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 Section A: Main
 Section B: ‘Styles
 Section C: Whiting Tower
 Section D: Sports
 Section D: Classifieds


UF00028408 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Santa Rosa press gazette
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00058
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Creation Date: July 23, 2005
Publication Date: 1984-
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00058
 Related Items
Preceded by: Milton press gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        A 1
        A 2
        A 3
        A 4
        A 5
        A 6
        A 7
        A 8
    Section B: ‘Styles
        B 1
        B 2
        B 3
        B 4
        B 5
        B 6
        B 7
        B 8
        B 9
        B 10
    Section C: Whiting Tower
        C 1
        C 2
        C 3
        C 4
        C 5
        C 6
    Section D: Sports
        D 1
        D 2
    Section D: Classifieds
        D 3
        D 4
        D 5
        D 6
Full Text





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Santa Rosa's Press


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July 23, AY
July 23, 2005


I (lstx*Yornyhmtw nepIpefonerly acentury


INSIDE


Whiting escapes list again


Leaders in New Orleans this weekend to continue the battle


By JIM FLETCHER
PG Assistant Publisher
In the midst of all the
Hurricane Dennis talk, many
Santa Rosans may not have
given much thought to the
importance of Tuesday.


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer
As Santa Rosa heads into
budget season, leaders face an
extra state-mandated challenge
aligning revenues and expenses
this year-how to plan ahead
for growth and decide who's
going to pay for it. Some area
developers say, for viable long-
term solutions, Santa Rosa
shouldn't look to impact fees.
Impact fees charge devel-
opers for part of the cost of new


At the Pentagon in the
Nation's Capital, that was the
deadline for military bases to be
added or dropped from the
upcoming base-closure list. The
deadline was just one part of a
lengthy process that makes up


growth and many Santa Rosa
residents have, for years, been
crying for leaders to tap the
developer spigot.
Proponents say the fees
place part of the expenses of
new growth on those creating it.
Leaders expect $270 mil-
lion in roadway expenses alone
over the next 15 years.
Santa Rosa officials have
indicated they may soon imple-
ment the fees, at a rate of about
See FEES, Page 7A.


Commissioner: Property


tax hike unlikely this year


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer


Santa Rosa ad valorem
property tax rates are not
expected to increase next year.
That, according to Santa Rosa
County Commissioner Tom
Stewart who passed the good
news on to Pace residents at a
Tuesday night 'Pace Town Hall
gathering.
Despite Ivan and Dennis
damage, officials estimate high-
er revenue levels-resulting
from property value increas-
es-will manage to offset storm
losses.


That means that although
residential tax bills, themselves,
will likely rise due to increased
home value, the rate at which
they're computed should stay
the same.
Those revenues are expect-
ed to cover next year's opera-
tional expenses, including 35
new employees, say officials.
According to Stewart, 11 of
those jobs will support Public
Works debris and other cleanup
efforts.
Stewart organized the meet-
ing to discuss possible storm
shelter/gym, community center
See TAX, Page 5A.


DCF visits area to talk Dennis


Florida Department of Children and Families Secretary Lucy Hadi speaks with Thomas Klingler about the
blue roof on his house while his mother Linda and sisters, Ellenor (in stroller), and Kimberly are assisted
with filing for Disaster Food Stamp assistance in Milton recently. Hadi visited the area to check on vol-
unteer efforts with the program after Hurricane Dennis.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


the Base Realignment and
Closure Comnmittee's proce-
dure.
The good news? While
some bases were, in fact added
to the list and few were deleted,
Milton's NAS Whiting Field


was never mentioned.
"Tuesday came and went
without incident," says Santa
Rosa County Commissioner
Don Salter who also heads local
efforts at base retention.
"They still have the right to


When it comes to tracking
crime, this area woman spends
her time crunching numbers
and looking at statistics.
See STYLES, Page 1 B.


NEWS


BRIEFS

Debris collection
underway in Milton
By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer


The City of Milton has'
announced it has renewed con-
tract services with WPR, Inc.
and its partner, Byrd Brothers,
for debris removal from
Hurricane Dennis.
The contract began
Wednesday and runs for 60
days. It will include three pass-
es through the city.
Milton residents are asked
to separate their debris into
three types including vegeta-
tive, construction and demoli-
tion, and white goods.
City officials are urging res-
idents to avoid blocking streets
with debris or piling debris near
fire hydrants or water meters.
Anyone needing assistance
with debris placement on the
right-of-way can contact the
Retired & Senior Volunteer
Program (RSVP) at 983-5220.
For general information
concerning Hurricane Dennis
debris removal, call City Hall at
983-5440.
School begins anew
.here on August first
By DEBORAH NELSON
'Press Gazette Staff Writer
School starts August 1.
District officials say they're
"'concerned a number of parents
,have August 2 marked as the
first day of school
"The Santa Rosa County
School District is recovering,
from Hurricane Dennis and
'continuing to evaluate schools
,and support facilities," officials
note.
The following dates will
,apply for all Santa Rosa County
employees and students:
July 25: Teachers report for
Spre-planning
August 1: Students report
for school
o sReach writer at:
Nelson@sr-pg.com


The Press
Gazette is
printed on
100% recy-
cled paper
using envi-


ronmentally-friendly soy-based
ink.

PRINTED WITH
# ISOYINK


It didn't take area motorists long to see this tanker unloading at an area gas station. In minutes, lines began to form. Santa Rosa resi-
dents have become increasingly frustrated over the limited availability of gasoline, but state officials promise things will get better.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


State vows gasoline supplies will improve


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
"Flying down the beach
this morning was like
Mother Nature's version of,
'Shock and Awe'...it was
very sad."
Those were the words of
Secretary Colleen Castille of
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
Thursday after touring the
area.
Castille also took time to
ansWer. residents' concerns
over gasoline supplies and
promised things would
improve.,
Local leaders met .with


fCastille after her tour to get
answers to questions ranging
from beach renourishment to
gas availability.
Castille promised leaders,
including Santa Rosa County
Commission Chair Gordon
Goodin, she would help expe-
dite the process to renourish the
beaches as quickly as possible.
"I have spoken with
Colonel Taylor with the Corps
of Engineers and he will work
on helping us to expedite the
process," she stated.
This was good news to.
Goodin who said, "We are
ready to issue our notice of
intent to renourish the beaches


"Floridians use one million more
gallons of gas per day then just a year
ago.,"
Castille


and, having the support we
need in expediting the process,
we hope to be able to get start-
ed as early as August."
Castille also told the group
her staff had taken peat samples
from the dunes to conduct car-
bon dating tests. This, she said,
would help in determining how
old the dunes were.
"We will get the beaches


back, but I don't think the
dunes will ever be the same
again," she said.
Residents should also
see the removal of under a-
ter debris beginning very
soon.
The discussion then
turned to gas availability in
the area both before and
See GASOLINE, Pg. 5A


add or delete bases...right up
until August 21," says Salter,
"But basically, we now feel
pretty good there will be no
action on luringng Field."
Even though the Whiting's
See WHITING, Pg. 2A.


Could Six

Flags area

be for court?


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer
The cure for Santa Rosa's
Courthouse blues might just
include a touch of pink-pink,
that is, of a certain curly-tailed,
porcine variety wallowing just
up the street.
Milton's old Piggly Wiggly
site. sa\s Santa Rosa Coounrt
Commissioner Tom Stew art.
offers a practical solution to the
nagging question of where to
house increasingly cramped
county judiciary operations.
The current Courthouse.
already ailing, sumtaned further
water damage during Hurricane
Dennis.
Lack of space at the aging
facility, which recently marked'
70 years of service is an ongo-
ing issue.
To build or not to build,
how much to spend and where
to house new. judicial facilines
have sparked much debate on
the courthouse's future.
Meanwhile, the Piggly
Wiggly building sits unused,
after last year's Albertson's deal
fell through.
Out-of-business since
2002- Piggly Wiggly's trade-
mark hatted porker still tips
motorists a faded chuckle from
the former supermarket's
deserted walls.
Stewart says the property,
located at the corner of
Dogwood Drive and Highway
90 offers an ideal judicial loca-
tion, because ample parking is
already in place, the spot is
See COURT, Page 3A.


p*.


A


Home builders are


unhappy with fees


II
721D1 13 ES55


I


9









Page 2-A The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Saturday July 23, 2005


COP TA
Sheriff offers

By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Have you ever wondered
what it's really like to be a
police officer?
Well, the Santa Rosa
County Sheriff's Office is going
to give you the opportunity with
a new program calledI the
'Citizens Law Enforcement
Academy.' "
This program, officials say,
will help with the perceptions

Whiting
Continued From Page One.
light now seems green, Salter
and other local "base-watchers"
were unwilling to breathe a full
sigh of relief. Friday, they were
off to New Orleans, for a round
of talks relating to this year's
BRAC process.
"This doesn't mean we are
totally in the clear yet," says
Salter, "but it is a good indica-
tion."
The BRAC process will
continue to move forward right
up until November 7-the date
when the ligt goes to 'U.S.:
President George W. Bush. At


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Mcrner IFC

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LK:
'Law Enforcement Academy'


(often misperceptions) people
have about law enforcement
gained from television and the
movies.
As glamorous as these per-
ceptions are, they are not
always based in reality.
"Most people have little
contact with police officers and
therefore either fear or mistrust
them," says Santa Rosa Sheriff
Wendell Hall.
In recognizing this, Hall
says he wants to educate citi-


that time, Bush must decide
whether to accept or reject the
list. Historically, by the time the
list makes it to the President,
the country's leader is ready to
accept the list.
Figures, supplied from
TEAM Santa Rosa, shpw
Whiting is not only a vital part
of the local community, but also
a major contributor to the area's
economy.
Whiting's presence
accounts for a significant per-
centage of total employment,
personal income, and business
sales in Santa Rosa County.
In addition, there are thou-
sands of military retirees living
in the area, whose tax contribu-
tions and spending add to the
local revenue flow.
Although sales of items
such as fuel, food, banking,
utilities, maintenance and con-
strniction services constitute one
part of Whiting's economic
contribution to area, experts
note that military-related
salaries make up the bulk of the
base's economic impact.
"Salaries comprise, the
major part of base expendi-
tures," note economic 'analysts
at University of Florida's Haas
Center for Business Studies.
"These include salaries for.
staff officer; enlisted and civil-
ian personnel, and student offi-
cers."
The economic impact of
Whiting salaries on the area's
total economy is tremendous
(about $268 million last year
alone).


zens on the internal structure of
police forces and the part that
community policing plays.
So, starting August 11,
Shenff's officials will host the
new program to help people
better understand this element.
The Academy, says Hall,,
will give citizens the opportuni-
ty to learn more about local law
enforcement as well.
Participants will attend a
three-hour class-one night per
week from 6-9 p.m.
The class will run for 12
weeks and will be held at the
Correctional Institution Facility
in East Milton-just east of the
Sheriff's office.
The program will cover
topics ranging from how not to
be a victim of crime to hand-
cuffing, fingerprinting, report-
ing crime, and the ramifications
of committing a crime. ,
Officials say participants
will get."a first hand knowledge
of the organizational structure
of the sheriff's office; officer:
training, what actually consti-
tutes a crime, and the difference,
between reasonablee suspicion'
and 'probable cause.'"
Attendees will also witness
live demonstrations of the
S.W.A.T. team, Major Crimes,
Narcotics and K-9 as well as
learn how a crime scene is han-
dled and how incriminating evi-
dence is collected.
Hands-on experiences will
include the proper handling of
firearms and experiencing what
an inmate's life is like behind
bars.
The Academy is, open to
.any resident of Santa Rosa
County over the age of 17 and
is free of charge.
. Participation is on a first-
come/first-served basis and
everyone who completes the,
course will receive an academy
t-shirt and certificate of com-
pletion.
For more information or to
enroll in the class, contact the
Sheriff's Office at 983-1236.
Story written by Jeff
Everts. Reach him at:
jeverts@srpressgazette.com


County Government

COUNTY COMMISSION
* District 1: Tom Ste\ art, Pace, FL 32571; Phone: 932-1340.
* District 2: Bob Cole, 8651 Riverstone Rd., Milton 32583; phone 983-1877.
District 3: Don Salter, 6000 Chumuckla Hwy., Pace, FL. 32571; phone 994-6426.
District 4: Gordon Goodin; 6467 Avenida De Galves, Navarre, 32566; phone 939-4949.
* District 5: John Broxson, 6495 Caroline St. Suite M, Milton 32570, phone 932-1340.
The Santa Rosa County Commission meets at 9:00 a.m. on both the second and fourth
Thursday of each month. The leaders meet in committee at 9:00 a.m. on Monday's proceeding
the Thursday meetings. Meetings are held in commission chambers of the Administrative
Complex on Highway 90. Phone 983-1877 for information or to reach commissioners in their
offices.

State Government


* Representative Greg Evers: 5233 Willing Street, Milton 32570 983-5550 Email
evers.greg @leg.state.fl.us
* Senator Durell Peaden Jr., 598 N. Ferdon Blvd, Suite 100, Crestview, 32536, 850-689-0556 -
sun com-675-7930
* Governor Jeb Bush: PL05 The Capitol, 400 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399 (850) 488-
4441. Email: fl.governor@myflorida.com

Federal Government


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
* Rep. Jeff Miller: 324 Cannon House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515; phone (
local) 479-1183; (DC) (202) 225-4136; -E-mail: www.house.gov/jeffmiller ,
SENATE.
* Senator Mel Martinez: P.O. Box 536176 Orlando,FL 32853-6176 phone' (407) 897-3130 fax
(407) 897-8595
* Senator Bill Nelson: Room 571, Hart Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C., 20510; phone
(202) 224-5274, (fax) (202) 224-8022.
WHITE HOUSE
* President George Bush: The White House, 1600 Penns.lvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500;
phone (202) 456-1414. Email at:president@whitehouse.gov.
* Vice President Dick Cheney: Office of the Vice President, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania
Ave., Washington, D.C., 20500; phone (202) 456-1414.

County Government

SCHOOL BOARD
* District 1: Kenneth Smith, 5700 Camelia St., Milton 32570, 623-4395.
* District 2: Hugh Winkles, 5684 Nicklaus Lane, Milton 32570, 623-6299
* District 3: Diane Coleman, 9400 Octavia Lane, Navarre 32566, 939-2661.
* District 4: JoAnn J. Simpson, 5059 Faircloth Street, Pace 32571, 994-5446
* District 5: Edward Gray III- 10 Gilmore Dr Gulf Breeze, FL 32561 850-932-6287
The Santa Rosa County School Board meets at 6:30 p.m. on the 2nd and 4th Thursday at 5086
Canal St., Milton. Phone: 983-5000.


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The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


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Saturday Jly 23205


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette
I nral


It's almost schooltime again. What bus will your child ride?
When will it get to your house? Find out in the School Bus
Schedule...coming in Wednesday's Press Gazette.


The Milton Garden Club June award for community pride in a business went to the new Gulf Coast
Community Bank on Highway 90 in Pea Ridge. The bank opened in its new building last April. Since then,
-,GardIn Club spokesmen say, "very .!rt,. live l I..aiilkpini; has been completed. The huge oak trees on
the property were preserved and trimmed after some damage from Ivan, and other attractive shrubs and
plants added." Accepting for the bank were: Dick Cloutler, Executive Vice President; Jerry Burden,
Senior Vice P'resi.l.-ni, Pat Adams and Ronnie Clark, Customer 'vi.-o Ktepresentatives. The public can
nominate a business or neighbor for an award, just send the nomination to Milton Garden Club
Community Pride Award, C/O L Scott, 6136 Katrina Dr., Milton, FL 32570.
S(Subminiied photo)


Court


C" llllllU t I "llll / 'Jl.'( t )lU'
served by major roadways and
is centrally sited,
"That would move the
courthouse to where it co Id
serve the population from one
general location," he specu-
lates,
Stewart proposes funding
new construction and tp,-'
needs with a hike in the sales
tax.
If voters .ppl'" a new
one-cent general sales tax, the
plin would use 1 of that cent,
for 4 or 5 years, to pay for dec
courthouse.
-i\HL the move is paid off,
Stewart says the 1/2 cent would
revert back to other public uses,
such as roadways.
A similar plan paid for
Santa Rosa County's jail.
XVoters rejected, in 2002, a
four-year courthouse sales
tax--but that I1 .r., square


foot facility was projected to
cost $4 2 million.
s tmxi estimates the
Piggly \\,g iv option would


cost less than half of that
amount: about $20 million.
Reach writer at:
Nelson @sr-pg. corn


County offers waiver

for piers, seawall permits


Residents seeking to recon-
struct docks, pier, and seawalls
d:,nL.qId by Hurricane Dennis
can receive a zoning waiver
from the Planning and Zoning
1 lice to replace a pre-existing
structure.
A zoning waiver is for the
"use" only and does not waive
construction review and permit-
ting requirements.
The zoning waiver will
enable residents to apply for a
building permit from the
Building Department. The pur-


pose of a building permit is to
ensure that -onii auction plans
and construction methods are
consistent with codes intended
to provide for a safe and sound
structure.
For more information, call
the Santa Rosa County
Planning and Zoning Office at
981-7075 or the Building
Department at 981-7000.
Story written from
staff reports.
Reach us at:
I t'n" ~ ', -1 .I' i/tl


'55* .5 hol:.r run/ fil. 7 yil ,'""' .'iaim'; feij "a'2l I nlflo,


AiOSFOIIi _PACE/MILTON HWY 90 Le

995Q 99 wireless
auhrzd gn


C. David Smith, M.D., Marian B. Stewart, M.D.,
Jeffery S. Kelley, M.D., and
J.S. Michael Smith, M.D.
are proud to announce



Gregory D. Heaton, O.D.

Jay Vision Center

14088 Alabama Street

Jay, FL 32565



Will join us in our new Jay Medical Complex.
The office will open July 11, 2005.
To schedule appointments please call us at

850-675-0625


A


Page 3-A


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1 THE SANTA ROSA PRES GAZETTE


P


EDITORIAL & OPINIONS


Watching Rucker
Never let it be said that our neighbors to the
north in Alabama aren't persistent. They work on a
relentless endeavor to snatch, or in the minds of
some of us-steal, our helicopter training program
at NAS Whiting Field.
Realizing the intensity of their efforts, we must
also recognize the equally intense determination of
Santa Rosa County Commissioner Don Salter and
other local Whiting advocates who have stood vig-
ilant against these takeover attempts.
For many years now, Alabama lawmakers and
officials have been determined to move the U.S.
Navy's pilot training to the U.S. Army's Fort
Rucker training program.
And while Whiting once again escaped the
Department of Defense's latest round of base clos-
ings, it didn't stop Alabama officials from making
yet-another run at convincing BRAC (Base
Realignment and Closure) commission members
in Atlanta that Whiting's helicopter training should
be combined with Rucker's rotary wing program.
Salter and other local leaders familiar with
similar past endeavors, were also there for the sole
purpose of information gathering. And, we're told,
they'll take what they say is "misinformation filled
with inaccuracies," and refute what was said dur-
ing the regional hearing in New Orleans on this
weekend.
The delegation from Alabama seems to be try-
ing to convince the DOD to create what they call a
Joint Service Rotary Center for Excellence to be
based at Rucker.
Salter says the delegation's presentation was
filled with distorted cost savings and, he feels,
what was presented can not be accurately certified.
This once again shows what can only be a
strong case of absolute desperation on the part of
the Alabama delegation and also clearly demon-
strates just how important it is that we never let our
guard down.
We specifically mention Salter for the mere
fact he has led the charge in defending Whiting's
training mission for many years and has diligently
and factually worked at making sure the training
mission for both rotary and fixed-wing aircraft is
not jeopardized nor compromised.
Long before becoming a county commission-
er, Salter and other community leaders worked
behind the scenes on such critical issues as
encroachment and development that could hinder
Whiting's training mission.
As a county commissioner, Salterhas spear-
headed efforts to create buffer zones around NAS
Whiting Field as well as its outlying fields
throughout Santa Rosa County. In recent months,
county commissioners supported Salter's efforts to
secure state and federal grant money to be used to
purchase private property around the base.
And Salter is determined to fulfill a dream for
the establishment of an aviation park that he
believes will benefit the county's economic devel-
opment plan.
The bottom line is that the time to show sup-
port for our military installation isn't when BRAC
conducts closure hearings, but everyday as what's
being done in Santa Rosa County.
We commend local leaders such as Salter and
others who have clearly demonstrated a total dedi-
cation to the preservation of NAS Whiting Field
and its very important mission.
We wish them well as they travel to New
Orleans this weekend for their latest round with
the BRAC process.


JULY 23, 2005


G (Santa to a',B Prss
VOL. 98, NO. 33
Serving Milton, Pace, Jay
Holley-Navarre, Gulf Breeze
& surrounding communities
Santa Rosa's Press Gazette (USPS 604-
360) is published twice weekly on Wednesdays
and Saturdays for $28 per year (in county) by
Milton Newspapers, Inc., Michael Coulter,
Publisher. Periodicals postage paid at Milton,
Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to: Santa Rosa's Press Gazette, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, Florida 32570.
Michael Coulter .President & Publisher
Jim Fletcher ....... .Assistant Publisher
Carol Barnes ....... Business Manager
Carlton Henderson .General Manager
Deborah Nelson ... .Staff Writer
Jeff Everts .........Staff Writer
Obie Crain, Jr...... .Special Projects Writer
Bill Gamblin ...... .Sports Editor
Jim Martin ......... Advertising Manager
Debbie Coon .......Advertising Exec.
Toni Coberly .......Bookkeeper
Rosie Farhart .......Archives
Tracie Smelstoys ... .Circulation
................. & Classifieds
Tracey Murphree ... .Classifieds,
... .......... .Graphic Design
Sheena Sorensen ... .Classifieds
Freddy Coon .......Pressroom Foreman
Gaspar De La Paz .. .Darkroom Technician
Angela Perritt ...... Production Manager
Debra Wistner ...... Graphic Designer
Cheryl Baker ...... .Typesetting
Joseph Bowman ... .Post Press Leader
Esther Sears, Bob Farmer,
Latesha De La Paz, Lissa O'Neal
and Brian Rinehart .Post-Press
Advertising rates available on request.
Telephone all departments:
(850) 623-2120 623-3616
FAX 623-9308
email: news@sr-pg.com
6629 Elva St., Milton, Florida 32570
Don't Forget to Recycle Your Paper


A look at slavery reparations


By WALTER WILLIAMS
Special to the Santa Rosa Press Gazette


The slavery reparations shakedown lobby is gear-
ing up for attacks on American industry. They've
failed in the courts and Congress, so they're going
after weak-kneed CEOs. At. the
NAACP's recent annual conven-
tion, Dennis C. Hayes, its interim
president, said, "Absolutely, we
will be pursuing reparations from
companies that have historical
ties to slavery, and engaging all
parties to come 'to the table."
According to Mr. Hayes, "Many
of the problems we have now
including poverty, disparities in
health care and incarceration can
be directly tied to slavery."
Part of the reparations WALTER
lobby's agenda is to pressure WILLIAMS
cities to enact laws requiring
companies that wish to do business with the city to
complete studies to see whether they had ties to slav-
ery. They've been successful in getting such legisla-
tion enacted in Philadelphia and Chicago. CEOs at
J.P. Morgan Chase Bank and Wachovia Corp. have
apologized for their predecessors' ties to slavery and
agreed to be shaken down for several million dollars
to fund scholarships and black history programs.
Mr. Hayes' reparations vision strains credulity
and is counter-productive to boot. Most black
Americans are neither poor nor in prison. So if pover-
ty and incarceration are directly tied to slavery, Mr.
Hayes might explain how so many blacks somehow
escaped this "legacy of slavery." For those blacks in
poverty or incarcerated, what's Mr. Hayes' message to
them? Is it to wait for CEOs to fork over some repa-
rations change and apologize for slavery? If that's the
message, then those blacks who are poor are going to
remain so, and those who are lawless will continue to
experience high incarceration rates.
I think a better message for avoiding long-term
poverty and high incarceration rates is: Graduate from
high school. Get married before you have children


Message from debris collectors
FM: PAM & ROBERT KELLY
Hello Milton:
We are Kelly Emergency Services and we are
back in your city to help you clean up the new storm
damage from Dennis.
First Ivan, now Dennis...we MUST stop meeting
like this!
Our goal is to have your streets passable, remove
debris from your yards and byways and do this with
the least amount of inconvenience to you as possible!,
We ask for your patience.
We hope to quickly bring a sense of balance and
serenity to your community.
Our wish for you is calm after the storm and a
lightness to guide your way.
Again, please be patient with our crews. Let us
know how we are doing and how better we can serve
you.

Studies show alcohol is bad idea
FM: BILL BLEDSOE
Dear Editor:
A writer has called me a hypocrite, demagogue,
and, of all things, a friend of James Carville.
PLEASE...don't call me a friend of Carville! (PG, 7-
6-05).
Warren Mills is typical of one who has no argu-
ment other than name calling, and gives nothing but
symbolism over substance to any debate, rather than
facts.
Research (I am providing the Editor with the doc-
uments) shows that the over-concentration of alcohol
outlets in a neighborhood is part of a process of local
economic decline, NOT a reflection of people's
demand for alcohol. (Groutt, 1993; Moshen, 1997;
Lee, 1998. Alcohol/AARIV).
Estimated costs of alcohol abuse and alcoholism
in 1998: $184.6 BILLION, (Harwood,. The
Economic Costs of Alcohol and Drug Abuse in U. S.,
Bethesda MD, DHHS, et al, Dec. 2000).
Alcohol-related traffic crashes in 1996 resulted in
more than $45 BILLION lost in economic productiv-
ity, and hospital/rehabilitation costs. (National
Highway Traffic Safety Admin., 1996).
The statistics are from a national study, not zeroed
in on Santa Rosa, but we'ARE a part of the big pic-
ture., Alcohol (that inanimate object' as Mills likes to


and stay married. Work at any kind of job, even one
that starts out paying the minimum wage. Finally, do
not engage in criminal behavior.
The recent phase of the reparations movement
contains an interesting twist. Rev. Wayne Perryman, a
conservative minister of Mount Calvary Christian
Center Church of God in Christ in Seattle, Wash., has
filed a lawsuit against the Democratic Party. His law-
suit, filed in United States District Court, in Seattle,
charges "that because of their racist past practices the
Democratic Party should be required to pay African
Americans Reparations." Rev. Perryman's brief, cit-
ing abundant historical evidence, charges that the past
racist policies and practices that were initiated against
blacks by the Democratic Party-were no different
than the policies and practices that were initiated by
the Nazi Party against the Jews.
Brian DeBose's Washington Times July 12th arti-
cle "NAACP to Target Private Business," describing
events at the NAACP convention, didn't report on
whether the NAACP, and black politicians present,
intend to support. Rev. Perryman's legal -actions
against the Democratic Party. What are we to make of
corporate CEOs, and their boards of directors, who'
cave in to the reparations shakedown? What are their
motivations? One possibility is that they might fear.
that a principled stand, telling the reparations hustlers
to take a hike, might cost them in terms of bad pub-
licity and sales. The CEOs might guess their stock-
holders prefer dividends to principle. Another expla-
nation, which makes less sense, is that the CEOs actu-
ally feel guilty about their predecessors' ties to slav-
ery more than a century ago. For their guilt, I have a
"Certificate of Amnesty and Pardon" at my website
that might help them:
www.gmu.edu/departments/economics/wew/gift.htmn
1.
There's a reparations agenda question that I
would have liked to ask the mayors of Philadelphia
and Chicago, who have laws that require companies,
seeking to do business with the city, to do studies
determining whether they had ties to slavery. Suppose
it's the city's monopoly electric company that refuses
to comply. Will the mayors tell them to keep their
electricity and work in the dark?


call it) does not pick you, you pick it, and eventually
become part of a "study."
"There is some evidence that the greater number
of alcohol outlets per resident in a community or
neighborhood, the greater the rate of drunk driving."
(Scribner, MacKinnon, Dwyer, Journal of Studies on
Alcohol, 447-453, 1994). Do I hear an "Amen" from
G.O.L.E.?
','Research has clearly established an association
between greater outlet density to alcohol-related out-
comes, such as: assaults, homicides, motor vehicle'
crashes, youth violence, cirrhosis deaths, and alco-
holism. Increased alcohol-outlet density by their very
nature, is associated with violence because they
define a physical and social environment in which
social norms and external' controls are weakened."
(Alaniz, Cartmill, Parker; Hispanic Journal of
Behavioral Sciences, 155-174, May, 1998). See
also: Parker, Rebhim, .1995, Albany State Univ.
Press.).
BEER makes up 81% of the alcohol drunk in a
hazardous way (defined' as FIVE or more drinks in
one day) in'the U. S. (Rogers, Greenfield, U. S.
Journal of Studies on Alcohol).
People who are unmarried, male, under age 30,
are the highest risk for "hazardous" drinking accord-
ing to the same study.
Studies are also, available to prove that the high
cost of alcohol-related incidents far exceed the total
taxes collected.
Since our County Commissioners have decided,
in their infinite wisdom, that the greater participation
in the voting process is their main concern, let's see
how soon they will deny that come November, 2006.
A mail ballot then just might put some of them out to
pasture. They will cry about the "cost" in 2006.
Why not now?




Copyrighted Material
W Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers

L. .N.


JULY 23, 2005


Your




Opinions


You Spoke Out,

Santa Rosa...

Wednesday, 7:52 p.m.
Wouldn't it be great if this
county could be divided into,
north and south Santa Rosa? Then'
the south could have all the
whiskey it wants and pay for their
beach renourishment and Navarre'
could be the big area that it wants.

Wednesday, 7:44 p.m.
Thanks for printing the infor-
mation about the contributors to'
CALL and GOLE. I would like to'
say those businesses that gave to.
GOLE, I will no longer patronize.'
I notice a lot of out-of-area people'
were donating to the GOLE"
cause.

Wednesday, 5:34 p.m.
This is Addie. To the man
who called in about the cable rate
hikes, let's not forget about' the'
poor service. I'm all for a new
cable system. Thanks for the
space.

Wednesday, 5:24 p.m.
Hi. I'm calling in response to
the person who called in last
week about recycling. I agree,
with her 100%. We do need more
places to recycle. Please, people.
let's get together and do this for
our kids.

Wednesday, 3:25 p.m.
I found the list of contributors'
to CALL very informative, I
notice not much money is being
given. I suspect this is an indica-
tion of how the vote will go.-
Times appear to have changed in
Santa Rosa and I believe this will
be the election when Santa Rosa
finally goes wet. I will also watch
future lists with interest to see if
CALL receives any donations
from Pensacola liquor stores. If it
does...well, won't that be a very
telling thing? ..

Tuesday, 1:49 p.m.
I am so proud of my local
paper. You guys did an outstand-
ing job during Hurricane Dennis:
You stayed right on top of the
event-much more than would bN
expected from most community
papers. Thanks again. Your
reporters are truly dedicated and
fearless.


You may Speak Out any time,
day or night. Just call our Speak
Out line at 623-5887 and leave


your message.



We want you to share your
views on the above topic(s)-or
ANY topic-with other Press
Gazette readers. Your views are
important, too.
Send your letters to: LET-
TERS TO THE EDITOR, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, FL 32570.
(FAX (850) 623-9308.)
Letters may be edited for con-
tent or to fit the available space.
For a letter to be published, you
MUST sign your name and please
include your phone number and
address so we may phone for ver-
ification, if necessary.


A A A


y

1'


AGE 4L A --.--- X--- ,


I ''


YOUR WRITTEN OPINIONS


TVA'1L


4









Local


Gas gouging allegations refuted


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer


Colleen Castille, Secretary of the Florida DEP, speaks with Santa Rosa County Commission Chairman
Gordon Goodin regarding beach renourishment and the gas shortage after Hurricane Dennis.
Press Gazette photo by Jeff Everts


Gasoline


Continued From Page One.
after hurricanes.
Castille pointed out usage
was definitely an issue when it
comes to gas availability.
"Floridians use one million
more gallons of gas per day
then just a year ago," she said.
S Castille said Florida
Governor Jeb Bush is pressing
fuel suppliers tO come up with
both short and long-term solu-
tions to resolve the shortages.
"What's hurting us right
now is the refineries in
Pascagoula and Mobile did not
get back on line as soon as we
had hoped," according to
Castille..
"We are having to bring gas
in by truck from a terminal in
Bainbridge, Georgia which is
very time consuming," she con-
tinued.
Castille did say the situa-
tion should get much better in
the net few days as sports, and
refineries are reopening and
barges are able to bring in need-


ed supplies.
The Secretary stated fuel
companies need to take into


account consumer usage of gas
before hurricanes when plan-
ning their delivery patterns.


Tax


Continued From Page One.
and public swimming pool
projects, proposed for construc-
tion behind Pace High.
Plans are already moving
forward for a new library to be
built on the location.
"Some time in early Spring
of next year, we're going to
have us a library," Stewart
announced to applause.
Voters, by a narrow margin,
previously rejected new taxes to
pay for a 15,000 square foot
facility behind Benniy Russell
Park.
Stewart subsequently pro-
posed to save an already-
received $500,000 grant and
match it with recreation funds.
The move, he says, would allow
the County to build a smaller,
6,000 square foot facility


behind the high school. He pro-
poses the library as a comer-
stone for a larger community
complex on the 25-acre site.
The Commissioner says
area neighborhoods lack ade-
quate storm shelter facilities
that include shower and kitchen
amenities. Updated evacuation
routes are expected to cost $200
million, and take 20 years to
complete-making local pro-
tection a priority.
If voters approve the shelter
and other complex projects,
officials expect State and
Federal money to cover 1/3 to
1/2 of the estimated $5.5 mil-
lion cost. A remaining $2 to $3
million would, most likely,
,come in the form of a special
SMSTU tax on Pace area resi-
dents.


In the wake of reports that
some area gas stations are
under state investigation for
price gouging, several
owner/operators say they want
to set the record straight.
"We want the people in
Santa Rosa County to under-
stand. We don't want people to
think we're taking advantage of
them in a situation," says The
Other Place representative
Holly Stephens. "We're not."
"We're from here," adds
Local 'Yokel owner Claude
Duvall. "There's nothing in it
for us to try to gouge our cus-
tomers."
It's not just homeowners
and drivers who feel the brunt
of disasters, station owners
point out, Crisis situations
impact business processes and
wholesale pricing schedules, as
well.
Gas supply line interrup-
tions mean higher prices for
retailers, too. Stephens says The
Other Place did not raise
markup rates during the Dennis
recovery period.
"We have all the documen-
tatiqn," she says. "In the space
of six hours, (wholesale) prices
went up 4 cents (per gallon)-
how do you account for that?"


"My costs went from $1.28
to $1.43 in one day," says
Duvall. "I don't know why they
did that...the people making
the gas are the ones making the
money on this."


After Ivan, tankers were
unable to dock at Pensacola
ports, increasing transportation
costs. Post-Dennis, ports were
undamaged, but safety checks
See REFUTE, Pg. 7A.


S Qualiy Water Quality Service

tin#Baker
W.gtgr Systemm, Inc.
*, 6837 Hwy. 89 NI, Milton, FL 32570-9531
The Annual Membership Meeting of
POINT BAKER WATER SYSTEM, INC.
will be held on Tuesday, August 16, 2005
at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be at the
office located at 6837 Hwy. 89.,
Any member in good standing and bondable
interested in qualifying for one of the
three positions on the Board of Directors
must apply in person with the
General Manager at 6837 Hwy. 89.
All applications will be accepted at least
30 days prior to the Annual Meeting and
closed 15 days (Aug. 1) before the meeting.
Voting will be held Aug. 16, 2005 from
8 a.m. until 7 p.m. for members only.
For information, please call (850) 623-4545.


"Respite Care Services"


Are you a primary caregiver who
needs a little time away?
Heritage of Santa Rosa can care
for your loved one while you
take a vacation. Call for details


The Heritage of
Santa Rosa
Committed to Caring


5530 Northrop Road Milton, Florida 32570
(850) 983-8888





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i


I


Page 5-A


Saturday July 23, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


f-R-M








Page 6-A The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Saturday July 23, 2005


BUDGET SUMMARY

THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF SANTA ROSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT ARE .4% MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Year 2005 2006
PROPOSED VILLAGE LEVY:
Local Effort 5.428 Additional 0
Discretionary 0.510 Capital Outlay 1.400
Supplemental Discretionary 0.250 Debt Service 0.000 TOTAL MILLAGE 7.588




GENERAL SPECIAL DEBT CAPITAL TRUST AND ENTERPRISE TOTAL-ALL
ESTIMATED REVENUES FUND REVENUE SERVICE PROJECTS AGENCY FUNDS FUNDS
Federal Sources $500,000.00 $14,945,556.07 $- $- $- $- $15,445,556.07
State Sources $107,979,440.65 $123,623.00 $1,058,340.62 $3,188,055.00 $- $- $112,349,459.27 ,
Local Sources $40,674,756.00 $4,714,091.00 $15,500.00 $15,502,153.00 $790,000.00 $458,883.63 $62,155,383.63
TOTAL SOURCES $149,154,196.65 $19,783,270.07 $1,073,840.62 $18,690,208.00 $790,000.00 $458,883.63 $189,950,398.97
Transfers In $1,535,540.00 $500,068.72 $1,761,376.50 $- $- $- $3,796,985.22
Nonrevenue Sources $- $- $- $- $- $- $-
Fund Balances/Net Assets July 1, 2005 $20,212,805.29 $1,390,744.84 $999,347.11 $16,508,648.97 $264,807.72 $75,843.43 $39,452,197.36' .
TOTAL REVENUES, TRANSFERS & BALANCES $170.902,541.94 $21,674,083.63 $3,834.564.23 $35,198,856.97 $1.054.807.72 $534,727.06 $233,199.581.55

EXPENDITURES

Instruction $94,864,832.90 $3,060,852.86 $- $- S- $- $97,925,685.76
Pupil Personnel Services $5,386,514.82 $575,215.71 $- $- S- $- $5,961,730.53
Instructional Media Services $3,202,091.36 $- S- S- S- $- $3,202,091.36
Instruction & Curriculum Development $2,220,527.91 $S1,709,648.29 S- S- S- $- $3,930,176.20
Instructional Staff Training $1,334,064.79 S436,081.26 S- S- S- $- $1,770,146.05.
Board of Education $389,392.84- S S- S- $- $389,392.84
General Administration $463,982.04 S38,356,89 S- S- $- $502,338.93
School Administration $10,186,949.59 S113,877.80 S- S- S- $- $10,300,827.39
Facilities Aquisition & Construction $21,753.47 $ 43,221.65 S- .S14,106,853.00 S- $- $14,171.828.12
Fiscal Services $,11119,472.34- $- $- $1,119,472.34
Food Service $- 8,960,849.27 $- S- S- $- $8,960,849.27
Central Services $4,233,821.29 S7,949.44 $- S- 8649,533.41 $483,103.65 $4,891,304.14
Transportation Services $12,580,661.25 S296,889.23 $- S- $- $- $12,877,550.48
Operation of Plant $12,937,636.64 S55,510.86 $- S- $- $- $12,993,147.50
Maintenance of Plant $4,944,539.22 85,006,000.00 $- $13,053,748.02 $- $- $23,004,287.24
Community Services $1,059,976.47 S810,516.80 $- S- $- $- $1,070,493.27
Debt.Service $- S- $2,819,717.12 $- $- $- $2,819,717.12
School Internal Funds $- S- $- r $- $40,000.00 $- $40,000.00
TOTAL EXPENDITURES $154,946,216.93 $20,314,970.06 $2,819,717.12 $27,160,601.02 $689,533.41 $483,103.65 $206,414,142.19
Transfers Out $500,068.72 $- $- $3,296,916.50 $- $- $3,796,985.22
Fund Balances/Net Assets June 30, 2006 $15,456,256.29 $1,359,113.57 $1,014,847.11 $4,741,339.45 $365,274.31 $51,623;41 $22,988,454.14

TOTAL EXPENDITURES,
TRANSFERS & BALANCES $170.902,541.94 $21.674.083.63 $3.834.564.23 $35,198.856.97 $1.054.807.72 $534.727.06 $233.199.581.55


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/IFOJVJ AL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE
OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.







School Board of Santa Rosa County

Historical Summary of Financial and Demographic Data

(Ten Year Summary 1994-95, 1999-2000, 2004-05)


Total Governmental Revenues Total Current Operating Revenue

*$200,000,000 $184,276,907 $190,000,000 $159689,233
$180,000,000 $48065,293 -- $160,000,000 $123,314,761
$160,000,000 $140,000,000
$140,000,000 $1200,000,000 8
$120,000,000 $97,563,136 $100,000,000 -87,55,87 -
$100,000,000 $80,000,000
$80,000,000 $60,000,000
$60,000,000 $40,000,000
$40,000,000
$20,000,000 $20,000,do00o
1994-95 1999-2000 2004-05 1994-95 1999-2000 2004-05

Total Debt Service Revenues Unweighted FTE Students
$5,685,650 *
$6,000,000 .. 30,000.00
$6,000,000
30,000.00
$5,000,000 24,423.45

25,000.00 2,642.18
$4,000,00019,371.65
$3,000,000
$2,000,000 15,000.00
$1,013,396 $1,011,960 10,000.00
$1,000,000 -l l y ,

$ 1994-95 1999-2000 2004-05
1994-95 1999-2000 2004-05


Total Number of Instructional Employees Total Number of
S2,000 o ,000
1,800 1,594 2,500
1,600 1,364
1,400 2,000 1,922
1,2009-
1,000 1,500
800-
600 -1,000
400 500
200
1994-95 1999-2000 2004-05 1994-95


Total Capital Projects Revenues.
:$25,000,000 $23,737,136 $23,575,714

:$20,000,000

$15,000,000

$10,000,000 437,714

$5,000,000

1994-95 1999-2000 2004-05
1994-95 1 999-2000 2004-05


Employees-All Categories

2,406








1999-2000 2004-05


A A


_


1








Saturday JIuly 23, 2005


Local


:Fees
Continued From Page One.
$1,800 per new home.
Other parts of Florida
impose even heftier develop-
inent fees.
They're highest in Central
Florida-approaching $15,000
per new home in Collier
County, according to an
October 2004 Herald-Tribune
report. But fee opponents note
that rate jumps to $30,000 when
related development fees are
.added.
And many developers feel
impact fees are ineffective and
.-cost the community in the long
run.
It's the worst form of taxes
I have ever seen," says Florida
Home Builders President Dan
Gilmore.. "...They completely
divide a community."
New growth pays for itself
better than older homes,

Refute
Continued From Page Five.
caused delays and supplies
diverted through Alabama any-
way, as roadway routes snarled.
Once gas gets through, it
.costs stations more to manage
long, irate lines, officials say.
Owners must make sure
extra people are on hand to
direct traffic and check receipts,
as well as maintain pumps and
monitor lines for cutting, fights
and other problems.
In one memorable post-
Dennis instance, station person-
nel were forced to intervene
when a man who cut-in line at
the Avalon Blvd. Penny Pantry
faced a very angry mob.
"We'd love to be able to
trust people and not have to be
out there," Stephens says, "but
we can't."
In addition to regulating
lines, station personnel must
ensure fair gas distribution.
Stephens says unless some-
body's there to keep an eye on
things, people will fill every
container on hand; potentially
buying as much as 50 gallons at
a time.
"Those at the end of the line
would end up without," she
points out.


Gilmore contends, because
property taxes are higher.
"Every new house pays
more than its fair share," he
notes.
Gilmore points to Collier
County, where housing costs
are pricing many workers out of
the neighborhood. He predicts a
similar exodus of teachers,
police officers and low-paid
workers to Escambia and
Okaloosa, if Santa Rosa follows
central Florida impact fee
trends.
"When it comes right down
to it, people are going to live
where they can afford," he
points out. "It's not about dol-
lars, it's about-is it a social
change that we wish to accept.
for Northwest Florida?"
To what extent impact fees
have increased costs-of-living
in Collier, or may accelerate ris-


Insurance would cover their.
losses, owners say, if they.
closed up shop after disasters to
wait out:recovery.
"We chose to open the
doors to serve the community,"
says Stephens. "We closed at
noon on the day of the hurri-
cane, and we opened back up at
6 the next morning."
Duvall says he's been
cussed at and threatened over
post-Dennis prices, but notes
residents have also expressed
appreciation that the store
remained open.
"I don't even know if it was
really worthwhile to keep the
store open," he comments.
"We're honestly just trying to'
help-we also have homes and
families we're trying to keep
going during these times. It's a
difficult situation for the public
and for us as well."
Further compounding price
disparity perceptions, stations
that have run out of gas often
leave the old prices hanging on
signs.
"That always makes us look
bad," says Duvall.
People out hunting gas may
see those lower prices, and
think they're getting a bad deal


ing housing costs, here, is
unclear. But nobody argues the
fees are ultimately passed on to
homebuyers.
The fees make building
entry- level workforce housing
harder for developers, says
Gilmore. In Central Florida, he
notes, governments have begun
subsidizing builders to con-
struct "workforce" housing.
"They now have the biggest
subsidies coming from General
Revenue to subsidize affordable
housing," he says. "It's a blind
tax-it hits you later on."
Sooner or later, say oppo-
nents of impact fees, the public
always pays.
"It's like a shell game,
Gilmore contends. "It doesn't
work."
Gilmore says he fears once
in place, impact fees will
increase, just as they have in


when they do find gas.
"People see that and they
feel like we're taking advantage
of them," Stephens says.
Post-Dennis, local stations
seemed to recover and have gas
supplies available before sever-
al chains. As of press time,
some chain stations were still
without gas.
, Local gas station owners
say it's not clear why gas sup-
plies are still slow, or why some
larger retailers do not have gas
available.
The Other Place owner
Warren Stephens says a "good
supplier," is keeping the station
pumping. Bigger chains, he
contends, are not meeting pub-
lic obligations.
Duvall says shipping logis-
tics may be playing a role in
shortages, but there's no way to
tell for sure.
After receiving post-Dennis
consumer complaints, State
regulators subpoenaed about 45
gas stations. Officials say
they're still going over records,
and no charges have thus. fat
been filed.
Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
Nelson@ sr-pg.c6m


central Florida.
"It's like letting the camel
get his nose under the tent-it's
like easy money," he observes,
and characterizes the' assess-
ments as government price fix-
ing.
"When the government
starts messing with (the econo-
my), I've never seen it where
that works out to be success-
ful," he maintains.
"This is not a developer try-
ing not to be taxed," Gilmore
contends. He says he'd like to
see fee study'results floated in a
public forum.
"Do your homework and
look at what it does to the com-
munity," he remarks. "I will pay
my way-I'll pay whatever the
facts prove...let's just have an
honest debate about it."
Gilmore suggests a broad-
based tax, such as a sales tax,
would be more effective, not-
ing, "If you're going to raise
taxes, just tell me you're going
to raise taxes...but don't do it
on the backs of the poor. Don't
ruin our county like others have
in (south and central Florida)."
Officials say a combination
of new sales taxes and impact
See GILMORE, Page 8A.


CongraWtlations to Middleton Clothiers


on thei new home located at
4847 West Spencerfield Rd in Pace

Aribbon cutting was conducted

on July 19, 2005 at2pm with the

Pace Area Chamber of Commerce,

Middleton Clothiers offers alterations

SM E toin house purchases for the woman who
or wants her clothes to0 fit.


NOTICE OF



PROPOSED



TAX INCREASE

The Santa Rosa County School District will soon
consider a measure to increase its property tax levy.


Last year's property tax levy
A. Initially proposed tax levy .............$ 47,569,947
B. Less tax reductions due to Value Adjustment
Board and other assessment changes.........$ 167,687
C. Actual property tax levy..........................$ 47,402,260


This year's proposed tax levy


...........$ 50,914,641


A portion of the tax levy is required under


state law in


order for


the school


board to


receive $81,596,638 in state education grants.
The required portion has increased by 0.91
percent and represents approximately seven-

tenths of the total proposed taxes.


The remainder


of the taxes


is proposed


solely at the discretion of the school board.
All concerned citizens are invited to a public
hearing on the tax increase to be held on July


28,


2005 at 6:30


p.m. at the School


Board


meeting room at 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL.
A DECISION on the proposed tax increase
and the budget will be made at this hearing.


NOTICE OF TAX FOR SCHOOL CAPITAL OUTLAY
The Santa Rosa County School District will soon consider a measure to
continue to impose a 1.4 mill property tax for the capital outlay projects listed
herein.

This tax is in addition to the school board's proposed tax of 6.188 mills for
operating expenses and is proposed solely at the discretion of the school board.

THE PROPOSED COMBINED SCHOOL BOARD TAX INCREASE
FOR BOTH OPERATING EXPENSES AND CAPITAL OUTLAY IS
SHOWN IN THE ADJACENT NOTICE.


The capital outlay.tax will generate approximately
to be used for the following projects:


$8,924,153.


CONSTRUCTION AND REMODELING
New Elementary School "A"
Woodlawn Beach Middle School Classroom Additions
Gulf Breeze Elementary -Classroom Additions
Gulf Breeze Middle School Exceptional Student Education Classroom
Addition
S.S. Dixon Primary School Replacement of Classrooms and Support Areas
MAINTENANCE, RENOVATION, AND REPAIR
Replacement of HVAC Systems
Upgrade of Fire Suppression Systems
Upgrade/Replacement of Fire Alarm Systems
Fire Safety Sprinkler Systems
NEW AND REPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT
Furniture and Equipment for New Schools and Additions
PAYMENTS FOR EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES AND SITES DUE
UNDER A LEASE PURCHASE AGREEMENT
New Elementary School "B" 'Certificates of Participation Payment
Berryhill Elementary School Certificates of Participation Payment
Holley-Navarre Middle School Certificates of Participation Payment
Holley-Navarre Primary School Certificates of Participation Payment
S.S. Dixon Intermediate School Certificates of Participation Payment
Navarre High School Certificates of Participation Payment
W.H. Rhodes Elementary School Certificates of Participation Payment
Thomas L. Sims Middle School Certificates of Participation Payment
PAYMENTS TO PRIVATE ENTITIES TO OFFSET THE COST OF
SCHOOL BUSES PURSUANT TO S. 1011.71(1)(i)
200 School buses under contract
All concerned citizens are invited to a public hearing to be held on
July 28, 2005 at 6:30 p.m.
at
the School Board meeting room, 5086 Canal St., Milton, FL

A DECISION on the proposed CAPITAL OUTLAY TAXES will be made at this
hearing.


Hurricane

Relief

Climate and Non Climate
Controlled Self Storage Units
Available for
Immediate Occupancy

Please Call
Patriot Self Storage

at 850-994-4504


Located at
4384 Luther Fowler Road, Just
off Berryhill Road,
budding North Harbor
Subdivision in Pace.

Your Insurance May Pay For
Your Storage
... . .. . .- -


"


- --- ---.--. -. . . .. .--


e hT Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 7-A


, J i..I.. 1 )nnli;


I







Saturday July 23, 2005


Local


Gilmore


Continued From Page Seven.
fees will cover bills as the pop-
ulation increases.
Santa Rosa officials esti-
mate impact fees will garner
about 20% of the projected
$270 million road needs.
"The way to solve (the rest
of) that problem is to use a sales
tax," Commissioner Tom
Stewart notes.
A one-cent sales tax would
generate $200 million over 20
years, according to county fig-
ures.
Combined with impact
fees, officials say they believe
the monies would cover most
future roadway needs.
Commissioners could also
institute a gas tax increase
through supermajority (4 or 5)


vote.
Of course, on the seldom-
heard third side of the coin,
some say instead of charging
the public, leaders should slow
development approval, specifi-
cally housing, until infrastruc-
ture catches up. But officials
often find that difficult-
strapped with laws that say too
much limitation of a property's'
uses equal a "taking" of private
property.
"Bedroom community"
Santa Rosa's new growth has
primarily been in housing-
which most experts agree costs
the public more than job pro-
ducing industry or commercial
growth.
Real estate developers have
even used special state


Enterprise Zone financial
incentives (intended to promote;
jobs) to develop areas, accord-.
ing to a July/August NW
Florida's Business Climate
Magazine report.
Ad valorem property tax.
rates, a source of much histori-
cal public dissent, are expected
to stay the same this year.
Higher assessed home val-
ues, however, will likely still
increase most homeowner:
property tax bills.
Per. new state law, local;
governments must predict what,
development'will cost and show;
how they'll pay for extra roads,
schools and other infrastructure&
costs, before approving growth.
Reach writer at:
Nelson@sr-pg.comr


Sheriff recalls early hours of Dennis"


Lessons learned from the
experiences of Hurricane Ivan,
just under a year ago, served
"extremely well," says Santa
Rosa County Sheriff Wendell
Hall.
The Sheriff says, because
of Hurricane Dennis' rapid
advance and departure, the
damage was less than Ivan.
Still, Hall says some portions of
the county-particularly in the
north end-did sustain substan-
tial damages.
As far as Navarre Beach
goes, Hall says the fact that
Ivan took out all the protective
berms, storm damage caused by
Dennis was far more than the
damage that occurred on
Pensacola Beach.
"But overall, the beach
fared better than expected,
despite portions of the island
that were breached and some'
erosion problems," Hall told
members of the Pace Rotary
Club Thursday morning.
Hall says if action isn't
taken soon to restore the berms
along the island, further dam-
age will occur to the existing
structures and further erosion
will occur.
As of this week, electrical


power has been restored to the
beach, but Hall says he doesn't
expect sewer service to be
restored for another three
weeks.
And, Hall says, he expects
the beach will be reopened to
the public this weekend.
In outlining emergency law
enforcement procedures taken
during hurricanes, Hall says his
office functions under an emer-
gency level system that
involves 180 law enforcement
officers working under six
shifts.
Saturday morning, prior to
Dennis impacting the area on
Sunday, Hall says all leave was
canceled and deputies were put
on 12-hour shifts.
Staging areas were estab-
lished at area schools and, by
Saturday afternoon, no less than
80 deputies were on the roads
throughout the county.
Due to the damage caused
by Ivan and the fact the admin-
istration and communication
centers were being operated out
of temporary portable build-
ings, sites were established at
the Milton Police Department
and other secure areas includ-
ing the Erimergency Operations


Center in Milton.
Hall says just after Dennis'
passed over the area, he and his'
staff evaluated immediate'
needs. Outside manpower,
which must be approved at the
state level, included 528 state.
officers who were assigned to.
already-functioning deputies.
,"We had no less than 30"
officers on Navarre Beach fol-
lowing the storm," Hall says.
Fuel needs for law enforce-'
ment were met by utilizing a'
permanent 10,000-gallon stor-'
age facility at 'the Sheriff's;
Office-as well as two tanker;
trucks stationed in Navarre and
Avalon Middle School.
"Our plan worked well and:
'by Tuesday morning, we were,
back to normal shifts.. It was at
that point we focused on thel
needs of the 372 employees and?
their families who work at the
sheriff's office," says Hall.
He says, during this storm,:
the department pulled together:
a small group of officers to,
check and assist Sheriff's office
employees. "You wouldn't
believe what a moral booster
that was to have our staff help-
ing families with downed trees
and other needs," says Hall.


G .nta o a' sPr






G&aze


tte


N nutrition

for







SRMinds
Reading the newspaper regularly leads children to discover new words and new ideas,
helping them succeed in the classroom and beyond. Strong reading skills and curiosity
about the world around them are important characteristics that will help children both now
and in the future as adults. Do your child a favor and subscribe to the Press Gazette.
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1 or mail your subscription to

I Z 6629 Elva St., Milton, FL 32570


4





e hT Santa Rosa Press e


,1


Pana R.-A
















Gaze"tte


t


1


L


SATURDAY

July 23, 2005
Section B


. I 3, 4


7


r


@ your


libraryM
Milton Public Library, West
Florida Regional Library
5541 Alabama St., Milton,
FL 32570 / 623-5565
Library Hours: Monday,
Friday, Saturday 9:00-5:00
Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday 9:00-8:00


Continuing Series Master
Gardener's each 3rd
Thursday, 6:30 p.m.
August 18: Vines for
Northwest Florida
Children's Programs will
resume after Labor Day!
Watch for announcements
when they resume.
To Beat the Summer Heat
- "Check out" some great
movies @ Your Library -
Classics Comedies Drama
- Thrillers.....
For your driving pleasure
- "check out" audio books on
cassette or CD @ Your Library

@ Your Library
http://wfrl.lib.fl.ius
Serving all communities of
central Santa Rosa County,
including Allentown., Avalon,
Bagdad, Chumuckla, Harold,
Milton, Munson, Pace,, Pea
Ridge and all areas in between.

r l- --J ----------


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Cat in the Hat & Grinch
June 28-30
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July 5-7
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July 19-21
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July 26-28
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YOUNG AND OLD
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Crunching the numbers:



Area woman spends time tackling area crime


By JEFF EVERTS
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Sometimes, Kathy Stinson
must feel like an accountant-
constantly churning out num-
bers and statistics.
Stinson is the Crime
Anal sik Unit Supervisor for
the Santa Rosa County
Sheriff's Office, a position she
has held since August of 2000.
Her unit's job is. to crunch
crime statistics and to analyze
crime data, statistics, and
offense reports within the
county.
"I love my job here," she
says enthusiastically.
Stinson recently graduated
from the Florida Department of
Law Enforcement's (FDLE)
Law Enforcement Analyst
Academy in Tallahassee.
The FDLE Analyst
Academy is the first and only
state-supported course of its
kind in the United States.
Analysts learn criminal and
intelligence skills, which are
used to successfully prevent
crime and conduct corhplex
investigations.
Stinson was one of 27 law
enforcement analysts repre-
senting 21 law enforcement
agencies from across the state.
that attended the class.
The class was an intensive
six Week/240 hour course that
covered topics ranging from
crime and intelligence analysis
to domestic terrorism and
courtroom testimony.


Stinson is also a member of
the First Judicial Law
Enforcement Association as
vell as the Northwest Flonda
Domestic Security Tjsk Force.
The Task Force false under
the umbrella of the United
States Homeland Security
Agency.
As pan of the task force, her


position is to process and dis-
tribute information vital to the
NW Florida area to task force
members. This information is
gathered from all legal agen-
cies in the area.
'Story rii'' .,_i h Yv ft E'ert1
Reach him at:
et* cl S'/ 't" e.cotr


Ivan.
She attributes this' to the
possible fact more people evac-
uated for Dennis so would-be
thieves felt there was more
opportunity to get. away with
their crimes.
Stinson was born and raised
in Pensacola and now resides in
Cantonment with her husband.
She has two grown daughters,
one granddaughter and another
grandchild on the way.
"I am surprised at how fast
the county is growing," she
says.
Prior to joining the Sheriff's
Office, Stinson spent 13 years
working with the State
Attorney's Office in Pensacola.
She also spent a year working
for a private law firm in
Louisiana.
She joined the Sheriff's
office when it started the Crime
Analysis Unit and it was just
her and one part-time person.
Now the Unit has two full-
time analysts working under
her supervision.


As part of her class work for
the class, Stinson also did an
assessment on Santa Rosa
County's recovery after
Hurricane Ivan.
Stinson has now become the
first Certified Law Enforcement
Analyst in Santa Rosa County.
She is one of only five
Certified Analysts in all of
Northwest Florida-joining
one from Escambia County,
two from Okaloosa County, and,
one from the FDLE.
Stinson's education also
includes a 40-hour course taken
at the University of Denver on
Crime Mapping.
Stinson says she spends a
good deal of time networking
with analysts in other counties
trying to track trends in the
region.
"It's a good way for us to
stay in touch and help each
other when we can," she stated.
One of the trends she has
recently been tracking is the
increase in looting after
Hurricane Dennis as opposed to


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The Island (PG13)
1:15 4:05 7:05 9:50
Bad News Bears (PG13)
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Wedding Crashers (R)
1:00 3:45 7:15 9:55
Charlie & the Chocolate Factory (PG)
1:30 4:00 7:00 9:30
Fantastic Four (PG13)
1:40 4:20 7:20 9:45
Dark Water (PG13)
7:25 9:55
War of the Worlds (PG13) -
1:20 4:10 7:00 9:45
Herbie: Fully Loaded (G)
12:50 3:00 5:10
Batman Begins (PG13)
1:10 7:05
Mr. and Mrs. Smith (PG13)
4:15 9:50


Comnt res


Narconon
Arrowhead reminder
Narconon Arrowhead
reminds you that during the
summer months, our children
are more apt to let boredom set
in and drugs and alcohol can
work into their lives. To help
your child this summer, recog-
nize the signs of drug and alco-
hol addiction and get the help
they need.
If you or someone you know
is struggling with an addiction,
call Narconon Arrowhead.
Narconon offers free addiction
counseling, assessments, and
referrals to rehabilitation cen-
ters nationwide and to your
community by calling 1-800-
468-6933 or logging onto
Sa i. ,I l.l,...... Help
save a life. Call now!


Young People in
Praise starts 25th
Shepherd's House Ministries
will be hosting Young People In
Praise, a community outreach
of Milton, FL. It is the 6th
Annual. Summer Youth Revival
& 9th Annual Youth Choir
Workshop with the King
Brothers of Jacksonville, FL.
The Revival begins at 7 p.m.,
Monday & Tuesday (July 25-
26) at Shepherd's House
Ministries on Stewart Street.
Choir Workshop at Mt. Pilgrim
Baptist Church, July 27th,
Greater Bethlehem AME, July
28th, .and New Providence
Baptist Church, July 29th.
Minister Angelo King will
be used by God to stir the souls
of the youth during the 2-night
revival. Gospel recording artist,
Antonio King will teach the
youth how to work together in a


choir to skillfully praise the
Lord. They will be joined by
their 2 younger brothers,
Michael, and Alex King. For
more information call 626-3526
or 623-1517.

Back to School shots
available Tuesday
Officials at Santa Rosa
County Health Department
have determined that the
Midway Health Department
can re-open for shots during the
following dates:
Tuesday, July 26, from 8
a.m. until 3 p.m.
Friday, July 29 from 8 a.m.
until 3 p.m.
Monday, August 1 from 8
a.m. until 3 p.m.
These will be walk-in immu-
nization clinics only. The
Midway Health Department's
number is 983-5200.


CRA sets meeting
The City of Miltoni
Community Redevelopment
Area (CRA) Steering
Committee is scheduled to meet
on Monday, July 25, 2005, at 4
p.m. in the Milton City Hall in
reference to the Master Plan for
downtown Milton.
If you have any further ques-
tions, please contact the
Planning & Development
Department at 983-5440.

Military
Officers Association
to hold meeting
"The Whiting Field Chapter,
Military Officers Association of
America meets at the Wings Inn
at Whiting Field Naval Air
Station for dinner and a pro-
gram at 1800 hours, Thursday,
July 28, 2005. Active duty and


retired military officers and
their spouses and guests are
invited to the meeting. Request
reservation for the meal by
1200 hours, July 27. Meal is
$27 per couple or $14 per per-
son. Contact Bruce Furlow for
information and reservation,
981-9144.

Habitat for
Humanity
to hold meeting
Santa Rosa County Habitat
for Humanity will hold a spe-
cial orientation meeting on
Tuesday, July 26, 2005 at 5:30
p.m. The meeting will be held
at The First Baptist Church in
Milton. For more information,
call Carolyn McCray at 981-
9998 or 623-9081. Habitat for
Humanity is dedicated to pro-
viding decent and affordable
houses for God's people.


661 am surprised at how fast

the county is growing

S-- Kathy Stinson


a,


vl










rage z-B .I ...- I
Obituaries


e hT Santa Rosa Press Ga e


Saturday July 23, 2005


Ard, Marian
Elizabeth Watts
Mrs. Marian Elizabeth
Watts Ard, age 73, of Jay,
passed away Thursday, July
14, 2005 in a local hospital.
Marian was born in
Harrisburg, IL, and had been a
resident of Jay for the past 47
years. She was a loving wife,
mother, grandmother, and great
grandmother. She was an avid
reader who loved classical
music and humming birds.
Marian was a member of Jay
First Baptist church and was
employed by the Brewton
CCA Federal Credit Union for
33 years.
She is preceded in death by
her parents-Thomas and
Jeannette Watts.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 52 years-Oakland
Ard, Jay, FL; sons-Frederick
Dalton (Vesta) Ard, Alabaster,
AL, and Ronald Lee (Bonnie)
Ard, Samson, AL; brother-
Thomas Martin (Jan) Watts, Jr.,
Elko, NV; sister-Betty Sue
(Carl)Norton, Cleveland, TN;
sister-in-law-Vessie Ard,
DeFuniak Springs, FL; broth-
er-in-law-Herman Ard, Port


IFIRST-

CHOICE

1441 Creighton Rd.
Pensacola, FL 32504
Toll Free:(850) 405-HomeI
Cell: (850) 777-1153,
Email: freysellstoday@hotmail.com


476-2154 a
www.1firstchoicerealty.cor


St. Joe, FL; grandchildren-
Taylor Lee Ard, Brandon Lee
Ard, Joshua Dalton Ard, and
Jeffery Martin Ard; Great
grandchildren-Hailey Ann
Ard, and Caleb Lee (Boy) Ard;
and numerous nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services were
Saturday, July 16, 2005 at 1
p.m., at Jay Funeral Home with
Brother Earle Greene officiat-
ing. Burial followed at Eight
Mile Cemetery in Samson, AL.
Pallbearers were Rex Goodson,
Bill Cannon, Burt Settle, Paul
Russo, Taylor Ard, and Dalton
Ard.
Flowers 'were accepted or
contributions may be made to
the American Cancer Society's
Jay Relay for Life. A fund is set
up at United Bank: 3885 Scotts
Plaza Drive, Jay, FL 32565.
Jay Funeral Home is, in
charge of arrangements.


Baker, Billy Joe
1936-2005
Mr. Billy Joe Baker, age 69
of Milton, went home to be
with Jesus on Sunday, July 17,
2005 at Sacred Heart Hospital
in Pensacola, FL.
Mr. Baker was born on


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March 28,1936 in Rose Hill,
AL to Dewey-Lee and Jessie
Lois Baker.
Mr. Baker is survived by-,
Mary Janis Baker, his loving
wife of forty-four years; his
son-Bruce Baker; his daugh-
ter-Melody Baker Lee and
her husband Sean; his three
brothers-Curtis and Betty
Baker, Kenneth and Susie
Baker, and Bobby Baker; his
three sisters-Oleane Hodges,
Edna and Eual Duncan, and
Marilyn Morgan-Odom and
her husband John.
Immediately after serving in
Europe with the United States
Air Force, Mr. Baker earned a
B. S. in business from Troy
State University and a Masters
in school administration from
the University of West Florida.
Mr. Baker spent 30 years' fine
tuning his: .public relations
skills in the Santa Rosa County
school system as both a teacher
and school principal before
retiring in 1988 to pursue a
career in real estate. For six-
teen years, Mr. Baker success-
fully sold real estate first with
Century 21 Southern Services
and, in his final years. With'
RE/MAX Horizons Realty.
Funeral services were at
Noon Wednesday, July 20,
2005 at the First Baptist
Church in Milton, where Mr.
Baker has been a devoted
member for forty-four years,
with Dr. David Spencer, Rev.
Doug Holmes, and Rev. Bill
Lee officiating. Interment fol-
lowed., with full Military hon-
ors at Barrancas National
Cemetery in Pensacola. Lewis
Funeral Home of Milton direct-
ed.
Active Pallbearers were-
William White, Michael


McGuire, Jason McGuire,
Michael Owens, Bill Chavis,
and Paul Hayes.
Honorary pallbearers were
the members of his cherished
Fisher Sunday School class.
Contributions may be made
to: Forward Together in Faith
Building Fund, C/O First
Baptist Church of Milton, 6797
Caroline Street, Milton, Fl.
32570.

Nix, Janice
Carpenter
1940-2005
Janice Carpenter Nix, age
65, of Milton, passed away
Thursday, July 14, 2005, at a
local hospital. Mrs. Nix was a
native and lifelong resident of
Santa Rosa County:
Daughter of the late Willie
and Ida Lee. Carpenter, a pio-
neer family of Santa Rosa
County, Jan grew up attending
The First Baptist Church of
Milton. She was a loving wife
and mother, ,who is dearly-
loved by her family. Jan was a
life member of the Milton
Garden Club and a Master
Flower Show Judge. Her heart
was with her family, her ani-
mals and her Garden Club
friends.
Jan. is survived by her hus-
band of 36 years-John C. Nix
Jr., of Milton, 2 daughters-,
Julie Kay Nix (Joseph
Kirkland), Laura Lee Nix, both
of Milton; 1 sister-Carol
Shields of Pace, her niece-
Darcy Tyer, nephew-Casey
Shields, and other relatives.
Funeral services for Jan
were 3 p.m., Monday, July 18,
2005, at the Lewis Funeral
Home Milton Chapel with Rev.


Wayne Stevens and Dr. Joe
Bamberg officiating. Burial
followed in the Milton
Cemetery. Pallbearers were
Pete Williams, Milton Hughes,
Stan Carver, Fain Yearty, Jim
LaClaire, and Larry Holt.
Honorary pallbearers were
members of the Milton Garden
Club.
Lewis Funeral Home of
Milton was in charge of
arrangements.

Bonckowski,
Marion T. (Rocky)
-Marion T. (Rocky)
Boncko\,ski, age 55, of
Milton, FL, died Saturday, July
16, 2005 'at his home.
He was a'native of Brewton,
AL, and had lived in this area
for many years. Mr.
Bbnckowski was a U.S. Army
veteran. He received the
Bronze Star for operations in
Cambodia above and beyond
the call of duty. He also
received The Air Award in the
101 t Airborne Division. He
was a good man who always
put others ahead of himself.
Survivors include 3 sons-
Marion T. (Lil' Rock)
Bonckowski, Mathew A.
Bonckowski, Ryan Joseph
Bonckowski; and 4 grandchil-
dren.
His Memorial Service was 3
p.m., Thursday, July 21, 2005
at the Donnie Sowell Funeral
,Home Chapel with Rev. Ron
Carnley officiating.

Bible Way Baptist Church
with Rev. Bill Wright officiat-
ing.
A special thanks goes to
Tanden Health Care for their
, loving care.


Donnie Sowell Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.

Nunnemacher,
Howell John
Howell John Nunnemacher,
age 88, of Milton, FL, died
Saturday, July 9, 2005 in
Pensacola,' FL.
Mr. Nunnemacher was born
in Allentown, PA, but had lived
in this area many years.
His wife-Margaret E.
Nunnemacher, preceded him in
death.
Survivors include 2 sons-
George, Nunnemacher of
Kansas, and, Timothy
Nunnemacher of Bethlehem,
PA; 2 daughters- Gail Diehl of
Milton, FL, and Patricia
Beahm of Bethlehem, PA; 10
grandchildren; 14 great grand-
children and 1 great-great
grandson.
- Memorial services will be 7.
p.m., Monday, July 25, 2005 at
Bible Way Baptist Church with
Rev. Bill Wright officiating.
A special thanks goes to
Tanden Health Care for their
loving care.
Donnie Sowell Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.

Stephens,
William Robert
William Robert Stephens
died Wednesday, July 20,2005.
The arrangements are being
handled at Harper-Morris
Funeral Home in Pensacola,
FL. Visitation is Sunday, July
24', 2005 from 5 to 7 p.m. at
Harper-Morris Funeral Home
The service will be Monday,
July 25, 2005.


Comnt


Division o
Tallahassee, FL The
Florida Department of,
Agriculture and Consumer
Services, Division of Forestry
announces that it is holding a
sign-up, for enrollment in the
Forest Land Recovery Program
(FLRP) which began July 22,
and runs through October 21.
This program, authorized
under, the 2005 Military
Construction Appropriations
and Emergency Hurricane
Supplemental Appropriations


f Forestry
Act, is available to non-indus-
trial private forest landow ners
"on a 75-25 'cost share basis,
Eligible practices include, but
are not limited to: site prepara-
tion, tree planting, and debris
removal activities. Landowners
who own at least 10 acres, but
more than 5,000 acres of land
in Florida and who have a prac-
tice plan will be eligible to
receive funding assistance
under FLRP. A maximum of
$25,000 will be available .for,


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Almost half of the state's 14
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owned by private non-industri-
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hurricane season of 2004,
many of these landowners are
in need of financial assistance
to help restore their forest-
lands.


Landowners can obtain
Application forms from their
local Division of Forestry
office and from other cooperat-
ing agencies. The Division of
Forestry's foresters will pro-
vide technical assistance to
landowners and will be the
local contact person for partici-
pating, landowners. For more
information, contact Ricky
Jones, SRC Forester at 983-
5310, fax: 9835266, or email:
jonesr@doacs.state.fl.us


Natural Health Corner
By Jimmie D. Hill, N.D., Ph. D.
The Natural Health Corner is intended solely for informational and educa-
oit nal ur oses and not as medical advice. Please consult a medical or


health care professional if you have questions about your


Our pets deserve natural food

Here's a question to consider: Would you ever
want to eat meat from 4-D. sources, which
Richard H. Pitcaim, D.V.M., Ph.D, and Susan
Hubble Pitcaim, say consist of "tissue from ani-
mals that are dead, dying, disabled or diseased
when they arrive at the slaughter house?" or
would you ever want to try moldy grains or ran-'
cid animal fats? Your pets may be eating these
things, if you're feeding them commercial pet
foods.
Dr. Pitcairn in his book, Complete Guide to
Natural Health For Dogs & Cats, cites a letter
printed in Prevention Magazine by a reader who
once worked in a chicken-butchering factory in
Maine.
The letter stated that in the factory, where
USDA inspectors, were present, trimmers cut off
damaged and diseased parts of chickens, which
were put into a garbage can and then sent to a pet
food factory.
Poor quality meat is not the only extra ingre-
dient, many pet foods contain all sorts of chemi-
cals and additives such as propylene glycol and


r health.


ethoxyquin,
which was orig-
inally devel-
oped for the
production of
rubber.
Dr. Pitcaim suggests giving your cats and
dogs raw meats, eggs, some grains, legumes, and
vegetables. He feels cooking meats kills vital
nutrients.
In addition to natural food, another way own-
ers can improve the health of their pets is to pre-
vent flea infestation. A natural remedy that can
help pets get rid of those no-good fleas is called
garlic. Garlic actually changes the taste of your
pet's blood; fleas hate the new taste. Dogs over
50 pounds can have as much as 2 teaspoons of
garlic a day, and smaller dogs can have one-
quarter to one-half teaspoon a day. Garlic can be
a problem for cats, so a safe limit is one-eighth
teaspoon or less a day for up to two weeks at a
time.

Jimmie D. Hill is a graduate of Clayton
College of Natural Health, Birmingham, AL and
owner of Alternative Health Food Store, Pace,
FL. E-mail is: GWYHILL@AOL.COM
J


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Saturday July 23, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Lifestyles


Smith's wed 50 years

Hubert & Martha Smith of
Milton celebrated their 50th
-. Wedding Anniversary on July
22, 2005.
,.J L._


.1


Baker's celebrate 50th


Thomas & Betty Baker of

Milton celebrated their 50th
Wedding Anniversary on

Thursday, July 18th. They are


the parents of 4 children, 5
grandchildren, and 1 great
grandchild. Both are retired
from the Postal Service.


Jennifer A.hle) Young, ot
Milton, and Shanc Da\id Rice,
of Kilgore, Te\ac, plan to be
married August 13, 2005 at
First Baptist Church in Milton.
Jennifer is the daughter of
Mr. & Mrs. James A. Young, Jr.,
of Milton and the granddaugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E.
Weekley of Milton and, Mrs.
James A. Young of Pensacola.
Shane is the son of Mr. &
Mrs. Gene W. Rice of Kilgore,
TX.
Jennifer graduated from
Milton High School in 1996
and went on to receive a B.S.
degree in Public Relations from
the University of Alabama, as


%.ell a a a Masters of Di'nit)
and a Masters of Christian
Education from Southwestern
Baptist Theological Seminar\
in Ft. Worth, TX.
Shane is a graduate of
Sabine High School in
Gladewater, TX, and received a
B.S. degree in Communication
Studies from Belmont
University in Nashville, TN. He
is employed as a Mortgage
Associate with Ameriquest
Mortgage Company in
Birmingham, AL.
After their wedding, the cou-
ple will reside in Birmingham,
AL.


Legals


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 1ST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
No. 05-CA-232

Mortgage Electronic
Registration Systems, Inc.,
PLAINTIFF.

vs.

Steven M. Meredith; Wondea
N. Meredith, et al.,

DEFENDANTS.'

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE

Notice is hereby given that,
pursuant to that Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated July 6. 2005, and
entered in civil case number
05-CA-232, of the Circuit
Court of the 1st Judicial Circuit
in and for Santa Rosa County,
Florida, wherein MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRA-
TION SYSTEMS, INC., is
Plaintiff and Steven M.
Meredith; Wondea N.
Meredith; GMAO Mortgage
Corporation, is/are
Defendant(s), I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at the front steps of the
Santa Rosa County
Courthouse, Milton, Florida,
Santa Rosa County, Florida, at
11:00am on the 9 day. of
August, 2005, the following
described property as set forth
in said Final Judgment, to wit:

COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP
1 NORTH, RANGE 29 WEST,.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH
01 DEGREES 36' 00" WEST
5.15 FEET; THENCE' SOUTH
88 DEGREES 19' 00" EAST
200.00 FEET TO THE WEST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
OF A COUNTY ROAD (50'
R/W); THENCE SOUTH 01
DEGREES 36'00" WEST
ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE 371.77
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 88
DEGREES 19'00" EAST
800.56 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE
.CONTINUE SOUTH 88
DEGREES 19' 00" EAST
ALONG THE NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF JEN-
NIFER LANE (50' R/W) 107.14
FEET; THENCE NORTH 01
DEGREES .41'00' E-'TT'
153.13 FEET;, -HEj.- E
NORTH 88 DEGREES 19'00"
WEST 107.14 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 01 DEGREES 41'00"
WEST 153.13 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
,NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair.
Debt Collection Practices Act
you are advised that this law
firm is deemed to be a debt
collector attempting to collect
a debt and any information
obtained will be used for that
purpose.

Dated the 7 day of July, 2005.

MARY M. JOHNSON*
Clerk of Circuit Court
CIR,:UiT ''-.'.RT SEAL
By j 'a,,r.,
Deputy Clerk

071605
072305


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 1ST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
SANTA ROSA COUNTY
Case #: 05-CA-242
Division #:

UNC:
UNION PLANTERS BANK,
N.A. D/B/A
REGIONS MORTGAGE, INC.,
FORMERLY REAL ESTATE
FINANCING, INC.,
Plaintiff,

-vs.-

JOHN W. ANDERSON;
CAROL M. ANDERSON;
UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POS-
SESSION #1; UNKNOWN
PARTIES IN POSSESSION
#2; IF LIVING, AND' ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER
AND AGAINST THE ABOVE
NAMED DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS


Defendantss.

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order of Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated July 6, 2005, entered in
Civil Case No. 05-CA-242 of
the Circuit Court of the 1st
Judicial Circuit in and for Santa
Rosa County, Florida, wherein
UNION PLANTERS BANK,
N.A. D/B/A REGIONS MORT-,
GAGE, INC., FORMERLY
REAL ESTATE FINANCING,
INC., Plaintiff and JOHN W.
ANDERSON AND CAROL M.
ANDERSON

are defendantss, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash, AT THE NORTH FRONT
DOOR OF THE SANTA ROSA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 6865 CARO-
LINE STREET, MILTON,
FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M. CEN-
TRAL STANDARD. TIME on
September 13, 2005 the fol-
lowing described property as
set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 42, BLOCK A, AUTUMN
RUN NORTH PHASE 2, A
SUBDIVISION OF A POR-
TION OF SECTION 13,
TOWNSHIP 2-NORTH,
RANGE 29-WEST, SANTA
ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA;
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK E PAGE 25 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF SAID
COUNTY.

IFYOU ARE A PERSON WITH
A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS
ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN
THIS PROCEEDING, YOU
ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST
TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION
OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
PLEAS CONTACT SANTA
ROSA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, 6865 CAROLINE
STREET SOUTHEAST, MIL-
TON, FL 32570 WITHIN 2
WORKING DAYS OF YOUR
RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE
OF SALE: IF YOU ARE HEAR-
ING IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-
955-8771; IF YOU ARE VOICE
IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-955-
8770

DATED at MILTON, Florida,
this 7 day of July, 2005.

MARY M. JOHNSON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
Santa Rosa County, Florida
CIRCUIT COURT SEAL
BY: J. WATKINS
Deputy Clerk

ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
WOODLAND CORPORATE
CENTER
4505 WOODLAND CORP.
BLVD.
SUITE 100
TAMPA, FLORIDA 33614
(813) 880-8888
05-66541T

071605
072305
7/L493

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR SANTA ROSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 04-724-CA

ROBERT E. EDGE,

Plaintiff,

vs.

LEONARD J. LaMONTAGNE,
and the Unknown Parties
claiming as heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, representa-
tives, or other claimants by,
through, under or against
LEONARD J. LaMONTAGNE,
not known to be dead or alive,
and CHARLOTTE M. POL-
LARD F/K/A CHARLOTTE M.
LaMONTAGNE,

Defendants.

AMENDED NOTICE OF
ACTION

TO: LEONARD J.
LaMONTAGNE and the
Unknown Parties claiming as
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, representatives, or
other claimants by, through,
under or against LEONARD J.
LaMONTAGNE, deceased;
Address Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Complaint has been filed
against you and the complaint
seeks to quiet and conform
title in and to the following
described real property locat-
ed in Santa Rosa County,


Florida, to-wit:

Commence at the Northwest
corner of the NE 1/4 of the
SW 1/4 in' Section 15, Twp
iN, Rge 28W; thence South
20 ft; thence East 295.0 ft to
Point of Beginning; thence
continue East 120.0 feet;
thence South 200.0 ft;
thence West 120.0 ft; thence
North 200.0 ft to the Point of
Beginning; Less and except
any previous, oil, gas and
other minerals stipulation.

Arid you are required to serve
a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to the Complaint on
the plaintiff's attorney, Jack
Locklin, Jr., whose address is
5941 Berryhill Road, Suite J,
Milton, Florida 32570, on or
before August 16, 2005, and
file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before
service on the plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint.

This the 6 day of July, 2005.

ERNIE LEE MAGAHA
Clerk of Circuit Court
CIRCUIT COURT SEAL
BY: J. WATKINS .
Deputy Clerk

071605
072305
7/494

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEAR-
ING TO ADOPT REVISIONS
TQ
SANTA ROSA DISTRICT
SCHOOLS CODE OF STU-
DENT CONDUCT FOR 2005-
2006

Pursuant to Chapter 120,
Florida Statutes, the Santa
Rosa County School Board
will hold a public hearing to
consider additional revisions,
additions and deletions to the
Code of Student Conduct for
2005-2006. The purpose of
these changes is to update the
existing Code of Student
Conduct in accordance with
legislative and State Board of
Education Regulations. The
public'hearing is August 11th
at 7:05 pm at the Santa Rosa
County School Board Room,
5086 Canal Street, Milton,
Florida.

Copies of proposed revisions,
additions and deletions will be
available for study and exami-
nation at the office of the
Superintendent of Schools in
Milton, Florida from 8:00 AM to
4:00 PM, Monday through
r;.' .July 15 through August
, II, _" y. .

John W. Rogers,
Superintendent of School

072305
073005
080605
7/498

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMU-
NITY AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INTENT TO FIND
THE SANTA ROSA COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENTS) IN COMPLI-
ANCE
DOCKET NO. 05-1-NOI-5701-
(A)-(A-
The Department gives notice
of its intent to find the
Amendment(s) to the
Comprehensive Plan for Santa
Rosa County, adopted by
Ordinance No(s). 2005-12 on
May 23, 2005, IN COMPLI-
ANCE, pursuant to Sections
163.3184, 163.3187 and
163.3189, F.S.
The adopted Santa Rosa
County Comprehensive Plan
Amendments) and the
Department's Objections,
Recommendations and
Comments Report, (if any),
are available for public inspec-
tion Monday through Friday,
except for legal holidays, dur-
ing normal business hours, at
the Community Planning and
Zoning Department, 6051 Old
Bagdad Highway, Milton
Florida 32583.
Any affected person, as
defined in Section 163.3184,
F.S., has a right to petition for
an administrative hearing to
challenge the proposed
agency determination that the
Amendments) to the Santa
Rosa County Comprehensive
Plan' are In Compliance, as
defined in Subsection
163.3184(1), F.S. The petition
must be filed within twenty-one
(21) days after publication of
this notice, and must include
all of the information and con-
tents described in Uniform


'


Rule 28-106.201, F.A.C. The
petition must be filed with the
Agency Clerk, Department of
Community Affairs, 2555
Shumard Oak Boulevard,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
2100, and a copy mailed or
delivered to the local govern-
ment. Failure to timely file a
petition shall constitute a waiv-
er of any right to request an
administrative proceeding as a
petitioner under Sections
120.569 and 120.57 F.S. If a
petition is filed, the purpose of
the administrative hearing will
be to present evidence and
testimony and forward a rec-
ommended order to the
Department. If no petition is
filed, this Notice of Intent shall
become final agency action.
If a petition is filed, other
affected persons may petition
for leave to intervene in the
proceeding. A petition for inter-
vention must be filed at least
twenty (20) days before the
final hearing and must include
all of the information and con-
tents described in Uniform
Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. A
petition for leave to intervene
shall be filed at the Division of
Administrative Hearings,
Department of Management
Services, 1230 Apalachee
Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3060. Failure to petition
to intervene within the allowed
time frame constitutes a waiv-
er of any right such a person
has to request a hearing under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
F.S., or to participate in the
administrative hearing.
After an administrative hearing
petition is timely filed, media-
tion is available pursuant to
Subsection 163.3189(3)(a),
F.S., to any affected person
who is made a party to the pro-
ceeding by filing that request
with the administrative law
judge assigned by the Division
of Administrative Hearings.
The choice of mediation shall
not affect a party's right to an
administrative hearing.

-s- Mike McDaniel, Acting
Chief
Division of Community
Planning
Department of Community
Affairs
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
2100

072305
072305
7/499

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR SANTA ROSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 06-000173-CA

GLENDA HOLLON and
CURTIS MICHAEL JOHN-
SON,
Plaintiffs,

VS.

JANET TATUM, and son,'
CHRISTOPHER NORMAN,
BRENDA GARRETT, SCOTTI
GARRETT, and BRANDY
WARNER,
Defendants,

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: Christopher Norman
Current Resident Address
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
Amended Complaint has been
filed against you and the com-
plaint seeks to foreclose the
mortgage on the following
described real property.locat-
ed in Santa Rosa County,
Florida, to-wit:

Lot 15, Block 2, In the resub-
division of the Skyline
Heights, a subdivision of a
portion of the NE 1/2 of the
NE 1/4 of section 28,
Township 2, North, Range 28
West, Santa Rosa County,
Florida, according to Plat
thereof, recorded In Plat"B",
page 38, of the Public
Records of Santa Rosa
County, Florida.

and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to the Complaint on
the plaintiffs' attorney, Jack
Locklin, Jr., whose address is
6460 Justice Avenue, Milton,
Florida 32570, on or before
August 22, 2005, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
the plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.

This the 13 day of July, 2005.

MARY M. JOHNSON
Clerk of Circuit Court


CIRCUIT COURT SEAL
BY: J. Watkins
Deputy Clerk

072305
073005

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 1ST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-409 CA

CHASE HOME FINANCE,
LLC, SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO CHASE MAN-
HATTAN MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION,

Plaintiff,
vs.

JAMES E. MOLLOHAN, SR.,
et ux., et al.,

Defendantss),

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment Scheduling
Foreclosure Sale entered on
July 6, 2005 in this case now
pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated
above.
I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the
Front Door of Santa Rosa
County Courthouse, 6865
Caroline Street, Milton,
Florida 32570, at 11:00 A.M.,
on the 9 day of August, 2005,
the following described proper-
ty as set forth in said Order or
Final Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 51, ARROWHEAD
ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION
OF A PORTION OF SECTION
16, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH,
RANGE 28 WEST, SANTA
ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
ACCORDING TO THE FLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK C, AT PAGE
60, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF SANTA ROSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ORDERED at SANTA ROSA
County, Florida, this day of
JULY, 2005.

As Clerk, Circuit Court
SANTA ROSA, Florida
CIRCUIT COURT SEAL
By: J. Watkins
As Deputy Clerk

072305
073005

PUBLIC NOTICE
SALE OF PROPERTY

Notice is hereby given that the
Santa Rosa County Board of
County Commissioners will
receive sealed bids for the pur-
chase of property located in
the Santa Rosa Industrial Park
(SRIP). Up to fifteen (15) acres
of land located at SRIP is up
for bid. Maps depicting the
available land are available at.
the Santa Rosa County Board
.,of C.-.uri, Commissioners
.Office, r.'5 Caroline Street,
Milton, Florida 32570.
Telephone (850) 983-1877.

The use of said land will be
limited to Industrial/heavy
commercial use with the
employment of a minimum
number of 10 new employees,
and paying 115% of the
County's average wage rate as
stated by Enterprise Florida
and have capital investment of
in excess of $1 million.

All bids must be in writing and
delivered by hand, Fed Ex, or
mail to the Santa Rosa County
Procurement Department,
6495 Caroline Street, Suite G,
Milton, Florida, 32570; and
must be received by 10:00
a.m., August 23, 2005; at
which time bids will be opened
and read aloud. All interested
parties are invited to attend.

Bids are to be sealed and
plainly labeled "BID SALE
OF PROPERTY". Bids
received after the time set for
the bid opening will be rejected
and returned unopened to the
bidder,

Santa Rosa County will retain
the right of first refusal in the
event the property is sought to
be sold. Santa Rosa County
reserves the right to negotiate
a higher sales price with the
highest responsive bidder.'
Santa Rosa County reserves
the right to award more than
one bid if it determines such to
be in the best interest of Santa
Rosa County.

Each bidder will submit a mini-
mum of $500.00 earnest


money deposit which, will be
non refundable should such
bidder be awarded the pur-
chase. The deposit will be
credited against the purchase
amount.

Santa Rosa County reserves
the right to waive informalities
in bids with or without cause,
to reject all bids, or to accept
the bid that it determines to be
in the best interest of the
County.

Each bidder making a pur-
chase proposal agrees that if it
is awarded the bid, it will enter
into a purchase agreement
described herein within thirty
days of the bid event. The pur-
chase agreement may be
assigned by the successful
bidder to an assignee.
approved by Santa Rosa
County'at the County's sole
discretion.

By order of the Board of
County Commissioners of
Santa Rosa County, Florida.

072305
073005
7/502

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the
Canvassing Board for the
September 6, 2005 Local
Option Election, will meet at
4:00 p.m., July 25, 2005 in the
Santa Rosa County Elections
Office located at 6495
Caroline St., Room 100, to
review the current Florida
Election Code and to establish
procedures, standards, and
meeting, dates for the Local
Option Election.
This meeting is open to the
public.

Ann W. Bodenstein
Supervisor of Elections
Santa Rosa County, Florida

072305
072305
7/503

Notice of Public Sale

Pursuant to ch 713.585(6)
85.09 f.s., Donna Caiazzo, as
authorized Title Specialist for
G & J Auto & Truck Repair, Inc.
will sell the following to the
highest bidders subject to any
liens; net proceeds deposited
w/clerk of court per 713.585;
owners/lienholders right to a
hearing per 713.585(6) 85.09
f.s.; to post bond per 559.917
f.s.; owner may redeem may
redeem vehicle for cash sum
of lien;' all sales held
w/reserve; inspect 1wk prior @
lienor facility; cash only; any-
one interested call (850) 477-
0074 or 292-2911; Sale date
8-8-05 @ 1pm @104 E. Nine
Mile Rd., Pensacola, FL
32534:
1994 Chevrolet VIN:
1G1BL52W6RR132311 lien
amt. $1 521 00 for labor/serv-
ices .r,,i .:..i.- charges.
Owner: Rosa Nell McMillan,
5469 Holley St., Milton, FL
32583: Customer: Johnny
Stacey, address unknown;
Lienor:.G & J Auto & Truck
Repair, Inc., 6013 Dogwood
Dr., Milton, FL 32570, ph (850)
623-9517.

072305
072305
7./504.

Notice of Sale

Pursuant to Subsection 5 of FL
Statute 713.78, Donna
Caiazzo, as authorized Title
Specialist for Tiger Point Paint
and Body, of Santa Rosa
County, will sell to the highest
bidder for cash in hand, sub-
ject to any liens and encum-
brances the following vehicle
on 8-8-05 at 1PM, at 104 E.
Nine Mile Rd., Pensacola, FL
32534:
1994 Honda
VIN#4S6CY58V9R4416950
Vehicle may be inspected 1
week prior, at Ilenor facility:
3630 Gulf Breeze Pkwy., Gulf
Breeze, FL 32563.

072305
072305

REQUEST FOR PROPOS-
ALS
FOR ARCHITECTURAL SER-

Notice is hereby given that the
Board of County
Commissioners of Santa Rosa
County, Florida is soliciting
sealed proposals for
Architectural Services from
qualified firms for a space
needs study of the Public
Service e / Public


Works/Engineering Complex
located on Old Bagdad
Highway in Milton, Florida.'

All proposals shall be consid-
ered in accordance with the
Florida Competitive
Consultant Negotiations Act.

All proposals must be in writ-
ing and delivered by hand, Fed
Ex, or mail to Santa Rosa
County Procurement
Department, Suite .G, Milton,
Florida 32570; and must be
received by 10:00 a.m.,
August 9, 2005. The. proposals
will be publicly opened and
read aloud at this time.

Only proposals received by the
aforestated time and date will
be considered. Proposals
received after the time set for
the proposal opening will be
rejected and returned
unopened to the submitter. All
proposals shall be sealed and
clearly labeled, "RFP-
Architectural Services".
Please provide twelve (12)
copies of the proposal.

Questions concerning this pro-
posal should be directed to the
Santa Rosa County
Administrator, Hunter Walker
at (850)-983-1855.

Selection shall be made based
on the criteria in F.S.
287.055(2). The Board of
County Commissioners
reserves the right to accept or
reject any and all proposals in
whole or in part, to waive all
informalities, and to award the
proposal that it determines to
be in the best interest of Santa
Rosa County.

By order of the -Board of
County Commissioners of
Santa Rosa County, Florida.

072305
072305


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR SANTA ROSA,
COUNTY FLORIDA PRO-
BATE DIVISION ;
CASE NO.: 57-2005-CP-206
DIVISION: "B"

IN RE: ESTATE OF

EMERSON CHARLES DEHN
A/k/a EMERSON C. DEHN
A/k/a CAPTAIN E.C. DEHN
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR. DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:

The 'administration of the
Estate of EMERSON
CHARLES DEHN, also known
as Emerson C. Dehn, also
known as Captain E. Dehn,
deceased, File Number 57-
2005-CP-206, is pending in
the Circuit Court, First Judicial
Circuit for Santa Rosa County, ,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 6865
Caroline Street, Milton, Florida
32570. The name and
addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and that personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served
with three months after the
date of the first publication of
this notice must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND
DEMANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The publication of this Notice
are July 23, 2005 and July 30,
2005.

Attorney for Representative:
William V. Linne, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 153430


127 Palafox Place, Suite 100
P.O. Box 12347
Pensacola, FL 32591-2347
(850) 433-2224

Personal Representative:
Patricia Anne Vaillant
4050 Renior Street
Pensacola, FL 32504

072305
073005

Notice Of Sale

To be sold for the lien owed for
charges of towing and storage.
The Vehicle will be sold to the
highest bidder' to satisfy the
Lien on the vehicle. The sale
will be held at C&D Recovery
6509 E. Oakland Dr. Milton in
Santa Rosa County in the
State Of Florida.

The Following Vehicles are
being held for the above
claimed lien.
1990 Continental Trailer Vin#
1ZJBW2525L1016826

The Registered and/or legal
owners are: Stryker Mack
Jones 1341 El Sereno Place
Gulf Breeze Fl. 32563.

Amount of towing is $0.00 Lien
Filing fee of $250.00 Storage
Charges of $675.00 as of July
23, 2005 plus $25.00 per day
plus sales tax.

The said sale will be held on
August 5, 2005 at 8:00 AM. If
the owner cares to recover,
said vehicle they may bring the
amount of the charges in cash
only before the date of sale to
C&D Recovery and the vehicle
will be surrendered to them.
This sale is in accordance with
FI. Statute 713.78

072305
072305
7/508

Notice Of Sale

To be sold for the lien owed for
charges of towing and storage.
The Vehicle will be sold to the
highest bidder to satisfy the
Lien on the vehicle. The sale
will be held at C&D Recovery
6509 E. Oakland Dr. Milton in
Santa Rosa County in the
State Of Florida.

The Following Vehicles are
being held for the above
claimed lien.
1985 Wellcraft Boat ID
#WELC0493K485

The Registered and/or legal
owners are: Jonathan Lee
Bridges PO Box 788
Pensacola Fl. 32591
Lien Holder: Navy Federal
Credit Union PO Box 3002
Merrifield Va. 22116-3002

Amount of towing is $250.00
Lien filing fee of $250.00
Storage Charges of $675.00
as of July 23, 2005 plus
$25.00 per day plus sales tax.

The said sale will be held on
August 5, 2005 at 8:00 AM. If
the owners care to recover
said vehicle they may bring the
amount of the charges in cash
only before the date of sale to
C&D Recovery and the vehicle
will be surrendered to them.
This sale is in accordance with
Fl. Statute 713.78

072305
072305

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 1ST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR SANTA ROSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO: 05-235-CA

CITIMORTGAGE, INC., suc-
cessor by merger to FIRST
NATIONWIDE MORTGAGE
CORPORATION

PLAINTIFF
VS.

SPENCER L. GRAHAM, IF
LIVING, AND IF DEAD, THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENOR,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES
AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST SPENCER L. GRA-
HAM; DARLENE GRAHAM, IF
LIVING, AND IF DEAD, THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENOR,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES
AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH,- UNDER OR
AGAINST DARLENE GRA-


HAM; HOME BUILDING CON-
CEPTS,- INC. A/K/A HOME
BUILDING CONCEPTS;
JOHN DOE and JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION

DEFENDANTS)

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated July 21, 2005 entered in
Civil Case No. 05-235-CA of
the Circuit Court of the 1st
Judicial Circuit in and for
SANTA ROSA County, Milton,
Florida, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at The
North front Steps at the
SANTA ROSA County
Courthouse located at 6865
Caroline Street, Milton,
Florida,'at 11:00 a.m. on the 9
day of August, 2005 the follow-
ing described property as set
-forth in said Summary Final
Judgment, to-wit:
BEGINNING ATTHE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF LOT 6,
BLOCK 2 OF OAKHURST
SUBDIVISION PLAT BOOK
"A", AT PAGE 84, THENCE
RUN EAST 100 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 100 FEET;
THENCE WEST 100 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 100 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. BEING IN SECTION
34, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH,
RANGE 28 WEST, SANTA
ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Dated this 13 day of July,
2005.

Mary M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
CIRCUIT COURT SEAL
By: J. Watkins
Deputy Clerk

THE LAW OFFICES OF
DAVID J. STERN, P.A.,
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
801 S. University Drive Suite
500
Plantation, FL 33324
(954)233-8000
05-39116(FNM)

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, 'persons with dis-
abilities needing a special
accommodation should con-
tact COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the SANTA ROSA
County Courthouse at, 1-800-
955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay,
Service.

072305
073005
7/510

ATTENTION

AUCTION SALE
Dogwood Storage aka By-
Pass Warehouses of 6121 and
6075 Dogwood Dr. Milton, FL
32570, pursuant to the provi-
sions of the Florida "Mini Self-
Storage Landlord and Tenant
Act" (FL Statute #83.801 et
sec) hereby gives NOTICE OF
SALE under said act, to wit:

On August 06, 2005, at 9:00
AM, Dogwood Storage aka By-
Pass Warehouses of 6121 and
6075 Dogwood Dr. M(lton, FL
32570, will conduct a public
sale and/or take into posses-
sion and entire contents of the
following Units:

All consist of household goods
and/or unknown items:

Customer Name & Unit

Sonia Arnold
58
Bethany Browning
246
Krystal Gilmore
341
Frankie Holland
18
Denise Irving
231
Ralph B James
317
Leonard Laymon
79
Jimmy Murphy
241
John Oudekerk
305
Robert Palmer
311
Tim Phillips
177
Steven Rich
218
Sandra Rutherford
129
Rebecca Tatem
234

072305
073005
zL511


,A


Page 3-B


Young & Rice to wed


.










e hT Santa Rosa Press Ga e


Saturday July 23, 2005


raQ d b -D

Pace Chamber of Commerce


PACE AREA
CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE
4344 HWY. 90
Pace, Florida 32571
Phone: 850-994-9633
Fax: 850-994-9577
Email:
pace @pace chamber
Website: www.pace chamber corn
OFFICERS:
Joe Shofner President
Mark Locklin-Vice President
Ted Dotson- President elect
Mae Cameron-Secretary
Eddie Smith-Treasurer
BOARD of DIRECTORS:
Mark Locklin Skyline Outdoor
Communications, Inc.
Mark Cotton Cotton Real Estate
Jimmy Cross Walmart #990
Ted Dotson Pace Water Systems,
Inc.
James Hart Five Points Small
Engine Repair
C.E. "Eddie" Smith Pace Memorials
Daniel Saba- Locklin & Jones
David Winkle- Winkle's Pharmacy
Derek Jackson- Peoples First
Community Bank
Warren Austin- Buffalo Rock.
Margaret Porter Nationwide
Insurance Agency
Mae Cameron Santa Rosa Florist
Joe Shofner Joe Shofner
Accountant
Noel Spurlock Advanced Dental
Concepts
Dan Stewart Dan Stewart, P.A.
Tom Stewart Stewart
Enterprises, Inc.
Wenda Sullivan Sullivan Family
Pharmacy
Sandy Wyatt Southland
Builders, Inc..
Derek Jackson- People's First
Community Bank-Director Elect
STAFF:
Lloyd Hinote-
Executive Director
Cyndi Fairfield,
Administrative Assistant
Pascale Henderson,
Administrative Assistant
VOLUNTEERS-
Debbie Coon Press Gazette
Carlton Henderson Press Gazette
Jim Waite Downey Properties
Alan Graham Alien Heat
Joe Potter Panther Computers
Fatima Hawkins -
The EscaRosa Press
Brent McMahan Morgsn Stanley
Karen S. Welch First Gulf Bank
Mortgage Division
Kim Seevers First Gulf Bank
Mortgage Division

PRINTING
A product of the Santa
Rosa Press Gazette,
printed in conjunction
with YOUR Pace Area
Chamber of Commerce.


124 Hr. Towing
(850) 994-0115
0 PAINT & BODY
INSURANCE CLAIMS
THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
OWNERS" DAVID E. & GENE COOK
4432 Floridatown Rd., Pace, FL 32571
S850-994-6324
6355 Highway 90, Milton. FL 32570
850-623-6003
8119 Pensacola Blvd.. Pensacola, FL 32534
850-476-5800
3052 Gulf Breeze Pkwy., Gulf Breeze, FL 32563
850-916-0030


-~.v__~OUEgon


7lt4\


Business Spotlights

Wheat & Rouse


Creative problem solvers,
trusted business partners!
With the addition of
Certified Public Accountant and
Attorney at Law James
"Jimmy" Scheltema to the firm,
Wheat & Rouse, Certified
Public Accountants in Pace has
enhanced its winning team of
three CPA's specializing in tax
services, business client matters
and non-accounting business
services.
"Mr. Scheltema has more
than 15 years experience as an
attorney in tax, property, and
regulatory matters" states
Managing Partner, Ed Rouse.
"And as a lawyer, Jimmy will
represent our firm.with his legal
skills to provide a full service


solution for our clients."
Wheat & Rouse, CPA's char-
acterizes itself as "Your
Hometown Professionals" is
located at 4475 Woodbine
Road, Suite 7, in Pace, and spe-
cializes in tax planning and
preparation services to individ-
uals, businesses and profession-
als in Santa Rosa and Escambia
counties as well as throughout
the United States. "Our success
is results of years of experi-
ence," says Rouse. "Our staff
excels as creative problem
solvers, proactive advisers,
attention listeners, technical
experts, and trusted business
partners.". Partner Tim Wheat,
CPA specializes in investment
advisory services and insurance.


Managing Partner, Ed Rouse.
CPA specializes in taxation and
accounting. James Scheliema,
CPA, JD specializes in litigation
services and small business:
solutions. In addition, the tean
of Wheat & Rouse include ti\ko
other accountants and a decteed
administrator certified inI
QuickBooks.
Should you have challenging
bookkeeping or tax planning
needs the staff at Wheat &
Rouse would like you to consid-
er their professional ser5 ces.
They can be reached at i850i
995-4050 or through e-mail b%
typing their first name coupled
with @timwheatcpa.com.


Dr. Editha Bielitz


Dr. Editha Bielitz, who
recently established her
Obstetrics and Gynecology
practice in Pace's Woodbine
Medical Park, is-one of the lat-
est professional enhancements
in the field of women's medi-
cine here.
Dr. Bielitz relocated her
office to this community from
Cranston, Rhode Island where
she has been in private practice.
Her initial idea, she said,
was to move her practice to
South Florida. But after visiting
the Santa Rosa County area, she
was so impressed with its cul-
ture and the hospitality of its
people that she decided this
would be. the place where she
would like to settle down
"But it was not only the peo-
ple that. impressed me," she
said. "I found the natural setting
to be beautiful and exciting.


MORE THAN JUST

BEAN COUNTERS
THE TAX PROFESSIONALS
Equity Accounting, Inc.
4430 Hwy. 90, Suite H
Pace, FL 32571
995-8848
S. Rick Faircloth, EA President
Yvonne Penninger Office Mgr.


The climate and the flowers
and other aspects of the area,
especially the beaches, remind-
ed me of my native Lithuania
and my home on the Baltic
Sea. It made me so happy to
have found a place so com-
pletely to my liking."
A native of Lithuania, Dr.
Bielitz received her medical
education at Vilnius V.
Kapsukas State University and
was licensed as a practicing
physician in obstetrics and
gynecology. She subsequently
served at Vilnius Maternity
Home specializing in delivery
room procedure and gynecolo-
gy.
She also received patients at
Vilnius Central District
Hospital for three years before
coming to the United States
where she worked as Fetal
Monitoring Coordinator at
Maimonides Medical Center in
Brooklyn., New York. Her
American residency in
OB/GYN 'was finished in the
late 1980s under Michael
Baggish, M.D., Professor and
Chairman of the Department of
OB/GYN at Mount Sinai
Hospital in Hartford,
Connecticut.
After a fellowship in
Maternal-Fetal Medicine at
Upstate medical Center in
Syracuse,.. New York, she
became director of the
OB/GYN Clinic at Mount


Sinai Hospital.
Dr. Bielitz continued in pri-
vate OB/GYN practice in
Bloomfield, Connecticut
before becoming attending
physician with Harvard
Community Health Plan in
Warwick, Rhode Island. She
continued her practice in
General Ob/GYN in Cranston
before relocating to Pace early
this year.
She is a member of the med-
ical staff at Santa Rosa Medical
Center and says she is looking
forward to working with
patients here in the area. "I'll
be offering them my expertise
and experience that comes with
mope than 25 years of practic-
ing in the field of obstetrics and
gynecology, as well is' a lot of
simply good medical care," she
said. Her expertise includes
delivering babies, surgery, and
the gamut of women's services.
"Whatever women medically
need, I can do for them," she
said.
It's obvious that Dr. Bielitz
is an educated and enlightened
professional individual. But
she's more than that. She is a
cultivated, broad-minded
woman who is proficient in
politics and current events, and
a doctor with whom you can
communicate.
She's not only a kind,
friendly, unintimidating
woman, she comes across as


genuinely interested in her pro-
fession and her patients and
possesses that special knack of
making them feel immediately
at ease.
Dr. Bielitz is looking for-
ward to meeting new patients.
Her office is located in the
Woodbine Medical Park, 4225
Woodbine Road, Suite G, just


north of Highway 90 in Pace.
Hours are from 9 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. Monday through
Thursday and from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. on Fridays. You can reach
her at (850) 995-9441 for an
early appointment.
Submitted by
Obie Crain


Locklin Technical Center


JNIE REALTY


CELL: 850-449-0405
TOLL FREE: 8.II .34b6.2'
%%,b: tl r,[ I x ln ,rh hl .A 1
Email. rmIuir, |mr alis a coni


0 : -I0 ;-6o; -


Buying-Selling-Investing
r Call Rosie Today
EACH OFFICE INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


:rnt re on call fir
Immediate Job Medical/Surgical,
Opportunities: Critical Care, Pediatrics,
Lk_ ;_ a -I*o* -Doctor Offices, All Areas


HNS LPNS
Call today:
474-9803
or 1-888-517-3065


Benefits Include:
* Direct Deposit
* Health Insurance
* Retirement Plan
* Referral Bonuses


WHY INDUSTRY
CERTIFICATION?
According to Certification
Magazine's survey conducted
in the Fall of 2003, Information
Technology professionals that
have earned an industry certifi-
cation brought an average
salary increase of 15.1 percent.
Santa Rosa Count) high school
students looking to inc rease
their value to potential employ0.-
ers can get a head start in this
process beginning August 1,
2005.
Locklin Technical Center's
new S.T.A.R.T. Academy of
Information Technology will be
home to three new industry-
authorized training programs:
Cisco Networking, Computer
Systems Technology including
A+ and Network+, and
Macromedia Digital Design.
The Cisco Networking pro-


gram provides students with
Internet technology skills
essential in today's global
economy by utilizing on-line
courseware developed by Cisco
Systems. This, cottrseware as
well as valuable hands-on lab
experiences with Cisco equip-
ment prepares students for
careers as LAN Support
Specialists. Network planning
Analysts, Network
Administrators and Network
Engineers. The salary range for
careers sought after by Cisdo
certified graduates is $34,000 -
$96,000 annually.
Computer Systems
Technology-offers students the
opportunity to achieve industry
recognized certifications in
computer networking.
CompTIA certification pro-
grams are known throughout
the technology community as


Pace Water System

24 Hour

Auto Phone Service
(easy steps)
1. Telephone: 850-994-5102
2. Enter Account Number
Followed By The # Key
3. Follow Voice Prompts


New Website: www.pacewaterorg


one of the best ways to break
into the information technolo-
gy field and build a solid
career.
A+ certification, the indus-
try standard for validating
skills expected of an entry-
level computer technician, and
Network+. certification, the
worldwide standard of compe-
tency for experienced net-
working professionals, can
lead to the careers as Computer
Repair Technician, Technical
Support Specialist, Network
Analyst or Network
Administrator.
Salaries ranging from
$32,000 $78,000 are attain-
able by indivuals who have
achieved one or both of these
CompTIA certifications.
Macromedia Digital Design
utilizes Macromedia MX web
tools that include Flash,
Dreamweaver and Fireworks
will be used to provide students
the knowledge and skill needed
for exciting careers in web
design, such as HTML Coder,
Web Production Artist, Web


Business (850) 994-7744
Cellular (850) 324-3999
E-Mail: ranae@exitrealtynfi.com


Content Specialist, Web
Producer and Web Designer.
The salary range for these
exciting careers in web design
is $29,000 $77,000 annually.
If you would like additional
information about any of these
programs, our admission
requirements or how you can
become a business partner,
please contact Charlin Knight
at 983.5700 ext. 136.


To

advertise

in the


Pace

Chamber

newsletter,

contact

Debbie

Coon at

623-2120

or

393-3666


A


D--- A D


ROSIE MEYERS
* Complete Real Estate Services


* Top Gun Award for outstanding
Sales Perfornance &
Achievements in the Real
Estate Profession
* Multi Million $$$ Producer
* Relocation Specialist
(Local or Long Distance)


PPeoples First

* ojda5ds Community Bank
PACE 4952 Highway 90
(850) 995-7425 "


I


[NURSES ON CALL.1


k


B"










:Saturday July 23, 2005


Pace Chamber of Commerce

La Hacienda


Make your next dining
experience La Hacienda, now
open in Pace!
For a delicious taste of old
Mexico in the heart of Pace,
Florida, La Hacienda is the
place to be. Enjoy delicious,
authentic Mexican cuisine in
one of the area's most attrac-
tive new places to dine. Open
daily (except Sunday) from 11
a.m. to 10 p.m. you'll enjoy
traditional recipes handed
down through generations of
^>the Barragan family.
Owned and operated by
Geronimo and Guilla
'Barragan, the restaurant offers
t;as many as 28 separate entrees.
Lunch specials are served daily
from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Dine
in patrons are offered compli-
: mentary chips and salsa served


"Discov
Santa Rosa County, FL -
Discover treasures every week-
end this October! The
i.Beaches to Woodlands Tour
will offer residents and visitors
a self-guided journey through-
out Santa Rosa with antiques,
,.arts & culture, and heritage
venues highlighting the coun-
ty's diversity from sugar-white
beaches up to historic districts,
vast farmlands and the endless
e trails found in the Blackwater
River State Forest. Florida's
,, largest state fore-st includes
vater trails, which gave the
area the distinction of Florida's
Official "Canoe Capital."
?- Romi White, coordinator of
the Beaches to Woodlands Tour
says, "We hope the area- will
become a destination for treas-
ure seekers because it is an
antiquing hot spot nestled in a
gorgeous natural setting, abun-
1 dant with local flavor and a rich
Z heritage dating back over 5,000
years. Also, October is the
r perfect time to visit the area
because the accommodation
rates are as pleasant as the sea-
sonal weather and festivities."
The first weekend of the ,-
month-long Tour offers an
opportunity to treasure hunt


in a lively atmosphere that cap-
tures the look and feel of the
Guatemala area. Once you've
been seated, your immediate
challenge will be selecting one
of the many mouth-watering
entrees La Hacienda offers.
From burritos, tacos, chalupas,
and enchiladas to carnitas
served with rice, beans and tor-
tillas, the menu will test your
endurance to keep from order-
ing more than you can eat.
Geronimo and his wife
Guilla, along with their staff
diligently prepare each meal
paying careful attention to
quality and timely service.
According to Geronimo, cus-
tomer care and attention is per-
haps the most important ingre-
dient of their successful formu-
la. Another important element


is affordable prices.
"We believe in value, quali-
ty and service," exclaims
Geronimo in a humble voice.
"Our family has been very
blessed and welcomed in the
Pace area. We are so thankful
to be a part of this great com-
munity."
And of course, no meal is
complete without dessert. You
will definitely want to sample
their Sopapilla flan, deep-fried
ice cream or an apple or peach
burrito. And don't overlook
the Agua de Orchata, Mexico's
most popular non-alcoholic
drink which contains rice
water, vanilla, cinnamon and
other spices. It's a great and
delicious thirst quencher.
Bienvenidos!


er treasures on Fall Tour"


along the Old Spanish Trail
Sale on the Hwy. 90 corridor
from Pensacola to
Marianna,
Florida,


so the Santa Rosa Arts &
Culture Foundation plans to
host the 'Old Spanish
rail Art &
Food Fest'
in his-
toric


4) *' down-
where '< o w t n
antique Milton in
stores, flea mar- conjunction with
kets, churches, individuals, Main Street Milton, which
and organizations will hold will hold a free live outdoor
sales the first Weekend in concert at Riverwalk, Park.
October. This corridor is a It's going to be a very fun, fes-
route Trail Sale founders Fred tive atmosphere!"
and Sharon Wilharm hope will A guided antiquing tour
become known as the "Florida will also be offered on a first-
Antique Trail." For details come, first-served basis so par-
about the event, visit ticipants can forget about driv-


www.trailsale .com.
According to White,
"Santa Rosa County residents
wanted to host a party to wel-
come guests who will be visit-
ing our area for the Trail Sale,


ing and simply enjoy shopping
throughout Santa Rosa, starting
in South end of the county with
trips to antique stores along
Hwy. 98 then progressing up to
the Old Spanish Trail Sale on


the Hwy. 90 corridor.
According to Kim MacCarthy,
owner of Copper Possum
antique in Milton and a partici-
pant in the event, "We are
excited about the total econom-
ic impact that this sale will be
bringing to our area, and look
forward to it's growth in the
future, too."
The Beaches to Woodlands
Tour was expanded to include
every weekend in October
2005. A sampling of some
planned venues includes: the
Jay Peanut Festival, Bagdad
Village Market Day and Tours,
Juana's Pagoda's Chili Cook-
off & Beach Volleyball,
Riverwalk Depot Day, Bull
Bash and Bluegrass at the
Chumuckla Farmer's Opry,
and kayaking and surfing clin-
ics with Eco-Beach.
There are many ways busi-
nesses, organizations, and indi-
viduals can get involved with
the Tour. For details or to
request a detailed brochure,
contact Romi White at 686-
1427 or
BeachesWoodlands@aol.com
or visit www.beaches-
rivers.com.


Military Affair Notes:

Another Pak & Ship is launching our second annual Independence
Day Campaign to send items to our troops in Iraq. This campaign
will go through the end of July. Last year we supported the
Stryker Brigade and the 362nd Military Police Detachment com-
manded by Capt. Bill Allen, an area resident. This year we are
supporting the M.P. unit that replaced Capt. Allen's unit. Last
year we mailed over 3,000 pounds to our troops. We need your
help again this year. If you would like to participate by donating
items to the troops you can drop your donation off at the Pace
Area Chamber of Commerce, Inc., 4344 Highway 90, Pace,
Florida. Another Pak & Ship will be taking items as well at 4212
Highway 90 in Pace. If you have questions concerning
the Annual Independence Day Campaign
please contact Debra or Steve Russell at 994-2696.
In the month of September the 842nd Signal Company of Milton
will be mobilizing in preparation to go to Iraq. A confirmed date
will be forthcoming. Please keep your calendar open
to come out and show your support for our local men
and women that will.be going overseas.
For more information please contact the Chamber at 994-9633.


;First Annual Lights Out Golf Tournament


If you missed our First
*-Annual Lights Out Golf
Tournament you missed a
great time!! Despite a little
rain the tournament came off
without a hitch. The tourna-
ment took place at NAS
Whiting Field Golf Course
with registration beginning at
3:30 p.m. followed by a shot-
gun start at 5:30 p.m.
The first nine holes were
played in the daylight with
the last nine holes played in
the dark with glow in the dark
balls. After the players
-returned from the 'first nine
holes they were greeted with
a catered dinner provided by
,,Biffalo Rock and door
prizes.
Before the back nine was.
started players participated in
Closest to the Pin Contest.
that was won by Elvie
Addingon who received a tro-
phy, contributed, by West
Florida Trophies, and $25
cash. Elvie Addinton also
received a putter for first
place prize in the putting con-
test.
The next contest was the
52 Card Countdown, our sec-
ond place winner Paul
Hinson took home a set of
wedges donated by Red Roof
Inn and first place winner
Mae Cameron took home a
leather Nike golf bag, con-
tributed by Skyline Outdoor
Communications, and a Blue
Angle Golf Shirt, contributed
by Buffalo Rock.
Todd Martin received a
trophy contributed by West
Florida Trophies and $25


'cash for receiving first place
in hitting the longest drive.
The players returned to the
golf course to complete the
tournament with glow in the
dark necklaces and golf
balls. The Chamber would
like to thank those who
helped make this event so
successful. Below is a list of
our volunteers:

Al Graham of Alien Heat,
Caleb Henderson, Carla
Gilmore of NAS Whiting
Field Golf Course
Crystal Hawkins, Fatima
Hawkins of The EscaRosa
Press, Jim Albritton of NAS
Whiting Field Golf Course,
Karen Welch of First Gulf
Bank, Mortgage Division,
Kim Seevers First Gulf
Bank, Mortgage Division
Mae Cameron Margaret
Porter of Nation Wide
Insurance
Tom Stewart of The
Board of County
Commissioners

Without the generosity of
the companies listed
below our event
would not have been
such a huge success.

Advance Tires & Service
Center, Air Products, Alien
Heat, Alternative Health
Food Store
Bayou Golf, Best Value
Inn & Suites of Pensacola,
Buffalo Rock, Downey
Properties
Fitzgerald & Brooks,
P.A., Jerry Wilson &


Associates, Margaret Porter
Nationwide Insurance
Company
Members First Credit
Union, Red Roof Inn -
Milton
Santa Rosa Jewelers,
Skyline Out Door
Communications
Wal-Mart #990, WEBY
1330


A big thanks also, goes
to our advertisers
listed below that helped
promote the tournament.

Pensacola News Journal
Santa Rosa Press Gazette
The EscaRosa Press
WEAR Channel 3 News
WEBY 1330
WECM Memories 1490

First place winners
received $125.00 per person;
second place winners
received $75.00 per person
and $50.00 for third place.
If you missed the
opportunity to
participate in our First
Annual Lights Out Golf
Tournament don't fret we
are working on next years
tournament.
So keep your golf clubs
close by and listen forinfor-
mation to come.,


ALTERNATIVE

HEALTH f

FOOD STORE
Vitamins Minerals Herbs
Organic Foods Natural Health Books
850-994-3606
Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D. 5533 Highway 90
NaturalHealth Consultant Pace, Florida 32571
S e-mail: gvwyhill@aol.com
Ask about our 10o Discount Club


- u L .; "

SANT ROSA
MEDICAL CENTER
--Second to None-
6002 Berryhill Road, Milton Florida
8SO-626-SRMC t7762) www.srmc.cc


Quality Honesty
SFair Prices
4335 Floridatown Rd.,
Pace, FL
994-9915
MV#38125


We Make Your Bus^iness

^^^^Our Business ^


At Pen Air Federal Credit Union, we want to help you "Get it Done." We can
offer the services that will make.owning your business a pleasure.


Dr. Nal'l11' C. Macht'It" lDC

+y.- Woodbine Family


otkl IIram llong0a [, Naxy L aMcK-
NOi e raCA ColM.n I


"We are dedicated to your
individual needs"
4670 Woodbine Rd. *
Pace


Chiropractic Care

For a consultation call

995-5773


Staff Parol
ofpjnack


JOSEPH W. BALDI
(850) 432-3000
3010 North 12th Ave.
Pensacola, FL 32503
Toll Free (888) 782-3325


Winkles

Pharmacy
Building A Tradition Of Trust
David B. Winkles
Registered Pharmacist
3818 Highway 90
Pace, Florida 32571
(850) 994-7005


?aula
McTGuir
Broker Associate, ABR,
CRS,'GRI, Hall of Fame

Horizons Realty
Indapendenlly Owned and Operated
3782 Highway 90,
Pace, FL 32571
Direct: 994-7555
(800) 239-8732
Off: (8a0) 995-0030
.,.Pu..NI.M.ao uire.com Fax: (850) 995-0592


*Business Loans
*Business Checking
"Business Savings
*Btusiness Check Card


*Business Credit Card
*Merchant Services
"Internet Banking
Aknd Much More...


Visit our Pace office located at 4586 Hwy 90
Office Hours:
Lobby: M-Th. 9an-Spm Fri. 9am- 5:30 pm
Drive-up: M-Th. 8:30am-5pm Fri. 8:30am- 5:30pm
Sat. 9am-Noon

ae-- 9m -m a As J-m --R&
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
(850) 505-3200
wwV.penair.org
S Memnbership Eligibility Required.


If Health and Dental Insurance for you and your employees has been difficult to obtain,
perhaps Staff Payroll could offer you a solution to this problem.
e can offer you and your employees the benefits of group health and dental insurance.
Along with providing Health and Dental coverage we also provide Workers'Compensation
coverage for your employees, write payroll checks, prepare payroll tax deposits, quarterly
reports and yearly employee W-2's. We also handle all unemployment forms, wage
garnishments from state and federal agencies. You just write one check for the payroll
amount plus the Staff Payroll fee.
Please feel free to contact me with any questions that you may have, I would like very much
to talk with you.

Workers' Compensation Risk Management Health Insurance
Human Resources Employee Handbooks and More


'


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


I I * *


Page 5-B


\'-










Pace Chamber of Commerce


WELCOME
New Members for June 2005


Name: Coldwell Banker JME Realty
Barbara Fields
Address: 5561 Woodbine Rd.
Pace, FL 32571
Phone: 850-994-6128
Fax: 850-994-5632
Email: bfields@jmerealty.com
Business: Realtor
Name: Tanglewood Golf & Country Club
Joseph S. Meyers-
5916 Tanglewood Drive
Milton, Florida 32570
Phone: 850-623-6176
Fax: 850-623-2014
Business: Golf Course
Name: Home Sweet Home
Thresa Cleveland
Address: 4890 Highway 90, Suite A
Pace, FL 32571
Phone: 994-3202
Email: tswicks@yahoo.com
Business: Antiques & 'Home D6cor
Name: Country Market
Dawn Worden
Address: 5441 Berryhill Road
Milton, FL 32570
Phone: 850-626-9010
Email: u2dawn@oal.com
Business: Check cashing/Retail


Town Hall Meeting

On Tuesday, July 19, 2005 at 6:30 p.m. there will be a town hall meeting for Pace.
The meeting will take place at Pace High School in Freedom Hall. The town meet-
ing will be hosted by Commissioner Tom Stewart of District One. The topics of dis-
cussion will be the Pace Library, FEMA Long Term Recovery Plan, Storm Shelter /
Gymnasium, Community Center / Senior Center, and Aquatic Center. Other items
of discussion will also include impact fees, storm water and traffic
congestion. The public is welcome and encouraged to attend.
For more information you may can contact the
Board of County Commissioners office at 983-1877.


Renewal Membership
June 2005
"Thank you", to the following businesses and individuals that have
renewed their Chamber memberships:
1. Al's Pawn Shop
2. Aurora Open MRI
3. Bill Salter Outdoor Advertising
4. Dr. Matthew Kinzelman MD
5. Ellicott & Cooke, PA, Bill Cooke
6. Exit Reality N.F.I., Bradley Taylor
7. Fisher Brown Insurance, Terry Fortune
8. McMahon Hadder Insurance,
9. Mooneyham Heating & Air, Gary Mooneyham
10. N.W. FL Blood Center, Betty Roberts
11. Patriot Baseball Boosters Club, Donna
Cumberland
12. Pea Ridge Elementry School
13. Shades of Light, Keith & Julie DuPont
14. Sharon Muncie
15. The Cutting Point, Inc.
16. Woodbine Family Dentistry


July kicks off the 2005 Cram
the Van campaign!
If you or your organization would like to help by donating school supplies below is a
list of drop off sites for your convenience. If you plan on donating school supplies be
sure to have you supplies donated by July 21st. If you do not have enough time to pur-
chase items you are welcome to donate money. Please make checks payable to If you
would like to volunteer your time to help Cram the Van you can contact the Pace
Chamber at 994-9633. Thank you for your generosity.
Cram the Van Box Sites
AmSouth Bank
Big Lots
City of Milton
Pace Area Chamber of Commerce, Inc.
Santa Rosa County Chamber of Commerce
Gulfwinds Federal Credit Union
Santa Rosa Medical Center
West Florida Community Care
Wal-Mart Gulf Breeze & Pea Ridge
Office Depot Gulf Breeze & Pea Ridge
If you need help with school supplies please come by their
Pace Area Chamber of Commerce, Inc.
to pick up an application,
Please note applications must be received by July 15th.


Bi-Monthly Breakfast:














For those that did not attend our bi-monthly breakfast on

June 21st you missed out on.a great chance for a free

breakfast. This month's breakfast was

sponsored by your Chamber of Commerce; this month's

theme was membership appreciation. Tim and Shell's

Kountry Kitchen provided a delicious meal as usual.

Christie Griffin of the United Way of Santa Rosa Country

spoke on behalf of the Cram the Van campaign. Look in

our newsletter for details. A big thank you needs to go

to Margie and Margie's Consignment Shopped, Marjorie

of Members First Community Bank. Marilyn of WECM

Memories 1490 for contribution door prizes.

Congratulations need to go to Debbie

Coon of the Press Gazette for

winning the 50/50 drawing. If you would

like to sponsor a networking event please

contact the Chamber at 994-9633.



A.


Paoe 6-B


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Saturday July 23, 2005











Today in Jay


Dennis devastates Pine Level Community


Hurricane Dennis blew
through the Pine Level
Community, located south of
Jay, sometime after 2 p.m.
Sunday, July 10, 2005, lasting
about 40 minutes or so. First, it
blew in from the north, then it
blew in from the northeast, and
finally, it blew straight in from
the east, howling and whistling
with such unbelievable force.
All the while, my husband and
I (Brenda & Gene Gabbert)
were mopping up water com-
ing in the windows and doors.
My husband actually had to
hold an upstairs window with
his hands to keep it from blow-
ing in, almost shaking frori its.
holdings. We watched as our
telephone line snapped loose
and our power lines came
down. We watched as tree
limbs and debris passed by.
After the hurricane, there
were shingles laying all over
our front lawn; they had blown
off the backside of our new
-roof. A large comer section of
the inside ceiling of our garage
was down. The winds from the
hurricane had blown through to
our center garage door and bent
it out, trapping our car and
truck inside. We had trees
down, with limbs everywhere.
Part of our cow barn roof and
side were gone. We had dam-
age to several of our barn
doors, etc. Despite our material
damages we felt very lucky to
be alive. We were worried
about the safety of our daugh-
ter and family.
Looking around, we noticed
our Jersey cows were out, graz-
ing on peanuts and lawns; Big
tree limbs had fallen on the
cow yard fence, and there was


no power to the electric fenc-
ing.
Looking up and down Pine
Level Church Road, there were
power lines down, telephone
lines down, trees down, and
limbs everywhere. Doyle
Hunter's storage bins were in
the road and across the fields,
along with parts of his barn.
Further down the road, parts of
Roy Ward's new barn and its
contents were everywhere.
Roofs of homes were damaged
here and there. Even further
down the road, Jimmy
Nelson's new barn was leveled,
with debris everywhere. He
had damage to other buildings
also.. His crop plane looked
okay. His house seemed pretty
well in tact. What a mess the
road was in, impassable by car
without moving debris.
We want to thank Jay Fire
Chief, Tony Simmons, assis-
tant to Fire Chief Levi Findley,
Tony Cozart, and all those with
the fire department who helped
us get our cows back inside
their fences. We want to thank
them for clearing Pine Level
Church Road, making it pass-
able. And we thank them for all
the other kind deeds like hand-,
ing out water and ice to every-
one who needed them.
I remember thinking, after
the hurricane, that we will be
living in the camper again for
awhile, hooked up to the gener-
ator, the cow fencing as well,
using bottled water, and wait-
ing for our power and tele-
phone service to come on. We
still have no telephone. But,
things could have been a lot
.worse. I thank God everyday
for sparing our lives.

I


,... -, ',. .. t... .
: *'- "T. ":'i, .."-. -" r
..-l ... -


Pine Level Church Road had a lot of devastation from Hurricane
Dennis, This is what is left of Doyle Hunter's storage bins and
barn.


Kitchen Korner

Corn Bread and Chicken

1 hen
salt & pepper to taste
1 can mushroom soup
2 tbsp. Flour
Cook the hen in boiling, salted water until tender. Drain and
reserve 2 cups broth. Cool hen and remove chicken from bones.
Cut in bite-sized pieces and place in a saucepan. Sprinkle with
pepper. Add soup and reserved broth and heat to boiling point.
Mix the flour with small amount of water and stir into chicken
mixture. Cook until thickened, then pour into buttered baking
dish.
Topping:
1 cup cornmeal
1 cup flour
3 tsp. baking powder
3/4 tsp. salt
1 egg slightly beaten
1/2 cup milk
2 tbsp. Melted butter
Sift the dry ingredients together into a bowl and add egg,
milk and butter. Mix well and pour over chicken mixture. Bake
at 3500 for 1 hour. Serves 6.
-Pearl Polosky,


-, "" .
... ..... .';C,. .'.. ":.,


j suitommenaencla


432-1411* 1-800-332-1411
Santa Rosa farmers will find a lot of interest in this week's
active grain and cotton markets. Below are comments on the
future's markets and the closing week's prices:,


More of Doyle's storage bins were in the fields.


This is a neighbor's house on Pine Level Church Road.

All Today in Jay information is submitted by
Brenda Gabbert. You may contact her at
675-6823 with any questions or comments.


This "was" Jimmy Nelson's barn.


Antiques S Collectibles

Can you guess what this is?
What model, what year?


Vanta




?oisa


News,
Sports,
Classifieds,
Business
and Service
Directory,
Community,
Kornerstone,


county


le


Futures Markets Weekly Recap Coffee fell below 100
cents as frost threats weakened in Brazil.
Coffee Futures plunged to a six-month low on Monday as
traders took advantage of selling and liquidating their long
positions while the chance of a Brazilian frost looked dim. At
the start of the week, coffee prices closed at a shocking 97.85
cents, a loss of 540 points. This was the first time the *nearby
contract settled below 100 cents since January of this year. As
the week persisted, the threat of falling temperatures did not
raise enough concern for frost, pushing the prices to a seven-
month low. However, the arrival of Hurricane Emily along the
Mexican-U.S. border limited the price decline after specula-
tion was made about possible damage to inventory stored in
parts of southern Texas. Mid-week, coffee had slightly recov-
ered, settling 190 points higher at 98.45 cents a pound. Once
again, drops in Brazilian temperatures stirred concerns for
crop problems, but no.frost was seen in the forecast. Traders
exercised their buying power in the market while bargain
hunting at the lowest coffee prices seen in- months.
Following weeks of high temperatures and little rain, corn
has finally found some price relief due to beneficial weather
forecasts. During Monday's trading day, profit taking moved
the market lower due to higher than expected overnight rain-
falls in Iowa. Nonetheless, corn settled at the highest price
recorded in almost a year, rising 2-1/4 cents to $2.60 per
bushel. The following day, Corn Futures closed sharply
lower at $2.48-1/2 per bushel, mainly reacting to soybeans'
price declines in the neighboring pit as well as uncertain
weather patterns. Precipitation forecasts in the eastern corn-
belt for Tuesday night through Wednesday morning lent a
bearish tone to the market. Corn continued its price decline
into Wednesday as rain fell across the crop region, and the
market reduced its risk premium that was posted by unfavor-
able weather conditions. Currently, the crop is in the middle
of the pollination stage, and with meteorologists predicting
hot and dry temperatures, traders are aware that the corn crop
could be damaged at this critical time in the growing process.
Cattle closed lower Monday, falling 2 points to 78.50 cents
a pound. The big news affecting this drop was the first load of
cattle crossing the border from Canada to the U.S., which
were initially banned in May 2003 following a case of mad-
cow disease found among Canadian cattle. The injunction of
Canadian cattle was overturned the previous Thursday, open-
ing the gates for more cattle to reach U.S. markets. On
Tuesday, the markets were clearly moving as Cattle Futures
rose 77 points to 79.27 cents a pound, and market participants
appeared to be somewhat relieved overall by the closure of
the Canadian cattle incident. Also, some traders expressed
doubts of a stampede of Canadian cattle, discarding the poten-
tial for a sudden rush of cattle to enter the U.S. market. Mid-
week, Cattle Futures increased by a smaller amount of 15
points, as recent news of a strike in a Canadian beef packing
plant being avoided along with a delay in the hearing of a law-
suit concerning the Canadian cattle imports kept traders
watchful.


We'repwt of it...



...and/uwad of it!







azette

t aress 6629 Elva Street Milton, FL
623-2120 Fax: 623-2007


Aug Beans


669,5 Sept Can Dollar .8228


Nov Beans 679,5 Sep Aust. Dollar .7633
Dec Corn 244.75 SeptTbonds 115.156
Dec Wheat 342.5 Aug Hogs 68.225
Sept Euro 1.2195 Aug Pork Belly 69.025


Sept British Pound 1.7497


Sept Yen


Sep Swiss Franc .7818
Sep U,S. Dollar 88.84


Aug Cattle


Sep OJ
Sep Lumber
Sep Cocoa
Sep Coffee
Oct Sugar


79.125 Sep Crude Oil 57.13


.9109 Aug Gold 425.70 Sep Heat Oil 1.6128


Sep Silver
Sep Copper


7.1325 Sep Unleaded
157.00 Sep Nat. Gas


Richa-d ,Hill leit, Jr., sideIt',estments
afa 'H-ill'**. -^** i .'" t


y adrutao July 23 2005


97,55
322.8
1407
98.90
9.66


J


1.6423
7,347


'ml


Closing Trices of Local Interest
I


" """''`~


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 7;B


This is what is left of Roy Ward's barn.


i







IPago R-R h at oaPrs aet auda uy2,20


You can pick up a Press Gazette at the following locations:


MILTON
Bass Quickburger
Texas Roadhouse
Cisco's
Santa Rosa Medical Center
Steph & Ellie's- Blimpie's
Country Market
The Other Place
Winn Dixie
CVS
Pic 'N Sav
Milton Bakery
Groovin Noovins
Short Stop (Munson)
Race Way Store
Food World
K-Mart
Press Gazette Office
Tom Thumb @' Glover Lane
Tom Thumb @ Williard Norris
Tom Thumb @ By-Pass
Tom Thumb @ Skyline
Santa Rosa County Complex
Hardee's
Ace's Restaurant
Family Dollar
Freds
Big Lots


EAST MILTON
Reggie's Bar-B-Que
Local Yokel
Kiley's
Shell Food Store
Tom Thumb @' Ward Basin
Tom Thumb @ Highway 87S

NORTH MILTON
(WHITING FIELD)
Ike's Food Mart
Tom Thumb @ Highway 87N
Up The Creek Store
Bubba's (Berrydale)

JAY
Farmer's Country Market
Greer's Grocery Store
Jay Hospital


PACE
Aunt Mary's
Whataburger
Wal-Mart
J&J Food Store
Happy Store
Winn Dixie
Korner Kwik


Pic-N-Sav
Groovin Noovins
Groovin Noovins (Woodbine)
Pace Mini Mart
Penny Pantry
Penny Pantry (Woodbine)
Tom Thumb @ Bell Lane
Tom Thumb @, Woodbine
Tom Thumb @ Highwy 90
Tom Thumb @ Crossroads
Tom Thumb @' Chumuckla
Ryans
Village Inn
Oops Alley
Pace Chamber of Commerce
CiCi's Pizza
Flea Market
Office Depot

AVALON
Tom Thumb @' Avalon Blvd.
Tom Thumb @ Mulat Road
Avalon Express


BAGDAD
B&B Food Store
Tom Thumb
Local Yokel


Lifestyles Obituaries Sports Business Reviews
* Kornerstone Education Classifieds Business & Service Directory*


Church Community Military Editorial ...plus more


1 Year in County


= $28.00,


1 Year Out of County = $40.00,


Senior in County


= $22.00


VVVj LiV


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Saturday July 23, 2005 -


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


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Saturday July 23, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


-zv&*.


vcrJiz/ / ciuwlw Oiyoux c/oia /Ri SwcJlay!


AFRICAN METHODIST Galilee Missionary Baptist-ABA
EPISCOPAL ZION Hwy 90, West Milton
Isaiah Chapel AME Zion Church


5038 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dri'
Milton

AFRICAN METHODIST
EPISCOPAL
Greater Bethlehem AME
5299 Richburg St., Milton

ANGLICAN
Trinity by the Fields
4980 West Spencerfield Road, Pace

APOSTOLIC
First Apostolic Church
5574 E. Highway 90, Milton
Pace Apostolic Church
4763 Old Guernsey Road, Pace

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD
Bagdad 1st Assembly of God.
4513 Forsyth Street, Bagdad
East Milton Assemby of God
5174 Ward Basin Road, Milton
Ebenezer Assembly of God
Ebenezer Church Road, Jay
Faith Chapel Assembly of God
205 South Airport Road, Milton
First Assembly of God
6163 Dogwood Drive, Milton
Glad Tidings Assemby of God
E. Highway 90, Pace
Jay First Assembly of God
400 S. Alabama Street, Jay.
McLellan Assembly of.God
6050 Three Notch Trail, Milton
New Hope Assembly of God
9550 Chumuckla Hwy, Pace
Pace Assembly of God
3948 Hwy 90, Pace
STrue Grace Fellowship Assembly of
God
I 517.S k illaId N'.m Rd Milton .
W-- lcoTme .Assemibbl it0 God
8581 Welcome Church Road;Milton'

BAPTIST -ABA
Benrriill Road B:pnsti-A.BA
,5. Berr, hull Road. Million
B..:Lhel Misiona-, Baplt -.ABl
6.17 Old Bagdad H), ,. Mitlon
Fellowship Baptist Church ABA
5223 Hwy. 90, Pace
First Missionary Baptist -ABA,
3949 Pace Road, Pace


re, BAPTIST
Avalon Baptist
4316 Avalon Blvd., Milton
East Side Baptist ..
4884 Ward Basin Road, Milton
Faith Baptist
6423 Hamilton Bridge Rd, Milton
First Baptist of Harold.
10585 Goodrange Drive, Milton
Mount Pilgrim Baptist
5103 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Street,
Milton
St. John Divine Missionary Baptist
5363 St. Johns Street, Milton

BAPTIST INDEPENDENT
Bitle B.ipuist Church of Pace
4001 Vern Street, Pace
Bible Way Baptist Church
5976 Dogwood Drive Milton
Brownsdale Baptist Church
Chumuckla'Hwy, Jay
Joy Bible Baptist
8613 Hwy. 90, Milton
Pleasant Hill Missionary Baptist
5550 Econfina Street, Milton
Solid Rock Baptist
6760 East Gate Road, Milton
Trinity Baptist
5301 Highway 90, Pace ..
Vicior Baptisil
4000 Avalon Blvd., Milton
Wet Filorida Baptit
56-21H,, H) 0, Mlon lt

BAPTIST-SOUTHERN
A% iior, Baptt .
4316 A al r Br id M .lon '.' .
Berrydale Baptist Church
6730 H%, 4. Ja\ -..
Billot. lnt Bapti of Holle. *Navarre.
Hjghmay S7 Nornh Hclle
Black'ater Bapts i '
S 16H9 Nlunson H'.:, Ibilion
Car a, Bapist
"- v ., He .. .89, Aller[mo n ...
Cora Bput .
".:' r 12953 H':, 97l.Jay ., /.
Ea.L Side Bapnj.
4884 Ward BJain Ruod. M3lion
Ferris Hill Baptist
6848 Chaffmin Street. Milton
'First Bagdad Baptist
4529 Forsyth St., Bagdad


First Baptist of Garcon Point
1780 Garcon Point Rd., Milton
First Baptist of Milton
6797 Caroline St., Milton
Florida Baptist Convention
3418 Ashmore Lane, Pace
Floridatown Baptist
3851 Diamond Street ,Pace
Harmony Ridge Baptist
5536 Hwy. 90 W, Pace
Hickory Hammock Baptist
Hickory Hammock Rd, E.Milton
Immanual Baptist
4187 Hwy. 90, Pace
James Street Baptist
106 W. James Street'Milton
Jay First Baptist
214 S. Alabama Street, Jay
Living Truth Church (Contemporary)
Meeting at S.S. Dixon Intermediate
School, Pace
Mount Calvary So. Baptist
5300 Berryhill Road Milton
New Bethel Baptist
10995 Chumuckla Hwy., Jay
New Life Baptist
6380 Bayberry Street, Milton
Mount Pleasant Baptist
6151 Dogwood Dr., Milton
Olivet Baptist
5240 Dogwood Drive Milton
Pine Level Baptist
3300 Pine Level Church Road, Jay
Pine Terrace Bapilst
6212 Pine Blossom Road Milton
Pleasant Home Baptist
8500 Plen.iu Home. Munionin
Santa Rosa Baptist Asso.
6820 Hwy. 87 North Milton
Spring Hill Baptist Church
9214 Munson Hwy. Milton
Wallace Baptist Church
6601 Chumuckla Hwy.
Woodbine Baptist Church
4912 Woodbine Road'Pace

BAPTIST -MISSIONARY
Mt. Bethel Baptist'
175 Limit Street Milton
New Macedonia Baptist Church
4751 Chumuckla Hwy. Pace
New Providence Missionary Baptist
4175 Popcorn Rd., Milton

CATHOLIC
St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church
6457 Park Ave. SW Milton, FL

CHARISMATIC
Sheperd House Ministry
5739 Stewart St. Milton

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Bagdad Chuch of Christ.
4413 Garcon Point Hwy., Bagdad
Berrtiull Church of Christ
3679 Berrnhitl Rd Pace.
Church of Ctnr
300 Margaret Si Milion.
Jay Chuich of Chri
E. High..,a ,, J- Ja
M.Pl.gael .';ecrLi Criui.h u" Christ
61745 Margret Streei. M lton,
McLellan Church of Chrisi
1lunron Hi'. Nhlictn :
Susan St Church of Chnrist
600 Susan St. Million
Wesi Millon Church of Crn "
,3J00 Highu) A9. Pace

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
Fem.s Hill Church of God in Crsi ,
909 N Albarra St Milon
Hope NMiniqur-.Church of God in Christ,
Inc.
113 Willing Street, Milton
World Church of God,


Milton' Worship Center
5177 Stewart St., Milton
Community Chapel Church of God,
4300 Pace Lane,
South of Wal-Mart
Second Chance
Church of God in Christ
5887 N. Stewart St., Milton

CHURCH OF GOD
Covenant Church of God
4645 School Ln., Pace
Church of God of Prophecy
600 Glover Lane, Milton, FL

COMMUNITY OF CHRIST
Community of Christ
6656 Raymond Hobbs St.Milton

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Pea Ridge Church of Christ
4400 Bell Lane, Peg Ridge

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER DAY SAINTS
Church of Jesus Christ.of
Latter day Saints ,
5737 Berryhill Rd., Milton

EPISCOPAL
St. Mary's Episcopal Church
6842 Oak St. Milton

FULL GOSPEL
Milton Victory Ministries
7235 E. Hwy 90 Milton
Living Faith Church ,
7400 Reformation Rd Milton,

HOLINESS
Hollandtown Holiness Church
1851 Pineview Church Rd, Jay
Cobbtown Holiness
4700 Greenwood Rd
Jay, FL 32565

INDEPENDENT
Grace Bible Church
Hwy 89 & Chestnut, Milton

INTERDENOMINATIONAL
Evangel Christian Church
210 Margaret St. Milton
Ken Sumerall Ministries
4901 Forest Creek Dr., Pace

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
Jehovah's Witnesses Milton
Congregation
5696 Berryhill Rd, Milton

LUTHERAN
Eternal Trinity Lutheran Church
6076 Old Bagdad Hwy Milton

METHODIST
Christ United Methodist Church
5983 Dogwood Dr., Milton
Chumuckla United Methodist Church
': 9485 Hwy. 197, Chiumuckla
Elizabeth Chapel United Methodist
Church
8008 Chumuckla Hwy., Pace :
1st United Meth.Church of Pace
- 4540 Chumuckla H., Pace
Woodbine United MNethodisi Church
5200 Woodbine, Pace
Bagdad Unied Methodis, Church
4540 Forsyth St., Bagdad
First United Methodist Church
6.'30 Bemrhill Rd Mili.on
Jay United Methodist Church '
300 South Alabama St., Jay.
Mae Edwards Memorial United
Methodist Church
5052 Mulat Road, Milton, FL
Pineview United Methodist Church


1400 Pineview Church Rd. Jay,
Wesley Memorial United Methodist
Church
4701 School Ln, Pace, FL
Woodbine United Methodist Church
5200 Woodbine Rd., Pace

NAZARENE
First Church of the Nazarene
5162 Avenida Del Fuego, Pace

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
Christian Life Church
4401 Avalon Blvd. Milton
Christian Life Church
4401 Avalon Blvd., Milton
Church.of the Living God,
3375 Garcon Pt. Milton ,
New Testament Church
5277 Glover Lane, Milton
Shepherd House Ministries'
5739 N. Stewart St., Milton
Word Alive Christian Church
5707 Stewart St., Milton

PENTECOSTAL
Gospel Lighthouse Church
.10001 Chumuckla Hwy., Pdce
United Pentecostal
Church of Berrydale
7580 Hwy. 4, Jay

PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS
Mount Zion Pentecostal Holiness
Church
208 Osceola St., Milton
Chumuckla Pentecostal Holiness Church
2841 Hwy. 182, Jay


Pace Assembly of God
S-- Pace Assembly Ministries, Inc.
-.. 3948 Highway 90
-...', Pace, Florida 32571-1998
Pastor Glyn Lowery, Jr.


Sunday School 9:45 am
Morning Worship 10:45 am
Campmeeting Service 6:00 pm


Living Word Worship Center
5573 Stewart St. Milton
Roeville Holiness Church
Munson Hwy., Milton
Cobbtown Holiness Church
4700 Greenwood Road (Hwy 164)
Jay, FL 32565


PRESBYTERIAN PCA
Westminster Presbyterian Church PCA
66599 Park Avenue, Milton

PRESBYTERIAN USA
First Presbyterian Church of Milton
205 Elmira St. ,.Milton, FL

Pace Presbyterian Church
4587 Woodbine Rd., Pace, FL

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church
5339 Zero Ln., Milton, FL
Mount Zion Primitive Baptist Church
603 4th Av., Milton, FL

PROTESTANT
Milton SDA Church
5288 Berryhill Rd., Milton

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST
Milton Seventh-Day
Adventist Church
5288 Berryhill Rd., Milton

UNITED PENTECOSTAL.
First Pentecostal Church of Bagdad
4636 Forsyth St., Bagdad


www.paceassembly.org
Office: (850) 994-7131
Prayer Line: (850) 994-5200
FAX: (850) 994-9936
Bus Service Available
Campmeeting Hour Telecast
WFGXTV35 Surdayis 7:30 am
NHBRTV33 Monrdays 9:00 pm


Wednesday Study Thewo 7:00mapmeelng T.me Radio Broadast
WednesdayStudTheWod 7:00pmTJT90 1 FMM-F 4:45 pm

"A Church That Maks NoApology For The Old-Time Religion"


6841 Oak S
Milton, Florida
Phone (850) 62;


St. Mary's

Episcopal Church
The Rev. John Wallace
Services:
Sunday Holy Eucharist: 8:00 & 10:00 am
Sunday School: 9:45 am
street Nursery.provided ,
32570 &.Handicapped access available
3-2905 Visit our website: http://152.52.16.22/60/


j Eternal Trinity Lutheran Church
LC MS

Rev. Daniel Thies, Ph.D. Pastor

Worship Services: Sunday 8:00 & 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Clearly teaching God's unchanging Word


6076 Old Bagdad Hwy.
http://eternaltrinity.org


Office Phone: 623-5780.
E-mail: Info@etemaltrinity.org


J Covenant Church of God
4645 School Lane Pace, FL 32571
"Preaching the Gospel publicly and from
I L. 1- --- 6 1--Z-- 39 A 6- I l --[ A


nouse io nouse. Acts 20u:20


God is Moving!

Benny M. Turner, Pastor Service Times
.Phone: 850-994-1273 Sunday 10:00 AM Worship
Fax: 850-995-1737 Wednesday 7:00 PM Study


4980 West Spencer Field Road
Pace, FL 32571
Phone (850) 995-7055 F, ax (850) 995-5844
Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 10:00
Bible Study 6:30 Wednesday evening
Nursery provided for Sunday service


First United Methodist-

Church of Milton

6830 Berryhill Street 623-6683

Worship Service @ 8:30 & 11:00
Sunday School @ 9:45
Youth Fellowship @ 5:00

Small enough to Care, Large enough to serve!


Hickory Hammock
Baptist Church
Pastor Carl Gallups (since 1987
Woiship& Children's Church 8:30 & 10:00 am
Sunday School 9 00 & 10:00 am '
Bible Study For All Ages 5:00 pm
Wednesday Worship 6:30 pm -'
Preschool All Services '
8351 Hickory Hammock Road, Milton 623-8959* www.hlckoryharnJK
Dynamic Worship Music Drama Children & Youth Ministries and I


'Celebrate with us!

Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Opportunities available
for all ages 6:30 p.m.

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
5983 Dogwood Drive; (Hwy 89), Milton
Church. Office: 623-8820 .'Robert West, Pastor


Pace Community Church

Reaching Seekers, Building Believers


Features...


* Live band, contemporary music.
* Exceptional children's & teen ministry
* Safe, clean nursery & preschool classes
* Small Groups & Seminars


Affiliation...
* Non-denominational & Bible based
* Purpose Driven
* A member of the Willow Creek Association


YOU'RE INVITED

CHURCH LIKE IT USED TO BEM


994-4310


www.PaceCommunityChurch.com


Future Plans...
* New worship facility now
under construction on 25
acre campus


Where? Currently meeting at Pace High School, 4065 Norris Road, Freedom Hall Ronnie Christian
When? 10:00 A.M. Sunday Pastor


'4


Page 9-B


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ae iuComm
Community


East Milton Elementary announces 4th nine weeks honor rol
Congratulations to the stu- Clevenger; Garrigus: Dalton Cason, Cody Cattnach, Vasquez; Wallis: Meleah Bush, Aaron Laughman, Alissa Elizabeth Wallis; Ellis
dents at East Milton School Haggerty, Brittney Hyler, C.J. Courtney Somerset; Ellis: Brandon Rodrigues; Nowling; Kingry Bria Banner, Allen, Carey C
who worked hard and made the Noble, Haleigh Padgett, Haley Langston; .Kyser Emily Weatherspoon: Dustin Fuller, Cody Carter, Christopher Courtney Creel, Trey
4th Nine Weeks Honor Roll! Natalie Rollo; KingryU Adam Bowman, Kara Crowe, Kirsten Taylor Hyler, Cheyenne Hinkle, Ishmael Hyman, Isaac Kelli Gallagher,
Blackwell, Ethan Brown, Davidson, Karissa Hebner, Jackson, Brittany -Lilley, Erik Miller, Tyler Osieczanek; Jackson; Kyser Nikk
"A" HONOR ROLL Heather Forester, Kody Steven Jernigan, Rebecca Pilto,J., Brooke Pugh, Hunter Richards: Kyano Mercer; Katie Cable, Trisha
'-v- C-ri Grimes. Ciarra Melvin. Nicole Stevens. Rutherford. Thompson: Emily Aughtman, Jason Goings, Trac


3r u ralae
Anderson: Courtney Vise;
Neubecker: Mitchell Kenney,
Adrian Smith; Porter: Rachel
Baker, Micaela Cooley,
Richard Krebs, Briana Swesey;
Sapp: Chandler Daggs,
Morgan Lundquist; Wallis:
Georgia Huffman.
4th Grade
Dixon: Jessica Brown, Lucas


"850) 572-5652 "
MARSHA BEACH
Owner/Realtor


Junction, Inc.
3689Availon Blvd
Milton. FL 32583
www.realestatejunction.com
'a Sv Yu 0 J


Pace, Brian Parmelee, Amber
Porter,\ Courtney Sims;
Thompson: Krisena Gall,
Anthony Hawthorne, Tyler
Maynard, Kimberly Trease.
5th Grade
Ballard: Zachary King,
Bryanna Lunsford, Dylan
Peacock, Carissa Penton, Jack
White; Barber-Morris: Blake


Fence Repair!
New or Repair Existing Fence
Quick Service
Free Estimates

(850) 291-4591

Local Licensed & Insured
BBB Registered


Britton, Brothers Inc.
.'i t'f Local Roofing Contractor
Sther Flat Shingles Tile Metal
S;;..",,;.. Commercial and Residental
Hail Damage? 14 Shell Avenue, FWB
Call Britton Brothers for a FREE Inspection

850-863-38,00


"A/B" HONOR ROLL
3rd Grade
V. Anderson: Ashley Clemons,
Lucas Erhardt, Aisha Gillam,
Jenna Hill, Dakota Huestis,
Nicolas Kuby, Matthew
LaShare, Laura Madison,
Alana Ramos; Neubecker:
Devin Anderson, Brandon
Bedsole, Cody Busby, Lindsey'
Gafford, Max Kietur, Tony
Kirkpatrick, Sarah Powell,
Rebecca Spivey, Justus
Wilson; Peaden: Kayla Baker,
Ronnie. Thompson; Porter:
Tomeka Gibbs, Dylan
Kimmons, Michael Langston,
Bennett Roper, Jessica Steele;
Richards: Heather Owens;
Spp' Jeremy Bailey, Thomas
Clifton, Emily Gill, Evan Polk,
Sianna Sandy, Sierra Sandy,
Tiffany Thomas, Emily


4th Grade
Dixon: Reeta Cannon, Shelia
Deir, Layne Dillard, Danielle
Harmon, Chance Hewitt,'
Kalena Nathey, Laura
Rawlinson, Sarah Smith, Jessie
Williams; Garrigus: Shane
Cash, Travis Pittman; Holt:


Tiana Jones, Rachel Joslin,
Jackie Parmelee, Amanda
Somerset.
5th Grade
Ballard: Nathan Barnes,
Kyndal Cobb, Jessica Morgan;
Barber-Morris: Bradley Craft,
Meagan Grace, Autumn Neese,


I
s: Ashley
Zopeland,
Dubose,
Chelsea
i Burton,
Freeman,
:i Irwin,


Ashley Patterson, Andrew
Phillips; Rorie: Jenna Daye,
Brandon Harrill, Jamie Harris,
Angeline Helton, Thomas
Hyler, Cody King, Cory Lilley,
Courteney Loyer, Jesse
Williams-Houchin.


Horticulture Trials underway


By Daniel E. Mullins
Extension Horticulture Agent
Santa Rosa County


Demonstrations and Trials
continue to be one,of the most
important Extension activities.
It is sometimes not enough to
just describe a new plant, pro-
duction practice or pest control
method. If it can be shown and
compared to conventional
materials and methods it usual-


DIRTY WORKS
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ly has more impact and is more
likely to be accepted, if appli-
cable.
Cut Flowers
I am convinced that cut
flowers of several kinds can be
grown commercially in our
area and have been gathering
information and providing
demonstrations and trials since
1992. A three year cut flower
demonstration was completed
in 1995 and a paper was written
reporting the results from over
50 different kinds of cut flow-
ers that were grown.
Since that time, several peo-
ple have tried their hand at
growing commercial cut flow-
ers. There are two new growers
in the County this year, and I
am excited about the possibili-
ties.
Further studies are under-
way this year in an attempt to
find other kinds of flowers that
might prove to be successful


under our growing conditions.
Thirty different cultivars, have
been ordered. These will be
grown and the information
made available to anyone inter-
ested in trying cut flowers as an
alternative crop.
Apple Trials
Can we produce apples
commercially this far South? It
was done 150 years ago near
Brewton, Alabama, so why not
find out? The apple grown at
that time was known as the
Shell Apple, developed by a
family of the same name.
Plants of this old cultivar
have been grafted and should
be ready for planting this fall.
They will be established on a
local farm in a replicated study,
comparing them to currently
recommended low chill apples.
So, the plan is to have an
orchard containing 60 trees of
four cultivars or varieties.


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Saturday July 23, 2005


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


P nn 10n-R


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SATURDA Y Ju ly 23 2005 Secion


Most people in
hurricane path
misunderstand risk.


Lt. Cmdr. Nathan Schneider relieves Cmdr. Mark Wassil


By Derek Nelson
"Naval Safety Center Public
Affairs


A recent Mason-Dixon
,, poll showed that many people
,,',who live along the East Coast
;and the coast of the Gulf of
Mexico don't feel vulnerable
from hurricanes, in spite of data
about the lethal effects of previ-
ous hurricanes. Fifty-six per-
cent of the respondents said
they felt "not too vulnerable" or
"not at all vulnerable," and one-
quarter said they would do
nothing to prepare for a storm.
Nearly half had no disaster plan
for the hurricane season that
starts on June I and runs
through November.
The poll was spon-
^; scored in part by the National
Hurricane Center and the
Florida Division of Emergency
Management, which takes the
issue extremely seriously since
the state was struck by four hur-
ricanes within six weeks last
year. Charley (Aug. 13) killed
:.34; Frances (Sept. 5) killed 38;
,; :Ivan (Sept. 16) claimed 52
lives; and Jeanne (Sept. 26)
killed 28. Total estimated dam-
age from these storms was
$20.1 billion.
"We can't afford to'
wait for a hurricane to get close
to prepare," said Max Mayfield,
director of *the National
Hurricane Center. Yet the poll'
revealed that one-quarter of the
Coastal residents thought -they-
could evacuate a flood-prone
area 30-to-60 minutes before a
hurricane made landfall.
Mayfield called this attitude "a
dangerous folly." When New
Orleans began an evacuation in
advance of Hurricane Ivan last
Year, highways out of town
were snarled for as long as 10
hours the day before the hurri-
Scane's winds and rain threat-
Sened.
More than half of the
S.2,100 people surveyed wrongly
-,thought masking tape would
'keep windows from shattering.
And 96 percent didn't know
that garage doors were the part
of a house most likely to be the
first structural element to fail
when a hurricane hits.
A good overview and
'introduction to hurricane pre-
-paredness is at the National
'Weather Service's website:
W2/english/intro.shtml>. It
includes a history of hurricanes,
a list of typical hazards and an
explanation of how storms are
forecast. It also describes spe-
cific actions to take to protect
your family and property,
including developing a family
plan, creating a disaster supply
kit, having a place to go, and
securing your home.
About the Naval
Safety Center: Established in
1951, the Naval Safety Center
is the Navy's leading organiza-
tion that conducts safety inves-
tigations, analyzes mishaps,,
and provides safety information
to the Fleet. The center serves
communities in aviation, afloat,
shore and recreation/traffic,
ground operations, and occupa-
tional safety and health.
Commander, Naval Safety
Center reports directly to the
Chief of Naval Operations, pro-
vides assistance to the Deputy
Assistant Secretary of the Navy
for Safety, and supports more
than. 4,200 Marine and Navy
commands worldwide to pro-
Smote safety and safety process-
es and to preserve the lives of
our service members. Our web
site is at
. Also'
visit our Navy NewsStand page
a t
al/nsc.>


From Center for Naval
Aviation Technical
Training, Milton
Detachment Public Affairs


Lt. Cmdr. Nathan D.
Schneider relieved Cmdr.
Mark Wassil as Officer-in-
Charge of the Center for Naval
Aviation Technical Training,
Milton Detachment, aboard
NAS Whiting Field Thursday,
July 21 at 9 a.m., at the center.
Schneider enlisted in
the Navy July 1981, attended
Basic Training in Orlando, Fla.
and completed Signalman 'A'
School before reporting to
USS Nashville (LPD-13)
where he completed two
Mediterranean deployments
and advanced to petty officer
second class. In June 1985 he
was selected to serve as the
Leading Signalman for the
Second Fleet Flagship, USS
Mount Whitney (LCC-20),
where :he advanced to petty
officer first class .and earned
the Enlisted Surface Warfare
Specialist pin.
In October 1987 he.
reported to the Fleet Combat
Training Center as an
Operations Specialist 'A'
School Company Commander,
where he served only one year
before being selected to partic-
ipate in the Enlisted Education
Advancement Program at'
Tidewater Community
College. Earning his associate
of science degree in Ma\ 1990


he received orders to USS
Virginia (CGN-38) where he
made his third Mediterranean
deployment and participated in
Operation Desert Shield and
Storm.
Selected for the
Enlisted Commissioning
Program in December 1990,.
Officer Candidate Schneider
reported for Advanced Officer
Candidate training at the Naval
Science Institute (NSI),
Newport, Rhode Island in May
1991 with follow-on orders to
Naval Reserve Officer Training
Corp Unit, Old Dominion
University.
In May 1993, he
attained a bachelor of science
degree in political science (with
a minor in history) and a com-
mission as an Aerospace
Engineering Duty Officer -
Maintenance. Following train-
ing at Pensacola, Fla., Ensign
Schneider reported to the
'Ghostriders' of VF-142 where
he excelled as the Assistant
Maintenance Officer and
Material Control Officer and
completed his fourth
Mediterranean deployment
embarked aboard USS George
Washington (CVN-73).
After de-commission-
ing VF-142 in May 1995, he
reported to the 'Rawhides' of
VRC-40, where he served as
the Maintenance Material
Control Officer and garnered
recognition as the Fiscal Year
1998 Commander .Earl)
Warning Wing, Atlantic's
Maintenance Officer of the


Year. Following VRC-40, Lt.
Schneider then reported, to the
'Blacklions' of VF-213, where
he ;served as the Assistant
Maintenance Officer and
Quality Assurance Officer, and
completed his first Western
Pacific deployment, embarked
aboard USS Carl Vinson (CVN-
70).
Having achieved sig-
nificant organizational level
experience, he split-toured to
the Aircraft Intermediate
Maintenance Department
(AIMD) onboard USS
Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71),
where he served as the IM2
(General Aircraft Maintenance)
and IM3 (Avionics) Division
Officer and completed his sixth
deployment.
In June 2002, Lt.
Cmdr. Schneider was. selected
to attend the Naval
Postgraduate School.
Graduating in December 2003,
he earned his masters of busi-
ness administration in logistics
and reported to the USS Harry
S. Truman (CVN-75), where he
recently completed his seventh
major deployment serving as
AIMD Maintenance Material
Control Officer. ,
Schneider's military
decorations include the
Meritorious Service Medal,
Navy and Marine Corps
Commendation Medal (three
awards),. Navy and Marine
Corps Achievement :Medal
(three awards), and various
other personrial and unit awards.


Schneider


Wings Club kept


Whiting well fed during Dennis

Story by Lt. J.G. Carl


Lepard
NAS Whiting Field Public
Affairs


Navy bases worldwide
have begun to shift towards a
new concept of club operations.
Under this new concept, most
bases have consolidated their
enlisted and officer clubs into
one.


The Wings Club at
NAS Whiting Field is just such
a complex, offering a variety of
social and recreational opportu-
nities. The club is the 'only
facility on Whiting to offer
three meals a day, seven days a
week. They remain open 365
days per year to accommodate a
variety of patron needs.
With a staff of 38
employees they offer a variety
of services, to include two
snack bars, full service dining,
take out ordering and operate
the largest catering complex in
Santa Rosa County. The Wings
Club can also be seen on the go
at the picnic pavilion, conces-
sion stand, an office briefing,
and even at the base's hurricane
shelter.
Visiting groups of
Reservists, Sea Cadets, and
Drug Education For Youth
(DEFY) students, to mention a
few, rely on the three square
meals a day provided by the
Wings Club during their stay.
The Wings Club opened its
doors to the National Guard
during Hurricane Ivan recov-
ery.
The club also respond-
ed commendably to Hurricane
Dennis. Prior to the storm, the
Wings Club stocked the base
shelter with food on the Friday
before the storm for more than
100 occupants. Afterwards,
club staff arrived as early as
7:30 a.m. on Monday, July 11,
to prepare the club to feed all
essential personnel on base, and
served 96 essential personnel
by noon that day. All hands
pitched in wherever needed
after that first meal, when the


Wassil


From left, Wings Club Cook Donna Walders, Cook Leader Deisree
White, Cook Michelle Leto, Manager Colette Obray and Caterer Jason
Brewer, were some, of the Wings Club staff who provided outstanding
culinary services during Hurricane Dennis.
Photo by Kevin Gaddie


National Guard arrived later
that Monday with 205 mem-
bers, all requiring meals.
Special recognition
should be given to the follow-
ing staff members of the Wings
Club for placing the needs of
service members and Whiting
Field staff ahead of their own
by coming in to work the
Monday after the storm: Jason
Brewer, Manuel Escorpizo,
Keith Prochrow, Michelle Leto,
Desiree White, Tina Sims,
Robert Ray, Lillian Santiago
and Ramon Santiago.
"We worked hard to
ensure that the military
assigned here, as well as the
National Guardsmen that
responded for the storm, were
fed hot meals and served cold
drinks during the relief efforts,"
said Leto. "It was the least we
could do for them." Depsite
damage to their own homes,
these staff members continued
to work at the Club, ensuring
the needs of others were met.
During the relief
efforts, a total of 3,277 meals
were provided to Whiting Field
servicemen and women, visit-
ing National Guardsmen, and
essential personnel. All of this
was accomplished with limited
staffing and extremely undesir-


able work conditions.
As a result of losing
power and air conditioning, the
kitchen was extremely hot and
unbearable, with temperatures
well above 100 degrees.
Luckily, power was restored
Thursday evening to the Wings
Club. The staff of the club also
worked extended hours in order
to ensure all of the dining needs
of those serving here were met.
Normal operations resumed
Friday, less than a week after
the storm made landfall.
Lunch buffets are
offered Monday through
Friday, from 10:30 a.m. to -1
p.m. Fried chicken is always a
favorite, on Wednesdays.
Patrons can go early, on
Thursday, for an extra helping
of banana pudding, or beat the
summer heat with the fully
stocked salad bar. The lunch
buffet is available for take out
as well. The price is charged
according to weight, so you
only pay for what you take. Be
sure to try the weekly sandwich
special, you will definitely find
a favorite.
Additionally, the
Wings Club debuted a new

Continued on Page 3-C


Civilian Employee

Assistance Program




HRO \ould like to remind e-ervone that their
homepage is a good source of information on
a variety of Human Resources issues includ-
ing the Civilian Employee Assistance Program
(CEAP). Recently our CEAP service provider,
GHE Healthcare, added a monthly newsletter
to their \\ebsite. GHE Healthcare's website
may be accessed through the HRO home-
page at ',\ \.l-ropFn ac,-la na\\ mil. A-fter enter-
ing, at the HRO main menu. select CEAP,
then CEAP Information. On the left side, is a
menu: select NEWS tor the newsletter for
both super\ isors and emplo\ ees. WVhile there
browse through the site for other worthwhile
information. If employees prefer, they can
access the GHE Healthcare website directly
at w w tederalsolui-nns.com nar-


A


*1'.1


I '~*-

it'


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t


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(












Whiting Field




'Families First' to transform personal moves


By LaWanda York, American
Forces Press Service


ALEXANDRIA, Va.
(NNS) The process of service
members moving their house-
hold goods virtually
unchanged for many years is
about to transform.

The Military Surface
Deployment and Distribution
Command (SDDC) is develop-
ing a new process called
'Families First' that is sched-
uled to launch Feb. 1, 2006.

"We are extremely
proud to introduce this
absolutely transformed person-
al property program that will
provide many benefits and safe-
guards to individual service
members," said Maj. Gen.
Charles W. Fletcher Jr., head of
SDDC and leading proponent
for Families First.

-Families First is
designed to alleviate some of
the stress of moving by involv-
ing the service members in the
process and giving them a voice
in how their personal property
is moved. Families First focus-
es on meeting the customers'
needs by promoting a first-rate,
moving experience.

Working closely with
the military services, the Office
of the Secretary of Defense and
Congress, SDDC partnered


with the trade associations of
the American moving industry
to create Families First.

"Families First is ded-
icated to supporting the armed
.force's most important stake-
holders, the military and civil-
ian service customers," said
Thomas Hicks, the command's
program director for personal
property moves. "Our commit-
ment to the warfighter runs par-
allel to our support to the
invaluable work provided by
America and international
transportation service
providers.

"The working partner-
ship between the moving indus-
try and the U.S. military is a
longstanding, mutually produc-
tive and positive relationship,"
Hicks said. Every year, about
500,000 service members and
civilian employees move to
new duty stations. This com-
prises the biggest moving popu-
lation in the United States,
making the stakes high for both
the customer and the trans-
portation service provider. The
partnership between the two
will soon enter a new dimen-
sion.

Presently, transporta-
tion service providers are
selected based on the lowest
cost, with little consideration
for performance. Under
Families First, transportation
offices will use a "best-value"
approach that focuses on per-
formance. Most moving busi-


ness will be awarded to trans-
portation service providers who
do the best work as measured
by the customer. That customer,
the service member, will exer-
cise his or her voice by com-
pleting a web-based customer
satisfaction survey to measure
the performance of their
movers.

"We all share the goal
of providing the best customer
service to those who deserve it
the most, the American service-
member," Hicks said. "Families
First unites the moving indus-
try, the .[military] services and
SDDC in a sensible and cooper-
ative manner -to achieve this
goal.

Transportation service
providers providing the best
service will receive the most
business. This emphasis on cus-
tomer satisfaction is expected
to stimulate better quality work
from all transportation service
providers.

Families First also
promotes customer satisfaction
through:

Full-replacement
value for property lost or dam-
aged beyond repair; Direct
claims settlement between the
service member and transporta-
tion service provider; Web-
based counseling option; and
Increased emphasis on direct
deliveries reducing temporary
storage requirements.


Currently,


members may only receive a
depreciated value for property
lost or damaged beyond repair
in a move. In the new program,
a member is entitled to the cur-
rent replacement value of the
item.

For example, a five-
year-old television with a
replacement cost of $200 would
be valued at only $100 if lost or
damaged beyond repair .now.
That $200 replacement cost is
depreciated at 10 percent a year.
Under full-replacement value,
the transportation service
providers will either replace the
lost or damaged item with a.
new item or reimburse the
service member the full cost of
a new one.

There are some excep-
tions where the transportation
service provider may replace
the lost or damaged item with a
comparable used item. The
exceptions list includes boats,
personal watercraft, ultralight
aircraft, pianos, musical organs,
firearms, art objects, all-terrain
vehicles and snowmobiles.

Today moving claims
are handled through the closest
military claims office. In
Families First, service members
file a claim directly with the
transportation service provider


using SDDC's web-base
filing process, a part of
new Defense Personal P
System. If no settler
reached within 30 days
vicemember may trans
claim to the servicing n
claims office'.

In all claims p
ing, maximum. transpo
service provider limit of
ty increases to $50,00
from the current $40,000

Presently,
members receive pr
information from the
transportation office
Department of Defens
phlet entitled "It's Your
In Families First, service
bers have an added opt
convenience to receive
move counseling t
SDDC's web-based I
Personal Property Syste

Families First
ages door-to-door mov
the goal of sharply re
temporary storage. Ter
storage results in mor
dling, delay and expense
which increases risk to tl
ment.

"Under the ne
gram, we will work
with the services to sync


-d claim
SDDC's
propertyy
nent is
3, a ser-
sfer the
military


member relocations so most
moves may be door to door,"
Hicks said. "This initiative
emphasizes customer conven-
ience and reduces the need for
the double handling of proper-
ty."


Families First pro-
process- vides a payment program fea-
ortation ture that automates payments to
f liabili- transportation service
0 up providers. The introduction of
0. automated PowerTrack pay-
ments for transportation service"
service providers enables them to be
e-move paid for their moves within five
e local to seven days, a special benefit
or the to the small-business-owner
e pam- sector of the moving industry.
Move." PowerTrack assists their busi-
e mem- ness operations by eliminating
ion and payment delays and providing a
ve pre- consistency to their cash flow.
throughh
Defense "We recognize that
m. Families First represents a dra-
matic change in .the way we do
encour- business," Hicks said. "The
es with greatest challenge is managing
reducing business among competing
nporary firms."
re han-
e, all of For more Department
he ship- of Defense news, visit
www.defenselink.mil.

w pro- For more news from
closely around the fleet, visit
hronize ww.nav.mi.
www.navy.mil.


service


Academic Achievement Awards'
June 30
Commander, Training Air Wing Five Capt. Terry Jones presents Academic Achievement Awards to Ensign
Joshua J. Brooks, Ensign Colin M. Gaines, Lt Narhan P. Kendrick, Capt. Robin D. Moree and Ensign
Benjamin J Sparacir, Thurcld\ June 30.
Photo by Tom Thomas


Dadiomott commissioned
2nd Lt. Joseph C. Dadic.mol an HT-8 Student Aviator, is commissioned into the Marine Corps by HT-8
Commanding Officer Cmdr. Jim Alger and HT-8 Automated Data Processing Officer Maj; Michael Brown,
June 10.


p


There's a burar hiding


in your house.


Three HT-8 Flight Students promoted to lieutenant junior grade
HT-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Jim Alger promotes, from left, Lt. j.g. Gregory J. Olah, Lt.j.g. Jeremy
Sutherland and Lt. j.g. Lora Gorsky, to their present ranks June 13.


And Orie Federafagency anread Tias'
the paperwork to prove it.
It's your electric water heater. And whether it's
brand new or 10 years old, its robbing you
blind every month. Just like clockwork.
Every family needs hot water. But, when it's
heated by electricity, it costs about 50 percent
more to heat than hot water that's heated by
natural gas
Small change? Not really. Each year, you pay
around an additional $1,50 to heat your water
with electricity.*
Who says? The Federal Trade Commission.
The one that puts. those energy efficiency
stickers on the front of Water heaters.
So what can you do? Simple. Call us at
Natural Gas of Milton at 983-5400 and ask
about our $400 rebate.
and ask about our $400 rebate.

Box 9Natural Ga09
69) P.O. Box 909 MIL


Over the first year you can save, on
average, $150.* And, as electricity prices
continue to increase-so will your saving by
using natural gas..
The benefits also continue to comfort.
Natural gas water heaters have a higher
recovery rate, which means you have more
hot water, faster. No more running out of hot
water in the middle of a shower!!
If you have a gas main boarding your
property, we will even install the first 100
feet of service line for FREE. If that sounds
good to you, pick up the phone and call us.
A $400 rebate is just waiting for you.



CALL 983-5400


Is of Milton
.TON, FLORIDA 32572


Advanced Academic Achievement Awards
July 7
Commander, Training Air Wing Five Capt. Terry Jones presents Advanced Academic Achievement Awards
to 1st Lt. Nicholas J. Molder and Lt. j.g. Jennifer A. Scharlow Thursday, June 30.


i


The Whiting Tower


Saturday July 23, 2005


Pare 2-C


b











I Whiting Field

SGuard supports families through deployment hardships Whiting Club
Continued From Page One


By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON -
'K Families of deployed National
", Guard and Reserve members
face challenges beyond those of
active-duty families, and a
strong family support network
stands behind them to help
through those difficult days, the
National Guard Bureau chief
said.
"The challenges are
|"'-considerable," Army Lt. Gen.
Steven Blum said during a joint
interview here with The
Pentagon Channel and the
American Forces Press Service,
For one thing, Guard
and Reserve call-ups extend
considerably beyond the
SArmy's standard one-year
deployment cycles, Blum
pointed out. "One year of boots
on the ground is not one year
for a National Guard soldier,"
he said. "It's about 18 to 22
.months of total mobilization
time."
hat translates to time
; on active-duty time, away from
+',


families in an intensive training
mode. "You're basically putting
your life on hold for at least a
year and a half," Blum said.
That's no small sacri-
fice for the affected troops or
the families they leave behind,
he said.
And unlike active-
component families, those in
the Guard and Reserve general-
ly don't have the built-in sup-
port system that comes from
living in or around a big mili-
tary base with lots of other fam-
ilies in the same boat.
Guard and Reserve
families "are spread all over the
landscape," Blum said. "They
live in the communities. So
when they are called up, that
spouse or that family may be
the only people in the whole
neighborhood or in that whole
apartment complex" to have
their loved one deployed.
That's considerably
different from big bases or
posts where "when the wing (or
unit) goes, everybody who lives
in that enclave feels exactly the
same problem."
To help support these


families, the National Guard
Bureau Family Program offers
a wide range of services and
support ranging from family
readiness groups at the. unit
level to a Web site that details
the full range of services avail-
,able to families, including
points of contact.
More than 400 family
assistance centers nationwide
serve as the program's center-
piece. These centers, generally
set up in National Guard
armories, serve as "a critical'
link" for families during the
loved ones' deployments, said
Air Force Col. Anthony Baker
Sr., the Guard's chief of Family
Programs.
They serve not only
Guard and Reserve families,
but also families of all active-
component members deployed
or recently returned from a
deployment.
Blum described them
as "a single-stop shopping
source" for families needing
information or assistance, -not
only during the deployment, but
also before and after.
Families typically turn


Hayes receives Navy and Marine.Corps Commendation Medal
-, ABH1 (AW) Cindy K. Hayes, NAS Whiting Field Operations Department Crash and Salvage Division
- Training Petty Officer, is presented with the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal by Whiting
Commanding Officer Capt. Joan Platz Tuesday, July 19.


Photo by Patrick Nichols


to the centers for information
about the deployment or to find
out where to go for anything -
from counseling support to
financial assistance to health-
care access, Baker said. Some
come with questions about their
family member's civilian
employer or to ask how to get
military identification cards.
To help broaden the
centers' reach, the Guard is
partnering with state and local
governments, the American
Red Cross, the United Services
Organization and veterans serv-
ice organizations. The Veterans
of Foreign Wars, American
Veterans and American Legion
are already partners, and the
Disabled American Veterans
will sign on soon, Baker said.
"These organizations
are a real force multipliers,"
Baker said. "They bring impor-
tant skills and expertise to the
table'so we're better able to
help meet families' needs,"
Baker said.
And regardless of their
needs, Baker said the Guard
owes it to its members to look
out for their families while
they're deployed. "If we, don't
do that, we have failed them,"
he said. "We want to employ
every resource possible for
families so that when service-
members are deployed, they
know their families are in good
hands."
Knowing that their
families have a dependable sup-
port system at home enables
Guard members as well as
all other servicemembers to
concentrate on their mission
rather than worrying about their
families needs, Baker said.
It also has a direct
impact on whether they remain
in the service. "We have a say-
ing, 'If we sustain the family,
then we retain the servicemem-
ber,'" Baker said.


menu on July 5 featuring a
number of new options for your
dining experience. Your burger
and sandwich options are limit-
less with the "Build Your Own"
concept. The new menu also
offers "Buckets-To-Go" din-
ners. The menu is designed for
quarterly changes of featured
lunch and dinner selections.
The recent menu changes
include customer suggestions
given during a customer survey.
The revised children's menu is
a great alternative to fast food.
The Club is eager to meet your
breakfast needs, and new
changes to the breakfast menu
are on the horizon.
Aces Lounge offers a
relaxed atmosphere for social
gatherings. In the event you
need something larger, Sikes
Hall serves the needs of well
more than 600 people.
Anything in between can be
found with a full range of cater-
ing abilities. From a five-
course meal to a Southern
Buffet to simply coffee and
muffins, the Wings Club can do
it. There is also a complete, pro-
fessional catering department to
attend to any of your catering
needs. You can utilize the
catering department's new
menu, which debuted in March.
If you are planning a wedding,
unit party, retirement, tie cut-
ting, or simple luncheon meet-
ing; the wings Club is available
to answer the call.
The Wings Club
recently added arcade games to
their Caf6 Room, offering bil-
liards, pinball, basketball, rac-
ing and target shooting. You


can also find one of two ATMs
on base in the Wings Club
Complex. The pool is also
open during the summer, from:
10 a.m. to 6 p.m., seven days' a
week. To make your time
beside the pool more enjoyable,
the hours of the Aces Lounge
have been changed to better
accommodate with the pool's
hours, enabling you to order
food from the Aces Lounge and
bring it out to the poolside.
"We're making a lot of
great changes," says Wings
Club Manager Colette Obray.
'We're listening to our cus-
tomers and to make this a place
for them to enjoy."
Furthermore, each one
of the five squadrons here at
NAS Whiting Field has been
asked to take ownership of the
atmosphere of individual rooms
at the Club. As a result, the
squadrons can decorate and
transform' the room into their
own unique space, allowing for
a personalized setting when
they utilize the room for meet-
ings and other events. The
rebuilding effort, at Wings, is
not limited to its building struc-
ture but spans to the foundation
of meeting the ever changing,
diverse needs of the customer.
The Wings Club is
open Monday through Friday,
5:30 to 9 a.m. for breakfast and
10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. for lunch
and dinner. On weekends and
holidays, the club is open from
7 to 9 a.m. for breakfast; 10:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. for lunch; and
4:30 to 7 p.m. for dinner. For
more information, contact the
Wings Club at 850-623-7311.


A4 (k i a a


Darrel R. Greer wWw.edwardjones.com
Parkmore Plaza Member SIPO
6259 Highway 90 *
Milton, FL 32570 Ehdwar 1dlo le
(850) 983-1471Edw dJones
ServingIndividualInveitori Since i87p j


II


II


Santa Rosa County Residents &


Business Community


-1~, -.


Cantrall re-enlists
AC2(AW) Mark Cantrall, an NAS Whiting Field Air Traffic Controllern re-enlists for three years June 17. The
re-enlisting officer is his father, Sgt. Maj. Don Cantrall (USMC, ret.)


Photo by'Tom Thomas


Three HT-8 Flight Students promoted to lieutenant junior grade
HT-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Jim Alger promotes, from left, Lt. j.g. Gregory J. Olah, Lt.j.g. Jeremy
Sutherland and Lt. j.g. Lora Gorsky, to their present ranks June 13.
Photo by Tom Thomas


Strongly Support

Our Men & Woman


at HAS Whiting Field


& All Military Personnel


.4


a


' Saturday July 23, 2005


The Whiting Tower


Page 3-C


I


h
'^






Page 4-C The Whiting Tower Saturday July 23, 2005
Whiting Field
Page 6 M The Santa Rosa Free Press Wednesday--June 2, 2004


Vol I


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'-'Saturday July 23, 2005


The Whiting Tower

Whiting Field


Officer Scholarship

Program seeks fleet applications


From Naval Education and
,Training Command Public
Affairs

PENSACOLA, Fla. -
'Officers interested in graduate
education take note: the Navy is
now accepting applications for
the 2006 Officer Scholarship.
Program. Under the program,
officers enroll in graduate
school on a full-time basis,
receive full pay and allowances,
and are reimbursed for perma-
nent' change-of-station costs.
Tuition must be paid by a non-
Navy funded scholarship
obtained by the service mem-
ber. The scholarship must be
equal to or greater than 50 per-
cent of tuition costs, and
Veteran's Administration bene-
fits, such as the Montgomery GI
Bill, can be used in conjunction
with the scholarship.
Officers must be avail-
able to sart studies before Sept.
30, 2006 and have 24 months or
'less to complete their course-
work. Candidates will be
selected based on performance
records, needs of the Navy, pro-
motion potential, academic,
qualifications and field of study.
Designator and subspecialty of
individual applicants will deter-
mine areas of study available
through the program.
"This can be an excel-


lent way to pursue a graduate
degree," said Billie Colonna,
Officer Special Education
Programs Manager for the
Naval Education Training
Professional Development
Technology Center. "Many of
the .top universities actually
recruit scholar-, and there are
scholarships available for those
who search. We currently have
program participants at M.I.T.,
Oxford, Johns Hopkins,
Harvard, Princeton and Purdue,
to name a few schools. Since
selection to the scholarship 'pro-
gram is contingent upon the
officer's ability to obtain a
scholarship, all potential
selectees should immediately
begin pursuit of a scholarship."
Lt. j.g. Janice
Geldmacher, Officer
Scholarship participant current-
ly enrolled at Johns, Hopkins
University, is studying Civil
Engineering with a focus on
oceanography and
hydrophysics. "The program
has been an exceptional experi-
ence," said Geldmacher. "It has
not only allowed me to com-
plete my Master's degree at the
school of my choice, but it has
also afforded me the opportuni-
ty to work with some of the
most distinguished professors
within the engineering commu-
nity. It is, without question, a
great program."


Applicants must
receive the endorsement of
their commanding officer.
.Officers- receiving command
endorsement should forward
application packages via their
commanding officer to the
Commanding Officer,, Naval
Education and Training
Professional Development and
Technology Center (NET-
PDTC), Code N2A2, 6490
Saufley Field Road, Pensacola,
Fla. 32509-5204. Deadline to
apply for the Officer
Scholarship Program is Sept. 1,
2005.
In addition to com-
manding officer approval and a
completed application letter,
application packages must con-
tain college information and a
detailer endorsement statement.
Selected applicants
will incur an additional obligat-
ed service equal to three times
the length of time the3 were in
the program, served concurrent-
ly with any other obligated
service they may have.
Specific guidelines,
additional requirements and
detailed program information
can be found in NAVADMIN
133/05 and OPNAV Instruction
1520.24B. For more informa-
:. __ 1I-- A 1 U.4-__ -


tion on the Naval E ucat
and Training Command, v
Wlit 2- -1. t n .'-:.--l


HT-8's MacGillis places first at Emerald Coast DeadliH Competition
HT-8 Student Naval Aviator Lt. j.g. Steve MacGillis holds the first place trophy he won at the Emerald Co
Classic Deadlift Competition, held at the Seascape Resort in Destin, Fla. June 11. He entered the comp
tion in the 198 lbs. weight class and deadlifted 600.1 Ibs., setting a Florida junior state record with the Wo
Association of Benchers and Deadlifters. MacGillis thanks the NAS Whiting Field Morale, Welfare a
Recreation (MWR) Fitness Staff for their support during his training. He is congratulated by Whiting M\
Fitness Director lan Edgar.
Photo courtesy of the NAS Whiting Field MWR. Departm


Vidak receives Meritorious Civil Service Award
Rikki Vidak, an NAS Whiting Field Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Licensed Social Worker, is pre-
sented with a Meritorious Civil Service Award by Whiting Executive Officer Cmdr. Thomas Kennedy at a
ceremony July 8. Also present is Whiting FFSC Director Dr. Tricia Christ.
Photo by Kevin Gaddie



Olmsted Scholarship


Program applicants needed


Story by Naval Education
and Training Command
Public Affairs


ion PENSACOLA, Fla. -
'isit The Naval Education. and
Training Command (NETC) is
now accepting applications
from regular or Reserve com-
missioned line officers for the
fiscal year 2007 Olmsted
Scholarship Program. Career-
minded and highly qualified
officers with at least three years
of active duty service but no
more than 11 years as of April
.1, 2006 are eligible to apply
for the program.
The Olmsted
Scholarship Foundation, named
in honor of Gen. George and
Carol Olmsted, and the
Department of Defense have
jointly sponsored this scholar-
ship program since 1959. Since
its inception, the scholarship
has focused on educational and
charitable purposes.
Retired Rear Adm.
Larry Marsh serves as President
and Chief Executive Officer of
the Olmsted Foundation and
was an Olmsted Scholar from
1968-1970 in Munich,
Germany. Marsh believes the
success of the program is a
direct result of the vision of the
man for which' the foundation
iast and the scholarship program is
eti- named.
irid "Gen. Olmsted, our
nd benefactor and founder, certain-
WR ly had great vision when he said
ent that the world's greatest leaders
must be,' educated broadly,"
Marsh said. "For the past 45
years, our programs have edu-
cated young officers in foreign
languages and foreign cultures,
which is becoming more and
more important in today's
world."


1


The scholarship pro-
gram educates career military
line officers that display
extraordinary potential for
becoming future military lead-
ers. The program is open to all
branches of the U.S. military.
Selected officers serve as full-
time students, in a two-year
graduate internship at a foreign
university. Students normally
study in a language other than
English, and interact with the
culture of their host country.
The students are expected to
live on the local economy, tray-
el widely, and be affiliated with
U.S. embassies or consulates
for administrative purposes
only.
With,the selection of
the 47th Olmsted Scholar Class
on March 30, 2005, 418 schol-
ars have completed, are com-
pleting, or are preparing for two
,years of study abroad. Their
studies to date have been in 35
languages, in 153 different for-
eign universities, spanning 50
countries worldwide.
Participation in the
Olmsted Scholarship Program
is voluntary. Nominated per-
sonnel are required to meet a
list of qualifications and prereq-
uisites, and complete and sub-
mit a command-endorsed nom-
ination package no later than
Sept. 16; 2005. Nomination
packages are forwarded to the
Naval Education and Training
Professional Development and
Technology Center (NET-
PDTC) in Pensacola. 'In
October, the applications are
reviewed and a final, Navy-
sponsored list -of nominees is
selected.
The Navy nominations
are then submitted to the
Olmsted Foundation Board of
Directors, along with nomina-


tion packages from the other
services. During a comprehen-
sive interview at the founda-
tion's expense at their Falls
Church, Va. Office, foundation
staff explore the candidate's
motivation to be a scholar,
choice of foreign university,
proposed course of study, lan-
guage aptitude and career goals.
Taking all this data into
account, the interview panel
makes its recommendations to
the Board of Directors for final

decisions on the candidates at
their meeting in late March
2006. Recipients can expect to
begin language training in the
fall of 2006 at the Defense
Language Institute or a compa-
rable course of instruction, with
foreign university studies
beginning in 2007.
Preferred courses of
study include Social and
Political Sciences, History and
International Relations. Other
non-technical or non-science
choices made by the scholar
may be. authorized.
Historically, Olmsted
Scholars have benefited from
this opportunity and often con-
tinue to promote to senior lead-
ership positions. As of 2004,
29 scholars have achieved the
general officer and flag officer
rank. Earlier this year,
Secretary of Defense Donald
Rumsfeld announced the presi-
dent's selections for promotion
to flag officer and one former
Olmsted Scholars was among
the list of nominees.
Additionally, after completing
the program, Olmsted Scholars
have taken a significant step to
becoming qualified for selec-
tion as Foreign Area Officers as
described in DoD Directive
1315.17.


'N


Marriage Enrichment


Retreat set for Aug. 5-6

Join the NAS Whiting Field's Chaplain's Office Marriage
Enrichment Retreat Aug. 5-6 at Camp Beck with in Foley, Ala. The retreat
is for authorized couples who are looking to renew, energize and enrich
their relationships. All lodging and meals will be provided.
Transportation will be provided upon request. Space is limited, so regis-
ter today! For information or registration, call the NAS Whiting Field
Chaplain's Office at 623-7211.


Do you know who I am?
B'. Teresa Morell
NAS Whiting Field MWR Recreation -ide
Samantha Cook is the Operations Assistant %%\ith NAS hitting g Field s Morale \Welfare and
Recreation I( \VRI Liberty & Leisure Information Center. located at Bldg. 1459 on Rangei St. She
armed ,%ith her husband at NAS Whiting Field \\here he is a Flight Student. She has been working g
\ith MWR for about 3 months. When asked \\hat she likes about her job, she responded .\Lth
"Offering fun acti'.ities and events to those people \\ho \\ork so hard on this base. When Samantha
is not working her fa'.orite NM VR facility, is the Fitness Center but she replied, 'I real appreciate the
actih ties that MWVR oilers and all the tree facilities.' When asked. what do \ou enlo'i mostabour being
a military\ dependant? Samantha replied 'Just being married to a wonderful husband and meeting nev.
people.' With hurricane season here I could not help but ask if she had eer experienced ., hurricane,
her response \\as "no."
The first 50 patrons that stop b\ the Libert\ Center and mention this article v.ill receive one
iree game ot bo.,ling at the Whiling Field BoA-ling Center.


Interested Annual


Leave Donors

Jack Eagle. a NAS Whiting Field employee at the Security Department., has exhaust-
ed all of his leave. His wife is terminally ill, and he is in need of your support. He has been
approved as a recipient for the Leave Donor program.
If you are a Civil Service employee and can help Eagle by donating any annual leave.
please contact Lisa Anderson at the Management Services Office, Bldg 1401, Room 122.


Page 5-C









PAGE 6-C


THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GALZI I I -


JULY 23, 2005


. e
, ', ,y *; ) .
. ... "],- ;. '! 'f i .?
, '.. * .M t l ,, *,,
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^y^/T
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Licensed & Insured

S Free Estimates
Call Donnie Roper
(850) 626-1792


Thomas Amon
w Tree Service
FOR AII OF YOUR Tree & .
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All Phases of Drywalling Any Texture
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NO MONEY DOWN I
REFERENCES AVAILABLE
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HM: (850)994-6713
KCell: (850)501-0519


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of NWF, Inc.
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Landclearing Demolition
Dirt Hauling Seeding and Mulching
Debris Removal Stump Grinding
Ph: 850-983-9979 ,.
Fax: 850-983-9969
K Drivers Needed! )


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Record A 10
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Price $695.00
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Florida Rooms. Screen Roomr. Pool
Enclosure'. Patio Co'ers. Cjrport'.
in NI Siding. Shulters. Skirting.
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Home Repair and Remodeling
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SCell: 850-225-5377
Cell: 850-225-9817
Licensed & Insured
.'0,,. i Since 1996


J j&D->
Vinyl jSiding
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epair.
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Jimmy Oaks Dewayne Davis
@50-698-3193 850-698-018!

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Home Improvements





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Boat Mechanic
Evenrude Johnson Mercruiser
A n,:,r,3.al.l" PriL-I C' n' ; 1^80
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850-384-2386
K 2


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*:Drywall +Painting
*:Carpentry e*:Ceramic Tile
+Doors *:*Windows
+Renovation
Carl
474-1310 315-264-3476
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6861
Barnhill Rd..
Milton. FL .
Fax.
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850 r 623-3461T 8 .670
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Wallpapering
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Call the Ericksens today!
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Licensed
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,i


Sports




UWF Basketball camp
-dates and sessions set
The .University of West
Florida is holding a camp July 25-
29.
These camps are for boys
and girls ages seven to 15. Camp
',\-hours are from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
each .day and costs $150 per
Scamper. There is a $10 late
charge for walk-up registration.
The camp will emphasize
individual improvement and moti-
,.vation to play basketball as a
S- 'team game.
Instruction on the funda-
mentals of shooting, ball han-
dling, passing, offensive strategy.
:^; defense, rebounding, rules of
:*;"basketball, and 1-on-1 play will
,',be done by the camp staff and
college all-stars.
Campers are asked to bring
a lunch or money for lunch, gym
',shorts, t-shirt, basketball shoes
and socks as well as a bathing
uit and towel if you plan to use
M te Olympic size swimming pool.
All campers will receive a T-
shirt and basketball.
To register or obtain more
information call 436-4413 or 474-
:-',3319. -
Milton High School is
ready to fry some fish
Milton High School is selling
S' tickets for their Annual Fish Fry to
be held Aug. 12 at 5 p.m. at the
high school.
Tickets are $25, which enti-
ties you to two fish dinners and
free parking behind the stadium
,for all six home football games.
For more information call,
.-David Beach at 554-4791 or
Marsha Beach at 572-5652.
Panther Basketball to
hold camp July 25-29
Milton High School is
",accepting applications for its
Annual basketball camIp.
The camp has been
"-rescheduled for July 25
through 29 at Millon High
-School from 2 p.m. to 5:30
p.m. each day.
Campers will be instructed
eon fundamental basketball
-skills and will receive a camp
T-shirt along with an ice cream
--'-party to follow the camp.
This year's camp will cost
$55 and for the pro level camp,.
-where the participant will
receive a basketball, $65. ,
For more information on
this year's camp or to register
,you can. contact Coach Tim
8Short or Athletic Director
Murray Rutledge at Milton
High School by calling 983-
5600. .Registrations will also
be accepted at the door.
PSA releases date for
Double Bridge Run
The Pensacola Sports
Association announced that the
ninth annual Double Bridge Run
will take place Feb. 4, 2006.
The event will include a 15K
Sand 5K course and a junior 5K for
children under 14. For more infor-
mation contact the Pensacola
Sports Association at 434-2800.
Milton varsity cheer
clinic starts July 25
Milton High School Varsity
Cheerleaders will hold a cheer
clinic July 25 to 29.
The clinic will run from: 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Milton
High School Gym and is open
for students in kindergarten to
eighth grade. Registration will
begin at 3 p.m. on Monday and
participants will receive a T-shirt
and the opportunity to cheer at
the Sept. 2 Milton home game.
For more information call
Milton High School at 983-5600.

Do you have
sports-related
news or
information on you
would like to
see published in
the Press
Gazette! If so,
send it to us at:
sports@sr.pg.com


I,


Henley Memorial is delayed


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor


Race fans can get ready to
shout, scream, and yell for their
favorite drivers at the fastest
three-eights mile dirt track
around. .
Southern Raceway will roar
to life this Saturday, but some
plans for this weekend have,
changed.
"We have had to move the
Derek Henley Memorial race to
Aug. 26 and 27 due to track
conditions," said Southern
Raceway track operator Mel
Langham. "We have also had to
change some things about the
memorial weekend, but .feel
that everyone will enjoy what
we have planned."
Instead of running late
models on Friday and Saturday,
Langham has changed the


Derek Henley Memorial
Schedule of events as well.
"August 26 e will run the
IMCA modified, street stock,
vintage, trucks, hoggs, hobb.,.
and stinger classes," said
Langham. "'On Saturday we
AI hale late models arriving
from all over the -outheast. :
"The. \%ill be here to com-
pete in a 44 lap feature With'
$4,400 going to the winner."
Southern is planning on
starting the night with the
IMCA, hobby and trucks %% which
will then be followed by late
model qualifying.
The top two qualifiers will
lock in the feature with the
remaining drivers looking to
race their way into the field.
One driver who is expected
to challenge what is expected to
be a strong field is Cuba, Ala.'s


Mike Boland.
Langham explained there
were several concerns that led
to the changes along with the
track conditions following
Hurricane Dennis's arrival on
July 10.
"We checked the other
track schedules and there was-
n't any -conflicts,." said
Langham. "Also the expense of
a two day event on teams and
how hard it will actually be for
these teams: to find hotel
accommodations."
Hotel accommodations
have been an issue for several
events since September when
Hurricane Ivan visited the gulf
coast.
Tonight Southern Raceway
will feature racing as usual in,
all classes with a $1,000 to the
See, SOUTHERN, Pg. 2D


Racing action will resume tonight at Southern Raceway in Milton,
but the Derek Henley Memorial weekend has been pushed back
until Aug. 26 and 27. Tonight will include a full slate of racing along
with the vintage class competing for a $1,000 prize.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


4 .;~*A.


Pace's Byron Thompson is seen starting the second round of the Joe
Durant Southern Juniors tournament Wednesday at A.C. Read Golf
Course in Pensacola. Thompson finished the tournament with a
score of 160.


Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Pace was well represented
in this week's Joe' Durant
Southern Juniors golf tourna-
ment.
April Thompson, of Pace,
carded a two day total of 223,
while Byron Thompson carded
a two day total of 160.
Madison Pressel of Boca
Raton, Fla., won the girls divi-
sion with a two-day score of
154 finishing six strokes ahead
of Niceville's Renee Cloutier.
Jord)*n Hage of W\inter
Park, Fla., and.Jaime Brabb of
Maitland, Fla., finished tied for
third at 162.
Scores for most of the play-
ers went up on day two, which
was evident boys division win-
ner Kyle Cobb.
Cobb, of Tallahassee. Fla.,
opened the tournament at A.C.
Read Golf Course with a round
of 68 on Tuesday before srrug-
gling in with a 72 on
Wednesday to finish at 140.
That was three strokes
ahead of Pensacola's Martin
Bunt's 143 who's 70 on
Wednesday was the lowest
round of the day..
Mobile's Ben Russel fin-
ished third with a 144.
Byron Thompson opened
the tournament on Tuesda.
k ith a round of 79 and followed
it \w ith an 81 on Wednesday.
Attempts 'to reach Byron
Thompson or April Thompson
after the tournament were
unsuccessful.

Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports @ sr-pg.com


By BILL GAMNBLIN
PG Sports Editor


Dana Wert hopes to prove last season's loss to the Oklahoma City
Lightning was just a fluke for the Pensacola Power. Wert is the third
leading rusher in the league and the top rusher for teams still alive
this post season.


One year ago the Pensacola
Power suffered their last defeat
in a battle after traveling to
Oklahoma City.
Now this Saturday the same
Oklahoma City Lightning will
have to return the favor by trav-
eling to Pensacola for a 'Battle
by the Bay'.
"This is a wonderful feel-
ing," said Donzaleigh Patterson,
a middle line backer for the
Power from Milton. "That is the
team I hurt my knee against two
years ago.
"Road games, especially in
the playoffs, are very hard."
But one year ago is when
the Pensacola Power lost their
last game and only the fourth in
franchise history 31-17 in the
Southern Conference
Championship game.


Pace's April Thompson is seen putting on the ninth green
Wednesday during the second round of the Joe Durant Southern
Juniors 'tournament at A.C. Read Golf Course in Pensacola.
Thompson finished the tournament with asocre of 223.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Before the game it was not
an enjoyable experience
according to running back Dana
Wert, who some consider one
of the toughest players on the
team.
"A lot of things went wrong
before that game," said Wert.
"The air conditioning was
broke the entire 22 hour bus
ride to Oklahoma City and we
were miserable about not play-
ing at home."
Oklahoma City defeated
the Nashville Dream 42-7 and
is hoping to cause a similar
result with the one-two combi-
nation of thunder and lightning.
Illiana Calderon led the
Lightning in rushing with 997
yards on the season, while her
teammate Lameshia Roland
was right behind with 807 yards
and leads the team averaging
13.8 yards a carry.


Offensively the Lightning
like to find Roland out of the
backfield as she is quarterback
Kim Mitchell's favorite target
and leads Oklahoma City in
receptions with 11 and receiv-
ing yards with 241.
Roland is also a kickoff and
punt return threat averaging 32
yards a kickoff and 20 yards per
punt.
The travel disadvantage is
apparently a very big one as the
home team has won eight of the
nine playoff games this post
season, as the Nashville Dream
lost their home game to
Oklahoma City.
Last week Pensacola
defeated the Chattanooga
Locomotion 42-12. Ironically
the Locomotion defeated the
Dallas Rage 16-14, which
defeated Okalahoma City 26-20
See, POWER, Pg. 2D


A


tri. Bana~sas~rsbl


Pace teens tee it up at juniors event


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor


Power ready for Battle at the Bay'


Pensacola looks to earn fourth trip to SupHer Bowl


1 I I I II rrr r P '


i


t


<

s














Sports


Page 2-D


Women can play football too!
I'I -


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
There is a game tonight you
shouldn't miss.
Tonight's match-up
between the Pensacola Power
and the Oklahoma City
Lightning will be nothing short
of exciting.
Time for me to take a drink
of water while you try to com-
pose yourself. I can just hear
some of the guys .laughing
about watching women play
football.
At Escambia County High
School, which is the high
school home of Emmitt Smith, I
can promise there will be no
appearances from the likes of
Terrell Owens, Derrick Brooks,
or Smith himself.
Instead you will see women
who play the game of football
for the same reason some of us
did in vacant lots, a friend's
back yard, or in high school-a
love of the game.
I know the old song and
dance that women can't play
football, but I dare you to tell
some players with the
Pensacola Power they don't
play football.
Back in 2000 when
Catherine Masters called me to
talk about the National
Women's Football Association
and her Nashville Dream, I was
a bit skeptical as well.
Six games between the
Dream and the Alabama
Renegades sold enough people
to start the league and create
our Pensacola Power.


SBill's

* SSj Locker


Selling me was going to
take a little more, which teams
like the Pensacola Power has
done.
How many big time pro
athletes in any game are going
to travel from Baton Rouge to
practice twice let alone lace up
a pair of cleats and strap on a
Riddell helmet.
There is such a wonder
woman, a rookie, with the
Power.
And what amazes me the
most is none of these women
get paid, but will instead pull
money out of their own pockets
or find a sponsor so they can
play football.
Derrick Brooks might play
for free, but I doubt if too many
others in the NFL would work a
full-time job to pay the bills and
adjust their schedule for a
game.
Despite all the myths and
guffaws, I promise these
women play football.
All ou 'will find at a .
Pensacola Power football game


... is 100 percent effort and a


~- ~L~: ~


Challenge

Answer these questions to win


2 tickets to see the Pensacola Pelicans!

Q: What big name area late model driver is
expected to drive in this years Derek Henley
Memorial at Southern Raceway?

Q: Who defeated the
Pensacola Power in the first
SupHer Bowl?
Note: you are eligible to win one pair of
tickets per month
Tickets for Pelican Home
games against the Coastal Bend Aviators
and the Edinburg Roadrunners


Call 623-2120 and ask to speak with
Bill! Answers can be found in
previous sports sections.


desire to win.
Since their first kickoff in
2001 the Power have compiled
a 45-4 record heading into
tonight's game.
Not too shabby huh?
And tonight you can still
find some of the original mem-
bers of that 2001 squad ready to
step out on the field and give it
their all like Milton's
Donzaleigh Patterson.
In the four previous seasons
the Power have made three trips
to the National Women's
Football Association's SupHer
Bowl.
Tonight they will try to
punch their dance card for trip
number four.
What other professional
sports franchise has even come
close to that level of success in
the area?
Some franchises announced
they were coming to the area
and never even tipped off their
first season.
Sports fans can be and will
be fickle. And when it comes to
spending their dollars will
always love and support a win-
ner!
Just ask the Braves fans
during the rotten years.
So what is keeping you
from purchasing that ticket to
watch the Power?
It can't be the price. A tick-
et to see the Power is just $10
and the kids are free.
There are a bunch of ladies
who will make sure you won't
regret it.


Power


Continued From Page One
earlier this season as both
squads split a home and home
series.
Road games seem to make'
for some very long days in con-
juncuon ith the travel.
"We want them to have the
same disadvantage we had last
year," said defensive captain
Jessica Rutherford. "After the
travel and trm ing to rest a day it
was still difficult for us to get


our focus."
The Power pride is ready to
explode for this game, as the
team is very hungry to return to
the World Championship game
of the National Women's
Football Association.
"We are hoping to show
them that last year was a fluke,"
said Wert.
Both teams already, know
what lies ahead of the winner
tonight's game.


Next Saturday the winner
of this game will face three time
NWFA World Champion
Detroit Demolition at. Papa
John's Stadium in Louisville,
Ky.
The Demolition defeated
the D.C. Divas 38-16 to earn
the Northern Division Title.
Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@sr-pg.com


Southern


Continued From Page One
winner of the vintage class.
Currently the vintage class
is being hotly contested in the
points chase between Chris
Bayhi and Stuart Wilson.
Bayhi is currently leading
Wilson by just two points, 410
to 408.
Tonight's purse should
make this competition e'en hot-
ter.
Gates open at -t p in. and
racing w ill begin at 7 p.m.

Southern Raceway Points
Standings (As of June 25)


Late Model: 1. Shep Lucas
336: 2. Lamn Boutwell 222.
3. Frank W'ilson 182: 4.


Jason Phillips 172; 5. David
Smith 160; 6. Joshua Joiner
156; 7. Wesley DuBoise 152;
8. Jonathon Joiner 142; 9.
Keith House 122; 10. Ricky
Soleman 108.
Hobby: 1. Dan Allen 354; 2.
Alan Colley 284; 3. Devin
Jones 274; 4. Tim fowler
232; 5. James Bates 158; 6.
Dean Shaw 136; 7. Martin
Tucker 126; 8. James Usserv
124; 9. Ryan Fowler 124; 10.
Dale Busch 124.
Vintage: 1. Chris Bayhi 410;
2. Stuart Wilson 408; 3. Jay
Jones 292; 4. Bo Slay 284; 5.
Russell Galbreath 240; 6.
Kylan Nathey 216; 7. James
Morris 192; 8. Raymond
Ray 174; 9. Sha\ n Hoomes
94; 10. Danny Thompson 78.
Truck: 1. Bo Bailey 382; 2.
Bobby Jemigan 368; 3. Bill
Blum 322; 4. Sam
McMullen 244; 5. Jerry
Stephens 196; 6. Les Smith
166; 7. Steve Wallace 144; 8.
Greg Jones 118; 9. David
Uebelsteadt 104; 10. Wally
Davis Jr. 98.
Street Stock: 1. John Cody
308; 2. Brandon Harris 298;
3. Brandon Kilpatrick 232;
4. Luther Fletcher 222; 5.
Thomas Pfeiffer 212; 6.


Jason Dolar 204; 7., Shawn
Kemp 184; 8. Steve Kemp
184; 9. Tim Chopp 180; 10.
Brad Lee 168.
Hogg: 1. Alan Seitz 352; 2.
John Taylor 322; 3. John
Cordell 264; 4. John
Etheridge 242; 5. Shane
Haynes 240; 6. Patrick
Jernigan 218; 7. Keith
Pinckaid 186; 8. Jonathon
Cotton 186; 9. Jamie Black
142; 10. Jeff Woodall 140.
Stingers: 1. David Steffens
318; 2. Charles Coburn 292;
3. Justin Galbreath 232; 4.
Jeremy Walters 198; 5. Chris
Gubson 192; 6. Travers
Everhart 174; 7. James
Kimbrough 156; 8. Michael
Johnson 136; 9. John. Jones
126; 10. Bobby Jones 122.
IMCA: 1. Joe Phillips 422;
2. John Melton 373; 3. Kyle
Elliott 314; 4. Kevin Bell
309; 5. Randy Polk 308; 6.
Jesse Barnhill 295; 7. Buddy
White 278; 8. Damon
Hammond 261; 9. Wesley
Griffin 261; 10. Tom
Galbreath 250.


Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@sr-pg.com


East Bay
" Sur',nd ',. Jul, I4. 2l:i5
SI 3-4 ANM t Ifeei
1 1.1 -NM Sun ric
9:32 AM Moon set
2:32 PM 1.74 feet
7:46 PM Sun set
10:27 PM Moon rise


Monday, July 25, 2005
1:38 AM 0.43 feet
6:01 AM Sun rise
10:38 AM Moon set
3:09 PM 1.32 feet
.7:46.PM Sun set
10:58 PM Moon rise

Tuesday, July 26, 2005
12:22 AM 0.76 feet
6:02 AM Sun rise
6:56 AM 0.98 feet
11:42 AM Moon set
7:45 PM Sun set
9:23 PM 0.81 feet
11:29 PM Moon rise,

Wednesday, July 27, 2005
6:00 AM 1.34 feet
6:02 AM Sun rise
12:44 PM Moon set
6:22 PM 0.50 feet
7:45 PM Sun set
10:27 PM Third Quarter


Pensacola Bay


Suid :.,, Jul. 24, :'I3
6 02 \M Sun nr'c
'.-1 AM M ,I.,.,r, -..t
12:25 PM 1.16 feet
7:48 PM Sun set
10:29 PM Moon rise
11:47 PM 0.29 feet

Monday, July 25, 2005
6:03 AM Sun rise
10:40 AM Moon set
1:02 PM 0.88 feet
7:47 PM Sun set
10:31 PM 0.50 feet
11:00 PM Moon rise

Tuesday, July 26, 2005
4:49 AM 0.66 feet
6:04 AM Sun rise.
11:43 AM Moon set
7:32 PM 0.54 feet
7:47 PM Sun set
11:30 PM Moon rise

Wednesday, July 27, 2005
3:53 AM 0.89 feet
6:04 AM Sun rise
12:46 PM Moon set
4:31 PM 0.34 feet
7:46 PM Sun set
10:27 PM Third Quarter


Navarre Beacn
Sur J.ul, 2-l 2i'ii,
W-i'l -01 Sun rrce

11:22 AM 1.47 feet
7:46 PM Sun set
8:46 PM 0.34 feet
10:27 PM Moon rise


Monday, July 25, 2005
6:01 AM Sun rise
10:38 AM Moon set
11:36 AM 1.15 feet
7:42 PM 0.55 feet
7:45 PM Sun set
10:58 PM Moon rise

Tuesday, July 26, 2005
3:43 AM 0.87 feet
6:02 AM Sun rise
7:26 AM 0.74 feet
11:03 AM 0.84 feet
11:42 AM Moon set
7:14 PM 0.64 feet
7:45 PM Sun set
11:28 PM Moon rise

Wednesday, July 27, 2005
3:32 AM 1.13 feet
6:02 AM Sun rise
12:44 PM Moon set
2:40 PM 0.48 feet
7:44 PM Sun set
10:27 PM Third Quarter


Suindj,. Jul -J. 21-1 5
12 I4 4 M 1"1 6f keet
'1 01 kI Sun rinc
9:32 AM Moon set
3:28 PM 1.74 feet
7:47 PM Sun set
10:28 PM Moon rise

Monday, July 25, 2005
2:08 AM 0.43 feet
6:01 AM Sun rise
10:39 AM Moon set
4:05 PM 1.32 feet
7:47 PM Sun set
10:59 PM Moon rise

Tuesday, July 26, 2005
12:52 AM 0.76 feet'
6:02 AM Sun rise
7:52 AM 0.98 feet
11:42 AM Moon set
7:46 PM Sun set
9:53 PM 0.81 feet
11:29 PM Moon rise

Wednesday, July 27, 2005
6:03 AM Sun rise
6:56 AM 1.34 feet
12:45 PM Moon set
6:52 PM 0.50 feet
7:45 PM Sun set
10:27 PM Third Quarter


A


)1


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Saturday July 23, 2005





\"


Milton's Donzaleigh Patterson (left) and Michelle Wert (right) is seen walking off the field following a
big defensive stop during last Saturday's game against the Chattanooga Locomotion.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin












aa a' Pr
gazette


PAGE 3-D


lassi


ec(


.S


SATURDAY
JULY 23, 2005


90 ANNOUNCEMENTS
92 AUCTIONS
94 MEETINGS
96 PERSONALS
98 TRAINING
EMPLOYMENT
102 DRIVERS
104 GENERAL HELP
106 HOME BASED
BUSINESS
108 HOTEL/MOTELS/
RESTAURANTS
110 LABOR
112 MANAGEMENT
-114 MEDICAL
116 OFFICE WORK
118 PART TIME
120 PROFESSIONAL
122 RETAIL
124 SALES/
TELEMARKETING
126 SKILLS/TRADE
128 POSITIONS WANTED
GARAGE SALES -
STYLES SECTION-WED.
202 GARAGE SALES-SAT.
SERVICES
305 AUTO
310 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
315 BUSINESS SERVICES
320 CHILD CARE
325 DOMESTIC
330 EQUIPMENT REPAIR
335 FINANCIAL SERVICES
340 HOME REPAIR
345 LAWN CARE
350 SENIOR CARE
355 SEWING/ALTERATIONS
360 MISCELLANEOUS
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-RENT
402 APARTMENTS
404 COMMERCIAL
406 HOMES
408 LAND
410 MOBILE HOMES
412 ROOMS FOR RENT
414 ROOMMATES WANTED
416 VACATION/RESORT
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-SALE
502 APARTMENTS
504 COMMERCIAL
506 HOMES
508 INVESTMENTS
510 LAND
512 MOBILE HOMES
514 VACATION/RESORT
PETS/ANIMALS
702 BOARDING
704 LIVESTOCK
706 LIVESTOCK SUPPLIES
708 PETS
710 PET SUPPLIES
712 LOST PETS
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
802 ANTIQUES
804 APPAREL
806 APPLIANCES
808 ARTS & CRAFTS
810 COMPUTERS
812 FARM EQUIPMENT
814 FURNITURE
816 JEWELRY
818 LAWN EQUIPMENT
820 LUMBER/HARDWARE
822 MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
824 OFFICE EQUIPMENT
826 SPORTING GOODS
828 ELECTRONIC
ISTEREO.TV..VCR)
830 MISC./SALE
832 MISC. WANTED
834 LOST MERCHANDISE
TRANSPORTATION
902 AUTO SUPPLIES
904 CARS
906 BOATS
908 FARM EQUIPMENT
910 MOTORCYCLES
912 MOTOR HOMES
914 RECREATIONAL
916 SPORTS UTILITY
VEHICLE
918 TRUCKS
920 VANS
922 OTHER


I INDEX I


IS STRESS Ruining
Your Life? Read Dl-
ANETICS by Ron L.
Hubbard. Call
(8131872-0722 or
send $7.99 to Dia-
net.cs. 3102 N. Ha-
Dana Ave Tampa
FL 33607

RUN YOUR ad
Siatewide!- For only
$450 you can place
your 25 work classi-
lied ad in over 150
newspapers
througriout tile state
reaching over 5 Mil-
lion readers Call
Ihis newspaper or
Advertising Nel-
works of Florida at
t866-742-1373. Visit
us online at
www.lloridaclassi-
tieas corn. Display
ads also available.


AUCTION 826 AC
MOL and alarm
Equipment on 7-23
at 11 30 am in Buck-
v'lie, Lafayette
County, FL. Call for
package i888;821-
0894.


FlL1 IIc~ lr~3~~~


you can encourage activities
that stimulate thinking and
promote physical wellbeing in
the lives of our communities
elderly. If your cheerful,
dependable and like flexible
schedules, we want to talk to
you. Call 850-477-5090.



SALES PERSON
$320 Salary, bonus,
benefits, advancement.
Key Auto Liquidation
4340 Avalon Blvd.
/, Milton, Fl.
Ask for Coach Gordon
850-983-3000



ACCOUNTANT/BOOKKEPER
FULL TIME AT PUBLIC
ACCOUNTING FIRM IN SANTA
ROSA COUNTY. CANDIDATE
SHOULD HAVE CLIENT WRITE-
I< UP EXPERIENCE, PAYROLL
KNOWLEDGE, GOOD
COMMUNICATION SKILLS AND
ABILITY TO WORK WELL
UNDER DEADLINES.
COMPETITIVE COMPENSATION
PACKAGE WITH BENEFITS.
SEND RESUME WITH SALARY
REQUIREMENTS TO:
,"'. ACCOUNTANT, P.O. BOX 2194,
PACE, FL 32571.


LOCAL HOME
IMPROVEMENT
COMPANY NEEDS
EXPERIENCED WINDOW
X & DOOR INSTALLERS.
DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE. CLEAN
DMV. MUST HAVE
TOOLS. 983-2899.


I JAITOR^SI


4 ":S..


FANTASTIC
AUCTION.
Casey's Country
Corner.
July 23rd '@4' 2pm
Rescheduled from
the 9th because
of Dennis. Antique
beds. Victorian
Tables Tea Cartns
Nippon, Hull Rubv.
Depression
Occupied Japan
Lamps. Gold baby
ring, Guns & parts,
Primitives trunks.
clocks. watches.
Peddle tractors,
old loys, tools,
coins, antiques,
used furniture and
much more
Gary Long
AB 1761.AU2421
10".: Buyers
Premium.
9204 N. Davis Hwy.
850-473-9337


NOW HIRING!
SCHOOL JANITORS
ALL OF
SANTA ROSA
COUNTY
ALL SHIFTS.
Full time or part time.
Competitive Wages &
Benefits offered.
Apply in person:
6544 Firehouse Rd.
Bldg. 3N Milton
983-5262


United Bank is now taking
applications for the position
of TELLER at our Milton
location. Banking
experience preferred but not
required. For further details
about this position, please
visit our website at
lwww 7 (ubankfl.comn or call
Gwen Bradan at
1-800-423-7026
to schedule an interveiw.

United Bank I|
un).nr H.arm',_,ia',F.,lli OpooJ.n.i mpi e
unteo B3n/t /s an Eqs Opoortu.f. Elmploler .


FULL TIME TITLE
CLERK. MILTON AREA.
DEALERSHIP SMALL SO
YOU MUST BE ABLE TO
WORK DIFFERENT
AREAS. AUTOMOBILE
EXPERIENCE A MUST !
CALL 983-3477 ASK FOR
SANDRA BAXLEY.


InI. ~kr IS] :jIIS'A~


NEED HELP FAST?
LET THE PRESS
GAZETTE'S HOT JOBS
NOW SECTION WORK
FOR YOU! CALL
SHEENA OR TRACEY
TODAY FOR RATES AND
DEADLINE
INFORMATION.


ACCOUNTING CLERK, IMMEDIATE
NEED FOR EXPERIENCED
ACCOUNTING/BOOKKEEPING
CLERK. IDEAL CANDIDATE WILL
HAVE ONE YEAR (MIN) OR MORE
TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE IN
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE,
CUSTOMER BILLING RECORDING,
CREDIT CARD SALES AND BANK
RECONCILIATIONS. WILL ALSO
PREPARE SALES/FUEL TAX
REPORTS. MUST BE PROFICIENT
IN COMPUTER SYSTEMS. SEND
RESUME TO: SMITH TRACTOR
COMPANY ATTN: ACCOUNTING
POSITION P.O. BOX 427 JAY, FL
32565. FAX: 850-675-6934.


I


44


RN PART-TIME
FLORIDA LICENSE FOR
NURSE REGESTERY.
DOING IN HOME
PATIENT ASSESSMENTS
IN SANTA ROSA
COUNTY.
CALL DORTHY
994-1046.


54


SBAPTIST
Jay Hospital
RN FT, PT or PRN.
FL License required.
CNAPCT FT. PT or PRN. FL Certification
preferred
Occupational Therapist PT position.
Will work in acute care. SNF and outpatient
setting. FL license required
Speech Therapist PRN position.
FL license required
Physical Therapist PRN position.
FL license required
Mled Tech FT. PT or PRN Position.
FL license required
12 hour shifts. FL license required
Patient Representative- FT. HS/GED.
Know ledge of computers,. basic ty ping skills.
medical terminology insurance billing
requirements and reimbursement and comprehen-
site understanding of all Business Office functions.
preferred. Applicant must hate the ability to
communicate effectively and to %work various shifts
including weekends. Must be team oriented.
Applications are accepted
Monday Friday from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. at
Jay Hospital, 14114 Alabama St., Jay, FL or
call 850-675-8069 for more information.


WAY OPACA NA


S *- 0
*A 6d






- *i*. fo


PRIVATE

PARTY ADS

*4.00/WK
up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30
$1.00 OFF FOR
3RD WEEK
MUST BE PRE-PAID


GARAGE

SALE ADS

15.00
up to 20 words
.25 PER WORD
OVER 20
PRE-PAYMENT
REQUIRED


COMMERCIAL

ADS

$11.00/1 st week
$1.00 OFF EACH
ADDITIONAL WEEK
up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30
SUBJECT TO
CREDIT APPROVAL


1 Poe ti





3. axyou a

in pm^lacing ^^^
yourad, S call
(850)623I-2120.


* S acKiHi^^^^^


A


ail


I AUCTION


M1J IiM


:17


5,


ARE YOU GOOD
WITH YOUR
HANDS & GOOD
WITH PEOPLE?
HURRICANE
CLEANUP HELP
NEEDED NOW!!
$400+/WEEK TO
START
VARIOUS
POSITIONS OPEN
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED
WE TRAIN
(850) 626-4429.


*y


I


r


4










I PAGE 4-D THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE JULY 23, 2005


102
Drivers


102
Drivers

DRIVER TRAINEES
Needed Nowl No
experience required.
CDL Training is now
available in your
area. Covenant
Transport has imme-
diate openings for
entry-level semi
drives. Our avg.
drivers earn more
than $36K first year.
OTR and Regional
runs get you home
Weekly. Train for top
pay call today. 1-
86.6-280-5309.

DRIVER-COVE-
NANT TRANS-
PORT! Excellent
pay and benefits for
Experienced Driv-
ers, 0/0, solo
Teams and Gradu-
ate Students. Bo-
nuses Paid Weekly.
Equal Opportunity
Employer (888)
MORE PAY (888-
667-3729)

EVERGREEN
TRANSPORTA-
TION needs drivers
to run the 13 SE
states with both
weekly and week-
bri hometime. We
offer good pay and
benefits. If you are
at least 23 with a
good drying record
with a. HAZMAT en-
dorsement please
come by our termi-
nal located at 300
Hwy. 95A, Canto-
ment, Florida across
from IP paper mill or
call 850-968-1702.

NOW HIRING
'No CDL required.
Truck driver with
tractor trailer and
forklift experience a
music 623-5385.

NOW HIRING quali-
fied drivers for OTR
positions. Food*
grade tanker. No
thazmat. No pumps.
Greal Benefits,
Competitive Pay and
new equipment.
Need 2. years OTR
- experience. Call By-
num Transport for
your opportunity to-
day: (80,0)741-7950.

S/E & 3-State Run:
T/T Drivers. HOME
WEEKENDS. Mile-
age Pay, Benefits,
401K. Trainees Wel-
c6me/Miami area-
exp. req. 21 min
age/Class-A CDL
Cypress Truck Lines
(800)545-1351


15 DAY LOCAL
CDL TRAINING
SFull and Part Time Classes
Major carriers hiring on site
*Tuition Assistance iI qualified
For over 29 years-
we've been training
America's Truckersa!
CALL TODAY!
'Truck Driver Institute
5780 Milton Road
Milton, FL
800-709-7364

104
General Help
$600 WEEKLY
working through the
government part-
time. No experience.
A lot of Opportuni-
ties. (800)493-3688
Code J-14.
1 WOMAN and a
Mop residential and
commercial cleaning
now hiring, Call 994-
8045.
AIDES NEEDED for
Milton Retirement
Center. 3 to 11 & 11
to 7. Call 623-6550.
ALL TRADESMEN:
PF/PW/BK/MC,
CR/EL/TW/MW/EO/
RG/SM/IW/&PAfTB/
PL/CO/CW/W. Work
out of state with top
pay & per diem. Re-
sume. to: Craft Net-
work, Box. 137472,
Clemont, FL 34713.
"BABYSITTER
NEEDED in my
home. Pea Ridge
area. Call 994-5719
or 994-6664.
CLEANERS & In-
*spectors Apply Fri-
days 10:00am-
1:00pm beginning
June 3rd. 'Century
21, Island View Re-
alty, 8510 Navarre
Pkwy., Navarre. No
phone calls.'
CLEANING PER-'
SON Needed. Seri-
ous long, term em-
ployment applicants
only. Must be relia-
ble & dependable.
Must have car avail-
able. Call 994-1785.
DATA ENTRY Work
ON YOUR OWN.
Flexible Hours! $$$.
GReat Pay!$$$ Per-
sonal Computer re-
quired. (800)873-
0345 ext #300.
EXPERIENCED-
PLASTERERS
needed. Must :have
own transportation.
Top pay. Call 698-
8327.


104
General Help


Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Next Class: Aug 1st
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
*Job Placement in your are
1.800.383-7364
Associated Training Services
wwwatsn-schools.com
EXPERIENCED
TREE Climbers,
hard working
groundsmen. Call
449-5243.
GREENHOUSE/
NURSERY work.
Full time, experience
preferred, Milton
area. Call 850-418-
1816 Ask for Jon.
HELP WANTED full
time stockers, part-
time cashiers open
availability and
weekends a must.
Great benefit, apply
in person at the
Pace Wal-Mart. No
phone calls please.
LIBERTY
NATIONAL Life
Insurance
Do You Earn
$75,000 A Year?
Would You Like
To? Using our pro-
ven marketing plan
you could earn
$75K your first year
with us--even more
the next year with
renewals and bo-
nuses! We offer two
retirement funds,
health insurance,
paid vacation,
convention trips
and morel No
experience neces-
sary. On-the-job
training Require-
ment: honesty, hard
work, dependable
transportation, and
the willingness to
follow our system.
We are an Equal
Opportunity
Employer.
Find out more Call:
983-7576.
WANTED MAINTE-
NANCE man, some.
experience, for Mo-
bile Home Parks.
626-8973.


104
General Help

LOCAL HOME Im-
provement Compa-
ny needs experi-
enced Window &
Door installers.
Drug Free Work-
place. Clean DMV.
Must have tools.
983-2899.

NOW HIRING for
2005 Postal posi-
tions $17.50-
$59.00+/hr. Full
Benefits/Paid Train-
Ing and Vacations
No Experience Nec-
. essary (800)584-
1775 Reference #
5600.

NOW HIRING wait-
ress and cook for
Bayou Cafe in Pace.
Call 994-9232,


P/T DIETARY AID
position available
8 hour afternoon
shift.
No experience
necessary.
Apply in person at
Santa Rosa Health
and Rehab
5386 Broad St.
in Milton EOE
Drug Free
Workplace


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
Milton Newspapers,
Inc. (dba The Santa
Rosa Press Gazette
and The Santa Rosa
Free Press) re-
serves the right to
censor, reclassify,
revise, edit or reject
any advertisement
not meeting its
standards of accept-
ance. Submission of
an advertisement
does not constitute
an agreement to
publish said adver-
tisement. Publication
of an advertisement
does'not constitute
an agreement for
continued publica-
tion.

SALES $5,500.
Weekly goal poten-
tial. If someone did
it, so can you! 2-3
confirmed appoint-
ments daily! Benefits
available.,Call Cath-
erine McFarland
(888)563-3188

YARD MANAGER
for Landscape Sup-
ply business. Good,
valid drivers license,
& forklift experience
required. Starting'
-pay at $8 an hour.
Monday-Friday 8-5,
Saturday 8-12. Call
850-626-8578.


Smurfit-Stone '
Brewton, Alabama Mill
in conjunction with
Alabama Technology Network Alabama
at Alabama Southern Technology
INVITE APPLICATION Network
FOR ENTRY LEVEL PRODUCTION POSITIONS


Entry Level Proauction operator position
Education: High School Diploma or GED
Work History: Someone with two years of full-time work history and a proven record of
perform ance, someone that plays by the rules, has demonstrated the drive to
achieve and move up in previous jobs, initiates his/her own learning, gets along
well with others, is helpful,
and has the mechanical, numerical and verbal aptitude to learn our jobs quickly.
Shifts and Job requires ability to work any all rotating shifts, overtime, weekends and holidays,
Environment: as well as the ability to handle the physical exposures, such as heat and noise.
Our pre-employment process has changed this year. Specifically, the Manufacturing Training Program will
be a one day, 8 hour, Papermaking Process Overview, replacing the 16 nightly sessions conducted in
previous years. Also, after the initial assessment, non qualifying applicants will be given information on their
results and potential opportunities to increase skill sets or future consideration.


To be considered, qualified potential applicants should complete this application with the
information below. Potential applicants will be required to submit a $25 non-refundable
check or money order to the Alambama Technology Network at Alabama Southern (ATN) to
provide for cost of this pre-employment testing. Deadline for receipt of the testing
reaisitration fee will be Auauat 1. 2005


Following Phase 1, potential applicants will receive a letter conforming receipt of payment
and other information. Potential applicants will be assigned a testing appointment time by
ATN based on availability. Potential applicants will be assessed for basic employment skills.
Testing will be conducted on either August 13th or 20th, 2005 at Jefferson Davis Community
College in Brewton, Alabama. Two sessions are available on each day, 8-12 AM and 1-5PM.


Following phase 2, qualifying applicants will be invited to attend an orientation meeting with
representatives from Smurfit-Stone and ATN. During this time, an additional assessment will
also be conducted as the first step in the interview preocess. The meeting will be conduct-
ed at the ATN Center on the Jefferson Davis Community College campus on August 30 and
September 1, 2005. After attending the meeting, interviews will be schedule for applicants
with Smurfit-Stone.

Following Phase 3, qualifying applicants will be invited to attend an interview on-site at
Smurfit-Stone. Mill Tours and interviews will be conducted on September 9th, and the week
of September 12-16 2005.

Following Phase 4, qualified potential applicants will attend a Manufacturing Training
Program an 8 hour training overview of the Papermaking process. This course will be !held
on October 3rd, 2005 An Equal Opportunity Employer
It is the policy of Smurfit-Stone to provide equal employment opportunity for all-qualified per-
o'ns and not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of
race. religion, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, national orgin, handicap, disability, or
because he or she is a disabled veteran or a Vietnam Era veteran.
Return to: Smurfit Pre-Employment
c/o Alabama Technology Network
PO Box 2000
Thomasville, AL 36784
Name Email Address
'Address Testing Preference:
City, State Saturday, August 13 AM or PM
Zip Saturday, August 20 AM or PM


118
Part Time
KENNEL POSITION
Approximately $30
per week. Dog and
Puppy care. North of
Milton in private
home. Call 626-
0255 Leave Mes-
sage.
m^^^^


310
Business
Opportunities
#1 CASH COWI 90
Vending Machine
units/You OK Loca-
tions Entire Busi-
ness $10,670 Hurryl
(800)836-3464
#B02428
$800 POSSIBLE
weekly income mail-
Ing brochures. Free
supplies. Genuine
opportunity. Free In-
fo. Call now!
(708)536-7030.
ABSOLUTELY
FREE Info onllnel
Work from any loca-
tloni Put your PC to
workI Great training.
$25-$75/HR. PT/FT.
Grow with expand-
ing International
Company
www.Suc-
cessSoGreat.com/?
Refid=ANF.
ALL CASH CANDY
ROUTE Do you earn
$800/day? 30 ma-
chines, free candy
all for $9,995. 800-
814-6323
B02000033 Call us,
we will not be under-
sold!
AMAZING OPPOR-
TUNITY to slip-proof
floors, tubs and
showers. Commer-
cial and residential
in your protected ter-
ritory, includes train-
ing. High income,
low overhead, mini-
mal investment,
(561)488-4098.
AVERAGE $1,000 a
day! WE help you
advertise. WE take
your calls. WE close
your sales! $1,995
start-up (877) 791-
7486 (TP2263)
315
Business Services
ABOVE & Beyond
Tree Service. Li-
censed and Insured.
Free Estimates. Ke-
vin Frey (850) 983-
7820. Call us...or
pay more!
BOLGER'S STUMP
Grinding & Tree
Service. Ellenwood,
GA 30294. Christian
owned and operat-
ed. Local references
available. (770)323-
3849, (478)278-
5876, Dublin
(478)272-2903.


CURTIS PENTON
Farms. Fresh
Squash,
Cucumbers,
Tomatoes, Peas,
Corn and
Watermelon.
Hwy. 87 North,
Berrydale
Santa Rosa Fresh
See our ad in the
Business
Service Directory.

D&D REMODELING
INC. General Con-
tractor All Types
Home Maintenance;
Roofs to Floors,
Renovations, Decks,
Tile, Plumbing, Etc.
Evictions, Move-
Outs, Construction
Cleaning, Pressure
Washing, Painting,
Tree work, & Etc.
Locally owned.
FREE ESTIMATES.
Lic.#4710-0037952
CELL#261-1173
CELL#261-3598


315
Business Services

ADVANCED
VINYL
Systems Inc.
Home Improve-
ment Specialists.
*Florida Rooms
*Screen Rooms
*Patio Covers
*Carports
*and much morel
Call us
Don Sweeney
orTed Brignano at
850-623-5442
5851 Hwy 90
Milton. See our ad
on the Business
Service Directory
ALLEN SERVICES
of NWF, Inc.
"All your site work
needs"
*Land clearing
*Dirt Hauling
*Erosion Control
,*Sodding
*Seeding &Mulching
*Demolition
Call 850-983-9979
Drivers needed
ARTIE KELLER
STUCCO. Licensed
and Insured. Con-
ventional and Syn-
thetic Systems. No
job to big nor to
small. Call 698-8327
or 626-9164.

B & B Home Im-
provements and, Vi-
nyl Siding. 25 Years
Experience. Free
Estimates. Licensed
and insured. 850-
981-3936, anytime.

CANNON RE-
CORDING STUDIO.
Record a 10 song
album, complete in-
cludes 100 CD's re-
tail ready. Price-
$695.00. Call
(251)296-2492.


315
Business Services
DAY BY Day Quality
Fencing. Competi-
tive pricing for all of
your fencing needs.
Locally licensed,
owned and operat-
ed. We look forward
to your call. New
fencing or repairs.
Call 850-529-3546.
DIVORCE, $275-
$350*COVERS chil-
dren,' etc. Only one
signature required
*Excludes govt.
fees Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext
600. (8am-7pm) Di-
vorce Tech. Estab-
lished 1977.
DOUBLE "B" Land
Clearing. Backhoe
Work. Licensed and
Insured. Bryen Bal-
lard, (850)994-5740
or (850)232-1581.,
DRIGGER'S HOME
Improvements Spe-
clalizing In room ad-
ditions, porches, pa-
tio, and general
home Improve-
ments. No job to
small, so. give us a
call. Free Estimates
850-626-7874 or
686-0733.
DRIVEWAYS,
LIMESTONE, As-
phault & all.types of
dirt. Ann Barnhill
Trucking, Inc. Call
for price. (850) 623-
3461 (850) 232-
0670. Free Esti-
mates!
EXACT DRYWALL.
Licensed & Insured.
Locally owned & Op-
erated, reasonable
prices. All Phases of
Drywalling, Any Tex-
ture, NO MONEY
DOWN, references
available. Member
of the Santa Rosa
Chamber of Com-
merce. Roger Tootle
HM: 850-994-
6713, Cell:
850-501-0519
FIRST CLASS
Home Repair. Roof
repair, painting,
pressure washing,
also mobile home
repair. Over 50
years experience.
Free Estimates. Call
Robert at 981-8257.
GROVER TREE
Service. Tree re-
moval and trimming,
specialist in Live
Oak pruning. Free
estimates, will travel,
insured and li-
censed. Call Spuggy
698-9243 or the of-
fice 698-7828:
HOLYFIELD TREE
Service. Hang limbs
and removal. 'We
beat all bids" We're
here to help not to
hurt. Call 800-448-
3170.


A- ~'-


Find your


name and





win $5.00


SFind your name in the Classified J

SSection of Wednesday's or

A Saturday's Press Gazette and you


|, can Win $5.00. Bring proof of

I identification by our office before

the date of next publication and
pick u yourmoney


315
Business Services
HOME SERVICE
Roof systems. Com-
mercial/Residential.
All types of Roofing.
Home Repairs.
FREE Estimates. Li-,
censed & Insured.
cc 049371 Call 850-
494-7777.
HUSEBY FLOOR
covering. Installing
Hardwood & Lami-
nate Flooring, sand
and refinishing. Rea-
sonable Rates. Li-
censed & Insured.
Call for quote 850-
994-7561 or 490-
0404.
J & D Vinyl Siding.
Hurricane Repair
Specialist. Call Jim-
my Oaks @ 850-
698-3193 or Dew-
ayne Davis @ 850-
698-0186.

LAMINATE,
CERAMIC
AND WOOD
PERGO
ENDORSED
INSTALLER
Offering economical
elegance Installing
all name brand
laminates, wood
and ceramic to -
private Individuals
and dedicated
professional
renovators.
Call Robert,
255-8414
or 995-7705.

.AND CLEARING/
Dozer/Tractor work,
Specializing in col-
vert installation &
Driveways. Leveling,
root raking, bushog-
.ging, disking. Equip-
ment and material
transport available.
By the Job or by the
hour. Call for esti-
mates. Call Billy
Rogers. 850-957-
4952 or Cell 850-
261-8407.
LARRY'S HOME
Repair
Improvements
Locally owned, one
operated. 30 years
experience.
License #
9840045969
Call 850-983-3428.

"LOCAL BOYS"
Roofing & Tree
Service. bobcat
work, Debris Re-
moval, Clean-up &
Stump grinding.
850-932-0902. Ken
or Sal. Licensed &
Insured.
REACH ALL
Tree Service &
Bucket Truck Serv-
ice. Complete tree
service for removal
of dangerous trees.
910-734-1916.


wallpaper and
removal, kitchens
and baths,
cabinet refacing.
12 years
experience,
Licensed and
Insured, Deal
directly with
owner.
Call Jon
637-7044.

Look for my ad In
the Business
Service
Directory


315
Business Services
LOCAL HOME Re-
pair. Paint, drywall,
trim & tile. Fence re-
pair & installation.
10 years experi-
ence. Contact Paul
McMullen 850-723-
9767.
MCARTHUR'S
STUMP Grinding.
623-6634 Call for
Pat 293-6500 or Call
for Doug 382-0393.

MIKE KAYLOR
Cement Mason
*Patios
*Walks
*Driveways
Free estimates,.
no job too small.
Quality work at
affordable prices.
994-0897.

MIZA HOME Im-
provements. Roofs,
siding, painting, win-
dows, and doors.
Specialty coatings,
block walls, flat
roofs, asphalt seal-
ers, for parking lots
and driveways. 626-
7390
MOBILE HOME
Brokers. Major and
minor repairs. Re-
roof, patio covers,
screen rooms, level-
Ing, locally owned,
operated. Free esti-
mates. 100% Fi-
nancing WAC. Call
857-1051.
NEW HOPE PAINT-
ING & WALLPA-
PERING *Drywall
repairs & patchwork
*Pressure cleaning
(homes, decks, pa-
tios, driveways &
sidewalks) *Carpen-
try work (crown
molding, paneling,
trim base & case, in-
stall cabinets & build
decks) Commercial/
Residential.
Interior/Exterior.
Family owned busi-
ness, over 30 years.
Call The Ericksens
today! (850)723-
2550 or 623-6034
NEWMAN'S TREE
Service. Dangerous
tree removal, debris
, removal, limb hang-
ers, Bobcat work,
tree trimming and
topping. Free esti-
mates, licensed and
insured. Darrell
Newman "owner"
803-316-0128 or
803-934-6737.


Divorce'108, Adoption'80
Name Change '55
FREE Typing, Call for
Worksheet (850) 434-7524
1850 N."W" Stl
(1 blk. N. of Flea Market)

RANDALL BOUT-
WELL, INC. All
types of Drywall..
hang, finish, spray,
paint. 850-995-4153
28 years experi-
ence. Serving Santa
Rosa and Escambia
Counties for 27
years.
RAYMOND'S TREE
Service. Affordable
Yard Maintenance.
Call The Rest, Then
Call The Best. 16
Years Experience.
Work Guaranteed.
Trim Trees, Clean
Up Debris. Locally
Owned & Operated
Call: 850-626-8098;
Cell: 850-516-3157;
Licensed, Insured.
S & L Fencing- All
types of fences, new
and repair. Special-
izing in custom pri-
vacy fence. Free es"
timates. Free Tear-
down. Open 7 days
a week 850-346-
2780.

SORENSEN'S-
REMODELING
Specialist. Home
repairs,
remodeling, tile,
wall texturing,
patiting Interior
and exterior,


Some days-
possible.
Call Lynne Hough at-
623-1440.

MILTON IN-HOME
Daycare has room.
for your newborn to.
two-year old. All,
hours, 7-days a:
week. Dedicated-
mom will love your.
child while you work.,
Call Lynne Hough at.
(850)623-1440.


A


pick up your money.








Gazette


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-- _


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I'


315
Business Services

STILL HERE From.-,
Ivan! Tree & Stump.
Removal. Specialist
in difficult trees &'
very large stumps by'.'
Big Bend Construc-
tion, Inc. And Smiths'
Tree Services. FL.
Lie. RR282811270..
386-867-0905. 1- ..
800-343-0877.

STUMP-EASE
STUMP Grinding.
Most removals -
$35.00. Discount for
multiply removals..
Backyard Accessible .-
Licensed & Insured. -
Local Contractor.
Retired USN. 232-
8746.


THE HANDYMAN
Have your Honey
Do list completed.
Also small business
maintenance.
Call 994-6283.
Will call back
Licensed & Insured

THOMAS, AMONG
Tree Service. For
ALL of your TREE &
DEBRIS Removal
Needslll We are li-
censed and Insured
to take care of all of
your tree and yard
debris troubles! We
want to help you get ,
those trees OUT OF-,
YOUR WAY! You-I
Emergency is Our.,
Specialty Top notch
climbers & experi-
enced groundsmen.!
Give us a call, we'll'
be there when you.;
need us! Estimates
are FREE & our''
work is AFFORDA-':
BLE!! We care about
our customer's safe-:'
ty & well-being, in *
this time of need!.
For a good, clean,'
safe job call Tho-
mas! 850-686-9426.

THOMAS DOZER;
Work *FREE ESTI-'
MATES* 'Land,
Clearing, Tree Re-
moval, Dirt
Level/Work. Call Ri-
chard Thomas (850)
981-0605. Licensed.
& Insured.

TNT CARPORTS
R.V. & Boat covers
Buildings,
.Garages.
Portable Sheds
CARPORTS
Single $595
Double $695.
12 X 41-$1295
24 X 31 $1990
Galvanized Steel
Many sizes/colors.
Financing Available
Free delivery & setup
(850)983-2296 or
Pager 505-1867

TREES AND Roofs.
Professional, tree ex-
perts, roof cover
ups, carpentry, local:
in business 40:
years, insurance
and license number:.
RC0066546. Call
850-862-0383 or:
850-865-2000

TRI-STATE ELEC-:
TRICAL Construc-.
tion, Inc. Your total;
electric contractor.;
Serving NW Florida:
for 30 years. "Re-
storing Power Safe-
ly' FI State
L#13001588. Call
for service. 850-623-
8087.

YARD CLEAN up;
debris removal, we-
have saws, tools,
etc. Family operat-
ed, affordable rates.
Free estimates. Li-
censed. Call 850-
554-0632 or 850-
556-4544. Email:
pickupclean4you @a
ol.com

320
Child Care

ATTENTION SHIFT
workers
Child care in my:
home afternoons
and evenings.












PAGE 5-D THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE JULY 23, 2005


325
Domestic
,:,DEPENDABLE
HOUSEKEEPER
,,TEN YEARS EXPE-
RIENCE. REASON-
,',ABLE RATES.CALL
994-6236
DO YOU need
Someone to sit with
your loved one?
L,'ots of TLC, experi-
J 'enced Nanny/Care-
giver or Companion.
SMonday-Friday. Call
450-5080.
335
S Financial Services
$50,000 FREE Cash
Grants*****_20051
Never Repay! For
personal bills,
s;' school, new busi-
ness. $49 BILLION
Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Opera-
tors! (800)856-9591
EXT #113.
FREE $$ CASH' $$
GRANTS! For 2005.
Never repay. For
personal bills! Home
buying School! New
Business! $5,000-
$500,000. Live oper-
ators! (800)860-
2187 Ext #116.
IMMEDIATE
CASHII! US Pen-
' sion Funding pays
cash now for 8 years
:'of your future pen-
sion payments. Call
(800)586-1325 for a
FREE, no-obligation
estimate. www.pay-
checktoday.com.


340
Home Repair
GENERAL REPAIR
Inc. Drywall, paint-
ing, carpentry, ce-
ramic tile, doors,
windows, renova-
tion. Call Carl 474-
1310 or 315-264-
3476. 15 years. ex-
perience, License #
9840048285.
LAYTON AND Sons
General Handyman
Services. Interior
and Exterior Remod-
eling, Vinyl Siding &
Soffits, Fences, Car-
ports, Pole-Barns,
Decks, Roof Repair.
994-7570. Cell: 850-
225-5377 or- 850-
225-9817.
RODNEY CLEVE-
LAND Handyman
Service. Painting,
carpentry, siding,
mobile homes, fen-
ces, etc. Licensed &
Insured. Free esti-
mates. Call 626-
8909

345
Lawn Care
A&M TREE Service
Free estimates, li-
censed and insured.
Storm damage dis-
count, cane service
available, 28 years
experience. Call
777-7749.
MOTIVATED TEEN
mows grass, most
yards $25. 983-8887
or 982-4351.


- '-
-~
-
-~


*


345
Lawn Care

CLARK'S LAWN
Care and General
Maintenance & All
Types of Tractor
Work. Licensed &
Insured. Call Mike
Clark at 626-2428.

PAGE'S TREE
SERVICE Trim, cut
& remove. Call 626-
2159 (if no answer,
please leave message)
FIREWOOD $50. a
load and up.
ROPER'S LAWN
Care. residential /
commercial. Li-
censed & Insured.
Serving Milton for 25
years. Free esti-
mates. Call Donnie
Roper
850-626-1792.

350
Senior Care

Place a
classified ad
today. Phone
623-2120.


VISITING
ANGELS
SENIOR CARE
-- In home
Companionship
Meals
Light housework
Errands
944-2211


-~. Syndicated Content


355
Sewing &
Alterations
JOANNE'S ALTER-
ATIONS fast profes-
sional service. 20
years experience,
will pick up and de-
liver with a $20 or-
der and small serv-
ice charge. Pace
and Milton area on-
ly. Call 626-0735 or
261-6853.
360
Miscellaneous
ABSOLUTELY NO
Cost to youl! New
power wheelchairs
and scooters. Call
toll free (800)843-
9199, 24 hours a
day to see if you
qualify.
EARN DEGREE on-
line from home.
*Business, *Para-
legal, *Computers.
Job Placement As-
sistance. Computer
& Financial 'aid if
qualify. (866)858-
2121
ESANARS


402
Apartments

VERY NICE 1, bed-
room efficiency for
rent. Ideal for se-
niors. $320 per
month plus utilities.
850-623-8875, leave
message.


- w


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-
*


*

*

*
*
*

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*



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*


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*

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402
Apartments
DUPLEX FOR rent
2br/ 1ba. W/d, dish-
washer, stove, re-
frigerator, and cen-
tral h/a. $475/ $500.,
Credit check re-
quired. Call 932-
9120.

404
Commercial

COMMERCIAL
SHOP for lease
30x50 on Hwy 87
in Milton.
2 (12x12) doors,
A/C, office,
bathroom, and
showroom. Call
983-2296 or
206-4323.

Commercial store-
front for rent: Hwy
87 Stewart St., Mil-
ton. 3,000 sq. ft.
block building, 1:70
feet hwy frontage.
Huge parking lot,
huge fenced back
yard. 2 ,bathrooms.
850-777-9374. Ne-
gotiable.

OFFICE BLDG for
lease in Milton.
'Great location on
Berryhill Rd. Very
nice, 3,300 sf. 2 ex-
ecutive offices, 6
restrooms. Newly re-
modeled. Call Amy
at 995-7101 or 982-
0288.

406
Homes
2/3 BEDROOM 1.5
bath, furnished, w/d,
utilities paid. In Mil-
ton. $750 plus de-
posit. Call 850-418-
1816 Ask for Jon.


E 3BD/2BA IN Pace,
newly remodeled,
carport and 12X24ft.
shed. $1000 month
$500 deposit. No
pets. Call 850-225-
0047.
3BR/ 2BA, 2 car ga-
I rage, all brick, new
carpet & vinyl, fresh-
ly painted. $1,100
per month. Owner is
licensed -, Florida
,Broker, Southern
Shores Realty, Inc.
Call Lynda Patter-
son 850-501-8000
FOR RENT 2 br
house with family
room. Total electric
3 miles from milton.
Call 626-8973.
FOR RENT:; 1600
sf, 3bd/2ba, just off
of Scenic Hwy near
Olive. Rd in .N.E.
Pensacola. Immacu-
late condition, new
everything. $895
month plus last &
deposit. Available
lers 7/15. Call 850-380-
8834 or 850-380-
1667.


- _

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- -


* -

- --


hA -


406
Homes

OUTDOOR PARA-
DISEI 3/2 complete-
ly furnished. 1/8 mile
from Blackwater and
Yellow River boat
launches. $1150
month plus deposit,
no pets, 1-6 month
lease. 8175 Cauey
Rd. Milton. Call
(662)397-6292.

408
Land

BEAUTIFUL
NORTH CAROLINA.
WINTER SEASON
IS HEREi MUST
SEE BEAUTIFUL,
PEACEFUL MOUN-
TAINS IF WEST-
ERN NC. Homes,
cabins, acreage and
investments. Chero-
kee Mountain Realty
GMAC
RealEstate,Murphy'.
www.cherokee-
mountainrealty.com
Call For A Free Bro-
chure (800) 841-
5868

LAND FOR SALE
Refer to
Classification
#510

LOT OR space for
R.V. or Travel Trail-
er for rent. Water,
sewer & electric"
available. 850-537-
6222 or 850-499-
7412. ,

MOBILE HOME lots
for rent including
R.V's. FEMA wel-
come. Eastgate Mo-
bile Home Ranch.
.626-8973.


410
Mobile Homes

2 TO 3 bedroom
rentals. Jay, Milton
and Pace. $400 to
$650 per .month.
Call 994-5703, leave
message.

2BD/1BA FRONT
Kitchen, CH/A, on
Avalon. Eastgate
Mobile Home
Ranch. 626-8973-

2BR/1BA MOBILE
Home. $400/mo,
dep. & ref. Call 850-
537-6222 or 850-
499-7412.

2BR/1BA, BUILT in
dressers, desk &
large counter in 2nd
bedroom, great for
computer/office. Pri-
vate lot, 2 miles
North of 110. No
pets, $440 per
Monthh, plus deposit.
Call 994-6802.


-I


412
Rooms For Rent

ROOMS FOR rent-
Downtown Milton,
Glover Lane, Every-
thing included.
$125/$150 wk. 983-
4884. (24 hours).
Cable, Refrigerator,
Color TV, Micro-
wave, A/C, garbage,
parking included.
Clean.






506
Homes

3BD/2.5BA. 2300
sqft. Immaculate
home in Kings wood
Estates on .54
acres. 3-car garage,
workshop, huge
family room, formal
living & dining. Un-
touched by Dennis.
First Choice Realty,
,'Lori Frey, Realtor.
850-777-1153.

HOUSE FOR Sale,
3bd/2ba. Built 11/03.'
For more informa-
tion' drive by 5917
Gillum Rd., Milton.


OPEN HOUSE.
4959 Pattock Place,
Woodbine Springs,
Pace. Saturday
and Sunday 10-2.
Jordan McDowell.
Exit Realty N.F.I.
516-2434.


510
Land

1 ACRE corner lot
near Whiting Field.
Private lake access,
high and dry, beauti-
ful homesite. No mo-
bile homes. $46,500
Call 981-1213.

15 ACRES in East
Milton $150,000. 20
acres in Milton parti-
ally cleared
$120,000. 1/2 acre
fenced lot in East
Milton, blocks from
Blackwater Bay,
$25,000. 3+ Beauti-'
ful acres in East Mil-
ton with 1,700 sq. ft.
home, has Ivan
damage, being sold
*as is $165,000. Lin-
da Owens, Exit Re-
alty, 850-698-9854.

GEORGIA COAST-
Large wooded ac-
cess, marshfront
and golf course
homesites. Gated
with tennis, kayak-
ing, and canoeing.
Limited availability-
mid $70's and up.
Call today (877)266-
7376.


-



-*



*1 *^B ^
S..-


510
Land

ATTENTION IN-
VESTORS: Water-
front lots in the Foot-
hills of NC. Deep
water lake with 90
miles of shoreline.
20% predevelop-
ment discounts and
90% financing. NO
PAYMENTS for 1
year. Call now for
best selection.
www.nclakefrontpro-
perties.com
(800)709-LAKE

FOR SALE, 2 lots of
Alabama River with
8X40 trailer, located
at Eurika Landing
Rd. $55,000 firm.
Must see, many ex-
tras. Call (850) 994-
0209.
LAND FOR RENT
Refer to
Classification
#408
"MAKE THIS Sum-
mer the Best" E
Tennessee's Norris
Lake arind Golf prop-,
erties make every
year special. Start-
ing at only $24,900-
Call Lakeside Realty
(423)626-5820 *
www.lakesiderealty-
tn.com.

NC MOUNTAIN
property. Gated
community with pri-
vate river and lake
access. Swim, fish,
hike. From $20,00 to
$70,000. Perfect for
log cabin. (800)699-
1289 or www.river-
bendlakelure.com.

NEARLY HALF
ACRE
improved lot.
20x40 shop, 6ft
chain link fence,
carport, large
beautiful trees,
cleared ready to
build home or
mobile home. Has
septic system.
Pea Ridge area.
$34,500 Call
983-2296.

NEW TENNESSEE
LAKE Property from
$19,900! 7 acre
parcel $34,900.
Lake parcel and log
cabin package
$54,900. Call toll-
free (866)770-5263
ext. 8 for details.

POLLUTION
CLEANUP Funds. If
you have. property
contaminated by pe-
troleum fuel from
storage tank sys-
tems that have been
out-of-service since
January 1985 and
you have owned
that
property since July
1990, you may be
eligible for 100%
cleanup by the
State. Call Grady
Swann 850-458-
5447.

VIEWS VIEWS
Views- Helena Mon-
tana 4.7 Acres
$79,900. Ride. out
your backdoor to
millions of acres of
national forest Awe-
some lake and
mountain views,
close to Canyon
Ferry Lake, minutes
to Helena. Soils test-
ed, utilities, ready to
build on. Call owner
(406)581-2125.


From iThe Fawctory To Us To YOUr


2005 DODGE DURANGO SXT


0 Local tax
^S~fl^Bax
*^jiiIw


Find out about these and more in your local paper! Public Notice

0S ,*, Irlf Id......


aiay niu Irme
Read your public notices.


www.floridapublicnotices.com


-


556
Homes

WESTERN NC
Mountains. North
Carolina. Where
there is: Cool Moun-
tain Air, Views and
Streams, Homes
Cabins and Acre-
age. Call for a Free
brochure of Moun-
tain Property Sales
call (800)642-5333,
Realty of Murphy,
317 Peachtree St.,
Murphy, NC 28906.
www.realtyofmur-
phy.com.

560
Land

COOL
SUMMERS/SKI
Winters. Need part-
ners to share new
Beech Mountain, NC
house. 5BR, 3.5BA.
2 acres w/waterfalls.
Great view, 5300ft
elevation. Use 6
Summer weeks plus
6 other weeks each
year. Only $1300000
per 1/4 interest. Call
(704)987-9295.

EAST ALABAMA
Mountain Property
for sale, one hour
West of Atlanta in
Piedmont, AL Great
for enjoyment or in-
vestment 15-acres-
$54,250. 512-acres-
$1,485. 'More infor-
mation Call Gary
McCurdy (256)239-
8001.

GATED MOUNTAIN
Community Near
Asheville, NC Spec-
tacular wooded lots -
great views! Paved
roads, clubhouse,
world- class trout
fishing, hiking trails
& morel Bear River
Community.
(866)411-5263.

GEORGIA LAND for
Sale. Eat' Central
Georgia 10 to 300
acres., Owner Fi-
nanced. Starting at
$1,800/acre. BRA-
SHEAR REALTY
'(706)722-4308
Complete details:
www.georgiacoun-
try.com.

GRAND OPENING!
Lakefront Acreage
from $69,900. Spec-
tacular new water-
front community on
one of the largest &
cleanest mountain
lakes in America!
Large, estate-size
parcels, gentle slope
to water, gorgeous
woods, panoramic
views. Paved roads,
country water, utilit-
ies. Low-financing.
Call now, (800)54-
5092 x 198.

GRAND OPENING]
Winding River Pre-
serve 11 July 30 &
31. Ocala/Gaines-
ville Area. 20 acres
from $185,000. 100
Acres from
$450,000. New
semi-private gated
community featuring
parcels w/frontage
on the Wacassassa
River. Gorgeous
woodlands teeming
w/deer & turkey.
SAVE up to
$20,0001 Great fi-
nancing. Call toll-
free (866)352-2249,
x 517 or www.fland-
bargains.com.

HENDERSON-
VILLE, VC, moun-
tains. Very upscale,
new, 3bd/3.5ba Del-
tec. Small gated,
quiet neighborhood.
3000', cool, private.
10 miles off 1-26.
Easy-access. Re-
duced. $625,900.
(828)693-1218.
Won't Last! Acreage
available.

LAKEFRONT BAR-
GAINS Starting at
$89,900. Gorgeous
lakefont parcels.
Gently sloping, pris-


tine shoreline, spec-
tacular views.
Across from national
forest on 35,000
acre recreational
lake in East Tenn.
Paved roads, under-
ground utilities, cen-
tral water, sewer.
Excellent financing.
Call now (800)704-
3145 x617, Sunset
Bay, LLC.


560
Land

LAKEFRONT LOG
Home. Lake Cum-
berland KY $99,900. -
Authentic 2400.
square foot Lake-
front Log Cabin,
Jamestown/Russell
Springs Area. Avail-
able July 30th. Call
Now: (800)770-9311
ex860.

NEW MEXICO 20
acres $34,990.
scenic region, views,
canyons, tress, roll-
ing hills, wildlife. En-
joy hunting, hiking,
horses, great cli-
mate. Power, great
access. 100% Fi-
nancing. Call
(877)822-LANDI


704
Livestock


PENTON'S FARM
Supply
(Allentown)
rC-rm -upIy


rFarm Supply
Bulk Corn & Oats
HMC Feed & others
Gates, Post, &
Fencing
Tues-Sat 8am-5pm
623-0442


706
Livestock Supplies


HAY
FOR SALE
Coastal Hay. 623-
6769 or 336-2267.'


708
Pets


ADORABLE
FEMALE
PUPPY!
4 month old Border
Collie mix. Very '
loving and playful
dog. Meets no
strangers. She
would be a great
pet for children or
someone that can
get down on the
floor and play with
her. We can not
give her all the
attention that she,
deserves. She
loves to take
showers. Comes
with all accessories
such as dog carry
cage, leash, collar,
dog treats, food,
and medicine. $25
Call 637-7044 or
623-2120
(ask for Sheena)
Spayed has already
been paid for,
selling that
for extra.

Donna Kelley

712
Lost & Found
PETS


FOUND!
MALE, black Lab
on Windham Rd.
Monday 7/18.
Call 623-8849
to identify.

LOST REDDISH
Brown male Pom-
eranian near Chu-
muckla Hwy "Tidwell
Rd." Call 850-934-
3745 or 850-712-.
7491. REWARD.


LOST YOUR PET?
Be sure to call
Santa Rosa
Animal Control
to report him
missing and to
be sure he's not
there waiting
on you to
pick him upl
850-983-4680


Copyrighted Material


I1 E PLOY P RC i1 1:


Q


4


i


* *


.


~uS











PAGE 6-D THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE JULY 23, 2005


usin ess crvice


ire or


Visiting Angels


In home
'i.'*, Companionship ,,/
'* Meals 4
SLight housework
SErrands

K 11 fl M


Greg Bolger






tole 's Stanfp Grindin


& Tree Seswvee
Ellenwood, Georgia 30294
Christian owned and operated

Local references available


770)323-3849 Dublin

478)278-5876 (478)278-5876


r


Commercial Home Service Residential




Roof Systems



All Types of Roofing


Home Repairs


P- i --s 'il ,


Licensed
& Insured


L.


850-494-7777


cc 049371


Thomas Dozer Work
*FREE ESTIMATES* .,.
5 Hour Minimum
Land Clearing Tree Removal
Dirt Level/Work

Richard Thomas 850-981-0605.,
Licensed & Insured )


' Mobile Home Brokers i
Major and Minor Repairs
~ Reroof ~ Patio Covers -
Screen Rooms Leveling ~
Locally Owned and Operated
Free Estimates
100% Financing WAC

K (850) 857-1051


.e6 Backhoe Work 'l%.
Oe Stump & Tree Removal '
Hurricane Clean-up
Dirt Work
No Job Too Big or Small
Bryen Ballard


(Since 1974 Ac FL State-
24 Hr. Service p L#13001588

TRI-STATE ELECTRICAL CONSTR, INC.
"Your Total Electric Contractor"
(Home Rewiring Residential
4 Commercial 4 Generators
fService Upgrades
MIKE ANDRASSI, Pres. Office: 850-623-8087
milton, FL 32570 Fax: 850-623-8083


L


Serving Santa Rosa
& Escambia for 27 years
Licensed & Bonded )


Milton In-home Daycar
has room for your
n ^newborn to two-year old.
All hours, 7-days a week
Dedicated mom will love
J5. your child while you work.


Call Lyrne Hougri a
* (850) 623-1440 )


Linda Owens -

Realtor

850-698-9854

5345 Hwy. 90

Pace, FL 32571
Email: lindaowens@exitrealtynfi.com


20'crs n ilt~oon ]['parItially ceare
blocs fromBlackBterffBaylBB





$25,000~SSe IS 0
'3+ BeautifulAcres'Bi 'Est Mlton^B
with 1,70 sq. ft. omehasIva
damagebeing sld as s $165,0
^^Bj^^^^^^^^^^B^)0.A^


,f-.Abv Byn


? :- Above & Beyond
Tree Service

Call us...or pay

Senior & Military Discounts
S- Licensed iFree
Li& insured Kevin Frey Estimales

(850)983-7820


'


T Se is a so on the back of section C! Check it oul


804
Apparel

PROM
DRESSES
Worn last year.
Not old


fashioned.
Sizes 8-10.
One purple
(never worn),
one white, and
one teal. All
three strapless.
Call Sheena
at the
Press Gazette
623-2.120 or
637-7044
after 5pm.

806
'Appliances
FOR SALE white
electric stove with
black top, $100. Cell
'(770)331-5574 leave
message.
814
Furniture
LARGE METAL
desk. Good condi-
tion. $50. Call 994-
9633.


826
Sporting Goods

PARABODY
PRO- Olympic
workout center.
300 lbs Olympic
plates, pull down
bars, preacher
curl, 5 1/2 inch
mats. Very good
condition. Can
deliver $200 obo.
Call 293-2240.

POOL TABLE, reg-
ulation size.
$1795.00. New in
crate, warehouse
price. 983-3763 or
313-0525.
830
Miscellaneous
For Sale
DEMO HOMESITES
wanted in your area
for the NEW Kayak
Pool. Take advant-,
age of this Unique
Opportunity. Save $
Financing available
For Details Call
(866)348-7560.
,THERAPEUTIC
SPA, insulated cov-
er, new. Warehouse
price. $1295.00.
983-3763 or 313-
0525.


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale
FLORIDA BUILD-,
ING Blowout. FL
Product Approved
30X40, 40X60,
40X100. Limited Of-
fer (800)300-2470
Ext 4 allbldg.com.

FOR SALE 40 gal-
Ion gas water heater
used one year, port-
able t.v. works well
$50, child's bumper
seat $5. Call 623-
4278.
HEAVY DUTY, Dual
Jet Ski Galvanized
trailer. 8X16, new
lights & wire. $600.
Call 850-516-1951.
METAL ROOFING
SAVE $$$ Buy Di-
rect From Manufac-
turer. 20 colors in
stock with all Acces-
sories. Quick turn
around! Delivery
Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.



Si. A stisire Ie
Farm Direct
We Deliver
434-0066


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale




We Deliver & Install
Centipede
St. Augustine
Bermuda
Bailed Pine Straw
Call us first, Save Time
Call us last, Save Money
Hwy. 87 So. Milton
628-8578

SALTER'S FARM
Market. Notice to
our customers: Salt-
ers Farm Market is
now also located at
the Pea Ridge Flea
Market on Hwy 90 in
Pace. For several
years we parked
and sold our sea-
sonal and Santa Ro-
sa homegrown
produce across from
the old Grandma's
restaurant in Milton
known as the Bob
Jernigan properties
on U.S. 90. We now
invite you to shop
with us at the farm.
You pick peas now
ready. 8855 Chu-
muckla Hwy. 994-
4734.


830
Miscellaneous,
For Sale
SHED 10X16, Broy-
hill :furniture, many
yard sale items.
Dealers only. $3,800
firm. 393-4165.
STEEL ARCH Build-
ings! Genuine Steel
Master Buildings;
factory direct at
HUGE Savings!
20x24, 30x60,
35x50. Perfect Ga-
rage/ Workshop/
Barn. Call (800)341-
7007.
www.SeelMas-
terUSA.com.
WE NOW HAVE
FRESH PRODUCE!
DOUBLE D Farms.
Hwy 89, Allentown.
623-3721 or 983-
6925.
832
Miscellaneous
Wanted
GLASS CRAFTER
needs empty glass
soft drink bottles, (all
kinds). Not necessa-
rily collectors edi-
tions. Will pick up.
983-8042.
PAY CASH for junk
cars or trucks. Run-
ning or not. Call
983-9527


904
Cars

1992 MAZDA 626.
4 door, sunroof,
automatic, white.
$1,000 OBO. For
more information
Call 983-2267.


LOW RIDER
82'Cadillac.
Hydraulics, subs,
t,v.'s, rag sunroof,
new paint
(Pearl White),
100,000 miles,
14" knock offs,
street charger.
Hops and turns
on three wheels.
$7,000 OBO
Call 626-5595
or 450-9201.

906
Boats
2002 CRESTLINE,
14ft aluminum with
trailer, with 2005
25HP Mercury
$3500 or with 98
8HP Mercury $2500,
many extras. Call
983-1444.


906
Boats
2002 HONDA Shad-
ow Aero. 1100, or-
ange and black,
mustang seat, leath-
er saddle bags
BAYLINER 175 I/O
Boat & Trailer.
$9500 Chevy en-
gine, less than 40
hrs, new break in in-
spection, garage
kept. New condition,
must see. Phone
983-6102.

ROY RADETSKI
Boat Mechanic.
Evenrude, Johnson,
Mercruiser. Afforda-
ble prices, Certified
since 1980, Quality
work, Mobile marine
service. Call 384-
2386.

910
Motorcycles
2002 HONDA Shad-
ow Aero 1100, or-
ange & black, Mus-
tang seat, leather
Lyke saddle bags,
Dance & Hines long-
shots, garage kept,
32,000 miles.
$6,500. George
850-
994-6922.


910
Motorcycles
HONDA 2000 CBR
600 F4, like new,
updated DID chain
&
sprockets, after mar-
ket stainless ex-
haust, K&N air filter,
polished rims, sport
tech windshield, new
matching .jacket, 2
helmets, backpack-
firm $4,900. Call
983-6246 or 850-
304-4714.

Place a
classified ad
today. Phone
623-2120.

912
Motor Homes
OLDER MODEL
motor home for sale
$3000,00. Made for
handicap, lift, wide
isle, handicap bath-
room, but it doesn't
have to be used for
handicap. Great for
hunters or fisher-
men. Self contained.
Great shape me-
chanically. About fif-
ty five thousand
miles. 850-477-
3040.


914
Recreational

1999 25FT. Coach-
man RV, queen size
bed, extra clean,
light, good condition,
pulls easy, 4200lbs.
$8,500 firm. 850-
982-6714.

916
Sport Utility
Vehicles

2001 JEEP Grand
Cherokee, green,
V8, great condition,
50K. $15,000 OBO.
626-6952.

918
Trucks

1985 NISSAN Pick-
up King Cab. Runs
good. Camper top.
$1,000. Call 994-
5488 or 450-5248.

1999 FORD F-150
Lariat 5.4 liter V8.
Excellent condition.
Loaded. Towing
package, new tires,
new brakes. Must
sell $9,400 obo. Call
623-3375.
91' CHEVY S-10,
4.3 Liter, V-6.
$2,500. 994-7286


/A


920
Vans
FOR SALE (30-Ser-
ies) 1981 Chev. Van
(3.4 ton) auto trans,
new tires, new re-
built-350-V8 motor.
Firm price. $1,000
cash. See @ 6492
Gaynell Ave. 450-.
1778 or 501-2306.


Place a
classified
ad today.
Phone 623-
2120.

922
Other
94 PETER Built.
Dump Truck, new
Warren dump sys-
tem, 1194 D3C Cat
Dozer, 99'case. 5 80
Super L backhoe, 12
ton Pintle Hook trail-
er, complete pack-
age. $100,000.
Completely serv-
iced, excellent con-
dition, ready to work.
Call 957-4952 or
261-8407.


f;


(

(


1% E NNO F


Free Estimatesl
All types of Drywall
eHang *Finish *Spray *Paint
e Pressure Washing

(850)95-453 ffic


u J


Ia


Get


1 -11


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