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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00588
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Creation Date: February 29, 2012
Publication Date: 10/31/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00588
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text







Visit us on the Internet at www.FrostproofNews.com


The


October 31.2012


Frostproof News


Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years


Volume 32 Number 40


USPS NO 211-260


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Frostproof, Polk County Florida 33843


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U.S. 27 carnage continues


Three more lives lost in accidents on deadly stretch of road


By BRIAN ACKLEY
BACKLEY@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
The carnage on U.S. Highway 27
continues.
For the ninth time in the last year,
almost to the day, the roadway between
County Road 640 and U.S. 98 was the
site of a deadly accident, this one early
Monday afternoon.
It took the life of a 27-year-old
Frostproof mother and her 4-month
old daughter. Her 3-year-old daughter
was airlifted to Tampa General hospital
in what sheriff's office officials de-
scribed as "extremely critical" condi-
tion at midday Tuesday.
Police say they do not know why
a 2003 Toyota, operated by Candy
Ocampo Greathouse, a 2004 graduate of
Frostproof Middle Senior High School,
left the highway while heading north on
U.S. 27 just north of C.R. 630A.
The vehicle crossed the grassy me-
dian and struck a pick up truck being
driven by 71-year-old Robert Holbrook
of Marshall, N.C.
Police said Greathouse was ejected
from her vehicle, and declared dead at


the scene. Her daughter Laaina, who
was born July 2, was airlifted to Sebring
Hospital where she also succumbed to
her injuries. Another daughter, Arriana,
who turns 3 on Dec. 12, was flown to
Tampa General.
Holbrook was operating a Toyota
Tundra pickup, and hauling a travel
trailer. He and his wife Pansi were taken
to Lake Wales Hospital, where they
were treated and released for minor
injuries, police said.
It was exactly one year and one day
ago, Oct. 28, 2011, that a cross-over
accident very near Monday's wreck
claimed the life of a 46-year-old Lake
Placid woman, the first of seven fatal
accidents on U.S. 27 in that area. The
eighth fatal accident on this stretch of
roadway came last Saturday morning
(See story, page 12)
The section of highway, which covers
a little over eight miles, was the subject
of a series of articles in the Frostproof
News this spring where law enforce-
ment and highway safety officials said
there was not much more that could be
done to make the rural stretch of road
safer.


PHOTO BY BRIAN ACKLEY
A Frostproof mother and her infant daughter were killed in this U.S. Highway 27 accident Monday
afternoon.


Hitting 100: Work hard and get plenty of rest


Boball reaches milestone with 'greatest


By JAMES COULTER
NEWS @ FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
Everyone has their own birthday
milestone they look forward to. But
one Lake Wales senior citizen reached
a milestone most only dream of
reaching.
Joe Boball celebrated his 100th
birthday Oct. 8 with family and friends
at Water's Edge of Lake Wales.
Boball, an active member of
Frostproof's First Baptist Church who
moved here in 1983, credits his long
life to the "greatest service from a good
nurse," his loving wife, Pauline, to
whom he has been married 72 years.


service from a good nurse, his wife
said. "Most of the time, we were happy.
Still are."


PHOTO PROVIDED
The Boballs retired to Frostproof in 1983.
"Getting along is the secret," Boball


Raising his family has been the most
important aspect of his life. Together
they had two daughters, Jenna and
Mary Anne, two grandchildren, Patrick
and Krista, and two great-grandchil-
dren, Shawn and Stephanie.
Over the century he has lived, Boball
has experienced nothing but good
health. His secret is working hard and
getting plenty of rest.
He claims to have only had the
measles and a knee replacement, and
he boasts of never taking a sick day off


100120


Care Center

to get set for

holidays

With the flip of the calendar
page this week, the Frostproof
Care Center will enter two of its
busiest months of the year, lend-
ing aid to families in need for the
Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday
season.
Care Center Executive Director
Ralph Waters said donations of time
and money are needed on many
fronts.
"Last year, 264 food boxes were
CENTER 20


TODAY'S
CONTENTS





o7 05252 00025 8


Calendar.................Page 2
Editorial ................ Page 4
County Report ...... Page 8
Obituaries........... Page 21
Sports.................. Page 22
Feeling Fit........... Page 29


Bulldogs tune
up for district
showdown this
Friday




Page22P


U.S. 27 sight of a
fatal accident last
Friday





Pae 12


Li~.t 21- --


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Page 2 Frostproof News October 31, 2012


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* FRIDAY, NOV. 2
First Friday Artwalk
The Frostproof Art League will host
its second ever First Friday Artwalk, a
downtown event featuring local artists
with their works. Many downtown busi-
nesses stay open for the evening event
too. And, hopefully, Mother Nature
cooperates better than it did for the
inaugural event in October. Call 863-
635-7271 for more information.

* FRIDAY NOV. 2

High School Football
A playoff berth will be on the line
at Faris Brannen Stadium as the
Frostproof Bulldogs host Lakeland
Christian in a-Class 3A, District 6 con-
test. Kickoff is at 7 p.m. Admission.


N SATURDAY, NOV. 3

39-mile yard sale
Municipalities, businesses and hom-
eowners along State Road 17, popularly
known as Scenic Highway, will host
a 39-mile yard sale, starting at 8 a.m.
Frostproof people wishing to participate
can set up booths along East Wall Street
which will be closed to vehicle traffic
during the event.

E MONDAY, NOV. 5

City Council
The Frostproof City Council regularly
meets on the first and third Monday
of each month. Original, this meeting
had been cancelled by city officials,
but enough business has come before
the board that they will in fact meet


starting at 6 p.m. in city hall.

* FRIDAY, NOV. 6

High School Football
The Frostproof Bulldogs will close
out their 2012 regular season with a
road trip to Auburndale to meet the
Bloodhounds. Game time will be 7 p.m.
Admission.

* SATURDAY, NOV. 10
Craft Show
First United Methodist Church of
Frostproof is holding a craft show
Nov. 10. Tables may be rented at $5
each and the event is open to the
public. Deadline for renting tables
is Nov. 3. For more information, call
863-635-3107.


M TUESDAY, Nov. 20
Chamber lunch
The Frostproof Chamber of Commerce
will host its monthly membership
meeting at the Ramon. Cost is $9 and
includes lunch. Starts at noon. Call 863-
635-9112 for more information.

* SATURDAY, DEC. 1
Christmas Parade
The holiday season gets its "official"
local start with the arrival of Santa
Claus in Frostproof's annual Christmas
parade. Parade will step off at 6:30 p.m.
Festival of Trees
The Ramon Theater will host Festival
of Trees event, first day of showing start-
ing a 3 p.m. Admission is $2, and vote
for your favorite.


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E T4 WELCOME TO YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
tlVENTS Want to see your event on this page? Call us at 863-285-8625 or
email news@frostproofnews.com.


Page 2 Frostproof News


October 31, 2012





October 31, 2012 Frostproof News Page 3


THE MOST ADVANCED HEALTH CARE IS BASED ON TRUST.


Nationally recognized heart care

is right here.

That's the Bostick advantage.


Winter Haven

Hospital

BOSTICK HEART CENTER

www.winterhavenhospital.org


AN AFFILIATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SHANDS HEALTHCARE


Winter Haven Hospital's Bostick Heart Center is
recognized by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons as
being in the top 10 percent of heart programs in the
United States, and ranked one of the nation's
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advantage by combining the best clinical experts with
the latest technologies and the most effective rehab
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you trust, Winter Haven Hospital.

Learn more at www.winterhavenhospital.org or
call 863-292-4688.

Compassion. Innovation. Trust. We're your family's choice.


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FIND 'R,'-C
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-- --~11-- I--~---F--CI


YOU Watch Us
M on YouTube


Frostproof News Page 3


October 31, 2012


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VIEWPOINT


Constitutional amendments


Eleven amendments to the state constitution, all of
them proposed by the Florida House and Senate, will
appear on your general election ballot. Each of them
pose constitutional and fiscal problems of which
voters should be wary. All but one could be handled
legislatively, but are being pushed as amendments
to hog-tie future legislatures from rolling them back
should the current political winds shift.
The irony of this amendment overreach is that
the Legislature only six years ago put a referendum
on the ballot to increase the vote margin required
to pass an amendment to 60 percent. It passed. The
amendment was a response to successful citizen
ballot initiatives, many of them unworthy of inclusion
in the constitution, ranging from pregnant pigs to
cast net restrictions. We supported that amendment
because of our long-held belief that the constitution
should be the framework for state government, not
an instrument of lawmaking.
Here are shortened versions of the lengthy and
often confusing ballot language for the 11 proposed
amendments.
Amendment 1 would have no application under
current law. It would prevent the state from creating
a substitute health care law if the Affordable Care Act,
known as Obamacare, is repealed.
Amendment 2 expands homestead property
exemptions for veterans beyond what is currently
offered.
The constitution requires the state to pass a


Our recommendation
balanced budget, but it can incur debt. Proposed
Amendment 3 would limit future lawmakers from
raising more revenue than the previous year plus
adjustments for inflation and population growth.
Amendment 4 further extends homestead exemp-
tions to new homebuyers, a plus for Realtors if it
increases sales, but a loss of millions in tax revenue
to schools and local governments who might have
to make up for the loss by raising rates. Local gov-
ernments and the Florida Association of Counties
and the Florida League of Cities rightly oppose this
amendment as an encroachment of Home Rule.
Amendment 5 is in response to a failed effort
in 2010 to split the state Supreme Court into two
jurisdictions, civil and criminal, and add additional
justices. It gives the Legislature the authority to repeal
court rulings by a simple majority. It also requires
Senate confirmation of justice appointments by
the governor. The latter is similar to the way the
U.S. Senate confirms justices, the former is a clear
violation of separation of powers central to the state
constitution.
Amendment 6 prohibits state funding for abortions,
which is already illegal under state and federal law.
There is no Amendment 7 on the ballot.
Amendment 8 would repeal the current consti-
tutional prohibition against funding of religious
organizations.


Vote no on all

Amendment 9 is one of those feel-good proposi-
tions. It would exempt the homestead property tax of
the spouses of deceased veterans or first responders
killed in the line of duty.
Amendment 10 would increase the personal prop-
erty tax exemption for small businesses by exempting
the tax on personal property valued between $25,000
and $50,000.
Amendment 11 is another homestead exemp-
tion. It would allow local governments to grant tax
exemption to those over 65 with incomes of less than
$27,000 whose home value is less than $250,000 if
they have lived there 25 years or more. Amendments
4, 9, 10 and 11 would further squeeze local govern-
ment's ability to fund services and infrastructure, and
put an increasing burden on an ever-shrinking pool
of non-exempted taxpayers. Florida TaxWatch found
that the breaks provided in these amendment would
cost the remaining taxpayers $500 million a year
more.
Amendment 12 broadens the base for selecting a
student to sit on the Board of Governors of the state
university system.
The Florida League of Women Voters recommends
voting No on all 11 offerings of the Legislature. The
League's position: the constitution should be kept
simple and straightforward. Those we elected for that
purpose should do the year-to-year lawmaking.
A No vote on all 11 amendments will speed up the
voting and put lawmaking back where it belongs.


Vote yes on

business tax break question


Voters will once again be asked if our
county commission should be allowed to
approve property tax breaks that would
encourage new and existing businesses
to expand and create jobs. The commis-
sion has asked voters this question in two
previous elections.
We have not always been in favor of
the county's efforts in this regard but now
think the third time just might be the
charm for Polk County.
The referendum would give the county
the power to OK property tax exemptions
to businesses locating to Polk County.
Existing businesses could get in on the
action if they expand and create new jobs.
We have had reservations about his
scheme before. We did not think previ-
ous attempts were specific enough. We
wanted the county to have more stringent
guidelines when it came to decide who
would get the tax breaks.
We think the county has come up with
a plan that is more specific and would
help to create jobs and allow businesses
to expand.
The referendum says the county will be
able to grant the exemptions to busi-
nesses if they meet the following criteria:
Create 25 or more new, full-time jobs
in the state while selling more than half of
its goods out of the state.
Create 10 or more new, full-time jobs
with pay rates more than the Polk County
average, at an industrial or manufactur-
ing plan or in a business in one of the


Our

recommendation

following industries; life sciences or
medical services, research, engineering
or high-tech, logistics agribusiness or
agriculture-tech.
Only property taxes levied by
Polk County on improvements to real
property and purchases of new tangible
property would be eligible.
-The scheme can only last 10 years.
Commissioners would have to ask
voters in another decade if they want to
continue the program.
Florida has been behind the curve
when it comes to tax abatement pro-
grams. Many other states have them and
similar incentives have been approved
by voters in more than half of Florida's
counties including Hillsborough,
Orange, Osceola, Hardee, Highlands and
DeSoto.
We need something in place to remain
competitive.
We are always wary of giving the
government the power to award special
privileges to any entity but agree that
Polk County needs to be competitive
when it comes to attracting new busi-
ness and creating jobs in our county.
That's why we recommend a yes vote
on this charter amendment.


Letters to the editor


Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya


Admittedly, we probably shouldn't
have gotten into Iraq, even though
Saddam Hussein might actually have
had "weapons of mass destruction" and
was putting people he didn't agree with
feet first into commercial shredders,
but we did it. We had won it. It cost us
5,000 American soldiers and billions of
dollars. We lost it when we failed to get
an agreement for 20,000 contingency
troops to remain and keep the peace
- now Iran is flying over Iraq bringing
weapons to Syria. Afghanistan we've
lost 2,000+ soldiers so far. We went in
to get Osama Bin Laden and defeat


Al-Qaeda and the Taliban noble and
legitimate reasons. But, we announced
proudly that we were leaving the end
of 2014 with no peace-keeping soldiers
left behind. Now the Taliban is biding
its time, infiltrating the Afghan military
(shooting our soldiers in the back). And
now, Benghazi, Libya. Our ambassador
and other high-ranking officials were
pleading for more security months
before the attack saying Al-Qaeda was
strengthening and several attacks (two
on the Benghazi consulate and one

PEARCE 5


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
* Aileen Hood General Manager Paul Northrop Sales Manager Jeff Roslow Editor Brian Ackley Managing Editor


Published every Wednesday at
14 W. Wall Street, Frostproof, FL 33843
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Frostproof, Florida and
additional Entry Office
*Phone (863) 676-3467 *Fax (863) 678-1297
Postmaster: Send address changes to
140 E. Stuart Ave.,
Lake Wales, FL 33853-4198


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
Six Months................... $25.68 One Year..........................$41.73
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNTY MAIL
Six Months....................$24.00 One Year............. ........$39.00
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
Six Months....................$40.00 One Year.........................$65.00
OUT OF STATE SUBSCRIPTION
Six Months....................$44.00 One Year.........................$72.00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frostproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews.com or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
'Wales Fl. 33853.


--


October 31, 2012


Page 4 Frostproof News






I


125th Summerlin Reunion this weekend


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

If last week's parade wasn't enough,
there's another one happening at the end
of the this week.
This parade, also going down Main
Street, is to help celebrate the 125th
anniversary reunion of the Summerlin
Institute.
The parade will feature alumni of the
school marching down Main Street to
Broadway and to the high school. And
after a reception there for the former
classinates and a tour of the high school
- which now has air conditioning,
organizer David Brewer put in an email
to those attending they will take in
the home football game against Winter
Haven High School.
There could be up to 1,000 people who
graduated from the school that existed
until 1968 that are coming to Bartow to
see old classmates, will see a battle of the
Bands, see a Car Cruisin' show and see
old movies on the lawn on the corner of
Wilson Avenue and Main Street.
That school and Union Academy
existed until 1968 until the school system
in the country desegregated and Bartow
High School was started in 1969.
Brewer, who helped to organize the
event, said about 500 people have
already paid for the 125th Summerlin
Reunion and another 200 have expressed
interest in attending. And, the people are
coming from all over the world.
"One fellow is coming in from Paris,"
Brewer said. "He's had some difficulty
with class reunions over the years."
And another former student, Randy
Johnson, who graduated in 1960, is
coming in from Oregon for the weekend.
Though Johnson's been back to Bartow
a handful of times since he left, he's
looking forward to this reunion because
of seeing those he hasn't seen in a long
time.
"One thing I'm concerned about is
being able to recognize people and them
being able to recognize me," he said,
adding this reunion may be a little more
special than other reunions because it
involves people from many different
classes. People in high school are not


PEARCE
FROM PAGE 4

on the Red Cross) had already taken
place. Requests for more security were
denied. Our people of the highest
rank (even in the situation room in the
White House) watched from 20 cameras


only friends with those in their class, he
said.
Johnson has not been totally out of
touch with Bartow. He was last here in
2008 to attend his father's funeral and his
mother lives in Lakeland and his sister
Iris was a Spanish teacher at Bartow
High School until last year. She currently
lives with her husband in Homeland.
Johnson, who is a graphic designer,
also designed the cover of the magazine
students will be given when they attend.
The commemorative book, called
Summerlin Echoes which is the same
name of the yearbook it published, has a
lot of recollection of the years in Bartow.
Much of the research into it was done
by 1961 graduate Stanley Hickson.
"It's meant to contain a lot of content
of old Echoes," Hickson said. "The oldest
is from 1922."
He said there's a little hole in the
middle because some of the material
couldn't be found, especially during
World War II.
"We got some wonderful help from the
journalism class at Bartow High School,"
he said.
Hickson said his memories spark
wonderful flashbacks and things that
have stuck with him vividly.
"During the Korean conflict the fire
whistle would ring and everyone in
Bartow would stop what they were
doing and offer their prayers." The
town was completely silent. "It was
amazing."
And, he said, the town's population
has not grown that much since that
time. At the time, he said the popula-
tion was about 15,000. According to
the 2010 Census the population is
just short of 20,000.
But in the last few months that
he has been returning to help plan
the reunion one thing he's noticed
that has changed is the number of
bicycles riding around town.
"The children changed, for one
thing," he said. "What I find is the
children on bicycles on the street.
In my era toward the '60s, I rode
my bicycle everyday and so did my
friends."
But he said the city looks similar
though the merchants are different.


mounted around our consulate and
from a surveillance drone above the
compound as 20 militants attacked our
Libyan ambassador and others. As they
watched, the attack lasted 7 hours. We
could have had help there within an
hour did we? no. We watched. We
did nothing. We need a new President.
Nancy Pearce
Lake Wales


M*T L




MOODY LAW
SI~~ 0 0l~r~Tli


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Friday, Nov. 2
Noon-5 p.m.: Registration and packet pickup
2:30-3:30 p.m.: Parade lineup at Chicken Shack
3:30 p.m. Summerlin 125th Parade
Schedule Pending: Tours of Bartow High School
6 p.m.: Reception: BHS cafeteria.
7:30 p.m.: Football game: Winter Haven vs. Bartow
High

Saturday, Nov. 3
6-8:30 a.m.: Class Tents setup in downtown Bartow
8-10 a.m.: Registration. Polk County History Center
9-11 a.m.: Pancake Breakfast
Schedule Pending: Tours of Bartow High &
Summerlin Building
10 a.m.-3 p.m. Battle of the Bands
All Day Saturday: Car Cruisin'show
Dark: Old movies at Wilson Avenue and Main Street
6-9 p.m. Saturday Nigh Street Fest.

In the 1960s there was a root beer
stand at U.S. 17 and Church Street
that is no longer there and The Yellow
Jacket soda shop that existed on the
corner of Main Street and Wilson
Avenue is now The Cookie Jar.
However, there are differences that
those who have not been back for a
while will notice.
"There was not a whole lot north
of the railroad tracks," Brewer said.
"Before the 1950s there was nothing
but the National Guard Armory and a
baseball park and a little DOT office."
All the commercial area on Van
Fleet Drive "was some guy's dream,"
back then, Brewer said.
The baseball fields were where
BB&T Bank is now and the civic
center and swimming pool was also
located in that area.
S"The old civic center, we lived there


,fr;i 1~~R-


gF-1;. .~
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CLASS OF 1967
45TH REUNION SATURDAY
Summerlin Institute's class of 1967 is having
classmates in town gather for its 45th reunion
Saturday.
Currently 60 of the class 200 graduates have
signed up and there is space to take more but
people should call to register as soon as possible.
It costs $20 and the event at the History Center
(100 E. Main St.) will be catered by Terrie Lobb,
have live music and there will be a photographer to
take a class picture of those present as well as take
individual and candid shots.
The reunion will be on the second floor of the
History Center and from 6-8 p.m. it will be for class-
mates from the class of 1967 and from 8-10 p.m.
other people from the 125th Summerlin Reunion
can join.
To register call Jean Summers Stinson at
863-533-8107.
From the photos being taken those and photos
from the 20th, 30th and 40th reunion and music
from 1967 will be compiled onto a DVD that will
be for sale. Only cash or checks will be accepted for
those who want to buy the DVD.
in the summer and spent days and
night in the pool," Hickson recalled.
"That was just east of (where) the
police station (is now.)"
And the feeling of Bartow has never
left. At least that's true for Johnson.
"Where I live right now in the
Rogue River in southern Oregon it is
mountainous," Johnson said. "Every
year I go to the middle school track
and there's a white park compacted in
sand. The smell of the place reminds
me of Bartow. There is a house at the
end and you can see a sable palm and
you never see those here. I'm con-
stantly reminded of Bartow."


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-. -.',


The Bereavement Department of Cornerstone Hospice
announces the presentation free of charge of
The Grief Workshops of Cornerstone Hospice.
This series of three workshops offers the community
a look at their grief in a very unique way and find healing in
artistic expression. Participants can sign up for one or all
of the workshops but must sign up in advance.







Series Free to Public at Cornerstone Hospice


monerstone
HOSPICE
& PALLIATIVE CARE
Your local, not-for-profit Hospice,
licensed since 1984.
All workshops are free and will be held at Cornerstone Hospice,
2590 Havendale Blvd., Winter Haven, FL 33881
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 Noon
All supplies will befiurnished. Space is limited, you need to
please pre-register by contacting Debbie Drash at
800-503-5756
or ifyou prefer, email
bereavement@cornerstonehospice.org
We invite you to visit Cornerstone Hospice : two websites:
www.cornerstonehospice.org
www.SeriousIllness.org/Cornerstone
\_________.._ _____ ._ .., .,.


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Frostproof News Page 5


October 31. 2012


Reunion to bring back memories


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g r-tnrn Nw October 31,201


Denise Grims


vs. Stacy McCland


The race for Florida State Senate, District 21 pits
veteran Republican lawmaker Denise Grimsley
against Democratic political newcomer Stacy
Anderson McCland.
This redrawn district is sometimes referred to as the
old JD Alexander seat. Alexander served this area well
for many years in the state Legislature. Alexander was
unable to run for re-election because of term limits.
Grimsley has served two terms as a state legislator
from Highlands County. She is a registered nurse and
a citrus grower.
As a state legislator she has focused on health and
agricultural issues, two topics that are important to
our area.
She is also a serious politician and campaigner.
She amassed a campaign war chest that amounted to
more than $850,000.
Her time as a state representative as a Republican
in a Republican-dominated legislature should provide
her with the opportunity to be an effective state
senator.


Our recommendations


Stacy Anderson McCland


McCland is a legal consultant for federal tax
and banking issues for a tax software firm, Petz
Enterprises Inc., with offices in Rome, Ga., McCland


also serves as a corporate director for the family
business producing orchids and growing trees near
Kissimmee. She holds a bachelor's degree in biochem-
istry, an MBA and a law degree.
Democrat McCland knows the issues and is a smart
and capable campaigner. The only thing she lacks is
hundreds of thousands of dollars in her campaign
account. Her war chest has about $7,000 in it.
She has good ideas concerning education and
would like to see state officials have a friendlier
attitude toward local school officials.
If McCland is unsuccessful in her race against
Grimsley, we hope she continues to participate in the
political process as she is a smart, quality candidate.
We believe that Denise Grimsley will be able to hit
the ground running as our new state senator. Her ex-
perience as a member of the House of Representatives
should allow her to serve on important committees
and serve her constituents well.
We recommend Denise Grimsley for State Senate,
District 21.


John Hall vs.


Ricky Shirah


John Hall has been working for Polk County gov-
ernment for 35 years. He was the director of three
different county departments and now wants to be
a county commissioner. The Republican is facing
Democrat Ricky Shirah, who is making his fifth run
at elected office in Polk County.
Hall started his career with Polk County digging
ditches and worked his way to the top, serving in
top management positions for the past 24 years.
When it comes to his view of county government
he has a very positive attitude, stating that the
current county manager, Jim Freeman is doing and
excellent job.
He does think he can help the county institute
improvements when it comes to things like the
time it takes to turn around a building permit or
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development order.
He is also a proponent of keeping the impact fee
moratorium in place.
"Do I think it's helped? Yes. Do I think we'll get
back to impact fees? Yes. But we need to be reason-
able," he said.
Hall's intimate knowledge of the inner workings
of county government would have to be an asset if
he became a county commissioner.
Shirah ran for a seat on the commission in 2004
and 2008. He also ran two times for a seat on the
Lakeland City Council.
He is a native of North Lakeland and says he
truly enjoys campaigning.


I R-- -, hia HALL VS SHIRAH 17
John Hall Ricky Shirah


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STC)Y'S QUALIFICATIONS




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Pa e 6 Frostproof News


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George Lindsey vs. Richard Castret


The race for Polk County Commission, District 1,
pits Lakeland-based developer and Realtor George
Lindsey against Richard Castret, who is a real estate
broker running with no party affiliation.
Lindsey is a Republican who says he has been
preparing for this run for 30 years.
"My dad instilled in me many years ago a civic
responsibility of being involved. Things are decided
by the people who show up. So I show up," he told the
newspaper's editorial board recently.
Lindsey has served on the county's charter review
board and recently served as the board's chairman.
He also served on boards for the Lakeland Chamber
of Commerce, Lakeland Association of Realtors,
Rotary Club of Lakeland Christina, Polk County
Builders Association and the Peace River Community
Mental Health Organization.
As a builder, Lindsey said he as "probably read more
impact fee studies than any elected official in this
county."
He is a proponent of keeping the county's morato-
rium on impact fees, at least for awhile.
"In these times and in these circumstances, this
(the moratorium) is the right thing to do," he said. "I
have talked to business owners who have said, were
it not for this moratorium, I would not be expanding
my business. I have heard from engineers that if it


Our recommendations


George Lindsey


Richard Castret


were not for this moratorium, my clients would not be
moving forward."
We don't think the moratorium is a good long
term-strategy for the county as it will cost the county
taxpayer money in the long run.
We are encouraged by his willingness to revisit the
issue in the future.
Castret ran an automotive business in Ohio for 30
years.


He is currently a real estate broker and owner of
Advantage REC Inc. in Lakeland.
He believes that government has too much red tape,
and that bureaucracy is holding back small business
and not helping with the economic recovery.
"The image of Polk County is damaged by empty
buildings," he told the newspaper's editorial board.
He believes that there is still more fat in the
county budget, even after years of cutting.
He disagrees with Lindsey on the merit of extend-
ing the moratorium on impact fees.
"In 2005 it looked like a good idea, but with it
being extended, we're going to have no tax base.
Maybe they should not be back at 100 percent, but
phased back in," he said.
We agree with that.
Both men are running good campaigns and have
a firm grasp of the issues facing the Polk County
Commission.
We think Lindsey's service on the Polk County
Charter Review Board and his years of community
service make him the best qualified of the two
candidates.

We recommend George Lindsey for Polk County
Commission, District 1.


HALL VS SHIRAH
FROM PAGE 6

"You have to work hard, you have to knock on
doors, you've got to get out and make yourself
available to the people," he said.
He describes himself as a conservative
Democrat. He worked for Publix for many years
and became an independent business person
when he purchased a towing service.
This is an interesting race. Both men are
long-time Polk County residents and both are


passionate about government affairs.
If elected, Shirah would be the lone Democrat
on the board. If elected, Hall would join a board
full of generally like-minded individuals.
If you would like to see the commission headed
in pretty much the same direction it has for the
past few years, then John Hall is probably your
candidate.
If you would like there to be at least one person
on the board who would be a contrarian and
sometimes ask the board questions they might
not otherwise here, then perhaps Shirah is you
candidate.
We think, however that the county commission


could use John Hall's unique experience as a
department head in three different departments.
Even though Hall's job will be to help develop
policy and not manage the day-to-day affairs of
government, it would be helpful to know how
policy will affect those who actually do the work.

That's why we recommend John Hall for a seat on
the Polk County Commission.


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Also available by Imperial Publishing
Louise K. Frisbie captures a glimpse of
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unique look into the history of central Florida
and the characters and events that shaped
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t To reserve your copies, please email:
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.41


" 3 IIW 7


Frostproof News Page 7


October 31, 2012


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No day ordinary for Karen Whaley


By STEVE STEINER
SSTEINER @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

(Editor's note: This is the first in a
series of articles on people and their
careers.)
It is9 a.m., and Karen Whaley, district
representative for Florida Rep. Ben
Albritton, R-Wauchula, is already hard at
work.
"The first thing I do is go through the
newspapers each morning," she said. What
she looks for are news articles of people
being recognized for an achievement, win-
ning an award, or celebrating a landmark
occasion such as a birthday or anniversary
"He sends notes handwritten notes -
to people who have done good stuff. We
certainly want to recognize them."
Before her is a stack of 60 hand-signed
letters by the congressman to school
valedictorians and salutorians. Albritton
hadWhaley compose a mass letter that he
then signed. However, he did not leave it
at that
"He added a personal note to each
letter," she said.
From there she listens to voice mail mes-
sages. Some of them can be quite lengthy.
As she listens, she said, she will write down
the gist of the message and eventually call
back.
"If we get a call, we definitely return it,
even if it's something we can't help with,"
said Whaley. On this particular day there
have been no phone calls. In fact, it is
rare visitors stop in at the office on 150
N. CentralAve. "Nowadays, most people
communicate via email."
Most times, people contact Rep.
Albritton with questions or concerns about
Medicaid or food stamps.
'A lot of them call because they can't
get through (to a particular agency)," said
Whaley. "We always start local. We don't
immediately contact Tallahassee." It is
preferable that way. "Rarely do we have
to call Tallahassee and go over someone's
head. Our job is to build a bridge."
Not all phone calls are people turning
to their representative, seeking help in
resolving a situation. Phone calls come
in requesting Albritton speak before their
group or organization. That can be a
bit of a challenge..If the Legislature is in
session regular session starts in March
and runs 60 days or ifit is in special
session, which has an indeterminate time
frame, made necessary if not all the work
was finished in regular session, then the
representative is unavailable.
It is slightly different when the august
body is out of session, but not necessarily
any easier. Like many in the Florida House
and Senate, representatives are business
career professionals. It is, said Whaley, a


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PHOTO BY STEVE STEINER
Karen Whaley (right) steadies the cutout placed in the Clerk of Court: Family Services-Domestic
Violence division. Looking on is Sherrie Schwab, Director of Victim Services for Peace River Center.


balancing act, tending to the family busi-
ness (he is in the citrus industry) as well
as tending to the needs and concerns of
constituents, as well as requests to making
guest appearances.
"I don't have his business schedule, I
have his legislative schedule," she said.
Finding out his availability takes some
doing. "We talk daily," she said. The two
of them also frequently text one another.
Whaley always knows when the call on her
cell phone is from him. It has a different
ring tone than from standard calls.

In and out the office
There is no "regular day forWhaley.
Some days she is in the office all day. At
other times, she is on the road. Other days
are a mix of the two. On this particular day
she is visited by Emily Nance and Sarah
Chevrier, the legislative and district aides,
respectively, of Rep. JohnWood, whose
office is in Haines City. Albritton and Wood
are sponsoring a "Veteran and Community
Employment Fair" that will take place from
11 a.m.-3 p.m., Oct. 31 at the Winter Haven
campus of Polk State College.
From there, the three travel to the
Peace River CenterVictim Service facil-
ity to meet with several representatives
from the agency, among them Angela
Jones, Resiliency Team Leader. Part of the
purpose for the visit is fact-finding.
The division Jones handles works with
children who live at home. Her clients are


those who can function in society, pro-
vided "slight adjustments" are made. They
also work with the parents, guiding them
to better assist their children.
Among the questions Whaley asks is
whether there are short-term facilities for
clients who have to be moved from the
home. Jones tells her there are none due to
funding cuts made more than nine years
ago.
Another question asked is whether
poverty plays a significant role. It does, said
Jones, who gave an example of a family
that until recently was "pulling down a
six-figure income and is now on welfare."
Their 9-year-old child knew of the specif-
ics, being present or overhearing conversa-
tions between the parents.
While at Peace River Center Victim
Services, Whaley, Nance and Chevrier meet
with Sherrie Schwab, the Director ofVictim
Services. The four of them are to travel to
the county courthouse to set up a display
- a life-size cutout for an upcoming
event From 5:30-7:30 p.m., Friday, Oct 26,
the first Annual Silent Witness Memorial
took place at the Polk County Sheriff's
Office.
During lunch, Whaley, Nance and
Chevrier share information on related
matters. Included in that conversation are
hints, suggestions, people to contact and
various approaches to take. The conversa-
tion continues back at Rep. Albritton's
office before Nance and Chevrier have to


I


Polk State to offer career educator fast-track


By MARY CANNADAY
MCANNADAY@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

With the increasing popularity of
career/technical academies and pro-
grams, the need for instructors who are
field-experienced has to be balanced
with state educational requirements.
It can be challenging for these
teachers to track down all the courses
that are required in order to remain in
the classroom. Superintendent Sherrie
Nickell told board members at their
Oct. 23 work session that there is now
an easier way, thanks to a partnership.
with Polk State College.
Career educators can take the five
required courses at PCS through an


accelerated program called Career
Educator Pathways.
And to make good news even better,
CEP costs almost half of what other pro-
grams charge; $1,500 for the sequence
as opposed to $2,700, according to
Denny Dunn, Assistant Superintendent
for Human Resources.
The goal of the CEP is to equip
vocational teachers with classroom
skills, if they are not degree teach-
ers. The courses are: Technology and
Industrial Certification, Teaching
Methods for the Career and Technical
Classrooms, Curriculum Construction
and Evaluation for Career and Technical
Educators, Students with Special Needs
in the Career and Technical Classrooms,


and Research-based Practices in
Reading Competency.
The need for this curriculum is
specified through Florida Statute, so the
district's certification department went
to work to come up with a local program.
Collaboration which began in March
between eight local and state agencies
led to the PSC option, which is offered at
no cost to the district. Polk Works, Florida
Troops to Teachers, the district's Workforce
Education Department and PSC adminis-
tration are among the partners.
According to Dunn, the idea was for
CEP to mirror another program already
in place, the Educator Preparation
Institute, which is an alternative pro-
gram for teachers seeking a state-issued


teaching certificate.
Workforce Education is a rapidly-
growing segment of the district's offer-
ings, consisting of 38 career academies
and pre-academies, covering more
than 30 specialties, such as culinary
arts, legal assisting, fashion design, and
information technology.
The district, in conjunction with
business and industrial partners, is
sponsoring the WH3 Expo Nov. 6 and 7
at the Lakeland Center, to showcase the
career-track's accomplishments and to
answer questions from the public and
prospective students.
The expo, which is free of charge,
runs 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 6 and 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on Nov. 7.


return to Haines City, and Whaley has to
travel to Wauchula, which is also in the
representative's district. There, she will
meet with a local organization that will
soon set up a KidPack project.
The latter puts together food packages
for elementary or middle school children
to bring home, in order they may have
something to eat before returning to school
on Monday, where they are eligible for
either free meals or meals at reduced cost.
It is shortly past 2:30 p.m., and Whaley
is running slightly behind schedule. It will
be close to 5 p.m., she estimates when she
returns to Bartow and calls it a day.

About Karen Whaley
Prior to her becoming Albritton's district
aide, Whaley was a dispatcher with the
Arcadia Police Department and then
attended the police academy to become
a law enforcement officer. While with the
Arcadia Police Department and on road
patrol, she became the Victims Advocate
Officer in the Violent Crimes Division.
Whaley left the police force and went to
work for a private child protective service
agency before returning to law enforce-
ment, this time with te DeSoto County
Sheriff's Office, where she supervised the
911 call center.
During this time, Whaley attended Bible
studies at the Albritton home; both attend
First Christian Church inWauchula.
"I've been friends with the family for
years," saidWhaley. When he decided to
run for office, Whaley began as a volunteer.
Soon after he hired her as his campaign
manager. It was a bit of a challenge. "I had
never done any campaigning before."
Upon election she became his District
Aide. Between Albritton andWhaley, they
make up two-thirds of his "team." The third
person is legislative aide Kevin Cleary.
"I've said it a million times, we have the
perfect team," she said. Currently, Cleary
is on a leave of absence, working to help
elect someone else in Florida win election.
Cleary, saidWhaley, is the nuts and bolts
person; his knowledge of bills and the
legislative process is vast and practically
immeasurable. It is also one she is glad she
does not hold. "I wouldn't have his job for
the combined salary of everyone on the
Floor."

About the Veteran and Community
Employment Fair
The event will be held from 11 am.-
3 p.m., in the gymnasium of the Winter
Haven campus of Polk State College;
veterans will receive a priority entry start-
ing 10 a.m. The event is sponsored by Reps.
Ben Albritton and John Wood of the Florida
House of Representatives. Call 863-508-
1100, or visit www.polkworks.org.


October 31, 2012


Page 8 Frostproof Ne s


I










Mike LaRosa vs. Eileen Game


The race to see who is our area's newest member
of the state House of Representatives turned into
one of the most unusual in a long time.
The race was supposed to pit Republican Rep.
Mike Horner against Democratic newcomer
Eileen Game. Horner, although running in a "new"
district, was the incumbent in the race and Game
was destined to be a footnote in this year's elec-
tion. She had a miniscule war chest and not even
too much backing from the Democratic Party of
Florida.
Everything changed when Horner's name report-
edly came up on the client list of an Orlando area
brothel. He was not charged with any crime but re-
signed his position in the House of Representatives
and dropped out of the race.
Because the ballots were already printed,
Homer's name could not be removed and the
Republican Party had to find someone to run in
his place. Mike LaRosa, a Realtor from Celebration
called the party and told them he was interested.
LaRosa and his family run a large real estate
company in Celebration. He points to the fact that
his business survived the Great Recession when
many real estate companies did not, is evidence
that he is capable of running a business and
understanding what small business people face
each day.
He recently moved from outside the district into
his district, and he's lived in St. Cloud for 15 years.
He is married to his high school girlfriend, Holly,
and has 4-year-old twins and a son who is 2. He
moved to St. Cloud from Miami.
Game recently moved from outside the district,
as well. So, voters here are faced with picking two
candidates who don't have too much experience
dealing with and interacting with the people
of Polk County. That is an unfortunate choice,
indeed.


Our recommendations



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,



Mike LaRosa Eileen Game

But we must choose.
On the one hand we have a Democratic can-
didate who is registered to vote in Polk County,
recently moved to Frostproof but lived most of
the time in Fort Lauderdale. On the other hand we
have a Republican candidate who moved into the
district to run for the race but didn't have to move
as far but also doesn't have much of a connection
with Polk County.
LaRosa doesn't have much invested in the
race. He jumped in just a few weeks ago. Game's
campaign was very low key until Horner's scandal
broke, and when the Democratic Party smelled
victory it threw a bunch of money her way.
In fact the mailers the party sent to area voters
recently mentioned Homer's link to the brothel
but didn't quite let voters know that Horner was no
longer running. Dirty politics, indeed. We would
have liked to see Game denounce those tactics
done on her behalf.
We like Game and think that she is a bright
individual who appears to genuinely care about
the issues. She has earned a master's degree in


industrial management and likes to say she is
"kind of nerdy and introverted." We think she
understands the plight of the working people of
her district and would study the issues carefully if
elected to the House.
She has an understanding of how the Florida
economy works and would like to see more small
farms and manufacturing nurtured in this area.
Voters should be aware that according to U.S.
Bankruptcy Court records, Game filed for personal
bankruptcy in January 2011. The filing showed that
she owed the Internal Revenue Service more than
$146,000 in back taxes. Game resolved the bank-
ruptcy in May 2011, agreeing to pay her creditors
smaller sums.
Game was also a manager with the accounting
firms Ernst & Young and Grant Thornton. She now
owns a small information-technology consulting
business.
LaRosa is a smart business person who seems to
have a lot of energy. We applaud him for volunteer-
ing to enter the race at the 11th hour. His name
will not appear on the ballot. Voters will be have to
vote for Mike Horner in order to vote for LaRosa.
Game was in the race from beginning, even
when she had to know that her candidacy was long
shot.
That is a sign, we think, that she is a woman of
conviction.
She has the brains of a computer programmer
and the heart of a working person.
The circumstances surrounding this race are not
perfect and both candidates have some excellent
qualities and some things that give us pause. But one
of them will represent us in Tallahassee next year.
We think Eileen Game is the best choice in this
race and deserves a chance to represent us in the
Florida House of Representatives.


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October 31, 2012


Frostproof News Page 9






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Paws and Perches


W arm greetings to everyone in
Lake Wales and Polk County.
Aug. 6, 2012, marked the
opening of Paws and Perches Animal
Hospital. I am Dr. Ashley Lab, the proud
new owner. I was fortunate to meet Dr.
Tim Swango at just the right time, when
he was ready to retire after operating
Swango Animal Hospital for 30 years. He
is now enjoying the life of leisure and fish-
ing to his heart's content. He has been a
tremendous help to me and has become
a wonderful friend. Thank you so much!
When you visit Paws and Perches,
you will find many things are the same.
Tammy, Brenda and Tina have stayed
on and been loyal staff members. Lea,
our groomer, has stayed and expanded
her services. You will also find that I
have the same gentle manner of caring
for and understanding the needs of you
and your pets. And of course, we are
in the same convenient location at 755
West Central Avenue, Lake Wales (right
next to FedEx), and phone number
863-676-6176.
You will also find a few new things
when you visit. State-of-the-art digital
imaging equipment has been installed.
A fresh focus on exotics is part of my
mission. New choices of food, supplies
and medications are available. And of
course, everything has been scrubbed,
buffed, repainted and refurbished to
make it more comfortable, attractive,
and efficient. We hope to make the


PHOTO PROVIDED
Dr. Ashley V. Lab and Dr. Tim Swango
experience of caring for your pets as
pleasurable as possible.
Finally, I want to thank all of the
clients, residents, business and profes-
sional community for your overwhelm-
ing warm welcome and well wishes. It
is truly a pleasure to work in and serve
this community.
I would like to invite all of you to
attend our Open House, Saturday,
November 17th from 1-4pm. Fun, food,
contests, prizes and important informa-
tion will be shared. Also, visit Paws and
Perches on Facebook (or Google "Paws
and Perches"). You will find useful infor-
mation, monthly specials and helpful
links. "Like" us we like you!


Name Brand 90 Days Financing
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0 Don't Be Scared...
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Maybe a Jack-O-Lantern? Arrr Matey...a
Pirate? Giraffes, Monkeys & Bunnies Oh
My! So many to choose from, stop in, try it
on, and get ready to Trick or Treat!


Keep it simple, but make a statement in a
Halloween Tank! "A Little Batty!" "Wicked!"
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October 31, 2012


Pa e 10 Frostproof Ne s


I






Octoer31 202FotrofNw ae1


If your business is animals ... You should be advertising here!
Call today and get your business noticed. 863-676-3467 or 863-533-4183


CATS DOGS OTHER SMALL ANIMALS
Carol Thompson, VMD
General Medicine & Surgery Laser Surgery
Behavior Consultation -Boarding
3631 Hwy. 60 E. -Lake Wales, FL 33898 ,
863-676-5922 Fax: 863-676-7342
EMERGENCY: 833-676-4677
^ THOMPSON'S
S/-< VETERINARY CENTER .










Miss Kitty is a 3 year old Faline is a 3 year old pastel torti. Lilly is a 7 week old kitten.
medium hair orange tabby. She loves her new bed and She never wants to miss a thing!
She is very friendly and is all settled in for her Lilly stays awake most of the
excited to find a new family, aftemoon nap. day to greet everyone.







My name is Bobby. I'm only Can you believe they named Hi, my name is Cameron. I'm
three months old. I have me Prissy? No, I should have a-nine week old mixed breed
the sweetest smile and love been name Adorable because female puppy! Come adopt me
L A everyone! that's what I am! and I'll kiss your whole face!
THE If you would like to donate, please send your donations to:
III A N The Humane Society of Polk County
555 Sage Road, Winter Haven, FL 33881
S C ICVTYr or donate online at www.humanesocietyofpolkcounty.org
SUOCI I 863-324-5227 863-325-8905 (fax)
of Polk County Hours: Tues-Sat 10am 5pm Kennel closes at 4pm

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Frostproof News Page 11


October 31. 2012


I







P-age12Frstrof ew-Otoer3121


U.S. 27 crash


Victim was employee at South


takes another life


County Jail heading home from work


A popular worker at the South
County Jail in Frostproof lost his life
Friday morning in yet another fatal
accident on U.S. Highway 27, this time
at the intersection of County Road 640.
It is the eighth fatal accident in the
last year on the stretch of highway
between U.S. 98 and County Road 640.
Police identified the victim as 62-year
old Victor Lopez of Haines City, a
detention support specialist at the local
jail. He was returning to his home after
working overnight at the facility, police
said.
"Victor took his job at the Sheriff's
Office very seriously, and he came to
work every day with this huge smile on
his face. Whenever you spoke to him
his face would always light up. His co-
workers who counted on him for their
safety knew he always had their back.
We as his work family mourn his loss.
We will come together and help each
other through this tragic event," said
Captain James Hogan, Commander of
the South County Jail.
According to a report from the sher-
iff's office, at around 6:23 a.m. Friday,
a 1998 four door green Kia owned and
drive by Lopes was heading north-
bound on U.S. 27 just south of County
Road 640 when for unknown reasons
it went into the median, striking a grey
2012 Nissan Rogue being driven by
59-year-old Martha Ritch of Lake Wales.
Reports indicated that Ritch was in
the median, facing westbound, about
to turn onto southbound U.S. 27. The
collision pushed her car out into the


southbound
lane, and she was

struck by a 2003 ,,. "
blue four-door
Toyota heading
southbound being
driven by 40-year- ""
old Cheryl Greives
of Winter Haven.
Lopez's Kia came
to a rest in the
median. V r
Lopez suffered Vior opez
significant injuries
and was declared
deceased on-scene, the sheriff's office
reported. He was wearing his seat belt.
The two other drivers were both
taken to Lake Wales Hospital, but nei-
ther suffered serious injuries and both
were treated and released. All three
drivers were the only occupants of each
of their vehicles.
It appears Lopez lost control of his
vehicle, a spokesperson for the PCSO
said. Polk County Sheriff's Traffic depu-
ties are seeking witnesses to this crash.
If anyone saw anything related to this
crash, contact the Polk County Sheriff's
Office at 863-298-6200.
Lopez was a civilian member of
PCSO. He was hired in November,
2000, as a detention support specialist,
working in the South County Jail in
Frostproof. A DSS performs support
duties such as: operate security doors,
handle inmate property, monitor
movement of visitors, monitor inmate


PHOTO BY ROBERT BLANCHARD


A Haines City man lost his life in this accident Friday on U.S. Highway 27 at County Road 640.


activity, provide information to the
public, assist other detention mem-
bers, maintain office logs, and the like,
police said.
He was on his way home from work
this morning after working the night
shift when he lost control of his car. He
is survived by a sister in Tampa, and
four grown children a daughter in
Brandon, and twin daughters and a son
in Puerto Rico. He is preceded in death


by his wife.
"We are saddened today by the loss
of our valued PCSO agency member,
Victor Lopez, who was killed in a traffic
crash in Lake Wales while driving home
from work this morning. We consider
ourselves a family here at PCSO, and
Victor's loss is felt throughout the
agency. Our thoughts and prayers are
with Victor's family during this tragic
time," Sheriff Grady Judd added.


Frostproof schools


get grant money


Frostproof teachers, and their
students, will benefit from several
grants that have been given to local
schools.
The Dollar General Literacy
Foundation has awarded a Youth
Literacy grant in the amount of
$2,000 to Lisa Sullivan, a first grade
teacher at Frostproof Elementary.
"The Dollar General Literacy
Foundation is pleased to support the
literacy efforts of Mrs. Sullivan," said
Rick Dreiling, Dollar General's chair-
man and CEO. "The Youth Literacy
grants are awarded annually at the
start of the school year so that the
funds are in place to have an impact
on reading education and support."
The Dollar General Literacy
Foundation's Youth Literacy grants
are awarded to assist with imple-
menting new or expanding existing
youth literacy programs; to purchase
new technology or equipment to
support youth literacy initiatives;
or to purchase books, materials or
software for youth literary programs.
In August, the Dollar General
Literacy Foundation awarded grants
totaling more than $2 million to
564 non-profit organizations, com-
munity groups, schools and librar-
ies throughout the United States.
It is estimated that approximately
315,000 youth will be served as a
result of these grants.
Sullivan said the name of her proj-
ect is ""Bridging the Gap Between
Reading and Math."
The money will be used to pur-
chase a multi-media package that
will help enhance student skills.
"I will be using the money to
purchase a set of Scholastic leveled
Math Readers," Sullivan said. "This


set includes 360 books and 60 ebook
CDs. I will use these to reinforce
reading skill during the math les-
son and to integrate literature into
Math."
Frostproof Elementary School
Assistant Principal Shay Hixenbaugh
and Ben Hill Griffin Elementary's
Stella Hatton, who teaches fourth
grade, were on hand earlier this
school year in Winter Haven to be
awarded Developer Award classroom
grants based on innovative programs
they have developed to help increase
student achievement.
Hatton was recognized for her
program "Rockin' and Eatin'," a science
program that integrates technology,
writing and science for fourth grade
students. The program is a way to
teach students about the types of
rocks and how they are formed in an
entertaining, creative and edible way.
Students tend to retain their learning
when they are involved in an activity
that captures and keeps their attention.
Hatton, a University of Florida
graduate, has been teaching for 12
years, and this is her second Teacher
to Teacher Classroom Connection
award.
Hixenbaugh was recognized for
her "Math Carnival," an evening
event that was designed to provide
all parents and students the oppor-
tunity to experience hands on math
activities in order to increase math
skills. Math Carnival takes place in
two different locations on campus
with the opportunity to participate
in many math activities at both
locations.
A graduate of Warner University
and Nova Southeastern, she is in her
fifth year at Frostproof Elementary.


&U,,jll!m


October 31, 2012


Page 12 Frostproof News


















The Constitutional Amendments


The explanation of these amendments
comes from the Collins Center for Public
Policy. It has a website that explains in
further detail what these amendments
mean, what the current law provides and
the history behind the law and the amend-
ments. It also contains a link to the Florida
Statutes and other government resources.
And, there is a place for readers to add their
comments.
The website is at http://collinscenter.
org/2012flamendments/home-2/.

Amendment 1: Health Care Service
What it would do:
This would add an amendment to the
state constitution that attempts to prohibit
the government from requiring individuals
to purchase health insurance.

If You Vote Yes:
A "yes" vote means you want the Florida
Constitution to include a provision that
prohibits the government from requiring
you to purchase health insurance.

If You Vote No:
A "no" vote means you do not want the
Florida Constitution to include a provision
that prohibits the government from requir-
ing you to purchase health insurance.

Arguments for:
Supporters of this proposed amendment
say the federal government cannot force
people to purchase health insurance, and
this amendment is an attempt to protect
Floridians from that requirement in the
federal health care act passed in 2010. They
say voting for this measure would send
a message that Congress overstepped its
authority.

,Arguments against:
Opponents say that despite its stated in-
tention, this proposed amendment will not
allow Floridians to opt out of the require-
ment that all Americans purchase health
insurance. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on
June 28, 2012, that the federal requirement
to purchase insurance is constitutional.

Amendment 2: Veterans Disabled Due To
Combat Injury; Homestead Property Tax
Discount
What it would do:
This amendment would allow certain
disabled veterans, who were not Florida
residents prior to entering military service, to
qualify for a discount on their property taxes.

IfYou Vote Yes:
A "yes" vote means you want the state
to give a property tax discount to disabled
veterans who moved to Florida after enter:
ing the military.

If You Vote No:
A "no" vote means you do not want to
extend the tax discount to disabled veterans
who moved to Florida after entering the
military.

Arguments for:
Supporters say this amendment will
benefit older veterans who were injured in
combat but did not live in Florida at the
time they entered the military. They say the
property tax discount can help with medical
bills and may allow veterans to stay in their
homes longer as they age. It might also
stimulate the housing market by persuading
veterans to move to Florida.

Arguments against:
Opponents say state and local govern-
ments face mounting budget shortfalls in
part because of diminished property tax
returns brought about by the collapse of the
housing market. Schools and local govern-
ments need to maintain the tax base or
consider cuts to public services.

Amendment 3: Revenue Limitation
What it would do:
This amendment would set a state
revenue limit each year based on a formula
that considers population growth and infla-
tion instead of using the current method
of calculating the revenue limit based on
personal income.

If You Vote Yes:
A "yes" vote means you want the state


to change the way it calculates its revenue
limit.

If You Vote No:
A "no" vote means you do not want the
state to change the way it calculates its
revenue limit.

Arguments for:
Supporters say this amendment would
ensure that the state budget never grows
beyond a family's ability to pay the taxes and
fees needed to fund that growth. They say it
would make government more efficient.

Arguments against:
Critics say that during tough economic
times, when tax revenues drop and there is
a greater need for government services, this
amendment would make it impossible for
agencies to meet demand, even when there
is available revenue. They say it threatens
funding for critical government services like
health care and education.

Amendment 4: Property Tax Limitations;
PropertyValue Decline; Reduction For
Non-homestead Assessment Increases;
Delay of Scheduled Repeal
What it would do:
Reduce the maximum annual increase in
taxable value of non-homestead properties
from 10 percent to 5 percent; provide an
extra homestead exemption for first-time
home buyers; allow lawmakers to prohibit
assessment increases for properties with
decreasing market values.

If you vote yes:
A "yes" vote means you favor the en-
hanced tax breaks being proposed.

If you vote no:
A "no" vote means you are against the
enhanced tax breaks being proposed.

Arguments for:
Supporters say this amendment would
make Florida property taxation more equi-
table, stimulate the housing and commercial
real estate markets and attract investors to
the state.

Arguments against:
Opponents say it would shift the tax
burden onto new businesses and Florida
residents while providing special benefits to
out-of-state and non-homestead property
owners.

Amendment 5: State Courts
What it would do:
This measure would provide for Senate
confirmation of Supreme Court justices; give
lawmakers control over changes to the rules
governing the court system; and direct the
Judicial Qualifications Commission, which
investigates judicial misconduct complaints,
to make its files available to the Speaker of
the Florida House of Representatives.

If you vote yes:
A "yes" vote means you want the Senate
to have confirmation power over Supreme
Court appointees, and some authority over
changes to the rules that govern the state's
courts. You also want to grant the House ac-
cess to Judicial Qualifications Commission's
investigative files on judges.

If you vote no:
A "no" vote means you do not want
these proposed changes made to the state's
judiciary.

Arguments for:
Supporters say the measure would
make the appellate court system run more
efficiently and add a layer of account-
ability before Supreme Court justices are
appointed.

Arguments against:
Opponents say the measure is a danger-
ous attempt to exert political influence over
the judicial branch by giving legislators
more authority.

Amendment 6: Prohibition on Public
Funding of Abortions; Construction of
Abortion Rights
What it would do:
This amendment would make the existing
federal ban on public funding for most


abortions part of the state constitution. It
would narrow the scope of a state privacy
law that is sometimes used in Florida to
challenge abortion laws.

If you vote yes:
A "yes" vote means you support putting
the existing federal ban on the use of public
funds for abortions into the state constitu-
tion; and you support eliminating the state's
privacy right with respect to a woman's right
to choose.

If you vote no:
A "no" vote means you are against placing
the existing federal ban on using public
funds for abortions into the state consti-
tution; and you are against eliminating
the state's privacy right with respect to a
woman's right to choose.

Arguments for:
Supporters say this makes it clear Florida
prohibits public funding for abortions and
gives the public a voice in deciding state
abortion law.

Arguments against:
Opponents say this amendment discrimi-
nates against women, strips away a woman's
fundamental right to choose, and erodes
established law, including rights of privacy.

Amendment 8: Religious Freedom
What it would do:
This amendment would remove the
prohibition in Florida's Constitution that
prevents religious institutions from receiv-
ing taxpayer funding.

If You Vote Yes:
A "yes" vote means you want to remove
from the Florida Constitution a prohibition
against the state funding religious institu-
tions and replace it with a provision that
prohibits the state from denying funding to
institutions based on religious affiliations.

If You Vote No:
A "no" vote means you want to retain the
provision in the Florida.Constitution that
prohibits the state from funding religious
institutions.

Arguments for:
Supporters say the amendment would al-
low the state to fund programs that provide
a valuable public service but are currently
denied that funding because they are affili-
ated with religious organizations. They also
say the current law that denies funding to
religious groups was passed in 1885 and is
rooted in anti-Catholic bias and should be
removed from the state's constitution.

Arguments against:
Opponents say the amendment would
eliminate a long-established component of
the separation of church and state that pre-
vents the government from funding groups
that espouse religious beliefs. They also say
the anti-Catholic bias cited by supporters
of the amendment was not a motivation for
the law's passage in 1885 and, even if it were,
that bias no longer exists and should not be
a reason for eliminating the ban on funding
religious groups.

Amendment 9: Homestead Property Tax
Exemption for Surviving Spouse of Military
Veteran or First Responder
What it would do:
This would grant a full property tax ex-
emption to the surviving spouses of military
veterans who die while on active duty and
to the surviving spouses of first responders
who die in the line of duty.

If You Vote Yes:
A "yes" vote means you want the state to
grant the full homestead exemption to the
surviving spouses.

If You Vote No:
A "no" vote means you do not want the
state to grant the full homestead exemption.

Arguments for:
It helps the families left behind when a
veteran or first responder dies in service to
his country or community.

Arguments against:
It takes a bite out of the tax revenues


schools and local governments need to
provide services.

Amendment 10: Tangible Personal
Property Tax Exemption
What it would do:
This amendment would double the
tangible personal property tax exemption
and allow local governments to increase the
exemption.

If You Vote Yes:
A "yes" vote means you want to double
the tangible personal property tax exemp-
tion and allow cities and counties to expand
the exemptions beyond that.

If You Vote No:
A "no" vote means you do not want to
double the tangible personal property tax
exemption and you do not want to allow cit-
ies and counties to expand the exemptions.

Arguments for:
Supporters say this amendment will
give tax relief to small businesses and help
stimulate the economy. They say it provides
a way for local governments to offer further
reductions in the business tax.

Arguments against:
Opponents say this amendment is part of
a trickle-down economic theory that does
not work. They say it will strip millions in tax
revenue from local governments struggling
to provide basic services.

Amendment 11: Additional Homestead
Exemption; Low-Income Seniors Who
Maintain Long-Term Residency on
Property; Equal to Assessed Value.
What it would do:
This amendment would give an additional
property tax exemption to low-income
seniors who have lived in their home for
more than 25 years.

If You Vote Yes:
A "yes" vote means you think cities and
counties should have the authority to grant
a full property tax discount to eligible
seniors.

If You Vote No:
A "no" vote means you do not think that
cities and counties should have the author-
ity to grant a full property tax discount to
eligible seniors.

Arguments for:
Supporters say this amendment will ben-
efit elderly residents on fixed incomes. They
say the property tax discount can help with
medical bills and may allow more elderly
residents to stay in their homes as they age.

Arguments against:
Opponents say state and local govern-
ments face mounting budget shortfalls in
part because of diminished property tax
returns. Schools and local governments
need to maintain the tax base.

Amendment 12: Appointment of Student
Body President to Board of Governors of
the State University System.
What it would do:
This amendment would change the way
the state selects the student representative
on the state university system's Board of
Governors, which oversees the university
system.

If you vote yes:
A "yes" vote means you want the state
create a new council of university student
presidents from which the student repre-
sentative to the Board of Governors will be
chosen.

If you vote no:
A "no" vote means you want to keep the
current system of selecting the student
representative to the Board of Governors.

Arguments for:
Supporters say this amendment guaran-
tees every university has a chance to have
their student body president be named as a
representative of the Board of Governors.

Arguments against:
Opponents say this amendment is
unnecessary.


Frostproof News Page 13


October 31, 2012








Page 14 Frostproof News


October 31, 2012


Citrus group hopes to spread larger message


By BRIAN ACKLEY
BACKLEY @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

Members of the Florida Citrus
Commission hope more consumers
will see and hear the citrus industry's
messages in the coming months,
thanks in part to a larger than expect-
ed crop for the 2012-13 season.
The Commission agreed to a new
budget that is about $5 million more
than the previous year's spending,
with more than 80 percent of that
increase to be poured into marketing
programs, according to Commission
Controller Debra Funkhouser.
She noted that the group's original
spending plan was crafted with a
forecast of about 194 million boxes of
citrus for the coming season, but the
USDA projections pegged that number
at about 197 million. The overall bud-
get for 2012-13 now comes in at about
$55.4 million. Some of the budget


increase was also attributed to lower-
than-expected spending last year.
"We went to into this budgeting
process saying any additional funds
that were generated be put back into
marketing programs, to beef up the
marketing programs, trying to get
us back where we were several years
ago," she said.
The orange juice component of
the citrus department's budget totals
$42.1 million, an increase of about
$3.4 million; $2 million of that jump
will go toward television and online
marketing, officials indicated. A good
chunk of that is earmarked for the
first quarter of 2013. Another $500,000
will go toward in-store shopper
promotions.
"We've beefed up our key selling
season so we're never off television
for more than two weeks," said Leigh
Killeen, deputy executive director for
domestic marketing. "We're taking


PHOTO PROVIDED


An uptick in expected citrus volume this season
means more marketing money for the Florida
Citrus Commission.

a hard look at all the (marketing)
tactics, what worked and what didn't
and executing on those as well. We're
really taking to hear the (marketing)
research and measurements."
SThe budget for online marketing
will go from about 10 percent to
14 percent of the overall advertising


spending.
The group has earmarked $6.7 mil-
lion for disease research, an increase
of $700,000 from last year, although
that figure will likely decrease some
later in the budget year.
"Some of the research that we ex-
pected to be necessary may not have
had to be accomplished and some can
in at lower costs also. We'll right size
that number as we move forward,"
Funkhouser said.
And while the vast majority of local
citrus is used in juice processing, the
commission is looking at spending
$100,000 to do a fresh fruit study.
"We're looking at consumer at-
titudes, perceptions and attributes
for future use as far as determining
marketing programs," Fnnkhouser
added.
The commission held it's monthly
meeting last week in Bartow when it
approved the budget.


S









For More Information:

Call I863) 534-5888 or


General Election




November 6, 2012



Polls are Open 7 am 7pm


visit us at PolkElections.com

Para asistencia en Espaiiol, per favor de llamar al (863) 534-5888



SUPERVISOR OF

,ELECTIONS
POLK COUNTYr FLORIDA
Lori Edwards


SAMPLE GENERAL ELECTION BALLOT
POLK COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOVEMBER 6, 2012


" TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL W NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE.
* Use only a pencil, or a blue or black pen.
" If you make a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If you erase or make other marks, your vote may not count.
* To vote for a candidate whose name is not printed on the ballot, fill in the oval, and write in the candidate's name on the blank
line provided for a write-in candidate.


PRESIDENT & VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)


Mill Romney
Paul Ryan

SBarack Obama
Joe Biden
Thomas Robert Stevens
Alden Link

Gary Johnson
James P. Gray

Virgil H. Goode, Jr.
James N. Clymer
SJill Stein
Cheri Honkala

Andre Barnett
Kenneth Cross

, Stewart Alexander
Alex Mendoza

Peta Lindsay
Yar Osorio

Roseanne Barr
Cindy Sheehan

STom Hoefling ,
Jonathan D. Ellis

Ross C. "Rocky" Anderson
Luis J. Rodriguez


Write-in
UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Vote for One)
Connie Mack
Bill Nelson
Bill Gaylor
Chris Borgia
Swlloman


Only voters who live In Congressional
District 9 may vote In this race. ,


Only voters who live In State Senate District2f
may vote in this race.


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS STATE SENATOR
DISTRICT 9 DISTRICT 21
(Vote for One) (Vote for One)

Todd Long REP Denise Grimsley REP
Alan Grayson DEM Stacy Anderson McCland DEM
Only voters wno hve in Congressoinal Only voters *nro lve in Sure Huaus Di trict Ji
District 10may vote tn thisrace. may role mn [os ra.s


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS
CPF DISTRICT 10
(Vote for One)

GRE : Daniel Webster REP
Val B. Domings DEM
REF .
Wlte-ln
Only voters *ho trl e n C.ngisslonal
SOC DIstrcr If may ore in thes race
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS
PSL DISTRICT 17
(Vote for One)

PFP Tom Rooney REP
; ;.' ,'..,,r, Bar, ..n DElI
AlP .
Only voersa r To l.e in Srate Senare
JPF District 14 mayvote inthis race.
STATE SENATOR
DISTRICT 14
(Vote for One)

William McBride REP
Darren Soto DEM
REP Only voters who live in State Senate
DEM District 15may vote in this race.
NPA STATE SENATOR
NPA DISTRICT 15
(Vote for One)


STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 39
(Vote for One)


Neil Combee REP
Carol Castagnero NPA
Only voters wno I, in Stare House Dsuirctl
may ore i Is thsret

STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 40
(Vote for One)

Seth McKeel REP
Lillian Lima NPA
OI ly rioter who I in State Housa DIsITI 1JI
nily wio iIn this risce
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 41
(Vote for One)

John Wood REP
Karen Cooper Weizel DEM
Only voters who live in State House District 42
may vote in this race.
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 42
(Vote for One)


Mike Horner
Eileen Game


Kelli Stargel REP
Stego Blue OEM

Notice to the Voter: A candidate in the race for the office of State Representative, District 42, has withdrawn resulting
in a replacement candidate as permitted by law. Please be advised that:
A vote cast for Mike Horner will count for Mike LaRosa. A vote cast for Eileen Game will count for Eileen Game.


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 1
(Vote for One)

George Lindsey REP
Richard J Castret NPA
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5
(Vote for One)

John Hall REP
Ricky Shirah DEM
JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice R. Fred Lewis of the Supreme
Court be retained in office?
SYES
NO


JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT
Shall Justice Barbara J. Pariente of the
Supreme Court be retained in office?
YES
NO
NO. 1 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 28
Health Care Services
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to
prohibit laws or rules from compelling any person or
employer to purchase, obtain, or otherwise provide for
health care coverage: permit a person or an employer to
purchase lawful health care services directly from a
health care provider, permit a health care provider to
accept direct payment from a person or an employer for
lawful health care services; exempt persons. employers,
and health care providers from penalties and taxes for
paying directly or accepting direct payment for lawful
health care services; and prohibit laws or rules from
abolishing the private market for health care coverage of
any lawful health care service. Specifies that the
amendment does not affect which health care services a
health care provider is required to perform or provide.
affect which health care services are permitted by law,
prohibit care provided pursuant to general law relating to
workers' compensation; affect laws or rules in effect as
of March 1, 2010, affect the terms or conditions of any
health care system to the extent that those terms and
conditions do not have the effect of punishing a person
or an employer for paying directly for lawful health care
services or a health care provider for accepting direct
payment from a person or an employer for lawful health
care services; or affect any general law passed by twvo-
thirds vote of the membership of each house of the
Legislature. passed after the effective dale of the
amendment. provided such law states with speciiacty the
public necessity justifying the exceptions from the
provisions of he amendment The amendment expressly
provides that it may not be construed to prohibit
negotiated provisions in insurance contracts, network
agreements, or other provider agreements contractually
limiting copayments coinsurance deductibles, or other
patient charges.


YES


JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME
COURT
Shall Justice Peggy A. Quince of the
Supreme Court be retained in office7

YES
NO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Anthony K. Black of the
Second Distnct Court of Appeal be
retained in office?

YES
NO


DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Shall Judge Darryl C. Casanueva of
the Second District Court of Appeal be


Shall Judge Charles A. Davis Jr. of
the Second District Court of Appeal be
retained in office?

YES
NO
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL


CIRCUIT JUDGE, 10TH CIRCUIT
GROUP 7
(Vote for One)

William "Bill" Sites
Christine Trakas Thornhill
SHERIFF
(Vote for One)
Grady Judd


Only wote no w lGe in the Lah ,Ashton
Commur,,ry Dv.ewopmenr Dislrcl may Otre
in this rice.


LAKE ASHTON COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT
SEAT 5
(Vote for One)
H Borden Deane


LAKE ASHTON II COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT
SEAT 4
(Vote for One)
Howard Kantrowitz
Doug Robertson


Shall Judge Edward C. LaRose of the NO. 3 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
Second District Court of Appeal be ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 1 AND 19
retained in office? ARTICLE XII, SECTION 32


YES
NO
NO. 2 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 32
Veterans Disabled Due to Combat Injury;
Homestead Property Tax Discount
Proposing an amendment to Section 6 of
Article VII and the creation of Section 32 of
Article XII of the State Constitubton to expand
the availability of the property discount on the
homesteads of veterans who became disabled
as the result of a combat injury to include
those who were not Flonda residents when
they entered the military and schedule the
amendment to take effect January 1. 2013.


YES
NO


State Government Revenue Limitation
This proposed amendment to the State
Constitution replaces the existing state
revenue hmitalon based on Florida personal
income growth with a new state revenue
limitation based on inflation and population
i.. ; I Tw. 1 A
collected in excess of the revenue imitation
must be deposited into the budget stabilization
fund until the fund reaches its maximum
balance, and thereafter shall be used for the
d3,, .. .]ri1- .. : I ,-, <*.. ,
from school districts for participation in a slate-
funded education finance program, or, it the
minimum financial effort is no longer required,
retumed to the taxpayers. The Legislature may
increase the state revenue limitation through a
bill approved by a super majority vole of each
house of the Legisature The Legislature may
also submit a proposed increase in the state
revenue hmiltaton to the voters. The
Legislature must implement this proposed
amendment by general law. The amendment
wil take effect upon approval by the electors
and wtl first apply to the 2014-2015 state fiscal
year

YES
NO


YES Margot Stevens
NO Only voters mwro Ie in lna Lake Ashron II
CoDISTRICTmu COURTy velopmen 0nc may ole
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL in Jrsce
in Ell race


I I


I retained in office?








October 31 2012


Frostproof News Page 15


A special salute to September's 'Top Dawgs'


Ben Hill Griffin Jr. Elemen-
tary in Frostproof recently
honored its September "Top
Dawgs." Honorees included:
Priscila Ballesteros, Gabriella
Branson, Emma Brown,
Jasiah Cenatus, Manny
Espinoza, Angel Galarza,
Guadalupe Gonzalez, Harley
Jones, Erica Lewis, David
Martinez, Alexis McElroy,
Adalberto Medina, Clarisa
Moreno, Olivia Nobles, John
Olivera, Leroy Picket, Skyler
Richardson, Vanessa Rivera,
Sierra Robertson, Sharissa
Sams, Jhoana Taylor and
Yaritsi Palacios Vargas.

PHOTO PROVIDED


SI.


Before You Go to the Polls ...

* Bring your Driver's License or another
form of photo and signature identification.

* If you have moved, update your
address with the Election's Office prior
to Election Day.


* Double che
you vote.
Your polling
location is
found on
your Voter
Information
Card.


ck your precinct before Early Voting is Available
October 27 November 3
from 7 am 7 pm
..*i r.. ,,x-on ^ at the following locations:

"" Lakeland Branch Courthouse
Sflhi ^ 930 E. Parker Street, Lakeland
Winter Haven Branch Courthouse
o Gil Jones Plaza 3425 Lake Alfred Road, Winter
S .,4i .i Bartow City Hall
450 N. Wilson Avenue. Bartow


r Have


* Larry R. Jackson Library
1700 N. Florida Avenue, Lakeland
* Lake Wales Library
290 Cypress Garden Lane, Lake Wales
* Davenport Branch Office
Ridgeview Plaza 45589 US Highway 27, Davenport
2 miles north of 1-4
* Mulberry City Hall
104 S. Church Avenue, Mulberry
* Haines City City Hall
502 E. Hinson Avenue, Haines City


NO. 6 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 28
Prohibition on Public Funding of Abortions;
Construction of Abortion Rights

This proposed amendment provides that public
funds may not be expended for any abortion orfor
health-benefits coverage that includes coverage of
abortion, This prohibition does not apply to an
expenditure required by federal law, a case in which
a woman suffers from a physical disorder, physical
injury, or physical illness that would place her in
danger of death unless an abortion is performed, or
a case of rape or ncest
This proposed amendment provides that the State
Constitutin may not be interpreted to create
broader rghts to an abortion than those contained
in the United States Constitution. With respect to
abortion, this proposed amendment overrules court
decisions which conclude that the right of pnvacy
under Article I, Section 23 of the State Constitution
is broader in scope than that of the United States
Constitution.

YES
NO
NO. 8 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 3
Religious Freedom
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution
providing that no individual or entity may be denied,
on the basis of religious identity or beef,
governmental benefits, funding or other support.
except as required by the First Amendment to the
United States Constitution, and deleting the
prohibition against using revenues from the public
treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church,
sect, or religious denomination or in aid of any
sectarian institution.

YES
NO
NO. 9 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 32

Homestead Property Tax Exemption for
Surviving Spouse of Military Veteran or First
Responder
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution
to authonze the Legislature to provide by general
law ad valorem homestead property tax relief to the
surviving spouse of a military veteran who died from
service-connected causes while on active duly or to
the surviving spouse of a first responder who died
in the fine of duty. The amendment authorizes the
Legislature to totally exempt or partially exempt
such surviving spouse's homestead property from
ad valorem taxation The amendment defines a first
responder as a law enforcement officer, a
correctional officer, a firefighter, an emergency
medical technician, or a paramedic This
amendment shall take effect January 1,2013.

YES
NO


NO. 10 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 3
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 32
Tangible Personal Property Tax Exemption
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution
to:
(1) Provide an exemption from ad
valorem taxes levied by counties, municipalities.
school districts, and other local governments on
tangible personal property if the assessed value of
an owners tangible personal property is greater
than $25,000 but less than $50,000. This new
exemption, f approved by the voters, will lake effect
on January 1,2013. and apply to the 2013 lax roll
and subsequent tax rolls.
(2) Aulhonze a county or municipality for
the purpose of its respective levy. and as provided
by general law, to provide tangible personal
property tax exemptions by ordinance.
This is in addition to other statevwde tangible
personal property tax exemptions provided by the
Constitution and this amendment.

YES
NO
NO. 11 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6
Additional Homestead Exemption; Low-Income
Seniors Who Maintain Long-Term Residency on
Property; Equal to Assessed Value
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution
to authorize the Legislature, by general law and
subject to conditions set forth in the general law, to
allow counties and municipalities to grant an
additional homestead tax exemption equal to tie
assessed value of homestead property if the
property has a just value less than $250,000 to an
owner who has maintained permanent residency on
the property for not less than 25 years, who has
attained age 65, and who has a low household
income as defined by general law.




YES
NO
NO. 12 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE IX, SECTION 7
Appointment of Student Body President to
Board of Governors of the State University
System
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution
to replace the president of the Flonda Student
Association with the chair of the council of state
university student body presidents as the student
member of the Board of Governors of the State
University System and to require that the Board of
Goverors organize such councd of state university
student body presidents


YES
NO


COUNTY PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION
QUESTION
Shall the board of county commissioners of
this county be authorized to grant, pursuant to
s. 3. Art VII of the State Constiuton, property
tax exemptions to new businesses and
expansions of existing businesses that are
expected to create new, fuii-time jobs in the
county?

YES For authority to grant
exemptions.

NO Against authority to grant
exemptions.


SAMPLE GENERAL ELECTION BALLOT
POLK COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOVEMBER 6, 2012

NO.-4 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 4, 6 ARTICLE XII, SECTIONS 27, 32,33
Property Tax Limitations; Property Value Decline; Reduction for Nonhomestead Assessment Increases; Delay of Scheduled Repeal
(1) This would amend Florida Constitution Article VII. Section 4 (Taxation; assessments) and Section 6 (Homestead exemptions) It also would
amend Article XII, Section 27, and add Sections 32 and 33, relating to the Schedule for the amendments.
(2) In certain circumstances, the law requires the assessed value of homestead and specified nonhomestead property to increase when die just
value of the property decreases. Therefore, this amendment provides that the Legislature may, by general law, provide Ihat the assessment of homestead
and specified nonhomestead property may not increase if the lust value of that property is less than the lust value of the property on the preceding January
1, subject to any adjustment in the assessed value due to changes, additions, reductions or improvements to such property which are assessed as provided
for by general law. This amendment takes effect upon approval by the voters. If approved at a special election held on the dale of the 2012 presidential
preference primary, it shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at the 2012 general election, shall take effect January 1. 2013.
(3) This amendment reduces from 10 percent to 5 percent the limitation on annual changes in assessments of nonhomestead real property. This
amendment takes effect upon approval of the voters If approved at a special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference primary, it shall
operate retroactively to January 1,2012. or, if approved at the 2012 general election, takes effect January 1, 2013.
(4) This amendment also authorizes general law to provide, subject to conditions specified in such law, an additional homestead exemption to
every person who establishes the right to receive the homestead exemption provided in the Flonrda Constitution with n 1 year after purchasing the
homestead property and who has not owned property in the previous 3 calendar years to which the Florida homestead exemption applied. The additional
homestead exemption shall apply to all levies except school district levies. The additional exemption is an amount equal to 50 percent of tie homestead
property's just value on January 1 of the year the homestead is established. The addibonal homestead exemption may not exceed an amount equal to the
median just value of all homestead property within the county where the property at issue is located for the calendar year immediately preceding January 1
of the year the homestead is established. The additional exemption shall apply for the shorter of 5 years or the year of sale of the property. The amount of
the additional exemption shall be reduced in each subsequent year by an amount equal to 20 percent of the amount of the additional exemption received in
the year the homestead was established or by an amount equal to the difference between the just value of the property and the assessed value of the
property determined under Article VII, Section 4(d), whichever is greater. Not more than one such exemption shall be allowed per homestead property at
one time. The additional exemption applies to property purchased on or after January 1,2011, if approved by the voters at a special election held on the
date of the 2012 presidential preference pnmary, or to property purchased on or after January 1,2012, if approved by the voters at the 2012 general
election. The additional exemption is not available in the sixth and subsequent years after it is first received. The amendment shall take effect upon approval
by the voters. If approved at a special election held on the dale of the 2012 presidential preference primary, it shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2012,
or, if approved at the 2012 general election, lakes effect January 1.2013.
(5) This amendment also delays until 2023, the repeal, currently scheduled to take effect in 2019. of constitutional amendments adopted in 2008
which limit annual assessment increases for specified nonhomestead real property. This amendment delays until 2022 the submission of an amendment
proposing the abrogation of such repeal to the voters.


YES
NO
NO. 5 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 2, 11, AND 12
State Courts
Pioposing a revision of Article V of the State Constitution relating to the judiciary.
The State Constitution authorizes the Supreme Court to adopt rules for the practice and procedure in all courts, The constitution further provides
that a rule of court may be repealed by a general law enacted by a two-thirds vote of the membership of each house of Ihe Legislature. This proposed
constitutional revision eliminates the requirement that a general law repealing a court rule pass by a two-thirds vote of each house, thereby providing that
the Legislature may repeal a rule of court by a general law approved by a majority vote of each house of the Legislature that expresses the policy behind the
repeal. The court could readopt the rule in conformity with the public policy expressed by the Legislature, but if the Legislature determines that a rule has
been readopted and repeals the readopted rule, this proposed revision prohibits the court from further readopting the repealed rule without the Legislature's
prior approval. Under current law, rules of the judicial nominating commissions and the Judicial Qualifications Commission may be repealed by general law
enacted by a majority vote of the membership of each house of the Legislature Under this proposed revision, a vote to repeal those rules is changed to
repeal by general law enacted by a majonty vote of the legislators present.
Under current law, the Governor appoints a justice of the Supreme Court from a list of nominees provided by a judicial nominating commission,
and appointments by the Govemor are not subject to confirmation. This revision requires Senate confirmation of a justice of the Supreme Court before the
appointee can take office. If the Senate votes not to confirm the appointment, the judicial nominating commission must reconvene and may not renominate
any person whose prior appointment to fill the same vacancy was not confirmed by the Senate. For the purpose of confirmation, the Senate may meet at
any time. If the Senate fails to vote on the appointment of a justice within 90 days, the justice will be deemed confirmed and will lake office.
The Judicial Qualifications Commission is an independent commission created by the State Constitution to investigate and prosecute before the
Florida Supreme Court alleged misconduct by a justice or udge. Currently under the constitution, commission proceedings are confidential until formal
charges are filed by the investigative panel of the commission, Once formal charges are filed, the formal charges and all further proceedings of the
commission are public. Currently, the constitution authorizes the House of Representatives to impeach a justice or judge. Further, the Speaker of the House
of Representatives may request, and the Judicial Qualifications Commission must make available, all information in the commission's possession for use in
o,'- ,,.- r ,,i, ., :,- ,3 .,: ",..,' Ti." C.-,: .. i ..: .. ....., I., 1,r, 14. .1:; ,t: A I,.- f;;IH1. ...r 'I; ^ ri f tn he House

information is used in the pursuit of an impeachment of a justice or judge, This revision also removes the power of the Governor to request files of the
Judicial Qualificatons Commission to conform to a prior constitutional change
This revision also makes technical and clarifying additions and deletions relating to the selection of chief judges of a circuit and relating to the
Judicial Qualifcations Commission, and makes other nonsubstantive conforming and technical changes in the judicial article of the ccnstlulion
YES
NO


I


I C--sl ~- I I -- -


N










1-4 corridor pushing Florida in Romney's direction


By ADAM C. SMITH
TAMPA BAY TIMIs

It has been a fundamental rule of Florida
politics for decades: Statewide campaigns
are won and lost on the I-4 corridor.
This week that celebrated swing-
voter swath stretching from Tampa Bay to
Daytona Beach is poised to deliver Florida's
29 electoral votes to Mitt Romney.
An exclusive Tampa Bay Times/Bay
News 9 poll of likely voters along the
Interstate 4 corridor finds Romney leading
Obama 51 percent to 45 percent, with 4
percent undecided.
"Romney has pretty much nailed down
Florida," said Brad Coker of Mason-Dixon
Polling and Research, which conducted
the poll for the Times and its media
partners. "Unless something dramatically
changes an October surprise, a major gaffe
Romney's going to win Florida."
The formula for Democrats to win
Florida has long been simple: win big in
the Democratic stronghold of Miami-
Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties,
avoid overwhelming losses in conservative
North Florida, and stay close to even along
the I-4 corridor. Obama and John McCain
essentially tied in the battleground four
years ago.
"Being that this is 1-4, the Florida battle-
ground, the region of the state that usually
tells you how it's going to come out, for
Romney to be up 6 points right now? They
should be able to call Florida as soon as the
polls close in Pensacola if they do their exit
polling right," Coker said.
The Oct. 22-24 survey focused only on
voters in the I-4 corridor, but Tampa Bay
on the western end has an uncanny knack
for almost exactly matching Florida's state-
wide results. Four years ago Obama beat
John McCain in Florida and Tampa Bay
defined as Hillsborough, Pinellas, Pasco,
Hemando, Polk and Citrus counties by the
same margin, 51 percent to 48 percent.
Now? The poll shows Romney leading
Tampa Bay 50 percent to 46 percent.
"I truly was looking for Obama to go in
and bring in some Republicans and say we
are going to do things together. The very
idea that this country is run without a bud-
get is a shame. How many households can
run without a budget?" said Republican
David Stratton, 67, a retired home builder
inValrico, one of the voters surveyed. "I
blame Obama for that. I'm sorry? He's
supposed to lead the country. He's the one
who promised hope and change. Not only
didn't it happen, he's proven it's nothing
more than rhetoric."
Central Florida on the eastern end of the
I-4 corridor skews more Republican and
includes Orange, Osceola, Lake, Brevard,
Sumter, Marion, Seminole, Volusia and
Flagler counties. Romney is leading in
Central Florida 52 percent to 44 percent.


The telephone survey of 625 registered
Florida voters in the I-4 corridor all likely
to vote in the November election was con-
ducted Oct. 22-24 for the Times, Bay News
9 and Central Florida News 13. The poll,
which included respondents using land
lines and cell phones, was conducted by
Mason-Dixon, a nonpartisan, Jacksonville-
based company. The margin of error is plus
or minus 4 percentage points.
Both campaigns have concentrated
relentlessly on the I-4 corridor. The nation's
top five media markets for presidential
campaign ads through most of October
include Tampa (No. 3) and Orlando (No. 5),
according to the Wesleyan Media Project.
Obama campaigned Thursday in Tampa
and returns to Orlando on Monday, while
Romney campaigned Saturday in Pasco
County and Kissimmee.
"I'm satisfied with the way things are
going. They're moving slow, but you can't
expect a whole lot too fast, especially with
the Republicans standing in the way every
step of the way," said Democrat Nicholas
Ficarrotta, 59, a retired electrician in Tampa
who was surveyed and supports Obama.
"It would be nice if everybody looked out
for one another."
But the poll underscores deep dis-
appointment in Obama in the main
battleground region of America's biggest
battleground state. Fifty one percent of I-4
voters disapprove of the president's job
performance, 54 percent see the country
on the wrong track, and 55 percent say
they are not better off today than four years
ago.
Asked who they trust more to improve
the economy, Romney leads Obama 52
percent to 44 percent. Likewise, 52 percent
trust Romney more to look out for the
middle class and 46 percent trust Obama
more.
"The country is heading in the wrong
direction," said Richard Invinjack, a
70-year-old retired IT specialist who lives
in the Villages and is voting for Romney.
"Too much debt, too much deficit, bad
foreign policy, too much making people
dependent on the government, too many
handouts, which I call buying votes, the
country is going down the wrong track 100
percent of the way."
Only on the question of foreign policy
were Obama and Romney roughly tied in
terms of voters' trust. Last week's foreign
policy debate in Boca Raton did little or
nothing to shift views, and the economy is
the overriding issue this year anyway.
One in three voters feel the economy is
getting better in Florida, while 22 percent
feel it is getting worse and 44 percent say
it's staying about the same.
"The same in Florida is not good," Coker
said.
The poll shows stark divisions along ra-
cial and ethnic lines. Six in 10 white voters


AP PHOTO/THE LEDGER / RICK RUNION
Ann Romney, wife of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, greets volunteers at
Fresco's Bakery & Bistro, Oct. 24 in Lakeland, right in the heart of Florida's key 1-4 corridor of
voters who appear to be breaking Romney's way.


in the I-4 corridor are backing Romney,
virtually all African-Americans support
Obama, and the president is leading
among Hispanics by nearly 20 percentage
points. African-Americans and Hispanics
accounted for about 20 percent of the I-4
voters surveyed.
Romney leads Obama among crucial in-
dependent voters 49 percent to 41 percent,
and he leads among men by 16 percentage
points. Obama leads among women 50
percent to 46 percent, but that's not nearly
as much of an advantage as Democrats
have hoped for.
Overall, 52 percent of the voters have a
favorable view of Romney and 39 percent
have an unfavorable view. Forty-seven
percent have an unfavorable opinion of the


president and 44 percent a favorable one.
Few Americans receive as much atten-
tion from the presidential campaigns as
those living around 1-4. Campaign com-
mercials flood their TV airwaves, and rarely
a week goes by without a visit from one of
the candidates or their top surrogates.
You might think these all-important
swing corridor voters relish their outsized
influence.
Wrong.
Only one in four say all the attention is
a good thing, while seven in 10 consider it
annoying.
Don't worry folks, it's almost over.

Times staff writer BrittanyAlana Davis
contributed to this report.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

Scenic Self Storage located at 1130 N. Scenic Hwy. Lake Wales, FL hereby gives notice
of a public sale to the highest bidder for cash only on November 13, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. in
accordance with the Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statutes (section 83.801-83.809).
Seller reserves the right to withdraw property from sale at any time.
This property is being sold to satisfy a landlord lien.

Property includes contents of the spaces of the following tenant.


TENANT NAME
Olitio Atkinson





Felicia Taylor


CONTENTS
Baby Changing Table, Baby Bed
and Mattress, Love Seat, Toaster
Oven, Stove, Recliner, Fan,
Vases, Lawn Chair, Refrigerator,
Assorted Boxes and Baskets

Couch, Love Seat, King or
Queen Bed Frame, Headboard
and Mattress, Rug, Lamps,
Shelves, Blankets, Frying Pans,
Assorted Boxes, Microwave


&


I *

"t 1t


* Enjoy mini massages and
refreshments

* Tour the center and discover
how adult day health care can
help your loved one
* Learn about Veterans'
assistance options including
the VA and Polk County
ADHC partnership


Wednesday,Nov.7 3:30-5:30p.m. OpenHouse


Polk County Adult Day Health Care, Haines City
751 Scenic Highway
(Next to Alta Vista Elementary School on State Road 544)


For more information, contact 863-519-8146 or
visit Polk-County.net/AdultDayCare.


Join us for a time of respite and rejuvenation, and
discover local support services available to help
you care for your loved one.


~c -- -- --~---- --gl---. ~e lpl


Page 16 Frostproof News


October 31, 2012


'* '






October 311, 2012 Frostproof News Page 17


Ghosts, ghouls and cheerleaders invade P


r


Left: Even though there
was a high school football
game going on at nearby
Faris Brannen Stadium,
we're pretty sure this lass
wasn't actually on the
sidelines there. In fact,
this is actually 12-year-old
Trent Kinard.


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
Frostproof's P & J Recreation held a special teen-only, drug and alcohol free Halloween event
Saturday evening. The kids were in a separate room away from the bar, and of course there was
plenty of adult supervision. There was quite a mix of clever, creative and scary costumes!


There were plenty of impressive Michael Jackson "Thriller" type dance moves on display during
the fun night.


Prizes were given out for various
costume categories. Winners
included, from left; Baleigh Barrett
for best overall, Dylan O'Brien as
the scariest for "The Mouth,' Trent
Kinard as funniest and Paul Thomas
for coolest with his ninja outfit.



Left: You'll have to take our word for
it, but underneath this great get up
is Colby Tucker.


Air
Cleaners
Remove particles
and pollutants


Carbon
Monoxide
S Alarm
* Monitors CO
levels in your
home


A-stj. 4


Humidifiers
Control moisture
in the air


Ventilators
Refresh the air in
your home


Improve the air quality

inside your home.

Improve your home's health by enhancing the quality of the
air inside. Carrier humidifiers help you control air moisture,
ventilators bring fresh air into your home air filters clean the
air before it circulates, advanced ultraviolet lamps eliminate
germs and bacteria, and carbon monoxide alarms measure and
detect CO levels in the home.





800 U.S. Highway 27 N. Avon Park 453-7571 Sebring 385-1731 Lake Placid 465-7771


Frostproof News Page 17


October 31, 2012


rs~


.tili










Jones leading Frostproof chamber as new director


By GEORGE FRANECEVICH
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEW'S.NET
In a storefront office of the Ramon
Theater building, you will find the
Director of the Frostproof Area
Chamber of Commerce, Karen Jones.
Most likely she'll be answering her
own phone, and doing her own typing,
when she's not fielding questions about
Frostproof or giving travel directions to
walk-ins.
To understand the duties of the
director, it's helpful to understand what
the Chamber of Commerce is and why
it exists.
The Chamber of Commerce is a local
organization of businesses and indi-
viduals, who advocate for the business
community and who, as they will tell
you, are making a serious commitment
"to furthering the prosperity of our
community."
Members of the Chamber of
Commerce consist of local businesses,
as well as other businesses either serv-
ing or doing business with the city and/
or its residents.
Any concerned individual who so
wishes, may also become a member of
the Chamber of Commerce.
The members elect a board and
a President which set policy for the
Chamber. A director is appointed who
acts as an intermediary between the
board and its members, as well as rep-
resenting the Chamber of Commerce to
the public at large.
The director also takes care of the
scheduling of various Chamber events
such as the monthly Chamber of
Commerce Luncheon. This usually in-
cludes securing a guest speaker and the
Director is responsible for the annual
Chamber of Commerce Banquet.
Additionally the Director helps
schedule and coordinate special
events such as Meet the Candidates,
the Orange Blossom Festival, and the


ANNUAL EVENT NOV. 10
The Frostproof Chamber of Commerce will be
hosting its Annual Banquet on Saturday, Nov. 10 at
the Ramon Theater.
Tickets are $50 per person and must be
purchased in advance as this is a catered event
by Texas Cattle Company, Inc. Tickets must be
purchased no later than Wednesday, Nov. 7
and they can be purchased online at Www.
frostproofchamber.com or in the chamber office
located at 11 E. Wall Street, downtown Frostproof.
The evening will begin with a social at 6:30 p.m.,
appetizers and a cash bar will be available. At
7 p.m. a dinner will consist of salad, New York strip
steak, baked potato and dessert. The highlight of
the evening will be presentation of the annual Man
and Woman of the Year awards.
For more information, contact the chamber at
863-635-9112.

Christmas parade, to name a few. As
the Chamber puts it, "such events are
excellent for promoting a business,
networking with other businesses and
prospective clients, while promoting
the city of Frostproof and for having
some good clean fun."
The director's office, is usually the
first stop for visitors seeking travel,
entertainment, or general community
information. The office also provides a
wealth of information for any inquiring
businessman regarding demographics,
business and/or commerce data.
The Director also helps maintain and
update the Frostproof Area Chamber
of Commerce web-site, as well as the
preparation of the Frostproof Area
Community Calendar of Events and
any event brochures.
After reading all of the above, one
might think that it is a requirement
that the Director be able to stop a
speeding locomotive or leap tall
buildings in a single bound. But in
spite of her daily routine, the Director
is actually a superhuman antithesis,
in that she is the very approachable,


Coffee and doughnuts taste better when you

are reading your hometown newspaper

Don't believe it? 1 (


Call today and

subscribe to the

Frostproof News

and see for yourself.

863-676-3467


Karen Jones was hired earlier this summer to be director of the Frostproof Chamber.


soft-spoken and mild mannered wife
of James Jones.
She is also the proud mother of two
young children, her daughter Harley
Anne, age 8 and her son, Bowen, 6.
The Jones family relocated to the area
from Miami in 2005. Karen believes she
was selected to fill the director's posi-
tion primarily because of her computer
and customer service skills. These were
skills she acquired while employed at
the University of Miami, teaching the
faculty and staff computer skills.
Since arriving here she has been em-
ployed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission as well as


Citizens Bank and Trust prior to being
selected for the Director's position.
Karen seems to enjoy her new
position and advises that she gets a
lot of cooperation and help from the
Chamber of Commerce members, as
well as being lucky enough to share her
storefront office with the very knowl-
edgeable Administrator of the Ramon
Theatre, Tina Miller.
For more information concerning
the community, contact the Frostproof
Area Chamber of Commerce Office
located at 15 East Wall St. in downtown
Frostproof. The Director is usually there
between noon and 4 p.m. weekdays.


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October 31, 2012


Page 18 Frostproof News










Family Week to celebrate 'Attitude of Gratitude'


By MARY CANNADAY
MCANNADAY @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

Just in time for Thanksgiving, par-
ticipants in this year's Polk County
Family Week will celebrate an "Attitude
of Gratitude" as the theme for the fifth
annual event, which is centered around
families of all shapes and sizes.
The kick-off event is Nov. 10 in down-
town Winter Haven's Central Park, with
activities scheduled as follows:
9 a.m.: Opening Ceremonies, includ-
ing an international parade.
9:30 a.m.: A Family Week Run/Walk
following opening ceremonies.
10 a.m.: Grandparent of the Year
Awards
10:20 a.m.: Run Results
11 a.m.: Student Essay Awards
11:50 a.m.: Student Art Awards
1 p.m.: Grand Prize Raffle ($500
Value-Must be Present to Win)
Fun, games and time together are
the hallmarks of Family Week, which
was conceived several years ago when
a group of women from Haines City's
Church of Latter Day Saints got together
to come up with some wholesome fam-
ily activities, realizing that there was no
such event open to the public at large.
The celebration has grown over the
years, and has been recognized by the
Polk County School Board and child
advocacy agencies, among others. Teri
Saunders, Chief Executive officer of
Heartland for Children, said "Heartland
for Children is a proud supporter of
Polk County Family Week. We know
that family is the building block for the
community and that children need safe,
stable, nurturing relationships if they
are to be able to grow and reach their
potential. Polk County Family Week
highlights the good in our community


and encourages family strengthening
activities." Heartland is the lead child
welfare and advocacy program for Polk,
Hardee and Highlands counties.
April Franke, who recently retired
from Healthy Families Polk, another
partner, said "I have seen Family Week
grow every year and never cease to be
amazed at the work and dedication
that goes into the preparation of the
event from committee members to
sponsors. I have been involved since
the very first year, when it started on
a chilly November evening in Mary
Holland Park in Bartow. I was part of
the Healthy Families team and helped
serve hot dogs. Healthy Families is all
about families, and so am I, so this was
a perfect fit."

Erin Bratsman, a Family Week
volunteer, said, "Volunteering at the
kick-off event has been something fun
for out whole family to do together. Our
favorite thing from last year was seeing
our sons play the piano in the talent
show. It was an entertaining show and a
nice way to spend a Sunday evening as
a family."
Bratsman praised the "tremendous
amount of work that the organizers put
in."
In addition to the daily activities of
Family Week, there are opportunities
offered by local agencies throughout
the week. The YMCA locations in Polk
County are offering free admission for
families during Polk County Family
Week, with hours varying by location.
Library activities include a Gratitude
Tree at the Bartow Public Library.
Visitors can write what they are grate-
ful for on a paper leaf to be part of a
gratitude tree displayed on the wall.
The new Haines City Public Library


PHOTOS PROVIDED
Bill Bailey and his sons enjoy the petting zoo at last year's Polk County Family Week kick-off. This
year's kick-off is Nov. 10 at Winter Haven's Central Park, with opening ceremonies at 9 a.m.


grand opening is this month, and
November's theme will be "Gratitude!"
The Lake Alfred Public Library is asking
visitors to support the homeless by
donating food and/or blankets at the
library. In a related activity, residents
can drop off non-perishable food items
at any Polk Magnify bank location on
Nov. 14, with the theme for that day be-
ing "I'm grateful for Food and Family."
On Nov. 15, free admission to
Exploration IV Children's Museum in
Lakeland, Bok Tower in Lake Wales and
Skate World in Lakeland is a thank-
you for donations of blankets, coats,
scarves, toiletries, or non-perishable
food items for the homeless made at
these locations.
Talent shows will be held Sunday,


Nov. 11 at 3 p.m. at The Chain of Lakes
Complex in Winter Haven and at 6 p.m.
at EPIC church in Lakeland.
Facebook devotees can post what
they are thankful for, on Nov. 12, and a
random drawing will award one of these
a $25 gift certificate. On Nov. 13, people
can post photos of someone being kind
on Facebook, and again will have a
chance at a $25 gift certificate.
There will be activities throughout
the week too many to mention
in a small space. The schedule of
events and further information can
also be obtained on the website
www.polkcountyfamilyweek.com.
Past themes include Values,
Generation Celebration, Mind, Body &
Soul, and Family Reunion.


Polk School Superintendent Dr. Sherrie Nickell presents the student essay awards at last year's
Polk County Family Week celebration. This year's essay theme is "Why I love my family," and the
winners will be announced Nov. 10 at 11 a.m. in Winter Haven's Central Park.


Christopher Meyer, M.D. Snehal Patel, M.D.


Polk County Family Week celebrated cultural diversity at the 2011 kick-off with an international
parade. The kick-off this year will also open with a parade. Polk County Family Week will be
observed Nov. 10-16 with a variety of events throughout the week.


Every day these skilled surgeons help people get back to their lives. They
provide a wide range of general, thoracic and vascular surgeries both
open and laparoscopic. And as surgeons on the medical staff at Lake Wales
Medical Center, their patients have convenient access to everything from
diagnosis through treatment, right here in Lake Wales.
For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 863-679-2707.


General, Vascular
& Thoracic Surgery
of Polk County

1120 Carlton Ave., Suite 1500
Lake Wales, FL 33853
Members of the Medical Staff at Lake Wales Medical Center
Lake Wales Medical Center is directly or indirectly owned by a nartnersh.
that proudly includes physician owners, including certain men I
the hospital's medical staff


Frostproof News Page 19


October 31, 2012







Page 20 Frostproof News October31, 2012


100


FROM PAGE 1


from work.
"I only missed one day of work and
that was when I had a tooth pulled," he
said. "But other than that, I never got
sick."
Boball was born in Martinsburg,
Ohio in 1912. His father was an Austria-
Hungarian immigrant and his mother
was from West Virginia. He worked
alongside his father in the coal mines
before his family moved to a farm to
break horses.
"I didn't like to work in them [coal
mines]," he said. "I couldn't wait to go
back to school."
In 1937, he moved to Cambridge,
Ohio to work in the oil fields as a tool
dresser and trackman.
One year later, he moved to Michigan
during a large oil boom, where he
worked in a prosperous oil field with
over 60 acres and 40 rigs.


Friends and family gathered earlier this month
at Water's Edge in Lake Wales to celebrate the
100th birthday of former Frostproof resident
Joe Boball.

During his stay, he met his wife,
whose grandmother owned the board-
ing house he was staying in.
They married in 1940, and three years
later, had their eldest daughter, Jenna.
Only 15 days after his daughter's birth,
Boball was inducted into the army.
He served for three years as an
engineer during World War II where he
aided in the invasion of Okinawa, Japan
in 1944.
After the war, he returned home and
moved with his wife out to an acre of
land near Plainwell, where, with his
own hands, he built their ranch house,
which he considered his life's greatest
accomplishment.
He worked as the chief operator at an
oil refinery for 31 years and loved every
day of it.
"When you worked in the oil field,
you drill one well and then you are


-em
r r


done," he explained. "You had to wait
for another well and by then your
money was all gone. But at the refinery,
you got paid every week."
He retired in 1978 and moved to
Frostproof in 1983, later retiring at
Water's Edge in 2009. Both he and his
wife enjoy their company of friends at
the assisted living center and at First
Baptist Church of Frostproof.
"We love being a part of a wonderful
church family and love our family at
Water's Edge," Boball said.
His hobbies and interests in life in-
cluded fishing, gardening, automobiles,
and motorcycles.
In his lifetime, he owned 37 cars and
five motorcycles. His first car was a 1933
Model A Ford Roadster, and his favorite
car was a 1962 Oldsmobile Starfire.
"I liked everything but the gas mile-
age," he said.
His preferred motorcycle brand was


Harley Davidson, with his favorite
model being a 1948 he bought in 1974.
Having grown up in a time where
horses were the main source of trans-
portation has given him a finer appre-
ciation for automobiles.
"Back then, you had to use a horse
and buggy just to go into town to get
the groceries," he said.
Overall, he remains optimistic about
the changes within his lifetime and
claims life has become better because
of them, with better transportation,
living standards, and higher income.
"I went through the depression
where a dollar was worth a dollar and
a nickel was worth a nickel," he said.
"I used to go out with my girl to Coney
Island and get a cup of coffee and two
hot dogs for 50 cents."
"You get more money now than you
did back then," he continued. "Back
then, if you had a dollar, you had a lot."


PHOTOS PROVIDED
The Boballs have been married for 72 years.


CENTER
FROM PAGE 1

given to families in the Frostproof area
during the holidays," Waters noted.
"Due to economic conditions, we
expect to have a substantial increase
in applications for Thanksgiving and
Christmas food. Assistance to these
families would be impossible without
the help of good neighbors in the
community."
Waters said there are several ways
people can help.
Food, Food, Food Meats, yams,
cranberry sauce, pasta, macaroni and
cheese, dried beans, rice, soups, flour,
sugar, small oil, drinks/juices, tomato
sauce, canned, shelf stable, or pow-
dered milk, and canned vegetables/
fruits, and meats and meals (beef stew,
chicken and dumplings etc.).
Gifts for all ages.
"We try to give every child one
special gift and two smaller gifts. Gifts
should be new or like new. If you desire
to wrap your gifts please indicate on
the outside if it is for a boy or girl and
the age, a category of the gift, i.e. car/
truck, doll, game, sports, arts and
crafts," Waters noted.


Financial assistance. "We gave gifts
to 443 children of our community last
Christmas. The financial needs are
always great," Waters said.
Personal Care Items Deodorant,
toothpaste, soap, toothbrush, shampoo
etc. are needed for clients.
*Volunteer your time. The Care Center
is always in need of helping hands. During
the holiday season there are many ad-
ditional tasks to do such as wrapping gifts,
filling food boxes and delivering.
Adopt a child or family. Shopping
for a particular child or family can
make this Christmas time special. Care
Center tries to fill specific requests for
each child.
"Many organizations, businesses and
individuals have increased their own
Christmas joy by giving to a family in
need," Waters noted. You may call the
Care Center to be put on their Adopt a
Family list.
Waters also said community mem-
bers can contact the center to "please
let us know of any families who could
benefit from these special holiday
services," he added. "The staff and
volunteers of the Frostproof Care
Center would like to wish you a joyful
and Christ-centered holiday season.
We appreciate the continued support
throughout the year."


|V E NEED YOU!





The Lake Wales
Republican Party

Campaign

Headquarters
Needs Your Help!

Canvass Neighborhoods,

MlIake Phone Calls,

GET OUT THE VOTE!

If you are a registered
Republican and need a

ride to the polls, Call Our 4
Office For Nlore In-ormation.

Early Voting- October 27 To
November 3
702 State Rd. 60 East

Election Day November 6 Lake Wales, Fl. 33853
A'\'
Ph: 863-455-6897



This ad paid for by the Republican
Party Of Polk County, not author-
ized by any candidate or candidate
ILK committee


Page 20 Frostproof News


v


October 31, 2012











OBITUARIES


Samuel V.

Puntureri
Mr. Samuel
V. Puntureri,
88, of Lake
Wales, Fla., died
on Thursday,
Oct. 25, 2012, at
Clare Bridge of
Winter Haven,
of complications
from Alzheimer's
disease. H
He was born
on Nov. 17, 1923, SamuelV. Puntureri
in Apollo, Pa., was
raised in Grove City, Pa. and moved to
Lake Wales in 2005. He served in the
United States Army during WW II. He
owned Sam's Barber Shop in Pittsburgh
and was a retired head custodian from
the North Allegheny Public School
District. He was a Life member of the
Knights of Columbus, and active in
the Elks and Lake Ashton Veterans
Association. He was a member of the
Catholic Church of Saint Matthew in
Winter Haven. His joyful and generous
hospitality was known far and wide. You
got met at the door with a smile and a
glass of homemade wine or a meal.
Sam is survived by his wife Judith
A. Puntureri, sisters Genevieve Perry
of Mercer, Pa. and Stella Stanzione of
Tarentum, Pa., brothers Rock Puntureri
and wife Louise of Butler, Pa. and Albert
Puntureri and wife Judith of Hermitage,
Pa., sisters-in-law Patricia Puntureri of
Sharon, Pa. and Jacki Puntureri of New
Castle, Pa., eighteen nieces and neph-
ews, and twenty-six great nieces and
nephews. He was preceded in death by
his first wife Lee Ann, a sister Teresa, a
brother Vincent, and brothers-in-law
Nick Perry and Richard Stanzione.
Mass of Christian Burial will be
held on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, at
10 a.m. at the Catholic Church of Saint
Matthew. Inurnment will follow in the
church columbarium.
Memorials of remembrance may be
made to Compassionate Care Hospice
2329 E.E Griffin Road Bartow, FL 33830.
Johnson Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.


Eleanor 'Nell'

Angle Richmond
Eleanor (Nell)
Angle Richmond
died on Oct. 24, "-.
days short of her "' ""
96th birthday. .
She was born
in Rochester,
N.Y. and mar-
ried Thomas
T. Richmond
in 1938. They
were long-time
residents of New Eleanor'Nell'Angle
Canaan, Conn., Richmond
Bridgewater, Vt.
and Lake Wales, Fla.
Nell, a strong advocate for women's
education, attended The Masters School
in Dobbs Ferry N.Y., from which she
graduated in 1934 and where she served
as a Trustee and Director of the Alumnae
Association for many years. She gradu-
ated from Smith College and served
as both her class representative and
President of the Alumnae Association.
Nell was a member of the Country
Club of New Canaan, the Woodstock, Vt.
Country Club, Mountain Lake, Fla. and
the US Senior Women's Golf Association.
She was an enthusiastic volunteer for
many organizations including the New
Canaan Sewing Group, The Gardeners,
and the First Presbyterian Church of
New Canaan. She also won awards for
her needlepoint works.
She is survived by her five daughters
Ann Jennings of Columbia S.C., Kate
Trotman of Key Biscayne, Fla., Carol
Orgain of Strafford, Vt., Janet Richmond
of North Hollywood Calif. and Sarah
Gray of Pittsfield, Vt. She leaves behind
11 grandchildren, 17 great grandchil-
dren, and her brother George Angle of
Rochester N.Y.
There will be a service in celebration
of her life on November 10th at 11 a.m.
at the First Presbyterian Church in New
Canaan, Conn. In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial gifts may be made to Smith College,
Northampton, Mass. 01063.
Hoyt Funeral Home and Cremation
Services of New Canaan, Conn. is in
charge of arrangements.


Evelyn Knight

Evelyn Knight, 89, of Lake Wales
passed away Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012, at
her residence.
She was born June 25, 1923, in
Cullman, Ala. to the late Charlie W. and
Cora B. (Bryant) Waddle; she has been
a resident of Lake Wales since 1949
moving here from Cullman, Ala. She
was a sectionizer for Citrus World for
35 years; she was a member of Christ
Central, loved to go to church, made
the best biscuits in the world, loved
southern gospel music and playing
checkers.
Evelyn was preceded in death by her
Husband, Hughie Knight.
Survivors include her daughter,
Genny (husband Frank) Waters of Lake
Wales; son, James L. (wife Ann) Knight
of Lake Wales; brother, James Waddle
of Bonifay, Fla.; 5 Grandchildren, 17
Great Grandchildren and 6 great-great
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held
12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, at
the Marion Nelson Funeral Home
with Pastor John Cannon and Rev.
Jeremy Cook officiating. Interment will
be held at the Lake Wales Cemetery.
Family will receive friends on Tuesday,
Oct. 30, 2012, from 11:30 a.m. until
service time. The webcast of the ser-
vice can be viewed and condolences
may be sent to the family at www.
marionnelson
funeralhome.com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


Richard C.

'Dick' Jerrils
Mr. Richard C. "Dick" Jerrils, 84 of
Lake Wales, Fla., formerly of Grand
Rapids, MI, died Friday, October 26,
2012, at Winter Haven Hospital.
Arrangements by Johnson Funeral
Home, Lake Wales.



Jimmie Lou

Pennington
Jimmie Lou Pennington of Frostproof
passed away Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012,
at Grace Healthcare in Lake Wales. She
was 85. Marion Nelson Funeral Home,
Frostproof is handling arrangements.

Words of Comfort
Let us be like a bird for a
moment perched on a frail
branch while he
sings, though he
feels it bend, yet
he sings his song,
knowing that he has
wings.
Victor Hugo

For more Words of Comfort, go to
www.wordsofcomfort.net


Open throuEgh Nov I 7th
Fri 5 10, Sat 10 10 & Sun 1:30 5
Tickets $4.95 & up, 2 & under FREE
3350 US Hwy. 17 N, Bowling Green


The


Heartland

Maze


S5 Acre Maze
* Night Maze (bring flashlight)
SAir cannon
* Cow Train ;t
* Pony Rides
* Play Area
SEntertainment
* Merchants
* Food Vendors
* Pumpkins


, OUTDOOR
X\4u I)


Nov 10th Scout Day
Discounts, FREE patch &
Special Scout Activities
Nov 16th Date Night
Enjoy a night out with
LIVE music
Nov 17th Winter
Resident Day
Visit our Event Calendar and
Information Page on our
website or call for details!
888-576-MAZE


Mfwaic
W-WOM


-war th. -1*.


S www.theheartlandnaze.com i


Let the voting begin


Voters wait patiently to cast their
ballot for the Presidential Election
Monday afternoon at Lake Wales
Library. Early voting started
Saturday. The Lake Wales location is
the closest one to Frostproof in Polk
County for early voting.
PHOTOS BY DEBRA GOUVELLIS


Join us Nov 3rd 10 AM 10 PM


\ Gospel Fest
All proceeds from Chicken Dinners for sale
PLUS a portion of admissions benefiting
SendMeMissions & The Homeless Coalition

Visit our website for
FULL Entertainment schedule!

Bring a lawn chair to relax & enjoy the music


October 31, 2012


Frostproof News Page 21


j-A -


~c,~,~~






Pae2 rspofNesOtbr3,21


Bulldogs tune up for playoff showdown with win


Playoff berth on the line this Friday


against


Lakeland Christian


By BRIAN ACKLEY
BACKLEY @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
For the Frostproof Bulldogs, it
surely was a little hard to not at
least peek ahead to Friday night's
showdown with district foe Lakeland
Christian.
That's because the winner of that
game at Faris Brannen Stadium will
punch a ticket to the post-season
playoffs, and the loser will not.
The Vikings come in at 6-2, but
haven't quite played the level of
competition that Frostproof has seen
this year. They won at home against
Cardinal Mooney, 20-17, for their
district win. Frostproof's district win
also came over Mooney, on the road,
33-19.
LCS also lost to Fort Meade, 37-34
(Frostproof lost 17-16), after blowing
a 21-0 lead, and tipped Tenoroc,
35-27, earlier in the year.
The Bulldogs turned in a solid
performance at home last Friday
night, outdistancing Tenoroc 24-8 in
a non-district matchup, not looking
too far ahead to LCS.
But when you do look, there's much
to like about the Vikings, starting
with their talented quarterback


Christian Alexander.
"I feel like our guys are getting bet-
ter every week, and that's what we try
to do," said Head Coach Price Harris.
"Lakeland Christian is a good foot-
ball team. It's going to take us work-
ing on our fundamentals and making
sure we take care of ourselves. I really
feel like that's the biggest thing for
us this week. We've got to take away
what they want to do, of course, but
it really comes down to our execu-
tion, the way we handle things. If we
take care of us, good things are going
to happen. Our guys are putting their
time in, paying attention, putting
time in the film, in to practice."
Alexander has thrown for over 1,700
yards this season, and has 21 touch-
down throws.
"He makes a difference. He throws
the ball great, on time. We've got a lot
of respect for them. We've got a man-
tra here, you respect all and you fear
none. We're always going to respect
them. The quarterback makes them
very tough," Harris added. "They're
going to get their kids out in space,
it's really going to come down if we
can tackle. We have to make sure that


.!! .-- -1 .



Is-.


.. .. .. -- .,
.~? "'" '-' .-.- ,- -r., - "- 1


PHOTO BY K.M. THORNTON SR.


Cecil Cherry tries to break through a few Tenoroc tacklers during high school football action
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Page 22 Frostproof News


'"-


;I

.si.
;- ,-.






October 31, 2012 Frostproof News Page 23


WIN
FROM PAGE 22

we tackle kids in space, that's going
to be big for us."
Frostproof took firm control of
things against Tenoroc in the third
quarter, scoring on their first two
possessions, thanks in large part to
Kaleel Gaines.
His team needed 12 plays to take
the opening kick of the third quarter
76 yards for a 12-0 lead. Gaines had
six of those runs, including a 13
yarder and a 14 yarder. He actually
scored on the play before Trevis
Harrington scored from 25 yards
out, but his run was called back on a
holding penalty.
The second possession was a
short one. Casey Thomas returned a
Tenoroc punt 19 yards to the Titans
31, and the Bulldogs increased their
lead to 18-0 just two plays later.
Major Plain hauled in a 14-yard
catch and then Kaleel Gaines went
off right tackles from 17 yards out.
Unofficially, Gaines ran for 136 yards
on the night.
The Titans rallied on their next
possession on a long but quick
drive as quarterback Victor Smith
Jr. threw a 17-yard touchdown pass
to Darrien Laster with 2:05 to go in
the third quarter. That pair hooked
up again on the two-point conver-
sion pass and the visitors had sliced
Frostproof's lead to just 18-8.
But any momentum swing that


-_- 7


,, -. -
PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
The Frostproof defense has been stout most of the season, as they showed again Friday, but will
face perhaps their biggest test of the season this Friday when they host Lakeland Christian. Here,
Trevis Harrington and Kaleel Gaines combine to make a stop.


Tenoroc hoped to get was quickly
dashed by Reggie Allen, who field a
short kick at his own 25, and broke
the return up the right sideline for
Frostproof's fourth touchdown of
the night. The two-point conversion,
which was originally good but called
back on a pen-
alty, failed from
the seven yard
line leaving the
S Bulldogs up 24-8
With 1:51 to play




S.. Frostproof's Daniel
Knighten breaks
off a 17 yard run
S- in the first quarter
Friday night against
Tenoroc.


in the third.
Extra points were one of the nega-
tives of the night. Frostproof was
0-for-3 in PAT kicks, and missed on
their only two-point try.
The first half wasn't much like the
second half in any fashion.
The Bulldogs needed just three
plays to move 66 yards on their first
possession of the game, scoring what
turned out to be the only points of
the first two quarters.
Taking over at their own 34,


Kaleel Gaines ripped of 46 yards to
the Titans 20. From there, Daniel
Knighten scampered around right
end for 17 yards to the Tenoroc three,
where Cecil Cherry finished things
off with a three -yard run up the
middle. The kick was no good, but
the Bulldogs were on top with 7:55
left in the first.
Much of the second quarter was
played in a stiff wind and light rain
squall, although it was not a big fac-
tor in either team's ability to score.
Frostproof controlled much of the
clock, putting together drives of 14
and 11 plays but getting no points.
The Bulldogs started at their own
11 on their second possession of
the first quarter, and drove to the
Tenoroc 30 before the drive ended
in an interception. Quarterback
Xavier Gaines had a 20-yard run on a
third-and-18 play early in the drive,
while Major Plains had a pass catch
for nine yards and Allen snared one
for 12.
Later in the half, Frostproof began
at its own 21, and pushed to the
Tenoroc 34 before the drive again
stalled. Kaleel Gaines had a 15 yard
run on that possession, and Allen
had a another 12-yard grab.
It was a significantly cleaner
half in terms of penalties for the
Bulldogs than they had put up in
recent weeks. In fact, they were only
flagged two times for 20 yards in
penalties in the first two quarters
Friday night.
After the Bulldogs district show-
down next week, they will close
the regular season on the road at
Auburndale. Tenoroc came into
Friday night's game with just one
win on the season, a 36-0 triumph
against Poinciana.
Frostproof improved to 5-3 overall.


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October 31, 2012


Frostproof News Page 23










County Property Tax Exemption OK



will level playing field


By STEVE STEINER
SSTEINER @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
Many voters may already be aware
there are 11 amendments being
proposed on the ballot by the state.
Perhaps going overlooked is the fact
there is one further amendment
voters will have to decide; only this
one is being proposed by the county:
"The County Property Tax Exemption
Question."
The amendment asks voters to con-
sider a property tax exemption for new
businesses, as well as the expansion of
existing businesses that are consider-
ing creating new, full-time jobs in
the county. Its purpose is to woo new
businesses while at the same time
assist current employers. According
to Commissioner Melony Bell, who
represents District 2, Polk County is
currently at a distinct disadvantage.
The nine counties that border Polk
already have similar measures in place.
It has had a negative impact.
"I know there have been some
companies that have told me that
'Hillsborough has offered me incen-
tives to move,'" she said. "We need
to be able to compete with other
counties."

If amendment succeeds
Should the measure win voter ap-
proval, the Central Florida Development
Council will be the administering agency
overseeing the operation of the program,


npiiliii, ?n!l


C3-
h b I j 1 A K



which Bell said is being spun off the
BOCC into a semi-autonomous agency.
"We'll be the conduit," said Rodney
Carson, Director of Economic
Development for the CFDC. The agency,
he said, will take applications for the
program and then submit recommenda-
tions to the BOCC, which will make all
decisions. "Our charge is to increase the
number of higher-skilled, higher wage
businesses."
It is what the CFDC already has been
doing for more than the past two de-
cades, said Carson. It employs a number
of strategies, including both initiating
prospective businesses as well as fielding
inquiries. If the exemption is approved,
any business seeking to move, or any
business looking to expand, will have to
meet certain guidelines and criteria that
are still being developed.
"We will look at what Enterprise
Florida has, and look to see what other
counties have in place," he said. "We
don't want to put more on the table than
we have to." The goal is to negate what
other incentives surrounding counties
have, so as not to have an advantage
over Polk County.
The CFDC will also be charged with
the responsibility of enforcing the


criteria established. There will be a
monitoring system, he said. It may be
similar to what already exists. Businesses
will have to establish the jobs and will
have to perform according to terms it
has signed. Currently, said Carson, there
are both companies that do not want
any incentives, as well as those that want
as many as possible. The former, he said,
exists because some companies may
find the ability to fulfill the incentives
too onerous.

Has it paid off?
In 2011, according to Carson, 11 com-
panies made announcements they were
either relocating to Polk County, or ex-
panding. Those companies announced
they would be making $191 million in
capital investments.
"That equates to $981,000 in ad
valorem taxes for the county, and
$1.1 million in school taxes," said
Carson. He further explained that the
school tax is separate and apart from
the county; regardless whether the
amendment passes, exemption from
school taxes does not exist.
Continuing, the 11 companies an-
nounced it would be creating 597 new
jobs; plus announced another 78 jobs
were saved. The average wage of those
jobs, said Carson, was $37,000.

Is it worth it?
District 1 Polk County
Commissioner Bob English believes


the measure will pay for itself in the
long run; he introduced the measure
and has been a staunch advocate for
it.
While objections have been raised
that the county would be giving away
money in ad valorem property taxes,
English believes that there will be a
payoff in the long run.
"The idea is the jobs they create
will outweigh the disadvantage of
not paying property taxes," he said.
English added that should all terms
and conditions be met, a business will
receive the exemption for 10 years.
After the tenth year, though, it will be
pay its property tax.
A further inducement is the cur-
rent impact fee moratorium on
construction, which sunsets January
2013. A business that qualifies for the
exemption (should it pass), will also
be eligible for the impact fee morato-
rium. "There are two reasons to come
here," said English.

About District 2
The communities in District 2
includes Bartow, Fort Meade, Lake
Wales, Frostproof, Highland Park,
Hillcrest Heights and Babson Park.

Counties bordering Polk
The nine counties bordering Polk
are Sumter, Pasco, Hillsborough, Lake,
Orange, Osceola, Hardee, Manatee
and Highlands.


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Page 24 Frostproof News


.IS .I





Frostproof News Page 25


October 31 2012


COUNTY BRIEFS


Bok Tower Gardens needs
volunteers for holidays
Bok Tower Gardens needs the time
and talent of more than 200 volunteers
to help with this year's Holiday Home
Tour at Pinewood Estate.
Volunteers help prepare decorations,
greet visitors, lead tours through the
home, and drive shuttles during the
six-week event that happens from
Nov. 23-Jan. 6.
Training will be offered during volun-
teer orientation sessions on Thursday,
Nov. 15 and Friday, Nov. 16 from 10 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m. with a break for lunch.
All new volunteers must attend one of
these sessions to participate.
As a nonprofit organization, volun-
teers are vital to daily operations of the
Gardens. Their contribution of time and
talent are significant to the success of
various programs, as well as the comfort
and overall experience of nearly 160,000
annual visitors. Each year, volunteers
donate more than 30,000 hours of ser-
vice. Volunteers donating more than 50
hours of service are recognized for their
contribution with benefits including a
tour of the Singing Tower, a complimen-
tary membership to the Gardens, and
free passes for family and friends.
For information or to apply to become
a volunteer, visit www.boktowergardens.
org/volunteer, call 863-734-1211 or email
lallen@boktower.org.

Wednesday is last day
to seek mail-in ballot
Polk County voters who plan to vote
by mail in the Nov. 6 General Election
have until today to submit a request
for a ballot to be mailed. Requests can


be made by calling 863-534-5888 or by
visiting polkelections.com. Voted ballots
may be returned by mail, or dropped
off at Elections Headquarters in Bartow
until 7 p.m. on Election Day.

Tax bills are in the mail
The 2012 property tax notices to all
of Polk County's property owners were
mailed out on Tuesday, Oct. 30.
"Property owners should be receiv-
ing their bills in the mail this week,"
said Polk County Tax Collector Joe G.
Tedder. Each year, Tedder and his
staff announce the mailing of tax bills
to property owners, knowing that up
to 1 percent of the bills each year will
come back as not deliverable due to
incorrect addresses. Tedder reminds
taxpayers that their taxes are due,
whether they receive a tax bill or not,
citing Florida law which clearly places
the burden of responsibility for pay-
ment of taxes on the property owner.
Tedder's staff reports more than
331,230 property tax bills will go out in
the mail this week. The only exceptions
to this are those property owners who
have opted to pay by an installment
plan. For them, no November bill will
be sent; instead, they will be notified of
third quarter installment payments due
Dec. 1.
Taxes for 2012 have a total taxable
amount of $492,357,950 as compared
to last year's tax roll which had a total
taxable amount of $514,206,073. This
year's tax roll represents a 4 percent
decrease in taxes and assessments
billed from the prior year and down
11 percent from three years ago.
Property owners who do not receive
their property tax notices) by Thursday,


Nov. 15 should contact the Tax
Collector's Office. Local callers may call
863-534-4700; callers outside the local
access area may call toll free 855-765-
5829 (855-POLK-TAX).

Smithsonian Photography
Exhibit opens
Polk Museum of Art's curator of art
Adam Justice will lead a tour of the
Museum's first Smithsonian exhibition,
"In Vibrant Color: Vintage Celebrity
Portraits from the Harry Warnecke
Studio" on Friday, Nov. 9.
The tour runs from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.
and is free with regular Museum
admission.
The exhibition, which was organized
by the Smithsonian's National Portrait
Gallery, contains 24 color photographs
from the 1930s and 1940s, including
Hollywood icons such as Lucille Ball,
Roy Rogers and Louis Armstrong. The
exhibition will run through Jan. 12.
The Polk County History Center will
have a display itself and it opens this
weekend. It will show Polk Portraits and
among them will be George Jenkins, the
founder of Publix, Bartow resident and
former NFL star Ken Riley and Frank
Lloyd Wright who designed a handful of
buildings in Polk County, for example.
The artwork will be on display in
the History Center at 100 E. Main St.,
through Saturday, Jan. 12.
There will be an opening reception
Nov. 2 at the Polk County History Center
for Polk Portraits.

Veterans ceremony
set in Winter Haven
On Saturday, Nov. 10 the community


of Traditions will dedicate a Veterans
Memorial "For All Who Served."
The ceremony will be held at the
clubhouse located at 4100 Bedford Ave.,
Winter Haven, FL 33884 and starts at
10 a.m.
The formal ceremony will be per-
formed with aid of the VFW, ROTC of
Haines City, the Patriot Guard Riders
and various veterans groups. Winter
Haven Commissioners, State Rep. John
Wood will be in attendance.

Richard III is coming
Polk State Theatre will perform
William Shakespeare's "Richard III,"
during a nine-day run.
The shows will be performed from
Nov. 7-11 and 15-18 at the Fine Arts
Theatre on the Winter Haven campus,
999 Ave. H N.E. All are at 7:30 p.m. ex-
cept Sunday matinees, are at 2:30 p.m.
They are free for Polk State students
and employees, as well as high school
students with school IDs, but $5 for the
general public. There are no advance
ticket sales.
"Richard III" is Polk State Theatre's
second Shakespeare performance,
following last spring's "The Taming of
the Shrew."
The play follows Richard's pursuit
of England's throne, a prize he's deter-
mined to win no matter how many lies
he must tell or people he must kill along
the way. Richard's cutthroat ways catch
up with him in the end, however, when
he faces a new challenger for the crown.



for reading the Frostproof News


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VOTE HALL FOR:

* NO NEW TAXES

* CREATION OF NEW JOBS

* RESTORE OUR ECONOMY

* ACCOUNTABLE GOVERNMENT

* TRANSPARENT GOVERNMENT


QUALIFIED!
* A true conservative Republican for over 25 years
* Worked for Polk County Government for 34 years,
24 years in management
* Certified Public Manager, Government Operations
* Bachelors Degree, Business Administration
specializing in Management
* Associates Degree, Engineering Technology
* Former Director for three different County Divisions
* Understands the County's budgeting process
* Give the people a budget they can afford,
and a budget they can understand
* Maintain my commitment to our Public Safety
Officials; Sheriff's Office, Fire Services and
Emergency Medical Services
* The Board will work closer with Constitutional Offices
to augment & enhance services provided
* Committed to looking for efficiencies in all programs
* Committed to preserving Polk County's heritage &
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Pae2 rspofNesOtbr3,21


Plenty of treats,


few tricks in Frostproof Saturday


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
A hay wagon was a fun and old-fashioned way to get around to find all the treats Saturday night in Frostproof, as members of the First Baptist
Church happily discovered.
Right: There was nothing scary about Cierra
SAnderson. In fact, she was a pretty as a prin-
cess, an Indian Princess, that is. In this case,
Sacajawea, who helped Lewis and Clark during
their famous expedition to the west coast.


Gabriella Morrison proved that you're never too young to enjoy the fun of Halloween. And we
suspect her grandmother Treva Morrison enjoyed the holiday festivities as well.



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--- -I --


Page 26 Frostproof News


October 31, 2012


4
.T~:





,Ttoe 3.22FrspofNw Pae7


PHOTOS BY K M THORNTON SR
Above: These costumes are so good and
colorful, it's almost hard to tell who is real
and who isn't. Just in case you couldn't tell,
that's 4-year old Shylo Montgomery, left, as
a Monster High doll and her 2-year old sister
Layla, a kitten. The guy on the right is not real.


Right: Making sure there were a few
scary tricks in the mix were, from left:
Crystal Williams, Anne Williams and
Roger Keller. Saturday night was the
official "trick or treat" night in Frost-
proof, and there were plenty of activities
sponsored by local churches as well.


Darlene Dahn (white and pink rabbit ears, and indeed, a little cotton tail) hands
out treats and hot apple cider at the Frostproof First United Methodist Church
Saturday.


Sometimes, it's just hard to wait until you get home to enjoy the treats, in this
case, treats passed out during the "Trunk or Treat" event at Frostproof's First
Baptist Church.


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Lake Wales Medical Center is directly or indirectly owned by a partnership that proudly includes physician owners,
induding certain members of the hospital's medical staff.


Frostproof News Page 27


October 31 2012






Pae2 rspofNesOtbr3,21


Board takes first step toward superintendent search


Discussion centers around consultants, scope, timeline


By MARY CANNADAY
MCANNADAY@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
The Polk County School Board took
the first step last Tuesday toward
looking for a school superintendent
to replace Sherrie Nickell, who has
announced she will retire in June
2013.
Opening their work session with
a lengthy discussion about how
and when to start looking, board
members came to agreement on two
things: that the search should be
national in scope and that the Florida
School Boards Association should
be considered as a contender for the
search process. The FSBA represents
all school board members throughout
Florida.
Wayne Blanton, executive director
of the FSBA will speak to the board at
1 p.m. Nov. 7 about the services his
agency can provide. Board member
Lori Cunningham said there were
advantages to using the FSBA.
"They know a lot of the players. It
might be good to take advantage of
their expertise," she said. "I did not
come away with a favorable view of
the company we used for the last
search," she added. "I would like to
try someone different."
Although the board agreed that the
FSBA should have a shot at the con-
tract, some felt that other companies
should be considered as well. In spite
Sof the $8,000 price tag for an FSBA
search, well below the $50,000 the
district paid for the last search, Board


Dr. Sherrie Nickell


member Kay Fields said, "We need to
get the best candidates we can."
Fields was of the opinion that the
search should be national, that the
board should take its time in finding
the right candidate, and that at least
three firms should be considered.
"We're acting like the FSBA will be
our saving grace," she said.
Incoming board member Hunt
Berryman agreed, saying, "I'm OK
with hearing from Dr. Blanton Nov. 7.
I just don't think we should make a
decision that day," (about which firm
to use.)
Berryman also expressed concern
that Florida's Sunshine Law would


deter some applicants, because their
names were sure to be published.
Board chairperson Hazel Sellers,
who initiated the contact with FSBA
and distributed a packet from them to
board members, said Blanton could
actually supply a list of other search
firms, and she would ask him to do
so. She also suggested that board
members call other board members
throughout the state to see what their
experience has been with various
search firms.
Because the search process is
personnel-oriented, it-does not
require a bidding process for the cho-
sen firm, according to board attorney
Wes Bridges.
Other issues that arose were setting
a timeline for starting the search as
well as determining when the new
superintendent would be hired.
"If a firm is not chosen in
November, we'll run into the holidays,
and the search won't begin until
January," board member Tim Harris
noted.
At issue also is the reason for
Nickell's decision to retire: health
issues within her family.
"Dr. Nickell would like us to move
to transition fairly quickly," Sellers
said. "She would like to be here to
help transition the new superinten-
dent." Sellers said if the search is
initiated in November, they might
have a person hired by February or
March.
The overriding sentiment in the
end was that the process should not


be rushed. "I remember the rush
last time," Dick Mullenax said. "We
may limit our options if we impose a
timeline."
Harris said because the require-
ments and parameters of what the
board wants in a superintendent were
still in place from the last search, "We
just need to speed getting the process
started. I personally don't want to go
the interim route," he added.
Board member Debra Wright said
she also thought the board should
look at the pay scale for the position.
"You get what you pay for," she
said. "We also need to have regard for
the 94,000 students in our district."
"I don't think there's a more
important position than this one,"
Cunningham agreed.






ON NI -NLE

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respond to conventional treatment.


For more information, call 863.679.1986.









AT 1AKE \WALFSIS MEDICAL CENTER


*Clinical professional is defined as a physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner. If
you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 911.

Lake Wales Medical Center is directly or indirectly owned by a partnership that proudly in-
cludes physician owners, including certain members of the hospital's medical staff.


October 31, 2012


Page 28 Frostproof News


















Worth waiting a year for inaugural event


Originally scheduled


to debut last


year,


wellness


expo drew about 800 people


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT
More than 500 Haines City area
residents joined the city Parks and
Recreation Department and 60 vendors
at the recent Wellness Expo at Lake Eva
Banquet Hall.
The eighth annual event drew
vendors who offered free health screen-
ings including blood pressure readings,
vision and hearing tests, along with
health-related information from other
vendors.
The Wellness Expo also coincided
with the first annual Stride for Fitness
5-kilometer race which snaked runners
around Lake Eva and its environs. The
inaugural run was scheduled for last
year, but had to be canceled because of
rain, according to Haines City Parks and
Recreation Department Events coordi-
nator Holly Carter.
"But it went really well this year,"
Carter said. "We had lots of runners and
lots of help making the race and expo a
success."
Helping out with the race and run
were "countless" volunteers, according
to Carter. "We couldn't do anything with
out their help," she said. Also helping
organize and manage the run were staff
from Anytime Fitness, she said.
Vendors at the Expo paid $25 per
booth which helped pay for trophies
for the top runners, Carter explained.
"Any money that's left over goes to buy
Christmas presents for under-privileged
children," she said.
"What we try to do with this Expo is
provide a service to the community,"
she said. "This gives people a chance


PHOTOS BY AL PALMER


Holly Carter of the Haines City Parks and
Recreation Department organized the Wellness
Expo and Stride for Fitness 5 K run in October at
Lake Eva Park.

to get health checks and gather health-
related information they may need in
the future."
Carter said this year's attendance
was a "good turnout" with estimates
on attendance ranging from 500 to 800.
"We have a lot of people who come out
every year," she added.
Heading the list of volunteers for
this year's events was a 25-member
contingent from Haines City High
School's Junior ROTC unit. "Those kids
were here early, manned the race route
and provided water to the runners and
then helped out at the Expo," the event
coordinator said.


Runners ready for the Stride for Fitness 5K run around Lake Eva


Visitors toured the vendor booths at Haines City's Wellness Expo.


With projects, Polk State nursing students educate new moms


More than 60 Polk State nursing
students displayed projects that will
educate new mothers on everything
from breastfeeding positions to post-
partum depression.
The students are all in their third
semester of the nursing program, when
their studies focus on Maternal-Child
Nursing and Women's Health.
Since fall 2011, students in the term
have been required to delve into a par-
ticular aspect of childbirth, be it caring
for the mother's clogged milk ducts or
swaddling a newborn.
Students must use the informa-
tion they glean to educate patients
in a clinical setting. They also design
presentation boards, which were
displayed in the Winter Haven Fine
Arts building. The boards are graded by
Nursing staff and, in many cases, end
up at either Winter Haven Hospital's
Regency Center for Women and Infants
or Lakeland Regional Medical Center,


where future patients will benefit from
the information.
Nursing Professor Marcia Scott, stroll-
.ing through the rows of projects, said
she's always impressed by the students'
creativity.
"It's amazing. I'm always blown away,"
she said, as she passed a project that
used a carved pumpkin to illustrate a
Caesarean-section incision.
The project is essential practice for
the students, who will have to educate
their patients on a daily basis when they
enter the workforce, Scott said.
Student Nikki Beals, herself a mother
of four, chose the topic of postpartum
depression. It may not be the most
fun topic related to new motherhood,
but it's one of the most important to
discuss, she said.
Beals, who has already presented
her information to a patient, said the
experience was a valuable one.
"My patient was really receptive to


the information. This project will help
make me a better nurse. As nurses,
we can't just push medication and
discharge our patients, we have to really
care about them and teach them to help
themselves," she said.
Student Aline Garcia, who built her
presentation board around a large pair
of rubber breasts that she had express
delivered to her home from Amazon,
based her project on breastfeeding and
the numerous difficulties that it can
pose for new moms.
Garcia, a mother of a 9-year-old, said
she wasn't provided much information
about breastfeeding, and wanted to
save others from the discomfort and
confusion she experienced.
"I had a lot of problems when I
was breastfeeding. People would tell
me to use heat, and others would tell
me to use cold, to relieve the pain,"
Garcia said, referring to the swelling
and clogged milk ducts that some


breastfeeding mothers often experience.
"Evidence-based practice tells us that
you should use cold to relieve pain in
between feedings but heat right before
a feeding to help the milk come out
easier."
With her project, and its eye-popping,
lifelike breasts, she hopes to help other
new mothers experience the joys of
breastfeeding.
"Even though it wasn't always easy,
I felt I did something really special for
my child by breastfeeding for a year and
two months. I wanted to educate other
mothers so they can do the same."
Polk State's Nursing Program is one
of several Health Sciences programs
offered by the College. The Nursing
Program offers Associate in Science and
Bachelor of Science degrees, and serves
approximately 400 students in any
given term. Approximately 60 percent of
Polk County's registered nurses gradu-
ated from Polk State.


Winter Haven Hospital

Compassion. Innovation.Trust.


I


^;-;-' I
9~r


--=---


Frostproof News Page 29


October 31, 2012






Page 30 Frostproof News October 31, 2012


FEELING FIT BRIEFS


CPR seminar coming
to Bartow, Lake Wales

Citizen CPR, a non-profit United Way
Community Partner is holding Save a Life
on Nov. 17, at Bartow Civic Center, Christ
Church on the Move in Lake Wales and
Ridge Career Center in Winter Haven.
This offers free Hands Only CPR training
to the community Hands Only CPR is an
effective rescue breathing method when a
bystander witnesses someone collapse in
cardiac arrest. Eighty-five percent of cardiac
arrests happen in the home, statistics show.
Hands Only CPR training can be
taught in a one-hour session. People can
pre-register for one of these three loca-
tions. At all locations registration and
refreshments starts at 8:30 a.m. Training
runs from 9 a.m.-10 a.m. The agency will
teach Hands Only Adult CPR, relief of
choking and an introduction to the AED
(automotive external defibrillator). This is
a non-certification course but still a valid
way to learn to save your loved one's life.
Pre- registration is requested.
Contact Citizen CPR at 863-680-1277 or
291-5977, or register at www.citizencprinc.
com.

Veteran Info fair
to help veterans
Polk State Lakeland has a Veteran
Information Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
on Nov. 5 in room LTB 1100.
Representatives from Polk State Student


Financial Services, the Department of
Veterans Affairs, the Florida Department
ofVeterans Affairs, Polk CountyVeterans
Services, and PolkWorks will be onsite.
Other veterans' organizations, includ-
ing Wounded Warrior, American Legion
and Disabled American Veterans, and
others will also be represented. Also,
nearly two-dozen veteran-friendly em-
ployers have also agreed to participate,
including GEICO, Pepperidge Farm and
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
The event will also feature aVA
Mobile Medical Clinic and aVA Mobile
Rehabilitation Clinic.
Attendees will have the opportunity to
receive information about veteran ben-
efits and services, make contacts within
the veteran community, and speak with
veteran-friendly employers about work-
related topics.
All veterans and their spouses are invited
to attend. Free food will be provided.
For information, contact Polk State
Veteran Advisor Ken Agosta at 863-297-
1010, ext. 6360, or kagosta@polk.edu.
Polk State Lakeland is at 3425 Winter
Lake Road.

Battle of Guns & Hoses
The inaugural Battle of Guns & Hoses
Bar-B-Q is set from 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 10, to feature barbecue ribs
cooking contest between policemen and
firefighters for a trophy and year-long
bragging rights.


This is the first fundraising event
for Green & Gold and the B Street
Community Center since ownership of
the center was transferred from the city
to the Foundation.
Lake Wales Medical Center is the
major sponsor and will provide the
food. Also, contributing to the event
are Citizens Bank & Trust and Sorensen
& Schade Chrysler, Dodge & Jeep.
Candlelight Christian Academy, located
on the corner of State Road 17 and
Sessoms Ave. in Lake Wales, hosts this
event on their premises.
There will be classic cars on display
from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Tickets or additional information are
available from Carole Kuehn 863-676-
8986 or B Street Community Center, 230
B Street, Lake Wales, 863-679-8091. It
costs $8 for a barbecue ribs dinner or $7
for either pulled pork sandwich plate or
beef brisket sandwich plate.

Battle of the Belts
to tackle buckling
up behind the wheel
Lakeland Regional's Trauma Support
Department is part of the "Battle of the
Belts" Program in Polk County, partner-
ing with All Children's Hospital and lo-
cal high schools to create awareness for
student drivers to buckle up for safety.
Motor vehicle crashes are the leading
cause of death for American teenagers,


statistics show. Teens have a higher
fatality rate in motor vehicle crashes
than any other age group and the lowest
safety belt use rates of all drivers.
According to All Children's Hospital,
the Battle of the Belts program was
initiated to change these statistics and
increase safety belt use among teenag-
ers. The goal is for high school students
to convince their peers to always wear
their safety belts.

LRMC to host
'Pics on the Promenade'
On Friday, Nov. 9 the Lakeland
Regional hosts Pics on the Promenade.
This free family-friendly community
event will kick off the holiday season
with an American classic: White
Christmas. The movie will begin at
the Lake Mirror Promenade at dusk,
approximately 6:30 p.m. The outdoor
promenade is beside the Lake Mirror
Center, which is located at 121 S. Lake
Ave., Lakeland.
With Downtown Lakeland as its
backdrop, a children's park next door,
and art displays on site, the atmosphere
of this event will make it an evening to
remember. Lakeland Regional presents
this to the community as family, friends,
and neighbors gather to see one of
Hollywood's greatest movies on the big
screen this holiday season.
For information, call 863-687-1400.


Robotic surgery program taking participants


Polk State College is n
participants to the first
Robotic Surgery Creden
program unlike any oth
"This is truly a unique
Nothing else like it exist
Parekattil, director of ur
botic surgery at Winter
who is also serving as th
Polk State Robotic Surge
Program.
Polk State's Robotic Su
Credential Program for
establishes formalized t
licensed registered nurs
cians who participate in
surgeries, filling an educ
has grown more pronou
rise of robot-assisted su
"There is a lot of em
training the surgeons
procedures, but not fo
and technicians. For ev
a robotic procedure, tl
six members of the op
staff. This is the first st
ing all the members of
Parekattil said.
The Polk State Robotic
Credential Program mix
and hands-on experience

SYou deserve


?71


1137 Dru
Lake Wa

-Ba2-w,
Bartow, F


ow accepting Haven Hospital's da Vinci Surgical
session of its System. After participants register, they
tial Program, a will receive information on how to com-
er in the world. plete online modules, which include
Opportunity. training videos created by Parekattil and
s," said Dr. Sijo members of his surgical staff.
ology and ro- Up until now, nurses and surgical
Haven Hospital, technicians primarily learned their
ie director of the functions on the job, a method that
ery Credential is not ideal, said Registered Nurse
Lynn Mulder, a member of Parekattil's
irgery surgical team.
the first time "This program is going to be a good
raining for basis for the participants who can then
es and techni- tailor it to their needs," Mulder said.
robot-assisted Polk State Nursing Director Annette
cation gap that Hutcherson said the College plans
nced with the three to four sessions of the cre-
rgery. dential program each year, with the
phasis on second session planned for Nov. 7-9
who do robotic to coincide with the Robotic Assisted
r the.nurses Microsurgical & Endoscopic Society's
very surgeon in second annual Multispecialty Robotic
here are five or Microsurgery Symposium, which will
rating room take place Nov. 9-11 in Tampa.
tep, in train- "People coming from all over the
f the team," state, country and world for the
RAMSES event will be able to come to
c Surgery Polk State for this training," Hutcherson
:es online study said.
ce with Winter Each session of Polk State's Robotic

personalized quality health care! I

Benigno Feliciano, M.D
Diplomate of the American
Board of Internal Medicine
Cardiac Diseases
Treating all High Blood Pressure
,,i, ;I,.I--- .*- Pulmonary Diseases


Osteo/ Rheumatoid Arthritis
an rir(1seS:-;S: Hypo/Hyperthyroidism
Diabetes
lid Circle Skin Diseases/ Cancer
les, Florida High Cholesterol
-y Mlv, su ite 110 Strokes
Fiorida Wound Care
Se habla Espanol
Monday Friday: 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
863-533-1617 I
Accepting new patients 16 and older
Walk ins welcome Same day appointments
,h ",t -:A .... .. .
.. '


Surgery Credential Program will ac-
cept 10-12 participants. Nurses who
earn the credential will also receive 20
continuing-education credits. The cost


for the program is $500.
To register go to roboticnursing.org,
or contact Hutcherson at ahutcherson@
polk.edu or 863-292-3769.


Page 30 Frostproof News


October 31, 2012











Facial nerve can cause unbearable pain


DEAR DRS. DONOHUE AND
ROACH: I travel a great deal and am
thus unable to read your column
regularly. If you have not covered this
subject, please tell your readers about
trigeminal neurology. I suffered for
three years with severe jaw pain before
my dentist diagnosed me and sent me
to a neurologist. PK.
ANSWER: I'm pretty sure, P.K., that
you mean trigeminal neuralgia. The
trigeminal nerve relays to the brain
all the sensations arising on the face.
It also controls the chewing muscles.
Trigeminal neuralgia consists of sud-
den attacks of unbearable facial pain
centered on a cheek, the chin, the jaw
or part of the lip or gums. The pain is
brief, lasting seconds to minutes. A
person with this disorder is in constant
fear of another attack arising unexpect-
edly. A breeze blowing on the face,
chewing, talking or brushing the teeth
can provoke an attack. Sometimes it
happens without a recognizable cause.
This nerve problem most often arises
in middle ages or older.
One underlying cause of trigeminal
neuralgia has to do with an artery that
encircles the nerve. Pulsations of the
artery often are the root cause of the


"2

, I&
--low~

Loo


TO YOUR
GOOD
HEALTH


painful attacks. The pulsations irritate
the trigeminal nerve.
A neurologist is the right doctor to
see about this problem. Treatment
with medicines often can control
attacks. Carbamazepine, lamotrigine
and baclofen are the names of some of
the medicines used for treatment. The
doctor gradually increases the dose of
medicine until success is achieved.
If medicines are unable to control
attacks, then a number of other ways
of dealing with the trigeminal nerve
are available. One way is to protect
the nerve from the encircling artery. A
neurosurgeon is the doctor equipped
to perform this operation.
If you're on medicine now, how are


you doing? I'm interested in knowing
what has happened to you.
DEAR DRS. DONOHUE AND
ROACH: I finished chemo and radia-
tion therapy in September of 2008. In
December of 2010, I started bringing
up yellow and green phlegm. After see-
ing many doctors, one finally suggested
a culture of a sputum sample. The
germ involved was Pseudomonas. I was
given 21 daily infusions of tobramycin,
and after the infusion used a nebulizer
containing tobramycin. The doctor says
Pseudomonas never goes away, but.it
can be controlled. Is this so? M.S.
ANSWER: Pseudomonas (SUE-duh-
MOAN-iss) is a bacterium found in
waters, soil, plants, hot tubs and many
hospital sites. It is difficult to eradicate.
Only a few antibiotics are effective
against it. Most often, infections with
this germ are seen in people who have
other illnesses.
In some instances, it can be
eradicated. I don't know if you're under
treatment right now. I imagine your
doctor will stop treatment eventually
and see how you do on your own. If
need be, antibiotic therapy can be
restarted if Pseudomonas raises its ugly
head again.


DEAR DRS. DONOHUE AND ROACH:
My son is 14. Our neighbor was a
professional boxer for a few years. He
still trains boxers in his garage and yard.
He thinks my son would be a natural
for boxing. My son is eager to start. I'm
not so eager. I'm concerned about head
blows and the damage they cause later
in life. What's your opinion? J.K.
ANSWER: I don't believe that any
sport compares with boxing when it
comes to exhausting work. A three-
minute round drains more energy
than most other sports burn in an
hour. Continuous upper-body action
demands greater energy than does pure
leg action.
Head injuries with the potential for
brain damage at a later date are a big
concern. I would give the boy permis-
sion only if head blows were eliminated
completely in his training.
Drs. Donohue and Roach regret that
they are unable to answer individual
letters, but will incorporate them in the
column whenever possible. Readers may
write the doctors or request an order
form of available health newsletters at
PO. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475. Readers also may order health
newsletters from www. rbmamall.com.


Does Internet use predispose us to become depressed?


The average American user of the
Internet spends just over an hour a
day online, according to the Bureau of
Labor Statistics. That's way more time
than most of us spend talking with our
mothers or therapists. So it seems quite
reasonable that an analysis of how
we use the Internet might prove quite
revelatory about our individual psycho-
logical makeup.
Specifically, does Internet use predis-
pose some of us to become depressed?
A group of researchers at the
Missouri University of Science and
Technology recently asked that ques-
tion, conducting a study that examined
not Wihat people look at online, but
how they use the World Wide Web. For
example, did they spend most of their
time reading and writing emails or
playing video poker?
The researchers were specifically
interested in patterns of Internet use
that reliably related to depressive ten-
dencies. They concluded that activities
such as heavy mailing, peer-to-peer
file sharing and chatting online, plus
a tendency to quickly switch between
websites, all predicted a greater
tendency to experience depression.
Excessive mailing, for example, might
signify a relative lack of strong face-to-
face relationships and a digital cry for
connection. The scientists couldn't say


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56 percent five years ago: 62.
Source: Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention

Phobia of the Week
Bromidrosiphobia or


WELL NEWS
Scott LaFee



why exactly, but they noted the behav-
ioral linkages correspond neatly with
previously published findings.
That's depressing, but maybe not
surprising. According to the Centers
for Disease Control, roughly 10 percent
of U.S. adults currently suffer from
depression. As many as two-thirds of
people living with depression don't
realize they have a treatable condition.
You can read all about it on the
Internet and then get depressed.

Body of Knowledge
At least 100,000 chemical reactions
occur in the brain every second.

Life in the Big Macs
One hour of running at six miles
per hour (a 10-minute-per-mile
pace) burns 680 calories (based on a
150-pound person) or the equivalent of
exactly one Big Mac.

Counts
Percentage of American adults who
reported walking at least 10 minutes at
one time in the previous week, up from


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Frostproof News Page 31


October 31, 2012





Page 32 Frostproof News


!As a Business Owner and Health Care Professional...
Denise graduated from South Florida Community College, Polk Community College,
*and Warner Southern College with degrees in Nursing & Organization
Management. Then, she earned an MBA from the University of Miami.
Her professional resume includes a broad range of experience important to the
Heartland region. She has worked as an emergency room nurse in Polk and
Highlands counties, in allied health care
- positions, run the family's retail
businesses, and managed citrus groves.


As Our Representative...
Denise Grimsley was first elected to the Florida House of
Representatives in 2004. She chaired the Agriculture and Health Care
Appropriations Committees. Then she rose to chair the House
Appropriations Committee, the first woman to ever serve in this role.
Despite the economic challenges faced by our state, she produced two
balanced budgets with no new taxes!


As a Mother and Grandmother...


A fifth generation Floridian, Denise is fighting to keep the same quality of life for her
grandchildren in Florida's Heartland that she, her parents, and her daughter have enjoyed.


Denise has gotten results for the Heartland in Tallahassee!
She has passed legislation which:
* Enhanced Florida's economic development efforts to attract companies to provide
more high-paying jobs
* Addressed a critical shortage of nurses in Florida and increased the number of
students graduating from Florida nursing schools by 14%
* Improved educational opportunities for Florida's children, from preschool through
university levels
* Assisted farmers affected by natural disasters and increased funding for research
into diseases affecting our important citrus industry
* Helped meet the special challenges and needs of Florida's rural counties


Denise has been honored for her service:
* Dr. W. J."Wil" Blechman Children's Advocacy Award, Kiwanis
Florida District, 2012
* Elder Care Advocacy of Florida, Most Effective Legislator, 2012
* American Conservative Union "The Defender of Liberty Award" 2011
* Americans for Prosperity"A" Rating, 2011
* Florida Hospital Association Excellence in Public Service Award, 2011
* Florida Citrus Mutual, Legislative Appreciation Award, 2005
* Florida Association of Counties, County Champion Award, 2006
* PACE Center for Girls Legislator of the Year Award, 2011
*The Transition House, Inc., Legislator of the Year, 2012
* Florida Cattlemen's Association, Legislator of the Year, 2012
* American Cancer Society, Legislative Leadership Award, 2011
* Southwest Florida Library Network, Library Champion Award, 2010
* Greater Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce Special
President's Award, 2010
* Florida Dental Association, Dr. Lewis Earle Legislative Service Award, 2010
* Polk, Highlands, and Hardee Chapter of Florida Partner in Crisis,
Certificate of Leadership, 2010
* Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc. Friend of Free Enterprise, 2010
* Florida Council for Community Mental Health, Legislator of the Year, 2010
* Florida Council on Aging Advocacy Award, 2010


Contact Denise:
150 N. Commerce Ave., Suite.2
Sebring, FL 33870
Email: denise@denisegrimsley.com
Telephone: (863) 835-0232
www.DeniseGrimsley.com

Follow Denise on _


Whehe yo6vtebymal g aN e'br'Ath Dnie Gimle
is-tg g g. t.aart *d
41 ~ ~ ~ e -' *


October 31, 2012






REAL ESTATE


Wednesday, October 31, 2012


CLASSIFIED


Lake Wales: 863-676-3467


Bartow: 863-533-4183


Autos
Auctions
Items for Sale
Homes for Sale
Homes for Rent
and More...


BA RTOW LAKE WALES FORT M EAD E


What are the


FRO STPRO O F H AIN ES CITY LAKELA N D W IN TER HAVEN


What's HOT in the marketplace?


steps involved

in buying a

foreclosure?

First you need to obtain a pre-approval
letter or proof of funds letter. This is
usually required by the seller of the fore-
closure.
Next, call Carrie Cornelius
your local
real es- 7 .j
tate agent 2i
and have
them P'I~I: F'rniu 'luvi Esate, Inc.
start the
search
that meets your criteria. Keep in mind
that foreclosures are not always in good
condition and often need repairs. This
may affect the likeliness of being able to
obtain financing. However, sometimes
banks that own foreclosed properties
will do repairs before listing them on the
market. Once you have found a home
that you are interested in, your real estate
|4|6 iater Agfe
Dra a Eihi em t 'DE
|1 1. I" lIrrat l 's ll.aJ.'
raraiEdPn apGll acEm
$64.900 OBO!!!
MSl Manlfic e t Ifcar. sKeJAm Real Ty. :inc.

Mm Am eysoT-REalEstE' ET



RI ME 7E

LU S REAL ESTATE INC.


This home in Lake Ashton, Lake Wales, FL is a 2 bed., 2ba., 1688 sq.ft living, bit 2005, w/ bonus room. Located in a golf course
community, the home was in move-in condition with new carpet and fresh paint sold for $130,000.
agent can submit your offer to the seller. title issues or other delays.


Do owners of foreclosed properties
pay for buyer's closing costs? Banks are
generally more likely to pay for closing
costs if the buyer is an owner occupant
and obtaining financing.

How long do these transactions take to
close? Typically you can close within 30-
45 days pending there are no unforeseen


0O State Rd.. 60 East
ake Wales, Fi. 33853
163-676-7040)


What are the risks associated with buy-
ing a foreclosure? Foreclosures are sold
As Is. Meaning the seller will not do any
repairs and the buyer accepts the prop-
erty in its current condition. Buyers are
encouraged to have a home inspection
and within the inspection time can ad-
dress any concerns as needed.


LEGACY REAL ESTATE CENTER


"PRIME PLUS SERVICE YOU DESERVE!"


FORECLOSURE, JUST LISTED
Hillside Drive in Lake Wales. 2 Br.
2Ba. On Large Lot. Enclosed Pool.
Large Screened Porch. Florida Room,
Near Lake. Walking and Bi.e Path,
Great Price! $59,696


CROOKED LAKE PARK,
Wales Street in Iake Wales. 3 Br 2 Ba.
Recently renovated to add lovely stone
accent to the exterior, large screened in
porch. ,-pin floor plan. Close to Warner
University. $94,900


Lots of
Living Area
* Open Floor Plan 3 BD/2 BA
South L.ake Wales
* Near \arner i'. & Bok Acad.
SLlrce Fenced Yard
$75,000


Sils Road
Great Investment
*O\ cr 5 Acres
Nice 2BD/2BA
lols of Pri'.,. I eI. L
SLong Term Tenant In Place
$45,000


Carver Street
In City Limits
SOpen & Air' 3BD/2BA
Well Built In 2(X)7
Con enient Location
SShotn Sale
$49,000


STOP BY OUR OFFICE FOR A FREE LIST OF FORECLOSURES!
PLEASE VISIT OUR \H LBSI IL man.urimrtilu-rculetalte.com


You can find every business and service Under the sun in the
Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it!

Call 863-676-3467


I I III I II I~ II II I sill I


u m 1 w vv___'t31 U3 li L








Pag 2 CISSFID October----- 31,- 2012


1000


REAL ESTATE


"We Are Pledged To The Letter And
Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achieve-
ment Of Equal Housing Opportunity
Throughout The Nation. We Encour-
age And Support An Affirmative
Advertising And Marketing Program In
Which there Are No Barriers To
Obtaining Housing Because of Race,
Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Famil-
ial Status Or National Origin."

1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH,
WELL MAINTAINED, ready
to move-in condition, tile
floors, large fenced yard,
screen porch, near Warner
University, $64,500 ID# 116
PRIME PLUS REALE ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
SE WINTER HAVEN 4 BED-
ROOM 3 BATH BUILT IN
2006, Beautiful 2 story home
with new kitchen appliances,
kitchen has granite counter-
tops, formal living and dining
areas, large master suite with
walk in shower plus garden
tub; home has over 2,500 ft.
of living area, beautiful vault-
ed ceilings, crown moldings,
just listed at $229,900 ID #
7334 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

LAKEFRONT HOME ON
LAKE WALK- IN- WATER,
large covered dock with boat
lift, formal living and dining
room, family room with fire
place, enclosed florida room,
remodeled kitchen with break-
fast nook, sun room, work
shop, screen porch; Spectac-
ular views from family room,
kitchen and florida room, lush
landscaping, privacy fenced
yard, utility shed, $255,000
ID# 9402 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
LAKEFRONT FORECLO-
SURE, BEAUTIFUL 3 BR. 2.
BA. HOME, Area of nice well
maintained homes, spacious
modern floor plan, great room
concept, master suite with
bonus room and access to
lanai and deck, large deck
with fire-pit and dock, JUST
REDUCED TO $165,000, ID #
5707 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

NEAR LAKE WAILES LAKE,
3 Br. 2 Ba. on Large Lot,
Home has wood floors and
tile, kitchen has been remod-
eled with granite counter-
tops, and beautiful cabinets,
being sold as a "short sale",
call for appointment and more
information, ID # 940, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

COMMERCIAL OFFICE USE
OR RESIDENTIAL ON HIGH-
WAY 60 EAST, LAKE
WALES, 3 Br. 1.5 Ba. Home,
large lot, ample area for park-
ing, would make a great office
location on busy highway 60,
$49,900 ID# 834 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

4 BR. 1 BA. BLOCK HOME,
Great BUY! Located in
Sebring, convenient location,
just reduced to $29,900 ID#
2326 PRIME PLUS REAL


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
AVON PARK--WE HAVE
SEVERAL HOMES FOR
SALE, all are priced to sell
quickly, some with lake view,
great investment opportunity;
call today for more informa-
tion or stop by our office for
details and map.
PRIME PLUS REAL-ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 or visit
online www.primeplus-
realestate.com

SEBRING--WE HAVE MANY
LISTINGS IN SEBRING AREA,
HOMES, CONDOS, Priced
Low, call 863-676-7040
today for more information or
stop by our office PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. or
visit online at www.primeplus-
realestate.com

LAKE ASHTON FORECLO-
SURE, 2 BR. 2 BA. Beautiful
home with open floor plan,
large rooms, huge Florida
room, 2 car garage plus golf
cart parking, home is in move-
in condition, call today for
appointment to see and more
information, JUST REDUCED
to 129,900 ID# 5304 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

LAKE ASHTON FORECLO-
SURE, NEW ON THE MAR-
KET, Located on a corner lot,
this home is ready to move in,
new paint, new carpet, spa-
cious floor plan with bonus
den, screened back porch,
call for more information,
$134,900, PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
ID # 4075 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

NEAR WARNER UNIVERSI-
TY, 3 BEDROOM 2 BATH,
located in crooked lake park,
spacious split-floor plan,
home has recently been
updated, has detached
garage with RV parking,
screen porch, $94,900 id#
4918, PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

LAKE-FRONT BEAUTY, 2Br
2Ba nestled on private Lake
Cypress in Lake Wales, enjoy
boating, fishing and using
your own private boat ramp.
Offers a spa in the back sun-
room, newer roof, complete
a/c system, kitchen cabinets
and appliances, Reduced
$254,000 id# 1671 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com

WATER-FRONT BEAUTIFUL
HOME ON CANAL LEADING
TO LAKE WALK IN WATER,


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
Move-In condition, 3 Br. 2 Ba.,
cathedral ceiling, spacious liv-
ing room, large Florida room
with view of canal and lake,
formal dining, plus eating
space next to kitchen, all
appliances, washer and dryer,
2 car garage, workshop,
large covered dock on deep
water canal, just seconds
from the lake, $189,900 id#
6616 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE

Homes for Sale
Frostproof Listings
618 Dulcimer Ln, 2/2/2
car garage, almost 1 acre
$59,900 Call Michelle
405 Walter Ave 3/2/1 cpt,
wood & tile floors, fenced
$64,900 Call Michelle
2660 Bear Run 2/2/1 cpt,
Blue Jordan Forest $80,000.
OBO Call Cindy
204 Woodstork Way 3/2 1
acre, fenced $82,000. Call
Michelle
206 Woodstork Way 3/2/2
garage new wood floor, tile
120,000, OBO Call Cindy
2616 Sand Pine Tr
3/2/Oversized garage 3.24
acres $138,900. OBO Call
Michelle
1140 Hopson Rd. 2/2
+Unique Detached Lanai
w/hot tub 11 +/-Acres
Reduced $139,900. Call
Michelle
3308 Indian Pipes Tr.
3/2/2 carport, 10 acres,
horse stalls + more
$145,000 Call Cindy
409 W 9th St 4/2.5/2 car
garage, split level, wood &
tile floors reduced $149,000
Call Michelle
313 S Palm Ave 3BR/1BA
Ig porch, cha, corner lot Ask-
ing $35,000. Call Michelle
83 Yale Ave 2/1, $39,900.
Call Wesley
204 Central Ave 2/1/lgar,
$49,000. OBO Call Cindy
Keystone Realty Inc.
863-635-0030
Lake Wales, fully renovated
& furn., 2bd/2ba. You will like
this home. Large lot with
pond, community owned club-
house, pool, boat ramp and
dock on Walk in Water Lake.
Only, $48,000. 863-632-
0894.

1040 CONDOSNILLAS
FOR SALE
2BDRM, 2BATH CONDO.
55+ Ideal for handicapped.
First Floor. 1 block from
Police Station, and 4 blocks
from downtown Historic Lake
Wales. $32,500. By Owner
863-676-2386

Classified = Sales


MOVE IN

NO DEPOSIT
Mobile Homes
as low as
$475 per month
call James
863-605-5736

ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


ACROSS
1 Mythological fire-
breather
8 Man-horse
creature
15 Tangled or
disentangled
16 Employee's
security pass
17 Like Napoleon on
Elba
18 Nonsense
19 Elementary
20 Teacher's answer
book
21 Guitarist Barrett
22 About, in dates
25 AEC successor
28 Labyrinth dweller
31 Elusive loch
dweller, familiarly
35 Powerful health
care lobbying gp.
36 Internet letters
38 Singer Ronstadt
39 Massage style
42 Champs-:
Paris boulevard
44 -face:
smooching
45 Law office hire
47 Not in the clergy
48 Riddler foiled by
Oedipus
50 Fictional
destroyer of
Tokyo
53 Match part
54 Erased
55 Leader of the
pitching staff
58 Nipper's org.
60 Godliness
64 Brahe
contemporary
67 Temples with up-
curved roofs
69 Paper-folding art
70 No help
71 Beowulf's victim
72 What each of
seven answers in
this puzzle is

DOWN
1 Final exam no-no
2 '80s tennis star
Mandlikova
3 Folk singer Burl


WANTED:




/



PAID VACATION DAYS
Whatever you want in a new job,
you'll find your way to it
in the Classifieds.

The Polk County Democrat
863-533-4183


By Sheila Welton
4 Arizona neighbor
5 Draw forth
6 Cath. or Prot.
7 Juice drink suffix
8 Name as a
source
9 Keenan's actor
father
10 Bulls org.
11 Smidgen
12 Puts in
13 Like Cinderella's
stepsisters
14 Bassoon, e.g.
20 Small racer
23 Cheers from tiers
24 Prankster
26 Count (on)
27 Forensic
detectives,
briefly
28 Trick-or-treaters'
costume items
29 Beatnik's "Got it"
30 J. Carrol : TV's
Charlie Chan
32 Fishhook-to-line
connection
33 Perfect
34 Cinch course
37 Big name in
Argentine politics


10/31/12
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40 With no
warranties
41 Emmy winner Daly
43 "Shane" star Alan
46 Oceano filler
49 The "X" in XFL,
so some thought
51 Homemade pistol
52 Imbeciles
55 Awestruck
56 'The Alienist"
author Caleb


57 Nobelist Wiesel
59 Slinky's shape
61 Cut and paste,
e.g.
62 Story
63 River of Flanders
65 Car starter: Abbr.
66 Young fellow
67 Milne's absent-
minded Mr.
68 It begins with
enero


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


Were you charged a fee for an Early
Access cash advance loan? If so, you
may be entitled to compensation!



Call NOW for information

concerning your legal rights.


Call Toll Free 866-507-1518
Jason K. Whittemore

SWagner, Vaughan & McLaughlin, P.A.
S 601 Bayshore Blvd., Suite 910 1 Tampa, FL 33606


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

4 6 Rating: GOLD

6 1 5 2 E 6 t ILEl 89

3 2 7 1 6 E 8 9 6 9 I L
-- --9 L 9 E 8 7 6
27 4
6 I Z L S 9 E 8
6 3 L E 6 8 9 9 !

5 1 9 9 8 1I6 LE

4 2 6 7 5 7 9 6 I L 58
-I-I 8 6 L 9t7
1 2 8 8 L Z 9 t11 6 9

7 1 c /lc/Oto or uoinos
10/31/12
10/31/12__________________________ -


October 31, 2012


CLASSIFIED


Page 2








October I 3121 CLSIIED Page 3 -


1040 CONDOS/ILLAS
FOR SALE
CONDO @ LAKE WALES
COUNTRY CLUB, Beautifully
furnished 2 Bed 2 Bath 2nd.
floor unit, Condo with Spa-
cious Floor Plan Located in
Golf Community. Family
room/lanai, Overlooks Pool,
Golf Course and Lagoon.
Many Community Amenities.
$99,900 id# 9202 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com

LAKE WALES COUNTRY
CLUB 2nd. Floor Condo, Fully
Furnished, Screened Balcony,
Great View Of Golf Course
And Lagoon, $99,000 id#
9202 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

GREAT PRICE ON THIS
FURNISHED 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH CONDO, 1,184 ft. liv-
ing area, screened porch,
convenient location to shop-
ping in the city limits of Lake
Wales. $29,900, PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 id # 130 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com

1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
3 BR. 2 BA. MOBILE HOME
ON 1 ACRE, NICE WELL
MAINTAINED HOME WITH
STORAGE BLD. Located just
east of Lake Wales near Lake
Rosalie, Great Fishing and
boating lake, $65,000 ID#
2188 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
Mobile Home with acreage
ready to move in great for
pets. Lots of space for the
price. 3BR 2BA, serious
offers only, no renters.
(850)308-6473

1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES
37 ACRE MIDDLE TN FARM
with 13 acre lake, nice home.
Selling at Absolute Auction,
Memorial Day. Van Massey
Auction Lic 1711. (931)433-
8686 Visit vanmassey.com
DEVELOPER FORCED LIQ-
UIDATION Smoky Mtn. Lake
Property Priced @ Foreclo-
sure/Short sale. Up to 100%
Financing/5% interest. Hurry-
Only 30 Reservations avail-
able! (877)551-0550 ext 100
WESTERN CAROLINA REAL
ESTATE Offering unbeliev-
able deals on homes and land
in the beautiful NC mountains.
Call for free brochures, fore-
closures, and area informa-
tion. 800-924-2635

1210 HOMES FOR RENT

Fort Meade 3bd, lba,
concrete block home.
Clean, new A/C, on large lot.
Located across from high
school. No pets. Need refer-
ence. $685. mo., $650.
s.d.
863-944-6740

LAKE WALES *5 houses
for RENT 2Bd/lBa, $550
monthly $450 deposit...
*1 house 3bd/lba, $600
monthly, $450 deposit. Call
863-676-5066 or 863-676-
1901 NO CALLS after 9pm

BUY IT!


SELL IT!


FIND IT!


SUN CLASSIFIED!


1210 HOMES FOR RENT

Lake Wales/Crooked Lake
Park- Cozy 3BR/1BA home with
screened porch and spacious
yard. There is a detached bonus
room with bathroom that could be
used as a game room or guest
suite. New interior paint.
$800/month, SD $800. Available
11/17/12. Call Maggie Stohler at
Legacy Leasing Services, Inc
86e-676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Lake Wales- 3BR/2BA home
with screened pool. New tile in liv-
ing room. Pool care included in
the rent. S1150/month, SD
$1150. Call Maggie Stohler at
Legacy Leasing Services, Inc
863-676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Davenport- Lovely 4BR/2.5BA
pool home on corner lot. 2 sto-
ries with living space on lower
floor and bedrooms upstairs. All
new appliances in kitchen.
$1100/month, SD $1100. Call
Maggie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Services, Inc 863-676-0024 or
visit www.LegacyLeases.com
Frostproof- 3BR/2BA on Lake
Reedy. Extra large lot. All new
paint and flooring. Florida room.
Interior washer/dryer hookup.
$875/month, SD $875. Call Mag-
gie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
services, Inc 863-676-0024 or
visit www.LegacyLeases.com
Commercial
Lake Wales office building with
over 300 feet of highway frontage
on Highway 27 South. Close to
27/60 intersection. Building
includes a spacious, bright recep-
tion area, four separate offices, 2
storage areas, and 2 acres of
land with plenty of parking space.
New AC unit and well pump.
$1750/month, SD $1750. Call
Maggie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Services, Inc 863-676-0024 or visit
www.LegacyLeases.com


212 E. Stuart Ave.
Lake Wales, Fl. 33853

1240 CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
WINTERSET CONDO
LAKE VIEW 2bd / 2bath,
upstairs
unit. Community amenities.
$800.00 per month. Security
deposit required. Call 863-
678-1498 or 863-241-1528

1300 DUPLEXES FOR RENT
BARTOW 459 Searcy Ave.
3/2, 1340 sf, w/d hookups,
CHA, appliances, 1 year
lease, $650/monthly,
$600/deposit. Call 863-603-
7715 or 863-533-4482.
BARTOW, 1 bedroom
572 E. Pearl Street.
No pets. $400/mo.
$150/security
Call Pearl 863-299-3522.
LAKE WALES lbd/lba, No
Pets, No Smoking, 1 Adult.
Rent $400 mo, SD $100. Call
676-6201

1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

APARTMENT FOR RENT
863-614-2846
CALL FOR DETAILS
BARTOW, lbd, partly fur-
nished. One mile East of Bar-
tow on Moose Lodge Rd.
(863) 533-0146 or (863)
512-0453.
COLONIAL SQUARE
APARTMENTS
FALL SPECIALS !
1 and 2 Bedroom apts with
central a/c and heat, large
floor plans, abundant clos-
et
space & FREE WATER
Starting at $465/ month
Move-In Specials too
Call 24/7: 866-485-
4961
Or visits online at:
ColonialSquareBartow.com
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

OAKWOOD MANOR
APARTMENTS
PRICES REDUCED FOR
LEASE UP!
Our updated villa-style
apartment homes provide
comfortable living at a
great price. Rates include
water.
Studio from only $405/mo
1 BR. from only $475/mo
2 BR with w/d hookups
from only $595/month
Convenient location,
Walk to shopping.
Call 24/7 866-485-
4977
Or visit:
OakwoodManorApts.co
m

1350 EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT
LAKE WALES Efficience
Apartment. $135 week. Elec-
tric / Water Included. No
Smokers, No Pets. 863-632-
7013

1420 WANTEDTO RENT
Looking for an small apart-
ment (sharing preferred)
Looking for an apartment
within 1 mile radius of the
Frostproof juice plant on 500
Lake Reedy Blvd.
Prefer to share the house.

1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
BEAUTIFUL CORNER LOT
NEAR BLUE LAKE, if you are
looking for a spot to build
your dream home, this is the
perfect location, near blue
lake, close to US 27, area of
nice homes; $29,900, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040

HOME SITE, Nice half Acre
lot located in Beautiful Area of
Homes. Growing Region Cen-
trally Located between Winter
Haven and Lake Wales. Par-
tially Cleared and ready to
Build your First Home.
$27,900 id #cc PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. (863) 676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

WOODED HOME SITE! 2
Acres of Beautiful Woods in
deed restricted community to
build your new home! Not too
far from Public Boat Ramp
into Lake Rosalie. Owner Moti-
vated and will look at all Rea-
sonable Offers! $39,900 id#
11209 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC (863) 676-7040.
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

LAKE FRONT ON LAKE
WALK IN WATER, Just Over
5 Acres, Partially Wooded,
Private Location, Dead End
Street. Great Price! $59,900
id# It22 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE, INC 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

OVER 1 ACRE ON LAKE
PIERCE, Great home-site on
Timberlane Rd. Lake Pierce,
One of the finest fishing lakes
in Florida. Beautiful old Flori-
da Woods; the lot is located
on paved rd. $58,000 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. ID#
7111 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

BLUE JORDAN FOREST,
ALMOST 3 ACRES, BEAU-
TIFUL NATURAL FLORIDA
WOODS, Gated community,
lots of wildlife, enjoy the coun-
try peaceful atmosphere,
$22,000 ID # 7299 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

Need Cash?
Have A
Garage Sale


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
NORTH FLORIDA LAND
LIQUIDATION 80 ACRES
Hunting $2800/acre. 40
ACRES Hunting w/owner
financing $3625/acre. 5
Acres restricted $39,000.
Brochure/specifics: 1-800-
294-2313 x3073. 7 Days a
week 7-7. A Bar Sales, Inc.
Top of the line RV park lot
for rent, monthly or season-
al. Across from beach on Hwy
A1A between Vero Beach and
Fort Pierce. Boat docks, ten-
nis and heated pool overlook-
ing the ocean. Call 352-347-
4470 or Email:
lwhy2@aol.com.
1515 WATERFRONT
North Carolina Mountain
Lakefront lots. New gated
waterfront community. Dock-
able lots with up to 300' of
shoreline, Low insurance, Low
property tax. Call Now
(800)709-5253

1520 OUT OF TOWN LOTS
20 ACRES FREE! Own 60
Acres for 40 Acre
Price/payment. $0 down,
$168/mo. Money Back Guar-
antee, NO CREDIT CHECKS.
Beautiful views, West Texas.
(800)843-7537.
www.sunsetranches.com
NC mountain property
must go. 4.5 acres with out-
standing views and privacy.
$25,000 OBO, great for
home or cabin. (828)394-
9298. Ask for Richard

1610 BUSINESS RENTALS
Commercial property for
rent, 322 S Scenic Hwy, Lake
Wales. Excellent business
location, large building
10,000 sq. ft., 14 ft overhead
doors, 1500 sq. ft. office
show room with A/C. Security
deposit required. $2000.00
per month 863-678-1498 or
863-241-1528

1620 COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY
OVER 14 ACRES HIGHWAY
FRONTAGE IN AVON PARK,
Multiple parcels, with mixed
use. Excellent potential for
commercial highway busi-
ness, or income property on
U.S. 27. Bank owned, recent
appraisal and priced accord-
ingly, call for more informa-
tion. PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

2000







EMPLOYMENT

2001 HELP WANTED
Drivers: Local, Great Pay &
Benefits. Home every day. Pd.
Holidays/Vac. 401K CDL-A.
w/X end. School grads.
Accepted 866-358-3937
A Few Pro Drivers Needed
Top Pay & 401K Great Equip-
ment & Benfefits 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
ACT NOW! New Pay Increase!
37-46 cpm. New Trucks in
2011. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-
Train for high paying Aviation
Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Avi-
ation Institute of Maintenance
(866) 314-3769.

Advertise Today!


2001 HELP WANTED

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS
Needed immediately for
upcoming roles $150-
$300 per day depending
on job requirements. No
experience, All looks
needed. 1-888-505-7425
for casting
times/locations.
ASAP! New Pay Increase!
34-46 cpm. 300 Newer
Trucks. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
CALL NOW! Top 5% Pay!
Excellent Benefits. 300 New
T660's. Need 2 months. CDL-
A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
CDL DRIVERS- Great Pay!
Tons of Texas Frac work!
Great company! Company
paid benefits! Must have bulk
pneumatic trailer experience.
Call today! (800)491-9029.
CDL-A Drivers Relocate for
Tons of Great Paying Texas
Oilfield work! Great compa-
ny/Paid benefits! Must have
bulk pneumatic trailer experi-
ence. Call today! (800)491-
9029
CDL-A DRIVERS. Central Flori-
da company seeks Solo &
Team Drivers. Tank and Dry
Van positions offering some
regional. lyr OTR/ Good MVR
required. (877)882-6537 or
www.oakleytransport.com
CLAIMS ADJUSTERS
NEEDED due to active Storm
Season. JEL's 5-day Boot
Camp, Nations #1 hands-on
trainer can prepare you. High
Income www.JELTraining.com
Companies waiting
CYPRESS TRUCK LINES
Home Weekends! Southeast
Regional, Top Pay & Great
Benefits! 6 Months TT exp
CDL with clean MVR. Call
(800)545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com
DRIVER- Not getting enough
miles? Join Knight Transporta-
tion and increase your income
with our steady freight. New
Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience. (800)414-
9569. www.driveknight.com
Driver- Recession Proof
Freight. Plenty of miles. Need
refresher? No out-of-pocket
tuition at FFE. $1000 Bonus
for CO's & $1500 Incentive
for 0/0's. recruit@ffex.net.
(855)356-7121
Driver-Drivers choose
from Weekly or Daily Pay.
Regional, OTR or Express
Lanes, Full or Part-time, CDL-
A, 3 months recent experi-
ence required. (800)414-
9569 www.driveknight.com
Drivers No Experience -
No problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to
$.49 per mile! CRST VAN
EXPEDITED (800)326-2778
www.JoinCRST.com
Drivers Earn Up to 39H/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR Flatbed
exp. Call: (800)572-5489 Joy
ext. 238 Susan ext. 227 SUN-
BELT TRANSPORT, LLC
Drivers Earn Up to 39C/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR
Flatbed exp. Call: (800)572-
5489 Susan ext. 227 Joy ext.
238 SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC.
Drivers Wanted-OTR Food
Grade Tanker Drivers Needed
Competitive pay, Benefits,
Guaranteed time off Class A
CDL-w/tanker endorsement
Prefer 2yrs experience
(800)569-6816 otterytrans-
portation.com
Freight Up = More $ 34-46
CPM 2Mos. CDL Class A Dri-
ving Exp (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
Employ Classified!


2001 HELP WANTED
Drivers- No Experience-
No Problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to 490 per mile!
CRST VAN EXPEDITED
(800)326-2778 www.Join-
CRST.com
Earn Up to $.51cpm!!! CDL-
A Drivers, Tanker & Dry Van
positions available. 1 year
OTR experience, Good MVR &
work history needed. Call
(877)882-6537 or apply
www.oakleytransport.com
FRAC SAND HAULERS with
complete bulk pneumatic rigs
only. Relocate to Texas for
Tons of work. Great compa-
ny/pay. Gas cards/Quick Pay
available. (800)491-9029
GROWING Local Newspa-
per is Seeking Qualified
Sales People. Please Send
Resumes to
pnorthrop@thelake-
walesnews.com, or call
Paul Northrop at
(863)676-3467.
Heat & Air JOBS Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on environ-
ment. Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job Place-
ment Assistance! (877)994-
9904

HELP WANTED
ORANGE BOX CAFE
7315 US HWY 27
FROSTPROOF

NEED FT/PT SEASONAL
WAITRESS/CASHIER,
HELPER IN ALL AREAS OF
RESTAURANT/GIFT SHOP

CALL 863-635-4873 EXT
203
TO SPEAK WITH SHIRLEY
OR
STOP IN AT OUR MAIN
OFFICE
7307 US HWY 27
FROSTPROOF
JUST GRADUATE? Play in
Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New
York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys.
$400-$800 wkly. Paid
expenses. Signing Bonus. Call
(877)259-6983
LIVE-WORK-PARTY-PLAY!
Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet
to New York! Hiring 18-24
girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly.
Paid expenses. Signing
Bonus. 1-866-574-7454

NOW HIRING: Companies
desperately need employees
to assemble products at
home. No selling, any hours.
$500 weekly potential. Info.
1-985-646-1700 DEPT. FL-
820
Medical Billing Trainees
Needed! Hospitals & Insur-
ance Companies hiring now!
No experience? Local Training
& Job Placement available! HS
Grad or GED & Computer
needed. (888)589-9677.
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED! Hospi-
tals & Insurance Companies
hiring now! No experience?
Local Training & Job Place-
ment Assistance available!
(888)219-5161.
Medical Management
Careers start here Get con-
nected online. Attend college
on your own time. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com

Advertise in
The Classifieds!


October 31, 2012


CLASSIFIED


Page 3





CLASSIFIED


October 31, 2012


Colonial Square
Apartments
j---=F= ,


1 & 2 BEDROOM SPACIOUS
RESIDENCES WITH 4 COMFORTABLE
FLOORPLANS TO CHOOSE FROM.
Rates range from $465 $610
including water, sewer & trash.


222 W. Ethelene St., Bartow
(Behind DQ)
(863) 533-4651


&-,HE


1 "F -1q 1!.



2 TON-13 SEER SYSTEM

$1,490*"'
Install it yourself or we can do it for you : d $650)
100% Financing Av.,;ll: TQB
State Licensed & Insured CACA44874
References available
Call John @ 941 -4=g. 5-'5..0
*FREE DELIVERY **Sales tax extra



Ceagrct Si ua'e Ap3 L rtnens


We offer Ist floor apartment homes that include
1 & 2 bedroom apartments. Our amenities are
screened-in patios, private entrances, swimming
pool, weekly resident functions, W/D connections
(in select units) and so much more! We pay some
utilities which include water/sewer and trash.
CALI AND ASK ABOUT OUR
GREAT MOVE-IN SPECIALS!
Directions: We are conveniently located behind Publix off State Rd. 60 in Lake Wales, FL.
200 Emerald Ave., Lake Wales, FL 33853
863-676-6317


.1'; .


NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
Immediate Availability Upon Approval
1 & 2 Bedroom Units. Affordable housing for low to
middle income families. Rent starts at $352 and $395.
All units have W/D hookups & kitchen appliances.
TDD 800-955-8771 Phone/Fax 863-676-9213
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 7am-Noon
.401 Winston Ave., Lake Wales, FL 33853
TA e his institution is on equal opportunity provider/employer. .


We buy any vehicle
in any condition.
Title or no title.
If you have a bank lien,
No Problem


Don't trade it in we will pay
up to $30,000 for any make
or model car, truck, van or SUV.
Call: AJ at 813-335-3794 or
813-237-1892


IJ, ,. .7'
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Buy .:
the "=t
Book
Used llookfrt i-
Why Pay Full
Retail?
Tues-Fri '..im--4pm
S.aii .m-. pni
3877 Recker Hwy. -,
Winter Haven
863-875-5735


5 FULL ROOMS
OF BOOKS TO
CHOOSE FROM!
*Paperbacks $3 or Less,
Hard Covers $50r Less
CD's & DVD's too!
r -- -
'$1 .& P I
SFor Any Book! !
I We do NOTbuybooks, I
but ask about our store
credit policy.
I ,- .


Whether your laptop is
dead, your computer has
a virus, or you want to
upgrade your computer,
we can help.

or come see us at:
1425 N Broadway Ave, Suite 3
smLIuIhAH*ivm-mn^m;frtattmeOgrgmapgM


* Expert service
* Fixed Rate
pricing
* Convenient
location
* Locally owned


_._ _- -- r.- -".' ..-- -.

DRIVEWAYS -PATIO SIDEWALKS
"BOBCATO




lra ejm.at e/
S63 z-: MIV7id8 3/-.
34BeJiew iDL"eF tMade, L 33841,_


CONCRETE SPECIALIST

OUR GUARANTY
NO MONEY DOWN-
PAY WHEN JOB IS
S COMPLETED!
Side Walks Patios Driveways
Epoxy Resurfacing 7;.-
Now offering Bathroom Remodeling
Serving all of Polk County --..
:/ .- FREE ESTIMATES ''--;. -:,-
S 863-578-3424 863-835-3222:.
2802531


ROADS- DRIVEWAYS --
SCrushed/Broken Tile -
-Parking Pads L : D
Site Preparation :
SRocks, Boulders, Fill
Residential* Commercial .
Licensed/Insured
863-528-0255
OWNER E!on n M "
OWNER (I 3^ 3 ^ ,.....,..- ,.


Page 4


.5m


Call 1-877-822-7167 to place your ad


==BMW


I ~ I -I I e -- c- I


CENTRAL FLORIDA'S COOLING SPECIALISTS

POiWELL
A/C & HEATING
SALES. SERVICE INSTALLATION
All Makes/Models Residential & Commercial
Financing available on new & replacement units
FREE ESTIMATES on installations & replacements
INSURED STATE CERTIFIED CAC1815469
863-293-5046






.. # '~:, F" y. '. "-f 5'' .' -
Contemporary & Open Studio with Full Kitchen,
and Ceramic Tile throughout, from 5405/month.
S Spacious 1 Bedroom starting at $475/month.
Large 2 Bedroom Residence with washer/dryer
hookups + utility room. from $595/month.
'i- .w:'v.O.akw! odManc0rr Aps ..:omi
1285 N US 17 Bartow (Aside WalMart)
(863 533- 5600


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TIODYAN


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Octbe 3121 DECLASSIFIED Page 5


Call 1-877-822-7167 to place your ad


Owner. Jacqueline Jackson DCF Lic. #F10POD957


Licensed by DCF


* From Infant to Pre "K"
* Accept After Schoolers
* Food Provided
* Beyond Center and
Circle Time Curriculum
* Early Learning
Coalition Accepted


Jackie Jackson
18 Johnson Ave, Lake Wales, FL 33853 863-521-8508
Support Groups Exercise Program for Children


i O 6


UNEMPLOYED CREE
U 0 Y CHANGE?
Train In As Little As No Experience Necessary
4 WIEEKS Day, Weekend and Evening Classes
4 Long Haul or Home Every Night
NITRUCK DRIVER Job Placement Assistance
J T RAI NING CDL Testing and Refrehe urss
TRAININSeHablas Espano


Industry Leader in Truck Driving Training

AA 863-294-1112


4950 Recker Hwy
Winter Haven


',U AN R SOU C S ,--,.-.'"'


Bg SIi.


* EMPLOYEE RECORDS
REVIEW HuI
* SAFETY INSPECTION
* PAYROLL REVIEW
* HANDBOOK REVIEW
* RECRUITMENT & SELECTION
ASSESSMENT
* EMPLOYEE RELATIONS/
COMMUNICATION ASSESSMENT


FIREARM COPWICE
UNEPUIOYIE*fI


man Resources Evaluation
Special Price

89.99
gI~ -; :i: "T


WAYNE CARROLL AGENCY
141 East Central Avenue, Suite 200 2ndRoor, Winter Haven (in Colonialbank)
863-289-5189





jA ,COBSE< HOM- 2ES
FACTORY O U T L E T
Also offering- Park Models Trade-Ins Repos
We pay cash for used homes-'86 or newer!



$56,900 $51,9000


JA^^&


SPAPA JOHN RISENERS


Underground Drain
j Variety of Colors
i- *Senior Discount
"Forget the Rest, Go With the Best"
863-858-1368

Slakelandgutters.com r winterhavengutters.com



Steve Wilson
Sanctuary Insurance
SAuto Homeo\ ners
e Life Healthl
Business LiL [m
233 E. Park Ave SANCTUARY INSURANCE
Lake Wales, FL .
863-678-0477




Polk's Only Store With All Varieties of
Deds r- Mattresses for Over 28 Years!
A+ BETTER BUSINESS RATED VOTED BEST IN POLK
MATTRESSES-FUTONS-ADJUSTABLES-WATERBEDS
mmMAN AIS IS


1806 First St. S. Winter Haven


* FINANCING (WAC) IS
* FREE LAYAWAY
* MATTRESSES MADE IN USA


POIA ATRY

l ESE 't ae aR caiB-Se""


ALOHA PAINTING CO. CA$H-CSON-NECTION
PAWN SHOP
BUY SELL* TRADE
*k l* *"We Buy Gold"
Gold Diamonds
Call Paul Bridwell Jewelry & Repair
Whit,'s Metal rltortn rc


863-287-0701
edit Card Aneoted licensed & Insured


4


MAJOR MEDICAL DENTAL VISION

Turned down for health reasons diabetes,
heart attack, cancer or? aiSm


.*.1 -w -., :._- -A- I-
4n P _" I.I.
=,,,.._. ,,...=, PAI.. NTI,.. NG_' :,. .. .


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A
LAWN CARE


CLASSIFIED


Page 5


October 31, 2012


B~c~aa~b


I


'NES







Pag 6e CLSSFID October--~-- 31,2012


2001 HELP WANTED
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
MOMS WORK FT/PT, no
experience necessary, we
train. New Swarovski Crystal
Jewelry by Touchstone Crys-
tal. $500 TO $5,000/MONTH
(407)295-1522 kontactkelly-
now@aol.com
j1MOVIE EXTRAS Earn up to
$250 per day To stand in the
backgrounds for a major film
production experience not
required. All looks needed.
Call NOW!! (877)435-5877
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses, www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783

Need Cash?
Have A
Garage Sale


2001 HELP WANTED
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses. www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783
OTR DRIVERS- Food Grade
Tank Drivers. CDL-A w/tank
endorsement, Good MVR &
Hazmat within 90 days
required. Up to 42cpm
w/additional mileage incen-
tives- & benefits. (877)882-
6537 or www.oakleytrans-
port.com
SURROGATE MOTHER
NEEDED Please help us
have our baby! Generous
Compensation Paid. Call
Attorney Charlotte Dan-
ciu 1-800-395-5449
FL Bar # 307084
We are needing a Mechanic
to work on Tractors & Heavy
equipment in our Okeechobee
field. We need some help with
repairs & maintenance. If
interested please call David
352-281-0235 or 386-454-
5688
Classified = Sales


2005 SERVICES
Abortion Not an Option?
Unplanned Pregnancy? Adop-
tion is a Wonderful Choice.
Living Expenses Paid.
Secure, Loving, Families
Await. Call 24/7 1-877-341-
1309 Attorney Ellen Kaplan
(FL #0875228)
ADOPTION
888-812-3678 All
Expenses Paid. Choose
a Loving, Financially
Secure family for your
child 24 Hrs 7 Days
Caring & Confidential.
Attorney Amy Hickman.
(FL Lic. #832340)
ADVEFRTI-SE!


2005 SERVICES
ADOPTION
Give your baby a loving,
financially secure family.
Living expenses paid.
Call Attorney Charlotte
Danciu 28 years experi-
ence. 1-800-395-5449
www.adoption-surroga-
cy.com
FL Bar # 307084
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


Advertise your way to Success!

Call now to advertise your business in
over 100 newspapers
866.742.1373
www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida
derti h Statewide Advertising Refreshing Rates


2005 SERVICES
ADOPTION
GIVE YOUR BABY THE
BEST IN LIFE! Many
Kind, Loving, Educated &
Financially Secure Cou-
ples Waiting. Living &
Medical Expenses Paid.
Counseling & Transporta-
tion Provided. Former
Birth Moms on Staff!
FLORIDA ADOPTION LAW
GROUP, P.A. Jodi Sue
Rutstein, M.S.W., J.D.
Mary Ann Scherer, R.N.,
J.D.
1-800-852-0041
Confidential 24/7
(#133050&249025)


AM


CLASSIFIED
TO WORK FOR
YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUYA HOME!


AIRLINES ARE

HIRING


Train for hands on Aviation Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance
866-314-3769


SCall 1-877-888-7167 to place your ad


m ,N s


Z / I, O 2 .. '. -


. ? '.ciY! "ri.i'a


E Lfs ,ST T "
.3! -
fir+......
I"-j ; ,9

~~4X. 971 Lw


AT YouR SERVICE REALTY
1400 Chalet Suzanne Road
Lake Wales, FL 33859 ()
Cell 863.221.0229 ,,
Business 863.676.4448
E-Mail eileenb@century21 com
Please visil my Web Site for your
teI a EstaorRetal Nfeeds at
www.tchmrndlFlohdaProperiesAbmn


Eileen Belanger
Sales Associate
Property Manager


ILII


863-978-8586


2 CAR
GARAGE
From only
$4985
13 Colors


130
mph
CERT.


I '

. ::: -. *'" ,


www.usabarnsandgarages.com


CARPORTS FROM
ONLY $695


Raised Center Aisle
Barns FROM $4680


I .


Ic Jneipaiated
LANDSCAPE SUPPLIES
Mulch Soils & Fill* Decorative
Rocks & Boulders- Fertilizer
Pick up & Delivery
PRO-CUT
TREE SERVICE
Arbor Equiped An I
^*^^^*^


F* /' s .. : -\ ," ." .- ,-.,- :,. ." 1,
'* ;..r : .'.- -:.
;.. f r ,, ; ? ,' ..- -,.. ,- '


SINGLE HUNG WINDOW
Insulated Glass, Dual Pane -
White Re-enforced .
Vinyl Frame g
stai $14900
at Onl Plus installation

k & ]JJ___FCRC1330032


, .: 6o .; ... -
.... ,- _: K J '
~ ..., ,'~ '
l.A


ON SITE r
SEWING "".'"lt
MACHINE N
REPAIR
Expert
Service & Repairs on
all Makes & Models .. -
HOURS 365 5th Street :. 1.',-; Hj.,-, F
MON.-FRI. 9AM-5PM(8329-0
TUES. 9AM-8PM (863) 299-3080
SAT. 9AM-4PM www.hearffeltquilting.com
Check our website for all the latest schedules, specials and events

T SV


-- -- -- -


"


October 31, 2012


Page 6


,--si,-a-


CLASSIFIED








Ocoe 3121 LSIFESPg


2005 SERVICES
* ADOPT College Sweet-
hearts. Happy Creative
Home, Laughter, Security,
At Home Parent, Beaches.
Expenses Paid.
FLBar42311 1-800-552-
0045 James & Helene *
DAL SING ESQ
ADOPTION 866-633-0397
Unplanned Pregnancy?
Provide your baby with a
loving, financially secure
family.Living/Medical
/Counseling expenses
paid. Social worker on
staff. Call compassionate
attorney Lauren Feingold
(FL Bar#0958107) 24/7
ARE YOU PREGNANT?
Childless & seeking to adopt.
Will be hands-on mom w/flexi-
ble schedule. Large extended
family w/adopted relatives.
Financial security. Expenses
paid. (Rep. by Adam Sklar,
Esq. FLBar#0150789) Emily
& Adam. 1-800-790-5260.

DIVORCE $50 $240*
Covers Child Support, Cus-
tody, and Visitation, Property,
Debts, Name Change... Only
One Signature Required!
*Excludes govt. fees! 1-800-
522-6000 Extn. 300 Baylor
& Associates

PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? Talk with
caring adoption expert. You
choose from families nation-
wide. LIVING EXPENSES
PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One
True Gift Adoptions. 866-
413-6298. FL- License
#100013125
ROOF REPAIRS ROOF
OVERS Mobile Home Roof
Specialist & Flat Roof. Free
Insurance Inspections.
Lic/Ins CCC1327406. All
Florida Weatherproofing &
Construction. 1-877-572-
1019
2010 PROFESSIONAL
INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING
AND ASSESSMENT
SPECIALIST
Application deadline: 11/8/12.
Please visit:
http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com
for detailed position posting.
863-784-7132. EA/EO.
/^ SOUTH
FLORIDA

2100 GENERAL
A Few Pro Drivers Needed
Top pay & 401K. Need CDL
Class A driving exp. (877)258-
8782 www.drive4melton.com
Drivers-HIRING EXPERI-
ENCED / INEXPERIENCED
TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up
to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo
Tractors! 1 year OTR experi-
ence required. Tanker training
available. Call Today:
(877)882-6537.
www.OakleyTransport.com
Drivers/Class A Flatbed.
GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to
.39 cents/mile. Late model
equipment & big miles! 1 year
OTR Flatbed experience. Call
(800)572-5489 x227.
SunBelt Transport
Transfer Drivers: Need 20
Contract Drivers, CDL A or B
to relocate vehicles to and
from various locations through-
out US-No forced dispatch.
(800)501-3783.
www.mamotransportation.com
PUT

CLASSIFIED

TO WORK FOR

YOU!

Call Lake Wales

863-6763467


3000


NOTICES

3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
ADVERTISE IN OVER 100
PAPERS throughout Florida
for One Low Rate. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
ALLIED HEALTH career train-
ing-Attend college 100%
online. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
(800)481-9409 www.Centu-
raOnline.com
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Busi-
ness, *Paralegal, *Comput-
ers, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Com-
puter available. Financial Aid if
qualified. Call (877) 203-
3179,
www.CenturaOnline.com
BANKRUPTCY, FORECLO-
SURE DEFENSE, Consumer
Rights. Peter Kelegian, Attor-
ney at Law, Gainesville, Flori-
da. Free no obligation consul-
tation. Serving counties
throughout North Florida.
(352)672-6444. peter@kele-
gianlaw.com #702706
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE
FREE VACATION VOUCHER UNIT-
ED BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION
Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer
Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing, Fast,
Non-Runners Accepted, 24/7
(888)468-5964.
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE FREE VACATION
VOUCHER UNITED BREAST
CANCER FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast Can-
cer Info www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Fast, Non-Runners
Accepted, 24/7 (888)468-
5964.
GET YOUR AD NOTICED
HERE And in Over 100
Papers throughout Florida for
One Low Rate. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
HORSE LOVERS MAKE $$
FOR YOURSELF OR CHARI-
TY. HOLD A COMPETITIVE
TRAIL CHALLENGE. CALL
ACTHA AT (877)99-
ACTHA(22842) OR VISIT
WWW.ACTHA.US GREAT FUN,
GREAT $$$
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789

IT'S NEVER
BEEN EASIER!







,\\ 0


Searching for a new car, home or just something
to do this weekend? Make it easy on yourself.
Subscribe to The Polk County Democrat
and get o wealth of information available
at your fingertips every day.
The Polk County Democrat
863-533-4183


3060 SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-
Train for hands on Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial
aid if qualified Housing avail-
able. CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance 866-314-
6283

AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONICS NOW TRAINING
PILOTS! Financial aid if qual-
ified. Job placement assis-
tance. Call National Aviation
Academy! FAA Approved.
Classes Starting Soon! 1-
800-659-2080 NAA.edu
ENTRY LEVEL at Home
Training Customer Service,
A+, Network+, Security+ No
experience needed Job
Placement Assistance Must
Have HS Diploma/GED Start
Immediately! sctrain.edu 1-
888-872-4677
MEDICAL CAREERS begin
here. Train ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical Manage-
ment. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV authorized. Call 888-
203-3179 www.CenturaOn-
line.com
NURSING CAREERS begin
here Get trained in months,
not years. Financial aid if qual-
ified. Housing available. Job
Placement assistance. Call
Centura Institute (888)220-
3178

3090 LOST & FOUND

Bartow, found Yorkie in
the area of Richland Manor.
Call to identify. 863-698-
1440.
LOST Himalayan Brown &
Beige Cat with bright Blue
Eyes. Lost near Lake Warren
Subdivision near Purran
Street At West Grove. Reward
for return. 258-0851

4000


FINANCIAL

4010 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
$150,000 +/yr. Potential
Turn Key Online Sales & Mar-
keting Wealth Creation Sys-
tem. No Selling to Family &
Friends Start In 24 hrs.
www.thel50Kgameplan.com
DO YOU EARN $800.00 IN
A DAY? Your Own Local
Candy Route 25 Machines
and Candy All for $9995.00
All Major Credit Cards Accept-
ed (877)915-8222
AINB02653
FREE Program on How to
Get Rich. Go to www.Your-
WishisYourCommand.com for
FREE offer. It's the Secret
Behind The Secret, today's
Think and Grow Rich!
GANA DINERO SIN DES-
CUIDAR TU HOGAR Con El
Lider En Ventas Por Catalogo
De Products Para El Hogar.
Pide Tu CATALOG GRATIS.
1.877.426.2627
www.intimahogar.com
Investors Outstanding
and immediate returns in
Equipment leasing for oilfield
industry. Immediate lease out.
Tax benefits and high returns.
We need more equipment!
(800)491-9029


4010 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
Investors Outstanding
and immediate returns in
equipment leasing for frac
industry. Immediate lease out.
Tax benefits and high returns.
We need more equipment!
(800)491-9029
4020 FINANCIAL/MISC.
$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
Cash Now!! Injury Lawsuit
Dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++ within
48/hours? Low rates Apply
Now By Phone! 1-800-568-
8321. www.lawcapital.com
CASH NOW! Cash for your
structured settlement or annu-
ity payments. Call J.G. Went-
worth (866) 494-9115. Rated
A+ by the Better Business
Bureau.
FREE DEBT SOLUTION. End
Foreclosure and Debt Collec-
tions within 90 Days. No Pay-
ments, No Bankruptcy, and
No Settlements. Guaranteed
Since 1993. (800)477-9256
www.zerodebtguaranteed.co
m

4080 LOANS / MORTGAGES
Access Reverse Mortgage!
Florida-based: Application &
closing in your home. Experi-
ence: almost 1,000 reverse
mortgages funded. Award-
winning customer service.
BBB A rating. NMLS #4566.
1(800)806-7126

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES

5090 HEATING & AIR


2-TON -13 SEER SYS-
TEM
$1,490* ** INSTALL YOUR-
SELF
OR WE CAN (ADDmoNAL $650)
STATE UC. & Is. CACA44874
*SALES AX EXcRA**FREE DELKV
100% FINANCING AVAILABLE
TQB, 941-465-5208
WINTER IS COMING
Heaters Patio "gun"type -
House 863-635-3824.

5110 LAWN/GARDEN & TREE
CLEARANCE SALE Orchids,
Palms, other Plants, Plus &
Pots 635-3824
GOING OUT OF BUSI-
NESS
Oak Tree Nursery. 20ft
trees $15-$25, 8-10ft trees
$5-$10. Plus Roses-Ties-
Pineapples.
863-635-6399

5115 LEGAL SERVICES
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
5120 MEDICAL SERVICES

VIAGRA/ CIALIS!
Save $500.00! Get 40
100mg/20mg Pills, for
only-$99! +4-Bonus Pills
FREE! #1 Male
Enhancement. Discreet
Shipping. Buy The Blue
Pill Now
1- 888-800-1280


ADVERTISE!


5120 MEDICAL SERVICES
ATTENTION DIABETICS with
Medicare. Get a Free Talking
Meter and diabetic testing
supplies at No Cost, plus Free
home delivery! Best of all,
this meter eliminates painful
finger pricking! Call 888-377-
3536
Canada Drug Center is
your choice for safe and
affordable medications.
Our licensed Canadian mail
order pharmacy will provide
you with savings of up to 90
percent on all your medication
needs. Call Today 888-372-
6740 for $10.00 off your first
prescription and free ship-
ping. Prescriptions Dis-
pensed from Canada are Dis-
pensed by: Health One Phar-
macy. License Number:
21791
Extra Diabetic Test Strips?
We Pay More! Most Major
Brands Bought, Volume Sell-
ers Welcome CALL TODAY!
800-284-0283
Major Medical, Dental, Vision
Health Insurance
Turned down for health
-diaetes, heart attack,
cancer or?
Guaranteed Issue- Health
This is NOT a discount Plan
Medicare Supplements
Medicare Advantage Plans
Medicare Disability Under 65

Wayne Carroll Agency
141 E Central Ave Ste 200
2nd floor, Winter Haven
(in Colonial Bank)
863-289-5189

5230 MISCELLANEOUS
$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen
on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit
Dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++within 48/hrs?
Low rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321 www.lawcapi-
tal.com

LAWSUIT CASH
Auto Accident? All Cases
Qualify. Get CASH
before your case settles!
Fast Approval. Low Fees.
(866) 709-1100 or
www.glofin.com
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ -- L*^^^^^^^^S*^


Searchng fra new car,
hom e orjlstsom ethiag to
do thiw eekend?M ake it
easy on youza2elSubscabe
today and getaw ealth of
inifo atin avalbbe at
yourfngertis.
S FrostpDroofN ews
The FortM eade Leader
The Lake W aes N ew s
The Polk County Dem ocrat
CallTodato Subscrbe!
863-676-3467 or
863-533-4183


5230 MISCELLANEOUS
AT&T U-Verse for just
$29/mo! BUNDLE & SAVE
with AT&T Internet+Phone+TV
and get a FREE pre-paid Visa
Card! (Select plans). HURRY,
CALL NOW! 800-327-5381

Bundle & Save on your
Cable, Internet Phone, And
More. High Speed Internet
starting at less than $20/mo.
Call Now! 800-364-0861
DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
WANTED!!! Get the Most
Cash, up to $27 per box!
Shipping Paid! Must be
Sealed & Unexpired. CM
Tony 813-528-1480 tonytest-
strips@hotmail.com
DISH Network. Starting at
$19.99/month PLUS 30 Pre-
mium Movie Channels FREE
for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask
About SAME DAY Installation!
CALL- 888-418-9787
Every baby deserves a
healthy start. Join more than
a million people walking and
raising money to support the
March of Dimes. The walk
starts at marchforbabies.org.
*REDUCE YOUR CABLE
BILL!* Get a 4-Room All-Digi-
tal Satellite system installed
for Free and programming
starting at $19.99/mo. Free
HD/DVR upgrade for new
callers, Call Now. 1-800-795-
7279
ROTARY MEMBERS are 1
worldwide network of inspired
individuals who improve com-
munities. For more informa-
tion visit www.rotary.org. This
message provided by Paper-
Chain and your local commu-
nity paper.
SOCIAL SECURITY DIS-
ABILITY BENEFITS. WIN or
Pay Nothing! Start Your Appli-
cation In Under 60 Seconds.
Call Today! Contact Disability
Group, Inc. Licensed Attor-
neys & BBB Accredited. Call
888-903-1353

SWIM SPA LOADED! Brand
New with Warranty, 3 Pumps,
LED lighting, Ozone Deluxe
Cover, maintenance free cab-
inet. Retails for $18,900.
Sacrifice $8995. Can deliver.
727-851-3217

$$$ We Buy Diabetic Test
Strips $$$ HIGHEST $$$
Paid. Deal with the Pros!! Get
paid in 24 hours. Free Quik
quote. 772-263-0425
www.Traderjackproducts.com
/strips

6000






MERCHANDISE

6012 GARAGE SALES
BABSON PARK, Sat. Nov. 3,
7am-3pm. 771 Ohlinger Rd.,
off Cody Villa Rd. Christmas
dishes, cloth & linen napkins,
antique table linens, mens &
women large size clothes.
25% of earnings go to Locks,
of Love.
Estate, large women sizes,
furn., appliances, house
hold goods. Nov. 9th &
10th, 7 til 3:00. 795 Shady
Lane.
FLORA LAKES BAZAAR, Fri'
day November 2, 7AM-3PM,
Saturday November 3, 7AM-
1PM. ACROSS THE STREET
FROM THE BARTOW CIVIC
CENTER. Serving Lunch and
Coffee.
Classified = Sales


Page 7


CLASSIFIED


October 31, 2012







PageI 8 I S I I D c o e 1 2 1


6012 GARAGE SALES
Garage Sale Nov. 1, 2,
and 3 7:30 to 3:30.
Tools, fishing, collectibles,
tupperware, depression
glass, china, dining/serving,
crafts, linens, electronics,
media, appliances, clothing,
jewelry, cosmetics, patio
equipment, gas grill, rocker,
cabinet sewing machine,
games/toys, health aids.
Cash Only. 748 S. Lake
Reedy Blvd., Frostproof.


6012 GARAGE SALES
Lake Wales Fri. & Sat.,
8:30-12:00, 5030 Polk
Street, S. Lake Wales, near
Warner University, motorized
bicycle, tools, clothing, boat,
fishing gear, misc. items.
Multi-Family Yard Sale,
2811 Tindel Camp Rd, 11/1-
11/3 8-3. collectables, furni-
ture, boat & motor, 3000 PSI
pressure washer, rods &
reels, tools, lots to choose
from! I


6020 AUCTIONS
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net


6020 AUCTIONS
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net


6180 HEAVY/CONST.
EQUIPMENT
SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -
SPRING SALE Cut lumber
any dimension, anytime.
MAKE MONEY and SAVE
MONEY In stock ready to ship.
Starting at $995.00
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/
300N (800)578-1363
Ext.300N


I sdverti-se Today


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Frostproof News Bell: Six months il go

6 I u idg:,.., ........ "i ,"' ,.arg'd i--
6, including city employee, charged in gi ,:


About $1,650 in fuel stolen according to sheri




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6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE

2010 Dodge Grand
Caravan Wheelchair Van
with 10" lowered floor;
wheelchair ramp; wheelchair
tie downs. 813-569-
0729
Bartow Gas heater, like
new, $350., OBO; Table &
chairs like new, cost $1,500,
take $400., OBO. 863-595-
8686.
MOVING must sell before
Nov. 15., small chest freezer,
wooden glass china cabinet,
misc. 863-943-4391


6270 WANTED TO
SBUY/TRADE
1992 Fort Meade High
School Annual. Good Cond.
Will pay top $$ if not written


T, I i 1 l...l.... ... .. ,
Wales NeWS

\LatiiicI hoo C unty Democrat
( .1" tt.1 C,,^ ;>'d ,s,, / ,,* ,\,,l,,./,ii>,, ,,.,,v .'ll 75 0 !

G k


863-559-1339

BUYING
GOLD, SILVER,
COINS, JEWELRY
Highest Prices In History!
ANY CONDITION
WE BUY IT ALL, and Pay So Much
We Almost Want to Cry. You, of
Course, Will Laugh With Glee!!
See PHIL at the former
HOLLY'S ARMY NAVY STORE
3440 Ave G NW
Winter Haven
Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm
Call first to confirm I'm there
863-299-6031
Our 33rd Year.

7000






TRANSPORTATION

7260 AUTOS WANTED
All autos bought with or with-
out title any condition, year,
make or model. We pay up to
$20,000 and offer free towing
call: 813-703-7297
CASH FOR CARS!
We Buy ANY Car, Truck
or Van! Running or Not.
Get a FREE Top Dollar
INSTANT Offer NOW!
1-800-558-1097
We're Local!
CASH FOR CARS: All
Cars/Trucks Wanted. Run-
ning or Not! Top Dollar Paid.
We Come To You! Any
Make/Model. Call For Instant
Offer: 1-800-871-9638
7333 MISC. BOATS
JON BOAT, 14ft. 6hp John-
son w/ galvanized trailer. 28#
thurst trolling motor. Live well.
$1200 Call 863-899-2648.
7360 CYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS
2001 Honda CBR F41 600
motorcycle. Runs great 17k
miles
863-285-8705. $2,800
7370 CAMPERS/
TRAVELTRAILERS
TRAVEL TRAILER, 33ft
Cougar 302RLS, double slide,
queen bed, rear living room.
Like new! Lots of extras! 231-
633-0024. (Haines City)


ClaNeedassifiedjob?
Check The

Classified!


/) ---


Save 47% off






newsstand rate!






Call (863) 5334183


October 31, 2012


Page 8


CLASSIFIED


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