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 Section A: Main
 Section B: Sports
 Section B: Inside Out
 Section B: Classifieds


UF00028408 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Santa Rosa press gazette
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00083
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Creation Date: October 19, 2005
Publication Date: 1984-
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00083
 Related Items
Preceded by: Milton press gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        A 1
        A 2
        A 3
        A 4
        A 5
        A 6
        A 7
        A 8
        A 9
        A 10
        A 11
        A 12
    Section B: Sports
        B 1
        B 2
        B 3
        B 4
    Section B: Inside Out
        B 5
        B 6
        B 7
    Section B: Classifieds
        B 8
        B 9
        B 10
        B 11
        B 12
Full Text





-Mlo Pace PeaRide -JaII e n HB asM


Santa Dosa' Press
'i 'y1


AY

05


wwirrssaet. co e50 Pls a*) Yui ol hmto n 1.pT o narya fuy


INSIDE


Trying to find the funds:


County faces $307 million list of infrastructure needs


. -. I
i"


Girls basketball practice is
about to begin, but the gym at
Pace High isn't ready. Where
will the team ready for the
upcoming season?,
See SPORTS, Page 1B.


By DEBORAH NELSON
Pres-c Ga:ere Stiri 'tS'rr
Does grovbth pay for itself?
Officials, at Monday's
County Revenue Modeling
Workshop answered Florida's
eternal question with a resound-
ing...yes and no.


Santa Rosa currently col-
lects enough property tax rev-
enue to cover the day-to-day
"costs of doing business," say
leaders.
But the county isn't socking
away the money it will take to
cover longer-term "big ticket"
infrastructure items, they con-


tend.
Projected 20-year infra-
structure needs include road-
ways, stormwater improve-
ments and a new couritouse-
in all, a $307.6 million list,
according to county, figures.
Major capital projects.
include Highways 90 and 98,


along with Avalon Blvd,
Woodbine Road, Berryhill
Road, Bell Lane and Glover
Lane.
And that's not counting 55
other county road projects-
detailed in Santa Rosa's long-
range Better Santa Rosa Plan-
planners predict, will .need


- -
m m b


*NEWS


VIEWS

OQLIs it too early to see
Christmas decorations in stores?


COLIN
SSMITH
"No not
really, I
don't think
Sso."


Santa Rosa turned out Saturday to get a taste of history at the
L&N Depot in Milton as the West Florida Railroad Museum
held its Open House. There were plenty of model trains on
display (see above). Even Native Americans got in on the act
(below). Members of the Blackwater Muscogee Tribe held
demonstrations of traditional Native American dance at
intervals during the weekend event.
Press Gazette photos by Bill Gamblin


ROSEMARY
HOFFMAN
S"I'm old
.fashioned-I
say yes, it's
too early."



LILLIAN
LEFFERTS
(Photo declined)
""Yes, Halloween's not even
over yet. We've got to get
'through one holiday at a time."


The "real deal" proved a little loud for 3-year-old Isaac
Wadkowki. When an actual train passed the old L&N Depot,
sounding its horn, Wadkowski quickly clamped his hands to his
ears. :


Area's four-footed student trots to Texas


Tuffy's in Texas!
Tuffi. the nation's first
horse to enroll in public school.
is in Anmnllo, Texas today. His
visit is part of national


Character Counts week, \ which
runs from October 16-22.:
Character Counts officials
say, "(the program) is the most
widely implemented approach,


Curtain going up

on 'Field of Screams'


The Press Gazette is printed on
100% recycled paper using
Sevironmentally-friendly soy-
based ink.

PRINTED WITH
70 EYINK






121H
' 75000 1.EB5
; taL


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Tickets are still available
for this Frida \' night's dinner
theater performance of "Field
of Screams."
The play happens at the
Milton Clubhouse, also known
as the Redheathens Baseball
Clubhouse.
The production is sold
out for Saturday's show.
Tickets do remain for
Friday evening, October 21,
however. The event begins at
6:30 p.m. Seating is limited to


50 people per evening and tick-
ets are $25 each.
"You will enjoy a full
course dinner and a decadent
dessert buffet," say organizers.
The GFWC Milton
,Woman's Club and the Milton
Shakespeare Club are present-
ing the play, written by Tom O.
Williams of Dauphin Island,
Alabama.
The play will be per-
formed by members of the
Imogene Little Theater, includ-
ing Michelle Wade, who plays
See PLAY, Page 3A.


to character education. It's a
nonprofit, nonpartisan, nonsec-
tarian framework that teaches
the Six Pillars of Character
g/dfixhm > : trustworthiness,
respect, responsibility, fairness,
caring and citizenship..." It is
the same six character traits that
Tuffy has adopted to teach chil-
dren by example.
Tuffy was enrolled in
East Milton Elementary School
last year and has visited thou-
sands of students around Santa
Rosa County. And while
Character Counts week brings
attention to the Six Pillars of
Character for one week in
October, it is Tuffy's mission to
keep those six pillars in the
frontlines of education year-
round.
Sharing is one trait not
covered by Character Counts
that Tuffy has implemented as
part of his message. Not only in
words, but also in action, East
Milton Elementary shares Tuffy


with other schools around Santa
Rosa County and now, Texas.
Five title-one schools in
Amarillo have partnered with
Santa Rosa to shareTuffy, who
See TUFFY, Page 3A.


attention in the coming years.
The county needs to begin
planning roadway needs today,
say leaders.
"One of my greatest con-
cerns is for us not to do what's
been done to Highway 98 over
the years," Commissioner Don
See REVENUE, Page 5A.


More

storm aid


is needed

By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer


The Family Resource
Board is asking the community
to help meet the needs of fami-
lies, especially those displaced
by recent hurricane activity.
The Santa Rosa Family
Resource Program, Inc., a not-
for-profit agency, has been serv-
ing the unmet needs of families
in Santa Rosa County since
1981.
The agency offers emer-
gency short-term financial
assistance to families with chil-
dren (birth to 18 years.)
Short-term assistance
includes food, infant formula,
diapers, cleaning supplies. utili-
r) p.:imner_. re'nt and -chool:
supplies etc. In collaboration
with communmt partners. the\
refer families to other agencies
for assistance.
Other services offered by
the agency include parent edu-
cation, homeless assistance and
holiday assistance.
Last year, they serviced
over 950 families with 2,062
children.
Officials say the agency
has seen a dramatic increase
this year in the number of fam-
ilies requesting assistance due
to the two hurricanes.
According to Sue
Bollinger, Coordinator for
Family Resource Program, it
has been difficult to keep goods
on the shelves due to the
increased volume of requests.
The agency needs non-per-
ishable food, especially ready-
to-eat canned goods such as
tuna and beef stew, diapers,
baby clothes, infant formula,
cleaning supplies, personal
hygiene items, and bed linens.
Cash donations are also
accepted. All donations are tax-
deductible.
Individuals, volunteer
organizations or churches are
invited to help area families-
contact Sue Bollinger at 626-
2054 or visit the office housed
in "The Family Place on the
Square" at 6576 Caroline St.
(next to Family Dollar behind
Church's Chicken) in Milton.
Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
Nelson@sr-pg.com


A group of Santa Rosa students contractually agree to study hard
and keep their noses clean in exchange for four-year scholarships.
It's part of the Bright Futures program, sponsored by the Santa Rosa
Educational Foundation. See story, page 3A.
Press Gazette photo by Deborah Nelson


i


^










Sheriff's Report


10/4 to 10/11
Akel, Antonio Ulysess;
Male; 27; 1958 Bayou Drive,
Navarre, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 10/5/05
Bauldree, Timothy Dean;
Male; 40; 5751 Hosea Gillman
Rd., Milton, FL; Drugs-Possess
Methamphetamine, Marijuana-
Possess Not More Than 20
Grams, Narcotic' Equip-Possess
And Or Use. 10/4/05


Bovkins, Johnathan Xavier
Omar; Male; 186832 Fast Gun
Ln, Milton, FL; Petit 1st Offense,
Fraud-Imperson-Misrepresent
Self Commit Personal ID Misd.
10/5/05
Hamilton, Lawrence Carl;
Male; 49; 1871 Lunetta St.,
Navarre, FL; Fail to Register as
Sex Offender. 10/5/05
LeBlanc, Seth Patrick; Male;
23; 701 Hill Road,.Lake Charles,


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LA; Carrying Concealed
Weapon-Firearm, Narcotic
Equip-Possess And Or Use.
10/5/05
Santiago, Leobardo Lopez;
Male; 24; 3396 Greenbriar Circ,
Gulf Breeze, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/5/05
Strickland, Kenny Lee;
Male; 19; 5332 Springhill Dr.,
Pensacola, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 10/5/05
Taylor, Matthew Allen;
Male; 18; 8121 Lillian Highway,
Pensacola, FL; Damage Prop-
Crim Misch-Over $200 Under
$1,000, Burglary of Structure
Conveyance Unarmed W/O
Person Inside (2 cts.), Larceny
Theft is $300 or More But Less
Than $5,000 (2 cts.)
Doyle, Colleen Thompson;
Female; 39; 1624 Kauai Court,
Gulf Breeze, FL; DUI. 10/5/05
Wright, James Lavon; Male;
37; 5734 Rolling Hills Dr.,
Milton, FL; Cruelty Toward
Child Abuse Without Great
Harm: 10/6/05
Hyde, David Matthew; Male;
25; 7721 White Sands Blvd.,
Navarre, FL; Fugitive From
Justice. 10/6/05
Moore, Candy Fisher;
Female; 36; 1800 W. Jackson St.,
Pensacola, FL; Fraud-Insuff
Funds Check Over $150.
10/66/05
Henderson, Timothy
Dewayie; Male; 39; 1713 N.
Davis Hwy., Pensacola, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony.
10/6/05
Williams, Anthony; Male;
38; 105 E. Anderson St.,
Pensacola, FL; Failure to Appear
for Felony Offense. 10/6/05
Gilbert, Heather; Female;
26; 5262 Richardson St., Milton,
FL; Cruelty Toward Child-
Aggrav Abuse. 10/6/05
Cudney, David Lloyd; Male;
26; 2114 Register Ln, Navarre,
FL; Burglary of Structure
Conveyance Unarmed W/O


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Person Inside, Larceny Petit 1st
Offense. 10/6/05
Hall, Amanda Lee; Female;
28; 1675 Champaign Ave., Gulf
Breeze, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 10/6/05
VanHoosen, Philip Michael;
Male; 36; Balatone St., Milton,
FL; Drive While License
Suspended Habitual Offender,
Attached Registration License
Plate Not Assigned. 10/6/05 -
Atkinson. Edward Charles;
Male; 44; 5687 Meadow Rd.,
Milton, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 10/7/05
Beaugrand HI, Patrick John;
Male; 45; 3636 Berryhill Rd.,
Pace, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 10/7/05
Davis, Bennie Charles; Male;
55; 5014 King Oaks Ct., Milton,
FL; Possess Marijuana Over 20
Grams. 10/9/05
Encinia, Ana Margarita;
Female; 22; 7280 Beddoes St.,
Olmito, TX; Cocaine Traffic 28
Grams Less Than 150 KG
Cocaine or Mixture. 10/7/05
.Tewell Donnis Ann; Female;
44; 5014 King Oaks Ct.,-Milton,
FL; Asslt Intent Threat To Do
Violence, Drugs-Possess Cntrl
Sub W/O Prescription, Narcotic
Equip-Possess And Or Use.
10/9/05
Johnson, Erik Lance; Male;
23; 6541 Lakeshore Dr., Milton,
FL; Probation Violation-Felony.
10/8/05
Jones, Michael Scott; Male;
21; 4524 Carl Booker Rd.,
Milton, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 10/8/05
Myers, Matthew Casey;
Male; 20; 3035 38thAve., Milton,
FL; Probation Violation-Felon',
10/8/05
Dykes, Chad Lee; Male; 18;
1958 Commodore Dr., Navarre,
FL; Larceny Theft Over $300
Under $5,000. NDG
Patterson, Christopher
Roland; Male; 28; 6201 Fox Run
St., Milton, FL; Drive While
License Susp 1st Offense,
Possess Cocaine. 10/8/05
Penton, Sandy Kay; Female;
38; 6535 Palamino Dr., Milton,
FL; Resist Officer-Obstruct W/O
Violence, Possess Cocaine,
Evidence-Destroying Tamper
With or Fabricate Physical.
10/8/05
Saywell, Cheryl Shinault:
Female; 62; 190 N. Old Corry
Field Rd., Pensacola, FL;


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Probation Violation-Felony.
10/9/05
Thornthon, Charles David;
Male; 30; 6413 Bellview Pines
Place, Pensacola, FL; Drive
While License Susp 1st Offense,
Kidnap Minor-Interfere with
Custody, Family Offense-Shelter
Unmarried Minor W/O Notifying
Parent/LEO. 10/7/05
Yale, Crystal Renee; Female;
19; 8965 Indian Ford Rd., Milton,
FL; Damage Prop-Crim Mischief
O\ er 1 2.' Under $1,000, Burglar
of Structure Conveyance
Unarmed W/O Person Inside (2
cts.), Larceny Theft is $300 or
More But Less than $5,000. (2
cts,).
Brandon, Jack; Male; 71;
5233 Sewell Rd., Milton, FL;
Battery Touch or Strike, Burglary
W/Assault or Battery. 10/8/05
Carden, Mason Earl; Male;
42; 4550 Pace Ln, Pace, FL;
Fraud-Imperson Contracting
License Subseq Violation, Larc-
Theft is $300 or More But Less
Than $5,000 (2 cts.), Fraud-
Imperson Contracting License 1st
Violation, Crimes Against
Person-Exploitation of Elderly
Less Than $20,000. 10/7/05
Farmer Traci Colomb;
Female; 37; 2021 West Indies Dr.,
Pensacola, FL; DUI Alcohol or
Drugs 1st Offense, DUI and
Serious Bodily Injury to Another,
DUI and Damage Property.
10/6/05
Granja, Jader J; Male; 28;
621 Colonial Drive, Ft. Walton
Beach, FL; Drive'While License
Susp Habitual Offender. 10/7/05
McBee. Jr., Louis Odell;
Male; 31; 2362 Avenida De Sol,
Navarre, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 10/7/05
Nelson, Travis Gene; Male;
24; 6485 Garner Landing Rd,
Holt, FL; Weapon Offense-
Missile Into Dwelling Veh
Building or Aircraft, Damage
Prop-Criminal Misch $200 and
Under. 10/9/05
Reed, Crystal Lee; Female;
25; 9212 Eagle Nest Dr., Navarre,
FL; Fraud-Illegal Use Credit
Cards-Use More 2 Times 6 Mos.
Obt Gds Money $100 More.
10/9/05
Salter II, Andre\% William;
Male; 18; 5261 Joanna PL, Pace,
FL; Damage Prop-Crim Misch
Over $200 Under .$1,000,
Burglary of Structure
Conveyance Unarmed W/O


ITh


4915 Highway 90 Pace,;
850-995-1600 :


FBoxffiOes12:3


The Fog (PG13)
1:40 4:20 7:20 9:45
Elizabethtown (PG13)
1:15 4:00 7:00 9:40
Domino (R)
1:20 4:15 7:15 9:50
Wallace & Gromit:
Curse of the Were-rabbit (G)
1:00 3:00 5:00 6:55 8:50
Flight Plan (PG13)
1:10 3:20 5:30 7:40 9:55
*In Her Shoes (PG13)
1:05 4:10 7:05 9:45
*Greatest Game Ever Played (
1:30 4:15 6:50 9:30
Two for the Money (R)
1:45 4:30 7:10 9:50
*Last Night Thurs. Oct. 20


ISt~3Eid.OcS


Dreamer (PG)
1:30 4:10 6:50 9:30
Doom (R)
1:45 4:30 7:10 9:50
North Country (R)
1:05 3:50 7:05 9:45


4


1*


L I I


_ I I II


I I I III I I I m





Wednesday October 19, 2005'-


Panne 2-A


e hT Santa Rosa Press e


li


Person Inside (2 cts.), Larceny
Theft is $300 or More But Les)
Than $5,000 (2 cts.). 10/8/05 ,'
Skipper, Joseph Samuel;
Male; 31; 8327 Raleigh Circ.,
Pensacola,' FL; Probatioti
Violation-Felony. 10/8/05
Levesque, Francois; Male;
42; 11193 Av Lamoureu ,
Montreal, Canada; DUI. 10/7/05'
Cowles, Ronald Charles
Male;. 42; 7025 Webster St;
Navarre, FL;, Driving Whil'e
License Suspended Habitual
Offender. 10/10/05 .
Dees, Lawanda Necolci:
*Female; 28; 124 N. Shipp Sti.
Evergreen, AL; Shoplifting-Petit
From Merchant 2nd or:
Subsequent Offense, Drugs-
Possess Cntrl Sub 7W/O,
Prescription. 10/10/05
Gilbreath, James Mlansel?
Male;'34; 5460 Nlunson H\\\.,
Milton, FL; Flee/Elude Polic';-
Flee W/Disregard of Safety to
Persons or Property, 10/10/0 5 .'
Hargett, Dallas BTrandoni
Male; 22; 1215 Leonard AveF
Lawrence, KS;: Probatioi
Violation-Felony,,10/10/05 -
Hughes, Natasha N: Female;
22; 5709 Yuka Dr., Milton, FL';
Probation Violation-Felony.
10/10/05 '
JTames, Gregory Lee; Male;
20; 3301 Gene Fleming Rda
Milton, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 10/10/05
Johnson, Chad Edward;
Male; 27; 8828 Byrom Campbelf
Damage Prop-Crim Misch
$1,000 or More, Veh Theft-Grand
3rd 'Degree, Resist Officer'-
Obstruct W/O Violence, Escape.
10/10/05
LeWis, Jennifer Lynn;
Female; 25; 1719 New Hope Rd.,
Gulf Breeze, FL; Probatioi
Violation-Felony. 10/10/05
Martin, Cynthia Daw .n
Hulett; Female; 39; 5582 Kingery
Rd., Milton, FL; Fraud-Utter
False Instrument. 10/10/05
Morgan_ Robert Dean; Mal;
20; 1804 Cross St., Pensacola,
FL; Failure To Appear for Felony
Offense. 10/10/05
Pierce, Sommer Alisa;
Female; 26; 2922 Crittenden Dr,,
Navarre, FL; Out of State
Fugitive From Justice. 10/10/05
.Strickland, Jimmy .Ray;
Male; 53; 4855 Attaway Drive,
Pace, FL; Drive While License
Suspended Habitual Offendef.
10/10/05
Burton, Timothy Scott, Jr.,
Male; 19; 7881 Penny Lane,
Milton, FL; Fraud-Swindle-
Obtain Property Under $20,000.
Spears, Tracy Ann; Femal,;
35; 626 Calhoun A\ e.. Pensacola"
FL; AVson-Burn With Intent tp
Defraud Insurer, Fraud-False
Statement File False Info Wiot
Dept of Ins. 10/10/05
Stevison, Cynthia Inedl;'
Female; 35; 4707 Spencer Oak s
Blvd., Pace, FL; Neglect Chili
Without Great Harm. 10/10/05 .
Barrick, Nancy Collier;
Female; 53; 509 East Lee Stret,
Pensacola, FL: DUI/10/10/05 I'
Marshman, Devona
.Elizabeth; Female; 37; 451.
Sunrise Drive, Pace, FL; Hit arnl
Run-Fail to Stop Remain at Crash
Involve Injury. 10/11/05
Ripple, David Lynn; Mal ;
59; 121 Schad Street, Brewtof,
AL; Traffic Violation-Expir4d
Registration Motor Vehicle r
Mobile Home Over 6 mo., Driv
While License Susp, Hit aad
Run-Fail to Stop Remain at CraSi
Involve Injury. 10/10/05 ,
J.ones, Christopher Dary;
Male; 23; 6306 Long St., Milton,
FL; Possess Marijuana Over 2b
Grams. 10/11/05
Kimmons, Steven Ea l;
Male; 41; 4237 Elvis Presley DY,
Milton, FL; Failure To Apper
For Felony Offense. 10/10/05 ,'






Wednesday October 19, 2005 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Page 3-A
SLocal


Program is a 'contract for college'


By DEBORAH NELSON
6ress Gazette Staff Writer


Top notch Santa Rosa stu-
dents and their parents gathered
at the School Board auditorium
last week to sign "scholarship
contracts."
| The Santa Rosa Education


FrunIdaLoII awiuuaru tle
agency's latest batch of Bright
Futures college scholarships, as
parents and teachers looked on.
The Foundation awarded 18
new scholarships this year-
that's in addition to 70 already-
existing scholarships ear-
marked for students yet to grad-


Bright Futures recipients pose with their signed "contracts." In the
documents, the youth, in exchange for scholarships, vow to keep up
iteir grades and stay out of trouble.

officials still working

weekend 'murder/suicide'


By DEBORAH NELSON
press Gazette Staff Writer


: Police say autopsy reports
show Pamela Hartley
.hompson was shot twice, and
joy Thompson Sr. once, during
Mst week's suspected
i~irder/suicide in Pace,
S'Police suspect Roy
S hompson, 40, entered the
d0me at 4825 O'Brian way
; early Saturday morning, shot
SHartley-Thompson, 40, and
then turned the gun on himself.
: Deputies were dispatched
Srp the residence at 1:40 a.m., on

Play
SContinued From Page One.
Gloria Steiner-Brenner; Joe
r nema, as Chick Enchilada; and
bonniee Andrews as Casey
Steinem.
Stacie Toups is direct-
. ng this weekend's show, and
tlhe assistant director is Chris
Ketnmer.
For reservations, call Paula
Lou Mapples at,850-626-9567
,1-


October 15, after a report of a
shooting. There, they discov-
ered the suspect and the victim
inside, with gunshot wounds.
The case is still under
investigation, but police say it's
likely a domestic violence relat-
ed murder/suicide.
Thompson Sr. had recently
been arrested for domestic vio-
lence- against the victim,
Hartley Thompson, officials
note. Police say they believe
Thompson entered the house by
breaking a window while the
victim was away.


or 850-626-0070.
The Milton Clubhouse is
located at 6863 Oak Street, one
block south of Highway 90
between Santa Rosa and Elmira
Streets, in historic downtown
Milton.
Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
Nelson @ sr-pg. com


s th


the University of West Florida.
"This is a'great day for us in
many ways,' notes Santa Rosa
School Superintendent John
Rogers. "We're honoring some
of our best students in the coun-
ty-and it's just good to see
what's going to take place in the
next four years."
Education Foundation
Leadership Council Chair
Randy Sansom told the young-
sters to stick with school
through college and that disci-
pline would carry through later
in life.
"I believe education is the:
key in our country to [encour-
age people] to make the right
decision and morally move in
the right direction," he remarks.
Nelson@sr-pg.com


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Homeowners with
money worries may qualify
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uate.
The scholarships guarantee
four years of college tuition. In
exchange, students must keep
up their grades through middle
and high school, and stay out of
trouble.
Students and their parents
sign the contracts, pledging to
keep to those guidelines.
Parents are included as part
of the learning process to maxi-
mize study opportunities, offi-
cials say. Students are also
assigned a mentor to help
smooth the path to graduation.
"It's completely rewarding
to see her hard work and our
hard work pay off at her early
age,". says Katrina Johnson. It
just reinforces what we're try-
ing to teach."
Johnson's daughter, Kaitlyn
received one of this year's
scholarships.
"Some days, it's kind of
stressful'" says Kaitlyn of the
work involved in keeping the
program up. "But on days like
this, it's completely worth it."
The Avalon Middle
Schooler says, after graduation,
she's leaning toward attending


Tuffy
Continued From Page One.
traveled more than 1,000 miles
over the weekend to be ready
for school in Amarillo Monday.
Traveling to Texas is
not the only activity Tuffy has
been completing. His first book
is published on-line on his web-
site: www.gotuffygo.com
.
Supporters say the website
has been growing and now
offers a puzzle, a coloring page,
and much more.
Tuffy is sponsoring a
coloring contest with two $100
first prizes. The coloring con-
test is included in today's Press
Gazette.
For more information
on Tuffy and how you can get
involved, contact the Santa
Rosa Educational Foundation at
(850) 983-5043.


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Have you been turned
down for a loan? Do you
need more than $10,000 for
any reason? Are you paying
more than 10% interest on
any other loans or credit
cards?
If you are a homeowner
and answered 'yes' to any of
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DAGF AA


I THE SANTA ROSA PRESS G TE


k J vr- ..4A. ---


EDITORIAL & OPINIONS


Time for the facts
Our very own Jeff Miller (U.S. Representative
from Chumuckla) has a unique opportunity to set
the record straight regarding the absolute botched
handling of Hurricane Katrina, particularly in New
Orleans.
Miller, along with 10 other lawmakers, has
been appointed to the Select Bipartisan Committee
to investigate the preparation for, and response to,
Katrina.
Finally, after weeks of watching the finger
pointing, listening to the political hacks armchair
quarterback, the out-of-control liberal media dis-
sect every aspect of what has happened and the
accusations of racial disparity, we should now
begin to see the truth and facts surface.
While no one could have anticipated every
event of this devastating disaster, most of us with
any intelligence at all, have come to the sad real-
ization Katrina has become a political and racial
battleground with absolutely no justification what-
soever.
No one can argue that the preparation and
response were flawed on the part of the City of
New Orleans, the state of Louisiana and officials
in Washington.
Many Floridians are shaking their heads in
total amazement at the botched events as they
unfolded before Katrina slammed Louisiana and
Mississippi. We continue to ask how Florida has
survived all the severe hurricanes that have
slammed our state, (four just last year), without
going through the Mickey Mouse performance of
what we've seen go on in New Orleans.
The time has long since past for the Bush
haters to shut their mouths and offer constructive
advice and intelligent input. Playing the race card
in this disaster reeks of underhanded and erro-
neous political mudslinging on the part of sup-
posed black leadership in this country.
There was really never a good time to point
fingers. Instead, we would have expected to see
unity for the sole purpose of effectively responding
to a serious situation, saving lives and effectively
helping the distressed in time of real need.
We can only expect Miller and other lawmak-
ers on this committee to bring out the accurate
facts as they relate to first responders, state gov-
ernment response and the actions taken on the fed-
eral level.
Then, and only then, can we, as taxpayers and
citizens of the United States, fully realize and
understand fact from fiction.
We found the behavior, attitude and clear lack
of leadership displayed after Katrina-on all
fronts-to have been disgusting.
Through a fair and balanced process, we
expect the facts to come forth. And from that, we
should expect serious steps to be taken on all lev-
els of government to prevent a repeat of not only
the problems experienced with Katrina, but the
disgusting political and racial spin that evolved on
the heels of a personal and regional catastrophe.
While all the fingers are being pointed at gov-
ernment. we should also clearly point out this
committee must expose individual responsibility
as a factor in preventing the events of Katrina.
We believe Miller, with his background of
dealing with pre and post-storm problems here in
Florida may just be uniquely qualified to dig for
the truth of what happened in New Orleans and
Mississippi.
We look forward to hearing the results of this
inquiry.


OCTOBER 19, 2005


G Santa osa's P ess
aze tie


VOL. 98. NO. 58


Serving Milton, Pace, Jay
IHolley-Navarre, Gulf Breeze
& surrounding communities
Santa Rosa's Press Gazette (USPS 604-
360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays:
.and Saturdays for $28 per year (in county) by
Milton Newspapers, Inc., Michael Coulter,
Publisher. Periodicals postage paid at Milton,
Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to: Santa Rosa's Press Gazette, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, Florida 32570.
Michael Coulter ... .President & Publisher
Jim Fletcher ........ Assistant Publisher
Carol Barnes .......Business Manager
Deborah Nelson ....Staff Writer
Jeff Everts ........ Staff Writer
Obie Crain, Jr. ......Special Projects Writer
Bill'Gamblin ...... .Sports Editor
SJim Martin ....... .Advertising Manager
Debbie Coon .... ... .Advertising Exec.'
Tracey Murphree ... .Advertising Exec.
Toni,Coberly .......Bookkeeper
Rosie Farhart ...... .Archives
Tracie Smelstoys ... .Circulation
Dale Bowden ...... .Classifieds,
............... Graphic Design
David Janer ... ....Classifieds,
........... ... .Graphic Design
Freddy Coon .......Pressroom Foreman
Esther Sears ...... .Darkroom Technician
Angela Perritt ......Production Manager
Debra Wistner ..... Graphic Designer
Cheryl Baker ...... Type'setting
Gaspar De La Paz .. .Post Press Leader
Bob Farmer, Latesha De La Paz,
Lissa O'Neal, Brian Rinehart
and Esther Sears ... .Post-Press
Advertising rates available on request.
Telephone all departments:
(850) 623-2120 623-3616
FAX 623-9308
email: news@sr-pg.com
6629 Elva St., Milton, Florida 32570.
Don't Forget to Recycle Your Paper


Copyrighted Material

I e Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


OCTOBER 19, 2009



Your

,Phone


A


You Spoke Outi
_~ .i


Youth need time, not Time


FM: WARREN THROCKMORTON
Dear Editor:
Is there a battle over gay teens? If you can believe
a recent Time Magazine cover story, a war is on
between gay activists and social conservatives over
adolescents who are declaring gay and lesbian identi-
ties at early ages. The number-one cable news show,
The O'Reilly Factor, recently interviewed the author
of the Time article, John Cloud, about the issue. Both
men expressed differing views on the matter and as I
explain below, I believe Mr. O'Reilly to be closer to
the correct view.
Central to the dispute is the impact of self-label-
ing. Is the proper response to same-sex feelings expe-
rienced by youth to come out as gay or lesbian or is it
to wait for more mature times to declare a sexual iden-
tity due to the pliability of sexual feelings and gener-
al adolescent confusion?
A related issue takes us into the consequences of
adolescent choices for public policy. Is the increased
emphasis on gay acceptance in schools creating pres-
sure on confused teens to declare early and become
militant about gay rights to meet adult expectations?
The Time article leaves no question that teens
are experiencing same-sex attraction earlier now
(boys,10; girls, 14) than in the 1960s (boys, 14; girls,
17).
Whatever one thinks about the origins of homo-
sexual attractions, there can be little debate that the
rapid increase in school-based clubs called gay-
Sstraight alliances has had an impact. Whereas in past
years, young people might have been willing to take a
wait-and-see attitude about same-sex attractions, now
they are encouraged to find a label for themselves
among an ever-grow ing batch of terms. Gay, lesbian,
bisexual, queer, transgender, and questioning are
identity designations lhat students as young as middle
school are having modeled through gay-straight
alliances and popular fiction books, such as the
Misfits.
On his show, Mr. O'Reilly questioned whether
Such early labeling was a good idea. In a cordial
exchange, Mr. Cloud and Mr. O'Reilly traded per-
spectives.
O'Reilly: But there's a problem here. No. 1, I
think almost every teenager gets confused about sex-
ual identity at some time. OK? So, you know, rushing
out to declare yourself one thing or another, I think, is
foolish. And m my book, which is better for, kids than
a Sinon and Schuster book, I say. don't define your-
self that way...Whose business is it if you're 13, 14,
15?...AmI wrong?
Cloud: Well, I think, you know, kids face the
assumption that they're straight, basically. So if
they're gay and they want to do something about that"
assumption, the only choice is to tell people that
they're gay. ,
is coming out the only choice? While it is one
choice, it certainly is not the only choice. Unless, of
course, you want to feel a part of an adult social
movement.
Although the ages of coming out are dropping,
when to have sex and with whom are generally con-
sidered to be decisions requiring an adult level of
maturity.
Declaring a gay identity long before reaching the
necessary level of maturation to engage in adult sexu-
ality requires the teen to either experiment sexually or
predict what his sexual attractions will be in the dis-
tant future or both. Instead of expanding their possi-
bilities, teens can feel cast into a social role.
A case can be made that teens are less likely' tto
explore their options if such a role is adopted and
lived out in an environment that encourages solidarity


to a political cause.
In his recent
Time article, Mr.
Cloud provides evi-
dence of just the
kind of social influ-
ence I refer to. He
describes pressure
experienced by gay
students to embel-
lish their applica-
tions for college
scholarships with
tales of victimiza-
tion for their gay
identity.
One such bene-
factor, the Point
Foundation exclu-
sively awards col-
lege funds to gay
students who have
demonstrated schol-


arship and gay activism during their high school
years. Thus, students are competing via how much
they have done to further adult political objectives
during their formative years.
Perhaps reflecting his own homosexual procliv-'
ities and his sunny outlook on the status of gay teens,
Mr. Cloud further opines, "a lot of these kids aren't
necessarily interested in gay politics or gay culture as
gay activists that formed it." I tend to agree and this is
precisely why schools should not promote activist
events such. as Day of Silence, where students are
expected to not speak for an entire day in sympathy
with a gay rights program.
So in this case, Mr. O'Reilly really is looking
out for teens who need time, not Time, to sort out
their feelings without activists organizing among
them.

Says husband wrongly accused
FM: LORRIE BACH
Dear Editor:
Twenty-four years ago, my husband was accused
and convicted of rape after a trail by jury, despite the
following actual facts:
The alleged victim identified my husband
despite the fact that he had a large tattoo on his left
arm which she did not see on her bare-armed assailant
who sat next to her in her car with the dome light on.
My husband has a scar on his forehead which
she did not see on her assailant.
My husband has always had brown hair and her
assailant had blonde hair.
The alleged victim was an adult who left her
boyfriend in the middle of the night to pick up anoth-
er who had called her in the early morning hours.
The alleged victim had no bruises, scrapes, cuts
of injuries or defensive marks of any kind.
My husband's alibi was that he was home,
sleeping like normal people do in the middle of the
night.
In addition to the above, the alleged victim stated
that her assailant touched and left fingerprints on her
pistol, her car, and her flashlight, but the fingerprints
did not match my husband's even though there were
numerous prints on all these items. She stated her
assailant was not wearing gloves.
At the time of the trial, certain scientific tests and
studies, specifically DNA analysis, were not available
to prove my husband's innocence.: Currently, we have
retained an attorney 'who has already requested and
petitioned courts and law enforcement to submit the
rape kit and clothing obtained from the alleged victim
for DNA anal sis.
Because of this con\ action, laws now require him
to register twice a year at the Sheriff's Department
and anytime he leaves the county or state, he must
contact local law enforcement here and where he
goes. He also submitted his DNA to the county.
We believe that convicted child molesters should
be incarcerated for many, many years more than what
the law now requires. All concerned citizens of Santa
Rosa County need to write their congressman and
force them to pass a law that child molesters do as
much time as murderers.
I am not embarrassed by the "sex offenders list"
that has been published, but my heart goes out to my
husband and others that have served time for some-
thing they were erroneously and wrongly convicted
of. I am concerned that someone will be motivated by
this "published list" and do harm to my husband or
family.
Because of this erroneous conviction, the mental
anguish that my husband and family has experienced
is unimaginable, let alone the financial cost involved.


0 Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

EAvailable from Commercial News Providers ,%





Santa Rosa...


Sunday, 7:47 p.m. ,
This is Carol. I am watching
this thing about the Ivory-billed
woodpecker on 60 Minutes. ;I
know for a fact that we used to
have this bird in our back yard.
My mother, who is in her 80s, can
attest to that. We used to see a pair
of them all the time. I keep hear-
ing that they are extinct and I've
been wanting to say something to
someone about this for some
time.

Saturday, 3:19 p.m.
I would just like to know
when Benny Russell Park will be
back open. I'd love to see an arti-
cle about this park. Thank you.-'.

Saturday, 2:15 p.m.
This is Pat, About the mad
cow rumor. My bus driver said
her brother-in-law had had it, was
in the hospital and was about to
die. You might want to check with
some of the bus drivers.

Saturday, 1:05 p.m.
A while back, someone
dumped a big white boat along
the side of the road. If they don't
come get it, I'm going to pack it
off.

Friday, 5:48 p.m. '
This is Joyce. I'm calling in
reference to the Barnes family in
Jay. They were told a benefit
would be thrown for them when
their house burned down. I'n
wondering why that was never
held.

Thursday, 9:02 a.m.
I just want to say that I agree
with the lady talking about transit
buses here in Milton. We do need
that, transportation. Now that We
have voted wet, we are really.
going to need it. Thanks.'


Thursday, 8:54 a.m.
I am just wondering w hat the
deal is about the duck family
crossing the intersection :bf
Berryhill Road and Dogwoodl I
think officials should put up a
sign saying: Warning, duck:cros-
ing. Thank you.



*4 '


You may Speak Out any
time, day or night. Just call 4ur
Speak Out line at 623-5807
and leave your message.


We want you to share your
views on the above topic(s)-ror
ANY topic-with other Pross
Gazette readers. Your views Are
important, too.
Send your letters to: LET-
TERS TO THE EDITOR, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, FL 32510.
(FAX (850) 623-9308.)
Letters may be edited for con-
tent or to fit the available space.
For a letter to be published, you
MUST sign your name and please
include your phone number and
address so we may phone for ver-
ification, if necessary. ,
,'k


4


I I I I


I 'rl I I I


i


YOUR WRITTEN OPINIONS










SLocal


revenue
SContinued From Page One.
lter remarks.
S He says it's time to buy
ts of way along Highway 90
future service roads.
"If we let Highway 90
develop like Highway 98 has,
it's going to be too late," he pre-
dicts.
The county courthouse will
also need to be replaced at some
point, according to county offi-
6cals, at an estimated $30 mil-
libn cost.
And International Paper has
indicated plans to divest some
20,000 acres in Santa Rosa's
north end-a move likely to
open that area to major devel-
opment.
Officials also note the coun-
ty may be ready to swap land
with the Navy for Spencer Field
sometime next year, leaving the
S600-acre parcel open to devel-
opment.
Officials say if the county
doesn't get a handle on how to'
pay for those future infrastruc-
pre needs, quality of life, as
"well as the county's capacity
.for growth could be slowed.
.t "As we become more pros-
.perous, we want more services,
Iand as we become more pros-
perous, we want less taxes,"
-ommission Chair Gordon
',oodin observes. "The trick is
,to find a way to do both."
p: Preferably, without hiking
property taxes--commissioners
faced very vocal public opposi-
tion to that suggestion, in 2003.
'w The answer, say officials, is
j 40 charge developers impact
:-fees for the costs incurred by
new growth, then fill remaining
funding gaps with other rev-
enue sources.
] i Impact fees, currently set at
bout $2,000 per new single
SAfmily home, would. generate
i.104.4 million over the next ten
ei .ars, according to county esti-
mates.
Other possible new revenue
sources include a one-cent sales
;a.\. a gas tax and document
:- tamp taxes on real estate trans-
I nrctionl.
: Over ten years, the county
would also collect $23.4 mil-7
lion in electric franchise fees,
and $29.8 million on Navarre
rLi .


Beach leaseholder taxes (pro-
vided the move to tax beach
residents clears a final Supreme
Court hurdle).
County estimates project a
new one-cent sales tax would
generate $129.5 million over
the next ten years.
A one-cent gas tax would
raise $34.6 million and would
directly tap those actually using
the roadways.
But some fear a local option
gas tax would simply send
Santa Rosans to already-cheap-
er neighboring counties to fill
up.


"We ma.
actually see a
lessening of
purchases in
the county if
we try [to raise]
that fuel tax,"
Commissioner
Bob Cole pre-
dicts.
County
staffers are
currently ana-


BOB COLE
Commissioner


lyzing Document Stamp tax
revenue potential.
But, leaders contend, it's
going to take a.combination of
revenue sources to completely
cover future needs without rais-
ing property taxes.
"We're not looking for one
silver bullet-I don't think one
silver bullet will fix the prob-
lems of the past," Salter
remarks, noting:
"If we don't find a way to
take the pressure off property
taxes, the only way we're going
to fix what's been broken is to
raise property taxes."
"We do not want current
property owners to pay for
growth," says Commissioner
John Broxson. "Growth should
pay for itself."
Leaders say they hope-that
by tapping developers to pay a
share of growth's costs, they'll
convince the public to approve
the penny sales tax next year.
If the public' does not agree,
say leaders, roads may continue,
to deteriorate, and growth could
slow.
iThat's because earlier this
year, Florida legislators man-
dated'..a ..-pa as you grow"


growth law. The measure
requires local governments
show they can pay for future
needs before approving new
growth.
Local governments must
have long-range capital (roads,
courthouses) funding plans in
place before approving new
development.
Not everybody wvas enthusi-
astic about impact fees at
Monday's meeting.
"I'm absolutely opposed to
impact fees, but not for the rea-
sons that you think," developer
and Florida Homebuilders
Association President Dan
Gilmore told the Board. "The
problem is what it does to your
communities."
Gilmore contends the fees
are regressive-penalizing
lower income homebuyers dis-
proportionately-and could
eventually price middle class
workers out of the neighbor-
hood.
As a cautionary, tale, he
points to Collier County, where
impact fees have topped
$20,000 per home.
Collier has begun to bus in
workers who can't afford to live
where they work.
Gilmore predicts if Santa
Rosa adopts impact fees, it
could push all home prices up.
And once the fees are estab-
lished, he warns, they'll likely
increase with time.
A study commissioned by
the National Association of
Homebuilders argues against
impact fees, finding that new
growth does indeed pay for
itself, and then some.
New housing pays for the
public costs it incurs, by gener-
ating construction jobs and later
"ripple effect" economic activi-
ty, says economist Elliot
Eisenberg, PhD.
"We know jobs create
homes, but homes also create
jobs," Eisenberg told the Board.
But Santa Rosa officials
point out that had impact fees
been imposed on new homes
back in 1991, the county would
be in much better shape now to
meet coming .infrastructure
needs.,
Broxson' emphasized, the


Commission's not out to get
developers.
"We hope you get on board
with us and help us solve the
problem," he remarked.
Officials say they'll look at
the possibility of imposing
impact fees as "special assess-
ments." Assessments would be
charged at the end of the con-
struction process rather than at
the start, and spread those pay-
ments out.
Officials say special assess-
ments could also be prorated
according tohome costs--per-
haps mitigating the low-income
expense factor.
To my mind [charging]
impact fees is regressive-it
hurts the people who can afford
it the least," says Goodini.
Officials note they don't
want to hamper development.
"The growth industry turns
our economy," says
Commissioner Tom Stewart.
Commissioners will discuss
the impact fee issue at next
Monday's Commission
Committee meeting. If
approved, the process will
move forward to the. public
hearing phase.
The county also plans
future public workshops to


update Santa Rosa's long range
Better Santa Rosa Plan.
The Plan outlines future
capital improvement projects
like roads and courthouses.
As for sales taxes- com-
missioners say they'd like to see
the issue put to referendum next
year.


Ultimately, that decision
will rest with the public.
"We can't go any further
than the citizens of this county
want to go," Broxson observes.

Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
Nelson @sr-pg.cor


MARSHA BEACH
850-572-5652
marshabeach@aol.comh


l Junctiontl nc
www.realestateiunction.com


Low List] lo Ratesp


Steel ,Rofing

And Siding
And everything in between including zee purlins, cee
channels, trim, fasteners, windows, doors, and skylights.

Jackson, MS 1-800-647-8540
~b~lb~2


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
SA meeting of the Santa Rosa County Board of Adjustment will be held on
November 3, 2005, at 5:30 pm at the Santa Rosa County Administrative
Complex, in the Commisioners Boardroom located at 6495 Caroline Street,
Milton, Florida.

The public is invited to attend and provide verbal or written comment. You are
also invited to provide written comment to our office at least one day prior to
the scheduled meeting for presentation to the Board if unable to attend this
meeting.

Information concerning these items may be inspected during regular business
hours (M-F 7:30-4:30) at our office located at 6051 Old Bagdad Hwy., Milton,
FL. The agenda is available on the Planning and Zoning page of the County's
website at www.co.santa-rosa.fl.us.

If you have any questions regarding this meeting, please call the Santa Rosa
County Commnunit 'Planning. Zofiing, and De'elopment Division at '
(850) 981-7075 or (850) 939-1259.' ,.


THE HEALING TOUCH

as reported in August 5 issue of Consumer Reports


Survey participants gave the highest marks to hands-on treatments.
They worked better than conventional treatments for conditions such
as back pain and arthritis, which cause significant discomfort yet
don't have reliable conventional cures.


Back pain, neck pain, fibromyalgia, and osteoarthritis accounted for
about one-fourth of the ailments that survey respondents told us
about. Standard medical treatments tend to provide only partial relief
for those maladies, which may be why a higher proportion of readers
tried alternative treatments for them than for other conditions.


"It makes sense to use alternative treatments when the primary
treatments are ineffective," says Howard Beckman, M.D., a clinical
professor of medicine at the University of Rochester with extensive
expertise in alternative medicine.


"For all four conditions, reader told us that "body therapies"-
massage, chiropractic, exercise, and physical therapy provided more
relief than medications, either conventional or alternative.



Chiropractic was ranked ahead of all conventional treatments,
including prescription drugs, by readers with back pain. (readers said
it also provided relief for neck pain.) Deep-tissue massage was found
to be especially effective in treating osteo-arthritis and
fibromyalgia, a painful musculoskeletal syndrome that conventional
medicine often remains at a loss to treat.




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The Santa, Rosa Press Gazette


%Wdnesday October 19, 2005


I


Page 5-A








The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday October 19, 2005 N'


Local


2005 St. Rose of Lima Fall Festival deemed big success


ers say they're "very happy"
with how things went.
Bigger and better amuse-
ment rides, gorgeous weather,
and great food all combined to
produce a record attendance for


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the three-day event at the St.
Rose of Lima Catholic Church.
Officials estimate the week-
end saw approximately 60,000
people stroll through the event.
"We're just thrilled at the
wonderful turnout and would
like to thank the people of
Milton and the surrounding
area for supporting the festival,"
says Connie Armstrong, Parish
Administrator.
"We would also like to
thank all of the volunteers who
gave of their time and talents to
help run the festival."


Rotary District Governor John
Tice traveled to Santa Rosa
recently to address the Pace
Rotary Club. Tice told members
the club is known around the
district as a "hard-charging"
club and is "well-connected" to
the district level. Tice outlined
the district's theme for the year,
Service Above Self. His address
came at the Pace Rotary Club's
regular Thursday morning meet-
ing, held at Stonebrook Village.


Nancy H.
Brown
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850-994-6128
CELL: 485-4921
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JME REALTY
5561 Woodbine Road
Pace, FL,32571 .
www.jmerealty.com


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
The St. Rose of Lima
International Fall Festival came
to an end Sunday and organiz-


Father Dennis O'Brien,
who is Pastor of St. Rose of
Lima, echoed Armstrong's
comments saying, "This being
my. first fall festival, I found it
was a great community builder
not only for our parish, but also
for the Milton and Pace com-
munities as well."
"I found it very family-
friendly with a cheerful atnios-
phere and I am thrilled about
the weekend."
The centerpiece of this'
year's festival was a Ferris
wheel which, when lit at night,
could be seen for miles-draw-
ing people to the festival
grounds like a lighthouse.
The wheel was one part of a
new set of rides brought in this
year to help appeal more to
families and not just young
children.
Festival-goers also, enjoyed
the variety of food available
during the weekend. Food from
hamburgers and hot dogs to
pierogies, Italian sausages, ele-
phant ears, turkey legs, Filipino
delights, and more were
offered.
A new addition this year
was a French style coffee
house, called Caf6 Du Rose,
run by the church's youth group
which officials say proved to be
"quite popular' ,/
One of the happiest people
at the festival was Howard
Hudson who won the grand
prize in the raffle...a 1996
Harley-Davidson motorcycle.
Hudson was surprised to
hear he had won since he didn't
even know his mother had
bought the tickets and entered
his name.
Festival organizers estimate
the event raised over $40,000
which will be used to support
various functions within the
church from its youth groups to
charities and to help the adopt-
ed "sister parish" in Bay St.
Louis, Mississippi rebuild after
Hurricane Katrina.
"We are grateful to the
other churches in the area for
their support of our festival and
relief efforts," Father O'Brien
stated.


rcis wie
V,,p rt wils n t o

, jl E::~i ,


what's not to .<


A.,,, all4L


Allen Littleton has an encounter with an Iguana during the 2005 St.
Rose of Lima Fall Festival. Animal encounters were available for
those so inclined. (Inset) Levi Pauley, 4, meets a turtle.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


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Page 6-A


-:., .... .,

Yes, the pot is big, but it takes it when you're cooking for 60,000.
Donna Arndt stirs a batch of gumbo in the Cajun Booth at this year's,
St Rose of Lima Fall Festival.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


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WUUneIsmuay ucoLuuOI E uuu-- Ih l t; .. -.. R -----Pg 7
Obituaries


Wells,
James Thomas
1919-2005
James Thomas Wells, age
85, of Holley died in his sleep
Thursday morning, October
13, 2005 at Baptist Manor
Nursing Home in Pensacola,
FL. He was a native and long-
time resident of Santa Rosa
County.
Mr. Wells was born on
December 17, 1919 in the fam-
ily home in Holley, He was the
youngest son and fifth out of
six children born to John
Matheny Wells and Ella Mae
(McKinney) Wells Myers, a
family with pioneer roots in
Santa Rosa County. He attend-
ed school in Holley and
Milton, graduating from
Milton High School in 1938.
In 1939, Jim joined the
Navy. He was stationed in
Boston, MA where he met his
future wife, Doris. On April 5,
1942 in Boston, MA, after just
four months of courtship,
Jimmy Wells married Doris
Elizabeth Loop, of Adrian, MI.
He served in the U. S. Navy
for a total of twenty-three
years. During World War,II he
was attached to the Marine
Corps as a hospital corpsman
and landed on the Island of
Tarawa with the Marines. After
retiring from the Navy, he con-
tinued his federal service for
another 23 years before retiring
in 1986. He returned to live in
Holley with his family in 1986.
SJimmy Wells was preceded
in death by his wife-Doris
(1987); sister-Emma
(Barney) Broxson (2003);
brother-Frank (2003); sis-
ter-Evelyn (Paul) Fogel
(2005); and parents- John
(1926) and Ella Mae (1982).
Mr. Wells was a hardwork-
ing man with a great love for
children. His family and
friends will greatly miss him.
Left to cherish his memory
are his six children--LTC
(Ret) Dan (Sharon) Wells of
Arlington, VA, Lt. COL (Ret)
John (Lorraine) Wells of
Stamford, CT, Carole Ann
Wells of Pensacola, FL, Mike
(Debbie) Wells of Navarre, FL,
and i\\ins-Ronnie (Laura)
and Dennis Wells of Florida;
grandchildren-Chris (Ginger)
Wells of Fort Knox, KY, Steve
Wells of Blacksburg, VA, Matt
(Dianna) Wells of Fort Knox,
KY, Kathryn Wells 'of
Alexandria, VA, Bryan
(Andrea) Wells of Easton, PA,
Kevin Wells of Bridgeport,
CT., and Danielle Wells of
Navarre, FL; four great grand-
children;. ; sister-Elizabeth
Brown of Pensacola; brother-
bavid (Clara), Wells of
Pensacola: and numerous
cousins, nieces and nephews.
'Funeral services will be 11
a.m. Wednesday, October 19,
2005 at Billory Baptist Church,
in Holley with Rev. Adrian
Wingate officiating. Jim will be
buried in the Harper Family
Cemetery adjacent to Billory
Baptist Church during a private
I family service on a later date.
Lewis Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.


Jernigan, Richard
Thames
1919-2005
Richard Thames Jernigan,
age 85, died Monday, October
10, 2005. He went to be with
His Heavenly Father surround-
ed by his loving family and
friends at his home.
Richard was bom December
4, 1919, to Edward and Lula
Allen Jernigan in the
Allentown Community.
Richard was a graduate of
Allentown High School in
1939. He enlisted in the United
States Navy in January 1941.
Richard served for 27 years.
During World War II he was a
Flight Engineer, retiring with
Honors, and the rank of Senior
Chief Petty Officer, in August
1968.
Richard married Jeanette
Barnes on December 26, 1941.
They shared 63 wonderful and
happy years together. They
were blessed with one son-
Richard Curtis Jernigan.
After his Navy Retirement,
he served 10 years as a Wood
Producer with 'Reichhold
Chemicals of Pensacola. He
was also a part-time farmer and
lifelong member of the Florida
Cattlemen's Association and
National Riflemen Association.
He was an avid hunter and fish-
ermen. Richard is a member of
the Community of Christ
Church in Milton.
Richard is preceded in death
by his parents and by his son-
Curtis Jernigan of Pleasant
Hill, Oregon.
Richard is survived by his
wife-Jeanette Jernigan of
Wallace Community; 4 grand-
children-Darla Dowdy, Lisa
Gielish, Keri Jernigan, and
Wyndi Krueg. all of Pleasant
Hill, Oregon area. He is also
survived by his loving God-
given family-Earl and Shirley
Rutherford, Tammy and Neil
Passmore and their 2 daugh-
ters, and Wesley, and Kristal
Rutherford and son, all of the
Wallace Community; numer-
ous loving family and friends.
Pallbearers were Ted
Pospiech, Carol Partain, Don
Henderson, Bill Voss, Mike
Wolfe, and John Price. ,:i
Honorary pallbearers were
Wayne Jernigan, Earl
Rutherford, Earnest Jernigan,
Larry Chapman, and Ray
Wolfe.
Funeral services were 2
p.m., Thursday, October 13,
2005, in the Lewis Funeral
Home Milton Chapel with
Elders Ed Strachan and Wayne
Blocker officiating. Burial fol-
lowed in Serenity Gardens with
full Military Honors. Lewis
Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.
In lieu of flowers donations ,
may. be made to "Relay for
Life" through the Santa Rosa
Building Inspections
Department; ATTN: Tambre
Lee, 6051 Old Bagdad Hwy.,
Suite 2, Milton, FL 32583.


Bauldree, J.W.
Mr. J.W. Bauldree, age 88,
of the Jay area community of


Brownsdale, died Monday,
October 10, 2005 in a local
hospital.
Mi. Bauldree was a long-
time resident of Brownsdale.
He was a successful farmer for
many years in the Santa Rosa
County area. He was a loving
father, grandfather, great-
grandfather and a friend to
those that knew him.
He is preceded in death by
his parents-Richard James
and Annie Myers Bauldree; 2
sons-Bobby and R.J.
Bauldree, and 1 daughter-
Bonnie Langham.
He is survived by his wife-
Molly Marie Bauldree; son-
Billy (Sharon) Bauldree;
daughters -Pearl (Fiank)
Rowell, Joyce Dobson, Jean'
Woodfin and Frances (Charles)
Lambert; sister-Ada
Diamond, all of Brownsdale; 8
grandchildren -Michael,
Melanie, Kellie, Tracey, Lee,
Brian, Tony and Shannon; and
12 great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were 11
a.m., Thursday, October 13,
2005 at Jay Funeral Home with
Brother Ladon Hall and
Brother Bobby Carnley offici-
ating. Burial was in Cora
Cemetery.
Active pallbearers, were
Mike Rowell, Glen Bingham,
Tommy Smith, Brian
Langham, Lee Langham and
Tony Woodfin.
Honorary pallbearers were
Jr.:Smith, James Earl Diamond,
Ricky Smith, Raymond
Diamond, Rex Goodson,
Merlin Edwards and Dan
Langham.
Jay Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.
The family would like to
thank the staff of Jay Hospital,
Dr. David Smith, Muzette
Mattox and Terri Hendrickson
for all the care given to Mr.
Bauldree.

Sparks,
Bernell "Bernie"
Mr. Bernell "Bernie"
Sparks, age 79, of Roseland
Circle, Brewton, AL, passed
away Thursday, morning,
October 13, 2005 at his resi-
dence after an extended illness.
He was a native of Jay, FL,
former resident of Cantonment,
FL, and a long time resident of
Brewton, AL. Mr. Sparks was
an active member of North
Brewton Baptist Church for
over 50 years, a U.S. Marine,
and was retired from Smurfitt
Stone with 35 years of service.
Survivors include his wife
of 58 years-Madeline Sparks
of BreWton, AL; 1 son-Greg
(Tabatha) Sparks of Mansfield,
LA; 3 daughters-Sue Sparks
(Harry) Hawthorne of Milton,
FL, Karen Sparks (John) Davis
of Gulf Breeze, FL, Lisa
Sparks Austin of Atmore, AL;
3 sisters-Christine Crockett
of Pensacola. Sybil Killam of
Century. FL. Milbra Heck of
Cantonment, FL; 9 grandchil-
dren; 5 great-grandchildren; a
number of nieces and nephews,
who lovingly referred to him as
"Uncle Brother."
Pallbearers were his grand-
children-Todd Rogers, Jason


AII A


YARD SALE-
Skyline- 6563 Julia
Dr. Fri & Sat. Oct.
21 & 22 7 a.m.
until ? Tools, golf
clubs, household
items, ladies
clothes, etc.

5 FAMILY garage
sale. Saturday Octo-
ber 22 7 a.m. to 12
p.m. 5277 San Mi-
guel St. (Avalon
area). Furniture, ap-
pliances, big man's
clothes. Well worth
the drive!

5784 HERMITAGE-
CIRCLE- ( Off
Northop) Cleaning
out. Many nik naks,
books, jewelry, ma-
terial, linens, scan-
ner, brass. Fri. &
Sat. 7-1.


R U READY FOR A.
HUGE SATURDAY
moving sale? Saws,
generator, flower
pots, bikes, guns,
tools, trailer, bass
boat, riding mower,
fishing gear, pres-
sure washer, Box
lots, patio furniture,
fans, heaters, exer-
cise equipment,
much more. 6184
Jays Way. Saturday,
October 22, be alert
for furniture sale
early November, ev-
erything goes.
2 FAMILY yard sale.
Saturday, Oct. 22.
Rain date Oct. 29.
Music boxes, porce-
lain granny & grand-
pa dolls, misc. 6854
Pine Blossom Rd.


HUGE
COLLECTION of
tools, toys, kitchen
items, and misc.
Just north of 1-10
off Ward Basin Rd.
Follow signs. Sat
10-22 8am to 2pm
Everything must
go!!

YARD SALE- in
Avalon Beach- 3325
Compton Dr. Boat &
accessories, furni-
ture, etc. 8 a.m. till
? Sat. & Sun. fol-
low signs from main
roads.
MOVING SALE-
Large amount of
household items.
Also, paddle boat,
water pumps, etc.
6503 Lakeshore
Dr., Milton.
6:30 a.m. till ?


BIG GARAGE Sale
Queen headboard
$25.00 with lights
and mirrors, plants
$2.00, formal $3.00,
quilt $3.00, sheets
$1.00, dolls $.50
and $1.00, much
more. Must sell
5153 Bent Tree Rd
off 87 South.
Saturday 7 til ?

YARD SALE- 3
Family, Sat. 8 a.m.-
1 p.m. on Shell Rd.
off Hwy. 90. Every-
thing! Baby clothes,'
furniture, toys, girls
clothes.
LARGE YARD Sale-
Thurs. Sat. 7 a.m.
until ? 5088 Glover
Lane, Milton. If rain
Fri; have it Thurs. &
Sat. If rain all week-
end it will be the fol-
lowing Thurs-Sat.


GREAT GARAGE
SALE
Includes: Baby
things, kitchen
things (glassware,
dishes and knick-
knacks), clothing
(cloth linen & table
linen) and house-
hold items. Fri21/
Sat22 @ 7am
5738 Red Oak lane
Milton

NEIGHBORHOOD
YARD SALE North
Harbor Subdivision
(off Berryhill near
Head to Toe). Satur-
day, October 22nd.
Starting at 7 am. For
more info call Annie
at 994-5462.


Myers, Charles Austin, and
grandsons-in-law--Keith
Kirchharr, Richard Vester, and
Robbi Hardy.
Funeral services were 3
p.m., Saturday, October 15,
2005 at North Brewton Baptist
Church with Rev. Michael
King officiating. Interment fol-
lowed in Green Acres
Memorial Gardens Cemetery,
Brewton, AL, with Williams
Memorial Chapel Funeral
Home of Brewton, AL direct-
ing.

Coon, Sr.,
James Franklin
1919 2005
James Franklin Coon, Sr.,
age 86, of Pace, FL, died
Friday, October 14, 2005. He
was a native of Opp, AL, and
had resided in this area since
1941. He was retired after 16
years of service with NYCO
Security Services ofPensacola.
He was a decorated U.S. Army
Veteran of World War II;
Mr. Coon was preceded in
death by his wife-Myra J.
Coon, by his parents--William
F. and Annie Coon, his grand-
son-James R. "Jimbo" Coon
and his 2 sisters-Ruby
Morgan and Estelle Parker.
Survivors include his son-
James Franklin (Billie) Coon,
Jr. of Milton; daughter-
Barbara Green of Milton; step-
son-Joel Crumbley of
Ranburne, AL; step-daugh-
ters-Karen "Candy" (Alton)
Rutherford of Pace, Cynthia
(Jim) LeMons of Laurel Hill,
FL; 9 grandchildren; 10 great-
grandchildren; 3 nieces -and 2.
nephews.
Services were Sunday,
October 16, 2005 at 2 p.m. in
the Donnie Sowell Funeral
Home Chapel in Milton. Rev.
Danny Brock officiated with
burial in Serenity Gardens
Cemetery.
Mr. Coon's grandchildren-
Chris Winstead, Sandy Coon,
Amanda Green; Tonia Fraley,
Tracy Jarvis, and Aaron Bell
served as his active pallbearers.
Honorary pallbearers were
Jeanie Parker and Kathy
Shelton.
Donnie Sowell Funeral
Home of Milton was in charge
of arrangements.


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Business Review


SKATELAND SKATING CENTER:


Featuring wholesome, healthful recreation in a safe


and secure environment


By OBIE CRAIN
Special Projects Writer


Roller skating is a great
American past time that's
been around for more than
130 years.
Not only does it provide a
great deal of fun and excite-
ment for children, teens, and
adults of all ages, it comes
with a bonus of many extra
features that helps the individ-
ual develop character, physi-
cal stamina, and self esteem.
SSo you see there's a lot
more to it than just fun and
entertainment. In fact, skating
ranks right up there among
such premier fitness activities
as swimming, jogging, bowl-
ing, and tennis in terms of
calory burning capacity.
With all the extra benefits,
it's no wonder skating is
quickly becoming the sport of
choice among individuals of
all ages. That's why owners
Terry and Jennifer Eady at
Skateland Skating Center,
located at 6056 Stewart Street
in Milton, are continuing their
efforts to avail the community
with facilities that will con-
tribute to the ultimate skating.
experience.
Although Terry and
Jennifer have, only owned
Skateland Skating Center
since February 14, 2003, they
have been associated with
skating activities and manage-
ment for many years. Terry
says his experience in skating
sports spans ". most of his
whole life," and he has.
demonstrated exemplary
achievement as both a speed
skater and in roller hockey.
In addition to regular roller
skating sessions, Terry and
Jennifer have developed pro-
grams in both speed skating
and roller hockey; which
-includes a Youth Roller
HockeN League for ages 4-17
years and an Adult Roller
Hockey League ith members
From 15-65 ears.
.A speed team that in\ol'ves
* both in-line and quad skaters
Shas also.been organized and

* ?r *


includes individuals 4 years to
50-something.
Terry's skating' career
began when he started speed
skating here in 1989.
Subsequently he traveled a
good bit, participating in com-
petitive activities. His skating
skills won him a great many
honors and a national champi-
onship. "But I don't consider
myself a professional skater
any more," Terry explained.
"Now that I have a family and
a business to take care of, I
find it far more convenient to
participate as a coach."
Using his expertise to train
others, in its own fashion,
offers him the self satisfaction
of seeing his skills 'and sports-
manship sustained in a posi-
tive way, and he enjoys the
contact. His speed skating
team continues to be a force to
be reckoned with, and it is
quickly achieving noticeable
recognition in area competi-
tion between New Orleans
and Tallahassee and beyond.
Terry and Jennifer are con-
fident that Skateland Skating
Center facilities exceed the
standards that most anyone
could expect in a rink of its
size and stature. Measuring
84x180 feet, the skating floor
is made of Maplewood, a fea-
ture so exclusive that it
remains one of only two of its
kind in the State of Florida.
In addition Terry and
Jennifer have invested a great
deal of time and money in the
building and the various facil-
ities that make the rink attrac-
tive. New video games, a pro
shop, new sound system, new
lighting, new carpet, and a
new exterior paint job are
some of the things that are
reflected in the make-over of
the rink and the various goods
and services it offers.
."We've invested a lot of
capital and man hours here to
bring this place up to the level
that we now have it, and we
are proud of what we have to
offer the skating public and
their families," Terry said.
It's a family business, and


WHOLESOME FAMILY ENVIRONMENT-Skateland Skating Center
owners Terry and Jennifer Eady feel that the atmosphere and physi-
cal facilities at Skateland are safe enough for their daughter,
Kamden. They operate the business in a family focused manner,
taking all the proper precautions that mean your children would be
safe and secure as well. (Photo by Obie Crain.)


its owners view the business
and what it has to offer from a
"family" perspective. They
say they know that parents are
apprehensive about leaving
their children in a place that
isn't properly policed and
supervised. And in that
regard, both Terry and
Jennifer said they wanted
everyone to understand that
Skateland had been "made
over" in the image of a safe,
wholesome environment that
meets or exceeds the normal
expectations that parents
could reasonably express.
There is an adequate staff to
manage and maintain the vari-
ous services that are offered,
and a school resource officer
is among those who chaper-
one events.;The:music is also
given proper attention, and
only the host appropriate
selections are featured.
In addition to both in-line


and quad "regular" skates,
customers who visit Skateland
will find all the conveniences


that they normally would find,
including games and a snack
bar that serves foods like
french fries, hot dogs, ham-
burgers, nachos, and the like.
Regular skates rent for $1
and speed and in-line skates
rent for $2. Fall Break day
skating includes Tuesday,
Wednesday, Thursday, 12
Noon to 4 p.m., $4; Saturdays
2-5 p.m. $3.50; and Sundays
2-4 p.m. $3.
Fall Break night skating
includes Fridays 7-11 p.m.,
$6.50; Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.,
$5.50. Tuesday 6:30 p.m. to
8:30 p.m., $2; and Thursdays
6-8 p.m. $3.
Skateland offers Birthday
Parties which are superb!
They have four great packages
for you to choose from,
including groups of 10 kids,
15 kids, 20 kids; and 25 kids.
And all packages include a
drink, hotdog basket, two
hours in a private party room,
regular skate rental, paper
goods, and birthday invitation.
All you have to bring is the
cake!
But reservations are
required, so call and book
your next party in plenty of
time. Of course no outside
food or drinks are allowed
inside the building, except the


cake.
Skateland is an adventure
waiting to happen for you!
And chances are you will be
thrilled at what you find avail-
able. You'll just have to inves-
tigate it to find out. The tele-
phone number is (850) 623-
9415 if they can -be of assis-
tance in any way or if you
want more information about
what they have to offer.
You may be pleasantly sur-
prised to learn that roller skat-
ing burns 350 calories in an
hour (at six miles per hour ...)
and that it's the equivalent of
jogging in terms of health ben-
efits.
So with the offerings of a
wholesome environment, a
fun activity for all skill levels,
school parties, fund raisers,
and fitness programs, what
else could be more suitable for
social activities. Roller skat-
ing is designed as an aerobic
activity for all ages. It not only
requires no special athletic
ability, but it develops charac-
t6r, promotes fitness, fosters
lifetime recreational habits,
and instills in individuals a
sense of pride and confidence.
Terry and Jennifer welcome
you. And they think you'll like
what you find at Skateland!



;;
.~.., I~
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"'' ;~: ~":
tr.r'
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RECENTLY RENOVATED FOR YOUR SKATING PLEASURE-Skaleland Skating Center located at 6056
Stewart Street is a great recreational facility. Redecorated inside and freshly painted outside, the build-
ing offers plenty of parking and all the amenities that will make your evening or afternoon of skating a
pleasure. Check out the many services that the owners offer in addition to skating! (Photo by Obie
Crain.)


for


utr iton


Minds
" Reading the newspaper regularly leads children to discover new words and new ideas,
. helping them succeed in the classroom and beyond. Strong reading skills and curiosity
about the world around them are important characteristics that will help children both now
and in the future as adults. Do your child a favor and subscribe to the Press Gazette.
---- -------- El

I Name:
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SPayment Enclosed:
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Bring in or Mail to: Santa Rosa Press Gazette
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.- .-,- ---------------- ---- -


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Pzz- t senior cit6zen)
aGita Boma Pre^
'1 or mail your subscription to


ztte 850 62 1 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570


A


Wednesday October 19, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


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Page 8-A








Wednuadmy Octobsr 19. 2005 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Page 9-A


Community Briefs


"CHief, tie militaryis now
awarding new medals for
service. What are they?"
Well, the only "new" medals
I know that are being awarded
are: Combat Action Badge,
Global War on Terrorism
Expeditionary Medal, Global
War on Terrorism Service
Medal, Afghanistan Campaign
Medal, and Iraq Campaign
Medal. Any eligible military
service member may be award-
ed the Afghanistan or Iraq
Campaign Medal as a replace-
ment for a Global War on
Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
may be awarded. However, no
service member can be award-
ed all three medals for the same
act, achievement or period of
service. The Combat Action
Badge is similar to the Combat
Infantryman Badge except that
it is awarded to service mem-
bers who have a military occu-
pational specialty other than
infantry or Special Forces. DoD
first awarded Combat Action
Badge this past Spring.


PHS holds drama
Pace High Drama is putting
on a production of "The
Legend of Sleepy Hollow".
The dates of the show are as
follows:
October 21 @ 7:00 p.m. /
October 22 @ 7:00 p.m. /
October 27 @ 7:00 p.m. /
October 29 @ 7:00 p.m. /
October 30 @ 3:00 p.m.
Tickets are $5.00 in advance
and $6.00 at the door. The
show on October 27 is Student
Night, so for students tickets
are $4.00 in advance and $5.00
at the door that night. For any
information or to order tickets
call 995-3500 /ext. 254.

F.A.S.T.
meeting to be held
The Florida Alabama
Strategic Taskforce Members
Chairman Mayor Jennings has
called a meeting of the F.A.S.T.
membership for Tuesday,
October 25, 2005 at 10 a.m. in
the Council Chambers of
Milton City Hall, 6738 Dixon
Street, Milton.
Senator Durell Peaden and
Representative Greg Evers will
be in attendance. Please make


every effort to attend. Should
you find you are unable to
attend, please call Pam
Willhoit at 850/983-5411 or
email her at adminsec@ci.mil-
ton.fl.us. The public is invited.

Munson HS
holds homecoming
Munson High School
Alumni Association will hold
its annual homecoming
Thursday, October 20th at Bear
Lake located off Highway 4 in
Munson.
Bring a covered dish for the
noon meal. Serving will begin
about 12:30 p.m. in the recre-
ation building.
Looking forward to a large
crowd renewing old friend-
ships and making new ones!
See you there!

Flower Show
Awards planned
The Milton Garden Club is
proud to announce the top
awards of their recent flower
show. Sonja Robinson won the
Designer's Choice Award for
her design in "sailing" and
Dottie Glenn won the


Designer's Choice Award for
her design in "Santa Rosa
Shores." The Horticulture
Excellence Award went to Faye
Anthony for her Amazon Lily
and Denise Dodge won the
Arobeal Award for her Blue
Hydrangea. Awards of Merit
went to Sonja Robinson for her
Yellow Lowie Zinnia; Martha
Martin for her Brassavola
Nodosa orchid; and Faye
Anthony for her Caladium and
Amazon Lily.

UWF
offers workshop
The University of West
Florida Small Business
Development Center (401 E.
Chase Street, Suite 100,
Pensacola) is holding its "How
To Write a Business Plan"
workshop on Thursday
evening, October 27, 2005
from 6 to 9 p.m. Attendees will
learn how to gather data and
write the business plan, as well
as become familiarized with
financing requirements. The
fee for attending this workshop
is $25 for the public and free
for students and faculty mem-
bers of the University of West


Florida who present a Nautilus
card. To register, call 850/473-
7830 or go to our website
(www.sbdc.uwf.edu) and click
on training.

MHS Bonfire/Pep
Rally is Tuesday
Panther Fans mark your cal-
endar now for the Bonfire/Pep,
Rally/Tailgate Party on
Tuesday, October 25th. This
activity is taking place before
the Big Milton vs. Pace
Football game on Friday,
October 28th. The Tailgate
Party begins at 6 p.m. with the
bonfire at 7 p.m. There will
also be concessions and games.
All -this will be located on
MHS Softball Field. Contact
Milton High School with any
questions, 983-5600.

Western
Gate Chapter
to hold meeting
The Western Gate Chapter
of the Florida Trail Association
will hold its monthly meeting
at 7 p.m., October 20, (every
third Thursday of each month)
at First Christian Church,


located at the intersection of
Goodrich & Langley Avenues.
Such things as Backpacking,
Canoeing, and Camping are
planned. New members are
welcome. Call 932-5469 or
http://westgate.floridatrail.org.

Come hike at Gulf
Islands Sea Shore
Saturday, October 22, at 9
a.m., there will be a hike at
Gulf Islands Seashore at Naval
Live Oaks free. Lunch will
follow at a restaurant. For more
details call 850/932-0125 or
http://westgate.floridatrail.org.


Volksmarch Group
to meet Saturday
On Saturday, October 22,
2005, the Pensacola
Volksmarch Club group will
walk at Fort Morgan in
Alabama. Meet in front of the
museum at 8:00 a.m. or call for
carpooling information. New
members welcome. Free.
Information: (850) 474-9012
o r
www.angelfire.com/trek/pen-
sacolafl/


Family Resource Program helping families in need


"I have an appointment
scheduled next week at Biloxi
VA Medical Center, Chief,
What do I do?"
Telephone your Primary
Care Provider at the Pensacola
Outpatient Clinic (476-1100). It
was your Primary Care
Provider that set-up the
appointment and the Primary
Care Provider is who is going
to have to change it. Where you
will now. go for the appoint-
ment I don't have any idea.
Some veterans are going to
Birmingham, AL, others !to
Gainesville, and some to
Pensacola NAS Hospital.

"Chief, you wrote some-
time back about a new State
hunting and fishing license
for veterans. Please explain it
again."
Okay, the State of Florida
now offers a "Military Gold
Sportsman's License" for
active duty and retired military
residents. I believe the fee is-
around $20.00. This is the same
license as the "Gold
Sportsman's License" that costs
$83.50. License includes hunt-
ing, salt and freshwater fishing,
archery, muzzleloading, turkey,
waterfowl, snook, and crawfish
permits. (For more information
about Florida.hunting and fish-
ing go to www.MyFWC.coml).


The Santa Rosa Family
Resource Program, Inc., a not-
for-profit agency, has been
serving ,the unmet needs of
families in Santa Rosa County.
since 1981. The agency offers
emergency short-term financial
assistance to families with chil-
dren birth to 18 years. Short-
term assistance includes food,
infant formula, diapers, clean-


ing supplies, utility payments,
rent and school supplies etc.
In collaboration with com-
munity partners, they refer
families to other agencies for
assistance. Other services
offered by the agency include
parent education, homeless
assistance and holiday assis-
tance. Last year they serviced
over 950 families with 2,062


children.
The agency has seen a dra-
matic increase this year in the
number of families requesting
assistance due to the two hurri-
canes, According to Sue
Bollinger, Coordinator for
Family Resource Program, it
has been difficult to keep goods
on the shelves due to increased
volume of requests.


The Family Resource Board
is asking the community to help
meet the needs of these fami-
lies.
We need non-perishable
food, especially ready-to-eat
canned goods such as tuna and
beef stew, diapers, baby
clothes, infant formula, clean-
ing supplies, personal hygiene
items, and bed linens. Cash


donations are also accepted. All
donations are tax-deductible. If
you,, your volunteer organiza-
tion or church would like to
help the families, please con-
tact Sue Bollinger at 626-2054
or visit the office housed in
"The Family Place on the
Square". at 6576 Caroline St.(
next to Family Dollar behind
Church's Chicken) in Milton.


Jay Hospital names Plant Operations Director


Ricky Sanders is the director
of plant operations at Baptist
Health Care affiliated Jay
Hospital. Sanders is a graduate
Jay High School, and he attend-
ed Locklin Vocational


Technical School and
Pensacola Junior College.
Sanders came to Jay Hospital
from Azalea Trace where he
worked for 15 years as a plant
electrician and later as plant


manager. His duties at Jay
Hospital include day-to-day
facility upkeep and managerial
responsibilities of the mainte-
nance department.


Pace Relay for Life receives award


The Pace Relay for Life
recently qualified for the 2006
American Cancer Society's
Pacesetter A% ard. This award is
given to Florida Relay For Life
events that are "setting the
pace" in order to achieve their
goals. To qualify for the
Pacesetter Award, Relays had
to meet certain requirements by
September 15, which includes
having 10% of their team goal
achieved, with 20% of past


teams recruited, as well as hav-
ing an Executive Committee in
place, and all Chair positions
filled. The 2006 Relay for Life
Executive Committee has been
hard at work since June in order
to achieve the Pacesetter
Award. The Pacesetter Award
demonstrates Pace's commit-
ment to Relay as a year-round
event and the committees have
done the advance work neces-
sary to ensure a successful


2006 Relay for Life event.
Relay is your opportunity to
call your friends and family,
lace up your shoes and get
ready to walk; trot, amble,
shuffle or jog to the American
Cancer Society's Relay for
Life. To learn more about this
fun-filled overnight adventure
and how you can join the fight
against cancer, call Heather
Cassida at 995-9331 or Shirley
Parker at 261-8718.


Radio Club holds monthly meeting


A good deal of additional
planning for the club's regular
hidden transmitter hunt (loose-
ly called a fox hunt) and an
upcoming engineering study of
the club's repeater perform-
ance was the order at the
monthly meeting.
The meeting also featured a
presentation on the ne%. ama-
teur technology called Echo'
Link by Richard McCoy
KK51N. Echo Link provides
for the use of amateur radio in
conjunction with a personal


computer to project a contact
any where in the world where
there is another Echo Link
capable station.
The system is in wide use.
between radio repeaters such
as the Club's repeater atop the
Berry Hill: road water tower
and others located throughout,
the worldd An operator of a
small hand held radio about the
size of a cell phone ,can now
talk with someone on the other
side of the world possibly in an
auto or also with a hand-held


radio. According to. McCoy,
the technology adds "a whole
new dimension to Amateur -
Radio."
While the system is not
installed in the club's repeater
as yet, interest in the new tech-
nology is high and-the presen-
iation turned up a number of
hams who already had "node"
numbers attached to their call
,signs. Node numbers are
dialed in to bring up a station
linked to a special server when
making the contact.


Richard McCoy KKSIN presented the monthly Millon Amateur Radio program on Echo Link, a new
technology that merges the personal computer with amateur radio to make contacts within the U.S. and
to and from foreign countries.


Thompson Reunion planned


The family and friends of
Ada and Lewis Thompson
are invited to come and
bring a covered dish on
Saturday, October 22, 2005
at Carpenter's Park under
the Pavilion. Lunch will be
served between 12 and 1
p.m. For more information
call Margaret at 623-4842.


Optimist Club donates funds to Rhodes

The Milton Optimist Club recently presented a check to Assistant Principal Tom Kennel of Rhodes
Elementary School. The $300 check will be used to help fund any disaster needs of families connected
with the school. As a Partner in Education, this is one of the many ways that the Club supports Rhodes
ES.


r


Ricky Sanders is named Director of Plant Operations at Jay
Hospital.


- ~ ------ ----I '~


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday October 19. 2005


11


Page 9-A








Paae 10-A I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday October 19, 2005


SKornerstone


United Methodist Church celebrates Homecoming &

175 years of serving the community


Pastor Gary Jones and the
congregation of Bagdad United
Methodist Church in Bagdad,
invites you to worship and
enjoy fellowship with many

Stinsons to
Booker's Mill The annual
Stinson Family reunion will be
at Booker's Mill in Evergreen,
AL on Sunday, October 23,
from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Dinner
on the ground lunch will be
served at noon. Family mem-
bers are expected to bring cov-


friends at the annual The guest speaker is Rev. David
Homecoming, Sunday, October Chunn, Pensacola District
23, 2005. The worship service Superintendent of the UMC.
begins at 11 a.m. with dinner to Bagdad UMC will be celebrat-
follow in the Fellowship Hall. ing 175 years (1830) since its

hold reunion & services


ered dishes of food for lunch. A
10:30 a.m. church worship ser-
vice will be conducted at
Barnwood Memorial Chapel
with Rev. Libba Stinson from
the Alabama-West Florida
Methodist Conference of
Andalusia, AL, conducting the


service. Country and Western
Stars, Glenn and Kitty from
Picayune, MS, will provide
entertainment in the afternoon.
Other events such as hayrides
and swimming will also be
available.


Cokesbury UMC to hold

Women's Conference


Cokesbury United
Methodist Church, 5725 N.
Ninth Ave., Pensacola, will he
hosting a Women's Conference
November 4-5. The theme is
"Treasure in Clay Pots". Rev.
Connie Shelton will help you
explore God's plan for daily
lives. The cost will be $25 if


Benefit


"But he answered
and said, It is
written, Man shall
not live by bread
alone, but by every
word that
proceedeth out of
the mouth of God"
-Matthew 4:4


establishment and 120 years
(1885) since the sanctuary was
built.


.-BIgdad, located at 452.-
.Firsyth St., in Bagdad cor
i.dially invites all to a Revivali
,.beginning Sunday, October,
;i23, 2005 through.
5Wednesday. October 26;
2,05. Special speaker wil
p, Reverend J.K. Minto4n'
tiS~iiday morning series.
at 11 a.m. M ,


paid by Oct. 27; $30 from Oct.
28 to Nov. 4. Child care is
, available for $10 per child with
advanced registration. Child
must come with a sack lunch on
Saturday. For more information
please contact Janet Westlake at
850-476-5818 or janet@cokes-
buryumc.drg


Concert


to help


Katrina recovery of NOBTS
There will be a benefit concert held at Hickory Hammock
Baptist Church located at 8351 Hickory Hammock Road, Milton,
FL, to aid the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary with hur-
ricane recovery..
Christian music artists from First Baptist Church of Milton,
Immanuel Baptist Church and others from the local area are donat-
ing their time and talents to help raise money for those at the sem-
inary who suffered loss during Hurricane Katrina. Come and join
us on Sunday, October 30, 2005 at 5 p.m.
If you have any questions you may contact Chera Willett,
Benefit Concert Coordinator, at 850/554-2151, or the church office
at 850/623-8959.

00:'-" "


105th


Homecoming


is set for Sunday
Pleasant Home Baptist Church will celebrate its 105th
Homecoming Sunday, October 26, 2005. Sunday School begins at
10 a.m. and Worship service at 11 a.m. Fellowship and "Dinner on
the Ground" will follow the services. For directions & information,
please. call 957-4440.


Fish Fry

Benefit
Berrydale Baptist Church
is sponsoring a Benefit Fish
Fry for Diane Salter on
Saturday, October 29, 2005
from 12 noon until...
The Fish Fry will be held
at the Berrydale Volunteer Fire
Department in Jay (intersec-
tion of Hwy. 4 and 87).
The Fish plate includes 2
pieces of fried catfish, 2 side
dishes (baked beans, Cole slaw
or potato salad), dessert and
iced tea. Cost is $6 per plate.
Donations would be great-
ly appreciated.
For more information, call
Dottie Rowell at 336-2750,
Mavis Kisner at 675-4014.


Ask the Preacher

...a weekly column answering your questions
.W.2h R'UI.'l ....... .- W I.. MO 1Bf -


with f calanswers a out We.
Dear Pastor Gallups, "What is heaven like? Will we know
each other? Will we still be married? Will we get to eat in heav-
en? Will we do something besides playing harps and singing all
day long?" -T.P., Milton
Dear T.P.,
The quick answer to these questions is...Unimaginable, Yes,
Probably Not, Probably so and YES!
You probably, want a little more than these simple answers
though. With the limited space that I have available in this arti-
cle I will attempt to give you some more information.
What is heaven like? The Bible says, "The eye has not seen,
the ear has not heard, the mind has not conceived..." It is
unimaginable. Think of the most beautiful picture that heaven
could be to you, and it is BETTER than that! It is a real, perfect,
sinless place where Jesus Christ is the light, life and center of
everything.
Will we know each other? Yes...When Jesus came out of the
tomb alive, his disciples knew him. When Jesus took Peter,
James and John up to the mount of transfiguration they saw
Moses and Elijah. They recognized them. They were real men,
but in "glorified, eternal" bodies,
Will we still be married? Probably not. Jesus said we would
be like the angels, neither "given or taken in marriage".
However, please remember, our relationships with one another
will be PERFECT, SINLESS and HOLY then. There will be
perfect love and perfect relationship one with the other. We will
enjoy a more wonderful love there than ever imagined here.
Will we get to eat in heaven? -Probably so. Jesus ate when he
came out of the tomb in His glorified body and state. For 40
days of earthly existence in His resurrected body, he ate and fel-
lowshipped with His disciples. The book of Revelation men-
tions trees in Heaven with fruit that willsupply the "healing for
the nations." Whether this is symbolic or literal, we don't know.
Will we just play harps all day long? No. However, worship
will be a big part of our eternal existence. However, Jesus said
that we would RULE and REIGN with Him! Who knows what
eternity will hold in st6re for those who belong to Jesus and
faithfully serve Him now! That is why Jesus said that it is worth
ANY price that it costs you to follow Him!


Carl Gallups is thePastor ofHickory Hammock Baptist Church. in Milton.
He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Florida State University, and a Master
of Divinity from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been
pastor of HHBC since 1987. He serves as an International Youth Evangelist for
the Southern Baptist Convention since 1990 preaching all over the US. and
Canada. For more information about HHC, call 623-8959 or visit our website @
www.hickoryhammockbaptist.org. If you have any questions for Ask The
Preacher, send it to: Ask The Preacher, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351
Hickory Hammock Road, Milton, Florida 32583-paid advertisement


;Do 'ou nave a special event coming up that you.WodItd'.
'likie to announce to the community? Are you haviii'
Gospel sing, Revival meeting, Bible ConferenceFestiyvaI
or maybe a special guest coming to your church? Articles
are free; there is no charge for placing them on the
Kornerstone page.
This page comes out every Wednesday.
Submissions must be in no later than Friday at 3 p.m. pre-
vious to the Wednesday edition. Photos are
welcome. You may drop them by at the office located,
at 6629 Elva Street; or fax articles to us at
(850) 623-2007, or email them to
church@sr-pg.com. -


to


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For more infoUation on
placing your
advertisement on this
page, call Retail
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I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday October 19, 2005


Paoe 10-A


I i






Wednsda Ocober19,200 TheSana Rsa PessGaztte age11-


SELF-SACRIFICING, STRONG-HEARTED


COMPASSIONATE.


BUILDING CHARACTER BY TEACHING


*RESPECT


*RESPONSIBILITY


*CITIZENSHIP


'TRUSTWORTHINESS


: *'FAIRNESS


*CARING
.~~~~~L -" .,.'",.I;'


4


TUFFY


Tuffy Coloring Contest!
Two $100 winners.
Choose either one of Tuffy's logos (does not determine winner).
Please send entries to the Santa Rosa Educational Foundation at:
5086 Canal Street, Milton, FL 32570.
Deadline: Nov. 1, 2005. Prizes to be awarded before Dec. 1, 2005
Please include name, address, telephone number, and.age. ,,
.. .-. ... '. ,.,..*" " t. ,':.;. *'.",: ,. ,',' ''


m


, The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 11-A


,


I i s _


Wednesday October 19, 2005


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Join Us At T


"he New
he New


S.,


October 20th, 9am-3pm


Blood Pressure
Body Fat Analysis
Body Mass Index
Pulmonary Function
Osteoporosis


h.4.97,
mb, I A "

....... ..


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Pulse Oximetry & Smoking Cessation
Information Provided by Respiratory Therapist
Discussion on Muscular Skeletal Rehabilitation
Approaches & Services with a Physical Therapist
Hearing Screenings &Video Ear Inspections
with a Hearing Instrument Specialist


.,* l'.



Lipid Profile
(Cholesterol, HD, LDL)

Glucose Screening
for Diabetes (Fasting
recommended after
midnight on 10/19)

PSA Prostate Screening
:': ,


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Wednesday October 19, 2005


e hT Santa Rosa Press Ga e


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Gazette


SDorts


Octbe 19',2005EDNESD AY


Look Inside for

Classified)
*Help Wanted, Real Estate *Automotive
*Saturday Feature Adopt-A-Pet
*Business Service Directory
*Find Your Name *Plus much more


Sports




Santa Rosa County
Chamber golf tourney
The Santa Rosa County
Chamber of Commerce will be
holding their 12th annual golf
tournament on Thursday,
October 20 at the Moors Golf
Club.
The tournament is a four per-
son scramble format with regis-
tration beginning at noon and a
shotgun start at 1 p.m.
Cost of the tourney is $75 per
player or $300 per team which
includes cart, 3 beverage tickets,
after round dinner, and door
prizes.
Sponsor packages are available
to $375 and include the above
plus one tee sign and advertising.
Mulligan and tee buster pack-
ages will be available at the door
for $20.
Prizes will include first, sec-
Sond, and third place as well as
closest to the pin and for longest
drive. Tee signs are $100.
For more information about this
golf tournament contact the
Santa Rosa County Chamber
office.

Patriot Classic Golf
Tourney at Stonebrook
The Pace High School Golf
Team will be hosting the Patriot
Classic Golf Tournament at
Stonebrook Golf Course on Oct.
24.
This two person scramble will
begin at 1 p.m. with check in set
for noon.
Entry fee for this tournament is
$130 per team and includes cart,
green fees, range.balls, and din-
ner following the tournament.
Top prize for this tournament is
$100 per player for first place and
club house gift certificates.
Players will also have the
chance to win a new Dodge
Charger with a hole in one on a,
Par 3.
Sponsors packages are also
available for this tournament.
For more information on this
tournament call Keith Kirchharr at
501-5792 or Becky King at 857-
1198.

SUWF to host 2005
PRA CC 5K trail run
Get ready to go over the river
and through the woods..and the
destination is not anywhere near
grandma's house.
The trails at the University of
West Florida are the challenge ofr
runners at the 2005 Cross
-,Country 5k.,
This off-road run is set for
Oct. 22 at 8 a.m. and will start at
the utility field at UWF before the.
course turns quickly onto the
.Wooded campus trails.
Participants are asked to
bring old. trophies and running
awards from any previous race to
be recycled.
This fun race is $5 for
Pensacola Runners Association
members and $8 for non-mem-
bers.
Registration forms are-avail-
able at
.www.pensacolarunners.com and
at UWF or Running Wild.

Do you have
i sports-related
news or
information you
would like to
see published in
the Press
SGazettel If so,
send it to us at:
sports@srpressgazette.


com


October 21 at 7:30pm
FT. WALTON BEACH
at
TATE
P'E-GAMESHOW START30 MIN. BBRE~OEOFF


Bulls win twin bill


By NONA BARDIN
Press Gazette Correspondent



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A bull named "Snoop Dog" gives Milton's Chris Bizzell a ride to
remember during competition. The bulls seemed to be winning their
battle with the riders all night
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


The bulls swept the cow-
boys at the Bull Bash for Hope
held this weekend at the Ted
May Arena.
With only three qualifying
rides Friday night the cowboys
did a little better on Saturday
with five cowboys still aboard
the mamouths when the eight-
second horn sounded.
Friday night's successful
ride by Morgan City, La.'s,
Lucas Gilbreau for 86 was good
enough to take the title for the
weekend, which helped raise
funds for the Jay Relay for Life
and the Hurricane Katrina
Relief Efforts.
Most of the cowboys appar-
ently needed more than just the
luck of the draw as half their
score depended on the bull.


Once the last rider had
taken his licks, the points were
tallied to find that the rider
from Friday night had kept his
lead of 86 points, taking first
place. He wasn't, however,
present Saturday night. The
second place finisher was Paul
Hayzlett, age 20, from
Lucedale, Mississippi, finishing
with 79 points, Dustin Delmas
(age 16), from Moss Point,
Mississippi, took third with 78
points,.and Bradley Atkins (age
19) from Eclectic, Alabama
rounded out fourth with 75
points. All of these young men
received cash awards and points
toward the Finals in
Homestead.
Besides the bulls using the
cowboys as lawn darts, there
was other entertainment includ-
ing gospel and country music


groups performing in concert
and various events for the kids.
To help pass the time
between events Damon Wilson,
one of the clowns in the arena,
and his sidekick Bucket Head
entertained the fans as part of
the Rhythm n' Ridin Tour of the
Southeastern Bull Riding
Association.
The Covington Cowgirls
Drill Team, from Andalusia,
Ala., thrilled young and old
alike with their precision riding
skills.
Another highlight between
bull riders was the "cattle
scramble", where two calves
have pink ribbons tied to their
tails. Youngsters were encour-
aged to get out into the arena
and at the count of three, try to
remove the ribbons from the
See, BULLS, Pg. B2


Deja Vu


a Royal


success

By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor


S. W.:, IFRM1.11.1- 11,1,. "04
With girls high school basketball practice set to begin Monday, repairs are still underway on the gym at Pace High School following the
damage of Hurricane Dennis. Repairs are not expected to be completed until November 11 raising questions about where to hold prac-
tices.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Panthers make


Gators road kill


B BILL GAMBLING
PG Sport Editor ___
Million came ready to pla\
Friday as the\ do\\ned
Escambia 42- 10 at
Emmlrr Smith Field in
Pensacola.
The 'irn secured the
Panther i6-2. 2-0 a Distnct 1-
4A playoff berth \ith the tile
being decided on Oct. 28'A hen
the Panthers visit cross counri
ri al Patriots.
Milton went to work very
quickly as they built a 28-0,
halftime lead and silence the


home crowd.
"I thought \e played as a
compete team." said Milton
coach Mike McMillion. "Our
defensive plaCed awesome and
e\eculed a good plan developed
b\ coach (Johnn I Haw\ kins.
"Our offense also did an
outstanding ijob e\ecurtin as
\ ell."
The Panthers took an earl\
7-0 lead hlien K le Conrad
scored on a 9-yard run
:In the second quarter the
Panthers did more than claw up
See, PAN I HERS, Pg. B.


Milton QB Dustin
Escambia.


Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Friday seemed to. be a mat-
ter of d6jA vu for the Jay Royals
as they made the long trek to
face the West Gadsden
Panthers.
On this night it was the
Royals making the dramatic
comeback as they defeated
West Gadsden 15-14.
Jay (2-5, 2-3) got on the
board when little knmo\n Tyler
DeGraff, who was subbing for
Michael \Wade. scired'on a 7-
yard run.
"Tyler did an outstanding
job in the second half scoring
from eight yards out," said Jay
coach Elijah Bell "No one
thought he would be able to do
it."
The point after made it 14-
7 with 2:10 left in the third
quarter and staed that way
until the Royals' next posses-
sion.
With 14 minutes left in the
game Jay was looking to spoil
West Gadsden's goal of remain-
ing in the District 1-1A playoff
picture.
But Devin Castleberry had
Another idea as he connected
with Brad Lowery for a 15-yard
touchdown strike.
Still trailing 14-13 the brain
trust on the Royals' sideline
decided to go for two.
The same play one week
ago, which dashed their playoff
hopes as they hosted Freeport,
could give Jay their second win
of the season.
Michael Wade, who had sat
out most of the second half giv-
ing way to DeGraff, had one
more surge in him after the
beating he took in the first
See, ROYALS, Pg. 2-B


Dobson victorious in St.

Rose Sunset 5K run Friday


Drew Cumberland breaks up an Aggie pass Friday night as Pace
increased it's record to 8-0 with a 44-0 pasting of Tate on the road
increasing their district record to 2-0 with a showdown against
Milton looming. See story on page B3.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
It as a \er\ fast track for
the St. Rose of Lima Fest\ial
5K Sunset Run as Ja\'s Matt
Dobson blistered the course in
15:59.
Jeff Johnson and Nlilton
cross-countr\ runner R\an
Holtman tried to keep up. but
could do not better than 16.45
and 16-53 respecmtel\.
Dobson. \iho is the cross
country and track coach at the
Uin\eirit\ ot \West Florida. ju-t
happened to be in the area and
decided to run the race on
Friday.
"I wasn't training for this
race," said Dobson who has
won the Walt Disney World
Marathon previously. "I was in


Milton on business and decided
to do this for fun.
"1 al\a;s ha\e a set of run-
ning clothes \v.ith me when I
travel and thought this \tould be
a great opportunity for some
Ia miI.\ fun."
After Dobson's fun run he
enjoyed the rest of the evening
\with his children Ann Marie
and Da\id, but for others the
e\ctement and fun had already
begun.
Holtnmin's excitement w"as
\ery evident as \.ell : s he
crossed the finish line beloI\ 17
minutes. which has been a goal
of his since he ran a 17:29 at the
Scratch Ankle 5K earlier this
year.
"I didn't think I could run
See, RUN, Pg. B4


Matt Dobson crosses the finish
line at the St. Rose 5K.
Photo by Bill Gamblin


LAiP..


-4


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_ I 'I ~TI II I-eL 1


r












Sports


Page 2-B


Panthers


Continued From Page One
the football field.
Dustin Land quickly got
things started with a 16-yard
touchdown scamper before he
decided to crank up his throw-
ing arm.
Land made it 21-0 when he
hit Jeremy Tolbert on a 27-yard
pass, but the sophomore quarter-
back was not done.
After Robert Carson inter-
cepted a Nathan Connelly pass at
the Milton 13, Land moved the
Panthers to its 28.
On first down Land
unleashed a long pass to Keenan
Tillman, who was streaking
down the right sideline, for a 72-
yard touchdown.
"(Friday) we were a com-
plete football team," said
McMillion. "Everybody was
doing their job.
"This was a good game for
us tonight and everyone did their
job to best help the team."
In the second half Milton
would add two scores as Maurice
Lantry connected with Tolbert on
a 52 yard strike, making it 35-0.
Christian Woods would


added a five
yard run to
make it 42-7.
Conrad
led the

rushing
attack with
106 yards
on just 12
carries and
the first
touchdown McMillion
of the game.
Emery Allen was next
gaining 44 yards on nine car-
ries.
Land went four-for-eight
through the air for 121 yards
and two touchdowns.
"Dustin is doing a real
good job," said McMillion. "I
hope he continues to be hum-
ble and thankful while he
keeps on progressing.
"He is a good young quar-
terback that needs to remain
grounded and keep learning
the game."
Milton surrendered only
one score when Connelly
found Morgan Barnett on a 15-


yard strike.
For the entire game Milton
held the Gators' offense in
check for a total of 106 yards.
"The defensive effort and
how they limited their offense
was a big plus for us," said
McMillion. "Our defense set
up our offense and gave us
good field position all night."
The road for Milton does-
n't get any better as they face
one of the strongest running
attacks in the region this
Friday as they host Crestview.
S "We have to keep our
focus on this game," said
McMillion as he fears some
might be looking ahead to.the
Pace game Oct. 28.
"Crestview has three very
good and strong backs and are
a very quick and physical
squad.
"We have to rise to this
occasion as they are probably
the best team we will have
faced so far on our schedule."

Story written by Bill
Gamblin. Reach him at:
sports@srpressgazette.com


Emory Allen looks for a hole in the Escambia defense to run through during Milton's victory Friday.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Royals

Continued From Page One.
half.
Those last three yards
were good
enough for
the win.
"The y
all said
they want-
ed to go
for two.
said Bell.
The r e
was no
question
on what to Bell
do.
"We, are all very glad it
work out and we got the
win."
iThe Royals will be at
home this Friday when they
face Port St. Joe, who have
,secured first place in.
District 1-A, with a. 5-0
record.
"This is our. homecom-
ing game," said Beil. "We
have to play our best as a
team by going out and' put-
ting our best offensive and
defensive efforts.
'"(Port St. Joe) is the
premier team in the dis-
trict, but we are going to
give it our best shot and do
what we can do."-


Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
attsports @ srpressgazette.com


Hunting season dates are set in Florida


Press Gazette Staff Report
Attention' i ingshooter-s!
Dove hunting, one of Florida's
favorite hunting seasons, began
recently, and other migratory
game bird seasons are just
around the comer.
Hunters may take mourning
and white-winged doves during
three hunting periods statewide.
First, phase runs through Oct.
24, second phase is Nov. 12-27
and third phase runs Dec. 10 -
Jan. 8. Shooting hours for the
first phase are noon to sunset,
and for the second and third
phases, shooting hours are one-
half hour before sunrise to sun-
set. The daily bag limit is 12,
but only four may .be white-
winged doves.
Snipe season is Nov. 1' -

Feb. 15 statewide. The daily
bag limit is eight, and shooting
hours are one-half hour before
sunrise to sunset.
Woodcock are legal to take
statewide Dec. 17 Jan. 15.
The daily bag limit is three, and
shooting hours are one-half
hour before sunrise to sunset.
Crows are legal game,
statewide on Saturdays and
Sunday only through Oct. 30,
then everyday Nov. 11 Feb.
18. There are no bag or pos-
session limits, and shooting
hours are one-half hour before
sunrise to sunset.


In addition to having a
hunting license, a migratory
bird permit is also required to
take migratory game birds in
Florida. In order to receive
this permit, hunters have to fill
out a short questionnaire when
they purchase their hunting
license. The information they'
provide helps the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service get a better
assessment on how many birds
are harvested each year.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) have also
officially set dates for this
year's waterfowl and coot sea-
son, goose seasons and youth
waterfowl hunting days.
.. There are iwo new rule
changes for this season. Pintail
uiick miiiay"'be taken for the
entire waterfowl season, and
the daily bag limit for scaup has
been reduced from three to two.
The first phase of waterfowl
season is Nov. 19-27 with the
second phase running Dec. 10 -
Jan. 29. Canvasback season is
Nov. 19-27 and Dec. 10-30
only. Shooting hours are one-
half hour before sunrise to sun-
set.
The daily bag limit for
waterfowl is six. This six-duck
liinut may consist of no more
than one black duck, one mot-
tled duck (Florida duck), one


fulvous whistling-duck, one
pintail, one canvasback (only
during canvasback season), two
redheads, two wood ducks, two
scaup, four scoters and four
mallards (only two of which
may be female).. The daily bag
limit for coot is 15 and for mer-
ganser, five (only one of which
may be a hooded merganser).
In Leon County and on
Lake Miccosukee (Leon and
Jefferson counties), waterfowl
hunting is\ allowed only on
Wednesday, Saturdays and:
Sunday during the open season
and on Nov. 24-25, Dec. 26,
Jan. 2 and Jan. 16. Lake
Talquin (Gadsden and Leon
counties) ard the Ochlockonee
River nay be hunted every day
during the open season.
On Lake lamonia and Carr
Lake (Leon County),. the use of
internal combustion engines is
prohibited any time during the
waterfowl and coot season.
Additionally, on Lake
Miccosukee the use of internal
combustion engines of more
than five horsepower is prohib-
ited.
Florida also is offering a
light goose (snow, blue and
Ross') and Canada goose sea-
son. The first phase of the light
goose season is Nov: 19-27
with the second; phase running
Dec. 10 Jan. 29. Light geese


may be taken only horth and
west of the Suwannee River.
The daily bag limit for each is
15, and the shooting hours are
one-half hour before sunrise to
sunset.
The Canada goose season
is Nov. 19-27 with the second
phase running Dec. 1 Jan. 30.
Canada geese may only be
taken on Lake Seminole within
Florida waters in Jackson
County which are south of S.R.
2, north of the Jim 'Woodruff
Dam and east of C.R. 271.
The daily bag limit is five and
shooting hours are one-half
hour before sunrise to sunset.
The FWC and the U.S: Fish
and Wildlife Service (USFWS)
have designated Feb. 4-5 as
.yiuth-waterfowl huntiing day~.


During this period, only chil-
dren under 16 years of age may
hunt waterfowl, coots and com-
mon moorhens while super-
vised by an adult (18 years of
age or older). Shooting hours,
daily bag limits and species
restrictions are the same as for
the regular waterfowl, coot and
common moorhen'seasons.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) suggest
hunters peruse the "2005-06
Migratory Bird Regulations"
Brochures and the "2005-06
Florida Hunting Regulations"
handbook at
MyFWC.com/hunting. These
publications also are available
from county tax collectors'
offices andlicense agents ....-


Milton takes second


in boys golf district


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor


It was a good showing for
Santa Rosa County at the
District 1-2A Golf
Championships. on Oct. 11. :
Milton finished second in
the boys competition with 328
points at Shalimar Pointe while
Pace was fourth with 336.
On the girls scorecard Pace
finished second to Ft. Walton
Beach 332-341 at Ft. Walton
Beach Pines.
Choctawhatchee won the
boys competition with a score
of 322 as Matt Kremble took
medalist honors carding a 72
for the Indian linksters.
Milton's Joey Moberly fin-
ished four strokes off the lead in
a tie for second with Ft. Walton
Beach's Darren Chapman, and
Washington's Zach Robinson.
Leading Pace was Parham
Booker who finished fifth over-


all with his 77.
Pace's Byron Thompson
was next area finisher with an
83 along with Milton's Scott
Hardison.
Other area scores at the
boys meet were Andrew Gillis
(Milton) 84, Tanner Kasisch4e
(Pace) 84, Troy Jordan (Milton)
:85, and Kevin Connor (Miltol)
86.
On the girls side Pace's
Haley Milsap finished in a tie
for second at Ft. Walton Beach
Pines when she carded a 74,
which was two shots of the
individual medalist Mallory
Fraiche's 72.
Milsap's teammate April
Thompson finished fourth over-
all with a 78.
Kearstin Grover carded:2 a
93 for the Lady Patrio's while
Lauren Summers shot a 96 to
help achieve the second place
finish.


East Bay Pensacola Bay Navarre Beach Blackwater River
Thursday, October 20, 2005 Thursday, Oct. 20, 2005 Thursday, Oct. 20, 2005 Thursday, Oct. 20, 2005
1:10 AM 2.25 feet 6:54 AM Sun rise 6:53 AM Sun rise 2:06 AM 2.25 feet
6:53 AM Sun rise 10:13 AM Moon set 9:14 AM 0.09 feet, 6:54 AM Sun rise
I10:12 AM. Moon set 11:09 AM -0.05 feet 10:12 AM Moon set 10:13 AM Moon set
1:00 PM -0.07 feet 6:12 PM Sun set 6:10 PM Sun set 1:30 PM -0.07 feet
6:10 PM Sun set 8:23 PM Moon rise 8:21 PM Moon rise 6:11 PM Sun set
8:21 PM Moon rise, 11:49 PM 1.53 feet 10:14 PM 1.97 feet 8:21 PM Moon rise


Friday, October 21, 2005
1:56 AM 2.29 feet
6:54 AM Sun rise
11:15-AM Moon set
1:58 PM -0.08 feet
6:09 PM Sun set
9:11 PM Moon rise

Saturday, October 22, 2005
2:46 AM 2.25 feet
6:54 AM Sun rise
12:12 PM Moon set
2:57 PM -0.03 feet
6:08 PM Sun set
10:05 PM Moon rise

Sunday, October 23, 2005
3:40 AM 2.17 feet
6:55 AM Sun rise
1:02 PM Moon set
3:56 PM 0.04 feet
6:07 PM Sun set
11:02 PM Moon rise


Friday, October 21, 2005
6:55 AM Sun rise
11:16 AM Moon set
12:07 PM -0.05 feet
6:11 PM Sun set
9:13 PM Moon rise

Saturday, October 22,2005
12:39 AM 1.50 feet
6:56 AM Sun rise
12:13 PM Moon set
1:06 PM -0.02 feet
6:10 PM Sun set
10:07 PM Moon rise

Sunday, October 23, 2005
1:33 AM 1.44 feet
6:57 AM Sun rise
1:03 PM Moon set
2:05 PM 0.03 feet
6:09 PM Sun set
11:04 PM Moon rise


Friday, October 21, 2005
6:53 AM Sun rise
10:32 AM 0.06 feet
11:14 AM Moon set
6:09 PM Sun set
9:11 PM Moon rise
11:02 PM 1.92 feet

Saturday, Oct. 22, 2005
6:54 AM Sun rise
11:36 AM 0.08 feet
12:11 PM Moon set
6:08 PM Sun set
10:05 PM Moon rise
11:55 PM 1.85 feet

Sunday, October 23, 2005
6:55 AM Sun rise
12:32 PM 0.14 feet
1:02 PM Moon set
6:07 PM Sun set
11:02 PM Moon rise


Friday, October 21, 2005
2:52 AM 2.29 feet
6:54 AM Sun rise
11:16 AM Moon set
2:28 PM -0.08 feet
6:10 PM Sun set
9:11 PM Moon rise

Saturday, October 22, 2005
3:42 AM 2.25 feet
6:55 AM Sun rise
12:13 PM Moon'set
3:27 PM -0.03 feet
6:09 PM Sun set
10:05 PM Moon rise

Sunday, October 23, 2005
4:36 AM 2.17 feet
6:56 AM Sun rise
1:03 PM Moon set
4:26 PM 0.04 feet
6:08 PM Sun set
11:02 PM Moon rise


Culpepper survives football


carnage to win weekly contest


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
This week our football con-
test seemed to be a little bit eas-
ier than last weeks and our pun-
dits records seemed to reflect
that fact.
With Jay's thrilling victory
over West Gadsden, FSU's loss
to Virginia, and USCs victory
over Notre Dame among oth-
ers, most of our reader's picks
fell in the 7-3 or 6-4 range.
The one contestant who
made it to the top of the pile
was Larry Culpepper of Milton
managing to, end up with a
nearly perfect record of 9-1 to
win, missing only the Florida
State versus Virginia game.
Coming in right behind at
8-2 were F.C. Brake, Jr.,
Donna Miller, and Roy Cooper
Those with 7-3 records
were Keith Kircharr, Glenn
Chavers, R.D. Williams,


4


Mayhew Brake, Barbara
Moravek, Martha Chavers, and
Shawn Taylor,
At 6-4 were Bema Faust,
Dewayne Queen, LynRae
Johnson, Scott Miller, Wade
Miller, Bryan Hathaway, and
Murray Rutledge.
At 5-5 were Shawn Hill,
Douglas Filbert, Shelen
Kennedy, Ronald Taylor, arid
Paul Tate.
At 4-6 were Kim Shaylor,
Richard McNew, Jerry Miller,
and Noreen Hill.
Finally, at 3-7 was Rulan
McWaters.
With Pace being off this
week, we have some interest-
ing. games for all of you to pick
from, so good luck to every-
one.

Story written by Jeff
Everts. Reach him at:
jeverts @ srpressgazette.com


A


I__1~





Wednesday, October 19, 2005.


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette








Wednesday October 19, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 3-B


Sports


Patriots blast


By NONA BARDIN
Press Gazette Correspondent
Pace has powered it way
into the playoffs after disposing
of Tate High School 44-0
Friday and proved to be very
rude homecoming guest to the
school in Gonzales, Fla.
With their first shutout of
the season the Patriots are 8-0
,heading into an off week.
Tate (0-6) took the opening
kickoff and were held to three
and out by a very focused Pace
defensive unit.
Following the Aggies punt,
Pace started on its own 36.
John Mark Patrick and Josh
Batchelor then went to work as
they carried the pigskin down
the.field for what would be the
winning, touchdown as Patrick
would plunge in from the one.
Ryan Strang added the
point after and it was all aca-
demic with 6:42 left in the first
quarter as the Patriots led 7-0.
Three plays later for Tate
and a gain of four yards it was
time to punt the ball away yet
again.
Nick Ferguson gained one
of those yards on a quarterback
keeper and Andrew Martin car-
ried the ball twice to gain the
other three.


Then the nightmare began
for Tate as junior Drew
Cumberland blocked the punt
which the Aggies fell on in the
endzone giving the Patriots a
safety and a 9-0 lead.
"I was worried about a let
down," said Pace coach Mickey
Lindsey. "But these guys love
to play.
"The past eigth weeks'
haven't been easy, but we will
do what we have to do the next
two weeks to get ready."
Cumberland would then
dash all hopes of an Aggie
offensive when he intercepted a
Ferguson pass on the Tate 43
and ran the ball all the way back
to the endzone.
""I couldn't have done it
without the rest of the defense,"
said Cumberland. "The coaches
had us out conditioning and we
decided as a team of what we
wanted to do.
"Now we are doing it as a
team and all out.
Strang's point after made it
23-0.
But Tate, who lost earlier in
the season to Milton 51-10,
wasn't going to give up as they
started their next drive from
their own 10.
But turned the ball over at


Aggies
their own 38 when the Aggies
failed to convert on fourth
down.
Chris Sorce took the ball
and gave Tate some time to try
again as he found Bear Comer
for a 38 yard touchdown pass.
Despite it being, a clear
crisp night in Gonzales, Pace's
30-0 halftime lead was raining
hard on Tate's homecoming fes-
tivities.
On the night Sorce was
nearly perfect for 127 yards and
two touchdown passes.
Sorce's other touchdown
pass found Jacob Dwyer on
what was a 17 yard strike.
In the third quarter Patrick
added his second touchdown of
thd game on an eight-yard dive.
On the evening the Senior
transfer from Jay gained 117
yards on 16 carries.
Pace capitalized on a Tate
fumble when Ariston Johnson
ran around the right end to
score with 3:03 left in regula-
tion.
S The win now makes Pace's
home game against Milton on
Oct. 28 even more important
as both teams are tied at 2-0 in
District 1-4A.
sports@srpressgazette.com


SContinued From Page One
moving calves. Some of the
-tykes gave up after a short time,
but two youngsters "came up
,with the loot. The winners were
Cody Thompson and Josh
'Merritt, both from Alabama,
Who received a cash prize for
'.heir effort.
.i The adults in the crowd
,vere challenged next in what
.was called "money the hard
'~'ay". This time, the "calf' was
>no calf at all! He was a full
fledged bull. A ribbon was tied
-,to the other end of the animal,
,it's horns.
The winner received a cash
prize AFTER some tumbling in


the dirt from a not quite so,
happy bull. Richard Engle, of
Berrydale, Fla., won the event.
Among the riders compet-
ing for points, there were those
who were there just to wow the
crowds.
One exhibition rider was
23-year-old Charles Doty, bet-
ter known as "Re-Ride", from
Sampson, Alabama,
Doty is only one of three
people in the U.S. to ride a bull
backwards. After getting
ready in the chute Doty nodded
his head and held on for dear
life literally.
The bull was bucking and
jumping, with Doty's legs


wrapped firmly around it's
horns.
Doty managed to stay on
the bull, with his face bouncing
off of the bull's backside, for a
full 8 seconds.
"The only other riders who
do this are from South Florida
and out west somewhere, so I
have to practice and learn on
my own," said Doty.
And learn he has. Doty has
had 13 broken bones and a frac-
tured skull in the one year that
he's been riding this way. He
has remained on the bull for
eight seconds ten times in his
one year career.
When he's not riding back-


wards, Doty is in the arena
helping to open gates for the
cowboys and provide safety in
keeping the bulls away from
any downed rider.
Local riders Randall Hinote
and Chris Bizzel failed to make
qualifying rides.
If you didn't catch the Bull
Bash Saturday you have anoth-
er chance.- They'll be at the
Farmer's Opry on Saturday,
October 22 beginning at noon.
This ride being held at the
Farmer's Opry. is part of the
Beaches to Woodlands festival
being held in Santa Rosa
County.
sports @ srpressgazette.corn


Rodeo clowns Darton Wilson and his sidekick Bucket Head help
with one of the kids events.during Saturday's Bull Bash for Hope.


2005 P *s aztt Fota SlCnet


HERE'S HOW TO WIN:
Pick the most games correctly and win $25.00.
Pick all ten games correctly and win $50.00.
Pick all ten games correctly and the
exact combined Tie-breaker and win
$100.00 6


1. Crestview @ Milton


OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM


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INSTRUCTIONS:
Find the games listed in the ads below
each week. Fill in names of winning
teams. Only score needed for tie-
breaker game.

CONTEST RULES: < -_
1. Anyone may enter, except
Press Gazette employees and
their families.
2. Entries must be on an official
blank-no reproduction will be accepted.
3. In case of ties in the number of winners picked,
the total score of the "tiebreaker" game will be used
to determine the winner. Should tied entries have the
same correct, or same number of points
closest to actual score, the prize will be
divided.
4. Only one entry may be submitted
per person.
5. The decision of the judges will be
final.
6. The winner will be announced
in the following Wednesday
issue of the Press Y,~ / ,r *'
Gazette. //// ft
7. Entries must be in the /"
Press Gazette office or .
postmarked not late '
than 5 p.m. on Fiday of
the contest week. 4. Michigan @ Iowa


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FOR 2005



PRESS GAZETTE



FOOTBALL CONTEST


NAME:
ADDRESS:
CITY:
PHONE:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.


6.


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BE
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*TIE BREAKER/Total Combined Score


TIE BREAKER: Total Score of
Nebraska @ Missouri


5. Texas Tech @ Texas




PDowns
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Hwy. 90 Milton, Pace


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4 -4


:Bulls


Drew Cumberland races through the Tate defense for a gain as the Patriots run roughshod over the
Aggies in a district football matchup by a score of 44-0 Friday night.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamb lin.


WE


A-








The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday, October 19, 2005


Sports


Run


Continued From Page One
that fast," said an exhausted
and excited Holtman. "I nor-
mally try to draft off the com-
petition since I am not a great
finisher.
"Today the competition was
definitely a little faster than I
am use to running against.
The women's overall title
went to 11 year old Laura Mae
Nelson who finished in 22:21.
Nelson, who is a member of
the Pensacola Wings, was very
pleased with her time.
"I thought I ran a good
race," said Nelson. "It was a lit-
tle hard at first going up hill for
so long in the beginning."
Dobson agreed about the
start.being rather difficult for a
road race.
"This was a fun course out
and back," said Dobson. "It is a
pretty simple course, but it was
a challenge as well.
"The whole first half of the
race you were running up hill,
which isn't bad if you are a
good hill runner. If you are not
it candefinately wear on you."
Master titles went to Frank
Hodges (19:46) for themen and
Susan Elizabeth Smith (23:29)
for the women.
Grand Master titles were
claimed by Dennis Mayeaux
(19:00) on the men's side and
Marilyn Archart (38:35) on the
women's side.
For race chairman Tim Viau
the sunset run was a tremen-
dous success.
"It doesn't get any better
than this," said Viau. "This
year's Sunset 5K surpassed all
my expectations.
"With 70 paid runners we
had our largest turnout ever."
Next year's event is expect-
ed to be bigger and better as
Viau is hoping to celebrate the
25th anniversary of the St. Rosa


of Lima Festival in grand style.
"This year we gave out
engraved medals," said Viau.
"Next year we are hoping to
grow this event on the 25th
anniversary by giving out very
nice tropheys."

Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at: sports@srpressgazette.com


The overall results of
the St. Rose of Lima
Festival 5K Sunset Run

1. Matthew Dobson 15:59
2. Jeff Johnson 16:45
3. Ryan Holtman 16:53
4. Sean Trombly 17:07
5.Adam Pegues 17:28
6. Dennis Mayeaux 19:00
7. Frank Hodges 19:46
8. Hunter Bondurant 19:57
9. George Georgiades 19:58
10. Matthew Rogers 20:32
11. Alex Greene 20:33
12. Kai Selin 20:45
13. Mark Viau 21:15
14. Mark Eberhard 21:42
15. Donald Carr 21:47
16. Michael Melendez 21:48
17. Roger Dobson 22:06
18. Laura Mae Nelson 22:21
19. Tom Kennell 22:36
20. Art Ceraldi 22:43
21. Sean Debien 22:49
22. Eric Hanna 22:50
23. Dan Carlson 22:56
24. Susan Elizabeth Smith
23:29
25. Christine Mayeaux 24:04
26. Stuart Camp 24:23
:27. Charles Mooney 24:31
28. Bruce Brysacz 24:38
29. Michael Orr 24:50
30. Larry Curtis 24:52
31. Samantha Gibbons 25:00
32. Megan Melandez 25:04
33. Jazlyn Smith 25:30
34. Lisa Maurath 25:58
35. Kelsey Pentecost 26:03
36. Brandon Lyter 26:03
37. Eva Gaus 26:03
38. Robert Lynn 26:34.


aM ..
.-,, :';. ,


(Above) Some of the 70 registered runners at the start of Friday's St. Rosa of Lima Festival 5K Sunset Run, which was won by Matthew Dobson
in a time of 15:59. (Below) Frank Hodges (left) registers for Friday's race with Linda Nicoletti and Jim Nicoletti during the final moments
before Friday's race.


39. Laurie Rogers
40. Dan Keely
41. Amy Gonzales
42. Paula Eagen
43. Federick Maurath
44. Barb McMillion
45. Jonna Lynn
46. Tom Lyter
47. Amy Linares
48. Angel Linares
49. Eleana Calvin
50. Chris Sanborn
51. Robert Kellberg
52. Kira Marie Orr
53. Nick Jarina
54. Mark Jarina
55. Zachary Conrad
56. Ivan Delabruere
57. Eric Abenajar
58. Pablo Sequio
59. Lindsey Isla
60. Marilyn Archart,
61. Serena Calvin
62. Scott Cowin
63. Cynthia Georgiades
64. Stormi Hein


Press Gazette photos by Bill Gamblin


26:43
27:16
27:20
27:23
27:36
27:46
28:50
29:47
29:52
29:57
30:22
30:42
31:20
32:44
32:49
32:50
33:00
33:04
33:10
36:32
37:46
38:35
38:49
38:50
39:31
40:12


Mini-Panthers


(Above) A Mini-Panther rushes off the field at the request of his coach.
(Right) Rachel Hughley, age 6, cheers on the Mini-Mites during their
game this Saturday at the Milton Community Park as they hosted the
Ensley Chiefs.


Press Gazette photos by Bill Gamblin


4


Page 4-B









Wednesday October 19, 2005


rage u-u


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'A


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Iah o b o b


Building

:By DEBORAH NELSON
iPress Gazette Staff Writer
SWhen shopping for floor-
Sing, primary homeowner con-
cerns tend to focus on durabil-
L ity and style. But considera-
Stions such as maintenance
;requirements, ease of installa-
.tion, and permanence also fac-
ritor in. Those factors differ con-
siderably between the most
,commonly installed floor cov-
-erings: carpeting, tiling and
wood.
CARPETING
According to Mary Young,
of Avalon Blvd.'s Howard
I Young Flooring, Inc., carpet-
Sing offers, the advantages of
comfort and aesthetics.
"It adds warmth," she
notes, but she also emphasizes
i;,the importance of researching
'.different carpet grades befor-
Smaking a decision. She says,
S"Ask questions."
"Carpeting provides a




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a room around the many flooring options out there


sound barrier," adds Lisa Lips,
co-owner of Milton's Carpet
Tile & Headquarters. "There
are a lot of multi-color carpets
out there as far as decorating
goes."
Young doesn't recommend
carpeting for those with severe
allergies, or those in highly
humid environments. She also
suggests homeowners consider
other options in high traffic
dining rooms, where food may
migrate behind backing materi-
al. Bathrooms, she says, consti-
tute another high traffic area
that needs special considera-
tion.
Carpet durability varies
from style to style. Berber is
generally the most durable,
particularly if, it contains an
Olefin-nylon blend. Frieze, a
style with tightly twisted knot-
ting, is also very durable.
"The more twisting, the bet-
ter wear you're going to get,"


T1

MlAN'S
ASH & CARRY
LL BUILDING MATERIALS
AVAILABLE
d Doors Roofing
Nails Siding
or 994-1360
. -Fri. 7-5 Sat. 7-12


says Young.
A "good density carpet
pad," extends durability, and
Howard Young Flooring advis-
es customers to install at least 8
lb padding for berber carpeting,
and 6-8 lb for other types.
Carpeting maintenance is
fairly routine, but necessary.
"Make sure you vacuum on
a regular basis," says Young,
"ideally one time per week for
each person living in the
house." Walk-off rugs, placed
just inside doorways, also help
extend carpet lifetime.
Young suggests shampooing
carpeting at least once per year,
using certified professional hot
water extraction and a truck-
mounted unit. Small shampoo
machines "a lot of times don't
get water and soap up com-
pletely," notes Young, leading
to stickiness and even more
soiling.
"Do not clean your carpet
with bleach," she emphasizes,
"no matter what (the marketing
materials) say."
And remember Lips' words
of wisdom.
"There is no such thing as a
stain-proof carpet," she empha-
sizes.
Young suggests homeown-
ers leave carpeting installation
to professionals. It requires
specialized tools and skills, she
says, and can be particularly
difficult to stretch and fit cor-
rectly, and is prone to ripping.


Every element of your Trane

air conditioner or heat pump

is designed to be very energy-

efficient. So along with staying

cool this summer, you can also

save money. Call your Trane

dealer, and prepare to reap

the rewards for years to come.



a^rww


Hardwood flooring, as shown here, can add a certain elegant charm to a home. But officials caution:
hardwood is not for every location. Many factors should be weighed, they say, before deciding what
they of flooring is "perfect" for your room.


"It's harder to repair carpet
than wood or tile," she notes.
TILE
Tiling, available in count-
less styles and colors, offers a
more permanent flooring
option than carpeting. It is
fairly low maintenance, and
may be installed anywhere in
the home.
Its permanence is both its
advantage and its disadvan-
tage, says Young.
"It's permanent," she notes,
"but that can be (problematic)
if you change your mind."
"Once it's down there, it's
down there," says Lips.
Tile receives a quality rat-
ing ranging from 1, the poor-
est, to 5, the highest.
Howard Young suggests
homeowners ensure tiling is
rated 3 or higher for durability.
Outside installation always
requires the maximum, 5-rat-
ing.
Young says tile is not diffi-
cult to install, but requires spe-
cialized cutting tools, is time
consuming, and "can be 'hard
on the knees." Spacers make
the job easier, and if homeown-
ers are willing to put in a little
elbow grease, the job can be "a
nice home project for your-
self."
Tiling may be composed of
porcelain or ceramic. Both are
durable, but "full body" porce-
lain material is uniform
throughout, and does not show
a terra-cotta interior if chipped.
"It's much easier to repair,"
says Lips, "usually (it just
requires) 2 or 3 tiles."
Cleaning usually just
requires water and a damp
mop, says Young. Specialized
tile cleaners may be used for
specific problem spots, but
Young cautions homeowners
to be careful around grouting.
Lips suggests homeowners
keep a few spare tiles on hand
for repairs.


WOOD FLOORING
Unlike tiling, wood requires -
a bit of extra care in selection
and maintenance.
"Wood does scratch and
fade," notes Young. She advis-
es Gulf Coast homeowners to
be very select e about wood
flooring purchases, ,to ensure
maneria)l will stand up to mois-
ture levels. Quality products
generally contain a 10-25 year
warranty.
If any doubt exists, she says,
perform a moisture test on the
concrete slab or sub-flooring to
ensure moisture levels fall
within the product's recom-
mended guidelines.
"If wood gets wet," Lips
points out, "you have to pull
the floor up."
She says, however, that "the
new engineered wood is easy
to take care of now, and it goes
with any d6cor."
Before installation, flooring
must undergo an "acclimation"
process. Raw flooring is
stacked for 48-72 hours in the
installation area to "acquire the
temperature and humidity level
of where, it's going, to be
installed."
The primary concern when
installing flooring, says Young
is to "make sure to use the
required adhesives."
Howard Young Flooring
does not recommend installing
wood flooring in bathrooms,
and suggests homeowners do
research before installing wood
in kitchen !areas. Absorption
levels vary, with' wood types,
and products containing higher
moisture absorption levels are
better for kitchen environ-
ments.
"Be careful of information
retrieved off the internet,"
Young cautions.
Wood installation can be
difficult, says Young, because
it requires specialized tools. It
is very easy to damage wood
during installation, and areas


like door jambs can be particu-
larly hard to 'cut around.
She suggests homeowners
interview two to three prospec-
tive contractors before select-
ing an installer, and request a
written contract. Make sure
contractors have local phone
numbers and addresses, she
adds, and request professional
licensing and proof of work-
man's compensation registry.
"Customers have every
right to request these things,"
notes Young.
Young advises specialized,
manufacturer-indicated clean-
ing products for wood floors.
Most products are coated with
polyurethane or other sealants,
and do not require waxing.
"It's really not necessary to
do all that," says Young.
Carpeting, tiling, wood ...
What's trendy in floor cover-
ings? ,Young and Lips see cus-
tomers buying across a spec-
trum of styles individualism
appears, to have arrived as the
modern factor in home design.
Young says customers tend
to install hard surface materials
in living areas, but carpeting
remains popular in bedrooms.
Berber carpeting in game
rooms, bonus rooms and play-
rooms is also "still popular."
As far as wood flooring,
"people seem to be going back
to a lot of natural colors," says
Lips. She cites "sensible floor-
ing, sensible colors," and "the
home as a refuge from the rat
race," as current trends.
Stylewise, contemporary
design is also about color, says
Young. Thanks to home main-
tenance shows, "people are
willing to step out a little bit
more," she notes. "Instead of
saying 'I need something more
neutral, they're looking for
something a bit more decora-
tive."
Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:


Looking For A NewCar?


The Classifieds put you in the driver's seat with a large
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The Santa Rosa Press Gazette 850-623-2120


850-623-2084


S


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Controlling pests of the South can be tough


If you took every single res-
ident in Santa Rosa and asked
them what "one thing" gives
the biggest headache when it
comes to yards and lawns,
you're likely to hear a loud
response: pests.
Those annoying littlebugs
and flies that seem to come out
of nowhere for the sole pur-
pose of your munching on your.
beloved greenery have been
around for a long time.
So, how do we keep these
pests away from,your home?
County .Extension Agent
Dan Mullins says having a
healthy yard is the number-one
way to avoid an overabun-
dance of pests.
One such annoyance is the
mole cricket. "Mole crickets
travel through the soil and eat
roots," says Mullins.
This obviously becomes a
problem for plants and vegeta-
bles. "The more healthy your
lawn, the less mole cricket
damage your lawn will sus-
tain," says Mullins.


, According to the Auburn
University website, mole
cricket control depends, not
only on the season of the year,
but also the life stages the pests
at that time. Mole cricket con-
trol is not a one-time, one
insecticide application, accord-
ing to the website.
Another -pest that has
proven to be just as aggravat-
ing and hard to get rid of is the
fire ant.
The University of Florida
website says, although fire ants
may look like an ordinary
house ant, they are "very
aggressive creatures capable
of inflicting a painful sting."
Crop losses are also reported
due to fire ants feeding on
seedlings and even citrus trees.
Officials say there are no
control methods that will "per-
manently" eliminate fire ants
from an area, however, there
are four strategies currently
being used to control them.
These strageties, according
to officials, consist of "broad-


cast bait applications," "indi-
vidual mound treatments,"
"barrier and spot treatments,"
and a strategy consisting of the
combination of the broadcast
baiting and the individual
mound treatment.
Another familiar pest to
Santa Rosa County is the love
bug. According to the
University of Florida
Cooperative Extension Service
website, these creatures are
not harmful, just bothersome.
Love bugs are small, black
flies with red thoraxes. They
feed on the nectar of various
plants, especially clover, gold-
enrod, and brazilian pepper.
Unfortunately, when they
swarm, they are drawn to the
smell of auto exhaust. This
causes huge swarms to hang
over roadways. The smash
remants on car hoods can, if not
quickly removed, pit the vehi-
cle's paint.
Officials insist nothing
much can be done to avoid love


bugs except for staying off the
road while they are in "peak
flight" 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. John,
Jackman, an entomologist at
Texas A&M University, says
"In general, if you can just.
ignore them, you're better off."
Moles have become a
problem in Santa Rosa.
According to Mullins, suitable
traps are available for mole
control.
The Cooperative Extension
Service website says moles are
beneficial because they eat
mole crickets, beetle larvae,
ants and slugs. The site goes on
to say, although moles are
accused of eating roots, grass
and other plants, they actually
feed upon the insects which are
responsible for the damage.
Although there are many
different pests, and not all of
them can be permanently elim-
inated, Mullins says there are
pesticides available that will
help prevent certain creatures
from ruining your lawn.


Getting your lawn 'almost' perfect


In this age, when keeping-
up. iith the Joneses keeps get-
ting harder, it can be comfort-
ing to know that even the
Joneses are having trouble
maintaining their lawns--
especially in Santa Rosa's cli-
mate.
People come to Santa Rosa
County for easy access to the
beaches and to enjoy the warm
sunshine, but those same con-
dition create problems for the
"perfect lawn." What do peo-
ple in this area need to know
about picking and maintaining
the right lawn?
County Extension Agent
Dan Mullins says a third of his
time is spent trying to better
understand this issue. He says
he has come to decide that
"this area is not a naturally
grass-growing country."
"People coming (to Santa
Rosa County) from other parts
of the country, expecting to
grow a perfect lawn, may be
disappointed," he says. "It is
possible, but people need to
lower their threshold of expec-
tations."


The basic thing people need
to do, according to Mullins, is
choose the "right grass" for
local conditions.
The University of Florida
Cooperative Extension Service
web site lists seven different
-types of grasses that work in
the steamy Florida climate.
According to the site, the most
common home lawn grass in
North Florida and.throughout
the Panhandle is centipede. It
grows well and tolerates the
climate and sandy soil.
Bermuda is one of the most
widely-used warm season
grasses for golf courses and


athletic fields, but is not rec-
ommended for lawns, say offi-
cials. It has high maintenance
requirements.
Bahia grass is a low main-
tenance lawn grass that is pop-
ular for, infertile, sandy soils
and does not require high
inputs of fertilizers, according
to the web site. But, it doesn't
create the "soft feel", under
your'bare feet and the mole
cricket (an infamous Florida
resident) loves its taste.
Carpet grass appears to
work best in wet areas, It
resembles centepede and
grows well on low pH soils


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where few other grasses can
thrive, says the Cooperative
Extension Service.
Following the basic instruc-
tions of the type of grass you
choose is imperative to the
health of your entire lawn,
according to Mullins.


Mole crickets, aphids, ticks, fire ants and more. These are just a
few of the critters that make living in Santa Rosa slightly less than
paradise. Experts say while you can never "win the war," you can
be victorious in a few battles-if you fight often enough.


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Page 6-B


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


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Today's chef uses lots of gadgets


If the mere mention of the
word "kitchen" brings to mind
an image of toiling slavery or
the area just doesn't quite
make your list of favorite
rooms in the house...here
some good news:
Countless gadgets and giz-
mos are available to help make
your kitchen fun.
According to Theresa
Booker, For the Kitchen pro-
prietor, now there is a variety
of products from cooking
equipment to cleaning solu-


tions that are even.better than
"new and improved" because
they actually work.
-She says the following prod-
ucts are not only fun, but also
shorten the length of time one
usually spends in the kitchen.
"With so many chef pro-
grams on television these days,
many of the utensils used in the
past have become outdated,"
Booker says. "Even the spatula
has been revolutionized."'
Booker is talking about the
new "Sveico Spatula"-a com-


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bined whisk and slice "fish" or
"angle" spatula said to be per-
fect for anything from mixing
and blending to frying and
baking (average cost: $15).
"It's awesome," Booker'
exclaims. "You can do so
much stuff with it because of
the angled blade. There's a
chef on television who uses it
for everything."
Another product she likes to
recommend to customers is the
"Santoku" by Wusthof-a
knife with a revolutionary
blade made popular by the "30
Minute Chef," Rachel Ray.
Booker says her shop "sells
them like crazy because of,
(Ray)."
"It's a great knife.
Lightweight with good bal-
ance, it's got little indentations
which keep things from stick-
ing to it when chopping or dic-
ing."
Retailing at $105, the
Santoku is pricey, but Booker
points out there is a lifetime
warranty on it. "And, right
now, we have it on sale,"
Booker notes,
For those inclined to get


fancy with lemon and lime
peelings, Booker suggests a
gadget made famous by
Martha Stewart-the.
"Microplane Zester and
Grater" (retail $12.95). Other
foods this product is good for
include any citrus, head
cheese, garlic or ginger.
She claims one use of the
Angled Measuring Cup
($9.99) is all it takes for any-
one and "you'll never want to
use your old one again."
Like the name implies, the
cup doesn't have to be held up
in the air to see how much is in
it. Simply set it on the counter
to see measurement levels
clearly.
Regarding cleansers, she
says there are products avail-
able to suit any preferences.
"Personally, I love 'Greased
Lightening,' but my sister
swears by anything with
bleach," Booker comments.
"And people who don't like to
use chemicals swear by baking
soda and vinegar."
Even cleanup equipment
has been modernized.
"With the new stemware
brushes, soap dispensing


wands and even a coffee pot
brush," says Booker, "kitchen
accessories today are not any-


thing like the ones that get
thrown in a drawer and forgot-
ten after just one use,"


Modern furniture trend is for an eclectic mix


SNAP


Anyhn LesJ stWntCtIR


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Reporter
For most people, furniture is
a major home purchase, and a
principal interior design ele-
ment.
The vast selection of avail-
able styles, prices and quality
levels can make furniture shop-
-ping a confusing enterprise.
According to Jeff Haddan,
owner-operator of Haddan's
Furniture on Glover Lane, the
process need not be difficult,
provided potential buyers
remember a few basic consid-
erations.
In the past, matching furni-
ture styles throughout the
house was trendy.
Contemporary interior design,
in contrast, leans towards an
eclectic mix of styles, says
Haddan.
Primary decorating con-
cerns today focus around coor-
dinating color combinations
that "you will be looking at for
a long time to come," he notes.
That means each individual
purchase affects a room's
design composition.
Haddan advises furniture
shoppers to look past surface
elements.
"It's very easy to look at


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color and be enamored ," he
notes.
Smart furniture shopping
requires more attention to
detail.
"It's akin to looking under
the hood of a car rather than at
the paint job."
According to Haddan,
upholstered furniture items are
the pieces that homeowners
most often replace.
"Fabrics and foams take the
most direct wear," he says.
"Barring an accident, all-wood
pieces (such as cabinets and
chests) tend to receive less day-
to-day wear."
Basic considerations when
seeking good quality uphol-
stered furniture include all
wood construction and sturdy,
no-sag spring systems.
"Avoid particle board con-
struction," Haddan advises,
.because stresses from wear and
tear will impact it more quick-
ly. He adds that solid bolt-and-
plate jointing can "go along
way toward keeping framing
straight and in shape.",
As far as fabric, primary
considerations include durabil-
ity, color and style.
Olefin blends, which are
usually combined with acrylic


or nylon, are the most durable,
says Haddan.
Color is a major factor
because today, people tend to
purchase furniture one piece at
a time. Haddan says that in the
past, buyers tended to purchase


matching sets all at once.
The same holds true of par-
ticular styles.
"Everything doesn't have to
match now," Haddan notes.
"Customers want pieces that
coordinate with their room
(scheme). Entire room
makeovers are rare."
Haddan says today's cus-
tomers often seek out decorat-
ing advice along with product
information. Many furniture
stores now offer interior com-
plimentary decorating services
to potential customers.
"A large portion of our busi-
ness is helping people decorate
with special order items," he
says. "We spend a lot of time
in interior design."
Do people look at furniture
as an investment item?
"Most definitely," says
Haddan.
"Customers are looking for
something that they can keep,
that will hold up. They look at
furniture as an investment in
the home."
Good furniture, he says,
"can become heirlooms, some-
thing you can pass on to your
grandchild."
Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
News@sr-pg.com


A


1


Dana "7-.


VOU*L F",N.I

MOREl I


Wednesday October 19, 2005


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


L---7-----


r











anta Rosa' Press

Gazette


PAGE 8B


.Iassi


ec(


S


WEDNESDAY

October 19, 2005


90 ANNOUNCEMENTS
92 AUCTIONS
94 MEETINGS
96 PERSONALS
98 TRAINING
EMPLOYMENT
102 DRIVERS
104 GENERAL HELP
106 HOME BASED
BUSINESS
108 HOTEL/MOTELS/
RESTAURANTS
110 LABOR
112 MANAGEMENT
114 MEDICAL
116 OFFICE WORK
118 PART TIME
120 PROFESSIONAL
122 RETAIL
124 SALES/
TELEMARKETING
126 SKILLS/TRADE
128 POSITIONS WANTED
GARAGE SALES -
STYLES SECTION-WED.
202 GARAGE SALES-SAT.
SERVICES
' 305 AUTO
310 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
315 BUSINESS SERVICES
320 CHILD CARE
325 DOMESTIC
330 EQUIPMENT REPAIR
335 FINANCIAL SERVICES
340 HOME REPAIR
345 LAWN CARE
350 SENIOR CARE
355 SEWING/ALTERATIONS
360 MISCELLANEOUS
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-RENT
402 APARTMENTS
404 COMMERCIAL
406 HOMES
408 LAND
410 MOBILE HOMES
412 ROOMS FOR RENT
414 ROOMMATES WANTED
416 VACATION/RESORT
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-SALE
502 APARTMENTS
504 COMMERCIAL
506 HOMES
508 INVESTMENTS
.510 LAND
512 MOBILE HOMES
514 VACATION/RESORT
PETS/ANIMALS
702 BOARDING
704 LIVESTOCK
706 LIVESTOCK SUPPLIES
708 PETS
710 PET SUPPLIES
712 LOST PETS
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
802 ANTIQUES
804 APPAREL
806 APPLIANCES
808 ARTS & CRAFTS
810 COMPUTERS
812 FARM EQUIPMENT
814 FURNITURE
816 JEWELRY
818 LAWN EQUIPMENT
820 LUMBER/HARDWARE
822 MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
824 OFFICE EQUIPMENT
826 SPORTING GOODS
828 ELECTRONIC
(STEREO/TV!VCR)
830 MISC./SALE
832 MISC./WANTED
834 LOST MERCHANDISE
TRANSPORTATION
902 AUTO SUPPLIES
904 CARS
906 BOATS
908 FARM EQUIPMENT
910 MOTORCYCLES
" 912 MOTOR HOMES
914 RECREATIONAL
916 SPORTS UTILITY
VEHICLE
918 TRUCKS
920 VANS
922 OTHER'


POPEYES IS
NOW HIRING FOR
CREW POSITIONS.
FLEXIBLE HOURS,
COMPETITIVE PAY AND
BENEFIT PACKAGE.
APPLY IN PERSON. 4683
HWY 90, PACE. 995-0073.


di
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SALES PERSON
$320 Salary, bonus,
benefits, advancement.
Key Auto Liquidation
4340 Avalon Blvd.
Milton, Fl.
Ask for Coach Gordon
850-983-3000


CALENDAR CLUB! (PART OF
SPECIALTY RETAIL VENTURE) HAS AN
IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITY FOR
SEASONAL RETAIL MANAGER FOR
OUR UNIQUE STORE IN UNIVERSITY
MALL. THIS IS A GREAT INCOME
OPPORTUNITY, INCLUDING SALARY
PLUS COMMISSIONS & INCENTIVES.
EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
OPPORTUNITIES@CALENDARCLUB.COM
OR FAX TO (877) 765-1606
IMMEDIATELY.


CERTIFIED FIREFIGHTER


City of Milton,
6738 Dixon St, Milton,
($26,015.00 Annually),
(850) 983-5400/Fax (850) 983-5415.
Reqs: F1.Cert. Firefighter,
H.S.diploma, current Fl. Vehicle
Operator's Lic. Aps can be obtained at
City Hall. We will be establishing
a register thru
Nov. 4, 2005. R
EOE, ADA and DFWP.


THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. WEST FLORIDA RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER, IN MILTON, FL. IS SEARCHING
FOR A FISCAL ASSISTANT. THIS PERSON WILL BE
RESPONSIBLE FOR A VARIETY OF FISCAL ACTIVITIES AND
TRANSACTIONS PERTAINING TO STATE, FEDERAL, GRANT
AND CONTRACT FUNDS. WILL ASSIST ACCOUNTANT IN
MONITORING EXPENDITURES, MAINTAINING INVENTORY
RECORDS AND CONDUCTING FINANCIAL ANALYSIS.
INCUMBENT WILL ALSO SERVE AS BACK UP AS FRONT
OFFICE REPRESENTATIVE. FOR A MORE DETAILED JOB
DESCRIPTION VISIT: WFREC.IFAS.UFL.EDU.
INFORMATION ON HOW TO APPLY IS AS FOLLOWS: TO
VIEW APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS AND COMPLETE AN
ONLINE RESUME, VISIT WWW.HR.UFL.EDU/JOB.
REFERENCE NUMBER IS 034384 AND THE DEADLINE TO
APPLY IS 10/21/05. IF AN ACCOMMODATION DUE TO A
DISABILITY IS NEEDED TO APPLY FOR THIS POSITION,
PLEASE CALL (352) 392 4621 OR THE FLORIDA RELAY
SYSTEM AT (800) 955 8771 (TDD). EOE


_______


GILCO TECHNOLOGIES-
WE'VE JUST OPENED A
NEW LOCATION IN
MILTON AND WE NEED
YOUR HELP! PLENTY OF
HOURS AVAILABLE-
$375+/WEEK TO START!
VARIOUS POSITIONS.
CUSTOMER SERVICE-
ASSEMBLY, PRODUCT
SET UP & DISPLAY &
OTHERS. RAPID
ADVANCEMENT AND
INCENTIVE PROGRAM
(850) 626-4429. FOR
INTERVIEW
APPOINTMENT.


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PEDIATRIC OFFICE
SEEKS EXPERIENCED
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
RECEPTIONIST.
FULL TIME POSITION.
FAX OR MAIL RESUME
(850)626-9110
5962 BERRYHILL ROAD,
MILTON, FL, 32570


-- u )
-!!!!AW~~wJl


MILTON TRUSS
COMPANY IS LOOKING
FOR HARD WORKING
DEPENDABLE PEOPLE
TO JOIN OUR GROWING
COMPANY. CALL DON
623-1967.


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OFFICE MANAGER AND
RECEPTIONIST, FULL OR
MULTIPLE PART- TIME POSITIONS
AVAILABLE FOR FRONT DESK
DUTIES IN COMFORTABLE
OFFICE. MILTON LOCATION,
ASSOCIATED COURT
REPORTERS. GREAT CLIENTS
AND FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE.
PLEASE FAX RESUME TO
(850) 626-4388


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IS STRESS Ruining
Your Life? Read DI-
ANETICS by Ron L.


Hubbard.


Call


(813)872-0722 or
send $7.99 to Dia-
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bana Ave., Tampa
FL 33607.


PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR
City of Milton is seeking qualified applicants for a new posi-
tion of Public Works Director. This position will be ultimately
responsible for, and provide oversight of, the various utility
and technical departments including: water/sewer, waste-
water/water treatment, natural gas, street/sanitatiot, meter and
parks/recreation. All of these department heads will report to
the public works director. General direction will be received
from the city manager. The city is looking for, an experienced
and successful manager with eight (8) years of a combination
of experience, managing a public works dept. and various
other city departments. Possession of a BS degree in a disci-
pline related to public works mgmt. is preferred. Possession of
a PE cert. is a plus, but not required.
This is a full-time city position under contract. Pay is range
$65,000.00 $70,000.00 with the starting pay negotiable
depending upon qualifications and experience.
Send resume and cover letter to: Donna Adams, City Manager,
City of Milton, PO. Box 909, Milton, FL 32572 by November
14, 2005. Please include applicable copies of licenses, certs.,
diplomas, etc. Under FL. law, all resumes are public records
and open for inspection at any time. Job description available
upon request.
EOE/ADA/DFWP


NEED HELP?
PLACE YOUR EMPLOYMENT AD IN THE HOT
JOBS NOW SECTION AND FINDTHE HELP
YOU NEED FAST! CALL DAVID OR DALE FOR
MORE INFORMATION.
850-623-2120


APAC, Inc. Hiring qualified applicants
for the following positions:

Applicants for the following positions are
eligible for a $200.00 sign-on bonus

Experienced Equipment Operators -
(Grader/Dozer/Excavator etc.)
Skilled Laborers,
Concrete Finishers/Formsetters
Asphalt Distributor Operator
Experienced Dump Truck Driver
Service lTruck Driver
Quality Control Tech Level 1 Plant


Apply in person, M-F 8am-5pm
4375 McCoy Dr., Pensacola, FL.
APAC is a drug-free workplace & EOE


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Drivers!
HOME EVERY NIGHT!
TDI OFFERS:
COMPANY PAID BENEFITS
MEDICAL & DENTAL
PAID VACATION
PAID HOLIDAYS
401K PLAN
TRUCK DRIVER INSTITUTE
MILTON, FL
THE NATION'S LEADING TRUCK D.UVER
TRAINING SCHOOL NEEDS EXPERIENCED
DRIVERS TO BE DRIVING INSTRUCTORS
TRAINING AMERICA'S TRUCKERS
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PRIVATE

PARTY ADS

$4.00/WK
up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30
$1.00 OFF FOR
3RD WEEK
MUST BE PRE-PAID


GARAGE

SALE ADS

$5.00

up to 20 words
.25 PER WORD
OVER 20
PRE-PAYMENT
REQUIRED


COMMERCIAL

ADS

$11.00/1 st week
$1.00 OFF EACH
ADDITIONAL WEEK
up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30
SUBJECT TO
CREDIT APPROVAL


1 Pon .ii




U."-
2Big dit6.2rmlo t
Milton, FL 32570.



3. F4,x your ad
in pla^c ingy''S~uT^^^^^
yoB^^^^ur ad, call^^^^^
(850) 623-2120,^^


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I PAGE 9 THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS OCTOBER 19, 2005


ASPCA ADOPT a
dog shelter month.
Any animals adopt-
ed by an individual
60 yrs. or older, the
shelter will provide
free spay & neuter
services. Any ques-
tions, call the Santa
Rosa County Animal
-Services shelter at
:983-4682 or 936-
,6177.



I miss you
more than you
will ever know.
I don't care


where you are,
where you
have been or
what you have
become.
Please call.
I Love You.
Mom.


AUCTION!! CASH-
IERS, NC October
21, 2005 Commer-
cial Building on Hwy
107N Lot37A Sap-
;phire Lakes Golf
Community 10:00
A.M. Miscellaneous
IItems 11:00 A.M.
:Real Estate 10%
* Buyers Premium,
210% down, 30 Day
'Closing Savage Re-
, al Estate & -Auction
. Co. Inc. NC #7189
GAL #3125
Kenneth Savage
(888)983- 0066
Toll-free
(770)718-8297

AUCTIONS ON-
LINE. Used Truck &
Equipment. Register
FREE. Low SELLER
fees. Promo, Code
SWC-103.
SVisit our website for
details and personal
assistance.
www.surplusonthe.N
ET. (877)215-3010
ESTATE AUCTION
167 +/- acres Div-
ided, homesites,
hunting, timberland.
October 29, 10:00
am Claxton, Evans
County, GA. 10%
i buyer's premium.
Rowell Auctions,
Inc. (800) 323-8388
www.rowellauctions.
com GAL AU-
SC002594
ESTATE AUCTION
S73 acre farm, Alder-
son, Monroe Coun-
ty, WV. Good house,
timber, great hunt-
ing, peaceful, low
taxes, FREE BRO-
CHURE. (800)726-
2897 www.riverben-
dauction.com Randy
Burdette #927



102
Drivers

CDL. DRIVERS!!!!
Long Haul loads to
WA, OR, CA, GA
and TX. Team or
Solo. All Air-Ride
equipment. Compa-
ny. paid medical,
Dental, life insur-
ance. 401K. Ham-
mell Transport Serv-
ice inc. (800) 274-
9076.

CDLAOTR DRIVER
TEAM.50CPMSOLO
.34CPM %100
DROP & HOOK
HEALTH BENEFITS
ASSIGNED EQUIP-
MENT REQUIRE-1
YEAR OTR HAZ-.
MAT & DOUBLES
(321)202-4406
DRIVER TRAINEES
Needed Now! No
experience required.
Werner Enterprise
has immediate
openings for entry-
level semi drivers.
Our avg. drivers
Searn more than
$36K first year. 60%
of our drivers get
home nightly/ week-
ly. 15-day CDL train-
ing available in your
area. Call today. 1-
866-280-5309.
DRIVER- DEDICAT-
ED Regional Coast-
al Transport HOME
EVERY WEEKEND
GUARANTEED!
65% preloaded/pre-
tarped- Avg. $718-
$918/week. Mobile,
AL Terminal- CDL-A
req'd. 877-428-
5627 www.ctdriv-
ers.com


IANme rUC


CFI ATLANTA ORI-
ENTATION-Average
2004 solo earnings
$49,9501 Think an-
nual earnings $0.05
NE bonus pay! XM
Service. Class A
CDL required. t
(800)CFI-DRIVE
(800-234-3748) or
www.cfidrive.com. f
COOKNEEDED for
Bayou Cafe. Mon- j
jay-Friday. Call c
994-9232.


an agreement to
publish said adver-
tisement. Publication
of an advertisement
does not constitute
an agreement for
continued publica-
:ion.
MILTON TRUSS
Company is looking
for hard working de-
pendable people to
oin our growing
company. Call Don
623-1967.


102
Drivers
DRIVER- HOME
WEEKLY- $.40 plus
$.03 NO HZMT NO
NYC EOE CDLA
866-357-7351.
DRIVER- NOW Hir-
ing qualified drivers
for Central Florida
Local & National
OTR positions.
Food grade tanker.
No hazmat. No
pumps. Great Bene-
fits, Competitive Pay
and new equipment.
Need 2 years OTR
experience. Call By-
num Transport for
your opportunity to-
day: (800)741-7950.
DRIVER-COVE-
NANT TRANS-
PORMT Excellent
pay and benefits for
Experienced Driv-
ers, O/O, solo
Teams and Gradu-
ate Students. Bo-
nuses Paid Weekly.
Equal Opportunity
Employer (888)
MORE PAY (888-
667-3729)
DRIVERS (FLAT-
BED) Home every
weekend Small
Family Owned Fleet
Leased to LAND-
STAR needs OTR
flatbed drivers. Con-
ventional equipment.
Regional and OTR.
Call 800-562-7690.
EVERGREEN
TRANSPORTA-
TION needs drivers
to run the 13 SE
states with both
weekly and week-
end hometime. We
offer good pay and
benefits. If you are
at least 23 with a
good driving record
with a HAZMAT en-
dorsement please
come by our termi-
nal located at 300
Hwy. 95A, Canto-
ment, Florida across
from IP paper mill or
call 850-968;1702.
NOW HIRING
No CDL required.
Truck driver with
tractor trailer and
forklift experience a
must. 623-5385.

LEARN
TO DRIVE
Tractor Trailers






15 DAY LOCAL
CDL TRANIING
Full and Part Time Classes
Major carriers hiring on site
Tuition Assistance if qualified
For over 29 years-
we've been training
America's Truckers!
CALL TODAY!
Truck Driver Institute
5750 Milton Road
Milton, FL
800-709-73644
S/E & 3-State Run:
T/T Drivers. HOME
WEEKENDS. Mile-
age Pay, Benefits,
401K. Trainees Wel-
come/Miami area-
exp. req, 21 min
age/Class-A' CDL
Cypress Truck Lines
(800)545-1351
STABLE CAREER.
IMMEDIATE OPEN-
INGS! Positions
available for experi-
enced CDL Holders.
Also Company
Funded Truck Driver
Training offered.
Financial assistance
for Hurricane Katrina
Victims.
(877)PRIME-JOB.
www.primeinc.com
104
General Help
$$ COOL JOBS$$
National company
hiring 18-25 Individ-
uals. Travel US cit-
ies. No experience
necessary. 2-weeks
paid training. Per-
sonality a must. For
interview call Laura
(866) 532-1082.
$600 WEEKLY
working through the
government part-
time. No experience.
A lot of Opportuni-
ties. (800)493-3688
Code J-14.


104
General Help
CLEANING PER.
SON Needed. Seri-
ous long term em-
ployment applicants
only. Must be relia.
ble & dependable.
Must have car avail-
able. Call 994-1785.
COMPANY AND
0/0 needed 87
cents per mile all
dead head paid +-
fsc. Call Don Salts-
man CTC Trucking
Inc. (321)639-1522.
DELIVERY FE-
MARV'S for pay! A
NATIONAL RV de-
livery service has
immediate needs for
qualified contractor
to deliver "new" RV
trailers from facto-
ries and dealers to
Hurricane relief
sites. This is a great
way for you help the
victims. Please log
today: www.horizon-
transport.com
EVALUATORS WE
require evaluators
throughout Florida to
audit businesses.
WE PAY YOU- YOU
PAY NO MONEY!
Apply www.secret-
shopnet.com
FLORIDA DEPART-
MENT of Agricul-
ture. OPS Peanut
Inspection positions
available, Jay and
Allentown area.
Contact Thomas
Vickers. (850)981-
8672 E.E.O.\A.A.
FUN JOB Travel
USA Now hiring 17-
23 sharp guys and
gals to work in a
young rock-n-roll
blue jean environ-
ment. Travel to CA,
FL. NY, & other U.S.
cities. Represent
major sports, fash-
ion, & news publica-
tions Seeking enthu-
siastic people to
start today. 2 week
paid training. Daily &
weekly bonuses.
Transportation & ho-
tel provide. Return
guaranteed. For in-
terview call Miranda
or Cat M-F 10-5
(800)537-7256
http://rnytraveljob.com
GILCO TECHNOL-
OGIES- We've just
opened a new loca-
tion in Milton and we
need your HELP!
PLENTY OF
HOURS AVAILA-
BLE- $375+/Week
to STARTI Various
positions. Customer
Service- Assembly,
product set up & dis-
play & others. Rap-
id advancement and
Incentive Program
(850) 626-4429. For
.interview appoint-
ment.
GULF ATLANTIC
Shutter Company
needs full time fabri-
cators. Day shift and
night shift, stop by to
apply at 6606 Elva
St. Milton, FL. Ask
for Mike.
HELP WANTED AD
Office manager and
receptionist, full or
multiple part-'time
positions available
for front desk duties
in comfortable office,
Milton location,
Associated Court

clients and flexible
schedule. Please
fax resume to
(850) 626-4388
HIRING- PANHAN-
DLE Concrete Cut-
ting, Inc. Laborers- '
no experience nec-
essary. Will train.
Good pay and bene-
fits. Call 850-572-
9749.
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
Milton Newspapers,
Inc. (dba The Santa
Rosa Press Gazette
and The Santa Rosa
Free Press) re-
serves the right to
censor, reclassify,
revise, edit or reject
any advertisement
not meeting its
standards of accept-
ance. Submission of
an advertisement
does not constitute


P/T & F/T
DIETARY AID
positions available
No experience
necessary.
Apply in person at
Santa Rosa Health
and Rehab
5386 Broad St.
in Milton EOE
Drug Free
Workplace


PEDIATRIC
OFFICE
seeks experienced
Medical Assistant
Receptionist.
Full time position.
Fax or Mail Resume
(850)626-9110
5962 Belryhill
Road, Milton, FL,
32570

PLANT NURSERY -
General nursery
work, full time.
Some experience
desired. Part time
possible. 983-9121.
STATE JOB
POSTING
Department of Agri-
culture-Division of
Forestry- OPS

Office Automation
Specialist I1

Location: Blackwater
Forestry Center (o0
miles North of Milton
on-Hwy. 191)' Apply
online at:

www.peoplefirst.my-
florida.com or Con-
tact Tommy McGraw
at 850-410-0747 for
more information.
WANTED INVEST-
MENT Banker with
the knowledge of
Forex currency trad-
ing, private place-
ment programs and
all paperwork per-
taining to templates,
sample program de-
scriptions, etc. For
more information
Call 786-522-3572.
TWO POSITIONS.
Full & Part Time
maintenance per-
sons, A/C knowl-
edge, own tools. Fax
resume or call 850-
626-1939.


310
Business
Opportunities

$1,000 WEEKLY
POSSIBLE! Stay
home! Earn cash
weekly! Mailing our
brochures. Genuine
Opportunity: Free,
info. Call Now!
(800) 693-3915 24
hrs.

$1,000 WEEKLY
POSSIBLE! .Stay
horhe! Earn cash
weekly! Mailing our
brochures. Genuine
Opportunity. Free
info. Call Now!
(800) 693-1629 24
hrs.

HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT
/0.0-4 .-


DUIIUU-tlWI DilUhlIUS
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Next Class: Oct, 3rd
Train in Florida
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com


104
General Help

LIBERTY
NATIONAL Life
Insurance
Do You Earn
$75,000 A Year?
Would You Like
To? Using our pro-
ven marketing plan
you could earn
$75K your first year
with us--even more
the next year with
renewals and bo-
nusesl We offer two
retirement funds,
health insurance,
paid vacation,
convention trips
and more! No
experience neces-
sary. On-the-job
training Require-
ment: honesty, hard
work, dependable
transportation, and
the willingness to
follow our system.
We are an Equal
Opportunity
Employer.
Find out more Call:
983-7576.
LIGHT JANITORI-
AL, 11pm-2:30am,
(Thurs-Sun). $7.00-
$7.50 per hour. Call
Sam. 291-0124.

LOCAL MINISTRY
has openings for an
assistant retail man-
ager and a Class D
truck driver in the
Milton area. Send
resumes to: Person-
nel, PO Box 870,
Pensacola, FL.
32591.

MOVIE EXTRAS,
ACTORS & MOD-
ELS! Make $75-
$250/day. All ages
and faces wanted!
No exp. Required.
FT/PT!
(800)714-7565
NIXON'S CLOTH-
ING store- P/T Sales
Associate, retail ex-
perience required,
Apply at 5061 Dog-
wood, Milton.
NOW HIRING for
2005 Postal posi-
tions $17.50-
$59.00+/hr. Full
Benefits/Paid Train-
ing and Vacations
No Experience Nec-
essary (800)584-
1775 Reference#
5600.


104
General Help

THE UNIVERSITY
of Florida, West
Florida Research
and Education Cen-
ter, in Milton, FL. is
searching for a fiscal
assistant. This per-
son will be responsi-
ble for a variety of
fiscal activities and
transactions pertain-
ing to state, federal,
grant and contract
funds. Will assist ac-
countant in monitor-
ing expenditures,
maintaining invento-
ry records and con-
ducting financial
analysis. Incumbent
will also serve as
back up as front of-
fice representative.
For a more detailed
job description visit:
wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu.
Information on how
to apply is as fol-.
lows: To view appli-
cation instructions
and complete an on-
line resume, visit
www.hr.ufl.edu/job.
Reference number
is 034384 and the
deadline to apply is
10/21/05. If an ac-
commodation due to
a disability is need-
ed to apply for this
position, please call
(352) 392 4621 or
the Florida Relay
System at (800) 955
- 8771 (TDD). EOE

VICE SECURITY
Officer needed.
Full/part time.
Evening and Night.
Milton and Navarre
area. Please call:
438-7011.

110:
Labor

02511460EXPERI-
ENCED BRICK ma-
son helpers needed.
MUST have trans-
portation. Call 994-
3488- ask for Joe.


310
Business
Opportunities
$2000 PER WEEK
NOW-Own your own
travel business. En-
ter the exciting world
of travel. Turnkey
training provided-
PT/FT $249 mini-
mum investment
Toll- free
(800)684-7920
$50,000 FREE Cash
Grants***** 2005!
Never Repay! For
personal bills,
school, new busi-
ness. $49 BILLION
Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Opera-
tors! (800)856-9591
.EXT#113.
$750 WEEKLY
SALARY! mailing
our promotional let-
ters. 100% from
home. Real Oppor-
tunity. FREE INFOI
Call Now! (800) 609-
5031 24 hrs,
***$500$50,000++
FREE CASH
GRANTS! 2005!
Never repay! per-
sonal/medical bills,
school, new busi-
ness-home. As
seen on TV. NO
CREDIT CHECK!
Live operators
(800) 270-1213 Ext.
95.
A CASH COWI 90
Vending Machine
units/You OK Loca-
tions Entire Busi-
ness $10,670 Hurry!
(800)836-3464
#802428
ALL CASH Busi-
ness! Local Candy
Vending Route! Un-
limited Earning Po-
tential. Includes 30
ALL Metal Machines
with Candy, Lifetime
Warranty. $9,895.
(800)704-5414
ALL CASH CANDY
ROUTE Do you earn
$800/day? 30 ma-
chines, free candy
all for $9,995. 800-
814-6323
B02000033 Call us,
we will not be under-
sold!
DATA ENTRY.
Work from any-
where. Flexible
Hours, $$Great
Pay$$ Personal
Computer Required
Serious Inquiries
Only. :(800)873-0345
Ext.499
LOCAL VENDING
ROUTE. Soda,
snack, candy, juices,
water, great equip,
and locations, fi-
nancing available
w/$7500 down.
Call (877)843-8726
--#Bp2002--37
SERVICE BUSI-
NESS FSBO. Sky's
the limit in this large
MILLION DOLLAR
business. http//land-
scapeandtreecofs-
bo.homestead.com.
For More Info Call
(941)485-9212
TURN A one time
$1995 Investment
into a huge monthly
passive income! We
do all the work. You
collect the checks.
CALL NOW.
(800)704-7344
ID#0130GE
WANT TO retire
early? And never
worry about money
again?
www.The3YearPlan.
Biz'
315
Business Services
BUDGET HOUSE
Painting- Insured &
Licensed. Call Andy
@ 850-304-9680.
ANN BARNHILL
TRUCKING Dirt
Work, Asphalt,
Limestone Rock,
Driveways. Call for
price. (850) 623-
3461 (850) 232-
0670. Free Esti-
mates!


Drivers
Earn $45,000 to $50,000 per year
and be home weekends!
Dedicated Customer
out of the Pensacola area hauling one
product only to regular customers.
No back-hauls.
Paid odometer mileage, loaded
and empty. Great benefits
and bonus programs!
Experienced CDL-A
Drivers only apply.
For details call Bill
@866-592-7006


315
Business Services

02510485
SORENSEN'S
REMODELING
Specialist. Home
repairs,
remodeling, tile,
wall texturing,
painting interior
and exterior,
wallpaper and
removal, kitchens
and baths,
cabinet refacing.
12 years
experience,
Licensed and
Insured, Deal
directly with
owner.
Call Jon
(850)390-6756.

Look for my ad in
the Business
Service
Directory

ABOVE & Beyond
Tree Service. Li-
censed and Insured.
Free Estimates.
Don't wait until its
too late. We also of-
fer stump grinding
and Bobcat serv-
ices. Kevin Frey
(850) 983-7820. Call
us...or pay morel
ADVANCED
VINYL
Systems Inc.
Home Improve-
ment Specialists.
*Florida, Rooms
*Screeh Rooms
*Patio Covers
*Carports
*and much more!
Call us
Don Sweeney
orTed Brignano at
850-623-5442
5851 Hwy 90
Milton. See our ad
on the Business
Service Directory
ALL ACCIDENTS &
Injury Claims.
AUTOMOBILE,
BIKE/BOAT/BUS,
ANIMAL BITES,
WORKERS COM-
PENSATION,
WRONGFUL
DEATH, NURSING
HOMES INJURIES;
"Protect Your
Rights"
A-A-A ATTORNEY
Referral Service
(800)733-5342
ARTIE KELLER
STUCCO. Licensed
and Insured. Con-
ventional and Syn-
thetic Systems. No
job to big nor to
small. Call 698-8327
or 626-9164.
BELINDA'S
CLEANING Service-
You make the
mess... We do the.

rest!! Residential &
Commercial- Rea-
sonable rates. Li-
censed. Call 206-
6763.
CANDI'S CLEAN-
ING Companion. In-
sured and licenses,
residential and com-
mercial cleaning.
We will take care of
all, your cleaning
needs. Give us a
call for a, free esti-
mate. Susan (850-
748-6922 or 626-
1354.
CERTIFIED
MASTER
TECHNICIAN-
MARK SALTER
Small engine
repairs. Kohler,
Briggs, Tecumseh.
Blowers, chainsaws,
lawn equipment,
generators, pressure
washers, edgers.
Parts also sold here.
Boutwell Automotive
6593 Caroline St.
Milton
850-623-4750.
DIRT CHEEP
Cleaning Service.
"HOLIDAY SPE-
CIAL" One deep
clean $10 discount
with ad. Homes,
condos, offices. Call
384-2388


315
Business Services
COKER'S LAWN &
TRACTOR Service,
from trimming to
tractor work. Clean
ups, raking, hauling,
mowing, bushhog-
ging, dirt work. Rea-
sonable rates, free
estimates (850)
529-0434 or (850)
623-0493. Licensed
& insured.

DAY BY Day Quality
Fencing. Competi-
tive pricing for all of
your fencing needs.
Locally licensed,
owned and operat-
ed. We look forward
to your call. New
fencing or repairs.
Call 850-529-3546.
DIVORCE $275-
$350*COVERS chil-
dren, etc. Only one
signature required!
*Excludes govt.
fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext
600. (8am-7pm) Alta
Divorce, LLC. Estab-
lished 1977.
DOUBLE "B" Land
Clearing. Backhoe
Work. Licensed and
Insured. Bryen Bal-
lard. (850)994-5740
or (850)232-1581.
DRIGGER'S HOME
Improvements Spe-
cializing in room ad-
ditions, porches, pa-
tio, and general
home improve-
ments; No job to
small, sbo give us a
call. Free Estimates
850-626-7874 or
S686-0733 or 623-
2805.
EXACT DRYWALL.
Licensed & Insured.
Locally owned & Op-
erated, reasonable
prices. All Phases of
Drywalling, Any Tex-
ture, NO MONEY
DOWN, references
available. Member
of the Santa Rosa
Chamber of Com-
merce. Roger Tootle
HM: 850-995-5090
Cell: 850-501-0519
FIRST CLASS
Home Repair. Roof
repair, painting,
pressure washing,
also mobile home
repair. Over 50
years experience.
Free Estimates. Call
Robert at 626-2093
or 777-7161.
GROVER TREE
Service. Tree re-
moval and trimming,
specialist in Live
Oak pruning. Free
estimates, will travel,
insured and li-
censed. Call Spuggy
698-9243 or the of-
fice 698-7828.
HUSEBY FLOOR
covering. Installing
Hardwood & Lami-
nate Flooring, sand
and refinishing. Rea-
sonable Rates. Li-
censed & Insured.
Call for quote 850-
994-7561 or 490-
0404.

LAMINATE,
CERAMIC
AND WOOD
PERGO
ENDORSED
INSTALLER
Offering economical
elegance installing
all name brand
laminates,.wood
and ceramic to
private individuals
and dedicated
professional
renovators.
Call Robert,
255-8414
or 995-7705.
God Bless our
Troops!

LOCAL HOME Re-
pair. Paint, drywall,
trim & tile. Fence re-
pair & installation.
10 years experi-
ence. Contact Paul
McMullen 850-723-
9767.


Displaced By The Hurricane


and Need a Job?


WeHaeImmdaeOpengs


*Weneed ise life insurnceagents

*We need th whowanttobecome



Call Us! 850-983-7576



Liberty National


Life Insurane Company i
*CG I d


.I.


315;
Business Services
LAND CLEARING/
Dozer/Tractor work
Specializing in col-
vert installation &
Driveways. Leveling,
root raking, bushog-
ging, disking. Equip-
ment and material
transport available.
By the Job or by the
hour. Call for. esti-
mates. Call Billy
Rogers. 850-957-
4952 or Cell 850-
261-8407.
MAYBE, YOU can
do it yourself, but
will you? Dave Kop-
pin Home Improve-
ment, Inc. Specializ-
ing in Insurance esti-
mates, Small Home
Improvement Proj-
ects & Maintenance.
(850) 626-6944.

MIKE KAYLOR
Cement Mason
*Patios
*Walks
*Driveways
Free estimates,
no job too small.
Quality work at
affordable prices.
994-0897.

MILL-TOWN CABI-
NETSI Free Esti-
mates! Custom Cab-.
inets. New & remod-
eled homes, Com-
mercial construction.
Licensed & insured.
Ron Lowery 850-
602-0747 & George
Cates 850-417-
0845.
MIZA HOME Im-
provements. Roofs,
siding, painting, win-
dows, ;and doors.
Specialty coatings,
block walls, flat
roofs, asphalt seal-
ers for parking lots
and driveways. 626-
7390
MOBILE HOME
Brokers. Major and
minor repairs. Re-
roof, patio covers,
screen rooms, level-
ing, locally owned,
operated. Free esti-
mates. 100% Fi-
nancing WAC. Call
857-1051.
NEED A LAWYER?
All Criminal Defense
& Personal Injury.
*Felonies Domes-
tic Violence Misde-
meanors* DUI* Traf-
fic Auto Accident*
Wrongful death.
"Protect your Rights"
A-A-A Attorney Re-
ferral Service (800).
733-5342.
NEW HOPE PAINT-
ING & WALLPA-
PERING *Drywall
repairs & patchwork
*Pressure, cleaning
(homes, decks, pa-
tios, driveways &
sidewalks) *Carpen-
try work (crown
molding, paneling,
trim base & case, in-
stall cabinets & build
decks) Residential.
Interior/Exterior.
Family owned busi-
ness, over 30 years.
Call The Ericksens
today! (850)723-
2550 or 623-6034

II^Iduffllr:i;;k
Divorce'108, Adoption 80
Name Change '55
FREE Typing, Call for
Worksheet (850) 434-7524
1850 N. "W" SL |
(1 blk. N. of Flea Market)
S & L Fencing- All
types of fences, new
and repair. Special-
izing in custom pri-
vacy fence. Free es-
timates. Free Tear-
down. Open 7 days
a week! 850-572-
1390 or 850-572-
1426.


SERI


I


SI


0


I


315
Business Services

ROSE RIDGE
Farms, Backhoe &
dumptruck service.,
Stumps removed,
debris cleared. Dirt
& material hauler.
Call Sam or Carol
Howell 850-995-
1730 or 850-449- .
1677. Licensed & in-:
sured. Free esti-
mates.

STUMP-EASE
STUMP Grinding.,
Most removals :
$35.00. Discount for
multiply removals.,
Backyard Accessible
Licensed & Insured.;
Local Contractor.
Retired USN. 232-f
8746.

TNT CARPORTS
R.V. & Boat covers
Buildings,
Garages.
Portable Sheds
CARPORTS
Single $595
-Double $695.
12 X 41-$1295
24 X 31$1990
Galvanized Steel
Many sizes/colors.
Financing Available
Free delivery & setup
(850)983-2296 or
Pager 505-1867

TREES AND Roofs.
Professional tree ex-
perts, roof cover
ups, carpentry, local
in business 4q
years, insurance
and license number
RC0066546. Call
850-862-0383 or
850-865-2000
VICKERS FENCING
"Making good neighi
bors one fence at a
time." Specializing ird
wood fences. New
installations and re,
pairs. Competitive
pricing. Free esti$
mates. 994-7585 oi-
791-0198.
WILLIAM SMITH "
Drywall, LLC -SpeT
cializing in Hurricane
Recovery. Free Est
timates- locally
owned & operated
Licensed & insured,
Office 850-626-8346
cell 850-207-0302. 1

325
Domestic

DEPENDABLE
HOUSEKEEPER-
TEN YEARS EXPE-
RIENCE. REASON.
ABLE RATES.CALL
994-6236 .

335
Financial Services

$50,000 FREE Cash
Grants*****_2005! '
Never Repay! For
personal bill;
school, new busi-
ness. $49 BILLION
Left unclaimed frorp
2004. Live Opera-
tors! (800)856-9591
EXT #113.

****$500-
$100,000++ FREE
Cash Grants! 2004!
Never repay! Per-
sonal/medical bills,
school, new bus)-
ness- home. As
seen on T.V. No
CREDIT CHECK!
Live operator!
(800)270-1213
ext.95.

CREDIT CARD
bills? Consolidate
today! Get out of
debt fast. One lojw
monthly payment.
Cut interest. Stop
harassment.
www.ihavetoomanya
bills.com Sincge
19911 (800)881- .
5353 x 17.









I PAGE 10 THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS OCTOBER 19, 2005


335
Financial Services

DOES YOUR busi-
ness need help get-
ting your books
ready for tax time?
Don't wait, prepare
now! Call the afford-
able bookkeeper
with 20 years experi-
ence in double entry
bookkeeping. 626-
2143.

EARN $1,000 per
,day! We take the
calls. We close the
sales! We help you
advertise. One time
purchase $1995.
(877) 791-7486
(TG1024)

IMMEDIATE
CASH!!! US Pen-
sion Funding pays
cash now for 8 years
of your future pen-
sion payments. Call
(800)586-1325 for a
FREE, no-obligation
estimate. www.pay-
checktoday.com.

340
Home Repair

METAL ROOFING
SAVE $$$ Buy Di-
rect From Manufac-
1trer. 20 colors in
stock with all Acces-
sories. Quick turn
Around! Delivery
Available Toll Free
C888)393-0335.

4 345
Lawn Care

CLARK'S LAWN
tare and General
Maintenance & All
Types of Tractor
York. Licensed &
Insured. Call Mike
,lark at 626-2428.

PAGE'S TREE
SERVICE Trim, cut
& remove. Call 626-
159 (if no answer,
'lease leave message)
FIREWOOD $50. a
Toad and up.

350
> Senior Care

SEEDED- HOME-
LIAKERS, Compan-
,ons, Milton area,
loving Care Sitters,
Inc. In home elder
are. 675-4278.


350
Senior Care


VISITING
ANGELS
SENIOR CARE
In homd
* Companionship
Meals
* Light housework
Errands
944-2211


355
Sewing &
Alterations


JUST JUDY'S
SEAMSTRESS
YEARS OF
EXPERIENCE,
FAIR PRICES.
Alterations
SDress-making
Repairs
*Weddings
*Formals
JUDY HARVEY
5901 Castle Drive
Milton, FL
626-6349


360
Miscellaneous

ABSOLUTELY NO
Cost to you'll Brand
new power wheel-
chairs and scooters.
Call toll free
(800)843-9199, 24
hours a day to see if
you qualify.

EARN DEGREE on-
line from home.
*Medical *Business,
*Paralegal, *Com-
puters. Job Place-
ment Assistance.
Computer & Finan-
cial aid if qualify.
(866)858- ,
2121www.onlineti-
dewatdrtech.com.






402
Apartments

1 BEDROOM fur-
nished apartment
with central heat &
air. No pets. $400.
month, $250. dep.
Call for appointment.
994-7246


N [TINiG[


The All New!


Jay



Apartments


FULLY RENOVATED ONE, TWO, AND

THREE BEDROOM UNITS NOW
AVAILABLE W.A.C.




850-623-0609r


406
Homes
BRAND NEW 3bd/
2ba home. Double
car garage, privacy
fence. 6242 Dixie
Road. $1200 month
plus deposit WAC.
Call 623-0609 for
more information.
BRAND NEW- 3/2,
2 car garage, in
beautiful Bayside.
Screen porch/appli-
ances, $1,450/mo.
plus security depos-
it. 936-4170.
FOR RENT 2 br
house on 2 acres of
land, 3 miles out on
Munson Hwy. Total
electric 626-8973.
FOR RENT-
4 bdrm/2 bath,
1,750
s.f., heat pump, en-
ergy efficient. 12 x
20 storage bldg.
Walking distance to
Elementary, High
School & city park.
Available 11/1.
$850 per month plus
deposit. Call 623-
9553.
FOR RENT- Brand
New Single Family
House- Country liv-
ing in Milton- 3 bed-
2 bath & office/den,
2 1/2 Car Garage.
$1,450. Mo. plus de-
posit. 850-449-2983
or 850-939-1414.
UNFURNISHED
HOUSE for rent in
North Milton (6573
Sinclair) 3 bed-
rooms/2 baths. No
pets. Total electric.
$875. deposit, $875.
per month., Baycrest
Realty 994-7918
408'
Land
DESIRED HORSE
HAVEN
20 acres North of
Milton; zoned agri-
cultural land tax val-
ue .$165,730; 2000
sq. ft. double wide
plus 2 mobile home
income rentals, ga-
rage, utility: shed,
tractor and barn.
$48,705. Total
$214,435 firm. Call
626-6767 leave
message.

FOR SALE-
Fenced, 4 acres +/-,
Deep well, septic
'tank. PartiallVy "
wooded and pas-
ture. 4 miles from
Milton city limits.
For more informa-
tion call 261-2741.


408
Land

LAND FOR SALE
Refer to
Classification
#510
LOT OR space for
R.V. or Travel Trail-
er for rent. Water,
sewer & electric
available. 850-537-
6222 or 850-499-
7412.

410
Mobile Homes
2 BDRM- front kitch-
en, 1 bath. Eastgate
Mobile Home
Ranch. 626-8973.

2 TO 3 bedroom
rentals. Jay, Milton
and Pace. $400 to
$650 per month.
Call 994-5703, leave
message.
SMALL 3 bdrm/1
bath- total electric.
Eastgate Mobile
Home Ranch. 626-
8973.
UNFURNISHED
MOBILE home for
rent. 1/1 in Pollard
Park. $325. month,
$200. dep. Total
electric. No pets.
Baycrest Realty.
994-7918

412
Rooms For Rent

BEDROOMS FOR
rent. Downtown Mil-
ton, Glover Lane,
Everything included.
$100/wk. 983-4884.
Cable, Refrigerator,
Color TV, Micro-
wave, A/C, garbage,
parking included.
Clean.


416
Vacation & Resort


FISHERMAN'S
PARADISE- Camp-
site, full hookup on
private lake,
siockeo with trophy
bass. Pier and boat
available for use.
Come fish and en-
joy quiet country
walks. $50.00 a
day. Call 623-3314.


CASFY'S HURSERY
FALL SALE


Selected

3 gal
trees
Dogwoods
Shade
Fruit
$5


Untagged
3 gal
Crepe
Myrtle $7
Selected
shrubs
on sale


Palms
Roses
Other
unlisted
specials

-,' '


Jon & Deb Casey
3851 Avalon Blvd. Milton 32583


850-623-8109
ODB05002


506
Homes

AVALON BEACH-
1,235 s.f., 3/2 split,
2003 model, vaulted
ceiling, plant ledge,
great location! No
hurricane damage.
Tile in kitchen/ba. 5
min from 1-10/Avalon
10 min. from
Pace/Milton.
$144,900. Call 995-
1198.


BRICK HOME on
3 1/2 acres. Over
2,700 living area.
Horses allowed.
Beautiful home
with formal L.R.
and D.R., Family
room with fire-
place, breakfast
room with Bay
Windows. All win-
dows in rear look
out on pool. Palm
trees beautifully
landscaped. 2 car
garage, workshop.
$299,900.
Joanne Bryan
Realtor
994-4718
King &Assoc. Realty

BY OWNER/
AGENT 3bd/2ba.
Lakefront. The
Moors Golf & Rac-
quet Club.
$239,900.380-3660.


FOR SALE
By Owner
1 acre of land with 4
bedroom/ 2 bath,
central air/heat,
swimming pool and
many extrtas. 626-
1821 call for ap-
pointment. Sonya
Wilkinson

FOR SALE- Ander-
son Ln.- Willard
North area. All brick,
3 bedroom/2 bath, 1
Acar garage, great
subdivision. Many
extras. $139,900.
983-6526.

Garson Point exit
22 S. Custom built
brick home 3br/2ba
2,428 sq. ft. with
separate finished'
guest house 864sq.
ft. on 1.3 acre lot..
Split floor plan with
master suite. Gar-
den, jacuzzi tub, se-
curity system, handi-
cap accessible
doors, and so much
more. $375,500 Call
850-572-5082.

POOL! 3br/ 2 bath!
in Milton on over 1/2
an acre. Townhouse
in Pensacola. Great
investment opportu-
nity. Canal front
property. Cleared
and ready for your
dream home! Lori
Frey, 1 First Choice
Realty 476-2154.

MILTON- NEW
2005 All brick,
4BD/2BA w/fireplace
on .35 acre.
$183,900. Call 585-
3975.


PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

WORKFORCE INVESTMENT PLAN

The Workforce Escarosa, Inc. (Escarosa) is charged by the State of Florida to write
and submit a two year plan to cover initiatives to be enacted under the Workforce
Investment Act (WIA) of 1998. Escarosa oversees services to be delivered within
Region 1 which encompasses Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida. WIA
establishes guidelines for local employment and training initiatives that will lead to
gainful employment for unemployed adults and dislocated workers: programs for
at-risk youth and youth who have dropped out of school; and the establishment of
One Stop Centers whereby numerous agencies are brought together to deliver a
continuum of services.

Please be advised that a rough draft of the WIA Plan for Region 1 is available for
review at the following locations, Monday Friday, From 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.

Escarosa Career Center Escarosa Career Center
3670 N. "L" Street 6570 Caroline Street
Pensacola, Florida 32505 Milton, Florida 32570


Escarosa Career Center Workforce Escarosa, Inc.
7600 Mayo Street 9111-A Sturdevant Street
Century, Florida 32535 Pensacola, Florida 32514

The WIA Plan is a generalized overview of planning operations. Any comments
regarding the plan must be presented in writing to the Sturdevant Street address as
noted above. Comments must be received no later than October 26, 2005. All com-
ments received will be submitted to the State Workforce Investment Board for their
review. If you have any questions regarding the above, please contact Edward
LeBrun at (850) 473-0939

Equal Opportunity Employer/ Programs
Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request of individuals with disabilities.


SmANTAROSA
REAiLESTATE^


506
Homes
GEORGIA BEAU-
TYI New home n
Ballground, Gover-
nor's Preserve,
4,416 s.f. brick and
frame, 2 car garage,
4 BR, 3 1/2 baths,
custom cabinets,
granite countertops,
island w/ custom de-
sign bar, view from
family room. 9 ft.
ceiling in living
room, hardwood
floor, stacked stone
fireplace to ceiling,
large deck, full base-
ment, swimming and
tennis. Must see!
$411,000. By own-
er. (706) 253-4121
or (770) 894-1988.
See it at : www.us-
newspapers.com/bal
around.
I HAVE homes in
foreclosure please
call 995 0787

510
Land
ASHEVILLE NC
AREA- WATER-
FRONT & MOUN-
TAIN HOMESITES
Gorgeous riverfront,
river view & wooded
homesites. 1+ acres
from the 40's. Gated
community with
amenities Call (866)
292-5762
BEAUTIFUL LEVEL
5 Acres, American
Farm's, Shade
tree's, Fruit tree's,
fenced large
barn/shop, pasture
with free 24 x 44
trailer $110,000
cash 981 0760
EAST ALABAMA
Mountain Property
for sale, one hour
West of' Atlanta in
Piedmont, AL Great
for enjoyment or in-
vestment 16-acres-
$57,750.00 More in-
formation Call-
Gary
McCurdy (256)239-
END OF SEASON
BLOW OUT SALE!
Canyon /Ferry
Crossing,. Helena,
Montana. Only 8
parcels left in this
magnificent develop-
ment. Awesome
lake and mountain
Views, close to Can-.
yon Ferry Lake, mi-
nutes to Helena.
Owner to pay clos-
ing costs. Call
(888)-770-2240.
LAND FOR RENT
Refer to
Classification
#408,
,NC MOUNTAIN-
10+ Acres/Stream/
$39,000. Grand
Opening October
22-23. Spectacular
long range views!
Near Blue Ridge
Parkway and Boone.
Excellent financing,
roads & utilities.
(800)455-1981, ext.
210


NORTH CAROLINA
Gated Lakefront
Communityl.5 acres
plus, 90 miles of
shoreline. Never
before offered with
%20 pre-develoment
discounts, %90
financing.
Call(800)709-5253


510
Land

SECLUDED &
SERENE

NW of NAS Whit-
ing Field

20 Placid acres
zoned agricultural

Land prop. tax
value at $198,043

3 mobile homes,
garage, barn, shed

626-6767
$247,239
THE BERNATH
Place/Waterfront lot.
80ft on Mulatto Bay-
ou. $250,000. 623-
6848.
7.75 PRIVATE
acres, near Harold
country store -
$96,875.
2,000 office
bldg., zoned com-
mercial on .43 acres
on Dogwood Dr. in
Milton, $199,000.
3.25 acres w/
1,700 s.f. home
sold "As Is" in East
Milton $165,000.
Acreage in Milton
for Sale. Linda
Owens/ Exit Realty
(850) 698-9854
WATERFRONT!
HOME sites from
$99,900. Eastern
North Carolina.. Call
clear Water Market-
ing (252) 633-
2059, Ext. 315.
www.cwmktg.com

512
Mobile Homes

2BD MOBILE home
for sale 16 x 70 plus
land. 983 4930

BEAUTIFULLY
DECORATED- 3/2
Horton Home on
TWo acres, bring
your horses, ,4512
Sleepy Hammock
Dr. ERA Bill Wal-
lace Realty, Call
Donna Cloman 626-
8082, additional in-.:
formation. $129,500.
MLS 287588.
DESIRED HORSE
HAVEN
20 acres North of
Milton; zoned agri-
cultural land tax val-
ue $165,730; 2(000
sq. ft. double wide
plus 2 mobile home
income rentals, ga-
rage, utility shed,
tractor and barn.
$48,705. Total
$214,435 firm. Call
626-6767 leave
message.
FOR SALE: In Mil-
ton, Horton-3
bdrm/2
ba, 1,848 s.f., new
A/C & metal roof, 10
x 20 back deck & 8 x
10 front deck. Sits
on 1.3 acres, 'all
fenced. 850-626-
0836.
Marlborough vil-
lage, 2br/ 1ba and
land for sale. Nice
lot owner finance/
offer723-2532.
MOBILE HOME &
Land for sale. awe-
some lot. 3Br/2Ba.
Ward Basin, large
shop, owner
finance/offer. Call
723-2532.


SECLUDED &
SERENE


* NW of NAS Whit-
ing Field

* 20 Placid acres
zoned agricultural

* Land prop. tax
value at $198,043

* 3 mobile homes,
garage, barn, shed

* 626-6767
* $247,239


SECLUDED 6
acres Northeast of
Milton, 10 minutes
from Blackwater
State Park.
2- 1999 Palm
Harbor modular
homes. 3B/2Bath,
front and back
porch on both,
shop, storage, fully
stocked fish pond.
Four acres fenced
pasture. Beautiful
family homesite,
must sell for
medical reasons,
$300,000 for all.
Call 850-957-8784
or 850-554-5237.


514
Vacation & Resort


GRAND OPENING
Sale! Lake Bar-
gains! Water access
from $ 34,900 w/
,FREE. Boat slips.
PAY NO CLOSING
COSTS! Sat & Sun.
Oct. 15 & 16th.
Huge pre-construc-
tion savings on
beautifully, wooded.
-parcels'- at -34,000
acre lake Tennes-
see. Enjoy unlimited
water recreation.
Surrounded by state
forest. Lakefront
available.! Excellent
financing! Call now
(800) '704-3154 x
658.

NC MOUNTAIN
CABIN- unfurnished
inside, on mountain
top, view, trees, wa-
terfall & large public
lake nearby.
$89,900. owner
(866) .-789-8535
www. NC77.com

TENNESSEE- NEW
LAKESIDE COM-
MUNITY- 1+ acre
homesites from the
30's. Private boat
slips, limited availa-
bililty. Close to
downtown- Chatta-
nooga/Knoxville.
Lake access from
community. (866)
292-5769. ,


512
Mobile Homes


PACE- CONVEN-
IENT to everything!
3/2 Palm Harbor,
new roof, but NO
hurricane damage,
3708 Estil Drive.
ERA Bill Wallace
Realty, Donna Clo-
man 626-8082 for
additional informa-
tion, photos.
$79,900. MLS
285741.


11,40sq*ft t 2495sq*t


aths


Bellehaven
SCathedral Ceiling In Great Room Chdwick 2
SSpacious Kitchen & Dining Area with custom cabinets Slratford 2
SArchitectural Shingles Vinyl Exterior Trim Norwood 2
Luxury Marble Vanity Tops Mayfair 2
Garden Tub and Shower Diplomat 2
SCeiling Fans in all Bedroom and Great Room Hampton 2
S Walk-in Closets In Bedrooms Gemini 2
French Doors Gas or Wood Fireplace Inglewood 2
Ambassador 2
A g. llB ik1 0 o pYork 2
Oxford 2
Will buid on Slab or Piers Leingn 2
Lexington 4 BR 2
Pinebrook (Signature Series)2
0 S u Fleetwoad 2
Kingston (Signature Series) 2
Executive 2 1/2
Regency (Signature Series) 3
2 Bedroom Duplex 2 (1 ei
Visit our website www.steelehomes.cc 3 Bedroom Duplex 4 (2 ew


S.S.STEELE
S AND COMPANY, INCORPORATED
*..... o,*.*-*Op 6705 N. Pensacola Blvd. 477-7880
FL. Li. #CRC044810 Toll Free (888) 231-1255


Sq. Ft. Price
1040 67,800
1149 70,600
1257 78,100
1341 83,000
1418 83,900
1510 86,800
1525 87,600
1579 90,.600
1586 98,100
1610 91,200
1622 95,000
1713 97,300
1812 101,300
1812 101,700
1833 116,600
1949 108,400
2129 131,300
2215 126,300
2495 155,000
ch unit) 1740 117,600
ach unit) 2062 135,800


*SA 9 0 0 5 : 0
SU N .CLO SED


-


560
Land

BEAUTIFUL
NORTH Carolina.
Escape the heat in
the cool beautiful
peaceful mountains.
of Western North
Carolina Mountains.
Homes, cabins,
acreage & invest-
ments. Cherokee
Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate,
Murphy. cherokee-
mountainrealty.com.
Call for Free Bro-
chure (800)841-
5868.

COASTAL NORTH
Carolina waterfront!
3+ Acres, $99,900
Beautifully wooded
parcel on deep boat-
able water with ac-
cess to ICW, Atlantic
& sounds. Prime lo-
cation close to town.
Paved rds, u/g utilit-
ies, county water.
Excellent financing.
Call now (800)732-
6601 x 1405.

NEW MEXICO 20
acres $39,900.
scenic region, views,
canyons, tress, roll-
ing hills, wildlife. En-
joy hunting, hiking,
horses, great cli-
mate. Power, great
access. 100% Fi-
nancing. Call
(914)232-5100.

SERENE MOUN-
TAIN GOLF HOME-
SITE $342/MO.
Breathtaking views.
Upscale Golf Com-
munity set amid Dye
designed 18 hole
course in Carolina
Mountains. Near
Asheville NC. A
sanctioned Golf Di-
gest School Teach-
ing Facility! Call toll-
free (800)334-3253
X 974 www.chero-
keevalleysc.com
Price: $69,900, 10%
down, balance fi-
nanced 12 months'
at 4.24% fixed, 24
month balloon,
OAC.

SOUTH COASTAL
SGeorgia $149,900
for a 2+ acre deep
water marsh lot
$224,900 for a 3+
acre oversized deep
water lot 45 min fro
Jacskonville/15 min
from St. Simon's.
Call today for ap-
pointment. Excellent
Financing available.
(877)GA-OCEAN x
708.

SOUTH COASTAL
Georgia 3+ acre
deepwater Ocean
Access Lot from just
$420 per month! *
45 min from Jack-
sonville/15 min from
St. Simon's Call to-
day for appointment.
Excellent Financing
available. (877)GA-
OCEAN x 703*
monthly pmnt of
$240.32 based .on
$59,900 purchase
price w/10% down
payment of $5,990,
$53,910 financed at
5.19% fixed (APR of
5.55% includes 1%


FREE TO GOOD
HOME
(2) 1 yr. old male
dogs. -Very friendly
& .well cared fo,r.
983-7820

FREE TO good
home- 2 .male kit-
tens, 1 black, 1 gray.
Approximately 13
weeks old. 623-
6805.
GIANT PLATED
Lizard for sale. Ac-
cessories included.
Call 418-0942 for
more information.
MYNAME is Moses,
I'm a 1 yr. old Male
American Bull, 63
pounds- My folks
are old, so I don't
get much exercise.
I'd love to have a
playmate at my
.home or yours. I
love dogs & people-
maybe we can meet.
Call 994-0049

712
Lost & Found
PETS

LOST 9 month old
white & black medi-
um hair dog look like
a Springer Spaniel.
Lost in vicinity of
Stewart St. Reward
offer. 626 6444 or
516 5445

LOST BEAGLES in
East Milton area.
Right after Dennis
near the end of July.
1 'male, 1 female.
Please call with any
Information 626-
2428 or 516-7983.
LOST DOG- Female
boxer, brown
w/white around
neck, black around
face/eyes. Lost
near Pine Blossom
& Cherokee Rd.
390-5899.
LOST MALE CAT
No tail, creamy
white with gray
face and blue
eyes. 623-3519


LOSTYOUR PET?
Be sure to call
Santa Rosa
Animal Control
to report him
missing and to
be sure he's not
there waiting
on you to
pick him up!
850-983-4680


A


4


4

*
i
4
4
4
4


4

14

I
4H


I


4


560
Land

origination fee) for 3:
yrs. 35 monthly pay-
ments of $240.32
w/final payment of.
$53,910. Offer void
where prohibited by
law.






704
Livestock

TWO HORSES are
in desperate need of
good, loving homes.,
Both horses were
confiscated by San-
ta Rosa Animal Con-
trol and have now
been nursed back to
health. They are.
ready to find the
home they've al-
ways deserved. For
more information
please contact
Wade Okahashi or
Kim Gallager at 850-
983-4680.

YARD EGGS- Large
.80 dozen, Medium
.60. Will wholesale.
Milton area. 346-
2380 or 346-2381.

706
Livestock Supplies


HAY
FOR SALE
Coastal Hay. 623-
6769 or 336-2267.


708
Pets

ASPCA ADOPT a
dog shelter month.
Any animals adopt-
ed by an individual
60 yrs. or older, the
shelter will provide
free spay & neuter
services, Any ques-
tions, call the Santa
Rosa County Animal
Services shelter at
983-4682 or 936-
6177.


1"'The REGECY.7


*<








I PAGE 11 THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS OCTOBER 19, 2005


HOT JO.......


802
Antiques
ANTIQUE MAPLE
table- folding sides.
$750. 623-8624.
804
Apparel


JUST JUDY'S
ALTERATIONS
Dress Making
and More!
Call Judy at
850-626-6349


PROM
DRESSES
Worn last year.
Not old
fashioned.
Sizes 8-10.
One purple
(never worn),
one white, and
one teal. All
three strapless.
Call Sheena
at the
Press Gazette
623-2120 or
637-7044
after 5pm.


806
Appliances.
FREEZER, ENTER-
TAINMENT' CEN-
TER, big stereo
stand, dresser,
drapes, TV, etc...
6821 Pine ST,
(across from school
board PK lot. Take
canal towards Bag-
dad then left on
Pine)
(850) 626-6636
"sale" price
814
Furniture
ELEGANT 5 PC.
SECTIONAL furni-
ture which includes
a hide-a-bed & 2 re-
cliners, pastel col-
ored fabric. $500
OBO. 995-8524
BLACK WOODEN
table, white tile top
4 chairs $75.00
OBO
Drop~ in electric
cooktop, 1 year old
'rigidaire. $125.00
_OBO
Phone:
(850)995-4357
LIVING ROOM
suite-. Very good
condition. 2 table
lamps. $190. 623-
6687.
SOFA GOOD
condition $75, coffee
table $10,2 lamps
$6, Electrolux vac-
uum cleaner $50
and other miscella-
neous items.
Call 994- 4562
818
Lawn Equipment
FOR SALE- Murray
12.5 h.p., 38 in. cut
riding lawnmower
w/dump cart. New,
less than 20 hours
running time. $700.
983-2779.


FOR SALE:.
Vermeer SC252
Self-Propelled
stump grinder.
Less.than 100 hrs.
Trailer Included.
$12,000. 983-2820


822
Musical
Instruments
KIMBALL PIANO-
Excellent condition.
$750. 623-9925.
826
Sporting Goods


GUNS FOR SALE
Windchester -
model 12 gauge, 28
inch mod $600
12 Gauge pump
S/G with hammer
$400
Remington, old
model deluxe 30/06
automatic rifle/
scope $400
National 12 gauge
$300
cash only
Call: 626 7352


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale
MARY BLAIR
6 3060 White 1/1
Insulated windows.
Brand new. Never
Installed. $500 obo.
572-1404.


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale

1983 NISSAN king
cab for sale, runs
but needs transmis-
sion. 1986 trans-
mission for sale. 2
bathroom sinks (1)
16x191/2 (1) 17 x
20 Pack and Play
for child, baby bath
seat, baby car seat.
623-4278.


Centipede-
St. Aixgustine
Farm Direct
We Deliver
434-0066

BUILDING SALE!
"Last Chance!"
20X26 Now $3995.
25x30, $5700.
30X40, $8300.
40X60, $12,900.
Many others. Meets
140 M.P.H. Higher
available. One end
included. Pioneer
(800)668-5422.

BUY FLOORING di-
rect from Dalton,
GA, save up to 60%
on all name brand
carpets, hardwoods,
laminates. Free es-
timates, Free gift
with purchase (800)
848-7747.
WWW.ACCESS-
CARPETS.COM
HOT TUB- 1 month
old, seats 4-6 peo-
ple, hardly used.
$2,500. 916-0003
or 501-3626.


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale


I


I


We Deliver & Install
Centipede
St. Augustine
Bermuda
Balled Pine Straw
Call us first, Save Time
Call us last, Save Money
Hwy. 87 So. Milton
626-85781

1986 transmission
for sale. Pack and
Play for child, baby
bath seat, toddler
car seat, child back
pack carrier, baby
car seat. 623-4278.
32 FT. Walk-in cool-
er, excellent condi-
tion. $7,500. 982-
3180.

832
Miscellaneous
Wanted
GLASS CRAFTER
needs empty glass
soft drink bottles, (all
kinds). Not necessa-
rily collectors edi-
tions. Will pick up.
983-8042.

PAY CASH for junk
cars or trucks. Run-
ning or not. Call
983-9527
WANTED MORE'S
Paying up to $10 a
case for MRE's. Will
pick up. Leave mes-
sage. 304-1263.


m


e (J a )11 I


Press


v v v v


AT McE3I POTAC-GMCBU.


V w V


4


0


*100+ Point Inspection Process *3 Day/150 Mile Vehicle Exchange Policy
*24 Hour GM Roadside Assistance *Bumper to Bumper Coverage for 3 Months
or 3,000 miles (Added to existing warranty, if in effect) *$0 Deductible Warranty


ORIGINAL LIST:
024,B30
STARTING FROM

106,981
3 IN STOCKcI


- -
onu
40 o .
Noi


ORIGINAL LIST:
*29,930
STARTING FROM

019,981
3 IN STOCK


FAMS


w


-1


_ RCerTified
USED VEHICLES
THE RIGHT WAY. THE RIGHT CAR,


2005



!4


a


* Copyrighted Material

SSyndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


*
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ORIGINAL LIST: ORIGINAL LIST:
=21,530 *23,530
STARTING FROM STARTING FROM

12,981T 13,981T
4 IN STOCKS 4 IN.. STOCK


ORIGINAL LIST:

STARTING FROM

t16,981
8 IN STOCKi


NEED HELP?
PLACE YOUR EMPLOYMENT AD IN THE
HOT JOBS NOW SECTION AND FIND THE
HELP YOU NEED FAST! CALL DAVID OR
DALE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
850-623-2120


834
Lost & Found
MERCHANDISE
FOUND
Boating & Fishing
equipment left be-
hind at boat launch
at bridge by the Riv-
erwalk. Please call
983-8243 to identify.
FOUND- TACKLE
box on Magnolia
Ave. between Stew-
art & Dogwood. Call
to identify between.
the hours of 6 p.m.-
9 p.m. 626-3644.



904
Cars
$500 POLICE im-
pounds cars from
$5001 Tax repos, US
Marshall and IRS
sales! Cars, Trucks,
SUV's, Toyota's,
Honda's, Chevy's
and morel For list-
ings call (800)571-
0225 xC295.
2000 MUSTANG
Convertible V-6,
runs great, custom
tint $7,000. Call 626-
3638.
VW CONVERTI-
BLE- '72 needs Tip,
garge kept. $3,500.
Call 572-5652.


oRES


; G 1 IP 'i T:


ORIGINAL LIST:
S22,130
STARTING FROM

$16,981*
3 IN STOCK


2005 CADILLAC DEVILLES
ORIGINAL LIST:
s47,095
STARTING FROM

I29,981*
3 IN S-TOCKC


11 M r N T I I 'Plus t title & license. +3.9% APR on select vehicles.
W At Pmest PO N TIA C Gid- With approved credit, See dealer for details.


McKenzie
PONTIAC GMC BUICK
See Us At www.mckenziemotors.com


S0*llfl P MI


Find your name in the Classified
Section of Wednesday's or
Saturday's Press Gazette and you
can win $5.00. Bring proof of
identification by our office before.
the date of next publication and


pick up your money.


GM CERTIFIED


USED VEHICLES:


2005 CHEVY IMPALAS


*

*of-

I

* r


ORIGINAL LIST:
27,090
STARTING FROM


$16,981


ORIGINAL LIST:
*28,700
STARTING FROM

18,981*
4 IN4 S.TCOCKPI


904
Cars

LOW RIDER
82' Cadillac.
Hydraulics, subs,
t.v.'s, rag sunroof,
new paint
(Pearl White),
1.00,000 miles,
14" knock offs,
street charger.
Hops and turns
on three wheels.
$6,500 OBO
Call 626-5595
or 450-9201.

906
Boats
BOAT FOR SALE-
1979 -16 ft. compact
yacht sailboat, motor
Mercury 4 stroke
used 5 times, cabin
below, trailer includ-
ed, great condition.
$2,000 OBO. Josh
748-9386 or 981-
9233.


I


914
Recreational
2 BUSES for sale-
CHEAP. Call Bill
Wallace at 572-
6500.
2002 CARRIAGE
Cari-lite. 36 foot 5th
wheel, 3 slide outs,
island kitchen.
$62,000. 10% down,
financing available.
850-981-1951.

DUTCHMAN
TRAVEL
Trailer
2000 sleeps 6, ex-
tra nice and clean,
asking $10,000.
.626-1821 Call for
appointment. Sonja
Wilkinson
FOR SALE-1991 34
FT. Cruise Master,
engine runs good,
comfortably sleeps
4. Clean inside/low
mileage. Fully
stocked with food &
dishes. 981-1467 or
418-9474.


-r ----~ ~ d I I I I L ----


916
Sport Utility
Vehicles
1991 FORD Explor-
er- Eddie Bauer-
$1,000 firm. Call
501-0273.
1996 GMC Jimmy,
V-6, cold A/C, runs
good. $1,100. Call
626-3638.
918
Trucks
2002 FORD F-150
Truck, 4 door, excel-
lent condition, ex-
tended warranty, low
miles. 1985 GMC
Suburban, runs
good, good work ve-
hicle, $2,300. 983-
7820.
'72 CHEVROLET
Pick up truck, runs,
SWB, needs paint,
$1,800. OBO. 516-
0113
91' CHEVY S-10,
4.3 Liter, V-6.


0-


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Find your



name and


I win $5.00


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129M HTY.


1c i0 MPGHe WY.A'


30 MPG HWY.


27 MP HWY


1 2c. MPG HWY.


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Specializing
in Hurricane


Damage Repairs
207-0302 626-8346


Florida Roomrn, Screen Rooms.. Pool
Encl ioure. Patio Co ers. Carport'.
\in\l Sidinn. Shuiner,. SkirLing.
A~inm ... Guiiers. Replacement
wiinrdJo. .-\luminum Columns.
Hairdralil, & Fencine
LICENSED AND INSURED


I!


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MASTER TECHNICIAN
MARK SALTER
Small engine repairs. Kohler,
Briggs, Tecumseh. Blowers,
chainsaws, lawn equipment,
generators, pressure washers,
edgers. Parts also sold here.


Boutwell Automotive
6593 Caroline St. in Milton
850-623-4750


Also Removes
Roots, Bushes, Hedgerows


* Backyard Accessible


* Local Contractor-Retired USN


Senior Discount
Licensed 232-8746 Insured


V 'I

~


"DAY BY DAY Quality Fencing
C,,nG':mi l'l,; e ,ri. .r ,,' .:.,r l ,: u,.l, lern.,in. ne i d


Locally licensed,


owned


and operated.


We look toward
to your call.


i e ie nc.n. ;.. re.pa ,
Call 850-529-3546


b daybydayfencing@gmail.conM

New Hope Painting
& Wallpapering
Inenror & Exterior Residential
Drywall
Pressure Cleaning
Wallpapering
S Carpentry Work
Call the Ericksens today!
728-2550 623-6084
^ IIr,- I,,:H-,i.l; ^ HO. ~l '-r~t-


DCIRECTV'
lp-.
C- I REC T W


UP TO 4 ROOMS
JUST $19.95
No Credit Card Required!


CALL Grea at 9"2-0633


or


1-800-844-2261


,,e Backhoe Work /,
U Stump & Tree Removal"
Hurricane Clean-up
Dirt Work
No Job Too Big or Small
Rrven Rallard


Mike Kaylor
Cement Mason


Patios Driveways Walks


Free Esumales Quality work


No lob loo small Ahordable prices


850-994-0897


Maybe, you can do it
yourself, but will you?


Licensed a insured
Locally owned & Operated
Reasonable Prices
All Phases of Drywalling Any Texlure
SPainting Remodeling Damage Repair
NO MONEY DOWN
REFERENCES AVAILABLE
Roger Tootle
HM: (850)995-5090
LCell: (850)501-0519.


iDave KoppiBnHo
3. -Impovmet, I..


Specializing in Insurance
Estimates, Small Home
Improvement Projects
and Maintenance


(850) 626-6944


Insured
Licensed
Licensed


\ -louse
! Painting
Call Andy @
(850) 304-9680


urni-.r*.Aflnavia.LS..f..i~i~


I e :T~iT!T~


In home
Companionship
Meals


Light housework
Errands


Sewrwise amoe..
Land Clearing, and all tractor,
dozer, and related services


Rto' Native :
uoH dy0ao


4190-'64014V


Need Stucco Work?


Local Home Repair


* Fence Repair Installation
* Paint Drywall *Trim *Tile


10 years experience
Contact Paul McMullen
850-723-9767


D&D
Remodeling


General Contractor
All Types Home Maintenance
..: ,,,i i .; M .: -r .ai .-n'
i,, TIl Hl ,rc.. E E.il ,n. r.;
,l.. '.' i I ri. |n r .: I ,,:,r CIr ia- nr ,,.
P|-'-- u[ U IW nii. l Pa,,a -,Lrr- i.T v, Wuri EIc


I,:,. 11


FREE
ESTIMATES

:.5 .'2i ... -


Cell# 261-1173


Cell# 261-3598


NO JOB TOO SMALL!


Call Billy Rogers for estimate
Phone: (850) 957-4952
Cell: (850) 261-8407

Miza


Home ImDrovements


LICENSED AND INSURED
Conventional and Synthetic Systems

698-8327


626-9164


C 'Coker's Lawn & "
From /Tr.in77'/ 1 o tra' .C.r w,' ,2'
Clean-ups Raking
Hauling Mowing '
Bushhogging Dirt Work
Reasonable Rates Free Estimates
(850) 529-0434
(850) 623-0493


Licensed & Iniiued


Above & Beyond
Tree Service


a:a>,..'-" l


Don't wait until it's


too late


Senior & Military Discounts


Stump
Grinding


Licensed Free
& Insured Kevin Frey Estimates
(850)983-7820


.1
Bobcat
Services


a -~w 3aa~a I~a v L JvWIH./5 ~PUR'


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Vickers Fencing
"MWaitg good neigiAicS ome fence at a tice.
.nprniali7inn in wnnd fences.


I


VrV I Vmm III mml v v v.%'
New installations and repairs.
Competitive pricing.
Free estimates.
4-7585 791-019 e


j 'w;S & L Fencing a


850-626-7390
^*,d ,,ui, ^,f.#.i, ',, i. .. V w i,
Offenng Economical Elegance
To Private Individuals
Laminate Ceramic Wood
instailalion Only


II1PERGO

Various Milllary Discount
Call Robert
850-255-8414
QQr;-77n_;


t

NL


... .. /..


DIRT CHPTRP
Cleaning Service
"HOLIDAY SPECIAL"
One deep clean
$10 discount with ad
Homes Condos Offices


A ~850-384-2388


i'


SMobile Homi
Major and Min
Reroof ~ Patic
Screen Rooms
Locally Owned ai
Free Estir


100% Financ
(850) 857


SORENc


REMODELING
"Horme Repairs
'Tile 'Wall Te
-Painling Interior :
"Wallpaper and
'Kilchens and Baths "C
12 years expe
Licensed and I
Deal D.recilv wil
Carl Jon A
637-7


7II~


A
1


K850-572-1390


850-572-1426)

U I-ffV .'av


YE7


ANN BARNHILL
TRUCKING, INC.
Asphalt
Limestone
Rock

8501 623-3461 60
Jesse Barnhill Trucking (850) 336-3081 :'


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CASEY'S NURSERY t]
FALL SALE

Selected Untagged Palms
3 gal 3gal Roses
trees Crepe Other
)ogwoods Myrtle $7 unlisted i
Shade Selected specials '
shrubs
Fruit :- ..
on sale '
$5 j"y -

Jon & Deb Casey
3851 Avalon Blvd.
Milton 32583



850,625.8109 : i


O^rige. Home^ Improvement
General Home Improvements '
Specializing in: t ".
Room Additions ,
Porches
Patios
No job to small, so give us a call! .
850-626-7874
850-686-0733
850-623-2805

e Brokers C |
or Repairs i l
o Covers -
- Leveling ~
nd Operated
nates
ing WAC
'-1051

SEN'S
SPECIALIST
"Remodeling
xturing IlAL
and Eyierior
d Removal
;aDinet Rlacing
rienci ESTIMATES
nsur.e
rn Owner

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