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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00591
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00597
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text

Visit us on the Internet at www.FrostproofNews.com

Wednesday


- "January 9, 2013



Frostproof News

Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years 7


The


54 heardandnewspapers.,,, ..
Sfor any one with questions, call 863-53.i-i-o3.


Volume 92 Number 2


USPS NO 211-260


Frostproof, Polk County Florida 33843


Copyrght 2012 Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.


City's mayor stepping down


Visit to nearby relative led Hutzelman here


By BRIAN ACKLEY
BACKLEY @' HEARTLANjDNE\ PAPERS
One of the city's biggest boosters,
Mayor Kay Hutzelman has presided at
her last council meeting.
Amidst cheers, hugs and most defi-
nitely lots of moist eyes, the popular
local leader submitted her resignation
from the city commission at the end of
Monday's regularly scheduled meet-
ing. She and her husband of 57 years.
Paul, are moving soon to Nokomis, on
Florida's Gulf coast.
"'I want you to know that I did not
make this decision lightly,." Hutzelman
told her colleagues, "but family health
concerns take priority. I think everyone
who has a family understands that.
1 thought I was going to remain in
Frostproof the rest of my life. But I
think the good Lord is watching out for
me. I look forward to a new adventure.
But I'll be watching."
Hutzelman is by far the council's
longest tenured member, and was on
the board during some rocky financial
times in the middle of the last decade
when the city in one year ran a deficit
of some $250,000.
"It's been such a pleasure to see the
city move forward. You have to get
beyond yourself personally. You have to
look at what is best for Frostproof. It's
such a charming, wonderful town," she
said. "We have so much potential. It
takes all of us working together. When
you walk out of this door, tell everyone
what a fabulous town this is."


Kay Hutzelman, right, shares an emotional
hug with City Manager T.R. Croley at the end of
Monday night's Frostproof City Council Meeting.
Hutzelman, who joined the council in 2004, is
moving to Nokomis with her husband Paul.
City Manager T.R. Croley presented
her with a plaque on behalf of the "city
council, our staff and the citizens of
this community, with recognition and
appreciation of your dedication, com-
mitment, leadership and outstanding
service to the City of Frostproof"
Croley said she was at an event
outside the city recently when someone
she didn't know approached her.
"He said to me. 'You have an awe-
some mayor. You just don't know how
fortunate you are that you have such a
high energy, positive influence for your
city, someone that has such true pas-
sion.' You have been such an influence


PHOTOS BY BRIAN ACKLEY
Frostproof City Council Member Martha Neher gives a hug and presents roses to Mayor Kay
Hutzelman, who presided at her last meeting Monday night.
for this community and made such a "The profile you have helped create
difference. I just thank you from the about Frostproof with your advocacy
bottom of my heart. We will surely miss and fierce pride in being part of this
you," Croley noted. community, I think it is extraordinary,"
All four of her council colleagues also
paid tribute. MAYOR 15


Local church says goodbye

to reverend after 21 years


By JAMES COULTER
CORRESPONDENT
Members of First Baptist Hilltop
Church honored the long and fruitful
ministry of Rev. Robert D. Austin at his
21st Anniversary Banquet on Saturday,
Dec. 8.
The retiring pastor has served the
church for 21 years, longer than any
pastor before him.
More than 115 guests congregated
within the education center, construct-
ed by Rev. Austin early in his ministry.
Aided by his two sons, James and


Marion, the 80-year-old wheelchair-
bound pastor, who suffered a stroke
earlier this year, wearily stood and
offered a few words about his love for
God and his congregation.
During the banquet, church leaders
and members spoke on his behalf and
of his accomplishments.
The evening ended with the pas-
tor delivering his final message, "A
Marathon Runner for God," based on 2
Timothy 4:7.
Because of his condition, the message
GOODBYE 17


Youngsters re-create pioneer

trek at Lake Arbuckle


By GEORGE FRANICEVICH
NEWS CORRESPONDENT
Scores of teens from all over Polk
County descended upon Lake Arbuckle
Wildlife Management area two days after
Christmas.
- It was an organized, orderly, chaper-
oned gathering sanctioned by the Forest
Service but it was far from one of the
usual nature or camping groups.
Young ladies were all attired in long
dresses or skirts with aprons and bon-
nets. The men sported wide brimmed
straw or felt hats, long sleeved shirts, and
cloth pants held up by suspenders.


What was even more remarkable was
the fact that amongst the teens there
was no evidence of any of the accoutre-
ments so much a part of their daily
"tech society" existence. No ear phones
dangling from their heads. No-one was
preoccupied with any of the various
arrays of hand held electronics so com-
mon everywhere today. No cell phones,
computers, or iPods There wasn't even
any evidence of junk food.
They all had gathered for Pioneer Trek
2012, sponsored by the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints.
TREK I5


TODAY'S
CONTENTS




711 05252 00025 8


Editorial ...........Page XA
Obituaries..........Page XA
School Life..........Page XA
Sports ...............Page XA
Calend'ar......... Page XA
County Report... Page XB
Feeling Fit.......... Page XB


MUSIC, MUSIC
Mel Tllis label
recording star
here Jan. 19



.9


How'd vou meet?
Share with us the stories of how you and your
spouse met. What is it that drew you together?
Where was it? What was it that attracted you to
storv iA ( Jii f


E I LLE FL '


SANTA VISITS
PCSO delivers
a 3ver, merry
Christmas





3










ALD ARA WELCOME TO YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
and Want to see your event on this page? Call us at 863-285-8625 or
e-mail news@frostproofnews.com.


THURSDAY, Jan.10
Library Concert
The unique banjo and washboard
duo "Cracked Walnuts" will offer their
unique brand of music and entertain-
ment at the Latt Maxcy Memorial
Library at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to
the public. Their show will focus on
entertaining tunes from the Civil War
era.

0 SATURDAY, Jan. 12
The Repeatles
One of the Ramon's most popular
annual shows is back as The Repeades
bring their unique talents to the
theater's stage, featuring 1950s-60s
tunes by the likes of the Beatles, Buddy
Holly, Everly Brothers and Ricky Nelson.
Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the
door. For information or tickets, go
to www.ramontheater.com or call the
Ramon office at 863-635-7222.


* MONDAY, Jan. 14
Polk Election Reps at Library
Representatives from the Polk County
Supervisor of Elections Office will be at
the Library to provide a variety of services
including: voter registration, updating
names and addresses, changing party af-
filiations, or requesting absentee ballots.
Officials will be on hand from 9 to 11 a.m.

1 WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16
Florida Flywheelers Show'
Flywheeler Park, a 240-acre showplace
east of Frostproof on Avon Park Cutoff
Road, will host its 26th annual antique
engine and tractor "swap meet" from Jan.
16 to 19. Admission is $7. For more infor-
mation, visit the group's website at www.
foridaflywheelers.org or call 863-285-9121.

Toddler Timne
Toddler Time was created for children up
to age four and their caregivers at the Latt


Maxcy Memorial Library Each session is
a fun introduction to books, finger plays,
action songs and rhymes. Toddler Time will
begin on Jan. 16 will be offered Wednesday
mornings at 10 a.m. Sessions are free and
run approximately 30 minutes.

SATURDAY, Jan.19
Kenyon Lockry in Concert
Mel Tillis protege and label co0n try
singer Kenyon Lockry will be back in
Frostproof for a return engagement at
the American Legion Post 95 Memorial
Auditorium in city hall. The show starts
at 7 p.m. and presale tickets are just $10
each. They are on sale now at city hall.
or by calling 863-635-7855. Proceeds will
benefit auditoritun restoration efforts.

* MONDAY, Jan. 21
City council
The Frostproof City Council regularly
schedules meeting for the first and third


Monday of each month. However,
because of Martin Luther King Day, the
Jan. 21 meeting has been cancelled.

SATURDAY, Jan. 26
Penny Sings Patsy Cline
Extraordinary singer and show-woman
Penny Eckman presents her special
Patsy Cline tribute at the Ramon Theater
starting at 7 p.m. Tickets $15 in advance,
$20 at the door. Go to www.ramontheater.
corn for more information, or tickets, or
call 863-635-7222.

* SATURDAY, Feb. 2
"Friends of jazz"
Friends of lazz, with GregTaillon (of
Porchdogs fame) will present Broadway
standards, ballads and dance tunes
audience members love to hear and sing
along with. For tickets, visit www.ramon
theater.com or the theater box office at 11
E. Wall Street. Call 863-635-7222 for info.
Tickets $15 in advance, $20 day of show.


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LENDER


Page 2 Frostproof News


January 9, 2013




January 9, 2013


Frostproof News Page 3


One call the PCSO was happy to make


Members of the Polk County Sheriff's Office made sure a number of local children had a most
happy holiday season this year as the law enforcers hosted a party and visit from Santa right
before Christmas at Frostproof City Hall.

Left: What started out to be sweets, treats and a Christmas movie turned out to be
more than you can imagine, as the Southeastern Polk County Sheriff's Office sponsored
six Frostproof families for Christmas. No one, parents or kids, were aware of what was
happening as they were told there was a sighting of a big flash across the sky and all were
asked to come outside to investigate. As they were all looking up in the sky, to our surprise
the fire truck rounded the corner, lights flashing and siren blasting as it pulled right up in
front of City Hall carrying the Jolly Old Fellow himself. It seems he was travelling overhead
and had a slight problem with his sleigh and had to make an emergency landing and was
rescued by the Frostproof fire department. Santa explained since his sleigh had broke down
and it was full of toys he would go ahead and give them out early but assured all he would
have it fixed and be back in business before Christmas day.


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Page 4 Frostproof News January 9, 2013







VIEWPOINT.



Analysis shows cameras may have positive effect


A recent study by the state highway department
supports claims that red-light cameras reduce
crashes at intersections, but it's far from conclusive.
While most municipalities saw decreases, some actu-
ally experienced increases.
On the other hand, the established programs
certainly did seem lucrative for private operators,
the municipalities they work for and the state. That's
the problem we've always had with these programs:
Once started, they could prove to be an indispensable
part of the revenue stream, even if their public safety
value is found to be lacking.
Lakeland and Haines City are two cities in Polk
County that use red light cameras.
Nearly 1 million motorists received $158 tickets in
the period studied. Some $75 of that stays with the
city or county, and $83 goes to the state. In Tampa,
the city had budgeted $2 million in revenues from
the red-light program in 2012, but actually ended
up collecting $2.3 million, according to the Tampa
Bay Times. And that was net revenues, after the state
received its cut and the vendor-operator was paid a
fee of $1 million.


Our Viewpoint
For that; accidents at 17 red-light intersections
dropped from 157 to 112 after cameras were installed.
Worth it?
Maybe, but the Times also pointed out that St.
Petersburg actually saw crashes increase 10 percent
at the 10 intersections where cameras were installed.
Another report noted accidents dropped in Miami,
but increased in Fort Lauderdale.
Overall, though, the broad study tilts toward
cameras.
The analysis by the state Department of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicles collected data from 73
police agencies from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012.
Of the total, 41 (56 percent) reported decreases in
crashes. Eleven (15 percent) reported an increase.
seven (10 percent) saw no change and 14 (19 percent)
did not report data.
To further break down the number, 32 (44 percent)
reported a decrease in side-impact crashes, the most
damaging intersection crash and the type of crash


that red-light cameras aim to prevent. Eight (11 per-
cent) saw an increase and 11 (15 percent) remained
the same.
As for rear-end collisions, 30 agencies (41 percent)
saw a decrease, 16 (22 percent) reported an increase
and five (7 percent) saw no change. Again, this
bolsters the pro-camera argument. Earlier studies
elsewhere had shown decreases in T-bone crashes
were offset by increases in rear-end collisions, as
motorists tend to slam on their brakes.
The highway department also reported that of the
total 999,929 tickets issued through the automatic-
photo system, only 20,064 were challengedltSeveity
percent were dismissed. (The ticket is a non-moving
violation.)
We've long been skeptical about the installation of
red-light.cameras, because the crash data has been
so sketchy. The one definitive outcome is the opening
of a new revenue spigot for operators, municipalities
* and the state, which is a poor justification. *,
The new study, although somewhat mixed, does in-
dicate a benefit in public safety, though.Very isolated
use may be worth reconsideration.


Daily's database


is hardly good journalismm
,~~ 0"' J. .


News does not have a virgin birth. It is
not delivered by the stork.
News is midwifed by people whose
egos are large enough to support the
notion that what they think is impor-
tant is what all of us should think is
important.
Not so long ago, the news was
delivered exclusively by editors and
broadcasters who had spent decades
earning the respect of the communities
in which they reported.,
These days, the bonds between
journalists and communities are frayed.
Established media brands change beat
reporters and sometimes ownership
as frequently as Taylor Swift changes
boyfriends.
Pressured to squeeze bigger profit
margins out of shrinking staffs, some
publishers confuse old school muckrak-
ing with plain old muck.
Take "The gun owner next door: What
you don't know about the weapons in
your neighborhood."
This.lengthy but not terribly infor-
mative story lead the December 23
edition of Gannett Co.'s White Plains
(N.Y.) Journal News. The centerpiece
of the package was an interactive map
showing the names and addresses of
handgun permit holders in the paper's
circulation area.
The Journal News didn't bother with
the hard and time-consuming work of
drawing meaningful conclusions from
its database. Missing is information
such as whether the named permit
holders had ever actually purchased a
gun.


Florence Snyder
(nholSB


By mid-week, tens of thousands of
folks all over the world had taken to
social media to denounce this half-
baked effort to provide a local angle on
the December 14 massacre that left 20
first-graders dead in Newtown, Conn.
One cranky reader with a blog of his
own protested the ... bright idea of.
exposing law-abiding gun owners and
feeding that information to criminals
and busybodies." Before long, the
blogosphere went to work piecing to-
gether an interactive map that asks -
and answers the question, "Where
are the Journal News employees in
your neighborhood?" Folks not known
for mindless media bashing tried and
failed to find something to say in the
Journal News' defense. The Florida-
based Poynter Institute's esteemed
Senior Scholar Roy Peter Clark spoke
for people who reflexively defend
everybody's right to say anything.
"My predisposition is to support the
journalism," Clark told The Associated
Press. "I want to be persuaded that
this story or this practice has some
higher social purpose, but I can't find
it."


A 73-year-old woman whose name
showed up in the Journal News data
dump complained to Washington Post
media critic ErikWemple, "They've put
me on the same level as a sex offender.
... What were they thinking? Were they
going to shame me out of a gun?" That's
a good question, and Wemple tried
to get an answer. But Gannett is not'
talking beyond a brief press release in
which Journal News publisher Janet
Hasson damned her newsroom with
faint praise." ... [Wie felt sharing infor-
mation about gun permits in our area
was important in the aftermath of the
Newtown shootings," Hasson said in the
release's most stirring turn of phrase.
Let's hope this bland bunker mentality
does not metastasize to Florida, where
Gannett owns four newspapers and
three TV stations.
Meanwhile, at Slate.com, a more
thoughtful database is taking shape.
In partnership with @GunDeaths,


the online magazine is working to
determine, day-by-day, how many
people have been shot to death since
Newtown.
It's not a statistic that government
keeps, and Slate.com is performing a
real service in volunteering its report-
ing resources to the worthy and
newsworthy cause of generating a
"crowd-sourced tally of the toll firearms
have taken since Dec. 14."
The sharp contrast between the.
Journal News' drive-by database and
the more informative mapping at Slate
reminds us that here in the post-
printing press era, good journalism is
happening in places we've never heard
of, and bad journalism no Ion
anywhere to hide.
Florence Snyder is a Tallahasse based
corporate lawyer u'ho has spent most
of her career in and.around newspa-
pers. She can be reached at fsnyder@
floridavoices.com.


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
* Aileen Hood General Manager Paul Northrop Sales Manager leff Roslow Editor Brian Ackley Managing Editor


Published every Wednesday at
14 W. Wall Street, Frostproof, FL 33843
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Frostproof, Florida and
additional Entry Office
*Phone (863) 676-3467 *Fax (863) 678-1297
Postmaster: Send address changes to
140 E. Stuart Ave.,
Lake Wales, FL 33853-4198


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We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frostproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews corn or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
Wales FI. 33853.


-ElT --

[CLOW~NCA


...;:. `


- --------------------------






January 9,2013 Frostproof News Page 5


MAYOR
FROM PAGE 1

said Councilwoman Diana Webster
Biehl. "I hope you know the depth of
appreciation that is felt throughout the
city."
While she has been a whirlwind of
support for many community causes
and groups, none were closer to her
heart than restoration of the Ramon
Theater which has become the cultural
center of southeast Polk.
Hutzelman joked that her husband
checked Nokomis to make sure there
wasn't an old theater there that needed
restoring.
"He said if there is, we're not com-
ing," she laughed.
Vice Mayor Anne Dickinson will fill
in as Mayor until the group's second
meeting in April. She will nominate
someone to fill Hutzelman's spot on
the commission until elections April 2,
which would cover just five meetings.
The council's Jan. 21 meeting was
cancelled because it falls on Dr. Martin


RECEPTION FRIDAY
A special "thank you" and "good bye reception
for longtime community leaders Kay and Paul
Hutzelman will be held Friday at the Frostproof Art
League building on Wall Street. The event will run
from 5 to 7 p.m. and is open to the public.
Luther King Jr. Day, a city holiday, and
at the moment there are no items that
need action at that time.
Dickinson said Monday night that
she is considering at least two and
maybe three different people, and
would like to speak with them further
to gauge their interest.
She did say, however, that she would
like to nominate someone who would
like to seek the position permanently
during the April election.
Hutzelman was first elected to office
-in April, 2004, to a three-year term,
after being appointed to fill the unex-
pired term of Mary Miller two months
before that. She was unopposed in that
election, and was first named mayor
by her fellow council members in 2009.
She was also unopposed in 2007 and
again in 2010 in her council races. The


couple moved here in 2000.
While Dickinson can nominate a
successor, her pick must be approved
by at least three council members.
City Attorney Mark Smith said
Dickinson is eligible to vote on her
own nomination.
"This city is indebted to you," said
Mike Arms, pastor at Southside Baptist
Church, in paying tribute to Hutzelman
during the public comments portion of
the agenda Monday night.
"Kay has a vision. She comes up with
what some people think are impossible
ideas and makes them happen," said
Tina Miller, who has for the last several
years worked alongside Hutzelman in
the combined offices of the theater and
chamber of commerce. "When she sets
her mind to it it's done. You can see
her many days walking in downtown
Frostproof, from business to business.
She has said that many people want
to hide when they see her coming,
because she always wants money. But,
it's all for a good cause."
In addition to her duties as President
of the Ramon Theater Board of Directors,
Kay has also served as Director of


Economic Development and president
of the Frostproof Chamber, past presi-
dent of the Frostproof Art League and
a two-time Woman of the Year. She is
also a member of Polk Arts Alliance and
winner of their CARP award in 2011 and
a representative on the Central Florida
Development Council.
"Kay keeps saying she's going to slow
down, step down and retire again,
but all of Frostproof hopes it isn't so,"
added Miller. "Kay, we hope you'll
keep doing what you're doing, for
many years to come. We can't imagine
Frostproof without you."
She has also been active with
the First Presbyterian Church and
Frostproof Care Center.
The Hutzelmans were visiting Kay's
sister at River Ranch when they discov-
ered Frostproof more than a decade
ago.
Since then, it would be easy-to say,
she's had two loves in her life.
"The marriage has stood for 57 years.
It's my turn to take care of him," she -
said with a quiver in her voice and
affectionate devotion in her heart, for ,
both.


TREK
FROM PAGE 1

According to Brother Mike Bingham,
Executive Director for this event, the par-
ticipants in this gathering were "leaving
behind the comforts of modem civiliza-
tion; hot showers, heat, air conditioning,
stoves, refrigerators, solid walls and a
roof."
In turn they were only allowed a few
personal belongings that would fit in
a five gallon bucket and their sleeping
bags.
For three days, the group would
participate in the journey of a lifetime,
a journey Cynthia Hopkins described
as both "physically challenging" and
"spiritually building".
"The Lakeland Stake of the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints conducts
this trek only once every 4 years for about
80 or 90 youths between the ages of 14
and 18, in commemoration of the pio-
neer heritage of the Church," explained
another organizer, Steve Smylie.
In the 1850's members of the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints began
their migration west from England and
other parts of Europe. They came to the
United States by ship, and then traveled
by train as far west as they could. Many
didn't have sufficient assets with which to
obtain horses and wagons.
Instead they either made or purchased
two-wheeled wooden handcarts and
pulled their belongings across miles of
rugged terrain to the settlement in Salt
Lake City, Utah.
The Lakeland Stake Trek memorial-
izes the use of these handcarts, in


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR.


The pulling of belongings on a cart was a
re-enactment of a cross-country trip many
decades ago.

particular the ill-fated Willy Handcart
Company journey where the pioneers
driven on by their zeal and faith,
failed to heed warnings about terrain,
weather and lateness of the season.
The trek culminated with about 70
pioneers dying in route.
The survivors believed that in spite of
their challenges. God continued to care
for them, and when they couldn't push
their carts any further and all seemed
lost, God sent in angels to help push,
lighten their loads, ease their suffering,
and mourn with them for their dead.
Bingham explains how these teens (14
to 18 years old) from congregations of
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints located throughout Polk County,
including Frostproof. voluntarily put
aside the conveniences of modem living
and stepped back in time for a local re-
enactment of that "pioneer trek".
The teens assembled at a make-shift
camp adjacent to the forest and each
was assigned to a pioneer "family" an


adult "ma" and "pa", a" big brother and
big sister" and 8 to 10 young men and
women, ages 14 to 18. There were a total
of eight families.
Ranger Dave Butcher from the Florida
Forest Service explained to the trekkers
how this Wildlife Management Area had
more endangered plants and animals
than anywhere else in the U.S. He went
on to tell the trekkers that in addition.
to a multitude of wild hogs, there were
also a few bears and at least one Florida
panther. All things including the plants
were best left alone.
Smylie described the first day's events
and how "under the watchful eye of
youth leaders that included the medi-
cal staff and other behind the scenes
support," each family replicating the
experience of the 19th-century handcart
pioneers, packed their belongings into
two-wheeled wooden handcarts and
then prepared to push, pull and other-
wise persuade these wooden wheeled
vehicles over dirt trails, through mud
and sugar sand, and around the Lake
Arbuckle Wildlife Management Area, in
order to get a taste of what their fore-
bearers experienced.
They pulled those handcarts for 12
miles the first day, and 17 miles total for
the three days.,
Smylie relates that the "Trail events
included a meeting with'Jim Bridger', an
introduction to some local 'Indians' and
a reading of some of the journals of the
courageous saints that wrote about their
trials."
Female pioneers who made the origi-
nal trek alone or with young children,
without benefit of a an adult male were
particularly challenged and to give the
female trekkers an appreciation for the


sacrifice and ordeal they experienced,
a part of the route was reserved for a
challenge where the "boys and girls get
separated and have to make their way
separately for a short time."
The second day included a pioneer fes-
tival where the participants could move
between activities that emulated various
pioneer skills, such as log sawing, candle
dipping, lasso tossing, biscuit shooting,
and black powder musket shooting.
There was fire making with steel and flint
which Mary Green excelled at. Teiglor
Cole demonstrated making butter by
taking a small jar (baby food jar will do)
adding heavy cream and salt to taste,
then shaking it until you have butter
(pour off the excess liquid).
"The second day ended with the trek-
kers dancing the Virginia Reel and other
dances that the pioneers were likely
to have enjoyed on the walk to Zion,"
Smylie noted.
Smylie describes how on the "third
day each youth receives a letter from
home (their real home, their real parents)
and then "meeting together under the
canopy of beautiful live oaks", expressing
their feelings about the trek experience."
"Youths and adults that have par-
ticipated in past Treks (they are held
throughout the year in different places
all over the world) have spoken with
great emotion about the deep feelings
they experienced while on the trek and
how it positively affected the choices
they have made throughout their lives,"
Smylie added. "We hope that our youth
might likewise, have an experience that
puts them in touch with their Savior and
supports them in decisions that they will
make during their life."


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Frostproof News Page 5


January 9, 2013






Page 6 Frosuproof News January 9, 2013


OBITUARIES


John W. Hunt, Sr.


John W. Hunt,
Sr., age 80,
passed away
from heart
failure Monday,
December 31,
2012 in Lakeland. /
Born
November 6,
1932 in Lake
Wales, he was
the son of the
late Charles M. John W. Hunt Sr.
and Dorothy
Williamson Hunt. Mr. Hunt was a U.S.
Army Veteran. Mr. Hunt was a longtime
Agricultural Real Estate Appraiser and
a Land Manager. Mr. Hunt earned a
B.S.A and M.S.A from the University of
Florida in Agricultural Engineering and
Animal Nutrition and Soils. He was a
ranch manager of 30,000 acres for 10
years.
He was designated an ARA #664-
Accredited Rural Appraiser and a mem-
ber of the American Society of Farm
Managers and Rural Appraisers in 1984,
a Senior Livestock Appraiser #665,
member of the International Society
of Livestock Appraisers in 1985, a
licensed Real Estate Broker since 1973.
Mr. Hunt was also a member of many
organizations including: the American
Society of Farm Managers and Rural
Appraisers, the Bartow Association of
Realtors, Past Piesident and Realtor
of the year in 1986, Past President and


31-year Supervisor of the Polk County
Soil Conservation District, Past District
Secretary, Treasurer, Vice President, and
President of the Florida Association
of Conservation, Florida Cattlemen
Association, Past County Director of the
Polk County Cattlemen's Association,
Past President of the Florida Beef Cattle
Improvement Assoc., Past President of
the American Red Brangus Assoc., Past
Councilman of the American Society of
Range Management, and a member of
Florida Society of Range Management.
He was also member of Holy Trinity
Episcopal Church of Bartow and a
Past President of the Soil and Water
Conservation District for the State of
Florida and a Past Chairman of the
Florida Forestry Advisory Council by
Governor's appointment.
Mr. Hunt is survived by two sons; John
W. Hunt, Jr., and David C. Hunt and wife
Beth, and his former spouse Kathleen
C. Hunt, all of Bartow. Arrangements
are being handled byWhidden-McLean
Funeral Home in Barrow, where the
family will receive friends on Thursday,
January 3, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Funeral
services will follow Friday, January 4 at
10 a.m. at the Holy Trinity Episcopal
Church, 500 West Stuart Street in
Bartow. Interment will follow at Lake
Wales Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
memorials may be made to the church
at the same address. Condolences to the
family at www.whiddenmcleanfuneral
home.com.


Frank H. Senn, 93, of Lake Wales,
Fla. passed away on Dec. 26, 2012 in
Orlando, Florida.
Frank was born in Atlantic City, N.J.
on Aug. 23, 1919 and resided in Egg
Harbor City, N.J. most of his life;until
moving to Florida in the late 1970's. He
retired after spending 30 years as owner
and president of George Senn Co., Inc.,
the family plumbing supply business in
Egg Harbor Ciry. Mr. Senn also retired
as president and director of Egg Harbor
Bank and Trust Company. Even though
he retired to move to Florida he became
associated with and eventually owned
and operated American Tour and Cruise
Service of Lake Wales until its sale in
1989.
Mr. Senn graduated from Moravian
College in Bethlehem, Pa. in 1942
and after working for the Bureau of
Standards in Washington, D.C. for four
months he enlisted in the U.S. Army
Air Corp as an aviation cadet and was
sent to Massachusetts Institute of
Technology (MIT) where he completed
the accelerated graduate course in
meteorology. Upon graduating, he was
commissioned a 2nd Lt. and served in
both the U.S. Army Air Corps and the
U.S. Air Force during World War II and
the Korean War. He resigned his com-
mission as Captain after 11 years of
duty to run the family business.


Leo F. Taylor

Leo E Taylor of Frostproof passed
away Wednesday, Jan. 02, 2013 at the
Florida Hospital Heartland in Sebring.
He was 87. Marion Nelson Funeral
Home of Frostproof is handling the
arrangements.


Adriana Lathrop Jahna


Adriana
Lathrop Jahna,
75, of Lake Wales,
passed away on
Thursday, Jan. 3,
2013, at Wmter
Haven Hospital.
She was born
Nov. 28,1937,
daughter of the .
late Robert and
Diana Lathrop
of Lyme, Conn. Adriana Lathrop Jahna
Following gradu-
ation from St. Mary's-in-the-Mountains,
Littleton, N.H. boarding school, she went
to Webber College, Babson Park. She met
and married Noel (Budgie) Clyde Jahna,
(son of Emil R. lahna, Sr.) of Lake Wales
on Aug. 25, 1956. He died in April 1964 in
an auto accident.
In addition to raising her five daugh-
ters, she was employed by E.R. Jahna
Industries until her retirement. A fine
golfer she played in numerous events
around the state and was a long-time
volunteer for the yearlyBen Hill Griffin
Charity Tournament at the Lake Wales
Country Club where she was a member.
Not only was Adriana an excellent
athlete and bridge player, she was an
artist with flowers, designing exotic ar-
rangements of Ikebana and other styles.
She was very knowledgeable about early
American and Victorian era antiques


Sidney Hollis
Sidney Hollis of Frostproof passed
away Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, at his
daughter's residence. He was 90.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home of
Frostproof handling arrangements.


and decorative objects. In the past few
years she took a keen interest in re-
searching and expanding the genealogy
and history of her New England family
lines.
She maintained a life-long member-
ship in the DAR, belonged to The Society
of Mayflower Descendants, active in the
Colonial Dames, and member of the
University of Florida Gator Booster Club.
She is survived by her daughters, Julie
Pearson of Babson Park, Adriana Jahna
ofWindermere, Elizabeth Jahna Lee of
Naperville, Ill., Jennifer Fugate of Lake
Wales, Antoinette "Toni" Jahna of Lake
Wales and a proud grandmother to her!
grandchildren She is also survived by her
sister, Diana Bouchard of Nashua, N.H.,
brother Robert W. Lathrop of Louisville,
Colo.; brother, Sheldon M. Lathrop of
Amherst, N.H.
There will be a gathering of family and
friends on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, from
4:30 until 6:30 p.m. at the Marion Nelson
Funeral Home of Lake Wales.
Private burial will be held at the Lake
Wales Cemetery at a later date.
Memorial donations may be made in
Adriana's name to the Lake Wales Care
Center, 140 E. Park Ave., Lake Wales, FL
33853
Condolences may be sent to the family
at www.marionnelsonfuneralhome.com
Marion Nelson Funeral Home of Lake
Wales is handling arrangements.


Elizabeth

Stovall Jerrils
Mrs. Elizabeth Stovall Jerrils, 80 of
Lake Wales, Fla., formerly of Grand
Rapids, Mich., died Tuesday, Jan. 1,
2013, in Orlando.
Arrangements are by Johnson Funeral
Home, Lake Wales.


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Frank H. Senn


He enjoyed many things in life,
playing golf twice a week with buddies,
building children's furniture in his
workshop, and traveling with his wife to
many parts of the world.
He was a member of Hiriam T. Dewey
F & A M Lodge of Egg Harbor City, N.J.,
the Moravian Church of Egg Harbor
City, the Lake Wales Country Club,
the American Legion, the Veterans
of Foreign Wars and a member of
Fellowship Dining of Lake Wales.
Those left to cherish his memory are
his wife, Harriet Kloehs Senn; daugh-
ters, Barbara Mangos of Paoli, Pa. and
Sandra Kurtz of Winter Garden, Fla.;
sons, Christopher Senn of Marlton,
N.., Ronald Senn of Egg Harbor City,
N.J. and step-sons, Kurt Dahlgren of
Danbuy, Conn., Ralph Dahlgren of Fort
Lauderdale, Fla., C. Anthony Kloehs
of Peachtree City, Ga., and David
Kloehs of Suwanee, Ga. He is also
survived by 19 grandchildren and 12
great-grandchildren.
Each time we embrace a memory, we
meet again with those we love ... for the
heart never forgets. Life is changed, not
taken away.
Memorials may be made to the
Moravian Church, 235 Boston Ave., Egg
Harbor City, N.J., 08215.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.

Words of Comfort
Death is the end of a lifetime,
not the end of a relationship.
Mitch Albom
For more Words of Comfort, go to
www.wordsofcomfort.net


Page 6 Frostproof News


January 9, 2013





Frostproof News Page 7


GOODBYE
FROM PAGE 1

was read by speaker George Grace, who
choked back tears halfway through
reading it.
For his service to his church and
community, Austin was conferred a
plaque by Dr. C.T. Kirkland of the South
Florida Progressive Baptist Association.
Rev. Austin will officially retire
Dec. 17, and will have an official
farewell dinner in january.
Austin was born Jan. 1, 1932 to Lake
Wales pastor James R Austin Sr. and
Lula NM. Austin.
He played baseball at Roosevelt High
School and Florida A&M University,
where he pitched the college's first
no-hitter. He was later drafted in the
Pittsburgh Pirates where he continued
playing until a work-related injury
forced him to quit.
He has remained married to his wife
Josephinpgor 47 years, and has fathered
two sons, James and Marion, and two
daughters, Pamela and Wanda.
He was the director of the Carver
Recreation Center in Bartow for 20
years and participated in various
civic organizations including the Polk
County Voter's League.
Friends and family describe him as a
man of few words, though when given
the opportunity to speak. his few words
command power and respect.
His gravitas was displayed as Voter
League president, where he command-
ed the crowds and settled disputes with
only a few words.
"He was that type of man: walk tall,
but speak softly," his son James said.
Because of his ability to commu-
nicate and relate with young people.
during integration in the 1960s, Austin
was often called to the public schools
to settle disputes.
His efforts at Bartow High School
ensured it never experienced a riot.
Most afternoons, his living room would
be crowded with students whom he
counseled, his wife Josephine said.
Austinrwould go to any length to
maintain healthy racial relations within
Polk County, even if it meant confront-
ing the Ku Klux Klan.
"It scared me even then to know he
was brave enough to do something like
that," Josephine said. "But he was that
brave, knowing that God was going to
take care of him."
In November 1982, while driving
along Christina Park Road in Lakeland,


PHOTO BY JAMES COULTER
Aided by his sons Marion and James, Rev. Robert D. Austin stands and addresses the congregation
he had faithfully served for 21 years.


in an experience similar to that of Saul
of Damascus, Austin claimed to have
been touched by the Holy Spirit and
pulled into a nearby park, where after
much prayer, he decided to enter the
ministry.
He was licensed to preach at Mount
Gilboa Missionary Baptist Church in
1985 and ordained in 1986. He served
there as associate pastor until becom-
ing pastor at First Baptist Hilltop in
Frostproof in 1991.
One of his first actions as pastor
was the construction of the education
center. He cleared the land behind the
church the following year, and within
the next decade, had the building con-
structed. For three years, it was paid
through mortgages until he determined
to pay off the entire building through a
fundraiser.
For his en tire ministry, he only
accepted the money from his pastoral
salary, never from anywhere else.
"He was the church's biggest giver,"
church financial secretary Christine
Wilson said. "He set up a pastor's aid
when he first started, and he never
spent one dime out of it. He always
used it for someone that was in need."
His frugality would be passed onto
his congregation through both his
example and instruction.
"He said that he wants no one to
put more than $2 in the plate, and bet


them it will never run dry," James said.
"And to this day, it has never run dry,
because he taught them how to save."
A running theme throughout his life
and ministry has been love, which he
not only conveyed through his setr-
mons, but also through his actions.
"He truly is a man of God," said'
Deacon James Smith. "He not only
preached the Word of God, but he lives
it."
"He wanted to make sure that people
love one another, and that's when you
know that you're right: when you love
your enemies as your friend," said
church member Terry Wellington.
This February. Austin was admitted
to the hospital for a stroke. Not only


p


was his coronary artery 90 percent
blocked, but unbeknownst to his fam-
ily, he suffered six strokes within the
past year.
He told his family he had suffered
multiple strokes while commuting
between the church and his home in
Bartow, and that he never told them in
order to protect them, James said.
"He loved that woman (his wife) so
much, that he would have nothing
happen.to her, that he willed his way
home through God's guidance." James
said. "And he would get out of his car
staggering, can hardly make it into the
house, and we would have to help him
in just'to sit him and all. And we knew
something was going on with him, but
at the time, we didn't know what."
Austin spent weeks in rehab recover-
ing from his surgery, though he desired
to return to church and preach.
On Easter Sunday, he returned to
church, barely able to talk or walk, but
with help from his son, he willed his
way to the pulpit and offered afew ; '
words.
"Not a single dry eye was in the *-,
building," fames said.
Though Austin will be retiring,
his ministry will continue to live on
through the souls he has touched and
the ministers he has inspired.
Throughout his life and ministry, he
has mentored many young men and
helped them set their lives straight. Two
notable men include Chauncey Henry,
football receiver at University of Miami,
and Larry Hardaway, attorney and
president of the Voter's League.
Once he retires, his congregation will
miss his love, his dedication, and his
smile.
"No matter what problem you have,
when you go to him, he don't sugarcoat
it," church member Rosa Hamtpon
said. "He'll give you a big smile first and
then help you solve that problem."


Two Time Winner of
Reader's Choice


Bernice Laverne Kelly


Bernice Laverne Kelly, a resident of
Dothan, died unexpectedly Tuesday,
Dec. 18, 2012, at Flowers Hospital. She
was 66.
A memorial service to celebrate her
life will be held 1:30 p.m. Saturday,
lan. 5, 204.8 at St. Columba Catholic
Church Chapel with Rev. Mr. Rick
Risher and Rev. Andy Wood officiating.
Mrs. Kelly was born on April 11,
1946, in Dothan, Ala. and lived the
early years of her life in Frostproof,
Florida. She was a resident of Dothan
for the past 12 years. She was a devout
Christian and Godfearing woman
and a loving and devoted mother and
grandmother.
Mrs. Kelly is predeceased by her
parents, Samuel and Frances Lockard: a


brother, Jim Locklerr and a sister, Betty
Nolin.
Survivors include five children, A.J.
Shields (Krisry) of Headland, Ala.,
Sherie Cunningham (John) of Dothan,
Ala., Michael Kelly of Dothan, Ala.,
Christie Kelly of Lakeland. Fla. and
Matthew Kelly (Krystal) of Dothan,
Ala.; thirteen grandchildren, Sierra
Shields, Dara Cunnigham, Tristin
DeCroo, Lyleigh Cunningham,
Christopher Kelly, Emily Kelly, Justin
Bundy, River Gipson, Holly Gipson,
Joshua Kelly, Samantha Church,
Jazsmen Kelly and Skilar Kelly; a sister,
Linda Lavender and a brother, David
Lockard, both of Lake Wales, Fla.
Byrd Funeral Home in Dothan, Ala. is
in charge of arrangements.


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OBITUARIES


January 9, 2013


i CRAMC






gUd, r N0= JanLuar 9..21 3


COUNTY


U~b-
rn-rn


Granddaughter Ellery Weiss rests her head on
ndma Maxine Weiss' lap. The dedication
knmony naming the Richard M. Weiss Clerks
fNhe Court Gallery was the second tribute
paid to Richard Weiss on Friday, Jan. 4.


Lloyd Harris, Chairman of the Polk County
Historical Commission, told about the history
of what is now the Polk County History Center
when it was the county court house.


Museum opens Richard M. Weiss Clerks of Court Gallery


By STEVE STEINER
SSTE [NE R @ HE RTL. ANDNE W\PSPAERS.COM

Richard Weiss was twice-honored
Friday, Jan. 4. Earlier that day, staff mem-
bers of the Clerk of Court office threw
him a farewell at the county courthouse.
Now, at 4:30 p.m.. in the lobby of the Polk
County History Center, the building that
once was the county courthouse, a more
formal presentation was taking place -
the dedication ceremony of the Richard
NI. Weiss Clerks of the Court Gallery..
It was a ceremony marked with
jocularity and gravitas, along with a
brief history lesson of the building.
Prior to his announced retire-
ment this past summer, Weiss had
worked with Museum Executive
Director Myrtice Young to create
a part of the museum that would
pay tribute to those who served as
Clerk of the Court throughout Polk
County's history.
"I think it's fitting you're being hon-
ored in the historic museum," said Polk
County Tax Collector Joe G. Tedder. For
it was in this building Weiss started his
public service career in Polk County.
Tedder told of an anecdote one time
when Weiss toured the museum. One of
the exhibits is a flatboat that is estimated
to be several hundred years old, carved
by the indigenous people who lived


in Polk County before the advent of
Europeans. "Richard thought it was his
first flatboat."
On a serious note, Tedder praised
Weiss for his devotion to the office.
"Richard has been a wonderful
partner to the Constitutional office,"
said Tedder. In closing, Tedder said that
he hoped he would someday leave his
office with the same respect Weiss had
received. But Tedder did not leave it at


that. "His first concern is, what's best
for his county. His second concern is,
what's best for his staff."
Afterward, Polk County
Commissioner and Chairwoman
Melony Bell explained the Latin root
of the word "clerk," which came from
the word "clericus" meaning clergyman,
because "in early medieval courts" most
laymen could not read, so writing was
entrusted to the clergy. In her remarks,:
she called Weiss "a man of high integrity."
When Lloyd Harris, chairman
of the Polk County Historical
Commission spoke, he brought
to everyone's attention that had it
not been for Weiss' predecessor,
friend and mentor, "Bud" Dixon,
there might not be a dedication
ceremony. For it was Dixon who
kept the building from being
demolished and turned into a
parking lot. The lobby in which
everyone stood, said Harris, was
named in Dixon's honor.
Weiss' contribution was no small
feat, though, said Iva Turner, Director,
Clerk of Courts.
"More than a year ago, Richard began a
project to commemorate the Clerk of the
Court history," said Turner. "This (area)
will forever stand as a tribute."
After the others had spoken, Weiss ap-
proached the podium. He said when he


was honored by the BOCC. his response
consisted of one word.
"I responded by saying 'wow, said
Weiss. "I still say 'wow." He jibed Bell
over a word she used in describing what
would soon take place, the unveiling
of the Richard NI.Weiss Clerks of Court
Gallery. "In my religion, when you said
unveiling ... "Weiss then pretended to
clutch his heart.
He then turned his comments to
Dixon, the man he considered both
friend and mentor.
"This building would not be standing if
it wasn't for Bud," he said. "You see what
he preserved for history." That latter was
of significance to Weiss. Weeks earlier,
when the county commissioners paid
tribute to him at its final December 2012
public session, Weiss spoke how much it
meant that the area being dedicated to
him was adjacent to the section of the
building named in Dixon's memory. "I
can't tell you how much I appreciate this."
He thanked museum executive direc-
tor Young, and others.
"The minute we brought it (the idea)
to Myrtice, she said, 'What a great
idea,'" saidWeiss. County Manager Jim
Freeman also played a significant role
in making the Clerks of Court Gallery a
reality, added Weiss who finished with
words of gratitude. "I thank all of you,
and I wish you well."


Stacy Butterfield now Clerk of the Court


By STEVE STEINER
SS TE NE R @ C'HEARTL.ANDNE WSPAPERS.COMI
A new era dawned shortly past
7:30 a.m., Tuesday, Jan. 8, with the
investiture ceremony of Stacy M.
Butterfield, now the Polk County
Clerk of the Circuit Court/County
Comptroller. Butterfield replaced
newly-retired Richard M. Weiss, who
had held the office since 1997. The
ceremony swearing Butterfield in
was held in the same Oliver Green
courtroom where a farewell reception
was held forWeiss who Butterfield
has often called her mentor on
Friday, Jan. 4.
A packed court room was on
hand to hear Polk Board of County
Commissioner Chairwoman Melony
Bell welcome them, who spoke about
Butterfield, calling it an honor to do
so. She attributed the high turnout to
Butterfield.
"This is a testimony of her love and
passion she has given to this county,"
said Bell. As part of the investiture,
Bell gave a brief history of the Clerk of


the Court position in Polk County. The
position was established Feb. 8, 1861,
and up to and including Weiss, had
been held by 20 individuals. "Stacy is
the 21st and the first woman in Polk
County to hold the position."
Continuing, Bell said Butterfield only
had three months in which to mount a
campaign, and said Butterfield literally
ran her campaign. Searching for a way
to describe Butterfield, Bell called her a
dedicated leader.
"Anything she does is 101 percent.
When she has a job to do, she does it,"
said Bell. "If you know Stacy, she'll go
beyond the call of duty."
In her acceptance, after being sworn
in by the Honorable Roger A. Alcott,
Circuit Judge for the 10th judicial
Circuit Court, Butterfield opened by
thanking a number of people, starting
with her family and incorporating
elected officials, judicial representa-
tives, and finally her staff.
"We have a great, dedicated team
of employees," Butterfield said, then
added she was "excited to get started."


PHOTO BY STEVE STEINER
The Honorable Roger A. Alcott, Circuit Judge for the 10th Judicial Circuit Court swears in Stacy
Butterfield as Polk County's Clerk of the Circuit Court. Holding the Bible upon which Butterfield took
her oath is her husband,Rick.


January 9, 2013


aP e 8 Frostproof News








Lockry visiting F proof for return engagement
Lockry visiting Frostproof for return engagement
J 0 1 0 0UP


Rising country music star Kenyon
Lockry, who was discovered and
signed by legendary entertainer
Mel Tillis, will be back to wow the
Frostproof area on Jan. 19.
The Kissimmee native was signed
in 2006 by Tillis' record label, and
just last year released his third CD
"It's About That Time," his first CD
that features all original material.
"Since then, I can't begin to list all
that Mel has taught me about show-
manship, songwriting, singing, and the
music itself," Lockry said about being
discovered. "I can't thank Mel enough.
I guess the pinnacle of my career will
always be performing at the Grand Ole
Opry. What a dream come true."
He has also shared the stage with
some of country music's biggest
names, from Roy Clark and Vince
Gill to Charlie Daniels and Clint
Black l
In addition to the Grand Ole Opry,
Lockry has performed at the Welk
Theater in Branson, Missouri, on the
American Queen riverboat, and at
the CMA Music Fest in Nashville.
Lockry said he had decided to
move to Nashville after cutting
a country demo tape there. Tillis
heard it while at a friend's hunting
camp, and asked to meet the singer.
"My family had just thrown me a
-'moving to Nashville party.' Iwas
going to live in my parent's RV,
and was leaving the next Monday,"
Lockry recalled. "Turns out, I met
with Mel Sunday, the day before I
was making the move. He told me if
I went up to Nashville on my own,
I was liable to meet all the wrong


A dream come true for country music star Kenyon Lockry was performing at the Grand Ole Opry.
He will play in Frostproof on Jan. 19.


people. He went on to say I could fundraiser for the American Legion
come up and stay with him at his Post 95 Memorial Auditorium's reno-
farm in AshJand City, outside of ovation efforts. Tickets are just $10
Nashville, and he'd introduce me to each for the Saturday show which
the right people. So that's just what will start at 7 p.m. They are on sale
I did." at Frostproof City Hall, or by calling
The Frostproof concert is a 635-7855.


celebrating our


2nd anniversary


* Breakfast
* Lunch
* Dinner
* Homemade
Desserts


Expert catering for any
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Attention to detail and the
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your celebration will be
culinary success!


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RESTAURANT & CATERING
550 East Main Street Bartow, FL, 33830
(863) 537-6373
www.especially4ubartow.com


I FANFARE FOR THE
RMERICAN C9ERO
Saturday, Jan. 19 7:30 p.m.
SFSC Theatre for the Performing Arts
Inspirational tribute to our soldiers and first responders
Tickets: $19, $22, $25
64ponsors: Dr. and Mrs. George D. Leidel (Gold)
Tim and Vivian Cook (Bronze)
bZ Carol Emery (Bronze)
Joan H. Hartt (Bronze)


CHINA AC9 'TIONAL J
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Monday, Jan. 28 7:30 p.m.
SFSC Theatre for the Performing Arts
This amazing 90-plece orchestra makes Its
first appearance on our stage.'
Tickets; $33, $36, $39
Sponsors: Florida Hospital Heartland &
Medical Center (Platinum)
Dr. and Mrs, Placldo M. Roqulz Jr. (Bronze)
Dr. Dini H. Rada/Heartland Pathology Associates
(Bronze)
Barbara A. Platte D.D.S. and Robert Gillmore1|
(Biorone) 1.,


OPEN:Sunday I 11:00am- 4:00pm Monday thru Friday 6:30am 8:00pm
Saturday 6:30 am 4:00pm


The Mel Tillis protege will appear in Frostproof
on Jan. 19. Tickets are on sale at Frostproof City
Hall. Admission is $10 per person.


January 9, 2013


Frostproof News Page 9






Pae1 --o poo-Nes....rv. 2013


By JAMES COULTER
NES CORRESPONDENT
The word that best describes the
photography of lanice Fann is "patience."
Currently on display at Lat MNaxcy
Memorial Library for its "Artist of the
Month" feature, most of her photographs
involved waiting for the right moment to
shoot them.
"I look for what it is that I want to take,
I wait for that moment to happen, and
then I take it," Farm said.
Her patience can be seen in her favorite
photograph of a sunset over Lake Clinch,
where she said she waited until the sun
was in the exact position she wanted it to
,Vt before shooting it.
, a photograph of the sun peeking
through a pair of reeds on the beach,
Farm said she had taken pictures at differ-
ent angles and locations before selecting
the right one.
For one gloomy beach scene, she
waited before an encroaching storm until
the sky was as dark as she wanted it to be
before taking the photograph.
As her gallery reveals, her favorite
subject is outdoor scenery, especially near
water. She especially loves water when it's
clear blue.
Most of her photographs are of local
subjects, while others were taken on her
vacations.
Her biggest challenge is with live
subjects, especially animals.
"They often don't do what you want
them to do," Fann said.
The camera model she uses is a Nikon







*

9 m
9 9 9 1


point-and-shoot.
"I don't have a real expensive camera,"
Farm said. "But as long as it's giving me
the quality of pictures I'm getting, it will
do."
Janice Fann was born in Baltimore,
Md. She graduated from Howard High in
1967. She lived throughout Marxyland and
New England before moving to Florida
where she has resided in Frostproof for
over 30 years.
She worked for human resources at Ben
Hill Griffin, Inc. for 25 years. Since her
retirement, Farm has dedicated her time
to her husband of 28 years, Michael, her
daughter, Michelle, and her grandchil-
dren Stetson, 6, and Reagan, 5.
It was "having a family and being able
to take pictures on special occasions" that
inspired her to take up photography
"I've always been the family photogra-
pher, so it's kind of been a lifelong hobby,"
she said.
She took photography classes at the
University of South Florida and has par-
ticipated in various photography clubs.
Her photography is purely a hobby,
as she does not have it displayed at any
other art gallery or personal website,
nor is she currently involved with any
photography club.
Her advice to both current arid pro-
spective photographers is to simply go
out and take pictures.
"Just take your camera and go out
and start shooting pictures and you'll be
amazed at what you get," she said.
Her photographs will be displayed at
the library until the end of the month.










S' . .- ,
7: **"', .: .. .- ...


9-. * * * *


'Patience' is key for


local photographer


Tomorrow night's concert featuring
"Cracked Walnuts" is just the start of a
busy month at Frostproof's Latt Ma-xcy
Memorial Library.
Cracked Walnuts will present "Music
of the Civil War The Lighter Side"
starting at 6:30 p.m., a one-hour
program that focuses on lighthearted,
knee-slappin' songs from the Civil War
era. It doesn't matter which side of
the Mason Dixon Line you're on, Jeff
and Jan Ausfahl will delight audience
members with banjo and washboard
music to such tunes as Old Dan Tucker
and the Yellow Rose of Texas.
On Monday, Jan. 14, from 9 to
I 1 a.m. representatives from the
Polk County Supervisor of Elections
Office will be at the Library to pro-
vide a variety of services including:
Voter registration, updating names
and addresses, changing party
affiliations, or requesting absentee
ballots.
The library will also debut a new


IA S IO Vi'OjlANTR I UST !i


PHOTO BY JAMES COULTER
Janice Fann is the Latt Maxcy Memorial Library's Artist of the Month for January.





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program in January called "Toddler
Time."
Toddler Time was created for children
up to age four and their caregivers.
Each session is a fun introduction to
books, finger plays, action songs and
rhymes. Toddler Time will begin on
Wednesday, Jan. 16 and will be of-
fered Wednesday mornings at 10 a.m.
Sessions run approximately 30 minutes.
The Latt NMaxcy Memorial Library
Annual Art Show will be held next
month, with the deadline for entries
of Feb. 1. The show will run from
Feb. 4 to March 8. Two categories are
offered this year including photogra-
phy (digital or film) and painting and
drawing. Awards reception will be held
on Thursday, Feb. 28, from 6 to 7 p.m.
Entry rules are available at the library
or call 863-635-7857 for details.
Also this month's featured Artist
of the Month is photographer, Janice
Fann. Her works will be on display
through the end of January.


Busy month at library


I


Page 10 Frostproof News


aJ nuary 9, 2013





J Frostproof News Page 11


Citrus Dept. wants to get in front of problems


Citrus commission to fight negative messages


immediately


By JEFF ROSLOW
IROSLOW@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
In an effort to get in front of nega-
tive messages getting to the public,
the Florida Department of Citrus
this month will start a campaign to
fight what it says could hurt orange
and grapefruit sales.
The pitch public relations director
Karen Mathis made to the Citrus
Commission earlier this month went
over so well that commissioners
were not only congratulatory about
the effort but wondered if more
money was needed for the effort.
"This is bigger than a $530,000
problem," said Commissioner Jay
Clark. Can we find money that
would be better spent (on this)?"
Commissioner Michael Haycock
questioned whether the amount
should be doubled or tripled.
The program is scheduled to
spend that amount on targeting
consumers and influential health
professionals and journalists who
deal with nutritional issues. The
total budget has $300,000 more that
will be spent on advertising. The
campaign is scheduled to start this
month.
Coming under attack and those
the citrus industry plans to coun-
terattack are consumers, health
professional influencers and media
influencers.
Mathis said the industry has to get
to pediatricians, family physicians,
nurse practitioners and registered
dietitians, reporters and editors who
are spreading inaccurate messages
about 100 percent orange drinks as
opposed to the drinks that add sugar
and could contribute to obesity.
"I've seen negative impacts of
sugar and orange juice to obesity
and we need some more balanced
stories," Mathis said, adding a more
accurate message has to get to the
editors of such publications as the
Washington Post, New York Times,
CNN and the Huffington Post to
name a few.
"The lower detractors are garner-
ing a lot of media coverage," she
said.
The marketing department has
hired Dr. James Rippe and dietitian
Heidi Skolnik to help this effort.
Rippe will be paid $30,000 and
Skolnik will be paid $15,000 for her
efforts to help FDOC.
Rippe, a doctor from Orlando, is
on board with the health benefits
of orange juice and Skolnik is a


well-known commentator appearing
regularly on the Today Show and -
Good Morning America, Mathis said.
Among the items that Rippe will
help with is getting to the editors
"who make decisions" regarding
coverage, to help correct incorrect
perceptions, Mathis said.
She also told commissioners when
Rippe talks to editors he will not go
alone. Either she or someone from
the FDOC will accompany him.
Also getting to the health influenc-
ers is important, she said. In many
instances there are health profes-
sionals who question the sugar
content.
"Our story is unique and we have
many key messages to share," she
told commissioners. "We contain no
added sugars and help consumers
reach health gaps. We've worked
very closely with a scientific team
that supports the health benefits of
100 percent orange juice."
The effort will not only be a
marketing campaign of getting to
detractors. Advertising will play a
large part in it. There will be televi-
sion and radio advertising, but also
there will be Internet advertising.
The FDOC has its own Facebook
page that is getting a lot of traffic
and Mathis said the effort on this
website is not only to continue
attracting eyes, but to make the
interaction fun and informative.
"The Internet is becoming a more
important source for consumers,"
she said. "There are new channels
online and we want to see Heidi
talking about OJ and that it has a
place in your daily diet."
She said the FDOC's Facebook
page is easy to use and share and for
consumers to send information to
followers.
Reinforcing the commissioners'
feeling that this effort should help,
Clark repeated getting out in front
of the problem before it gets too
large and hurts orange growers is an
important effort.
Just a few weeks ago the USDA
predicted a drop of 7 million boxes
this year.
"We must put a lot of emphasis on
the negative publicity and we must
respond to it," Clark said. "Your
message to get out in front, I think
we can get a lot from this' program."
Commissioners are expecting an
update on the effort at each sub-
sequent meeting on this campaign
effort.


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Citrus leaders are concerned that perhaps their message isn't getting out loudly enough.


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January 9, 2013












This ministry packs a punch, for good reason


By GEORGE FRANICEVICH
NEWS CORRESPONDENT
Usually the only places in Frostproof
routinely more peaceful than the
library are the churches. Which begs
the question, "What are the strange,
incongruous, 'warlike' sounds emanat-
ing from the Frostproof First Baptist
Church every Sunday and Tuesday
afternoon?"
Not to worry, because even though
the warlike sounds are coming from
warriors, they are not your ordinary
warriors. They are the warriors of a
dynamic new type of ministry.
"This ministry," Master Instructor
Dianna Coon explains, "uses the art
and science of an ancient martial art,
Tae Kwon Do, to provide an experience
that is beneficial to one physically,
spcially, and spiritually."
Coon recalled that, "Tae Kwon Do
originated out of necessity during
Japan's occupation of Korea, during
which time the Koreans were not
allowed weapons of any kind," and she
goes on to explain, "that while the art
is known for its emphasis on kick-
ing techniques and powerful strikes
it also focuses on self-defense and
self-improvement."
Tae Kwon Do is the most popular
of all the martial arts practiced today.
Part of the reason for this popularity is
that Tae Kwon Do was granted Olympic
Sport status.
The Frostproof Baptist Church
Ministry is associated with the Victory
Chung Do Kwan Association which
utilizes a curriculum established by the
Kukkiwan in South Korea also known as
the World Tae Kwon Do headquarters.
"In our ministry, activities are not
restricted to exercise and battle, but
are also social and family oriented,"
explains Coon, "and yet the fact that
you may not have any family members
that are able to attend this ministry,
should not stop you from coming. The
ministry is in itself a family. A family
that you will become part of."


The program is open to anyone in the
community, age four and up, and is not
just for church members or Baptists
only. The goal of the First Baptist
Church and this ministry program is to
show others the love of Jesus by provid-
ing a program where the community
can learn and grow together.
"As we practice and learn how to
strengthen our bodies, and minds,
while increasing our spiritual develop-
ment, we must also mark our progress
by testing and achievement of rank,"
Coon said.
The senior instructor in this ministry
is the dynamic and caring Fourth
Degree Black Belt, Dianna Coon. She
has 15 years of Tae Kwon Do experi-
ence. She is VTCDKA (Victory Tae
Kwon Do Chung Do Kwan Association)
Certified, and one of the first 10 Female
XVTCDKA Masters.
Coon is assisted by her 16-year-old
son, Matthew, a Third Degree Black
Belt, who has been studying Tae kwon
Do since he learned to walk. Matthew
has earned many local and state
championships and has participated in
several Junior Olympic competitions.
Also assisting occasionally is her
oldest son, Brian, a Third Degree
Black Belt, who is currently the
Church Youth Minister. Brian is
the reason Coon became a martial
artist. He was participating in the
after-school program of the Tae
Kwon Do Academy of Excellence
in Lake Wales, when his mother
decided to partake in the program,
"because it looked like such fun"
and the rest is history.
First Degree Black Belt, Steve
Singletary is a valued instructor who
has been with the ministry program
from the start; his son, Sven, also a First
degree Black Belt. Together they pro-
vide instruction and guidance to help
brig the newer and younger students
up to speed.
All the instructors trained at and
were VTCDKA certified through the
ministry's sister school, the Lake Wales


q.


Dianna Coon works with one of the program's younger students.


Academy of Excellence. It was their vi-
sion and support that was the founda-
tion for this program.
Tuesday, Jan. 15, the Frostproof
Baptist Church Tae Kwon Do Ministry
will be holding an open enrollment
from 5-6 p.m. at the Church on 96 West
B Street,. For information, call 863-635-
3603 or email Coon at dlcoon@hotmail.
com.
Frostproof Baptist Church Tae Kwon
Do is a ministry of the Frostproof
Baptist Church, and operates on a
cost-recovery basis. The instructors


and support staff all volunteer their
time. The Church provides the space
for the ministry, consequently the
cost for the ministry to operate is very
low.
Tuition is $20 per month per indi-
vidual or $30 per month per family.
Additional costs include the uniform
at cost, $20 per person. There are other
incidental fees such testing fees and a
VTCDKA national membership annual
fee (for rank certification). After you
reach a certain rank, protective spar-
ring gear will be needed.


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It's not always all work. The classes can be fun, too, for kids and adults of all ages and skill levels.


Coffee and doughnuts taste better when you

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Don't believe it?


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Frostproof News

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863-676-3467


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Page 12 Frostproof News


January 9, 2013


niOUIus muvIutu






January, 2013 Frostproof News Page 13


More than hogs,


Youth Fair features a var


By JEFF ROSLOW
JRO5LOWV(' HIEARrL NDN)EWSPAPERS.COMN
While many probably think of hogs and
steers when it comes to the annual Polk
County Youth Fair, the event that kicks off
its 66th year later this month, in reality, the
event shows off a lot more than that.
To name just two items that students
from around the county' will take part in,
consider the chili cook off contest and an
archery event. Both are extremely popular
and neither have anything to do with
animals.
"People do need to understand the
youth fair is not only animals. It's got a lot
of other things too," said Pat Crowell, who
oversees the events that take place inside
the center's building.
But the.are also different events out-
side the center, too, such as archery. Taking
place in the arena, this contest at last year's
debut had more than 50 students.
"It was the first year at the fair (last year)
and it was unbelievable," said Lamar
Collins, who helps organize the event.
Collins who helps coach archery
students at Union and was instrumental
in starting a squad at Summerlin Academy
this year, said this event is really good for
the kids and considering the first-year

A TASTE OF AGRICULTURE
The Fifth Annual Country Dinner is on Saturday,
Jan. 12, at the Higginbotham Rocking Ranch, 2200
Well Road, Lakeland. The social hour begins at 6
p.m. and the dinner and live auction begins at 6:30
p.m. Entry costs $25 for adults, 510 for students and
children younger than 18. Proceeds benefit the Polk
County Youth Fair. To RSVP call 863-644-6681.
Schedule of Events
Buildings are open to the public at 8:30 a.m. and
close after the last event of the evening. Entry is free.
Wednesday, Jan. 23:
9 a.m., Judging of non-perishable exhibits
Thursday, Jan. 24:
10 a.m., Tri-Color judging of non-perishable exhibits
Saturday, Jan. 26:
8:30 a.m., Horse show
9 a.m., Judging of perishables/Tri-Color Judging
Sunday, Jan. 27:
10 a.m., (first half) Market Hog Show
1-2:30 p.m., Intermission of Market Hog Show
2:30 p.m., (second half) Market Hog Show
Monday, Jan. 28:
8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Archery Competition
9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Tablesetting and Menu Planning
Contest
2 p.m.-4 p.m., Top Ranch Hand Contest
6 p.m., Market Hog Showmanship Contest
Tuesday, Jan. 29:
10 a.m., Market Hog Sale


S J
success, it is likely to be a continuing event.
The archery competition takes
place NMonday, Jan. 28 and goes from
8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
The 66th Annual Polk County Yobuth Fair
starts with judging the non-perishable
exhibits on Wednesday, Jan. 23, but the day
it really gets under way is Saturday, Ian. 26
when the Horse Show kicks off the day at
8:30 a.m. The fair takes place at the Start
Center, 1702 U.S. 17 S., Bartow. There are
events every day through the next Friday
and it is free to attend.
The Stuart Center building will be
filled with items students made. And
there will be a cake auction, mannequin
modeling, a storytelling contest and a
sew-off contest. but if you plan to go
to the center Wednesday afternoon, be
prepared. That's the day of the chili cook
off contest and it's bound to be elbow-to-
elbow traffic.
"One of the bad parts is it gets so
crowded at that rime we have to clear off
the floor," said Timnmy Tucker, who helps
organize the event
But he said that's not really such a bad
thing.
"It's a great event," said Tucker, \who also
helps organize the chili cook off contest.
"One thing that makes it so popular is the
10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sew Off Contest, Individual
10 a.m., Cake Auction
1 p.m., Mannequin Modeling
3-7 p.m., Working Booths
4-6 p.m., Sew Off Contest. Team (pillows)
4 p.m., Commercial Heifer Show/Showmanship
Wednesday, Jan. 30:
9 a.m.-noon, Storytelling Contest
1-5 p.m., Chih Cook-Off Contest
3-5 p.m., Stuart Center, open to the public
3-6 p.m., Dog Showmanship Class
5 p m., Poultry Show/Showmanship
7 p.m., Whip Popping Contest
Thursday, Jan. 31:
8 a.m., Dog Show
9 a.m.. Demonstrations
10:30 a.m., Illustrated Talks
9 a.m.-noon, Poultry, Egg and Rabbit Judging Contests
10 a.m.-4 p.m., Beef Breeding Show/Showmanship
2 p.m., Scrap-Off Contest
3-7 p.m., Mannequin Modeling
3-7 p.m., Working Booths
7 p.m., Market Steer Show/Showmanship (open and
commercial)
Friday, Feb. 1:
9-9:45 a.m., Horticulture Judging Contest
10 a.m.-noon, Working Booths
10 a.m.-noon, Mannequin Modeling
10:30 a.m.-noon, Livestock Judging Contest
2-4 p.m., Blueberry, Cilius, peace and Ornamental
Plant Sale
4:30-5:30 p.m., Tti-Color Presentation,
6 p.m., Parade of Champions
6:30 p.m.. Commercial Heifer Sale
7:30 p.m., Market Steer Sale


You deserve personalized quality health care!

13Benigno. Feliciano, M.D
D Diplomate of the American
SBoard of Internal Medicine
S-* Cardiac Diseases
| *Treating all High Blood Pressure
adult illnesses Pulmonary Diseases
Osteo/ Rheumatoid Arthritis
and diseases: Hypo/Hyperthyroidism
Diabetes
1137 Druid Circle Skin Diseases/ Cancer
Lake Wales, Florida Hih ChnlAtArnl


2000 Osprey Blvd., Suite 110
Bartow, Florida


* Strokes
* Wound Care


Se habla Espanol
Monday Friday: 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
863-533-1617
Accepting new patients 16 and older I !
- Walk Ins welcome Same day appointments
Internal Medicine Institute, P.A.


horses and steer


iety of events for all kinds


dayit happens it kind of influences the hog
show and steer show and that night is the
whip contest, so people can come, get a
bellyful and go."
This year's show features 32 teams
competing, and with three people on a
team, that's 96 students involved. There
have been some rule changes which may
have increased the attendance, but both
Crowell and Tucker said it is a popular
event. One point that makes that obvious is
the People's Choice Award.
Fair goers can buy five cups for a $1
and get a cup and can then vote for their
favorite. Tucker said that is a heavily
participated in contest. Two other parts of
the cookoff- and all three contests award
first, second and third places is a judge's
award and the best decorated booth.
One other thing they had to contend
with this year was being able to allow 32
teams to compete. All the cooking is done
on site as the students have two hours
to make-their chili. Before this year, 32
teams could not compete but the county
chipped in and now that many teams can
compete.
Before this year, electricity was being
used to prepare the chili with pulldowns
which were only supposed to be for
computers, Crowell said. She said no one
was aware of that, so electricians had to
rewire it. Last year with about 20 teams
competing, and building wired to allow up
to 32, it was no problem. This year they're
right at the limit, he said.
And, the competition is strictly for the
kids. They aren't allowed any help from
their parents except to bring in the equip-
ment they may use.
"We let the parents help bring in stuff,
but then we send the parents out and close
the door," Tucker said.
And, the money raised through the


FILE PHOTO
Dalton Scott of Frostproof entered this hog in
2011, but the annual Polk County Youth Fair
isn't always just about the animals.
competition sponsors scholarships
100 percent.
It's all part of the what the youth fair is
about, Tucker said: the kids.
"What makes this fair different than
most is there are no rides and nothing
else," he said. "This is about the kids and
what we can teach them then capture the
next group.


January 9, 2013


Frostproof News Page 13









Welcoming 2013 with a holiday whodunit at the Ramon


PHOTOS PROVIDED
When the title of the murder mystery is "I Saw Mommy Killing Santa Claus," rest assured the cast
of characters was as entertaining as they were diverse.


Although the Ramon's murder mystery series have been going on for a few years now, and always
draw a big crowd, there are still plenty of first timers, as was the case New Year's Eve as Lori and
Pibb Underwood enjoy their first trip to the Ramon with their daughter Teah Butler.


Be a BETTER MANAGER


tomorrow!
Books by Bartow Authors


Frisbie's Laws:
25 Surefire Rules for Successful Management
by S. L. Frisbie, IV
Yesterday's Polk County
by Louise K. Frisbie
Peace River Pioneers
by Louise K. Frisbie
Florida's Fabled Inns
by Louise K. Frisbie
Each book is $14.95 plus sales tax,
or order multiple books and SAVE!
Any two books, $26.90 (save 10%)
Any three books, $38.10 (save 15%)
Any four books, $47.85 (save 20%)
Offers expire 5 PM Dec. 20, 2012

Books may be purchased at The Polk County
Democrat, 190 South Florida Ave., Bartow, or
add $4 per book for mailing.
To order, email SLFrisbie@polkcountydemocrat.com
or call 863-533-4183 or mail coupon below to Imperial
Publishing, 190 South Florida Ave., Bartow, FL 33830


YES Reserve my copies of:- - -- - -
YES: Reserve my copies of:


Frisbie's Laws
Peace River Pioneers


Yesterday's Polk County ,
___ Florida's Fabled Inns


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Address
City___________________ State Zip_
Phone___________ Email
I will pick up my purchase or Mail to above address
_ Payment enclosed $_ or I will pay when I pick up my order


January 9, 2013


Page 14 Frostproof News


j 7fcna






January 9, 2013 Frostproof News Page 15


'Christianity Explored'


kicks off next week


Buzzy Elder may have the title
"Reverend" attached to his position
at Frostproof's First Presbyterian
Church.
But the local community leader
is hoping that their "Christianity
Explored" program, which starts
next Tuesday, reaches believers and
non believers of all faiths.
"It's not designed to be intimidat-
ing or heavy, everyone goes at their
own pace, and contributes as much
or as little as they want," he said
about the seven-week program.
All materials, including a Bible for
those who might not have one, will
be provided free of charge, and
dinner will be served to start each
class at 6 p.m. Free child care is also
being provided.
"We want to make it as easy
as possible on everyone to


participate," he added. "And we
are hopeful of seeing people of
many faiths. The important thing
here is to learn about and promote
Christianity, it's not just a Baptist,
or Presbyterian or Methodist thing."
The program is based on the Book
of Mark, but is tailored in such a
way that those with lots of knowl-
edge or very little knowledge of the
Bible can learn.
"It's very flexible and informal
which is one of the nice parts of
the program," Elder added. "The
accompanying materials, like the
CDs and printed materials, are very
impressive though."
The classes run each Tuesday
through the end of February. For
more information or to sign up,
contact the church at 863-635-3955.


pE-VMEN SALES M


PHOTO PROVIDED
Buzzy Elder, pastor at Frost-
proof's First Presbyterian _
Church, is hoping "Christianity
Explored,"which starts next
week, will help folks of all
faiths.


F--1771


Frostproof News Page 15


January 9, ?2013









APASSION1


Be aware and educated before


choosing 'other' species as pets
species .as'Pelts


I have always been amazed at the
variety of other species (other than
the routine dog, cat, fish, etc.) that my
clients have presented to the veterinary
hospital. Some are easy, some are not.
Some are a liability. The most disap-
pointing factor to me is the lack of
correct information relating to the care
of the various species.
-For example, the parakeet is an in-
elpensive and simplepet. Most clients
do not pursue any education about the
care of these birds, and rely on the pet
store for advice. The majority of para-
keets that I see in the practice are on a
seed only diet, which is NOT a balanced
diet. These and other pet birds should
have a diet that is varied and balanced


(i.e., extruded feed/pellets).
Pet species such as ferrets, skunks,
raccoons, Coati Mundi, fox, and
Kinkajou (Honey Bears) have unique
vaccine requirements as well as dietary
VET 117


PHOTO QOVIDED
Dr. Thomas
Schotman holds a
baby tiger. They're
cute but they may
not make good pets.


First, we don't sell acupuncture as some
kind of"miracle cure." It isn't. But, in many
cases, especially chronic cases that have not
responded as well as might be expected to
conventional treatments, acupuncture offers
a viable, safe and affordable alternative often
with very good results.


Treatment is available for issues of many kinds,
including lameness, skin condition, urinary
tract and kidney issues. and neurological and
respiration ailments. Dr. Shank is one of just a
handful of vets in all of Florida certified by the
renowned Chi Institute in both small and large
animal acupuncture.
Please call us today your first consultation is
FREE to see if acupuncture treatments might
be right for your dog, cat or horse.


.Lori.J..Shank..DVM
FORT MEADE ANIMAL CLINIC
~Lori J. Shank, DVM
711 t. Broadway, Fort Meade
Call for appointment: 285-8652







-4.
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Animal Hospital



863-676-6176


Page 16 Frostproof News


January 9, 2013


Dr. homas B.
Ochotman

mmS^







Sp ,
,,. I- - _


VET
FROM PAGE 16

needs. For example, if normal ca-
nine distemper vaccine (for dogs) is
administered to these species, there
is a risk of actually giving those
animals clinical distemper disease.
Additionally, many of these pets
can become intractable and some
even bite their owners. Many spe-
cies require permitting by the state.
Most reptile species are
fairly easy to maintain if certain
specifics requirements are met.


The basking species, like the
green iguana, can thrive if the
diet is correct, temperature is
adequately warm AND they
have exposure to direct sunlight
(there is NO artificial UV source
that will replace sunlight). The
large constrictors (pythons and
anacondas) have new mandatory
requirements (i.e. microchip
and permits), and venomous
reptiles have multiple permitting
requirements.
Primates may seem attractive as
pets but DO NOT make good pets.
The state and the USDA will have
say so, and a veterinary relationship


is required.
While Hama and alpaca are
considered domestic species,
camels require permits. Pot Bellied
Pigs can be great pets but are pigs
and have their management issues.
Obesity is my most common health
problem with them.
The bottom line is if a different
species is desired as a pet, thorough
and extensive investigation of
the complete management needs
should be explored, including
liabilities.
The Internet has as much misin-
formation as.it does good informa-
tion. Talk to your veterinarian.


Dr. Schotman shows courage getting so close to this skunk.


THE PUP HUT
Professional
Pet Grooming
Owners and Pet Stylists Annett & Shana
OVER 45 YEARS EXPERIENCE
294-1799
-, Owners & Pet Stylists 1619 Dundee Rd. Winter Haven, F L. 33884
, Annett & Shana

CATS DOGS OTHER SMALL ANIMALS
Carol Thompson, VMD
General Medicine & Surgery Laser Surgery
Behavior Consultation Boarding
3631-HWy. 60 E. -Lake Wales, FL 33898
863-676-5922 Fax: 863-676-7342
EMERGENCY: 833-676-4677
> THOMPSON'S .
1'ETERI-NARY CENTER













Come in and take a tour
and learn all about Suite Dreams Day Care!


| Suite Dreams .
520 Mountain Lake Cutoff Rd.
Lake Wales, FL 33859
863-676-1451




VETERINARY HOSPITAL w
wwwdakewalesvets.com


Cane is a one year old lab mit who
knows how to sit and lay down.


Nyla ii a three year old female
who, as you can see, likes to talk.


Manrey is anou lu monins ola.
He is sweet and playful.


Fancy is a 6 year old pug (hihuahua
mi and s good wili kids


Sam is an adultdeclawed male
(al He lit s) be a lap cal


ADOPTIONS

THL

HUMANE
SDOETYL

If you Vwould like to donate,
please send your
donations to.
The Humane Society
of Polk County
555 Sage Rd.
Winter Haven, FL 33881
863-324-5227
Or you can donate online
by going to:
www.humanesocietyof
polkcounty.org
Tues-Sat 10am 5pm
Kennel closes at 4pm


Water's Edge is a not-for-profrt retirement community
designed to bring the best in senior living to tnose of all faiths, beliefs
and traditions.Water's Edge offers villa homes, independent apartments,
assisted living and memory care.
To learn more about the residences at Water's Edge of Lake Wales,
please call 863.678.68'0 or visit .
www.watersedgelakewales.org -



WATER'S EDGE .


of Lake Wales
Inspired Senior Living
10 Grove Avenue West Lake Wales, Florida 33853


Iz::i~


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I i 111


.. .....-


Frostproof News Page 17


aJ nuary 9 2013






V 1fu


FEELINGUtm



Cruciferous vegetables: What a family


One of the folk traditions around the
world on New Year's Day is eating cab-
bage for good luck. There are compel-
ling reasons though, for consuming
cabbage and any of its relatives all year
round. The name cruciferous stems
from the cross-like shape of the four-
petaled flowers of these vegetables'
plants. They are also referred to as
the mustard family or Brassica, "cole
crops" in Latin. Members of this family
include: arugula, broccoli, collard
greens, kale, horseradish, bok choy,
Brussels sprouts, rutabaga, radish,
turnip, cauliflower, wasabi, kohlrabi,
watercress, and mustard.
Few foods can compete with crucif-
erous vegetables for their nutritional
value. They offer a high concentration
of vitamin A, C, K, all the B vitamins,
as well as powerful datioidants such
as beta carotene and lutein. They are
also rich in potassium, manganese, and
fiber. Cruciferous veggies are champion
cancer fighters containing glucosino-
lates, a group of natural compounds
which aid in detoxifying a wide variety
of cancer-causing toxins before they
assault healthy cells.
Caution should be exercised,
however, by people suffering from an
underactive thyroid (hypothyroid-
ism). Cruciferous vegetables contain
substances which interfere with the
manufacture of thyroid hormones in
the body. Such individuals should eat
these veggies no more than 1-2 times
per week, and mostly cooked. Cooking
destroys the thyroid suppressant
(goiterogens) activity.
Everyone else, in order to fully
benefit from these health-boosting
nutritional celebrities, should eat them
both cooked and raw.
The best cooking methods are to
briefly saut6 or steam the vegetables.
Cruciferous veggies offer an enormous
variety of culinary possibilities when
all parts of the plants are used: flowers
(as in broccoli and cauliflower), stems,
seeds, roots (such as turnip roots, and
rutabaga), and leaves. Some steaming
suggestions: peel, halve, and sprinkle


Health Correspondent


turnip roots with pepper and steam
12-15 minutes; or peel and cube a
rutabaga and steam 20 minutes, then
drizzle with olive oil on your plate;
lightly sprinkle cauliflower florets and
chopped stalks with ground nutmeg
and steam 15 minutes; brussel sprouts
can be steamed whole, or halved and
saut6ed with olive oil, chopped garlic,
and an herb, and mixed with cooked
grain or pasta, etc.
When making one of cole slaw's nu-
merous versions, drowning the salad in
a truckload of niayonnaise is unhealthy
and unsavory. A better tasting and
healthier dressing such as vinaigrette
(made from olive oil, wine vinegar, salt,
pepper, and an herb) is a better choice.
Or, make an Oriental dressing adding
soy sauce.
Sauerkraut, kimchi, and other
fermented veggies play a special role
in a healthy diet. They are known to
promote good digestion by beefing
up the all-important intestinal flora,
necessary for proper digestion and
nutrient absorption.
Improve your health luck: pay lip
service to cruciferous vegetables....
Happy and Healthy New Year.
Here are some recipes of delicious
and easy-to-make dishes for you to
try enjoy.

COLESLAW WITH WALNUTS
(Serves 3)
4 cups shredded cabbage
1 green onion, thinly sliced
2 cup roasted walnuts, coarsely
chopped .:


DRESSING:
2 tablespoons wine vinegar or juice
of 1 lemon
6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 clove garlic, finely grated
1/2 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
Salt and pepper
teaspoon honey
In a large bowl whisk together the
dressing. Add all other ingredients -
mix well.

STEAMED
BROCCOLI SALAD
(Serves 2)
4 cups broccoli florets and peeled
and sliced stalks
2 /2 tablespoons roasted, sliced
almonds

DRESSING:
Juice of V2 a lemon
1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper
Prepare the broccoli for steaming.
To roast almonds: heat a dry skillet
(without oil) at medium heat. Add the
almonds and stirring frequently, roast
8 minutes or until golden and fragrant.
Transfer immediately to a plate.
Meanwhile, steam the broccoli


S .. Eating
cabbage
can bring
you good
S has some
4 t nutritional
value.

PROVIDED








10 minutes or until tender-crisp. Drain.
In a bowl make the dressing. Add broc-
coli and almonds.

RADISH SALAD
WITH CELERY
VENAIGRETTE DRESSING
(Serves 3)
7 cups salad greens or Romaine let-
tuce, shredded
6 radishes
2 scallions, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, finely
chopped

DRESSING:
Juice of 2 a lemon
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper
1 tablespoon capers
1 1z celery stalks, finely grated

In a large bowl mix the dressing. Cut
radishes in half then thinly slice them.
Add all other ingredients.
Judy E. Buss is a nutritional cooking
instructor based in Lakeland, Florida.
She is a member of the American
Nutrition Association and a colum-
nist for and member of the American
Holistic Health Association.


Mall Walkers plan 2013 kickoff party


The Mall Walkers program, sponsored
by Lake Wales Medical Center and Eagle
Ridge Mall, has its 2013 Kickoff Party
from 9-10 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 17, in the
food court of the Eagle Ridge Mall.
Registered participants will receive
T-shirts, tracking cards and a descrip-
tion of new prizes to be offered in the
upcoming year. Lake Wales Medical
Center will be offering a mini health fair
and breakfast will be provided.
Prize parties will be held each month,
during which Mall Walkers participants
can redeem their mileage tracking cards
for prizes. Mileage logged must be
walked inside the mall.to be eligible for
prizes through Mall Walkers.
LilWalkers also is tracking total
miles walked by the group this year, and
tracking their virtual journey to various
destinations around the U.S. on a wall
map that is displayed in the mall's food
court.
For information about Mall Walkers,
call Lake Wales Medical Center at
S 863-679-6802.

Director of Pharmacy hired
Lake Wales Medical Center wel-
comed a new Director of Pharmacy,
netha Colorado-Tiner. Tiner has


Kennetha
Colorado-Tiner


a background
in health care,
working in posi-
tions that include
Clinical Staff
Coordinator and
Assistant Director
of Pharmacy at
other hospital
systems. She most
recently worked
for Carefusion, a
medical technol-
ogy company.


Offerings at Winter Haven
medical center
These offerings are happening over
the next two months at Winter Haven's
Center for Women and Infants. It is
located at 101 Ave. O. SE, Winter Haven.
For information on what is being of-
fered call 863- 294-7020.

Baby Care Workshop class on
basic baby care for expectant,
adoptive, or brand new parents.
Pre-registration required for class
Tuesday, Feb. 5, from 6-9 p.m.

Eight-hour babysitting class on


basic child care. The class covers being
a responsible babysitter, accident pre-
vention, how to handle emergencies,
age appropriate playtime activities and
Child CPR. For those between 11-16.
Pre-registration required and cost is
$30. Saturday, March 16, from 9-5 p.m.

Birth Preparation Workshop that
focuses on physical and mental prepa-
ration for labor and birth. 7-9:15 p.m.
Pre-registration required and space is
limited. Fee is $40 per couple if deliver-
ing at the Regency Center for Women
and Infants and $60 if delivering else-
where. Class times are every Thursday,
Jan 9-30, and Thursdays, March 7-28.

Breastfeeding Part 2: Out and About
class for breastfeeding moms will
focus on breast pumps, milk storage
information, discreet nursing in public,
back to work issues and breastfeeding
and the law. Saturday, Feb. 2, from
10:30-noon.

First Months Club for new parents
meeting from 3-4:30 p.m. Sessions
include informal sharing as well as
information of concern on topics such
as sleeping, feeding, safety, and growth
& development. Babies are welcome.


There is no charge and no pre-registra-
tion required.

The Happiest Baby class for new
parents is Tuesday, Feb. 26, from
5:30-6:45 p.m. Registration for this
program is available. Cost is $20, which
includes a parent kit with DVD.

Infant CPR class for $15 per person
and must be pre-paid. The class is
Tuesday, Feb. 26, from 7:30-9 p.m.

Online Childbirth Education
classes. The class is ideal if mom has to
be on bedrest or if there are schedul-
ing conflicts. The online class is an.
interactive, web-based program that
includes animated illustrations and
videos.

Breastfeeding class. Taught by a
lactation consultant, the class covers
suggestions on breast preparation, the
father's role, returning to work and
special techniques. Grandparents and
family members are welcome. Pre-
registration required. Class Monday,
Jan. 14, from 7-9 p.m.

Free car seat inspections are offered
by appointment. Call 863-294-7020.


January 9, 2013


Page 18 Frostproof News






January 9, 2013 Frostproof News Page 19


The issue of life expect


DEAR DR. ROACH: I realize most of
the letters you print are from senior
citizens, like me. I am 72 and have health
issues high blood pressure, elevated
cholesterol and arthritis, and I realize I
will not live forever. One of my friends
woke me up when she said she "has to
die of something." The thought of death
does not petrify me. When I've been in
senior health facilities, I've seen many
people whose quality of life is so limited
that I think I would choose a peaceful
death over some of those situations.
Sometimes I get the impression that
some of us think that if we get just the
right physician's care and medications,
life can go on and on. I-also realize that
Americans spend many of their health
dollars in the final year of their lives, and
that seems wasteful and unnecessary.
So I'd like you to relate what current life
expectancies are and what factors most
affect life expectancy. J.G.
ANSWER: Thank you for this hon-
est and thought-provoking letter. As
a primary-care doctor for 20 years, I.
have thought a lot about the issues you


bring up. I also have spent a lot of time
examining mathematical models of life
expectancy.
Let me start with your point that
Americans spend many of their health
dollars in the last year of life. In fact,
27 percent of spending is during the final
year of life. Unfortunately, it is not always
clear as it is happening that the last year
of life is upon us, or even that the illness
one is facing is destined to be the final
one.
So, it makes sense to treat illness
appropriately, no matter what the age.


I don't see people regret medical care
when the outcome is uncertain; people
regret too much medical care when a
terminal result is certain. That often takes
time. You have been wise enough to look
at what the future might hold, and now
is the time, if you haven't already, to write
out your wishes in the form of a living
will and to designate and, especially,
discuss with your durable power of
attorney for health care what your
wishes are in case you are no longer able
to make those wishes known. That way,
once it becomes clear, your family and
doctors will know-what you want.
Your second question is about cur-
rent life expectancy. These numbers are
available readily from the Social Security
Administration website, and you can find
that a 72-year-old woman has, on aver-
age, a life expectancy of about 15 years.
On the other hand, if you make it to 87,
you still have a life expectancy of about
six more years.
However, nobody lives forever. Even for
a person with the healthiest lifestyle, who
has avoided chronic diseases and has


ncy

good genetics, that person at 72 has a life
expectancy of 20 to perhaps 30 years.
You can make a huge difference by
keeping your blood pressure under
control, exercising regularly and eating
well. The jury remains out, but I suspect
that personality traits, including resil-
ience, and strong social connections also
predict long life.
TO READERS: Questions about the
common problem of uterine fibroids are
answered in the booklet of that name.
To obtain a copy, write: Dr. Roach No.
1106, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475. Enclose a check or money order
(no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the
recipient's printed name and address.
Please allow four weeks for delivery.
Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable
to answer individual letters, but will
incorporate them in.the column whenever
possible. Readers may email questions to
ToYourGoodHealthmed.cornell.edu or '
request an order form of available health
newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475. Health newsletters may be
ordered from u'u'wirbmnamall.com.


Watching is part of learning even with eating


Want your kids to eat more fruits and
vegetables? Eat with them.
A University of Leeds study found that
children who see their parents eating
healthy foods tend to eat them more.
According to the study, 63 percent of
children worldwide don't consume the
World Health Organization's recom-
mended amount of five portions (400g)
of fruits and vegetables per day.
The researchers said children who
always ate a family meal together at a
table consumed 125 grams (1.5 por-
tions) more fruits and vegetables on


WELL NEWS
Scott LaFee


average than children who never ate
with their families. Even those who
reported eating together only once
or twice a week consumed 1.2 por-
tions more than those who never ate
together.
"Even if it's just one family meal a
week, when children eat together with


parents or older siblings they learn
about eating. Watching the way their
parents or siblings eat and the differ-
ent types of food they eat is pivotal
in creating their own food habits and
preferences," said study author Janet
Cade, a professor at the University
of Leeds School of Food Science and
Nutrition.
Body of Knowledge
In maximum ordinary breathing, the
speed of air passing through the nose,
equals 10 feet per second, or Force 2 on the


Beaufort wind scale, e.g., a light breeze.
Life in Big Macs
One hour of showering burns 136
calories (based on a 150-pound person)
or the equivalent of 0.2 Big Macs. It also
wastes a lot of water.
Counts
39 times per week, on average, that
U.S. surgeons leave a foreign object,
such as a sponge or towel, inside a
patient's body
Source: Johns Hopkins University


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If you experience any of these symptoms. call 9-1-1 and ask to be taken to Florida Hospaiq
For more infotrmaion, please visit www.hheardand.org


FLORIDA HOSPITAL
HEARTLAND MEDICAL CENTER


Frostproof News Page 19


January 9, 2013


I





P2~P 20 Prnstnrnnf News January 9, 2013


THE MOST ADVANCED HEALTH CARE IS CONVENIENT.


Auburndale Family Health Center
2028 Highway 92 West
(863) 965-9327

Bartow Family Health Center
1625 N. Carpenter Ave.
(863) 533-1448

Dundee Family Health Center
5999 Dundee Rd., Suite 750
(863) 292-4656

Haines City Family Health Center
36245 Highway 27
(863) 421-9801

Lake Wales Family Health Center
201 SR 60 West
(863) 679-9644

Southeast Winter Haven
FamilyHealt Center
6035 Cypress Gardens Blvd.
(863) 324-4725

Winter Haven Family Health Center
100 Avenue I, N.E.
(863) 292-4077


Ifyouarelooking forfamiyheathcare that's professional, friendly and convenient,
Winter Haven Hospital invites you to visit one of our seven conveniently located
Family Health Centers.
Your local Family Health Center offers a wide range of healthcare services
for children two years-of-age and older, adolescents and adults including:
school physical, immunizations, basic x-rays and laboratory tests, minor surgery
and routine gynecological exams.
When it's your family's health, you want the best doctors, the best nurses and next-door
convenience. Each of our Family Health Center offices is open Monday through Friday,
9:00 am to 5:00 pm.
Compassion. Innovation.Trust. We're your family's choice.


Winter Haven

Hospital

FAMILY HEALTH CENTERS

Compassion. Innovation. Trust.


"!" "tl .' :


Yoi Watch Us
B on YouTube


January 9, 2013


Page 20 Frostproof N s






REAL ESTATE


Wednesday, January 9, 2013


Lake Wales: 863-676-3467


Bartow: 863-533-4183


CLASSIFIED
Autos
Auctions
Items for Sale
Homes for Sale
Homes for Rent
and More...


BARTO W LAKE WALES FO RTM EADE FRO STPROOF H AIN ES CITY LAKELAND W IN TER HAVEN

What should I look for when deciding on a community?


SFirst, look at your job location and or the
value of commuting from a nice peace-
ful bedroom community into to a larger
more populated city. There are advantages
that may outweigh the price difference
of the price of gas. For instance, in the
Frostproof area, we pride ourselves on
small community values including highly
rated public schools that consist of grades
from K-12. The traffic is rarely a problem
Since there are only two red lights and two
caution lights within the city limits.: What
a perfect place for the folks slowing down
and wanting to drop a.line to catch a fish?
Ouir town consist of lakes greater in mass
size than the land size.

What should I do if I'm feeling excluded
from certain neighborhoods?
Immediately contact the U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) if you ever feel ex-
cluded from a neighborhood or particular
house. Also, contact HUD if you believe
you are being discriminated against on
the basis of race, color, religion, sex,
nationality, familial status, or disability.
HUD's Office of Fair Housing and Equal
Opportunity has a hotline for reporting
incidents of discrimination: 1-800-669-
9777 (and 1-800-927-9275 for the hearing


Spacious 4 bedroom 2 bath double wide on 1.11 Acre located at 2907 Mar Lisa Cove Rd, Lake Wales; a REO/bank owned property
sold by Michelle Hutto, an Approved HUD Selling Broker received the winning bid for her buyers at $35,200.00.


impaired).

How can I find out about community
resources?


Go to your local realtor's website, chanc-
es are they have a community resource
center with local links such.as the one
found on Keystone Realty's website, www.
Keystone-RealEstate.NET.


j!G-E 3CO(9W0MAI1N CAVE!!
d/2 bath-DWMH REDUCED TO $138,900 OBO!
Blue Jordan Forest
.'--. ._ Michelle K. Hutto, Broker-Owrer
r -iaa'Iygiria|-l..,no co"n
245S Scenc Hiwy Frosiproo FL 33843
3-635-0030 Fax 863-6 5-0031 Ceil S3. -528-1136
www.Keystone-RealEslate.NET


You can find every business and service Under the sun in the
Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it!

Call 877-822-7167



LEGACY REAL ESTATE CENTR!


i8,.- 86,6676-7040
"PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.

"PRIME PLUS SERVICE YOU DESERVE!"
l mvm-..-


Lots of Living Area
* Ot'n Floor Plan 3 B[D/2 B.-\
South Lake aklc'
* Ner W\amir (I' & Hok A id
Large Fenred Yard
$75,000


BIG HOME! LOW PRICE! CANAL FRONT WITH POOL
4 Bedroom 3 Bath 2 Story Home with 3 Bedroom 2 Bath with enclosed pool.
almost 3,000 ft. living area. buili in home has new roof. new paint. new car-
2006, spacious living area and kitch- pet, Ready to Move-In. Covered Boat
en, upstairs bonus room. master suite Dock on. Canal to Lake Walk tn Water,
lashqpinawi jac414 49 0 Recently RvducedPice Sia9;z -
^ START YOUR NEW YEAR OUT WITH A NEW HOME o
J CHECK OUR WEB SITE wvm.primcplusreale.tate.com


MEDICAL FACILITY
NEAR HOSPITAL
Mdikhal \eihhbrhtl)d
*9 Exam.Rni-.i5 Bath
.5 Olliceq'Lg. Reception Area
tL,. Corner Lie" 22 PRkin. Lt
$106,000


Pool Home On
Yarnel Avenue
* Large Corner I.Al
* Spaicious, 3BD/2BA
New A/C
SHuge Lanai/Poul Area
$129,000


I I __ I I I 'I'








Page 2 CLASSIFIEDS January 9,2013


1 000 1020 HOUSES FOR SALE


REAL ESTATE


"We Are Pledged To The Letter And
Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achieve-
ment Of Equal Housing Opportunity
Throughout The Nation. We Encour-
age And Support An Affirmative
Advertising And Marketing Program In
Which there Are No Barriers To
Obtaining Housing Because of Race,
Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Famil-
ial Status Or National Origin."

1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
CANAL FRONT HOME, 3
bed 2 bath home with
screened in ground pool,
breakfast bar, new carpet,
new paint, new roof and new
screen on pool enclosure, 1
car garage, on canal with a
dock and boat lift; listed at
$159,900 ID #6084 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
NICE 2 STORY HOME,
Large 4 bed 3 bath spacious
home with 2,931 sq. ft. living
space, Jacuzzi tub and dual
sinks in master bath, break-
fast bar, closet pantry and
ample kitchen cabinet space,
laundry room, and 2 car
garage; listed at $104,900 ID
#2167 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
CUTE 3 BEDROOM 2 BATH
HOME, This nicely land-
scaped home has a screened
in porch, 1 car garage and a
fenced yard; listed at
$54,900 ID #106 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
LARGE 2 STORY HOME, 5
bed 3.5 bath 2 story spacious
home with 3,716 sq. ft. living
space has stainless steel
appliances, granite counter-
tops, island, and breakfast
bar; the master bath includes
dual sinks, a separate shower
stall and a spa tub; it has
ceramic tile floors, new car-
pet, screened in patio and an
oversized 2 car garage. Beau-
tifully landscaped with con-
crete paver driveway and
walkway; located in a gated
community; listed at
$269,000 ID #1860 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
SE WINTER HAVEN 4 BED-
ROOM 3 BATH BUILT IN
2006, Beautiful 2 story home
with new kitchen appliances,
kitchen has granite counter-
tops, formal living and dining
areas, large master suite with
walk in shower plus garden
tub; home has over 2,500 ft.
of living area, beautiful vault-
ed ceilings, crown moldings,
just listed at $199,900 ID #
7334 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
LAKEFRONT HOME ON
LAKE WALK- IN- WATER,
large covered dock with boat
lift, formal living and dining
room,- family room with fire
place, enclosed florida room,
remodeled kitchen with break-
fast nook, sun room, work
shop, screen porch; Spectac-
ular views from family room,
kitchen and florida room, lush
landscaping, privacy fenced
yard, utility shed, $255,000
ID# 9402 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co


AVON PARK--WE HAVE
SEVERAL HOMES FOR
SALE, all are priced to.sell
quickly, some with lake view,
great investment opportunity;
call today for more informa-
tion or stop by our office for
details and map.
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 or visit
online www.primeplus-
realestate.com
SEBRING--WE HAVE
MANY LISTINGS IN
SEBRING AREA, HOMES,
CONDOS, Priced Low, call
863-676-7040 today for
more information or stop by
our office PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. or visit online at
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

WATER-FRONT BEAUTIFUL
HOME ON CANAL LEAD-
ING TO LAKE WALK IN
WATER, Move-In condition,
3 Br. 2 Ba., cathedral ceiling,
spacious living room, large
Florida room with view of
canal and lake, formal dining,
plus eating space next to
kitchen, all appliances, wash-
er and dryer, 2 car garage,
workshop, large covered
dock on deep water canal,
ust seconds from the lake,
$175,000 ID# 6616 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
CONDOS
GREAT WINTER RETREAT OR
GET AWAY, Completely Fur-
nished, includes Washer (no
dryer), Ceramic Tile through-
out, bedroom has carpet,
screened porch has ceramic
tile, roof new 2009; Ameni-
ties include: Pool, Rec. Room,
Clubhouse, lake access, spa,
tennis courts, shuffleboard,
basketball, mini-golf, bocci
ball, gym, library; listed at
$49,000 ID #905 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
GREAT PRICE ON THIS.
FURNISHED 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH CONDO, 1,184 ft. liv-
ing area, screened porch,
convenient location to shop-
ping in the city limits of Lake
Wales. $29,900, PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 id # 130 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
MOBILE HOMES
3 BR. 2 BA. MOBILE HOME
ON 1 ACRE, NICE WELL MAIN-
TAINED HOME WITH STOR-
AGE BLD.
Located just east of Lake
Wales near Lake Rosalie,
Great Fishing and boating
lake, $65,000 ID# 2188
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
VACANT LAND
BEAUTIFUL CORNER LOT
NEAR BLUE LAKE, if you are
looking for a spot to build
your dream home, this is the
perfect location, near blue
lake, close to US 27, area of
nice homes; $29,900, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040
HOME SITE, Nice half Acre
lot located in Beautiful Area of
Homes. Growing Region Cen-
trally Located between Winter
Haven and Lake Wales. Par-
tially Cleared and ready to
Build your First Home.
$27,900 id #cc PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. (863) 676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
WOODED HOME SITE! 2
Acres of Beautiful Woods in
deed restricted community to


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
build your new home! Not too
far from Public Boat Ramp
into Lake Rosalie. Owner Moti-
vated and will look at all Rea-
sonable Offers! $39,900 id#
11209 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC (863) 676-7040.
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
LAKE FRONT ON LAKE
WALK IN WATER, Just Over
5 Acres, Partially Wooded,
Private Location, Dead End
Street. Great Price!'$59,900
id# Lt22 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE, INC 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
BLUE JORDAN FOREST,
ALMOST 3 ACRES, BEAU-
TIFUL NATURAL FLORIDA
WOODS, Gated community,
lots of wildlife, enjoy the coun-
try peaceful atmosphere,
$22,000 ID # 7299 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
VACANT 5 ACRE PASTURE
LAND, with electric on site,
well, and fenced, zoned for
horses. Just listed $25,000
ID #57 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m-


Don't put the

brakes on


Give your advertising
budget the green
light-use our
classified to spread
the word!
Call us to find out
how our classified
section can rev up
your business.


(863)


676-3444


ACROSS
1 "World Series of
Poker" channel
5 Improve
10 Japanese
noodle
14 See 17-Across
15 Hawk's weapon
16 Neatness
analogy ending
17 Queen of the 14-
Across,
familiarly
18 The money
follows it
20 Gardner of film
21 Lacking
embellishment
22 Missouri
tributary
23 Olympic hero
27 Duty
28 Conductor
Andre
29 which way
30 Suffix with phon-
31 River project
32 Create, as words
34"_ Death": Grieg
work
35 Treat like a child
38 Sense
41 Lincoln et al.
42 gratia: by the
grace of God
44 Italian article
45 "Now I
understand!"
46 Fin de : end of
the century
49 Approximate no.
50 Rapid rail
transport
53 Tokyo-based
watchmaker
55 New Haven
collegians
56 Columbus-to-
Cleveland dir.
57 Actor's tryout
60 Do bar work,
perhaps
61 British weapon of
WWII
62 Down Under
soldier
63 Basic video
game
64 _buco
65 Grind, as teeth
66 Old-fashioned
sort


By Gerry Wildenberg
DOWN
1 Spend a night on
the trail
2 With 47-Down,
proverbial cloud
feature, and a
hint to the starts
of 18-, 23-, 35-,
50- and 57-
Across
3 Begged
4 "The Matrix" hero
5 Early in the
moving
6 Native New
Zealanders
7 Former "Idol"
judge with
Simon, Kara and
Randy
8 Lon of Cambodia
9 Genetic letters
10 Smart talk
11 Poppy products
12 Super Bowl, e.g.
13 New wings,
maybe
19 Golf star Mcllroy
21 Super Bowl sight
24 "Stop, ya swabs!"
25 Innocents
26 -trix relative
32 Early computer
language


g 1/9/13
ELA /OUl 'sOO!AJaS e!pa aunqJ L 0LOZ(o)
A 90 HS VIN O 9SS0O
ONOd OVZN V NBIS
B I IS IS IN9 Uo 0 S
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1-3 a s 3 e -V I S 1 10
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N I S8vil 0 0 D 1 0
N Id V N01VI1 91 IN
v OSs 0N 3W V NdS9
POAIOS eIzznd sAepsaupeM


33 Maitre d's "Are
you by yourself?"
34 Run like _
36 Obama's
birthplace
37 Prepares for print
38 "I suppose"
39 Flies, for example
40 Send-ups
43 Playground
response to a
challenge
45 Reed instrument


46 Sewer line
47 See 2-Down,
48 Benefit of some
bars and drinks
51 TV hostGibbons
52 Schiaparelli et al.
54 Lotto-like game
58 Racehorse, to a
tout
59 Spike TV,
formerly
60 Coppertone
letters


A local research study may offer free
investigational rheumatoid arthritis medication.
Compensation up to $1200

Cal: 8 6-44-46
*or ii wwRtra* o


Clssified


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU

column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process n -,ii r to solve the puzzle. The cin -. ii',
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold *

3 2 9 Rating: GOLD
9 7 8 ....
635Z L 6 9 1E I 9 8
6 3 85 1 8 Z z 96 f 9 L

6 8 9 E 9 L 8 L V I 6 Z
-818 9L9E6
8 4 7 6 -- -_
9 E L 6 EZ 1711 8
3 4 1 1 6 17 J I 8 9 L E9
9 8 3 Z6 t I E 8 L 9
S_7 _L 9 1 9 Z 6
7 9X L [1 9 6 8 Z t E
3 9 2
I------ ------


MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE
Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management.
Job placement assistance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized.
Call 888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com


Centura
| COLLEGE


CLASSIFIED


71m-W~T ~ I


Page 2


January 9, 2013







Janury 92013CLASIFIDS Pge


Homes for Sale
Frostproof Listings
405 Walter Ave 3/2/1 cpt,
wood & tile floors, fenced
$64,900 Call Michelle
2660 Bear Run 2/2/1 cpt,
Blue Jordan Forest $80,000.
OBO Call Cindy
204 Woodstork Way 3/2 1
acre, fenced $82,000. Call
Michelle
206 Woodstork Way 3/2/2
garage new wood floor, tile
$115,000, OBO Call Cindy
2616 Sand Pine Tr
3/2/Oversized garage 3.24
acres $138,900. OBO Call
Michelle
1140 Hopson Rd. 2/2
+Unique Detached Lanai
w/hot tub 11 +/-Acres
Reduced $139,900. Call
Michelle
3308 Indian Pipes Tr.
3/2/2 carport, 10 acres,
horse stalls + more
$145,000 Call Cindy
409 W 9th St 4/2.5/2 car
garage, split level, wood &
tile floors reduceduced$149,000
Call Michelle
83 Yale Ave 2/1, $39,900.
Call Wesley
204 Central Ave 2/1/1gar,
$49,000. OBO Call Cindy
130 Overocker Circle 3/2
immaculate concrete block
home with new wood lami-
nate floor, ceramic tile in
bathrooms, new central air
conditioning, some new win-
dows, freshly painted inside
and out Asking $69,000.
OBO Seller's are very moti-
vated! Ask for Michelle
703 N Palm Ave 2/1
$59,000 has a 3 year lease,
corner lot next to Hwy 630
Call Fred
258 Quail Run $110,000
large DW 4/2 on approx.
acres, fenced small
barn/workshop Ask for
Michelle
90 S Lake Moody Rd
$249,000 4/2 on 3.37
acres, lakefront, small grove,
detached garage/workshop
Call Fred
203 West Wall St. 4 apart-
ment units 2-1/1 collects
$460/month each 2-2/1 col-
lects $500/month Asking
$169,500 for all on corner
lot across the street from
public library, play park and
walking distance to down-
town shopping and clinic.
Call Wesley
Homes for Rent
124 Lakeview Avenue,
Frostproof 2 bedroom 1
bath with front porch
$425/month 1st, last and
Sec. Call Michelle
10 Center St Frostproof
2bed/lbath w/lbath in det
garage $500/month $250
Security deposit Call Cindy
1350 S Scenic Hwy
2bed/1 bath cottage on Sil-
ver Lake $550/month $550
Security $550/last month
Call Michelle
Keystone Realty Inc.
863-635-0030

Seize the sales
with Classified!


1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
Fort Meade -'05, 3bd, 2ba,
26'x44', doublewide, fully
furn. 1048 Wisconsin St. SE.
$28,000. 810-516-7541.
Mobile Home $60,000,
Includes Lot. Double-wide,
3Bd/2Ba, Fla Rm, Screen Rm,
Barn & Irrigation, White Vinyl
Fence, C/A/H.
863-638-2837
1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES
37 ACRE MIDDLE TN FARM
with 13 acre lake, nice home.
Selling at Absolute Auction,
Memorial Day. Van Massey
Auction Lic 1711. (931)433-
8686 Visit vanmassey.com
DEVELOPER FORCED LIQ-
UIDATION Smoky Mtn. Lake
Property Priced @ Foreclo-
sure/Short sale. Up to 100%
Financing/5% interest. Hurry-
Only 30 Reservations avail-
able! (877)551-0550 ext 100
1210 HOMES FOR RENT
BABSON PARK, 503 Hillside
Dr., 2br/1.5ba C/H/A, W/D
Included, nice yard, no pets.
$650/mo. plus security. 863-
875-6761.
BARTOW 1BD 1BA
$550.00 monthly $300.00
SD
863-837-0013
BARTOW, Clean 1Bdr Apart-
ment in Duplex, on Bartow's
Westside. Ceramic tile floors
throughout, large kitchen.
$425./monthly.
863-299-8070.
FROSTPROOF 3 bed-
room, Great location Big
yard Avail. Now!
$625/month Lv msg. 863-
635-1234
LAKE WALES *2 houses
for RENT 2Bd/1Ba, $550
monthly $450 deposit...
Call 863-676-5066 or
863-676-1901
NO CALLS after 9pm

IT'S NEVER
BEEN EASIER!


^ i


S\
K


Searching for a new car, home or usl something
to do this weekend? Make it easy on yourself.
Subscribe to The Polk County Democrat
and get a wealth of information available
at your fingertips every day.
The Polk County Democrat
863-533-4183


1210 HOMES FOR RENT

Lake Wales- 4BR/2BA split level
home with 2 car garage. New tile
floors throughout. Stainless steel
appliances. 2400 sq ft!
$1200/month, SD $1200. Call
Maggie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Services, Inc 863-676-0024 or
visit www.LegacyLeases.com.
Lake Wales- Cozy 4BR/2BA with
fresh interior paint. Located close
to shopping. $1200/month, SD
$1200. Call Maggie Stohler at
Legacy Leasing Services, Inc
863-676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Lake Wales- 3BR/2BA home in
Highland Pointe. Tile floors
throughout. Two car garage.
$950/month, SD $950. Call Mag-
gie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Services, Inc 863-676-0024 or
visit www.LegacyLeases.co
Lake Wales- 2BR/1BA duplex.
Recently updated kitchen.
$500/month, SD $400, 1st, last,
and SD required up front. Call
Maggie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Services, Inc 863-676-0024 or
visit www.LegacyLeases.com
Lake Wales/Crooked Lake
Park- Cozy 3BR/1BA home with
screened porch and spacious
yard. All new tile floors and paint.
here is a detached bonus room
with bathroom that could be used
as a game room or guest suite.
$800/month, SD $800. Available
11/30/12. Call Maggie Stohler at
Legacy Leasing Services, Inc
863-676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Commercial
Nalcrest- 379 sqft for lease in a
community that boasts 500
apartments and approximately
800 residents. This space would
be ideal for a hair or nail salon.
There is an attached bathroom.
Water and wifi included in rent.
$400/month. Call Maggie Stohler
at Legacy Leasing Services, Inc
863-676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Nalcrest- 950 sqft of
Retail/Office Space for lease in a
community that boasts 500
apartments and approximately
800 residents. There is an
attached bathroom and 600 addi-
tional square feet that could be
added on to the existing 950 sq
ft. Water and wifi included in
rent. $800/month. Call Maggie
Stohler at Legacy Leasing Ser-.
vices, Inc 863-676-0024 or visit
www.LegacyLeases.com
212 E. Stuart Ave.
Lake Wales, Fl. 33853








1240 CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
WINTERSET CONDO -
LAKE VIEW 2bd / 2bath,
upstairs
unit. Community amenities.
$775.00 per month. Security
deposit required. Call 863-
678-1498 or 863-241-1528

1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
Indian Lake Estate 2bd,
2ba, duplex with w/d hook-up.
$575. mo., $575. sd., Call:
863-205-3868.
Classified = Results


1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
2/1 in Highland City
Hancock to Charlton
$475-$505/month
Move In Specials
Lakeland Properties &
Mgmt., Inc.
(863)665-8575

BARTOW, 495 E. Guava
Street. lbr/lba $300
month plus $300 security
deposit. One year lease.
863-533-3900 or
863-603-7715

COLONIAL SQUARE
APARTMENTS
FALL SPECIALS!
1 and 2 Bedroom apts with
central a/c and heat, large
floor plans, abundant clos-
et
space & FREE WATER
Starting at $465/ month
Move-In Specials too
Call 24/7: 866-485-
4961
Or visit us online at:
ColonialSauareBartow.com

OAKWOOD MANOR
APARTMENTS
PRICES REDUCED FOR
LEASE UP!
Our updated villa-style
apartment homes provide
comfortable living at a
great price. Rates include
water.
Studio from only $405/mo
1 BR. from only $475/mo
2 BR with w/d hookups
from only $595/month
Convenient location,
Walk to shopping.
Call 24/7 866-485-
4977
Or visit:
OakwoodManorApts.co
m

1340 MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
BARTOW 2BR 2BA
$650.00 monthly $500.00
SD
863-837-0013
1350 EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT
Efficiences Apartments
For Rent. Quiet Neighbor-
hood. Adults only. No. Pets.
863-514-0103
LAKE WALES Efficience
Apartment. $135 week. Elec-
tric / Water Included. No
Smokers, No Pets. 863-632-
7013
Lake Wales Efficiency.
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at house, 444 E Central Ave.
863-855-0764

Need Cash?
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1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
OWNER FINANCE N.
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Brochure, Shirley 800-
545-3501 386-466-2254
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must go. 4.5 acres with out-
standing views and privacy.
$25,000 OBO, great for
home or cabin. (828)394-r
9298. Ask for Richard

1610 BUSINESS RENTALS
Commercial property for
rent, 322 S Scenic Hwy, Lake
Wales. Excellent business
location, large building
10,000 sq. ft., 14 ft overhead
doors, 1500 sq. ft. office
show room with A/C. Security
deposit required. $2000.00
per month 863-678-1498 or
863-241-1528

2000


EMPLOYMENT

2001 HELP WANTED
A Few Pro Drivers Needed
Top Pay & 401K Great Equip-
ment & Benfefits 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
ACT NOW! New Pay Increase!
37-46 cpm. New Trucks in
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Driving Experience. (877)258-
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AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Aviation
Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Avi-
ation Institute of Maintenance
(866) 314-3769.
ASAP! New Pay Increase!
34-46 cpm. 300 Newer
Trucks. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
CALL NOW! Top 5% Pay!
Excellent Benefits. 300 New
T660's. Need 2 months. CDL-
A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
CDL DRIVERS Great Pay!
Tons of Texas Frac work!
Great company! Company
paid benefits! Must have bulk
pneumatic trailer experience.
Call today! (800)491-9029.
CDL-A Drivers- Relocate for
Tons of Great Paying Texas
Oilfield work! Great compa-
ny/Paid benefits! Must have
bulk pneumatic trailer experi-
ence. Call today! (800)491-
9029

ADVERTISE!


AAIM


2001 HELP WANTED
CDL-A DRIVERS. Central Flori-
da company seeks Solo &
Team Drivers. Tank and Dry
Van positions offering some
regional. lyr OTR/ Good MVR
required. (877)882-6537 or
www.oakleytransport.com
CLAIMS ADJUSTERS
NEEDED due to active Storm
Season. JEL's 5-day Boot
Camp, Nations #1 hands-on
trainer can prepare you. High
Income www.JELTraining.com
- Companies waiting
CYPRESS TRUCK LINES
Home Weekends! Southeast
Regional, Top Pay & Great
Benefits! 6 Months TT exp
CDL with clean MVR. Call
(800)545-1351 .
www.cypresstrick.com
DRIVER- Not getting enough
miles? Join Knight Transporta-
tion and increase your income
with our steady freight. New
Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience. (800)414-
9569. www.driveknight.com
Driver- Recession Proof
Freight. Plenty of miles. Need
refresher? No out-of-pocket
tuition at FFE. $1000 Bonus
for CO's & $1500 Incentive
for 0/0's. recruit@ffex.net.
(855)356-7121
Driver-Drivers choose
from Weekly or Daily Pay.
Regional, OTR or Express
Lanes, Full or Part-time, CDL-
A, 3 months recent experi-
ence required. (800)414-
9569 www.driveknight.com
Drivers No Experience -
No problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to
$.49 per mile! CRST VAN
EXPEDITED (800)326-2778
www.JoinCRST.com
.Drivers Earn Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 .yr OTR
Flatbed exp. Call: (800)572-
5489 Susan ext. 227 Joy ext.
238 SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC.
Drivers Earn Up to 39C/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR Flatbed
exp. Call: (800)572-5489 Joy
ext. 238 Susan ext. 227 SUN-
BELT TRANSPORT, LLC
Drivers Wanted-OTR Food
Grade Tanker Drivers Needed
Competitive pay, Benefits,
Guaranteed time off Class A
CDL-w/tanker endorsement
Prefer 2yrs experience
(800)569-6816 otterytrans-
portation.com
Drivers- No Experience-
No Problem. 100/% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to 490 per mile!
CRST VAN EXPEDITED
(800)326-2778 www.Join-
CRST.com
Earn Up to $.51cpm!!! CDL-
A Drivers, Tanker & Dry Van
positions available. 1 year
OTR experience, Good MVR &
work history needed. Call
(877)882-6537 or apply
www.oakleytransport.com
FRAC SAND HAULERS with
complete bulk pneumatic rigs
only. Relocate to Texas for
Tons of work. Great compa-
ny/pay. Gas cards/Quick Pay
available. (800)491-9029

Employ Classified!


AIRLINES ARE

HIRING


Train for hands on Aviation Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance
866-314-3769


Saves Lives


C lon cantr ispth








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Oran gem on. tVV 11hp

NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
Immediate Availability Upon Approval
1 & 2 Bedroom Units. Affordable housing for low to
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All units have W/D hookups & kitchen appliances.
TDD 800-955-8771 Phone/Fax 863-676-9213
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 7am-Noon
0 401 Winston Ave., Lake Wales, FL 33853 3'
i" This institution is an equal opportunity provideremployer. "


CENTRAL FLORIDA'S COOLING SPECIALISTS

POWELL
A/C & HEATING
SALES SERVICE. INSTALLATION
All Makes/Models Residential & Commercial
Financing available on new & replacement units
FREE ESTIMATES on installations & replacements
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3 UPDATED FLOOR PLANS!
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Page 4


CLASSIFIED


January 9, 2013


I APARTMENTS I


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Sanctuary Insurance
* Auto Homeowners
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233 E. Park Ave SANCTUARY INSURANCE
Lake Wales, FL
863-678-0477
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WAYNE CARROLL AGENCY
141 East ntral Avenue, Sute2002 Mo/orWanterHaven a(intCrn/oba
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Top Quality Malenals Free Estimates
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Call Paul Bridwell at 863-287-0701
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January 9, 2013


CLASSIFIED


Page 5


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Page 6


CLASSIFIED


January 9,2013


2001 HELP WANTED
Freight Up = More $ 34-46
CPM 2Mos. CDL Class A Dri-
ving Exp (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
GROWING Local Newspa-
per is Seeking Qualified
Sales People. Please Send
Resumes to
pnorthrop@thelake-
walesnews.com, or call
Paul Northrop at
(863)676-3467.
Heat & Air JOBS Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on environ-
ment. Nationwide certifica-
. tions and Local Job Place-
ment Assistance! (877)994-
9904

JUST GRADUATE? Play in
Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New
York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys.
$400-$800 wkly. Paid
expenses. Signing Bonus. Call
(877)259-6983
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED! Hospi-
tals & Insurance Companies
hiring now!' No experience?
Local Training & Job Place-
ment Assistance available!
(888)219-5161.


2001 HELP WANTED
Medical Billing Trainees
Needed! Hospitals & Insur-
ance Companies hiring now!
No experience? Local Training
& Job Placement available! HS
Grad or GED & Computer
needed. (888)589-9677.
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
Medical Management
Careers start here Get con-
nected online. Attend college
on your own time. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qual-
ified.. Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CentuiraOnline.com
Advertise Today!


2001 HELP WANTED
MOMS WORK FT/PT, no
experience necessary, we
train. New Swarovski Crystal
Jewelry by Touchstone Crys-
tal. $500 TO $5,000/MONTH
(407)295-1522 kontactkelly-
now@aol.com
MOVIE EXTRAS Earn up to
$250 per day To stand in the
backgrounds for a major film
production experience not
required. All looks needed.
Call NOW!!! (877)435-5877
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses. www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
. experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses, www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783

Need Cash?
Have A
Garage Sale


2001 HELP WANTED
OTR DRIVERS- Food Grade
Tank Drivers. CDL-A w/tank
endorsement, Good MVR &
Hazmat within 90 days
required. Up to 42cpm
w/additional mileage incen-
tives & benefits. (877)882-
6537 or www.oakleytrans-
port.com
Temp Agricultural- Equip
Operator 3/1-12/10/13:
10 openings. Operation, ser-
vice and maint of farm equip-
ment, incl rippers, disks,
plows, cultivators, trans-
planters, water wheel
planters, seeders, harvesting
and packing equipment.
Install pumping sta. and irriga-
tion equip. 6 months exp req.
$12/hr. Free housing & trans-
port provided, tools provided
at no cost to worker; Employ-
ment guaranteed for ? of work
period. Pastore Orchards,
626 S White Horse Pk, Elm
NJ; Apply at nearest NJ Dept
of Labor office and show a
copy of this ad. Contact Work-
force NJ One Stop Career
Center 44 N White Horse Pk
#C, Hammonton NJ; Ref: Job
Order # NJ0840889
Classified = Results


2001 HELP WANTED
Temp Farm Workers 3/1-
12/10/13: 69 openings.
Manually plant & harvest veg-
etables using hand & power
tools; Clean grade, sort,
package and load crops. 3
months exp req at GAP cert
farm, must have tomato exp.
$10.34/hr. Free housing &
transport provided, tools pro-
vided at no cost to worker;
Employment guaranteed for ?
of work period. Cassaday
Farms 401 Pine Tavern Rd
Monroeville, NJ; Apply for this
job at nearest NJ Dept of
Labor office and show a copy
of this ad. Contact Workforce
NJ One Stop Career Center
174 E Broadway, Salem, NJ
08079; Ref: Job Order
#NJ0840824
2005 SERVICES
ADOPTION
Give your baby a loving,
financially secure family.
Living expenses paid.
Call Attorney Charlotte
Danciu 28 years experi-
ence. 1-800-395-5449
www.adoption-surroga-
cy.com
FL Bar # 307084


2005 SERVICES
ADOPTION 866-633-0397
Unplanned Pregnancy? Pro-
vide your baby with a loving,
financially secure family. Liv-
ing/Medical/Counseling
expenses paid. Social worker
on staff. Call compassionate
attorney Lauren Feingold (FL
Bar#0958107) 24/7
DIVORCE $50 $240*
Covers Child Support, Cus-
tody, and Visitation, Property,
Debts, Name Change... Only
One Signature Required!
*Excludes govt. fees! 1-800-
522-6000 Extn. 300 Baylor
& Associates
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? Talk with
caring adoption expert. You
choose from families nation-
wide. LIVING EXPENSES
PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One
True Gift Adoptions. 866-
413-6298. FL License
#100013125

Need a job?
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tory


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Janury 92013CLASIFIDS Pge


2005 SERVICES
ADOPTION
GIVE YOUR BABY THE
BEST IN LIFE! Many
Kind. Loving, Educated &
Financially Secure Cou-
ples Waiting. Living &
Medical Expenses Paid.
Counseling & Transporta-
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GROUP, P.A. Jodi Sue
Rutstein, M.S.W., J.D.
Mary Ann Scherer, R.N.,
J.D. 1-800-852-0041
Confidential 24/7
(#133050&249025)

2100 GENERAL
DRIVER, Daily or Weekly
Pay. $0.01 increase per
mile after 6 months and 12
months. $0.03 quarterly
bonus. Requires 3 months
recent experience. (800414-
9569. www.driveknight.com
Drivers/Class A Flatbed.
HOME EVERY WEEKEND! Pay
.37 cents/mi. Both ways, FULL
BENEFITS. Requires 1 year
OTR flatbed experience.
(800)572-5489 x227.
SunBelt Transport
Jacksonville, FL
TOP PAY FOR LIMITED
EXPERIENCE! 34 cpm for 1
mo. OTR exp. plus benefits.
New equip. & 401K. (877)258-
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NOTICES

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HORSE LOVERS MAKE $$
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TY. HOLD A COMPETITIVE
TRAIL CHALLENGE. CALL
ACTHA AT (877)99
ACTHA(22842) OR VISIT
WWW.ACTHA.US GREAT FUN
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PREGNANT? CONSIDER.
ING ADOPTION'? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit
ted couple seeks to adopt
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPD
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
3090 LOST & FOUND
Brown & White Jack Rus-
sell -lost before Christmas,
North Lake Shore Blvd area -
LW. REWARD. Call 287-5411
or 287-5410
LOST DOG Reward for
Georgia's Return-last seen
wednesday night in the area
of Polk Halfway House.
Friendly Beagle 20 Ibs has
microchip, has Highlands
County Tag, call 863-257-
4228

4000







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CASH NOW! Cash for your
structured settlement or annu-
ity payments. Call J.G. Went-
worth (866) 494-9115. Rated
A+ by the Better Business
Bureau.


4020 FINANCIAL/MISC.
FREE DEBT SOLUTION. End
- Foreclosure and Debt Collec-
tions within 90 Days. No Pay-
L ments, No Bankruptcy, and
. No Settlements. Guaranteed
- Since 1993. (800)477-9256
, www.zerodebtguaranteed.co
m

4080 LOANS / MORTGAGES
- Access Reverse Mortgage!
Florida-based: Application &
Closing in your home. Experi-
Sence: almost 1,000 reverse
Mortgages funded. Award-
winning customer service.
BBB A rating. NMLS #4566.
1(800)806-7126

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES

5054 CONTRACTORS

Miscellaneous Contract-
ing

GENERAL REPAIR!
*Additions & Remodeling
*Chimney Cleaning
*Concrete Work
*Vinyl Siding
*Roofing
Lightening Rod Installa-
tion.-
Painting Commercial &
Residential
Free Estimates
Lic. & Ins.
Hollis Smith
863-676-5413
863-528-2435

5115 LEGAL SERVICES
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
5120 MEDICAL SERVICES

I, ,

FIE DiNC SHOP

SAVOR LOCALLY
o SAVE GAS

HOME
i _


.0E~C *ES GONE SHOPPING .

Major Medical, Dental, Vision
Health Insurance
Turned down for health
-diaetes, heart attack,
cancer or?
Guaranteed Issue- Health
This is NOT a discount Plan
Medicare Supplements
Medicare Advantage Plans
Medicare Disability Under 65
Wayne Carroll Agency
141 E Central Ave Ste 200
2nd floor, Winter Haven
(in Colonial Bank)
863-289-5189
VIAGRA/ CIALIS!
Save $500.00! Get 40
100mg/20mg Pills, for only-
$99! +4-Bonus Pills FREE! #1
Male Enhancement. Discreet
Shipping. Buy The Blue Pill
Now 1- 888-800-1280
Classified = Results
.,'


5120 MEDICAL SERVICES

Need Help With Your
Loved Ones?
MALE CAREGIVER
AVAILABLE
Years of Experience with
Dementia & Alzheimer's.
Offers personal assistance
with your Health Home -
Life
Available Days, Nights
& Weekends
CALL BILL ANYTIME AT
863-207-5534

5230 MISCELLANEOUS
$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen
on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit
Dragging? Need $500-
$500,O00++within 48/hrs?
Low rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321 www.lawcapi-
-tal.com
AT&T U-Verse for just
$29/mo! BUNDLE & SAVE
with AT&T Internet+Phone+TV
and get a FREE pre-paid Visa
Card! (Select plans). HURRY,
CALL NOW! 800-327-5381
DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
WANTED!!! Get the Most
Cash, up to $27 per box!
Shipping Paid!. Must be
Sealed & Unexpired. Call
Tony 813-528-1480 tonytest-
strips@hotmail.com
DIRECTV for $29.99/mo for
24 months. Over 140 chan-
nels. Free HD-DVR Upgrade!
Free NFL Sunday Ticket
w/Choice Package! Call Today
for details 1-866-981-8287
DISH Network. Starting at
$19.99/month PLUS 30 Pre-
mium Movie Channels FREE
for 3. Months! SAVE! & Ask
About SAME DAY Installation!
CALL 888-418-9787
Every baby deserves a
healthy start. Join more than
a million people walking and
raising money to support the
March of Dimes. The walk
starts at marchforbabies.org.
*REDUCE YOUR CABLE
BILL!* Get a 4-Room All-Digi-
tal Satellite system installed
for Free and programming
starting at $19.99/mo. Free
HD/DVR upgrade for new
callers, Call Now. 1-800-795-
7279
ROTARY MEMBERS are a
worldwide network of inspired
individuals who improve com-
munities. For more informa-
tion visit www.rotary.org. This
message provided by Paper-
Chain and your local commu-
nity paper.
SOCIAL SECURITY DIS-
ABILITY BENEFITS. WIN or
Pay.Nothing! Start Your Appli-
cation In Under 60 Seconds.
Call Today! Contact Disability
Group, Inc. Licensed Attor-
neys & BBB Accredited. Call
888-903-1353

PAUL'S
Small Engine Repair
Golf Cart & Lawn Equipment
Sales & Service .
Set of 6 Volt Golf Cart
batteries for $449 (+tax)
: Carryout Only (installabon
I Available)
S Paul Wilkerson
* 829 Bostick Road
Bowling Green FI 33834



Need a job?
Check The
Classified!


MERCHANDISE

6020 AUCTIONS
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net

6180 HEAVY/CONST.
EQUIPMENT
SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw.-
SPRING SALE Cut lumber
any dimension, anytime.
MAKE MONEY and SAVE
MONEY In stock ready to ship.
Starting at $995.00
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/
300N (800)578-1363
Ext.300N
6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
ATTEND COLLEGE ON
LINE from home. Medical, *
Business, Criminal Justice,
* Hospitality. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV authorized. Call
www.CenturaOnline.com
1-888-203-3179
6270 WANTED TO
BUY/TRADE

BUYING
GOLD, SILVER,
COINS, JEWELRY
Highest Prices In History!

ANY CONDITION
WE BUY IT ALL, and Pay So Much
We Almost Want to Cry. You, of
Course, Will Laugh With Glee!!
See PHIL at the former
HOLLY'S ARMY NAVY STORE
3440 Ave G NW
Winter Haven
Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm
Call first to confirm I'm there
863-299-6031
Our 33rd Year.






.- EA S









Searhing fora new car,
horn e orjistsom ethiig
to do thisweekend?
M ake iteasy on youmse]
Subscrbe today and get
wealth ofinfin ation
available atyour
fingertps.
The Lake W alesN ew s
The FortM eade Leader
ThePo IkCounty Democrat
FrostpkWofN ew s
CALLTTO DAY TO SUBSCRIBE I
863-676-3467 or
863-533-4183


TRANSPORTATION

7140 MISC.DOMESTIC
AUTOS


2005 FORD ESCAPE 2.3L, 4
cyl., AM/FM/CD, PW, PL, tilt,
cruise. $5950 DLR. Call Terry,
Cannon Used Car Superstore
863-646-5051
7260 AUTOS WANTED
CASH FOR CARS All
Cars/Trucks Wanted. Run-
ning or Not! Top Dollar Paid.
We Come To You! Any
Make/Model. Call For Instant
Offer: 1-800-871-9638
CASH FOR CARS!
We Buy ANY Car, Truck
or Van! Running or Not.
Get a FREE Top Dollar
INSTANT Offer NOW! 1-
800-558-1097
We're Local!

7300 TRUCKS/PICK-UPS
1998 CHEVROLET 1500,
4X4 extra cab, $5950 DLR.
Call Terry. Cannon Used Cars
Superstore 863-646-5051




a A
2000 FORD RANGER w/top-
per $4950 DLR. Call Terry.
Cannon Used Cars Superstore
863-646-5051
7333 MISC. BOATS
JON BOAT, 14ft. 6hp John-
son w/ galvanized trailer. 28#
thurst trolling motor. Live well.
$1200 Call 863-899-2648.
7360 CYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS
2001 Honda CBR F41 600
motorcycle. Runs great 17k
miles
863-285-8705. $2,800

PUT

CLASSIFIED

TO WORK FOR.

YOU!

Call Lake Wales

863-6763467


6000 7000
< T<>


January 9, 2013


Page 7


1997 TOYOTA CAMRY One
Owner 91,000 miles, $4950
DLR. Call Terry. Cannon Used Car
Superstore 863-646-5051
2002 FORD TAURUS ,
75,000 mi, 6 cyl., a/c, very
clean, heavy duty suspension
906-364-1668


I -- ,



2004 CHEVROLET CAVALIER,
$4950 DLR. Call Terry.
Cannon Used Car Superstore
863-646-5051


CLASSIFIED







The average cost of a brewed cup of coffee

$1.38


Cost of a first class US Postage Stamp

.45


Cost of a home delivered newspaper

ONLY .40 CENTS!


ht~prct up iarbiwd al t n hm n hlidiu p jr



The Fort Meade LeaderR _
75r ran Mbnde, Flonda 3R41 1 __
.--- At
ReTunion and I mnucH zpr L
SL Frostproof News
r75 L.dii, *iiv MtIw,n ,Vw.(^ .i" '. .. ... "
The ort eadeLead r /^M^ ^|^ B ^a
75< Fn b~tHcnd V l ri- ------- *--- --^S H-S.-"-._ -. --


Re Polk Cunty Democrat
BHanrJw. kimda 30 S AUItiT, Oct M. 2010
rre paiode ... Van Fleet could
be avoided with
new highway
ti Ii I1 S 17
*'<{r iu1ii w<)1iM Ivpas IU lt.


Subscribe Today! Call 863-533-4183


r Page 88


CLASSIFIED


January 9, 2013


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