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The Frostproof news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00583
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Creation Date: February 29, 2012
Publication Date: 09/26/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00583
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

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Wednesday


j w September 26, 2012



Frostproof News

Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years 7

Volume 92 Number 35 USPS NC 211-260. Frostproof, Polk County Florida 33843


Copyright 2012 Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.


Homecoming royalty
- ; -., .


PSC looking at


Frostproof for classes


By BILL ROGERS
BROGERS @ LAKEWALESNEWS.COM
Polk State College is apparently hav-
ing growing pains and the solution to
the problem might be in Frostproof.
PSC officials have looked at
Frostproof City Hall on.West First Street
as a possible site for classes, according
to John R. Alexander, chairman of the
Historic Preservation Committee.
- Alexander told the Frostproof City
Council on Monday night that an inde-
pendent building assessment has to be
made. He noted that the college will pay
for the assessment at a cost of between
$40,000 and $50,000.
The council voted 5-0 to send letter
to the college giving its approval to do
the assessment,
"It's the first little step," Alexander
said.
Alexander said Polk State's enrollment
at I.D. Alexander Center in Lake Wales
has reached 800 students, which he said
is the maximum.
He said the college is interested in
getting higher education closer to the
people.
It was mentioned during the meeting
that space might be available in City
Hall in the downstairs west wing and


upstairs east wing.
In other business, the council ap-
proved an annual contract of $30,000
for planning advisory services with
the Central Florida Regional Planning
Council.
There was the second reading for two
ordinances that were both approved.
One is a political campaign signs
amendment to the Land Development
Code that establishes a deadline for the
removal of the signs. Those running for
office will have 10 days after an election
or referendum to remove signs. Code
enforcement will be responsible.
The second ordinance is the flood-
plain amendment to the LDC. It pro-
vides.consistency with the 2010 Florida
Building Code and the American
Society of Civil Engineers standards for
flood resistant design and construction.
Maps are available showing what
lands in Frostproof are in a floodplain
area..
The council adopted a resolution
called a Complete Streets Policy. It will
serve as a resource or a guide not a
mandate for local governments for
streets and roads that are designed and
operated for not only motorists but
CLASSES 113


Depot market back for

second event Saturday


By JAMES COULTER
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
The Frostproof Market will be hosted
for the second time this year at the
Historic Frostproof Depot at 118 E. Wall
St. Saturday Sept. 29 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
Thirty vendors will be offering a wide
selection of merchandise including
handmade gifts, jewelry, home d6cor,
creative cards, art, woodworking, elec-
tronic cigarettes, antiques, homemade
jams & jellies, grapevines, and Peruvian
chocolates.
Vendors include local businesses and
franchises such as Artsy Doll Boutique,
The Pampered Chef, Tupperware,
Biltmore Inspirations, Thirty One,
Avon, Capo Security, Mary Kay, and
MHPhotography.
The market is a joint-effort between


Frostproof Chamber of Commerce and
Princess Wiggle-Bottom Boutique.
."It's a great way to see what local
people are able to do and what they
have," said Kelly Banks, owner of
Princess Wiggle-Bottom Boutique. -
Banks has been selling embroidered
shirts and other clothing and accesso-
ries for more than a year. She currently
runs her business from her home as
a hobby, but says she would like to
expand and open her own store if given
the opportunity.
For now, the Frostproof Market has
allowed her to showcase her merchan-
dise to a broader audience than what
she would have received from her
website.
"I had a lot of orders placed that day,"
EVENT| 13


TODAY'S
CONTENTS




7I ll05252 00025 8


Calendar................Page 2
Editorial ............... Pae 5
Sports.......... Page 9.14-16
Obituaties........... Page 12
Feeling Fit ........... Page 17


HOMECOMING GAME


Frostprooffalls
in homecoming
football game




16


.1 --


rhe


GALA SATURDAY
It has become a
Ramon tradition





7


I


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50









PR0v, 2r oNwStb ,0--12


CALEN"DARand


* SATURDAY, SEPT. 29
Ramon Theater Gala
Make plans now to attend the Ramon
Theater's annual fundraising gala
"Lights ... Camera ... Dancing." Show
starts at 7 p.m. and Polk County Sheriff
Grady Judd will serve as the master of
ceremonies. Contact the theater for
more information at 863-635-7222.

1 SATURDAY, SEPT. 22
Market at the Depot
A Frostproof Market will be held from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the historic Wall
Street Depot. Organizers are promising
"lots of fun, excitement and activities
for the whole family." Vendors will
include gift items, jewelry, woodwork-
ing, antiques and more.

N SUNDAY, SEPT. 30
Fifth Sunday Service
The Frostproof Ministerial Alliance
will host its second ever "Fifth Sunday"


event at 6 p.m. at the Ramon Theater.
Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd will
preach. Event is open to the public; a
goodwill offering will be taken.

FRIDAY, OCT. 5
Downtown Art Walk
Local artists and vendors will have
works for sale and on display from
5 to 8 p.m. Entertainment. For more
information, contact the FrostproofArt
League at 863-635-7271.
High School Football
The Frostproof Bulldogs open their
district schedule on the road when they
take on U.S. 98 rival Fort Meade. Kick
off will be at 7 p.m.

SATURDAY OCT. 13
Hospice Fundraiser
The Ramon Theater will host a-special
fundraiser for Cornerstone Hospice, a
Mad Hatter Tea Party Luncheon. The


event will run from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Wear your funniest, wackiest or prettiest
decorated hat; prizes will be awarded.
Tickets are $15 per person. Contact the
Ramon for more information or tickets,
863-635-7222.
Ford Drive One 4 UR School
The Frostproof FFA and cheerleaders
will be hosting a fundraiser at the high
school starting at 10 a.m. Test drive a
Ford, and the car company will make
a $20 donation to the clubs. Food will
also be available for sale.

FRIDAY, OCT. 26
Halloween Murder Mystery
The Ramon will host "Clued In To
Murder" in a special Halloween-themed
murder mystery dinner theater event.
Prizes will be given out to the best cos-
tumes, which are optional. Cost is $30
per person which includes dinner. Call
the Ramon for 863-635-7222 for tickets,
or go online to www.ramontheater.com.


T Want to see your event on this
page? Call us at 863-285-8625 or
email news@frostproofnews.com.


S


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LOCAL ARRESTS
Sept. 10
James Dease, 29, of 236 East 8th Street, Frostproof,
- charged with burglary and petit theft.
Allen Dubberly, 20, of 833 Lime Street, Frostproof-
charged with possession of marijuana and possession of
paraphernalia.
Kevin Perez, 23, of 153 Florida Lane, Frostproof-
charged with violation of probation.
Sept. 11
Margarito Garcia, 44, of 1441 McClennean Road,
Frostproof charged with non-payment of child
support, burglary, grand theft larceny, and dealing in
stolen property.
Sept. 13
Justin Cadwallader, 21, of 551 Mullinsville Road,
Frostproof- charged with battery.
Sept. 14
SJustin Raines, 21, of 415 Chesney Blvd., Frostproof
charged with burglary, petit theft larceny, posses-
sion of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia, posses-
sion of new legend drug without prescription.
Sept. 15
Pedro Macedo, 40, of 116 Gilberto Jose Road,
Frostproof- charged with driving with an expired
license.


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Frostproof News Page 3


etpeS mber 26 2012





We've been guardedly optimistic in recent years by
signs that many of the state's residents are becom-
ing more plugged in and educated about everything
from the Constitution to the nuts-and-bolts of
electoral process. As Thomas Jefferson rightly said,
"Democracy demands an educated and informed
electorate."
We've been pessimistic about how Florida
Republican politicians, especially those in the
Legislature would behave given the supermajorities
they enjoy in both houses. That pessimism has been
unfortunately confirmed by a series of self-dealing
scandals, budgetary trickery, voter suppression
efforts and, most recently, by an effort this year to
turn the state Constitution into a vehicle for inserting
ideological priorities into what is supposed to be a
framework for flexible self-government.
While each of the transgressions committed by
an unhinged and unaccountable Legislature should
alarm even conservative Floridians, there is under
way an even more naked assault on the "checks
and balances" built into Florida's constitution. The
Republican Party of Florida executive board voted
on'Friday to oppose the merit retention of Justices
Barbara Pariente, Fred Lewis and Peggy Quince on
Nov. 6, giving official party imprimatur to a third-
party campaign financed by a shadowy group called
Restore Justice and a billionaire-backed PAC.
The campaign is the fulfillment of a warning former


Our Viewpoint
Florida BarAssociation President Scott Hawkins gave
the Sun during an editorial board visit last November.
Make no mistake, any separation between the
Republicans in the Legislature and the RPOF is mere
paperwork. The pushback against the Supreme Court
is directly linked to decisions by the court to remove
several constitutional amendments from the ballot
in 2010, including one that was a blatant attempt to
confuse voters about a different redistricting amend-
ment that was also on the ballot. The campaign is
now clearly in violation of any reasonable fealty to the
wisdom of separation of powers inherent in the state
and U.S. Constitution.
The RPOF vote drew criticism from across the
political spectrum, including former Republican state
Sen. AlexVillalobos, who told the Palm Beach Post,
"No party has any business getting involved in this."
One of the three justices targeted last week gave an
unusually frank rebuttal to the campaign, according
to the Tampa Bay Times.
"There is an entire branch of government to
protect and defend. We cannot sacrifice fairness and
impartiality and the court system to political whims,"
said Justice Fred Lewis. The Times also reported
that Americans for Prosperity, the political action


committee backed by billionaires Charles and David
Koch, was buying television advertising highlighting
Supreme Court.decisions. There's no problem with
informing voters about the record of our chief judges,
but part of that education should include the political
and ideological motives of their detractors.
The other two targeted justices are Barbara Pariente
and Peggy Quince. Lewis and Pariente were appoint-
ed by former Gov. Lawton Chiles, while Quince was
jointly appointed by Chiles and former Gov. Jeb Bush.
Florida Supreme Court justices are appointed by
governors upon the screening and recommendation
of the Judicial Qualification Commission. Every six
years, their names appear on the ballot where voters
mark Yes or No for retention. Lewis, Pariente and
Quince have twice been retained by voters.
One of the most prominent opponents of the RPOF
move is Stanley Tate, a Republican member of the
qualification commission, who told the Times, "Any
good attorney will tell you they want their judge to be
a good attorney, not a good Republican. I'm hoping
the general public will disavow the decision by the
Republican.Party. I think they made a mistake."
Florida is a state of laws. We weaken the state by
imposing partisan politics on judicial decisions.
Unfortunately, in Florida it is yet another example of
a majority party that believes it is beyond reproach
or accountability. We trust our educated voters will
teach them a lesson.


Letters to the editor


Look at this says proud

but frightened American


Dear Editor,
I am a proud American. But at the
moment I am a frightened American.
Our nation is at a crossroads and I fear
we may continue on the wrong path.
This upcoming election is monumental,
the most critical in our nation's history.
This current occupant of the White
House is leading us down a certain path
of destruction. I don't consider him my


president because he was ineligible
and most certainly not qualified. If he
is elected president again our liberties
will surely be gone. America, please
wake up. Look at his record. It is time
to objectively look back to see what he
has done to our nation. His slogan of
forward is to put blinders on and keep

WIESING 16


Dear Editor,
One of the major criteria in current
tax discussions is effectiveness of job
creation.
Today is very unlike the 1980s, when
corporate America had little cash, we
were coming out of an extremely high
interest rate environment (prime as
high as 12 percent and mortgages as


Dear Editor,
America was built on several founda-
tional principles our "basics." We were
founded with a hand on the Bible and
with "Our Lord" in the Constitution.
When we violate our core basics, it is
always destructive.
Slavery violates our basics. Everyone
has God-given rights. The Civil War, fu-
eled by the immorality of slavery, killed


high as 18-19 percent), but we
extensive investment in plant
equipment for both upgrading
products.
Corporations today have mo
than ever in history and borro
readily available to ANY succe
ness at historically low rates -


more Americans than any of o
Sexual immorality violates o
basics. Adultery is the stuff tha
nations. Anthropologist J.D. U:
researched 86 empires that cra
to sexual immorality.
Why does America have mo:
homes than any nation? When


needed


and It has been nearly eight years since
g and new Dad died, three months short of attain-
ing the age of 90.
ore cash He lived a rich, full life, married to the
wing is love of his life, Louise, and to a job as a
ssful busi- journalist that he loved almost as much.
for some The time has come for Mary and
BEYERS 16 me to dispose of his and Mother's
remaining worldly goods. (Mother pre-
deceased him by 15 years.)
Deciding which have enough mean-
ing to us, or to our children, to keep
ur wars. them is a time-consuming job. Mother,
,ur to her credit, prepared an extensive
tt topples inventory with notes on the nature,
nwin place of purchase, and original price of
washed due much of what remains in the house.
Many items are packaged with
re broken detailed notes of the contents.
Sthe Bible She.made a tough job easier.


ULLOM 6


One of the most valuable "finds" is a


a"s^.,
,
-I
y^ I*"
~,'''S


SL. Frisbie




S L. Frisbie can be contacted at
slfrisbie@polkcountydemocrat.com


set of four cardboard boxes containing
copies of the columns he wrote during
his two years of service in World War
II; some mementoes of his post-war
travels in Europe, such as a Red Cross
map of Paris prepared especially for
servicemen; and what appears to be
every letter that he wrote to Mother.
His feet were frozen during The Battle
of the Bulge, and he spent several
FRISBIE16


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
* Aieen Hood General Manager Paul Northrop Sale, Man:ager Jeff Roslow Edor Brian Ackley Managing Ediror


Published every Wednesday at
14 W. Wall Street, Frostproof, FL 33843
by Sun Coast Media Group. Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Frostproof, Florida and
additional F.IEnr Ofhce
*Phone 1863) 676-3467 *Fax (863) 678-1297
Postmaster: Send address changes to
140 E. Stuart Ave..
Lake Wales, FL 33853-4198


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
Six .Mond s ............ $25.6t One Year.. ......... $41.73
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNTY MAIL
Six Months ............... 24.00 One \ear ...... ... ....$39 00
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
,L\ Months .......... Win io One Year............. 65 I
OUT OF STATE SUBSCRIPTION
Six Months......... $44 00 One Year.................... ... 72.00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frostproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews.com or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
Wales Fl. 33853.


Tax policy for wealthy have

little effect on job creation


Letters from the war


America's foundation


September 26, 2012


Page 4 Frostproof Ne s


VIEWPOINT


Republican Party inserts itself into justice retention





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Frostproof News Page 5


eS member 26 2012






Pae6Fotro esSpebr2,21


The Inquiring Photographer

Where do we need to progress (or are lacking) in race relations?


Amelia Bell-James

I still think we need
to work on accepting
differences between
the cultures, and
increase equality
across the board.


WIESING


FROM PAGE 4

surging forward like lemmings toward a
certain destruction.
I cannot believe veterans could align
themselves with him after seeing how
She abhors this country and its military.
He has no respect for our flag or this
nation's history. He wants to decimate
our military yet wants a national secu-
rity force. Now what might that be for?
Some who call themselves Christians
still support him even though he
openly supports abortion and homo-
sexuality. And if that isn't enough, his
Democratic party banishes God from


LeeAnna Himrod,
Intern for Florida
Representative
Ben Albritton

I think we've a very
long way, and I'm
very proud of where
we are.


their convention. How can Christians
in good conscience vote for such a
man? Search your hearts, Christians.
Is America sufficiently dumbed down
to accept a leader such as this, the pied
piper of Washington? Has America
become so distracted and deceived
that it cannot see clearly? Look at our
national debt. Look at the lack of
foreign policy. Look at the divisiveness
of this administration. Look at the
moral degradation. Look at the denial
of Christian values. Look at the total
lack of respect for the office of presi-
dent. Look at the total lack of respect
for our Constitution. Look objectively
at all these things. It is frightening. And
he wants to continue.
Then there is Obamacare. Is anyone


Ernest L. Joe,
PCPS Senior
Director of
Diversity
Management
First, we have to get
past our biases. We
need to understand we
all come from different
cultures, but we can
work as a team.


paying attention at what this will cost?
Our Medicare rates will go up substan-
tially. Health care will suffer greatly.
There is only so much money to go
around and when you rob from one to
pay for the other it is a recipe for disas-
ter. Free health care? Dream on, folks.
Read up on this travesty. It will scare
the daylights out of you. As Margaret
Thatcher once said, "Socialism is fine
until you run out of other people's
money." Think about that.
Americans, read some history.
Become informed. Don't listen to the
drivel of the television ads. Those can
truly be classified as propaganda; they
are misleading and many are outright
lies. Please look at the overall picture.
Look at the record. Is this the path we


PCPS
Superintendent
Dr. Sherrie Nickell

What you feed, grows.
Whatyou starve, dies.
Feed communication,
relationships and feed
into each other. That will
keep race relations posi-
tive and progressive.


want to continue on? I don't think so. I
humbly ask that America elect a man
who has character, not one who is one.
I pray that God will continue to bless
America. But I can certainly under-
stand if He does not because how can
He bless a nation that.turns its back on
Him? Look at how He dealt with Israel.
When Israel strayed, He abandoned
them to their own sinful lifestyles.
But He always took them back when
they repented. Is that happening to
America? Are we going to repent as a
nation? Are we going to reverse course
and seek Him? November 6 will tell. In
the meantime, I pray and I shudder at
the prospect of an angry God.
Gary M. Wiesing
LakeWales


BUYERS
FROM PAGE 4

as low as 2 V percent. Hence, if plant
and equipment were the need of our
economy, it would be getting done\
What is missing today is DEMAND


ULLOM
FROM PAGE 4

was minimized and pornography was
given a place of influence, the result-
ing sexual immorality contributed to
divorce and abortion.
The immorality of abortion costs
more American lives every year than
the total of all our wars. From the
moment of conception, everyone has
God-given rights.
God loves everyone, but adultery
is not a God-given right. If sexual

FRISBIE
FROM PAGE 4

months of his military service in Army
hospitals in Europe. He wrote home
every few days.
We republished the columns in
the last year of so of his life, when a
series of mini-strokes and the onset of
dementia ended his colhimn-wvriiing
days that went back to 1937, the year
he graduated from Florida Southern
College.
The letters, some written exclusively
to Mother and some to his entire fam-
ily, are a treasure I am just beginning to
enjoy for the first time.
Some of the letters to Mother are
flirtatious and a bit too personal to be
shared.
Some of the examples of bawdy hu-
mor of men in uniform that he shared
with her also are unsuitable for a mixed
audience of readers.
I am sure he never intended for
his son to read ilicm. but at 71, I am
beyond being embarrassed by iht1m.
And I think he would get a kick out of
know ing itha his son was now reading
what was written by this 30 en ar oli
private first class who graduated at the
head of his college class and turned
down an lirkc 'sC commission for which
he felt he was not qualified.

SOne of his most poignant letters


from the consumer, primarily tied to
his adjustment (delivering of debt and
general hesitancy, if not inability, to
take on new debt).
For the former problem, tax reduc-
tion for the wealthy, with its high rate
of saving/investing, is by far the more
effective policy for the latter prob-
lem that action will have almost NO


immorality were beneficial, our Lord
would promote it. See Ephesians 5,
I Corinthians 13, and my daughter's
paraphrase: http://www.mannaformar-
,riage.com/?p=407
Gratefully, Romney, Ryan, and the
Republican Party support life, marriage,
fiscal responsibility, and the enforce-
ment of our anti-pornography laws.
What would Jesus do? He tells every-
one to go the right direction. That is not
hate speech; that is authentic love. That
is good for today and forever.
John 3:16 is basic.
Virgil Ullom
Babson Park -
was written on June 30, 1945, on their
eighth wedding anniversary. He spoke
of his love for his wife, and for his four-
year-old son. He said I had inherited
both the best and worst traits of each
of them.
Another was a letter that he wrote to
me on Aug. 24, 1945, telling me how
proud he was of me for bravely facing
the removal of my tonsils.
He enclosed a medal (since separated
from the letter) that I assume was a
replica of the Combat Infantryman's
Badge that he was awarded, felling me
I deserved it, and should wear it on the
pint-sized replica of his own uniform
that Mother either made or bought for
me when Dad was in the Army.
He included a stick figure drawing of
himself in an Army hospital bed with
one foot elevated in a small canvas
hammock, smoking a cigarette and
reading a book.
I remember the tonsillectomy; I do
not remember that letter.
I shall treasure it.

(S. L. Frisbie is retired from journal-
ism. He also retired as a colonel ulfit
two years in lit, atlil-.' 1.rmnl and 30
years in the loitid Natirionl ciird. He
has said mnan times that his Dad did
more for his country in two years than
he did in 32. And by4he grace of God. he
returned home from the war May God
grant eternal peace to the souls of those
soldiers who didn't.)


effectiveness the wealthy are NOT
dependent on tax policy to facilitate
demand satisfaction.
While I will question the degree of
effectiveness of reduced taxes for non-
wealthy (it is not possible to reduce
taxes sufficiently to off-set the loss in .
net worth sustained in an an eighteen
month period of the second half of
2007-2008), it is historically proven
that a higher portion of tax breaks for


non-wealthy translates into demand
than for the wealthy.
Hence my conclusion that in our
current economy, tax policy for the
wealthy involving marginal change
either up or down will have minimal
effect on job creation and the economy
in general.

Fred Beyers
Frostproof


WE NEED YOU!


The Lake Wales

Republican Party

Campaign

Headquarters

Needs Your Help!.
You Can Make A Differ-
ence. Come Join The Efforts
Of Others To Help Win
Back The Future Of Our
Country!
Now Is The Time For All
Conservatives And Like
Minded Patriots To Get In-
volved!
Call Today Or Stop By Our
Office To Join In The Effort
And Do Your Part.
702 State Rd. 60 East

Lake Wales, Fl. 33853

Ph: 863-455-6897

www.polkgop.org
This ad paid for by the Republican Party
SOf Polk County, not authorized by any
candidate or candidate committee


September 26, 2012


Page 6 Frostproof News






September 26, 2012 Frostproof News Page 7


It's that time of the year again. Fall is
in the air. Football season has started.
And it's time for the annual Ramon
Theater Gala which is the fundraiser for
the year which will take place on Sept.
29 at 6:30 p.m.
Polk County's own Sheriff Grady Judd
will be returning as the emcee.
"He enjoyed the show so much last
year, he asked to return," said Kay
Hutzelman, the theater's executive
director. "Our theme of dancing pairs
who compete for votes (dollars) will
take place again this year, having been a
huge success last year."
In addition to the competition for
money votes (the fundraiser part of the
program), a People's Choice award has
been added, which will be determined
by ticket vote. Sparkle Ball trophies will
be given out to the dance winners and
participants.
"We've also heard that the Cleaning
Ladies will be back, along with some
other surprise entertainment," she
added. "It's an evening you will not want
to miss."
In addition to all the music and
entertainment, guests will be served
heavy hors d'oeuvres.
Tickets are $35 and can be purchased
online at www.ramontheater.com or
by calling 863-635-7222. The Ramon


Theater is reg-
istered with the
IRS as a 501(c)
(3) corporation.
The theater is
also looking for
event sponsors
and taking orders
for ads in the gala
program.
This event
began in 2007,
shortly after the Polk County Sheriff
Ramon Theater
restoration project
was finished to the
point where the theater could be used
for events. Since then there has been
an ongoing endeavor to enhance and
improve the theater with stage lighting
and sound equipment. The theater has
been able to expand entertainment
offerings such as murder mystery
dinners and the annual music series
which have become well-attended
events, not only by Frostproof
residents, but those from surrounding
communities also.
"The Ramon Theater is having a
regional impact as attendance continues
to grow." Hutzelman added. "Get your
tickets now and don't miss out on the
fun and entertainment."


PHOTO PROVIDED
Weikert Ford in Lake Wales provided a number of different vehicles that Frostproof residents
could take out for a spin, including the Focus, Fiesta, Taurus, and of course, pick up trucks. This
year's event will be Oct. 13.


Test drives to help school groups


In the market for a new car? Or at least
thinking about buying one in the future?
If so, you can help a couple of different
Frostproof Middle Senior High School
groups by participating in the annual
"Ford Drive One 4 UR School" event
scheduled here on Oct. 13.
The idea is simple. Weikert Ford in
Lake Wales will drive down some of
their most popular cars and trucks,
and you show up to test drive them
sometime between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
And for every person that goes for a
spin, Ford will donate $20 per person to


the cheerleaders and Future Farmers of
America club.
There are no strings attached, and no
pressure to by a car. Simply drive and
donate.
As a bonus, for every person who takes
a test drive in a Ford Escape, the car
company will donate an additional $10
to the school groups.
There are other ways to show your
support as well. The cheerleaders will
also.have hamburgers, chips and drinks
for sale and the FFA will have a big bake
sale going on with yummy desserts.


Theater gala has become

annual Ramon tradition

Grady Judd making encore

appearancefor dancing fun


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451 E e Ridge Drive ae ales. Florida
451 Eagle Ridge Drive Lake Wales, Florida


There's something

for everyone at

Eagle Ridge Mail


~1~ _4__1_1


September 26, 2012


Frostproof News Page 7


i I






Page 8 Frostproof News September 26, 2012


COU lN REPORTk


Horner out of race after



name linked to prostitution probe


By BRANDON LARRABEE
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE Rep. Mike Horner,
R-Kissimmee, dropped his bid for re-
election Monday after his name was
connected to a prostitution operation
in Orange County.
Horner, a two-term lawmaker who
chairs the House's transportation
and economic development budget
committee, stepped down following.
reports linking him to Mark David
Risner, 54, who was arrested Aug. 16
for racketeering and five prostiru tion-
related charges.
Horner hasn't been charged with
any crime.
"I've had no greater honor than
serving the people of Florida, but I
have no greater priority than doing
the right thing for my family," Horner
said. "I pray to have the chance to
earn back their trust and respect dur-
ing the remainder.of my life."
Homer's statement.came after \
reports broke linking someone with
his name to Risner. Bernie Presha, a
spokesman for Lawson Lamar, the
state attorney for Orange and Osceola
counties, said the name Mike Horner
"was listed on a list of possible
clients" found after Risner's arrest.
Presha said authorities weren't
even certain that the document was
a client list, and there are no plans to
investigate Horner or any of the other
people on the list.
But while denying some of the de-
tails of the earliest reports about his


In this May 2, 2011 file photo, Rep. Mike.Horner, R-Kissimmee debates a lawsuit bill di
legislative session in Tallahassee, Fla. Horner dropped out of his re-election race Mon
name has been linked to a prostitution ring in central Florida.


involvement in the scandal, Horner
essentially confirmed Monday that he
had erred.
"I deeply regret decisions I
made that are causing my family


unjustifiable pain and embai
ment," he said. "While currei
accounts from this morning
erroneous, my family still des
better from me, as do all my


supporters and constituents."
Incoming House Speaker Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, issued
a statement Monday supporting
Homer's decision to drop out.
"I believe he made the right deci-
sion," Weatherford said. "It is in the
best interest of our state and his fam-
ily. As elected officials, we are held to
a high standard and no member of the
Florida House is above that standard."
Homer's name will still appear on
the ballot, though the Republican
parties in Polk and Osceola counties
will have five days to name a replace-
S ment who will receive any votes cast
forHorner. The Democratic nominee.
for the seat, Frostproof business-
woman.Eileen Game, shied away from
commenting on Homer's decision.
"My prayers go out to Mike and his
family as they address this personal
matter," she said in a brief email to
the News Service of Florida.
Horner was seen as likely to win
re-election in the district, which
includes St. Cloud and largely rural
portions of Polk and Osceola coun-
ties. While Democrats have a nearly
five-point edge in voter registration
AP PHOTO in the district, Republican Gov. Rick
during the Scott carried it by nearly 10 points
day. His in 2010. U.S. Sen. John McCain of
days Arizona won by 0.5 points in 2008,
when he was the Republican nominee
rrass- for president.
nt press Even if Game were to win the
are district, the GOP is heavily favored
serves to retain control of the House in the
friends, November elections.


BOCC OKs land exchange at Circle Bar B Reserve


By STEVE STEINER
SSTEINER@ POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
A proposal to swap 4.6 acres of land
that will be covered with water when
Swif mud (Southwest Florida Water
Management District) embarks upon
a program to improve the (qualiti of
water in Lake Hancock, as well as raise
the level of the lake, for a similar sized
lot of high land of approximately 4.26
acres, met with resistance from John
Ryan, who spoke on behalf of the Sierra
Club, and David Hupp, with Friends of
the Parks.
However, commissioners unani-
mously approved the swap.
The land in question involves proper-
ty of the Circle B Bar Reserve which
is approximately 1,300 acres and
Tfh neighboring cattle ranch owned
b\ Al Bellolto According to Linda
AlhKinlcy, the as'sistait county attorney.
in Michiel Craig's office, Bellotto, who"
bought the land in 1948 sold what is
now the Circle B Bar Reserve to both
the County and Swiftmud in 2000. He
kept possession of land to the north-
west of the Reserve and continues
raising cattle.
The entire land had and has been
used for cattle raising prior to Rcllotito'
1948 purchase, and NMcinley said that
according to Bellotto, at one point the
cattle were grazing lhroiugholiut l
entire property during WWI as almost
all the men were str\vitng in ilic, military.
Mickinll) statdiil th.i ahhtllunlh
COi'i!nldemiiiin liOOdroleinigs had


proceeded, primarily as a formality,
as Polk is the only Florida county that
requires such a proceeding before
taking land, that Bellotto proposed the
land swap, in part, to avoid adding an
undue cost to taxpayers. Those costs
would also include any engineering
and appraisal work.
The land swap comes with the
provision, a permanent conservation
easement. It can only be used for cattle
grazing while Bellotto possesses the
land. Should it ever be sold, that ease-
ment would remain intact.
McKinley said some modification to
the land would be necessary, but was
minor, the construction of a barbed
wire fence to contain the cattle.
"That will not prohibit smaller ani-
mals from going in and out the fence,
ob\ iou-ly'." said McKinley. Another
aspect wouldbe that Swiftmud and
the county had right of first refusal if
Bellotto wanted to sell the property at
a later date; also, if the county wanted
to purchase back the property in the
future, it could do that. McKinley sum-
marized that if approved, the property)
would remain "in the same state it is
now." The same would hold true for the
land swapped. McKinley said that land
already is wetlands and would remain
such.
In order to do the swap, the
counl\ will need to cede the
4.6 acres it already co-owns with
t\iifumidl to the water miniagemcn
,eritfl \, was Ml'Kinle%'s concluding
remark, and she proposed the BOCL.


approve the proposal.
In a PowerPoint presentation,
Jeff Spence, Director of Parks and
Recreation, reiterated much of what
McKinley had already presented such
as the fact the land being offered is and
has been closed to the public. The land,
he said, was pasture land, now over-
grown, that was slated for restoration
that never has been done.
Commissioner Bob English appeared
in favor of the land swap.
"I'm just curious why anybody would
object to this," he stated. "Is there
anybody who would object to this?"
Indeed, there were, replied Spence,
who listed the Sierra Club, Audubon
Society and Friends of the Park.
"This is the first time we've addressed
an issue like this with the trading of
any environmental lands," said Spence.
He further stated the measure ap-
proving the proposal by the county's
Conservation Land Selection Advisory
Committee was a close one, 6-5 in
favor. The close vote was due in part it
being a precedent-setting issue. "We
tried to make it as equal as we could."
For Commissioner Edwin V Smith,
the proposal benefits everyone.
"This thing is a win-win-win. A win
for Mr. Bellotto, it's a win for the county
and the water district, and it's a win for
the wildlife," said Smith. "I have a hard
time trying to find the negatives."
Smith added no money is exchanging
hands and that everyone is better off.
While English could not find any
objections, and Smith no negatives.


John Ryan, appearing on behalf of the
Ancient Islands Sierra Club, had objec-
tions and negatives.
"Their objections on this exchange
comes from a number of points of
view," spoke Ryan. One of those was
what might result from the precedent
being set. However, that was not the
main point, contended Ryan..It was the
fairness of the exchange, as well as the
fact the land being proposed and its
projected use was not in keeping with
already-established conditions.
"We believe the cattle grazing is
conflict with the stated purpose of the
easement," said Ryan. However, the
"meat of the conservation easement"
should include a clause that if Belloo
decides the property is no longer need-
ed, then the parcel should revert back
to the county and Swiftmud. Those two
entities should not have to buy the 4.26
acres back. He called for condemnation
proceedings to continue.
Also being objected was the value of the
land being exchanged; Bellotto was getting
land more valuable in return for the land
being ceded. He termed this exchange
a "reverter" clause and said it was more
equitable than the first right of refusal
He was joined in that sentiment by
David Hupp, who appeared on behalf
of Friends of the Parks. His objection
was similar that the county was giving
up land that was good for unusable
wetlands. He said that Commissioner
Todd Dantzler, in his capacity as a
Realtor, would not find that a fair
exchange if this was a private deal.


Page 8 Frostproof News


September 26, 2012





etpeS mber 26 2012


JV Bulldogs still perfect on football field L ..D ..
l I Ufa 1 ..'1 1 1


Frostproof News Page 9


Earlier this month at Faris Brannen Stadium the Bulldogs won, 42-6. Corey Larkin, fights for a few
extra yards during the win over the Lake Placid Green Dragons.


Jacob Waibel literally gets a foothold and slows down this Lake Placid runner while help comes from
Daniel Wells (65) and Erest Hamilton. Offensively, Anthony Gardner scored three times, and the
team's backups got plenty of action as many of them were in the game early in the third quarter.


The Frostproof Bulldogs moved their fall record to 4-0
last Thursday on the road with a hard-fought 19-12
win at always tough Hardee. Here, Austin Castillo gets
to the outside to pick up some well-earned yardage.
Casey Anthony had two long touchdown pass catches
in the win, and quarterback Jesse Henson threw for
more than 100 yards. The team ground out 80 yards on
the ground and scored late to pull out the win.


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New program aims to keep inmates from
By STEVE STEINER Judd announced the community- by those by as little as 1 percent, that How
SSTEINER@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM based program at a press conference would lead to a savings of $1.4 billion to p.
Thursday, Sept. 20. He was accompa- nationwide. chan
No doubt about it, Polk County nied by Don Brown, who heads up the "We want to return them as tax- to er
eriff Grady Judd wants to make sure Lakeland branch of the NAACP, and payers, not tax users," said Judd. is a c
wving time in Polk County jails will be attorney Larry Hardaway. Throughout the press conference, Hard
experience inmates do not want to "This is a holistic approach in the Judd made it a point to repeatedly ly su
)eat. Toward that, he has instituted fight against crime," he said. The bring attention to the fact this latest com:
reral.actions, such as no longer purpose is to help prepare inmates for program-is at no cost to the county. be fu
oviding peanut butter, tea, coffee and when they no longer are incarcerated. Proceeds come from commissary WI
lk. Instead, there are crackers, water "What we are helping to do is prepare sales, that go into a prisoner wel- Brow
d powdered milk. If they want those them. fare fund, as well as the proceeds It wa
ms, he suggests inmates stay out of "We are going to have a school envi- from items.confiscated in drug and-- trenc
. ronment in the county jail every day," gambling arrests and convictions, your
Nor are male inmates given free he continued. The program is going to The program, which began several affec
derwear. If they want it, theycan be all day long. "We wake everyone up months ago, has already produced some
y underwear just like law-abiding at 6:30 a.m., with "Reveille." At results. him 1
izens do; the only difference being 11 p.m.,it closes with "Taps." "One inmate told me, 'This is the has 1
nates have only one place to make Inmates will receive a standard first think I've ever earned and been beinl
ch a purchase at the jail commis-- education similar to that found in awarded in my life," the sheriff said. Br
y. Otherwise, in mates are free to "let the Polk County Schools, which has The program has proven popular, he "If a
Breeze travel up one leg and down reviewed the program, as well as teach added, and waiting lists to get into he's I
other," as Judd is fond of saying. He social skills and how to prepare for life classes exist. However, there is a
o has taken away weight and bas- outside jail. shortage of teachers. Currently there
ball hoops, as well as unlimited TV "We want to change the philosophy are approximately 25-30. The PCSO
wing. There also is no more tobacco of the county jail," said Judd. "To a could use triple that amount. "As we
king allowed. learning environment from a detention go forward, it's the community and
While these measures may seem environment." He cited another set of volunteers, not money, that's going
native and they are, deliberately statistics. Sixty-five percent of those in to make it work."
said Judd, they do produce results. the jail are high school dropouts. Of Echoing Judd's words, Hardaway
e current crime rate is 50.9 percent that number, 43 percent didn't com- told of a childhood friend who had
ver today than it was in 1997 said the plete the 10th grade." lived a hard life. Hardaway spotted
eriff. Dropout drives up crime. Schooling him one day as the friend was leav-
However, not everything instituted reduces it. Seventy-five percent of ing the county jail. Giving him a ride
Along those lines, including the crimes are committed by high school home, the man asked for a sizeable
est project unveiled: "Keys to Stay dropouts." amount of money that Hardaway -
t of Jail." If the program can reduce crime knew would go to purchase drugs.


returning
ever, the next day, on his way
purchase the drugs, the friend
iged his mind and decided
nulate Hardaway. "Today he
deacon in his church," said
away. "I'm here today to public-
pport not support totally
mit to the program. I'm going to
Illy involved."
ien it was his turn to speak,
n said talking was not enough.
s necessary to "get into the
:hes." He cited the three A's. "Its
attitude, not your aptitude that
ts your altitude." Brown said
e of those incarcerated have told
being in jail is the best thing that
happened to them, because by
g in jail they are alive.
own closed by reminding people,
man cannot work and make it,
going to steal and take it."


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I









Chamber hosts property appraiser at monthly lunch event


Polk County Property Appraiser Marcia Faux
was the guest speaker at last week's Frostproof
Chamber of Commerce luncheon. She recently
was re-elected to another four-year term.
PHOTOS BY NEAL BYRD


I iW HiI >i IBMI
Above: Getting a chance to catch up with each
other before the lunch meeting began were,
from left: Lore Bragg, Randy Scott, and Angle
Hanger.

Right: Citizen's Bank and Trust has had a
Frostproof presence for decades, and was well
represented last week at the chamber lunch by
Chuck Thornton, left, and Brian Marbutt.


OBITUARIES Davina F. Conner


Flora J. Conner

Flora J. Conner, 94, of Frostproof
passed away Sunday, Sept. 23, 2012, at
the Grace Health Care in Lake Wales.
She was born Nov. 18, 1917, in
Greenville, S.C. to the late James M.
& Mittie E. Mason; she came here
from Greenville, S.C. in 1943. She
was a homemaker, a former longtime
member of the Christian Fellowship
of Frostproof and attended the First
Baptist Church of Lake Hamilton.
Flora was preceded in death by her
husband, Albert L. Conner in 1995 and
a daughter, Jeanette Meyer in 2012.
Survivors include her four daughters,
Fay Dease of Frostproof, Alyce Conner
of Lake Alfred, Dale Lathem of Dundee
and Deborah Linne of Lake Wales; 16
grandchildren, 40 great-grandchildren
and 17 great-great-grandchildren.
Visitation is 6-8 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 27, 2012, and the service is 11 a.m.
Friday, Sept. 28, 2012, at the Marion"
Nelson Funeral Home in Frostproof.
Interment will follow at the Silver Hill
Cemetery in Frostproof.
Condolences may be sent to the fam-
ily and the webcast of the service can
be viewed at www.marionnelson
funeralhome.com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


Davina E.
Conner, 36, died
Sept. 23, 2012.
She was born
Feb. 19, 1976, and ..
was a resident of
Frostproof and
lived the last 15
years on the east y "
coast of Florida.
She is survived"
by three children,
Dustin Looney, Davina F.Conner
Dalton Dobkins
an Jewelie Conner; father, Dave Conner;
mother, Janet Mills; sisters Helen Kay
Conner, Brenda Chambers and Shantel
Mills; grandmother Hazel Jeannette
Boshears.
Services will be held at the First
Baptist Church in Frostproof at 2 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 30.

Words of Comfort
Memories live forever, they grow
richer through the years, they are
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Memories live forever,
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.: t connect us to the
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September 26, 2012


Page 12 Frostproof News


I







September 26, 2012 Frostproof News Page 13


Third grader Jaden Gaulden picks out a few of
the many items everything from pencils to
stress balls from the Star Academy booth
at the vendor fair. The fourth and fifth grade
open houses were held at a different time.




CLASSES
FROM PAGE 1

cyclists and others.
A lease agreement with Kings Trail
Christian Church was approved by the
council. The church will be renting the
FrostproofWoman's Club for $500 a
month for a year.
The council reappointed Buzzy Elder
to a three-year term on the Planning
and Zoning Commission.
SBefore the regular meeting, the final
budget hearing was held. It was brief
and lasted only about five minutes.
The council adopted the millage rate

EVENT
FROM PAGE 1

she said. "That was the first time I had
everything out for people to see, and
they were amazed that I had that much
to offer."
She had suggested starting the mar-
ket after noticing that Frostproof did
not have a farmers market like other
cities in Polk County had.
"Every other city has a farmer's
market once or twice a month and we
didn't have anything like that," she said.
The first Frostproof Market was held
earlier this summer on May 19.
"It was a real good turnout consider-
ing it was the first one," she said.
Banks plans to improve turnout for
this market with better advertising. She
had done most of the advertising for


Jajaira Matos of"A Quantum Leap"was one
of over a dozen vendors offering free tutoring
talk with third grader Sabino Zamora and his
mother Beatriz Zamora.

of 7.8209, which has not changed in five
years. Homeowners in the city will see
atax bill of $7.82 per $1,000 of assessed
valuation.
A home owner whose house is
valued at $100,000, minus the $50,000
Homestead exemption, will pay
$391.05 in city taxes next year.
The total budget for 2012-13 is
about $12.3 million. According to
the budget summary, the operating
budget expenditures of the city are
.49 percent less than in the 2011-12
budget.
Mayor Kay Hutzelman described it
as a "great budget.
"We met our goal," the mayor said,
noting that is good for the citizens.
the last market, but this time around,
she has also.prompted the individual
vendors to advertise on their behalf.
"That was the main complaint last
time: that it wasn't advertised," she
said.
The hours for this market will also be
set one hour earlier than the last one,
as Banks notes how both people and
vendors had arrived and left earlier
than previously scheduled last time.
The Frostproof Market is planned to
be held every four months. The date
for the next market will be announced
sometime this October or November.
For information, contact the Frostproof
Chamber of Commerce at 863-635-9112
or at info@frostproofchamber.com, or
contact KellyBanks at 863-632-3206 or at
Kelly.Banks@gmx.com.
For vendor information and updates
on future events, visit and like the
Frostproof Market Facebook page.


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graders have open house


Frostproof's
Ben Hill Griffin
Jr. Elementary
School recently
started its annual
series of open
houses with third
grade students
and parents.
First year teacher
Savannah Taylor,
right; shared
a presenta-
tion about the
federal Title One
program.
PHOTOS BY
K.M. THORNTON
SR.


at BHG Jr Elementary


Frostproof News Page 13


September 26, 2012


,:









Allen, Maxwell are FPMSHS 2012 homecoming king, queen


Students at Frostproof Middle Senior
High School are asked to make choices
all the time, but one of the toughest
came last week, when six couples were
vying for the title of homecoming king
and queen.
When all the ballots were counted,
seniors Reggie Allen and Megan
Maxwell were crowned with the coveted
titles.
Allen, whose parents are Telisha Sanford
and TheresaWilliams, is a standout of the
Bulldogs varsity football team, and par-
ticipates in track and field and basketball
as well. His favorite high school memory
came in 2010 when as a sophomore the
Bulldogs traveled to take on undefeated
andnumber one ranked Fort Meade in the
finale to the football season. Allen helped
Frostproof to a 36-35 upset, and he said he
will never forget that night. His future plans
Share to attend college and play football and
major in business.
He received his crown from Tyrone
Hamilton, last year's king, who lives in
Frostproof and plans to join the U.S.
Army where he hopes to pursue a degree
in criminal justice. He would eventually
like a career with the federal DEA.
Other candidates included:
Brandon Corso, son of Laura Corso.
Brandon plays varsity football, and is a
member of the DECA and FBLA clubs,
FCA, and is a member of the National
Honor Society. He has also participated
in track and basketball. He said his
favorite memory of high school is just
playing football with all his friends since
little league and growing up with them.
Clayton Farrer, son ofWilliam and
Peggy Farrer, has been a member of
the school swim team, wrestling team
Sand track team. His favorite high school


Reggie Alien and Kathryn Flood
memory is representing Frostproof at the
state wrestling tournament and his time
with his friends. He plans to participate in
college wrestling and join the U.S. Army.
Jose Gonzalez, son of Jose and Marcia
Gonzalez, is a member of the Interact
Club, FBLA and Academic Team, better
known as the A-Team. Jose's favorite high
school memory was working on spirit
week posters. He plans on going to a
four-year university to major in biology,
chemistry or physics.
Trevor McCall, son of Bobby and
Jennifer McCall, is a member of the
Bulldogs varsity football team and FFA.
His favorite memory is beating Fort
Meade in overtime. He plans to
attend college and get a degree in
sports medicine.
*Marcus Ramos, whose father is
Anthony Ramos and grandson of Ana


Jose Gonzalez and Megan Maxwell
Ramos, plays baseball for the Bulldogs.
His favorite memory is transferring
back to Frostproof. He plans to go to
college and play baseball.
Maxwell, daughter of Steve and
Beverly Maxwell, has been part of the
softball, volleyball and soccer teams
during her time at the school. She is
also a member of the National Honor
Society and cheerleading squad. She
has had tons of great memories and
thanked all her amazing friends includ-
ing Ashton Robillard, Hannah Sikes
and Moises Bautista to name just a few.
She plans to attend college and earn a
degree in business and event planning.
She received her crown from last
year's queen, Hannah Sikes who resides
in Babson Park and attends Webber
International University, majoring in
exercise science and plans to eventually
become a college athletic trainer. She
is a member ofWebber's cheerleading
squad and youth leader at South Lake


Brandon Corso and Samantha Franks
Wales Church of God.
Other queen candidates included:
*Kathryn Flood, daughter of Russ and
Susan Flood, is the varsity cheerleader
captain, a member of the tennis team, FFA,
FCA, National Honor Society, DSRYouth
Ministries, FBLA and is a dual enrolled stu-
dent. She has also coaches the Frostproof
Dawgs little league cheerleaders. Her
favorite high school memory is cheering
Friday nights at Faris Brannen Stadium.
She plans to attend a state university where
she hopefully can cheer and obtain a
nursing degree.
Samantha Franks, daughter of Jody
and Susan Franks, has been active in golf,
soccer, National Honor Society, FBLA and
is the student council secretary. Her fa-
vorite memory is winning golf and soccer
districts in the same year, 2010-11. She
plans to attend the university of South
Florida to study physical therapy.

HOMECOMING 115


I. Dared r eh lid e!,I


There were many signs in the high school hallways which featured lots of impressive art and
intimidating images.


I~J:qih~A. n. . . ..


MOODY LAW


"As a fifth generation resident of Florida's Heartland, I understand
the needs of our communities. My varied professional career, as a
nurse, small business operator, and citrus grower gives me a wide
perspective of the challenges faced in these fields. "I got involved in
the public arena to help shape a government that's responsive, not
intrusive. I have worked hard to meet the challenges of the last few
years and balance our state budget without raising taxes. With your
vote on November 6, I will keep working hard for you in Tallahassee."


Denise










www.denisegrimsley.com
Contact Denise:
150 N. Commerce Ave., Suite 2 Sebring, FL 33870
Telephone: (863) 835-0232 Email: denise@denisegrimsley.com


Page 14 Frostproof News


September 26, 2012


~~f:


j-... s.
,.,. ,. '*- ..i'





Frostproof News Page 15


eS tember 26 2012


Marcus Ramos and Celin Romero


Trevor McCall and Raegan Miller.


Above: Staff judges hallway decorations.
Below: The hallway decoration theme was "All American."AII four classes, from the freshmen to
the seniors, showed lots of creativity with their displays like this one. After all, what's more All
American than a football tailgate party?


Clayton Farrer and Desiree Gaines


HOMECOMING
FROM PAGE 14

SDesiree Gaines, daughter of Ecoya
Hampton and David Gaines, is a
member of DECA and played basketball
throughout her middle school years
and as a freshman and sophomore.
She was also on the track team for two
years. Her favorite high school memory
is becoming a candidate for homecom-
ing queen. She plans to attend college
and get a degree in nursing.
Raegan Miller, daughter of Bill
Miller and Sherry Peacock, has been
involved in the golf team and ten-
nis team at the school. She is also a
member of the National Honor Society,
DECA and FFA. Her favorite high school
memory was watching Mr. Stanciu
rip his shirt off at the pep rally. She
plans to attend Webber International
University on a golf scholarship and
study business.
Celin Romero, daughter of Vicky
Romero, said her favorite high school
memory was her whole junior year.
She may join the U.S. Army after
graduation.
Overall spirit week winners at the
high school was the senior class,
followed by the freshmen, juniors
and sophomores. In the middle
school, the eighth grade was first,
followed by seventh grade and
sixth grade.
In the high school hallway display
contest, the freshmen finished first,
followed by the seniors, juniors and
sophomores. In the middle school
poster contest, ciglith grade was first,
followed by the seventh grade and then
sixth grade.


Two cheeleaders walk down the hall at the
school last week.


w


oupualluck f- , fVif







Pa2e 16 Frostnroof News September 26, 2012


Bulldogs don't get a kick out of homecoming


By BRIAN ACKLEY
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET

The Frostproof Bulldogs slipped,
stumbled and generally spent four
quarters bumbling their way around
the Faris Brannen Stadium field Friday
night. And Mulberry made them pay
for the nightmarish homecoming
performance.
More specifically, Panther kicker Noe
Guillen made them pay. The Mulberry
junior had three field goals, one from
50 yards, and the visitors took advan-
tage of bevy of Frostproof miscues to
post a 16-6 win. Frostproof freshman
quarterback Xavier Gaines did not
complete a pass the entire night, and
was picked off three times, but there
was plenty of blame to spread around.
After a lackluster first half, the
Bulldog offense misfired on just its
second play of the third, dropping
a wet ball on a snap with Mulberry
recovering at the Frostproof 25. It was
a common theme as both teams had
trouble hanging on to the football.
Three plays later, Panther kicker Noe
Guillen drilled his third field goal of the
night, this one from 43 yards away with
less than two minutes gone in the third
quarter, and the visitors had their first
lead of the night, 9-6.
Less than two minutes after that,
Mulberry stretched its advantage to
16-6 when once again, the Frostproof
offense founds itself deep in its own
territory and couldn't hang on to the
pigskin. A loose ball was jumped on by
Jerry Joyce in the end zone to give the
Panthers their 10-point advantage with
8:51 still left in the third.
Frostproof's offense had its best
moment after that the hosts had


managed one first down in the game to
that point thanks in large part to Cecil
Cherry, who helped the Bulldogs drive
into Mulberry territory after starting
at their own 20. After an exchange
of fumbles, it was Cherry again who
picked up most of the yardage and was
seemingly heading for pay dirt, only to
see him fumble inside the five-yard line
to end the scoring threat early in the
fourth.
Special teams and defense set up
Frostproof's first and only score of the
night. Mulberry was pinned at its own
19 after the opening kickoff, and the
defense allowed only a couple of yards
on three plays. A bad snap on the punt
try was recovered by the Bulldogs, who
had a first and goal at the six on their
first possession of the night.
It took Kaleel Gaines just two plays
to open a 6-0 lead with 8:52 to play
in the first quarter as the point-after-
touchdown run attempt failed.
Neither offense could muster much
after that, with the field tilted in the
Panthers favor for much of the first 24
minutes. The only time Frostproof had
life was on a muffed punt late in the
second quarter, but the offense was
unable to do anything with it after a
recovery at the Mulberry 48.
The Frostproof defense was stout as
Mulberry had three straight drive starts
in Bulldog territory, and on a fourth,
was at the Frostproof 37 after just one
play.
The Panthers did get a 47-yard field
goal from Guillen with 8:07 to play
in the second quarter to slice the
lead to 6-3, and he did himself three
better with just a second to go from
intermission when he hit one from 50
yards out that cleared the cross bar by









Looking to get out
from the shadow of
their own goal post,
Trevis Harrington
looks for some room
to run, flanked by
Kerry Wood (33) and
Sam Hamilton (55).


Frostproof quarterback Xavier Gaines reaches out in the rain on this keeper play to try and gain
extra yardage in the first quarter Friday night as the Bulldogs hosted Mulberry.


plenty. That left the game tied at 6-6 at
intermission. Last week, Guillen hit a
46-yarder at Avdn Park.
Heavy rains came through the
Frostproof area'a couple of hours
before game time, but by kickoff, the
precipitation had been reduced to a
persistent drizzle, It finally abated by
midway through the third quarter.
Mulberry came into Friday night's
game 1-2, having lost their first two


games before nabbing a 9-6 win over
Avon Park in week three. Frostproof
was 2-1, suffering their first loss, by
a point, last week at home against
Desoto. The Bulldogs had defeated
Avon Park, 27-0, to open the season
The Bulldogs are not in action next
Friday, but hit the field again on Oct.
5 when they start district play on the
road against U.S. Highway 98 rival Fort
Meade.


I.I. O

i -.i.- ri s


PEACE OF MIND FOR YOUR FAMILY


Custom care for seniors and adults
with disabilities, respite for caregivers


Affordable long-term care alternative

Four convenient locations -
Bartow, Haines City,
Lakeland and Lake Wales

Licensed practical nurses and
nursing assistants

Contact Us at 863-519-8146


Planned activities
Health monitoring
Nutritious meals
Daily personal care
"- .


September 26, 2012


Page 16 Frostproof News






September26, 2012 Frostproof News Page 17


FEELING


.2 -?' "'^ ;i
,'; .. .I-L.'e
_*.v -.._
S'^1 ^ ^


Open he

The Lake Wales Adult Day Health
Care Center provided tours of its
facilities to 88 visitors during an open
house last Thursday. The Alzheimer's
Association, Florida Gulf Coast Chapter,
Veteran's Support Services, caregiver
support providers and government offi-
cials were on hand to provide informa-
tion about the services available. The


From left is
Harold Gallup,
Lake Wales
Director of
Economic
Development,
Donna Kay,
Adult Day
Care Center
Administrator
and Lori Miller,
Director of
Wound Healing -
at Lake Wales
Medical Center,
who.were part
of the open
house at the
Lake Wales
Center.


Some people who
attended Thurs-
day's open house
included, from
left, Mike Mason,
Polk County
Veterans Support
Services, Marcia
Andresen, Social
Services Director,
Hope Jones,
Elderly Services
Manager and Ernie
Roberts, Polk
County Veterans
Support Services.


)se held

two-year-old center where the open : ''
house was held is at 305 W. Central Ave.
There are also facilities in Bartow, 615
Jackson Ave.; Haines City, 751 Scenic
Highway; and Lakeland, 1200 Southern
Ave.
The daily cost for services is $45.
Cassie Jacoby


PHOTOS BY CASEY JACOBY
The Alzheimer's Association
set up a table at the open
house. Here is Suzanne Lull,
Alzheimer's Association
Support Group Facilitator,
Elaine Auger, Alzheimer's Asso-
ciation Support Group Facili-
tator and Patti Spears, Grace
Healthcare Administrator.


County Commissioner Bob English and Donna Kay, Adult Day
Care Center administrator, were all smiles Thursday at the open
house at the Lake Wales center.


Bartow, Haines City hospitals named to quality measures list


By JEFF ROSLOW
SJROSLOW@POLKGOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Bartow Regional Medical Center
and Heart of Florida Regional Medical
Center in Haines City were named the
only two Polk County hospitals as top
performers in key quality measures by
the Joint Commission.
The commission is regarded as a
leading accreditor of health care orga-
nizations. This is the second consecu-
tive year the Bartow facility was named
to the list. There were a total of 620
hospitals named on the list that was
announced this month.
Bartow Regional was recognized
for its achievement on the following


measure sets: Heart Failure and
Pneumonia. The ratings are based
on an aggregation of accountability
measure data reported to The Joint
Commission during the 2011 calen-
dar year. The list of Top Performers
increased by 50 percent from its debut
last year and represents 18 percent of
accredited hospitals reporting data.
Brenda Sponsler, the chief nursing
officer for Bartow, said that among
other things, continuing education
for employees and physicians, the
implementation of best demonstrated
practices for Emergency Room and
Inpatient processes, the implementa-
tion of evidence based protocols for the
appropriate qualityindicators, timely


monthly internal reporting analyses
and monthly operational reviews, as
well as the assignment of authority,
accountability and responsibility for
improvement for all quality indicators.
"We understand that what matters
most to patients at Bartow Regional is
safe, effective care. That's why Bartow
Regional has made a commitment to
accreditation and to positive patient
outcomes through evidence-based care
processes," said Troy DeDecker, CEO.

PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
Troy DeDecker, the Chief Executive Officer of
Bartow Memorial Hospital, speaks to members
of the Committee of 100 Friday morning.


Winter Haven Hospital

Compassion. Innovation. Trust.


:16 K S 6 III]IHJIJIIILIE


%M s'


t
.frs
^ -. .k


September 26, 2012


Frostproof News Page 17


ir
; -
;--


mi

II ~r






Page 18 Frostproof News September 26, 2012


CPR class offered Thursday


Lake Wales Medical Center will has
a community CPR class on Thursday,
Sept. 27, from 8 a.m.-noon in the
LWMC Hunt Building 2nd floor
classroom.
Teacher for the course is Education
Director April Guindon and it costs
is $40 for initial certification, $20 for
renewal.
The course is American Heart
Association certified. Prior to class
day, participants need to come to
Guindon's office to fill out a registra-
tion form, check out a course book,
and pay for the course. To register, call
863-678-2716 and leave a message.
These classes are held quarterly.
The last class of 2012 is scheduled
Wednesday, Dec. 19.

Mommy and baby expo planned
Watson Clinic's obstetrics & gy-
necology department has "We're
Expecting" Mommy & Baby Expo
which is a special event tailored for
expectant parents, those who are
planning pregnancy, or have just
welcomed a newborn.
The event which takes place on
Saturday, Oct. 13 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
from the First Presbyterian Church,
175 Lake Hollingsworth Drive,
Lakeland will feature physician pre-
sentations on topics relevant to par-
ents and parents-to-be, breastfeeding
tips from a certified nurse lactation
consultant, skin care recomrenda-
tions, free chair massages, deilonstra-
tions of proper car seat applications,
and a boot camp designed specifically
for new and expectant fathers.
Various children's activities will be
offered, as well as a display of the lat-
est trends in maternity fashions. Food
and refreshments will be available for
the entire family, and door prizes will
also be given away throughout the
event.
Attendees are.encouraged to bring
along their friends, family members,
or others who could benefit from the
information offered at the event. Both
Watson Clinic and non-Clinic patients
are invited to attend.
The Expo also serves as an advanced
preview of the many exciting new
developments in Watson Clinic's
OB-GYN department, including the
first ever 'maternity concierge' in Polk
County, a series of valuable education
classes, and an upcoming move for
OB-GYN physicians located in Watson
Clinic's Main location to brand new
facilities on the renovated 3rd floor of
the Bella Vista Building in Lakeland.
For information call 863-393-9475.

Clinic hosts first-time Medicare
enrollees
The Watson Clinic Foundation is
planning an event designed to an-
swer common questions regarding
Medicare coverage on Oct. 3-4.
The seminar, coordinated in
partnership with the West Central
Florida Area Agency on Aging Inc.,
is of particular benefit to first-time
enrollees living or working throughout
the community. Counselors from
Serving Health Insurance Needs for
Elders (SHINE) will address a number
of topics including the purpose of
Medicare, the process for enrollment,
and eligibility requirements.
The free seminars are scheduled
from 2:30-3:30 p.m. onWednesday,
Oct.3 and 5:30-6:30 p.m. on Thursday,
Oct. 4. Both are in the library of
Watson Clinic, 1600 Lakeland Hills
Blvd., Lakeland.
Light refreshments will be served,
and the doors for each event will open
30 minutes prior to start time. To
reserve space at this important event,
call 863-802-6220.


Demenech named LWMC employee
of the month
Lorenzo Domenech, ES Tech II in
Environmental Services, has been
chosen as Employee of the Month for
August at Lake Wales Medical Center.
Domenech has been with Lake Wales
Medical Center since October 2005.
In nominating him for the award, a
colleague wrote, "Lorenzo has-done an
outstanding job on the floors. He has
really gone above and beyond in making
sure his areas are clean and look good.
He was relentless during the 3rd floor
PCU project, working long hours to help
ensure that we finished the project well
ahead of schedule. Lorenzo is a great
asset to Lake Wales Medical Center."

Wiggs joins Bartow Regional Medical
Center
Kimber Lauren Wiggs, of Lakeland,
has joined the marketing team at
Bartow Regional Medical Center as a
Public Relations intern.
Kimber comes to the hospital after
earning a master's degree in Literature
at the University of Edinburgh in
Scotland. She graduated with a bach-
elor's in English from Washington and
Lee University in 2010, and in 2006,
she graduated from International
Baccalaureate at Bartow High School.
Kimber is the daughter of Howard and
Linda Wiggs.

Fifth annual breast cancer walked set
Lake Wales Medical Center's Healthy
Woman program is holding its fifth an-
nual Breast Cancer Awareness Walk on
Saturday, Oct. 13 in Lake Wales.
The walk will begin and end at
Kiwanis Park on Lakeshore Boulevard.
Walkers will use the path around the
lake, and can walk to the end of the
path and back, or may choose to walk a
shorter distance.
Check-in will begin at 8 a.m. at the
pavilions at Kiwanis Park, and the walk
begins at 8:30 a.m. Door prizes and
recognition of survivors will be held at
9:30 a.m. Participants also are encour-
aged to decorate bras in the theme
of their choice and wear them over
their shirts on the walk. Prizes will be
awarded for best decorated bras!
The hospital's mammriography depart-
ment will be there with information
about screening and diagnostic mam-
mograms, stereotactic breast biopsy
and breast MRI. Breast cancer affects 1
in 8 women.
There is no charge to participate. Sign
up by Sunday, Oct. 7 will guarantee a
T-shirt at check-in. Late registrants will
receive a T-shirt, if available, on a first-
come, first served basis at check-in the
day of the walk.
To register, visit www.
LakeWalesMedicalCenter.com and
click on Healthy Woman, or call
863-678-2288.

Strides Against Breast Cancer
coming
The American Cancer Society plans
its 10th annual Making Strides Against
Breast Cancer walk on Oct. 20 at Mosaic
Park in Bartow.
This walk used to be held in Lakeland
is moving to Bartow this year. It is Polk
County's breast cancer walk which sup-
ports local patient assistance, educa-
tion, free local patient cancer gift items,
research, and outreach.
Visit www.putonyourpinkbra.com/
polk to sign up a team or sign up as a
survivor, to attend the event's Survivor
Reception.
Proceeds from the event go toward
breast cancer initiatives, education in
the community, breast cancer patient as-
sistance, and research for breast cancer.
For details call Janice Perkins at
863-688-2326, ext. 5502, or email polk.
msabc@cancer.org.

-Mall Walkers party Oct. 4
The Mall Walkers program, sponsored
by Lake Wales Medical Center and Eagle


PHOTO PROVIDED
Lorenzo Domenech, center, is congratulated by LWMC Assisant CEO Eric Lachance, left, and Hospi-
tality Director Brian Stone.


Ridge Mall, has its next prize party 9 a.m.-
10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4, in the Food
Court area of the mall.
During the prize party, Mall Walkers
participants are asked to turn in their
mileage tracking cards. Mall Walkers
tracks each walker's mileage, and
they earn prizes for reaching mileage
milestones. Mall Walkers also is tracking
total miles walked by the group this
year, and logging their virtual journey
to various destinations around the U.S.
on a wall map that is displayed in the
mall's Food Court.
The Mall Walkers program enables
people to walk inside the mall from
8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through
Saturday, and from 10 a.m. to noon on
Sunday. Participants are encouraged
to use their tracking cards to log their
mileage each time they walk in the
mall to earn prizes, including walking
towels, water bottles, movie tickets, and
gift cards. Mileage logged and turned
in must be walked inside the mall to be
eligible for prizes through Mall Walkers.
For information 863-678-2288.

Lab awarded gold seal accreditation
Lake Wales Medical Center's labora-
tory has earned The Joint Commission's
Gold Seal of Approval for accreditation by
demonstrating compliance with The Joint
Commission's national standards for health
care quality and safety in laboratories.
The accreditation award recog-
nizes LWMC's dedication to con-
tinuous compliance with The Joint
Commission's standards.
LWMC underwent an unannounced


on-site survey in June where a team
ofJoint Commission surveyors evalu-
ated the hospital for compliance with
standards of care that directly affect the
quality and safety of diagnostic services
and patient care.
The Joint Commission's laboratory
standards emphasize the results a
laboratory should achieve instead of
emphasizing the technical methods of
performing testing, and were developed
with input from professional laboratory
organizations.

Gibbs joins Bartow's hospital as
director of radiology
Bartow Regional Medical Center hired
Diane Gibbs as the new Director of
Radiology.
Gibbs comes to BRMC after serving as
director of radiology and PACS admin-
istrator for 10 years at Franklin Regional
Medical Center in Louisburg, NC.
Prior to her work at Franklin Regional,
she spent seven years as the director
of radiology at Sebastian River Medical
Center in Sebastian.
In these positions, Diane considers
providing a remarkable patient experi-
ence to be her first priority.
Gibbs received her MBA in Health
Care Management from Century
University in Albuquerque, NM and her
bachelor's in Professional Studies from
Barry University in Miami Shores.
She is also a Certified Radiol6gic
Technologist, a Certified
Mammography Technologist, and a
Certified Cardiovascular Interventional
Technologist.


You deserve personalized quality health care!

"p Benigno Feliciano, M.D
SDiplomate of the American
t Board of Internal Medicine
S* Cardiac Diseases
STreating all High Blood Pressure
adult illnesses Pulmonary Diseases
,r Osteo/ Rheumatoid Arthritis
and diseases: Hypo/Hyperthyroidism


1137 Druid Circle
Lake Wales, Florida
2000 Osprey Blvd., Suite.1.10
Bartow, Florida


* Diabetes
* Skin Diseases/ Cancer
* High Cholesterol
* Strokes
SWound Care


Se habla Espahol
Monday Friday: 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
863-533-1617
Accepting new patients 16 and older
Walk ins welcome Same day appointments
9 Internal Medicine Institute, P.A. _-


September 26, 2012


Page 18 Frostproof News










Blood sugar high in morning why?


DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I have type
2 diabetes and check my blood sugar
every morning before breakfast. It's
usually in the 125 mg/dl (6.9 mmol/L)
to 150 (8.3) range. When I have my
blood sugar checked at the lab, they
tell me to fast before taking the test.
MyAIC.is in the 6.2 to 6.5 range. My
doctors are happy with these numbers.
I take metformin and glyburide daily.
I am 80 and have been doing this for
many years.
My question is that before retiring
for the night my sugar reading is 110
(6,1) to 120 (6.7).Why does my sugar
rise during the night when I'm asleep?
No one gives me a satisfactory answer.
Some say, "The body does strange
things," and other nonsensical answers.
Can you give me a common-sense
answer? P.V
ANSWER: It's not easy explaining
why blood sugar rises when you have
nothing to eat during sleep. I don't
mean to offend you, but do you take
a late-evening snack? It can take four
hours for some food to exit the stom-
ach. The carbohydrates taken from the
snack might not raise blood sugar until
four hours after you've eaten it.
A better explanation is that your
diabetes medicines have been metabo-
lized before you wake up in the morn-
ing. Metformin comes in two different
preparations, an extended-release form


WELL NEWS
Scott LaFee


With age comes wisdom. Or so the
saying goes. But a University of Texas
at Austin meta-analysis found that ag-
ing adults often rely more, not less, on
supernatural explanations for major
life events, such as death and illness.
Psychologist Cristine Legare
and colleagues conducted a South
African study in which respondents,
who had access to both modern and
traditional medicine, were told sto-
ries about people who had HIV, then
asked to endorse or reject several
biological and supernatural explana-
tions for why the characters in the
stories contracted the virus.
According to the findings, partici-
pants of all age groups agreed with
biological explanations for at least
one event. Yet supernatural explana-
tions, such as witchcraft, were also
frequently supported among chil-
dren (ages 5 and up) and universally
among adults.
Legare said the findings contra-
dict the common assumption that
supernatural beliefs dissipate with
age and knowledge. Rather, she said
they appear to persist and co-exist,
growing stronger with age.
"The standard assumption that
scientific and religious explanations
compete should be re-evaluated in
light of substantial psychological
evidence," Legare said. "The data,
which spans diverse cultural contexts
across the lifespan, shows super-
natural reasoning is not necessarily
replaced with scientific explanations
following gains in knowledge, educa-
tion or technology."

Body of knowledge
The average lifespan of a growing
human hair is three to seven years.

Number cruncher
A Burger King Croissan'Wich with
egg and cheese (115 grams) contains
300 calories, 153 from fat. It has


and
an immediate-release form. If you take
the immediate release, the medicine
might be long gone before you waken
the next day.
The same goes for glyburide. It lasts
from 12 to 24 hours. But if you are a
person in whom it lasts on the shorter
side.of that span, it, too, may have been
metabolized long before you wake in
the morning.
A before-breakfast blood sugar is best
when in.the range of 70 (3.9) to 130
(7.2) Your highest reading is 150 (8.3),
not all that far from the ideal high. Too-
exact control can result in dangerously
low readings.
Your hemoglobin A1C is perfect. It
indicates blood sugar control for the
prior three months. I see why your
doctors are happy with your readings.
You should be too.



Biology or I

17 grams of total fat, or 26 percent
of the recommended total fat intake,
for a 2,000-calorie daily diet.
It also contains 145 milligrams of
cholesterol (48 percent), 740 mg of
sodium (31 percent) 26 grams of total
carbohydrates (9 percent), 5 grams of
sugar and 12 grams of protein.

Counts
10 Number of times more
genetic mutations found in tumors
in smokers than in non-smokers.
Source: Washington University in
St. Louis

Doc talk
Aphonia The inability to speak

Phobia of the Week
Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia
Fear of the number 666

Never say diet
The Major League Eating speed-
eating record for watermelon is
13.22 pounds in 15 minutes, held by
Jim Reeves.

Best medicine
A chemist walks into a pharmacy
and asks the pharmacist, "Do you
have any acetylsalicylic acid?"
"You mean aspirin?",asked the
pharmacist.
The chemist replies, "That's it. I
can never remember that word!"

Observation
"Did you know that Jacques
Benveniste, one of the world's leading
homeopathic 'scientists,' now claims
that you can email homeopathic
remedies?
Yeah, see, what you do is you can
take the 'memory' of the diluted sub-
stance out of the water electromag-
netically, put it on your computer,
e-mail it and play it back on a sound
card into new water. I mean, that
could work, right?"
English novelist and essayist
Nick Hornby
Last words
"Why yes, a bulletproof vest."


TO READERS: The booklet on val-
vular heart disease explains things like
aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation.
Readers can order a copy by writing:
Dr. Donohue No. 105; Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a
check or money order for $4.75 U.S./$6
Can. with the recipient's printed name
and address. Please allow four weeks
for delivery.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I take 81 mil-
ligrams of aspirin daily. I will be taking
a trip to the Far East, which includes
a 14-hour plane ride. I am thinking of
taking the higher aspirin dose, 325 mil-
ligrams. Is all I need the 81 milligrams?
S.B.
ANSWER: The 81-milligram strength
aspirin ought to afford you protection
against forming clots. Stagnant blood
tends to clot. If the legs are in a resting
position, like sitting on an airplane for
14 straight hours, the leg veins could
develop clots.
You can add to the anti-clotting effect
of aspirin by getting up and walking up
and down the aisle every half hour. Or
if the airplane crew takes a dim view of
this, you can contract your leg muscles
many times every 15 minutes when you
are seated.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: You wrote
less-than-favorable comments on
turmeric. I am 82 and have had severe
leg pains in both legs. I could not make


Boogeyman?

The final request of convicted
criminal James W. Rodgers (1910-
1960) while facing a firing squad.
To find out more about Scott LaFee


Bta

BE'TER




tomorrow!
^^'0 W^i. ^ l F


it to my grandson's graduation. I was
told to try turmeric, and I started. After
three days, I noticed improvement.
After 21 days, the pain is gone. I walk
much better. I referred it to a friend
who has had the same success. Please
do the world a favor and print this.
- R.S.
ANSWER: Turmeric comes from the
roots of a plant related to the ginger
plant. Curcumin is its most important
constituent. It's used as a spice in
curry. It's been used for a wide range
of illnesses. The proof of its healing
properties isn't extensive. However,
I feel that a person who gets relief
from symptoms with turmeric should
continue with it and spread the word
to others. I don't believe it will harm
anyone. Medicines derived from plants
are nothing new. Aspirin, perhaps
the most.widely used medicine in the
world, was first derived from the bark
of the willow tree.
":* *
Dr Donohue regrets that he is unable
to answer individual letters, but he Will
incorporate them in his column when-
ever possible. Readers may write him
or request an order form of available
health newsletters at PO. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Readers may
also order health newsletters from www.
rbramall.com.


and read features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate website at
www.creators.com.


* BUY THIS BOOK TODAY..
* START READING IT TONIGHT..
* BEA BETTER MANAGER TOMORROW!


Also available by Imperial Publishing
Louise K. Frisbie captures a glimpse of
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unique look into the history of central Florida
and the characters and events that shaped
it. Filled with photos and facts that only a
true native historian would know.


4 0 +.- -. tax

To reserve your copies, please email:
SLFrisbie@polkcountydemocrat.com
or call 863-533-4183


%


Frostproof News Page 19


September 26, 2012





Page 20 Frostproof News September 26, 2012


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September 26, 2012


UL"


I


L+- :








REAL ESTATE


Wednesday, September 26, 2012


CLASSIFIED


How do I What's HOT in the marketplace?


determine the


amount of my


original offer?

Your initial offer should fall within the range that
you are pre-qualified to make purchase with. There
isn't a fixed percentage what you should offer the
seller. What I tell'my clients, the seller has hired their
agent to get
as close to Michelle Hutto
the price they
are asking for
and the buyer
naturally
wants to buy
as low as he :
possibly can. Keystone Real Estate, Inc.
The deal is to '. -
find the sweet
i spot; where both parties agree.
What is "earnest money" and how much do I need?
This is the deposit paid by the buyer to "hold" the
contract. I like to say, "it's putting money where you
mou th is." It is an earnest way of keeping the buyer
committed to the contract. Most times, the contract
is contingent on the buyer receiving financing with
specific terms if that doesn't happen by the deadline
then the earnest money will be returned. If the buyer
decides that they simply do not want to purchase the
house; they may be forfeiting the deposit. The earnest





SOFFICE 3 "M to o4 it
R1iFkAIL W00 l.t m NJ al
mkcmc162tempul y.rr.com
203-414-3886 or 863-678-4182 x 224
2301 East Park Avenue, Lake Wales FL 3~3 5


The photo is of a spacious bedroom 3 bath, formal living and dining room, large kitchen and two car garage brick house sold
9/21/2012 by Michelle Hutto for $92,000.00 to a first time home buyer and his family. We wish them well with their new property.


money deposit is put into an escrow account. The
funds are credited to the buyer at closing. There isn't
a formal rule to how much should be given but with
most REO and other foreclosing companies it is gen-
erally recognized as $1,000.00 or 2% of the purchase
price. I usually advise minimally $500.00 for less than
$50,000. purchase pride then $1,000 or higher thereaf-
ter works. Additionally, I customarily request buyer's
to give their deposit within three business days after
the acceptance of the terms of the contract. As a real
estate broker we have three business days to deposit
the funds and the escrow agent who is holding the
funds have another seven to ten days to make certain
the funds clear before a refund of deposit can be is-
sued.
Is there any way I can protect niyself against emer-


206 WOODSTORK WAY
LK CALOOSA
FROSTPROOF
3B'2BA2GaC CB on ACRE,
wecd & rvses anowed
GREAT PRICE
$125,000
Cid Wise. Agnt .. ieystooa Realy, Inc
wisec2@aow corn,
245 S Scenic Hwy Frostpioof FL 338t3
S 863-52-036(ceyl), B-3635-j30 (O ffi:e)
F www.mltystonfRu~slati.NEr


agency repair bills in my new home? A home warranty
is a very good tool for sellers and buyers. Initially,
while the seller is marketing their house for sale they
typically live in the home and needing their home to
sell, they truly need to keep everything in good condi-
tion so that it is easier for them to sell it to a ready
buyer. With a home warranty policy, a seller can give
a warranty for major appliances, central heat and air
system, pool equipment and etc according to which
plan they may purchase. If the appliance needs ser-
vicing before or after a contract is initiated the repairs
or replacement of the appliance is just a quick service
call and small fee away. I had a house listed and the.
refrigerator went out before we even had a buyer.
Repairs couldn't be made so a brand new refrigerator
was put in place. The policy more than paid for the
initial $395.00 investment fee.


You can find every business and service
Under the sun in the
Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it!
Call 863-676-3467


LUS

"PRIME PLI









AFFORDABLE LAKI
HOME, over 1.800 ft. I
spacious modem floor p
view from deck with fir
repairs needed, make of

STOP BY OUR O
PLEASE VISIT
hy ^i- ?-' t r*?. "- ,F .*.*-i


... -. :-
700 State Rd.6 Eat
M Lake Wales, Fl. 33853
863-676-7040
REAL ESTATE INC.
US SERVICEYOU DESERVE!"









E-FRONT SE WINTER HAVEN JUST LISTED.
giving area. Located just off C)press Gardens Rd.
Alan, beautiful Home has over 2.500 ft. living area, 4
e pit, some Bed 3 Bath. Wood Floors. High Ceil-
fer. $165,000 ings, Huge Master Suite, 5229,900

OFFICE FOR A FREE LIST OF FORECLOSURES!
OUR WEBSITE www.primeplusrealestate.com


LEGACY REAL ESTATE CENTER


Highland Pointe
Priced To Sell!
* No cr' 3 Ldr',/2B.tlh


Charming
Bungalow
DclihtIful Becdri 'n
Ori ginal H;idwonJ H'orl,
Sidckalk Ncighbohrhood
* In Th'n Ncar ParkA & Lake


LIS H y. 27
Commercial
High Frrift InlaicrLTco'n
E\itlllitc OIicC Sllll'k
Lo'rhh &C inlniermnc Ri'li's
L,.ir Parking L'l


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Page 2 CLASSIFIEDS September 26,2012


1000 1020 HOUSES FOR SALE


REAL ESTATE


'We Are Pledged To The Letter And
Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achieve-
ment Of Equal Housing Opportunity
Throughout The Nation. We Encour-
age And Support An Affirmative
Advertising And Marketing Program In
Which there Are No Barriers To
Obtaining Housing Because of Race,
Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Famil-
ial Status Or National Origin."

1020 HOUSES FOR SALE

House for Sale
313 S. Palm Ave. 3/1, cor-
ner lot $35,000 OBO! Broker
owned Call Michelle
83 Yale Ave 2/1, $39,900.
Call Wesley
204 Central Ave 2/1/1gar,
$49,000. OBO Call Cindy
130 Overocker Cir 3/2 like
NEW! $69,000. Call Michelle
House for Rent
3/2.5 CB, 214 S. Orange
Frostproof $600/mb Broker
owned, Call Michelle
Keystone Realty Inc.
863-635(Q030
LAKEFRONT' FORECLO-
SURE, BEAUTIFUL 3 BR. 2.
BA. HOME, Area of nice well
maintained homes, spacious
modern floor plan, great room
concept, master suite with
bonus room and access to
lanai and deck, large deck
with fire-pit and dock, JUST
REDUCED TO $165,000, ID #
5707 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
NEAR LAKE WAILES LAKE,
3 Br. 2 Ba. on Large Lot,
Home has wood floors and
tile, kitchen has been remod-
*eled with granite counter-
tops, and beautiful cabinets,
being sold as a "short sale",
call for appointment and more
information, ID # 940, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
3 BR. 2 BA. ON LARGE
LOT, NICE HOME WITH
SCREENED PORCH, Bank
Foreclosure, new on the.mar-
ket, .priced to sell quick
$44,900 ID # 2124 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
6776-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
4 BR. 1 BA. BLOCK HOME,
Fenced Yard, Screen Porch,
Garage, Great BUY! $49,800
ID# 2326 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
AVON PARK--WE HAVE
SEVERAL HOMES FOR
SALE FROM 35,000--
44,900, all are priced to sell
quickly, some with lake view,
great investment opportunity;
call today for more informa-
tion or stop by our office for
details and map.
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 or visit
online www.primeplus-
realestate.com
SEBRING--WE HAVE
MANY LISTINGS IN
SEBRING AREA, HOMES,
CONDOS, Priced Low, call
863-676-7040 today for
more information or stop by
our office PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. or visit online at
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m


2 STORY HOME IN BAR-
TOW, BUILT IN 2008, OVER
2,600 FT LIVING AREA, 4
Br. 3 Ba. home,,move-in con-
dition, just reduced to
$159,900, call for more infor-
mation ID# 1916, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
NEW LISTING 3 BR. 1
BATH ON CORNER LOT IN
LAKE WALES, Nice Condi-
tion for this starter home,
located just outside the city
limits of Lake Wales, Great
Buy for this cute block home!
$45,000 ID# 356 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040
LAKE ASHTON FORECLO-
SURE, 2 BR. 2 BA. Beautiful
home with open floor plan,
large rooms, huge Florida
room, 2 car garage plus golf
cart parking, home is in move-
in condition, call today for
appointment to see and more
information, JUST REDUCED
to $134,900 ID# 5304 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
LAKE ASHTON FORECLO-
SURE, NEW ON THE MAR-
KET, Located onr a corner lot,
this home is ready to move in,
new paint, new carpet, spa-
cious. floor plan with bonus
den,. screened- ba'ck- porch,
call for more information,
$134,900, PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
ID # 4075 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
NEAR WARNER UNIVERSI-
TY, 3 BEDROOM 2 BATH,
located in crooked lake park,
spacious split-floor plan,
home has recently been
updated, has detached
garage with RV parking,
screen porch, $98,500 id#
4918, PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
LAKE-FRONT BEAUTY, 2Br
2Ba nestled on private Lake
Cypress in Lake Wales, enjoy
boating, fishing and using
your own private boat ramp.
Offers a spa in the back sun-
room, newer roof, complete
a/c system, kitchen cabinets
and appliances, Reduced
$254;000 id# 1671 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
WATER-FRONT. BEAUTIFUL
HOME ON CANAL LEADING
TO LAKE WALK IN WATER,
Move-In condition, 3 Br. 2 Ba.,
cathedral ceiling, spacious liv-
ing room, large Florida room
with view of canal and lake,
formal dining, plus eating
space next to kitchen, all
appliances, washer and dryer,
2 car garage, workshop,
large covered dock on deep
water canal, just seconds
from the lake, $189,900 id#
6616 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m


1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
3 BR. 2 BA. MOBILE HOME
ON 1 ACRE, NICE WELL
MAINTAINED HOME WITH
STORAGE BLD. Located just
east of Lake Wales near Lake
Rosalie, Great Fishing and
boating lake, $65,000 ID#
2188 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co


Advertise Today!


1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES
37 ACRE MIDDLE TN FARM
with 13 acre lake, nice home.
Selling at Absolute Auction,
Memorial Day. Van Massey
Auction Lic 1711. (931)433-
8686 Visit vanmassey.com
DEVELOPER FORCED LIQ-
UIDATION Smoky Mtn. Lake
Property Priced @ Foreclo-
sure/Short sale. Up to 100%
Financing/5% interest. Hurry-
Only 30 Reservations avail-
able! (877)551-0550 ext 100
NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS 12mins to
Asheville. 5000+sf
5bd/4.5bath brick cus-
tom home on 31+acres
w/pond & springs. Too
many features to list!
$1,000,000. www.own-
ers.com ID#WTA1577.
OWNER (321)960-9794
WESTERN CAROLINA REAL
ESTATE Offering unbeliev-
able deals on homes and land
in the beautiful NC mountains.
Call for free brochures, fore-
closures, and area informa-
tion. 800-924-2635
1210 HOMES FOR RENT

3/2.5 CB, 214 S. Orange
Frostproof $600/mo Broker
owned, Call Michelle
Keystone Realty, Inc.
863-635-0030
BARTOW 2bd-lba, 1175
S- Johnson St.,,$700. mo.,
'$25 discount if pd. before
first of mo. Jenny Smith,
863-533-1236 or 670-5401
Fort Meade 3bd, Iba,
concrete block home.
Clean, new A/C, on large lot.
Located across from high
school. No pets. Need refer-
ence. $700. mo., $675.
s.d.
863-944-6740
LAKE WALES *5 houses
for RENT 2Bd/1Ba, $550
monthly $450 deposit...
*2 houses 3bd/lba, $600
monthly, $450 deposit. Call
863-676-5066 or 863-676-
1901 NO CALLS after 9pm
LAKE WALES very nice
3bd/lba, country house, Ig.
kitchen, ACW/ceiling fans,
garbage/sewer/water includ-
ed. $700. ,o. 863-635-6399

Don't put the

brakes on


Give your advertising.
budget the green,
light-use our
classified to spread
the word!
Call us to find out
how our classified
. section can rev up
'. your business.


t(863)
rMuip


fi.


We're More
Than Just
Print.
.,. -.
... ..- ~-T. .- X.,
.- ...



Visit Our
Website!
www.lakewalesnews.com
www.polkcountydemocrat.com


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Stir-fry additive
4 [frog lands in
pond]
8 Remote control
battery
14 Baba of folklore
15 Bindle carrier
16 "Zip your lip!"
17 Diarist AnaTs
18 "Gotta hit the
hay"
20 Future snakes,
perhaps
22 Regards highly
23 Elementary
school
fundamentals
25 Cut from the
same cloth
29 Lemon and lime
30 Swift means of
attack?
32 Put into words
33 Poe's "ungainly
fowl"
36 D.C. athlete
37 Mom's behavior
warming
41 of Good
Feelings
42 Gives the heave-
ho
43 Rap's Wayne
44 With-the-grain
woodworking
technique
46 Theater sections
48 Canadian pump
sign
49 Marks to brag
about
54 "Why bother?"
56 Color property
57 Canned pasta
brand
61 "Characters
welcome"
network
62 Receive, as a
radio signal
63 South American
country at 0
degrees lat
64 Looney Tunes
collectible
65 Structural threat
for many a
house
66 Gels
67 Towel lettering


By Jeffrey Wechsler
DOWN
1 'The Balcony"
painter
2 Insult
3 Cookies with a
bite
4 Chi preceder
5 Solitary sorts
6 Beyond zaftig
7 Baudelaire, par
example
8 Evaluates
9 Quark's locale
10 Global
networking
pioneer
11 Girl in a pasture
12 Gossipy Smith
13 OCS grads,
usually
19"
Rosenkavalier"
21 Bed or home
ending
24 "Over here!"
26 Reader with a
sensitive screen
27 Modem site of
Mesopotamia
28 Keeps after taxes
31 Like Big Ben
33 Big chunk of Eur.
34 Framed work


9/26/12
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S I H SI IS.L S L El O A
1 390 V N 0 NI9N nI
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8 3 A OS NA 3 NI N
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119 0VV dO111Id ESV1
pGAIoS eizznd s,AepseupeM


35 No. twos
37 Nothing more
than
38 Eye part
39 Surpassed in
extravagance
40 Elie Wiesel work
45 Large eel
46 Took it on the lam
47 Grandchild of
Japanese
immigrants


50 Little one
51 Traditional
doings
52 "That has ring
to i'
53 Elite Navy group
55 Kent State's
home
57 Norm: Abbr.
58 Water filter brand
59 Whichever
60 Airline to Oslo


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

5 2 6 Rating: GOLD
3 4 7 9 1 6 S1E 9 8 LE 7
5 2 37 Eg t 8 L 6 Z I 9 9 E
8 EZ 9 S- L 1 6 8
3 1 8 0
S 3 6 E L 8 9
2 5 4 8 8 9 1 I 6 E S L 1
7 5 Z L I 89 t E 6
89 6 3 L E 89 I 6 Z t 9
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9 I 6 L tZE 8 9
6 1 2 79 8 ES 6 I L
171-9 1 8 E 9 6 t 1 L
4 7 3
./96 ol uo!lnos
9/I26d2


September 26, 2012


Page 2


CLASSIFIED







Page 3


Setme 2621 CLASI ED


Summerlin Oaks
Apartments
$99.00
Moves You In!
2- 4 Bedrooms Available
*Clubhouse Covered Picnic Areas*
*Fitness Center *Pool wlSundeck *
*rCare Center *Playground*
Pet friendly Community!
For a limited time only, call 863-533-2787
New Management,
New Attitude!


8UMMERN OaS
Apatment"- -
SummerlinOaksApts.com
Located In the Bartow Area


AdvertisingNetwork Florida

Classified*Display Metro Daily Online

The key to advertising success









1-866-742-1373

www.AdNetworksFlorida.com




WANTED












PAID VACATION DAYS

Whatever you want in a new job,
you'll find your way to it
in the Classifieds.

The Polk County Democrat
863-533-4183


1210 HOMES FOR RENT

Lake Wales- 3BR/2BA with all
new paint inside and out. New tile
floor throughput. 2 car garage.
Large storage shed.
$850/month, SD $850. Call Mag-
gie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
services, Inc 863-676-0024 or
visit www.LegacyLeases.com
Davenport- Lovely 4BR/2.5BA
pool home on corner lot. 2 sto-
ries with living space on lower
floor and bedrooms upstairs. All
new appliances in kitchen. Pool
care is included in rent.
$1225/month, SD $1225. Call
Maggie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Services; Inc 863-676-0024 or
visit www.LegacyLeases.com
Davenport- 4BR/2BA home with
screened pool. Private backyard
area. 2 car garage. Pool care is
included in rent. Can be furnished
or unfurnished. $1100/month, SD
$1100. Call Maggie Stohler at
Legacy Leasing Services, Inc
863-676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Fort Meade- 3BR/1BA with hard-
wood floors throughout. Large
backyard. Interior washer/dryer
hookup. $550/month, SD $550.
Call Maggie Stohler at Legacy
Leasing Services, Inc 863-676-
0024 or visit www.LegacyLeas-
es.com
Babson Park- 3BR/2BA lake-
front home on Crooked Lake.
Enjoy lake views from living room,
dining room, and screen porch.
Large beach area. Many updates
throughout. $1500/month, SD
$1500. Call Maggie Stohler at
Legacy Leasing Services, Inc
863-676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Frostproof- 3BR/2BA on Lake
Reedy. Extra large lot. All new
paint and flooring. Florida room.
Interior washer/dryer hookup.
$900/month, SD $900. Call Mag-
gie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
services, Inc 863-676-0024 or
visit www.LegacyLeases.com
Commercial
Lake Wales office building with
over 300 feet of highway frontage
on Highway 27 South. Close to
27/60 intersection. Building
includes a spacious, bright recep-
tion area, four-separate offices, 2
storage areas, and 2 acres of
land with plenty of parking space.
New AC unit and well pump.
$1750/month, SD $1750. Call
Maggie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Services, Inc 863-76-0024 or visit
www.LegacyLeases.com


212 E. Stuart-Ave.
Lake Wales, Fl. 33853

1240 CONDOSNILLAS
FOR RENT
WINTERSET CONDO -
LAKE VIEW 2bd / 2bath,
upstairs
unit. Community amenities.
$800.00 per month. Security
deposit required. Call 863-
678-1498 or 863-241-1528


EmployFlorida.com

1-866-FLA-2345


1240 CONDOSNILLAS
FOR RENT
LAKE WALES COUNTRY CLUB
2nd. Floor Condo, Fully Fur-
nished, Screened Balcony,
Great View Of Golf Course
And Lagoon, $99,000 id#
9202 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

GREAT PRICE ON THIS FUR-
NISHED 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH
CONDO, 1,184 ft. living area,
screened porch, convenient
location to shopping in the
city limits of Lake Wales.
$29,900, PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
id # 130 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
1300 DUPLEXES FOR RENT
BARTOW 459 Searcy Ave.
3/2, 1340 sf, w/d hookups,
CHA, appliances, 1 year
lease, $650/monthly,
$600/deposit. Call 863-603-
7715 or 863-533-4482.
BARTOW, 1 bedroom
572 E. Pearl Street.
No pets. $400/mo.
$150/security
Call Pearl 863-299-3522.
LAKE WALES lbd/lba, No
Pets, No Smoking, 1 Adult.
Rent $400 mo, SD $100. Call
676-6201

1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

BARTOW, 495 E. Guava
Street. Ibr/lba $300
month plus $300 security
deposit. One year lease.
863-533-3900 or
863-603-7715

COLONIAL SQUARE
APARTMENTS
SUMMER SPECIALS !
1 and 2 Bedroom apts with
central a/c and heat, large
floor plans, abundant clos-
et
space & FREE WATER
Starting at $465/ month
Move-In Specials too
Call 24/7: 866-485-
4961
Or visit us online at:
ColonialSquareBartow.com
Lakeland 2614 Harden,
Combee Rd., 2bd, Iba, w/d
hook-up. $550. mo. 321-228-
4724.
OAKWOOD MANOR
APARTMENTS
PRICES REDUCED FOR
LEASE- UP!
Our updated villa-style
apartment homes provide
comfortable living at a
great price. Rates include
water.
Studio from only $405/mo
1 BR. from only $475/mo
2 BR with w/d hookups
from only $595/month
Convenient location,
Walk to shopping.
Call 24/7 866-485-
4977
Or visit:
OakwoodManorApts.co
m

1340 MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT

S.E. Bartow 80 ft. Road.
2bd, 2ba, C/H/A on 1-1/4
acre lot. New cond., no
pets. Need reference.
$600. mo, $575 s.d. 863-
944-6740.

1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
20 ACRES FREE! Own 60
acres for 40 acre price/pay-
ment. $0 Down, $168/mo.
Money Back Guarantee, No
Credit Checks. Beautiful
Views, West Texas. 1-800-
843-7537 www.Sunse-
tRanches.com

BEH -0 .0B


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
HOME SITE, Nice half Acre
lot located in Beautiful Area of
Homes. Growing Region Cen-
trally Located between Winter
Haven and Lake Wales. Par-
tially Cleared and ready to
Build your First Home.
$27,900 id #cc PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. (863) 676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

WOODED HOME SITE! 2
Acres of Beautiful Woods in
deed restricted community to
build your new home! Not too
far from Public Boat Ramp
into Lake Rosalie. Owner Moti-
vated and will look at all Rea-.
sonable Offers! $39,900 id#
11209 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC (863) 676-7040.
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

LAKE FRONT ON LAKE
WALK IN WATER, Just Over
5 Acres, Partially Wooded,
Private Location, Dead End
Street. Great Price! $79,900
id# It22 PRIME PLUS REAL
.ESTATE, INC 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

OVER 1 ACRE ON LAKE
PIERCE, Great home-site on
Timberlane Rd. Lake Pierce,
One of the finest fishing lakes
in Florida. Beautiful old Flori-
da Woods; the lot is located
on paved rd. $58,000 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. ID#
7111 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

BLUE JORDAN FOREST,
ALMOST 3 ACRES, BEAU-
TIFUL NATURAL -FLORIDA
WOODS, Gated community,
lots of wildlife, enjoy the coun-
try peaceful atmosphere,
$22,000 ID # 7299 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

1515 WATERFRONT
North Carolina Mountain
Lakefront lots. New gated
waterfront community. Dock-
able lots with up to 300' of
shoreline, Low insurance, Low
property tax. Call Now
(800)709-5253

1520 OUT OF TOWN LOTS
NC mountain property
must go. 4.5 acres with out-
standing views and privacy.
$25,000 OBO, great for
home or cabin.. (828)394-
9298. Ask for Richard
Top of the line RV park lot
for rent, monthly or season-
al. Across from beach on Hwy
A1A between Vero Beach and
Fort Pierce. Boat docks, ten-
nis and heated pool overlook-
ing the ocean. Call 352-347-
4470 or Email:
Iwy2@aol.com.
1620 COMMERCIAL
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY
OVER 14 ACRES HIGHWAY
FRONTAGE IN AVON PARK,
Multiple parcels, with mixed
use. Excellent potential for
commercial highway busi-
ness, or income property on
U.S. 27. Bank owned, recent
appraisal and priced accord-
ingly, call for more informa-
tion. PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK FOR
YOU!

FIND A JOB!
BUYA HOME!
BUYA CAR!


2000


EMPLOYMENT

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Top Pay & 401K Great Equip-
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LIVE-WORK-PARTY-PLAY!
Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet
to New York! Hiring 18-24
girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly.
Paid expenses. Signing
Bonus. 1-866-574-7454
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-
Train for high paying Aviation
Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Avi-
ation Institute of Maintenance
(866) 314-3769v;-
ASAP! New Pay Increase!
34-46 cpm. 300 Newer
Trucks. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
CALL NOW! Top 5% Pay!
Excellent Benefits. 300 New
T660's. Need 2 months. CDL-
A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com .
CDL DRIVERS- Great Pay!
Tons of Texas Frac work!
Great company! Company
paid benefits! Must have bulk
pneumatic trailer experience.
Call today! (800)491-9029.
CDL-A Drivers Relocate for
Tons of Great Paying Texas
Oilfield work! Great compa-
ny/Paid benefits! Must have
bulk pneumatic trailer experi-
ence. Call today! (800)491-
9029
CDL-A DRIVERS. Central Flori-
da company seeks Solo &
Team Drivers. Tank and Dry
Van positions offering some
regional. l-yr OTR/ Good MVR
required.'" (877)882-6537 or
www.oakleytransport.com
CLAIMS ADJUSTERS
NEEDED due to active Storm
Season. JEL's 5-day Boot
Camp, Nations #1 hands-on
trainer can prepare you. High
Income www.JELTraining.com
- Companies waiting
COTTAGE PARENTS
Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch-
es, central Florida location,
seeks responsible, dedicated
married couple with no live in
children, to care for troubled
teenage girls. $47,000
annually per couple + bene-
fits.
Housing, utilities and food
provided (while on duty).
Extensive background screen
req'd. Fax resume to
863/533-7006 or e-mail
isemple@youthranches.org.
CYPRESS TRUCK LINES
Home Weekends! Southeast
Regional, Top Pay & Great
Benefits! 6 Months TT exp
CDL with clean MVR. Call
(800)545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com
DRIVER- Not getting enough
miles? Join Knight Transporta-
tion and increase your income
with our steady freight. New
Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience. (800)414-
9569. www.driveknight.com


Ir~L~anfYYUliZI11


September 26, 2012


: :i l.., H-,1.i 1 i r:,-i q l xs, p. -To, ulTLi -ir, rrn iroi n, : i j-.-i: i. jajj.l ii.. 1.i,, 1;i COni. 4,,l d. "M -( 0 Hi n T ih .. 'lei jI,


CLASSIFIED







Page 4 LSIID etme 621


2001 HELP WANTED
Driver- Recession Proof
Freight. Plenty of miles. Need
refresher? No out-of-pocket
tuition at FFE. $1000 Bonus
for CO's & $1500 Incentive
for O/0's. recruit@ffex.net.
(855)356-7121
Driver-Drivers choose
from Weekly or Daily Pay.
Regional, OTR or Express
Lanes, Full or Part-time, CDL-
A, 3 months recent experi-
ence required. (800)414-
9569 www.driveknight.com
Drivers No Experience -
No problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to
$.49 per mile! CRST VAN
EXPEDITED (800)326-2778
www.JoinCRST.com
Drivers Earn Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR
Flatbed exp. Call: (800)572-
5489 Susan ext. 227 Joy ext.
238.- SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC.
Drivers Earn Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR Flatbed
exp. Call: (800)572-5489 Joy
ext. 238 Susan ext. 227 SUN-
BELT TRANSPORT, LLC
Drivers Wanted-OTR Food
Grade Tanker Drivers Needed
Competitive pay, Benefits,
Guaranteed time off Class A
CDL-w/tanker endorsement
Prefer 2yrs experience
(800)569-6816 otterytrans-
portation.com.
Drivers- No Experience-
No Problem. 100% Paid CDL.
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to 490 per mile!
CRST VAN EXPEDITED
(800)326-2778 www.Join-
CRST.com
Drivers: Local, Great Pay &
Benefits. Home every day. Pd.
Holidays/Vac. 401K CDL-A.
w/X end. School grads..
Accepted 866-358-3937


2001 HELP WANTED
Earn Up to $.51cpm!!! CDL-
A Drivers, Tanker & Dry Van
positions available. 1 year
OTR experience, Good MVR &
work history needed. Call
(877)882-6537 or apply
www.oakleytransport.com
Fast Growing Insurance
Agency In Lake Wales Seek-
ing a CSR No Experience
Necessary.
FAX Resume to 863-676-
9567 1
FRAC SAND HAULERS with
complete bulk pneumatic rigs
only. Relocate to Texas for
Tons of work. Great compa-
ny/pay. Gas cards/Quick Pay
available. (800)491-9029
Freight Up = More $ 34-46
CPM 2Mos. CDL Class A Dri-
ving Exp (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
GROWING Local Newspa-
per is Seeking Qualified
Sales People. Please Send
Resumes to
pnorthrop@thelake-
walesnews.com, or call
Paul Northrop at
(863)676-3467.
Heat & Air JOBS --Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on environ-
ment. Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job Place-
ment Assistance! (877)994-
9904

JUST GRADUATE? Play in
Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet fo New
York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys.
$400-$800 wkly. Paid
expenses. Signing Bonus. Call
(877)259-6983
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED! Hospi-
tals & Insurance Companies
hiring now! No experience?
Local Training & Job Place-
ment Assistance available!
(888)219-5161.

GET RESULTS -
USE CLASSIFIED!


2001 HELP WANTED
Medical Billing Trainees
Needed! Hospitals & Insur-
ance Companies hiring now!
No experience? Local Training
& Job Placement available! HS
Grad or GED & Computer
needed. (888)589-9677.
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
Medical Management
Careers start here Get con-
nected online. Attend college
on your own time. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
MOMS WORK FT/PT, no
experience necessary, we
train. New Swarovski Crystal
Jewelry by Touchstone Crys-
tal. $500 TO $5,000/MONTH
(407)295-1522 kontactkelly-
now@aol.com
MOVIE EXTRAS Earn up to
$250 per day To stand in the
backgrounds for a major film
production experience not
required. All looks needed.
Call NOW!!! (877)435-5877
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses. www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses. www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783
OTR Driver wanted. 1 yr. min.
exp., 48 states, competitive
pay. Contact: walter@sungar-
denlogistics.com. 352-263-
7791.
OTR DRIVERS- Food Grade
Tank Drivers. CDL-A w/tank
endorsement, Good MVR &
Hazmat within 90 days
required. Up to 42cpm
w/additional mileage incen-
tives & benefits. (877)882-
6537 or www.oakleytrans-
port.com


H HO I OR s


:-"X~. ~~'
,,
.-
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a~~~a 1Y


IT'S YOUR TIME TO PLAY IN ORLANDO.
The crowds are down. The savings are up. This is the best time to get out and play in Orlando and
Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek makes your getaway even more rewarding. Located within the gates of
Walt Disney World Resort, the resort features spacious guest rooms, 12 unique restaurants and lounges,
a Rees Jones-designed championship golf course, world-class spa, award winning pool with lazy river,
plus complimentary transportation to all the Disney theme parks. And all with no resort feel

STAY HILTON. GO EVERYWHERE.


Hilton
ORLANDO BONNET CREEK


Bonnet Creek Fall Retreat
From $179 per night
Includes a $50 daily Resort Credit and daily self-parking
For reservations call 888-208-7440. Ask for promotion code BCFT.
Visit HiltonBonnetCreek.com/fall


.'l' i. ..1 .,.1 i I., h1 1 1 i. 1i 1., I. .... ,I I .,, 1..1 <,es gratuities or other incidental charges. Offervalid
i 1 1 .I . ii I. i, . I. 1 1 I I.., I !. 1.,,, .1 *ii, 'l, i.i. offersf rdiscount and ,i not applicableto group or
negotlated ratis Minimum length of stay requirimentla fay pply Resorl credit not applicable to retail purchases. and cannot be applied to
feoam ati or .i i.. 1.1 I. I i, 1.1, 1 1.. jI 11 1,,,,, n ,, 1 i... t.runu d resort credits.
* 'l~r i du.l~ol~ '-nmnl l nupin m .i ~ P ~ll liipir.. i rn;6 plr


2001 HELP WANTED

SURROGATE MOTHER
NEEDED Please help us'
have our baby! Generous
Compensation Paid. Call
Attorney Charlotte Dan-
ciu 1-800-395-5449
FL Bar # 307084

2005 SERVICES
A childless young married
couple (she-37/he-47) seeks
to adopt. Hands-on
mom/devoted dad. Financial
security. Expenses paid.
Cathy & Joel.
(FLBar#0105789; ask for
Michelle/Adam). 1-800-790-
5260.

Abortion Not an Option?
Consider Adoption. It's a
Wonderful Choice for an
Unplanned Pregnancy. Liv-
ing/Medical Expenses Paid.
Loving, Financially Secure
Families Await. 1-877-341-
1309 Atty Ellen Kaplan (FL
#0875228)
* ADOPT California TV &
Advertising Executives
yearn for 1st baby to Love
& Cherish. *Expenses
paid.* FLBar42311 1-
800-552-0045* DAL
SING ESQ
ADOPTION 866-633-0397
Unplanned Pregnancy?
Provide your baby with a
loving, financially secure
family.
Living/Medical/Counsel-
ing expenses paid. Social
worker on staff. Call com-
passionate attorney Lau-
ren Feingold (FL
Bar#0958107) 24/7
ADOPTION 888-812-3678
All Expenses Paid. Choose
a Loving, Financially
Secure family for your
child 24 Hrs 7 Days Car-
ing & Confidential. Attor-
ney Amy Hickman. (FL
Lic: #832340)
DIVORCE $50 $240*
Covers Child Support, Cus-
tody, and Visitation, Property,
Debts, Nafne Change... Only
One Signature Required!
*Excludes govt. fees! 1-800-
522-6000 Extn. 300 Baylor
& Associates
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? Talk with
caring adoption expert. You
choose from families nation-
wide. LIVING EXPENSES
PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One
True Gift Adoptions. 866-
413-6298. FL License
#100013125
ADOPTION
Give your baby a loving,
financially secure family.
Living expenses paid.
Call Attorney Charlotte
Danciu 28 years experi-
ence. 1-800-395-5449
www.adoption-surroga-
cy.com
FL Bar # 307084
ADOPTION
GIVE YOUR BABY THE
BEST IN LIFE! Many
Kind, Loving, Educated &
Financially Secure Cou-
ples Waiting. Living &
Medical Expenses Paid.
Counseling & Transporta-
tion Provided. Former
Birth Moms on Staff!
FLORIDA ADOPTION LAW
GROUP, P.A. JodiSue
Rutstein, M.S.W., J.D.
Mary Ann Scherer, R.N.,
J.D.
1-800-852-0041
Confidential 24/7
(#133050&249025)
DISH SPECIAL! Starting
at $19.99/month. 2 Free
HD-DVR, 3 Months Free
Premium Movie Channels
and BlockBuster@Home!
Free Next-Day Installa-
tion. Call 877-821-0116.


2020 CLERICAL/OFFICE
TAKE STOCK IN
CHILDREN
(PT) Bachelor's degree req.
Related exp. pref. Position is
based in Hardee County.
$15.00/hr. (20 hrs/wk)
Deadline: 10/1/12.
For details visit:
http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com
(863) 784-7132. EA/EO.

2100 GENERAL
ATTN: Drivers Freight Up
equals More $$$ New Pay
Package. New KW Convention-
slas. Need CDL Class A Driving
Exp. (877)258-8782.
www.drive4melton.com
DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED
NOW! Learn to drive for
Stevens Transport! Earn $700
per week! No experience
needed! Local CDL Training.
Job ready in 15 days!
(888)368-1964
Drivers Daily or Weekly
Pay! $0.01 raise per mile
after 6 months. Refrigerated &
dry van freight. CDL-A, 3
. months current OTR exp.
(800)414-9569
www.driveknight.com
Drivers/Class A Flatbed.
GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up
to .39 cents/mile. Late model
equipment & big miles! 1 year
OTR Flatbed experience. Call
(800)572-5489 x227.
SunBelt Transport
OTR FLATBED DRIVERS
Experienced. Earn 50 up to
55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign
on to qualified drivers. Home
most weekends. Call:
(843)266-3731
www.bulldoghiway.com EOE

3000








NOTICES

3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
ADVERTISE IN OVER 100
PAPERS throughout Florida
for One Low Rate. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
ALLIED HEALTH career train-
ing-Attend college 100%
online. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
(800)481-9409 www.Centu-
raOnline.com
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Busi-
ness, *Paralegal, *Comput-
ers, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Com-
puter available. Financial Aid if
qualified. Call (877) 203-
3179,
www.CenturaOnline.com
BANKRUPTCY, FORECLO-
SURE DEFENSE, Consumer
Rights. Peter Kelegian, Attor-
ney at Law, Gainesville, Flori-
da. Free no obligation consul-
tation. Serving counties
throughout North Florida.
(352)672-6444. peter@kele-
gianlaw.com #702706
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE
FREE VACATION VOUCHER UNIT-
ED BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION
Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer
Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing, Fast,
Non-Runners Accepted, 24/7
(888)468-5964.
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE FREE VACATION
VOUCHER UNITED BREAST
CANCER FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast Can-
cer Info www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Fast, Non-Runners
Accepted, 24/7 (888)468-
5964.
Classified= Sales


3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
GET YOUR AD NOTICED
HERE And in Over 100
Papers throughout Florida for
One Low Rate. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
HORSE LOVERS MAKE $$
FOR YOURSELF OR CHARI-
TY. HOLD A COMPETITIVE
TRAIL CHALLENGE. CALL
ACTHA AT (877)99-
ACTHA(22842) OR VISIT
WWW.ACTHA.US GREAT FUN,
GREAT $$$
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple .seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
S3060 SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial,
aid if qualified Housing avail-
able. CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance 866-314-
6283

AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONICS NOW TRAINING
PILOTS! Financial aid if qual-
ified. Job placement assis-
tance. Call National Aviation
Academy! FAA Approved.
Classes Starting Soon! 1-
800-659-2080 NAA.edu
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
PROGRAM ONLY $250!
Educators Inc. High School
over 25 years of experience.
Fully accredited. Use for Col-
lege, Military, Trade School or
Job. 1-800-590-9611
www.Eduhighschool.com
MEDICAL BILLING TRAIN-
ING! Train for Medical Billing
Careers at SCTrain.edu No
Experience Needed! Job
placement assistance after
training! HS/GED/PC Needed
1-888-872-4677

MEDICAL CAREERS begin
here. Train ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical Manage-
ment. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call 888-
203-3179 www.CenturaOn-
line.com

NURSING CAREERS begin
here Get trained in months,
not years. Financial aid if qual-
ified. Housing available. Job
Placement assistance. Call
Centura Institute (888)220-
3178
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINING!
Train for Medical Billing
Careers at SCTrain.edu
No experience needed! Job
placement assistance after
training. HS/GED/PC needed.
(888)872-4677

3090 LOST & FOUND

LOST
Chocolate Dachshund
missing from Harden Blvd.
and Alamo Drive in south
Lakeland. Please call if you
picked him up. My 2 year
old son is so upset about
him getting out. 863-640-
1378 "tuffy" was last seen
on 9-9-12 at about 5:30pm
on Harden Blvd

BUY IT!

SELL IT!

FIND IT!

SUN CLASSIFIED!


Turn account receivables into CASH!!!

Tired of waiting 30, 60, 90 days? Meet payroll.
Increase profits. Great for startups, bankruptcies,
tax liens, bad credit & more. $20k to $10M+
www.jpcapitalsolutions.com
863-589-6587
Wjpcapitalsolutions@gmail.com

JP Capital Solutions
Capital solutions For Your Business Needs


September 26,2012


Page 4


,,



'~ei


CLASSIFIED


'Il~CL







Septmbe 26,012CLASIFIDS Pge


3090 LOST & FOUND

Lost
Male, Yorkie,
Black/Brown/Gray.
He has been missing
since
Sat. Sept. 15. He was last
seen near Ft. Meade Mid-
dle/Sr. High School. If you
have seen him or heard of
his whereabouts, please
contact us at (863)860-
6533 If no answer, please
leave a message. Reward
Available.

IT'S NEVER
BEEN EASI ER!

Cn

-





Searching for o new car, home or just something
to do tils weekend? Moke it easy on yourself.
Subscribe to The Polk County Democrat
and get a wealth of information ovoilable
at your fingertips every day.
The Polk County Democrat
863-533-4183


4000


FINANCIAL

4010 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
$150,000 +/yr. Potential
Turn Key Online Sales & Mar-
keting Wealth Creation Sys-
tem. No Selling to Family &
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All Major Credit Cards Accept-
ed (877)915-8222
AINB02653
FREE Program on How to
Get Rich. Go to www.Your-
WishisYourCommand.com for
FREE offer. It's the Secret
Behind The Secret, today's
Think and Grow Rich!


"4010 BUSINESS 4020 FINANCIAL/MISC.
OP N$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
Investors Outs g Cash Now!! Injury Lawsuit
and immediate returns in Dragging? Need $500-
equipment leasing for frac'-$.500,000++ within
industry. Immediate lease out. 48/9purs? Low rates Apply
Tax benefits and high returns. Now' By- Phone! 1-800-568-
We need more equipment! 8321. www.lawcapital.com
(800)491-9029
HAVE YOU Won a
Investors Outstanding Judgement? Did you collect
and immediate returns in it? Get Cash Now. Call Ken-
Equipment leasing for oilfield wood Financial 702-749-1477
industry. Immediate lease out.
Tax benefits and high returns. LAWSUIT CASH Auto Acci-
We need more equipment! dent? All Cases Qualify. Get
(800)491-9029 'A^u ,O ......r r.
CASH u b f uu ta


iNECESITAS DINERO EXTRA?
Este Negocio Es Para Ti!!!
Gana Vendiendo Productos
De Cama Y Baho De Intima
Hogar. CATALOG GRATIS.
Llama Al 1.877.426.2627.
www.intimahogar.com
4020 FINANCIAL/MISC.
CASH NOW! Cash for your
structured settlement or annu-
ity payments. Call J.G. Went-
worth (866) 494-9115. Rated
A+ by the Better Business
Bureau.


seize me sales
Need Cash? with Classified!
Have A Garage Sale! I


Ano e uuore your case sei-
ties! Fast Approval. Low
Fees. (866) 709-1100 or
www.glofin.com
FREE DEBT SOLUTION. End
Foreclosure and Debt Collec-
tions within 90 Days. No Pay-
ments, No Bankruptcy, and
No Settlements. Guaranteed
Since 1993. (800)477-9256
www.zerodebtguaranteed.co
m

4080 LOANS / MORTGAGES
CASH NOW! RECEIVING
PAYMENTS from Mortgage
Notes, Structured Settle-
ments, Contest annuity or cell
tower lease? SELL PAYMENTS
NOW! NYAC (800)338-5815.


4080 LOANS / MORTGAGES
Access Reverse Mortgage!
Florida-based: Application &
closing in your home. Experi-
ence: almost 1,000 reverse
mortgages funded. Award-
winning customer service.
BBB A rating. NMLS #4566.
1(800)806-7126

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES

5060 CLEANING
SERVICES


I CLEAN HOMES, I
openings, 10+ yrs.
license, referrels.
863-651-2870


have
exp.


5110 LAWN/GARDEN &TREE

GOING OUT OF BUSI-
NESS
Oak Tree Nursery. 20ft
trees $15-$25, 8-1Oft trees
$5-$10. Plus Roses-Ties-
Pineapples.
863-635-6399

5115 LEGAL SERVICES
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
5120 MEDICAL SERVICES
ATTENTION DIABETICS with
Medicare. Get a Free Talking
Meter and diabetic testing
supplies at No Cost, plus Free
home delivery! Best of all,
this meter eliminates painful
finger pricking! Call 888-377-
3536
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order pharma-
cy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 90 percent on all
your medication needs. Call
Today 888-372-6740 for
$10.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping. Pre-
scriptions Dispensed. from
Canada are Dispensed by:
Health One -Pharmacy.
License Number: 21791
VIAGRA/ CIALIS!
Save $500.00! Get 40
100mg/2Omg Pills, for
only-$99! +4-Bonus Pills
FREE! #1 Male
Enhancement. Discreet
Shipping. Buy The Blue
Pill Now
1- 888-800-1280

5185 ROOFING
MOBILE HOME ROOF SPE-
CIALIST Free Inspections
Lic/Ins CCC1327406. All
Florida Weatherproofing &
Construction. 1-877-572-
1019
5230 MISCELLANEOUS
$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!! $$$ As seen
on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit
Dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++within 48/hrs?
Low rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321 www.lawcapi-
tal.com


Need a job?
Check The
Classified!


5230 MISCELLANEOUS
AT&T U-Verse for just
$29/mo! BUNDLE & SAVE
with AT&T Internet+Phone+TV
and get a FREE pre-paid Visa
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starting at less than $20/mo.
Call Now! 800-364-0861
DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
WANTED!! Get the Most
Cash, up to $27 per box!
Shipping Paid! Must be
Sealed & Unexpired. CGII
Tony 813-528-1480 tonytest-
strips@hotmail.com
DISH Network. Starting at
$19.99/month PLUS 30 Pre-
mium Movie Channels FREE
for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask
About SAME DAY Installation!
CALL 888-418-9787
Every baby deserves a
healthy start. Join more than
a million people walking and
raising money to support the
March of Dimes. The walk
starts at marchforbabies.org.
KILL. ROACHES & PALMET-
TO BUGS! Buy Harris Roach
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*REDUCE YOUR CABLE
BILL!* Get a 4-Room All-Digi-
tal Satellite system installed
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September 26,2012


Page 5


CLASSIFIED






September 26, 2012


Pae CLSSFID


-. .- -*.- .- ":- .-* .*.
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CLASSIFIED


Page 7


September 26,2012


I


I







Page3P 8 CLSIID etme 621


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NC. Iron Horse Properties.
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September 26, 2012


Page 8.


CIASSIFIEDS





















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LAKE WALES NEWs-POLK COUNTY N


AGRI- USINESS-SErr 2012


Agriculture a major program in school district


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT
When about 3,500 Polk County high
school and middle school students
head to their classes, they head to the
barn, not the classroom. -
They are involved in one of the
county school system's most popular
programs, agriculture.
Offered at almost all the county's
high schools and a dozen middle
schools, students can learn everything
from the fundamentals of growing
plants to agriculture research and
management, according to Polk County
School Board's Teacher Resource
Specialist David Byrd.
"It's one of our most popular pro-
grams," says Byrd, who was an agricul-
ture teacher for more than 25 years.
Most of those students, according to
Byrd, are several generations removed
from farming for a living but there ap-
pears to be a renewed interest. In some
schools, he added, the ag classes are
some of those first filled when students
are selecting their elective classes.
There are 45 teachers who specialize
in agriculture-related classes which
range from the fundamentals of
agriculture to veterinarian assisting.
Bartow High School's two agriculture
teachers teach vegetable production
and horticulture, an animal science
component and three classes at
Summerlin Academy are devoted to
equestrian activities.
BHS also has its own greenhouse,
dabbles in a plant rental business and
boasts its own hydroponic garden.


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.BMS students tend the agriculture program's pig, D.W., who is expecting in a few weeks.


"It's a very comprehensive program
and is very popular with the students,".
Byrd said.
There, he added, traditional gar-
den crops are cultivated and several
students keep animals for the animal
science component.
At Haines City High School and
Dundee Ridge Middle School, there
is a full-fledged Farm Academy which
also has two teachers and there more
than 300 students concentrate on the
fundamentals of agricultural research


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and management, he said.
"When you think that in 35 years,
the world's population will reach nine
billion people, all of whom have to be
fed with less land and less water, learn-
ing how to manage farms to maximize
their potential is critical," he says.
HCHS also offers classes in tradi-
tional agricultural production and how
to best use existing environmental
resources, he adds.
"They learn not only how to grow
crops, but how to maximize their pro-
duction while having the least impact
on the environment."
Byrd says he and his teaching stable
all have the same passion.


Jessie Locke holds a squealing one-week old
piglet at the Bartow Middle School FFA hog
pens. Now in Bartow High School FFA, she
started out in Bartow's Middle's FFA.
"For me, agriculture is a passion. I
was brought up farming and ranching
and like all my teachers, we want to
share it with the students."
The traditional ag classes have been
enhanced since their inception in the
early 20th century under the Smith-
Hughes Act of 1917.
"That law mandated that agriculture
PROBLEM J3


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2 9b


Agribusiness Today

A publication of The Polk County Democrat, The Lake
Wales News, The Fort Meade Leader, The Frostproof
News, The Lake Placid Journal and The Arcadian



Jim Gouvellis: Publisher
Aileen Hood, General Manager
JeffRoslow, Editor
Paul Northrop, Sales Manager
_Layout and Design: John McMullen


I Auu Y1 "ilv" 3 "LIPZ'r.


a






A U r YYnr- Y U R S L W EK- COUN..... D.AF....E FR.D LA RAK PC. A


PROBLEM
FROM PAGE 2
instruction be provided in public
schools. Boosted by the 1928 formation
of the Future Farmers of America clubs,
ag classes took root in high schools
across the nation.
."Now we use computer technol-
ogy for everything. You can see kids
researching how things are grown in
other countries and they are learning
more and more about global marketing
of agriculture products. They can see
how the same crops they are learning
about are grown in other countries and
compare their productivity with classes
in other states or countries.
SUntil the late 1960s, ag classes were


limited to boys, but now more than half
of the students are girls, he said. "They
are as involved as their male class-
mates, maybe more," he added.
The animal sciences classes are
among the most popular, Byrd said.
They include the basics of raising, feed-
ing and production of livestock.
"They also learn how to manage
livestock and learn not only the hands-
on care of animals, but how they can
improve the quality of the animals they
produce," he says.
All this isn't free to the school board
or individual schools, Byrd says. He
said the school board's annual alloca-
tion of about $100,000 for supplies
and equipment doesn't cover the costs
related to the agriculture sciences.
"We also have federal grants that
supplement .the District's allocation


and rely heavily on donations and the
students do a lot of fund-raising," he
elaborates.
Some of the schools have larger cam-
puses which gives the ag teachers more
land to work with, he says. "But schools
like Lakeland have had to be creative,"
he says. He adds that LHS ag students
recently worked with the Volunteers in
Service to the Elderly (VISTE) to plant a
community garden.
"That's the sort of creativity we're
seeing in how our teachers will find
ways to educate their students," Byrd
said, "Not only in how to grow plants
but how to share their knowledge with
the community."


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW


Courtney Fox from Haines City 4H pulls her cow at the Polk County Youth Fair Beef Breeding Show
Jan. 26.


Dolan Sprout, of Lake Wales, leads his Labrador retriever Alena through an obstacle course
Thursday, Jan. 26, at the Polk County Youth Fair.


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Larr ivar Ps News-Por v Goury DEMOCRAT-FROSTPROOF NEWS-FORT MEADE LEADER-LAKE PLACIDJOURNAL-ACADIAN











Greening could be cured in this lab



Lake Alfred is home to Citrus Research and Education Center


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT

There's a best kept secret in Polk
County tucked in among citrus groves
in Lake Alfred. It employs more than
250 people and more than 33 of them
are doctors but it isn't a hospital well,
not exactly.
I.. '* ..


CREC Director Dr. Jackie Burns talks about
strides made at the Lake Alfred Citrus Research
Center.
It's a high-tech academic think tank
that houses dozens of students and
trail-blazing PHDs who are doing
everything they can to halt diseases -
not ones that affect people, but plants,


This sign marks the low-key entry to the Citrus Re
Center in Lake Alfred.
citrus plants.
The Citrus Research and Education
Center is marked only by a sedate sign
that says it is an arm of the University
of Florida and specializes in anything
that affects citrus health, prepara-
tion, propagation and even packaging.
Led by 25-year veteran Dr. Jackie
Bums, the sprawling complex features
dozens of labs, some super high-tech
equipment like you might see in a
modern big-city hospital or crime lab,
and faculty and students searching


for everything from a cure for canker
to eradication of the pest that causes
citrus greening. Burns says they also
look at ways to improve crop yields and
improve packing and processing plants.
"We serve the citrus industry with the
sciences that support that industry,"
she says. "That's allwe do."
SAmong the citrus-y stuff going on at
the mini-UF campus are studies of cell
genetics, entomology, flavor and food
chemistry, the study of rootstocks and
scions, water conservation, hurricane
recovery methods, a study of fungal
diseases, a systemic pathogen research
lab and continuing studies of cell plant
physiology. They also investigate soils
and their effects on citrus.
The transformation lab headed by Dr.
Vladimir Orbovic has its own incubator,
sterilizing furnace, autoclave, laminar
flow hoods and a Zeiss microscope. On
a recent visit, Orbovic showed Burns
how his lab had successfully added an
unusual grape coloration to mini-citrus
plants through gene splicing. "This is
the sort of ground-breaking research
we are able to do here," the director
said.
She also showed another lab
overseen by Dr. Nian Wang that was
mapping the genomes of the pestilent
citrus greening
disease.
"We are min-
ing this type of
data for meth-
ods to control
the spread of
the disease," she
DTh said.
Burns said the
UF extension
I, operates on
a $12 million
annual budget,
some of which
PHOTO BY AL PALMER comes from
search and Education various sources
including a hefty
chunk from the
citrus industry itself.
"We work closely with the industry
with whom we have a great relation-
ship," the horticulture professor said.
S"They are extremely supportive of
our work here because the work is for
their benefit."
"Pegple are doing incredible things
here," Burns says. "It's highly probable
we'll find a cure for citrus greening or
at least learn how to live with it.
"We're cautiously optimistic about
that, but our people are doing things


PHOTO BY AL PALMER


The Ben Hill Griffin Citrus Hall houses meeting and educational facilities.


PHOTO BY AL PALMER
Dr. Vladimir Orbovic shows Dr. Jackie Burns some of the latest plant graftings he's working on in
the transformation lab.


today that were unheard of 10 years
ago."
All the research performed at the
IFAS (Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences) station is available to the
industry or those in support industry,
according to Burns.
To make it easier for the scientists
there also are about 600 acres of citrus
maintained by the Center, Burns adds.
She said most of the research center's
groves are in Lake Alfred, but their are
another 200 acres in Highlands County.
"We put our research into the field in
those groves," she says, "So we can see
first-hand what strides we are making."
The center once focused on citrus
canker but have switched the major-
ity of their research efforts on solving
the greening problem. "Through what
we've learned here, we've been able
to reduce the disease's effects on the
industry remarkably," she said. "We've
taught growers how to spray smart,
modify their spraying patterns and du-
rations to fit the biology of the psyllid
(the minute insect that carries the
greening germs) all to reduce the infec-
tion rate. With new cultural strategies,
we're figuring out how to extend the
life of each tree, which in turn extends
their productivity."
Burns also said the industry was
turning more and more to concen-
trated growth.
"Within 20 years, we believe there
will be a transition from 120 trees per
acre to 500 trees per acre," she explains.
"If the trees are smaller, if they are
properly produced, they can be as
productive as a larger tree and will be
easier to mechanically harvest. That's
one way our research here will help the


growers."
For additional information about the
Citrus Research and Education Center
or the work the scientists are doing,
Burns suggested the center's website at
www.crec.ifas.ufl.edu.
7]


PHOTO BY AL PALMER
Dr. Nian Wang and doctoral student Neha Jalan
l6ok at the genetic markers of the bacteria
that causes citrus greening.


AGRI-BUSINESS-SEPT. 2012


4 vw


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GRI- USINESS-SEPT. 2012


Canine canker detector showcased at Citrus Expo


By CLINTON BURTON
NEWS@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM

LEE COUNTY- On Aug. 15 and
16, Southeast Ag Net/Citrus Industry
Magazine hosted Citrus Expo, a two-day
seminar and trade show, at the Lee Civic
Center. The event featured lectures and
question and answer session with some
of the world's foremost authorities on
the agricultural and business ends of
citrus production and the opportunity
to browse the latest innovations in
citrus-growing technology. But the un-
disputed star of the show, on Aug. 16 at
least, was a black lab mix named Juice.
Juice is one of a handful of dogs, all
rescues, being trained by former law en-
forcement professional Pepe Peruyero


PHOTO BY CLI
Johnny Georges, left, of GSI Supply Inc., was one o
tors at the Citrus Expo On Aug. 15 and 16 at the Le
George' booth promoted the Tree T-Pee, awater-s
protecting device that he invented. Georges is pic
Adams of Family Dynamics.


to sniff out citrus canker.
While Juice waited patiently offstage
Peruyero, the founder and Chief
Operating Officer of J&K Canine
Academy, explained how dogs have
proven their abilities throughout the
years to find, with their sensitive noses,
what no human could every find with
the naked eye.
The history of dogs and the use of
dogs in law enforcement and the mili-
tary have made the value and versatility
of dogs clear, but there is a significant
difference between training a dog to '
sniff out drugs and training a dog to
detect citrus diseases, he said.
"When we talk about narcotics and
we talk about developing dogs for these
different types of searches, it's pretty
limited. When we talk
about a police officer
stopping a vehicle on the
side of the interstate and
running a dog through it,
that's one car. We're talk-
ing about doing hundreds
of acres. We're talking
about doing thousands
of plants in a nursery.
We're talking about doing
hundreds and hundreds
of thousands of fruit in
a grove or in a packing
,house," he said.
That makes the scope
of the inspections much
different and the cost of
bringing the dogs into
NTON BURTON a grove has to be taken
into consideration.
f the exhibi- "This is a civilian mar-
e Civic Center. ket. Is it cost-effective
saving, tree to use these dogs? In
tured with Jeff law enforcement and
the military it doesn't


matter," he said. "But we have to
look at it from 'Is it feasible for
us, as an industry, to apply these
techniques in the field.'"
Peruyero didn't discuss costs,
but focused on the savings to
growers from finding a disease
before it becomes a full-blown
outbreak.

How effective are the
dogs?
Peruyero said his initial objec-
tive was to get the dogs to detect
diseases at 95 to 98 percent
accuracy, with false indication
rates less than 4 percent.
"We were able to achieve false
indication ratings in the 2 to 3
percent and the accuracy levels
in the high 90s," he said.
Peruyero said the dogs are
trained to sniff out specific
compounds, but there are still
research programs to determine
what dogs are identifying when
they detect a disease. pe
"The reason why this is impor- of
tant is that, oftentimes, the dogs at
are going to identify something Ju
we are not going to be able to
see," he said. "If I can walk into a
grove and see (a disease) I'm not goi
to need a dog."
Peruyero said the program is not
perfect, but it will allow growers to
detect problems earlier-as dogs can
identify issues before even the most
highly trained person can see it.
"It could be a lesion on the back o
the leaf. It could be a lesion up 20 fe
high. It could also be somethingtha
not visible," he said.
SOne of his dogs has detected a


Pr-u lU orY LLININ IUN lUMIUN
epe Peruyero, the founder and Chief Operating Officer
J&K Canine Academy, spoke to Citrus Expo attendees
Sthe Lee Civic Center about using trained dogs like
lice, above, to detect citrus canker by smell.

diseased tree in a nursery that did not
ng show any visible symptoms until two
weeks later, Peruyero said.
The dogs are also much faster than
people.
One handler and two dogs can in-
spect a 16-acre grove in about six hours,
Peruyero said. '
f That day, inspectors from the' Un ited
et States Department of Agriculture
tis inspected the same grove taking 108
man-hours and confirmed the dogs'
98 percent accuracy rate, he said.


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Mixed bag for Florida citrus this year


ByJAKE NORDBYE
THE NAPLES DAILY NEWS
It was a year of conflicting returns for
Florida citrus growers.
Market prices were high and yields
were strong in 2011-12 for the second
consecutive year.
Even so, the costs of production for
growers continued to rise because of
price hikes for fertilizers and chemicals,
and the need to purchase sprays to fight
citrus greening, which damages and
kills crops.


CITRUS




"Costs are the No. 1 problem for all of
us, big or small," said Wayne Godwin, a
citrus grower from Lake Placid. "But, on
the other hand, pricing has been very
favorable, so the overall outlook is still
pretty positive."
Growers from around the state spent
several days last week reflecting on the
challenges facing the industry at the
Citrus Expo at the Lee Civic Center in
North Fort Myers. They also outlined
strategies for boosting consumer
demand for an industry that contrib-
utes $3 billion annually to the state's
economy.
In the first four months of 2012,
orange juice sales fell 11.2 percent
to 15.5 percent per month, accord-
ing to a recent Florida Department
of Citrus report. But there have been


improvements, with
sales increasing one or
two percentage points
during the last three
months.
"We lost relevance
with consumers and
now we're starting to
regain it," said Bob
Norberg, a deputy ex-
ecutive director at the
Bartow-based Citrus
Department.
"Florida can regain
market share if we
produce more. We need
the growers to be ex-
cited about replanting
and getting levels back
up to where they were
about 10 years ago."
In 2001, Florida
produced 230 million
boxes of oranges and
this year the state -N
produced 145 million
boxes, 90 percent of
which is sent to juice Hudreds, indud
plants. August.
The price per box of
oranges this year was $6.83 compared
to $3.47 in 2001-02.
Less availability means higher prices
and that discourages people from buy-
ing orange juice, but that is countered
by the fact that when growers produce
too much, prices.generally drop. The
key is prices for their crop to remain
high enough to augment the costs of
\production while not driving away
consumers.
Norberg spoke to a group of around
300 citrus growers and industry leaders
at the Expo onWednesday about how


ing many from Polk County, attended the annual Citrus Expo in Lee County near Fort Myers in


to increase future demand for orange
juice and his strategy was a simple one:
inundate consumers with advertising
through social media, websires and
media partnerships..
New advertisements for Florida OJ
have appeared on the television show
"Entertainment Tonight," ESPN, the
youthful website FunnyorDie.com, and
in promos for the latest movie install-
ment of "Ice Age."
"What we're doing is targeting a little
younger audience," Norberg said. "We
know they'll be our consumers of the
future. We have to reach them with


different methods like social media
and commercials that are a little more
light-hearted."
Godwin, who has been growing
oranges for more than three decades,
said growers need to embrace the latest
methods available for reaching the
consumer.
"Advertising is the key, and it always
will be," Godwin said. "We're in the age
of Twitter and all of those things that a
lot of us only know a little about. But-.:
things like Facebook are the future and
embracing it is the only way we are
going to survive."


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LAKE WALES NES-POLK COUNTY DEMOCRAT-FROSTPROOF NEWS-FORT MEADE LEADER-LAKE PLACID IOURNAL-ARCADIAN


3,000 small farms in Polk County


By CATHY PALMER
CORESPONDENT
There are more than 3,000 small
farms in Polk County, more than in any
of Florida's 67 counties, Polk County
agriculture extension agent Mary Beth
Henry said at a recent Lunch and Learn
program at Polks History Center in
Bartow.
"There are more
and more small
farmers trying to
concentrate on
producing and sell-
ing locally grown
products for local,
consumption,"
the University of ,
Florida Institute
of Food and
Agricultural
Sciences agent
said. s
"It's our (the ex- Mary Beth Henry and Po
tension office) job Center program director
to help small farm-
ers learn how to
run their farms like a business and find
ways to market the produce or livestock
they raise." She said the extension
service assists these small growers on
both operation and production.
Henry explained that Polk's small
farms are mostly 100 acres or less, but
are only designated as 'small farms'
by the U.S. Department of Agriculture
if their annual revenue is less than
$250,000.
"Ninety percent of Florida's farms
fall into this category," she said. "This
definition really captures the diversity'
of small farm production. There can
be a wide variety of revenue per farm,
depending on what the crops raised
are."


PF
ill
r


She explained that an acre of blue-
berries or citrus obviously yield higher
revenue than an acre of beef cattle
pasture.
"Most of Polk County's farms are less
than 50 acres and citrus and cattle are
still the traditional crops."
One of Henry's tasks, she explained,
is to educate small farmers on how to
increase their yield
and provide infor-
mation and assis-
tance on potential
alternate crops.
"We're seeing
more and more
diversity of crops,"
she explained, cit-
ing recent produc-
tion of blueberries
and the addition of
peach orchards to
HOTO BY AL PALMER the county's annual
crops. We're also
k County History looking into the
Myrtice Young. viability of raising
pomegranates and
olives, since both
those have similar soil and watering
needs as our existing citrus crops," she
said.
There also is an expanded interest
in developing vineyards, she added.
"There are successful vineyards in
Clermont and Hillsborough counties,"
she. says, so "they could possibly be
successful in Polk County too."
She added that the local IFAS agents
Work closely with the university's
agriculture and livestock development
departments to pursue alternative
crops or types of livestock, and that
the knowledge gained at the university,
experimentation labs is gladly shared.
"We've seen growth in the local peach
production that was based on fruit


PHOTO BY PEGGY KEHOE
Mike Facente bums a diamond around the brands of the Polk County Cattlemen's Association,
Polk Proud 150 and Circle B Bar Reserve, with assistance from Dusty Holley. Brands from area
ranches were burned into the picnic table at the new Cow Camp at Circle B at an outdoor dinner
that marks the farming industry in Polk County.


strains developed at the university to
grow in Polk's soil and climate condi-
tions. The same is true of blueberries."
Henry also told the lunch group
that most of Polk County's small farms
are run by farmers who are employed
outside the farm and the average age of
owners/operators is 60.
"Most of our small farmers are first
generation farmers and many of them
have less than 10 years of agriculture
experience," the agent said. "We are
here to help them learn and show
them ways they can grow both better
produce and improve their farms in
general."
Henry and her fellow agents


frequently conduct classes to assist
small farmers and consumers. There
have been.canning and preservation
classes, networking meetings, USDA
funding classes and a computer class
on how to use a statewide marketing
program called MarketMaker.
"We encourage local farmers to
market their produce locally as well,"
she said, adding that there are farmers'
markets in many Polk communities,
including Bartow, Lakeland, Winter
Haven, Auburndale and Haines City.
Additional information on small
farms or small farm educational op-
portunities may be obtained via the
website www.polksmallfarms.com


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. A ES EWS- OLK OUNTY yy Anal one a


Dr
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Cattle industry vital to H

By BILL ROGERS total economic impact and comprises
BROcERS @LAKEWALE WS.C approximately 72 percent of the total
land in the county. There are 832 farms
rive along any of the major roads in with an average size per farm of 572
lands County and there is plenty of acres and an average value per farm of
al evidence to show the size of the $391,829.
e industry. Commercial agriculture is one the
ie numbers will validate that county's core industries.
ration. Although the amount of farmland
cording to the Florida Department has decreased 17 percent since 2002,,
riculture, based on 2011 numbers, Highlands has 476,256 acres, the
lands County has about 102,000 department said.
I and is tied for second in the Agriculture is also a significant
withand the most cattle beef as industry in Florida providing more than
as dairy- with Osceola County. 700,000 jobs. According to the depart-
chobee County has the most with ment, there are 47,500 farms statewide
chobee County has the most with and 9.2 million acres of agricultural
the top 10 cattle producing lands. That represents $100 billion
the top 10 cattle producing in total direct, indirect and induced
ties in the state, nine are in or i total direct, idrect andiduced
the Heartland region that includes economic impacts are contributed from
lands. The only exception is agriculture and related products to the
innee County in north Florida. state's economy.
is is truly cow country," said "People think it (farm products)
y Gornto, livestock agent for y comes from Publix and that is the scary
ly Gornto, livestock agent for theGoto said.
Iandq Cnintr v F...n; ~ Cnr2r~rei thing," Gornto said.


.I tJUUcJtl' tO JIXULJ.LY .lA.LClJl.UAt 0 1VICAE;.
Gornto said that the region is not
classical farmland but is good for grass.
He added there is some kind of grass
most of the year where cattle can graze.
"If you can grow grass you can raise
cattle," he said. s
Cattlemen continue to face chal-
lenges such as the costs of fertilizer
and diesel fuel. Water management will
always be critical and is an integral part
of farming.
"We like to eat every day and can't
grow something without water," Gornto
said.
He said cattlemen are looking at new
ways to plant winter pastures as well as
pasture maintenance.
The cattle industry is a major part of
Highlands County's agriculture profile.
The agriculture department said ag
represents more than $1.9 billion in


ighlands County economy


PHOTO BY JAN AND VIC LARSON


A cowboy prepares to ride.
I as & -..


nIMUlU BY JAN AND VIC LARSON
Cowboys and their horses are familiar sights
in the Heartland where cattle production is
a critical element in the agriculture-based
economy. -.


PHOTO BY JAN AND VIC LARSON

A buggy pulled by a mule was just one of themany participants in the 2012 FlOrida Cracker Trail
Ride from Bradenton to Fort Pierce. "Keeping History Alive" was the theme as riders rode the
historic trail used to drive cattle to market in bygone days of the cattle industry in Florida.


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Citrus growers learn about latest research


By SUSAN E. HOFFMAN
NEWS @POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM

ARCADIA Citrus grove manag-
ers learned about some of the latest
developments in research from the
University of Florida when the Peace
River Valley Citrus Growers Association
met July 31.
During a luncheon sponsored by
ORO Agri, two researchers from the
University of Florida's Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences reviewed
their latest findings.
Bob Rouse started off by showing


Bill Castled of UF/IFAS, a horticulture professor,
described some of the most popular vrieties
of rootstocks now available for citrus growers.


the benefits researchers discovered in
pruning citrus trees damaged by citrus
greening. Trees infected with greening
(also called HLB) are weakened and
may have damaged roots.
Rouse described studies in which
some HLB-affected trees were pruned,
reducing the canopy of the tree
significantly.
Nearby, a row of control trees, also af-
fected by greening, were left unpruned.
Both groups were then fed various
mixtures of nutrients and fertilizers.
Early results are promising, Rouse
said. The combination of pruning with
nutrient application appears to help
trees more than just nutrients alone.
The pruned trees had "unbeliev-
able growth" and quickly sprouted
many new shoots. When researchers
measured production, they found the
pruned trees had yields close to the
unpruned trees during the first year,
and later seemed to be even more
productive.
While growers might want to remove
HLB-affected trees, Rouse said that
means several years before replanted
trees will begin producing again. By
pruning, it might be possible to keep
some damaged trees in production
longer.
Bill Castle, a professor and horti-
culturist with the Citrus Research and
Education Center, then spoke about the
most popular types of rootstock chosen
by Florida growers.
Although new types are being devel-
oped all the time, he said Swingle has
been the number one rootstock for
more than 20 years. Second and third
are Kuharske and Carrizo, which are
closely related, followed by Sour Orange,


Members of the Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Association learned some of the latest develop-
ments in citrus research during a luncheon sponsored by ORO Agri.


Cleopatra and X-639.
Each type has features that might '
be sought by a grower; for example, he
said Kuharske is a Carrizo type that was
found to have resistance to nematodes.
The X-639 was developed in South Africa
and does consistently well with navel
oranges.
"Growers should be trying new root-
stocks for at least part of your grove," he
said. "Invest in some new types, and you
will learn a little."


Growers also received a book sum-
marizing recent IFAS research on other
citrus topics ranging from pesticide
application techniques to worker protec-
tion standards.
PRVCGA schedules these roundtable
sessions a few times a year, and also
plans bus tours for growers to con-
tinue learning the latest methods and
research.
For more information, visit www.
prvcitrus.org.


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Community garden



23 trees growing at district


i growing in Bartow




office that employees made


A r.-.. 1r:TCT.7..CC .q l 019


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT
A visitor to the Polk County School
Board's Bartow campus may have
noticed some new landscaping.
There are 23 citrus trees scattered
on the Floral Avenue campus in
Bartow, including loquat, oranges,
lemons, limes, tangelos, tangerines, red
grapefruit and tangerines, all part of a
community garden.
If you look closely, you will also see
50 blueberry bushes spread in two
smart rows and hidden in the orna-
mental landscaping, you might even
find herbs like lavender and rosemary.
It's a community garden..
It started in January when school
district employees like Brenda Taguri,
David Byrd, Walter Draffin and Tom
White got together to mull over ways to
do something for their fellow employ-
ces and the community at large, Taguri
said.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY BRENDA TAGURI
A unique water gathering system was installed
to use drainage from the air conditioning
systems to water the community garden.

"We see this garden as having
the potential to improve employee
health in ways such as: increasing
access to fresh, healthy fruits & veg-
etables, increasing access to fresh air
and sunshine, and reducing stress
through the act of gardening," Taguri'
said. "We also foresee the garden
I -


fostering an atmosphere that values
teamwork, where we take pride in our
accomplishments."
The school board demographics
coordinator also said, "We also see this
gardening project as a good example
for both adults and the children we
serve in Polk County. We hope that we
will cultivate involvement and partner-
ships from the community."
She added the garden will let school
board employees "use our many talents
in a way that will benefit us all."
The garden started in March and
kicked off with the planting of the trees,
followed by the blueberry bushes and
herbs. She explained that the trees were
purchased with a $1,500 grant from
Mosaic and the blueberry bushes were
.donated by Clear Springs and Mixon
Farms:
The group initially met on Saturdays
and their contingent was augmented
by area students earning community
service hours. "But some of us work in
the garden after work and on our lunch
hour," she said.
She explained that the gardening
group opted for the citrus trees first
because they would be less labor
intensive and then added the rows of
blueberries.
"Those were first, but we have also
tried some bucket planters. We started
with 15 planters but are down to 10
right now," she added.
Taguri said the group, as many as
40, is also planning to install raised
vegetable beds.
"We've got some surplus materials
from playgrounds including interlock-
ing timbers that will form the raised
beds.
"We also have compost bins. They
are enclosed and are using scraps from
the complex cafeteria to augment the
yard waste collected," she explains.
The gardening group also uses
recycled water to water the fields and
.trees.
"We figured out how to trap the
drainage from the air conditioners
that was just going into the ground
and now, we're using it to water the
gardens," she said. She adds that the
watering of freshly planted trees "was
a pain, since we had to haul buckets
and buckets of water," but it appears
to be successful since all the trees and
bushes have survived an unusually dry
spring. "We got a work out with that."
Taguri said the trees are interspersed
across the campus and the blueberry

Ps'f^^^' ^-^*


PHOTO PROVIDED BY BRENDA TAGURI
All hands were on deck when blueberry plants were lined up in neat rows at the school board
employees' community garden.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY BRENDA TAGURI
A donated rain barrel helps gather water for plants in the school board employees community
garden.


patch is located by a pond on the cam-
pus grounds.
In addition to the trees and blueber-
ries, the community gardening group
plans to expand their orchard to
include avocado, mulberry and peach
trees.
"We'll just have to see from there,"
she said. "But, we're all looking forward
to raising some vegetables." She said a
winter crop including collard greens is
next on the planting agenda.


All employees of the district office
were invited to join the gardening
group when it was initially formed and
added that members of the community
are also invited to join in this project.
"We welcome anyone who wants to
join us," she said.
Anyone interested in participating
in the community garden may contact
Taguri at the school board office in
Bartow or email her at brenda.raguri@*
polk-flnet.


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Bartow Middle School agricultural program thriving for 14 years


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT

Since 1999, Bartow Middle School
students have raised hogs, chickens,
rabbits, beans, collards and other gar-
den crops all under the watchful eyes
of agriculture program teacher Michelle
Parmer.
All the "money crops" are raised to
fund the program that teaches students
not only animal husbandry and the
rudiments of botany and agribusiness
but basic nutrition and, according to
...


"They do everything for the animals
- feed them, water them, weigh them,
give them shots and even castrate the
piglets," she said. "Then they learn how
to plant the garden, keep it weeded and
monitor the plants' growth. It teaches
them so much."
The program's younger students
usually spend only one semester with
Parmer, but eighth graders can opt to
take agriculture for a full year. "When
they finish here, they are ready to move
into the ag program over at the high


PHOTO BY AL PALMER
Briana Jones, Lexie Bennett and Tristan Russell (from left) take turns cuddling the ag program's
mini-Rex rabbit while Katy Locke makes sure all is well.


the ribbons and trophies her classes
have won. Most recently, they bested
senior high students when they took
first place in the food science category.
"They have to create a product, do
market analysis and then sell their
product," she explained. "Boy were
they good."
While many of her students partici-
pate in Future Farmers of America,
most don't. Many of them participate
in the Youth Fair, held in Bartow each
spring.- "I can't tell you how many of
my kids have won at the Fair," she says,
"but they are amazing every year." She
says she has had to request the school
maintenance team install extra shelves
in her classroom to hold the program's
trophies.
Agriculture comes easy to Parmer,
who triple majored in college. At
the University of Florida she studied
animal and poultry sciences and added
agriculture education into the mix. "I
guess that makes me a triple threat,"
she jokes. From college, Parmer was a
farrowing house manager on a swine
farm and spent several years in various
other agriculture jobs in Illinois and
North Carolina before returning to
Central Florida. She, herhusband and
their two daughters live near Plant City.
Parmer's commute doesn't end on
Friday when class is dismissed. She
travels back to Bartow to make sure
the animals are tended, watered and
fed. "I have a lot of support from the
community," she explains. "That's why
I do this. The parents support this


PHOTO BY AL PALMER
Michelle Parmer talks freely about her hopes
for the BMS Agriculture program and herpride
in her students'accomplishments.


program and their kids. And the staff
here makes it all worth while."
Parmer hopes the program contin-
ues to grow, but in a slightly different
direction. She says she hopes the
program will combine with other
electives offered to form an Agri-Tech
Academy that can expand the oppor-
tunities for the students. "We believe
it's doable and in the not too distant
future," she said.


Parmer, environmental protection and
civics.-" -
"We try to teach kids that they are
stewards of their community," PFtrmer
explains. "Not just the land, but the
environment as well." She adds that her
500 plus or minus students learn where
their food comes from, how it is raised
and the impacts the farming may have
on their environs. "It's really interest-
ing," the veteran teacher-farmer says,
"that most of my students are from the


PHO
Madison Roberts (left) and Megan Shaffer look fo
to pick.

city and don't live on farms or ranches."
She says her classes usually have a wait-
ing list and students, must be selected to,
attend one of these elective classes.
While some of the class time is spent
indoors, Parmer tries to get her sixth,
seventh and eighth graders out into
the school's half-acre of crop fields and
animal pens. "They love to go out to the
fields," she says. On a recent visit, the
32 students of one class sashayed out to
the two crop fields behind he school,
stopping at the pig pen (yes, pig pen)
to look at D.W., the class pig, and cast a
glance at the chicken coop'and rabbit
hutch.


school."
Right now, the students are monitor-
ing D.W.'s pregnancy's progress. "We
expect she'll have her piglets in late
May," Parmer said in May. "Then we'll
sell the piglets and use the money to
pay for next year's program." The entire
program is self-funded with money
raised by marketing its crops and
livestock and with some donations from
local businesses and civic groups. She
cites the American
Legion, Clear Springs
and CNR Express
Inc. as examples of
local contributors
to the program. "We
couldn't do it without
the community
support we have," she
says.
A group of students
ventured into the
chicken coop to
check for any newly-
laid eggs, which are
also sold. "Most of
our produce, whether
)TO BY AL PALMER animal or vegetable,
winds up sold to
r beans ripe enough faculty or family
members," Parmer
said. "So, the kids are
learning not only how
to raise a crop, but how to market it as
well."
The ag program planted two crops,
one in the fall of 2011 and one in the
spring of 2012. They harvested string
beans and will be picking squash before
long, she said. The winter crop included
collard greens. Parmer also said that
any produce not sold is donated to a
local woman's shelter.
The program hasn't gone unnoticed
throughout the state, Parmer says
proudly. "These kids have participated
in more than 30 competitions in 20
different areas," she says, showing off


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LAKE WALES NEWS-POLK CO JOURNAL-ARCADIAN









Warner University to roll out new agriculture program


By MARY CANNADAY
MCANNADAY @LAKEWALESNEWS.COM
Although Polk County's interests
over the years have branched out to
development, tourism, and technology,
its agricultural roots run deep and wide.
Farmlands, citrus groves, ranching and
aquaculture still underlie the foundation
of Polk's economy, and now there is a
nearby university program to support
these interests.
Warner University on U.S. Highway'
27 between Lake Wales and Frostproof
will offer a degree in Agricultural Studies,
officially starting in the fall of 2013. The
school is taking applications for the pro-
gram now however. According to Lauren
Lewis, the program's director, ag students
will begin in the General Studies program
of Warner University in preparation
for course work in Agricultural Studies
which begin with the sophomore year.
'As in any degree program, they have
math and English classes and such,
which they can begin in theFall of 2012,"
Lewis said. The school is planning a pilot
agriculture class in Spring of 2013.
"We hope, by Dec. 1 of this year to
have an outline of courses that will be
offered as well as our faculty needs and
any facilities to be built for the program,"
Lewis said.
She said the program will rely heavily
on those already in the field, so to speak.
"We want the courses to be taught
by industry professionals, so they will
probably be adjunct instructors," Lewis
said. This is the only four-year agriculture
program in Florida that covers such a
broad agricultural spectrum, Lewis said.
Students will be able to take electives in
environmental science, animal science,
citrus, or a number of other special-
ties, as well as being well-versed in


agri-business and marketing.
The department will have a very
hands-on approach, Lewis said, and
every year students will serve an intern-
ship, giving them opportunities to earn
experience in the field.
"I spoke to the Florida Future Farmers
of America convention two weeks ago,
attended by over 4,000 students, and
there was a huge interest in this pro-
gram," Lewis said.
According to statistics from the county
government website, Polk County has the
second largest amount of farmland in
the state with an estimated 626,634 acres.
Polk remains the sixth most produc-
tive agricultural county in Florida. The
$878 million citrus industry employs
approximately 8,000 people in Polk
County. Polk ranked first in the state for
total citrus picked for the 2009-10 season
with an estimated total of 27.9 million
boxes harvested. Polk also ranked first
in the state in the amount of commer-
cial citrus groves with approximately
S83,471 in 2010, according to the Florida
Agricultural Statistical Service.
In addition to citrus, Polk was ranked
third in the state in 2004, in number of
beef cattle with an estimated 105,000
head of beef and dairy cattle, accord-
ing to the Florida Agricultural Statistics
Service. Total receipts from the sale
of crops and livestock in Polk County
rose to $284.8 million in 2002 based
upon a report released by the Bureau
of Economic Analysis at the U.S.
Department of Commerce.
Warner University is located in the
center of one of the most productive
agricultural regions in the state. Over
200 acres of university-owned land are
also readily accessible for students to
study agriculture and conduct hands-on
learning projects. The H.EAR.T. (Hunger,


PHOTO BY BRIAN ACKLEY
A grover worker in groves along Scehic Highway. Warner University will be starting a new agricul-
ture program this fall.


Education and Resources Training)
Institute, located on campus, provides a
unique training ground for agricultural
needs in a Third World country.
Lewis, the new director, is a Polk
County native, having grown up in
Haines City, "So I have a lot of local con-
nections," she said. Lewis has an under-
graduate degree in Agricultural Business
and Economics from Auburn University
and a master's degree in Agricultural
Education from Texas A&M.
She has a longtime association with
the FFA as well.
The program was carefully researched
and vetted before launching. President
Greg Hall appointed a task force of agri-
cultural industry professionals, board of
trustees, and university staff to explore its
feasibility. Task Force members included:
Doris Gukich, Dawn Rafool, Dr. Jim
Christoph, Judge BobbyWilliams, Steve
Maxwell, Tony DiMare, Keith Mixon ,and
Hill Griffin.
One of the first experts the task
force contacted was Commissioner of


Agriculture, Adam Putnam, who encour-
aged Warner to move forward with an
Ag degree program. He was interested in
a program that would allow students to
develop a solid foundation of knowledge
and skills in the area of "General Ag"
studies, according to the school's website.
."I'm excited about this new program.
It's a good opportunity for students to get
a four-year degree with a broad base,"
Lewis said in closing.

Note: On pec. 1, afundraiser will be
held on Brdma Island, an environmental-
ly protected portion of theLightsey ranch
holdings. The island is noted for having a
wealth of wildlife species. Thefund-raiser
will include tours of the island, Lewis said,
andfirmed-up information about the
program's course offerings and specifics
will be available to visitors at that time.
Further information call or mailing
Lauren Lewis at 863-638-7116 or lauren.
lewis@warneredu or Doris Gukich,:vice-
president for advancement, 863-638-7611
or doris.gukich@warner.edu.)


wherever there's Mining, we'n


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Acm-BUS -SP 2012


LAKE WALES NEWs-POLK COUNTY DEMOCRAT-FROSTPROOF NEWS-FORT MEADE LEADER-LAKE PLACID JOURNAL-ARCADIAN









Florida DOC changes mission statement


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDIBMOCRIAT.COM
The Florida Department of Citrus,
focusing on where it plans to go and
what it should be concentrating on,
came up with a new mission state-
ment as it starts its new year.
At its first public meeting of
the fiscal year on Sept. 12, newly
hired Executive Director Douglas
Ackerman presented the mission
statement which commissioners
'approved. All members approved
the change except Commissioner
Michael J. Garavaglia, Jr., who was
absent.
The new mission statement is
"Maximize consumer demand for
Florida citrus products to ensure the
sustainability and economic well-
being of the Florida citrus grower,


the citrus industry and the State of
Florida."
It changes from the old statement,
which has been in place since 2005:
"Grow the market for the Florida
citrus industry to enhance the
economic well-being of the Florida
citrus grower, citrus industry and the
State of Florida."
"We sat down to figure out where
we are and where we want to go and
how to get there," Ackerman said.
He said the thing he keeps hearing
is the growers want to "make sure
this industry is here for our kids
and our grandkids," he said. "That's
sustainability."
Commissioner Vernon "V.C."
Hollingsworth, III, said he was a bit
nervous about using that term.
"I don't want to change anything
(in the statement), but I have a


cause and concern as an agricul-
turist and that is the deal when
I see the word sustainability," he
said. "Most of the time when I see
sustainability it's not whether the
farmer makes a profit."
He said farmers are not simply
interested in sustaining but to grow
and be as productive as possible.
"That word has two meanings and
that word makes me nervous," he
said.
Ackerman said he understands
that concern but he said he is
realizes the goal is longevity of the
Industry.
Ackerman said there are seven
guiding values behind the consumer
statement: accountability, expertise,
principled ethical standards, col-
laboration, focus, innovation and
people.


The next steps for the industry to
take are to develop a metrics adviso-
ry committee to develop and decide
on the proper measures for success
and begin reporting, Ackerman told -
commissioners.
While commissioners unanimous-
ly voted in favor of changing the
mission statement, Hollingsworth
told Ackerman, who has been execu-
tive director for just a few months,
that they are currently riding on his
word for the future of the DOC.
"I also want to take your word to
the relevance of this and loyalty to
Florida citrus," he said. "We'll"take
your word so we can move forward
that this is a high priority and what
we are going to realize."
"That is our priority, but you're
going to have to see that," Ackerman
said.


Shopper marketing results vague after on e year


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
After spending a year in shopper
marketing Florida Department of Citrus
commissioners heard an update on
what the agency has accomplished.
Though the marketing department
expected some results after this period
of time, there were not many to report.
But, they were told they are reaching
some conclusions and getting some-
where positive.
"We hoped for quick results at that
time and were led to think it would be
easier,' said Leigh Killeen, deputy ex-
ecutive director of domestic marketing.
"No one has been more disappointed


than I have been, or the team has been,
that this is taking so long. You've been
patient but we've worked real hard to
create a measure for these programs
and we know what's important."
In his presentation to commissioners,
Qaisar Shareef, a senior vice president
at MARS Advertising Inc., with 26 new
programs the shopper marketing pro-
gram which uses in-store promotions,
online and social media to reach those
doing the shopping, orange juice sales
increased last year by $1.96 for every
dollar spent and in grapefruit sales rose
10 cents per every dollar spent.
Now, he says, research into what
works and what doesn't and where to
head is the direction to take. In-store


promotions where shoppers are re-
minded of sales and partnerships, like
the agreement it had with Jimmy Dean
sausage on Father's Day that included a
coupon, worked well. Online and social
media aspects did not work as well.
"The best programs are pre-store and
post store elements," he said. "There
was something in the store that jogged
their memory again. They would leave
the store with the need to come back
again."
He added, "Where the program had
a reliance on digital and not focused in
the store didn't do as well."
Shareef spent nearly 30 years with
Proctor and Gamble before joining
MARS about a year ago.


He said currently there is about a
$3 return on the shopper marketing
program and he's looking for $4-$6,
though that may not be a realistic goal
for a single product as opposed to an
overall set of products.
The return in sales didn't look so great
to Commissioner Michael Haycock who
said, "We spent $3 million to get'$5
million in sales. That's doesn't look great
to me."
Shareef said things could get better.
"The extent that we are learning from
this is not giving the return we want
now."
He also pointed out that what they
are doing is looking at juice sales; fruit
sales are not included.


I help the land yield its best.

I am Mosaic.


It's no surprise to find an orange grove here in Florida. But most
people don't realize that, along with providing crop nutrients to
farmers across America, Mosaic farms its own citrus groves. We
have about 6,000 acres of citrus in production, and 500 of those
acres are on reclaimed land. As grove superintendent, I see things
through, from planning to harvest.


It makes sense that I keep Florida's land growing.


Mosaic



www.mosaicfla.com


cArlS-Br / ,7,- S 201. 2012


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Youth start new cattle association


By KELLEY BAKER
CORRESPONDENT


Wally Martin.of DeSoto County is one of the
organizers of the newly formed Florida Junior
Maine-Anjou Association.


ARCADIA- Two young cattle exhibi-
Stors are starting up a new statewide
association for youth interested in
Maine-Anjou cattle.
Arcadia native Wally Martin, along
with Victoria Baker of Punta Gorda, had
the opportunity this summer to attend
the American Junior Maine-Anjou
Association's National Youth Leadership
Conference in Lansing, Mich. They
had a chance to meet other youth from
around the country'and, after hearing
about all their state associations do,
the two came back to Florida inspired
Sto start a Florida Junior Maine-Anjou
Association.
Back home, they contacted the
national association and other state
groups for assistance on starting a
Florida organization. Martin feels a
Florida association is important "to
give people a chance to get to know
others in the state that also raise
Maine-Anjou cattle."
He added, "Most people in Florida
assume that Maine-Anjou cattle are a
cold weather breed and since we only
have about two months of cold weather
they will not do well in Florida, but that
is not true they thrive vcry well in
the Florida heat."
"One reason that we need to have a
breed association," Baker said, "is so
that we can promote this breed and
educate cattlemen that the Maine-
Anjou cattle can excel in the commer-
cial market here in Florida, not just the
show ring."
Both Martin and Baker have a real
passion for anything agriculture, and
especially the beef cattle industry.
Martin was recently elected the FFA
District 10 President and Baker was


ARCADIAN PHOTO BY KELLEY BAKER
Victoria Baker and Wally Martin were inspired to start a Florida Maine-Anjou group for youth
interested in thar breed of cattle after attending a national Maine-Anju leadership conference in


summer.
elected Secretary. They both became
familiar with the Maine-Anjou breed
while showing in youth cattle shows.
At every 4-H, FFA and county fair
cattle exhibition you will see young-
sters exhibiting Maine-Anjou. They
are the most popular breed youth
exhibitors show. They are known for
their great muscling ability as well as
their docile disposition.
The first meeting of the new state
organization took place in Arcadia
Sept. 1 in Arcadia.
During this first organizational


meeting, some of the steps needed to
form a state association will be started.
Fundraising efforts and sponsors will
be discussed.
One of the association's early goals
will be to host a show and field day
to be held right here in Arcadia, and
they also hope to represent Florida at
the 2013 Junior National meeting next
summer in Nebraska.
For more information on how to be
involved or to be a sponsor, callWally
Martin at 863-990-4469 orVictoria
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Report: Isaac's rainfall eased drought some


By MICHAEL MUSKAL
Los ANGELES TIMES
LOS ANGELES The soggy breakup
of Hurricane Isaac brought some
relief to parts of the drought-plagued
Midwest, but other agricultural areas
continue to bear the pain of a worsen-
ing climate.
The hardest-hit drought areas of the
continental United States decreased
slightly to 21.45 percent, down by 1.7
percentage points, according to the
U.S. Drought Monitor map.
Parts of Missouri, Illinois and Indiana
got some relief because of rain associ-
ated with Isaac, a slow-moving storm
that hit the Louisiana coast on Aug. 28


as a Category 1 hurricane and wended
its wet way across parts of the South
and Midwest.
The rain came after many crops had
already been harvested, but it may yet
manage to improve the soybean yield.
However, the rain bypassed the key
corn-producing states of Nebraska and
Iowa, both hard hit by drought condi-
tions that have brought some increases
in consumer prices.
Isaac was a slow-moving, especially
wet storm that brought flooding to
Louisiana and other parts of the region.
Because the storm lingered, it dropped
more than 10 inches of rain in some
areas, improving the drought status
in parts of Louisiana and Arkansas,


according to the monitor.
The storm, downgraded from hur-
ricane status as it moved inland, also
dropped 2 to 6 inches of rainfall in
many areas of Missouri, Illinois and
Indiana, according to the drought
survey. That resulted in improvements
in at least one way drought is measured
for many areas, including parts of
Ohio and Indiana. In some areas, Isaac
improved drought conditions in two
categories of measurements.
"The improvements were based upon
how well soil moisture levels responded
throughout the area that received
the most rain and also the favorable
response of the river and streamflows,
which were running at near record


lows," the weekly report noted.
Missouri, for example, saw the areas
of exceptional drought fall from 35
percent to 3 percent; In Illinois, the
two worst classifications of drought
fell from about 70 percent to about 7
percent.
But the Plains states were less for-
tunate, missing the rain and having a
return in some areas of the 100-degree
temperatures that have scorched the
region through much of the summer.
Nebraska reported that 71 percent
of the state was in the higher drought
classifications. In Iowa, the area in
exceptional or extreme drought rose to
62 percent, up 4 percentage points.


As drought ravages corn crops, ethanol quota is challenged


By JOHN H. CUSHMAN JR.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Three big inter-
twined but rival agribusinesses corn
farmers, meat and poultry producers,
and biofuel refineries are in a politi-
cal fight to protect their interests as a
drought ravages corn producers and
industrial consumers alike.
At issue is whether to suspend a
five-year-old federal mandate requiring
more ethanol in gasoline each year, a
policy that has diverted almost half of
the domestic corn supply from animal
feedlots to ethanol refineries, driven up
corn prices and plantings and created
a desperate competition for corn as the
drought has gripped the nation's farm
belt \
Meat producers are demanding that
the Obama administration waive the


In this August photo, a dry corn field receives
some rain from a passing thunder storm near
Blair, Neb.
ethanol quota to ease rising feed prices.
But ethanol producers worry that the
loss of the quota would undermine the
ethanol industry and do little for corn
farmers but drive down the price of
their stunted harvest.
The meat industry, backed by
several governors, lawmakers and even
international food agencies, argues that
the quota has distorted grain markets


by sucking up corn when ranchers can
last afford it.
But the ethanol industry says that its
corn consumption is down 12 percent
since the start of the summer and
that weekly ethanol production is at a
two-year low. As corn prices have risen,
refineries have scaled back production,
idled dozens of plants and sold ethanol
inventories.
"The market is already responding
to the reality of this drought," said
Agriculture Secretary TomVilsack, a
former Iowa governor who supports
the quota.
Corn growers, caught in a politi-
cal tug of war between their biggest
customers, are asking the government
to move cautiously, if at all. (Many
ethanol refineries are owned by corn-
farmers.)
So far, the Obama administration


seems inclined not to interfere. The
president "has been a strong believer
in ethanol," a spokeswoman, Jennifer
Psaki, said. "He thinks it's a driver of the
economy here and a key component of
renewable energy."
Support for the ethanol industry,
which blossomed because of a system
of tax breaks followed by the fuel
mandate, has long been bipartisan, and
the current debate is splitmore along
regional than partisan lines.
Whatever ripple effects are felt in
food or gasoline prices, a group of
Purdue University economists said
Thursday as they presented a study
of a possible waiver, the drought has
already done its economic damage.
The only thing polity makers can
accomplish, the economists said, is toi,
distribute the harm across the various
affected sectors.


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Drought puts federal crop insurance under scrutiny


By ALYSSA A. BOTELHO
THE WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON This year's historic
drought is turning the spotlight on an
obscure form of aid for America's farm-
ers: federal crop insurance.
With crop losses soaring, farmers
are headed toward some $18 billion in
losses, and taxpayers might foot up to
$10 billion of that, according to Vincent
Smith, an economist at Montana State
University who has studied crop insur-
ance for nearly two decades.
That's on top of the $9 billion this
year that the federal government
provided farmers to help them afford
crop insurance premiums.
Partly because of the costs involved,
the insurance program has come under
scrutiny from both sides of the political
aisle. Budgethawks and environmen-
talists alike are calling for tougher
limits that they say would discourage
farmers from taking risks with their
finances and the land.
But Congress seems to be interested
in expanding, not curbing, the crop-in-
surance program, and farmers say the
insurance program is a critical lifeline,
especially this year,
In large part due to the hottest
July on record in 118 years, the U.S.
Department of Agriculture lowered its
expected yield for corn and soybean
harvests for the second time in two
months with corn predicted to be at
its lowest yield in more than 15 years.
Under the insurance program, which
dates back to the Great Depression and
the Dust Bowl of the 1930s,,the govern-
ment pays 60 percent of the premium
for coverage. T he farmer pays the rest.
ThpIugh policies are offered by private
insurers, the government reinsures


Steve Niedbalski shows his drought and heat
stricken corn while chopping it down for feed
in July in Nashville IlI. Farmers in parts of the
Midwest are dealing with the worst drought in
nearly 25 years.
them against their losses and helps
fund their annual operating costs.
Environmental groups complain that
the government-subsidized insurance
has encouraged corn farmers to take
risks and till lands they otherwise
wouldn't. They say that, in turn,.
destroys areas critical for both wildlife
and livestock struggling to find grazing
places that aren't parched.
More than 23 million acres of
American grass and wetlands were
plowed under for cash crops like
corn and soybean from 2008 to 2011,
according to a report released last
Monday by the Environmental Working
Group (EWG). Land losses were great-
est in counties that received the largest
amount of crop insurance subsidies,.
the study said.
"That's equivalent to plowing the
entire state of Indiana or 31 Yosemites,"
said Scott Faber, the group's vice
president of government affairs. "It's a
huge impact to take an area the size of
Indiana and cover it from one end to


the other in fertilizer."
Most of the newly tilled acres are
in the Great Plains and the Upper
Midwest, which have been hit-hard by
the drought. In many cases, livestock
producers, with no government-subsi-
dized insurance like crop farmers, are
shelling out for expensive corn and hay
to feed their animals because they can't
find new pastures for grazing.
"I don't want to under-emphasize
that crop farmers will face problems,"
said Purdue agricultural economist
Christopher Hurt. "But the crop sector
has a lot of compensation potential
right now that the livestock sector just
never sees."
Other critics say the crop insurance
subsidies are simply too expensive at a
time when the federal budget is awash
in red ink. Nevertheless, House and
Senate versions of the 2012 farm bill
would offer more generous insurance
coverage in place of a controversial "di-
rect payment" program that gave lump
sums of money to farmers whether
they grew crops or not.
Smith, also a visiting scholar at the
American Enterprise Institute, a free-
market think tank, recently concluded
that the expanded crop insurance
program could potentially be even
more expensive for taxpayers than the
lump sum payments.
"If the government takes on much of
the risk in farming, paradoxically, farm-
ers adopt riskier production practices
and stop using cheaper tools to man-
age business," he said.
Those riskier practices, he added,
include using fewer chemicals against
pests, failing to rotate the kinds of
crops planted, and expanding into
marginal, less fertile lands which EWG
members say could be conserved or


used as graze land.
But defenders of the crop insur-
ance program say its a vital part of the
government safety net for farmers. "I
know the program has critics, but in
farm country, it's the most valuable
tool we have to survive," said Anthony
Bush, an Ohio corn farmer. "That's why
80 percent of us buy it."
And David Redman, an adviser in
Lawrence County, Ind., who helps
both farmers and ranchers respond
to natural disaster, says that while big
farm corporations might see profits
this year because of high crop prices
and insurance claims, the 100-200 acre
family-sized farms won't.
"Most of the farmers I know buy bare
minimum coverage to cover out-of-
pocket expenses just enough to keep
going next year," he said, adding that a
quarter of the 700 farmers he assists in
his area don't buy any insurance at all.
Those farmers say they still can't afford
the premiums, even with .the govern-
ment subsidy, Redman said.
Bush has paid into the program for
over a decade and has never qualified
to collect a claim on his losses, though
he expects to this year. He says his
share of the annual premium is roughly
$30,000. He has lost over $140,000 to
drought on his corn harvest.
A member of the National Corn
Growers Association, Bush says that
while some highly insured crop farmers
might be inclined to expand their op-
erations, the trend can be discouraged
by expanding conservation programs
rather than reducing subsidies.
Debate is also swirling around USDA
regulations that keep secret the identi-
ties of participating farmers includ-
ing 26 of the nation's largest farming.
operations which received more than


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Video crew chronicles Lake Placid,


home of state Ag Woman of the Year


By MAT DELANEY
NEWS@LAKEPLACIDJOURNAL.COM
A three-
man video
crew was
in Lake
Placid for
three days
a this week
in January,
videotap-
ing the
hometown
of Sarah
Childs,
the state's
Agriculture
Woman of
the Year for
PHOTO PROVIDED 2011. It was
shown at
Sarah K. Childs shown at
the Florida
State Fair in
February when Childs will be officially
recognized.
-Graphic designer Bill Humphries, vid-
eographer Richard Hill and director Rick
Lurding. all of Tallahassee, videotaped
several locations in and around Lake


Placid. The video is intended as a tribute
to Childs and her hometown.
Lurding said similar videos have been
created for past Ag Woman of the Year
honorees. Traditionally, he said, those
videos have debuted during the award
presentation at the state fair. "These
(videos) are a lot of fun for us," he said.
"We get to showcase the hometown of
our winner and show a little bit about
their life."
Also featured is a glimpse of Childs'
work-a-day world at the Heartland area
operations of Lykes Brothers, Inc. Cattle
Ranch and Citrus Division where she
works to ensure the company is in com-
pliance with Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) and Occupational Safety
and Health Administration (OSHA)
rules.
Childs was presented with the
award Feb. 13, during the Ag Woman
of the Year luncheon at the Florida
State Fair in Tampa. The award, now
in its 27th year, is sponsored by the
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services and the Florida
State Fair Authority.
The award recognizes women who
have made outstanding contributions
to Florida agriculture.


FFA students attend Ag Woman

of the Year luncheon


JOURNAL PHOTO BY MAT DELANEY


Graphic designer Bill Humphries, videographer Richard Hill and director Rick Lurding consider a
scene for a video about Lake Placid the hometown of Sarah Childs, Florida's Agriculture Woman
of the Year.


According to a press release from
the Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, Childs has been
an enthusiastic participant in Florida's
agriculture industry, dedicating her
time and talents for more than 40
years to organizations, such as Florida
Cattlewomen's Association, Florida Beef
Council, Florida Hereford Association,
Highlands CountyYouth Livestock Show
and the Highlands County Cattlemen's
Association.
She is the only woman to serve two
non-consecutive terms as Florida
Cattlewomen's Association President
and as a 4-H Leader has been a chief
proponent of providing youth educa-
tional and leadership opportunities for


more than 15 years.
"Sarah has been a long-time ambas-
sador for Florida's agriculture, livestock
and ranching industries," said Agriculture
Commissioner Adam Putnam."Her dedi-
cation, commitment and service to this
state and our community are unmatched
and it is an honor to present her with this
year's Woman of the Year in Agriculture
award."
Childs is the second Highlands
County resident to be named Florida's
Agriculture Woman of the Year. Norma
Stokes of Lorida was chosen for the
honor in 1996, the same year she was
honored-as Florida Cattlewoman of the
Year by the state association.


Pictured, left to right, are Lake Pladd FFA Advisor Lauren Butler, Lake Placid Sr. FFA President
Heidi South, Florida's Woman of the Year in Agriculture Sarah K. Childs, and Lake Pladd Sr. FFA
Vice-President Nick Swain..


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Historic Cow Camp ends anniversary year


By PEGGY KEHOE
and JEFF ROSLOW
Polk County's 150th anniversary
came to an end Saturday, Feb. 25, at the
Circle B Bar Reserve with the opening
of the Historic Cow Camp.
The camp at the 1,267-acre preserve
features a cabin and corral. The dedica-
tion opened with a cattle drive and
even featured a county commissioner


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
Ned Waters, a member of the Cattlemen's Association and one who helped design the Cow Camp, cut the ribbon Cracker style Saturday. The ribbon
was actually a strand of barbed wire. After failing to cut it with a whip, he grabbed it and pulled the wood stump from the table to the left.


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
One of the many cows crowded a pen created
at the Cow Camp at the Circle B Bar Reserve.
The cows were driven into the corral that
morning at the camp's dedication that marked
"Citrus, timber and much of it being
cattle made Polk County what it is
today." Commissioner Sam Johnson
said. "But probably today it's the people
that make it what is." ,
He said the camp gives people a
look of what it was like to live in Polk
County in the mid 19th century.
"That was a tough life," he said.


Lloyd Harris, chairman of the Polk
County Historical Committee, gave a
rundown of what it like for those who
made mid-Florida their home in the
19th century and he said the opening of
the camp doesn't necessarily close the
150th anniversary celebration, which
lasted a year, but marks the continu-
ation of learning about the county's
history.
"Welcome to the journey," he said to
the 100 people who showed up for the
opening. "We're coming to the close
of a year-long celebration with the
opening of a camp at the Circle B Bar
Reserve and opening the showing of
the oldest industry in Polk County."
Imperial Polk County Cattlemen's


Association (PCCA) volunteers built the
addition to Circle B in the area where the
former ranch's original cow camp was,
county Historic Preservation Manager
MyrticeYoung said.
In keeping with the grassroots nature of
the year-long sesquicentennial celebration,
the PCCA approachedYoung about build-
ing the cow camp a few months ago, and
also provided some funding. The county
provided the materials for the camp, which
includes a cabin and corral. Polk County
brands will adorn one of the structures,
along with a brand made of the Polk Proud
150 logo, Young said.
Designs for the camp were drawn by
local cattleman and artist Ned Waters,
who visited a 1905 camp in Northeast Polk


County, Young explained.
"In the 19th century the cattle drives
startedin March and lasted until August,"
according to information shared by Maria
Trippe, Polk County Historical Museum'as-
sistant, on the PCCAwebsite. "Cow Camps
were scattered over the woodlands about
one day apart. They consisted of crude
shelters and log pens to gather wild cattle.
The animals had to be flushed from the
Florida palmetto scrub and swamps with
whips, dogs, and horses."
The Cow Camp will preserve the he ..age
and culture of one of Polk County'soldest
industries. An outdoor exhibit educates
visitors about the history of the land, its -


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A gy..E USINESS-SErt 2012


LAKE WALES NEWS-POLK COUNTY DEMOCRAT-FROSTPROOF NEWS-FORT MEADE LEADER-LAKE PLACID JOURNAL-ARCADIAN






2_ LAK WALES NES-OL COUNT DORA-RSTRO NESFR MED LEAER-AK PLCI JORA-A A A R- SIES EP.21


CAMP
FROM PAGE 21

preservation and uses, and how it led to
where we are today in the cattle industry
and land use.
Waters and the Imperial Polk County
Cattlemen's Association were recognized
for their service at the Feb. 21 Polk County
Commission meeting "for their generous
commitment of time and support in con-
tributing to Polk County's Sesquicentennial
celebration."
"The financial contribution and
exceptional efforts of the members of
the Imperial PollkCounty Cattlemen's
Association have made possible the Circle
B Cow Camp Exhibit" were acknowledged,
was wereWaters' "visionary guidance and
selfless acts of time and dedication ... in
creating the concept and design of the cow
camp exhibit"
In a non-traditional style, the ribbon-
cutting was done Cracker style, as Harris
said, as Waters rode in on horseback
and tried to cut a barbed wire "ribbon"
with a whip. However, after four failed
attempts, he pulled the barbed wire and
the wood post it was tied to, sitting on a
table, tumbled to the ground.
The camp was officially open.


PHOTO BY PEGGY KEHOE
Chatting at a preview of the Cow Camp are
(from left) Ned Waters, who designed the
cabin; Kerry Hammock and Starla Hammock of
Auburndale. The beds are built high to catch
the breeze, and filled with moss.


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
Mustang Sally and The Hamjos enterained the crowd during the Cow (amp kickoff marking the
end of Polk County's 150th anniversary celebration Saturday at the Circle B Bar Reserve. Pat
Kochenburger (from left) plays the washtub bass, Dick Prince is on banjo, Sally Anderson plays
the hammered dulcimer, and Danny Lomnick is on guitar.


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
Polk County Historic Museum historic preservation manager Myrtice Young speaks to the crowd
Saturday at the Cow Camp dedication as Lloyd Harris, chairman of the Polk County Historical
Committee, looks on.





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.. . ..B. . .. ... ...E.T. 2 1 AK A E N w -o.... ..... ... .. .......-..... .... NE .S .R ME DE LE.D. -LA. PL. CID I R ......- A.. D.. b..


Polk County Commissioner Sam Johnson talked
to the dowd at the dedication ceremony of the
Cow Camp Saturday at the Circle B Bar Reserve
after riding in on horseback. He said the Cow
tamp represents what Polk County looked like
when it started.


James Finley (left) and Earli Sullivan sit on the
steps of the cabin at the Circle B Bar Reserve
Cow Camp. Sullivan recalls spending nights
in a similar cabin on Rough Island on Lake
Hatchineha. Moss lined the beds and some-
times he would smoke it over the fire"to run
the chiggers out," Sullivan said, and use his
saddle for a pillow. When working the cattle
out there, all the supplies had to be carried in
by horseback.


"rK. 1


Mia Flores, 5, of Lake Wales almost catches the
loop in a game of Grace at the Circle B Bar
Reserve during the Cow Camp kickoff Saturday.


Zane Bashdor, 7, gives it his best shot with
a lasso Saturday at the Circle B Bar Reserve
during the Cow Camp kickoff there.


PHOTO BY PEGGY KEHOE
Checking the heat of a branding iron are (from
left) Junior Cash of Lake Wales, David Hunt
from Alturas-Bartow area, and Neil Combeeof
Lakeland. The brands were used to decorate
a picnic table at the Cow Camp at Circle B Bar
Reserve at a dinner Thursday.


23


AGRI- USINESS-SEPT 2012


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24 8-LAKE WALES NEws-POLK COUNTY DEMOCRAT-FROSTPROOF NEWS-FORT MEADE LEADER-LAKE PLAcIDJOURNAL-AcADIAN AGRI-BUSINESS-SEPT. 2012


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SOUTHERN KITCHEN

l:'s "Sout.hern homemade cooking at its best. We are proud
,to o80ffer the finest in family dining with recipes that have
-n developed from a 50 year Johnson family restaurant
tradition. On our buffet you'll find crispy catfish and
S- chicken, homemade soups, fresh salads, casseroles
-sserts, made-fro m -scratch entrees, along with oLir
nature Southern vegetables and Mom's sill[t t
cr"b read. At dinner, we step it up a notch with Dad's.
rked barbeque ribs. There are over 50 fresh, family
cipeson our Family Reunion Buffet that change with-th
s so8rl., so you know that it is always as fresh as it gets.


K.AST, LUNCH & DINNER 7 DAYS A E
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