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 Section B: Community
 Section C: ‘Styles
 Section D: Sports
 Section D: Classifieds


UF00028408 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Santa Rosa press gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00098
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Creation Date: December 10, 2005
Publication Date: 1984-
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00098
 Related Items
Preceded by: Milton press gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        A 1
        A 2
        A 3
        A 4
        A 5
        A 6
        A 7
        A 8
        A 9
        A 10
        A 11
        A 12
    Section B: Community
        B 1
        B 2
        B 3
        B 4
        B 5
        B 6
        B 7
        B 8
        B 9
        B 10
        B 11
        B 12
    Section C: ‘Styles
        C 1
        C 2
        C 3
        C 4
        C 5
        C 6
        C 7
        C 8
        C 9
        C 10
    Section D: Sports
        D 1
        D 2
        D 3
        D 4
        D 5
        D 6
        D 7
        D 8
    Section D: Classifieds
        D 9
        D 10
        D 11
        D 12
        D 13
        D 14
Full Text






I Milon I Pace P Rd e Ja* A I.illeil1 iI-ie Harld *B a d *t i


&ianta osma's Press

-W I


WEDNESDAY
December 7, 2005


FieScion 0I (ls a)* Yor nlyho etonIewsapr1 fr earyI c*tu


INSIDE


Santa


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer


The challenge period for
Santa Rosa County's wet/dry
referendum is over and no
appeals were filed. The sale of
hard, liquor snow officially on
the way. In fact, by this week-
end, sonie restaurants may.


already be serving the spirits.
Once the vote is certified
and a letter is sent to the county
Planning and Zoning office,
restaurants could begin selling
liquor by the drink this week.
But does this mean area res-
idents- will see an abundance of
establishments serving alcohol
taking oler the count.i?


Probably not, according to offi-
cials and state regulators.
The process for obtaining
licenses falls into two cate-
gories...depending on which
type of business is applying for'
.he license.
The lirst categorN includes.
businesses such as restaurants,
hotels, condominium accom-


modations, caterers, or special-
ty centers.
These businesses can apply
for a license immediately after'
the country's paperwork is
approved, but must meet strict
limitations as to their size, num-
ber of rentable units, seating
capacities 'and/or revenue per-
centages.


Wi.'


Pace had high hopes of ending
their season in Miami. Those
hopes were dashed Friday when
the Patriots fell to Nease High
School in St. Augustine.
See SPORTS, Page 1B.


NEWS


VIEWS
Q..What features would you
like to see with a city swimming
pool?
CRYSTAL
MARTINEZ
"I would
Like to see
adult and
youth teams
as well as
water aero-
bics and
swimming
lessons."


do." qF 1


~The Press
( 4 Gazette is
printed on
100% recy-
cled paper
using envi-


ronmentally-friendly soy-based
ink.




7PD03 13 5.5
121H*


Let the shopping begin
Christmas got underway in Pace this weekend with the annual parade. (Above)-Santa arrived via firetruck for all the festivities. (Below,
left) three youngsters (Sarah Rabinowitz, 3; Sean Everts, 4; and A.J. Rabinowitz, 5) anxiously awaited the beginning of the parade.
(Below, right) floats for the parade took several forms, including this one that included a giant "Rudolph."
Press Gazette photos by Jeff Everts


Milton hopes to begins 'pool project'


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
For those residents in the
area hoping to dangle their toes.
in a community pool, the time
may be coming sQon.
That's according to Milton
Ma\or Gu\ Thompson who
says he would like to break
ground on a city swimming
pool project in the first quarter


of 2006.
The project, which will be
built at the Miltoni Community
Center, will cost an estimated
$1 million, Thompson says.
"Right now, we have about :..
$550,110-600,000 get aside for:
construction of the pool."
Thompson hopes to sit
down with his staff in the near
future to brainstorm ideasfor
financing options for the


remaining balance of the price
tag.
He would like to see the
pool used by local swimming
teams when completed such as
those Ifrom nlilton and Pace
High Schools who currently
have. no local place to train or
hold meets.
Thompson even envisions
hiring a swimming director
who could also coach local


teams if needed.:
Various local youth and
club teams could also use the
pool.
Other uses:for a communi-
Ly pool could be competitions
dn local, state, or national levels
and teaching children how to
swim.
Thompson would also like
to explore a partnership with
the Santa Rosa County School


wet'

The second category per-
tains to stand-alone package.
stores and grocery stores with
attached package stores.
Once county paperwork is
approved, these potential busi-
nesses can pay a $100 fee to be
placed into a. lottery for the
available -quota" of licenses,
See WET, Page 10A.


Anderson
.Lane light


coming



by Feb. 1

By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer


Work on a long-awaited
stoplight at Anderson Lane and
Berryhill Road began last week,
and officials say the light
should be up and running by the
end of January.
That's good news for resi-
dents who must cross busy
Berryhill Road to get home
from Anderson.
The project was scheduled,
then halted, last year-after
county officials found they
might be able to receive grant
money to fund it.
Other improvements to the
intersection include resurfacing
and widening by adding new
turn lanes. ..- ,..
Berrhill serves as an alter-
nate cut-through for drivers
traveling from the Chumuckla
area to Milton.
That traffic is compounded
in the morning by parents drop-
ping off children at Berryhill
Elementary School, which is
situated. centrally along
Berryhill Rd.
Anderson Lane intersects
Berryhill a short distance from
the school and much area
school traffic feeds into it.
In the morning rush hour,
traffic for parents trying to get
to school can back up all the
way to Anderson, as drivers
wait for a clear spot. .
The same problem happens
again in the evening, as drivers
return to Pace via the same
route. Commissioners recently
approved a new 900-home sub-
division along Berryhill, near
the elementary school, which
will add to the neighborhood
traffic load.


i


n 2006


Board to possibly put a cover of
some sort over the pool.
A Milton pool would fill a
need in the area, Thompson
says, as there are currently no
community pools in the County
with the exception of a. pool
which is being built as part of
the new YMCA complex in
Navarre.
Santa Rosa County
See POOL, Page 10A.


S always room fo0r one more. Pass the breadil


-j .. I -


I -


64 I recommend PJC to any student who wants to be in a caring atmosphere and to be considered


more than just a number in class. I could not have asked for more devoted counselors. They have done all


they can in assisting me to meet my financial need. They want to help students any way possible.Y
Deven Ann Walther, student

Choose PJC Reister on campus December 12.-15 ,
,. :., .. .: .:. ,.. .. '" ., -,.'. .., . ,, . ..,2 : : ,._ ., ',,i.' ,; ,.:.. .. : .. :.a.' -; a i '" " ..P; *:' -
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Wednesday December 7, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


*-- County moves toward impact fees,

FAST* ACCURATE FRIENDL dividing area into three 'zones


IBERTY "The fastest growing tax

CTAX preparation company ever".
SERVICE *


5675 Hwy 90, Suite C


f Rockwell Plaza


Santa Rosa County leaders
are poised to begin tapping con-
struction for dollars-an effort
they say is designed to help
make growth pay for itself.
Payments, under a plan out-
lined Monday, would be paid
by developers in some
instances, by builders in others,
and by homebuyers in still oth-
ers--depending on the type of
conditions. surrounding the
development.
The plan would take effect
in January, although some proj-
ects currently in the pipeline
would be subject to the fees.
Impact fees are charged
against new development for
part of the infrastructure costs
(like roadways) it creates.
Santa Rosa officials hosted
a workshop earlier this year to
study ways to format the pay-
ments.
At that time, leaders dis-
cussed the option of requiring
developers to pay up front for
new growth; and also discussed
the possibility of Special
Assessments, which spread
payments out.
Special assessment pay-
ments would be due when
building permits are pulled.
During impact fee hearings,
developers had argued that up-
front fees would be transferred
to new owners anyway, through
home price increases.
At Monday's hearing,
County Planning and Zoning
Director Beckie Faulkenberry
presented a plan that would
allow special assessment-type
payments for new growth.
Builders would have the
option of paying up-front
impact fees-or choosing to
defer payments to special
assessments.
Up-front fees would accrue
directly to special accounts,
earmarked for .infrastructure
improvements.
Deferred fees would be
imposed as special assessments,
and payments spread out over
seven years.
The special assessments


could be bonded (borrowed
against) by the county, and that
money deposited in special
accounts.
A portion would be due up
front.
If implemented, Monday's
.plan would base fee amounts
for housing development on
construction location.
The plan would divide the
county into three zones, each
with a separate fee collection
account.
Single family home fees in
urban areas would run about
$2,090, while rural fees would
be lower-about $1,200.
Rural fee-areas would
encompass Rural Development
Plan boundaries established
earlier this year to preserve
farmland zones.
Officials say growth's
impact on those areas is less,
and thus, fees would be set at
lower rates.
Commissioner Tom Stewart
expressed concern that lower
rural zone fees could encourage
more building in those zones.
Officials say they'll keep an
eye on north-end development
trends to help prevent develop-
ers from taking advantage of
the lower fee rates.
Commissioner John
Broxson questioned whether
spreading payments out would
reduce the amount of money
available immediately for proj-
ects like road improvements.
"One of the concepts we're
here dealing with is, we need
those improvements [made]
today," he pointed out.
"People are probably going
to opt almost universally for the
[long-term] assessments... one
of the reasons for impact fees is
to have the cash in hand to get
the project done, right?"
Revenues would still be
available for use right away,
because the county could bond
against expected payments,
according to Commissioners.
Officials say the county will
be able to borrow money at spe-
cial, lower rates for bond issues.


On single family residential '"
construction, fees would be col-b,.
elected at the building permit
stage.
For subdivisions, fees
would be due at the final plaf ">
stage.
Fees for commercial or---*
industrial development would
be collected at the building per-
mit stage.
The Planning and Zoning
Department would decide how' ";-
much commercial development. ,,,'
would. pay on a case by case-
basis.
Officials say they'll work to'.
make sure the fees don't inter-
fere with luring industrial
growth to the area.
Mobile homes on individ-,
ual lots would fall under similar '
rules as single family homes,
while mobile home. park con ^!
struction would be treated as,'
commercial developments.
Officials contend special
assessments present a better
way to collect the fees, because
they spread payment responsi-.,,
bility among developers-,
builders and homeowners, and'
lower the up-front financial "
impact, according to Monday's '
presentation.
Commissioner Gordon
Goodin says he opposes impact",
fees, contending the assess- ,
ments punish young homeown- "
ers, the working poor and
retirees, by raising home prices. f
"You can paint it pink, but :
in my mind it's still a tax," he,
remarks.
Commissioners decide,
Thursday, whether to enact a
new ordinance requiring the
fees.
Officials say they hope"'-
implementing fees against netw
growth will inspire the public to,
vote in a one-cent sales tax,, :
next year.
Talk on that issue is expect-a
ed to surface in the early por--.
.tions of 2006.

Reach us at:,.
News @ sr-pg. corn


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Wednesday December 7, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Local


ISchool Board hopes voters

will renew half-cent sales tax


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
SWith one new elementary
school about to be finished and

Oak St.

Fest begins

.Friday a.m.
By DEBORAH NELSON
'Press Gazette Staff Writer
I This year's downtown
Milton Oak St. Christmas Fest
kicks off Friday morning with a
sold-out vendor lineup and con-
tinues through the weekend.
The Fest begins at 10 a.m.,
and features arts and crafts
booths, children's activities,
,confections from Santa's Sweet
!Shop, and a special visit by
Tuffy the Horse.
S Tuffy's scheduled to appear
:Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
Santa's Sweet Shop will be
located at the Women's
Clubhouse, 6863 Oak Street.
Along with sweets and treats,
:the'shop will offer the Women's
Club Cookbook for sale.
A homemade soup and
gumbo lunch at St. Mary's
Episcopal Church continues
through the weekend, in con-
junction with the Fest.
Friday's luncheon opens at
I 1 a.m., at St. Mary's Episcopal
Parish Hall, 6850 Oak Street.
Saturday's lunch begins at 11
a.m and Sunday's at noon.
SThe lunch costs.$5.
The Oak St. Christmas Fest
Opening hours are Friday and
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4; and
unida\, noon to 3 p.m.
Oak Street will be closed
from Escambia Street to Elmira
Street for the three-day event
.nd portions of Santa Rosa
itreel ,. ill also be closed for the
safety of those attending the
show.
Call 623-9635 for more
details.


construction of a new one set to
begin soon, the Santa Rosa
County School Board is think-
ing about where the money will
come from.
One of the sources the
Board has used in the last seven
years is the half-cent sales tax,
approved by voters to assist
with school construction and
maintenance.
This tax adds approximate-
ly $6.4 million to the Board's
coffers this year alone, accord-
ing to Steve Ratliff, Assistant
Superintendent for
Administrative Services.
"This is. an increase from
the first 'year when we collected
only about $3 million," he says.
"We have seen an increase
this year due to Hurricanes Ivan
and Dennis."
The tax is currently sched-
uled to end in October of 2008.
However, Ratliff has already
begun a public information
campaign with hopes of having
.the tax extended when the time
comes.
"Without this money, we
are going to be-in deep trouble,"
he maintains.
Ratliff says the money col-
lected over the years has been
used for the maintenance and
building of classrooms at every
school in the county.
"The good thing about this
sales tax is, everyone pays, not
only the residents, but the per-
son who stops at a restaurant
while passing through the coun-
ty," he adds.
"We are not levying the full
tax that we could be."
According to Ratliff, the
fact this. half-cent sales tax
passed with a 79% favorable
tally is a vote of confidence
about how the School Board
uses its finances.
The problem the School
Board now faces is the booming
population growth in the coun-
ty.. .leading to more students in
school classrooms.
This, coupled with the new
state class size amendment, has


Ratliff and his staff scrambling
to find space to house all of the
students.
A new elementary school is
on the verge of being finished in
Navarre to help relieve over-
crowding there.
In addition, Ratliff hopes to
begin the bidding process on a
new elementary school in' the
area near Avalon Middle School
by the end of December.
Ratliff estimates this
130,000 square foot facility will
cost in the neighborhood of $20
million... money the School
Board will probably, have to'
borrow for construction using
Certificate of Participation (or
C.O.P.) loans.
There is also the question of
growing student populations in
both middle and high school
facilities.
"We are going to have to
look at expansion at both
Avalon and Sims Middle
Schools as well as a new high
school at some point soon,"
Ratliff says.
The School Board has
received two parcels of land
from the planned new Whisper
Creek development, near
Berryhill Elementary and could
receive an additional two
parcels from a proposed new
800-home development in East
Milton.
This, officials say, will give
the System potential locations
for new schools, but not the
finances with which to build
them,
But Ratliff says, working
with both FEMA and its insur-
ance company regarding funds
from Hurricane Ivan and
Hurricane Dennis, an estimated
$30 million might be found.
"Right now, we' are using
the sales tax money to finance
storm recovery until we get the
funds back from FEMA and our
insurance," he said.
Story written by Jeff
Everts. Reach him at:
jeverts @ srpressgazette. corn


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PAUE A I HE SNTA OSA PESS AZETE DEEMBE 720


EDITORIAL & OPINIONS


Study carefully
Public transportation is typically subsidized by
our tax dollars and it doesn't usually pay for itself.
For Santa Rosa County, that could mean coming
up with hard-to-find money to provide a service
we believe would benefit a small percentage of
county residents.
But the idea is on the table for discussion...as
it should be... to actually see the feasibility of pub-
lic transportation between Santa Rosa and
Escambia Counties.
With the rising costs of fuel and actually own-
ing and maintaining a vehicle, some residents view
the idea as a means of finding affordable trans-
portation to popular shopping areas, grocery stores
and excursions in neighboring Escambia County
and shopping destinations in Pensacola.
To implement the plan would be basically sim-
ple, according to Escambia County Area Transit
Executive Director Chris R.S. Higer.
Hager told the Santa Rosa Press Gazette
recently in an exclusive interview that if Santa
Rosa County went after some funding, then a part-
nership between the two counties could be worked
out.
Santa Rosa's portion of the agreement would
mean purchasing the buses. (He recommends four
at a cost of about $300,000 each.) Also, the plan
would require Santa Rosa to pay a portion of the
regular operating costs.
Hager, who has already conducted a two-coun-
ty study as part of the post-Hurricane Ivan recov-
ery process, says ECAT could easily establish
hourly service between Santa Rosa and Pensacola.
Tentative plans call for bus stops at the Avalon
Park-and-Ride, the Gulf Breeze Wal-Mart, and
Park-and-Ride locations along I-10.
New bus stops would also be established in
areas of Escambia and Pensacola to accommodate
Santa Rosa riders.
On the part of Santa Rosa County officials, we
would seriously suggest a survey be taken to actu-
ally see just how many residents would take
advantage of the service and to determine the
financial feasibility of such a two-county contract.
One important question that needs to be
answered is, how will those wanting the service be
able to get to the designated bus stops.
Another important question the survey should
ask is, how will patrons use the service? For
instance, do riders want the service for job
employment or for shopping?
There appears to be a two-fold purpose of
exploring this joint venture. One is to provide bus
service to those who otherwise can't afford a vehi-
cle, the gas to fuel it and maintenance. The other
factor involves public transportation as a way to
ease congested roadways in Santa Rosa County.
At this particular point in the process, we hon-
estly don't believe bus service will noticeably
reduce.,affilcongestion and if all we have is three
or four buses traveling our highways with few
patrons riding therm, the program will fail.
Some. critics may also bring up the argument
of why we should be providing public transporta-
tion to carry people to Escambia County to allow
our residents to spend their money elsewhere when
they should be shopping locally?
While the idea is worth exploring, it is critical
that these... and many other questions...be fully
answered before any agreement is signed.
The idea sounds good, we only suggest we
take a good long look at it before we move ahead
with this.


DECEMBER 7,2005


G Santa Do~sa & ID
azette
VOL. 98 NO.72
Serving Milton, Pace, Jay
Holley-Navarre, Gulf Breeze
& surrounding communities
Santa Rosa's Press Gazette (USPS 604-
360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays
and Saturdays for $28 per year (in county) by
Milton Newspapers, Inc., Michael Coulter,
Publisher. Periodicals postage paid at Milton,
Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to: Santa Rosa's Press Gazette, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, Florida 32570.
Michael Coulter ... .President & Publisher
Jim Fletcher ........ Assistant Publisher
Carol Barnes .......Business Manager
Deborah Nelson ... .Staff Writer
Jeff Everts .........Staff Writer
Obie Crain, Jr. ...... Special Projects Writer
Bill Gamblin .......Sports Editor
Jim Martin ......... Advertising Manager
Debbie Coon ........Advertising Exec.
.................. Advertising Exec.
Toni Coberly .......Bookkeeper
Rosie Farhart ....... Archives
Tracie Smelstoys .... Circulation
Dale Bowden ....... Classifieds,
................ Graphic Design
David Janer ........Classifieds,
.................. Graphic Design
Freddy Coon .......Pressroom Foreman
Esther Guerra ......Darkroom Technician
Angela Perrtitt ......Production Manager
Debra Wistner ...... Graphic Designer
Cheryl Baker .......Typesetting
Gaspar De La Paz .. .Post Press Leader
Bob Farmer, Latesha De La Paz,
Lissa O'Neal, brian Rinehart
and Esther Guerra .. .Post-Press
Advertising rates available on request.
Telephone all departments:
(850) 623-2120 623-3616
FAX 623-9308
email: news@sr-pg.com
6629 Elva St., Milton, Florida 32570


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County's impact fees a good plan


FM: TOM DANNHEISSER,
Santa Rosa Co. Attorney
Dear Editor:
While people can reasonably debate the pros and
cons of impact fees, it is not, accurate to say that
Santa Rosa's proposed impact fee ordinance favors
"developers". In fact, Santa Rosa's proposed ordi-
nance impacts "developers" much more than the typ-
ical impact fee system used by other cities and coun-
ties.
This is how impact fees typically work:
"Developer" Jones develops a 300 lot subdivi-
sion. Impact fees are not due and payable at this
time.
Lots in the 300 lot subdivision are sold to indi-
viduals and home builders.
When the homeowner or home builder pulls a
building permit, the impact fee is due and paid.
The "developer" therefore does not pay any-
thing toward the impact fee under the typical
impact fee ordinance.
Santa Rosa's proposed ordinance requires the
impact fee be due and payable at the time of the
initial subdivision development. The ordinance allows
"Developer" Jones (or anyone paying an impact fee,
including individual homeowners) the
option of paying the fee over a period of seven years.
This option has several benefits:
Unlike other impact fee ordinances, Santa
Rosa's would bring in a quicker and steadier revenue
stream to fund road improvements. The revenues start
flowing as soon as the plat is filed and does not wait
for the individual lots to pull building permits. As you
know, some subdivisions have vacant lots for years or
decades.
Because the revenue flow begins sooner and is
more stable, it would be easier and cheaper to obtain
any needed financing for major road improvements.
The County can borrow money cheaper than
individuals so the interest cost is less than if the home-
owner financed it within his private mortgage.
The assessments also take the sting out of the
purchase price of the home. This way, the first time
buyers and retirees on fixed incomes can manage their
finances more easily
If the homeowner desires to pay off the impact
fee with a lump sum payment, they can.

Let leaders know this is a bad idea

FM: MANLEY FULLER
Dear Editor:
Recently, the U.S. House of Representatives bare-
ly passed what is known as the Deficit Reduction Act
of 2005. While deficit reduction is no doubt a good
thing, special interests are using the bill as a vehicle to
take public lands and gut existing conservation pro-
grams. This effort, led by Representative Richard
Pombo (CA), who also wants to eviscerate the
Endangered Species Act, would allow the sale of our
public lands, which had previously been mined for
very little cost to the industry, to commercial develop-
ers. These are the same lands that Teddy Roosevelt
and others brought into public ownership to protect
the natural beauty of this nation for future Americans.
It would be the biggest land scam in our history.
The bill also guts the Conservation Security
Program which helps farmers with renewable energy
and efficiency at a time when we need to be augment-
ing these types of programs. Protecting working farm-
lands is a good thing for the economy and for the
environment.
Lastly, the Senate version of the bill opens the
Arctic National Wildlife refuge to oil drilling.
Desecrating one of the last pristine places on this con-
tinent will not make this nation energy independent.
We need to emphasize conservation and the use of
renewable sources.
Please contact Senator Bill Nelson and Mel
Martinez and your US Representative and let them
know we do not want these misguided provisions put
into law.

Thanks to Bill Bledsoe
By: JEFF PENDLETON
Dear Editor:
I grew up here and left the area after high school.
I left lots of family in the area and now I've come
home to help with some family issues.
One chore I had was to ascertain the status of our
family plot at the Milton Cemetery.
In doing this, I had the pleasure of meeting Bill
Bledsoe, the cemetery's manager. Bill was the epito-
me of a professional. He was accurate and thorough.
He takes his duties very seriously and it shows.
I suspect he is an unsung hero of the community.
And I think you are lucky to have him.


Thank you, Bill, for making an unpleasant job so
pain-free.
Semper Fi.

Don't let them mess with Internet
FM: ERIC JACKSON
Dear Editor:
On Wednesday, November 16, the historic
"World Summit on the Information Society" con-
vened in Tunisia. And while the name given to this
United Nations' sponsored meeting sounds sophisti-
cated and futuristic, in reality the delegates in atten-
dance will be debating a measure that could put the
greatest technological development of recent decades
at risk. On the summit's agenda will be several dif-
ferent proposals to strip control of the World Wide
Web from the United States and entrust it to the UN.
History is the reason that the Internet '"s backbone
is run by the U.S. The predecessor for today 's Web
was created by Pentagon researchers as a decentral-
ized communication system that could survive a
nuclear war. But in the ensuing decades, the Cold War
gave way to commerce and the Internet became the
world 's most important engine for economic growth
and the spread of personal liberty. The thirteen super-
computers that control the Domain Name System (or
DNS) that routes emails and Web page requests
through the Internet are controlled by ICANN, a non-
profit corporation set up by the Department of
Commerce. Under ICANN's non-partisan supervi-
sion, online commerce and communication have
prospered as, usage of this American invention has
soared to 1 billion people worldwide.
But although the results of U.S. stewardship of it
creation are beyond reproach, the globalists meeting
in Tunis wanted to endorse a proposal to take control
of the DNS away from ICANN and entrust it to a UN-
approved body. While an impulse to give control of
the World Wide Web to the world" might sound rea-
sonable upon first hearing, this rhetoric masks a dan-
gerous agenda that American officials should resist.
The Internet is simply too important to entrust to
the UN for several critical reasons. First, control of
the DNS would give the UN financial authority over
the Internet. Many of the globalist followers of Kofi
Annan and Jacques Chriac have long advocated an
Internet usage tax as a means of transferring wealth
from OECD countries to the developing world and for
generating revenue for the UN itself. Operating under
the belief that the Internet is part of what they call the
"global commons," advocates of an Internet tax
have estimated they could collect at least $70 billion
a year according to the United Nations Development
Programme's 1999 Report, and the price tag today
would undoubtedly be even, higher given the
Internet's rapid growth since that report was pub-
lished.
Second, UN control would almost certainly
politicize the Internet, making international access to
it contingent on political considerations. If a country
ran afoul of international consensus, who's to say that
the UN would not change the DNS to restrict emails
and Web sites from a given nation? After all, the vote
tally in the General Assembly .from 1948 to 1991
came to 55,642 votes that condemned Israel for one
thing or another, compared to only 7,938 in support.
So who can confidently say that Israel- or perhaps its
ally, the often maligned only remaining superpower-
wouldn't be hit 'with a crippling ban on Internet
access?3
Third, seizing control of the DNS away from
ICANN could lead to a fragmentation of the
Internet- a technical nightmare in which individual
countries set their own standards and apply their own
toll booths. This is the approach that freedom-hating
regimes such as Iran, China, and Cuba- who were all
members of the working group that planned the
November summit- tend to favor because it would
make it easier for them to censor online material and
limit the free flow of information. In essence, such a
scenario would take the "World" out of the World
Wide Web and leave a cacophony of incompatible
national Intranets in its place.
Beyond the UN's ulterior motives and its known
tendency of corruption, the move to can ICANN is
simply without merit. The organization has shown
itself to be committed to a non-politicized Internet
with a DNS based on feedback from all stakeholders,
not just government. With the world's leading
Internet firms such as Google, eBay, and Yahoo all
located in the U.S., ICANN has far more incentive to
promote the global health of the Web than the UN
ever will. And ICANN is already a truly multination-
al affair- the governments of over 100 countries
already serve on an ICANN committee designed
specifically to collect international input. As the say-
ing goes, "If it ain 't broke, don't fix it."


Don't Forget to Recycle Your Paper


You Spoke Out,

Santa Rosa...


Saturday, 5:34 p.m.
This is Doris. Why the heck
don't you put in the addresses of
the ribbon-cuttings? Please put in
the address of the businesses.
We'd like to know. Thank you.

Saturday, 4:48 p.m.
I agree with Jo from
Saturday's Speak Out. I'd like to
see a Riverwalk and a few boat
ramps. Pace has a lot of beautiful
water and I think a Riverwalk
would be great. I just can't think
where any such thing is right now.

Saturday, 4:36 p.m.
This is Jim. In response to Jo.
She apparently doesn't know
there has been a Floridatown boat
ramp and park as long as I can
remember.

Saturday, 2:10 p.m.
This is Louise. I'm calling in
reference to Jo's remark. She
wants a Riverwalk in Pace or Pea
Ridge? Where is the river?? Do
we need to dig one?

Saturday,.11:31 a.m.
I'm calling about the article
about the boys that left the school.
Aren't students supposed to be
supervised by teachers? How-
could this have happened?
Someone needs to be in charge
here because something could
have happened to those kids.

Friday, 3:45 p.m.
I see in the paper where
Avalon Blvd. is going to cost $10
million more. Why don't they get
someone to design a road without
all these bike lanes, curbs, gutters
and the like. We're just throwing
away all the taxpayers' money.

Thursday, 9:59 p.m.
Hi. I live in Milton. I happen
to enjoy this area. One of the
problems...why do people have
to litter? Every traffic light I come
to, I look out the window and see
hundreds of cigarette butts. Don't
people realize they don't break
down and go anywhere. I'm ask-
ing people to please stop throwing
their butts out the window. Let's
take pride in where we live and
let's have a beautiful America.

Thursday, 9:57 p.m.
I'm calling again about East
Milton. We need more businesses
out here. I understand they are
going to be putting 500 more
homes out here. We need some
fast food restaurants; we need a
Wal-mart. It is hard for us to drive
all the way back into Milton. We
need some
things out here
to help us save -'
on gasoline.
Thank you.
You may Speak Out any
time, day or night. Just call our
Speak Out line at 623-5887
and leave your message.


We want you to share your
views on the above topic(s)--or
ANY topic-with other Press
Gazette readers. Your views are
important, too.
Send your letters to: LET-
TERS TO THE EDITOR, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, FL 32570.
(FAX (850) 623-9308.)
Letters may be edited for con-
tent or to fit the available space.
For a letter to be published, you
MUST sign your name and please
include your phone number and
address so we may phone for ver-
ification, if necessary.


DECEMBER 72005


I THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE


PAGE 4A







Wednesday December 7, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Local


U'



7


r,,ow Is.TZ O l .Y
The members of the Hobbs Middle School's Student Government Association are collecting toys to help
"Cram the Canoe" and also assist needy children in the area for the Toys for Tots program. Their col-
lection efforts will continue until December 16 and they hope to collect enough toys to overflow the
canoe.


Press Gazette photo by Jeff Everts


Hobbs crams canoe for tots


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
The Student Government of
Hobbs Middle School in Milton
is sponsoring a "Cram the
Canoe" campaign to collect
'-toys for the U.S. Marine Corps
S''"Toys for Tots" campaign.
Y The school was approached
`by Richard Baldwin of MR
Buildings, the local official col-
lection point for the program, to
see if it would be interested in
'helping in this year's drive.
') The answer from the school
: ';and the Student Government


SMilton mo
.'/-V'


w By JEFF EVERTS
c' Press Gazette Staff Writer
"a The City of Milton is pro-
gressing toward a new fire sta-
tion...slated to be built on
Stewart Street at Ravine.
" According to Milton Fire
" Chief John Reble, however, a
C lot of issues remain to be
''resolved before construction
can begin.
"I won't speculate on time
frames right now," Reble says.


One of the first issues,'now
that the property has been pur-
'"chased, s'"i6' hire'sdfiieone to
'*'tear down- the hduse currefitly.
smllrig' on the land.
S-- "We tried to find someone
1who was willing tb move the
house, but so far no one seems
to be interested," says Reble.
He is also working with
-architects to develop specific
' plans for the proposed building.
',-' "We need to make sure the
!j shape of the building fits the
propertyy and gives us enough
1"room to turn the trucks behind
the building and pull straight
in," he says.
He just recently received
:t the site survey for the property
Sand now can move forward with
-' actual design work.
ei 'Reble says acquiring the


Quality It's
:, In our name
because It's
br. ^


was yes.
Baldwin delivered a full
sized canoe, painted to look like
a candy cane, to the school and
the collection drive was under-
way.
"I thought it would be a
good idea because they asked
us to do it and that was special,"
says SGA member Katy
Baldwin. -
Fellow SGA member
Cassie Barr agreed saying, "I
think it's a really good idea
because anything for these chil-
dren is better than nothing at
all."


ving on


land shows positive progress,
but believes firemen are still a
long way from moving in.
One person who would like
to see things move faster is
Milton Mayor Guy Thompson.
"I think we need to get this
on the fast track because we are
moving too slowly," Thompson
says.
Thompson and Reble are
both concerned delays in con-
struction could end up adding
to the rising cost of both labor
and materials in the wake of the
recent hurricanes.
The&move'ao a new'fire sta-
tion is being mandated by the
fact .the fire department has out-
grown its currefit digs.
According to Reble, the
current firehouse was built in
1962 when Milton was just
starting a move to having full-
time, paid firefighters.
"The building is too small
and is not designed to have
sleeping quarters, which we
need." Reble says.
"It also does not come up to
current building and life safety
codes," he adds.
According to Reble, the
current building has a host of
other problems from cracks in
the foundation and walls to a
sinkhole in the driveway.


These students know there
are children in our area who
are dealing with the loss they
suffered in the aftermath of
Hurricane Dennis.
They understand some
people lost everything they
had in the storms and had to
start over from scratch.
"I know I would feel real-
ly bad if I didn't have any
presents," said Katelyn
Nelson.
Andrea Harris added, "It's
sad because people don't have
enough money to buy presents
and we can help."
When asked what he is
doing to spur the students at
the school to give, Student
Government President Dustin
Harscher said, "I'm bringing
in presents to motivate them
and show them what they can
do."
When asked how many
toys they hope to collect all of
the students answered in uni-
son saying, "As many as possi-
ble,"
The toy drive continues at
the school through December
16 and the students hope to
collect so many presents a
truck will be needed to deliver
them to Baldwin's business.

Story written by Jeff
Everts. Reach him at:


je\verts5@'srpreai gzte r.;I:om


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Page 6-A The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday December 7, 2OO5~


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By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Stepping across the thresh-
old into one area historical
home-turned-business, visitors
enter an atmosphere that's part
elegant salon and part refur-
bished antiques museum.
The oldest standing home
in Pace, located at the comer of
Chumuckla Highway and
Highway 90, now hosts the
Penton House Salon and Day
Spa.
The home was .built in
1910,. by Henry Penton, and
had never been sold outside the
family until Doug and Alice
Campbell purchased it in
February.
Photographs of the house,
in various former states, line
newly-renovated interior walls.
The building, which at one

Book
Continued From Page Three.
than any book in the agency's
Heritage series, and was the
first to generate a second
Volume, according to the
Genealogical Society.
Volunteers have worked to
collect as much information as
possible for the series and for
preservation in state and local
archives.
Milton's library houses an
extensive local genealogical
and historical research section.
Current holdings include
census records, birth, death and
marriage registers, maps and
photographs. A copy of the first
Heritage edition is also on the
shelves.
For more information on
the Heritage book series, con-
tact coordinator Joyce Schnoor
at 623-1835.
The Genealogical Society
meets the third Saturday of
each month at 10 a.m. in the
Milton Library meeting room.
Contact them at 623-5160.
Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
Nelson @ sr-pg. comr


time housed a gas station, stood
vacant in recent years. It faced
demolition when the
Campbell's bought it and put
the home's antique architecture
to use as a salon/spa.
"It was a wreck when we
got it," Doug Campbell recalls.
An admirer of the home
since high school, Alice
Campbell noticed a sale sign
after Hurricane Ivan and the
couple stopped to talk to the
owner.
Other potential buyers
wanted to raze and redevelop
the site, he told them.
The Campbells had other
plans in mind which, Doug
notes, helped the owner decide
to sell.
"They were hoping some-.
one would want to buy the
house and do something with
it," he recalls.
Alice, who has been styling
hair for 21 years, wanted to
branch out into a larger salon.
So the couple, both Pace
high graduates, decided to take
a chance on a piece of local his-
tory.
After closing in February,
the pair, with the help of family,
put in 12 to 16 hour days, seven
days a week, to completely strip
and renovate the building.
"It was a lot of work,", says
Doug. "There were a lot of
long, long hard hours... we
must have pulled out thousands
of nails."
"Our family looked at us
like we were crazy," he recalls,
"but we saw what it was going
to be."
The house's unique charac-
ter and alluring charm, he
reflects, make it a natural spa
setting.
"We both love old things,"
Doug remarks. "The ambiance
right off the bat is relaxing and
soothing. It's not a cookie cutter
[style]."
Along with roof and struc-
tural repairs, the couple
removed old wallpaper, put up
drywall, and installed new fix-
tures and trimming.
The couple say the building


is an ongoing project.
"There were a lot ofi
prayers said," Doug recalls.
"You had to look at it in sec-
tions."
New d6cor includes stained
glass inserts, faux finished.
walls and wood flooring, along
with modem salon equipment,
massage tables, and other spa
accoutrements.
The building's renovation
efforts extend to the fine
details-the salon's period fur-
nishings were purchased froni
area antique shops.
"It was definitely a labor of
love," Doug notes.
The final goal, he says, was
to create an atmosphere in
which people would want td
work.
Currently, the Penton
House Salon and Day Spa fea-
tures five hairdressers, two nail
specialists, an esthetician, and
two massage therapists o1l
hand.
For more information, con-
tact the Penton House at 994,
8633.
Nelson @ sr-pg. cony

Story gets

Hall quote J

all wrong


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer


A story in the November 16
issue of the Press-Gazette
regarding the monitoring of
GPS bracelets for criminal
offenders, included an inaccu-
racy attributed to Sheriff
Wendell Hall.
The statement, which
read... "This," says Hall, "is
something that would never
happen if the Sheriff's Office
were doing the monitoring,"
was not correct. Hall did not
say his department would
"never" make a mistake.
The paper apologizes to
Sheriff Hall for the inadvertent
inaccuracy.


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Wednesday December 7, 2005W


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


I


R


Page 6-A


.The OQll.tir, tli^D






Wednesday December 7, 2005 ,,~ ..


Local

City raising funds for skate park


about $


By JEFF EVERTS $187,0
Press Gazette Staff Writer says.
Milton is sliding forward "W
with plans for a skate park, forward
according to Councilwoman Pat because
Lunsford who chairs the com- material
| mittee. The
"To date, we have collected $120,0

Milton Mayor


127,280 of the estimated
00 cost of the park," she
Ve would like to move
i as quickly as possible
e the costs for building
als keep going up."
e City has, so far, put up
00 of the money along

says


2006 holds challenges


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
"There is not one of us that
hasn't had a new challenge this
year."
That's Milton Mayor Guy
Thompson's summary when
talking about where the City
and where it stands as it pre-
pares to end 2005.
And no one knows better
than Thompson the challenges.
the residents of Milton have had
to contend with.
Struggling to recover from
the effects of Hurricane Ivan in
September of 2004, Milton took
a direct hit in July from
Hurricane Dennis... causing
extensive damage.
A city, which was already
struggling financially from the
recovery efforts of Ivan, was
.suddenly left to scramble to
find funding and materials to
recover from a second major
storm in less than a year.
"We are going to get back
on track and have already put
several things into motion,"
Thompson says.
Among those, a renewed
crackdown on code ehforce-
ment violations within 'munici-
"pal limits.
"We have gotten numerous
complaints from residents say-
ing people are letting their
yards get terrible," Thompson
'states.
He and the City Council
have given Code Enforcement
'Officer Sharon Holley the green
'light to begin prompting prop-
erty owners to clean up their
homes and land.


On another front, Milton is
about to complete the construc-
tion of a new 21,000 square
foot warehouse, which will pro-
.vide both work areas for things
such as city vehicles and other.
areas to store materials.
A project Thompson would
like to see move along is the
building of the City's new fire
station on Stewart Street. (See
related story, this issue.)
"I'm ready to see this proj-
ect get on the fast track, things
are moving a little too slowly,"
he says.
Other projects Thompson is
happy to see 'moving ahead
include the Highway 90 sewer
water upgrades (which will also
benefit residents and businesses
on Glover Lane), various down-
town projects, and the water
treatment plant.
Among major projects the
Mayor would like to work
begin on: a feasibility study on
expanding the water and sewer
system to the Berryhill area,
extending it to Whiting Field
and the Bagdad area; and pro-
viding sewer and water service
to East Milton including its own
water plant.
Thompson would like to
have an engineer do the study to
determine what is needed to
accommodate growth and the
financial costs involved.
He would also like to do the
same with the City's gas system
to look at ways of expanding it
and offering more services.
"We need to move forward
on expanding the gas system or
we need to look at selling it and
I don't want to do that," he says.


with a donation from the Milton
Kiwanis Club of $5,000 and
various fund raising efforts
have added another $2,280.
"'Pat is working very hard
on this project and it will be
good for the kids and the com-
munity," says Mayor Guy
Thompson.
The City is also donating
the land for the estimated 8,500
square foot park, slated to be
located behind the Milton
Community Center.
Lunsford would like to get
some financial assistance from
the Board of County
Commissioners, but was
rebuffed in her first effort to do
so.
This was despite the fact
that Lunsford estimates up to
75% of the users of the park
would, most likely, be county
residents.
"Right now, I have no idea
when we can begin because we
need to collect another $60,000
to cover the costs," Lunsford
says.
"We are also going to need
to look at the costs for lights
and fences as well."
Lunsford is hoping another
appearance before the County
Commissioners will produce
more fruitful results with the
county deciding to pitch in and
help cover the costs.
Commission Chairman Bob
Cole seemed to leave the door
open, saying, "If they were to
come back to us after the first of
the year and show us they have
made an effort to raise more
money, we would be more
inclined to help them out."
Lunsford feels the skate
park, once built, would draw
people from all over the region
for special events such as tour-
naments, school functions, and
youth outings.
Milton is still accepting
donations for the park and
interested persons or organiza-
tions can contact either
Lunsford or City Manager
Donna Adams at 983-5411.
Story written by Jeff
Everts. Reach him at:
jeverts @srpressgazette.com


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Business Review



Martin's Tree Service:

Legitimate and experienced land clearing experts at your service and on call


By OBIE CRAIN
Special Projects Writer
Land clearing is a broad
specialty, but Mike Martin has
it mastered!
If you've ever even
remotely doubted that your
property could be made to look
more attractive and environ-
mentally becoming than it .is
now, it's a cinch you've not
had an opportunity to discuss
its future with Mike Martin,
owner and manager of
Martin's Tree Service, whose
mission it is to prove other-
wise.
With appropriate planning
and proper effort by experi-
enced land clearing specialists,
it's not only possible but
entirely practical.
You see, sometimes it
takes more than just removing
a tree, grinding a stump, or fill-
ing in an indention to give


your property a renewed pro-
file and function. The possibil-
ity exists that the lot might
need to be custom cleared.
And who is better prepared
to accomplish such tasks for
you than Mike Martin of
Martin Tree Service who is
available and willing to put his
more than 40-plus years of
experience and expertise in lot
clearing, tree removal, stump
grinding, and related lot
enhancement activities to
work for you immediately.
Mike Martin established
his business here more than a
year and a half ago, and his
commitment to the area is evi-
denced by the lengths to which
he has gone to assure area res-
idents of that resolution
through local media and adver-
tising outlets and by his per-
formance through charitable
deeds.
Mike says he "discovered"


this area after arriving here fol-
lowing Hurricane Ivan in 2004
as a hurricane relief worker.
"There"s something special
about not only the geography
of the regions, but about the
quality of life that's part of it,"
he said. The "down-home"
atmosphere, the climate, the
diversity of natural resources
like the fresh water rivers and
streams, the Gulf, and the
integrity of the people them-
selves, all make this one of the
most desirable places to live
and work, ever, he said.
Time and time again Mike
has bent over backward to
make his work affordable to
the needy and of a quality that
he can back up through cus-
tomer endorsements. Many
have been the times when
Martin's Tree Service has
priced jobs significantly below
many other contractors' esti-
mates.


TOOLS OF THE TRADE ARE SOMETIMES AS IMPORTANT AS THE TRADEI-Mike Martin at Martin's
Tree Service has all the appropriate tools and equipment necessary for lot clearing. Whether it's a
dump truck related activity, tree removal, stump grinding, or other debris removal, you can rest
assured that it can be done effectively and safely by Martin's Tree Service's industrial technicians.
Mike Martin is available and willing to put his more than 40-plus years of experience and expertise in
the industry into your job. Give him a call at (850) 417-3085 any day during reasonable hours.
(Photo by Obie Crain.)


"BEFORE (ABOVE) AND AFTER
(RIGHT) MARTIN'S TREE SER-
VICE'S WORK-It's easy to see
what a difference lot clearing can
do for your property. This real
estate located in the Avalon
Beach-Mulat area clarifies
Martin's Tree Service's capability
and quality of workmanship in lot
clearing before and after the fact.
Call Mike Martin at (850) 417-
3085 and he will be glad to tell
you about it He can also refer
you to other satisfied customers
that his company has done work
for. If your property needs to be
just cosmetically enlightened of
vegetation or completely cleared,
it's a job that you can entrust to
Martin's Tree Service.


"It makes us feel pretty
good to have a customer go out
of his way to let us know how
satisfied he is," Mike said, "and
that happens all the time. In
fact much of our work comes
from customers who like our
work and tell their friends and
acquaintances about it. You
can't buy that kind of advertis-
ing!"
Everything about the com-
pany is professional. "We dis-
cuss the job with the customer
and make every effort to see
that the work is carried out by.
these specifications," Mike
said. "But in the event a misun-
derstanding does slip through,
we will do everything in our
power to make it right."
And ultimately, it's the
quality of work that tells the
tale, Mike says. "When you do
what you do well, and I feel we
always do, invest the proper
time and energy into the job
which it requires, and respect
your customer's wishes, people
are bound to notice," he said.


Pride in workmanship, he
says, speaks for itself and is
always a part of the job that
never appears on your bill.
That goes without saying, of
course, because of the thirty-
something years he has been
affiliated with the Better
Business Bureau, Mike has
never gotten a complaint about
his workmanship.
"Integrity matters," Mike
will tell anyone. "We do what
we say we will do, and that
commitment is taken serious-
ly."
And it's important to have
the proper tools at your dispos-
al that will make your accom-
plishment of the job successful,
Mike points out. Dump truck,
stump grinder, and Bobcat with
duals are some of the major
tools among the arsenal of
equipment that Martin's Tree
Service has at' its disposal.
With commitments like
this, why would anyone look
for a second appraisal.
If your yard or other prop-


erty still has trees that need to
be cut and taken out or stumps
that need to be removed, Mike
can handle it.
And if your property needs
to be just cosmetically enlight-
ened of vegetation or com-
pletely cleared, it's a job that
you can entrust to Martin's
Tree Service as well.
You're invited to try
Martin's Tree Service. on for
size, quality, and performance.
It's licensed and insured and
has a local identity and pres-
ence.
Call Mike at (850) 417-
3085 and get his assurances
that the work you want done
can be accomplished effective-
ly and safely. You can access
him during reasonable hours
any day of the week.
Join the ranks of the satis-
fied customers who continue to
make members of the crew at
Martin's Tree Service proud of
what they do!
You'll be the '.. inner!


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A 77 J,05"


Wednesday December 7, 2005


e hT Santa Rosa Press Gaz e


Pane 8-A


(at
LEADER








Local


Donations needed for Waveland


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
The City of Milton is con-
tinuing its assistance to
Waveland, Mississippi in the
town's recovery efforts from
Hurricane Katrina.
Waveland is still working to
restore even basic essential util-
ity services to its residents who


have returned.
Cash donations continue to
be needed to assist in purchas-
ing special request items for
Waveland city employees.
Checks can be made out to
the City of Milton Hurricane
Relief Fund and either dropped
off at city hall or mailed to P.O.
Box 909, Milton, FL 32572.
Supplies that Milton hopes


to take on its next trip to
Waveland include non-perish-
able food items, new kitchen
items (dinnerware, silverware,
cookware), and NEW small
appliances (coffee makers,
toasters, etc.) No clothes or
used items can be accepted.
To make donations call
City Hall at 983-5411.
jeverts@srpressgazette.com


Two new restaurants are now open in the Pace/Pea Ridge area. The two are located next to each other.
(Above) El Rodeo, a Mexican establishment, offers its patrons a taste of cuisine from across the border
r while, next door, (Below) at the Okki Japanese Steak House, customers can find a sushi bar, as shown.
. In addition, the establishment includes habachi grills where meals are prepared before customers' eyes.
Press Gazette photos by Jeff Everts


Attend the upcoming informational meeting in your neighborhood to learn more about
the new Medicare prescription.drug coverage available to you:1
DECEMBER 9 2005
10:00 AM
TANGLEWOOD COUNTRY CLUB
Learn how Prescription Solutions from PacifiCare plans give
you more ways to save with the freedom to choose:
>A plan that eliminates the Medicare $2,850 coverage gap.
> No $250 Medicare deductible on any plan
> Save even more with convenient home delivery
Call now to reserve your seat for the upcoming informational
meeting or to schedule a one-on-one appointment.
850-983-8352
9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM M-F


CLARENCE L BROWN
CLARENCE BROWN INSURANCE
5649 TREVINO DRIVE
MILTON FL 32570
Broker License # A031865
Prescription Solutions from PacifiCare Medicare prescription drugcoverage plans are underwritten by PacifiCare Life and Health Insurance Company
(PacifiCare Insurance Company in the State of New York), which contracts with the federal government. Prescription Solutions from PacifiCare
is offered in all states. Members must be entitled to Medicare Part A or enrolled in Part B. Members may be enrolled in only one Part D Plan at a
time. Member must continue to pay Medicare Part B if not otherwise paid for under '. .,;t ...t.. L, .:.[hl.i it-;r.Jrii ri, -...cn ;it'.: Pirin D Prm;IjM
is $0. Limitations, copayments and coinsurance will apply. Members must use net-..,l phi, Iiu., I.. I 1; Iiiniict cir.umirran :, nemrhU1 h ,111
use out-of-network pharmacies at a reduced benefit. Some members may qualify for additional assistance with premiums and cost-sharing. Please
contact us for more information, 'A .,k r.[-,..: .ii i.. I 11; j..]. i IjNh '. i l in r i, i.t. pp, .pl..: j.... The person who discusses plan options
with you is either employed by or contracted with PacifiCare. The person may be compensated based on your enrollment in a plan.


-e ....
e nt worry. ll save u .
S ^.. ... .' ..' .. *,.. j ; ... *. .* **: s '. .' ':- '" '

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PACE LOCATION ACROSS FROM
WALMART SUPER CENTER
4960 HWY 90
995-0666
HOLIDAY HOURS THRU CHRISTMAS
MON-FRI 8-8 SAT 9-5


MILTON LOCATION NEXT TO BEALL'S
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623-8353
HOLIDAY HOURS THRU CHRISTMAS
MON-FRI 8-8 SAT 9-5


The'UPS StorEe6']


,Wednesday December 7, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 9-A










Local


Year of storms puts crunch on United Way funding


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
When the major storms of
last year came through the area,
one agency people turned to for
help was the United Way of
Santa Rosa County.
The result? The organiza-
tion was sapped of much of its
finances and supplies.
The agency is now hoping
its annual fund raising cam-
paign will help it further assist
the residents of Santa Rosa
County, according to. campaign
coordinator Rebecca Frinkel.
The United Way has sent
out over 55,000 mailers to
county residents and business-
es, asking for support. This
year's goal is to raise $350,000.
"Small as we are, we met a
big challenge after the hurri-
canes. We gave out free school
supplies to over 500 families


GUY THOMPSON
United Way
Executive Director


who were evacuees after the
storms," says the organization's'
head, Guy Thompson.
Indeed, the United Way's
Cram the Van program was
described as a Godsend for


many families who lost all of
their school supplies when
Hurricane Dennis hit just
before the opening of school.
United Way has also been
involved in coordinating relief
efforts with other local agencies
to offer help to victims not only
from Dennis, but also
Hurricane Katrina.
"We are hurting from peo-
ple who are giving multiple
donations to various relief
efforts and might not be able to
give to United Way," Frinkel
said.
To further assist in helping
people after such disasters, the
United Way is teaming with
Interfaith Ministries on a new
program.
Servicepoint is a web-based
program, which will link area
churches with the United Way
and help coordinate and speed
assistance where it is needed.-


Wet


Continued From Page One.
which will be issued within
Santa Rosa County.
This quota is based on pop-
ulation and changes with
increases or decreases in popu-
lation-one license for every
7,500 people.
The State must advertise
the quota lottery for three
weeks prior to it being held.
Then, a 90-day period opens for
persons to register for the lot-
tery.
If a person or company is
selected in the lottery, which is
conducted by random computer
drawing, they then have the
right to file for a liquor license
with the state.
Realistically, this would
mean county residents would
not likely see package stores for
approximately six months,
according to Eileen Klinger,
Florida Division of Alcohol,
Beverage and Tobacco.
Upon approval, the new
licensee must then pay the state
a fee of $10,750 before the,
license is issued..


This fee is placed into a
trust fund with the Department
of Children and Families to be
used only for alcohol and drug
abuse education, treatment, and
prevention programs.
The question of Sunday
sales is another item often men-
tioned. Cities and counties
decide that issue and, in fact,
both Santa Rosa County and the
Cities of both Milton 'and Gulf
Breeze already have ordinances
prohibiting such sales. ,
"I don't see any reason to
make a change," Milton Mayor
Guy Thompson says.
"Our ban on Sunday alco-
hol sales was by a vote of the
citizens and we will honor their
wishes," Thompson continues.
Gulf Breeze Mayor Lane
Gilchrist adds, "I've been in
city government since 1982 and
Sunday liquor sales have never
been an issue during that time."
The County does, however,
allow Sunday sales of alcohol
on the tourist-haven peninsula
beginning at noon and in
Navarre Beach, beginning at 7


a.m.
County ordinances also
stipulate on-site consumption
of alcohol cannot occur within
2,500 feet of a church or school.
Milton's regulations stipulate a
500-foot buffer. Bars and
lounges would not be able to
operate within this distance.
The City of Gulf Breeze
already has ordinances in place
restricting where businesses
selling alcohol can be located.
As a result, officials say it may
be difficult for any new busi-
nesses selling alcohol to open
within the confines of that
municipality.
Restaurants, on the other
hand, are exempt from this
standard if they derive more
than 50% of their revenue from
non-alcohol sources.
Restaurants also have to
have a minimum size of 2,500
square feet of space and be able
to seat at least 150 persons to
qualify for the special liquor
license.
Reach writer at:
jeverts@srpressgazette.comrn


United Way is also listed as
one of the top agencies in the
state according to Volunteer
Florida, which coordinates vol-
unteer efforts throughout
Florida.
"The United Way is doing
as well as can be expected,"
says Thompson.


"Our fund raising campaign
will hopefully be better than
expected."
Thompson and Frinkel both
point out that employees who
receive United Way donation
cards at work do have the
option of choosing which coun-
ty they want the money sent to,


either Escambia or Santa Rosa.
This is due to the fact that
United Way efforts in both
counties use a common pledge
card listing both as choices.
"Next year will be our year
to take off and soar," Thompson
says.
jeverts @srpressgazette. coin


Groups seek to protect


Northwest Florida wetlands


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer
A coalition of area civic
groups, including the League of
Women Voters, the Sierra Club
and the Clean Water Network,
is gearing up for battle next
year-over a key part of
Northwest Florida's water sys-
tem perceived to be currently
under threat by development.
Environmental Resource
Permitting (ERP) requires
Florida's Department of
Environmental Protection
(DEP) to offer a review before
"isolated" wetlands may be
filled in for development.
Isolated wetlands are not
directly connected to other sur-
face water. They are, however,
connected through ground
water.
"Whatever happens to them
also happens to other parts of
our ecosystem," notes
. Northwest Florida Sierra Club
conservation chair Rosalie
Shaffer.
Established in 1995, ERP is
already in effect in most of
Florida-implemented by


Pool
Continued From Page One.
Commissioners, in the mean-
time, are exploring the possibil-
ity of a pool at a yet-to-be-built
Pace area community center.
Story written by Jeff
Everts. Reach him at:
J vel.ti 'srpe't'p a:iue lie c.i


Water Management Districts.
Except in Northwest
Florida.
The region was exempted
from the process because the
Northwest Florida Water
Management District is limited,
by law, to the amount of proper-
ty taxes it may collect.
That law was due to expire
in 1999, 2003, and again this
year, but lawmakers extended it
for five more years.
Florida Governor Jeb Bush
opposed the extension and sup-
ported bringing state ERP regu-
lation to Northwest Florida dur-
ing this year's legislative ses-
sion.
Although the ERP initiative
failed, lawmakers pledged to
find a way to make the program
work in Northwest Florida at
next year's session.
Meanwhile, Northwest
Florida's isolated wetlands con-
tinue to fall under the "non-
jurisdictional" category and
may be dredged and filled with-
out state permits.
Area environmental advo-
cates say they'll'spend the com-
ing months mobilizing the pub-
lic to call and email legislators
in support of ERP.
"We want it brought in this
year," notes Clean Water
Network's Southeast Regional
Director Linda Young.
"We've waited ten years ,for
it-they've had enough time to
figure out what they want to
do."
But, say officials, passage


of the bill won't necessarily
protect wetlands forever.
That's because state-level
efforts are underway to absorb
other Federal wetlands over-
sight functions in Florida.
*A first step, they say, would
be to bring Northwest Florida
in line with the rest of the
state's permitting process.
That, say environmental-
ists, may help explain the
Governor's support for the
measure this year.
If that happens, say offi-
cials, it could be disastrous for
Florida.
Wetlands advocates say
they hope to see ERP imple-
mented and hope to see efforts
to reduce Federal protections
fail.
Officials estimate there are
about 800,000 acres of wet-
lands currently at risk in
Northwest Florida.
Wetlands are said to serve
as a natural buffer between dry
land and the open water.
Also known as "Mother
Nature's kidneys," marshy and
swampy areas filter and
recharge groundwater before it
returns to the aquifer.
Wetlands absorb pollutants,
and contain floodwaters.
Officials note wetlands also
play a role in moderating cli-
mate conditions.

Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
Nelson @sr-pg. corn'


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I


Wednesday December 7, 2005


e hT Santa Rosa Press Ga e


(


g


Page 10-A








Wednesday December 7. 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Local


Manatees moves from Pensacola to Milton


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer


Milton is about to get a
brand new restaurant...with a
very Caribbean flair.
Manatees' Stewart Street
Grille will be opening Monday
in its new location at 5365
Stewart Street, just south of
Milton High School.
Owners David Knudsen
and son Eric were forced to find
a new location for their restau-
rant after Hurricane Ivan
severely damaged the previous
location in downtown
Pensacola;
"We began scouting this
new location in June and finally
closed on it on October 17,"
Knudsen says.
"We gutted the building to
the walls and completely reno-
vated it in a Caribbean theme."
The Knudsens will be
bringing along their head chef,
Jason Hostler, from-. their for-
mer location and can't say
enough about the man behind
the grill.
"Jason has been with us a
long time and has been very
good for us and we appreciate
him," Knudsen says.
Hostler has been a profes-
sional chef for 10 years and will
be celebrating his sixth anniver-
sary with Manatees in June.
Knudsen says there has
already been a lot of interest in
the new restaurant.
"We have had a lot of peo-
ple stop by and say they are
happy to see us here. They are
wondering when we are going
to open," he says
"We have also been very
happy with the number of peo-
ple who came to put in applica-
tions to work for us."
Manatees will be open
seven days a week, Monday
through Thursday from 11 a.m.
until 9 p.m., Friday from 11
a.m. until 10 p.m., Saturday
from 4-10 p.m., and Sundays
from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m.
On Sunday, the restaurant
will.,Qnly serve brunch from a
set menu which includes Eggs


When it was in Pensacola,
patrons knew this restaurant as
"Mr. Manatees." After hurricane
winds damaged the Pensacola
property, owners began looking
for a new location. The new
home will be on Stewart Street
in Milton (shown above), a loca-
tion, previously home to the
Cutting Board. (Left) The facility
has been renovated inside as
well, giving the restaurant a
"Caribbean feel." Owners
David and Eric Knudsen say they
plan to open their new estab-
lishment Monday.
Press Gazette photos
by Jeff Everts


Benedict, a Cajun Omelet,
Huevos Rancheros, Eggs Louis
XIV, a seafood omelet, French
toast, and a combination of
eggs, mullet, and smoked
Gouda cheese grits.
There is even an offering on
the brunch menu for children at
$3.95.
The regular.menu shows a
decided Caribbean twist with
items ranging from grilled jerk
chicken tenders to "krab" bites,
grilled jerk wings and shrimp
kabobs, blackened tuna bites,
grouper chowder, and dauphin
parmesan.
There are also hamburgers,
steaks, tuna, and pork on the
menu as well as shrimp and
crawfish po' boys.
The dessert menu includes
such temptations as key lime
pie, Jamaican banana pie,
strawberry cream pie, and a
Snicker's blitz.
They will also feature one
of Hostler's signature dishes:
Smoked Gouda Cheese Grits.
"These are fantastic and the
flavor is just unbelievable," says
Knudsen.
Manatees will feature wine
and beer among its beverage


offerings, but will not have a
full alcohol bar.
"Can't have it, don't want
it," says Knudsen of the bar.
"We are too small at 98
seats to have one, but I don't
feel we need it either."


p i I


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Page 11-A


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The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday, December 7, 2005


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I i;> 11 11 ;'IM














08u __ __ 'WEDNESDAY

.,azette oiui December 7, 2i


Ask '01e




Chief

"Chief, I'm having trou-
ble getting my drug refills
from the VA. Is there any
help out there?"

The VA has a new drug re-
fill program. Veterans who
have access to the Internet
and can go on-line may now
order their re-fills through
"MyHealtheVet". The VA
began this process at the end
of August, 2005. Over 70,000
prescriptions have been filled
since the program started.
What happens is the re-fill
order is received at a central
processing point, then sent to
the least used mail-in phar-,
macy, somewhere in the
Nation, and the re-fill is then
mailed to you. This saves you,
time and them cost by using
under used facilities.
Also on the
"MyHeatheVet" website you
can track health conditions
(e.g. past blood pressure read-
ing/cholesterol levels, record
of medications, medical tests,
etc.). VA plans on expanding
this website to include
appointments, co-payment
balances, access to complete.
medical records, and allow
this access to local personal
physician and family mem-
bers. The website is
.-.,-. -. ... .. .-- i


"This may not be in your
."area Chief, but can you find
>out why the Navy Exchange
is sometimes out of socks.
and deodorant?"

Sure. I was told about this
back in September of 2005.
DoD asked the Navy
Exchange Service Command
,(NEXCOM) to make up
'35,000 "comfort kits" con-
taining 41 different items to
distribute to military mem-
bers and families located in
the Federal disaster areas
along the Gulf Coast.
Pensacola is the Southeast
distribution center for NEX-
COM. "Comfort kits" have
the following items: tooth-
brushes, deodorant, shampoo,
,socks & underwear, batteries,
etc. Hope this answers. your
question.


4915 Highway 90 Pace
850-995-1600


Met


Aeon Flux (PG13)
1:45 4:30 7:20 9:50
Pride and Prejudice (PG)
1:20 4:10 7:05 9:40
Yours, Mine,& Ours (PG)
1:10 3:15 5:20 7:25 9:30
Just Friends (PG 13)
1:40 4:20 7:10 9:45
*Rent (PG13) .
1:15 4:00 6:50 9:40
Harry Potter & the
Goblet of Fire (PG 13)
1:00 4:15 7:30
Walk the Line (PG 13)
1:05 4:05 7:00 9:45
Chicken Little (G)
1:30 3:25 5:20 7:15 '9:05
*Last Night Thurs. Dec.8


Stat. Fri Dec -
Chronicles of Narriia: The
Lion, the'Witch and the -
Wardrobe (PG)
1:00 2:30 4:00 5:30 7:00
8:30 9:55


Kitchen


Experts weigh in on

how to get the most

out of your kitchen


Q: Our kitchen is really
small. No work island and low
ceilings, not quite 8 feet. We
are budgeting for a rnakeover
in the spring. Meamnhile, I'm
trying to collect good ideas to
discuss with our remodeler. So
please share any tips you may
have.
A: Better yet, we'll pick the
brains of an inspired profes-
sional kitchen designer,
Melissa Siebold of Canterbury
Design. who reorganized and
opened up the small kitchen we
show here. It, too, had low ceil-
ings and limited floor space,
plus. it would have to serve
two avid cooks who enjoy
plam i n amateur chef together.
To gain actual square
footage, Siebold opened up an
adjacent laundry room and
turned it into a butler's pantry,
*where she could install a sec-
ond sink. Then she took out the
original kitchen pantry and
wall ovens, replacing them
with a 4-foot-square peninsula
that offers much-needed count-
er space and also houses the
microwave-con section oven.
Most dramatic and inspired,
the designer had the low (8-
fo,[i, ceiling peeled off tc,
reveal the joists. Painted white
Sith bead-board installed
between the joists, the ceiling
gains both visual height and the.
country character the home-.
owners wanted. More bead-
board accents the cabinetry (by
Wood-Mode), and more coun-
try flavor comes in the Gothic-
arched window now'installed
over the original kitchen sink.


This artful wall arrangement kicks up
ly designed sitting room.


The palette is neutral and
natural, with the white cabi-
nets, 2-inch-thick honed mar-
ble countertops, and hardwood
floors, o, er which that gleam-
ing copper range hood casts a
rich glow.
FYI, helpful hints and
kitchen makeover how-tos are
today's hot topic in home
remodeling. Some of the many
good sources you: can check
out for your idea collection
include: wwx.<\ood-
mode.com, www.nkba.coin
and www.superkitchen.com.
Q: My husband is lusting
after a super-big TV screen.
We'll have to make room for a
new entertainment center-in the
family room, and I want some-
thing antique, like an armoire
or large bookcase. Is it'logical
to try to fit one of the new TVs
in an antique?
A: You have a lot of vari-
ables to factor in here and not
just the size of some of the new
and huge TVs, which can have
screens from 30 to 42 inches.
The weight of today's TVs is
also a major consideration.
Sets with flat and wide screen
technology weigh far more
than trriditionail TVs with the
same size screen, warns Susan
Dountas of Sauder, a manufac-
turer of ready-to-assemble
home theater, and entertain-
ment armoires.
Dountas cautions that it's
"more important than ever
before to know the weight limit
of an entertainment center or
television stand before you try
to marry it to your new TV."
That goes for antique pieces,


the interest level in a careful-


A hot topic nowadays


Two cooks won't spoil the broth in this roomy kitchen carefully laid-out with ample counter space.


too. Sauder offers a guide to
choosing the right piece .that
may help you determine if your
antique is up to the job: click
on "Entertainment Furniture"
at www.sauder.com.

Want to beautify your home
and do a beautiful thing for
others in the process?
Furnishings from the Alpha
Workshops in New York City
are showing up in show houses
and decorating projects by top
interior designers across the
country, where they give aspe-


It's how ya
f a


Q: I've hung a bunch of pic-
tures qn the sh6rt wall of our liv-
ing room, but I'm not happy
with the way they look..Nothing
seems to relate to anything else,
and they look more confused
than interesting. Maybe 6ou cain
show and tell some w ays to han-
dle groups of pictures better?
A: As with all things in the
design world. "how" matters
more than "what" when you are
arranging a wall of artwork. Or
anything else, in fact.
Fve been pulled over to
peruse art walls that display
nothing more than magazine
clippings, simply because they
were so well framed and"
arranged. And I'm not talking
about beautiful, expensive
antique frames, either (although
P'e seen walls of frames hung
totally empty because they are


cial glow to both the room and
the homeowner.
Hand-screened wallpapers,
decorative finishes and furni-
ture, glorious fabrics and
important accessories, hand-
made in the Alpha Workshops
offer a helping hand to people
living with HIV/AIDS, By
teaching them the skills to
make such decorative products,
the workshop is providing life-
saving jobs to the artisans, and
remarkable,,hand-made items
for interior design projects.
Just one example: New


York designer Jamie Drake,
whose clients include Mayor
Michael Bloomberg's several
private homes, also used Alpha
Workshops handcrafts in the
refurbishment of historic
Gracie Mansion in Manhattan.
Celebrating its 10th
anniversary this year, the work-
shops are the brain- and heart-
child of executive director
Kenneth L. Wampler.
To see more home furnish-
ings and learn how to acquire
them for your own rooms, click
on % '' ,v.alpha\%orkshops.org.


C p -'


wonderful works of art all by
themsel es). .
Variety seems to be the spice
of interesting wall. arrange-
ments. To intrigue the eye, you
need a play of different size and
differentd\ shaped frames Ty) to
work some ovals and rounds
into your grouping, and use a
,mix of vertical and horizontal
shapes.
Build in a little visual "ten-
sion," too: avoid perfect sym-
metry nothing's more pre-
dictable than two same-size pic-
'tures hung side-b:, -side unless
it's that one large picture
anchored above a chest or sofa.
Much more interesting to bal-
ance large artworks with several
smaller ones underneath or on
one side. In the same wa-, three
same-size pictures stacked up' a


wall is interesting; hung side-by-
side-by-side, they're a bore.
In other words, objects gain
importance from- being seen
together. One suggestion on how
to connect those dots in a picture
grouping: establish a set amount
of space between them. The
designer suggests hanging
pieces 3 inches apart, no matter
what shape or size you're deal-
ing with.
That guideline, applied to the
grouping in the photo we show
here, helps achieves a classic
sense of calm without the usual
symmetrical balance. The vari-
ety of sizes and the different
depths of the objects in this
cohesive .arrangement generates
the kind of visual energy that
makes all ofBilhuber's interiors
'look as contemporary as they are
classic.


I


Clean out your
garage and
clean up on taxes
"Donating your vehicle to
the American Lung
Association of Florida may be
worth more than you think.
. Tallahassee, FL-It's never
too early to plan for your taxes,
and one great way to get a tax
deduction is to donate your
used vehicle to the American
Lung Association of Florida
before the end of the year.
It's so easy! Just call the
American Lung Association of
Florida at 1-800-LUNG-USA
to donate your vehicle and we


will take care of the rest. We
tow your vehicle for free.
You will receive detailed
instructions and, two simple.
forms to fill out. Your donation
is a potential tax deduction.
Avoid the hassles of selling and
posibhl pocket more in tax
savings than if you sold!
Your vehicle will be auc-
tioned. Proceeds benefit the
American Lung Association if
Florida's fight against lung dis-
ease through research, patient
education, asthma summer
camp for children and school
programs in our community.
Doing something to help
others always feels good. And


that easy tax break is a nice
reward.

Avalon MS
holds celebration
On November 10, the SGA
(Student Government
Association) of Avalon Middle
School had a Veteran's Day
assembly for the local veterans
and the 'parents of Avalon stu-
dents in the Armed Forces. the
assembly started off wonder-
fully with the AMS symphonic
band playing the "Star
Spangled Banner." Students
and teachers gave speeches on
the history of Veterans Day. and


what it means to them. The
AMS choius sang many mean-
ingful and patriotic songs. To
show how much Veteran's -Day
means to the students of AMS,
there was a poster contest for
each grade level. There was a
Poem and Essay contest as
well. The SGA also held a col-
lectioi for items, such as soap
and toothpaste to donate to the
Veteran's Hospital in
Pensacola. The great assembly
was closed with a few powerful
words by Mr. Anderson, the
head of SGA, and the playing
of TAPs by two AMS sym-
phonic band students, Clayton
Gilbert and Samantha Fields.


Poster Contest winners were


Poster Contest winners were
6th grade-Ist-David Lowery,
2nd-Megan Broadaway, 3rd-
Dakota Major;
7th grade- Ist-Grayson
Jones, 2nd-Trevor Thomas,
3rd-Charles Jimenez; 8th
grade- 1st-Tiffany Alviola, 2nd-
Kourtlyn Nason, 3rd-Lorin
Santo.
Poem Contest winners were
1st place-Emma Ayala, 2nd
place-Jessica Howard, 3rd
place-Kelsey Landsguard.
Essay Contest Winners were
1st place-Lisa Mauro, 2nd
place-Deidra Krowlikowski,
3rd place-Connor Bachman.


^ y I lB I W'..
[BUBantaSS'SRosa^^^H


*^








Wednesday December 7, 2005- -


I The Santa Rosa Press Jazette


Pana 9-R


Communi

Gulf Breeze's Hospital


ty


new surgical department open


Gulf Breeze Hospital's sur-
gery department expansion is
complete. The surgery unit will
now include six surgery suites
- four new and two renovat-
ed. Two of the suites are
designed specifically for
orthopaedic procedures.
Orthopaedic care accounts for
the highest volume of surgical
cases at Gulf Breeze Hospital.
The six surgery suites are
positioned around a central
sterile processing department,
improving efficiency and
access to instrumentation. The
expansion 'project has
increased the size of the sur-
gery department from 6,636
square feet to more thl-n 21.i,(0
square feet and more than dou-
bled the number of recovery
beds. Renovations also made
room for the relocation of


rJ- r ,I j r Jr iJ

W/TI 'r____ 'rll
yrrr ? DS r'rB9'1 r r"I

_i 1 liJj *i i y, "i WM U.T

-Durable, over sized design
with two special boot compartments


endoscopy and pain manage-
ment services from patient care
areas on the second floor to the
first floor surgical services
department. The relocation and.
expansion of the surgery
department frees up 15 beds
that have been reclaimed for
inpatient care.
The surgery department
expansion is part of. a $28.8
million construction project
that began at the 60-bed facili-
ty in 2003. Completed portions
include a 30,000 square-foot
medical office building and a
9,000 square-foot building that
is occupied by Gulf Breeze
FirstRehab and the Ciano
Cancer Center.
Improvements within the
hospital include new emer-
gency, intensive care and diag-


nostic imaging departments, as,'
well as additional patient care
areas. Renovations to the origi-,,
nal diagnostic imaging depart--
ment and outpatient testing"
registration area are underway
and expected to wrap up inril'
December. New construction'
added more than 47,000 squared
feet to the existing facility. /;
Three other projects are cur-
rently under\ita on the Gulf '
Breeze Hospital campus .'4
Renovations to the original'
professional office building oni'
the north wing of the hospital"
continue. The Endoscop)
Center will be completed later
this i ear. After construction oft
the Andrews Institute fort
Orthopaedics and Sports
Medicine is in full swing with
completion of first phased-'
expected in October 2006: 4
'Ci
Cadena :


named
Director


Cyd Cadena now serves as the
director of operations at Baptist
Medical Park on Nine Mile '"
Road. Cadena has been
employed with Baptist Health
Care for 24 years. Most recently-j,-
she served as chief nursing offi- ,
cer for BHC affiliates, Jay and
Atmore Community hospitals. ,
Cadena also is a consultant with,
Baptist Leadership Institute. '
Cadena holds a Master's
Degree in Nursing from the .
Medical College of Georgia. '


*A.portion of the funds will be .
donated to the Justin Cowboy Crisis Fund (JCCF),dedicated to
helping the injured professional rodeo athletes and their time of need.

Ask a Sales Associate for details.


Circle J Western Store is
located halfway between
Jay and Pace, FL


In Chumuckla, On


Hwy 197


Open Monday-Saturday 9-6
(850)994-0555
www.circlejwestern.com


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CyberSmartl purchased monitor falls under warranty, we will give you
Sa loaner until It Is fixed!
FREE On-site technical support: If CyberSmart! can't
solve any problem with your CyberSmartl Computer after 10 minutes
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Kenneth E. Lamb, "The Cybe A

479-0777 5080 Hwy. 90 Pace
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Call our Central Office for questions, tech r.. ..t.. 'cu 6
support, repair appointments for computers M T h, F, Sat.: 10 AM 7 PM i
and networks In homes or offices. Wed. (Church night) 10 AM 5 PM


kn
7,


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2005 J1TIN/WNFR

GEAR BAG


agu


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4









I The Santa Rosa Pres e


Wednesday Decemner /, zu 1 PL IO


Community Briefs


Piecemakers
Quilting
Guild to meet
The Piecemakers Quilting
Guild of Milton meets the 2nd
Monday (Dee. 12) of each
month at the Milton Library.
For more information call Joan
McLendon at 623-0761.

Recreation
Committee to meet
The December meeting of
the City of Milton Parks &
Recreation Committee has
been rescheduled to'Monday,
I December 12, 2005, at 8:20
a.m. in Conference Room B at
City Hall, 6738 Dixon Street.
For further information on the
meeting, contact the City
Manager's Office at 983-5411.
All meetings are open to the
public.


City
Council to meet
The Milton City Council
will meet on Monday,
December 12, 2005 at 5:01
p.m. in the Council Chambers
at the Milton City Hall, 6738
Dixon Street, Milton, FL. The
meeting is being held to discuss
connection and impact fees for
NEW water and sewer cus-
tomers. For further information
on the meeting, contact the City
Managers Office at 983-5411.


Regular
Session to meet
The City of Milton's City
Council will meet in Regular
Session on Tuesday, December
13, 2005, at 5 p.m. in Council
Chambers of City Hall, 6738


Dixon Street. For further infor-
mation on the meeting, contact
the City Manager's Office at
983-5411.

Santa & Mrs.Claus
coming to Bagdad
Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus
will be visiting the Bagdad
Volunteer Fire Department for
pictures and candy Saturday,
December 10, 2005 from 12
noon to 6 p.m. There is no
charge for this event, but please
bring your own camera.
Dogwood to hold
Christmas luncheon
The Dogwood Chapter of
the Milton Garden, Club will
meet for its Christmas
Luncheon at La Hacienda in
Milton Tuesday, December 13,
2005 at 11:30 a.m.


PHS hosts "Make A Difference Day"


Pace High School's Student
Government Association is
sponsoring "Make A
Difference Day" on Saturday,
December 17th. "Make a
Difference Day" is sponsored
by USA Weekend, the Points
of Light Foundation, Disney
World Company and Paul
Newman's food company
S(Newman's Own). It is a
national day of helping others
- a celebration of neighbors
helping neighbors. The event is
usually held in October. Due to
conflicts with the school sched-
Sile and the hurricanes, the
annual event had to be resched-
uled to Dec. 17th.
For, the fifth year, Pace
High's SGA is organizing a
clothing drive for families in
need. SGA has aided approxi-
mately 3,500 people in the-first
four years. The families will be
selected by school guidance
offices, churches, Family
Services of Milton, the Red
Cross and other business
Organizations in Santa Rosa
County. These families will be
allowed to pick out clothing
: d other items for their fami-
lies-~throughout the day. The


cafeteria will be transformed
into a retail clothing and
department store, except the
items will be free for the fami-
lies in need.
SGA is asking for donations
of clothing (all sizes from baby
to adult), shoes, baby items,
bedding, kitchen items, toys,
games, books, etc. They ask
that all items donated be in
good condition. Your donations
are vital to the success of this
project.
Items should be delivered to
the Pace High School office
(specify Room 126- Make A
Difference Day SGA) by
Wednesday, Dec. 14th.


MOVING SALE
5162 Buccaneer Cir.
(off Hamilton Bridge
Rd., follow signs).
Winter clothes and
Christmas items
also. Friday 9th and
Saturday 10th
7-until ?
Call 623-8230


For further information, call
995-3600 and ask for the SGA
room or Kami Russell at 995-
3825 in the evening.


Suscribe to the
Santa Rosa

Press Gazette!

Call today for
details

623-2120


YARD SALE
5841 Parsons Rd.
Sat. iDec. 10th.
7 am until ?
Children's clothes,
toys, furniture,
computer, Christmas
decorations, something
I for everyone.
1A-Ixz-


STORAGE SHED SALE
Saturday, Dec. 10th
8am-3pm.
4872 West Spencer
Field in Pace.
Furniture, microwave,
dishes, lamps, some
collectibles & misc.
Low prices.


Manuel Abendan, M.D.
of

Pace Health Care

4944 Highway 90 Pace, FL.
lcess the street from Wal-Mlarti
,.


Welcomes










:.w .
e4o: _#.p ; ,a', ..... ." .. .





And
Pain Management Clinic


Ce:sar F Most
L!anera, JJr.,. M,.D,,, PA,

Board Certified by the American
Academy of Pain Management and is
available on Thursdays in Pace, and all
other days in Pensacola. His services cover
all types of acute and chronic pain including
back and neck, headaches, shingles, pelvic
pain, auto accidents, and work-related
injuries. Treatments offered consist of
interventional spine injection therapy, .
inint therinnv nrolo-therapnv and ;


Jd i ... IN niI a [ e e r .. .
medication management.


For appointments call
(850) 477-5610


Page 3-B


Insurance Accepted


/


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WAil-n-oojd. naumkar 7 2nnf


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D.na AT I&


Lifestyles


Locklin


celebrates 80th


We have a lot to be
thankful for during the
holidays because of you-
our friends and neighbors
here in Milton.
It is a pleasure to be part
of this community. Enjoy
the holiday season.
Call or stop by today.
Darrel R. Greer
Parkmore Plaza
6259 Highway 90
Milton, FL 32570
(850) 983-1471
www.edwardjones.com
.MmbarSIPC
EdwardJones
re_~;^~ al-^ i-j


KUCH'S PAWN SHOP
^^^F- ~ j-9

Christmas Clearance
Shot Guns $125 and up
Great Inventory of
All gauges Pumps
and automatic's

Miscellaneous
Power Tools
Generators Power Saws
Air Compressors
Chainsaws Drills
Routers Reciprocating
See our
Jewelry Selection
Rings Chains &
Necklaces
6713 N Stewart St.
Milton, FL
626-3380,


The family of Claude
Locklin Jr. would like to
announce an open houpe cele-
bration of his 80th birthday on
Sunday December 11 from 2
p.m.-4 p.m. at The Russell
Center on the campus of
Locklin Technical Center.
Friends are encouraged to
come to the celebration hosted
by his children-Suanne
Locklin-Johnson, Mark
Locklin, Michael Locklin and
Mitch Locklin, and the Jack
Locklin family.


M1I


Mr. Locklin has lived in the
Milton area his entire life and
has been a strong supporter of
Santa Rosa County. Claude
served his country during the
Korean War, taught night
school GED classes, was an
agent with the FBI and was
instrumental in community
development as co-owner with
his father Claude Locklin Sr. of
Locklin Home Builders.
Please join his family in
wishing him a blessed 80th
birthday.


Samfords

celebrate 25 years

Raleigh Gregory and Carolyn DeAnne Samford, celebrated
their 25th wedding anniversary on November 28, 2005.
The happy couple began their journey together as high school
sweethearts and are still deeply in love and best friends. They are a
true testament to strong and unconditional lote.
The couple are the proud parents of four children-Raleigh
Gregory II, Nelida Renee, Justin Lee, Lucy Melinda; and the lov-
ing grandparents of three grandchildren -Raleigh Gregory III,
Lilly Marie, and Emily Leighanne.
The couple's laughter and friendship are an inspiration to all
who know them. May God continue to bless their love and give
them many more years together.
ajBJ.BI..lSr..1Jr.I5..Br.frBIJ5..SrSBIBJi.lr.]B..Br.3r.r.lrBIB1:B.Pa.


Claude Locklin


(/f//C // c0/1/,CO/W / X' at o- C / to- .



mm/ tdo-t /b,? i ,S./,'e .-St/owi. .


Goodwin wins in age division at pageant
Brittney Goodwin, age 6, Miss/Southern USA Christmas "
competed in the All American Pageant November 26, 2005.
Miss Southern USA pageant She won 1st Alternate in
held at the Edgewater Beach SUSA, Age Division (5 year- '.-4.,
Resort on October 1, 2005 in old), won Christmas Queen in
Panama City Beach, FL. the All American Miss in the 5


She won Southern USA
National Supreme Queen and
Southern USA National
Supreme Queen and Southern
USA State Queen in the 5 Year
Old Age Division. She also
won Alternates, 2nd
Photogenic, 2nd Portfolio, 2nd
Sportwear, and 1st in Most
Beautiful. She also competed
in -the- -All American


Year Old Division. Brittney
attends Munson Elementary
and is in Mrs. Roser's
Kindergarten Class. She is a
very bright little girl. She just
celebrated her 6th birthday
November 15.
She is the daughter of
Tammy Gaddess and the proud
grandparents are Walter and
Elisa Gaddess and Robert and
Jennie Goodwin.


MWedicine


Shoppers


P HARM


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Introducing the Newest Member of Your Friendly Health-Care Team.


To us, a good pharmacy is more than
good products. It's also professionals
who take the time to know you and
your personal health-care needs. This
quality distinguished the neighborhood


pharmacy of years past. You find it at
The Medicine Shoppe Pharmacy -
including our friendly new pharmacists.


OUR PERSONAL INTEREST IN YOU IS juT ONE EXAMPLE OF THE
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Medicine


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5524 Stewart St. Milton, FL 3257
Phone: 850-623-3211 Fax: 850-623-2353
Web Address: www.medicineshoppe.com
Email: 1844@medicineshoppe.com
MC/Visa Workmen's Comp
We accept most insurance


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MARSHA BEACH
850-572-5652
marshabeach @ aol.com

wweafestate
Junction, Inc.
www.realestateiunction.com


Low .is in Rt


Wednesday December 7, 2005


1 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


,%*









Wednesday December 7, 20Db I The Santa Rosa I-~'ess Gazette Page 5-B


Obituaries


SHaveard,
Margaret Pittman
S1925-2005
Margaret Pittman Haveard,
age 80, of Milton passed away
on Friday morning, December
S 2,2005.
SMrs. Haveard was born on
February 17, 1925 in Escambia
County, Alabama to Alva
Pittman and Margaret Bass
Pittman. She lived most of her
life in the Santa Rosa and
Escambia County area. Mrs.
Haveard was a member of the
First Assembly of God Church
in Milton. She was preceded in
death by her husband-Alfred
Haveard and a daughter-
Kathy Haveard.
She is survived by 2 daugh-
ters and sons in law-Joyce
Gail and Tom Gehrke of
". Milton, and Debbie and Randy
Cabaniss of Milton; 6 grand-
i children-Wendy Parr, David
Gehrke, Heidi Steranka, Eric
Cabaniss, Ryan Cabaniss and
Adam Cabaniss; 2 great
grandchildren-Justin and
Kaylee Gehrke.
Funeral Services for Mrs.
Haveard were held 3 p.m. on
Sunday, December 4, 2005 at
the First Assembly of God
Church in Milton with Rev.
Fred Rogers officiating.
Burial followed in the
Serenity Gardens Cemetery
with Lewis Funeial Home
directing.
The family received friends
-from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. ut
Sunday (prior to services) at
.. the First Assembly of God
c i Church in Milton.
Active Pallbearers were-
Scott Carpenter, Bobby Green,
5 Tony Grice, Michael Knowles,
| Steven Haveard, and. Ashley
k Haveard.
Lewis Funeral Home of
Milton was in charge of
* arrangements.

SSkipper, William
I Ronald (Skip)
? 1954 2005
William Ronald "Skip"
Skipper, age 51, of Pensacola,
e passed away Friday, December
S2, 2005 matter a long and coura-


geous battle with lung disease.
Born July 12, 1954 he was a
native and lifelong resident of
Pensacola. He worked at
Solutia, formerly Monsanto for
30 years, was a member of the
Flying Eagles and a proud
member of the NRA. Ronnie
loved the beach, fishing, and
camping, hunting and special
times with family and friends.
His passion for life and his
sense of humor touched all our
hearts.
He is preceded in death by
his father-William Skipper.
Survivors include beloved
wife-Teena of 23 years;
sons-Alan (Brittany) and Billy
(Brandy), stepson-Dennis;
mflother-Marie; granddaugh-
ters-Veronica and Bailey; sis-
ter-Loria Dean (William
Jackson, Messina Dean). Other
survivors include numerous
aunts, uncles, cousins, and
many special friends.
"My heart is severely pained
within me, and the terrors of
death have fallen upon me.
Fearfulness and trembling have
come upon me, and horror has
overwhelmed me. So I said,
"Oh, that I had wings like a
dove! I would fly away and be
at rest. Indeed, I would wander
far off, and remain in the
wilderness, I would hasten my
escape from the windy storm
and tempest" Psalm 55:4-8.
This passage from the Bible
is what I could describe for my
Daddy. When read it seems like
my dad is saying it to me, and
the Bible also tells us that in
Heaven God will wipe. away
every tear from their eyes, there
shall be no more death, nor sor-
row, nor crying. There will be
no more pain, for the former
things have passed away...-
"Behold, I make all things new"
-Rev. 21:4-5.
People who knew my daddy
will always have the best mem-
ories of him event though at
times he was so "hardheaded."
He would try his best to help
whoever he could and every-
body knew that in their hearts.
In some of my last conversa-
tions with him, we talked about
death. I asked him if he was
going to Heave. His reply was


I


"Son, I'm a good person and
help everyone I can, but I wish
God would give me a sign to
inake me believe." I went on to
explain that being a good per-
son doesn't get him into
Heaven, you have to have faith
that God is real and ask God to
come into your heart and ask for
forgiveness for your sins. We
had several conversations on
this topic...I have faith that my
father is in Heaven where there
is no more pain, no more cry-
ing, and no more dying. I will
miss my dad greatly. He was
my worldly father that I 'will
grieve until there is no more
crying. My dad will be greatly
pissed. -William Alan
Skipper.
The Skipper family would
like to thank the following peo-
ple from Sacred Heart Hdspital:
Dr. William Belk, Dr. Keen
Arney, Dr. Laskey, (Tulane,
LA), Nurses Michelle and
Chris, Nurses in I.C.U. and
'Heart unit.
The Skipper family would
also like to thank the pallbear-
ers: Joe Brown, Larry Murphy,
John Burris, Stanley Sanders,
Jimmy Averette, Gary Hilderth,
and honorary pallbearer Charles
Parker.
Funeral services were held
Monday, December 5th at 10
a.m. at Lewis Funeral Home in
Milton:

Vercrouse,
Sr., Jay Norris
1927 2005
Jay Norris Vercrouse, Sr.,
age 77 of Milton, Florida
passed away Wednesday,
November 30, 2005 in a local
hospital. He had resided in the
Milton area for the past 13 years
and was at one time a profes-
sional Baseball player.
He is survived by 3 sons-
Gary A., Jay N., and Donald E.
Vercrouse; 2 daughters-
Sheryll Lynn Dunwoodie, and
Lori Ann Spears; 2 sisters-
Jean Townsend and Vivian
Brewer; 18 grandchildren and
12 great grandchildren.
Lewis Funeral Home in
Milton, FL is in charge of local
arrangements.


Extraordinary Personal


Care for Women.

We believe in providing a level of thoughtful care ai'd:I expertise that
will ensure your c' nfrr :. a Id confidence in us. As certified specialists
in Ob tet-rics aE:] G:, iGn-coio'-,, we promise to reward your trust with
straight .-inw,'r and the asurdir.-'E that you will r ci,-' the best possible
care. After v,.ti as ,:,f education and experience, Dr. David and Dr. Davis
hai-e Ic i:pened-i Pace OB/GYN in a brand-new building featuring state-
of-the art itchinlL ;i and an approach to women's criie that. emphasizes
prompt, comfortable, effective treatment. Please contact us for more
information on our services and experience or to make an tipp,-intrnert.

For an appointment call 850-995-9066.


I S h iJ -i I


I ,
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ii


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Pace

OB/GYN
46.28 Summerdale Boulevard
Pace. Florida 32571


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West Florida

PRIMARY CARE


Rotating Specialist


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< Dr. Dissanayaki Oncology/Hematolo gy

Dr. Parker Cardiology

Dr. Obeid Pulmonary

Dr. Kimura Allergy


Dr. Meredith

6072 Doctors Park

Milton, FL 32570

981-9340


Ln


Lab & X-ray Available
on Site


(I *~
I


Page 5-B


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


. Wednesday December 7, 2005


I RI \7.l aisffIII


it


3


\







Pae6BUTeSnaRs rs azteWdedyDcme ,20


SKornerstone / Community


MaHarreys in concert


3


nights


The MaHarreys will be singing tonight, Thursday, and Friday night at the Chumuckla Pentecostal
Holiness Church, located at 2841 Highway 182, at 7 p.m. Pastor Ira Decker is inviting the communi-
ty to come hear these uplifting singers! For more information call 994-5444.


Stephanie to sing...


Stephanie Leavins will be in concert at Mt. Pleasant Baptist
Church on Sunday, December 11 at 11:00 a.m., the church is
located at 6151 NW Dogwood Dr., Milton. Pastor Charlie
Bradshaw invites everyone to attend this special Christmas ser-
vice. For more information, call 626-0600.


The Fidelis Community
Center will be having their
monthly singing Friday,
December 9th at 6:30 p.m. The
groups performing are Silver
Eagle, Sound & Spirit, and The
Rowell Bluegrass Band. A
meal will be available for $5
starting at 5:30 p.m. The pro-
gram is free. For more infor-
mation contact Shorty Ryals at
476-2547.
"Mary's Voice"
presented Sunday
First UMC, located at 6830
Berryhill Street, will have their
Chancel Choir present a dra-
matic musical, "Mary's Voice"
during the morning worship
services, Sunday, December
11, at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.
The Children's Choir will
present "The Next Noel: A
Humbling Christmas Musical
for Children that same day at
4:30 p.m. in the Fellowship
Hall, followed by refresh-
ments. The public is invited to
all these services.


Toys for Tots

locations!
The following locations
for the Toys for Tots have
boxes reqdy for you to donate
and make some children
happier this Christmas.
Santa Rosa Chamber of
Commerce, 5247 Stewart St.,
Milton; ph: 850/623-2339-
Nicole Frenk.
United Bank. 5941
Berrmhill Rd.. Milton: ph:
850/98 1 3 3 52-Katie
Krasnosky.
Covenant Hospice. 5907
Berryhill Rd.. Milton, ph:
8501202-5930-Erin
United Bank. 3885 Scott's
Plaza Dr., Ja; ph: 8501675-
6000-Fay Loewen.
MR Buildings, 5787 Hwy.
90, Milton; ph: 981-9303-
Richard Baldwin
Big Lots. 6247 Hwvy. 90.
Milton;. ph: 850/9983-2383-
James Pence.
Edward & Jones, 6259
Hwy. 90, Milton; ph: 850/983-
1471-Jacqueline Brown.
84 Lumber, .5495'
Industrial, Blvd., Milton; ph:
850/981-9484-Roger-Payne.
K-Mart,. 6050,-Hwy. 90,
Milton; ph: 8501623-6260-
Mr. Clark. .
Dollar Tree, ,4924 .Hwy.
0 ~ i os,, .- 7';.


I


Luncheon date


Senior December
is set for Tuesday


1


.The monthly,
Community Senior's
i Luncheon at Bagdad
United Methodist
Church, located at 4540
Forsyth Street, Bagdad,
FL is planned for
Tuesday. December
13th at II a.m. All
t. Senior Citizens are
in cited! Call 626-1948
for more information
"Unto Us a Savior is Born"
The people of Harmony Ridge Baptist Church, 5536 Hwy. 90
West, in Pace invite you to join us Friday, December 9th at 7 p.m.
for an evening of celebration of the birth of Christ.
A special musical presentation will be followed by refresh-
ments and fellowship. Please plan to be our guest and to bring a
friend. More information? Call 850/994-1551.


re's to


ur


alth


For more information on placing your
advertisement on this page, call Retail
Advertising at 623-2120


.1. MILTON


MV MEDICAL
PRIMARY CARE CE11TTE -
6072 Doctors Park, Milton
981-9340
H.M. Meredith, II, M)D.
Our facility provides a full range of services for children and adults to meet most of your health care needs.
In addition, we offer.Basic X-Ray and Laboratory Testing.
Our office operates by appointment. Appointments are always held open for same day urgent problems.
We are accepting new patients. We would be honored if you considered us for your medical care.
This medical facility is equipped and staffed to care for you and your family needs.


Park l Avenue
PHARMACY, Inc.


"The people you KNOW and TRUST with your prescriptions."


623-2222

5440 Dogwood Drive Milton, FL 32570
(Winn Dixie Shopping Center)


ALTERNATIVE HEALTH


FOOD STORE
"Wihere educated natural health choices are made."
Deanna Gilmore: Manager Jimmie D. Hill; Ph.D, Natural Health Counselor
E-Mail address: GWYHILL @ AOL.com
5533 Hwy. 90 Pea Ridge 994-3606
Mon.-Fri.: 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Sat.: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.


Professional Hearing Aid Centers


& Advanced Audiology, Inc.


S"Hear what another satisfied p 1M
patient has to say...!"
eterman, 'Tve never "heard" it so good! I want to thank atocia Wilson, Bc-HIS
Au.D., CCC-A you & your people for the outstanding care & ._-_.A'.'n.o-
concern in solving my hearing problem." .-t'_r*Her'ln7-
Vince Whibbs i...-'''
Milton Pensacola Crestview .
5851 Berryhill Road 115 North Palafox 502 N. Main St. w
623-8818 438-4092 689-0545 W


.1~


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday December 7, 2005


Ask the Preacher
... a weekly column answering your questions
with Biblical answers about life.
Dear Pastor Gallups, "I was recently told that you were call-
ing for the "ouster" of all of the Commissioners because they
voted for a "mail-out" ballot in the recent "wet-dry" election.
He told me that you did this on the radio on one of your week-
ly programs. Is this true? Do you really think that the mail-out
ballot had anything to do with the outcome considering the mar-
gin of the votes?" J.D., Milton
Dear T. D.,
I have never called for the "ouster" of any of the
Commissioners on the radio. I am on a live, weekly talk-radio
program on WEBY 1330 every Thursday morning at 8:00 a.m.
During the election I DID say that I was shocked when I
returned home from a mission trip to Peru to discover that our
Commissioners had done this.. I also said that I predicted that if
we went "FULL WET" that the Commissioners might be in
trouble politically.
I still believe this might be true based upon the fact that we
did go wet and many, many people are speaking of "one more
vote" that they get in the upcoming Commission election.
It is true that all five of our County Commissioners voted to
use a mail-out ballot. This was the first time in the history of this
county to use this method for the "wet-dry" election. It also cost
the county many tens of thousands of dollars more than a con-
ventional precinct vote would have cost.
Yes, I believe with all my heart that the mail-out ballot had a
huge impact on the outcome of the election. So do the wetsS"!
The "wets" lobbied the Commissioners for it because accord-
ing to all the research they had done they "knew" they could
win it this way, and probably, only this way. (This research and
its author from the University of West Florida, and the "lobby"
of the wets was printed in the Pensacola News Journal.) The
Commissioners obliged their lobby, 5-0. We now have a wet
county.
And never forget according to the "hard liquor" people, all
of this was done for only two reasons....more MONEY and more
ability to DRINK LIQUOR EASIER. These are two fine rea-
sons for a County to sell its soul huh?
Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church. in Milton.
He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Florida State University, and a Master
of Divinity from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been
pastor of HHBC since 1987. He serves as an International Youth Evangelist for
the Southern Baptist Convention since 1990 preaching all over the US. and
Canada. For more information about HHC, call 623-8959 or visit our website @
www.hickoryhammockbaptist.org, If you have any questions for Ask The
Preacher, send it to: Ask The Preacher, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351
Hickory Hammock Road, Milton, Florida 32583-paid advertisement


1


Page 6-B










Wednesday December 7, 2005


I The Santa Rosa PrKss Gazette


Le als


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR SANTA ROSA
COUNTY, STATE OF FLORI-
DA
Case No. 05-506-DR-01-AD-R
DIv.R
IN RE: Adoption of a minor.
AMENDED NOTICE OF
ACTION
TO ANY AND ALL INTEREST-
ED PARTIES:
NOTICE IS GIVEN that a
Petition for Adoption regarding
a child known as DEMETRE
LAVONTE POPE, born
November 2, 1997, at
Pensacola, Escambia County,
Florida, has been filed and any
interested party is required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on V. Keith
Wells, V. KEITH WELLS, PA.,
904 East Gadsden Street,
Pensacola, Florida 32501, with-
in thirty (30) days, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioners' attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter.
DATED the 16 day of
November, 2005. .
DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION: November 23, 2005
As Clerk of the Court
Circuit Court'Seal
BY: Rochelle Leonard
As Deputy Clerk
112305
S121405

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SANTA ROSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FIle No.: 57-2006-CP-383
DivIsilon:
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MILTON A. BARTHELL
Decemsed
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administanton)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an
Order of Summary
Administration has been
entered In the estate of MILTON
A. BARTHELL, deceased, File
Number 57-2005-CP-383, by
the Circuit Court for SANTA
ROSA County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
Is P.O. Box 472 Milton, Florida
32572; that the edent's date
of death was July 22, 2004; that
the total value of the estate is
$12,000 and that the names
and addresses of those to
whom It has been assigned by
such order are:
Name
ROBERT BARTHELL
Address
501 4th Avenue
Two Harbors, MN 55616
PAM WOLFE
1006 East 14th Street
Davenport, IA 52803
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
. ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the
decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other
than those for whom provision
for full payment was made in
the Order of Summary
Administration must file their


claims with this court WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY
OTHER APPLICABLE TIME
PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is December 7,
2005
Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
/s/ Martin S. Rosenbloom
Martin S. Rosenbloom, Esq.
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 323470
BAKALAR & EICHNER, P.A.
150 South Pine Island Road
Suite 540
Plantation, Florida 33324
Telephone: (954) 475-4244
Person Giving Notice:
Is/ Robert Barthell
Robert Barthell
501 4th Avenue
Two Harbors, Florida 55616
120705
121405
128056
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that
pursuant to WRITS OF EXE-
CUTION issued in Circuit Court
of Santa Rosa County, Florida,
on the 29th day of April, 2004 in
the cause wherein Paul Russo
and Bobbie Russo were plain-
tiffs and Debra Kay Kea was
defendant, being Case No. 57-
2003-287-CA in said court, I,
Wendell Hall, As Sheriff of
Santa Rosa County, Florida,
have levied upon all the right,
title, and interest of the defen-
dant, Debra Kay Kea in and to
the following described real
property, to wit:
DESCRIPTION OF PROPER-
TY
Begin at the Northwest comer
of the North half of the South
half of Lot-5, of a Subdivision of
Section 41, Township 5 North,
Range 29 West, according to
the Plat of Record as recorded
in Deed Book "Q", at page 151
of the Public Records of Santa
Rosa County, Florida. Thence
go South 00 degrees 30 min-
utes 58 seconds West along
the West line of said Lot-5 a
Distance of 119.16 feet to a
point of Intersection with the
East Rlght-of-Wea of Beck
Avenue (Apparent 50' R/W),
Thence go South 01 degrees
57 minutes 54 seconds West
along said East Right-of-Way a
distance of 88.15 feet, Thence
departing said East Right-of-
Way go South 88 degrees 19
minutes 19 seconds East a dis-
tance of 652.26 feet to the East
Boundary Line of the Town of
Jay City Limits, Thence go
North 01 degrees 32 minutes
20 seconds East along the East
Boundary Line of said Town of
Jay City Limits a distance of
207.29 feet to the North Line of
the North one half of the South
one half of said Lot-S, Thence
go North 88 degrees 19 min-
utes 19 seconds West along
said North Line a distance of
653.73 feet to the Point of
Beginning, the above described
Parcel of Land is situated in
Sections 41, Township 5 North,
Range 29 West, Santa Rosa
County, Florida, and contains


3.1 acres more or less,
And on the 10th day of January,
2006 I shall offer this property
for sale, at the east front door of
the Santa Rosa Criminal
Justice Facility, in Milton, Santa
Rosa County, Florida, at the
hour of 1:00 p.m. on or as soon
thereafter as possible. I will offer
for sale all the said defendants,
Debra Kay Kea right, title and
Interest in the aforesaid real
property, at public auction and
will sell the same, subject to
taxes, all prior liens, encum-
brances and judgments, if any
to the highest and best bidder
for CASH IN HAND. The prp-
ceeds to be applied as far as
may be to the payment of costs
and the satisfaction of the
above-described execution.
WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF
OF
SANTA ROSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
By: Deputy James E. Chessher
James E. Chessher
Deputy Sheriff
IF YOU HAVE A DISABILITY
REQUIRING SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATIONS OR TO.
ARRANGE TO VIEW THE
PROPERTY, PLEASE CON-
TACT JANICE PLATT (850)
983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN
(7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE
SALE DATE.
120705
121405
122105
122805

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that
pursuant to WRIT OF EXECU-
TION Issued In the Circuit Court
of Santa Rosa County, Florida,
on the 9th day of September,
2005 in the cause wherein
Chase Manhattan Bank, USA,
N.A. was plaintiff and Andy
Wilkinson was defendant, being
Case No. 03-558-CA In said
court, I, Wendell Hall, As Sheriff
of Santa Rosa County, Florida,
have levied upon all the right,
title, and Interest of the defen-
dant, Andy Wilkinson in and to
the following described person-
al propey, to wit:
DESCRIPTION OF PROPER-
TY
1965 FORD MUSTANG
VIN # 5F071677037
I shall offer this property for
sale, at east front door of the
-Santa Rosa Criminal Justice
Facility, in Milton, Santa Rosa
County, Florida, at the hour of
1:00 p.m. on January 10, 2006
Or as soon thereafter as possi-
ble. I will offer for sale all the
said defendants, Andy
Wilkinson, right, title and Inter-
est In the aforesaid personal
property, at public auction and
will sell the same, subject to
taxes, all prior liens, encum-
brances and judgments, If any
to the highest and best bidder
for CASH IN HAND. The pro-
ceeds to be applied as far as
may be to the payment of costs
and the satisfaction of the
-above described execution.
WENDELL HALL, SHERIFF
OF
SANTA ROSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
By: /s/ Deputy Jason RIckmon
Jason Rickmon
Deputy Sheriff
IF Ou HW,vE A DISABILITY


REQUIRING SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATIONS OR TO
ARRANGE TO VIEW THE
PROPERTY, PLEASE CON-
TACT JANICE PLATT (850)
983-1281 AT LEAST SEVEN
(7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE
SALE DATE.
120705
121405,
122105
122805 .
S1215
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SANTA ROSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DMSION
Case No.: 57-2005-CP-36
Division B
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Myrtle Audrey Perrin
(a/k/a Audrey B. Perrin)
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of Myrtle Audrey Perrin (a/k/a
Audrey B. Perrin), deceased,
whose date of death was
October 11, 2004 File INumber
57-2005-CP-36, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Santa
Rosa County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is PO Box 472 Milton, FL
32572. The name and address
of the personal representative
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE TIME OF SER-
. VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice Is December 7,
2005.
/s/William R. Mitchell
William R,. Mitchell, of
Wmin, Rod Mitchell PA.
125 South Alcaniz Street, Suite
1
Pensacola, FL 32502
RO. Box 30056 (Zip 32503)
Telephone: (850) 439-1003
Facsimile: (850) 439-1002
Florida Bar #: 0896462
Attorney for Personal
Representative
/st Patricia Mohan
Patricia Mohan
Personal Representative
3916 Deerwood Circle.
Pace, FL 32571
120705
121405
12Msa


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Whiplash Injuries

A patient can expect to receive the best quality care available in our area.






























vehicle accidents. current medical literature reveals that even
minor accidents with speeds as low as 15 m.p.h. can cause
joint, nerve, disc and ligamentous injuries. Other symptoms
such as headaches, dizziness, jaw pain (TMJ), low back-pain,
memory loss can often be directly related to the trauma
involved in a "whiplash" type injury.
If you, a friend, or relative has been involved in an accident,
I urge you to call my office for a thorough evaluation by a physi-
cian who specializes in neuromuscular injuries and spine relat-
ed problems.
As an experienced health care provider, I utilize the most up
to date diagnostic and therapeutic services available in our
medical community.
Our goal is to provide experience you can trust, and depend
on, and the guarantee that your health is our main concern.




S WATERS T







Glover Lane Milton 623-2111


Dr. Wllia Waters Experience you Trust!


Pane 7-B


I






PSUIA B-B I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday December 7, 2005


I


Call between 9am and 3pm Monday (12/12) thru Friday (12/16)
to subscribe and receive the low price of...


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IU 6629 Elva Street
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IRecipient's Name I
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Address $40 per year"

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-Phone For your convenience...you can also fax your
subscription with credit card info to 623-2007
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Wednesday December 7, 2005


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Pane R-R'








Wednesday December 7, 2005 I The Santa Rasa Press Gazette Page 9-B


W.H.


Rhodes Elementary


COMMUNITY


Together We Can Make The Difference


Please note: Information on the School pages is provided in whole by the individual educational facilities which are wholly responsible for its content;


Please note: Information on the School pages is provided in whole by the individual educational facilities which are wholly responsible for its content:
They provide disks with the written copy, and the scanned photos each week. The Press Gazette is not responsible for the content.

Rhode's Reading Program is Oriental


This year at W.H. Rhodes
Elementary, our reading theme
is "Orient Yourself to Reading
at Rhodes Elementary." Each
year we combine all of our
school activities, such as the
Arts Festival, together with our
Accelerated Reading Program
to create an exciting atmos-
phere for the students, as well


as the staff.
Everyone is "traveling" to
the Orient through many differ-
ent avenues,L which is evident
when you walk in the school
and see the brightly colored
Oriental decorations in every.
room. Usually staff members
wear the school t-shirts that
were created with the school


theme on Fridays to emphasize
our school spirit and to help
motivate the students to contin-
ue to read.
During our AR celebrations,
students anrd staff alike dress in
whatever Oriental attire they
have. Our school-wide goal is
to pass 40,000 AR tests! We are
off to a good start and an excit-
ing year so far!


Together We Can



Make The Difference


Left: Do Dragons Only
Exist in Fairy tales? The stu-
dents in Mrs. Lana
Rowell's fourth grade class
at WH Rhodes found the
correct answer. No drag-
ons still exist today in our
world. Chase Coppedge, a
student in Rowell's class,
had his mother, Patty
Coppege, come to school
to show the class his "drag-
on" Jeffrey. Jeffrey is a
"monitor", a cousin to the
Komodo dragon. Jeffrey
needs much warmth and
loves to be wrapped up in
a blanket. Ahhhhhh...


Right: The Student Council
float for Rhodes won first
place in the community
division.


Polite Star Citizens


Kindergarten
Brenna Williams
Rm 315/Burt
Mayzie Potton
Rm 314/Crosswell
Alli Sciadone
Rm 313/Bozeman
Christy O'Neal
Rm 312/Waller
Andrew Bradshaw
Rm 308/Benavides
John Adams
Rm 306/Larson
Erin Nolan
Rm 202/Piscopo
Randale Hinton
Rm 89B/Hendon

First Grade
Becky Ward Rm 304/Lane
Chauncey Griffin
Rm 201/Kehl
Georgia Farless
Rm 203/Hamilton
Malia Herrara
Rm 205/LeDew
Brianna Washington
Rm 207/Moreno
Ladarian Embrey
Rm 310/Robinson
Megan Predmore
Rm 204/Rinehart
Gavin Collum
Rm 206/Dublin
Brianna Hunter
Rm 208/Cabaniss
Taylor Robinson
Rm 215/Elliott

Second Grade
Dustin Franz
Rm 404/Burke
Madison Mravlja
Rm 406/Gentry
Ben Coulter
Rm 410/Robinson
Sean Barker Rm 401/Duke


Drew Jones Rm 403/Hicks
Alexia Slack
Rm 405/Coppedge
Keeley Ryan Rm 407/Kelly

Third Grade
Haley Kent Rm 601/Nolan
Adam Sizemore Rm 508/ D.
Mitchell
Hope Michel Rm
506/Seaman
Autumn Matthew Rm
504/Langham
Toni Gray Rm 502/Holland
Dominique Craig Rm 89/A.
Albro
Alexia Smith Rm
507/Casey
Emily Russell Rm 503/K.
Mitchell

Fourth Grade
Sade Crosby Rm 708/Duncan
Antaya Jenning
Rm 707/Eubanks
Ke' aira Goldsmith
Rm 706/Erickson
Tim Malinoski
Rm 704/Rowell
Taylor Drereher
Rm 702/Deas
Michael Buckner
Rm 703/Chuites
Chance Butler Rm 223 Brunn
Patricia Lambeth
Rm 214 Waldrop

Fifth Grade
Arin Schultz Rm 603/Powers
Vita Locke Rm 605/Stone
Ashley Pate Rm 604/Cone
Amir Kelker Rm 606/Ross
Samantha Usi Rm 607/Taylor


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday December 7, 2005


Page 9-B










Patj.10-B- h- at aPrs aet -nsdyDcme--20


Military


McCarthy graduates
from AF BMT
Air Force Airman James C.
McCarthy has graduated from
basic military training at
Lackland Air Force Base,,San
Antonio, Texas. -
During the six weeks of
training, the airman studied the
Air Force mission, organization,
and military customs and cour-
tesies; performed drill and cere-
mony marches, and received
physical training, rifle marks-
manship, field training exercis-
es, and special training in
human relations.
In addition, airmen who
complete basic training earn
credits toward an associate
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is a 2002 graduate of
Locklin Vo-Tech High School,
Milton, FL.


Howard reports
through Army DEP
Jamie L. Howard has joined
the United States Army under.
the Delayed Entry Program. The
program gives young men and
women the opportunity to delay
entering active duty for up to


one year.
The enlistment gives the new
soldier the option to learn a new
skill, travel and become eligible
to receive as much as $50,000
toward a college education.
After completion of basic mili-
tary training, soldiers receive
advanced individual training in
their career job specialty prior
to being assigned to their first
permanent duty station.
The recruit qualifies for a
$20,000 enlistment bonus.
Howard, a 2005 graduate of
Central High School, Milton,
FL, has reported to Fort
Benning, Columbus, GA, for
active duty.
He is the son of James
Howard of Indian Ford Road,
Milton.


Peppard reports
through Army DEP
Sarah B. Peppard has joined
the United States Army under
the Delayed Entry Program. The
program gives young men and
women the opportunity to delay
entering active duty for up to
one year.
The enlistment gives the pew
soldier the option to learn a new
skill, travel and become eligible
to receive as much as $50,000
toward a college: education.
After completion of basic mili-
tary training, soldiers receive
advanced individual training in
their career job specialty prior
to being assigned to their first
permanent duty station.
The recruit qualifies for a
$15,000 enlistment bonus.
. Peppard, a 2003 graduate of
Santa Rosa Christian Academy,


Milton, FL, has reported to Fort
.Jackson, Columbia, SC, for
active duty.
She is the daughter of
Thomas and Emily Olsen of
Hawkins Drive, Pace, FL.

Dean completes his Naval
BT
(FHTNC) -Navy Seaman
Recruit Elliot J. Dean, Jr, son of
Angelina M. and Elliot J. Dean
of Milton, FL, recently complet-
ed U.S. Navy basic training at
Recruit Training Command,
Great Lakes, Ill.
During the eight-week pro-
gram, Dean completed a variety
of training, which included
classroom -study and practical
instruction on naval customs,
first aid, firefighting, water safe-
ty and survival, and shipboard
and aircraft safety. An emphasis
was also placed on physical fit-
ness.
The capstone event of boot
camp is "Battle Stations". This
exercise gives recruits the skills
and confidence they need to
succeed in the fleet. "Battle
Stations" is designed to galva-
nize the basic warrior attributes
of sacrifice, dedication, team-
work and endurance in each
recruit through the practical
application of basic Navy skills
and the core values of Honor,
Courage and Commitment. Its
distinctly "Navy" flavor was
designed to take into account
what it means to be a Sailor.
Dean is a 2004 graduate of
Milton High School of Milton,
FL.

Schubmehl & other
shipmates volunteer
(FHTNC) -Navy Seaman
Apprentice Frank N.
Schubmehl, son of Anita A.
Amberson of Milton, FL, and
his fellow shipmates made a
port visit to Puerto Vallarta,
Mexico while assigned to the
guided-missile frigate USS
Jarrett homeported in San
Diego.
During the visit, Sailors vol-
unteered their time at Casa


Hogar, a local orphanage.
Sailors painted the orphanage's
exterior walls and distributed
toys to the children. The
crewmembers also played soc-
cer with the children. For the
past 13 years Casa Hogar has
provided a home for children
ages infant to teenager while
relying on private donations and
charity organizations. The
orphanage has received numer-
ous visits from U.S. Navy ships
in the past.
Guided-missile frigates like
USS Jarrett are anti-submarine
warfare combatants for
amphibious expeditionary
forces, underway replenishment
groups and merchant convoys.
Schubmehl is a 2004 gradu-
ate of Evant High School of
Evant, TX and joined the Navy
in June 2004.

Jalomo deployed
to Iraq and Kuwait
(FHTNC) -Navy Petty
Officer'3rd Class Juan M.
Jalomo, son of Wanda Jalomo
of Jay, FL and Demetrio Jalomo
of Jay, FL, and more than 470
Navy reservists were mobilized
from Naval Expeditionary
Logistics Support Force
(NAVELSF) Charlie home
based in Williamsburg, VA, and
deployed to Iraq and Kuwait in
support of the Global War on
Terrorism.
During the deployment,
Jalomo's unit will work directly
for the Army to provide a criti-
cal combat service support mis-
sion. Sailors are relieving Army
personnel as part of a scheduled
force rotation. NAVELSF
Charlie's primary mission is
cargo handling, which includes
vessel on-loading and off-load-
ing as well as conducting mar-
shalling yard operations.
Jalomo is a 1992 graduate of
Milton High School of Milton,
FL and joined the Navy in
January 1997.

Casias completes BT
(FHTNC)-Navy Seaman
Recruit Theodore C. Casias, son


of Keri J. and Junior Sims of
Milton, FL, recently completed
U.S. Navy basic training at
Recruit Training Command,
Great Lakes, IL.
During the eight-week pro-
gram, Casias completed a vari-
ety of training, which included
classroom study and practical
instruction on naval customs,
first aid, firefighting, water safe-
ty and survival, and shipboard
and aircraft safety. An emphasis
was also placed on physical fit-
ness.
The capstone event of boot
camp is "Battle Stations". This
exercise gives recruits the skills
and confidence they need to
succeed in the fleet. "Battle
Stations" is designed to galva-
nize the basic warrior attributes
of sacrifice, dedication, team-
work and endurance in each
recruit through the practical
application of basic Navy skills
and the core values of Honor,
Courage and Commitment. Its
distinctly "Navy" flavor was
designed to take into account
what it means to be a Sailor.
Casias is a 2005 graduate of
Pace High School of Pace, FL.

Cuthbert
completes Naval BT
(FHTNC)-Navy Seaman
Tyanna J. Cuthbert, daughter of
Stephanie G. Cuthbert of
Navarre, FL. and. John R.
Harnor of Covert, MI., recently
completed U.S. Navy basic
training at Recruit Training
Command, Great Lakes, IL.
During the eight-week pro-
gram, Cuthbert completed a
variety of training, which
included classroom study and
practical instruction on naval
customs, first aid, firefighting,
water safety and survival, and
shipboard and aircraft safety.
An emphasis was also placed on
physical fitness.
The capstone event of boot
camp is "Battle Stations". This
exercise gives recruits the skills
and confidence they need to
succeed in the fleet. "Battle
Stations" is designed to galva-


nize the basic warrior attributes
of sacrifice, dedication, team-
work and endurance in each
recruit through the practical
application of basic Navy skills
and the core values of Honor,
Courage and Commitment. Its
distinctly "Navy" flavor was
designed to take into account
what it means to be a Sailor.
Cuthbert is a 2005 graduate
of Navarre High School of
Navarre, FL.


Ogden reports
to duty in SC
Curtis W. Ogden has joined
'the United States Army under
the Delayed Entry Program. The
program gives young men and
women the opportunity to delay
entering active duty for up to
one year.
The enlistment gives the new
soldier the option to learn a new
skill, travel and become eligible
to receive as much as $50,000
toward a college education.
After completion of basic mili-
tary training, soldiers receive-
advanced individual training ,in
their career job specialty prior
to being 'assigned to their first
permanent duty-station.
The recruit qualifies for an
$11,000 enlistment bonus.
Ogden, a 2005 graduate of
Pace High School, Milton, FL,
has reported to Fort Jackson,
Columbia, S.C., for active duty.
He is the son of Jeffery and
Regina Ogden of Yancy Drive,
Pace.


Whee C* ouGe


/


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NORTH MILTON
(WHITING FIELDi
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Page 11-B


1 The Santa Rosa Pres e


Wednesday Decembe i


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-//eart Attacks... Strokes...
Broken Bones... Playground
Accidents... Whatever your
medical emergency is, we are

Close To Home!


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In an emergency, you
need attention fast.
At Santa Rosa Medical
Center, wve',e implementerd
the Nurse First System,
a streamlined procedure
that allows patients to be
seen first by a Primary
Triage Nurse when you
enter our Emergency
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tizes the case. Rest ..assured,
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MEDICAL CENTER
Emergency Services, Second To None


6002 Berryhill Road, Milton Florida
850-626-SRMC (7762) www.srmc.cc


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Wednesday December 7, 2005


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WEDNESDAY

December 7, 2005
Section C


Dogs improve

health of heart

failure Datients 1fI


T-he health of hospitalized J *J
heart patients can get a boost from
lut -, 12-minute visit from man's
be't trend, according to research
repo'nred Nov. 15 in Dallas at the
American Heart Association's
:inndal meeting.
Researchers found that a visit
from specially trained four-foot-
-d mend helped heart and lung
tuncti- n by lowering pressures, -- ,
diminishing release of harmful
hormones and decreasing anxiety
among hospitalized heart failure
parents.
Benefits exceeded those that
camnie from a visit from a human
., u n eer or from being left alone.
Animal-assisted therapy has
been .hown to reduce blood pres-
.ure in healthy and hypertensive
parents. It reduces anxiety in hos-
pah.iled patients, too.
Still, using dog therapy to
,ioihe people's minds and
improve health has been consid-
e red more a "nicety" than credible
science, said registered nurse
Kjihie M. Cole, the study's lead
author and clinical nurse at the
Lin.ersity of California Los
Aneks Medical Center.
SWEAT INDICATOR
S.'eating during physical
acin ity or in hot weather is Guffey's customer Paul Bartolacci,
healthy. But when individuals while discussing the latest looks
e i n perspiring while experienc-
in, discomfort in their chest, m, et's ike !C h
neck or jaw with little or no t s like 'C h
Ser ieon it could be the onset of
SheJrt attack, says a study by the
Lin '.ersity' of Illinois at Chicago.,
"nWe can stop a hean attack Only with m
during the process, but you have
0to ce to the hospiiai first," said Atlanta
Caherine Ryan, research assistant "' Then Miguel Wilson
professor of medical surgical I/ bounds into his
nursing. "The real push for Y Atlanta bungalow,
improved survival is to .get them
proved survival is to get them fresh off a round of golf, he's never
R, an presented her findings caught off-guard to see a man loung-
No, 15 at the American Heart ing in his living room, drinking his
4, ociation's annual meeting in liquor or using his office equipment.
Dall,& The stud, -.^a funded by \il-on. a custom clothier, con-
the Na.',nal Iritrure, of Health' sides the open door polic, .it his
through the University of Illinois Executive Ciothiers shop a tool of
Chicago's Center for Reducing the trade. He's not alone among
Ri', in Vulnerable Populations. upscale clothiers who realized long
T i me is of the essence during a ago that the key to selling is putting
heart attack, and doctors have men at ease.
men at ease.
ured people who experience His unobtrusive store has more
common n symptoms shortness of creature comforts of home -
brejath, cold sweats, nausea, light- kitchen uest bedroom, plasma
ededness, or discomfort inthe, guest bedroom, plasma
hhe t.. arm, neck or jaw to get to TVs, wet bar than ccoutemients
a hospital as quickly as possible. of a haberdashery.
But delay in -eeking treatnient is "When clients come in. it's not a
commn.i n and w'.or.ens the oui- high-pressure sales situation," said
come after a heart attack, Ryan Wilson, who crisscrossed the coun-
said. try custom-fitting pro athletes and
Ryan employed data from 10 mega-church pastors-before estab-
related studies from eight groups living .. tn. "Some gui
of authors in the United States- and just come over to say hello; see how
Great Britain. The numbers had just come doing, have a drink, rsay hello; see how
:"been collected in interviews with we're doing, have a drink, rel.
1,073 hejrt aliacik p.atienit;. Before kini. the- re in. 'Letme
S Ryan. tludid d I- c, -n Fl, r l ij\e a loo0 k a1 s.,:ne lhins
symptoms: chest I .i-cc, rfor AN k.ents' needs hja' evolved-
nqshoulder, arm, or hand discom- over time, specialty stores around
'fort; neck or jaw discomfort; back the country have made the necessary
Jdisconifiri. abdominal discom- changes. For years they've been
fort; indigestion; nausea and vom- regarded as destinations for styles
iting; shortness of breath; sweat- and brands not readily available at
ing; dizziness and lightheaded- larger retail stores. In the process,
ness; weakness; and fatigue. tlie;e shops from Fred Segal in
Her analysis showed that coro- Broadway in
hary patients with the shortest Los Angeles to the's in Broadwa hvin
'delays before seeking medical Detroit and Levy's in Nashville -
-help, an average of 10 hours, also have mastered the delicate art of
remembered experiencing the making men feel comfortable while.
largest number of symptoms. shopping and paying tor dollar for
Patients with the longest delays, purchases.
an average of 23 hours, were more, Added touches, such as adult
likely to have experienced fewer beverages and opportunities for
symptoms. male bonding, make these specialty.
Ryan's analysis also showed stores the most profitable niche in
that sweating was a key symptom the menswear industry.
.that sent heart attack sufferers to has been captured in
Jo piril emrer'nc room. i a rather succinct rule: Never say
search of help. However, there a rather int rule: Never sa
was no link between sweating and "No.
the severity of a cardiovascular That's the mantra espoused by
incident, Ryan said. Wilson at his made-tb-measure
ASPIRIN THERAPY shop. Suits at Executive Clothiers
Recent survey results released start at $800 and escalate into the
by the American College of $2,000 range once finer fabrics and
Preventive Medicine found that custom details come into play. But
'48 percent of diabetes patients in cost isn't questioned, Wilson said,
the United States older than age because clients are made to feel val-
40 fail to use aspirin therapy to ued
reduce their risk of recurrent heart "When you come here you feel
attack or stroke. The same number a
reported that they had not dis- at home," said Jason Caffey, the
cussed aspirin therapy with their retired NBA forward, who made an
health care provider, impromptu stop at Executive
Heart attack and stroke are the Clothiers recently to have a fray in
most life-threatening conse- his custom-made blue jeans mended.
quences of diabetes, occurring "You can come and have a drink.
more than twice as often among You can sit and watch TV. You're
people with diabetes than in those not rushed off. There's no crowds to
without. Heart attack accounts for deal with."
approximately 65 percent of Other amenities including
deaths in people with diabetes. es and in-home
The American Diabetes concierge services and in-home
'Association recommends that wardrobe consultations have also
aspirin be considered for use in bolstered'revenues nationMide
the prevention of both first and 'Specialt) store sales were a
recurrent cardiovascular events in $12.8 billion bright spot on the oth-
patients with diabetes.


~~1


EK1wnu PIl u I


ping: It's a guy thing


More than ever, men


find a comfort zone


in clothing stores


president ot IBa
with Tim Richey.


,ers,


m's suits for sale


Miguel Wilson of Executive Clothiers (right) finds a nice glass of
wine and other comforts of home can help customers like David
Taylor choose the perfect fabric. Such personal touches help make


such specialty stores the most profitable niche in the menswear


industry.
erwise hazy retail horizon, accord-
ing to market analysis by the NPD
Group. From December '03 to
November '04, revenues from spe-
cialty stores rose 7.4 percent the
greatest 2004 increase in sales of
any channel of distribution.
Those numbers reprecintit .ears.
if not decades, of culti.iing per-
sonal relationships with the clien-
tele, eventually including the
friends of those loyal clients.
The extra time proprietors of
specialty shops spend with clients
makes impressions more indelible
than sales receipts.
"When someone comes into
my store, I want the reception to
feel as warm as when someone
enters my home ;:iidl Don Guffey,
who owns a store in Atlanta's
trendy Buckhead district. "You do
that, and you've broken down the
barrier guys put up-when they think
you're going to force them into
buying this or that."
Specialty shops like Guffey's
also stand out ,from mass market
conpemitors by offering mr ridd
choices to wealthy males.
Thousands of fabric swatches are
available, along with detailed tai-
loring options (double vs. single-
breasted, or notched vs. peak
lapels).


"You can come and
have a drink. You can
sit and watch TV.
You're not rushed off.
There's no crowds
to deal with."
JASON CAFFEY
v Former NBA player who
shops at Executive Clothier,
a boutique in Atlanta

Since the typical specialty shop
client is often too busy to be both-
ered with shopping, several cus-
tomers buy multiple suits at once.
Some menswear specialists also
send merchandise to out-of-town
clients. Credit card numbers are
kept on file, and customers typical-
ly accept merchandise sight
unseen.
"This is not a department store
atmosphere, where the closest thing
you find to someone assisting you
is at the cash register," said John
Manning, a corporate attorney, dur-
ing a final fitting on some dress
slacks at Guffeys.
"This place is like.'Cheers,' "
he added. "Everybody knows your
name."


Atlanta
f you see Jonathan Hyla
wearing sunglasses while
digging through stacks of
designer jeans and loading up on
trendy T-shirts, he may be hiding a
hangover, but he's certainly not
trying to hide who he is.
He is a man who loves to shop.
And he is not ashamed.
"I've always liked it," said
Hyla, the 25-year-old radio pro-
ducer. "Jeans are the top of the list.
And I'll sound like such a girl,
but shoes. I have more shoes
than the average guy. There's just
certain things that I think, make an
outfit, if you will."
Whatever the reason, shopping
has become an increasingly
acceptable and popular pastime for
younger, single guys like Hyla.
Men in the 25- to 49-year-old
age group are responsible for more
than 55 percent of the buying
power among males a market
that is expected to grow nearly 25
percent to $6.7 trillion by 2009,
according to a recent report by
market research publisher
Packaged FacLs.
So retailers, in an effort to get
as much of this money as possible,
are using matn-centric marketing
messages to push moisturizer, hair
mou se. designer jeans-and acces-
sories in man-friendly store envi-
ronments.
At Nordstrom in Atlanta, for
example, there is a bank of flat-
screen televisions tuned to news
and sports in the men's shoe
department.
At a Mac, 's in Miami. the cos-
meucs area recently was expanded
24 percent to make room for men's
products and a private spa.
"They're doing a great job of
marketing this," Hyla said. "It's
definitely become more accepted
to shop. Some of my more rugged,
friends might make fun of me ...
but I like to take care of myself."
Jane Arrendale Sims began
capitalizing on this trend a year
ago when she opened a men's
department at Blue Genes, her
boutique for women in a trendy
part of Atlanta
The .men's side has seen
greater growth in its first year than
the women's side did in its first 12
months and the women's
department had a spectacular first
year, she said.
"It's incredible," said
Arrendale Sims, co-owner. "The
men buy a lot more at one time
than the women do."
Hyla admits he often buys
more than he needs. But he's also a


MEN AND
SHOPPING

Some findings from "The
U.S. Men's Market," a
recent study by market
researcher Packaged Facts:
About 1 in 4 men under
age 40 say they shop fre-
quently. That percentage
declines to less than 20
percent for men in their
40s and 50s.
Affluent single men ,
spend about as much as
their female counterparts
. on furniture, major appli-
ances and household tex-
tiles.
* Nearly 2 out of 3 men
only go shopping when
they need something, and
only 1 in 4 enjoy shopping
even when they don't
make a purchase.
SMe n the Southeast and
Southwest are most likely
to prefer shopping with
their families.


focused shopper; he doesn't dilly-
dally around the racks.
"I don't need to stare at the
jeans for five hours," he said.
"Guys are quick in, quick out. I
don't spend alot of time, as long as
everything is easily accessible and
I can get help qui '.y"'-
Johnny Fulmer is another man
who sees shopping as a perfectly
legitimate male hobby. As co-
owner of Church Street Market in
Marietta, Ga., he encounters many
like-minded people.
"We've seen a lot more men
here over the last two years," said
Fulmer, who with his wife sells
gourmet food, flower<, kitchen
accessories and willow furniture.
"Men see their spouses working a
lot of hours, and they want to pitch
in and help. It's not fair if the hus-
band and wife both work all day
and then the wife has to do every-
thing." '
Gender roles are no longer as
concrete as' they appeared in the
past, particularly among men and
women in the under-40 age group,
said Roger D. Blackwell, a con-
sumer behaviorist and marketing
professor at Ohio State University.
"Consumer preferences are
influenced by variables such as
education and careers, and for
younger college-educated con-
sumers, the education and careers
are nearly identical," he said.
"There are still obvious differ-
ences between genders for some
products, but there is a lot of blur-
ring."


Stuart Carbone shops regularly at a high-fashion boutique tor
women that recently opened a men's side.


1*










Pana 2-C I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday December 7, 2005


Cooking Comer


Leftover treasures:


While preparing the
Thanksgiving feast, be sure to
save some of your kitchen
scraps. Carrot tops, celery
leaves, mushroom stems and
onion peels can be put to good
use in a homemade broth.
After you have carved your
Thanksgiving turkey and
removed all the succulent meat,
don't toss the carcass in the
trash it is the broth's founda-
tion. And better broth makes
for livelier leftovers. Try it in
Crockpot Turkey in Puff Pastry,
Hearty Turkey Stew and
Turkey Gumbo.
Broth is not at all hard to
make. With kitchen shears or a
heavy knife, cut the carcass
into large pieces and place in a
stockpot or soup pot. Add water
to cover by 2 inches. Bring to a
boil over high heat and skim off
any foam that rises to the sur-
face.
Now comes the fun part.
Throw in that stash you saved,
as well as any leftovers from
'the Thanksgiving feast. Got
squash? How about green
beans, lima beans, pearl onions,
peas or corn? In they go. Toss
in an onion and garlic cloves,
peels and all. Throw in a couple
of carrots, a stalk or two of cel-
ery and a tomato.
Rosemary, thyme, sage and
chives are perfect for flavoring
broth. If fresh sprigs are not
available, add 1/2 teaspoon
dried of each. Now add salt, to
taste, and 5 or 6 whole pepper-
corns.
Return stock to a boil, then
reduce to a simmer. Cook par-
tially covered for 2 hours,
adding water' if necessary to
keep the carcass covered. Let
cool, remove and dispose of
carcass and vegetables, and
strain. Use as directed in turkey
recipes, or as you would chick-
en broth.
If not using broth immedi-
ately, freeze in small or large
quantities. Fill an ice cube tray
with broth and when frozen,
remove cubes to plastic bags.
Use the flavorful squares to
jazz up soups and sauces.


LEFTOVER
Debone the
hours after it i
refrigerate mea
sealable contained
Use excess t
to 4 days, and
gravy within 1
simply freeze.
When reh
reheat thoroughly
ture of 165 F
steaming through
CROCKPOT
PUFF PASTRY
2 tablespoons bu
1 pound cremin
halved or quarter:
2 onions, finely c
4 stalks celery, p
1/4-inch dice
1 tablespoon d
leaves
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon f
black pepper
1/4 cup' all-purpc
3/4 cup turkey b
1/2 cup dry whit
1 red bell pepper
1/2 cup heavy w
2 pounds coo]
turkey, cubed
8 frozen puff pas
Yields 6 to 8 ser
In nonstick
medium-high he
to pan and heat
Add mushrooms
they begin to lo
Using a slotted s
to slow cooker.
Reduce heat
Add onions an
cook, stirring, u
are softened. Ad
and black pepp
stirring 1 minu
and wine and s
ened (mixture
thick).
Pour mixture
rooms. Cover an
for 4 hours. Ad
cream and turi
high for 20 to 25
Prepare puff
according to p
tions. Spoon tur
over pastry.
-. Adapted fri


Turkey rises again
TIPS & Dependable Slow Cooker
bird within 2 Recipes" (Robert Rose,
is cooked and $22.95) by Judith Finlayson.
at in shallow, HEARTY TURKEY STEW
ers. 2 tablespoons olive oil
turkey within 3 1 medium to large onion, cut
stuffing and into 1/2-inch chunks
to 2 days, or 1 pound Yukon gold potatoes,
cut into 1-inch chunks
eating turkey, 4 ounces (2 cups) mushrooms,
y to a tempera- halved
and hot and 5 cloves garlic, minced
hout. 1 1/2 cups turkey broth, or
TURKEY IN chicken broth
1 1/4 pounds cooked boneless
matter turkey meat, cut into 1-inch
ni mushrooms, chunks
red 1/2 teaspoon salt
chopped 3 cups broccoli florets and thin-
peeled, cut into ly sliced stems
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
dried tarragon Yileds 4 servings.
Place olive oil in large, non-
stick Dutch oven and cook
reshly ground onion, stirring occasionally,
until onion is lightly browned
ose flour and soft, about 7 minutes.
roth Stir in potatoes, mushrooms
te wine and garlic. Add broth and salt
r, diced and bring to a boil. Reduce to a
shipping cream simmer, cover and cook until
ked, boneless potatoes are tender yet still
firm, about 10 minutes.
stry shells Add broccoli, cover, and
vings. cook until potatoes and broc-
skillet over coli are tender, about 5 min-
eat, add butter utes. Add turkey chunks.
t until melted. Meanwhile, in small bowl,
and saute until whisk flour into milk until
se their liquid, smooth. Stir flour mixture into
spoon, transfer simmering stew and cook, stir-
ring until sauce is thickened,
to medium. about 2 minutes.


id celery and
ntil vegetables
d tarragon, salt
per and cook,
te. Add broth
tir until thick-
will be very

e over mush-
id cook on low
Id red pepper,
key. Cook on
minutes.
pastry shells
package direc-
key and sauce

om "Delicious


it


I 4 t
'1


I The Santa .Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday December 7, 2005


Panea 2-C


f








Wd d Dcember 7 2005


Styles

Holiday style in 10 minutes


If there's one thing every-
one is short of this time of year,
it's time especially when
you're trying to get dressed for
a party.
"You are stacking events
like a true, high-society
socialite," says Lloyd Boston,
author of the new "Before You
Put That On" (Simon and
-Schuster, 2005) and style
expert for NBC's "Today"
show. "Even if you're just
making the holiday rounds to
Ssee family, attending middle
school concerts and chatting
up your better half's tipsy boss
at the annual holiday soiree,
wearing the right clothes helps
to make all of these functions a
bit less taxing, and a whole lot
less burdensome."
After all, aren't we sup-
posed to be having fun?
Here's Boston's minute-by-
minute,, step-by-step plan to
get you ready for that holiday
party before you can say "No
more jingle bell earrings,
please."
MINUTES 1-2
Snatch a pale solid sweater
that has just a little sex appeal
like an off-the-shoulder white
or camel cashmere or a merino
wool sleeveless turtleneck.
MINUTES 3-4
S Jump into a dark tailored
bottom to ground it. A black
pencil or A-line skirt, black-
suit trousers, or even a fu:i
wool wrap skirt that hits the
floor.
MINUTES 5-6
Keep warm in stylish boots
that hit the knee and go with
any of the above. Black leather
pointed-toe boots, or even a
black equestrian riding boot
for a twist!
MINUTES 7-8
Select just one over-the-top
accessory that says "bling!" A
metallic belt that dangles low,
a pair of oversized chandelier
earrings or a chunky vintage
br6och.
MINUTES 9-10
Go for flawless skin by
using an all-in-one founda-
tion/powder.- Add ,sshimmer to


your eyes but nowhere else. A
holiday lip (for many, it's clas-
sic red) and mascara, and hit
the starry night like you just fell
from on high!
Some other fast holiday
fashion tips from Boston:
Kissing Santa is better than
wearing him on a sweater. "If
you have one of these in your
closet, there is no need to toss
it," says Boston. "Just wear it
for an audience of those 12 and
under for maximum compli-
ments."
The retro elegance of real
fur adds instant cachet to the


most basic pieces of dress
attire, he says. But if you
choose to wear faux fur, it too
can add glamour to holiday out-
fits. "Either way, something
warm and fuzzy can give you
high style."
Instead of always jumping
into that same old little' black
dress, try renting a tuxedo.
"The trick is renting only the
jacket and pants," says Boston.
"No need for anything else.
You can add your own sparkly
shell or tank, or even just a
low-cut camisole for a sexier
look. And work the jacket or
pants as separates:"
Make your handbag your
statement piece. "The trick is to
pair your signature bag of the
day with something subtle or
opposite that will allow it to
shine on its own stage," says
Boston. "Let all eyes go to your
bag first." And for the holi-
days? "Be certain that you have
an evening clutch on standby."
And you might replace a
few of those "old" holiday
standbys: Instead of holiday
icon earrings, wear vintage
crystal clusters; instead of holi-
day-themed necklaces, try a red
coral one with a black or white
top; replace holiday hair orna-
ments with black lacquered
chopsticks and yes, those holi-
day theme sweaters -" instead
try shining in a metallic sweater
in silver or gold. Santa will
surely spot you in a crowd!


Santa Rosa County Tax Collector 2005







,, . ----










Robert McClure
Santa Rosa County
Tax Collector
The 2005 Santa Rosa County tax bills were placed in the mail November 1 st
and should be in property owner's hands by now. If you have not received a
bill for all property you own in Santa Rosa County please contact us immedi-
ately at one of the following locations, phone number, or web-site. Please
remember that taxes paid or post-marked during the month of November
receive a 4% discount.

Main Office: Milton: Santa Rosa Administrative Center 6495 Caroline Street

Branch Offices: Pace 4000 Hwy. 90 Unit A, across from the new Sonic
Drive-In, Open 7-6 Tuesday through Friday

Jay 5259 Booker Lane in the Community Center

Gulf Breeze: 1101 Gulf Breeze Parkway Suite 104

Midway: South Santa Rosa Services Center 5841 G. B. Parkway Suite B

Office Hours: All offices are open 8-4:30 Monday through Friday, with the
exception of the Pace Branch which is open 7-6 Tuesday through Friday

Office website for inquiries & payments:
www.robertmcclure.com

Office phone number: 983-1800 Mailing address:
P.O. Box 7100 Milton FL 32572


ADVANCED DENTAL CONCEPTS


Noel Spurlock, D.D.S.


Adrian Attkisson, D.M.D.


4140 Highway 90, Pace, FL 32571
(850).994-8185

We offer individual care for all members of your family Our comprehensive services include:


* Preventative Dentistry
* Cosmetic Bonding
* Porcelain Veneers
* Crowns & Bridges
* Root Canal Therapy
* Oral Surgery
* Tooth Whitening


A smile Is Forever, And We Keep You Smiling!


$25 OFF
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NEW

PATIENTS

Expires 11/13/2005


* Sealants & Fluoride
* Periodontics
* IntraOral Camera
* Insurance Plans Welcome
* Continued Education on
Up-to-Date Techniques,
Materials & Concepts


"We Want You To Have,a WHITE Christmas!"

Complimentary box of
Crest White Strips Supreme
Professional Teeth Whitening


$65 value
When you have a
comprehensive exam and x-rays
Expires 11/13/2005


Office Hours:
Monday- Thursday: 7-30 am to 5:00 pm
Friday: 8:00 am to 12:00 noon


If you're looking for family dental care or if you have any dental problems, please call.
We're confident that you will receive the finest dental care in a professional and caring environment.


i
Lfi
0


l eThe Santa Rosa

gazette ,Free Press



Local
news, sports, classified & businesses
Your hometown newspaper!
6629 Elva Street, Milton
623-3616 623-2120


-4


e nes ay e ,


Page 3-C


I The Santa Rosa Pres e


^
,^f^









Page 4ThI SantGzD


Community


Florida missed


a favorable deal on


drilling


5587 Berryhill Rd.
Milton
(1 mile west of hospital)

623-5685 i


Seuoig Alt M6 Sat. Raw Caudg


24 Hr.
Emergency
Service
Available


AfnotheWr Pak & Ship
Full Service Copy & Ship Center
+ "Serving All Debra C. Russell
'Your Business Needs" owner
Phone: 850-994-2696


4212 Hwy 90 Pace, FL 32571
Fax: 850- 994-8710
Email: anotherpaknship @bellsouth.net


C(


Jeff


Miller


speaks


Florida missed an excep-
tional opportunity this month.
Florida could have insured that
no oil or gas exploration took
place within 150 miles of most
of its coast or within Eglin Air
Force Base's Gulf test ranges.
But instead of choosing to pro-
tect our shores and our military
from oil companies, some
members of the Florida delega-
tion chose to ensure their
reelection in 2006. I am con-
cerned their risky gamble could
backfire. On July 1, 2007, just
19 months from now, the mora-
torium protecting the waters off
the Florida Panhandle known
as Lease Area 181 expires.
With the expiration of the
moratorium, the Minerals
Management Service within
the Department of Interior will
be able to sell oil and gas leas-
es within 20 miles of


Welcome to the Family!

Pastor & Mrs. Glyn Lowery

and the Family of

Pace Assembly of God

Invite you to be our guest at

3948 Highway 90

Pace, Florida

Office: (850) 994-7131
v Prayer Line: (850) 202-3200
Transportation: (850) 202-3162


Weekly Schedule of Services & Meetings
These are regularly scheduled services and activities.
Many others are scheduled for various groups or for special
needs, from the young to the young at heart!"
Sunday ..
9:45 AM .................. ......Sunday School classes for all ages
10:45 AM ............ .. ... ... ........... Morning Worship Service
Super Church for children thru 6th grade
5:00 PM ..... .......... ............... .Campmeeting Choir Practice
6:00 PM . .... . . . . . . .. .Campmeeting Service

3rd Monday Each Month
7:00 PM ........................................Ladies Night Out


Tuesday
9:00 AM ................... Women's Ministries Prayer & Bible Study

1st & 3rd Tuesday Each Month
7:00 PM ........................Convalescent Home Visitation

2nd & 4th Tuesday Each Month
6:45 PM ........... ....... ..... ........ .. Ladies Bible Study
7:00 PM . . . . ..... ............ .Men's Prayer Meeting

Wednesday
9:0'OA M ...................................................................................Ladies V visitation
5:30 PM-6:45 PM ........................ .............. ...................Supper Served
7:00 PM ................. ..... . . . Mid-Week Study in the Word
Royal Rangers & Missionettes
Son Life Student Ministries (Youth ages 12+)
HEAR PASTOR LOWERY ON THESE PROGRAMS:
CAMP MEETING TELEVISION
Pensacola/Mobile ........... . .. ....... .WFGX TV 35 .................. . . .Sunday 7:30 PM (ET)
Friday 6:30 PM (ET)
DeFuniak Springs, FL TV 24 ... ... ... ... .. .. ... .. ........ . Sunday 4:00 PM
*Tampa/Clearwater, FL ...... ........ ......... WCLF TV 22 ................ . . .. .Monday 1:30 PM (ET)
*DishNetwbrk, Satellite ............ . . .... .Sky Angel II 9702 ........................ ... Monday 1:30 PM (ET)

CAMP MEETING TIME RADIO


Crestview/Baker, FL ............ .............. WTJT 90.1 FM .................. ...... ................ ...M-F 4:45 PM
Brewton, AL .............................. .W ELJ 90.9 FM ... .. ......... ...... ...............M-F 6:45 AM
Ocean Springs, MS ........................... WOSM 103.1 FM ..................... ................. .M-F 3:15 PM
Moultrie, GA .............. ................... WNTM 93.9 FM/1300 AM ........... ............. Sunday at 6:40 AM(ET)
Visit us at our Website:
www.paceassembly.org
www.sonlife.com
A, M .',
'' "' ' "';'-''"V. I- ', .-v ,.


A Church That Makes No Apology For The Old-Time Gospel!


CLAk --


60656 NA / Ar^ww MiffL f1 5,25M
(65,W) 625-94/5
^v 00 eBAI; IPAte'Kn..q,


Don't forget we are open EVERY:
*Tuesday Nite 6:30-8:30 p.m. $ 2
Friday Nites 7:00-11:00 p.m. $6.50
Saturday Afternoon 2:00-5:00 p.m. $ 3.50
Saturday Nites 7:00-10:00 p.m. $5.50
* Sunday Afternoon (After Labor Day) 2:00-4:00 p.m. $3.00
-*vkae/ahsidwfMrofcof


.4 &


.'*


Pensacola. There is no guaran- ration is a state's rights iss
tee that this moratorium will be is abundantly clear tha
extended and with rising natu- State of Florida does not
ral gas, heating oil and petrole- drilling to negatively affe
um costs, it is becoming beaches and shores. So wh
increasingly likely that this give the people the abili
moratorium will be left to prevent it? Since the rer
expire. Florida's U.S. Reps. of this provision from
Mike Bilirakis, Cliff Stearns House Deficit Reduction
and I worked with the House the House Committee
leadership to construct a plan Resources has began mc
to give the people of the state forward on legislation
control of the destiny of its Neil Abercrombie, D-Ha
waters rather than a federal and, John Peterson, R-P/
bureaucrat or a member of allow drilling for natural g
Congress from Texas or close as seven miles fror
Pennsylvania This provision coast of Florida. It also ii
.would have prevented any diately repeals all e\1
drilling within 150 miles of the moratoria that currently pi
coast of Florida (well outside our coastline. This is jus
of the State of Florida 's posi- first in what I predict will
-tion of 100 miles) and prevent- series of attempts to drill i
ed any activity east of the mili- Eastern Gulf of Mexico.
tary mission line, where Eglin could have been prevented
Air Force Base tests and evalu- instead of showing the le
ates weapons systems. The pro- ship to give the state the a
vision also contained language to protect itself from drilli
to trade the existing leases in perpetuity, some Florida I
the Destin Dome, some as cians caved in to the pre
close as 17 miles off the coast of newspaper editorial re
of Florida, for other leases that boards that had never reas
are at least 100 miles from the probably didn't understand
coast. The bill also would have protective language. I will
extended the current moratoria tinue to fight any an
until 2017, and given protec-, drilling that occurs within
tion to the East Coast of Florida miles of our coast or encr
and the Straits of Florida for es on our military missi
the first time. We could have the Eastern Gulf I am, ho
ended the threat of drilling for er, disappointed that sor
96.5. million acres in the Gulf our delegation didn't tak
of Mexico forever. I've often opportunity to end the thr
argued that oil and gas explo- our shores once and for al


The eating


season is upon us
Thanksgiving is the Limit your alcohol-1
inevitable kickoff to the fat drinks.
season er, the holiday season Eat slowly and enga
the time between turkey day conversation.
and New Year's Day when the Eat smaller portion
temptations presented by heap- good rule of thumb is tha
ing helpings of our favorite tions should be about the
foods never seem to cease. of a deck of playing cards
The good news, according For more tips and nutr
to a survey by the National holiday recipes,
Institutes of Health, is that the www.southbeachdiet.com
average American puts on only BIGGER NOT BETTI
1 pound during the holiday sea- According to a new C
son. The bad news is that University study, when in
pound is seldom lost. goers were served stale
So, given that Thanksgiving corn in big buckets, they
is a holiday that centers on percent more than those
feasting with family and the same stale popcorn
friends, there are several sim- medium-size containers.
pie steps you can take to ensure Tasty food created
that your holiday meal is nutri- larger appetites, the
tious and keeps you from loos- found. Fresh popcorn in
ening your belt on a permanent tubs resulted in people e
basis. 45 percent more than
Dr. Arthur Agatston, author given fresh popcorn in
of "The South Beach Diet" urn-size containers.
(Rodale; $24.95), offers these "We're finding that p(
tips to keep fit and trim while size can influence intal
eating your way through much as taste," said
Thanksgiving: Wansink, professor of ma
Start your day with break- ing and applied economic
fast: The morning of Cornell University. "I
Thanksgiving Day can be hec- packages and containers
tic with baking and prepara- lead to overeating foods v
tions for feasting not even find appealing."
Take a family walk. While There is a silver lining
the turkey roasts relieve stress, findings, though. Portion
exercise and spend quality time can be used to increase the
with your children and family. sumption of less appeti
Greet your guests with but healthier foods, such a
soup. vegetables, said Wansink.
Focus on nutrient-dense "While a small bowl o
food. carrots might make for a
Fill your plate with high- afternoon snack, a large
fiber foods and lean protein,. might be even better," Wa
Sample' every food you said.
like in moderation. The study is publish


I


Wednesday December 7, 2005 ','


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Paching Supplies Business Cards Rubber Stanips


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Community


Pea Ridge Elementary recognizes 'Students of the Week'


Week for November 7 to 11 th. Congratulations
Kindergarten Class Autumn Dunlop, Ashley Santo, Sophie Eberhard,
Emerald Carter and Jason Payne.


First Grade Class MacKenzie Hardy, Randi Watson, Warren Sells,
Savannah West, Ciarra Junsch, Charlie Breed, Matthew Adams, and
Gabrielle Langham.


Second Grade Class Reanna Catches, Erin Lavoie, Anthony Krevatas,
Rachel Randell, Tristan Thomas, Ashleighann Grund, Kortney Harrington,
and Brianna Rutherford.


Fifth Grade Class Zach Carroll, Amber Presley, Lindsay Steen, Marisa
Straughn, Morgan White, and Jason Pfeiffer.


Week for November 14 to November 18. Corgratulationsl
Kindergarten Class Kaylee Kowalski, Amanda Tyson, Chloe Hart, Brandon
Griffin, Felisha Nail, Mica Hamm, Jake Randell, Christian Wilkerson, and
Jason Payne.


Third Grade Class Francis Van Dyne, Rebecca Geiberger, Bailey Williams,
Marcus Holcomb, Kimberly Madison, Corie Tate, Kirsten Moree, Garrett
Taylor and Courtney Cox.


First Grade Class Chloe Baker, Sammy Montano, Kolby Odom, Blake
Russell, Summer Cranston, Morgan Pearson, Rachel Nation, Jonathan
Gibson, and Randi Watson.


Fourth Grade Class James Satterfield, Felicia Sasser, Koral Major, Ashley
Alvarez, and Briana Branstetter.


Second Grade Class Jarvis Frank, Christian Antoniazzi, Dylan Hesser,
Emily Griffin, Morgan Bragunier, Skylar Peck, Audumn Holden-Lindsay, and
Emily Arrant.


Fifth Grade Class Cora Scott, Michele Baggett, Andy Anderson, Charlie
Nail, Grey Price, Vinny Oddo, and Dillon Ard.


For quality construction of portable buildings, garages, privacy


fences, decks and numerous outdoor projects


Vinyl 10x


All buildings 10 x 12 and under come


with one 4' door, one window and a ramp.
All sizes over a 10 x 12 come with one 4' door,
two windows and a ramp. All buildings are


tied down and leveled up. All are custom
built on your site with no on-site fees.


Jensen Outdoor Projects


5593 Hwy. 90
(Just two miles east of Walmart Supercenter)


9 4:30 M F
Sat. by appointment


995-2724,


A L


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 5-C


Wednesday December 7, 2005


-Ammmmmmlw-


Stee.1 1 ux ;2


0 17~k.^^bj^


t










P gaP T-C M s Pres G ten---2


Sheriff's Report


r Nov. 23 to Dec. 1, 2005
, Czoch, Michael Matthew;
Male; 24; 8916 Jupiter Drive,
Pensacola, FL; Resist Officer-
. Flee Elude LEO with Lights
, Siren Active, Drugs-Possess
' Cntrl Sub W/O Prescription.
1 11/26/05
* Davis, Tonya Davon;
: Female; 34; 4753 Blue
Ribbon Dr., Milton, FL;
Public Order Crimes-Commit
1st Degree Msd Evidence
4 Prejudice, Damage-Prop-
^ Crim Misch-$200 and Under.
, 11/26/05
; Hall, Amanda Lee;
Female; 28; 1675 Champagne
^ Ave., Gulf Breeze, FL;
: Probation Violation-Felony.
: 11/25/05
McClarnen, Sean Duane;
Male; 20; 5029 Bent Tree Rd.,
Milton, FL; Drive While
License Suspended Habitual
Offender, Carrying Concealed
Weapon Electric Weapon or
Device. 11/27/05
* Morris, Timothy Randall;
" Male; 27; 6313 Matador
#. Street, Milton, FL; Aggrav
Asslt W/Intent to Commit a
" Felony. 11/26/05
NotI, Maxine Maria;


Female; 21; 4969 Yacht
Harbor Drive, Pensacola, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony.
11/23/05
Sanford, Michael Duane;
Male; 39; 27,28 Gordon Ln. Rd
Jay, FL; Shoplifting-Petit
From Merchant 2nd or Subseq
Offense, Drugs-Possess Cntrl
Sub W/O Prescription.
11/23/05
Higgins, Kyle Henry;
Male; 27; 4845 Friendly St.,
Pace, FL; DUI. 11/26/05
Vasquez, Jorge Emilio;
Male; 26; 8038 Hartington
Dr., Navarre, FL; DUI.
11/26/05
Cobbh, James Leonard;
Male; 42; 5600 Windermere
Trace, Milton, FL; DUI
Alcohol or Drugs 2nd Offense.
11/26/05
Reed, Michelle Suzanne;
Female; 28; 1005 Gloria Ave.,
Ft. Walton Beach, FL; DUI.
11/23/05
Vieira, George Clayton;
Male; 22; 5392 Munson Hwy.,
Milton, FL; DUI. 11/24/05
Adams, Seth Randolph;.
Male; 31; 3237 College Ct.,
Gulf Breeze, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 11/28/05


Hurricane Katrina Victim

Assistance Program

Alltel Wireless is participating in a special
Federal Lifeline/Link-Up program whereby
AlItel will offer discounts on wireless service
to new and existing customers who are
victims of Hurricane Katrina and eligible for
FEMA individual housing assistance. You must
have your FEMA authorization letter to apply
for the discount,

For more information about the program
-and how to apply, please visit
alltel.com/lifeline or visit your,
local Alltel store.



CllteL
0M0wireless
OJMOS258


Bucklde, David Shaw;
Male; 42; 3266 Hwy. 87,
Navarre, FL; Failure to Appear
for Felony Offense, 11/28/05
Jensen, Finnbjorn
Brynjolvur; Male; 29; 132
High St., Somersworth, NH;
Out of State Fugitive From
Justice. 11/28/05
Jordan, Scott Kelly;
Male; 34; 710 Scott St.,
Bainbridge, GA; Failure to
Appear for Felony Offense.
11/28/05
Campbell, John Tate;
Male; 27; 4003 Islander Hotel,
Okaloosa Island; Drugs-
Possess Cntrl Sub W/O
Prescription, DUI Alcohol or
Drugs 1st Offense. 11/29/05
Dellapietro, Amanda
Joan; Female; 27; 1216 "X"
Street, Pensacola, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony.
11/29/05
Gay, David Lee; Male;
45; 4991 Lacy Ln, Jay, FL;
Larc-Theft is $300 or More
But Less Than $5,000.,
11/29/05
Havard, Michele Lee;
Female; 27; 4665 Kimberly
Dr., Pensacola, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 11/29/05
Risko, Mark Thomas;
Male; 48.; 321 N. Spring
Street, Pensacola, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony.
11/29/05
Roberts, Glyn Allen;
Male; 52; 4350 Ponderosa Rd,
Milton, FL; Carrying a
Concealed Weapon-Firearm.
11/28/05
Stromberg, James
Matthew; Male; 44; 1522 West
Podarosa Road, Ft. Walton,
FL; Damage Prop-Criminal
Misch $1,000 or More,
Burglary of Structure
Conveyance Unarmed W/O
Person Inside, Larc Theft is
$300 or More But Less Than
$5,000 (2 cts.).
Biggs, Bobby Darrell;
Male; 44; 5358 Cathy St.,
Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 1-1/30/05
HIinote, David Alan;


Male; 34; 3740 Berrypatch Ln,
Pace, FL; Drive While Lic
Susp Habitual Offender.
11/30/05
Lutz, Joseph Roy; Male;
52; 7846 Fleetwood ,Dr.,
Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 11/30/05
Mask, Wesley David;
Male; 27; 7604 Pontiac Dr.,
Pensacola, FL; Failure to
Appear for Felony Offense.
11/30/05
Reiswig, Sr., Rodney Roy;
Male; 65; 8402 Tortuga St.,
Navarre, FL; Sex Asslt Vict
Over 12 YOA Physical Force
No Dmg (domestic violence).
11/30/05
Ca-glk, Dewayne Allen;
Male; 27; 5224 Nimitz Rd.,
Milton, FL; DUI.
Bond, Sherri Melinda;
Female; 34; 4407
Cooperwood Dr., Pace, FL;
Larc-Grand Theft $10,000 or
More Less Than $20,000.
12/1/05
Bostic, Leslie Marie;
Female; 33; 116 Missour Ave.,
Lynn Haven, FL; Possess
. Methamphetamine, Drugs-
Possess Cntrl Sub W/O
Prescription, Narcotic Equip-
Possess And Or Use. 12/1/05


Crongeyer, Daniel Scott;
Male; 22; 5709 Bronco PL,
Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 12/1/05
Dayis, Jr., James An Juan;
Male; 33; 1701 Highland St.,
Harrisburg, PA; Probation
Violation-Felony. 12/1/05
Gray, Ronald Dewayne;
Male; 35; 115 Warrick Dr.,
Pensacola, FL; Failure to
Appear for Felony Offense.
12/1/05
Hinote, David Alan; Male;
34; 3740 Berrypatch Ln, Pace,
FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 12/1/05
Hullett, Mary Blaydes;
Female; 43; 4881 Williams
Rd., Pace, FL; Resist Officer
With Violence, Marijuana-
Possess Not More Than 20
Grams, Narcotic Equip-
Possess And or Use. 12/1/05
Lothrop, Timothy Glenn;
Male; 31; 5740 Pine Ridge
Drive, Milton, FL; Opium or
Deriv-Possess with Intent to
Purchase Schedule I or II,
Possess Cocaine, Marijuana-
Possess Not More Than 20
Grams, Narcotic Equip-
Possess And or Use. 12/1/05
Yeser, Frank Xavier;
Male; 56; 6395 Metz Road,


Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 12/1/05
Walker, Contrina Lafaye;
Female; 32; 218 Winthrop,
Pensacola, FL; Larc-Theft is
$300 or More But Less Than
$5,000. 12/1/05
Wendell, Charles
Christopher; Male; 23; 8501
Deaton Ridge Rd., Holt, FL;
Weapon Offense-Missile into
Dwelling Veh Building or
Aircraft, Damage Prop-Crim
Mischief $200 and Under.
12/1/05
Too.ey, John David; Male;
36; 5395 Park Lane, Milton,
FL; Fugitive From Justice.
12/1/05
Heyen, Thomas P; Male;
35; 650 E. Ten Mile Rd,
Pensacola, FL; Failure to
Appear-Felony Offense.
12/1/05,
Stacy, James Edward II,
Male; 41; 840 Tanager, Ft.
Walton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 12/1/05
Downs, Timothy Andrew;
Male; 27; 5940 Carroll Rd.,
Milton, FL; DUI. 12/1/05
Watts, William Benjamin;
Male; 21; 2506 Lawrence
Cooley Rd., Milton, FL; DUI
Alcohol or Drugs 2nd Offense.
12/1/05


Season continued from page 4


the September/October issue of
the Journal of" Nutrition
Education and Behavior.
Wansink and Junong Kim,
assistant professor of market-
ing at the University of Central
Florida, gave 158 moviegoers
either medium, (4.2-ounce) or
large (8.4-ounce) tubs of free
popcorn that was either fresh or
14 days old. The researchers
asked the moviegoers to
describe the popcorn after the
movie, and they weighed how
much popcorn was left in the
containers.
As expected, the 14-day-old
popcorn was described with
such remarks as "stale" and "it
was terrible."
When the moviegoers were
asked if they thought they ate
more because of the size of the
container, 77 percent of those
given the large tubs said they
would have eaten the same
amount if given a medium con-


trainer.
"This means that the movie-
goers were unaware that the
exceptional amount they ate
was due to the size of the con-
tainer," said Wansink, wlio also
is the author of the new book,
"Marketing Nutrition: Soy,
Functional Foods,
Biotechnology, and Obesity"
(University of Illinois Press;
$34.95).
HOME COOKING
Children who frequently eat
out score worse on measures of
cardiovascular disease risk than
those who eat more meals at
home, researchers reported at
the American Heart
Association's Scientific
Sessions 2005 held Nov. 13-16
in Dallas.
"As a culture, we say we
value physical activity and
healthy eating, but in reality
we're all about convenience
and convenience foods because


we have such busy schedules,"
said study author Karen Olson,
a registered nurse and execu-
tive director of the
Cardiovascular Research and
Education Foundation in
Wausau, Wis.
"We are seeing younger and
younger patients with more
aggressive cardiovascular dis-
ease, and we realized we need-
ed to take a closer look at our
young people to see when risk
factors emerge and why," she
said. "We're concerned
because we know that children
who have cardiovascular risks
grow up to be adults who have
these risks."
The project included 621
participants who completed
diet and exercise surveys.
Researchers examined the par-
ticipants to find out the rela-
tionship between the develop-
ment of cardiovascular disease
risk factors and eating outside
the home.
Researchers randomly
selected students in the second,
fifth, eighth and llth grades
who participated in the Wausau
SCHOOL Project, an examina-
tion of the development of risk
factors for cardiovascular dis-
ease and diabetes.
Twenty-percent, or 126, of
the students indicated that they
had eaten out four or more
times weekly, not including
lunches in the school cafeteria.
Compared with the 495 stu-
dents who ate out less than four
times a week, those who dined
out often had significantly:
Higher blood pressure, a
leading cause of cardiovascular
disease and stroke.
Lower levels of high-den-
sity lipoprotein, or HDL the
"good" cholesterol that protects
against heart disease.
Smaller low-density
lipoprotein particle size. Small,
dense LDL particles are associ-
ated with atherosclerosis, a
leading contributor to heart
attack and stroke.
Lower scores on the quan-
titative insulin-sensitivity
check index. Lower insulin
sensitivity is an early sign of
progression toward type 2 dia-
betes.
Significantly overall higher
dietary intake of starch, sugar,
sodium, fat and cholesterol.


Advertise your
business or skill
with the Santa
Rosa Press
Gazette! Call
today for details
623-2120


k


Wednesday December 7, 2005


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


n o a ('









Wednesday December 7, 200


Styles


Candid kids:

Challenges when it comes to holiday harmony


Here's a Christmas quiz for
parents of young children.
Your entire extended family is
gathered around the tree
watching your little basket of
joy open the last of his
umpteen Christmas presents
when he looks up with his
puppy dog eyes and says, "Is
this all there is?"
You should:
a) Take a Stink Blaster to
his PlayStation 2 and send him
packing to his room.
b) Apologize to your rela-
tives and say you can't believe
you raised such a spoiled brat.
c) Put him across your knee
and don't give him time to
stuff his 12 new pairs of socks
, down his jammies.,
d) Give him a hug.
While answer "c" may
sound pretty good at that
moment, the answer actually is
"d."
"Young children are still
learning how to handle disap-
pointment appropriately," said
Marge Harvan, director of the
Weaver Child Development
Center at Malone College in
* Canton, Ohio. "Comfort is for
feelings. It is not to approve of
- the mistaken behavior. Saying
to them, either with a hug or
words, that you understand the
' feelings doesn't mean you still
* shouldn't tell them what is
appropriate behavior."
This is not a time to show
anger, she said. Instead, we
should look at it as an opportu-
Snity to teach values.
"I do understand that we
don't want to teach selfishness
or ingratitude," she said. "Say
something like, 'Wow! Santa
sure gave you some special
L things,' or, 'It's exciting to get
to open so many things. Which
one will you play with now?'
This gives them the next thing
to think or do. When little ones
get stuck on a feeling or a
thought, we can move them on
with redirection to another


appropriate thought or feel-
ing."
But aren't young parents
today guilty of coddling their
children instead of imposing
some good old-fashioned dis-
cipline? Won't the grandpar-
ents in the room be shaking
their heads in disapproval?
Harvan says our first con-
cern should be what we teach
our children, not whether oth-
ers approve of us and the way
we do it.
"This can be really tough
when we are 'onstage' in front
of so many others at the holi-
day time. It is sometimes hard
to sort out feelings we have as
'someone's parents' versus
being 'someone's children' -
doing what we believe is right
versus doing what someone
else thinks is right," she said.
So, after hugging him and
telling him we understand he is
disappointed that something he
wanted wasn't under the tree,
he is still pouting. Next,
Harvan said, we should tell
him how his behavior makes
us feel.
"A continued pout can bring
the response, 'I'm disappoint-
ed you can't enjoy the rest of
these wonderful things,'" she
said, explaining that this will
relate the value you want the
child to learn.
She said situations like
these are magnified at
Christmas, but they reflect how
important it is to teach the val-
ues of gratitude, sensitivity and
appropriateness all year long.
For parents of children age
3 and younger, you get a pass
this year. Harvan said they are
pretty excited with whatever
they get and 2-year-olds proba-
bly will prefer the packages
over the actual toys.
With 4- and 5-year-olds, she
said, expectations are so high
that even if they get everything
they want, it is normal for them
to have a letdown of adrena-


line. "Give them downtime,
cuddle time," she said.
Most importantly, parents
need to relax and enjoy the day
if they want their children to
do the same. Children will mir-
ror their excitement over each
gift they open.
"Children pick up the par-
ents' attitudes to a large
extent," said Russell Kick,
founder of the Self-Discovery
Research Institute in Tucson,
Ariz. "The degree that you can
relax and be happy is impor-
tant. Smile, laugh, make it a
pleasant time.
"Children are sensitive," he
continued. "Parents can keep
tension out of the house.
Create an atmosphere that is
uplifting and take their minds
off Christmas' being a time
when you get, get, get."
Do this, he said, by doing
things together as a family and
creating special traditions.,
Harvan agrees. Young par-
ents often have unrealistic
expectations themselves, he
says, sometimes based on try-
ing to re-create their childhood
holidays, which often might be
seen through rose-colored
glasses.
But if parents show a love
and awe about the season,
"kids will get that it's special,
and it will grow with them,"


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she said. "Children will
remember the feelings and
atmosphere more than the
presents."
Remember, however, that
kids are honest. They may look
like they just bit into a lemon
when they open that handmade
sweater from Aunt Doris.
Little reminders along the way
are helpful. This' may be the
time to say, "Aunt Doris must
really think you're special for
her to make you that sweater."
Kick said, "Just remind them
to be nice."
The bottom line, says
Harvan, is to tell your children
that wishes are nice to have,
but they don't always come
true. If your children are disap-
pointed, it will be a passing
disappointment.
"Part of growing up is
learning to deal with disap-
pointment," she said. "The big-
ger picture issue here is that
parents have the responsibility
to help children learn to deal
with disappointment."
But, if all else fails, blame
Santa, Kick said.
"Tell them, 'There are lots
of boys and girls in the world.
Santa has to make sure'there
are enough toys for every-
one,'" he said. "Swing the idea
around from getting to getting
some and also giving."


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'Page 7-C


I The Santa Rosa Press G ette


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Ideas for helping children with their holiday expectations:
Teach them and involve them in the true meaning of Christmas, not just the
economic side. Discuss their expectations with them in advance. Discuss
and emphasize giving, sharing and personal relationships as the most enjoy-
able aspects of the season. Be specific about what gifts you feel are appro-
priate for them and your financial restrictions. Remind them that it is fine
to ask for what they want, but no one gets everything they ask for.
Encourage them to be givers as well as receivers. Do things together as a
family that will make the holidays special, like a drive to see lights or a tak-
ing in a Christmas show.









r a -u u- a a
Local Military


Poe graduates BMT
Air Force Airman Hannah
N. Poe has graduated from
basic military training at
Lackland Air Force Base, San
Antonio, Texas.
.During the six weeks of
training, the airman studied the
Air Force mission, organiza-
tion, and military customs and
courtesies; performed drill and
ceremony marches, and
received physical training, rifle
marksmanship, field training
exercises, and special training
in human relations.
In addition, airmen who
complete basic training earn
credits toward an associate
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Poe is the daughter of
Jeffrey Poe Sr. of Kevin Drive,
Gulf Breeze, FL, and Lisa
Dickens of W. Westchester
Parkway, Grand Prairie, TX.
She is a 2004 graduate of
South Grand Prairie' High
School, Grand Prairie.


Baxley deployed
to Operation
Iraqi Freedom
Air Force Tech. Sgt. John P.
Baxley is currently deployed
overseas at a forward operating
location in support of
Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Operation Iraqi Freedom is
the official name given to mili-
tary operations involving mem-
bers of the U.S. armed forces
and coalition forces participat-
ing .in efforts to free and secure
Iraq. Mission objectives focus
on force protection, peacekeep-
ing, stabilization, security and
counter-insurgency operations
as the Iraqi transitional govern-
inig bodies assume full sover-
eign powers to govern the peo-
ples of Iraq.
Members from all branches
of the U.S. military and multi-
national forces are also assist-
ing in rebuilding Iraq's eco-
nomic and governmental infra-
structure, and training and.


preparing Iraqi military and
,security forces to assume full
authority and responsibility in
defending and preserving
Iraq's sovereignty .and inde-
pendence as a democracy.
Baxley, a ground radio
maintenance craftsman with 18
years of military service, is
normally assigned to the 355th
Communications Squadron,
Davis-Monthan Air Force
Base, Tucson, AZ.
His wife, Tracey, is the
daughter of Curtis and Janet
Archer of Jacksonville, FL.
The sergeant is a 1980 grad-
uate of Milton High School,
FL.

Blatz graduates BCT
Army Pfc. Amanda L. Blatz
has graduated from basic com-
bat training at Fort Jackson,
Columbia, SC.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied the
Army mission, history, tradi-
tion and core values, physical


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E D U C A T I 0 N A L

OPPORTUNITY CENTERS


fitness, and received instruction
and practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons, chem-
ical warfare and bayonet train-
ing, drill and ceremony, march-
ing, rifle marksmanship, armed
and unarmed combat, map
reading, field tactics, military
courtesy, military justice sys-
tem, basic first aid, foot march-
es, and field training exercises.
She is the daughter of Robin
Weeks of' Old Hickory
Hammock Road, Milton, FL,
and sister of Johnathan Blatz of
Grimms Landing, Navarre, FL.
The private is a 2005 gradu-
ate of Navarre High School..

Flores
joins Army DEP
Antonio A. Flores has
joined the United States Army
Reserve under the Delayed
Training Program.
The program gives young
men and women the opportuni-
ty to delay reporting for basic
military training for up to 270
days. An enlistment in the
reserve gives many new sol-
diers the option to learn a new
skill, serve their country, and
become eligible to receive
more than $7,000 toward a col-
lege education, $20,000 for
repayment of college loans,
and a maximum $5,000 cash
bonus.
After completion of basic
military training, most soldiers
receive advanced individual
training in their career job spe-
cialty prior to being assigned to
their first permanent duty sta-
tion.
The recruit qualifies for a
$10,000 enlistment bonus.
Flores, a 2005 graduate of.
Milton High School, FL, will
report to Fort Leonard Wood,
Waynesville, MO, for active
duty on December 28, 2005.
He is the son of Charito and
Bernabe Flores of ParkAve. E.,
Milton.


Sorrel .
promoted in rank
(FHTNC)-Navy Seaman
Apprentice Brian W. Sorrells,
son of Barbara E. and William
C. Sorrells of Navarre, FL, was
recently promoted to his cur-
rent rank upon graduation from
recruit training at Recruit
Training Command, Great
Lakes, IL.
Sorrells received the early
promotion for outstanding per-
formance during all phases of
the training cycle. Training
which included classroom
study and practical instruction
on naval customs, first aid, fire-
fighting, water safety, survival,
and shipboard and aircraft safe-
ty. An emphasis was also
placed on physical fitness.
The capstone event of boot
camp is "Battle Stations". This
exercise gives recruits the skills
and confidence they need to
succeed in the fleet. "Battle
Stations" is designed to galva-
nize the basic warrior attributes
of sacrifice, dedication, team-'
work and endurance in each
recruit through the practical
application of basic Navy skills


and the core values of Honor,
Courage and Commitment. Its
distinctly "Navy" flavor was
designed to take into account
what it means to be a Sailor.
Sorrells is a 2004 graduate
of Navarre High School of
Navarre, FL.


McClellan
joins Army DEP
Jordan J. McClellan has
joined the United States Army
under the Delayed Entry
Program. The program gives
young men and women the
opportunity to delay entering
active duty for up to one year.
The enlistment gives the
new soldier the option to learn
d new skill, travel and become
eligible to receive as much as
$50,000 toward a college edu-
cation. After completion of
basic military training, soldiers
receive advanced individual
training in their career job spe-
cialty prior to being assigned to
their first permanent duty sta-
tion.
The recruit qualifies for a
$15,000 enlistment bonus.
McClellan will report to
Fort Benning, Columbus, GA,
for basic training on January 5,
2006.
He is the son of Janet
Negovan of Silverthom Road,
Gulf Breeze, FL.

Fellner
completes NBT
(FHTNC)-Navy Seaman
Recruit Robert M. Fellner,
nephew of Brian K. Belcher of
Milton, FL, recently completed
U.S. Navy basic training at
Recruit Training Command,
Great Lakes, IL.
During the eight-week pro-
gram, Fellner completed a vari-
ety of training, which included-.
classroom study and practical
instruction on naval customs,
first aid, firefighting, water
safety and survival, and ship-
board and aircraft safety. An
emphasis was also placed on
physical fitness.
The capstone event of boot
camp is "Battle Stations". This
exercise gives recruits the
skills and confidence they need
to succeed in the fleet. "Battle
Stations" is designed to galva-
nize the basic warrior attributes
of sacrifice, dedication, team-
work and endurance in each
recruit through the practical
application of basic Navy skills
and the core values of Honor,
Courage and Commitment. Its
distinctly "Navy" flavor was
designed to take into account
what it means to be a Sailor.
Fellner is a 2004 graduate of
Oak Ridge High School of Oak
Ridge, TN.

Gafford completes
Naval BT
(FHTNC)-Navy Seaman


James S. Gafford, a 2002 grad-
uate of Pace High School,
Pace, FL, recently completed
U.S. Navy basic training and
was meritoriously promoted to
his current rank at Recruit
Training Command, Great
Lakes, IL.
During the eight-week pro-
gram, Gafford completed a
variety of training, which
included classroom study and
practical instruction on naval
customs, first aid, firefighting,
water safety and survival, and
shipboard and aircraft safety.
An emphasis was also placed
on physical fitness.
The capstone event of boot
camp is "Battle Stations". This
exercise. gives recruits the
skills and confidence they need
to succeed in the fleet. "Battle
Stations" is designed to galva-
nize the basic warrior attrib-
utes of sacrifice, dedication,
teamwork and endurance in
each recruit through the practi-
cal application of basic Navy
skills and the core values of
Honor, Courage and
Commitment. Its distinctly
"Navy" flavor was designed to
take into account what it means
to be a Sailor in today's U.S.
Navy.


Bondi graduates
from BMT
Air Force Airman Zachary
K. Bondi has graduated from
basic military training at.
Lackland Air Force Base, San
Antonio, TX:
During the six weeks of
training, the airman studied the
Air Force mission, organiza-
tion, and military customs and
courtesies; performed drill and
ceremony marches, and
received physical training, rifle
.marksmanship, field training
exercises, and special training
in human relations.
In addition, airmen who
complete basic training earn
credits toward an associate
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is the son of Noel Bondi
of Rolyat Road, Pace, FL.
Bondi is a 2005 graduate of
Pace High School.


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Wednesday December 7, 2005


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


DPan 8_C











Styles


Therapies stop people from getting SAD in the winter


It's not unusual to feel sad in
the waning days of autumn as
the sun sets earlier and nights
get longer. In fact, for some
people, especially in northern
climes, it can be downright
depressing.
If you are like many who
suffer symptoms of depression
during the winter months that
subside in spring and summer,
you might be experiencing sea-
sonal affective disorder, or
SAD.
SAD is a real mood disorder
associated with episodes of
depression related to seasonal
variations of light. It was first
noted before 1845, but was not
officially named until the early
1980s.
As seasons change, there is a
shift in our "biological internal
clocks," or circadian rhythm,
due partly to changes in sun-
light patterns. This can cause
our biological clocks to be out
of step with our daily schedules.
The most difficult months for
SAD sufferers are January and
February, and younger people
and women are at higher risk.
SAD symptoms include:
Fall and wintertime depres-
sion.
Fall and wintertime exces-
sive eating, sleeping and weight
gain.
Fall and wintertime crav-
ings for sugary and/or starchy
foods.
Remission of symptoms
during spring and summer.
POSSIBLE CAUSE
Melatonin, a sleep-related
hormone secreted by the pineal,
gland in the brain, has been,
linked to SAD. This hormone,
which might cause symptoms
of depression, is produced at
increased levels in the dark..
Therefore, when the days are
shorter and darker the produc-
tion of this hormone increases.
TALK THERAPY
Many people who experi-
ence SAD will receive treat-
ment involving sitting in front
of a light bo\ for an hour or two.
a day in hopes that the, full-


spectrum light will simulate
sunlight and make them feel
better. Others will be recom-
mended to spend an hour a day
outside during daylight hours, a
suggestion that can be impracti-
cal during cold or rainy condi-
tions.
Light treatment works rea-
sonably well, but it can be hard
to stick with. Kelly Rohan, an
SAD expert and assistant pro-
fessor of psychology at the
University of Vermont, views it
as more of a quick fix than a
long-term solution.
She is experimenting with
cognitive-behavioral therapy, a
common form of "talk therapy"
'that has been used for non-sea-
sonal depression since the
1960s. She believes her experi-
ments mark the first time talk
therapy has been used to treat
SAD.
The results, in early research
and clinical trials, are promis-
ing.
In a 2005 .study involving 61
patients, Rohan treated. one
group with daily light therapy,
another %%ith 12 sessions of cog-
nitive-behavioral therapy and a
third group with a combination
of both treatments.
Rohan's findings, which will
be published later this year as a
follow-up to a 2004 study that
appeared in the June issue of
Journal of Affective Disorders,
show that all three groups
showed comparable, improve-
ment across the six weeks of
study treatment compared to a
wait-list control group.
In addition, the largest per-
centage of patients (80 percent)
responded in full when cogni-
tive-behavioral therapy and
light therapy were combined.
Furthermore, those who
underwent cognitive-behavioral
therapy both alone and with
light therapy were less
depressed at the one-year fol-
low-up compared to patients
who had been treated v ith light
therapy_ alone.
Only 6 percent of the cogni-
utje-beha\ioral therapy partici-


pants met the criteria for
depression at the one-year fol-
low-up, while 40 percent of
light-exclusive participants met
the depression criteria during
the winter season of the next
year.
DRUG TREATMENT
If phototherapy doesn't
work, an antidepressant drug
might prove effective in reduc-
ing or eliminating SAD symp-


toms.
Starting treatment with an
antidepressant medication dur-
ing the fall can reduce the risk
of developing depression
throughout the fall and winter
months, reports a study in the
Oct. 15 issue of Biological
Psychiatry, the official journal
of the Society of Biological
Psychiatry:
Rosenthal and colleagues


performed a study with more
than 1,000 patients with SAD
from the northern United States
and Canada. The relapse rate
was 16 percent for patients tak-
ing the antidepressant com-
pared with 28 percent for those
taking the placebo. Early anti-
depressant treatment reduced,
the overall risk of fall-winter
depression by about 44 percent.
When the patients stopped


taking the antidepressant in the
spring, there was no increase in
the depression relapse rate
compared with the placebo
group.
If you believe you are feel-
ing the effects of SAD, experts ',
recommend discussing your
symptoms thoroughly with
your family doctor and/or men-
tal health professional.


~'~4.'


More than 30 million women are menopausal. More are approaching this per-
sonal transition, during which various forms of hormone therapy
may become necessary to help treat symptoms such as hot flashes,
weight gain, moodiness and sleep disturbances.,


Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement
Therapy may be an effective solution for those
women who want another option to synthetic
hormone therapy. Compounding pharmacists
can prepare treatments using plant-derived
hormones that are biologically identical to those naturally occur-
ring in women, and specially adapted to match your individual
hormone levels. You're unique-why shouldn't your therapy be?


Ask your physician about Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy
tdfrid


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I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


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:Wednesday December 7, 2005 I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Page 10-C


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Wednesday December 7, 2005


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 10-C


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5.SB~'BM ^rB H S [I^yjBBI^


Sports



Saddle Club announces
monthly time event
The Blackwater Saddle Club
will hold their monthly time event
snow on Dec. 10, at the East
Milton Recreational Park.
Competitions will be held in
six different events and six differ-
ent classes.
Signups will get under way
at 10 a.m. with the show starting
at 11 a.m. All participants must
show proof of negative coggins.
This event is open to the
public and there is no alcohol,
allowed at this event.
Concessions will be sold at this
e. ent.
For more information con-
tact Lisa Jones at 626-3275.
PSA All-Star game
tickets on sale now
Tickets are on sale now for the
2nd annual Pensacola Sports
Association High School All-Star
Football Game.
This game will'be held Dec. 16
at 7 p.m. at Escambia County
High School and will feature high
school seniors from Escambia,
Santa Rosa, and Okalopsa coun-
ties.
Tickets are available from PSA
for $5. Tickets will be $7 at the
gate on the night of the game.
Children ages 13 and under will
be $3.
b For more information contact
fhe Pensacola Sports
Association at 434-2800.
Milton softball holds
Christmas Dance
The Miton High School girls
softball team will be having a
Christams Dance on Dec. 17 at
the high school cafeteria.
There will be a dance con-
test, games, and a good night for-
everyone starting at 6:30 p.m.
and lasting until 10 p.m.
All proceeds from this dance
will benefit the Milton High.
School girls softball program.
Christmas Parade fun
run set for Saturday
The Pensacola Runners
Association is taking registrations
%for their 2005 Christmas Parade
Dash set for Dec. 10.
This will be a one mile
course and runners are encour-
aged to wear holiday attire. Two
prizes will be awarded to the run-
ners with the best costume.
.Saturday's race will get
underway prior to the Christmas
SParade in Downtown Pensacola.
Organizers have also added
Steam competition for area
schools and youth groups this
. year.,
S. For registration or more
i information contact Janet Boylan
at 324-8838, Thad Kopec at 433-
0212 or Paul Epstein at 435-9222.
KofC to hold a hoop
contest at Milton HS
The Milton Knights of
Columbus will have a basketball
free throw contest on Jan. 7,
2006
This'contest is open to boys
and girls ages 10-14.
Kids will compete against
their own age and gender group.
Prizes will be awarded at
this competition with winners
progressing to regional, state,
and national competitions.
Official rules and entry forms
are available at the Knights of
Columbus websitete
www.kofc7027.org.
Or you, can e-mail questions
to e_c_grillot@yahoo.com.
PSA releases date for
Double Bridge Run
The Pensacola Sports
Association says the ninth annual
Double Bridge Run will take
place Feb. 4, 2006.
The event will include a 15K
and 5K course and a junior 5K for
children under 14.
For more information, contact
Sthe Pensacola Sports
Association at 434-2800.


Roping the stars


Jay s Prescott brothers are more than a team


By NONA BARDIN
PG Sports Correspondent
On Christmas Day, Cody
and Colter Prescott will cele-
brate their eighteenth birthday.
Along with turning eighteen,
they will become eligible for
the Professional Rodeo Circuit.
When they enter a rodeo, they
will fill a "card" and when the
card is satisfied, they can begin
their rookie year as profession-
al riders.
While they wait for that
moment, the twin sons of Jeff
and Marsha Prescott, of Jay,
continue to compete in the high
school level of competition.
Several years ago, the boys
were interviewed at their home
in Jay. At that time, they were in
the Junior Rodeo Circuit. Both
Cody and Colter have blown


Colter and Cody
Prescott in action at
Baker this weekend
Baker, Fla., will host an
Alabama High School Rodeo
Dec. 10 and 11lth.
Cowboys and cowgirls
grades 9-12 from all over the
state of Alabama as well as
North Florida will be compet-
ing in nine different rodeo
events. Events will run all day
on Saturday and Sunday morn-
ing as well. A Wrangler
Rodeo will be at 1:00 p.m. on
Saturday with youngsters
grades 6-8 competing.


away competitors from all over
the Southeast.
Now it's 2005, and I caught
up with the guys again. This


time, they are a little older, a lit-
tle bigger, and a whole lot better
at what they enjoy!
The twins still ride as a
team in the calf roping competi-
tion, but compete against each
other in other areas of the
rodeo. When asked how they
felt about competing against
each other, they both stated that
they were fine with it. "As long
as the Title comes back to Jay."
While being Honor stu-
dents at Jay High School, the
boys have a daily routine that
they follow very strictly. Up at
6AM, feed and water the ani-
mals (both the horses and the
calves that they use), then off to
school. Upon their return as
seniors at JHS, they begin
again, checking on-everything,
See, PRESCOTT, Pg. D3


Cody.andColton Prescott are seen with some of the hardware and
prizes they took during the 2005 Alabama High School Rodeo
Association competition.
Photo submitted


Thorpe sees

derby hopes

melt away

Area driver wins for
first time since '73


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor


Three of the four surviving members of the 1945-46 Milton Panthers squad, (left to right) Jack Locklin, Raymond Tolbert, and Steve Gill look
at an 1946 edition of the Panther Paw while reminiscing about a basketball season they will never forget
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


All those years ago


Former Panthers remember the best season back when


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
Basketball season is under-
way in Santa Rosa County, but
60 years ago Milton had a mag-
ical season.
'the Panthers, under the
direction of first year coach
Jean D'Avignon, went 19-2 to
become one of the best basket-
ball teams in Panther history at
the time.
There have been other great
teams to wear the-Milton cof-


ors, but there, was something
special about the Panthers in an
ear when some teams played on
clay courts and had to use vol-
unteered cars to just travel.
"Money was tough back
then and there were several
times we couldn't get the bus to
go to a game," recalled Jack
Locklin, who was captain of the
1945-46 Panthers. ."There were
times when we would be at the
gym (which was located *at
-Locklin Ball Park) and get a


call from the other team saying
they couldn't make it.
"There were some other
times when we had to get fans
who were familiar with basket-
ball because the referees could-
n't make it to the game either."
But the four surviving
members of the 45-46 Panthers,
Locklin, Steve Gill, E.M.
.Helms, and Raymond Tolbert,
have several fond memories of
that magical season.
"For a team like us to make'


it to Tallahassee was a big feat,"
said Gill, who stressed there
were only 1,500 people in
Milton. "Playing in that game
was very exciting."
Today the Panthers are part
of Class 4A with a senior class
around 450 students, back in
1946 there were 23 seniors and
450 students in Milton, which
included the eighth graders, as
MilIon played in Class B.
During that magical year
.See, ~PAST, Pg. D6


A local driver won the 38th
Annual Snowball Derby
Sunday at Five Flags
Speedway, but he wasn't from
Santa Rosa County.
Pensacola's Eddie Mercer,
who started the race from the
pole, held off defending cham-
pion Steven Wallace--to claim
his first title in 17 attempts.
Santa Rosa driver Keith
Thorpe could only be a specta-
tor Sunday at he couldn't get
his Super Late Model up to
speed.
"We had car problems and
couldn't get up to speed on
Friday or Saturday," said
Thorpe, whose qualifying effort
was just over 101 miles per
hour. "After failing to qualify
we just decided to put it on the
trailer and not run the last
chance qualifier on Saturday."
Thorpe was very glad of his
decision after watching a huge
pile up on the first lap of the last
chance qualifier on Saturday.
"I was a little relieved we
didn't run the last chance on
Saturday after seeing that
wreck on the first lap," said
Thorpe. "If we would have been
in the race the wreck was about
where we would have started
from."
So what kept the Pace driv-
er from making his third
Snowball field?.
"We are still trying to figure
it out," said Thorpe. "We are
taking it back to the chassis
builder so he can take a look,
but it might be a bent car or
spindle.
"No matter what we tried
on the car it wouldn't react
right."
During the Derby itself
See, DERBY, Pg. D5


Pace season ends one game too short


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. -
The season might riot have
. ended in Miami for the Pace
Patriots, but they ended their
season in style with their head
held high and all of their fans
cheering them on.
'On the scoreboard, Pace
came up on the short end 31-14
to Nease High School, but head
Coach Mickey Lindsey knows'
his team is made up of winners.
"Counting our kickoff
game we finished the season
14-1," said Lindsey. "How
many teams can say that?
"This loss hurts because we
are competitors, but our kids
have played with class and style


Do you hive sports-related
nw. or

Information you would like to
Iee publbhed In the Prom
Oiu iti f 100 ad It to Us eti


all season long."
Both teams tested the
waters in the first quarter as it
was a battle of field position
until Nease drew first blood on
a 33-yard field goal off the foot
of Alex Amaral.
Pace would try to tie the
game with 3:18 left in the first
half, but Ryan Strang's 44 yard
attempt was blocked and rolled
into the end zone for a touch-
back.
The Panthers took over at
the 20 and seemed to be in
reverse until a second second-
and-24 play from their own 3-
yard line.
Tim Tebow was back in the
shotgun when he saw Ryan
See, PACE, Pg. D7


Pace 0 14 1,
'Nea'e 0 10 14 7-31

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TheSanta.. Ros Pres aztt Weneda. ecmbr 00


Page 2-D


downtownpensacola
: I4


1.
i


Artesana
Blend
Distinctive Kitchens
Dollarhide's Music
Don Alans
Eat at Home
Eat
Elebash's Jewelers
Ever'man Natural Foods
Ginger Bender Stationery, etc.
Global Grill
Grand Reserve Cigar & Smoke Shop
Jackson's
Jewelers Trade Shop
Pensacola Hardware Co.
oyi, 4 in *AI


Wednesday, December 7, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette












~Nednesday December 7. 2005 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Page 3-D


Sports


N.


Prescott


:Continued From Page One
eedmings, caring for the horses,
teq. "It's very time consuming,"
ays their mother Marsha.
l'They are doing something out-
,'ide with the animals all of the
tinie, but they don't complain
about it." If dad, Jeff, ever hears
one of the boys say how cold it
is outside, he just tells it like it
i, "Well, that's fine, we can sell
thd horses and you won't have
io ideal with it." NO WAY! The
voting men always tend to their
animals. Some of the young-
sters in the neighborhood are
becoming interested in the
rodeos, and the twins have a
private audience of awestruck
kids as they practice.
i And it has paid off, in a big
w4y. As of now, the boys are
affiiated with the PCA Circuit.
They must pay their High
School membership dues and
compete in multi-state competi-
iions. There are usually 600 -
700 other cowboys with whom
they compete against. The odds
opf winning are slim, but Cody
arid Colter do not go by odds.
They just win!
At the calf roping events,
iCody is the header (the cowboy
that uses'a lasso to catch the
hdad of the steer) and Colter is
ihe Heeler ( the cowboy who
laiso's the hind feet of the ani-
mal). The animal must be com-
pletely caught. If the lasso only
catches one leg or one horn, the
bQys don't score as many points
a& possible as they could have
had all gone well. Not only
idoes calf roping include the tal-
enit of the cowboys, but it
inAcludes the talent of the well
trained horses. The horses back.
ujp to keep the ropes tight so
that the calf cannot get away.
;Cbdy and Colter have to teach
Lt(e horses how to do this and
itley have several "reserve"
horses that they take to different
rodeos. *
Jay High School does not
offerr a Rodeo Team, so the boys
ate affiliated with Alabama.
!They bIae several top college
coaches interested in' them,"
offering sc ol'ar'hip., a_ l(e! as
i > ,


having already won some
scholarships. The family has
attended many "Senior Days"
at several colleges, and Cody
and Colter Prescott are well
known. While the boys have
their sights on the colleges they
like, mom and dad would like
them to be as close to home as
possible. "It would be easier on
us if they guys needed extra
horses, to have them nearby,
than halfway across the coun-
try," said mom. "We could meet
them halfway and the twins
could trailer their reserve stock
from there, but my husband has
said that we have to cut the
strings sometime." She didn't
sound persuaded into letting
that happen any time soon.
Cody and Colter competed
in the Alabama High School
Finals Rodeo, held in June.
Colter was named the "Calf
Roping Champion for 2004/05"
(with a time of 9.7 seconds)
and Cody received the second
place honor of "Reserve
Champion" (with a time of 10.4
seconds). Colter received a Tod
Slone saddle and both of the
boys were given Gist
Championship belt buckles to
add to their growing collection.
Along with those awards,
both of the boys were crowned
"State Team Roping
Champions" for the year,
(timed at 6.6 seconds) with
Cody as the header and Colter
as the heeler. Both of them won
Tod Slone saddles ,and
Championship Gist belt buck-
les. Cody was also named
"High Point Roper" in the finals
by accumulating the most
points in all of the roping
events. For this, he received a
Gist belt buckle. Cody's horse,
Peppy Laredo, was named
"Horse of the Year." His horse
was given a Tod Slone breast
collar and his rider, Cody,
received a $300.00 scholarship.
Cody was also named "All
Round Cowboy" for the Perry,
Georgia rodeo. This .six. state ....
eVent was called 'the
Southeastern' Shov. do'.'n
*Rodeo. w^e -


Colter was voted the
"Incoming 2005/06 Student
President for the Alabama High
School Rodeo Association."
Both boys will serve as "Event
Coordinators" for the upcoming
year Colter in the team roping
events and Cody in calf roping
events.
Both of these talented cow-
boys competed in the IFYR
Youth Rodeo, held in Shawnee,
Oklahoma in July, where they.
placed first in the first round of
the team roping competition.
They were awarded 1500.00 for
this honor.. Cody also placed in
the money in the first round of
the calf roping event. The
Prescott's made it to the "short
go" at the Youth Finals in team
roping. Because of their success
at the State Finals, the boys
earned their way into the
National High School Finals
Rodeo, held in Gillette,
Wyoming. Cody placed third in
the second round of calf roping
and won $450.00, a $100.00
scholarship, and an engraved
plaque. He was also named the
"National Team Roping Event
Director."
Though the twins are not
exact duplicates of each other,
they do think as one.
Cody stated. I try to set
my priorities straight and take
care of business first." If the
grades aren't right, the horse
trailer won't leave the yard is a
rule from dad! "I would like to
hit the Professional Rodeo
Circuit after college," said
Cody.
Right behind him, Colter
stepped in, "I work twice as
hard at everything that I do and
I love to succeed. My plans are
to hit the Pro Circuit, too, with
my hauling partner, Cody, so
we can split the gas and the
driving duties"!
Look for the Prescott twins
on ESPN one day soon. These
guys are getting out of it what
they're putting into, it. And it's
paying off! BIG!

Noina Birdin. Rul'/ her
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be submitted per person. 5. The decision of the judges will be final 6. Updatres will appear in the PG with the winner announced on January 7, 2006 7. Entries
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CITY

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Wednesday December 7, 2005 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette
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The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, December 7, 2005


Sports




Jaguars stay perfect by stopping Escambia Charter


Pace and Milton suffer first losses of year


Central's, Keith Germann is seen scoring a basket during a preseason
win over Jay during the Santa Rosa Tip Off Tournament held at
Milton High School.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
Central improved to 4-0
in the early season as they
disposed of Escambia Charter
Saturday night at home 77-
49.
In a wire to wire victory,
the Jags took an early 17-10
lead after the first quarter and
extended its lead to 17 at
halftime 39-22.
Keith Germann and
Logan Campbell both fin-
ished the night with a double
double.
Germann led all scorers
with a game high 29 points
while Campbell was next
with 22. Each finished the
night with 12 rebounds.
.Central continued extend-
ed their lead in the third quar-
ter as Hunter Bondurant, who
was held scoreless on the
night led the Jags with four
assists and seven key steals.
Milton 77, West Fla. 49
Milton responded after
suffering their first loss of the
season by defeating West
Florida Tech 77-49.
After jumping out to a 20-
16 lead both team went cold
in the second quarter, but the
Panthers (3-1) were able to
extend their lead to eight at
the half, 29-21.
Adam Allen logged
another double double in the
win with a game high 24
points and 10 rebounds.
Also scoring in double'
digits for the Panthers
Saturday were Terrance
Mitchell and Jeremy Millar
with 12 points each, while
Jeremy Tolbert added 10.
In the second half Milton
poured it on by outscoring the
visiting Jaguars 48-28.
Defensively Milton was
led by Tolbert and Millar who
had three steals each, while
Mitchell led the Panthers


with five assists.
Pine Forest 57, Milton 46
On .Friday Pine Forest
knocked off the Panthers 57-
46 at Pine Forest High
School.
The Eagles were able to
lead 14-11 at the end of the
first quarter and held on to a
slim two point lead 20-22 at
the halftime break.
In the third quarter Pine
Forest pulled away for good
outscoring Milton 19-11 after
the break.
Allen led the Panthers
with 21 points, which tied
Pine Forest's Johnathan,
Gossett for tops in the game.
Jay 57, Flomaton 52
Jay jumped out to an early
lead in Flomaton and held on
to win over their hosts 57-52.
The Royals (1-1) used the
scoring of Greg Nelson,
Jeremy Swick, and Brad
Lowery, who all ended the
night in double figures, to
take a 16-9 lead at the end of
the first quarter.
At halftime Jay had
extended the seven point mar-
gin to 11, 35-24.
Flomaton chipped away in
the second half, but they
could not overcome its poor
first half.
Lowery led the Royals
with 16, while Nelson and
Swick added 15 and 14 points
respectively.
Choctaw 60, Pace 45
Pace suffered their first
loss in district action on
Thursday when they lost to
visiting Choctawhatchee 60-
45.
In a game moved ahead
due to the Class 4-A semi-
finals, the Indians outscored
Pace (2-1) 24-13 in the sec-
ond quarter to lead 33-21 at
halftime.
The Patriots, who were
led in scoring by David


Quesada with 13, rallied in
the third quarter by cutting
the lead to eight, 42-34 before
Choctaw dominated the final
quarter.
In girls action:
Pine Forest 49, Milton 41
Milton was hampered by
another slow start as they lost
to Pine Forest at home 49-41.
The Lady Eagles took a
quick' 12-3 advantage in the
first quarter leaving Milton
(0-3) to play catch-up the
remainder of the night.
Milton fought back with
a strong second quarter and
only trailed by five at half-
time 25-20, but Pine Forest
wouldn't allow them to get
any closer.
Jameia Shields and Takia
Barnes led Milton with 12
points and three steals each.
Nicole Harper led the
Lady Panthers by grabbing
12 rebounds.
Choctaw 55, Pace 50'
Pace lost a back and forth
affair on the road to district
foe Choctawhatchee 55-50.
The Indians took a 15-9
lead, but saw that lead erased
by the newest member of
Class 5A District 1 as they
took a one point lead into the
break 29-28.
But out of the break
Choctaw went on a 19-9 run
and never looked back.
Pace (6-2) was able to cut
into the Indians lead, but it
wasn't enough.
Erica Wright led the Lady
Pats with 21 points.
Lindsey McDonald
grabbed seven boards while
Samantha Lewis and Surita
Guyton combined for seven
steals in the loss.
Pace 48, Navarre 44
On Thursday Pace had to
rally in the fourth quarter to
defeat Navarre 48-44.
After both teams exited


from their locker rooms tied
27-27 following halftime,
Navarre built a three point
lead heading into the final
stanza by outscoring the vis-
iting Lady Pats 10-7 to make
it 37-34.
But Pace rallied to
outscore the Lady Raiders
14-7 in the final eight min-
utes of play.
Wright scored a game
high 21 points to lead Pace,
while Lewis added 13 in the
winning effort.
Paxton 54, Central 20
Paxton handed Central
their first district loss of the
season in Allentown 54-20 on
Thursday.
Paxton had a slim 11-8
lead after the first quarter,
but dominated the remainder
of the game by outscoring the
Lady Jags (3-3) 43-12.
Central was led by Jenna
O'Kelley with eight points.
Navarre 6. Milton 1
Navarre defeated Milton
on Friday at Panthers
Stadium in girls' soccer 6-1.
Kristen Weekley scored
the only goal on Friday for
the Lady Panthers (3-5).
Tanya Cronir had 16
saves on the night, but she
wasn't able to stop the Lady
Raiders who sustained pres-
sure on her in the net as five
Navarre players scored goals
led by Regan Eastwood with
two?
Crestview 3, Milton 0
On Thursday Milton lost
at home to Crestview 3-0.
Despite getting seven
shots on goal the Milton
could not find the back of the
net.
Cronin had five saves in
the loss.

Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@srpressgazette. oom


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: Wednesday, December 7, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 5-D


Sports


il t%


Derby


Continued From Page One
Sunday, Mercer led the race
until he spun out on lap 12 fol-
lowing contact from Freddie
Query in turn three.
Following the spin he
,.-joined Wallace in the back of
the pack.
Wallace had to take cham-
pions provisional just to make
the race after his car was found
,.'to be a quarter of an inch too


wide during tech inspection and
was limited to just one qualify-
ing lap.
Rounding out the top five
,Sunday were Clay Rodger in
third followed by rookie Augie
Grill and two time champion
Bobby Gill rounding out the top
five.
Mercer returned to the front
of the pack by lap 189 when he
passed Wallace when he dove


below the son of NASCAR
Champion Rusty Wallace,
going into turn one.
Wallace would regain the
lead on lap 241 when he beat
Mercer out of the pits following
the 10th of 13 cautions during
the 300 lap race.
Mercer took on fresh rub-
ber on lap 254 and passed
Wallace for good on lap 266.'
Two cautions in the final


laps would bunch the field, but
Wallace could not get around
Mercer, who he defeated by 13
lengths last year for the win.
For Thorpe he is looking
ahead to next season.
"We are going to work on
our Pro Late Model and run the
weekly series at Five Flags,"
said Thorpe. "I want to concen-
trate on the weekly series
because I enjoy it.


Keith Thorpe's crew member and brother, Mike, stays with the car
during technical inspection on Wednesday in preparation for the
38th Annual Snowball Derby at Five Flags Speedway in Pensacola.
Thorpe failed to make the field for this year's race, but is looking to
improve and shooting for next year.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


S\ asi nay rensacoia nay navarre Beacn macKwaier niver
-' Thursday, Dec. 8, 2005 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2005 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2005 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2005
'- 3 20 AM 1.20 feet 1:13 AM 0.80 feet 3:41 AM First Quarter 3:41 AM First Quarter
3 41 AM First Quarter 3:41 AM First Quarter 6:32 AM Sun rise 4:16 AM 1.20 feet
, .. 6 32 AM Sun rise 6:33 AM Sun rise 10:04 AM 0.34 feet 6:33 AM Sun rise
S '* 12:21 PM Moon rise 12:22 PM Moon rise 12:20 PM Moon rise 12:21 PM Moon rise '"
2:34 PM 0.11 feet 12:43 PM 0.07 feet 4:46 PM Sun set 3:04 PM 0.11 feet
4:46 PM Sun set 4:48 PM Sun set 7:02 PM 0.86 feet 4:46 PM Sun set
8:11 PM 0.86 feet
radirav Decemher 9 2005 Friday, December 9 2005 11:46 PM 0.91 feet Friday, Dec. 9, 2005


12:27 AM Moon set
2:14 AM 0.78 feet
6:33 AM Sun rise
12:51 PM Moon rise
1:06 PM 0.36 feet
4:47 PM Sun set
8:54 PM 0.82 feet
Saturday, Dec. 10, 2005
1:30 AM Moon set
6:33 AM Sun rise
8:25 AM 0.25 feet
1:21 PM Moon rise
4:47 PM Sun set
8:13 PM 1.14 feet
Sunday, Dec. 11, 2005
2:32 AM Moon set
6:34 AM Sun rise
7:41 AM -0.14 feet
1:53 PM Moon rise
4:47 PM Sun set
8:26 PM 1.46 feet


12:07 AM 0.52 feet
12:28 AM Moon set
6:34 AM Sun rise :.
11:15 AM 0.24 feet
12:52 PM Moon rise
4:48 PM Sun set
6:47 PM 0.55 feet
Saturday, Dec. 10, 2005
1:31 AM Moon set
6:34 AM 0.16 feet
6:35 AM Sun rise
1:23 PM Moon rise
4:49 PM Sun set
6:06 PM 0.76 feet
Sunday, Dec. 11, 2005
2:34 AM Moon set
5:50 AM -0.09 feet
6:35 AM Sun rise
1:54 PM Moon rise
4:49 PM Sun set
6:19 PM 0.97 feet


Friday, December 9, 2005
12:26 AM Moon set
6:32 AM Sun rise
9:34 AM 0.52 feet
12:51 PM Moon rise
4:47 PM Sun set
5:58 PM 1.01 feet
Saturday, Dec. 10, 2005
1:29 AM Moon set
3:37 AM 0.48 feet
6:33 AM Sun rise
1:21 PM Moon rise
4:47 PM Sun set
5:40 PM 1.22 feet
Sunday, Dec. 11, 2005
2:32 AM Moon set
3:57 AM 0.14 feet
6:34 AM Sun rise
1:53 PM Moon rise
4:47 PM Sun set
5:20 PM 1.42 feet


12:27 AM Moon set
3:10 AM 0.78 feet
6:34 AM Sun rise
12:51 PM Moon rise
1:36 PM 0.36 feet
4:47 PM Sun set
9:50 PM 0.82 feet
Saturday, Dec. 10, 2005
1:30 AM Moon set
6:34 AM Sun rise
8:55 AM 0.25 feet
1:21 PM Moon rise
4:47 PM Sun set
9:09 PM 1.14 feet
Sunday, Dec. 11, 2005
2:33 AM Moon set
6:35 AM Sun rise
8:11 AM -0.14 feet
1:53 PM Moon rise
4:47 PM Sun set
9:22 PM 1.46 feet


"But we are also looking at
the blizzard races to see what
might be possible at the end of
the season."
Thorpe would not rule out
another attempt at the
Snowball Derby in 2006, but
he is planning on racing next
December.
"We will definitely be run-
ning in the Snowflake 100 next
year," said Thorpe. "I thought
we had it all ready this year,
but our stuff was still outdated.


"This was definitely a tough
field as two of the Roush Driver
X program racers and Jeremy
Pate failed to make the derby
field."
Thorpe is also looking at
starting his season off this
March in Opp, Ala., when he
attempts to qualify for the
Rattler 150.
Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@srpressgazette.com


PRA announce beach run


Press Gazette Staff Reports
For years, runners through-
out the southeast have looked
forward to thefirst Saturday in
January...anticipating the chal-
lenge of running a 5K/10K or
Half Marathon on a course
along the beautiful white
beaches of Northwest Florida's
GulfCoast.
Each year, the Beach Run
has drawn more than a thousand
participants and their families
to the area. The Pensacola
Runners Association has


worked hard to see loyal partic-
ipants will have even more to
look forward to in 2006. The
race -formerly known as the
Navarre Beach Run is on. The
location has changed to
Pensacola Beach.
Hurricane damage forced
the move,but Pensacola Beach
Run race director, Gary Bunde
believes this is a positive
change.
"Although the location has
changed, everything else will
be the same."


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Past
Continued From Page One
Milton enjoyed some special
moments in the post season
despite losing to Panama City
in the district semi-finals.
They advance to the semis
,by .upsetting a highly favored
Malone squad.
In the District Class B tour-
nament Milton defeated
Chipley before losing to
Mariana in the finals.
And in the game that almost
didn't happen, Milton lost to Ft.
Lauderdale at the State Class B
Tournament.
"We were late getting to the
game," said Gill. "They were
about to give up on us when we
walked in for the game.
"We didn't get to warm up,
we just had to start playing."
For Tolbert, who was the
leading scorer for the Panthers
that season, it was rather hard.
"You have to shoot a little
bit before the game to warm up
and get use to the basket," said
Tolbert. "But we didn't get to
that night."
One highlight of the game
recorded by reporters then was
the play of Helms as he was
acknowledged for his efforts in
shutting down the Flying Els'
C.M. Newton.
"He was real excited about
that and still has the clips some-
where," said Locklin. "That is a
game that E.M. is real proud
of."
,, Back then who would of
thought that Newton would go
on to be a successful basketball
coach at Alabama, Vanderbilt,
and then athletic director" at
Kentucky.
Milton and their first year
coach set most of their oppo-
nents on their heels because
D'Avignon brought with him
set plays.
"He was a real good coach
that came to Milton from
Colorado," said Gill, who
decided to try out for the team
his junior year. "He was the first
person to teach and run plays.
"That was unusual for the
area and I believe one reason
why we won 19,. games," ,
Locklin described.the play


Pictured is the 1945-46 members 'of the Milton Varsity basketball
team. Front row, from left to right are Donald Lawliss, Jack Locklin
(captain), Warner Urquhart, and Roswell Barnes. Row two: Steve
Gill, Jimmie Thomas, L.J. Whitfield, Frank West, and B.M. Helms. On
the back row is Raymond Tolbert.


as a motion or roll, which many
today recognize as a weave.
"We would be dribbling
around up top when someone
would break in front of the bas-
ket for a lay-up," said Locklin.
If there was a need for a
shot from the outside, everyone
looked for Tolbert.
, "They would let me shoot,"
recalled Tolbert. "From 18 to 20
feet out I could bust the basket."
What was amazing about
his shot at the time was he
would shoot the ball with one
hand compared to the two hand-
ed shots his teammates were
required.
"Ray was good at the one
handed shot," said Locklin.
"And he was the only player
that got to shoot that way.
"The rest of us even had to
shoot our free-throws granny
style."
But the style of game was-
n't the only thing different.
Milton's main rivals were
Chumuckla and Munson.
Other opponents for the
Panthers at the time included
Crestview, Bonifay, Chipley,
Mariana, Pensacola Catholic,
and Jay.
"Chuniuckla won a state
title before I "wa-s in high
school," recalled "Lockin.


"And Jay was a good club.
"But we never played
Pensacola High -because they
were so much larger."
Also most of the games
Were played in Milton.
"We were one of the few
teams that had a wooden floor
gym," said Locklin. "The rest
of the schools had a dirt or
clay court.
"And if you dived for the
ball then it really hurt."
Since these men played for
the Panthers the game. has
changed a great deal to include
jump shots, three point lines,
and bigger players.
Tolbert sometimes won-
ders what it would have been
like with a three point shot
back then.
"Oh lord would I have
loved the three point line,"
said Tolbert. "Coach
D'Avignon was big on the fast
break and doing things that
other teams back then didn't
do."
The one thing that will
never change to success-on the
court is chemistry.
"As a team we had pretty
good chemistry," said Locklin.
"We grew up together and had
played as a team since the sev-
enth and eighth grade.'4


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I MMO**Al


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, December 7, 2005


Page 6-D


'T(Ot


0
I


iw












Wednsda, Dcembr 7 205 Th Sata O~a res GaettePan 7-


Sports


Pace
Continued From Page One
Ellis streaking down the field
on a post pattern.
The Nease quarterback
drew back from five yards deep
in his own end zone and slung
the ball to Ellis hitting him in
stride for the score as the
Panthers took a 10-0 lead.
With the clock against
them, Pace remained unfazed
by the task ahead as quarter-
back Chris Sorce led the
Patriots down to the Nease 22.
Pace's threat ended when
Sorce's pass went off the hands
of his target and into the arms
of a Nease defensive back.
"We came up just short,"
said Lindsey. "As an offense we
just struggled and had trouble
executing offensively until the
end."
Nease extended their 10-0
halftime lead to 24-0 before
Pace could erase the zero on
their side of the scoreboard.
One critical drive in the
third quarter for Nease was
aided by four personal fouls
called against the Patriots.
The flags came on what was
called a late hit on Tebow, two
unsportsmanlike conduct calls,
and a pass interference to set up
Tebow's 10 yard run with 5:36
remaining in the quarter.
Pace got the offense rolling
as they mixed the running game
with the short pass to chew up
the field until Sorce plunged in
from the one to make it 24-6.
Sorce then hit Jakob Dwyer
for the two point conversion to
make it 24-8 as the huge crowd
from Pace, which outnumbered
those from Nease, started get-
ting over the numbing cold.
"We tried our best tonight,"
said Lindsey. "After the first
score I thought we still had a
chance.
"These kids have come
back all year, but tonight we
just came up short."
Nease handled an on-side
kick from Pace and answered
when Daunte Owens took a
swing pass from Tebow 42
yards for his second touchdown
of the game with 5:23 remain-


Members of the Pace defensive unit become better aquainted with
Nease quarterback Tim Tebow, who spent a great deal of the night
scrambling and running away from the defensive pressure supplied
by the Patriots. Nease defeated Pace 31-14 and ended their season in
the semi-finals of the 4A Florida High School Football playoffs.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


ing.
Pace made one final push in
the final minutes as Riley
Hawkins climbed the ladder to
grab Sorpe's pass from a
Panther defender and then fin-
ish off the play by scampering
the remaining 15 yards to the
end zone for a 43 yard score. A
two point conversion failed.
Tebow was the offense for
Nease as he carried the ball 18
times for 81 yards and went 8
for 18 for 216 yards through the


air.
Pace kept Tebow honest as
they tackled him on four occa-
sions for losses.
"We kept getting after him,"
said Pace's Chris Cooke. "We
just couldn't stop the big plays.
"I caught him one time and
jumped on his back."
Cooke then admitted, "But
then I was along for the ride."
Sorce finished the night
going 16 of 26 through the air
for 170 yards and rushed for
another 24 on 10 carries.
"We didn't make it to
Miami," said Sorce. "But we
made it as far as any Pace team
has ever gone.
"It is nothing to be ashamed
of to finish a season 14-1 and I
am walking away with my head
up."
Nease will play Seffner
Armwood, the defending
Florida 4A Champion, who
defeated Miami Washington
37-34.

Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@srpressgazette.comrn


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(Half Mile North of Hwy. 90) (Half Mile South of Fairfield)

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'I "


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, December 7, 2005


Page 7-D








The Santa Rasa Press Gazette Wednesday. December 7, 2005


Page 8-D


W.I.C. AND E.B.T.
CARDHOLDERS
WELCOME

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7 Days A Week


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Wednesday, December 7, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


*I











: Santa Rosa's8 Press

6azette


PAGE 1E


I


0 0


assi,


WEDNESDAY

* /II e December 7, 2005


if


.-~eSs*-:-~: Ir.


%.


-.4.


i '!2' I'S


90 ANNOUNCEMENTS
92 AUCTIONS
94 MEETINGS
96 PERSONALS
98 TRAINING
EMPLOYMENT
102 DRIVERS
104 GENERAL HELP
106 HOME BASED
BUSINESS
- 108 HOTEL/MOTELS/
RESTAURANTS
S110 LABOR
112 MANAGEMENT
114 MEDICAL
116 OFFICE WORK
118 PART TIME
120 PROFESSIONAL
122 RETAIL
124 SALES/
TELEMARKETING
126 SKILLS/TRADE
128 POSITIONS WANTED
GARAGE SALES -
STYLES SECTION-WED.
202 GARAGE SALES-SAT.
SERVICES
305 AUTO
310 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
315 BUSINESS SERVICES
320 CHILD CARE
325 DOMESTIC
330 EQUIPMENT REPAIR
335 FINANCIAL SERVICES
340 HOME REPAIR
345 LAWN CARE
350 SENIOR CARE
355 SEWING/ALTERATIONS
360 MISCELLANEOUS
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-RENT
402 APARTMENTS
404 COMMERCIAL
406 HOMES
408 LAND
410 MOBILE HOMES
412 ROOMS FOR RENT
414 ROOMMATES WANTED
416 VACATION/RESORT
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-SALE
502 APARTMENTS
504 COMMERCIAL
506 HOMES
508 INVESTMENTS
510 LAND
512 MOBILE HOMES
514 VACATION/RESORT
PETS/ANIMALS
702 BOARDING
704 LIVESTOCK
706 LIVESTOCK SUPPLIES
S70 3 PETS
710 PET SUPPLIES
712 LOST PETS
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
802 ANTIQUES
804 APPAREL
806 APPLIANCES
808 ARTS & CRAFTS
810 COMPUTERS
812 FARM EQUIPMENT
814 FURNITURE

818 LAWN EQUIPMENT
820 LUMBER/HARDWARE
822 MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
824 OFFICE EQUIPMENT
826 SPORTING GOODS
828 ELECTRONIC
(STEREO'TV/VCR)
830 MISC.iSALE
632 MISCJWANTED
834 LOST MERCHANDISE
TRANSPORTATION
902 AUTO SUPPLIES
904 CARS
906 BOATS
908 FARM EQUIPMENT
910 MOTORCYCLES
912 MOTOR HOMES
914 RECREATIONAL
916 SPORTS UTILITY
VEHICLE
918 TRUCKS
920 VANS
922 OTHER


- I... -


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PACE WALMART NOW
HIRING PART-TIME &
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WEEKEND & EVENINGS
A MUST. GREAT BENEFITS.
APPLY WITHIN THE PACE
WALMART. ABSOLUTELY
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.


A


-immedSiate-Sopning


Outside Sales Executive
Saita Rosa', Prt-s Ga:ciuc ha:i an1 immedi-
ale opening for a proen sales executive. The
successful candidate will ha\e a % inning
personality\ and a proern track record m


otf .des production.


*'~ -'-~ A


BECOME AN OWNER START
PART-TIME GET PAID FOR
HELPING OTHERS AND BEGIN
BUILDING A BUSINESS YOU
MIGHT OWN ONE DAY! UNIQUE
ENTREPRENEURIAL
OPPORTUNITY WITH PRIMERICA.
A MEMBER OF CITIGROUP. FOR
MORE INFORMATION. CALL
MARGARITA AT
850-626-7188


* Represent an excellent product


,ALE


SALES PERSON
$320 Salary, bonus,
benefits, advancement.
Key Auto Liquidation
4340 Avalon Blvd.
Milton, Fl.
Ask for Coach Gordon
850-983-3000


MEALDSG


HELP WANTED
WELDER FABRICATOR AND
HELPERS KNOWLEDGE OF
VARIOUS METALS HELPFUL.
HAVE A VALID DRIVERS
LICENSE. WE BUILD
ORNAMENTAL IRON FENCING,
RAILING, SPIRAL
STAIRWAYS.METAL DESIGN
983-3007


IS STRESS
Ruining Your Life?
Read DIANETICS
by RonL.Hubbard.
Call (813)872-
0722 or
send $7.99 to Dia-
netics, 3102 N
Habana Ave.,
Tampa FL 33607.


DCALA COM/RES.
Hign visibility & de-
sirable locations.
501 Spring Lake Rd
& 103 SE Tuscawilla
Ave. Tranzon Dng-
gers Walt Dnggers.
Lic. Real Estate
Broker (8771347-
4437.


- in service to the community f
for almost a century. I
* Good compensation package.
* Excellent family working environ-
ment.
* Ability to grow with the company.


Reply to: Press Gazette, 6629 Elva St.
Milton, FL 32570. Phone 623-2120.
email: letters@srpressgazette.com


WEST'FLORID


HEALTH INFORMATION CLERK
FT POSITION (32 HRS) EXCELLENT BENEFITS.
COMPLETE "MEDICARE PART B" BILLING, MONITOR
AND COORDINATES VISITATION, ROUTE CALLS
EFFICIENTLY, ASSIST CUSTOMERS, MAINTAIN
MAINTENANCE OF MEDICAL RECORDS. GOOD
WRITTEN AND VERBAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS.
1YR CLERICAL EXPERIENCE, 1YR EXP. IN MEDICAL
SETTING. APPLY AT WEST FLORIDA COMMUNITY
CARE CENTER, 5500 STEWART ST, MILTON, FL.

OPERATED UNDER CONTRACT BY LAKEVIEW
CENTER, INC. FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN & FAMILIES
EEO/ AFFIRMATIVE ACTION /M/F/D/V
EMPLOYER DRUG FREE WORK PLACE
EBAPTISTHEALTHCARE.ORGILAKEVIEWCENTER


AUCTION! 347+/-
acres, offered divid-
ed, Early County,
GA. Excellent farm
& hunting land.
Thursday, Decem-
ber 15, 2:00pm.
Rowell Auctions,
Inc. 1800)323-8388
www.rowellauclions.
com 10'% BP GAL
AU-C002594


Electrician & Helpers!!

This could-possibly be the last career change
you I ill ever ha\e to make. Finally!!! Be paid
and receive the benefits that reflect your
worth! We offer Health Insurance. Life
Insurance. Paid vacations, paid sick days off
and a retirement package. We have a fully
staffed office, warehousee and management
team in place to assist you as ,,ou perform your
%\ork as a true professional that you are.
We are about our employees!!!
If this interests you and you are an experienced
residential electrician or helper, then call us at:
NI & NI Electric of N.V. FL., Inc. Navarre
939-0404 for driving instructions.
\e are looking forward to meeting you!!!


102
Drivers


YOUR AD
HERE
CDLA OTR DRIV-
ERS TEAMS 60
CPM SOLOS 34
CPM 100'. DROP &
HOOK HEALTH
BENEFITS AS-
SIGNED EOUIP-
MEtIT REOUIRE- 1
YEAR OTR HAZ-
MAT & DOUBLES
(321 202-4406.


NEED EXTRA CHRISTMAS
CASH?
NOW HIRING DRIVERS.
STARTING PAY IS
$6.15 HOURLY + $1.25
DELIVERY
(SIGN IN BONUS)
APPLY IN PERSON.
PAPA JOHN'S
HIGHWAY 90, MILTON


COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH TECH
FFT- MUST HAVE A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA IGED
WITH (1 YEAR OF WORK EXPERIENCE IN
BEHAVIORAL OR MEDICAL HEALTH CARE.
OR (1 YEAR OF APPROPRIATE COLLEGE STUDY IN
SOCIAL SERVICES RELATED FIELDS.
A VALID FLORIDA DRIVER'S LICENSE
GOOD DRIVING RECORD.
JOB #580-000571 I 580-0002224
POSITION LOCATED IN MILTON
LAKEVIEW CENTER. INC 1221 W LAKEVIEW AVE.
PENSACOLA FL. 32501
WWW EBAPTISTHEALTHCARE.ORG
,LAKEVIE CErlTER
AFFIRMATIVE ACTIOrJN/ DRUG FREE
EMPLOYERiMAF;D/V DRUG FREE WORKFORCE/
DRUG TESTING REQUIRED- -


102
Drivers
COMPANY DRIV-
ERS. S.32-.41 per
mile. 1 2 raise every
si>. months. Lease
purchase 0'O
.90cpm. National
Carriers The Elite
tleet 1888)707-
7729 nationalcarn-
ers : com
WANTED EXPERI-
ENCED Dump truck
drier Refer-.ice Ie.
quired 1 i)'rr
Please call j850,
336-3084


Service Plumber- with a minimum of
3 years experience. Starting pay-
$14.00 $16.00 an hour depending
on experience. We are looking for a
team player that has a desire to
grow with us. Your work effort will be
appreciated. Helpers- we are looking
for team players that want to learn a
trade or expand their knowledge and
skills with willingness to work hard. 7
Call 626-8552 for interview :


102
Drivers
CYPRESS TRUCK
LINES, INC Driver
Designed Dispatch
FLA ONLY/Flat Bed
students welcome
Home Every
WeevEnd Most
Nlghlts 800(545-
1351 www.cypres-
struck corn
DRIVER TRAINEES
[Ilee-ed fJv.ow' INo
experience required
Werner Enierprises
has immediate
openings for entry.
level semi drivers
Our avg. drivers
earn more man
$36K lirst year. 60%
of our drivers get
home nrghrlly'teel.-
1l1 15-day CDL train.
ing available in ur
area Call today 1.
866-280-5309
DRIVER- DEDICAT-
ED Regional C',ast-
al Transo,,rt HOME
EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEEDi
65:: preloaded/pre-
larped- Avg $718-
$91 8,'week M,.tile.,
AL Terminal-. CDL-A
1eq'd 877-428-5627
www Cldrivers.co,:n


102
Drivers
DRIVER-COVE-
NANT TRANS-
PORT. Excellent
pay anda enelits for
Experience Driv-
ers. 00., Solos
Teams & Graduate
Students Bonuses
Available Retriger-
ai6d Now Available
18881 MORE PAY
i888.667-3729)
DRIVERS WANTED
Average dispatch is
2.100 miles "3-Pa,
Packages 1t choose
from "Laie model
Equipment 'No Haz-
rMal 'No East-Coasi
'100-: rlo-Touch
Freigrit Weekly Ad-
riances 'Direcl De-
posil 'weekly Isame
week) Senlemerls
Solos and Owner
Operators Welcome
Requirements. I-
year OTR veriliable
experience. CDL
CLASS A Plus Safe
Driving record,
Call Smlithway LO-
gistics Inc
18001282-1911 ext
115
NOW HIRING
OJo CDL required
Truck driver witl
tractor trailer and
i.:.rkiin experience a
must. 623-5385.


'-AYST PACEANAD-


PRIVATE

PARTY. ADS


-n P- .
ri'

Govat 0.


4.00/WK
up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30
$1.00 OFF FOR
3RD WEEK
MUST BE PRE-PAID


GARAGE

SALE ADS

$5.00

up to 20 words
.25 PER WORD
OVER 20
PRE-PAYMENT
REQUIRED


COMMERCIAL


ADS

$11 .00/1st week
$1.00 OFF EACH
ADDITIONAL WEEK
up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30


SUBJECT TO
CREDIT APPROVAL


aB|ml~nd ue you
Visa or-Master~T~?T*rd.^
2. Bing ad in to 6629,Elva St.

BHBM11tin,. FL 32570.
3. Fax your adif?^^^^^
^S^^^^^^Sto uffsfnat^^H^^
BB^i'(80) 623-2007I^^^^
(24 hours).^^^^


h1


,-ZLp, Iz --,7


AAFT...J


INDEX


- %- a I


^sasS wt


I ANOCM E


m


[ A C TI N L


[ EMPLOY 1


" '$ .


I .


*'-


,









PAGE 2E THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS DECEMBER 7,2005


102
Drivers
EVERGREEN
TRANSPORTA-.
TION needs drivers
,- to run the 13 SE
states with both
weekly and week-
end hometime. We
'offer good pay and
benefits. If you are
., at least 23 with a
good driving record
with a HAZMAT en-
-. dorsement please
come by our termi-
nal located at 300
, Hwy. 95A, Canto-
ment, Florida across
from IP paper mill or
*,. call 850-968-1702.
0/0 DRIVER- FFE,
The F/S is higher
here! $1.11 Avg.
$2,000 sign-on
$2,600 referral bo-
nus. Base plate pro-
vided. No truck no
problem, low pay-
ment with short
lease. (800)569-
9298.
OWNERS OPERA-
TORS *$1,000
SIGN-ON BONUS
*Refrigerated *SE
Regional *Home
', Weekly *Weekly
Settlements *Top
Percentage Pay +
Fuel Surcharge
*Dedicated Dis-'
patcher *Own Light-
', weight Late-Model
Truck. Call Cammy
@ (800)237-8288.

LEARN
TO DRIVE
Tractor Trailers


15 DAY LOCAL
CDL TRAINING
* Full and Part time Classes
* Major carriers hiring on site
* Tuition Assistance it qualified
For over 29 years-
we've been training


America's TrucKerst
CALL TODAY!
STruhck Driver Institute
5750 Milton Road
Milton, FL
800-709-7364
.?
0- 104
General Help
$ $ $ $
Top Pay
Carpenters,
Concrete Finishers/
Formsetters
needed for
immediate
permanent
employment
Experienced only
need apply
(850) 368-5629
$ $ $ $
$5,500. Weekly goal
.' potential. If some-
one did it, so can
you! 2-3 confirmed,
Appointments daily!
Benefits available....
Call Catherine
McFarland
(888)563-3188
'" $600 WEEKLY
working through the
'j' government part-
time. No experience.
A lot -of Opportuni-
ties. (800)493-3688
Code J-14.

AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN
needed. Must be
certified in air condi-
tioning and have
Experience in diag-
'', nostics and drivabil-
ity. Apply in person
at 4916 Glover
," Lane in Milton. No
'a phone calls please.

CLEANING PER-
SON Needed. Seri-
ous long term em-
'ployment applicants
only. Must be relia-
ble & dependable.
'" Must have car avail-
able. Call 994-1785.
COMPANION
WORKER needed
for elder care, 32
hrs weekly. Days
Mon; Tues; Thur;
F 8hrs each and, Sat
\/ and Sun 4hrs each.
Must be able to
transfer. Call Mary,
.-. Loving Care, at
.;,: 675-4278.
COMPANY AND
,'- 0/0 needed 87
"'"' cents per mile all
dead head paid +
r fsc. Call Don Salts-
man CTC Trucking
-. Inc. (321)639-1522.
COOKNEEDED for
"' Bayou Cafe. Mon-
day-Friday. Call
994-9232.
HANDYMAN-
COUNTRY Haven
apts. 10 hours a
week at $10 per
hour. Please call
626-7929.


-104
General Help
DRIVER- NOW HIR-
ING QUALIFIED
DRIVERS for Cen-
tral Florida Local &
National OTR posi-
tions. Food grade
tanker, no hazmat,
no pumps, great
benefits, competitive
pay & new equip-
ment. Need 2 years
experience. Call By-'
num Transport for
your opportunity to-
day. (800)741-7950.

F/T-MA DEGREE in
psychology, social
work or related field
with one (1) year
experience in a
mental health
substance abuse
related setting re-
quired or BA with
(2) yrs experience
in the same as
above. Avalid FL
driver's license,
good driving record.
Job #510-007691/
510-005740/
483-002076
(Milton & Pensacola
location).

FULL TIME mainte-
nance supervisor
year experience
HVAC certified,
plumbing, electrical
arid drywall. Must
have own tools and
transportation. Fax
or call 494-2640.
HEALTH INFOR-
MATION CLERK
FT position (32 hrs)
excellent benefits.
Complete. "Medicare
Part B" billing, moni-
tor and coordinates
visitation, route calls
efficiently, assist
customers, maintain
maintenance of
medical records,
good written and
verbal communica-
tion skills, lyr cleri-
cal experience,; lyr
exp. in medical set-
ting. Apply at West
Florida Community
Care Center, 5500
Stewart St, Milton,
FL.
Operated under con-
tract by Lakeview
Center, Inc. for the
State of Florida, De-
.partment of Children
& Families EEO/
Affirmative Action
/M/F/DN Employer
Drug Free Work
Place ebaptis-
*thealthcare.org/lake-
viewcenter
HEAVY EQUIP--
MENT Operator
CERTIFIED. Hands
on Training. Job
Placement Assis-
tance. Call Toll Free.
(866)933-1575. AS-
SOCIATED TRAIN-
ING SERVICES,
5177 Homosassa
Trail, Lecanto, Fl.
34461.
HELP WANTED
Welder Fabricator
And Helpers
Knowledge of
various metals
helpful .
Have a Valid Drivers.
License. We Build
Ornamental Iron
Fencing, Railing,
spiral stairways.
Metal Design
983-3007


PACE, 11pm-
2:30am, (Thurs-
Sun). $7.00-$7.50
per hour. Call Sam.
291-0124.
LIBERTY
NATIONAL Life
Insurance
Do You Earn
$75,000 A Year?
Would You Like
To? Using our pro-
ven marketing plan
you could earn
$75K your first year
with us--even more
the next year with
renewals and bo-
nuses! We offer two
retirement funds,
health insurance,
paid vacation,
convention trips
and morel No
experience neces-
sary. On-the-job
.training Require-'
ment: honesty, hard
work, dependable
transportation, and
the willingness to
follow our system.
We are an Equal
Opportunity
Employer.
Find out more Call:
983-7576.


104
General Help
MOVIE EXTRAS,
ACTORS & MOD-
ELS! Make $75-
$250/day. All ages
and faces wanted
No exp. Required.
FT/PT!
(800)714-7565,
MOVIE EXTRAS,
ACTORS & MOD-
ELS! Make $75-
$250/day. All ages
and faces wanted!
No exp. Required.
FT/PTI!
(800)545-1351
MOVIE EXTRAS,
ACTORS & MOD-
ELS! Make $75-
$250/day. All ages
arid faces wanted!
No exp. Required.
FT/PTI (800)851-
9046.
NEED EXTRA
CHRISTMAS
CASH"'
Now Hiring Drivers.
Starting pay is $6.15
hourly + $1.25
delivery
(Sign in Bonus)
Apply in person.
Papa John's
Highway 90, Milton.
NOW HIRING for
2005 Postal posi-
tions $17.50-
$59.00+/hr. Full
Benefits/Paid Train-
ing and Vacations.
No Experience Nec-
essary (800)584-
1775 Reference #


- AUC -WALMAR"I
now hiring part-time
& temporary position
weekend &
evenings
a must. Great bene-
fits. Apply within the
pace. Walmart. Ab-
solutely no phone
calls please.
PRESS OPERA-
TOR NewsKing ex-
perience preferred.
Benefits group
health, vacation/sick
time and holidays.
E-mail
belderton @ nsb-ob-
server.com, fax
(386)424-9858, Pub-
lisher, Observer
Newspapers. P O.
Box 10, New Smyr-
hta Beach, FL
. 32168:
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
Milton Newspapers,
Inc. (dDa Tne Santa
Rosa Press Gazene
ana The Santa Rosa
Free Press) re-
serves the right to
censor, reclassify,
revise, edit or reject
any advertisement
not meeting its
standards of accept-,
ance. Submission of
an advertisement
does not constitute
an agreement to
publish said adver-
'tisement. Publication
of an advertisement
does not constitute
an agreement for
continued publica-
tion.


"%-t
if"' "cl
"-'-iPa'o E
a'., B -
i,- ca'^g
13 aJJ,


Fini


Satu
ca
ider


the


104
General Help
SATELLITE TECH-
NICIANS needed.
No experience nec-
essary. Great career
w/ benefits. Must
have driver's license
& cell phone. 1-800-
292-8421.
TEAMSI $1000 sign
on bonus/ea, Approx
$1100/wk. 2yrs
OTR, No DUI/DWI.
Jax, FL area. Excel-
lent Equipment! Ex-
cellent Lanes! Great
Benefits! Home
Weekends!
(888)216-0180
www.callcpc.com.

TV TECHNICIAN
needed for local
electronics repair
shop Experience
required. Call
994-9598


.3
310
Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY
ROUTE Do you earn,'
$800/day? 30 Ma-
chines, Free Candy
All for' $9,995.
(888)629-9968
B02000033. CALL
US: We will hot be
undersoldl
DATA ENTRY.
Work from any-
where. Flexible
Hours, $$Great
Pay$$ Personal
Computer Required.
Serious Inquiries
Only. (800)873-0345
Ext.499 -
INTERNATIONAL
INVESTMENT
BANKING Firm Has,
Middle Market Busi-
nesses For Sale. If
Interested In, Buying
Or Selling A Busi-
ness, Call (877)217-
8231.
WHAT IS the "Ideal
Sales Job"? Leads
given! Viable busi-
ness for next 100
years! 'Residual in,
come No ihvest-
menti Your busi-
nessl Your hours!
80k-120kl Call us:
(888)287-6033 ext.
302 www.merchant-
cooperative.com.
315
Business Services
ABOVE & Beyond
Tree Service. Li-
censed and Insured.
Free Estimates.
Don't wait until !its
too late. We also of-
for stump grinding
and Bobcat serv-
ices. Kevin Frey
(850) 983-7820. Call
us...or pay morel
ALL ACCIDENTS &
Injury claims Auto-
mobile,
bike/boaubus. ani-
mal bites, workers
compensation,
wrongful death,
nursing home inju-
ries "Protect your-
Rights", A-A-A Attor-
ney Referral Serv-
ices (800) 733-5342.
MANNING'S MEAT
All cuts of beef,
Pork, Poultry
Deer and Wild,
Hogs Ground,. Cu-
bed, Sliced. Sum-
mer sausage.
Smoked sausage..
Phillip ,Manning,
Owner 850-501-
6861.


S315
Business Services
ARRESTED IN-
JURED Need a
Lawyer? All Criminal
Defense & Personal
Injury. *Accidents
*Injuries *Wrongful
Death *Felonies
*Misdemeanors .
*DUI *Traffic. A-A-A
Attorney Referral
Service (800)733-
5342 24/7.


AHH I=a.I =U Is t .U
A LAWYER?: All
Criminal Defense.
*Felonies *Misde-
meanors *DUI *Au-
tomobile Accident
*Domestic Violence
*Wrongful Death.
"Protect Your
Rights" A-A-A Attor-
ney Referral Service
(800)733-5342
24/7.
ARTIE KELLER
STUCCO. Licensed
and Insured. Con-
ventional and Syn-
thetic Systems. No
job 'to big nor to
small. Call 698-8327
or 626-9164.
BORDER TO Bor-
der Fence and Deck
Company. All types
of. fencing installed
and repaired. Spe-
cializing in privacy
fencing and wooden
decks. Our privacy
fences are built with
SCREWS. Free Es-
timates. 485-2532.
BOWDEN QUALITY
fencing- All types of
fence, new or re-
pairs. Best rates,
Licensed & Insured.
Free estimates. Call.
850-341-5391 .
BUDGET HOUSE
Painting- Insured &
Licensed. Call Andy
@ 850-304-9680.

CAPITAL TRUST
FINANCIAL
Leading financial
Institution approving
....small, business,
mortgage, vehicle,
and personal loans.
Immediate
response. Give us a
call at
1 (800) 419-1.599
or apply online at
www.capitaltrust
financlal.comrn

)AY BY Day Quality
Fencing. Competi-
tive pricing for all of
your fencing needs.
Locally licensed,
owned and operat-
ed. We look forward
to your call. New
fencing or -epairs.
Call 850-529-3546.
DIRT CHEEP
Cleaning Service.
"HOLIDAY SPE-
CIAL" One deep
clean $10 discount
with ad. Homes,
cdndos, offices. Call
384-2388
LOCAL HOME Re-
pair. Paint, drywall,
trim & tile. Fence re-
pair & installation.
10 years experi-
ence. Contact Paul
McMullen 850-723-
9767.


Find your


name and


win $5.00


d your name in the Classified
Section of Wednesday's or
irday's Press Gazette and you
in win $5.00. Bring proof of
itification by our office before
)date of next publication and
nink fl vnour mlnev.


315
Business Services
DIVORCE $275-
$350*COVERS chil-
dren, etc. Only one
signature required!
*Excludes govt.
feesI Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext
600. (8am-7pm) Alta
Divorce, LLC. Estab-
lished 1977.
DOUBLE "B" Land
Clearing. Backhoe
Work. Licensed and
Insured. Bryen Bal-
lard. (850)994-5740
or (850)232-1581.
EXACT DRYWALL.
Licensed & Insured.
Locally owned & Op-
erated, reasonable
prices. All Phases of
Drywalling, Any Tex-
ture, NO MONEY
DOWN, references
available. Member
of the Santa Rosa
Chamber 'of Com-
merce. Roger Tootle
HM: 850-995-5090
Cell: 850-501-0519
FIRST CLASS
Home Repair. Roof
repair, painting,
pressure washing,
also mobile home
repair. Over 50
years experience.
Free Estimates. Call
Robert at 626-2093
or 777-7161.
VICKERS FENCING
"Making good neigh-
bors one fence at a
time." Specializing in
wood fences. New
installations and re-
pairs. Competitive
pricing. Licensed an
Insured. Free esti-
mates. '994-7585 or
791-0198.


315
Business Services
G&E LANDSCAP-
ING AND TREE
SERVICES
Free estimates,,
credits card ok.
Grading, mulching,
weeding, trimming,
new beds, old. beds
redone, clean ups,
clearing stump
grinding, tree remov-
al. 850-529-5650
HUSEBY FLOOR
covering. Installing
Hardwood & Lami-
nate Flooring, sand
and refinishing. Rea-
sonable Rates. Li-
censed & Insured.
Call for quote 850-
994-7561 or 490-
0404.
IRENE'S PET Care
Pet Sitting
Boarding
Dog Walking
19 yrs. in Rescue
Milton, Florida
(850)981-1007

J & C Construction'.
Vinyl Siding, &
handyman
Lic#9840044249.
Locally Owned,
Licensed & Insured.
20 Years Experi-
ence. 994-4426.

MAYBE, YOU can
do it yourself, but
will you? Dave Kop-
pin Home Improve-
ment, Inc. Specializ-
ing in Insurance esti-
mates, Small Home
Improvement Proj-
ects & Maintenance.
(850) 626-6944.


315
Business Services
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING.
20+ years experi-
ence. Fox Remod-
eling LLC. Cabinet
installation, trim car-
pentry, tile, and
more. Licensed &
Insured. Also Certi-
fied Installer for
Home Depot &
Lowes. Call 850-
981 0508. Leave
message for Ron.
LAND CLEARING/
Dozer/Tractor work
Specializing in col-
veren installation &
Driveways. Leveling,
root raking. Oushog-
ging, disking Equip-
ment and material
transport available.
By the Job or by rhe
hour. Call for esli-
males. Call Billy
Rogers. 850-957-
4952 or Cell 850-
261-8407.
LYNNE HOUGH
Photography Photo
Restoration & Stor-
age. 48 hour turn-
around time on CD
or email 8 mp digital
excellent quality
guaranteed. 623-
1440 or www.black-
.waterimages.com
MCARTHUR HOME
Improvement.
Decks, Porches, Out
Buildings. 850-995-
7812.
NEW CONCRETE
Construction
Patios Driveways -
Slabs:
Also Tearout &
Replace damage
concrete
(850)494-7777


SANTA ROSA COUNTY

HUMAN RESOURCES

EMPLOYMENT

ANNOUNCEMENT

***************************************
ATTENTION: The information given on your
application will be evaluated against the mini-
mum qualifications of the job description. The
length of related work experience, training and
education described on your application, will be
an important consideration in the entire applica-
tion and selection process.' After all applications
are evaluated, your name will be placed on the
employment list; ranked accordingly,
Other than this announcement, no further
notification will be sent.
****** |t**** ***** ***** ***********

Administrative Clerk II (4113)
Range: 10 $ 9.23 per hour
**12/05/2005 12/12/2005 **
Note:. All experience and/or educational
requirements must be clearly'documented on
application efizr qualification for employment
is determined.
Minimum Qualications (Must Be Attained'
Before the Closing Date)
HS/GED. (3) yrs exp in typing and data entry;
type 30 wpm. CERTIFICATION: Mala
require the ability to obtain and hold current cer-
tification in the NCIC/FCIC terminal course.
ADDITIONAL: Must pass a thorough back-
ground check, including CVSA and physical
exam. May require shift work.

Evidence Clerk (1011)
Range: 11 $ 9.46 per hour
**12/05/2005 12/12/2005 **
Note: All experience and/or, educational
requirements must be clearly documented on
application before qualification for employment
is determined.
Minimum Oualifications (Must Be Attained
Before the Closing Date)
HS/GED. (3) yrs exp in inventory control; (1)
yr of clerical exp including record keeping or
accounting, Applicants selected for this position,
must pass a CVSA, background investigation,
and a physical/drug screening as a condition of
hiring.

Planner I (6037)
Range: 23 $ 32,253.19 $ 35,601.49 DOQ
**Open Until Filled**
Note: All experience and/or educational
requirements must be clearly documented on
application before qualification for employment
is determined.
Minimum Qualifications (Must Be Attained
Before the Closing Date)
Bachelor's degree in Urban and Regional
Planning, Environmental Science, Architecture,
Landscape Architecture, or related field and 1
year of relevant planning and zoning experi-
ence, or Master's degree in Urban and Regional
Planning or related field and no experience.
LICENSE: Applicant must have a valid State
of Florida Driver's License at the date of hire,
and maintain said license while employed in this:
position.


315
Business Services

MIKE KAYLOR
Cement Mason
*Patios
*Walks
*Driveways
Free estimates,
no job too small.
Quality work at
affordable prices.
994-0897.

MOBILE HOME
Brokers. Major and
minor repairs. Re-
roof, patio covers,
screen rooms, level-
ing, locally owned,
operated. Free esti-
mates. 100% Fi-
nancing WAC. Call
857-1051.
NEW HOPE PAINT-
ING & WALLPA-
PERING *Drywall
repairs & :patchwork
,*Pressure cleaning
(homes, decks, pa-
tios, driveways &
sidewalks) *Carpen-
try work (crown
molding, paneling,
trim base & case, in-
stall cabinets & build
decks) Residential.
Interior/Exterior.
Family owned busi-
ness, over 30 years.
Call The Ericksens
today '(850)723-
2550 or 623-6034


Divorce '108, Adoption *80
Name Change '55
FREE Typing, Call for
Worksheet (850) 434-7524
1850 N. "WSt
(1 blk. N. of Flea Market)m


315
Business Services
STUMP-EASE
STUMP Grinding.
Most removals
$35.00. Discount for
multiply removals.
Backyard Accessible
Licensed & Insured.
Local Contractor.
Retired USN. 232-
8746.
TNT CARPORTS
R.V. & Boat covers
Buildings,
Garages.
Portable Sheds
CARPORTS
Single $595
Double $695.
12 X 41-$1295
24 X 31 $1990
Galvanized Steel
Many sizes/colors.
Financing Available
Free delivery & setup
(850)983-2296 or
Pager 505-1867
TREES AND Roofs.
Professional tree ex-
perts; roof cover
ups, carpentry, local
in business 40
years, insurance
and license number:
RC0066546. Call
850-862-0383 or
850-865-2000
320
Child Care
CHRISTIAN
GRANDMOTHER
wishes to provide
child care to infant,.
toddler in downtown.
Milton. $85 a week.
Call 850-449-4070.


PLACE YOUR AD HERE


Planner II (6038)
Range: 25 $ 35,601.49 $ 39,297.38 DOQ
**Open Until Filled**
Note: All experience and/or educational
requirements must be clearly documented on
application before qualification for employment
is determined.
Minimum Qualifications (Must Be Attained
Before the Closing Date)
Bachelors Degree in Urban and Regional
Planning, Environmental Science, Architecture,
Landscape Architecture, or related field, and 2
years of relevant planning and zoning experi-
ence, or a Master's Degree inf Urban and
Regional Planning or related field and 1 year of
-relevant pla6nig and zoning experience.,
LICENSE: Applicant must have a valid State
of Florida Driver's License at the date of hire
and maintain said license while employed in this
position.

Planner III (6035)
Range: 27 $ 39,297.38 $ 43,376.94 DOQ
**Open Until Filled**
Note: All experience and/or educational
requirements must be clearly documented on
application before qualification for employment
is determined.
Minimum Qualifications (I'ifut Be A4iained
Before the Closing Daie )
Bachelor's degree in Urban and Regional
Planning. Environmental Science, Architecture,
Landscape Architecture, or related field and 4
years of relevant planning and zoning experi-
ence, or Master's degree in Urban and Regional
Planning or related field and 2 years of relevant
planning and. zoning experience. LICENSE:
Applicant must have a valid State of, Florida
Driver's License at the date of hire and maintain
said license while employed in this position.

Testing will be held on Thursday, December
15, 2005 for Communications Dispatcher I
and Administrative Clerk II. The APPLI-
CANT must contact Human Resources at 850-
983-1948 to receive their assigned testing time
for the date above. All applications and sup-
porting documents must be received on or
before Monday December 12, 2005 at 4:30pm
in order to obtain a testing time. **NO'
EXCEPTIONS WILL BE MADE ON
DATE/TIME**

FOR EACH POSITION APPLIED FOR, ALL
REQUIRED SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS
(i.e. diplomas, transcripts, and/or
certificates) LISTED ON THE JOB DESCRIP-
TION/S, MUST BE SUBMITTED BY THE
CLOSING DATE/S NO LATER THAN
4:30pm. DOCUMENTS MAY BE DELIV-
ERED BY US MAIL, FAX, EMAIL, OR
HAND DELIVERED. If the required sup-
porting documents are not in by the close
date. your application will not be submitted
for consideration. In an effort to further assist
applicants, we offer the ease of applying online
at HYPERLINK "http://www.santarosa.fl.gov"
www.santarosa.fl.gov. Complete job descrip-
tions and applications are also available at the
Santa Rosa County Human Resources Office,
6495 Caroline Street, Suite H, Milton, FL
32570, phone (850) 983-1948, Fax (850) 981-
2003. Veteran's Preference will be given in
accordance with Florida Statutes.


A Drug Free Workplace/
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


A


I


II


46 ? ......I..... I "


r"


4









I PAGE 3E THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS DECEMBER 7, 2005


325
Domestic
DEPENDABLE
HOUSEKEEPER
TEN YEARS EXPE-
RIENCE. REASON-
ABLE RATES.CALL
994-6236
345
Lawn Care
CLARK'S LAWN
Care and General
Maintenance & All
Types of Tractor
Work. Licensed &
Insured. Call Mike
Clark at 626-2428.
PAGE'S TREE
SERVICE Trim, cut
& remove. Call 626-
2159 (if no answer,
please leave message)
FIREWOOD $50. a
load and up.


350
Senior Care

VISITING
ANGELS
' SENIOR CARE
In home
Companionship
Meals
Light housework
Errands
944-2211


355
Sewing &
Alterations


JUST JUDY'S
SEAMSTRESS
YEARS OF
EXPERIENCE,
FAIR PRICES.
Alterations
Dress-making
Repairs
*Weddings
*Formals
JUDY HARVEY
5901 Castle Drive
Milton, FL
626-6349


Sewing &
Alterations
MARIANNE
CICHON
alterations, custom
sewing, crafted are
available.
Over 40 years
experience on
sewing. For more
details or services
please contact me at
Marianne Cichon
5662 Whispering-
wood Dr.Pace, Fl,
32571
(850) 994-3675

360
Miscellaneous
CREDIT REPAIR -
29 years experience
licensed and bond-
ed. One price -
clean credit for life.
Lee Harrison Credit
Restoration. Call `
(903)835-1667 for
free information
package.
www.LHcreditrepair.
com,
LH2171@aol.com.

EARN DEGREE on-
line from home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Com-
puters. Job Place-
ment Assistance.
Computer & Finan-
cial aid if qualify.
(866)858-2121
www.onlinetidewa-
tertech.com.
METAL ROOFING
SAVE $$$'Buy Di-
rect From Manufac-
turer. 20 colors in
stock with all Acces-
sories. Quick turn
around Delivery
Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.
NEW LOG CABIN-
NC Mountains. New
shell on secluded
mountain site.
$89,900. Hardwood,
forest. 'Great fall col-
ors. Paved road.
Near parks & lakes.
Acreage & financing
available. (828)247-
0081.


Miscellaneous
OXYGEN USERS:
Enjoy more free-
dom! Travel without
canisters, Oxlife's
lightweight, Oxygen
concentrators run off
your car & in your
home. U.S.A.- made
Warranteed
(800)780-2616
www.oxlifeinc.com.
PURPLE MARTIN
Houses from
www.SKMFG.com
are now available at
the World's Largest
Retailer in Pet De-
partment, $19.97,
for a store near you,
call (800)764-8688.





402
Apartments
1 BEDROOM unfur-
nished apartment for
rent. 623-8875

1BR/1BA, APART-
MENT Total Electric.
No pets. $350 per
month/ $300 securi-
ty deposit. 623-5697
leave message.


The All New!
Jay

Apartments

FULLY RENOVATED ONE,TWO,AND
THREE BEDROOM UNITS NOW
AVAILABLE WAC.



QUIET NEIGHBOR-
HOOD 2br/lba cen-
tral air and heater.
All electric freshly
painted and new
carpent, garbage
pick up included. No
pet $495 per month,
$450 deposit. Call
623-1601


404
Commercial
FOR RENT-
Commercial bldg:
800 sq.ft. 7251
Hwy. 90 East ,
$700.75 per month.
Sales tax & water in-
cluded. $500 de-
posit. (850) 623-
8575.


NEWLY REMOD-
ELED Office Spaces
Available for rent
$200-$250
conveniently located
across the street
from. Santa Rosa
County Courthouse
Call 850-623-0208
for details
406,
Homes
ACCEPTING AP-
PLICATIONS for
rental homes in Mil-
ton & Pensacola. 3
bedroom, 1 bath.
Rent for $725 and
last month's rent.
Deposit $500.
Phone 850-981-
9695. Leave msg.
will return call
ASAP.
FOR RENT
Like new clean
2BR/BA. home in
Milton garage, ceil-
ing fans, stove. Ref-
non smoking envi-
ronment no pets
$850. mo. 800 se-
curity deposit-
(850)994-5946.
FOR RENT- Brand
New Single Family
House- Country liv-
ing in Milton- 3 bed-
2 bath & office/den,
2 1/2 Car Garage.
$1,450. Mo. plus de-
posit. 850-449-2983
or 850-939-1414.
LARGE COUNTRY
home, 7 miles N of
Whiting Field's Hwy
87 entrance.
4bd/2ba, formal liv-
ing/dining room,
den/study, eat-in-
kitchen, CH/A. No
smoking/pets.
1st/last months rent
required. $795
month, $500 depos-
it. 995-0500/995-
8282.
MILTON- 2 Bdrm, 1
bath, A/C, new in-
side. 5454 Munson
Hwy. Near East
'-gate Whiting"'$675
F & L, 957-4825.
MILTON- IMMACU-
LATE 3/2 House on
quiet cul-de-sac.
Awesome school
district. New refrig-
erator included.
Sorry no pets al-
lowed. $975 month
lease w/ $800 secur-
ity deposit. Call
623-5483 or .384-
)733.
. 'wn


Copyrighted Material

; Syndicated Content .-


*
0




i

I


406
Homes
MILTON- NEW 4
bdrm, 1 acre, all ap-
pliances. $1,250
plus deposit. Possi-
ble lease or pur-
chase. VA financing.
Call Tom (agent)
850-449-2983.


355 360


TWO NEW 3/2
Homes, Planation
Woods- $1,150 per
month plus deposit.
877-548-4373.
.408
Land

LAND FOR SALE
Refer to
Classification
#510

MOBILE HOME lots
for rent including
R.V's. FEMA wel-
come. Eastgate Mo-
bile Home Ranch.
626-8973.
410
Mobile Homes
13 X 56, 2 bdrm,
clean, new heat &
air, Rice Rd. & Old
Bagdad *Hwy. area.
$400 dep. $570
rent.
324-0494.
2 BDRM/2 bath Mo-
bile home on private
lot in Pace. Total
electric. $485 per
month/ $200 depos-
it. No pets. Baycrest
Realty 994-7918.
2 TO 3 bedroom
rentals.. Jay, Milton
and Pace.' $400 to
$650 per month.
Call 994-5703, leave
message.
4/2 'MOBILE home
on private lot. No
smoking. No pets.
References re-
quired. $650 mo
plus damage depos-
it. Trash pick -up,
washer and dryer in-
cluded.
Call 623-6099
or 626-1627
IFOR RENT 3BR/
Doublewide on cor-
ner lot total electric.
East Gate Mobile
Home Ranch 626-
8973
MARLBORO VIL-
LAGE bedroom/ 2
bathroom 475/475
2 bedroom, 1 bath
400/400. No pets,
723-2532
MOBILE HOME for
rent in Pace near
Hamilton Bridge Rd.
3BR/2BA, $700-'
$700. rental refer-
ence required. Call
554-8138
MOBILE HOME for
rent- 1 bdrm/1 bath,
Pea Ridge area.
$350 per month
$200 deposit. No
pets. Baycrest Re-
alty 994-7918.


FOR SALE 91 ALLEGRO
In Good Shape

$22,000 o.b.o.








850-675-3623 Cell 324-2350


GEORGIA PROP-
ERTIES for sale-
Parcels range from
.to,,j,QO. acres. All
deeply discounted
1031 tax exchange.
welcorhe. Visit
Peach State at
www.farmandtimber-
com or Call (866)
300-7653.
LAND FOR RENT
Refer to
Classification
#408

SECLUDED &
SERENE

NW of NAS Whit-
ing Field

20 Placid acres
zoned agricultural

Land prop. tax
value at $198,043

3 mobile homes,
garage, barn, shed


* 626-6767
* $247,239
THE BERNATH
Place/Waterfront lot.
80ft on Mulatto Bay-
ou. $250,000. 623-


410
Mobile Homes
NICE, QUIET, clean
park. Includes water,
garbage & lawn
service. Two new
2bd/ 2ba. from $500
to $600. No pets.
255-7772.
QUIET .PARK, new
2BR 2B $525 + dep.
also 2BR 1B $425+
dep.NO PETS, Se-
niors welcome, Call
626-1552.
SMALL 2BR ideal
for single or couple
East Gate Mobile
Home Ranch. 626-
8973.
412
Rooms For Rent
BEDROOMS FOR
rent. Downtown Mil-
ton, Glover Lane,
Everything included.
$100/wk. 850-449-
4070. Cable, Refrig-
erator, Color TV, Mi-
crowave, A/C, gar-
bage, parking in-
cluded. Clean.
ROOM FOR rent,
Kitchen, washer &
dryer, utilities fur-
nished, $75 a week.
Near King Middle
School. Call 626-.
2786
414
Roommates
Wanted
LOOKING FOR
roommate- near
Hwy. 87N & Hwy 4
intersection, conven-
ient to Whiting Field,
Jay and Brewton.
Call Jena 981-3320.
ROOMMATE
WANTED- Clean,
non-smoker house
in Navarre, $550
per mo. utilities in-
cluded. Available in
January. 936-9862.


506
Homes
BY OWNER Cute
Cottage Style Home,
in Milton 3 bed-
rooms/ 1 1/2 bath-
rooms, white picket
fence, flower boxes,
porch and deck, 2
out buildings.
$79,900. Call
(850)623-3190 or
(850)485-4439
BY OWNER/
AGENT 3bd/2ba.
Lakefront. The
Moors Golf & Rac-
quet Club.
$239,900. 380-
3660.
CUSTOM BUILT
HOME- 2,769 s.f.
4/2,. Avalon Beach,
too many amenities
to list. Call Nate
Holler 206-0607
Danley Realty 623-
5648.
MILTON- NEW 4'
bdrm, 1 acre, all ap-
pliances. $1,250
plus deposit. Possi-
ble lease or pur-
chase. VA financing.
Call Tom (agent)
850-449-2983.
POOL! 3br/ 2 bath
in Milton on over 1/2
an acre. Townhouse
in Pensacola. Lori
Frey, 1 First Choice
Realty 476-2154.


510
Land

FOR SALE-
Fenced, 4 acres +/-,
Deep well, septic
tank, zoned agricul-
ture. Partially wood-
ed and pasture. 4
miles from Milton
city limits. $16,500
per acre. For more
information call
261-2741 or
623-6329.



,Ad Ilk


556
Homes
MIAMI WATER-
FRONT Pre-con-
struction 10% down,
2 year build out. GA
Coastal Waterfront
Pre-construction 1st
phase assignable/
GA Lots $6,900+,
RV lots $15k. Real-
tor/ (877)468-5687.
NC MOUNTAIN
LOG CABIN on
mountain top, unfin-
ished inside, view,
trees, waterfall &
large public lake
pearby, no traffic,
$89,900 owner
(866)789-8535
www.NC77.com.

AMY J.
SYMONDS
UNIQUE 6,000 sq.
ft. Lake Lanier
home, private-2ac,
325 ft on lake, ex-
quisite gardens, wa-
terfalls, boat dock,
50mi. NE of Atlanta,
GA $1,500,000: Do-
ris, Savage RE,
(770)861-8525.

560
Land
"TENNESSEE
LAKE PROPER-
TIES" Located on
pristine Norris Lake,
TVA's first reservoir.
Lakefronts, lake &
mountain views,
homes and land.
CALL Lakeside Re-
alty (423)626-5820
www.lakesiderealty-
tn.com.


Available from Commercial News Providers


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14.Bg f.Bo2,9A't0


* Spacious Kitchen & Dining Area with custom cabinets
Architectural Shingles Vinyl Exterior Trim
Luxury Marble Vanity Tops
Garden Tub and Shower
Ceiling Fans in all Bedroom and Great Room
Walk-in Closets in Bedrooms
French Doors Gas or Wood Fireolace


SWillbuild on Slab or Piers
I ;- .- :^f~l^^'^ff^^^^^^


Visit our website www.steelehomes.cc


5.S.STEELE
AND COMPANY, INCORPORATED
..**"...,o., 6705 N. Pensacola Blvd. 477-7880
FL. Lic. #CRC044810 Toll Free (888) 231-1255


Baths Sq. Ft. Price
Bellehaven I 1040 67,800
Chadwick 2 1149 70,600
Stratford 2 1257 78,100
Norwood 2 1341 83,000
Mayfair 2 1418 83,900
Diplomat 2 1510 86,8Q0
Hampton 2 1525 87,600
Gemini 2 1579 90,600
Inglewood ,2 1586 98,100
Ambassador 2 1610 91,200
York 2 1622 95,000
Oxford 2 1713 97,300
-Lexington 2 1812 101,300
Lexington 4 BR 2 1812 101,700
Pinebrook (Signature Series)2 1833 116,600
Fleetwood 2 1949 108,400
Kingston (Signature Series) 2 2129 131,300
Executive 2 1/2 2215 ,126,300
Regency (Signiture Series) 3 2495 155,000
2 Bedroom Duplex 2 (I each unit) 1740 117,600
3 Bedroom Duplex 4 (2 each unit) 2062 135,800


oI


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A g* 55SI
^^^J^ 6 3^^


512
Mobile Homes
FOR SALE- Double-
wide mobile home
on 1/4 acre. 3/2,
1,600 s.f., f/p,
$89,900. Will do
owner financing
w/$20K down. Call
Barbara Cumbie
377-6787 or 626-
8959.
SECLUDED &
SERENE

NW of NAS Whit-
ing Field

20 Placid acres
zoned agricultural

Land prop. tax
value at $198,043

3 mobile homes,
garage, barrio, shed

626-6767
$247,239


SECLUDED 6
acres Northeast of
Milton, 10 minutes
from Blackwater
State Park.
2- 1999 Palm
Harbor modular
homes. 3B/ 2Bath,
front and back
porch on both,
shop, storage, fully
stocked fish pond.
Four acres fenced
pasture. Beautiful
family homesite,
must sell for -
medical reasons,
$300,000 for all.
Call 850-957-8784
or 850-554-5237.


Waterfont Pre-Con-
struction. Realtor
(877)468-5687.
TN WEEKEND RE-
TREAT ACREAGE
New lake community
close to Chattanoo-
ga & Knoxville. Lim-
ited number of pri-
vate boat slips.
Community lake ac-
cess and amenities.
1/2 + acres from
$40K. Call
(866)292-5769.


560
Land
$10,000 DIS-
COUNT! Grand
Opening! Ocala
area- The Preserve
at Oak Hill. Upscale
equestrian commun-
ity of 5 to 21 acre
parcels. Private, gat-
ed, trails. Discount
ends 12/15/05.
Broker/Owner.
(352)330-0022

ASHEVILLE, NC
Mountains, Grand
Opening! Large
Mountain properties,
spectacular long
range views of sur-
rounding Pisgah Na-
tional Forest, mi-
nutes to downtown
Asheville and the
Blue Ridge Park-
way. Only 65 care-
fully sculpted home-
sites offered in 175+
acre gated commun-
ity w/ Clubhouse,
outside hearth, and
nature trail. Pre-
Construction pricing.
Huge savings, Ex-
cellent financing!
This extraordinary
opportunity ,won't
last long I Call Now
(888) 670-5263.
BEAUTIFUL
NORTH CAROLINA.
ESCAPE THE
HEAT IN THE
COOL BEAUTIFUL
PEACEFUL MOUN-
TAINS. OF WEST-
ERN NC. Homes,
Cabins, Acreage &
Investments. Chero-
kee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate,
Murphy. www.chero-
keemountainrealty.c
om. Call for Free
Brochure (800)841-
5868.
COASTAL LIVING
at it's Best- Bruns-
wick County, North
Carolina. Homes
and homesites.
CALL NOW!
(800)682-9951
Coastal Carolina
Lifestyle Inc
www.coastalcaroli-
nalifestyle.info.
COASTAL LIVING
at it's Best- Bruns-
wick County, North
Carolina. Homes
and homesites.
CALL NOW!
(800)682-9951
Coastal. Carolina
Lifestyle Inc
www.coastalcaroli-
nalifestyle.info.
COASTAL SOUTH-
EAST Georgia
Large wooded water
access, marsh view,
lake front, and golf
oriented homesites
from the mid $70's
Live oaks, pool, ten-
nis, golf. (877)266-
7376. www.cooper-
spoint.com.
EAST ALABAMA
Mountain Property
for sale, one hour
West of Atlanta in
Piedmont, AL Great
for enjoyment or in-
vestment. 19.5-,
acres- $6,142 down
$510 monthly.lnfor-
mation Call Glenn
(850) 545-4928.
ESCAPE TO YEL-
LOW TOP MOUN-
'TAIN, Western NC.
Easy Access, Paved
Roads, Privacy, Gat-
ed, Awesome views!
Acreage w/creeks &
log cabin shell from
$89,900. Financing
Available. (828)247-
0081.
FIND PEACE
FROM THE
STORMS!
Magnificent Georgia
Properties For Sale.
Timberland, Farm-
land & Recreational
*Acreage's From 3.
TO 3,000*
Call PeachState at
(866)300-7653.
www.farmandtimber.

GAL 2550

GEORGIA HOT
LOTS Starting at
$7,500+. Hot
Springs Village, Ar-
kansas. No Credit
Check. Owner Fi-
nanced, 20% down.
GA Coast & Miami


SERENE MOUN-
TAIN Golf Homesite
$69,900. Breathtak-
ing views. Upscale
golf community set
amid Dye designed
18 hole course in
Carolina Mountains.
Near Asheville NC.
A sanctioned Golf
Digest Schools
teaching facility Ex-
cellent financing.
Call toll-free
(866)334-3253 x.
993 www.cherokee-
valleysc.com,


'.


560
Land
GRAND OPENING
SALE Phase 2.
Lake
View Bargains! Wa-
ter access from
$34,900 w/ FREE
Boat Slips. PAY NO
CLOSING COSTS!
Sat & Sun 12/10 &
12/11. Huge pre-
construction savings
on beautifully wood-
ed parcels at 34,000
acre lake in Tennes-
.see. Enjoy unlimited
water recreation.
Surrounded by state
forest. Lakefront
available. Excellent
financing! Call now
(800)704-3154 x
701.
INVESTMENT
LOTS $5,000 in-
creasing in value by
the month, on paved
roads with all utilities
FSBO (954)523-
8118.
MOUNTAIN HOME,
Arkansas. Mountain
lots $4995 each.
Water, Electric,
Paved Streets.
,Ready to build on.
Large fresh water
lake w/access. Call
864 647 0817 or
864-247-1539.
MOUNTAIN, LAKE,
and Vacation Prop-
erties available in
Northeast Georgia
and Western NC.
Contact Exit Realty
(877)203-5151
www.exitng.com

NC MOUNTAIN
LOG CABIN on
mountain top, unfin-
ished inside, view,
trees, waterfall &
large public lake
nearby, no traffic,
$89,900 owner
(866)789-8535
www.NC77.com.
NEW MEXICO -16
acres $24,990
Scen-;
ic region, views,
canyons, trees, roll-
ing hills, wildlife. En-
joy hunting, hiking,
. horses,' great cli-
mate. Power, great
access. 100% fi-
nancing Call
(914)232-5100.
NORTH CAROLINA
Gated Lakefront
Communityl.5 acres
plus; 90 miles of
shoreline. Never
before offered with
%20'pre-develoment
discounts, %90
financing.
Call(800)709-5253
OWN A LAKE-
FRONT RETREAT
Private community
on the TN/KY bor-
der. Just 1-1/2 hours
to Nashville. Spec-
tacular views of
Lake Barkley. 1 to 6
acres from the $40s.
New to Market. Call
(866)339-4966.
OWN A PRIVATE
MOUNTAIN RE-
TREAT Spectacular
gated riverfront
mountain community
near Asheville, NC.
1-8 acre building
sites from the $60s.
Borders National
Forest. Community
lodge & river walk.
Call (866)292-5762.
SEASON CLOSE-
OUT SALE IN THE
TENNESSEE SMO-
KIES Gated Water-
front Community
Riverfront and
Mountain Views
Available. Prices
Starting Low as
$46,900. Final
Phase Limited Lots
Call Now! Ask about
our lot/ home pkg.
Buy Direct from the
Developer SAVE
THOUSANDS$$$$
(800)559-3095 ext
327
www.rivercrest.com.


-


502
Apartments
. 4. SALE Duplex,
$95,000. Call 994-
8045
506
Homes
4743 WILDWOOD
DR. waterfront, 1
acre; 2 houses. Sale
by owner
BY OWNER Cute
Cottage Style Home,
in Milton 3 bed-
rooms/ 2 bathrooms,
white picket fence,
flower boxes, porch
.and deck, 2 out
buildings. $79,900.
Call (850)623-3190
or (850)485-4439


6


- -


qlb


* *


JL
\








I PAGE 4E THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS DECEMBER 7, 2005


560
Land
TN WEEKEND RE-
TREAT ACREAGE
New lake community
close to Chattanoo-
ga & Knoxville. Lim-
ited- number of pri-
vate boat slips.
Community lake ac-
cess and amenities.
1/2 + acres from
$40K. Call (866)292-
5769.
WESTERN NC
MOUNTAINS North
Carolina Where
there Is: Cool Mouri-
tain. Air, Views &
Streams, Homes,
Cabins & Acreage,
: CAsL FOR FREE
BROCHURE OF
MOUNTAIN PROP-
ERTY SALES
(800)642-5333. Re-
alty'Of Murphy 317
Peachtree St. Mur-
phy, N.C. 28906.
ww*,realtyofmur-


PLACE
YOUR AD
HERE
WESTERN NORTH
"CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS
S Cool Air, Views,
Strqams, Homes,
Cabins, Acreage
FREE BROCHURE
OF MOUNTAIN
PROPERTY
(800)642-5333.
Realty Of Murphy
317T. Peachtree St.
Murphy, N.C.28906
www.realtyofmur-
hy'com


706
Livestock Supplies


HAY
FOR SALE
Coastal Hay. 623-
6769 or 336-2267.


708
Pets
CHRISTMAS BOX-
ERS- for sale -
Ready 12/16/05. 4
females left- fawn w/
white streak down
face & white on
neck. Both parents
on premises. $350
each. 626-6149.
FOR SALE- Pom-
eranian puppy, bbmrn
09/20/05. Tiny, 1
1/2pnd, 10 weeks
old, male. Accepting
deposits, will hold
until Christmas
w/deposit. All shots
to date and health
certificates. AKC
APRI registered. To
see or for more in-
formation, contact
Flora @ 623-5940
or
380-5999.
GIANT PLATED
Lizard for sale. Ac-
cessories., included.
Call 418-0942 for
more information.
POMERANIAN
PUPPIES for sale.
AKC registered. 8
weeks old. $400.
675-2719.


712
Lost & Found
PETS
LOST 9 month old
white & black medi-
um hair dog look like
a Springer Spaniel.
Lost in vicinity of
Stewart St. Reward
offer. 626 6444 or
516 5445
LOST BEAGLES In
East Milton area.
Right after Dennis
near the end of July.
1 male, 1 female.
Please call with any
Information 626-
2428 or 516-7983.


LOST MALE CAT
No tail, creamy
white with gray
face and blue
eyes. 623-3519

LOST YOUR PET?
Be sure to call
Santa Rosa
Animal Control
to report him
missing and to
be sure he's not
there waiting
on you to
pick him upl
850-983-4680

LOST- BOSTON
Terrier- black With
white on feet and
green collar with dog
tags. Answers to "
Little Bit". Please
call 623-6929or 981-
0808


804
Apparel


JUST JUDY'S
ALTERATIONS
Dress Making
and Morel
Call Judy at
850-626-6349


806
Appliances
FOR SALE maytag
stackable washer
and dryer exc. cond.
$225.00 side by
side. refrigerator.
$225.00
FOR SALE- Maytag
Side by side refriger-
ator. Excellent con-
dition. $250. May-
tag Neptune dryer
$150. 995-8730.
HONDA POWERED
Generators at every-
day low prices
Ready for immediate
shipment. 3,000 kw
to 15,000 kw. Call
(888)483-8722 or
S(877)807-8722. 24
hours.

814
Furniture
FURNITURE- OAK
entertainment center,
$75, kingsize bed w/
headboard & bed-
ding $250. Call 994-
7783 aytime & leave
messaan


GENERAL
MERCHANDISE


820
Lumber &
Hardware

SAWMILLS FROM
only $2,795.00 Con-
vert your LOGS TO
VALUABLE LUM-
BER with your Nor-
wood portable band
sawmill. Log skid-
d'ers also available.
www.norwoodindus-
tesQom -Free in-
formation:
(800)578-1363 ext
300ON.


814
Furniture
OCCASIONAL
CHAIR- fabric
w/wood trim for den
or bedroom- also
coffee table mahog-
ony Queen Anne
legs. $150. for both,
818
Lawn Equipment
FOR SALE- Murray
12.5 h.p., 38 in. cut
riding lawnmower
w/dump cart. New,
less than 20 hours
running time. $700.
983-2779,
KABOTA TRACK-
ER 4cylinder. diesel
18' long trailer, bush
hog straight blade,
box blade, sm
scoup, and boom.
for sale $9,700. Call
626-6404


826
Sporting Goods
GOLF BUSINESS,
play lots of golf, play
better golf, play the
best courses, help
others through charl-
ties, earn an awe-
some income. Call
24/7 (800)709-4684.
830
Miscellaneous
For Sale

3-WEEK BUILDING
SALE "Last
Chancel" 20x26
Now $3995. 25x30
$5700. 30x40
$8300. 40x60
$12,900. Others.
Meets 140 M.P.H.
Higher available.
One end included.
Pioneer (800)668-
5422.
ALL STEEL
BLDGS. UPTO
50 % OFFI Engi-
neered for Hurricane
Coast Ship factory
direct for quick deliv-
ery. 24 x 30 Up to
100 x 200 I Call
Now! (800) 499-
6401 Eddie.
CHRISTIAN FIC-
TION books, over 50
titles $75. Matthew
Henry commentary
set $20, Floral chair
$25, King size quilt
$50, Lrg. wood shelf
w/4 hooks $25. King
size sheet set $20.
Mermaid metal wall
hanging $10. 994-
50nn


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale

'iltA111


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale
FOR SALE- 20"
chrome rims with
new tires $1,400. Al-
so a black sofa &
love seat w/match-
Ing black and gold
pillows. New condi-
tion $400. Call 255-
9293,.

FREE 4-ROOM Dl-
RECTV W/INSTAL-
LATIONI FREE
DVRI FREE DVD
PLAYER 3
MONTHS FREE
HBO CINEMAXI
ACCESS 225+
CHANNELS. 100%
DIGITAL CONDI-
TIONS APPLY.
CALL NOW
(866)500-4056.
MMER STEEL
BUILDING CLEAR-
ANCE SALE All
Sizes Must Go
25x20, 30x40,
40x60, 40x80 other
sizes available
FREE shipping if or-
dered by November
14th (800)878-1343.




We Dellyer & Install
Centipede
St. Augustine
Bermuda
Balled Pine Straw
Call us first, Save Time
Call us last, Save Money
Hwy. 87 So. Milton
626-8578


HERE

3-WEEK BUILDING
SALE! "Last
Chance" 20x26
Now $3995. 25x30
$5700. 30x40
$8300. 40x60
$12,900. Others.
Meets 140 M.P.H.
Higher available.
One end .included.
Pioneer (800)668-'


Centipede-
St. Augustine
Farmn Direct
We Deliver
434-0066
SAVE ON PRE-
SCRIPTION MEDI-
CINESI Up to 90%
discount! Patent.
Generic. OTCs too.
Reliable. Safe.
Easy. Fastl Order
via Internet. CC pay-
ment. US Postal
Service delivery.
www.pharmamx.co
m.
STAINED GLASS
fiberglass molds,
beveled, full sheet
Youghiogheny
glass, various tools.
623-6768.

PLACE

YOUR

AD


832
Miscellaneous
Wanted

GLASS CRAFTER
needs empty glass
soft drink bottles, (all
kinds). Not necessa-
rily collectors edi-
tions. Will pick up.
983-8042.

PAY CASH for junk
cars or trucks. Run-
ning or not. Call
983-9527,

834
Lost & Found
MERCHANDISE

FOUND
Boating & Fishing
equipment left be-
hind at boat launch
at bridge by the RIv-
erwalk. Please call
983-8243 to Identify.




904
Cars

1980 EL Camino for
sale. Price negiotila-
ble. 626-8438.

1999 LINCOLN-
Less than' 50K
miles. Extra clean,
leather. $11,000
obo. 623-9057 or
626-3380. ,
2001 CHRYSLER
Sebring LX Coupe
maroon, A/C, Sony
cd, 93k miles. Runs
and looks great.
Asking $6000. Call
Vickv (@ 38an-578


4.


904
.Cars
FOR SALE 2000
Dodge Stratus, SE,
good cond. Av mile-
age for year, Ideal
for students high
school and college.
priced right, $4365

914
Recreational
12 1/2 FT. TRUCK
Camper, electric
jacks, air, furnace.
$3,000.00 850-981-
1951.
918
Trucks
1985 CHEVROLET
Truck, good work
truck, $1,000. 623-
9057 or 626-3380.
91' CHEVY S-10,
4.3 Liter, V-6.
$2,500. 994-7286
920
Vans
'91 FORD High top
van. $1,900. 341-
6532.
922
Other
4'X8' UTILITY Trail-
er $400 metal frame
with pressure treat-
ed sides, end +
floor. 13" tires good
condition 850-623-
8232
OCC SCHWINN
Chopter Bicycle, all
original like new, ex-
tras included. $125
1R0. nall 994-4263


J








I PAGE 5E THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS DECEMBER 7, 2005


"DAY BY DAY Quality Fencing"
Cor pi.hh'e pring or an 1 O our -eri r ng neen .


_-. Locally licensed,
owned
, ,. and operated.
'.;, We look toward
'i ', to your call
j ris. leri cirigor rep.air4
Call 850-529-3546
daybydayfencing@gmail.co
-. ft -- j-'. ^rfiisha


Patios-Driveways-Slabs


'McArthur Home
Improvement Local Home Repair
Oe Fence Repair Installation
--- Paini Drywall *Trim *Tile


Also Tearout & .h -e
Replace Damage Concrete O : di
(850) 494 7777 995-7812


10 years experience
Contact Paul McMullen
850-723-9767


.i

Milrtofil,
.-, 9yrs.; in


itding
ding


/"


/-


Mike Kay
Cement Ma


Patios Driveways *


Free Estimates Ouality w(
No lob 1oo small Ahlorda'le


850-994-0


(J & C Construction


MANNING'S MEAT


S- ANN BARNHILL T- PROCESSING
TRUCKING, INC. GrS ied andWid Hoed
1 Asphalt Lon callywnd Sl Smoked Sausage
dLimestone, Le d Iu r Summer Sausage
g.d 2YesEp en PHILLIP MANNING. OWNER
e R#ock 98 4004850-501-6861
S (850623-3461 670426 Ater Hours and Sundays
Jesse arnhill Trucking (850) 336-3084 850-626-9156

Maybe, you can do it You'll find exactly
flor y yourself, but will you? what you need in the
son DIRT CHEEP I BSD! Businesses, place
Walk Cleaning Service your ad in the Business
S"HOLIDAY SPECIAL" specializing in Insuran Service Directory and
fcW Onei deepi clean Specializing in Insurance
r One deep clean Estimates, Small Home recieve a FREE line ad!
e prces $10 discount with ad Improvement Projects Call Dale or David at
Homes Condos Offices and Maintenancel Dale or David at
897 850-384-2388 (850)626-6944 623-2120tofind outhow


~7N ~


VisitingAngels


In home
Companionship
* Meals
Light housework
Errands


Licensed


House
S Painting
Call Andy @
(850) 304-9680


obile Home Brokers


Major and Minor Repairs


~ Reroof Patio Covers -
- Screen Rooms ~ Leveling ~
Locally Owned and Operated
Free Estimates
100% Financing WAC
(850) 857-1051


Uew Hope Painting
& Wallpapering
interior & Exterior Residential *=
SDrywall -
Pressure Cleaning
Wallpapering "
Carpentry Work
Call the Ericksens today!
723-2550 623-6034


A~%~' E~1i ~


.. Above & Beyond
M, Tree Service


Don't wait until it's
too late
Senior & Military Discounts


Stump
Grinding


Licensed Free
Licensed Kevin Frey Estimates
& Insured(850)983-7820
(850)983-7820


Licensed i& Insured
Locally owned & Operated
44 Reasonable Prices
All Phases ot Drywalling Any Texlure
Painiing Remodeling Damage Repair
S jNO MONEY DOWN
REFERENCES AVAILABLE -*
Roger Tootle
SHM: (850)995-5090
I Cell: (850)501-0519


Sesrui loe..
" Land Clearing, and all tractor.
dozer, and related services


NO JOB TOO SMALL!
Call Billy Rogers for estimate
Phone: (850) 957-4952
Cell: (850) 261-8407
'^%-^- \\ ziruww


Also Removes
Roots, Bushes, Hedgerows


LICI-Nb-U ANU D INSUHLU
Conventional and Synthetic Systems
698-8327
626-9164


'w


;e Backhoe Work "%
\V Stump & Tree Removal 'c
Hurricane Clean-up
Dirt Work
No Job Too Big or Small
Rrnon Rallardr


I
I


* Backyard Accessible


* Local Contractor-Retired USN


// AV // Senior Dicouni
.. ,Licensed 232-8746 Insured


B&E LANDSCAPING
AND TREE
SERVICES
FOR FREE ESrIMATES CREDIT CARDS OK
GRADING. MULCHING WEEDING,
TRIMMING, NEW BEDS,
OLD BEDS. REDONE,
CLEAN-UPS, CLEARING, STUMP
GRINDING. TREE REMOVAL.
(850) 529-5650


"L/4
..


1 FIRST 1777-1153
CHOICE www.1 firstchoicerealty.com
1441 CREIGHTON RD, PENSACOLA, FL
32504
RESLTO" Fax: (850)479-2555
Cell: (850) 777-1153
EMAIL: freysellstoday,@hotmail.com


Lori 1rey
REALTORL'


POOL! 3br/ 2 bath in Milton on over 1/2 an acre.
law \ K- 1=


LEADING FINANCIAL INSTITUTION APPROVING
BUSINESS, MORTGAGE, VEHICLE, AND
PERSONAL LOANS.
iliRAR~ic~n~l All- Of'kl4Ml~Ell


VIMALL


IMMEDlii = 4orEiSP ONS;;
GIVE US A CALL AT 1(800)419-1599 |
OR APPLY ONLINE AT
WWW.CAPITALTRUSTFINANCIAL.COM


^ Vickers Fencing
S"'aai good neigh4dor one ke ce at a time.
I Specializing in wood fences.
New installations and repairs.
Competitive pricing.
,/ Free estimates. Licensed & Insured. 0
QQA-.7 R; 7Q1-.(I1 QR .


r ~ ~
______________I A


- .,,.,


'I


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i





Page 6-E The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday December 7, 2005


1g200 PONTAC


3.5 V-6, automatic


120 GM IER;M.tiIHMGAfI


1 200 GM'ANYN DI


E206 SAIE:5E3


V8 engine, automatic


/


222501


IAl-e 200 PONTAC


Premium leather, loaded


geE ENVOYES


Polished wheels, XM radio, power seat


120g0 0 iMw M i ]


Leather, loaded, 3rd seat


#Certified *100+ Point Inspection Process *3 Day/150 Mile Vehicle Exchange Policy
EUSED VEHICLES *24 Hour GM Roadside Assistance *Bumper to Bumper Coverage for 3 Months
THE RIGHT WAY. THE RIGHT CAR. or 3,000 miles (Added to existing warranty, if in effect) *$0 Deductible Warranty


2005 PONTIAC SUNFIRE


2005 CHEVY MALIBU LS


ORIGINAL LIST: $19,100
STARTING FROM ,


Uhooseto
UW m!
room!W


2005 CHEVY IMPALA 4 DR.
I. ,' -," -K '


ORIGIAL LST:$2388


ORIGINAL LIST: $23,885
STARTING FROM

15,5961U


a IV


ORIGINAL LIST: $22,130
STARTING FROM


4
I


w o~s
UrmT
Uos


2005 BUICK TERRAZA
Leather, Entertainment
System! i


fL


ORGIA LIST: $25,010


ORIGINAL LIST: $25,010
STARTING FROM
s16,961


We'Are Professional Grade


O0SIGPONTIACO
DeSIGNEo PFOR ACTION '


ORIGINAL LIST: $28,495
STARTING FROM bN44W


W


U


BEYOND PRECISION


4 ,,


ORIGINAL LIST: $32,185
STARTING FROM
$20,961*


*Plus tax, title & license. +3.9% APR on select vehicles.
With approved credit. See dealer for details.


Z


0


PONTIAC GMC BUICK
See Us At www.mckenziemotors.com


S I S


A.


I


See Some Red-Save Some Green enzie PontiacGM-Buick!


$1


$


*


It,


!


i


W'S


Wednesday December 7, 2005


Page 6-E


e hT Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Nam"


io