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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00587
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Creation Date: February 29, 2012
Publication Date: 10/24/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00587
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text






Visit us on the Internet at www.FrostproofNews.com


T hOctober 24,2012



Frostproof News


Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years


Volume 32 Number 39


USPS NO 211-260


750


Frostproof, Polk County Florida 33843


EARLY VOTING
Vote Early: Eight locations open from
origin****OR1GIN MIXED ADC 335
,205 SMA LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTO
[205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
SPO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 326117007

* Lake Wales Library, 290 Cypress Garden Lane, Lake Wales
* Mulberry City Hall, 104 S. Church Ave., Mulberry
* Winter Haven Courthouse, Gil Jones Plaza, 3425 Lake Alfred
Road, Winter Haven

Copyright 2012 Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.


Why doesn't everyone vote?



Perennial question debated at roundtable


By MARY CANNADAY
MCANNADAY@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
The Issue:
It's a question that has
political devotees and
scholars scratching their
heads. "Why don't people
vote?"
In a country where the
freedom to cast a ballot is
considered a right, why Burton
are citizens not lining up
outside the polling places, as do those
in more repressive countries, some-
times risking their lives to vote?
Seven people invested in the vot-
ing process through one capacity or
another gathered Oct. 10 at a Sun Coast
media roundtable to pose their theo-
ries on the issue and to offer possible
solutions.
The Players:
Participants in the
roundtable included
Colleen Burton, commu-
nity engagement manager
with the Central Florida
Regional Planning Council
Nelson who also ran opposite Lori
Edwards in the primary for
Supervisor of Elections. We
also spoke with Lori Edwards individu-
ally. Due to poll worker training, she
could not attend the roundtable.
Also weighing in were Jimmy-Nelson,
chairman of the Republican Party of
Polk County; Joe Bowyer, president of
the Greater Winter Haven Democratic
Club and his wife Dolores, both orga-
nizers of the Florida Alliance for Retired
Americans.
Ruth Ann Eaddy, Director of
Candidate Recruitment
and Campaigns for the
Democratic Executive .. **
Committee was part of the
roundtable, as well as two
people who have tire-
lessly worked to register Joe Bowyer
voters: Mary Jo Jarrett
of the League of Women
Voters and William Moure, Civic Action
Coordinator for the Lake Wales NAACP


The Discussion:
The roundtable took place two days
after voter registration cutoff, and
attention turned to getting out the vote
among the 345,930 citizens on the rolls
as of Oct. 1.
The turnout in the
general election of 2008
was one of the highest
in recent history, with 64
percent of the electorate
turning out, compared to Dolores
47 percent in 2006 (in PolkBowyer
County) according to the
Polk Supervisor of Elections office.
Early voting in Polk proved popular in
the 2010 elections, with 23,000 vot-
ers lining up at early voting sites and
40,000 voting by mail. According to Judy
Walker of the elections office, those
numbers are expected to more than
double this year.
But why are the numbers not closer
to 100 percent? For example, in the
2012 primary, six local
positions were decided
by only 18.92 percent of
voters. These key positions
were Clerk of the Courts,
Elections Supervisor,
Property Appraiser, County
Eaddy Commission seat three,
Circuit Judge group 27 and
County Judge group five.
Moderator, Editor Jeff Roslow, got
the ball rolling, asking "How do we get
people to the polls, and who should
take the lead in this effort?" Burton
noted that at a recent seminar she
had attended, Susan McManus, of the
University of South Florida, said "People
make their voting decisions by listen-
ing to people they know. Most of the
time when people vote, they have no
first-hand knowledge of the
issues."
"In getting people out to ,
do almost anything, it takes
an invitation from some-
one you know and trust,"
Burton said. "We have a
myriad of non-political en- Jarrett
titles that could encourage
people to vote." She mentioned civic
clubs, social clubs, schools, the business
community and parents, among others.


PHOTO BY KATHY LEIGH BERKOWITZ
Those who were invited to the roundtable shared ideas as to how to combat voter apathy. From
left is Colleen Burton, Jimmy Wells, William Moure, Dolores Bowyer, Joe Bwoyer, Ruth Ann Eaddy
and Mary Jo Jarrett. Sitting at the head of the table is moderator Jeff Roslow


"Obama's big win in 2008 came from
students reaching out to students," she
added.
Burton noted that the
Catholic church she at-
tends had for the first time
this year urged people to
vote.
Edwards, in a separate
interview, cited the three Moure
top reasons people give for
not voting, taken from the
2010 U.S. Census. Number one reason
was that they are too busy to vote, or
have a schedule conflict. Number two;
the voter is disabled, ill or has family
issues. Number three, and the one
Edwards says she hears most often out
in the community is that they are not
interested or they feel their vote doesn't
count. Early voting or mail-in ballots,
both available in Polk, can help alleviate
the first two barriers, she said.
Jarrett was of the opinion that taking
civics classes out of the schools had
damaged young people's knowledge of
government and of voting as civic duty.
"We have to make young voters aware


QUESTION 123


TODAY'S
CONTENTS





7 2 000251111 8
7 05252 '00025 8


Calendar................Page 2
Editorial ................ Page 4
Obituaries ............. Page 6
County Report...... Page 8
Sports .................. Page 14
Feeling Fit........... Page 29


'Everyone

gets to vote'
By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
Everyone who is registered to vote
will get to vote.
That is what Polk
County's Supervisor of
Elections Lori Edwards
told poll workers dur-
ing a training session
Oct. 16.
"The fact of the mat-
ter is everyone get to \Edwards
vote," she told about 40
people at the class and volunteered
to sit in the precincts on Election
Day. "If they have no identification,
they see Voter Information Specialist
and they will have ballots to give
them. No one can turn people away
from voting."
Once a person in question has
VOTE123


Hazel Mary Grace
Alexander passes
away at age 101


S6


I





Page 2 Frostproof News


and


* FRIDAY, OCT. 26
Halloween Murder Mystery
The Ramon will host "Clued In To
Murder" in a special Halloween-themed
murder mystery dinner theater event.
Prizes will be given out to the best cos-
tumes, which are optional. Cost is $30
per person which includes dinner. Call
the Ramon at 863-635-7222 for tickets,
or go to www.ramontheater.com.
High School Football
The Frostproof Bulldogs return to
Faris Brannen Stadium and will host
Tenoroc in a non-district game starting
at 7 p.m. Admission.

* SATURDAY, OCT. 27
Trick or Treat
Official Trick or Treat time in
Frostproof will be from 6 to 8 p.m.


Oct. 27, per a resolution approved by
the city commission.

* FRIDAY, NOV. 2
First Friday Artwalk
The Frostproof Art League will host
its second ever First Friday Artwalk, a
downtown event featuring local artists
with their works. Many downtown busi-
nesses stay open for the evening event
too. And, hopefully, Mother Nature
cooperates better than it did for the
inaugural event in October. Call 863-
635-7271 for more information.

FRIDAY NOV. 2
High School Football
A playoff berth could be on the
line at Faris Brannen Stadium as the
Frostproof Bulldogs host Lakeland
Christian in a Class 3A, District 6


contest. Kickoff is at 7 p.m. Admission.

N SATURDAY, NOV. 3
39-mile yard sale
Municipalities, businesses and hom-
eowners along State Road 17, popularly
known as Scenic Highway, will host
a 39-mile yard sale, starting at 8 a.m.
Frostproof people wishing to participate
can set up booths along East Wall Street
which will be closed to vehicle traffic
during the event.

E MONDAY, NOV. 5
City Council
The Frostproof City Council regularly
meets on the first and third Monday of
each month. However, the meeting for
the first Monday in November has been
cancelled. The next regularly scheduled
meeting will be on Nov. 19.


N SATURDAY, NOV. 10
Craft Show
First United Methodist Church of
Frostproof is holding a craft show Nov.
10. Tables may be rented at
$5 each and the event is open to
the public. Deadline for renting tables
is Nov. 3. For more information, call
863-635-3107.





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October 24, 2012


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Pae4Frs-oo esOcoe 2,21


VIEWPOINT


Rooney for District 17 U.S. House


Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Rooney, who has rep-
resented Florida's 16th District in the U.S. House of
Representatives since 2008, faces Democratic chal-
lenger Will Bronson in the Nov. 6 general election
for the newly drawn District
17, which encompasses all of
Hardee, DeSoto, Highlands,
Okeechobee, Glades, and ..
Charlotte counties and portions
of Polk, Manatee, Hillsborough, I .
and Lee counties. .
After living in Palm Beach .. -
County during his first two
terms, Rooney has said he will
move his main office to Punta
Gorda and live in the new
district, probably in Charlotte
County, if reelected to the
House.
Rooney's position on the
House Agricultural Committee and his support of the
passage of a long-stalled comprehensive farm bill is
important to this area and its ag industry. As federal
biofuel policies evolve away from a dependence of
corn as the primary source for ethanol, Florida farm-
ers will gain access to a new market for crops such as
sorghum. Rooney's influence on non-corn ethanol
quotas and biofuel research and development will be
critical.
Like his previous district, the new District 17 is


Our Viewpoint
expansive and Rooney has demonstrated a commit-
ment to reaching out to constituents, being respon-
sive to their concerns and keeping in touch with local
officials. As we noted during his primary challenge,
Rooney was a key player in the funding of U.S. 17,
which runs through the heart of the new district. The
roadway will give him a prime vantage point to gauge
how federal policies impact everything from eco-
nomic development to education to the environment.
Bronson is a newcomer to Florida politics, running
his first campaign here, but he is a veteran of three
congressional contests in Massachusetts and Georgia.
A former Republican, he switched parties in response
to the launching of the Iraq War and has developed
an antipathy for the way banks and other corpora-
tions have redistributed wealth from the middle class
to the 1 percent he accuses of "gaming the system" for
their benefit.
A Navy veteran who later flew for Delta Airlines,
Bronson became a Episcopalian minister after his
retirement. Staunchly defensive of guns right, he is
just as fierce in his beliefs about what he feels are
rampant abuses of civil liberties by post-9/11 stat-
utes. He criticized Rooney for his support of a bill that
restricts where protesters can gather when the Secret
Service is operating in an area. He shares our view
that Rooney overreached in signing onto what he


called the "infamous Bachmann letter" that he called
a "McCarthyite witch hunt for Muslim Brotherhood
influence in our government." Bronson said Rooney's
opposition to climate change policies puts coastal
residents and communities at
risk for rising sea levels and
extreme weather cycles.
Bronson is a passionate and
.-' 1 intelligent man, who cares
S deeply about a wide range of
issues, locally, nationally and
globally. He is frank about
his political conversion and
undaunted by running against
an incumbent in a traditionally
conservative area of Florida.
We were impressed with
Will Bronson Bronson's intellect, passion
and frankness. Rooney has
deftly negotiated politically turbulent waters in his
two terms, maintaining a problem-solving approach
to the job that serves his constituents and com-
munities well. He needs to lead his fellow moderate
Republicans away from the damaging brinksmanship
some in the party have flirted with in recent years.
Divided governments in the past haven't devolved
into dysfunction as this one has. That must change
and we believe Rooney can play a role.
We recommend Tom Rooney for the District 17 seat
in the U.S. House of Representatives.


Letters to the editor


Polk treats manufactured

housing unfairly


I live in a Manufactured Home
Community in Lake Wales, a 55+ park,
along with other seniors. For 2012, our
park received a tax increase of $34,688,
along with an increased value assess-
ment of 66 percent. This was in addition
to the $104,509 we paid in 2011. While
you may think all of these taxes are paid
by the park owner, think again; every
dollar of tax increase is passed thru
to the senior residents as part of their
leased land agreements. It is we senior
residents who pay the taxes.
This huge tax increase of $34,688 was
caused because some large conglomer-
ate bought up nine of these manufac-
tured home communities counties here
in Polk County. While I realize the tax
accessor's office was following the law
in having to reevaluate all manufac-
tured home communities as to their
new value, based on what these nine
sold for, there is no justifiable reason
for the failure of Marsha Faux's office
not petitioning the State for relief or
adjustment from these required tax
assessments. Further, this increase hit
only the manufactured home com-
munities, not site-built home sites, not
agriculture, not business, etc.
We seniors live in these 55+ com-
munities for a few simple reasons:


affordability, ease of maintenance, se-
curity, companionship, community, etc.
These nine recently sold parks changed
ownership mainly because the interest
rates are so low, allowing the purchaser
extremely low financing. The govern-
ment always seems to be looking for
new groups to exempt from taxes. Look
at the Homestead exemption increases
on this year's election ballots. And with
the park owner being the ones who col-
lects and pays these taxes as part of the
leased-land rent agreements, he gets
to deduct them and reduce his federal/
business taxes. In addition, we residents
are double taxed the tax we pay in our
rents, and the tax we have to pay the
DMV every year for our manufactured
homes. On top of all this, manufactured
home values have been dropping
significantly. My home is worth far less
than I paid for it just four years ago so
I am "under water" and therefore can't
afford to sell it? So our homes values are
way down and yet our taxes go way up.
Something is very wrong here.
Contrary to popular belief, seniors
don't have an unending supply of
money. What we have, we worked for,
and saved for, and we didn't go out and

HILLIARD 5


St. Pete mayor shouldn't be

playing hardball with the Rays


I'm sitting in a comfortable chair with
a libation watching Prince Fielder catch
a pop-up and then the delirious cel-
ebration. It's going to be a chilly World
Series in Detroit.
When the Tigers come here to
Lakeland for spring training, the an-
nouncer always makes a point of telling
the short-sleeved crowd the tempera-
ture back in Detroit 46 degrees, 52,
something like that.
As a baseball fan, I know it's good
for the game that the Tigers won the


B Cary McMullen







pennant historic franchise that's seen
McMULLEN 5


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
*Aileen Hood General Manager Paul Northrop Sales Manager Jeff Roslow Editor Brian Ackley Managing Editor


Published every Wednesday at
14 W. Wall Street, Frostproof, FL 33843
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Frostproof, Florida and
additional Entry Office
*Phone (863) 676-3467 -Fax (863) 678-1297
Postmaster: Send address changes to
140 E. Stuart Ave.,
Lake Wales, FL 33853-4198


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUN-T'
Six Months ..... .$25.68 One Year......... ..$41 73
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNTY MAIL
Six Months...................$24.00 One Year........................$39.00
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
Six Months....................$40.00 One Year. ........................$65.00
OUT OF STATE SUBSCRIPTION
Six Months....................$44.00 One Year.........................$72.00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frostproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews.com or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
Wales Fl. 33853.


October 24, 2012


Page 4 Frostproof News










Area race for state house seat draws scorn, money


By STEVE BOUSQUET
TIMES/HERALD TALLAHASSEE BUREAU

TALLAHASSEE The Florida
Democratic Party's decision to pro-
duce hard-hitting mailers highlight-
ing Republican Rep. Mike Homer's
alleged link to a brothel, after he
resigned, is generating partisan ten-
sions among House members.
The Democratic Party says it stands
by the mailers, even though incoming
House Democratic caucus leader Rep.
Perry Thurston told House Democrats
to avoid discussing the matter
publicly.
The race features Democrat Eileen
Game, an Avon Park resident who
said she will move to Frostproof
should she win, against Mike LaRosa,
whose name doesn't even appear
on the ballot. The district includes
southeastern Polk as well as Osceola
County.
Horner, a Republican from


HILLIARD
FROM PAGE 4

buy a brand new home and brand new
car as soon as we got married. No, we
SAVED for that, and worked our butts
off so we could rest a little in our senior
years and have a meal out every now
and then. The taxes may not seem like
much to the average person, but we
have people in our park who have to
choose whether they will eat or pay
their increased rent because of these
taxes and many are widows and widow-
ers. They didn't choose this, but a loss


MCMULLEN
FROM PAGE 4
hard times lately and all that. It's no
doubt a morale-booster for the folks
in an area that needs bucking up, and
it likely will be good for Lakeland's
economy to have the American League
champs maybe even the World Series
champs in town in March.
But I'm a bit grumpy right now
because none of the teams to which
I'm loyal, chiefly the Tampa Bay Rays,
are still in the playoffs. The Rays'
front office has no one to blame but
themselves, stubbornly sitting on an
overflowing basket of pitching that they
could have used as trade bait to get
what they so desperately need, a reli-
able hitter. But that's a baseball deci-
sion. They face an even more troubling
business situation.
My wife and I make it over to St.


Kissimmee, immediately announced
on Sept. 24 he would not seek re-
election after his name was found on
a client list at an Orlando brothel. He
has not been charged with a crime.
The Republican Party named
LaRosa as the replacement candidate
in House District 42 in Osceola and
Polk counties. But Homer's resigna-
tion came too late to remove his
name from the ballot, so voters who
support LaRosa will have to vote for
Horner on their ballots.
State Democrats then flooded the
district with two mail pieces telling
voters to "put an end to the embar-
rassment," that "enough is enough"
and that "Rep. Mike Horner is linked
to a brothel" and an "alleged prosti-
tution operation."
"I'm disappointed in what I would
consider an intellectually dishonest
mail piece, considering the fact that
Mike Horner is no longer a candi-
date," said Rep. Will Weatherford,


of their partner, steady inflation and
the drop in interest rates have made it
so. A lot of our seniors are back working
or looking for work when they should
not have to, just to make ends meet.
Am I upset? You bet I am. And just
because the County Commissioners
delayed that ridiculous Stormwater
tax for another year doesn't mean it is
dead. Our park's assessment this year
for Stormwater would have been yet
another tax of $19,611, making a one-
year tax increase of $54,299. At least,
due to public pressure, the county
commissioners had the sense to back
off.
And who knows what they will come


Petersburg about once a season to
see a game, and therein lies part of
the reason the Rays are a struggling
franchise, the wizardry of manager Joe.
Maddon notwithstanding. To restate
the obvious, they need a more central
location.
It doesn't take a marketing genius
to figure out that with a better and
more easily accessible stadium than
Tropicana Field, the Rays would draw
more fans, be in a stronger financial
situation and better able to compete
for free-agent players. Better play
would draw even more fans. It would
be a virtuous cycle.
But the Rays are tied by contract
to the Trop until 2027, and so far St.
Petersburg Mayor Bill Foster has -
pardon the pun played hardball with
the Rays and their centrally located
suitors, Hillshorough County. He has
threatened to sue if the Rays so much
as talk to anyone outside the city of St.


R-Wesley Chapel, the incoming
House speaker. "I would never, and
will never, defend the actions that
he took, but to continue to pile on is
wrong."
The mailers state that they are paid
for by the Florida Democratic Party
and are so-called three-pack ads
benefiting three House Democrats,
one of whom is Thurston, of Fort
Lauderdale.
Three-pack ads allow political
parties to exceed the $50,000 ex-
penditure cap by a party to a single
candidate.
Within hours of Homer's resigna-
tion last month, a House Democratic
staff member sent an email to House
Democrats that said, "Rep. Thurston
requests that if contacted in regard
to the (Horner) situation, none of our
members make comment. There is
nothing we need to add at this time."
Thurston said no one in the
Democratic Party showed him the


up with again next year.
We are seniors, we are Americans, we
always pay our fair share, that is our
way. We contribute to our area, both
economically and with volunteerism.
We seniors don't ask for anything other
than what we have earned. But realize,
we aren't dumb and we certainly aren't
senile. The County is WRONG on this
situation. True, they may have been
following the law in true government
bureaucratic fashion. But If Ms. Faux
and her staff truly cared for the Polk Co.
seniors, they should have immediately
seen this situation arising, and peti-
tioned the State on these methods of
assessment and gotten an exemption.


Pete about the possibility of playing
some day in a stadium somewhere on
the other side of the Howard Frankland
Causeway.
In the latest incident, according to
the Tampa Bay Times, St. Pete City
Attorney John Wolfe sent a letter to
Hillsborough County's attorneys on
Oct. 18 pointedly stating that the city
would regard "any discussions with
the Rays about stadium locations,
regardless of how couched, as tortuous
interference" with its contract with
the club. Talk about a jealous partner.
Foster reminds me of the kind of guy.
who shoots his wife for saying hello to
the mailman.
The Rays have made it clear, and the
attendance numbers back them up,
that all their fine efforts on the field are
not going to be enough to save baseball
in the Tampa Bay area if they continue
to be bound to the Trop. This is the
inconvenient truth Foster is studiously


mailers before they went to voters.
Under state election law, candidates
mentioned in party "three-pack"
ads are not required to approve the
content under a change made last
year by the Republican-controlled
Legislature. "I either would not
have approved it or would not have
approved my name being associated
with it," he said. "I'm not trying to
pass the buck, but I was not aware of
this particular ad."
In a statement, Democratic Party
executive director Scott Arceneaux
said: "The facts are the facts. Mike
Horner was involved in a prostitution
scandal that disgraced himself, his
family and his party. Republicans
have yet to come clean about what
they knew and when they knew it."
Thurston said that when he learned
of the mailings, he phoned Horner to
say he had nothing to do with them.
He said he's optimistic that Game will
win the seat next month.


Instead, they took the easy way out,
followed those state guidelines to the
letter, crossed every "t," dotted every "i"
and screwed over the people who could
least afford it, with the old excuse of
"I'm just doing my job," or "I'm just fol-
lowing the law." This won't be forgotten
come Election Day.
If we want to continue to see people
move to Florida and support this state's
economy, then the tax assessors need
to grow some backbone and stand up
to the state of Florida when the regula-
tions don't make good sense. Thank
you.
Richard Hilliard
Lake Wales


ignoring. If things get bad enough, it's
possible that Major League Baseball
would use its considerable muscle to
pry the Rays out of Foster's death grip
and pack them off to another city.
All this makes me wonder if Foster
is being a tough politician, using the
Rays' contract with Tropicana as a
bargaining chip to get something in
return, or if he just has a death wish.
The former I could understand and
even respect. The latter would make
him out to be the kid who would smash
his favorite toy with a hammer rather
than share it.
If Foster has any aspirations to higher
office, he'll want to be the politician,
not the selfish kid.
Meanwhile, I'm hoping the Giants
win it all.
Cary McMullen is a journalist and
editor who lives in Lakeland. He can be
reached at cmcmullen@floridavoices.
com.


MOODY LAW


Frostproof News Page 5


October 24, 2012






Pa FrstrfNesOtbr2,01


Hazel Mary
Grace Alexander,
101, passed
away peace-
fully at home in
Lake Wales on
Saturday, Oct. 20,
2012.
Hazel Mary
was born in
Gardendale,
Texas, on March 9,
1911. Three years Hazel Mary Grace
later, her family Alexander
moved to East Glacier, Mont., where
her father served as the station agent
for the Great Northern Railroad.
Hazel Mary attended school in
Spokane, Wash., where she graduated
as valedictorian at 15.
The family then moved to St.
Augustine, Fla., and she enrolled in
Florida State College for Women in
Tallahassee. Following two years in
school, one year teaching to earn
enough money to finish her last year in
college and her final year, she gradu-
ated from Florida State College for
Women with a baccalaureate degree
in English at age 19. During her senior
year, she attended the Sorbonne in
Paris where she earned a certificate in
teaching Spanish and French. In 1931
she began teaching languages at the
Lake Wales High School where she also
served as class sponsor for numerous
classes, directed class plays, supervised
the publication of the school paper and
Crown Jewel yearbook, and advised the
Spanish Club.
In 1961 she retired to pursue other
interests with her husband, Hugh B.
Alexander, family and friends. Her
life was filled with countless interests
including reading, square dancing,
travelling and cooking. She loved music,
sang in church choirs and played piano
and organ.
Her artistic talents became apparent
in the creations she made in pouring
and painting porcelain, sewing, knit-
ting, needle pointing and quilting.
Throughout her life she shared her
talents by teaching others and inspiring
them to pursue excellence. She had an
indomitable spirit, a positive attitude
and set an incredible example for all
those with whom she came in contact.


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She loved and was devoted to her
family and students, inspiring each one
with the importance of learning and
encouraging each one to do their best.
Hazel Mary was a member of the
First Presbyterian Church of Frostproof.
Community activities included mem-
bership in the American Association
of University Women for over 50 years.
In 1996 she received the AAUW Lake
Wales' Branch Foundation Award.
During her AAUW presidency (1956-
1958), she led the successful effort to
build the building that still houses the
Lake Wales Library.
In 2006 Hazel Mary was the first
inductee into the Lake Wales High
School teachers Hall of Fame and was
named Pioneer of the Year by the Lake
Wales Historical Society.
In 2011, she was recognized by her
alma mater, FSU, with a brick naming
her a Centenarian installed at Westcott
Plaza.
Hazel Mary was preceded in death
by Hugh, her husband of 58 years, and
Robert Howard Grace, her brother.
She is survived by her sons, Jim
(Nancy) of Orange City, Fla., and John
(Sarah Jane) of Frostproof; seven
grandchildren, Rose Banwart (Geoff),
Hugh (Cathy), Roger (Anna), Sherry
Osman (Medhat), JD (Cindy), Laura
Grace, and Nancy Caswell (Lee); and
13 great-grandchildren, Christina,
Kimberly, Malcolm, Melanie, Audrey,
Spencer, Adam, Ameer, Britton, Keaton,
Lee, Grace and Sarah; four nephews,
Steve (Pam) Grace, John (Joan) Grace,
Don (Catherine) and Ken (Peggy)
Grace.
A memorial service to celebrate her
life and home going is Friday, Oct. 26 at
10 a.m. at the First Presbyterian Church
of Frostproof.
Visitation will follow the service.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be
made to the First Presbyterian Church
of Frostproof, PO. Box 126, Frostproof,
FL 33843, or to the Lake Wales Library,
290 Cypress Gardens Lane, Lake Wales,
FL 33853.
Condolences may be sent to the
family and the webcast of the service
can be viewed at www.marionnelson
funeralhome.com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


HD "Curly" Chavis, 70. of Babson
Park went home to be with the Lord
on Friday, Oct. 19, 2012, in Winter
Haven.
Curly was well known for his kind,
generous ways and his loving, caring
heart. At his 51 years of work at
Mini-Macs, he grew to love so many;
and was loved by so many. After
he retired, Curly continued to do
what he loved most, mowing lawns
and spending time with his two
great-granddaughters.
Curly was married to his beloved
wife of 49 years, Jeannie Chavis. He
loved to mow lawns and would give
the shirt off his back to absolutely
anyone. One thing anyone that knew
him would remember how he loved
to joke around and kid with every-
one. Everytime you turned around
he was pickin' on you!
He is survived by his wife, Jeannie;


Mary Ellen Hazlett Brimlow
Mary Ellen Hazlett Brimlow passed Gaetz Hendry and Derrick Luke; two
away on Friday, Oct. 19, 2012 at Heart stepsons, David and Michael Brimlow
of Florida Hospital in Davenport, Fla. and seven grandchildren.
She was born Feb. 19, 1955 and resided A gathering of friends will be held at
in Polk County most of her life. She was her parent's home in Lake Wales at 840
raised in Lake Wales and had lived in Cassleberry Drive on Thursday, Oct. 25
Frostproof for many years. from 2 to 5 p.m. A memorial service will
She is survived by her parents, Ellen be held at 6 p.m. on the same date at
and David Hazlett of Lake Wales; her Marion Nelson Funeral Home in Lake
husband, Joe Brimlow of Frostproof; Wales.
two brothers, Jeff and John Hazlett; Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
sister, Suzanne Lawson; children, Becky charge of arrangements.


Roberto G. Trevino


Roberto G. Trevino of Frostproof
passed away Wednesday, October 17,
2012 at the Florida Hospital Heartland


Medical Center in Sebring. He was
72. Marion Nelson Funeral Home,
Frostproof is handling arrangements.


Thelma Minshew
Thelma Minshew, 84, of Lake Wales,
Florida died on Monday, Oct. 15, 2012,
at The Groves Center.
Arrangements by Johnson Funeral
Home, Lake Wales.


Robert F. Atkins
Robert E Atkins, 83, of Lake Wales,
died on Tuesday, October 16, 2012, at
Astoria Heath in Winter Haven.
Arrangements by Johnson Funeral
Home, Lake Wales.


Hazel Mary Grace Alexander


HD 'Curly' Chavis


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brother, Daniel Chavis and wife,
Willene; sister, Shirley Peacock and
Ernest Manning; daughter, Lisa
Nespoli and husband, Ralph Nespoli;
sons, Kirby Chavis and wife, Lisa
Chavis, Mark Chavis and HD Chavis,
Jr; eight grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.
Curly was preceded in death by his
parents, Mary and Kirby Chavis; two
brothers, LB and Coley Chavis; and
one sister, Ottie Lee Odom.
The family will be receiving friends
from 6-8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, and
the memorial service will be held 1 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012, at the Marion
Nelson Funeral Home in Lake Wales.
Condolences may be sent to the
family and the webcast of the service
can be viewed at www.marionnelson
funeralhome.com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


October 24, 2012


Page 6 Frostproof News





By BRIAN ACKLEY
BACKLEY@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
There were more than a few days
when Carl Hadden felt like the Maytag
repair man.
Helping people find jobs in our
area was a lonely line of work, largely
because there were so few projects or
businesses that were actually looking for
good workers.
"I'm from this part of the county,"
Hadden said. "I know it's really tough
down here. There's a lot of jobs that
left. But between now and the end of
the year, there's well over 100 jobs here.
So people who want work, now there's
work. There's people here in South Polk
that are hiring so the challenge now is to
get those job seekers plugged into those
open jobs, and the Mobile One Stop is a
huge part of that puzzle. There's em-
ployers that want to hire people."
Two projects in particular are provid-
ing a local stimulus, but aren't the only
ones hiring.
"Streamsong, they have to hire 75
people in the next 60 days," Hadden
noted, "and these are jobs with benefits,
full time jobs, right in Fort Meade. And
there's a phosphate company in Fort
Meade that's hiring right now, high pay-
ing jobs with benefits. If they have the
skills, these are 20-plus dollars-an-hour
jobs."
And that's one of the reasons Polk
Works will be bringing its Mobile One
Stop to Frostproof on the third Thursday
of each month for the foreseeable
future, to bring local job seekers the
resources and information they need
directly to them.
Last week, there were nine local job
seekers inside the unit, getting various
kinds of help right before noon.
The MOS, which will be parked near
the Latt Maxcy Memorial Library and
is open from 9 a.m.-3 p.m, is crammed
full of resources, including more than a
dozen computers with internet access,


access to Microsoft Office products like
Word and Excel, a copy machine and
printer, and even a fax machine.
"If you've never seen it before, it's
really quite impressive," said Marybeth
Soderstrom, a community outreach co-
ordinator for Polk Works. "When I saw it
for the first time, I was literally amazed.
We have everything you would need for
your job search. Anything you need to
do on the computer, you can do."
Staff members will help those who
stop by develop and create a resume,
offer career counseling skills, and help
search for jobs online. There's actually
an office space where job candidates
can go through private mock job inter-
views to sharpen that skill as well.
And it's all free.
Mosaic's Streamsong resort is already
hiring, as is JDC Phosphate, which has
exclusively contracted with Polk Works
to cull applications and pre-screen job
seeker's skills before they are inter-
viewed, all at no cost to the employer or
employee.
"Ten years ago, there was no career
builder.com, no monster.com. You
walked in and filled out an application,"
Hadden said. "Now, everybody wants to
do it on line."
There is even a clothes locker avail-
able for job seekers who need a slight
wardrobe upgrade for interviews.
Stacy Hackworth, general manager
for the Ferguson Industries distribu-
tion warehouse, is a board member for
PolkWorks, and recently hired two new
employees through the group. They also
used Polk Works extensively when the
firm first came to Frostproof.
Hadden, who is a business services
consultant for PolkWorks, also said
there is grant money available to help
firms who are hiring, or for retraining
existing ones.
"We are aggressively looking for
opportunities," he said. "If you're going
to hire or train anyone, I should be your
first phone call."



The Polk Works Mobile One-Stop van will be in
Frostproof the third Thursday of each month
near the library.


PHOTOS BY BRIAN ACKLEY
Among the many features in the Mobile One Stop Career Center are 13 computers that people can
use to create resumes and search for jobs with the help of a Polk Works staffer.


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PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE
The City of Bartow and the Teamsters Local 79
representing the Bartow Fire Department bargaining unit
will meet on Friday, October 26, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. in the
City Commission Chambers located at 450 N. Wilson
Avenue, Bartow, Florida.
The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the pending labor
union contract.
If anyone decides to appeal any decision made by the
committee with respect to any other matter considered at
this meeting, he will need a record of the proceedings, and
for such purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and
F.S. 286.26, persons with disabilities needing special
accommodations to participate in this proceeding should
contact Linda R. Culpepper no later than five (5) days prior
to this proceeding at telephone number 863-534-0100 for
assistance; if hearing impaired call 1-800-955-8771 or voice
impaired call 1-800-955-8770 (VOICE) for assistance.
2796215


Frostproof News Page 7


October 24, 2012


Polk Works van can be gateway to local jobs


Nearby businesses filling 100 positions in next few months


j
"






I Prnyp8Fostroo Nws ctoer 4,,01


Health Department director resigns for new job


Dr Haight to hired for community health at Lakeland Regional Medical Center


The director of the Polk County
Health Department has resigned
his position as he was hired as the
Associate Vice President of Community
Health at the Lakeland Regional
Medical Center.
Dr. Daniel Haight, who ran the health
department for more than 16 years, will
start his new job on Nov. 19.
"Joining Lakeland Regional Medical
Center is an exciting opportunity. As
one of the largest health systems in the
state, people's lives are impacted every
day by highly trained professional and
compassionate staff," Haight said.
In his new position, Haight will
oversee major initiatives outlined in its
Community Benefit Plan to include
increasing access to healthcare for
non-emergencies, particularly for the
uninsured and underserved.
"And this new role combines


preventive health-
care, community
health, and a great
community institu-
tion that serves the
entire county and
beyond," said Haight.
Dr. Ulyee Choe
will serve as Interim
Health Department
Director when Haight Dr. Daniel Haight
leaves his position.
Choe is board certified in internal
medicine and infectious diseases. He is
currently an assistant professor at the
University of South Florida Division of
Infectious Disease and International
Medicine. He has been working very
closely with Haight on various health-
care initiatives and provides care in
the adult and HIV clinics at the Polk
County Health Department.


His areas of interest include health
promotion and preventative medicine.
Before Haight leaves the Health
Department, one final accomplish-
ment will occur in late November when
a decade-long effort to modernize
all health department sites will be
complete with the opening of the new
Haines City clinic.
"As part of my career development, it
is important for me to continue making
an impact on the health of Polk County
residents while still being involved in ac-
ademics," Haight said. "Joining Lakeland
Regional Medical Center is an exciting
opportunity. As one of the largest health
systems in the state, people's lives are
impacted every day by highly trained
professional and compassionate staff."
In his new position at LRMC, Haight
said he is pleased to still be connected to
the community as he wants to continue


serving it and he is also happy to be
serving in a hospital that is becoming a
teaching hospital and with his colleagues
committed to fostering a good partner-
ship with the Polk County community in
the transformation of healthcare.
"I share the vision of Lakeland
Regional's president and CEO, Dr.
Elaine Thompson, who says by com-
bining health education, community-
based preventive healthcare, and
exceptional delivery of care, Polk
County residents and visitors will
receive the best healthcare experience
available," he said.
Haight is board certified in internal
medicine and infectious diseases and
is also an associate professor at the
University of South Florida, Morsani
College of Medicine, Division of
Infectious Diseases and International
Medicine.


Counting down to 39 miles of treasure hunting


By DIANA WEBSTER-BIEHL
SPECIAL TO THE LAKE WALES NEWS

The 5th annual 39-Mile Yard Sale will be
on Saturday, Nov. 3, from 8 a.m. 2 p.m.
Residents as well as businesses
along the thirty-nine mile route are
setting up sales tables offering a wide
array of "finds" for the canny shopper.
Linda Ballou, who lives in Orlando,
shopped the entire route last year and
is planning to do it again this year. "It
makes for a fun day... and now it's an
annual tradition. There is so much to
see along the road... and of course,
really interesting things to see at the
sales. Oh, the temptations," she said.
DeDe Anderson of Haines City has,
for the last two years, coordinated the
church-members' yard sale at St. Ann
Catholic Church on the Ridge Scenic
Highway (State Road 17), just south of
the Haines City proper. "Our official
site is only one mile from the north
end of the Scenic Highway. We have a
large yard, great parking, and a view
of Lake Eva across the street." For the
fifth year, people will be able to find
bargains and "treasures" in Haines
City, as well as other communities all
along the Scenic Highway.
There are community sites from
Dundee to Frostproof, where people
who don't live on Scenic Highway, can
come and set up a sale table. The cost
is $10 for residents and $25 for com-
mercial vendors.
In Dundee, the Dundee Feed and
Supply will hosting the community
yard sale and they expect a big turn-
out. "This is the first year the commu-
nity site is at Dundee Feed and Supply,
but it its perfect," according to orga-
nizer Susan Welborn. "We have had
more calls than ever this year seeking
the location in Dundee," she added.
A bit further south on Scenic Hwy.,
is Lake Hamilton. Betty Van Der Mark
and her husband Ray are hosting the
community site on their property, just
off Scenic Highway. This is their first
year getting involved, and they did
it because they wanted to help raise
money for a dear friend who is bat-
tling cancer. "We are a loving, small
community [in Lake Hamilton], always
helping each other when needed. Our
sale is for cancer to help a dear
friend with her expenses. We are


Tammy Zimmerman, left, and Amber Johnson were on hand at the 39-Mile Yard Sale last year to
quench the thirst of shoppers with Florida's Natural orange juice.


also collecting Teddy Bears (and all
kinds of stuffed animals) for children
for their upcoming breakfast with
Santa and for the Hospital's Children's
Ward." Their location, on Gates Street
at Scenic Hwy, is sponsored by the Lake
Hamilton Women's Club. At this loca-
tion, as at other specified communityy
locations," community members can
set up a spot for just $10.


Further south is the quaint historic
community of Lake of the Hills. Johanna
Buscher, a community organizer, said
"We always have a great sale at the Lake
of the Hills Community Club... a build-
ing on the National Register of Historic
Buildings... and a community club now
celebrating its 99th year. We are right
on the edge of Lake Starr... and it is a
beautiful sight to see."


Bargain-hunters will find all sorts
of "treasures" along the Ridge Scenic
Highway (State Rte. 17). There are
sales in Lake Wales. The community
location is at the Trailhead Center,
and the Board of Realtors is holding a
big sale to raise funds for their annual
Student Scholarship drive.
Babson Park is always a very lively
center for sales, according to Welborn.
"The Audubon Society's big annual sale
helps them meet their annual budget.
The Babson Park Women's Club is
also having a big sale," she said. The
Babson Park community sale location
is at the Webber University's Band
Building parking lot, just across from
the main campus. And, according to
Frostproof organizer, Diana Webster
Biehl, "Frostproof is always fun. It is
a fabulous "old Florida town, and the
community sale is at the intersection
of Wall Street and Scenic Hwy., with a
view down the street of Lake Reedy to
the east and Lake Clinch to the west."
People who want to sell at a com-
munity location should contact Diana
Biehl at 863-605-4564 or Susan Welborn
at 863-638-7308 to reserve a spot.
This annual event is organized by
the Ridge Scenic Highway Corridor
Management Entity to bring people
from the region to the communities
along the Ridge Scenic Highway,
stimulating the economy and exposing
them to the unique vistas of the Ridge
Scenic Highway. Economists say that
85 visitors bring one job to the area.
This event really makes an impact and
draws visitors from all over the region.
This event is sponsored by Ben
Hill Griffin, Inc., Bok Tower Gardens,
Edward Jones Investments, Florida's
Natural, Hunt Bros., Lake Wales Care
Center, Lake of the Hills Community
Club, Sun Media Group (Frostproof
News, Lake Wales News, Haines City
News), Babson Park Women's Club,
Lake Hamilton Women's Club, the City
of Frostproof, the Town of Hillcrest
Heights, Town of Highland Park,
the City of Lake Wales, the Town of
Dundee, and Haines City.
To learn more about the event and
the many visual and cultural assets
along the Ridge Scenic Highway,
visit http://www.ridgescenichighway.
com and the Ridge Scenic Highway
Facebook page.


October 24, 2012


Page 8 Frostproof Ne s


I


.-'* i






October 24, 2012 Frostproof News Page 9


Middle


School


FFA


chapter


on the go


The Frostproof Middle School FFA group has
been on the move recently, hosting a car wash
a few weeks ago at McDonald's. The money
raised was used to purchase new officer
emblems for the officer team. The remainder of
the money will help fund the Middle School FFA
party scheduled Friday at the Depot. Chapter
members extended their thanks to everyone
who had their car washed or made a donation.
PHOTO BY K.M. THORNTON SR.


88 1~aJ I


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2082 FRONTl





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Frostproof News Page 9


October 24, 2012


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2012 TITAN


2012 VERSA HATCHiACK






Pae1 rspofNesOtbr2,21


L


Civility reigns at question and answer forum


By STEVE STEINER
SSTEINER @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

The League of Women Voters forum
held Monday, Oct. 22 may have lacked
the fireworks of the presidential debate
that followed, but what it lacked in
pyrotechnics it more than made up in
civility and discussion of issues, not
personalities.
The procedure was simple. A mem-
ber of a committee assembled by the
LOWV would read questions, either
ones of their own, or from those sub-
mitted by audience members. Each
candidate would take a turn answering
first in an allotted time frame before
yielding the floor to the next candidate.
There were two rounds, the first fea-
turing the four candidates running for
county commissioners: George Lind-
sey and Richard Castert vying for Bob
English's seat, and John Hall and Ricky
Shirah seeking to replace Sam Johnson;
both English and Johnson are coming
off the BOCC having reached the end of
their term limits.
For the most part, there was little dif-
ference among the county commission
candidates in their answers. Frequently,
candidates said aloud they agreed
with what the candidate who had just
spoken prior to them had commented.
However, there were occasions when
the candidates differed, if sometimes
only slightly.
A question posed regarded library


PHOTO BY STEVE STEINER
(From left) George Lindsey, Richard Castret, John Hall and Ricky Shirah took questions in a forum
presented by the League of Women Voters.


funding, Hall called for the necessity
to prioritize what's important to the
citizens of the county. If the citizens
believe funding the library is a top
priority, then "We have to find a way
to fund it." However, under current
economic condition, it may be neces-
sary to decrease funding until matters
turn around.
When Shirah weighed in, he took the
current BOCC to task over the situation


in the Four Corners section of the county.
The closest library there is in Lake Coun-
ty, and it costs Polk citizens to use that
library's services. He castigated the BOCC
response of "let's send the bookmobile
up there more often."
Lindsey in his response, was more
concise, and simply declared, "We have
to live within our means." His opponent,
Castret, called for a re-evaluation of the
MSTU (Municipal Taxing Services Unit).


He also said recently the BOCC com-
mitted more than $800,000 to a number
of non-county agencies. Those monies
should have been redistributed.
Castret also said libraries need to
re-examine their purpose. Libraries
should be about books, not movie rent-
als or the latest in technology. "Let's
keep the libraries being libraries."
The second session featured Wil-
liam "Bill" Sites and Christine Trakas
Thornhill, both whom are seeking
the bench for the 10th Judicial Cir-
cuit Judge, Group 7. It was far differ-
ent than the preceding session with
the commissioners.
Whereas the commission candidates
were poised and unruffled, through-
out most of the questioning Thornhill
appeared at a loss in her replies. She
rambled at times when answering, and
sometimes it appeared as though she
did not understand the question. In
comparison, the answers Sites provided
were measured and spoken with clarity.
It began with the first question. What
did each feel the most important role a
judge had. Thornhill struggled with the
question before saying a judge has to
be fair, impartial and professional. "The
judge needs to listen, not just move the
parties along."
Sites spoke how a judge needs to fill a
number of roles, as well as the impor-
tance being knowledgeable about the
law. "The court," said Sites, "plays the
role of being a problem solver."


Senate race overshadowed by presidential election


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
AP POLITICAL WRITER

TALLAHASSEE This year's Senate
race competing for attention with the
presidential election is like the Arena
Football League championship going
head-to-head with the Super Bowl,
Bruce Hornsby playing across town
from Bruce Springsteen or "Larry the
Cable Guy: Health Inspector" playing
on the screen next to the latest Batman
extravaganza.
While some folks are paying atten-
tion, most eyes are on the bigger event
on the Nov. 6 ballot. Republican Con-
gressman Connie Mack IV's campaign
to unseat two-term Democratic Sen. Bill
Nelson has almost been an afterthought
as President Barack Obama and Re-
publican Mitt Romney are in a heated,
super-tight election in the largest of
battleground states.
Obama, Romney and the outside
groups that support them have gobbled
up tons of television time. And the can-
didates, their running mates and their
wives have been holding Florida rallies
almost daily leading up to the election,
making the Senate race the most lack-
luster in recent years.
"Drawing on 1988, I remember how
difficult it was to get anybody to pay
attention to the Senate race when
you've got a hotly contested presidential
race," said Connie Mack III, who won
the seat his son now seeks. And that
race between George H.W. Bush faced
Democrat Mike Dukakis wasn't nearly
as competitive as this year's presiden-
tial contest. "And of course with Florida
today being one of the key states, most
of the attention is going to go to the
presidential race."
It hasn't helped that the Republican
primary started as a wild, crowded race


and then fizzled when the younger
Mack and his famous name entered,
driving three major candidates out of
the race. Instead of a
post-primary boost,
Mack, 45, was in a
position of having
to generate his own
excitement, and it's
been slow going. And
Nelson, 70, hasn't -
done much to raise
the profile of the race,
either, choosing to
quietly raise a lot of BILL NELSON
money and air televi-
sion ads rather than large-scale public
campaigning.
There was only one debate, and it
was an ugly one. Mack pushed to make
Nelson look like a tax-raising liberal in
lockstep with Obama, and Nelson called
Mack a liar. Instead of dealing head on
with issues, it was mostly a lot of finger
pointing.
With less than three weeks to go be-
fore the election, retired teacher Carole
Delhorbe hasn't made up her mind,
saying she still needs to research Mack
because she doesn't know much about
him other than what she's seen in televi-
sion ads.
"I like Nelson as a person," said Del-
horbe, a Republican from Ruskin who is
supporting Obama. "I may vote for him
but I haven't decided yet."
And even the star-power of former
New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani couldn't
drum up a huge crowd when Mack
pulled up to Port St. Luce restaurant
about two weeks before the election.
About 60 people attended, includ-
ing two waitresses and some random
passers-by who were unaware of the
event until stumbling across it.
Trase Rowland, 70, a Republican from


Fort Pierce, was asked what he liked
about Mack as he waited for him and
Giuliani to arrive.
"I don't know yet,"
he said. "I know some
interesting things
about Connie Mack,
more about his father
and his great-grand- I
father."
Other than a
campaign event with
Jimmy Buffett, Nelson
has mostly been a
low-key campaigner. CONNIE MACK IV
While Mack was hit-
ting multiple cities a day on a bus tour,
Nelson planned to take reporters on a
visit to four-generations of family graves
in the conservative north Florida town
of Chipley.
Nelson has the advantage of incum-
bency and the name he's built through
12 years in the Senate, in addition to
serving as insurance commissioner
when it was still a Cabinet post. The Or-
lando resident is folksy with old Florida
roots and he's proven he can win even
when other Democrats on the ballot
can't.
In 2000, he beat Republican Bill Mc-
Collum by 284,000 votes when Repub-
lican George W Bush carried Florida by
just 537. And in 2006, he beat Katherine
Harris by 22 percentage points when
Republican Charlie Crist won the gover-
nor's office by 7 percentage points.
Mack was largely able to clear the Re-
publican primary field base on his name.
Besides his father, the Fort Myers resident's
great-grandfather is the baseball Hall of
Fame manger. Other than trying to tie Nel-
son to Obama on issues like the president's
health care overhaul and economic poli-
cies, a centerpiece of his campaign is what
he calls his "Penny Plan."


Mack proposes cutting government
spending by 1 percent each year for
six years and then cap spending in the
seventh year to balance the budget.
Nelson said it would devastate funding
for government programs like Medicare
and Social Security.
The campaign has been negative.
Nelson ads have attacked Mack's char-
acter, pointing to a bar fight and other
incidents from his past.
And Mack has been misleading about
Nelson's record, like the oft-repeated
lines that Nelson voted for higher
taxes more than 150 times and was the
deciding vote for Obama's health care
overhaul. Another Nelson Nebraska
Sen. Ben Nelson is cited as being the
last Democrat to declare support for the
plan.
"If I were in the United States Senate,
we wouldn't have Obamacare. He was
the deciding vote," Mack said, a claim
that could be made against the other 59
senators who supported it.
And Mack repeatedly says Nelson
votes for Obama's agenda 98 percent
of the time, though Nelson is widely
considered closer to the political middle
than most of his Democratic Senate
colleagues by non-partisan groups that
analyze voting records.
That's the image Nelson, who flew on
the space shuttle as a congressman in
1986, is trying to project.
"When I flew in space, I looked
through the window of that spacecraft
back at Earth and it was stunning that
I didn't see any political division, and I
didn't see ethnic and religious divisions.
We're all in this together," Nelson said
during the debate with Mack. "That's a
metaphor of what we should do in our
politics bring people together in a bi-
partisan way. We're not Rs or Ds, we're
Americans."


October 24, 2012


Page 10 Frostproof News







Ocoe 4 02FospofNw ae1


PHUIU PHUVIU-U


Soon-to-retire Florida State Senator JD Alexander (third from left) was honored by Polk County
Commissioners for his years of service in the Senate and for his contribution in that capacity for
the betterment of the county. The commissioners are wearing pink in honor of Breast Cancer
Awareness month.


County commission honors

Alexander, Summerlin Institute


By STEVE STEINER
SSTEINER @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

Retiring Florida State Senator
JD Alexander.was honored by the
Polk County Commissioners with a
proclamation at its Oct. 16 regular
meeting.
Commission chairman Sam
Johnson read off a summary of
Alexander's many accomplishments
during his tenure in the Legislature.
He then paid tribute for what
Alexander delivered to the county.
"It's been my pleasure the last
eight years to serve as a county
commissioner, and know that we
had a legislator who was a champion
of Polk County," said Johnson. "Sen.
JD Alexander always had an open
door policy to us, took phone calls,
and didn't mind calling us when he
had a question or concern back here
at home; to make sure we all under-
stood the positions as they were and
had the facts to make them."
Johnson said Alexander did his
homework and always put the area
first.
"JD Alexander always faced adver-
sity and stood tall, gathered his facts
and championed those causes which
he believed were in the best inter-
ests of Polk County," said Johnson,
who summarized the effort behind
the creation of Florida Polytechnic
University. Johnson stated his belief
that the county will benefit for years
to come in ways yet to be imagined
that will not be recognized for years
to come.
Upon his acceptance of the proc-
lamation, Alexander promised to be
brief in his remarks, and started off
with a tribute to the BOCC, as the
commissioners are the first on the
"firing line."
"I've always appreciated the
working relationship with the com-
mission over the years, trying to do
the things working together to
do the things that can change the
economic future for our region,"
Alexander said.
He then acknowledged the wrath
and ire he drew down upon himself
regarding the creation of Florida
Polytech, yet said it was of no
concern what others from different
regions thought of him. What mat-
tered was his always remembering
the citizens of Polk County who
elected him. It is why he put in place
a strategic opportunity that will
transform the "economic prosper-
ity of our region over the coming
decade."


He added that he's looking forward
to stepping back.
"My work's done. I'm going to
happily cheer from the sidelines and
salute the work that you do," he said.
"I've done my best. I didn't leave
anything on the table. I gave it my
all."
On behalf of the BOCC, Johnson
thanked Alexander "for caring" and
wished he and his family much suc-
cess in the future.

Summerlin Institute
Another proclamation issued
by the BOCC paid tribute to the
Summerlin Institute on the occa-
sion of the 125th anniversary of its
founding.
"Summerlin Institute was the first
brick schoolhouse in the state of
Florida south of Jacksonville," said
County Attorney Michael Craig. He
recited how the Institute went from
a one room log structure in 1858,
to when Jacob Summerlin donated
land in 1866 for the establishment
of the county seat, churches and
the school. At that time, continued
Craig, "families paid tuition for
children to be schooled." The brick
schoolhouse was begun withthe lay-
ing of the cornerstone May 12, 1887.
"On that date, Summerlin became a
free, public institution."
The change in name from
Summerlin Institute to Bartow High
School, which had occurred years
earlier when a new school building
was constructed, became official in
1971 when diplomas were issued in
the name of the latter.
Commissioner Melony Bell had
the privilege and honor presenting
the proclamation. Those accepting
it, said Bell, were from the Class of
1963. In her brief presentation, Bell
spoke of the two-day celebration to
be held in Bartow Nov. 2-3. In addi-
tion to a section of the Bartow High
School football stadium that will be
cordoned off, a parade in downtown
Bartow was scheduled. Bell invited
everyone to turn out for the parade.
Stan Hickson, who accepted the
proclamation, thanked the BOCC,
and spoke of the responses he had
received from alumni.
"It's truly the spirit that has
amazed me," said Hickson. He told
of incidents in which member of
the Class of 1941 had already ap-
proached him asking how they could
help, along with "When can we
start?"


IPh uaaetCrtO f


Frostproof News Page 11


October 24, 2012






Pa-e-12 F- rofNwOcbe2420


Chamber luncheon


is


a true 'Royal' event


Frostproof Middle
Senior High School
junior Jordan Arnold
was on hand at the
lunch to help drum
up support for the
school's yearbook.
She noted that this
year, the book will
feature full color, and
that they are hoping
to find sponsors to
help defray the cost
to students.


The Frostproof Chamber of Commerce held its monthly luncheon meeting at the Ramon Theater
recently, sponsored by Royal Care of Avon Park. Royal Care's marketing director Janet Tindell was
the guest speaker. She was joined at lunch by Ginny Wolfe, Cornerstone Hospice Community Rela-
tions Coordinator.


1'


44


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Todd Bobo, Royal Care's
Director of Therapy, also
spoke to the lunch time
crowd at the Ramon
Theater.


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Relay Kickoff draws SRO crowd in Frostproof









Sl Fighting cancer
is hard work,
and the stand
room only
crowd made
\ -- sure they had
Plenty of nutri-
M. -tionforthe
fightahead,
enjoying a fried
chicken meal
with plenty
7 r:_. -'' of homemade
7 fixin's.
.. .:'- .. .PHOTOS BY
:. BRIAN ACKLEY












Luminarias are a big part of the Relay ambiance and experience. They are
often sponsored in memory of someone, or in honor of a friend or relative who .
has beaten cancer.
Members
ofthe
Federation
of Christian
Sportsmen
team sign in.
They were T "
one of the .
team's last
year that '
S ,.helped raise
over $20,000.
This year is
Frostproof's
10Oth anni- i
versary for


and the Wall
Street Play
Park.



Caellen Curtis is the American Cancer Society's
community liasion for the second year in Frostproof.
S --She also works with Relay in Fort Meade and other
local municipalities.







.- -
Ir~

This luminaria was a
real piece ofart.There
were a number of them
on the tables during
last week's Frostproof
Relay for Life 2013 4
Kickoff event at the
Wall Street Depot.

Y T Frostproof Librarian Missy Hadden is this year's team chairmen. Two new
A number of people in teams signed up the night of the kickoff event last Tuesday. In nine previous
attendance went home years, the Relay has raised almost $250,000 locally in the fight against
with snazzy Relay hats. c cancer.


Frostproof News Page 13


October 24, 2012







Pag 14Fotro esOtbr2,21


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Big-play Bulldogs roll to district triumph


By BRIAN ACKLEY
BACKLEY @ HEARLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

The Frostproof Bulldogs were hoping
Friday night to take a first step toward
their second straight appearance in high
school football playoffs.
And thanks to a high-powered, huge
play offense, they did just that. Taking
their longest road trip of the season, the
Bulldogs raced past Sarasota Cardinal
Mooney, 33-19, to even their district
record at 1-1 on the season.
As a result Class 3A, District 6 is as wide
open as ever. Frostproof is 1-1, while
Cardinal Mooney slipped to 0-2. Lakeland
Christian and Fort Meade were facing off
in Fort Meade last night in a key district
game that too will go along way towards
deciding playoff spots.
Lakeland Christian will play in
Frostproof Nov. 2, while the Fighting
Miners hit the road at Cardinal Mooney.
The host Cougars made a contest of it
in the final two periods, scoring the first
10 points of the third quarter.
Cardinal Mooney opened the second
half with an impressive 18-play drive
that ate up more than seven minutes of
the third quarter. But it eventually stalled
inside the Bulldog 10, and the Cougars
settled for a 27-yard field goal to cut their
deficit to-26-12.
They drove 59 yards on their second
possession, with Vita hooking up with
Elijah Toussant on a 25-yard TD pass in
the final minute of the third quarter to
pull within 26-19.
But that was as close as the hosts would
get. Cecil Cherry intercepted a Vita pass
with three minutes to play in the final
frame, near midfield, that sealed the deal
once he then broke free on offense on a
fourth-down and short at the Cougar 40.
Cherry covered all 40 yards to pay dirt in
the final minute. With the PAT kick good,
Frostproof made its 33-19 lead stand up
in the final seconds when Marcus Bobb
picked off his third pass of the night.
The Bulldogs didn't take long to start
the offensive onslaught in the first half.
Frostproof struck with a vengeance
on their first possession. Starting at their
own 10, they were flagged for a five-yard
penalty, and then covered 95 yards in two
plays. Xavier Gaines hit Daniel Knighten
on a fly patter down the right sideline
to midfield, and on the next play, Xavier
hit Kaleel Gaines in the left flat on a
50-yard catch and run. The PAT kick, after


a holding penalty on the first try, was
blocked, leaving the Bulldogs up early
6-0.
The advantage was short lived, how-
ever, as the hosts scored on their ensuing
possession, hitting a 65-yard post route
from quarterback Reese Vita to receiver
Casey Gunderson. The kick was good,
and the Cougars lead was 7-6. Vita came
into action Friday night having thrown for
over 1,110 yards this season.
The Bulldogs needed two plays again
on their second TD drive of the night, on
their second possession. This time Xavier
Gaines took a snap from the shotgun
formation, and weaved his way through
the Mooney defense for a 12-7 lead with
6:35 to go in the first quarter. The PAT kick
was again no good.
The Bulldogs were their own worse
enemy on their third possession, as had
been the case many times in the last two
games, getting flagged for penalties three
times and finally ending up with a 4th-
and-20 at their own 25 when a punt snap
sailed out of the endzone for a Cardinal
Mooney safety with 1:48 to play in the
first quarter, cutting the Bulldogs lead to
12-9.
The stunner came early in the sec-
ond quarter when it appeared that the
Cougars were marching in for a go-ahead
score. Taking over at their own 48,
Mooney moved inside the Frostproof
10. But on a third-and-three from the
Bulldogs' four yard line, Marcus Bobb
stepped in front of a Vita pass, and raced
102 yards up the left sideline sprung
near midfield on a great hustle block by
Reggie Allen to turn the tables and give
Frostproof a 19-9 lead. Bobb also inter-
cepted another pass later in the first half.
The Bulldogs put further distance
between themselves and the Cougars in
the final seconds before intermission,
again on a huge play. Xavier Gaines found
Knighten open on a short pass, and the
senior receiver raced the rest of the way
- again aided by a great hustle block
by Allen for a 70-yard catch-and-run
touchdown, putting the visitors ahead
26-9 at the break.
The evening didn't get off to a very
auspicious start. The scoreboard didn't
work, and didn't for the whole game, and
the Cougars tried an onside kick to start
the contest, which they recovered. The
Frostproof defense did rise up, however,

TRIUMPH 115


PHOTO BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
Frostproof's Kaleel Gaines leaves Cardinal Mooney tacklers in his wake Friday night during high
school football action in Sarasota.


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The Frostproof News


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October 24, 2012


Page 14 FrostproofNews


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October 24, 2012 Frostproof News Page 15


TRIUMPH
FROM PAGE 14

to force a three and out.
About the only negative of the first half,
'in addition to the onside kick, was the
penalty bugaboo. After being flagged for
over 200 yards in infractions last week
against Hardee, Frostproof was whistled
for nine infractions in the first two
quarter for 70 yards.
Cardinal Mooney was without its star
running back Anthony Caiazzo, who
last year as a junior, logged 298 carries
for 1,832 yards. He has been sidelined
much of this fall with a hamstring injury.
Frostproof's lone regular season district
win last year came at Faris Brannen
Stadium, 12-7, over the Cougars.
Both teams came into Friday night's
game with an 0-1 district mark, Cardinal
Mooney, who came in 4-3 overall, opened
its 2012 district schedule a couple of
weeks ago by falling 20-17 at Lakeland
Christian, while Frostproof got nipped by
Fort Meade, 17-16.


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR. Frostproof defender Richard Cobb makes a tackle during action Friday
Frostproof's Daniel Knighten hauls in this pass from quarterback Xaviernight.
Gaines during high school football action Friday night against Cardinal
Mooney in Sarasota. L


Frostproof News Page 15


October 24, 2012





By MARY CANNADAY
MCANNADAY@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

In growing numbers, vacation-
ers and day-trippers are looking for
windows into the small and medium-
sized towns they pass through on the
way to major tourist attractions.
It was the consensus of the Polk
historic community Oct. 17 that it's
time to catalog the local artifacts,
documents and historic sites that
enrich Polk County, map them and
share them with visitors. Eco/Heritage
tourism is on the uptick.
According to figures provided by
Myrtice Young, Historic Preservation
Manager for the Polk County Historic
Center in Bartow, historic tourism ac-
tivity adds about $6.3 billion annually
to Florida's income from visitors.
"Although historic sites may not
be primary destinations, visitors find
their way here and it enhances their
tourist experience," Young said. "They
stay longer and they spend more
money," she said, quoting presenters
at a recent seminar she attended.
The Polk County History Center is
partnering with the Central Florida
Convention and Visitors Bureau to
promote the idea of Polk as a rich
historic resource. Gatekeepers of
Polk's vintage treasures were invited to
a forum Wednesday, to get their input
and to recruit the many hands that
will be needed to get the program off
the ground.
Since there are heritage and


community festivals already held
throughout Polk County, the hope is
to come up with a central schedule of
these, so that visitors will know what's
happening and when, Young said.
Historians and marketing folks
from Bok Tower, Homeland Heritage
Park, The Frank Lloyd Wright Center
and Historic Councils in Kathleen,
Fort Meade, Bartow, Mulberry and
Davenport watched a video presenta-
tion on the topic over lunch. They
wrote down five historical venues that
might fit into the ecology/heritage
tourism model. As well, they were
asked what the next step should be for
the group.
Young offered the Historic Center's
staff as the "concierge" for the project.
Just a few of Polk's historic resources
mentioned at the meeting include 52
cemeteries, three World War II air-
fields, four historic hotels, 27 heritage
festivals, six Native American sites and
28 buildings that are on the National
Register of Historic Properties. And
that's just the tip of the iceberg.
Suggestions from the group
included one by Harriet Rust of the
Davenport Historical Society to cre-
ate a map of historic and environ-
mental sites. The creation of an eco/
heritage trail app for cellphones was
suggested by Wayne Guest of Fort
Meade, and several specific routes
were suggested for those interested
in particular aspects of history. One
suggestion was for a Polk African
American history path, including


PHOTO PROVIDED
Frostproof's Ramon Theater, which opened in the 1920s, could be an example of a historic desti-
nation for tourists.


such sites as the L.B. Brown house
in Bartow, suggested by S.L. Frisbie
IV of the Polk County Historical
Commission. County Commissioner
Ed Smith noted there are little
known sites and facts about Polk
County as well, such as the fact that
there was once a P.O.W. camp in
Winter Haven.
As to the next step, the group


decided to: Identify and compile eco/
heritage assets, to create and assem-
ble an executive committee charged
with establishing guidelines and
standards for Polk County Heritage
Tourism and establishing eco/heritage
visitor trails.
The group's next meeting will be
Nov. 14, noon, at the Polk County
History Center.


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Historic tourism could be the key


Group trying to make Polk tourist destination


October 24, 2012









Parents get own resource building at FP Elementary


Outreach program designed to help mom and dad make


kids better students


BY BRIAN ACKLEY
BACKLEY @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
Students have all kinds of places
to go when they are at Frostproof
Elementary School.
Now their parents have a special
place of there own too.
The school culminated a two-year
effort earlier this month with the open-
ing of its new parent resource room, an
area designed to help moms and dads
at home to make better students of
their sons and daughters.
One of the school's portable class-
room buildings has been converted
for adult use, and features books and
games that parents can check out
to use at home with their children.
Materials are available in both English
and Spanish.
Future objectives of the project are
to provide parents with computer
access to learn how to check on their
student's progress, to provide parents
with classes to learn how to help their
children at home with homework and
to provide various times and days all
during the school week to meet all
of the parent's schedules to access
resources.
"Our goal is to help parents help their
child at home," said Dart Meyers, who
is in his first year as the school's princi-
pal. "Once they get home, this can help
them bridge that gap. Eventually we'd
like to have it open all day."
Tuesday afternoons are busy at the
school, not only with expanded hours
at the resource room, but with the
Accelerated Reading Program after
school that involves both students and


'u-ilu BiY .M.I. I nuIltN N n.
Many people had a hand in the start and opening of the parent resource room idea, including, from left: FES Guidance Counselor Elaine Lilly, school
media specialist Debbie Wrye, former Title One program facilitator Tina Battani, former school principal Kim VanHook, principal Dart Meyers, current
school Title 1 program facilitator Catherine Ogburn, FES Inclusion Teacher Ashley Avery and the school's assistant principal Shay Hixenbaugh.


parents. Students read and then are
tested, and rewarded, for their compre-
hension skills.
A number of local businesses and
organization partnered with Frostproof
Elementary on the resource room
project including the school district's
Title One department, Bagwell Lumber,
Lowe's Distribution Center, Fort
Meade Animal Clinic, Ruck's Nursery,
the Frostproof Rotary Club, Juana
Rosales and Adrian DeLeon, Wise Seed
Company, Four Seasons Restaurant and


the Frostbite Restaurant.
A ribbon cutting event earlier this
month included Kim VanHook, who
was principal at Frostproof Elementary
up until this year and the school's for-
mer Title One coordinator Tina Battani,
who left the district this summer to
move back to her native Michigan,
but flew back to Frostproof for the
ceremony.
A number of parents, students and
staff members volunteered their time
on Sept. 29 for a special work day to get


the room ready for its opening. A
special mural was painted by Ed
Geserick, the school's art teacher.
A second portable, next to the parent
resource room, has been converted for
use in the Florida First Start program
which is designed for parents with
children from birth to age 3.
Monthly parent meetings are held
the first Tuesday of each month from
10 a.m. to noon. The sessions include
PARENTS118


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Frostproof News Page 17


October 24, 2012








PARENTS
FROM PAGE 17"
topics on child development and par-
enting. Parents socialize and children
play together and door prizes are given :
away, there is even lunch for everyone.
The school's parent educator also
will do monthly home visits to get
youngsters ready for pre-school and .
kindergarten. There is limited space. :
To register, contact Jeanie Tilley at .
863-635-8569. 7
The parent resource room will be
open school days from 8 to 9 a.m. and
2 to 3 p.m. in addition to Tuesday
afternoons from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.




School officials cut the ribbon on Frostproof Elmentary's new parent After reading a book, students take a comprehension test and earned
resource room which officially opened this month. points for Bulldog rewards. Here, second grader Lorena Cadena takes
her test with the help of her older sister Brittney, who is a senior at
.Frostproof Middle Senior High School.




One of the recent -
treats Tuesday
was a visit by the
Kona Ice stand, _
.. courtesy of the
school's PTO.


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR. -'
First grader Paulina Ayana takes advantage At the end of Tuesday acitivites, kids enjoy a pizza party. Kindergarten
of Tuesday's Accelerated Reading Program at student Brent Watts, left, and his first-grade brother Cogan convinced
Frostproof Elementary with her mom Augustina. principal Dart Meyers to participate in this photo op.





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October 24, 2012








It bodes well for Lady Bulldogs


The girls cross country team con-
tinued to dominate last weekend at
Tenoroc High School where 10 schools
participated on Saturday, Oct. 13.
The Lady Bulldogs ran their third
race and again brought home the first
place win. Dorothy Alvardo finished
fourth, Isabel Aguilar was fifth, Stefani
Galarza was eighth, Angie Ramirez was
12th, Christina Bullard crossed 24th and
Lauren Pooley was close behind at 26th.
The JV team showing improve-
ment saw Jazmin Pizano finishing the
race and finished third, while Abigail
Laureano and Makayla Bradley just
missed the top ten placing 12th and
13th. Jazmin's time was the best on
our girls teams at 24 minutes and 33
seconds.
The JV boys cross country team is
beginning to run as a pack. The boys
Ran the Roc at Tenoroc High School
with Jimmy Laureano leading the
Bulldogs, placing ninth in 24 minutes
and 25 seconds. Joshua Warren, Samuel
Sanchez, Roger Aguilar and Jose Trejo-
Mejia all finished in the top 20.




Frostproof Girls Varsity smile after their third
straight win. Back Row: Stefani Galarza,
Christina Bullard, Lauren Pooley; Front Row:
Isabel Aguilar, Dorothy Alvarado, Angie
Ramirezjpeg.


-1


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Presenting the Frostproof Girls Varsity and JV Cross Country Team.








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October 24, 2012


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Page 20 Frostproof News


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Vanguard gets new citrus from BHG Inc.


Thanks to a generous donation by
local citrus grower Royce Godwin and
help from Ben Hill Griffin, Inc., students
at the Vanguard School began a new
agricultural endeavor recently.
About one dozen orange trees were
donated to the school by Godwin, who
is retired from BHG. Students were
given instruction by local growers re-
garding how to properly plant a Florida
citrus tree. On hand to assist were Philip
Rucks, a local nursery owner, as well
as David Nelson and Godwin, both
representatives of BHG.
"This is the first time our campus has
had citrus trees," said Dr. Cathy Wooley-
Brown, president and CEO of the school
on U.S. 27. "We have a lot of people to
thank for this."
Specifically, Brown mentioned


Godwin, Nelson, and Rucks, along with
the entire Ben Hill Griffin citrus compa-
ny. "This would not have been possible
without their generosity," she added.
The new trees are located near the ag-
ricultural education area of Vanguard's
campus, which also includes a func-
tioning greenhouse and animal sci-
ence facilities. Vanguard's educational
emphasis is on project-based learning,
and Monday's citrus education was part
of that hands-on emphasis.
Located in Lake Wales, The Vanguard
School is a fully accredited boarding
and day school educating students in
grades 5-12 with learning differences
such as attention issues, challeng-
ing reading disorders, Dyslexia, and
Asperger's Syndrome, according to the
school's website.


Vanguard students Chase Walker, left, and Alex Ellis, right, receive tree-planting instruction from
Royce Godwin of BHG Inc.


The whole tree-planting crew from left, rear: Vanguard Students lan Denton, Sam Stoudt, Alex
Ellis, Chase Walker, and Amara Koryus. Left side, front: Assistant Principal Rob Williams and
Student Jakob Baird. Right side: Phillip Rucks, Owner Phillip Rucks Citrus Nursery, Royce Godwin,
(Retired) Senior VP of Groves at Ben Hill Griffin, Inc., and David Nelson, Grove Division Supervisor
at Ben Hill Griffin, Inc.


PHOTOS PROVIDED
Students Sam Stoudt and Alex Ellis (in foreground) continue the tree planting at Vanguard while
other students and Ben Hill Griffin, Inc. employees assist (in background).

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Frostproof News Page 21


October 24, 2012


e





October 24, 2012


Pa e 22 Frostproof Ne s


Frostproofs volleyball


seniors won't be denied


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
Frostproof senior volleyball players Catie Kincaid with her mother Sandy and father Robbie
during Senior Night festivities last week in Frostproof.


Senior Rebecca Ruskin goes low for this shot in action last week against Victory Christian. And
what a night it was! After the Lady Bulldog seniors were honored, they promptly went out and
lost the first two games of the match (25-14 and 25-16) before roaring back to win the final three
games and take the match.


Catie Kincaid goes down for this dig in volleyball
action last week against Victory Christian on
Senior Night. Kincaid, one of two seniors on the
team, helped rally the troops for a dramatic
five-game win. After losing the first two games.
Frostproof would not be denied in winning games
25-9, 30-28 and 15-10 in the fifth game clincher
of a memorable evening.


I A- - -
Rebecca Ruskin, center, was one of the two seniors on the Frostproof Lady Bulldogs volleyball
team that was honored last week on Senior Night. She is shown with her mother Farrah and
father Tim.


Join us for a time of respite and rejuvenation, and
discover local support services available to help
you care for your loved one.


" Enjoy mini massages and
refreshments
* Tour the center and discover
how adult day health care can
help your loved one
* Learn about Veterans'
assistance options including
the VA and Polk County
ADHC partnership


Wednesday,Nov.7 3:30-5:30p.m. OpenHouse

Polk County Adult Day Health Care, Haines City
751 Scenic Highway
(Next to Alta Vista Elementary School on State Road 544)

For more information, contact 863-519-8146 or
visit Polk-County.net/AdultDayCare.


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October 24, 2012 Frostproof News Page 23


QUESTION
FROM PAGE 1

of how issues touch their lives," she
said.
Cultural differences presented pluses
and minuses in voter recruitment.
"How do you get Hispanic women from
traditional families to know it's OK to
vote?" Jarrett asked.
On the other hand, Eaddy noted
that when she recently canvassed
a Poinciana neighborhood, visiting
Hispanic voters, "They were thrilled to
get the information, but then again,
they were from a country where people
could not vote. They value the vote."
Moure said "It's easy to tell people
to vote, but there are roadblocks. For
example the amendments, two long
sheets of paper some with misleading
verbiage."
There are a total of 12 amendments
on the ballot this year, all originating in
the legislature.
The League of Women Voters puts
out a guide to the amendments and
candidates, but the fear was that voters
would get frustrated and start auto-
matically checking off yes or no's. (See
special section inside.)
Joe Bowyer said due to the complex-
ity of this ballot, his group is encourag-
ing mail-in voting. "We urge people to
vote at home, over the kitchen table,
where you can take your time reading


"People make their voting decisions by listening to people
they know. Most of the time when people vote, they have
no first-hand knowledge of the issues."
Colleen Burton
commenting on what she heard at a seminar


the amendments."
Nelson, who was quiet through much
of the free-wheeling discussion, said,
"Most of what we're talking about is
symptomatic we have to get down to
the basics." Nelson named three foun-
dational institutions which help form
good citizenship and responsibility:
family, church and school. Nelson said
the breakdown of the family and taking
civics out of the schools has contrib-
uted to the slide in voter turnout and
interest in government.
"Bring a child up in the way he
shall go and he will not depart from
it," Nelson said, quoting scripture to
underline the idea of parental respon-
sibility in nurturing good citizenship.
"For too long, we've abdicated this."
Nelson also said churches do have
a place in educating people to be
responsible citizens, although some in
the group saw that as a blurring of the
separation of church and state.
Jarrett stated that in Polk County,
history classes start post-Civil War.
"Why should kids think it's important
to be an American patriot if they're not
taught that?" she asked.


Saturation of the voting message was
at issue, with many stating that there
was room and a responsibility to drive
home the importance of voting.
Dolores Bowyer observed "When
we lived in Nevada, it was so much
easier to get people to vote. They had
caucuses. They would set up precincts
in the casinos, schools, everywhere.
Transportation was provided for
veterans. Student volunteers would set
up phone banks."

The suggestions:
Each participant at the roundtable
was asked to contribute a suggestion
on how to change the situation of low
voter turnout. The solutions offered
included holding more educational
forums, such as those sponsored by the
League of Women Voters, to explain the
issues and amendments. Additional
ideas included getting back to basics by
teaching citizenship in the home and in
the schools, and sending out personal
invitations to people to attend politi-
cal block parties, and continuing to
partner with groups such as the NAACP
to get the word out.


The amount of money spent on
campaigns was seen as problematic,
with people tending to "tune out" ads
after a time, causing loss of interest. So,
limits on campaign contributions were
recommended. Also, one participant
felt that going back to single-district
politics would force candidates to go
back to grass-roots politics, such as
going door to door.
Burton said local media was
named as one venue for encouraging
the vote, adding that the national
media is often perceived as skewed.
Increased use of social media, to
reach younger voters, was also
mentioned.
One suggestion was to have a full
class period in civics class devoted
to the current ballot; what's on it and
what the amendments mean.
And reaching people through their
day-to-day venues, such as clubs and
churches, was a popular (and proven)
outreach.
Edwards said her office has "a very
aggressive outreach program," visiting
schools, businesses and retail venues
such as malls. I personally spoke at 26
civic clubs last year, which works out
to about two per month," she noted.
Note: We would like to hear your
ideas and suggestions on this. Feel
free to email letters to letters@heart-
landnewspapers.com or mail to 190
S. Florida Avenue, Bartow, FL 33830
or 140 E. Stuart Ave., Lake Wales, FL
33853-4198.


VOTE

FROM PAGE 1


his or her identification verified the
vote will go down as a provisional
ballot. "We check the signature on the
envelop and if it's good.
"We do everything we can to make
their count," she said.
Having them show up to is another
story.
In Polk County as of Oct. 1 there
were 345,930 people registered to vote.
The figures for Election Day have not
been finalized and registration closed
on Oct. 9. Of those registered for the
primary election 18 percent showed up
to the polls.
"Some people think it doesn't matter,
but it does," one poll worker Susan
Grinath said about voting.
In 2000 election the presidential
election was held up for 36 days
because one vote mattered. The figures
showed that George Bush beat Al Gore
by 537 votes but there some dispute
and ultimately the Florida Supreme
Court held up the victory for Bush
giving him the 270 electoral votes he
needed to win.
"What I do know is it's my democrat-
ic right," said Raumoul Nicholas who
will work as a deputy at the Bartow
Presbyterian Church on Election Day.


He said his one vote does make a
difference and he thinks not enough
people turn out to vote. He feels the
only way to turn that around is to
talk to people and talk to them how
important it this right is. Many coun-
tries don't give people the right to help
name who represents them and over-
looking it here sets a poor example.
Not catering to that end but still
helpful is Lori Edwards told poll work-
ers during the training that it's OK to
take children to the polls on Election
Day.
"It's OK to bring kids," she told the
volunteers. "They have to be well-
behaved, but they learn about this at
home. They don't necessarily learn
about voting at school."
Edwards also emphasized that peo-
ple who come to vote and have some
sort of disability deserve the same
smile, cooperation and help anyone
else gets and in fact there are tools the
poll workers get to help those who are
hard or hearing, have sight problems
or other disabilities. There are audio
ballots at every precinct. And, she
emphasized those with assistants, she
said, make sure you are talking with
the voter and not the assistant.
"Talk to the voter," Edwards said.
"The assistant sometimes feels they are
in charge."
And, she also emphasized the poll
workers, though they don't see the bal-
lots, if they are asked the voters don't


have to vote in every race.
"And you can tell them that if you are
asked," she said.
To Angela Davis, a precinct worker
since 2008, she said she's always exer-
cised her right to vote though she's had
friends tell her it doesn't matter.
"They tell me I'm crazy, but if you're
going to voice your opinion you've got
to vote," she said. "Sometimes it won't


go the way you voted but don't go away
and if you don't vote, don't talk trash."
She thought maybe knocking on
doors may increase the turnout.
Debra Allen who has worked at the
polls for about 15 years said doing this
work always interested her. She thinks
turnout is OK in Polk County but, "I
wish more would take interest in the
privilege and just do it."


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Frostproof News Page 23


-... 11 11










Flywheelers begin new season on Nov. 7


The Florida Flywheelers will be kick-
ing off their 2012-13 season Nov. 7 at its
more than 200-acre Avon Park Cutoff
Road facility.
The season's first show, the 17th an-
nual Fall Fuel Up, will run through Nov.
10, and feature a specialsalute to U.S.
military, veterans and law enforcement.
In addition, there will be free admission
to current FFA and 4H Club members
wearing their home group shirt or
jacket.
Additional shows this year will be Jan.
16-19 (26th annual Swap Meet) and
Feb. 20-23 (21st annual antique engine
and tractor show), and the popular
Christmas weekends will be held Dec.
7 and 8 and again Dec. 14 and 15.
The February show will have a special
emphasis on International tractors.
Each show features daily parades
with antique cars, tractors and trucks.
On the grounds, visitors can experience
an operating sawmill, antique steam
engine, antique tractor pulls, antique
fire truck, farm machinery, agriculture
museum, old time jail, Cracker house,
hot air engines, used car dealership,
Flywheeler store, antiques flea market
and homemade ice cream.
The site's old time village includes
cabins, barns, a church, print shop,
mercantile, sawmill, garages, black-
smith, schoolhouse, hardware store,
woodworking shop, stables, slaughter-
house, jail, firehouse, catalogue store,
gas stations and more.
Visitors are also invited to stop in
and see what's new at the women's


craft building which displays quilts and
handmade items.
For visitors wishing easier access to
all parts of the grounds, golf cart rentals
are available, but reservations are
recommended by calling 800-385-1385.
Information about the show and the
grounds is available by calling 863-285-
9121, or by visiting the group's website
at www.floridaflywheelers.com.
Admission is $7 for adults during the
three show periods, and children under
12 are free.
According to the group's website, The
Florida Flywheelers Antique Engine
Club is a non-profit organization,
founded in 1972, to promote interest
in restoring, preserving and exhibiting
antique internal combustion engines,
steam engines, antique tractors and
autos and other labor saving devices
from the by-gone years.
This was done by members hosting
shows at their homes and farms around
the state. As interest in the hobby grew,
some of these shows were held at rental
facilities that could handle larger public
attendance.
In 1997 it was decided to purchase
property in a central location in south
Polk County where members could
have a show to display their collections
to the public without the need to rent
facilities. Flywheeler Park has now
grown to almost 240 acres and includes
a tractor pull track, club and member
buildings which house displays, col-
lections and many large engines, and a
membership which is over 1,500.


Frostproof resident David Renshaw parks his 1952 McCormick Farmall tractor during a
Flywheelers event earlier this year.


This colorful display of machine seats is just one of the many exhibits decorating the 240 acres
area that the Flywheelers have open to the public.


FILE PHOTOS
Carl Kitchens, or Lions Head, Ontario, gets a big puff of smoke as he fires up his Fairbanks-Morse
15 horsepower engine. The machine powered a shingle mill in eastern Canada before it was
recovered and rebuilt. It is one of many antique machines on display at the Flywheelers park.



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Pon't Forget Your Lawn Chairs and Blankets


October 24, 2012


Page 24 Frostproof News


I





Frostproof News Page 25


October 24, 2012


Lake Wales Pioneer Days provides a blast from the past


By CASSIE JACOBY
CJACOBY@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

Staging a blast from the past with
some new twists is a bit like teaching
an old dog new tricks. But, organiz-
ers of the Lake Wales Pioneer Days,
celebrating its 37th year on Oct. 26-28,
have managed to do it again.
"We have an army of volunteers who
started working on the celebration
the day after last year's event ended,"
said Jennifer Nanek, special projects
manager for the city of Lake Wales. One
of the organizers of the event for the
past 14 years, Nanek's biggest challenge
is to come up with fresh ideas while
continuing many of the cherished
traditions.
"In addition to more new vendors
offering a wider variety of food, we've
expanded the festival to start earlier
and include evening activities by team-
ing up with the Lake Wales Revival,"
Nanek explained. "Family Fun Nights
will begin on Thursday, Oct. 25, and
continue through Sunday, Oct. 28. One
of the most exciting moments will be
when lucky winners receive cash to
help pay their bills. Up to $1,000 will
be given away each night through
Sunday."
The festival was created to celebrate
the community's history and earliest
settlers. One of the top highlights of
the event and closely-guarded secret is
who will be named the Pioneer of the
Year. Given annually since 1978, the
rules specify that the recipient must
be "a person who has been employed
in an occupation or engaged in civic
pursuits that have contributed signifi-
cantly to the growth and development
of the greater Lake Wales community."
On Friday, Oct. 26, the annual Quilt
Show will kick off the festivities at
the Lake Wales Depot Museum from
4-7 p.m. The show will continue on
Saturday from 1-5 p.m.
On Saturday, Oct. 27, at 10 a.m.,
Pioneer Hour will open with the tradi-
tional ringing of the Tillman Bell and
will honor pioneers from 1853 when
the region was first surveyed, to 1925
when Lake Wales officially became a
city. The 2012 Pioneer of the Year will
be announced by Mimi Reid Hardman,
the Lake Wales Depot Museum ex-
ecutive director and founder of the
Historic Lake Wales Society. The Lake
Wales Highlander Band and Scottish
Unit will perform.
Also beginning at 10 a.m., the


Historic Architectural Carriage Tours
will be provided free by the Florida
Flywheelers. Sponsored by Citizens
Bank and Trust, tours will begin and
end at the western end of Lake Wailes,
and encompass a circular tour of
more than 50 historic homes and
buildings. Tours will run on Saturday
from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday from
11 a.m.-4 p.m.
At noon on Saturday, the antique car
parade and show will begin. Sponsored
by the Lake Wales Depot Museum
and The Historic Lake Wales Society,
antique automobiles and tractors will
travel through the downtown streets,
on First Street from Seminole Avenue
to Stuart Avenue and on Stuart Avenue
from First Street to Third Street to the
Festival grounds at Lake Wailes. More
than 50 antique cars will be on display
at Crystal Lake Park until 5 p.m.
Entertainment and family activi-
ties will be provided throughout the
weekend including the Florida
Flywheelers with antique tractors,
engines and toys, and a Civil War era
camp with an authentic tent, costumes
and other materials. Children will be
able to enjoy games, pony rides, moon
bounce, rock climb and clowns. Canoe
and pram racing will take place on
Lake Wailes.
The Society for Workers of Early
American Trades (SWEAT) will re-
turn to demonstrate and sell crafts.
Demonstrations include blacksmiths,
wood carving, spinning, churning but-
ter and weaving pine needle baskets.
Favorite performers returning
include the Talako Indians, a group of
dancers from Orlando who are each
at least partially of Native American
descent; folk artist Chris Kahl; and
Cracker Cowboy Poet, Hank Mattson.
Festival hours are Saturday,
Oct. 27, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday,
Oct. 28, 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. Admission
and parking are free. Sponsors include
Citizens Bank& Trust, The Ledger,
Publix Supermarkets, Fields Cadillac,
97 Country/98 Max, Lake Wales
Medical Centers, Walmart, SEMCO
Construction, the Central Florida
Visitors & Convention Bureau, the City
of Lake Wales, the Historic Lake Wales
Society and the Lake Wales Depot
Museum.
For information, visit http:/ /www.
cityoflakewales.com/depot/pioneer_
day.shtml or contact Jennifer Nanek
at 863-678-4182, ext. 270 or email
jnanek@cityoflakewales.com.


PHOTO BY CASSIE JACOBY


Jennifer Nanek, the city's special activities coordinator, stands on the banks of Lake Wailes,
which will be occupied with much activity this coming weekend during Pioneer Days.


S I tJh-I r S I -, 7


I






Page 26 Frostproof News October 24, 2012


Acupuncture, viable, safe and cost-effective


Chief had been in my relative's
family for year. A purebred Dalmation,
he was loving, loyal and for most of
his 11 years, lived in a hallway, with a
cardboard box and blanket his only true
constant companions.
As if to try and attract attention, he
was one of those dogs that was a great
"smiler". He could show his pearly
whites with the best of them, not in
anger, but in attempt to win you over.
With me, it worked every time, and
when I would visit, I would always leave
with the standing offer that if they no
longer wanted Chief, he always would
have a place in my home. After all, he
had always had one in my heart.
Even so, I was shocked when after
11 years, I got a call. If I still wanted
Chief, he was mine. Within an hour,
he was in our house, happily cavorting
with our two other dogs, and a cornu-
copia of cats.
It wasn't long though, given his
age, that his hind end began to show
pronounced weakness. That was soon
followed by issues of incontinence,
and before long he was taking more
pills than the rest of the household
combined. It was then when I was first
introduced to animal acupuncture
- many, many years before I became
a veterinarian by not my regular
animal doctor, but my equine veterinar-
ian. While most of the work she did was
on horses, she suggested that a course


of acupuncture might significantly
enhance and increase Chief's quality of
life.
It consisted of a series of four once-
a-week visits, and even after the first
visit, there was noticeable improvement
in Chief's posture, strength and ability
to move freely about. By the end of the
fourth visit, he was clearly and signifi-
cantly improved, even the incontinence
issues almost totally disappeared.
Thereafter, Chief needed a visit to his
acupuncturist about every six to eight
weeks. We used to joke that it was time
for his "tune up". His last years were
happier and healthier and more enjoy-
able because of our decision to take a
leap of faith in trying what was a largely
unknown animal treatment option at
that time.
Acupuncture, to be clear, is not a
miracle cure, even though some prac-
titioners might want you to think so. At
Fort Meade Animal Clinc, we don't try
to "sell" it that way. Even in my practice,
even though there is almost always
some improvement in the patients we
see, success isn't universal. In that way,
acupuncture is very much like conven-
tional medications, some work better in
some dogs and cats than others, just as
is the case in humans too.
But because it's frequently a ques-
tion of degrees of improvement,
acupuncture is very often a viable, safe
and cost-effective treatment option,


Lori J. Shank, DVM


either in conjunction with traditional
western medicine, or combined with
other elements of a more holistic-only
approach including herbs and diet. It
is very much worth investigating in
medical conditions that may be chronic
or acute, whether it be conditions
involving lameness, respiratory, skin,
kidneys and the like. In truth, there are


acupuncture procedures and protocols
for almost every ailment.
Getting my certification in both large
and small animal acupuncture from
Florida's highly regarded Chi Institute
is something that I am proud of, and
proud to offer our clients as one in a
series of treatment options for their
cherished pets.
Not only do animals usually exhibit
little discomfort during a procedure,
they often start to enjoy it. It is not as
costly as many people might think,
either, especially when it can be substi-
tuted for potentially expensive prescrip-
tion medications.
In the last decade, small animal
acupuncture has become much more
widely accepted in the veterinary field.
In fact, in the last decade, the number
of acupuncture certified veterinarians
has quadrupled. I think that's in part
because clients have shared their suc-
cess stories with their pet-loving friends
and families, and appreciate the fact
there is another treatment choice they
can consider.
Had it not been for my own personal
experience many years ago, I might
never had had my mind opened to the
potential benefits of animal acupunc-
ture. I would welcome the opportunity
to chat with you, either in person or on
the phone, to see if acupuncture might
be right in your dog or cat's situation.
Somewhere, Chief is still smiling.


Name Brand 90 Days Financing
Furniture & Accessories Same As Cash Available




:. *~ a ow,'


First, we don't sell acupuncture as some
kind of "miracle cure." It isn't. But, in many
cases, especially chronic cases that have not
responded as well as might be expected to
conventional treatments, acupuncture offers
a viable, safe and affordable alternative often
with very good results.

Treatment is available for issues of many kinds,
including lameness, skin condition, urinary
tract and kidney issues, and neurological and
respiration ailments. Dr. Shank is one of just a
handful of vets in all of Florida certified by the
renowned Chi Institute in both small and large
animal acupuncture.

Please call us today your first consultation is
FREE to see if acupuncture treatments might
be right for your dog, cat or horse.


FORT MEADE ANIMAL CLINIC
Lori J. Shank, DVM
, 711 E. Broadway, Fort Meade
'Call for appointment: 285-8652


CATS DOGS OTHER SMALL ANIMALS
Carol Thompson, VMD
General Medicine & Surgery Laser Surgery
Behavior Consultation Boarding .
3631 Hwy. 60 E. *Lake Wales, FL 33898
863-676-5922 Fax: 863-676-7342 .
EMERGENCY: 833-676-4677
r5 THOMPSON'S
S VETERINARY CENTER
s '______


THE PUP HUT
Professional
Pet Grooming
Owners and Pet Stylists Anneft & Shana
OVER 45 YEARS EXPERIENCE

294-1799
Owners & Pet Stylists 1619 Dundee Rd. Winter Haven, FL, 33884
Annett & Shana

^----________ I ..,......,,..Is C, --~8 8 _11 - ~ \


' '


71- .. 4. -"''^


October 24, 2012


Page 26 Frostproof News





Frostproof News Page 27


nrtnhor 9,4 9n019


SSaturday,
L, -1 October 27, 2012
L- 1:00pm 4:00pm



Bring your furry little ones and your kids too!
Bounce House Treasure Hunt Bake Sale Raffles
Costume Contest for the kids and dogs
(Entrants must be here by 3pm. please)
Hot Dogs, Drinks & Chips will be available for your donation only.
All funds will be donated to "Snickers Wish"




1 VETERINARY HOSPITAL



A. Fleet Ryland, DVM Thomas Schotman, DVM Michael Matthews, DVM Jess Andersen, DVM Oarcy Forber, DVM
520 Mountain Lake Cutoff Road Lake Wales, FL 33859
863-676-1451



*i "l .


r


Banana is wishing she
had a place to call home.
Could that be with you?


xge--' -, ENf I
Sophie is an adorable 10
week old itty, bitty, pitty.
Come in and meet this
precious baby today!


Look into my eyes. You're
getting very sleepy. Now you're
under my control. Get into your
car and drive to the Humane
Society and adopt Dino!


Crystal is one happy girl.
She loves every one she
meets!


Cleopatra and Sunfire are
litter mates. They are only
three months old and very
loving kitties.


My name is Rolex and I'm
so sad because I don't
have a family to love me.
Do you think you could
love me?


THE.

HUMANE

SOCIETY


If you would like to donate, please send your donations to:
The Humane Society of Polk County
555 Sage Road, Winter Haven, FL 33881
Or you can donate online at: www.humanesocietyofpolkcounty.org


863-324-5227 863-325-8905 (fax)


Hours:-Tues-Sat 10am 5pm Kennel closes at 4pm
A


0


I, Ion't Be Scared...
It's a Howling Good Sale at The Doggie Bag!


Trick or Treat! Find that perfect look for
your pup to show off their Howl-O-Ween
Spirit. Is your pup the Cop or Robber?
Maybe a Jack-O-Lantern? Arrr Matey...a
Pirate? Giraffes, Monkeys & Bunnies Oh
My! So many to choose from, stop in, try it
on, and get ready to Trick or Treat!


Off ', : ,
:.. '.;. ,,. .' .
Keep it simple, but make a statement in a
Halloween Tank!"A Little Batty!" "Wicked!"
"Naughty!" Or a simple"I Love Halloween!"
Accessorize that look with a Halloween
Collar & Lead! And, don't forget that
special Halloween Toy.


0 a -




4 $.J ,
'* .w-


The Doggie Bag
1745 E. Edgewood Dr.
Lakeland, FL 33803
863-683-6220
M~F 10to 6. Sat. 9to 4


The Doggie Bag of Bartow
155 S. Central Ave.
Bartow, FL 33830
863-533-6807
M~-F 10to6. Sat. 9to3


www.thedoggiebagboutique.com


Water's Edge is a not-for-profit-based retirement community
designed to bring the best in senior living to those of all faiths, beliefs
and traditions.Water's Edge offers villa homes, independent apartments,
assisted living and memory care.

To learn more about the residences at Water's Edge of Lake Wales,


please call .:''


or visit;


WATER'S EDGE


of Lake Wales


10 Grove Avenue West Lake Wales, Florida 33853



-- _

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1





Paee 28 Frnstnrnnf News October 24, 2012


Ben Hill Griffin,


Jr. Elementary


honors Top Dawgs


PHOTO PROVIDED
Ben Hill Griffin, Jr., Elementary School recently honored its October"Top Dawgs." Students cited included: Adriana Vazquez, Alexis Rodriguez, Anahi Martinez, Angel Chavez,
Cassidy Edwards, David Colon, Emma Coatney, Germany Hamilton, Gisel Perez, James Roscoe Smith, Jennifer Gil-Barrios, Jennifer Jimenez, Malina Galati, Mason Britt, Myrna Perez, Noelia Aguilar,
Primitive Garcia, Ralissa Schmidt, Rosa Montalvo, Sabrina Strait, Sara Ormsby, Sarah Ratliff, Sean Baerhold, Shana Quinn, Talissa Garza and Yuritza Flores Borja.
7 --


WELLS
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Stock C2117
$27,751 S34094O/


Jeep


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2012 JEEP
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ock 19,9071 i

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rst 2012 DODGE
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October 24, 2012


e gaP 28 Frostproof N s


*09 \






October 24, 2012 Frostproof News Page 29






Polk makes a big stride against breast cancer





Polk makes a big stride against breast cancer


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW @ EARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

Michelle Whitman made a large
stride Saturday at Mosaic Park.
At the 10th annual Making Strides
Against Breast Cancer, she spoke to
thousands who attended about her
bout with breast cancer. Sporting
a pink and red headpiece and
pink necklaces, she told about the
surgery, her chemotherapy and 35
radiation treatments and how unbe-
lievable this could happen to her.
"I was a little white rat on a
wheel," she said. "I was working,
raising a family and at 46 I thought
what could happen to me?"
She said she was four months late
on a mammogram and when she
was asked if she should have one
she did and got the worst phone call
she's ever gotten.
"When I got the call it was the
worst I feared. But it was a fight and
it was a fight I intended to win," she
said.
She said she's gone through days
when she didn't want to get out of
bed and dressed and she's had days
that have been better, but she is de-
termined to win this fight. And more
winning has been happening with
breast cancer in the last generation.
After increasing for about 20
years, female breast cancer rates
started to go down 12 years ago,
dropping about 7 percent. It is still
the number cancer that women get
- and Polk County is second most
frequent county in Florida it hap-
pens in but it is decreasing, the
American Cancer Society reports.
But with the continued walks
and a focus on raising money for
research remaining high, people like
Whitman believe there will come
a day "when I open the paper and
read that a cure for breast cancer
was found.
"We can hang up our pink bras
and sneakers and say 'we made it.'"
In the meantime, the fight con-
tinues and nearing tears, one of
the hosts for the Making Strides
walk, Todd Wiseman from Channel
10 in Tampa remembered Saturday
for something else: "Ten years ago
today my wife was preparing a meal
for woman with breast cancer. It was
her last meal. Tonight she's prepar-
ing a meal for a survivor. But breast
cancer deaths will continue to go
down and they can be attributed to
walks like these."
The Making Strides Against Breast
Cancer walk debuted in Bartow after
being held in Lake Hollingsworth
in previous years. It was primarily
moved for more room for people
and parking as up to 3,000 show up
for this event. Event Chairperson
Christian Lee said this year's walk


Tanya Farther, left, and Candace Rueda had their outfit well-thought out as a
two-woman bra. They were all smiles at the team picture of Harrell's Hope of
a cure. They raised $4,200 for the annual and was the second highest money-
raising team for the walk.


Michelle Whitman talks about her struggle
with breast cancer as she is going through
efforts to help her get through it at Saturday's
annual breast cancer walk. Thousands took the
5 kilometer trek through Bartow Saturday and
celebrated at Mosaic Park.

had more teams than in any previ-
ous year and co-host Jeni Taylor
from 97 Country radio, said Perky
Pals was the top money raiser at
$8,250. Harrell's Hopes for a Cure
was second at $4,207.31 and Publix
Credit Union was third $4,132.31.
Overall the goal is to raise $120,000
for research but the totals won't be
known until sometime in December,
Lee said. Currently the American
Cancer Society website said this
walk has raised 65,967.23.
And with this effort only in Polk
County, Whitman sounds confident
she will not only beat the disease
but will participate in many more
walks to come.
"The doctor told me I now have a
life expectancy of 85 years and I'm
going to hold him to it," she said.


0.


Bryce Hampton and his team from Seffner,
the Pink Educators, came to Bartow Saturday
to take part in the annual breast cancer walk.
He and his head were prepared the party and
celebration to the survivors and remembrance
to the victims.


Jalee Collins, 2, and Julian Concepcion, 14 months, liked the white
and pink balloons, pink signs and each other at Saturday's annual
breast cancer walk. Thousands from around Polk County and
outside showed up for the event at Mosaic Park.


Mary Van Koppen, a breast cancer survivor,
stands with other survivors Saturday at the
stage in Mosaic Park.


Ashley Hemdon and Tammy Waltz were picking
up the rear at Saturday's breast cancer but
they were excited as anyone on the 5 kilometer
trek. They were going to try to catch up with
their team, Bosom Buddies as they walk down
Broadway.


Jean Louis from Lakeland and Yesenia Garcia
from Fort Meade dance in front of the stage
at Mosaic Park Saturday as SLS Entertainment
provided the music at the annual breast cancer
walk.


Winter Haven Hospital

Compassion. Innovation. Trust.


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Pae3 rspofNesOtbr2,21


Diabetes survivor skills class


Diabetes Survivor Skills is from 1-3 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 24, in the Hunt Building
on the second floor classroom.
Registered Dietician Jamie Moore
teaches the free class that is ideal for
those newly-diagnosed with diabetes,
those who are struggling with managing
the disease, or anyone who just wants a
refresher course on managing diabetes.
Registration is required. Participants
are encouraged to bring a guest as well.
Call 863-678-2288.
There's a party at the mall
The Mall Walkers program, sponsored
by Lake Wales Medical Center and Eagle
Ridge Mall, has its next prize party
9-10 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 8 in the Food
Court area of the mall.
During the party, Mall Walkers are
asked to turn in their mileage tracking
cards. Mall Walkers tracks each walker's
mileage, and they earn prizes for reach-
ing mileage milestones.
The Mall Walkers program enables
people to walk inside the mall from
8-10 a.m. Monday through Saturdays,
and from 10 a.m.-noon Sundays. All
must enter through the Food Court,
and are encouraged to wear their Mall
Walkers T-shirts so that security officials
know they are part of the program.
Mileage logged and turned in must
be walked inside the mall to be eli-
gible for prizes through Mall Walkers.
Participants are reminded to check with
their physician before beginning any
exercise program.
For information, call 863-678-2288.
Miller named physician recruiter
Lori Miller was hired as Physician
Recruiter and Physician Network
Development Director for Lake Wales


Medical Center.
Prior to accepting this position,
she served as program director at
LWMC's Wound Healing
Center, which opened in "
December 2010. Under i
her leadership, the Wound ..
Healing Center was
launched and has enjoyed '
success in treating patients .
with non-healing wounds.
Paige Myers will assume MILLER
the role as program direc-
tor at the Wound Healing Center. Myers
has more than fours years' experience
managing successful wound care
programs and also has many years of
community relations and marketing
expertise.
LWMC names employee health nurse
Eudora Schomer was named
Employee Health Nurse for
Lake Wales Medical Center.
Schomer has been
with the hospital for -
22 years, most recently
serving as Clinical Quality
Coordinator. In her new
role, she will be manag-
ing employee health and SCHOMER
workers' compensation for
the hospital.
Home Healthcare Community
praises Rep. Ross
Participants in the Bring the Vote
Home initiative thanked Rep. Dennis
Ross, R-Lakeland, for supporting Florida
seniors by speaking out against co-
payments for home healthcare services
for the state's Medicare beneficiaries.
Bring the Vote Home is a nationwide
initiative to help senior, disabled and


homebound Americans and their clini-
cians cast their votes this election year.
Florida's home healthcare community,
which represents 340,000 Medicare
home health beneficiaries and more
than 50,000 skilled home health clini-
cians, is taking part in this national
effort.
Bring the Vote Home is also offering
lawmakers an opportunity to express
their views about home healthcare via
the initiative's website at www.bringth-
evotehome.org.
"We shouldn't tell our seniors, our
parents, that they must choose between
their home or their health care," Ross
said in a statement from the floor of
the U.S. House of Representatives. "We
should keep home healthcare free of
co-payments to ensure that they have
the ability to remain in their homes,
in their communities, and with their
families and memories."
Dr. Izsak to present ulcer program
Dr. E. Moshe Izsak, a board-certified
Gastroenterologist at Lake Wales
Medical Center, will present a free
Lunch and Learn program on Ulcers at
noon Thursday, Oct. 25.
The program is in the hospital's
community classroom, on the second
floor of the Hunt Building.
Dr. Izsak will discuss what causes
ulcers, their symptoms, and treatment
options. A Question & Answer period
follows.
The program is free, and lunch is
provided. Pre-registration is required.
Call 863-678-2288 to register.
LRMC CEO named to top 120
Lakeland Regional Health Systems
President and CEO Elaine Thompson


is today

was recently named to the Becker's
Hospital Review "120 Women
Hospital and Health System Leaders
to Know."
According to Becker's Hospital
Review, those included in this national
list demonstrate leadership within
the hospital and healthcare industry
and were chosen based on excep-
tional oversight of hospital or health
system operations, financial turn-
arounds and quality improvement
initiatives.
Thompson joined Lakeland Regional
in 2010, and under her bold direction
and unquenchable desire for continu-
ous improvement, LRHS has expanded
its scope of services and facilities and
has risen to prominence on a national
level. In addition, during her tenure,
Lakeland Regional Medical Center has
become the fifth largest hospital in
Florida and the inaugural member of
the USF Health System which will
transform Lakeland Regional into a
teaching hospital.
Thompson also spearheaded a
massive initiative to digitize Lakeland
Regional, with a single electronic
health records system. This imple-
mentation was the culmination of her
resolute commitment to advanced
technologies and illustrates her
ability to inspire and lead more than
4,500 employees to historic achieve-
ments with this critical improvement.
Before her appointment as LRHS's
president and CEO, Elaine served
as president of Lankenau Hospital
in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania and
executive vice president and chief
operating officer of St. Luke's Hospital
and Health Network in Bethlehem,
Pennsylvania.


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I~u N


"My whole family is thankful that my knee
replacement gave me my life back...especially
my horse, Hot 'Lil Badger."
Christene Griffin, RN
Joint Replacement Care Coordinator
Florida Hospital Center fr Bone, oint t- Spine



L Christene chose our Center because as an OR nurse, she
worked directly with the surgical team for five years. It was also
because she wanted the best technology with the most
compassionate care. And it certainly was a plus that the Center
is ranked by HealthGrades, the leading independent health care
ratings organization, in the top 10% nationally for Orthopedic
Services. Now, Christene is our Joint Replacement Care
<,-li Coordinator, sharing her knowledge, her insight,
her compassion...and her new lease on life.


A Take your first step toward a life free of joint pain.
7 Call (863) 402-3627 or visit www.FHHeartland.org.


f i iitU S'

* '.
"I,, Ity


!.. 'nj r Bone, J'! A' Cj i t .Sine
(.t'enter fi,, Bone. Joint 5' Spine


P JT OU


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I


October 24, 2012


Page 30 Frostproof News


" ~..p I~? J~`'t~
8,,1 a.. it b ric


-./ -A


Bc. aIi T: E I' r I:"
''










Black rings around neck associated with diabetes


DEAR DRS. DONOHUE AND
ROACH: My granddaughter has had
diabetes and a fatty liver since she
was young. She is 16, overweight and
refuses to exercise. She has black rings
around her throat. I've been told it's
from the diabetes not being properly
controlled. Also, I've noticed a dark
tinge to the skin around her shoulders
under the arms. A.C.G.
ANSWER: It sounds like your grand-
daughter has acanthosis nigricans, a
skin condition strongly associated with
diabetes -- specifically with type II
diabetes, the kind where the problem
is resistance to insulin, not a total lack
of insulin, as it is in type I diabetes.
Type II used to be called "adult onset"
or "non-insulin requiring." However,
more frequently, adolescents and even
children are being diagnosed with type
II diabetes, and some people with type
II require insulin. Acanthosis nigricans
happens most commonly in the nape
of the neck, the underarms and the
groin, but in more severe cases, it
can include areas around the eyes or
around joints. There are other causes,
but insulin resistance is by far the most
common.
It is important to know that this


1 A

I .


TO YOUR
GOOD
HEALTH


darkening of the skin (often associated
with a thicker, velvet-like texture of the
skin) has nothing to do with hygiene,
and does not even necessarily relate to
diabetes control. It relates to the degree
of insulin resistance (the amount of
insulin needed to reduce blood sugar
is much greater in a person with type
II diabetes than in a person without it),
and is more common in darker-skinned
people.
Being overweight almost always
increases insulin resistance, so losing
weight usually improves the dark pig-
mentation. More importantly, weight
loss can reduce the fatty liver, reduce
the amount of medication needed and
make exercise easier. But weight loss


can be very, very hard to accomplish,
and particularly so for adolescents.
I cannot overemphasize the social
stigma some adolescent girls feel when
they are overweight, and combined
with a serious condition like diabetes,
it can have a devastating effect on these
young women.
A family that is accepting, supportive
and encouraging can make all the
difference. Helping her choose a better
diet and get some exercise even if it's
inside the house, if she is uncomfort-
able getting out likewise can begin
to turn around this problem. Working
with her doctor and honestly discuss-
ing her body-shape-issue is important,
as many diabetes medicines make
losing weight harder and a few, such
as metformin (Glucophage and oth-
ers) and exenatide (Byetta and others)
make weight loss easier.
Finally, for those who are excessively
overweight, bariatric surgery has a high
cure rate for diabetes. I don't recom-
mend it often, but we are increasingly
considering it in younger diabetics.
DEAR DRS. DONOHUE AND
ROACH: I can't get rid of ringworm.
Please help me I can't find a doctor
to help. C.S.


ANSWER: Ringworm is a fungal
infection of the skin. It has nothing
to do with worms. Most of the time,
treatment with an over-the-counter
antifungal cream, such as miconazole
(Desenex and others) or terbinafine
(Lamisil and others), twice daily for
two or three weeks (until a week or so
after the rash fades), usually is effec-
tive. If it doesn't work, it's time to see a
dermatologist.
TO READERS: The booklet on colon
cancer provides useful information on
the causes and cures of this common
malady. Readers can obtain a copy
by writing: Dr. Donohue No. 505,
Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
Enclose a check or money order (no
cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the
recipient's printed name and address.
Please allow four weeks for delivery.

Drs. Donohue and Roach regret that
they are unable to answer individual
letters, but will incorporate them in the
column whenever possible. Readers may
write the doctors or request an order
form of available health newsletters at
PO. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475. Readers also may order health
newsletters from www.rbmamall.com.


Study: Creative people more susceptible to being mentally ill


Vincent Van Gogh was indisputably a
great artist and also somewhat de-
ranged. The specific nature and cause
of his suffering is a matter of continu-
ing conjecture. Experts have suggested
epilepsy, bipolar disorder, sunstroke,
acute intermittent porphyria, lead
poisoning and Meniere's disease. What
isn't debatable is the fact that Van
Gogh, who committed suicide in 1890,
was mentally ill.
And, perhaps, the source of his
creativity. In a new study out of the
Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, re-
searchers say people in creative profes-
sions, from dancers and photographers
to writers and scientists, are more
susceptible to psychiatric disorders
than the population at large, including
depression, anxiety syndrome, alcohol
abuse, drug abuse, autism, ADHD,
anorexia nervosa and suicide.
The study, which tracked 1.2 million
patients and relatives, is the largest of
its kind.
The findings, which reinforce earlier
research, aren't necessarily bad, say
the authors. It's a question, perhaps, of
how much one is willing to sacrifice for
one's art.
Put another, less artful way: "If one
takes the view that certain phenomena
associated with the patient's illness are
beneficial, it opens the way for a new
approach to treatment," said study


WELL NEWS
Scott LaFee



author Simon Kyaga. "In that case, the
doctor and patient must come to an
agreement on what is to be treated,
and at what cost. In psychiatry and
medicine generally there has been a
tradition to see the disease in black-
and-white terms and to endeavor to
treat the patient by removing every-
thing regarded as morbid."
Van Gogh's life may have had its mor-
bid moments, but his art was stellar.

Get me that, stat!
On average, women in New Zealand
are oldest when they give birth to their
first child: 29.9 years. American women
rank 14th at 24.9 years.

Body of knowledge
When you laugh, you expel short
bursts of air up to 70 mph.

Life in Big Macs
One hour of riding a bus burns
68 calories (based on a 150-pound per-
son) or the equivalent of 0.1 Big Macs.

Phobia of the Week
Cherophobia Fear of gaiety


You deserve personalized quality health care!

Benigno Feliciano, M.D
SDiplomate of the American
Board of Internal Medicine
Cardiac Diseases
0 0 P 0 i, : e* High Blood Pressure
adult is-e10i Pulmonary Diseases
."B- Osteo/ Rheumatoid Arthritis
S.. Hypo/Hyperthyroidism


1137 Druid Circle
Lake Wales, Florida
2000 Osprey Blvd., Suite 110
Bartow, Florida


* Diabetes
* Skin Diseases/ Cancer
* High Cholesterol
* Strokes
* Wound Care


IMI


Never say diet
The Major League Eating speed-eat-
ing record for fried catfish is 7.5 pounds
in 10 minutes, held by Patrick Bertoletti.

Hypochondriac's guide
Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome
sounds funny. It's not. The condition
involves venous malformations appearing


both inside and outside the body. They can
be extremely painful and bleed constantly.
It's especially worrisome if the condition
involves the gastrointestinal tract.
The cause of BRBNS isn't known,
though there is a recognized genetic
component. Fortunately, the condition
is very rare: Less than 155 cases have
been documented worldwide.


Se habla Espanol
Monday Friday: 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
863-533-1617
Accepting new patients 16 and older
Walk ins welcome Same day appointments


P- "Mm- --- H


Frostproof News Page 31


October 24 2012


I





Page 32 Frostproof News


October 24, 2012


I...--


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O E irNT' '.i.fl.:rilv .4 219 i6 L i.r iT ili: 6267 ?
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m New 2012/2013 CHEVY


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ALL Pp CES & rCOUN5S 14- ,0 "ATE. ALLY r.i' i ; AS~ EN :E. ,-1.t: E 5 ,. GMM TARGETED PRIVATE OFFER, PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE FEE & DEALER FEE. LEASE TERMS VARY BY MODEL OFFER VALID
WITH OFFP S AV ALE ,A T lIIE OF pUBLICATO3.H AND tr-E S JEJCT 0 CHANGE. PHOTOS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.


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Starting From

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i







REAL ESTATE


Wednesday, October 24, 2012


Bartow: 863-533-4183


BARTOW LAKE WALES FORT M EADE FROSTPROOF HAINES CITY LAKELAND W INTER HAVEN


How much house


can I afford?
Once you have decided to buy a home, the
next step is to determine how much you can
afford to spend. Many factors come in to play
to determine the mortgage amount you qualify
for; In-
come,
crime, Joni Gerard
rating, It]
monthly -
expens-
es, the te l.c Real fEstate, Inc.
amount of
cash avail-
able for a down payment and current interest
rates will all be a factor in the final decision.
Your real estate agent will be able to guide
you through the process of finding a reputable
lender. The lender will pre-qualify you for a
loan. They will also be able to match you with a
specific type of loan that will benefit you most.
Some of the different types of loans available
are:
FHA, with as little as 3.5%
down payment;
USDA, up to 100% financing available;
VA loan, For Veterans only;
Conventional, may require as
much as 2% down; and
Reverse Mortgages, which are
designed for seniors.
3308 Indian Pipes Trail,
Blue Jordan Forest -Frostproof
3/2 spacious DW w/dbl carport,
3 horse stall barn w/tack room,
3 pastures, 3 lots on 10+acres.
Asking only $145,000
Must see property!
Cindy Wise, Agent, Keystone Realty, Inc.
wisecrew2@aol.com
245 S. Scenic Hwy., Frostproof, FL 33843
www.Keystone-RealEstate.NET


What's HOT in the marketplace?


Joni Gerard, participated in the sale of this 4000 square foot house, on 5 acres with 135 feet on Blue Lake. Sale price $278,000.


FHA insured loans are available on single
family and multifamily homes. The buyer is re-
quired to make a down payment of 3.5% of the
purchase price. Mortgage insurance is required
on FHA loans until to mortgaged amount is
less that 80% of the current market value. The
condition of the home does play a factor as the
property must meet FHA guidelines.
USDA loans, also known as Rural Develop-
ment Loan, allows qualified buyers to purchase
a home with $0 down. The property must be
located in a rural area as defined by USDA
guidelines, but most of Lake Wales meets the
rural requirement.
VA Loan, or Veterans Loan, began in 1944
through the GI Bill of Rights. The buyer must


use the property as their primary residence.
The maximum guarantee authorized by the
VA is 25% of the loan amount. The maximum
VA home loan is $417,000, except in Hi and AK
where the maximum loan is $625,000.
Conventional loans require a down payment
of 20% of the purchase price. This type of loan
can have a fixed or adjustable interest rate.
A reverse mortgage, aka Lifetime Mortgage, is
a loan available to home owners of retirement
age and is used to release the home equity in
the property.
To learn more about the different loan pack-
ages available in your area, call your real es-
tate agent and ask for a referral to one of their
trusted lenders.


LEGACY REAL ESTATE CENTER


Lots of'
Living Area
* Open Foor Plan 3 B B2BA
South Lake Wales
* Near Warner U. & Bok Acad.
Larc Fenced Yard
$75,000


Sils Road
Great Investment
Over 5 Acres
*Nice 2 'RI.'2
Lotso of Pn.at) 'ro, Ilc
* Long Term Tenant In Place
$45,000


Car-er Street
In City Limits
* Open & Airy 3BDs2BA
*Wellt Built In 2X)7
Convenient L cation
Short Saie
$49,000


f INN& a 7W0 State Rd. 60 East
M = I E Lake Wales, FL 33853
E863-676-7040
LUS REAL ESTATE INC.
"PRIME PLUS SERVICE YOU DESERVE!"


FORECLOSE RE. JUST LISTED SE WINTER HAVEN JUST LISTED,
Hilhide Drive in Lake Wales. 2 Br. 5 Bedroom 3.5 Bath Executive Home,
2Ba. On Large Lot. Enclosed Pool, Over 3,700 Ft. Living Area, 2 Story
Large Screened Porch. Florida Room. Home. Spacious Modern Kitchen. Large
Near Lake, Walking and Bike Path. Master Suite WA ih Walk-In Shower. Ja-
Greart Price $59,696 ctrui Tub, Bank Furcasure $296,000
S lOP BY OL R OFFICE L OR .A FREE LIST OF FORECLOS URES!
PLEASE X IO'l I OUR H L DSI C www.primeplusrealestate.com


You can find every business and service Under the sun in the
Business & Service Directory!


Make your business a part of it!

Call 863-676-3467


- I I II lr


CLASSIFIED
Autos
Auctions
Items for Sale
Homes for Sale
Homes for Rent
and More...








Page-- -~-"- 2 CLSIFID Octbe 24,2012 I


1000







REAL ESTATE


"We Are Pledged To The Letter And
Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achieve-
ment Of Equal Housing Opportunity
Throughout The Nation. We Encour-
age And Support An Affirmative
Advertising And Marketing Program In
Which there Are No Barriers To
Obtaining Housing Because of Race,
Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Famil-
ial Status Or National Origin."

1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH,
WELL MAINTAINED, ready
to move-in condition, tile
floors, large fenced yard,
screen porch, near Warner
University, $64,500 ID# 116
PRIME PLUS REALE ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
SE WINTER HAVEN 4 BED-
ROOM 3 BATH BUILT IN
2006, Beautiful 2 story home
with new kitchen appliances,
kitchen has granite counter-
tops, formal living and dining
areas, large master suite with
walk in shower plus garden
tub; home has over 2,500 ft.
of living area, beautiful vault-
ed ceilings, crown moldings,
just listed at $229,900 ID #
7334 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

LAKEFRONT HOME ON
LAKE WALK- IN- WATER,
large covered dock with boat
lift, formal living and dining
room, family room with fire
place, enclosed florida room,
remodeled kitchen with break-
fast nook, sun room, work
shop, screen porch; Spectac-
ular views from family room,
kitchen and florida room, lush
landscaping, privacy fenced
yard, utility shed, $255,000
ID# 9402 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

LAKEFRONT FORECLO-
SURE, BEAUTIFUL 3 BR. 2.
BA. HOME, Area of nice well
maintained homes, spacious
modern floor plan, great room
concept, master suite with
bonus room and access to
lanai and deck, large deck
with fire-pit and dock, JUST
REDUCED TO $165,000, ID #
5707 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

NEAR LAKE WAILES LAKE,
3 Br. 2 Ba. on Large Lot,
Home has wood floors and
tile, kitchen has been remod-
eled with granite counter-
tops, and beautiful cabinets,
being sold as a "short sale",
call for appointment and more
information, ID # 940, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

COMMERCIAL OFFICE USE
OR RESIDENTIAL ON HIGH-
WAY 60 EAST, LAKE
WALES, 3 Br. 1.5 Ba. Home,
large lot, ample area for park-
ing, would make a great office
location on busy highway 60,
$49,900 ID# 834 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

4 BR. 1 BA. BLOCK HOME,
Great BUY! Located in
Sebring, convenient location,
just reduced to $29,900 ID#
2326 PRIME PLUS REAL


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

AVON PARK--WE HAVE
SEVERAL HOMES FOR
SALE, all are priced to sell
quickly, some with lake view,
great investment opportunity;
call today for more informa-
tion or stop by our office for
details and map.
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 or visit
online www.primeplus-
realestate.com

SEBRING--WE HAVE MANY
LISTINGS IN SEBRING AREA,
HOMES, CONDOS, Priced
Low, call 863-676-7040
today for more information or
stop by our office PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. or
visit online at www.primeplus-
realestate.com

LAKE ASHTON FORECLO-
SURE, 2 BR. 2 BA. Beautiful
home with open floor plan,
large rooms, huge Florida
room, 2 car garage plus golf
cart parking, home is in move-
in condition, call today for
appointment to see and more
information, JUST REDUCED
to 129,900 ID# 5304 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

LAKE ASHTON FORECLO-
SURE, NEW ON THE MAR-
KET, Located on a corner lot,
this home is ready to move in,
new paint, new carpet, spa-
cious floor plan with bonus
den, screened back porch,
call for more information,
$134,900, PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
ID # 4075 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

NEAR WARNER UNIVERSI-
TY, 3 BEDROOM 2 BATH,
located in crooked lake park,
spacious split-floor plan,
home has recently been
updated, has detached
garage with RV parking,
screen porch, $94,900 id#
4918, PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

LAKE-FRONT BEAUTY, 2Br
2Ba nestled on private Lake
Cypress in Lake Wales, enjoy
boating, fishing and using
your own private boat ramp.
Offers a spa in the back sun-
room, newer roof, complete
a/c system, kitchen cabinets
and appliances, Reduced
$254,000 id# 1671 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com

WATER-FRONT BEAUTIFUL
HOME ON CANAL LEADING
TO LAKE WALK IN WATER,
Move-In condition, 3 Br. 2 Ba.,
cathedral ceiling, spacious liv-
ing room, large Florida room
with view of canal and lake,
formal dining, plus eating
space next to kitchen, all
appliances, washer and dryer,
2 car garage, workshop,
large covered dock on deep
water canal, just seconds
from the lake, $189,900 id#
6616 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
Lake Wales, fully renovated
& furn., 2bd/2ba. You .-.Ill like
this home. Large lot with
pond, community owned club-
house, pool, boat ramp and
dock on Walk in Water Lake.
Only, $48,000. 863-632-
0894.


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE

Homes for Sale
Frostproof Listings
618 Dulcimer Ln, 2/2/2
car garage, almost 1 acre
$59,900 Call Michelle
405 Walter Ave 3/2/1 cpt,
wood & tile floors, fenced
$64,900 Call Michelle
2660 Bear Run 2/2/1 cpt,
Blue Jordan Forest $80,000.
OBO Call Cindy
204 Woodstork Way 3/2 1
acre, fenced $82,000. Call
Michelle
206 Woodstork Way 3/2/2
garage new wood floor, tile
120,000, OBO Call Cindy
2616 Sand Pine Tr
3/2/Oversized garage 3.24
acres $138,900. OBO Call
Michelle
1140 Hopson Rd. 2/2
+Unique Detached Lanai
w/hot tub 11 +/-Acres
Reduced $139,900. Call
Michelle
3308 Indian Pipes Tr.
3/2/2 carport, 10 acres,
horse stalls + more
$145,000 Call Cindy
409 W 9th St 4/2.5/2 car
garage, split level, wood &
tile floors reduced $149,000
Call Michelle
313 S Palm Ave 3BR/1BA
Ig porch, cha, corner lot Ask-
ing $35,000. Call Michelle
83 Yale Ave 2/1, $39,900.
Call Wesley
204 Central Ave 2/1/1gar,
$49,000. OBO Call Cindy
Keystone Realty Inc.
863-635-0030

1040 CONDOSNILLAS
FOR SALE
2BDRM, 2BATH CONDO.
55+ Ideal for handicapped.
First Floor. 1 block from
Police Station, and 4 blocks
from downtown Historic Lake
Wales. $32,500. By Owner
863-676-2386
CONDO @ LAKE WALES
COUNTRY CLUB, Beautifully
furnished 2 Bed 2 Bath 2nd.
floor unit, Condo with Spa-
cious Floor Plan Located in
Golf Community. Family
room/lanai, Overlooks Pool,
Golf Course and Lagoon.
Many Community Amenities.
$99,900 id# 9202 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com

LAKE WALES COUNTRY
CLUB 2nd. Floor Condo, Fully
Furnished, Screened Balcony,
Great View Of Golf Course
And Lagoon, $99,000 id#
9202 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

GREAT PRICE ON THIS
FURNISHED 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH CONDO, 1,184 ft. liv-
ing area, screened porch,
convenient location to shop-
ping in the city limits of Lake
Wales. $29,900, PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 id # 130 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
3 BR. 2 BA. MOBILE HOME
ON 1 ACRE, NICE WELL
MAINTAINED HOME WITH
STORAGE BLD. Located just
east of Lake Wales near Lake
Rosalie, Great Fishing and
boating lake, $65,000 ID#
2188 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES
37 ACRE MIDDLE TN FARM
with 13 acre lake, nice home.
Selling at Absolute Auction,
Memorial Day. Van Massey
Auction Lic 1711. (931)433-
8686 Visit vanmassey.com

Employ Classified!


MOVE IN

NO DEPOSIT
Mobile Homes
as low as
$475 per month
call James
863-605-5736
27g2577 -


ADVERTISE!



Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Brains
7 Like many a reply
env.
10 Low-tech missile
13 New Age
physician
14 Zeno's home
15 Namibia
neighbor: Abbr.
16 Florida export
17 *"Ditto!"
19*1955
Communist
defense treaty
21 Old Russian
dynast
22 Pulitzer
playwright Rice
23 The tiniest bit
25 _Moines
26 Sink, as a
snooker ball
28 Flattering
deception
31 Daddy-o
33 Marsupial
sometimes called
a bear
34 Friction reducer
37 *"1 can answer
your questions"
40 Map reader's
aid
41 Firefighter Red
43 Gaming console
with a fitness
component
44 County in eastern
Ireland
47 R&B's Hill
49 Peoria hrs.
52 Score tempo
54 Opposite of
neo-
56 Fr. miss
58 *Momentarily
forget
60 Like the best
bonds, and a hint
to the answers to
starred clues
62 Dumpster fill
63 Reunion
attendees
64 Goes down in the
west
65 Done for the first
time
66 Sew up
67 de deux
68 Trusty mounts


By Gareth Bain 10/24/12


DOWN
1 Made an
appearance
2 Team captain's
concern
3 Moving janglers
4 Teeth-cleaning
step
5 Title writer in a
John Irving novel
6 Hasenpfeffer, for
one
7 Director's cry
8 Jam thickener
9 Black Hills terr.
10 *"Wheel of
Fortune" host
11 "A Day Without
Rain" New Ager
12 Culture medium
14 Israeli diplomat
Abba
18 When one might
have a late lunch
20 'The Chosen"
novelist Chaim
24 'The Addams
Family" adjective
27 Special _:
military force
29 Flamenco shout
30 Shoreline
indentation
32 Print maker


S (1313 iS Vd 0a N 3
N 9 IC 1 I s VO1 AsN
a sjnj ujei HD ..... v v

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- NI VI1 1 H IS -I I

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m sloo n 31NIOi HJ-41G 3

V A I N A m 1VlN13 1 s v 0

9NVIo0 S IS 0 d OH

paJoS alzznd s,AepsOupOAM


34 Wine barrel wood
35 Dictator Amin
36 *Space cadet's
home?
37 Inland Asian sea
38 Lehar operetta
"The Merry "
39 Breathable gases
42 Car at a long
light, say
45 Herbal brew
46 Everglades birds
48 Cheerful


49 Painter Monet
50 Had an inkling
51 Small gifts
53 Extremists, for
short
55 2004 remake
starring Jude
Law
56 Fabricate
57 Rested
59 Venus de Milo's
lack
61 Egyptian snake


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest),

5 9 2 7 8 Rating:GOLD

3 9 t 6 8 1 Z L

3 8 2 4 8 1 E L 9 9S 6
9 E L 6 t7 9 1 8
-------------|--L6 98
4 83 t I17 I 9 6 L 8 Z
5 9 6 9 8 L 17 Z I S

6 1 3 L I 9 E 8 6 9 1
V7 9 8 1 E 6 L
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8 1 2 7 I 6 E t L 8 9
5 8 L 9 Z 6 t,9 I

3 7 5 1 4 zilZ ol uoiinEos
10/24112


October 24, 2012


CLASSIFIED


Page 2


0/59/18
-
[ oul soo )








October-I 24,01 CLSIFIE PageC 3 --


1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES
DEVELOPER FORCED LIQ-
UIDATION Smoky Mtn. Lake
Property Priced @ Foreclo-
sure/Short sale. Up to 1.00%
Financing/5% interest. Hurry-
Only 30 Reservations avail-
able! (877)551-0550 ext 100

1210 HOMES FOR RENT
Fort Meade, 3bd, 2ba, 838
S. Hendry. w/d hookup.
C/H/A, $850.mo, $600.sd,
863-698-4897.
LAKE WALES *5 houses
for RENT 2Bd/1Ba, $550
monthly $450 deposit...
*1 house 3bd/lba, $600
monthly, $450 deposit. Call
863-676-5066 or 863-676-
1901 NO CALLS after 9pm
Lake Wales- 3BR/2BA home
with screened pool. New tile in iiv-
ing room. Pool care included in
the rent. $1150/month, SD
$1150. Call Maggie Stohler at
Legacy Leasing Services, Inc
863-676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Davenport- Lovely 4BR/2.5BA
pool home on corner lot. 2 sto-
ries with living space on lower
floor and bedrooms upstairs. All
new appliances in kitchen.
$1100/month, SD $1100. Call
Maggie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Services, Inc 863-676-0024 or
visit www.LegacyLeases.com
Fort Meade- 3BR/1BA with hard-
wood floors throughout. Large
backyard. Interior washer/dryer
hookup. $550/month, SD $550.
Call Maggie Stohler at Legacy
Leasing Services, Inc 863-676-
0024 or visit www.LegacyLeas-
es.com
Frostproof- 3BR/2BA on Lake
Reedy. Extra large lot. All new
paint and flooring. Florida room.
Interior washer/dryer hookup.
$875/month, SD $875. Call Mag-
gie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
services, Inc 863-676-0024 or
visit www.LegacyLeases.com
Commercial
Lake Wales office building with
over 300 feet of highway frontage
on Highway 27 South. Close to
27/60 intersection. Building
includes a spacious, bright recep-
tion area, four separate offices, 2
storage areas, and 2 acres of
land with plenty of parking space.
New AC unit and well pump.
$1750/month, SD $1750. Call
Maggie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Services, Inc 863-676-0024 or visit
www.LegacyLeases.com


212 E. Stuart Ave.
Lake Wales, Fl. 33853

Need Cash?
Have A
Garage Sale


1210 HOMES FOR RENT

NELSON AND ASSOCIATES
BARTOW RENTALS
2/2 Carpenter, $750.
2/1 Carpenter, $750.
2/1 Palm Place $750.
No pets. No application fee.
See us for all of your
Real Estate needs.
Nell.nelson@verizon.net





Call Nell at
(863) 640-1864

1240 CONDOSNILLAS
FOR RENT
WINTERSET CONDO -
LAKE VIEW 2bd / 2bath,
upstairs
unit. Community amenities.
$800.00 per month. Security
deposit required. Call 863-
678-1498 or 863-241-1528

1300 DUPLEXES FOR RENT
BARTOW 459 Searcy Ave.
3/2, 1340 sf, w/d hookups,
CHA, appliances, 1 year
lease, $650/monthly,
$600/deposit. Call 863-603-
7715 or 863-533-4482.
BARTOW, 1 bedroom
572 E. Pearl Street.
No pets. $400/mo.
$150/security
Call Pearl 863-299-3522.
LAKE WALES lbd/lba, No
Pets, No Smoking, 1 Adult.
Rent $400 mo, SD $100. Call
676-6201

1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

APARTMENT FOR RENT
863-614-2846
CALL FOR DETAILS
BARTOW, lbd, partly fur-
nished. One mile East of Bar-
tow on Moose Lodge Rd.
(863) 533-0146 or (863)
512-0453.
FORT MEADE, 2BR/1.5BA,
w/d hookup, screen porch,
very nice and clean. $575.
monthly.
321-228-4724

1340 MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT

Connersville Area, 2bd,
1.5ba, Call: 863-533-5767 -
Lake Wales, 4807 Catfish
Rd., Unfurn. 2bd, 2ba, Ig.
Floridaroom. Fenced, no pets.
$600. mo., $600 dep.
803-337-8862


1350 EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT
LAKE WALES Efficience
Apartment. $135 week. Elec-
tric / Water Included. No
Smokers, No Pets. 863-632-
7013

1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
BEAUTIFUL CORNER LOT
NEAR BLUE LAKE, if you are
looking for a spot to build
your dream home, this is the
perfect location, near blue
lake, close to US 27, area of
nice homes; $29,900 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040

HOME SITE, Nice half Acre
lot located in Beautiful Area of
Homes. Growing Region Cen-
trally Located between Winter
Haven and Lake Wales. Par-
tially Cleared and ready to
Build your First Home.
$27,900 id #cc PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. (863) 676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

WOODED HOME SITE! 2
Acres of Beautiful Woods in
deed restricted community to
build your new home! Not too
far from Public Boat Ramp
into Lake.Rosalie. Owner Moti-
vated and will look at all Rea-
sonable Offers! $39,900 id#
11209 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC (863) 676-7040.
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

LAKE FRONT ON LAKE
WALK IN WATER, Just Over
5 Acres, Partially Wooded,
Private Location, Dead End
Street. Great Price! $59,900
id# lt22 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE, INC 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

OVER 1 ACRE ON LAKE
PIERCE, Great home-site on
Timberlane Rd. Lake Pierce,
One of the finest fishing lakes
in Florida. Beautiful old Flori-
da Woods; the lot is located
on paved rd. $58,000 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. ID#
7111 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

BLUE JORDAN FOREST,
ALMOST 3 ACRES, BEAU-
TIFUL NATURAL FLORIDA
WOODS, Gated community,
lots of wildlife, enjoy the coun-
try peaceful atmosphere,
$22,000 ID # 7299 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com


1515 WATERFRONT
North Carolina Mountain
Lakefront lots. New gated
waterfront community. Dock-
able lots with up to 300' of
shoreline, Low insurance, Low
property tax. Call Now
(800)709-5253

1520 OUT OF TOWN LOTS
NC mountain property
must go. 4.5 acres with out-
standing views and privacy.
$25,000 OBO, great for
home or cabin. (828)394-
9298. Ask for Richard

1610 BUSINESS RENTALS
Commercial property for
rent, 322 S Scenic Hwy, Lake
Wales. Excellent business
location, large building
10,000 sq. ft., 14 ft overhead
doors, 1500 sq. ft. office
show room with A/C. Security
deposit required. $2000.00
per month 863-678-1498 or
863-241-1528

1620 COMMERCIAL
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY
OVER 14 ACRES HIGHWAY
FRONTAGE IN AVON PARK,
Multiple parcels, with mixed
use. Excellent potential for
commercial highway busi-
ness, or income property on
U.S. 27. Bank owned, recent
appraisal and priced accord-
ingly, call for more informa-
tion. PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

2000






EMPLOYMENT

2001 HELP WANTED
Drivers: Local, Great Pay &
Benefits. Home every day. Pd.
Holidays/Vac. 401K CDL-A.
w/X end. School grads.
Accepted 866-358-3937
A Few Pro Drivers Needed
Top Pay & 401K Great Equip-
ment & Benfefits 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
ACT NOW! New Pay Increase!
37-46 cpm. New Trucks in
2011. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Aviation
Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Avi-
ation Institute of Maintenance
(866) 314-3769.


2001 HELP WANTED
Alan Jay Automotive Net-
work is now hiring Auto Ser-
vice Technicians. Great pay /
benefits, Pd. training, vaca-
tion, holidays, and more! Send
resume to iames.lizotte@alan-
iay.com or call James Lizotte
at (863) 314-5324
ASAP! New Pay Increase!
34-46 cpm. 300 Newer
Trucks. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
CALL NOW! Top 5% Pay!
Excellent Benefits. 300 New
T660's. Need 2 months. CDL-
A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
CDL DRIVERS- Great Pay!
Tons of Texas Frac work!
Great company! Company
paid benefits! Must have bulk
pneumatic trailer experience.
( :Il today! (800)491-9029.
CDL-A Drivers- Relocate for
Tons of Great Paying Texas
Oilfield work! Great compa-
ny/Paid benefits! Must have
bulk pneumatic trailer experi-
ence. Call today! (800)491-
9029
CDL-A DRIVERS. Central Flori-
da company seeks Solo &
Team Drivers. Tank and Dry
Van positions offering some
regional. lyr OTR/ Good MVR
required. (877)882-6537 or
www.oakleytransport.com
CLAIMS ADJUSTERS
NEEDED due to active Storm
Season. JEL's 5-day Boot
Camp, Nations #1 hands-on
trainer can prepare you. High
Income www.JELTraining.com
- Companies waiting
CYPRESS TRUCK LINES
Home Weekends! Southeast
Regional, Top Pay & Great
Benefits! 6 Months TT exp
CDL with clean MVR. Call
(800)545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com
DRIVER- Not getting enough
miles? Join Knight Transporta-
tion and increase your income
with our steady freight. New
Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience. (800)414-
9569. www.driveknight.com
Driver- Recession Proof
Freight. Plenty of miles. Need
refresher? No out-of-pocket
tuition at FFE. $1000 Bonus
for CO's & $1500 Incentive
for O/O's. recruit@ffex.net.
(855)356-7121
Driver-Drivers choose
from Weekly or Daily Pay.
Regional, OTR or Express
Lanes, Full or Part-time, CDL-
A, 3 months recent experi-
ence required. (800)414-
9569 www.driveknight.com
Drivers Earn Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR Flatbed
exp. Call: (800)572-5489 Joy
ext. 238 Susan ext. 227 SUN-
BELT TRANSPORT, LLC


2001 HELP WANTED
Drivers No Experience -
No problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to
$.49 per mile! CRST VAN
EXPEDITED (800)326-2778
www.JoinCRST.com
Drivers Earn Up to 39C/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR
Flatbed exp. Call: (800)572-
5489 Susan ext. 227 Joy ext.
238 SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC.
Drivers Wanted-OTR Food
Grade Tanker Drivers Needed
Competitive pay, Benefits,
SGuaranteed time off Class A
CDL-w/tanker endorsement
Prefer 2yrs experience
(800)569-6816 otterytrans-
portation.com
Drivers- No Experience-
No Problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to 49C per mile!
CRST VAN EXPEDITED
(800)326-2778 www.Join-
CRST.com
Earn Up to $.51cpm!!! CDL-
A Drivers, Tanker & Dry Van
positions available. 1 year
OTR experience, Good MVR &
work history needed. Call
(877)882-6537 or apply
www.oakleytransport.com
FRAC SAND HAULERS with
complete bulk pneumatic rigs
only. Relocate to Texas for
Tons of work. Great compa-
ny/pay. Gas cards/Quick Pay
available. (800)491-9029
Freight Up = More $ 34-46
CPM 2Mos. CDL Class A Dri-
ving Exp (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
GROWING Local Newspa-
per is Seeking Qualified
Sales People. Please Send
Resumes to
pnorthrop@thelake-
walesnews.com. or call
Paul Northrop at
(863)676-3467.
Heat & Air JOBS Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on environ-
ment. Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job Place-
ment Assistance! (877)994-
9904

JUST GRADUATE? Play in
Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New
York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys.
$400-$800 wkly. Paid
expenses. Signing Bonus. Call
(877)259-6983
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED! Hospi-
tals & Insurance Companies
hiring now! No experience?
Local Training & Job Place-
ment Assistance available!
(888)219-5161.
Medical Billing Trainees
Needed! Hospitals & Insur-
ance Companies hiring now!
No experience? Local Training
& Job Placement available! HS
Grad or GED & Computer
needed. (888)589-9677.
Medical Management
Careers start here Get con-
nected online. Attend college
on your own time. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. Call (800)481-9409

Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial-Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
IClassified = Results]


One Click. Job Reso.ce .
-. 0 1 -,'J : ,,


EmployFlorida.com

1-866-FLA-2345


S Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ nonda
Telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Flonda Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol.


~69~3(
I~t~~~wuu~ir~a


Page 3


October 24, 2012


CLASSIFIED







Pae 4 D Octobe 24,2


Call 863-676-3467 to place your ad


S CENTRAL FLORIDA'S COOLING SPECIALISTS

.... POWELL

,A/C & HEATING
Sl SALES. SERVICE. INSTALLATION
SAll Makes/Models Residential & Commercial
Financing available on new & replacement units
c FREE ESTIMATES on installations & replacements
INSURED. STATE CERTIFIED CAC1815469
863-293-5046


Colonial Square
Apartments


1 & 2 BEDROOM SL (CIOt'U
RISIDENCEs %\% I I 4 (COMF)OR I .\BI.
FL.OORPI\NS TO( CiHOOSE FRO(I.
Rates range from $465 .S610/
including water, sewer I- trash.


222 W. Ethelene St., Bartow
(Behind DO'
(863) 533-4651


Genrgelton Square Apartments
S' .v ..,.-'-.'c. ;" :. ;. ',~f

We offer 1st floor apartment homes that include
1 & 2 bedroom apartments. Our amenities are
screened-in patios, private entrances, swimming
pool, weekly resident functions, W/D connections
(in select units) and so much more! We pay some
utilities which include water/sewer and trash.
CALL AND ASK ABOUT OUR
GREAT MOVE-IN SPECIALS!
Directions: We are conveniently located behind Publix off State Rd. 60 in Lake Wales, FL.
200 Emerald Ave., Lake Wales, FL 33853

A WHOLES__.A LEJ


3 UPDATED FLOOR PLANS!
Contemporary & Open Studio with Full Kitchen,
and Ceramic Tile throughout, from $405/month.
Spacious 1 Bedroom starting at $475/month.
Large 2 Bedroom Residence with washer/dryer
hookups + utility room. from 5595/month.
j; /w.OAD' r-d',Ai o jlA'ltn Lr- Ap .r.c-rni I
1285 N US 17 Bartow (Aside WalMart)
86._3) 533- 5 0|


N -W, .T K. -NG)-

NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
Immediate Availability Upon Approval
1 & 2 Bedroom Units. Affordable housing for low to
middle income families. Rent starts at $352 and s395.
All units have W/D hookups & kitchen appliances.
TDD 800-955-8771 Phone/Fax 863-676-9213
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 7am-Noon
S 401 Winston Ave., Lake Wales, FL 33853
Hc es "ed This institution is an equal opportunity provider/employer.


| AUTO
WHOLESALE
We buy any vehicle
in any condition.
Title or no title.
If you have a bank lien,
No Problem


Don't trade it in we will pay
up to $30,000 for any make
or model car, truck, van or SUV.
Call:AJat813-335-3794 or
813-237-1892


:BS SC OMP U ""EAR


:. .. -, 8i .- ,

s .'^ ^' / I. ,, -----v l .^. .



. .. : ..., ;.! ; ZiC ... ;r' ,O0
W ON] z


Buy: 1
the f
Book
[ledil Illrcnh "h!\
Why Pay Full
Retail?
Tues-Fr. '4.an-4pn
Sat 9am-3pm
3877 Recker Hw y.
`Winler Haen
863-875-5735


U-


FULL ROOMS
OF BOOKS TO
CHOOSE FROM!
*Paperbacks $3 or Less
* Hard Covers $5 or Less


CO s & St s tool


1 For Any Book! I
I We do NOTbuy books, I
Sbut ask about our store
_ credit policy.
-r ,


SPC Repair

Whether your laptop is
dead, your computer has
a virus, or you want to
upgrade your computer,
we can help.
Ca 3863-578-5775
or come see us at:
1425 N Broadway Ave, Suite 3


* Expert service
* Fixed Rate
pricing
* Convenient
location
* Locally owned


IO EI SCNR TE


CONCRETE SPECIALS

SOUR GUARANTY
NO MONEY DOWN-
PAY WHEN JOB IS
"i COMPLETED!
S -? -
Side Walks Patios Driveways

Now offering Bathroom Remodelingf
S -.Servmg all of Polk County
FREE ESTIMATES
/i 863-578-3424 863-835-3222
257q6969


ROADS- DRIVEWAYS
Crushed/Broken Tile E. .
Parking Pads [
Site Preparation 176.6.
Rocks, Boulders, Fill ,
Residential Commercial
Licensed/Insured
863-528-0255 (3 ia Id


OWNER


-, .. .- ,
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y I
Up


~1~5~~8~~


irs


I 1 I


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-- --- -- --


October 24, 2012


CLASSIFIED


Page 4


_11116nes


UMNMUMMMww
OZERmW







Octbe 24 291 CLASIFED Pag 5-s-- -~--


0i~


Call 863-676-3467 to place your ad


Il^' '. | -g-i...





Owner: Jacqueline Jackson DCF Lic. #F10POD957
Licensed by DCF From Infant to Pre "K"
Accept After Schoolers
Food Provided
Beyond Center and
Circle Time Curriculum
Early Learning
Coalition Accepted
Jackie Jackson
18 Johnson Ave, Lake Wales, FL 33853 863-521-8508
Support Groups Exercise Program for Children





Train In As Little As

4 WEEKS

N I TRUCK DRIVER
TRAININGG
Industry Leader in Truck Driving Training

of 863-294-1112



THE-HR SH--PJ fm ki+2' T FIREARUCOMPIiANCE
UNEMPLOYMENT J O W,
EMPLOYEE RECORDS
REVIEW Human Resources Evaluation
SAFETY INSPECTION Special Price
PAYROLL REVIEW
HANDBOOK REVIEW
RECRUITMENT & SELECTION
ASSESSMENT 8999
EMPLOYEE RELATIONS/
COMMUNICATION ASSESSMENT




SA ti Ay







e- O LU .d '
/S








CASH CONNECTION
PAWN SHOP
BUY SELL TRADE
S1"We Buy Gold"
j 7* Gold -Diamonds
Jewelry & Repair
Whites Metal Detectors

863-676-4514
214 Domaris Ave Lake Wales. FL3385+34607 -;
John W. Steedley


.- -:. :_-_ -I
-, ". __ ^/ ^ ... i "- ; q_' ,E ',,*.,-' .'


NEED A

CHANGE
* No Experience Necessary
* Day, Weekend and Evening Classes
* Long Haul or Home Every Night'-
* Job Placement Assistance
* CDL Testing and RefresheCurses
Se Hablas Espanol


950 Recker Hwy
Winter Haven


s,
1 I-
~P YP
: iO
t P
L


ll_ I.'ACOsN HOMES
F A C T O R Y O U T L E T
Also offering Park Models Trade-Ins Repos
We pay cash for used homes-'86 or newer!



$56,900 $51,900





p. I : '. "

~: I A I


8 1 .'* \*


?.1- '> ; '- :


I Demo: Houses, Shed, etc.
Haul Rock, Sand, Dirt,
., Backhoe, Bobcat


.
___ i *H'S?^ ^ ^


HIPAPA IJOHN HISMNER


Underground Drain
S" Variety of Colors
Senior Discount
"Forget the Rest, Go With the Best"
863-858-1368

lakelandgutters.com winterhavengutters.com




Steve Wilson
Sanctuary Insurance

Auto Homeowners
*Life Health
Business
233 E. Park Ave SANCTUARY INSURANCE
Lake Wales, FL
863-678-0477

I k


ALOHA PAINTING CO.




Call Paul Bridewell

863-287-0701


Credit Card A accepted


Licensed & Insured


"Put the spring Biomechanically
back in your step!" Designed Orthoic
I NEBL Fontwear
LASER1
THEIRAnsY
WINTER HAVEN: 101 6th St. NW
DAVENPORT: 2211 North Blvd. W. r - -
LAKELAND: 1115 Lakeland Hills Blvd. I $ 2
BARTOW: 510 West Main St 33830
SBIOFREEZE


I


llCILCB-~81PI


CLASSIFIED


October 24, 2012


Page 5


'-_ _'_ .. .


. .







Pag 6 CL SIID Ocoe 24,2012~ ~--- -~ I~ L -


2001 HELP WANTED
MOMS WORK FT/PT, no
experience necessary, we
train. New Swarovski Crystal
Jewelry by Touchstone Crys-
tal. $500 TO $5,000/MONTH
(407)295-1522 kontactkelly-
now@aol.com
MOVIE EXTRAS Earn up to
$250 per day To stand in the
backgrounds for a major film
production experience not
required. All looks needed.
Call NOW!!! (877)435-5877
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
g.perience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses. www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses, www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783

Advertise in
The Classifieds!


2001 HELP WANTED
OTR DRIVERS- Food Grade
Tank Drivers. CDL-A w/tank
endorsement, Good MVR &
Hazmat within 90 days
required. Up to 42cpm
w/additional mileage incen-
tives & benefits. (877)882-
6537 or www.oakleytrans-
port.com
PERSONAL
ASSISTANCE NEEDED
We are looking for an Office
Assistant. Duties include
greeting clients, answering
phones, and routing mail,
data entry and retrieve,
scheduling and calender
maintenance, Ideal candi-
dates will have proven cus-
tomer service skills in an
administrative setting and
experience with Microsoft
Office applications email
resumes to
rclaytonl77@gmail.com
IF INTERESTED



Check The
Classified!


2010 PROFESSIONAL
INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING
AND ASSESSMENT
SPECIALIST
Application deadline: 11/8/12.
Please visit:
http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com
for detailed position posting.
863-784-7132. EA/EO.
A' SOUTH
./ FLORIDA

2100 GENERAL
Apply Now, 13 Drivers Top
5% Pay and benefits. Need
CDL Class A Driving Exp.
(877)258-8782.
www.drive4melton.com
Drivers-HIRING EXPERI-
ENCED / INEXPERIENCED
TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up
to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo
Tractors! 1 year OTR experi-
ence required. Tanker training
available. Call Today:
(877)882-6537.
www.OakleyTransport.com
Drivers/Class A Flatbed.
GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to
.39 cents/mile. Late model
equipment & big miles! 1 year
OTR Flatbed experience. Call
(800)572-5489 x227.
SunBelt Transport


3000

'--





NOTICES

3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
ADVERTISE IN OVER 100
PAPERS thir..1,:l,:.'it Florida
for One Low Rate. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
ALLIED HEALTH career train-
ing-Attend college 100%
online. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
(800)481-9409 www.Centu-
raOnline.com
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE
FREE VACATION VOUCHER UNIT-
ED BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION
Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer
Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing, Fast,
Non-Runners Accepted, 24/7
(888)468-5964.


3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Busi-
ness, *Paralegal, *Comput-
ers, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Com-
puter available. Financial Aid if
qualified. Call (877) 203-
3179,
www.CenturaOnline.com
BANKRUPTCY, FORECLO-
SURE DEFENSE, Consumer
Rights. Peter Kelegian, Attor-
ney at Law, Gainesville, Flori-
da. Free no obligation consul-
tation. Serving counties
throughout North Florida.
(352)672-6444. peter@kele-
gianlaw.com #702706


AM


3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE FREE VACATION
VOUCHER UNITED BREAST
CANCER FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast Can-
cer Info www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Fast, Non-Runners
Accepted, 24/7 (888)468-
5964.
GET YOUR AD NOTICED
HERE And in Over 100
Papers throughout Florida for
One Low Rate. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
Classified Works!


AIRLINES ARE

HIRING


Train for hands on Aviation Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance
866-314-3769


Call 863-676-3467 to place your ad


~ai- ~i .lI "~


L ID


.. ,; .. ._ i: o '




'--, - _-- ... ,

;' ,.. -. .
at\ ?7-, '1, -7





Eileen Belanger
2j |- Sales Associate
^^CI IProperty Manager

AT YOUR SERVICE REALTY
1400 Chalet Suzanne Road
Lake Wales, FL 33859 ()
Cell 863.221.0229
Business 863.676.4448
E-Mail: eileenb@century21.com
Please visit my Web Site for your
Real Estate or Rental Needs at
www.theCentrlFlRordaProperties.com U S NM


This Barn Installed
From ONLY $2635


2 CAR
GARAGE
From only
$4985
13 Colors


Delivered & Installed
From ONLY $5575


863-978-8586
130
mph
S "' CERT.


www.usabarnsandgarages.com


CARPORTS FROM
ONLY $695


Raised Center Aisle
Barns FROM $4680


ON SITE
SEWING
MACHINE
REPAIR
Expert
Service & Repairs on
all Makes & Models
HOURS: 365 5th r-i '.',,,_-r H, .r, FL
MON.-FRI. 9AM-5PM
TUES. 9AM-8PM (863) 299-3080
SAT. 9AM-4PM www.heartfeltquilting.com
Check our website for all the latest schedules, specials and events







,3'incoarporated
LANOSCAP'E SUPPLIES
Mulch Soils & Fill Decorative
Rocks & Boulders Fertilizer -,
Pick up & Delivery 4.'
PRO-CUT F
TREE SERViCE '
Arbor Equiped ;., "


I II ^ ^I





SINGLE HUNG WINDOW
Insulated Glass, Dual Pane ";
White Re-enforced
Vinyl Frame $
starting 14900
atOy Plus Installation
I MM u [I 1 ) R0C 1-3('ni2


-FnC pbMLNf~II


I


October 24, 2012


Page 6


CLASSIFIED


s
i '- ii







Octbe 24,01 CLSIID Pag 7 -L L_


3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
HORSE LOVERS MAKE $$
FOR YOURSELF OR CHARI-
TY. HOLD A COMPETITIVE
TRAIL CHALLENGE. CALL
ACTHA AT (877)99-
ACTHA(22842) OR VISIT
WWW.ACTHA.US GREAT FUN,
GREAT $$$
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
3060 SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINING!
Train for Medical Billing
Careers at SCTrain.edu
No experience needed! Job
placement assistance after
training. HS/GED/PC needed.
(888)872-4677
3090 LOST & FOUND

Bartow, found Yorkie in
the area of Richland Manor.
Call to identify. 863-698-
1440.

4000







FINANCIAL

4010 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
$150,000 +/yr. Potential
Turn Key Online Sales & Mar-
keting Wealth Creation Sys-
tem. No Selling to Family &
Friends Start In 24 hrs.
www.thel50Kgameplan.com
DO YOU EARN $800.00 IN
A DAY? Your Own Local
Candy Route 25 Machines
and Candy All for $9995.00
All Major Credit Cards Accept-
ed (877)915-8222
AINB02653
FREE Program on How to
Get Rich. Go to www.Your-
WishisYourCommand.com for
FREE offer. It's the Secret
Behind The Secret, today's
Think and Grow Rich!
Investors Outstanding
and immediate returns in
Equipment leasing for oilfield
industry. Immediate lease out.
Tax benefits and high returns.
We need more equipment!
(800)491-9029
Investors Outstanding
and immediate returns in
equipment leasing for frac
industry. Immediate lease out.
Tax benefits and high returns.
We need more equipment!
(800)491-9029
4020 FINANCIALMISC.
CASH NOW! Cash for your
structured settlement or annu-
ity payments. Call J.G. Went-
worth (866) 494-9115. Rated
A+ by the Better Business
Bureau.
FREE DEBT SOLUTION. End
Foreclosure and Debt Collec-
tions within 90 Days. No Pay-
ments, No Bankruptcy, and
No Settlements. Guaranteed
Since 1993. (800)477-9256
www.zerodebtguaranteed.co
m

4080 LOANS / MORTGAGES
Access Reverse Mortgage!
Florida-based: Application &
closing in your home. Experi-
ence: almost 1,000 reverse
mortgages funded. Award-
winning customer service.
BBB A rating. NMLS #4566.
1(800)806-7126


4080 LOANS / MORTGAGES
CASH NOW!! RECEIVING
PAYMENTS from Mortgage
Notes, Structured Settle-
ments, Contest annuity or cell
tower lease? SELL PAYMENTS
NOW! NYAC (800)338-5815.

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES

5110 LAWN/GARDEN &TREE

GOING OUT OF BUSI-
NESS
Oak Tree Nursery. 20ft
trees $15-$25, 8-lOft trees
$5-$10. Plus Roses-Ties-
Pineapples.
863-635-6399

5115 LEGAL SERVICES
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
5230 MISCELLANEOUS
$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen
on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit
Dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++within 48/hrs?
Low rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321 www.lawcapi-
tal.com


6000
l' lb.


6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE

2010 Dodge Grand
Caravan Wheelchair Van
with 10" lowered floor;
wheelchair ramp; wheelchair
tie downs. 813-569-
0729







B7854 12 Dodge Charger
SE V6, A/T Aluminum
Wheels, PW, PDL, CC, TW,
Only 3,500 Miles. $19,970
Call: 863-533-0793
Tom Edwards Chrysler
1425 W. Main St., Bartow







B7885 10 Dodge Grand
Caravan SXT Leather,
Power Doors and Lift Gate,
Aluminum Wheels $15,970.
Call: 863-533-0793
Tom Edwards Chrysler
1425 W. Main St., Bartow







B7890A 09 KIA Sportage
LX Leather, A/T, PW, PDL,
TW, CC, CD $11,970.
Call:863-533-0793
Tom Edwards Chrysler
1425 W. Main St., Bartow


6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE


Tom Edwards Chrysler
1425 W. Main St., Bartow


C2022B 06 Chevrolet HHR
LT 4 Cyl, A/T, PW, PDL, TW,
CC, CD Stereo $7,970.
Call: 863-533-0793
Tom Edwards Chrysler
1425 W. Main St., Bartow
eI'. I-


T2178B 09 Toyota Tacoma
R/C- A/T, AC, AM/FM/CD
Stereo, LOW MILES.
$13,970.
Call:863-533-0793
Tom Edwards Chrysler
1425 W. Main St., Bartow

Need Cash?
Have A
Garage Sale


6270 WANTEDTO
BUY/TRADE

BUYING
GOLD, SILVER,
COINS, JEWELRY
Highest Prices In History!

ANY CONDITION
WE BUY IT ALL, and Pay So Much
We Almost Want to Cry. You, of
Course, Will Laugh With Glee!!
See PHIL at the former
HOLLY'S ARMY NAVY STORE
3440 Ave G NW
Winter Haven
Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm
Call first to confirm I'm there
863-299-6031
Our 33rd Year.


7000


TRANSPORTATION

7140 MISC.DOMESTIC
AUTOS
2000 CADILLAC DEVILLE ,
less than 55k miles. Pearl
white w/camel vinyl top. Nice
leather interior. Fully loaded.
Exc. cond. $7,200 863-559-
6935
7260 AUTOS WANTED

All autos bought with or with-
out title any condition, year,
make or model. We pay up to
$20,000 and offer free towing
call: 8 13-703-7297

Seize the sales
with Classified!


7333 MISC. BOATS
JON BOAT, 14ft. 6hp John-
son w/ galvanized trailer. 28#
thurst trolling motor. Live well.
$1200 Call 863-899-2648.
7360 CYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS
2001 Honda CBR F41 600
motorcycle. Runs great 17k
miles
863-285-8705. $2,800
7370 CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
DEER HUNTERS, 28' Aristo-
cart, travel trailer, good
shape, $2,500. 863-285-
2323
TRAVEL TRAILER, 33ft
Cougar 302RLS, double slide,
queen bed, rear living room.
Like new! Lots of extras! 231-
633-0024. (Haines City)

IT'S NEVER
BEEN EASIER!







\ t


Searching for a new car, home or just something
to do this weekend? Make it easy on yourself.
Subscribe to The Polk County Democrat
and get a wealth of information available
at your fingertips every day.
The Polk County Democrat
863-533-4183


MERCHANDISE

6012 GARAGE SALES
Bartow, Fri. 26th & Sat.
27th, 8am-2pm, 1540 Olean-
der Place. Halloween/Fall
decor., cookware, antique
sewing machine, bakers rack,
outdoor furniture, etc.
6020 AUCTIONS
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net

6180 HEAVY/CONST.
EQUIPMENT
SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -
SPRING SALE Cut lumber
any dimension, anytime.
MAKE MONEY and SAVE
MONEY In stock ready to ship.
Starting at $995.00
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/
300N (800)578-1363
Ext.300N

Need a job?
Check The
Classified!


The Lake- Wales News


CLASSIFIED


Page 7


October 24, 2012





Page 8 CLASSIFIEDS October 24,2012


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(863


533-4183


'Tt \ednesdi
Polk County Democrat:
Barlow,'s loi newii e'usl. er Since 1931 750 ;


off


October 24,2012


CIASSIFIEDS


Page 8


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--. 11 -- --- I - -