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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00570
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00570
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text

Visit us on the Internet at www.FrostproofNews.com

Wednesday
June 27, 2012


Frostproof News


O i I C-, ,-,
205 SMA LIBRAP y ol L
205 SMA UNIV OF '- '*L,.-'
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


750


Volume 90 Number 23


. USPS NO 211-260


Frosiproof. Polk County Florida 33843


Copyright 2012 Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. -


Frostproof avoids most of Debby's wrath


Weather deaths reported in Winter Haven, Highlands County


FROM STAFF REPORTS


While neighbors to the south, north and west
took a heavy hit, the Greater Frostproof area
remained relatively unscathed, at least through
Tuesday morning, by Tropical Storm Debby.
City officials indicated few problems with heavy
rains and storms that raced from south to north on
Sunday and Monday. A tornado warning was issued
for a brief time Monday morning shortly after 10
a.m. when the National Weather Service indicated
that it saw atmospheric rotation over the West
Frostproof area.
Fire Chief Bill Lord said his department dis-
patched a truck to the area where the possible
tornado was said to be forming, but that no dam-
age was found and none had been reported.
Overall, while many areas to the east received
almost a foot of rain through Tuesday, with more
on the way predicted, two reporting stations that
make up the Community Collobrative Ram, Hall
- and Snow Netork reported Frostproof totals that
only rivaled a typical rainy day this time of year.
One site reported a total of 4.4 inches of rain
Sunday and Monday while a second recorded 2.97
inches of rain.
There were problems at the city's wastewater
treatment plant, but city Public Works Director
lames Keene indicated that they developed earlier
in the weekend from a possible lightning strike,
and were not directly caused by the heavy rains.
Not far from here, however, Debby was downright
deadly.
A tornado slammed into homes Sunday-after-
noon along a stretch of Lake Tune Road in Lake
Placid. destroying several houses, heavily damaging
others, and
leaving
a wake
of debris
hundreds
offeet
S-- -.-wide and
".several
miles long.
:The tor-
h v t nado that
slammed
Lake Placid
is believed
to be the
same that
hit Venus, a
small com-
munity just
off U.S.
27 about
PHOTO PROVIDED 50 miles
The massive tornado was photographed as it south of
swept across pasture land near Venus. Frostproof,


TODAY'S
CONTENTS Cale ................Page 2
Editorial ................ Page 4


7 05252 00025 8


Obituaries............. Page 6
County Report ..,... Page 8
Feeling Fit ........... Page 25


PHOTO BY BRIAN ACKLEY
Flooded yards, like this one along U.S. 98 just west of U.S. 27, was one of the results of rains from Tropical Storm Debby locally.
Overall, though, the Frostproof area survived the storm with few problems.


killing 32-year-old Heather Town and destroying
homes there, too.
"Sunday afternoon I heard a strange howling out
back. I looked out the window and saw the funnel
with flying tree limbs that formed into a water
spout as it passed over the pond," said neighbor
Doug Karlson. "While I was assessing the damage
my neighbor, Richard Deavers, drove up to see if I
was all right. He said the tornado barely missed his
house. He saw the neighbor's trailer being de-
stroyed, lifted into the air. The lady was found dead
in a tree, still holding her live baby."
Her husband, Elmer Town Jr. said "She was a
great mother, and held her baby through all of this
and held her so tight. She was holding her during
the tornado. And when they found her, she was still
holding her."
Highlands County Sheriff Susan Benton said the
"human side of the story" is the "protection of a
mother for her child; she never let go of her little
one, even in death."
According to a press release from the sheriff's of-
fice, the mother and her toddler were thrown about


200 feet into a wooded area when the tornado
struck Town's home on Montana Trail in a remote
part of the Venus community.
After the twister passed, neighbor Shane Penrod
heard a child crying and weht to investigate with
another neighbor, Jason Knapek. The two searched
the woods and found the victim, still cradling her
daughter.
. Another neighbor, Emily Troup, joined the rescue
effort and called 911. Knapek carried the child
from'the woods and to a truck to await the arrival
of Emergency Medical Services teams. Penrod and
Troup stayed with the mother until emergency
help arrived. An unidentified neighbor provided a
blanket and jacket to cover Town and protect her
from rain.
Deputy Jorge Martinez was the first public safety
official to reach the scene, followed quickly by
Deputy Brian VanFleet. Within minutes, personnel
from the Venus Volunteer Fire Department arrived
and tended to the victim until EMS arrived on scene.
WRATH |9


EI BOARD MEMVIBER


The


Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years


Two named to
Ben Hill Griffin
Inc. board


12






Page 2 Frostproof News June 27, 2012


CALEN


Friday
Movies at the Library
The Latt Maxcy Memorial Library will
offer four free movies on Fridays at
3:30 p.m., starting June 29. Free. The
first movie will be "Kung Fu Panda."
Run time is 88 minutes and it is rated
PG.
Friday, July 13
Movies at the Library
The Latt Maxcy Memorial library
will offer its second free movie of the
summer, "Mr. Magorium's Wonder
Emporium." The show starts at 3 p.m.,
run time is 94 minutes, and it is rated G.
Monday, July 16
City Council
The Frostproof City Council will meet
in regular session in city hall starting


V : 4


at 6 p.m. Please note that the council
has cancelled its regularly scheduled
meeting for Monday, July 2. The group
normally meets the first and third
Monday of each month.
Lyndel the Magician
Frostproof's Latt Maxcy Memorial
Library will sponsor another special
Family Night event as Lyndel the
Comedy Magician will present a special
free show, starting at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 17
Chamber Lunch
The Frostproof Chamber of
Commerce will host its monthly
meeting at the Ramon Theater starting
at noon. Guest speaker will be Polk
County Sheriff Grady Judd. Cost is $9.
Contact the chamber for more informa-
tion, 635-9112.


Tuesday, July 24
Meet the Candidates
The Frostproof Chamber of
Commerce will host a special "meet the
candidates" night at the Ramon Theater.
Candidates for various county races will
speak, and meet and greet voters.

Monday, August 13
World of Reptiles
One of the most popular summer
library shows of the season will make a
return visit to Frostproof at 6:30 p.m. as
John Storms and his "World of Reptiles"
will be here for a free show. Don't miss
his snakes, crocs and other surprises!
Saturday, August 18
Murder Mystery
The Ramon Theater will host another


-


1111


in its popular series of murder mystery
dinner theaters. This one is "Murder
is Par for the Course." Cost is $30 and'
includes the murder mystery and din-
ner. Call 635-7222 for more information.
Tickets can also be purchased online
at www.ramontheater.com. Please note
that the date has changed to the 18th
from the previously announced date of
Aug. 25.


*I


GET


c:as.. .. ...

', c.a'.,. c-sh .-


with a new
FREE checking
account1


AT WELCOME TO YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
EdI V i Want to see your event on this page? Just go to www.frostproofnews.net
Eand click on Community Calendar. Questions? Call us at 863-285-8625.


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 33 LOcCAT[ION?^S THROUGHOUT CENy^^TRAL FLORIDA^^^^^^^^^^^


Page 2 Frostproof News


June 27, 2012


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June 27, 2012 Frostproof News Page 3


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L


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AN AFFILIATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SHANDS HEALTHCARE


When it's a stroke, every second counts.
That's why knowing the symptoms-and having
Winter Haven Hospital's nationally recognized
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Stroke symptoms can include: severe headache;
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June 27, 2012


Frostproof News Page 3


v


iA AMAu


He had a stroke last October.
Today, they're leaving on a cruise.

Bon voyage, John and Nancy.












VIEWPOINT


Take a look at dangerous stretch of


27


Whether you've lived here all your life, or you are a
recent convert to the Ridge, it doesn't take long to fig-
ure out that U.S. Highway 27 is a dangerous roadway.
The carnage comes it seems on an almost daily ba-
sis. Asthe region's major north-south traffic arterial,
some of it is expected an unavoidable. So many cars,
at places traveling at interstate speeds, will inevitably
lead to horrific accidents. Too many claim lives.
Recently, an eight mile stretch of the highway,
south of Lake Wales and north of Frostproof, and con-
taining a middle school and a university, have been
particularly deadly. In little more than five months
time, six different accidents have claimed a life.
Every accident is analyzed by at least two different
local agencies, the Polk County Sheriff's Office and
the Florida Department of Transportation regional
office in Bartow. They regularly look for clues and
insights that might help them learn whether or not
there are safety issues that might be more deeply
investigated to see if action is needed.
In our series of stories, a review of the six particu-
lar crashes do not show any obvious pattern, that
road engineering or speed enforcement might have
otherwise prevented. Three of the six, for example,
involved legally impaired drivers. One was a nine-car
pile up in heavy fog. Two simply involved apparently
drivers who did not pay close enough attention to the
oncoming traffic around them.
In other words, driver error was the only true com-
mon denominator.
Still, there are at least two additional safety steps


Our Viewpoint

that we believe should be seriously considered.
One are reflective speed bumps along the eight
mile stretch of road between the intersection of
County Road 640 and U.S. 98. Currently, there are
about two miles worth of the safety devices, running
from approximated Camp Inn south in both the
north and southbound lanes.
Two of the accidents in that area, however, were
crossovers, where one vehicle left the inside lane,
crossed the median and struck oncoming traffic. One
involved an impaired driver, where speed bumps
currently are installed and the other involved fog,
which because of Crooked Lake and swampy overall
conditions there, is common. There are no reflec-
tive bumps where that accident happened. Beyond
improving visibility, we have all, at one time or
another, drifted to a lane's edge and gotten startled by
the audible reminder when a vehicles tires hit those
bumps, potentially preventing more crossover type
accidents.
The second and perhaps more vital safety consider-
ation is a traffic light at the entrance to Bok Academy,
a request that has already been turned down once.
According to a DOT spokesperson, lights are not
considered as safety devices. But in that particular
spot, common sense would dictate that such a light
would dramatically improve overall safety.


The obvious improvement is for cars and buses
headed south on U.S. 27, turning left into Bok. A
light would give those vehicles a turning arrow, and
thus clearly defined period of time in which to turn
without having to challenge northbound traffic.
Secondly, it would also potentially help open up more
space for vehicles exiting Warner University to head
north. Currently, there is a short left hand merge
lane (unusual in an of itself when safety experts talk
about driver's expectations) in which vehicles have
virtually no chance to get up to a safe merge speed.
If were northbound traffic was occasionally halted by
a traffic signal at the Bok Academy intersection, such
merging would be much less fraught with the terror
currently associated with the deadly spot. (One of the
six accidents involved a driver who was attempting
to do just this, and was broadsided by a truck as she
crossed U.S. 27 from the university's entrance.) It is
understandable why there is a checklist of objective
criteria that usually must be met before a light is to
be considered. The county gets traffic light requests
for many different roadways and intersections.
And, they are expensive. However, this particular
spot deserves a new look, with both objective and
subjective analysis that takes into consideration the
unique aspects of the highway and the constituency
that regularly uses it.
We owe it to everyone who uses U.S. 27 to make it
as safe as possible. That mostly begins, and ends with
us, the drivers. But, there are times we could use a
little help, too.


Letters to the editor


Smacks of 'class warfare'


There is a campaign going on that should work, if you don't make a profit,
smacks of "class warfare" by the they you go out of business. Therefore,
President and his reelection effort. you need profits to make jobs. People
The President and his VP are saying want to be part of our economic system
that it is not right or good to be suc- because they know that with hard work
cessful and you should be punished by and good ideas, they can make profits
more taxation if you are very successful and create businesses. Jobs are the
economically. I think that he does not essential byproduct of this process, but
know how our "American" economy is without the profits, there are no jobs. By
supposed to work. demonizing the goal of private equity
People start businesses to make mon- capital to make profits, the President is
ey or profits. If they are successful, they showing a total lack of understanding of
are able to hire employees and build a our economic system and it is no won-
business. As they become more profit- der that his policies have been a dismal
able, they are able to expand and hire failure at creating jobs. His higher tax,
more people. And the cycle continues more regulation, more government
as long as they do a good job of meeting ideas have done nothing to further the
their customers' needs. It is all built on goal of more jobs and more taxpayers.
making a profit. This is ultimately where
the jobs are created, by companies Terry G. Loyd
making profits. In our system, the way it Lake Wales

Florida Property Insurance problems


Hurricane season is here and
Floridans are still not properly pro-
tected with 'affordable" insurance
against possible disastrous hurricanes.
Citizens property insurance was cre-
ated by the Legislature in 2002 for the
benefit of property owners that could
not obtain private sector insurance but
that program is not working. Citizens'
Interim President Tom Grady's message
is "Don't buy my product." Grady says
that citizens policies are not only a bad


deal for its customers but even worse
for those holding private sector policies
because of potential assessments and
surcharges for all.
It's unfortunate but a fact that private
sector insurance companies and the
"Pup Companies" they establish in
Florida do not want to provide wind-
storm coverage despite what industry
lobbyists might proclaim. These carriers

Gutierrez 16


Whose behavior wa:


One of the more memorable Florida
National Guard officers for whom I
worked during my 30 years as a Guard
officer was Brig. Gen. Robert L. Howell.
Bobby (forms of address become
more casual after retirement) was no
prude, but I well remember his first
briefing to his staff on the way he did
business.
An off-color joke from the podium
was permissible, within bounds of good
taste, he said, "but if I hear an officer
take God's name in vain, I will walk up
to the stage and remove him myself."
I appreciated that caveat, not only
because it is good when a boss sets the
expectations (that, incidentally, is one
of Frisbie's Laws, for those who have


+ll
.... ...


s worse?

S.L. Frisbie




S.L Frisbie can be contacted at
slfrisbie@polkcountydemocrat.com


not yet bought a copy of my book ...
and your number is legion) but also
because I totally agree.
I have often said that I can out-cuss
most people I know in both English and
Spanish (the result of having attended
FRISBIE16


Published every Wednesday at
14 W. Wall Street, Frostproof. FL 33843
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Frostproof, Florida and
additional Entry Office
*Phone (863) 676-3467 -Fax (863) 678-1297
Postmaster: Send address changes to
140 E. Stuart Ave.,
Lake Wales, FL 33853-4198


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
Six Months.................. .$25.68 One Year................... .. $41.73
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNTY MAIL
Six Months..................$24.00 One Year....... ........... $39.00
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNT! ES
Six Months...... ...........$40.00 One Year........................$65.00
OUT OF STATE SUBSCRIPTION
Six Months.............. $44.00 One Year....................... $72.00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frostproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews.com or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
Wales Fl. 33853.


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
* Aileen Hood General Manager Jeff Roslow Editor Brian Ackley Managing Editor


. ... . ............. .......... ..


Page 4 Frostproof News


uJ ne 27 2012






June 27, 2012 Frostproof News Page 5


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
The Fritzy Bros. One Man Circus made a stop at the Latt Maxcy Memorial Library last Monday,
much to the delight of many Frostproof youngsters. Performing is Steve Lombardo, who balances
on top of the Earth.


Under the


Latt Maxcy


This unicycle trick drew lots of smiles, laughs and even a few gasps, we think.


Egi; 1"


Five-year old Cami Balser gets a ride she will likely remember for a long time.


It's one thing to juggle, it's another altogether to do it while perched high on a unicycle.


Right: As "Fritzy" advised
several times, please don't
try this at home. Fire eating
is for trained entertainers
only! Still, it's not something
you see everyday at the
library.



Left: Jessica Martin is
getting a few pointers on
ball walking, trying to figure
out if it really is as difficult
as it looks. Here's a hint, it
isn't easy!


big


top


June 27, 2012


Frostproof News Page 5






~Page 6 Frostproof NewsJune 27, 2012


OBITUARIES


Brinda Newby Arredondo


Brinda Newby Arredondo, 59, of
Frostproof passed away June 25, 2012,
at Hope Hospice in Sebring.
She was born Aug. 20, 1952, in Rhea
County, Tenn. to the late Jesse Doyle
& Johnnie Ruth Newby; she came to
the area from Tennessee as a teenager.
She was a manager/waitress at the 27
Truck Stop and a member of the Family
Life Church in Frostproof. She was a
loving wife and mother; and enjoyed
family times, crafts and collecting
knick-knacks.
Brinda was preceded in death by her.
sister, Helen Newby and three brothers,
Bobby Newby, Jimmy Newby and Rev.
Jerry Solomon. Survivors include her
husband of 34 years, Julian Arredondo;
one daughter, Sandra Arredondo of
Frostproof; two sons, Michael Newby
of Frostproof and Anastacio "Jesse"
Arredondo (Ginny) of Cache, Okla,.;
two sisters, Judy Maynor of Lake Wales


and Darlene Patterson of Cleveland,
Tenn.; three brothers, Charles Newby of
Lake Wales, Donald Solomon of Dallas,
Texas and Elmer Solomon of Oakdale,
Tenn.; six grandchildren, D'Andra,
Felix, Briana, Kristen, Dustin and Alicia;
one great-grandchild and many nieces
and nephews.
Visitation is from 6-8 p.m. Thursday,
June 28, 2012, at the Marion Nelson
Funeral Home in Frostproof.
Funeral service is 11 a.m. Friday, June
29, 2012, at the First United Methodist
Church in Frostproof with Rev. Kelly
Galati officiating.
Interment will follow at the Silver Hill
Cemetery.
Condolences may be sent to the fam-
ily and the webcast of the service can
be viewed at www.marionnelson
funeralhome.com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


Kathy Weimer Lola 'Aunt Bea'
KathyWeimer of LakeWales passed t d y
away Sunday, June 24, 2012 at the Lake teedley
Wales Medical Center. She was 56.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home, Lake Lola 'Aunt Bea" Steedley of LaBelle
Wales is handling arrangements. passed away Monday, June 25, 2012 at the
Oakbrook of LaBelle Nursing Home. She
was 94. Marion Nelson Funeral Home in
Frostproof is handling the arrangements.


GUTIERREZ
FROM PAGE 4

routinely increase insured property
values on renewal policies, in order to
obtain higher premiums, but they do
not want more new business.
This limited availability of property
insurance is not just for those who have
chosen to live in "harm's way" as some
describe it. It is a problem that faces all
of Florida and other states with similar
windstorm exposure.
State officials in Florida, by them-
selves, are not capable of solving this
problem any more than they are able
to provide insurance protection against


flooding. There are no easy answers
to this problem but among proposals
that have been mentioned in the past
are those that would allow the wind
and flood coverage to be on the same
policy. This allows private carriers to be
reimbursed for the processing of these
policies but eliminates the duplication
of administrative and claims handling
expenses.
Now, during hurricane season while
all politicians are campaigning we have
an opportunity to let our voices be
heard and let them know this is a criti-
cal problem for us in Florida that needs
to be addressed.

Louis Gutierrez
Lake Wales


1110 Druid Circle, Lake Wales
. ."- (. .icros ftro itie emergencyy Entrance of the hosp
*1'" : "* '0 ^ ^ -.i:ll "'! i .,1.

Monday-Thrsagy 9AM'-SiPM. Friday 9AM-12Pf
S-' ..'warbamngeruom


Medical Care for Adults
& Children
SOfftice Skin Surgery
School & Work Physicals
Medicare and Insurance
Accepted
ital) Affordable Fees for
Uninsured
Convenient Later
M Appointments
Home Visits


Irv "m ftam


FRISBIE
FROM PAGE 4

ROTC summer camp with a contingent
of Puerto Rican college students, and
having been a member of a National
Guard unit whose mess section was
primarily Hispanic) and I can do this
without taking God's name in vain.
Having established, at least by my
own declaration, my fluency in the
linguistics of cussin', I feel qualified to
declare the appropriate parameters for
the same.

Another of my more memorable
Guard moments was when a subor-
dinate who didn't like the way I had
handled a situation chewed me up one
side and down the other the last day
of summer camp. Yeah, sometimes
subordinates do that, and I understood
how angry he was.
But he made the mistake of cursing
with about every third word.
Finally I interrupted him and said,
"Joe (not his real name), I know how
mad you are, and I will listen to what
you have to say. But stop taking God's
name in vain.
"I do not appreciate it, and I doubt
that He does."
This man who had so much to say
only moments before was suddenly at a
loss for words.

Four 13-year-olds who taunted (bul-
lied, in the lexicon of the day) a school
bus aide a few days ago had the mis-
fortune of having their reprehensible
behavior captured on a cell phone. It
achieved viral status on the Internet.
Viewer response resulted in dona-
tions to the woman that exceed
$640,000 at this writing, and are still
rising. It is nice to see the public come


to the support of a woman in her 60s
who did not deserve this kind of verbal
abuse.
But performers on NBC's Today
show worked themselves into a frenzy
trying to outdo each other in their
condemnation.
The normally unflappable Matt Lauer
labeled them "monsters."
A panel of three commentators
debated their proper punishment. The
first said that their images should not
have been blurred in the telecast. The
next said that their names should be
broadcast along with their faces. The
next recommendation was that ad-
dresses be added to the identification,
presumably to facilitate Zimmerman-
style threats to their entire families.
Then came the declaration that their
parents should be sent to prison (I am
not making this up) to atone for their
offspring' misbehavior.
OK, I think an entire summer spent
on restrictions, perhaps including some
form of involuntary servitude, such as
picking up trash in the neighborhood
for three months, might have sufficed.
But that is a judgment call.
It was when one of the self-appointed
experts took God's name in vain to give
emphasis to his declaration that the
three of them had not yet proposed
a punishment cruel enough to fit the
crime that I had to ask myself, "What
is the standard of conduct reasonably
expected from an adult broadcaster on
a morning talk show?"
And my next question was, "Where is
Bobby Howell when you need him?"

(S. L. Frisbie is retired, both from
the Guard and from journalism. He
remembers General Bobby Howell as a
keen judge of talent and potential; he
promoted S. L. to the rank of lieutenant
colonel, and found a job for him which
put him in line for colonel.)


SPOLK
STATE
COLLEGE





E^44we~r ^.


,Page 6 Frostproof News


June 27, 2012






June 27, 2012 Frostproof News Page 7


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June 27, 2012


-


Alg.'






Page 8 Frostproof News June 27, 2012


Wet weekend:


's damage


Grateful they weren't hurt, Manuel and Rocio
Vera and their daughter Pamela Diaz look at
the oak tree that fell on their house Sunday
evening. Rocio Vera was sitting in the room
where it hit.
PHOTO BY PEGGY KEHOE


..~


PHOTO B'I JOHrN McMULLEN
A tarp covers what's left of the roof of a home in Winter Haven damaged by the tornado
that swept through Polk County Sunday evening.


~-*-


PHOTO BY JOHN McMULLEN


Storm damage in a parking lot with debris from the roof of a house partially hidden
behind the trees in Winter Haven.


PHOTO BY JOHN McMULLEN
The side parking lot of a church on Cypress Gardens Boulevard on the curve before Lego-
land shows quite a mess left over from the storms Sunday evening.


~v-1


A tent frame lies toppled
on it's side after the
winds that blew through
the area Sunday night.
PHOTO BY JOHN
McMULLEN


PHOTO BY JOHN McMULLEN


A home just escaped damage after the top of an oak tree fell on the driveway during
Sunday night's storm.


Page 8 Frostproof News


June 27, 2012


LF


i. A


'-' 44-"..







June 27, 2012 Frostproof News Page 9


WRATH
FROM PAGE 1

Town was pronounced dead at the
scene. Her child was transported by
ambulance to Florida Hospital Lake
Placid and then to a Tampa trauma
center..
Town was making her home with
three children. The other two girls
were visiting a relative in Okeechobee
and were not at home when the storm
struck. Town moved to Venus about a
year ago from Okeechobee.
There were several tornado re-
ports Sunday in southern Highlands
County, starting shortly after noon
and continuing until shortly after
5p.m.
Highlands. County Emergency
Management Director Scott Canaday
said that because much. of southern
Highlands County is farm and ranch
land, some tornado damage is still
being discovered.
The National Weather Service in
Ruskin recorded four confirmed
tornadoes hitting the county, but con-
cedes that number is probably low.
Fortunately, no injuries were
reported in the Lake Placid tornado.
Police Chief Phil Williams said of-
ficers conducted a house-to-house
search in the heavily damaged areas
and everybody was accounted for
unharmed.
Polk County Emergency
Management Director Pete McNally
said Monday that a tornado might
have touched down Sunday night
north of Haines City. McNally added
that a twister that hit near Legoland
in Winter Haven was the "more
damaging". of the two storms.
Debby, which has produced much-
needed rain for the state but also
deadly tornados, has proven to be


difficult to forecast.
"We don't know what it is going to
do," McNally said. "We're going day
by day."
John McMullen, a graphic designer
with Sun Coast Media group, lives on
Lincoln Road in Winter Haven, just
across from Lake Dexter.
"The high clouds were going to
the northeast, the lower clouds were
going to the northwest. It was raining,
and that's when the rain stopped.
Then they started spinning counter-
clockwise, and it started raining really
hard. And it is almost as if the lower
ones tilted up to the right that's
when the rain started going up along
with coming down, and that's when
you heard the roar, coming from the
Legoland direction," McMullen re-
called. "I had the girls run in and get
in a closet while I stayed and watched
for a moment longer, but the wind
kept getting stronger and swirling
more so I went in. No sooner was I in
the house, it was over. We went back
out and it was a light rain and hardly
any wind. We had no damage except
a couple small branches in the back
yard. Several houses in the neighbor-
hood lost trees though."
Seven tornadoes have been con-
firmed across the state as of Tuesday
morning, according to the National
Weather Service.
The tornadoes, ranging between 75
to 120 mph, spiraled through Citrus,
Hardee, Highlands, Polk and Pinellas
counties Sunday afternoon and eve-
ning. Experts will be looking to other
.areas that may have also been hit by a
tornado. Weather service emergency
response meteorologist Michael
Gittinger said some damage in South
Tamps may be related to a tornado.
"We're.kind of expecting there may
be some other ones," Gittinger said.
"There is some more digging that
we're going to have to do. For now,


JOURNAL PHOTO BY MAT DELANEY
This lakefront home was the first to face the fury Sunday when a tornado spawned from a water-
spout on Lake June-In-Winter. The roof was ripped from the second floor and the entire structure


was twisted on its foundation.

we've got seven."
To the northwest, in Bartow,
Manuel Vera heard a loud noise
Sunday evening at 6 p.m. during the
storm. He stepped outside to see
what it was and saw a large oak falling
toward his house.
The noise of the tree breaking was
"terrible," he said, and loud, draw-
ing their neighbors out in the rain to
check on the family.
The tree top covered about half of
the house at the corner of Wallace
Avenue and Clower Street in Bartow,
but fortunately no one was hurt.
Vera's wife, Rocio, was sitting in the
room that took the brunt of the tree,
their daughter, Pamela Diaz, said.
Her cat, Chilis, had been watching
the day-long storm activity from a
window.
The tree didn't break into the center
of the roof, but damaged the edges
enough to let rain in.
Vera said the city sent a crew out


and they disconnected the electricity
to the house. Wires had been pulled
down by the tree.
"Thank God nobody was hurt," Vera
said. "We are lucky we are still alive.
The rest can be replaced."
-A second storm fatality happened
in Winter Haven, where wet roads
are believed to be a cause of a deadly
crash.
Around 6:40 p.m. on Sunday a gray
1994 Honda Accord being driven
southbound on Lake Shipp Drive near
the intersection with Ridge Avenue by
23-year-old Enrique Martinez Salgado
of 635 South Rifle Range Road lot
1 in Wahneta, hit a wet spot on the
road and Salgado lost control of the
vehicle. He had in his car with him
21-year-old Maria Isabel Barajas, of
the same address. She was sitting in
the front passenger seat.
The Honda rotated

WRATH |15


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spawned from Tropical Storm Debby Sunday evening.
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June 27, 2012


Frostproof News Page 9






Page 10 Frostproof News June 27, 2012


Amy Gravina and Dr. W. Bernard
Lester were elected to the to the board
of directors of Ben Hill Griffin Inc. at its
annual meeting May 29.
Gravina is
the founder of
Gravina, Smith,
Matte & Arnold
Marketing and
Public Relations
firm based in Fort .
Myers. She is an
accredited public
relations profes-
sional with awards
for public relation
programs includ-
ing the Florida Amy Gravina
Public Relations
Association All
Florida Golden Image Award. She is a
former member of the board of direc-
tors of Alico Inc. and is a member of the
University of Florida Public Relations
Advisory Council, the Florida Gulf Bank
board of directors and the Florida Gulf
Coast University Resort and Hospitality
management advisory board. In 2012
she was named by Gulfshore Business
magazine as one of Southwest Florida's
40 most influential people of the past
decade.
Gravina received her bachelor's
degree in public relations and master's
degree in mass communications from


the University of Florida.
Lester is an agri-business profes-
sional who received his bachelor of
science in agriculture and master of
science in agricul-
ture economics
at the University
of Florida and his ,
Ph.D. in agricul-
ture economics -'
at Texas A&M
University. :
Lester has held
several agri-busi-
ness leadership
positions includ-
ing.at the USDA, Dr. W. Bernard Lester
agriculture econo-
mist, executive
director of the Florida Department of
Citrus and CEO, president and member
of the board of directors of Alico Inc.
Additionally, he was active with vari-
ous associations, boards and councils
including the Gulf Citrus Growers
Association, Orange-Co Inc. board of
directors, Florida Gulf Coast University
board of.trustees and the University
of Florida Leadership Program for
Agriculture and Natural Resources.
In 2012, Lester was inducted in '
the Florida Citrus Hall of Fame and
has received numerous awards and
recognition for his industry, civic and
educational endeavors.


... ..


SAVE LIVES. GIVE BLOOD.
......- ...
o. ,' ') '-
- O' -:'- -' -, Q .^ J .. O *


Lester, Gravina appointed

to Ben Hill Griffin board


There are ongoing road projects to the
west and north this week
Avenue M N.W in Inwood in Mulberry
will be closed from 37th Street Northwest,
which is a quarter-mile west of 42nd
Street; 36th Street Northwest will be closed
until Friday, July 6, to replace two existing
storm pipes.
This week, during the day, the contrac-
tor will continue performing miscel-
laneous activities throughout the project
corridor on Old Bartow/Eagle Lake Road.
With the weather permitting, these
activities are anticipated for approximately
two weeks.
On Van Fleet Drive, work on new travel
lanes, turn lanes, sidewalks and drainage
will continue behind barrier walls along
northbound U.S. Highway 98 from Van
Fleet to south of Manor Drive, and along


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westbound Van Fleet from Walmart Drive
to U.S. 98.
With the Fort Fraser Trail entrance
off westbound Van Fleet closed due to
construction, people can access the trail
from the Wilson Avenue entrance.
Access to businesses in the work zone
is being maintained and motorists are
advised to use caution and watch for
workers, DOT reports.
For information, visit www.IdriveUS98.
cornm.
On State Road 60 at the Pollard Road
Extension east of Bartow the contractor
will be adding left and right turn lanes into
a new access road.
Intermittent lane closures are expected
between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. as crews work
on the roadway this week. The project is
expected to be complete by the end of July.


Road work to the west, north


Page 10 Frostproof News


June 27, 2012









not alsa e.smM.tic issue.













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SVaricose veins, which are enlarged veins in the
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June 27, 2012


Frostproof News Page 11









Governor shifts stance on illegal worker crackdown


By BRENT KALLESTAD
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov. Rick
Scott is backing away from his cam-
paign promises to pass new laws that
would crack down on illegal workers.
The first-term Republican governor
said last week that it's up to the federal
government to develop some kind of
work visa program a notably dif-
ferent position from his early days in
office in 2011, when he called for a
state E-Verify program.
"We've got to have a national E-verify
program because I don't want to put
Florida business at a disadvantage,"
Scott said following an appearance at a
Tallahassee Rotary Club meeting. "We
need to make sure we have a work visa
program that doesn't put Florida busi-
nesses at a disadvantage."
Scott's shift comes as presumptive
Republican presidential nominee Mitt
Romney has struggled with the immi-
gration issue. Romney is counting on a
win in Florida, a major swing state with
a large immigrant population.
Scott signed an executive order
on his first day as governor ordering
state agencies to use E-Verify to de-
termine if current or prospective em-
ployees are legal. It was also Scott's
top priority in the 2011 legislative
session, but Florida's Republican-led


AP PHOTO /TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT / BILL COTTEREL
Gov. Rick Scott talks with Capitol reporters last week in Tallahassee after a luncheon speech. The
Republican governor, who promised in 2012 to bring an Arizona-style immigration law to Florida,
retreated form that position and said the federal government-should develop a "work visa program"
for undocumented immigrants. The GOP-controlled Florida Legislature has failed to pass tough
immigration verification requirements during Scott's two legislative sessions as governor.


Legislature balked at passing immi-
gration laws favored by the governor
that some described as tougher than


those in Arizona.
The governor signed executive
orders less than an hour after taking


the oath of office on Jan. 4, 2011 that
would crack down on the hiring of
illegal immigrants and require the
governor's agencies to use the federal
government's E-Verify system to check
all existing and prospective state and
contract employees.
But the Republican-led Florida
Legislature adjourned four months
later without an agreement on the
tough measures sought by the governor
and Attorney General Pam Bondi, who
both campaigned on tougher immigra-
tion laws. Florida tourism officials
and Agriculture Commissioner Adam
Putnam, also a Republican, cautioned
that such measures could damage
those industries.
Sen. JD Alexander, a Lake Wales
Republican and the Senate budget
chairman, argued that there are many
problems with E-Verify and that it is
costly for employers.
"The Florida Senate stands up for
hard-working folks and doesn't do the
politically expedient thing, but does the
right thing," said Alexander, a central
Florida citrus grower who employs
hundreds of migrant farmworkers.
Hundreds of immigrants and their
supporters also flooded the Legislature
for several weeks of the 2012 session
to oppose the immigration measures
sought by Scott, including'some from
the Frostproof and Fort Meade area.


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June 27, 2012


Frostproof News Page 13


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F Tff i i II1 ll M a 1' iM iTiifM11 I T7-lli ]=


I


I





By BILL ROGERS
BROGERS @LAKEWALESNEWS.COM

Eric Hinshaw recalled what his
mother, Vita Hinshaw, said when
asked what she wanted to be put on
her tombstone. She replied: "It was a
pleasure."
That statement epitomized her life,
Eric Hinshaw said, Tuesday.
"Mom was somebody who enjoyed
life," he said. "She enjoyed every
morsel of life and was just a joyful
person."
Hinshaw, 89, passed away June
16 in her daughter's home at Chalet
Suzanne Restaurant and Country Inn,
surrounded by her family who had
been singing, sharing stories, and
finally, anointing her head with oil, as
mentioned in her favorite Psalm 23,
according to information provided by
the family.
A public Celebration of Life will
took place on Friday, June 22 at
9 a.m. on the grounds of Chalet
Suzanne in Lake Wales. Interment
was at the Hinshaw Family's Memory
Garden at Chalet Suzanne.
Vita was born in Omaha, Neb., in
1922 then moved to Hollywood, Fla.,
with her parents.
Lake Wales was their destination
in 1928. Parents Thomas and Claire
Petersen founded Petersen Industries,
where Vita worked as a young girl
sewing mattresses, tarpaulins, pick-
ing bags, and tents. Vita attended the
public schools in Lake Wales, then
business college. She loved words,
classic books and. poetry.
When asked, "What books other
than the Bible were most influential
on your life?" Vita replied, "The
dictionary because there is always
something new to learn, and a
biography of Aaron Burr because it
showed me that there is another side
to every story."
A bright student, Vita skipped two
grades and graduated from Lake
Wales High School in 1939 at age 16.
Her father died suddenly the week
before Pearl Harbor was bombed


PHOTO PROVIDED
Vita Hinshaw will be missed by all, as her
legacy lives on through her children at Chalet
Suzanne.
in 1941. Soon the patriotic young
woman enlisted in the Navy WAVES
(Women Accepted for Volunteer
Emergency Service), where she
remained throughout World War II.
Vita returned to Lake Wales after
she got married. She and Carl lived in
a tiny guest room at Chalet Suzanne.
She hostessed, waited on tables,
drove the boat for Carl's breath-
taking water ski shows.
Vita was the second generation
owner of Chalet Suzanne for many
years. She spearheaded the effort to
put Chalet Suzanne on the National


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Register of Historic Places, not
just as a building, but as a historic
district. She founded the popular
Ceramic Salon. She worked to get
Chalet Suzanne's Moon Soup into the
Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum.
She established the Wedding and
Autograph Garden, where the tiles
guests signed are placed on the
circular garden wall and many wed-
dings are performed. She inaugurated
Kay's Pathway, named for a friend,
allowing easy dining room access for
handicapped guests.
During a special meal for food
editors from all over the country,
Vita created the world famous menu
item, Broiled Grapefruit with Grilled
Chicken Liver Canap6. It was born
out of necessity because the chicken
livers didn't get done in time to be
served at the planned time. Vita
wanted to make sure the guests
enjoyed them, so she placed one
on each broiled grapefruit as it was
served.
In 2002, Vita was recognized as the
Lake Wales Pioneer of the Year. To
celebrate her 80th birthday that year,
Robert Tolf, the restaurant editor of
Florida Trend, highlighted her many
accomplishments in a four-page
article. She has been featured on
many local and national television
programs.
Her "quiet grace and elegance
deeply touched all who met her,
giving her not only business acquain-
tances, but deep friendships with her
guests and fellow workers," said her
daughter Tina Farewell. "She was a


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woman of deep, but quiet Christian
faith, a woman of great curiosity who
loved to work, and was filled with
grace, joy, adventure, and hospital-
ity whether to kings, princes, and
potentates, or to dishwashers and
servers in training. Many recall her
tremendous encouragement to them,
especially in their young.adult years."
Mrs. Hinshaw is survived by daugh-
ter Christina (Tina) H. Farewell and
her husband Bob, their five children
and four grandchildren, as well as her
son Eric Hinshaw and his wife Denise
(Dee), their three children, and one
grandchild, of Lake Wales.
She was preceded in death by her
mother and father, Thomas and
Claire Bulwan Petersen, her brother
John E. Petersen, son Carl E Hinshaw
III, daughter Heidi Claire Hinshaw,
several babies born into heaven,
and her husband of 50 years, Carl E
Hinshaw, Jr.
Johnson Funeral Home is in charge
of arrangements.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to Dunklin Memorial Camp,
where a Christian approach to
alcohol and drug addiction produces
effective and enduring results, www.
Dunklin.org, 3342 S.W. Hosanna
Lane, Okeechobee, Fla. 34974, or to
Lake Wales Care Center, a faith based
community service organization
which demonstrates Christ's love
by building bridges between people
in need and people with a desire to
serve, www.LakeWalesCareCenter.
org, 140 E. Park Ave., Lake Wales, FL
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Page 14 Frostproof News


Hinshaw recalled as 'just a joyful person'


Owner of Ridge's iconic Chalet Suzanne


June 27, 2012


VV II IIL 'Io. ,' -)1 : L






June 27, 2012 Frostproof News Page 15


PHOTO BY JOHN MCMULLEN
The entrance to Osprey Estates in Southeast Winter Haven is a mess, littered with downed limbs
after a tornado Sunday evening.


WRATH
FROM PAGE 9
counter-clockwise, crossed the center
line, and struck a white 2000 Saturn
being driven northbound on Lake
Shipp Drive by 39-year-old Christina
Dowdey of 2407 Avenue C NW in
Winter Haven, police said. A silver
2012 Toyota also heading down
Lake Shipp Drive, being driven by -
21-year-old Christina Guarino of 122
E. Hampton Drive in Auburndale,
was unable to stop in time to avoid
the two cars that had already col-
lided, and struck the Saturn, reports
indicate.
Maria Barajas suffered severe
injuries during the crash and died
en route to the hospital. The remain-
ing drivers and passengers were all
transported to Winter Haven Hospital
where they were either treated and
released or were in good condition as
of Monday morning.:


Lake Shipp Drive was closed in both
directions for approximately four
hours. Impairment does not appear to
be a factor. The crash appears to have
occurred due to standing water on
the roadway, from the severe storm,
police added.
PCSO had a mobile command
station set up in the Gold's Gym park-
ing lot, located at Cypress Gardens
Boulevard and Cypress Gardens Road
in Winter Haven, throughout Sunday
evening.
Parts of northern Florida could
get 10 to 15 inches of rain, and some
spots as much as 25 inches, as the
storm wrings itself out, forecasters
said.
"The widespread flooding is the big-
gest concern," said Florida Emergency
Operations Center spokeswoman Julie
Roberts.
"It's a concern that Debby is going
to be around for the next couple of
days, and while it sits there, it's going
to continue to drop rain. The longer it
sits, the more rain we get."


AP PHOTO/ FLORIDA TIMES UNION / KELLY JORDAN
A message referring to rainfall from a tropical storm system is displayed at the San Jose Baptist
Church on Monday, in Jacksonville.


I StUR EYU NT RU I T


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Frostproof News 1




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Frostproof News Page 15


June 27, 2012





Page 16 Frostproof News June 27, 2012


Four games, four wins


sends


Frostproof to


states


Joshua Long makes this attempt to score but comes up a little short thanks in large part to the Fort
Meade catcher. No matter, the Bulldogs defeated the Miners twice in the tournament last week.


tried for a double play.







-- --,
,: ', . -


Corey Leech makes an underhand flip to Triston
DeVane after field a ground ball as the pair
tried for a double play.


. .



Triston DeVane uses two hands, which is good
fundamental baseball, as he tags out this
DeSoto runner.


PHOTOS BY NEAL BYRD
Frostproof's Corey Leech waits for this throw, but it came just a touch too late, as this Fort Meade
player slides safely underneath the possible tag.




Frostproof's Stephen Kinard ,
takes off for first base after ..-
putting down this bunt. A.L


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June 27, 2012


A,77


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June 27, 2012 Frostproof News Page 17


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Frostproof News Page 17







Pag 1-Q rstrof-NwsJue-2, 01


Florida's Natural adds 14th stockholder member


Florida's Natural Growers Board of
Directors voted last week to add a 14th
stockholder member to the Cooperative
member base.
. Southern Gardens Groves Corporation
of Clewiston, Florida, an industry leader
in agricultural products and a premier
Florida grower organization, was ap-
proved as a stockholder member. The
commitment of Southern Gardens to the
cooperative prepares Florida's Natural
Growers for future Brand growth of its
Not-From-Concentrate flagship Brand,
Florida's Natural, company officials
indicated.
"The addition of our 14th stockholder
member, Southern Gardens Groves
Corporation, will help secure a supply
of fruit to further grow our Not-From-
Concentrate business and provide Florida
oranges for our never imported Florida's


Natural," said Cooperative CEO Steve
Caruso. "Florida's Natural is experiencing
significant brand growth with record
market share increases, distribution and
consumer loyalty."
The past three years have been record
years for Florida's Natural Growers' in
terms of fruit returns and growth to its
members' equity despite the challenging
economic environment, he added
"Southern Gardens, a leading grower
and processor of premium quality orange
juice and citrus by-products, believes
that becoming a grower member of the
Florida's Natural Growers Cooperative
provides a great opportunity to enhance
its presence and growth in the Florida cit-
rus industry," stated Rick Kress, President
of Southern Gardens.
Kress said that this partnership will op-
erate in conjunction with other initiatives


recently completed and/or in progress
to ensure Southern Garden's long term
presence in the Florida citrus industry.
"Florida's Natural is a leading national
Brand of citrus products and including a
portion of Southern Gardens' fruit port-
folio in this partnership will strengthen
and grow both companies now and in the
future," he added.
Florida's Natural Growers is comprised
of fourteen grower organizations repre-
senting almost 1,000 individual growers
who own nearly 60,000 acres of citrus in
Florida. Florida's Natural Growers oper-
ates its processing plant in Lake Wales
with a juice packaging plant in Umatilla,
Florida. The Lake Wales facility employs
670 employees in Lake Wales and 101
in Umatilla, Florida and can extract
over nine million pounds of fruit every
twenty-four hours in peak season. Brands


produced in Lake Wales include Florida's
Natural, Florida's Natural Growers Pride,
Donald Duck, and Bluebird.
Southern Gardens owns and/or man-
ages 16,500 net acres of citrus groves in
Southern Hendry County. These groves,
one of the largest under single ownership
in the country, contain 1.8 million trees
which will provide high quality fruit to
Florida's Natural Growers Cooperative
and the Southern Gardens Citrus
Processing Plant.
SGC also owns an enclosed, state-of-
the-art citrus nursery in Gilchrist County,
west of Gainesville, providing disease-free
trees to replant grove acreage lost to citrus
canker and greening. Southern Gardens
long has been recognized as an industry
leader in efficiency, vertical integration,
modern grove management and citrus
research, Florida's Natural officials added.


June 27, 2012


Page 18 Frostproof News






June 27, 2012 Frostproof News Page 19


Lake Placid grower

to lead Citrus Mutual


Highlands county businessman Mark
Wheeler has been elected president of
Florida Citrus Mutual, the state's largest
citrus grower organization representing
nearly 8,000 grower members. Wheeler
succeeds Victor Story Jr. who will re-
main on Mutual's executive committee.
"Over the past two years Vic Story has
done a tremendous job as president
of Mutual," said Michael W. Sparks,
executive VP/CEO of Florida Citrus
Mutual. "Mark (Wheeler) has a tough
act to follow but I know he is up for the
challenge and I look forward to working
with him."
Wheeler, Chief Financial Officer of
Wheeler Farms Inc. in Lake Placid, is
a third generation citrus grower and a
fifth generation Florida agricultural-
ist. He sits on the board of directors
of Wheeler Brothers Inc., a harvesting
company, and his president of Boston
Mining Inc., a citrus and real estate
investment firm. He is also on the Ag
First/Farm Credit board of directors. He
makes his home in Bradenton.
Wheeler has a Bachelor of Science
degree in Finance from Troy University
in Alabama.
"I'm proud to serve on the Board of
Florida Citrus Mutual and humbled to
be elected president," Wheeler said. "I'll
do my best to maintain the bar set by
Vic Story."
Mutual's vice-presidents for the 2012-
2013 season are: Bo Bentley of Winter
Haven, representing the western area;
Kevin Bynum, of Vero Beach, represent-
ing the eastern area; Larry Black of
Fort Meade representing the northern
area; and Steve Johnson of Wauchula


representing the southern area. Steve
Sorrells of Arcadia was re-elected as sec-
retary and Dennis Broadaway of Haines
City was re-elected as treasurer.
The elections took place at the 64th
annual meeting of Florida Citrus
Mutual which was held June 14 at the
Florida Citrus Industry annual confer-
ence in Bonita Springs.
Florida Citrus Mutual also officially
installed its 21-member board of direc-
tors at the annual meeting. Each direc-
tor serves a one-year term, with a term
limit of two years for the president.
The Florida citrus industry creates
a $9 billion annual economic impact,
employing nearly 76,000 people, and
covering more than 550,000 acres.
Florida Citrus Mutual was founded in
1948.
For more information, visit www.
flcitrusmutual.com.






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SThe LakeWales News, '-

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beginning Friday, July 13th
Spirit Lake Nursery
5123 Spirit Lake Road, Winter Haven, FL 33880 (863) 299-1819
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Frostproof News Page 19


June 27, 2012


.CRAPE MYRTLE


.SALE







Page 20 Frostproof News June 27, 2012


The Salvation Army


is always ready.


Can respond to need within an hour


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT
As Florida's hurricane season is
upon us, agencies like The Salvation
Army are geared up, stockpiling ma-
terials and reviewing plans to rapidly
respond anywhere in Polk County if
and when a disaster strikes.
The Salvation Army, who's head-
quarters are in north Lakeland, is
historically, if not first, one of the
first agencies to respond with meals,
supplies, hygiene kits and other
necessities for people who may have
been rendered homeless or helpless
after a disaster, said Debbie Bickford,
one the Army's emergency operations
team members.
"We can respond anywhere in the
county within an hour," she explained
recently. "We work closely with the
Emergency Operations Center to
determine where we go and then we
just go. We can have a team out there
as soon as we're told it is safe."
Just going usually means the deploy-
ment of the Salvation Army's mobile can-
teen which is fully equipped to dispense
hot meals, water and ice, she said.
"We're fortunate," she says," be-
cause we have two full commercial
kitchens in Lakeland and we keep
them adequately stocked to feed the
homeless and hungry on a regular
basis. We can also call from anywhere
in the state or country if we have to."
She adds the kitchens and all-
important ice-makers can be fueled
via generators that are on site.
"We're geared up all the time. It's
part of our mission, to be there when
people need us," she said.
Bickford explained the SA has about
35 staff members in Polk County, all
of which would be activated should a
storm or other disaster strike here or
nearby.
"We also have dozens of volunteers
on call who have gone through our
training program so they know how to


react with us in times of crisis.".
Bickford also said additional staff
and supplies could be drawn from
larger Salvation Army central ware-
houses in neighboring Tampa and
Orlando.
"In addition to our own stores in
Tampa or Orlando, we have those
to draw on. We can have our supply
chain in operation within 30 min-
utes if we need to. We also keep our
vehicles gassed up and ready to go as
soon as we get the information from
the Emergency Operations Center.
We also keep our phones and radios
charged so we always have good com-
munications between our staff and
the EOC. Communication is the key,
both coming in and going out," she
explains.
"We alert our people when we get
the word from the EOC and then
follow the plans we've developed over
the years."
Those plans, she added, are up-
dated annually and constantly under
review.
"We remind our volunteers of the
process and routinely discuss our
plans among the staff."
Bickford also explained that the
Salvation Army has several staff mem-
bers assigned when the Emergency
Operations Center is activated so
there is no delay in deployment.
"We're always ready," she said.
She also said the Army is prepared
to assist in emergency response long
term if required.
"If the need is great enough," she
said, "We can call on people and sup-
plies from anywhere in the country.
But, we want to take care of the
immediate needs and then, through
a triage system, determine where we
may be needed long-term."
"As long as we are needed and can
be of help to our neighbors," she
said, "We'll be there with whatever is
needed. That is the Salvation Army's
mission: to be there to help."


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National Guard has 9,000 there for you
By CATHY PALMER said. "Those guardsmen would be at
CORRESPONDENT home taking care of their families and
their regular jobs," he explained. "We
With its roots dating back as far as St. would probably call on units from other
Augustine's first settlements, the Florida parts of the state to step in. Regardless,
National Guard has always been there. we would have guardsmen there within a
And, with hurricane season upon us, few hours after we're called in."
they are still there and, according to their Like most other agencies, the National
spokesman, are always ready. Guard has been participating in simu-
Should Central Florida be faced with a lated hurricane scenarios. This year's
hurricane during this storm season, the exercise, Kielbasa explained, simulated a
Florida National Guard has some 9,000 storm coming ashore in the Tampa area,
"weekend warriors" ready to join forces "So we know exactly what and where we
with local agencies to "protect life and would be deployed should we be needed
property, preserve the peace, maintain in Central Florida."
order and ensure public safety," said He said the Guard would assist in such
Guard spokesman Sgt. Thomas Kielbasa. areas as search and rescue, maintaining
But, just because a storm may be the relief supplies transportation system,
barreling down on Central Florida, that helping distribute water and ice, and
doesn't mean the Guard is automatically providing security and communications
headed here, Kielbasa says. They have to assistance to local agencies."
be invited to the party. He said that in 2004, the Guard assisted
Some members of the Guard may be in getting supplies into storm ravaged
automatically put on alert if the state and areas, set up a command and communi-
local emergency operations centers are cations center and helped distribute ice,
activated, and in many areas, guardsmen water and food to stricken areas.
may be sent to monitor the storm from "We also have the capability to trans-
the local EOC, Kielbasa explained. port supplies to and from an impacted
"We may have someone in the EOC area," he said.
locally" he said. "It depends on the Kielbasa said the Guard has state-of-
individual situation." the-art communications systems that al-
He was not sure whether anyone low it to interact with both local agencies
would be stationed at the Polk EOC, but and the military.
said, "the Guard will be closely monitor- "Communication is vital in times of
ing any storm just like any other emer- emergency and we have the capability
agency response agency would." of talking with both civilian and military
Kielbasa said the Guard would respond authorities.
to a request from the state EOC in "We're self-contained," he said. "So
Tallahassee which in turn; would respond we can go anywhere and do just about
to a request from the local EOC. He said anything that is needed. We're a fluid and
the Guard "will have boots on the ground flexible force so we can fill the gaps that
within a few hours after an order was local agencies may not be able to."
issued," he said. Kielbasa also said that the Guard was
While there are National Guard units called upon in Hurricane Ike in 2005 and
in Bartow, Lake Wales, Winter Haven, flew supplies by helicopter to Key West
Haines City and Lakeland, those units and provided support to hard-hit areas
would "probably not be called up," he in 2004.


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Frostproof News Page 21









Law agencies hooked with each other for emergency situations


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT

With hurricane season upon us as
Debby so ably reminded everyone this
week we can all rest a little easier
knowing that local law enforcement
agencies, like most other city and
county services, are ready to protect
and serve us before, during and after a
storm.
Agencies like the Polk County
Sheriff's Office, the Bartow and Lake
Wales police departments have their
emergency plans in place and have
practiced gearing up should the county
face serious storms this season.
The Polk Sheriff's Department, which
serves both Frostproof and Fort Meade,
has an "all hands on deck" mode.
should it appear Polk will be impacted
by a storm, according to emergency'
operations coordinator Lt. Alan Cloud.
Even though the PCSO has of-
fices scattered throughout the county,
including substations in Frostproof
and Fort Meade, it also has a mobile
command center than can and will be
dispatched to whatever area appears
most in need, .Cloud explains.
"We've got the command center
and other mobile equipment that is
self-sustaining and doesn't even need
electricity to operate," he says, show-
ing off the command center which is a
revamped semi seized in a drug raid.
He adds that all the equipment is
repeatedly tested for several months
before the storm season officially
starts to make sure it is ready for
deployment.
"We've been testing everything for
weeks," he said "and tweaking anything
that needs it."
The SO also has 600 deputies that
will all be placed on stand-by once an
EOC bulletin indicates a storm is ex-
pected to impact the county. "Everyone
is called back from vacation or off-
duty," he says. "So we'll be ready."
The SO even gets its paperwork
ready.
"We even go through filling out
mock FEMA (Federal Emergency
Management Administration) :forms for
reimbursement to make sure we don't
find ourselves lagging behind when
we are eligible for emergency response
funds after an event," he said.


All three agencies said they had
improved their individual and joint
communications systems since the '04
storms.
"We're all on the same communica-
tions system now," Herschel said, "that
makes a world of difference. We can
call each other without any problems
and better coordinate what we've got
to do."
The municipalities have all their ,
department vehicles gassed up and
ready once put on alert, both Schulze
and Herschel said. Cloud echoed that
all deputy cars were readied, as well as
the command center and other op-
erational vehicles, some of which may
give the SO a leg up in preparedness.
Cloud said the SO could be com-
pletely self-contained since it had not
only the command center vehicles, but
also has a cook trailer and a mobile
bunk house. He said the command
center, cook trailer and bunk house
had all been deployed to Mississippi to
assist there when that area was devas-
tated by Hurricane Katrina.
"We took over the entire law enforce-
ment for the whole county around
Waveland, Mississippi ,for about 30 to
40 days," he says. "It might not be the
best, but we can function we could
feed ourselves, bathe and have a place
to sleep," he explained. He added that
the bunk trailer could sleep 14 and,
by using two shifts, could sleep a total
of 28 in a 24-hour period. "We know
it works and we know how to make it
work best."
He also said preparing the vehicles
for use, he also had to secure those
that would not be in immediate use.
"We have to take our aircraft out of
the storm's path," he explained. "We
can't have a helicopter in-a hangar with
big doors in 100-mile-an-hour winds,"
he said, "so we'll take them as far as we
have to protect them, then bring them
back as soon as the storm passes to
assist in recovery efforts."
All three departments coordinate
closely with the EOC, the spokesmen
said, praising EOC efforts to maintain
open discussion of plans, deployment
and contingencies. :
"It's been real good working with the
EOC," says Cloud," Prior to '04, we didn't
have the relationships we all have now.
That makes the world of difference."


The Lake Wales Police Department,
according to Assistant Chief Troy
Schulze, learned valuable lessons in
2004 when the east Polk community
took the brunt of that season's unprec-
edented series of storms that sashayed
across the county.
"We learned a lot during that sea-
son," Schulze said. "We've got new gen-
erators to keep our communications
up and running, and we're coordinat-
ing more closely with other agencies
and the EOC (Emergency Operations
Center)."
Schulze said the city revamped its
emergency operations plans after the
2004 season and will immediately alert
all of its 43 officers and civilian support
staff to brace for an impending storm
and be ready to respond as soon as it
is safe for vehicles to be on the road to
keep order, police shelters and re-
institute routine patrols.
Schulze's efforts are virtually du-
plicated by Bartow's police, says Maj.
Dennis Herschel.
"We also learned a lot after '04," he
said. "The city removed the old water
tower that created a hazard for the
police department building, and now it


will be our 'safe haven' and center for
operations."
Bartow's 41 officers, 21 civilians and
four part-time officers are expected to
muster at the department headquar-
ters as soon as a storm is imminent,
Herschel said.
"Then, we'll be ready to hit the
streets to keep things in order."
His patrols, like their Lake Wales
counterparts, also will resume patrols
and assist in keeping roads open for
emergency operations like fire and
ambulance, as well as street clearing
crews.
"We'll also be available at shelters
and to assist the sheriff's department
or neighboring communities if they
need us and we can spare our people."
Both city departments plan to divvy
up their forces into 12 hour shifts to
keep maximum manpower available in
a storm's aftermath.
"We feel like we're all better prepared
for anything that comes," Herschel
says. "We have all developed a much
better rapport," Schulze says.
"And we're all as ready as we can be,"
Cloud added. "We just hope we don't
have to put our plans to the test."


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Page 22 Frostproof News


June 27, 2012


v










'This is where it all comes together'

Emergency Operations Center has the latest to keep officials, residents knowing


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT

There's a state-of-the-art $5 million
reinforced nearly windowless building
next door to the sheriff's department
headquarters offWinter Lake Road chock
full of high-tech everything that is clearly
one man's domain.
It's the Polk County Emergency
Operations Center and it's honcho is
Emergency Management Director Pete
McNally. Opened in 2010, the block
building houses the latest in communica-
tions, education and visual displays that
will make sure McNally and dozens of
Polk officials are informed of fluid situa-
tions should the county be assailed by a
disaster, from a deadly crash that closes
Interstate 4 for hours and hours, wildfires
that run amok, flooding of low lying areas
or a a major hurricane.
McNally oversaw the construction and
installation of high-tech equipment in the
above-ground bunker that will be called
into play should a storm threaten Polk
County this hurricane season.
For now, it's used for constant train-
ing and planning meetings that will be
unfolded if a disaster threatens or strikes.
With the pride of a new homeowner,
McNally shows off his building, point-
ing out the massive visual screens, the
complex video controls and the clearly
marked assigned seating for those who
would man the EOC in times of crisis.
"This is where it all comes together,"
McNally explains.
The soft-spoken Emergency
Management Director leads a tour with
the confidence of an architect, which in
effect he is the architect of the safety of
Polk County's thousands of residents.
OK, he's not physically responsible
for the safety of thousands, but in es-
sence, the buck stops with him. He's the
designated 'incident commander' who
will coordinate the efforts of dozens of
agencies who respond in times of disaster,
including fire, rescue, police and utilities
and citizen safety.
"I see that strategies and policies dictat-
ed by the Board of County Commissioners
and County Manager are implemented
and coordinated," he explains.
McNally's the one who decides when
the EOC is opened, usually about 72
hours before a hurricane or major storm
is expected to impact Polk County, he
explains.
"Then, it all starts to fall into place," he
said, adding there are stations in the main
incident room,for every Polk municipal
government, law enforcement agency,
relief agencies, state agencies and just
about anybody else who will be called
into play should the county expect to be


impacted by a hurricane.
"All the agency representatives report to
the EOC and we start implementing the
plans each one has already prepared," he
said. "Every city, agency and organization
has their own individual plans and we just
try to make sure they all merge into one
cohesive response effort."
That's not an easy task, he says, but
through his efforts and those of the
agencies, "communication is great now."
He explains that having a central location
from which directions can be monitored
and implemented, changes can be imme-
diately made that will make response and
recovery "much easier and much better."
"It's much easier to just look across the
table to the Red Cross or Salvation Army
and say we need your people to go here,
than it is to try to find someone. The same
goes for anyone involved in emergencies,
whether they are a government agency or
a private one," he adds.
"Since we've been meeting regularly
and discussing possible scenarios, we've
developed relationships and rapports that
we could not have were we not all in the
same room," he said;
Each station in the main incident
monitoring room has its own communi-
cations terminal and phone, so directions
can be immediate and simultaneous, he
explains. There also is a press room so an
instant feed can be relayed to the media
for dissemination to the general public.
Besides the new EOC building, the
county also has implemented a $7 million
radio/communications system that
links all emergency responders, includ-
ing police, fire, ambulance and rescue
personnel, McNally explains. But it also al-
lows coordination with utilities to identify
outages, help direct clean-up efforts and
maintain and open shelters.
McNally says the new communication
system provides coverage of 97 percent
of the county, which is "wonderful," he
said, adding "there are only a few places
where communications may be spotty,
but with only minor relocations our
police or emergency crews can regain
communications."
He said the construction of a communi-
cations tower in the Poinciana area would
close that 3 percent gap. "We're working
on getting that done as soon as possible,"
he said.
McNally's not only charged with
keeping his fingers on what's going on
in Polk County, he's also the 'go-to guy'
for the state EOC. He explains he reports
directly to the state EOC as situations
progress and coordinates any state or
federal responses as needed. He's the
one who lets the state know if additional
state resources or the National Guard is
needed and coordinates with the Federal


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Emergency Management Director Pete McNally discusses hurricane preparedness.


Emergency Management Administration
for post disaster recovery operations.
It's also up to McNally to make the call
if nearby neighboring counties' help is
needed. He cites the massive crash that
closed Interstate 4.
"We knew early on that we were going
to have almost all our fire vehicles and
ambulances tied up on the Interstate, so
we asked Hillsborough and Orange coun-
ties to send an ambulance to the county
line should we need them to answer a
call for us," he said. "That's the kind of
cooperation I'm talking about."


With all the preparations in place to
handle a disaster, McNally still main-
tains its up to Polk residents to prepare
themselves.
"It's up to us to beat the drum for
people to get themselves ready for a
disaster," he said. "We have all our plans in
place, now they should too. They should
know where the nearest shelter is, where
they can evacuate to and what supplies
they need to have on hand. It doesn't mat-
ter how prepared we are, if people don't
take this seriously, our best efforts may
not be enough."


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Frostproof News Page 23





Page 24 Frostproof News June 27, 2012


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Page 24 Frostproof News


June 27, 2012












FEELING i



Leapfrog rates hospital safety


Davenport, Bartow facilities


get


highest Polk


grades


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM

In terms of safety the hospitals in
Davenport and Bartow rank as the two
best in Pelk County.
A survey conducted by a panel of
safety experts from Harvard, Johns
Hopkins for the Leapfrog Group
showed the Heart of Florida Regional
Medical Center in Davenport rated
an A in safety, the Bartow Regional
Medical Center rated a B and the Lake
Wales Medical Center, Winter Haven
Hospital, Lakeland Regional Medical
Center all rated Cs.
"We set but a year ago to try to
establish the hospital with the best
safety score and there are a lot of
ranging factors and a lot of hospitals,"
said Erica Newman, a program man-
ager with Leapfrog said. "There was
nothing that addressed patient safety
that consumers understand. The best
hospitals in the country could have
the best surgeons, but if the hospital
doesn't take care and get infections
from happening then the surgery could
be in vain and patients could leave in
worst shape when they got there."
Leapfrog used a nine-member Blue
Ribbon Expert Panel and uses 26
measures of publicly available hos-
pital safety data to produce a single
score representing a hospital's overall
capacity to keep patients safe from
infections, injuries, and medical and
medication errors.
So the consumer question may re-
main that what the letter scores mean.
Newman said the ratings are not to be
taken as is but it should have consum-
ers ask questions.
"The message is not to avoid a C hos-
pital," Newman said. "It's very important
for all patients to know they will be.
The best hospitals make mistakes and
patients should remain engaged."
She added: I hope the consumers use
the scores and talk to hospital adminis-
trators," she said.
She said the rating system is in-
tended to start conversations to get
hospitals to make improvements.


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOV
Bartow Regional Medical Center was recently given a B grade in a Hospital Safety Score by the
Leapfrog Group.


*/

THELEAPFROGGROUP

In focusing on patient care and
choices, Lake Wales Medical Center
has that in mind.
"Our hospital values transparency
and consumer knowledge about the
quality of care provided for patients,"
said Maryemma Batchelder, the
director of marketing for LWMC said.
"The Leapfrog Group is one of several
organizations that provide online
data measures about hospitals and we
believe it should be viewed as another
source of information."
Batchelder said when choosing a
hospital, the medical center encourag-
es consumers to consider of a variety
of actors and speak with their doctor
about their care plan and research
safety and quality information for
their state.
She said the hospital has what is


HOSPITAL
SSAFETY

/ SCORE"
called a "daily huddle" every day with
staff and managers to discuss patient
safety and potential issues.
"It's a communication tool to
heighten awareness and active safety
surveillance. We also are actively work-
ing on identifying our Serious Safety
Even rate with the aim of reducing our
rate of Serious Safety Events."
In the thought that hospitals under
the same ownership group may rate
higher in this survey because of the
ability to share resources and have
more options more easily, Newman
said that isn't necessarily true.
"In evaluating the scores there is no
consistency across with a system where
they scored," Newman said. "In that
case it does make sense that there is


Bartow Regional Medical Center, B
Bayfront Medical Center, St. Petersburg, B
Florida Celebration Health, B
Flonda Hospital Heartland Medical Center, Sebnng, A
Heart of Florida Regional Medical Center, Davenport, A
Lakeland Regional Medical Center, C
Lake Wales Medical Center, C -
South Florida Baptist Hospital, Plant City, B
Tampa General, C
Winter Haven Hospital, C
For more on the survey, see http://hospital
safetyscore.org.
some score consistency with a system,
but it doesn't necessarily mean they're
safer because they are in a system."
At Banow Regional Medical Center,
which is owned by HLMA, its score
rated higher than most Polk County
hospitals and two sister hospitals, one
in Davenport and one in Sebring rated
As. Brenda Sponsler, the CNO at Bartow
attributes.its Process for Perfection
program for its high safety rating.
"The program includes continuing
education for all associates and physi-
cians, the implementation of best
demonstrated practices, the imple-
mentation of evidence based protocols
for quality indicators, monthly opera-
tional reviews, and the assignment of
authority, accountability and respon-
sibility for improvement for all quality
indicators."
The president and CEO at Florida
Hospital in Sebring said his staff
focuses on safety and quality at the
hospital on its own.
"Our staff members are a dedicated
group of healthcare professionals,
joined together by a shared set of
values that are committed to deliver
consistently high standards of quality,
patient safety, and patient satisfac-
tion," Tim Cook said.
Leapfrog is an organization that has
existed since 1998 and the survey was
created two years ago to rate perfor-
mance in the nation on national stan-
dards of safety, quality and efficiency
that are most relevant to consumers
and purchasers or care. More than
1,200 hospitals in the country partici-
pated in the survey, Leapfrog said.


VA to have mental health clinic in Tampa


The Department of Veterans Affairs
has selected University Corporate Park of
Palm Beach Gardens to build a new men-
tal health clinic for veterans in Tampa.
"This new facility will ensure that
Florida's veterans continue to have
access to high-quality medical care that
they've earned through their service to
our nation," said Secretary of Veterans
Affairs Eric K. Shinseki.
The facility will be at 10770 N. 46th St.


in Building E.
The project, which will create 13
construction jobs, will be completed
next summer.
The contract calls for a 22,300-square-
foot, one-story building, with 154 parking
spaces. VA will pay an annual rent of nearly
$600,000 under the 10-year contract.
Mental health services are now pro-
vided at another leased facility adjacent
to the James A. Haley VA Hospital.


The clinic, which will be located five
miles from the Haley VA facility, will
provide services for nearly 148,000
veterans in Hernando, Hillsborough,
Pasco and Polk counties.
VA has many entry points to care
through the use of Vet Centers, the
Veterans Crisis Line, and integration of
mental health services in the primary
care setting. Since 2007, VA has seen
a 35 percent increase-in the number


of veterans receiving mental health
services, and a 41 percent increase in
mental health staff.
In April, Shinseki announced VA
would add approximately 1,600 mental
health clinicians to include nurses,
psychiatrists, psychologists, and social
workers as well as nearly 300 support
staff to its existing workforce of 20,590
mental health staff as part of an ongo-
ing review of mental health operations.


Winter Haven
Hospital
BOSTICK HEART CENTER
AN AFFILIATE OF TrH UNIVERSITY Of FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND HANDS HEALrfHCARE


Nationally recognized heart care is right here.


That's the Bostick advantage.
s. 'q


Frostproof News Page 25


June 27, 2012








Hospital foundation funds 2nd

nursing faculty position at PSC


PHOTO PROVIDED
Celebrity servers and the Foundation team. The Celebrity Dinner raised more than $9,000 for the
pediatric unit at Florida Hospital.

Florida Hospital Foundation


dinner raises $9,000


With the help of local celebrities,
hungry patrons andYanni's Prime
Choice Restaurant, the Florida Hospital
Heartland Medical Center Foundation
Celebrity Dinner raised more than
$9,000 in an effort to update and
expand pediatric services.
Florida Hospital in Sebring has part-
nered with the Walt Disney Pavilion at
Florida Hospital for Children in Orlando
"to offer the best and most comprehen-
sive care," a spokesman said.
Local notables served an enthusiastic
crowd of more than 260 guests, a new
record for this.benefit's third year.
Some of the waiters for the affair
were Jon and Sharon Beck, First Baptist
Church of Avon Park; Dr. Raisa Camilo,
Sun 'n Lake Medical Group; Bill Benton,
Clifton Larson Allen; Kim Heintz,
Highlands Independent Bank; Bill and


Lisa Jarrett, Bill Jarrett Ford; Andrew
Katsanis, Grace Bible Church of Sebring;
Drs. Carmelita and Abe Lim, Carmelita
Lim, MD and Associates; Jean Lund,
Tom and Chad Lund Insurance; Peggy
Smith, Florida Hospital Foundation
board member; Cliff and Suzette
Rhoades, Clifford R. Rhoades, PA, and
Happy Owl & Le Attique; John and Jan
Shoop, Highlands Independent Bank
and Sebring International Raceway;
Dr. Norm and Laurie Stephens, South
Florida Community College; Robin
Scheck, SunTrust Bank; and Tim Cook,
Florida Hospital CEO and president.
Through the efforts of Celebrity Dinner
and an 18-month Foundation campaign
to raise more than $200,000, Florida
Hospital will offer an updated pediatric
unit and expanded services to families in
Highlands and Hardee counties.


The Winter Haven Hospital
Foundation pledged $400,000 to
Polk State College the second such
substantial contribution in two years
to create a new faculty position in
nursing.
This contribution by the Winter
Haven Hospital Foundation will
underwrite a new position at PSC that
will play a significant role in admin-,
istering the college's new Bachelor
of Science in Nursing program. The
position will assist with professional
activities at Winter Haven Hospital
that will benefit patients and staff as
well as students.
"The Foundation has elected to
make this investment for multiple
reasons. First, we foresee the need
both in training future nurses for our
community and in expanding op-
portunities for students who would
like to pursue careers in nursing at
Winter Haven Hospital," said Eric
Adamson, chairman of the Winter
Haven Hospital Foundation Board of
Trustees. "Secondly, we've seen results
by partnering with Polk State College."
Lance Anastasio, president and
CEO of Winter Haven Hospital, said:
'"As many people know, Winter Haven
Hospital's commitment to the nurs-
ing profession is exemplified by our
achievement of the 'Magnet status'
designation awarded by the American
Nurses Credentialing Center. On
a long-term basis, we believe this
partnership and Magnet status will
encourage the best and brightest
students in Polk County to pursue
careers in nursing and other related
healthcare professions at Winter
Haven Hospital."
Polk State conducted a national *


search to find a candidate to fill the
new position, said Eileen Holden,
president of PSC. She noted that
through the Winter Haven Hospital
Foundation's continued investment
in Polk State College, the college has
been able to commit long-term fund-
ing to the position filled by Professor
Mimi Jenko.
"The Winter Haven Hospital
Foundation's partnership with Polk
State will accelerate the training of
nurses in our region, and it represents
the gold standard of public-private"
partnerships," Holden said. "As our
region grows, so too do our needs
for highly trained nurses to carry out
the mission of serving patients in our
community. That the Winter Haven
Hospital Foundation has chosen to
continue to invest in the training and
career development of new nurses
speaks to the benefit of having a locally
owned, locally controlled, not-for-profit
healthcare institution like Winter Haven
Hospital in our community."
Winter Haven Hospital Foundation
executive Joel Thomas said the foun-
dation'sBoard of Trustees is.dedicated
to working with regional philanthropic
leaders interested in advancing excel-
lence in health care for the Central
Florida community.
"Few things are more rewarding
than to make a long-term investment
in the place where you work and
live and to see that investment reap
dividends," Thomas said. "This newest
funding brings the Winter Haven
Hospital Foundation's total support for
the Polk State College nursing program
to more than $800,000. We believe our
community and our organization will
reap benefits for years to come."


Bayfront drops Aetna contract


By ELIZABETH BEHRMAN
TAMPA BAY TImEs
Bayfront Health System will no longer
accept Aetna insurance in most cases.
The two sides could not agree to
higher rates during recent contract
negotiations, though they did not rule
out a future contract.
Aetna, which insures 300,000
members across Tampa Bay, pays the
hospital at least 30 percent less than
other health insurers, said Bayfront
7" chief financial officer Bob Thornton.
"We were really asking Aetna to6
bring us up to fair market rates, and we
weren't able to get there with them over
several weeks of negotiation," he said.
The contract officially expired Friday.
Bayfront, which includes Bayfront
Medical Center, will continue to accept
Aetna for trauma patients and those
with out-of-network benefits.
"Anybody in the community that
needs emergency medical care can
come to Bayfront," Thornton said. "We
are not turning anybody away."

Lakeland Regional Cancer Center
awarded oncology

Lakeland Regional Cancer Center
was awarded a full, three-year re-
accreditation by the American College
of Radiation Oncology for physics,
administration and medical review in
Radiation Oncology.
The accreditation is the result of
intensive review by a team of board
certified radiation oncologists, radiation
physicists, and onsite reviews of Lakeland
Regional Cancer Center on March 30 and
April 4. In addition to the onsite review,
ACRO's team of experts reviewed a
random sampling of LRCC's charts.
LRCC provides the latest radiation
therapies to aggressively treat cancer,
including:


Thornton said Bayfront and Aetna are
also working with patients who need
ongoing care and have pre-scheduled
treatments to make sure they are not
affected by the change.
Many other area hospitals still accept
Aetna, including St. Petersburg General
Hospital, Tampa General Hospital, St.
Anthony's Hospital and Morton Plant
Hospital.
Aetna spokesman Walter Cherniak
said the health insurer has had a con-
tract with Bayfront for at least 12 years.
Health care costs are constantly on the
rise, he said, and Aetna could not increase
payments as Bayfront had requested
without raising customer rates. Cherniak
said Aetna did propose a multiyear
contract in which the payments would
increase each year but was still unable to
reach an agreement with Bayfront.
"We would certainly like them to be
in our network, but we also have an
obligation to our customers to keep a
hand on rising health care costs as best
we can," Cherniak said. "We were not
able to reach common ground."

SIntensity Modulated Radiation
Therapy which delivers high doses of
radiation directly to cancer cells in a
very targeted and conformal way.
Image Guided Radiation Therapy
which is pretreatment imaging that
helps deliver radiation therapy more
precisely to tumors that shift as a
result of organ motion and involuntary
movement.
Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation
which is a tumor site-specific breast
cancer treatment delivering radiation
from inside the breast directly to the area
where cancer is most likely to recur.
Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS)
which delivers a highly precise con-
centrated dose of radiation directly to
tumor tissue utilizing sophisticated im-
aging and three dimensional mapping.


Sta rt t


The Wellness Team at Medi-Weightloss
Clinics can help-you win the weight loss
battle, providing:

* One-on-one support and motivation
* Fitness advice-
" Recipes, shopping lists, and guidance
for dining out:'
" Tips to overcome temptations






YOUR INITIAL
CONSULTATION


,: ,.. .. : .


S, .. . .


6'


Page 26 Frostproof News


lune 27,2012


. i


. wmmwm









High potassium often indicates poor kidney function


DEAR DR. DONOHUE: Will you write
something about high blood potassium
level? I received a call from my doctor
regarding a high potassium reading
from recent routine blood work. I am a
relatively healthy, 72-year-old woman.
I have gastroesophageal reflux disease.
I take hydrochlorothiazide for high
blood pressure.
The doctor said he would do another
potassium check in a month. I have
had one banana a day but have now
substituted strawberries, and will elimi-
nate potatoes from my diet. J.A.
ANSWER: Potassium has many func-
tions. It facilitates nerve transmission
of information. It keeps the heart beat-
ing at a normal tempo. It's important
in producing muscle contractions. It
maintains body electrical neutrality.
A rise in blood potassium most often
is due to a malfunction of the kidneys,
one of-whose jobs is to maintain a
normal level of that mineral. Rarely
does potassium rise from potassium-
rich foods if the kidneys are function-
ing normally. Your blood pressure
pill hydrochlorothiazide ought to be
lowering your potassium.
False potassium elevations are


sometimes responsible for a high
reading. Repeated clenching and
unclenching of the fist to make veins
more accessible to the lab tech drawing
blood can falsely elevate potassium. A
high blood count of both red and white
blood cells is another reason for a spu-
ridus rise of potassium. One of these
explanations might fit your high read-
ing. Medicines called beta blockers,
ACE inhibitors and ARBS all blood
pressure medicines can elevate the
potassium level. Dehydration, diabetes
and a low output of hormones from the
adrenal gland are other causes.
You have no symptoms. I wonder
about the validity of your lab test.


A second test will settle the issue. If
you're worried about this, call the
doctor and ask for a repeat test sooner.
High blood potassium can bring about
abnormal heartbeats.
The booklet on sodium, potassium
chloride and bicarbonate explain the
functions of these body chemicals and
how low or high readings are corrected.
To obtain a copy, write: Dr. Donohue -
No. 202, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475. Enclose a check or money order
(no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the
recipient's printed name and address.
Please allow four weeks for delivery.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: Three years ago
I had a cardiac defibrillator implanted. At
the time, it never occurred to me that this
might present a problem at airline check-
ins. I don't travel very much.
Now I have to take a trip to the West
Coast. I live on the East Coast. Is it safe
for me and my defibrillator to pass
through the metal detectors? C.P.
ANSWER: You can safely pass through
the airport screening detectors. Tell
the security personnel that you have
an implanted defibrillator. They may
choose to give you a hand search rather
than put you through the detector.


To play it really safe, call the office of
the doctor who implanted the defibril-
lator for confirmation.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: Years ago,
first-aid kits included smelling salts for
reviving people who may have fainted.
Also, they were obtainable over-the-
counter at drugstores. I cannot find
them anymore. What happened? J.B.
ANSWER: Smelling salts release am-
monia gas. It's an irritant that stimu-
lates breathing and wakens a bit more
quickly someone who has fainted. I
guess smelling salts are not considered
to be important. People naturally revive
quickly from a faint. I found many sites
on the Internet that provide smelling
salts. I also found drugstore advertise-
ments for them. CVS Pharmacy pro-
vides smelling salts.

Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable
to answer individual letters, but he will
incorporate them in his column when-
ever possible. Readers may write him
or request an order form of available
health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Readers may
also order health newsletters from www.
rbmamall.com.


Study: Number of diaper changing dads increases


The emergence of the modern
father the fellow who is actively
engaged and involved in the lives of his
children dates back to at least the
1960s. Indeed, it's now quite the norm
and expectation for dads to have full,
healthy, deep relationships with their
sons and daughters.
Changing diapers, though, takes
time.
In a new paper published in online
journal History and Policy, research-
ers at the University of Warwick in the
United Kingdom say that as recently
1982, almost half of fathers said they
had never changed a diaper.
The number has dropped signifi-
cantly. A 2000 study reported that 97
percent of fathers surveyed said they'd
changed a diaper. Less clear was
whether they had changed a second.

Body of knowledge
A recent National Institutes of Health
project to identify the more than
10,000 microbial species found in and
on humans estimates that nonnative,
resident organisms bacteria, viruses,
fungi, molds and more comprise up
to six pounds of person's weight.

Get me that. Stat!
iicording to a Center for Disease
Control study in 2010, cost savings in
states with universal motorcycle helmet
laws were nearly four times greater
(per registered motorcycle) than in
states without these comprehensive
laws. Annual costs saved from helmet
use, in terms of medical, productivity
and other costs, ranged from a high of
$394 million in California, which has a
universal helmet law, to a low of $2.6
million in New Mexico, which has a
partial law, or a law requiring that only
certain riders wear helmets.

Life. in big macs
One hour of water skiing burns 408
calories (based on a 150-pound person)
or the equivalent of 0.6 Big Macs.

Counts
Weighted statistical average


WELL NEWS
Scott LaFee



percentage of a nation's population
that has access to essential drugs:
63.5. The high is 95 percent, shared by
most'developed countries. The low is 0
percent, found in Third World countries
such as Ghana and Tajikistan.
Source: World Health Organization

Stories for the waiting room
A recent, longitudinal meta-analysis
by Carnegie-Mellon University re-
searchers of stress levels among
Americans (based on similar surveys
taken'in 1983, 2006 and 2009) shows
that neither stress levels-haven't
changed much, nor the demographics
of the people who feel it most. They
are typically women, people with lower
incomes and less education.
The results also showed that
American adults feel less stress as they
age and that retirement is generally not
viewed as an adverse event.

Phobia of the week
Anthophobia fear of flowers

Never say diet
The Major League Eating speed-eat-
ing record for roast beef sliders is 37.5
in eight minutes, held by Bob Shoudt.

Best medicine
First guy: Hey, man, what's wrong?
You look a little green around the gills.
Second guy: I accidentally swallowed
some food coloring yesterday. Had to
go to the ER.
First guy: What'd the doc say?
Second guy: He said I'd be fine, but
frankly, I feel like I've dyed a little
inside.

Observation
"We never repent of having eaten too
little."
Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)


SSt^J* S MONEY
^^^.^^i I~^^H


Epitaphs The formula represents Boltzmann's
explanation for entropy of a system
"S = k log W" (how energy dissipates and changes).
Etched on the Vienna tombstone When his peers rejected the formula,
of Ludwig Boltzman (1844-1906). Boltzmann committed suicide.
Boltzmann was an Austrian physicist To find out more about Scott LaFee
who made fundamental contributions and read features by other Creators
to statistical thermodynamics and Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit
mechanics. He was an early proponent the Creators Syndicate website at www.
of the controversial atomic theory, creators.com.


June 27, 2012


orptsorF of News Page 27





Page 28 Frostproof News June 27, 2012


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Page 28 Frostproof News


June 27, 2012