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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Inside Out
 Section A Continued
 Section B: ‘Styles
 Section B: Prime
 Section B: Milton High Panthe...
 Section B: ‘Styles Continued
 Section C: Sports
 Section C: Classifieds


UF00028408 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Santa Rosa press gazette
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028408/00039
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Rosa press gazette
Alternate title: Milton press gazette
Portion of title: Press gazette
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Milton Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Milton Fla
Creation Date: May 18, 2005
Publication Date: 1984-
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Milton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Santa Rosa County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Santa Rosa -- Milton
Coordinates: 30.630278 x -87.046389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 76, no. 104 (Mar. 29, 1984)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001994926
oclc - 33399204
notis - AKH2012
lccn - sn 95047208
System ID: UF00028408:00039
 Related Items
Preceded by: Milton press gazette

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        A 1
        A 2
        A 3
        A 4
        A 5
    Section A: Inside Out
        A 6
        A 7
        A 8
    Section A Continued
        A 9
        A 10
    Section B: ‘Styles
        B 1
        B 2
        B 3
        B 4
        B 5
    Section B: Prime
        B 6
        B 7
    Section B: Milton High Panthers
        B 8
    Section B: ‘Styles Continued
        B 9
        B 10
    Section C: Sports
        C 1
        C 2
        C 3
    Section C: Classifieds
        C 4
        C 5
        C 6
        C 7
        C 8
        C 9
        C 10
Full Text

12 /01/05 U IB0 0
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORIC
-U 'LVERSITY OF FL
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007
E S -' 7, C 07a W IP


Santa Qosa's Press


, ltV


WEDNESDAY

May 18, 2005


. INSIDE


50I (lu tx)* ouIolyho etwI nwsapr corner acetuy


Navy recommits to JPATS

'Whiting could receive first squadron of new training planes in 2006


By JIM FLETCHER
PG Assistant Publisher


Area officials are hopeful
last Friday's announcement of
recommended base closures
and realignments (by U.S.
Secretary of Defense Donald
Rumsfeld) will mean the local


training base will soon see its
first full shipment of new train-
ing aircraft.
Whiting escaped the list
without any mention whatsoev-
er (a fate not shared by neigh-
boring NAS Pensacola.
Rumsfeld suggested eliminat-
ing about 1,100 civilian and


300 military jobs at that facili-
ty.)
Santa Rosa County
Commissioner Don Salter also
has a long history of serving on
groups to retain area military
installations. He notes, "The
decision made by the-Secretary
of Defense last Friday was a


Stepping' into summer means
doing it with style-with shoes
that make a stylish statement.
What's hot for your dogs for the
dog days of summer? Find out
inside.
See STYLES, Page 1B.


show of support for NAS
Whiting to continue to provide
100% of the Navy, Coast Guard
and Marine helicopter training
and 60% of all fixed-wing train-
'ing.
"With that vote of confi-
dence, there is an indication
that the new JPATS trainers will


NEWS


VIEWS
*' "How do you feel after hear-
ing Whiting survived BRAC's
round one?
BRANNON
':- CULPEPPER
S "I think it's
wonderful.
; That would
been a blow
ato the econa -
omy."


PITTMAN
"I'm glad to I .
hear it, it-
helps the
economy .
a lot. I hate
around here ., .
to see
Milton
growing like -
Pensacola, but we've all got to
work."
| ", ROBERT
GODWIN
"There's a lot
of retirees
that come to
i Milton and
tL stay. It's good
for the econo
mv and it's


good for
being neigh-
borly."


..* SANDY
HORN
"It's a shame
about
Pensacola,
%%ith all the
history.
What do we
need a Navy.
'without
ports for?"
.AsdilRS


Memorial Day cook-out planned here


Memorial Day celebration at
Riverwalk Park.
The "4-H Honoring
American Veterans-Past,
Present and Future 2005
Memorial Day Cookout" began
with "Valentine's for Vets"


efforts, put on by a few 4-H'ers
each year to honor veterans at
Valentine's Day.
"Each time, we left with the
feeling that there was so much
more to do to say thank you to
those who have sacrificed so


much to keep our country free,"
note organizers.
Valentines for Vets led to
last year's Vets Appreciation
cookout in Pensacola. Around
500 meals were served by par-


See COOK-OUT, Page 5A.


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer


A 4-H student project to
recognize county veterans has
evolved into a cookout, for
everyone attending this year's'


come to Whiting Field."
In fact, Salter says he was
particularly happy to see the
Navy had recommitted itself to
a procurement schedule for the
new training aircraft (starting in
2006.)
Whiting's aging inventory
See PLANES, Page 5A.


Leader


is in


hospital

By JIM FLETCHER
PG Assistant Publisher
At press time Tuesday,
District 1 Santa. Rosa County
Commissioner Tom Stewart
was hoping to be released from
the hospital.
Stewart was admitted late
Saturday night after complain-
ing of chest pains.
Commissioner Don Salter
says he spoke with Stewart by
phone Monday evening and
notes, "he seems to think there
are no new problems, just the
same old problems he's had for
some time causing him pain,
but he checked himself- in just
to be.sure.".
Salter says Stewart. was,
Monday, .mJiiing a heart
catherization to ensure there
were no serious problems'.
While county leaders never
like to be shorthanded with one
of their own in the hospital, the
news is particularly difficult for
the Pace Area Chamber of
Commerce-in which Stewart
is active.
That business body had
already been shorthanded. Pace
Area Chamber of Commerce
Executive Director Lloyd
Hinote has been out of the
office for several weeks follow-
ing a heart attack.
Story written by Jim
Fletchen: Reach him at:
fletcher@sr-pg.com

Art auction

set for this

Saturday
N Check out some fine art-
work, have something to eat,
and maybe pick up a painting or
two-at Bagdad Elementary
School's Third Annual Fine Art
Auction, tomorrow evening.
Both student's paintings
and professional artwork will
be for sale at a pair of auctions
to benefit the school's art
department, and the Gulf Coast
Kids' House.
Bagdad Elementary hosts
the event tomorrow evening in
the school's cafeteria.
Previews begin at 5:30
.p.m., followed by auctions at 6.
Along with kids' paintings,
over 50 professional works will
be available via a "silent auc-
tion."
The professional art was
donated by artists from around
the country, according to organ-
izers.


ronmentally-friendly soy-based
ink.


SPRINTED WITH
SMy INK


1 1


If petition drive is successful:


Will wet/dry vote be mail-in or at tradional polling sites?


By BILL GAMBLING
Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Officials with Grow Out
Local Economy (GOLE)-the
group attempting to garner
enough signatures to call for a
wet/dry vote here-began mail-
ing some 99,000 petition cards


last week. Many Santa Rosans
received their cards Saturday.
Others, GOLE officials say, will
be getting their cards in the
coming days.
The issue of whether Santa
Rosa should allow the sale of
hard liquor is dividing largely
on religious and moral argu-


ments. With more than 42% of
Santa Rosa's polling places
inside churches or church facil-
ities, some have wondered if
that could affect how such an
election would be held,
But despite the fact that 17
of the 40-plus Santa Rosa
County polling places are


inside a church facility, no one
is expecting any problems.
"I don't expect there to be a
problem,", says Santa Rosa
County Supervisor of Elections
Ann Bodenstein.- "I mailed a
letter in March to all the
precincts about the possibility
of a local option election and no


one responded negatively to it."
At the time of Bodensteia's
letter, any talk of a local option
election in Santa Rosa County
was just that, but with GOLE's
paperwork now filed with Santa
Rosa County Clerk of Courts
Mary Johnson and petition
See WET/DRY, Page 3A.


TOM
HORN
"I think it's
great news,
for Whiting. I
trained there,
but it's too
bad about
Pensacola."


t










The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday May 18, 2005


Sheriff's Report


May 6, to May 13, 2005

Davis. Jr., Roger Allen;
Male; 27; 7225 Cosner Dr.,
Huber Heights, OH; Probation
Violation-Felony; 5/8/05
Dennison, Durke Deyon;
Male; 36; Hwy. 90, Jernigan
Rd., Pace, FL; Out-of-State


Fugitive from Justice. 5/6/05
Hill, Thomas Joe; Male; 53;
4833 Gunter Rd., Milton, FL;
Aggravated Asslt W/Intent to
Commit A Felony, Battery-
Touch or Strike. 5/8/05
Hinds, Michael Allan;
Male; 34; 3382 Greenbriar
Circle, Gulf Breeze, FL; DUI


A4;n
Steel Roofing


And Siding
And everything in between including zee purlins, cee
channels, trim, fasteners, windows, doors, and skylights.
They're manufacturer direct, too. M Asi
Jackson, MS 1-800-647-8540 M NeY r


Alcohol or Drugs 4th or
Subsequent Offense, Drive
While Lic Susp Habitual
Offender. 5/7/05
Johnson, Jermaine Xavier;
Male; 32; 208 Sessions St.,
Milton, FL; Cocaine-Possess
With Intent to Purchase
Schedule II, Marijuana-Possess
Not More Than 20 Grams.
5/6/05
Landry, Frank Marshall;
Male; 33; 6018 Queen St,
Milton, FL; Burglary of
Structure Conveyance
Unarmed W/O Person Inside,
Narcotic Equip-Possess And
Or Use. 5/7/05
Rodier, Delores Elaine;
Female; 47; 5224 Nimitz Rd.,
Milton, FL; Failure to Appear
for Felony Offense. 5/6/05
Woodall, Shelley Ginger;
Female; 47; 4715 Lynn Rd,
Milton, FL; Drive While
License Suspended Habitual
Offender. 5/7/05
Abbott, Carl Wayne; Male;
23; 5683 Fairview Dr., Milton,
FL; Possess Cocaine, Narcotic
Equip-Possess And or Use.
5/7/05
Cole, Aaron Gardner; Male;
21; 2905 Highway 178, Jay,
FL; Aggravated Battery-
Offender Knew/Should Have
Known Victim Pregnant
(domestic violence). 5/7/05
Corley, Eual David; Male;
37; 8100 Old Stagecoach Rd.,
Milton, FL; Larceny-Theft is
$300 or More But Less Than
$5,000. 5/8/05
Darby Wanda Sims;
Female; 42; 8136 Molina St.,


The acceleration/deceleration injury is usually related to motor vehicle accidents.
Current medical literature reveals that even minor accidents with speeds as low as; 15
m.p.h. can cause joint, nerve, disc and ligamentous injuries. Other symptoms such as
headaches, dizziness, jaw pain (TMJ), low back pain and memory loss can often be direct-
ly related to the trauma involved in a "whiplash" type injury.
If you, a friend, or relative have been involved in an accident, I urge you
,- ^ _to call my office for a thorough evaluation by a physician who specializes in
neuromuscular injuries and spine related problems.
As an experienced health care provider, I utilize the most up to date
diagnostic and therapeutic services available in our medical community.
Our goal is to provide experience you can trust, and depend on,
.' -'yand guarantee that your health is our main concern.


ur. William waters


WATERS
CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
4891Glover Lane Milton 623-2111
Experience you Trust!


Navarre, FL;, Larceny Theft is
$300 or More But Less Than
$5,000, Embezzle-Make False
Entry in Corporate Books, Pass
Forged-Altered Instrument.
5/7/05
Gardner. Rachael
Christine; Female; 34; 5709
Yucca Drive, Milton, FL; Drive
While License Suspended
Habitual Offender. 5/6/05
Homes, Daniel, Edward;
Male; 37; Holling Town Rd,
Jay, FL Drive While License
Suspended Habitual Offender.
5/8/05
Johnson,. Robert Jermaine;
Male; 23; 6945 Ferris Hill St.,
Milton, FL; Cocaine-Possess
W/Intent to Sell Mfg Deliv Etc
Schedule II, Possess Marijuana
Over 20 Grams, Narcotic
Equip-Possess And Or Use (4
cts.). 5/7/05
Rigmaiden, Karl Bernard;
Male; 40; 4011 Raven St.,
Milton, FL; Drive. While
License Suspended Habitual
Offender. 5/6/05
Hinds, ; Michael Allan;
Male; 34; 3382 Greenbriar
Circle, Gulf Breeze, FL; DUI
Alcohol or Drugs 4th or
Subsequent Offense. 5/7/05
Selley, Robert Eugene;
Male; 43; 3648 Hwy. 90,
Milton, FL; DUI Alcohol or
Drugs. 5/7/05
Alford, John Charles; Male;
36; 3369 Grenbriar Circle, Gulf
Breeze, FL; DUI. 5/8/05
Erickson, Keith Austin;
Male; 41; 32 Stewart Circle, Ft.
Walton Beach, FL; DUI. 5/7/05
Hamilton, Charlotte
Annette; Female; 37; 4444
Sleepy Hammock Dr., Milton,
FL; DUI. 5/6/05
Hamilton, Warren Dixon;
Male; 25; 6207 Glenwood Dr.,
Milton, FL; DUI. 5/6/05
fill, Henry M; Male; 68;
5861 Womack Rd., .Milton, FL;
DUI. 5/6/05
Webb, Bertha Geneva;
Female; 44; 6921 Dorsey Lane,
Milton, FL; DUI. 5/7/05


.Ziglar, Stephen Bradley;
Male; 20; 11273 Boundary
Line Rd., Milton, FL; Possess
Cocaine, Narcotic Equip-
Possess And Or Use. 5/7/05
Benton, William Leon;
Male; 41; 4322 Kings Ct.,
Pace, FL; Neglect Child with-
out Great Harm. 5/9/05
Carter, Johnny Burian;
Male; 63; 20397 Highway 41,
Brewton, AL; Fail to Register
as Sexual Offender. 5/9/05
Hannah, Sr., Clarence
Anderson; Male; 51; 5260
Green Springs Dr., Milton, FL;
Drive While Lic Suspended
Habitual Offender. 5/9/05
Smith, John David; Male;
32; 9073 Larkenwoods Dr.,
Navarre, FL; Out of State
Fugitive From Justice. 5/9/05
Staples. Jr., James Randall;
Male; 40; 229 East Brent Ln,
Pensacola, FL; Failure to
Appear for Felony Offense.
5/9/05
Cowles, Ronald Charles;
,Male; 42; 7025 Webster St.,
Navarre, FL; Drive While
License Suspended Habitual
Offender. 5/9/05
Thomas, Katrisa Lynnett;
Female; 28; 6638 James St.,
Milton, FL; Possess Cocaine,
Marijuana-Possess Not More
Than 20 Grams. 5/9/05
Hawk, Michael Drew;
Male; 36; 5674 Mulat Rd.,
Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 5/10/05
Hernandez, Derek
Anthony; Male; 25; 1934
Garnade Rd., Conyers, GA;
Probation Violation-Felony,
Failure to Appear for Felony
Offense. 5/10/05
Jordan, Jason Adroh; Male;
24; 1575 Dorman Trl, Gulf
Breeze, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 5/10/05
Thompson, 1lichael
Jermaine; Male; 20; 6903 Sea
Turtle Circle, Navarre, FL;
Probation Violation-Felony.
5/10/05
Gibson, Christopher Alan;
Male; 27; 1476 Douglas Hyatt


JOHNSON COUNTY, GA




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Road, Horton, AL; Failure to
Appear for Felony Offense.
5/10/05
Hill, Brian Anthony; Male;
20; 7726 Navarre Pkwy,
Navarre, FL; Kidnap Minor-
Interfere with Custody. 5/10/05
Johnson, Fredrick
Octavius; Male; 18; 7307
Kennedy Ln, Milton, FL;
Drugs-Possess Cntrl Substance
W/O Prescription. 5/10/05
Joseph. Eugene Edward;
Male; 26; 4428 Nora Ave.,
Pace, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 5/10/05
McNeese, Randall Marvin;
Male; 33; 64 Joe Stockstill Rd.,
Carrire, MS; Possess Marijuana
Over 20 Grams, Narcotic
Equip-Possess And Or Use.
5/10/05
McNally, Jeffrey Mark;
Male; 42; 5820 Ibis Road,
Milton, FL; DUI Alcohol or
Drugs 2nd Offense. 5/10/05
Boyer, Charles George;
Male; 32; 4424 Rice Rd.,
Milton, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 5/11/05
Caswell, Jr., Dennis; Male;
23; 5429 Buena Vista Dr.,
Milton, FL; Cocaine-Possess
With Intent to Sell Mfg Deliv
Etc Schedule II, Marijuana-
Possess Not' More Than 20
Grams.' 5/11/05
Edmonds. Zachary S.;
Male; 26; 7826 Sonnydale Ln,
Milton, FL; Obstructing
Justice-Intimidate Threaten Etc
Vict Witness Informant,
Battery-Touch or Strike
(domestic violence). 5/11/05
Flowers, Nathan Allen;
Male; 25; 6195 Wooded Way,
Milton, FL; Battery-Touch or
Strike (domestic violence),
Possess Cocaine, Marijuana-
Possess Not More Than 20
Grams, Narcotic Equip-Possess
And or Use. 5/11/05
Mattingly, Perry Joe; Male;
36; 8002 Armstrong Rd.,
Milton, FL; Vehicular Theft-
Grand 3rd Degree. 5/11/05
McDaniel, Mark Ray;
Male; 42; 6230 Glenwood
Drive, Milton, FL; Larceny-
Grand Theft $10,000 or More
But Less Than $20,000.
.Wh.yte, Joshua Lee; Male;'
23;. address unknown;.
Burglary of Structure
Conveyance Unarmed W/O
Person Inside (2 cts.), Larceny
Theft is $300 or More But Less
Than $5,000, Resist Officer-
Obstruct W/O Violence.
5/11/05
Halsey, Robert Allen; Male;
23; 1925 Esplanade St.,
Navarre, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 5/11/05
Sorrells, Matthew Stephen;
Male; 23; 5549 Ormond Drive,
Pensacola, FL; Probation
Violation-Felony. 5/11/05
Turner, Linda Mondies;
Female; 21; 5256 Yancy Drive,
Pace, FL; Probation Violation-
Felony. 5/11/05
Constantin, Robert Blake;
Male; 23; 8939 Eagle Nest
Court, Navarre, FL; Drive
While License Suspended
Habitual Offender, Marijuana
Possess Not More Than 20
Grams, Narcotic Equip-Possess
And Or Use. 5/12/05
Perritt, Tera Lynn; Female;
24; 6638A James St., Milton,
FL; Possess Cocaine,
Marijuana-Possess Not More
Than 20 Grams, Narcotic
Equip-Possess And Or Use.
5/12/05
Trull, Thomas Levan II;
Mare; 32; 4620 Evelyn St.,
Pace, FL; Sex Asslt-Vict Over
12 YOA Physical Force-No
Damage. NDG


Now Open

Twice is Nice

Ladies Clothing and Consignment
Petite to Plus Sizes
M-F 10 to 5pm Sat 10-2pm
5207 Dogwood Dr.
626-6985


Ron Joyce
Realtore
(850) 393-6601
Kristen Langton
Realtors
(850) 516-7662
www.RonJoycoHomes.com
Southern Homes Realty, Inc.
6056 Doctors Park Rd.
Milton, FL. 32570
(850) 626-0123


A


Page 2-A


mmmmmm.-


<11







, I ---I--. a-.. 40 ',nnr


e hT Santa Rosa Press e


Wednesday May 18, 2005
Local


Page 3-A


Wet/Dry
Continued From Page One.
cards in the mail, the chances of
an actual wet/dry .vote are
Becoming more real.
With just over 99,000 regis-
S,'tered voters in Santa Rosa
County, GOLE is trying to
obtain over 25,000 signatures to
present to the Santa Rosa
County Board of
Commissioners.
"The only input I have on
the election process is the day,"
says Bodenstein. "It is up to the
county commissioners if the
Necessary number of signatures
are presented and certified."
Commissioners, notes the elec-
Stions head, will decide what
"type" of election would be
called for.
One option available to'
county leaders is that of a mail-
out ballot instead of the stan-
dard polling of voters at their
respective precincts.
Established precincts not
allowing their facilities ,to be
used for an election doesn't
happen very often.
In fact, it has only been'an
issue once before-in 1993-
when the Wallace precinct was
established at the Wallace
Baptist Church.
When the church would not
allow voting for the election,
the polling place was moved
across the street to the Wallace
Community Center, which has
now been replaced by the Pace
Athletic Facility Clubhouse on
Chumuckla Highway.
Some in the religious conm
munity are not quite as opti-
mistic as Bodenstein.
"I would not be surprised if
it becomes an issue in some
way," says Bobby Musselwhite,
President of the Santa Rosa
County Baptist Association.
7 "The biggest concern could be
the promotion of the issue (of
alcohol) so close to the polling
site.
"I don't know how some of
the churches would feel with
signs or people on their proper-
ty promoting voting for legal-
S ized liquor sales." .
Current campaign laws do
not allow signs within 50 feet of
the .front door of a polling


place.
"I don't see a problem with
the signs as long as they are
tastefully done," says Alan
Cassady, pastor at Woodbine
United Methodist Church inr
Pace. "Most signs can be taste-
fully done like the sign to vote
yes or no on the various propo-
sitions in California."
But the interpretation of
what the election law allows in
the way of signage could be
another issue altogether.
"We have made ourselves
available to help our communi-
ty," says Pine Terrace Baptist
- Church Pastor Mike Wiggins.
"But we have restricted the use
of a lot of signs during the elec-
tion.
"We have to look at the sign
and if it is an attended sign,
then we allow it, but those signs
that are unattended are
removed."
Those unattended signs
could be considered offensive
to the churches, which is some-
thing Santa Rosa County
Commissioner John Broxson
does not want to happen.
"I don't want to have this
election cost us any more than it
has to," says Broxson. "But I
also do not want to offend any-
one or ask them to do some-
thing contrary of their doctrine.

Pre-K needs

volunteers
By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Santa Rosa's Early
Learning Coalition is seeking
preschool caregivers to provide
voluntary Pre-K services start-
ing in August.
Although Santa Rosa's
School District won't receive
Pre-K funding this year, private
providers may still offer the
program.
Early Learning and Santa
Rosa's Children's Services
Center plan a workshop, tomor-
row, to provide information to
prospective participants.
The meeting happens at 7
See PRE-K, Page 5A.


"I haven't satisfied myself
on the question of how it would
affect the churches, but Ms.
Bodenstein seemed to think it
would not be a problem."
Preliminary estimates proj-
ect it would cost Santa Rosa
County about $90,000 to have a
traditional election on the issue,
while a mail-out election would
cost about $169,000.
For GOLE the question is
to see what happens.
"We want to get the issue
out to the public," says GOLE
Director Chuck Pohlmann. "If
it passes, it passes; if it fails, it
fails.
"This is not the only project
we are in the process of work-


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ing on, but it is our first because
we feel the tax dollars that
would be generated would
become a major economic
development and everyone
would benefit."
For Citizens Against
Legalizing Liquor (CALL),
they are hoping GOLE never
gets enough signatures to call
for an election. But if it does,
they then hope the churches
allow the elections to be held
because of the cost.
"It will be less expensive to
hold the elections at the polling
places," says Robert Smith, a
former Santa Rosa County
Commissioner who heads up
CALL. "Traditionally, when an


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election is held at a polling
place, the people that are
against an item are more likely
to come out and vote.
"The mail out ballots might
get more participation, but they
are also more expensive on the


county.
Both CALL and GOLE
noted the ever changing demo-
graphics in the area and that is
what has them wondering if the
issue is placed on the ballot,
how the outcome could go.


Pevrnanent

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PAGE A I TE SANA ROS PRES GAZETE MA 18 G


Something for all
Santa Rosa County Commissioner Tom
Stewart is embarking on a very ambitious project
that, very possibly, could give the Friends of the
Pace Area Library what they want by matching an
already-approved $500,000 state grant with coun-
ty dollars.
But what Stewart has conjured up goes well
beyond just a library on county-owned property
near Pace High School.
Stewart's broad based concept calls for asking
property owners in the Pace area to approve a spe-
cial taxation district to fund a hardened storm shel-
ter/gym, an aquatic (swimming pool) facility and a
community center.
While a previous referendum vote of the peo-
ple in the Pace area rejected just a library, Stewart
is hopeful that voters in a broadened taxing area
will get behind the multi-use complex. The margin
of defeat for the library was, after all, very slim.
We believe Stewart is confident that with those
voters who did support a Pace library coupled with
the Pace community wanting a community center,
property owners would be quite willing to accept a
special tax for a period of possibly five years.
Stewart wants the entire complex to be located
on a portion of the 25-acre site already owned by
the county near Pace High School. And the library
would be housed in an acceptable 5,000 to 6,000
square foot facility.
One of Stewart's selling points would be to
also set aside a portion of the county-owned prop-
erty so that private businesses could lease space
and those lease fees could then be used as opera-
tional funds for the library.
A convincing aspect of Stewart's plan includes
seeking a state grant to help offset the dollars
needed from local taxpayers.
Stewart, who even before being elected to the
commission, had been a strong advocate of the
needs of Pace, believes the plan will work. Despite
voter rejection for a library under the form of a
MSTU, this District 1 commissioner supports the
efforts of the Friends of the Pace Library, but
argues the previously-desired 14,500 square foot
facility was a little larger than necessary.
Impacted voters in the MSTU would, more
than likely, support his proposed 5,000 to 6,000
square foot facility--especially if it is part of ,a
much bigger project that includes a community
center.
From Stewart's initial presentation, it appears
this challenging endeavor may just be the winning
combination that could appeal to a wider group of
Pace voters. It basically offers something for
everyone-whether it be to serve senior citizens,
shelter residents during a hurricane or those sim-
ply wanting to read a good book.
But with so many factors involved, voters will
no doubt want some firm facts regarding acquiring
state grants and who will actually be asked to
increase their property taxes and by how much and
for how many years.
We applaud Commissioner Stewart for at least
stepping up to the plate with a plan of action.
It is obvious he has put a lot of thought into
this plan and it could be a recipe for success. But
many governmental agencies are eyeing additional
taxing possibilities. If Stewart doesn't act fast, his
appeal t6 voters for a few extra dollars could end
up at the end of a long list of requested taxes.
And that could spell political doom for an oth-
erwise good project. Let's hope he can move
quickly on this one.


MAY 18, 2005

G (anta lDosa
Gazette
VOL. 98, NO. 14
Serving Milton, Pace. Jay


Holley-Navarre, Gulf Breeze
& surrounding communities
The Press Gazette (USPS 604-360) is pub-
lished twice weekly on Wednesdays and
Saturday for $24 per year (in county) by
Milton Newspapers, Inc., Michael Coulter,
Publisher. Periodicals postage paid at Milton,
Florida. POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to: The Press Gazette, 6629 Elva
Street, Milton, Florida 32570.
Michael Coulter .President & Publisher
Jim Fletcher ........ Assistant Publisher
Carol Barnes .......Business Manager
Carlton Henderson .General Manager
Deborah Nelson .. ..Staff Writer
Obie Crain, Jr. .Special Projects Writer
Bill Gamblin .......Sports Editor
Jim Martin .........Advertising Manager
Debbie Coon .......Advertising Exec.
Toni Coberly .......Bookkeeper
Rosie Farhart ....... Archives
Tracie Smelstoys ... .Circulation
................. & Classifieds
Tracey Murphree ... .Classifieds,
.................. Graphic Design
Sheena Brunson ... .Classifieds
Freddy Coon .......Pressroom'Foreman
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Joseph Bowman ... .Post Press Leader
Wayne Codn, Esther Sears
and Brian Rinehart .Post-Press

Advertising rates available on request.
Telephone all departments:
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FAX 623-9308
email: news@sr-pg.com
6629 Elva St., Milton, Florida 32570
Don't Forget to Recycle Your Paper


PAGE 4A

OUlJR OPINIONS


A


Opinions


I


In favor of imI

FM: CLIFTON COX, JR.
Dear Editor:.
Concerning the problem of growth and who pays
for it here in Santa Rosa County, there seems to be a
quite simple answer.
It has always been my feeling-and many more of
us with not just this problem-that "the person who
pays should be the one who creates the problem." The
one who creates this over-crowded problem is the per-
son who moves into the county. Without them, we
would have no problem.
To solve the problem is to require the developers
to build the necessary infrastructure (roads, parks,
schools and any other public facilities that are
required to handle the impact the development would
create). In turn, they will add the extra cost to each lot
as an impact fee and all the newcomers will share the
cost.
When I built a new home in Fort Myers in 1993,
$3,000 was added to the cost of building the home. I
did not object because I was part of.the problem.
What I see as the great question is: will our lead-
ers face up to the pressures brought on by the devel-
opers? Time will tell if they are working for the devel-
opers or for the people who put them in their jobs.

Alcohol is bad

FM: JEWEL CHRISTIAN
Dear Editor:
Every day, 45 Americans lose their lives and over
800 are injured in alcohol-related crasfies, and one out
of three people who are killed are not the driver.
Forty percent of all traffic fatalities (the leading
cause of accidental deaths) are alcohol-related and
alcohol has been implicated in many other kinds of
accidents as well, says the National Institute on
Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.
According to MADD (Mothers Against Drunk
Drivers), it only takes one drink to double the chances
of a fatal car crash. The National Highway
Transportation Safety Administration has now chosen
to use the term "crash" and not "accident." This sug-
gests that most accidents are not "accidental."
The effects on the brain centers may last as long
as five hours after the alcohol has been ingested even
after the blood alcohol level has returned to normal.
Yet, alcohol-related automobile crashes kill the equiv-
alent of two jumbo jet crashes-killing all the occu-
pants-every week. Stop and think about this,
Alcohol impairs nearly every aspect of the brain's
ability to process information, as well as the eye's
ability to focus and react to light according to a study
done by the University of California at Berkley.
Fatally injured drivers who have been drinking are
least likely to have been wearing seat belts. More than
three-quarters .of pedestrian fatalities occur at non-
intersections and most happen at night, according to a
recent government analysis of over 20 years of acci-
dents. Most pedestrians were men, and many were
intoxicated at the time of the accident. Alcohol is a
factor in about a third of fatal bicycle accidents.
Besides impairing coordination and prolonging reac-
tion time, drinking greatly reduces the likelihood that
cyclists will wear helmets.
Many people do not realize that alcohol is not
merely a risk on the road, but also at home-leading
to violence and divorce. Alcohol is a poison for chil-
dren. For children, even ingesting a small amount of
alcohol can be deadly.
Alcohol is present in nearly 50% of homicides


r1 ** 0
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I Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


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pact fees...
(U.S. Dept. of Health and Human resources). Alcohol
is a factor in 40 percent or more of falls and the
drinker is likely to be hurt more seriously than a non
drinker given the same traumatic circumstances (U.S.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.)
To be fair, everyone that takes a drink does not
become an alcoholic no more than going to
McDonalds makes a person a hamburger. However, a
person does become impaired to a certain extent after
drinking only one drink of alcohol.
Santa Rosa County is, by far, the best county in
the state of Florida. Let's continue to keep our coun-
ty as safe as possible and vote no on the wet and dry
issue.

A letter to liquor

FM: REUBEN MILEY
Dear Alcohol:
First and foremost, let me tell you that I'm a
huge fan of yours. As my friend, you always seem to
be there when needed. The perfect post-work cock-
tail, a beer at the game, and you're even around in the
holidays, hidden inside chocolates as you warm us
when we're stuck in the midst of endless family gath-
erings. However, lately I've been wondering about
your intentions. While I want to believe that you have
my best interests at heart, I feel that your influence
has led to some unwise consequences:
1. Phone calls: While I agree with you that com-
munication is-important, I question the suggestion
that any con\ ersation of substance or necessity takes
place after 2 a.m. Why would yoiu make me call those
ex-boyfriends/girlfriends when I know for a fact they
do not want to hear from me during the day, let alone
at all hours of the night?
2. Eating: Now, you know I love a good meal, but
why do you suggest that I eat a taco with chili sauce,
along with a big Italian meatball and some stale chips
(washed down with WINE and topped off with a Kit
Kat after a few cheese curls & chili cheese fries)? I'm
an eclectic eater, but I think you went too far this
time.
3. Clumsiness: Unless you're subtly trying to tell
me that I need to do more yoga to improve my bal-
ance, I see NO need to hammer the issue home by'
causing me to fall down. It's completely unnecessary,
and the black and blue marks that appear on my body
mysteriously the next day are beyond me. Similarly, it
should never take me more than 45 seconds to get the
front door key into the lock.
4. Furthermore: The hangovers have GOT to
stop. This is getting ridiculous. I know a little
penance for ,our previous evening's debauchery may
be in order, but the 3 p.m. hangover immobility is
completely unacceptable. My entire day is shot. I ask-
that, if the proper precautions are taken (water, vita- ^,
min B, bread products, aspirin) prior to going to
sleep/passing out face down on the kitchen floor with
a bag of popcorn, the hangover should be minimal
and in no way interferewith my daily activities.
Alcohol, I have enjoyed our friendship for some
years now and would like to ensure that we remain on
good terms. You've been the invoker of great stories,
the provocation for much laughter, and the needed
companion when I just don't know what to do with
the extra money in my pockets. In order to continue
this friendship, I ask that you carefully review my
grievances above and address them immediately. I
will .look for an answer no later than Thursday 3 p.m.,
(pre-happy hour) on your possible solutions and
hopefully we can continue this fruitful partnership.
Thank you,
Your biggest fan

P.S. THINGS THAT ARE DIFFICULT TO SAY
WHEN DRUNK:
1. Innovative
2. Preliminary
3. Proliferation
4. Cinnamon

THINGS THAT ARE VERY DIFFICULT TO
SAY WHEN DRUNK:
1. Specificity
2. British Constitution
3. Passive-aggressive disorder

THINGS THAT ARE DOWNRIGHT IMPOS-
SIBLE TO SAY WHEN DRUNK:
1. Thanks, but I don't want to have sex.
2. Nope, no more beer for me.
3. Sorry, but you're not really my type.
4. Good evening, officer. Isn't it lovely out
tonight?
5. Oh, I couldn't. No one wants to hear me sing.


2

*-f

',
I


You Spoke Out,

Santa Rosa...
Sunday, 8:48 p.m.
My name is Bill and I am
against the idea of going wet. I'
think everyone that is against it, 6
write NO on the petition and mail .:
it back. This will cause them to':.
spend money on postage. Write,
NO in bold. i

Sunday, 3:49 p.m.
This is James in Milton, about:
the wet county debate.. .take a?
trip to Miami, Orlando or any*
major city that has grown around,
being wet and take a look at the)
lifestyle that grows around it. I'mA
sure it will change your mind.

Sunday, 7:48 a.m.
This is Dorin. I just finished
reading The Minority View-,
How NOT to be a poor person.;
This was an excellent article.
Please continue to keep publish-
ing this person. His viewpoints
. are very important to our country.,
Thank you, very much.

Saturday, 8:56 p.m.
I think the majority of ourt
problems today would have been,
handled better if, 20 years ago;,
,we had beguna.a $20,000 pert
house' impact ,fee. Then we.
'wouldn't have all' these people:
who have moved here, trying to
tell us how to run our county. :

Saturday, 3:09 p.m.
Three cheers for Al Leonard's:
article about a new courthouse. I1
hope the county commissioners:
will take heed. Let's get rid of the,
junk house we have now, and>
build a real courthouse.

Saturday, 1:11 p.m.
My name is Rosemary. I hate'
to hear that we are living in a dry,
county. Beer flo s all over the
place. We are not dry. It's a wet
county that just doesn't allow the'
nice things. And it's a nice county .
because men love beer.

Saturday, 12:53 p.m.
There needs to be proper traf-'
fic signals near the Medical:
Center. The traffic has been
increased. A caution light and'
some 25 mph signs would help to'
slow things down for everyone.


You may Speak Out any
time, day or night. Just call our
Speak Out line at 623-5887
and leave your message.

REEM E


We want you to share your
views on the above topic(s)-or
ANY topic-with other Press
Gazette readers. Your views are
important, too.
Send your letters to: LET-
TERS TO THE EDITOR, 6629
Elva Street, Milton, FL 32570.
(FAX (850) 623-9308.)
Letters may be edited for con-
tent or to fit the available space.
For a letter to be published, you
MUST sign your name and please
include your phone number and
address so we may phone for ver-
ification, if necessary.


"4


t


EDITORIAL & OPINIONS



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Available from Commercial News Providers
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I YOUR WRITTEN OPINIONS :1


I THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE


MAY 182C"5


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Page 5-A


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


eudnusuay may ,
I (nO'i1


Planes


Continued From Page One.
of Turbo Mentor aircraft has
been slated, for some time, to
a be replaced with modem Texas
II aircraft. But budgetary issues
forced the Navy to cutback on
its purchases several years
ago-stopping after only a
handful of planes had been pur-
"chased.
Without the necessary 45
planes to stand up a full
squadron, the 25 or 30 that were
received were sent to NAS
Pensacola to be used for navi-
gator training until a full
squadron could be purchased.
"That decision," notes,
Salter, "was somewhat of a dif-
'ferent decision by the Navy
because it had wanted to brirrg
Sup Whiting Field first. Luckily,
they have now recommitted to
bringing them here next year."
S While 45 planes will allow
Whiting to stand up a full
squadron of the new trainers,
:140 to 150 of the aircraft would
be necessary to fully supply the
local Naval training facility.
Still, local officials say they
were pleased with last week's
announcement and plan to
spend the next few months
making sure Whiting isn't
somehow worked into the list of
bases to be closed or realigned.
"I think," notes Salter, "it is
now important to remember
that last Friday was just the first
day of BRAC-not the last.
J "The initial decision by the
Secretary of Defense was, obvi-
ously, in our favor. We also
know the job of BRAC is to
Evaluate those decisions made
by the Secretary of Defense.
They will, for the next two or
three months, be looking at his
Decisions and they certainly
have the right to add to or delete
from the Secretary's list."
As a result, local officials
say they will continue to do
what they have been doing:
Working to improve the military
value of NAS Whiting Field.
They will do this, says Salter,
by continuing to purchase land
around the Whiting or work
with Florida Forever to place
land around Whiting ,and its, ,,
outlying- fields-into permanent
protection zones'.,.
"Encroachment," notes
Salter, "will continue to be one
of the driving forces behind the
BRAC commission's decision-
making process. It will be upon
us to continue to tell the storyof
all the hard %ork done by many
to prevent encroachment
around NAS Whiting Field and
the outlying fieldsras well."
To that end, a large contin-
gent of officials from the
Panhandle will, later today, jet
their way to Washington. The

Pre-K
Continued From Page Three.
p.m. at the Children's Services
_Center, Gateway, Plaza
Shopping Center, 6564
Caroline Street.
Private providers must meet
the following criteria to qualify
for the Pre-K program:
They must hold a director
credential, be licensed (child
care facility, family child care
home, or large family child care
home) or exempt from licensure
(private school or faith-based
provider). For additional infor-
mation regarding the local VPK
program and tomorrow's meet-
ing, contact the Early Learning
Coalition of Santa Rosa County
at 983-5312.


Darrel R. Greer
Parkmore Plaza
6259 Highway 90
Milton, FL
(850) 983-1471
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
Edwardjones
ServingIndividual Investors Since1871


meeting is part of the two-coun-
ty on-going effort to show com-
bined support for the military.
The trip has been an annual one
since 1994.
"In the past, we've just
gone up to show our support to
the Navy and, to some degree,
ask what we could do to better
support its mission," says
Salter. "This will be a bit differ-
ent and somewhat awkward.
They are supporting leaving
Whiting Field as it is, and that's
a good thing. But on the other
side of the coin, they're looking


at potential cutbacks in
Pensacola. We will have to walk
the fine line of supporting the
Navy's position on Whiting
Field while also suggesting it
revisit the decision on NAS
Pensacola."
Whiting has a long history
of fighting battles to retain its
elite status with the Navy. "We
must continue to work through-
out the summer to make sure
the BRAC commission does not
get caught up in other areas try-
ing to convince them to move
helicopter training to Ft. Rucker
or fixed wing training to Texas,"


Cook-out


(1,000), cheese, condiments,
produce, paper goods and
chips.
Buffalo Rock Pepsi is
donruag drinks and a grill.
Student Youth Committee
organizers include Kaitlin
Hudson, Parker Hudson,
Jackson Mullins, Lauren Pace,
and members of the Panhandle
4-H Archery Club.
Other sponsors include the
Santa Rosa Press Gazette,
county commissioners, and 4-
H's Operation Military Kid pro-
gram.
Early donors may have
their names added to promo-
tional flyers.
For more information, or to
donate to the event, contact
Jamie Hudson at 994-8501.
Reach writer at:
Nelson@sr-pg.comrn


Continued From Page One.
ticipating 4-H students.
"This year, we hope to
serve 1,000," say participants.
The cookout is scheduled to
happen in conjunction with
Memorial Day activities at the
Riverwalk Veteran's Plaza.
"If you haven't visited the
Plaza, let this be your excuse,"
say event coordinators. "It is
breathtaking. Santa Rosa is
proud to be the home of such a
fine tribute to all of our service
men and women. Please join us
in honoring our American
Veterans."
The 4-H is seeking dona-
tions from area businesses and
individuals, in the form of sup-
plies and monetary contribu-
tions.
Needed items include ham-
burgers, hotdogs and buns


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says Salter. "We must stay close
to the BRAC commission and
make sure it understands the
Secretary of Defense made the
right decision."
All in all, Salter says, "it's
going to be a long, long, hot
summer."
fletcher@sr-pg.comn


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Page 6-A I The Santa Rasa Press Gazette Wednesday May 18, 2Ou~i


a-s




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Tips on
By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer
It's the time of year-when a
yard owner's fancy turns to
total warfare-against a partic-
ularly malevolent insectoid
invader faction.
For frontal assault against
the now-ubiquitous fire ant,
several new treatments are
available... but bird and butter-
fly-lovers should pay careful
attention to product warning A


getting
terflies, that includes beneficial
insects (like ladybugs), reptiles
(like lizards and turtles that eat
bugs and slugs) and fish.
Some may also be dangerous
to pets and children-check
labels carefully to be sure.
Available anti-ant remedies
run the gamut from liquid
"drench" treatments to one-
time, yard-wide powders, to
mound-by-mound granular
sprinkles. ,


labels.
New, one-time treat-
ments may be especially
hard on backyard wildlife. A n d
Most successful fire ant then there
treatments must, generally, be are home
reapplied regularly-they don't remedies.
always kill the queen, and new The best
queens can fly from place to strategy to eliminate colonies,
place. say experts, is to treat each
Thus, any one-time treat- mound separately, and then
ment is going to be extra-inten- broadcast yard-wide insecticide
sive...and may also kill other, to control foraging workers.
beneficial creatures in the yard. Regardless of the treatment
In addition to birds and but- selected, experts point out that


rid of fire ants


proper application is key to con-
trol.
For quick results, individual
mounds can be drenched or
injected with insecticide, or
sprinkled with broadcast
bait. /
Not all broadcast bait
treatments may be effec-
tive against fire ant species.
Other substances break)
down in light, and must be reap-
plied more often. Homeowners
should read all labels, experts
advise, to ensure the product is
designed specifically for fire
ants.
Broadcast treatments, such
as Amdro, Logic, and Over-N-
Out, generally come in granular
bait form for sprinkling over
large areas. Foraging ants bring
the pieces back to the colony
and feed them to queen and
brood.
Make sure granular bait is
fresh and dry-ants will turn
their insecty noses up at rancid


or wet material.
Bait should also
when ants are actively
If ants begin retrie
ment within .,


from app
cation,
,,are
During especially h
ants move around du
evening hours.
Apply liquid (dre
ment during cool, su
ing hours, when m
colony is in the mou
queen is closer to the
University of Flori
recommend using o
per 8-inch mound.
Try not to disturb
during treatment.
If treatment does
the queen, the mound
pear. Bait sprinkled


mound may prove more effec-
be applied tive, because
ly foraging, workers feed the .'
;ving treat- poisoned sub-/'
stances to, the
10-30 min- queen and grow-
a t e s ing ants, thus elimi-
nating the nest.

li- that indiscriminate killing of all
they natural competition in the yard
active. may induce the ants to return in
ot periods, greater numbers.
ring cooler Home remedies often prove
ineffective.
ench) treat- Multiple queen colonies are
mnny morn- not aggressive towards each
lost of the other, according to insect scien-
nd, and the tists, so shoveling dirt from one
e top. mound into another to encour-
rida experts age ant-warfare is ineffective,
one gallon and is only likely to result in
multiple stings.
the mound Fire ants eat dead animals,
plant "honeydew" sugar secre-
not reach tions and other sources of
d will reap- sweets, protein and fats. They
around the break solids down to liquid


form before ingestion,
AA. thus, the oft-touted
S^home remedy of
sprinkling
grits on an
anthill to make
Sthe grain
"explode"
inside them may feed
workers, but it won't kill them.
Experts also caution against
pouring boiling water or ignit-
ing flammable liquids over ant
mounds, due to inherent burn
risks. The same goes for house-
hold chemical products such as
bleach and drain cleaner,
which pose more danger to the
environment and people than
to the ants, and may not even
penetrate the nest to the queen.
Several species of fire ants
inhabit the Southeast. The red
imported fire ant, Solenopsis
invicta BUren, is the particular-
ly aggressive variety that typi-
cally invades suburban back-
cont. to page 7


Shining t
"Landscape lighting is func-
tional, but it also allows you to
showcase the beauty of your
yard, garden and home after
dark," landscape lighting expert
Andrea Connor, of Niceville's
Nite Time Decor points out.
When homeowners think of
outdoor lighting, standard
options like floodlights and
entry door illumination likely
come to mind first.
But there are a host of other
possibilities for enhancing front
and backyard landscaping, using
light, to show them off at night.
Don't just focus on the door,
say experts, think about the path-
way leading up to the home's
front.
"Clear away the brush and
debris from your front walkways
and add attractive, low-voltage
lights to illuminate the footpath
to your door," Connor suggests.
And what about grill, and
entertainment areas-how to
make them more comfortable
for guests?
"If you plan on plenty of out-
door entertainment on the deck
or by the pool," says Connor,
"install low-voltage lights under
handrails, deck benches, tables


ie 'light'
or stairs for a dramatic effect and
for safety."
And lighting need not be lim-
ited to above ground.
"Submerged lights in water
gardens or ponds add an aesthet-
ic touch to the total landscape,"
notes Connor.
Green thumbs know a beauti-
ful flower 'garden is its own
reward. But gardens can be


on landscaping


enjoyed after the sun goes down
too, experts point out, with a bit
of strategically placed lighting.
"Once those colorful
flowerbeds are in full bloom,"
says Connor, "showcase them at
night by inserting downlights in
nearby trees to highlight the var-
ious ground cover."'
And the home, itself, is a thing
of beauty when properly illumi-


nated.
Speaking of color... experts
say nighttime lighting can even
be used to enhance the appear-
ance of plantings, themselves.
"Use a slightly colored light
instead of white," says Connor,
"to make your shrubs appear a
deeper green or a bed of flowers
look brighter."


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Page 6-A


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday May 18, 20u5











Wednesday May 18, 2005 I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Page 7-A


~eLII3&~
-


q


,


Growing your own orchard offers variety


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Nothing is quite as gratify-
ing, and as liberating, as coax-
ing food from the earth. And we
who live in North Florida are
blessed with an especially wide
range of edibles we can grow.
When you grow your own
fruit, you reap a rich flavorful
harvest, and you control every-
thing that goes into producing
it.
Another benefit of having
your own orchard is that it
allows you to grow fruits that
are unobtainable in the market-
place.
Rarely do you find in any
market such fruits as Pink
Pummelos, an ancient grape-
fruit with a relative size of bas-
ketballs with a smooth sweet
grapefruit flavor, or Sanbokan
Lemons, which taste like sweet-
ened lemonade when you bite
into them. But you can grow
them right in your backyard.
When was the last time you
saw a tree-ripened fig in a gro-
cery store? Figs come in such a
vast array of shapes, sizes and
flavors. Some, like Celeste and
Nero, are so rich they're like
eating fig preserves right off the
tree.
Growing your own fruit
means being able to choose old
heirloom varieties like Hood
and Pineapple Pears for pies
and preserves. Or having a
Mayhaw tree to make your own
fire ants continued from page 6


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world famous Mayhaw jelly.
There's just so much to
choose from,
Starting an orchard with
youngsters teaches them where
food really comes from, instills
a sense of wonderment for
Nature, and will give them
memories they will carry with
them a lifetime.
Here are a few things to con-
sider before beginning your
orchard;
Pick varieties that are suited
for our climate.
We're blessed with winters
that will allow us to grow such
temperate fruits as ,apples,
peach, pear and plums. But
you'll need to look for low-chill
varieties that will fruit well in
our area.
You can also grow such sub-
tropicals as citrus, bananas and
papayas. You'll need to choose
more cold-hardy citrus that can
take the occasional hard freezes
the area gets, or be ready to pro-
tect them through cold spells.
Make sure they're grafted on
Trifoliate root-stocks, as this
helps keep them dormant in the
winter. Banana and papaya are
possible, but you need to know
the tricks of making them fruit.
Choosing a site with at least
six hours of direct sun will give
you the best fruit.
No wet, soggy soils should
be chosen. Most fruits, except


yards. The species hitched a
ride from Brazil to the Gulf
Coast in the 1940s, probably
along with cargo shipping bal-
last soil.
The ants are reddish brown
and, unlike some .other species,
workers appear in multiple
sizes, anywhere from 1/8 to 1/4
inches long. Each wields a
stinger, which injects alkaloid-
based venom as the insect


bananas and Mayhaws, prefer
dry feet.
Remember to ask if your
chosen fruit needs a pollinator.
Many fruits, including apple,
plum, quince, chestnut, paw
paw and pineapple guava need
two varieties to set fruit.
Give them enough room to
grow. Most tree fruits need 15
to 20 ft. to mature properly.
If you're short on room and
want to get a great selection, try
planting two or three different
varieties in the same hole. Each
tree becomes a "main branch."
This allows you to have fruit
that's ripening at different
times.
People who live on small
lots can incorporate fruit into
the landscape, enjoying both
beautiful flowers and good
things to eat.
Many fruits make excellent
patio plants. Citrus, figs,
pineapple and pomegranate all
produce well in containers.
Check out this list of tried
and true varieties;
Apples: Anna, Dorsett
Golden, Tropic Sweet.
Pears: Hood, Baldwin ,
Orient, Kieffer, Golden Boy,
Sug, Pineapple, Canes.
Peaches: Florida King,
Suwannee, Junegold, La
Feliciana, Tex Price, Southern
Pearl, UFO Peach, Gulf King,
Gulf Prince.


stings.
When the nest is disturbed,
workers swarm out to attack
anything in the vicinity. Stings
cause swelling and a blister,
and may induce allergic shock.
Instances of fatal attacks have
occurred.
Fire ants typically nest in
sheltered areas-under patios,
foundations and driveways, as
well as in the lawn, mulched


SR T T WSWf L/NO OF CONCRETE ART

6383 Banyan Dr. Milton FL 32570
(Coner of Hwy. 87 North & Banyan Dr.)
850-623-0362


Plums: Improved Methley,
Byrongold, Bruce, Ruby Sweet,
Gulf Rose, Gulf Blaze, Gulf
Ruby, Gulf Beauty.
Nectarines: Suncoast,
Sungold, Karla Rose.
Pecans: Moreland, Sumner,
Elliot, Curtis.
Chestnuts: Dustan Hybrid,
Chinese Chestnut.
Persimmons: Saijo, Great
Wall, Honan Red, Sheng, Fuyu,
Ichikikei Jiro, Hana Fuyu.
Figs: Brown Turkey ,
Celeste, Hunt, Nero, LSU Gold,
LSU Celeste, LSU
Everbearing, Hollier, Tena,
Alma, Jelly, Smith, Ventura.
Citrus: Super cold hardy;
Kumquats, Meyer and Tiwanica
Lemons, Satsuma and
Changsha Tangerines, and
U.S 119 Orange If you can
provide some protection, the
choices are much wider, includ-
ing many oranges, navels, tan-
gelos, and even limes and blood
oranges as patio plants.
In addition to these familiar
fruits, there are some more
unusual edibles that grow well
in our area. These include
Mayhaw, Jujube, Asian Pear,
Quince, Pomegranate, Olive,
and Paw-Paw.
There really is a wide range
of fruit trees that can be grown
here.




gardens or in flowerpots.
Mounds may house a single
queen, or more closely crowd-
ed multiple queen colonies.
Ant queens live as long as
six years, and maturation time
from egg to adult is around 38
days. According to the
University of Florida, as many
as 97,000 queens per year may
be produced on an acre of land
in the Southeast, although most
will die. From the original
queen, which can lay 1,500
eggs per day, a colony can
reach 7,000 in six months. A
"typical mature colony" would
contain about 80,000 workers,
although populations range as
high as 200,000.
Story written by Deborah
Nelson. Reach her at:
nelson @sr-pg.comn


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Wednesday May 18, 2005


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 7-A










I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday May 18, 2005


"Wired" homes still a dream for


Santa Rosa homebuyers are
increasingly savvy about how
they want their homes to' be
wired. In today's dream homes,
high-performance communica-
tions are essential. Yet, officials
say some new homes continue
to be built with inadequate
wiring for computers, entertain-
ment systems and other forms
of sophisticated home electron-
ics.
A new minimum standard
for residential communications
wiring was enacted by the
Federal Communications
Commission in 2000, but many
builders remain poorly
informed about the ruling or
have little understanding of
what it means. A few still build
homes that don't even measure
up to the basic FCC require-
ment. Others barely meet the
standard. Consequently, home-
owners who want more than the
bare minimum often have to
rewire at a cost substantially
higher than the cost of installing
adequate wiring in the first
place.
Conceived by the FCC in the
1990s, the minimum standard


governing inside broadband
wiring is not very high-tech,
based as it is on 10-year-old
technology. There is a simple
remedy for this, however. At lit-
tle additional cost to builders,
high-performance copper com-
munications wiring known as
Category 5e can and should
- be installed in new homes.

Inside Wiring Report Card
As a guide for potential buy-
ers and owners, the Copper
Development Association sug-
gests grading homes according
to the level of communications
wiring installed therein. Think
of it as a "report card" for
builders,.

A = Excellent
This home exceeds expecta-
tions. Two Category 5e struc-
tured wiring ports one for
telephone and one for data --
combined with two RG-6 coax-
ial cable ports for two-way
video signals, are available at
two different locations in virtu-
ally every room. A central dis-
tribution device (CDD) pro-
vides connectivity between


rooms and with the outside
world, and simplifies network
management. Wiring is
installed in a star configuration,
meaning that each outlet is
wired directly back to the CDD.
This home might also have a
sophisticated home entertain-
ment center, and may be wired
for whole-house audio with
speaker wires extending to key
listening areas in the home.

B = Good
Two Category 5e and two
RG-6 ports are star-wired to at
least one location in all key
rooms, including bedrooms.
Additional wiring has been
installed behind walls for future
use, although outlets must be
installed as needed by the
homeowner. Entertainment,
security and energy-manage-
ment features may also be pre-
sent.

C = Average
Category 5e and RG-6 out-
lets are provided in two or three
key rooms, also using a star
configuration. This wiring is
fairly typical of what is promot-


many
ed as "structured wiring" in new
homes today. The homeowner
may find it limiting or inflexible
in terms of entertainment fea-
tures or for sending broadband
to children's bedrooms and
adding home automation and
security cameras.

D = Minimum standard
This house barely meets
FCC requirements for its
wiring, which is adequate main-
ly for telephone lines. Not
exactly the "dream home" tech-
smart people are looking for
today or will need tomorrow.

F = Failure
In this case, the house does
not meet even the minimum
FCC standard. Even if the
builder used the right wires,
check out the installation -
daisy chaining, or wiring
sequentially from outlet to out-
let, does not get a passing grade.
As far as up-to-date technology
goes, this home is a lemon! It is
the responsibility of the builder
and installer to bring the home
up to the FCC minimum stan-
dard.


Map your home's electrical system


You don't have to be a pro-
fessional electrician to diagram
the electrical wiring in your
home but why would any-
one want to.do that?
Actually, there are many
good reasons. Knowing the pat-
tern of your home's wiring cir-
cuits and how your electrical
service panel is organized can
be a big help when a circuit
breaker trips or a fuse blows.
It's also important to know if
the wiring in your home is
keeping up with your lifestyle.
Finally, whether you know it or
not, you're in a good position
to "optimize" your system if
your pattern of electrical use
isn't well-matched to your
house's circuitry. More about
that later.
People who live in older
homes should be especially
attentive to their wiring. Today
Americans consume nearly five
times as much electricity per-
household as they did in the
1950s. If your home was built
back then, or earlier, it may still
have the original wiring -
inadequate by today's stan-
dards.
Even a newer home could
have insufficient wiring.
Builders don't often build for
above-average power usage.
And home electrical use will
only increase in the future. For
all these reasons, and more, you
need to take inventory of your
house's wiring.
Getting Started
Begin by switching off one
circuit breaker or removing one
fuse at the electrical panel in
your home. Next, determine
which plug-in receptacles (or
outlets, as they're commonly.
known) and which switches
don't work when that circuit is
off.
Outlets can be tested with
a low-cost multi-meter or an
electrician's test light, or you
can simply use a night-light or
lamp. Be sure to test both
receptacles of duplex (double)
outlets, since one half might be
on a completely separate cir-
cuit. If so, make note of it; this
could be a dangerous situation.
The second half of the outlet
could also be connected to the
same circuit through a switch in
the room, for convenience. Part


of the mapping process is to
note what your switches con-
trol. Finally, be sure to note
which outlets are GFCIs
(ground-fault circuit inter-
rupters). These are there, for
your protection and can be
identified by the presence of
two buttons marked Test and
Reset.
If you're working alone,
you can save some steps if you
plug in a loud radio, then turn
off each of the breakers or
remove the fuses, one at a time,
until the music stops. This will
identify which circuit you're
dealing with. You can then map
that circuit by testing nearby
outlets and switches.
Next Steps
Test results should be col-
lected circuit by circuit -
and entered into a table. Each
outlet or light switch in the
house should be uniquely iden-
tified in the table. Record the
amperage rating for each circuit
(identified on the breaker or
fuse) as well.
If practical, also record the
gage (diameter or thickness) of
the wiring in each circuit, typi-
cally marked on the plastic
outer jacket containing the
wires. If it's 14 AWG, the cir-
cuit should be protected by a


74 -

Sho.c~

J aler



DipaigTeSsOCU pine


breaker or fuse no larger than
15 amps. If it's 12 AWG 20
amps at most. If it's 10 AWG
(such as most ctqthes-dryer cir-
cuits) 30 amps maximum.
The importance of proper
breaker and fuse sizes cannot
be overstated. If they're not
correct, they should be replaced
at once.
Depending on the size. of
your home and the extent of the
wiring, you may have any-
where from a few to 10, 20 or
even 40 separate branch cir-
cuits. Generally, more circuits
means less chance that any one
circuit will be overloaded.
It may come as a surprise
that ordinary homeowners can
actually do something to
improve or "optimize" their
electrical systems. Depending


on your level of competence -
and your local laws you may
be able to solve some of the
problems revealed in your map-
ping.,
Pbr example, an over-
loaded circuit can be divided
into two circuits by adding an
extra wiring run. This not only
makes your home safer, but it
will also reduce or eliminate
tripped breakers or blown
fuses. Replacing a broken light
switch, or an outlet that needs
to be upgraded, is a fairly sim-
ple do-it-yourself job. (Don't
forget to turn off the 'power
first.) Replacing standard out-
lets with GFCIs (now required
in kitchens, baths, basements
and other wet locations) may
require the expertise of an elec-
trician.


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What Can Be Done?
Builders must make deci-
sions based on customers'
future needs. Buyers must insist
on a full description of the com-
munications wiring systems in a
new home. A number of indus-
try groups are actively pushing
for improvements in home
wiring.
Many builders now recog-
nize that a new home without a
high-performance communica-
tions wiring system is an
impediment to sales. Buyers of
new homes are finding it easy to


say "No" to homes with inade-
quate wiring.
One of the biggest reasons
for buying a brand-new home is
to benefit from the latest home
technology. There is no reason
to accept a new home that does
not merit a grade of "B" or bet-
ter when it comes to communi-
cations wiring.,
For more information about
the FCC ruling and high-perfor-
mance communications wiring,
see www.copper.org/telecom.


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Page 8-A


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ANDERSIN EQUIPMENT
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623=ycg50.05 1^


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FROM
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WHITING FIELD, CH
THE WHITING TOWERn


SATURDAY


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OF THE


IN EVERY


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and


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anta Press 6629 Elva Street Milton, FL
S623-2120 Fax: 623-2007


r


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Page 9-A


Wednesday May 18 2005


I


GAZETTE !










The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Five PJC staffers have graduates


Wednesday May 18, 2005


Local


It '..,s "ail in the falm l\ at
tils c.ir's Pensacola Junior
College. Milton Cjmpus' com-
niencenme... ceremrnnies.
Fi' e PJC staff members can
cl.iim newly-diploma'd stu-
dents i four daughters and one
husband i in this \ear's graduat-
ing class


Business professor Dorlnda
Lynn's daughter, Celia. has
earned an Asociate of Science
in the College's Zoo Animal
Technology. program.
Celia, %%ho graduated
magna cum laude. goes on to an
internship at Disney's Animal
Kingdom. the first such honor


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for a PJC Zoo Tech student.
Brittain-Amos-Bankester.
whose mother, Anthea Amos is
PJC's Academic Coordinator,
graduated cum laude %with an
A.A. and plans to go on to stud\
Education.
Anthea Amos is herself. a
PJC graduate and 197S
Homecoming Queen.
Kimberb Renee Brant. a
Robinson Honors Scholar.
graduated cum laude with an
A.A. and plans to transfer to
LUWF to studN Ph\sics and
Math. Kimberl.'s mother. Dr.
Georgiana Bryant. is PJC's
Director of Student Affairs.
Dr. Brant also attended a
community\ college before
transfemng to Tallahassee.
She sas, %hen it came
time to pick a school, she guid-
ed her own daughter in the
same direction.
"I very much believe in the
community college as a compo-
nent of the education process,"
she notes. "It provides an excel-
lent transition to a larger uni-
versity."
Smaller schools, Dr. Bryant
points out, offer students more
access to professors, as well as
flexibility in trying out different
career areas.
"It allows them to have the
opportunity to test the waters,"
she notes. "(Smaller schools)
can offer (students) a solid
foundation that helps them out
later as far as career selection."
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Submitted photo,



Library plans summer of events


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer
Milton's library is gearing
up for a full schedule of chil-
dren's summer activities;,
including story-time, reading
programs, a book sale and other
events.
Registration for the sum-
mer "Read Around Florida"
reading program happens June
1 to 11.
Parents will have to pre-
register and pick up tickets this
year instead of paying at the
door-coordinators hope that
will help streamline the
process.
This year's special topics
include Watermania, Fun with
Animals, and Score with
Sports.
Members of Pensacola's
Pelicans, Ice Pilots and Power
will be on hand during sports
week to visit.
Preschool story-time con-
tinues through May 18 at
Milton, when the program takes
a break until June 15.
Milton Children's Librarian
Margaret Chatraw says Santa


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Rosa libraries plan a full sched-
ule of story-time activities this
summer.
For details, contact the
library at 623-5565.
Organizers note that sum-
mer story-time sessions will be
held for children only-staff is
working on getting a tent for
parents to wait and, perhaps,
enjoy a book and refreshments
while youngsters are visiting.
Chatraw notes the arrange-
ment gives younger readers a
special time to practice their
independence skills in a struc-
tured learning environment.
The library is also sponsor-
ing a contest for an original rap.
Deadline for submission is June
11-students will receive infor-
mation on entering at area
schools or they may contact the


library.
The Friends of the Library.
are gearing up for their annual;
Book Sale to benefit the llbrar,
The sale happens Frida,.
June 3 (8 a.m. to 6 p.m.) and.
Saturday, June 4 (8 a.m. to 4'
p.m.) at the County Auditorium.;
Book lovers can get a head'
start on the sale, however, at a'
special kickoff dinner and Early,
Bird sale, Thursday, June 2 (5
p.m. to 8 p.m.).
Early Bird admission is by;
advance ticket sale only-tick-;
ets are $12 and may be picked'
up at the Milton Library, Tops.
Appliance, or the Chamber of:
Commerce.

Story written by Deborah-
Nelson. Reach her at;-
Nelson@sr-pg.con,


'Read Across is


Chumuckla' coming


By DEBORAH NELSON
Press Gazette Staff Writer


Want to help promote liter-
acy in the community?
Organizers of Chumuckla
Elementary School's upcoming
Read Across Chumuckla Day
hope the event will pass along
the message that reading is the
foundation for learning.,
"One academic factor
above all factors predicts the
future of our children: reading
literacy," notes Chumuckla
Principal Dr. Karen Barber.
"If a child can read, the
possibilities for a child's future
are endless."
Focusing on all things liter-
ary, the May 25 event is
designed to encourage the com-


munity, as a whole, to pick up a;
book..
The school is inviting
"guest readers" to host 20-
minute story-times and other
activities throughout the day.
Guest readings will be
scheduled from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Organizers also hope the
focus will promote reading out-
side the school.
"Read at home on May 25
with your family or enjoy a
quiet moment by yourself with
a good book," Barber recom-
mends.
Coordinators request guest
readers and other volunteers
RSVP by May 23.
To participate, call 995-
3690.


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WEDNESDAY

z'zette aMaY. 18,2005

^ Section B
Stvie .......


Ask

'Ole Chief
"Chief, will you explain the
new National Guard/Reserve
education program?"
Sure, here goes. The new
Guard/Reserve education pro-
Sgram is called Chapter 1607.
This program is for those Guard
and Reserve members that are
called to active duty for 90 days
or more. The traditional Guard
and Reserve still have education
benefits under Chapter 1606
(pays $288.00 a month).
Under Chapter 1607, benefits
are paid as a percentage of active
duty Chapter 30 (Montgomery
GI Bill) benefits (currently
$1,004 a month) without the
required $1,200 payment that
active duty personnel have.
Chapter 1607 are paid out in a
stair-step fashion. Benefits are
paid this way: (1) 90 days to one
year active duty are paid at 40%
of active duty rate; (2) one year
to 2 years or more active duty
are paid 60% of active duty rate;
and (3) two years or more active
duty are paid 80% of the active
duty rate. If the activated
Guardsman or Reservist are'
injured during the first 90 days
and receives a medical dis-
charge, then the individual will
receive benefits at the 90-day
active duty rate (40%)..
Chapter 1607 benefits are
granted to all Guard and Reserve
that have served on active duty
since September 11, 2001. To
apply, the Guardsman/Reservist
must hand-write "CHAPTER
1607" on top of the application
form (VAF 22-1990 or -1995).
See "vet-Rep" at each school for
additional information. Those
Guardsmen or Reservists that
have been discharged 'from
Guard or Reserve are eligible for
this new prgraman't i iiig :, they
still have entitlement remaining
(36 months education).


I I

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4915 Highway 90 Pace
I 850-995-1600 I


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Movies Sfintart at 0:00 a


June 7-9
Shrek & Shrek 2
I June 14-16
Cheaper by the Dozen
& Ice Age
June 21- 23
Cat in the Hat & Grinch
June 28-30
I Daddy Day Care
& Are We There Yet
July 5-7
Fat Albert & Garfield
July 12-14
I Lemony Snickets
& Sky Captain
July 19-21
Spirit & Shark Tale
July 26-28
Elf & Raise Your Voice


Wm,."1,--,"


A SLICE OF HEAVEN

AWAITS SHOE LOVERS AS

COLORFUL, SEXY AND

SASSY WEDGES EDGE

BACK ONTO THE SCENE


If the word "wedge" con-
jures images of cheese or cake,
you haven't visited 'a shoe
department lately.
The wedge heel is being
touted as the look of the season
from such designers as
Valentino, Emanuel Ungaro
and Kate Spade. Less pricey
shoe labels Nine West, Charles
David and Bandolino are also
toeing the wedge line.
Historians say Italian shoe
designer Salvatore Ferragamo
introduced the wedge, made in
one piece with the sole, in the
'30s. And it has enjoyed period-
ic revivals. This time around,
the wedge comes in bold col-
ors, styles and prints often
trimmed with jewels, flowers or
straps. Wedge heels, in various
heights, are cut from wood,
cork, metallic-glazed leathers
and exotic skins.
Perhaps the best-known
wedge is the espadrille, a clas-
sic warm-weather shoe with a
heel covered in jute, sometimes
raffia. Traditionally, this
footwear is. made with colorful
or natural canvas, often sport-
ing ties around the ankles.
On why the wedge is so
popular. this, season, Aarti
Nanda, an assistant shoe buyer
for Macy's, said, "Women want
a change from the pointy-toe
stiletto of the last couple of
years. Also, the look is fresh
and updated and, best of all,
appeals to a wide range of
women."
For Gregg Andrews,
Nordstrom's fashion director,
the shoe fits in perfectly with
this season's ready-to-wear.
"The pretty, feminine story
continues in fashion," he said.
"But it's not as structured. With


a wedge, a woman can get
height and feel sexy, yet the
shoe has a casual vibe.."
Andrews also points out
. that wedges can be worn with
just about anything, from shorts
and skirts to cropped pants and
linen skirt suits. "Some styles
are sleek and slender and feel
more like a traditional pump,"
he said. "Others are heavier and
look well with the bohemian
look that's big in fashion. These
shoes take on a personality of
their own."
As far as foot doctors are
concerned, wedge heels don't
qualify as villains.
"They are not terrible, and
are better than stilettos," said
podiatrist Rami Calis, an
instructor of orthopedics at
Emory University's School of
Medicine. "They have a wider
base of support for the heels."
That said, Calis, who is
also chief of podiatry at Grady
Hospital, has a few reserva-
tions. "The higher the heel of
the shoe will take. your hip and
tilt it forward, which can con-
tribute to curvature of the spine
and alter hoev you walk," he
said.
"A high heel also pushes
your foot forward into the toe
box of the shoe, which, when
your toes are crammed in, can
cause- corns, calluses and
bunions."
Calis says that any shoe
heel beyond 11/2'inches high
can cause foot deformities,
which often show up later in
life.
However, he does admit
that "a high heel does give the
leg a more shapely appear-
ance."


Left: Pucci print-inspired
wedges make colorful
footnotes ($24). Newport
News catalog: 1-800-688-
2830, www.newport-
news.com.
Below: Slide into Enzo
Angiolini's wedges with
flower trims. Each pair
$79, in blue or green. At
Parisian.


S FmOEESO HE
YOUNG-ANDOLD


4915 Highway 90 Pace
850-995-1600


Box ffllJicepens 12:30
Wwwwl~movfieshowtmemnet
0 30
,OnWed.NighS ,8tid
u^KStrWasEitsodeIII (G13


Monster in Law (PG13)
1:30 3:55 7:20 9:45
Kicking and Screaming (PG)
1:05 3:15 5:20 7:30 9:40
House of Wax (R)
1:45 4:20 7:15 9:50
Kingdom of Heaven (R)
2:00 5:00 8:00
Crash (R)
1:20 4:10 7:05 9:35
XXX2: State of the Union (PG13)
1:10 4:15 7:25 9:50
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (PG)
14n 4A 0 7N1O 930


Star Wars Episode III (PG13)
1:00 2:30 4:00 5:30 7:00
8:30 9:50


Classic espadrilles from Nine
West are fun and funky in
fabric prints.


Comnt


Craft is named a United States National Award Winner


The United States
Achievement Academy
announced that Hillary N. Craft
from Milton, FL, has been
named .a United States National
Award Winner in Cheerleading.
This award is a prestigious
honor very few students can
ever hope to attain. In fact, the
Academy recognized fewer
than 10% of all American high
school students.
Hillary, who attends Milton
'High School, was nominated for


this national award by Laura
Childers, a coach and teacher at
the school. Hillary will appear
in the United States
Achievement Academy Official
Yearbook, which is published
nationally.
"Recognizing and support-
ing our youth is more important
than ever before in America's
history. Certainly, United States
Achievement Academy winners
should be congratulated and
appreciated for their dedication


to excellence and achievement,"
said Dr. George Stevens,
Founder of the United States
Achievement Academy.
The Academy selects USAA
winners upon the exclusive rec-
ommendation of teachers,
coaches, counselors and other
qualified sponsors and upon the
Standards of Selection set forth
by the Academy. The criteria for
selection are a student' academ-
ic performance, interest and
aptitude, leadership qualities,


responsibility, enthusiasm,
motivation to learn and
improve, citizenship, attitude
and cooperative spirit, depend-
ability, reomnmendition from a
qualified sponsor.
Hillary is the daughter of
Clifton & Kathy Craft, of
Milton, FL. The grandparents
are Ruby Craft of North Loup,
NE.


Submit your community
announcements to 6629 Elva
Street, Milton


I


I m


/ [


,, m h v ^ I, IV ,


I


^










Page 2-B I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Wednesday May 18, 2Uu5
Obituaries


Sollenberger,
H. Larry
1937 -2005
H. Larry Sollenberger, age
67, of Milton, died May 12,
2005. He was a native of
Ramona, Kansas and had
resided in Milton since 1972.
He was a retired Chief
Machinist Mate, U.S. Navy
with 20 plus years of service.
He was also retired from The
Westinghouse Corporation.
He was a member of the
Vintage Japanese Motorcycle
Club, The Mobile BayVintage


Motorcycle Club and
Brotherhood of the 3rd Wheel.
He is survived by his wife-
Ladora Dee "Lovell"
Sollenberger; sons-David
Courtney, Eddie (Sandy)
Courtney, Richard Courtney,
Rick (Liana) Courtney; daugh-
ters-Linda (Rion) Donovan,
Patty (Jerry) Gholston, Sherri
Lovell, Tammi M. (Mark) Jean,
Cindy (Terrance) Lamoreau,
Diana (Daniel) Gosselin,
Deidre (Eric) Owens; 2 sis-
ters-Carolyn McCool, and
Sharon Sollenberger; 19 grand-
children; and 1 great grand-


CASH OW As seen
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(800) 794.7310
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"Peak Season"


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Strawberries
The Best Strawberries
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W Pick by the Pound or
We Pick by the Pint, Half Flat or Flat


I mile west
of traffic
eight, Hwy.4
Baker


Fresh Strawberry Yogurt
StrawberyShortcake
Strawberry Cookbooks

School Bus Tours Welcome
Gift Boxes Available


F e no C o o 8 5 O 68


child.
Services were 11:30 a.m.,
Monday, May 16, 2005 at the
All Faith Chapel, Naval Air
Station, Pensacola. Chaplain
Larry Home officiated with
interment and full military hon-'
ors at Barrancas National
Cemetery.
Donnie Sowell Funeral
Home of Milton was in charge
of arrangements.

Kenneth
Benard Mitchem
1950-2005
Kenneth Benard Mitchem,
55, of the Springhill
Community, passed away on
Thursday, May 12, 2005 in a
local nursing facility.
Mr. Mitchem was born on
March 4, 1950 in Milton,


Florida. He was an avid sports
fan.
Mr. Mitchem is survived by
his father-Ken Mitchem of
the Springhill Community; 1
son-Kenneth Hunter
Mitchem of Wichita, Kansas; 1
Step Brother-Raymond
Richburg, of Milton; 1 sister-
Betty Larson (Lewis) of Winter
Park, FL; special friend-Judy
Rouark of Ozark, AL, and
numerous nieces and nephews.
Funeral Services for Mr.
Mitchem were 2 'p.m.,
Saturday, May 14, 2005 at the
Lewis Funeral Home in Milton
with Rev. Jimmy Pittman offi-
ciating.
Active Pallbearers were
Roger Hardy, Richard Hardy,
Leon Mitchem, Millard
Mitchem, Mallory Nelson, and
Joel Stokes


Honorary Pallbearers were
Ken Smith, Carlton Ardis, Carl
Griffin, Doug Foster, Billy
Parker, and Coy Campbell.
Burial followed in the
Pleasant Home Baptist Church
Cemetery.
Lewis Funeral Home of
Milton is in charge of arrange-
ments.

Sowell,
Mary Louise
1922 -2005
Mary Louise Sowell, wife
of the late John Louis Sowell
and daughter of the late John
Bodiford and Liddie
Treadaway, died May 11, 2005.
She was born May 26, 1922 in
Geneva, AL, and had resided in
Arlington, Georgia for many
years where she was a member


of the Arlington Baptist
Church.
She is survived by her 4
sons-George Wallace Sowell,
Arlington, GA, John Earl
Sowell, Long Beach, CA,
Thomas Sowell, Americus,
GA, Dwight Sowell, Marietta,
GA; 2 daughters--Nettie Mae
Hall, Pensacola, FL, Rita
Burns, Cantonment, FL; 19
grandchildren; and 16 great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services were 3
p.m., Sunday, May 15, 2005 at
the Oakie Ridge Baptist
Church near Wausau, GA.
Church Pastor Sean Hardesty
officiated with burial in the
Oakie Ridge Baptist Church
Cemetery.
Donnie Sowell Funeral
Home of Milton was in charge
of arrangements.


I Commnity


Historical Society hosts museum
The Santa Rosa Historical tour of the Thompson House
Society played host to several given by owners Charlie and
group tours of its Museum of Pat D' Asaro, which included a
Local History this spring. The glimpse of the writing on the
fourth grade classes from East wall left by Yankee soldiers
Milton Elementary School had during the Civil War in 1864.
a field trip on April 29th. Two All came away with a new
classes rotated every hour appreciation for the area in
between the Imogene Theatre which they live.
with its Museum of Local A second group, a seniors
History, the L&N Depot and the club from the Gulf Breeze
Thompson House in Bagdad. United Methodist Church, will
Laurie Green gave a brief histo- be coming for a luncheon and
ry of our area in conjunction tour put on by Society volun-
with their study of our Florida teers on May 26th. If you are
heritage. After touring the interested in our local history,
museum, Mrs. Green led them and have three hours a month,
to the Riverwalk, where she the Society invites you to
pointed out the former locations become a museum docent.
of the lumber mill and shipyard. Volunteers currently open
She asked them to imagine the the museum on Wednesdays k
river filled with ships loaded from 10 to 4. The Historical
ith lumber or waiting for Society would like to be open a Students listen close
with lumber or waiting for Society would like to be open at


repair. The children continued
their tour with a visit to the
Veterans Memorial.
Upon leaving the Imogene
Theater, the classes toured the
depot, where West Florida
Railroad Museum member Art
Tuttle impressed upon the
excited students the important
role --that- the" railroad played
when it first came through the
Panhandle in 1882.
Their third destination was a


least two days a week, but more
volunteers are needed. A free
luncheon and workshop will be
held for anyone interested in
learning more about our local
history, and is willing to donate
3 hours a month! on Saturday,
May 21st from 11 to 2 p.m. The
Museum is located at 6864
Highway -90; across' from the
courthouse. A short history of
our area will be included, but
no tests given! Museum
Director Elaine Sessions states
that, "It is not necessary to be
knowledgeable to be a museum
docent, merely willing to be
here three hours a month."
Anyone wishing to reserve a
space should call the Society at
626-9830, or Laurie Green at
623-4998. .


tours


ely to the history of local museums.


The children also got to see antiques, including these clothing
irons.


FEDERAL CREDIT UNION


(850) 505-3200

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Wednesday May 18, 2005 1 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Page 3-B

Legals


IN THE UNITED STATES DIS-
TRICT COURT FOR THE
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF
FLORIDA
PENSACOLA DIVISION
Case No. 3:02cv261/MCR
UNITED STATES OF AMERI-
CA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DAVID W. QUALLS;
DARLENE FITZGERALD,
"' a a/k/a
DARLENE ATES, f/k/a
DARLENE A. QUALLS;
FCC NATIONAL BANK; and
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION III,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT UNDER AND BY
VIRTUE OF A FINAL
DECREE OF FORECLO-
SURE RENDERED IN THE
ABOVE-STYLED CASE ON
MARCH 23, 2005, BY THE
UNITED STATES DISTRICT
COURT FOR THE NORTH-
ERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA,
IN FAVOR OF THE PLAIN-
TIFF, THE UNDERSIGNED,
APPOINTED IN SAID
DECREE, WILL ON THE
25TH DAY OF MAY, 2005, AT
12:00 NOON, IN FRONT OF
THE SANTA ROSA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE DOOR IN
THE CITY OF MILTON,
FLORIDA, OFFER FOR SALE
AND SELL AT PUBLIC OUT-
CRY TO THE HIGHEST BID-
DER, THE FOLLOWING


DESCRIBED PROPERTY,
SITUATED, LYING AND
BEING IN SANTA ROSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA:
Lot 15, Block D, SANTA
VILLA VII, a subdivision of a
portion of Section 13,
Township 1 North, Range 29
West, according to the map
or plat thereof as recorded
In Plat Book C, page 117, of
the public records of Santa
Rosa County, Florida.
Being the same property as
described in that certain real
estate mortgage dated
December 20, 1989, as
recorded in Book 1066 at
page 446 of the public
records of Santa Rosa
County, Florida.
SUBJECT TO all recorded oil,
gas and mineral reservations;
easements and rights of way
of record; and to the lien of all
unpaid taxes and assess-
ments.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMA-
TION CONCERNING THE
ABOVE PROPERTY CON-
TACT THE OFFICE OF THE
U.S. ATTORNEY, TELE-
PHONE NO. 850/444-4030.
SALE IS BY POSTAL MONEY
ORDER OR CERTIFIED
CHECK MADE PAYABLE TO
THE U.S. MARSHALS SER-
VICE. TEN PERCENT OF
HIGH/ACCEPTABLE BID IN
CERTIFIED CHECK OR
CASHIER'S CHECK (NO
CASH) WILL BE ACCEPTED
WITH THE BALANCE DUE


WITHIN 48 HOURS. THIS
SALE IS SUBJECT TO STATE
AND LOCAL TAXES.
DATE:
April 19,2005
DENNIS A. WILLIAMSON
United States Marshal
Northern District of Florida
BY: Doris Massengill
DORIS MASSENGILL
U.S. Marshals Service
042705
050405
051105
051805
052505

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMU-
NITY AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INTENT TO FIND
THE
SANTA ROSA COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENTS) IN COMPLI-
ANCE
DOCKET NO 05-MI-NOI-
57011-(A)-(I)
The Department gives notice
of its intent to find the
Amendment(s) to the
Comprehensive Plan for Santa
Rosa County, adopted by
Ordinance No(s). 2005-05 on
March 21, 2005, IN COMPLI-
ANCE, pursuant to Sections
163.3184, 163.3187 and
163.3189, F.S.
The adopted Santa Rosa
County Comprehensive Plan


Amendments) and the
Department's Objections,
Recommendations and
Comments Report, (if any),
are available for public inspec-
tion Monday through Friday,
except for legal holidays, dur-
ing normal business hours, at
the Community planning and
Zoning Department, 6051 Old
Bagdad Highway, Milton
Florida 32583.
Any affected person, as
defined in Section 163.3184,
FS., has a right to petition for
an administration hearing to
challenge the proposed
agency determination that the
Amendments) to the Santa
Rosa Comprehensive Plan are
In Compliance, as defined in
Subsection 163.3184(1), F.S.,
The petition must be filed with-
in twenty-one (21) days after
publication of this notice, and
must.include all of the informa-
tion and contents described in
Uniform Rule 28-106.201,
F.A.C. The petition must be
filed with the Agency Clerk,
Department of Community
Affairs, 2555 Shumard Oak
Boulevard, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-2100, and a
copy mailed or delivered to the
local government. Failure to
timely file a petition shall con-
stitute a waiver of any right to
request an administrative pro-
ceeding as a petitioner under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
F.S. If a petition Is filed, the
purpose of the administrative
hearing will be to present evi-
dence and testimony and for-
ward a recommended order to


the Department. If no petition
Is filed, this Notice of Intent
shall become final agency
action.
If a petition is filed, other
affected persons may petition
for leave to intervene in the
proceeding. A petition for inter-
vention must be filed at least
twenty (20) days before the
final hearing and must include
all of the information and con-
tents described in Uniform
Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. A
petition for leave to intervene
shall be filed at the Division of
Administration Hearings,
Department of Management
Services, 1230 Apalachee
Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3060. Failure to petition
to intervene within the allowed
time frame constitutes a waiv-
er of any right such a person
has to request a hearing under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
F.S., or to participate in the
administrative hearing.
After an administrative hearing
petition is timely filed, media-
tion is available pursuant to
Subsection 163.3189(3)(a),
F.S., to any affected person
who is made a party td the pro-
ceeding by filing that request
with the administrative law
judge assigned by the Division
of Administrative Hearings.
The choice of mediation shall
not affect a party's right to an
administrative hearing.
-s- Charles Gauthier, AICP
Chief of Comprehensive
Planning


Division of Community
Planning
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
2100
051805
051805
5/338
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR SANTA ROSA
COUNTY FLORIDA
FAMILY LAW DIVISION
CASE NO.: 57-05-0435-DR-
091
IN RE: The Marriage of
CHARLES L.TAYLOR,
Husband/Petitioner,
and
JELENE E.TAYLOR,
Wife/Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JELENE E.TAYLOR, who
is not known to be dead or
alive, and If dead, her hairs,
devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, credi-
tors, trustees or other
claimants claiming by,
through, under or against
Jelene E. Taylor, who is not
known to be dead or alive.
.Address believed to be #80
Burgos Street, Paniqul,
.Tarlac, Philippines.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you


are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
the Petition on the Petitioner's
attorney, Michael Gibson,
Esquire, whose address is
5424 Highway 90, Pace,
Florida 32571, on or before
June 8, 2005, and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of the
above-named Court, either
before service on Petitioner's
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Petition.
This the 3rd day of May, 2005.
MARY JOHNSON
Clerk of Circuit Court
CIRCUIT COURT SEAL
By: Chris Schilling
051805
052505
060105
060805
5/339
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR SANTA ROSA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Case No.: 57-2005-CP-122
Division: B
IN RE: ESTATE OF
OLIVE MYERS CAIN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Olive Myers Cain,


deceased, whose date of
death was March 29, 2005; is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Santa Rosa County, Florida,
Probate Division; File Number
57-2005-CP-122, the address
of which is 6865 S.W. Caroline
Street, Milton, Florida 32570.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons, who have
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, and who
have been served a copy of
this notice, must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER' THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE


Lippert attends Presidential Classroom


Richard Lippert, a student at
Milton High School, will attend
the Presidential Classroom's
National Security in a
Democracy program, June 25 to
July 2, 2005.
Presidential Classroom,(PC),
the leader in civic education,
provides the best and brightest
high school juniors and seni.-s
unprecedented access to the
leader in civic education, pro-
vides the best and brightest high
school juniors and seniors
unprecedented access to the
leaders who shape America's
public policy, Participants will
explore the government, mili-


tary and private sector play in
planning and executing defense
and homeland security policy.
During the week-long pro-
gram, PC Scholars interact with
Washington insiders, including
Members of Congress, presi-
dential appointees, senior mili-
tary officials, top business lead-
ers and journalists. Students
observe the U.S. Congress in
action, visit their congressional
offices and debate current issues
with peers from the United
States and abroad. They also
visit the renowned sites of our
nation's capitol such as the
White House (by special invita-


tion), the U.S. Department of
State and Arlington National
Cemetery. Additional program
highlights include a seminar on
the floor of the U.S. House of
Representatives, and exclusive
tour of the Pentagon and visits
to the Federal Bureau of
Investigation Training
Academy and Manassas
National Battlefield in Virginia.
Former Congressman Jack
Buechner, CEO and President
of PC said, "Our students meet
and question the people who
make and shape our nation's
policies. No other program
melds leadership, academics


and current events in such an
appealing combination. Our
students return home with a
new .perspective on American
politics and the world."
In ,1968, Presidential
Classroom, a nonprofit, nonpar-
tisan, 501(c) 3 civic education
organization, began to prepare
young leaders for responsible
citizenship and provide out-
standing high school students
the chance to explore the politi-
cal process firsthand.
For more information visit
our website at www.presiden-
tialclassroom.org.


Gulf Breeze Hospital Administrator to retire


Dick Fulford, the adminis-
trator who led Gulf Breeze
Hospital since its opening 20
years ago, will retire July 1.
A long-time Baptist Health
Care vice president, Fulford
provided the direction that has
made Gulf Breeze Hospital a
national leader in patient satis-
faction and employee satisfac-
tion.
"For almost 38 years Dick
Fulford has been an integral
part of the Baptist Health Care
delivery system with a unwa-
vering commitment to excel-
lence and a passion for our
patients and their families," said
Al Stubblefield, Baptist Health
Care president. "For the last 20
years he has set a standard for
delivering personalized health-
care at Gulf Breeze Hospital
that has become the benchmark
for every hospital in the coun-
try."
Fulford's retirement coin-
cides with the hospital's 20th
anniversary celebration and


comes on the heels of a $28.8
million renovation and expan-
sion project-one that doubled
the size of the original facility.
Fulford has been with
Baptist Health Care for 38,
years-22 as administrator of
Gulf Breeze Hospital. He
assumed the role during the
planning and construction
stages of the facility. During his
tenure at Baptist, Fulford has
served as senior vice president
of hospital operations and
Baptist Hospital assistant direc-
tor. In 2003 Gulf Breeze
Hospital, along with Baptist
Hospital and Baptist Medical
Park-Pensacola, was the recipi-
ent the Malcolm Baldrige
National, Quality Award, the
highest honor given to
American businesses.
Fulford has held leadership
roles beyond Baptist Health
Care's campus, serving on the
Gulf Breeze City Council and
as mayor pro-tem. Fulford has
served on the board of directors


for several community organi-
zations including the Gulf
Breeze Chamber of Commerce,
ARC of Santa Rosa County,
Northwest Florida Area Agency
on Aging, Pensacola Junior
College and Santa Rosa County
United.Way. He also served as
president of the Gulf Breeze
Rotary and was named a Paul
Harris Fellow.
Bob Harriman, Ph.D., will
step in as administrator of the
60-bed hospital in south Santa
Rosa County upon Fulford's
departure at the end of June.
Harriman is currently vice
president of quality improve-
ment, patient safety and clinical
services for Baptist Health Care
and a consultant for Baptist
Leadership Institute.
Harriman has been involved
with healthcare for over 30
years and has a clinical back-
ground in radiologic technolo-
gy. He also holds a doctorate in
educational leadership from
Florida State University. He


New Hope School plans reunion


The 13th annual reunion of
those who attended New Hope
;in North Holmes County, FL, is
'Saturday, May 28, beginning at
10 a.m., at the Masonic Hall on
the old school site, south of
Highway 2 on 179A, the
Geneva-Westville road.
Thousands of students,


many of whom live in the
Florida-Alabama-Georgia tri-
state area, attended New Hope
School, which taught students
from the 1890s to 1963. Acov-
ered-dish luncheon will be held
at noon.
For more information, con-
tact Max Thomas at 850-956-


2714, 1300 Carlis Ln,.
Westville, FL 32464, Pose
Vaughan at 956-2502, 1463
Vaughan Dead River Rd.,
Westville, FL 32464, or Pearl
Thompson at 850/956-4537,
1284 Hwy. 163, Westville, FL
32464.


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Opening Soon




May, 2005


Any customer who is in need of their records,

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birth and send to Adams Pharmacy 6406 Hwy

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look forward to serving you and your families

in the future.



Thank you,

The Staff of Adams Pharmacy


was Baptist Medical Park-
Pensacola's inaugural adminis-
trator, and he served as vice
president of ambulatory servic-


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AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication
is May 18, 2005.
/s/ Dennis Whiteley
DENNIS WHITELEY
Personal Representative
4625 Mulat Road
Milton, Florida 32583
/s/ Tiffany A. Durst
TIFFANY A. DURST, of
MOORE, HILL & WEST-
MORELAND, PA.
Post Office Box 13290
Pensacola, Florida 32591-
3290
(850) 434-3541
Florida Bar No. 647691
051805
052505
5/340
NOTICE OF MONTHLY
MEETING OF THE SANTA
ROSA BAY BRIDGE
AUTHORITY
The Santa Rosa Bay Bridge
Authority will conduct its regu-
lar monthly authority meeting
at 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, May
25, 2005, in. the Florida
Department of Transportation
(FDOT) Conference Room C,
located at 6025 Old Bagdad
Highway, Milton, Florida. For
further information call (850)
981-2718.
051805
051805
5/l341


!


w4


i







Page 4-B I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette

Kornerstone


Alpha Course is available in this area


What is Alpha? The Alpha
course i:' an opportunity for.
anyone to explore spirituality
from a Christian perspective.
Relaxed, non-threatening, low-
key, and FUN, Alpha is a place
to ask anything about life and
spiritual matters-no questioner is
considered, too simple or too
hostile.
What is involved? Over ten
thought-provoking weekly ses-
sions,'Alpha guests share meals,
listen to a series of talks, and
they have small group discus-
sions. Each talk covers a funda-


mental question, such as "Who
is Jesus?" "How Does God
Guide Us?" and "How Can I
Resist Evil?"
I More than 6 million people
have completed the Alpha
course since it started at the
Holy Trinity Brompton church'
in London. Today the course is
being run worldwide; meeting
in homes, schools, universities,
and military post, and prisons
with the support of every differ-
ent and major denomination.
Is it for you? Everyone is
welcome on an Alpha course!


Some people want to investi-
gate whether God exists and if
there is any point to life; others
are concerned about what hap-
pens after death. Still others
may have attended church, but
feel they have never really
understood the basics of the
Christian faith. People come
from many different back-
grounds and hold many differ-
ent viewpoints, but most come
with the same basic objective:
to establish whether God and
Jesus Christ have any relevance
for their lives.


What will it cost? The
Alpha course is free to all.
How do I sign up or get
more information... Call the
Bay Area Vineyard Church at
850-341-9797 or 341-9710 and
talk to one of our pastors or
email us at
bayareavineyard@earthlink.net
and we will get information and
meeting details to you.
Alpha Course begins in
Milton Sunday, May 22, 2005
.from 6 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. and is
sponsored by the Bay Area
Vineyard Church.


Aglow International has local meeting place


Aglow International is a
trans-denominational organiza-
tion of Christian women with
more than 3,500 local groups in
over 150 nations around the
world. It began with four
women in 1967 and is now one
of the largest international
women's organizations with
over 1,400 local groups in the
U.S. alone. International head-
quarters is located in Edmonds,
Washington.

NEED


PRAYER?
Every Saturday, from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m., there will be a
free prayer session. The loca-
tion is next to Custom Oak
Furniture, Hwy 197,
Chumuckla. "If you have a
prayer need, please stop by. I
would love to pray with and for
you," states Carol D. Hughes.
"Free Prayer is an outreach of
"Mind Moment Ministries,
Hearing the Heart of God." For
more information, please call
850-675-0490 or email
cdhughes52@bellsouth.net.


Our mission is to lead
women to Jesus Christ and pro-
vide opportunity for Christian
women to grow in their faith
and minister to others. Aglow
women reach out to their com-
munities in many directions: To
women in prison, senior homes,
inner city neighborhoods, and
mental institutions; to single
moms, as well as the average
women next door who may
need a cup of tea and a good


chat with a friend. Each month,
Aglow International reaches an
estimated 2 million women
through local fellowships such
as the Pensacola Florida
Lighthouse. Prayer and evange-
lism are an important part of the
meetings along with a
Mentoring Program that seeks
to help and guide women who
may need someone to walk with
them through issues in their
marriages, maturing in their


faith (new Christians) or any
other need.
Meetings are held at the
Bayview Senior Citizens
Center, 2000 East Lloyd Street
on the 3rd Thursday (May 19th)
of each month at 6 p.m. Each
meeting consists of praise, wor-
ship, and special speakers. For
further information, call
Carolyn Cobb at 968-3148 or
Lynda Brooks at 995-0053.
Come join us!


Homecomings & Singings this weekend!

Homecoming is Sunday at CPH Church
.Chumuckla Pentecostal Holiness Church will be hosting a Gospel Singipg,.feat g.Ahe.GQsp.l!
Harmonians Sunday, May 22, 2005. It will also be their annual homecbrriing! Special speaket'ill be'
&eir~fcirmf.pastor,Rev.Jeff Pack, Services &.tn .E Y n
speciall service! Luncb will be served approximately a6d aOniOh,-o
Ira Decker at 994-5444.

Glory "Be Opry is Saturday
Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church, located at 4701 SchdoI Lan4. Pacei EL inpts thl
Glory "B" Opry on Saturday, May 21st, 2005, a fundraiser with all proceed. Y .6to
Disaster.Relief Medical Kits. Doors open at 6. p,m. Program sta.& at6Op. p'j4.
beacceptebd'and appreciated very much!-, .. .':.


"For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all
men. Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we
should live soberly, righteously, and godly in this
present world. Titus 2:11-12


Wednesday May 18, 2005


Ask the Preacher
...a weekly column answering your questions
with Biblical answers about life.


Dear Pastor Gallups, "What does the Bible say about fast-
ing?" U.Y. Bagdad
Dear U.Y.,
Fasting means self-denial by going without food for a period
of time. Fasting may be total or partial avoiding certain foods
or eating smaller than normal quantities. The origin of fasting as
a religious practice is unclear, but both the Old and New
Testaments of the Bible mention a number of instances of fast-
ing for various reasons.
Some of the most common Biblical instances for fasting were
for distress, grief, spiritual preparation and repentance.
In both the Old and New Testaments, fasting is seen as use-
ful for humbling oneself as a sign of commitment or repentance
and for increasing faith, especially when accompanied by
prayer. However, fasting was not to be considered an end in
itself, nor a substitute for obedience to God and living a right-
eous life.
Jesus said that fasting, like prayer, should be done in private
and not for show (Matthew 6:16-18). John the Baptist's disci-
ples routinely fasted according to Jewish custom, but Jesus and
His disciples did not. However, Jesus said His disciples would
mourn and fast after He had left them (Matthew 9:14-15; Mark
2:18-20; Luke 5:33-35). We know that the early Christians prac-
ticed fasting at least occasionally (Acts 13:3, 14:23, 2
Corinthians 6:5, 11:27).
Despite the tradition of fasting in the Bible and Jesus' refer-
ences to it, the New Testament teachings do not require fasting,
and neither Jesus nor His disciples made fasting an obligation on
the part of the believer. However, a tradition of partial fasting on
certain days dates back to the early days of Christianity.
Church teachings and traditions about fasting vary. Many
Catholics observe partial fasting traditions during Lent (the peri-
od between Ash Wednesday and Easter). Orthodox Christians
observe even more fasting days. Most Protestant and New
Testament churches do not have any firm rules or traditions
about fasting. However, even some 'New Testament churches
have been called to prayer and fasting for certain events and
prayer requests.
In short, fasting can be useful and a powerful spiritual expe-
rience in one's walk with the Lord Jesus. However, there
appears to be no Biblical requirement on the New Testament
Christian to fast. It is a highly personal matter between the
believer and the Lord.


Carl Gallups is the Pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church. in Milton.
He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Florida State University, and a Master
of Divinity from The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been
pastor of HHBC since 1987. He serves as an International Youth Evangelist for
the Southern Baptist Convention since 1990 preaching all over the US. and
Canada. For more information about HHC, call 623-8959 or visit our website @
www.hickoryhammockbaptist.org. If you have any questions for Ask The
Preacher, send it to: Ask The Preacher, Hickory Hammock Baptist Church, 8351
Hickory Hammock Road, Milton, Florida 32583-paid advertisement


You think it's hot h
-God


ere?


re's to




your


1"
^
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< ,
4


alth


For more information'
on placing your
advertisement on
this page, call
Retail Advertising at 623-2120


~'Ii.


SMILTON
FAMILY
M41KIEDICAUL
West Florida EDICAL
PIMARCRE CENTER
6072 Dottors Park, Milton
474-8451
H.M. Meredith, II, M.D.
Our facility provides a full range of-services for children and adults to meet most of your health care needs.
In addition, we offer Basic X-Ray and Laboratory Testing:
Our office operates by appointment. Appointments are always held open for same day urgent problems.
We are accepting new patients. We would be honored if you considered us for your medical care.
This medical facility' is equipped and staffed to care for you and your family needs.


Park Avenue

PHARMACY, Inc.


623-2222

5440 Dogwood Drive Milton, FL 32570


"The people you KNOW and TRUST with your prescriptions."


ALTERNATIVE HEALTH


FOOD STORE
"Where educated natural health choices are made."
Deanna Gilmore: Manager Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D, Natural Health Counselor
E-Mail address: GWYHILL @ AOL.com

5533 Hwy. 90 Pea Ridge 994-3606
Mon.-Fri.: 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Sat.: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.


Professional Hea 1.,g Aid Centers O


& Advanced Audiology, Inc.
"Hear what another satisfied
Sabr patient has to say...!" o.
Peterman, "I've never "heard" it so good! I want to thank PatriciaVl
Au.D., CCC-A yOu & your people for the outstanding care & ,A
concern in solving my hearing problem." -*!,,
Vince WhIbbs "-.
Milton Pensacola Crestview
5851 Berryhill Road 115 North Palafox 502 N. Main St.
623-8818 438-4092 689-0545


A




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(Winn Dixie Shopping Center)


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Lifestyles


d ib /// 1(71- ~V$0(c C f/e/0q( /Lt,
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6 6 (Sabw t, lhl~to^.


Emily Gray and Paul Whitfield



Mr. & Mrs. Craig Gray of Christian Counseling.
Clayton, North Carolina The prospective bridegroom
announce the engagement of is the grandson of Mr. & Mrs.
their daughter Emily I. Gray to Ed Whitfield of Milton, Florida
Paul M. Whitfield, son of Mr. & and Mr. & Mrs. Marshall
Mrs. Jerry Whitfield of Milton, Caswell of Pensacola, Florida.
Florida. He is a graduate of Milton High


The bride-elect is the grand-
daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Donald
Gray of Dadeville, Alabama
and Mr. & Mrs. Kim Alsop of
Jasper, Alabama. She is a grad-
uate of Auburn High School
and currently attends the
Baptist College of Florida
where she is pursuing a
Bachelor of Arts degree in


School and currently attends
The Baptist College of Florida
where he is pursuing a Bachelor
of Arts degree in Biblical
Studies.
The wedding will be an
event of July 23, 2005 at
Lakeview Baptist Church in
Auburn, Alabama.


Cheryl Johnson and Christopher Thomas

^ X/lc$UnJ ekty aye &


Cheryl Ann Johnson of
Milton and Christopher E.
Thomas of Pensacola plan to be
married October 8, 2005 at St.
Joseph's Catholic Church in
Pensacola. Cheryl is the daugh-


ter of Mrs. Yvonne Johnson and
the late M.O. (Jack) Johnson of
Milton, and Christopher is the
son of Ms. Sandra Thomas of
Cantonment and Mr. Dewey
Thomas of Pensacola.


PLUMBING & SEPTIC Service
Free Estimate Septic to Sewer
Drain Line Repairs New Septic Tanks
Fast Service Pump Outs
Pumping your septic tank is the single most important thing you can do
to protect your system. If the buildup of solids in the tank becomes
too high and solid move to the drainfield, this could clog and strain
the system to the point where a new drainfield will be needed.
Drainfield repairs or replacements can cost thousands of dollars.
*Suggested frequency is once every 3-5 years.
r--7- --- ------ q
0"-- .oO Santa Rosa
Save 0off 626-8552
Any Septic Tank Pump Out with a 6
ny Septic with a I Locailly Owned & Operated
Tank Inspection/Certification ___ L c #RF11067221
SLicensed & Insured
L------------------------ ___&Inue


Laura "Sugarbear" Myrick is a 14 year old girl from Milton, FL in
desperate need of a lung transplant. She has battled a rare interstitial lung
disease all her life and has spent most of her 14 years on oxygen. Sadly
the disease has progressed to the place where she must absolutely have a
lung transplant. Without ither medical team has given her less than 2
years to live. She and hernonom must move t-St, Louis. Missouri in June
2005, to await donor lungs. Laura has alwv ofug' ~tthis battle valiantly
and has so many plans f.Athe future, whicd ,e will and determina-
tion to live. She contain s to'attend King I-ol and really hates
to miss a day even th .h she h Qw.Jhas t lchair added to the
ever-present oxygen ta k.

If you would like toqdonate to Iaura, a'bank account has been established
in her name at Peope's First Ba~kk. Donations may'b bnade atthe Pace or
Pensacola offics of People's First or to her chUrqch. True Grace
Fellowship, 5178 Willard Norris Road. Milto.L' 32570. All
donations are appreciated and will greatly help in the medical
and living expenses for Laura and her family.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
A meeting of the Santa Rosa Board of Adjustment will be held on June 2, 2005 at
5:30 pm at the Santa Rosa County Administrative Complex, in the Commisioners
Boardroom located at 6495 Caroline, Street Milton, Florida.


The public is invited to attend and provide verbal or written comment. You are
also invited to provide written comment to our office at least one day prior to the
scheduled meeting for presentation to the Board if unable to attend this meeting.


Information concerning these items may be inspected during regular business
hours (M-F 7:30-4:30) at our office located at 6051 Old Bagdad Hwy., Milton,
FL. The agenda is available on the Planning and Zoning page of the County's
website at www.co.santa-rosa.fl.us.


If you have any questions regarding this meeting, please call the Santa Rosa
County Community Planning, Zoning, and Development Division at
(850) 981-7075 or (850) 939-1259.


YARD SALS


5761 HERMITAGE
Circle. Saturday. Ba-
by & kids toys, home
decor and lots more.
7 till 12.
4 FAMILY yard sale.
Saturday only. 8-12.
No early birds. 497
Mitscher in Whiting
Housing Authority.
MILTON/PACE
Fund raiser for dogs
for the deaf. Sat 8 -?
in front of Southern
Seafood, 5538 Hwy
90.


MOVING SALE Fri-
day & Saturday 20th
& 21st, 9am-3pm.
5456 Forest Hills
Lane, 89N, follow
signs.

BIG YARD Sale. Sat
May 21st. 8:30 a.m.
until. 7531 Hender-
son Smith Rd. Go
Munson Hwy. Turn
right on Indian Ford
Rd. to Henderson
Smith Rd. Clothes,
furniture, dishes. If
not raining. Follow


FABRICS, signs
CRAFTS, clothes,
commercial tread- INSIDI
mill, lockers, station- Movin
ary bike, lots of stuff, and S
5567 Baltic Court, applial
Milton. Followsigns pots a
off Avalon & Bell crowa\
Lane. Fri & Sat 7am 5164-A
until large.


E OUTSIDE
g Sale. Friday
aturday. Small
nces, dishes,
and pans, mi-
ve, and more.
A Astor Vii-


PATIO YARD sale
19th, 20th, 21st.
6270. Long St. Air
conditioner, iron
bedstead, old, kni-
ves, tools, costume
jewelry, burn bar-:
rels, new screen
tent, plants all kinds
of misc. stuff.
GARAGE SALE
5/21/05 8 a.m. to
1:00 p.m. Baby
clothes, all kinds of
toys & equipment in
abundance plus oth-
er things as well.
6337 Pansy Dr. off
of Willard Norris Rd.
HUGE YARD Sale.
Sat & Sun. 9 a.m.-?
Lots of items, furni-
ture, washer & gas
dryer, gas stove,
etc. 5627 Stewart
St. 626-3836 2
weekends.


SATURDAY 7 a.m.- 4 FAMILIES Fri. 8-4
until. Sunday noon- Sat. 8-2 5882 Cher-
okee (off Pine Blos-
6 p.m. All kinds of som) Sm. applian-
Christmas lights & ces, movies, dishes,
decor, furniture, headboard, loads of
misc. Something for
misc. household ap- everyone, come
pliances, tools. check us out! Rain
,A '.. .. ... .. or shine


We ve gyu every-
thing! 7701 Straw-
berry Court. Follow
chain link fence sur-
rounding Milton air-
port to the end, turn
left, first road on left.

MULTI-FAMILY GA-
RAGE sale. Sat
5/21. 7-12. 5245
Morgan Ridge. 2-
burner outdoor party
cart w/cooler, orien-
tal vases, lots more
good stuff.


YARD SALE May
20th & 21st. Friday
& Saturday. 5264
Catalina St.,' Pace.
7:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.
Wrought iron bed,
brass bathroom light
fixtures, oak bath-
room accessories,
household decor,
Christmas decora-
tions, lots of clothes,
shoes, bench grind-
er, misc. tools and
lots more.


~jPtiL

- U~J~
A


You can pick up a

MILTON
Santa Rosa County Courthouse
/ Bass Quickburger
Texas Roadhouse
Cisco's
Santa Rosa Medical Center
Country Market
The Other Place
Winn Dixie
Eckerd's
Pic'N Say
Milton Bakery
Groovin Noovins
Short Stop (Munson)
Race Trac Gas Station
Food World
K-Mart
Press Gazette Office
Tom Thumb @ Glover Lane
Tom Thumb @ Williard Norris
Road
Tom Thumb @ By-Pass
Tom Thumb @ Skyline
f['i(,, ; Santa Rosa County Complex
Hardee's
Ace's Restaurant
S, i Family Dollar
/ Chubby's


Press Gazette at the following locations:
EAST MILTON Happyv Store


Reggie's Bar-B-Que
Local Yokel
Kiley's
Exprezit
Shell Food Store
Tom Thumb @ Ward Basin
Tom Thumb @ Highway 87S
NORTH MILTON
(WHITING FIELD)
Ike's Food Mart
Tom Thumb @ Highway 87N
Up The Creek Store
Bubba's (Berrydale)
JAY
Diamond BP Gas Station
Farmer's Country Market
Greer's Grocery Store
PACE
Aunt Mary's
Dollar Tree
Whataburger
Wal-Mart (Inside @ Cash
Registers & Oustide Rack)
J&J Food Store


Winn Dixie
Korner Kwik
Pic-N-Sav
Groovin Noovins
Groovin Noovins (Woodbine)
Pace Mini Mart
Penny Pantry
Penny Pantry (Woodbine)
Tom Thumb @ Bell Lane
Tom Thumb @ Woodbine
Tom Thumb @ Highwy 90
Tom Thumb @ Crossroads
Tom Thumb @ Chumuckla
Ryans
Village Inn
Oops Alley
AVALON
Tom Thumb @ Avalon Blvd.
Tom Thumb @ Mulat Road
Avalon Express
BAGDAD
B&B Food Store
Tom Thumb
Local Yokel


Lifestyles Obituaries Sports.* Business Reviews
* Kornerstone Education Classifieds Business & Service Directory
Church Community Military Editorial ...plus more
1 Year in County = $24.00,

1 Year Out of County = $35.00,

Senior in County = $17.00


Youcan i also om. eby.] tei off.i'eerIca.lltostartasubriI Ii. IIIo.m


SVisa & Mastercard Accepted3-

Visa & Mastercard Accepted


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I


/, %,!;'
. .' i It,.

I &, !
UC; r
B f'l' e
/s/it n


I I

Where Can You Get


*


Wednesday May 18, 2005


I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


4


Op '


i,


Page 5-B








The Santa Rosa Press Gazette WEDNESDAY, MAY 18,2005


Page 6B


Santa Rosa Seniors
sponsoring mature
driving program.
Call 626-5113 for
information
or to register.


I.'


www.srmc.cc
SPONSORED IN PART BY


SANTARDSA
MEDICAL CENTER


Prime Time
With Obie


By OBIE RAIN
PRIME Edtor


After considerable
self-adjustments and fine
tuning, the season has
finally gotten its act
together, and it looks as if
it has leveled out in the
direction of some hot, hot
weather. A change is good,
but as I've said before, the
human condition is never
satisfied. If it's hot weath-
er, we want cold. If it's
cold, we want it to be hot.
Think even deeper. If
it's raining, it's too wet. If
the sun shines several
days in a row, it's too
dry, and we need rain. In
the summer the days are
too long, and in winter,
they're too short. We can't
be satisfied with the clock,
so we set it ahead and then
turn it back again.
But I suppose as long as
we have the intellectual
capacity to make things
difficult for ourselves, we
will. (The human condition
again.)
We're just now getting-
over the wrath of
Hurricane Ivan, and it's
the time of year that we
have to start worrying
about "that" season again.
The weather is one of
those things that is above
our reach, however, and
we'll just have to live by
faith on that one. I hope and
pray that I never have to
experience that trauma
again in my lifetime.
There's good news and
bad news about the new I-
10 Pensacola Bay bridge.
Although the DOT has acted
swiftly in planning the new
one, it's disappointing to
realize that it will take
several years to complete.
But come to think of it,
I've just about gotten used
to the traffic congestion
and delays associated with
the old one. Anything new
would require a learning
experience.
Maybe I'll still be driv-
ing by that time. What with
having to produce four
identification sources to
get drivers licenses, it's
questionable. I'm intelligent
enough to understand the
positive posture of this
requirement, but I'm not
sure I :can produce four
ID's. Maybe they won't be
too hard nosed about the
kinds of "proof" that's
required. We'll just have
to wait and see.
With the warm weather
come the pests, including
mosquitoes, gnats, cut-
worms, and snakes! I have
already encountered two
snakes during my daily
walking tours. One of them
looked like a coral snake. I
understand there's another
species that resembles the
coral but is actually harm-
less.
It's the colored bands
and how they are arranged
that determines which they
are, I think. However, I
was so intimidated by the
encounter that I didn't
have time to memorize the
color band arrangements. I
just gave it the right-of-
way and continued my
journey, albeit with
renewed vigilance!
Snakes and spiders and
Obie don't get along
together. I just leave them
alone and try very hard
not to invade their territo-
ry.
You be careful, too, as
you go about your daily
activities! Don't take on
more responsibilities than
you have to, and enjoy
whatever it is that you
have to do!
We don't always get
what we want given to us
automatically. Sometimes
we have to ask. Power is
something you take, not
something you beg for.
Try it for a change!


We Treat You Like Family!


I.-
oyiLC


'Ii ~. *yI '1

I 9 i.
l:..i.


MEMORIAL DAY'S MEANING STILL APPRECIATED-For some the true meaning
of Memorial Day has lost its value. But for others it will always be a day
of remembrance of those who have died in our nation's service. For army
retiree Vernon W. Davis and his good friend Tonja French its significance
is as strong today as it ever was, although they do think the day's origi-
nal intention as a military memorial has been somewhat weakened through
its casual designation as a guaranteed "summer holiday." Many feel that
when Congress made the day into a three-day weekend in with the National
Holiday Act of 1971, it made it all the easier for people to be distracted
from the spirit and meaning of the day. For Vernon and Tonja, who have
recently moved to Century, the Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial is a beauti-
ful and meaningful dedication to the spirit of those who gave their all. "It's
something all the people in Santa Rosa County, and really everyone in this
area, can be proud to be associated with," Tanja said. "Somebody had to
genuinely care to take the necessary time and make the concentrated effort
that it took to plan and build this monument. It's outstanding." (Photo by
Obie Crain.)


ROMEOs start with red hats, too, but gaudy simi-
larity to Red Hatters group not uniform


The Red Hatted girls just
may have started something
big! They've spurred a male
counterpart, of sorts.
This new group of gentle-
men (aged 59 to 86) in Ft.
Meyers call themselves
ROMEOs (Retired Old Men
Eating Out!) The popularity of
the Red Hat societies around
the country, currently number-
ing some one million worldwide,


brought out their male ego, and
got the group started in much
the same fashion as the Red
hatters, did in their infancy, a
group outlandishly dressed hav-
ing lunch.
Their one rule? No rules!
They don't have any officers,
don't hold meetings, and don't
pay dues. The only thing they do
require is the red baseball cap
with ROMEO on it.


OSKAR'S KORNER

And you are welcome to it!
By Oscar Davis


Reading labels is an obsession with some people. But
actually, on today's food packaging, I don't see how they
get any information from it at all.
The names of the ingredients in most of our food gives
you the idea that the package of food never came from a
farm at all. It sounds more like it came from a chemistry
set.
Does this mean that I no longer need room for a few
rows of vegetables? That all I need is a chemistry set?
Listen to me. How can you have a fruit drink that contains
no fruit or fruit juice? How about ice cream that has no
cream, artificially flavored and sweetened and colored
with a list of ingredients that you can't even pronounce.
Are you sure that you want that in your stomach? No
wonder we don't see many big farms today.
My wife is a label reader. She wants to know what
things are made of. I gave up on this years ago.
We were shopping a few weeks ago, and we were in the
cooking oil section. She didn't have a problem with cooking
oil. She recognized that corn oil came from corn, peanut oil
came from peanuts, olive oil came from olives, and so on.
Then I saw a huge display of oil at the end of the isle,
and I knew that I had to turn her around and get going the
other way before she saw it. And I dlid just that.
If she had seen that display, it would have done a num-
ber on her trying to figure it out. But, Thank God, I got her
turned around, and we went the other way. And we got our
shopping done without problems.
What kind of display was it? Johnson's baby oil ..


Founders Pat Darga and
Bob Beals say the group was
formed for comradeship. "Men
are pretty much loaners, (but)
we have a few ha-has and a few
drinks, (and) it works out fine,"
Darga explained.
He said they engage in a
number of conversations, from
simply making fun of one anoth-
er to real estate to boating to
current events in entertainment.
Both Darga and Beals are confi-
dent that the group will become
popular as it catches on.
"We could sit at home and
do nothing, or gather around
lunch and exchange lies," Darga
said. It's unlikely it will catch on
in conservative Milton.
We'll watch this one very
closely!


There's evidence that it has!


Memorial Day: Has the day lost
its original meaning?


It's true, casually
speaking, that Memorial Day
is no longer treated as a day
of remembrance for those
who have died in the service
of their country.
For many, it's merely a
guaranteed "three-day"
holiday to look forward to, a
day off from work or a
weekday at the beach.
Traditional observance
of Memorial Day has dimin-
ished over the years. Many
American nowadays have
forgotten the meaning and
traditions of Memorial Day.
At many cemeteries, the
graves of the fallen are
increasingly ignored and
neglected.
Many people no longer
remember the proper flag
etiquette for the day. While
there are towns and cities
that still hold Memorial Day
parades, many have not held
a parade in decades. Some
people think the day is for
honoring any and all dead,
and not just those fallen in
service to our country.
Many feel that when
Congress made the day into
a three-day weekend in with
the National Holiday Act of
1971, it made it all the eas-
ier for people to be dis-
tracted from. the spirit and
meaning of the day.
As the VFW stated in its
2002 Memorial Day
address: "Changing the"date
merely to create three-day
weekends has undermined
the very meaning of the day.
No doubt, this has con-
tributed greatly to the gen-
eral public's nonchalant
observance of Memorial
Day."
In an effort to somehow
counter this trend back in
January of 1999 Senator
Inouye introduced bill S189
to the Senate which pro-
posed to restore the tradi-
tional day of observance of
Memorial Day back to May
30th instead of "the last
Monday in May."
The following April, Rep.
Gibbons introduced the bill
to the House (H.R. 1474),
but both his and Senator
Inouye's efforts were to no
avail. The bills were
referred to the Committee
on the Judiciary and the
Committee on Government
Reform, and to date, there
have been no further devel-
opments on them.
However, to help reedu-
cate and remind Americans


of the true meaning of
Memorial Day, the National
Moment of Remembrance
resolution was passed in
December 2000 which asks
that at 3 p.m. local time, for
all Americans to voluntarily
and informally observe in
their own way a moment of
remembrance and respect
pausing from whatever they
are doing for. a moment of
silence or listening to
"Taps."
Memorial Day was first
officially proclaimed on May
5, 1868 and first officially
observed on May 30, 1868
when flowers were placed
on the graves of Union and,
Confederate soldiers at
Arlington National
Cemetery
The "Memorial" in
Memorial Day has been
ignored by too many of us
who are beneficiaries of
those who have given the
ultimate sacrifice. Often we
do not observe the day as it
should be, a day where we
actively remember our
ancestors, or family mem-
bers, our loved one, our
neighbors, and our friends
who have given the ultimate
sacrifice.


You can help
reinvigorate the
day and help in
some fashion to
reshape it once
again into the day '
it was meant to
be:
*By visiting
cemeteries and
placing flags or
flowers on the
graves of our fall-
en heroes.
*By visiting
memorials.
*By flying the
U.S. Flag at half-
staff until noon.
*By flying the
POW/MIA Flag as
well
*By participat-
ing in a National
Moment of
Remembrance.
*By renewing a
pledge to aid the
widows, widowers,
and orphans of our
failed dead, and to
aid the disabled
veterans.


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IT PAYS 5318 Stewart Street, Milton


I


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I


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


WEDNESDAY, MAY 18,2005


".n


<

1


4,









WEDNESDAY, MAY 18,2005 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Page 7B


Over 100
Physicians in
Pace. Milton. Navarre
and Pensacola


www.srmc.cc
SPONSORED IN PART BY


SANTAROSA
MEDICAL CENTER


I landed down through generations


Milton family has no plans to part with 1938 signed

copy of Du Maurier's novel 'Rebecca'


By OBIE CRAIN
PRIME Editor


While Frank Moore and
\' his daughter Fran Hill were
i examining the personal
,. belongings of his late wife,
x Barbara, recently, they
, were 'pleasantly surprised
to "rediscover" a copy of
Daphne Du Maurier's
"Rebecca," complete with
'. the author's autograph.
"I had not paid any
attention to the author's
C signature on the book
, before," Fran said, "so my
7,. dad and I decided to exam-
. ine it in more detail."
*'i Fran remembered the
book's having belonged to
her grandmother, Effie
Costain, who lived in
Henryville, Indiana and that
it was passed on to her mom
who brought it with her to
SMilton after Grandma-
Costain's death.
"Just out of curiosity, I
decided to have the book
appraised," Fran continued.
;, "I believe it has been in the
family since the 1930s, and


after that length of time,
especially with the author's
autograph, I thought it
might have become more
valuable."
And indeed it had.
"This is an early
American edition of
"Rebecca" by Daphne Du
Maurier, published by
Doubleday in 1938," the
appraisal indicated. "The
book is in very good condi-
tion and is signed by the
author."
The appraiser went on
to speak of Du Maurier who
lived between 1907 and
.1989 as an English novelist,
biographer, and playwright.
"She wrote romantic sus-
pense novels, mostly set on
the coast of Cornwall, and
is best known for her 1938
novel "Rebecca," which
was filmed by Alfred
.Hitehcock in 1940.
"The novel has been
characterized as the last
and most famous imitations
of Charlotte Bronte's
"Jayne Eyre," according to
the appraiser.


By the

Numbers...

EDWARD M. ROUSE, CPA
edward@timwheatcpa.com
Maximizing Deductions
for Combined
Business/Pleasure Travel


Psst Want to know a secret? Us accountants are most-
ly sly types. Yes sir that is right we always schedule our
continuing professional education classes in nice places and
then we ask Uncle Sugar to foot some of the costs. Isn't
that low down. Yeah, but I know y'all want to get in on the
deal so here is how it works.
If you take a trip solely for business reasons, all rea-
sonable and necessary travel expenses, including; travel
fares, lodging,, meals, and incidental, expenses are
deductible (subject to the 50% disallowance for meals and
entertainment). However, if your trip involves both busi-
ness and personal activities, a portion of the travel expens-
es may be a non-deductible personal expense.
While on domestic travel, if you are on business in the
United States and extend your stay for a vacation, or have
other non-business activities, the proper treatment of your
travel expenses depends on how much of the trip was busi-
ness-related.
The following guidelines apply:
If the trip was primarily for business, you can deduct
the costs of getting to and from the business destination and'
any business-related expenses. If the trip was primarily
for personal reasons, such as a vacation, the costs of get-
ting to and from the destination are not deductible.
However, any business costs, icuired,while at the destina-
tion are deductible expenses. ,
Whether a trip is primarily business or primarily per-
sonal depends on the facts and circumstances. The amount of
time spent on business activities compared to the amount
spent on personal activities is an important .factor. While
this is often regarded as a more-than-50% test, no direct
IRS authority supports this approach. Time spent is only one
factor to consider and may not be the dominant factor.
For example, if you would not have taken the trip except
to achieve the business purpose, you have a strong argu-
ment that the trip is primarily business related, even if you
spent less than 50% of the time on the trip attending to
business matters.
OK, I know that is a little vague. That's where your
trusty tax professional comes into the picture. Sometime it
is necessary to make a judgment call. Now if you want to
get real cute and take a foreign business trip make sure you
deduct 100% of foreign travel expenses only if the entire
time was spent on business activities.
Now, if the majority of your time was spent on business
activities during a foreign trip, your business-related trav-
el expenses are deductible. However, if the travel was pri-
marily personal, your travel expenses are not deductible,
even if there was some business activity. However, busi-
ness-related expenses other than travel expenses incurred
during the trip are deductible.
OK Boss I get the picture. The rules for deducting trav-
el expenses incurred on trips that combine business and
personal activities are complex. So before you book that
cruise to the Pacific Island with nice beaches and pretty
gals in grass skirts you should make sure that your Uncle
Sugar is on board. 4
(This article is for general information purposes only, and is.not
intended to provide professional tax advice. To determine how this or
any other tax information may apply to your specific tax situation,
contact your tax professional for more details and counsel.)


"Signed copies of this
classic have gotten quite
expensive, making this a
valuable collectible," the
appraiser went on to say. He
also indicated that based on
current offerings and sales
of signed copies of
"Rebecca" with similar
description as to publisher,
binding, size, and condition,
" the subject book is
adjudged to be worth
$800." Replacement value
is set at $1000.
There is no estimate of
what the book may have
cost in a retail bookstore
when it was published 67
years ago..
The appraisal report, as
explained, is an appraisal
expert's opinion of value
based on market comparable
research of the item's


Exercise added to equation


New look of Food pyramid
icon including exercise not
cast in stone, report says

Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks? Even
the government has proven that to be unfounded with the
new food pyramid just released.
The old, traditional, pyramid-shaped guide to healthy
eating has been turned drastically to reveal a new graphic
which interprets the food groups as rainbow-colored bands
running vertically from the tip to the base.
,Orange for grains, green for vegetabless., redfor fruits,
a yellow silver for oils, blue for milk products, and purple
for meats and beans were designed to charm and amuse us
while laying the groundwork with information that is sup-
posed to make us healthier. Preferred foods such as grains,
vegetables, and milk products have wider bands than the
others.
And just imagine! Exercise, and not so subtle at that,
has been added in the form of a staircase to remind us of the
importance of keeping our bodies fit. The image on the pyra-
mid depicts a figure climbing steps to the top.
In the old pyramid-shaped guide to .healthy eating,
grains filled the bottom, fats and sweets were at the tip,
and vegetables, fruits, and dairy products were in the mid-
dle.
Although the prior pyramid is qiJite familiar to most
everyone, according to Agriculture Secretary Mike
Johanns, "Few Americans actually follow the recommen-
dations."
Improving the health of a nation that has only grown fat-
ter since the first pyramid debuted in 1992 is the goal of
the new government tool.
Nearly two out of three Americans are overweight or
obese, and a report last month in The New England Journal
of Medicine contended that obesity, particularly in children,
is trimming four to nine months off the average life
expectancy.
"If we don't change these trends, our children may be
the first generation that cannot look forward to a longer life
span than their parents, something that should be very
troubling to all of us," said Eric Bost, the Agriculture
Department's under secretary for food, nutrition, and con-
sumer services.
Learn more about the new food pyramid at
www.mypyramid.gov on the internet.


FOur Family Serving Yours

for Seventy-Six Years!


LUWIs runeiil nuome staf piciured L t0 R, ifning: Janet Preston, Sam Lewis, MIKe Lewis, Ken unler, uyninia
Helms-Price; Standing: Bill Vanchesky, Chase Lewis, Stephen Lewis, L is William Pdce, David Dykes


Lewis FunerafIHome
Pre 9f edServices Vaufts 'Monuments
'Two Locations to Serve Our Growing County"
6405 Hwy. 90 West ComingSoon 7794 Navarre Pkwy.
Milton, FL our (w race Location on Navarre, FL
23-2243 WestSpencer FieUldRpad 939-5122)


A 67 YEAR OLD KEEPSAKE-Frank Moore takes a
great deal of pride in the novel, "Rebecca" auto-
graphed by its author, Daphne Du Maurier, pub-
lished by Doubleday in 1938. The book belonged to
his late wife Barbara, who acquired it from her
mother, Mrs. Effie Costain, who lived in
Henryville, Indiana. His daughter Fran Hill decid-
ed to have the book which once belonged to her
grandmother appraised and was pleasantly sur-
prised to find that it is quite valuable. The fami-
ly is quite certain, however, that the heirloom's
market value will ever come into play! It will
definitely remain in the family.


ALTERNATIVE












FOOD STORE






"Where educated natural

health choices are made."




Deanna Gilmore: Manager

Jimmie D. Hill, Ph.D.
Natural Health Counselor

Email address: GWYHILL@aol.com




5533 Hwy. 90 Pea Ridge

994-3606

Mon.-Fri.: 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.,

Sat.: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.


'I'
S.,,


Ii- -001'


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Page 7B


- WEDNESDAY, MAY 18,2005








I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Grea Thng AeA e 4 apein A9ilonHihScoot


1.i


By: Mel]sa.'Stis.i.. :,.apy 6m tinons,. Se has eon: firsf plac inm an aca.-.
.A -plo frstpl cein athletics, acadmics,' nd'
"Left, Left'.' basic marching al Leadership Academy, She received a,
Left, right, left." letterman her sophomore year, she won honor platoon.,
The voice her junior year, and Cadet of the Month her sophomore
of Aubrey year.


Ballard is
heard by
over 100
N a v a 1
J unior
Reserve
Officer
STraining
Corp cadets.


Aubrev
June Ballard is.
the daughter of
Kathleen and
James May. She has
.. tw.o sisters Kari and Ariel
May.
Aubrey's favorite extracurricular activity is
-NfJROTC., in which she serves as Armed Drill Team
,.Commander. While spending all of her high school
years greatly involved in ROTC, she has recei\ ed many
-awayds'. She's been awarded the Military Order of the
Purple Heart, a plaque from Whiting Field Helicopter
Training Squadron 8. and Leadership Academy. She
*has 'also had the honor of being on Colorguard her
sophomore year. and she's served as Commanding
Officer of NIROTC. She has been involved in winning


Aubrey has two favorite teachers: Senior
Chief Petty Officer Rosenbarker and Lieutenant
Commander Fortuna. "They have taught me a lot
through all of my high school years. They have helped
me to mature into a young woman," says Aubrey.
The only organization that Aubrey really has
time for is ROTC because it is so time consuming. In
ROTC she has held many positions, including,
Colorguard Executive Officer. Class Leader. Executive
Officer of Unit, and she is currently Commanding
Officer of Unit and Armed Drill team commander.
After high school, Aubrey plans to marry
Justin Russell and go to college wherever Justin gets
stationed with the United States Marine Corps.
As an underclassman, Aubrey looked forward
to being a senior because of graduation. Her most mem-
orable moment has been recei\ ing Armed Drill Team
Commander and being Commanding Officer of unit
In closing. Aubrey says. "I would like to thank
mni mom and dad for pushing me through high school
and getting me this far. I especially would like to thank
my mom. I'd also hke to thank m\ Nanny and Pa%\paw
for supporting me through everything I did. I'd like to
thank Justin for allia\s beinm there and helping me to
start a new% life. I lo\e you all."


Papa John's Pizza Scholarship W inner is Shari Tucker
Congratulations to Shari Tucker who won the Papa John's Pizza Scholarship for Milton High School
in the amount of $1,000.00. Mr. Jim Janicki, Marketing Coordinator for Schools presented the check to
Shari. Congratulations Shari!


Pictured I-r: Gloria
Gibson, Curriculum
Coordinator, Brian
Noack, Assistant
Principal, lim lanicki.
NM a r k e I i n g
Coordinator for
Schools, Papa lohnis
Pizza, Shari Tucker,
Dorothy lean Tucker,
mother, Rhonda
Chaiers, Senior
Guidance Counselor,
Ian Flores, Senior
Class Sponsor.


J ,- a",, Y ,-' cI' asses' '(mak-. ",

-b- l e d0 thismimerfor MHS students. Courses.in -
,Sce. i Studies, '..Math.:'. E, li's Intensive Math, Intensive ,-
SReadingand Intetisive Language Arts are being offered FREE t. MS:S
sltdents needing to take these classes. Students may begin signing, 0p.
on the clip boards located inthe giddan e office, before sch.dol 'aIfft. '
school and during luichi. Session f is June 6 June 24 and Sessiohin II ,
is June 27-July 18. .

Summer school Drivers Education This is the written part of ':,
Drivers, Education and for the student wishing to earn 1/2 credit. This-
is taught by Coach Short and the written part is free to students. Theie :T
are 20 days of class from June 13 to Jul\ 12. There will not be class
on June 24th and July 4th. Times for the morning session are 9 a.m.
to 12 noon. Afternoon session is from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. (for athletes ,
involved in summer programs and those involved in makeup academ-
ics.)

Community School Athletic courses are being offered for athletes.
and students and there is a fee to take these classes. Contact the
Athletic Department for more information.


Lee and Coleman get published!
Congratulations to two MNHS students. Rosanna Lee and Kitchelle
Coleman. Both of these students submitted works to the "Creative
Communication" Poetry/Essay contest, and their selections were chosen for
publication! Way to Go' Congratulations!


The Mighty Black and

Gold take a unforgettable walk


The MHS Nlightr Black & Gold
Band members discovered them-
sel\es in a new role during their
recent trip to Orlando. The band
became cast members at Walt Disney
World's Magic Kingdom on
Thursday. April 14. 'ftei an e\tensiue
application process earlier this year.
the Mighty Black & Gold Band was
invited to g2ie a parade performance
in the Magic Kingdom. Band mem-
bers spent the day enjoying the rides
and attractions before meeting at 4:30
b\ the clock tower at Pirates of the
Caribbean. The\ were then led back-
stage where they made preparations
for the 6:00 parade that they shared
\ ith three other marching bands from
other states. MHS Band Director


Gray W\eavei states. "There is nothing
that can compare to the experience of
marching a Disney Parade." The
experience of marching down
Mainstreet USA towards Cinderella's
Castle and then around through
Liberty Square is indescribable. The
most exciting part is hearing the
Disney announcer say "Ladies &
Gentlemen. boys & girls, Walt Disney
World is proud to present the Milton
High School Mighty Black & Gold
Band from Miiton. Florida" as you
prepare to march down the street!"
The MHS Band also visited Wet 'n
Wild Water Park, Medieval Times
Dinner & Tournament, and Universal
Studios Islands of Adventure Theme
Park during their visit to Orlando.


/ Important Phone \
Numbers for MHS

Main Office: 983-5600:
Main Office Fax 983-5610
Guidance: 983-5609
Guidance Fax: 983-5618:
Attendance :983-5608:Attendance
Answering.Machine-983-5658: Band:
983-5611 Weight Room: 983-5606:
Chorus:983-5613: M. Rutledge:
983-5616: Athletic Fax: 983-5614
or visit us at
www.santarosa.k 12.fl.us/mhs/


7
t I'


Proud


to be a


Panther!.




t 4 1 .
.'" "r<;tt'H-p..-f. ".-,"." ''2^-P2 l "'


Your "good neighbor" agent Ken Kincaid

Ken Kincaid Insurance Agency, Inc.

5259 Stewart St. Milton, FL 32570

Bus. (850) 623-9424 Res. (850) 626-7101
State Farm Insurance Companies Home Offices: Bloomington, Illinois


A


~':C~]~>~ K


4,'
I'
?.



f,


7 .


Pane 8-B


Wednesday May 18, 2005


.',-." = -';


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Wednesday May 18, 2005 I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette Page 9-B


RATES INCREASING SOON


iular subscription price is $24. a year.

Special offer price is $20. a year.


ATTENTION SENIORS


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Milton, FL 32570. You may also fax your order in. Fax number 623-2007 I
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1 The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday May 18, 2Uu5


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Sports



USPTA to have free "
tennis clinic in Milton
Free tennis lessons are being
offered through the United States
Professional Tennis Association's
Tennis Across America program.
Mario Alvarez will be heading
up the USPTA's activities at the
Pensacola Junior College's
Milton Campus on May 21 and
the Pensacola Campus on May
28.
This event is free to the pub-
lic and will feature an instruction-
al tennis clinic involving begin-
ners and advance players a like
no matter is they are a junior or
adult.
For more information on the
USPTA's Tennis Across America,
call Alvarez at 623-2911, or con-
tact the USPTA World
Headquarters at (800) USPTA-
4U. Information about the nation-
wide program and player tips are
also part of USPTA's Web site at
www.uspta.com.
Free athletic physical
are scheduled June 9
On June 9 free physical will
be offered for Milton and Pace
High Athletes by Baptist Health
Care at the Milton Community
Center.on Byrom Street.
I Milton athletic physical will
be conducted from 9 a.m. to
noon, while athletes from Pace
can get their physical from 1
p.m. to 3 p.m.
Athletes can get their physi-
cal forms at their respective high
school athletic office and must
be completed before June 9.
Per Florida High School
Athletic Association rules any
student who even attempts to try
out for a sport must have a com-
pleted physical on file in the ath-
letic office before trying out.
These forms also have to be
signed by your parent or
guardian prior to the physical.


.'* 4" ,
ai..,
-'B ,! ",' _, *,,.-


Champions Tour golfer Jim Thorpe is presented with the trophy after winning Monday's playoff in the 11th Annual Blue Angels Classic held at the Moors in Milton. Thorpe!
defeated Morris Hatalsky on the third playoff hole to become the first back-to-back winner of Champions Tour events in 2005.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Thorpe flying high ..after 'Classic'


The Big Lagoon Run to
be held at Bear Lake
Organizers of the Big Lagoon
Trail Run announced that Bear
Lake State Recreation Area in
Munson will serve as the site for
the 2005 trail run held by the
Pensacola Runners Association.
The run will be Saturday,
May 21, and will get underway at
8 a.m.
Entry fee for the race is $15
per person, which will include
park fees, lunch;,and a PRA visor.
Following the trail run will be
a traditional picnic. During the
picnic the Pensacola Runners
Association will elect, new board
members and officers for the
2005-06 season.
Registration form for this
event are available at area sports
outlets and health clubs- or are
available online at www.pen-
sacolarunners.com. "
Late registration and packet
pick-up will be held Friday, May
20, at Running Wild in Pensacola,
or at the pavilion at Bear Lake on
race day.
Youth bowling league is
set to kick off June 7
Oops Alley has announced a
new promotional programs for
kids ages 5 through 10 years of
age.
The Kid's Alley league is set
to begin on June 7 and run for 10
weeks with a start time of 2 p.m.
each Tuesday.

PSA releases date for
Double Bridge Run
The Pensacola Sports
Association announced that the
ninth annual Double Bridge Run
will take place Feb. 4, 2006.
The event will include a 15K
and 5K courses and a junior 5K
for children under 14. For more
information contact the
Pensacola Sports Association at
434-2800

Do you have
sports-related
news or
information you
would like to
see published in
the Press
Gazette? If so,
send it to us at:
sports@sr-pg.com


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor


Two titans teed it up on
Monday morning to decide the
11th Blue Angels Classic.
After, darkness ended

Sunday's playoff after one hole,
both Jim Thorpe and Morris
Hatalsky' were ready to play
after a good nights rest.
As a modest gallery gath-
ered under cool and sunny skies
Monday, Thorpe and Hatalsky
went to the 10m tee to pick up
where they left off.
"This tournament was a lot
of fun," said Thorpe. "It is just
very unfortunate that one of us
has to come in second because


Pace golf


scramble


is Friday


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
It is time to tee it up for the
Pace Area Chamber of
Commerce Golf Tournament
this Friday at Tanglewood Golf
and Country Club.
This four person, scramble
costs $65 per player, which
includes a dinner after the tour-
nament, sack lunch, cart and
green fees, range balls one hour
prior to start, all beverages,
hole in one prizes, and door
prizes.
A team registration is $360,
which includes four players,
one tee sign, mulligan, sack
lunch, and dinner.
All players who register
must also submit a handicap for
this tournament, which will
have, prizes for first, second,
and third places. The first place
team in the tournament will
receive $125 per players.
Tee time will be at 12:30
p.m. May 19, with registration
beginning at 11 a.m.
Registration deadline on
this tournament is Thursday
May 19. For more information
please call the, Pace Area
Chamber at 994-9633.


we both played well this week-
end."
Thorpe boomed his drive,
but Hatalsky turned up the heat
with his second shot landing
within 12 feet of the whole.
It wasn't as close, but
Thrope's, golf ball stopped 15
feet from the pin it struck on his
.approach shot.
Neither golfer could sink
their birdie attempt so the first
Monday playoff in Champions
Tour history returned to the
18th hole yet again.
Both players placed their
tee shots straight down the mid-
dle with Thorpe having the
slight edge on distance.


Hatalsky's second shot
came up short of the green and
landed in the left bunker pro-
tecting the 18th green.
Thorpe, seizing the
moment, grabbed his 8-iron
knocking his ball to within 10
feet of the hole.
"I knew when he left his
putt short at number 10 that I
might make mine," said
Thorpe. "But when he hit it in
the bunker at number 18 I had
the green light."
After getting out of the
sound, Haltalsky sunk his putt
to save par, but all eyes were on
Thorpe.
With a hushed gallery


Royal determination































,*. .



lay pitcher Jessie Johnson is seen making a delivery in Friday's
Region 1-2A Finals against Wewahitchka. For a complete look at
Friday's game see page 3C
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


Thorpe lined up the same shot
that he had to send the tourna-
ment into what would be the
fifth playoff in tournament his-
tory.
A solid stroke and true
touch powered Thorpe's golf
ball to the bottom of the cup for
the win, becoming the first
back-to-back winner on the
Champions Tour this season.
"I got a putting tip from Lee
Trevino a couple of weeks ago
when I was in Austin," said
Thorpe.
After the tournament
Hatalsky talked about the sec-
ond shot of the third playoff
hole.


"I eased up on the second
shot on 18," said Hatalsky.
"The putt I made at 18 today
was meaningless because I
knew he would make his.
"Today I gave the tourna-
ment away with my putter; I amn
disappointed because I thought
I should have won."
Previously the four playoffs
at the Blue Angels Classic saw
Raymond Floyd defeat Tom
Wargo in 1995, Lee Trevino
made a dramatic comeback and
win a five man playoff over
Bob Eastwood, David Graham,
Mike Hill, and Dave Stockton
in 1996, Isao Aoki defeated Gil
See, PLAYOFF, Pg. 2C


Trojans execute


against the Patriots


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor


Everyone was hoping for a
Northwest Florida baseball
showdown for the Region 1-4A
title, but someone forgot to tell
the Trojans of Tallahassee
Lincoln.
Pace (23-5) saw their sea-
son come to an end as Lincoln

won 4-1 Friday at Pace High
School.
The Patriots, did their best
to defend their turf but a couple
of errors in the first inning, put
them in a position that they
were uncomfortable in.
"We just got into a panic
mode," said Pace coach Charlie
Warner. "After we fell behind
on those two errors I felt like
we started pushing at the plate.
"Once we started pushing
at the plate the game became
too easy for their starter
(Brandon Whitaker)."
Lincoln got the first run of
the game after Matt Culligan
led off with a double.
Two errors, including a
wild throw from the outfield,
moved Culligan to third for
Ricky Moulton.
Moulton hit a sacrifice fly
to center to score Culligan.
Pace would answer with a


Pace catcher Stevie Scott has,
been selected to play on the
North Florida All-Star squad this
weekend against other Florida
high school seniors in Sebring,
Fla.
Press Gazette phot6
by Bill Gamblin
run in the third as Caleb Gindl
singled to center bringing home
Brandon McFarren, who dour
bled to left to lead off the third,
The Trojans would then ge4
to Pace starting pitcher Chris
See, PACE, Pg. 3C


,


.1


j














Sports


Playoff

Continued From Page One
Morgan in 1997, while in
2001 it was Mike McCullough
defeating Andy North, but all of
those playoffs came on a
Sunday.
The last tournament Thorpe
won, the FedEx Kinko's
Classic, he signed the check
over to his church so the ques-
tion Thorpe had to answer was,
who would get the $225,000 he
won on Monday.
"I think this check is spo-
ken for by my wife," joked
Thorpe. "The last check I gave
to the church I think cut into her
shopping just a little so she will
get this one.
"Later on this year I plan on
playing a tournament and giv-
ing my winnings to the Boys
and Girls Club of America
because I really appreciate all
of what they do to help the
community.""
Overall for this weekends
tournament 64 of the 78
Champions Tour players fin-
ished the three day Blue Angels
Classic at even par of 210 or
better.
Tournament Chairman
Jimmy Lee. was very please
with the finish.
"This was another out-
standing tournament," said Lee.


CLASSIC
AN OFFICIAL CHAMPIONS TOUR EVENT


o k, ,V- ... ... ,
4 '. .' ... '=. ' -T. '' '" ,'fj "i ~ '", ,,.-; .= -- .'


Morris Hatalsky is seen knocking his second shot out of the bunker on the third playoff hole Monday of
the Blue Angels Classic. Hatalsky would par 18, but lose as Jim Thorpe would birdie to secure his second
consecutive win on the Champions Tour.


"And you could not ask for a
better spokesperson for the
tournament as I know he will be
back next year to defend his


title.
"Both Thorpie and Morris
played an outstanding tourna-
ment and either one would be a


Press Gazette phot by Bill Gamblin
fine champion, but Jim came
through on 18 to sink that birdie


put to win.


sports @sr-pg.comrn


Stadler steals the show Saturday


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
Saturday was ,a day when
the birdies sang and records
were broken.
After the first round yielded
an amazing 302 birdies the
Champions Tour professionals
worked their magic with anoth-
er 317 birdies along with an
amazing 11 eagles, which was
six more than were carded on
Friday.
But that just scratched the
surface of what happened.
It was hard to say which
golfer deserved the most head-
lines Craig Stadler, Jim Thorpe,
or Pete Oakley.
Stadler, whose appearance
has earned him the nickname
"The Walrus" had ten little rea-
sons to brag about as he played
Saturday's round to an amazing
10 strokes under par carding a
60.
That 60 tied the single
round record at the Blue Angels
Classic, which was recorded in
1997 by Isao Aoki at this event.
Walter Morgan, Bruce Fleisher,
Thorpe, and Tom Purtzer would
match this score at other
Champion Tour events.
"I drove the ball better
today than yesterday," said
Stadler who carded 11 birdies
and one bogey. "I made a lot of
putts today and you have to do
that to go low."
Stadler just missed carding
a 59, but a 27 foot birdie
attempt ended up missing just
right of the hole.
"I've never had a chance at
59 before," admitted Stadler.
"This is the first chance I had at
putting for a chance at 59.
"Today was a nice rebound
for how I played yesterday."
Thorpe himself set a tour-
nament record by finishing the
second round at. 13-under par
127. ihus breaking the l-under


The eter popular 'Walrus' Craig Stadler is seen driving a carl back out onto the course Sunday following
the second rain delay due to inclement weather. Despite shooting a 10-under par 60 on Saturday, Sladler
finished the tournament tied for ninth place at 11 under par.


par 129 set in 1999 by Bob
Duvall.
"As I mentioned yesterday
I thought someone would post a
low round and Stadler goes out
and shoots a 60," said Thorpe,
who was looking at becoming
the first back-to-back event
winner on the Champions Tour
this season. "I misread some
greens today and .hit the wrong
club at number 16 when I used
a 7-iron.
"Today we had another
good solid round and managed
to overcome Stadler's 60 to get
the lead."
Thorpe is also looking to
join Duval (1999), Gil Morgan
(2000), and Bob Gilder (2003)


who went on to win the Blue
Angels Classic when they held
the lead following 36 holes.
But the shot of the day
belonged to Pete Oakley who
carded an ace (hole-in-one) on
the 191-yard 12th hole.
Oakley's 4-iron directed the
ball to what would be the first
hole-in-one on the Champions
Tour this year.
Raymond Floyd (1995),
DeWitt Weaver (1997), and
Dave Eichelberger (2002) have
carded the previous holes-in-
one at the Blue Angels Classic.
Also carding personal bests
on Saturday were Curtis
Strange who shot an 8-under
par 62. His last 62 came in 1983


Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


at the Sammy Davis. Jr. -
Greater Hartford Open, while
Mike Sullivan also had his best
showing of his brief Champions'
Tour career with a 7-under par
6,3 and was one shy of his,
career best 62.
Sullivan shot a 62 on the
PGA Tour most recently at the
1992 Federal Express St. Jude
Classic.
Hole number nine remained
the most difficult with an aver-
age score of 4.199 after two
days, while number 11
remained the. easiest with an
average of 4.53
Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
atisports@sr-pg.coni


Hazards are no problem on Friday


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
Friday was a good day for
par or below par during the first
round of the Blue Angels
Classic with the trio of Vicente
Fernandez, Morris Hatalsky,
and Jim Thorpe leading the way
with seven under rounds of 63.
Fernandez's round of 63
was even more impressive, after
his dip in the water.
"I didn't get off to a good
start," said Fernandez, who
recorded his llth round in the
60's on Friday in his last 12
starts. "But I made a good save
for par when I hit my 5-iron to
4 feet of the hole.
"There was no way I
thought I would shoot a 63
when I hit my tee shot in the


water at number one."
This round tied his career
best, which also came at the
Classic back in, 1997 when it
was called the Emerald Coast
Classic as he posted an opening
round of 63.
Also posting his career best
was Hatalsky, whose 63
matched his 2002 RJR
Championship, which included
six straight birdies on holes 11
through 16.
"On the front side I was
driving the ball poorly and got
away with it," said Hatalsky.
"But from twelve on my
rhythm came back and I played
well from that point on.
"It has been awhile since
I've had a stretch of birdies like
that, but in Austin recently I got


to 6-under after eight holes in
the first round."
Previously on the tour this
year golfers Jerry Pate, Don
Pooley, and Bruce Fleisher had
streaks of five consecutive
birdies.
On 18 69-year-old Dale
Douglass hit what many called
the shot of the day as his 6-iron
was the magic wand he needed
as his second shot rolled into
the hole from 171 yards out for
an eagle.
The eagle on 18 helped
Douglass shoot a 1-under par
69, which allowed him to match
his age for the second time in
his career. During his career
Douglass has also bettered his
age on two different occasions.
Thorpe's round of 63 was a


continuance of his strong play
with his fourth consecutive
round in the 60's, which goes
back to his victory to at the
FedEx Kinko's Classic in
Austin, Tex.
"Anytime you catch a
course like this with no wind
and the condition it is in there
are going to be a lot of low
scores," said Thorpe. "The level
of competition out here is so
good and we haven't played a
course like this this year.
"The course is perfect."
The word perfect was the
best way to describe the course,
as the 78 Champions Tour pro-
fessionals set a new scoring
record for a single round as the
Classic field a0 eraged 69.346.
sports @s r-pg. conm


Mother Nature



wanted to play



on Sunday too


By BILL GAMBLIN
PG Sports Editor


Friday the Blue Angels
Classic started with .78 golfers
competing for the winner's
share of the prize money.
On Sunday it came down to
just two-Jim Thorpe and
Morris Hatalsky-but Mother
Nature had other plans for those
attending the third day of the
Blue Angel Classic as she want-
ed to play through.
With darkness enveloping
the 18 hole Moors, Thorpe and
Hatalsky went back to the 18th
hole to see who would win the
title.
Thorpe, who has just sunk a
10-foot birdie to send the game
to a playoff, saw his tee shot on
,the first hole of the playoff find
the bunker.
"My shot from the bunker
on 18 in the playoff was one of
my best shots of the tourna-
ment," said Thorpe.
Hatalsky came out and hit a
solid tee shot that made some
feel he would make quick work
of Thorpe.
Without hesitating Thorpe
grabbed a 7-iron and guided the
ball to %within 15 feet of the
hole. while Hatalsky sa%% his
second shot land just a foot or
two further from the hole.
Despite having one of the
best putting strokes in the tour-
nament, Hatalsk) could not find
the bottom of the cup and
wound up two putting.
"When you play 30 years of
pro golf you will see things like
this," said Hatalsky. "It was dif-
ficult to see on the last hole and
the playoff hole..
"I just misread the putt on
the final hole."
Thorpe lined up his putt,
but the ball seemed to be as
exhausted as its owner coming
up just one roll short of finding
the hole for a winning birdie.
"I guess my golf ball was as
tired as I was," said Thorpe. "It
just didn't have one more roll in
it."
So after two weather delays
and one playoff hole, Mother
Nature would win and force a
.Monday playoff.
The lirst delay came after
the final group had teed off
from the 11th hole.
Nearly three hours later
play would resume, as Thorpe
would relinquish his lead to
SHatalsk), who had been within
striking distance for the entire
three days of the tournament.
Before the second delay
Hatalsky would take a two shot
lead over the Champions Tour
most recent winner at the
FedEx Kinko's Classic in
Austin, Tex., but Thorpe would
not go away.
Another delay while they
were on the 14m hole would
nearly send home the thousands
in attendance, but they would
miss one of the most exciting
finishes since Lee Trevino won
a five way playoff in 1996.
With Hatalsky leading by
one stroke the leaders teed off
at No. 18 and Hatalsky's drive
coming up very short, while
Thorpe's drive cleared the
bunkers on the left hand side of
: the fairway.


Delays! Delays!
Delays!
O3 1:40 p.m. The first thun-
derstorms of Sunday
approach and stop play after
the final group have teed off
on hole 11. A heavy rainstorm
puts the remainder of the tour-
ney in doubt.
C 4:20 p.m. Play resumes
after the area is clear of any
threats of lightning.
0 4:53 p.m. The horn
sounds a second time after
the group of Allen Doyle, John
Jacobs, and Fuzzy Zoeller fin-
ish out 18 which makes the
round official.
L 6:30 p.m. Play resumes
until darkness halts play at
7:35 p.m. after Thorpe and
Hatalsky have finished their
first playoff hole.


Hatalsky would come back
with his second shot and bring a
roar from
those
remaining in,
the gallery
with a sec-
ond shot
that stopped
on the green
about 15
feet abol e
the hole
Thorpe t
would use Hatalsky
an 8-iron on
his second shot landing just 10
feet to the left of the hole.
Stadler finished his round
of 70 and ended in a six-way tie
for ninth place.
With all eyes on Hatalsky,
his birdie putt to win would
come up just short as he mis-
read the green.
Thorpe was determined to
win and it was as if he was des-
tined to add his name to the
long playoff history of the Blue
Angels Classic as he sunk his
birdie attempt while dancing to
the roaring gallery.
"I had trouble seeing on the
last hole, but I thought momen-
tum was on my side so I sug-
gested we go ahead and play the
playoff tonight," said Thorpe.
"Morris was ready and told me
let's do it.
"That was the attitude we
both had from the start of the
day as we both felt the champi-
onship would come down to us
two."
Defending champion Tom
Jenkins finished in a tie for third
place 13-under par, to post the
best finish in the 11-year histo-
ry of the Blue Angels Classic
for a defending champion.
"I thought I played pretty
well in defense of my title,"
said Jenkins. "I eagled the sev-
enth hole and felt like I was
going to have one of those
magic rounds.
"Then I missed a birdie putt
on the 11th and I felt that really
slowed my momentum."
Also posting a strong finish
was Don Pooley who posted a
low round Sunday of 63 to
move into the tie for third.
Due to the delays, while
Pooley came off the course he
did not have time to talk, as he
needed to catch a flight to a
scheduled commitment.


Page 2-C


The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday May 18, 2005









I The Santa Rosa Press Gazette


Wednesday May 18, 2005


Pace

Continued From Page One
Source in the fourth when Kyle
Delvecchio hit a solo shot over
the left field fence.
In the fifth inning Moulton
padded the Trojan lead with a
triple to right scored Travis
Erven and a single by
Delvecchio allowed Moulton to
score the final run.
"When the errors were
committed and they scored that
really set a tone for the entire
game," said Warner. "Mentally
they didn't realize we had plen-
ty of game left to come back
and win."
In the sixth Pace was able
to get two runners on, but the
threat ended with two consecu--
tive groundouts afterwards.
The final at bat was a quick
three up and three down for the
visiting Trojans.
Sorce worked five innings
-before giving way to Glenn
Desposito who silenced the
Tallahassee bats with two fiery
innings of work.
"The guys never did quit,"
said Wamer. "I just really hate
to see this sad ending to a sea-
son for them
"Especially the seniors who
were good leaders on this
team."
Warner has been selected as
a coach for the North Florida
team in an upcoming All-Star
,Game to be held this weekend
*in Sebring, Fla.
, And joining Warner -
i Sebring this weekend will be
'Pace senior catcher Stevie
' Scott.
"The coaches of the 30 high
schools in the area get together


- ". -.- 4' '
.L ;, ,.,..: o .-...::^ a,.
__ .-, *^.:i - l:-..,. .-" "_. .^ .. ..- -


Jay's Candice Gilman reaches second base in the first inning as one of the Lady Royal's three hits against
Wewahitchka in Friday's Region 1-2A Championship played at Jay High School. A young Lady Royals
team lost 6-0 to the defending Region Champs.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin



Lady Royals lose 6-0 in 2-A


Region Finals to Lady Gators


Pace's baseball coach is seen looking back at the umpire Friday night
after a discussion during Friday's game..
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


and select two seniors to be on
the team," said Warner. "Then
they will look at the rosters and
fill the spots they don't have by
choosing from a list of nomi-
nated players."
Another way players can be
picked is from six scout picks


according to Warner.
"I am not sure which way
he was selected," said Warner.
"But this is a tremendous honor
for him."
Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@sr-pg.com


C hall enge

Answer these questions to win
2 tickets to see the Pensacola Pelicans!

Q: What" grade" is Central softball pitcher
Brittany Weaver?


--IL.


.1


i


Q: What school has Glenn
Desposito signed a baseball
scholarship with?


Tickets after for Pelican Home
games against the Ft. Worth Cats
and the El Paso Diablos


Call 623-2120 and ask to speak with
Bill! Answers can be found in


previous sports sections.


By BILL GAMBLING
PG Sports Editor
Strike three can be very elu-
sive for a pitcher in some cases.
Friday Jay's Krista Autre\
found that out in the Region I -
A Championship against
defending champion
Wewahitchka.
With two strikes and tic
bases loaded the Lady Gators
Britney Grice automatically
returned Autrey's pitch back up
the middle and off her out-
stretched glove to score two
runs.
Autrey had already defend-
ed her position one batter earli-
er with the bases loaded with a
force out at home, but she could
only get a glove on what could
have been the third out of the
fifth inning.
Wewahitchka loaded the
bases again when all runners
were safe following a, oer,,to
short, which brought up Kayla
Rich.
Rich then deposited
Autrey's offering over the left
center fence for a grand slam.
"We just missed one pitch
location tonight," said first year
Jay coach Brian Watson. "It
was a great pitch but they just
got the barrel on the ball.
"They did an outstanding
job executing the bunt to get
runners on base."
Jay threatened in their first
at bat when Candance Gillman
doubled to right field with two
outs, but Jessie Johnson popped


- *


Candance Gilman is seen here stretching for a ball that was hit by
Wewahitchka during that crucial fifth inning Friday as the Lady
Gators scored all six of their runs.
Press Gazette photo by Bill Gamblin


up to second base.
After that Jay could only
manage two more hits when
they had a threat in the sixth
inning eliminated as Jill Miller,
who led off the inning with a
single, was tagged out at third
on an Amy Emmett single.
"(Wewahitchka) put run-
ners on base tonight," said
Watson. "When they got on
base they put the pressure on us
to make the plays and we could-
n't.
"But I am so very proud of
this team and what all they
did."
Watson was very proud of
what his team has accom-
plished in their first year.
"Everything just clicked
when it, was tune for the dis-
tricts," said Watson of the Lady
Royals four game winning
streak that was snapped Friday.
"When I got here the first day I


met 30 new girls.
"After getting to know
them for a month and watching,
them play that is when we took
a step back and went to work."
Only two players-Nicole
Gafford and Miller-are gradu-
ating from this squad which
started five sophomores and
one eighth grader.
"I couldn't be more proud
of these girls," said Watson.
"Take away that one inning we
had tonight and it could be a
totally different story.
"But we are definitely
building a team in the right
direction."
In the loss Autrey retired
the first nine Wewahitchka bat-
ters before surrendering a sin-
gle in the four inning and struck
out three on the night.
Story written by
Bill Gamblin. Reach him
at sports@ sr-pg.com


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5:51 AM Sun.rise 5:52 AM Sun rise 5:51 AM Sun rise 5:51 AM Sun rise
1:03 PM 0.83 feet 1:00 PM 0.76 feet 8:58 AM 0.92 feet 1:59 PM 0.83 feet
2:39 PM Moon rise 2:40 PM Moon rise 12:59 PM 0.84 feet 2:39 PM Moon rise
6:39 PM 0.78 feet 6:13 PM0.72 feet 2:39 PM Moon rise 7:09 PM 0.78 feet
7:37 PM Sun set 7:37 PM Sun set 4:47 PM 0.88 feet 7:37 PM Sun set
8:16 PM 0.79 feet 8:13 PM 0.72 feet 7:36 PM Sun set 9:12 PM 0.79 feet


Thursday, May 19, 2005
3:10 AM Moon set
4:07 AM 0.63 feet
5:50 AM Sun rise
10:57 AM 0.95 feet
3:36 PM Moon rise
7:37 PM Sun set
8:01 PM 0.48 feet

Friday, May 20, 2005
3:38 AM Moon'set
5:50 AM Sun rise
10:22 AM 1.19 feet
4:35 PM Moon rise
7:38 PM Sun set
8:42 PM 0.16 feet

Saturday, May 21, 2005
4:08 AM Moon set
5:49 AM Sun rise
10:24 AM 1.47 feet
5:38 PM Moon rise
7:38 PM Sun set
9:26 PM -0.14 feet


Thursday, May 19, 2005
3:11 AM Moon set
3:41 AM 0.57 feet
5:52 AM Sun rise
10:54 AM 0.87 feet
3:37 PM Moon rise
7:35 PM 0.44 feet
7:38 PM Sun set

Friday, May 20, 2005
3:39 AM Moon set
5:51 AM Sun rise
10:19 AM 1.09 feet
4:36 PM Moon rise
7:38 PM Sun set
8:16 PM 0.15 feet

Saturday, May 21, 2005
4:09 AM Moon set
5:51 AM Sun rise
10:21 AM 1.35 feet
5:39 PM Moon rise
7:39 PM Sun set
9:00 PM -0.13 feet


Thursday, May 19, 2005
12:24 AM 0.65 feet
3:10 AM Moon set
5:50 AM Sun rise
7:50 AM 1.04 feet
2:44 PM 0.61 feet
3:36 PM Moon rise
7:37 PM Sun set
9:55 PM 0.75 feet
11:48 PM 0.74 feet

Friday, May 20, 2005
3:38 AM Moon set
5:50 AM Sun rise
7:15 AM 1.22 feet
3:52 PM 0.35 feet
4:35 PM Moon rise
7:37 PM Sun set

Saturday, May 21, 2005
4:08 AM Moon set
5:49 AM Sun rise
7:06 AM 1.43 feet
4:47 PM 0.08 feet


Thursday, May 19, 2005
3:11 AM Moon set
4:37 AM 0.63 feet
5:51 AM Sun rise
11:53 AM 0.95 feet
3:36 PM Moon rise
7:38 PM Sun set
8:31 PM 0.48 feet

Friday, May 20, 2005
3:38 AM Moon set
5:50 AM Sun rise
11:18 AM 1.19 feet
4:36 PM Moon rise
7:39 PM Sun set
9:12 PM 0.16 feet

Saturday, May 21, 2005
4:08 AM Moon set
5:50 AM Sun rise
11:20 AM 1.47 feet
5:39 PM Moon rise
7:39 PM Sun set
9:56 PM -0.14 feet


PENSACOLA PELICANS

GIVEAWAY EXTRAVAGANZA
Friday, May 20th Fort Worth Cats
Pelican Park 6:35pm
First of three game series

Pelicans T-Shirt Giveaway Night presented by American
Lube Fast and TK 10 1. Every fan through the gates


N *-


gets a FREE Pelicans T-Shirt.


www~penacoa* *an~


Pane 3-C


I


--40


I











a7Ptf Uo~a'~ Pre* 1WEDNESDAY
G.A271, 18, 2005


PAGE 4-C assi.iecls


90 ANNOUNCEMENTS
92 AUCTIONS
94 MEETINGS
96 PERSONALS
98 TRAINING
EMPLOYMENT
102 DRIVERS
104 GENERAL HELP
106 HOME BASED
BUSINESS
108 HOTEL/MOTELS/
RESTAURANTS
110 LABOR
112 MANAGEMENT
114 MEDICAL
116 OFFICE WORK
118 PART TIME
120 PROFESSIONAL
122 RETAIL
124 SALES/
TELEMARKETING
126 SKILLS/TRADE
128 POSITIONS WANTED
GARAGE SALES -
STYLES SECTION-WED.
202 GARAGE SALES-SAT.
SERVICES
305 AUTO
310 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
315 BUSINESS SERVICES
320 CHILD CARE
325 DOMESTIC
330 EQUIPMENT REPAIR
335 FINANCIAL SERVICES
340 HOME REPAIR
345 LAWN CARE
350 SENIOR CARE
355 SEWING/ALTERATIONS
360 MISCELLANEOUS
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-RENT
402 APARTMENTS
404 COMMERCIAL
406 HOMES
408 LAND
410 MOBILE HOMES
412 ROOMS FOR RENT
414 ROOMMATES WANTED
416 VACATION/RESORT
SANTA ROSA
REAL ESTATE-SALE
502 APARTMENTS
504 COMMERCIAL
506 HOMES
508 INVESTMENTS
510 LAND
512 MOBILE HOMES
514 VACATION/RESORT
PETS/ANIMALS
702 BOARDING
704 LIVESTOCK
706 LIVESTOCK SUPPLIES
708 PETS
710 PET SUPPLIES
712 LOST PETS
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
802 ANTIQUES
804 APPAREL
806 APPLIANCES
808 ARTS & CRAFTS
810 COMPUTERS
812 FARM EQUIPMENT
814 FURNITURE
816 JEWELRY
818 LAWN EQUIPMENT
820 LUMBER/HARDWARE
822 MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
824 OFFICE EQUIPMENT
826 SPORTING GOODS
828 ELECTRONIC
(STEREO.TV/VCR)
830 MISCJSALE
832 MISC./WANTED
834 LOST MERCHANDISE
TRANSPORTATION
902 AUTO SUPPLIES
904 CARS
906 BOATS
908 FARM EQUIPMENT
910 MOTORCYCLES
912 MOTOR HOMES
914 RECREATIONAL
916 SPORTS UTILITY
VEHICLE
918 TRUCKS
920 VANS
922 OTHER


- a^
Q ,U 4i- ," .
IR ER T R


GENERAL ASSIGNMENT REPORTER
The Press Gazette has an opening for a general
assignment reporter. The successful candidate
will have strong writing skills and the ability to
work well under pressure.
Experience with Macimosh computers and
programs
like Microsoft Word and Quark Xpress a plus.
This is a full-time position
(Monday through Friday)
with occasional weekend work
as well. The Press Gazette
is a drug free workplace and
an equal opportunity employer.
Call Jim Fletcher at
623-2120 or submit
your resumes to :
Jim Fletcher,
Press Gazette,
6629 Elva Street


HO JBNt
:" 2','''
B:,. S


GET HELP FAST

BY PLACING YOUR

HELP WANTED AD

IN THE PRESS

GAZETTE'S HOT

JOBS NOW! CALL

TRACEY OR

SHEENA AT

623-2120 FOR

DEADLINE AND

PRICING

INFORMATION.


IA RM i 54 ISOP


NEED LABORERS
AND OPERATORS.
DRUG TEST
REQUIRED. $100 SIGN
ON BONUS. CALL
983-6584 FOR MORE
INFORMATION.


FULL TIME AT PUBIC ACCOUNTING
FIRM IN SANTA ROSA COUNTY.
CANDIDATE SHOULD HAVE PUBIC
ACCOUNTING EXPERIENCE, TAX
KNOWLEDGE, GOOD
COMMUNICATION SKILL AND
ABILITY TO WORK WELL UNDER
DEADLINES. COMPETITIVE
COMPENSATION PACKAGE WITH
BENEFITS. SEND RESUME WITH
SALARY REQUIREMENTS TO:
ACCOUNTANT, P.O. BOX 2194,
PACE, FL 32571.


Farm supervisor Position # 00013881

The University of Florida's West Florida
Research and Education Center in Jay,
Florida is recruiting for a Farm Supervisor
position. Incumbent will supervise and train
and inmate work crew; oversee farm
operations and maintain land records.
Candidates will be subjected to pre-
placement drug and alcohol testing, a
background check on driving record and a
training session for the commercial Driver's
License. If admitted into the program, annual
testing will follow. Minimum of a HS Diploma
and six years of appropriate experience is
required. Relevant college course work and/or
vocational training may substitute at an
equivalent rate for the required experience. To
view application instructions and complete an
online resume, visit www.hr.ufl.cdn/job or call
983-5216 ext 121. Sharon Davis will assist
you. Requisition number for this vacancy is
032753 and the deadline date to apply is
5/20/05. If an accommodation due to a
disability is needed to apply for this position,
please call (352) 392-4621 or the Florida Relay
system at (800) 955-8771 (TDD). An Equal
Opportunity Institution. To view a more
detailed job description visit
http://wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/


IC SO


GILCO

A Factory outlel for
Scott Fetzer need to fully staff its
MIlon Pace location
Located 1/3 Mile
from Milton
High School
Customer Service or Sales
experience not needed
But would be nelpiui
Free lull on the lob training
Program on premises
Must De a team player and
willing to work hard
1600/mo to start
Plus bonuses.
Tnis is not lelemarkeiing or
multilevel markeling., is a
real job with real pay
Opportunity to advance from within
All Inat quality will star Mon.
To secure an interview.
Call Tracy at 623-4429.


Gulf-Atlantic Constructors, Inc.
Hiring Qualified applicants
For the following positions: r

General Laborers %


Equipment Operators

Truck Drivers

Apply in person, M-F 8am-5pm
650 West oakfield Drive,
Pensacola, FL
EOE, drug free

Benefits include health insurance,
401 K, ESOP, vacation, paid holidays.


.4;'


*~~ii ~i./


HELP WANTED AS -
SOON AS POSSIBLE. ,
EXPERIENCED
ROOFERS &
LABORERS.
NO SUBS.
478-6887.


HOME HEALTH CARE NOW
HIRING EXPERIENCED
CAREGIVERS FOR ALL OF
SANTA ROSA COUNTY. ALL
SHIFTS AVAILABLE, NO
PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
APPLY IN PERSON AT: TLC
CAREGIVERS 4400 BAYOU
BLVD, SUITE 9
PENSACOLA, FL 32503


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PRIVATE

PARTY ADS

$4.00/WK
up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30
$1.00 OFF FOR
3RD WEEK
MUST BE PRE-PAID


GARAGE

SALE ADS

$5.00
up to 20 words
.25 PER WORD
OVER 20
PRE-PAYMENT
REQUIRED


COMMERCIAL


ADS

$11 .00/1st week
$1.00 OFF EACH
ADDITIONAL WEEK
up to 30 words
.25 PER WORD
per PUBLICATION
OVER 30
SUBJECT TO
CREDIT APPROVAL


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hMfilt"onT, ^FL3570

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I PAGE 5-C THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS 18, 2005


APAC, Inc. hiring qualified applicants for
the following positions:

General Laborers
Please apply at Escarosa Career Center

Applicants for the following positions are
eligible for a $200.00 sign-on bonus

Experienced Equipment Operators -
(Grader/Dozer/Excavator etc.)
Skilled Laborers
*Concrete Finisher/Formsetters
*EXP Asphalt Crew -
(Raker/Luteman, Screed Operator)
*Asphalt Distributor Operator
*Paver Operator
*Asphalt Paving Forman
Service Truck Driver
*Quality Control Tech Level 1 Plant

Apply in person, M-F 8am 5pm
4375 McCoy Dr., Pensacola FL.
APAC is a drug-free workplace & EOE.


SANTA ROSA COUNTY
HUMAN RESOURCES
EMPLOYMENT
ANNOUNCEMENT
********************************
ATTENTION: The information given on your applica-
tion will be evaluated against the minimum qualifications
of the job description. The length of related work experi-
ence, training and education described on.your applica-
tion, will be an important consideration in the entire
application and selection process. After all applications
are evaluated, your name will be placed on the employ-
ment list; ranked accordingly. Other than this announce-
ment, no further notification will be sent.

Administrative Clerk II (4113)
Range: 10 $ 9.05 per hour
**05/016/2005 05/23/2005**
Note: All experience and/or educational requirements
must be clearly documented on application before qualifi-
cation for employment is determined:. '
Minimum Qualifications (Must Be Attained Before the
Closing Date) HS/GED. (3) yrs exp in typing & data
entry; type 30 wpm. CERTIFICATION: May require the
ability to obtain and hold current certification in the
NCIC/FCIC terminal course. ADDITIONAL: Must pass
a thorough background check including CVSA and physi-
cal exam. May require shift work.

Computer Support/Web Technician I (4403)
Range: 16 $ 22,378.87 24,702.08 DOQ
**05/09/2005 05/23/2005**
Note: All experience and/or educational requirements
must be clearly documented on application before qualifi-
cation for employment is determined.

Minimum Qualifications (Must Be Attained Before the
Closing Date) HS/GED. (2) yrs. of software and/or hard-
ware computer support exp, specifically with Windows
Based Computers and/or Servers version 2000 or later.
(2) yrs. exp with web development software and graphic
creation software, demonstrating proficiency, (1) yr. of
exp with Microsoft Word, Excel, and Access demonstrat-
ing proficiency. PREFERENCE: Will be given to appli-
cants who have experience with Dreamweaver,
Photoshop and experience with Document/Imaging
Systems. LICENSE: Applicant must have a.valid State
of Florida Driver's License at the date of hire and main-
tain said license while employed in this position.

Testing will be held on Thursday May 26, 2005 for
Communications Dispatcher I and Administrative Clerk
II. The APPLICANT must contact Human Resources at
850-983-1948 to receive their assigned testing time for
the date above. All applications must be received on or
before Monday, May 23, 2005 at 4:30pm in order to
obtain a testing time.

**NO EXCEPTIONS WILL BE MADE ON
DATE/TIME**

FOR EACH POSITION APPLIED FOR, ALL
REQUIRED SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS (i.e. diplo-
mas, transcripts, and/or certificates) LISTED ON THE
rJOB DESCRIPTIONS, MUST BE SUBMITTED BY
iTHE CLOSING DATE/S NO LATER THAN 4:30pm.
:DOCUMENTS MAY BE DELIVERED BY US MAIL,
'FAX, EMAIL, OR HAND DELIVERED. If the required
supporting documents are not in by the close date, your
application will not be submitted for consideration. In an
effort to further assist applicants, we offer the ease of
applying online at www.santarosa.fl.gov. Complete job
Descriptions and applications are also available at the
SSanta Rosa County Human Resources Office, 6495
SCaroline Street, Suite H, Milton, FL 32570, phone (850)
983-1948, Fax (850) 981-2003. Veteran's Preference will
ibe given in accordance with Florida Statutes.

A Drug Free Workplace/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER


IS STRESS Ruining
Your Life? Read Dl-
ANETICS by Ron L.
Hubbard. Call
(813)872-0722 or
send $7.99 to Dia-
netics, 3102 N. Ha-
bana Ave., Tampa
FL 33607.
ONE CALL
STANDS
BETWEEN YOUR
BUSINESS and mil-
lions of potential
customers. Place
your advertisement
in the FL Classified
Advertising Network.
For $450 your ad
will be placed in
over 150 papers.
Check out our 2x2
and 2x4 display net-
work tool Call this
paper, or Heather
Mola, FL Statewide
Network Director at
(866)742-1373, or e-
mail
hmola@flpress.com
for more information.
(out of state place-
ment is also availa-
ble.) Visit us online
at www.florida-clasi-
"._


AUCTION
CASEY'S
COUNTRY
CORNER
May 21 @ 7 pm
Preview 12 noon
Nicest sale yetl
Carved Victorian
sofa and chair,
inlayed armoire,
oak Hoosier,
lawyers
bookcases,
childs acordian,
Fenton, Redwing,
McCoy, primitives,
tools, coins & more.
10% buyers premium.
Gary Long
Au2421/AB1761
9204 N. Davis Hwy.
850-473-9337
WE BUY

AUCTION- LAKE
Hartwell, Stephens
Co., GA. 35 lake
lots. 65.5+/- acres.
Development RE
Friday, May 6, 2p.m.
Rowell Auctions,
Inc. www.rowellauc-
tions.com (800)323-
8388 10% BPGA-
LAU-C002594.


I AUCTION


Accountant City of Milton
CONTRACT POSITION-Salary $24K $38K Ann.
(depending upon qualifications and experience)

Requirements: BS Degree with major in
Accounting & 3 years of Professional
Accounting experience; or combination of
experience, education, & training. One yr. of
gov. exp. desirable. Knowledge of technical
and professional principles and skills of
accounting and automated accounting sys-
tems. Regular 40 hr. week, Monday Friday.
Supervised by Chief Accountant.
Send resumes and cover letter to: City
Clerk, City of Milton. P.O. Box 909, Milton,
Florida, 32572, through May 31, 2005.
Please include all copies of Licenses,
Certificates, Diplomas, Etc. Applicants will
be required to complete a "Release of
Information Statement." Job Description
available upon request.
EEO/ADA,/DFWP 0


Set the pace. Help navigate a complex and changing world.
Guide troubled teens toward a bright new horizon. And learn
for yourself why life's best lessons come from the heart.

Eckerd Youth Alternatives is an innovative non-profit
organization operating therapeutic wilderness treatment
programs, juvenile justice and early intervention programs
throughout the eastern United States.


EYA offers a variety of career opportunities.
Locally, we are seeking entry-level & experienced:
* Counselors Teachers
* Social Service/Human Services professionals

Choose the road less taken with a career path.
unlike any other. Chart the way with Eckerd
Youth Alternatives. Learn more about us and
apply online now at:

www.eckerdyouth.org


EOEfDrug-Fre Workplaco


Security
Self Storage
4391 Hwy. 90 Pace, FL
will sell at public
auction by
competitive bidding on
Wednesday -
May 25th, 2005
on premises where
said property has
been stored.
Purchases must be
paid for at time of pur-
chase in cash only.
All purchased items
are sold as is, where
is and must be
removed at the time
of the sale. Sale is
subject to
cancellation in the
event of settlement
between owner and
obligated party..
850-994-0033
Office
SMOKEY MOUN-
TAINS/GATLIN-
BURG. Foreclosure
Auction. 4 chalets, 2
mountain lots, 1 of-
fice building. June 3,
12:00 noon. Furrow
Auction Company
(800)4FURROW;
www.furr6w.com.
TNLic#62..


FLORIDA NOTARY
Weddings 994-6689:
After 5:30 pm



102
Drivers
DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW! No
experience required.
Werner has immedi-
ate positions for en-
try-level semi driv-
ers. Our avg Drivers,
earn more than
$36K first year. 60%
of Werner drivers
get home nightly or
weekly. 15 day CDL
Training now availa-
ble in your area. For
a solid new career,
call Today 1-866-
280-5309.
DRIVER-COVE-
NANT TRANS-
PORT: Excellent
pay and benefits for
Experienced Driv-
ers, 0/0, solo
Teams and Gradu-
ate Students. Bo-
nuses Paid Weekly.
Equal Opportunity
Employer (888)
MORE PAY (888-
667-3729)
DRIVER-COVE-
NANT TRANS-
PORT: Excellent
pay and benefits for
Experienced Driv-
ers, 0/0, solo
Teams and Gradu-
ate Students. Bo-
nuses Paid Weekly.
Equal Opportunity
Employer (888)
MORE PAY (888-
667-3729)
DRIVER-GREAT &
Plenty! Teams Start
up to .47 cents.
Company Singles-
.39 cents. Students
.31 cents. Owner
Operators $1.05
loaded mile. KLLM-
CDL-A. (866)357-
7351. EOE.
DRIVERS More
Hellos & Less Good
byes. Teams start
up to .470 Company
Singles start up to
.390 Students start
up to .310 KLLM.
CDL-A 866-357-
7351. EOE.
S/E & 3-State.Run:
T/T Drivers. HOME
WEEKENDS. Mile-
age Pay, Benefits,
401K. Trainees Wel-
come/Miami area-
exp. req. 21 min
age/Class-A CDL
Cypress Truck Lines
(800)545-1351


102
Drivers
EVERGREEN
TRANSPORTA-
TION needs drivers
to run the 13 SE
states with, both
weekly and week-
end hometime. We
offer good pay and
benefits. If you are
at least 23 with a
good driving record
with a HAZMAT en-
dorsement please
come by, our termi-
nal located at 300
Hwy. 95A, Canto-
ment, Florida across.
from IP paper mill or
call 850-968-1702.

NOW HIRING
CDL required.
Truck driver with
tractor trailer and
forklift experience a
must. 623-5385.
NOW HIRING for a
driver position
Must have CDL.
Apply in person at
Lulich Steel LLC,
Milton Santa Rosa
Industrial Park
(1st building on left)
Now have excellent
benefits, compara-
ble pay and local
routes
6am-5pm
Monday-Friday
NOW HIRING quali-
fied drivers for OTR
positions. Food
grade tanker. No
hazmat. No pumps.
Great Benefits,
Competitive Pay and,
new equipment.
Need 2 years OTR
experience. Call By-
num Transport for
your opportunity to-
day: (800)741-7950.
OWNER OPERA-
TORS Needed! We
provide equipment,
plenty of work for
experienced owner
operators. Good
MVR & Home week-
ends. 'Fuel price
held @ 1.25 Gal.
New Line -Trans-
ports. (888)714-
0056.
SUNCOCARRIERS-
$1000 SIGN-ON
BONUS!*Owner Op-
erator*. Run Instate
Florida* SE Region-
al* Home Weekly*
High '. Percentage
Pay*Refrigerated
Runs*No HazMat
*Dedicated Dis-
patcher*Own light-
weight late-model
tractor. Call Cammy
@ (800)237-8288


BAPTIST
Jay Hospital

RN-FT, PT or PRN.
FL license required.
Occupational Therapist-
PT position. Will work in acute care,
SNF and outpatient setting. FL license required.
Speech Therapist-
PRN position. FL license required

Physical Therapist-
PRN position. FL license required.

Med Tech-
FT position. FL license required.

Applications are accepted
Monday- Friday 9 a.m. 5 p.m.
at Jay Hospital,
14114 Alabama St., Jay, FL.
or call
850-675-8069 fc more information.


Hurricane Ivan
Temporary Jobs Program

Have you lost your job due to Hurricane Ivan? Have you been laid off from your previous
employer or are you long term unemployed? If so, you may qualify for our
interesting and fulfilling temporary jobs program.

Types of jobs may include, but are not limited to:

Field Case Workers
Job Development Technicians
Administrative/Clerical Workers
Maintenance Mechanics
Maintenance Workers
Laborers and more...

Some are degree positions, but "MOST" are not.

Please call one of our Escarosa Career Centers
for eligibility and documentation requirements.'

3670-A North "L" Street
Pensacola, FL 32505

6570 Caroline Street
Milton, FL 32570
(850) 983-5325 ext 110, 106 or 116

We are a Drug Free Workplace
An Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer/Program
Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities


102
Drivers

LEARN
TO DRIVE
Tractor Trailers






15 DAY LOCAL
CDL TRAINING
Full and Part Time Classes
SMajor carriers hiring on site
*Tuition Assistance if qualified
For over 29 years-
we've been training
America's Truckersl
CALL TODAY!
Truck Driver Institute
5750 Milton Road
Milton, FL
800-709-7364
TRUCK DRIVERS
needed. Navarre
area. 936-9827 or
554-2979.
104
General Help
$1500 WEEKLY
GUARANTEED
NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS $50
CASH HIRING BO-
'NUS GUARAN-
TEED IN WRITING
(888)287-6011 ext.
107 www.USMail-
ingGroup.com.
2004 EARNINGS:
Avg. solos $49,950,
Top team: $154,222,
Top solo: $70,526.
XM radio service,
class A CDL re-
quired. (800)CFI-
DRIVE (800-234-
3748)
www.cfidrive.com.
A COOL Travel Job.
Now hiring (18-24
positions).
Guys/Gals to work
and travel entire
USA. Paid training,
transportation, lodg-
ing furnished. Call
today, Start today.
(877)646-5050.
A&E CAREGIVERS
seeks part time di-
rect care staff to pro-
vide services to
mentally and physi-
cally challenged per-
sons in Santa Rosa
& Escambia County.
FBI background
check required. To
arrange for interview
call 458-3829.
CLEANING PER-
SON Needed. Seri-
ous long term em-
ployment applicants
only. Must be relia-
ble & dependable.
Must have car avail-
able. Call 994-1785.


Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Next Class: May 31st
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement in your are
1.-800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com
GREETERS/SALES
$8 hr. plus bonuses.
Apply within. 4340
Avalon Blvd.
HELP WANTED as
soon as possible.
Experienced Roof-
ers & Laborers. No
Subs. 478-6887.
HIRING- PANHAN-
DLE Concrete Cut-
ting, Inc. Laborers-
no experience nec-
essary. Will train.
Good pay. Call 850-
572-9749.


We're Hiring In Milton
Up to $9.00 hr, All Shifts
Available For Hospital
Housekeeping, Dietary Food
Service & Warehouse Workers
1 Floor Tech, 2nd Stift -
2 Floor Techs, 3rd Shift
Call Today!
Express Personal Service
at (850) 494-1776


TELLER
Full-Time
First National Bank of Florida has a
Teller position available in the Milton
Office. Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. to
5:30 p.m. and rotating Saturdays
7:45 am to 12:15 p.m. Prior
experienced preferred but if you
have cashier or retail experience and
excellent customer service skills,
we are willing to train. First National
offers an excellent benefit package.
Applications will be accepted from
9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Milton
Office-located at 6512 Caroline St.
Fax (850) 626-8631
AA/EOE


"4


Is


104
General Help
AGENTS WANTED:
Necessity Horse
Supplement seeking
horse people to set
up dealers and sell
product. Exclusivi-
ties available. Work
in an industry you
love! Contact Sarah
@ (877)788-4448,
equineinfo@ihvets.c
om.
AGENTS/SALES
MANAGERS
$600.00-$1250.00
wk. National Mem-
bership Association
seeking statewide
agents and manag-
'ers,. immediate in-
come positions, sell-
ing to small busi-
nesses. We offer:
Weekly Payl Month-
ly Residualsl Bonus-
es! Local training
and support! No ex-
perience, will train!
Licensed insurance
agents a plus. En-
dorsed Leads! Call
for local interview.
Start today, receive
first check next
week. Paul Newber-
ry (877)477-5796
pnewberry@fars-
marketing.com.
COOK NEEDED for
Santa Rosa Travel
Plaza. Experience
necessary.. 850-981-
3323
DATA ENTRY Work
ON YOUR OWN.
Flexible Hours! $$$
GReat Pay!$$$ Per-
sonal Computer re-
quired. (800)873-
0345 ext #300.
DUMP TRUCK driv-
er needed. Full-time.
Call 983-9775.
EXPERIENCED
STYLIST NEEDED,
no clientele neces-
sary 623-1164 or
626-9775.
EXPERIENCED
WAIT staff needed.
Stevie D's Sports
Bar. Apply in per-
son. 623-3749
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT


?











I PAGE 6-C THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS


104
General Help
'IN NEED of infant &
f2 year old teacher.
Full and part time.
Apply at Pace Chris-
`tian Acader.i;. 994-
7602

r KRICKET'S CUT-
TING Edge has 2
rooms available for
booth rent. Hairsty-
list and nail tech
needed for busy sal-
on on Hwy. 90 in
Pace. Call for ap-
pointment at 994-
9100 ask for Kricket.
LIBERTY
,. NATIONAL Life
Insurance
, Do You Earn
., $75,000 A Year?
Would You Like
,- To? Using our pro-
ven marketing plan
you could earn
$75K your first year
with us--even more
. the next year with
; renewals and bo-
nuses! We offer two
retirement funds,
health insurance,
paid vacation,
convention trips
and more! No
experience neces-
sary. On-the-job
training Require-
ment: honesty, hard
work, dependable
transportation, and
the willingness to
follow our system.
We are an Equal
Opportunity
Employer.
Find out more Call:
983-7576.
: MARBLE CRAFT
: has immediate
, openings in marble
Fabrication and in-
stallation. Lifting re-
quired. 5995 Byrom
St. 623-3504
MECHANICS
'WANTED Hours
- guaranteed. Top
pay. Apply at 4340
SAvalon Blvd.
NEED PERSON to
'clean home on a
weekly basis in the
East Milton area.
i. Must have own
* transportation & per-
'sonal references. 4
to 8 hours per week,
1 $10 per hour.
.NOW HIRING cash-
ier for Baileys Penny
'Pantry 3840 Hwy
90, Pace. 994-7801.
NOW HIRING for
, lawn maintenance.
, Experience a plus,
, but willing to train.
,-Must have clean
driving record.
Please call 850-324-
.4035.
;, NOW HIRING wait-
Sress and cook for
.r Bayou Cafe in Pace.
Call 994-9232.
r; OFFICE MANAG-
ER, outside sales,
~ recruiter needed in
Milton area. Fax or
,,Email your resume
to Fax 352-243-
S7362. Email bkap-
:, raun@laborsolu-
, tions.com
A'1I


'.e


P/T DIETARY AID
position available
8 hour afternoon
shift.
No experience
necessary.
Apply in person at
Santa Rosa Health
and Rehab
5386 Broad St.


in Milton EOE
Drug Free
0 Workplace
*-O
POSITION AVAILA-
-; BLE in growing
landscape/mainte-
,, nance company.
Pay based on expe-
rience. Call 723-
5781.
SALES $5,500.
Weekly goal poten-
tial. If someone did
it, so can you! 2-3
confirmed appoint-
ments daily! Benefits
,, available. Call Cath-
;.-i erine McFarland
'. (888)563-3188

., GARAGE DOOR In-
stallers Needed. Im-
mediate openings,
experience prefer-
'. red, hourly pay de-
pends on experi-
ence. Call 994-2267
or 475-8700.
WANTED A handy-
d: man and cleaning
lady. No experience
necessary. 626-
8973

TAKING
APPLICATIONS.
'" Good DL required,
r outside work.
' Bob's Canoes.
623-5457.


104
General Help


SKILLED/
UNSKILLED

GILCO is a rapidly
growing company
that is ahead in
production and
behind in
personnel. We
need18-25
hardworking,
ambitious &
dependable people
from Milton, Pace,
Pensacola, Gulf
Breeze and all local
places to staff our
new Milton location.

*No Experience
needed
(due to "Earn While
You Learn Pro-
gram" training)
*Full/Part time
*Fast advancement
potential
*This is not
telemarketing
*Paydays every
Friday
*$350-400/wk
to start

To secure an
immediate
interview,
Call either Tracy
Lynn or Leigh
At 626-4429
(9am-7pm)


SMART STYLE
Family Hair Salon is
looking for motivated
stylist interested in
career advancement
in fast paced loca-
tions. Position offers
competitive pay,
benefits and bonus
program. Please
contact area super-
visor Jamie Tidwell
@ 1-888-888-7778
ext. 2295 for more
details.

STYLIST NEEDED
for busy salon. We
pay up to 65% com-
mission. Clientele
provided. Stop by for
application at 5086
Hwy 90 Pace or call
995-1990.

SUBWAY AT Whit-
ing Field now. hiring
Sandwich Artist.
Competitive wages.
Page Deborah at
436-0004.

TEACHERS WANT-
ED! Over 50 South
Carolina school dis-
tricts interviewing at
the 16th annual "SC
EXPO. for Teacher
Recruitment" Colum-
bia, S.C. June 6.
Register online at
www.cerra.org/teach
erexpo.asp. State-
wide online teaching
application available
at
www.winthrop.edu/s
cteach

TRANSOLUTIONS,
INC. Medical Tran-
scriptionists: FT and
PT positions availa-
ble. Excellent bene-
fits and compensa-
tion. Software, dicta-
tion equipment pro-
vided. Phone costs
paid. 2 years' hospi-
tal transcription ex-
perience required.
Fax (847)234-3471
or apply online
www.transolutions.n
et. EOE.

114
Medical

HEALTHCARE

Try Something
Different!,

If you're a talented
healthcare profes-
sional who's tired of
the typical hospital
routine, there's nev-
er been a better time
tO explore the excit-
ng world of correc-
tional medicine. Join
the Prison Health
Services tam at the
Santa Rosa County
Jail in one of the fol-
owing openings:

LPNs-PRN
Medical Assistants-
FT, nights & PRN all
shifts.

Ne offer a safe and
supportive work en-
vironment and ex-
cellent rates/bene-
its. Contact Susan
Hedman at: 850-
983-1131 or forward
esume via fax: 850-
983-1130. EEO/AA
www.prisonhealth.co
m


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116
Office Work
HOUSE ARREST
Office. Clerical and
general office skills-
communication
skills- possible ad-
vancement. Send
Resume: Court Pro-
grams, Inc. 6860
Caroline St. Milton
32570.
124
Sales &
Telemarketing
NATIONAL PUB-
LISHING company
looking for sales
representative in
Florida. Willing to
travel Monday-Fri-
day. Commission
position. Company
average pays
$720/week. Call
(800)225-6368 ext.
333.
128
Positions Wanted
RETIRED MAN with
clean class "D" driv-
ers license wants
part time driving job
with your vehicle.
Relief driver, small
deliveries, courier
service, errands,
etc.. Out of town
okay. Ph. 623-0292



310
Business
Opportunities
#1 CASH COW! 90
Vending Machine
units/You OK Loca-
tions Entire Busi-
ness $10,670 Hurry!
(800)836-3464
#802428


fr
$1,380 WEEKLY!!!
Processing Our Bro-
chures. FT/PT. $50
CASH HIRING BO-
NUS! Guaranteed in
writing. (800)469-
8030.
ALL CASH CANDY
ROUTE Do you earn
$800/day? 30 ma-
chines, free candy
all for $9,995. 800-
814-6323
B02000033 Call us,
we will not be under-
sold!
AN INCREDIBLE
Opportunity. Learn
to Earn $100k+/year
wrkg from home
P/T. NOT MLM Free
info (800)627-4958
www.newligestyle.ca

FANTASTIC BUSI-
NESS Opportunity.
Family Financial
Centers Provides a
unique approach to
the check cashing
and payday loan
business (877)236-
5508. www.familyfi-
nancialcenters.com.


310
Business
Opportunities
HEARD OF Vem-
ma? #1 in only 5
mon's! Your own
internet business!
World-wide product
interest! Very believ-
able income figures!
www.vemmabuilder.
com/118796805.
(877)233-5609 Toll
Free.

HELP WANTED
Earn Extra income
assembling Key
Chains from any lo-
cation. No experi-
ence necessary.
Start immediately!
(800)405-7619 ext
750 www.easywork-
greatpay.com.
LOG HOME dealers
wanted. Great earn-
ing potential, excel-
lent profits, protect-
ed territory, lifetime
warranty. American
make- honest value.
Call Daniel Boone
Log Homes (888)
443-4140.
THOUSANDS OF
BUSINESSES For
Sale By Owners Na-
tionwide. Preview
Business for free! In-
terested in Buying or
Selling A Business
Call:-GW Merger-
(877)217-8231 or
visit
www.gwmerger.com

VENDING ROUTE!
Local-
Coke/Lays/Mars/Wa
ter. Financing avail-
able w/$7500 down.
Great locations and
equipment. Call
(877)843-8726
(02037-SC960).

315
Business Services
ABOVE & Beyond
Tree Service. Li-
censed and Insured.
Free Estimates. Ke-
vin Frey (850) 983-
7820. Call us...or
pay more!

ADVANCED
VINYL
Systems Inc.
Home Improve-
ment Specialists.
*Florida Rooms
*Screen Rooms
*Patio Covers
*Carports
*and much more!
Call us
Don Sweeney

orTed Brignano at
850-623-5442
5851 Hwy 90
Milton. See our ad
on the Business
Service Diirectory
ARTHUR KELLER
STUCCO. NEED
STUCCO WORK?
No job to big nor to
small. Call 698-
8327/626-9164.
B & B Home Im-
provements. 25
Years Experience.
Free Estimates. Li-
censed and insured.
850-981-3936, any-
time.
BRITTON BROTH-
ERS Inc. Local
Roofing Contractor.
Flat, Shingles, Tile,
Metal. Commercial
and Residential. 14
Shell Avenue, FWB.
Hail Damage? Call
Britton Brothers for a
FREE Inspection.
850-863-3800.


315
Business Services
DIVORCE $275-
$350*COVERS chil-
dren, etc. Only one
signature required
*Excludes govt.
fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext
600. (8am-7pm) Di-
vorce Tech. Estab-
lished 1977.
DIVORCE & IN-
CORP $99 Plus pa-
ternity and other
family law forms.
Fast, reliable and
accurate. Call (888)
Speed-44 or (888-
773-3344). Legal
Expedia Inc, 8am-
6pm weekdays.
DOUBLE "B" Land
Clearing. Backhoe
Work. Licensed and
Insured. Bryen Bal-
lard. (850)994-5740
or (850)232-1581.
DRIGGER'S HOME
Improvements Spe-
cializing in room ad-
ditions, porches, pa-
tio, and general
home improve-
ments. No job to
small, so give us a
call. Free Estimates
850-626-7874.
ETHRIDGE HOME
repair Remodel-
ing, repair, room
additions, painting,
porches, decks,
ect... Also, all mo-
bile home repairs.
Free estimates.
Day/night 675-0219
EXACT DRYWALL.
Licensed & Insured.
Locally owned & Op-
erated, reasonable
prices. All Phases of
Drywalling, Any Tex-
ture, Member of the
Santa Rosa Cham-
ber of Commerce.
Roger Tootle HM:
850-994-6713,
Cell:
850-501-0519
FIRST CLASS
-Home Repair. Roof
repair, painting,
pressure washing,
also mobile home
repair. Over 50
years experience.
Free Estimates. Call
Robert at 981-8257.
FLORIDA NOTARY
Weddings, 994-
6689,After 5:30 pm
HUSEBY FLOOR
covering. Installing
Hardwood & Lami-
nate Flooring, sand
and refinishing. Rea-
sonable Rates. Li-
censed & Insured.
Call for quote 850-
994-7561 or 490-
0404.

MIKE KAYLOR
Cement Mason
*Patios
*Walks
*Driveways
Free estimates,
no job too small.
Quality work at
affordable prices.
994-0897.


315
Business Services
LAND CLEARING/
Dozer/Tractor work
Specializing in col-
vert installation &
Driveways. Leveling,
root raking, bushog-
ging, disking. Equip-
ment and material
transport available.
By the Job or by the
hour. Call for esti-
mates. Call Billy
Rogers. 850-957-
4952 or Cell 850-
261-8407.

LOCAL HOME Re-
pair. Paint, drywall,
trim & tile. Fence re-
pair & installation.
10 years experi-
ence. Contact Paul
McMullen 850-723-
9767.
MAYBE, YOU can
do it yourself, but
will you? Dave Kop-
pin Home Improve-
ment, Inc. Specializ-
ing in Small Home
Improvement Proj-
ects & Maintenance.
Cell (850) 346-2496
or (850) 626-6944.
Free Estimates.
MCARTHUR'S
STUMP Grinding.
623-6634 Call for
Pat 293-6500 or Call
for Doug 382-0393.
MOBILE HOME
Brokers. Major and
minor repairs. Re-
roof, patio covers,
screen rooms, level-
ing, locally owned,
operated. Free esti-
mates. 100% Fi-
nancing WAC. Call
857-1051.
NEED A LAWYER
ARRESTED? IN-
JURED? Criminal
Defense *State
*Federal *Felonies
*Misdemeanors
*DUI *Auto Accident
*Personal injury
*Domestic Violence
*Wrongful Death
"Protect Your
Rights" A-A-A Attor-
ney Referral Service
(800)733-5342 24
HOURS 7 DAYS A
WEEK.
NEED AN Attorney?
Arrested? Criminal
defense *State
*Federal *Felonies
*Misdemeanors
*DUI *License Sus-
pension *Parole
*Probation *Domes-
tic Violence *Drugs
"Protect Your
Rights" A-A-A Attor-
ney Referral Service
(800)733-5342 24
HOURS A DAY 7
DAYS A WEEK.
SALTER'S FARM
Market. Country
made syrup, sea-
sonal produce.
Quality fruits and
vegetables. 8855
Chumuckla Hwy,
Pace, Fl 32571
(850) 994-4734. "If
we grow it, you'll like
it".


315
Business Services
NEW HOPE PAINT-
ING & WALLPA-
PERING *Drywall
repairs & patchwork
*Pressure cleaning
(homes, decks, pa-
tios, driveways &
sidewalks) *Carpen-
try work (crown
molding, paneling,
trim base & case, in-
stall cabinets & build
decks) Commercial/
Residential.
Interior/Exterior.
Family owned busi-
ness, over 30 years.
Call The Ericksens
today! (850)723-
2550 or 623-6034

PRO PAINT-N-PA-
PER and Repairs.
Licensed, Insured,
15 yrs exp. Free Es-
timates. Serving Es-
cambia, Santa Rosa
and Okalodsa coun-
ties. Specializing in
.Paint, Decks, Wall-
paper, Carpentry,
Privacy Fence, Sid-
ing Repair, Ceramic
Tile. Call Tami Per-
due, Keith Fowler.
850-516-9988.
lI iH i il]


Divorce 108, Adoption '80
Name Change f55
FREE Typing, Call for
Worksheet (850) 434-7524
1850 N. "W" St.
(1 blk. N. of Flea Market)
RANDALL BOUT-
WELL, INC. All
types of Drywall
hang, finish, spray,
paint. 850-995-4153
- Office. 3417 Regal
Way, Pace, FL
32571, 28 years ex-
perience.
SORENSEN'S- RE-
MODELING Spe-
cialist. Home re-
pairs, remodeling,
tile, wall texturing,
painting interior and
exterior, wallpaper
and removal, kitch-
ens and baths, cabi-
net refacing. 12
years experience,
Licensed and Insur-
ed, Deal directly with
owner. Call 637-
7044.

THE HANDYMAN
Have your Honey
Do list completed.
Also small business
maintenance.
Call 994-6283.
Will call back!
Licensed & Insured

THE MOWER Medic
We service Your
Mower in your home
at your
convenience.
Bob Knowles office
(850) 626-8300 Cell
(850) 982-3576.
*


315
Business Servic

TNT CARPORT
R.V. & Boat cove
Buildings,
Garages.
Portable Sheds
CARPORTS
Single $595
Double $695.
12 X 41-$1295
24 X 31 $1990
Galvanized Stei
Many sizes/color
Financing Availabl
Free delivery & setu
(850)983-2296 o
Pager 505-1867

320
Child Care

ATTENTION P
RENTS! Summ
openings for ages
through 12 at T
Angels Romi
Room Home Ch
Care. Limited ope
ings, Register Ea
6am-11pm. Monday
Friday. 623-3603.

REGISTERED
CHILD Care; ha
room for newbor
and up to 9 month
Great reference
Call 994-0260 a
for Beth.
TENDER HEAl
Learning Cen
Avalon Bapt
Church 4316 Aval
Blvd. Milton,
32583 Phone: 62
8936 Now register
ing for the summer
and fall. Summer a
tivities: field trip
picnics at the par
and water days. Fa
Meets and excee
all state and loc
academic require
ments. Prepar
children for K-
Qualified staffing. i
ble based curric
lum. Christian en
ronment. Infan
through K-4. Aft
school care provi
ed.

325
Domestic

DEPENDABLE
HOUSEKEEPER
TEN YEARS EXP
RIENCE. REASON
ABLE RATES.CAI
994-6236

335
Financial Service

$50,000 FREE Cas
Grants*****_2005!
Never Repay! F
personal bill
school, new bus
ness. $49 BILLIO
Left unclaimed fro
2004. 'Live Opera
tors! (800)606-608
EXT #75.


335
es Financial Services.

S HOMEOWNERS!
rs CONSOLIDATE
your debts. Save
Hundreds per month
on your payments!
Stop throwing hard-
earned money
away! Call to lower
payments or get
cash. (866)766-
el 1920.
rs.
e IMMEDIATE
p CASH!!! US Pen-
ir sion Funding pays
' cash now for 8 years
of your future pen-
sion payments. Call
(800)586-1325 for a
FREE, no-obligation
RA- estimate. www.pay-
ner checktoday.com.
s 5
iny LOANS BY phone.
per Up to $1000 in
iild 24hrs. No credit
en- checkI Bank
rly. account
ay- Req. (888)350-3722
www.paycheckto-
day.com.

ve LOANS BY phone.
rns Up to $1000 in 24
hs. hrs. No Credit
es. Check! Bank Ac-
ask count Req.
(888)350-3722
VT www.paycheckto-
tT day.com.
ter
:ist SMALL LOANS on
on vacant land by local
FL private investor. No
26- payment for 1 year.
er- No job or credit
ier check, necessary.
ac- Fast closing. Ph.
ps, (850) 623-0292
rk,
all: 340
ds Home Repair
cal
e- SORENSEN'S- RE-
es MODELING Spe-
-5. cialist. Home re-
Bi- pairs, remodeling,
:u- tile, wall texturing,
vi- painting interior and
its exterior, wallpaper
ter and removal, kitch-
d- ens and baths, cabi-
net refacing. 12
years experience,
Licensed and Insur-
ed, Deal directly with
owner. Call 637-
7044.
E-
E- 345
N-
Lawn Care
3 HIGH School Se-
niors do yard work-
s 'rake, mow, clean up
debris. Call for free
sh estimates. 983-8887
or 982-4351
or ,
s, ALBERT PEAR-
si- SON'S lawn service.
)N Senior discounts!
m Free estimates! Li-
a- censed. Albert Pear-
!1 son owner, call 850-
983-1431

m


345
Lawn Care
CLARK'S LAWN
Care and General
Maintenance & All
Types of Tractor
Work. Licensed &
Insured. Call Mike
Clark at 626-2428.

FARRELL'S LAWN
CARE Reasonable
Rates & Quality
Service. Mowing,
Raking, Edging,
Shrubs Trimmed,
Gutters Cleaned,
Debris Hauled. Call
850-995-8067

JOHN T'S
Lawn Services
ECL, LLC
Mowing, edging,
RSn,. Di B ih


Jo5UaIII ng. LUOs I
trimming, Debris
cleaning-ups Local
Company!
Commercial and
Residential. Owner
Operated. Licensed
and Insured.
324-4035.
981-9542.


PAGE'S TREE
SERVICE Trim, cut
& remove. Call 626-
2159 (if no answer,
please leave message)
FIREWOOD $50. a
load and up.
ROPER'S LAWN
Care. residential /
commercial. Li-
censed & Insured.
Serving Milton for 25
years. Free esti-
mates. Call Donnie
Roper
850-626-1792.

350
Senior Care


VISITING
ANGELS
SENIOR CARE
In home
Companionship
Meals
Light housework
Errands
944-2211


360
Miscellaneous
DISCOUNT DEN-
TAL Plans from
DentalPlans.com,
Save 60% on Dental
Care. Call Toll-free
(888)632-5353 1,0%
off with coupon
Code: Paper 10.


EARN DEGREE on-
line from home.
*Business, *Para-
legal, *Computers.
Job Placement As-
sistance. Computer
& Financial aid if
qualify. (866)858-
2121


* *


Copyrighted Material

SSyndicated Content W

S Available from Commercial News Providers


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iq. Ft.
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NOW S17998
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*Plus tax, title & license. With approved credit.



McKenzie
PONTIAC GVIC BUICK
See Us At www. mckenziemotors.,com


I PAGE 7-C THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS


360
Miscellaneous

INSURED DRIVER
will take to doctors
Sor store for cost of
: gas and small fee
for time and effort.
Nursing Aide De-
gree. 983-9270

TRADE INDUS-
TRIES interested in
additional training?
i Indoor Air
Quality/Mold Inspec-
tor Certification and
Environmental Eval-
uator Classes. Fast-
est growing industry
1 in America. Class In-
J' cludes: Training ma-
terials, website list-
ing, on-line continu-
ing education and
.. more. (800)419-
0539.

SAT RS
REA ESAT
FORREN


402
Apartments

1 BEDROOM fur-
nished apartment
with, central heat &
air. No pets. $350.
month, $250. dep.
Call for appointment.
994-7246

FOR RENT, Pace
S1/1 furnished, avail-
able now. $160
week $400 dep, all
utilities included.
995-4753.
PACE AREA- nice,
1 bedroom, 1 bath
apartment for rent.
Water, (includes hot
also) sewer and gar-
bage furnished.
Nice yard. Qet area.
Great for one or two
people. $265 per
month, $265 deposit
850-626-9020.
SLEEPING ROOM-
Efficiency apart-
ment. $325 month.
$100 deposit. Utilit-
ies furnished. 623-
2862

404
Commercial


FOR RENT 10,000
sq. ft.- 6606 Elva
SSt. Call 850-572-


406
Homes
2 BR, 1 B, Central
H&AC, water, sew-
er, garbage includ-
ed. $385.00 mo./
.$300.00 dep. 6619
Dearborn St. (corner
Dearborn & Peach-
tree) Drive by & look
then leave a mes-
sage at 712-7513.
3BR, 2BA unfur-
nished brick house
in Pace. $875 month
$500 deposit. No
Pets. 4256 Seaport.
Baycrest Realty.
994-7918.
408
Land
BEAUTIFUL
NORTH CAROLINA.
WINTER SEASON
IS HERE! MUST
SEE BEAUTIFUL,
PEACEFUL MOUN-
TAINS IF WEST-
ERN NC. Homes,
cabins, acreage and
investments. Chero-
kee Mountain Realty
GMAC
RealEstate,Murphy
www.cherokee-
mountainrealty.com
Call For A Free Bro-
chure (800) 841-
5868
GOLF VIEW Bar-
gain! 198/ mo. Nice-
ly wooded home-
sites in upscale golf
community close to
town. A sanctioned
.Golf Digest Teach-
ing Facility, too! Call
toll-free (866)334-
3253 x863.
www.cherokeeval-
leysc.com Price:
$49,900, 10% down,
bal fin 12 mo @
4.49% fixed, one yr
balloon, OAC.
LAND FOR SALE
Refer to
,Classification
#510
.OT OR space for
R.V. or Travel Trail-
er for rent. Water,
sewer & electric
available. 850-537-
6222 or 850-499-
7412.
410
Mobile Homes
1BR, 1BA in Milton.
Pollard Park. $325
month. $20.0 depos-
it. Baycrest Realty
994-7918


410
Mobile Homes

2 BEDROOM trailer.
Garbage furnished.
994-5023

2BD/2BA, TOTAL
electric, dishwasher
etc. Eastgate mo-
bile home park.
626-8973.
2BR1BA & 3BR
1BA, Nice, clean,
and quiet. Water
and garbage furnish-
ed. No pets. Call
623-6055.

3 BR 2 BA total
electric. Dishwasher,
etc. Eastgate Mobile
Home Ranch. 626-
8973
3BR, 2BA double
wide in Pace. $600
month $250 deposit.
No Pets. Total elec-
tric. Baycrest Realty
994-7918

EAST MILTON Mo-
bile Home. 2Br/2Ba,
on Lake. Available
May 15th. 981-9744
MARLBOROUGH
VILLAGE 2bd/1ba,
deck, w/d hookup,
$400 month $400
deposit. 479-4410.

412
Rooms For Rent

4 BEDROOMS
available for rent in-
cluding pool & jacuz-
zi and good female
company. Weekly or
daily. Lots of love.
983-9270.

ROOM FOR rent,
Kitchen, washer &
dryer, utilities fur-
nished, $65 a week.
Near King Middle
School. Call 626-
2786

416
Vacation & Resort

A GATLINBURG
Hot-tub Cabin- Se-
cluded! Sunbathe,
soak in your heart-
shaped Jacuzzi.
Midweek 5-night
special from $395.
Weddings from
$199. Reunion:
lodge, $595/night.
(800)726-6989
www.gocabins.com.


-



506
Homes

2BD/2BA ACRE lot,
fenced yard, sepa-
rate storage,
screened porch and
fireplace. Garcon
Point area.
$124,000. neg. Call
572-5082.

AUCTION 7,542+/-
Acres Divided. Sat-
urday, April 30 10
am. Surry County,
NC. Iron Horse Auc-
tion Company Rock-
ingham, NC.
(910)997-2248
**NCAL 3936
www.mountainvie-
westates.org.

EAST MILTON 3
BR, 2 BA. $52,000.
850-516-1378 or
994-6191

FOR SALE BY
OWNER: 1564 sq.ft.
brick home with dou-
ble car garage on
1.33 acres located
off Anderson Lane
on dead end road.
Fenced yard, florida
room (12X22), and
large workshop
(42X24). Berryhill/
Hobbs/Milton School
District $239,000.
For more informa-
tion call 554-5558 or
623-5605 or 698-
8770.

FORECLOSED
GOV'T Homesl $0.
or Low down! Tax
repos and bankrupt-
cies! NO Credit O.K.
$0 to low down. For
listings (800)501-
1777 ext 1299,

HOME RESTORA-
TIONS LOANS FOR
PURCHASES AND
REFINANCES.
GOOD RATES FOR
FIRST AND SEC-
OND MORTGAG-
ES. FOR
FAST/FREE AP-
PROVALS CALL:
866-878-0860, AF-
FORDABLE HOME
FUNDING.


506
Homes

MIGHTY TENNES-
SEE River view
"Bluff' Home. North
Alabama. $254,000.
Lake Guntersville
69,100 Acre Lake
"Waterfront" Home.
Place for Boat-
house. North Alaba-
ma. $325,000. Deb-
bie Mathis Realty.
(888)574-2525.

NEW 3BR/ 2BA
1580 sq/ft corner lot.
Located in Jaime
Ridge in Milton.
6190 Bandol Court.
Fully carpeted.
Worth seeing, worth
owning $158,500
Call between 9am-
6pm, 939-8568.
NEW 3BR/ 2BA lo-
cated in Jaime
Ridge in Milton.
4723 Lemoyne Vis-
ta. Fully carpeted. A
must see. $148,500
Call between 9am-
6pm 939-8568.
NO CAROLINA
MTN PROP One of
a kind log cabin on
creek. High elev,
2/1. Fireplace,
Porch, mountain
view on 5.31 acres.
Good rent history,
$189,500. Ralph L.
Crisp RIty Co... An-
drews NC (800)438-
8621

TANGLEWOOD
GOLF COURSE on
17th tee. Furnished
2100 SF 3 BR 2 BA
custom home with
many features and
amenities. Open
floor plan. Great for
entertaining. Over-
size garage, Spa
Pool. 289K. Ph.
850-
623-0292

510
Land

20 ACRES in Milton
partially cleared
$120,000.
1/2 Acre lot in East
Milton, Blocks from
Blackwater Bay, mo-
bile homes ok,
$20,000. 15 acres in
East Milton
$105,000. Linda
Owens, Exit Realty,
850-698-9854.


510
Land

3/4 ACRE
improved lot.
20x40 shop, 6ft
chain link fence,
carport, large
beautiful trees,
cleared ready to
build home or
mobile home. Has
septic system.
Pea Ridge area.
$38,000 Call
983-2296.

ATTENTION IN-
VESTORS: Water-
front lots in the Foot-
hills of NC. Deep
water lake with 90
miles of shoreline.
20% predevelop-
ment discounts and
90% financing. NO
PAYMENTS for 1
year. Call now for
best selection.
www.nclakefrontpro-
perties.com
(800)709-LAKE
COASTAL GEOR-
GIA- Water access
marshfront home-
sites. Gated com-
munity, tennis,
golf,kayaking & con-
oeing. Preconstruc-
tion discounts, limit-
ed time. From mid-
70's www.cooper-
spoint.com
(877)266-7376.
GUADALUPE RIV-
ERFRONTI Spec-
tacular wide river-
fronts in "Prime"
Texas Hill Country
location. 10-32
acres w/lots of water
frontage, huge
trees,
panoramic views..
From $300's to
$400's. Limited
number available,
call now before
they're gone.
(800)609-7042' x
110 Brokers &
Agents welcome.
LAND FOR RENT
Refer to
Classification
#408
"MAKE THIS Sum-
mer the Best" E
Tennessee's Norris
Lake and Golf prop-
erties make every
year special. Start-
ing at only $24,900-
Call Lakeside Realty
(423)626-5820
www.lakesiderealty-
tn.com.
NC MOUNTAINS-
Panoramic views
and mountain
streams in high ele-
vation between
Boone and Ashe-
ville. Tracts range 1-
5 acres with access
and utilities from
$49,900. (800)455-
1981, x.148.
NORTH CAROLINA
- Mountainview Es-
tates, New Gated
Community of Cus-
tom Full Log Homes.
Preconstruction pri-
ces. Models open
daily. 5 Miles to
Cherokee-Harrah's
Casino, minutes
from golf. From
$299,000. (877)888-
2224. www.moun-
tainviewestates.org.
TENNESSEE LAKE
Property Sale! Par-
cels from $24,900 6
1/2 Acre lot $59,000.
27 Acre Lake Estate
.$124,900. Cabins
Available. Call toll-
free (866)770-5263
ext. 8 for details.


510
Land
NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS!
Spring is blooming
and is beautiful! A
wonderful time to
look for real estate.
See Photos:
www.NorthCaroli-
naMountainRealty.c
om 'or call(800)293-
1998. Free Bro-
chure.

PRIME TEXAS Hill
Country 25-30 Acre
Ranch Properties.
Huge oaks, views-
great horse proper-
ty. Amenities include
guest houses, pool,
tennis court, barn,
riding arena, more.
Excellent locations
near Austin and San
Antonio. From
$219k. Tremendous
opp'ty, call now
(866)937-2624,
x113.
SO. GA. Coastal
Property 3+ AC of
Deepwater Ocean
Access from $345/
mo! Ready to build
in gated community
with many ameni-
ties. Near St. Si-
mon's and Jackson-
ville. Call now!
(877)426-2326. ext
853 Monthly pay-
ments of $344.57
based on $79,900
with 10% down. In-
terest- only pmnt.
w/5.75% fixed rate
for 2 years. Con-
verts to a 15 yr vari-
able loan. Rates
subject to change
w/out notice. Void
where prohibited.
VIEWS VIEWS
Views- Helena Mon-
tana 4.7 Acres
$79,900. Ride out
your backdoor to
millions of acres of
national forest Awe-
some lake and
mountain views,
close to Canyon
Ferry Lake, minutes
to Helena. Soils test-
ed, utilities, ready to
build on. Call owner
(406)581-2125.





556
Homes
WESTERN NC
Mountains. North
Carolina. Where
there is: Cool Moun-
tain Air, Views and
Streams, Homes
Cabins and Acre-
age. Call for a Free
brochure of Moun-
tain Property Sales
call (800)642-5333,
Realty of Murphy,
317 Pea6htree St.,
Murphy, NC 28906.
www.realtyofmur-
phy.com.

'560
Land
5 MINUTES to
Greenbrier Resort
MTN Land Bargains
20 Acres & Up
www.iiveinwv.com.
LOOKING FOR
Mountain Property?
Gated community
near Hot Springs,
NC. Spectacular
view A river home-
sites. Clubhouse,
paved roads &
Morel Call (866)411-
5263 Bear River
Lodge.


560
Land
GRAND OPENING!
May 21 & 22
Ocala/Gainesville
Area. 20 Acres from
$195,000. 100 Acres
from $450,000. New
semi-private gated
community featuring
parcels w/frontage
on the Wacassassa
iver. Gorgeous
woodlands teeming
w/deer & turkey.
SAVE $10,000. Plus
get up to $10,000
to-
ward closing costs!
great financing, little
down. Call toll-free
(866)352-2249, x
436 or www.flland-
bargains.com.
LAKEFRONT BAR-
GAINS Starting at
$89,900. Gorgeous
lakefont parcels.
Gently sloping, pris-
tine shoreline, spec-
tacular views.
Across from national
forest on 35,000
acre recreational
lake in East Tenn.
Payed roads, under-
ground utilities, cen-
tral water, sewer.
Excellent financing.
Call now (800)704-
3145 x617, Sunset
Bay, LLC.
NEW MEXICO 20
acres $24,900.
scenic region, views,
canyons, tress, roll-
ing hills, wildlife. En-
joy hunting, hiking,
horses, great cli-
mate. Power, great
access. 100% Fi-
nancing. Call
(877)822-LAND!

PETS &^
ANIMA^LS


704
Livestock

PENTON'S FARM
Supply
(Allentown)
Farm Supply
Bulk Corn & Oats
HMC Feed & others
Gates, Post, &
Fencing
Tues-Sat 8am-5pm
623-0442


706
Livestock Supplies


HAY
FOR SALE
Coastal Hay. 623-
6769 or 336-2267.


708
Pets


FREE: 5 Kittens. All
different colors. 623-
3665


WANTED 1 akc fe-
male Jack Russell to
breed with 1 AKC
male Jack Russell.
Stud service fee or
pick of the litter.
850-623-4762
WANTED LONG
haired calico kitten.
Call 626-0255.


MAY SAVINGS EVENT
S Ovew r$3000 On A New ntaii.


1 II 1i I ,' ,
.*Pd eauaftll1rebad & cg U .n, Inludina htDy PRm/m st onRanm 15000 IMltay on uh Is
.1.1razonnia au oMna orrumhoa. M tboIIorn ip
Rne C',a I YW Lr rs.All 1
~nsn~r~flbn~ub ~Wo aemsaHo avehices.
WA4 Pf 90 W ltwuoghM M 23,2 .


708
Pets


WANTED:
YORKSHIRE
Terrier puppy.
Can be mixed or
pure bred, papers
or no papers.
Loving home
with no children.
Please call
623-2120 at the
Press Gazette
for Sheena, or
637-7044
after 5pm.


712
Lost & Found
PETS

LOST MALE
Yorkie in Round
Up Valley. This is
a treasured,
child's pet that is
much loved and
missed. Please
call 983-0844.


LOST YOUR PET?
Be sure to call
Santa Rosa
Animal Control
to report him
missing and to
be sure he's not
there waiting
on you to
pick him up!
850-983-4680


802
Antiques

ANTIQUE FURNI-
TURE Table with
leaf, 6 chairs, china
cabinet and server.
$900 OBO 957-
9786

THE RESTORA-
TION Shop. Antique
furniture restoration
and refinishing. Over
15 years experi-
ence. Portfolio & ref-
erences available.
Call Glenn at 981-
5466.
804
Apparel

JO ANNE'S AL-
TERATIONS. I have
done alterations for
2 local cleaners for
12 'years. I have
opened a shop in
my home. Fast, Pro-
fessional Service,
give me a call. 8-5.
Mon-Fri. 626-0735
or 261-6853.


PROM
DRESSES
Worn last year.
Not old
fashioned.
Sizes 8-10.
One purple
(never worn),
one white, and
one teal. All
three strapless.
Call Sheena
at the
Press Gazette
623-2120 or
637-7044
after 5pm.


806
Appliances

Dennis Hillan

LARGE GE Refrig-
erator, good condi-
tion. $50. Whirlpool
apartment size re-
frigerator, like new.
$50. 983-1593.
SIDE BY side refrig-
erator with ice and
water in door
$225.00, refrigerator
nice $125.00 Ken-
more washer and
dryer, excellent con-
dition $90.00 each,
dishwasher excel-
lent condition
$60.00. 995-8730

808
Arts & Crafts

GAIL'S CERAMICS
Moving Sale. May
thru June. Buy one
get one 1/2 price.
5148 Chavers St. 10
a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Tuesday 12-3:30
p.m. 983-0380
810
Computers

COMPAQ COM-
PUTER. Barely
used. $400. 623-
1039


812
Farm Equipment
NEW HOLLAND
hay bine, square ba-
ler & rake, 4000
Ford tr. 623-6046
814
Furniture

BEDROOM- ALL
NEW SOLID
WOOD 5-PIECE
SET. Chest, mirror,
dresser, nightstand
and bed. $995.
Can deliver.
850-418-2015.

COUCH WITH hide-
a-bed and matching
love seat, brown in
color $150. Also
wooden coffee ta-
bles with 2 end ta-
bles. $75 excellent
condition 626-0629
DINING TABLE w/2
leaves, 6 chairs, chi-
na cabinet- $450; ta-
ble w/1 leaf, 4
chairs, oak- $150
994-8298 or 382-
2634

DISTRIBUTOR
MATTRESS
OVERSTOCK
New mattress sets,
brand name, war-
ranty, in plastic.
PLUSH TOP
Queen $125
Full $95

PILLOW TOP
King $230
Queen $159
Full $140

Can deliver
850-418-5274

LARGE METAL
desk. Good condi-
tion. $50. Call 994-
9633.
, LOVE SEAT and
sleeper sofa. Good
condition. $300.00
OB. Call 850-626-
6952

MEMORY FOAM
MATTRESS SET -
NEW, brand name,
in plastic, factory
warranty. Sacrifice
$595. Can deliver
850-418-5274.

=ATIO FURNI-
TURE. Includes 48
inch circular remov-
able glass top table,
4 Teak and wrought
iron chairs with pad-
ding and two chaise
lounges with pads.
All in excellent con-
dition. $150.00 for
everything, -981-
1064.
QUEEN MAT-
TRESS SET new
dbl pillow top. Ex-
ceeds Sertia warran-
ty $250. Can deliver
850-501-0270 Still in
plastic: 501-0270
SLEEPER SOFA:
$250. Wood table &
4 chairs: $100. Cof-
fee table: $35. 19"
Philips color TV:
$50. Sansui VCR:
$40. TV stand
w/swivel top: $20.
Wooden rocking
chair: $50. 380-9666
or 380-0123.
SOFA & loveseat.
Paid $1900. Sell for
$400. Call anytime.
675-1882
828
Electronics
Stereo-TV-VCR
A NEW COMPUT-
ER-BUT NO CASH?
You're APPROVED-
Guaranteedl* NO
CREDIT CHECK-
Bad Credit- Bank-
ruptcy Ok. (800)319-
8860 1OA-9P EST-
Mon-Fri* Checking
Account Req'd
www.pcs4all.com.
830
Miscellaneous
For Sale
8 FOOT Leisure Bay
pool table, light oak,
1" slate, leather

pockets. Complete
with cover, balls &
cubes. $1500 firm.
You move. 994-
7783 after 6:00 p.m.
BUILDING SALE!
"Rock Bottom Pri-


ces!" Example
30x40 Now $5170.
Ends optional. Beat
Next Price Increase.
Go direct. 25x30.
30x44. 35x50.
40x60. 50x100. Oth-
ers. Pioneer.
(800)668-5422.
CLOTHES, WHIT
fence, clay pots, crib
& items, stuffed
toys, bike, Danelle
Steel books. 626-
0475.


'I.


2004 BUICK RENDEZVOUS


NOW S17,998
ONLY.......


N21 998


6 6


GM CERTIFIED


USED HEADQUARTERS
Great Selection! Great Service!
And Nobody... But Nobody Beats Our Prices!


SCertified *100+ Point Inspection Process *3 Day/150 Mile Vehicle Exchange Policy
USEDVEHICLES *24 Hour GM Roadside Assistance -Bumper to Bumper Coverage for 3 Months
THERIGHTWAY.THERIGHTCAR or 3,000 miles (Added to existing warranty, if in effect) *$0 Deductible Warranty


WHILE THEY LAST!
Hail Damaged Vehicles Still Available At Incredible Savings!


2005 GMC SIERRA CREW CAB LIGHT HAIL DAMAGE! I


TOTAL MSRP:....................... 36,343
PACKAGE DISCOUNTS: ...........-$3,000
SAVINGS & REBATES:............ -$8,490



SALE24853
PRICE....


18, 2005


I EXAM


BjussffomMconlds



850m6234481'I


W: W ,-..AM~f









-I PAGE 8-C THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS -


830
Miscellaneous
For Sale
UIRECTV SYSTEM
from Expert Satellite
FREE Installation
CALL TODA & ask
about FREE GIFT
(800)672-1519
EXERCISE BICY-
CLE. $100; Pres-
sure washer 1900
pfl $125 623-4485
FOR SALE Pea
sheller, 10" radial
saw, air compressor,
24 foot extension
ladder. 623-8979.
FREE 4-ROOM DI-
RECTV SYSTEM In-
cluding standard In-
stallatlon. 140+
Channel S29 99/mo.
for 3 months. Ac-
cpss to over 225
channels Limited
time. S&H Restric-
tions g Apply.
(866)500-4056
METAL ROOFING
SAVE $$$ Buy Di-
rect From Manufac-,
tUrer, 20 colors In
stock with all Acces-
sories, Quick turn
a"oundl Delivery
Available Toll Free
(488)393-0335.
MYERS WHOLE-
SALE & Retail Nurs-
ery. Spring Plant
Sale. Angel Trum-
pets, Confederate
Rose, Japanese
Yews, Jacabenlas,
Crepe Myrtles, .Aza-
leas, Aucubas, -box-
woods, Legustrum,
Flowering Cherry,
and many more. By
appointment only.
623-1945


830
Mlscellaneo
For Sale


SPA. MUST Se
person Deluxe.
er Used, IncI
Cover. Will.De
Full Warranty,
Finance W,
Payments U
$100 per Month
a
Hurry,
(800)980-7727.

STEEL ARCH B
Ingsl Genuine S
Master Bulldl
factory direct
HUGE Sav'l
20x24, 30
35x50. Perfect
rage/ Works
Barn, Call (800)3
7007.
www.SeelMas-
terUSA.com,



. Centipede
St. Au.gustii
Farm Direc
We Deliver
434-0066


830
us MIscellaneous
For Sale

STEEL BUILDING
Clearance-Many
sizes available, all
steel 1-beam bolt-to-
gether design, dellv-
itill ery, stamped draw-
ings Included,
s 1(888)757-8335 Ext.
102,

im STEEL BUILD.
an" INGS. Factory deals
on *save $$$, 40 x 60'
to 100 x 200', Exam.
ple: 50 x 100 x 12' Is.
$3.60 sqft.
(800)658-2886.
ll 7 www.rlgidbuildlng.co
Nev- m.
udes
?liver.
Can THE LOWEST Pre-
,AC. sorlption Prices
nder LESS THAN CANA-
h., n DA, Global Medi-
cines, Arizona physl-
Call clan owned.
(866)634-0720
www.globalmedl-
cines.net.
3uild-
3teel VINTAGE RE-
ings, CORDS with covers
at for sale. Good Con-
'ngsl ditlon. '45 rpms.
)x60, Some date back to
Ga- 1927 or later. Price
hop/ negotiable, 981-
341- 7277

WE NOW HAVE
FRESH PRODUCE!
DOUBLE D Farms.
SHwy 89, Allentown.
I Quality, Freshly
I Picked, Local. Straw-
berries. You. pick'
ae strawberries SAT-
ct URDAY ONLY 8am-
r until. 623-3721 or
983-6925.


832
Miscellaneous
Wanted
CASH PAID for
Hardcover Books
and 1920- 1960 Se-
rial movies (cliff-
hangers), Tel: 850-
623-5416. Please
leave a message.
GLASS CRAFTER
needs empty glass
soft drink bottles, (all
kinds). Not necessa-
rily collectors edi-
tions, Will pick up.
983-8042,
PAY CASH tor junk
cars or trucks. Run-
ning or not, Call,
983-9527
SINGLE MOM w/2
teenagers looking
for a 3, bedroom
house or mobile
home In Pace High
School District, Call
after 5 p.m. 995-
4558,
WANTED MORE'S
Paying $10 a case
for MRE's, Will pick
up. Leave message.
304-1263,
TURN
TRASH INTO

CASH

Hold a garage or
yard sale.
Contact our
specialists at
623-2120. We
even have yard
sale kits to make
It all easier.

WANTED: GUITAR
player to jam with.
No Country. 850-
225-9620


834
Lost & Found
MERCHANDISE

LOST: Taken
from my home.
100 piece watch
collection, several
pieces of jewelry,
stuffed musical
turtle with eden
tag. These things
mean a loss of 6
years off my life.
Please return, No
question s asked,
Kennlngton
Subdivision. Just
leave on front
porch.,
Sylvia Wolfe
(the cat lady)


902
Auto Supplies
TRUCK LID White,
Short wheel base,
step side, 2 years
old. $450 OBO 623-
5863
904
Cars
1995 FORD Contour
G1 fully powered.
$1750.00 994-1549

'64 MERCURY Ma-
rauder 2 door. Red
& white. Good con-
dition, 97,00 actual
miles. New engine
with less than 500
miles. Brand new
tires. 623-3463
FORD CAR. Runs.
$300. 623-1039.


904
Cars
'95 LINCOLN Town
Car, White, Excel-
lent condition, Fully
loaded, Really
clean, $4300 623-
3463
CAR FOR sale 91
Buick Century,
$300,00, Cold air.
Runs. Needs work,
981-3360 or 207-
1573
906
Boats
14 FOOT fiberglass
boat, 20 horse John-
son, 2 swivel seats,
Includes trailer,
$1400, 983-2364
1998 MONTEREY
BR 18 foot, stainless
prop, alum, trailer,
bimlnl top. $7900
OBO, 983-2426
912
* Motor Homes
2001 DUTCHMEN
Classic camper.
Awning, slldeout liv-
ing area, oak cabi-
nets, queen bed,
.bumper pull, warran-
ty, spotless $16,000.
Call 982-1894,
SHOP FLORIDA'S
Motorhome- Towa-
ble Head- Quarters.
Giant Recreation
World. 3 locations:
*US 1- Melbourne-
(800)700-1021. *US
1- Ormond Beach
(800)893-2552
*West Colonial
Drive, Winter Gar-
den- (800)654-8475.


914
Recreational
1994 JAYCO Pop-
up camp r for sale,
$1500 OBO. 983-
6334
GIANT SUPER-
SALE-MAY 11th-
14th, Old Wal-Mart,
11640 U.S. Hwy 1-
Sebastian. Free Ad-
mission, Free Park-
Ing, Nation's #1 Sell-
Ing Brands, Low-
Supersale Pricesi
LEISURE CRAFT
28" like new, sleeps
6, awning, all acces-
sories, new refriger-
ator, $4200. 623-
3463
SALEM LE 29 ft
travel trailer. 2 sets
of bunk beds In back
with queen size bed
In front. $24,700.
554-6332 '
SIX PACK cab over
camper for short bed
pickup. Porta-potty.
$500 w/o jacks.
$800 w/brand new
jacks, 626-1130

916
Sport Utility
Vehicles
1993 BRONCO
XLT. All power, 302,
5 speed, Great
body, many extras.
$3,500. OBO Call
626-3839.'

918
Trucks
91' CHEVY S-10,
4.3 Liter, V-6.
$2,500. 994-7286


918
Trucks
'98 CHEVY S10 ex-
tended cab with 3rd
door, 55k miles, Ex-
cellent condition,
Home 995-0353 Cell
384-2782
920
Vans
1990 CHEVY Van.
Good shape, V6
eng. A/T. and Air,
$3000 623-6046


922
Other
ALL STEEL 4x8ft
trailer with 2x4 alu-
minum tool box on
front, $550, 623-
3870.


Place a
classified ad
today. Phone
623-2120,


922
Other
DONATE YOUR
CAR, FURNITURE,
REAL ESTATE TO-
DAY- Help eliminate
poverty housing and
homelessness.
FREE Towing, Tax
Deductible, Life.
Council Inc.
wwwlifecouncll,org
(877)734-LIFE or
(877)734-5433,


i Find your


A1 name and
ON A ll




S win $5.00

SFind your name in the Classified
Section of Wednesday's or
t Saturday's Press Gazette and you
, can win $5.00. Bring proof of
" identification by our office before
the date of next publication and
pick up your money.

1


|6azettei
6629 Elva St., Milton 623-2120
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18,2005


/







I PAGE 9-C THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS


18,2005


CLASS OF


Show your graduate how
proud you are of them!
Place an ad in the May 25th edition
of the Press Gazette


We areso proud
of all your
accomplishments!
Keep up the great work!
Good Luck with your
future, we wish
you the best!
Love,
"Mom & Dad, etc."
This is a 3 X 3 Classified Ad.
$40 includes 25 words & a photo.


2X3 ad with
photo for only


3X3 ad with
photo for only


$


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' Make it a Picture
Perfect Graduation


We are so
proud of you!
"Name
of grad"
. Love,
"Mort &
Dad, etc."


This is a 2X3
Classified Ad.
$25 includes 15 words & a photo)


If you prefer not to use a photo you can
purchase a 2X2 with 20 words for $20.
Please contact Tracey or Sheena
for more information.


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35








I PAGE 10-C THE SANTA ROSA PRESS GAZETTE/FREE PRESS


.l.ger sHm


General Home Improvements
Specializing in:
SRoom Additions
Porches
Patios
No job to small, so give us a call!
,850-626-78742


MANNING'S MEAT'
,, PROCESSING
SNOW OPEN
ALL TYPES OF MEAT
GROUND, CUBED, SLICED. AND WRAPPED
SUMMER SAUSAGE SMOKED SAUSAGE
BUY BULK & SAVE
WHOLESALE MEAT PRICES
Please call for pricing
PHILLIP 1,14li', 6OrIIJER
K850-501-6861>


The Mower Medic
lie sen'ice Your Mower in
Youlr hote atf our
conemence'
Bob Knowles
Office (850) 626-8300
iK, Cell (850) 982-3576 2


DOUG'S LAWN SERVICE




"Owner operated and a local yocal"
Call 850-324-9149
or 623-5370


'Roper's
Residenti;
License

Free
S Cal
(85


i Lin


Lawn Care
al/Commercial
Ed & Insured


Estimates I
I Donnie Roper
0) 626-1792)

inda Owens -


SMcArthur's Stump- Need Stucco Work?
Grinding call
623-6634 *l|
6 Licenr-sed & Irnsured
Cell for Pat Cell for Doug
293-6500 382-033 698-8327
You do not have to pull 698-83 I
stumps. Just grind them 6264
down below the ground. 626) 9164


II i "l e


F Realtor %PLLIX
850-698-9854 S
Pace, FL 32571 Most Removals $35.00
r n E,,,. *,,-,, .- .,,.,r,I,. Discount for Multiple Removal
1. Backyard Accessible
from Byolo* Local Contractor-Retired USI

versedd 232-8746,,nsurd


HOME RESTORATION LOANS
FOR PURCHASES AND REFINANCES
GOOD RATES FOR FIRST AND SECOND MORTGAGES
FOR FAST/FREE APPROVALS CALL:
866-878-0860
AFFORDABLE HOME FUNDING


KPro Paint -N- Paper And Repairs
Licensed Insured 16 years exp.
% wI .
Paint Privacy Fence Siding Repairs
Carpentry Decks Ceramic Tile Drywall

KTami Perdue 850-516-9988 Keith Fowler-
, ; T, F --_ ... .... .


I


s

N4
)


2


.. Britton Brothers Inc.
firto" .Local Roofing Contractor
,-riathers Flat Shingles Tile Metal
-,,., Commercial and Residental
ail Damage? 14 Shell Avenue, FWB
Call Britton Brothers for a FREE Inspection
850-863-3800 2


.FILLDR


ANN BARNHILL
TRUCKING, INC.
Barnhill Rd.. VIM%
vMilton. FL aim. "
32570
623-3461 *- Mk
850) 623,3461, ( 8 0
Jsse Barnhill Trucking (850) 336-30


^ee6 Backhoe Work ,'%
'o Stump & Tree Removal c
Hurricane Clean-up
Dirt Work
No Job Too Big or Small
Bryen Ballard


Visiting Angels


mIike] :4 kIM


i In home
'-h Companionship
Meals
Light housework
Errands


K


3417 Hegal Way
Pace, FL 32571
28 years experience
Licensed & Bonded


9


7."seby Flooring and "
:." Home Repair
Installing Laminate and Hardwood
Floors
Sand & Refinishing
Renovations and Repairs
Santa Rosa Native
Licensed & Insured Handyman
Call for Quote
Office 850-994-7561
KCell 850-490-0404)


JOHN T'S LAWN SERVICES


.. U -..
"Owner operated and a local yocali"
Call 324-4035
- or 981-9542


Florid. Room-. Sciien Roiomn-. Pool
En l.'-sure', P.ii. Co..ei,. Carp,-[.
\ ina I Sidil '. SliuII e Skiiiir n
-V,' Iir L,, G iuLir:. Re'pla'ccin' n
\V rd,:,,,\ ,A lun'inltii Colilnns
Flanridial. & Fciminri
LICENSED AND INSURED


iNew Hope Painting
& Wallpapering
Interior & Eeor CoL mercill A 'Rei,:jnili
Drywall
Pressure Cleaning
Wallpapering
Carpentry Work
Call the Ericksens today!
723-2550 623-6034
\ I ,,n ,- .. ,:. I.. ... i,, ,


Free Estimates
*Remodeling *Repair
*Room Additions *Decks
*Porches *Painting
Also All Mobile Home Repairs
Day/Nigh


iie Restoration shoj
!Antique 'Furniture
'Reyair & xRefinishing
Over 15 years experience
!Portfolio & 'References 'Avaiilabe
8747 wfwy 90
Ca(C 9Gen @
K (850) 981-5466


Albert Pearson's Lawn Servic
Free Estimates



Albert Pearson Owner

850-983-1431


This 2X2
Business Service
Directory Ad
Space could be
yours! Call Tracey
today at 623-2120.
K. 2


Home Improvements
" 25 Years .r
Experience -J
Free Estimates '

(50) 981-3936 anytime


SALTER'S FARM
MARKET
COUNTRY MADE SYRUP
SEASONAL PRODUCE

8855 Chumuckla Hwy.
"If We Grow It Pace, FL 32571
You'll Like It" Open for Business
Mon Sat 8am 5pm
850-994-4734


FPenton's Farm^
Supply
(Allentown)
iFormerly C A L Farm Supply
Bulk Corn & Oats
HMC Feed & Others
Gates, Post & Fencing
.- -,Tues, Sat. 8:00 5:00


SORENSEN'S
REMODELING SPECI
"Home Repairs "Remodeling
jM^ P4 "'Teii -Wai Texluring
'Painting Inlerior and Exterior
'Wallpaper and Removal
'Kitchens and Baths 'CaDinel Reiacirng
,A, 12 ,,. a .-.*n. i r. e
BB^ Deal O ,ri.'l 'in. ,,jrer


637-7044


ALIST




.
.. -< .** ,,r- .; -, fl
;? ,'.. ',^. ;


4 Mobile Home Brokers
Major and Minor Repairs
~ Reroof ~ Patio Covers ~-
Screen Rooms ~ Leveling -
Locally Owned and Operated
Free Estimates
100% Financing WAC
K (850) 857-1051


Above & Beyond
Tree Service .-


K


Call us...or pay
more!
Senior & Military Discounts
Licensed Free
& Insured Kevin Frey Estimaes
(850)983-7820


,s,,In. Mike Kaylor
Land Clearing, and all tractor, Cement Mason
dozer, and related services
Patios Driveways Walks
SFree Estimales iuIit/, wor
NO JOB TOO SMALL! Jo lob .o r d,,ie p,,:
Call Billy Rogers for estimate 850-994-0897
Phone: (850) 957-4952 0-994 089
S Cell: (850) 261-8407 2 ,)


/
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All types of Drywall
*Hang Finish Spray
* Paint *Pressure Washing


{.r ,,a& "- -. _. .


a


i


18,2005


/I


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