCurdy explained
that his family works together
to pro% ide good ser\ ice.. The
boys' and their father do the
outside work while his sisters
and. morn handle the business'
side. The Chamber has nothing
but praises for NicCurdy and
son's ser\ ices and the outstand-
ing %work of everyone involved
with keeping the chamber of
Commerce looking good.


Joyce Young's garden also-'.
is a winner of the October
Community Pride Award. Mrs..'
Young lives in the Country'-
Haven apartments #6104D13 '-
Mrs. Young's selection of flowV, -
ers sends a cheerful message to ;
all her neighbors. Especially;',
lovely is the Hibiscus with large"''--
orange flowers. This plant sur--.
prisingly survived last winter.
There are other apartments
at the Country Haven that are.':
also noteworthy and the Milton'
Garden Club applauds their
efforts.
If you %would like to nomi-"
nate a public landscape such as.
a business of church, or a pri-
%ate residence. please call or e :
mail the Milton Garden Club at
626-2003. miltongarden-
club@ yahoo.com.


lni ivr6


a JW liw-w -if


Your Community
Credit Union!
Pensacola, Milton,
Atmore, and
Coming Soon
to Gulf Breeze!

www.gwfcu.org


Sacred Heart offers rehab


Heather moon, along with
others from Workforce
Escarosa, Inc.'s Region I, was
recognized as Outstanding
Student for the 2005-2006
Program Year on September 20,


2006, during an awards cere-
mony at the annual luncheon
held this year at Mustin Beach
Officers' Club aboard NAS
Pensacola. In 2006, Heather
graduated Santa Rosa Adult


SANTA ROSA COUNTY
TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED
COORDINATING BOARD MEETING
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006 10:00 AM
MILTON CITY HALL
260 DIXON STREET
MILTON, FLORIDA
PUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATTEND COMPLIANCE WITH
AMERICAN DISABILITIES ACT, REASONABLE
MODIFICATIONS TO ACCESS MTG UPON REQUEST -
CALL D. MCKENZIE 850-595-8910/48 HRS ADVANCE



Steel Buildings
And everything in between including steel roofing
and siding, purlins and trim, and all the accessories.
They're manufacturer direct, too.


w" Just in time for Thanksgiving and Christmas! -
Cured and Smoked Turkeys 10-12lb average, $2.09 Ib
Whole Cured and Smoked Hams 15-20 Ib average $1.89 Ib
Free Delivery With Purchase of 10 of More.
Individuals and Compnies
(--I I I d if ( W iti'l S A ll( /Iffel I V / k
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-623 6329:


-aip rhhlAgl''Er" k dCoi'P me-JoPF'1in Us Now!'


Heather's plans
for the future
include earning
a certificate in
Web Design
from Locklin
Technical Center
before going to
college.



School where she received her:
diploma through the traditional'
high school curriculum. While:
at SRAS, Heather served as;
Historian for the Student:
Government Association, was:
chosen as student representative:
serving on the School.
Improvement Committee, and:
was staff writer for the school:
newspaper.,
She also participated in the'
WIC (Workforce Investment,
Act) Youth Services Program,.
which is sponsored by the:
School Board of Santa Rosa;
County and Workforce'
Escarosa, Inc. Pam Boutwell,,
WIA Youth Services;
Coordinator for the SRC School:
District, nominated Heather for
the award and presented a',
plaque to her for "superb dedi-,
cation to program goals and
objectives." '
Heather has participated in'
the program since 2004. In
accepting this award, Heather
credited Mrs. Boutwell and the
work experience component ot
the WIA Youth Serviced
Program "for giving me the,
confidence to join the work
force."
Heather's plans for the
future include earning a certifi-;
cate in Web Design frorn
Locklin Technical Center
before going to college.


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Chumuckla United Methodist Church Updates


Things are so exciting at
Chumuckla United Methodist
Church. A new Praise and
Worship service has been
uniderway for a few months now
with great things happening.
Gieg Blackman, our Minister of
Music, is doing an excellent job
of leading the upbeat music for
tluis service at 9:15 each Sunday
morning.
I : Stephen Ministry is an
important part' of Chumuckla


UMC. On Sunday, Oct. 8, 2006,
we commissioned our second
class. Those completing the 20-
week course of study were:
Patsy Ard, Robin Barber, Anita
Caraway, Elaine Joseph and
Greg Joseph. With a total of ten
Stephen Ministers we are able
to give one on one Christian
care to more hurting people.
Because I Care (BIC) is a
new ministry, which was
launched in, early summer to


offer visits to lonely people.
With twenty-five BIC Ministers
we are able to visit so many
more homebound and lonely
people than ever before.
This is the second year we
have provided After School
Care for Chumuckla
Elementary School. The num-
bers have almost doubled over
last year. Our Children and
Youth Director, Lisa Lassiter is
our Director for CAC. She has


Pine Terrace Baptist hosts Wild Game dinner for men


Pine Terrace Baptist
Church will host a Wild Game
Dinner for a "Men's Night
Out". Men of all ages are invit-
ed to attend this free wild game
dinner (venison, roast geese,
chick gumbo and much much
moree) on Saturday, November
.1. starting at 5 pm at the Pine


Terrace Baptist Church in
Milton, Florida. Travis Fryman,
former baseball player for the
Detroit Tigers, will be the guest
speaker, and the Rowell Family
will provide entertainment for
the night. Several door prizes
will be awarded with the grand
prize being a CVA muzzle load


Moms' Club to hold Making Money
*. The MOMS Club of Pace / Memories, Avon, Discovery
Milton welcomes the public to Toys
our "Moms Making Money" -Hobbies i.e. Sewing, Art,
event to provide Stay-at-home Crafts, Photography
Moms with ideas on making -Professional i.e. Writing,
money while keeping the little Nursing, Teaching, the possibil-
ones at home. We will have ities are endless here
representatives from: -Web Based i.e. EBay,
-Direct Sales i.e. Southern Mystery shopping, surveys
Living at Home, Creative -Business owners and


"'Making Room in the Inn" Dinner
A benefit dinner to aid homeless families will be held
Saturday, November 18, 2006 at 6 p.m. at Sikes Hall, NAS Whiting
-Field, Milton, FL. There will be door prizes, a silent auction, and
entertainment. Tickets are $50 each or $500 a table.
"...therefore I command thee, saying, Thou shalt open thine
hand wide unto thy brother, to thy poor, and to thy needy, in thy
land."


rifle. Pine Terrace is located at
6212 Pine Blossom Road in
Milton, Florida. For more infor-
mation on Pine Terrace or for
more details on the Men's
Night Out Wild Game Dinner,
call (850) 623-3954. Visit our
website at www.ptbc.org

at Home Seminar
much more!
When: Thursday, Nov. 9th
from 6 p.m.-9 p.m.
Where: St. Mary's
Episcopal Church, 6849 Oak
St. Milton.
Contact, Jennifer Arrieta
983-1542 for more information.
,This meeting is open to the
public.
Bagdad Yard Sale
Bagdad United Methodist
Church will have a Yard Sale
on Sat., Nov. 11 beginning at
,8:00 a.m. Bagdad United
Methodist Church is located atv
4540 Forsyth Street in Bagdad.
For more info, please call the
church office, 626-1948.


two very capable ladies work-
ing with her, Tryllis Kilpatrick
and Patsy Ard.
Rev. Clive Knights, pastor
of CUMC, invites everyone to
come and experience the love
that is shown by the. church
family. We hope to see you
Sunday at 9:15 and 11 a.m. and
6 p.m. Wed. night's supper is
served at 5:30 and Bible Study
and children activities start at
6:30 p.m.

:Pastor Appreciation
:& Fellowship
Ebenezer Assembly of
God Church will be honoring
their pastor, and family,
Brother Bobby & Sister Dena
and Zach Carnley, Brother
:Marvin & Sister Daisy:
Merritt, and Sister Claudine
& Brother Bud Kimmons.
Lunch will follow after the
morning message. Come and
celebrate this special day with
the congregation. For more-
information, call 850-675-:
:4892.
:Senior Luncheon
The Bagdad United:
Methodist Church
QCommunity Senior's
:Luncheon is scheduled for
iWed., Nov. 15th at 11:00. All
senior citizens in the
community are invited. There:
is no charge for the lunch and
entertainment is also
:provided. Bagdad UMC is:
located at 4540 Forsyth St. in
Bagdad.


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Ask the Preacher

...a weekly column answering your ques-
tions with Biblical answers about life.
Dear Pastor Gallups, "Since Jesus said to 'turn the other
cheek' and since the 10 commandments say that 'Thou shalt
not kill', why would a Christian fight in a war or participate in
any type of violence at all?" J.I. Milton
Dear J.I., Certainly it is preferable if a Christian never has
to fight in a war or engage in any kind of violence at all within
their lifetime. Some are so blessed, but not all. However, please
don'tmake the common mistake of taking these two concepts
and scriptures out of context.
The teaching of "turning the other cheek" applies specifi-
cally and directly to the action a Christian should take when he
or she is persecuted for their faith in Jesus. If one is ridiculed,
made fun of, misrepresented, etc., because of their testimony for
Jesus, they should take no vengeful action. There is nothing
wrong however for attempting to correct a falsehood and reiter-
ating the truth. Jesus did that all the time.
Turning the other cheek does not necessarily apply to pro-
tection of one's life and property or one's nation from enemy
attack. How one specifically responds to any of these situations
is between them and the Lord, the circumstances of the moment
and the ulti mate consequences of their action. But, the "turn the i
other cheek" principle would not preclude a Christian from pro-
tecting himself or someone else. I praise the Lord that there are
Christian law enforcement and military officials serving and
protecting our nation everyday! I am thankful that when the
enemy or a criminal attacks that these Christian officers don't
turnm the other cheek" aren't you?
"Thou shalt not kill" is an unfortunate translation in the
King James Version. The original Hebrew in that verse means -
"murder." There is a huge difference between "kill" and."mur-
der." Again, sometimes a police officer, military soldier,
Governments (through a judicious death penalty) or even a pri-
vate citizen protecting life and property has to, unfortunately,
KILL. But to murder someone ik strictly prohibited by God's
La.% and society's law.
I hope this clarifies these often misunderstood and misin-
terpreted Biblical concepts.
Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church. in Milton. .He has a-Bachelor of
Science degree from Florida State University, and a Master of Divinity from The New Orleans Baptist
Theological Seminary. He has been pastor of HHBC since 1987. He serves as an International Youth
Evangelist for the Southern Baptist Convention since 1990 preaching all over the U.S. and Canada. For
more information about HHBC, call 623-8959 or visit our website @ www.hickoryhammockbaptistorg.
If you have any questions-forAsk-The Preacher, send it to: Ask The Preacher, Hickory Hammock Baptist
Church, 8351 Hickory Hammock Road, Milton, Florida 32583-paid advertisement


I


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Page 5B


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


I


I


.1





Page 6-B I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday November 8, 200


N


qjou can pick up a Pess gagette at the (o&owing pfaces.


MILTON
Bass Quickburger
Texas Roadhouse
Santa Rosa Medical Center
Steph & Ellie's- Blimpie's
Country Market
The Other Place
Winn Dixie
CVS
Pic 'N Sav
Milton Bakery
Groovin Noovins
Short Stop (Munson)
Race Way Store
Food World
K-Mart
Naval Housing
Press Gazette Office
Tom Thumb @ Glover Lane
Tom Thumb @ Willard Norris
Tom Thumb @' By-Pass
Tom Thumb @ Skyline
Santa Rosa County Complex
Hardee's
Ace's Restaurant
Family Dollar
Freds
Big Lots
Red Barn Bar-B-Q


EAST MILTON
Reggie's Bar-B-Que
Local Yokel
Kiley's
Shell Food Store
Tom Thumb @ Ward Basin
Tom Thumb @ Highway 87S

NORTH MILTON
(WHITING FIELD)
Ike's Food Mart
Tom Thumb @ Highway 87N
Up The Creek Store


JAY
Farmer's Country Market
Greer's Grocery Store
Jay Hospital"

PACE
Whataburger
Wal-Mart
J&J Food Store
Happy Store
Winn Dixie
Korner Kwik
Pic-N-Sav
Groovin Noovins


Groovin Noovins (Woodbine)
Pace Mini Mart
Penny Pantry
Penny Pantry (Woodbine)
Tom Thumb @' Bell Lane
Tom Thumb @ Woodbine
Tom Thumb @ Highway 90
Tom Thumb @ Crossroads
Tom Thumb @ Chumuckla
Ryans
Village Inn
Oops Alley
Pace Chamber of Commerce
CiCi's Pizza
Flea Market
Office Depot

AVALON
Tom Thumb @ Avalon Blvd.
Tom Thumb @ Mulat Road
Avalon Express

BAGDAD
B&B Food Store
Tom Thumb
Local Yokel


Lifestyles Obituaries Sports Business Reviews
* Kornerstone Education Classifieds Business & Service Directory
Church Community Military Editorial ...plus more
1 Year in County = $28.00,
1 Year Out of County = $40.00,
Senior in County = $22.00





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A SALUTE TO OUR TheSanta Rosa Press Gazette

VETERANS & R MILITARednesday, November 8,2006


VETERANS & OUR MILITARY


Military

Purple
Officials with the
Rosa County V
fMemorial Plaza are sei
honor recipients of the
Heartvawarid'ttring a n
Veteran's Day dedicate
mony of the park's I
Order of the Purple
Memorial monument. T
mony will begin at 12 N
The Santa Rosa
Veteran's Memorial Pla
nered with Chapter 56(
Military Order of, the
Heart to, erect the m>n'
which according to local
officials, is the first Purp
Mlemonrial i North Flor
The Militar) Order
Purple Heart is a congre
I' chartered organizati
Sth- local chapter is coimi
444 veterans who have
the pre tigiotis awar
Everett, who has been
tie Purple Heart five ti]
present\ serves as Con
.fthe local chapter beli
. erecting the, memori
location with such ai
4ill provide family and
a4 serene place to pay-res
those who were injured
Sincombat.".
' Commissioner Don
.1lS. Army combat vet


Order of the Purple

Heart recipients set
e Santa the Vietnam War and founder of will feature a 2
veteran's the Veteran's NMemorial Plaza, refreshments, c
eking to states, "We are honored to have Salter add
Purple worked with this organization to about the
oontime establsh a tribute to these great Memorial and I
on cere- veterans. *The Purple Heart award, the o 01
Military Monument will be a wonderful tary decoration
- Heart addition to the memorial and will also be
he cere- will help show our appreciation Veteran's M
loon. to those who have given of their book."
County life for our country or whose The book
iza part- who have been wounded pre- in the eighth g
6 of the serving our freedom." in Santa Rosa
Purple The families of award recip- starting in
nurnent. ients and the public are also Freedom, the bc
Chapter encouraged to attend the unveil- nerstone of Sai
le Heart ing ceremony at which many District School
ida. dignitaries, including U.S. cate our chili
r of the Congressman Jeff Miller, will become part c
essional- participate. American His
on, and According to Miller, who where each yea
priced of serves on the Committee on taught to ever
earned Veterans' Affairs in Congress, dent and each
rd. Bill "The Purple Heart is earned by the students tc
a,.'. arded service members v. ho hia e sus- and utilize thi
mrnes and tainted injuries due to hostile classroom to n
nmander combat, and I can think of noth- to learn more
e e e".. ing, more appropriate than to and our freedom
ial in a build a memorial in honor of our They will h
ambience fellow Northern Floridians who nity to first
Friends have earned this prestigious American bald
aspects to award." for many, man
or killed Acclaimed soloist Lisa symbol or face
Hilliard and Santa Rosa Pipes people. They w
Salter, a and Drums are also scheduled to the Warrior,
teran of participate in the event, which every America


Heart Memorial dedication honoring all

for Veterans Day at Veterans Memorial
1-gun salute and has been prepared to gi'e his or for this great country. Then each given the opportunity to study
courtesy of 4-H. her life in defense of this great student \ ill see each of the serv- each of the 13 panels which
s, "Information country, and better understand ice panels that represent our reflect each and every war and
Purple Heart that freedom is not free and major military services: Army, major conflict this country has
he history of the every generation in some %\ aN is Navy, Marines,-Air Force, and been involved in -iice the first
old's oldest mili- called upon to make sacrifices Coast Guard. Then they will be day of our independence.


presently in use,
included in the
memorial Plaza

will be included
grade curriculum
County schools
2007. Called
ook will be a cor-
nta Rosa -County
Ils to better edu-
dren as it will
if, the 8th grade,
tory curriculum
r freedom will be
y 8th grade stu-
teacher will take
o the Memorial
s. as an outdoor,
motivate children
about America
ms.
have the opportu-
learn about the
eagle which has
y years been the
of the American
ill then get to see
who represents
an veteran who


A PROCLAMATION BY THE MAYOR
OF THE CITY OF MILTON, FLORIDA,
PROCLAIMING NOVEMBER 11, 2006,
AS VETERAN'S DAY


WHEREAS,


WHEREAS.


WHEREAS,


Veteran's Day has been set aside as a national holiday to honor
those American Veterans w ho served in the military sern ices to
preserve our freedom: and

It is a honor an honor and privilege for the City of Milton to join
with Santa Rosa County in honoring Veterans from the w ars in
Bosnia, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Iraqi and all other Veterans
who made great sacrifices to defend our freedom and way of
life: and

It is fitting that our citizens join in honoring our sons and
daughters through whose service and sacrifices we no%\ enjoy a
freedom and way of life unique in this world: and


SEQUENCE OF EVENTS
DEDICATION OF THE MILITARY ORDER OF THE PURPLE HEART MEMORIAL

WELCOME: Commissioner Don Salter
POSTING OF THE COLORS: Na% arre High School NJROTC/Honor Guard
NATIONAL ANTHEM: First Baptist Church of Milton Choir

t INVOCATION: Reverend Fred Rogers
INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS: Master of Ceremonies Ferd Saloman
PRESENTATION TO RURAL METRO: Commander Bill Everett
S PRESENTATION TO COMMISSIONER DON SALTER: Commander Bill Eierett

MILITARY SPOKESPERSON: Col. Christopher E. Holzworth IV
CIVILIAN SPOKESPERSON: Congressman Jeff Miller
NIOPH SPOKESPERSON: State Commander NIOPH Jim Holland

INVOCATION: Lt. Commander Jason Riggs

HISTORY OF NIOPH: Master of Ceremonies Ferd Saloman

UNVTILING OF THE MONUMENT: Navarre High School NJROTC/Honor Guard by Santa
Rosa Drum and Pipe Band


LAYING OF THE WREATH: Military Guards
21 GUN SALUTE: NAS Whiting Field Honor Guard

TAPS: Milton High School Band

GOD BLESS AMERICA: Mrs. Lisa Hilliard
CLOSING: Master of Ceremonies Ferd Saloman


NOW, THEREFORE, I, Guy Thompson, Mayor of the City of Milton,
Florida, do hereby procaim November 11II, 2006

"VETERAN'S DAY"

and urge all citizens to reflect upon this day, upon those American Veterans we
honor and to fully appreciate the freedom that we enjoy today.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have set my hand and caused to be affixed he offi-
cial seal of the City of Milton. Florida, this 13th day of October 2006.




Guy Thompson, Mayor


ATTEST:



Dewitt Nobles, City Clerk


is

tt
r







Wednesday-November 8,2006


New book, Freedom, will be used as a teaching tool in county schools


By BILL GAMBLING
Santa Rosa Press Gazette

Sometimes, 'freedom' can
take longer than expected.
America's forefathers found
this out during the
Revolutionary War and now,
members of the Santa Rosa
Veterans Plaza Committee are
relearning that lesson with a
book they are looking to pub-
lish.
Freedom, which was
expected to be in the hands of
Santa Rosa County eighth-
graders by the start of this
school year is now expected to
be completed by January;
Monday, Santa Rosa
County Commissioner Don
Salter and Ralph Nessesen, who
oversees the Veterans Memorial
Plaza in downtown Milton,
handed the book over to
Heritage Publishing's David


AGENT
BOB LOCKLIN


Bice.
Bice, whose company pro-
duced the Heritage of Santa
Rosa books, expects the edition
to be ready for students before
the end of this school year.
"We are looking to publish
1,200 books in the first print-
ing," says Bice. "900 of those
books will go to the Santa Rosa
County School System.
"The rest will be available
to the public and other groups
interested in them."
Salter and Bice both express
something special about the
book and the entire project.
"As a publisher, I am not
worried about this project being
a success," says Bice. "If I
thought this was a risk and
wouldn't be successful, then we
would be waiting another six
months or so."
Salter, a former U.S. Army
paratrooper in Vietnam from
1967-1968, is excited about the


623-3608 I

102 Stewart Street, S.E.


possibilities the Veterans' Plaza
can offer students as a true out-
door classroom.
"When we started, we
involved (Santa Rosa Schools)
Superintendent (John) Rogers
and got the total endorsement
from a group of history teach-
ers," says Salter. "We have
worked with three interns at the
University of West Florida, and
assembled another group of
retired military officers to
review the book for correct-
ness."
Currently, the Veterans'
Memorial Plaza serves as a
timeline with black granite pan-
els showing the different wars
or battles in which America has
been involved. It also includes
other "significant information,"
officials say.
The biggest twist to the
book is, each chapter corre-
sponds to a part of the Plaza
itself.


DISCUSSING FINAL DRAFT Heritage Publishing's Daid Bice. left, goes over the final dralt
of Freedom with Ralph Nessesen, center, who oversees the Santa Rosa Veterans' Plaza, and Santa,
Rosa County Commissioner Don Salter, right. The book will be used as a teaching tool by Santa;.
Rosa County educators in conjunction with their 8th grade American History classes. The book,'.
echoes many of the historical events honored in the county's Veterans' Memorial Plaza. (Photo by:


-since 1958-


Congratulations to our Area Military...

We appreciate your patronage since 1958!






BUSINESS HOME AUTO FLOOD


We Salute Our


Armed Forces &


Vete ra s



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"The seventh graders'
classes are geared more toward
world history," says Stice.
"While students in the eighth
grade study American history.
but we are looking at putting
this book together so it will
cover enough for anyone to pick
up and learn something."
With .a classroom that can
be used as a hands-on tool with
bias relief panels and a history
timeline in black granite, Stice
feels the book will only add to
what the Plaza already offers.
"We will touch base on all
the time periods involved-
starting with the American
Revolution and covering history
all the way through to the pres-
ent," says Stice. "This will be
done so the students can have a
better understanding before they
go.
"We will also work on a les-
son planner to help teachers


with additional information and'&
activities outside the class,-"
room."
In the beginning, Salteri
stressed what' the book'i:
Freedom, would offer students.'-'
"This book will talk about,-
our Constitution and explairi'
more about the history noted on
the panels with pictures," says:
Salter. "The book will be intro-
duced in the classroom and will
allow the students to do a more,
in-depth study of what this.
Veterans' Memorial Plaza truly
represents."
As this project goes for-
ward, the Santa Rosa County:
Veterans Memorial Plaza'
Committee is looking for spon-
sors.
If you are interested in sup-
porting the book project, contact
Nessesen at 626-7292. Story
written By Bill Gamblin. Reach
him at: news@sr-pg.com


Bill Gamblin.)
Thus, the Veterans', Plaza
comes to life.
"Teachers can choose to go
to the Plaza before introducing
the book or afterwards." says
Salter. "This lets the kids visit,it,
touch it, and feel it.
"Kids are a lot more excited
about learning when they feel
more involved.".
But this is not the typical
history book that covers
American History starting with
the Revolutionary War and con-
tinuing through Operation
Desert Storm.
"This book features quotes
from local Veterans, which
makes it unlike any other," says
Salter.
Currently, the Plaza features
blank panels in the hope of the
latest entry being the "war to
end all wars," but those on the
Veteran's Committee are realis-
tic.
"We would like to think
there will be no more wars,"
says Salter. "But it appears there
will always be those who are
jealous of our freedoms and
want to take them away."
So not only is the Plaza a
living tribute to the veterans of
Santa Rosa County, but the book
Freedom will also be updated.
"This is a living document,"
says Bice. "The most unique
thing about this book is it gives
you information from the
Veterans' side, unlike any other
history book published."
One of the UWF students
who worked on Freedom was
Pace's Jessica Stice. She was
selected to assist Santa Rosa
County Coordinator of Social
Studies Clark Youngblood of
Milton High School.
"I have fallen in love with
this project," says Stice, a grad-
uate student from Massachusetts
who has been watching the
Plaza's activities from afar since
she was selected in 2005. "I will
be doing my internship through
the University of West Florida
and then will continue on after
the internship."
Currently, Youngblood and
Stice are doing preliminary
work on the book-setting an
objective, looking at the cur-
riculum, and establishing a
timeline for the work.


Purple Heart was once

'Badge of Military Merit,'

oldest military decoration
Because General George Washington created it in 1782, they
Purple Heart is Americais oldest military decoration.
Washington gave it a different name, however. He called it the;
Badge of Military Merit.
August 7, 1782, Washington decreed that ". .. whenever any,
singularly meritorious action is performed, the author of it shall be'
permitted to wear ... over his left breast... a heart in purple cloth.",
Three Continental Army noncommissioned officers received the',
award in 1783. William Brown, Elijah Churchill, and David Bissell.
had demonstrated great courage Brown and Churchill in combat;
and Bissell as a spy who pretended to desert from the American'
forces, enlisted in the British Army and obtained valuable informa-,
tion.
'After the American Revolution, the Badge of Military Merit:
was forgotten. No comparable award was made to soldiers during:
Americafs awards of th 19th century.
When Army Chief of Staff Gen. Douglas MacArthur revived;
the award February 22, 1932, and renamed it the Purple Heart, he'
intended the decoration to recognize meritorious service, which, in:
his interpretation, included being wounded as a result of enemy:
action. I
In General Order No. 3, MacArthur announced that "the Purple,
Heart, established by ... Washington ... is hereby revived out of,
respect to his memory and military achievements."
The Army decided that new Purple Heart would be for "any sin-:
gularly meritorious act of extraordinary fidelity or essential serv-
ice."
But the new award criteria also had a twist. By definition, any-
wound "which necessitates treatment by a medical officer" and was.
received in combat, was included in the meritorious service. This,
was the beginning of the link between the Purple Heart and the,
injured soldiers.
During the 1930s, the Army awarded a small number of Purple,
Hearts to World War I veterans for meritorious service and thou-
sands and thousands to soldiers who had been wounded in combat
in France in 1917 and 19 18. 1
In later years, the Purple Heart was awarded to those killed inl
action and in 1942, the Navy obtained authority to awad h the Purple
Heart to sailors, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen. In World War II,'
more than 200 purple Hearts were awarded for meritorious service;
In 1942, however, it was decided the Purple Heart should be award-:
ed only for those wounded or killed in Action. As a result, the Wardc
Department changed its regulations so the Purple Heart was exclu-,
sively for troops wounded or killed in action with the enemy.
That changed in the 1960s when President John F. Kennedyi
expanded the definition of lienemyi so that Americans fighting in a
undeclared war in Southeast Asia would receive the Purple Heart
when wounded in firefights with guerrillas.
In the 1980s, President Ronald Reagan changed the Purple,
Heart's criteria to include service members who suffered injuries as
a result of an international terrorist attack. The medal retains its
unique character as the only decoration that does not depend on 4
superior's favor or approval every service member who suffers (
qualifying injury or wounded gets a Purple Heart.
Today, the Purple Heart is highly prized and is among the most
recognized of all American decorations and medals. This is due to
its beautiful design, but also because of its unique history sets it
apart from all other military awards.


I The Press Gazette-Nfilitary Appreciation


Page 2-C





Page 3-C


Wnecdan v _-Nnvemher 8. 2006


Cpl. J. R.
Pensacola's Marine Corps
League remains very active in
community volunteer and chari-
ty: work in this area.
The Marine Corps League
ws chartered by an Act of
CRngress on August 4, 1937,
and is classified as a
y6teran/military service organi-
z4tion and was formed for the
purposes of promoting the inter-
ests of the U.S. Marine Corps;
to provide camaraderie and
assistance to Marines, as well as
tc their widows and orphans,
and to preserve the traditions of
the U.S. Marine Corps.
I It is a not for profit corpora-
tion within the provisions of the
hIternal Revenue Service Code
5Q1(c)(4), with a special group
exemption letter which allows
for contributions to the League
ta be tax deductible by the
dbnor. Its membership of 60,000
4iembers is comprised of honor-
qbly discharged, active duty,
retired, and Reserve Marines
with 90 days of service or more
iA the Fleet Marine Force. Navy
(6rpsmen are also eligible under
tie same criteria.
The detachment's name was
changed this year from the
William D. Carter detachment
td the Cpl. J.R. Spears detach-
ment in memory of Cpl. J.R.
Spears of Molino, Florida, who
was the 2000 solder killed in
Iraq and the first Marine lost
from this area. Detachment
activities this year included the
dedication of one of the ball
fields at the Don Sutton Sports
Complex in Molino, Florida, in
honor of Cpl. Spears' ultimate
sacrifice for his country.


1*


Spears Marine Corps League detachment active in community


Members of the detachment
and active duty Marines from
MATSG-21 at NAS, participat-
ed in the event. J.R. played on
the same ball fields growing up
before he graduated from high
school and joined the Marine
Corps.
On September 22, at the first
Tate High School home game,
the Tate staff, members of the
detachment and active duty
Marines from MATSG-21 par-
ticipated in honoring J. R. by
retiring the football jersey he
wore as an offensive lineman
for Tate High School. J. R.'s
parents were presented with a
shadow box with the jersey and
other memorabilia relating to
his service in the Marine Corps.
Another. box was presented by
the Tate staff to be displayed in
the hallway for all the students
to view and reflect upon. It is
considered one of their own
alumni's contributions to ensure
their continued freedoms.
The detachment is heavily
involved in fundraisers to raise
money to assist Marines in the
area. After Katrina last year, the
detachment traveled to Biloxi
and assisted over 20 Marine
families with cash, cleaning up
their yards and residences,
hanging sheetrock, painting, and
supplying washers, .dryers,
refrigerators, and furniture to
help bring them back to the
standard of living they enjoyed
before the storm.
This year, detachment 066,
in association with the Marine
Corps Aviation Association and
MATSG-21, were able to raise
over $34,000 for three local


~2'


charities with the 5K run.
MATSG-21 has sponsored the
event for the last 23 years.
The major fundraiser is an
annual classic car show. This
year's show was at the Five
Flags Speedway and drew in
many well-restored classic cars.
Five Flags generously donated
their facility to assist the detach-
ment in raising money to com-
plete their mission.
NAPA was a major partner
as well and provided many indi-
vidual donations from the local
NAPA stores and automotive
repair shops. A large portion of
the proceeds from this event
goes to the Toys for Tots pro-
gram in Escambia and Santa
Rosa counties.
The detachment works very
closely with the Marine Corps
Reserve unit that coordinates
and supervises the program by
locating pick up boxes at vari-
ous location in the area. They
then pick up the toys and deliv-
er them to pick up points in both
counties.
Each May, just before
Memorial Day, the detachment
conducts a clean up at the
Milton Cemetery. Bill Bledsoe,
a detachment member and its
Chaplain, is also the cemetery
director and supervises the clean
up.
Members bring mowers,
weed eaters, rakes, and trim-
mers and do a massive cleanup
that takes all day. A group BBQ
follows the clean up at the site.
Active duty Marines from
MATSG-21 and Whiting Field
join in the work and hear about
the "Old Corps" from detach-
ment members. On Memorial
Day members gather at the
cemetery and place flags at the
graves of each service man
buried there:
Supporting veterans in the
community and those national
holidays honoring veterans,
members attend ceremonies at
the Wall South and Veterans'
Park in Milton each year. A
wreath from the League is pre-
sented at each site honoring the
veterans whose service has
helped preserve this great
nation's heritage and freedoms.
The Marine Corps League,
J. R. Spears Detachment 066,


meets the second Tuesday of
each month at 7 p.m. at the
Escambia County Road
Department facility in
Cantonment at 601 Highway


297-A. Dues are $30.00 per
year.
Anyone interested in joining
the League or needing addition-
al information can go to the web


site at www.pensacolam-
cleague.com or call Phil Foster
at 380-0640 between the hours
of 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday.


CPL. J. R. SPEARS MARINE CORPS LEAGUE DETACHMENT PLACES WREATH AT
VETERANS PLAZA IN DOWNTOWN MILTON


MILTON CEMETERY CLEANUP Each May, just before memorial Day, the detachment con-
ducts a clean up at the Milton Cemetery. Bill Bledsoe, a detachment member and its Chaplain, is
also the cemetery director and supervises the clean up. Members bring mowers, week eaters,
rakes, and trimmers and do a massive clean up that takes all day. On Memorial Day members
gather at he cemetery and place flags at the graves of each service man buried there.
. -, ..


The City of Milton is proud to be



"The Cradle of Naval Aviation"



















: *" . . *-. *" ." J














,9-11 ..-



Front Row (left to right) Councilman Bunny Jernigan, Councilwoman Marilyn Jones, Mayor Guy Thompson, City Clerk Dewitt Nobles,
Councilwoman Pat Lunsford, Councilman Grady Hester
Back Row (left to right) Councilman Clayton White, Councilman Lloyd Hinote, Councilman R.L. Lewis, Councilman Buddy Jordan



"Our Best Wishes to the many men and women who


have served our country."


. vveunesuny -Iqu v


I


I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


I -


4el- "









PG Columnist and CPA Ed Rouse delivers commissioning challenge to 2nd Lt. Joshua Showalter


Reverend Pastor, General
and Mrs. Bjorkland, Officers
and men of the Marine Corps,
Officers and men of our sister
services, ladies and gentleman.
As you well know we are hear
today to recognize the com-
mencement of our brother
Joshua's life as an officer in the
service of this great republic.
The word commencement is
derived from the Latin word
which means to begin so Joshua
as you take up this grave
responsibility I would like to
reach down to the deepest well
of human strength where the
still water resides, rather than
appeal to superficial emotion, so
that you maybe in some way
armed for the struggles ahead.
There is a wide spread senti-
ment within our church and our
nation which affirms that the
pacifist is more noble than the
Christian soldier. This senti-
ment is not grounded in history
and is essentially a lullaby in the
face of the apocalyptic fascist
doctrines that seek the destruc-
tion of our free will, which is the
basis of our democratic values
and the essence of Christian
freedom.
We have heard this lullaby
before. During the low and dis-
honest decade of the 1930's
when presented with a clear and
present danger, the intellectual
fore fathers of the current voices
of appeasement and pacifism
congratulated themselves for
having achieved "peace in our
time" when in fact all they had
achieved was the addition of
their signatures to the death
warrant for millions of innocent
people. They contradicted what
all the saints have taught us that
if you have the power to resist
evil and you fail to exercise that
power you have committed an
act of moral turpitude. Now the
souls of those millions con-
demned to death at Munich cry
out to us for justice. Their
refrain is'never again.
However in order for us to
answer them we must know
what it means to be a Christian
and a soldier? We must look to
the examples of history for
enlightenment.
Sebastian the Martyr,
Raphael Semmes, Desmond


COMMISSIONING CEREMONY Edward Rouse, right,
delivered a challenging speech at the commissioning of his
friend, Joshua Showalter, who entered the Marine Corps ranks
as a 2nd Lieutenant. The Showalter family has a rich military
history that goes back to low Jima.


Doss, Count Von Stauffenburg
In days gone by our fathers
clearly understood the role of a
Christian soldier as a knight and
there was no need to explain,
apologize or rationalize. Even
the pagan Plato in his book "The
Republic" refers to the role of
the guardians.
Bernard of Clairveaux
comes closest to the mark when
he observes
"When someone strongly
resists a foe in the flesh, relying
solely on the strength of the
flesh, I would hardly remark
it....And when war is waged by
spiritual strength against vices...
this, too, is nothing remark-
able... But when one sees a man
powerfully girding himself with
both swords...He is truly a fear-
less knight and secure on every
side, for his soul is protected by
the armor of faith just as his
body is protected by armor of
steel. He is thus doubly armed


and need fear neither demons
nor men."
Let me tell you about a
knight that I have known
Warren Showalter**Iwo
Jima Story**Officers request
change in plans**Col, reminds
them they have orders**they
salute and leave and, are dead by
0800 next morning.
I often wonder whether it is
easier to remain alive and carry
that memory for so many years
or to submit willingly to orders
but I do know we are taught as
Christians that "submission to
the will of God is perfect free-
dom"

Joshua I know you are not
afraid because you are a Marine
but you may have some doubts
about why God has called you
to this time and place. You are
leaving the protection of the
'cocoon that the Christian com-
munity and your family have


given you up to this point in
your life.
Even in the Marine Corps,
as noble an institution as it is,
you will find some shirkers,
bureaucrats and heathens but
you will also meet some gen-
uine heroes, patriots and saints.
Take your strength from them.
Learn and transmit their exam-
ple to others as you carry out
your duties and when you hear
those voices of doubt remember
the Lord is with you and you
stand on the shoulders of giants.
As a marker on your road
ahead I leave you with the
example of General Stonewall
Jackson:
"General" I asked, "How is
it that you can keep so cool and
appear so utterly insensible to
danger in such a storm of shell
and bullets?"
"Captain, my religious
belief teaches me to, feel as safe
in battle as in bed. God has fixed
the time.....I do not concern
myself about that, but to be
always ready, no matter when it
may overtake me.
"That is the way all men
should live, and then all would
be equally brave."
Semper Fidelis and Memory
Eternal
Would all the veterans here
present please stand and pray
with me


My Prayer:
Almighty Father in Heaven,
on this day when Joshua
Showalter has offered himself'
In service to our republic,
we his brothers in arms do
humbly pray.
For forgiveness for our sins
And the many times we
have failed
To be worthy of your love.
For our brothers who have
sacrificed their body and spirit.
They gave the fullest meas-
ure of love as they performed
their duties.
They served not themselves
or the evil designs of a dictator
but in loyalty
Attempted to carryout the
will of the people.
I For our families and the
families of our comrades
Who have also suffered,
that they may know peace
In the knowledge that all
things are ordered in
Accordance with your
Divine will.
For our brothers who con-
tinue to suffer from PTSD,
Depression and guilt that
Your hand would touch
And heal them and that they
may have the strength
Which can only come from
submission to your Divine plaiq.
For our enemies that they
may also come to know,


Your Divine guidance, pro-
tection and mercy. We extend ini
Your
Holy Name the hand of re&6
onciliation and humbly pray thdi
the
People of the world will of
day have all the blessings they,,'
Deserve as Your children
and according to Your will. ;
For the men and woman i.
the armed forces
* Who this day are set aboln
protecting the innocent and
bringing to justice the guilty. *,
We do humbly pray that Yo4
would grant them your Divine
protection. That You would
have mercy on the innocent pet-
ples of the afflicted nations an@
that you would spare the men(-
bers of the military from the
ravages of war both physical
and mental as we have known
them all too well oh Lord.
For the people of our nation
that they may come to a full
understanding that freedom
according to your Divine plan
requires sacrifice and that they
may understand the heavy but-
den of those who have made this
sacrifice in the past.
We humbly and earnestly
make this prayer in the name of
Our Lord Jesus Christ,. as we
know you are the one who ha's
ruled the nations from age to
age. AMEN


2nd Lt. Joshua Showalter with his father Kenneth Showalter at his commissioning.


- ...


ROBERT G. MCCLURE

TAX COLLECTOR


/ FLORIDA -

USANPL
U S ARMY
U.S. ARMY
i FLORIDA -

P SAMPL
U.S. NAVY
U.S. NAVY
A FLORIDA m'

SMPL
i 'U 5 AIR FORCE
U.S. AIR FORCE
.... ...... ..si.a ......



U.S. MARINES



OSTGAMPLR

COAST GUARD


FLORIDA- '
s. aPL
9i I v V C O E
DISABLED VETS PU




D.V. WHEELCHAIR SA
SFLORIDA .. .



PARALYZED VETS PA

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NAT'L GUARD


PE


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U.S. RESERVE


FLORIDA

8 00000
MAT WOUNDED VEMRAN
RPLE HEART
' FL.A"- '.iA -*iBo

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LUTES VETS
FLORIDA -'i

SSAMPLi
US PARATROOPEP
NRATROOPER
n, o ;..i.,, :



EX-P.O.W.



000ARL HARBOR

ARL HARBOR


ABOVE YOU WILL FIND 15 OF THE SPECIALTY TAGS THAT OUR
OFFICES ISSUE WHICH ARE RELATED TO OUR MILITARY.
PLEASE CONTACT US AT 983-1800 FOR QUALIFICATIONS &
FEES FOR THESE TAGS OR VISIT OUR WEB-SITE AT
www.robertmcclure.com
FOR INFORMATION ON THESE AND OTHER SPECIALTY TAGS.
IN ADDITION YOU WILL BE ABLE TO CHECK THE STATUS OF YOUR REAL
ESTATE TAXES AND MAKE PAYMENTS FOR TAG RENEWALS, PROPERTY TAXES,
OCCUPATIONAL LICENSES, AND HUNTING/FISHING LICENSES ONLINE.
MY STAFF AND I WANT TO WISH ALL OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, ESPECIALLY
OUR VETERANS, A HAPPY & HEALTHY VETERANS' DAY, 2006.


We at Mooneyham Heating & Air

Conditioning, Inc. join our

community to welcome home our

own 842nd Signal Corp back from

Iraq. And say a "Job well done."

We also honor the men and women

who serve our country

both active and retired veterans

as we observe Veterans Day.



Mooneyham


Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc.


Ha7b StopR n.

Its Hard Th Stop A Thrne.


Gary Mooneyham, President
David Beach, Vice President
4061 Avalon Blvd.
Milton, FL

623-2084


C.M.C. AL #87090 FL #041100


Wednesday -November 8, 2006


I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


Page 4-C






Wednesday-November 8, 2006


I The -Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


.. 1~**
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FRONT AND CENTER!-The Blue Angels will perform this
weekend, November 10 and 11, 2006 beginning at 2 p.m. each
day. Attractions will include not, only the Blue Angels demon-
stration team and Fat Albert, but also the Army Cobra demon-
stration team with a tribute to patriots. It will be a celebration
of the Blues 60 years in the air, a homecoming of sorts. During
1949 and 1950, the famed Navy precision flying team made their
home at NAS Whiting Field, and the Navy'f first jet training
unit, JTU ONE (JTU-1) was commissioned. The outbreak of the
Korean War in 1950 caused the stay of the Blue Angels and
JTU-1 at Whiting Field to be short-lived, as the Blue Angels
were ordered to disband and go into combat. In 1950 in


response to the needs being experienced by the Navy, the team
reported to the aircraft carrier USS Princeton. Jet training was
transferred from NAS Whiting to Kingsville, Texas. At that time
NAS Whiting was once again concentrating on basic pilot train-
ing. As a special treat, and in conjunction with the 60th anniver-
sary celebration, the IMAX Theater at the National Museum of
Naval Aviation at Pensacola Naval Air Station, will present
"Magic of Flight" featuring the Blue Angels. It'will be shown for,
a special price of $6.00. There are numerous other special
attractions planned for the weekend, and the public is encour-
aged to participate in the fun and entertainment. For a more
formal atmosphere, bring your lawn chairs!


Page 5-C


NAS Whiting Field

once home to Blue

Angels flight team


At the end of World War II,
Chester W. Nimitz, then the
Chief of Naval Operations,
ordered the formation of a flight
demonstration team to keep the
public interested in naval avia-
tion.
The Blue Angels performed
their first flight demonstration
less than a year later in June
1946 at their home base, Naval
Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville,
Florida. Flying the Grumman
F6F Hellcat, they were led by
Lt. Cmdr. Roy "Butch" Voris.
Only two months later on
August 25, 1946, the Blue
Angels transitioned to the
Grumman F8F Bearcat and one
year later, the 1947 team, led by
Lt. Cmdr. Robert Clarke, intro-
duced the now famous
"Diamond Formation."
By the end of the 1940's the
Blue Angels were flying their
first jet aircraft, the Grumman
F9F-2 Panther. In response to
the demands placed on naval
aviation in the Korean Conflict,
the team reported to the aircraft
carrier USS Princeton as the
nucleus of Fighter Squadron
191 (VF-191), Satan's Kittens,
in 1950.
The team reorganized the
next year and reported to NAS
Corpus Christi, Texas, where
they began flying the newer and
faster version of the Panther, the
F9F-5. The Blue Angels
remained in Corpus Christi until
the winter of 1954 when they
.relocated to their present home
base at NAS Pensacola, Florida.
It was here that they progressed
to the swept-wing Grumman
F9F-8 Cougar.


The ensuing 20 years saw
the Blue Angels transition to
,two more aircraft, the Grumman
F11F-1 Tiger (1957) and the
McDonnell Douglas F-4J
Phantom II (1969).
In December 1974, the
Navy Flight Demonstration
Team began flying the
McDonnell Douglas A-4F
Skyhawk II and was reorgan-
ized into the Navy Flight
Demonstration Squadron. This
reorganization permitted the
establishment of a commanding
officer vice a flight leader
(Cmdr. Tony Less was the
squadron's first official com-
manding officer), added support
officers and further redefined
the squadron's mission, empha-
sizing the support of recruiting
efforts.
On November 8, 1986, the
Blue Angels completed their
40th anniversary year during
ceremonies unveiling their pres-
ent. aircraft, the new sleek
McDonnell Douglas F/A-18
Hornet, the first dual-role fight-
er/attack aircraft now serving on
the nation's front lines of
defense.
In 1992 more than one mil-
lion people viewed Blue Angel's
performances during a 30-day
European deployment to
Sweden, Finland, Russia,
Romania, Bulgaria, Italy, the
United Kingdom and Spain.
This was the first European
deployment in 19 years.
The 2005 show season
brought out more than 17 mil-
lion spectators. Since 1946, the
Blue Angels have performed for
more than 414 million fans.


k Team Santa Rosa,

;Executive Commnittee


--..''--.-.. --' :M


-' -- 4 A


Dan McKenzie
McKenzie GMC Pontiac & Buick


SALUTES



All Santa Rosa County Veterans

Both Active and Retired

Let us pause on Veteran's Day

to remember and show

our appreciation.


Also a special salute to the

842nd Signal Corp

National Guard Unit Returning

home to Milton from Iraq.

A job well done.

"Welcome Home"










PONTIAC GMC BUICK
Hwy 90 at 89, Milton
623-3481


-t .


A Salute to the


Men & Women.,,


'VVho Have or


Are Pres'ently,.,


Serving

.0urCountry,..





Wednesday-November 8, 2006


Eglin AFB still retains one of the most important roles in the military


: Spanning five wars, mod-
em-day Eglin evolved from a
distant and honorable past.
Currently the Air Armament
Center tests and evaluates non-
nuclear munitions, electronic
combat systems and naviga-
tion/guidance systems.
For more than sixty-five
years and spanning six wars,
Eglin has played a prominent
role in airpower history. In
1931, personnel of the Army Air
Corps Tactical School (Maxwell
Field, Alabama) looking for a
site for a bombing and gunnery
range, saw the potential of the
sparsely populated' forested
areas surrounding Valparaiso,
Florida, and the vast expanse of
the adjacent Gulf of Mexico.
' A local businessman and
airplane buff, James E. Plew,
saw the potential of a military
payroll to boost the depression-
stricken economy in the local
area. He leased to the City of
Valparaiso 137 acres on which
an airport was established in
1933, and in 1934, Plew offered
the U.S. government a donation
of 1,460 contiguous acres for
the bombing and gunnery base.
This leasehold became the head-
quarters for the Valparaiso
Bombing and Gunnery Base
activated on 14 June 1935 under
the command of Captain Arnold
H. Rich. On 4 August 1937, the
base was redesignated Eglin
Field in honor of Lieutenant
Colonel Frederick I. Eglin, U.S.
Air Corps, killed on 1 January
1'937 in an aircraft crash.
With the outbreak of war in
Surope in 1939 and President
Roosevelt's call for an expan-
sion of the Army Air Corps,
General Henry H. "Hap" Arnold
ordered the establishment of a
Proving ground for aircraft
armament. Eglin was selected
for the testing mission, and on
27 June 1940, the U.S. Forestry
Service ceded to the War
Department the
Choctawhatchee National
Forest, consisting of some
384,000 acres. In 1941, the Air
Corps Proving Ground was acti-
yated, and Eglin became the site
for gunnery training for Army
Air Forces fighter pilots, as well
as a major testing center for air-
craft, equipment, and tactics. In
March 1942, the base served as
one of the sites for Lieutenant
Colonel Jimmy Doolittle to pre-
pare his B-25 crews for their
raid against Tokyo.

In addition to testing all new
aircraft and their serial modifi-
cations, the Proving Ground
Command, established at Eglin
April 1942, found the isolation
and immensity of the ranges
especially well-suited for spe-


cial tasks. For example, in 4944,
personnel developed the tactics
and techniques to destroy
German missile installations
being built to support V-l buzz-
bomb attacks on England.
By the end of the war, Eglin
had made a recognizable contri-
bution to the effectiveness of the
American air operations in
Europe and the Pacific and con-
tinued to maintain a role in the
research, development, and test-
ing of air armament. Eglin also
became a pioneer in missile
development when, in early
1946, the First Experimental
Guided Missiles Group was
activated to develop the tech-
niques for missile launching and
handling; establish training pro-
grams; and monitor the develop-
ment of a drone or pilotless air-
craft capability to support the
Atomic Energy Commission
tests, Operation CROSS-
ROADS, at Eniwetok. On 13
January 1947, the Guided
Missiles Group received nation-
wide publicity by conducting a
successful drone flight from
Eglin to Washington, D.C., in a
simulated bombing mission.
Both as a reaction to the
Soviet atomic explosion in 1949
and in recognition that research
and development had lagged in
the years of lower priority to
operational concerns, the Air
Force, in early 1950, established
the Air Research and
Development Command (later
Air Force Systems Command).
The following year, the Air
Research and Development
Command established the Air
Force Armrament Center at
Eglin, which, for the first time,
brought development and test-
ing together. After the start of
the Korean War in 1950, test
teams moved to the combat the-
ater for testing in actual combat.
They numbered among their
accomplishments improved air-
to-air tactics and improved tech-
niques for close air support. On
1 December 1957, the Air Force
combined the Air Proving
Ground Command and the Air
Force Armament Center to form
the Air Proving Ground Center.
The Center built the highly-
instrumented Eglin Gulf Test
Range and for the next few
years, served as a major missile
test center for weapons such as
the BOMARC, Matador, GAM-
72 "Quail," and GAM-77
"Hound Dog.",

As the Southeast Asia con-
flict increased emphasis on con-
ventional weapons, the respon-
sibilities ,at Eglin grew. On 1
August 1968, the Air Proving
Ground Center was redesignat-
ed the Armament Development


and Test Center to centralize
responsibility for research,
development, test and evalua-
tion, and initial acquisition of
nonnuclear munitions for the
Air Force. On 1 October 1979,
the Center was given division
status. The Armament Division,
redesignated Munitions
Systems Division on 15 March
1989, placed into production the
precision-guided munitions for
the laser, television, and infrared
guided bombs; two anti-armor
weapon systems; and an
improved hard target weapon
used in Operation DESERT
STORM during the Persian Gulf
War. The Division was also
responsible for .developing the
Advanced Medium Range Air-
to-Air Missile (AMRAAM), an
Air Force-led joint project with
the U.S. Navy.
In addition to its develop-
ment and testing mission, Eglin
also served .as the training site
for the Son Tay Raiders in 1970,
the group that made the daring
attempt to rescue American
POWs from a North Vietnamese
prison camp. In 1975, the instal-
lation served as one of four
main U.S. Vietnamese Refugee
Processing Centers, where base
personnel housed and processed
more than 10,000 Southeast
Asian refugees at the Auxiliary
Field Two "Tent City." Eglin
again became an Air Force
refugee resettlement center pro-
cessing over 10,000 Cubans
who fled to the U.S. between
April and May of 1980.
On 11 July 1990, the
Munitions Systems Division
was redesignated the Air Force
Development Test Center.
During the 1990s, the Center
supported test and evaluation for
the development of nonnuclear
Air Force armament including
next generation precision-guid-
ed weapons; operational train-
ing for armament systems; and
test and evaluation of command,
control, communications, com-
puters, and intelligence (C4I)
aerospace navigation and guid-
ance systems.
On 1 October 1998, as part
of the Air Forces' strategic plan
to guide the service into the 21st
Centur.. the' Air Force
Development. Test Center
became the Air Force Materiel
Command's Air Armament
Center (AAC). As one of
,AFMC?s product centers, AAC
is responsible for development,
acquisition, testing, and fielding
all air-delivered weapons. AAC
applies advanced technology,
engineering, and programming
efficiencies across the entire
product life cycle to provide
superior combat capability. The
Center plans, directs, and con-


ducts test and evaluation of U.S.
and allied air armament, naviga-
tion/guidance systems, and
command and control (C2) sys-
tems and supports the largest
single base mobility commit-
ment in the Air Force.
AAC accomplishes its mis-
sion through three components:
the Air Force Program
Executive Office for Weapons
with two systems wings and a
systems group, the 46th Test
Wing, and the 96th Air Base-
Wing. Recently the AAC:pro-
vided our warfighters with the'
munitions and expeditionary
combat support to dominate the
enemy in Operations ALLIED
FORCE, ENDURING FREE-
DOM, and IRAQI FREEDOM.
During this time Deparment of
Defense, the Air Force, and
AFMC presented the Air
Armament Center with awards
in acquisition, test, and combat.
support
In 2004, the Air Force
Materiel Command (AFMC)
requested that its logistics and
product centers, of which the
Air Armament Center at Elgin
AFB is one of four, reconfigure
their program offices into con-
stituted units (wings, groups,
and squadrons) so that the
AFMC organizational structure
would resemble that of other
major commands. In Dec 2004,
the system program offices
became named wings, groups,
and squadrons, and in May 2006
the named units were redesig-
nated as numbered units.
The 46th Test Wing, the
96th Air Base Wing (ABW), and
the 33rd Fighter Wing (FW), a
tenant unit at Eglin that is
assigned to the Air Combat


Command, with headquarters at
Langley AFB, Virginia, regular-
ly deployed people, equipment,
and aircraft to support
Operation IRAQI FREEDOM
and Operation ENDURING
Freedom: (Afghanistan).
Additionally, the 96th Ground
Combat Training squadron
trains airmen from other Air
Force bases in the techniques
and tactics of ground combat.
Many of these airmen eventual-
ly go to the Middle East to per-
form air base defense and
ground convoy protection
duties. Finally, the Air
Armament Center developed,
tested, and made the initial pro-
curement of various air-deliv-
ered weapons, such as the Joint
Direct Attack Munition(JDAM)
and, most recently, the Small
Diameter Bomb (SDB), current-
ly used in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Both use Navstar GlIbu.!
Positioning System (GPS) sig-
nals to provide highly accurate
delivery of the weapon to desig-
nated targets.
In addition, the AFSOC/PA
and ACC Red Horse/PA at
Hurlburt Field and the, 919
SOW/PA at Duke Field can give
you inf., on the USAF Special
Operations units in the local
area.
They are low density, high
use outfits that have made major
contributions to the GWOT and
'are some of the most combat
decorated units in the active and
Reserve Air Force.
The most significant current
program changes come from the
Nov 2005 recommendations of
the independent Base
Realignment and Closure
(BRAC) Committee. The


BRAC Committee recommend-"2
ed that the Department of;-
Defense locate the flight and-,'
maintenance training for all"
services and international buy-,'..
ers of the Joint Strike Fightdr{'
(JSF), now known as the F-35.
Lightening II, at Eglin AFB,."
The 96 ABW has been busy.
developing a plan to beddowri-;
the new training wing, to lbei
assigned to the Air EducatiohiQ
and Training Commar~;:-
(AETC), probably in the area-.
now. occupied on the west sidet
of the base by the 33 FW. lu-:
August 2006, the Air Force,-
agreed to change the mission 1t'
the 33 FW to F-35 training and-
place it under AETC. The Air-'
Force would then reallocate the+'
currently assigned F-15s to"
other Air , Force units. :
Additionally, the BRAC
Committee recommended that
the US Army's 7th Special
Forces Group be moved from
Fort Bragg, North Carolina, to
the Eglin military reservation to
take better advantage of the var-
ied terrain and environment of
the Eglin reservation.
Current plans will place the
7th Special Forces Group on
Duke Field, about ten miles'
north of the Eglin main area.
These new units will bring to ti,.
general Fort Walton Beach area
about 3,000 new military per-
sonnel and up to around 12,000-
family members and contract
tors.
The leadership of Eglin
AFB is working diligently v. ith
DoD, Air Force, regional and'
local officials to accommodat&e-
the large influx of people Jif
terms of housing, transportation
routes, and other related issues'.'


We salute you,


our men and


women of tlhe


Armed Forces!



IVilton

983-5650

G-ulf Breeze


iy^ ""<^"^ y^


4ina uwd d



au id tud +e.m

4

















GOD BLESS AMERICA


Ce nS Rr..e






4837 Glover Lane

MILTON

623-0797


Tops Appliances


wishes to


congratulate our


active & retired


military as we


celebrate Military


Appreciation Month.


Also, we want to


thank you for your


patronage since we


opened our business


in 1957.





623-3371
Highway
90 West
Milton
Appliance


I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


Page 6-C







.Wednesday-November 8, 2006


I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


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Wednesday-November 8,2006


Page 8-C


The nation's youngest mili-
tary service kicked off its 60th
anniversary observance the
weekend of October 14. 2006
with the official dedication of
the Air Force Memorial at
Arlington, VA.
The memorial, composed of
three bold and graceful spires
soaring skyward to a height of
270 feet, was dedicated and
given to the nation bv the Air
Force Memorial Foundation at
an official ceremony at 1:30
p.m. October 14, on a three-acre
promontory next to Arlington
National Cemeter) and a shorn
walk from the Pentagon.
Officials said the memorial
honors the millions of men and
women who have served in the
Air Force and its predecessor
organizations, including the
U.S. Signal Corps. the \rm\ Air
Corps. and the ArmN Air Forces.
It pa\s tribute to the dedica-
tion. sacnfice and contributions
of those who pioneered the
skies, those w ho shape the air,


space, and cyberspace victories
of today, and those w ho will
continue to do so in the future,
officials said.
The memorial features a
pated "Runway to Glory" at the
site entrance. a larger-than-life
bronze Honor Guard statue: two
granite inscription v alls located
at either end of a central lawn;
and a glass contemplation wall
that reflects the missing-man
formation. the final tribute gives
to fallen airmen.
The memorial's surrounding
spaces will be landscaped to
create a memorial park and
parade ground overlooking the
nation's capital.
The dedication ceremony
included an aerial review con-
sisting of aircraft from the
1930s through modern day,
from the B-17 Flsing Fortress
and B-24 Liberator of World
War II fame to the B-2 Spirit
and C-17 Globemaster III, as
\well as a fite-ship "Heritage
Flight" featuring the P-51'


Mustang, the F-86 Sabre, the F-
4 Phantom, the F-15 Eagle, and
the F-22 Raptor.
The U. S. Air Force
Thunderbirds also performed a
flyover and "bomb-burst"
maneuver reflecting the design
of the memorial's three spires.
Due to space limitations at
the Memorial site, overflow
seating was made available in
Pentagon South Parking with
live simulcast of the dedication.
The Air Force also hosted
an open house in Pentagon
South Parking from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. that Saturday. In addition
to the live simulcast of the dedi-
cation from 1:30 to 3 p.m., the
Open House featured perform-
ances by the U.S. Air Force
Drill Team and the U.S. Air
Force Band's high-energy "Max
Impact" ensemble, a "Heritage
Parade of Uniforms," a concert
by country singer Lee Ann
Womack, and a variety of inter-
active displays and exhibits
Sshiowing America's airmen, Air


Force equipment, technology,-
and aircraft.
Static aircraft displays;
included the Predator and:
Global Hawk unmanned serial'
vehicles; UH-1, HH-60, MH-53:
helicopters; the CV-22 tiltrotor,
aircraft; and an F-35 Joint Strike;
Fighter display model.
The weekend concluded'
with 'a memorial service on.
October 15 at 10:30 a.m. at the'
memorial site.
Officials participated in. a;
wreath-laying ceremony punc-,
tuated by a missing-man forma-:
tion flown by F-16 Fighting,
Falcons. Again, overflow seat-
ing was available in Pentagon:
South Parking with live simul-'
cast of the service.
Immediately following both,
the official dedication ceremony;
October 14, and the memorial
service October 15, shuttles'
transported the public from,
Pentagon South Parking to the;
Memorial site to view the
Memorial.


Santa Rosa County Veterans Service Office is

available and ready to assist area veterans


NEW AIR FORCE MEMORIAL On behalf of all American
citizens President George W. Bush accepted the Air Force
Memorial from Air Force Memorial Foundation Chairman
Ross Perot Jr. during the previous day's dedication ceremony at
the base of the Air Force Memorial that overlooks the Pentagon,
Designed by the late James Ingo Freed the memorial with its
three soaring spires inspired by the U.S. Air Force
Thunderbirds bomb burst manuever, pays tribute to and hon-
ors the patriotic men and women of the U.S. Air Force and its
predeccessor organizations. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt.
Cohen Young)


The Santa Rosa Counts
Veterans Ser ice Offices are
provided b\ the Counts
Commissioners as a sen ice to
the counts's v veterans and
dependents., military retirees
and active dut military person-
nel.
Offices are located in Milton
at 6491 Caroline St.. Suite 2-
telephone 850-626-8724 and the
South Serv ice Center
(Courthouse Annexi, 5841 Gulf
Breeze Parkway (Midwa ):
telephone 850-9.32-9568.
Normal hours of operation for
both offices are: ,8 a.m. to 4
p.m., Monday through Friday.
Please contact our offices for
information and assistance in
applying for Department of
Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits.
Homestead Exemptions for
Disabled Veterans
Effective 1 January 2003, the


state of Florida increased its
homestead exemption for serv-
ice-connected disabled veterans
from $500 to $5.000. The
exemption is available to any
veterann who lies in Florida.
w ho ow ns homestead property.
and who has a ser ice-connect-
ed disabilit- of from 10 to 100
percent that is not permanent in
nature. State law already pro-
sides a full homestead property
ta\ exemption to veterans who
are permanently and total\ dis-
abled.
County homestead applica-
tions are processed between
January and March each year. In
order for the County Appraiser's
Office to grant this exemption,
you will be asked to provide a
letter dated in the past year from
the VA Regional Office, St.
Petersburg, worded specifically
for homestead exemption pur-


poses. The County Appraiser's
Office cannot accept any other
type of letter from the VA.
Disabled veterans in the
above categories may obtain the
homestead exemption letter by
calling the VA's Toll-Free num-
ber at 1-800-827-1000. You
must inform the counselor at the
VA that you need a letter for


homestead exemption purposes;
You can expect to receive your;
letter within five (5) to ten (10);
working days from the day you*
make the phone call.
If you need anN assistance in
obtaining this letter. please con-;
tact our office at 626-8724.
(Milton). or 932-9508 (Gulf
Breeze).


H@NOR1N& OUR


We are free



because of your sacrifice.



















Safeguarding our freedoms and securing our interests
around the world is a monumental job requiring the talents
and commitment of our brave armed forces.


Peoples First Community Bank recognizes the sacrifices..
made by all military men,.women and their farnilje.-

To all who contribute to our freedom, we sayithankybi.:


Peopes First


The best bank in the neighborhood.


Pace Banking Center
4952 Hwy. 90
995-7425


wC-, C.C.S.P.


On veteran sD.,,
)O reedont and' salutee and honor those "ho haTe r "
fOrtCeo and justice or nanklind, haVe Sacrificed
OUr COUnt % "as built On a foundation
unalienable right fo r al undalonthat freedomrn is an

G it eresPeple A untr is Oly strong asthe
In the book of Psalms, Chapter 21 .erse 7, King David writes;


your hand will layh i d writes
right hand will seay izhold on all your enemy
against u, Your foes Thou es, and your
agieedYOU, and devise TogWicked -mh they plot evil

Syou will make them mes, they cannot
y at them with drawn bow.u their backs when

On 'Veteran's Da I
Ourn victories anDayfr give thanks to the God, ho delivered l of

oServe. a rthemen and Womnen who obeyed thecall to

May our COuntry eyed the call to

serve. Ma reaze that we-e
ase rve ay wOe Come back to God the Father tron uas Sodn,
Jessn Christ. Mlay we seek Ii -mir th ahr he s od in


-, ainin'Vic ,sss., Soulandi
akg to Ver oransgressi -,and deliver o
o ur foes. Our Country



May God grant favor. ,

to im. for on our Country as we turn ourhearts back


www.peoplesfirst.com


Member
FDIC


LENDERg


I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


New 270 ft. Air Force Memorial at Arlington

given to the nation in public ceremony








































































































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I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


Page 2-D


2006 VETERANS DAY CEREMONIES
MILTON HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM
11:00 O'Clock a.m.


Welcome:

Invocation:


Pledge of
Allegiance:

National Anthem:


Wreath
Presentation:


GUN SALUTE:


Master of Ceremonies Tom Giffith

Dr. Mike Wiggins,
Pastor, Pine Terrace Baptist
Church

MCPO Joe Vukovcan, CMC NAS
Whiting Field
Combined Bands, Pace High School
and Milton High School

Fleet Reserve Branch 210 & Unit
AmVets post & Unit
VFW 4833 & Auxiliary
American Legion Post 78 &
Auxiliary
Elks Lodge 2377
Marine Corps League

NAS whiting Honor Guard


TAPS: Milton High School Band

POST THE COLORS
(Guests may be seated)

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS AND INTRODUCTION OF
VETERANS OF THIS ERA WARS, IRAQ,
AFGHANISTAN, BOSNIA, AND DESERT STORM

PRESENTATION OF PROCLAMATIONS:

Mayor Guy Thompson, City of Milton
Commissioner Bob Cole, Santa Rosa County

ANNOUNCEMENT OF HAPPY VETERANS CARD CONTEST
WINNER BY DAV
ANNOUNCEMENT OF ESSAY CONTEST WINNERS, FLEET
RESERVE

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Captain Joan Platz
Commanding Officer, NAS
Whiting Field

BENEDICTION: Chaplin Jason Reggs


Troops of the 842nd

are homeward bound!


"Let's welcome the troops
home!"
That seems to be the over-
whelming theme of thought
among the citizens of Milton
and Santa Rosa County as the
time nears for the return of the
842nd Signal Company
deployed to active duty
September of last year.
Although no timetable has
been announced for their arrival,
it is generally assumed that it
will be later this month. "We
hope to have all of them home
by Thanksgiving," said Santa
Rosa County Commissioner
Don Salter who is heading the
welcome home planning group.
The 842nd Signal Company
Army Reserve unit left Milton
amid enthusiastic fanfare slight-
ly more than a year ago,
although the weather was rainy
and dreary. It did not by any
means dampen the spirits of
family, relatives, friends, and
acquaintances of the some 90
service members who spent a
short time training before being
deployed to the battlefields of
Iraq. Even though no definite
date has been established for
their return, at least one
Welcome Home Committee
member has estimated it to be
i3-


sometimes near the middle of
this month. One 842nd
Homecoming Committee mem-
ber, Dave Hoxeng, suggested
that the unit would return via
Camp Shelby, Mississippi
where they would stay for a few
days before making their way
back to their home base.
Salter says the unit will be
met at the Florida-Alabama line
and escorted back to Milton by
motorcade with plans steady for
a celebration ceremony at the
Army Reserve headquarters.
Those plans include a
Thanksgiving meal to all service
members and their families no
matter what the date of their
return might be.
"Date pending, however, it
is anticipated to be during the
week of November 13," is the
answer for their return schedule
according to an official news
release concerning plans for the
homecoming celebration.
When the troops make their
way back to their headquarters
located on Dogwood Drive in
Milton, the public is encouraged'
to line the route, which will be
from Interstate 10 and Highway
90, west of Ensley, along
Highway 90 to Milton.
Well-wishers are encour-


aged to wave, and if possible'
display flags or signs of appreci-'"
ation for the motorcade. Local,-
Radio stations, including,
WXBM-FM 102.7 and Cat-,'
Country 98.7 will be broadcast-",
ing real-time information'
regarding the motorcade's pro-"
cession along the route so well
wishers will not have to wait,'
long to welcome the troops;'
back.
Businesses along the route';
are encouraged to place wel-
come home messages of appre-'
ciation on roadway signs. Also;-'
4-H Club members will be plac-"
ing yellow ribbons along the"
way.
Additionally, Santa Rosa"
Medical Center is providing-'
lunch for the troops and their-'
families after the return at first"-
Assembly of God Church locat-
ed near the unit's headquarters''
on Dogwood Drive.
According to Salter, who is-
coordinating this event, this. is a'
". . wonderful American effort,,
to welcome our heroes home." -
For anyone who wishes to,
become involved, it is suggested'
they contact the Santa Rosa,'
County Chamber of Commerce'
at 850-623-2339. -




Al.7
LiV '


We Salute Our

Veterans of the

U.S. Armed Forces!

God Bless America!

Call or submit to us the name of your military name for prayer

Pace Assembly
3948 Highway 90 g ae F6lorida
(850) 99471'
Pastor. Rev. JosdlfRogers
Website wiww.paceassembly.org

You are welcome to be our guest ,
in any of our services! '


Classes !
10:4W



7:00
Royal


WE SALUTE

TROOP 842

AND Au


MILITARY PERSONNEL


SANTA ROSA COUNTY

SHERIFF'S OFFICE


Welcome Home

842ndSgnal Corp Army

,Rserve Unitfrom Iraq.

A job welldone to the men

& women of this Unit.

Let us also honor OUr Veterans

both active and retired.


lew4


?ce0d qew~ou


Pre NecC Services
Vaults Monuments
'Two Locations to
Serve Our Growing County"


6405 Hwy. 90 West
Milton, FL
623-2243


7794 Navarre Pkwy.
Navarre, FL
939-5122 )


N ;;or


Wednesday-November 8, 20


[


,q









iting, You're looking mighty fine!


n July 2003, NAS Whiting
eld celebrated its 60th year of
continuous operation. What was
once a field of weeds has
become the backbone of the
Navy's flight program. During
its history, Whiting Field has
served as a prisoner-of-war
camp for German soldiers,
home of the famed Blue Angels
flight demonstration team and
home of the Navy's first jet
training unit.
Before the field was official-
ly. commissioned, personnel
were already beginning to train
"the world's best aviators."
Squadron 3-B of Naval
Auxiliary Air Station (NAAS)
Saufley Field, Pensacola,
Florida, began operations on
July 1, 1943. Squadron 3-B was
later joined by Squadron 3-A of
Chevalier Field to form Training
Squadron THREE. In only 14
weeks, Whiting Field came into
being to fulfill the need for pilot
training commands in WWII.
Commissioning ceremonies
for Naval Auxiliary Air Station
(NAAS) Whiting Field were
held on July 16, 1943, in the
South Field Hanger. At 11 a.m.
that day, Rear Admiral George
D. Murray, Commandant of the
1Naval Air Training Center, wel-
comed some 1,500 persons and
introduced Mrs. Kenneth
Whiting, the widow of Naval
hero, Captain Kenneth Whiting,
for whom the station was
named.
The commissioning of
Whiting Field took place at a
crucial time in American histo-
ry. Only six days before the
commissioning, the invasion of
Sicily had occurred. Throughout
World War II, Whiting's mission
vas to train aviators for the
fpiet.
Former POW Camp

On July 12, 1945,
Detachment THREE 1470 SCU
vxas established. Detachment
TiHREE, a prisoner of war
(POW) camp for German sol-
diers, was operated through the
efforts and cooperation of Naval
authorities at NAS Pensacola
apd Army authorities at Camp.
Rucker. Alabamna.


NAS WHITING CHOPPER


Certified documents indi-
cate that the purpose of Whiting
Field's POW camp was ". .. to
furnish manual labor details
necessary for construction and
soil erosion projects at the
field."
The first officer in charge of
the POW camp was Army
Captain Robert H. Fuller. He
arrived on July 7, 1945. Two
days later, he returned to Camp
Rucker to escort the first group
of 100 German POWs to
Whiting. Assisting him were 19
enlisted soldiers who were
assigned to Whiting to guard the
prisoners and help run the camp.
On August 3, an additional
125 prisoners were sent to
Whiting. The labor for construc-
tion of the prisoners' barracks
was provided by the POWs.
Other construction projects
included rebuilding a storage
shed for a barber's shop and
erecting buildings to house the
canteen and reading room for
the prisoners. All construction
was completed with salvaged
materials. No new construction
was necessary. A small dispen-
sary also was provided as hospi-
tal quarters for the minor ill-
nesses among the prisoners.
With'the end..-of the war came


numerous victory celebrations.
German POW's were returned
to their homeland. Training
flights for cadets and aviation
pilots were suspended for sever-
al days so the men could decide
whether to remain in the Navy
or return to civilian life. The
entire country breathed a sigh of
relief.
Milton residents became
accustomed to the sight of
heavy and medium bombers in
the skies. By 1949, Whiting
Field was known throughout the
Naval Air Basic Training
Command as the backbone of
the Navy's flight program.

Home of the Blue Angels

During 1949 and 1950, the
famed Navy precision flying
team, the Blue Angels, made
their home at Whiting Field, and
the Navy's first jet training unit,
JTU ONE (JTU-1), was com-
missioned. The outbreak of the
Korean War in 1950 caused the
stay of the Blue Angels and
JTU-1 at Whiting Field to be
short-lived, as the Blue Angels
were ordered to disband and go
into combat. Jet training was
transferred to Kintg\ ille. Te\i.
Once again. \\Whiting co.ildo, .


centrate on basic pilot training.

More Changes Developed

In 1955-56, Whiting adopt-
ed a new aircraft, the Beechcraft
T-34B Mentor, a trainer with tri-
cycle landing gear. In 1956, the
instrument tactics phase of basic
flight training was moved from
NAAS Saufley Field to Whiting.
During this time, the T-28
Trojan was brought to Whiting
Field to augment student train-
ing. By 1957, the fighter-attack
syllabus of flight training was
phased into Whiting's flight pro-
gram, and in December 1959,
multi-engine training was
moved to Whiting for a short
period of time. On 1 May 1960,
Primary Training Squadrons
TWO (VT-2), THREE (VT-3)
and SIX (VT-6) were estab-
lished. VT-2 and VT-6 were
located at North Field; VT-3 at
South Field. Beginning in 1965,
Whiting Field underwent a
major facelift as an estimated
$10 million was spent on con-
struction projects. Whiting Field
was subsequently commis-
sioned as a Naval Air Station.

Training Air Wing Five


In January 1972, as a result
of a major reorganization of the
Naval Air Training Command,
Whiting Field became the home
of Training Air Wing FIVE.
Under the command of
Commander, Training Air Wing
FIVE (TRAWING-FIVE) were
his staff, three primary training
squadrons and support person-
nel attached to NAS Whiting
Field. Also in 1972, Helicopter
Training Squadron EIGHT (HT-
8) came under the command of
TRAWING-FIVE and was later
split to form Helicopter Training
Squadron EIGHTEEN (HT-18).

Helo Training

In 1973, helicopter training
began. Helicopter Training
Squadrons EIGHT and EIGH-
TEEN were assigned to South
Whiting Field. Training
Squadron THREE relocated to
North Field, making North Field
the home of the three fixed-wing
squadrons. Since then, all grad-
uates of Navy helicopter train-
ing have received their Wings of
Gold at Whiting Field.
Academic and simulated-
flight-trainer instruction are also


provided. In April, 1977, the T-
34C Procedure Training Cockpit
was accepted into the syllabus
and in the fall of that year, the
station began its transition to the
T-34C Turbo Mentor as the pri-
mary trainer.
In August 1980, the new
simulator building was complet-
ed.The building houses numer-
ous flight simulators for instruc-
tor-student and self-paced
instruction and familiarization.
In the spring of 1983, the T-
28 was phased out and a static
display was presented to the sta-
tion. In the fall of 1983, the UH-
1 was phased out. It was the end
of an era.

Whiting Field today hosts a
fleet of over 200 T-34Cs and
nearly 150 TH-57s.
The Naval Air Station is
composed of two separate air-
fields. Primary and intermediate
flight training is conducted at
North Field. Over 1,200 stu-
dents complete their primary
flight training annually. South
Field is used for helicopter
training. There are also 13 out-
lying fields used for student
training.


- l-


Tom Stewart
District 1


Bob Cole,
District 2
Chairman


Don Salter
District 3


Gordon Goodin
District 4


John Broxson
District 5


e saute all our veterans, as well as all// actve-duty military members and the

wonderful things they do to he/p make Santa Rosa County ap geat pace to live,

work and pla A special thankato our area military for th less work they


perform protecting our notion


' "M -4 +: + -+ ."L+ + +Ls,:+


A


70.


Board of County Commissioners 983-1877
Building Inspection and Permits 623-0166
Animal Services 983-4680
Extension Service 623-3868


Health Department 983-5200
Emergency Operations Center 983-5360
Enhanced 911 System 983-5372
Mosquito Control 626-0191


Planning & Zoning Division -626-8839
Road Department 626-0191
Public Information 983-5255


" --'* .. :.' -" : ..'';-:" ,+': **- ..... : 318

i ;-"'1'- --- '* A " .-, B 4?."
_. *, ..:'-.,e _,_ .. -- '. .. ' 2 < .

*E . .. -. .
NA W hi tig Barr a c.ks,
"-' -I' .",---
.NAS Whiting Barracks, 1 944


I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


Page 3-D






I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


Area Veterans' groups provide services, recreation for those who have served


DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS CHAPTER 125
WORKS AS AN ADVOCATE FOR THE VETERAN
Disabled American Veterans Chapter #125 is named in
honor of Corporal Paul D. Lyon, Jr., United States Marine
Corps, who was killed by the hand of terrorists in the bomb-
ing of the Marine Barracks on Sunday, October 23, 1983 in
Beirut, Lebanon where 242 American service men were killed
on that faithful day.
Paul graduated from Milton High School in May of 1981.
DAV #125's name was changed on September 14, 1990
in honor of Corporal Paul Lyon, Jr. Paul's parents, Marie and
Paul, Sr., live in Milton and are members of DAV Chapter
#125.
Disabled American Veterans is made up exclusively of
men and women disabled in the nation's defense and is ded-
icated to one single purpose: building better lives for the
entire nation's disabled veterans and their families.
This mission is carried forward by:
-Providing free, professional assistance to veterans and
their families by obtaining benefits and services earned
through military service and provided by the Department of
Veterans Affairs and other agencies of government.
-Providing outreach concerning its programs to the
American people generally, and to disabled veterans and
their families specifically.
-Representing the interests of disabled veterans and
their families and widowed spouses and their orphans before
Congress, the White House, and the judicial branch as well as
state and local governments.
-Extending DAV's mission of hope into the communities
where these veterans and their families live through a net-
work of state level departments and local chapters. ,
-Providing a structure through which disabled veterans
can express their compassion and spirit of comradeship
through a variety of volunteer programs.
DAV is a nonprofit organization that works as an advocate
for the veteran. It is not part of the Veterans Administration
and receives no funding from the U.S. Government. All of its.
funding comes through donations.
At the local level the goal is to get the public to know when
a person needs help and to send him or her over if they are a
veteran. The membership works with other veterans organi-
zations and the VA and are treated as a partner by the VA.
This is a win-win situation. The organization helps the Va
with its ever increasing backlog of cases by sending them well
put together claims. With its help the DAV knows how to help
cut through some of the mistakes that an individual might
make that either kills or slows down the claim process. This
streamline effect helps the VA and in turn helps all veterans in
need.
At Chapter 125 members work hard to help keep vets
informed and up to date on legislation that affects them and
support the community by helping with Veterans Day and
memorial festivities and assisting the school system in teach-
ing school children about the veterans of today, and the


"We at Downs Paint and


Body wish to


thank all of


the Military Personnel at


Whiting


Field


for


the


patronage for the past 38


years.

Body


Facility


Downs


Paint


a Direct


for


most


ance companies.


and


Repair

insur-


So,


in


case of an accident think


of Downs I

and request


Daint


& Body


our 24


hour


wrecker service."


Bob Downs, Owner


Vo 0


- imO & IA@IO

Two Locations To Serve You
3650 Hwy. 90 Pace 995-8595 |
6141 Hwy. 90, West Milton 623-4342


heroes of yesterday.
Meetings are held on the first monday of each month at 7
p.m. at the Living Faith Church on Reformation Road in East
Milton. The telephone number is 850-981-5446, and the web-
site is http://www.davchl25.org/
The organization welcomes newcomers, old members
who have not been in a while, and guests. The very best thing
one can do for a veteran is to get them in touch with the DAV,
especially if they have physical or emotional problems.
It can be determined after a short informal interview if a
claim for them should be submitted, no matter how long ago
their military service.
The organization is. currently seeking some small office
space in order to carry on the service work they do twice a
week. Hurricanes destroyed the office so graciously donated
for their use.

VFW POST 4833 INVOLVED IN
NUMEROUS PROGRAMS ALL YEAR
Post Commander Harold Hulst and Auxiliary President
Audrey Goodman salute their members and take pride in the
organization's outreach.
The Post and Auxiliary are involved in the following pro-
grams every year:
-Voice of Democracy taped essay contest for grades 9-
12.
-Patriot Pen written essay for grades 6-8.
-Outstanding teacher of the year (3) k-5, 6-8, and 9-12.
-Patriot Art grades 9-12.
-Coloring contest for elementary schools.
-Americanism Programs Flags in schools, special pro-
grams in schools, parades.
-Community Service helping in the community, safety
and drug programs, and operation uplink calling cards for mil-
itary.
-Cancer Aid and Research Fund raisers and monies
sent to Dept. Headquarters to be given to research and can-
cer grants for Auxiliary members stricken with cancer.
-Buddy Poppy Program These are made by hospital-
ized veterans and monies raised go into the post or auxiliary
Relief Fund to help a veteran or his family.
-National Home Florida House This home is supported
by VFW and Aux. members throughout the country for veter-
ans' children living there. They are put through school and
even college.
-Legislative Letters sent to politicians in Washington
asking for their support in taking care of veterans as they
were promised, including health care, living adjustments,
schools, etc.
-Junior Girls Some auxiliaries in state have Jr. Girls
units for girls ages 5-16.
-Youth Activities Sponsoring scouts and ball teams,
have special parties for children and this year the Department
Presidentis special project is iMake a Wish FoundationT for
critically ill children to grant them a very special wish. It costs
approximately $4,500 per wish.
-Hospitals purchasing needed items for veterans in VA
hospitals and nursing homes and visiting during each year
playing bingo, serving food, and ladies make all the desserts,
etc.
-Rehabilitation This is:a program, that involves care for
veterans and their families out of the hospitals, and includes
Adopt a Vet, Help the Homeless, Assist Senior Citizens, edu-
cate members and the public regarding veterans entitle-
ments. Military units are also adopted, and much food and
clothing is donated to hurricane evacuees.
-PAC Political action committee monies raised to be
used to keep veterans[ issues in front of the legislative branch
in every state and the District of Columbia.
There are so many parts to all of these programs, but the
organization sees that all the goals are reached.






WELCOME HOME

TO 842nd

SIGNAL CORP.



We and our appreciated
NAS Whiting Field

personnel say

THANK YOU FOR YOUR

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED!




Lindsay, Andrews,

Leonard, PA


ATTORNEYS AT LAW


623-3200

5218 Willing Street Milton C3
K 2


AMVETS COMMITTED TO
SERVING FELLOW VETERANS
Why AMVETS? Because as one vet put it, "Itis a good
place to be."
Thereis a reason for that, and it's the Post's commitment
to support fellow veterans-each and every one of them-!
whether itis transporting them to VA clinic for an appointment,
to the store-for some groceries, or just providing any informa- -
tion they might need to get their earned entitlements or to get
the benefits information of what they are eligible to get as a
member of AMVETS.
Our organization is, in fact, the only congressionally chat-
tered veterans service organization whose membership is
open to any who has honorably served in the U.S. Armed
Forces since World War II.
Being an AMVET, one shares a commitment with others
who think the same-with the same values, the same beliefs.
As a member one also can share with other vets the pride that
comes from being a veteran-in an organization devoted to
helping and improving the quality of life for the community's
citizens.

HONORlNG OUR



NAVY LEAGUE SANTA ROSA COUNTY COUNCIL
SUPPORTS EDUCATION, YOUTH, SEA SERVICES
Navy League Santa Rosa County Council is pleased to
annually provide a $100 Savings Bond as the prize for the
Veterans Day Essay Contest winner. I
The organization is also proud of its tradition as "Citizens
in Support of the Sea Services". Navy League has the follow'-
ing goals:
-To educate national leaders and the American people to
keep them aware.
-To support the Sea Services, Navy, Marine Corps,
Coast Guard, and Merchant Marine.
-To support the men and women of the Sea Serviced,
and provide assistance for their families.
-To support youth programs (Naval Sea .Cadets arid
NJROTC Programs.)
The Navy League, of the United States was established by
President Theodore Roosevelt in 1902, with the same four
goals then as exist today. Locally, Navy League Miltoh
Council was initially chartered on 30 August 1956.
In order to broaden the scope of its organization the name
was changed to Navy League Santa Rosa County Florida
Council on 15 November 1997.
Members say they are pleased to have officially adopted
U.S. Naval Air Station Whiting Field, Training Air Wing FIVE,
the three NJROTC Units in Santa Rosa County (Milton High
School, Pace High School, and Navarre High School), and
provide support for Naval Sea Cadets Whiting Division.
Members are additionally proud to provide annually two
$1,000 Scholarships to sons or daughters of Maritime Service
parents (plus NJROTC and Naval Sea Cadet Program grad-
uates) graduating from Santa Rosa County schools.
During BRAC considerations, Navy League membership
has been looked upon as a measure of community support
for NAS Whiting Field and other Sea Service installations ip
the area.
Navy League Santa Rosa County Council is proud to be
a Sea Service supporting organization in the community.


Let Us

Honor

Our Active
and Retired
Military




SPACE WATER
SYSTEM
Woodbine Rd.,Pace


I[


Page 4-D


God Bole

Our Militai

Active and Reti

Mary Johnson, Clerk of I
Santa Rosa Counnt


rv,

Ire'd'.

Court


Wednesday -November 8, 20








Wednesday-November 8,2006 U The Press Gazette-Military .Appreciation Page 5-D


For those who want to know how to show support for our soldiers...
How can I send a message the War on Terrorism through the military relief societies : http://www.defendamerica.mil/ sages@estripes.com, are limited and cope with long deploym
show support for our the Army's 'To Our Soldiers' Army Emergency Relief at otf/index.html to 50 words or less and will be of their loved ones. Whil.
diers? w e b s i t e http://www.aerhq.org/ DoD officials ask citizens printed on a first-come, first-run would be inappropriate for I
The Dept. of Defense is http://www.army.mil/toourSoldi Navy/Marine Relief Society not to flood the military mail basis. "Stars and Stripes" to endorse any organize
ponding to queries from ers at http://www.nmcrs.org/ system with letters, cards, and reserves the right to screen and specifically, service member.
sands of Americans who are Donate a calling card to Air Force Aid Society at gifts, edit all messages and to omit value and appreciate s


help keep service members in
touch with their families at
Operation Uplink at
http://www.operationuplink.org/
Send a greeting via e-mail
through Operation Dear Abby at
http://anyservicemember.navy.
mil/ or
http://www.OperationDearAbby
.net
Sign a virtual thank you
card at the Defend America Web
site at http://www.defendameri-
ca.mil/nmam.html
Make a donation to one of


again asking what they can do to
show their support- for service
members, especially those serv-
ing overseas in this time of war.
The following are websites for
several organizations sponsor-
ing programs for members of
the Armed Forces overseas.
While it would be inappropriate
for DoD to endorse any specifi-
cally, service members do value
and appreciate such expressions
of support:
- Send a message of support
to Soldiers who are serving in


http://www.afas.org/
Coast Guard Mutual
Assistance at
http://www.cgmahq.org/
Donate to "Operation USO
Care Package" at
http://www.usometrodc.org/care
.html
Support the American Red
Cross Armed Forces Emergency
Services at http://www.red-
cross.org/services/afes/
Volunteer at a VA Hospital
to honor veterans who bore the
lamp of freedom in past con-
flicts.
Support families whose
loved ones are being treated at
military and VA hospitals
through a donation to the Fisher
House at http://www.fisher-
house.org
Reach out to military fami-
lies in your community, espe-
cially those with a loved one
overseas.
Defend America website:
http://www.defendamerica.mil


Due to security concerns
and transportation constraints,
the Defense Department can't
accept items to be mailed.
Some people have tried to
avoid this prohibition by send-
ing large numbers of packages
to an individual service mem-
ber's overseas address, which
however well intentioned, clogs
the mail and causes unnecessary
delays. U.S. troops deployed to
the Persian Gulf region and
other overseas locations can,
now receive personal messages
from family members, friends,
neighbors, colleagues and sup-
porters via the pages of "Stars
and Stripes" as well. "Messages
of Support,".a daily section that
debuted March 17, gives family
and friends of deployed service
members a chance to pass their
greetings, words of encourage-
ment and announcements free of
charge.
"Messages of Support" can
be e-mailed to "Stars and
Stripes" 24 hours a day at mes-


any determined inappropriate.
"Stars and Stripes" is the edito-
rially independent, Defense
Department-authorized daily
newspaper distributed overseas
for the U.S. military communi-
ty. It provides commercially
available U.S. and world news
and objective, staff-produced
stories relevant to the military
community in a balanced, fair
and accurate manner. Stripes is
currently increasing its Middle
East circulation with the goal of
providing one paper for every
three persons stationed there.
What can I do to support our
troops?
We appreciate your support
of our Armed Forces and think-
ing of our troops! Thousands of
Americans are asking what they
can do to show their support for
service members, especially
those serving overseas and fac-
ing combat during this time of
war. We must also remember
our military families who offer
much support, sacrifice so much


American Legion Post 78

chartered back in 1921
At a caucus of the First American Expeditionary Force
(AFT) in Paris, France on March 15-17, 1919, Lt. Col.
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. proposed that an organization be
formed to honor American veterans.
The distinction of naming this new organization the
"American legion" rests with Maurice K. Gordon, a Major in
,the 36th Division. At the follow-on conference in St. Louis on
September 16, the same year, work began on creating a
national American Legion.
-, The American Legion national charter and a permanent
structure were approved in April, 1919, and included plans for
an American Legion Department in all states.
.-, Accordingly, the Department of Florida, American Legion
was established.
- The permanent charter for Post 78 was issued on October
21, 1921, and.was subsequently named the Norman A Garrett
Post in honor of First Lieutenant Norman A. Garrett.
Born in rockville, MD, Mr. Garrett travelled to Milton and
-Was the time keeper and paymaster for the Santa Rosa
County Bay Point Mill Company when the United States
.entered World War I.
He joined the military and served with Company D, 325th
-Florida Infantry, 82nd Division and was shipped overseas to
France. He was killed on the battlefield at Meuse Argonne in
France.
Initially buried in France, he was three years later buried
in the Arlington National Cemetery, Grave No. 3998, Section

The Norman A. Garrett meets at the Post Home the third
Tuesday of each month and has over 200 members.
The post has always supported local community projects,
assisted veterans, and widows and families.
The American Legion published "Need a Left" as a serv-
ice to young people on the best books about high school stu-
dents obtaining information on college scholarships. Their
involvement with education began in 1921.
The current Commander of Post 78 is Tom Griffin, 623-
5055 .


ents
e it
)oD
tion
s do
uch


expressions of support: We have
a web site that has collected
information about a number of
the programs our fellow citizens
have undertaken on behalf of
the troops. It is called
"American Supports You" Our
Military Men and Women, and
its address on the Internet is
www.americasupportsyou.mil.
This web site offers you
ways to send messages to the
troops, and obtain materials for
developing your own support
program. Also, provided is a
short list of organizations that
will help you send messages and
packages as well as provide
other support.
The support and generosity
of the American people has
touched the lives of the more
than 300,000 service members
deployed overseas. Thank you
for your continued prayers and
support during these challeng-
ing times. United we will suc-
ceed in our cause to defeat ter-
rorism


NR NAS Whting Field 0167 now makes

Whiting its home for monthly, weekly drills


NR NAS Whiting Field 0167 was established in October 1994
to provide contributory support to the daily functions of Naval Air
Station Whiting Field, Milton, FL. Since its inception, the unit's
members have been performing all of their Active Duty for Training
(ADT) aboard NAS Whiting Field in the Florida Panhandle. From
October 1994 to September 1998, the unit performed its monthly
weekend drills at NAS Atlanta, Atlanta, GA.
, In October 1998, the unit moved, and made NAS Whiting Field
its 'home' for both monthly weekend and two-week ADT drills.
Most of the unit's 48 staff personnel are from the Atlanta, GA area
and have chosen to make the "commute" to Whiting without hesita-
tion.
Members of Fighting Whiting 0167's Reserve unit are assigned
to base Security, Crash and Public Works departments and provide
seamless integration into their active duty work-centers. Security
personnel perform patrols and gate sentry duties. The Crash person-
iel rotate through Whiting's 14 outlying landing fields, providing
additional watchstanders where needed, while the Seabee Division
perform many self-help projects.
Due to the unit's flexible drilling schedule and the support of the
base Commanding Officer, Fighting Whiting 0167 was able to
refurbish, formerly vacant spaces onboard the air station, which


were delegated for the unit's use by the base Commanding Officer.
It required hundreds of hours of cleaning, tearing down and rebuild-
ing, and now the spaces are now productive work-centers for the
unit its own little 'home away from home.'
The flexible drill schedule allows for the unit's members to
work side by side with their active' duty counterparts during the reg-
ular workweek. Security personnel perform gate sentry and patrol
duties on the days they are available to drill.during the week, as well
as on drill weekends and during the two-week ADT. Crash crew
members are able to stand duty at the outlying fields on weekdays,
when flight operations are taking place, while performing fire fight-
ing Crash training and drills on the weekends. The Seabees work onr
many projects assigned by the PWO. The first project was storm
water erosion control, and North Field runway work. The experi-
ence of working together, active duty and Reservist, fosters the
seamless integration that is the mission of the Reserves.
As the unit progresses through its ninth year since inception, it's
difficult to distinguish the Reserve personnel from the base's active
duty staff. The relationship has become a mutually beneficial one.
That is exactly how the base Commanding Officer, CAPT Joan
Platz, and Fighting Whiting's Commanding Officer, LCDR Tim
Ny.land want it work.


SGregOry S ertyAppraser
Santa Rosa CoUfyY Prop A Io
A SanveerO 0

ed or eP vess y gratitude t
ponororarmedfocesancrreritly -n.


a o f,2 our wand ewho serve u anda .ai .o pfra
,nPr detaotae a P In tmesha ast.. and th o omen eand ....n"tl as

tCose the baubof t
for thesafereT.,urn"
Cor p ecniallVhtigt OTcmmnt


.. .oismproudet- toue..d. applaadud ou;ke tois cou lt m
a nta R osa f, or.... ei-r'IervIce to OUT, ... o withl us toou
ntryoan
Sintt formallyou
itary er*V ~ p 13-tU" ,_.4."'teoltth al o-.


please accept t my

placeto lve. erve our veterans.
place to live. otypope Appraiser's office is happy et is a $5O0 t
fouarea. oed disabled veteran, be aware office wth
Th San service c hedmesteaded proprtY simply pr
Vfyuareas lettoer stservied conneced hen You apply' rcl
a vao . .i l a b l e o n v u l i s a bi. i Y .. . . ase r c u _ n y q u e s t i o n s .
eemption stating your csao detailsoh or if you haveany qutio
you letter statoingoCometefreedo
our office at 993-1,90nav to stop and reflect Oil thefreo ea


*1


y.
at


please take moment this Veteran

en O, ande thea" a Veteran


lI


Appraiser)


MOOVFIlC' suteetsu
6495 CUx1ine Steet
bWilOnl Florid327


P.O. B VOX 0ida 32512
v,.. s50.623-1284


5941 GUlff lid 32563

(850) 934ZI75l


-, I'


'F


Ages 2 and under eat free. All prices include a beverage and dessert bar.


Fried Chicken & Catfish

Southern Style Vegetables

Fresh Prepared Salads

Deliciously Prepared Meats

Oven-Fresh Breads &

Homemade Desserts


HOURS: Mon.- Thurs. 10:30 am to 8:30pm
Fri. 10:30 am to 9:00 pm
Breakfast Sat. & Sun. 7:00 10:30 am Only
Sat. 7 am to 9 pm
Sun. 7:00 am to 8:30 pm



C71 e- 1tt6 c e 6 /

if6 ^ffewd


North Davis & Olive Road

850-477-5465


or
Sold

resp
thou


5490 Mobile Hwy. & Saufield Road

850-944-5605


44


(850) 983-18" ..........


.Wedinesday= November 8,2006


i The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


Page 5-D






Wednesday-November 8, 2006


g i-, T h .ec


Coast Guard, 'most unique agency', traces its organization back to 1790
The United States Coast ment functions also continued to Coast Guard began to maintainti
Guard, one of the country's five expand. Congress tasked it with the country's aids to maritime
uar, ne f he hecontry'sauul nidstomg 1aritim


armed services, is also one or
the most unique agencies of the
federal government. It traces its
history back to 4 August 1790,
when the first Congress author-
ized the construction of ten ves-
sels to enforce tariff and trade
laws, prevent smuggling, and
protect the collection of the fed-
eral revenue. Known variously
as the Revenue Marine and the
Revenue Cutter Service, the
Coast Guard expanded in size
and responsibilities as the nation
grew.
These added responsibilities
included humanitarian duties
such as aiding mariners in dis-
tress. The agency's .law enforce-


enforcing laws against slavery,
piracy, and enlarged our respon-
sibilities to prevent smuggling.
They were also given the
responsibility to protect the
marine environment, explore
and police Alaska, and chart the
growing nation's coastlines, all
well before the turn of the twen-
tieth century.
The service received its
present name in 1915 under an
act of Congress when the
Revenue Cutter Service merged
with the Life-Saving Service.
The nation now had a single
maritime service dedicated to
saving life at sea and enforcing
the nation's maritime laws; The


navigaution, including operating
the nation's lighthouses, when
the Lighthouse Service was
transferred to the Coast Guard
in 1939. Later, in 1946,
Congress permanently trans-
ferred the Bureau- of. Marine
Inspection and Navigation to the
Coast Guard, thereby placing
merchant marine licensing and
merchant vessel safety under
our purview.
The Coast Guard is one of
the oldest organizations of the
federal government and, until
the Navy Department was estab-
lished in 1798, it served as the
nation's only armed force afloat.
It has continued to protect the


Two new campaign medals have been

announced for Afghanistan and Iraq


Have new campaign medals
been issued for Afghanistan and
Iraq?
The Department of Defense
announced on April 7, 2005 the
creation of two new campaign
medals for Afghanistan and
]raq.
Presidential Executive
Order 13363 established the
Afghanistan and Iraq campaign
medals to recognize members,
who made specific sacrifices
ad significant contributions in
thse areas of operation.
Service members authorized
the Afghanistan Campaign
NMedal must have served in
direct support of Operation
Enduring Freedom on or after
Oct. 24,2001, to a'future date to
le, determined by the Secretary
df Defense or the cessation of
the operation.
The area of eligibility
encompasses all land areas of
the country of Afghanistan and
11i air spaces above the land.
Those authorized the Iraq
Campaign Medal must have
served in direct support of
Operation Iraqi Freedom on or
after March 19, 2003, to a future
d4te to be determined by the
Secretary of Defense or the ces-
,ation of the operation.
; The area of eligibility


encompasses all land area of the
country of Iraq, and the contigu-
ous water area out to 12 nautical
miles, and all air spaces above
the land area of Iraq and above
the contiguous water area out to
12 nautical miles.
Service members must have
been assigned, attached or
mobilized to units operating in
these areas of eligibility for 30
consecutive days or for 60 non-
consecutive days or meet one of
the following criteria:
Be engaged in combat dur-
ing an armed engagement,
regardless of the time in the area
of eligibility; or while partici-
pating in an operation or on offi-
cial duties, is wounded or
injured and requires medical
evacuation from the. area of eli-
gibility; or while participating
as a regularly assigned air crew
member flying sorties into, out
of, within or over the area of eli-
gibility in direct support of the
military operations; each, day of
operations counts as one day of
eligibility.
Service members qualified
for the Global War on Terrorism
Expeditionary Medal by reasons
of service between Oct. 24,
2001, and April 30, 2005, in an
area for which the Afghanistan
Canipaign Medal was subse-


quently authorized and between
March 19, 2003, and Feb. 28,
2005, in an area for which the
Iraq Campaign Medal was sub-
sequently authorized,, shall
remain qualified for that medal.
Upon application, any such
service member may be award-
ed the Afghanistan or Iraq
Campaign Medal in lieu of the
Global War on Terrorism
Expeditionary Medal for such
service., No service meniber
shall be entitled to all three
medals for the same act,
achievement or period of serv-
ice.
The awarding authority for
the Afghanistan and Iraq cam-
paign medals shall be the pre-
scribed by the member's respec-
tive military service regulations.
Both medals may be awarded
posthumously. Only one award
of the Afghanistan Campaign
Medal and Iraq Campaign
Medal may be authorized for
any individual.
Service stars are not pre-
scribed. Individuals may receive
both the medals if they meet the
requirement of both awards;
however, the qualifying period
of service used to establish eli-
gibility for one award cannot be
used to justify eligibility for the
other.


U.S. COAST GUARD TO THE RESCUE! The Coast Guard is one of the oldest organizations
of the Federal Government, and until the Navy Department was established in 1798, it served as
the nation's only armed force afloat. It received its present name in 1915 under an act of Congress
when the Revenue Cutter Service merged with the Life-Saving Service.


nation throughout its long histo-
ry and has served proudly in
every one of the nation's con-
flicts. The Coast Guard's nation-
al defense responsibilities
remain one of our most impor-
tant functions even today.
In times of peace it operates
as part of the Department of
Homeland Security, serving as
the nation's front-line agency
for enforcing our laws at sea,
protecting coastline and ports,
and saving life.


In times of war, or on direc- Guard serves
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I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


Page 6-D


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Wednesday-November 8. 2006


I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation


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Page 8-D I The Press Gazette-Military Appreciation Wednesday-November 8, 2006

All Hands ... Online
It's a good time to remember how to display the flag.
And if you have forgotten What to do when the flag pass-
es by in a parade or is raised at a baseball game, here
are a few pointers.
Saluting the flag
Salute the flag when it is six paces from the viewer
and hold it until the flag has passed six paces beyond.
Salute the flag at the first note of the National Anthem
and hold the salute until the last note is played. Never
use a flag as a decoration use bunting.
When in civilian attire MEN remove hats and hold at
left shoulder with hand over heart: without hat, place
right hand, palm open, over heart. WOMEN should place
right hand, palm open, over heart. When in athletic cloth-
ing, face the flag or music, remove hat or cap and stand
at attention; a hand salute is not given.
Carrying the flag
4 When marching Carry the flag on the right in any
procession or parade. If there are many other flags, carry
the flag in the front center position.
If you are carrying a flag Hold the flag at a slight
angle from your body. You can also carry it with one hand
and rest it on your right shoulder.
Displaying the flag outdoors
On a vehicle Attach the flag to the antenna or clamp
the flagstaff to the right fender. Do not lay the flag over
the vehicle.
On a building Hang the flag on a staff or on a rope
over the sidewalk with the stars away from the building.
Over the street Hang the flag with the stars to the
east on a north- south street or north on an east-west
street.
-- Above other flags Hang the flag above any other
flag on the same pole
Other flags, separate poles Hang all flags on equal
poles. Hang the U.S. flag on its own right, hoist it first and
lower it last.
In a window Hang the flag vertically with the stars to
.the left. of anyone looking at it from the street.
Half-mast This is a sign of mourning. Raise the flag
to the top of the pole then lower it to the half way point.
Before lowering the flag, raise it to the top again at the
end of the day.
Upside down An upside-down flag is considered a
distress signal.
Displaying the flag indoors
Multiple staffs If you display the flag on a staff with
other flags around it, place the flag at the center and
highest point. Crossed staffs Keep the flagstaff higher
and on ils own right.
Behind a speaker Hang the flag flat on the wall. Do
not decorate the podium or table with the flag. Use
bunting for decoration.
Next to a speaker Place the flag in a stand on the
speaker's right. Use the same placement for a religious
service.
In a hall or lobby Hang the flag vertically across
from the main entrance with the stars to the left of any-
one coming through the door.
On a casket Drape the flag with its canton at the
head and over the left shoulder of the body. Do not lower
the flag into the grave.


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a 5y.j.i!| *i 11 66.SHSS


Sports




start on Wediesday
Football tickets for
Milton's first round Class 4A
football game against
Crestview will be available in
advance at the high school.
Ticket sales will begin on
Wednesday in the main office
from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and will
be on sale during the same peri-
od on Thursday.
Friday ticket sales will be
held from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
All tickets will cost $7 and
a ticket must be purchased for
any student age first grade and
up.
Hen and Gobbler
Shamble is No. 18
Stonebrook Golf Club will
host a hen and gobbler shamble
on Nov. 18.
This two person (male and
female) shamble will get under-
way with. a shotgun start at
noon.
Entry fee for the shamble is
$100 per couple for non-mem-
bers and $80 per couple for
members.
Cart fee is included and
there will be food and prizes
following play.

GoldW Rd Iders
W hoklda r d yb rkt
The Milton Chapter of the
Gold Wing Road Riders
Association will be having a
pancake breakfast on Nov. 18 at
Texas Roadhouse.
Breakfast will be served
from 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. and
tickets are just $5.
Tickets can be purchased in
advance or at the door.
All proceeds will go to the
Milton Relay for Life.
The Milton GWRRA will
also be participating in the
Veteran's Day Parade on Nov.
11.
Old Sdcoo Wmsft
at audi oMiu Nov. II
In some strange, twists and
turns it looks as if embattled
foes will become partners this
Saturday as Old School
'Wrestling returns to the Santa
,Rosa Auditorium.
Adrian Whisper and John
Saxon, who have battled over
the NWA New< South
Heavyweight title, will now be
tag team partners as they face
Mercury McLoud and Steve,
Savage.
Also expected to be in atten-
dance are Ron Fargo, OWS
Heavyweight Champion
"Redneck" Steve Fury, and the
PWA Order of Evil.
Doors at the Santa Rosa
Auditorium in Milton will open
at 6 p.m. with bell time set for
7:30 p.m.


Do you have

sports-relat-

ed news or

information

you would

like to see

published in

the Press

Gazette? If

so, send it to

us at:

sport@srpress

gazette,om


Winners will'


Brad Skipper, a former Pace Patriot, is seen battling for a rebound
during the Cici's Classic hosted by Pensacola Junior College at the
Bo Johnson Center on the PJC Milton Campus. PJC defeated
Monroe Community College 84-83. Skipper was named to the
All-Tournament team.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


By KEN BARNES
PG Sports Correspondent
Sandwiched between vying
for a playoff spot and the play-
offs next week, Pace's Patriots
celebrated homecoming in fine
fashion with a 38-0 thumping
of West Florida Tech (0-10).
Pace (7-3) cashed in on four
of five turnovers that led to
scores and threw up a stout
defense while tuning up for
Navarre next week.
The Patriots struck hard
and fast at the get go as Airi
Johnson, who finished the game
with 102 yards on 12 carries,
scampered to pay dirt from nine
yards out.
Eric Martinez, who con-
verted on all five point after


move on


OPace to face Raiders; Milton hosting Crestview


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
Pace and Milton are guar-
anteed only one game and that
is this Friday.
Milton (7-3), who defeated
Pace in a shootout to claim their
first district crown since 2003,
will host Crestview (7-3) in the
opening round of the Class 4A
football playoffs at 7:30.
While Milton hosts its first
playoff game since 2003, Pace
(7-3) will travel south on
Highway 87 to face Navarre.
The Raiders (7-3) will be in
their first ever playoff game this
Friday at 7:30 ppn.


Barlow


runs way


to state

SJay sophomore
going to Dade City
By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
Then there was just one.
Of all those who started the
cross country season with
dreams of a trip to the state
meet across Santa Rosa County,
J.'t ss Dale Bar!o( gel.% t lthi\e
it.
Saturday Barlow finished
15th at the Class A boys cross
country regional in Tallahassee
at the Miccosukee Greenway.
Barlow's time of 17.48.63
was just over t\ro minutes
behind the time of regional
winner Michael Anderson of
P.K. Yonge, who covered the
5K course in 15:41.38.
Now Barlow is preparing
for this Saturday's state finals to
be held at Little Everglades
Ranch in Dade City, Fla., as the
boys Class A boys event is set
to begin at 8:30 a.m. local time.
Overall the Royals finished
ninth in the boys' race with 209
points.
P.K. Yonge won the region-
al title with 36 points followed
by Maclay .(105), Oak Hill
(113), St. Johns Country Day
(153), and North Florida
Christian (164) to round out the
top five.
"It has been an extremely
exciting season for us," said Jay
boys' head coach Sonya Odom.
"This is a young team and each
meet they ran with a desire to
get better and to win as a team."
Barlow* and the entire top
five runners for Jay recorded
See, BARLOW, Pg. 2E


Navarre
is looking to
put a he c oart-
brest round king
loss against i
rival ce head coach Miculf
Breeze
behind them 1
as Austin
Grimm and
the Raiders
hope to set
sail past the McMillion
first round in
their post season debut.
"(Navarre) has a' very
explosive offensive attack"
said Pace head coach Mickey


Lindsey. "They can .run and
pass the ball real well and they
possess a ieal solid defense.
"Defensively. they play
hard and fly around to the ball,
which is one reason they are the
district champs.",
Pace has had a very busy
past couple of weeks with a
must win over Milton on Oct.
27 followed by a shootout on
Oct. 30 and homecoming just
four days later against West
Florida Tech.
But Lindsey is not letting
his guys take this game lightly
as the real season begins.
"You are not assured of


anything past one game,' said
Lindsey. "Navarre is the district
champs so we have to be ready
to play."
Speaking of being district
champions, Milton is preparing
to face a very familiar foe in the
Crestview Bulldogs.
"Crestview has been a big
rivalry for us," said Milton head
coach Mike McMillion. "In this
game you don't know what to
expect.
"We have been fortunate to
win some close games against
them."
One of those close games
came just three weeks ago


when they R-
defeated the A
then unde-l
Bulldogs 7-
6 ine
Crestview.
Since
starting the
season 7-0
Crestview
has lost
three Lindsey
straight and
ended the season with a 35-251
loss to Mosley (Lynn Haven)'
last Thursday in Panama City.
See, PLAYOFFS, Pg. 4E,


; ... .. .. 1- -

Baker's defense had its hands full trying to deal with the Jay Royals Friday and especially Brandt Hendricks who rushed for 172 yards and
passed for another 153. Jay sent their senior class out on a 21-14 win over their arch rivals who are just a few miles east on Highway 4.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin



Royals crown Gators


3 Hendricks becomes a Royal nightmare for Gators


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
Baker must feel like it was
living a Royal nightmare all
overagain.
Brandt Hendricks apparent-
ly is the reoccurring theme of
this nightmare as he ran all over,
the Gators Friday as Jay won
the 'War on Highway 4' 21-14.
Hendricks, who gained
nearly, 200 yards last season
against Baker, helped Jay's ail-
ing backfield as he led the run-
ning game with 172 yards on 36


carries.
"I did what I had to do,"
said Hendricks who played at
tailback and quarterback on the
offensive side and spent quite a
bit of time on defense as well.
"With all the injuries the team
has gone through we all did
what we had to do.
"But the key tonight were
the seniors and how they led the
team through it all as I definite-
ly not use to playing tailback."
After jumping out to an
early 14-0 lead the Gators (6-4)


fought their way back and tied
it at 14-14 with 36-seconds
remaining in the third quarter.
David Langston capped off
the drive with a five-yard run as
David Beck added the kick to
make it 14-14.
The Jay defense assisted on
the drive as a pass interference
call was compounded when the
Royals were also flagged for
unsportsmanlike conduct to,
move the ball from the Baker
43 to the Jay 27.
After each team saw their


next possessions stall because
of incomplete passes, the
Royals would take over at their
20-yardline with, 9:39 remain-
ing on the clock.
Jay, who finished 4-6 on the
season after winning just three
games last season, moved
Hendricks from the tailback
spot to quarterback and the
Gators had trouble adjusting as
they made quick work of the
possession.
The Royals got a gift
See, JAY, Pg. 2E


attempts and a 33-yard field
goal, made it 7-0.
Senior Eric Lane Picked off
an errant Jaguar pass on West
Florida's next possession at the
visitor 34.
With just 2:32 showing in
the first quarter, sophomore
quarterback Aaron Munoz
found Vance Smith all alone in
the Jag end zone to push Pace
up 14-0.
The bottom really fell out
for Tech as Matt Pariato
blocked a Jaguar punt in the
same period to put the Pace
offense back in business at the
Jag 23.
One snap later, Munoz went
to the air again and hit Kim
See, PACE, Pg. 2E


-
Pace ended the 2006 season
with a shutout on homecoming
of West Florida Tech


Pace whips West Florida

a Patriots enter playoffs on winning note


^ 6arita Qcw-i6 Prem j Id









Sports


.... "+ ] "






1A District Meet. B arlow, a sophomore at Jay, will be traveling to the
State Cross County Meet this Saturday to be held in Dade City.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Barlow

Continued From Page One
personal best times.
Drew Kennedy finished
30th (18:20), Jeffery Fisher fin-
ished 52nd (19:07), Dusty
Kennedy was 56th (19:15), and
Robby Smith finished 77th
(20:37) to round out the Royals
scoring.
Colton Smith finished 87th
(21:22), while Levi Blackmon
finished 88th (21:45).
"It was a tough course,"
said Odom. "So I knew they
had given everything they had
to get those times."
On the girls side the Lady
Royals eighth with 206 points,
which put them between Rocky
Bayou (169) and Pensacola
Christian Academy (242).
Maclay, who is looking to
defend its girls state title, took


Oak Hall (131) to round out the
top five.
Gloria Raney led the Lady
Royals finishing 29th in a time
of 22:22, which was three plus
minutes behind the winning
time of 19:05.84 posted by
Meghan Roberts of P.K. Yonge.
Trista Talbot was next for
Jay finishing 33rd (22:37),
Leely Trevino finished 41st
(23:08), Allison Blair finished
47th (23:29), Taylor Dover fin-
ished 67th (24:45), Robin
Blackman finished 68th
(24:47), and Jennifer Sutler fin-
ished 70th (25:07).
"It was a very competitive
meet and difficult course," said
Jay girls coach Becky Holley.
"I am very proud of the girls
effort and how they gave it
everything they had today."


the regional title with 29 points
followed by P.K. Yonge (63), Story written by
St. Johns Country Day (77), Bill Gamblin. Reach him
Aucilla Christian (118), and at sports@srpressgazette.com


"j wk



Jay's Gloria Raney led the Lady Royals with her 29th place finish
Saturday in the Class A Regionals. Jay finished eighth overall in the
girls' competition.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Jay
Continued From Page One
when the threat of third-and-10
from the Baker 45 suddenly
became a first down because of
an unsportsmanlike conduct
penalty against the Gators.
Five plays later Hendricks
found the end zone from six
yards out to make it 21-14 fol-
lowing the Tyler DeGraaf kick,
with 4:13 remaining.
"All of our seniors played a
heck of a game and I am glad
we can send them off with a
win," said Jay head coach
Elijah Bell. "I could not ask for
a better game tonight.
"This is what small town
football is all about."
Baker had. two chances to
score, but they could not find a
way to break a fired up Royals
defensive unit.
At the start of the game
some might have felt the
Royals, who has won two con-
secutive games against their
biggest non-district rival, might
have came out over confident.
And. the second play from
scrimmage made several very
nervous as Laine Barnhill
scooted 58 yards for what
seemed like a touchdown, but a
yellow piece of laundry for an
illegal shift stopped the Gators
cold as they were forced to punt
three plays later.
Jay's first possession start-
ed off with a holding penalty,
but that was nothing as Baker
was faced with a steady diet of
Hendricks carrying the football
until he capped the drive with
5:42 remaining with a six yard
run.
"We moved Brandt around,
but we didn't know what would
happen," admitted Bell after the
game. "Fortunately' it was all
good."
Jay would keep the
momentum going as Jesse
Lewis stopped a fake punt for
no gain to give the Royals the
ball back at their own 41.
Josh Marshall would cap
off the 59-yard drive with a 1-
yard plunge on the first play of
the second quarter to make it
14-0 Jay.
"Tonight the kids played
really, really hard," said Bell.
"They played as hard as I have
seen them play all year and
hopefully we can carry that
over to next year.
"We are going to enjoy this
win as long as it can stand us."
Besides his rushing totals
Hendricks also passed for 153
yards as he completed eight of
19 attempts.

Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@ srpressgazette.com


Pace

Continued From Page One
Pearson for Pace's third score
of the evening.
Leading 21-0, Pace would
tally another score on a Louie
Wise 1.-yard plunge coupled
with Martinez's three-pointer to
rest the numbers at halftime,
31-0.
The Patriots tacked on the
final score of the night with
6:41 left in the third as, sopho-
more Kolby Boesen sprinted in
from 34 yards out.
West Florida came close to
avoiding a shutout late in the
same period on a 69-yard run,
but a holding penalty erased the
play.
The Jaguars have allowed
488 points this season, which is
the most for a team in the four
county area of Escambia, Santa
Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton.
Next highest in the area is
South Walton who has given up
320 points.
On the flip side of the
ledger the Jaguars have only
scored six points, which was a
late touchdown against
Woodham High School in week
five of the season.
Ben Giles' interception of a
Tech aerial at the Patriot 9 late
in the contest kept the Jags out
of the end zone on the Jaguars
last possession.
Munoz finished the night
by completing six of nine pass-
es for 75 yards.

Story written by
Ken Barnes. Reach him at
sports@srpressgazette.com


Above, Jay head coach Elijah Bell is seen urging defender Jesse Lewis to attack the line harder and come.
up with a big play defensively. Below Lewis answers the call with a big hit on a Baker running back for a;
loss as the Royals ended the season on a winning note by downing their arch rival Baker Gators 21-14 at
home.
Press Gazette photos by Bill Gamblin


Pace's Riley Hawkins is seen here making a dramatic catch earlier in the week as the Patriots defeated
Escambia County in the shootout 17-14 that required four overtimes.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Pane 2-E


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, November 8, 2006,'







Wveunesuay, IIuvemuerI .uu
Sports


Season
Name Record Pct.
,Mike Bodd\ -12M -1
Don Musgta'.e .129 7I
;Car Lip4-ia,. ---33 70
:Keith k Nrchhart 76.34 69.1
'Sha. n l-hil '5 35 68.2
,Glenn Cha,.ers 5-35 68 2
jerenr Brov n 741-3 6- 3
iHenr, L S'.ilt -4-36 67.3
;De'.\a\ne Queen "4-36 6- 3
'Paul Hinsonri 3 3- 66 4
tMrurrav Rutledge 7-33- 66 4
.Letha McCaskill .-3-3 6b.4
iRust[ lone -2.-38 65.5
'F.C Brake. Jr ; 8 65.5
,Ronald Tavlor 65.35 65
iMartha Cha'.ers 65-35 65
CICarol Oaughiei\ 6436 64
-Jerry Miller 70-40 63.6
.R.D Williams 63-37 63
Neil McDonald 63-37 -3
Gra,, Weaker 61-37 63
Martin Brake 69-41 h2 -
BrN an Hatha'wav 69-41 62.7
Walter Starnes 62- 33 62
Rulan Mc\VWjler- 6-.43 60.)9
[Ashle, Mc.\'aters 6--4: 6019
Donna Miller 66 44 60
Michelle jobe 59-41 5",
ILarr\ Gibson 59-41 '-1
;Wade Miller 64-46 58.2
kLnRae lohnson b3-4- 5-.3
Berna Fausi 56-44 56
'Beck lone-i 52-4' 3 52
Those who have not met
the 100 game minimum.
Hovard \ ann 82 811


Leaders
lohn Rale, ,.1 ', 5
ludy Hodge-s 22-8 3.3
Noreen Hill 583.22 2 5
ill Hood 2-182 701
Barbara Mc.raek 219 "0
Scott Milller 3 t0
T'ler Bohannon 34 16 68
Harold Henderson61-29 67 8
Da', d Bhannon 4- 23 67.1
Mark Hud-e i) 60-30 66 7
limmie Hood 59-31 65.6
lake McDoinald 52-23 65
AuL tin \Vo, le', 52.28 65
Frank r.tason 31.2] 65
M, izhael Ilaquish 26-14 65
D I lone. 13-- 65
Cod', Martin 13.- 65
Larr', Culpeplper 45-25 64.3
,Dougla Filbert 51 29 63.8
.nihorn lobe 44-26 62.9
Burdc.tte Miller 25 15 62.5
Mick T.Fe 3-.3 61.7
I Scont Terr', 48 32 60
Lance Ezelle 1 2 8 60
Barbara Hag', 12 8 60
Rot, Cooper 128 6ii
loseph MlcDonall 53.3- 58.q
Paul Tate 51-1) 56.7
Daj\rn youngg 11-9 55
Tro', lobe 32-28 51.3
VVa\ne Dai-s 16-14 53.1
Glonila Mason :,.-24 52
Dustin Luthei 41-39 51
Richard Lain 5-5 t50
Ma lie Brake 34 46 42.5
\\'illi.im C lin -., 401


Mason cashes at 8-2


7 Upsets case for topsy-turvy weekend


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
To say it was an ugly week-
end would be an understatement
at best.
Out of 55 players this week
on 26 finished above .500, but the
upsets could not slow Frank
Mason who posted a weekend
best card of 8-2.
Mason's only two misses on
the weekend came as he predicted
Georgia to win along with Texas
A&M.
Kentucky's upset of Georgia
was a fairly common loss on most
cards as were Maryland's win
over Clemson and Wake's win
over Boston College.
One game behind Mason on
the weekend was Jake
McDonald, Mike Boddy, Neil
McDonald, Douglas Filbert, and
Dustin Luther who finished at 7-
3.
Larry Culpepper, Jeremy
Brown, Tyler Bohannon, Gary


Upshaw, Paul C. Tate, Ronald
Taylor, Murray Rutledge, Paul
Hinson, Letha McCaskill,
Michelle Jobe, Joseph
McDonald, Gray Weaver, Harold
Henderson, Carol Daughtery,
Ashley McWaters, Shawn Hill,
Austin Worley, Barbara Moravek,
Larry Gibson, and Keith
Kirchharr were all in the pack at
6-4.
The next major pack checked
in at 5-5 and included J. Scott
Terry, Henry L. Swift, R.D.
Williams, Dawn Young, Jerry
Miller, Mayhew Brake, Mick
Tate, Becky Jones, Rusty Jones,
Anthony Jobe, Walter M. Starnes,
Rulan McWaters, Dewayne
Queen, Berna Faust, Richard
Laing, Burdette Miller, Dona
Musgrave, and Glenn Chavers.
Jimmie Hood, LynRae.
Johnson, F.C. Brake, Michael
Jaquish, Martin Brake, Wayne
Davis, Troy Jobe, Donna Miller,
and Wade Miller finished at 4-6,


while Martha Chavers and Bryan
Hathaway rounded out the week
at 3-7.
With the wild weekend
behind us the overall standings
have gotten considerably tighter
as several are just percentage
points away from the top spot.
Currently Mike Boddy and
Don Musgrave are tied at 71 per-
cent, while Gary Upshaw is in
third at 70 percent.
Keith Kirchharr is currently
fourth at 69.1 percent, while
Shawn Hill and Glenn Chavers
are next in fifth at 68.2 percentage
points.
Jeremy Brown, Henry L.
Swift, and Dewayne Queen are
tied for seventh at 67.3 percent,
while Paul Hinson, Murray
Rutledge, and Letha McCaskill
round out at tie for 10th place at
66.4 percent.,
Who ever wins the over all
prize from Wings on the Go will
earn it as this week could prove to


be very interesting.
As for the high school con-
tests you have Crestview at
Milton, while Pace is traveling to
Navarre.
On the college side there are
several key games that could be a
coin toss as others carry post sea-
son dreams.
Those games are Tennessee
at Arkansas, Oregon at USC,
Nebraska at Texas A&M,
Vanderbilt at Kentucky, Alabama
at LSU, and Middle Tennessee
State at Arkansas State.
Louisiana Monroe at Florida
International, Texas El-Paso at
Alabama-Birmingham, and
Central Florida at Memphis are
more for pride, but appear to be
evenly matched on paper.
Here is just a friendly
reminder to put down the points
for the tiebreaker as it could mean
the difference from winning some
cash and admitting that you came
close.


.200 Pr*ss Gzete' ootbll*ontst


HERE'S HOW TO WIN:
Pick the most games correctly and win $25.00.
Pick all ten games correctly and win $50.00.
Pick all ten games correctly and the exact com-
bined Tie-breaker and win $100.00

INSTRUCTIONS:
Find the games listed in the ads below each
week. Fill in names of winning teams. Only
score needed for tie-breaker game.

CONTEST RULES:
1. Anyone' may enter, except Press Gazette
employees and their families.
2. Entries must be on an official
blank-no reproduction will be l -. -
accepted.
3. In case of ties in the number '' I
of winners picked,
the total score of the "tiebreaker' -game
will be used
to determine the winner. Should tied entries have the same
correct, or same number of points closest to actual score, the
prize will be divided.
4. Only one entry may be submitted per person.
5. The decision of the judges will be final.
6. The winner will be announced in the fol-
lowing Wednesday issue of the Press .
Gazette.
7. Entries must be in the Press Gazette
* office or postmarked not late than 5-.p.m.
on Fiday of the contest week.


OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM


FOR 2006


PRESS GAZETTE



FOOTBALL CONTEST


/ .



NAME: .
I I
ADDRESS: I


CITY:
I PHONE:


3.


14. 9.
15. 10. I

I*TIE BREAKER/Total Combined Score I
1-------------------------------- .
TIE BREAKER: Total Score of
Louisiana-Monroe at Florida International


1. Crestview at Milton



Downs
PAINT & BODY
BOB DOWNS, Owner
Phone: 623-4342
Hwy. 90 Milton, Pace


YOU DON'T "'ORTA" WANT|
TO YLL YoU, QME'


1111- -N Ar-0- -'-tk
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
2. Pace at Navarre ,
Visit atn.ffice, aItfion a#tr you at
Pace, Milton I ".-om2i'r.iP'^g Field

(850) 00
3. Tennessee at Arkansas 1 170 '.p 1. i o g
MembnhershipFlig iib Reuired 0JM05111

8. Middle Tennessee at Arkansas St.
ATMORAL-D COAST
i=AUTOMOTIVE U ACCESSOI-1I5S


5. Nebra Gary Mooneyham


MOONEYHAM David Beach
H ,t;,y-, i, Con-,rI;ln;n, i,-r 4061 Avalon Blvd.
Milton, FL 32583 2


rANE Ph (850) 623-2084"
It's Hard b StopA7hwne" CMC04110 http://mooneyhamhvac.com


4mBLOOD
CENTER


850-434-2535
www.nfbcblood.org
10. Central Fla. at Memphis


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 3-E


d N b 8 2006








rage 4-E
Snorts


2006 FHSAA Class 4A Bracket


Regional Quarterfinals Regional Semifinals
Friday, Nov. 10 Friday, Nov. 17


Regional Finals
Friday, Nov. 24


State Semi-
Finals
Friday, Dec. 1


Class 4A


W1 Milton (7-3)


R2 Crestview (7-3) .

W3 Lincoln (5-1)


Ice Pilots name new coach-
Press Gazatte Staff Reports will assume the Head Coaching :
PENSACOLA, FL The role tonight when the Ice Pilots-.,
Pensacola Ice Pilots of the ECHL host the Augusta Lynx in the first.
announced (today) Friday effec- of back-to-back games at The&i
tive immediately that George Hangar beginning at 7:05 p.m.
Dupont will move over to concen- "Without a doubt, the two:'
rate full-time on hockey opera- changes we have just made oolid-.
tions and player development in ifies the hockey side of this organ-',
his new role of Director of Player ization" states Greg Schuh, Ice..-
Personnel. Pilots President. I ,
In an additional move, the Ice "George Dupont has al]% a\ s,
Pilots also announced that wanted to focus his expertise or01
Assistant Coach Joe Clark has the player and budget side of;
been promoted to Interim-Head things and at the same time we areA,
Coach. The announcements will able to elevate Joe Clark to head
take effect immediately, and Clark coach."

CsJommuityIu Sportsm Results


Gospel Projects Soccer
Through Nov. 4, 2006


R4 Wolfson (3-6)


W2 Navarre (7-3)


R1 Pace (7-3)


W4 First Coast (8-1)


R3 N~losIe\ I6-3) 1


W5 Nease (9-0)


R6 BeIleviev% 6-41I


L


Rockets
Turbos
Strikers
Talons
Bullets


Tankers
Stallions
Fighters
Pilots
.Choppers




Bears
Tigers
Packers
Hawks,
Falcons


Bombers
Eagles'
Heat
Sharks
Knights


W7 Merritt Island (4-6)


R8 Tarpon Springs (5-51


W6 Eastside (8-1)


R5 Columbia 17-21 1


W8 Central (Brook) (7-2)


R7 Seabreeze (8-1) |


Playoffs

Continued From Page One
"Crestview is a good foot-
oall team that will get after you
on defense," said McMillion.
"Sometimes there is more scor-
ing than you would expect in a
game against them.
"But they are well coached
and our kids are going to have to
come out focused if we hope to
get a win against them."
For Milton they are looking
forward to playing a game
before the home crowd.
"We are thankful for having
the first game at home," said
McMillion. "We are excited
about play in front of our fans."
As far as any health con-
cerns go, both teams seem to be
in pretty good shape despite the


very physical match ups late this
season.
"We have a few injuries,"
said Lindsey. "But it is nothing
that would wouldn't expect at
this point of the season.
"We have a whole week to
practice and work on getting
everyone ready."
For Milton they took full
advantage of an off night this
past Friday.
"We are in pretty good
shape for this point of the sea-
son," said McMillion. "We had a
good open week work out, while
letting those with a few bumps
and bruises heal for this week."
This season the FHSAA has
set ticket prices for the playoff
games at $7 each.


J-6 Standings
East
W L I
9 1
9 1 :
7 3
'3 6 :
3 8 (
West
W L
8 2 :
7 1
3 9 1
2 9
0 11

U-8 Standings
East
W L
10 1
6 4
4 5
1 8
0 9
West
W L "
112 0
6 4
6 6
5 6
3 9


U-10 Standings
East
W L T Pts.
Broncos 10 0 0 24
Turf Pilots 8 2 0 20
Chargers 4 5 0 9


Milton will be hosting their first playoff game since 2003 this Friday
when they host Crestview at 7:30 p.m. Advance tickets are $7 and go
on sale today.


Steeler? 1 9 0 2 *4,

West
W L T Pts.
Argos 5 4 0 13
Patriots 5 3 0 11 -
Twisters 2 7 0 5 '
Raiders 1 7 0 3

U-13 Standings
East
W L T Pts.,
Cobras 7 2 0 18 ?
Lightning 5 3 0 14 ,,
Thunder 3 6 0 7;
Stingers 1 8 0 2 .

West ,
W L T Pts."7
Comets 8 0 0 20 p
Barracudas 5 3 0 12 ';
Tarpons 4 4 0 10 '
Tornados 1 8 0 2 ,
.
Correction:
Tanglewood Golf Club '
Ladies Golf Association
Halloween Bingo
October 31, 2006 %

1. Evelyn Mirbrath
2. Betty Gullickson

Tanglewood Golf Club
Ladies Golf Association
Baker's Dozen
October 10, 2006

1. Nancy Welch '
.2. Bobbi Utt and Sue Gibson
(tie)


prescription, nilropracuc
Call (850) 324-6675 or
http://shawnelliott.thedreamcard.net aa
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East Bay Pensacola Bay Navarre Beach Blackwater River ----
Thursday, Nov. 9, 2006 Thursday, Nov. 9, 2006 Thursday, Nov. 9, 2006 Thursday, Nov. 9, 2006
S. 12:41 AM 2.33 Feet 6:10 AM Sun rise 6:08 AM Sun rise 1:37 AM 2.33 Feet
-. 6:09 AM Sun rise 10:38 AM Moon set 10:01 AM -0.22 Feet 6:09 AM Sun rise
10:37 AM Moon set 12:08 PM -0.34 Feet 10:37 AM Moon set 10:38 AM Moon set
1:25 PM -0.40 Feet 4:55 PM Sun set 4:54 PM Sun set 1:55 PM -0.40 Feet ,. /
4:54 PM Sun set 8:41 PM Moon rise 8:39 PM Moon rise 4:54 PM Sun set
8:39 PM Moon rise 10:19 PM 1.90 Feet 8:39 PM Moon rise


Friday, November 10, 2006
1:39 AM 2.22 Feet
6:09 AM Sun rise
11:25 AM Moon set
2:26 PM .-0.34 Feet
4:54 PM Sun set
9:42 PM Moon rise

Saturday, Nov. 11, 2006
2:33 AM 2.05 Feet
6:10 AM Sun rise
12:05 PM Moon set
3:07 PM -0.23 Feet
4:53 PM Sun set
10:42 PM Moon rise

Sunday, November 12, 2006
3:19 AM 1.84 Feet
6:11 AM Sun rise
12:07 PM Third Quarter
12:38 PM Moon set
3:30 PM -0.06 Feet
4:52 PM Sun set
11:40 PM Moon rise


Friday, November 10, 2006
12:55 AM 1.85 Feet
6:10 AM Sun rise
11:26 AM Moon set
1:09 PM -0.29 Feet
4:55 PM Sun set
9:43 PM Moon rise

Saturday, Nov. 11, 2006
1:49 AM 1.71 Feet
6:11 AM Sun rise
12:06 PM Moon set
1:50 PM -0.20 Feet
4:54 PM Sun set
10:44 PM Moon rise

Sunday, November 12, 2006
2:35 AM 1.53 Feet
6:12 AM Sun rise
12:07 PM Third Quarter
12:39 PM Moon set
2:13 PM -0.05 Feet
4:54 PM Sun set
11:41 PM Moon rise


Friday, November 10, 2006
6:09 AM Sun rise
10:57 AM -0.11 Feet
11:24 AM Moon set
4:53 PM Sun set
9:42 PM Moon rise
11:13 PM 1.75 Feet

Saturday, Nov. 11, 2006
6:10 AM Sun rise
11:43 AM 0.04 Feet
12:04 PM Moon set
4:53 PM Sun set
10:42 PM Moon rise

Sunday, November 12,2006
12:07 AM 1.60 Feet
6:11 AM Sun rise
12:07 PM Third Quarter
12:11 PM 0.23 Feet
12:38 PM Moon set
4:52 PM Sun set
11:40 PM Moon rise


NAfir HZ-


rL DESS tQU STED


Friday, November 10, 2006
2:35 AM 2.22 Feet
6:10 AM Sun rise
11:26 AM Moon set
2:56 PM -0.34 Feet
4:54 PM Sun set
9:42 PM Moon rise.

Saturday, Nov. 11, 2006
3:29 AM 2.05 Feet
6:11 AM Sun rise
12:06 PM Moon set
3:37 PM -0.23 Feet
4:53 PM Sun set
10:43 PM Moon rise

Sunday, November 12, 2006
4:15 AM 1.84 Feet
6:12 AM Sun rise
12:07 PM Third Quarter
12:39 PM Moon set
4:00 PM -0.06 Feet
4:53 PM Sun set
11:40 PM Moon rise


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The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


RAY"


n0 A A I





The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, Novem er ,
Sports


Page 5-E


Above, Angie Watson (left) Michelle Killgore, and Haley Millsap (right) talk about golf clubs and who is
using what kind of driver prior to the Patriot Classic Golf Scramble Monday at Stonebrook Golf Course.
Millsap needed just a little bit of help after breaking her driver during a tournament a couple of days
back. (Left) Brad Marcilliatt strikes an intimidating image as he returns from the driving range after
warming up.
Press Gazette photos by Bill Gamblin



Golfers bear arms


0 Monday scramble benefits Pace golf program


Experienced childcare workers preferred, but not required.
Great Pay!
Santa Rosa Community School


:Ava Snellgrove
983-5650
Milton/Pace


Lauren Kirchgessner
934-4095
Gulf Breeze/Navarre


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Ainau.._ M.,amhAr R 2006nn


I









Pre&

GtPitlte 8


PAGE 6-E


..;....... ........ "---.........--".__...


assi


ie


.S


WEDNESDAY

NOVEMBER 8, 2006-


90 ANNOUNCEMENTS
92 AUCTIONS
94 MEETINGS
96 PERSONALS
98 TRAINING
EMPLOYMENT
102 DRIVERS
104 GENERAL HELP
106 HOME BASED
BUSINESS
108 HOTEL/MOTELS/
RESTAURANTS
110 LABOR
112 MANAGEME-NT
114 MEDICAL
116 OFFICE WORK
118 PART TIME
120 PROFESSIONAL
122 RETAIL
124 SALES'
TELEMARKETING
126 SKILLS/TRADE
128 POSITIONS WANTED
GARAGE SALES -
STYLES SECTION-WED.
202 GARAGE SALES-SAT.
SERVICES
305 AUTO
310 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
315 BUSINESS SERVICES
320 CHILD CARE
325 DOMESTIC
330 EQUIPMENT REPAIR
335 FINANCIAL SERVICES
340 HOME REPAIR
345 LAWN CARE
350 SENIOR CARE
355 SEWING/ALTERATIONS
360 MISCELLANEOUS
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-RENT
402 APARTMENTS
404 COMMERCIAL
406 HOMES
408 LAND
410 MOBILE HOMES
412 ROOMS FOR RENT
414 ROOMMATES WANTED
416 VACATION RESORT
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-SALE
502 APARTMENTS
504 COMMERCIAL
506 HOMES
508 INVESTMENTS
510 LAND
512 MOBILE HOMES
514 VACATIONRESORT
PETS/ANIMALS
702 BOARDING
704 LIVESTOCK
706 LIVESTOCK SUPPLIES
708 PETS
710 PET SUPPLIES
712 LOST PETS
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
802 ANTIQUES
804 APPAREL
806 APPLIANCES
808 ARTS & CRAFTS
810 COMPUTERS
812 FARM EQUIPMENT
814 FURNITURE
816 JEWELRY
818 LAWN EQUIPMENT
820 LUMBER'HARDWARE
822 MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
824 OFFICE EQUIPMENT
826 SPORTING GOODS
828 ELECTRONIC
(STEREO."TV."VCRI
830 MISC./SALE
832 MISC.,WANTED
834 LOST MERCHANDISE
TRANSPORTATION
902 AUTO SUPPLIES
904 CARS
906 BOATS
908 FARM EQUIPMENT
910 MOTORCYCLES
912 MOTOR HOMES
914 RECREATIONAL
916 SPORTS UTILITY
VEHICLE
918 TRUCKS
920 VANS
922 OTHER


HOT


OVERHEAD DOOR
COMPANY
is hiring skilled construction
tradesmen to be trained as door
installers and service techs.
Good pay and benefits.
Call: 983-2520


ADOPTION A nur-
turing family seeks
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We are financially
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Please call Christine
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JUMBO GREEN &
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Call:675-6876
LOOK AND Feel
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Art 981-0279 on-
line at
shopherbalife.com/a
hamm or stop by
Simply Shelia's
"Dogwood Shopping
Center" for free
samples.


AIRLINES ARE
HIRING Train for
high paying Aviation
Maintenance Ca-
reer. FAA approved
program. Financial
aid if qualified Job
placement assis-
tance. CALL Avia-
tion Institute of
Maintenance
(888)349-5387.
HEAVY EQUIP-
MENT OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT:
'Bulldozers, Back-
hoes, Loaders,
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tification, Job Place-
ment Assistance;
Associated Training
Services (800)251-
3274 www.equi-
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JOB FAIR
FEATURING
CONSTRUCTION, TRANSPORTATION,
PRODUCTION, TECHNICAL, CLERICAL,
CALL CENTER, CUSTOMER SERVICE,
MANAGER, RETAIL JOBS, & more!!
Local & Regional Employers ready to hirel
Thursday, November 09
9am -- 3pm
ESCAROSA CAREER CENTER
3670-A North L Street
Behind Town & Country Plaza

( ... J


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Scots,-.r,4ts/.
ESCARDOSA CAREER CENTER

BRING YOUR RESUME
Pensacola Century
Phone: (850)595-5200 Phone: (850) 256-6250 P
Fax: (850) 595-5249 Fax. (850) 256-6255


Miltor
hone: (850) 983-5325
Fax:(850) 983-5330


102
Drivers
AMERICA'S DRIV-
ING ACADEMY
Start your'driving ca-
reer today! Offering
courses in CDL A.
Low tuition fee!
Many payment op-
tions! No registration
fee! (866)889-0210
info @ americasdri-
vingacademy.com.
DRIVER
DEDICATED RE-
GIONAL Guaran-
teed Home EVERY
Wkend! Avg. $725-
$1025/wk 65% pre-
loaded/pretarped
Mobile, AL Terminal
CDL-A required
877-428-5627,
www.ctdrivers.com


102
Drivers
DRIVER NEEDED
over the road. Must
have clean CDL with
1 yr. experience or
more. Must pass
DOT physical. Fay
Way Trucking. 850-
981-0773, 850-261-
5355.
DRIVER- ACT
NOW...Hiring OTR &
Local Drivers *Earn
$4,000 in bonuses
your 1st year *New
Equipment *Premi-
um Pay Package
*No HazMat Re-
quired -Call
(877)882-6537-Oak-
ley Transport, We
care about our driv-
ers!
DRIVER-DEDICATED
ACCOUNT OPENING
Tango Transport
Dedicated Services
is now hiring for the
Standard Furniture
account. Start at
.40 cpm. New Con-
ventionals. Home,.
weekends. Family
Medical/Dental.
401K. CDL-Aw/18
months OTR exp.
req'd. Call:
, 877-826-4605. EOE
DRIVER-HIRING
QUALIFIED DRIV-
ERS for Central
Florida Local & Na-
tional OTR posi-
tions. Food grade
tanker, no hazmat,
no pumps, great
benefits, competitive
pay & new equip-
ment. Need 2 years
experience. Call By-
num Transport for
your opportunity to-
day.. (800)741-7950.


NOW HIRING
Tri-County Community Council, Inc. is
accepting application for a
Community Services Specialist
for the Milton Office.
QUALIFICATIONS: High School diploma
(GED) with I year related experience and /or
training.
DUTIES: Assist low income families in need of
assistance with Services Programs and coordi-
nate with other social service agencies.
REOUIREMENTS: Current Driver's License
and proper vehicle insurance. Must comply with
background screening.
Applications may be obtained at any of the Tri-
County Community Council Inc., offices and
submitted by Monday, November 13; 4:30 p.m.
Contact Sharon Kent, Administrative Assistant,
(850) 547-3689, or 800-395-2696 for informa-
tion.
Successful applicant will be subject to pre-
employment drug test.
Only qualified applicants will be considered.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND
DRUG AND SMOKE FREE WORKPLACE.


102
Drivers
DRIVER-HIRING
QUALIFIED DRIV-
ERS for .Central
Florida Local & Na-
tional OTR posi-
tions. Food grade
tanker, no hazmat,
no pumps, great
benefits, competitive
pay & new equip-
ment. Need 2 years
experience. Call By-
hum Transport for
your opportunity to-
day. (800)741-7950.
DRIVER: YOU
WANT IT, WE
HAVE IT! Solo,
teams, owner opera-
tors, company driv-
ers, students, recent
grads, regional,
dedicated, long
haul.
Van, flatbed. Must
be 21. CRST Career
Center. (800)940-
2778, www.drive-
forcrst.com.
GULF COAST
REGIONAL
TRACTOR TRAILER
DRIVER
S*CDL -
*Clean MVR
*Fork Lift experience
*40 cents per mile
plus drop off
*Home at night

Call: 850-626-8578
OTR DRIVERS de-
serve more pay and
more hometime!
$.48/mi. 1 year ex-
perience. More ex-
perience makes
.more! Home week-
ends! Run our Flori-
da Region! Heart-
land Express
(800)441-4953
www.heartlandex-
press.com.

104
General Help
$2,900 WEEKLY
Guaranteed! Ad-
dressing letters in
your spare time.
Free postage/sup-
plies. No experience
necessary!! Start im-
mediately, write
A&G Publications,
2370-G Hillcrest Rd.
#147-H, Mobile, AL
36695.
DATA ENTRY!
Work From Any-
where. Flexible
Hours. Personal
Computer Required.
Excellent Career
Opportunity. Serious
Inquiries Only
(800)344-9636 Ext.
700.
EXPERIENCED
CLEANERS needed
for commericall
cleaning. 916-4446


(




.it _--


104
General Help
DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!!!
Werner needs entry-
level semi drivers.,
No exp. required.
Avg. $36k+ 1st yr!
60% home
nightly/weekly. CDL
training in your area.
1-866-280-5309
EARN UP. to $550
WEEKLY Working
through the govern-
ment PT No Experi-
ence. Call Today!!
(800)488-2921 Ask
for Department
W21.
EXCEPTING RE-
SUMES for sales
position'. Fax re-
sume to: Bill Salter
Advertising Inc. @
994-9580
FEMALE DANC-
ERS needed for Ry-
thum & Blues Band.
Call: 450-8018
Leave name and
number.
HELP WANTED ,
Counselor needed
for ... expanding
Weight Control-Cen-
ter in ,Pace. Call
994-6840 for an in-
terview.
LICENSED PLUMB-
ERS & Helpers
needed. Benefits
Available. 626-8456.
MAINTENCE MAN
must know how to
paint, minor plumb-
ing and carpeprtry,
drywall experience.
Must have own tools
and transportation:.
Apply in person @
Emeral Sands.
623-3821
NOW HIRING
Housekeepers, ap-
ply in person Emer-
ald Sands on Hwy
90
OVERHEAD DOOR
Company is hiring
skilled construction
tradesmen to be
trained as door in-
stallers and service
techs. Good pay
and
benefits. Call:
983-2520
TEAMS NEEDED.
Home weekly. Class
A-CDL w/HAZMAT.
TOP PAY & BENE-
FITS. (800)428-
.0678. www.Armelli-
ni.com.
WANTED: FRA-
MERS & Carpenters
helpers. Must be de-
pendable & have
transportation.
Please call:
\554-2068


104
General Help
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
Milton Newspapers,
Inc. (dba The Santa
Rosa Press Gazette
and The Santa Rosa
Free Press) re-
serves the right to
censor, reclassify,
revise, edit or reject
any advertisement
not meeting its
standards of accept-
ance. Submission of
an advertisement
does not constitute
an agreement to
publish said adver-
tisement. Publication
of an advertisement
.does not constitute
an agreement for
continued publica-
tion.
110
Labor
ATTENTION
LADY'S Christian
College girl looking
to clean your
homes', has experi-
ence references al-
oSd'-"Vailable. Call
288-1336.
HOUSE CLEANING
for local Santa Rosa
area, call for rates
626-5851.
114
Medical
FREE DIABETIC
SUPPLIES! MEDI-
CARE PATIENTS!
Call Us Toll Free
(866)294-3476 and
receive a FREE ME-
TER! Am-Med Qual-
ity Diabetic Sup-
plies.
124
Sales &
Telemarketing

LIBERTY
NATIONAL
Life Insurance Co
Is expanding its
operation and is
looking for people
to fill insurance
sales & service
positions. Average
annual earnings
$48,554. Fringe
benefit package:
2 retirement funds,
health insurance,
paid vacation,
convention trips &
many others.
No experience
necessary. We
have on the job
training. Contact
Jonathan Jones at:
682-2775 or
Fax
resume to:
850-682-1523
Liberty National
is an EOE
ODCO


I,


126
Skills/Trade
CUSTOM DESIGN
Interiors
Now hiring-top pay!
General Laborer
Metal Polisher '
Aluminum & S. Steel
Welder -
Call: 850-995-4544,1
128
Positions Wanted'
HARD WORKING
cleaning.' .persdoi
needed long term for
growing cleaning"
business. Call 994'
1785


305
Auto
1992 PONTIAC LE-
MANS $1000 OBO
MELANIE 623-9040
310
Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY
ROUTE Do you earn
$800/day? '30 Ma-
chines, Free Candy
All for $9,995.
'(888)629-9968
BO02000033. CALL
US: We will not be
undersold!
FOR SALE
Approximately 27,5
Used and New Foi,-
mal Dresses ari0
Bridalware. Shoes,
jewlery, jewlery
showcase, mirrors
and other items t6
*start a dress bus'-
ness. Call after 3pm.
334-488-6661 ;;
GOLF BUSINESS
Play Lots of Golf
and Travel. Play bei-
ter, tournaments
played in US andI
World Raise MoneO
for Charities. Earn
Awesome Income.
www.SGSPresentai
tions.com (800)861-
9456 24/7
INVENTORY. COM-
PLETE training. $4.1
billion industry. Cll
(800)695-5380. in-
fo @ PalmsWeightLc,
ss.com.
LEARN TO buy
Foreclosures, tax
liens, and rehabs for
pennies on the dol-
lar. Mentor walks
you through each
deal A-Z to ensure
SUCCESS
(800)433-4556.
NO BULL! I eari
$500 daily just by
placing tiny little
ads... You can todc!
No Selling. Find out
how. www.1ste6-
maximizer.com/1814
0


PRIVATE

PARTY ADS

*4.00/WK

up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30
$1.00 OFF FOR
3RD WEEK
MUST BE PRE-PAID


GARAGE


SALE ADS


15.00

up to 20 words
.25 PER WORD
OVER 20
PRE-PAYMENT
REQUIRED


COMMERCIAL

ADS

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WAYS TO PLACE AN A D


IT







I PAGE 7 TE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE /FREE PRESS NOVEMBER 8, 2006


310
Business
Opportunities
WORK ONLINE at
home 23 people
needed immediately.
Earn a part or full-
time income. Apply
'REE online and
get
started! 800-807-
5176
www.wahusa.com
Enter Ad Code 1826
YOU WON'T
SLEEP
TONIGHT! The "Ulti-
mate Juice" money-
-making opportunity
is coming 12/01/06.
Preview at:
www.JuicePerfect.c
om. Don't miss this
-tremendous nutri-
tional-technology
breakthrough! FREE
Pre-registration!!
315
Business Services
ARTIE KELLER
STUCCO. Licensed
and Insured. Con-
ventional and Syn-
thetic Systems. No
job too big nor to
"small. Call 698-8327
-or 626-9164.
-B & W MASONRY
Brick/Mason for
Hire!
Bricks, Blocks &
Concrete. Brick Mail
Boxes, Knee Walls.
No Job Too Small!!
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
434-5824
BORDER TO Bor-
der Fence and Deck
Company. All types
*Vf fencing installed
9nd repaired. Spe-
,cializing in privacy
;fencing and wooden
decks. Our privacy
fences are built with
,SCREWS. Free Es-
|mates. 485-2532.
-NEW HOPE PAINT-
ING & WALLPA-
PERING *Drywall
repairs & patchwork
"*Pressure cleaning
,(homes, decks, pa-
tios, driveways &
sidewalks) *Carpen-
try: work (crown
,molding, paneling,
,trim base & case, in-
-istall cabinets & build
',decks) Residential.
lfnterior/Exterior.
Family owned busi-
-'ness, over 30 years.
Call The Ericksens
today! (850)723-
2550 or 623-6034


315
Business Services
CELESTIAL
INSPIRATIONS
Psychic Readers
Available Daily
Crystals, Incense,
Candles, Herbs,
Books, CD's, Cards,
Fountains and more
to compliment your
spiritual beliefs. On-
line Store: www.
celestial-inspira-
tions.com
4474 Woodbine
Road, Unit-#3
(Woodbine Plaza
Parking Lot)
Phone:
850-995-4288
Tuesday-Friday
10-6 and Saturday
10-4

COKER'S LAWN &
TRACTOR Service,
from trimming to
tractor work. Clean
ups, raking, hauling,
mowing, bushhog-
ging, dirt work. Rea-
sonable rates, free
estimate (850) 623-
0493. Licensed & in-
sured.
DIRECT CAR
DETAILING
will come to your lo-
cation, dependable
& reasonable
623-8415
DIRT CHEEP
CLEANING SERVICE
Whole house or
just bathrooms.. Our
specialty prefabricat-
ed showers shines
every time. New
customers 10%
discount. Call:
384-2388
DOUBLE "B" Land
Clearing. Backhoe
Work. Licensed and
Insured. Bryen Bal-
lard. (850)994-5740
or (850)232-1581.
HANDY HANDS
ON CALL
Home Improvement
Specialists
850-525-0736
Emergency Repair
Service Available
www.alpha-atherton.com
*Licensed & Insured
*Accept Credit
Cards
*Free Estimates
*Member BBB &
SRCC

Divorce '108, Adoption '80
Name Change '55
FREE Typing, Call for
Worksheet (850) 434-7524
1850 N."W" St.
(I blk. N. of Flea Market)!


315
Business Services
JEFF'S COMPUT-
ER Service: My
place or yours. Up-
grades, virus remov-
al, maintenance,
programming, hard
ware replacement,
home networks,
slow system repair,
cable/DSL, modem
installation, setup;
nights/weekends
too. Information
Technology Degree.
850-485-1283
LEBER'S PAINT
AND TRIM, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Call for Free Esti-
mate. Interior Paint-
ing, Trim Work,
Hardwood Floors,
Exterior Painting.
Phone:
850-206-5370

MIKE KAYLOR
Cement Mason
*Patios
*Walks
*Driveways
Free estimates,
no job too small.
Quality work at
affordable prices.
994-0897.

MOVE 4 LESS
REALTY
Sell your home for
$2995. W6 do it all
we simply charge
less! J. Scott Terry
686-2620 or
Shawna Carpenter
850-450-4091
Ask about our Buy-
ers Bonus Program.
NEED TRASH Re-
moved or trees and
landscaping? Butler,
292-6980 or 564-
0064 at your serv-
ice.
PEA RIDGE
Flea Market -
Open Weekends
5186 Hwy90

Pea Ridge Self
Storage
Located behind
Flea Market. Low-
est prices in town.
'RV & Boat Storage
*Fenced & Lighted
Resident Manager
S994-8056
ROGERS' DOZER
SERVICES, INC.
Land clearing,
and all tractor,
dozer and related
services.
Free Estimates.
NO JOB TOO
SMALL!!
You may find
cheaper but you
won't find better.
Call Billy Rogers:
850-957-4952 or
cell: 850-261-8407
TNT METAL
BUILDING, INC.
R.V. & Boat
covers,
Garages.
Portable Sheds
CARPORTS'
Call for best prices,
in town!
Galvanized Steel
Many sizes/colors:
Financing Available
Free delivery & setup
(850) 983-2296 or
Cell: (850) 206-
4008
THE SCREEN MAN
Window Screen on
Site. Repair or Re-
placement.
995-0719
Cell: 637-5611
Free Estimates


Find your


e name and



win $5.00


Find your name in the Classified ,I
Section of Wednesday's or
Saturday's Press Gazette and you
can win $5.00. Bring proof of
identification by our office before
the date of next publication and
pick up your money.

I -Prem A


315
Business Services
SNH ENTERPRIS-
ES, Inc.
Home Improve-
ments, Shooting
Houses, Tractor
Work. Specializing
in vinyl siding, re-
modeling, barns,
porches, fences,
decks. 25+ years
experience. Li-
censed and insur-
ed. Call: 850-675-
0422 for free esti-
mates.

Attention Hunters:
Prefab or assem-
bled shooting hous-
es. See our model
located at west end
of Berryhill Rd.

Tractor work food
plots, bush hogging,
light dirt work.

Visit our website at
www.strengthnho-
nor.com.
STUMP-EASE
STUMP GRINDING
Most removals $35
Discount for multiple
removals & Back-
yard accessible.
Local Contractor
Retired USN
Licensed & Insured
232-8746
320
Child Care
CHILD CARE in my
home. Infant to 3
yrs. old. Friday, Sat-
urday, and Sunday
12 p.m. until. Call
Ms. Pat 623-6455
REGISTERED
CHILD care home in
Milton has openings
for infants, toddlers
and preschoolers,
After school care al-
so. available. Please
call Valerie:
983-8043
REGISTERED
HOME I
IN MILTON AREA
HAS 1 OPENING
FOR AN INFANT.
MON.-FRI.
7:00AM TO 5:30PM..
REASONABLE
RATES!
CALL LORIANNE
AT 623-1670
325
Domestic
DEPENDABLE
HOUSEKEEPER
Seeking additional
clients. Over 15
years of experience!
References avail.
upon request.
Call: 994-6236
335
Financial Services
PRIVATE MONEY
AVAILABLE: Easy
qualifying. Rapid
funding. Flexible
terms on real estate
secured properties.
*Bare-land *Com-
mercial *Residential.
Thomas: (866)895-
.4502.
345
Lawn Care
CLARK'S LAWN
CARE General
Maintenance & All
Types of Tractor
Work Licensed &
Insured. Call: Mike
Clark at 626-2428
PAGE'S TREE
Service Trim, cut &
remove. Call 626-
2159 (if no answer,
please leave message)
Firewood $50. a
load and up.


350
Senior Care
CHRISTIAN WOMAN
available for
sitter/companion po-
sition. References
available. Call Cindy
at 850-983-2098
DEPENDABLE
LIVE-IN care giver/
companion seeking
position. References
provided. Call 994-
0010.
360
Miscellaneous
AIRLINE MECHAN-
IC Rapid training
for high paying Avia-
tion Career. FAA
predicts severe
shortage. Financial
aid if qualify Job
placement assis-
tance. CALL AIM
(888)349-5387.
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Com-
puters *Criminal
Justice. Job place-
ment assistance.
Computer provided.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. Call (866)858-
2121 www.on-
lineTidewaterTech.c
om.
DIVORCE$275-
$350*COVERS
CHILDREN, etc.
Only one signature
required! *Excludes
govt. fees! Call
weekdays (800)462-
2000, ext.600. (8am-
6pm) Alta Divorce,
LLC. Established
1977.
WOLFF TANNING
BEDS Buy Direct
and Save' Full Body
units from $22 a
month! FREE Color
Catalog CALL TO-
DAY! (800)842-1305
www.npfetstan.com.





402
Apartments
1 BEDROOM fur-
nished apartment
with central heat &
air. No pets. $400.
month, $300. dep.
Call for appointment.
994-7246
1 BEDROOM unfur-
nished apartment for
rent. Ideal for se-
niors. 626-0287,
please leave mes-
sage
2 BR/1BA
CH & AC
New Carpet!
Water, Sewer,
Garbage Included.
$475./$450.
Triplex-Deerborn &
Peachtree in Milton
1 block off Stewart
Drive by, then leave
message. (also
available 1BR $425.)
Call: 712-7513


ANDORA DEER
Run & Country Vil-
lage Apts. 4260
Hwy 90 in Pace are
now accepting ap-
plications for 1 & 2
BR apartments.







EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

994-4353 .


402
Apartments
FOR RENT
2/BR. 1/BA Apart-
ment Beautiful Bay
View, deck, carport,
quiet, excellent com-
munity. 626-1602
FOR RENT
Small 2/BR apart-
ment. $500/rent
$350/deposit.
LUXURY APART-
MENT available No-
vember 1st,
2bd/2ba, ceramic tile
floors, fireplace,
laundry room $600
damage deposit
$700 monthly rent,
Ask for Sheree.
623-2500 or
994-4962
MILTON-VERY
NICE 2 bedroom 2
bath duplex for rent.
Completely remod-
eled, has fireplace..
Approx. 1300
square foot., Very
nice area $700.00
month and $700.00
deposit. 995-4335
MULAT/PACE-2
BEDROOM 2 Bath
Apartment for rent.
Central heat and air,
lots of yard. Laundry
room on premises.
$400.00 month
$400.00 deposit.
995-4335
SCENIC VIEW
APARTMENTS
4950 Glover Lane;
Milton
Now accepting ap-
plications for 2 bed-
room apartments.






EQUAL MOUSING

623-4053


FOR RENT
1/Br 1/Ba unfurnish-
ed. $425/mth plus
deposit. Includes
water, sewage and
trash. Offer Satelite
and telephone.
Apply in person at
Emerald Sands on
Hwy 90.
FOR RENT
2/Br 1/Ba Apartment
$450/mth $200/de-
posit no pets. Water
and sewage furnish-
ed. 623-5734 or
626-0740

404
Commercial
MILTON/COMMER-
CIAL Office space
for rent: Approx
2000 square foot for
rent on Stewart
Street in Milton. Per-
fect for professional
office space. Very
nice and clean.
$900.00 monthly
and $900.00 Depos-
it. 995-4335
OFFICE SPACE
FOR LEASE
6061 Dr's Park,
1,800 sf, newly ren-
ovated. 623-5618


BAPTIST
Jay Hospital
RN's- Full Time & Part Time positions. Florida License required. ACLS and
PALS preferred.

Radiology Technologist- Graduate of accredited ARRT program or registry
eligible. HRS operator. Must have excellent patient care skills and good com-
munication skills

Physical Therapy Assistant Full Time. Must have PTA License to treat
physical therapy out patients & acute care. Administer therapy treatments as
directed by PT. Sign on Bonus!

Swing Bed Coordinator/Activities Director HS graduate, CPR certified.
Full Time. CPR certified. Current C.N.A. License. Ability to work efficient-
ly and effectively with other healthcare team members.

Quality Improvement Director Current licensure in the state of Florida as
a Registered Nurse with 3 years nursing experience; AS or BSN preferred.
Strong critical thinking skills and ability to multitask and manage multiple
priorities and responsibilities. Working knowledge of quality improvement
principles. Computer/clerical experience and skills.

Medical Technologist- (PRN) PRN position, lab experience preferred.
Licensure in all areas of core lab blood bank and microbiology, skills and
duties are general PC operation skills, must be self motivated, FL licensure
required.

Release Of Information /File Clerk Part-time, Highschool graduate, 1-2
years clerical experience, type 35 wpm. File by numeric and alpha with high
degree of accuracy.

Jay Hospital offers and excellent benefit package. Applicants interested
please contact Wendy Covert in Human Resources at 850-675-8069 or fax
application to 850-675-8173 or email to wcovert@bhcpns.org or apply in per-
son at Jay Hospital 14114 Alabama Street, Jay Florida.


406
Homes

3BD/2BA BRICK
w/garage, ceramic
tile throughout, ener-
gy efficient, ceiling
fans, blinds, new
countertops, win-
dows, fenced back-
yard. Walking dis-
tance to Avalon Mid-
dle School. conven-
ient to 1-10 & shop-
ping, non-smoking
environment. $800
month $800 deposit.
623-8675 before
7pm.
FOR RENT
3/Br house or mobile
home, water & gar-
bage furnished. No
Pets. $675/mo
$300/deposit.
675-6614
3 BD/2BA Newly re-
modeled, central
heat and air, carport,
excellent location,
near elementary
schools. $850 month
$500 deposit
623-9553
FOR RENT

*3/2 Home, Chis-
holm Rd. Pensacola
$850

"3/1.5 home, 5705
Divot Ln. Milton
$850

*3/2 home, 6579
Cedar St., Milton
$850.


e3/2 Waterfront
home, 5084 Sam
Miguel Milton $1450


Santa Rosa Realty
623-0077
=OR RENT
1/BR house in
good condition,
clean in Bagdad util-
ities furnished. No
pets $650/mth
$150/deposit.
623-8415
FOR RENT
3/BR 2/BA Holley By
Sea, Full recreation-
al' benefits, hot tub.
Pets ok, non-smok-
ing environment.
$1300.'renI
$1000/deposit.
360-672-5727
FOR SALE/RENT
Plantation Woods
3/BR 2/BA. Pets ne-
gotiable, non-smok-
ing environment.
$1000/rent
$1000/deposit.
360-672-5727
HOLLEY
NAVARRE area
2/b 1.5/ba mobile
home, total electric,
private lot $525/mo
$300/deposit
994-7918
Bay Crest Realty


HOME FOR Rent
3/Br 2/Ba home in
Milton. 995-1090
HOUSE FOR
LEASE/RENT
2/BR 1/BA W/D
connections. Pet de-
posit required., $600
reht/$600deposit
626-4266
HOUSE FOR Rent
Milton-3bed/2bath.
Great neighborhood,
outside pets ok.
1900 sq. ft.
$1050/mo,
$1000/deposit
Call: 502-418-7888 .
ONE BEDROOM
house in Bagdad.
Good condition &
clean. Water & gar-
bage furnished.
$600 a month, $150
deposit. No pets.
623-8415
RENTALS 2 to 3 BR
in Jay, Milton and
Pace. $400 to $650
per month. Call:
994-5703
408
Land
FOR RENT
2 or 3 bedroom, total


electric, dishwasher,
etc. Fenced in yard
on acre property.
$700/mth 626-8973
LAND FOR SALE 2
Acres located off
Leonard Barnes Rd.
Asking $28,000.
Call: 850-449-6904
LAND FOR SALE
Refer to
Classification
#510


410
Mobile Homes
2/BR 1/BA off Ava-
lon in Park.
Water/garbage fur-
nished $435/mth
$200/deposit. No
Pets. 994-7918
Baycrest Realty
FOR RENT
2/Br 2/Ba garden
tub, dishwasher and
total electric. East
Gate Mobile Home
Ranch.
626-8973
MOBILE HOME for
rent. Call 623-6055
2BD/2BA WEST
Milton, $525 a
month, $250 depos-
it. No Pets. Total
Electric. Baycrest
Realty. 994-7918
5...OFF AVALON
Blvd. 2bd, a/c, cov-
ered entry, all elec-
tric. water and gar-
bage included.
$300mo $200 dep.
no pets. 623-2567
or
623-8753 (4324)
DOUBLEWIDE FOR
rent, total electric,
on corner lot. East-
gate Mobile Home
Ranch. Call:
626-8973

410
Mobile Homes
FOR RENT
14'x60' 2/Br 2/Ba
CA/H Clean, quiet
and nice Pace area.
995-1717
FOR RENT
2/BR 1/BA Mobile
Home $450mth
dep.& ref. Call:
850-537-6222 or
850-499-7412.
FOR RENT
2/Br 1/Ba trailer
$300/mth $250/de-
posit. Rustic setting
on Nichols Lake.
994-7587
MOBILE HOME for
rent
Quiet & clean 2/2 all
electric CH/A, deck.
Includes water, gar-
bage and sewer.
$475/mth
$395/deposit
623-9902
MOBILE HOME
spaces for rent, can
accommodate all
sizes, East Gate
Mobile Home Ranch
626-8973
NICE, QUIET, clean
park. Rent includes
water, garbage,
lawn service. Two
2/br 2/ba, no pets.
$450/mo. & 3/br
2/ba $550/mo.
698-4582
Bruce Lane, Milton
RENT/LEASE OP-
TION 3/2 Double-
wide Mobile home in
East Milton. $650
rent $650 security.
For Sale: $80,000
w/$10,000 down
$350/per mth for 25
years @10.9%.
377-6787
WEST MILTON
3bd/2ba 14x80 5105
Ridgeway Blvd. To-
tal Electric.
$625/$300. No Pets.
Baycrest Realty
994-7918
412
Rooms For Rent
ROOM FOR rent
Milton-Munson
area.Long or short
term. Quite non-
smoking environ-
ment. Kitchen, laun-
dry, Utilities, satellite
TV, fax, internet, un-
limited long distance
included. $325 mo.
957-4616
ROOMS FOR RENT
Large rooms,
utilities included,
washer/dryer, share
kitchen, near Kings
Middle School. $80
or $100 per week,
plus deposit.
Call 626-2786


Cell 982-3176
414
Roommates
Wanted

ROOMMATE
WANTED
East Milton
$250/mth. Must love
animals, non-smok-
ing environment.
Utilities included.
Call: 288-1807 for
more information.


414
Roommates
Wanted
ROOMMATE
WANTED Furnish-
ed bedrooms for
rent in Milton home.
Refrigerator, micro-
wave, TV, Cable in-
cluded. $100 per
week. 449-4070





452
Apartments




The All New!
Jay

Apartments

FULLY RENOVATED ONE,TWO,AND
TiREE BEDROOM UNITS NOW
AVAILABLE W.AC,


850-983-6995

460
Mobile Homes
FOR RENT 4 bed 2
bath double; wide
mobile home. $750
per month. $650 se-
curity deposit/ East
Milton newly ren-
ovated. Please call
Barbara Cumbie @
377-6787





504
Commercial
2 COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS
FOR RENT
Good location in
Milton. Call:
623-5500
506
Homes
FOR RENT
3/Br 2/Ba brick
house in Pace.
Great location! New
carpet, tile and
paint. All appliances
are included plus-
washer/dryer. Call
for more info.
346-2806
FOR SALE
by owner
Open House Sat. &
Sun. 10am 5pm.
Milton. 2/Br 1/Ba
corner lot like new.
5552 Elm Street,
near Milton High
School. $89,000
259-9052 or
699-3698
LEASE WITH Op-
tion in Milton, 3/2
1700 sq ft. $5000
Option owner/agent.
850-206-4026
510
Land
5 ACRES fenced
pasture for sale.
Located off Munson
Hwy, Indian Ford
Rd. Close to Cold
Water Creek.
$90,000 957-8784
or 554-5237
CARDINAL REALTY
Anni Thompkins
637-5611
Carmen Resmondo
261-5890

*Hunting land in
Geneva, AL
98 acres with 8 RV
hookups

*26.47 acres high
dry Robinson Pt. Rd

*18.27 acres in
beautiful Cleair
Creek

*4.25 acres in Jay

*2.45 Lakefront
acres in Pensacola

*2.50 acres Black-
water Circle

3 acres East Milton
zoned for Mobile
Homes

*Water front lot in
Beautiful Bayside


LAND FOR RENT
Refer to
Classification
#408

MILTON
4080 Raven end of
street, off DaLisa.
123 X 300, .84 +or-.
Power, water, sep-
tic, outbuilding.
Owner $35,000
casb_324-049A__
PACE LAND for
sale 2 acres for
more information go
to: Sharphome.com.
ID#flabg.'


-512
Mobile Homes

SECLUDED 6
ACRES NE of
Milton 10 minutes
from Blackwater
State Park
Two 1999 Palm
Harbor modular
homes. 3BR/ 2BA,
front/back porch
on both, shop,
storage, fully
stocked fish pond.
4 acres fenced
pasture beautiful
family homesite.
Must sell for
medical reasons
$300,000 for all
Call:
(850) 957-8784 or
(850) 554-5237
FOR SALE
1997 Fleetwood Mo-
bile home. 2/BR
2/BA. 14 x 70, cov-
ered porch, shed, vi-
nyl siding, central
heat/air. All applian-
ces stay. Excellent
condition must sell
immediately. Ridge-
way Blvd. Milton.
reduced to $25,900
Call:983-9316.r





556
Homes
FRANKLIN, NO
NEW Timber Frame
Home, Rustic Ele-
gance, 2.7 ac, Capti-
vating mtn. views,
stream, ponds,
porch w/outdoor fire-
place, 3BR, 3BA,
Loft & Unfin. Base-
ment (770)998-
0856, www.ThePon-
datFeatherstone.co
m.
HOME FOR Sale
5 acres 3/1 brick
home. 20x24 new
shop. Pond, barn,
pasture, fireplace,
washer/dryer, freez-
er, new appliances,
1000sq ft. deck and
much more. 25 mi-
nutes Milton, 30
minutes Woodbine
$162,000 obo.
251-867-7825

560
Land
40 ACRES with
pond Near State &
Nat'l Parks. Camp,
Fish, Hunt.
$149,900 owner fin.
$7995 down
(800)352-5263 Flori-
da Woodland Group,
Inc. Lic RE Broker.

A LAND BARGAIN -
WYOMING 35 acres
- $49,900; 50 acres -
$59,900. Located 90
minutes east of Salt
Lake in the foothills
of the Uinta Moun-
tains. Snow-capped
mountain views.
Surrounded by gov't
land. Recreational
paradise. EZ Terms.
Call Utah Ranches,
LLC. (888)541-5263.
BEAUTIFUL BLUE
RIDGE, NC Moun-
tain Views. 8+ Acre
Mountain Estate.
Heavily Wooded
with Stream. EZ Fi-
nancing- $49,900.
(800)230-6380,
ext.120.
BEAUTIFUL N.
CAROLINA. ES-
CAPE THE HEAT IN
THE BEAUTIFUL
PEACEFUL MOUN-
TAINS OF WEST-
ERN NC Homes,
Cabins, Acreage &
INVESTMENTS.
CHEROKEE
MOUNTAIN GMAC
REAL ESTATE.
cherokeemountain-
realty.com Call for
free brochure
(800)841-5868.
GULF FRONT lots
$595k. Homes start-
ing mid $300k. New
master planned
ocean front com-
munity on beautiful
Mustang Island,
near Corpus Christi,
TX. www.cinnamon-
shore.com,
(866)891-5163.
MYRTLE BEACH,
SC OCEANSIDE-
NEAR BEACH GAT-


ED COMMUNITY
$169,900- $225,900
Exquisite 1 and 2
BR. Villas- Presti-
gious Location
Granite countertops,
Sunrooms, Walk-in
closets Owners
clubhouse/ Fitness
room/ Tennis Courts
90% Financing for
Qualified Purchas-
ers Limited Availabil-
ity (800)382-3332
Open 7 days.


Position available
at our Pace Location.
38-40 Hours per week.
Excellent benefit package.
Prior experience preferred
but if you have cashier or
retail sales experience and
excellent customer service
skills, we are willing to train.


Apply in person at:
First National Bank of Florida
Pace Office
4104 Hwy. 90
Pace, FI 32571
Fax (850) 994-9964


AA/EOE







I PAGE 8 THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE /FREE PRESS NOVEMBER 8, 2006


560
Land
LAKE LOT CLOSE
OUT SALE Satur-
day, November 11.
We'll make. your
payments for the 1st
year 3 ACRE LAKE
ACCESS ONLY
$34,900. FREE
BOAT SLIPS! On
spectacular 34,000
acre recreational
lake in Eastern Ten-
nessee, Surrounded
by state forest. Lim-
ited # available. Call
today for early ap-
pointment (800)704-
3154 X 880, TN
Land Partners, LLC
10% down, balance
financed 1 year @
7.25% fixed, 1 year
balloon, OAC, pay-
ment
$189.77/month.
MOUNTAIN GOLF
RESORT LIVING
Beautiful Blue Ridge
Mountain location.
Cashiers, NC. 70
degree July days.
Preconstruction
event October 27-
29 during leaf sea-
son, so call now to
attend' and for more
information.
(888)743-2975 and
www.riverrocknc.co
m. Vision Rock LLS,
Broker.


560
Land
MURPHY, NORTH
CAROLINA Afforda-
ble Homes in the
Mountains. Afforda-
ble Homes, Moun-
tain Cabins and
Land. CALL FOR
FREE BROCHURE
(877)837-2288 EXIT
REALTY MOUN-
TAIN VIEW PROP-
ERTIES www.exit-
murphy.com.
N. FLA 80 Ac $6200
per acre. Pines,
hardwoods & creek.
Homesites, hunt or
recreation.
(800)294-2313 Ext
1185 A Bar Sales,
Inc. 7 days 7am-
7pm.
NC GATED Lake-
front Community.'
Pleasantly mild cli-
mate 1.5 acres, 90
miles of shoreline.
Never offered before
with 20% pre-devel-
opment discounts,
90% financing. Call
(800)709-5253.
NEW, PRE-CON-
STRUCTION Golf
Community- Coastal
Georgia. Large lots
w/ deepwater,
marsh, golf, nature
views. Gated, Golf,
Fitness Center, Ten-
nis, Trails. Oak
Park, Docks. $70k's
- $300K (877)266-
7376 www.cooper-
spoint.com.


560
Land
NORTH GEORGIA
Lovely 7-acre re-
treat, located on the
Cherokee/Pickens
County Line. Has
600 ft. trout stream
frontage in rear,
5B/4BA house, pool,
hot tub, pasture &
woodlands. Listed
for $575,000. Ron
Zalkind, MetroBrok-
ers/GMAC,
(706)273-0459.
SW GEORGIA 203
Acres of planted
pines. 170 Acres, 17
years old located 4
miles west of Pel-
ham. Excellent
Hunting! Priced to
Sell Call (229)890-
2589.
VA MOUNTAIN
LOG CABIN unfin-
ished inside, view,
trees, private, large
creek and river near-
by, $139,500 owner
(866)789-8535
VA94.com.
VIEW WESTERN
North Carolina,
North Georgia, East-
ern TN, Real Estate.
Excellent retirement
area. Very afforda-
ble homes, cabins,
land. Low taxes.
Good paying jobs
available, www.mtla-
kesreguide.com.


560
Land
WATERFRONT RE-
SORT LIVING WIL-
MINGTON, NC His-
toric Port City Coast-
al Development The
Bluffs on the Cape
Fear. Fastest Grow-
ing County in NC.
Public Grand Open-
ing Oct 21. Direct
Ocean Access. Pre-
construction incen-
tives to call now.
www.thebluffsnc.co
m (866)725-8337
Cape Fear Bluffs,
LLC Broker.
WITH TENNES-
SEE'S Beautiful
Lakes & Mountains,
you are sure to find
the perfect spot to
call home. Call Nan-
cy Gaines, Gables &
Gates (865)388-
7703, (865)777-
9191 www.nancy-
gaines.corn



706
Livestock Supplies

HAY
FOR SALE
Coastal Hay.
623-6769 or
336-2267.


708
Pets
FOR SALE
Male Shelttie
11mths old. Has ra-
bies and other shots
Very playful and
good natured. $350
with papers. Call:
Leslie at 675-3187
TOO ACTIVE for se-
nior. Male, white and
brown Lab mix. Free
to good home. All
shots, energetic and
smart. Needs fenced
yard & loving home.
Call 623-6602.
710
Pet Supplies
GOT A BIRD?
NEED A CAGE?
Large 2'x2'x4' King's
Cage. Two food
bowls and one water
bowl rotate out. for
service. Bottom tray
slides out for clean-
ing. Includes stand.
Black in color. Call
Jim, (850)393-3654.
712
Lost & Found
PETS
FOUND CAT black
and white, declawed
cat. Found on the
evening of 11-1-06.
Call 983-8050

LOST YOUR PET?
Be sure to call
Santa Rosa
Animal Control
to report him
missing and to
be sure he's not
there waiting
on you to
pick him up!
850-983-4680




814
Furniture
FOR SALE Enter-
tainment center, 56
in. by 48 in. with
glass door, oak look,
$30, call 623-1262.


814
Furniture
FOR SALE
Super Single water-
bed with bookcase,
Headboard and fair-
ly new mattress and
heater. $100.00
626-3749
820
Lumber &
Hardware
METAL ROOFING
SAVE $$$ Buy Di-
rect From Manufac-
turer. 20 colors in
stock with all Acces-
sories. Quick turn
around Delivery
Available (352)498-
0778 Toll Free
(888)393-0335.
822
Musical
Instruments
"CLASSICAL GUI-
TAR LESSONS-
Matt Cosgrove B.A.,
M.M. FSU in guitar
performance, is now
accepting students
of all ages from be-
ginners to ad-
vanced. Visit
www.cgstudio.matt4
move.com or call
529-6034 or
995-1288"
830
Miscellaneous
For Sale
FOR SALE
2-plots with vaults at
Eastern Gate. Me-
morial Gardens in
Pensacola. Asking
$3000. Call:
983-6949
FOR SALE
Sonic Scooter, just
like new, only been
used 4 times. Holds
up to 250 Ibs.
623-9212



Centipede-
St. Augustine
Farrm Direct
'We Deliver |
-At o .


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale
PRE-ENGINEERED
STEEL BUILDINGS.
30x40 was $13,200
now $6,800. 40x60
$21,860 now
$10,520. 60x80
$36,120 now
$17,740. Other sizes
up to 100,000 sf.
Erection Available.
(800)720-6857.




We Deliver & Install
Centipede
St. Augustine
Bermuda
Bailed Pine Straw
Call us first, Save Time
Call us last, Save Money
Hwy. 87 So. Milton
626-8578

SPECIAL BUILD-
ING SALE..."DON'T
MISS IT!" Fall deliv-
ery or deposit holds
till spring.
25'x40'x14' $5800.
40'x60'x16' $12,800.
Front end optional.
Other sizes availa-
ble. Pioneer.
(800)668-5422.
832
Miscellaneous
Wanted
GLASS CRAFTER
needs empty glass
soft drink bottles, (all
kinds). Not necessa-
rily collectors edi-
tions. Will pick up.
Call: 983-8042
PAY CASH for junk
cars or trucks. Run-
ning or not. Call
983-9527
WANTED
OLD ROOFING TIN.
Will tear down and
haul. 983-8042 or
393-9617


904
Cars
CARS FOR SALE
1989 Cadillac Bra-
hams, leather, load-
ed, runs great, new
w. pump, new tires,
new battery, $1500
*Firm.

1993 Geo Storm
Red, runs great, cd
player
$1200
Call: 626-6149
FOR SALE
01 Mustang V6 con-
vertible. 123K miles.
New Rubber.
$6000 994-6283
FOR SALE
1995 Ford Diesel
4DR, long bed.
Great condition.
$6900 obo.
723-2911
MY MOM'S CAR:
1984 Mercury Grand
Marquis. 67,500 ac-
tual miles. In great
condition, transmis-
sion a bit sluggish
until it warms up.
$1,500 OBO. Call
Jim, (850)393-3654.

910
:Motorcycles '
FOR SALE
01 Goldwing 1800.
Must sell! $11,000
994-6283
FOR SALE
1996 Harley David-
son Dino Glide,
Blue. Low miles,
$9000 obo
723-2911
LUKE
ROBINSON

912
Motor Homes


Cathedral Ceiling in Great Room
*Spacious Kitchen & Dining Area with custom cabinets
Architectural Shingles Vinyl Exterior Trim
S, Luxury Marble Vanity Tops
: '*" .Garden Tub and Shower
Ceiling Fans in all Bedroom and Great Room
SWalk-in Closets in Bedrooms
French Doors Gas or Wood Fireolace


Over 50 Years In Business
Visit our website www.steelehomes.cc


11,040 sq.f.to245sq~t


Baths Sq. Ft.
Bellehaven I 1040
Chadwick 2 1149
Stratford 2 1257
Norwood 2 1341
Mayfair 2 1418
Diplomat ,, ,,, ,, ,,;t,, ...I '
Hampton 2
Gemini 2 1579
Inglewood 2 1586
Ambassador 2 1610
York 2 1622
Oxford 2 1713
Lexington 2 1812
Lexington 4 BR 2 1812
Pinebrook (Signature Series)2 1833
Fleetwood 2 1949
Kingston (Signature Series) 2 2129
Executive 2 1/2 2215
Regency (Signature Series) 3 2495
2 Bedroom Duplex 2 (1 each unit) 1740
3 Bedroom Duplex 4 (2 each unit) 2062


Price
67,800,.
70,900
78,400
83,000
83,900

90,600
98,100
91,200
95,000
97,300
101,300
101,700
116,600
108,400
131,300
126,300
155,0010
117,600 2
135,800


S.S.STEELE
AND COMPANY, INCORPORATED
E.....HOpp-fty 6705 N. Pensacola Blvd. 477-7880
FL. Lic. #CRCo44810 Toll Free (888) 231-1255

i *'*


"Copyrighted Material

g Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
lib li g


-


%~.o'


O- 0 0


- m I


..rti n n o t::--


COINS, STAMPS
& JEWELRY

3 P 59
235 E. 9 Mile Rd. Pensacola, FL
(Northview Shopping Center)
WE SPECIALIZE IN
COIN JEWELRY FOR GIFTS
Pendants Rings Bracelets
Money Clips' 14 ct. Gold Sterling Silver
. 0 .................- .- .... j


* 0
* w


99 Fleerwood6 B6un-
der 34', excellent
condition, 1 owner,
67,097 miles, no
smokers, no pets,
extras include:
brake buddy, towing
hitch, full cover, pa-
tio shade, FULL
TANK OF GAS, and
more.'In Milton.
WAS $55K NOW
$45k. 850-983-0147
leave message or
ghhchief@aol.com
920
Vans
91 ASTRO VAN
4.3 Automatic trans-
mission, runs good.
AC is cold. $2195
232-7255
FOR SALE
2002 Chrysler
Town-n-Country
Van. Good condi-
tion. Sell for pay off
approx. $7,000.
Call:232-6875
922
Other
I BUY Junk Vehicles
957-4761 or
306-5397


How To Make Your



Car Disappear.,,



Simply advertise in the Classiieds

and get results quickly!











THE SANTA
ROSA'S
PRESS GAZETTE
&

FREE PRESS
623-2120
6629 ELVA STREET
MILTON, FL 32570


Look what


Florida

NOTICED!


0 School district budgets
* Property auctions
* Public hearings
* Local tax charges


- -


S -~


Find out about these and more in your local paper! Public Notice
S l., ..I Resorce Center


ctay informea.u
Read your public notices.


www. floridapublicnotices.com


MIN. P-1 WO"S*,i,


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i








I



I




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i&

'* ?'.;


. .
.;7 i:"
' ; .. ,.
: ,,,


b
MODELS OPEN
MONDAY-FRIDAY
1 8:00-5:00
SAT. 9:00-5-00,
SUN. CI-Of





I PAGE 9 THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS NOVEMBER 8,2006


gosODY BEAr

McKenzie


New 2006 PONTIAC New 2007 BUICK HERE NOW READY FOR
TORRENT LACROSSE IMMEDIATE DE VERY
MSRP, 0P6014 M1cp
$22,990 --$22,8455



F' 17,990 19or 90
'Plus tax, tags & license. All rebates to dealer- ... 'wi ., i n nl i ',.ii, i 1. All ..a,, All New For 2007 Come See Itl
.USED CAR INVENTORY REDUCTION!


MR.DA S.EC- L


I -R.DA*SECAL


I MR DA S-


*Plus tax, tag & title.:

cIenzie


* GMNC BUICK
623-3481 www.mckenziemotors.com
O ARE PROFESS IOAL GAADu I BEYOND PRECISION
(i, > I ns. ,, ii A3', W t '. I p Mi j'^ ",,r N I T, I0.


.1
-I
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'3 ~Piiers~ gazette

I


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"-3 F' 4*in~3CflWWWWASk'-W -.----. a.r0m3,w~a,~~.fl


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........................................................................................................................................


Subscribe to the Santa Rosa Press Gazette
(this applies to new, renewal or gift subscriptions)
and your name will be put into a drawing
to win a FREE turkey dinner.

OR

For each classified ad placed,
your name will be put into a drawing
to win a FREE turkey dinner.


~i' U
~ A U


93V
* ~"33~ 33 3
a'
~O'3-3
N~V t.~A'


33, 3~'


Tuikey dinner will include a 10-12 lb. turkey, 2 Ilb. of dressing, 2 lb. broccoli & rice casserole,
1 lb. gravy, 1 dozen King rolls and your choice of an apple pie or pumpkin pie,


: The deadline is November 15th, 2006. The winner will be announced in the November 18th issue of the Santa Rosa Press Gazette
- ', !.*


PONTIAC
Hwy. 90 At 89, Milton *
I VPIONTUAC I
-ii'i'B, B,.W*, ~ii.. :-

* V
























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We can assist you with all of your advertising needs.


rSNH ENTERPRISES, INC
HOME IMPROVEMENTS TRACTOR WORK
Vinyl siding Barns
Rernodeing Decks
Porches Fences
25+ yrs experience Free estimates
ATTENTION HUNTERS:
Shooting houses available
See model house -
wesi Berrynill Rd
Licensed Jeff Hill 675-0422 Insured
www.strenglhnhonor.com 4


Sell your home for $2995!
J. Scott Terry Shawna Carpenter
850-686-2620 850-450-4091


= Also Removes
Roots, Bushes, Hedgerows
= Backyard Accessible
= Local Conlractor-Retired USN
Senior Discouni
licensed 232-8746 Insufed,


The Mower Medic
We service Your Mower
in your home at your
? convenience

Bob Knowles
Office (850) 626-8300
Cell (850) 982-3576


All lypes 01 rences
New Installation and Repairs.
Specializing in Privacy Fences
Our privacy lences are built wilh SCREWS
Fice E-uirnale- Localv Owned
Licensed & Insured
485-2532


DIRE CHKKP
Cleaning Service
Whole house or just bathrooms.
Our speciality is prefabricated
showers, shines every lime. New
customers ~ 10o discount
(850) 384-2388


?PBuildings / Garages
All Steel Construction
Free: Delivery I Setup / Trim / Anchors


Cell: 850-206-4008
NFinancing Available


S PEA RIDGE
FLEA MARKET
OPEN WEEKENDS
5186 HWY 90
PEA RIDGE SELF STORAGE
Located behind Flea Market
Lowest prices in town!
*RV & Boat Storage
*Fenced & Lighted
Resident Manager
994-8056


MIKE KAYLOR
Cement Mason

Patios Driveways Walks
Free Estimates Quality work
No job too small Affordable prices

4 850-994-0897 j



Backhoe Work
Stump & Tree Removal
Hurricane Clean-up
Dirt Work
No Job Too Big or Small
Licensed & Insured




NEW HOPE PAINTING
& WALLPAPERING
Interior Exterior- Residential
~ Dry Wall ~ Pressure Cleaning
Wallpapering Carpentry Work
Call the Ericksens today!
723-2550 ~ 623-6034
If no answer, please leave message


Idb~r's airit aid '7, [IM

Interior & Exterior
-Painting
*Trim Work
*Hardwood floors
Call for Free Quote!
Phone: (850) 206-5370
Email: BryanLeber21@yahoo.com





4I


Coker's Lawn &
Tractor Service
From trimming to tractor wo0
Bushhogging Dirt W
L Clean-ups ~ Rakil


rk
ork
ng


Hgl 7 fHauling ~ Mowing
Reasonable Rates Free Estimates
(850) 623-0493
Cell- 485-7977,
Licensed & Insured


Beautiful building & surrounding groC nds
provide an ideal setting for your celebration
Rental available for Christmas parties,













Cl 626-9164
CaBill Tompkins





'The Screen Man"
Window Screen on Site
Repair or
Replacement


CELE"TAL IMPJIRA11ONS

*Crystals ( khcense
Tandles 'H-erbs
rBooks -And more to
'Cards your spiritual
'Fountains Online aore: befifg
woAw ceiiei-lspliatIn&Ofl M~I
4W.N 4 cr,,ne Roa~d Unit93
(Voon. Pkva Par Qlg Loll
F'none 55JJ.95-428
EI a'i dbAl 1r~spIrHt.oM@9MMii cn


Call 623-3616



Brick/Mason for Hire!
B & W Masonry
Brick's & Block's Concrete
-Brick Mail Boxes
*Knee Walls
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!
LICENSED & INSURED
FREE ESTIMATES
434-5824


Handy Hands ON CALL!
HOME IMPROVEMENT SPECIALISTS
850-525-0736
Emergency Repair Service
Available
www.alpha-atherton.com
*Licensed & Insured
*Accept Credit Cards
*Free Estimates
*Member BBB & SRCC




Land Clearing, and all tractor,
dozer, and related services


NO JOB TOO SMALL!i
Call Billy Rogers for estimate
Phone: (850) 957-4952
Cell: (850) 261-8407


. Insured


Vickers Fencing
"Making good neighbors one fence at a time"
Specializing in wood fences.
New installations and repairs.
Competitive pricing.


Free Estimates
994-7585


Licensed & Insured
791-0198


9.I
. ,
i-^ ; ;




BUSINESS & SERVICES


lm%


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