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The Santa Rosa press gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00181
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Creation Date: September 27, 2006
Publication Date: 1984-
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00181
 Related Items
Preceded by: Milton press gazette

Full Text







&Santa Dosa's ress


t r ..... r *-,* *WEDNESDAY
_______ _____ LSeptember 27, 2006.



After alleged drug deal, deputy hit by fleeing car
Afer-alleged, rug deal dep u hit leet.ng ca


By LYNNE HOUGH
Press Gazette Staff Writer
An alleged drug deal in the
parking lot of a local fast food
chain resulted in a chain of
events landing two people in
jail and injuring a Sheriff's
deputy.
It began Friday night when
two Santa Rosa Deputies-
Blake Weekley and Sgt. Joe
McCurdy-were sitting in an


unmarked. patrol car at
LaHacienda's on Hwy. 90 in
Milton, according to reports.
The parking lot of
LaHacienda is positioned
slightly higher than the parking
lot of neighboring Wendy's fast
food restaurant. The deputies
say from their vehicle, they wit-
nessed what they believed to be
a drug transaction-occurring:
right in front of the Sheriff's


car.
Deputies note the driver of
the vehicle, Santon Anthony
Moorer moved his car to the
rear of Wendy's parking lot.
The second person believed to
be involved in the drug transac-
tion, a female, also moved her
vehicle to the south parking lot.
In an effort to approach the
vehicles, the deputies drove
into the WXend'i's parking lot.


Weekley .says in his report,.
McCurdy activated the red and
blue lights on the Sheriff's car,
and pulled in partially behind a
Saturn and ,in front a 1970s
model Cjadillc driven by,
Moorer.
Weekley was attempting to
get out of the unmarked
Sheriff's vehicle when he sa\,-
Moorer sped from his 'parked
location, striking the Sheriff's


Office vehicle and "brieflc pin-
ning" Weekle 's leg in the door.
Police' say Moorer. fled the
scene at \\end\ 's, nearly run-
ning o, er a patron exiting the
business '
. Santa Rosa Sheriff's
Deputies notified the, Milton
Police Department of the hit
and run. Moorer was cjpt1ured
at his College Drive home. He
was arrested by Milton police


and charged with leaving the
scene, of an. accident; with
injuries.
While Milion Police 'offi-
cers were at the College Drive
address, reports say a wrecker
was called to pick up Moorer's
car. It was then police say a
woman at the home, Wendi
Adams, began walking near the
tow truck as the driver attempt-
See HIT, Page 3A.


No one was injured when this vehicle was struck at Parkmore Plaza Drive and Hwy. 90 Friday evening. Police say a
,truck pulled out from the side street, forcing this driver to take evasive action, ending up airborne, landing on this stone
wall at Ollie's.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin.

Decision coming soon on GPS monitoring


PANB -RBTL:

Teens develop their own

language to confound parents
"Children would rather converse in a'
By PAMELA HOLT "chat room" than talk o'n the phone with a
Press Gazette Staff Writer real person," says Coleman.
RUF2C? . Although the Internet itself is a good'
PANB-RBTL. PIC? LMIRL 2NYT. thing. it (like everything else), can be used!
for bad, sav s Santa Rosa County School'
If the above looks a little like a foreign Board Superintendent John Rogers.
language, that's because it is-the lan- "The Internet has been such a plus in,
guage of your teenage children or at least seeking information. We teach students
the language they speak on line. the standards: reading, writing, and anrth-'
The above cryptic lines translate to: metic. But there's a lot we teach from rote
Are you free to chat? Parents are nearby- nmemor\,and sometimes they ma\ or mafl
read between the lines. Do you have a pic- .not retain that." says RDog.ers ,
ture? Leit' meet in real life tonight "You teach students how :to; access':
According to School. Board Member information. iinf''rinalion access is- so
Diahe Colenmai. cliildren \ho ' ue 'web pre alent-s.' from [the aspect of commu-
pages like NM, Space.corn uste this language nication and infornnation- the Internet is
frequently to keep others parents from such a great tool for learning and. used
understanding cert con\er-.ations with properly , It is a greaL tool But con-muni-
theii plrei,. i catitn C.t be .good arnd hd. W\e . ant par.
Colein.ini e,.li, Siiant1 Rosa Count\ ents to be .,,ewre of \ord_., code'., and the


is. ..ell rep! c;ented on N1) Sp.ice conm.


Dr. Phil crew visits Pace


By PAMELA HOLT
P[',. > ai -~tl i Slttl t a .ia
A national television camera crew for
the Dr. Phil Show visited Pace High
School.
They were turned away-so, accord-
ing to one Pace High parent, they set up
across the street. The parent s a\ the crew
was interested in speaking with the trans-
gender student attending the school'and
caused an unwanted spotlight on the Santa
Rosa County School District.
The School Board's attorney, Paul
Green, advised all School Board member'.
to be closed mouthed about the subject-
causing all school employees to be mute.
Approached to interview with the
camera crew, Santa Rosa School
Superintendent John Rogers declined the
opportunity. He says he didn't have time
to be interviewed because he "had a full
schedule."
Several students at Pace High agree
the crew wanted to interview students on
campus and they wanted to talk to the
transgender student. One student says the
camera crew took photos.
Michael De Pasquale, Media
Relations for The Dr. Phil Show, would,
neither verify nor deny the camera crews'


visit to Pace High. Although De Pasquale
did verify Dr. Phil was not on campus.
Story written by Pamela Holt.
Reach her at:
I oh1lt@ ri-pL=. 1.11m

Bluegrass tunes

coming to PJC
There's a ,ign sitting at the entrance to
Pensacola Junior College in Milton. It
advertises live Bluegrass music once a
Inonth-rihlt there at PJC.
Satluda\. from noon until 8 p.m.. the
PJC Fall Blueeras Da\ v. III get underv.aN.
AdmissIon i, $3, under 16 free Niusic
will be playing all day long provided by
the Gulf Coast ,Bltie Grass Music
Association. Bands include the Sawgrass
See BLUEGRASS,, Page 5A.

Correction..
In the Sept. 23 edition of the Santa
Rosa Press Gazette, it was reported Gary
Pruitt introduced to the county the contrac-
tor who was chosen to demolish the jail.
This was not the case. The paper regrets
the error.


By LYNNE HOUGH
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Santa Rosa Sheriff Wendell
Hall and members of his

5 'S"h - The Press
, ". Gazette is
Sprinted on
100% recy-
cled paper
-*. using envi-
ron nentally-friendly soy-based
ink.

i! PRINTED WilTH
^SOINK





72000 135B5
121H


department have come under fire over
GPS monitoring.
Public Defender Tony Henderson
filed a motion seeking a hearing all-
leging Hall's handling of the GPS vio-
lates the civil rights of defendants.
In court Friday morning before
Judge Paul A. Rasmussen, Hall testi-
fied, along with certified deputies from
his department, members of the' State
Department of Corrections, probation
employees. Sentinel employees,
undercover narcotics officers and one
confidential informant.
Henderson said the hearing was
focused primarily on Pretrial Release
defendants and not those on GPS mon-
itoring for domestic violence or as
terms of probation.
Much of the testimony heard last
week surrounded the manner in which
Sentinel-the company contracted by
Hall to provide GPS service-bills
"clients".
It was established early in the tes- -
timony Sentinel has an office inside


the jail, staffed with two employees.
Henderson says Sentinel was chosen
by Hall who says he "looked into it"
on his own..
Hall testified he believed Sentinel
billed on a sliding scale, based on the
income of the defendant. He told
Henderson he thought the billing was
equal to one hour's pay of each defen-
dant. Unemployed clients paid only a
dollar a day, according to the Sheriff.
When quizzed, Hall said he was
not aware of a minimum fee of $14
being charged by Sentinel, saying no
one had been denied a contract for
GPS monitoring' for the lack of ability
to pay. It was' also determined the
wages of the defendant only-and not
the household-were allegedly taken
into consideration when determining
what to charge. This policy was adjust-
ed after Sentinel began servicing
clients for the county, according to tes-
timony.
Hall told Henderson if a defendant
See GPS, Page 3A.


This miniature model of the old L&N Depot is part of a model railroad display which will
be "up and running" for Depot Day. Fall is finding its way to the area, so it's just about
time to enjoy the outdoors at the West Florida Railroad Museum's Heritage Artists Depot
Day. Mark calendars for October 14 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. event at the Historic L&N
Depot in Milton, north of Bagdad on Santa Rosa 191 (Henry St.)
Press Gazette photo by Lynne Hough


R


S,:t LANGMG-U."PaQe�'64.






The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday September 27, 2006 "'-


X Tim Shelton
"" ; '-if - Milton, FL

---h-" m. ; .111.. N V 850-554-0626
FA RMS 850-675-1543

. ', ' www.Shelton-farms.comr


SBoer Goats
(meat goats, breeding goats & show goats)
Donkeys
(guard animals and pets)
Farm Services
(backhoe ~ stump removal - bush hog - discing)

charge by he mile minimumm charge i ,


From September 7th to
September 17. 2006
Adams Sr., Kirkland Lamar;
Male; 42; 6914 Da Lisa Rd.,
Milton, FL; Failure to Appear for
Felony Offense, Failure to Appear
for Felony Offense, Driving While
License Suspended Habitual
Offender, Cocaine Possession.
9/7/06
Bobb, Joshua Michael; Male;
25; 8141 Toledo St., Navarre, FL;4
Aggravated Battery-Domestic
Violence-Offender Knew/Should
Have Known Victim Pregnant,
Kidnap-False Imprisonment-
Domestic Violence-Adult. 9/7/06
Escalante, Anoldo; Male; 25;
8587 Billy Bob Ln., Milton, FL;


BOB HAYROKERARD Jeanese Hayward

E-Mail: rhreal0714@bellsouth.net "r.981 5 5ss
Website: rhreal.com Broker Associate
6 Hy. 90S te A ,
S4. (850) 9817-1555 (6e6) 981-1555 Toll Free


Floor Plan

1164SF

1281SF

1310SF

1330SF

1393SF


Floor Plan
1164
1310
1330



Floor Plan
1281
1310


Bdrm/Bth

3/2

3/2

3/2

3/2

3/2


East Milton
Brick Homes
Garage

1-Car

2-Car

2-Car

2-Car

2-Car


Pre-Sale Price After
10/1/06
$129,900 $136.900

$143,000 $150,000

$147,280 $154,280


$148,600

$155,900


Pre-sale price includes premium and corner lots.
Cox Road
East Milton Brick Homes
Bdrm/Bth Garage
3/2 1-Car
3/2 2-Car
3/2 2-Car
Ross Street
East Milton


Bdrm
3/2
3/2


Garage
1-Car
1-Car:


North Milton
(Near Whiting Field)
Floor Plan Bdrm/Bth Garage
1164 3/2 1-Car
1281 3/2 I-Car
1310 3/2 1-Car
1330 372 1-Car
1393 3/2 2-Car


$155,600

$162,900


Price
$129,900
$145,650
$147,800



Price
$129,900
$132,900



Price
-$120,000
$127,000
$129,000
$130,000
$137,000


Battery on Officer, Firefighter,
EMT, Etc., Resist Officer With
Violence, Disorderly Intoxication.
9/7/06
James III, Jimmie Louis;
Male; 23; 5336 Eaton Dr., Milton,
FL; Probation Violation-Felony.
9/7/06
Trotter, Willie Terrance;
Male; 28; 5865 Byrom St., Milton,
FL. Failure to' Appear for Felony
Offense. 9/7/06
Dowdall, Michael Windhall;
Male; 30; 5582 Berrybrook Cir.,
Pace, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. No Booking Date Given.
Tandy, Cheryl Denise;
Female; 38; 16900 N. Bay Rd., Bld
2 1614, Sunny Isles, FL;
Larceny-Petit 1st Offense,
Forgery. of-Alter Bank Bill Note
Check Draft, Fraud-Utter False
Bank Bill .Note check Draft. No
Booking Date
Davis, Diana Lynn; Female;
40; 12394 Hwy. 87, Milton, FL;
Cocaine Possession, Narcotic
Equipment Possession and or use.
917/06
Robinson. Brandy , Lee;,
Female: 23: 5824 Congress St.,
Gulf Breeze. FL: Marijuana
Possession-\i'h Intent to Sell
Manufacture or Deliver Schedule I,
Narcotic Equipment Possession
and or use. 9/7/06
Selwyn, Kristi Lynne; Female;
37; 2008 Mistral Lane, Ft. Walton
Beach, FL; Fugitive From Justice.
No Booking Date Given.
Cole, Chadrick Daniel; Male;
36; 6230 Woodward Ln., Milton,
FL; Cruelty 'Toward Child-,.
Aggravated Battery on Child.
9/10(1/06
Gaines, Larry Donnell; Male;
58; (No Street Address) Mobile,
AL; Out of State Fugitive From
Justice. 9/9/06
Hohenberger. Cindy Lou;
Female: 41: PO Bo\ 633. Bagdad,
FL; Cocaine Possession, Narcotic
Equipment Possession and or use.
9/9/06 "
Moore. Daniel Thomas; Male;
23; 5235 Riverwalk St., Milton,
FL; Battery-Domestic Violence-
Touch or Strike, Obstructing
Justice-Intimidate Threaten Etc
Victim Witness Informant. 9/9/06 .
Phillips, Jennie Marie;
Female; 23; 4949 Hirsh St., Milton,
FL; Aggravated Assault With
Deadly Weapon Without Intent to
Kill, Battery-Domestic Violence-
Touch or Strike, Damage Property-
Criminal Mischief-$1000 or
more. 9/10/06
Powers, Wayne Mitchell;
Male; 38; 8555 Hickory Hammock
Rd., Milton, FL; Resist Officer-
Obstruct_,. W/0 .. Violence,.
Marijuana-Producing-Schedule I.


9/10/06
'Seaman, Candace Rochelle;
Female; 30; 6215 Glenwood Dr.,
Milton, FL; Failure to Appear For
Felony Offense. 9/9/06
Stuart r., William Ray; Male;
23; 2261 Janet St., Navarre, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony. 9/8/06
Whobrey, Patricia Denise;
Female; 47; 5242 Galaver Cut Off
Rd., Baker, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 9/8/06
Shock, Margaret Alline;
Female; 21; 8197 Tortuga St.,
Navarre, FL; Larceny-Over $300
Under $5000. No Booking Date
Given.
Farmer, David Ryan; Male;
17; 1899 Reserve Blvd. Bldg. 17,
Navarre, FL; Cocaine Possession,
Possession M/J Under 20 Grams.
No Booking Date Given.
Bowman, Amanda Sue;
Female; 18; 7 Waynell 'Cir., Ft.
Walton Beach, FL; Vehicle Theft-
Grand 3rd Degree. 9/8/06
Caraway, Linda Strain;.
Female; 54; 1850 Shady Creek Dr.,
Cantonment, FL; Larceny-Theft
is $300 or More But Less, Than
$5000. 9/9/06
Dowell, Rube Allen; Male; 36;
5 Calhoun Ave., Destin, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony. 9/8/06
Madison, Jerry Dean; Male;
44; 3604 "Q" St., Pensacola, FL;
Vehicle Theft-Grand 3rd Degree.
9/9/06
Manning, Christopher Austin;
Male; 19; 4716 Henry Wilson
Creek Rd., Milton, FL; Failure to
Appear for Felony Offense. No
Booking Date Given.
Kelly, Amanda Jean; Female;
15; 9224 Ridge Dr., Navarre, FL;
Vehicle Theft-Grand 3rd Degree.
No Booking Date Given.
Miller. Robert Jeffery; Male;
42; 3345 Burms Ave., Pensacola,
FL; DUI. 9/10/06
Toe, Santos Jose; Male; 23;
225i Wrindtrace Rd., Navarre, FL;
DUI. 9/10/06
Ayres, Glen M.; Male; 36;
4558 3rd St., Louisville, KY; DUI.
9/9/06
Howell, Andrew Harmon;
Male; 18; 5731 Juergen Way,
Milton, FL; DUI. 9/9/06
Peacock, Andrea Noelle;
Female; 21; 6782 Anola Dr.,
Milton, FL; Traffic Offense-DUI
and Damage Property. 9/10/06
Daugherty, Brett Patrick;
Male; 19; 2651 Edmund Dr., Gulf
Breeze, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 9/11/06
Lewis, Jennifer Lynn; Female;
26; .1719, New Hope Rd., Gulf',
Breeze, FL; Amphetamine-,
Traffic-Or Methamphetamine 14
Grams or Over, Narcotic


Equipment-Possession-Use
Possess Manufacture Paraphernalia
to Transport Drugs, Drugs- -'
Deliver/Distribute-Distribute
Listed Chemical for Manufacture.
9/11/06
Seeley, Michael Edward; -.
Male; 47; 366 S. Airport, Milton,
FL; Larceny-Grand Theft
$10,000 or More Less Than
$20,000. 9/11/06
Webb Jr., William Gary;
Male; 40; 7854 Munson Hwy.,
Milton, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 9/11/06
. Hamilton, Pamela Ann; ,,
Female; 39; 3116 Fredericksberg
Dr., Montgomery, AL; Failure to .
Appear for Felony Offense.
9/11/06
Chamberlain, Nkosi Zerel;
Male; 11; 2377 Pineneedle Ln.,'
Navarre, FL; Battery on Elected '
Official or Education Employee (2
cts.). No Booking Date Given.
Bennett-Hamrick, Tristan,
William; Male; 15; 7837 ,-,
Sunnydale Dr., Milton, FL;
Aggravated Battery-Cause
Bodily Harm or Disability. No
Booking Date Given.
Roberge, Joshua Albert; Male;
27; 5800 Capitol Dr., Gulf Breeze, -
FL; DUI. 9/11/06
Boutwell, Randall Dee; Male; '
52; Rt. 2 316A, Milton, FL;
Battery-Domestic Violence-
Touch " or Strike, Aggravated,.
Battery-Offender Knew/Should
Have Known Victim Pregnant.
9/12/06
Hulst III, Harold Lester;'
Male; 18; 3920 Red Bud Ln., Pace, "
FL; Probation Violation-Felony.
9/12/06 ,
Roberts, Bronson Wayne; ,:
Male; 33; 6866 East Gate Rd.,
Milton, FL; Out of State Fugitive,
From Justice. 9/12/06
Sayers, Joshua Borden; Male;
31; 63 Brenda Ln., Mary Esther,
FL; Battery-Domestic Violence-
Touch or Strike, Obstructing
Justice-Intimidate Threaten Etc.'
Victim Witness Informant. 9/12/06
Smith, Malcom Eric; Male;;,
26; 13025 Munson Hwy., Milton, -'/
FL; Failure to Appear for Felony,-
Offense (3 cts.). 9/12/06
Bryant, David Rossie; Male;
26; 4325. Rice Rd., Milton, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony. No''
Booking Date Given.
Sneed, James Darrell; Male; ,
37; 5843 Peachtree St., Milton, FL;'.,
Nonmoving Traffic Violation-:.,'
Drive While License Suspended,-
Habitual Offender. 9/12/06
Worth, Christopher Lynn;'
Male; 32; 9896 American Fjrms
Rd., Milion. FL, Probation-'
Violation-Felony. No Booking'-'
Date Given.'
Continued On Page 5A.


Page 2-A


Sheriff's Report






W auuniruuuy ouanumhar 971 ,l LUR ....n.. oaPrs zt.teUPage.3-A


Local


GPS


Continued From Page One.
is unemployed, he believed
Sentinel would adjust their
charges to accommodate. He
also said, as an example, if a
defendant were paid $100 an
hour, he would pay $100 per
day.
But later testimony by a
Sentinel employee working at
the Santa Rosa County Sheriff's
Office contradicted those
claims.
The employee told the court
Sentinel does charge a mini-
mum fee for GPS monitoring.
With no exclusionary zone, the
fee is $12; with an exclusionary
zone, it is $14; house arrest
costs a defendant $9 per day,
minimum.
(By, comparison, the
Florida Department of
Corrections charges $6.94 a
day, the same for everyone,
according to testimony by a
State employee. A judge is
allowed to adjust the cost down
to as low as $1 per day with the
State of Florida pays the differ-'
ence.)
In addition, county court
defendants must pay the fees,
regardless of their employment
status, or their GPS release is
denied and they return to jail.
The most the employee could
recall a defendant being
charged' was around $30,
according to testimony.
When Henderson asked the
employee if he had communi-
cated this information to Sheriff
Wendell Hall, he answered,
"I've never met him."
When the same employee
was asked what happens if the
defendants don't pay, he told
Henderson, "They get violated,
put back in jail."
Defendants who do not
meet the Sheriff's established
requirement' of having a land-
line telephone and an in-county
address are not eligible for the
Sentinel program. Those defen-
dants go back to court, before a
judge, who has the ability to
change the original order 'and
allow the person to hire a pri-
vate GPS contractor.
As reported last week,
Henderson alleges the Sheriff


has "created two classes of indi-
viduals who are ordered into
pretrial release with GPS moni-
toring. One class, he says, is
comprised of citizens of Santa
Rosa County who have landline
telephones and are deemed
amenable to supervision by the
Sheriff. The other class is com-
prised of all of the other indi-
viduals who are ordered into
pretrial release with GPS moni-
toring and are able to contract
with private providers."
In addition to concerns over
billing practices, testimony
revealed "potential for abuse"
cases.
Court officers openly dis-1
cussed an incident in which a
Santa Rosa Sheriff's deputy
assigned to tl'e GPS unit was
removed from his duties and
reassigned after it was alleged
he changed a court order on his
own. In .Friday's hearing,
Rasmusseni referred to altered
paperwork in which a pretrial
release order was changed to a,
house arrest by the deputy.
Testimony by several par-
ties Friday morning surrounded
a case involving a, confidential
informant who was suspected,
of using marijuana. One nar-
cotics officer . said' it was
unknown if a drug test violation
occurred due to a previous mar-
ijuana incident or a recent one.
It was alleged narcotics
officers used a GPS monitoring
device placed on a confidential
informant to determine her
whereabouts after the fact-
even though she/ was not
assigned any exclusionary
zones. The informant testified
she was threatened with incar-
ceration by her probation offi-
cer.
Henderson pointed out that
kind of monitoring is investiga-
tive and is not allowed. When
questioning Hall, Henderson
said federal warrants must be
obtained for wiretaps. However,
he alleged Santa Rosa Sheriff's
Office employees, in his opilp-
ion, violated the privacy rights
of the confidential informant by
utilizing the GPS in ways not
set forth by a judge.
In another incident, testi-


money by an Escambia County
man arrested for narcotics
revealed another concern. The
defendant indicated a Santa
Rosa Sheriff's deputy told him
he would haxe to move here to10
be placed on a GPS monitor.
The man said he stayed with a
friend in Santa Rosa County
after his arrest so he could qual-
ify, when in fact, he could have
been referred to a private
provider by a judge.


On April 3. Hall created the
GPS Unit at the request of the
Clerk's office and . under
Administrative Directive 2006-
07 signed by Rasmussen.
In approximately two
weeks, Rasmussen is expected
to render his decision.

Story written by Lynne
Hough. Reach her at:
hough@sr-pg.com


Hit


Continued From Page One.
ed to load the Cadillac. *
Reports say Adams was
talking on a cell phone and after
being told numerous times to
move away from the tow truck,
informed officers her attorney
said she could take photos of.
the Cadillac.
Police say they told the
woman she could take photos
after the car was loaded on the
wrecker. Adams was allegedly
warned several more times to
step away from the wrecker-
and %\ as nearly struck by it after
ignoring officers.
Police say the woman
ignored ;their "lam l'ul com-
mand" until an officer N yelled at
her to pre% ent her from being
hit. Reports say Adams refused
to cooperate with officers in
attempts to identify her. She
was arrested and charged with


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obstructing justice, according to
police.
Sheriff's -deputies say
Moorer was charged with
aggravated battery on a law
enforcement officer; aggravated
assault on a law enforcement
officer; aggravated assault (for
almost striking a citizen in the
parking lot); fleeing and elud-
ing law enforcement; distribu-
tion of crack cocaine; resisting
arrest with violence; and crimi-
nal mischief.
hough@sr-pg.coni


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SMon, \Wed, Fri from 8 a.m. to noon
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* Board-Certified Obstetrician.'Gynecologist
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,-4 6 . -




BUDGET SUMMARY

CITY OF MILTON FISCAL YEAR 2006 - 2007
THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE
CITY OF MILTON ARE 1% MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL
OPERATING EXPENDITURES


REVENUES


General Natural Water & Sanitation Other
Fund Gas Fund Sewer Fund Fund Funds


CASH BALANCES
BROUGHT FORWARD:
Estimated Revenues:
Taxes : 2.750 Millage
Ad Valorem Taxes
Franchise Taxes
Utilty Taxes
Local Option Gas Tax,
Licenses & Permits
State Shared Revenue
Fines and Forfeits
Charge for Services
Miscellaneous Revenue
Contributions from Other Funds
State and Federal Grants
Grants/Other Local Units

Other Sources
Service Connections

Impact Fees
Debt Proceeds
Other Financing Sources
Funds Forward
Transfer from other Funds

DOWNTOWN FUND:
DEBT SERVICE FUND:
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND:


TOTAL REVENUE


TOTAL REVENUE ALL FUNDS:

EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES:

General Government
Public Safety
Transportation
Culture & Recreation
Debit Services/Non-Operating
Capital Outlay
Grants In Aid
Downtown Redevelopment
Capital Projects
DEBT SERVICE FUND


$898,768
400,000
887,437
349,043
147,550
762,735
68,700

10,450
2,062,783
1,185,767
50,000

261,404




732,492
2,737,740


4,744,898 4,230,800
685,800 300,100


1,040,000
27,075


2,408,562


Total





898,768
400,000
887,437
349,043
147,550
762,735
68,700
10,015,698
1,023,425
2,062,783
3,594,329
50,000


261,404
225,000


225,000


1,733,273
10,409,000
569,335
53,937


1,733,273
10,409,000
569,335
786,429


149,800 149,800
232,330 232,330
1,848,390 1,848,390,


10,554,869 5,430,698 19,930,007 1,067,075 2,230,520 39,213,169


3,126,251 5,038,74
2,605,491
701,760
449,764
601,810 366,433
3,031,693 25,525
38,100


0 2,197,454


3,561,300
14,171,253


791,323


275,752


11,153,768
2,605,49
701,760
449,764
4,805,295
17,228,471
11,800 49,900
138,00 138,000
1,848,390 1,848,390
232,330 232,330


RESERVES
TOTAL EXPENDITURES:


-EXPENSES:


10,554,869 5,430,698 19,930,007 1,067,075 2,230,520 39,213,169


THE TENTATIVE ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE
ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD DC007006


S I lBusiness Network

...-. International



Tri cities chapter meets every

Thursday morning at 7am at Elk's Lodge

5063 Highway 90, Milton. We encourage area
business professionals to visit our networking

meeting. Any questions contact Dawn Young at


748-7886 i
www.tHcitiesbni.com


NOTICE OF




PROPOSED TAX INCREASE




The City of Milton has tentatively

adopted a measure to

increase its property tax levy.





Last year's property tax levy:



A. Initially proposed tax levy ....................................$770,647

B. Less tax reduction due to Value Adjustment

Board and other assessment changes...... .($9,386)

C,. Actual property tax levy .. ........ ......... .,$780,033

This year's proposed tax levy ............................... $946,072






All concerned citizens are invited to attend a public hearing
on the tax increase to be held on


September 28, 2006
5:01 PM
At City Council Chambers
6738 Dixon Street
Milton, Florida


A FINAL DECISION on the proposed tax increase and the
budget will be made at this hearing.
I


Page 3-A


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesdav Santembar 27- 2008


I







Prt.4 *A- ----- -----


Milton Mayor is

right, time to beef

up enforcement

Milton city leaders have taken some very
important steps toward dealing with the munici-
pality's future-steps that are long overdue, in
dealing with planning and development.
Outside observers have clearly identified what
Milton must do in order to adequately deal with
such issues as research in comprehensive planning,
land use, as well as paper work management.
Currently, Milton spends $340,000 on its
Planning and Development Department, but city
officials learned recently that only 4.7 percent of
that amount 'was spent' on actual planning and
development.
What city leaders discovered is, the city
spends more money on landscaping than it does on
more important issues.
Milton seems to have a problem with its abili-
ty to manage growth-clearly evident throughout
the city limits.
One area Milton Mayor Guy Thompson says is
high atop his priority list is to improve code
enforcement, an area of city government that is
falling far behind in dealing with blight, neglect
and sheer abuse.
Thompson is right in his assessment of the sit-
uation when he says code enforcement needs to be
more diligent in its efforts, and the fact the city
simply hasn't been doing the job it needs to be
doing.
One example of what Thompson is saying is
the old Piggly Wiggly building and the former
Bypass Exxon gas station in the Six Flags
Shopping Center at Highways 90 and 89.
This is an eyesore and itsimage sends-a nega-
tive message to any investor or developer looking
to locate in Milton.
The message that this one, of many, blighted
areas of Milton sends is that city leaders have little
pride in the appearance of their town. This is an
unwelcome site and it detracts from what we
believe this city can and should be.
We could not agree more with Mayor
Thompson that code enforcement officials should
begin now to travel about the city and take note
of violations, which are frequent throughout the
city.
It is time for city officials to get tough on busi-
nesses and homeowners who are contributing to
the problem.
If Milton is to become what so many people
want it to be, then. city officials are going to have
to seriously crack down on code violations.
Changing this negative image will be chal-
lenging, but the fact of the .matter is that until
something is done to change the way many areas
of Milton look today, little progress will be made
in dealing with the future.
Milton has a tremendous opportunity to
reignite outside interest from those with the
resources to bring life back into this historic city.
Mayor Thompson, who we believe has an
absolute passion for his city, can effectively bring
about the necessary changes in the way his city
does business.
Now that he has identified ways to better man-
age his city, we have absolutely no doubt he will
implement the necessary changes.

SEPTEMBER 27, 2006


Gazetfe
VOL. 99, NO. 52
Serving Milton, Pace, Jay
Holley-Navarre, Gulf Breeze
& surrounding communities
Santa Rosa's Press Gazette (USPS 604-
360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays
.and Saturdays for $28 per year (in county) by
Milton Newspapers, Inc., Michael Coulter,
Publisher. Periodicals postage paid at Milton,
Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to: Santa Rosa's Press Gazette, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, Florida 32570.
Michael Coulter ... .President & Publisher
Jim Fletcher ........Assistant Publisher
Carol Barnes ...... .Business Manager
Lynne Hough ...... .Staff Writer
Pamela Holt........ Staff Writer
Obie Crain, Jr. ..... .Special Projects Writer
Bill Gamblin .......Sports Editor
Jim Martin ........ .Advertising Manager
Debbie Coon .......Advertising Exec.
Lori Dempsey ......Advertising Exec.
Toni Coberly .......Bookkeeper
Rosie Farhart ...... .Archives
Tracie Smelstoys .. . .Circulation
Tammy Enyeart .... Pace Office
Kimberly Potter.... Classifieds,
........ .........Graphic Design
Freddy Coon ...... .Pressroom Foreman
Gaspar De La Paz . . .Darkroom Technician
Angela Perritt ..... Production Manager


EDITORIAL & OPINION


\5USH ASKING, MEDIA FAWNING AP THE DEMOCRATS HAVE, REISTE.ED
IM To VOTE..!... LIVE FROM NEW YORK VIT4 14UGO CI4AVEZ- IACVKTO YOU!"
Remember pets durng torm 9/24




Remember pets during storms


FM: ALISA MULLINS
Dear Editor:

The tropical storm season, is not yet over and it is
important to remember to make arrangements to pro-
tect your animal friends. One of the most valuable les-
sons learned from Hurricane Katrina is to evacuate if
at all possible and to never ldave animals behind.
There is no \\ a ofkno inc ha mha a mi happen to your
home and if or % hen \ou \%ill be able to return.
Companion animals left behind'may drown, die of
dehydration or heat exhaustion, or escape and become
lost.
Fortunately, many hotels waive animal restric-
tions during disasters. If you can't afford to stay at a
hotel, call your local humane society or animal shel-
ter to ask if any arrangements are being made for
evacuating animals. Pack a tent so that you can camp
out as a last resort. Also pack a leash or carrier, bot-
tled water, bowls, tie-out kit, dry food, kitty litter, and
a litter pan.
If you can't get to your home, arrange for a
neighbor or friend to take your animals. If you have
any elderly, disabled, or disadvantaged neighbors,
offer to help them evacuate with their animals-these
people, who are among the most vulnerable, are also.
often the most likely to refuse to evacuate because of
their animals.
If you are forced to leave animals behind, never,
leave them tied up or confined to a cage or to a single
room. Allow them access to upper floors and fill bath-
tubs and sinks with water. Leave several weeks' sup-
ply of dry food scattered around the house and make
sure that animals are wearing ID tags.
For more information on safeguarding your ani-
mal friends, visit HelpingAnimals.com.

Fuel efficiency is in your hands

FM: ANDREW KORFHAGE
Dear Editor:

'With oil-rich Iran positioning itself as the nemesis
of a sitting U.S. president, gas prices holding at levels
intolerable to American consumers, and U.S.
automakers losing market share to more-efficient
vehicles from overseas, one could take a look at
America today and be forgiven for wondering: Is it
2006 or 1979?
In 1979, American consumers and Congress both
took action on the oil problem. Drivers across the
country began purchasing efficient Japanese cars, rel-
atively new to the U.S. market, to keep their fuel effi-
ciency high and save money on gas. At the same time,
U.S. lawmakers, enhancing a bill passed after the first
oil crisis of 1973, instituted ambitious new fuel econ-
omy standards, starting in 1978 for cars, and then in
1979 for light trucks. The new rules, known as
Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards,
set out to double the average passenger car's fuel
economy to 27.5 mpg by 1985. In the 1980s, the
CAFE stAndards largely succeeded (despite pressure
from the auto industry to water them down). Now,
2006 seems a lot like 1979, with CAFE standards vir-'
tually unchanged in 27 years, and 27.5 mpg holding


fast as the fuel standard for American cars.
This decades-old 27.5 mpg goal is no longer
acceptable. Not only does the United States continue
to import too much oil from politically volatile
regions, but in the years since 1979, the scientific
community has come to a consensus that the carbon
dioxide emissions associated with our dependence on
oil are hastening catastrophic climate chaiine. All the
old problems with fossil fuels a e still there, and now
we know we're cooking the planet as '. ell. Climate
scientists from the Princeton Environmental Institute
have given some goals to aim for, if we're serious
about fighting climate change. According to their
Carbon' Mitigation Initiative (which makes compre-
hensive recommendations across a range of industries
for lowering U.S. carbon emissions), America needs
to move its vehicles to an average of 40 mpg in fuel
efficiency by 2010, getting to at least 60 mpg by
2050.
We can do this. The American Council for an
Energy Efficient Economy lists the Honda Insight,
Honda Civic Hybrid, and Toyota Prius (all Japanese,
in an echo of 1979) as the most-efficient cars of 2006,
and each already clears the 40 mpg hurdle. American
companies can do this too - and should, for con-
sumers who are equally interested in protecting the
environment, saving gas money, and buying
American - but the carmakers need a push.
This time around, it appears unlikely the push
will come from Congress. An amendment to raise
average fuel economy to 33 mpg by 2016 died in the
House of Representatives last year, while a similar
bill, proposed by Sen. Barack Obama (D, Ill.) remains
stuck in a Senate committee. (A less ambitious bill,
by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D, Calif.), proposing simply
to raise the fuel economy of federally owned fleets
remains similarly stuck.)
After decades of inaction at the federal level,
American consumers must act on their own.
Detroit needs to hear from drivers fed up with
buying too much expensive gasoline, while oil com-
panies make record profits, climate change proceeds
unabated, and the United States remains hostage to
foreign oil producers. American drivers need to
demand better cars from American companies, by
writing letters or talking to dealerships. Better yet,
U.S. consumers can use their pocketbooks to send
this message, by purchasing only the fuel-efficient
vehicles that can truly make a difference to our envi-
ronmental health and national fuel security.
The benefits of raising our national average fuel
economy will be many. According to data from the
U.S. Energy Informatidn Administration, if
Americans are driving vehicles that get better than 40
mpg within the decade, the annual oil savings will be
greater than the amount we currently import from the
Persian Gulf region each year. This will simultane-
ously boost our energy security while reducing the
threat of climate change - not to mention giving
American consumers a break at the pump.
Together, for our health, our national security, and,
the health of the planet, we need to raise our fuel
economy, whether Congress is on board this time or
not.


0a
Opinions^-


You Spoke Out,

Santa Rosa...
Via e-mail /
In reference to the picture ip
September 9, 2006 on page 2-A,
take by Lynne Hough, where your
staff would have the reader 'to
believe this is 13 county workers
standing around and one digging
a hole. When in fact this f s
Anderson Columbia doing the
work, this job is let under a con-
tract and the 14 worker work for
the contractor not Mr. Whitfield.;

Sunday, 1:27 p.m.
Hi, this is Patti. I would like
to respond to Jim's commeifis
about raises for deputies. Perhap's,
when other county workers are
willing to work ten-hour shits,,
weekends, holidays, and put their
lives on the line, then they can be
eligible for these raises as well.

Sunday, 12:43 a.m.
This is Joyce. It is a pity that
the sales tax did not go through-'o
improve our roads. Responding to
the Sept. 23 Our Opinions col-
umn. In the middle of the column,
you refer to our traffic as a night-
mare. I just returned from Atlanta.
On a scale, of one to.ten, Santa
Rosa doesn't even compare. Still.
I believe the tax should have
passed so we can keep our roads
moving.

Saturday, 3:27 p.m. ;,
The county road tax was
voted down. People were saying
commissioners were wasting
money, but they don't want to fix
our roads. Seems like a bunch of
hypocrites in the county.

Thursday, 5:57 p.m.
My name is Reba. I was jfist
reading about the What-a-burger
on Stewart Street. I think we nedd
a variety. I'd like to see 'a
Checkers.

Thursday, 3:38 p.m.
This is Mary. I have called, in
a number of times to report peo-
ple that put out their stray animals
in the Blackwater River State
Forest. It is part of the county. We
don't need people to have to call
animal control. These people
need to do it. Finally, on another
note, I'd like to see a good shoe
store come into the area.














You may Speak Out any
time, day or night. Just call our
Speak Out line at 623-5887
and leave your message.





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,:.,4
SEPTEMBER 27, 2096


I THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE


AGfE4 AA


I





Dana I-A


Wednesday September 27, 2006 1 ne Santa Hosa Press bazette "

Sheriff's Report- (Continued From Page 2)


" Hawkins, Durand Andrew;
ale; 16; 6861 Larriet Ln., Milton,
,$; Vehicle Theft-Grand 3rd
�e .ree. Burglary of Structure
' 6r.'. e, rance Unarmed W/O Person
4'pHide. Larceny-Over $300 Under
111.11 No Booking Date Given.
.', Cummings, Alicia Carlce;
'Nmale; 17; 5700 East Milton Rd.,
Milton, FL; Battery-On
Detention Staff Juvenile Probation
Officer. No Booking Date Given.
McOueary, Michael Dwayne;
Male; 41; 6324 Matador St.,
Milton, FL; Traffic Offense-DUI
Alcohol or Drugs 2nd Offense.
9/12/06
S Cook, Kenneth Glen; Male;
41; 60012 Hwy. 23, Smithville,
MS; Traffic Offense-DUI Alcohol
or Drugs 3rd Violation Within 10
Years. Nonmoving Traffic
Violation-Drive While. License
Suspended 1st Offense. 9/13/06
Lagoon, Brant Starr; Male;
30; 6541 Flintwood St., Navarre,
FL; DUI. 9/13/06
Parker, Doryan; Male; 32;
5946 Pinywoods Place, Milton, FL;
DUI. 9/13/06
' Zoulek, Timothy Alan; Male;
35; 5633 Windermere Trace,
Milton, FL; DUI. 9/13/06
Bearden, Brandon David;
Male; 19; 4744 Kitty Hawk Cir.,
'Gulf Breeze, FL; Larceny-Grand
.6f Firearm. 9/13/06
-,, Hutcheson, Wanda Marie;
-Female; 49; 3359 Greenbrier Cir.,
.Gulf Breeze, FL; Conservation-
,Epvironment-Reckless Careless
Pollute Cause Harm, Damage
Property-Criminal Mischief-
'$1000 or More. 9/13/06
Slattery, Steven John; Male;
'48; 1882 Coral St., Navarre, FL;
Failure to Appear For Felony
Offense. 9/13/06
Douglas .Jr., Daniel Drew;
Male; 14; 5212 Yancy Dr., Pace,
_FL; Sex Assault-Victim Over 12
YOA Physical Force No Damage.
No Booking Date Given.
Scott, Michael James;, Male;
-28; 4072 Scottsdale Ave., Pace, FL;
'-Larceny-Over $300 Under
$'5000. No Booking Date Given.


Everhart, Lee Allen; Male;
51; 6304 Greenwood Dr., Milton,
FL; DUI. 9/14/06
Fifield, Steven Robert; Male;'
46; 2125 River Birch Rd., Gulf
Breeze, FL; Traffic Offense-DUI
and Damage Property. 9/14/06
Martin, Robert Burch; Male;
43; 2800 Keego Rd., Brewton, AL;
DUI. 9/14/06
Ouackenbush, Rebecca Ann;
Female; 47; 7200 Springhill Rd.,
Milton, FL; Moving Traffic
Violation-Reckless .Driving 1st
Offense, DUI, Drugs-Possession-
Controlled Substance W/O
Prescription. 9/14/06
Lowery, Jeremt Lee; Male;
29; 4498 Lyons Place, Holt, FL;
DUI. 9/14/06.
Donaldson, Shane Neal;
Male; 35; 5448 Bright Meadows
Rd., Milton, FL; Possess of
Weapon-or Ammo by Convicted
Florida Felon (4 cts.), Drugs-
Possession-Controlled Substance
W/O. Prescription. 9/14/06
Spinks, Danny Lynn; Male;
40; 6033 Enfinger Rd., Pace, FL;
Fraud-Impersonate-Contractor
During State of Emergency.
9/14/06
Barbig, Daniel Brian; Male;
12; 5144 San Miguel St., Milton,'
FL; Burglary - of Structure
Conveyance Unarmed W/O Person
Inside, Criminal Mischief-Over
$200 Under $1000. No Booking
Date Given.
Brown, Joshua Lawrence;
Male; 12; 3308 Damon Dr., Milton,
FL; Burglary of Structure
Conveyance Unarmed W/O Person,
Inside, Criminal Mischief-Over
4200 Under $1000, Larceny-
Grand of Fire Extinguisher. No
Booking Date Given.
Boykins, Johnathan Xavier
Omar; Male; 19; 7839 Fleetwood
Dr., Milton, FL; Larceny-Theft is
$300 or More But -Less Than
$5000. 9/14/06
Bullard, Curtis Wayne; Male;
18; 965 Fleming Cir., Pensacola,
FL; Burglary of Structure
Conveyance Unarmed W/O Person
Inside (3 cts.), Larceny-Theft is
$300 or More But Less Than $5000


After years, sewer comes to 90


By PAMELA HOLT
-Press Gazette Staff Writer .
For six years, businesses
and residents on Highway 90
have waited for connection to
the Milton's wastewater lines at
"the completion of a Highway
90/Glover Lane Sewer Project.
Annexed into the City in
-2000, one business owner, John
Marshall of Milton Computers,
says he voted for annexation
simply for one reason-sewer.
Marshall received a letter
-from the City stating he, can
.,' ,


Bluegrass

Continued From Page One.
Revival, Milton; Southern
:Sounds, Pensacola; Whitestop,
:'Mississippi; Cross Cut, Panama
.,City, Dog River Boys, Mobile;
and Grassfire, Molino.
This family event will have
concessions available all day-
-as a fundraiser for the school
-itself.
It is held on the Milton
.Campus, in front of the Student
- Activity Center. Organizers say,
'bring lawn chairs-the show's
-conming, rain or shine.
For more information,
.please call Charles Samuel at
(850) 994-4070 or Tom Easley
at (251) 987-1624.
Story written by Lynne
Hough. Reachher at:
hough@sr-pg.com


hook up to sewer around mid
October.
Mayor Guy Thompson says
the six-year delay "took longer
than we wanted and the reason
was waiting on the Florida
Department of Transportation
to finish its second preliminary
design to include the sewer
lines' location."
Thompson explains the
City felt it would be better to
wait to avoid interfering with
the planned widening of
Highway 90 to six lanes and
spend millions of dollars more
relocating the lines again.
Tommie Speights,
spokesman for the Florida
Department of Transportation
in Chipley says he has no idea
when the six lanes are going to
appear. He says there's money
set aside for widening from
Avalon Boulevard to Highway
87, but no monies are designat-
ed for actual construction.
City officials didn't know
sewer wouldn't be available
when the annexation happened,
says Thompson. He says, "we
were about a year late getting
started with planning for the
sewer project which added to
the delay."
Business owners say they
are happy to know the service
will soon be arriving.
Mike Lewis, Director of
Lewis Funeral Home at 6405
W. Highway 90, says being
See SEWER, Page 6A.


(2 cts.), Larceny-Grand Theft
$5000 or More Less Than $10,000.
9/14/06
Gross, Larry Donnell; Male;
26; 1140 Lake Dr., Cantonment,
FL; Probation Violation-Felony.
9/14/06
Peacock, Andrea Noelle;
Female; 21; 6782 Anola Dr.,
Milton, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 9/14/06 -
Thomas, Willie Herbert;
Male; 47; 5861 Peachtree St.,
Milton, FL; Cocaine Possession,
Drugs-Possession-Controlled
Substance W/O Prescription,
Marijuana-Possession-Not More
Than 20 Grams, Narcotic
Equipment-Possession and or use,
9/14/06
Williams, James Monroe;
Male; 30; 3003 Crittenden Dr.,
Navarre, FL; Failure to Appear For
Felony Offense. 9/14/06.
Alday, Donald Wade; Male;
30; 8370 Billy Bob Ln., Milton,
FL; Battery-Domestic Violence-
Touch or Strike, Cruelty Toward
Child-Domestic Violence-
Infliction of Physical or Mental
Injury. 9/16/06
- Aych, Rachel Christine;
Female; 22; 6983 Begonia St.,
Milton, FL; Failure to Appear for
Felony Offense. 9/15/06
Beasley, Tremaine Donnell;
Male; 24; 6611 Grace St., Milton,
FL; Damage Property-Criminal
Mischief-200 Dollars and Under,
Burglary of Dwelling Unarmed No
Assault or Battery, Burglary of
Structure Conveyance Unarmed
W/O Person Inside, Larceny-
Theft is $300. or More But Less
Than $5000. 9/16/06
Bryant, Christopher Delaine;
Male; 18; 7251 East Bay Blvd.,
Navarre, FL, DUI, Nonmoving
Traffic Violation-Drive While
License Suspended 1st Offense,
Flee/Elude Law Enforcement
Officer at High Speed. 9/17/06
Corley, Brent Dewayne; Male;
42; 6465 Maddox Rd.,.Milton, FL;
Out of State Fugitive From Justice.
9/16/06
Dowden, Michelle Lynn;
Female; 34; 1724 Broadview St.,
Milton, FL; Failure to Appear for
Felony Offense, Resist Officer-
Obstruct By Disguised Person,
Dru gs - Possession
M-et h a m p h e t amine - mine,
Marijuana Possession-Not More
Than 20 Grams, Narcotic
Equipment-Possession and or use,
Drugs-Possession Listed Chemical
With Intent to Manufacture
Controlled Substances. 9/17/06
Elery, Charles Anthony; Male;


4915 Highway 90 Pace
850-995-1600


Jackass 2 (R)'
1:05 3:05 5:05 7:05 9:25
Jet Li's Fearless (PG13)
1:45 4:30 7:20 9:50
Flyboys (PG13)
1:10 3:55 6:50 9:35
*How to Eat Fried Worms (PG)
1:30 3:25 5:20
Gridiron Gang (PG 13)
1:20 4:10 7:00 9:40
Everyone's Hero (G)
.1:00 3:00,4:55 6:50 8:45
The Black Dahlia (R)
1:15 4:00 7:05 9:45
*The Covenant (PG13)
1:40 4:15 7:10 9:30
*Wicker Man (PG 13)
1:45 4:30 7:15 9:45
*LAST NIGHT THURS. SEPT 28

Open Season (PG)
1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00 8:55
The Guardian (PG 13)
1:15 4:00 6:55 9:40
School for Scoundrels (PG 13)
1:40 4:20 7:15 9:45


45; 510 Union St., Ft. Walton
Beach, FL; Marijuana Possession
Over 20 Grams. 9/16/06
Folsom, Taylor McAllister;
Male; 46; 5629 Balsam St., Milton,
FL; Drugs-Possession-Controlled
Substance W/O Prescription,
Moving Traffic Violation-
Reckless Driving 1st Offense.
9/16/06
Levaugh, Richard Paul; Male;
43; 5422 Whisper Ln., Milton, FL;
Nonmoving Traffic Violation-
Drive While. License Suspended
Habitual Offender. 9/16/06
Nelson, Heather Leigh;
Female; 31; 8906 Figland Ave.,
Pensacola, FL; Robbery-By
Sudden Snatching W/O Firearm or
Weapon. 9/16/06
-erry Jr., William Edward;
Male; 46; 4005 Harrison Ave., Jay,
FL; Aggravated Assault-With
Deadly Weapon Without Intent to
Kill. 9/17/06
Raybon, Heather Nicole;
Female; 26; 7847 Fleetwood Dr.,
Milton, FL; Drugs-Possession
Methamphetamine, Marijuana-
Possession Not More Than 20
Grams, Drugs-Possession-Listed
Chemical With Intent To
Manufacture Controlled Substance.
9/17/06


Experienced childcare workers preferred, but not required.
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Ava Snellgrove Lauren Kirchgessner

983-5650 934-4095
Milton/Pace Gulf Breeze/Navarre




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(850) 983-1471
6259 Highway 90
Milton, FL 32570-1708
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Local


Pane 6-A "


'Ghost tour' set for Oct. 27-28


The Santa Rosa Historical
Society is busy planning this
year's Ghost of Milton Walking
Tour. This will be the fifth year
for this popular event, which
had to be postponed for the past
two years dne to hurricane dam-
age.
It will be held on the week-.
end before Halloween: Friday,
October 27th and Saturday,
October 28th. There is no rain
date, so bring umbrellas and
galoshes if the ,weather is
inclement.
Guided tours will leave the
Imogene Theatre, located on
Hwy. 90, across from the court-
house in downtown Milton,
every 15 minutes from 6 to 9
p.m.
Tickets are $10. Children 5-
12 are $5 and free for little ones
in strollers. They may be pur-
chased at door with cash or
check. The route is handi-
capped accessible.
Costumed tour guides will
lead visitors on a one'mile walk
through the historic district,
stopping at various locations
where actors will recreate
scenes from Milton's history
that actually happened on that
spot. Although a few of our


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. :se . a- u -


more infamous citizens, along
with their untimely deaths, are
portrayed, there are also friend-
ly ghosts, cute ghosts, and
humorous ghosts. Each year,
new ghosts are added, but his-


torical accuracy is maintained.
The Walk lasts approxi-
mately 75 minutes and ends at
the Imogene Theatre with
punch and cookies that disap-
pear as fast as the ghosts do. All


tour-goers will leave with a,.-.
greater appreciation of Milton's '
early history, having actually',."
experienced it in a fun and'.
ghostly atmosphere.
news@sr-pg.comrn


Laidlaw working to lure new drivers ,


Skateland Skating Center
6056 N. Stewart St. Milton, FL 9$570 (850) 67-9415


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New Public Skateing Session Times:
*Mondays Tiny Tot Stroll-n-Koll 1:00-3:00 p.m. 9
*Tuesday Nite 6:90-8:10 p.m. 4 Z.
*Wednesdays Tiny Tot StolI-n-K.oll 1:00-4:00 p.m. $ 9
* Friday Nites 7:00-11:00 p.m. ~8.0O
* Saturday Afternooi Z:00-5:00 p.m. 3.5O
* Saturday Nttes 7:00-10:00 p.m. 04550
* Suday Aftern ons) 2:00-4:0 p.m. $.00
www.skatelandmion.com


3BIV3.5 BA in main Victorian Charmer.
1 BD/1BA, kitchenette in garage apartment,
workshop, gazebo w/ outdoor kitchen
on 1.03 acres, mls# 311950.


By PAMELA HOLT
Press Gazette Staff Writert
The signs posted on the side
of school buses are prevalent
around Milton, Pace and
Navarre: Now Hiring: Laidlaw
.needs drivers; $500 sign up
bonus.
Laidlaw Education
Services recently met with
union representatives to.discuss
its current collective bargaining
agreement.
The current labor agree-
ment was modified to further
provide incentives to keep
employees and attract new
workers., New drivers will be
offered a starting rate of $10.50
per hour, and the Company has
instituted financial incentives
for existing employees.
Officials say Laidlaw is tak-
ing additional actions to contin-



KELLER
WILLIAMSS






Marsha Beach
"Celebrating 26 Years"
572-5652
mir' -


ue to improve timely student
transportation for Santa Rosa
County.
*Qualified drivers assigned
to assist in covering routes and
providing assistance to existing
drivers.
*Recruiting efforts include
job advertisements in television
and newspapers, organized
county-wide mail distribution
in conjunction with school dis-
trict, and placed banner ads on
the outside of buses throughout
the county.
*Driver sign-on bonus
incentives for new hires.
*New management/field
supervisory positions in the
,South end and administrative
help for added phone support.
*Scheduled Professional

Language -
Continued From Page One.
language students may use at
home where they can supervise
Internet usage," explains
Rogers.
Coleman states 87% of
youth between the ages of 12
and 17 are online. Of the 87%,
51% are online at least once per
day. Only 37% say they have
parental rules to adhere to and
only 33% say parents' check on
line activities.
"Its all in how you use the
tools," says Rogers. "Teach
kids the right way to use the
Internet safely-the resources
are out there. Certain sites
needs to be prohibited and site
blocking programs are helpful,"
says Rogers.
, Rogers. believes communi-
cation between parents and
children is key to keeping chil-'
dren safe and keeping the par-


Sewer
Continued From Page Five.
without sewer service "has been
a problem."
Lewis Funeral home moved
to the current location 32 years
ago. Lewis explains, "there
wasn't much out here then and
when growth came our way, the
ability to absorb waste became
less and less."
Le%%is Funeral flome rests
on a little over four acres along
the highway. About 10 year,
ago, Lewis installed a lift sta-
tion and elevated drain field to


Quality - It's
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Sale begins
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Chuck Roast


New drivers will ,
be offered a start- .
ing rate of $10.50
per hour...


Customer Service Training for
the fall break.
Laidlaw is working with the'
Santa Rosa School District to'
review and refine school bus''
routes and hire and train quali-2
fied drivers to meet student''
transportation needs, officials'
,say .
Story written by Pamela.'
Holt. Reach. her at:
, holt@sr-pg.com


'-C
ent-child relationship healthy.
Parents need to follow up,
with their children to ensure the.-
youngsters are in compliance"
with the parents' expectations,.
notes Rogers.
Coleman says, in her stud-
ies, she found every child who"'
spends a lot of time chatting in
"chat rooms" has interacted.
with a sex offender.
Rogers says he knows it is,
impossible to police the com-
puter and check up on children,,
24 hours per day, but he :hinks'
it's knowledge and communica-,
tion that are important inA
Internet safety.
The bottom line, according,
to. Coleman? "We want Santa'
Rosa students to be safe on'
line."
Tips for Internet safety are
available at:.'
www.santarosa.kl2.fl. us



service the business.
. Lewis says he's happy to�
get on the system, but "it's been
a long time coming." He agrees'
with Marshall-it was one tof.
the promises of being annexed&
into the City and "he's glad to{
see it finally happen"
Marshall says he's had a4
burden in dealing with his sep-i
tic tank, and will be relieved to
be connected to the City in tihe.
service he was promised.'
Reach writer at:,
holt@sr-pg.comb


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Wednesday September 27, �J06


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


4�







Wedunesuday September 27a, 206.UUU--- - -

Community

Pen Air wins award-twiceI o ,,r ,,,sI


(San Antonio, TX) The
2006 Defense Credit Union
Council Conference held in
San Antonio, TX honored Pen
Air Federal Credit Union for
the second year in a row - and
third time in a six-year period.
Pen Air FCU was selected over
several Credit Unions nation-
wide to be the recipient of the
Navy's Defense Credit Union
of the Year Award for its imme-
diate response after Hurricane.
Katrina devastated much of the
Mississippi Gulf Coast and for
their initiative in the Military
Stves Program. Also, Pen Air
FCU's Mobile Service Center
was used by* Keesler Federal


Credit Union to help get-funds
to their military members. Plus,
Pen Air FCU held a charity golf
tournament to benefit the
Navy-Marine Corps Relief
Society . and raised over
$35,000 - much of which went
to families affected by the hur-
ricane. "It is a great honor to be
recognized for something we
strive to do everyday, serve our
members to the fullest of our
capability," said John Davis,
President/CEO of Pen Air
FCU. This marks the third time
that Pen Air Federal Credit
Union has been recognized as
the Navy's Defense Credit
Union of the Year.


Subscribe
today!
623-2120


Weekly newsletter available for veterans


Reminder: .The Florida
Department of Veterans' Affairs
(FDVA) produces a weekly
newsletter for veterans. It's
available online ' at
http://www.flbridavets.org/new
s/archive.asp
And........
Defense Department to
Review Military Awards
Program
By Sgt. Sara Wood, USA
American Forces Press
Service
WASHINGTON, Sept. 22,
2006 - In an effort to provide
clarity in awards standards
across the military services, the.
Defense Department has begun
a comprehensive review of mil-
itary awards and decorations, a
DoD official said here yester-
day.
This routine review will
result in revision of DoD
Instruction 1348.33-M, the
Manual of Military Decorations
and Awards, Bill Carr, deputy,
undersecretary of defense for
military personnel policy, said
in an interview. The changing
nature of warfare in the global
war on terror and lessons
learned over the past few years
have prompted some changes
to make the system work better
across the military, Carr said;
"It's been about 10 years
since 'we've re% iewed . our
direct e in 'a comprehensive .
way and, given the events of


the global war on terror - our
experience operationally in that
environment, there are some
changes we think' we can make
to give greater clarity and con-
sistency to the a%\ ards." he said.
.The review will focus on-
several specific areas where
discrepancies among the differ-
ent branches of the m iitary
have come to light, Carr said.
One of these areas is the cri-
teria for ."V" de% ices and
Purple Heart Medals, he said..
In the Army, the "V" device
only is awarded for valor,
whereas in the other services, it
can be awarded simply for a
service member's presence in
the, theater of .operations, he
explained. When it comes to
Purple Hearts, the different
services have slightly different
standards for level of injurN,
Carr said.
Another area that will be
addressed in the review is the
definition of the theater of.
operations when it comes to
expeditionary medals, Carr
said. The Air Force defines the
theater of operations as the
globe, because their pilots fly
.all over the world,, but other
services define the theater as a
specific piece of ground, he.
said.
"The review 'itself really is
generated by questions that
arose from the services, one
by one, over the past couple of


years," Carr said. "Concerns
have been expressed by one
service about the practices of
another service, and as we saw
that pattern, it was pretty clear
that it was now time to con-
duct a more comprehensi e'
review."
SA working group consisting
,of represenLtimes from each
ser ice, the Joint Staff aild the
I Institute of Heraldry will form
the core of the comprehensive
review effort, Carr said. There .
will also be a structure in
place to address institutional
changes that come up from the
review, he said.
The review is expected to
last about six months, and
shortly thereafter, if the serv-
ices have achieved a consen-
sus, DoD will be able to move
pretty quickly with publica-
tion of the new instruction,
Carr said.
After the review, DbD will
have one set of standards for
awards procedures, as it does
now, Carr said. Discrepancies
have arisen because of lan-
guage in the current standards
that can be interpreted differ-
ently, he said. With this
review, DoD officials hope to
*make the standards clearer and
more objective, he said.
"There probably are ways
to do that and, if we achieve it,
we'll have greater consisten-
cy," he said.


6033 Arnies Way
Tanglewood:East!
Motivated Seller! Bring all offers!
Only 4 years young. Split
bedroom, fireplace, cathedral
ceilings, breakfast bar, oak
cabinets,'-garden tub, large 12x19,
great room, 12x20 suriroom,
.privacy fence b'ack Nard. sprin-
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give us a call. .
ERA Bill \\allace Reality v
572-6500


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Q. What is ear stapling?
A. A tiny surgical stainless steel staple is placed in the
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Q. What is the average weight loss?
A. Woman - 2-5 lbs week
Men - 4-11 lbs week

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Dan McKenzie a

Lisa McKenzie Dampier of

McKenzie GMC Pontiac & Buick


SALUTES


Kyle olley has devoted lis -energy enthusiasm and

leadership abilities to the Santa Rosa educationall

foundation and Tuffy, 1R]eal Amlerican Quarter

Horse Hero. lijs efforts have resulted in increasing

public awareness of literacy, at the root: the c/l/dren.t/.

This is happening not-only in Santa kosa C county,

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Page 7-A


Thp Santa Rosa Press Gazette


i _ _ J J ... ft--.* L-- nnno


I


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Community Briefs


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NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS
All Board of County Commissioner.Meetings and other county department
meetings are held at the County Administrative Center, Commissioner's Board Room.
6495 Caroline Street, Milton, Florida, unless otherwise indicated.
Marine Advisory, October 3 5:00 p.m.


Zoning Board of Adjustments
Commission Committee
Navarre Architectural Advisory Board
Navarre Community Center
Building, Code Board of Adjustments
t i5>. 015i Old B..ce-, H y., Milton
- C-.:rde.erie R-:. ' ,
Commission Regular
Fire Protection Board of Adjustment and Appeals
6051 Old Bagdad Hwy., Milton
Conference Room
Local Planning Board
Long Term Recovery Organization
6051 Old Bagdad Hwy., Milton
Media Room
Emergency Services Advisory Committee
Aviation Advisory
Library Advisory
Commission Committee
Utility Board
Bagdad Historical Architectural Advisory Board
6051 Old Bagdad Hwy., Milton ,
P & Z Conference Room
Parks and Recreation
CComir., .r. Reoui ',-
Conpii-..0on Spec. ea.tNeerin.gRezoning;


October 5
October 9
October 10
October 11

October 12
October 12


5:30 p.m.
9:00 a.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.

9:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.


October 12 6:00 p.m.
October 17 3:00 p.m.


October 18
October 18
October 19
October 23
October 23
October,25

October 25
October 26


2:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.
5:00 p.m.
8:30 p.m.

5:30 p.m.
9:00 a.m.
c.:'.-, c. i.


ANgcni-.' .ro inmirroe. .e ],r 0. .iI.,,Ie c. ' nw ,,.1 ,'! All 'lee[I .Ile is.
.11 tne Bj..ro R.",-i. c. , cr. bo ,.e, el I. e ,'u.d ofir .,:. ed E till 13 -o .r l,0 -el-: r.-Ir-, �
.mer- i.jr,n- ..r.tC- ri- l�mar, -


Annual garage and.
bake sale planned
The Heritage of Santa Rosa
is having its Annual Garage and
Bake Sale on Friday,
September 29, 2006 beginning
at 7:00 a.m. at 5530 Northrop
Road in Milton.

Republican
Club to meet
The Republican Club of
Santa Rosa County will hold its
monthly- meeting and Dutch
Treat Dinner at COCO-
DRIE'S,, 8649 Gulf Blvd.
Navarre Beach, FL 32566


"OPEN HOUSE"
9/30-10 TO 4AND
10/01 -1 TO 5
5696 Trevino Dr
Could ou uie $5000 offered d to buser
wi.h acceplible offer9 Ma)be buy-don n
your rate, appl) 10 closingg cosl., 9L e
cash for a great mp or install a hot tub'!
Th s isa wonderful bome on the lIlth
fairway of Tanglewood GoLf course It
has 3 bedrooms 2 baths. 2 replaces,
a gorgeouiis imlioom, exceptional
landscaping, and much more! Call
Sherilyn Patrick anytime on 346-0455.
Diretnon', From HN 90, north on
Glover. left on Willard Noiris, left
on Tanglerood. night on Tretrio -
second house on ithe night.

Prudential

Florida WCI Realty


(Located just across the
Navarre Beach Bridge) at 6:30
P.M. on Tuesday October 3,
2006. This meeting is open to
the public.
For additional information
please contact Morgan Lamb,
President, 2067 Pine Ranch
Drive, Navarre, FL 32566,
Telephone (850) 939-2409, or
Email morganlamb@bell-
south.net.

City
Council to 'meet
The City of Milton's City
Council will meet in Executive
Session. on Monday, October 2,
2006, at 4:00 p.m..in Council
Chambers of City Hall, 6738
SDixon Street. All.meetings are
open to the public. For further,
information on the- meeting,
contact to City Manager's
Office at 983-5411.

Fall Arts and Crafts
Show is Friday
The Knights of Columbus
Ladies Auxiliary to host early
Arts & Fall Craft Show.Friday,
September 29th from 10 a.m. to
8 p.m. and Saturday, September
30th from 8 a.m. to 12 noon at
the Knights of Columbus Hall
on' 5470 Dogwood Drive,
Mihlon. FL.
The show will feature 30
exhibitors with heedle\%ork.
pottery,'jewelry, paintings and
more. It is free admission and
there will free park ing. Food
and beverages will also be
available.


VFW
plans yard sale
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post
4833 will hold their semi-annu-
al yard sale on Friday and
Saturday, October 6th and 7th
from 8:00 a.m. to noon. The
sale will be at the post location
at 5918 Carroll Road in Milton.
On sale-furniture, also a
piano. cloiluni, afgans, house-
hold article, children's articles
and other miscellaneous items.
The proceeds of the sale will
be used to assist our local veter-
ans and their families.

Friends to host
Open House
Friends of the Gardens of
Norith-est Florida will be par-
ticipating in the Open House at
the Unii ersit% of Florida on the
Milton Cainptis of PJC on;
Saturday, October 7, 2006. The
program topic will .be'
"Qnarniental Grajs-e:" by Dr.
Mlack Thetfoid, Associate
Professor of Environmental
Horticulture at the University,
which h \\ill be held at 11:00
A.M. tinder the Big Oak Tree in
the Gardens. This is an opportu-
nity for you to visit the Gardens
at their peak. enjoy several hor-.
ticulture talks, being offered,
support the Student Club's Plant
Sale and participate in the Open
House sponsored by the
University of Florida which
begins at 9:100 A1.M. SJaurda%.
SOctober 7, 2006, until Noon.
For, further information. call,'
983-5216. E\t 113.


Help needed
for Paint Day
The Bagdad Community
Center is. having a Paint Day. It
will start at 8 a.m. Volunteers
are needed. Contact Josh Wilks
at 850/981-9915 or email at:
B agdadwaterfro'nt @bell-
south.net

Celebrate @
your Milton Library
Come celebrate the official
Grand' Opening of the ganta
Rosa Counts Library System
on Frida. and Saturday,
September 29-30.
Friday events will include:
door prizes, art contest display
and winners, '1:00 p.m. face
painting and children's activi-
ties, 1:45-2:15 p.m. MHS
IMighty Black and Gold
Marching Band, 2:00 p.m.
Friends of the Milton Public
Library Quarterly Meeting-
public is invited to attend.;2:00-
4:00 p.m. Cat Country 98.7 will
be visiting with "the Cat", and
prize wheel, 4:00 p.m. ribbon
cutting and reception.
Saturday events will
include: All, day door prizes,
children ages. 3-11 are encour-
aged to dress up as a favorite
storybook character, face paint-
ing and children's activities,
12:00 p.m. bring your own
lawn chairs for a performance
by bluegrass band, "Whistle
Stop", 12:00 p.m. Hot Dog
Cookout, 1:00 p.m. Stor teller
Pat Nease Reads Sillh Stories
Celebrating Sunmimer' End,
kids favorite storbiiok ctharac-
ter cosmine contest judtiIll2.


Club For Growth names Miller

"Defender Of Economic Freedom"


Scores '96 Percent on
Congressional Ratings; Ranks
#12 out of 435 in House
Washington, -DC
(September 22, 2006) - Pat
Toomey, president of .the Club
for Growth, the nation's lead-
ing free-market advocacy
organization with over 36.000
memnberi. today .announced,
That Congressman, Jeff1Miller
(R-Fl-0[) has earned the first
annual "Defender of Economic
Freedom Award" created to
honor Members of Congress,
who have a strong voting
record on ,economic growth
issues.'



Gem Lore
byWilliam E Cobb
Past President Florida Jewelers
Spokesman for Jewelers of America

Rings Distinguish
Classes
Although everyone in the
United States, today, may
wear any kind of ring he can
afford, such was not the case
during Roman era. The iron
ring was the original and only
ring for a time and was
awarded by the sovereign as
a mark of individual honor.
From the earliest times of the
Roman Republic, a senator
sent to an embassy received a
gold ring, while all other sen-
ator were restricted to wear-
ing iron rings. Soon, howev-
er, all senators were allowed
to wear gold rings and in the
last years of the Republic, the
privilege was extended to
many other classes of citi-
zens, including some freed-
men, even followers of less
reputable vocations, eventu-
ally, the iron ring became the
badge of slavery and all free
men regardless of class, were
able to wear gold rings.


"With his score of 96%.
Congressman Miller is clearly
a hero of, the pro-economic.
growth agenda," said Club for
Growth president, Pat Toomey,
"He demonstrates a strong
commitment to limiting goy-
ernment spending and promot-
, in, firee-manrket principles."
"Congressmian 'Miller is 1
of only , 36,. members ,of
Congress to earn this award,
and is ranked 12th out of 435
members in the House of
Representatives," Toomey
added.
The rating is based on
'Miller's voting record and
examines legislative actions
that reflect Club for Growth's
immediate pro-economic


growth policy goals, includ-
ing:
* Cutting and limiting gov-
emrnment spending
* Making the Bush tax
relief permanent
* Death Ta\ repeal
* Social Securit'. reform
with personal; retirement
accounts
* Legal reform to end abu-
.sive lawsuits
* Elininanlig the IRS arid
replacing the current tax code
* School choice
* Regulator\ reform and
deregulation
, Visit
www.clubforgrowth.com for
the complete 2005
Congressional Scorecard.


Harold School

Reunion planned 1924-1963


Harold School Reunion will
be held October 14, 2006 from
1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the W.
H. Rhode Elementary School
Cafeteria on Byrom Street.
Our menu will consist of
heavy hors 'd'ourves. We ask
you to bring enough for your
family plus one more. Paper
products, drinks and ice will be
furnished for you.
If anyone would be willing
to sing at the event please con-


tact Barbara at (850) 206-
4968.
We are looking forward to
seeing you once again. I prom-
ise you a wonderful time.
Please try to attend.
For more information
please contact Barbara
Redfield Daily at (850) 206-
4968, Amy Doris Helms
Phillips at (850) 418-3874 or
Mary Moore Johnson at (850)
623-8736.


NOTICE OF CHANGE OF LAND USE .

AND INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE

The Santa Rosa County Local Planning Board and Board of County Commissioners will con-
duct public hearings to consider a change of land use and/or rezoning of land areas depicted on
the maps within this advertisement. The hearings are scheduled as follows:

Local Planning Board (to consider and make a recommendation on the proposals):
Thursday, October 12, 2006 at 6:00 p.m..

Board of County Commissioners (to consider adoption of the ordinance):
Thursday, Octobe, 26. 20t6 or 6:00 p.m.

Both meetings will be held at the Santa Rosa County Administrative Center in the Board
Meeting Room, 6495 Caroline Street, Milton, Florida. At the public hearings, the Local
Planning Board and Board of County Commissioners shall consider the ordinance entitled:

AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA; AMEND-
ING ORDINANCE 91-24 AS AMENDED; CHANGING THE ZONING DIS-
TRICTS AS DEPICTED IN THE, ATTACHED MAPS; APPROVING THE
AMENDMENTS TO THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP OF THE LAND DEVELOP-
MENT CODE AS DEPICTED IN THE ATTACHED. MAPS; AMENDING ARTI-
CLES 2 AND 7 ESTABLISHING REGULATIONS FOR SWIMMING POOL
ENCLOSURES; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.





- I ' ' 7 ' I
** _-1 I I ' I I ' ~' I^ "" . . ' --- i-- T-- -- -; -RDI -- '-

Ll -77%-

-- --1 i
- . . - - - - -- M ] IE i_ ---- II .. -






Zrnxrg Distric t Atended: fron ElM (Mixed Zdiig Distric t Aended: fron Ml (Rural
Reidsrtia1 aiviaisdimDistrict)to R2 (Medium ResiartiaDLgstrict)toRI. (single Faily
DansittyResmUtaialistrc t) -tctIal. ag mi- Residatial District) -t cal aEpoxinately 5
mately 3.5 acres ' , as


. . .. . . . .. .
Ri i


i iM I : -


AG




-


Zkring District Anlced: frm El (Sirngle Family
Resiatial District to RIM (Mixed Rekhtial
Stdivsimkn Distbc t) - .38 SX

The proposed ordinance and maps may be inspected by the public prior to the above scheduled meet-
ings at the Santa Rosa County Planning Department, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton, Florida.
Interested parties may appear at the meetings and be heard with respect to this proposed ordinance.
All interested parties should take notice that if they-decide to appeal any decision made by the Santa
Rosa County Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter coming before said Board at
said meeting, it is their individual responsibility to insure that a record of proceedings they are appeal-
ing exists and for such purpose they will need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record shall include the testimony and the evidence upon which their appeal is to be
based.

Santa Rosa County adheres to the Americans with Disabilities Act and will make reasonable modifi-
cations for access to this meeting upon request. Please call Santa Rosa County Planning, Zoning and
Development Division at (850) 981-7075 or (850) 939-1259 to make a request. For Hearing-
Impaired, 1-800-955-8770 (Voice). Requests must be received at least 48 hours in advance of the i
meeting in order to provide the requested service.,


YARD SALE
Fri. Sept. 29th
7am-2pm
Lots of kids items
. and misc.
4874 Jaimae Lee
Drive. in Milton
3 FAMILY Yard Sale
8am-until. Sat Sept
30th. Kitchen appli-
ances, large variety
of other things.
6524 Hamilton
Bridge Road.
YARD SALE ...
September 29th &
30th. 7am until ?
Corner of Willard
Norris and Jays
Way. Furniture, cab-
inets clothes, elec-
tronics and much
more.


VICTORY LIFE
CHURCH
Hwy 90 E. Milton
Friday and
Saturday
Sept 29th & 30th
8am Until 1pm
lots of good stuff
everyone welcome
MULTI-FAMIILY
YARD SALE!
Lots of kids' stuff.
Saturday, Septem-
ber 30th 6a.m.
4769 Ribault Lane,
Milton Across High-
way 90 intersection
from Bealls Shop-
ping Center


MULTI-FAMILY
SALE
5700 Windham Rd.
Saturday 7:00am -?
Gun Cabinet, Bent-
wood Rocker, 26"
Bikes, Kitchen,
items, plants, lamps,
tables, etc.
YARD SALE
Sat. Sept. 30th
6648 Grace Street
(off Stewart St. pass
M.H.S) stairmaster,
weight bench, kid &
adult clothes, & lots
of misc.
YARD SALE
Sat 9/30 7:30-12:00
NicNacs, baby/tod-
dler clothes,misc.
6502 Colonial Drive


THE HERITAGE
OF SANTA ROSA
ANNUAL
GARAGE SALE
AND
BAKE SALE
5530 NORTHROP
ROAD IN MILTON
FRIDAY
SEPT. 29, 2006
7:00 AM

GARAGE SALE-
Name your price.
Downsizing quickly.
Thurs. & Fri.
8am-1pm
4657 Evelyn Street


YARD SALE
And Bake Sale'
Pine Level Baptist
Church in Jay.
3300 Pine Level
Church Road.
Next door to Gab-
bert Peanut
Festival
October 7th. 2006
8am to 1pm
Lots of nice items
and home baked
cakes, pies and
more.
Info: 675-6660
YARD SALE
Friday and Saturday
7am-1pm. baby
stroller, swing, sau-
cer, baby girl gym-
boree & gap clothes,
futon & stereo.
5574 Chantilly Cr.,


YADSL YARD A LSAL


i


Wednesday September 27, 2006 -


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Pan R8-A







Wednoedav Rantamhar 27.9f200R


e hT Santa Rosa Press Gazette


wu__ua ,u .L ocal luv_ LIL .. ..
Local


McKenzie Pontiac GMC Buick celebrating 40 successful years!


It's Milton's last and only family owned and operated automobile dealership


By OBIE CRAIN
Special Projects Writer

For forty-something years
now, even perhaps as long as a
half century, Dan McKenzie has
nourished a mutually successful
and loving relationship with
Milton and its people, both of
which he characterizes as ". . .
the finest in the � %orldi'"
For him Milton has proven to
be the utopia he was destined to
reach. He overcame a degenera-
tive and debilitating health con-
dition here, raised his family
here, established roots that will
forever bind him to the fabric of
the area, and achieved a distin-
guished level of accountability
here that few will ever match. '
Often characterized as a "gen-
tleman's gentleman," Dan con-
tinues at 82 to enjoy a profile of
success and integrity almost
mythologically panoramic in
character and scope.
And like the battered-pow-
ered, drum-thumping bunny on
TV, this year Dan and his extend-
ed, automobile-related family are
energetically celebrating 40
years of McKenzie Pontiac GMC
"Buick (and Oldsmobile until it
was phased out by General
Motors), the oldest and for that
matter, the last and only family
owned and operated automobile
dealership !eft in Miti.Rn
There's hardly anyone who
doesn't know and recognize Dan
McKenzie when they see him.
But few know the most intrigu-
ing story of how the young "cat-


tleman" from Pineapple,
Alabama literally stumbled into
Milton and came to make it his
home. And more interesting even
is how he became involved in the'
automotive business, eventually
acquiring and managing one of
the area's most prestigious deal-
erships.
Dan grew up in the small,
rural Pineapple community, the
son of a modest sawmill owner
and operator. But his aspirations�
didn't follow that kind of a
career, and he ended up "ranch-
ing", tending a respectable herd
that he thought would make a
good living for himself and his
'family.
He was plagued, however,
with this severe asthmatic condi-
tion that seemed to progressively
worsen. It eventually became so
severe that he had to seek profes-
sional medical help from a respi-
ratory specialist in Foley,
Alabama. The doctor there
promptly, advised him that he
would most like have to move to
Arizona or Wyoming to save his
life.
Disappointment not with-
standing, he decided to return
home and consider his next
move. His asthma, he figured,
was gradually killing him, and he
had to do something.
On his way home he stopped
to spend the night in Milton. And
you know what? His asthma
completely disappeared. Until,
this day, he says, he has never
been bothered with the debilitat-
ing disease as long as he stayed
in Milton. And at 82, today he is


a fine example of respiratory
health, a condition that bespeaks
the veracity of his medical histo-
ry.
The rest is history, but too
vague to leave untouched.
Everything he seemed to partici-
pate in turned to success, and
soon he was on his way to
becoming a respected member of
the Milton business common nirt\.
I "I was befriended by 0. U.
Stokes who gave me a job and the
opportunity to learn and move up
in the automotive sales business,"
Dan says of his former friend and
mentor. "On my first day at the O.
U. Stokes Mercury dealership on
Stewart Street, across from where
Milton High School now sits, I
sold a brand new Mercury," Dan
says. "I will always remember it.
It was one of the finest two-door
hardtop Mercury sedans on the
market at the time, and its ales
price was a staggering $3,000!"
Dan says that 0. U. Stokes
was one of 'his first friends and
mentors and that there were plans
to, cut him into the dealership's
management and eventually own-
ership, but that those plans never
materialized, and Stokes eventu-
ally went out of business.
Meanwhile Frank Whittle
offered him a job in the Whittle'
Motor Company, the local
Chevrolet dealership in, down-
town Milton, and he worked there
as manager for a good long time.
But other opportunities arose,
and Dan became a Dodge dealer,
operating and managing -the
Dodge dealership in Milton for


two years.,
Then came his latest opportu-
nity to affiliate with General
Motors, and in 1971,,he bought
the well-known Pontiac Buick
GMC Oldsmobile dealership
assets from DeWitt and Lillian
Webster in East Milton (at the
location now occupied, by the
Copper Possum) and established
the McKenzie Pontiac GMC
Buick " (and formerly
Oldsmobile) dealership that he
currently owns and operates at
6500 Caroline Street in Milton.
He moved the dealership to this
location in 1974.
The sprawling property at the
intersection of Dogwood Drive
and Highway 90 in Milton with
millions of dollars in vehicle
inventory is some of the most
valuable real estate in the city.
Dan says there have been too
many contributing factors to the
base of his success to mention
each one individually. But he
credits his spiritual values and
the support of his family for most
of the stability of his business
success and personal accom-
plishments.
SA major milestone in his life
occurred in 1945 while he was
home on leave from the
Maritime Service. He married
his childhood sweetheart, the
former Mary Till, who was at the
time a schoolteacher. He says she
is and always has been the foun-
tain of his inspiration. 'She has
always been a great wife and
mother-to all of us'" he, said.
Mary taught school in Milton


for Principal Martin Luther King
at Berryhill. "One of her great
loves and recreational past times
is the Milton Garden Club, and,
she has made a great contribution
to its success over the years," he
said.
They are the proud parents of
five daughters, one of whom,
Dianne, died at the age of 9 from
Leukemia. Of the other four,
Janet, Linda, Lisa, and Dana, all
-but Lisa have followed in their
mother's footsteps as school
teachers.
Lisa became involved with
her father in the automobile deal-
ership and has assumed much of
the responsibility for its adminis-
tration. She is currently on a
leave of absence, but Dan is sure
he can manage until she gets
back.
"They have all made me
proud," he acknowledged of his
wife and daughters.
Dan is a man of integrity in
both his personal life and his
business dealings. He says he
maintains a positive outlook and
tends to look for the positive
traits in others rather than focus-
ing on the values he contributes
in his relationships with other
people.
The things he says he misses
most are the personal contacts
that he used to have with his
friends. "There are fewer oppor-
tunities to get together like there
used to be in the old days when
everyone would come into town
on Saturday, and at the post
office where you could discuss


politics and business and any
other subjects you wanted to talk
about with your friends," Dan
reminisced.
"Those times and opportuni-
ties are gone," Dan said.." They
have been replaced by paper and
iechnologi. And sadly to say,
nian\ of the old gang of.friends
are gone already, too. I miss peo-
ple like Frank Whittle and Bob
Sikes and 0. U. Stokes and
DeWitt Webster." But he still has
his spiritual values to hold on to,
He attends First Baptist Church
and counts among his close
friends these days people like Joe
Bamburg, Cotton Byrom, Wilbur-
Adams, Clyde Gracey, Bubba
Fisher, Buddy Jordan, and Betty
Willey.
"This 40-year celebration of
the dealership is a yearlong
thing," Dan says. "We have been
focusing on sales promotions and
miscellaneous events all
throughout the year. There are no
immediate plans for a master
kickoff event. We're just taking
it slow and easy and enjoying the
ride."
But lay it to the car salesman-
ship or whatever, he could hard-
ly sign off without inviting the
public to come in and explore
what McKenzie Pontiac GMC
Buick has to offer. "There are lot
of valuable deals still available,"
he said. "No%% is definitely the
time to buy!"
And at McKenzie Pontiac
GMC Buick they're wishing to
make it a great year for you,by
offering the finest Nehicle' you'll
find anywhere, penod!


in Milton, Florida


'II,

ci


Quality Christian Education.
-- We have openings for

Children from age 3 through

High School






























6331 Cke tmd Ditive
(- , ,.tt 4)












( Hm89)


Page 9-A


WE WELCOME ALL NEW FAMILIES TO
SANTA ROSA COUNTY.



LET US INTRODUCE YOU TO


* . ~'..~''*
I ....


The zero turn mower that

makes everyone's cut.

Kubota ZG20 and ZG23


'~~'4~ ~


Tough enough for professionals. Easy enough for homeowners.
* 20 or 23 HP V-twin gasoline engines - Quiet, yet powerful
* Heavy duty deep deck - Designed for durability
* Shaft-drive mower - No belts to change
* Wet multi-disk PTO clutch - Smooth power transfer
* Hydraulic deck lift - Easily adjust cutting height
* Foldable ROPS - Get in and around objects safely
* Built-in mower lift - For easier maintenance
* Optional mulching system - No clippings to bag
Take on the tough turf...all day, every day.

Wise Equipment Sales & Service

1147 S. Ferdon Blvd.

Crestview, FL 32536

(850) 682-3366


E:EVERYTHINGuoYOU VALUE


i


1

i





Wednesday September 27, 2006 ;,'


Paoe 10 A


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Pace Chambe-of-Commerc


one


Name of Business:
Popeye's Chicken and
Biscuits
Name of Owner: Pat
Butler- Marketing/ Kathy


S H-jrZ.: Ry
Paula McGuire.
ABR, CRS. GRI
Broker \'..oclate,




www.PaulaMcGulre.com iI,;:i



S" '24 Hr. Towine

INTc&I BODY
S INSURANCE CLAIMS
THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
OWNERS: DAVID E. & GENE COOK
4432 Floridatown Rd., Pace, FL 32571
850-994-6324
6355 Highway 90. Milton, FL 32570
850-623-6003
8119 Pensacola Blvd.. Pensacola, FL 32534
850-476-5800
3052 Gulf Breeze Pkwy., Gulf Breeze, FL 32563
850-916-0030


RI/BON CUTTINGS


Sam and Debby Lewis
and their sons Chase and
Trent, Mike and Kathy
Lewis, their son Stephen
and his wife Kimberly
along with -their entire
staff announce the con-
struction of their newest
location at .4777 West
Spencer Field Rd, Lewis
Funeral Home, Pace
Chapel. The 8,000 square
ft. facility will be unique it
will not be constructed in
the "traditional"
funeral home design. It
will feature a multiuse
central grand room that
can be utilizes as,
the chapel or reduced in'
size as the needs dictate,
This new construction


994-1355 Middleton

(>' � &1/o/i MY /0- , m.fMi',-





7 OmtAlterations on in store pore purphase


All Forma ls on Sale

u p 50% off 4841 WEST !


Staff Ptll
[dfp n


lIe-r


/0-6 a
I.,


SPENCERFIED * PACE I


JOSEPH W. BALDI
(850) 432-3000,
3010 North 12th Ave.
Pensacola, FL 32503
Toll Free (888) 782-3325


CONSIDERING OUTSOURCING PAYROLL?
STAFF PAYROLL OF PENSACOLA, INC. is locally owned and operated.
We have been serving NORTHWEST FLORIDA SINCE 1988.
We are LARGE enough to serve all your payroll requirements, yet have
not lost
the ability to meet your personal. needs.
We understand and are able-to accommodate the needs of our.community.
Let us show you how cost effective this could be for you.
Workers' Compensation * Risk Management * Health Insurance 3
Human Resources * Employee Handbooks and More i


Advertise your business

in the Pace Chamber

newsletter! Contact

Debbie Coon at

623-2120 to

find out how!


also includes a crematory
facility that will be housed
in its own 4,000 square ft.
structure. This will be the
first crematory facility in
Santa Rosa Co. The Fields
of Faith Tribute center
will also be unique in the
fact it will allow families
to hate closure with cre-
mation that most funeral
homes are not able' to
offer at this time. The esti-
mate completion is.
expected to take 10 to 12
months. This will be the
third facility for the
Lewis,'s. The Milton loca-
tion 6405 Hwy. 90 West
and the Navarre location
at 7794 Navarre Pkwy are
the other two locations.


The local family owned
business was founded by,
L.D. and Elizabeth
Hoodless Wolfe in 1928.
It continued through Avis
and Dorothy Wolfe Lewis
and is now in its fourth
generation with the addi-


tiop� of Sam and Del
sons, Chase and'Trent
Mike and Kathies
Stephen.
The Lewis family'
pleased to be a part o0
grow ing community
Pace.


Popeye's Chicken & Biscuits
Bishop Area Supervisor,
Karen ' James -General -- . =
Manager
Address: '4687 Highway
91, Pace,Fl. 32571
. Phone: 850-995-0073 : Ti - s'i
Fax: 407-365-9489., 9- ,

Services Provided:
Fast *and casual restau- . '
rant/catering, full service
(over 100 ' - - : " ' -
people); Self service
preparation under 100
people. Future Goals:
Build catering sales and
community service. : :-


tWinkle.
Pharmacy
Building A Tradition Of T
David B. Winkles
Registered Pharmacr
3818 Highwvay 9
Pace, Florida 325
(850) 994-70


We ak Y urBsns
Ou0 usns


At Pen Air Federal Credit Union, we want to help you "Get it Done." We
offer the services that v.i' i rr, lm.-It..TILIni ,,Ul LiUiV'., ' a pleasure.
*Business Loans *Business Credit Card
*Business Checking *Merchant Services
*Business Savings *Internet Banking
"Business Check Card And. Much More...
Visit our Pace office located at 4586 Hwy 90
.Office Hours:
Lobby: M-Th. 9ain-5pm Fri. 9amn- 5:30 pm
Drive-up: M-Th. 8:30an-Spin Fri. 8:30am- 5:30pm
Sat. 9am-Noon

F EDERALCREDIT UNION
(850) 505-3200
www.penair.org
MemberMshiip Eligibility Requiied.


11 m ! ! ! i ' 1 , !' ! ! ' n' '! ! '! ! !1,1 ' m P !' P !P ......


Interj
.: Inter


Family Promise
of Santa Rosa, Inc.
faith Hospitality Network (IHN)


'a


Director: Debbie Laird
850-623-5300
info@www.familypromisesrc.org


Family Promise of Santa Rosa County launches the long awaited Interfaith Hospitality Network of host and support churches with its first group of homeless families in crisis towards
self-sufficiency!
This is not another dependency creating "handout" program, but a real meaningful transitional program to give each family a "helping hand" to help themselves through the process
of attaining gainful employment and affordable housing with temporary assistance, counseling and resources necessary to accomplish self sufficiency goals.
On any given day, there are over 2500 homeless people in Santa Rosa County with little to no local social services to assist them. Lack of public transportation complicates or hin-
ders the homeless families from the basic needs of keeping children in schools to applying for jobs or benefits through neighboring counties with social services.
Family Promise of Santa Rosa County has launched with 11 host churches on record and 8 support churches offering financial aid, supplies, meals, transportation and volunteers.
The initial host churches have been inspected for safety and welfare of all participants. With current number of host churches, the program can support up to a maximum of 14 indi-
viduals making up no more than 5 families. Each family is screened and the adults must agree to actively work on an individualized plan to regain independence and self-sufficien-
cy. With ongoing host church recruitment, the program will increase the number of individuals appropriately.
/As of this week, the program has 2 families in the system with the 3rd almost through the qualification process. The first family is a married couple with 2 small children, 10mni
22mo olds. The second family is a single mother with 4 children ranging from 7 to 15. The third family is a single mom with a 17mo old and a 4yr old. Each of these fami'"
willing to work to make positive changes in their lives and circumstance. The churches provide temporary housing, meals and transportation while the Family Promise Day eC
provides the assistance, counseling and resources to help them apply to available programs, benefits and potential jobs while the children attend public schools. The "Program".
vides their needs while they make the effort to improve their current situation from homelessness to one of self-sufficiency.
For more detailed information about the local/national program, how you, your church/synagogue, company or group can help or to see our immediately needed wish list, log
http://www.familypromisesrc.org or http://familypromise.org.


Lewis Funeral Home New Expansion


I


Between banker and customer,
trust is the tie that binds.
. o-scove.theAr fen e te' 1aba genusealy conrinltled to stomer seOice
callnIin te rIuere wi 6 dyoealMs.lAPeoplsFie.wll ak'MWa e . li te
toge toknow youand,. iEncesaeo. ellind thatweVegaoloa10incomlnn,
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.'wik toa e yasour tust Iand, onlltMellwe lwredommenl theproduls arl d,.
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Page 12Z-A The Santa Rosa Press Gazette weonesoay bepiemner LI, iuuow
Lifestyles


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A patient can expect to receive the best quality care available in our area.


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The acceleration/deceleration injury is usually related to motor
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joint, nerve, disc and ligamentous injuries. Other symptoms
such as headaches, dizziness, jaw pain (TMJ), low back pain,
memory loss can often be directly related to the trauma
involved in a "whiplash" type injury.
If you, a friend, or relative has been involved in an accident,
I urge you to call my office for a thorough evaluation by a physi-
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As an experienced health care provider, I utilize the most up
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A t0 WEDNESDAY

-t" - te September 27, 2006

� : , MX JJ__ Section B


Ask Molly

Parsons

Press Gi_.fte .-dvic
Column __
Dear ,Mlollv.
I need iour help. I have a
Siad trin fro lim hih hool wiho
iiatills t. 'Ii 1. I hia1 n'[ tSt iln
ihis person in 5 'fea's. bur the
ma nit. lt he, Ii _ltdi/ lilt cdi e
finilh' otf 0 ar-itecd ai'd just
abcu tlt tla ii at i lo of house nd
I, lit 1 A1l imti dan0d 1d I 'r e
.thlaii.itil tid siriscd O tia'
Shouduli I un ti hem don'a. inli
, I hai'c olither plans or tthal?
/I'. be b t l e n a Iotlite. /'1i noi1
slirt t'/ihal / t(l/l 10 do.
Not Frm High School
i sil-'I5

Dear High School:
I understand \our dilemma
and can s*mnipathize \\ith \ou
Living in North\\est Flonda
sometimes brings about
un anted houseeuests.
However. there are questions I
ha\e to ask did they su\ how
man\ of the farnil. i ill be
attending at this %isit' Is there
an e\ent the\ %\\ill anend during
the \isit Ho%% long are the\
planning to ta ,'? Ho', man\
meals \ill the\ ha\e in 'our
home?
Askin these questions
ahead of their isit h ill speak
volumess to the friend sa\ une-
I'm not planning on keeping
you up the whole time-w-ith-
out sounding. rude but still
making the point.
If they still don't get the
point, set some limits. If \ou
get the ans- er, "I'm not sure
how long we'll be with syou,"
tell them "if that's the case, I
can only have you at my house
for three days tops. We have
such a: full schedule that
week." If food becomes an
issue as well, do the same-
,"we will only be eating in one
day while you're here. Can
you make a casserole? Or
salad?"
While they're at your
home, set aside time for just
the two of you to spend togeth-
er. This way, you will not feel
rushed nor stressed about how
much you're giving and the' 're
doing all the taking.
If it seems you can't take
the visit at all, tell your friend
while you'd love to see them
for dinner one evening, you
just can't have a houseguest on
this particular week-but
you'd be glad to recommend a
hotel.
Dear Molly'.
I have been dating "'Fred"
for about five years and each
time I approach the subject of a
deeper relationship, he begins
to back away or avoid the sub-
ject. Ifeel I need to cut this guy
loose and move 6n. What do
you think?
Tired of Waiting
Dear Tired:
I agree with you. Cut him
loose gently...but if you can't
and he won't -take the hint
say it straight. Get lost.
Written by Molly Parsons.
Reach her at:

Attn: Molly Parsons


For all the latest on
local ne\\ws and
commUnit\ events.
subscribe to the
Santa Rosa Press
Gazette. Only $28
for a one year
subscription to
residents within
Santa Rosa
County. For our
senior citizens, it is
only $22. So ive
us a call today! o


623-2120


-RoisaI


"Ghostly" mists such as this are often caught on the cameras of the owners as well as visitors to the property.


There's nothing like a ghost sto


Two East Milton residents saythey are living in a real-life campfire tale


By LYNNE HOUGH
Press Gazefie Staff' \'ritcr _ _ , .
""'G6ts are still haunting an American Farms property in East Milton.
And the owners say it isn't fun.
Several years ago. Press Gazette readers were made aware of a property
located on Nichols Lake Road \\here strange happenings were documented
on camera thousands of times.
Everything from orbs to spooky misty clouds with' shapes inside have
been photographed by Mike Wright, who lives on the property with Rai
Orszak. Independent invest igat ion by paranormal investigators led the pair
and their property to be listed in two books-Encyclopedia of Haunted
Places, Ghostly Locales from around the World; and Our Haunted Lives,
True Life Ghost Encounters-both compiled and edited by Jeff Belanger.
The photographs taken by Wright are usually in the dark and ' ith a digi-
tal camera and a flash. Orbs have been captured on "film" by others, besides
Wright.
While many don't believe in such things or the alleged meaning behind
the discovery of paranormal activity, Wright and Orszak don't have to be
convinced. They say they've lived it.
Inside their home, they believe the spirits are active. Both report missing
items, the. shaking of furniture, and sounds-documented by a recording
device. Their dogs have reacted to "something" inside the house more than
once, invisible to the human eye.
The men say the\ belie\ e there is history at the base of their experiences,
and note a slave cemetery from days past may be located on or near their
1.25 acres. They are also concerned when Yellow Fever hit the area in the
early 1900s, victims may have been taken away from the then-civilized areas
of the county for burial, possibly in mass graves.
SWhile no proof of the speculations exists, the."haunting" continues. Over
the years, as Wright pinpoints where the most activity is, the photographs
pick up more detail. In some cases, serpents are alleged to be seen in the
mist, along with human forms, and in a couple of photos, some say they see
demons.
Wright and Orszak are open to visitors at the property, by appointment.
They are eager to speak of their experiences and say they want the public to
realize what they experience is real.
Their photographs can be viewed online by keyword search: spiritsonthe-
land. To reach Wright or Orszak, email at: ..J"i-,,:IIh..,i.,,I - ,I.
Story written by Lynne Hough. Reach her at:
hough@sr-pg.com


. , . - .' i . - , ,' , - . ' . . I
.- , .,' , , . , , ,
...........................I.... __...,_..


Hundreds of orbs are seen here. Some believe these are just dust
particles or tricks of light. Others believe this is the energy that remains
after someone passes on.


Here a mist resembling a leaning tree or even a tornado is captured on
film.


I',.


Preservation Association plans semiannual Market Day


BAGDAD - The Bagdad
Village Preservation
Association will organize its
semiannual Market Day event
from 7 a.m. antil 2 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 7, at the his-
toric Bagdad Museum
Complex in Bagdad. The
day's events include a white
elephant sale, fish fry, home-
made ice cream and baked
goods, as well as time for
social gathering.
The white elephant sale will


begin at, 7 a.m. along with
breakfast items for early risers,
including sausage biscuits,
homemade cinnamon rolls and
coffee. Fish dinners with sides
of cheese grits, hushpuppies,
coleslaw, and baked beans will
be served around 10 a.m.,
Homemade ice cream will be
available at that time, as well.
A self-guided walking tour of
the village will begin at the
museum at 10 a.m.
The Bagdad Village gift


shop offers local history-relat-
ed souvenirs and gifts ranging
from coffee mugs, bumper
stickers, key chains, magnets,
and handmade dolls, to draw-
ings and prints by local artists,
books of local history, as well
as Bagdad's annual Christmas
ornament collection. This
year's ornament drawing is the
new Bagdad Community
Center on porcelain ornament.
Donations for the white ele-
phant sale are now being


accepted at the museum com-
plex. Volunteers are also need-
ed.
Once a bustling lumber mill
village, Bagdad was once the
center of the Southeastern
lumber industry for more than
110 years before closing in
1939. According to local histo-
rians, at one time Bagdad was
the biggest, most modern lum-
ber export in the western
world. Bagdad was listed on
the National Register of


Historic Places in 1987.
The Bagdad Village
Museum Complex is located at
the corners of Bushnell and
Church streets (4512 Church
St.) in Bagdad.
For more information or
directions to the museum, or to
find out more about the
Bagdad Village Preservation
Association, visit the associa-
tion's Web site at . ' 1:-
i .11 , 8 or call 850-981-
9915.


I







Th.oi n ui amiannau u gi� ra@@ ILWLnt, " T


Santa Rosa Medical
Center sponsors
mature driving
program.
Call 626-5113 for
information
or to register.


www.srmc.fasthealth.com
SPONSORED IN PART BY


Prime Time
With Obie

By OBIE CRAIN
PRIME Editor
You will probably have
noticed by now that the circula-
tion schedule of our PRIME
pages has been somewhat
erratic recently. It was our inten-
tion originally that they circulate
somewhere close to the date
that fixed income individuals
receive their monthly
"allowances" and did their shop-
ping, which at the time meant
somewhere around the third of
the month.
But so many things have
changed over the last couple of
years that those policies aren't
exactly relevant anymore.
First' of all, Social Security
regulations have changed, and
receipt days of monthly checks
are no longer relegated to the
"third" for everyone, especially
new recipients. Rather, they are
mailed out in relation to the
recipient's birthday in order to
relieve the extreme postal pres-
sure that must originate with
such heavy mailings.
Then when Hurricane Ivan
swept through year before last,
our schedule was interrupted,
and the pages came out later
than usual. Then the same thing
happened' again last year with
Hurricane Katrlna, and the
schedule suffered an even
greater setback.
But we have tried to stay
within the boundaries of "the
middle of the month," so to
speak, that is, up until this
month. I have been out of the
loop due to an unexpected sur-
gery, and am just now getting
back into the, swing of things,
trying desperately not to rupture
our perfect publication record
for the past 16 years or so.
Thank goodness, we've
reached the goal of keeping it
within the boundary of the cur-
rent month at least. And I'm
going to make an extra effort to
see that we gradually reign in
the publication date and eventu-
ally get it back within the first
.two weeks of the month the way
it used to be. I've heard no com-
plaints, and I thank you for that.
You've been very loyal, and I
appreciate the interest and sup-
port that we've always gotten
from our readers.
Now about being "out of the
loop." It's amazing just how
much one can miss by not being
on the go for a few weeks. Gas
has dropped by more than a
half dollar a gallon, and I'm. so
glad to see it down in the two-,
Odollar-and-change range for
the first time in ages. I was also
surprised by the astonishing
progress made on the Interstate
10 bay bridge replacement
while I wasn't noticing.
And of course the work on
Highway 90 through downtown
Milton has not escaped my
attention either. when that job is
finished, we can all take a
breath of relief.
Among other things I've
managed t6 catch up on some
of my reading and talking with
people that I haven't had the
chance to visit with in a while. I
would also like to take this
opportunity to thank the many
friends and acquaintances that
took the time to visit and wish
me a speedy recovery.
By golly, I think I've gotten
the hang of it. I've met several
deadlines, have gotten back to
eating sensibly, and am begin-
ning to exercise outdoors again.
The fall weattier is really doing
its part, too!
But it's not about me. I like
to think my function is to report
the news, not make it, and in
that respect I'll wind up with my
usual advice: take care of your-
selves, and do something that
will make you happy and proud!
I'm trying!


SANTAROSA Second to None!
MEDICAL CENTER


GROUP PARTICIPATION-An engaging overview of the group's meeting shows Jane Allen
addressing the gathering. Word Is that the Society will continue to hold reunions and mem-
bers were told to watch out for any future announcements to that affect.


OSKAR'S CORNER
And you are welcome to it!
By Oscar Davis
Santa Rosa has been blessed with a lot of fine eating places, many that I have eaten at and many
that I haven't. Being a cafeteria operator for over 18 years (and living with my 44-inch waist line), food
really does interest me.
During my recliner time today I got to thinking about what makes a cafe a success story. And I find
that there is one common denominator-LSD!
If you could ask the McCarys, the Rollos, Ms. Joe and Ted, the Nicholses, and even the Nelsonses
at Navarre, I'm sure they would agree with me. LSD enabled us all to produce quality food at a good
price, and this made LSD important to you, because you benefitted from it. LSD made the difference
between profit or loss. Without it, you might have paid more and got less.,
LSD goes far beyond the sixties. We had to originate most of ours while food operators today just
pick up a catalogue and order theirs. They also have the convenience of sales people with it knocking
on their doors regularly. LSD is something that you as a customer don't even think about, but the busi-
ness owner has to have it on his mind constantly.
He could get a good "high" from it when he looked at his profit picture.
For Heaven's sake, what do you mean! It's as simple as Simon. LSD is really nothing more than
Labor Saving Devices. What in the world did you think I meant?

USE CAUTION WHEN GETTING AUTOMATED CALLS
Santa Rosa County Emergency Management officials are urging residents not to hang up on auto-
mated telephone calls, because the department is using such a system for notification of various emer-
gencies.
The County makes automated calls for communication about hazardous materials incidents, evac-
uation notices, and in searches for a missing senior or lost child.
Officials say all automatic calls issued would begin with the county identification.


,vineaypercunr or mu uwrnu

*5E - ~ .E L... .I....AL.


wnety percent or me ae7mn
occur In those ages 65 and older

Season for one of America's

most lethal killers on its way!


Influenza, also known as
'the flu, is a contagious disease
that is caused by influenza
viruses which infect the respira-
tory tract (nose, throat, and
lungs) in humans.,
The flu is different from a
cold, mainly because the symp-
toms and complications are
more severe. Influenza. usually
comes on suddenly and may
include these symptoms: fever,
headache, malaise (a feeling of
being ill and without energy that
can' be extreme), cough, sore
throat, nasal congestion, and
body aches. ',
Seasonal influenza . is
amongAmerica's most lethal
killers, according to the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC), because the
virus infects so many people-5
percent to 20 percent of the U.S.
population every year.
Most people .who get this
contagious respiratory illness
caused by the influenza virus
recover in a week or two without
complications. But each year,
more than 200,000 people have
complications severe enough to
send them to the hospital. And
another 36,000 die each year
from seasonal influenza.
Ninety percent of the deaths
occur 'in those ages 65 and
older, but the highest rates of
infection occur in children. And
healthy children younger than 2
years are as likely to land in the
hospital because of influenza as-
those over 65.


A lot of the illness and death
caused by the flu can be pre-
vented by a.yearly flue vaccine.
People in high-risk groups and
people who are in close contact
with those at high risk should
get a flu vaccine every year.
"Vaccination remains the
single most effective preventive
measure, available against
influenza, and can prevent many
illnesses and deaths," says
Jesse Goodman, M.D.,,director
of the Food - and Drug
Administration's Center for
Biologics Evaluation and
Research. Yet each year millions
of Americans choose to take a
chance and forgo influenza vac-
cinations.
Public health officials urge
those eligible for vaccination to
receive it and remind people
that although influenza vaccina-
tion begins in September or
October each year, vaccine con-
tinues to be available in
November, December, and later,
and immunization during those
months is still beneficial.
.For those who are healthy, a
different kind of vaccine, called
the nasal-spray flu vaccine
(sometimes referred to as LAIV
-for Live Attenuated Influenza
Vaccine), was approved in 2003.
The nasal-spray flu Vaccine con-
tains attenuated (weakened) live
viruses, and is administered by
a nasal sprayer.
It is approved .for use only
among healthy people between
the ages of 5 and 49 years. - ,, .


MANY HAPPY RETURNS-Mrs. Corrie Lockett, 92, (left) was the most senior member of the
society to attend the reunion. The food service Is the beneficiary of many of her most pro-
ductive years. She Is now enjoying retirement. Evelyn Mulkey, right, Is also a retired lunch-
room worker.

Senior Lunchroom Worker's Society

members share pride at first reunion

The Senior Lunchroom Worker's Society had its first annual reunion on July 23, 2006. The event
was held at the Benny Russell Center and was' attended by both old and new retirees with a sprin-
kling of current employees as well.
Cory Lockett, 92, was the oldest worker in attendance. She shared some of her experiences
with the group, including the task'of setting up the first lunchroom at Wallace School. Later in her
career, she moved to the old Milton High School lunchroom on Canal Street, and then to the pres-
ent Milton High School lunchroom on Stewart Street.
Mrs. Lockett retired with 32 years of service.
Imogene Reeder who retired in May of this year with 40 years of service has the most experi-
erice. In all there were 35 lunchroom workers in attendance, the longevity of which would indeed
be hard to measure if it were to be ratioed in terms of years in food service.
It was also of note that three past directors attended the reunion and reminiscenced with the
group about how food services have changed over the years. Members were also advised to keep
watch for the date and time of the next reunion.
Faye Weeks is to be commended for her work in bringing this feature to public attention.


Who should get vaccinated?

Vaccine is available to anyone who wants to reduce his or
her chances of getting influenza, with a few exceptions, but the
CDC strongly recommends it for the following groups of people:
> All children 6 months to 59 months of age--a new rec-
ommendation for this influenza season.
> Women who will be pregnant during the influenza sea-
son
> People ages 50 years and older.
o Children and teen-agers (ages 6 months to 18 years)
who must take aspirin regularly and therefore might be at risk for
developing Reye syndrome it they get influenza
o Adults and children ages 6 months and older with chron-
ic heart or ling conditions, including asthma
> Adulls and children who have required hospitalization or
regular doctor visits during the past year because of chronic
metabolic diseases, including diabetes. kidney disease, hemo-
globin abnormalities, or weakened immune system
> People with any condition thal makes it hard to breathe
or swallow, such as brain injury or disease, spinal cord injuries,
seizure disorders, or other nerve or muscle disorders.
P Residents of nursing homes and other facilities that pro-
vide care for people with chronic medical conditions.
Healthy household contacts and caregivers of children
up'to 5 years old and people at high risk for severe complica-
tions from influenza
, Health care workers
Since no influenza vaccine is approved for children younger
than 6 months of age, families should use a strategy known as
"cocooning," says william Schartner, M.D., professor and chair-
man of the Department of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt
University Scho'i of Medicine in Nasrivilie, Tenn.
"They should provide a cocoon, or zone of protection,
around that very vulnerable young child by vaccinating all the
other people in the family, including grandma and grandad who
come in for visits, and out-of-home caregivers."

Social Security services offered
The Pensacola Social Security office has announced that a rep-
resentative from that office will be available to assist and furnish .
information to clients the second Tuesday of each month at the .
Milton Community Center, 5629 Byron Street in Milton. The repre-.
sentative will be available to assist clients during the hours of 8 a.m.
to 9 a.m. on the designated day.
In addition to providing fact sheets nd pamphlets explaining the
agency's functions, representatives will assist with Social Security.,
card applications, scheduling appointments to file for benefits,
answering questions, helping with change of address or direct-,
deposit information, and other such miscellaneous matters.


Do you have the right protection for your needs?

FISHER-BROWN
INCORPORATED
-I


IT P623-3414
.4 IT PAYS 5318 Stewart Street, Milton


I


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,2006


Thp Ranta Rnsa Press Gazette






WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 27, 2006 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Over 100


www.srmc.fasthealth.com
SPONSORED IN PART BY


SANTA ROSA
MEDICAL CENTER


Physicians in
Pace, Iilton, Navarre
and Pensacola




icaiiSenidfan


Second to None!


New Social Security disability determining process

will shorten decision time, make payments earlier


Jo Anne Barnhart,
Commissioner of Social
Security, has issued a linal rule
establishing a new disability
determination process.
The new process, built upon
Social Security's electronic dis-
ability claims process, will shorlt-
en decision times and pay ben-
efits to people who are obvious-
ly disabled much earlier in the
process.
"The changes we are mak-
ing in the disability process will
greatly improve the quality of
service that Social Security pro-
vides to millions of disabled
,workers and their families,"
Commissioner B hanrt said.
'The new process uses 21st
century technology and creates
accountability at every step. It
reflects my goals of improving
the accuracy, consistency and
fairness of our" process and
ensuring that we make the right
decision as early in the process
as possible."
The new disability process
provides for:
A quick disability determina-
tion. process for those who are
obviously disabled. Favorable
decisions would be made in
such cases within 20 days after
the claim is received by the
state .disability determination
agency. ,
* A new Medical-Vocational


By the

Numbers...

Here's some interesting facts
about those pointss " you pay
Son a home mortgage

EDWARD M. ROUSE, CPA
edward@timwheatcpa.com


Expert System (MVES) to
enhance the expertise needed
to make accurate and timely
decisions. The MVES will be
composed ot a Medical-
Vocational Expert Unit and a
national network of medical.
psychological and vocational
experts who meet qualification
standards established by the
Commissioner.
* A new position - the Federal
Reviewing Official - that will
review state agency determina-
tions upon the request of the
claimant. This will eliminate the
reconsideration step of the cur-
rent appeals process.
* Retention of the right to
request a de novo hearing and
decision from an Administrative,
Law Judge if the claimant' dis-
agrees with the decision of the
Federal Reviewing Official.
' Closing the record after the
Administrative Law Judge
issues a decision, with provision
for certain good cause excep-
tions to this rule..
* A new body - the Decision
Review Board - to review and
correct decisional errors and
ensure consistent adjudication
at all levels of the disability
determination process. The cur-
. rent Appeals Council will be
phasedout .gradually. Social
Security plans to phase in bthe
new process on' a region-by-


Edward Rouse


There are a lot of advertisements about refinancing your home.
Refinance now! Rates have never been lower! Captain how should
the payments incident to refinance, be handled? Good question
Scooter. Code Section 163 permits a deduction for qualified resi-
dence interest. While many people think of home mortgage interest
as being deductible, the definition of qualified residence interest
(QRI) is a bit more complicated. SURPRISE!
QRI is split into two separate elements. The first is acquisition
debt. Interest on acquisition debt is deductible on indebtedness up
to $1,000,000 for a primary and secondary residence. The total debt
cannot exceed $1,000,000. Acquisition debt is debt incurred to
acquire, construct, or substantially improve a primary or a second-
ary residence. The second part of QRI is home equity debt. Home
equity debt is debt that is not acquisition debt. However, the limit on
home equity debt is $100,000. In other words, you cannot deduct
interest on debt exceeding $1,100,000 total for a primary and sec-
ondary residence.
OK Boss but what about those pesky points I paid? When you
refinance existing debt, you frequently will pay points. Points are
pre-paid interest and are deductible on acquisition debt. However, if
the refinance is merely to reduce your interest rate or change the
terms of the loan, the points are not deductible in the year paid, but
rather are deductible over the life of the loan.
Alright I know you want me to tell you about the exceptions to
this rule after all everybody has to make a living some how. A court
case, Huntsman, 90-2 USTC from the Eighth Circuit finds that points
paid to refinance a home mortgage loan were deductible in the year
paid under a very specific set of facts.
In January 1981, the Huntsman's financed the purchase of their
principal residence by obtaining a three-year loan with' a "balloon"
payment secured by a mortgage on their home. In 1982, they
obtained a home improvement loan and secured it with a second
mortgage on their home. In 1983, the Huntsman's obtained a per-
manent mortgage on their home and paid off the prior loans with the
proceeds. They also paid $4,440 in points, which they deducted on
their 1983 income tax return under section 461 (g)(2) which allows
the immediate deduction of points paid in connection with the pur-
chase of a taxpayer's principal residence. In 1986, the IRS sent the
Huntsman's a notice, disallowing the deduction on the grounds that
section 461(g)(2) does not apply to points paid for refinancing a
home, but only to points paid during the financing of the initial pur-
chase.
Scooter, thank God for the courts. The court held for the tax-
payer, that the points paid in this case were part of acquisition debt.
In the written decision the court states, "That refinancing of existing
indebtedness is generally used to lower interest rates or to achieve
some other financial goal not connected "directly" with home owner-
ship. But the weakness of the government's case is that they con-
cede that the Huntsman's did not do that here. Acquiring the per-
manent mortgage was done to extinguish the short-term loans and
finalize the purchase of the home. We conclude that obtaining the
short-term financing was merely an integrated step in securing the
permanent financing to purchase the home."
Wahoo! Mark up a win for the taxpayers and remember points
on a refinance typically will be spread out over the life of the loan
however; there are exceptions to every rule.
(This artAcle Is for general Information purposes only, and is not Intended to
provide professional tax advice. To deMerne how this or any other tax Informa-
tion may apply to your speolc tax situation, contat your tax professional for
more details and counsel.)


region basis beginning with the
Boston Region this summer.
The Boston Region is com-
prised of the states of
Connecticut. Maine,
Massachusetts. New
Hampshire, Rhode Island and
Vermont.
The new disability process
is the result of a collaborative
effort that began during a dis-
cussion Commissioner
Barnhart had with President
Bush early in her term. On
September 25, 2003.
Commissioner Barnnart pre-
sented Congress with an
approach to improving the dis-
ability process. Since then,
-Commissioner Barnharl and
Agency staff conducted hun-
dreds of meetings with interest-
ed groups and individuals.
Social Security also care-
fully considered nearly 900 sug-
gestions received during a 90-
day public comment period that,
followed publication of a pro-
posed regulation to improve the
disability process on July 27,
2005.
"The comments we
received during our. extensive
outreach effort and in response
to our proposed rule were
extremely helpful and deeply
appreciated," ' said
Commissioner Barnhart.
"I was very impressed with
.the professionalism, time and
effort that the interested parties,
put into their suggestions. I
believe we have improved the
final rule as a result."


The preamble to the final


rule explains the changes that
were made to the proposed
regulation as a result of the
comments the Agency
received. To ensure that discus-
sions and improved under-
standing continue even after
implementation of the linal rule,
the preamble also notes that
Social Security plans to contin-
ue to meet with interested par-
lies as the new process is rolled
out.


In conjunction with the
changes in the disability deter-
mination process, Social
Security is conducting several
demonstration projects aimed
at helping people with disabili-
ties who are interested in work-
ing.
These projects support the
President's New Freedom
Initiative and provide for work
incentives and opportunities
earlier in the process. In these
demonstrations, the Agency will
test providing cash supports,
various forms of medical bene-
fits, and employment supports
such as transportation assis-
tance.
Social Security will look at
how making these available will
help people with disabilities
successfully work.
"From the beginning, I have
been committed to developing a
disability determination process
that provides the level of serv-
ice the American people expect
and deserve'," Commissioner
Barnhart said.
"I am confident that this rule
will do just that."


Belle ye it or not!


Government suspends Federal excise
taxes on long distance phone service
The Internal Revenue Service has announced that it will stop
collecting the federal excise tax on long-distance telephone service.
The tax on telephone services was first imposed in 1898. The
current rate is, 3% of the charges billed for these services. The IRS
announcement follows decisions in five federal appeals, courts hold-
ing that the tax does not apply to long-distance service as it is billed
today.
Taxpayers will be eligible to file for refunds of all excise tax they
have paid on long-distance service billed to them after .Feb. 28,
2003. Interest will be paid on these refunds.
Taxpayers will claim this refund on their 2006 tax returns. In
order to minimize burden, the IRS expects to announcesoon a sim-
plified method that individuals may use.
"So taxpayers won't have to spend time digging through old tele-
phone bills, we're designing a straightforward process that taxpay-
ers may use when they file their tax returns next year," said IRS
Commissioner Mark W. Everson. "Claiming a refund will be simple
and fair."
The IRS announcement does not affect the federal excise tax on
local telephone service, which remains in effect. Likewise, various
state and local taxes and fees paid by telephone customers are also
unaffected.
More information can be found in IRS Notice 2006-50. It was
also published in Internal Revenue Bulletin 2006-25, dated June,
19, 2006.
Citizens are tending to "wallow" in the luxury of this undertaking,
since it is seldom if ever that such an occasion arises. Few of any
PRIME readers consulted can remember when a tax was ever sus-
pended before!

Our Family Serving Yours

for Seventy-Seven Years!


Zew4 antera /ome

Pre NeedC Services * Vaults * Monuments
'Two Locations to Serve Our Growing County"


6405 Hwy. 90 West
Milton, FL
L 623-2243


7794 Navarre Pkwy.1
Navarre, FL
939-5122 /


I'


HAPPY BIRTHDAYS, FRIENDSI-lf you've not had the
privilege of meeting Sanford and Roberta Perry, you've
missed a wonderful experience. They are the .kind of
neighbors most neighbors would like to have, kind, car-
Ing, and helpful. Today they are enjoying a 39 year asso-
clation with a community where they've lived, raised a
family, and retired. Married In 1949, the Perryes will be
celebrating their 57th Wedding Anniversary next year. On
September 20, 2006 Roberta had a birthday, and we want
her to know that we wish her the best. Sanford is having
one on October 21st. We want to wish him the best of
everything as well.

.2006 Santa Rosa County

Disaster Guide still available
Santa Rosa County citizens and residents should be aware that
copies of the county's 2006 Disaster Guide made available by Santa
Rosa County's Division of Emergency Management is still available.
With more than two months of hurricane season left, the threat
of a storm is as real as tomorrow, and weather officials stress that
no one should let his or her guard down against such a possibility.
The Disaster Guide is a comprehensive evaluation of a number
of disaster possibilities, and gives specific information on'-how citi-
zens should react to them. It not only deals extensively with torna-
dos, wildfires, severe thunderstorms, hazardous materials, and the,
like, but it also presents a section on terrorism and weapons of mass
destruction. It also has a great hurricane tracking map.
Do yourself, a favor and pick one up. They are strategically
placed all over the county. You can get one at the Press Gazette.








ATERNATIWE













FOOD STORE






"Where educated natural

health choices are made"




Deanna Gilmore: Manager

Theresa Stearly: Herbal Specialist


Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D.
Natural Health Counselor


Email address: GWYHILL@aol.com



5533 Hwy. 90 Pea Ridge

994-3606

Mon.-Fri.: 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.,

Sat.: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.


The Santa Rosa Press 6azette


NATEDNESDAY, SEPTEN IBER 27, 2006







rage "o
rV1BD AThSaoPsGeWds Spm 2,2 006
-* --- ------- - ---- ~-----------~


A


"It's a Blessing" food program open to everyone


Welcome to "'l's a Blesiang
food, affiliate of Angel Food
Ministries and a program of the
Pensacola United Methodist
Community Ministries. This
food program is open to
EVERYONE at a cost of only
$25 per unit. To sign up, please
call 623-6683 at Milton 1st
United Methodist, 6830
Berryhill Road. Date and time:
September 27 from 5:30 to


6 30 pmn or September 28 &
29 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Pay and pick up at this location
on October 21 between 8:30
and 9:00 a.m.
There is no limit to the numi-
ber of units at $25 each that
you may purchase. Each unit
entitles the individual to pur-.
chase a "special box" with con-
tents and prices subject to
change each month.


The Hendersons to perform


The Hendersons will be,
appearing at . Cobbtown'
Holiness Church in Cobbtown,
FL, south of Jay on Saturday,
September' 30, 2006 at. 6:00
p.m. Everyone is welcome to
this special. concert by The
Hendersons. For further infor-
mation please contact 850-675-
6715.
The Hendersons is a gospel
singing minister that has trav-
eled extensively for 17 years


singing primarily~ southern
gospel music, and make their
home in Milton, FL. They have
seven recorded projects, of
which CD's or cassettes are
available. They al] a-. \ bring to
the stage great harmony in pre-
senting the gospel in song in a
way that you will enjoy being
in concert with then and be
blessed.
SEveryone is 'Aelcome to
attend this concert.


Menu for October. 2006 is.
� (10) 4-oz. Beef and Bean
Burritos, 4 #IQF chicken
thighs, 1.5# pork roast, 3#
chicken tenders, 1# fully
cooked meatballs, 28 oz. pasta
sauce, 16 oz. pasta, #2 onions,
11 oz. breakfast cereal, 1
dessert item, 7.8 oz Lasagna
dinner, 16 oz, Rice, 2 # pota-
toes, 7.5 oz. Pancake mix, 1
dozen eggs, 1#16 bean soup


mi\. 2# chicken breast files.
Special #1 - ($18.00) (4) 8
oz. T-Bone steaks and 2 #'s
breaded shrimp..
Special #2 - ($18.00) 10 #
Box corn dogs (60 ct.)
Special #3 - ($18.00) 4.5 #
Chicken Cordon Bleu.
October 21st is the pick up
date. Must have your receipt in
order to'. pick up units - No
* receipt/ No unit.


Attention Churches!!
Have a special event corning up that you would d like to announce
to the community 'V Articles are free: there is no charge for plac-
ing them on the Komerstone page. Submissions must be in no
later than Fnday at 3 p.m. pre\ ious to the Wednesday edition.
You can drop them by at the office located at 662c Elva Street:
fax it to us at i850) 623-2007. or email church@C'sr-pg.com.


It's a New Season,
It's a New Day"

. Pastor Steve . and ,Sandra
Zepp % ouid like to invite ou
to Ne%% Hope Assembls of
God Church in Chumuckla.
Florida. Pastor Steve is
Senior Pastor at New Hope
and excited about-'what the
Lord is doing and going to do 4'.
at New Hope Assembl% If
you're looking for a church
where you will be welcomed
and a place where you can be -
used in many different min-
istries of the church, then 3 ou
have a place at New Hope waiting for you.
SERVICE TIMES:I
Sunday morning-Sundayi School at 10:00
Sunday Morning Worship at 11:00
Sunday Evening Service at 6:00
Wednesday Service at 7:00
Youth Service Wednesday at 7:00
"Youth Blast" held 1st Friday night each month


Flu Shot $30 ~ Pneumonia Shot $40 i
No Co-Pay for Medicare Part B Recipients.
Cash and Checks Accepted
SNo co-pa', ior qualified Medicare Part B recipients It.'ithoul anr HMO
* Medicare HT.10 pariciprits are considered selp-pay recipients
* Most shot costs can be submitted to your healtncare company for reimbursement
* All vaccinations administered by licensed healthcare professionals


SANN EICAL
PERSOAL


857-7797Iv7�j
6400 N. Davis Hwy Ste. 5
Pensacola, FL 32504


Affordable Home Care Services

S, (NAs/HHfis('ompanion Sitters * 24 hrs/day - 7 davs/week
S, Licensed/Bonded/Insured'
^G . n TBathing * Grooming * Feeding
NANNI S Meal Preparation * Running Errands
Transportation to the Dr.'s Appts.

Hiring Certified Nursing Assistants 995-0599
Serving Santa Rosa and Escambia Counties Quality Home Health Care Since 1990 Lic#NR30211252




V MILTON

FAMILY

M iVIEDICAL
west Frida
PRItJ.R CEN-TER
6072 Doctors Park, Milton
981-9340
H.M. Meredith, II, M.D.
Our facility provides a full range of services for children and adults to meet most of your health care needs.
In addition, we offer Basic X-Ray and Laboratory Testing.
Our office operates by appointment. Appointments are always held open for same day urgent problems.
We are accepting new patients. We would be honored if you considered us for your medical care.
This medical facility is equipped and staffed to care for you and your family needs.


Warm... Caring... Experienced

Foard Certified Pediatrician

- Member of the American Academy of Pediatrics ' ---,.
* Serving oth Sacred Heart Children's Hospital
/i and Santa Rosa Medical Center
-* Most Insurance Accepted
S\ Now Accepting New Patients
FKEE To schedule an appointment please call Luis A. Ghiglino, M.D.
Preiatai aF.A.A.P.
5962 Berryhill Road * Milton
www.santarosapediatrics.coma


your


For more information on placing your advertisement on
this page, call Retail Advertising at 623-2120



ALTERNATIVE HEALTH


FOOD STORE
thereee educated iiatural health choices are made."
Theresa Stearly, H.erbal Specialist * Deanna Gilmore, Manager
Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D, Natural Health Counselor
E-Mail address: GWYHILL @ AOL.com
5533 Hwy. 90 Pea Ridge * 994-3606 !
Mon.-Fri.z 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Sat.: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.-


-~~1


'F
ov--kt


"The people you KNOW and TRUST with your prescriptions."


Park M Avenue

PHARMACY, Inc.



623-2222

5440 Dogwood Drive * Milton, FL 32570
(Winn Dixie Shopping Center)


' THE HEARING DOCTOR


Sabrina Kaestle Peterman
Au.D.,BC-ABA
A"'


* Free Hearing Test
* 100% Digital Programmable Hearing Aids
* Sales, Service and Repairs on all makes & models
All Insurance, Including Medicaid, HMO, OWCP,
WellCare &TriCare
* Assistive Listening Devices
* Free Amplified Telephone Cert.
-Trial Plan


Bcrryhill Medical Plaza
5937 Berryhill Rd
(inside Dr. Veriiali's Office)


Kornerstone


I


Ask the Preacher
... 3 1 ' A/ilc , lu n' :ririi eril., i Our /quei
S.:':. t '(ione iith Bibical anst\er-' about lite.

Dear Pastor Gallups, " The other day I was witnessing to two
teenagers, they asked the question, "if there is a God, why would He
let so many people die?" How would you reply to this question?"
J.W., Graceville, Florida

Dear J.W.,
I have been asked this question at many times and in many dif-
ferent ways. It is an age-old question. Recently, it is usually asked
in connection with the 9-11 attack or the war in Iraq or the hurri-
caine.s sunamis and earthquakes that we experience around the
world.
The answer is very coincreie. Hoie'%er. it depends upon one's
perspective ot life. If one believes that there is no God or that God
is somehow mean and uncaring or unable to do anything about these
tragedies, then that person will be frustrated and confused, to be
sure. But, if one understands 'that the Word of God gives us the
answer and the perspective and if we would, by faith, accept that
answer then our perspective becomes like God's perspective and we
worship and serve Him inspite of worldwide or personal disasters.
The Bible makes it clear that'THIS life is NOT a pleasure par-
adise. It is a fallen creation. It is filled with war, crime, natural dis-
aster, death, destruction, deciet, lies, filth and heartache.
Most of the calamity we bring on ourselves DIRECTLY
because of our own personal choices against God's Word. Other
calarrmities. however, like sunamis, earthquakes, floods, etc., are an
indirect result of man's collective sin nature, and a fallen creation,
which h becan at the Garden of Eden
The Bible s.as that the purpose of this life is a feeding g out"
or a -boot camp'" for hu rnanity. Will you serve, lIoe and w orship the
Lord Jesus Christ inspite of and e\en in Ihe midst of pain, suffer-
ing and evil or will you reject Him and serve yourself and the lies
of this A orld' That is the question of the ages and how you answer
it and. live it - determines your eternity.
Armed with this Biblical perspective, a Christian can live, a vic-
torious and fruitful life inspite of the world's calamities, either per-
sonal or collective. I hope this helps you answer the questions of
those to whom you witness.


Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church. in Milton.
H, lii ,, B, 1d. :., ;S.. ,i .-. ,_ Ja m c, ' F..,,, .. i.,, i-., _ l_> mi 'p,,Ihri ,aAi i \ tlr
' iw* oowii ii."tI Th, .\ Oi ic BA,:,I, 0'/' ,'",,S I Sip i So*. i iti(H ,,c I /o t'Kic,
f,, t.., *I H H BC ,,,, 1'.', H s ..,', a . .; Ii.',ir, h:, h.il ".,iiii E ,'na iii r
'Ia 5,. ,,i 1 B.ipi,.t C,. '!,,,' ,i ,_I, , 1 , WiL'ki v o , ,i'hl, oin ..*t, the U.S. and
i-,,k.h/ F,. .-',,,l . ,, ,."i'-ri " , i. -,i HHBSC anll 3- .595',<,, ,i nit our website
S... .. h 'i i.:, ,,,..: 'al irt .i If ', ". i ave any questions for Ask The
P .i ,i/., s ', bn , 1 _'- Ti,. Pr a.ila' Hi-.", \'HammockBaptist Church, 8351
H, A..- r Ho.' ... Rood Ilt-ii, Florida 32583-paid advertisement


"...see that ye love one another with
-a pure heart fervently:"
-1 Peter 1:22


Singing and a Supper
Full Gospel Community Church of Dixonville is holding a
Singing and a Supper Saturday, September 30 at 5:00 p.m.
Grilled and BBQ chicken, potato salad, baked beans, bread,
salad and dessert will be served.. Donations only.
Anyone interested in singing or for more information please
contact Bill & Tonya Thompson at 850-675-3886, Wanda Day
at 251-867-2847 or Tonya McNew at 251-809-0377.
All proceeds will go toward the Church Building Fund.


re 's to


alth


Wednesday September 27 , 2006


I I I


626-HEAR
�4327)


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


DPna A R







Wednesday September 27, 2006 I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Page 5-B



THE CHILD MOLESTERS IN OUR MIDST
(Caution: The following may be offensive to some readers)

"Dear God, it can't be true!" The woman prayed as she examined the disposable diaper. Her grandson, C, had worn the diaper home from the day care center. The blonde,
blue-eyed toddler attended the well-respected childcare center since infancy. The diaper was dry in front, but damp and clumpy in back - not the appropriate spot for wet-
ness in a diaper worn by a male. The diaper had absorbed a fluid that did not look or smell like urine or feces. The appearance was more like semen or a lubricant. She
examined the child's bottom. A little too pink, perhaps, but no bruises, tears, or blood.
The grandmother did not attempt to question C, whose vocabulary was limited to only a few words. Instead, she phoned his mother, a single parent. "Mom, there are no
'men working at the childcare center. It cannot be semen. Stop imagining things!" C's mother said dismissively. Neither the mother nor the grandmother chose to believe
the evidence. It was impossible to them that such a thing could happen in one of the town's premier childcare centers.
: Whether male or female, sexual predators look like, average citizens. They marry, have children, attend church, and work steadily. They come in all ages, all races,
all intelligence levels, all professions. and BOTH sexes. They volunteer or work where they can gain access to your children. They become scout leaders, coach-
; es, or teachers. Their victims range from infants to teenagers. They behave like any other friendly neighbor, and they often seem to.have great rapport with chil-
dren.
' In the book, Nursery Crimes: Sexual Abuse in Day Care (1988, Sage Publications, Newbury Park, CA), authors David Finkelhor, Linda Williams and Nanci Burns
, studied documented sexual abuse at 270 childcare centers throughout the United States. They discovered that 30% of abusers or co-abusers were child-care pro-
fessionals; 15% were non-professional aides or volunteers; 16% were owners or directors; 14% were non-child care staff (janitors, secretaries); and 25% were
family members of childcare center employees or owners. In only 16 of 270 cases studied were children abused by perpetrators who were completely outside of
the childcare center operation.
There was no logical explanation for the diaper's appearance. but no obvious suspect. There were men who worked in the church adjacent to the center, but the grandmoth-
. er never saw them around the children. The employees' husbands and boyfriends were frequently at the center, but they seemed to,be accompanied by the employees. It
never occurred to C's family that a female would harm him, or that she would allow anyone else to. The grandmother refused to belieX e her fears.
In 37% of the cases studied in the book, Nursery Crimes, children disclosed the abuse, primarily to family members. In 67% of the remaining cases, an adult (usu-
ally a relative) noticedsuspicious behavior or symptoms that caused them to report the abuse. In 11 % of the cases studied. the child's initial report was discount-
ed by either the parent or by the authorities. Parents discounted reports or indications of abuse because they were in denial; they lacked confidence in their own
judgment, they handled their suspicions by quietly removing their child from the center: or they made an informal complaint to the childcare center itself. In
some instances the childcare operators adamantly denied the abuse and then tried various schemes to intimidate or dissuade the parents from reporting it to
authorities.
. Almost a year passed, and the,diaper %\ as forgotten. Other signs appeared. but were ignored b\ C's family. For months C had multiple inflamed nicks on all ten of his cuti-
cles, but the child could not or would not explain these recurring injuries. C graduated to a new classroom, with a new teacher. He began to protest when his mother left
him. Day after day, he stood at the window, screamed, cried, and banged on the glass as his mother left. The staff assured C's mother that all toddlers experience separa-
tion anxiety, and it would pass in time. There was a brunette and a red-headed boy in C's class that seemed to be having the same degree of emotional upset, so C's moth-
er thought the three boys' behavior must be normal.
It was \ ith sad resignation that C went to school each day, although he pleaded not to go. About three times per week, C's mother got phone calls from the childcare cen-
ter, advising that C was removed from his classroom for disobedience. C's mother scolded C on the phone while C cried and be ged to go home. When C's mother threat-
ened to come to the center and spank the child, C begged her to come and spank him. Spank him! C's mother did not connect this odd request to the diaper. None of C's
family checked on C during the day, on the advice of the director, who suggested it would only increase C's emotional upset.
Researchers in the book, Nursery Crimes, listed the bathroom as the most common site for sexual abuse to occur in a childcare center, although offices, closets.
and common activity areas were used, in addition to sites outside of the facility. The location as well as the timing of the abuse was most often determined by the
need for secrecy. The abusers customarily sought a time when staffing was low. Naptime %was the primary time for abuse in the cases studied, but it also occurred
at other times of the day, when most of the staff and children were engaged in outdoor play or other activities where the absence of one child might go unnoticed.
C came home with small bruises and cuts. Once the pide of his face was clawed, another time it was, his thigh. He always blamed the injuries on other children who attend-
ed the center. C would not talk about how he spent his days. He became interested in knives and blades of all kinds. He was increasingly angry with his mother. He bit a
couple of his teachers and pulled their hair, but he was never violent toward his peers. It was very difficult to get him to sleep, and he often had nightmares. He did not
make progress in potty-training, as would have been expected of a three and a half year old. He came home from school -with soiled pants about three times per week, but
he had fewer "accidents" at home on weekends or school breaks. Once he came home with a tear in a new pair of underwear. C made unusual comments, like threatening
to put cold water in a relative's ear. C's mother decided it was time to see a therapist.
The Nursery Crimes researchers found that in 31% of the cases studied, physical force was used on the children to gain their compliance in sexual activity. In
42% of the cases, threat of force was used, to include threats with, weapons, threatened harm to the child's family, or to pets. Children were drugged in 13% of
the cases studied. Force was not used in all cases: the perpetrators sometimes made games out of the sexual activity, rewarded participation, and presented sex
acts as a routine part of toileting or education. In one documented case, the perpetrators pretended to call the child's parent in the child's presence, and "got per-
mission" from the parent to abuse the child. Children were threatened with death and other violence to themselves or their families if they disclosed the abuse.

C attended a couple of counseling sessions before he told his grandmother about the sexual abuse. He was three and a half years old. In an emotionless, detached voice ,he
described the sodomy with details no pre-schooler should know. He identified his abusers, and named several other victims. Agency professionals, whose jobs were to pro-
tect crime victims, directed C's family not to discuss the matter with anyone, to include other parents whose children C identified as victims. C's physical examination
failed to provide any corroborating evidence. C would not cooperate in subsequent interviews with authorities. Authorities never told C's family whether the parents of the
other victims were informed of the specific allegations, and whether those victims were examined or interviewed. To date, no arrest has been made.
The National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services published a brochure called Child
Sexual Abuse Prevention: Tips to Parents. That document stated the following may indicate sexual abuse:
* Extreme changes in behavior, such as loss of appetite.
* Recurrent nightmares, disturbed sleep patterns, or fear of the dark.
* Regression to more infantile behavior such as bedwetting, thumb sucking, or excessive crying.
* Torn or stained underclothing.
* Vaginal or rectal bleeding, pain, itching, swollen genitals, and vaginal discharge.
* Unusual interest in or knowledge of sexual matters, expressing affection in ways inappropriate for a child of that age.
* Fear of a person or intense dislike at being left somewhere or with someone.
* Other behavior signals such as aggressive or disruptive behavior, withdrawal, running away or delinquent behavior, failing in school.
Beverly James and Maria Nasjleti, in their book, Treating Sexually Abused Children and Their Families (1983, Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc., Palo Alto,
CA.) included the following in their list of indicators of sexual abuse:
* Bruises or hickeys in the face or neck area or around the groin, buttocks, and inner thighs.
* Fear of bathrooms and showers.
* Combination of violence and sexuality in artwork, written schoolwork, language, and play.
.* Self-mutilation, excessive masturbation,
* Extreme fear or repulsion when touched by an adult of either sex.
* Anxiety, withdrawal, guilt, somatic complaints, hyperactivity, difficulty separating, impaired trust, lying, phobias, and conversion hysteria were
some of the pre-school-age behavioral indicators identified by Gomes-Schwartz, Horowitz, and Cardarelli in their book, Child Sexual
Abuse - The Initial Effects ( 1990, Sage Publications, Newbury Park, CA.)
This is a plea to all parents whose children attend or attended local childcare centers, and to all current and past employees of those centers: If you harbored the slightest
suspicion that something was amiss, now is the time to share that suspicion with appropriate authorities. The number for the abuse registry is 1-800-962-2873. Document


your concerns in writing, and forward them to Florida Department of Children and Families, 1317 Winewood Blvd., Tallahassee, FL, 32933.
C's family asks that if you have a child in daycare, drop by unexpectedly, and often. Get to know your child's classmates, and their parents. Count heads: if a class mate
is absent when you drop by, find out why, and confirm the center's story with the child's parents. Insist that all daycare center volunteers and support staff receive the same
background investigation as the teachers. Question the presence of visitors at the center, even relatives of the employees. Know your child's schedule, and the working
hours of the persons who care for him. Question your child about his daily activities, and the activities of his classmates. Explain to your toddlers that their bodies belong
to them alone and that they have the right to say no to anyone who might try to touch them. Explain what is and is not appropriate assistance in diaper changing and potty
training. Tell your toddler that no adult should ask them to keep secrets from you. Instruct your child to tell you if they are threatened, or if they feel uncomfortable with
any adult. Trust your instincts. Believe your child. Immediately report any suspicious behavior to the abuse hotline. Remember that taking action is critical because if noth-
ing is done, other children will continue to be at risk.
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I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday September 27, 2006


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Obituaries


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Blackman,
Carl Dean Sr.
1937-2006
Carl Dean Blackman, Sr.,
age 69, of Navarre, FL, died
Thursday, September 21, 2006
at his home. Mr. Blackman was
a life long resident of
Northwest Florida, and was of
the Protestant faith. Mr.
Blackman was a veteran of the
U.S. Navy where he drove
Higgins boats and did troop
Transports. He was employed at
Hurlbert Field from f973-1996.
Mr. Blackman is survived
by: his wife of 42 years-Mary
Ellen Blackman, one son-Carl
Dean (Star) Blackman, Jr., one
daughter-Marsha (Phillip)
Lippincott, one brother-Larry
(Diane) Blackman, Two sis-
ters-Kathy (Hal) Parsons and
Pat (Tony) Wingate, six grand-
children and a huge extended
family..
t Services were held Tuesday,
September 26, 2006 at Lewis
Funeral Home, Navarre Chapel
with Rev. Carl Gallops, Rev,
Greg Robards, Rev. Jack
Goldfarb, and Rev. Jimmy
Reinhart officiating. Burial was
in Whitmire 'Cemetery in


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In lieu of flowers, contribu-
tions may be made to:
Children's Ministries of
Hickory Hammock Baptist
Church, 8351 Hickory
Hammock Road, Milton, FL
32583.

Sanders, Robert
Edward "Bob"
1948-2006
Robert Edward "Bob"
Sanders, age 58, of Milton,
died Saturday, September 23,
2006 in a local hospital. Bob
was born June 24, 1948, in
Horse Cave, Kentucky. He left
Horse Cave, KY, for a twenty
year U.S. Naval career. He
retired in Milton in 1990. He is
a member of. Hopewell
Primitive Baptist Church.
Bob is survived by his wife,
Garia Manning Sanders, of
Milton; son, Chris (Heather)
Sanders, of Mobile, AL; daugh-
ter, Kim (Larry) Culpepper, of
Milton: grandson, Carson
Culpepper, of Milton, and his
sister, Margaret (Maxie)'
Hatcher, of Cave City,; KY..
Funeral services for Mr.
Sanders will be 10 AM,


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Wednesday, September 27,
2006, at Hopewell Primitive
Baptist Church with Rev. Bill
Stewart and Rev. Greg Smith
officiating. Burial will follow
in Hopewell Primitive Baptist
Cemetery with Lewis Funeral
Home directing.
Lewis Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.

Watkins, Tommie
1917-2006
Tommie Watkins, 89, of
Milton passed away on Friday,
September 22, 2006 in a local
nursing facility. Mr. Watkins
was a native and lifelong resi-
dent of Milton. He was bom on
September. 16, 1917 to Neal
Watkins and Fannie Adams
Watkins. He was a United
States Disabled Army Veteran
of World War II, and was in the
101st Airborne. He was a mem-
ber of. the Maargaret Street
Church of Christ Church. .
Mr. Watkins was preceded
in death by his wife of 53 years,
Betty Watkins, a brother
Delbert A. Watkins,.. and an
infant sister Pearie Watkins.
Mr. Watkins is survived by
his son, Tommie Watkins, Jr. of
Milton, and two nieces and a
nephew.
Funeral services for Mr.
Watkins were held at 2 pm on
Tuesday, September 26, 2006'
at the Lewis Funeral Home in
Milton with Minister David
Myers, and Elders Hubert
Smith and Wayne Blocker offi-
ciating. Burial followed in the'
Crain Cemetery with Lewis
Funeral Home directing.

McDaniel, Wilma
1914-2006
Wilma McDaniel, age 92,
stood before our' Lord and
Savior and was lovingly
embraced in His arms this
Sunday morning, September
17,2006. ,
With unconditional love,
support, and guidance, Wilma
devoted her life to the Lord and
family. She was and will, con-
tinue to be a role -model to the
many lives who were changed
and touched by her.
Wilma McDaniel was in
love with the same man from
the early age of 5 years old.
Phil and Wilma were playmates
as children and became devot-
ed partners at the young-age of
19 during the Great
Depression, proving that love,


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concurs all, even the Great
Depression.
Our loving mom was a pio- -:
neer for all women who dream
for the excitement and freedom
that riding a motorcycle gives.
She was one of a handful of "
women in the entire country
who dared to take the controls.
She loved the wonderful feel-
ing of the wind, and the beauty
of this wonderful country that 2
can truly be seen while travel-
ing on her own 1941 Indian
Chief motorcycle. She contin-
ued to feel this freedom
through the age of 78.
Although her walk with us
has ended and we shed our
tears of sorrow, we cannot help
but shed tears of joy as she
begins her long awaited heav-
enly walk with the Lord.
You will be loved and -
. remembered every day of our ,;
lives.
Wilma is preceded in death
by her father, Perry 0.
Wagoner; mother, Lillian
Hardy Wagoner; and sister,
Mildred Wagoner Sherburne.
Wilma is survived by her.
.loving, faithful husband. of 73
years, Philip McDaniel; son,
Joseph McDaniel; daughter,
'Ruth McDaniel; twin daugfi-
ters, Evelyn Langmaid and -
Elaine McCabe and husband
Roger, McCabe; grandsons, .
Chris -Langmaid and wife '
Carly, David Hall and wife
Teresa, and Danny Hall; great -.
grandsons, Lance Langmaid
and Logan. Langmaid and
many nieces and nephews.
A memorial service for the
family and friends was held at
Pine Terrace Baptist Church in
Milton on Thursday, .-
September 21, 2006. A family
burial was held at the .
Barrancas National Cemetery
on Tuesday, September-19, .
2006.
In lieu of flowers, coritribu-
tions can be made to the
Gideon International.
Jay Funeral Home is in .-
charge of arrangements.


Fo xcuie nie deals sh . - 0:opa. lcm -0 -ate


rayu


I- I










I The Santa Rosa Press G e


Wvednesday ouptember 27, 2006


Legal Notices


PROPOSED CONSTITU-
TIONAL AMENDMENTS
TO BE VOTED ON NOVEM-
BER 7.200QQ
NOTICE OF ELECTION

I, Sue M. Cobb, Secretary
of State of the State of Florida,
do hereby give notice that an
election will be 'held in each
county in Florida, on
November 7, 2006, for the rat-
ification or rejection of pro-
posed constitutional amend-
ments of the State of Florida.

NO.1
CONSTITUTIONAL AMEND-
MENT
ARTICLE III, SECTION 19
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
STATE PLANNING AND BUD-
GET PROCESS

Ballot Summary:
Proposing amendments to the
State Constitution to limit the
amount of nonrecurring gener-
al revenue which may be
appropriated for recurring pur-
poses In any fiscal year to 3
percent of the total general
revenue funds estimated to be
available, unless otherwise
approved'by a three-fifths vote
of the Legislature; to establish
a Joint LegislatIve Budget
Commission, which shall Issue
long-range financial outlooks;
to provide for limited adjust-
ments In the state budget with-
out the concurrence of the full
Legislature, as provided by
general law; to reduce the
number of times 'trust funds
are auiormaticall terminated
i.:. require me preparaior.u ean
S lennial ra.'iiuor, of a long.
range, state planning docu-
ment; and to establish .a
Government Efficiency Task
Force ana specify/ ita duties

Full Text:
ARTICLE III .
LEGISLATURE

SECTION 19, State
Budgeting,..Planning and
Appropriations Processes,-
(a) ANNUAL BUDGETING,.
'M1 1 EffS 08s':-Q', 1,001,
General law shall prescribe
the adoption of annual state
budgetary and planning
processes and require that
detail reflecting the annualized
costs of the state budget and
reflecting 'the nonrecurring
costs of the budget requests
shall accompany state depart-
ment and agency legislative.
budget requests,'the gover-
nor's recommended budget,
ar, ,appfdpranoiir.n Uills
i, Unlei':; aopr-:.e. . a '
ireA-lilhri:r +*,,ce ,A train mere- '
,r'nnr, .:. e.- ar.r, :u-.' . arrr-.-
.r. yniorln mra t ..A r t r.ogrnr.
aup..:. irc l rr. n nre.:uti-.-I
gin rar l r-., nue lurid i'.-.r any
*r. . ; [ [ar.ri l ri . ot L.: -i .
.-, Ir-, r-r,n -:1 irne t, Clil Oin,',

t'0 re A .a ,lulin al nr,- l -"
1io.-.n at r' el,,r,,. il.l:,rl ii iT.al .
i ri ' c .i -a, r , rr. i, . ir-, r al
lay. - .a:r. to lal .a g ar .Trentl
I. mlI an I.e- a.s i J,,ad- ,

orir, i al i lail.' I . I A, C.u
, ri at. ' o; l , 1.'..7i:.,.l ae d .. .r
t. . 7 r .itr, .e Ihi, l r, c lud i'r.
T,.,.,.,i ." :,T,.T,'r _-i:.r *:-r ir si.
r-e7mJi... o511 f s. p cif1i' yr. o-
,ri.: - i r.: . 11-1 i ..o-,. . rn r.i-e


9 For purposes of this sec-
tion eu'alionee, the, terms
department and agency shall


-- FCflaT r-ropm r - a -.:l:.r.,
.,.,r,,r, Per,- t w , |:'I.:"' ..."L
tion bill shall be used for each
major program area of the
state budget; major program
areas shall include: education
enhancement "lottery" trust
fund items; education (all
other funds); humah services;
criminal justice and correc-
tions; natural resources, envi-
ronment, growth manage-
ment, and transportation; gen-
Si, ;:,....','r.. rI and judicial
:.,a,-.,cr, I , n',ajr program
area shall include an itemiza-
tion of expenditures for: state
operations;- state capital out-
lay; aid to local governments
and nonprofit organizations
operations; aid to local govern-
ments and nonprofit organiza-
tions capital outlay; federal
funds and the associated state
Matching funds; spending
.air,.:.rim n ,:,i.r,, for operations;
iar.3 rp- i',.irj authorizations
for capital outlay. Additionally,
appropriation bills passed by
the legislature shall-include an
itemization of specific appro-
priations that exceed one mil-
lion dollars ($1,000,000.00) in .
1992 dollars. For purposes of
this subsection, "specific
appropriation,' "itemization,"
( and "major program area"
shall be defined by law. This
itemization threshold shall be
adjusted by general law every
four years to reflect the rate of
inflation or deflation as indicat-
ed in the Consumer Price
Index for All Urban
C: .-.uT,- r, U.S. City
' r~-~iJ oii Items, or succes-
sor reports as reported by the
United States Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor
Statistics or its successor.
Substantive bills containing
appropriations shall also be
subject to the itemization
requirement mandated under
this provision and shall be
subject to the governor's spe-
cific appropriation veto power
described in Article III, Section


(c) APPROPRIATIONS
REIEW PROCESS.
(1t No later than Seotember
15 of each veer. the joint leg-
islative budget commission
shall issue a long-range finan-
cial outlook setting out recom-
mended fiscal strategies for
the state and its departments
and agencies in order to assist
the legislature in making budg-
et decisions. The long-range
financial outlook must include
major workload and revenue
estimates. in order to imple-
ment this paragraph, the Joint
legislative budget commission
shall use current official con-
sensus estimates and may
request the development of
additional official estimates.
(21 The ioint legislative budg-
et commission shall seek input
from the public and from the
executive and judicial branch-
es when developing and rec-
ommending the long-range
financial outlook.
131 The legislature shall pre-
scribe by general law condi-
tions under which limited
adjustments to the budget, as
recommended by the governor


or the chief justice of the
supreme court, may be
approved without the concur-
rence of the full legislature.
Pfot'.i uly 9 . , . 1 1003 ge .al



wu-'rt -r - rrdiMob

"'6 boh h-ouoo of tho 1 8918'a
.. .. . . . .. ..."' . .. ..'


(d) SEVENTY-TWO HOUR
PUBLIC REVIEW PERIOD. All
general appropriation bills
shall be furnished to each
member of the legislature,
each member of the cabinet,
the governor, and the chief
justice of the supreme court at
least seventy-two hours before
final passage by either house
of the legislature of the bill In
the form that will be presented
to the governor.
(a) FINAL BUDGET
REPORT. 6#684W iPIO All'Ofb
4 en4el A final budget report
shall be prepared as pre-
scribed by general law. The
final budget report shall be
produced no later than the
2ch 9W4 dayfter the begin-
ning of the fiscal year, and
copies of the report shall be
furnished to each member of
the legislature, the head of
each department and agency
of the state, the auditor gener-
al, and the chief justice of the
supreme court. '
(f) TRUST FUNDS
.a i. N irusi tuna ol iiir Sraie
of Florida or.other public body
may be created or-re-created
by law without .a three-fifths
Fi -vote of the membership
of each house of the legisla-
ture In a separate bill for that
ourpose'only.

mayt be ro a tedms affaatl~o i
(1 :, aw w t i:n, ths lith: m
acc vnts for the ceffsarnci
.of thi- ors tle of d ;tA tris-
heldbyetleo State trust funds

all4.k. e.i.o..... shall termi-
nate not more than four years
after the effective date of the'
:act authorizing the Initial cre-
atrlion of te trust fund. By ,law
the legislature may -set a
shorter time period for which
any trust fund Is authorized .
- (3) Trust funds required by
federal programs or. man-
dates; trust funds est funds established
for bond covenants, inden-
tures, or. resolutions, whose
revenues are legally pledged
by the state or public bqdy to
meet debt service or' other
financial re ments of any
debt obligations of the state or
any public body; the state
transportation trust fund; the
trust fund containing the net
annual proceeds from the
Florida Education Lotteries;
the Florida retirement trust
fund; trust funds for Institutions
under the management of the
Board of Governor s Rgon~e,
where such trust funds are for
auxiliary enterprises and con-
tracts, grants, a.,-i. .i',at,6r.:
as those terms ,i-' doeiri-a ,
general law; trust funds that
serve as clearing, funds' or
accounts for the chief financial
officer or state agencies; trust
funds that account for assets
'held by the state in a trustee
capacity as an agent or fiduci-
ary for individuals, -private
organizations, or other gov-
ernmental units; and other
trust funds authorized by this
'ir ..,,' ,IJl ir.- r. l i , -, , .'fu ,l ina
par aer :i', of this subsec-

(4) All cash balances and
income of any trust furids
abolished under this subsec-
tion shall be deposited into the
general revenue fund.



1noinmbfr a, mI02.
1.: et .,C,, T ':T-6i L :,:,
Ti.d- Fi .i b : .era-l l".d r


G enrta la: : "s mplto i fioa
YFr'o. not r=ON'.A. -811=3Itn,



frthe 4 retoratioo. 1, 0s fund
Shall be "ompised -f f b dgs

.af li!&to' . f' die ,tPt b dgf t


till ofth.ise osun td oion, b
amount for .th 104864 1007 fi








completed fiscal an 'osnet
eqa to at least 5% of tlastid



oal yeaT ad PRlOESarES neo
omedal yoaR Subject to the pro-
visions of this subsection, the


equal to at least 5% of the last
completed fiscal year's net
revenue collections' for the
general revenue fund shall be
retained in the budget stabi-
lization fund.The budget stabi-
lization fund's principal bal-
ance shall not exceed an
amount equal to 10% of the
last completed fiscal year's net
revenue collections for the
general revenue fund. The leg-
islature shall provide criteria
for withdrawing funds from the
budget stabilization fund in a
separate bill for that purpose
only and only for the purpose
of covering revenue shortfalls
of the general revenue fund or
for the purpose of providing
funding for an. emergency, as
defined by general law.
General law shall provide for
the restoration of this fund.
The budget stabilization fund
shall be comprised of funds
not otherwise obligated or
committed for any purpose.
(h) LONG-RANGE STATE
PLANNING DOCUMENT AND
DEPARTMENT AND
AGENCY PLANNING DOCU-
MENT PROCESSES. General
law shall provide for a long-
rance state planning docu-
ment The governor shall rec-
ommend to the legislature
biennially any revisions to the
long-range state planning doc-
ument, as defined by law.
General law shall require a
biennial review and revision of
the long-range state planning
document, ohall r-q'_ikro the


.......... .. '-� i and shall
require all departments and
agencies of state government
to develop planning .docu-
ments that identify statewide
strategic goals and obiectives.
consistent with the long-range
state planning document. The
long-range state planning doc-
ument and department and
agency planning documents
shall remain subject to review
and revision by the legislature.
The long-range state planning
document must include pro-
aections of future needs and
resources of the state which
are consistent with the lone-
range financial outlook. The
department and agency plan-
ning documents shall include
a prioritized listing of planned
expenditures for review and
possible reduction in the event


of revenue shortfalls, as
defined by general law. Toe
- ' ::: ::. :
t'.r, .' tiuo-- -.'i - _nd - lo.


tho- udi.ia - .. ...h , Thi-: ,2�
oo -tl=. ohall bo 'ff=t".'= "=ly

(i) GOVERNMENT EFFI-
CIENCY TASK FORCE. No
later thanl January of 2007.
and each fourth veer there-
after, the president of the sen-
ate. the speaker of the house
of representatives, and the
governor shall appoint a gov-
ernment eflciencv task force.
the membership of which shall
be established by general law.
The task force shall be com-
posed of members of the leg-
islature and representatives
from the private and public
sectors who shall develop rec-
ommendations for Improving
governmental operations and
reducing costs. Staff to assist
the task force In performing Its
duties shall be assigned by
general law. and thetask force
may obtain assistance from
the private sector. The task
force shall complete Its'work
within one year and shall sub-
mit Its recommendations to the
soint legislative budget com-
mission, the governor, and the
chief justice of the supreme
nourt. a o.l ,
' J .JOINT LEGISLATIVE
BUDGET COMMISSION.
There Is created within the
legislature the point legislative
budget commission composed
of equal numbers of senate'
'members appointed by the
president of the senate and
house members appointed by
the speaker of the house of'



Commission shall be filled In
the same manner as the origi-
nal appointmentt. 'From
November of each odd-num-
berad year through October of '
each even-numbered year. the
chairperson of the lont legisla-l
tive budget commlsslon shall
be appointed by the president
of 'the senate and the vice
"hW person of the eommis-
slon shall be pooointed.by the
speaker of the house of repre-
sentatives. From November of
each even-numbered year
through October of each odd-
numbered year. the chairper-
son of the loint legislative
budget commission shall be
oalponted by the speaker of
-the house of representatives
and the vice chairperson of
the commission shall be
appointed by the president of
the senate. The joint legislative
budget commission shall be
governed by the joint rules of
the senate and the house of
representatives, which shall
remain in' effect until repealed
or amended by concurrent
resolution. The commission
shall convene at least quarter-
ly and shall convene at the call
of I',n re .-jidieri cf the e,'ate
an. ir,. .p Saer .-.i iLrA ho,-A
of representatives. A majority
of the commission members of
each house plus one addition-
al member from either house
constitutes a quorum. Action
by the commission requires a
majority vote of the commis-
sion members present of each
house. The commission may
conduct its meetings through
teleconferences or similar
means In addition to the pow-
ers and duties specified in this
subsection, the ioint legislative
budoet.commission shall exer-
-cise all other owners and per-
form any other duties not in
conflict with paragraph (61c(3)
and as prescribed bv general
law or ioint rule.


NO.2
CONSTITUTTUTIONAL AMEND-
MENT
ARTICLE VI, SECTION 4,
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
TERM LIMITS

Removed from the ballot by
the Florida Legislature.
NO.3
CONSTITUTIONAL AMEND-
MENT
ARTICLE XI, SECTION 5
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
REQUIRING BROADER PUB-
LIC SUPPORT FOR CONSTI-
TUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
OR REVISIONS

Ballot Summary:
t Proposes an amendment to
Section 5 of Article XI of the
State Constitution to require
that any proposed amendment
to or revision of the State
Constitution, whether pro-
posed by the Legislature, by
initiative, or by any other
method, must be approved by
at least 60 percent of the vot-
ers of the state voting on the
measure, rather than by a sim-
ple majority. This proposed
amendment would not change
the current requirement that a
proposed constitutional
amendment imposing a new
state tax or fee be approved by
at least 2/3 ofthe voters of the
state voting in the election in
which such an amendment is
considered.

Full Text:
ARTICLE XI
AMENDMENTS

SECTION 5. Amendment or
revision election.-
(a) A proposed amendment
to or revision of this constitu-
tion, or any part of it, shall be
submitted to the electors at
the next general election held
more 'than ninety days after
the joint resolution or report of
revision commission, constitu-
tional convention or taxation
and budget reform commis-
sion proposing it is filed with
the custodian of state records,
unless, pursuant to law enact-
ed by the affirmative vote of
three-fourths of the member-
ship of each house of the leg-
islature and limited to a single
amendment or revision, it is
submitted at an earlier special
election held more than ninety
days after such filing.
(b) A proposed amendment
or revision of this constitution,
or any part of it, by initiative
shall be submitted to the elec-
tors at the general election
provided the initiative petition
is filed with the custodian of
state records no later than
February 1 of the year in
which the general election is
held.
(c) The legislature shall pro-
vide by general law, prior to
the holding of an election pur-
suant to this section, for the
provision of a statement to the
public regarding the probable
financial impact of any amend-
ment proposed by initiative
pursuant to section 3.


(d) Once in the tenth week,
and once in the sixth week
immediately preceding the
week in which the election is
held, the proposed amend-
ment or revision, with notice of
the date of election at which it
will be submitted to the elec-
tors, shall be published in one
newspaper of general circula-


tion in each county in which a
newspaper is published,
(e) Unless otherwise specifi-
callv provided for elsewhere in
this constttitution, if the pro-
posed amendment or revision
is approved by vote of at least
sixty percent of the electors
voting on the measure, it shall
be effective as an amendment
to or revision of the constitu-
tion of the state on the first
Tuesday after the first Monday
in January following the elec-
tion, or on such other date as
may be specified In the
amendment or revision.

NO.4
CONSTITUTIONAL 'AMEND-
MENT
ARTICLE X, SECTION 27
(Citizen Initiative)

Ballot Title:
PROTECT , PEOPLE,.
ESPECIALLY YOUTH, FROM
ADDICTION, DISEASE, AND
OTHER HEALTH HAZARDS
OF USING TOBACCO

Ballot Summary:
To protici people easpeciali,
y.:,uin iror, ad, -tCllor, ,llsa&e
rang .:.irer h1eaitI razardO,. ,ti
using tobacco, the Legislature
shall use some Tobacco
'Settlement money annually for
a comprehensive statewide
tobacco education and' pre-
vention program using
Centers for Disease Control,
best practices. Specifies some
program components, empha-
sizing youth, requiring 'one-
irid oIo ttal annual Iunding for
a'.artlalrng Annual funanlg is
II ot 2005 Tooacco
Settlement payments t1o
Florida aidusiae annually for
Inflation Pro.Ies deftinitions
Etfae.:l.e immeaiaiely,

Full Text:

BE IT ENACTED BY THE
PEOPLE OF FLORIDA THAT
Article .X, Florida
Constitution, Is amended to
add the following:
Section 27.
Comprehensive Statewide
Tobacco Education And
Prevention Program. Ir. oraer
to protect peopeia eapecially
,'Ouilt from naalin nazarda of
As.ir.g tobacco Including
adiacTi.e dicio-arrc cancer,
cardiovascular diseases,- and:
lung diseases; and to,discour-
age use o, totacco particular.
Iy among 'ouir, a portion. of
ine mcna, inat itoaccc corn-
panles pay to the State of
Florida ' under -the Tobacco
Settlement each year shall be'
.used to fund a comprehensive
statewide tobacco education
and prevention program con-
sistent With recommendations
of .the U.S. Centers for
Disease - Control and
Prevention (ODC), as follows:.
(a) Program. The money
appropriaiJd puriuanr i t ih;s
se.:,c.n ir.ail be u-erd i - lun- .a
comprehensive statewide
tobacco education and pre-
.enior. pr...:rra ,m cor. .iler.
',Ir, ire ra.:c .mmnrend.alo,'", 1.-w
-eActl :i'. pr.-,gram .:orr.p.:,r,,ni:
r, r. , I y:e '1 4 ' S I P a.:ipce ror.
Comprehensive Tobacco
C.:.nir-.i PP,Cio,a.n .. Ir., . CDC '
aS lu.:r. b6.-l ra.:1.C i .a, re
amended by the CDC. This
program shall include, at a
minimum,, the following com-
portents, and may include
additional .::.:mpoc.nert that
are also ,:.:..ry ,a',.i,,3 ,.iirn the
CDC Be,; P ;asci.:e.- a perl-
odioally amended, an: ir, ai
j, i .rl i."ri h ,5 a :.:;.:.;.,T,Fli.I r

Sar.. , ir., :. d, .:.1 ui .-r, .rinT , Ir, .
r ii:.lI ..fri- i.'.' L . ir -E r"Q, uh,'-
minimum components:
(1) an advertising campaign
'to discourage the use of
tobacco and to educate peo-
ple, especially youth, about'
the health hazards of tobacco,
which shall be designed to be
effective at achieving these
goals and shall include, but
need not be limited to, televi-
sion, radio, and print advertis-
ing, with no limitations on any
individual advertising medium
utilized; and which shall be
funded at a level equivalent to
one-third of each total annual
appropriation required by this
section;
(2) evidence-based curricula
and programs to educate
youth about tobacco and to'
discourage.their use of it.
including, but not I.I'ri l,.i To,
programs that involve youth,
educate youth about the
health hazards of tobacco,
help youth develop skills to
refuse tobacco, and demon-
strate to youth -how to stop
using tobacco;
(3) programs of local com-
munity-based partnerships
that discourage the use of
tobacco and work to educate
people, especially youth,
'about the health hazards of
tobacco, with an emphasis on
programs that involve youth
and emphasize the prevention
and cessation of tobacco use;
(4) enforcement of laws, reg-
ulations, and' policies against-
the sale or other provision ofl
tobacco to minors, and the
possession qf. tobacco by
minors; and
(5) publicly-reported annual
evaluations to ensure that
mogeys appropriated pur-
suant to this section are spent
properly, which shall include
evaluation of the program's
effectiveness in reducing and
preventing tobacco use, and
annual recommendations for
improvements to enhance the
program's effectiveness, which
are to include comparisons-to.
similar programs proven to be
effective in other states, as
well as comparisons to CDC
Best Practices, including
amendments thereto.
(b) Funding. In every year
beginning with the calendar
year after voters approve this
,,.r. -r,.i'.,Tr, ihe Florida
-.-iigilaure r i ll appropriate,
for the purpose expressed
herein, from the total gross
funds that tobacco companies
pay to the State of Florida
under the Tobacco Settlement,
an amount equal to fifteen per-
cent of such funds paid to the
State in 2005; and the appro-
priation required by this sec-
tion shall be adjusted annually
for inflation, using the
Consumer Price Index as pub-
lished by the United States
Department of Labor.
(c) Definitions. "Tobacco"
includes, without limitation,
tobacco itself and tobacco
products that include tobacco
and are intended or expected
for human use or consump-
tion, including, but not limited
to, cigarettes, cigars, pipe
tobacco, and smokeless
tobacco. The "Tobacco
Settlement" means that cer-


tain Settlement Agreement
dated August 25, 1997,
entered into in settlement of
the case styled as State of
Florida, et al. v. American
Tobacco Company, et al.,
Case No. 95-1466 AH (Fla.
15th Cir. Ct.), as amended by
Stipulation of Amendment
dated September 11, 1998;
and includes any subsequent
amendments and successor


agreements. "Youth" includes
minors and young adults.
(d) Effective Date. This
amendment shall become
effective immediately upon
approval by the voters.

Financial Impact Statement:
This amendment. requires
state government to appropri-
ate approximately $57 million
In 2007 for the Comprehensive
Statewide Tobacco Education
and Prevention Program,
Thereafter, this amount will
increase annually with, nfla-
lion Thia Bperding Is expected
0to reaucs tobaCCo conrumrp-
tIor Asi a reull. IOAme long.
lOrm savings io lriae eand local
go.ei'nmni reaslin and irur-
ance' programs are probable,
but Indetai'mr.ialn Ailso minor
reajru� IoSa I0 saete goerr,-
mvr,t I probable Out irdaloer-
milnate.

NO. 6
CONSTITUTIONAL AMEND-
MENT
ARTICLE III, SECTION 16
(Citizen Initiative)

Ballot Title:
I N D, E P E N D E N T
N 0 r P A R T I S A N
COr,,r.ISSlION TO
APPORTION LEGISLATIlaE
AND' CONGRESSIONAL
DISTRICTS WHICH
R E P L A.C E S
APPORTIONriiErT ' BY
LEGISLATURE

eremon.eod irorr, me OSliOi
irn FIore g Supreme Court
NO 6
CONSTITUTIONAL AMEND-,
MENT
ARTICLE Vil. SECTION 6 :
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 26
(Legslattlve)

Ballot Tille:
IrJCREASED HOMESTEAD'
EXEMPTION

Ballot Summary:
Proporin.g amendment of me
State Constitution it Ir,crease
te maximum aeOllonal
rr.omestea e Income aerniors from 25 000
to 50 000 and to screoaule
ithe arridment 10 tae effect
January i 2007 ilt adopito

Full Text:

ARTICLE . .
FINANCE AMID TAXATION,
SECTION 6. Homestead
exemptions.-
(a) Every person who has
the legal or equitable title to'
real estate :and maintains
thereon the permanent resi-
daence of the owner, or another
legally or naturally dependent
upon the owner, shall be
exempt from taxation thereon,
except assessments for spe-
cial benefits, up to the
asas'.ed valuation of five
ho.uz.an,,J , ,,iilar; up-r., e liab
ii:rn- ert .rr t ri. n ithereto ir, ire
msranrpr pr.a:,.r'b d b', las. Tre
real ioiait ma-, sco nli' d t,
1,i 1 C.r C e-Qulla plis ile rCt, th
.ntrellci joli'atl, , ir. :.:.mmL.tr
i a : .a ,:.:'"-,.i. lr,,rijrrl ,:.r irdlre:,t-

asr.e: r, epr .rl i h irea
.:tae- ifr rL .r pr.:.rl.
iar , irlvrecil ir. a *-,:.rp.:. ,l,.:r,
att, ined, g s I� , . a ixty.- r'.:l.is
initially in .excess of ninety-
eight years.
ib'i iot more than one
.-rr.pi..-r, shall be' allowed
any individual or family unit or
v"ide d ,, 1 , ,in s.islel- ( r,d ) l
j<.:io3 tir . .alu. .:, the real,
inrilalsd ti ai tri,; to the
' I r .:,r n amc - o:. .:.,.,,r r'lp '
Ihrugr.j , I .: .: ,r r. ri . -r:r ,p
in a corporation, the value of
the proportion which the Inter-
,st ir re ,:.:.rfie .ral.:a.r. Cs r I:.
the arms:, . - -t s c o .l ire
property.
i.-'i B, ur.-ral law and sub-
j I, di:, :.,:'.,l, r,w specified
therein, the exemption shall be
increased to a total of twenty-
five thousand dollars of the
assessed value of the real
estate for each school district
levy. By general law and sub-
ject to, conditions specified
therein, the exemption for all
other levies may be increased
up.to an amount not.exceed-
ing ten thousands dollars of the
assessed value of the real
estate, if the owner has
attained age sixty-five or is
totally and permanently dis-
abled and if the owner is not
entitled to the exemption pro-
vided in subsection (d).
(d) By general law and sub-
j .:,i i,: .:,;.r,.jlt;.:,r.l i r:.,.:;l;ed
trey,-n. Ir.,- -,erTpf,:.,,- r,all r:e,
increased to a total of the fol-
lowing amounts of assessed
value of real estate for each
levy other than those of school
districts: fifteen thousand dol-
lars with respect to 1980
assessments; tents; twenty thou-
sand dollars with respect to
1981 assessments; twenty-
five thousand dollars with
respect to assessments for
1982 and each year thereafter.
However, such increase shall
not apply with respect to any
assessment roll until such roll
is first determined to be in
compliance with the provisions
of section 4 by a state agency
designated by general law.
This subsection shall stand
repealed on the effective date
of any amendment to section 4
which'provides for the assess-
ment of homestead property
at a specified percentage of its
just value.
(e) By general law and sub-
ject to conditions specified
therein, the Legislature may
provide to renters, who are
:.: Ti,-,=ri ,, i ,:i.je,,l ad val-
,:.,�,|T,|I' ,I, ri,-, *1ji ad val-
,:,', . i:,, I� iv:. Such ad val-
:,y oin an, , ei,, shall be in the
form and amount established
by, general law.
general Ia., .1- r.. ,:i;pi-lh3: .:,r
municipalities, for the purpose
of their respective tax levies
and subject to the provisions
of general law, to grant an
additional homestead tax
exemption riot exceeding fiyty
twenty4f4ise thousand dollars to
any person who has the legal
or equitable title to real estate
and maintains thereon the per-
manent residence of the
owner and who has attained
age sixty-five and whose
household income, as defined
by general law, does not
exceed twenty thousand dol-
lars. The general law must
allow counties and municipali-
ties to grant this additional
exemption, within the limits
prescribed in this subsection,
by ordinance adopted in the
manner prescribed by general
law, and must provide for the
periodic adjustment of thre
income limitation prescribed in


this subsection for changes in
the cost of living.

ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

SECTION 26. Increased
homestead exemption.-The
amendment to Section 6 of
Article VII increasing the max-
imum additional amount of the


homestead exemption for low-
income seniors shall take
effect January 1. 2007.

NO.7
CONSTITUTIONAL AMEND-
MENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6
(Legislative)
Ballot Title:
PERMANENTLY DISABLED
VETERANS' DISCOUNT ON
HOMESTEAD AD VALOREM
TAX

Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to
the State Constitution to pro-
vide a discount- from the
amount of ad valorem tax on
the homestead of a partially or
totally permanently disabled
veteran who Is age 65 or older
who was a Florida, resident at
the time of entering military
service, whose disability was
combat-related, and who was
honorably discharged; to
specify the percentage of the
discount as equal to the per-
centage of the veteran's per-
Smanent servlce-connected
disability;' to specify quallflca-
lion required eris foi r ine dla-
couni, l t, sulorize ir.a e
Legislature o ail ihe anore u-
al application requirement In
subsequent years by general
'a,, ena to specify that the
sr.:,.ilion takes effect
December, 2006, Is self-exe-
cuting ancrd doS not require
Implementing legislatiorn

Full Text:
ARTICLE .iI
FINANCE &ND TAXATION

SECTION 6 Homeatead '
exeimptionn -
lai E.,ery person wno nsB1
the legal or equlisole tile to
real estt e ano maintains
emareon the permanent real-
enoe of thae owner or anoiner
legally or naturally rdpsndent
uporn ine owner sharl ne
exempt from taxation mereon,
except saseasments for spe-
ciasl erefts up to10 itre
assessed 'valuation of. five
inousand dollars, uppor alatb-
Il.nment of rlgni nereto In tna
manner prascrnbad by la'w
Tne real estate may Da neIo Dby
lagai or equitable title S y Ir.e
eantireaieS jointly in cornmonr,
as a condominium or inoireci-
I1 Oy stock owner.nrip or mnem-
aersrip representing ir,
*,i.,ner s or member a propnri
eiary inrereat in a corporation
owning a fee or a iseaenoid
irilaii, in excess. of,- ninety-
eighti ears
I ., 1101. more' than' one
.,,ein.-r.p stionail be allowed
any ,irn.lidual or lamll' unit or,
with respacl to anr. re-,len nai
unit. N.:. �nmpiiuon Anali
exceed In .aluoe o the real
estate -assessable .to the
-:, rev r or. ,rn ..a-e c , o ,rernip
irsrou, r, sio,:k or mamonernl-p
'in a co .rp ator,.l r it .alua 01l
i e propur.p .r r wnicn ire tniAr.
Ca Ir, ir, c.:,rp-:,rallor uear 1to
r1e8 as es. e .aSlu - t1 irne
property. . .
.. (c) By general law and sub-
i lci ui . r . ir . Ior n .�.is .; ',feol
Sira.ire ir.c ]r,.e .e .mpilon r.arll b
ir.Cnac o. 10, a sal 01 IrAoer., .
Ii.., ir.:,u:ar, il .4 ,5, 1 .- :.1 ir-.
' ,ea.e '. *alur, ,I irn. real
e h a le r..r e. r,a n i.r-.:.r.l *, iricw1
I., By , gen.srai la,. arid aun D
[Act to ,::r.dilio,',t ,pc..:lrlid
Iereilr ine h eern ti, n r ':.r all
,:,Irr ia.,A: ,'nv re irin:reaced
ui tCa. ra amn'i.r.i .i,'1 r ctio :.
i .r,, r. ,I i.-,r, , ..nllor- :i *I e

, h c p rolv e f o r n ,t '- r h a . l
11 sllr'pe ifJ e d t .rI l e of 1,:
l.l i , a er.a peirm la-r.rii, .3i
, bihj, ,arl I Irn ,rc r,r r i, noi
-r.illve6 I.:, Ire h .er., pior. ar,
.1.ii , r. iubi:T:Ilin '1
p1a B ger.,erai i a-d -u-b'
ject to conditions, specified
therein, the exemption shall be
increased to a total of the fol-
lowing amounts of assessed,
value of real estate, for each
levy other thanr those of school
districts: fifteen' thousand dol-
lars with. respect to 1980
assessments; twenty thou-
sand dollars with respect to
1981 assessments; twenty-
-five, thousand dollars with
respect to. assessments for
1982 and each year thereafter.
However, such increase shall
not apply with respect to any
a.c , : eiim .ni r.:.li uill such roll
.; w .: ,i irm',.e.1 to be in
:OC.rr I.lix.:t ,ir ir, pd" w.. Ioie. r.
a :.Iu ,TIo., 4 r., a ; te nl e r.C
de ,Qrna hl cl a., . oer s -ral law.
Tr.,;. i:.- .iaec,,]r;. :r,.,ii stand
repealed on the effective date
of any amendment to section 4
which provides for the assess-
ment of homestead property
at a specified percentage of its
just value. n
. (e) By general law and:sub-
ject to conditions specified,
therein, the Legislature may
provide to, renters, who are
permanent residentresidents, ad val-
orem tax relief on all ad val-
crem tax levies. Such ad val-
cram' tax relief shall be in the
form and amount established
by-general law.
(f) The legislature may, by
general law, allow counties or
municipalities, for the purpose
of their respective tax levies
and subject to the provisions
of general law, to grant an
additional homestead tax
Exemption not exceeding
twenty-five thousand dollars to
any person who has the legal
or equitable title to real estate
and maintains thereon the per-
manent residence of the
owner and who has attained
age sixty-five and whose
' household income, as defined
by general law, does not
exceed twenty thousand 'dol-
lars. The general law must
allow counties and municipali-
ties to grant this additional
exemption, within the limits
prescribed in this subsection,
by ordinance adopted' in the

pr,,:..:h.: a,'iju'im.nt of the
income limitation prescribed in
this subsection for changes in
the cost of living.
(g) Each veteran who is ace
65 or older who Is oartially or
totally permanently disabled
shall receive a discount from
the amount of the ad valorem
tax otherwise owed on home-
stead oropertv the veteran
owns and resides in if the dis-
ability was combat related, the
veteran was a resident of this
state at the time of entering
the military service of the
United States, and the veteran
was honorably discharged
uoon separation from military
service, The discount shall be
in a percentage equal to the
eercentaoe of the veteran's


permanent, service-connected
disability as determined by the
United States Department of
Veterans Affairs. To qualify for
the discount granted by this
subsection, an applicant must
submit to the county property
appraiser, by March 1. roof of
residency at the time of enter-
ing military service, an official
letter from the United States
Department of Veterans
Affairs stating the ercentaae
of the veteran's service-con-
nected disability and such evi-


dance that reasonably identi-
fies the disability as combat
related, and a coov of the vet-
eran's honorable discharge. If
the property appraiser denies
the request for a discount, the
appraiser must notify the
applicant in writing of the rea-
sons for the denial. and the
veteran may reapolv. The
LeaIslature may. by general
law. waive the annual applica-
tion- requirement in subse-
quent years. This subsection,
shall take effect December 7.
2006. ,is self-executln. and
does not require Implementing
legislation.
NO .8
CONSTITUTIONAL AMEND-
MENT
ARTICLE X, SECTION 6
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
EMINENT DOMAIN

Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to
the State Constitution to 'pro-
hibit the transfer of private
property taken by eminent
domain to a natural person or
ron.ae erinly' providing that
- 7n- Leglaiature may by gener-
al iA, pauaed b, a Ihrea-flfths
.Ola cr ne memc.erarsrip of
aacn iroue ol Trhe Legialature
permit eSepliors aiiorinrg inr ,
transfer 0 aSuc, private prop-
erty; .end providing that this
prohibition on the transfer of
private property taken by emi-
nent aomirn s s ppicapolI If
ir.e petition of taking Tnat initi-
aled ins conraamnation pro.
ceeding a flilaed or or after
- January 2, 2007;
Full Text: ' , ' .

ARTICLE X
MISCELLANEOUS
SECTION 6 Eminent,
domain -
jiS No private property snall
be taken except lor a public
purpose and airth full compan-
eation marelor paid To eacn
ovwnar cr secured Oy deposit in
the registry oL me court and
a.'eailasble 10 ire owner
Dbi Provilion me, Oe nmade
by law for ins taking of ease-
mania by like proceedings for
inc drainage ol inte lard of one
parson oer or hor Orugn in
land of another
ci Private orop r['.,I tasn D.'
elTinenfi domain opursuan t 10 a
ceillon to initiate ,:..nlemna-
lon DrocaAedlins ela or or
aner Januarv 2 2007 ma.' noi
ow convue', to a natural er-
son r o rl,aa eea illt e rt as ,
poviC, c].e R av o -ntral law
pa'ose, DP a irre'i-iI-hh- c.1- olI
the. membership of each"
houseof the Legislature.
083006 : '
092706

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR SANTA ROSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 57'2005 CP 847
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF:

REBECCA FOREMAN,
Deceased. ,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Th'- administration of the
-io aei .t1' Rebecca Forsman
deceased, whose date of
icair- .,ia' August'4, 2005,
F; Itumir..er 57-2005-CP-347,
pwithd;r.. irs th. Circuit Court in
,'..jd Ic.'i S ria Rosa County,
SFl,:,lia PrC ..,Cal Di M' N.:.r. ire
Sria fIL'Sa Cart,, l e 4 UIT' ,
Breezc Per-watu, '3uif Braez,
' Flr,i.l a iEE - r1 Th.E namE- aTr.i
a,:,lrA- i i.-.l , Ire percr..ai rep'.
T:IS, NOi CE." ran [rO. pror30 Ai
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or' demands against
decedent's estate oh whom a
copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF. 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION LOF
THIS. NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE TIME OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors .of the dece-
dent and other, persons having
Claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file
their claims with this..court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE -DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publication of
this Notice is September 20,
2006.

/s/ Byron E. Cotton
Byron E. Cotton
Cotton, Gates & Cotton
Three Plew Ayenue
Shalimar, Florida 32579
Florida Bar No.: 0695521
(850) 651-9900
Attorney for Personal
Representative

/s/ Sara F. Thomas
Sara F. Thomas
1510 Heritage Street
Fort Walton Beach, Florida
32548
Personal Representative

092006
092706


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT, IN AND FOR SANTA
ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NUMBER: 57-2006-
CP-268
DIVISION:

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
CHARLES J. KAHN,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of CHARLES J. KAHN,
deceased, File Number 57-
2006-CP-268, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Santa
Rosa County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which.
is Santa Rosa County
Courthouse, 6865 Caroline
Street, Milton, Florida 32570.
The name and address of the
Personal Representative and


the Personal Representative's
Attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, Including
unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, on whom
a copy of this notice Is served
must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER


OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
.DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or
unliquldated claims, must. file
their claims with this Court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE 'OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE

ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The date of the first publics-
tion of this Notice Is
September 20, 2006.

"/a/BETTIE-KAHN
BETTIE KAHN
..74 Bay Bridge Drive
Gulf Breeze, FL 32561
Personal Representative

/s/LONNIE L. SIMMONS '
LONNIE L. SIMMONS'
Attorney ,'for , .'Personal,
Repreaeniatl'.
Suite 302 3000 , Langley
AC6er, ue
Pensacola Florida 32504 .
(850) 474-0686
Florida Bar Number: 380806
-092006 .
092706


AMENDED NOTICE OF
SHERIFF'S BALE

NOTICEs rn eraebI given itN
' pursuant to WRIT OF EXECU-
TION aSueO In nme County
Court of oHllIscrougr County,
Flornas. on me 6TH day of
July, ,i006 In te cause
wherein RAILROAD AND
,INDUSTRIAL CREDIT
UNION, was plaintiff and
PHYLISS ANN DEEN AND
DANIEL L DEEt .ere deten-
dants going Case N'o 05-
13723-SC r, saiId court I
Wendall Hall, As Sheriff of.
Santa Rosa County, Florida,
have leviedupon 0ll the right,
title, and.lnterest of the defen-
dant, Daniel L Deen In'and to
the following described par
anor rac errnD to w It':
DESCRIPTION OF PROPER-
TY'
1.987 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE
VIN # 1G1YY2185H5127118 .

I shall offer this property for
sale, at east front door of the
Sania Ric;.a Criminal Justice
FacIIlIy in M.liun.r Santa Rosa
Cour.ry. Florin .at the hour of
1.:00 p.m. on the 24th day .of
October, 2006, Or as soon
Thereafter as possible. I will
onei' ir I., e ale : r.� i ,id ,i.Air,.
damnr HAILLEL L S'EErJ
r,gri ,1i - rd il.rC:l i ,r, irm
eforesaid personal property at
rul,.r,: a,. .:r .n a-, . .d .I : ll - n r,.
:an c, e, "ul:,Je,:l K,:, l% : all
pi'i r i;-wr .: OraniurTbi .a,', ": r,,J
uamer .: .a , 1 r,j r.rIr,.
e'- ar,. :e'-:l C'.oder or , H
Ii H.1 iL' Trne pr.:.,:e ,.' I.. re-
a l.prilli. ,a iar a .at, T. I,:. ir.e
p.,,mrnir, I C .i'c . -.; ,-: '' Ih,9 a ,


WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF
OF ,- riT- r.: - COUNTY,
FLCORiDA
EB JE: '-H:EsHEA
Dvpuly Sn,-,

IF YOU HAVE A DISABILITY
REQUIRING . ,SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATIONS OR TO
ARRANGE. TO VIEW THE
PROPERTY, PLEASE CON-
TACT JANICE PLATT (850)
983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN
(7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE
SALE DATE.

092006
092706
100406
101106


NOTICE OF ACTION

BEFORE THE BOARD OF
NURSING

IN RE: The license to nurs-
Ing

Susan Springer Davidson,
1432 El Sereno Place
Gulf Breeze, FL 32563

CASE NO.: 2005-68386

LICENSE NO.: RN 2927512

The Department of Health has
filed an Administrative'
Complaint against you, a copy
of which may be obtained by
contacting, Ollie Evans,
Assistant General Counsel,
Prosecution Services Unit,
4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin
#C65, Tallahassee Florida
32399-3265, (850) 245-4640

If no contact has been made
by you concerning the above
by November 1, 2006, the
matter of the Administrative
Complaint will be presented at
an ensuing meeting of the
Board of Nursing in an infor-
mal proceeding.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilitiqs
' Act, persons needing a special
Accommodation to participate
in this proceeding should con-
tact the Individual or agency
.sending this notice not later
than seven days prior to the
proceeding at the address
given on the notice.
Telephone: (850) 246-4640, 1-
800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-
955-8770(V), via Florida Relay
Service.

092706
100406
101106
101806


NOTICE OF INTENT TO
CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE

The reading and adoption of
the following proposed
Ordinance by the Board of
County Commissioners of
Santa Rosa County, is sched-
uled for 9:30 a.m., October 12,
2006, in the Commissioners
meeting room at the
Administrative Complex, 6495
Caroline Street, Milton,
Florida.

AN ORDINANCE GRANTING
AN ECONOMIC DEVELOP-


MENT AD VALOREM TAX
EXEMPTION TO
PRODUCTION METAL
STAMPING, INC., 8133
OPPORTUNITY DRIVE, MIL-
TON, FLORIDA 32583;


Page 7-B


SPECIFYING THE ITEMS
EXEMPTED; PROVIDING
THE EXPIRATION DATE OF
THE EXEMPTIONS; FINDING
THAT THE BUSINESS
MEETS THE REQUIRE-
MENTS OF FLORIDA
STATUTE 196.012(15); PRO-
VIDING FOR CODIFICA-

TION; AND, PROVIDING FOR
AN EFFECTIVE DATE,
'these proposed Ordinances
may be Inspected by the pub-
lic prior to.-hv aoo.e i'ic.ed-
uled meeting at mae Or.:a of
the Clerk of Courts, BOCC
Support Services Department,
6495 Caroline Street, . Milton,
Florida. All' Interested parties
should take notice that If they
decide to appeal any decision
made.by the Board of'County
Commissioners with respect
to any matter coming before
.aia Bsar.3 a i aid : am ir,. ii
irilr ir,,. lOual 'ca p.:riAlbipii,
to Insursethat a record of pro-
ceedings 'they are appealing
exists and for such purpose
they will need to Insure that a
verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record
shall Include the testimony
ard ise e.iderLe upon which
their appeal i to be based.
irtirerstad parties n'ei appear
ai ir meeting and c heard
,r, respect 10 trise proposed
ordinances,.

092706
092706


Notlce of Sale

Pursuant to Fl St 713.585,
Auto Lien & Reco.aer;' Inc
..,Powar of Anttorney ill sall.
ire following .,ericlaa to me
highest bidder to satisfy' lien.
All auctions field with reserve,
as Is where is, Cash or
Certified funds. Inspect 1
week prior at Ilenor facility,
]-i.6166le , parties call 95.
893-0052 Sale date 10-i-'-6
@ 10:00 am. Auction will occur
where each vehicle Is located
under License AB0000538..Be
advised that owner or lienhold-
6r rea a rigrh lto a nsarinrq pnror
to 10 r, cneduai d .sara oi .alie
by filing with the Clerk of
Courts, Owner/Llenholder may
recover vehicle without Insti-
tuting judicial proceedings by
posting bond as per Fl Stat
559.917; 25% buyer premium
additional net proceeds, in
excess of lien amount wilt be
deposited with the Clerk of
Court

iaaa INTERrjATI,.:-,lL TK

reO HtINCLE WITH CORE
' *-ELIV 11 I l t.:. I 5A:41.l_
E- RI- HI-.I -OrL , cu: tH .
-LE VITHCAFI E DELI'..ER I
ci.1 IAA- I h'1t .EF-' -l U HUL'.
. i 1 r, r, Hl,,sr ,j t , u_ ':
A.,'' ,Rtirl T CDR "-:F'Rill .
HILL ir.2
of_ ____ :
lienor: TRUCKER'S 24 HR







FLegal AdvertiseLL-ent F
Purs :.ant to Rule 3-7.10 of the

AUTO LIEN & RECOVERY .
SE idge: ar: col

reinsLL statement t F to The Florida


*0 92 7 0 6 ' ' / ; " '
092706 ' ,' . .
9/750

Legal Any dvertiseons havinen

Pursuant to Ruleing upo3-7.10 ofthe
pRules of Discipline of The.
Florida Bar, Randall J.t (850)
Etheridge of -800-342-806Pensacola,.
*Florida has petitioned the
Supreme Court of Florida for
reinstatement, to The Florida
Bar. Any persons having
knowledge bearing upon the
petitioner's fitness or qualifica-
tions to resume the practice of
law should .: : ,i.a.:i tl
Underwood, h'ia" 1 !]iq. ,:,r ,
, for The Florida Bar, at (850)
475-5077 or 1-800-342-8060,
ext.. 677p.

092706
.093006:
100406
100706
101106
101406
101806
102106
102506
9/751

NOTICE TO BIDDERS
HORIZONTAL BALER &
CONVEYOR

Notice is hereby given that the
Board of County
Commissioners of Santa Rosa
County, Florida, will receive
sealed bids for a horizontal
closed door baler & conveyor.

All bids must be original and
delivered by hand, Fed Ex, or
mail to the Office of the Santa
Rosa County Procurement
Department, 6495 Caroline
Street, Suite G, Milton,
Florida, 32570; and must be
received by 10:00 a.m.,
October 31, 2006, at which
time bids will be opened and
read aloud. Bids received after
the time set for the bid open-
ing will be rejected and
returned unopened to the bid-
der. All interested parties are
invited to attend.

Questions. concerning this
, request should be directed to
Floyd Rentz at (850) 981-
7135.

Specifications and bid form
may be secured from Santa
Rosa County Website
(www.santarosa.fl.gov/bids) or
at the Santa Rosa County
Procurement Department at
the above address. Telephone
(850) 983-1833.

The Board of County
Commissioners reserves the
right to waive irregularities in
bids, to reject any or all bids
with or without cause, and to
award the bid that it deter-
mines to be in the best interest
of Santa Rosa County.

Santa Rosa County does not
discriminate on the basis of
race, color, national origin,
sex, religion, age, or handi-
capped status in employment
or provision of service.

By order of the Board of
County Commissioners of
Santa Rosa County, Florida.


092706
092706
90752


KNOWLEDGE GIVES SOCIETY THE POWER TO ADVANCE. PICK UP A NEWSPAPER.


Il-J--------.. ft__ _ ....' 7 'MnI





Page 8 B The Santa Rosa Presstazette Wednesday, September 27, 2006


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Wednesday, September 27, 2006


Page 8 B


The Santa Rosa Press'Gazette


LEA.















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Sports



Dixie Barrel Radng
on Oct. 7in Baker
The Dixie Barrell Racing
Association is hosting a $2,000
added Open 4-D event on Oct.
7 in Baker, Fla.
This will be followed by the
DBRA's regualr nionthl show.
on Sunday.
. Entry fee's for the Open 4-
D is $40 with a $20 entry fee
for the Youth 3-D. and $12 for
the PeeWee 2--D.
Belt buckles will be award-
ed to the winners in each Pee
Wee Di vision.
For more information you
cain call 850-537-8918 or 850-
944-0968.


proams for areayouth
. The, Pensacola Sports
Association and. the Northeast
YMC \A will hold youth
wrestling for ages kindergarten
through 12th grade.
This program is taut2ht by
Olympic Coach Rob Hermann,
who is currently coaches the
U.S. Navy Wrestling Team at
NAS Pensacola.
The - Youth Wrestling
Program will begin Nov. 6 and
meet each Monda\ from 4.30 to
6 p.m.
For more information or to
register you can contact the
Northeast YMCA at 478-1222.
Co-ed towmnyto

Camp E-Ma-Chamee is
holding it's, first ever Co-Ed
.Softball Slam at the East
Milton Recreational Park on
Oct. 7. . ' :
Cost to enter this tourna-
ment is $150 a team and pro-
ceeds ;-ill help. with pro-
grams offered to tha Noung
people at Camp E-MNa-
Chamee.
Games will get under%' aN
at 9 a.m.
-< During the tournament
there will be several actix i-
ties for a day of family) fun.
For more information or
to register contact. Bruce
Predmore or Meredith
McKni2ht at 675-4512.
Registration deadline is
Sept. 28.
Baseball fall camp is
taking regisWations
All-Pro Baseball Academy
'will hold a fall instructional
'camp on Oct. 2.
The camp will be held in
two sessions and broken dow" n
into third through fifth grade
'and sixth through eight grade
Academy Instructors
include Mac Seibert of the
Tampa Bay Devil Rays, former
,major leageer Talmadge
,Nunnari, and others.
For more information call
572-3356.
Pensacola Power
tryouts announced
The Pensacola Power
Women's Football Team has
announced tryout sessions
, through Oct. 15.
Registration will begin at
1:30 p.m. and the tryout will go
from 2 to 4 p.m.
Tryout locations are Oct. 8
at the John R. Jones Sports
Complex on Nine Mile Rd. in
Pensacola. Locations for an
Oct. 1 tryout in Foley, Ala., and
Oct. 15 tryout in Ft. Walton
Beach have not been confirmed
at this time..
All females over the age of
18 are welcome to tryout and
no prior football experience is
necessary.
All potential players will be
required to register with the
NWFA and pay a one time $35
fee. Please come prepared to
practice and bring a photo ID
and proof of insurance.
Additional information can
be found at www.pensacola
power.org,


Real season begins Friday


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editcr _
Now the football season
heats up for eeryone in Santa
Rosa County.'
For Pace and Milton the
real season begins as District 1-
4A action beings.
The Patriots i4-1j l \ill Lrat -
el to face the Gators of
Escambia County (3-2).
Escambia Count% has been
a big surprise this season as
they are the second leading
scorer in District I-4-A \ith 117
points scored. whilee allowing
the fewest %% ith 56. -
Last Friday they fell prei to
the high flying Eagles, of Pine
Forest in a 14-0 loss.
In 2005 Escambia went 3-7


\%ith wins o\er Tate. West
Florida Tech, and Rutherford.
The Patriots defeated them
40-20 as they handed the
Gators one of
its 3se en losses.
No\% Pace
seems to hate
re bounded
from their regu-
lar season loss
since late in
200-4 % ith
another dra-
nmatic in over
Washington 33-29.
The 33 points scored
against W\Vashington %as the
most scored this season since
the Patriots needed 35 to defeat
Ft. Walton Beach b- one.


Kickoff for Pace and Tate 1l-3I got their first \%in
Escambia is set for 7 p.m. of 2006 by a score of 38-7 over
North of Escambia High. Springfield Rutherford.
Milton \%ill be playing the Last season the Aggies
improved Tate Aggies. '\ent 0-9, but had se\eralprob-


GP ump battling the call


SClark to. celebrate birthday y and career Saturday


Jim Clark, who has umpired at Gospel Projec ts for the past 10 seasons, is seen enjoying a days work call-
ing the sport he loves.
Submitted photo


By BILL GAMIBLIN
PG Spor'' Edii'
A \er\ familiar \oice was
missing this past baseball sea-
son at Gospel Project's Park
and that \oice belonged to
umpire Jim Clark.
Clark, who will turn N0 on
Saturday, is battling cancer, but
the disease is keeping him from
letting his 'oice be heard at
sporting events and from
behind the plate.
A \ery maid sports fan tho
has'unpired baseball in the area
for over 35 years found out
something was w rong after he
.lost his voice at a football
game. e ,
, "We were at the Milton and
Pace football game. last year
when Jim went horse," said his
wife Sue. "At first we thought
he was yelling very loud.
"But as time Went on he
continued to feel v.orse and
worse." ",
After several doctor \isits
Clark was told in late March he
had stage four lung cancer and
immediately began treatments.
The radiation . and
chemotherapy treatment may.
have taken their toll on Clark,
but it hasn't dampened his love
for ,sports or life.
"I love watching kids play
ball," said Clark, "and' I
enjoyed watching them grow
up and go on to play college
ball.
"It w wouldn't surprise me to
see some one in the pro ranks
before long."
One player he remembers
vividly pitching is current Tate
principal Ricky Shackle who
Clark described as a good
pitcher.
But it didn't matter who
was pitching Clark loved being
at the game.
"It was odd not umpiring
this year at Gospel Projects,"
said Clark. "When I would go
See, UMP, Pg. 4C


lems during the off season as
Ed Rigby is their third coach in
less than a year, but last
Friday's win ended a 12-game
losing skid in Gonzalez.
"This is the start of a new
season," said Milton coach
NMike McMillion. "This is the
season that counts and every-
one is 0-0 going into this
Friday."
Kickoff is set for 7:30 at
Tate.
Wh ile Milton and Pace are
starting district play this Frida,.
Jay is in the heart of their dis-
trict schedule and at 0-2 in
District 1-A are in need of a win
as the\ host Liberty Count\ at 7
p.m.
See, FRIDAY, Pg. 2C


Haley Millsap is seen pondering
a putt in a golf tournament ear-
lier this year.
Press Gazette photo
.--by--Bll/Gamblin

Pace makes

a push on

golf links

By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor .
Pace tested the waters on
Friday in the Miracle Strip Golf
Tournament and came away
with some impressive finishes.
The girls', who were led by
individual medalist Haley
Millsap, finished third with a
team total of 363.
Millsap, who carded 'a 70,
was seven strokes better than
her nearest competition as
Niceville's Ana Garcia carded a
77 at the Ft. Walton Municipal
Golf Course.
Gulf Breeze took the team
honors with a 344, followed by
Niceville's '354 and Pace in
third at 363.
"Haley played well," said
Pace head coach Becky King.
"April (Thompson) held her
own with an 82 and Lauren
Summers came in with a 90.
"I think this tournament
and the FCA tournament will
help us to start getting ready for
See, GOLF, Pg. 4C


Lady Royals continue to run over

a Rocky course in prep for districts

�7 Central's winning streak is now at five matches


The boys race got off to a strong start for Jay, but Washington and
company.proved to be too much for the young Royals squad
Saturday.


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
The J.D. Mac Invitational
had a few surprises, but the
biggest one came in the girls'
race.
Washington did not take the
top honors as they have at most
of the area cross-country meets.
This time the Lady
Wildcats finished second to Ft.
Walton Beach.
Ft. Walton's girls took the
top honors with 51 points fol-
lowed by Washington (88) and
then Catholic (102) to round
out the top three.


Following the race Jay's
girls coach, Becky Holley, was
ecstatic with her team's fourth
place .finish, but more impor-
tantly it was their third win over
district rival Rocky Bayou, who
finished sixth.
Jay, who raced without sen-
ior Taylor Dover, posted a score
of 119 to Rocky Bayou's 143.
This marks the third con-
secutive race the Lady Royals
have topped their biggest dis-
trict rivals in four meets.
Rocky Bayou edged Jay at
the Wildcat Invitational by hav-
ing the better finish of its sixth


place \runner. At the very next
meet they tied again, but the
Lady Royals had the better
sixth place finisher.
On the boys side
Washington defeated Navarre
34-48, with Ft. Walton Beach
finished a distant third with 73
points.
Jay finished 10th with 278
points, while Rocky Bayou was
llth with 289 points, but
Pensacola Christian Academy
was ahead of both teams in sev-
enth with 209 points.
Individual results at the
See, PREPS, Pg. 4C


I







The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Pane 2-C


Sports




Milton wins old-fashioned battle


Wednesday, September 27, 2006 ,'


G Woods runs wild as


defense stalls Indians


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
It might be hard to notice,
but Milton head coach Mike
McMillion had a small smile
after the Panthers dispatched
Choctawhatchee 21-3.
Milton (3-2) showed a very
balanced attack in what was an
old-fashioned football game.
"We played four quarters in
a very physical contest," said
McMillion. "And our defense
played well against a Well
coached team.
"Tonight they toughened up
and gave us good field position."
After each team traded hits
like two heavyweights, Milton
was able to string some plays
together for their first touch-
down of the night.
Dustin Land, who went 7-
of-8 for 70 yards, found Ledrey
Bender for a 21-yard pass near
midfield. Land then called his
own number and rushed the ball
down to the Indians 20.
From there it was Christian
Woods with one of his two
touchdowns on the night as he
scampered 20 yards for the
score.
Choctaw then threatened
until the offense forced a
turnover and Milton's offense
went back to work.
With 3:19 left in the opening
half Talris Brown scored from
six yards out as the Panthers
went up 14-0 following the extra
point from Matt Shouppe.
Milton appeared to give
Choctaw excellent field position
just before hAiftime when the
Panthers fumbled, but they got
the ball right back when Logan
Neely intercepted a pass and
returned it to midfield.,
Choctaw's defense gave the


Indians some excellent field
position in the third quarter as
they started their second drive
from the Panthers' 41.
Nine plays later Jack Allen
kicked a 28 yard field goal to
make it 14-3 and that would be
as close as the Indians would get
in their bid to spoil the Panthers'
home coming.
Defensively the Panthers
were giving the ,much larger
Indian linemen fits as they
allowed Choctaw 137 yards
offensi\el,, with two plays
accounting for 35 yards of that
total.
"We played much better as a
defensive unit against
Choctaw," said McMillion. "We
still need to keep practicing hard
and getting better.
"We must work.hard on
staying low as a defensive line
and scraping and using our
hands better as linebackers."
Milton iced the game "then
they took advantage of a short'
field follow\ ing a Choctav. punt
gave them first and 10 from the
Indians 38.
Two plays later Woods
would score his second touch-
down of the game from 312
yards out as he carried the ball,
seven times for a 64 yards on the
night.
The biggest thing for
McMillion is the team did not
show signs of being distracted.
"Tonight we played as a
unit," said McMillion. "There
are a couple of things we need to6
correct, but this was a very phys-
ical contest.
"The biggest thing .to me
was we didn't let the disruptions
of it being homecoming week
become a determining factor in
the game."


Milton's Christian Woods is seen rushing for one of his two touchdowns Friday at the Milton Panthers dispatched the Choctaw Indians 21-
3 on homecoming.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Friday,

Coniiiocd From Page One
The Royals (1-4) have suf-
fered through some heartbreak-
ing losses to Sneads and
WeWahitchka, where one play
in each game could have them
at 3-2 %w ith a 2-0 district record.
A loss would just about
eliminate the Royals who are
trying to work their way


through injuries to Tyler
DeGraaf and Rush Hendricks,
who are not expected to play,
this Friday.
Hendricks was supposed to
be checked about a possible
torn ACL he suffered in
Friday's loss to Sneads on
Monday.
LibertN County appears to


have one of the strongest
defenses in District 1-A as they
have allowed only 25 points
this season, which is the lowest
in the district.
"We have 4 district games
and then Baker. Think about
every play"! "We need to get
our guys. well so that they can
plaj." Bell said 'after Fridj\ 's


loss to Sneads. "This is not a
one person or one player team.
We all lost this game."
Monday the practicing will
start all over, Bell added.
"Tonight, we just didn't get the
job done."
Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@srpressgazette.cod6


Pace returns to form in



defeating Washington


7 The Patriots

score with 56

seconds to spare

B% KEN BARNES
PCg_ ',.,,'i C.,,,l SP,,l 'P 'l l _
Bi Plia\s. lots of offense
and momentum sw ings chtarac-
terized Frida s tussle bet'.' een
the Pace Patnrios and the
\\ashinoion \\ ildcats
The resilient Patriots posted
their fourth % in of the -ear er-
sus one loss min a dramauc 33-29
win.
Pace came out of the start-
ing gates with a vengeance
while marching 80 yards in
eight plays to go up 7-0.
Junior tailback , Airi
Johnson's four successive car-
ries for 65 yards catapulted the
Patriot (4-1) offense.
From the Cats' 20, it took
just three snaps with Bear
Comer hitting pay dirt from one
yard out.
Washington (2-2), stymied
by a stiff Pace defense, was
held a bay throughout the first
period and didn't dent Patriot
territory until early in the sec-
ond period.
Pace cushioned their lead
and appeared to put the contest
away earlyon a Johnson 13-
yard run. The shining play in
that drive was an aerial from
Patrick Coogan to Tre Daniels
for 31 yards.
Washington's offense final-
ly got untracked late in the
quarter and tacked on their first
score of the night at the 5:25
mark.
Two series later, Pace
received 'a gift' via a shanked
Wildcats punt to put the
Patriots in great field position
at the visitors' 40.
Four snaps later, with the
ball resting on the Wildcats'
12, Eric Martinez drilled home
a 29 yard field goal to make it
17-7 Pace.
The fireworks were not
over, however, as Michael


Pace's Riley Hawkins is seen earlier in the season with a big catch
against Gulf Breeze. On Friday the Patriots' offense came back to life
in a 33-29 win over Washington High.


Taylor booted a 56-yard field
goal through the uprights as
time expired in the half to
make it a 17-10 contest.
Pace secured momentum
early in the third quarter as the
Patriots pounded the 'Cats
defense for 58 yards in nine
plays as they were at the
Washington 1.
On second-and-goal
Coogan's keeper gave Pace a
short-lived 24-10 lead.
Washington came right
back and scored at the 5:21
mark to make it a game, but
Drew Cumberland blocked the
PAT to make it 24-16
The Wildcats defense stiff-
ened and held the Patriots to
three and out before keeping
the momentum offensively as
they scored again to make it
24-22 after misfiring on a two
point conversion.


Washington would take
their first lead with the third
quarter drawing to a close at
29-24.
Martinez was good on his
second field goal to cut the
Cats' lead to 29-27.
Washington was looking
to drive the dagger into the
heart of the Patriots until
Brandon Morel intercepted
Lynderrick Williams at the
Pace 22.
Pace took. the ball with
6:13 remaining in the game
and slowly worked their way
down the field as Daniels
plunged in over the goal line
with 56 seconds remaining to
ice the game and yet another
amazing comeback.

Story written by
Ken Barnes. Reach him at
sports@srpressgazette.com


Josh Marshall is seen fighting for yardage in Friday's home opener for the Jay Royals.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Pirates rob Royals 13-12


3 Injuries now add to Jay woes this season


By NONA BARDIN
PG Sports Correspondent
Any hope for a win for the
Royals Friday night was dashed
as freshman running back/line-
backer, Rush Hendricks, took a
bad hit and possibly tore the
ACL in his right knee.
"We are playing our hearts
out", stated Hendricks. "The
injuries are killing us."
But Hendricks went on to
say that the team could only do
what it can with the players that
they have.
Unfortunately, for the
Royals (1-4; 0-2 in district 1-A)
there was no win, as the Pirates
of Sneads took the win home in
a 13 - 12 ending.
Leading 12-7 Jay appeared
set for their second win of the
season until the final minutes of
the game.
Sneads quarterback C.J.
Whittington hit Allen Campbell
for a 72 yards strike giving the
visiting Pirates the ball on the
Jay 2 yard line.
After a penalty pushed
them back to the Jay 9,
Whittington found Alex Scott
in the end zone with 21 seconds
remaining.


While starting the ballgame
at a fairly fast clip, the Royals
were intent on not coughing up
the ball in fumbles and they
succeeded.
The Royals marched the
ball downfield several times, as
they did in the opening drive of
the game, without netting that
critical touchdown to help
jump-start its offense.
Hendricks scored the first
touchdown of the game when
he plunged in from the one to
give the Royals a 6-0 lead after
the attempt for two failed.
Then after senior Ben
Smith intercepted a
Whittington pass Hendricks
scored again.
This time it was from 17
yards out and the two-point
conversion failed again, but the
Royals led 12-0 with 3:21
remaining in the first half.
Sneads responded with an
80-yard kickoff return from
Scott to cut the lead to 12-7 and
it remained that way until the
Pirates (3-2; 1-1 in District I-
A) final drive of the night.
Then Hendricks went out
and it all began to fall apart.
Defensively the Royals


kept the Pirates at a safe dis-
tance from their goal line in"
what proved to be a very hard-
hitting affair.
After falling behind 13-12,.
the Royals couldn't respond.
fast enough as the time clock:
ticked away the final seconds of:
the game.
Head Coach Elijah Bell;
told his players that "we let one'
slip away." He looked ahead to'
the games that are yet to be:
played. "We have .4 district:
games and then Baker. Think;
about every play"! "We need to;
get our guys well so that they;
can play," Bell stated. "This is,
not a one person or one player:
team. We all lost this game".
Monday the practicing will:
start all over, Bell added.'
"Tonight, we just didn't get the
job done".
The Royals will be home,
again on Friday night after:
what seemed to be a season on,
the road. Jay will host Liberty,
County in another district.
match up. Kickoff is set for 7.
p.m..
Stoiy written byv
Nona Bardin. Reach her:
at sports@srpressgazette. comrn







The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday. September 27, 2006


Sports


For some it was too easy


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
Some commented as they
dropped their picks off on
Friday this would be a tough
week.
Well for some it might have
been, but it also got very.
crowded at the top of the leader
board as 11 individuals finished
Saturday night tied with records
of 9-1 out of the 53 who played
this past week.,
Carol Daughtery, 'Jill Hood,
Paul Tate, Glenn Chavers,
Michelle Jobe, Anthony Jobe,
Jerry Miller, Harold Henderson,
Joseph McDonald, Mike
Boddy, and Shawn Hill all fin-
ished with just one loss.
The games missed by these
11 outstanding prognosticators
ranged from Mississippi State
over UAB in overtime, Pace
coming from behind to beat
Washington, Sneads and the
Hail Mary used to beat Jay,
Troy's loss at Nebraska, or
Kansas beating South Florida.
. So we go to the tiebreaker
once again and this time Glenn


Chavers made it easy as he pre-
dicted Wisconsin and Michigan
would put up 40'points, which
is exactly what they did.
So Glenn can now blame
UAB for costing him a whop-
ping $100 instead of the $25 he
will be receiving.
But I do want to also con-
gratulate Paul Tate even though
he won't get a prize for the
-biggest comeback by going 9-1
after going 1-9 the week before.
Other tiebreaker scores pre-
dicted were Daughtery picking
52, Hood 51, Tate 42, Michelle
Jobe 48, Anthony Jobe 42,
Miller 45, Henderson 41,
McDonald 58, Boddy 46, and
Hill 43, so it was a very close
competition.
Finishing at 8-2 this past
week were Don Musgrave,
Larry Culpepper, Noreen Hill,
Ashley McWaters, Berna Faust,
Martha , Chavers, Jake
McDonald, and Martin Brake.
Almost half of the group
finished 7-3, which included'
Scott Terry, Henry L. Swift,
Walter M. Starnes, Tyler


Bohannon, Donna Miller, Judy
Hodges, Becky Jones,
Dewayne Queen, Wade Miller,
Scott Miller, Paul Hinson,
Jeremy Brown, Bryan
Hathaway, Dustin Luther,
Murray Rutledge, Neil
.McDonald, Douglas Filbert,
Gloria Mason, Gary Upshaw,
R.D. Williams, F.C. Brake, Jr.,
Keith Kirchharr, Larry Gibson,
Barbara Hagy, Jimmie Hood,
and Ronald Taylor. I
Rulan McWaters, Letha
McCaskill, Rusty Jones,
LynRae Johnson, Frank Mason,
Mayhew Brake, and Gray
Weaver all finished at 6-4.
Burdette Miller finished out
the week at 5-5.
Overall for the Wings on
the Go prize Shawn Hill is lead-
ing with 82 percentage points
with a record of 41-9, while
Mike Boddy is not far behind at
80 percent with a record of 32-
8.
To be eligible at this point
of the -contest you must have
predicted a minimum of 40
games or four out of the five


weeks we have played.
Several are right on the bor-
der line and it is critical you
play every week so you can
have your chance to win this
very Wild Wing prize.
As district action heats up
critical high school games will
involve' Pace at Escambia,
Liberty at Jay, and Milton at
Tate.
In the college ranks Ohio
State could face a big challenge
in Iowa, Georgia Tech and
Virginia Tech could be interest-
ing as well as Troy at UAB in
the -battle of the Alabama under
card.
And the tiebreaker should
prove interesting as we are
looking for the total points that
will be scored between Temple
and Vanderbilt.
, Please be reminded that all
entries must be turned in by 5
p.m. on Friday or post marked
by Sept. 29 to be eligible.

Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@srpressgazette.com


Season Leaders


Name Record Pct.
Shaun Hill 41.9 82
Mike Bodd 32-8 80
Noreen Hill 31-9 7 .5
Don Misgrve 31-9 .5
Paul Hinson 38.12 76
lerem\ Bro\ n 38-12 '6
Henry L. SLift 38-12 76
Mark Hodges 30-10 -5
Jimmie Hood 30-10 75
LvnRae lohnson 37-.13 74
Glenn Chaj.ers 3- 13 7-4
Walter Starnes 29 11 '2.5
Keith Kirchharr 36 14 72
Gar) Up,sha\, 36-14 2
Br\an Hathav'av 36-14 72
Murray Rutledge 35-15 70
Letha McCaskill 35-15 70
lerr\ Miller 35-15 "0
Dewa\vne Queen 35-15 70
Ronald Tm lor 28.12 170
R.D Villiam-s 28-12 70
Larr\, Gibcon 28-12 70
Rust lones. 34.16 68
,Rulan Mc\Valers 34-16 68
F.C. Brake, Jr. 34-16 68
Neil McDonald 27-13 67.5
Martha Chavers 27-13 67.5
Martin Brake 33-17 66
Carol Daughtery 2t6-14 65>
\\ade Miller 32-18 64l
Gra, \\Wea'.er 32.18 64


Ashle, McWaters 32-18 64
Michelle jobe 25-15 62.5
Donna Miller 31-19 62
Berna Faust 24-16 60
Beck' Jones 24-16 60
Those who have not met
the 40 game minimum.
Ill Hood 9-1 90
Anthon\ lobe 9-1 90
.\Austin \Aorle\ 16-4 80
Larr, Culpepper 8.2 80
Floward \ ann 8-2 80
Harold Henderson 23-7 76.7
lohn Rale 22.8 73 3
Scott Terr', 21-9 70
T\ ler Bohannon 14.6 70
Scon Miller 7-3 70
Gloria Mason --3 70
Barbara Hag', "-3 70
loseph McDonald 20-10 66 7
Jud' Hodges 13-7 65
Da'.id Rohannon 13-7 65
D.I. Jone; 13-7 '65
Douglas Filbert 19-11 63.3
Lance Ezelle 128 60o
lake McDonald 1 2.8 60
Frank Mason 6-4 60
Paul Tate 16-14 53.3
Burdette Miller 5-5 50
Ma-he\. Brake 9-11 45
Dustin Luther 12-18 40
C(od\ Martin 4-6 40


HERE'S HOW TO WIN:
Pick the most games correctly and win $25.00.
Pick all ten games correctly and win $50.00.
Pick all ten games correctly and the exact com-
bined Tie-breaker and win $100.00

INSTRUCTIONS:
Find the games listed in the ads below each
N eek. Fill in names of winning teams. Only
score needed for tie-breaker game.

CONTEST RULES:
1. Anyone may enter, except Press Gazette \ I '.
emnployee-s and their fanulies.
2. Entries must be on ar. oti cial .
blank-no reproduction v., II be -
accepted.
,.,.In.case of ties in-the number,
of winners picked,
the tot:l score of the "tiebre.,ker" -aime
i will be used
to determine the winner. Should tied entries ha,-e the same
correct, or same number of points closest to actual score. the
prize "will be divided.
4. Only one entry may be submitted per person.
5. The decision of the judges will be final.
6. The winner will be announced in the fol- *" - --
lowing Wednesday issue of the Press ..
Gazette. -'
7. Entries must be in the Press Gazette
office or postmarked not late than 5 p m i l.
on Fiday of the contest week. !t1





" i ....


OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM


FOR 2006



PRESS GAZETTE



FOOTBALL CONTEST

I



r--- -----------------------------
I NAME: ,
ADDRESS:
CITY:
IPHONE:__


2. 7.
13. 8. I
14. 9. ,
5._______ 10.I

l*TIE BREAKER/Total Combined Score____
- --m----------- --- --------- ----- - m
TIE BREAKER: Total Score of
Temple at Vanderbilt


1. Pace at Escambia



Downs'
PAINT & BODY
BOB DOWNS, Owner
Phone: 623-4342
Hwy. 90 - Milton, Pace


YOU DON'T "ORTA" WANT
TO .ELL YOU HOME

YOUR
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7. Oregon at Arizona St.

AND WE'RE NOT ABOUT TO
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FEDERAL C CREDIT UNION
2. Liberty at Jay , . '

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(85 50 32
3. Milton at Tate .,,

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8. Alabama at Florida
eMERALD COAST
, IA .TCov.O,-TrNvE Ej ACCeSSO.s.IeS
iN4q HtihjI-.y 9.0 East
Milton, FL 32570

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David Beach


IVIU U I'L - T, " i I V I .
L. ..... .... .^ '- ' 4061 Avalon Blvd. I
Milton, FL 32583


* ,Ph (850) 623-2084|
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HaIve~ you given yet



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''.


Hours of Operarion
Sun.-iTurs10:30am - 9:00om
Fri. &Sat. 10:30aim -10:00pm


after al I
Mim.. A a ce
Hoei iGames


Page 3-C


Gazett Football, Co n'test


p 11 loll I I I I I I IIIIIIIIIIJIlow


7


11







rage 4-4, . . . . ..
Sports


Ump


Continued From Page One
to the park I can remember the
kids coming up and asking me
what field I had.
"They were disappointed
when I didn't get their field."
Gospel Projects Athletic
Commissioner Todd Brainerd
also found the going hard this
season because he had to
replace Clark in the umpiring
rotation.
"He is very knowledgeable
about baseball and softball,"
said Brainerd. "So it was very
difficult for us to replace him
after we got the reports we
weren't expecting from the doc-
tors.
"Jim didn't put up with
anything from the coaches or
players; he treated everyone the
same and people respected his
authority on the field."
This Saturday at the Red
Barn on Highway 90 they will
be celebrating his birthday at
noon and invite people to come
out and visit with Clark.
The lunch is a dutch treat
affair, but the fellowship of
sharing baseball and other
sports memories is what Clark's
family hopes will make this
birthday very, very special.
Clark's wife pointed out
she is looking forward to hear-
ing the stories and enjoyment of
reminiscing, but explains hugs
and other contact could be bad
for him.


"He is currently in his sec-
ond round of chemo and his
numbers are way down," she
explained. "This has been a
rough year for him and we want
this birthday to be extra special
for him."
For the man who has
umpired everything from little
league to high school games
across Santa Rosa and
Escambia counties, the biggest
thrill he got was calling a strike
when he worked behind the
plate.
"It was something special
when the pitcher had his break-
ing ball working and caused the
batter to bail out of the box,"
said Clark. "Then the ball
would break back over the plate
and I would call it a strike.
"The batter would look at
me like I was crazy, but knew
that I was right."
This past May, Clark
missed his "first T-Ball World
Series in quite a while.
"I went out to watch them
play the first three days of the
tournament," recalled Clark. "It
wore me out to the point I
couldn't make it to the champi-
onship game.
"They has asked me to
come out and do the coin toss
for that game, but I just could-
n't do it."
Clark paused to gather
some strength for his voice. "I
did not want to go out there and


..,-'. -' ' ' �______________i v
Jim Clark is seen visiting the T-Ball World Series this year instead of serving as an umpire as he has for the past 10 years.
Submitted photo


take away from the game even
though they asked, me to
umpire."
Brainerd knew he had
someone special in Clark and
depended on him to work on the
protest committee at Gospel
Projects,. but his biggest plus
was that you knew what was
going on during one of Clark's


games.
,"The kids love and adore
him," said Brainerd. "He made
it 100 percent clear and out was
an out and you didn't walk
away wondering what hap-
pened. '
"He was a force to be reck-
oned with and you knew he was
in charge at all times."


Preps


Gloria Raney led the way for the Lady Royals Saturday as they defeat-,
ed Rocky Bayou for the third straight cross county meet
Press Gazette pboto by Bill Gamblin


Continued From Page One
meet for Jay and Central's three
runners on the boys' side were
not available at press time.
The race also featured some
new equipment to benefit vari-
ous programs at Jay High
School as the Jay Quarterback
Club purchased a, new timing
system.
"I am very thankful for
what they have done for not
only cross country, but the
entire school," said Holley. "I
am proud our community helps
and is as supportive of all the
athletes at the school as they
are.
"Most quarterback clubs
only support football, but;at Jay
.they support all of the pro-
grams."
In volleyball last week
Central saw their winning
streak extend to five matches
with wins over WS Neal and
Rocky Bayou.
Central is now 9-3 overall
and 4-1 in District 1-A with two
more district matches remain-
ing.
Against Neal on. Thursday
Central won 19-25, 25-15, 25-
23, 18-25, and 15-13.


In the win Alesia Enfinger
had 24 assists, while Krista
Adkinson posted 13 kills and
Ashton Melvin recorded 13
digs.
The Lady Jags on Friday
won a close affair over Rocky
Bayou in a make-up district
game due to the lack of offi-
,cials.
Milton (5-10; 5 8 in
District 1-4A) fell at home to
Washington in three straight
games 25-13, 25-15, and 25-17.
Pace (3-8; 1-6 in District 1-
5A) was swept by Choctaw 25-
14, 25-18, and 25-17.

Story written by
'Bill Gamblin. Reach him,
at sports@srpressgazette.com


East Bay Pensacola Bay Navarre Beach Blackwater River
. -..-" - TlhuriaN.Sepit 2-.. 0'i-:. Tiiur,.J', Sep,' 2 1. 1 200'1 TimiSu r ,. Sep ' ',,ia ri-.ur IJ-, i,.. 2' 2' i "
2.42 AM 2.17 Fet 1.5IAM l.61 Feet 6.39 AM Surn I se . ?S M . - Iii F,1
, . 6:39 AM Sun rise 6:41 AM Sun rise 11:39 AM 0.32 Feet 6:40 AM Sun rise
- 12:21 PM Moon rise 12:23 PM Moon rise 12:21 PM Moon rise 12:22 PM Moon rise ,'..
, '. 3:15 PM 0.25 Feet 1:58 PM 0.20 Feet 6:37 PM Sun set 3:45 PM 0.25 Feet
6:37 PM Sun set 6:38 PM Sun set 10:16 PM Moon set 6:37 PM Sun set
f0:16 PM Moon set 10:18 PM Moon set 10:16 PM Moon set


Friday, September 29, 2006
3:47 AM 2.25 Feet
6:40 AM Sun rise
1:21 PM Moon rise
4:44 PM 0.11 Feet
6:35 PM Sun set
11:12 PM Moon set

Saturday, Sept. 30, 2006
5:01 AM 2.32 Feet
6:17 AM First Quarter
6:41 AM Sun rise
2:16 PM Moon rise
5:48 PM -0.03 Feet
6:34 PM Sun set

Sunday, October 1, 2006
12:15 AM Moon set
6:19 AM 2.38 Feet
6:41 AM Sun rise
3:07 PM Moon rise
6:33 PM Sun set
6:37 PM -0.10 Feet


Friday, September 29, 2006
3:03 AM 1.87 Feet
6:41 AM Sun rise
1:22 PM Moon rise
3:27 PM 0.09 Feet
6:37 PM Sun set
11:14 PM Moon set

Saturday, Sept. 30, 2006
4:17 AM 1.94 Feet
6:17 AM First Quarter
6:42 AM Sun rise
2:18 PM Moon rise
4:31 PM -0.03 Feet
6:35 PM Sun set

Sunday, October 1, 2006
12:17 AM Moon set
5:35 AM 1.98 Feet
6:42 AM Sun rise
3:08 PM Moon rise
5:20 PM -0.09 Feet
6:34 PM Sun set


Friday, September 29, 2006
12:20 AM 1.88 Feet
6:40 AM Sun rise
12:47 PM 0.25 Feet
1:20 PM Moon rise
6:35 PM Sun set
11:12 PM Moon set

Saturday, Sept. 30, 2006
1:29 AM 1.93 Feet
6:17 AM First Quarter
6:40 AM Sun rise
1:46 PM 0.20 Feet
2:16 PM Moon rise
6:34 PM Sun set

Sunday, October 1, 2006
12:15 AM Moon set
2:49 AM 1.96 Feet
6:41 AM Sun rise
2:39 PM 0.21 Feet
,3:06 PM Moon rise
6:33 PM Sun set


Friday, September 29, 2006
4:43 AM 2.25 Feet
6:40 AM Sun rise
1:22 PM Moon rise
5:14 PM 0.11 Feet
6:36 PM Sun set
11:12 PM Moon set

Saturday, Sept. 30, 2006
5:57 AM 2.32 Feet
6:17 AM First Quarter
6:41 AM Sun rise
2:17 PM Moon rise
6:18 PM -0.03 Feet
6:35 PM Sun set

Sunday, October 1, 2006
12:15 AM Moon set
6:42 AM Sun rise
7:15 AM 2.38 Feet
3:08 PM Moon rise
6:33 PM Sun set
7:07 PM -0.10 Feet


Clark admitted he put his
all into the game.
"Sometimes I was so loud
on a call the catchers would
jump out of their skin," said
Clark. "Then they would smile
and let you, know they loved the
excitement.
"I loved the excitement and
it was real[."


All Clark wanted to do in
his life was to grow old.
"I was not expecting this at
all," said Clark, who continues
to work at Whiting Field.
"I guess it is just not the
Lords will."
,Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@srpressgazette.com


__________________________________________________________________ 1


Golf

Continued From Page One
district."
This tournament was the
first time either Pace squad
played 18 holes in competition.
"There is a big difference in
having to stay focused for nine
holes, which we normally play
,during.the season and 18," said
King. "These tournament will
help us to start working on
that."
. On the boys side Pace fin-
ished fourth with team total of
309.
Pensacola Catholic took the
team honors with a score of 294
followed by Niceville with 303,
.and Mosley rounding out the
top three at 306.
Pace's Parham Booker led
the Patriots with a 75, which
was five strokes behind individ-
ual medalist Matt Krembel of
Choctaw High School.
"Although we shot a 309
we felt like we could have shot
a little lower," said Pace coach
Keith. Kirchharr. "Parham had
one bad hole that he tripled on
and Tanner (80) had a rough
front nine.
"But all in all they turned it
around on the back nine."
Pace's Jake Bradley and
Tyler Klava shot low scores by
carding a 76 and 79 respective-
ly.
Jay Watson, who has
missed most of the season due
to injury, shot an 80.-


Booker "
"Playing in the Miracle'
Sinp Tournament. \%e _goi to see-
some of the Okaloosa Count\v
team that are in our district.'�
said Kirchharr. "There are a lot
of teams in our district that have
a chance to win.
"We are just going to have
to put us some real low scores."'
Kirchharr feels the district
is still up for grabs and tI%
achieve it his team needs to'
play more consistent.
Milton was scheduled toj
play in this tournament, bu1t
elected not to due to homecom-',
ing activities and commitments
Story written by,
Bill Gamblin. Reach him"
at sports@srpressgazette.conV


Comniy SotsRsut


Gospel Projects
Soccer
Through Sept 23, 2006


U


Turbos
Strikers
Rockets
Bullets
Talons



Tankers
Pilots
Fighters
Stallions
Choppers

U


Bears
Tigers
Hawks
Pacers
Falcons



Eagles.
Bombers
Heat
Sharks
Knights


J-6 Standings
East
W L 1
4 0 (
3 1 1
3 1 (
2 2 (
0 2


West
W L
2 1
2 3
1 3
0 0
0 4


J-8 Standings
East
W L 1
2 1
2 1 (
1 3 (
1 3 (
0 3


West
W L
3 1
3 0
3 1
2 2
1 3


Turbos
Strikers
Rockets
Bullets
Talons

U


Turf Pilots
Broncos
Chargers
Steelers



Patriots
Argos
Twisters
Raiders

L


Cobras
Lightning
Thunder
Stingers


East
W L
4 0
3 1
3 1
2 2
0 2


-10 Standin
East
W L
2 1
2 0
1 3
1 3

West
W L
3 0
2 1
1 1
0 2

1-13 Standin
East
W L
2 1
1 2

0 3


West
W L
Comets 4 0
Barracudas 2 1
Tarpons 1 1
Tornados 1 2


. T Pts.
0 10 ,
1 9
0 7
0 4
1 1 "

gs

T Pts.,
0 6 ,'
0 5 .
0 2
0 2



T Pts.:
0 8
0 5
0 3 '
0 0

gs

T Pts.;:
0 6 ,
0 3
0 3 "
0 0 '.


T Pts.�:
0 10
0 5 ,
0 3 ,
0 2


12 --- A -t


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, September 27, 2006,�,'







WednesdayU~, SeptemberU 27, 20U
Sports
Th 1at os rs aetePg -


Cross


County


support,


and success

The J.D. Mac Cross Country Invitational was
a tremendous success this year as coaches
and officials had an much easier time keep-
ing up with times thanks to the new clock
purchased by the Jay Quarterback Club.
(Right) Drew Kennedy is seen running dur-
ing Saturday's meet at the Jay City Park.
Press Gazette photos
by Bill Gamblin


FISH BUSTERS
BULLETIN i


Freshwater Fishing Regulations:
What's best for your area?
By: Bob Wattendorf, biologist,
the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
It's a real balancing act to try to decide whether we
need more rules or less rules, stricter rules or more
lenient rules to deliver what Florida anglers want here
in the best recreational fishery in the world.
Florida Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC)
Division of Freshwater Fisheries management's overall
mission' is "to manage, enhance and preserve Florida's
freshwater aquatic life for public benefit." Our day-
to-day objective is "to provide optimum-sustained
use" of these resources.
The balancing act results from "optimum" meaning
different things to different people, so we try to find out
what the local public wants from'the resource and pro-
vide it to them in appropriate locali.:.ne For instarice,
in somn place people mar. %ani j roph. bass fishery -
- even if all the fish have to be released. In others, they
may be more interested in a bream and catfish fishery
that provides a lot of fish to take home for dinner.
In making these decisions, we must ensure we man-
age the resource, not only for current demands, but
always with an eye to the future, so the resource can
be "sustained" over the long haul.
"Use" recognizes other values than just harvest.
For instance, the catch-and-release ethic and the
importance of aquatic habitats to land owners, boaters
and others have to be part of the picture. So, our,
challenge is to balance the future of the resource
based on the best available science, with anglers and
others enjoying the resource, while at the same time,
balancing the goal of optimizing public use in local
areas and keeping regulations simple.
One case in point is "spider rigs." These are boats
with multiple fishing rods, sometimes more than 20
per angler, that often target black crappie (speckled
perch) or other schooling fish. Similarly, some shore-
line anglers like to put out multiple poles, sit back and,
wait for the action to unfold. Although these anglers
may increase their odds, they are still restricted to the
same bag limits as an angler with a single rod or pole.
Many issues come to mind here, but our first
concern is the resource. Our biologistsexamine the
population, size and growth.rates of fish and evaluate


9
their habitat and available forage to
get a good idea of the health of a
fishery (for instance, the crappie fish-
ery in Lake Kissimmee).
They also examine the use of the
fishery via creels (surveys of anglers
to determine how many fish they are
catching and how many anglers are
using the resource how often).
From that we determine if the
population is being over-fished or
remaining stable. Remember, native
freshwater fish species have relatively short life spans,
and natural mortality often exceeds angling mortality,
so allowing some harvest is often good for the resource
and does not adversely affect its sustainability. If har-
vest needs to be regulated, this is normally handled by
creel limits, while size limits can help ensure fish have
an opportunity to spawn at least once before they are
caught, or help create higher-quality fisheries,.with
more, large, fish. /
The second issue is public use and social perception.
In the case of spider rigs, as long as creel limits pre-
vent these anglers from taking more fish than other
anglers and still protects the fishery, should the state
regulate how an angler takes them? This is a quandary
fishery biologists and administrators frequently deal
.with and applies to many other techniques, such as use
of electronic fish finders, elevated platforms on boats
for spotting fish, use of live versus artificial bait,
underwater cameras for spotting fish, fish scents, flash-
ing lights and more.
As recreational fishing technology continues to
improve and some anglers revert back to what they
consider to be more purist techniques, such as fly fish-
ing from a kayak, this question is bound to come up
more frequently. So, as we weigh the options, we are
interested in knowing what's best for your area.
The FWC wants to hear from our stakeholders, and
one way you can provide feedback is to participate in
online surveys. The question of spider rigs is featured
at MyFWC.com/Fishing. Scroll down in the right hand
column and click "Quick Input Survey" to let us know
what you think.
Each year, FWC staff evaluates proposed changes to
hunting and freshwater fishing regulations. Changes
supported by staff are submitted for consideration at
the September Commission meeting. This year is an
off-year, meaning criteria for changes are conservative.
Proposed rule changes are posted on our Web site
"http://myfwc.com/commission/Final2007-
2008InternmetCommentVersion.pdf' MyFWC.com/com-
mission/Final2007-2008IntemetCommentVersion.pdf
and mailed to identified stakeholders for review and
comment. Any approved changes will be adopted in
February 2007 and become effective July 1, 2007. The
public input process for 2007 will be on an on-year
basis and allow more options to be considered. Watch
this column or MyFWC.com for how and when to
make your suggestions.


--oIol


- *1.


I0n
,ion


for


, . t ,-, , ,_,, . 1

,. ',*


~a~ie~ a~.-
I~
'L .~
,y~;2 >~
I ~


,1


S


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ideas, helping them succeed in the classroom and beyond, Strong reading skills and
curiosity about the world around them are important charateristics that will help chil-
dren both now and in the future as adults. Do your child a favor and subscribe to the
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' , . . ".
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,, y C,,.


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 5-C


Wagi*�-ail-- O--A--I-mh 97 nnc










L~o~a'~ Pfe~

~Thzette


PAGE 6-C


_______ JV


90 ANNOUNCEMENTS
i .92 AUCTIONS
94 MEETINGS
' 96 PERSONALS
98 TRAINING
EMPLOYMENT
102 DRIVERS
104 GENERAL HELP
106 HOME BASED
BUSINESS
108 HOTEL/MOTELS/
RESTAURANTS
110 LABOR
112 MANAGEMENT
114 MEDICAL
116 OFFICE WORK
118 PART TIME
120 PROFESSIONAL
. 22 RETAIL
.124 SALES'
TELEMARKETING
126 SKILLSTRADE
128 POSITIONS WANTED
GARAGE SALES -
STYLES SECTION-WED.
202 GARAGE SALES-SAT.
SERVICES
305 AUTO
310 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
315 BUSINESS SERVICES
320 CHILD CARE
325 DOMESTIC
330 EQUIPMENT REPAIR
335 FINANCIAL SERVICES
340 HOME REPAIR
345 LAWN CARE
350 SENIOR CARE
355 SEWING/ALTERATIONS
360 MISCELLANEOUS
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-RENT
402 APARTMENTS
404 COMMERCIAL
406 HOMES
408 LAND
410 MOBILE HOMES
412 ROOMS FOR RENT
414 ROOMMATES WANTED
416 VACATIONRESORT
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-SALE
502 APARTMENTS
504 COMMERCIAL
506 HOMES
508 INVESTMENTS
510 LAND
512 MOBILE HOMES
. 514 VACATION/RESORT
PETS/ANIMALS
702 BOARDING
704 LIVESTOCK
706 LIVESTOCK SUPPLIES
708 PETS
710 PET SUPPLIES
712 LOST PETS
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
802 ANTIQUES
804 APPAREL
806 APPLIANCES
808 ARTS & CRAFTS
810 COMPUTERS
812 FARM EQUIPMENT
814 FURNITURE
816 JEWELRY
818 LAWN EQUIPMENT
820 LUMBER'HARDWARE
822 MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
824 OFFICE EQUIPMENT
826 SPORTING GOODS
828 ELECTRONIC
(STEREOTV.VCR)
830 MISC.,SALE
832 MISC 'WANTED
834 LOST MERCHANDISE
TRANSPORTATION
902 AUTO SUPPLIES
904 CARS
906 BOATS
908 FARM EQUIPMENT
910 MOTORCYCLES
912 MOTOR HOMES
914 RECREATIONAL
916 SPORTS UTILITY
VEHICLE
918 TRUCKS
920 VANS
922 OTHER


DIRECT CAR
DETAILING
will come It ,our1 c.-
calion, dependable
& reasonable
623-84-15
IS STRESS Ruining
'four Relahonship,-4 '
Buy arni Read DIA-
NETICS by L Ron
Hubbard Call
18131872.07l2 ,-,r
se-r d 8.00c r Dia-
neiliC,. 3102 t'l. Ha.
oarna Ave. Tl-mmpa
FL 3i36i


"'LAND AUCTION'
200 Props Must be
Sold!"
LOA ' Crown E Z Fi-
n.rincirig. Fr-e.- Caia-
log 18Ci'0i37-1603
vwA LAI'JDAIJ-
CTIOrj (.jm rIRLL
Eact. LLC Auctior,
L. enie AB25,09
[,lark Bulziuk Au'-:
i.:,neer
LiC.en-e 4U3448,
Jeft J.:.ri ..rn.or, Auc-
lioneer
LicenrE AU?.4.49
Stace.,, Mauk Au,:-
iionr Feer
Licer..e AL -'447


assi:


,LAND AUCTION,
20' Props Musi be
Sold'

Low Down E-Z Fi-
nancing. Free Caia-
log 18001937-1603
www LAIJDAU-
CTIOr c-om nrRLL
East LLC Auci:nrn
Bus.
Licenie:AB2509.
Mark Bulzluk Au,.-
11orieer
License-AU3-148.
.iJe1 Johnrion Auc-
iioneer
License AU344194.
Slacev ..lauk Au,:-
tioneer
License.AU3447


102
Drivers
DRIVER
DEDICATED RE-
GIOIJAL Guaran-
teed Home EVERY
Wkenrii Avg. $725 -
$1025.'wk 65':':. pre-
loaded pretarped
Mobile, AL Terminal
CDL-A required
877-428-5627
vwww CldriverS cmrn
GULF COAST
REGIONAL
TRACTOR TRAILER
DRIVER
'CDL
*Clean MVR
"Fork Lift experience
'40 cents per mile
plus drop off
"Home at night

Call: 850-626-8578


102
Drivers
DRIVERS-FLATBED
AL, GA, & FL
Dispatch
HOME
WEEKENDS
GUARANTEED
Earn Up to 39c/mi

BCES In -.Me1dical
Denial & Vision Co..
Malcrh 401K in 90
days, 50:: Pre-load-_
& Tarpird Loadl

[lu l be ai leai-i 2'3
yrs old & 1 yr OTR
Flatbed E:p
SUNBELT TRANSPORT
Call Herb-
1-800-494-8471
,J A ,,, ,,-' ,,I T, ,,,'' Orn

104
General Help
DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!!!
Werner needs enirv-
level se-rn oriver,-r
rJo e.p required
Avq. $36k+ 1,I vrr
601: homer
ni'3ritly we-kly. CDL
Irairning ' r ,our area
1-866-280-5309
EXPERIENCED
SHEET rock
hanger; and lini:h.-
ers,carpenter, r in-
d,,m.y n r, .lu.1 ha, .
.vaiid dr..erI . ii:en.r e
20'7-7 70
HELP WANTED
Root Leak Repair
Spec allI
Pav pending e. per,-
ence Send wor-l e,:-
perien:e into ic
Leai'mi-:lier
PO Bo--.. 842
MilIon. FL 325'721
0842


104
General Help
HANDY MAN or
Cornracior needed
1.: do a varnel, cf re-
pairs on cominercial
and residential pr:p-
enies eed some-
one dependable ,
hmrae-,I and who
does a greair I.:.lt.
A4:cepirn indi'.i dual
rbido. or each propcr-
ry. i850u995-43,5s

DELIVERY
DRIVER
C,'lI: A C:DL lr,..-r
re::.rJ r e- . . ' Ii
::r,. erriience C.
, lehi-rc rI..1Tn � Fr,
Schedule Roules.
uIl C, : ,:uij io, -rr r
,:'ieri.,d OrCj.i Free

per:.-.nr T-re H T
H-a, r.r,, L,:, "1:1111
.W '.:...e nrer,i ,I I

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
r..ii0on 'ert-p, pers,
Inc idba The Sanria
Ro,:.a Pre_-- Gazelle
and The Sanla Ro,.a
Free Pres.i re-
-erv.'eS mhe righl i:.
cer .:or, rfleeil- I iv
re,. a'e edii :r releCi
an, ad'.. ereme i
noI r meelirng .
-iranidaid t acc:epi-
r,:e Subrr .:.,:,r ,:1
an .ad.e-rlic,:.-er I
doe. i':, ,::,nh;iiiuile
an aiareernenri 10
publiih :..aid ad'.'er-
ienen-r Publ':alior'
(OI ar advi-rc .crrril

ar areen'ie r or r
,:,,rlrlo ed pi, ii, -a-
ihorj


:iec


104
General Help
YARD HELP for
Landscape Supply
buSlness. Good, val-
id drivers license &
forklit e'perence a
plus Monrdav-Friday,
8-5, Salurdays 8-12
Call 850-626-8578.
106
Home Based
Business
WORK AT HOME
C, ILII JE
2j people needed
irnimedalely Earn a
parn r lull lime in-
come Apply Free
onine and gel sanr.
e n' 80(i-8)7-.176
WW waruja corn
Enter Ad Code 1826
114
Medical
RN'S & LPN'S
Needed Immedialell
iwilh ho.prial e,.peii-
encel
'Daly Instant Pay
'Direc Deposil
'401K "Fle.,ble
Schedules Rn &
LPIJ Conlra,:I Avail-
able
Swann,,.e edic al
Per:o.nnel
6400 (J LC avis Hwy
Suile 5.
Pen':ac.la,FL 32504
l8506 857-7 97
1850185, 7-'8011-la.
CAROL M.
FARMER


S


124
Sales &
Telemarkeling

LIBERTY
NATIONAL
Life Insurance Co
I. expanding is
operalron and is
looking lor people
Io Ill insurance
sales & service
positions. Average
annual earnings
$48554 Frinrge
benelil package:
2 rehremenil unds,
rea Ir insuran.'6e,
paid v'ac lion,
Convention Irps. \
many others
I c eperiernce
necessary We
have on the lob
Training Cor.act
jonamhan Jonesr al
983-7576 or
Fa,.
"esu e Ic,
85.0-.682-152'3
Liberlyv aHonal
Hian EOE


126
Skills/Trade
AUTO BODY Sh,,p
foreman neeed ~ a
Fa.or,, Spe: C:loi
s,,on Ce r r .0 iiii-
Snule_. Ir: im r ll n.
o:n H V8, ,5 :,1 1I-10.
gredl oppo'runih es
lor a qualivy body
lech wlh org:ani:a.
ltiornl and leadership
skills 4 day Wo.'c
weel, woh greal
benril pac I.ag,
850M .23-,t.91


126
Skills/Trade
CUSTOM DESIGN
inlerors
Iow h.riring-iop pay'
General Laborer
Meal Po'ih.er
A1lumrn,rum & S Sl-el
ueldl.lr
Call 850-9,5'.4.4-

128
Positions Wanted
HARD WORKING
.:leaning per-onr
re jed l':.ng l-rrri rtor
,growing clearing
busirne.s Call 994-.
1785



MOVING SALE
5226 Sewell Roa:ad
Million
E>.eculiv deslt va r
Ous other ienmr. 10::.
rn,ariy i: li h l
Stanr Wrdner:.-da'v
September 2T7r al
9am Ic 'prr,
Sale will continueue lor
a lew week.



310
Business
Opportunities
#1 HOME BUSI-
NESS - PERIOD!
G, i Fa,:.' rl: W,
.:,,r I L-: e i cour
Dreamni Aw.,rd Win-
niln Giarnl is Creial-
ing $$$.. i Fe-iuredj
ron CrfIl Ride W.,ie
'. Firni.in: Il Fre.-

'eaulon'atedin.
o:,nie ,:omn


310
Business
Opportunities
BECOME AN own-
er, start part lime.
Gel paid for rielping
other. and begin
building .a business,
you might own one
day. Unique enlre-
preneurial opportuni-
iy with Pro-America
PRIMERICA, a sub-
sidiary of City Group
Fcr more informa-
tion call Michele
Hayes al. 626-7188

315
Business Services
ARTIE KELLER
STUCCO. Li'enLed
arnd Insured. Con-
verii:rnal and Syn-
thelic S,-tlenms. 0o
jorb I:: big nor to
small. Call : .-8.8327
or 626-9164
B&B HOME
IMPROVEMENTS
25 years e..perence.
Free estimates
Licensed & Insured
Call anylime'
(850) 981-3936
"No job too small'
BELINDA'S--
CLEANING Service
I'0u nmake the
lnie-. .we do the
resl"
Please Call:
206 6763


-AS ITO A ACIANi


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WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 27,

2006


S NOW!


IM LLCHAR


F'"9 v Wi JFa =,1I -7


CNA's Part-time in Pace.Department of Health
3-11 & 11-7 Floor Technician F.T Part-time in Pace. Santa Rosa County Health
Our Family, Your Family. One Hours flexible. Must know Department
Family Committed to Loving, payroll and general ledger. Huma ilton Servi clinic
Giving. and Caring- Human Services Counselor III
Giving, and Caring Income ltax knowledge a plus. Minimum QOualifications: Bachelor's
United in making a difference!! Excellent pay. degree-Social Work preferred.
5530 Northrop Road Familiarity with medical
Milton. FL 32570 Fax resume to: terminology and local resources
(850) 983-8888 (850)995-8849 plus excellent
EOE verbal/communication skills.
Incurments may be required to
-. n perform emergency duty before.
P during and/or beyond normal work
hours or days. Salary: $29.500. Only
S Slate of Florida applications
M C I,.accepted - no resumes, please.
Prison Health Services peoplefirsA.myflorida.com. or fax
needs LPN's or CNA's. FT . application to People First at 904-
Sf 636-2627. Please reference
12hr shifts, ith excellent requisition number 640-03029.
Position closes 5 p.m. on Friday.
benefits. Please call October 6. 2006. For more
Debbie at 850-983-1131 or information, call the People First
Service Center at 877-562-7287.
Sheree at 850-689-7942. EO/AA/VP/Employer



The Press Ga�ctl has anlinn-
diate opening for post-pres,-
OVERHEAD DOOR RN'S and LPN'S Needed inseriet. This posMion n wolves
COMPANY Immediately pLitin' the sectLion of the paper
is now hiring for Overhead Door Daiy Insiare Pay "Direct Deposernd F
Installers. Good pay and benefits, '401K "Flexible Schedules I n a.m. to 5 p.m Cal Jim
Experienced and Beginner "RN & LPN Contract Available Fletcher -' 123-2 121 or appl. in
positions available. 6400 N. Davis Hwy. Suite 5 person.
983-2520 Pensacola, FL 32504 T , ,. -, . , , E,, ,.,,,,
yJ, !932 2(850)857-7797 (850)857-7880 E, ....... , ' , ,',,


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FIW06��ritage of Sant ,.'R


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I PAGE 7 THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE /FREE PRESS SEPTEMBER 27, 2006


315
Business Services
BORDER TO Bor-
der Fence and Deck
Company. All types
of fencing installed
and repaired. Spe-
cializing in privacy
fencing and wooden
'decks. Our privacy
'fences are built with
SCREWS. Free Es-
timates. 485-2532.
CHICKEN
GEORGE'S
Lawn Service
Weed Eating,
hedging, landscap-
ing,clearing fence,
refurbishing flower
beds, no job to big
or to small. Senior
Citizen discount. Li-
censed
983-3196
COKER'S LAWN &
TRACTOR Service,
from trimming to
tractor work. Clean
ups, raking, hauling,
mowing, bushhog-
ging, dirt work. Rea-
sonable rates, free
estimate (850) 623-
0493. Licensed & in-
sured.
DIRT CHEEP
Cleaning Service.
We Furnish Sup-
plies. Senior dis-
count with ad.
Homes, condos, offi-
ces. Call 384-2388


315
Business Services
D&D REMODELING
INC. General Con-
tractor All* Types
Home Maintenance;
Roofs to Floors,
Renovations Decks,
Tile, Plumbing, Etc.
Evictions, Move-
Outs, Construction
Cleaning, Pressure
Washing, Painting,
Tree work, & Etc.
Locally owned.
FREE ESTIMATES.
Lic.#4710-0037952
CELL#261-1173
CELL#261-3598

DAN'S TRACTOR
works. Licensed and
insured. Bush-hog-
ging. Discing. Front-
end loading. Debris
removal. Dan Fran-
cisco, owner. Cell
(850) 529-8718
Home (850) 623-
8697

DEPENDABLE
PERSON to clean
your business or
home at reasonable
prices. Call:
626-3551
DOUBLE "B" Land
Clearing. Backhoe
Work. Licensed and
Insured. Bryen Bal-
lard. (850)994-5740
or (850)232-1581.


EDUCATION SERVICES


WE'RE ACROSS THE COUNTRY
AND CLOSE TO HOME. " .


315
Business Services
HANDYMAN SERVICES
*DOORS
*WINDOWS
*SMALL.HOME RE-
PAIR
FREE ESTIMATES
ROBERT WARNER
850-393-2032
LACEY FENCING &
Decking,INC. serv-
ices include fencing,
decking, and marine
construction.li-
censed & insured
ALL WORK GUAR-
ANTEED. Call us to-
day for a free esti-
mate.(850) 623-
2541.,
LOCAL HOME Re-
pair. Paint, drywall,
trim & tile.. Fence re-
pair & installation.
10 years experi-
ence. Contact Paul
McMullen 850-723-
9767.

MIKE KAYLOR
Cement Mason
*Patios
*Walks
*Driveways
Free estimates,
no job too small.
Quality work at
affordable prices.
994-0897.


MOVE 4 LESS
REALTY
Sell your home for
$2995. We do it all
we simply charge
less! J. Scott Terry
686-2620 or
Shawna Carpenter
850-450-4091
Ask about our Buy-
ers Bonus Program.

NEW HOPE PAINT-
ING & WALLPA-
PERING *Drywall
repairs & patchwork
'*Pressure cleaning
(homes, decks, pa-
tios, driveways &
sidewalks) *Carpen-
try work (crown
molding, paneling,
trim base & case, in-
stall cabinets & build
decks) Residential.
Interior/Exterior.
Family owned busi-
ness, over 30 years.
Call The Ericksens
today! (850)723-
2550 or 623-6034
NO, TIME or energy
to cook? Call me!!!
,Healthy home
cooked meals, by
Christian Certified
Nutritionist. 626-
6367 ask for Mary

Divorce 108, Adoption 80
Name Change '55
FREE Typing, Call for
Worksheet (850) 434-7524
1850 N,"W" St. 9
(1 blk. N. of Flea Market)l

SPICER POOLS
Vinyl liner replace-
ment, repairs,
pumps, filters, etc.
Over 30 years expe-
rience. Licensed,
free estimates.
Call 623-4952 or
512-7211
STUMP-EASE
STUMP GRINDING
Most removals $35
Discount for multiple
removals & Back-
yard accessible.
Local Contractor
Retired USN
Licensed & Insured
232-8746


315
Business Services
THE MOWER MEDIC
We service Your
Mower in your home
at your
convenience.
Bob and Andy
Knowles. Office
(850) 626-8300
Cell (850) 982-3576
THE SCREEN MAN
Window Screen on
Site. Repair pr Re-
placement.
995-0719
Cell: 637-5611
Free Estimates

Several Contrac-
tor's to do Repairs
or Improvements to
your Home or Busi-
ness? If so call J &
L Services. We spe-
cialize in Complete
repairs and im-
provements to your
home and business.
Ceilings, floors, car-
pentry, drywall,
painting, paneling,
siding, fencing,
decks, patios, yard
maintenance, tree
service and the list
goes on.
J & L Home Improve-
ment Services
850-287-1914
One call does it
all!

320
Child Care
AFTERSCHOOL
CHILDCARE
Rhodes-King School
District. Fun atmos-
phere. Reasonable
rates. DCF certified.
Call 626-6405
CHILD CARE
in my home, with
lots of hugs and'
TLC. From a mother
of one. Please call
Dawn at 995-8505
Ref's. upon request
CHILD CARE in my
home in Milton. All
ages. Please' call
Valerie: '
983-8043.
NEW DAY care
in East Milton has
openings for all
ages. Fun and edu-
cational environment
after care welcome.
East Milton School
District.
SCall 981-0843,3
REGISTERED
HOME Day Care
has openings for
-newborns to 5. Af-
fordable rates in
Pace area.
994-2354
WANTED
PRE-SCHOOL
TEACHERSo
With 45 hours of
ChildCare Training,
Certificates or CDA
preferred but not
neccesary.
Now accepting Child
Care Vouchers.For
further Information
Contact Tender
Heart Learning
Center at:
626-0117
325
Domestic
CERTIFIED & Expe-
rienced patient care
technician will take
care of your loved
ones, run errands
and do house keep-
ing. Please Call
Susan at 516-0715 .


i"Te EGEpY


* Cathedral Ceiling in Great Room
SSpacious Kitchen & Dining Area with custom cabinets
SArchitectural Shingles * Vinyl Exterior Trim
* Luxury Marble Vanity Tops
* Garden Tub and Shower
SCeiling Fans in all Bedroom and Great Room
SWalk-in Closets in Bedrooms
SFrench Doors * Gas or Wood Fireplace
1 " Ir '. * * - -

Will build on Slab or Piers
S- - * -
A e s . .g-s


Visit our website www.steelehomes.cc


1i,040 Sq f.S o2,SqE, M


Bellchaven
Chadwick
Stratford
Norwood
Mayfair
Diplomat
Hampton
Gemini
Inglewood
Ambassador
York
Oxford
Lexington
Lexington 4 BR
Pinebrook (Signature Series)
Fleetwood
Kingston (Signature Series)
Executive
Regency (Signature Series)
2 Bedroom Duplex
3 Bedroom Duplex


S.S.STEELE
S AND COMPANY, INCORPORATED
Equdouppo.,y 6705 N. Pensacola Blvd. * 477-7880
FL, Lic. #CRC044810 Toll Free (888) 231-1255


aths Sq. Ft.
I 1040
2 1149
2 1257
2 1341
2 1418
2 1510
2 1525
2 1579
2 1586
2 1610
2 1622
2 1713
2 1812
2 1812
)2 1833
2 1949
2 2129
2 1/2 2215
3 2495
2 (1 each unit)1740
4 (2 coach unil)2062


Price
67,800
70,900
78,400
83,000
83,900
86.800
88,100
90,600
98,100
91,200
95,000
97,300
101,300
101,700
116,600
108,400
131,300
126,300
155,000 �
117.600 0
135,800


MOELSOE
MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00-5:00
.AT.*:005 :00,
SUNCLSED


325
Domestic
DEPENDABLE
HOUSEKEEPER
Seeking additional
clients. Over 15
years of experience!
References avail.
upon request..
Call: 994-6236

345
Lawn Care
CLARK'S LAWN
CARE General
Maintenance & All
Types of Tractor
Work - Licensed &
Insured. Call: Mike
Clark at 626-2428
PAGE'S TREE
Service Trim, cut &
remove. Call 626-
2159 (if no answer,
please leave message)
Firewood $50. a
load and up.





402
Apartments
1 BEDROOM fur-
nished apartment
with central heat &
air. No pets. $400.
month, .$300. dep.
Call for appointment.
994-7246
2 BR/1BA
,CH &AC
New Carpet!
Water, Sewer, Gar-
bage Included.
$475./$450.
Triplex-Dearborn &
Peachtree in Milton
1 block off Stewart
(center apartment
facing Dearborn)
Drive by, then leave
message.
Call: 712-7513
FOR RENT
Milton- very nice
2/BR 2/BA duplex
for rent. Completely
remodeled, has fire-
place. Aprox 1300
square foot. Very
nice area. $700/mth
$700/deposit.
995-4335
MILTON, BRICK
2PLEX 2BD/1 BA
Stove, frig, d/w, all
ceramic tile, fenced
yard, Ldry Rm, non
smoking. $575/mo.
. 982-7969 ...
PACE 4PLEX
2 BD/1BA, all c/t,
stove, frig, & d/w,
cathedral ceilings,
large yard, & shed
w/elect. Non-smok-
ing. $600/month
626-2928
PACE, 4PLEX,
2bed/1bath all c/t,
stove, frig & d/w.
Cathedral ceilings
Lg yard & shed
w/elect. Non-smok-
ing $600/mo.
Call: 626-2928
UNFURNISHED
2BD/.1ba Duplex,
CH&A, WD connec-
tions, NO Pets $500
rent, $300 deposit,
Call For appoint-
ment. 994-7246


404
Commercial
700 SQ Fr Com-
mercial space near
Winn-Dixie corner of
Park Ave / Hwy 89/
.$675 a month.
850-384-6194
MILTON/COMMERICAL
OFFICE space for
rent: Aprox 2000
square foot on Stew-
art Street in Milton.
Perfect for Profes-
sional Office Space.
Very nice and clean.
$900/mth $900/de-
posit. 995-4335
OFFICE SPACE
Hwy 90, utilities in-
cluded. $300 a
month. Call Steve at
341-1952 or 341-
1952
OFFICE SPACE
FOR LEASE
6061 Dr's Park,
1,800 sf, newly ren-
ovated. 623-5618

406
Homes
3 BD/2BA Newly re-
modeled, central
heat and air, carport,,
excellent location,
near . elementary
schools. $850 month
$500 deposit
623-9553
3BD 2BA 1 month
old house $1050 a
month. 626-3388

Waterfront 2 story
house with boat lift,
newly remodeled,
$1500 a month.
626-3388
AVAILABLE NOW
Centrally located
clean brick home.
Three bedroom, one
bath, C H/A, stove &
refrigerator. Fenced
backyard. Rent
$725 Deposit $500
First and last month.
(850) 981-9695
CHUMUCKLA
PACE Area
3bd/2ba, freshly
painted, new floor-
ing, fireplace, gar-
den tub, serperate
living den area.
$750 deposit, $750
per month.
293-9762


*3/2 Waterfront
home, 5084 Sam
Miguel Milton $1450

3/2 Home, Milton
4545 Hayes Rd.
$850

Santa Rosa Realty
623-0077
FOR RENT
3/BR 1/BA, fresh
paint, new kitchen
cabinets, new appli-
ances, new air,
fenced backyard.
$850/mo $850/de-
posit. Call850-293-
6559


406
Homes
FOR RENT
3000 sq. ft, 4 bed-
room, Office, 3 full
baths, new applian-
ces, new carpet, in-
ground pool. Immac-
ulate condition.
Great neighborhood.
At $1,300 per month
this wont last long.
478-3725

FOR RENT
4/BR 2/BA Brick
home in. Pace, very
clean 1980 sq. ft.
with 'privacy fence,
1/3 acre, workshop,
hardwood and tile
floors. Convenient
location! $1050/mth
Call Michelle at
Week's Realty 723-
0700 or 994-2989
FOR RENT
4846 Jennifer Lane
Behind Wal-Mart
4/BR 2/BA 1980 Sq.
ft. Hardwood floors.
1/2 acre privacy
fence, large storage
building. Non-smok-
ing environment.
$1050/mth
$10560.deposil.
994-2989
FOR RENT '
Milton - Nice 4/BR
2/BA home. Close to
High School and in
very nice area.
$900/mth $900/de-
posit. 995-4335
FOR RENT
New Adams Home
in Pace. 4/BR 2/BA,
2-car garage, formal
living and dining
rooms, great room,
breakfast area, front
porch. 5327 Willow
Oak Dr. (off East
Spencer Field)
$1300mo. plus de-
posit. Call:
(850)642-2121.
HOME FOR Rent
Milton 1bd/1 ba Du-
plex 1 Block West of
Milton Courthouse
5189 Santa Rosa St
$390/$390
Call:02514275
384-4361
HOME FOR Rent
Waterfront 3bd/3ba,
family roornr with fire-
place, Central Heat
&, Air, large shaded
yard. $1,200 a
month. Call 450-
9201 or 450-1008
HOUSE FOR Rent
Berryhill Road
3bd/2ba, privacy
fence, 8x8 shed,
built 2005, approx.
1100 sq. ft. $895 a
month. Junction Re-
alty 626-7675 or
572-7486
MILTON, 2BR/1BA,
Complete renova-
tion, washer, dryer,
refrigerator.One
block from boat
ramp, elementary
school $690/mo,
$690/deposit 850-
983-9061


CITY OF MILTON

Plant Operator I City of Milton -
Water/Wastewater Treatment Plant: Req:
HS dip., 2 yrs exp as certified operator of
WWTP, poss. of St. of FL DEP Class "C"
Wastewater Certification. This is a full
time City of Milton position.
Salary: $22,776.00 - $24,876.00 annually
DOQ & Exp. To apply contact
Landrum Staffing,
P.O. Box 15700, Pensacola, Florida,
32514 (6723 Plantation Road, Pensacola)*
or call (850) 476-5100. Aps. accepted
through 10/8/06
AA/EEO/ADA/



*BAPTIST
Jay HDspital

RN's- Full-time & Part-time positions. Florida License required. RN in
ER Department. ACLS and PALS preferred.

Radiology Technologist- Graduate of accredited ARRT program or
registry eligible. HRS operator. Day shift. Must have excellent patient
care skills and good communication skills

Physical Therapy Assistant - Full-time, Must have PTA License to
treat physical therapy out patient & acute care. Administer therapy treat-
ments as directed by PT. Sign on Bonus!

Swing Bed Coordinator - HS graduate, CPR certified. Full-time. CPR
certified. Current CNA license. Ability to work efficiently and effectively
with other healthcare team members.

Technical Assistant (Phlebotomist) - FT, HS/GED. Phlebotomy certi-
fication preferred. Must be proficient in Phlebotomy. Data entry, excel-
lent telephone etiquette and customer service skills required.

Jay Hospital offers and excellent benefit package- Applicants inter-
ested please contact Wendy Covert in Human Resources at 850-675-
8069 or fax application to 850-675-8173 or email to
wcovert@bhcpns.org or apply in person at Jay Hospital 14114 Alabama
Street, Jay Florida.


406
Homes
PACE 3BD/2BA
Newer doublewide,
very clean, w/d
hookup. partially
fenced. 2 decks,
non
smoking, $700 a
month/ with early
payment
discount.$700 de-
posit. Call: 623-8628
PACE GARDEN
Home for rent.
Gated Stonebrook
Village. 1,800 S.F.
3BR/2BA Double
Garage, Fenced
Yard, Lawn Service,
New Flooring, No
Pets, $1,300 MO/
$1,000 Deposit
Available 10/15/06
934-3056-or
232-1241
PEA RIDGE.Area
3bd/2ba 1,400 sq ft
nice house. $900
deposit, $900 a
month. Credit
Checks. Carter On-
vestments of North-
west Florida, Inc.
S 994-4008
RENTALS 2 to 3 BR
in Jay Milion and
Pace. $400 to $650
per month. Call:
994-5703
408
Land

LAND FOR SALE
Refer to
Classification
#510
NOW SELLING!
Stafford Farm Sub-
division in Chumuck-
la 1-1.5 acre lots, re-
stricted, curb/gutter,
underground utilit-
ies. $45,000 per lot
& up. Call Kim 994-
4852/393-6042

410
Mobile Homes
2/BR 1/BA off Ava-
lon in Park.
Water/garbage fur-
nished $435/mth
$200/deposit. No
Pets. 994-7918
Baycrest Realty

2BD. 1BA, Air Con-
ditioner New, Heat
and Air.Large Clos-
ets, Quiet and
Clean, in the Heart
of Pace. No Pets.
$475 a month, and
$400 damage de-
posit. 995-1717
2BD/1BA
MOBILE Home
C/H/A, total electric,
on private lot,
screened porch, ice
maker, fridge, dish-
washer, partially fur-
nished. $485 a
month 1st and last
months rent. $300
deposit. Credit
Check. leave mes-
sage if no one is
home. 995-6138


410
Mobile Homes
FOR RENT
2/BR 1/BA Mobile
Home $400mth
dep.& ref. Call:
850-537-6222 or
850-499-7412.
FOR.RENT
3BD 1 .5 Bath, all
electric, washer and
dryer hookup. 10x14
deck, no pets, trash
included.
$525 a month $500
deposit.
Call: 623-1601
IN NORTH MILTON
2/BR 1/BA on pri-
vate lot. Total Elec-
tric. $500/mth
$250/deposit. Nol
Pets. 994-7918
Baycrest Realty,
MARLBORO
VILLAGE
2bd/1 ba, deck,
washer/dryer hook-
up. $400/$400.
Call:723-2532
NICE, QUIET, clean
park. Rent includes
water, garbage,
lawn service. Two
2/br 2/ba, no pets.
$450/mo. & 3/br
2/ba $550/mo.
698-4582 ,
Bruce Lane, Milton
WEST MILTON
3bd/2ba 14x80 5105
Ridgeway Blvd. To-
tal Electric.
$625/$300. No Pets.
Baycrest Realty
994-7918

412
Rooms For Rent
ROOM FOR rent
Milton-Munson
area.Utilities includ-
ed, free long dis-
tance, direct TV, fax,
internet.Non smok-
ing environment,
maid & laundry
available. $325 mo.
957-4616 -

ROOMS FOR RENT
Large rooms,,
utilities included,
washer/dryer, share
kitchen, near Kings
Middle School. $80
or $100 per week,
plus deposit.
Call 626-2786

414
Roommates
Wanted
ROOMMATE
WANTED
Mature roommate
needed. Waterfront
property in Pensaco-
la. Near Navy Base,
10 minutes from
Perdido Key Beach-
es. $450 security
deposit, $450 rent,
needed on or before
9/5/06. Call 626-
8959 or 377-6787
ROOMMATE
NEEDED. Milton
850-449-4070


416
Vacation & Resort'
VACATION RENT-
AL Navarre Beach
1-bedroom town-
house - sleeps 4 -
completely furnished
- pool soundside .
walk to the beaclih &
Gulf. Best rate oni
beach. $600 wkly o0
$295/week-end. d.
Call 623-9553.





452
Apartments




The All New!
Jay

Apartments

FULLY RENOVAI ONE TWOAN
MEEBEDROOM UNMNOW
AVAILABLE W.AC.


850-983-6995






504
Commercial
1.5 AC Corner Lot
Hwy 98 Zoned HCD
Gulf Breeze
$1,200,000

2.25 Ac Vacant Lot
Hwy 87 In Process
of Zoning to HCD
Navarre $1,200,000

4 Ac Hwy 87. one
block N of 1-10 HCD
Milton $3,500,000

10.28 Ac Hwy 87
one block N of 1-10
HCD Milton
$7,500,000

Call Wanda Jordan
850-384-0925 or
John Jordan 850-
420-0133

RE/MAX Total
Properties 850-936,
7771
2 COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS
FOR RENT
Good location in
Milton. Call:
623-5500

506
Homes
1.48 AC 430t oni
the Bay- Garcon
Point $250,000
Waterfront Lot

2.38 Ac with mobile
home and (2) 12x24
workshops. Ameri-
can Farms- Milton
$95,000
1800 sq ft. 3/2
home. Fireplace, 3
car carport, all brick
metal roof, close tc
downtown Milton
$190,000

Cal: Wanda Jordar
850-384-0925 or
John Jordan 850-
420-0133
RE/MAX Total.
Properties.
Toll Free:.
1-877-936-7771


2BD/1BA NICI,
clean and quiet. Al11
utilities furnished.
Pace area, no pets.
Call 995-1717 ,

BRAND NEW
3BD/2BA home,
brand new sub divi-
sion $149,900, Flori-
da Coast Reality,
two to choose from
850-225-9899


SANTA ROSA COUNTY
GOVERNMENT
Accepting applications for the following:

* Probation Clerk I
*Additional employment opportunities
online

Apply online at www.santarosa.fl.gov,
or visit Santa Rosa County Human
Resources,
6495 Caroline Street, Suite H, Milton,
FL, Veteran's Preference will be given in
accordance with FL Statutes.

Drug Free Workplace
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


APAC; Inc. Hiring qualified applicants

for the following positions:

Applicants for the following positions are

eligible for a 200.00 sign-on bonus


* Experienced Mechanics

* Experienced Dump Truck Drivers - Class A or B

* Experienced Skilled Laborer - Asphalt Crew

* Experienced Asphalt Spreader Operator

* Skilled Laborer - Shop


Apply in person, M-F 8am-5pm

4375 McCoy Dr., Pensacola, FL.

APAC is a drug-free workplace & EOE







I PAGE 8 THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE /FREE PRESS SEPTEMBER 27, 2006


506
Homes
EAST MILTON
MLS#307964, 2 1/2
high and dry acres,
1996 Palm Harbor
Manufactured
Home, 2250 square,
feet, 4/3 excellent
condition, $129,500,
fenced pasture,
bring horses,com-
munity water, well,
paved road, Howard
ERA Bill Wallace
Realty, 850-450-
4104 or
850-983-3475
MAKE OFFER
EAST MILTON
Own for less than
you can rent, 1 yr.,
new 4/BR on 1 acre
with all appliances
and over size ga-
rage. 5 minutes to
110. Holley Proper-
ties. $ 179,900 Call
VA Financing Avail-
able With Lease Op-
tion. Call: Tom:
' 449-2983
Owner/Agent


506
Homes
FOR SALE By Own-
er, bedroom brick-
home on 3/4 acre.
150,000. Off Berry-
hill Road close to
hospital. Won't last
long. 850.983.1436
FSBO, 5524 Cyana-
mid Road, Milton,
$129,000.00. Seller
will pay up to $4,000
in Buyers Closing
Costs or Pre-Paid
Fees. Brick, 1200
sq. ft. 90.75 x 160
Lot. A/C Unit, Lami-
nate Wood Floors,
Ceramic Tile, Ceiling
Fans, Light Fixtures,
Wood Blinds, Wall
Paint, Roof & Wood
Porch-All new in mid
2005. Side by Side
Ref., Smooth Top
Stove & Dishwasher
included! Must Sell!
(Q50)982-8392
NEWLY
REMODLED
3BD/BA Waterfront
Home for Lease.
$1200 Security.
Call 626-3388


506
Homes
HOME FOR Sale
or Rent.
New Construction
3bd/2ba, quiet
neighborhood, no
smoking and pets
with approval.
$1000/$1000
Call:360-672-5727
HOUSE FOR SALE
with 5 acres and a
barn. 3 bd/2 bath.
Very spacious.
Wooden and tile
floors, except in
bedrooms which
are carpeted.Beauti-
ful landscaping, with
sprinkler system and
, well. Much more to
see, Must See to
believe. $259,000
Call: 623-0660 or
207-1163
510
Land
LAND FOR RENT.
Refer to
Classification
#408


510
Land
5 ACRES fenced
pasture for sale.
Located off Munson
Hwy, Indian Ford
Rd. Close to Cold
Water Creek.
$90,000 957-8784
or 554-5237
FOR SALE
3 Acres on west side
of Woodville Rd.
Bagdad, FL
$75,000. Call and
leave message.
850-957-4002
LAND
22 1/2 acres located
in Santa Rosa
County. Hwy 89 Be-
tween Jay & Florida
& Brewton, Alaba-
ma. In the Mt. Car-
mel Community.
251-867-5348 or cell
251-510-1777
LAND FOR SALE
17 acres.Hwy 90
East Milton/Harold.
$235,000.
By The Sea Realty.
Call: 642-4278


512
Mobile Homes
FOR SALE
1997 Fleetwood Mo-
bile home. 2/BR
2/BA. 14 x 70, cov-
ered porch, shed, vi-
nyl siding, central
heat/air. All applian-
ces stay. Excellent
condition must sell
immediately. Ridge-
way Blvd. Milton.
reduced to $27,900
Call:983-9316.
FOR SALE
Very nice 14 x70
Mobile Home 2/BR
2/full baths, stove,
refrigerator, new
clothes dryer, chest
freezer, 2 large patio
deck porches. Cov-
ered patio awning,
skirting - like new
central heat/ac Pace
area. $10,500 obo
479-9252


512
Mobile Homes

SECLUDED 6
ACRES NE of
Milton - 10 minutes
from Blackwater
State Park
Two 1999 Palm
Harbor modular
homes. 3BR/ 2BA,
front/back porch
on both, shop,
storage, fully
stocked fish pond.
4 acres fenced
pasture beautiful
family homesite.
Must sell for
medical reasons
$300,000 for all
Call:
(850) 957-8784 or
(850) 554-5237




, ' '

/ tj^


514
Vacation & Resort
LATE SUMMER
Discounts and Free
Golf! Dale E Peter-
son Vacations. Nav-
arre, Okaloosa Is-
land, Destin, South
Walton, Panama
City. www.destinre-
sorts.com
(800)336-9669.


560
Land
NEW, PRE- Con-
struction Golf Com-
munity- Coastal
Georgia. Large lots
w/deepwater,
marsh, golf, nature
views. Gated, Golf,
Fitness Center, Ten-
nis, Trails. Oak
Park, Docks. $70k's
- $300k (877)266-
7376 www.cooper-
spoint.com.
WESTERN NEW
Mexico 62 acres
$110,990 Trees, mtn
views, wildlife, close
to BLM. Horseback
riding, hiking, hunt-
ing. Perfect for vaca-
tion, investment, re-
tirement. Electricity.
100% financing.
Larger acreage
available. (866)365-
2825.


560
Land
SAVANNAH AREA
DESIRABLE RICH-
MOND HILL LAKE
COMMUNITY 1 TO
3 ACRE LOTS from
$79,900 Gated en-
trance, great
schools. Lakefront
and Marshfront
available. Premium
amenities package.
Excellent financing.
PRE- CONSTRUC-
TION SALE SATUR-
DAY, SEPTEMBER
30TH CALL FOR
MORE INFO!
(888)525-3725 X
1796,



706
Livestock Supplies
FOR SALE
Combination Stock
Trailer - 1988 Circle
J, 10,000GVW, ex-
cellent condition.
$3,250.
850-529-7996


708
Pets
FREE TO GOOD
HOME
1/2 Jack Russel
1/2 Daschund
Black and Tan
All GirlsI!
207-2158

712
Lost & Found
PETS
FOUND, LOST Tri-
Color Beagle in
Munson, wearing an
orange flou resent.
collar.
712-9223
LOST HORSE
Last seen 3 weeks
ago in Bagdad area.
Light tan with spot-
ted rear. 981-5444

LOST YOUR PET?
Be sure to call
Santa Rosa
Animal Control
to report him
missing and to
be sure he's not
there waiting
on you to
pick him up!
850-983-4680


G

A

B

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s

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I GH

LBOW


sT

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P,


Ep


T E


E C

T E

ON

NT


ACROSS
1. Clytemnestra's
mother
5. Grass unit
10. Tito, for one
14. Mideast land
15. Hall of Famer Hank
16. Green vegetable
17. Forest growth
18. Furrows
19. Poker declaration
(2 wds.)
20. Pacts
22. Slept briefly
24. Hafez al-Assad's
nation: abbr.
25. Navy off.
26. Tubers
27. Expensive car, for
short
28. Bull, in Barcelona
29. Quiet__ mouse
(2 wds.)
32. Challenger
35. Confederates
37L Spring, in Israel
38. Heads
39. Leave out
10. JFK Space Center
cape
42. Pool member
43. Compass heading
44. Optimist's phrase
(2 wds.)
45. Flightless bird
46. In addition


47. Evergreen
48. Home of "Seinfeld"
51. Wheat measure
54. More alienated
56. Cookie favorite
57. Lifeless
59. __ the Night (1985
film)
60. " Along Without
You Very Well"
(2 wds.)
61. Subside
62. Roman track post
63. Letterman's foe
64. Gathered leaves
65. Pitcher Saberhagen


DOWN
1. SoHo studios
2. Granular corundum
3. Brave one
4. Actress Held
5. _ powder
6. Keglers' hangouts
7. Onassis et al.
8. Speck
9. Traps
10. Jumps rope
11. Miner's need
12. "Nothing can need
-" (George
Herbert) (2 wds.)
13. Peddle
21. Small duck
23. Berserk


26. Sing an alpine song
27. Hit for Hirt
28. One of Jupiter's
moons
29. Culmination
30. Pelt
31. Concerning (2 wds.)
32. Le Mans event
33. "Blank Czech" Lendl
34. Liana
35. Allgood and
Teasdale
36. Crumb
38. Strange
41. Depraved
42. Offended
45. Coined
46. Snapshot
47. Strong point
48. SF athlete, to a fan
49. Actress Davis
50. Zagreb native
51. Bubble and churn
52. Exhort-
53. "Mine eyes have

54. Disclosure of a
secret to the press
55. Leg, e.g.
58. Cagers' gp.


O

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T

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* Local tax


Owwpo"OvAMBIJ


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FR

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I S
N A

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ANSWERS


SEPTEMBER 23,2006.


i i


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M AI I 'I S L E

'A I R E D EE
I E 7B
B I S M JE D I

[E] F A I R K

fli V 0 N H E

S H Y IN E S

K. S 0 E A T

E R R

E E R S R 0

E D s I

R E F I T

I R A T E

E S T E S


I








I PAGE 9 THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS SEPTEMBER 27, 2006


712
Lost & Found
PETS
REWARD "BETSY"
(She needs medica-
tions Daily) Boston
Terrier 11 yrs old,
missing since Sept.
11th. King Middle
School area. Betsy's
hearing is not good.
Black in color with
white between eyes
and around nose,
chest is white. Long
scar on right hip.
* Call 850-626-1049
or 304-1242 anytime


806
Appliances
FOR SALE
Sears Kenmore
Electric Range Mod.
790. Brand New,
never been usedli
$275. Call:
850-313-6227


814
Furniture
CHERRY DINING-
ROOM set w/6
chairs, hutch, and
drysink. $2,500
OBO Call 995-4970
COMPUTER CABI-
NET Old Word
Leather Very hand-
some. Paid $600
sacrifice $120,
Sleeper Sofa Tropi-
cal. Print, Wicker-
Great Condition
$215 994-3749 or
516-3267
FOR SALE
Kitchen table with 4
chairs, Love seat,
small entertainment,
center, recliner in
good condition,
brass floor lamp and
chandelier, mirror
and pictures, book-
case, microwave,
Kirby vacuum clean-
er 1 1/2 yr. old.
983-3879
816
Jewelry
WHITE HALL
White Gold
Wedding Set
18 karat gold, dia-
mond weight 1.25
karat, marguise, bril-
liant, clarity 11.
size 5
$2,700
981-2328


. p.EBN
ALL ABOVOTHEs AI for
j- BEST
THE, BESTIO
PRICING hi& IRT;S
THE BEST MO
VEHICLES I E UME


+0% for 72 onthsis in lieu of rebates& advertised prices & is not combinoll
.,.-iii, lh..:r. WAC. *Pritesoreafterell rebles, ncloudlno Clnyslernenri
urpoeroun reonnie (customer must ualif. The $1o000 Chser Financiol Sot
Cosh isasoilableonly toD aimnlerClrsler employees. Picluresareforillustraltio
| urposesonlp Dealerlot responsThle for fypographlcllerors. Allvehildes
sebiectto prior sale. Plus tux,tt , & fees oi a a vehicles. Plus $269 pre-deller
.n,, . iit ,ii, I. W.A C. These prICes eno onMndapctloer2,
jUG. j,' i.u rr ;.mrl truqd emark of DaimlerC C C corporation. Chrysler
a.. o registered trademark of Daimler Chrysa Corporation.,


820
Lumber &
Hardware
METAL ROOFING
SAVE $$$ Buy Di-
rect From Manufac-
turer. 20 colors in
stock with all Acces-
sories. Quick turn
around! Delivery
Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335
826
Sporting Goods
FOR SALE
Boflex. Motivator II,
$500 obo. Nordic
Track cross country
$200 obo.
619-322-7993
830
Miscellaneous
For Sale,



Centipede-
St. Augustine
Farm Direct
We Deliver
434-0066 |
GLIDER AND
matching / ottoman
(oakwood) $50
Flutterby baby set-
swing,bouncy seat,
soother/mobile,play-
mat, $125 set, jump-
eroo all batteries in-
cluded. Dabrina
Bruce. at 777-8549.
5559 Woodcrest Dr.


QUEEN SIZE cro-
chet bedspread, an-
tique drop leaf table
with 6 chairs, dining
room table with 6
chairs practically,
brand new. Call for
prices. 626-7787




We Deliver & Install
Centipede
St. Augustine
Bermuda
Bailed Pine Straw
Call us first, SaveTime
Call us last, Save Money
Hwy. 87 So. *Milton
626-8578t

832
Miscellaneous
Wanted
PAY CASH for junk
cars or trucks. Run-
ning or not. Call
983-9527


832
Miscellaneous
Wanted
GLASS CRAFTER
needs empty glass
soft drink bottles, (all
kinds). Not necessa-
rily collectors edi-
tions. Will pick up.
Call: 983-8042
WANTED
OLD ROOFING TIN.
Will tear down and
haul. 983-8042 or
393-9617
- S "'"


902
Auto Supplies
NEW MUD Tires. (4)
30x9.50x15 LT Fire-
stone Destination
M/T $350.00 Ph#
418-0729
904
Cars
98 CHEVY Lumina
$400 needs trans-
mission. Excellent
condition. 626-6017
CARS FOR SALE
1989 Cadillac Bra-
hams, leather, load-
ed, runs great, new
w. pump, new tires,
new battery, $1500
Firm.' f' -


906
Boats
BOAT FOR Sale
14ft Sundance Stiff
fiberglass, unsinka-
ble, 25 HP Out-
board, 40 pound
foot
control electric,
galvanized trailer,
like new, $4,295
OBO 994-9946
918
Trucks
1997 DODGE Ram
Good Conidtion
110,000 miles. Ask-
ing price $4,300.
Call 994-4519
87 B2000 Pick-up
truck, will trade for a
van or a car, or will
sell for $1500.
983-7204
920
Vans
. 91 ASTRO VAN
4.3 Automatic trans-
mission, runs good.
AC is cold. $2195,
232-7255


TAMMY


FIRITE NAME BELOW


Press
Gazette


1993 Geo Storm
Red, runs great, cd
' player
$1200
Call: 626-6149
MECURY SABLE
LS 1997 Station-
wagon V-6 1 owner
garage kept, new
transmission, 18-26
MPG. 60/40 folding
seats, luggage rack.
Excellent Condition.
133,000 miles. Ask-
ing $4,200. Call 476-
8399 or 678-908-
8310


VOLVO FOR Sale
or will trade for truck
or van, runs good.
$800. Call 626-6089
906
Boats
14FPT JOHN Boat,
trailer, 15 HP Me-
cury, Four Stroke, en-
gine, 2 life jackets,
fish finder, $2,500,
OBO 983-8510


~
*~f 1~-~ -- I


McKENZIE PONTIAC-GMC-BUICK OFFERS THE


I, Il


'06 PONTIAC
TORRENT

P6014 Is


k - h * *


'06 G'iJ~ l ALL NEW
ErvoY o ' 07 GM
SLE YUKON
#F6178 #T7048


_21_939 '31,.
'06 BUlJI(K '07 PONTIAC G6
TERRAZA CONVI

#B6048 ,l- -.


38


How To Make Your



Car Disappear...



Simply advertise in the Classifieds

and get results quickly!


7,IReady For Delivery!

PLUS...COME BY & CHECK OUT OUR USED CAR & TRUCK CLOSEOUT!
*Plus tax, tag & fees. "Includes SmartBuy Bonus Cash. With approved credit. Must be financed through GMAC. +See dealer for details.
ww. mckenziemnotors. com





PC)NT I'CJ * MVC- - B3UICK.
Hrwy 90 At 8, IVIilton * 623-3481,


WE ARE PROFESSIONAL GRADE -BEYOND PRECISION


THE SANTA ROSA'S

PRESS GAZETTE
&

FREE PRESS

6629 ELVA STREET

MILTON, FL 32570

(850)623-2120
OR

(850)995-0330-PACE


Brick
Family


Maegan


-r-r



















*0


I


AAk,,oe-..e





































Wed tall e- smpl-ca rgeless
*~rogram!
As bu ur uyr ons*9L


trimming to tractor work
Bushhogging - Dirt Work
J2 Clean-ups Raking


Roots


Hauling - Mowing LICENSED AND INSURED
-8 6r- COr'ErjTi.rEO AL . '. rilTHETIC S .:TE..J'1
Reasonable Rales - Free Esrimaies 6 9 O-37
(850) 623-0493 69O-8O3 /
Cell- 485-7977 6 9 16
,L. Licensed & Insured . 626-9164


MIKE KAYLOR
., Cement Mason
C Buildings / Garages
Patios, Driveways Walks All Steel Construction
Frese Del, er) Stip, Trim 4ncnor. '


SD&D '
REMODELING
E ,liERAL COlJTR.'\CTOH
ALL T' PES HO.*lE r..IAINTEHlAlIICE
Rookie toc FlooIC - Renu-alionsS
- Deck; -Tile - Pluirbinr1
- Evictionsrr - Move-ous
. Construc licon Cle.ariing
- Pressure Washing - Painting -- Etc.
FREE ESTIMfATES Cell# 261-1173
IC.#4710-0037y952 Cell# 261-359
B.,


Cell: 850-206-4008
v Financing Available


BOBCAT AND TRACTOR WORK
Diiveways Culveils, LiDhl Land Clearing
Site Prep and Clean Up
Fill Dir, Brown Dirt and Limerocl' Hauling


Tony Joiner
(850)554-3460
(850)981-3211


rDAN'S TRACTOR
WORKS
LICElISED,?. INSURED
Bush-Hogging - Debris Removal
Front-End Loading ~ Discing
Cell (850)529-8718 1
Home (850)623-86971


1


* Also Removes
s,. Bushes, Hedgerows


* Backyard Accessible
* Local Contractor-Retired USN
Senior Discounr
:o 232-8746 Irurd


Land Clearing
Dirt Work
Free Estimates
Brown fill or clay $160.00
per load in the Milton
Area


850g83; 90*o -mIe
850-1e54-3507cIuel I-


SNEW HOPE PAINTINGi
& WALLPAPERING
Interior - Exterior - Residential
S- Dry Wall - Pressure Cleaning


Wallpapering ~ Carpentry Work
Call the Ericksens today!
723-2550 ~ 623-6034
If no answer, please leave message




Backhoe Work
Stump & Tree Removal
Hurricane Clean-up
Dirt Work
No Jot) Too Big or Small
I icnsed , Insue,"


-5-.
~fr.
5..-


Call today lor a
Free Eshimale.
All work Guarenieed
' S.R.#98400-11197
-, : ,= . . = -.. -,-,

850-623-2541
Solui:ons lor l .-,i your liencir.,_:i r,-n
"L:c:al-iiv O*rneI ' tI ,r WVCor rirhip
SlaVLirrantv A


-. .5


Home Improvements
N.F., Inc. n
' Insured .. .
Licensed C '
Free Eslin-males
25 Years Experience

850) 981-3936 anytime
'! Work


ANN BARNHILL
TRUCKING, INC.
Fill Dirt Brown Dirt
Limestone Crushed Asphalt
Driveway Culverts
Mobile Home PADS


: u * U.

HW

1~~~~~~


HANDYMAN SERVICES

' DOORS
'WINDOWS
*SMALL HOME REPAIR


Free Estimates Quality work
No job too small Affordable prices

850-994-0897


JS


.1,


Need Stucco Work?`�
"all

ARTIE. KELLER STUCCO
No job too big nor sma


F


pft


I