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The Frostproof news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00562
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Creation Date: February 29, 2012
Publication Date: 05/2/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00562
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text


Visit us on the Internet at www.FrostproofNews.com


The Wedesday
e 'May 2,2012



Frostproof News

Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years 7


Volume 92 Number 17


USPS NO 211-260


Frostproof, -i4 Corunrty Florida 33843


Copvii'gt jhi'i: Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.


Relay chair heeds personal call


Fundraising event this Friday, Saturday downtown


By JAMES COULTER
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
When Alice Thornton was taken to the hospital
four years ago for a twisted knee, her grandson Chuck
remembers, she did not expect to be diagnosed with
cancer.
Then again, few people ever expect it, despite how
many families it always seems to touch.
The doctors performed several tests, suspecting
that more may have been wrong with her, and discov-
ered she had lung cancer and 10 brain lesions.
Her condition was likely due to her being a heavy
smoker and having been reluctant to visit the doctor,
her grandson claimed.
She was expected to live six weeks. She died two
weeks later on Oct. 13, 2008, at just 70 years of age.
That experience would be one of the motivating fac-
tors behind this weekend's Frostproof Relay For Life,
and nationwide American Cancer Society program
which raises millions of dollars to help-combat the
dread disease.
Her death would prompt her grandson to join the
Frostproof Relay For Life committee, where he serves
as event chair.
"You hear about cancer throughnit 3rnlri-i- .... --
once you experienced a loved one go through it first-
hand, you get a different perspective on it," he said.
The Frostpoof Relay For Life will be held Friday,
at the Frostproof Play Park on West Wall Street. The
event will start at 6 p.m. and end on noon the next
day.


". - ,. .. I- ---.s .
.... -, -a : -_' o '. .a.- . *,
The purple shirts represents survivors, many who took a lap at last year's Frostproof relay'.


The Relay For Life is an annual fundraiser held by
the American Cancer Society to honor cancer pa-
tients, survivors, and victims, and to raise money for
cancer research and awareness.


Teams will camp out in the park raising money
through food, games, and other activities while their
RELAY110


Citizen Bank and Trust Frostproof branch manager Chuck
Thornton, left, is the chairman of this year's event. Also on
hand from the American Cancer Society to help coordinate the
local relay is Caellan Curtis.


Griffin buys 4K acres from Alico


Alico, Inc. a land management company, an-
nounced last week the cash sale of two parcels of
land totaling 4,020 acres near Frostproof.
The sales price of the two properties is approxi-
mately $10.1 million and will result in a pre-tax gain
of approximately $9.2 million to be recorded in the
third quarter of fiscal 2012, Alico indicated.
The purchasers of the parcels of land are Ben Hill
Griffin III, the brother-in-law of John R. Alexander,
Alico's Chairman of the Board, and Ben Hill Griffin
Inc.. According to Alico, because the transactions were
between related parties they were referred to and ap-
proved by the company's audit committee, which is
comprised entirely of independent directors.
Both parcels were considered to be surplus to
Alico's agricultural operations, according to a com-
pany press release.
The first parcel is located and totals 3,635 acres.
The purchase price is approximately $9.1 million or
$2,500 per acre. Alico recorded a deposit for the par-
cel of $200,000. The sales contract was entered into


on April 13 with Ben Hill Griffin III and will close
no later than June 12 with the deed and possession
delivered on said date. The second parcel of land
is totals 385 acres. The purchase price is approxi-
mately $1 million or $2,750 per acre. Alico recorded
a deposit for the parcel of $50,000. The sales contract
was entered into on April 16 with Ben Hill Griffin Inc.
and will close no later than June 12 with deed and
possession delivered on said date.
Alico, headquartered in Fort Myers, is a land man-
agement company operating in Central and South-
west Florida. Alico owns approximately 139,600 acres
of land located in Collier, Glades, Hendry, Lee and
Polk counties,
The larger tract of land is north of Avon Park Cutoff
Road, west of U.S. Highway 27, and is part of prop-
erty first owned by Griffin's father more than 50 years
ago when he bought Alico in 1960. It is pastureland,
and according to published reports, won't likely be
used for citrus much, if at all. The smaller parcel is at
the north and east end of Lake Reedy.


TODAY'S
CONTENTS




7 05252 100025 8


Editorial ..............Page 4A
Obituaries ...........Page 6A
Sports................Page 12A
County Report .... Page 1B
Feeling Fit........... Page 5B


Avon Park shuts
down Bulldogs in
finals





13A


50









Villa open house shows how it helps troubled youth


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT
More than 400 Polk County residents
joined staff and residents at Saturday's
41st anniversary celebration open
house at the Florida Sheriffs Ranches
Youth Villa for Girls on State Road 60
east of Bartow.
On hand were the villa's 40 residents,
26 staff members, Polk County Sher-
iff's deputies and state sheriffs Youth
Ranch officials. The Bartow facility is
one of four residential sites provided
through the sheriffs' program to curb
delinquency and develop good citizens.
Forty girls currently live in four cot-
tages. A fifth cottage is under develop-
ment, according to officials.
One of the highlights of the open
house was a tearful recounting of one
resident's experience at the Bartow
facility. Fifteen-year-old Kaila C. told
the audience the villa had given her
stability in her life, offered a family
atmosphere and gave her "a home."
After two years at Bartow's villa, Kaila
returned to her real family in Live Oak
and found herself again "acting out and


getting into trouble."
She and her father, Chris C., recon-
tacted the villa staff who welcomed her
back.
"This place and the people here are
'saving' me," she said. Her father said
the villa "is giving her the stability and
more than I could give her. I just want
what's best for her and this place is
helping her get that."
Kaila added that she plans to remain
at the villa "as long as I can and hope I
can qualify for one of the scholarships
they offer here."
The residential programs "help each
child develop a sense of responsibility
through work, study, pray and play,"
explains Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches
President Roger Bouchard.
The recent open house was to say
"thank you" to area supporters and
introduce others to the Youth Villa pro-
grams, he added.
"We're very thankful for all the com-
munity support this facility receives
from Polk County," Bouchard added.
"This is a great place for these girls and
they seem to prosper here."
Showing its support, the Polk County


Sheriff's Office also offered some of its
services to those attending. On hand
were representatives of the PCSO crime
prevention unit, the armored rescue
vehicle, helicopter and members of the
K-9 unit. Also on display were a dozen
vintage and antique cars.
Sonny's Barbecue Restaurant of Bar-
tow catered the lunch.


PHOTOS BY AL PALMER


More than 400 area residents joined Youth
Villa residents and staff for lunch at an open
house Saturday, April 28.


Kaila C., 15, told her story Saturday to visitors
at the recent Florida Sheriffs Youth Villa open
house.


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Page 2A Frostproof News





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Frostproof News Page 3A


May 2, 2012





Gov. Rick Scott seemed to be finding
steadier political footing in recent months,
but he reverted to his old wobbling last
week when he went out of his way to annoy
a special group of Floridians.
The state's supervisors of elections re-
acted with testiness when the administra-
tion moved to release a survey presumably
indicating the efficiency of their offices.
A report in the Tampa Bay Times said
Scott had told the Secretary of State's Office
to request data from the Jan. 31 primary,
compile it and publish a scorecard.
Most all the state's 67 supervisors com-
plied with the initial request, but said they
hadn't been told the data would be made
public this way.
A handful didn't even bother to complete
it.
So when the results were leaked to the
Tampa Bay Times before the secretary of
state could post them online the super-
visors went ballistic.
They fired off a letter of protest. They held
a 90-minute conference call with the secre-
tary of state's staff.
The general reaction to the scorecard,
summed up by Pinellas County Elections


Our Viewpoint
Supervisor Deborah Clark, was, "It was
insane and unnecessary." (Clark's office, by
the way, received a relatively high ranking.)
Beyond the overheated hyperbole, it did
seem presumptuous for one independently
elected constitutional officer the gover-
nor-- to rate others. Scott, the former head
of a private hospital chain, may be drawn
to idea of accountability through numeric
measurements, but he has no actual au-
thority over these officers.
As some supervisors said, they might as
well rate the governor's office.
On the other hand, it is fair to argue the
data might highlight a persistent problem
if, say, a particular office had consistently
low marks.
That might serve the public interest.
This scorecard didn't really show much,
though. Like so many of these things, the
exercise just seemed sketchy.
Polk County Elections Supervisor Lori
Edward's office scores 6 out of a possible
seven, losing points for how the office
handled absentee ballots.
Only 13 other supervisors in the state


scored higher than Edwards' office. The
three lowest counties Brevard, Palm
Beach and Seminole scored minus-four
each. The reason?
They just didn't bother submitting their
assignments.
In fact, the overall marks were positive.
Some 371 items were "submitted early,"
presumably a good thing, and 103 were "on
time."
Only 37 were "submitted late." So, bottom
line, very favorable.
One big potential problem, though, is that
with an election looming a less-than-stellar
rating could always give supervisors' oppo-
nents a little ammunition. (Only a three?)
And that's Scott's real problem.
After supporting regressive voting legis-
lation opposed by election supervisors of
both parties throughout the state last year,
the administration made a ham-handed
attempt to hold them accountable. The
whole exercise accomplishes little, other
than further alienating largely nonpartisan
public officials.
Why? For a governor who seemed to be
gaining some political footing, this seemed
a bit wobbly again.


Letters to the editor


Foolish decisions

have real consequences


For a hundred years from the bottom
of the ocean the Titanic has sent the
silent message to any who will listen:
"Foolish decisions have consequences."
America is in first place for making
many self-destructive decisions. A hun-
dred years ago, we weren't doing it per-
fectly, but we didn't owe more money
than any nation, or have more broken
homes, or have more in prison.
We had a better understanding
of why "our Lord" is honored in our
Constitution, and why we place our
hand on the Bible in government and
in court.
The families had meals together. The
unity and harmony gave stability and
civility to the next generation.
A husband was to cherish, protect,
and provide for his wife and children.
The wife was recognized for whom she
is, an incredibly wonderful and beauti-
ful creation.
She had a lifetirie "wow" for her
husband. (Please see my daughter's
website at www.mannaformarriage.
com .) Ladies practiced modesty. (Their
clothing kept their physical secrets


for their husbands.) Historically, many
homes had a time for Bible reading,
singing, and praying. Family is the basic
building block of any nation.
America knew that happiness did
not come from a pill or a bottle (Pro-
hibition). (Today, substance abuse is
America's number one health problem.)
Babies were considered a blessing. The
minds of youth were filled with positive
character-building messages, not porn
and violence.
Whenever we think we are smarter
than our Creator, the results are heart-
ache and tragedy. "Repent" is a loving
message designed to avert catastrophe.
The navigators of the Titanic knew
they were in dangerous water, but they
refused to slow down or change course.
Why? They believed that their ship was
unsinkable! Ships, nations, and people
are sinkable.
The most foolish decision is that
which denies our Lord's wisdom for
today and His plan for eternity, which
is found in John 3:16.
Virgil Ullom
Babson Park


Where were Fort Meade leaders?


We had the privilege of attending the
Fort Meade Chamber of Commerce
Luncheon, held at the Fort Meade City
Park, on Wednesday, April 18, 2012.
The audio and visual presentation at
the luncheon was the culmination of
almost a year's worth of preparation
and planning by the Fort Meade Vision
Committee to beautify and enhance our
downtown area. The hard work by the
committee, consisting of Janet Wright,
Janice Thompson and Virginia Cragle,
was evident by their "Vision" of Fort
Meade in the near future.
The only thing missing in their
presentation was attendance by Fort
Meade City Commissioners. Their ap-


parent lack of interest in the message of
the Vision Committee speaks volumes
why the City of Fort Meade has become
stagnant and mired in the past.
With the coming of the Streamsong
Complex and the new bioenergy plant,
you should be able to expect that the
City Commissioners would stand
behind and support any and all efforts
by the citizens of Fort Meade and the
surrounding area to encourage growth
and pride in our city. It appears to many
of us that apathy and ignorance is the
strong suit of the Fort Meade City Com-
missioners.
Mary Murray and Sue Townsend
Fort Meade


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
* Aileen Hood General Manager Jeff Roslow Editor Brian Ackley Managing Editor


Published every Wednesday at
14 W. Wall Street, Frostproof, FL 33843
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Frostproof, Florida and
additional Entry Office
*Phone (863) 676-3467 'Fax (863) 678-1297
Postmaster: Send address changes to
140 E. Stuart Ave.,
Lake Wales, FL 33853-4198


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
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We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and Ipliii.j All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frostproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews.com or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
Wales Fl. 33853.


rr~s~s~ II.


May 2, 2012


Page 4A Frostproof News


VIEWPOINT



Polk is high on a less than meaningful list







May 2, 2012 Frostproof News Page 5A


The Inquiring Photographer



Are you in favor of moving the July 4 celebration


to Eagle Ridge Mall or keeping it at Lake Wailes?


I prefer the lake because I live there, Keep it at the lake. It's a safety issue, Eagle Ridge Mall. It will probably be
on Washington Avenue, and I can the fireworks landing in the lake. easier to enjoy the fireworks at the
watch the fireworks from my home. Also, kids can play at Lake Wailes. mall because of access.
Charlotte Whitty James Croff Brian McClintock
Lake Wales Babson Park Lake Wales


I think Eagle Ridge Mall would have
more space, have a lot more people.
Sandra Garcia
Lake Wales


When you nick a cop..


It was in the summer of 1959, nearly
53 years ago, that I joined the staff of
The Tallahassee Democrat as a police
reporter.
Mike Beaudoin, my city editor, told
me it would take a year to really build a
rapport with the officers, or as he put it,
"for them to trust.you."
He was correct. Five weekday morn-
ings and every Saturday evening I was a
fixture at the police station.
I could both spell and type better
than most of the officers, and on slow
Saturday nights, I sometimes typed
accident reports for them.
They were a good bunch of guys,
and in my three years on that job, I
befriended many of them.
Some even confided in me when they
needed a sympathetic ear to listen to
their marital or financial woes.
When a more experienced reporter
resigned, Malcolm Johnson, our execu-
tive editor, told me he was going to pro-
mote me from the police beat to county
government and courts coverage.
"Thanks, Mr. Johnson," I told him,
"but I don't consider leaving the police
beat to be a promotion."
"That's fine," he replied. "You can
keep the police beat plus your new
responsibilities." And I did.



Cops and reporters have several
things in common.
Our job is to observe and investigate
to determine what has happened, and
to report our findings, clearly and ac-
curately.
Most of us-are motivated by a desire
to see people individually and collec-
tively treated fairly, and to make our
community a little better place to live.
Some of us fall short of the mark, and
when that happens, it is the job of our
bosses to replace us before we do too
much damage.
We don't always get along, cops and
reporters, and that's okay. Our jobs call
for us to be right, as God gives us the


I


S.L. Frisbie




5.L. Frisbie can be contacted at
slfrisbie@polkcountydemocrat.com


power to discern what is right, not to be
popular.
But even when we disagree, we can
have mutual respect for each other and
each others' jobs. That usually is the
case.



For the past three months, I was en-
rolled in Bartow's Citizens Police Acade-
my, a once-a-week program that allows
laymen to get an up close look at police
work and the officers who perform it.
We learned a lot about the rules and
the stresses that they work under.
One of the highlights is the ride-
along, when enrollees get to ride with
an officer for several hours to watch
what they do and to become even better
acquainted with this unique job called
police officer.
Invariably we were impressed by
"our" officers and the way they perform
their jobs.
And several times the observation
was made that anybody who thinks the
city should contract with the sheriff's
department for law enforcement should
spend a few weeks learning what an
asset this community has in its police
department.
There is no substitute for seeing first
hand what you're talking about.



(S. L. Frisbie is retired. In writing about
violence directed at police officers over
the years, he has observed, "When you
nick a cop, we all bleed.")


It will be tough sledding, but the Florida
Legislature needs to continue trying to rein
in the unsustainable rise in public pensions
and benefits.
Fortunately, the state has done a good job
in recent years. Local governments, not so
much.
Pew Center on the States said in a 2007
study: "Florida is a national leader in saving
enough to cover its pension bill-but it
hasn't yet put any money aside for future
retiree health benefit costs."
Altogether, states are $1.26 trillion behind
the curve in paying for benefits, Pew said in
a 2011 update.
Democrat controlled states such as Cali-
fornia and Illinois are drowning in debt and
seeing businesses flee because of pension
obligations politicians have been unwilling
to address.
For a look at the growing problems
nationwide with public pensions, see
this: http://www.nationalreview.com/
articles/297094/public-employee-unions-
gone-wild-patrick-brennan Granting overly
generous public employee pay and benefits
is easy for politicians. They can promise the
moon, pick up a few votes for re-election,
and let future generations worry about the
cost.
Public employee unions know this and
exploit it to the max. If they can't get costly
benefits from local governments, they
are not shy about running to Tallahassee.


Lloyd Brown


Legislators often are happy to please them,
leaving it to the local officials to figure out
how to pay the cost.
The American Legislative Exchange
Council says state and local employee
benefits are 69 percent higher than those of
employees in the private sector.
Most private pension plans are defined
contribution, meaning the employee con-
tributes as much as he likes, up to a limit,
and usually the employers match a certain
amount. The pension depends on what the
investment earns.
Most government entities have defined
benefit plans, which promise employees a
certain percentage of their pay upon retire-
ment. If the state can't earn the money by
investing, it must pony up anyway, which
generally requires tax increases.
The Florida Retirement System began
BROWN 110


Local governments not

handling pensions very well


I I r I I


I


Frostproof News Page 5A


May 2, 2012






Pae6 rspofNw a ,21


Lt. Col. James
Ross Jeffrey,
Ret., 68, of Lynn
Haven, Fla., had ,
his final wish
honored on April
13, 2012, which -
was to peacefully
pass away in his
sleep at his home
with- his wife by
his side.
Ross was born Lt Col (Ret)
in Salem, Ohio, to James Ross iJffrey
Betty Louise Feezel Jeffrey and James
Hamilton Jeffrey Jr. He moved to Lake
Wales, Fla., at an early age and re-
mained a Florida resident throughout
his adult life.
He earned a Bachelor of Science in
Business Administration with a major
in Finance at the University of Florida
in 1966 and a Master of Business Ad-
ministration with a Major in Finance
at the University of Florida in 1968. He
joined the Medical Service Corps in the
United States Air Force in 1969, and re-
tired as a hospital administrator at the
rank of lieutenant colonel in 1996.
He met his wife, Cindy, during their
Air Force careers and they were married
for more than 24 years. They made Lynn
Haven their home for the past 11 years.
He always considered himself a "gear-
head" and enjoyed working on/restor-
ing old cars and attending car shows.
He especially enjoyed Corvettes and

Howard V. Dent
Mr. Howard V Dent, 81, of LakeWales
and formerly Indian Lake Estates, died
on Monday, April 23,2012, atThe Groves

WVa., to John and Myrtle Barker Dent
and moved to Florida 21 years ago from
Fayetteville, N.C. He was retired after 22
years as a machinist for-Goodyear. He was
a United States Air Force veteran.
He is survived byhis beloved wife of 59
years, Jessie J. Dent; daughter Debra Storey
and husband Wayne of Malabar; sons, Dan-
iel Dent and wife Beth of Cameron, North
Carolina and Darrell Dent and wife Susan
of LakeWales, seven grandchildren Amber,
Jason, Jeremy, Brandon, Brie, Jaime and
Kelseysix great grandchildren, and sisters
Jewell Bonham of Cabin Creek, and Gladys
Dent of Charleston, WVa.
Interment.will be made at a later'date at
the Dent Family Cemetery in Hewett.
Memorials of remembrance may be
made to The Groves Center 512 S. 11th St.,
LakeWales, Fla. 33853.
Johnson Funeral Home is in charge of -
arrannements_


was always in his element while restor-
ing his beloved 1957 Corvette. Thank-
fully that project will still be completed
in honor of his memory.
He was an accomplished home
brewer and brewed more than 200
batches of beer, mostly ones in which
he developed his own recipe for. He
never came across a beer he couldn't
clone himself. He also enjoyed travel-
ing, exercising, and spending all of his
timewith his wife.
Ross was predeceased by his mother
and father.
He is survived by the love of his life,
Lt. Col. Cynthia Furlow Jeffrey, Ret.; his
sister, Nancy Grable of Cleveland Tenn.;
brother, William Drasdo and wife,
Mary Ann, of Lake Wales, Fla.; father &
mother-in-law John and Joan Furlow
of Durham, N.C.; sister-in-law and
brother-in-law, and several nieces and
nephews.
The family wishes to thank the entire
staff of Dr. Lu, Moffitt Cancer Center,
Dr. Overmyer, Dr. Finney, and Dr. McK-
enzi, and Emerald Coast Hospice for
their outstanding compassionate care.
A memorial service with full military
honors was held at the Kent-Forest
Lawn Funeral Home on Saturday,
April 21, 2012.
Expressions of sympathy may be
viewed or expressed at www.kentforest
lawn.com.
Kent Forest Lawn Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.

Lucille M.

"Cille" Joynt
Lucille M. "Cille" Joynt of Lake Wales
passed away Wednesday, April 25, 2012
at the Lake Wales Medical Center. She
Was 89.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home, Lake
Wales is handling arrangements.


Frank Joseph

Sibrava
Frank Joseph Sibrava of Alturas
passed away Monday, April 23, 2012, at
his residence. He was 69.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home, Lake
Wales is handling arrangements.


Crispin to be remembered


Lt. Col. (Ret.) James Ross Jeffrey


at memory
In observance of 2012 National Police
Week, which is May 13-19, the Fraternal
Order of Police Polk County Lodge #46
and the Polk County Law Enforcement
Memorial Fund Inc., will hold the 25th
annual Polk County Peace Officers'
Memorial Service.
It is scheduled for 10 a.m. Thurs-
day, May 10, at the Polk County Law
Enforcement Memorial in Lakeland
Veterans Memorial Park on Lime Street,
between Lake Beulah Drive and the
west side of the Lakeland Center.
. Lakeland Police Officer Arnulfo
Crispin, who died in the line of duty
on Dec. 21, will be the fifth Lakeland
police officer and the 31st Polk County
law enforcement officer commemo-
rated on the Polk County Law Enforce-
ment Memorial.
Family members of fallen officers,
representatives from various Polk
County law enforcement agencies, pub-
lic service organizations, and state and
local government agencies will attend.
Highlights of the memorial service
will include a presentation of colors by
a joint agency Color Guard from the
Polk County Sheriff's Office, Lakeland
Police Department, Winter Haven
Police Department, Bartow Police
Department, and the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Commission; Roll Call of
Heroes; Fly Over by PCSO and Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission aviation units; Retreat of the
Fallen Rider by the PCSO Mounted
Unit.; Tampa Fire Department bagpipe
players; Joint Agency Honor Guard -
Three-Gun Volley; and Taps. The Har-
rison Center for Visual and Performing
Arts "Encore Signers" will perform


ial service
an ensemble of
patriotic and
spiritual songs.
Speakers will Wt
include John r-
Sheffield, presi-
dent, FOP Polk
County Lodge



chairman of the Officer Arnulfo Crispin
board.
The keynote
speaker will be Lakeland Police Chief
Lisa Womack and Pastor Douglas Bari-
ilas, River of God Christian Church.
A luncheon hosted by the FOP Polk
County Lodge #46 and the Polk County
Law Enforcement Memorial Fund Inc.,
will take place at the FOP Polk County
Lodge #46, 125 West Brannen Road,
Lakeland.
Anyne can attend the memorial ser-
vice and luncheon. For information call
863-688-1725.


for reading the

Frostproof News


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Central Parnk Stroll














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IN WINTER HAVEN
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* Music by Marcus.Brixa Jazz Trio
* Vote for the People's Choice Award
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The Chain of Lakes City MORE THAN AN ART MUSEUM
2012 SPONSORS
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Boswell & Dunlap, LLP Elephant Outlook Envisors, LLC
Everett Whitehead & Son Construction Food Partners Reiss Engineering, Inc.
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Tampa Electric Tucker Construction & Engineering *
Winter Haven Chamber Foundation, Inc. Buffy & Kerry Wilson


May 2, 2012


Page 6A Frostproof News


n, TUA ES S







May 2, 2012 Frostproof News Page 7A


SUN PHOTO BY GREG MARTIN
HDR project engineer Heather Manganiello, right, gestures toward the Peace River authority's
reservoir as others, including Derek Dunn-Rankin, Mike Coates and a second HDR consultant, look
on Friday. The reservoir remains more than half full after a spring of record low river flows.


Putnam: Ag can be


first loser in water wars


By GREG MARTIN
NEWS@FORTMEADELEADER.COM
ARCADIA From the foot of a
reservoir so big it could hold 400,000
swimming pools, Florida Agriculture
Commissioner Adam Putnam spoke
of a need for regional stakeholders
to work together to balance water
allocations among urban residents,
agriculture and the environment.
"This (water) is important to
every Floridian," he said. "Agricul-
ture clearly understands; they are
the biggest loser and the first losers
when it comes to water wars."
Putnam was speaking as guest of
honor at the Peace River/Manasota
Regional Water Supply Authority's
annual barbecue Friday. About 150
attended, including numerous repre-
sentatives from several of the au-
thority's four members Charlotte,
DeSoto, Sarasota and Manatee coun-
ties. It was sponsored by Friends of
Peace River Water, which is a group
of the authority's contractors.
This year's barbecue came amid
the first serious dry spell since the
authority's 6 billion gallon reservoir
was completed at a cost of more
than $77 million in 2009. Although
the upper Peace River has gone dry
due to a lack of rainfall and low
aquifer levels, the authority still has
enough water to supply 27 million
gallons per day for more than 190
days.
Pat Lehman, authority executive
director, said he often gets asked
if it's possible to meet the public's
demand without sacrificing water for
agriculture or the environment.
"If you look around here today, I
hope you can see the answer," he
said.
He was referring to the authority's
strategy of scalping high flows from
the Peace and storing them for low-
flow periods. That helps preserve
groundwater for agriculture and at
least some stream flow for aquatic
life.
Putnam, a lifelong Bartow resi-
dent, served from 1996 to 2000 in the
Florida House, and from 2001-2011
in the U.S. House. He was elected
the state's commissioner of agricul-
ture in 2010.
He called the authority's reservoir
"visionary and exciting."
"This Manasota project was way


ahead of its time and should be a
model for the state," he said.
Putnam also-spoke against a long-
standing movement to dismantle the
state's five water-management dis-
tricts and transfer control over water
resources to one agency in
Tallahassee.
"Nothing's ever apolitical, but (the
districts) are as much apolitical as
anything can be," he said. He noted
the districts are established along
watershed boundaries.
He said he also was opposed to
one proposal that would allow water
to be exported from rural areas in
one region to urban areas in another.
North Florida likely would win in a
battle drawn over those lines be-
cause it has more clout, he said.
Instead, regions should cooperate
on projects entailing desalination,
reuse, surface-water reservoirs and
conservation, he said. The.agricul-
ture department established best-
management practices for water
conservation that saved 1 billion
gallons per year, he said.
"Make no mistake, getting it right
impacts every Floridian," he said.
The authority's projects are not
just remarkable for their size, said
Dorian Popescu, an engineer with
the DMK firm. They also are note-
worthy because representatives from
the region's four counties teamed
up with the Southwest Florida Water
Management District to fund them.
"It's a huge thing to be able to
withstand a long period of drought,"
he said.





'LT


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ARTISTIC PHOTOS



A .



451. Eagl ie e Drive Lake Wales, Florida


Frostproof News Page 7A


May 2, 2012


i









Wilson, Garrett are big winners in youth art show


One of the Frostproof Art League's
fun annual events, its youth show, has
come to a close, with a number of area
students and youngsters taking home
many honors.
Alexis Wilson took home "Best of
Show Honors" for her work "Chelsey" in
the high school mixed media category.
She is a senior.
One of the unique awards is the
People's Choice honor. Patrons are
invited to put money in a container
to "vote" for their favorite piece. The
funds are then used to help ongoing
youth art efforts at the gallery. This year,
Shelby Garrett out-distanced the field,
as her work in acrylics drew $70.57 in
donations.
A complete list of winners follows:
Kindergarten First place Jonathan
Albert, second place Nathaniel Reid.
First-grade First place Autumn
Ellis, second place Paula Ramos, third
place tie between Leslie Flores and
Nazareth Braken, honorable mentions
to Blayze Hess and Caden Smith.
Second grade First place Talissa
Garza, second place Emma Coatney,
third place Alec Lambert.
Third grade First place Wileishka
Rodriguez, second place Leah Brown,
third place Trevor Smith, honorable
mention David Arrendondo.
Fourth Grade First place Autumn


Balser, second place Anaya Aalberg,
honorable mention Clarissa Moreno.
Fifth grade First place Isela Flores,
second place Anna Garcia.
After school art, acrylics First place
Destiny Hess, second place Shelby Gar-
rett, third place Joseph Stanley, honor-
able mentions to Kiah Kenshalow and
Christopher Branson.
After school art, mixed media First
place Destiny Hess for "Raccoon Fam-
ily," second place Victor Balleza for
"Beauty of a Web", third place Scarlett
Branson for "Alligator with Blue Fish
Catch," and honorable mention Kiah
Kenshalow for "Turtle at Night."
Middle school first place Luke
Smith, eighth grader, for "Trees on the
Beach."
High school, drawing, painting, mark-
er First place, sophomore Quinn
Spires for "Razor Wire/Alien Spear," and
second place to senior Veronica Molina
for "Angry Flowers."
High school 3-D First place, junior
Marisol Espinoza for "Dragon Fly," and
second place, senior, Alicia Barnes for
"Green Bottle."
High school mixed media First
place, junior Jose Gonzelez for "Psyche-
delic Broccoli." He also took second with
"Drift." Third place, sophomore Edward
Loya. Merit awards to junior Liz Lizalde
for both "Squash" and "Radial Plant."


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
At the show reception, some of the winners pose with their awards, including, front row from
left: Trevor Smith, Caden Smith, Kiah Kenshalow, Emma Coatney, Autumn Ellis,and Alec Lambert.
Back row from left: Quinn Spires and Destiny Hess.


POLK

STATE
COLLEGE


* accredited


* local


* awesome


polk.edu


Page 8A Frostproof News


May 2, 2012







May 2, 2012 Frostproof News Page 9A


From a Bulldog to a


Tiger


PHOTOS PROVIDED
Frostproof's Zack Jenkins, center bottom, signed last week to play football this fall at
traditional NCAA Division III power Wittenberg in Ohio. On handfor the occasion were his
brothers, Nathan and Josh in the front row, and in back, from left: Joel "Papa"Jenkins,
mother Theresa and father Anthony. The schools posted an 8-2 record last season, and plays
in the North Coast Athletic Conference.


Frostproof's Zack Jenkins will continue his college football career next fall at Ohio's Witten-
burg College, an NCAA Division III school with an excellent academic reputation. On the
field, they are pretty good too, with regular appearances in the NCAA post-season playoffs.


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iFort an t


I'm Curie Bellinghamn. a senior
who wants to graduate at Bok
Tower. After moving here in the
summer of 2007, it %\as some-
thing I had to look
forward to: I was
going to have the
honor of recei ing
my diploma in one 4
of the most beau-
tiful places in the .
country. Although
it seems to be a
rite of passage, it
also now seems
to be important
to the changing culture of dhe
school and the efforts taken by the
administrative ,staff here at Lake
\\ales Iligh School tu beautify
the communir\. I wasn't ready to
let something that I had eagerly
awaited for o\ei four years just
slip out of nmy grasp. It's very
important that this is something
that we get to do. and I'm pair of
a group bound and determined
to get there. \'\ ith our Ielp, \w
can achieve our gaial jof sing the
money needed I':I itir eL.penses iII
graduation dy. and aiI\ donation
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are making dream~ n Lm i tiUL.
Thank you!"

Do1natritn Iflofrnil.tiEIt
Lake 1 ,1 u ; .
S6 -' -4-.'2 ..\F 1 :
Check, 12 i;'a Ib \l .I-I
memno:2012 t;.Ji,.ii ,i ,'i ,i !' .' r


(
- ]-.9.


A gator tale























\~ -"




P I" 1M.
r. -41











PHOTO BY K.M.THORNTON SR.
This fella, we're not sure actually if he was friendly or not, but he was pretty good-sized,
decided Monday morning would be a good time to cross County Road 630, between North
Lake Reedy Boulevard and Mullinsville Road. We're assuming he made it OK, to wherever it
was he was going, since he had a police escort.
",': -. "" (:.
'; r
.'. ,, .7C- ~ 't,. '' ,,
i "' .'7 :' :, .', . r. _
[i "J,'- .v ,, .. ,. .. ? , '












was he was going, since he had a police escort.


Frostproof News Page 9A


May 2, 2012







Pag 10 rspofNw a ,21


Polk seeks vendors for Hu


Polk County Fire Rescue is look-
ing for vendors for the annual Polk
County Hurricane Expo planned
June 2 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Lake
Eva Banquet Hall in Haines City.
The expo offers residents an op-
portunity to educate and prepare
themselves for all potential hazards.
Fire Rescue is seeking vendors to
provide relevant disaster prepared-
ness information to residents who


attend the event. Exhibitors are
asked to contribute $25 per booth
to help offset the cost of the event,
and a door prize valued at $25.
County and non-profit agencies
will be allotted one booth at no
charge. In order to include organi-
zations in pre-event promotions,
potential vendors can fill an appli-
cation online no later than May 11.
Businesses may also become a


rricane Expo

Hurricane Preparedness Partner
with PCFR by contributing $300.
Partners will be showcased on pro-
motional materials and at the event.
For partnership details and ven-
dor registration, visit www.polk-
county.net/hurricaneexpo.
In addition to vendor booths, the
event will include guest speakers,
safety demonstrations and emer-
gency vehicle displays.


ARRESTS
April 17
Sirena Miller, 32,31 Attucks Circle failure to appear.
April 19
Juan Bautista, 46, 337 Luke Street driving with
an expired license.
April 21
Tony Alvarado, 22, 237 Ramon Avenue, Frostproof-
trafficking methamphetamine.
Charles Mcclenithon, 48,414 South Scenic Hwy.
#17, Frostproof- violation of pre-trial release and
aggravated battery.


RELAY
FROM PAGE 1A

members take turns walking laps.
Following the Opening Ceremony,
the relay begins with the Victory Lap
walked by cancer survivors to celebrate
their victory over cancer.
Next is the Caregivers Lap walked by
family and friends who helped their
loved ones through their struggle with
cancer.
After dark, candles dedicated to
cancer patients or victims are lit up
along the track during the Luminaria
Ceremony where participants walk a
lap in silence.
The event concludes with the Fight
Back Ceremony where participants
make a commitment to take action
against cancer.
In recent years, the Frostproof Relay
For Life had been held on the athletic
field of Frostproof High School, but this
year, the school would have charged
$2,000 to hold the event. Frostproof
Play Park was chosen as the new
location after approval from the city
council.
As of now, 105 participants and 18
teams have signed up. Teams include
Ben Hill Griffin Jr. Elementary, Citizens
Bank and Trust, City of Frostproof,
Cure Hunters, Federation of Christian


BROWN
FROM PAGE 5

offering a defined contribution plan as an
alternative in 2000 and about 15 percent of
employees take that option.
One weak spot is that Florida is the only
state where public employees pay nothing
for their retirement. Gov. Rick Scott and
the Legislature tried to fix that but were
stymied, temporarily, by a court ruling.
There are also other gold-plated pro-
grams for state employees, such as the
DROP program and health insurance
subsidies for retirees. Florida TaxWatch has
recommended eliminating both.
But the fiscal responsibility shown in
Tallahassee hasn't filtered down to local


Sportsmen, Ferguson Sinkers, First
Baptist Church of Frostproof. First
Presbyterian Church of Frostproof,
Frostproof Church of God, Frostproof
Church of God Youth, Frostproof
Elementary, Frostproof Middle-Senior
High Interact Club, In The Moment
Photography, Nancy Bell Family and
Friends, The "Doe" Nators, The Coffee
Club of Shepherd Christian Commu-
nity, and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. -
Gamma Phi Zeta.
This year's goal is to raise $30,000,
which would be an enormous jump
over previous Frostproof events. Over
$8,000 has already been raised.
Teams and participants have been
raising money for the event throughout
the year. Currently, the team that has
raised the most money is Frostproof
Church of God with $1,933, while the
participant who has raised the most
money is Catherine Daniels with $675.
Thornton and his team at Citizens
Bank and Trust plan to raise $2,000.
Though they have only raised $100 thus
far, they are expecting to raise more
through a silent auction on their
website, Thornton said.
Thornton hopes to see as many
people come out to support the event
as possible.
S"My personal goal is to educate the
town and let people know about the
relay," he said. "I've talked with many
people who didn't even know we had

governments.
James Madison Institute, a Tallahas-
see think tank, said, 'As of year-end 2011,
Florida's 100 largest cities oversee 208
separate pension plans for their employees.
Of these, only 14 percent received a grade
of 'A," or were at least 90 percent funded;
62 percent received a grade of"C" or lower,
and 15 percent were woefully underfund-
ed."
Legislators have limited ability to nudge
local politicians toward fiscal responsibility.
That's mostly up to local voters. If they are
happy paying higher taxes to provide better
pay and benefits to public employees than
they have themselves, so be it.
Lloyd Brown was in the newspaper busi-
ness nearly 50 years, beginning as a copy boy
and retiring as editorial page editor of the
Florida Times- Union inJacksonville.


Last year, Leslie Roberts and daughter Kasie did face painting to raise money for the Ben Hill
Griffin Elementary School team.


the event, let alone that we had one this
year. To see the town come together for
a common goal is my personal goal."
Anyone wishing to participate has
until Friday to sign up.
Donations can be made to the event,


teams, and participants on the Frost-
proof Relay for Life page on the Relay for
Life website: http://www.relayforlife.org/
For more information, visit the
website or the Frostproof Relay for Life
Facebook page.


*Prices not inclusive of tax, title, license and dealer doc fees. Advertised inventory available at time of
dispatch. May not be combined with any other offer and not applicable to prior sales. Dealership not
a responsible for typographical errors. See dealer for details. Offers expire 5/5/12. DCW17766-0412


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May 2, 2012


Page 10A Frostproof News


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UtIIII I g IIIIII
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l111ll111 illl1111 1111111
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,lilimllrlIIIIln jmll !






Mav2 202Fotro Nw ae1


Gator attacks man on


Doctors cautious about


course


infection, his wife says


By MARY CANNADAY
MCANNADAY@LAKEWALESNEWS.COM
Albert Miller, the Lake Ashton
resident who last week survived a
gator attack during a round of golf,
has been admitted to the hospital as
a precautionary measure, his wife
Dottie said Tuesday.
Miller was undergoing tests Tues-
day, so his wife recounted the story.
Miller was grabbed by a gator
as he was participating in a local
tournament at the Lake Ashton golf
course. He was walking back up the
bank, after fishing golf balls out of
the retention pond, when he was at-
tacked by the gator.
"He thought he had stepped on
a live wire at first," his wife said.
"Then his golfing partners saw that
he had been grabbed by the gator,
and thrown three feet into the air."
The gator sunk his teeth into
Miller's knee and dragged him into
the pond.
His friend Ted Price was the first
to reach him, with two others, Car-
roll Setzer and Les Townes,.close-
behind. They grabbed Miller, but he
was already up to his belt buckle in
water. Then, miraculously, the gator
let go.
The men were able to rush Miller
to the gate, where he was rushed by
ambulance to Winter Haven
Hospital.
Miller's golfing partners took him


to the community's gate, where he
was taken by ambulance for medical
care.
Miller has been at home since
then, but at a doctor's appointment
Tuesday-morning, a decision was
made to hospitalize Miller.
"They were concerned about in-
fection and the swelling of his leg,"
Dottie Miller said. "They want to put
him on some heavy-duty IVs. We're
pretty grateful that they are being
pro-active," she added.
Thinking back to the incident,
"Even though it was a horrific ac-
cident, we are so thankful that
someone was with him and able to
help him," she said. "Some of the
accounts going around said that the
men beat the gator with golf clubs
to get him to let go," Dottie said.
"That's not true: they had no clubs
with them. There is no explanation
of why the gator let go," she said.
The Lake Ashton residents website
has a new advisory up, about watch-
ing out for gators.



PHOTO PROVIDED BY LAKE ASHTON
RESIDENT FROM LAKE ASHTON
IMAGE GALLERY
This nine foot gator was taken into custody
after attacking a Lake Ashton man during his
golf round.


NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL

IMPACT STATEMENT F-35 OPERATIONAL BASING
The United States Air Force (Air Force) has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in accordance with the National En-
vironmental Policy Act.. The Air Force proposes to establish the initial beddown for F-35A operational aircraft at one or more Air Combat
Command (ACC) or Air National Guard (ANG) installations over a period of approximately 5 years. The beddown scenarios consist of 18
or 24 F 35A aircraft at ANG or AFRC installations, and 24, 48, or 72 F-35A aircraft at ACC bases. The Air Force has identified six alterna-
tive locations for initial basing of the operational F-35A aircraft: Burlington AGS (a preferred location), Vermont; Hill AFB, Utah (a preferred
location); Jacksonville AGS, Florida; McEntire JNGB, South Carolina; Mountain Home AFB, Idaho; and Shaw AFB, South Carolina. The
proposed action also includes basing of personnel needed to operate and maintain the F-35A, and construction and/or modificationoffacili-
ties on the bases to support F-35A operational aircraft. F-35A aircraft would conduct training flights from the base and in existing airspace
associated with each proposed location. No new airspace would be established as part of the proposed action.

The 45-day review and public comment period for the Draft EIS initiated when the Notice of Availability was announced in the Federal Reg-
ister on April 13, 2012. The Draft EIS is available for downloading from the Web at www.accplanning.org or a hard copy can be obtained
by contacting Mr. Nick Germanos at (757) 764-9334.

Public hearings will be held during the 45-day review and comment period commencing on April 30, 2012, and ending on May 17, 2012.
Please see the table below for locations and dates of the hearings. They will all be held from 5 to 8 p.m.: an open house will occur between
5 to 6 p.m., at which time Air Force personnel will be available to answer questions about the proposal. The formal public hearing will begin
at 6 p.m. After a brief presentation to provide the results outlined in the Draft EIS, the floor will be opened for comments from the public
pertaining to the environmental analysis and findings; all oral comments will be recorded by a stenographer. If all commentors have had
an opportunity to comment, the Hearing Officer may adjourn the meeting before 8 p.m.

City/Town Date Location

Brunswick, Georgia Thursday, May 3,2012 Brunswick High School, 3920 Habersham Street
Jacksonville, Florida Tuesday, May 8, 2012 First Coast High School, 590 Duval Station Rd.
Avon Park, Florida Wednesday, May 9, 2012 Avon Park Middle School, 401 South Lake Avenue
Palatka, Florida Thursday, May 10, 2012 Larimer Performing Arts Center, 216 Reid Street

All comments will be accepted through June 1,2012; both written and oral comments will be considered equally. Written comments can
be submitted at any of the hearings or sent via U.S. Postal Service to
HQ ACCIA7PS, 129 Andrews Street, Suite 337, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia 23665-2769, ATTN: Mr. Nick Germanos.
L L ~ IIL~ ~6-L I - --


II


Frostproof News Page 11A


May 2, 2012


j -










SI;.. Baber helps Bulldogs


Sdi vower to district win...


PHOTOS BY NEAL BYRD
Josh Baber gives maximum effort, and probably scared a batter or two, as he went the distance
last week in a 13-4 Frostproof win over DeSoto in the opening game of the Class 4A-District 10
playoffs. Baber struck out 10.


All eyes are skyward, including those of
Frostproof catcher Steven Colon, who waits for
this foul ball to come down. Frostproof actually
trailed in the game early, 2-0 and 4-1, only
to explode for 11 runs in the third inning to
defeat DeSoto, 13-4.

ANh I


Zack Smith slides in with one of the Frost-
proof's 13 run in an easy win over DeSoto in
playoff action last week. Frostproof will be at
Berkley Prep tomorrow evening in the opening
round of the state playoffs.








DeSoto's Levi Davis waits for a throw at second
as Frostproof's Cody Wilson slides in.


Fort Meade Animal Clinic
i" 711 E. Brodadw, Fort ~leade/ 285-8652 '"



One in three pets will get lost at least once in
their lifetime. We at Fort Meade Animal Clinic
are hoping to reduce that number. Right
now, you can get your pet a microchip ID,
and lifetime registration fee for the chip, for
just $39.95. Remember, many microchip fees
Don't incidur the cost of i-,gti-rjg ",ijr chip. Ours
does, -il .ere is no fee ','er to '- the chip
o you NTo, thieres


' -


. no reason to
: .:. 'to m a


Marcus Ramon dives back to third base during action April 24 as the Frostproof Bulldogs defeated
the DeSoto Bulldogs, 13-4. The two teams had split a pair of games during the regular season.


Marcus Bobb, Casey Thomas, Clay Barnes and Cody Wilson (from left) confer during an inning
change at Frostproof's 13-4 win over DeSoto in district playoff action last week in Avon Parki.
Bobb was one of the offensive heros, among many, as he scored twice and drove in three runs.
Frostproof banged out 11 hits and made just one error. DeSoto had just four hits and was charged
with four errors.

STHANKSF FOR INGUSjBESTI~DEL SANDWICHDANDP
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May 2, 2012


Page 12A Frostproof News


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r- .rPicrre~~


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Ma ,21 rspro esPg 3


... but Avon

Park scores

late to win

district crown






Although disappointed after the tough loss,
the Bulldogs live to fight another day. They will
open the Class 4A regional baseball playoffs on
the road Thursday in Tampa against Berkley
Prep.


as"


I -I
Marcus Bobb kicks up plenty of infield dirt with this slide into second. Bobb
had the only hit of the night, a single in the fourth inning for Frostproof. As
the Bulldogs lost in the district title game to Avon Park, which didn't record
their first hit until a four-run seventh broke a 0-0 tie.


.' . GR EK. A
ALL THE B A YO' l E' E ..k FD


DS TROPHIES O s" T
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.i ..:. o- f, .. .
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SaCU!Si


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PHOTOS BY NEAL BYRD
Frostproof's Brant Howell tags second just as an Avon Park runner arrives at the base. Frostproof
managed just one hit, and the host Red Devils broke open a scoreless tie in the seventh with four
runs, to win the Class 4A, District 10 baseball title last week.


-4


1 rfc

Our children's

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Frostproof News Page 13A


May 2, 2012


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Pae1AFotrofNw a ,21


Ridge gets its very own dog park


Leesa Galloway and her dog "Mickey Mouse" enjoy the brand new picnic tables that are scattered
throughout the new dog park.


The park is sectioned off for small and large dogs so all can enjoy themselves.


INSTRUCTIONS FOR CALENDAR
EVENT SUBMISSIONS
All events must be submitted through our website,
www.frostproofnews.net. Click on "Community Calendar"on
-he lIef. .I" : a f '.ubmtlTl Eircni hlr,,,r .1 free or paid listing and
fill out the appropriate information.
If you can't enter your events via our website, we can type
lhem in:rn ,: vur tiehali i ihei r ili :t .5 per event, per commu-
nity edition. This fee does not guarantee your event will make
the printed version. Call 863-285-8625 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
weekdays to make a payment or to have us enteryour event
for you.
Free listings have a maximum of four lines per event and run


,'I N A L


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2:00 pm til dark


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Expires 5/31/12 Expires 5/31/12
For Tee Times Call (863) 385-4830,
Sign up to receive our E-Specials www.sunla


in the paper on a first-come, first-served basis.
Paid listings provide additional space for $10 per day, per
event, per community edition. All paid listings will run in the
location designated for the event type.
We only allow one submission per event, per day. If your
event runs for more than one day, you will need to complete a
separate submission form for each day. Multiple submissions of
the same event for the same date may result in all the related
events being removed.
Be sure to read the full instructions and tips on the submis-
sion page. We reserve the right to exclude any submitted event
that does not meet our specifications or that requires excessive
editing. There is no guarantee that a free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.




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www.lslandViewRestaurant.com


PHOTOS BY DEBRA GOUVELLIS
Future Eagle Scout lan Galloway fills a water bowl for dogs to quench their thirst at the first-ever
lake Wales Dog Park. The park is next to Holy Spirit Catholic Church on Ninth Street.




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May 2, 2012


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Middle Senior High School honors standout youth


Frostproof's Middle Senior High
School recently honored several special
students.
On April 4, two of Frostproof's stu-
dents were honored at the Polk County
School District's "About Face" Annual
Breakfast in Winter Haven.
Kayla Cobb, 10th grader, and Da-
nique Rosius, eighth-grader, were
selected to represent the school. They
were honored on stage and each
received a medal for this award. Both


Honored for their outstanding citizenship were, fr
Jennifer Rowles and Madison Aldrich.


Kayla and Danique were nominated by
Melodie Davis, Dean of Students. Davis
was also selected as both the students
Mentor-- the person who most helped
them in their turn-around. School
officials said both Kayla and Danique
showed a remarkable turn-around this
year in their attitude and behavior.
This change also helped increase
their grades, they added.
At the middle school, a student's
character is also an important part
of who they
are, and each
month three
students who
-" represent a
S- particular trait
are cited. April's
trait was citi-
S zenship.
Sarah Me-
S 'dina was the
honoree for
sixth grade,
.. nominated by
; reading teacher
SSuzanne Duke.
"I would like
S:'t' to nominate
SSarah Medina
for Citizen-
ship. Sarah
,e 'shows great
citizenship as
secretary in the
middle school
k- Angel Friends
Forever Club.
She conducts
herself in
regard to the
duties of this
rom left: Sarah Medina, office and even


.. : "~;kP t- i
PHOTOS PROVIDED
The Polk County schools recently honored two Frostproof Middle Senior High School students for
their "about face" during the 2011-12 school year. They are Danique Rosius, left, and Kayla Cobb,
right. They are pictured with the school's Dean of Students Melodie Davis.


beyond her responsibilities in office
to the classroom and classmates," her
teacher wrote.
Jennifer Rowles was selected for sev-
enth-graders. Both Coach Karen Bolin
and Holly McCraw nominated Jennifer.
They noted, "Jen is a super sweet
young lady who is always helping other
students. She is very kind to others and
is involved in athletics and activities
within our school. She is a great role
model for others and is just an all-


around great kid! Jennifer is a caring
student. She gets along well with her
fellow classmates. She is always one of
the first to volunteer to offer help."
Madison Aldrich was picked from the
eighth grade. She was nominated by TV
production teacher Ernie Pittman.
"She is an all-around fabulous
student-athlete. Polite, pleasant, most
intelligent, driven to succeed, great
sense of humor, dedicated. A really
great kid!" he noted.


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May 2, 2012


Page 16A Frostproof News


i








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F'
-4 I


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^ 11 '^F ^
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Donations needed



for Polk homeless



graduating seniors


By DIANE NICHOLS
DNICHOLS@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Crossing that stage and getting a high
school diploma is an accomplishment
'for any teen that meets that milestone.
But, for the 100 graduating seniors who
may not have family to live with and
often make their home in parking lots,
that diploma represents the kind of
strength that heroes are made of.
Because of that, the Polk County
School system's Sunshine Foundation is
heading up the "Adopt A Senior Project,"
which collects gift hampers for home-
less students filled with donated practi-
cal items to recognize their remarkable
achievement.
Lorrie Prince, chairman of the foun-
dation, acknowledges that there is no
better feeling than to help to encourage
these homeless youths.
"Our committee here is made up of a
very devoted team who helps fill these
hampers with a set of the recommended
daily living items, so the students can
have what they need as they move from
place to place," said Prince. "We want
to send them off from high school with
a sense that people in this community
care about them. We'll receive letters
from some of the students who tell us
how those donations changed their lives
saying that they weren't aware anyone
really cared at all. That's something that
sticks with me and makes me want to
continue to do this."
The "Adopt A Senior Project" fills col-
lapsible hampers with much needed
items donated by the community. Such
gifts include bus passes to help the
homeless students in getting back and
forth to school, rolls of quarters for their
laundry, food gift cards to common eat-
ing locations such as Subway, McDon-
ald's, Burger King, etc. in denominations
of $5, $10, $15, and new twin sheet sets
in solid colors only for the students to
spread on couches where they sleep if
staying with friends or family members.
Monetary donations are also needed
by making checks out to "Polk County
Schools." These gift hampers will be
given out to the students beginning next
week and will continue to be dispensed
for the rest of the school year.
"We have had a wonderful response
from the people in Polk County who
definitely have big hearts," said Prince.
"The bulk of this year's monetary dona-
tions has come from The Polk County
Sheriff's Charities, which we are very
thankful for. We have also been contact-
ed by senior citizens on pensions who
want to donate. We get calls from those
who have very little that want to still
contribute and do something. It is really
quite touching to see such an outpour."
To date, Polk County is the only dis-
trict doing such a drive for their home-
less students, but Prince stated calls
are beginning to come in from outside
jurisdictions asking how they can set
up a similar program. The goal is now
to see the "Adopt A Senior" program
expand outside the county and possibly
the state.
With the crash in the economy in
2008, Florida's student population has
become poorer each year. Almost all
school districts in the state have experi-


TO HELP
Donations are still being sought in hopes that all 100
students will receive a gift hamper.
You can mail the items to: Sunshine Committee,
Learning Support.Division, Polk County Schools, #270
Bartow Municipal Airport, Bartow, FL 33830.
Bus passes can be purchased online by going to www.
ridecitrus.com.
For information on the "Adopt A Senior Project" contact
Lorrie Prince orTracy Hannah at (863) 534-0930.

enced spikes in the number of kids who
qualify for subsidized meals. Accord-
ing to statistics released by the Florida
Center for Investigative Reporting,
homelessness among school-age chil-
dren in Florida has soared from 30,878
in the 2006-07 school year to 56,680 in
2010-11. Advocates for the homeless say
external factors driven by poverty, such
as lack of housing, low wages, foreclo-
sure and unemployment, place Florida
and its public school system at a critical
juncture.
Overcoming such adversity to go on
to receive a high school diploma is the
ideal outcome according to Dee Dee
Wright, a homeless liaison with the Polk
County Schools. An outcome that solely
relies on the inner core of that homeless
student.
"The students that rise above such dif-
ficult obstacles have a resiliency within
them," said Wright. "Many homeless
students do drop out and don't have
that resiliency, but these students in the
public school system under the care of
the Hearth Project, have excelled against
unthinkable odds because they had that
drive inside of them."
According to Wright, often the other
students in high school aren't aware
that these students are homeless. Out of
shame or fear of being treated differ-
ently, many homeless youth don't talk
about their situation. Many live on their
own without any family or friends to rely
on, while others may be homeless with
their family due to loss of the parent's
job or because their parents have passed
away. Some homeless students do stay
with an aunt or family member only to
be "kicked out" as soon as they turn 18,
often leaving them to fend for them-
selves on the streets with school being
the only place they are able to eat and
have a roof over their head.
To celebrate the upcoming gradu-
ation with Polk's homeless students,
Tony Grainger, owner of the Stanford
Inn, held a free steak lunch-eon for the
teens on Tuesday, May 1, at his second
restaurant, Runway 9/27 Air Base Bistro
located at the Bartow Municipal Airport.
After hearing about the many homeless
students in the county at a Rotary Meet-
ing, Grainger knew this was something
he wanted to roll up his sleeves and be
a part of.
"I thought this was such an amazing
achievement for these young kids to
overcome what they have faced and still
graduate," said Grainger. "Most seniors
get a car when they graduate, but these
kids don't get a thing. This steak lun-
cheon with all the trimmings was some-
thing we could do that would not only
make a difference, but also give them a
sense of dignity and respect."


REPORT


By KIM WILMATH
TAMPA BAY TIMES
Add the son of embattled former chan-
cellor Marshall Goodman to the list of
recent resignations from the University of
South Florida Polytechnic.
Robert Goodman was paid $50,000
a year as a community liaison for the
school's Blue Sky business incubator pro-
gram. He is one of nine USF Poly employ-
ees who have resigned from the school
in the past month, according to letters
released to the Times on Friday.
Those employees include the commu-
nications and development directors, who
left Thursday after two other administra-
tors were recommended for dismissal


S...


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
Bartow city and Polk County officials scooped up and threw some dust dedicating the
Ernest Smith Road in a groundbreaking Monday. The road will connect State Road 60 to
U.S. Highway 98, bypassing Van Fleet Drive and should take about a year to build. The road
exits onto U.S. 98 next to Bartow Ford, the company started by Smith. From left are Bartow
City Commissioner James Clements, Chamber of Commerce President and A-C-T owner Rob
Kincart, Bartow Mayor Pat Huff, Polk County Commissioner Melony Bell, Ernest Smith,
Bartow Ford owner Bob Ambrose, Polk County Manager Jim Freeman, Polk County Commis-
sioners Ed Smith and Todd Dantzler, and Polk Transit Division Director Jay Jarvis.



Genshaft: No layoffs at


Poly for at least a year


By KIM WILMATH
TAMPA BAY TIMES
After saying last week that she wasn't
sure the University of South Florida
would be able to keep all the employees
from USF Polytechnic past July, President
Judy Genshaft now vows there will be no
layoffs for at least a year.
Genshaft delivered the message Mon-
day flanked by Florida Rep. Seth McKeel,
who helped craft the bill that creates the
state's 12th public university this summer.
McKeel, R-Lakeland, said he wanted to
clarify the situation after hearing about
Genshaft's message last week.
Starting on July 1, USF Poly will cease to
exist and Florida Polytechnic will launch
with all of the former branch campus'
resources. USF, in turn, will get $10 mil-
lion to keep paying faculty to continue
teaching current students in Lakeland
until they graduate. No new students will
be accepted.
Though Genshaft previously said USF
Poly's payroll was closer to $18 million,
McKeel pointed out at a news conference
Monday that the Florida Poly legislation
includes language that requires the new
university to cover any additional costs
incurred by USF during the teach-out.
Genshaft said any staff that aren't
needed as USF Poly starts closing down,
such as those in the admissions office, for
instance, would be welcomed at the main
USF Tampa campus.
Meanwhile, the Florida Board of


Governors, which
oversees the state A
university system,
could begin taking
applications for
membership on
the new Florida
Polytechnic's
board of trustees
as early as this
week, a spokes-
woman said.
The board
The board Jud Genshaft
appoints five
members to
each of the state's
public universities' 13-member govern-
ing boards, and the governor appoints
six more for staggered five-year terms.
The two remaining seats are taken by
universities' student body presidents and
chairs of their respective faculty senates
or equivalents.
The call for applications typically re-
mains open for 30 days.
Still, even after that board is set up, the
new university won't be able to open its
doors overnight, university system Chan-
cellor Frank Brogan said Monday.
"I'm not sure yet that people even
understand the significance of this
change," Brogan told Board of Governors
staff members, as they prepared for an
upcoming meeting on the Poly transition
plan. "Transition is not tossing someone
the keys on June 30 as the other party
walks out the door."


following an investigation that indicated
financial mismanagement and a hostile
environment at the school.
Also making his departure official is
Travis Brown, the younger Goodman's
boss at Blue Sky, who said in an investiga-
tion interview that he was lured to the job
under false pretenses. His last day will be
June 29, two days before USF Polytechnic
is shut down and the new Florida Poly-
technic is born.
Most of the letters are short --with the
exception of two. Samantha Lane, who
was in charge of media relations for USF
Poly, and Maggie Mariucci, who served
as director of development and govern-
mental relations, cited hostile working
environments as reasons for leaving.


Throwing the dust


Goodman's son resigns from Poly











The Depot displaying Native artifacts


By STEVE STEINER
SSTEINER @ LAKEWALESNEWS.COM

Thanks to the assistance of Dick Old-
sen, the latest exhibit at the Lake Wales
Depot Museum, the Native American
Display, is now ready for public viewing.
Oldsen, 73, a snowbird who will be
returning to Fremont, Ind., the middle
of May, has been collecting Native
American artifacts since he was 5 and
an uncle took him hunting for artifacts.
"I know just enough to get into
trouble," joked Oldsen. Growing.seri-
ous, he said he met Mimi Hardman,
the president of the Historic Lake Wales
Society and museum director approxi-
mately 18 months ago and told her of
his interest. She immediately seized
upon the opportunity. "She asked me to
assist when they decided to have their
North American display."
It was for Oldsen an interesting ex-
perience as he and museum volunteers
and staff went through its collection.
"They had some material they didn't
know they had," he said. Some of it
was in fragile condition, he added, so
they had to proceed with caution as the
displays were set up.
Many of the items, Oldsen said, do
not come from Florida nations.
"I was surprised, because most of the
material is either Plains or Northern,
from the Midwest, Ohio, Tennessee,
Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky." The nations
in and around the Lake Wales area, said
Oldsen were the Seminoles, Mickosuke
and the Calusa, who inhabited areas
from Tampa to Key West. The latter, he
said was intriguing.
"They are the mystery tribe. They
moved around a lot. Marco Island is
where many settled," he said. "There is
no idea where they were from. Maybe
South America."
It is also a mystery, Oldsen added,
what became of them and said specula-
tion is the Calusa may have been ab-
sorbed into the Seminole Nation. There
was also another aspect of the Calusa
that separated them from most of the
North American nations.
"They practiced cannibalism, for the
sake of filling their stomachs," he said.
"They also sacrificed people. Mostly
those captured in battle."
As for the items on display, Oldsen
appeared to know the history about
almost all of them. He pointed to an
item in a display case that looked like
a purse or pouch made from buckskin
and adorned with beads and other
materials.
"These are called 'trade' or 'seed'
beads," he said. "They were manufac-
tured in Europe and traded for fur."
Another section of item, Oldsen said,
was made using bird feather quills.
Sometimes porcupine quills were used,
he added.
In another display case was a breast
plate that may have been worn in
battle.


WANT TO GO?
The Depot Museum is opened Monday-Friday, 9
a.m.-5 p.m., and Saturday 10 a.m.- 4 p.m., and will
be ondisplay until September. A $2 donation from
adults, and a $1 admission for children 12 and under
is requested. The museum is located at 325 Scenic
Highway, Lake Wales. For information call (863)
676-5160, or email: lakewalesdepot@gmail.com


PHOTOS BY STEVE STEINER
Don Oldsen points out who is whom among the portraits of Florida Native Americans. The
portraits are but one of many items on display at the Lake Wales Depot Museum celebrating the
indigenous peoples who populated Florida before and since Europeans first arrived.


The breastplate on display may have been
worn in battle. It also is likely to have been
made of turkey bones. The beads possibly came
from Europe and were used to trade for furs.
"The breast plate was made from bird
bones, mostly turkey," he said. "Once
the breast plate was blessed, it gave
them (a warrior) immunity." That was
the theory. Of course, when the breast
plate did not protect a warrior from in-
jury or death, Oldsen said he "bet there
was a lot of disappointment."
Other displays included arrowheads,
figurines and pipes. A number of the
latter, he said, were made of catlinite, a
stone found in Minnesota.
"They would carve them and make
them quite ornate," Oldsen said. "They
were originally used for ceremonial pur-
poses and meetings. Then they began
catering to the tourist trade."
The figurines, however, were found in
phosphate mines in Mulberry, Oldsen
pointed out, and resemble those found
from Central and South America.
Other items in addition to the arti-
facts include a series of photos taken
at the start of the 20th century by Karl
Everton Moon (after 1918, he spelled
his first name, Carl). There also are a
number of portraits of famed Florid-
ian Native Americans, including Chief


The beads used to build this probably were
manufactured in Europe and used to trade for
furs and other items, according to Dick Oldsen,
who helped assemble the Native American
display at the Depot Museum.


Among the displays is this and other Native
American dresses. A number of them were
made and sold to the touristtrade.


Osceola; the chief, said Oldsen, was half Mr
black. Oldsen said that many runaway
slaves were welcomed into the Semi-
nole nation, which explained the chief's
ethnic and racial heritage.
A number of the artifacts on display
are on loan to the museum, said Hard-
man, including those furnished by the
Fleming family, who reside in both Lake .
Wales and California, and from Don
Scheck.
The museum in Frostrpoof has also
loaned items. The headdress is a reproduction that came
from a western Native American nation.


Dick Oldsen and Mimi Hardman stand at the front of a chickee, a structure that often served as
living quarters, according to Hardman.


Among the few local items on display is this arrowhead. The legend reads it was found embedded
in a tree in downtown Lake Wales.


i--1 1 0 0 -


Wednesday, May 2, 2012


B 2e gaP SCMG Central a


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Wednesday, May 2,2012 SCMG Central Florida Page 3B


7Y^2w




O0 7GK


The Lake Ashton R CoImunity Benefit As-
sociation thanks its many sponsors

anld sdonorsfor inaking it possible to finance~
over $50,000 in donations a gra

to the local school teachers it takes
Sgeneroushearts and many hands

and we are most grateful




PLATINUM SPONSORS ($10000RMORE) -Auto Zone
-Anonymous -Ax, Bob & Mary
-Maxwell, Ed & Cynthia -B & B Appliance and Furniture
-Fields Huston Cadillac, Buick, & GMC -Badcock Furniture
-Jarrett Gordon Ford, Lincoln, Mercury -Bags Wags Rags
-O'Connor, Cathy -In loving memory of -Bank of America
Robert (Bob) O'Connor. -Bartel, Bradley W., DDS, PA
-Battery Plus
GOLD SPONSORS ($500-$999) -Beans-n-Brushes
-American Coach -Beef O'Brady's
-Center State Bank -Benedict-Smith Design, Inc.
-Fleetwood RV -Besten, Cal & Ardy Den
-Hill Nissan -Bob Evans Restaurant
-Huston Motors KIA -Bright House Networks
-Red Hoagland Hyundai -Cammeo's Salon and Spa
-Toyota of Winter Haven -Chalet Suzanne
-Weikert Ford -Cherry Pockets Steak and Seafood
-Chevrolet Center, Inc.
SILVER SPONSORS ($300-$499) -Chili's Bar and Grill Winter Haven
-Bryan's Auto, Truck & RV Collision Repair -Chili's Bar and Grill Lake Wales
-Central Florida Dermatology & Skin -China Pearl Buffet
Cancer Center, W. Wade Foster, MD PA -Choma, Joe & Gloria
-Eye Specialists of Mid-Florida, Winter -Christenson, Dave & Sandra
Haven -Citizens Bank and Trust
-Leary Brothers/Bargain Carts -Classis Collections
-Raysway, Inc. McDonalds -Claussen's Furniture
-UBS, Scott & Suzanne McKay -Cliff's True Value Hardware
-Weaver McClendon & Penrod, LLP -Coen (Kirchner), Kimberly
-Couture, Ray & Anne
BRONZE SPONSORS ($100-$299) -Crazy Fish Grill
-Adams, James & Patricia -Cuttin'Up Salon
-Alan Jay Chevrolet -Dan's Fan City
-Buck's Body Shop, Inc. -DiBattista, Dom & Joan
-Body Ease Rhode Island Physical -Dillard's
Therapy Center -Elegant Jewelers
-Buttriss, Bert & Carolyn -Elizabeth's Design Studio
-Creative Coach -Else Group LLC
-Evans, George & Pat -Ernstberger, Paul & LaVerne
-Henderson Sacs PA -Evergreen Irrigation Service
-Humana Charles Schmidt -Fabor Bakery
-Munroe, Thom & Nancy
-Parker and Company Lawn & Landscape DONORS
-Patton Tires, Inc. -Fey, Chet & Sharon
-PUP Christine Graves -Firestone Complete Tire Care
-Rags-N-Riches Carpets, Inc. -Fletcher Electric
-RJF Advisors Bob Ference -Florida Natural
-Schroeder, Jeff& DeDe -Florida Pest Control
-Sizzling Grill -Forni, Max, DMD
-Sorensen & Schade Chevrolet -Fred's Southern Kitchen
-Sorensen & Schade Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep -Gabler, Bill & Phyliss
-State Farm Insurance Kevin Welton -Galaxy of Lights
-Trees of Righteousness -Garrett, Sandy Massage Therapist
-Winter Haven RV -Gibson and Sons
DONORS -Giovanni's NY Pizza
-ABC Fine Wine and Spirits -Golden Nails
-A&S Gifts -Golf America
-Action Signs -Great Clips for Hair
-All About Antiques -GQ Golf, Inc.
-Al's Restaurant -Hampton Inn and Suites Lake Wales
-Advance Auto Parts Winter Haven -Happy Flowers
-Advance Auto Parts Lake Wales -Hartman Rare Coins
-Andy Thornal Company -Health Concepts Kim
-Angela's Accents -Hebel, Mark
-Art and Framing on the Park -Hinchman, Jim & Sandy
-Art's Golf Carts -Historic Bok Sanctuary
-Auto Dynamics Inc. -Home Depot (Rt 27)


-Howardson, Bob & Georgeann
-Hungry Howie's Pizza
-Hunt Brothers Cooperative
-Hurricanes Grill and Wings
-IHOP
-Imperial Lanes and King BBQ,
Eagle Ridge Mall
-J &J Sunshades
-Johnson Funeral Home
-Katie's Caf6
-Keller, Don & Carol
-Kirchner, Harry & Sally
-Kuchler, Don & Lynne
-Lake Ashton Golf Club
-Lake Wales Car Wash
-Lake Wales Family Restaurant
-Lake Wales Veterinary Hospital
-Laughing Cow Market
-Lazy Days Super Center
-Learning Curve
-Lee's House of Vacuums
-Leisure World Patio Furniture
-Leland Car Wash
-L'lncontro Italian Restaurant
-Little Studio Interiors
-Loesel, Bob & Claudia
-Longhorn Steakhouse
-Longview RV Superstore
-Lori Draper's Furniture
-Lorraines Place
-Low Ball Louie's Tobacco
-Lupini, Max & Betty
-Macko, Milo & Dianne
-Magic Genie Cleaning Services
-Mama's Attic Antiques
-Manny's Chop House
-Marine Supply
-Markel, Dave & Karen
-Marland, Sandra
-Maxwell, Cindy
-McCullough, Angela
-McGee Tire
-Midas Auto Service Experts
-Moore, John Brook
-Mulford, Richard & Ann
-Mummert, Ronald & Jean
-New Edge Interior
-Norby's Steak and Seafood
-Oakwood Golf Course
-Pan, Ed & Sue
-Para, Ray & Iris
-Pat's Nu-Star Car Wash
-Perkins Winter Haven
-Piazza, John & Mary Beth
-Polk Furniture
-Polka Dots
-Powell, Fred & Shelba
-Printer's Palette
-Publix Supermarket (Lakeland Office)
-Rafool, Christian
-Rags-N-Riches Carpets, Inc.
-Rags to Riches Chantel
-Rainbow Silk and Wicker
-Red Lobster
-Reddinger, Keith & Linda
-Robinson, Sonny & Nancy


-Rollins, Emily
-Ross, David & Linda
-Ruby Tuesdays
-Sage, Bill & Shirley
-Salon 229 -Vicky
-Salon 229 Amanda Calhoun
-Salon 229- Jennifer
-Schack's Bar-B-Que
-Schwartz, Ed & Carol
-Schwendler, Richard & Wendy
-Shearn, Gary $ Gail
-Simmons, George & Janet
-Sizzling Grill
-Sleep World
-Southeast Eatery
-Starbucks Coffee
-Steel City Grill, Eagle Ridge Mall
-Sternquist, Larry & Jo Ann
-Stina's AAA Vertical Blind Factory, Inc.
-Streeter, Gary & Jean
-Sun Tropic Tanning Salon
-Suncoast Media Group
-Swanson, Dee Professional Massage
& Body Works
-TD Bank
-The Gallery
-Tijuana Flats Burrito Company
-Tips and Toes Nail Spa
-Tire Barn
-Tire Kingdom
-Tire's Plus Winter Haven
-Treasure House Antiques and
Collectibles
-Treasure Island Fine Jewelry
-Tuffy Tire and Auto Service
-Veterinary Healthcare Associates
-VIP Nails and Spa
-Village Kitchen Shop
-Vitamin World
-Wal-Mart Supercenter 7450 Cypress
Gardens Blvd.
-Warehouse Outlet
-Wild, Bill & Harriett
-Woody's

aeWales ews


2004-2012
TOTAL GRANTS TO SCHOOLS

Roosevelt Academy $ 5,602.22
Spook Hill Elementary $18,668.65
Janie Howard Wilson
Elementary $37,370.75
Chain of Lakes Elementary S25,988.75
Hillcrest Elementary $26,104.38
PolkAve Elementary $27,018.47
Lake Wales Charter Schools
Kindergarten Program $10,400.00
Snively Elementary $14,082.14
Wahneta Elementary $ 2,845.69
Hartridge Academy $ 5,624.84
TOTAL DISTRIBUTION $173,705.92


SCMG Central Florida Page 3B


Wednesday, May 2, 2012











School Board pulls charter resolution


By PEGGY KEHOE
PKEHOE @ POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM

In the continuing saga of Lakeland High
School and Harrison School of the Arts
- will they become charters, whether as
separate schools or one Polk County
School Board members are concerned that
what's best for the kids will be lost in the
fight among the adults.
During last week's work session,
Superintendent of Schools Sherrie Nickell
asked the board not to vote on a resolution
proposed on March 27 by Board Member
Frank O'Reilly. The resolution said the
board favored the two schools remaining
together on the same campus, although
it would be an expression of the board's
wishes and not a binding document. It
would reaffirm the state Department of
Education's finding that the two schools
share one school number.
Two weeks ago the board agreed to
wait until the April 24 meeting to vote on
the resolution, giving Nickell more time
to work on mediation between the two
schools'principals, Craig Collins at Har-
rison and TracyCollins at LHS. A group of
Harrison parents and teachers is seeking
start-up charter status, while-a group at
LHS wants the school to be a conversion
charter, operating at its current facility.
Harrison also wants to use its facility, but
would need to add academics. Harrison
students currently take academic classes
at LHS. One of the issues is that Harrison
wanted 15 academic teaching units and
Lakeland wanted to keep them; another
has been scheduling conflicts.
The resolution generated emails from
both sides, with each saying the resolution
favors one side over the other.
Nickell told the board that "quite a bit of
time and energy" had been expended on
the situation by her and staff. "I've thought
long and hard about this ... listened to
what the teachers are saying, the parents,
the students.
"With faculty and parents at both
schools considering charter applications,
the board would be interjecting itself into
that process prematurely," she said. "It
would be inappropriate to take action that
could be construed as preferring one over
the other, I believe."
Having studied the history of the
school, Nickell said she feels "Harrison is
more than a fine arts department; it was
envisioned as a high school for the arts,"
and having the two programs on a single
campus is a "beneficial arrangement" for
both schools.
Over the years the board has continued
"to make substantial investment" in a
specialized facility and staff.
"The purpose (of the arts school) was to
provide access to all of the students in Polk
County and I think it's important that that
message be heard."
Similar arrangements on other cam-
puses such as the campus containing
Bartow High School, International Bac-
calaureate and Summerlin Academy, with
three separate principals "work together
for the good of the students."
As to Harrison and LHS, Nickell added,
"I'm convinced that the interests of all
students in Polk County are best served by
these two programs remaining within the
school district where they can benefit from
the resources and the support that the
district can provide."
Nickell said she was "dismayed" to learn
four weeks ago that a mandatory conflict
resolution process had been established
between the two schools' principals in
2009, prior to her becoming superinten-
dent, and that "the expectations of that
process weren't met... Matters have esca-
lated, unfortunately."
If LHS succeeds in becoming a charter
school, Nickell said arrangements would
be made to continue Harrison's programs,
and vice versa.
Nickell also said efforts were being made
to find out why folks are looking at char-
ters for the two schools. Teachers there
would like more flexibility and latitude


with curriculum, she said, and there can
be some of that within the district. Another
concern was facility repairs, which in one
case a work order hadn't been submitted,
but she said staff is "working really, really
hard" to address these issues.
"The bottom line is I don't want any of
our schools to go charter," Board Member
Kay Fields declared, favoring some type of
board action. "It concerns me that we sit
back and wait and do nothing proactive.
At some time the board has to make some
hard decisions and do what's best for kids."
While Board Chairman Hazel Sellers fa-
vors the two schools sharing one campus
as they do now, but with the expectation
that they work collaboratively, she believes
the perception about the proposed resolu-
tion is a problem.
"The resolution is for keeping things as
they are," she said, "but it's not perceived
as that by the public" who think it's a vote
for one or the other. "I don't want things to
be more divisive. We need to be firm in our
expectations" of the two schools working
together. "I expect the model to work and
work well... That's my expectation."
"I don't think we can all live in this
drama world much longer," Nickell said.
Board Member Lori Cunningham
agreed with Sellers that "perception is
reality," and that a vote on the resolution
would create more dissension. "We have
two wonderful, wonderful programs that
coexist on one bheaLfiltil campus.
"No matter who you talk to some people
have their own interests at heart and want
to separate, but the common thread to
me is to keep the schools together on the
campus as originally intended," Cunning-
ham said. "We need to step up to the plate
and do what's best for the kids and let the
superintendent take care of the adults."

O'Reilly: Take a stand
The man who proposed the resolu-
tion O'Reilly said it was designed to
affirm what the Department of Education
said: it was one school number, one cam-
pus, two "wonderful programs."
He said problems have been going on
between the schools for six or seven years,
primarily because of personality conflicts
between the principals. He agreed with
Fields that the board needs to take a stand.
"My idea of this resolution was to take
a stand and say this is one number, one
school, one campus; nowhere in that
resolution or nowhere have I ever said a
derogatory thing about the faculty, the
program or the students of either school,"
O'Reilly asserted.
"When people criticize this resolution as
being divisive, no, it's not divisive. It takes a
stand on what the Department of Educa-
tion said," he added.
"I proposed this to bring it together once
and for all: one number, one school, and by
golly, one tremendous program if we work
together," O'Reilly urged to board to "take a
stand and say this is what we as a board are
demanding. I feel very strongly about it."
Board Member DebraWright also said
the perception of the resolution is divisive,
and that people need to "lay aside per-
sonal feelings and do what's best for the
children ... Until we learn to work coop-
eratively as a team, we'll continue to have
problems in the house."
She said controversy between the two
schools has "very little to do with the
students," but "seems to be about power
and control." The resolution, she believes,
"pours coals on the fire."
"If schools are applying for charter, that's
a clear sign to me something is wrong,"
Wright said. "It's time to state expectations
... if expectations are not met there's a way
to professionally solve it."
Despite the schools operating under one
state number, Nickell said she's not sure
that means Harrison would have to go
with LHS if that school went charter.
"What we have brewing in Polk County
is not what was contemplated when the
charter school statute was written," Board


Member Tim Harris said. "Since 1997, our
counterparts at the Florida Department of
Education are scratching their heads say-
ing 'what on earth?'
"This is something completely different.
The motivations are not common to what
the motivations were for getting charter
schools in the first place." Harris said the
board couldn't know what direction to
take until or unless it receives the charter
applications. Having noted that Harrison
is $1.1 million in the hole, Harris said he
understands that Lakeland High"School is
now aware of the "extraordinary" costs that
are associated with the arts school that the
high school doesn't have.
"It goes back to what I've said all along,"
Board Member Dick Mullenax said. "This
has all been caused by adults and not by
students."
He questioned the need for the reso-
lution. "People are dug in. What does it
solve? We already know it's one number."
The proposed resolution generated a
response "like nothing I've ever dealt with
since I was on the board," Mullenax said.
Saying he was a "eternal optimist," Mul-
lenax hoped "the adults can calm down a
little bit" and resolve the matter.
The big thing has been the conflict in
the schools' leadership, he stated. "IfI had
it in my power I'd fire both of them."
Once a charter movement is under way,
state law prohibits any actions that could be
considered retaliatory against school staff.
"I still think it will be decided in court
about two years from now," Mullenax said.
"At what expense? The students will be the
losers."
"We can squash this resolution," Fields
told her fellow board members, "but if you
think that squashing this resolution is go-
ing to squash the movement at Lakeland
High School and Harrison, I feel strongly


WHAT ARE CHARTER
SCHOOLS?
Charter schools are independent public schools
that operate under a performance contract or
"charter" with the school board, according to the
Polk County Schools'website. The charter defines
rules and regulations of the school which is account-
able for academic and financial results.
Charter schools are "fiscally and academically
accountable to the sponsoring school system, but
exempt from district and most state statutes."They
have control over 95 percent of the student funds
generated through enrollment. "This freedom is
intended to allow charter schools to be more inno-
vative, demonstrate better student performance,
and make the local school the agent of change for
the students the school serves:"
Start up charter schools are brand new schools
that may offer"a specialized curriculum or serve a
specific student population such as at-risk students
or special needs students."
A conversion charter school is an existing public
school that converts to charter requiring "agreement
from-the teachers and parents of the charter school,
the submittal and approval of a charter application
by the sponsor, and the negotiation of a charter
contract" by the school board after a public hearing.
that is not going to be the case."
She suggested that a timeline could be
worked on and the superintendent could
continue to work to bring some stability
between the two administrators. Sellers
agreed that a timeline was a good idea and
that the board could ask Nickell to have
something by the next meeting, on
May 22. She said there were some im-
mediate problems that could be resolved
without worrying about the charter.
Board members agreed to pull the reso-
lution from the evening's regular agenda,
but a few people spoke at the board meet-
ing, anyway.


Wednesday, May 2, 2012


Page 4B SCMG Central Florida






Wensay.a 221 SMIenrlFlrd Pg.B


FEELING


Lake Wales Medical Center honors volunteers


Lake Wales Medical Center had its an-
nual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon to
honor the more than 100 volunteers who
donate thousands of hours every year
helping the hospital provide top quality
care to its patients and visitors.
Barbara Hitchcock was named Volunteer
of the Year. She has logged more than 1,000
hours since becoming a hospital volunteer
two years ago and greets visitors on week-
ends in the main lobby and volunteers in
the Gift Shop during the week.
"Barbara is one of those volunteers who
never seems to have a bad day," said Eric
Grenier, who coordinates the volunteer
program at the hospital. "She always
seems to greet you with a smile when you
walk in the door. She is kind, friendly, and
always willing to go the extra mile to help
our visitors."
The hospital also gave three Star Per-
former Awards to volunteers "who exem-
plified customer service and going above
and beyond to make Lake Wales Medi-
cal Center a great place to receive care."
Those awards were presented to Gail
Mucha, Ann Clement, and Judy Boettger.
Mucha and Boettger work at the Main
Lobby front desk and make visitors feel
welcome and at ease with their enthusi-
asm, Grenier said. Clement works in the
Gift Shop and delivers flowers to patients
twice a week.
All three ladies were nominated by visi-
tors, patients, and peers.


The awards luncheon was held April 17
at First Baptist Church. Each of the hos-
pital's volunteers received a pin, a note-
book, a certificate of appreciation, and
many also earned service award pins:
100 hours: Nicholas Apuzzo, Kelly
Birchfield, Judy Boettger, Stephen Clem-
ent, Susan Fehser, Marilyn Gibson,
Christina Harper, Mary Hudnell, Stepha-
nie Jester, Marshal Kirchik, Carol Lassiter,
Patterson Monroe-Duprey, Gail Mucha,
Mary Jane Newcomer, Barbara Peters,
Daniel Say, Eli Say, Rosemarie Seiss,
Marion Thornton, Barbara Waldrop, Carol
Whitaker, and Fredrick Whitermore.
500 hours: Joyce Angrist, Gloria Apuz-
zo, Charles Coffin, Joanne Harold, Mary
Luhr, Suzanne Padula, Jeanne Propes,
Mary Ann Rosevink, Anna Stewart, Pres-
ton Troutman, Betty Vandellen, Payton
Ward, Janet Whitehead, Laura Williams,
and Gloria Wurth.
1,000 hours: Barbara Hitchcock, Caro-
Slyn Hull, and Sherry Oakes.
1,500 hours: Tom Egan, Marjorie Knowl-
ton, and Theresa Proulx.
2,000 hours: Robert Cramer, Edwin
Friedlander, and Mary Martin.
Additionally, service hour pins were
awarded to: Marleen Wallace, 2,500 hours;
Larry Chlebeck, 3,000 hours; Lorraine
Cadwell and David Fehser, 4,000 hours;
Warren Cook, 5,000 hours; Ellen McEl-
hinny, 8,000 hours; and Martha Carter,
16,000 hours.


Wholesome fare offers unlimited flavors


A widespread myth about a healthy
diet is that it is boring ard tasteless. For
millions of folks already experiencing
the joys and benefits of whole foods cui-
sine, this myth is considered comical.
Novices are often amazed to discover
thatisuch fare is scrumptious, and actu-
ally more flavorful and exciting than the
conventional taste of same-ol'-same-ol'
butter, cream, bacon, sugar, sodium,
MSG, cheese or artificial flavors.
Like an artist using the full spectrum
of his/her color palette, the cook pre-
paring nourishing meals uses a vast ar-
ray of flavors produced with vegetables,
herbs, spices, and fruits. These ingredi-
ents are surprisingly inexpensive, easy
to find, and packed with health-pro-
moting compounds that enhance the
nutritional value of the food.
As people become more health-mind-
ed, they also learn to enjoy and appreci-
ate the original taste of fresh vegetables
and fruit, sometimes without adding
other ingredients. Let's explore some of
the countless flavor possibilities which
can transform a humble dish into a
mouth-watering culinary event:
Add a teaspoon of lemon zest to
cooked whole grains, coupled with olive
oil, salt and pepper. It is also delicious
in sauces, fruit salsas or mixed with
lemon juice, dill weed, and drizzled on
poached fish.
Lime juice adds a fabulous flavor to


Judy E. Buss




Health oIrrre ponrjnr


numerous Southwest dishes, corn-black
bean salad, fruit salads, and beverages.
Two to three finely grated radishes
mixed with olive oil, lemon juice, salt
and pepper, make a delightful salad
dressing. i
Capers are flavor bombs, and can be
added to tangy cooked sauces (lemon
juice, zest, chopped cooked tomatoes
and garlic) as fish, chicken or pasta
topping.
The world of herbs is a cook's dream
tool box. Fresh, chopped basil leaves,
mixed into pasta salad with yogurt
dressing, or sprinkled on sliced ripe
tomatoes with chopped purple onion,
olive oil lemon juice, and mustard
dressing are a flavorful touch. Incor-
porate fresh, chopped mint leaves into
a Mediterranean lentil salad (cooked
lentils, a diced tomato, chopped fresh
parsley, crumbled feta cheese, and a
green onion.) Add oregano to chicken


salad, olive tapenade, meat loaf or balls.
Garlic: Drum roll please! Garlic is a
nutritional and medicinal superstar and
flavor magician. You can transform even
armadillo droppings into a memorable
treat by mixing in garlic. (Please don't
try this at home ... ) Finely-grated garlic
may be added to salad dressings, or
minced and cooked in sauces, stews,
soups and meat dishes.
Ginger root, readily available in
any grocery store produce section, is
another health- and flavor-boosting
gold mine. Try a teaspoon of peeled and
finely grated ginger, mixed with diced,
steamed sweet potatoes, olive oil and
chopped green olives; or salad dress-
ings; sprinkled on steamed veggies; or
incorporated into a fruit salad (kiwi-
fruit, green grapes, honeydew, orange
juice, shredded coconut).
Sliced, fresh mushrooms, cooked in
olive oil for 10-12 minutes with salt,
pepper, and oregano, lend a mag-
nificent flavor to cooked whole grains
(brown rice, barley, millet, etc.), mashed
or baked potatoes, or pasta.
Olives, green or black (preferably not
from cans), are great in raw vegetable
salads or a potato salad. They infuse zing
into seafood and poultry sauces and
form the base of the tapenade appetizer.
Cinnamon the pastry darling is
also fabulous on cooked hot break-
fast cereal, diced and steamed sweet


potatoes and apples slices, even in
Moroccan-style burgers (ground turkey,
chopped onions and green olives, rai-
sins, lemon zest, and ketchup).
Sprinkle a little powdered nutmeg,
salt and pepper on cauliflower florets.
Steam for 12-15 minutes yum!
Add versatile cumin powder to pinto
bean soup, guacamole, stir-fry bone-
less chicken nuggets (with lemon juice,
salt and pepper). Its earthy flavor also
enhances tomato salsa, sauces for grain,
and corn-bean relish.
The onion family is among the chef's
best friends. Chopped and cooked in ol-
ive oil, along with garlic and an herb, it
makes a great sauce. Flavoring raw and
cooked veggie salad or added to whole
grain pilafs, soups, stews or sandwiches,
onions are tasty. Each member of the
onion family has its own distinct flavor ,
and degree of pungency. Some, like the
purple onion, are the culinary equiva-
lents of heavy artillery, and require a
tissue box. Others, such as the sweet
onion, are kinder and gentler.
All of the ingredients discussed above,
as well as others, should be regular resi-
dents in your pantry.
Bon appetit.

Judy E. Buss is a nutritional cooking
instructor: She teaches at The University
of South Florida Polytechnic, The Rath
Center; Senior Scholars Program.


Winter Haven Hospital

Compassion. Innovation. Trust.


Left: WMC Volunteer
Coordinator Eric
Grenier congratu-
lates Volunteer of
the Year Barbara
Hitchcock.
Below: LWMC's Star
Performers Award
S winners (from
left) Gail Mucha,
Ann Clement, and
S Judy Boettger are
congratulated by
Voulnteer Coordi-
S nator Eric Grenier.
I' :rtI PHOTOS PROVIDED


- I


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SCMG Central Florida Page 5B"


Wednesday, May 2, 2012


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Paae 6B SCMG Central Florida Wednesday( May 2,2012


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syndrome, nocturnal muscle cramp,


What are
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Varicose veins are enlarged
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or flesh colored. They are
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on legs and look like twist-
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2i1:

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What is Chronic Venus
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Chronic Venous Insufficiency
(CVI) is a progressive medical
condition that worsens over time
and affects the veins and vessels
in the leg that carry oxygen-poor
blood back toward the heart. Vari-
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veins in the leg that appear like
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Obesity-linked diabetes tougher to treat in kids


BLOOMBERG NEWS

Type 2 diabetes is harder to treat
in children ages 10 to 17 than it is in
adults, according to one of the first
large studies of the disease in younger
people.
The research also found that diabetes
develops more rapidly in this age group.
About 700 overweight and obese U.S.
children and teens were given three
therapies in the study: The oral drug
metformin alone; that medicine com-
bined with GlaxoSmithKline's Avandia;
and metformin used alone with diet
and exercise.
All three had high failure rates, ac-
cording to the results published in the
New England Journal of Medicine. The
data is key as the number of overweight
children in the United States has tripled
since 1980, spurring a concurrent rise
in Type 2 diabetes, according to the
Centers for Disease Control and Preven-
tion in Atlanta. About 3,600 new cases
are diagnosed in children yearly, the
researchers reported.
"With diabetes developing younger in
life, it means people now have the dis-
ease for a longer period and will move
onto more intensive and expensive


therapy earlier, and require it longer,"
said Timothy Gill of the University of
Sydney, in an email. "These implica-
tions may be magnified by the more
severe form of diabetes that appears
to develop in adolescents and young
adults. There are enormous public
health consequences."
Gill, who is principal research fellow
at the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutri-
tion, Exercise and Eating Disorders,
wasn't involved in the latest research.
The study, which ran for four years,
found that 52 percent of those using
metformin alone had treatment failure,
forcing them to undergo daily shots
of insulin to control their blood sugar.
Metformin combined with lifestyle
changes didn't significantly improve
blood-sugar rates and only about a
third of the patients gained the targeted
weight loss.
Use of Avandia with metformin was
the most effective therapy, though that
too failed in 39 percent of the children
and teenagers, according to the data.
The results "imply that most youth
with type 2 diabetes will require multi-
ple oral agents or insulin therapy within
a few years after diagnosis," wrote
David B. Allan, at the University of Wis-
consin School of Medicine and Public


Health in Madison, in an accompanying
editorial.
The failure rate with metformin alone
appeared higher among children than
it is in some adult patients, Allan wrote.
The report didn't say why Type 2 diabe-
tes is harder to treat in children, though
the researchers suggested the normal
growth cycle may be at least partly at
fault.
The research was led by Phil Zeitler, at
the University of Colorado Denver, and
Kathryn Hirst and Laura Pyle at George
Washington University in Washington.
It was funded by the National Institute
of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney
Diseases in Bethesda, Md., among other
groups.
"This study highlights some of the
real challenges posed in managing
young people affected by type 2 dia-
betes," said Louise Baur, a professor of
pediatrics at the University of Sydney, in
an email. "Lifestyle change is difficult,
and families and young people need
a great deal of support to do so. And
the study also shows that medications
aren't a panacea."
Baur, who is on the editorial board of
the International Journal of Pediatric
Obesity, wasn't involved in the research.
Diabetes can lead to heart disease


and other medical ailments later in
life. With Type 2 diabetes, fat, liver, and
muscle cells become resistant to insu-
lin. As a result, blood sugar doesn't get
into these cells to be stored for energy,
building up instead in the blood.
People who develop Type 2 diabe-
tes as children are more susceptible
to increased blood-cholesterol and
triglycerides, which are risk factors
for cardiovascular disease, said Paul
Zimmet, honorary president of the
Brussels-based International Diabetes
Federation, who has studied the disease
for 40 years.
"We don't have a solution to this
except to do better things about preven-
tion," said Zimmet, who wasn't involved
in the research. The data supports what
physicians have seen in their offices, he
said, adding "it's typically more difficult
to achieve desirable blood-sugar con-
trol in children and adolescents than it
is adults."
One key issue is treatment compli-
ance, he said,
"Adults may understand better that
this is a life-long disease," Zimmet said
in a telephone interview. "It's very hard
to tell a 12-year-old that they're going
to be on medication for the rest of their
life."


What are the long-term effects of heartburn medicines?


DEAR DR. DONOHUE: Will you
please comment on the effects of long-
term Prevacid for GERD? A friend has
had this for 10 years and has taken Pre-
vacid for many years. I went on the In-
ternet and found this statement about
Prevacid: "This product should never
be taken for more than 14 days and
not longer than four months. Long-
term use could result in pre-cancerous
nodules in the esophagus, stomach
and colon." My friend is now receiving
chemotherapy and radiation for cancer
of the esophagus and stomach.
I have never seen mention of this in
your column. Anon.
ANSWER: GERD gastroesophageal
reflux disease, heartburn is one of
humankind's most common disorders.
It's the spurting upward of stomach
acid and digestive juices into the
esophagus, the swallowing tube. Pre-
vacid belongs to a class of medicines
called proton pump inhibitors. It effec-
tively stops the production of stomach
acid, and for most it quickly relieves
the pain of heartburn. The other PPI
drugs are: Dexilant, Nexium, Prilosec,
Protonix and Aciphex.
If it's possible, limiting the time
during which PPIs are used is desir-
able. However, heartburn is a chronic
condition, and chronic administration
of drugs is essential for containing it.


TO YOUR
GOOD
HEALTH

Dr. Paul
Donohue
[) [)g|


Doctors, therefore, have latitude in the
length of treatment.
Prolonged use of PPIs encourage the
growth of a digestive tract bacterium
called C. difficile. It can give rise to
diarrhea and is sometimes difficult to
uproot.
Prolonged use has been associated
with an increased risk for breaking
bones, especially the hip bone. How-
ever, reliable data on this issue are
conflicting. The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration has not required that any
warning about bone breaks be issued.
The threat of cancers of the digestive
tract was once believed to be possible.
Further research has not substantiated
this threat.
People ought to get off PPIs from
time to time to see if thev trulv need


long-term treatment. They can use
other medicines, like Maalox, Tums or
Rolaids. Avoiding foods that stimulate
acid production is another worthwhile
treatment. Those foods include choco-
late, peppermint, spicy food, citrus
fruit, tomatoes, alcohol and caffeine.
Elevating the head of the bed with
6-inch blocks under the bedposts is
helpful.
The booklet on heartburn explains
this common disorder Readers can ob-
tain a copy by writing: Dr Donohue -
No. 501, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475. Enclose a check or money order
(no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the
recipient's printed name and address.
Please allow four weeks for delivery.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I've been told
that raw milk and bone broth is a good
treatment for osteoporosis. Will you
comment on this? P.
ANSWER: Bone broth, made by cook-
ing bones in boiling water, is a source
of calcium. It's a reasonable way to
meet one's calcium requirement. I can't
find a reference that gives the exact
calcium content. It depends on how
many bones are used. Raw milk is an-
other source of calcium. "Raw" means
not pasteurized. Since milk has been
pasteurized, the number of infections
that came from drinking unpasteurized
milk has plummeted. I can't endorse


using raw milk.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am 79 and
dread the annual Pap test. Is it really
necessary for me to continue it? -
D.M.
ANSWER: If a woman is 65 or older
and has had three normal consecutive
Pap smears, she can stop having the
test.
Talk to your doctor about this. The
doctor might have reasons for continu-
ing the test that aren't known by you or
me.

Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable
to answer individual letters, but he will
incorporate them in his column when-
ever possible. Readers may write him
or request an order form of available
health newsletters at PO. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Readers may,
also order health newsletters from www.
rbmamall.com.



AVE $$$SSS$$$

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ASSISTE,1 I, 1 V N( Ri 11) I N C E


12 East Grove Avenue
Lake Wales, FL 33853
@ (863) 679-8246
www.savannahcourtlakewales.com
Assisted Living Facility License No: 9888


OUR SPECIALTY IS CARING.
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----~-~-c -------------~~-c II ~I


SCMG Central Florida Page;B


Wednesday, May 2, 2012


.4 .-

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Moo





IF-


.7..


Nationally recognized heart care

is right here.

That's the Bostick advantage.


4.~


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Winter Haven

Hospital

BOSTICK HEART CENTER

www.winterhavenhospital.org


AN AFFILIATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
S COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SHANDS HEALTHCARE


Winter Haven Hospital's Bostick Heart Center is
recognized by TheSociety of Thoracic Surgeons as
being in the top 10 percent of Heart Programs in the
United States, and ranked one of the nation's
Top 50 Heart Centers by a leading consumer
advocacy magazine. We give our heart patients every
possible advantage by combining the best clinical
experts with the latest technologies and the most
effective rehab services available. And it's all backed
by the hospital you trust, Winter Haven Hospital.

Learn more at www.winterhavenhospital.org or
call 863-292-4688.

Compassion. Innovation. Trust. We're your family's choice.


- --


Page 8B SCMG Central Florida


THE MOST ADVANCED HEALTH CARE IS BASED ON TRUST.

.... ,.,, :,s- .- ,. ,


Wednesday, May 2, 2012


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REAL ESTATE


Wednesday, May 2, 2012


CLASSIFIED


Why should I sell What's HOT in the marketplace?


my home now?
Now is as good a time as any to sell your home if
it is priced fairly according to current market prices.
True, it may be far less than what you would initially
expect your home to be worth. However, think of
it likethis,ifyou ASKYOUR
waited for the prices
to come back up, REAL ESTAE
look at how much PRO
more interest, taxes
and insurance you Michelle Hutto
could possibly be ,Keystone Realty, Inc.
paying for an un-
known period of
time. Additionally,
there are buyers out in the market looking. The buy-
ers can afford to finance. If you are needing to sell to
relocate, downsize or upsize, it is always a good time
to sell. Keep your home in great condition. Make it
have a fresh curb appeal attraction inside and out.
> What is a CMA?
Comparative Market Analysis, which a REALTOR
can easily perform using data from the MLS, Multiple
Listing Service. I would look at the subject and find
at least three to four comparable sized homes, yards,
year built etc that are listed and have sold within the
past six to twelve months. The report then gives you
the average price, average days on the market and
much more data to help the client make an informed
decision on listing or buying a property.
>
> How do I compete with foreclosures?
Make your house attractive, physically. Even if your
house is priced higher than foreclosures, the buyers


lome recently listed for $85,000 sold for $67,000 with only 28 days to contract.


really prefer a move in ready home. Often times fore-
closures need new a/c's because the originals were
either stolen, or broken, light fixtures, appliances are
missing, carpet needs to be cleaned or replaced, in-


terior or exterior needs paint etc. These things could
cost a lot of money. So it is best to have all of these
show in the best of light to the potential buyer, this
would be how you can be superior to a foreclosure.


You can find every business and service under the \
sun in the Business & Service Directory!
Make your business a part of it! Call 863-676-3467


'SUN 't


r r700 State Rd. 60 East
IM E Lake Wales, Fl. 33853
s 863-676-7040
SL U REAL ESTATE INC.

"PRIME PLUS SERVICE YOU DESERVE!"








WATERFRONT HOME ON LAKE CYPRESS
A RARF. FIND ON A GREAT FISIIN(; AND BOATIN(I LAKE, THIS
HOME COMES WITH ITS OWN lOAT RAMP AND DOCK. BREATH-
TAKING \'IEI\S FROM TIlE SIN ROOM COMPLETE WITH PA. SPA-
C IM HSWF.IIl..M.\INT\lINED BRI( K h1101M $254,000
STOP BY (OUIR01 II ()R A RKL LIST.-OF1 (>)R.('LOSUR I.S,!
PLLASL VISIF OUR \\ L [ I L n .iirimnl tuireh.le:llr.. m


r.H l &[ I C TDIR E CT r ai .aORI Ya
U WJ1. rUJ~LUL Uu ~m w u


LEGACY REAL ESTATE CENTER


Indian ,Lake
Estates
* Lal e' A 'l' Hlilltin l-.i

* $2(hlhli 1: I,;iI lli..I
(;l[ l ('arWC'I lirllit)l
$2500


Lakefront
Alta Vista
Like Eva
22 I-ee I..'l Lik r honita
., I ti.l, = 4 78 ,iic%
I* P[l 'lcr' i N ( )\ 0 1.' I Ii.liiiiInI
$99,000


Build in
Timberlake
Lake iere Drive
$*2 L 1,0-' Acre. 1I, aLhiv
Quiet. Neat Siicet
N ieo Bla-i i mnip
$15,000 each


-7A


--- ------ -- - ------- - -- -- ---~ ---'


MMEMMM=Mkwmj








Page~ 2 CLSIID Ma ,21


1000

A7





REAL ESTATE


"We Are Pledged To The Letter And
Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achieve-
ment Of Equal Housing Opportunity
Throughout The Nation. We Encour-
age And Support An Affirmative
Advertising And Marketing Program In
Which there Are No Barriers To
Obtaining Housing Because of Race,
Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Famil-
ial Status Or National Origin."

1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
BARTOW Wonderful coun-
try home on. 6.19 acres. This
3/1 home has lani, laminate
flooring and inside laundry
room. Property has 2 deep
wells and 2 septics. All for
only $128,000. Call Barbara
Blanchfield at 863-412-1110.
Midflorida Real Estate Sales.
CARLSBERG ESTATES, 2
BR. 2 BA. Nice community
with lake access, clubhouse,
pool, Home built in 2006, has
2 car garage, ID# 241, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
JUST REDUCED, LOCATED IN
CROOKED LAKE PARK, great
condition and a perfect
starter home for the first time
home buyer' or winter resi-
dent; 2 Br. 1 Ba. $49,900,
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 ID #
4801 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
LAKE JUNE POINTE
ESTATE 5 Bedroom, 3 Bath
Custom Home in a Gated
Community with screened
pool. Front and back porches
with 1.43 acres of beautiful
landscaped property including
fruit trees. Lots of room to
roam, inside and out with
plenty of parking. Only
$334,900. Debra Ann Worley
Real Estate 863-465-0123
LAKE-FRONT BEAUTY, 2Br
2Ba nestled on private Lake
Cypress in Lake Wales, enjoy
boating, fishing and using
your own private boat ramp.
Offers a spa in the back sun-
room, newer roof, complete
a/c system, kitchen cabinets
and appliances, Recuced
$254,000 id# 1671 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
LOCATED NEAR LAKE
PIERCE AND GREAT FISH-
ING, this 3 Br. 2 Ba. Home
has a lot to offer, Built in
2000, this is a great buy for
only $59,000 PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
NEAR KISSIMMEE CHAIN
OF LAKES, East Lake Wales,
3 Br. 1.5 Ba. 2 lots, neat and
clean, move in ready, bring
your boat and fishing poles, 1
block from Lake Rosalie, mari-
na and boat ramp, near state
park, reduced to $59,000
OWNER SAYS MAKE OFFER!
id# 10755 PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
NEAR WARNER UNIVERSITY, 3
BEDROOM 2 BATH, located in
crooked lake park, spacious
split-floor plan, home -has
recently been updated, has
detached garage with RV
parking, screen porch,
$98,500 id# 4918, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com .

Classified = Sales


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
WATER-FRONT BEAUTIFUL
HOME ON CANAL LEADING
TO LAKE WALK IN WATER,
Move-In condition, 3 Br. 2 Ba.,
cathedral ceiling, spacious liv-
ing room, large Florida room
with view of canal and lake,
formal dining, plus eating
space next to kitchen, all
appliances, washer and dryer,
2 car garage, workshop,
large covered dock on deep
water canal, just seconds
from the lake, $189,900 id#
6616 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE www.primeplus-
realestate.com

1030 WATERFRONT HOMES
Waterfront Home For Sale
Lake Clay-Ski-Fish-Fun, Sand
Bottom Lake, 3 Bedroom 2
bath, Beautiful Oaks, Fenced
Yard, Spectacular Sunsets.
Debra Ann Worley Real Estate
863-465-0123

1040 CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
CONDO @ LAKE WALES
COUNTRY CLUB, Beautifully
furnished 2 Bed 2 Bath 1st
floor unit new carpet and
paint. Located in Golf Com-
munity. Family room/lanai
Overlooks Fairway and
Lagoon. Many Community
Amenities. $79,900 id# 6204
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
GREAT PRICE ON THIS FUR-
NISHED 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH
CONDO, 1,184 ft. living area,
screened porch, convenient
location to shopping in the
city limits of Lake Wales.
$29,900, PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
id # 130 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
LAKE WALES COUNTRY
CLUB 2nd. Floor Condo,
Fully Furnished, Screened
Balcony, Great View Of Golf
Course And Lagoon,
$102,000 id# 9202 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
1070 DUPLEXES FOR SALE
INCOME PRODUCING
PROPERTY FOR SALE
INCOME, Duplex-2 DBed-
rooms 1 Bath each side-Rent-
ed $1,050 mo. Walk to
Schools, Library, Shopping,
and Lake June Lakefront Park
and Ball Fields $84,900.
Debra Ann Worley Real Estate
863-465-0123
1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
3 BR. 2 BA. MOBILE HOME
ON 1 ACRE, NICE WELL MAIN-
TAINED HOME WITH STOR-
AGE BLD. Located.just east of
Lake Wales near Lake Ros-
alie, Great Fishing and boating
lake, $65,000 ID# 2188
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
ALMOST 2 ACRES WITH 3 BR.
2 BA. MOBILE HOME, built in
2009, good condition, move
in ready, all fenced located in
country setting near lake Ros-
alie, $85,000 PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 ID # 2002 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
BABSON PARK, 4 Br. 2 Ba.
over 2,200 Ft. Living Area,
Older Home With Lots Of
Charm! Popular Babson Park
and Crooked Lake Area, this
home is a real find, just
reduced to $55,900; PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com ID #41

Need Cash?
Have A Garage Sale!


1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
JUST LISTED, NEAR LAKE
WAILES LAKE, JUST A SHORT
WALK TO BIKE AND WALKING
PATH, 3 Br. 2 Ba. with almost
2,000 Ft. of living area, spa-
cious living room, new carpet
and paint, large screened
porch, $97,000, PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com id# 1185
Very Nice 1988 Layton Park
model with 2 side Out's.
Located in Whiddens Mobile
Home Park Frostproof. Has
new utility building, hardwood
floors, furnished. Just bring
your clothes. Plus much
more. Call for details 863-
635-5972. Asking only
$8,000.
1095 MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE

BRAND NEW HOMES
FOR SALE
Great Specials
Reduced Prices
Beautiful Manufactured
Home Community
863-439-7418

1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES
37 ACRE MIDDLE TN FARM
with 13 acre lake, nice home.
Selling at Absolute Auction,
Memorial Day. Van Massey
Auction Lic 1711. (931)433-
8686 Visit vanmassey.com
DEVELOPER FORCED LIQ-
UIDATION Smoky Mtn. Lake
Property Priced @ Foreclo-
sure/Short sale. Up to 100%
Financing/5% interest. Hurry-
Only 30 Reservations avail-
able! (877)551-0550 ext 100

1210 HOMES FOR RENT

129 Stevenson Rd, Winter
Haven. 3 bd/2 bath w/1 car
arage & small shop.
900.00 month + security.
No pets. Call 863-678-1498
or 863-605-0473
BARTOW 2bd, Iba, $480.
mo., 1 yr. lease, 1st mo. free.
Security deposit required.
Near park & community cen-
ter. 813-767-6452
BARTOW 2bd, Iba, $480.
mo., 1 yr. lease, 1st mo. free.
Security deposit required.
Near park & community cen-
ter. 813-767-6452
BARTOW
755 E. Blvd Street
2 bedroom/1 bath
$550/monthly
$500/security deposit
1 yr. lease.
863-603-7715 or 863-
533-4482
FROSTPROOF 2bd-lba
central A/C-appliances
screenporch-new paint
Sun Ray 311 Raymond Ave.
$550. 863-635-1234. L
mess
LAKE WALES AREA. A Very
Nice Houses For Rent. 2 Bd
$450 mo. call 863-635-6399
LAKE WALES House for
RENT 2Bd/1Ba, $550 /
monthly $450/deposit, will
work with you Call 863-676-
5066 NO CALLS after 9pm

Advertise in
The Classifieds!


1285 COTTAGES FOR RENT

LAKE WALES, lbr/lba
lakeside cottage for rent.
Non-smoker. No Pets. Ref-
erences. 863-676-6201.

1300 DUPLEXES FOR RENT
FORT MEADE, St Patrick
Day Special 2bd Iba, fur-
nished appliances, garbage,
trash and lawn service. 863-
559-7035.
1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
BARTOW, lbd, unfurn, remod-
eled,- w/stove & refrig. 584
Mooselodge Rd, 1 mi. E. of Bar-
tow. 533-0146 or 512-0453.
COLONIAL SQUARE
APARTMENTS
SPRING SPECIALS !
1 and 2 Bedroom apts with
central a/c and heat, large
floor plans, abundant clos-
et
space & FREE WATER
Starting at $465/ month
Move-In Specials too
Call 24/7: 866-485-
4961
Or visit us online at:
ColonialSquareBartow'.com
FORT MEADE lbd, furn.
apartment, clean, utilities
furn. $140/wk Deposit $100.
No pets. 863-285-9422.
FORT MEADE. lbr/lba,
small, clean, quiet. No pets.
Near Patterson Park.
$400/month, $200 security.
Call 863-512-7326.
LAKE WALES 1Bedroom
apt., no smokers or pets.
$135 wk, $270 to move in.
Water & Elect included. 863-
632-7013
OAKWOOD MANOR
APARTMENTS
PRICES REDUCED FOR
LEASE UP!
Our updated villa-style
apartment homes provide
comfortable living at a
great price. Rates include
water.
Studio from only $405/mo
1 BR. from only $475/mo
2 BR with w/d hookups
from only $595/month
Convenient location,
Walk to shopping.
Call 24/7 866-485-
4977
Or visit:
OakwoodManorApts.co
m

1390 VACATION/
SEASONAL RENTALS
Flagler Beach Oceanfront
Vacation Rentals Furnished
Studio, 1, 2 and 3 Bedrooms.
Full Kitchens, Free Wi-Fi,
Direct TV, Pool. 1820 S.
Oceanshore Blvd. 386-517-
6700 www.fbvr.net
1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
5 ACRES NEAR LAKE
ROSALIE, Located in a gated
community in a rural setting;
wildlife galore, near county
boat ramp and access to
Lake Rosalie, Deed restricted
to single family homes only,
beautiful wooded parcel,
$49,900 id# It 11, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
GET RESULTS -
USE CLASSIFIED!


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE


COUNTRY LIVING -
WHERE YOU CAN
HAVE IT ALL!!!

THE COUNTY IS DROP-
PING THE IMPACT
FEES FOR THE NEXT
SIX MONTHS AND NOW
IS THE TIME TO BUILD
A NEW HOME!!! SAVE
$$$THOUSANDS BUY-
ING AND BUILDING
NOW!!

ALTURAS, 14 acres
(more or less) for sale.
Will divide into mini-
mum of 5 acre tracts.
High and dry. Suitable
for building home, small
grove or raising cattle
or horses. Big enough
to build a home & sepa-
rate mother-in-law suite
or 2 homes! Close to
Alturas Elementary.
Enjoy country living at
its finest! Just 10 miles
to Bartow, Lake Wales
or Winter Haven. For
more information or to
schedule an appt. call
863-512-0041.
HOME SITE, Nice half Acre
lot located in Beautiful Area of
Homes. Growing Region Cen-
trally Located between Winter
Haven and Lake Wales. Par-
tially Cleared and ready to
Build your First Home.
$27,900 id #cc PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. (863) 676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
LAKE FRONT ON LAKE
WALK IN WATER, Just Over
5 Acres, Partially Wooded,
Private Location, Dead End
Street. Great Price! $79,900
id# lt22 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE, INC 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
PREVIOUSLY FORECLOSED
NC MOUNTAIN Property
North of Blue Ridge, GA
May 12th +/- 2.5 Acre
Estate lot level, paved
roads, electric and water.
$19,900. 1-877-717-5263
Ext#145


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
Waterfront, land or citrus?
www.marvadsit.com
Mary L. Adsit, Realtor
863- 285-7118
WOODED HOME SITE! 2
Acres of Beautiful Woods in
deed restricted community to
build your new home! Not too
far from Public Boat Ramp
into Lake Rosalie. Owner Moti-
vated and will look at all Rea-
sonable Offers! $39,900 id#
11209 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC (863) 676-7040.
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m

1515 WATERFRONT
North Carolina Mountain
Lakefront lots. New gated
waterfront community. Dock-
able lots with up to 300' of
shoreline, Low insurance, Low
property tax. Call Now
(800)709-5253

1520 OUT OFTOWN LOTS
NC mountain property
must go. 4.5 acres with out-
standing views and privacy.
$25,000 OBO, great for
home or cabin. (828)394-
9298. Ask for Richard

1620 COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY
OFFICE FOR-LEASE, State Rd.
60 E., Lake Wales, New
Office Building offers great
exposure on Major Highway,
open floor plan available,
approx. 820 sq.ft. RENT
NEGOTIABLE, Call For details,
Also larger space available if
needed, PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
OR 863-632-0272 (ask for
David) www.primeplus-
realestate.com
OVER 14 ACRES HIGHWAY
FRONTAGE IN AVON
PARK, Multiple parcels,
with mixed use. Excellent
potential for commercial
highway business, or income
property on U.S. 27. Bank
owned, recent appraisal and
priced accordingly, call for
more information. PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com


I ADVERTISE!


Advertise your way to Success!

Call now to start growing your business
deflisig HNetworks 866.742.1373
i : www.facebook.com/AdNe Florida

StatewideAdvertising at Refreshing Rates
I .


Page 2


CLASSIFIED


May 2, 2012









May2 201 CLSIID Page 3


2000


EMPLOYMENT

2001 HELP WANTED
A Few Pro Drivers Needed
Top Pay & 401K Great Equip-
ment & Benfefits 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp (87.7)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com

Employ Classified!


ACROSS
1 Skiing need
5 Color Me
1990s R&B group
9 Wait for a light,
perhaps
13 Debate choice
15 Hardly_: rarely
16 French company?
17 acid
18 Lamebrain
19 Behold, to 57-
Down
202002
DiCaprio/Day-
Lewis historical
drama
23 Ending with
stamp
24 U.S.'s Ryder Cup
foe
25 Letters from
Greece
26 The past, in the
past
281968
Davis/Lawford
spy spoof
32 "Me ":"My
name is," in
Spain
33 Mrs. Gorbachev
34 Big Island city
37 Aquarium fish
40 Fed. crash site
investigator
41 Assured way to
solve a
crossword puzzle
43 Moved, as a
dinghy
451940
Grant/Russell
comedy
49 First National
Leaguer with
eight consecutive
100-RBI seasons
50 Society page
word
51 Pier gp.
52 Circle segment
551962 Rat Pack
remake of
"Gunga Din"... or
collectively, the
ends of 20-, 28-
and 45-Across
59 Island goose
60 German crowd?
61 Word after dog or
lop
62 1-Across vehicle
63 Memo words


2001 HELP WANTED
Team & Solo Drivers. Imme-.
diate positions available! 48
CPM split for teams. 35 CPM
for solo drivers. Drop & hook
available. No touch freight.
Weekly pay + insurance. CDL-
A w/1 year OTR req'd. Food
grade tank carrier. 8 0 0-
8 7 7 2 4 30
www.indianrivertransport.co
m
ACT NOW! New Pay Increase!
37-46 cpm. New Trucks in
2011. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com

Classified ks


By Steven L. Zisser
64 Franklin heater
65 Frizzy do
66 General
chicken
67 Members of the
flock
DOWN
1 Put on
2 Wanderer
3 Adds one's two
cents
4 Chicken snack
5 A headboard is
part of it
6 Noted bell ringer
7 Rely
8 Drafted
9 Prefix with
graphic or logical
10 Dilapidated
11 Like Vegas losers,
so they say
12 Program file suffix
14 Sportscaster-who
wrote "I Never
Played the
Game"
21 Lash : attack
verbally
22 Belgian river
27 Not at all colorful
29 As a companion
30 this world:
alien


2001 HELPWANTED
AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Aviation
Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Avi-
ation Institute of Maintenance
(866) 314-3769.
ASAP! New Pay Increase!
34-46 cpm. 300 Newer
Trucks. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
CALL NOW! Top 5% Pay!
Excellent Benefits. 300 New
T660's. Need 2 months. CDL-
A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
Classified = Results


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31 Bamboo lover
34 Onetime Ritz
competitor
35 Per se
36 SiriusXM
Radio subscriber,
say
38 Once-in-a-blue-
moon events
39 Seed covers
42 High card
44 Online
connections?


46 Change further,
as text
47 Gets the lesson
48 Peter of Peter,
Paul & Mary
53 Christopher who
played
Superman
54 Gives up
56 Take from the top
57 Fabled fiddler
58 Can't stand
59 Secretive org.


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


2001 HELP WANTED
CDL DRIVERS- Great Pay!
Tons of Texas Frac work!
Great company! Company
paid benefits! Must have bulk
pneumatic trailer experience.
Call today! (800)491-9029..
CDL-A Drivers Relocate for
Tons of Great Paying Texas
Oilfield work! Great compa-
ny/Paid benefits! Must have
bulk pneumatic trailer experi-
ence. Call today! (800)491-
9029
CDL-A DRIVERS. Central Flori-
da company seeks Solo &
Team Drivers. Tank and Dry
Van positions offering some
regional. lyr OTR/ Good MVR
required. (877)882-6537 or
www.oakleytransport.com
Central Florida Health
Care, Inc is actively recruit-
ing for:
Laboratory Assistant to per-
form daily clinical lab opera-
tions: phlebotomy, Basic x-ray
and process lab results. Basic
x-ray license and excellent
computer skills required.
Avon Park and Frostproof
locations.
Accounts Payable Clerk
with 2-3 years experience.
Knowledge of GMS. pre-
ferred.-Avon Park location.
Send Resume to: CFHC,
950 CR 17A West, Avon Park,
FL 33825, via e-mail to
hr@cfhconline.org or fax to
(863) 452-3011. Ex. bene-
fits, compete. salary.
EOE/DFW
CLAIMS ADJUSTERS
NEEDED due to active Storm
Season. JEL's 5-day Boot
Camp, Nations #1 hands-on
trainer can prepare you. High
Income www.JELTraining.com
- Companies waiting
CYPRESS TRUCK LINES
Home Weekends! Southeast
Regional, Top Pay & Great
Benefits! 6 Months TT exp
CDL with clean MVR. Call
(800)545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com
DRIVER- Not getting enough
miles? Join Knight Transporta-
tion and increase your income
with our steady freight. New
Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience. (800)414-
9569. www.driveknight.com
Driver- Recession Proof
Freight. Plenty of miles. Need
refresher? No out-of-pocket
tuition at FFE. $1000 Bonus
for CO's & $1500 Incentive
for O/0's. recruit@ffex.net.
(855)356-7121
Driver-Drivers choose
from Weekly or Daily Pay.
Regional, OTR or Express
Lanes, Full or Part-time, CDL-
A, 3 months recent experi-
ence required. (800)414-
9569 www.driveknight.com
-Drivers No Experience -
No problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to
$.49 per mile! CRST VAN
EXPEDITED (800)326-2778
www.JoinCRST.com
Drivers Earn Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR
Flatbed exp. Call: (800)572-
5489 Susan ext. 227 Joy ext.
238 SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC.
Drivers Earn Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR Flatbed
exp. Call: (800)572-5489 Joy
ext. 238 Susan ext. 227 SUN-
BELT TRANSPORT, LLC
Drivers Wanted-OTR Food
Grade Tanker Drivers Needed
Competitive pay, Benefits,
Guaranteed time off Class A
CDL-w/tanker endorsement
Prefer 2yrs experience
(800)569-6816 otterytrans-
portation.com


2001 HELP WANTED
Drivers- No Experience-
No Problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to 490 per mile!
CRST VAN EXPEDITED
(800)326-2778 www.Join-
CRST.com
Drivers: New Flatbed Freight
Lanes! We Offer: No Tarp-
ing!!! Great Miles, Pay-up to
.60cpm, Benefits & Home
Time. CDL-A, lyr OTR Exp,
Good MVR Frank Donnelly at:
1-888-567-4969, x22.
Earn Up to $.51cpm!!! CDL-
A Drivers, Tanker & Dry Van
positions available. 1 year
OTR experience, Good MVR &
work history needed. Call
(877)882-6537 or apply
www.oakleytransport.com
EXPERIENCED window tin-
ters and audio installers need-
ed. Call owner at 863-223-
8087.
FRAC SAND HAULERS with
complete bulk pneumatic rigs
only. Relocate to Texas for
Tons of work. Great compa-
ny/pay. Gas cards/Quick Pay
available. (800)491-9029
Freight Up = More $ 34-46
CPM 2Mos. CDL Class A Dri-
ving Exp (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
Heat & Air JOBS Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on environ-
ment. Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job Place-
ment Assistance! (877)994-
9904

JUST GRADUATE? Play in
Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New
York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys.
$400-$800 wkly. Paid
expenses. Signing Bonus. Call
(877)259-6983
Maintenance Personnel for
Lake Wales and Frostproof
apartment communities.
Seeking an experienced main-
tenance person with plumb-
ing, electrical, appliance
repair and painting back-
ground. Fax resume or letter
of interest to 407-347-1036.
EOE.
Medical Billing Trainees
Needed! Hospitals & Insur-
ance Companies hiring now!
No experience? Local Training
& Job Placement available! HS
Grad or GED & Computer
needed. (888)589-9677.
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED! Hospi-
tals & Insurance Companies
hiring now! No experience?
Local Training & Job Place-
ment Assistance available!
(888)219-5161.
Medical Management
Careers start here Get con-
nected online. Attend college
on your own time. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
Medical Management Careers'
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura0nline.com
MOMS WORK FT/PT, no
experience necessary, we
train. New Swarovski Crystal
Jewelry by Touchstone Crys-
tal. $500 TO $5,000/MONTH
(407)295-1522 kontactkelly-
now@aol.com


2001 HELP WANTED
MOVIE EXTRAS Earn up to
$250 per day To stand in the
backgrounds for a major film
production experience not
required. All looks needed.
Call NOW!!! (877)435-5877
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses. www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses, www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783
NOW HIRING: Companies
desperately need employees
to assemble products at
home. No selling, any hours.
$500 weekly potential. Info.
1-985-646-1700 DEPT. FL-
820
Office administrator for
Frostproof Chamber of Com-
merce,- part time. Send
resume to P.O. Box 968,
Frostproof, Fl 33843
OTR DRIVERS- Food Grade
Tank Drivers. CDL-A w/tank
endorsement, Good MVR- &
Hazmat within 90 days
required. Up to 42cpm
w/additional mileage incen-
tives & benefits. (877)882-
6537 or www.oakleytrans-
port.com
Personal Assistant/book-
keeper
PERMANENT PART TIME
personal and business assis-
tant /bookkeeper who is
extremely Mac computer
savvy. This position requires
for 16-24 hours/wk. Looking
for hard working, honest,
articulate, healthy person'.
Few of the duties include per-
sonal errands, answering and
making phone calls, Mac
computer work, Exel files,
making travel plans, arrang-
ing pick up and deliveries etc.

Must have these skills.
-MULTI TASKING
- excellent verbal and written
communication skills and flu-
ent in English
- committed to providing
excellent customer service at
all times
- sawy with Mac (PC does not
count)
- extremely organized
- self motivated
- must be older than 21 years
old.

Send your resumes to: open-
ingposition2012@gmail.com,
Include education, work histo-
ry, and your city, your email.
DO NOT send resume if you
do not meet all of these crite-
rias.














2005 SERVICES
American Auto Transporters
Reliable Shipping of Your Car
Member BBB, Guaranteed
Rates, Pick up date and satis-
faction Daily trips from Flori-
da to NorthEast 1-800-800-
2580 www.shipcar.com
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process of elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
7 3 8 Rating: GOLD

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Page 3


May 2, 2012


CLASSIFIED






CLASSIFIED


May 2,2012


Call 863-676-3467 to place your ad


Ii

CENTRAL FLORIDA'S COOLING SPECIALISTS -
W E L |S06reen Rooms Room Additions
POWELL oof
PWL :-' Gutters Carports Awnings
C HN Windows Roof Overs
A/C & HEATING Soffit/Facia
SALES, SERVICE INSTALLATION S T4 .
All Makes/Models Residential & Commercial -
Financing available on new & replacement units 'AILUMINUM
FREE ESTIMATES on installations & replacements .
INSURLD.-TAIE(E3RIFIE[ (A(131541 6 3-937-5585
863-293-5046


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Colonial Square
Apartments


1 & 2 BEDROOM SPACIOUS
RESIDENCES \VITH -4 C()FORT\BLE
FLOORPLANS TO CHOOSE FROM.
Rates range from $465 $610
including water, sewer & trash.
\* 222 W. Ethelene St., Bartow
i I (Behind DQ)
(863)533-4651


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\ Ig We offer 1st floor apartment homes that include
1 & 2 bedroom apartments. Our amenities are
screened-in patios, private entrances, swimming
pool, weekly resident functions, W/D connections
(in select units) and so much more! We pay some
"" utilities which include water/sewer and trash.
CALL AND ASK ABOUT OUR
GREAT MOVE-IN SPECIALS!
Direitonsr We ale (onvemently located behind Pubhl off State Rd 60 nr Lake Wales. FL.
200 Emerald Ave.. Lae Wales. FL 33853
863-676-6387







NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
Immediate Availability Upon Approval
1 & 2 Bedroom Units. Affordable housing for low to
middle income families. Rent starts at $352 and $395.
All units have W/D hookups & kitchen appliances.
TDD 800-955-8771 Phone/Fax 863-676-9213
S Office Hours: Monday-Friday 7am-Noon
S401 Winston Ave., Lake Wales, FL 33853 1
HAndpSed This institution is an equal opportunityprovider/employer.


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3 UPDATED FLOOR PLANS!
Contemporary & Open Studio with Full Kitchen,
and Ceramic Tile throughout, from S405/month.
Spacious 1 Bedroom starting at 5475/month.
Large 2 Bedroom Residence with washer/dryer
hookups + utility room. from 5595/month.
yvww.Oakwood ManorApts.crm
1285 N US 17 Bartow (Aside WalMart)
1 8 863) 533-5600


J. T.
863-269-6556
Jimmy
863-430-6700
Jimmy Lee
863-877-8952


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WE BUY CARS IN ANY CONDITION
PERFECT OR NOT SO PERFECT We pay up to $30,000
Any Make -Any Model All motor vehicles, RV's,
Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, etc.
Lost Title No Problem You can also call [813] 531-4289
Bank Lien No Problem or [305) 763-1924


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* Rental Cleanups .
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Page 4


PUBLIC AUCTIONS MONDAYS, THURSDAYS
& SATURDAYS 6:30PM
We handle Portable Warehouses & Amish Furniture
23660 US 27 N., Lake Wales
863-227-7598
SOUTHERNAUCTIONCOMPANY@GMAIL.COM
AB2730 AU3820


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CENTRAL FLORIDA'S COOLING SPECIALISTS

POWELL
A/C & HEATING
SALES SERVICE INSTALLATION
All Makes/Models Residential & Commercial
Financing available on new & replacement units
FREE ESTIMATES on installations & replacements
INSURED.ITArE CERTIFIED CAC1315459
863-293-5046


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Apartments


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1 & 2 BEDROOM SPAcious
RESIDENCES WITH 4 COMFORTABLE
FLOORPLANS TO CHOOSE FROM.
Rates range from $465 $610
including water, sewer & trash. |


222 W. Ethelene St., Bartow
(Behind DQ)
(863) 533-4651


We offer 1st floor apartment homes that include
1 & 2 bedroom apartments. Our amenities are
screened-in patios, private entrances, swimming
pool, weekly resident functions, W/D connections
(in select units) and so much more! We pay some
'.-" utilities which include water/sewer and trash.
CALL AND ASK ABOUT OUR
GREAT MOVE-IN SPECIALS!
Directions: We are conveniently located behind Publix off Slate Rd. 60 in Lake Wales, FL.
200 Emerald Ave.. Lake Wales, FL 3 853
863-676-6387


ak wood Manor
Apartments
3 UPDATED FLOOR PLANS!
Contemporary & Open Studio with Full Kitchen,
and Ceramic Tile throughout, from $405/month.
Spacious 1 Bedroom starting at $475/month.
Large 2 Bedroom Residence with washer/dryer
hookups + utility room. from $595/month.
www.OakwoodManorApts.com
1285 N US 17 Bartow (Aside WalMart)
k (863) 533-5600


Advertisers Get
Two Weeks FRE
The First Moth.

gall at 676-3467

Today!


APA TMNT.AUCION ER


NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
Immediate Availability Upon Approval
1 & 2 Bedroom Units. Affordable housing for low to
middle income families. Rent starts at $352 and $395.
All units have W/D hookups & kitchen appliances.
TDD 800-955-8771 Phone/Fax 863-676-9213
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 7am-Noon
0 401 Winston Ave., Lake Wales, FL 33853
andicsipe This institution is an equal opportunityprovider/employer.


0 COM PAwlTY
PUBLIC AUCTIONS MONDAY, THURSDAYS
& SATURDAYS 6:30PM
We handle Portable Warehouses &Amish Furniture
23660 US 27 N., Lake Wales
863-227-7598
SOUTHERNAUCTIONCOMPANY@GMAIL.COM
AB2730 AU3820


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J.T.
863-269-6556 AUTO
WHOLESALE
Jimmy
WE BUY CARS IN ANY CONDITION


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PERFECT OR NOT SO PERFECT
Any Make -Any Model
Lost Title No Problem yo
Bank Lien No Problem


We pay up to $30,000
All motor vehicles, RV's,
motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, etc.
ou can also call [813] 531-4289
or (305) 763-1924


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Page 5


CLASSIFIED


May 2, 2012


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May 2, 2012


11


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Put the spring LASER
back in your step!" r TREATMENT
'N EW 'I r u1:1 .-J. I
LASlill
THlI&IAAPT .l
LOCATIONS- -
.. WINTER HAVEN: 101 6th St.NW $12
taxi DAEliJfcr ? 2i in 1 V
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S28TH ANNIVERSARY
ALL MATTRESSES Y -AR
AMERICAN MADE L 'tOCL'CQLNE r SIBtBTERBLStINEAE
2-9L9.r -- 071
2zaa^^ag~ 40 99^
1806 First St. S. Arlnr H 4 |T Hr '
Cypress Gardens Bi. .. Fir-I UP TO
Behind Bost.-, [r..113r"Ut
vie-' I50% OFF1
CATALOG CENTER LOVESYOU ..



Eileen Belanger
C n | | Sales Associate
knUIm Property Manager

SAT YOUR SERVICE REALTY
1400 Chalet Suzanne Road
Lake Wales, FL 33859 (,
Cell 863.221.0229
Business 863.676.4448
E-Mail: eileenb@century21.com
Please visit my Web Site for your
Real Estate or Rental Needs at i
www.theCentralFlortdaProperties.com L


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Adverfisers Get

TiawoWs FRa ..,
T re FrMt Mawth

Call Joanmm at 53-4 1 83

Today!


K- MHP
Eu*raal E-Mr s^ vc


ICTANKSEW ING MACHINE STE BII


*.1681i' n saPu:


S"Aeizeat e:
* Septic Tank Installation Drainfield Installaior,
* Storm Sewers Plumbing Repairs
RE8SB)ENIL& COEVlERCIAIL M
863-644-4033 Fax 863-937-5713
David Shoupe-Owner
40 Years experience
I asapsepticl@yahoo.com
SSR0451201 W 4


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ON SITE
SEWING
MACHINE
REPAIR
Expert
Service & Repairs on
all Makes & Models


HOURS:
MON.-FRI. 9AM-SPM
TUES. 9AM-8PM
SAT. 9AM-4PM


Sr~ti X~


365 5th Str..-l :'. .'ll,- e- F. :L .:i
(863) 299-3080
www.heartfeltquilting.com


\ Check our website for all the latest schedules, specials and events


SHOOTERS SPL


GUNSMITH SERVICE
Tuesday-Saturday 10am-9pm
One Scenic Central (Corner Scenic Hwy & Central)
Lake Wales 863-676-4626
IRO I
MOUNTAIN ,
50 ROUND lAMMO



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LrZ- .1 i -*- a ewitsa
This Barn Installed
From ONLY $2635


2 CAR
GARAGE
From only
$4985


Delivered & Installed
From ONLY $5575'


130
mph
CERT.


www. saba I'rnsanll dgrages. corn


CARPORTS FROM
ONLY $695


Raised Center Aisle
Barns FROM $4680
,.. ..- :, ;q o *"'-- **


Page 6


863-978-8586


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M ay 2, 20 2C A S F E SP g


2005 SERVICES
Abortion Not an Option? Con-
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ADOPT Art classes to
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Give your baby a loving,
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www.adoption-surroga-
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FL Bar # 307084
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e Ri mXi



Thediff


4000


riI A lI/ JI


rlIIMPNI UIML
'nnn


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BUSINESS SERVICES

5115 LEGAL SERVICES
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
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MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW!
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One-Year Money-Back Guaran-
tee when you buy DIRECT.
Call for the DVD and FREE
Good Soil book! 866-674-
4644
SAVE on Cable TV-Internt-
Digital Phone. Packages start
at $89.99/mo (for 12
months.) Options from ALL
major service providers. Call
Acceller today to learn more!
CALL 1-888-903-2647
SWIM SPA LOADED! Brand
New with Warranty, 3 Pumps,
LED lighting, Ozone Deluxe
Cover, maintenance free cab-
inet. Retails for $18,900.
Sacrifice $8995. Can deliver.
727-851-3217
WANTED UNEXPIRED DIABET-
IC TEST STRIPS Up To
$26/Box. Pr ePaid Shipping
Labels. Hablamos Espanol! 1-
800-267-9895 / www.SellDia-
beticstrips.com

$$$ We Buy Diabetic Test
Strips $$$ TOP $$$ Paid 24
hours! Free Ship this week
only call for details. Visit
Traderjackproducts.
cor/strips. Qwik quote: 772-
263-0425 (New Ad Copy -
Place Under
2 MILLION MISSING CHIL-
DREN ANNUALLY The only
"guaranteed" comprehensive
child safety program proven
to prevent children from going
missing. BBB accredited.
Oprah endorsed! Visit:
www.childshieldusa.com/
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Maximum strength
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May 2, 2012


CLASSIFIED


Page 7








Page 8 DECLASSIFIED May 2, 2012


6000


MERCHANDISE
6012 GARAGE SALES
BARTOW ESTATE SALE
Fri/Sat, 8-3, 1160 Maple
Ave. (Richland Manor), Clean-
ing Mom's house, everything
must go.
'BARTOW Wildwood Baptist
Church, 1120 S. Woodlawn
Ave. Lots of everything. Sat.
May 5th, 7-3.
SOUTH LAKE WALES,
4847 Benton St., May 4-5, 8-
2. Furniture, Household
Items, Toys.


6012 GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALE.
5/12/12. 8:00AM.
ALL MUST GO.
205 GENESIS POINT
DRIVE, LAKE WALES. 33859
WARNERR UNIVERSITY AREA)
LAKE WALES, 1011 Susan
Dr (whispering Ridge Sub-Div)
May 5, 8-3. Gigantic Garage
Sale. Furniture, Small Appli-
ances, Crafts, Linens.
TWO FAMILY BARTOW,
Fri/Sat, 7-3, 645 S. Central
Ave.


6020 AUCTIONS
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


6180 HEAVY/CONST.
EQUIPMENT
SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -
SPRING SALE Cut lumber
any dimension, anytime.
MAKE MONEY and SAVE
MONEY In stock ready to ship.
Starting at $995.00
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/
300N (800)578-1363
Ext.300N
6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
AIRLINES ARE HIRING
Train for hands on Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial
aid if qualified. Housing avail-
able. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.
Need Cash?
Have A
Garage Sale


6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
ATTEND COLLEGE ON
LINE from home. Medical,
* Business, Criminal Jus-
tice, Hospitality. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. SCHEV certified. Call
(877)206-5165.
www.CenturaOnline.com
GUN SHOW
Winter Haven, 500 3rd Street
May 5-6, Sat, 9-5, Sun,
9-4. GunTraders is now
buying GOLD, Concealed
Weapons Classes Daily, Free
Safety Class & Appraisals
Bring your GUNS & GOLD
to sell or trade
GunTraderGunShows.com
352-359-0134
Seize the sales
with Classified!


p4,. -4,A


6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
MOVING SALE Pioneer 30'
travel trailer w/super slide
sleeps 9. Good condition.
$4,500. OBO. 863-533-9063
evenings.
6270 WANTEDTO
BUY/TRADE

BUYING
GOLD, SILVER,
COINS, JEWELRY
Highest Prices In History!
ANY CONDITION
WE BUY IT ALL, and Pay So Much
We Almost Want to Cry. You, of
Course, Will Laugh With Glee!!
See PHIL at the former
HOLLY'S ARMY NAVY STORE
3440 Ave G NW
Winter Haven
Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm
Call first to confirm I'm there
863-299-6031
Our 33rd Year.

7000


U


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The Lake Wales News 676-3467

The Polk County Democrat 533-0402

The Frostproof News 635-2171

The Fort Meade Leader 285-8625


TRANSPORTATION

7140 MISC.DOMESTIC
AUTOS
2000 CADILLAC DEVILLE ,
less than 55k miles. Pearl
white w/camel vinyl top. Nice
leather interior. Fully loaded.
Exc. cond. $7,200 863-559-
6935
2010 DODGE WHEEL-
CHAIR VAN, 10 inch lowered
floor with tie downs & wheel-
chair ramp. $31,995. 727-
492-1630
7260 AUTOS WANTED
CASH FOR CARS!
We Buy ANY Car, Truck or
Van! Running or Not. Get a
FREE Top Dollar INSTANT
Offer NOW! 1-800-558-
1097 We're Local!
CASH FOR CARS: All
Cars/Trucks Wanted. Run-
ning or Not! Top Dollar Paid.
We Come To You! Any
Make/Model. Call For Instant
Offer: 1-800-871-9638
We Buy unwanted car, trucks,
vans with or without title any
condition,year,make or model.
We pay up to $20,000 and
offer free towing'call
813-505-6939
7333 MISC. BOATS
JON BOAT, 14ft. 6hp John-
son w/ galvanized trailer. 28#
thurst trolling motor. Live well.
$1200 Call 863-899-2648.
7360 CYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS
2001 Honda CBR F41 600
motorcycle. Runs great 17k
miles
863-285-8705. $2,800
7370 CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
TRAVEL TRAILER, 33ft
Cougar 302RLS, double slide,
queen bed, rear living room.
Like new! Lots of extras! 231-
633-0024. (Haines City)
BUY IT!

SELL IT!

FIND IT!


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May 2, 2012


Page 8


CLASSIFIED