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The Frostproof news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00581
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Creation Date: February 29, 2012
Publication Date: 09/12/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00581
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text


Visit us on the Internet at www.FrostproofNews.com

Wednesday

September 12, 2012


Frostproof News


Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years


Volume 92 Number 33


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Cancer claims first BHG principal


Faye Smith was inspiration for many

at Frostproof elementary school


By KATHY LEIGH BERKOWITZ
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
Every year, David Smith and
his wife, Alice Faye Atmore
Smith, headed for Chesapeake
Bay, Va., to be with David's
niece and her husband, for the
couple's annual fishing trip.
Next Friday, he plans to
continue the tradition, but this
time, without Faye at his side.
She passed away Aug. 1, 2012,
at Lake Wales Medical Center,
from complications after a bout
with rapid progression breast
cancer. She was 68.
Smith was the first-ever prin-
cipal at Frostproof's Ben Hill
Griffin Jr. Elementary School,
where she retired. School
officials there late last week
said they have put in a request
to the county that the media
center at BHG be renamed in
her honor..
"Mrs. Smith kept in touch
with her beloved BHG by
serving on the SAC Committee
until her death," noted current


Principal Patti McGill. "She will
be deeply missed by the Ben
Hill Griffin Elementary family."
Just eight weeks after the
lump in her breast was dis-
covered, she passed away, her
husband said.
He smiles when he talks
about her, yet also while chok-
ing back tears.
"We had good times," he
said. David is the president
of the Lake Wales Chapter of
the Nationa Association for
the Advancement of Colored
People..
He said that people say
"behind every good man is a
good woman, but she's in front
of me."
"I respected her for the things
she'd done."
The couple was married 36
years, with a united family of six
children in all, which included
two sons they had together.
A broad smile spreads across
David's face when he remem-
bers how they met.
David used to be a process


server for the Polk County
Sheriff's Office, and Faye lived
in Babson Park.
When she drove to Lake
Wales, he'd pull her over with
his lights and sirens, and one
day, he said, "I'm going to
marry you."
So every time she came to
town, she'd see David in her
rearview mirror.
One day, David was assisting
the Rev. Lawrence Epps of Epps
Mortuary with transporting a
body to Greensville. He spoke
to Faye about being the lady
attendant for the day (funeral-
processions had both ladies
and gentlemen assist), and she
agreed.
"While in the car about
the time we got to Dundee, I
told her the door might come
open, so she'd sit next to me,"
he said, laughing.
"She said later, 'is there
really something wrong with
that door?'"
PRINCIPAL 113


PHOTO PROVIDED BY SMITH FAMILY
Precious memories: Alice Faye Atmore Smith stands with her husband, Lake
Wales NAACP President David Smith, at a recent gala. Alice was the first
principal of Ben Hill Griffin Elementary and passed away Aug. 1,2012.


10th annual Relay for Life kickoff Oct. 9


PHOTO PROVIDED
Members of the Frostproof Relay for Life 2013 team development committee include, from left: Brian Coon,
Austin Gravley, Michelle Bracken and Missy Hadden.
r


With hopes of making it one
of Frostproof's signature com-
munity events, the official kickoff
for the local American Cancer
Society's Relay For Life will be
held Tuesday, Oct. 9, organizers
have announced.
An evening of fun, singing,
testimonies and food will start at
6 p.m. at the Frostproof Depot.
A number of teams have
already committed to being
part of the 2013 event includ-
ing Ben Hill Griffin Elementary,
Citizen's Bank and Trust, City of
Frostproof, Coffee Club, Cure
Hunters, Doenators, Federation
of Christian Sportsmen, Ferguson
Sinkers, First Presbyterian
Church, First United Methodist
Church Child Care, Frostproof
Church of God, Frostproof
Elementary School, Frostproof


Middle/Senior High Interact
Club, Nancy Bell's Family and
Friends, and Zeta Phi Beta
Sorority, Inc.
* Any community or civic organiza-
tions, churches and businesses
interested in forming a team can
contact team development com-
mittee Chairman Missy Hadden
at missyl0u@yahoo.com or ACS
community representative Caellan
Curtis at caellan.curtis@cancer.org or
863-668-2326, extension 5508.
The event will be held earlier
in the spring next year to encour-
age more community support.
It is scheduled April 5 and 6 at
the Wall Street Play Park, where
it was held last May. This year's
theme is "A Decade of Making a
Difference" since it is the 10th
anniversary of the Frostproof
Relay.


TODAY'S
CONTENTS




I7 H2i52 001211


Calendar................ Page 2
Editorial ................ Page 4
Obituaries ............. Page 6
County Report...... Page 8
Feeling Fit ........... Page 14


The


Bulldogs 'D'shines
again in win over
Sebring





Pages 1 0 11


Charges filed in fatal
crash near Frostproof





Page 6









WELCOME TO YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
and Want to see your event on this page? Questions? Call us at 863-285-8625.


*THURSDAY
Third Grade Open House
Ben Hill Griffin Jr. Elementary School will host its third-
grade open house. The fourth grade event will be Sept. 18
and the fifth-grade event Sept.20.

*FRIDAY
High School Football
The Bulldogs will have their 2012 home opener hosting
DeSoto. Kickoff at Faris Brannen Stadium is at 7 p.m.

*SATURDAY
Boosters Fundraiser
Members of the Frostproof Bulldogs Booster's Inc
invite fans to have a "Bulldog Blast" at Club 300, a
special fundraiser to support athletics at Frostproof
Middle Senior High School. It will be an evening of
hours d'oeuvres, live music, fireworks and friends, not to
mention a chance to win prizes. Tickets are $100 each,
and only 300 will be sold. Tickets are good for two adult
admissions, no minors please. The event will be held at
586 Sunrise Drive in Babson Park at the end of Thorburg
Road on Crooked Lake from 7 to 10 p.m. Tickets are on
sale at Roscoes and Frostproof Family Diner. Tickets can


also be ordered by mail at P.O. Box 833, Frostproof FL
33843, and they will be mailed back to you. Dress will
be casual, and winners do not have to be present to
win. Joe Willy Neckbone and the Fisheads will be the
featured band.

* FRIDAY, Sept. 21
High School Football
The Frostproof Bulldogs will be hope for the second
straight week, after opening on the road for weeks one
and two of the high school football season, when they
host Mulberry in a non-district contest. Game time is
7 p.m. at Faris Brannen Stadium. Admission.

N TUESDAY, SEPT. 25
Open House
The Frostproof Middle-Senior High School will host a
special open house which will run from
6 to 7 p.m.

* SATURDAY, SEPT. 29
Ramon Theater Gala
Make plans now to attend the Ramon Theater's annual
fundraising gala "Lights... Camera ... Dancing"' Show starts


at 7 p.m. and Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd will serve as
the master of ceremonies. Contact the theater for more
information at 863-635-7222.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 30
Fifth Sunday Service
The Frostproof Ministerial Alliance will host its second
ever"Fifth Sunday" event at 6 p.m. at the Ramon Theater.
Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd will preach. Event is open to
the public; a goodwill offering will be taken.

*FRIDAY, OCT. 5
Downtown Art Walk
Local artists and vendors will have works for sale and on
display from 5 to 8 p.m. Entertainment. For more informa-
tion, contact the Frostproof Art League at 635-7271.

* SATURDAY OCT. 13
Hospice Fundraiser
The Ramon Theater will host a special fundraiser for
Cornerstone Hospice, a Mad Hatter Tea Party Luncheon.
The event will run from 11:30 a.m.-1:30p.m. Wear your
funniest, wackiest or prettiest decorated hat; prizes will be
awarded. Tickets are $15 per person. Contact the Ramon


for more information or tickets, 635-7222.

* FRIDAY, OCT. 26
Halloween Murder Mystery
The Ramon will host"Clued In To Murder"in a special
Halloween-themed murder mystery dinner theater event
Prizes will be given out to the best costumes, which are
optional. Cost is $30 per person which includes dinner. Call
the Ramon for 635-7222 for tickets, or goonline to
www.ramontheater.com.

* SATURDAY, OCT. 27
"Trick or Treat"
The Frostproof City council has designated Oct. 27
as the official night for"Trick or Treat." Little ghosts, goblins
and ghouls of all kinds will be going door to door from
6 to 8 p.m.

* SATURDAY, NOV. 10
Craft Show
First United Methodist Church of Frostproof is holding
a craft show Nov. lOTables may be rented at $5 each and
the event is open to the public. For more information, call
635-3107.


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September 12, 2012





County government critic and ac-
tivist, Joel Chandler, has filed suit
against the Polk County School Board
stating that the government agency is re-
fusing to provide public records.
The records in question are emails between
school board members, particularly be-
tween board members Frank O'Reilly and
Kay Fields.
The board's attorney, Wes Bridges, advised
the school board that, although the school
system found 966 emails between the two
board members in a four month period
requested by the activist.
Bridges said the school district only had to
release 21 of those emails to Chandler.
By law, citizens have a right to review the
contents of county communications. To do so,
they must put in a special request and pay for
county employees' time in preparing the emails.
But nothing other than policy states how the


Our Viewpoint

emails are to be made public.
Chandler, in his lawsuit, said the school
system charged him $667 for the 21 emails.
Anyone should be able go into the school or
county or city administration buildings and
look through correspondence while sitting at a
public computer. The emails are not private and
should be open to immediate public inspection.
It's our government. Citizens should be able
to observe how elected officials deal with public
matters. And according to state law, this cor-
respondence is already public. So why not make
everything available in a way that is easy and
accessible?
Telling a citizen that the cost to retrieve
emails is too high and there are private (which
we would argue is not true) emails mixed


in with the public ones, just sounds like an
excuse not to be more open. We also expect
people would adapt without extreme pain to a
more open system. Sunshine leads to healthier
systems.
Why not try harder to make the day-to-day
business of local government more accessible
and visible? A government more open to its citi-
zens is a government that is more understood
and respected by its citizens. When a govern-
ment hides things from its citizens a sense of
mistrust grows stronger and stronger.
The county school board has a history of
not trying to be open when it comes to public
records. School board attorney Wes Bridges
pleaded no contest in 2009 to a charge that he
violated the state's public records law. He paid a
fine of $275.
When a citizen is asked to pay more than $600
for a few emails, we think that amounts to an
unlawful fine or punishment handed out.


How many years does it take?


One of the oldest and lamest excuses
for failure uttered by politicians and
bureaucrats is, "It took my predecessor
years to get us into this mess; it will take
me years to fix it."
In the private sector, when a new
president, general manager, head
coach, or other chief honcho is brought
in, he (or she) is expected to bring
about improvements promptly, not
years down the road.
Even a football coach can get by for
only one season with the excuse: "This
is a building year because my predeces-
sor did such a poor joIl of recruitment."
The incumbent president of the
United States is neither the first nor the
last to complain for an entire term that
all the problems he has been unable to
solve are the fault of his predecessor.
Governors and mayors are fond of the
same excuse.
"A mere four years is not enough. Give
me four more years and I will do what
I promised to do when you elected me
four years ago."

And here is a prediction: if Obama
is re-elected and remains unable to fix
the economy in another four years, his
party will declare that eight years is not
enough, "but elect Hillary (or whom-
ever) and we'll for sure get it fixed in the
next four years."
Or maybe eight.
Another prediction: If Romney is
elected, and the economy is still in a
shambles in 2016, his excuse will be
that it was unreasonable to expect him
to fix the mess he inherited in a mere
four years, "but give me four more, and
I promise to get it right."
Appointed governmental managers
take the same approach, though not
all can survive four years on the job
without fixing the problems they were
hired to fix.


S.L. Frisbie




S.L. Frisbie can be contacted at
slfrisbie@polkcountydemocrat.com


I am not a fan of Keynesian econom-
ics, which I understand only in the
broadest sense: that government needs
to be in charge of the economy to make
it work.
Government's biggest help should be
to stay out of the way.
When it comes to national economic
policy, I tend to place more trust in the
private sector to muddle through and
rebuild the economy than in politicians
and bureaucrats, who are generally
lacking in'the character-building experi-
ence of having to meet a payroll.
Neither group has pure motives or
final wisdom. Each is interested in
pushing its own agenda. We live in an
imperfect world.
I tend to believe that the government
in particular, the federal government
- should get its own house in order,
and allow the private sector to do the
same.
The private sector cannot borrow
itself out of debt, or spend its way to
thriftiness.
It appears that government can't
either.

(S. L. Frisbie is retired. One of his all-
time most admired city commissioners of
yesteryear proposed that the Legislature
be required to rescind two laws for every
new law it passed.)


The Polarization of Prayer


In his excellent new book, "Bad
Religion: How We Became a Nation of
Heretics," Ross Douthat describes how
the heresy of nationalism idolizing
the nation has rendered American
religious groups captive to partisan
politics.
"If you don't want to vote for George
W. Bush because of the Iraq War
then you're playing into the hands of
Christianity's left-wing enemies. If you
can't vote for Barack Obama because of
abortion, then you're an accomplice to
the shredding of the Constitution. You
simply cannot be a social democrat and
an orthodox Catholic, or a conservative
Christian who's also genuinely antiwar,'
he writes.
This polarization became evident
again when the Catholic Archbishop
of New York, Timothy Dolan, agreed
to give the concluding benediction at
the Republican National Convention
in Tampa. On the left, Sarah Posner
blogged at salon.com that the U.S.


Cary McMullen







Conference of Catholic Bishops, of
which Dolan is president, "has unequiv-
ocally attached itself at the hip to the
Republican Party." Republicans, trying
to fan anti-Democratic flames among
Catholics, were gleeful that such an
outspoken Catholic leader would make
an appearance.
Two problems became apparent with
the complaints on the left and the re-
joicing on the right. One was that Dolan
proved to be an equal-opportunity man
McMULLEN 15


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis- Publisher
* \ileer Huod Gen-r l Manager Paul N'orl-it p Sal: M.: I agI .lat iRtI.--I ditor Lninj \: M.nnjuir, EdiiJ ,r


Published every Wednesday at
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K7- 00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will beedited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor ec:tiion is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frostproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews.com or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
Wales Fl. 33853.


September 12, 2012


Page 4 Frostoroof News


VIEWPOINT



Government needs to be more open






September 12, 2012 Frostproof News Page 5


Update coming on iconic


e hotel


By BILL ROGERS
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
Inquiring minds want to know about
the status of one of the most iconic
buildings on the Ridge, the Grand
Hotel, and among them are members
of the Lake Wales City Commission.
Commissioners will have a chance
to ask questions of the hotel's devel-
oper next week. They have sched-
uled a meeting with Ray Brown at
5:15 p.m. Sept. 18 at City Hall,
"It is such an icon and is the biggest
structure in town," said Lake Wales
Mayor Mike Carter.
In February 2010, the city approved
a development agreement with Dixie-
Walesbilt LLC for the initial $1.5 million
in renovations to the exterior of the
10-story building in downtown.


The city acquired the deteriorating
building in December 2007.
Brown previously said he planned to
build retail space on the ground floor
and several condominiums on the
upper floors. He also had said the plan
is to spend $6 million toward restor-
ing the building to its original 1927
appearance.
Commissioners seem to agree that
they are hoping to receive a progress
report and find out if there is a con-
struction time line.
Mayor Carter wants to ask Brown
if he is having any difficulties. Carter
said nothing seems to be changing, at
least on the exterior.
"If there is activity, the average
person is not seeing it," he said.
Commissioner Betty Wojcik wonders
what happened with the original


investors in the project and wants to
know if he has new ones lined up.
Wojcik said the city is trying to
work with Brown and has had several
conferences with him.
She said she doesn't want next
Tuesday's meeting to be confronta-
tional, but she believes now is the time
for Brown to provide information as to
what he has accomplished.
Commissioner Chris Lutton wants
to know when the three tenants who
have signed leases are going to locate
in the hotel. Lutton is interested in
knowing what Brown's long-term
financial plan is for the refurbishing
project.
Commissioner Terrye Howell initially
asked for an update on the hotel after
some citizens had been asking her
about it.


pP


PHOTO BY KATHY LEIGH
BERKOWITZ


The Grand Hotel
adorns the skyline
of Lake Wales, and
commissioners,
like many others
in town, continue
to ask the question
as to"what'sup"
with the hotel. The
City Commission is
meeting this week
with the hotel's
project manager,
Ray Brown, for
what they hope
will be an update
of the status of
renovations by
Dixie Wailesbilt,
LLC.


MCMULLEN
FROM PAGE 4

of prayer. No sooner had he agreed to
pray at the Republican Convention
than it was announced that he would
pray at the Democratic National
Convention in Charlotte. Dolan will
have the distinction of being the only-
person to immediately follow each
party's nominee Mitt Romney and
Barack Obama after their acceptance
speeches.
The second problem was that
nobody had yet heard Dolan's prayer.
It was a model of civil religion, quoting
the Declaration of Independence and
"America the Beautiful" more than the
Bible.


Here's part of what he said: "(W)e ask
your guidance for those who govern
us, and on those who would govern
us: the president, and vice-president,
the Congress, the Supreme Court,
and on all those who seek to serve
the common good by seeking public
office, especially Governor Romney
and Congressman Ryan. Make them
all worthy to serve you by serving our
country."
That's a noble sentiment that
neatly managed to pray for Obama and,
Romney in one sentence. It's true that
Dolan made brief references to two
issues more aligned with Republicans
- abortion and religious freedom but
he also twice asked blessings for im-
migrants, an issue more favorable to
Democrats.
In short, Dolan pulled off what


Catholics have been doing for centu-
ries now, and which politically active
conservative Protestants have not yet
gotten the hang of. He spoke of truths
that transcend the politics of the mo-
ment, which both sides need to hear.
* To be sure, Dolan is not completely
above suspicion of partisanship. The
Conference of Catholic Bishops'
fight with the Obama Administration
about contraceptive provisions in the
Affordable Care Act under the guise of
"religious liberty" seems disingenuous.
And abortion remains the issue without
parallel or compromise for Catholic
leaders.
Still, as Douthat says, "One need not


agree with the exact balance they've
struck to admire the consistency with
which the Catholic bishops have defied
easy partisan categorization over the
years..." He is correct that what we
need is faith that addresses the work of
governing, without being partisan.
Republicans and Democrats who
seek to use Dolan for their own ends
will be disappointed, and that is an
entirely good thing.

Cary McMullen is a religion
writer who lives in Lakeland. He can be
reached at cmcmullen@floridavoices.
com.


VILLAGE OF HIGHLAND PARK, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Village of Highland Park Village Commission will hold Public Hearings on the
following ordinances on Friday, September 21, 2012, at 6:00 PM or as. soon thereafter
as possible. The hearings shall be held at the Hillcrest Heights Town Hall,
151 North Scenic Highway, Babson Park, FL.

ORDINANCE 2012-04
AN ORDINANCE OF THE VILLAGE OF HIGHLAND PARK, POLK COUNTY,
FLORIDA, GRANTING TO FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION d/b/a
PROGRESS ENERGY FLORIDA, INC. A NON-EXCLUSIVE ELECTRIC
UTILITY RIGHT OF WAY UTILIZATION FRANCHISE; PRESCRIBING THE
TERMS AND CONDITIONS RELATED TO THE OCCUPANCY OF MUNICIPAL
STREETS AND RIGHTS-OF-WAY IN THE VILLAGE OF HIGHLAND PARK,
FLORIDA, FOR THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING ELECTRIC SERVICE;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY OF PROVISIONS; AND PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The proposed Ordinance and a copy of this notice may be inspected by
contacting the Village Clerk at (863) 455-6518 during normal
business hours, Monday through Friday.

All interested parties may appear at public hearings and be heard with respect to the
proposed Ordinance. Comments may also be submitted in.writing prior to the
hearings to ihe Village Clerk, P.O. Box 168, Lake Wales, Florida 33859-0168, or
during the public hearings. Persons with disabilities requiring special accommoda-
tions in order to participate in the public hearings should contact the
Village Clerk at (863) 455-6518 at least 48 hours in
advance of the public hearings to request such accommodations.

PURSUANT TO SECTION 286.0105, FLORIDA STATUTES, IF ANY PERSON
DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE VILLAGE COMMIS-
SION WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THESE PUBLIC
HEARINGS, SUCH PERSON WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS
AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, SUCH PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT
A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, INCLUDING THE
TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS BASED.


Frostproof News Page 5


September 12, 2012




I


Page 6 Frostoroof News


September 12, 2012


OBITUARIES


Arline W. Miller


Arline W.
Miller, 98, of
Lake Wales
passed away
Friday, Sept. 7,
2012, at her res-
idence of heart
failure. -
She was born i
May 26, 1914,
in Preston,
Ontario,
Canada to
the late Clarence E. and Florence
Wooden and has been a Lake Wales
resident since 1981 coming here
from Damascus, Penn.
She worked as.an English and
Home Economics teacher in
Pennsylvania and New York. She was
a member of the First Presbyterian
Church, the Lake Wales Country
Club, Lake Wales Women's Club,
Association of University Women,


Inner Wheel Club and Sigma Kappa
College Sorority.
Arline was preceded in death by
her husband, L. Russell Miller in
2002 and son, Russell Miller in 2010.
Survivors include two sons, Larry
Miller of Marina Del Rey, Calif.,
Craig Miller of Chappaqua, NY;
nine grandchildren and nine great
grandchildren.
Memorial Service is 3 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012, at the First
Presbyterian Church of Lake Wales
with Rev. Chad Reynolds officiating.
The family will have a reception at
the church following the service.
Contributions may be made to the
Lake Wales Care Center or American
Red Cross.
Condolences may be sent to the
family at www.marionnelsonfuneral
home.com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


Carol Marie
Crosby, 64, of
Lake Wales
passed away
Sunday, Sept. 9,
2012 at her resi- ,
dence. (Cancer)
She was born
July 22, 1948 in
Winter Haven,
Florida to the
late Robert Carol Marie Crosby
and Doris
(Robertson)
Hamburg; she was a lifelong
resident of Lake Wales. She wAs an
Administrative Supervisor for the
Lake Wales Medical Center ECF,
loved to Snook fish, followed Junior
on hunting trips all over the coun-
try; she was very family oriented,
loved her step-sons, took care of
her late mother and sister and was a
great gardener.
Carol was preceded in death
WordIs of C;omxort
Reual I it as often yon
wvi s. a happy lcnc ry
flaerv- weat-rs out+
-ILi* bbi*--F I^ i lm ^


by her Parents Robert and Doris
Hamburg Survivors include her -
husband, Griffin G. "Jr" Crosby of
27 years; step sons, John P. (wife
Debbie) Crosby of Lake Wales,
Griffin-G. "Nick" (wife Martine)
Crosby III of Lake Wales; brother,
Jeffrey Hamburg of Raleigh, NC; four
step grandchildren; a niece, two
nephews and many cousins.
Memorial services will be held
11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012 at the
Lake Wales Lutheran Church with Dr.
John Glamann officiating. The family
will have a reception at the church
following the service. In Lieu of
flowers, donations can be made in her
honor to Moffitt Cancer Center (12901
Bruce B Downs Blvd. Tampa, Florida
33612). The webcast of the service can
be viewed and condolences may be'
sent to the family at www.marion
nelsonfuneralhome.com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.

A onymo.t s ---
follo w^;- iwmt-l.r, a.fffi !!g~ iS


Fatal crash leads to charges


for Manatee County man


A Manatee County man has been
charged in a fatal crash between Fort
Meade and Frostproof on U.S. 98 that
happened this spring, law enforcement
officials said late last week.
Polk County Sheriff's Traffic
Homicide deputies issued an arrest
warrant for 34-year-old Gina Tutera of
4705 Josselin Place in Parrish, charging
him with two felony counts of vehicu-
lar Homicide in a traffic fatality that
resulted in the deaths of two people on
March 21.
According to the arrest affidavit,
around 3:37 p.m. that day, Tutera was
heading eastbound on U.S. 98 east of
Avon Park Cut-off Road near the crest
of a hill when he crossed over the
double yellow line and "fully" entered
into the westbound lanes, colliding
with a Ford Focus occupied by 73-year-
old Bobbie Herring of Avon Park and
G60 \ car-old Karen Holmes of Lithia.
Police allege their investigation
revealed that Tutera was .x,_vdiin, the
speed limit by 20 miles per hour when
he struck the victims' vehicle.
In .iiliiioii, police say Tiiti- also
sent or received 51 text messages and
received two phone calls, one of which
lasted for 15 minutes, from 1hW lin,- he
left his house at :'. I', p.m. until the time
of the crash less than an hour later.
A.ccIiiding to the arrest .all.ida ii, a


witness heard
Tutera on his
pho te shortly
after the crash, ...
indicating he was
trying to pass
someone when
the accident oc-
curred. Police did
not say that he
was on his phone
or testing at the
actual time of the GINO TTERA
accident.
Reports say
both vehicles
veered to the north upon seeing each
other where the collision occurred near
the highway's north shoulder.
Tutera was located in Manatee
County early Friday morning and was
booked into the Manatee County Jail,
where he was.released on $10,000
bond.
After the accident, Tutera was
airlifted to Lakeland Regional Medical
Center with critical injuries. Police said
he was not wearing his seat belt.
Herring was also airlifted to LRMC,
however he died en route to the
hospital, Holmes died on scene. It is
unknown whether or not they were
wearing their seat belts, police said at
the time of the crash.


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September 12, 2012 Frostproof News Page 7


Hutzelman attends county


mayors r
Frostproof Mayor Kay
Hutzelman is always on the go
it seems, so it's no surprise she
was one of many Polk County
mayors in attendance in a
special roundtable last week.
PolkVision's Second Annual
Mayors Roundtable was a great
success at Polk State College in
Winter Haven, organizers said.
The kickoff event for Polk
Vision's Leadership Exchange
Series set a positive tone for KAY HU
countywide communication
and cohesiveness. The mayors
in attendance included: Jack Myers,
Auburndale; Barbara Manley, Fort Meade;
Kay Hutzelman, Frostproof, Joanna
Wilkinson, Haines City; Mike Carter, Lake
Wales; Gow Fields, Lakeland; Joe LaCascia,
Polk City; JP Powell, Winter Haven; Sam
Pennant, Dundee; and Marlene Wagner,
Lake Hamilton.
"I felt it was an excellent opportunity to
share ideas and to listen to how other cities
tried to solve similar problems," Hutzelman
said.
She also concurred that there was a spirit
of cooperation in the group.
"It was the first time that I heard the
larger cities discuss the possibility of send-
ing a company that did not find the right
fit in their city to others, and Frostproof
was mentioned as one who definitely had
"shovel ready" land in our industrial area,"
she added.
Mayors participated in a moderated
discussion regarding successes and issues
in their cine-. The forun pro\ ided opportu-
nities to share ideas and best practices. and
offer support to one another to help move
the county fotivard.
PoAlkVision Government Task Force chair
Deric Feacher, also assistant city manager
ofWinter Haven, welcomed the mayors


roundtable


T
IT


and the audience of 50, which
included county, commu-
nity and business leaders from
across Polk.
"The Mayors Roundtable is
essential for continued collabo-
ration among our municipali-
ties. This discussion allows the
leadership of each community
to talk about their partnerships
with one another and what
agendas should be communi-
ZELMAN cated to our state delegation.
Working together we can further
our efforts," he said.
After introductions and overviews of each
city represented, the group tackled a variety
of topics, including continuity of leadership
in their cities, sharing information, learning
from other mayors, and city relationships
especially between those that border one
another and have inter-city agreements and
connectivity.
The mayors expressed that participation
in this event and with the Ridge League
of Cities, of which Frostproof is an active
member, are beneficial to their communi-
ties, providing information that leads to
inner-city agreements and shared resources
in times of budget constraints.
Lake Hamilton Mayor Marlene Wagner
stated that through working with fellow
Ridge mayors, Lake Hamilton was able
to contract to have code enforcement
continue through lean times. Similarly -
Frostproof contracts with Lake Wales for
building'nspection services.
* "Thosepartnerships are a direct result
of meetings like this and fellow mayors'
willingness to work together to help all
residents," she said.
Mayors were asked if city relationships
were better, the same or worse after the
inaugural Mayors Roundtable in 2011. The
majority agreed relationships were better.


A Al



POKL NT
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OPEN HOUSE


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305 West Central Ave., Lake Wales

Thursday, Sept. 20
3 to 5 p.m.

Learn about adult day health care, an affordable
alternative for long-term care. Tour this center and meet
the nurses who will care for your loved one.

Other centers are located in Bartow, Lakeland and Haines City.


For more information, call 863-519-8146


There's something

for everyone at

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DEPARTMENT STORES
DILLARD'S 676-764
JCPENNEY 679-961
SEARS 679-20C

APPAREL
AEROPOSTALE 679-919
BON WORTH 679-870
BODY CENTRAL 676-424
HIBBETT
SPORTING GOODS 679-801
SHOW ROOM 679-989
BELLA BRAZIL 676-884
NICK'S FOR MEN 678-298
VICTORIA SECRET 676-493
LIDS 676-565
CHARLOTTE RUSS 678-368
MONICA'S
CRYSTAL PLACE 678-127
SUNGLASS HUT 676-953

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OFFICE 679-311
LEE NAILS 676-080
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OPTICAL OUTLETS 676-091
REGIS HAIRSTYLES 676-490
SEARS AUTO 679-202
ZEEBA'S HAIR
SALON 676-090
MOBILE
ACCESSORIES 585-235
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Frostproof News Page7


September 12,2012





September 12, 2012


IiN REPORT


Hall almost a no-show at Tiger Bay


By STEVE STEINER
SSTEINER@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
It was.almost a one-man show
- at the Sept. 10 Polk County Tiger'
Bay hincheon. Scheduled to speak
were John Hall and Ricky Shirah.
Both are candidates for the District
5 seat on the Polk County Board
of Commissioners, the seat being
vacated by Sam Johnson, who is being
term-limited out.
When the meeting started Hall was
absent.
Although Hall's absence created an
awkward situation, it was met with
humor by S.L. Frisbie, IV, who serves
as emcee at these luncheons.
"I'm not going to do. a Clint
Eastwood and address an empty
chair," said Frisbie to the enjoyment of
members and guests alike.
Several minutes later it was an-
nounced that Hall was on his way.
It was also announced it had been
decided to proceed with the sched-
uled program, albeit with a slight
variation of the format. That format,
which consists of a five-minute
introduction by each candidate, fol-
lowed by a subsequent question and
answer session, would begin prior
to Hall's arrival. Thus Hall would not
have the opportunity to hear what his
opponent said about him. Shirah took
advantage of the opportunity.
"I'm not a political pilgrim,"said
Shirah. He had lived in District 5
many years, unlike Hall, who moved
into the district in order to compete
for the seat. "District 5 is my home."
Boosting his candidacy, Shirah
added that he is a known factor.
"I know the concerns," he said. "I
know the people. They know me."
That statement was made in answer
to the first question presented, which
asked him for an example of his com-
mitment to the district.


As Shirah answered the questions
submitted from the audience, he
punctuated his answers with hems
and haws, pregnant pauses, and
more than a smattering of "ums"
and "ers." It stood in stark contrast
to Hall, whose'late arrival could not
have been timed more perfectly. He
entered the Peace River Country Club
dining hall just as Shirah finished
answering the final question.
Apologizing for his late arrival, Hall
explained he had gotten his dates
confused. As proof of that, he stated
he had been pleased to learn (incor-
rectly) that because he had an event
to attend on Tuesday that also was
in Bartow. It was not until he was
reached by George Lindsey that he
realized his mistake; Lindsey, inciden-
tally is also running for a seat on the
BOCC, for District 1, which is being
vacated by Bob English, who has also
reached the end of his term limit.
When it was Hall's turn to talk
and take questions, his delivery was
smooth and deliberate, in addition to
his seeming to have a deeper grasp of
the issues. Plus he appeared unruffled
over his faux pas of mixing up the
date. Having not heard Shirah's earlier
comments about moving into the ;
district in order to run for the District
5 seat, Hall focused on his more
than three decades as a now-retired-
employee of the BOCC. That provided
him an exposure to the workings of
county government, he said, an expe-,
rience gained as he worked his way
up and through the ranks. In com-
parison, Shirah's experience consisted
of 21 years working for Publix before
becoming a small business owner.
Their answers were in response to
what each believed qualified himself
to handle a $1.3 billion budget.
When it came to issues, sometimes
Shirah and Hall gave similar answers.
Both agreed that BOCC had made the


PHOTOS BY STEVE STEINER
As his opponent, Ricky Shirah (left), looks on,
John Hall responds to a question submitted by Ricky Shirah explains an answer to one of the
an audience member. questions posed him.


correct decision taking the stormwa-
ter assessment fee out as a line item
on next year's budget, and that they
each would have voted in similar
fashion. They each held impact fees in
disdain.
"I haven't seen a whole heck of a lot
to see where it's helped," said Shirah.
Hall called them punitive, but
acknowledged impact fees served a
purpose and are what he considered
an inevitability.
"At some point in time, we're going
to have to reimpose impact fees," Hall
said.
They differed on the question "What
is the most critical issue facing the
BOCC that will impact Polk County?"
Shirah cited the need for good-qual-
ity, high-paying jobs. Hall believed the-
county's water supply, both boosting


quantity as well as quality, was the top
issue.
One of the more interesting ques-
tions was why had each candidate
selected the political party he now was
affiliated with. For Hall, when he first
became eligible to vote, he registered
as a Democrat. However, as time
passed, he found himself voting less
and less for Democrats.
Shirah was influenced by his grand-
father, who took him to campaign
rallies when Shirah was a little boy. He
said that although he is a Democrat
it didn't mean he agreed with every-
thing his party stands for. However,
he summarized that in the end, party
affiliation was a non-issue.
"I don't think it matters which party
you belong to as long as you're doing
the right thing," Shirah said.


Attorney General to speak at Drug Summit in Bartow


The Coalition Partnership of
StandUP Polk, Hardee County
Alliance for Substance Abuse
and Pregnancy Prevention,
Drug Free Highlands, will hold
the third annual Drug Summit
from 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 27, at the WHI-I. Stuart
Conference Center, 1710 U.S.
Highway 17 in Bartow.
This collaborative event
is to discuss the latest drug
trends and develop proactive
measures to prevent substance
abuse in families, schools and
businesses.
Florida Attorney General
Pam Bondi will be on hand
as a guest speaker, and the
keynote speaker for the event
will be Paul Doering. M.S., a
distinguished service profes-
sor in the Department of
Pharmacy Practice Emeritus
at the University of Florida,
College of Pharmacy.
Pariicipamii may earn free
CEU's, CME's, or Coerificates
of Attendance. The fee for the
Drug Summit event is $20, and
includes breakfat and lunch.'
Polk Counmy'- first Fall
Purge Your Pills Rx Drop Off is


Pam Bondi


scheduled from 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 12, at Everest
University's Lakeland Campus,
995 E. Memorial Blvd., Suite
110. For info, call (863)
274-7008.
lihen on Saturday,. Sept. 29,
StandUP Polk and local law
enforcement agencies will
join the Drug Enforcement
Administration for
Prescription Drug Take-Back
Day at six locations in Polk


County, from 10 a.m:-2 p.m.,
for citizens to turn in unused
or unwanted human and pet
medications. Those places are:
Auburndale Police
Department, 2 Bobby Green
Plaza; Haines City Police
Department, 35400 U.S.
Highway 27; Lake Alfred
Police Department, 190 N.
Seminole Ave.; Lake Wales
Police Department, 133 -
E. Tillman Ave.; Lakeland
Police Department, 219
N. Massachusetts Ave.;
and Winter Haven Police
Department, 125 N. Lake Silver
Drive N.W.
Medication may also be
taken to any of the county's
four permanent drop sites at
the Auburndale, Haines City,
Lake Alfred, and Winter Haven
police departments.
Medications may be safely
disposed of at home by dis-
solving medications in water,
mixing with coffee grounds or
cat litter, pouring into a zip-
pered plastic bag, and putting
in your trash.
For information, call Stand
UP Polk at 863-802-0777.


Controlled burns
scheduled for Green
Swamp
The Southwest Florida
Water Management District
will conduct "controlled,
prescribed burns" this month
on the District's Green Swamp
Wilderness Preserve.
About 500 acres of land will
be burned in small, manage-
able units. The scheduled,
managed burns are a part of
routine maintenance of lands
managed by the District.
Every effort will be made
to ensure that smoke will not
affect homes or highways,
Swiftmud reports. However,
vehicle operators should
exercise caution in case smoke
does lead to reduced vis-
ibility on the area's roads or
highways.
The District protects about
449,000 acres of environmen-
tally sensitive lands for water
resource and natural systems
protection.
For information, call 352-
796-7211 or 1-800-423-1476,
ext. 4467.


Mosquito spraying
this week
Mosquito spraying will con-
tinue this week in Polk County
in known breeding areas. The
county is conducting ground and
aerial spraying as needed to con-
trol adult mosquito populations
based upon mosquito trap results
and citizen service requests.
The areas scheduled this week:
Wednesday: Jan PhylVillage,
East Lake Hancock, Eagle Lake,
Winter Haven, Lake Miriam and
Garden Grove.
Thursday. West Poinciana,
Solivita, Lake Hatchineha,
Poinciana, Eagle Lake, Bartow
Airbase, Lake Eloise and
Walk-in-Water.
Mosquitoes are generally most
active at dusk and dawn; how-
ever, floodwater mosquitoes can
bite during daylight hours. The
best protection from mosquito-
transmitted diseases is avoiding
mosquito bites. If you must be
outside when mosquitoes are ac-
tive, cover up. Wear shoes, socks,
long pants and long sleeves when
outdoors. Apply mosquito repel-
lent to bare skin and clothing.


P 8 F t f News


age rosproo





September 12, 2012 Frostproof News Page 9


JV Bulldogs work hard for win over Mulberry


Anthony Gardner
does all he can
to score this
touchdown on a
fourth down play
as the Bulldgos
hosted Mulberry
in junior varsity
football action last
Thursday at Faris
Brannen Stadium.
After an easy win in
week one, the Bull-
dogs had to work
a little harder in
their second game,
but still came out
on top, 20-6.


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR.


-r- Frostproof's Eric Richardson tries to escape from this Avon Park defender during junior varsity
,-: football action last week. The Bulldogs are back in action tomorrow night, and are at home
.-. .... again, this time hosting Lake Placid in a 7 p.m. start at Faris Brannen Stadium.


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Frostproof News Page 9


September 12, 2012






Page 10 Frostproof News September 12, 2012


Bulldogs come alive in second half


By BRIAN ACKLEY
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET


The Frostproof Bulldog shook off a
sluggish first half, and rallied with big
plays in the second half to defeat the
Sebring Blue Streaks 19-8 in non-dis-,
trict high school action Friday night.
It was the second win in as many
regular season starts for Frostproof,
which was on the road last week as
well in shutting out Avon Park, 27-0.
This one was much tougher, al-
though the defense again shined for
the second straight week. The unit, al-
lowed 32 yards in net total offense on
the road in Avon Park, and 35 against
last week in Sebring.
"The defense has been lights out,"
Coach Price Harris said. After the need
for some adjustments in personnel
during the pre-season, the unit has,
come together nicely, despite the fact
that it starts now only two seniors.
"They really kept us in it. We had to
find the right guy to fill some voids,
and I feel like now we've got some
guys that have really stepped up."
A season opening pre-season loss
against Haines City might have been a
good thing, he added.
"We got refocused, the kids came
back and worked hard at doing the
little things;" he noted. "We knew we
could play a lot better than we did."
With a freshman at quarterback,
and many other very young skill
position players, there have been
moments of brilliance, and moments
of frustration.
"The offense has been coming. We're
right there, but we feel like we could
be better," Harris said. They had 315
yards in offense against Sebring, 288
against Avon Park. "I feel like we could
be a 400 or 500 yard offense. We've got
to block better and hit some big plays
when we get the opportunity. We've
got to get better at the execution part,
but we've been working hard on that.
The coaches are going to fix that prob-
lem, that's not going to be an issue. It's
a couple little things we have to fix."
Frostproof put together its best
and most energetic possession of the
young season midway through the
third quarter against Sebring, and that
swung momentum the Bulldogs way.


Starting at their own 25, Frostproof
freshman quarterback Xavier Gaines
scrambled for 15, and then found
Kaleel Gaines on the near sideline
on a 3rd-and-15 play. He made a low,
diving catch, just staying in bounds,
and had just enough yardage for a
first down at the Sebring 30. Cecil
Cherry then took over, bursting off
right tackle for 23 yards to the Blue
Streak 3. Three plays later, Cherry did
the honors from two yards out. The
strange PAT run attempt failed, but
Frostproof led 13-7 with six seconds to
play in the third period.
That seemed to fire up the Bulldog
defense, which threw Sebring back-
wards 13 yards in three plays on the
host's ensuing possession.
After the punt, Frostproof started at
the Sebring 38 and drove inside the
25, but was stopped on an intercep-
tion that was returned to the 38. But
the Bulldogs took the ball right back
as Kaleel Gaines jumped on a fumble
on Sebring's first play at the Blue
Streak 45. On the very next play, Trevis
\Herrington, one his first of two carries
on the night, burst up the middle and
outran the secondary all the way to
pay dirt. The PAT again failed, but
Frostproof led 19-8 with 8:29 left to
play.
Neither team was especially sharp
on the offensive side in the first two
quarters.
Sebring opened the scoring midway
through the first quarter thanks to
a Bulldogs special teams miscue. A
blocked punt put the hosts on offense
at the Frostproof 30. After a first down
at the Bulldog 18, Sam Hamilton
burst up the middle to drop Gayle
for a three-yard loss. That eventually
led to the drive stalling, but Hunter
Livingston kicked the ball 38 yards, on
a 37-yard field goal try, to put Sebring
on top 3-0 with 4:29 to play in the first.
The Frostproof offense struggled
mightily early on, managing just
three-and-out series on their first
three possession. That actually led to
Sebring's second score of the night
when a punt snap sailed over the
kicker's head and out of the end zone
for a safety and a 5-0 Sebring lead with
11:13 to play in the half.
Sebring was content to try and chew


PHOTO BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
Cecil Cherry was a physical presence all night long, making big hits on defesne and tough to bring
down when running the ball.


up yardage and the clock, opening the
game with 14 consecutive running
plays. Their first pass was a comple-
tion at the Frostproof 26 midway
through the second quarter on the
- 1- -


drive ensuing the safety.
However, that scoring threat was
snuffed when Kijana Gaines jumped


BULLDOGS 111


MOODY LAW
,i,-f a 0W a s I USS E Ior i-idISIM


H HEALTHY' WOMAN
A LAKE WALES MEDICAL CENTER RESOURCE




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Registration opens at 8 a.m. and the walk kicks off at 8:30.
Participants con walk as far as they'd like along the path around the lake and
then return to Kiwanis Park at 9:30 for our recognition of survivors and for
our door prize drawings.
We're also encouraging those who are interested to decorate bras in the theme of
their choice and wear them over their shirts on the walk.
Prizes will be awarded for the besl decorated bias!
Register no later than Sunday, Oct. 7
to guarantee a T-shirt @
andclickon HEALTHY '- WOMrN AN

Lake Wales Medical Center
bette_veldman@chs.net 863-678-2288


Page 10 Frostproof News


September 12, 2012






September 12, 2012 Frostproof News Page 11


BULLDOGS
FROM PAGE 10
on a bad snap from center and
recovered the fumble at the Blue
Streak 15. It looked like the of-
fense was still in neutral until on
a third-and 15 play, Xavier Gaines
connected with Kaleel Gaines on
a 50 yard bomb. Kaleel got his feet
tangled with the Sebring defensive
back as the ball was in the air, and
caught the pass as he was falling
to the turf. A 12-yard completion
to Marcus Bobb put the Bulldog
offense at the Sebring 23, and
two plays later, Xavier Gaines
went virtually untouched up the
middle on a keeper for Frostproof's
first points of the night. Lamar
Bobb added the extra point, and
Frostproof had its first lead, 7-5,
with 3:52 to go before intermission.
The lead was short lived howev-
er, as a kickoff return to the Bulldog
41 gave Sebring another scoring
chance. The drive eventually
stalled, and Livingston was called
on again to try a 48-yarder. It went
48 yards, hitting the crossbar and


The Frostproof Marching Band made the road trip as well. Their new show will be
on display this Friday when the Bulldogs host Desoto.
going over it for a field goal with 17 opener against a tough Desoto
seconds left in the second quarter, squad. Kick off will be at 7 p.m.
putting Sebring back on top 8-7 at "They're a very good football
the break, team," Harris noted. "They've got
The Blue Streaks entered last athletes all over the place. They
night's contest, which also was haven't been slowed down yet
their home opener, after falling last They're big, they're fast They're
week at Desoto, 24-6. going to be a huge challenge, and
The Bulldogs, now 2-0, will finally we're excited by it."
get back home next Friday to Faris Desoto opened its season with a
Brannen Stadium for their home 28-6 win over Sebring.


PHOTO BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
The Frostproof defense saw a lot of Sebring running back Alrick Gayle
Friday night. Here, Harrison Johnson (50) gets ready to help out Kerry
Wood (56) in making a stop.


PRE


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Frostproof News Page 11


September 12, 2012









School budget approved without teacher pay plan


By PEGGY KEHOE
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
Polk County School Board members
approved a nearly $750 million budget,
but it doesn't include pay raises for
teachers.
Those have yet to be negotiated, with
sessions set for Sept. 17 and 24.
Only one person spoke during a
public hearing on the budget last dur-
ing the board meeting.
That was Marianne Capoziello, presi-
dent of Polk Education Association,
which represents teachers, para-
educators and educational support
personnel/secretaries.
"We talk about the budget and it's a
bunch of numbers," Capoziello said.
"Everybody gets lost in those numbers,
but those numbers represent the edu-
cation of our students. It represents the
money we have to be able to provide
them with a high quality education and
beyond that it represents the financial
health of our employees."
The budget also represents the com-
munity's financial health, she asserted. -
'As the largest employer in this area,
our financial health and the people
we employ decide whether we have
a thriving or a struggling economy in
Polk County, so we have to pay a good


deal of attention to our budget.
"So here we are today and you have
to vote on something. I still believe
and will believe and state until the day
I die that you need to start budgeting
your salaries up front in the budgeting
process. You need to look at (pay) steps
up front in the budgeting process. They
are not new, they are not a surprise,
they are in every contract you sign off
on and yet here we are in September
not yet signed off on our salaries.
"I long for the day when you put it
up front in your budgeting and that
people come back to school knowing
what their salary will be for the up-
coming year. It's doable; other counties
do it."
While acknowledging issues with the
economy, Capoziello said salaries still
need to be up front in budgeting.
"It is your staff that delivers the
rigorous and relevant learning; it is
the support staff that supports those
classrooms. If we are going to move
this county to an A district, we are not
going to do it without those staff.
"The best and the brightest need to
be compensated at every level."
The nearly 300-page budget docu-
ment includes overviews and explana-
tions of the complicated education
financing system for public schools,


involving federal, state and local
money.
During the earlier work session,
Board Member Lori Cunningham ques-
tioned whether some of the millions
left in the fund balance at the end of
the fiscal year could be used for cur-
rently unfunded programs or salaries.
Mark Grey, assistant superintendent
of business services, explained that
the money is rolled over into the next
year's budget and added to that year's
revenue. It would be impossible to say
how much would be available at the
end of the next year, he said. *
Another thing affecting income is
that property taxes are only budgeted
as 96 percent of the calculated revenue.
Lots of people pay their taxes before
the deadline and receive discounts for
doing so, while others don't pay them
at all.
Polk's total federal revenue is
calculated at $121,278,745; state at
$474,868,996; and local, $333,884,262.
This year's millage rate is 7.492,
comprised of 5.255 state-required local
effort, 0.748 discretionary operating
determined by the district,-which make
up the general operating millage, and
1.5 mills capital outlay.
General operating millage is used
for general operating expenses such as


utility bills, supplies, equipment and
salaries. Capital outlay millage is used
for construction, renovations and re-
modeling; purchasing sites, buses and
equipment for new facilities; purchase
of technology equipment; and paying
debt service.
Before 2008 districts had been able
to levy up to 2 mills for capital outlay,
but the Legislature reduced that to 1.5
mills, so that the difference could be
part of the required local effort be-
cause of lower state revenues.
A mill is $1 per $1,000 of assessed
property value. For a home valued at
$65,000, with a homestead exemp-
tion of $25,000 reducing the taxable
value to $40,000, the school tax at the
proposed millage would be $299.68.
Florida's homestead exemption is
now $50,000 for homes valued at more
than $75,000; homes between $50,000
and $75,000 get a percentage of the
additional exemption; those $50,000
and under can get only the $25,000
exemption, according to the Property
Appraiser's Office. In any case, the
second $25,000 exemption does not
apply to the school portion of property
taxes.
Last year's levy was 7.670, which is
0.178 more than this year, or almost
18 cents per $1,000 of property value.


Fifth Sun

Sept. 30 will:
Frostproof's second "Fifth Sunday"
community church service will feature Polk
County Sheriff Grady Judd on Sept. 30 at
the Ramon.
The event, which started in June with
a crowd of almost 150 people, is a special
community religious celebration scheduled
on months with five Sundays. It will start at
6p.m.
Judd will preach at this month's event.
Judd began his career at the Polk County
Sheriff's Office in 1972 as a dispatcher. After


iday event

feature sheriff
transferring to the Patrol Division in 1974,
he quickly progressed through the ranks
holding every rank from sergeant to
colonel. In 2004, Polk County elected Grady
to serve as Sheriff by a 64 percent majority
vote against two opponents.
In November 2008, he was re-elected,
with 99 percent of the vote. He is now seek-
ing re-election to his third term as sheriff.
He is recognized across the state for
his efforts against child pornography and
Internet crimes involving minors.


Coffee and doughnuts taste better when you

are reading your hometown newspaper

Don't believe it? -"


Call today and E

subscribe to the F

Frostproof News

and see for yourself.

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September 12, 2012


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Frostproof News Page 13


Care center 'financial fitness' classes start


The Frostproof Care Center will be
offering another series of "financial
fitness" classes starting tomorrow
evening.
The program runs Thursday
evenings, and is for the whole


PRINCIPAL
FROM PAGE 1

Before David actually married her,
he took her to her home in Georgia,
where her parents lived.
"I said I told your daughter I'm
going to marry her," he said to her
parents.
Their only concern was that he
make sure to bring her back to see
them, a promise which he kept, many
times.
The ceremony, performed at the,
Polk County Courthouse by Judge
Bobby Stokes, with the Judge Oliver
Green as David's best man.
"When we got married, Judge Green
said (to Faye) 'when you get tired of
him, you bring him back to me, and I'll
take care of him,'"'David said.
-David and Faye each had children
from prior marriages.
After the wedding, he took her to her
parents' house, and they were planning
to tell them during that visit that they
had gotten married, but the children
beat them to it.
"We guess you all got married," her
parents said.
"The kids said you went in one room
that said 'marriage license' and across
the hall, went to a room that said-
'judge,'" they added.
Faye was an educator, and as such
was hired by Dale R. Fair when he
became principal as his assistant
principal.
Later, she was given a school of her
own'. ... ..: .. ** ...-........ ...
Securing the principal job at Ben Hill
Griffin Jr. Elementary, she literally put
on a hard hat, sat in her car, or walked
the grounds, while watching the school
being built.
She ordered furniture and supplies
for the building.
But shortly after the school opened,
a hurricane came and took off the top
of the school, so she moved the classes
to First Baptist Church in Frostproof.
"Governor Jeb Bush came to inter-
view her and she was on the news
channel," David said.
Those who Worked with her admired
her and were mutually'empowered by
her.
One person she inspired was Rosa
Hampton, a woman who worked as a
lunch lady at the school. As Rosa says,
"One day she came to the lunchroom,
and she said, 'honey, what are you
doing in here? As well as you work with
these kids, you need to take your butt
back to school and get your degree so I
can put you in a classroom teaching.'"
"I was afraid. At first I said I can't,"
-she said.
But Faye replied, "There's no such
word as can't."
So Rosa became a paraeducator
and was kept on the school's payroll,
helping to substitute for absent teach-
ers while going to school to get her
bachelor's degree.
Later, she achieved a master's degree
in curriculum and instruction with a
concentration in reading.
After her first day in the classroom,
Rosa admits she thought, "Oh, I am too
old for this," but Faye had an answer
for that too.
"She said, 'no you're not, you can
do it.'"
Every Saturday, she went to
Bethune Cookman University
(College, at the time,) and then went
two days a week to Sanford, taking


family, offering incentives and ideas
for stretching the family dollars a bit
further. Child care is provided at no
charge, and dinner is provided at
6 p.m.
One incentive for those who qualify


Bethune night classes.
She finished at Warner University.
For her master's degree, she went to
National Louis University, who had a
satellite classroom in Orlando.
And this she did by getting rides
from other people, as she did not and
still does not drive a vehicle.
"Looking back at it, I knew I wouldn't
be where I am today if she hadn't kept
pushing me," she said.
Today, she is a third grade school
teacher, still at Ben Hill Griffin Jr.
Elementary.
Then there was Alice Johnson, who
met Faye when Faye was assistant
principal at Dale R. Fair Babson Park
Elementary.
When Faye went to Ben Hill Griffin
Jr. Elementary, Alice followed a group
of staff who came from Frostproof
Elementary.
Alice notes that Faye was "very well
organized," and an encourager.
"Ms. Hampton is one story," she
said, "but there are others."
"She encouraged me to go into
technology. I just felt like she was
able to pick out my strengths," she
said. "She really cared about her staff,
Alice notes that in the year of Ben
Hill's opening, they had a talent show
in which the staff would sing the
song, "We are Family," and adds that
"a lot of us get choked up because
that is how we felt."


is a savings account match of funds.
Classes start at 6:30 p.m. Snacks
and games will also be provided, and
transportation can be arranged for
those who might need it.
A separate teen class will start


The night before Faye died, David
notes he saw his wife at 5 p.m.
"She held my hand before I left and
told me I was a good husband," he
said.
He spoke with Rosa Hampton, not-
ing "I said, Rose, I can't get it out of
my mind, that she said I was a good
husband."
Rosa's reply via text, which David


Sept. 21 for those in grades six through
12. A second class will meet Oct. 5. The
two sessions start at 5:45 p.m. and will
end at 7 p.m.
For information on either, contact
the care center at 863-635-5555.


saved, said, "Look at it this way, she
wanted u 2 know that she was truly
happy with every day that God al-
lowed her to be with u and she didn't
want 2 leave this world without u
knowing it."
"She reached down and picked up,"
David said of his wife. And with that,
he quietly put away his phone. "I've
got good memories."


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September 12, 2012













FEELINe's Medical Center's st male nurse's aide retires



Lake Wale's Medical Center's 1st male nurse's aide retires


Gene Isom I
By KATHY LEIGH BERKOWITZ
KLBERKOWITZ@LAKEWALESNEWS.COM
Forty-four years is a long time, and as
Gene Isom said to his co-workers at Lake
Wales Medical Center, "I'm going to miss
all of you guys."
Tears, smiles and hugs were plentiful as
the hospital threw a retirement party for
Isom in the hospital cafeteria.
Back in 1967, he started his career there,
answering an ad in the newspaper which
said the hospital would pay a nurse's aide
while they were still in training.
He was Lake Wales Medical Center's
first male nurse's aide.
"The rest of them were orderlies," he
said.
Surrounding by friends remiscing the
past, he said, "I've watched this hospital
grow."
He remembers the days when it was
common to be called "colored," he says.
This was also remembered by Ivadene
Howell, as she gave a speech about old
times and how he had a nickname, "the
colored doctor."
That moniker, she said, attached
itself readily when a young patient who
had been in an auto accident required
traction.
"The only person who knew how to
make the traction right was the 'colored
doctor'," she said.
The young man was the one who
made the reference, she added, making
special request for Isom.
Howell added that "in the nineties, he
became a poster boy," waving her hand
to a poster made by LWMC with Isom
interacting with patients, which read,
"Your safety is our concern."
"Just make sure you keep the dust out
of your hair," she joked with him.
Isom's wife, Marty, presented him a
"honey-do" list, an actual fabric scroll,
with various activities.
"Housework, mow, clean the garage,
mow," she said.
Everything that was on the list, or
nearly everything, was followed by "and
mow."
She also added "fishing" so he'd have
something fun to do.
There is a story behind Isom's love life,
or rather, the love of his life.
He met Marty through her grand-
mother, at the hospital, who said, "I've
got someone for you."
A few years after he started working at
the hospital, he and Marty got together.
They've been married for years, both
of them working at the hospital he
in transport services she in infection
control.
At this point in the conversation, Isom
looks up and gets a hug from Brenda
Floyd, the hospital switchboard operator,
who said she "told everybody to please
join us in the cafeteria for his retirement
party."
Then he looks up and hears a familiar'


honored for



11I


44 years of


service


PHOTOS BY KATHY LEIGH BERKOWITZ
Gene Isom, retiring from Lake Wales Medical Center after 44 years of service, gets a pat on the
back from long time colleague and friend, Ivadene Howell.


voice coming from a blonde with a lot of
gusto, Nancy Kovencz.
The operation room manager, she's
seen a lot too, and Isom was one of those
people who liked to lighten things up with
a joke.
"Who's going to abuse me going up and
down the hall now?" she said, then gave
him a hug, and tried not to cry.
The feeling was mutual, as Isom looked
around at all of his friends.
Carol Parrish, long time numrse at
LWMC, smirked, "You lucky dog."
And what does Isom say he remembers
most?
Two things "they accepted me well
back then," in which he remembers the
days as the country was morphing away
from the racial divide.
The other thing he said, is something he
learned, early in his career.
With this, his eyes get glossy again.
"You learn the love for a patient, the
love for people," he said.
A man in a white doctor's coat makes
his presence known, and it is Dr. James
Nelson, or "Jim," as everyone calls him.
.He hugs Isom and then the two, more
so Nelson than Isom, but they both cry
and slap each other's backs.
They are fishing buddies ... life.outside
the hospital.
"Gene fishes, therefore, he lies," jokes
Nelson, and Isom smiles.
Nelson says he doesn't know what he's
going to do without Isom around the
hospital.
Isom nods and said, "It's time, it's time,"
and looks over at his daughter, Bethany,
and granddaughter, Mya.


And perhaps, she is at least part of the
reason he's retiring.
"That's Pop-Pop day care-center right
there," he laughs, adding he's going to
enjoy taking time for fishing, for projects
around the house, and for his family, most
of all.
Nelson jokes again, because Marty will
remain.
Someday it will be Isom's turn to repay
his wife's"jest" with a list of his own when
she retires.
"Well, at least Marty works," Nelson
teased.
As for a favorite memory, all these
years?


,. 1



















Marty Isom holds a long "honey-do" list, which
she read quite willingly to those who filled the
cafeteria last week for her husband's retire-
ment party at Lake Wales Medical Center.


Gene Isom retired last week after 44 years of
service at Lake Wales Medical Center in trans-
port services. He was the hospital's first male
nurse's aide in the 1960s.

Left: Bethany Jean and daughter, Mya, watch
the festivities. Bethany is Gene and Marty
Isom's daughter, and Mya is their grand-
daughter.

"I can't even put my finger on it," Isom
says.
One thing stands out in his mind,
though.
And that, he says "was when the
hospital got the hospital back from Winter
Haven Hospital. The community needed
this hospital. The hospital is very impor-
tant to the community."
Great emotion followed this statement,
and he looks 'around the room again.
Is there one thing he wants everyone to
remember about him?
Yes. "That I was lovable and kind to
everyone, not just one of them, every
one," he said.


-, -Winter Haven Hospital

Compassion. Innovation. Trust.


^ : ,

.No't;-


i


September 12, 2012


Page 14. Frostproof News







SeDtember 12, 2012 Frostproof News Page 15


The role of sugar in diabetes


DEAR DR. DONOHUE: My husband
is 6 feet 4 inches tall and weighs 170
pounds. He is a competitive distance
runner. He loves Kool-Aid and calcu-
lates that he drinks in a year 150 pounds
of sugar in Kool-Aid alone. A friend told
him if he continues this habit, he might
develop diabetes. Can a skinny, athletic
person develop diabetes from consum-
ing sugar? S.B.
ANSWER: Although "sugar" is half the
name of sugar diabetes, sugar doesn't
cause diabetes. It's a popular belief
that it does, but it doesn't. People with
diabetes are careful to watch their sugar
intake, and they watch their total carbo-
hydrate intake, but diabetics don't have
to eliminate sugar completely from
their lives. Careful monitoring of sugar
and carbohydrate intake is essential for
their control of blood sugar.
Type 1 diabetes, the kind that requires
insulin for control, often has its onset
in younger years. It's due to a destruc-
tion of the insulin-making cells of the
pancreas. The destruction is believed
to be the work of the immune system.
Sugar has nothing to do with it. Type
1 diabetes accounts for 5 percent to
10 percent of all diabetes cases.


TO YOUR
GOOD
HEALTH

Dr. Paul
Donohue


Type 2 diabetes, the much more
common kind, comes about from a
decline in insulin production along with
a decline in the effectiveness of insulin.
Ninety percent of type 2 diabetics are
overweight, and weight loss helps them
control their blood sugar. Physical inac-
tivity also contributes to type 2 diabe-
tes. So do genes. Again, it's not the sugar
intake that produces this common type
of diabetes. But monitoring the intake
of sugar is important for control of this
variety of diabetes.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: If one has
genital herpes and takes acyclovir twice
a day for suppression of outbreaks,
should one get the shingles vaccine?


ANSWER: The shingles vaccine con-
tains live chickenpox virus. Chickenpox,
acquired most often in childhood but at
other ages as well, lives in nerve cells for
the rest of that person's life. Shingles is the
result of the virus coming out of hiberna-
tion in nerve cells and traveling to the
skin to cause an outbreak of shingles.
Acyclovir (Zovirax) and its two close
relatives famciclovir (Famvir) and
valacyclovir (Valtrex) suppress recurring
outbreaks of genital herpes, a differ-
ent virus from the chickenpox virus of
shingles. However, these same drugs also
can do in the chickenpox virus. Since
they have that effect, they could kill the
virus in the shingles vaccine and make
it ineffective in its protection against a
shingles outbreak. The vaccine shouldn't
be given to a person who is taking these
medicines for suppression of a herpes
recurrence or for.any other reason.
You can get the shingles vaccine if
you stop acyclovir for a week or so. Ask
your doctor if he or she agrees.
The booklet on herpes discusses this
common infection and genital warts in
detail. Readers can order a copy by writ-
ing: Dr. Donohue No. 1202. Enclose
a check or money order (no cash) for


$4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the recipient's
printed name and address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am 81. When
I urinate, the bowl is covered with tiny
foam bubbles. Is this dangerous? What
causes it? E.K.
ANSWER: Urinated urine covered
with foam that looks like a head of beer
poured into a glass might be due to pro-
tein in the urine. Ordinarily, no protein
should be in urine. The kidney's filter-
ing stations keep protein in the blood.
Protein finds its way into the urine when
those stations have holes in them.
Don't let this alarm you. Foamy urine
isn't a reliable sign of trouble. You can
settle the question by getting one of
medicine's cheapest, fastest and easiest
tests, a urinalysis. Your doctor can ar-
range such a test for you.
Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable
to answer individual letters, but he will
incorporate them in his column when-
ever possible. Readers may write him or
request an order form of available health
newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475. Readers may also order
health newsletters from www.rbmamall.
com.


Glass shape may be key in how much alcohol people drink


What shape you find yourself in after
consuming alcohol may depend, in part,
on the shape of the glass containing the
drink.
British scientists invited 160 social
drinkers, ages 18 to 40 with no history
of alcohoUsm, to a pair of experimental
sessions. In the first, they were asked to
consume either a lager or a nonalcoholic
soft drink from either a straight-sided
glass or from a curved "beer flute."
Participants who consumed lager from
the curved flutes finished their drinks al-
most twice as-quickly as those who drank
from straight-sided glasses. The drinking
rates of the nonalcoholic beverage were
the same, regardless of glass shape.
Angela Attwood of the University
of Bristol's School of Experimental
Psychology said the reason may be that
it's more difficult to judge the halfway
point of shaped glasses. As a result,
drinkers are less able to gauge how much
they've consumed and wind up drinking
more, faster.
To test this reasoning, the study partici-
pants came back for a second session in
which they evaluated computer images
of differently shaped glasses containing
varying volumes of liquid. They were
asked to assess whether the glass was
more or less than half full. Curved glasses
produced the greatest amount of error.
"People often talk of 'pacing them-
selves' when drinking alcohol as a means
of controlling levels of drunkenness," said


WELL NEWS
Scott LaFee


Attwood. "I think the important point to
take from our research is that the ability
to pace effectively may be compromised
when drinking from certain types of
glasses."

Number cruncher
An order of breaded, fried onion rings
(83 grams, or about 9 rings) contains 276
calories, 140 from fat. It has 15.5 grams
of total fat or 24 percent of the recom-
mended total fat intake for a 2,000-calorie
daily diet.
It also contains 14 milligrams of
cholesterol (5 percent); 430 mg of sodium
(18 percent); 31.3 grams of total carbohy-
drates (10 percent) and 3.7 g of protein.

Observation
"Marriage is not all about love. That's
half of it. The other half is about that mo-
ment you have-with yourself when you're
looking in the mirror, and you just go,
'Oh man. I'm going to compromise my
dreams, get fat, sick, old and die someday.
I kind of want to have someone around
for that.'"
Marc Maron


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Phobia of the week
Defecaloesiophobia fear of painful
bowel movements.
Never say diet
The Major League Eating speed-eating
record for vanilla ice cream is 1.75 gallons
in eight minutes, held by Patrick Bertoletti.


Counts
Children who regularly
used a steroid-based asthma
inhaler were shorter than children who
did not use the drug, budesonide, at
adulthood by 0.5 inches.
Source: Washington University
School of Medicine


Frostproof News Page 15


September 12, 2012





Page 16 Frostproof News September 12, 2012


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Page 16 Frostproof News


September 12, 2012