<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section B: Sports
 Section B: Classifieds
 Section C: Honor Those Who...
 Section D: Honoring Our Brave...


UF00028408 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Santa Rosa press gazette
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00085
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Creation Date: October 26, 2005
Publication Date: 1984-
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00085
 Related Items
Preceded by: Milton press gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        A 1
        A 2
        A 3
        A 4
        A 5
        A 6
        A 7
        A 8
        A 9
        A 10
        A 11
        A 12
    Section B: Sports
        B 1
        B 2
        B 3
        B 4
    Section B: Classifieds
        B 5
        B 6
        B 7
        B 8
        B 9
        B 10
    Section C: Honor Those Who Serve
        C 1
        C 2
        C 3
        C 4
        C 5
        C 6
        C 7
        C 8
    Section D: Honoring Our Brave Veterans
        D 1
        D 2
        D 3
        D 4
        D 5
        D 6
        D 7
        D 8
Full Text





I ito P c 9 P aR idge o' J y* o All n ow *H r ld o Ba d d as ioI


&eanta Doa's Press


r -wv


12/01/05 **B010
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
UNIVERSITY OF FL
PO BOX 117007


GAINESVILLE


FL 32611-7007


AY


) UcLUUUIl lu, -d05


wwwKsrpressigazette*iomi W (luI ii I I Iiiieo nnw ppr i1 fornealyl.enuy


INSIDE


Who needs history?


Group seeksfreedom from Bagdads 'nitpicky' rules


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer
A routine Bagdad zoning
issue, Monday, erupted into
open confrontation that includ-
ed calls to end' Bugdad's


National Historic Register sta-
tus.
The ruckus stemmed from
discord between Bagdad's
Architectural Review Board
(ARB) and residents who say
they're weary of historic build-


ing code requirements and
restrictions... restrictions some
describe as "nitpicky," ."frus-
trating," and "maddening."
Monday night's original
agenda item centered on a
minor Bagdad Historic District


land development code change
to clarify construction i.\Ile
requirements.
But Bagdad resident Robert
Duvall introduced a motion to
do away with the Historic
District code requirements and


- .oy .. -;- .

Milton High managed a 20-3
"maul" over the Crestview
Bulldawgs Friday. Next for the
team...the big one: Milton takes
on Pace this Friday night.
See SPORTS, Page 1B.


NEWS


VIEWS
QLDo you think Bagdad resi-
dents should conform to a
Board's wishes?

S PAT
CAHILL
"If they
want it to be
3 f R in the his-
s toric district,
yes."


ED
CAHILL
"No. I don't
think it's fair
that any-
-body should
Ibe told
'[stuff like]
you have to
cut your
grass to a
certain length."


ANGELA
DIXON
"No-it's not
fair."


BRIGIT
CONNER
"I kind of
*like it that
.way down
there-we
don't have
?enough of
those old
Housess"


SPAMELA
;SEAWRIGHT
(photo declined)
'No. They should be able to do
whatever they want with their
'own houses."
!ICHRISTINE
BROWN
(photo declined)
"I think if it's been a family
there for years, no. If they've just
moved to the area, yes."


The Press
Gazette is
printed on
100% recy-
cled paper
using envi-


ronmentally-friendly soy-based
ink.

PRINTED WITH
ISOYINK




I I
7: E7C5 1 55BS
1J l4l


Resident seeks stiffer mobile home laws


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gax. e Strtt _ri r
East Milton resident
Charles Hooker has iaken hi
1 .


roof repair problems to the
top-Hooker asked Santa
Rosa's Board of
Commissioners, Monday, to do
something tllout county mobile


home repair work protection.
Mobile home contractors
are not subject to the same per-
mit and inspection standards as
traditional "stick-built" housing


Professional Educators expand union


B. DEBORAH NELSON


PitS CG:e[IC Sta1n HTiTt-. I ,h
The Santa Rosa
Professional Educators
Association iSRPE) is expand-
ing its membership eligibility
for county school empklo ees.
In addition to teachers,
SRPE President Bill Gandy
says the group is now looking
for education support personnel
interested in joining the organi-
7ation.
Eligible personnel include
secretaries, teacher assistants,
bookkeepers and data proces-
sors, among others.
The SRPE represents 1,725


I I

Secretaries, data proces-
sors, bookkeepers,
teacher assistants, more
teachers during collective bar-
gaining and other personnel
negotiations
The agency recently negoti-
ated a 7.23 percent teacher pay
raise, the largest for county
educators since 1989-1990.
SRPE officials had been
seeking pay increases for some
time, noting Santa Rosa has one
of the highest school perform-
ance levels, statewide, but pay


rates have not kept pace.
As of this year, Santa Rosa
teachers rank 35th of 67 coun-
ties in the state for pay, accord-
ing to SRPE, while Santa Rosa
students ranked 1, 2, 3 and 4th
in FCAT testing, according to
the SRPE.
County officials and others
have expressed concerns that
rising Santa Rosa costs of liv-
ing, particularly home costs,
will eventually price teachers,
police officers and other public
employees out of the area.
The SRPE also represents
bus drivers who were "grandfa-
thered" into county employ-
See UNION, Page 6A.


contractors.
That's something Hooker
says he found out the hard
way... when his newly-repaired
roof began to come apart.
"My problem is my roof,
and it's probably a big problem
with a lot of mobile home own-
ers in Santa Rosa County," he
told the Board.
Hooker hired a local con-
tractor, who, Hooker says, used
labor out of Ohio to do post-
Ivan repair on his roof.
Now, he says, it appears the
roofer glued some of the shin-
gles together instead of nailing
them. The result, says Hooker:
the roof is coming off in sheets.
He notes he was charged
the regular repair rate-even
though the contractor did not
have to pay for a permit.
"Whereas that fee could
have gone to the county, it's in
the contractor's pocket," he
points out.
Now, says Hooker, he's out
See LAWS, Pg. 6A


i,


ARB oversight altogether. He
then proposed Bagdad be
removed from the National
Historic Register.
Bagdad homeowners who
agree say they never got a vote
See BAGDAD, Page 3A.


Stewart St.

upgrades

scheduled
The Florida Department of
Transportation and the consult-
ingfirm of Genesis Group will
conduct an informal public
information meeting N1 memberr
17 at the Milton Community
Center, 5629 Byrom Street.
The 6 p.m. .meeting is
designed to offer discussion
about the resurfacing and road
improvements planned for
Stewart Street in Milton.
The project consists of
milling and resurfacing Stewart
Street from Highway 90 to.
King Middle School (a distance
of about two miles).
Along with the milling and
resurfacing of Stewart Street,
the e'isung signals at Berryhill
Road will be updated and
numerous stormwater inlets
will be reconstructed.
Sidewalks aind, driveways'
will be upgraded, as needed,
throughout the pmjcct linur~:to
be in compliance with current
Americans with Disabilities Act
criteria.
New signage and pavement
marking and other related reha-
bilitation and safety improve-
ments will also be employed
along Stewart Street.
Plans for the project will be
available at the meeting. The
project is expected to take about
six months (beginning in the
fall of 2008).
Similar upgrades to the
Bypass drew criticism when
median improvements were
made that limited motorists
ability t6 turn at previously
allowed spots. However, DOT
officials do not mention if the
project on Stewart Street will
include median upgrades.
The meeting, officials say,
will follow an "open house"
format and will consist of dis-
plays and 'drawings depicting
the proposed, improvements at
its point of completion.
Department representatives will
also be on hand to answer any
questions from the public.
'Interested persons are
encouraged to attend and par-
ticipate.
fletcher@sr-pg.com

Berryhill,

Anderson

light slated
By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Milton residents weary of
Anderson Lane's Berryhill
Road left turn challenge won't
have much longer to wait for
relief, officials say.
A new light should be in
.place and working in about 30
days, according to County
Public Works Director Avis
Whitfield.
In the meantime, crews will
get to work striping and shoul-
dering the upgraded segment.
Resurfacing on the roadway
began Monday, and should be
complete this week, officials
say.
Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
Nelson @sr-pg. com


.**
*<1







Page 2-A The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday October 26, 2005

Sheriff's Report


SOT COSALEOGA]


2+ Acres Deepwater Marsh Lot
$149,900
3+ Acres Oversized Deepwater Lot
$224,900
45 min from Jacksonville/15 min from St. Simon's
Call today for appointment Excellent Financing available a


I 7 A*CA N


6(956M t Sff S. 3OfW SA .57
(8-50) 65-94/e
irf no GEA'B PAfcl ie,


Don't forget we are open EVERY:
*Tuesday Nite 6:30-8:30 p.m. $ 2
Friday Nites 7:00-11:00 p.m. $6.50
Saturday Afternoon 2:00-5:00 p.m. $ 3.50
*Saturday Nites 7:00-10:00 p:m. $5.50
*Sunday Afternoon (After Labor Day) 2:00-4:00 p.m. $3.00

sYY.fe/daffifffo xf toff


(Fee NoNede


(i antaRosaCuny

8am 4pm*Atrhusetig
(MonFri) by apoinmen

Contact: ant Ros HIVAID

TakFoc

7537 ighwa 90Est

Cal 850-63-2616


Oct. 12 to Oct. 16
Battles, Timothy Leon;
Male; 47; 6544 Julia Dr.,
Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/12/05
Causey, Michael Anthony;
Male; 22; 5550 Alabama St.,
Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/12/05
Hannah Sr., Clarence
Anderson; Male; 51; 5260
Green Springs Dr., Milton,
FL; Attached Registration
License Plate Not Assigned,
Drive With Expired Lic for
More than 4 Months, Drive
While License Suspended
Habitual Offender. 10/12/05
Lanning, William Jack;
2258 Hwy. 98 West, Santa
Rosa Beach, FL; Resist
Officer Refuse to Accept Sign
Citation or Post Bond, Sex
Pred iViolations-Fail to
Register as Required, Resist
Officer Obstruct W/O
Violence. 10/12/05
Raybon, Jr., Rex Allen;
Male; 31 7598 Circle R Ranch
Ln, Milton, FL; Fail to register
as a Sexual Offender. 10/12/05
White. Jr., Ronald Dewey;
Male; 26; 4321 Chalet Cir.,
Pace, FL; Marijuana-Possess
W/Intent to Sell Mfg. or
Deliver Schedule I 10/12/05
Ryder, Mike III; Male; 25;
6625 Trammel Dr., Milton,
FL; Fugitive From Justice.
10/12/05 ,
Agerton, Brandon Leon;
Male; 23; 6505 Seabreeze
Lane, Milton, FL; Failure to
Appear for Felony Offense.
10/12/05
Beavers, Clara Mae;
Female; 78; 7061 Nelson St.,
Navarre, FL; DUI. 10/12/05
Ferrell Jr., James


Franklin; Male; 25; 18
Magnolia Drive, Freeport, FL;
DUI. 10/12/05
Frisk, Kristena Maria;
Female; 42; 8121 Lilian Hwy.,
Pensacola, FL; Drugs-Possess
Cntrl Substance W/O
Prescription. 10/12/05
Goulet, Stephen Michael;
Male; 20; 3553 Falling Brook
Court, Pace, FL; Marijuana-
Possess Marijuana Over 20
Grams, Narcotic Equip-
Possess And Or Use. 10/12/05
Allen, Quinton Dean;
Male; 35; 6469 Barnes St.,
Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/13/05
Brackin, Don Andrew;
Male; 46; 8002 Armstrong
Rd., Milton, FL; 'Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/13/05
Broxson, Jr., Ronnie
Lloyd; Male; 28; 9412
Permenter St., Milton, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony.
10/13/05
Caraway, Dawn Marie;
Female; 27; 5602 Cyanamid
Rd., Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/13/05
Seigle, Kevin Charles;
Male; 26; 5808 Congress Ct.,
Gulf Breeze, FL; Drive.While
License Suspended Habitual
Offender. 10/13/05
Svetlik, Rodney
* Christopher; Male; 32; 698
Georgia St:, Crestview, FL;
Asslt-Intent Threat To Do
Violence, Battery-Touch or
Strike (domestic violence),
Resist Officer With Violence,
Obstructing Justice-Intimidate
Threaten Etc. Vict Witness
Informant. 10/13/05
Hill. John Jr., Male; 43;
1612 Okaloosa St., Milton,
FL; Contempt of Court-


THE LOAN CORPORATION
Home of the 1.45% Asset Manager Loan'"
Cut Your Mortgage Payment In Halfl
With rates as low as 1.45% and up to 40 years to pay,
No Lender Closing Costs. No Points. No Broker Fee.
Loan amounts $250,000 to $5.000,000. We are a direct lender.
Borrow: $250,000 for $686 Imo, $500,000 for $1,3731mo
Cash out for debt consol., home improvement or investments.
Free No Oblgation Approval--Reinance or Purchase Loans
Call Toll Free 800-957-7622
&.I a1. .. ^p. .-.i j -s.1 r.i a u c-. m I. La u L. *g 3 L i la.l L u.
O ur'i "Csh Rc'., '.d approach I Iinrn.:iring real estate b,.11l
derTorinstrate to0 'iu the pooer Itie .righ.rt Ican can have In
allowing r/ou to. build wealtrh (equity I at an accelerated rate
Most people finance real estat- the Samre way they iould .
cars or otrler aepreciatiing as-'ets Freal estjt ic different because it
goes up in value sna need to' be rnariceji dirfererti,: to mrnir;ce your
interest payments .;
Learn more about the secret: cf a Cas Fo.W "Oba.. rather tro-n th n
traditional "Amrfrnization btsed nfinanr-.ing arpr.r ac our horme is
most likely your biggate aerssl .and n..ed an .Asetl anicer' loanto
optimize your debt management
Call today and vie will re .al tire sscris trie .6,ath, hrae i n,: n or .'.
years ; I|


Violate Domestic Violence
Injunction, Sex Asslt-Victim
Over 12 YOA Physical Force
No Damage. 10/13/05
Creech, Roger Edison;
Male; 45; 3176 Laurel Drive,
Gulf Breeze, FL; DUI.
10/13/05
Forte, Scott Douglas;
Male; 20; 6450 Walnut St.,
Milton, FL; Marijuana-
Possess With Intent to Sell
Mfg or Deliver Schedule 1.
10/13/05
Slack, Anthony Jerome;
Male; 32; 4512 Limit St.,
Milton, FL; Cocaine Sell-
Schedule II. 10/12/05
Attaway, Christopher Lee;
Male; 21; 7767 Rube Pace
Road, Milton, FL;, Stolen
Prop-Dealing In Stolen
Property. 10/16/05
Brosch, Steven Wade;
Male; 43; 6261 Buckskin Dr.,,
Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/16/05
Brown, Theodoplius
Larron; Male; 28; 1241 El
Paseo Circle, Pensacola, FL;
Out of State Fugitive From
Justice. 10/16/05
Cartwright, Johnathon
Dwayne; Male; 26; .4264
Auckland Rd, Pace, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony.
10/15/05
Cole, Wade Bradley; Male;
49; 1812 Eagle Bay, Navarre,
FL,
Finn, Timothy Jack; Male;
37;' 9629 Guidy Lane,
Pensacola, FL; Failure, to
Appear for Felony Offense.
10/15/05
Glover, John Da\ id; Male:
41; 130 Magnolia St., Milton,
FL; Cruelty Toward Child
Aggravated Abuse. 10/15/05:


Darrel R. Greer
Parln mor Fi
S659 Higrhw 9*)
MI, :,r, FL :"' \'C
&.'fri 986.-i, 1


www.edwardjones.comn
UilhD~r il

EdwardJones
sfnuigxd tuna mfStiS


Heyen, Thomas P.; Male;-
35; 650 Ten Mile Rd,,
Pensacola, FL; Damage Prop-'
Crim Misch $200 and Under,
Vehicular Theft-Grand 3rd
Degree, Resist Officer
Obstruct W/O Violence, DUI.,
10/15/05
Johnson, Jr., Larry Ray;
Male; 30; 215 Aquamarine.
Dr., Pensacola, FL; Probation,.
Violation-Felony. 10/14/05
Marshall, Jeffery Bernard;
Male; 43; 7866 Pleasant Oaks;
Ave., Navarre, FL; Aggrav?
Asslt W/Deadly Weapon W/Q
Intent to Kill (domestic vio-
lence); Battery-Touch or:
Strike (domestic violence):;
10/15/05
Rettig, Benjamin Avery;'
Male; 23; 2421 Jackson Bluff;;
Tallahassee, FL; Failure to:
Appear for Felony Offense.
10/15/05
Rollo, Robert Major; Male;1
31; Munson Hwy., FL; Failure"
to Appear for Felony Offense;'
10/15/05
Shock, Jason Eric; Male;
24; 6480 Starfish Cove, Gulf
Breeze, FL; Public Order'
Crimes-Commit 2nd Degree'
Felony Wearing Mask or
Hood, Burgl of Occupied
Conveyance and Unarmed,,
Sex Offense-Voyeurism.'
10/14/05
.Williams, Jimmy Lee;
Male; 31; 5900 Nine Mile
Rd., Pensacola, FL; Failure to
Appear for Felony Offense.
10/16/05
Davis, Joseph Alexander,
Jr.; Male; 41; 145 Hillside
Mobile Home Park, Troy, AL;
Failure to Appear for Felony
Offense. NDG
Edwards, Daren Leigh;
Male; 21; 9172 Stillbridge
Lane, Pensacola, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony:
NDG
Baker, Michael Jeremy;
Male; 34; 7201 Red Brick
Rd., Milton, FL; Possess
Cocaine, Narcotic Equip-
Possess And Or Use:
10/14/05
Goodson, Kristy
Copeland; Female; 32; 507
Spring St., Jay, FL; Kidnap
Adult-Incompetent- : "Person
Interfere W/ Custody.
10/14/05
Tinsley, Paul Wilbert;
Male; 73; 3014 Shearwater
Dr., Navarre, FL; Larceny
Theft is $300 or More But
Less Than $5,000. 10/14/05
Townley, Gregory Steven;
Male;. 43; 9440 Darlene
Circle, Pensacola, FL,
Larceny Theft is $300 or More
But Less Than $5,000:.
10/14/05
Williams, Terra Danese:;
Female; 30; 6248 Oglesby
Rd., Milton, FL; Larceny-Petit
1st Offence, Marijuana-
Possess W/Intent to Sell Mfg
or Deliver Schedule 1, Drugs'
Possess Cntrl Subst W/O
Prescription (2 cts.), NarcotiC
Equip-Possess And Or Use;;
10/14/05
McCraw, Daniel Eugene;
Male; 50; Byrom Campbell
Rd., Chumuckla, FL; DUW.
10/15/05
Williams, Jeremy Michael;
Male; 32; 4748 La Cast
Circle, Pace, FL; DUI.
10/16/05
Information provided
by the Santa Rosa County
Sheriff's Office.


4915 Highway 90 Pace
R850-995-160


Doom (R)
1:45 4:30 7:10 9:50
Dreamer (PG)
1:30 4:10 6:50 9:30
North Country (R)
1:05 3:50 7:05 9:45
The Fog (PG13)
1:40 4:20 7:20 9:45
Elizabethtown (PG13)
1:15 4:00.7:00 9:40
Wallace & Gromit:
Curse of the Were-rabbit (G)
1:00 3:00 5:00 6:55 8:50
*Domino (R)
1:20 4:15 7:15 9:50
*Flight Plan (PG13)
1:10 3:20 5:30 7:40 9:55
*Last Night Thurs. Oct. 27


Legend of Zorro (PG)
1:05 4:05 7:00 9:45
Saw 2 (R)
1:10 3:15 5:20 7:25 9:55
Prime (PG13)
1:20 4:15 7:15 9:40





mI


Box Office Opens 12:30
www.movieshowtime.net


".. >., ,) -


I I


Ak








wednesday uctnoer 2o, 2uuI ,*, '-'i"; "" .I .. UUULL
Local


Bagdad
Continued From Page One.
on the 1988 Historical District
designation, and now allege it's
interfering with their property
rights.
Bagdad's 107 historical
structures date back to 1842,
according to preservationist
Michael Johnson.
"These are precious assets
to. everyone in Santa Rosa
County, the State of Florida,
and America," he observes.
: Duvall, however, told the
Board he represents 140 peti-
tioners who do not "resent his-
tory," but want to "nullify"
home construction and appear-
ance restrictions placed on
Bagdad homeowners.
; William Clover, who lives
in a 100-year old home, says
the community wants to be his-
toric, but does not want a Board
overseeing painting, siding,
roofing and other homeowner
choices.
"What bothers me is to
have somebody tell me how, to
do those things," he remarks.
SAccording to Duvall, resi-
dents have reported trespassers
photographing homes and look-
ing in windows. The visitors
claimed to be preservationists
recording homesite appear-
ances to prevent future changes,
he says.
SDuvall contends ARB
restrictions step on residents'
constitutional rights. Those
property owners who desire
Historic zonings, he adds,
should be free to pursue them.
Johnson explains the Codes
are designed to ensure housing
matches historic styles. The
requirements, he notes, won't
interfere with constructing
modern, energy efficient
homes.
. Patricia Johnson says her
family has lived in Bagdad
since 1867 and she recently
lpuilt a new home to Historic
Code to help enhance existing
community architecture. She
says the house was a reasonable
dost to construct, and adds to its
surroundings.
., .Michael.Johnson points out
that Bagdad's unique mix of
antebellum homes and authen-
tic reproductions is a rarity.
' But other residents who


spoke at Monday's meeting say
the issue is not one of aesthet-
ics, but of financial reality.
"The cost places an undue
restriction on the people of
Bagdad to comply [with histor-
ical Codes]," Duvall contends.
Johnson says the changes
add an average of $5,150,
(about 3 percent) to the cost of
building a 1,800 square foot
home.
But others note not every-
body lives in, or can afford, a
traditionally built home, and the
county has effectively banned
mobile homes from the Historic
District. Old mobile homes
were "grandfathered" to
"remain, but may not be
replaced.
That's proving problematic
for residents with mobile home
storm damage.
Debbie Busby says she put
$8,000 into an Ivan-damaged
trailer, only to see it ruined by
Dennis. Busby says she was
refused permission to replace
the home, leaving her son's
family with no place to live.
"Somebody on the [ARB]
has decided three people are
homeless...nobody should be
able to make that choice," she
says.
FEMA trailers received
special approval after Ivan, and
officials say residents with
storm-damaged trailers may
petition the Board of
Adjustments for special permis-
sion to install new ones.
But Busby says the county
told her "absolutely no" to
replacing the trailer.. Clover
points out, future storm damage
is likely, and will impact mobile
homeowners and residents who
cannot afford repairs.
"The people of Bagdad,
basically, are not wealthy," he
observes. "They don't have the
finances to build and repair
homes according to (historic)
code."
Like many across the coun-
ty, Bagdad residents who can't
afford to replace paid-for
homes are grappling with the
spectre of homelessness.,
"My son and my grandbab\
shouldn't have to livey,sone-
where else," Busby remarks.
Florida's "Save our


SHIP (STATE HOUSING INITIATIVES PARTNERSHIP)
PROGRAM NEEDS CONTRACTORS

The West Florida Regional Planning Council(WFRPC) has administered the State
Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Program in Santa Rosa, Holmes, and
Walton counties since its inception in 1992. Licensed contractors have been com-
pleting substantial rehabilitation work through the SHIP program since that time.
The WFRPC is currently soliciting licensed general, building and residential con-
tractors to perform substantial rehabilitation work. Interested parties willing to per-
form rehabilitation work in Santa Rosa, Walton, or Holmes counties should contact
SherryDuffy at the WFRPC at (850) 595-8910, extension 210.
SOJM05166


Homes" property tax law man-
dates property taxes may not
increase by more than 3% per
year.
But any rebuilt homes
would be taxed at face value,
and that, those affected say, is a
sobering prospect for many
who were just making ends
meet before Ivan.
Clover points to changes
Historic zoning brought to
Pensacola's Seville Square.
Realtors and lawyers
bought properties up, he notes,
pushed up home prices, then
pushed residents out who
couldn't afford the resulting
property tax hikes.
It's not about buildings,
anyway, Clover contends.
"The basic problem here is
that it's not just structures...it's
the people that are the historical
reference in this community,"
he observes. "They are the her-
itage, and they are the ones who
are going to be affected by
this."
Future generations, he
points out, will be impacted by
today's rules.
.Clover called for a Bagdad
referendum on Historic District
designations and Cpdes.
Instead, commissioners
tabled the issue altogether until
the community comes up with
changes to make Historic
District regulations workable.
That will likely happen
through a recent Waterfronts
program to plan future Bagdad
development.
Officials say that that pro-
gram centers around communi-
ty input.
Waterfronts Program
Manager and ARB member
Josh Wilks notes upcoming
public forums will seek to put
together a "community vision."
He contends Monday's
strife results from "a total mis-
conception about what's going
on in Bagdad."
"It feels like there's just
accusations going on out there,"
he remarks. "People are only
listening to what they want to
listen to...we need to come-,up
with a compromise."
Reach writer at:
Nelson @ sr-pg.com


I


WE'RE NOT THE
ONE OF THE BI
THURS F
SATURDAY


FREI
IGX GA
FAO
(WHERE YOUR THE RACECIAR
THE
ROBINSOI
EVERY
ROCKET TP


.LrAlUHL rKEi Et
BIGGEST BUT WE ORE FAMILY FUN FOR
EST FAIRS AROUND... EVERYONE!!!
RI 5PM TO IOPM
Y IPM TO 10PM

E PARKING
MING SYSTEM
IE RACING N
DRIVER) EVERY 60 MINUTES R
ORIGINAL I ..
N'S RACING PIGS D '
45 MINUTES E
HE ROBOT 26TH-29z
? *7'-" --- -c <.-". r7-;- .


NEw COM


Prices start at just




$466.65!

Desktops Laptops *Servers


15% OFF!

On all newdesktops, laptops,

networks, and repairs during

our "Now Open in Pace!" Sale
S,-le ends Morndav Oct. 31 2005 Not to be combined with any other discounts

CyberSmart! Exclusive Warranties
SWe dare any competitor to match these!
FREE 3-year warranty on CPU, motherboard: RAM gets a Lifetime
warranty at CyberSmartl
FREE 3-year warranty on monitors at CyberSmartl
SCyberSmartl's Exclusive Loaner Program: if your
CyberSmarti purchased monitor falls under warranty, we will give you
a loaner until it is fixed!
FREE On-site technical support: IfCyberSmart! can't
solve any problem with your CyberSmattI Computer after 10 minutes
on the phone, We will send a technician to you at NO CHARGE for
warranty repairs


loth,
Kenneth E. Lamb's 19, 0



Cyb erSart
Computers & NetworkingTM
Kenneth E. Lamb, "The Cybet @

479-0777 5080 Hwy.900 Pace
Next to CI'5. PTzzrA
Call our Central Office for questions, tech e 0....T.(e at a C l Prce
.support, repair appointments for computers M T, Th, F, Sat.: 10 AM 7 PM
and networks in homes or offices. Wed. (Church night) 10 AM 5 PM


Z cated.in the
Santa Rosa
Medical Office Building




a Physical
Rehabilitation

Personalized
Team Includes
Registered Nurse
Registered Dietician
Exercise Therapist

One-On-One
Counseling

Convenient and
Close to Home


SANTAROSA
MEDICAL CENTER
Rehabilitation Services, Second1 T None
5992 Berryhill Road, Milton Florida
850-626-5368 www.srmc.cc a
c


4-


~-pa~' d~rmrp~


... -- -------


I


Page 3-A


e hT Santa Rosa Press e


Sn 1 4.6. L )_nn 2)nnr


E










PAGE_ 4A_ IH AT OAPESGZTEOTBR2.20


Let them pay
While high-risk insurance provider Citizens
Insurance Company has a lot of work ahead of it in
dealing with its policyholders, its plan to substan-
tially raise its rates is justified following the expe-
riences of recent hurricanes and severe tropical
storms.
Last year's hurricanes left state-run Citizens
with a $516 million deficit from its windstorm
policies as a result of damage caused to homes,
businesses and property in what is clearly defined
as "high risk" areas.
We're told, in some parts of our area, which is
among the lowest windstorm rates with Citizens,
the cost of hurricane home insurance would
increase as much as 253 percent, which is appro-
priate, based on the clear fact(the properties these
policies cover are in strike zones for coastal hurri-
cane damage.
Naturally, policyholders are strongly opposing
the proposed rate increases and are crying that
what is being done is simply not fair.
The fact of the matter is, there is nothing fair
in life and if these property owners choose to live
on the beach-or anywhere in the coastal area-
then they should understand the risks and costs
associated with living there.'
What these hurricanes have finally made clear
is the fact that this state-run, high-risk insurance
company has a fiscal responsibility to ensure it can
meet its obligations. Policyholders also have a
responsibility to pay appropriate premiums that
take into consideration the high risks involved.
There is absolutely no justification whatsoever
for those residents who do not reside in or operate
businesses in the coastal region to bail out this
state-run insurance company for the sake of the
policyholders who are complaining the proposed
new rates are too high.
We must remind our readers that Citizens
Insurance Company was formed for the sole pur-
pose of providing coverage to the people who are
unable to obtain insurance from any other compa-
ny because of the location of their property.
If the state is to continue offering coverage for
coastal property, then the rates.it charges should
adequately cover the high possibility of wide-
spread losses when the area is hit by a hurricane.
Not only should the insurance rates be under-
standably higher than policies on property not in
the "danger zone," but state and local regulations
should force home and business owners to con-
struct their structures to standards capable of with-
standing hurricane force winds.
There is certainly little sympathy.on the part of
most Santa Rosans when it comes to those proper-
ty owners on Navarre Beach who, bythe way, have
paid absolutely no property taxes for decades.
Hopefully, that will change thanks to Property
Appraiser Greg Brown. With all the public money
it takes to provide police protection, public educa-
tion, public road work and public services to these
victims of hurricanes, we can only say that it is
about time they started paying for living on a bar-
rier island.
If folks want to live on a beautiful, sandy area
where they can fall asleep to the sounds of the
waves, that's fine.
But they should not then moan and groan
when they discover there is a price associated with
that chosen lifestyle.
Let them pay what the "system" says is fair.
Then, perhaps, we'll have fewer people choosing
to live in that area.


OCTOBER 26, 2005
G Santa Dosa' ress

Gtazette
VOL. 98, NO. 60
Serving Milton, Pace, Jay
Holley-Navarre, Gulf Breeze.
& surrounding communities
Santa Rosa's Press Gazette (USPS 604-
360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays
and Saturdays for $28 per year (in county) by
Milton Newspapers, Inc., Michael Coulter,
Publisher. Periodicals postage paid at Milton,
Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to: Santa Rosa's Press Gazette, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, Florida 32570.
Michael Coulter ... .President & Publisher
Jim Fletcher .........Assistant Publisher
Carol Barnes ........Business Manager
Deborah Nelson ... .Staff Writer
Jeff Everts ......Staff Writer
Obie Crain, Jr. .... .Special Projects Writer
Bill Gamblin .......Sports Editor
Jim Martin .. ........ Advertising Manager
Debbie Coon ......Advertising Exec.
........... ..... Advertising Exec.
Toni Coberly .......Bookkeeper
.Rosie Farhart .......Archives
Tracie Smelstoys ... .Circulation
Dale Bowden .......Classifieds,
S.............. Graphic Design
David Janer .........Classifieds,
............... .Graphic Design'
Freddy Coon ......Pressroom Foreman ,
Esther Sears ........ Darkroom Technician
Angela Perritt ..... Production Manager
Debra Wistner ..... Graphic Designer
Cheryl Baker .......Typesetting
Gaspar De La Paz .. .Post Press Leader
Bob Farmer, Latesha De La Paz,
Lissa O'Neal, Brian Rinehart
and Esther Sears ...Post-Press
Advertising rates available on request.
Telephone all departments:
(850) 623-2120 623-3616
FAX 623-9308
email: news@sr-pg.com
6629 Elva St., Milton, Florida 32570
Don't Forget to Recycle Your Paper


EDITORIAL & OPINIONS


Gulf Coast needs 'Marshall Plan'


FM: JOHN SCHMITT
Dear Editor:
As the scenes of devastation from Hurricane
Katrina gradually fade from the media, we face the.
long and difficult task of rebuilding over 90,000
square miles that might have been better off if only a
war had been fought there.
In fact, in many respects, the task facing the Gulf
Coast is not terribly different from the one that faded
Europe after World War II. The United States
responded then with the Marshall Plan-a massive aid
program that cost over 1 percent of our total income
between 1948 and 1951.
,The results were, of course, enormously success-
ful. A continent in tatters quickly rebuilt itself, laying
the groundwork for fifty years of unprecedented eco-
nomic growth and prosperity. Certainly, our own citi-
zens deserve no less than what we did for Europe at a
time when we were a much poorer country, straining
under our own post-war economic burdens.
Once the immediate job of relief is finished, what
would a full-scale Marshall Plan for the Gulf Coast
look like? Any serious plan would have to aim, first
and foremost, at the region's poverty and inequality,
which has probably done more damage than the actu-
al storm and subsequent flooding.
As the images of Katrina's refugees exposed so
clearly, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama are three
of the poorest states in the country. Low incomes and
the resulting low tax bases, combined with the Gulf
Coast's appalling economic inequality, are what real-
ly wreaked havoib. If ;du'"doubt this, think back to
September 11, when stockbrokers and office cleaners,
merchant bankers andl parking-lot attendants, all died
together. But while brokers and bankers may have lost
their homes in New Orleans, they weren't trapped on
.their rooftops or in the Superdorne and, few, if any,
died.
A first concrete step in a Gulf Coast Marshall Plan
would be to install a world-class transportation and
communications infrastructure, including fiber optics,
high-speed Internet, local public transportation,
regional rail, airports, and seaports. To the extent pos-
sible, reconstruction efforts should focus on using
local companies and local workers, in jobs that pay
good wages with health insurance.
The emergency relief bill just passed by
Congress, which allows reconstruction contractors to
pay below the "prevailing wage" in the area-just $9
per hour-takes exactly the wrong approach. In the
medium term, these kinds of public investments in
basic infrastructure would raise the productive capac-
ity of the local economy, attracting new private invest-
ment and better-paying jobs.
Second, no amount of re-investnment will make
sense unless the region builds a functioning environ-
mental infrastructure.
Repairing and improving the levees is an obvious
place to start. But, as environmentalists in the region
have been arguing for years, the best protection
against the storm surge that ultimately swamped New
Orleans would have been large and healthy wetlands
and barrier islands, which absorb storm surges more
effectively than anything humans can build on their
own.
Unfortunately, coastal developers have converted
large swaths of these incomparable natural barriers
into commercial and-residential areas, leaving the rest
of the coast exposed to the full brunt of the storm


surge.
Third, the Marshall Plan worked so well in
Europe, in part, because Europe invests so heavily'in
its people. Europeans generally offer free education
from before kindergarten through college, as well as
free health care to all. For the moment, universal
health insurance probably lies outside the realm of the
politically feasible, but surely, we could make a
national commitment to give the Gulf Coast the finest
educational system in the country, with first-class
school facilities and the best and the brightest teach-
ers.
This will cost billions, of course. But, President
Bush is already looking to spend over $50 billion for
relief and reconstruction. His administration has
already spent over $190 billion to invade Iraq and
rebuild its infrastructure, schools, and hospitals.
Just as our "greatest generation" shouldered the
responsibility for rebuilding Europe, we, much richer
today than they were then, have a profound obligation
to the Gulf Coast. Anything less would betray the
thousands of American refugees whose suffering has
passed before our eyes on televisions and computer
screens for more than a month.

Who is grabbing the profits?
FM: JIM HIGHTOWER
Dear Editor:
Do the honchos of Big Oil think we have sucker
wrappers arothnd our heads?
E\xonMobil is the latest of the giants to takeout
full-page &ds'~eling us rhfat'hfey feel our pain at the
gas pump and are doing all they can to hold down
prices. Then they snicker at us and run to the bank
with the rip-off profits they're taking right out of our
wallets.
Unconscionably, these brand-name corporations
have even tried to shift the blame for price gouging to
the small, independent gas station owners, which is
like a bank robber blaming the teller for handing the
money over at gunpoint.
The local station owners take a lot of the public
heat for the surge in prices, since they're the only ones
in the system that the public sees. But the system is
rigged so that they're just passing the cash on to the
real robbers.
A Washington Post investigative report recently
analyzed the increase in gasoline prices, which went
from $1.87 a gallon last September to $3.07 this year.
Who grabbed this $1.20-a-gallon increase? The report
found that gasoline taxes actually fell by two cents,
and our local distributors and gas stations got less
than a penny from the increase. The crude oil produc-
ers, however-including Exxon, BP, Shell, et al-
took an additional 46-cents from our pockets
But the big winners by far were the gasoline
refiners-which also happen to be Exxon, BP, Shell,
et al. Their share was 70 cents-a 255 percent
increase for them in one year! In all, of the $1.20 per
gallon price hike, Big Oil-which both produces the
crude and refines it into gasoline-made off with
$1.16.
There are your gougers.
Yet the oil-soaked George W does nothing about
their thievery, instead meekly suggesting that hard-hit
consumers should simply drive less. However, Sen.
Byron Dorgan wants real action. He's calling for an
excess profits tax on Big Oil.
To learn more, call his office: 202-224-2551.


Your


Phoned

0.m


You Spoke Out,

Santa Rosa...

Saturday, 3:39 p.m.
Hi. This is Paul from Milton.
On your editorial page, the opin-
ion column, I want to thank yqu
very much. I just have a notion to
send that column to O'Reilly at
Fox News.

Saturday, 2:54 p.m.
I wish the county could buy; a
huge piece of property and put a
lot of used mobile homes on it.
Put a large fence around it and put
all the sexual predators in it-
away from all schools and the
like. They could then have the
area posted so everyone would
know where they are. This way,
we would not have to worry about
them. I love the fact that the
Sheriff came out with that
newsletter.

Saturday, 2:46 p.m.
Hello. I am calling in refer-
ence to the question of the week:
in this day and age, is it safe for
your youngster.go trick-or-treat-
ing? I think the idea is ridiculous.
We tell our children to not talk to
strangers and not take candy from
them. Then, on Halloween, we
tell them to do just that. I think it
would be better for everyone 'to
have their own'small parties. It
would be fine if it could be done
in your own neighborhood with
your own little neighborhood
kids.

Saturday, 9:08 a.m.
Hi, I would just like to say
that the Milton High Band always
seems to have such a good time.
They don't make it all about the
show, they make sure the young-
sters enjoy the music and what
they're doing. Thanks so much..

Thursday, 8:45 a.m.
This is Ruby. I'd like to thank
everyone that helped me when I
took a nasty fall in a local parking
Slot. So many people helped me
and I just wanted to say thanks.
I'm 81 years old.

Thursday, 6:05 a.m.
Well, it is almost time for the
trick or treaters. I dread this "hol-
iday" every year. It has turned
into little less than a license for
youth to damage things.


I.J'
You may Speak Out any
time, day or night. Just call our
Speak Out line at 623-5887
and leave your message.


pi~ ~d


We want you to share your
views on the above topic(s)-or
ANY topic-with other Press
Gazette readers. Your views are
important, too.
Send your letters to: LET-
TERS TO THE EDITOR, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, FL 32570.
(FAX (850) 623-9308.)
Letters may be edited for con-
tent or to fit the available space.
For a letter to be published, you
MUST sign your name and please
include your phone number and
address so we may phone for ver-
ification, if necessary.


A


I I I I


r I


OCTOBER 26, 2005


I THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE


PAGE 4A






Wednesday October 2 005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Local


Evers vows to stren


en property rights


By DEBORAH NELSON
i press Gazette Staff Writer
'n "Fix it to where they can't
Ske my home."
', District 1 Florida House
Representative Greg Evers says
that's something he's hearing
over and over from residents
worried about governmental
powers of eminent domain.
A U.S. Supreme Court
decision, earlier this year, ruled
,that local governments and
"public/private" agencies may
seize private property and
award it to other private inter-
ests for speculative "economic
development" projects.
The decision sparked wide-
spread criticism and state-level
efforts, nationwide, to strength-
en private property rights.
In Florida, the House Select
Committee to Protect Private
Property Rights met last week
to hear testimony on possible
changes to Florida's law.
Evers sits on the Committee


and says efforts to strengthen
property rights in Florida are
moving forward.
Eminent domain has histor-
ically been used to build roads,
airports and other public proj-
ects that benefit the community
as a whole.
But the recent Supreme
C6urt ruling sets precedent for
local governments to take citi-
zens' homes and property for
uses the government deems will
better generate tax revenue.
The decision allows gov-
ernment to take property from
one private owner and pass it to
another private owner, corpora-
tion or developer deemed likely
to increase the tax base.
"I thought-what is this
country coming to?" Evers says
of his reaction to hearing the
Supreme Court decision.
He points out that eminent
domain proceedings have
moved away from their original
purpose to build public projects
like roads, schools and hospi-


tals.
"Let's go back to the origi-
nal intent," Evers says. He pre-
dicts tighter restrictions on pri-
vate property seizure could hap-
pen as soon as the next legisla-
tive session.
"There will be some legis-
lation coming down," he
affirms.
A primary focus will likely.
be the current Florida statute
governing "blight."
Florida eminent domain
law is fairly straightforward on
how land may be taken for pub-
lic use.
An exact definition of
"blight," on the other hand, is
less clear.
Currently, Florida statute
(163.340) requires governments
to determine a neighborhood is
"blighted" before invoking emi-
nent domain for economic
development.
But governments have
broad discretion to decide
whether neighborhoods are


domain may be used, and how
blight designations work.
Florida's legislature, last
year, attempted to introduce
laws that would make it easier
to take land for economic
development., Evers notes he
opposed that bill, which died in
the House.
"This is not the first time
I've seen that dog run," he
observes.
But the danger to private
property isn't likely to disap-


pear anytime soon, as long as
local governments are looking
to increase their tax base.
"We will see that it's not at
the expense of some local per-
son's home," Evers notes.
Proposed changes may be
ready before Florida's next leg-
islative session begins, Evers
says.

Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
Nelson @ sr-pg.com


GREG EVERS
Representative


blighted.,
To declare blight, officials
may consider factors such as
"outdated" building density
patterns (single homes vs.
apartments), falling lease rates,
vacancy levels, or even "inade-
quate street layout," when mak-
ing blight calls.
Evers says the Committee
is working on an exact legal
definition of how eminent


NOTICE OF CHANGE OF LAND USE

AND INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE

The Santa Rosa County Local Planning Board and Board of County Commissioners will conduct
public hearings to consider a change of land use and/or rezoning of land areas depicted on the maps.
within this advertisement. The hearings are scheduled as follows:

Local Planning Board (to consider and make a recommendation on the proposals):
Thursday, November 10, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.

Board of County Commissioners (to consider adoption of the ordinance):
Monday, December 19, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.

Both meetings will be held at the Santa Rosa County Administrative Center in the Board Meeting
Room, 6495 Caroline Street, Milton, Florida. At the public hearings, the Local Planning Board
and Board of County Commissioners shall consider the ordinance entitled:

AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA;
AMENDING ORDINANCE 91-24 AS AMENDED; CHANGING THE ZON-
ING DISTRICTS AS DEPICTED IN THE ATTACHED MAPS; APPROV-
ING THE AMENDMENTS TO THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP OF THE
LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE AS DEPICTED IN THE ATTACHED
MAPS; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.


NOTICE OF CHANGE OF LAND USE

AND INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE

The Santa Rosa County Local Planning Board and Board of County Commissioners will conduct
public hearings to consider a change of land use and/or rezoning of land areas depicted on the maps
within this advertisement. The hearings are scheduled as follows:

Local Planning Board (to consider and make a recommendation on the proposals):
Thursday, November 10, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.

Board of County Commissioners (to consider adoption of the ordinance):
Monday, January 26, 2006 at 6:00 p.m.

Both meetings will be held at the Santa Rosa County Administrative Center in the Board Meeting
Room, 6495 Caroline Street, Milton, Florida. At the public hearings, the Local Planning Board
and Board of County Commissioners shall consider the ordinance entitled:

AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA;
AMENDING ORDINANCE 2003-25; AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND
USE MAP OF THE SANTA ROSA COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN;
CHANGING THE LAND USE CLASSIFICATIONS AS DEPICTED IN THE
ATTACHED MAPS; AMENDING ORDINANCE 91-24 AS AMENDED;
CHANGING THE ZONING DISTRICTS AS DEPICTED IN THE
ATTACHED MAPS; APPROVING THE AMENDMENTS TO THE OFFI-.
CIAL ZONING MAP OF THE LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE AS DEPICT-
ED IN THE ATTACHED MAPS; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.


Zoning District Amended: from RRI (Rural Residential Single Family District) to PUD (Planned
unit Development) total approximately 160 acres


Zoning District Amended: from AG (Agricultural District)
to NC (Neighborhood Commercial) total approximately
4.95 acres.
Future Land Use Designation Amended: from
Agricultural and Single-Family Residential to Commercial


Zoning District Amended: from AG (Agriculture
District) to R2 (Medium Density Residential Dictrict) -
total approximately 9 acres.
Future Land Use Designation Amended: from
Agriculture to Medium Density Residential.


Zoning District Amended: from R2 (Medium Density Residential) to R3 (Medium High Density
Residential) total approximately 6.37 acres


Zoning District Amended: from AG (Agriculture) to HCD
(Highway Conimercial Development District) total
approximately 1.08 acres.
Future Land Use Designation Amended: from
Agriculture to Commercial.


Zoning District Amended: from Rl (Single Family
Residential District) to HCD (Highway Commercial
Development District) total approximately 4.5 acres.
Future Land Use Designation Amended: from Single


Family Residential to Commercial.


Zoning District Amended: from AG2 (Agricultural District-2) to AG (Agriculture/Rural
Residential District) 263.56 acres

The proposed ordinance and maps may be inspected by the public prior to the above scheduled
meetings at the Santa Rosa County Planning Department, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton,
Florida. Interested parties may appear at the meetings and be heard with respect to this proposed
ordinance. All interested parties should take notice that if they decide to appeal any decision made
by the Santa Rosa County Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter coming
before said Board at said meeting, it is their individual responsibility to insure that a record of pro-
ceedings they are appealing exists and for such purpose they will need to insure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record shall include the testimony and the evidence upon
which their appeal is to be based.

Santa Rosa County adheres to the Americans with Disabilities Act and will make reasonable modi-
fications for access to this meeting upon request. Please call Santa Rosa County Planning, Zoning
and Development Division at (850) 981-7075 or (850) 939-1259 to make a request. For Hearing-
Impaired, 1-800-955-8770 (Voice). Requests must be received at least 48 hours in advance of the
meeting in order to provide the requested service.
OJM05162


Zoning District Amended: from RIM (Mixed Residential
Subdivision District to HCD (Highway Commercial
Development District) total approximately .6 acres.
Future Land Use Designation Amended: from Single
Family Residential to Commercial.


Zoning District Amended: from AG (Agriculture
District) to HCD (Highway Commercial Development
District) total approximately 9.16 acres
Future Land Use Designation Amended: from
Agriculture to Commercial.


The proposed ordinance and maps may be inspected by the public prior to the above scheduled meetings at the Santa Rosa
County Planning Department, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton, Florida. Interested parties may appear at the meetings and
be heard with respect to this proposed ordinance. All interested parties should take notice that if they decide to appeal any
decision made by the Santa Rosa County Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter coming before said
Board at said meeting, it is their individual responsibility to insure that a record of proceedings they are appealing exists and
for such purpose they will need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record shall include the
testimony and the evidence upon which their appeal is to be based.

Santa Rosa County adheres to the Americans with Disabilities Act and will make reasonable modifications for access to this
meeting upon request. Please call Santa Rosa County Planning, Zoning and Development Division at (850) 981-7075 or
(850) 939-1259 to make a request. For Hearing-Impaired, 1-800-955-8770 (Voice). Requests must be received at least 48
hours in advance of the meeting in order to provide the requested service. OJM0563


i4


Page 5-A







Local


Laws


Continued From Page One.
the repair money, as well as
whatever a new roof will cost.
"I don't have that money
and the insurance won't pay it,
because it's the contractor's
problem," he remarks. "It was
his shoddy work."
Despite Santa Rosa's high


cost of living and tight job mar-
ket, Hooker notes he bought
and paid for his home, and pays
taxes on it.
Currently, mobile homes
are not covered by Florida's
Building Code, although modu-
lar homes are.
That creates a gray area in


county permitting and inspec-
tion procedures, officials say.
But Hooker contends
mobile homeowners have the
same right to county inspection
protection as traditionally built
homes.
"This is a double standard,
and it's clearly not right," he


NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER A TEXT

AMENDMENT TO THE SANTA ROSA

COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

The Local Planning Board will conduct a public hearing to consider a text amendment to the Santa
Rosa County Comprehensive Plan as follows:

thursday, November 10, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.
The meeting will be held at the Santa Rosa County Administrative Center in the Board Meeting
Room, 6495 Caroline Street, Milton, Florida. At the public hearing, the Local Planning Board
shall consider theordinance entitled:

AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO SANTA ROSA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA; AMENDING ORDINANCE 2003-25;
AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT OF
THE SANTA ROSA COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN;
AMENDING POLICY 3.1.A.8, AMENDING THE MAXI-
MUM ALLOWABLE DENSITY WITHIN THE NAVARRE
BEACH MEDIUM-HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL CAT-
EGORY FROM TWELVE DWELLING UNITS PER ACRE
OF LAND TO FOUR UNITS PER PLATTED LOT; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The Board of County Commissioners will consider the recommendation of the Local Planning
Board regarding the above text amendment at a subsequent transmittal public hearing to.be adver-
tised at a later date.

The proposed ordinance may be inspected by the public prior to the above scheduled meetings at
the Santa Rosa County Planning Department, 6051 Old Bagdad Highway, Milton, Florida.
Interested parties may appear at the meetings and be heard with respect to this proposed ordinance.
All interested parties should take notice that if they decide to appeal any decision made by the
Santa Rosa County Board of County Commissioners with respect to any matter coming before said
Board at said meeting, it is their individual responsibility to insure that a record of proceedings
they are appealing exists and for such purpose they will need to insure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record shall include the testimony and the evidence upon which their
appeal is to be based.

Santa Rosa County adheres to the Americans with Disabilities Act and will make reasonable modi-
fications for access to this meeting upon request. Please call Santa Rosa County Planning, Zoning
and Development Division at (850) 981-7075 or (850) 939-1259 to make a request. For Hearing-
Impaired, 1-800-955-8770 '(Voice). Requests must be received at least 48 hours in advance of the
meeting in order to provide the requested service.
sOJM05161


~&jMM~,~*~,wAka


notes.
The Board agreed and, not-
ing the issue may be "a crack


that needs to be filled," tasked
staffers with researching an
ordinance solution to the prob-


Union


Continued From Page One.
ment slots after the school dis-
trict privatized bus driver jobs.
Amalgamated Transit
Union Local 1395 represents
those school bus drivers who
work for the private contract
firm. Laidlaw Education


Services.
Last year, Local 1395
underwent a long series of
efforts to ensure health benefits
remained available to drivers.
Florida. is a "right to work"
state-employees may form a


union, but none are required to
join or pay dues. All employees,
however, receive any benefits
negotiated by the union.
Story written by Dqborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
Nelson@sr-pg.com


Firefighters help victims

Mercury of storm in Mississippi


Continued From Page One.
Women who would like to
take part in this study can con-
tact Barbara McMillion, RN, at
the Santa Rosa County Health
Department: 983-5200.
Story written by Jim
Fletcher Reach him at.
fletcher@sr-pg.com

Coloring

contest

winners

announced

By JIM FLETCHER
Press Gazette Assistant Publisher


The list of winners is ready.
Each year, the Santa Rosa
Press Gazette holds a "Say No
to Drugs" coloring contest to
help get the message of the
evils of drugs out to youngsters.
Officials with the publica-
tion say a large number of
entries were received and judg-
ing the youngsters' coloring
was "not easy."
Still, paper officials say the
list is now complete.
In the 5-6 age group, Casey
Delong is the winner.
Frank Giovanni Tamborella
took first-place honors in the 7-
8 year of age category. Second
place was claimed by Hanna
Wingate.
In the 9-10 year-old group,
Brittany Lilley was awarded
first place. Carolyn Byrd took
second and Emily Monson was
awarded the third-place honors.
The youngsters can come
by the paper Friday at 4 p.m. to
claim their prize and to take
part in a photo opportunity.
Story written by Jim
Fletcher Reach him at:
fletcher@sr-pg.com


Members of the Milton
Professional Firefighters, Local
2944 traveled to Pascagoula,
Mississippi last-month to deliv-
er post-Katrina aid and assis-
tance.
"(Members), were wel-
comed by members of the
Pascagoula Firefighters Local
1469 at their central fire house,"
officials recount.
The Association presented
seventeen cashier's checks to
the neighboring association-
which received the most impact
from Hurricane Katrina,
according to officials.
Pascagoula firefighters suf-
fered damages ranging from
total loss to major destruction.
Many were forced from
their homes, now unlivable.
"The Pascagoula Local
1469 expressed great apprecia-
tion upon learning that their

Pace toddler


Local union had been chosen as ,
the recipients," says Secretary'
Treasurer Geoff Freeman of,
Local 2944. "[Some] even felt
as though their needs had been.
forgotten until that point."
Following a presentation,
ceremony, Doug Hague, a
member of Pascagoula's local
1469, took the Local 2944 dele-
gation on a tour of the damage
that had been caused by,
Hurricane Katrina in that com-
munity.
"The devastation was;
unlike anything I had ever seen,
even worse than Ivan," Freeman
recalls. "It was hard to believe
what damage this community,
was dealing with and how little:
exposure they had received'
compared to New Orleans and
Biloxi."
Prior to the -visit, Milton's
Local 2944 conducted an emer-
gency boot drive to raise funds.
news@sr-pg.com


dies in pool Chamber


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer


The Santa Rosa Sheriff's
Office is investigating a
Saturday incident in which a
Pace toddler appears to have
drowned in a swimming pool.
Officials say fourteen-
month old Bennett Hatfield, III,
was unresponsive when
deputies found him at the
Roland Road residence
Saturday afternoon.
Police performed CPR and
transported the child by Life
Flight to Sacred Heart Hospital,
where he was pronounced dead
shortly thereafter.
Police say the cause of
death appears.to be accidental
drowning.


breakfast is

7:15 Friday
Got an appetite for a morn-
ing meal and some business-
like fellowship?
The Santa Rosa County
Chamber of Commerce will
hold its Last Friday Horizon
Breakfast Friday morning at
7:15.
The event is being'held in
the Locklin Educational
Building behind the Santa Rosa
Medical Center.
Gooden Homes will serve
as the sponsor for the event and
the Navy League Santa Rosa
Council will recognize the
Sailors of the Quarter from
NAS Whiting Field.


-Double ...12.9%/o R
. ..... :. C a sh B a ck I P "
0.9


.' oin .
l"~I' "' % ,; "
Dou.9% APR


StartingOctbheI 17. 20(15 through December 31, 2005 you will be seeing double each
"ine you use our Pen Air FCLI Visa or MasterCard. You call get double the points
'when using sour Visa and double the cash back each time ou use iourMasterCard.
So get vour Pen Air FCLI credit card and start uing i t! .' .
,:k, j


S. a ..
." -:' *^""1', l 1 '" '^ ^ A yt i. ;-:.U,, r \ p N. ..


.- "-'- "i ..;..' ; 'r ". Olli eril i H, ,,, es !i pl. ',l. ,hl, I'.'il .i ht ,l,, l<'.i ,, i,,


L


lem.


Reach writer at:
Nelson @ sr-pg.com.


"


Wednesday October 26, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette



~:'\
:"'' :f\


Page 6-A






Wednesday October 2 05


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Obituaries


Ard, Ophelia
1904-2005
Ophelia Ard, 101, of
Milton, was called Home to be
with her Lord on Sunday
morning, Oct. 23, 2005, at a
local nursing facility.
Mrs. Ard was born on April
22,1904 in Elba, Alabama, and
had lived -in the Northwest
Florida area for most of her
life. She was of the Baptist
Faith.
Mrs. Ard is survived by her
daughter-Mary McClung of
Milton; 3 grandchildren-
Carol Douglas of Milton, Rick
(Harriet) McClung of Milton,
and James McClung of
Orlando, FL. She was
'Grannie' to 8 great grandchil-
dren and 6 great-great grand-
children; 1 sister-Odessa
Nobley of Alabama; and
numerous oth6r relatives and
friends.
Funeral Services for. Mrs.
Ard will be held at 2:00 p.m.,
Thursday October 27, 2005 at
the Lewis Funeral Home in
Milton with Rev. Charlie
Bradshaw officiating.
Burial will follow in the
Cora Baptist Church Cemetery
with Lewis Funeral Home
directing.
The family will receive
friends from 1:00 am on
Thursday Oct.'27. 2005 until
time of services.
Pallbearers will be .Tim
O'Brien, Tim Bishop, Neil
McClung, Max McClung,
Ronnie Douglas, and Rodney
McCoy.
Lewis Funeral Home of
Milton is in charge of arrange-
ments.

Moore, Rufus
'Sonny' Paul Moore
1943--2005
Rufus 'Sonny' Paul Moore,
age 61, of the Allentown
Community passed away on
Friday evening, October 21,
2005 in a local hospital.
Mr. Moore was born in Jay
October 29, 1943. He was an
avid fisherman and camper. He
was an auto mechanic at
Western Auto for many years.
Mr. Moore is survived by
his wife of 41 years-Luna
Faye Moore;, 2 sons-Joseph
Paul Moore, and James
Timothy Moore; 2 daughters -
Lorie Ann Lewis and Debra
Faye Finney; 4 grandchil-
dren-Virginia Marie Plant,
Paige Nicole Plant, Timothy
Dalton Moore and Norissa
Lewis; sisters-Betty Faulk,-
Hazel Miller and Susie
Aligood.
Funeral Services were at 11
a.m. on Tuesday, October 25,
2005 at the Lewis Funeral
Home in Milton with Rev.
Mike Poston officiating.
Burial followed in the
Whitfield Assembly of God
Church Cemetery with Lewis
Funeral Home directing.
Pallbearers were. Eddie


Morris, Glen Howard, Chad
Howard, Kenny Knupp, Robert
Peek, and David Oglesby.
Lewis Funeral Home of
Milton was in charge of
arrangements.

Stokes, Ray M.
1918 2005
Mr. Ray M. Stokes, age 87
of the Pleasant Home
Community, died Tuesday,
October 18, 2005.
He was a lifelong resident of
this area, was a retired farmer
and carpenter and was a mem-
ber of the Pleasant Home
Baptist Church.
He was preceded in death by
his wife of 64 years-Mildred
E. Stokes and by his grand-
son-James Lee Stokes.
S Survivors include 3 daugh-
t$rs-Vermel (Jimmy) Pittman
of Pleasant Home, Janice Opal
(Eddie) Sawyer of Frisco City,
AL; Pallie (Ronney) Coogle of
Milton; 2 sons-Joel (Gloria)
Stokes of Pleasant Home,
Lloyd (Barbara Jean) Stokes of
Pea Ridge, FL; 2 brothers-
Claude Stokes, and Clinton L.
(Wyoma) Stokes; 4 sisters-
Lucille Andrews, Jeanette (Hal)
Moody, Beuna V.
Hasselvander, Mamie L.
(Loris) Day; 14 grandchildren
and 22 great-grandchildren.
Services were 2 p.m.,
Saturday, October 22, 2005 at
the Pleasant Home Baptist
Church. Rev. Alton Nixon and
Rev. Mark Oaks officiated with
burial in the Church Cemetery.
Mr. Stokes'nephews served
as. active pallbearers.
Honorary pallbearers were
Jack Sanborn, Kurt Sanborn,
Kenneth Mitchem, R.H.
Kenniniton, Ray Cawthon,
James Manning, and Bunny
Roberts.
Donnie Sowell Funeral
Home of Milton was in charge
of arrangements.

Darce, Miller M.
1927-2005
Miller M. Darce of Pace,
went home to Jesus and: his
Heavenly Father on Thursday,
October 20, 2005.
He is survived by his wife--
Barbara; 3 daughters-Wanda,
SRomona, and Becky; sons-in-
law-David and Larry; 6
grandchildren and 7 great-
grandchildren.
Barbara's brothers, sisters
and their families hold Miller in
the highest regard and love him
deeply. He will be greatly
missed.
To know him was to love
him. His selfless, kind and gen-
'tle spirit endeared him to all.
Always willing to lend a hand
and go the extra mile, gave him
lasting, loving friends. He was
truly one in a million.
A memorial service was
held at Woodbine Baptist
Church Sunday, October 23,
2005 at 2:30 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations


ONLY
$1999


to- the Woodbine Baptist
Church Building Fund, The
American Cancer Society or
The American Heart
Association are requested.
Donnie Sowell Funeral
Home of Milton was in charge
of arrangements.


Legal

Notice

PUBUC NOTICE TO BID-
DERS
SOLICITATION OF SEALED
BIDS FOR HOUSING REHA-
BIUTAT1ON
Sealed bids will be received by
the West Florida Regional
Planning Council beginning
October 31, 2005 until
November 14, 2005, at 8:00
a.m., at which time bids will be
publicly opened and read
aloud, at the West Florida
Regional Planning Council,
3435 North, 12th Avenue,
Pensacola, Florida 32503 for
substantial rehabilitation for
the following housing units
under the Santa Rosa County
SHIP program: 2976 Highway
4, Jay, Florida 32565; 6653
Walker Street, Milton,
Florida 32570; 1232 Lewis
Road, Milton, Florida 32570;
and 3812 Rockwood Dr.,
Pace, FL 32571 All Blds
are to be submitted to the
West Florida Regional
Planning Councll at 3435
North 12th Avenue.
Pensacola. Florida 32503.
For bids to be considered, all
bids must include: all itemized
costs total bid cost must be In
ink and must be signed by the
submitting contractor. Any bid
that does not meet the above
requirements will not be con-
sidered. West Florida
Regional Planning Council as
agent for Santa Rosa County
'reserves the right to reject any
and all bids. Bid packages
may be-obtained at the West
Florida Regional Planning
Council, 3435 North 12th
Avenue, Pensacola, Florida
32513.
A Pre-Bid Conference will be
held on November 9, 2005, at
8:00 a.m., at the West Florida
Regional Planning Council,
3435 North 12th Avenue,.
Pensacola, Florida 32503.
Attendance at the Pre-Bid
Conference Is strongly rec-
ommended,
Additional Information may be
obtained upon request at the
West Florida Regional
Planning Council at 595-8910,
extension 237.
102605
102605
1n755


m0
Have yo


MORGAN
INVESTMENT

SERVICES, INC.

Fred T. Morpjn ..
LFL i.. .-.i.:-.-I
v! ',, f .,, ,,,, 5
L F




www.lpl.com/fred.morgan

6815 Caroline Street, Milton, FL 32570
Office (850) 623-1113 Fax (850) 623-1337
Securities Offered
Through Linsco/Private Ledger
Member NASD/SIPC
0a


-----~------


ALTERNATIVE HEALTH


C FOOD STORE
"Where educated natural health choices are made. "

5533 Hwy. 90 Pea Ridge 994-3606
Mon.-Fri.: 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Sat.: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

... RUSSIAN CHOICE IMMUNE contains a specific strain of
Lactobacillus Rhamnosus Lysate which has significant immune
system supporting properties.
.S. NEW LIFE COLOSTRUM PLUS supports immune system func-
,an tion, enhances skin and muscle rejuvination and increases
.* i strength and stamina.
ANTI-BIO herbal antibiotic providing immune enhancing support
OSCILLO helps to relieve symptoms of the flu with no drug inter-
Sactions and non-drowsy.
UMCKA COLD CARE shortens duration of throat, sinus, and
bronchial irriatations.

Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D., Natural Health Consultant is available to help you by
I:. i' researching the best possible Alternative Therapy for your specific problem.


HAIR CLEAN 1-2-3TM
Lice remover & killer. Clinically proven. Natural ingredients. Includes Lice Comb.
o0DC05248 Theresa Stearly: Herbal Specialist Deanna Gilmore: Manager
Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D, Natural Health Counselor E-Mail address: GWYHILL @ AOL.com


I get 1
-, FREE


* Camera With flash
.*Speakerphone,


Audiovox CDM8910


get 1
FREE


* Camera/Video
* Speakerphone


LG AX5000


come and get your love"



Elltel
wireless


With 2-year service agreement on both lines. Limited time offer. While supplies last.

alltel.com 1-800-alltel9

I Altel Retail Stores Authorized Agents I Equipment & promotional offers at these locations may vary.
Pace Cory Navy Base Shops at Milestone AlabamaE Forida Pace TC Wireless
5090 U.S. Hwy. 90 5600 liwy. 98 W. 2146 W. Nine Mile Rd. Bay Minette Defuniak Springs Cellular Services (850) 505-0171
(850) 994-5000 (850)457-7044 (850) 478-7035 Advanced Wireless The Wireless Company (850) 995-0099
Pensacola Marks Square (2511937-8600 (850) 951-1211 Pensacla
Airport 4600 Mobile Hwy. I Business Sales Mobile Ft Walton Beach Cellular Services Proud Sponsor of.-
1630 Airport Blvd. (850) 457-0196 1850 505-4607 Talk About Wireless Wireless Advantage (850) 445-2772
(850) 505-4624 Naval Air Station (2511 473-3489 (850) 243-6664 (850) 473-6884
(850) 475.0050
Cordova Mall 250 Saufley St. Wireless Freedom Gulf Breeze (850) 484-3977
5100 N. 9th Ave. (850) 458-6193 (251)853-0311 Cellular Services
(850) 478-5420 (850) 916-1007


626= 1297-

66SoM


*Coverage may not be available In all areas. See Alltol for details.
"Federal, state and local taxes apply. In addition, Alltel charges a Regulatory Cost Recovery Fee (currently 561), a Telecom Connectivity Fee (currently 59t), federal & state Unlversal Service Fund
fees (both vary by customer usage), and a 911 fee of up to $1.94 (where 911 service is available). These additional fees may not be taxes or government-required charges and are subject to change.
Coverage: Promotional minutes apply within the National Freedom calling area. See coverage map at stores or alltel.com for details. Usage outside of your calling plan is subject to additional roaming,
minute & long-distance charges.Plan Details: Mobile-to-Mobile Minutes apply to calls between Alltal wireless customers that begin & end in your plan's calling area. Call forwarding, 411 & voice
mail calls excluded. Nights are Mon-Thurs 9:00pm-5:59am. Weekends are Fri 9:00pm-Mon 5:59nm. 2 Lines for $75 1000 anytime minutes shared between two lines. Extended night minutes begin at 7
p.m. and end at 5:59 a.m. Phone Promotions: Phones available at sale prices to new customers and eligible existing customers. Contact Alltel to determine if you are eligible. Additional Information:
Limited-time offer at participating locations. While supplies last. Credit approval & approved handset required. $20 non-refundable activation fee applies per line. $200 early termination fee may apply
per line. Offers are subject to the Alltel Terms & Conditions for Communications Services available at any Alltel store or elltel.com. PAC-MAN B1980, 2005 Namco Ltd., All rights reserved. All product
& service marks referenced are the names, trade names, trademarks & logos of their respective owners.


.A


Page 7-A


National*
QQQ 1Anytime '4999
0 Minutes

Unlimited Mobile-to-Mobile Minutes


Unlimited Nights & Weekends
Limited time offer!
Additional charges apply. See below."


Camera Phones

Buy One Get One FREE


so

0
5
"E..


(Ceuteare
tlnfsmati
xceile/


I


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS
All Board of County Commissioner Meetings and other county department meetings are held at the County
Administrative Center, Commissioner's Board Room, 6495 Caroline Street, Milton, Florida, unless otherwise
indicated.
Marine Advisory Committee November 1 5:00 p.m.
Zoning Board of Adjustments and Appeals November 3 5:30 p.m.
Commission Committee November 7 9:00 a.m.
East Milton Town Hall Meeting November 7 6:00 p.m.
E. Milton Elementary School Cafeteria
FL-AL TPO November 9 1:30 p.m.
Building Code Board of Adjustments and Appeals November 9 3:00 p.m.
6051 Old Bagdad Hwy., Milton
Conference Room
Commission Committee/Reorganization November 10 9:00 a.m.
Navarre Area Architectural Meeting November 10 3:00 p.m.
Navarre Community Center
Fire Protection Board of Adjustments and Appeals November 10 4:00 p.m.
6051 Old Bagdad Hwy., Milton
Conference Room
Munson Town Hall Meeting November 10 6:00 p.m.
Munson Elementary School Cafeteria
Local Planning Board November 10 6:00 p.m.
Local Mitigation Strategy Meeting November 16 1:30 p.m.
Emergency Operations Center
4499 Pine' Forest Rd., Milton
Aviation Advisory Committee November 16 5:00 p.m.
Library Advisory Committee November 17 5:00 p.m
Commission Committee- November 21 Cancelled
Commission Special Meeting Rezoning November 21 6:00 p.m.
Utility Board November 21 Cancelleed
Bagdad Historical Architectural Advisory Board November 23 8:30 a.m.
6051 Old Bagdad Hwy., Milton
Conference Room
Emergency Services Advisory Committee November 23 2:00 p.m.
Parks and Recreation Committee November 23 5:30 p.m I
Commission Regular November 24 Cancelled.
Agendas and minutes are also available at wwwco sgpta-rqsa fl us. All meetings held in the
Board Room can be viewed live and/or replayed at this web site y selecting the meeting from
the main page.


I








Community Briefs


CASH NOW As seen
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794.7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Stmctred Settlements! I


'IT -FalFull Service


MARSHA BEACI
850-572-5652
marshabeach @aol.com


I lunctiol, Inc.
www.realestateiunction.com


, -


Steel Roofing


And Siding
And everything in between including zee purlins, ce
channels, trim, fasteners, windows, doors, and skylight
They're manufacturer direct, too. l *M ; tira
Jackson, MS 1-800-647-8540


WHY PAY MORE?






'ISEE-


"We will SAVE you $$!

Installation *Repairs *Drain Lines
Grease Trap *Certifications *Pump Ou
Septic to Sewers *Rod Outs.


626-8552

PLUMBING & SEPTIC
Locallly Owned & Operated
SLic # RF11067221
Licensed & Insured


I C~


Wher C Y
.I.
52 .i : .


You can pick up a Press Gazette at the following location


" \ Mli[LIO
iBa QuOkburgT.'r
"c'.r R.,,duuse
i': C, ,o :, '
Sjnri Ro's McJicil Ceraier
Steph Ellie'.- Blimpie'..
Countrvnl MAker
The onIci Pljce
Sinn Duk-c
,", C\S
hP i .N Sa '
Million Bak:rr
ShiGroui. Ir NIl.o n I
Sl-,.,n i1. ,p i riy,'ni
c1 W., Sl' e
." K .-Man
Pr CiG:er C Olifce
TomrT Thumb Gl.icr Linr
T-m Thumbrr' \\ illurd N.rn
T.. T. Thumb B., PJ,-
T -r Thumb ,.r Sri. ,r li
Sarij R.:-,j CuJo., Corriple ,
H.hlcai m
/ i'" Rcljurjrir
FraFj, D.llar

,. ] Bif Lois


Tom Thumtb ~ Ward Basin
Tom Thumb 4' Hlhr.'a, S7S

NORTH MILTON
iN'HiTING FIELDi
ite'; F.',.J Man
Tom Thumtb -. High ".) rN
1ip The Crlk Si.: rc
Butbb.' BLrr.id.le I

F rmer' C..',uilr., .I, l
Gi'cr' Gc"'',er', Si,'rt
la\ Hou.r'iajl

PACE
% h lajt'u r

i& l F. ....J 5. 11.. :
HJipp. i'Lc
i. ,ri Li'.le
Iriow Ki it


PvI.N-Sj
(G ri,.,'in N,"1:,'i, rl
Gr. :i. inr N .'',. ii i ".,.hlr ic I
Paie lin M.ri
Pernn, Pa nuri
P nlri, pjrirqr I '.:..,.,"1,nei
T.'m TliumL '' BIIl Ljlic
T.' i Thumei \\'.'-.dl:,r
T.,m Tlunitb .' Hil.,.. 'li
T ,il Thumnib .' e ,. C i' :' ri'' j
Tomn Thumb 'I' Chuiriu'. I..I
R',an
\Vll.qt iTr,
Cic.. A ll .,

Fk M wil..

\VAMLQN
T ,,r T. hunI ,'M :' .,:,', BI ..J
T'[rl Tlunh ,.' Mwulm. o',.d
- ,Al' E .i :"l

B&:B F.,..:.d Si.:..:
T,,i Thuril:


Lifestyles Obituaries Sports Business Re\ ie\\s
* cornerstone Education Classifieds Business & Service Directorx *
Church Community Military Editorial ...plus more
1 Year in County = $28.00,

1 Year Out of County = $40.00,

Senior in County = $22.00


-I


~


S@your



Library

Milton Public Library, West
Florida Regional Library
S 5541 Alabama St., Milton,
FL 32570 / 623-5565
Library Hours: Monday,
Friday, Saturday 9:00-5:00
Tuesday, Wednesday,
I Thursday 9:00-8:00

New Books: Come check
out the new non-fiction books
H for, elementary and middle
schools religion, culture,
geography, animals, holidays,
and.biographies.
Research Databases:
Don't forget to use library
sponsored research database
S for homework and research
Needs from elementary needs
through college. You can use
these sources at the library or
from home or any remote
Internet access. Subject areas
cover Biography, Literature,:
Science, History, Social
Science, and Health.
New Databases include
Chilton's Automotive Manuals
online and Florida Legal
e Forms. Visit or call the library
s. to get more details.

S Children's Programs:
Group Story Time for Ages
3 5 each Wednesday at 9:30 -
this is for caregiver groups -
appointment required
Preschool Story Time for
Ages 3-5 each Wednesday at
10:30 Children should be
able to attend story time with-
N out a caregiver
MU DI LUSCIOUS:
Preschool Story Time -
October Schedule for Milton:
October 26: Halloween
Cuisine
$ After School program for
Ages 6-11:
October 26: 3:00-3:45 p.m.,
Halloween with Pat Nease,
Its Storyteller, presenting
Halloween tales to chill your
spine and tickle your funny
bone!
@ Your Library -
http://wfrl.lib.fl.us
Serving all communities of
central Santa Rosa County,
S including Allentown, Avalon,
g Bagdad,, Chumuckla, Harold,
S Milton, Munson, Pace, Pea
Ridge and all areas in between.


PJC Institute offers courses for November


The following classes are
offered for the month of
November. For information
and registration call 484-1374.
Personal Strategies for
Navigating Change (4 hrs.) 1
p.m. till 5 p.m., Nov. 3; Cost:
$79.
Beginning Course in
Computers (8 hrs.) 8 a.m. till
12 noon on Monday and
Wednesday, November 7,
2005; Cost: $79.
MS Word. Level II (8 hrs.)
from 8 a.m. till 12 noon on
Monday & Wednesday, Nov. 7
and 9, 2005; Cost: $79.
Excel. Level II (8 hrs.) from
8 a.m. till 12 noon on Tuesday
& Thursday, November 8 &
10, 2005; Cost: $79.
Excel. Level I (8 hrs.) from
8 a.m. till 12 noon on Monday
and Wednesday, November 14
& 16, 2005; Cost: $79.
Access. Level I (8 hrs.)
from 8,a.m. till 12 noon on
Monday & Wednesday,
November 14' and 16, 2005;
Cost: $79.
MS Word. Level I; (8 hrs.)
from 8 a.m. till 12 noon on
Tuesday & Thursday,
November 15 and 17, 2005;


Cost: $79.
After All You're the
Supervisor (6 hrs.) from 8 a.m.
till 2 p.m. on Friday, November
18, 2005; Cost: $129.
MS Word. Level I (8 hrs.)
from 5:30 till 9:30 on Tuesday
& Thursday, November 15 &
17,2005: $79.
MS Word. Level I (8 hrs.)
from 8 a.m. till 12 noon on


Monday and Tuesday,
November 21 & 22, 2005;
Cost: $79.
Power Point (8 hrs.) from-8
a.m. till 12 noon on Monday &
Tuesday, November 28 & 29,
2005; Cost:-$79.
Diversity: Food For
Thought (3.hrs.) from 1 p.m.
till 4 p.m. on Wednesday,
November 30, 2005; Cost: $64.


Gulf Breeze

teacher spotlighted


Erin Turack (Cosky) has
been teaching at GBHS for 1
year. Prior experience includes
2 years of public school educa-
tion and 5 years General
Education. She graduated with
a degree in Environmental
Science. _from .SDSU., ."iMs
Turack worked for the Nav\ at
the Scripps Institute of
Oceanography on biolumines-
cent phytoplankton working on
their light signature to help
SEALS and bots not give away
their positions. Erin teaches
Marine Biology and Biology


Homeowners wit money worries
may qualify for low-interest loans
LOANS: Direct lender loosens its re- ments? Financial problems? Medical
uirements for homeowners who need bills?l RS liens?It does, nmattter
money now. Iflou are a homeowner with sufficient
Have you been turned down fora loan? equi other's -an excellent chiance ybu
Doyou need more than$10,000 for ary w ill quality foraloan- usuallywithin 24
reason'?Are you paying more than 10% hour.
interest on al other Ions orcrndit cuds?
interest on another s or critds? You can find out over the phone and
If you area homeowner and answr- free ofcharge-if you qualify. Honey
,ed ',es an of thee questions, they Mae Mortgage is licensed by the by
can tell you over the phone and without theFLDeptof FinancialServices.Open
oigaon ifddou quLess-than- 7 days a week for your convenience.
cI-Fredit? Selfemlyedss-thto-per p cta- 12 e 4
credit? Selfemployed? Late house pay- 1-800-700-1.242 ext.214 a


Is:


IkrU* CA G f


, .



/


3+ Acres Deepwater Ocean Access Lot
from just $240 per month!*
45 min from Jacksonville/15 min from St. Simon's
Call today for appointment Excellent Financing available
*monthly payment of $240.32 based on $59,900 purchase price
with 10% down payment of $5,990, $53,910 financed @ 5 19", fixed
(APR of 5.55% includes 1% origination fee) for 3 yrs. 35 monthly
payments of $240.32 with final payment of $53,910.
Offer void where prohibited by law,


-1-87-GjOC AN .0


I


(


( *i
/


62 Elva St.* *Mitn s6322

4344 Hwy. 90 West Pace 995-0330


, ,, i, Visa & MasterCard Accepted


classes. She is our Freshman
Volleyball coach. Her commu-
nity involvement includes the
Coast Keepers.
Erin recently married on
October 2nd to Todd Cosky in
Naperville, IL. The new Mrs.
Cosky and husband honey-
mooned in Belize on Ambergris
Cay for a week. Her hobbies
include scuba diving which she
had the privilege of doing while
on her honeymoon in Belize.


Advertise your

business or

skill with the

Press Gazette!

Call today

for details

623-2120


IYLR D1 IALE


YARD SALE
Oct. 28th 9-1 and
.Oct. 29th 9-12.
Eternal Trinity Lutheran
Church at 6076 Old
Bagdad Hwy., Milton
(across from
Driver License Office)
P.W.O.C. OF NAS
Whiting Field Chapel
will have a rummage
sale on Sat Oct 29th
from 9AM 2PM
It will be held at
R.S.V.P. Bldg on
Bypass 89
(Dogwood)
Proceeds will go for
charity work.


LARGE YARD Sale
Fri & Sat 10/28 &
10/29. 4658 Keyser
Lane, Pea Ridge, 1
block off Hwy 90
(close to Walmart)

GARAGE SALE
,2841 Hwy182
Chumuckla
Pentecostal Church
Sat., Oct. 29th
8:00am until ?
For information,
call 994-5444


GARAGE SALE
Saturday, Oct. 29
8am until ?
3 family sale
5017 Forest Creek
Drive, Woodbine
Hills, Pace

LARGE
YARD SALE
Saturday 10/29 &
Sunday 10/30.
$204 Hawks Nest
Drive, Milton, FL
(Off Glover Lane)
CHEAP STUFF


MILTON
Huge Garage Sale
MOVE OUT OF
ANTIQUE MALL/
Antique, collectible,
furniture, glassware,
Blueridge, Guardian
cookware, Pyrex
and much more.
6026 Running Deer
PRad. Take Berryhill
to Anderson.
Follow signs.
Fri.10/28, Sat.10/29
7am until ?


'I '
I...
'C a*oisiQW
r


i(


i<
ft


Im WF


/



'l i .


'A,


AMVETS
Halloween Party
The AMVETS Post 1292,
located at 6333 Old Bagdad
Hwy., will have a Halloween
Costume Party on Friday,
October 28, 2005 at 7:30 p.m.
with Murphy's Law Band pro-
viding the music.
A costume contest will take
place with 1st, 2nd, & 3rd
place prizes. Everyone come
on out and enjoy.

Garden Club to
host Holiday Fest
.The Milton Garden Club
will host "Holiday ,Fest," a
market place celebrating
Southern Holiday Traditions,
Saturday, November 5, 2005 at
7 a.m. until 5' p.m. at the
Garden Club Center, 5256
Alabama St., Milton. This
shopping extravaganza will
showcase holiday party foods
and crafts, as well as plants and
garden accessories of our
members. Local vendors will
feature unique gifts including
jewelry, collectibles, fashion
accessories and much more.
Admission is free. After shop-
ping, enjoy a light lunch for the
bargain price of $5. Take-outs


are also available. For more
details, call 623-8943 or 623-
1422.

ACT/SAT,
Workshop planned
A workshop to assist stu-
dents in the Santa Rosa and
Escambia County High
Schools who will be taking the
December 3rd SAT Test and
the December 10th ACT tests
will be held in Gulf Breeze.
Alice Hart will conduct the
classes. The workshop will
provide approximately 12
hours of instruction. This
workshop will consist of 6 ses-
sions.
Workshop Dates and Times
are as follows: (All times for
these dates will be 6 to. 8 p.m.)
Tues., Nov. 29; Wednesday,
Nov. 30; Thurs., Dec. 1;
Monday, Dec. 5; Tues., Dec.'6,
Wednesday, Dec. 7.
Registration for this work-
shop must be postmarked by
November 16,2005.
Registration forms have
been faxed to the area high
schools. All materials, snacks
and drinks are furnished.
Students will need to bring cal-
culators.
If you have any questions,


please contact Mrs. Hart via
email: Amhartl966@aol.com
or call her cell (615) 585-2401
or (850) 932-9761. (If you call,
leave a clear message including
your name, phone number,
e-mail, address and/or fax num-
ber so your call can be
returned) or contact your high
school Guidance Department.

Readers
Theatre presents
'Bud's Wake'
The Santa Rosa Literary
Society will showcase local
writers in the Panhandle at the
Shakespeare Club, 6863 Oak
Street, Milton, on November 4
& 5 at 7 p.m. and Sunday,
November 6, at 2:30 p.m.
Patrons are invited to partici-
pate in the comedy/drama,
"Bud's Wake", written as a col-
laborative effort by members
of the Milton/Pace Writer's
Group. Dessert/Coffee will be
served. Tickets ($10) may be
purchased at the dorr.
Also available will be a
newly published book, entitled
"A Short Stories Sampler" con-
taining stories written by twen-
ty local authors who will be on
hand to sign copies.


'
' "


Wednesday October 26, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


I iL w


$


ww-V wim -V


'
`'' '


i. -


""'


,


", 1l


I \


I


Page 8-A







i .I. n L o qnnn


weanesoay uciooer 2U, t UUO I ,.[ ,IILd I UU l O ULULL
Commuinitv


Askir





'. N
Se'





"SBP (Survivor Benefit
Plan) will have open
enrollment beginning.
when, Chief?"

SBP\\ill open enrollment
this month (October) for all
that wish to enroll except
those who elected to termi-
nate the coverage in the
past.

"Chief, what is the lat-
est information about
SBP/DIC off-set?"

All I can write is that no
legislation has been signed
by the President. I will not
comment about changes in
law until the law is law! I
would suggest that you con-
tact or join one of the local
veterans organizations,
American Legion, VFW,
etc., because they all have
information on proposed
legislation. Changes in laws
are confusing enough with-
out trying to think about
changes that may happen.
Changes in VA regulations
occur each week. These
changes arrive from VA's
General Counsel (VA
lawyers), Agency directives
in Central Office
(Washington, D.C.), The
Court for Veterans Appeals,
and those that made by the
South end of a North bound
horse in St. Petersburg.

"I want to sue the VA in
court for my medical care.
Where do I turn Chief?"

First, you will need to
retain a private attorney.
SNext, you have only two
Years to file a claim under
the Federal Tort Claims Act
(FTCA). Now, you've got to
file an Administrative Tort
SClaim, Standard Form 95,
With the VA Medical
SFacility where you received
your medical care. If the
Tort Claim is turned down
you have six months to file a
lawsuit, hence the attorney,
Sin Federal District Court.
SFTCA has set rules on how
much the attorneys' fees
may be. Twenty percent for
settlement and twenty-five
percent if the case must go
to litigation. Above and
beyond this information,
you are out of my knowl-
edge area on this subject.
My area of expertise is in
U.S. Title 38 1151 or 38
C.F.R. 3.356, receipt of
compensation, for negligent
medical care. To sue the VA,
go through the Courts with
an attorney is my best
advice.


SRCREA to
The Santa Rosa CountS
Retired Educators held
their regular monthly meeting
at the Fors\th House on
October 17. 2005 Rosemanr
Brown, administrator. had
invited the group to meet
there. During breakfast Ms.
Brown told about the Forsi th
House and hot the concept of
assisted hn ig got started. She
described the acti\ities
that are pro\ ided for the resi-
dents there and ho\\ numerous
Volunteer groups in Santa Rosa
County come and give of their


help Katrina victims
time to help out. Her talk \as help m 1 s ieco\er! .
\ern infornmalie and ot interest Ne\ month's meeting \\ill
to a group of people v. ho might be held at the regular meeting
possible some das benefit from place on the campuL of Locklin
such a facility Technical Center No\ember 21
A business meeting v.as at 10:00 j.m. The guest speak-
held following the talk b\ Ms. er for thi, meeting "\ill be
Broi n. Alice GuidJ. Senator Durrell Peaden of the
Conmmunt\ Service Chair. Florida State Legislature. He
took up a collection from the has been asked to address legis-
members This \ ill be used to laton that is of special concern
purchase small appliances for to senior citizens. All members
the residents of \Waeland, and prospective members are
Misisssippi. the Katrina de\as<- encouraged to attend this meet-
tated to\\ n, that has been adopt- ing.
ed by the City of Milton for


i ,

BE INSTRUMENTAL IN

FUELING CHILDREN

ACADEMIC 5UCCES, AN -
EA THROUGH SCHOOL-
HEALTH ..


EMES Cafeteria manager, Sheila Beck and her staff, created a week-
long theme of fun activities during National School Lunch Week.


ilo P h hl oi E o l
Milton HS Panther Athletes joined EMES students for lunch.


Getting students to eat a
healthy and well-balanced meal
can be a daily challenge for par-
ents each day that they send
their child off to school.
Whether a student brings their
own lunch, or purchases it from
the school lunchroom, good
food choices are a concern for
everyone. Imagine preparing
quality lunches for 600-700 peo-
ple each school day, making sure
that foods are fresh,. well pre-
pared and attractively presented
at the food counters. And, yes, it
needs to smell yummy tool
National School Lunch Week
is observed throughout the State
of Florida each fall to encourage
proper nutrition. The theme for
this year's. week long program
was "instrumental in good nour-
ishment," and each school could
expand that theme to highlight
their cafeteria. EMES cafeteria
manager, Sheila Beck and her
staff used decorations and spe-
cially named foods to make the
week a fun and festive time.
Using the tropical theme that
is being featured this year at
East Milton ES, the cafeteria
staff decorated the stage with a
Caribbean beach scene with


V VLLIILL~BI~~ VJ


Gloria Warr (r) is the Activities Director at the Forsyth House and
Rosemary Brown (I) Administrator, Forsyth House.


I I


":'rl ^"'*^;
,'* .?', ',"
., ,- ~-, '

1 .' ,' .'
.* '- .* '. -- '








r r^
,. -,
A ,,'
,




4.' L .


East Milton News


MMM~~mM~M~mMwm~wmmw~mm I


Page 9-A


e hT Santa Rosa Press e


dent mentors working with mid-
dle and elementary school stu-
dents. The MHS students are
positive role models, and they
are quickly recognized by :a
Panther shirt or uniform logo.
Walking the hallways, the older
students are met with waves,
sometimes a quick hug or a high-
five.
Special thanks to -Coach
.Rutledge and the following
MHS athletes: Holly Pace-
Volleyball, Kyle Conrad-
Football, Lynne Harman-Girls
Cross Country, Ryan Holtman-
Boys Cross Country, Sophie
Falzone-Swim Team, Kevin
Cannon-Golf, Paige .Antone-
tBoys Soccer, Victoria Blocker-
Girls Soccer, Jake Hullet-Boys
Basketball, Demita Beasley-
Girls Basketball, Tatayana
Neely-Girls Track, Emery Allen-
Boys Track, Blaine Williams-
Baseball, Kelly Lockett-
Softball, Katy Jernigan and
Rebecca Baker-Cheerleading,
Ashley Eyers-Tennis, Josh
Smiley-Boys Weightlifting, and
Missy McMillion-Girls
Weightlifting.


large photo cutouts of several
staff members performing in a
calypso band. The food counters
were decorated with various
musical instruments,.and work-
ers wore bright tropical colored
work shirts.
Along with the fun, good
meals and healthy choices were
still the top focus of each day.
Several Milton HS athletes were
special guests at the Desert Deli
Caf6, joining the younger stu-
dents for lunch. Mrs. Beck invit--
ed the athletes to select their
meals, visit with the EM stu-
dents, and casually discuss prop-
er nutrition and its importance in
what athletes achieve. Coach
Murry Rutledge also had lunch
with the students, and the table
talk covered subjects from food
to sports, and favorite teams.
EMES-PTA paid for the guest
meals, and made sure everyone
got enough to eat.
Sometimes our top high
school athletes don't realize the
impact they have on younger
students. The younger students
definitely look up to them, and
feel really special when they get
to meet and interact with older
students. MHS has several stu-


Pea Ridge ES-First Grade Students of the Week for October 10 14th, '05 are:
Hunter Peeterse, jesse Holland, Conner Giddens, Allyson Bullock, Caitlyn Johnson,
Kindle Lynch, Brianna Stanfield and Tommy Luebbers.


Pea Ridge ES-Kindergarten Students of the Week for October 10 14th, '05 are:
Preston Watson, Allyssa Ainsley, Beau Martin, Savanna Priddy, Laurel Hutto, Jason
Barlow, Tyler Barrett, Parker Lloyd and Grace Lowell.


San News,
Sp0,

Santa Casi
Classifeds;
Business
and'Service
Direcloq,,
Rbnd comufl
Komerstone,



County





,andpmdofit!


Pea Ridge ES-Second Grade Students of the Week for October 10-14th, '05 are: Pea Ridge ES-Third Grade Students of the Week for October 10-14th, '05 are:
R.J. Putnam, Danielle Riley, Cassidy Klette, Lena Kennedy, London Parker, Corrie Brandon Allred, Mary Beth Arrant, Christopher Radney, Taylor Parker, Taryn
Lloreris, Brittanie Rios, Dana Siyufy, Dustin Gardner, and Katelyn Chapman. Hammond, Lindsay Nelson, and Justin Townsend.


Pea Ridge ES-Fifth Grade Students of the Week for October 10-14th, '05 are:
Clayton Santo, Aaron Wilson, Hannah Chambers, Meagan Shiver, and Makenzie
Ervin.


MHS athletes emphasized healthy eating


Pea Ridge Elementary announces Students of the Week


I


IG S ta' m i. te
Gaze e


Pea Ridge ES-Fourth Grade Students of the Week for October 10-14th, '05 are:
Elizabeth Carroll, Karley J.ohnson, Hannah Culleiton, Stephanie Keeler, Amanda
Nolan, and Ashleigh Goldfarb.


RI ESh3,212 M F L 2
e MIN, l c a 4








-aa 10A~TeSnaRs rs aeteWdedyOtbr2,20


0, Kornerstone


He walks by faith and not by sight...


Faith Baptist Church, located at 6423 Hamilton Bridge Rd in
Milton, will be having a Revival beginning Wednesday, November
2, through Sunday, November 6. Time will be 7 p.m., Wednesday
through Friday; Sunday times are 11 a.m., and 6 p.m., Sunday,
November 6.
Evangelist Terry Sanders will be the special speaker. He is
physically blind, but Evangelist Terry Sanders sees, perhaps better
than many of those around him. He has no guide dog and no longer
uses a white cane.
Terry went blind in his youth. He admits it was harder to accept
his blindness before he was saved in 1971. It is his commitment to
Christ that enables him to overcome his handicap.
Terry graduated Valedictorian from Hudson Sr. High School in
Hudson, FL in 1976. He went on to Piedmont Baptist College in
Winston-Salem, NC and graduated Summa Cum Laude in 1980.
Terry Sanders now travels in full time evangelism with his par-
ents, who also accompany him with special music. Terry plays the
piano and sings Gospel music.
Terry states, "My blindness helps me minister to people and I
believe this is one of the reasons that the Lord allowed it."


Bagdad United Methodist Church
invites the public to a Fall Festival on Saturday, October 29, 2005
at 6 p.m. Activities will include a Space Walk, A Chili Cook-Off
(contest), Bobbin for Apples, Kids Trunk or Treat, Crafts, a Cake
Walk, Cookie and Pumpkin decorating and more. Costumes are
welcome. Bagdad UMC is located at 4540 Forsyth Street in
Bagdad, FL. For more information, please call the church office at
626-1948.
You are invited to
Living Word Worship Center's 3rd
Annual Harvest Festival on Friday, October 28, 2005 from 6 to 9
p.m. There will be space walks, an Orbitron, hayrides, face painting,
popcorn, food and much much more! And it is Free! For more infor-
mation, please call 983-7694.

First United Methodist Church of
Pace, located at 4540 Chumuckla Hwy., Pace, will be having a
"Fall Family Fun Day" on Saturday, October 29 from 5 to 7:30
p.m. Cost is free! There will be singing, drama, and free food.
Theme for the evening is "Running the Race." Come dressed as
your favorite athlete! For more information, please call 994-5608.

Mount Pleasant Baptist Church wii
be hosting a Fall Festival on Monday, October 31 from 6-8 p.m.
We will have a variety of games, cake walk, costume contest (no
scary or spooky costumes, please) for all ages,,free book van, free
notdogs and fixings, bake sale (to benefit our sound system). Each
child will receive a bag of candy and prizes. Everyone is welcome.
The church is located at 6151 Dogwood Drive, and the festival will
be rain or shine!! ,


SMark your calendar, Evangelist Terry Sanders and family will
be ministering at Faith Baptist Church Nov. 2-6 (Wed.-Sun.);
beginning at 7 p.m. nightly except Sunday, which will be 9:45 a.m.,
11 a.m., and 6 p.m.
The Pastor and the congregation invites all to come and hear
God's Word preached. For more information, please call the church
office at 623-8207.


Olivet Baptist Church of Milton, located at
5240 Dogwood Drive (SR 89) invites you to attend their Fall
Festival Monday, October 31, 2005 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the church.
There will be fun and games for all ages, young and old, from
a Space Walk to a Dominoes Tournament. There will be prized for
the kids games.
Plenty of Hot dogs will all the toppings to satisfy the 'hungries'
will be available. In addition, there will be a Chili Cook-Off
Contest. Sign up and enter the Mild, the Hot, or the 911 or even all
three. Come on all you Chili lovers!
There is a special contest for the men a Cake Baking contest.
Recognition for Best Tasting, Most Decorated and the Ugliest
cakes. This will be followed by an old-fashion Cake Walk. When is
the last time you took part in a cake walk?
The mystery Dominoes Champion has issued a challenge to all
to try and beat him or her at their favorite game. Come on out to the
festival for lots of fun!

Victory Life Church, located at 7235 Hwy. 90
East Milton,.is inviting everyone to our Free Festival "Jesus
Party". There will be lots of food, fun, games, moon walk, and
prizes. Everyone is welcome and everything is free! Join us
Sunday, October 30th at 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

89th Annual Homecoming
First Baptist Church of Bagdad was established in 1916. Rev.
W.D. Milam and the congregation cordially invites you to worship
with them and enjoy fellowship with many friends at their 89th
Homecoming, Sunday, October 30, 2005. Rev. Jack Goldfarb will
be the guest speaker. Worship service is at 11 a.m. Come and
enjoy!

Stephanie Leavins in concert
Stephanie Leavins will be in concert at Floridatown Baptist
Church, Sunday, October 30 at 6:00 p.m., the church is located at
3851 Diamond St., in Pace. Everyone is welcome to attend this
special service. For more information, call 994-8090.
,
:2f


Ask the Preacher

...a weekly column answering your questions
with Biblical answers about life.


Dear Pastor Gallups
"In light of the recent giving up of the GAZA STRIP
territory by Israel, would you please, reprint your excellent
article on the truth about Israel and its territories? D.M. Milton
Dear D.M., It would be my pleasure. If you will go to our
website www.hickoryhammockbaptist.org and then on the
main index page on the left column you will see a link to a
detailed explanation of this very topic that I put together for our
website visitors. ,
In recorded history, Israel is the only nation that has EVER
occupied that land as a legitimate, recognized nation. There
have been "tribes" and various "kingdoms" over recorded his-
tory, but never a NATION. Israel had kings, a military, a thriv-
ing economy, trade with other nations, borders, a capitol city,
and they were recognized by other nations as a real nation.
In 70 AD the Jews were scattered and the Romans leveled
the temple and city walls of Jerusalem. From 70 AD until 1948
AD there was no "Jewish nation or claims to the land in any eth-
nic or national way. There was never another legitimate nation
established there. The Roman Empire and the various forms of
it. throughout European history held the area. In the meantime
there were Jews living throughout the area as well as Arabs (rel-
atives of the Jews through Abraham). The Romans first called
this area Palestine and later the British, after WWI renamed it
Palestine. Palestine is the Latin term for land of the Philistines,
the Jews' most hated enemies.
In 1948 when Great Britain and the U.N. designated a Jewish
portion of Palestine, the Jews claimed independence and
reestablished Israel. The next day Israel was attacked by 6 Arab
nations. The Arabs in the area fled. Again in 1967 when Israel
was attacked by Arab nations, the Arabs living in the area fled.
Israel won both of these major wars. The Arabs that fled claim
to be "refugees" from the land and want Israel destroyed and
they want the land for themselves.
The problem is that it NEVER was the ARAB'S land! The
bottom line is this...The land is Israel's by heritage, Biblical
command, British declaration, U.N. Declaration and by Israel's
earning it by defeating every enemy that has tried to take it from
her since 1948. That is the Biblical, historical and political
truth.


Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church. in Milton.
He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Florida State University, and a Master
of Divinity from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been
pastor ofHHBC since 1987. He serves as an International Youth Evangelist for
the Southern Baptist Convention since 1990 preaching all over the US. and
Canada. For more information about HHC, call 623-8959 or visit our website @
www.hickoryhammockbaptist.org. If you have any questions for Ask The
Preacher, send it to: Ask The Preacher, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351
Hickory Hammock Road, Milton, Florida 32583-paid advertisement


Thanksgiving baskets,
First Baptist Church of call to reserve a basket.
Milton will be giving away Please call the--church:
Thanksgiving food baskets on office at 623-3122 before
Monday, November 21, from November 7, 2005 to reserve a
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the church. Thanksgiving Basket. The
The give-a-ways will be limited church is located at 6797.
to the first 100 families who Caroline Street in Milton.


Don't Forget!!
It will be time to turn your clocks BACK one;
hour before retiring Saturday night, Oct. 29th.;
If you do forget, your pastor will be happy for
you to arrive at church an hour earlier!


re's to




your alth




For more information on placing your
advertisement on this page, call
Retail Advertising at 623-2120


CObstetrics

Gynecology


4225 Woodbine Rd, Suite G, Pace, FL 32571


Phone (850) 995-9441


Edith Bielitz MD


H.M. Meredith, II, M.D.
Our facility provides a full range of services for children and adults to meet most of your health care needs.
In addition, we offer Basic X-Ray and Laboratory Testing.
Our office operates by appointment. Appointments are always held open for same day urgent problems.
We are accepting new patients. We would be honored if you considered us for your medical care.
This medical facility is equipped and staffed to care for you and your family needs.


"The people you KNOW and TRUST with your prescriptions."


Park Avenue

PHARMACY, Inc.



623-2222

5440 Dogwood'Drive Milton, FL 32570
(Winn Dixie Shopping Center)


ALTERNATIVE HEALTH


FOOD STORE
"Where educated natural health choices are made."
Deanna Gilmore: Manager Jimmie D. Hill,. Ph.D, Natural Health Counselor
E-Mail address: GWYHILL @ AOL.com
5533 Hwy. 90 Pea Ridge 994-3606
Mon.-Fri.: 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Sat.: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.


Professiomnal eartl.. Aid Centeras


& Advawed Auldiology, Isnc.


S"Hear what another satisfied
patient has to say...!"
Sabrlna Kaestle Johl
Peterman, "I've never "heard" it so good! I want to thank Pa
Au.D., CCC-A you & your people for the outstanding care &
concern in solving my hearing problem."
Vince Whlbbs8
Milton Pensacola Crestvlew
5851 Berryhill Road 115 North Palafox 502 N. Main St.
623-8818 438-4092 689-0545


F


n i, wilson, IllH;-IS
itrdola Wllson, BC-H1S


~0
ulThTinE
V


~ IICr(l


Wednesday October 26, 2005


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


0


-- -


Pane 1 0-A









Lifestvles


S


(.! I~y


I


If
,-'


.4i r


bSL;j]


Jaclyn Nicole Courtney of Pace, FL, a freshman at Judson College in Marion, AL, participat-
ed in the annual President's Reception for new students at.the college on September 13,
2005. She is shown here meeting Dr. David Potts and his wife, Beth.


SRMC birth announcements


~ (. 4.


Seth Michael Hall was born
:Friday, September 30, 2005 at
:9:03 p.m. weighing 6 pounds,
,11 ounces and was 19 inches


long. The parents are the
happy Michael and Sheila Hall
of Munson, FL. Very proud
grandparents are Dale & Jo


Jennifer Macias'& Eric Marcias, a son, Talan Marcias, born
Monday, October 3, 2005.
Stacey Ramey, a daughter, Kaylyn Ramey, born Monday,
October 3, 2005.
Melinda M. Taliercio & Paul J. Taliercio, a daughter, Gianna
Marie Taliercio, born Friday, October 7, 2005.
Amber Foster & John Bloechle, a daughter, lade Foster, born
Tuesday, October 11, 2005.
Joy Harvey & Stephen Harvey, a son, Stephen Harvey, born
Thursday, October 13, 2005.
Tyanne Powell & Michael Powell, a son, Tyler Powell, born
Thursday, October 13, 2005.
Marcia Harnage & Sean Harnage, a daughter, Hailey
Harnage, born Wednesday, October 12, 2005.
Michelle Goldberg & Ryan Goldberg, a son, Isaac Goldberg,
born Friday, October 14, 2005.
Mary Brewton & Chad Brewton, a son, Tristan Brewton, born
Monday, October 17, 2005.
Christal Conn & J.T. Griffin, a son, lason Griffin, born
Tuesday, October 18, 2005.


.- ,
-L'.


Ann Hall of Milton, and
Venita Bradley of Pensacola,
FL. Seth is our little miracle
guy!


1- A


f *hWe


-.


xr

* "'


...
** t^^ SK


4^p


A4.'


Seth Michael Hall


Wednesday October 26 2005


I i


Page 11-A


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


fcte,.


. ,' :


, AM ,


i,:



.fgl~:
I
1:*
1:


t


h
\








The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


c,
'
-2


T


"3

rn
h-^







I


z
0
CD


CL
Cto


U,
3


C.)
(,

=3

0

-0


0
Ck


tt1


'I
4 ,4 ,"


*^ 44 C
,.'-, ."
,, ;; ,



II'
I,, ',',, .
_ -_ '. ," .
" '.''y ',:., : .
, n. "


,:" .: : .; ,
_,,i .:; .. .. .. .. o .
ll
.,'':... ..
? .. ,:.= : .'


-I
:3
0


C3,
*

CO)


p1


0

CD


M








'CA


CD

m


CD


CD


JL-"-


eT


''.4'.
* *':


'.4" 44 '4


I. '' '
4'i&


0)
Ma
Ln
co
(43 Qj
0
m
.


-I
0
3


a


4-
c=
n
0)


0


4 0
(aOo m >
; -.i l cC)
gS C" = B:
S0]rS g
P-16
*C. S '" ?
Ig- ffl 3
Y ,, Ir


r~
10
P.
3
CL


0
3


rn
3

(_
3k


Fas


cI
m
rL




cn wu


C,
CD
(I


CA)
N>
-4


I m ^^^

S2 -



4.' ^ 7
S N "{
0 4.4 r C
rf r t,
,7U*=*mg
z

rn:


I
-r,
O
(0


En


mF2


4.' ,* .


ICDX -n
I~ a
p~ m
K -I

-n m
i- U)


<
0

C


?
'
Co


0


I


I


C.AW
O.?s


,i


1


,'j


~iis~
d~dJ~DL~M


1
C
T '"":


r.
**': .
i.J,:


;Ma


L .. i


Con














G ana Rosa' Press

Gazette


Snorts


Octe 26, 200 WED .EDA


Look

Cla


for


NI


*Help Wanted *Real Estate *Automotive
*Saturday Feature Adopt-A-Pet I
*Business Service Directory
*Find Your Name *Plus much more


Sorts



Final registration set
for jay Rec. hoops
The Jay Recreation
Department has set the date and
times for it's final registrations for
basketball.
The registration will be held on
Saturday, October 29 between 9-
11 a.m. in the school gymnasium.
The fee for registration is $35
per player and is due that day.
Runners Association to
hold Vets Day run
The Pensacola Runners
Association will be holding their
popular 4-mile run/walk on
Veteran's Day, November 11,
2005.
The run will start off at 7 a.m.
at the McDonalds on Radford
Boulevard at NAS Pensacola.
This will be held as a prelude
to the popluar Blue Angels Air
Show.
All profits from this year's run
will benefit the Wounded Warrior
Project which helps seriously
injured vets and their families.
The course will wind through
NAS Pensacola and Barrancas
National Cemetery.
All participants must register
by November 8 either online at
www.active.com or in person at
Running Wild.
For information contact Lee
Wright at 939-3527 or Michelle
Burdick at 476-6147.

MHS has Halloween
madness Monday
S Milton High School will open
their boys basketball practice on
Monday by holding a Halloween
madness party which is open to
the public.
The event Will take place
from 6:30 8 p.m. at the school
bym and admission is $1 per per-
son which will enter you into a
series of drawings for prizes.
There will also be trick or
treat candy available for the
youngsters so they don't miss out
on more nocturnal activities.
A costume contest will be
held with prizes and drawings will
be held throughout the evening
,for various prizes.
For more information on the
Halloween event at Milton High.
School contact Coach Short at
the school at 983-5600.
PSA releases date for
Double Bridge Run
The Pensacola Sports
.'Association says the ninth annual
,Double Bridge Run will take place
Feb. 4, 2006.
The event will include a 15K
.and 5K course and a junior 5K for
-ciildren under 14.
SFor more information, contact
the Pensacola Sports Association
at 434-2800.

Do you have
Ssports-related
News or

information you
Should like to
see published in
the Press
Gazette? If so,
send it to us at:
sports@srpressgazette.
corn


Two-county meet:

SMen, women take part in cross-country event
SBy JEFF EVERTS The girls overall individual Santa Rosa boys were Jame
Press Gazette Staff Writer title went to Samantha Ernest of Metelak of Pace who finished
The two county Escarosa Washington H.S. who finished 11th (17:54.96), Jackson Moor
h, t. cu-n--- .. ....-....-, in a time of 20:20.98. of Pace who finished 14l


The lay and Pace girls leave fro m the starting line during the
Escarosa Cross Country which was held Saturday at the Pace Cross
Country complex at Sims Middle School.
Press Gazette photo by Jeff Everts,


Cross Country meet brought outL
every high school team from
both Escambia and Santa Rosa
Counties on a cool, windy mom-
ing, which was perfect for run-
ning.
Santa Rosa schools did well
in the meet Navarre coming in
third in the boys race and Gulf
Breeze coming in third in the
girls.
In the girl's individual
places, Santa Rosa county run-
ners were paced by Trista Talbot
of Jay who placed fourth overall
with a time of 20:54.61. She
was, followed by Alex Guenter
of Pace who finished 13th in a
time of 22:02.22.


In the girls team competi-
tion, Pensacola Catholic finished
first with a total of 64 points fol-
lowed by Washington (79), Gulf
Breeze (98), Pensacola Christian
(108), Rocky Bayou Christian
(144), Navarre (157), Pace
(169), Jay (183), and .Milton
(245).
In the boy's races, Eric
Larson of Washington took the
individual title in a time of
16:28.79 followed ,by Kenny
Whitman of Pine Forest
(16:44.22), .. and Jeremy
Schmuch of Pensacola Christian
(17:00.37).
The top finishers among


s
d
e
h


(18:04.82), and, Ryan Holtman
of Million who finished 19th
(18:21.76).
The boys team competition
saw Washington in first with 40
points followed by Pensacola
Catholic (84), Navarre (87), Pine
Forest (93), Pensacola Christian
(146), West Florida Tech (160),
Pace (178), Gulf Breeze (250),
Tate (281), East Hill Christian
(288), and Milton (313).
The teams now prepare for
district competition which will
be held in Tallahassee.
(See additional photos 3-B)
Story written by Jeff Everts
sports @sr-pg.com


For The Title

Pace, Milton prepare


for Friday square off


Milton receiver Jeremy Tolbert lunges between two Crestview defenders to catch a touchdown pass on
a fake punt play.
Press Gazette photo by Jeff Everts


Bulldogs Mauled


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazetie Staff Writer
Million Coach Mike
McMillion came into Friday
night's game with a 5-1
Crestview team hoping his
squad wasn't looking ahead to
the upcoming Pace game
instead of the task at hand.
From the looks of things, he
didn't have to worry too much
about what his players were
thinking about.
Bolstered by two trick plays
the coach pulled out of his bag,,
the Panthers were able to cruise
to a 20-3 victory over the visit-
ing Bulldogs increasing their
record to 7-2.
Milton opened the scoring
on their very first drive with a
gadget play that saw wide
receiver Jeremy Tolbert on a
reverse only to pull up short and
hit a wide-open Caleb Stewart
for a 57-yard touchdown' pass..
Stewart was so open on the


play his coaches hoped he did-
n't drop the ball. No defender
was within 20 yards of him.
Crestview came out on their
opening drive and appeared to
be moving the ball well until
'the drive stalled at'the Milton
21 and the Bulldogs had to set-
tle for a field goal to make the
score 7-3.
Milton immediately came
back on their next possession
moving the ball quickUN down
the field.
The drive was highlighted
by runs of 27 yards by Kyle
Conrad and 11 yards by Emery
Allen.: : '
Dustin Land hit Robert
Carson with a 29-yard strike to
put Milton inside the Crestview
five before running the ball in
himself for the second Panther
touchdown of the game to make
the score 13-3.
The only other scoring in
the first half came in the second


quarter after Milton put togeth-
er a long drive capped by a cou-
ple of key runs by Allen and
Land.
The drive was capped by a
fake field goal when Land went
under center and then hit
Tolbert on a perfect 25-yard.
strike in the end zone for .a
touchdown making the score
20-3.
The Milton defense was
stingy all night not allowing the
visitors much room to mo e the
ball either rushing or passing
and forcing them to go three
and out on several possessions.
The second half of the
game was notable for the
absence of Dustin Land from
the game and, what, Coach
Mike McMillion said, a better
effort.
"We played better in the
second half than we have all
season" he said.
See, PANTHERS, Pg. 2-B


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
There are some rivalries in
football which are legendary
and evoke memories for players
and fans on both sides of the
field.
Florida-Georgia, Michigan-
Ohio State, Auburn-Alabama,
Texas-Oklahoma...just men-
tion any of them and fans blood
begins to boil.
But none can elicit instant
whoops from fans as the game
which will, be played this
Friday night at Patriot
Stadium...
Milton at Pace.
The rivalry goes back years
and has even pitted families
against each other on the night
the game takes place.
This year the game takes on
the added significance of being
for the District 1-4A title with
both teams coming in undefeat-
ed in the district.
But, despite the records,
both teams have been keeping
an eye on the calendar for this
game since fall practice started
in August.
It doesn't matter what the
teams records are or what the
game means, these two teams
want to beat each other bad.
The teams are playing for pride,
bragging rights, and the bronze
helmet.
Pace Coach Mickey
Lindsey brings his team in fresh
off of a bye week in the sched-
ule.


"I don't know if the bye
week helped us or not," he says.
The Patriots are 8-0 on the
season, 2-0 in the district, and
ranked fifth in the state in the
most recent 4A football poll.


The Patriots come in at
8-0.
The Panthers are at 7-2.


They have progressed from
being the cardiac kids early in
the season, winning games with
late scoring drives.
They have now become a
dominant force both offensively
and defensivel and.are on 4
roll coming in with successive
routs of Escambia, Mosley, and
Tate.
"Everyone on our team
knows this is a big game with a
lot riding on it," Lindsey says.
"This game says a lot about
our county and the quality of
the football our county teams
play."
Milton coach Mike
McMillion, on the other hand,
knows his team will be facing a
tough opponent.
"Pace is much bigger and
more experienced than us,"
McMillion says.
"We don't match up with
them so we will have to be
overachievers."
The Panthers come into the
game with a 7-2 overall record
and also 2-0 in the district.
They are coming off of a well-
played victory over Crestview
last Friday night.
"Our team has improved
throughout the year although
we had a few nights we didn't
perform too well," McMillion
states.
"We played well last \week
and against Escambia and are
still growing and evolving."
Coach Lindsey says of his
See, PREVIEW, Pg. 2-B


Sharks bite Royals


By Nona Bardin
PG Sports Correspondent


coverage

Coverage


October 28 at 7:30pm
GULF BREEZE
at
PENSACOLA '
PREGAMsE s oWSTARS30 N. BEFOREiCKOFF


With just one loss (to
.Blountstown) early in the season,
the Port Saint Joe Sharks added a
third shutout to their record beat-
ing the Jay Royals by a score of
48 0 Friday night, in Jay.
The Royals were hoping for
the best in front of the
Homecoming crowd at Merle V.
North stadium. Even with all
playoff hopes out of the question
for the Royals, they knew that a
win would have caused a major
headache for the Sharks, who
would have found themselves in
a tie for first place.
Jay could not cover much
ground with the fierce Shark


defense attacking from every
direction. Three plays were all
the Royals could manage in the
series of drives.
That's when things got ugly,
for the Royals. On every Shark'
possession, they scored. Port
Saint Joe's offensive game was
an unstoppable force for the
Royals. The second set of plays,
the Sharks scored from twenty
yards out, with senior Ash Parker
carrying it into the endzone and
the Royals were down by 7.
After a 17 yard Royal return,
they would punt again just three
plays later. The ball rolled out of
bounds at the Royal 49 yard line.
Port St. Joe would score
again again, on a quarterback


sneak play from 23 yards out to
make the score 14-0.
Jay managed a third down
conversion on their offensive
series, but found themselves in a
punting situation just three plays
later. The punt was a touchback
and the Sharks took over on their
own 20 yard line.
The Royal's weary defense
took to the field again to keep St.
Joe from another score.
After a 17 yard punt return,
the Sharks would score in 2 play
but it was called back by a penal-
ty.
Jay's Carlos Waldrop and
Jesse Lewis were just 2 of the
defensive players tryin to pro
See, ROYALS, Pg. 2-B


Country music singer Daron Norwood performs the national
anthem at the Milton-Crestview football game.
Press Gazette photo by Jeff Everts


AL


"~ r


B00atictlBB3E





- --------


I


!


4








The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, October 28, 2005


Sports


Preview


The Patriots rely on the leadership of quarterback Chris Sorce who
has led-the team to an 8-0 record this year and a place in the district
1-4A championship game.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Continued From Page One
teams foe, "they have a good
football team and it will be a
great game."
The game may very well
come down to how well the
team's leaders, Milton QB
Dustin Land and Pace QB
Chris Sorce perform.
When both quarterbacks
are on their respective "A"
games their teams perform
very well.
Source is among the top
quarterbacks in the area in vir-
tually every offensive category
from yardage to touchdowns.
Land doesn't have the sta-
tistics that Sorce has but has
been very effective in leading
his team offensively for the
entire season.
For the fans, arriving early
will be the key.


Officials are expecting a
very large crowd so they sug-
gest arriving at least an hour
before the game if you want to
get a seat.
Both parking and seating
will be at a premium for this
highly anticipated game.
The night takes on an extra
significance for Pace as they
will- be inducting eight men
and women into their athletic
Hall of Fame at halftime. (See
related story, Pg. 3B)
"This is what high school
football is all about," Lindsey
states.
The winner of Friday's
game will host a first round
playoff game at their home
field, while the loser will have
to take to the road in their
quest for a state championship.
jeverts @srpressgazette.com


Milton is led on offense by their quarterback Dustin Land who had
the team on a roll at 7-2 coming into the showdown game against
Pace for the district title.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblifi


Panthers

Continuedfrom Page One
"This was a physical game
and I'm proud of how our play-
ers did."
Land left the game at half-
time with a sore ankle and did
not return for the second half,
leaving the play calling to
Maurice Lantry.
The second half did see a
number of penalties called
against both teams thwarting
drives.
"We have a big game next
week and we didn't want to
take any chances with him,"
McMillion said.
On summing up the game
McMillion said, "It was a hard
fought battle and both teams
played hard."
The Panthers now head into
'the district title game against
their arch-rivals from Pace on
Friday night.
Story written by Jeff Everts.
sports@sr-pg.com


Friday night's game against Crestview was also senior night for the school where they honored those who
are soon to graduate from football, cheerleading, band, and ROTC. Here, Head Coach Mike McMillion
greets the family of offensive lineman William Robinson and prepares to give a yellow rose to his moth-


er.


Press Gazette photo by Jeff Everts


jay High School celebrated homecoming on Friday night against
Port. St. Joe. Although the visitors were not very accommodating, it
was a nice night for Queen Laura McCurdy and her escort, Coulter
Prescott as they are congratulated by Princ. Westmoreland
Press Gazette photo by Nona Bardin


Roya s

Continued From Page One
tect the endzone, but St. Joe would
not be denied, scoring anyway
from the 26 yard line making the
score 21 0 with 7:20 left in the
second quarter.
The Royals dug in and did not -
give up. An 11 yard punt return is
where the Royal offensive set up
camp. With Deven Castleberry
under center for the injured Brandt
Hendricks (due to return to play
next week), it was, again, a three
and out for the Royals. The Lowry
punt landed on the 22 yard line of


the Sharks.
The Sharks scored in 6 plays
on a 30 yard pass reception,
squelching the hope of an upset,
bringing the score to 27 0.
The Royals took possession of
the ball once more before half-
time, with an 18 yard puntreturn to
their 28 yard line. Jay fumbled the
ball, but Michael Wade (Sr) recov-
ered it for Jay and the teams head-
ed to the locker room for some
half-time recouping.
Jay wouldd kickoff to Port St.
Joe to open the second half with
two third down conversions, the
Sharks would see the endzone
again injust 8 plays on a 1 yard run


bringing it to St'Joe 35 Jay 0.
On the ensuing kickoff, Jay
chewed up 23'yards on the return,
but found themselves in the same
position of fourth down. The punt
'was blocked by a St Joe special
teamer and the Sharks took over on
their own 20 yard line.
S With just 20 yards between
them and their goal line, the Sharks
scored in three plays. The point
after was replayedwhen a penalty
was charged toward the Sharks.
Once the ball was backed up 5,
yards, the kicker (a New Orleans
evacuee) put it through the uprights
and the score stood at 42 0.
Even at the bleakest moment,


the Royal team never gave up. With
the Sharks kickoff, Jay was looking
at a three and out again, until Port
St Joe fumbled on the return, giv-
ing Jay the ball back on their own
35 yard line. On a third and 6, the
Royals decided to go for the con-
version, but it just wasn't in the
cards for Jay. St. Joe took over on
downs at the Royal 31 yard line.
With :33 left in the game, St.
Joe scored once more from 8 yards
out, but the point after was no
good. The Sharks ended the game
with a 48 0 shutout.
The Royals had 162 yards on
the ground (including 95 yards
that were gained on return plays).
Wade gained 37 yards on 12 car-


ries. Tyler DeGraff added 15
yards on 12 carries. Castleberry
was 1 for 6 in his passing game.
The Royals had 2 penaliies for 20'
yards and recovered three fum-
bles. i
The Sharks' quarterback was
3 for, eight in his passing game.
St. Joe ate up 294 yards on the
ground in rushing and 17 more
on a punt return. They tallied
seven touchdowns and had 3
penalties for 35 yards.
Coach Elijah Bell was
pleased with his team's effort. He
stated, "You see what a real good
team is. With hard work, you can
be, too."


"We never gave up anid we
didn't have any 'stupid' penal-
ties," stated Bell.
Brad Lowry (punter, kicker,
wide receiver) stated that the
team had overcome some hard
times at the beginning of the sea-
son. "But we have formed a
strong bond between us, one that
will never be broken." He went
on to say, "We have come togeth-
er and we take it week by week,
keeping everyone injury free and
together."
Jay will travel to T.R. Miller
on Friday night to take on the
Tigers. Kickoff is 7:30.


LynRae Johnson


wins picks contest


in tiebreaker action

Two contestants get one wrong


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer


East Bay Pensacola Bay Navarre Beach Blackwater River
Thursday, October 27, 2005 Thursday, Oct. 27, 2005 Thursday,. Oct. 27, 2005 Thursday, Oct. 27, 2005
!. AM Moon rise 1:56 AM Moon rise 1:54 AM Moon rise 1:54 AM Moon rise
.. 58 SAM Sun rise 5:30 AM 1.04 feet 4:24 AM 1.46 feet 6:59 AM Sun rise
S 3 AM 1.55 feet 6:59 AM Sun rise 6:58 AM Sun rise 8:33 AM 1.55 feet:
3.24 PM Moon set 3:26 PM Moon set 2:12 PM 0.65 feet 3:25 PM Moon set
,6:04 PM Sun set 4:47 PM 0.37 feet 3:24 PM Moon set 6:04 PM Sun set
6:38 PM 0.56 feet 6:05 PM Sun set 6:04 PM Sun set 7:08 PM 0.56 feet


Friday, October.28, 2005
2:49 AM Moon rise
6:59 AM Sun rise
8:51 AM.1.34.feet
3:51 PM Moon set
6:03 PM Sun set
6:36 PM 0.74 feet

Saturday, October 29, 2005
1:31 AM 1.00 feet
3:44 AM Moon rise
4:57 AM 0.99 feet
7:00 AM Sun rise
10:48 AM 1.12 feet
4:17 PM Moon set
5:53 PM 0.92 feet
6:02 PM Sun set
11:37 PM 1.13 feet

Sunday, October 30, 2005
3:39 AM Moon rise
6:00 AM Sun rise
6:49 AM 0.77 feet
3:43 PM Moon set
5:01 PM Sun set


Friday, October 28, 2005
2:51 AM Moon rise
6:44 AM 0.89 feet
7:00 -kM Sun rise
3:53 PM Moon set
4:45 PM 0.50 feet
6:04 PM Sun set
11:24 PM 0.67 feet

Saturday, October 29, 2005
3:06 AM 0.66 feet
3:45 AM Moon rise
7:01 AM Sun rise
8:41 AM 0.75 feet
4:02 PM 0.61 feet
4:19 PM Moon set
6:04 PM Sun set
9:30 PM 0.76 feet

Sunday, October 30, 2005
3:41 AM Moon rise
4:58 AM 0.51 feet
6:02 AM Sun rise
3:45 PM Moon set
5:03 PM Sun set


Friday, October 28, 2005
2:49 AM Moon rise
5:51 AM 1.33 feet
6:58 AM Sun rise
2:03 PM 0.80 feet
3:51 PM Moon set
6:03 PM Sun set
9:30 PM 1.10 feet

Saturday, Oct. 29, 2005
1:29 AM 0.97 feet
3:44 AM Moon rise
6:59 AM Sun rise
8:14 AM 1.19 feet
1:53 PM 0.92 feet
4:17 PM Moon set
6:02 PM Sun set
8:37 PM 1.21 feet

Sunday, October 30, 2005
2:46 AM 0.81 feet
3:39 AM Moon rise
6:00 AM Sun rise-
9:15 AM 1.09 feet
12:34 PM 1.00 feet


Friday, October 28, 2005
2:49 AM Moon rise
6:59 AM Sun rise
9:47 AM 1.34 feet
3:52 PM Moon set
6:03 PM Sun set
7:06 PM 0.74 feet

Saturday, October 29, 2005
2:27 AM 1.00 feet
3:44 AM Moon rise
5:27 AM 0.99 feet
7:00 AM Sun rise
11:44 AM 1.12 feet
4:17 PM Moon set
6:02 PM Sun set,
6:23 PM 0.92 feet

Sunday, October 30, 2005
12:33 AM 1.13 feet
3:40 AM Moon rise
6:01 AM Sun rise
7:19 AM 0.77 feet
3:44 PM Moon set
5:01 PM Sun set


Wow, what a difference a
week makes. This week's foot-
ball contest was a little too easy
and our pundits records, or their
excellent guessing, reflected
that.
With Alabama and
Michigan pulling out tight vic-
tories, among others, most of
our reader's picks fell in the 8-2
or 7-3 range.
We managed to have two of
our contestants this week end
up with only on incorrect pick
each and that was on the same
game, Bowling Green and
Western Michigan with Western
coming out on top.
So, we have to go to over-
time and check the tiebreaker
scores to see who our winner is
going to be between LynRae
Johnson and Glenn Chavers.
The tiebreaker game was
the total score between
Nebraska and Missouri, which,
was 65 points. Chavers picked
40 and Johnson picked 52.
So, the one contestant who
made it to the top of'the pile this
week is LynRae Johnson of


Milton managing to end up
with a nearly perfect record of
9-1 and winning in the tiebreak-
er.
Coming in right behind at
8-2 were Ronald Taylor, Martin
Brake, Sharon Taylor, F. C.
Brake, Jr., R. D. Williams,
Richard McNew; DeWayne
Queen, Wade Miller, Donna
Miller, Scott Miller, Jerry
Miller, Mayhew Brake, and
Noreen Hill.
Those with 7-3 records
were Murry Rutledge, Berna
Faust, Shelen Kennedy, Roy
Cooper, Paul Tate, and Bonnie
Goldfarb.
At 6-4 were Martha
Chavers, Bruce Hopkins,
Shawn Hill, Keith Kirchharr,
and Larry Culpepper.
This week, we have THE
rivalry game with Milton visit-
ing Pace for the district champi-
onship, along with some inter-
esting games, including the
Florida-Georgia game, for all of
you to pick from, so good luck
to everyone.
Story written by Jeff
Everts. Reach him at:
jeverts @srpressgazette.com


t


Page 2-B


- I 1 I


I







The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday October 26, 2005


1t.e top Santa Rosa girls finisher was Trista Talbot of Jay High School who finished fourth in the girls event
.at the Escarosa Cross Country meet. Talbot led her Jay team to an overall eighth place finish in the meet.
,iress Gazette photo by Jeff Everts


Several girls are conforted by parents and teammates after they finish the course during the cross coun-
try meet which was held at Sims Middle School. The race was exhausting depsite the weather.
Press Gazette photo by Jeff Everts


4 .5 C ~
t\ X F. .-I


,-The Pace and Jay boys leave the starting line to begin their portion of the Escarosa Cross Country race
on Saturday. The Pace boys finished in seventh place overall while the Jay boys finished in fourteenth
.,place.. ... .. .
Press Gazette photo by Jeff Everts


Milton runner Ryan Holtman gets some words of comfort from a parent after he finished in ninteenth
place during the boys race. Overall, the Milton High boys team finished a disappointing eleventh in the
overall standings.
Press Gazette photo by Jeff Everts


gg0saFotbne


HERE'S HOW TO WIN:
Pick the most games correctly and win $25.00.
Pick all ten games correctly and win $50.00.
Pick all ten games correctly and the
exact combined Tie-breaker and win
$100.00


INSTRUCTIONS:
Find the games listed in the ads below
each week. Fill in names of winning
teams. Only score needed for tie-
breaker game.


CONTEST RULES


1. Anyone may enter, except
Press Gazette employees and
their families.
2. Entries must be on an official
blank-no reproduction will be accepted.
3. In case of ties in the number of winners picked,
the total score of the "tiebreaker" game will be used
to determine the winner. Should tied entries have the
same correct, or same number of points
closest to actual score, the prize will be
divided.
4. Only one entry may be submitted
per person.
5. The decision of the judges will be
final.
6. The winner will be announced
in the following Wednesday
issue of the,Press ,/' '. ri' .
Gazette. //
7. Entries must be in the
Press Gazette office or t /
postmarked not late .to J /
than 5 p.m. on Fiday of r.
the contest week. 4. UCLA @ Stanford


@1
o0
L.
rj


1. Milton @ Pace


OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM


C FOR 2005


PRESS GAZETTE


FOOTBALL CONTEST


NAME


ADDRESS:
CITY:
PHONE:


1.


2.


3.
4.
5.


6.
7.


8.
9.
10.


*TIE BREAKER/Total Combined Score


TIE BREAKER: Total Score of
Mississippi @ Auburn


5 Michigan @ Northwestern



Downs
PAINT & BODY 6.Purdue@PennSt.


BOB DOWNS, Owner
Phone: 623-4342
Hwy. 90 Milton, Pace \


FEDERAL CREDIT UNION _

Visit aI.u1j0 u ou at
Pace, .bn Field

7. Southern Illinois @ Wester,-, ": o r
M Melblrship Eligibility Required. OJM05111


9. Oklahoma @ Nebraska Mooneyham Heating &
Air Conditioning, Inc.
4061 Ava/on Blvdo
TRANE Milton, FL 32583
ya sopAne. Phone:.(850) 623-2084
~Ithnsl (850) 476-5522

David Beach
CMC04 100 Gary Mooneyham 0MOS113


4 lk1


Sports


Page 3-B


Ir~rl~


I


I


----


o1fplr


a


1\







The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, October 26, 2005 ''


SDorts


I


Farmers


Pace High to induct eight athletes on Friday night


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer


Growing up, most kids
dream of fame and recognition
for their accomplishments dur-
ing their lifetimes.
Be it as an entertainer,
doctor, lawyer, or athlete it's
nice to be remembered by your
friends and colleagues for
what you have done.
This Friday night, on a
high school football field in
Pace, time will temporarily
stand still during the heated
rivalry of the Pace-Milton
football game so that eight
deserving men and women can
be honored by their friends,
family, and peers for what they
were able to achieve during
their high school careers.
The recognition they are
getting moves some of them to
have fond memories, some to
reminisce, and some to the
brink of tears as they remem-
ber good times they had.
For, at halftime of the
much anticipated football
game, these eight deserving
people will be only the second
class of athletes inducted into
the Pace High School Hall of
Fame.
Those being honored
cover the entire ranges of
sports at Pace from volleyball
and softball to football, base-
ball, basketball, and track.
This year's honorees
should also bring back happy
memories for those Pace faith-
ful who have followed sports
at the school over the last 25
plus years.
The list includes Robin
Cook, Lori Simpson, Tim
Wyrosdick, Steve Newton,
Todd Smith, Jason McBride,
Lee Roberts, and Thad Busby.
The Press Gazette will
profile each of the eight who
will be honored reminding
fans of what sports they
excelled in, where their sport
took them after high school,
and what they are doing now.
Tim Wyrosdick
Tim graduated from Pace
High School in 1980 after hav-
ing participated in both base-
ball and football.
His time playing high
school football offered some
challenges which he, along
with a core group of team-
mates, was able to 'overcome.
These included having
four coachesin four years, and
his team falling from approxi-
mately 50 players at the begin-
ning of his senior season to
around 30 at the end of a cam-
paign that
saw the
SPatriots fin-
ish with al- .
9 record.A
W'e
had to stick ,
together. .
not just in
football but
in ever\n
sport," he "
says. Wyrosdick
T he
experience helped him devel-
op friends and relationships he
still enjoys to this day.
He was very surprised
when he was selected as a first
team all-state football player
after his senior season and
gives much of the credit for
that and his scholarship to play
college football to Robert
Freeman, Pace's current
Athletic Director, who was
one of his coaches at the time.
"We had a lot of fun my
senior season despite our
record. It was a growing year
for me and I learned a lot
about the game of football," he
states.
"It developed a desire in
me to play football beyond
high school."
Wyrosdick went on to play
football on a scholarship from
Mississippi College' in
Clinton, Mississippi.


_ ______


"Robert Freeman was' a
huge influence on me and
helped get things together for
me so that I could play college
ball," he says.
His college career was cut
short on February 7, 1981.
when, during' spring football
drills, he slipped on a patch of
ice on the field causing an
awkward collision with anoth-
er player. The collision lead to
a spinal contusion causing
temporary paralysis. Doctors
refused to clear him to play
again.
"I remember that day like
it was yesterday. I spent sev-
eral weeks in the hospital," he
stated.
"I remember the ball carri-
er telling me to get up and I
told him I couldn't,"
Wyrosdick didn't let the
setback stop him from finding
another purpose in life.
Today, after being a
teacher, coach, and Principal,
he is continuing, a distin-,
guished career in the educa-
tion field as Assistant
Superintendent of the Santa
Rose County School Board.
"That's when the fun
began. I really have enjoyed
my career in education."
When asked about his Hall
of Fame induction, Wyrosdick
said, "I was shocked but'very
honored."
Robin Cook
(Dezarn)
Robin graduated from
Pace High School in 1995
after a prolific career in ama-
teur golf both on the high
school and American 'Junior
G o 1 f
Association
levels.
She was
a two-time

champion
who says
she did a lot
of traveling
in high
school in
order to ; Dezarn
play golf.
Dezarn credits her playing
'in AJGA tournaments with
helping her in her high school
career.
"I got to know a lot of the
top players that I would be
competing against in high
school and how they play," she
says.
After graduating from
Pace she accepted a scholar-
ship from Auburn to play golf
for the Lady Tigers in the
tough Southeastern
Conference.
While at Auburn she
earned second team all-ameri-f
can honors twice as well as
being named the 1999 SEC
Player of the Year in her senior
year.
After graduating from
Auburn, Dezarn thought about
turning pro but ultimately
decided against it.
"I thought about it because
I had played golf all my life.
But, the so called mini tours of
the time were not very excit-
ing," she says.
Now, Dezarn is the head
women's golf coach at the
University of West Florida and
enjoying every minute of it.
"It's nice and different to
be on the other side andsee
what my coaches went through
when I played."
"I found out quickly that
recruiting is by far the hardest
part of the job."
She also spends time at her
(and her team's) home course,
Stonebrook, where she is also
the assistant golf pro at the
course owned by her parents.
When asked if she would
consider any other coaching
opportunities, she said that if
an opportunity were to become
available at an SEC school,
and especially Auburn, she
would jump at it.


"If Auburn were to call I
would probably jump out of
my clothes leaving so fast to
get there."
On being honored with
induction to the Hall of Fame
Dezarn says, "I was shocked
and thrilled. It's a nice way to
be remembered by your
friends and peers."
Lee Roberts
Lee, who graduated ii
1994, had the distinction of
following in the footsteps of
two famous names.
At Pace, he followed fel-
low honoree Thad Busby as
the starting quarterback of his
high school football team.
This was despite some good-
natured concern on Busby's
part.
During a playoff game in
his junior year,, Roberts
replaced Busby as quarterback
in the second half of a playoff
game because of a sore shoul-
der Busby was suffering from.
Coach Mickey Lindsey
turned to Roberts and told
him, "Warm up, this is your
game now."
When Busby heard that
Roberts was going into the
game he told his replacement,
"Don't get too comfortable,
this is my job."
Roberts took over the
reigns of leadership at Pace in
the fall of 1993 following the
departure of Busby to FSU.
He took full advantage of
his one year as the starting
quarterback to earn a full
scholarship to the University
of Southern Mississippi.
During his senior season,
he says the games that stick
out most in his mind are a big
win against Tate and a victory
over Milton on a last second
field goal. He also says a
comeback victory over
Crestview was memorable.
"I had such a fun time
playing in high school and
playing along side Thad."
Upon arriving at Southern
Mississippi, Roberts was once
again following in the foot-
steps of a famous predecessor,
namely NFL legend Brett
Favre.
S "It was pretty interesting
following Brett at USM know-
ing how much he had accom-
plished in college and the kind
of player he was...it was an
honor."
One of his most memo-
rable games in college came
during his sophomore year on
November 16, 1996.
His team traveled to
Tallahassee to take on an FSU
team, which was now being
led by Thad Busby, who was a
junior at the time.
"It was a day I might not
want to remember but I'm sure
Thad might tell you other-
wise."
. By the end of the day,
Busby's Seminoles walked out
of the stadium with a 54-14
victory leaving Robert's team
with an 8-3 record for the sea-
son.
At Southern Mississippi,
Roberts did manage to out due
his' famous predecessor in a
couple of areas. To this day,
Lee Roberts is still the single
season passing yardage and
touchdown leader at his alma
mater. Take that Brett!
After college, his one
opportunity to look at pro
football came in the summer
of 1999 when he received a
call from the Dallas Cowboys.
"They asked me to come
for a weekend workout but the
timing was bad for me so I
decided to continue my work-
ing career."
Today, Roberts is in
Pharmaceutical sales and has
just relocated to Hattiesburg,
Mississippi, which is the home
of Southern Mississippi.
"Being a family man is
very important to me so I just
enjoy sitting in the stands and


ors.
"I told Thad and Lee that
neither one of them would
have gotten a college scholar-
ship if it hadn't been for me.
Someone had to catch all of
their passes.
McBride was voted a place
on the all-decade team as a
football receiver in the 1990's.
He played' football, base-
ball, and basketball and loved
them all.
"What I miss most about
that time is playing with my
friends and teammates."
McBride is very happy to'
be inducted into the Hall of
Fame along side his two
friends, Busby and Roberts.
"It makes it very special to
be inducted together."
The thing he remembers
most about his football days
was his junior year when the
team went 11-2 and made it to
the state semi-finals, losing to
eventual champion Dade City
21-17.
"That was what really
started the winning tradition at
Pace."


watching the games with my
sons."
Todd Smith
Smith graduated from
Pace High School in 1979 and
participated in track, basket-
ball, and football for the
Patriots.
Smith
gives most/
of the credit
for his suc-
cess to one
of his
coaches.




Smith
"Anything involving
Coach Russell is an honor. He
was a great motivator and we
never had an attitude problem
on the team."
He played his first football
game in the eighth grade and
he says it's hard to remember
many things from back then.
S"The thing I remember
most about back then was
everything was new, including
the wooden bleachers."
Smith also participated in
the first basketball game ever
played at the Pace gym.
"I played ball every
chance I had."
"Running out on the field
on Friday nights was very
exciting to me."
Smith did not go on to col-
lege on a scholarship.
He has been working for
the Santa Rosa County
Sheriff's Office for about 16
years. He is now a sergeant at
the Pace substation.
In September of 2003,
Smith was on aerial patrol
with the Sheriff's narcotics
unit when his plane, crashed
leading to a variety of broken
bones and other injuries.
He was in the hospital for
several .months recovering
before beginning 15 months of
rehabilitation work.
Smith was able to pass his
physical exam and return to
work with the Sheriff's office
about a year ago.
"I was extremely honored,


McBride went to college
not for football, however, but
for baseball.
He went to .PJC for two
years and was then set to go to'
South Alabama when he got
drafted by the New York
Yankees. Professional base-
ball turned out to be too allur-
ing to resist.
He played for the Yankees
from 1996-1998 and remem-
bers one game in particular
which stands out in his mind.
"One year in spring train-
ing I got to pitch one inning
for the big league team against
our AAA team. I got to meet a
lot of the big players, who were
playing for the Yankees.at the
time."
Dwight Gooden started the
game for the Yankees that day.
In 1998 he spent the sec-
ond half of the year on the dis-
abled list and ended up leaving
baseball altogether.
McBride is now back at
Pace High School as a math
teacher and is looking forward
to Friday's ceremony.
"I think it's a big deal any-
time you're recognized for
your achievements...it's spe-
cial."
Thad Busby
Arguably the most famous
of the inductees, Busby gradu-
ated from Pace in 1993.
He played both baseball
and football for the Patriots
and was a standout athlete in
both sports.
He had never played quar-
terback in football when he
took over as the starter during
his sophomore year, a year he
says was not very pretty.
"We went 1-9 that year but
lost seven of those games by a
combined total of 21 points."
'The next two years we
did very well and made it fur-
ther in the playoffs than any
other Pace team has done."
Busby echoes the state-
ment made by McBride about
starting the winning tradition
at Pace but quickly adds, "The
kids behind us have carried it
on and done a great job."
In baseball, Busby consid-
ers himself one of the lucky
ones. That is because, in his
freshman year as the starting
right fielder, Pace won the
state championship.
"We had the talent to win
another one after that but
unfortunately it didn't hap-
pen."
Busby loved playing both
sports in high school but had
to make a serious decision
about his future during his
senior year.
He was drafted to play
baseball by the Toronto Blue
Jays and offered a rather size-
able signing bonus.
However, his contract stat-
ed he couldn't touch a football
for seven years and, according
to Busby, that is what made his
mind up to go to Florida State
on a football Scholarship.
During his college days he
says the two games that stand
out most in his mind were both
during his junior year.
The first was the already
mentioned game against .his
friend Lee Roberts and
Southern Mississippi.
The second was a late sea-
son encounter with the number
one ranked and hated Florida
Gators who were led by
Heisman Award winner Danny
Wuerfel.
The Seminoles won that
game but lost to the Gators in
the Sugar Bowl that year and
the Gators went on to win the
National Championship.
Busby attended both the
49ers and Browns NFL train-
ing camps but didn't receive
much of a chance on making
either team.
"When you come in as the
4th or 5th string QB you don't
get many chances to prove
yourself."


p.


Page 4-B


Hall


He is now a football coach
at Daytona Seabreeze High
School and is enjoying work-
ing with his players.
"I love coaching and I love
the kids. It's a great way to.
give back what I have learned
from the coaches I have had."
On joining the Hall of
Fame Busby said, "It's a big
honor after going out there as
a little kid and dreaming of
being a Pace Patriot. I'll never
forget it."
Steve Newton
Newton graduated from
Pace in 1984 after playing
both baseball and football for
the school.
"What a great place to play
sports," he remembers about
his days at Pace.
He achieved his greatest
success in baseball, under the
tutelage of Coach Buddy
Smith, whom Newton gives a
great deal of-credit to for his.;;
success.
"He taught me a lot and I.
can't thank him enough for
what he did for me."
When he graduated from;
Pace, Newton had 5 or 6 schol-
arship offers in baseball but
chose PJC in order to be clos-
er to his parents who came to
every game.
"My dad is a big sports fan
so it was important for him to
be able to watch me play."
After he graduated from
PJC, Newton was drafted and
signed by the New York Mets.
The highlight of his Mets
career came in 1987 when he
received the Doubleday Award '
as the outstanding player in
the Mets Minor League sys-
tem.
Newton stayed around for
a few more seasons in the pros
before arm trouble ultimately
forced him to move on with
his life.
"I should have had it taken
care of but I didn't."
Newton went back to col-
lege to earn his degree and;
become a middle school
teacher.
He now resides in the St. ,
Louis area and is a baseballI
coach at Francis Howell North
High School.
"I'm a coach now because;
of the coaches I had growing
up. I love coaching young
people and trying to make a,
difference."
As for being inducted into
the Hall of Fame, Newton;
says, "It's humbling...I'm
very pleased. It's special."
Lori Simpson
Unfortunately, we were
not able to catch up with Lori
before press time but will run a
biography on her in our
Wednesday edition next week.
Story writteri by Jeff
Everts. Reach him at:
jeverts @srpressgazette.co
m,




Editor's


Note...

The Pace High
School Hall of
Fame induction
ceremonies will
take place at half
time of the Milton-
Pace High School
football game this
Friday night at the
Pace High Football
stadium.


surprised, and shocked when I
received the letter telling me I
had been chosen. I can't think
of a nicer compliment or
honoi."
Jason
McBride
Jason
graduated -
from Pace '
in 1994 and .
will be the .
first to tell
you how
much he
helped oth-
ers in
receiving cBride
their hon-


JL


q,


e


f









S I


PAGE 5B


assi.


WEDNESDAY
. fiee October 26, 2005

.id


90 ANNOUNCEMENTS
92 AUCTIONS
94 MEETINGS
96 PERSONALS
98 TRAINING
EMPLOYMENT
102 DRIVERS
104 GENERAL HELP
106 HOME BASED
BUSINESS
108 HOTEL/MOTELS,
RESTAURANTS
110 LABOR
112 MANAGEMENT
114 MEDICAL
116 OFFICE WORK
118 PART TIME
120 PROFESSIONAL
122 RETAIL
124 SALES/
TELEMARKETING
126 SKILLS/TRADE
128 POSITIONS WANTED
GARAGE SALES -
STYLES SECTION-WED.
202 GARAGE SALES-SAT.
SERVICES
305 AUTO
310 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
315 BUSINESS SERVICES
320 CHILD CARE
325 DOMESTIC
330 EQUIPMENT REPAIR
335 FINANCIAL SERVICES
340 HOME REPAIR
345 LAWN CARE
350 SENIOR CARE
355 SEWING/ALTERATIONS
360 MISCELLANEOUS
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-RENT
402 APARTMENTS
404 COMMERCIAL
406 HOMES
408 LAND
410 MOBILE HOMES
412 ROOMS FOR RENT
414 ROOMMATES WANTED
416 VACATION/RESORT
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-SALE
502 APARTMENTS
504 COMMERCIAL
506 HOMES
508 INVESTMENTS
510 LAND
512 MOBILE HOMES
514 VACATION/RESORT
PETS/ANIMALS
702 BOARDING
704 LIVESTOCK
706 LIVESTOCK SUPPLIES
708 PETS
710 PET SUPPLIES
712 LOST PETS
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
802 ANTIQUES
804 APPAREL
806 APPLIANCES
808 ARTS & CRAFTS
810 COMPUTERS
812 FARM EQUIPMENT
814 FURNITURE
816 JEWELRY
818 LAWN EQUIPMENT
820 LUMBER/HARDWARE
822 MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
824 OFFICE EQUIPMENT
826 SPORTING GOODS
828 ELECTRONIC
(STEREO.TV/VCR)
830 MISC./SALE
832 MISC.'WANTED
834 LOST MERCHANDISE
TRANSPORTATION
902 AUTO SUPPLIES
904 CARS
906 BOATS
908 FARM EQUIPMENT
910 MOTORCYCLES
912 MOTOR HOMES
914 RECREATIONAL
916 SPORTS UTILITY
VEHICLE
918 TRUCKS
920 VANS
922 OTHER


-~~'. -d
'FI 2Ki 1.3
a, .* '' ~r: ~ W~


FULL TIME AT PUBLIC
ACCOUNTING FIRM IN SANTA
ROSA COUNTY. CANDIDATE
SHOULD HAVE PUBLIC
ACCOUNTING EXPERIENCE,
TAX KNOWLEDGE, GOOD
COMMUNICATION SKILLS AND
ABILITY TO WORK WELL
UNDER DEADLINES.
COMPETITIVE COMPENSATION
PACKAGE WITH BENEFITS.
MAIL RESUME WITH SALARY
REQUIREMENTS TO:
ACCOUNTANT, 4430 HWY 90,
SUITE H, PACE, FL 32571 OR
FAX TO 850-995-8849.


'I
"a
*' *,



,2


A LOCAL UTILITY IS TAKING
APPLICATIONS FOR A SERVICE
REPAIR TECHNICIAN IN THE
WATER DEPARTMENT. MUST BE A
HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE WITH A
FLORIDA DRIVER'S LICENSE, BE
ABLE TO WORK IN ADVERSE
CONDITIONS, AND SUBMIT A
DRUG TEST. PLEASE SEND
RESUME TO 4401 WOODBINE
ROAD, PACE, FLORIDA 32571


I









I


SALES PERSON
$320 Salary, bonus,
benefits, advancement.
Key Auto Liquidation
4340 Avalon Blvd.
Milton, Fl.
Ask for Coach Gordon
850-983-3000


a
r


ATTENTION! WE ARE LOOKING FOR HIGHLY MOTIVATED
PEOPLE TO JOIN OUR FAMILY O PROFESSIONALS '& WEST
FL COMMUNITY CARE CENTER, A DIVISION OF LAKEVIEW
CENTER, INC. OPENING FOR FULL TIME PSYCH TECHS &
ON-CALL PSYCH TECHS. MUST HAVE 1 YR. RELEVANT
MENTAL HEALTH OR HUMAN RELATION WORK EXP. OR 1YR
APPROPRIATE COLLEGE STUDY RELATED TO
PSYCHOLOGY. MENTAL HEALTH, NURSING OR SOCIAL
SCIENCE. COMPETITIVE PAY, OUTSTANDING BENEFITS &
AGGRESSIVE RETIREMENT PLAN. APPLY @ 5500 STEWART
ST.. MILTON. FL.
OPERATED UNDER CONTRACT BY LAKEVIEW CENTER,
INC. FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF
CHILDREN & FAMILIES EEO/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/ M /F/D/V
EMPLOYER DRUG FREE WORK PLACE
EBAPTISTHEALTHCARE.ORG/LAKEVIEWCENTER


OFFICE ASSISTANT
NEEDED.
994-3925
PROFESSIONAL
TELEPHONE SKILL
A MUST.


SEASONAL RETAIL MANAGER
WANTED CALENDER CLUB!
UNIVERSITY MALL,
PENSACOLA, FL.
GREAT SALARY +
COMMISSIONS. E-MAIL YOUR
RESUME:
OPPORTUNITIES@ CALENDAR
CLUB.COM OR
FAX 877-765-1606
IMMEDIATELY.


OFFICE ASSISTANT
FOR SALTER
CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY, FILING,
ANSWER PHONES,
COMPUTER,
MON- FRI 9- 5
CALL 623- 0002


MEDICAL ASSISTANT/ RECEPTIONIST
NEW PEDIATRIC PRACTICE
SEEKS UPBEAT, CARING,
INNOVATIVE PERSON WITH
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS. GOOD SALARY
MAIL RESUME TO:
5962 BERRYHILL RD.
MILTON, FL, 32570
OR FAX (850)626-9110


.' ..


cm i Ai


OFFICE MANAGER AND
RECEPTIONIST, FULL OR
MULTIPLE PART- TIME POSITIONS
AVAILABLE FOR FRONT DESK
DUTIES IN COMFORTABLE
OFFICE. MILTON LOCATION,
ASSOCIATED COURT
REPORTERS. GREAT CLIENTS
AND FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE.
PLEASE FAX RESUME TO
(850) 626-4388


GENERAL LABOR
FOR FAST
GROWING
COMPANY. DRIVERS
LICENSE A MUST,
324-8337


Up to
12.50*
per hour I
S'ndides attendanc./
perfarmarce incentives
based on project.
. M &".


Experience
Opportunity!


Ig Immed it Opnn


Outside Sales Executive
Santa Rosa's Priess GaC:emut has an immedi- ",
ite opening for a proven sales executive. The .l -
successful candidate \ ill ha\e a \ inning


personality\ and a proven track record
of sales production.

* Represent an excellent product
- in service to the community
for almost a century.
* Good compensation package.
* Excellent family working environ-
ment.
* Ability to grow with the company.


-A 1


Free PC/Computer
Skills Training!
PC SkilLs Training
-regiter f r oiur FFEE
c..nste. harnd-on
>cs moom to~inrg-no,
obligation to happy !
Call 475-7200 ior
more detr-k.
Office Hours:
Mon.. Sa.m.-, p.m.
Tues., Weds., Thutu.,
8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Fr.. a a.m -4 p.m.
Sat. a. .-,ti on


Reply to: Press Gazette. 6629 Elva St. I
Milton, FL 32570. Phone 623-2120.
email: letters@srpressgazette.com


C AYS TO PLACE AN AD I


S *"Y
*6 .


PRIVATE

PARTY ADS

$4.00/WK
up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30
$1.00 OFF FOR
3RD WEEK
MUST BE PRE-PAID


GARAGE

SALE ADS


$5.00
up to 20 words
.25 PER WORD
OVER 20
PRE-PAYMENT
REQUIRED


COMMERCIAL


ADS

$11.00/1st week
$1.00 OFF EACH
ADDITIONAL WEEK
up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30
SUBJECT TO
CREDIT APPROVAL


1 Phne-t i
BS^^^B~n* B SZTi^^~B
VH^is^~al or Mas(^iter flard.'.
fulBrinadinto629lvaSt
M *ilton, FL32570.
3. ^^^Fax your adjfK^IH^^
11 ^^^B^ftousat ^^^^^

(850) 623-1200-/^B^HB^
(24 hours).??jTj^H^
For ass^*is^7ytanceB^^
in^^^^T?~ paing ~^^H^^
your ad, call~iS


anta Dosa^ Press

Gazette


~ 'C


I IX- w-


""w 0


J I


^l~-_..^ ,,..,^W AIN (.
guma=i~ajmTB


. .... ....


,' '-., "'


pot


I


I


~s ~;*
't;*- ~ ~


.~-~








I PAGE 6B THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS OCTOBER 26, 2005


SANTA ROSA COUNTY University accredited by the American Library
HUMAN RESOURCES Association; (6) yrs exp in management of a
multi-library system with experience in library
EMPLOYMENT operations, budgeting, and employee supervi-
ANNOUNCEMENT sion; or any equivalent combination of educa-
tion, training, and experience which provides
the requisite knowledge, skills, and abilities for
rENTION: The information given on your this job.


application will be evaluated against me mini-
mum qualifications of the job description. The
length of related work experience, training and
education described on your application, will
be an important consideration in the entire
application and selection process. After all
applications are evaluated, your name will be
placed on the employment list; ranked accord-
ingly.

Other than this announcement, no further


notification will be sent.
** **** *********************** *********
Communications Specialist Trainee (1234)
Range: 15 10.45 per hour
**10/24/05 10/31/05**
Note: All experience and/or educational
requirements must be clearly documented on
application before qualification for employ-
ment is determined.
Minimum Oualifications (Must Be Attained
Before the Closing Date)
SHS/GED: Type 20 CWPM. CERTIFICA-
TION: Current First Aid, or Florida First
Responder, or valid Emergency Medical
Technician license, or valid Paramedic license.
.Current CPR certification. Must successfully
.complete and pass TTY certification within six
months of hiring. Must successfully complete
Sand pass NAEMD Emergency Medical
Dispatch Course and Hazardous Materials
Awareness Level I within one year of hiring.
ADDITIONAL: Applicant must successfully
Pass a drug screen. UNUSUAL REQUIRE-
MENT: Ability to wear headset for extended
periods of time. NOTE: Applicants who have
completed certification in the NAEMD
Emergency Medical Dispatch course will be
given preference over other applicants.

Communications Specialist I (1235)
Range: 16 $ 10.97 per hour
**10/24/05 10/31/05**
Note: All experience and/or educational
.requirements must be clearly documented on
application before qualification for employ-
ment is determined.
Minimum Oualifications (Must Be Attained
Before the Closing Date)
HS/GED. Type 20 wpm. CERTIFICA-
TION: CPR certification. TTY certification.
NAEMD Emergency Medical Dispatch certifi-
cation. Hazardous Materials Awareness Level I
certification. All certifications must be current.
UNUSUAL REQUIREMENTS: Ability to
wear a headset for extended periods of time.
ADDITIONAL: Successfully pass a drug
screening.

Communications Specialist II (1237)
Range: 18 $ 12.11 per hour
**10/24/05 10/31/05**
Note: All experience and/or educational
requirements must be clearly documented on
applicaiioni beiorA qualification for employ-
ment ., .-mnnined.
Mihi, '. )ualificatiotis (,utS Be Aitained
.B t' : Cnvling Date)
HS/(.' i : (5) yrs exp in Public Safety dis-,
patch; ._ with (2) yrs being emergency medical
and fire dispatching. CERTIFICATION: CPR
certification. TTY certification. NAED
Emergency Medical Dispatch certification,
NAED Emergency Fire Dispatch certification,
Hazardous Materials Awareness Level I (or
higher) certification. All certifications must be
current. Must obtain APCO Communications
Training Officer Certification with one (1)
year. ADDITIONAL: Successfully pass a
drug screen. UNUSUAL REQUIRE EVENTS:
Ability to use a headset for extended periods of
time. Wear departmental issued pager and be
on call as directed by management.


Library Clerk I (3101)
Range: 6 $ 8.36 per hour
**10/24/05 10/31/05**
**Part-Time position only**
Note: All experience and/or educational
requirements must be clearly documented on
application before qualification for employ-
ment is determined.
Minimum Oualifications (Must Be Attained
Before the Closing Date)
HS/GED. (3) months experience working in a
library, or equivalent education or training.

Director of Santa Rosa Libraries (3307)
Range: 35 $ 58,337.18 $ 71,078.20
DOQ
**Open Until Filled**
RESUMES ONLY
Mirimum Oualificatinns (Must Be Attained


Before the Closing Date)
Ma-ier's degree in Library Science from a


Planner I (6037)
Range: 23 $ 32,253.19 $ 35,601.49
DOQ
**Open Until Filled**
Note: All experience and/or educational
requirements must be clearly documented on
application before qualification for employ-
ment is determined.
Minimum Qualifications (Must Be Attained
Before the Closing Date)
Bachelor's degree in Urban and Regional
Planning, Environmental Science, Architecture,
Landscape Architecture, or related field and 1
year of relevant planning and zoning experi-
ence, or Master's degree in Urban and
Regional Planning or related field and no expe-
rience. LICENSE: Applicant must have a
valid State of Florida Driver's License at the
date of hire and maintain said license while
employed in this position.

Planner II (6038)
Range: 25 $ 35,601.49 $ 39,297.38
DOQ
**Open Until Filled**
Note: All experience and/or educational
requirements must be clearly documented on
application before qualification for employ-
ment is determined.
Minimum Qualifications (Must Be Attained
Before the Closing Date)
Bachelors Degree in Urban and Regional
Planning, Environmental Science, Architecture,
Landscape Architecture, or related field, and 2
years of relevant planning and zoning experi-
ence, or a Master's Degree in Urban and
Regional Planning or related field and 1 year of
relevant planning and zoning experience.
LICENSE: Applicant must have a valid State
of Florida Driver's License at the date of hire
and maintain said license while employed in
this position.

Planner III (6035)
Range: 27 $ 39,297.38 $'43,376.94
DOQ
**Open Until Filled**
Note: All experience and/or educational
requirements must be clearly documented on
application before qualification for employ-
ment is determined.
Minimum Qualifications (Must Be Attained
Before the Closing Date)
Bachelor's degree in Urban and Regional
Planning, Environmental Science, Architecture,
Landscape Architecture, or related field and 4
years of relevant planning and zoning experi-
ence, or Master's degree in Urban and
Regional Planning or related field and 2 years
of relevant planning and zoning experience.
LICENSE: Applicant must have a valid State
of Florida Driver's License at the date of hire
and maintain said license while employed in
this position.

Testing will be held on Thursday November
3, 2005 for Communications Dispatcher I,
Communications Specialist Trainee, and
Communications Specialist I. The APPLI-
CANT must contact Human Resources at 850-
983-1948 to receive their assigned testing time
for the date above. All applications and sup-
porting documents must be received on or
before Monday October 31, 2005 at 4:30pm in
order to obtain a testing time.

**NO EXCEPTIONS WILL BE MADE ON
DATE/TIME**

FOR EACH POSITION APPLIED FOR, ALL.
REOIIRED )SUTPPORTIN(nr TGOCUMNTT S


(i.e. diplomas, transcripts, and/or
certificates) LISTED ON THE JOB
DESCRIPTIONS, MUST BE SUBMITTED
BY THE CLOSING DATE/S NO LATER
THAN 4:30pm. DOCUMENTS MAY BE
DELIVERED BY US MAIL, FAX, EMAIL,
OR HAND DELIVERED. If the required
supporting documents are not in by the close
date. your application will not be submitted
for consideration. In an effort to further assist
applicants, we offer the ease of applying online
at www.santarosa.fl.gov. Complete job
descriptions and applications are also available
at the Santa Rosa County Human Resources
Office, 6495 Caroline Street, Suite H, Milton,
FL 32570, phone (850) 983-1948, Fax (850)
981-2003. Veteran's Preference will be given
in accordance with Florida Statutes.

A Drug Free Workplace/EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


m

ASPCA ADOPT a
dog shelter month.
Any animals adopt-
ed by an individual
60 yrs. or older, the
shelter will provide
free spay & neuter
services. Any ques-
tions, call the Santa
Rosa County Animal
Services shelter at
983-4682 or 936-
6177.


Emily,
I miss you
more than you
will ever know.
I don't care
where you are,
where you
have been or
what you have
become.
Please call.
I Love You.
Mom.

IS STRESS Ruining
,Your Life? Read DI-
ANETICS by Ron L.
Hubbard. Call
(813)872-0722 or
send $7.99 to Dia-
netics, 3102 N. Ha-
bana Ave., Tampa
FL 33607.


IS STRESS Ruining
Your Life? Read DI-
ANETICS by Ron L.
Hubbard. Call
(813)872-0722 or
send $7.99 to Dia-
netics, 3102 N. Ha-
bana Ave., Tampa
FL 33607.


OCTOBER BEAD
FEST October 29th,
30th, Ft.Myers, Clar-
ion Hotel. Announc-
ing Palm Beach
Gardens November
4th, 5th & 6th Amara
Shrine Temple.
Bead, RMC, & Wire
Wrapping Classes
available. Info at
www.OctoberBead
Fest.com or
(866)667-3232



ABSOLUTE LAND
Auction, Cleveland
County, NC. Tracts
10 to 28 acres, open
and wooded land
with creek frontage.
Perfect for horses.
Auction November
5, 10:00 AM held at
Burns Senior High
School. See details
at www.woltz.com or
call (800)551-3588
for brochure. Woltz
& Associates, Inc,
Brokers & Auction-
eers (NC #7560)
Roanoke, VA.
AUCTION NOVEM-
BER 5, 10 a.m. 226
+/- acres, irrigated,
farm equipment,
steel warehouse,
o'0% BP Rowell Auc-
tions, Inc.
(800)323-8388
www.rowellauctions.
com GALAU-
C002594
ESTATE AUCTION
167 +/- acres Div-
ided, homesites,
hunting, timberland.
October 29, 10:00
am Claxton, Evans
County, GA. 10%
buyer's' premium.
Rowell Auctions,
Inc. (800) 323-8388
www.rowellauctions.
com GAL AU-
C002594


Drivers!
HOME EVERY NIGHT!
TDI OFFERS:
COMPANY PAID BENEFITS
MEDICAL & DENTAL
PAID VACATION
PAID HOLIDAYS
401K PLAN

TRUCK DRIVER INSTITUTE
MILTON, FL
THE NATION'S LEADING TRUCK DRIVER
STRAINING SCHOOL NEEDS EXPERIENCEq,,
DRIVERS TO BE DRIVING INSTRUCTORS
TRAINING AMERICA'S TRUCKERS
FOR OVER 25 YEARS.
PREDICTABLE HOURS
SPEND QUALITY TIME WITH YOUR
FAMILY!
No OVERNIGHT TRAVEL
STARTING WAGES $600 PER WEEK
TRACTOR TRAILER
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED!
CALL DAVID
1-800-363-7364
FAX WORK HISTORY TO
(478) 994-0946


AUCTION!I CASH-
IERS, NC October
21, 2005 Commer-
cial Building on Hwy
107N Lot37A Sap-
phire Lakes Golf
Community 10:00
A.M. Miscellaneous
Items 11:00 A.M.
Real Estate 10%
Buyers Premium,
10% down, 30 Day
,Closing Savage Re-
al Estate & Auction
Co. Inc. NC #7189
GAL #3125
Kenneth Savage
(888)983- 0066
Toll-free'
(770)718-8297
AUCTIONS ON-
LINE. Used Truck &
Equipment. Register
FREE. Low SELLER
fees. Promo, Code
SWC-1 03.
Visit our website for
details and personal
assistance.
www.surplusonthe.N
ET. (877)215-3010 ,
ESTATE AUCTION
73 acre farm, Alder-
son, Monroe Coun-
ty, WV. Good house,
timber, great hunt-
ing, peaceful, low
taxes, FREE BRO-
CHURE. (800)726-
2897 www.riverben-
dauction.com Randy
Burdette #927



102
Drivers
CDLAOTR DRIVER
TEAM.50CPMSOLO
.34CPM %100
DROP & HOOK
HEALTH BENEFITS
ASSIGNED EQUIP-
MENT REQUIRE-1
YEAR OTR HAZ-
MAT & DOUBLES
(321)202-4406


* Dry Van


* Excellent Pay
* Top Benefits
* Great Company

Recruiter available
Sat AM. and Sun all day


102
Drivers
DRIVER TRAINEES
Needed Nowl No
experience required.
Werner Enterprise
has immediate
openings for entry-
level semi drivers.
Our avg. drivers
earn more than
$36K first year. 60%
of our drivers get
home nightly/ week-
ly. 15-day CDL train-
ing available in your
area. Call today. 1-
866-280-5309.
DRIVER- ALL
NEW- KLLM Home
7-10 days $ .40
plus $ .03 NO
HZMT, NO NYC.
EOE CDLA 866-
357-7351
DRIVER- DEDICAT-
ED Regional Coast-,
al Transport HOME
EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEED
65% preloaded/pre-
tarped- Avg. $718-
$918/week. Mobile,
AL Terminal- CDL-A
req'd. 877-428-
5627 www.ctdriv-
ers.com
DRIVER- NOW Hir-
ing qualified drivers
for Central Florida
Local & National
OTR positions.
Food grade tanker,
No hazmat, No
pump,, great bene-
fits, "competitive pay

& new equipment.
Need 2 years expe-
rience. Call Bynum
Transport for your
opportunity today
(800)741-7950.
DRIVER-COVE-'
NANT TRANS-
PORT. Excellent
pay and benefits for
Experienced Driv-
ers, 0/0, Solos
Teams & Graduate
Students. Bonuses
Available. Refriger-
ated Now Available.
(888) MORE PAY
(888-667-3729)
S/E & 3-State Run:
T/T Drivers. HOME
WEEKENDS. Mile-
age Pay, Benefits,
401K. Trainees Wel-
come. Miami area-
exp. req. 21 min
age/Class-A CDL
Cypress Truck Lines
(800)545-1351


ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
for part time
Toll Collectors.
Must be able to work any
and all shifts and
weekends and Holidays.
For more
information call;
Mon Fri.
936-4600.


Drivers

Start Earning $$$ for
Christmas NOW!
Earn $45,000 to $50,000 per year
and be home weekends!
Dedicated Customer
out of the Pensacola area hauling one
product only to regular customers.
No back-hauls.
Paid odometer mileage, loaded
and empty. Great benefits
and bonus programs!
Experienced CDL-A
Drivers only apply.
For details cal ill i
@866-592-7006
0


102
Drivers
EVERGREEN
TRANSPORTA-
TION needs drivers
to run the 13 SE
states with both
weekly and week-
end hometime. We
offer good pay and
benefits. If you are
at least 23 with a
good driving record
with a HAZMAT en-
dorsement please
come by our termi-
nal located at 300
Hwy. 95A, Canto-
ment, Florida across
from IP paper mill or
call 850-968-1702.

NOW HIRING
No CDL required.
Truck driver with
tractor trailer and
forklift experience a
must. 623-5385.

LEARN
TO DRIVE
Tractor Trailers


15 DAY LOCAL
CDL TRAINING
* Full and Part Time Classes
* Major carriers hiring on site
- Tuition Assistance I qualified
For over 29 years-
we've been training
America's Truckers!
CALL TODAY!
Truck Driver Institute
5750 Milton Road g
Milton, FL
800-709-7364t

STABLE CAREER.
IMMEDIATE OPEN-
INGS! Positions
available for experi-
enced CDL Holders.
Also Company
Funded Truck Driver
Training offered.
Financial assistance
for Hurricane Katrina
Victims.
(877)PRIME-JOB.
www.primeinc.cor

_s e.Y oLoo


TRACTOR TRAIL-
ER DRIVING IN-
STRUCTORS need-
ed part time and full
time for our Milton,
FL facility. Minimum
requirements:''"
years OTR, exc.
safety record, meet
DOT requirements,
high school grad or
GED with good
communication
skills. Competitive
pay and benefits
package. Call David
@ 1-800-363-7364,
fax work history to
(478)994-0946 or
email personnel@
cdiservices.cc


Camp Night

Watch
Full time, excellent benefits -
That Start Day One!

Eckerd Youth Alternatives Inc., is
seeking a Night Watch staff member
for our wilderness camp in Milton, FL.
You will be be responsible for
monitoring campsites to ensure safety
and security during nighttime hours.
H.S. diploma or equivalent preferred.
Previous experience and demonstrated
ability to work over night shift
required.You may fax a resume to
850-675-1230 or for more information
call 850-675-4512.
EOE,M/F/D/V, Drug Free Work Place |


HURRICANE IVAN

TEMPORARY JOBS PROGRAM
IF YOU HAVE LOST YOURJOB (TEMPORARILY OR PERMANENTLY)
AS A RESULT OF HURRICANE IVAN,
you may be eligible for temporary employment under our Temporary Jobs Program.
Workforce Escarosa, Inc. is coordinating with Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties
regarding the need for temporary employees. Types of jobs may
include, but are not limited to:
Clerical
General Labor
Construction Worker/Carpenter's Helper
Interested persons should visit the Escarosa Career Center at:
6570 Caroline Street
Milton, FL 32570
850-983-5325


All program applicants must provide:
Proof of Identification
Proof of Address
Proof of Social Security Number
Proof of Citizenship (e.g. Birth Certificate or Passport)

Drug testing is required

An Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer/Program Auxiliary aids
and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities


i. c&



ATT


- .1 W-tj-L-UM3 t; ItUtftt5U


B Ifl mk I m


I
t
r
1
r
r
f
I
i




r
r


I
o











I PAGE 7B THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS OCTOBER 26, 2005


104
General Help
S$600 WEEKLY
working through the
-government part-
time. No experience.
'A lot of Opportuni-
ties. (800)493-3688
Code J-14.
'A LOCAL utility is
taking applications
for a Service Repair
Technician in the
Water Department.
Must be a high
-school graduate with
a Florida driver's li-
cense, be able to
:work in adverse con-
S editions, and submit o
a drug test. Please
send resume to
4401 Woodbine
Road, Pace, Florida
32571
ACCOUNTANT/BO
?OKKEEPER FULL
'Time at public ac-
counting firm in San-
:ta Rosa County.
'Candidate should
Shave public account-
king experience, tax
:knowledge, good
;communication skills
!and ability to work
S well under dead-
;lines. Competitive
compensation pack-
;age with benefits.
Mail resume with
salary requirements
Sto: Accountant, 4430
Hwy 90, suite H,
Pace, FL,32571 or
fax to 850-995-
8849.
-ATTENTION! WE
are looking for highly
-motivated people to
-join our family o pro-
fessionals @ West
FL Community Care
,Center, a Division of
Lakeview Center,
Inc. Opening for Full
Time Psych Techs

On-call Psych
Techs. Must have 1
yr. relevant mental
,-health or human re-
Slation work exp. or
lyr appropriate col-
: lege study related to
J psychology, mental
health, nursing or
social science. Com-
petitive pay, out-
standing benefits &
aggressive retire-
ment plan. Apply @
,5500 Stewart St.,
Milton, FL -

Operated under con-
tract by Lakeview
Center, Inc. for the
State of Florida, De-
partment of Children
& Families EEO/Af-
firmative Action/ M
IFID/V Employer
Drug Free Work
Place ebaptis-
thealthcare.org/Lake
viewCenter
CLEANING. PER-
SSON Needed. Seri-
ous long term em-
Sployment applicants
Only. Must be relia-
ble & dependable.
Must have car avail-
abte. Call 994-1785.
COMPANY AND
0/0 needed 87
cents per mile all
dead head paid +
fsc. Call Don Salts-
man CTC Trucking
Inc. (321)639-1522.
i COOKNEEDED for
Bayou Cafe. Mon-
day-Friday.' Call
994-9232.
DELIVERY FE-
MARV'S for pay! A
NATIONAL RV de-
livery service has
Immediate needs for
qualified contractor
Sto deliver "new" RV
Trailers from facto-
Sries and dealers to
Hurricane relief
Sites. This is a great
Sway for you help the
Victims. Please, log
Today: www.horizon-
Stransport.com
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT


104
General Help
EVALUATORS! WE
require evaluators
throughout Florida to
audit businesses.
WE PAY YOU- YOU
PAY NO MONEY!
Apply www.secret-
shopnet.com
FUN JOB Travel
USA Now hiring 17-
23 sharp guys and
gals to work in a
young rock-n-roll
blue jean environ-
ment. Travel to CA,
FL. NY, & other U.S.
cities. Represent
major sports, fash-
ion, & news publica-
tions Seeking enthu-
siastic people to
start today. 2 week
paid training. Daily &
weekly bonuses.
Transportation & ho-
tel provide. Return
guaranteed. For in-
terview call Miranda
or Cat M-F 10-5
(800)537-7256
http://mytraveljob.com
GENERAL LABOR
for fast growing
company. Drivers li-
cense a must, 324-
8337
GULF ATLANTIC
Shutter Company
needs full time fabri-
cators. Day shift and
night shift, stop by to
apply at 6606 Elva
St. Milton, FL. Ask
for Mike.
HELP WANTED AD
Office manager and
receptionist, full or
multiple part- time
positions available
for front desk duties
in comfortable office,
Milton location,
Associated Court
Reporters. Great
clients and flexible
schedule. Please
fax resume to
(850) 626-4388
HIRING- PANHAN-
DLE Concrete Cut-
ting, Inc. Laborers-
no experience nec-
essary. Will train.
Good pay and bene-
fits. Call 850-572-
9749.
WANTED INVEST-
MENT Banker with
the knowledge of
Forex currency trad-
ing, private place-
ment programs and
all paperwork per-
taining to templates,
sample program de-
scriptions, etc. For
more information
Call 786-522-3572.


104
General Help
LIBERTY
NATIONAL Life
Insurance
Do You Earn
$75,000 A Year?
Would You Like
To? Using our pro-
ven marketing plan
you could earn
$75K your first year
with us--even more
the next year with
renewals and bo-
nusesi We offer two
retirement funds,
health insurance,
paid vacation,
convention trips
and more! No
experience neces-
sary. On-the-job
training Require-
ment: honesty, hard
work, dependable
transportation, and
the willingness to
follow our system.
We are an Equal
Opportunity
Employer.
Find out more Call:
983-7576.
-IGHT JANITORI-
AL, 11pm-2:30am,
(Thurs-Sun). $7.00-
$7.50 per hour. Call
Sam. 291-0124.

MEDICAL ASSIS-
TANT/RECEP-
TIONIST
New pediatric prac-
tice seeks upbeat,
caring, innovative
person with excel-
lent communication
skills. Good Salary
Mail resume to:
5962 Berryhill Rd.
Milton, FL, 32570
or
Fax (850)623-0124

MOVIE EXTRAS,
ACTORS & MOD-
ELS! Make $75-
$250/day. All ages
and faces wanted!
No exp. Required.
FT/PT!
(800)714-7565
NIXON'S CLOTH-
ING store- P/T Sales
Associate, retail ex-
perience required.
Apply at 5061 Dog-
wood, Milton.
NOW HIRING for
2005 Postal posi-
nons $17i50-
$59.00+/hr. Full
Benefits/Paid Train-
ing and Vacations
No Experience Nec-
essary (800)584-
1775 Reference #
5600.


p 'i RO :1 R INGl I


The All New


104
General Help
OFFICE ASSIS-
TANT for Salter
Construction Com-
pany, filing, answer
pones, computer,
Mon Fri 9 5
Call 623- 0002
OFFICE ASSIS-
TANT needed.
994-3925 Professio-
nal telephone skill a
must.

P/T & F/T
DIETARY AID
positions available
No experience
necessary.
Apply in person at
Santa Rosa Health
and Rehab
5386 Broad St.
in Milton EOE
Drug Free
Workplace

PLANT NURSERY -
General nursery
work, full, time.
Some experience
desired. Part time
possible. 983-9121.
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
Milton Newspapers,
Inc. (dba The Santa
Rosa Press Gazette
and The Santa Rosa
Free Press) re-
serves the right to
censor, reclassify,
revise, edit or reject
any advertisement
not meeting, its
standards of accept-
ance. Submission of
an advertisement
does not constitute
an agreement to
publish said adver-
tisement. Publication
of an advertisement
does not constitute
an agreement for
continued publica-
tion.


SEASONAL RE-
TAIL Manager
Wanted Calender
Club! University
Mall, Pensacola, FL.
Great Salary + Com-
missions. Email your
resume: opportuni-
ties@calendarclub.c
om or fax 877-765-
1606 immediately.


104
General Help

STATE JOB
POSTING
Department of Agri-
culture-Division of
Forestry- OPS

Office Automation
Specialist I

Location: Blackwater
Forestry Center ( 20
miles North of Milton
on Hwy. 191) Apply
online at:

www.peoplefirst.my-
florida.com or Con-
tact Tommy McGraw
at 850-410-0747 for
more information.

110
Labor

02511460EXPERI-
ENCED BRICK ma-
son" helpers needed.
MUST have trans-
portation. Call 994-
3488- ask for Joe.

114
Medical

AFFORDABLELE!
INSURANCE
Health/Life/Accident
Individual, Family,
and Coverage for
the Self Employed
(850)748-2574
(850)934-9406
The MEGA Life and
Health Insurance
Company
Oklahoma City, OK





YARD SALEII
October 28th 9 1
October 29th 9 12.
Eternal Trinity Lu-
theran Church. 6076
Old Bagdad High-
way, Milton across
from Driver License
Office.




310
Business
Opportunities

$2000 PER WEEK
NOW-Own your own
travel business. En-
"ter the exciting world
'of travel. Turnkey
training provided-
PT/FT $249 mini-
mum investment
Toll- free
(800)684-7920


GetThe 9
ADVMANAGE OfI


IT'S OUR BIGGEST IDEA YET.
INTRODUCING THE ALL-NEW
2006 JEEP COMMANDER


0


Jay


Apartments


FULLY RENOVATED ONE, TWO, AND
THREE BEDROOM UNITS NOW
AVAILABLE WA.C.


850-623-0609.


Value.


i sq.40 -.i F i Prices


uatnearal selling in rear noom
SSpacious Kitchen & Dining Area with custom cabinets
SArchitectural Shingles Vinyl Exterior Trim
SLuxury Marble Vanity Tops
SGarden Tub and Shower
SCeiling Fans in all Bedroom and Great Room
SWalk-in Closets in Bedrooms
SFrench Doors Gas or Wood Fireolace


Baths
Bellehaven
Chadwick 2
Stratford 2
Norwood 2
Mayfair 2
Diplomat 2
Hampton 2
Gemini 2
Inglewood 2
Ambassador 2


DUIIUUWIr II, baWIUlluVA, = ITYork
Loaders, Dump Trucks, Oxford
eSc Will build on Slab or Piers Leington
Graders, Scrapers, Lexington 4 BR
E aAPinebrook (Signal
Excavators Fleetwood
Next Class: Oct. 3rd Kingston (Signatu
Executive
Train in Florida Regency (Signatu
2,Bedroom Duple
-National Certification Visit our website www.steelehomes.cc 3 Bedroom Duple
*Financial Assistance
-Job Placement S.S.STEELE
800o383-7364 Se AND COMPANY, INCORPORATED
Associated Training Services ....... ,,,, 6705 N. Pensacola Blvd. 477-7880
www.atsn-schools,com FL. Lie. #CRC044810 Toll Free (888) 231-1255


2
2
2
2
lure Series)2
2
ire Series) 2
2 1/2
ure Series) 3
ix 2( eci
ex 4 (2 e


Sq. Ft. Price
1040 67,800
1149 70,600
1257 78,100
1341 83,000
1418 83,900
1510 86,800
1525 87,600
1579 90,600
1586 98,100
1610 91,200
1622 95,000
1713 97,300
1812 101,300
1812 101,700
1833 116,600
1949 108,400
2129 131,300
2215 126,300
2495 155,000
ich unit) 1740 117,600
ach unit) 2062 135,800,
R


:0 1-3 5:00
ST 90-a5
:UN. LS


310
Business
Opportunities

$50,000 FREE Cash
Grants***** 20051
Never Repay! For
personal bills,
school, new busi-
ness. $49 BILLION
Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Opera-
tors! (800)856-9591
EXT #113.

$966.00 WEEKLY
INCOME Mailing
our sale brochures.
Genuine opportunity
No personal selling
or advertising.
Supplies provided.
$250.00 Sign-up
Bonus Call
(702)988-0187
(24 hours)

A CASH COW! 90
Vending Machine
units/You OK Loca-
tions Entire Busi-
ness $10,670 Hurryl
(800)836-3464
#B02428

ALL CASH Busi-
ness! Local Candy
Vending Routel Un-
limited Earning Po-
tential. Includes 30
ALL Metal Machines
with Candy, Lifetime
Warranty. $9,895.
(800)704-5414

ALL CASH Busi-
ness! Local Candy
Vending Route!
$50k/yr Potential. In-
cludes 30 Machines
+ Candy, $9,895.
Call Now!
(800)704-5414


310
Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY
ROUTE Do you earn
$800/day? 30 ma-
chines, free candy
all for $9,995. 800-
814-6323
B02000033 Call us,
we will not be under-
sold!
DATA ENTRY.
Work from any-
where. Flexible
Hours, $$Great
Pay$$ Personal
Computer Required.
Serious Inquiries
Only. (800)873-0345
Ext.499
LOCAL VENDING
ROUTE. Soda,
snack, candy, juices,
water, great equip,
and services, financ-
ing available/
$7500 down.
Call (877)843-8726
--#B02002--037
ORANGE COUNTY
Choppers Distribu-
tors Needed ,for
OCC Energy Drink
product. $15,000
req'd for inventory,
Protected Territory &
Exposure.
YOU CAN'T LOSE!!
(888)216-5831

SERIOUS ENTRE-
PRENEUR? THIS is
it. Most powerful
compensation plan
on planet. No sell-
ing.Not MLM. Pro-
ven way. to earn a
VERY substantial in-
come. Call:
(800)775-0723
www.WinWindow.co
m


NEED A FRESH START?


GOOD CREDIT
BAD CREDIT
1ST OR 2ND MORTGAGE
CONSOLIDATION
REFINANCING
BUSINESS OR ALL
PURPOSE LOANS.


CALL TODAY FOR FAST
RESULTS
TOLL FREE
1-866-517-4484


310
Business
Opportunities

SERVICE BUSI-
NESS FSBO. Sky's
the limit in this large
MILLION DOLLAR
business. http//land-
scapeandtreecofs-
bo.homestead.com.
For More Info Call
(941)485-9212

TURN A one time
$1995 Investment
into a huge monthly
passive income! We
do all the work. You
collect the checks.
CALL NOW.
(800)704-7344
ID#0130GE

WANT TO retire
early? And never
worry about money
again?
www.The3YearPlan.
Biz

315
Business Services

BUDGET HOUSE
Painting- Insured &
Licensed. Call Andy
@ 850-304-9680.


$5
od w Fth



LLt
\t~xataS
iectthi^


~

:%
wi5






r

a
L


C


I A T M c E N I P O T A -- U I K 1


GM CERTIFIED Iits


USED VEHuICLES:

Certii d "100+ Point Inspection Process *3 Day/150 Mile Vehicle Exchange Policy
SU D VEHICLES 24 Hour GM Roadside Assistance *Bumper to Bumper Coverage for 3 Months
THE RIGHT WAY THE RIGHT CA. 'or 3,000 miles (Added to existing warranty, if in effect) *$0 Deductible Warranty

2005 PONTIAC GRAND AMS 2005 BUICK CENTURY 2005 BUICK LESABRES







ORIGINAL LIST: ORIGINAL LIST: ORIGINAL LIST:
S21,530 *23,530 28 %,4495
STARTING FROM STARTING FROM STARTING FROM


$12,981 $13,981T $16,981"
4 IN STOCK! 4 I1 STOCK 8 IN STOCK
2005 CHEVY IMPALAS 2005 PONTIAC GRAND PRIXS 2005 PONTIAC VIBES







ORIGINAL LIST: ORIGINAL LIST: ORIGINAL LIST:
27,090 *24.,330 *22,130
STARTING FROM STARTING FROM STARTING FROM

16 981 16,981 $16,981
5 3 IN STOCK! 3a IN STOCK!
2005 BUICK RENDEZVOUS 2005 PONTIAC MONTANA SV6s





-. : -', 2005 CADILLAC DEVILLES
ORIGINAL LIST: ORIGINAL LIST: ORIGINAL LIST:
*28,700 *29,930 *47,095
STARTING FROM STARTING FROM STARTING FROM


$18,981T $19,981T $29,981"
4 IN1 STOCK! 3 IN STOCKS 3 IN STOCK
I (<-M I: - P -NT IC :.U I 'Plus tax, title &license, +3.9% APR on select vehicles.
,,S fP O N TIA C .. With approved credit. See dealer for details.



MclKenzie

PONTIAC GMC BUICK
See Us At www.mckenziemotors.com


V.,


J


315
Business Services

!!AFFORDABLE!!
INSURANCE
Health/Life/Accident
Individual, Family,
and Coverage for
the Self Employed
(850)748-2574
(850)934-9406
The MEGA Life and
Health Insurance
Company
Oklahoma City, OK


LAMINATE,
CERAMIC
AND WOOD
PERGO
ENDORSED
INSTALLER
Offering economical
elegance installing
all name brand
laminates, wood
Sand ceramic to
private individuals
and dedicated
professional
renovators.
Call Robert,
255-8414
or 995-7705.
God Bless our
Troops!


315
Business Services

02510485
SORENSEN'S
REMODELING
Specialist. Home
repairs,
remodeling, tile,
wall texturing,
painting interior
and exterior,
wallpaper and
removal, kitchens
and baths,
cabinet refacing.
12 years
experience,
Licensed and'
Insured, Deal
directly with
owner.
Call Jon
(850)390-6756.

Look for my ad in
Sthe Business
Service
Directory

ANN BARNHILL
TRUCKING Dirt
Work, Asphalt,
Limestone Rock,
Driveways. Call for
price. (850) 623-
3461 (850) 232-
0670. Free Esti-
mates!


Find your



name and


win $5.00


ind your name in the Classified


Section of Wednesday's or

Saturday's Press Gazette and you
can win $5.00. Bring proof of
identification by our office before
the date of next publication and ,
pick up your money.

Press


iGazetteW
6629 Elva St., Milton 623-2120

SJ, ~.s., ,......


=..


ff-


0 -


All


-"'


I I












I PAGE 8B THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS OCTOBER 26, 2005


315
Business Services
ABOVE & Beyond
Tree Service. Li-
censed and Insured.
Free Estimates.
Don't walt until Its
too late. We also of-
fer stump grinding
and Bobcat serv-
Ices. Kevin Frey
(850) 983-7820. Call
us...or pay morel
ADVANCED
VINYL
Systems Inc.
Home Improve-
ment Specialists.
*Florida Rooms
*Screen Rooms
*Patio Covers
*Carports
*and much morel
Call us
Don Sweeney
orTed Brignano at
850-623-5442
5851 Hwy-90
Milton. See our ad
on the Business
Service Directory
ALL ACCIDENTS &
Injury Claims.
AUTOMOBILE,
BIKE/BOAT/BUS,
ANIMAL BITES,
WORKERS COM-
PENSATION,
WRONGFUL
DEATH, NURSING
HOMES INJURIES.
"Protect Your
Rights"
A-A-A ATTORNEY.
Referral Service
(800)733-5342
RTIE KELLER.
STUCCO. Licensed
4nd Insured. Con--
ventional and Syn-
ihetic Systems. No
lob to big nor to
small. Call 698-8327
or 626-9164.
B & B Home Im-
provements and Vi-
/yl Siding. 25 Years
Experience. Free
Estimates. Licensed
and -insured. 850-
881-3936, anytime.
BUCK'S PAINTING
f'Hunt No More We
Get the Job Done"
,O0 Yrs of Exp
Pressure Washing
Drywall & Remodel-
ng
'James (Buck)
Harrell
i(850)983-8612
'CANDI'S CLEAN-
:ING Companion. In-
Jsured and licenses,
*residential and com-
:mercial cleaning.
'We will take.care of
all your cleaning
needs. Give us a
*call for a free esti-
:mate. Susan (850-
'748-6922 or. 626-
,1354.
,DOUBLE "B" Land
Clearing. Backhoe
4Work. Licensed and
insured. Bryen Bal-
'lard. (850)994-5740
MOr 1~50123-7--lrf1


* *9


315
Business Services

CERTIFIED
MASTER
TECHNICIAN-.
MARK SALTER
Small engine
repairs. Kohler,
Briggs, Tecumseh,
Blowers, chalnsaws,
lawn equipment,
generators, pressure
washers, edgers.
Parts also sold here.
Boutwell Automotive
6593 Caroline St.
Milton
.850-623-4750.

COKER'S LAWN &
TRACTOR Service,
from trimming to
tractor work.:Clean
ups, raking, haliIng,
mowing, bushhog-
ging, dirt work. Rea-
sonable rates, free
estimates (850)
529-0434 or (850)
623-0493. Licensed
& Insured.
DAY BY Day Quality
Fencing. Competi-
tive pricing for all of
your fencing needs.
Locally licensed,
owned and operat-
ed. We look forward
to your call. New,
fencing or repairs.
Call 850-529-3546.
DECORATIVE
CONCRETE & Deck
Coating. Old and
New Construction
Personalize & beau-
tify your home or
business by giving
style to your walk-
away, driveway, bal-
cony or pooldeck.
Restoration, water-
proofing, traffic coat-
ing, and much more.
Servicing Santa, Ro-
sa & Escambia.'
For free estimate
call William curtis
221-2995
DIRT CHEEP
Cleaning Service.
"HOLIDAY SPE-
CIAL' One deep
clean $10 discount
with ad. Homes,
condos, offices. Call
384-2388
DIVORCE $275-
$350*COVERS chil-
dren, etc. Only one
signature required!
"Excludes govt.
fees! Call weekdays
(8001462-2000. ext
600. (8am-7pm) Alta
Divorce, LLC. Estab-
lished 1977.


DRIGGER'S HOME
Improvements Spe-
cializing in room ad-
ditions porches. pa-
tio, and general
home improve-
ments. No job to
small, so:give us a
call. Free Estimates
850-626-7874 or
686-0733 or 623-
i


WI
'F


315
Business Services
EXACT DRYWALL.
Licensed & Insured,
Locally owned & Op-
erated, reasonable
prices. All Phases of
Drywalllng, Any Tex-
ture, NO MONEY
DOWN, references
available. Member
of the Santa Rosa
Chamber of Com-
merce, Roger Tootle
HM: 850-995-5090
Cell: 850-601-0519
FIRST CLASS
Home Repair. Roof
repair, painting,
pressure washing,
also mobile home
repair. Over 50
years experience.
Free Estimates. Call
Robert at 626-2093
or 777-7161.
GROVER TREE
Service. Tree re-
moval and trimming,,
specialist In Live
Oak pruning. Free
estimates, will travel,
Insured and li-
censed. Call Spuggy
698-9243 or the of-
fice 698-7828.
HUSEBY FLOOR
covering. Installing
Hardwood & Laml-
nate Flooring, sand
and refinishing. Rea-
sonable Rates. Li-
censed & Insured.
Call for quote 850-
994-7561 or 490-
0404.

J&L HOME Im-
provement services
we perform an as-
sortment of jobs ev-
erything from the
exterior of your
Home to the interior
Call today 983-3428

JANITORS &
MAIDS- part-time
work, top pay. Day
& evening work.
Milton area. 'Call
469-1183.
LAND CLEARING/
Dozer/Tractor work
Specializing in col-
vert installation &
Driveways. Leveling,
root raking, bushog-
ging, disking. Equip-
ment and material
transport available.
By the Job or by the
hour. Call for esti-
mates. Call Billy
Rogers 850-957-
4952 or Cell 850-
261-8407.


315
Business Services
MANNING'S MEAT
All cuts of beef,
Pork, Poultry
Deer and Wild,
Hogs Ground, Cu-
bed, Sliced. Sum-
mer sausage.
Smoked sausage..
Phllilp Manning,
Owner 850-501-
6861.
MAYBE, YOU can
do It yourself, but
will you? Dave Kop-
pin Home Improve-
ment, Inc. Speciallz-
Ing In Insurance esti-
mates,-Small Home
Improvement Proj-
ects & Maintenance.
(850) 626-6944.

MIKE KAYLOR
Cement Mason
*Patios
*Walks
*Driveways
Free estimates,
no job too small.
Quality work at
affordable prices.
994-0897.

MOBILE HOME
Brokers. Major and
minor repairs. Re-
roof, patio covers,
screen rooms, level-
ing, locally owned,
operated. Free esti-
mates. 100% Fi-
nancing WAC. Call
857-1051.
NEED A LAWYER?
All Criminal Defense
& Personal Injury.
*Felonies Domes-
tic Violence Misde-
meanors* DUI* Traf-
fic Auto Accident"
Wrongful death.
"Protect your Rights"
A-A-A Attorney Re-
ferral Service (800)
733-5342.
NEW HOPE PAINT-
ING & WALLPA-
PERING *Drywall
repairs & patchwork
*Pressure cleaning
(homes, decks, pa-
tios, driveways &
sidewalks) *Carpen-
try work (crown
molding, paneling,
trim base & case, in-
stall cabinets & build
decks). Residential.
Interior/Exterior.-'
Family owned busi-
ness,. over. 30years;.
Call The Ericksens
today! (850)723-
2550 or 623-6034


- A1?4 A


- 5 s-.M.-


LOCAL HOME Re-
pair. Paint, drywall,
trim & tile.- Fence re-
pair & installation.-
10 years experi-
ence. Contact Paul
McMullen 850-723-
o7'7


w


Divorce '108,Adoption ')i
Namie Change 55
FREE ping, Call for
Worksheet (850) 434-7524
1850 N."W" SL
(1 blk. N. of Flea Market),


r


w


b


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content _

Available from Commercial News Providers


* -










-N

*e a
* .
*
*C






* ___





* -


S
- a 0
S
0
0
S

0


-


-a



* -

* c-

o
* 0'-


S
0
S



0
0


- -


~, .
-


---
* -


315
Business Services

REMODELING
KITCHEN and Bath
remodeling, textur-
Ing, painting 7yrs.
Experience in San-
ta Rosa County.
Licensed & Insured
712 5077

ROSE RIDGE
Farms, Backhoe &
dumptruck service.
Stumps removed,
debris cleared. Dirt
& material hauler.
Call Sam or Carol
Howell 850-995-
1730 or 850-449- '
1677. Licensed & In-
sured. Free esti-
mates.

S & L Fencing- All
types of fences, new
and repair. Special-
Izing In custom pri-
vacy fence. Free es-
timates. Free Tear-
down. Open 7 days
a week 850-572-
1390 or 850-572-
1426.

STUMP-EASE
STUMP Grinding.
Most removals
$35.00. Discount for
multiply removals.
Backyard Accessible
Licensed & Insured.
Local Contractor.
Retired USN. 232-
8746.

TNT CARPORTS
R.V. & Boat covers
Buildings,
Garages.
Portable Sheds
CARPORTS
Single $595
Double $695.
12 X 41-$1295
24 X 31 $1990
Galvanized Steel
Many sizes/colors.
Financing Available
Free delivery & setup
(850)983-2296 or
Pager 505-1867

TREES AND Roofs.
Professional tree ex-
perts, roof cover
ups, carpentry, local
in business 40
years, insurance
and license number:
RC0066546. Call
850-862-0383 or
850-865-2000

VICKERS FENCING
"Making good neigh-
bors one fence at a
time." Specializing in
wood fences. New
installations and.re-
pairs. Competitive
pricing. Free esti-
mates. 994-7585 or
791-0198.

WILLIAM .SMITH
Drywall, LLC -Spe-
cializing in Hurricane
Recovery. Free Es-
timates- locally
owned & operated.
Licensed & insured.
Office 850-626-8346
cell 850-207-0302.

WOOD OR VINYL
fencing @unbeata-
ble prices.
Commerical/
residential. $100 off
minimum job *if you
mention this adl
Renfro & Sons
850-712-2034/* 100
ft. minimum.

325
Domestic

DEPENDABLE
HOUSEKEEPER
TEN YEARS EXPE-
RIENCE. REASON-
ABLE RATES.CALL
994-6236

335
Financial Services

$50,000 FREE Cash
Grants*****_2005!
Never Repay! For
personal bills,
school, new busi-
ness. $49 BILLION
Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Opera-
tors! (800)856-9591
EXT'#113.


335
Financial Services
****$500-
$100,000++ FREE
Cash Grantsl 20051
Never repay Per-
sonal/medical bills,
school, new busi-
ness- home. As
seen on TV, NO
CREDIT CHECK
Live operators
(800)270-1213
ext.95.

CREDIT CARD
bills? Consolidate
today Get out of
debt fast., One low
monthly payment.
Cut Interest. Stop
harassment.
www.lhavetoomany-
bills.com Since
19911 (800)881-
5353 x 17.
DOES YOUR busi-
ness need help get-
ting your books
ready for tax time?
Don't wait, prepare
nowl Call the afford-
able bookkeeper
with 20 years experi-
ence In double entry
bookkeeping. 626-
2143.
IMMEDIATE
CASHIII US Pen-
sion Funding pays
cash now for 8 years
of your future pen-
sion payments. Call
(800)586-1325 for a
FREE, no-obligation
estimate, www.pay-
checktoday.com.
IMMEDIATE
CASHIII US Pen-
sion Funding pays
cash now for 8 years
of your future pen-
sion payments. Call
(800)586-1325 for a
FREE, no-obligation
estimate. www.us-
pensionfunding.com

WE REMOVE NEG-
ATIVE CREDIT RE-
PORTS. LI-
CENSED, BONDED
AND MEMBERS OF
FLORIDA WEST
BETTER BUSI-
NESS BUREAU.
OVER 10 YRS IN
BUSINESS.
WWW.CREDITRE-
PAIRTODAYCOM
(866)WOW-MY-
CREDIT.

340
Home Repair
METAL' ROOFING
SAVE $$$ Buy Di-
rect From Manufac-
turer. 20 colors in
stock with all Acces-
sories. Quick turn
around! Delivery
Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.

345
Lawn Care
CLARK'S LAWN
Care and General
Maintenance & All
Types -of Tractor
Work. Licensed, &
Insured. Call Mike
Clark at 626-2428.

PAGE'S TREE
SERVICE Trim, cut
& remove. Call 626-
2159 (if no answer,
please leave message)
FIREWOOD $50. a
load and up.
350
Senior Care
IN HOME Compan-
ionship/senior care.
Call 450-5080.

NEEDED- HOME-
MAKERS, Compan-
ions, Milton area,
Loving Care Sitters,
Inc. In home elder
care. 675-4278.

VISITING
ANGELS
SENIOR CARE
In-home
*- Companionship
Meals
*- Light housework
Errands
944-2211


355
Sewing &
Alterations

JUST JUDY'S
SEAMSTRESS
YEARS OF
EXPERIENCE,
FAIR PRICES,
Alterations
Dress-making
Repairs
*Weddings
*Formals
JUDY HARVEY
5901 Castle Drive
Milton, FL
626-6349


360
Miscellaneous

EARN DEGREE on-
line from home.
*Medical *Business,
*Paralegal, *Com-
puters. Job Place-
ment Assistance.
Computer & Finan-
cial aid if qualify.
(866)858-
2121www.onllneti-
dewatertech.com.


EN
RAESTE


402
Apartments
1 BEDROOM fur-
nished apartment
with central heat &
air. No pets. $400.
month, $250r dep.
Call for appointment.
994-7246
406
Homes
BRAND NEW 3bd/
2ba home. Double
car garage, privacy
fence. 6242 Dixie
Road. $1200 month
plus deposit WAC.
Call 623-0609 for
more information.
BRAND NEW- 3/2,
2 car garage, in
beautiful Bayside.
Screen porch/appli-
ances, $1,450/mo.
plus security depos-
it. 936-4170.
FOR RENT- Brand
New Single Family
House- Country liv-
ing in Milton- 3 bed-
2 bath & office/den,
2 1/2 Car Garage.
$1,450. Mo. plus de-
posit. 850-449-2983
or 850-939-1414.

408
Land
DESIRED HORSE
HAVEN
20 acres North of
Milton; zoned agri-
cultural land tax val-
ue $165,730; 2000
sq,\,ft. double wide
plus 2 mobile home
income rentals, ga-
rage, utility shed,
tractor and barn.
$48,705. Total
$214,435 firm. Call
626-6767 leave
message.
LAND FOR SALE
SRefer to
Classllication
#510
MOBILE HOME lots
for rent including
R.V's. FEMA wel-
come. Eastgate Mo-
bile Home Ranch.
626-8973.
410
Mobile Homes
2 BDRM- front kitch-
en, 1 bath. Eastgate
Mobile Home
Ranch. 626-8973.
2 TO 3 bedroom
rentals. Jay, Milton
and Pace. $400 to
$650 per month.
Call 994-5703, leave
message.
MOBILE HOME for
.rent- in, Milton. 2
bdrm/2 bath. $500
per month plus se-
curity. 324-8337. .
SMALL 3 bdrm/1l
bath- total electric.
Eastgate Mobile
Home Ranch. 626-
8973.




* *


Oe S


410
Mobile Homes
MOBILE HOME for
rent- Milton,
3 bdrm/2 bath (14 x
70) on secluded pri-
vate property off
Eastgate Rd. No
pets. Min. 1 yr.
lease- no excep-
tlons. $600
mo./$750 dep. Cred-
It check & referen-
ces required. Availa-
ble 11/15.
Call 313-9951 for
appt.
TRAILER- QUIET,
fenced, porch front
& back, 3/2 CHA,
equipped kitchen,
W/D hook up, close
to 1-10 $650 mo,/
$650 deposit, Ref-
erences required.
'994,9123 after 12
noon.
UNFURNISHED
MOBILE home for
rent. 1/1 In Pollard
Park. $325. month,
$200. dep. Total
electric. No pets.
Baycrest Realty.
994-7918
412
Rooms For Rent
LARGE ROOM for
rent with cooking fa-
cility. Utilities Includ-
ed. 626-8973
416
Vacation & Resort

FISHERMAN'S
PARADISE- Camp-
site, full hookup on
private lake,
stocked with trophy
bass. Pier and boat
available for use.
Come fish and en-
joy quiet country
walks. $50.00 a
day. Call 623-3314.

&


506
Homes

BRICK HOME on
3 1/2 acres. Over
2,700 living area.
Horses allowed.
Beautiful home
with formal L.R.
and D.R., Family
room with fire-
place, breakfast
room with Bay
Windows. All win-
dows in' rear look
out on pool. Palm
trees beautifully
landscaped 2 car
garage, workshop.
$299,900.
Joanne Bryan
Realtor
994-4718
King & Assoc. Realty
BY OWNER/
AGENT 3bd/2ba.
Lakefront. The
Moors Golf & Rac-
quet Club.
$239,900. 380-
3660.

FOR SALE
By Owner
1 acre of land with 4
bedroom/ 2 bath,
central air/heat,
swimming pool and
many extrtas. 626-
1821 call for ap-
pointment. Sonya
Wilkinson
FOR SALE- Ander-
son Ln.- Willard
North area. All brick,
3 bedroom/2 bath, 1
car garage, great
subdivision. Many
extras. $139,900.
983-6526.
Garson Point exit
22 S. Custom built
brick home 3br/2ba
2,428 sq. ft. with
separate finished
guest house 864sq.
ft. on 1.3 acre lot.
Split floor plan with
master suite. Gar-
den, jacuzzi tub, se-
curity system, handi-
cap accessible
doors, and so much
more. $375,500 Call
850-572-5082.
I HAVE homes in
foreclosure please
call 995 0787
POOLI 3br/ 2 bath
In Milton on over 1/2
an acre. Townhouse
in Pensacola. Great
investment opportu-
nity. Canal front
property. Cleared
and ready for your
dream home Lorl
Frey, 1 First Choice
Realty 476-2154.


510
Land

BEAUTIFUL LEVEL
5 Acres, American
Farm's, Shade
tree's, Fruit tree's,
fenced large
barn/shop, pasture
with free 24 x 44
trailer $110,000
cash 981 0760


FOR SALE-
Fenced, 4 acres +/-,
Deep well, septic
tank, zoned agricul-
ture. Partially wood-
ed and pasture. 4
miles from Milton
city limits. $16,500,
per acre. For more
Information call
261-2741 or
623-6329.

LAND FOR RENT
Refer to
Classification
#408
THE BERNATH
Place/Waterfront lot.
80ft on Mulatto Bay-
ou. $250,000. 623-
6848.
7.75 PRIVATE
acres, near Harold
country store -
$96,875.
* 2,000 office
bldg., zoned com-
mercial on .43 acres
on Dogwood Dr. in
Milton, $199,000.
* 3.25 acres w/
1,700 s.f. home
sold "As Is" in East
Milton $165,000.
* Acreage in Milton
for Sale. Linda
Owens/ Exit Realty
(850)698-9854

512
Mobile Homes
14X70 3BR 2 Bath
Mobile Home. See
at 4790 Wildwood
Dr. $8000.
983-0920

2BD MOBILE home
for sale 16 x 70 plus
land. 983 4930.
DESIRED HORSE
HAVEN
20 acres North of
Milton; zoned agri-
cultural land tax val-
ue $165,730; 2000
sq. ft. double wide
plus' 2 mobile home
income rentals, ga-
rage, utility shed,
tractor and barn.
$48,705... Total
$214,435 firm. Call
626-6767 leave
message.
Marlborough vil-
lage, 2br/ 1ba and
land for sale. Nice
lot owner finance/
ohter723-2532:
MOBILE HOME &
Land for sale. awe-
some lot. 3Br/2Ba.
Ward Basin, large
shop, owner
finance/offer. Call
723-2532.

SECLUDED 6
acres Northeast of
Milton, 10 minutes
from Blackwater
State Park.
2-1999 Palm
Harbor modular
homes. 3B/ 2Bath,
front and back
porch on both,
shop, storage, fully
stocked fish pond.
Four acres fenced
pasture. Beautiful
family homesite,
Smust sell for
medical reasons,
$300,000 for all.
Call 850-957-8784
or 850-554-5237.


514
Vacation & Resort
GRAND OPENING
Salel Lake Bar-
gainsl Water access
from $ 34,900 w/
FREE Boat slips.
PAY NO CLOSING
COSTS Sat & Sun.
Oct. 15 & 16th.
Huge pre-construc-
tion savings on
beautifully wooded
parcels at 34,000
acre lake Tennes-
see. Enjoy unlimited
water recreation.
Surrounded by state
forest. Lakefront
available.! Excellent
financing Call now
(800) 704-3154 x
658.

NC MOUNTAIN
CABIN- unfurnished
Inside, on mountain
top, view, trees, wa-
terfall & large public
lake nearby.
$89,900. owner


(866) 789-8535
www. NC77.oom


END OF SEASON
BLOW OUT SALE
Canyon /Ferry
Crossing, Helena,
Montana. Only 8
parcels left In this
magnificent develop-
ment. Awesome
lake and mountain
views, close to Can-
yon Ferry Lake, mi-
nutes to Helena.
Owner to pay clos-
ing costs. Call
(888)-770-2240.


* 0


I-


514
Vacation & Resort

TENNESEE WA--
TERFRONT sale
2.4 acre waterfront,',
$9,9001 Dockable.
building, lots from.
$14,9001 Cabin,
package. $54,900.,.
Call Nowl (866)-,
770-5263 Ext. 8

TENNESSEE- NEW
LAKESIDE COM-'
MUNITY- 1+ acre'
homesites from the'
30's. Private boat!
slips, limited avalla-'
bililty. Close to'
downtown Chatta-"
nooga/Knoxvlllef
Lake access, from,'
community. (866)'"
292-5769,






560
Land

ASHEVILLE NC,
area- MOUNTAIN;
ACREAGE 1+ acre-
riverfront, mountainlr
view and wooded-
homesites from the;
$50's. Gated com-.
munity with custom:
lodge & river walk
(866) 292-5762.

ASHEVILLE NC
AREA- WATER-
FRONT & MOUN-:
TAIN HOMESITES
Gorgeous riverfront,-
river view & wooded"
homesites. 1+ acres-
from the 40's. Gated.
community with:
amenities Call (866):
292-5762

BEAUTIFUL LAKE
LOS- GEORGIA'S
Finest & Boating.
New Golf Course
on pristine Lake
Russell. Owner fi-
nancing available,
(706)213-6734
www.lakerussellpro-
perties.com.
BEAUTIFUL
NORTH CAROLINA:
ESCAPE THE
HEAT IN THE
COOL BEAUTIFUL
PEACEFUL MOUN-
TAINS:. OF WEST-
ERN NG,. Homes,
Cabins. Acreage &
Invesimen'is. Crero-
kee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate,
Murphy. www.chero-
keemountainrealty.c
om. Call for Free
Brochure (800)841-
5868.
COASTAL GEOR-
GIA gated communi-
'ty, deep water ac-
cess, ancient oak
trees, golf, tennis;
proposed pool and
fitness. 1 acre
homesites from the
mid 70's. (877) 266-
7376. www.cooper-
sooint.com
COASTAL NORTH
Carolina waterfront!
3+ Acres, $99,900
Beautifully wooded
parcel on deep boat-
able water with ac-
cess to ICW, Atlantic
& sounds. Prime lo-
cation close to town.
Paved rds, u/g utilit-
ies, county water.
Excellent financing:
Call now (800)732-
6601 x 1405.
COASTAL NORTH
Carolina waterfront
3+/- acres, $99,900:
Beautifully wooded
parcel on deep boat-
able water with ac-
cess to ICW, Atlantic
& sounds. Prime lo-
cation close to town,
paved rds, ug utilit-
ies, county water.
Excellent financing.
Call now (800) 732-
6601x 1405.

EAST ALABAMA
Mountain Property
for sale, one hour
West of Atlanta in
Piedmont, AL Great
for enjoyment or in-
vestment 16-acres-
$57,750.00 More in-
formation Call Gary
McCurdy (256)239-
8001.


it








I PAGE 9B THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS OCTOBER 26, 2005


560
Land
GRAND OPENING!
Lakefront Acreage
from $69,900. SAVE
$10,000 Nov 5th &
6th. Spectacular
new waterfront com-
munity on one of the
largest & cleanest
mountain lakes in
America! Large, es-
t ate-size deepwater
parcels, gorgeous
woods, panoramic
views. Paved roads,
country water, utilit-
ies. Low financing.
Call now (800)54-
5092 x 266.
NC MOUNTAIN
property. Land with
spectacular views,
creeks and hard-
wood trees on Yung
Mtn. 1-15 acres,
from $25,000 to.
$89,000. Perfect for
log cabin. (800)
699-1289 or
www.riverbendlake-
lure.com
NC MOUNTAIN-
10+ Acres/Stream/
$39,000. Grand
SOpening October
22-23. Spectacular
long, range views
Near Blue Ridge
Parkway and
Boone.
Excellent financing,
roads & utilities.
(800)455-1981, ext.
210
NC MOUNTAINS 20
Ac w/50 Miles Views
Secure Private -
Easy Gentle Build-
ing Sites Towering
Hardwoods Near
Asheville: & Lake
Lure $120,000. Pris-
Stine Propertes
(800)262-4187.


560
Land
NORTH CAROLINA
Gated Lakefront
Communityl.5 acres
plus, 90 miles of
shoreline. Never
before offered with
%20 pre-develoment
discounts %90
financing.
Call(800)709-5253
PRE-CONSTRUC-
TION WATER-
FRONT Only 10%
down, 2007 comple-
tion and immediate
furnished condos
minutes from Ft. lau-
derdale Beach.
$209K + up. Great
rental investment
Realtor (877) 468-
5687.
SERENE MOUN-
TAIN GOLF HOME-
SITE $342/MO.
Breathtaking views.
Upscale Golf Com-
munity set amid Dye
designed .18 hole
course in Carolina
Mountains. Near
Asheville NC. A
sanctioned Golf Di-
gest School Teach-
ing Facility! Call toll-
free (800)334-3253
X 974 www.chero-
keevalleysc.com
Price: $69,900, 10%
down, balance fi-
nanced 12 months
at 4.24% fixed, 24
month balloon,
OAC. '
SOUTH COASTAL
Georgia $149,900
for a 2+ acre deep
water marsh lot
$224,900 for a 3+
acre oversized deep
water lot 45 min fro
Jacskonville/15 min
from St. Simon's.
Call today for ap-
pointriment. Excellent
Financing available.
(877)GA-OCEAN x
708.
WESTERN NORTH
CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS
Cool Air, Views,
Streams, Homes,
Cabins, Acreage
FREE BROCHURE
OF MOUNTAIN
PROPERTY
(800)642-5333.
Realty Of Murphy
317 Peachtree St.
Murphy, N.C.28906
.www.realtyofmur-


560
Land

SOUTH COASTAL
Georgia 3+ acre
deepwater Ocean
Access Lot from just
$420 per monthly *
45 min from Jack-
sonville/ 15 min from
St. Simon's Call to-
day for appointment.
Excellent Financing
available. (877)GA-.
OCEAN x 703*
monthly pmnt of
$240.32 based on
$59,900 purchase
price w/10% down
payment of $5,990,
$53,910 financed at
5.19% fixed (APR of
5.55% includes 1%.
origination fee) for 3
yrs. 35 monthly pay-,
ments of $240.32'
w/final payment of
$53,910. Offer void
where prohibited by
law.

TENNESEE LAKE-
SIDE acreage- .new
community. 1+ acre
homesites from the
30's. Private boat
slips, limited availa-
bility. Lake
access/boat ramp.
Close to downtown
Chattanooga. '(866)
292-5769,

WHITEWATER LIV-
ING-IN the Tenne-
see Smokies -Gat,
ed waterfront com-
munity Riverfront
and Mountain Views
available, Prices
starting as low as
$46,900. Final
phase limited lots,
Call now! No closing
costs buy direct
from developer.
SAVE THOU-
SANDS$$$ (800)
559-3095 Ext. 327
www.rivercrest.com
* some restrictions
apply.

PETS &^
ANIMA^LS


708'
Pets
ASPCA ADOPT a
dog shelter month.
Any animals adopt-
ed by an Individual
60 yrs. or older, the
shelter will provide
free spay & neuter
services. Any ques--
tions, call the Santa
Rosa County Animal
Services shelter at
983-4682 or 936-
6177.


FREE TO GOOD
HOME
(2) 1 yr. old male
dogs. Very friendly
& well cared for.
983-7820

FREE TO good
home- puppies, .11
wks old, have 1st
shots, dewormed,
Lab mix. 356-7122..
GIANT PLATED
Lizard for sale. Ac-
cessories included.
Call 418-094? for'
more information.
MOVING... MUST,
find a good home for
a great dog. 4'1/2
year old
White Lab. LOveabie
And friendly. 983-
2618 or 623-0726
712
Lost & Found
PETS
LOST 9 month old
white & black medi-
um hair dog look like
a Springer Spaniel.
Lost in vicinity of
Stewart St. Reward
offer. 626 6444 or
516-5445
LOST BEAGLES in
East Milton area.
Right after Dennis
near the end'of July.
1 male, 1 female.
Please call with any
information 626-
2428 or 516-7983.
LOST DOG- Female
boxer, brown
w/white .around
neck, black around
face/eyes. Lost
near Pine' Blossom
& Cherokee Rd.
390-5899.
LOST MALE CAT
No tail, creamy
white with gray
face and blue
eyes. 623-3519
=,~


712
Lost & Found
PETS

LOST YOUR PET?
Be sure to call
Santa Rosa
Animal Control
to report him
missing and to
be sure he's not
there waiting
on.you to
pick him upl
850-983-4680


802
Antiques
ANTIQUE MAPLE
table- folding sides.
$750. 623-8624.
804
Apparel


JUST JUDY'S
ALTERATIONS
Dress Making
and More!
Call Judy at
850-626-6349


PROM
DRESSES
Worn. last year..
Not old
fashioned.
Sizes 8-10.
One purple
(never worn),
one white, and
one teal. All
three strapless.
Call Sheena
at the
Press Gazette
623-2120 or
637-7044
after 5pm.


806
,Appliances


818
Lawn Equipment
FOR SALE- Murray
12.5 h.p., 38 In. cut
riding lawnmower
w/dump cart. New,
less than 20 hours
running time. $700.
983-2779.

FOR SALE:
Vermeer SC252
Self-Propelled
stump grinder.
Less than 100 hrs.
Trailer included.
$12,000. 983-2820


822
Musical
Instruments
KIMBALL PIANO-
Excellent corndilon
$750 623-9925
826
Sporting Goods

GUNS FOR SALE
Windchester -
model 12 gauge, 28
:'inch mod $600
12 Gauge pump
S/G with hammer
"$400
Remington, old
model deluxe 30/06
Automatic rifle/
scope $400
National 12 gauge
$300
cash only
Call: 626 7352

HUNT ELK, Red
Stag, Whitetail,, Buf-
falo season opens
3/31/06. Guaranteed
hunting license;,
$5,00. We have No--
Game, No-Pay poli-
cy. Call days:
(314)209-9800, eve-
nings (314)293-
0610.
830
Miscellaneous
For Sale

01517640


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale


Centipede-
St. Augustine
Farm Direct
We Deliver
434-0066 ,
'32 FT. Walk-in cool-
er, excellent condi-
tion. $7,500. 982-
3180.
6 3060 White 1/1
Insulated windows.
Brand new. Never
installed. $500 obo.
572-1404.
ALL STEEL
BLDGS. UP TO.
50 % OFF!. Engi-
;n'eered for Hurricane
Coasti Ship factory:
direct for quick deliv-
ery. 24 x 30 Up to'
100 x 200 i Call.
Now!' (800) 499-
6401 Eddie.

BUILDING, SALE!
"Last 'Chancel"
20X26 Now $3995:
25x30, $5700.
30X40, $8300.
40X60. $12,900
Many, others. Meets
140 MP.H.' Higher.
available. One end
included. Pioneer
(800)668-5422.
DIVING BOARD-
POLARIS, sand fil-
ter- like new. :2
pumps, make an of-
fer. Oak entertain-
ment center that will
hold 27 in. TV.
make offer. .994-
7783 leave mes-
sage.
FOR SALE Black'
Bart wood insert
burns 18' logs.
$00.00 call 623-
5100
FREE- 2 pair of mo-
bile home steps (1)
5 steps/up to 45 in-
ches & (1) 4 steps/
.up to 37.5 inches.
Wooden with rod
iron railing. Located
near Whiting Field.
626-5975.


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale

HOT TUB- 1 month
old, seats 4-6 peo-
ple, hardly used.
$2,500. 916-0003
or 501-3626.
METAL ROOFING
SAVE $$$ Buy Di-
rect From Manufac-
turer. 20 colors in
stock with all Acces-
sories. Quick turn
around Delivery
Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.





We Deliver & Install
Centipede
St. Augustine
Bermuda
Bailed Pine Straw
Call us irsi "Save Time
Call usast ave Money
Hwy. 87So. Million
626-8578

1986 transmission
for sale. .:Pack and
SPlay lor child, baby
'bath seat, toddler
car seal, child back
pack carrier, baby
car seat. 623-4278.

832
Miscellaneous
Wanted

GLASS RAFTER
needs empty glass
soft drink bottles, (al!
kinds). Not necessa-
rily collectors edi-
tions. Will pick up.
983-8042.

PAY CASH for junk
cars or trucks. Run-
ning or not. Call
983-9527
WANTED MORE'S
Paying up to $10 a
case for MRE's. Will
pick up. Leave mes-
sage. 304-1263.

834
Lost & Found
MERCHANDISE


834
Lost & Found
MERCHANDISE

FOUND-, TACKLE
box on Magnolia
Ave. between Stew-
art & Dogwood. Call
to identify between
the hours of 6 p.m.-
9p.m. 626-3644.




904
Cars

$500 POLICE im-
pounds cars from
$5001 Tax repos, US
Marshall and 'IRS
sales! Cars, Trucks,
SUV's. Toyota's.
SHonda's, Chevy's
and more! For list-
ings call (800)571-
0225 xC295.

2000 MUSTANG
Convertible V-6,
runs great, custom
tint $7,000. Call 626-
* j6 38 : i .....
99 EXPEDITION
Eddie Bauer. Good
condition $10,000
Phone 981-9471


LOW RIDER
82' Cadillac.
Hydraulics, subs,
t.v.'s, rag sunroof,
new paint
(Pearl White),
100,000 miiles,
14" knock offs,
street charger.
Hops and turns
on three wheels.
$6,500 OBO
Call 626-5595
or 450-9201.

VW CONVERTI-
BLE- '72 needs Tic,
garge kept. $3,500.
Call 572-5652.

914
Recreational

2 BUSES for sale-
CHEAP. Call Bill
Wallace at 572-
6500.


914
Recreational


DUTCHMAN
TRAVEL
Trailer
2000 sleeps 6, ex-
tra nice and clean,


asking.$10,000.
626-1821 Call for
appointment. Sonja
Wilkinson

1996 GMC Jimmy,,
V-6, cold A/C, runs,
good. $1,100. Call
626-3638.


916
Sport Utility
Vehicles


918
Trucks


2002 FORD F-150
Truck 4 door, excel-
lent condition, ex-,
lended warranty low
miles. 1985 GMC
Suburban, runs.
good, good wor.< ve-
hicle, $2,300. 983-
7820.


'72 CHEVROLET
Pick up truck, runs,
SWB, needs paint,
$1,800.' .OBO. 516-
0113

91' CHEVY S-10,
4.3 Liter, V-6.
$2,500. 994-7286 :


I


GENRA


^


r-~----~--~-;c1-h-I-~ IrlR~CIXX-ljl~.







I PAGE 10B THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS OCTOBER 26,2005


Y BY DAY Quality Fencing


Coumpi;i;.i pr;'in for all of your fencing needs.
S,..h.,- Locally licensed,


nwned


ir '' "' and operated.
We look forward
to your call.
New fencing or repairs
Call 850-529-3546
K davbvdavfencina@amail.corrn


MASTER TECHNICIAN
MARK SALTER
Small engine repairs. Kohler,
Briggs, Tecumseh. Blowers,
chainsaws, lawn equipment,
generators, pressure washers,
edgers. Parts also sold here.


Boutwell Automotive
6593 Caroline St. in Milton
850-623-4750


'New Hope Painting
& Wallpapering
Interior & Exterior Residential
Drywall
Pressure Cleaning
Wallpapering
SCarpentry Work
Call the Ericksens today!
723-2550 623-6034
I lif nn nntwnr MA-P-- Ip.vA -ma


o' Backhoe Work ./,1,
0\o0 Stump & Tree Removal O'


Hurricane Clean-up
Dirt Work
No Job Too Big or Small
Brven Ballard


Maybe, you can do it
yourself, but will you?


Florida Rooms, Screen Rooms, Pool
Enclosures, Patio Covers, Carports,
Vinyl Siding, Shutters, Skirting,
Awnings, Gutters, Replacement
Windows, Aluminum Columns,
Handrails, & Fencing
LICENSED AND INSURED


Also Removes
Roots, Bushes, Hedgerows


* Backyard Accessible


* Local Contractor-Retired USN


Senior Discount
Licensed 232-8746 Insured


Dai pi 00
Im roem nt Ic.


Specializing in Insurance
Estimates, Small Home
Improvement Projects
and Maintenance


(850) 626-6944


Insured
Budget &
Licensed

S House
Painting
Call Andy @
(850) 304-9680


Mike Kaylor
Cement Mason


Patios Driveways Walks


obile Home Brokers


Maior and Minor Repairs


Personalize & Deautity your nome or
business by living style to your


Free. Estimates Quality work
No job too small Affordableprices


850-994-0897


Reroof- Patio Covers -
- Screen Rooms Leveling.-
Locally Owned and Operated
Free Estimates


VisitingAngels


NIOR CAREI


* In home
0 Companionship
* Meals
* Light housework
* Errands


r okers Lawn c
Tractor Service
From trimming to tractor work
Clean-ups Raking
Hauling Mowing
Bushhogging Dirt Work


Reasonable Rates Free Estimates
(850) 529-0434
(850) 623-0493
k. Licensed & Insured j


: M QE MN _


REMODELING SPECIALIST
*Home Repairs *Remodeling
*Tile *Wall Texturing
*Paintihg Interior and Exterior
*Wallpaper and Removal
4 *Kitchens and Baths *Cabinet Refacing
12 years experience
Licensed and Insured
Deal Directly With Owner
S. Call Jon At
** 17m- A ^ ;4 .


MnEU n~Rininii.
TRUCKING, INC.
Asphalt
Limestone., ,
Rock i

8506 823.3461 1 )
Jesse arnhill Trucking (850) 336-3(


You'll find exactly
what you need in the


BSD! Businesses, place
your ad in the Business
Service Directory and
recieve a FREE line ad!
Call Dale or David at


-2120 to find out


I EXIT REALTY N.R
Linda Owens Realtor
850-698-9854
5345 Hwy. 90
Pace, FL 32571
Email:


ens @exitrealtynfi.com


Licensed &-Insure :,
Locally owned & Operated
Reasonable Prices
All Phases of Drywalling Any Texture
* Painting Remodeling Damage Repair
NO MONEY DOWN
REFERENCES AVAILABLE
Roger Tootle
HM: (850)995-5090
LCell: (850)501-0519 1


r.,09.w..a Werner'
Serswie rmn,.
Land Clearing, and all tractor,
dozer, and related services



NO JOB TOO SMALL!
Call Billy Rogers for estimate
Phone: (850) 957-4952
Iall: (IR5II\ 2R1-Adn7


Above & Beyond
e STree Service


Don't wait until it's
too- late


Senior & Military Discounts


Licensed KVin Fre Free
Stump & Insured Kv Estimates
Grinding (850)983-7820


offering Economical Elegance
To Private Individuals
Laminate Ceramic Wood
Inslalliaion Only '

IIIIPERGO

Various Military Discount
Call Robert
850-255-8414
QQO-O77n


Bobcat
Services


1 FIRST '476-2154
CHOICE 0 www.1firstchoicerealty.com
1441 CREIGHTON RD, PENSACOLA, FL 32504
Fax- (8501479-2555
Cell. |850, 777-1153
a 'ror EMAIL. Ireysellsioday@holmail.com Lori
3 br/ 2.5 bath in Milton on over 1/2 an acre REAI
,' Townhouse in Pensacola. Great investment
opportunity
Canal front property. Cleared and' ready for your dream


lenerai nuitne iiiijouvemellinut
Specializing in:
. &AA Room Additions


-rey
LTOR','


wetle


Porches


Patios


No job to small, so give us a call!
850-626-7874
850-686-0733
,. ,..- f F% fM A


Need Stucco Work?
Call


LIUtN~b-U AINU INSUMR-tU
Conventional and Synthetic Systems

698-8327
Ri9R-Q_1R4


SLocal Home Repair


* Fence Repair Installation
* Paint e Drywall *Trim *Tile


10 years experience
Contact Paul McMullen
850-723-9767
0. X X 0 P i I


I


100% Financing WAC
(850) 857-1051


A.


--. .


1944-2


I


t


Ul


L %,Vil k








































































Schedule of Events for Veterans Day
Program Haywood Hanna Stadium, Milton High School
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2005

Parade Starts St. Rose of Lima Church on Park Avenue at 10:00 a.m.
Formal Ceremonies at begin at 11:00 a.m. in Stadium
(Or to be moved into MHS campus auditorium in event of inclimate weather)
Citizens Call Bill Allen, DAV #125
Welcome to the 2005 Veterans Day Ceremonies
Parade the Colors led by Naval Air Station Whiting Field Color Guard,
Pace & Milton High School NJROTC, and the SEA CADETS Whiting Division
Invocation: LCDR. STEVE SHAW, CHAPLIN CORPS, USN
Pledge of Allegiance followed by
National Anthem with Combined Bands
Laying of Wreath escorted by GYSGT M.M. Whitney, USMC
Rifle Salute and Taps

Avalonr Middle School "MEISTERSINGERS"
(under the direction of Ms. Joy Tyner)
Will sing Armed Force Salute and Sing America Sing,
Introduction of Special Persons

Guest Speaker
Colonel. C.E. Holzworth, USMC, Commander MATSG-21

ESSAY CONTEST WINNER Fleet Reserve Association Branch 210
Benediction: LCDR: STEVE SHAW, CHAPLIN CORPS, USN
Proclamations from City of Milton and Santa Rosa County
Santa Rosa County HappyVeterans Day Card Contest Winners
First Place Best in County Ribbons
Presented by CO HT-18 & DAV 125.

Veterans Day Programs continue with a special ceremony to dedicate and unveil
THE WAR DOG MONUMENT in the Santa Rosa County Veterans Plaza at 12:30.


Cpl


Participating Members, Santa Rosa County Veterans Advisory
Council.
American Legion Post & Unit 78
American Legion Post 121
AMVETS Post #1292
Paul D. Lyon Jr. USMC, Disabled American Veterans Chapter #125
and Ladies Auxiliary.
Fleet Reserve Association Branch & Unit #210
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post and Auxiliary #14833
MILTON ELKS LODGE Number 2377


A PROCLAMATION BY THE MAYOR OF THE
CITY OF MILTON, FLORIDA,
PROCLAIMING NOVEMBER 11, 2005, AS
VETERANS DAY

WHEREAS, Veteran's Days has been set aside as a national holiday to honor
those American Veterans who served in the military services to preserve our
freedom; and

WHEREAS, It is an honor and privilege for the City of Milton to join with
Santa Rosa County and the other cities and counties throughout this great
nation who have dedicated memorials to the gallant men and women who
made. great sacrifices to defend our freedom and way of life; and

WHEREAS, It is fitting that our citizens join in honoring our sons and daugh-
ters through whose service and sacrifices we now enjoy a freedom and way of
life unique in this world;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Guy Thompson, Mayor of the City of Milton,
Florida, do hereby proclaim November 11, 2005, as

VETERAN'S DAY

and urge all citizens to reflect upon this. day, upon those American Veterans we
honor and to fully appreciate the freedom that we enjoy today.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have set my hand and caused to be affixed the
official seal of the City of Milton, Florida, this 3rd day of October, 2005.


67


Guy Thompson, Mayor


ATTEST:


Dewitt Nobles, City Clerk


r


60''


~/~Yn~dMu










rayg ,-u


NAS Whiting passes muster under BRAC scrutiny!

After extensive preparations Milton and Santa Rosa County can rest easy now that NAS Whiting is safe


Sweeping reassessment
of military bases and facili-
ties by the nation's Base
Closure and Realignment
Commission left NAS
Whiting Field untouched, but
other area units suffered
major civilian losses in jobs
and military spots.
Although NAS Whiting
Field survived round one of
the Pentagon's latest Base
Realignment and Closure
process, the future had not
been chiseled in stone at the
time.
Round two was still- to
come!
What it meant for NAS
Whiting's future mission,
some officials said their, was
still cloudy.
The local base got past
round-one without even
being mentioned, but NAS
Pensacola did not fare as
well, officials pointed out.
"If Whiting is showing no
loss or no gain, it could
mean the Navy is deciding to
do nothing as far as its pri-
mary aviation training is con-
cerned," commented Santa
Rosa County Commissioner
Don Salter at the time.
"Or, it could mean that
changes will occur at other
primary aviation bases" he
continued, "We just simply
don't know that yet."
Now we do. NAS Whiting
has passed muster.
The nine members
named to serve on the 2005
BRAC Commission was sub-
mitted by the President and
Congressional leaders for
Senate confirmation in
March of this year. They
were approved, and the pre-
liminary recommendations
by the Defense Department
reached them this May.
These recommenda-
tions,, a list of.bases that the
Department had selected for
closure or realignment (sub-
mitted .on. September 8,
2005), were the ones that
failed to mention NAS
Whiting Field, and subse-
quently were accepted.
President Bush was to
decide by September 23,
2005 whether to accept or
reject the BRAC recommen-
dations in their entirety, the
White House's only option.
The Commission had
until October 20, 2005 to
submit a revised list of pro-
posed closures if the


President had rejected its
preliminary report. And after
that the President had until
November 7, 2005 to
approve or disapprove the
revised recommendations.
Although the recommen-
dations did not please every-
one, it was a positive,
process, most officials
agree.
The Commission termi-
nates on April 15, 2006.
To protect NAS Whiting
from closure, officials had
worked feverishly to reduce
residential encroachment on
area military bases since
Washington's last BRAC
round.
The county's Joint Land
Use Study (JLUS) program
incorporates zoning and
other land use changes
designed to discourage
housing construction near
NAS Whiting and its outlying
fields. And it has worked.
The JLUS project was
recognized twice in recent
months. It received the 2004
Award of Excellence from
Florida's Chapter of the
American Planning
Association and the Florida
Planning and Zoning associ-
ation's Outstanding
Innovation Award. '
"I feel like all the hard
work that everyone has done
is paying off," Salter noted.
While NAS .Whiting is
basking in' the afterglow of
relief, NAS Pensacola was
not so lucky. The installation
lost 1,000 civilian and 302
military positions.
But the Pensacola facility
is slated -for other realign-
ment as ,well. The
Pentagons list indicates 555
military and 124 civilians are
slated for transfer to
Pensacola.
Nearby Eglin Air Force
Base gained' 2,100 civilian
position while Hurlburt Field
lost six contractor slots.
Here is why NAS Whiting
field is so important, It is a
fixture in Milton, contributing
bigtime to the area's econo-
my.
Thousands of Navy,
DOD civilian, and contractor
personnel work at the air-
field, and its presence
accounts for a significant
percentage of total employ-
ment, personal income, and
business sales in Santa
Rosa County.


Add to that the fact that
thousands of military retirees
reside in the area.. Their
combined retirement pen-
sions, Social Security
income and tax contributions
and spending add to the
local revenue flow.
NAS Whiting contracts a
variety of commodities and
services, such as fuel, food,
banking, utilities, mainte-
nance,' and construction
from the local economy as
well.
The economic impact of
NAS Whiting salaries on the
area's total economy
equaled to about $268 mil-
lion in 2003.
As of January 1, 2004,
NAS Whiting Field employed
3,061 in "defense-related"
jobs, approximately 8% of
Santa Rosa's total employ-
ment count of 38,600.
NAS Whiting jobs do
more than add cash flow.
Their presence generates a


That's a witrap ... the base is safe!


need for additional goods
and services, which helps
employ more area residents.
Officials .estimate that


each military-related job
housed at NAS Whiting cre-
ates additional jobs in the
surrounding area.


The base also pays the
City of milton approximately
$2.1 million per year in utility
services.


Not everyone is aware of the intricate history

and workings of the BRAC Commission


In July 2001, the
Department of Defense
announced an Efficient
Facilities Initiative (EFI). This
consolidation was projected
to save an estimated $3.5
billion annually. EFI was
designed to enable the U.S.
military to match facilities to
forces:
EFI ensures the primacy
of military value in making
decisions on facilities and
harnessing the strength and
creativity of the private sec-
tor by creating partnerships
with local communities.
All military installations
were to be reviewed, and
recommendations made
based on the military value
of the facilities and the struc-
ture of the force. The EFI
encouraged a cooperative
effort between the President,
the Congress, and the mili-
tary and local communities
to achieve the most effective
and efficient base structure
for America's Armed Forces.
SIt would give local com-
munities a significant role in
determining the future use of
facilities in their area by
transferring closed installa-
tions to local redevelopers at


no cost (provided that pro-r
ceeds are reinvested) and by
creating partnerships with.
local communities to own,
operate, or maintain those
installations that remain.
In mid-December 2001
House and Senate negotia-
tors authorized a new round
of military base closings, but
delayed .any action until
2005. While the Bush admin-
istration and the Senate had
wanted the base-closing
process to begin in 2003, the
House had been opposed.
Under the compromise
plan, the Secretary of
Defense would submit a
force structure plan and facil-
ity inventory, with a certifica-
tion that proposed closings
were justified by the force
structure plan and that they
'would produce net savings.
The closings would also con-
sider environmental costs
and community impact.
Seven of the nine com-,
mission members could vote
to add bases to thel
Pentagon's proposed clo-
sure list, but a simple major-
ity would suffice to drop
bases from the closure plan.
The Bush administration has


estimated that 20 percent to
25 percent of military bases
are surplus, and that the
Pentagon couldsave $3 bil-
lion a year by eliminating
surplus facilities.
The nine members
named to serve on the 2005
BRAC Commission were to
be submitted by the
President and congressional,
leaders for Senate confirma-
tion in March, 2005.
In May, 2005, the
Department of Defense
would submit to the BRAC
Commission and the
Congressional Defense
Committees a list of bases
that the Department had
selected for closure or
realignment. Communities
across the nation with a mili-
tary installation began gear-
ing up for BRAC 2005. .
The Base Realignment
and 'Closure, (BRAC)
process had its origins in the
1960s. Understanding that
the Department of Defense
(DOD) had to reduce its
base structure that had been
created during World War II
and the Korean War,
President John F. Kennedy
directed Secretary of


Defense Robert S.
McNamara to develop and
implement, an extensive
base realignment and clo-
sure program to adjust to the
realities of the 1960s.
The Office of the
Secretary of Defense (OSD)
subsequently established
the criteria to govern the
selection of bases without
consulting Congress or the
military. Under McNamara's
guidance DOD closed sixty
bases early in the 1960s
without Congress 'or other
government agencies being
involved.
In view of the political
and economic ramifications
of the closures. Congress
decided that it had to be
involved in the process and
passed legislation in 1965
that required DOD to report
any base closure programs
to it. However, President
Lyndon B. Johnson vetoed
the bill. This permitted DOD
to continue realigning and
closing bases without con-
gressional oversight
throughout the rest of the
1960s.

See BR.AC, Page 3


1


Let Us

Honor


Our Active

and Retired
Military





PACE WATER
SYSTEM

Woodbine Rd.,Pace
994-5129


I


Premier Pet Grooming

Keri Sims Owner/Groomer


8-5 Mon-Sat
Closed
Tues. & Sun.


r


-r I I


- ---- ----- s


e hT Santa Rosa Press Ga ette


Saturday October 26, 2005


Pan o 9r












BRAC history as involved and complicated as the decisions it had to make


From Page 2


Economic and political
-pressures eventually forced
Congress to intervene in the
p process of realigning and
closing bases and to end
i DOD's independence on the
matter. On 1 August 1977
iPresident Jimmy Carter
approved Public Law 95-82.
SIt required DOD to notify
Congress when a base was
^ candidate for reduction or
closure; to prepare studies
on the strategic, environ-
iMental, and local economic
.: consequences of such
ijction; and to wait sixty days
!or a congressional
response.
'. Codified as Section
,2687, Title 10, United States
Code, the legislation along
:with the requirements of the
;National Environmental
!Policy Act (NEPA) permitted
Congress to thwart any DOD
proposals to initiate base
.realignment and closure
'studies unilaterally by refus-
ling to approve them and
gave it an integral role in the
process.
As economic pressures
mounted, the drive to realign
and close military installa-
tions intensified. In 1983 the
President's Private Sector
Survey on Cost Control (the
'Grace Commissicn) con-
cIluded in its report that
economies could be made in
,base structure and simultai-
n'reously recommended the
.creation of a nonpartisan,
independent commission to
,study base realignment and
.,losure. Although nothing
p.ame of this recommenda-
,tion, the defense budget that
,had been declining since
1985 and that was predicted
to continue to decrease in
coming years prompted the
.Secretary of Defense to take
'decisive action.
In 1988 the Secretary of
:Defense recognized the
,requirement to close excess
..bases to save money and
therefore chartered the
'Commission on Base
Realignment ard,d Closure in
,1988 to recommend military


bases within the United
States for realignment and
closure.
Congress has enacted
two laws since 1988 that pro-
vide for the closure, in part or
in whole, and the realign-
ment of facilities. Since
1988, there have been four
successive bipartisan
Defense Base Closure and
Realignment Commissions
(BRAG) that recommended
the closure of 125 major mil-
itary facilities and 225 minor
military bases and installa-
tions, and the realignment in
operations and functions of
145 others.
By another accounting,
the, four BRAG rounds
achieved 97 base closings
and 55 major realignments.
This resulted in net savings
to taxpayers of over $16 bil-
lion through 2001, and over
$6 billion in additional sav-
ings annually.
The principal mechanism
for implementing the policy
in both statues has been an
independent, bipartisan
commission. Two of the most
pressing issues are provid-
ing assistance to local com-
munities economically
impacted by base closures
and establishing a cost-
effective program of environ-
mental clean-up at bases
prior to their disposition.
Under the BRAC
process, the Secretary of
Defense makes recommen-
dations to a commission,
nominated by the President,,
confirmed by the Senate.
The commission, after being
confirmed by the Senate,
reviews these recommenda-
tions and makes their own
recommendations to the
President.
The President then
reviews the recommenda-
tion, either sends those back
to the commission for addi-
tional work or forwards them,
without changes, to the
Congress, and then the rec-
ommendations of the com-
mission. go into effect unless
disapproved by a joint reso-
lution of the Congress..
Following Clinton's


action, lawmakers did not
agree until 2001 to schedule
another round of base clos-
ings. Before it was resolved,
the dispute held up a confer-
ence agreement on the fiscal
2002 defense authorization
bill (PL 107-107) and led
Bush to threaten to veto the
bill if it did not allow a new
round in 2005.
Defense Secretary
Donald H. Rumsfeld and
Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton,
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs
.of Staff, told the House
Armed Services Committee
in July 2001 that the
Pentagon maintained 25
percent more facilities than it
needs, even after four
rounds of base closings in
the 1990s. By some
accounts, the excess military
bases annually cost taxpay-


ers an estimated $3.5 billion.
The armed services are
focusing on improvement of
installation operations, and
the OSD are examining effi-
ciencies that could be
obtained by such actions as
consolidation of functions on
installations, regionalization
of support, base realign-
ments and closures, and cre-
ation of joint installations
where facilities are shared'
by active forces, National
Guard, and Reserve compo-
nents of all the services.
,At the installation \level,
better understanding of what
facilities (and their condition)
exist on an installation per-
mits more efficient use of the
space that is available, and
is a first step for any base
planning. The Army and the
Navy have been using pro-


cedures that permit them to
lease unneeded facilities on
their installations to neigh-
boring communities or com-
mercial organizations. In
turn, the lessee provides
some form of in-kind support
to the installation (e.g. con-.
struction or operation of a
needed facility) or payment.
to the government.

2005 BRAC
March 15: President
Bush to name members of
the fifth Base Realignment
and Closure (BRAC) com-
mission.
May 16: Defense
Secretary Donald H.
Rumsfeld to give the BRAC
commission and Congress
the Pentagon's recommen-
dations for military facilities
that should be closed.


Sept. 8: BRAC commis-
sion to make its own base
closure recommendations.
Sept. 23: Presidential
decision on whether to
accept or reject the BRAC
recommendations in their
entirety, the White House's
only options. If Bush accepts
the plan, it becomes final
within 45 legislative days,
unless Congress passes a
joint resolution to block the
entire package.
Oct. 20: If Bush rejects
the BRAC recommenda-
tions, the commission has
until this date to submit a
revised list of proposed clo-
sures.
Nov, 7: President to
approve or disapprove the
revised recommendations.
April 15, 2006: The
commission terminates


Shadows deepen as the sun sets at the Veterans Memorial in downtown Milton


The City of Milton is proud to be



"The Cradle of Naval Aviation"'







































Nobles, Councilwoman Pat Lunsford, Councilman Grady Hester




"Our Best Wishes to the many men and women who


have served our country."
8
B R ( t i C lma o W onc oC


































have served our countryy.)


Y


&


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Saturday Uciouer 26, 2005


Paae 3-C












Area veterans' service organizations contribute to the lifestyle of those who

served as well as those active duty military men and women now serving


Disabled American Veterans
Chapter 125 works as an advocate


Disabled American
Veterans Chapter #125 is
named in honor of Corporal
Paul D. Lyon, Jr., United
States Marine Corps, who
was killed by the hand of ter-
rorists in the bombing of the
Marine Barracks on Sunday,
October 23, 1983 in Beirut,
Lebanon where 242
American service men were
killed on that faithful day.
Paul graduated from
Milton High School in May of
1981.
DAV #125's name was
changed on September 14,
1990 in honor of Corporal
Paul Lyon, Jr. Paul's parents,
Marie and Paul, Sr., live in
milton and are members of
DAV Chapter #125.
Disabled American
Veterans is made up exclu-
sively of men and women
disabled ii the nation's
defense and is dedicated to
one single purpose: building
better lives for the entire
nation's disabled veterans
and their families.
This mission is carried
forward by:
-Providing free, profes-
sional assistance to veterans
and their families by obtain-
ing benefits and services
earned through military serv-
ice and provided by the
Department of Veterans
Affairs and otheragencies of
government.
-Providing outreach
concerning its programs to
the American people gener-
ally, and to disabled veterans
and their families specifically.
-Representing the inter-
ests of disabled veterans
and their families and wid-
owed spouses and their
orphans before Congress,


We salute
military


the White House, and the
judicial branch as well as
state and local governments.
-Extending DAV's mis-
sion of hope into the commu-
nities where these veterans
and their families live
through a network of state
level departments and local
chapters.
-Providing a structure
through which disabled vet-
erans can express their com-
passion and spirit of com-
radeship through a variety of
volunteer programs.,
DAV is a nonprofit organ-
ization that works as an
advocate for the veteran. It is
not part of the Veterans
Administration and receives
no funding from the U.S.
Government. All of its fund-
ing comes through dona-
tions.
At the local level the goal
is to get the public to know
when a person needs help
and to send him or her over
if they are a veteran. The
membership works with
other veterans organizations
and' the VA and are treated
as a partner by the VA.
This is a win-win situa-
tion. The organization helps
the VA with its ever increas-
ing backlog of cases by
sending them well put
together claims. With its help
the, DAV knows how to help
cut through some of the mis-
takes that an individual might
make that either kills or
slows down the claim
process. This streamline
effect helps the.VA and in
turn helps all veterans in
need.
At Chapter 125 members
work hard to help keep vets
informed and up to date on


4507 Chumuckla Hwy.
Pace, Florida 32571
(850)994-1610

our Quiltingstation.com
I Quiltingstation@bellsouth.net


We Salute Our

Veterans of the

U.S. Armed Forces!


Pace Assembly of God
3948 Highway 90 Pace, Florida
(850) 994-7131
Pastor: Rev. Glyn Lowery Jr.
E-Mail: info@paceassembly.org

You are welcome to be our guest
in any of our services!

S Sunday


f


legislation that affects them
and support the community
by helping with Veterans Day
and memorial festivities and
assisting the school system
in teaching school children
about the veterans of today,
and the heroes of yesterday.
Meetings are held on the
first Monday of each month
at 7 p.m. at the Living Faith
Church on Reformation
Road in East Milton. The
telephone number is 850-
981-5446, and the website is
http://www.davch125.org/
The organization wel-
comes newcomers, old
members who have not been


Post Commander Harold
Hulst and Auxiliary President
Audrey Goodman salute
their members and take
pride in the organization's
outreach.
The Post and Auxiliary
are involved in the following
programs every year:
-Voice of Democracy -
taped essay contest for
grades 9-12.
--Patriot Pen written
essay for grades 6-8.
-Outstanding teacher of
the year (3) k-5, 6-8, and 9-
12.
-Patriot Art grades 9-
12.,


-Coloring contest for
elementary schools.
Americanism
Programs Flags in schools,
special programs in schools,
parades.
-Community Service -
helping in the community,
safety and drug programs,
and operation uplink calling
cards for military.
-Cancer Aid and
Research Fund raisers and
monies sent to Dept.
Headquarters to be given to
research and cancer grants
for Auxiliary members strick-
en with cancer.
-Buddy Poppy Program
- These are made by hospi-
talized veterans and monies
raised go into. the post or
auxiliary Relief Fund to help
a veteran or his family.
-National Home Florida
House This home is sup-
ported by VFW and Aux.
members throughout the
country for veterans' children
living there. They are put


in a while, and guests. The
very best thing one can do
for a veteran is to get them in
touch with the DAV, especial-
ly if they have physical or
emotional problems.
It can be determined
after a short informal inter-
view if a claim for them
should be submitted, no
matter how long ago their.
military service.
The organization is cur-
rently seeking some small
office space in order to carry
on the service work they do
twice a week. Hurricanes
destroyed the office so gra-
ciously donated for their use.


through school and even col-
lege.
-Legislative Letters
sent to politicians in
Washington asking for their
support in taking care of vet-
erans as they were prom-
ised, including health care,
living adjustments, schools,
etc.
-Junior Girls Some
auxiliaries in state have Jr.
Girls units for girls ages 5-
16.
-Youth Activities-
Sponsoring scouts and ball
teams, have special parties
for children and this year the
Department President's spe-
cial project is "Make a Wish
Foundation" for critically ill
children to grant them a very
special wish. It costs approx-
imately $4,500 per wish.
-Hospitals purchasing
needed items for veterans in
VA hospitals and nursing
homes and visiting during
each year playing bingo,
'serving food, and ladies
make all the desserts, etc.
-Rehabilitation This is
a program that involves care
for veterans and their fami-
lies out of the hospitals, and
includes Adopt a Vet, Help
the Homeless, Assist Senior
Citizens, educate members
and the public regarding vet-
erans entitlements.
Military units are also
adopted, and much food and
clothing is donated to hurri-
cane evacuees.
-PAC Political action
committee monies raised to
be used to keep veterans'
issues in front of the legisla-
tive branch in every state


We're Smart. We're Trustworthy. We're Professional.
And You Know What Else? We're 100% Focused on You.


Introducing the Newest Member ofYour.Frlendly Health-Care Team.

iTo.us, a good,pharmaoy Is more than good products. It s also professionals
'Who take the time to knoWv you and your personal heallh-care needs This quality
S distinguished the neighborhood pharmacy of years past You find it at
'The Mediclne Shoppe, Pharmacy including our friendly new pharmacists.
. ..* i *. ;' ,


Best Wishes to tae 842Hn Sigal Corp.
Our prayers are with ou
Our personal interest in you is just one example of The Medicine Shoppe
PromiseSM to provide the products, information and personal service you
need to care for your health and your family's health with confidence.

5524 Stewart St. Milton, FL 32570
Phone: 850-623-3211 Fax: 850-623-2353 i


Web Address: www.medicineshoppe.com
MCNisa Workmen's Comp


Email: 1844@medicineshoppe.com
We accept most insurance


and the District of Columbia.
There are a great many
parts to all of these pro-


grams, but the organization
is deligent in seeing that all
the goals are reached.


Our military ... defending our freedoms!

Fleet Reserve Association supports
active and retired in sea services
The Fleet Reserve Association, Bob "He-Coon" Sikes.'
Branch 210, is a nonprofit veteran organization with 379;
members. The Branch sponsors the Ladies Auxiliary Unit.
210, with 150 members.
The Branch is also the'sponsor of the U.S. Naval Sea'
Cadets Corps. Whiting Division.
The Fleet Reserve Association has goals which include'
lobbying on behalf the active duty and retired members of the
Sea Services on matters pertaining to pay, benefits, and:
quality of life issues,
The Fleet Reserve Association conducts an annual essay
contest, with prize money available from Branch 210,
Southeast Region and National competition. The Grand Prize'.
winner will receive $15,000 in U.S. Savings Bonds.
The essay is open to all seventh through twelfth grades,,
The theme this year is "What My Vote Will Mean to Me."
The Branch participates in all patriotic events in the com-,
munity and has membership in the Santa Rosa Veterans{
Advisory Council.
The Branch operates the Branch Memorial Home at 6409'
Fleet Avenue in Milton, Point Baker area, with lunch served
Monday through Friday, dinners on Friday evening, and:
breakfast on Sunday morning. All are open to the members
of the Branch and Unit and their guests.
Membership is open to all current and former enlisted
members of the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Coast'
Guard, as well as the reserve components of each.




+ IM3 =ON ll a I


Pen Air Federal Credit Union is a
Full Service Financial Institution,
serving members since 1936.


Proudly serving our
men and women of the
Armed Forces




(850) 505-3200

www.penair.org


Membership Eligibility Required..


i


VFW Post 4833 involved in
numerous programs all year


Cal or subm -... o us e nae f your military name forpray
Call or submit to us the name of your military name for prayer


9:45 AM Sunday School
Classes available for all ages... Nursery Adult
10:45 AM Morning Worship Service
6:00 PM Camp Meeting Service
Wednesday
5:30 PM 6:45 PM Supper
7:00 PM Study in the Word (Adults)
Royal Rangers & Missionettes (Children))
Sonlite Student Ministries A


(Students Ages 12+ and
Young Single Adults)


y adrutaS October 26 2005


-


The Santa I osa Press Gaz e


Pane 4-C


r


#












Area veterans' service organizations contribute to the lifestyle of those who

served as well as those active duty military men and women now serving


Whiting. Field Chapter of the
Military Officers Association of
America serves through outreach


The Whiting Field
Chapter of the Military
Offices Association of
America (MOAA) is a non-.
profit national veterans asso-
ciation.
Our organization is dedi-
cated to maintaining a strong
national defense and pre-
serving the earned entitle-
ments of active and retired
members of the armed serv-
ices and their families and
survivors.
: Additionally, the organi-
zation actively serves the
community and the nation
through numerous outreach
projects spanning from
ROTC programs offered


through the Santa Rosa
School system, Toys for Tots,
and disaster relief.
Membership is open to
active duty and retired mem-
bers who hold or have ever
held a warrant or a commis-
sion in any component of the
Army,, Marine Corps, Navy,
Air Force, Coast Guard, U.S.
Public Health Service, or
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
and their surviving spouses.
Our members currently
meet for fellowship and din-
ner at 6 p.m. on the fourth
Thursday of each month at
the "Wings Club," Whiting
Field Naval Air Station.


Sea Cadet Program gradu-
ates) graduating from Santa.
Rosa County schools.
During BRAC considera-
tions, Navy League member-
ship has been looked upon
as a measure of community
support for NAS Whiting


Field and other Sea Service
installations in the area.
Its leaders say the Navy
League Santa Rosa County
Council is proud to be a Sea
Service supporting organiza-
tion in the community, and
their duty is to serve.


!Navy League Santa Rosa County
Council supports sea services


Navy League Santa
Rosa County Council is
pleased to annually provide
a $100 Savings Bond as the
l5rize for the Veterans Day
Essay Contest winner.
The organization is also
proud of its tradition as
"Citizens in Support of the
Sea Services." Navy League
has'the following goals:
-To educate national
leaders and the American
people to keep them aware.
-To support the Sea
Services, Navy, Marine
Corps, Coast Guard, and
Merchant Marine.
-To support the men
and women of the Sea
Services, and provide assis-
tance for their families.
-To support youth pro-
grams (Naval Sea Cadets
and NJROTC Programs.)
The Navy League of the
United States was estab-
lished by President
Theodore Roosevelt in 1902,


with the same four goals
then as exist today. Locally,
Navy League Milton Council
was initially chartered on' 30
August 1956.
In order to broaden the
scope of its organization the
name was changed to Navy
League Santa Rosa County
Florida Council on 15
November 1997.
Members say they are
pleased to have officially
adopted U.S. Naval Air
Station Whiting Field,
Training Air Wing FIVE, the
three NJROTC Units in
Santa Rosa County (Milton
High School, Pace High
School, and Navarre High
School), and provide support
for Naval Sea Cadets
Whiting Division,
Members are. additionally
proud to provide annually
two $1,000 Scholarships to
sons or daughters of
Maritime Service parents
(plus NJROTC and Naval


A child ponders the significance of the memorial bricks.

American Legion Post 78, first
chartered in 1921, heavily involved


At a caucus of the First
American Expeditionary
Force (AFT) in Paris, France
on March 15-17, 1919, Lt.
Col. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.
proposed that an organiza-


tion be formed to honor
American veterans.
The distinction of naming
this new organization the
"American Legion" rests with
Maurice K. Gordon, a Major


in the 36th Division. At the
follow-on conference in St.
Louis on September 16, the
same year, work began on
creating a national American
Legion.
The American Legion
national charter and a per-
manent structure were
approved in April, 1919, and
included plans for an
American Legion
Department in all states.
Accordingly, the
Department of Florida,
American Legion was estab-
lished.
The permanent charter
for Post 78 was issued on
October 21, 1921, andwas
subsequently named the
Norman A. Garrett Post in
honor of First Lieutenant
Norman A. Garrett.
Born in rockville, MD, Mr.
Garrett travelled to Milton
and was the time keeper and
paymaster for the Santa
Rosa County Bay Point Mill
Company when the United
States entered World War I.
He joined the military


and served with Company D,
325th Florida Infantry, 82nd
Division and was shipped
overseas to France. He was
killed on the battlefield at
Meuse Argonne in France.
Initially buried in France,
he was three years later
buried in the Arlington
National Cemetery, Grave
No. 3998, Section 3.
The Norman A. Garrett
meets at the Post Home the
third Tuesday of each month
and has over 200 members.
The post has always
supported local community
projects, assisted veterans,
and widows and families.
The American Legion
published "Need a Lift" as a
service to young people on
the best books about high
school students obtaining
information on college schol-
arships.
Their involvement with
education began in 1921.
The current Commander
of Post 78 is Tom Griffin, and
the Post can be accessed at
623-5055.


AMVETS is an organization
committed to serving veterans

Why AMVETS? Because as one vet put it, iltis a good
place to be.
Thereis a reason for that, and itfs the Postis commitment
to support fellow veterans-each and every one of them--
whether itis transporting them to VA clinic for an appointment,
to the store for some groceries, or just providing any infor-
mation they might need to get their earned entitlements or to
get the benefits information of what they are eligible to get as
a member of AMVETS.
Our organization is, in fact, the only congressionally char-
tered veterans service organization whose membership is
open to any who has honorably served in the U.S. Armed
Forces since World War II.
Being an AMVET, one shares a commitment with others
who think the same-with the same values, the same beliefs.
As a member one also can share with other vets the pride
that comes from being a veteran-in an organization devoted
to helping and improving the quality of life for the communi-
tyfs citizens.

If you know of a veteran in need,.you willdo him
or her a favor by referring them to one of these organizations


P

,r
,r



Tom Stewart ,
District 1


Bqb Cole
District 2.


Don Salter
District 3


Gordon Goodin John Broxson


District 4


District 5


We salute all our veterans, as well as all active-duty military members and the

wonderful things they do to help make Santa Rosa County a great place to live,

work andplay. A special thanks to our area military for the tireless work they are

performing in helping us rebuild after Hurricane Ivan.


Board of County Commissioners 983-1877
Building Inspection and Permits 623-0166
Animal Services 983-4680
Extension Service 623-3868


Health Department 983-5200
Emergency Operations Center 983-5360
Enhanced 911 System 983-5372
Mosquito Control 626-0191


Planning & Zoning Division 626-8839
Road Department 626-0191
Public Information 983-5255


P


L, -2-M


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 5-C


adrutaS October 2 5


S3
8
E3


lp


NAVY A- p-
EiN^TN-P~s'









e oy u

Blues' history is as rich as the team's performance


At the end of World War
II, Chief of Naval Operations,
Adm. Chester W. Nimitz,
ordered the formation of a
flight demonstration team to
showcase naval aviation.
The team performed its first
flight demonstration less
than a year later, June 1946.
Flight Leader, Lt. Cmdr. Roy
"Butch" Voris led the team
flying the Grumman F6F
Hellcat at Craig Field, Naval
Air Station (NAS)
Jacksonville, Florida.
The Navy Flight
Demonstration Team transi-
tioned to the Grumman F8F
Bearcat, August 25, two
months after the first demon-
stration. In 1947 Flight=
Leader, Lt. Cmdr. Robert
Clarke, introduced the
famous diamond formation,
now considered the Blue
Angel trademark. At the end
of the 1940s, the Blue Angel
Team was flying its first jet
aircraft, the Grumman F9F-2
Panther.
In 1950, the Korean
Conflict put a great demand
on naval aviation. The Navy
responded by reassigning
the Blue Angels to the air-
craft carrier USS Princeton
(CV-37), where the. Blue
Angels became the nucleus
of Fighter Squadron 191
(VF-191), known as Satan's
Kittens.
The Blues were reorgan-
ized in 1951 and reported to
NAS Corpus Christi, Texas
where the team began flying


Need to refresl
in D-Day an
The terms D-day and H
attack or operation is to be
tion when the day and ho


the F9F-5, the faster version
of the Panther. The team
remained in Corpus Christi
until the winter of 1954. The
beginning of 1955 brought
the team to its present
home, Sherman Field, NAS
Pensacola, Florida where it
transitioned to flying the
swept-wing Grumman F9F-8
.Cougar.
The ensuing 20 years
saw the Blue Angels transi-
tion into two more aircraft. In


1957 the team began flying
the Grumman F11F-1 Tiger.
By 1969 the team was per-
forming in its first dual-
engine jet, the McDonnell
Douglas F-4J Phantom II.
In December 1974, the
Blue Angel Team reorgan-
ized as the U.S. Navy Flight
Demonstration Squadron
establishing Cmdr. Tony
Less as the commanding
officer. The squadron added
support officers and rede-


fined its mission to support
Navy recruiting. The Blue
Angel Squadron also
donned a new aircraft in
1974, the McDonnell
Douglas A-4F Skyhawk II.
On November 8, 1986,
the Blue Angels completed
their 40th anniversary.
During the ceremony the
squadron unveiled its pres-
ent aircraft, the sleek
McDonnell Douglas .(now
Boeing) F/A-18 Hornet. The


Hornet is the first dual-role
fighter/attack aircraft serving
on the nation's front lines of
defense.
In 1992 the Blue Angel
Squadron deployed for its
first European tour in 19
years. Over one million peo-
ple in Sweden, Finland,
Russia, Romania, Bulgaria,
Italy, the United Kingdom,
and Spain saw the. Blue
Angels perform during their
30-day tour. In November


1998, Cmdr. Patrick Driscoll
landed the first "Blue Jet" or
a "haze gray and underway"
aircraft carrier, USS Harry S;
Truman (CVN-75).
The air shows through-
out the 1999-show season
brought out more than 15
million spectators, and since
1946, the team has flown for
over 337 million people.
(This information was
provided through the BluI
Angels' website.)


National cemeteries for Veterans open to all service members
By Robin Higgins Honorable Discharge and Cemeteries with available Florida National Cemetery the conference report.
Executive Director must have served a mini- space, grave liner, the open- for at least another 20 years. On January 13 of last
Florida Department of mum of 24 months unless ing and closing of the grave, The Navy has agreed to year, a roundtable discuS-
Veterans' Affairs separated due to early over- a Government headstone or transfer 80 acres of land to sion was held in Tallahassee
The VA's National seas return, convenience of marker, a burial flag and a the current 45-acre ceme- on the need for a National
Cemetery Administration the government, or based Presidential Memorial tery at Barrancas National Cemetery in South Florida.
operates four National upon disability. Certificate all at no cost to Cemetery, thereby extending Leaders from the VA$
Cemeteries in Florida: Spouses, never-remar- the family. The VA also pays burial space through National Cemetery
Barrancas in Pensacola, St. ried widows or widowers, a burial and plot allowance to January 2003. Administration and from tho
Augustine (not accepting minor children, and under the bext of kin of those eligi- South Florida has been Division df Public Lands at
new burials), Bay Pines certain conditions, unmar- ble veterans who are not on the VA's list of highest pri- the Florida Department of
(accepting only cremains; ried adult children, are also buried in a national ceme- orities for a new National Environmental Protectioi
spouse can be buried if vet- eligible for burial. Eligible tery. Cemetery since 1987. attended.
eran already interred), and spouses may be buried even For more information, Today there are' ver Representatives from the
the Florida National if they predecease the veter- please contact the U.S. 435,000 veterans in the National Cemetery
Cemetery in Bushnell. an. Department of Veterans seven counties of south Administration came t
Burial in a National Members of the reserve Affairs at 1-800-827-1000, Florida alone. A staggering Florida last year for actual.
Cemetery is open to all components of the Armed the Florida, National 48 percent (or 208,800) of site visits. A cemetery for
members of the Armed Forces who die while on Cemetery at (352) 793- these veterans are over 65 veterans in South Florida
Forces and those.vetefans active duty or while perform- 7740, the Barrancas years of age. Yet, despite the may finally become a reality;
who meet minimum active ing training duty, or who have National Cemetery at (850) overwhelming need, These cemeteries exisk
service duty requirements 20 years of service in 452-3357, Bay Pines at Washington has never come to honor our veterans with $
and were discharged under reserve components of the (727) 398-9426, or the up with the money to build a final resting place and com-
conditions other than dishon- Armed Forces (creditable for National Cemetery National Cemetery in South memorate their service on
orable. retired pay), may also be eli- Administration Office in Florida. behalf of a grateful nation.
For those who served gible for burial. Washington at 1-800-697- I am pleased to. report' I have now visited all four
after September 7, 1980, Burial benefits include a 6947. that in recent months there of these beautiful and hal-
they must have an gravesite in any National In October, 2000, has been some progress, in lowed places in .Florida. I
Governor Bush and the large part due to the efforts encourage you to take an
Florida Cabinet voted unani- of Governor Bush and opportunity to visit them too.
h your memory on what the "D" mously to expand the Florida Florida's Congressional del- In fact, take a child and use
National Cemetery at egation. Last year Congress the visit to teach them about
id the "H" in H-Hour signify? Bushnell by approximately supported an appropriation the history and sacrifices -
113 acres, of $500,000 for the planning their forefathers. It may be
1-hour are used for the day and hour on which a combat Once faced with running of the next four National good opportunity to pass-o)i
initiated. They designate the day and hour of the opera- out of space, this action will Cemeteries and specifically the important lesson that
ur have not yet been determined, or where secrecy is allow for burials at the mentioned south Florida in "freedom is not free."


essential. The letters are derived from the words for which they stand, "D" for the day
of the invasion and "H" for the hour operations actually begin. There is but one D-day
and one H-hour for all units participating in a given operation. It is unnecessary to
state that H-hour is on D-day.
When used in combination with figures and plus or minus signs, these terms indi-
cate the length of time preceding or following a specific action. Thus, H-3 means 3
hours before H-hour, and D+3 means 3 days ,after D-day. H+75 minutes means H-
hour plus 1 hour and 15 minutes.
Planning papers for large-scale operatiolfs'are made'Voirrdetail-long before spe-
cific dates are set. Thus, orders are issued for the various steps to be carried out on
the D-day or H-hour minus or plus a certain number or days, hours, or minutes. At the
appropriate time, a subsequent order is issued that states the actual day and times.
The earliest use of these terms by the U.S. Army that the Center of Military
History has been able to find was during World War I. In Field Order Number 9, First
Army, American Expeditionary Forces, dated September 7, 1918: "The First Army will
attack at H hour on D day with the object of forcing the evacuation of the St. Mihiel
Salient."
D-day for the invasion of Normandy was set for June 6, 1944, and that date has
been popularly referred to by the short title "D-Day."
Source: The General Service Schools, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, Combat
Orders (Fort Leavenworth, Kansas: The General Service Schools'Press, 1922).


Golden Corral offering meal to active military, veterans:


We would like to remind
all veterans and military per-,
sonnel of the upcoming
event which shows Golden
Corral Buffet and Grill's gen-
erosity and the care, com-
passion, and dedication of a
prominent, national veterans
sponsoring group.
On Monday, November
14, 2005, Golden Corral and
the Disabled American
Veterans (DAV) are partner-
ing for another great Military
Appreciation Monday
between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m.
on the Golden Corral premis-
es.
It's a day nationwide that


Golden Corral Buffet and
Grill welcomes the nation's
veterans and active duty mil-
itary men and women to a
'free buffet dinner and drink
and lots of camaraderie.
Military Appreciation
Monday is Golden Corral's
way of saying 'Thank You" to
the nation's veterans and
active duty military men and
women. It's also a great
opportunity for individuals to
learn more about the DAV as
an organization.
Both the DAV and
Golden Corral Buffet and
Grill urge everyone attending
to visit the DAV information


table to meet members of
Chapters in their respective
areas and chec.g~tare
DAV information .hat-willJ be
available. SantaRt~rpeBill
Allen, we understand, will be
representing the Santa Rosa
DAV Chapter.
Veterans and active duty
personnel are reminded to
mark calendars now for
Monday, November 14,
2005. The nearest local
Golden Corral Buffet and
Grill is located at 2260
Langley Avenue just off
North 9th Avenue i;n
Pensacola. The telephone
number is 473-0185.


To our friends

and neighbors

at N.A.S.

Whiting Field...



6PAST &R
I 'PERSQNNE

We are proud

and glad you ,

Best Wishes



Lindsay, Andrews,

Leonard, PA


ATTORNEYS AT LAW



623-3200

5218 Willing Street Milton
K


"We at Downs Paint and

Body wish to thank all of

the Military Personnel at


Whiting


Field


for


the


patronage for the past 37


years. Downs


Body


is


Paint


a Direct


Facility for


and


Repair


most insur-


ance companies.


case of an

of Downs


and


request


So, in


accident think


Paint


& Body


our 24


hour


wrecker service.)

Bob Downs, Owner


We salute you,


our men and


women of the


Armed Forces!


MVA0ILT5 .ONM
9V 8 -56E I 0
a~ p; = ~E ~C


Two Locations To Serve You
3650 Hwy. 90 Pace 995-8595


6141 Hwy. 90, West Milton 623-4342


2
a


8
2!


ir


Saturday October 26, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


DPnn RCP


^


GUPJ IF-' BRE IE. IEZ- ME
934--4095










In fond remembrance of the dedication of the Veteran's Memorial in downtown Milton in 2004...


Saturday October 26, 2005


GreSgory yS. A (ppI

: 1 armel forces ande ptelss e'
;h krer r tI- see cu A eir saSirlirs.
pou ao ho aOu r hoand t het hoo
c appreate aoe. stand those a dwOman inpray
Eappr t tae ae" ,u military me,.s and* .,
I m po eredi ims as
those who hn t paifia ,eroiITta oe Of ouW
o e cl at a n th e ac r If t is th e b ackb .n ,or ,n't I, -
can f a our-.mendn ad woman In
Sreturnof a Our inraq.
t oe sae retn 8, nSignal Corp ioheisaf
fort t 'tir ngn -. and we're pleased fort t nelI s O

home to i e d please acceto
Santa R osa County o hengourcnimu. tolie.
through tile BY-P be' tribuntis toaeatplc
passage h or country an C ol aknty a, gre
t h e i r s e r v i c e t o O U d o W l m *
heartfelt tha or allyou do with us to makethiscou
Ith Suannk ypose ~officeis happy to serveouve

Sanea oservic o hedmesteadedpropertY S hi
I a a on your icecownen
-w' e letter Stating y0 e details o0 ,
our office at 953 1 for complete
-OU T. the freedom we an l
questions stop and reflect
please take a moment this Veteran'S Day to stop and reflect on
enyoy, and Ilen hank a Veteran.

4-


On Veteran 0Da
O or "fe an doime san t anst d horo th i ho ha r
r s mankind. o acriiced
Our countryas built on a foundation that dm a
ualienable right far all ,
God it Serves. -eal)Pi. at COun edomian
era pe 1 as Strong as the
In the bookof Psalm Chat 21ts

"Your Dhand ill lay hold on alourenenie a
g/zseizeYourfoes TVhough th,




n Veterans 'sDavyr osie tanks to r e i
OUr victories and f t othe and y ao
serve. candf or the Menicot e God,, wh p'delte"
sevetenaandWo whoDbeye Is Dd cll f

AMay our Country, reai we arenyto
Serve. May we relze that "
s Christ. MACoe back to God theFather trong as the God-n
Jesu Chwi Ma e Hie m witha oughisSon
onceangain toforgive our transre all our heart, soul and
again in Victory Over o, f Sone ,nd d,
ov Our foes.o and deliver ourcoun

Veteran, those who
We salute those who served and continue
Veea a. to serve on their day,
May Godgr
May God grt favor on country as We turn our hearts back

to Him. O.r
-1
s-


f


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 7-C


'


f-


ir m m .


pnY~~Y"~ .I CT i ... .. .. (..-I. .:~-T*--I~-ZI(Y~-C~-I~I~:*UTr~ )I








ragey -L-
u-k


Honoring the Flag is honoring our heritage ..


Displaying the Flag outdoors


a
qw


* .-$


.
^prnnd



econd,


p...,,. ,~.'" sL:'r?:~
'*4. '~


SANTA ROSA MEDICAL CENTER


Modern medicine and a


compassionate, caring staff...


A t Santa Rosa Medical Center we provide the best in
modern medicine and a compassionate, caring staff.
From the emergency room to surgery, recovery and
rehabilitation, our services truly are Second to None.





SANTAL CN
MEDICAL CENTER


6002 Berryhill Road, Milton Florida


850-626-SRMC (7762)


www.srmc.cc


" 24-Hour Emergency Care
" Business Health/Worknet
Santa Rosa
" Community Outreach
Programs
I Critical Care
M Gastroenterology
I Gynecology
* Health Education Programs
* Heart Catheterization Lab
I In-Patient, &
Same-Day Surgery
* Laboratory Services
I Mammography and
Bone Dexascan (Density)
* Med-Key Program
" Radiology & Diagnostic
Imaging, Including MRI, CT,
Ultrasound
I Rehabilitation Services
" Volunteer Services
* Women's Services/Baby Suite,
Prenatal Classes, Birthing
Rooms
1|


0


:...f


/





Saturday October 26, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


PDnn o


*'< .


r:i
.~t c~, i.
'`~. L .'.


&118~~











.-.a


-'4 1ka 4 :7


- ;, :" .l~ ,,' -

. ; '. 1 -' "
* : ^ *

i ":









",."
r
*~ *;


`,r '
'-_ -








'
'. : '<
~ '; -,- '











r,

P


I''


4.I


r


. -;.5 -' .r ,

~e
I' ,
r:. I
a, ,_ .


' 4.


"a i


r


S -
.4. ,


IC


/


.


4,


'


t 'S


--

r
-


~; :;~
'
r
~~.


r







'' ` ''
''
:
'


it


G U)k







, e2-lTe at Rs PesGaet StrdyOtae 6,20


'Mobilized in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.


0 0


Milton's own 842nd Signal Company (Army Reserve) gets royal send off


A community-wide send
off for members of Milton's
842nd Signal Company
(Army Reserve) reached
monumental strength
Monday, September 26,
2005, as Santa Rosa's first
military unit ". mobilized in
support of Operation Iraqi
Freedon."


that everyone in Santa rosa
County supports them," he
said.
Local leaders were not
disappointed in the turnout,
despite the inclimate weath-
er. Their hopes that Santa
Rosans would turn out in
force that Monday morning
to wave aoodbve and offer


I'lese students eton T let a little rain dampen Ilteir spirits, especially on a day like tils.


support.
Anticipations are that
businesses will continue to
tie yellow ribbons in support.
The Unit staged its
departure from the Signal
Company's facilities on
Dogwood Drive (Highway
89) where many citizens
assembled to witness the
send-off.
Parking was not available
at the Company's headquar-
ters, but ample space was
provided on the Milton


Assembly of God Church''
lot and at the county exten-
sion office next door.
The convoy left the;
Signal Company's head--
quarters traveling east on;
Appaloosa to Stewart Street!
where they turned south.
They continued south or
Stewart Street to U. S.- 9C
(Caroline Street) then west
to Avalon Blvd. and ultimate-'
ly to Interstate 10. Signs
blanketed the convoy route
wishing the soldiers well.
;


Better to smile while everybody's looking... Comeback safe and well...


Congratulations to our Area Military...

We appreciate your patronage since 1958!


BUSINESS HOME AUTO FLOOD


623-3608 I
S :102 Stewart Street, S.E.


-since 1958-


Conroy embarks on its journey to 1-10 through the wet streets of lilton ...


Despite a downpour,
area citizens still managed to
turn out to wish members of
the 842nd Signal Company,
Army Reserve, well.
Sources say the unit,
which convoyed out of the
area in, a steady drizzle, is
headed for Iraq. While the
U.S. Military does not
release particulrs of any
troop movement, .being
mobilized for Operation Iraqi
Freedom could mean the
group's next stop would be
Iraq.
That's why Santa rosa
community leaders were
wanting to make sure the.
men and women of the unit
got a proper, good ol' Santa
Rosa send off.
And that they did!
The Signal Company
gathered around 7:30 a.m.
Monday in preparation for an
approximate 9 a.m. depar-
ture which officials say is
expected to be from 12 to 18
months.
Santa Rosa County
Commissioner Don Salter,
who is often involved in local
military support matters,
commented in a heart felt
way.
"Our hearts go out to the
families of these people, and
we want them all to know


"Serving

The Florida
Panhandle

For Over
38 Years"
.9 -w ,-rw m l.l *as'j sr


ProfessionaC hearing AiidCenters

support our troops!
&We wouldfike to thank allthe men andwoman of our armed

forces retired andactive duty -for your services.

To sfow our appreciation, we would ike to extend a 15% DISCOUNT
on alCofour hearing systems to allactive duty andretired
militaryfor the entire month of Novemberl
(*with military ID.)


PENSACOLA
115 N. PALAFOX

438-4092


MILTON
5851 BERRYHILL ROAD

623-8818
\\ \\V.PROFESSIONALHF\ARING.A\DS CNOM


L.olI rk .n, Iii
k ,Ili H'....J S A .rl.),,- kJ,.iL e ] ,nem,,,in,.A UC-.ABA


MOST BRANDS INCLUDING
STARKEY UNITRON
SIEMENS SONIC
OMNI PHONAK
NU-EAR

FREE HEARNG EST


SMALL IN'; INC(I I IDIN,, MEF ih-.'.if H.i i.
i i.\\ (-)\CP \\ El.L<( \RF. TRI.t- AiF
CRESTVIE\\
502 N. MAIN ST.

689-0545


It's awfully hard to let go...


God Bless


Our Military


Active and Retired!

S MaryJohnson, Clerk of Court
Santa Rosa County


AGENT
BOB LOCKLIN


Professional Hearing Aid Centers






& Advanced Audiology, Inc.


LOKLNINURAC


- I


- I I


Saturday October 26, 2005,


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


PaP e 2-D







S~'turday October 26, 2605 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Paqe 3-0


,Words can not describe the emotions that prevailed during the 842nd
Signal Company (Army Reserve) send off on Monday, September 26,
2005. It is times like this that draw a bond among citizens like no other.
Old and young, students and teachers, laborers and professionals all are
reduced to a common denominator of values: Love, honor, duty, appreci-
ation, and sacrifice. It was impossible to label each photo, but if you see
Someone you know, the mission of showing them has been accomplished.
A' ,* 1


Wherever our armed f

may go, our gratitu

goes with them.


forces


ide


The recent departure of Milton's 842nd Signal Company, an
Army Reserve unit called up to take part in Operation Iraqi
Freedom, moved all of us who live and work in Santa Rosa
County to think about the sacrifices made by our men and
women in uniform and the impact that their service has on
the families they leave behind. Safeguarding our freedoms
and securing our interests around the world is a
monumental job requiring the talents and commitment of
thousands upon thousands. To all who contribute to that
critical work, we say thank you and godspeed.

4592 HIGHWAY 90 PACE 995-7425


Pieo es First
SCamnty Brk
The best bank in the neighborhood
Visit our webslte @ www.peoplesflrst.com


0
0
S0
Crt?-


ROBERT G. MCCLURE
TAX COLL SECTOR


*U)-i-


U.S. ARMY
FLORIDA -

SaIMPL
U.S. NAVY
: FLORIDA
w rSAMPL
u. A._IR FORCE
U.S. AIR FORCE
eI HFLORIDA *I

^USMO1
MARINE COmPSn
U.S. MARINES
-fOORIOAD -
r ASfMPL
1S COAST GUARP
COAST GUARD


DISABLED VETS
SFLORIDA .

0MV ,-,
D.V. WHEELCHAIR
sFLORIDA .C
MERpCUUU
DMV m
PARALYZED VETS
All IORiDA-4- ., -
NiPON iALiji nn
SUNSHINE "al!
NAT'L GUARD

us l
RESERVE U UU
SLNSHIN( 9STA
U.S. RESERVE


FLORIDA
1 00000
SCOM3T WOQV1 ED .VETBAN
PURPLE HEART

SAMPL
SALUTES VETS
FLORIDA ---
SAMPLI
US PARATROOPER ,_
PARATROOPER


X-PC 0flO0
i ^A
EX-P.O.W.

PEARL SLINSHINF A (
PEARL HARBOR


ABOVE YOU WILL FIND 15 OF THE SPECIALTY TAGS THAT OUR
OFFICES ISSUE WHICH ARE RELATED TO OUR MILITARY.
PLEASE CONTACT US AT 983-1800 FOR QUALIFICATIONS &
FEES FOR THESE TAGS OR VISIT OUR WEB-SITE AT
www.robertmcclure.com
FOR INFORMATION ON THESE AND OTHER SPECIALTY TAGS.
IN ADDITION YOU WILL BE ABLE TO CHECK THE STATUS OF YOUR REAL
ESTATE TAXES AND MAKE PAYMENTS FOR TAG RENEWALS, PROPERTY TAXES,
OCCUPATIONAL LICENSES, AND HUNTING/FISHING LICENSES ONLINE.
MY STAFF AND I WANT TO WISH ALL OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY, ESPECIALLY
OUR VETERANS, A HAPPY & HEALTHY VETERANS' DAY, 2005.


-Y


I


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


--


:' Saturday October 26, 2005


Page 3-D


r







PaQe 4-D I.. ... .. ... Ud .LL


Dedication of War Dog Monument scheduled to take

place at Veterans Memorial Plaza on Veterans Day


Beginning at 12:30 p.m.,
following Veterans Day
observances at the Milton
High School Stadium, the
2005 Veterans Day
Dedication of the War Dog
Monument will be held at the
Santa Rosa Veterans
Memorial in Milton.
After a welcome from
County Commissioner Don
Salter, an opening prayer,
the pledge, and other intro-
ductions, the keynote
address will be delivered by
Bill Peeler, U. S. Air Force
Dog Handler, Vietnam.
Following the guest
speakers remarks, the War
Dog Monument will be
unveiled by non other than a
dog. The importance of dogs
in the military is the founda-
tion for this observance.
From the time of ancient
Egyptians, Greeks, and
Romans to todayis soldiers,


manis best friend has loyally
followed his owner into battle
as a well-trained War Dog.
'From the birth of the
United States, dogs have fol-
lowed American soldiers into
war demonstrating great
bravery on the front lines,
heroically saving lives under
fire, and comforting the sick
and wounded.
The first record of
American dogs in battle is in
1835 when dogs were used
during the Seminole war in
Florida and Louisiana. Since
then they have acted as sen-
tries and saved lives during
the Civil War, were enlisted
in both World Wars, and
were instrumental in the jun-
gles of Vietnam.
Soon after the attack on
Pearl Harbor, December
1941, civilians formed vol-
unteer group called Dogs for
Defense and started a train-


ing center at Fort Royal,
Virginia. In 1942 the group
was officially incorporated
into the Quartermaster
Corps and was called the iK-
9 Corps.T
From that point in history
our loyal four-legged friends
were officially escorting
American soldiers into battle.
During the height of
World War II more than ten
thousand American dogs
assisted soldiers, medics,
and other military personnel
in Europe and the Pacific.
Since then a vigorous train-
ing program has created
countless numbers of
American military dogs who
have heroically fought with
the distinction of an
American soldier, sailor, or
airman.
The bond formed
between the dog and his
handler is one of u6der-


standing, deep trust, and
love.
This memorial honors all
war dogs who have sacri-
ficed a warm safe home, a
game of catch in the back-
yard, or a long walk with his
owner to bravely assist
American soldiers on the
battlefields.
Following unveiling of the
monument, presentations of
wreaths ; from veterans
organizations will take place.
TAPS' and a closing
prayer will end the official
ceremony, but a cook-out
has been planned to further
unify guests in their com-
memoration and recognition
activities during the day.
Program director ,and
Memorial Committee mem-
ber Ralph Nesensen advises
that in the event of rain, the
event will be postponed until
the following day.


Dog handler will keynote Dog Monument dedication


Beginning at 12:30 p.m.,
following Veterans Day
observances at the Milton
High School Stadium, the
2005 Veterans Day
Dedication of the War Dog
Monument will be held at the
Santa Rosa Veterans
Memorial in Milton.
After a welcome from
County Commissioner Don
Salter, ,an opening prayer,
the pledge, and other intro-
ductions, the keynote
address will be delivered by
Bill Peeler, U. S. Air Force,
Dog Handler, Vietnam.
Following the guest
speakers remarks, the War
Dog Monument will be
unveiled by non other than a
dog. The importance of dogs
in the military is the founda-
tion for this observance.
From the time of ancient
Egyptians, Greeks, and
Romans to todayfs soldiers,
manis best friend has loyally
followed his owner into battle
as a well-trained War Dog.
From the birth of the
United States, dogs have fol-
lowed American soldiers into
war demonstrating great
bravery on the front lines,
heroically saving lives under
fire, and comforting the sick
and wounded.
The first record of
American dogs in battle is in
1835 when dogs were used
during the Seminole war in
Florida and Louisiana. Since


then they have acted as sen-
tries and saved lives during
the Civil War, were enlisted
in both World Wars, and
were instrumental in the jun-
gles of Vietnam.
Soon after the attack on
Pearl Harbor, December
1941, civilians formed a vol-
unteer group called Dogs for
Defense and started a train-
ing center at Fort Royal,
Virginia.
In 1942 the group was
officially incorporated into
the Quartermaster .Corps
and 'was called the iK-9
Corps.
From that point in history
our loyal four-legged friends
were officially escorting
American soldiers into battle.
During the height of
World War II more than ten
thousand American dogs
assisted soldiers, medics,
and other military personnel
in Europe and the Pacific.
Since then a vigorous train-
ing program has created
countless numbers of
American military, dogs who
have heroically fought with
the distinction of an
American soldier, sailor, or
airman.
The bond formed
between the dog and his
handler is one of under-
standing, deep trust, and
love.
'This memorial honors all
war dogs who have sacri-


ficed a warm safe home, a
game of catch in the back-
yard, or a long walk with his
owner to bravely assist
American soldiers on the
battlefields.
Following unveiling of the
monument, presentations of
wreaths from veterans
organizations will take place.
TAPS and a closing
prayer will end the official


ceremony, but a cook-out
sponsored by the 4-H Clubs
has been planned to further
unify guests in their com-
memoration and recognition.
activities during the day.
Program director and
Memorial Committee mem-
ber Ralph Nesensen advises
that in the event of rain, the
event will be postponed until
the following day.


SSGT FELKER OF THE 362 MP DET. (L&O) TRAINS RIGC


K-9 CORPS ARMY REGULARSK-9 CORPS ARMY REGU":
LARS-Dogs are almost as much a part of the army as soldiers
'today. They are governed by Army Regulations, and their train-
ing and care are given careful consideration. From the birth of
the United States, dogs have followed American soldiers into
war demonstrating great bravery on the front lines, heroically
saving lives under fire, and comforting the sick and wounded.
The first record of American dogs in battle is in 1835 when dogs
0" t' were used during the
Seminole War in Florida and
Louisiana. since then they
.have acted as sentries and
Saved lives during the Civil
War, were enlisted in both
mental in the jungles of
Vietnam. War Dogs are con-
tinuing to be used today as
evidenced by these .photos
from Iraq. Captain William
D. "Bill" Alleu who com-
manded the 362 Military
Police Detachment (Law and
Order) at Tigras river, Iraq
said his organization had a K-
9 Unit and said that military
S' dogs are one of the service's
-greatest assets and deserve a
lot of credit for saving lives.
.-. He explained that dog han-
l j' dlers are also often put in
great peril in the course of
:t -- -handling their dogs. Above
SSGT Gerlott of the 362
'-.-- Military Police Detachment
(L&O) shows one of the well
trained K-9 members of the
)ROUSLY WITH THE DOG detachment. Very well man-
nered!


We Salute Our


Armred


Forces &


Vete ra ri s


A I1ERNATIVE HELEALTH

FOOD STORE
"Where educated natural health choices are made."

5533 Hwy. 90 Pea Ridge 994-3606
Mon.-Fri.: 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Sat.: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.


Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D., Natura/-Hea/th Counse/or


e-mail: gwyhill@aol.coml


Ato our veterans and NAS Whiting Field for

I helping Santa Rosa County be the best it can be!




SANTFA ROSA CHRISTIAN SCHOOL


C4SAEUI
IDucOjECTS


YAC
YCUTU-
ATEIULTIC
CIJI


Serving Santa Rosa County since 1962


Register
,with the
leader
in wholesome
youth sports
for boys
& girls.


MERRY-GO-
ROUND
LEARNING
CENTER
AGES 2 4


Santa Rosa
Christian
School admits
students of
any race, color,
and national
or ethnic origin


6331 Chestnut
P.O. Box 643
Milton, FL 32572
Phone: 623-4671
Fax: 623-9559


g,


Tops TV &


Appliances wishes to

congratulate our

active & retired

military as we

celebrate Military

Appreciation Month.


Also, we want to


thank


you


patronage

opened out


for


your


since we

business


in 1957.


Appl I


623-3371
Highway
90 West
Milton


A


Saturday October 26, 2005


e hT Santa Rosa Press e


I


I











Eglin evolved from a distant and honorable past


For more than sixty-five
years and spanning six wars,
Eglin has played a prominent
role in airpower history. In
S1931, personnel of the Army
Air Corps Tactical School
(Maxwell Field, Alabama)
looking for a site for a bomb-
fng and gunnery range, saw
the potential of the sparsely
populated forested areas
surrounding Valparaiso,
Florida, and the vast
expanse of the adjacent Gulf
bf Mexico.
A LOCAL businessman
ind airplane buff, James E.
Plew, saw the potential of a
military payroll to boost the
depression-stricken econo-
fny in the local area. He
teased to the City of
Valparaiso 137 acres on
Which an airport was estab-
lished in 1933, and in 1934,
Plew offered the U.S. gov-
'rnment a donation of 1,460
Contiguous acres for the
bombing and gunnery base.
SThis leasehold became
the headquarters for the
!Valparaiso Bombing and
Gunnery Base activated on
114 June 1935 under the
'command of Captain Arnold
H. Rich. On 4 August 1937,
the base was redesignated
Eglin Field in honor of
Lieutenant Colonel Frederick
1. Eglin, U.S. Air Corps, killed
on 1 January 1937 in an air-
craft crash.
With the outbreak of war
in Europe in 1939 and
President Roosevelt's call for
an expansion of the Army Air
.Corps, General Henry H.
"Hap" Arnold ordered the
establishment of a proving
ground for aircraft arma-
ment.
Eglin was selected for
the testing mission, and on
27 June 1940, the U.S.
Forestry Service ceded to
the War Department the
Choctawhatchee National
Forest, consisting of some
384,000 acres.
IN 1941 THE AIR Corps
Proving Ground was activat-
ed, and Eglin became the
site for gunnery training for
Army Air Forces fighter
pilots, as well as a major
testing center for aircraft,
equipment, and tactics. In
.March 1942, the- base
served as one of the sites for
Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy
Doolittle to prepare his B-25
crews for their raid against
Tokyo.
In addition to testing all
,new aircraft and their serial
,'modifications, the Proving
Ground Command, estab-
lished at Eglin. April 1942,
'found the isolation and
immensity of the ranges
(especially well-suited for
.special tasks. For example,
"in 1944, personnel devel-
oped the tactics and tech-
^niques to destroy German
missile installations being
Built to support V-1 buzz-
;bomb attacks on England.
BY THE END of the war,
SEglin had made a recogniza-
t.ble contribution to the effec-
tiveness of the American air
'operations in Europe and the
Pacific and continued to
"maintain a role in the
research, development, and
'testing of air armament.
p'Eglin also became a pioneer
Sin missile development
,when, in early 1946, the First
SExperimental Guided
5


Missiles Group was activat-
ed to develop the techniques
for missile launching and
handling; establish training
programs; and monitor the
development of a drone or
pilotless aircraft capability to
support the Atomic Energy
Commission tests,
Operation CROSSROADS,
at Eniwetok. On 13 January


1947, the Guided Missiles
Group received nationwide
publicity by conducting a
successful drone flight from
Eglin to Washington, D.C;,'in
a simulated bombing mis-
sion.
BOTH AS A REACTION
to the. Soviet atomic explo-
sion in 1949 and in recogni-
tion that research and devel-
opment had lagged in the
years of lower priority to
operational concerns, the Air
Force, in early 1950, estab-
lished the Air Research and
Development Command
(later Air Force Systems
Command).
The following year, the
Air Research and
Development Command
established the Air Force
Armament Center at Eglin,
which, for the first time,
brought development, and
testing together. After the
start of the Korean War in
1950, test teams moved to
the combat theater for test-
ing in actual combat.
THEY NUMBERED
among their accomplish-
ments improved air-to-air
tactics and improved tech-
niques'for close air support.
On 1 December 1957, the
Air Force combined the Air
Proving Ground Command
and the Air Force Armament
Center to form the Air
Proving Ground Center.
SThe Center built the high-
ly-instrumented Eglin Gulf
Test Range and for the next
few years, served as a major
missile test center for
weapons 'such as the
BOMARC, Matador, GAM-
72 "Quail," and GAM-77-
"Hound Dog."
As the Southeast Asia
conflict increased emphasis
on conventional .weapons,
the responsibilities at Eglin
grew. On 1 August 1968, the
Air Proving Ground Center
was redesignated the
Armament Development and,
Test Center to centralize
responsibility for research,
development, test and evalu-
ation, and initial acquisition


of nonnuclear munitions for
the Air Force. On 1 October
1979, the Center was given
division status.
THE ARMAMENT
Division, redesignated
Munitions Systems Division
on 15 March 1989, placed
into production the precision-
guided munitions for the
laser, television, and infrared


guided bombs; two anti-
armor weapon systems; and
an improved hard target
weapon used in Operation
DESERT STORM during the
Persian Gulf War. The
Division was also responsi-
ble for developing the
Advanced Medium Range
Air-to-Air Missile
(AMRAAM), an Air Force-led
joint project with the U.S.
Navy.
IN ADDITION to its
development and testing
mission, Eglin also served
as the training site for the
Son Tay Raiders in 1970, the
group that made the daring
attempt to rescue American
POWs .from a North
Vietnamese prison camp. In
1975, the installation served
as one of four main U.S.
Vietnamese Refugee
Processing Centers, where
base personnel housed and
processed more than 10,000
Southeast Asian refugees at
the Auxiliary Field Two "Tent
City." On 11 July 1990, the
Munitions Systems Division
was redesignated the Air
Force Development Test
Center.
DURING THE 1990S, the
Center supported test and
evaluation for the develop-
ment of nonnuclear Air Force
armament including next
generation precision-guided
weapons; operational train-
ing for armament systems;
and test and evaluation of
command, control, commu-
nications, computers, and
intelligence (C41) aerospace
navigation and guidance
systems.
On 1 October 1998, as
part of the Air Forces' strate-
gic plan to guide the service
into:the 21st Century, the Air
Force Development Test
Center became the Air Force
Materiel Command's Air
Armament Center (AAC). As
one of AFMC?s product cen-
ters, AAC is responsible for
development, acquisition,
testing, and fielding all air-
delivered weapons. AAC
applies advanced technolo-


gy, engineering, and pro-
gramming efficiencies
across the entire product life
cycle to provide superior
combat capability. The
Center plans, directs, and
conducts test and evaluation
of U.S. and allied air arma-
ment, navigation/guidance
systems, and command and
control (C2) systems 'and


supports the largest single
base mobility commitment in
the Air Force.
AAC ACCOMPLISHES
its mission through three
components: the Air Force
Program Executive Office for
Weapons with two systems
wings and a systems group,
the 46th Test Wing, and the
96th Air Base Wing.
Recently the AAC provided
our warfighters with the
munitions and expeditionary
combat support to dominate
the enemy in Operations
ALLIED FORCE, ENDUR-
ING FREEDOM, and IRAQI
FREEDOM.
FIELD ONE:
Named after Maj. Walter
J. Wagner, who died in an
aircraft crash Oct. 10, 1943.
He was a former command-
ing officer for the 1st Proving
Ground at Eglin. Today, the
area is northeast of Eglin
main and identified on many
maps as area C-5.
FIELD TWO:
Named for Lt. Col.
George E. Pierce, who died
in an aircraft crash Oct. 19,
1942. He was a former com-
manding officer of the 1st
Proving Ground Torpedo
Squadron (Composite) at
Eglin. Today, the area is 10
miles north at the East Gate
on Highway 285 and is iden-
tified on maps as Site C-3.
This field was the site of one
of the Vietnamese
Resettlement Camps in
1975.
FIELD THREE:
Named for 1st Lt. Robert
L. Duke, who died in an air-
craft crash Dec. 29, 1943. He
was assigned as an assis-
tant to the Proving Ground of
the Army Air Forces Proving
Ground Command at Eglin.
It was one of the first auxil-
iary fields built. Today, the
area, which is about 12 miles
north of the East Gate on
Highway 85, is better known
as Duke Field. The 919th
Special Operations Wing
(AFRES) and the 728th
Tactical Control Squadron
are there.


FIELD FOUR:
Named for 2nd Lt.
Garland O. Peel Jr., who
died in an air crash Jan. 2,
1942. He was a gunnery
school instructor at Eglin.
Today, the area is just a few
miles off Lewis Turner
Boulevard on Eglin Road
326, and is the home for a
variety of civil engineering
and services mobility train-
ing programs.
FIELD FIVE:
Named for Capt. Anthony
D. Piccolo, who died in an
aircraft accident Oct. 6,
1942. Piccolo was the com-
manding officer of the 386th
Single Engine Gunnery
Training Squadron at Eglin.
Today, the area is due north
of Field Four and serves as a
microwave station. On most
base maps, it is identified as
Site C-4.

FIELD SIX:
Narned for 1st Lt. Andrew
Biancur, who died in an air-
craft accident Jan.8, 1944.
He was a test pilot with the
Medium Bombardment
Section of the 1st Proving
Ground Group at Eglin.
Today, the area is the site of
the U.S. Army 6th Ranger
Training Battalion and
referred by them as Camp
Rudder. It is 23 miles from
Eglin Main and was the
home of the Federal Prison
at one time. FIELD SEVEN:
Named for Col. Robin E.
Epler, who died in an aircraft
crash Jan. 28, 1944. He was


(


a deputy commander
(Technical) of the Army Air
Forces Proving Ground at
Eglin.
FIELD EIGHT:
Named for 2nd Lt.
Richard E. Baldsiefen, who
died in an aircraft crash
March 4, 1942. He was a
gunnery school instructor at
Eglin. Today, the area is in
the southeastern portion of
the base in a region called
Range 52.
FIELD NINE:
Named for 1st Lt. Donald
W. Hurlburt, who died in an
aircraft crash Oct. 2, 1943.
He was a member of a fight-
er section in the 1st Proving
Ground at Eglin. This was
the largest of the original
gunnery ranges. Today, the
area is 24 miles from the
West Gate on Highway 98.
Of the 10 fields, it is one of
the two to originally have
hangars built. The Air Force
Special Operations
Command and the 16th
Special Operations Wing are
here.

FIELD TEN:
Named for Capt. Barclay
H. Dillon, who died in an air-
craft crash Oct.2,1943. Dillon
was a member of a fighter
section of the 1st Proving
Ground Group at Eglin.
Today, the area near Field
Ten serves primarily as a
landing strip for the Navy's
basic flight training pro-
grams. The Navy calls the
field "Choctaw OLF".


ouitrwn 842ndSignal orp




















OD BLESS AMERICA


senvnem
REThAL



CENTER

4837 Glover Lane

MILTON

623-0797 i


,'


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


,; Saturday October 26, 2005


Page 5-D


-1


4











The United States Marine Corps:


Continuing a proud tradition of those who so valiantly fought and

died at Belleau Wood, Iwo Jima, Chosin Reservoir, and Khe Sanh


Overview of the History
of the Marine Corps
Brief History of the
United States Marine Corps
On November 10, 1775,
the Continental Congress
meeting in Philadelphia
passed a resolution stating
that "two Battalions of
Marines be raised" for serv-
ice as landing forces with the
fleet. This resolution, estab--
lished the Continental
Marines and marked the
birth date of the United
States Marine Corps.
Serving on land and at sea,
these first Marines distin-
guished themselves in a
number of important opera-
tions, including their first
amphibious raid into the
Bahamas in March 1776,
under the command of
Captain (later Major) Samuel
Nicholas. Nicholas, the first
commissioned officer in the
Continental Marines,
remained the senior Marine
officer throughout the
American Revolution and is
considered to be the first
Marine Commandant. The
Treaty of Paris in April 1783'
brought an end to the
Revolutionary War and as
the last of the Navy's ships
were sold, the Continental
Navy and Marines went out
of existence.
Following the
Revolutionary War and the
formal re-establishment of
the Marine Corps on 11 July
1798, Marines saw action in
the quasi-war with France,
landed in Santo Domingo,
and took part in many opera-
tions against the Barbary
pirates along the "Shores of
Tripoli". Marines participated
ih numerous .naval opera-
tions during the War of 1812,
as well as participating in the
defense of Washington at
IBladensburg, Maryland, and
fought -alongside Andrew
Jackson in the defeat of the
British at New Orleans. The
decades following the War of
1812 saw the Marines pro-
tecting American interests
around the world, in the
Caribbean, at the Falkland
Islands, Sumatra and off the
coast of West Africa, and
also close to home in the
operations against the


Seminole Indians in Florida.
During the Mexican War
(1846-1848), Marines seized
enemy seaports on both the
Gulf and Pacific coasts. A
battalion of Marines joined
General Scott's army at
Pueblo and fought all the
way to the "Halls of
Montezuma," Mexico City.
Marines also served ashore
and afloat in the Civil War
(1861-1865). Although most
service was with the Navy, a
battalion fought at Bull Run
and other units saw action
with the blockading
squadrons and at Cape
Hatteras, New Orleans,
Charleston, and Fort Fisher.
The last third of the 19th
century saw Marines making
numerous landings through-
out the world, especially in
the Orient and in the
Caribbean area.
In World War I the Marine
Corps distinguished itself on
the battlefields of France as
the 4th Marine Brigade
earned the title of "Devil
Dogs" for heroic action dur-
ing 1918 at Belleau Wood,
Soissons, St. Michiel, Blanc
Mont,.and in the final Meuse-,
Argonne offensive. During
the two decades before
World War I!, the Marine
Corps began to develop in
earnest the doctrine, equip-
ment, and organization
needed for amphibious war-
fare. The success of this
effort was proven first on
Guadalcanal, then on
Bougainville, Tarawa, New
Britain, Kwajalein, Eniwetok,
Saipan,. Guam, Tinian,
Peleliu; Iwo Jima, and
Okinawa. By the end of the
war in 1945, the Marine
Corps had grown to include
six divisions, five air wings,
and supporting troops. Its
.strength in World War II
peaked at 485,113. Thewar
cost the Marines nearly
87,000 dead and wounded
and 82 Marines had earned
the Medal of Honor.
While Marine units took
part in the post-war occupa-
tion of Japan and North
China, studies were under-
taken at Quantico, Virginia,
which concentrated on
attaining a "vertical envelop-
ment" capability for the
Corps through the use of


The men and women

of the Santa Rosa

County Sheriff's Office

Salute our

Veterans


We support



Troop 842,


helicopters. Landing, at
Inchon, Korea in September
1950, Marines proved that
the doctrine of amphibious
assault was still viable and
necessary. After the recap-
ture of Seoul, the Marines
advanced to the Chosin
Reservoir only to see the
Chinese Communists enter
the war. After years of offen-
sives, counter-offensives,
seemingly endless trench
warfare, and occupation
duty, the last Marine ground
troops were withdrawn in
March 1955. More than
25,000 Marines were killed
or wounded during the
Korean War.
The landing of the 9th
Marine Expeditionary
Brigade at Da Nang in 1965
marked the beginning of
large-scale Marine involve-
ment in Vietnam. By summer
1968, after the enemy's Tet
Offensive, Marine Corps
strength in Vietnam rose toa
peak of approximately
85,000. The "Marine with-
drawal began in,1969 as the
South Vietnamese began to
assume a larger role in the
fighting; the last ground
forces were out of Vietnam
by June 1971. The Vietnam
War, longest in the history of
the Marine Corps, exacted a
high cost as well with over
13,000 Marines killed and
more than 88,000 wounded.
In the spring of 1975,
Marines evacuated embassy
staffs, American citizens,
and refugees in Phnom
Penh, Cambodia, and
Saigon, Republic of Vietnam.
Later, in May 1975, Marines
played an integral role in the
rescue of the crew of the SS
Mayaguez captured off the
coast of Cambodia.
Less than a year later, in
August 1990, the Iraqi inva-
sion of Kuwait set in motion
events that would lead to the
largest movement of Marine
Corps forces since World
War II. Between August 1990
and January 1991, some 24


infantry battalions, 40
squadrons, and more than
92,000 Marines deployed to
the Persian Gulf as part of
Operation Desert Shield.
Operation Desert.Storm was
launched 16 January 1991,
the day the air campaign
began. The main attack
came overland beginning 24
February when the 1st and
2d Marine Divisions
breached the Iraqi' defense
lines and stormed into occu-
pied Kuwait. By the morning
of February 28, 100 hours
after the ground war began,
almost the entire Iraqi Army
in the Kuwaiti theater of
operations had been encir-
cled with 4,000 tanks
destroyed and 42 divisions
.destroyed or rendered inef-
fective.
From 1990-94 Marines
were actively engaged in
providing assistance to the
Nation's counter-drug effort,
.assisting in battling wild fires
in the western United States,
and aiding in flood and hurri-
cane relief operations.
During the late 1990's,
Marine Corps units deployed
to several African nations,
including Liberia, the Central
African Republic, Zaire,,and
Eritrea, in order to provide
security and assist in the
evacuation of American citi-
zens, during periods of polit-
ical and civil instability in
those nations. Humanitarian
and disaster relief operations
were also conducted by
Marines during 1998 on
Kenya, and in the Central
American nations of
Honduras, Nicaragua, El
Salvador, and Guatemala. In
1999, Marine units deployed
to Kosovo in support of
Operations Allied Force.
The Marine Corps has
continued its tradition of
innovation to meet the chal-
lenges of a new century. The
Marine Corps Warfighting
Laboratory was created in
1995 to evaluate change,
assess the impact of new


technologies on warfighting,
and expedite the introduction
of new capabilities into the
operating forces of the
Marine Corps. Exercises
such as "Hunter Warrior," and
"Urban Warrior" were
designed to explore future
tactical concepts, and to
examine facets of military
operations in urban environ-
ments.
Today's Marine Corps


stands ready to continue in'
the proud tradition of those'
who so valiantly fought and i
died at Belleau Wood, Iwoi
Jima, the Chosin Reservoir,j
and Khe Sanh.
Combining a long and;
proud heritage of faithful
service to the nation, with
the resolve to face tomor-'
row's challenges will contin-i
ue to keep the Marine Corps.
the 'best of the best."


Distinguished Marine

will serve as keynote

Veterans Day speaker
Veterans Day will be celebrated in Milton on Friday,
November 11, 2005 beginning with a parade that will lead to
the Milton High School stadium.
The parade will form on the Saint Rose of Lima Parking
Lot (the unpaved property next to Winn-Dixie across from theI
Church) on Park Avenue. The parade will proceed east on
Park Avenue and turn left (north) on Byrom Street, then right
(east) on Hobbs Street into the Milton High School Stadiurr
parking lot.


Colonel Christopher E. Holzworth IV


Veterans Day ceremonies will begin in the stadium at 11
a.m. Colonel Christopher E. Holzworth IV, familiarly known as
iCavemani will deliver the keynote address.
Colonel Holzworth was raised in Ft. Lauderdale, and
attended Marine Corps Officer Candidate School (OCS) after
graduating from the University of virginia. He was commis-
sioned a Second Lieutenant in April of 1983.
Upon completing the Basic School, he reported to Naval
Air Training Command, Pensacola and was designated a
Naval Aviator in 2985.
After an active career in various assignments, Col
Holzworth returned to MCCDC Quantico, VA in August of
1996 to attend Marine Corps Command and Staff College
where he received a Masterfs degree in Military Science.
Reporting to Training Air Wing FIVE, NAS Whiting Field,
he assumed his duties as Executive Officer and
Commanding Officer of Helicopter Training Squadron EIGH-
TEEN (HT-18) in June of 2000 to September of 2002.
Many awards and honors later, Col. Holzworth was
selected to the Naval War College, College of Naval Warfare
for the Top Level School program at Newport, RI in November
of 2002. He received his Masteris in National security and
Strategic Studies in November of 2003.
Col. Holzworth was selected for command of MATSG-21
(Marine Barracks at Pensacola NAS) in the summer of 2004
and was promoted to his present rank in January of this year.
His personal decorations include the Defense Meritorious
Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal with Gold Star, Air
Medal with numeral 11?, Navy/Marine Corps Commendation
Medal with gold star, and the Navy/Marine Corps
Achievement Medal.
Col. Holzworth is married to the former Shelley Garrison.
they have two children, a son christopher V (10) and a daugh-
ter Grayson (8).

Parade participants asked to
preregister for Friday's event
Plans are under way for the Milton Veterans day parade to be
held on Friday, November 11, beginning at 10 a.m.
Line up for the Veterans Day parade wiV begin at 9 a.m. in the
vacant parking lot across the street from St. Rose of Lima on Park.
Avenue behind Winn Dixie on Dogwood Drive.
The parade will commence at 10 a.m. down Park Avenue to
Byrom turn left on Byrom right on Hobbs right into the Milton
High School Stadium parking lot. Ceremonies will be held begin-
ning at 11 a.m. in the Stadium.
Parade participants are asked to pre-register with the Santa
Rosa County Chamber of Commerce, 5427 Stewart Street in
Milton or by calling 623-2339.
There is no fee to participate.


HONORING OUR

~L4Ll VS~


Your sacrifice provides us
with our continued freedom
from years past and into
tomorrow futurer.
Thank You,
Dr. Mackenzie & Staff


Woodbine Family

Chiropractic Care

Call for your consultation today "We are dedicated
995 5773 to your individual
995-5773 needs."
4670 Woodbine Rd., Your Spine: The
Pace Backbone Of Good Health


I


Page 6-D


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Saturday October 26, 2005


Q








Saturday uctober 2o, 2UUO

Helping others a duty for Marine Corps League Detachment 066 Pensacola area


Area Marine Corps League active in hurricane relief efforts


The Marine Corps effort
League Detachment 066 photo
Pensacola area has been during
actively participated in the PI
Hurricane Katrina recovery Comr

r_-w -


as evidenced by the
graphs that were made
g the effort.
hil Foster,
nandant, characterized


the first week in September:
iThis has been a week of
emotions ranging from gung
ho one minute to the
Kleenex box the next.T


ASSISTANCE IN ACTION-MCL Detachment 066 began Sept 3, 2005 with a trip to
Gulfport, Ms. with 1300 MREis, water, diapers, canned goods, and other supplies for
approximately 40 families stranded on the outskirts of Gulf port. The supplies were
paid for by former Mayor Barney Burks, an Air Force Pilot and Korean War Veteran.
MATSG-21, NAS, Executive Officer, Lt. Col. Dave Glassman arranged for the MRE pick-
up and the Navy Exchange personnel assisted in the loading.
"

Ja 1', f .


That being said, the
Commandant, reached out
to his itroopsi on September
17, 2005 explaining the
activity. The service we are
providing is a joint effort of
donations, e-mail networks
and people who know how to
get things done in the short-
est amount of time,T he said.
iDetachment 066 is just one
of the parties. We thank each
of you again from the bottom
of our hearts for all you have
done.
"We would have not
made the progress we made
this week without everyonefs
involvement he told Marine
families and friends.
The Marine Corps
League was founded by
Major General
Commandant, John A.
Lejeune, in 1923 and char-
tered by an Act of Congress
on August 4, 1937.
Its membership of
60,000 is comprised of hon-
orably discharged, active
duty and Reserve Marines
with 90 days of service or
more, and retired Marines. It
includes officer, enlisted,


male, and female members.
The League is classified
as a veterans and military
service organization and
was formed for the purposes
of promoting the interests of
the U.S Marine Corps; to
provide camaraderie and
assistance to Marines, as
well as to their widows and
orphans; and to preserve the
tradition of. the U.S. Marine
Corps.
': t is a not for profit organ-
ization within the provisions
of IRS Code, with a special
group exemption letter which
allows for contributions to
the Marine Corps League, its
Auxiliary, and. subsidiary
units, to be tax deductible by
the donor.
Members of the Marine
Corps League join together
in camaraderie and fellow-
ship for the purpose of pre-
serving the traditions and
promoting the interests of
the United States Marine
Corps.
This is accomplished by
banding together those who
are now serving in the U. S.
Marine Corps and those who


'IT IS ALL ABOUT DUTY AND HONOR-With its mission, MCL Det. 066 meets face to
!face, one on one, with each person and provide them with exactly what they need and
ask for. Reward is to witness the look of hope return back on their faces when they are
told that MCL members will be with them for the long haul, not the initial blush of sup-
port that fades very quickly after such a tragedy as Hurricane Katrina.


MASS DESTRUCTION OF HURRICANE KATRINA-Todate the MLC Detachment 066 has
assisted over 20 Marines and their families in the Gulfport area and several who were
stationed in New Orleans with 4th Marines. iWe UPS them what they need,i
Commandant Foster said.


SMilitary Appreciation Luncheon scheduled onboard NAS Pensacola at Naval Aviation Museum
'i i appreciation of, and in area. Milton Rotary Club. event in that it gives the Rotary Pace Rotary Club. the impact the families of c
'conjunction with, all Escambia The luncheon will again be The event is one of two clubs in our area an opportunity Assistant Rotary Governors military play in our economy
and 'Santa Rosa Counties held at the Naval' Aviation annual projects put together by to centergize and clearly Michael Bolton and Ron "We are well aware of t
Rotary clubs, the Annual Museum onboard NAS the efforts of the two county demonstrate their appreciation Richards are leading CROP in tremendous impact our militia
Military Appreciation Pensacola and include all the Rotary Clubs under the leader- for what the military has done the year's appreciation lunch- families have on our two-cou
Luncheon will be held Nov. 16 Rotary clubs in the two-county ship of the combined Rotary of for the Escambia and Santa eon. Bolton is a member of the ty area, and this is just one w
to recognize the importance of area, including the Pace Rotary Pensacola ICROP). Rosa County area," says Pace Rotary Club. Bolton is a the Rotary Clubsin our area c
the military in the two county Club and the nevns formed "'This is an extraordinary Vincent Andry, president of the member of the Pace Rotary show our appreciation,, sa
Club, which meets every Andry.
,-'-: ,. Thursday at Stonebrook Village The other major event t
SGolf Club. two-county Rotary Clubs joil
."We know the economic ly sponsor under CROP is t
impact of what the military) annual Business and Ethi
; i |does for our area and recognize Awards banquet.

WALKINS ONLY 3682-A W. Hwy. 90
PHONE Pace, FL 32571
994-0381 (Next to Al's Pawn Shop

SJohn's II
Barber Shop
Specializing in Military
SClipper & Regular Hair Cuts
Razor Fade
*, i 'See 'D' or Wayne








5587 Berryhill Rd.
Milton
(1 mile west of hospital)
.' 623-5685 24 Hr.
Emergency
Service
S oats m e iSadaw Pt C.at Available


our

he
try
in-
ay
an
ays

he
nt-
he
ics


i~B





i


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 7-D


n."k- op onn





have been honorably dis-
charged from that service;
voluntarily aiding and ren-
dering assistance to all
Marines and former Marines
and to their widows and
orphans, and by perpetuat-
ing the history of the Corps
through fitting acts to
observe the anniversaries of
historical occasions of par-
ticular interest to Marines.
The Marine Corps
League also has an
Auxiliary. Women marines,
former women marines,
wives, widows, mothers,
grandmothers, granddaugh-
ters, stepmothers, sisters,
daughters and step-daugh-
ters.of a marine or of a for-,
mer marine are eligible to
belong to the. Marine Corps
League, Inc.
Also, associate members
must be sponsored by a cur-
rent auxiliary member (not
less than 16 years of age.)
The Marine' Corps
League Auxiliary is a non-
profit veteransis organiza-
tion, and is a subsidiary
organization of the Marine
Corps League.


/.








rage g -u .


Captain William D.
In his civilian job with the the K-9 unit which he
Florida Probation and Parole encouraged to talk abc
Commission, William D. iBilli view of the coming unv
Allen, enjoys a regular day at
the office-or whatever envi- L-a,. W Da'
ronment duty may call for on apt Wm.
any particular day in connec-
tion with his job as a law
enforcement officer.
But times have been dis-
similar.
Slightly more than six
months ago, Bill was in a
totally divergent situation.
Still in a law enforcement
capacity, yes, but under
much different circum- V'I ,r
stances. U.S. Army Captain'
William D. iBilli Allen was
then the commanding officer
of the 362 Military Police
Detachment (Law and
Order) at Tigras River, Iraq.
iLaw enforcement in the
military is about the same as .
in regular, civilian situations, "
practically speaking,i he
said. 1Only the conditions
and the circumstances, and
often the missions, are '.
changed. ; '
Captain Allen, meeting J
the experience and military
qualifications, was called ,
upon to lead a very unique '
unit. He describes it as
something totally newf, put
together to serve a military '
need of a contemporaneous -' :.
nature.
The unit was formed and Veterans Day.
staffed with experienced 1Dogs are one of th
individuals and functioned in itary[s greatest -as:
a capacity that fit the situa- Captain Allen comme
tion at the time. IThey are very versat
The Military Police have their activity and dese
a somewhat different mis- lot of credit for saving I
sion than ordinary civilian He told; how they,
law enforcement authorities, trained to ferret out wou
some of which are recon- homicide bombers, thl
naissance, escorting and bomb detection, find' h
protecting supply lines, tak- munitions, and to ass
ing care of prisoners, of war, other types of searches
and escorting and protecting 1After areas are
government officials and doned off in a danger
other individuals in certain dogs are used to search
situations such as people in area and the houses foi
the new Iraq government, he tives and central
said. among many other dt
Although the 362 MP he said.
Det. (L&O) was composed of Captain Allen told
personnel from all military Army Regulations g
duty functioning capacities, 'the up-keep, training,
one particular section was care for its dogs in thE


"Bill" Allen back home after MP duty in Iraq


Swas
out in
veiling


id


of a War Dog Monument at
the Veterans Memorial here
in Milton next month on


Allen Jr. U.S. ARMN


year.
He graduated from pace
High School and received
his .Second Lieutenantis
.commission through dual
programs at Florida State
University and the University
of West Florida where he
received his degree.
His military career was
launched on a positive note
and over the years he devot-
ed himself to fulfilling his mil-
itary obligations with honor
and dignity which has result-
ed in promotions to his pres-
ent rank.
There is a possibility of
still yet another promotion to


Major, but he says he is not
sure that he wishes to con-
tinue his military career.
"Thatis a question that I
am resolving with my wife,
and which touches, a lot of
ramifications, and no deci-
sion has been made at this
time," he said.
He indicated that thereis
a lot to be said about being
in an environment where "...
someone is constantly trying
to kill you."
He says he has a great
appreciation for his military
career and especially his
service in Iraq.
It has given him new


insight and understanding
about how others, including:
his wife and family, have,
managed to assume and'
discharge responsibilities;
that are not ordinarily a part,
of their lives.
He says that although he.
has fulfilled his Military com-
.mitment, he is not at the
moment free to immediately!
disengage,
So he continues in his,
reserve capacity, currently
affiliated with a military unit;
in Tallahassee, and is living;
with his wife, four children
(with another on the way) in;
Milton.


Captain Bill Allen honors fellow soldier

from Florida killed in rocket attack in

Iraa by naming a kennel in his honor


e mil-
sets,?
ented.
ile in
rye a
lives.T
were
ild-be
rough
idden
ist in
cor-
zone,
:h the
r.fugi-
band,
ties,
how
govern
and
3 K-9


Corps. iStandards are very
high, and you can believe
they are very well cared for,i
he said. In fact he told of
many instances were dogs
were availed air-conditioned
kennels when there was
none for the handlers! That
in itself tells of their value, he


said.
lAnd I would also point
out the diversity and commit-
ment of the dog handlers,
themselves Captain Allen
said. iThey are very compas-
sionate, dedicated individu-
als and very often put them-
selves in. extreme peril in
their handling of the dogs,T
he said.
Captain Allen was mobi-
lized for Iraq in November of
2003 and was released from
active duty in February this


Logistics Support
area, Anaconda, Iraq-As
the kennel was being built to
house the military working
dogs at LSA Anaconda,
Capt. William Allen, Jr. was
struck by a bit of inspiration.
The kennel he believed
should be named for a mili-
tary policeman, Arthur S.
Mastrapa, killed at the base
during a rocket attack in
June.
"We responded to the
attack. He died at the scene,"
said Allen commander of the
362nd Military Police
Detachment, a reserve unit
from Ashley, Pa, but made
up of soldiers from several
states.
Mastrapa, 35, was not
part of Allen's unit, but the
kinship between cops made
the link an easy one. Plus,
Allen said, there was some-
thing he saw in news cover-
age of Mastrapa's funeral in
the states. "His daughter
was clutching a puppy near
the casket," Allen said. "It just
kind of 0 I don't know."
The kennel opened
Thursday afternoon


(November 11, 2004) as' the
sun set on Veterans Day. In
a short ceremony prayers
were offered, Mastrapa's
biography was read by Brig
Gen Oscar Hilman, and
commander of the 81st
Brigade Combat Team cut
the ribbon.
Allen's unit was the first
to have military working dogs
at the base. The dogs are
capable of detecting bombs
and drugs or can be used for
simple patrolling.
"It is prestige job to
have," said Allen because
the military spends a lot of
money training the dogs
before placing them in the
hands of a solider. Hilman
called the dogs a "combat
multiplier" in the effort
against insurgents. Because
of security concerns, the
exact size of the kennel
could not be released,
according to military officials.
Mastrapa had been an
MP while serving on active
duty in the 1990s. He joined
the reserves on June 16,
2000, and worked, as a mail-
man in civilian life in


Altamonte Springs, FI. He;
was assigned to the 351st'
Military Police Company
from Orlando, FL and&
worked as a driver and gun-:
ner during Operation Iraq
Freedom. After his death, he;
received a Bronze Star
Medal. He and his wife,'
Jennifer, were parents to,
Marisa and Reece. A plaque
will be placed on the kennel'
to honor Mastrapa's memo-;
ry.
Allen said he spoke with
Jennifer Mastrapa about the:
kennel dedication. She told;
him it was a good thing to do.;
"She said she.felt like thek
Army hadn't forgotten her,"'
he said.
Capt. William Allen,:
Commander of the 362nd:
MP Det L/Q, from Milton,
Florida, is a graduate of:
Pace High School and the:
University of West Florida;
arid was awarded a Bronze'
Star while serving in Iraq. He,
is the son of Bill and Esther
Allen of Milton.
(Article written by Ron
Jensen, Stars and _Strips,
11/16/04)


Santa Rosans continue to support the Military!


'dl


BFGoodrichF Fall Special
A Cooling Systemt
All Service S AM .


Truck & Auto Accessories


j@^.J5^ f> ;~jF""
--111"^^ te

5th Wheel Hitches Warn Winches


Receiver Hitches


Nerf Bars


Tool Boxes


Spoilers Ground Effects Fog/Running Lights Front End Bras Trailer
Hitches Bedliners Camper Tops Bedmats Running Boards Cowl
Induction Hoods Tool Boxes Trailer Hitches Fifth Wheels Goosenecks

We do Spray-in Bedliners


We at Mooneyham Heating & Air

Conditioning, Inc. join our

community to honor the men and

women who serve our country and

to congratulate both active and

retired veterans as we observe

Veterans Day and especially our

own 842nd Signal Corp now

activated in Iraq.



Mooneyham

Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc.


I's Hatd 7b Stop A Tuine.


.4020 H wy. go P ace LA'T X


Gary Mooneyham, President
David Beach, Vice President
4061 Avalon Blvd.
Milton, FL
623-2084


C.M.C. AL#87090 FL#041100


I


(_\~;(lll(j(dB(ll'11111~


Saturday October 26, 2005


e hT Santa Rosa Press Ga e


Dn_-- n n


I


-r v v


r