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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Frostproof news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00560
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Creation Date: February 29, 2012
Publication Date: 04/18/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00560
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text

Hutzelman gives

'State of the City' address


BU L LDOGS


g'~~e FUN NBG T ~f~
Revelers have a
'grand' time


Visit us on the Internet at www.Frostprooflvews.com

Wednesday
April 18, 2012


_I:I i (ii i i Iii-i..
":

B

Llr
Copyright 2012 Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.


Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years


Frostproof, Polk County Florida 33843


USPS NO 211-260


Volume 92 Number 15


Several commissioners cited
COncerns over the idea of waiving
the fees, which have already been
discounted by 50 percent because
the city lowered them a couple of
years ago in hopes of attracting de-
velopment here. Through the end
of July, all county impact fees have
been waived, and Family Life was
hoping that th~e city might follow
that lead for them.
Concerns included the fact that
the church will not pay taxes on
their developed property, mean-
ing impact fees would be the only
revenue the city could expect from
any building there, and the prec-
edent waiving the fee altogether
might set for future development
projects.
"I'm sort of thinking that maybe
the city can't afford to- do it,"
Councilwoman Anne Dickinson
said. She also pointed to the fact
the city just approved a rezoning
for an expansion of the Ben Hill
Griffin fertilizer operation, and
that they too might ask for fees to
be waived if the church proposal
was approved.
"That will probably be a big
chunk of change, so y;ou nered to
FEES 11A


By BRIAN~ ACKLEY
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
Frostproof city officials are hap-
py to have a new local construc-
tion project. But they aren't happy
enough to waive almost $10,000 in
building impact fees that will go
along with it, at least not yet.
Family Life Church asked Mon-
day night for those local fees to be
waived, fees associated with their
plan to start construction on a new
sanctuary on 14-plus acres of land
just south of Frostproof Middle
Senior High School.
The 200-seat facility would be
the first of what is planned to be
a six-building campus that would
ultimately include a 999-seat sanc-
tuary to replace the 5,000-square-
foot one that ground was broken
for on Easter Sunday. Church offi-
cials have said that total build-out
of the project coulld take as long as
a decade.
City manager T.R. Croley said
the church is seeking a waiver of
fees, excluding water impact fees,
of $9,880 on phase one and phase
two of the project, eachl phase ,f
which would involve con~strucltion
of a 5,000-square-foot building.


PHOTOS BY1 K.Ml THORNTON] SR.
The Frostproof Bulldogs, football variety, are getting a little informal conditioning work in these days,
on Monday nights in fact, with a series of interesting drills, getting ready for the start of spring practice
May 1. And, it's not too early to plan ahead, the spring Red and White game will be May 25 at 7 p.m. and
the Spring Glassic will be May 31 against Winter Haven.


of a second.
- Hutzelman's annual state of the
.city address came on the heels of
last month's annual audit report
which showed Frostproof has
about $4.3 million in unrestricted
reserves, a far cry from the middle
of last decade when; massive debt
incurred by a federally mandated
sewer project left the city in a
$250,000 financial hole.
"I'm extremely proud of the
progress made toward solving very
difficult economic issues," she said.
"The economy nationwide is still
struggling, and small towns bear
many burdens due to a lack of
resources and unfunded state and
federal mandates. But I do believe
we are on positive financial footing."
ADDRESS | 11A


By BRIAN ACKLEY
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
Mayor Kay Hutzelman, who was
appointed to that post for a fourth
year Monday night, said the city's
financial picture continues to
improve, but adds~officials will be
taking a close look at utility rates
in the near future.
Hutzelman was nominated and
approved unanimously by the
other city council members to
continue serving,as Frostproof's
mayor. She has been a council
members for eight years.
Anne Dickinson will continue
serving as the city's vice-mayor.
She too was unanimously ap-
proved. Diana Webster-Biehl was
nominated for the post, but de-
clined and the motion died for lack


Calendar............. Page 2A
Editorial ..............Page 4A
Obituraries ...........Page 6A
Sports ................Page 12A


Tune up for
baseball districts


~111~:


The


FYO Stp roof News


754


City WOn't WaiVe


chur ch building fees


Monday Night Football,

Frostproof style


TO DAY'S
OC u r urg*


.UIIIEIIILI





SSATU RDAY
Lotela Gold Band, 7:00 pm, Ramon
Theater, 863-635-7222. Lotela Gold '50s
&l '60s Show Band. $20 Floor $15
Balcony
INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMISSIONS
All events must.be submitted through our website,
www.frostproofnews.net. Click on "Community Calendar"
on the left, click on "Submit Event:'choose a free or paid
listing and fill out the appropriate information.
If you can't enter your events via our website, we can
type them in on your behalf at the rate of $5 per event, per
oimmunity ditiion. his e does not u~artee your event
9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays to make payment or tohave us enter
your event for you.
Free listings have a maximum of four lines per event and
run in the paper on a ikst-come, first-served basis.
Paid listings provide additional space for $10 per day, per
event, per community edition. All paid listings will run in the
location designated for the event type.
We only allow one submission per event, per day. If your
eventrns for more than one da.


Page 2A Frostproof News


April 18, 2012


St111 being accepted
community members are all invited to the Frostproof Art League's ,
see the artistic talent of youth and high College Scholarship from ar
school students. the seniors participating in
The show will be open to the public School Artist category. The ~
from Friday, April 20 to Friday, April 27, be announced at the Award
during gallery hours, Tuesdays through on Tuesday evening, April 2
Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Student Art Show Chair, D
Gallery visitors will be able to vote said, "The high school art is
on a "People's Choice" with a penny, very impressive and inspirir
dime or nickel as their vote, up through fleets the excellent art progr
the closing day of the exhibit. The school students at Frostproc
proceeds of the "People's Choice" will Senior High School.
support the Frostproof Art League and "However", she added, "I
Gallery's after school and summer art not only about the show an
programs for children. The winners rific work of the student art
of the "People's Choice" will receive can't wait to see the pride o
special recognition as well. "People's artists in seeing their work
Choice" voting will end on Friday, in a gallery. The younger ar
April 27 at gallery closing, be able to rub elbows with
A panel of artists will be judging both sophisticated 'big kid' artist
the youth entries and the high school high school."
entries and will be awarding "Best pf For more information, col
Show," First-, second-, and third-place Biehl at (863) 605-4564 or th
ribbons as well as prizes. The judges proof Art League and Galler
will also be selecting the recipient of 635--9271.


eR

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Art Major
long
the High
awards will
s Reception
4.
>iana Biehl,
always
ng, and re-
:am for high
of Middle/
am excited
Id the ter-
lists, but
,f the youth
shown
tists will
the more
ts froni
ntact Diana
re Frost-
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Youth art show planned,


eHtneS

Youth entries are still being accepted
to the Frostproof Art League and Gal-
lery Student Art Show opening this
coming Friday.
This year's exhibit features elementar-
ry and middle school artists as well as
artists Frostproof Senior High School in
the annual student show.
If you have a talented youngster
(kindergarten through eighth grade) in
your family, it is not too late to get an
entry into the Frostproof Art League
and Gallery's Annual Student Art Show.
Entries in the youth category are be-
ing accepted Wednesday and Thurs-
day (18th and 19th) afternoon from
2-4 p.m. Late entries will be accepted
Friday morning before noon, gallery
space permitting.
The Annual Student Art Show opens
this coming Friday, April 20, with
the artists and awards reception on
Tuesday, April 24, from 7-8:30 p.m. at
the Gallery, 12 E. Wall St. Parents, rela-
tives, friends, neighbors and interested


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Winter Haven


Hospital

BOSTICK HEART CENTER


www.wintqerhavenhospitali.org




A LLAG FFIITME ICl EE AND VSEH S EA THAR


Wlinrter Haven Hospital's Bostick Hdeart$ Center is

recognized by The Society of Thora~cic Surgeons as

being in the top 10 percent of Heart Programs in the
United States, and ranked one of the nation's

Top 50 Heart Centers by a leading consumer

advocacy magazine. We give our heart patients every

possible advantage by combining the best clinical

experts with the latest technologies and the_ most
effective reh'ab services available. And it's -all b~acked.

by the hospital you trust, Winter Haven Hospital.


Learn more at www.winterhavenhospital. org or
call 863-292-4688.


Compassion. Innovation. Trust. We're your family's choice.


Frostproof News Page 3A


April 18, 2012


THE MOST ADVANCED HEALTH CARE IS BASED ON TRUST.


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is right here.


That's the Bostick advantage.


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VIE WO IN




Highlighting the value of conservation


Three months ago, a few conservationists
set off from the southern tip of Florida on an O1
expedition intended to attract attention to
the value of preserving natural lands. They tech manner.
were, in a sense, following in the footsteps of are running w
Lewis and Clark, John Muir, George Perkins bio-trekkers a:
Marsh and Theodore Roosevelt, all of whom Web pages; th
left a legacy of American environmental social media s
stewardship. Ifyou're curj
This year it was biologist Joe Guthrie, dawildlifecorr
conservationist Mallory Lykes Dimmitt and reach the end
photojournalist Carlton Ward Jr. who formed is Earth Day.
the core group of trekkers hoping to make a The point of
1,000-mile journey in roughly 100 days. They glades to the (
were joined along the way by a filmmaker, Refuge is to pt
journalists, property owners and politicians. connected lan
Their adventure an low-impact affair big-time head
~involving walking, canoeing, kayaking and bears, but mig
camping is being documented in a high-. mals large ane

Letters to th~e editor


ur Viewpomnt

Florida prciblic radio stations
weekly in-depth reports. The
re posting photos and video on
ey are ,blogging and updating
ites.
ioils, pheck it out at wwyeflori-
idor~org. The group expects to
of the trail this Sunday, which

'the expedition from the Ever-
Okefenokee National Wildlife
publicize the importance of
Idscapes for wild animals. The
liners are panthers and black
:ration corridors benefit ani-
d small.


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frostproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews.com or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
Wales Fl. 33853.


The Frostproof NeWS
Jirn Gouv;ellis Publisher
* ileen Hood General Mlanager leff` Roslowv E~ditor Brian Ackley Mlanaging E~ditor


_ I III


April 18, 2012


Page 4A Frostproof News


Primarily, they maintain habitat for the
larger animals who need large spaces to
thrive. But conservation lands also safeguard
waterways by restricting development that
keeps water cleaner.
Humans also benefit from what is now
known as eco-tourism: hiking, bird-watch-
ing, hunting and fishing. And, since many
conservation easements are on large work-
ing ranches, they help sustain a historic agri-
cultural economy and a valued way of life.
For the most part this expedition through
the Heartland counties and the East Coast.
We expect Floridians' interest in preserva-
tion will continue to be strong.
Wildlife corridors aren't only for bears
and panthers, but for smaller creatures, ~for
things like clean water, for a healthy econo-
my and for us too.


I have lived in a historic home in Ft.
Meade for 8'years. Our homeowner's
insurance company from our home in
Lakeland was glad to insure our new
old home for approximately $860.00
annually. Within the 8 years we endured
multiple huricanes. We had no need to
file a claim, they don't make homes like
they did in 1912. .
As so may people in Florida, our
property value plummeted. Our prop-
erty taxes fell too, but our home owners
insurance has skyrocketed to over
S$4,000.00 annually and most insurance
;company's will not insure old homes.
Isn't insurance based on value of the `


item being insured? If property vahie
goes down why are the homeowners
premiums going up? I am writing this
letter in hopes you will publish this in
your newspaper so other historic ho-
meowners can share and compare and
ask why we are being discriminated for
keeping our history intact.
If there is not a change in how his:'
toric homes are insured I am afraid they
will be left standing vacant or worse
case scenario demolished. This- is our
history and ihe need to seriously con-
sider the consequences.
Tanga Calhoun
Fort Meade


There is an interesting analogy
between the current Supreme Court
case constitutionalityy of the Health,
Care Law) and the Dred Scott case of
1857 constitutionalityy of whether Dred
Scott was free or slave). It is interest-
ing to note that with all the-notoriety
of the present case, its comparison to
the Dred Scott case has not even been
mentioned.
The Supreme Court, in the Dred Scott
case, was asked whether Scott was
free or slave because he had lived in a
free state for a number of years. In the
present case, the court has been asked -
to rule on the mandatory insurance
coverage requirements of the Health
Care Law. In the Dred Scott case, the
Court, 7-2, voted to not only rule on the
primary issue, concluding that Scott
was a slave, but became an "activist"
court by expanding the issue, declar-
ing that the Conipromise of 1820 was
unconstitutional and regardless of the
language of the Constitution giving


Congress the right to "make rules and
regulations respecting the territory and ~
other property belonging to the U.S."
In the present case, from interrogations
by the justices, they appear to be going
beyond the' basic question (mandatory
requirements of the Health Care Law)
and into an "activist" mode.
The decision in the Dred Scott case -
had dire results. It split the Democratic
Party, north and south; was considered
the prime reason for the growth of
the Republican Party resulting in the
election of Lincoln; and became one of
the causes of The Civil War (slavery in
the territories). The question has to be
asked if the Supreme Court decides
that the whole Health Care Law, with
its many desirable features, is uncon-
stitutional, will the Court be perceived
as being "activist" (as in the Citizen
United case) and therefore, conserva-
tive agenda? Time will tell,
Paul Flynn
Lake Wales


Obviously this first time administra-
tor does not have the same understand-
ing of the value of the "on call GYN
service" that those 9 physicians who
signed- a petition asking to reconsider
the ER GYN on call.
It is an irresponsible decision on the
part of the administrator to dismiss
these physician's opinions, as they are
the ones who most frequently admit
for consultation and ER admission to
BRMC when related to women.
It is unfortunate that we do not have
the administrator from Heart of Florida
that believes in women and how they
are the responsible family member to
choose the hospital for their care.
Dr. Ralph J. Nobo, Jr. MD
Bartow


There they go again at Bartow Re-
gional, manipulating numbers to their
advantage.'Even using their less than
accurate numbers, the hospital has
documented over 45 cases that I have
been involved with patients admit-
ted through the ER. Dr. Booker has
informed me that he has has seen the
same number of patients or even more
than I have.
That being the case clearly demon-
strates that between Dr. Booker and I,
we have been involved, at the request
of the admitting physician and or the
ER physicians, well over 100 women,
without a doubt, this is not the number
that the "administrator" would like you
to be believe that have been seen or
consulted.


Published ever\ Wetdnejday at
1-1 W Wal Strree, FrO5Eprool, FL 3.3843
b! Sun Coast Merdia Group. Inc. at uts Offi~ce.
Perriodical postage paid at Frost proof,. Florida and
additional Entry Olfice
*Phone I 863) 6;6-3-16; *Fax (86:3 6~ 8-1297
Poitmaster: Send address changes to
1-10 E. Sruart .4ve.,
Lake Wailej, FL 33853-4198


HOME~ DELTR'ERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE INi POLE COUNTY
SLa Mondhs .... ... .J1;?..08 one leas . .. ... li :3
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE INCOUNTY NL11L L
SL*. blrntlhs..... .. 5-'40 O~ne lear... ..... r39-.0)11
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
sc blonrhs ..... .... S-l.O0.0 One ear .. . ..... +65 00
OUJT OF STATE SUJB5C R IP f ON
is blonths ... ..... 941.un O3ncie.i. .. .;. .7200


Insurance cost too much


An activist Supreme Codit?


B ar tow Re gional de cision

quetine b dco










~a-~'i~l ~~u~~sFood, friends and

Y fists full of cash


~IiChamber's annual F~un Night is more

rewarding for some than others





or Tony Sackett had the
honors of slicing off
i some delicious pork.
PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR
Bob Goering, left, and Jeff Futral have fun shucking some corn which was fresh and tasty as part
of the menu which featured prime rib and both a baked potato and salad bar. Don't forget the
cheesecake too, for desert, all part of the Frostproof Chamber of Commerce's annual April Fun
Night fundraiser held last Saturday evening in Friendship Park.

Left: He might be a little young
to ride just yet, but young
-Conner Reynolds still looked J
pretty snazzy in this leather
biker vest, one of the raffle
prizes donated by O'Hara
Restoration. And is there a more
entertaining emcee around
than Diana Webster-Biehl? :



Right: There were many
people, young and old, who
would have fit right in at a
party during the Roaring 20s.


Frostproof News Page 5A


April 18, 2012


The final four numbers left in the lottery drum all agreed
to split the top prize of $5,000 Saturday night. Winners
included, from left: Deborah Crumbly, Churck Thornton,
Carol Hill and Dede LeFils.





SWords of


Comfort
often you
pi mrnemor
out1.
Fudimi


~3~F~s~~





Fort Mueade Animalr Clinic
"+9 711E, Brodwa'y. For/ Mea~de/~ 285-8652~ $"i



one~ in three PBts ivilll getlobSt at least ones In
their lifetime.l~ We aS f-ort Mdeti Animall Clinic -
are helping to reduice that naumberr, Rigiht
now,7 you3t canW get your pet a mcicrochip ID,
andl Ilfe9tie registrationl fee for the chilp. For
just $39.95. Remebrtrwk, m~arry itfcrochip fees~
don't include ~the ~cost of regiestrinc gU your I chip.us
do~e, and there is no fee ever to re-register thiQe hip
sho~uld yotu change youro aeddess. No~w, there's no
I~ Ss4s~zlPP~i~ %a~ no~P1 re asn to delay calrl us today at;
Homel~rr~g alr 285-1852 to maiike ant appoitpment,


Page 6A Frostproof News


April 18, 2012


William "Bill"
Bryan, 75, of Lake
Wales passed 5
away on Friday,
April 6, 2012. -
He was born -.
Nov..11, 1936, in
Lake Wales; where j-
She lived mos~t of '
his life.
- He graduated
from Lake Wales
Senior High in William "Bill" Bryan
1954 and then at-
tended the University of Florida. He was
a true Gator fan.
Bill married Sandra Payne on Sept. 9,
-1961, and they recently celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary at the Dilard
: House in Dillard, Ga. He enjoyed spend-
ing time with friends and family, espe-
cially his three grandsons. He also loyed
~hunting, fishing and spending time in the
Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina.
Bill was preceded in death by~ his par-
ents. Marshall and Ednah Bryan and o~ne


grandson, Bryan Mitchell Smith.
He is survived by his wife, Sandra
Bryan; son, Michael Bryan and daughter-
in-law, Donna (Pilcher) Bryanl, daughter,
Melissa Smith and son-~in-law, CBy Sm~ith;
grandsons, Clay Smith, Benjaimin Bryan
and Joshua Bryan; brother, Donal'd Bryan
and sister-in-law, Eileen Bry;an; andi
many iiieces, nephea2rs and cousins. He
will be truly missed by all who knew him.
The family received friends at
10 a.m. Tuesday, April 10, at First Presby-
terian Church in Lake Wales, where Bill
served as a deacon.
Thle funeral service followed at
11 a.m. in the church sanctuary.
Memorial contributions may be made
to the First Presbyterian Church (-16
North Third Street, Lake Wales, FL 33853)
or the Lake Wales Care Center (140 Ehst
Park Avenue, Lake Wales, FL 3385;)). C~on
dolences may be sent to the family and
the wetbcastr of the service can be vieired~
at naviv\\marionnel;onf~ne~ralhomerom
Mlarion N~elson Funerall H-ome is in
charge of arrangements. '-:


Jer r! Rudd, 69, ofi Fros tp poo f passed ~
away piril 2012l, at home.
He wias born inl Bret ard, N.C. and
mo\ ed to Frostrproof at an early age.
He was of the Baptist faith and went to
Southside Baptist Church. Mr. Rudd was
an honorably discharged veteran of the
Marines. He retired from city/county as
all EMTIFirefighter. He then managed a
grove until retiring. He is survived by his
wife, Linda Rudd; mother, Betty Rudd
and brother James Rudd, Jr.
A memorial service is scheduled for


Nellie E~lizabedi
Barker Clements, :
95, o~f Frostproof ~~~;~
passed away ~
Thursday,April5i, ~~~~6
2012, at her daugh-
ter's residence.
She was born
Dec. 28, 1916, in
Madison, Fla. to ..
the late William &
and Martha
(Fennell) Barker: Nellie Elizabeth
and moved to : Barker elementss
Frostprooffrom .
Madison in 1926. Nellie wits a retired
cashier from Futral's Foodwayin Frost-
proof, where she was employed for more
than 50 years, and a member of the First
Ba ptist Church of Frostproof, the- Eastern
Star, and the Froscproof \Yo'lman~s Club.


TOmmy -L. Watts
Tommy L. Watts, 63, of` Lake Wales
passed away Sunda!. April -15, 2012,
.at his home. Marioa.Nelson Ftmeral
Home is in charge of arratigemerits.

PalireD k~ins

Dawson


Nellie was preceded in death by; her
husband, Curtisj G. Cletments. Sun~ivors
include daughters. Ma~rtha Nell Callalva
(Warren) of Penns\-lvania and Mlelba
Taylor (Jim) of Frostpr~oof fo~ur glanld-
children, Curtis W. Callawa! iTr istina~l
of Georgia, Leigh Ann Cai~lklivay of
Alabama, Benjamin Taylor of Frostproof
and Stella Taylor of New York; -and two
great-grandsons.
Visitation wits held from 1 p.m. until
the funeral service at 2 p.m. M o nda\,
April 9, 20: 2, at thle First Baptist Church
ofFrostprqoof, wi\th Re\. D~arro~l Hood
officiatmng. Inte~rmnt~n followe~~d at rthe
Silver Hill Cemetery. The web cast of the
service can be viewed and condolences
niay be sent to the family at wwld.ma-ri_-
onne'~lliltldonfunralbue.com.l
Mlar ion Ne~lion Fu~neranl Home is in
CharIge of a trangeme-n ti.


Ro er Richard

Backett
;-Roger Richard Brack~ell of ladian
Lake Estates passed aw\ai M o nda!-,
April 16, 2012. He ~\as 880. Mlarion
Ne~lson Funeral Home inl Lake \V;ale s
handling the arrangements.


C lora M. Quattlebaum, 90, if Frostproof
passed away Sunday, April l5, '20:12, at The
Groves Center in Lake Wales~ due to: natural
causes.
She w;s~ bornl Mai~ 19, 1921 in Hoclmes
Count\! Fla.. to the late James.-L andl Hertie
I Ha\dcrinh meBrown; and she came here
hrom Chipley, Fla., in 1954. She was a
homemaker and was of the Baptist faith,
:She loved gardening and traveling within her
dal rta was preceded in deadi b h\ie r hu -
.band, J.C. Quattlebaum, in 1992, and 12 ;
brothers and sisters. Survivors include her
daughter, Tammy Garcia (Dennis) ofWin-
ter Haven; manyr nieccei, nephews, friends
and beloved pets, Cody and Butch.


Visitation is from 68 p.m. Thuriday,
April 19, ?r01_, andc the funeral seice ii ait
Sp~m. Frida!- .1p-ril -(.20, 212, at the Ma~rion
Nelicon Fu~neral Homne in Frostsproof w~ith
Rev.\ 5te\'e BaS3 ofic~iatilg.
Intennent \\;ill follow ait dre Sih\er Hill

Thelfamily would like to thank the doc-
tors anid stlFaff atE d~ie LakesTalesMdica l
Center, also thestaffat The Groves C:enter

the f~amil\ and the iv;ebcaslt cifth~::~
service can be viewed at www~.
marionnelsonfuneralhome.comn.
Ma~rion Nelson Funeral Ho~me isin.. t-
charge~ of arrangements..


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William 'Bill' Bryan


R dd

May 5, 2'012, at 3 p.m. at Southside
Baptist Church iri Frostproof.
In lieu of flowers, anj! one wishing to
give a donation to help pay- hospital and
other bills due to hospice being at home
with him, can do so at Southside Baptist
Church in care of Linda Rudd or send
it to the Jerry Rudd Memorial Fund at
Southside Baptist Church, EQ. Box 515,
Frostproof, FL 33843.
Jerry has joined our Lord in heaven
and will forever be missed here on
earth.


Nellie Elizabeth Barker Clements


ClOra M~. Quattlebaum


C COLLEGE


PhLiline Dinkins Dawson passed .I Recall it as
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NIOTIC~E OF AVAILABILITY~ DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL

I IMPACT STATEMI EN T F-35' OPE RATI~I ONAL BAS IN G

The United States Air Force (Air Force) has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in accordance with the National En-
vironmental Policy Act. The Air Force proposes to establish the initial beddown for F-35A operational aircraft at one or more Air Combat
Command (ACC) or Air National Guard (ANG) installations over a period of approximately 5 years. The beddown scenarios consist of ;18
or 24 F 35A aircraft at ANG or AFRC installations, and 24, 48, or 72 F-35A aircraft at ACC bases. The Air .Force has identified sixe alterna-
tive locations for initial basing of the operational F-35A aircraft:. Burlington AGS (a preferred location), Vermont; Hill AFB, Utah (a preferred
location); Jacksonville AGS, Florida; McEntire JNGB, South Carolina; Mountain Home AFB, Idaho; and Shaw AFB, South Carolina. Thie
proposed action also includes basing of personnel needed to operate and maintain the F-35A, and construction andlor modification of facili-
ties~on the bases to support F-35A operational aircraft. F-35A aircraft would conduct training flights from the-base and in existing airspace
associated with each proposed location. No new airspace would be established as part of the proposed action.

The 45-day review and public comment period -for the Draft EIS initiated when the Notice of Availability was annotinced in the Federal Reg-
ister on Apiril 13, 2012. The Draft EIS-i available for downloading from the Web at wwwJ.accplanning.org or a ~hard copy can be obtained
by contacting Mr.^Nick Germanos at (787)764-9334.

Public hearings will be held during the 45-day review and comment period commencing on April 30, 2012, and ending on May 17, 2012.
Please see the table below for locations and dates of the hearings. They will all be held from 5 to 8 p.m.: an open house will occur between
5 to 6 p.m., at which time Air Force personnel will be available to answer questions about the proposal. The formal public hearing will begin
at 6 p.m. After a brief presentation to provide the results outlined in the Draft EIS, the floor will be opened for comments from the public
pertaining to the environmental analysis and findings; all oral co~mmnts willl be recorded by a stenographer. 1fg11,pogmentors have had
an opportunity to comment; the Hearing Officer may adjourn the meeting before 8 p.m. :"$

City/Town Date Location

Brunswick, Georgia Thursday, May 3,2012 Brunswick High School, 3920 Habersham Street
Jacksonville, Florida Tuesday, May 8, 2012 ::--1I PirstCoast H-igh School, 590 Duval Station Rd.

Avon Park, Florida Wednesday, May 9, 2012 Avon Park Middle School, 401 South L~ake Avenue

Palatka,. Florida Thursday, May 10, 2012 Larimer Performing Arts Center, 216i Reid Street

All comments will be accepted through June 1, 2012; both written and oral comments will be considered equally. Written comments can
be submitted at any of the hearings or sent via U.S. Postal Service to
HiQ A`CCIA7IPS, 129 Andrews Street, Suite 337, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia 23665-2769, ATTN: Mr. Nick Germanos.


April 18, 2012


gaP e 8A Frostproof News


He said he is also excited because Polk
COunty seems to be excited about it,
making it work both ways.
"I am extremely excited about being
in Polk County," he said. "We've gotten a
tremendous reception from the county."
April Brown, Fort Meade's city plan-
ning director, who was at the Com- -
mittee of 100 meeting, showed that
excitement when she said prior to the
presentation, "I'm greatly excited about
the number of jobs coming to Polk
County (with EcoGen)."
Fort Meade officials have indicated
that the plant could double the city's tax
base, which has dropped in recent years
mostly due to the slumping real estate
market.
This 60-megawatt plant, Quinn said,
could generate about an $11 million
positive economic infusion to Polk
Cotmnty over the life of the contraitt,
according to a study by the Central
Florida Regional Planning Council. The
contract it has with Progress Energy is
for 29V/2 years and starts when the plant
starts operating, planned for June: 2014.
"It will be pretty good and have a
significant impact on Polk County," he
said.

op~maen tmcng fo oth Cenra eoi a
Development Council, had said previ-
ously this project is one of the most sig-
n-ificant and largest economic develop-
ment projects for Polk County.
Though Quinn wouldn't get elaborate
on the types of jobs or the pay range
involved, there are other jobs this plant
could create. EcoGen has started work-
ingwith Ruck's Citrus Nursery in Frost-
proof, which plans to start a eticalyiptus
tree nursery.
Quinn said Rucks will develop seed-
lings the company needs for grow~inig


eucalyptus trees. He added the compa-
ny has also been in contact with orange
producers in the area, too.
"We've been talking to orange pro-
ducers about their dead wood," he said.
Any kind of dead wood would be suf
ficient for the plant to use, he added.
The wholesaler of electricity oper-
ates by having electric companies as
customers; those companies then sell
electricity to homes and businesses.
The plant building, he said, will be
well-hidden so that people probably
won't see it and won't smell any waste.
It should provide electricity to 4,000-
5,000 homes and businesses.
The plant is a "green" operation be-
cause it makes electric power by using


.eucalyptus tree bark. He said using this
type of bark is part of what is remarkable.
"The beauty of eucalyptus is it grows
so fast," he said. "It grows from a seed-
ling to 48-50 feet long in two years."
The plant will have 10,000 acres to
grow these trees but when asked how
many trees per acre could fit, he said
that was proprietary information and
he couldn't reveal it.
One of the advantages of the plant's
location off U.S. Highway 17 on
land that has been annexed into Fort
Meade's city limit is because Progress
Energy power lines are near it, there are
CSX rail lines in the area and there is a
proximity to major highways, allowing
ease for transportation of goods.


By JEFF ROSLOW
NEWS@FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET

The vice president of development
for U.S. EcoGen is excited about what's
going to take place in this area.
This summer ground will be broken
for the 1,163-acre plant in Fort Meade.
The company expects with its sale of
electricity to Progress Energy, a new
step will be taken in green energy and
the start of a new project.
A company that has been in exis-
tence since 2009, EcoGen's $240 million
plant in Fort Meade is thie first of four
it is planning to build, Paul Quinn told
members of the Bartow Committee of
100 Friday. It will bring 350 construction
jobs to Polk County to build the plant,
which will offer 30-35 blue and white
collar management jobs,when it opens.


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PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
Paul Quinn, the vice president of develop-
ment for U.S. EcoGen, LLC, speaks Friday to the
Committee of 100 members in Bartow.





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April 18, 2012


Frostproof News Page 9A


s ave s


apoproving new Polk university


every day that impact the lives of each
and every Floridian," Scott said in his
veto letter. "When making these choices
I always consider the family of four
that makes $40,000 a year and may be
struggling to make ends meet. How does
this impact their lives? These are their
dollars we are spending, after all. When
I went line by line through the budget,
I asked myself, 'Is this the proper role
of state government? Should we spend
taxpayers' dollars for that purpose? And
if so, what is the return on investment?"'"
Among the vetoes this year: $500,000
for the Dan Marino Foundation~Voca-
tional School for disabled kids,
$1.5 million for the Florida Council
Against Sexual Violence and $100,000 for
the Autism Center of Miami. Scott also
vetoed $250,000 to provide security for
the Oct. 22 presidential debate sched-
uled at Lynnr University in Boca Raton
and $500,000 for the Florida Aquarium.
Scott vetoed $200,000 for stormwater
improvements at Hilsborough Avenue



i~j~ C IWill he orwon'the?
mFlorida Governor Rick
Scott won't make a final
call on the creation of
USF Polytechnic until
SFriday, although he left
$33 million in funding
for the project intact
Tuesday.
k AP PHOTO


and 30th Street in Tampa and $100,000
for a natural habitat park on the Semi-
nole campus of St. Petersburg College.
He did not veto $5 million in the
budget for a "world-class" rowing cen-
ter in Sarasota.
Scott also proposed a deal to keep
tuition increases at state universities
to 5 percent. While he did not veto a
tuition increase of up to 5 percent, he
said he would lobby the Florida Board
of Governors ~to keep any tuition hike
to 5 percent.
Scott signed the 2012-13 state spend-


ing plan, HB 5001, surrounded by
adoring students at Cunningham Creek
Elementary School. In brief remarks, he
touted an additional $1 billion for the
state's school systems.
The infusion of money does not off-
set last year's cuts of $1.3 billion.
ITwo Lake Wales projects were
slashed, including $100,000 for Our
Children's Academy and $50,000 for
the Lake Wales Arts Council. Both were
on the so-called "turkey" list issued
recently by Florida TaxWatch. The USF
funding was not on that list.


FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORT
Gov. Rick Scott signed a $70 billion
state budget Tuesday afternoon during
a low-key ceremony at a Jacksonville-
area elementary school, but left
unresolved the issue of creating a new
university in Polk County.
Scott vetoed $142 million in spend-
ing slashing everything from $10,000
for the state prison system to try to find
cheaper phone service for inmates to
$12.3 million in payments to the state's
expressway authorities.
Last year, the gove~r~rnoye~tted
$615 million in projects.
The governor also approved
$33 million for the potential new
Florida Polytechnic University in Lake-
land, but Scott remained coy whether
he would sign or veto a separate bill
that actually creates the university.
Scott told reporters he would act on the
separate USF Poly bill Friday.
"As governor, I must make choices


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Page 10A Frostproof News


April 18, 2012


FC AT time is here

Upgraded tests started M~onday,
concern over school grades


says. The math tests for seventh and eighth
graders allow the use of calculators, and
'some math tests require rulers for younger
students. Some science students may
be allowed to use a reference sheet with
information and formulas that may be
needed. Reading testing may include more
passages from the public domain, includ-
ing historical documents and works by
classical authors.
What the tests' results mean vary accord-
ing to age groups, the administrator says.
For third-graders, those that don't pass may
be held back a year. For high-schoolers,
passing the algebra test and reading test are
required for graduation.
The tests also play a part in how each
school ls graded, Ferrer adds. Because
the standards have been raised, parents
may see individual school grades drop.
"Because the scoring has changed,
we expect to see some A and B schools
drop to C, D or Fs," she said. "We know
this is always an issue, but like always,
we are already making plans to address
these changes. We just want parents to
know that their school's quality is main-
tained, that only the testing require-
ments have been changed."
While teachers, students and school
officials have been steadily preparing
for the upcoming testing period, Ferrer
also offered some tips for parents to
help their children do well on the tests.
Parents should already have been
reading to and with their children, she.
said. And, she cautions, "make sure your
children get to bed early the day before
their tests. They should also be properly
fed and ait school on time. Parents also
should try not to add to their children's
stress levels during the testing periods."


By CATHY PALMER
NEWS @FORTMEADELEADER.COM
Monday, the dreaded four letters started
to echo throughout Polk County schools -
FCAI. Only this time, the Florida Compre-
hensive Assessment Tests have been jacked
up to the next level: FCAT 2.0.
Thousands of students will be facing
^revised and upgraded standardized tests of
their reading and math with science added
to the mix.
Students in grades three-10 will be
tested on reading skills and comprehen-
sion; grades three-eight will take math
tests, grades file and eight will rake science
exams and those kids w\ho need it for
graduation will retake the 10th grade read-
ing assessment test
Polk County Schools Senior Director of
Assessment, Accountability and Evalua-
tionWilma Ferrer says this year's FCATs are
"raising the bar," over last year's exams.
"This year's tests are more diffcult and -
rigorous," she explained. "Our standards
have changed ... we're using the next gen-
eration of standards." .
Some-of the 2.0 tests will be computer-
based, Ferrer said. The grades six and
10 reading tests are computer based,
according to the Florida Department of
Education.
"This is a real issue if some schools don't
have the resources.We are stretched in
some areas now, and with computer-based
tests ongoing, it's a challenge. We are mak-
ing a slow transition to computer based
testing until more funds are available for
our technical needs," she said.
Some of the tests are given in 70-minute
blocks with a break between sessions, and
some will be given over two days, Ferrer


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Frostproof News Page 11A


April 18, 2012


they (costs) won't happen," Mayor Kay
Hutzelman added.
Family Life Church Pastor Kelly
Galati said the cut in impact fees didn't
appear to be working.
"Nobody's building, zero," Galati
said. "I'm not asking for a favor just for
the church."
Impact fees on the overall project
could climb close to $20,000, city of-
ficials noted.
However, city council member Ralph
Waters, who is a paid member of the .
church ministerial staff and had already
stepped aside in any previous votes
connected with the plan because of his

reduce city debt, by refinancing certain
obligations, that might help mitigate
any potential water and sewer rate
jumps. -
"All in all I think our city is as healthy


personal conflict, asked that the group
consider an ordinance that would waive
impact fees for a period of time that would
help any project that came to the city.
"I think for us to waitre impact fees,
as the county has, for three months
or six months, I don't see that we'd be
losing a lot of revenue," Waters said. "If
it should encourage other businesses to
come, then we benefit down the road.
I would like to have more time to talk
about the overall picture of how we
might help our community."
The council will next meet on Mon-
day, May 7, and might consider such an
ordinance then.

as it can be considering these eco-
nomic times," she added. "The city,
the council and city staff have shown a
willingness to tackle economic tasks for
the good of the city firmly in mind."


"If we were to pass it for the church or any
other business, we would be saying to
the citizens that they are going to end up
subsidizing a specific church or a specific
business. I would not be in support of an
ordinance that would remove all impact
fees. Right now, you've got a bargain price."
She added the county has a much
larger tax base to spread any loss of
impact fees than the city does.
"We didn't make up these (impact
fee) figures. We didn't pull stuff out of
the air. These are real costs to the city,"
she said. "We thought the 50 percent
was a fair approach."
"You just can't hide the fact that

Hutzelman said the city would have to
take a closer look at utility rates since
they are barely a break-even propo-
sition at this point, auditor Turner
Wiggins said.
Phase Two of the city's sewer ex-
pansion project is now complete, she
noted, with 295 new customers now
online, after beginning in March, 2009.
"This year, he indicated that we really
need to review this (rate hikes) care-
fully, or we might find ourselves in a
deficit again," she said.
Hutzelman indicated that a work-
shop will be held to explore ways to


SFEE
FROM PAGE 1A

consider that too," she noted.
The city council gave its final ap-
proval to the church's overall build-
ing plan at its meeting of April 4, and
while they wholeheartedly support the
project, Councilwoman Diana Webster-
Biehl said the city has already reduced
impact fees once, and that it vi~as a
controversial decision to do even that.
"Thke impact fees exist to recoup costs
that come with development," she said.


ESADDR S
FROM PAGE 1A

She noted the city once again has
a balanced btidget, despite a drop of
about 8 percent in property values in
Frostproof last year.
''Our auditor indicated that our audit
was extremely positive for the third
year in a row," she added. "We are
optimistic as long as we make prudent
decisions."
However, both the auditor and


PHOTOS BY BRIAN ACKLEY
Frostproof {ouncilwoman Diana Webster-Biehi
takes her oath of office Monday night, admin-
istered by (ity Clerk Sarah Adelt. Webster-Biehi


1-rostproot Councilman Halph waters ofttically
began his second term on the board Monday
night, getting his oath of office from (ity Cl'erk
Sarah Adelt.


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81
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Frostproof's Casey Thomas is tagged out at home plate in a game where every run really
mattered, Fortunately, the Bulldogs pulledout a 9-8 win over visiting Lake Placid,


_ _ ~ ~I~ ____


r__


_ _ C C __ I


Page 12A Frostproof News


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
Frostproof's Marcus Bobb gets tangled up with Lake Placid's Jacob Crom.


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~9s~Q~~Marcus Bobb scrambles
back to first base as Lake
Placid's Morgan Lott awaits
F ~the throw. Frostproof won,
~9-8, and Frostproof will
.be the top seed in next
-d week's (lass 4A, District 10
..~..c.-':.-.. tournament in Avon Park,
which starts Monday. Frost-
proof will open up against
Desoto.







Above: Buildog (asey Thomas
makes this dive into first base to -~ ~~p8
try and beat the throw to defender Ji F~I
Rutino Gutteriez.




Left: Frostproof tuned up for its 'l
upcoming district play with a nail-
.el~~ biting 9-8 win over Lake Placid in
action last week. Here, Frostproof's ~~
Seddon Henry waits for a throw
while Lake Placid's Jacob (rom '
dives back into the bag.






Jake Smith of Frostproof tries to get under the tag of Lake Placid s Jacob (rom. The Buildogs
defeated the Green Dragons by a run, and later in the week topped Mulberry 5-1 to earn the top
seed in next week's district tourney. Smith was 2-for-3 at the plate, and scored twice. Clay Barnes
and Brant Howell each drove in two.








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April 18, 2012


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Frostproof News Page 15A


A ril 18 2012


highlighted in annual legislative luncheon


and drive on the road that were previously
at risk of getting a ticket can now drive on
the road after this session. They are the
vehicles that transport orange bins from
the groves to citrus haulers.
"Goat trucks were at risk of getting a
ticket and now everything is legal," he said.
What it comes down to is letting the leg-
isla~tors kn~ow what is on your mind, he said,
and they likely can get something done.
"Everyday you go through and in your
business you deal with regulations and
hurdles, be thoughtful and bring those
thoughts to us," he said. "We've got to k~now
about them so we can deal with them. It's
like those packinghouses. It took five years
but the we got it done."
It was the same wiay with energy bill
and getting it moved the Commission of
Agriculture's Office, McKeel said.
"This was the first time we passed -
an energy bill and moved energy to the
Commissioner of Agriculture's Office,"
he said. This renewable resource, he


added, impacts your industry.
Among the questions Larry Black, the
president of the Polk County Farm Bureau,
gathered from members and read to the
crowd was whether central Flonda would
ever have its own water management
district.
"Hopefully it would be very good.
Having an identity in Central Flonida would
be very good," Albritton said. "This part
of the state is very important to Flonda.
I think it would be interesting to most
people here, but it's a difficult task and it
would take some time."
Outgoing legislator Alexander said he
wouldn't be so confident of such an entity:
"I have to say I don't agree with Ben. If you
think starting a university is tough, this
would be very tough."
On whether the $2 million to fight citrus
greening is secure, Alexander said that
money is not up to bemng vetoed. "As long
as the university (of Flonida) is up to doing
this, we're in good shape."


JD Alexander. Those who represent Polk
Voters on stage were Republicans Sen.
Alexander, Rep. Ben Albritton Rep. Mike
Horner Rep. Seth McKeel Rep. Kelli Stargel
and Rep. John Wood.
Alexander started the presentation say-
ing how reapportionment was the big issue
this year. He and others repeated that since
the balanced budget did not raise taxes it
w\as a huge victory.
However, it was the three big agriculture
bills that shine brightly for the industry that
made the session successful for the farm-
ing industry.
Those three bills included a $2.3 million
tax break for packinghouses, $2 million in
research money for IFAS to study HLB, also
known as citrus greening, and $16 million
in tax credits for renewable energy sources.
"These flew in right under the radar,"
Parks told the crowd.
And while Albjritton was particularly
proud this was passed, he also pointed out
that goat trucks that use on-road diesel


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Monday's gathering of some 80 ~people
from the Polk County Farm Bureau -
thanked legislators, and legislators them-
selves bragged about how good the session
was to the farm industry, this year,
"This was the best session we've had in a
long time," said Ben Park, the chief lobbyist
for the Florida Farm Bureau Federation,
at Monday's Polk County Farm Bureau
legislative luncheon at Bartow's Stuart
Conference Center. "You couldn't ask for
anything more. This has been the most pro
businesses legislature we've ever had," he
said, referring to delegation that took the
stage to summarize the session and take a
handful of questions from the audience.
The only Polk legislator not present was
Sen. Paula Dockery, but appearing instead
was Rep. Denise Grimsley, R-Sebring, who
does not represent Polk voters but she is
rurming for the seat being vacated by Sen.


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Lashman to challenge Judd in sheriff's race


Citrus Tour raised $921,569
lRSt year. Last year the two
fundraisers together which
includes eight walk-a-thons -
raised $1.3 million.
The amount of participation
and money being raised for
research has the president of
the society excited.
"This is an exciting year for
Bike MS as we celebrate the
25th anniversary of the event
for the Mid Florida Chapter
and the third year of our in-
creasingly popular Citrus Tour
route," said Carroll Franklin,
president of the Mid Florida
Chapter,
"With every dollar we raise,
we are one step closer to end-
ing MS."
Multiple sclerosis is an
incurable, chronic disease of
the central nervous system. It
interrupts the flow of informa-
tion between the brain and
body, causing unpredictable
symptoms that can include
numbness and blurred vi-
sion, as well as paralysis. Most
People are diagnosed between
the ages of 20 and 50, with
twice as many women as men
affected.
Those who can't or don't
inant to take part in the bicycle
-fundri'ser may make dona-
tions or volunteer by going to
www.nationalmssociety.org/
FLC or contacting Cody Yerian
at (813) 889-8363, ext. 201.
For information about the
riding event visit http:/ /bike
flc.natio nalmssociety. org.

PHOTO PROVIDED
The 2012 Bike MS: The Citrus Tour is
set to kick off this weekend from Bok
STower Gardens.


By JEFF ROSLOW
RosLow @ POLKCOUNTYDIEMOCRAT.COM

SGot your breath? How are
Your legs?
Well if you've answered in
the positive to those two ques-
tions, you may want to join in
the muscular dystrophy Citrus-
Tour. It's bicycle ride from~ I
Bok Tower to Orlando3 and one 3
of the two biggest fun'drais-
ers for the Multiple Sclerosis
Foundation.
It is planned for Friday and
Saturday; April 20-21, when
cyclists can choose a 50-mile,
75-mile or 100-mile route that
will go through orange groves
and pastoral terrain. They will
stay overnight at the Caribe
Royale Resort in Orlando
where they will participate
in a dinner. On the second
day, they will ride back to Bok
Tower Gardens where there
will be a finish line victory
parade.
Meagan Mills with the
National MS Society said she
expects at least 1,500 cyclists to
take part in the event,
"This is our 25th year and
we've got a goal of $966,000
for the (Mid-Florida) chapter.
We also do the walk event and
these two are the biggest fund,
raising events we have."
-Registration for The Citrus
Tour is open up to taking-off
time. The current fee is $310
for individuals and $300 for
a member joining a team. It
includes a $250 fund-raising
Allumum.
The walk-a-thon, which
was held in various cities in
mid-Florida last month gener-
ates quite a bit of money for
research but the Bike MS: The


"We have technologies here that are
so far behind Hillsborough County and
Orange County," he said.
The salaries can be improved as well.
"Look at the tax base," he said. "Stop
giving money back to the county."
Something else Lashman said he would
do if he became sheriff is conduct an
audit of the police academy. He wonders
if those entering the academy are being
taught everything they need to kn~ow.
"I want to make sure they are being
trained properly," he said. "They may
be passing the exam but are they being
taught the right skills?"
On the administrative side, Lashman
questions why the agency has, accord-
ing to him, four executive aides. He
also wonders why so many non-sworn
civilian employees of the agency take *
home cars.
Lashman was asked why he thinks he
can beat Judd, who is running for his
third term as sheriff.
"I think people are getting tired of the
showboating ... about the frivolous law -
suits," Lashman said.
He added that Judd appears on TV
"for the most idiotic things." Lashman
used a bust a few years ago at the North
Lakeland Sam's Club over baby food


theft as an example.
"He was on Bay News 9 for 90 min-
utes over baby food theft," Lashman
said. "We're the meth capital of the
United States and baby food took
precedence over meth."
Lashman, who has lived in the county
for 12 years, said he was born in California.
His family moved to Florida settled in Bro-
ward County. He is a 1981 graduate of Fort
Lauderdale High School and earned the
rank of Eagle Scout while in high school.
He said he went though the Lake
Worth Police Academy. His law en-
forcement career included spending
three years with the Belle Glade Police
Department in Palm Beach County,
worked for Palm Beach Gardens Police
Department and the Department of
Juvenile Justice in Martin County. He
also said he worked as a volunteer spe-
cial deputy in Manatee County.
He said he applied to become a sheriff's
deputy in Polk in 2000 but was not hired.
Lashmartwas a write-in candidate for
sheriff in 20;08. According to the Polk
Supervisor of Elections, there were 1,981
votes with Lashman's name on them.
There were a total of 8,561 write-in votes
for sheriff. Sheriff Judd received more
than 207,000 votes in that election.


By BILL ROGERS
CORRESPONDENT

Michael Lashman's philosophy about
law enforcement could be summed
up as a combination of old school and
today's technology. ,
"I believe in old school; it.wsorks,"
said Lashman, who is running for Polk
County sheriff.
The 49-year-old Lakeland resident
has several changes in mind if he can
defeat the incumbent, Grady Judd, in -
this year's election that is scheduled
Aug. 14.
Lashman is seeking signatures on pe-
titions in his bid for sheriff. According
to the Polk County Supervisor of Elec-
tions, he will have to collect 3,256 valid
petitions by the May 7 deadline.
"The reason I'm running for sheriff is
I just see what is gomng on here is so ass
backwards ...," Lashman said.
Lashman thinks community polic-
ing is important and that it is not being
done in Polk.
"I was always told 'high profile, less
violence," he said. "You keep criminals
on their toes by doing high profile."
Lashman said he understands that
Polk has a large land area that has to


be covered.
"We have a lot
of rural areas,
houses can be sev-
eral miles apart,"
he said. "We have
enough money in
our budget to put
out business cards
or a flier ... TIm
your deputy, and
I patrol this area.
My counterpart
who works the
night shift also Michael Lashman
works here. You
have a problem in
your neighborhood, call us.'
Lashman believes the county needs to
have 200 more deputies to adequately
serve the population.
"It's a high turnover agelicy," he said.
"You go there, you get trained. Once you
get probation, you're evaluated and you
go to bigger agencies." .
Lashman claims that morale is low
and that deputies have not had a raise
in a couple of years.
He contends the agency needs to be
modernized, saying, for example, that
its laptops are outdated.


Bicycles to trek from Lake Wales to Orlando

2012 Bike M lS.- The Citrus Tour to kick off from Bok Tower April 20






Wednesday, April l8, 2012


Page 2B SCMG Central Florida


4.3 million boxes of tangerines. Those
numbers are unchanged from March.
The yield for from concentrate orange
juice (FCOJ) decreased to 1.62 gallons
per 90-pound box from the previous
estimate of 1.64 gallons per box.
The USDA predicts Florida will har-
vest 18.8 million boxes of grapefruit in
2011-12, showing a minor rise from the
March forecast of 18.7 million.
The Florida citrus industry creates
a $9 billion annual economic impact,
employing nearly 76,000 people, and
covering about 550,000 acres.






Shop the

ClaSS Ifled s


divisive bills, ..
ignoring the more
moderate voices,
Dockery said.
"They didn't -
really care where
we stood on is-
sues," Dockery
said. "When you. B
combine the
12 Democrats
with us unhappy
Republicans it be- Sen. Paula Dockery
came a matter of
getting just one or
two more votes."
In a cramped Capitol office, six
female senators gathered for an im-
promptu interview. The subject: their
underestimated clout.
"None of us have been shrinking vio-
lets," said Nan Rich, the Senate Demo-
cratic leader and the only woman in a
top political slot.
These women characterize them-
selves as self-appointed leaders. They
get by on charisma and discipline,
refusing to be intimidated, studying ev-
ery bill, asking pointed questions, and
being more prepared than their male
colleagues.
The Senate is known for its indepen-
dent streak. But backbone has a price
in a chamber where loyalty is. rewarded
with privilege and leaders keep control
with intimidation.
,Regardless of gender, lawmakers who
cross leadership see their bills disap-
pear from agendas.
After Dockery antagonized Senate '
leadership during her 2009 crusade
against SunRail, her bills seldom made
it to committee calendars, let alone to
the floor for a vote.
Dockery was punished further,
relegated to offices on the second floor
vitlly members of the minority- party
'dtlidexchilded from the- powerful Senate
Budget Committee.
Dockery lost one of her hardest
fought battles against Sen. JD Alexander,
R-Lake Wales, who-pushed through a .
measure to immediately break off USF
Polytechnic in Laakeland into its own
university, bypassitig an approved incre-
mental plan for the branch's indepen-
dence. The bill passed the Senate 36-4.
"It was the best example of political
muscle I could think of," Dockery said.
Politics is still a boys' club, the women
say, and rather than follow the fraternity
rules, they've created their own.


Detert recalls .
that when she
was elected to the
House in 1998,
a colleague said
that if she aspired &-
to be a part of
leadership, she
would have to
follow the lead of -
current leaders.
Detert chose an-
other route. While Sn ac eet
not a "leader, Se.NnyDtr
1)etert has been
instrumental in
landmark legislation to offer assistance
and scholarships to foster children and
prevent child abuse in day cares.
"Women usually don't think that
way," she explained. "We don't wait un-
til we're leaders. We just start right in."
Sen. Ronda Storms, R-Valrico, Itgreed.
"If you wait until you're the leader,
you'll never get it."
The disparity between women and
men,in elected office is well known.
Six women are serving as governors
in 2012. Women make up 17 percent of
Congress and about 25 percent of legis-
latures, according to the Rutgers Center
for American Women and Politics.
Rich is the Senate's first female mi-
nority leader.
Two women former Sen. Toni
Jerimings and Sen. Gwen Margolis -
have served as Senate presidents. The
House has never chosen a female as its
speaker.
The Florida Senate, in some ways, is
a tug-of-war of cultures.
SLeaders frequently travel to sport-
ing events linked to fundraisers out
of state. And they turn to their male
friends, instead of the females, to raise
cam paign! cash and putblicity, said Sen. .
E\-el\p Lynn, R-O~rmond Beach.
"T'he womjnen, evern through they get
involved in the fundraising and they
are excellent at it, they're not involved
in the various events where the guys
get together and they do big things,"
she said.
Put another way, it's a man's
Legislature,
In February during a bitter fight
over who would become Senate presi-
dent in 2014 Bradenton Sen. Mike
Bennett bought neckties for five of his
male colleagues.
The ties repeated a phrase inilatin: "Non
illegitimi carborundum." Translation: Don't


let the bastairds
grind you dcwn. .
Sen. Garrett
Richter, R-Naples,
joked that Ben-
nett couldn't
afford ties for all
40 senators, so
he gave them to
the chamber's
male Republican "
leadership.
The Florigla Sen. Ronda Storms
Senate steers
women toward
family issues,
Detert says, while men focus on issues
of money and power.
Health and Human Services, for
example, wvaj considered a ivoumen's
issue until health coits ilkyrocketed and
sw\elledc to nearly; one- third of` the bud-
get. Then men wanted to chair those
committees, Detert said.
"As a woman, you can do the touchy,
feely stuff the guys have no interest in,"
said Detert, who chairs the Commerce
and Tourism Committee. "That is until
it becomes a big rioney issue, then the
guyrs want it."
The women laughed as they de-
scribed the reaction of Sen. Jack Latva-
la, R--Clearwvater, when he found out he
was "the token male" on the Children,
Families and Eldei Affairs Committee.
Latvala said,he's not the "warmest,
cuddliest guy," but he learned a lot
from that committee and is glad he was
placed there.
Incoming Senate President Don
Gaetz, R-Niceville, said he believes the
male-female divide is fading.
Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lau-
derdale, for example, chairs a budget
subcommittee on civil and criminal
justice and Sen. L~izbeth Benac~quisto,
R-Werllington., chairs the budget sub-
commnitee on tourismn, transportation
and econvdijtiic development.
It's too early to decide w~ho~will chair
the Senate's top committees next year.
But Gaetz said it should include an
equal share of men and wilomen.
"I think about what people's interests
are and about which senator has the cour-
age to carry an issue through a firestormr
of opposition," he said. "The women in
this Senate are as capable, if not more
capable, than the men in that area."
The women of the Senate know that,
of course.
Tlicy sho ved it in 2012.


By BRITTANY ALANA DAVIS
TAMPA BAY TIMES

TALLAHASSEE On the final day of
the 2012 legislative session, Sen. Paula
Dockery worked the Senate chambers
counting "no" votes on a bill to turn
failing public schools into private char-
ter schools.
She and fellow senators mostly
women had rallied against the con-
troversial proposal for weeks. .
S"Are we still good?" asked Sen. Nancy
Def~ert, R-Venice, as Dockery walked by.
S"As of now, we're stil good," Dockery
replied, worried about possible swing
votes.
By Dockery's. count, the bill should
go down on a tie vote.(there are no tie-
breakers in the Florida Senate). But she
jtood tense at the \ote screen, biting a
nail. The computer rallied the vote, and
her hands swung over her head.
20-20.
Success. .
The tie was another proud moment
for Dockery, a Lakeland Republican, and
her ragtag caucus of Senate floaters.
Together, they defeated massive ex-
" pension of private prisons, blocked an
oinnibus anti-abortio~n bill from debate
and prevented unregulated, out-of-
state companies from taking over state-
sponsored homeowners insurance.
The unexpected force of unofficial
leaders and whips had crossed party
lines to build moderate coalitions
: aimed at thwarting priorities of Senate
President Mike Haridopolos, ~R-Merritt
Island, and his deputies.
The Senate's 13 women didn't always
:vote together -in fact, a woman spon-
sored the so-called "parent trigger"
education bill. But there was enough
~'camaraderie among them, enoligh
powerful voices to influence nearly
every close v;ote of the session.
t. In the -10l-membher Flo'rdi~~Senlate,
where three men hold the most power-
ful positions, another groliip came into
their own.
`The women of the Senate. .
The coalition wasn't premeditated
or organized. And it often included
men like Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New
Port Richey, and Sen. Dennis Jones,
R-Seminole'.
r "It was spontaneous combustion,"
Detert said. "WVe all hated the same bills."
I`The rebellion grew out of frustration
in both'parties that Republican leaders
were using their super majority to force


Coldwell Banker Commercial
released its annual sales recognition
awards and for the third time since
affiliating with Coldwell Banker Com-
mercial in 2006 and three out of four
years running, Dean Saunders earned
the 2011number-1 Global Sales Pro-
fessional Award.
Saunders is the founder of the land
real estate brokerage firm, Coldwell
Banker Commercial Saunders Real
Estate and is a partner in the com-
mercial real estate brokerage, Coldwell
Banker Commercial Saunders Ralston
Dantzler Realty, both in downtown
Lakeland.
For the 2011 sales year, he contin-
ues his standing in the top 2 percent
category for sales worldwide for six
years, every year since affiliating. The
category has an elite membership
recognized from the 3,000 brokers and
agents worldwide, the organization
said. The Top 2 percent is based upon
the year's sales numbers. Saunders
also placed for the fifth time in the
Circle of Distinction Platinum.
"As John D. Rockefeller once said,
'the major fortunes in America have
been made in land.' The variable mar-


ket challenges .f;
will only shift the ~ -d~
buyer's demo-
graphics but .
not the ability
to' get land sold.
Right now, strong
commodity pric-
ing is affecting
farmland and
is where inves-
tors are placing Dean Saunders
their money.
A real estate
broker needs to know their market as
it relates to the repositioning of buyer
demographics to be successful in all
economic times," Saunders said.
" Saunders also led the company over-
all to its fifth win of the "Commet-cial
Elite Office" award. This is bestowed
upon companies with sales numbers
in the top 15' of all companies
worldwide.
In 2011, the firm's year-end totals
were $107 MM in land sales, 79 trans-
actions, and 22,771 acres sold. The
company's success rests in the expert
knowledge of the 15 broker associates
and agent land professionals.


The U.S. Department of Agriculture
reduced its orange crop forecast for
the 2011-12 season by 2 million boxes
last week, estimating Florida will now
produce 145 million boxes.
"It's truly amazing Florida growers
can once agamn proditce such a quality
crop in the face of inimense challenges
such as HLB, or citrus greening," said
MichaelW. Sparks, executive vice presi-
dent and CEO of Florida Citrus Mutual.
"This is a testament to the resiliency of
ciur growers and the fact they are the
best in the world, bar none."
The USDA makes its initial forecast
in October and then revises it monthly
until the chd of the season in July.
During the 2010-12 season, Florida
produced 139 million boxes of oranges.
The 2011-12.April decrease was seen
entirely in Valencias, with the estimate .
dropping from 73 million to 71 million
boxes. Early and mid-season variet-
ies remained at 74 million boxes. For
Florida specialty fruit, the USDA pre-
dicts 1.15 million boxes of tangelos and


Senate women find unexpected dlout


SSaunders wins awards


April crop estimate

hdTOps ssig tly





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Wednesday, April l8, 2012


B 4e gaP SCMG Central Florida


On ihN ofQen si aay Mulen
7:30 p.m. Monday, April 23, in the SFCC
Theatre for the Perfor~ming Arts.
In 2002, Mullen's career as Freddie
Mercury began, and One Night of Queen
was formed along with his band The
Works. Since then, One Night of Queen
has gone from strength to strength and is
one of the hardest working bands in the
land. For the last five years, it has consis-
tently performed more than 150 shows
each year all around the world.
Fans of Queen will hear "Bohemiain
Rhapsody," "We are the Champions,"
"Killer Queen," "You're My Best Friend,"
"Crazy Little Thing Called Love," "Radio
Ga Ga," "Under Pressure," "Another
One Bites the Dust,"' to name just a few
Queen hits.
Widely known as the most in demand
Queen tribute group, this large scale
production is complete with a world-class
vocalist, musicians, sound, and lighting.
Queen's Freddie Mercury was one of
rock's essential front men, thrilling
crowds with his flamboyant stage persona
and that staggering four-octave range.
"There are very few people out there
that have the range that Freddie had
- to go from low to high and just the
power that he had but also the softness
and the purity of tone," Mullen said.
As he grevir into his late teens, Mullen
began fronting bands and often heard
the words, "You sound like Freddie Mer
cury," but didn't think too much about
it until the year 2000 when he won the
most votes ever on Stars in Their Eyes,
a British reality show on which- contes-
tants impersonate their favorite stars.
He, of course, impersonated Mercury,
singing "A Kind of Magic."
In 2002, Mullen assembled The Works


Ten sculptures are on display in the
Central Park area of~linter Ha\en a~d
will be for the next year aj part of the
12th annual Florida Outdoor Sculpture
Competition.
This is the seventh year that the
pieces selected in the Florida Outdoor
Sculpture Competition have been
displayed in Winter Haven.
The exhibition will be celebrated
from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 3,
at the Central Park Stroll, in the
Central Park area of downtown Winter
Haven.
"The presence of public art is an
asset to any community, attracting
visitors and potential residents alike,
stimulating civic dialogue and enliv-
ening the environment," said Claire
Orologas, executive director of Polk
Museum of Art. "Our partnership with
the city of Winter Haven is an impor-
tant example of the kinds of partner-
ships we hope to establish throughout
Polk County in order to integrate art
into the lives of its.citizens outside the
museum context."
The 10 works come from artists
representing eight states. The selected
artists, their hometowns and their
sculptures are:
*Jorge Blanco of Sarasota, "Easy
Run," 2011, aluminum and powder
coating, 15 feet by 7 feet by 3 feet.
*Mark Dickson of Tallahiassee,
"Messenger," 2011, welded and stain-
less steel, 10 feet by 6 feet by 4 feet.
*Steve Durow of New Orleans,
"Levee Break," 2011, cast glass and
steel, 17 feet by 8 feet by 4 feet.
*Kevin Eichner of Hilton Head


Island, S.C., "Modus Vivendi," 2011,
steel, 9 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 6 inches
by 5 feet 6 inches.
*C.R. Gray of Hiram, Maine,
"Rock-ET Man," 2011, river stone,
6 feet 6 inches by 2 feet 8 inches by
6 feet 9 inches.
udith Greavu of Dola, Ohio, "Arts
Spirit," 1989, bronze, 7 feet 5 inches by
3 feet by 3 feet 5 inches.
*Hanna Jubran of Grimesland, N.C.,
"earth water fire," 2008-2009, steel and
paint, 14 feet by 6 feet by 24 inches.
*Stephen Klema of Winsted, Conn.,
"Hobbes Claw," 2011, wood and metal,
12 feet by 4 feet by 1 foot.
*Ana Lazovsky of Thousand Oaks,
Calif., a~~srael, "Copacabana Wave,"
2010, fi iass, cast aluminum, paint
and steel~~ feet 9 inches by 7 feet
3 inches by 5 feet.
*Adam Walls of Laurinburg, N.C.,
"weight and balance," 2011, painted
steel, 11 feet by 7 feet 6 inches by
4 feet.
The sculptures have been installed
and will remain on display through
early March 2013.


PHOTO PROVIDED
Gary Mullen and The Works plan a tribute to
the rock group Queen at South Florida Commu-
nity College on April 23.
his backing band, around guitarist
David Brockett.
"I had known him for a number
of years because we're both from
Glasgow," Mullen said. "He was very in
demand as a session player and had
been in several bands."
Mullen worked on becoming Mercury
onstage.
"I guess from watching Freddie over
the years, I had subconsciously picked
up a few of the moves. But when I
~started actually going out and people
started paying money to come see me,
I thought, 'I really need to actually look
a bit harder and see what he actually
does' because Queen fans are very true
Sto the memory of Freddie."
Tickets range from $20 to $30 and may
be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven
days a week,~ at performances.southflorida.
edu. Tickets may also be purchased by
calling the SFCC Box Office at (863) 784-
7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office
located in the front of the Theatre for the
Performing Arts, Monday, Wednesday, and
Thursday, Y11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 600 West
College Drive, Avon Park.


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Historic craft demonstrations and vendors
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USF Poly split leaves students out of mix


PHOTO PROVIDED
The University of South Florida Polytechnic
will remain a part of USF for now. The Board of
Governors voted 13-3 Wednesday to have it split.

ander said it would be easier to set up the
university than try to get an existing school
to focus on STEM and that the amount of
money being spent to get the institution up
and running is relatively small.
"It sure beats spending another $200-
plus million building parking decks," said
Alexander. "I'd rather build classrooms and
serve students."
In a separate letter, the Council of -100
endorsed legislation that would allow UF
and FSU to boost tuition rates beyond the
limits in state law. Other universities could
also do that if they meet 11 of 14 standards
set out in the legislation (HB 7129).
The council's letter argued that UF and
FSV lag behind the national average in
tuition for similar institutions.
"When 50-60 percent of graduates have
no debt, and average debt levels are again
below those of the nationally preeminent
institutions, it becomes a matter of person-
al responsibility in addition to access," the
letter says. "Market forces can't optimally
drive improved performance if students
don't have appropriate skin in the game."
Scott has been hesitant about the tuition
bill, in part out of his opposition to increas-
ing the cost of living in the state.-
"You want to make sure that families in
this state can afford a great education," he
said Thursday. "And you want to make sure
it's a great education."


Wednesday, April l8, 2012


B 6e gaP SCMG Central a


or so students on the Lakeland cam-
puS who lack the money and lobbyists
to persuade anyone in Tallahassee to
listen to them.
"I think that's a sentiment felt byi a lot
of the students around here," said Sage
Stevens, a member of the student gov-
ernment executive council. "We kind of
got sold out."
Current students have been assured
they will graduate with accreditation
from USF, but they fear they will be
marginalized as the campus moves
away from mainstream programs and
evolves into the math and science spe-
cialization of Florida Polytechnic.
They worry class options will shrink, arid
they will be forced to travel to USF cam-
puses in other counties. They worry about
the quality of instructors plummeting.
Essentially, they worry that a Going-
Out-of-Business sign is about to be
taped to the front door of their univer-
sity, and everything will go downhn l
from there.
"Going to Tallahassee to the H~Iouse
of Representatives and watching them
vote on this was very disturbing," said
Jessica McLemore, secretary of the
student government. "Knowing how
misinformed they are when voting on
things as important as this? It stinks. It
makes you wonder about everything
else they're doing.
"They're spending millions of dollars
on a new university at the same time
they're cutting hundreds of millions
from the state university system. You
would think ~that's common sense. You
would think they understand that, but


By JOHN ROMANO
TAMPA BAY TIMES .

The fight is almost over, and the
grown-ups seem happy.
The bill that would turn USF Poly-
technic into the state's 12th university
has landed on the desk of Gov. Rick
Scott and needs only his signature to
become reality.
That means the political scheming
of Sen. JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales,
is almost complete. That means the .
budget concerns of University of South
Florida leaders are close to being put to
rest. And that means legislators are all
sleeping soundly.
But has anyone stopped to ask what
that means for USF Poly students?
"I haven't found anyone on this cam-
pus who is in favor of that bill," said
Damon Dennis, the USF Poly student
government president. "Our office is
right next to the student lounge, and
I talk to people about it every day. No
one likes it."
The story has been told and retold
dozens of times, so I won't bother you
again with all of the details.
Basically what happened is this:
As Senate budget chairman, Alex-
ander had the muscle to threaten USF
with major funding cuts if he didn't get
his independent university. Fearing this
political blackmail, USF agreed to cut
its Lakeland campus loose in exchange
for budget concessions.
Sure it got a little messy, but every-
one wins in the end.
Unless you're talking about the 2,000


I LglY~B~IC~ I ~ r ~~rr~ llY ***-..~ n
TAMPA BAY TIMES PHOTO
University of South Florida students listen as the Senate Budget Committee discusses university
funding at a meeting in Tallahassee in February.


As to whether he will sign the bill
making the Poly the 12th independent
university is also not known.
While Alexander said he thought the
meeting went well, he declined to charac-
terize Scott's response to the case laid out
by supporters. Alexander said he thought
most of the public input Scott was receiv-
ing was in favor of the measure.
And he raised the prospect that veto-
ing the bill could also delete~ funding
for the campus, meaning USF would
have to find the money to run the pro-
gram elsewhere.


they don't."
Sen. Paula Dockery, R-Lakeland,
wrote a letter to Gov. Scott last week re-
questing he visit the USF Poly campus
and talk to students before deciding
whether to sign the bill.
A spokeswoman for Dockery said
they have not yet heard from the gov-
ernor's office. A spokeswoman for the
governor said Scott was happy to listen
to the concerns of anyone involved.
As to whether Scott will visit USF
Poly? The governor's office had no
comment.


By BRANDON LARRABEE
THE NEws SERVICE OF FLORIDA

TALIAHASSEE An influential group of
business leaders urged Gov. Rick Scott on
Friday to veto a plan that would accelerate
independence for the University of South
Florida's Lakeland campus.
In a letter, the Florida Council of 100
asked Scott to nix the proposal for Florida
Polytechnic University, already slated to be-
come the 12th university under a plan laid
out by the Board of Governors last year.
The bill in front of Scott (SB 1994),
sponsored by Senate Budget Chairman
JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, would alter
the board's bh~ieprint and accelerate the
campus becoming a free-standing institu-
tion, though Chancellor Frank Brogan and
others have argued that it will take longer
for the campus to be accredited under the
legislation.
The organization also wrote Scott to
support a measure that would give the
University of Florida and Florida State
University more authority to raise tuition
by virtually unlimited amounts. Both letters
were signed by Steven Halverson, chairman
of the council.
In its letter about Florida Polytechnic,
the council said that the state can't afford
to start a new university at the same time
that utility tax revenues that fund construc-
tion are slumping and the state budget for
the coming fiscal year includes a one-time,
$300 million reduction for the 11 existing
schools.
The group also said setting up a 12th uni-
versity is "the slowest and most expensive
way to produce more STEM graduates in
the state," undermining the case for a school
that supporters say would focus on the
science, technology, engineering and math
degrees that will power the future economy.
"You have repeatedly and correctly stated
that the decision to invest taxpayer dollars
should be based on an objective analysis of
the return on investment," the letter said.
"Plainly, the case for Florida Polytechnic
University has not been made."
After meeting with Scott Thursday, Alex-


Council of 100:


Veto Poly, sign tuition











SAR attends celebration of last Revolution Navy battle


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Wednesday, April l8, 2012


He was the first naval commander
in the Revolutionary War to capture a
British ship, the Edward, and fought
the last naval battle of the war with the
Sybil.
Between his first victory capturing
the Edward and his last destroying the
Sybil, he captured more than 20 British
ships. He helped General Washington
cross the Delaware River and fought
the battle of Trenton and Princeton
while waiting for his new ship to be
built. He was appointed the first com-
mander of the United States Navy by
President George Washington: his was
commission lumber 1 dated June 4,
1794. He is the true father of the United
States Navy.
The Florida Society of the Sons of the
American Revolution has organized this
patriotic event in an effort to remind
all Americans of the importance of the
American Revolution and to honor the
men and women that fought and died
for our freedom and way of life.
For more information or to become a
member of the SAR contact Bill Thorn-
hill at (863) 294-5730 or Joe Hill at (352)
523-1194 or P.O. Box 367, San Antonio,
FL 33576.


Three Lakeland Chapter SAR mem-
bers attended the annual celebration
ceremony of the last naval battle of
the American Revolutionary War. R.
Hagerman, M. Sellers and W. Sharp
represented the chapter at the Veteran's
Memorial Center at Merritt Island.
The last battle of the Revolutionary
War was fought March 10, 1783, just
off the coast of Florida below Cape ~
Canaveral.
John Barry was commander of the
American ship Alliance which was
escorting the Duc de Lauzon, a ship
loaded with 72,000 Spanish silver dol-
lars. This money was on its way to the
Continental Congress for use in the war
effort.
Barry spotted a fleet of British ships,
the Sybil, the Alarm and the Tobago. To
protect the Duc de Latzon anti ensure
safe arrival of the sil\-rr, John Barry
engaged the Sybil.
The roar of the ship's cannons could
be heard on land and a furious 45-min-
ute gun battle ensued with Barry being
the victor.
Barry was born in Ireland but Phila-
delphia was his home and America was
his country.


Three Lakeland Chapter SAR members attended the annual celebration ceremony of the last
naval battle of the American Revolutionary War. R. Hagerman, M. Sellers and W. Sharp (from
left) represented the chapter at the Veteran's Memorial Center at Merritt island.The battle was
fought March 10, 1783, just off the east coast of Florida below Cape Canaveral.


Theatre Winter Haven has its 12th A~n-
nual Gathering of Angels, Broadway At
The Ritz, at the Ritz, 263 W Central Ave.,
Winter Haven on Saturday, April 21.
The gala begins at 6:30 p.m. with
cocktails and hors d'oeuvres catered
by Teri Lobb. At 7:45 p.m. there will be
entertainment furnished by Winter Ha-
ven's own Brass Heart Band. This will
feature songs from some of Broadways
best productions, including many by


Andrew Lloyd Webber.
Dancing and desserts will follow
from 9 p.m.
There will be a silent auction of
airline tickets, beach condo vacations,
art, jewelry and more.
Tickets can be purchased by calling the
Theatre Winter Hlaven Box Office at (863)
292-7469 (SHOW), by visiting the box of-
fice or by going on-line to www.theatre
winterhaven.coiri. Ticket price is $50.


A town hall meeting to discuss trends
and give input on prevention needs in
the community is set for April l9.
Members of StandUP Polk, the Coali-
tion for a Drug-Free Polk, are present-
ing the program at 8 a.m. in the Fun
Town 4D Theater at Legoland Florida in
Winter Haven.


It is open to the public and free to the
first 200 registrants. Registration and a
light breakfast is set from 7:30-8 a.m.,
and the program will run about an hour.
Admission to Legoland Florida theme
park is not included with this event.
Advance registration is required by
calling StandUP Polk at (863) 802-0777.


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Page 8B SCMG Central Florida


Wednesday, April l8, 2012


For many years~, the Society for the Pre-
vention of Cruelty to Animals in Lakeland
has been referred to as Lakeland SPCA
or the SPCA of Polk County, and even at
times the ASPCA, which is a humane orga-
nization based in NewYork City.
Through programs like the Wellness
Wagon, Therapy Dog International testing,
Healthy for the Holidays and outreach
efforts like World Spay Day 2012, the SPCA
has served Auburndale, Bartow, Haines
City and beyond.
McClurg Animal Medical Center has
treated patients from Fort Meade, Lake
Wales and Davenport, and people have
traveled from Lithia, Hudson and Apollo
Beach to adopt from the Adoption Center.
As people can see, the reach extends be-
yond Lakeland and even Polk County.
To convey this growth SPCA Inc. in
Lakeland has begun doing business as
SPCA Florida. SPCA Florida's brand launch
encompasses its future vision, which
includes increasing reach and impact by
re-activating cruelty investigation depart-
ment and creating a new medical trans-


port service program.
"The organization has made strides in
reaching people and pets throughout the
state with our community programs, and
our efforts are only going to increase as we
continue to grow and expand our services
and programs," said Executive Director
Warren Cox.
Beyond its current building expansion
project SPCA Florida's McClurg Animal
Medical Center intends to further develop
its services to reach homebound residents
and underserved populations that need af-
fordable veterinary care for their' pets.
"We will continue reaching further into
communities throughout the stateiton i
ensure all pet owners have access'tb iquali
ity, affordable medical treatment for' their
animals," said Cox.
With this launch, SPCA Florida has im-
plemented a revised logo and introduced
a new user-friendly website filled with
-additional resources for new pet parents,
youth interested in humane education
and much more. Visit www.spcaflorida.org
for information.


A 60-year-old Sebring resident was
killed in a wreck Wednesday on State
Road 60 east of Bonnie Mine Road, the
Polk County Sheriff's Office said.
At 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 11, a
blue 2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser driven
by Kathleen Diane Diamond of Sebring
was heading eastbound in the outside
lane of S.R. 60 just east of Bonnie Mine
Road when it drifted over into the inside
lane and struck the right rear portion
of a red 2001 Ford Taurus being driven
eastbound in the inside lane by 30-year-


old William Jesse Jacobs of Winter Ha-
ven. Jacobs had just left work at Mosaic.
The collision caused the PT Cruiser
to flip and roll several times. Diamond,
who was not wearing a seatbelt, was
ejected from the Cruiser. She died at
LRMC as a result of her injuries, the
sheriff's office reports.
Jacobs was wearing his seatbelt and
did not suffer any serious injuries. He
was takeni to Bartow Regional Medical
Center where he was examined and
released. T~he investigation is ongoing.


: SPCA Florida's 20th Anniversary Walk
~for the Animals and SPCA 5K is Satur-
~day, April 21, from 8 a.m.-noon on the
'west side of Lake Hollingsworth near
Patten Heights and Lake Hollingsworth
Drive.
S.The 5K registration is $25 in advance
:or $30 the day of the eit nt. Runners
can register at 7 a.rn. for the run that
begins at 8 a.m. Walk-a-thon regis-
tr~ation begins at 8 a.m. followed by
the walk at 9 a.m. Walkers who have
raised $75 will receive T-shirts. Other
fundraising prizes include theme park
tickets and vacation stays.


The event will feature canine con-
tests including musical sit, hot dog
eating and a Barkaritaville costume
competition. Rescue dogs will be avail-
able for adoption.
There will also be a bounce house for
the children as well as pet supply and
food vendors.

Money r-aised from the event helps
SPCA Florida care for more than 6,000
homeless animals and thousands of pets
and people in the community. People
can r-egister a t h ttp://walk. spcaflo rida.
org or call (863) 646- 7722.


SPCA Inc. transitions


to SPCA F-o1 d


SPCA PETS OF TH E WEEK
Visit us at the SP(A, 5850 Brannejn Rd South, Lakeland.
Call 863-6416-7722, www.rptallorida.org, biog.lptaflorda.org.
Adoption Center Hours: Monday.- Thursday, 11 a.m.: 7 p.m.: Friday Saturday, 11 a.m. 5 p.m.
McClurg Medical Center Hours: Monday Sunday, 8 a.m 7 p.m.0Open 7 days a week.


Woman killed in wreck near Mulberry


SPCA Florida kicks off 20th anniversary walk





Counties to sue over new state Medicaid law


Polk one of four counties joining organization in lasuit


Wmnter Haven

Hospital
BOSTICK HEART CENTER


Wednesday, April l8, 2012


SCMG Central Florida Pagre 98 .


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT

Thirteen-year-old Bryce Duncan knew he had
some buddies, but he didn't find out he had more
thani10:, 000until this, past weekend when legions
turned ip at the first annual Wingin' It Festival at
the Wint'er Haven Ai rpo rt.
The Wingin' It Festival is the brainchild of
Bryce's mom and dad, Brandy and Shannon
Duncan, and featured wings, barbecue, beer
and bands. Midway vendors, children's activities
and educational booths and wing cooking teams
rounded out the offerings that filled the grassy
roadside field adjacent to the Winter Haven
Airport's.new terminal.
"I started dreaming how cool it would be
to have a festival that planes could fly into,"
Brandy said. "It has a unique feel and I knew it
was something different that could draw a real
crowd.
Twenty teams entered to determine who made
the best wings and were joined by more than 27
vendors, selling everything from beer to barbe-
cue. According to Brandy, the bands were a big
draw on the first night of the festival,
"People love the bands and we were lucky to
get some good local and area bands to come .
play." She added that most of those involved in
the festival either donated their time or reduced
their fees,
The Winter Haven Airport also donated the
use of the property, and parking was handled by
Winter Haven area boy scout troops. The founda-
tion and the scouts split the parking fees "That,,
wassa real win-win situallorf. We both benefited,
Brandy said. "And that was one other thing we


others out there who can't find that help. Bryce's
Buddies seemed like a way we could reach out to
other families in that same position. And come
up with ways to help them." Bryrce's Buddies was
born.
While dealing with their own child's problems,
the Duncans decided that Bryce's Buddies had to
make a real splash to draw attention to this issue.
"Sitting at our table, we decided to form the
foundation, not knowing that it costs money to
even establish foundationo"
The Duncans started by holding garage sales
with donations from fellow Winter Haven and
Polk County firefighters.
"We drove around to people's houses and gath-
ered up stuff to, sell. We raised enough money
with that sale to pay to establish the foundation.
Then we decided we had to kick it up, and came
up with the festival idea."
Even while' planning a huge event, Brandy and
Shannon have stayed true to their purpose: edu-
catmng and helping families with diabetic kids.
"We've found people through the media and by -
word of mouth," she explains. "We tell them to
take a breath, shed the guilt, and do what we can
to help them learn and cope "
"Kids just need to know they are not alone and
are not the only ones that are diabetic," Brandy
adds. "They have to know they are a little different,
but there's no reason for the disease to rule their
lives. They just have to learn to be responsible."
And they've learned that they can have fun. The
festival was proof of that.
Anyone wanting to make a donation to Bryce's
Buddies can do so at www.brycesbuddies.org,
www.winginitwh.com or by mail to Bryce's Bud-
dies Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, P.O. Box 771,
Winter Haven, FL 33882.


"PHOTO BY AL PALMER
Brandy Duncan with son, Bryce, the catalyst for Bryce's Bisddies
Juvenile Diabetes Foundation.
didn't have to worry about.',
The seeds for the festival took root about four
years ago when the Duncans founded the Bryce's
Buddies Juvenile Diabetes Foundation to provide
education and support for youngsters diagnosed
with the childhood ailment.
Bryce was 9 when he was diagnosed, Brandy
explained, and as she researched ways to learn
about juvenile diabetes and how she could help
her son cope with his disease, she found that
many families were facing financial hardship in
tryn to help thi child en
r g' hard ad dit' cery epnsive she said
"We wanted to send Bryce to a diabetes camp
to be with other kids with diabetes so he would
realize he wiasnkt 'that different' and discovered
how expensive it was. We were lucky arid got
some help to send him, but there are so many


By BRITTANY ALANA DAVIS
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TALIAHASSEE The Flonida As-
sociation of Counties' Thursday said it
will sue the state over a new law that
requires counties to pay $323.5 million
mn disputed Medicaid bills.
Pasco, Polk, Manatee, and Leon
counties vowed to join the suit in an
effort to reverse the law, whip r-equires
counties to pay milliodis of do lars in
backlogged bills. Others may follow.
The counties blame the debt on glitches
in the state software system that led to
thousands of errors and duplicate invoices.
"From the outset, we've said that lo-
cal taxpayers shouldn't be forced to pay
for Tallahassee's accounting errors,
said Chris Holley, executive director
of the Florida Association of Counties.
'And to ensure that they are not, we


will be pursuing legal action."
The board voted unanimously in
favor of the suit during a conference
call with attorney Ginger Delegal, who
discussed the counties' legal standing.
The call was closed to the press.
The problem stems from an agree-
ment between the state and the coun-
ties to split long-term hospital care
and nursing home bills for patients on
Medicaid, the health care program for
th~e poor and disabled.
The state has the authority to with-
hold its share of funding to' recoup the
money it says the counties owe. The
law allows the state's 67 counties to
pay back only 85 percent of their debt
but will hold them responsible for the
entire bill if they contest.
Florida Association oif Counties
Spokeswoman Cragin Mostseller said
the suit will likely pin on a provision


in the state Constitution that protects
counties from "unfunded mandates."
In other words, Florida can't reduce .
the percentage of taxes it shares with
the counties without a two-thirds vote
in the House and Senate, a threshold
neither chamber achieved.
Florida counties and members of the
tea party lobbied hard against the bill,
accusing the state of refusing to fix its
own errors and balancing its budget o
the backs of counties.
Polk County commissioners voted
unanimously to join the suit at its
April 3 meeting at the reconunenda- I
tion of its attorney Michael Craig and- :
County Manager Jim Freeman.
Craig told commissioners this bill-
ing to county taxpayers will affect the
county significantly. Freeman said the
county has $12 million in back billing
and in his most recent look at revenue


sharing there is a concurring cost that
wold be $5 million and the current
budget is $5.9 in the Medicaid share.
"It's significant as far as back billing
:and the source of funding is probably
the general fund," Freeman told com-
missioners at the April 3 meeting.
Whehi Gov. Rick Scott signed the bill
tw~o wveeks ago, he took the unusual step
of sub mi t ing a letidr inthe jecretary
'of'tate and ordered odffic:ia~ls Wiith the
Agency fo~r Health Care Administration,
,which oversees Medicaid, to travel to
every county to discuss billing issues.
The letter does not allude to a spe-
cific plan to fix the billing system, but
Scott assured the counties that they will -
only be required to pay what is due.
Some. of the counties have money in
reserves, but others may have to raise
taxes or trim expenses.
Je~ffRoslow contributed to this article.


I


Bryce finds 10,000 friends


Thousands attend fundraiser to help those fight diabetes


Nationally recognized heart care is right here. L-


That's the Bostick advantage. ?













Prosthetics get the personal touch


Page 10B SCMG Central Florida


SWednesday, April l8, 2012


the design details of her collaboration with
Summit but promised that the newest legs
for her collection would be beautiful.
The earliest known prosthesis that
facilitated movement is the bendable
wood-and-leather "Cairo toe" discovered
on a female mummy dating between 1069
and 664 B.C.
In the M~iddle Ages, prosthetics were
made of armor. Pirate-style wood posts
and hooks followed. In the early 19th
century, wealthy amputees commissioned
hand-carved limbs with metal adornment
before assembly-line manufacturing took
hold.
During the Civil War, amputations were
performed on 60,000 or so soldiers, accord-
ing to Katherine Ott, medicine and science
curator at the Smithsonian Institution's
National Museum of American Hlistory.
Prosthetics for survivors were so crude that
Confederate army veteran James Edward
Hanger fashioned one himself from whit-
tied barrel staves and soon was commis-
sioned to produce more. (Hanger Prosthet-
ics & Orthotics remains prominent.)
Alloys and plastics developed in later
wars helped advance prosthetic devices.
Then carbon fiber propelled function to
new heights.
Designed by amputee Van Phillips, the
FlexFoot Cheetah leg was produced in 1996
- just in time for Mullins to race in the
Atlanta Paralympics. (South African athlete
Oscar Pistorius, also a double amputee,
currently is petitioning to compete with
them in the Olympics.)
Recent developments have included
advanced motors, myoelectric signals that
trigger muscle movement and even brain
activated devices. Aesthetics, however,
were' driven by "the medical model," Ott
said. "It was 'reconstruct the function that -
was lost and don't worry about anything
else. '
Where aesthetics were emphasized, they
focused on hyperrealism, which typically
landed them in the realm of "the uncanny
valley''- a term used to describe the
disturbing response people can have to
animated or robotic replicas.
Take the foam rubber feet Mullins
remembers from her youth: color-coded
'Caucasian," she said, they resembled
'nuclear peach.
Speaking at the 1998 Intemnational De
sign Conference in Aspen, Colo., she called
on artists to dive into the world of prosthet-
ics so that form, function and aesthetics
could unite.
That year, the late fashion designer Alex-
ander McQueen created Mullins' ash legs,
carved with grapevines and magnolias-
Today, Mullins has more than a dozen pairs
of legs that allow her to range in height
from 5-feet-8 to 6-feet-1. A small cadre of
designers worldwide now creates prosthet-
ics as fashion statement.
Summit was in the Aspen audience
the day Mullins spoke. After she showed


By LEE ROMNEY
Los ANGELES TITVEs
We can rebuild him. We have the tech-
nology. We can make him better than he
was. Better ... stronger ... faster.
-Oening to "The Six Million Dollar
Man"
As a boy, Scott Summit was entranced by
that television show's premise. As an indus-
trial designer, he has made it his business.
Summit makes legs.
SChrome-plated legs. Leather-coated legs.
Ings, some laser-etched with tribal tattoos,
that mirror the shape of an amputee's
sound limb without pretending in the least
to be human.
Prosthetics long have focused on func-
tion. But the same design sensibility that
Shas come to influence practical items like
smartphones is turning synthetic limbs
into a platform for self-expression. As Sum
mit helps fulfill that desire, he is influenc-
ing what it means to live with a disability.
Designer limbs must "represent person-
ality as well as physicality," Summit said
recently from his work space on the upper
floor of a light-dappled building near
downtown San Francisco.
"The thought was, if it was beautifully
sculpted and crafted, it would change ...
the way the person actually perceives their
own body and, hopefully, it would then
change the way society sees amputees."
Modem prosthetic engineering -
~cutting-edge suspension hardware on
titanium rods and carbon graphite sprint
ing legs has done wonders for utility but
little to reference the human form. And to
some armputees, attempts to mimic the
real thing flesh-toned silicone limbs,
complete with fake veins just don't seem
right.
Summit's company, Bespoke Innova-
tiohs, takes off-the-shelfpro~:shetics with
the latest advances and surrounds them in
personalized fairingss," a term borrowed
from the shapely casings that reduce drag -
on motorcycles.
His clients tend to be young and image-
conscious wounded military personnel
and injured motorcyclists are prominent.
To spread the word about the emerging de-
sign field, Summit is collaborating with ce-
lebrity amputees, among them Paralympic
record-setter Aimee Mullins, who changed
the conversation when she walked down
'a London fashion runway 14 yeats ago in
designer legs cared from solid ash.
"What Scott's onto is taking something -
that was ... at best functional and elevating
it to something that is coveted by people
who have legs of flesh and bone," said Mul-
lins, 36, who was bomn without fibulae and
'had both legs amputated in infancy.
"fA prosthetic limb doesn't represent the
need to replace loss anymore. It can stand
as a symbol that the wearer has the power
to create whatever it is that they want to
create in that space."
The model and actress declined to spill


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Army veteran Matt Sullivan chose to have the logo for NFL team the San Diego Chargers stamped
on the polished calf fairing of his customized prosthetic leg made by Bespoke Innovations.


off two sets of legs one lifelike and the
other utilitarian he began to puzzle out
an alternative, "something with the grace
and fluid lines that came from the body,"
he said, "that is still visibly a product of a
designer."
Technology helped. A process known as
3D digital printing allows one-of-a-kind
designs that once would have been too
costly or complex to carve by hand or cre-
ate by injection mold to be produced with
a few computer keystrokes.
Summit's goal was lofty to create a
fully functional personalized prosthesis
that could be printed from lightweight,
durable materials for Third World consum-
ers, whose good legs would be scanned
with a portable camera. By 2008, he devel-
oped one at a cost of $4,000, a sharp drop
from what would have totaled more than
$60,000 in machined parts. But the price
was still too high.
Summit said he was down to $1,000 in
savings drinking cheap beer at happy
hour two-for-one specials when he
teamed up with Kenneth Trauner, an
orthopedic surgeon and engineer. The pair
founded Bespoke in 2009 and last year
began to sell fairings.
The devices, which typically cost
between $4,000 and $6,000 make up a
small slice of Bespoke's activity (Summit
said he can't discuss what's coming next, as
patents are pending). But they have made
a mark in the design world.
First, designers have an intimate conver-
sation with the customer about his or her
sense of self. The fairing's shape is dictated
by a digital scan of the mirrored limb. In
the case of double-amputees, Bespoke has
used stand-ins. The form is "laser sintered"
in durable nylon and can suggest patterns
of lace, herringbone and more. Further


adornment comes with chrome plating,
leather sheathing, fabric coatings and laser
etching.
Their designs have matched customers'
tattoos, complemented the stitching on
a Channel handbag and referenced the
grill of one German amputee's beloved
Volkswagen GTI.
The company began marketing the
fairings last year, ramping up slowly with
word-of-mouth referrals and outreach to
veterans. Summit declined to release exact
numbers but said the company is on track
to produce hundreds annually by next
year. Although private insurers have largely
balked at covering the cost, Summit said,
a growing number ofVeterans Adminis-
tration hospitals are making the fairings
available. .
When retired Army Sgt. Matthew Sul-
.livan, whtise foot was blown off by a land
mine in Afghanistan, showed up a few
months ago at the San Diego VA's prosthet-
ics lab to get his device adjusted, he said,
his jaw dropped.
Summit and Bespoke employee Chad
Crittenden -who lost a leg to cancer and
was among the first to receive a fairing -
were there scanning soldiers for designer
prosthetics. They squeezed Sullivan, a
sports enthusiast who favors kn~ee-length
shorts, into their schedule.
Sullivan's fa~iring mirrors the powerful
contours of his good leg. On the chrome-
plated calf piece is a laser-etched logo of
the San Diego Chargers.
"It no longer reminds them of some hor-
rific injury they had," Wayne Koniuk, a San
Francisco prosthetist, said. "They think,
'That thing is way cool."'
"Kind of in a weird way," Sullivan said,
"you feel like you've gotten a part of you
back."


You deserve personalized quality health care!

Benigno Feliciano, M.D

%a Diplomate of the American
SBoard of Internal Mledicine
~o~~a~rrg a~l Cardiac Diseases -
High Blood Pressure
t; adult illnesses Pulmonary Diseases
and86 diseases: Osteo/ Rheumatoid Arthriti
*Hypo/Hyperthyroidism
Diabetes
1137 Dru d Circle
Skin Diseases/ Cancer
Lake Wales, Florida
High Cholesterol
2000 Osprey Blvdl., Suite 110 Strokes
Bartow, Florida
So habla Esparaol
Monday Friday: 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
863-533-1 61.7
Accepting new patients 16 and older
Walk ins welcome Same day appointments
Internal MEedicine Insstitute, P~.A -










Wake Forest offers epilepsy information


Keeping abreast with blood


WELL NEWS
Scott LaFee



writing in the journal Molecular &
Cellular Proteomics, the McGill re-
searchers say they've developed the
beginnings of one. They tested an early
version on 17 volunteers already diag-
nosed with a type of breast cancer and
11 healthy controls. The test identified
a subset of six of 32 surveyed proteins
that could, in combination, reveal the
presence of cancer.
The next task is to expand the study
with additional markers and a greater
diversity of patients and cancer types.

BODY OF KNOWLEDGE

ro adlt5 hmanisnpin rcompaessies
to rught.

GET ME THAT. STAT!
A University of Michigan School of
Public Health study found that Cau-
casian patients were 1.52 times more -


State to challenge autism ruling


Wednesday, April l8, 2012


SCMG centrall Florida Page 11B


DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I saw a copy
of your column in which' a writer asked
about resources for epilepsy informa- .
tion other than the Internet. I thought I
might let you know that I have operated
a nationwide, toll-free information line
on epilepsy, called the Epilepsy- Infor-
mation Service, since 19~'9. We'1 ha\e
taken more thart half a million calls dur-
ing this time and are available 8 a.m. to
5 p.m., Monday through Friday. We are
more than happy to discuss most any
aspect of epilepsy and its ramifications
with callers. When we don't have the
answers, we will do everything we can to
seek them out, if there are answers. We
also make referrals to other key agencies
or resources that may not be known to
the caller. If there is any way we can be
of assistance to those seeking infornia-
tion or support, \v;e are happy to do so.
Our toll-free number is 800-642-0500 -
E! Gibson, director, Epilepsy Information
Service, Wake Forest School of Medicine.
ANSWER: Thank you so much for
making my readers and me cognizant
of your services. I receive many ques-
tions from readers who have epilepsy
or have a relative or friend who has
it. They will be happy to learn of this
information center.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am 90 years


enlarged gland squeezes the urethra
so a full bladder can never completely
empty itself. Men with an enlarged
gland wake up several times a night be-
cause their bladders fill up with urine
in short order.
Your idea of using a stent to prop
open the urethra is a wonderful one. A
stent is a small metal coil that's self-
expanding. Stents are used to prop
open heart arteries that have become
clogged from cholesterol buildup.
Stents have saved many from a heart
attack.
Urethral stents have been devised
and tried. Most urologists have aban-
doned their use. Minerals in the urine
often deposit on the stent and eventu-
ally block it. Secondly, in the urethra,
scar tissue adds to stent obstruction.
And finally, it is techimically difficult to
remove a urethral stent.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am a
71-year-old male in good health for the
most part. Just recently I had an experi-
ence that my doctor said was very un- .
usual. One day I started experiencing
abdominal pain in the afternoon. By
6 p.m., it was so bad that my wife took
me to the emergency room. My blood
pressure was out of sight, and they dis-
covered that my intestine had wrapped


around itself and was choking off. They
also discovered that my abdominal
organs were reversed.
Have you ever come across this in
your practice? J.B.
ANSWER: Only last week a man in
his 70s wrote that he had had an ab-
dominal scan that showed malrotation
of his abdominal organs. Things that
should be on the right were on the left,
and vice versa. For him it had caused
no problems.
For you, malrotation led to emergen-
cy surgery. The transposed intestines
twisted on themselves and created an 1
obstruction. This is volvulus. It's a con-
dition that has to be rectified quickly.
No, I have never had a case of trans-
position of abdominal organs, or vol-
vulus. I have a surgeon friend who did,
and he insisted on talking me through
the case minute by minute.

Dr Donohue regrets that he is unable
to answer individual letters, but he will
incorporate them in his column when-
ever possible. Readers may write him
or request an order form of available
health newsletters atRO. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Readers may
also order health newsletters from www.
rbmamall.com.


old. Aside from my legs, I still have my
marbles and working parts. I had can.
cer of the prostate three times. I have
asked several urologists plus mine,
but don't get a sensible answer. T[hope
you can offer one. Why can't they put a
stent in the prostate so it doesn't block
the flow of urine when it enlarges? The
VA gave me up at 80 and said I wouldn't
die from prostate cancer. Thank you.
.- D.S.
ANSWER: You're talking about two
separate conditions: prostate cancer
and prostate enlargement. It's prostate
enlargement that's the usual cause of
an inability to empty the bladder. The
urethra, the tube that runs from the
bladder and through the penis, also
passes through the prostate gland. An


One in eight women will be diag-
nosed with breast cancer during her
lifetime. Early detection boosts the
odds of successful treatment and
long-term survival, but current diag-
nostic technologies can be problem-
atic. Mammograms, for example, are
cumbersome, costly and in many cases,
detect cancer only at an advanced
stage. Scientists at McGill University
are w\o rking on what diay IfdirovE~o be a
radical new and faster way of diagnos-
mng breast cancer in a drop of blood.
For years, researchers focused on
perfecting a test that analyzed the pres-
ence of a particular, telltale biomarker
called carcinoembryonic antigen,
or CEA. But CEA is also foutiid in.the
blood of healthy people, and its level of
concentration varies by genetic back-
ground and lifestyle.

a bige g and hp flye btecrk p
ture. They want to create a molecular
portrait that simultaneously measures
multiple blood proteins and identifies
the combination of signature mol-
ec ls that make up cancer's character-
istic "fingerprint.
No such test current exists, but


likely to be prescribed antidepressants
for major depressive disorders than
Hispanic or African-American patients
with similar ills. When prescribed, how-
ever, the type of medication chosen by
the physician did not vary by race or
ethnicity.
That was not true, however, when
study authors looked at Medicare and
Medicaid patients. In those cases, they
found Medicare and Medicaid patients'
were 31 percent and 38 percent less
likely to be' prescribed the newest gen-
eration of antidepressants compared to
patients with private insurance.

LIFE IN BIG MACS
One hour of sitting in a Jacuzzi burns :
68 calories (based on a 150-pound per-
son) or the equivalent of 0.1 Big Macs.

COUNTS
Average amount, in dollars, Medicare
spends between the time a patient is -
diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and
related disorders and the time the pa-
tient enters it nursing home $29,743.
,Source:
]udith Bentkover Brown University


DOC TA~LK


Pulsatile beating, as'in a pulsatile
mass

PHOBIA OF THE WEEK
Atychiphobia fear of failure

NEVER SAY DIET
The Major League Eating speed-
eating record for cream-filled, glazed
doughnuts is 47 in five minutes, held
by Patrick Bertoletti.

OBSERVATION
"If the doctor cures, the sun sees it;
if he kills, the earth hides it."
Scottish proverb

CURTAIN CALLS
In 1987, Franco Brun, a 22-year-old
prisoner in Canada's Toronto East De-
tentio~n Center, choked to death while
attempting to swallow a Gideon's Bible.
To fnd out more about Scott LaFee,
visit the Creators Syndicate website at
www.creators.com.


By JIM SAUNDERS
THE NEws SERVICE OF FLORIDA

The state Agency for Health Care
Administration likely will appeal a
federal judge's ruling that requires the
Medicaid program to provide a type of
intensive treatment to autistic children.
AHCA refused to cover the treatment,
contending in part that it is experimen-
tal and not medically necessary. But
Miami federal judge Joan Lenard last
month ordered the agency to provide
the treatment, known as applied
behavior analysis-
"If these children do not receive (ap-
plied behavior analysis) in the primary
years of development up to age 6 and
then to 12 years of age, the children
may be left with irreversible language
and behavioral impairments," Lenard
wrote in a March 26 order.


AHCA has started carrying out Lezia-
rd's order. But spokeswoman Michelle
Dahnke said in an email Thursday that
the agency "intends to appeal the rul-
ing" to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals.
Dahnke said she could not com-
ment on the grounds for the appeal.
But among the issues in the case is the
state's discretion to determine whether
Medicaid services are medically neces-
sary and, in a related issue, whether
they are experimental.
"Federal courts have repeatedly
held that the states can define medical
necessity to exclude unproven and ex-
perimental treatments," the agency said
in a court document filed last month
before Lenard held a trial and issued
her ruling. .
The lawsuit, filed in February 2011,
named three children as plaintiffs. But


Lenard's ruling applies to thousands of
children in the Medicaid program who
have been' diagnosed with autism or
a broader classification of conditions
called "autism spectrum disorder."
Applied behavior analysis is a type of
treatment that can include such things
as one-on-one therapy sessions and re-
wards to help correct children's behav-
ioral problems. Miriam Harmatz,
a Florida Legal Services attorney who
represented the children in the case
against AHCA, disputed that the treat-
ment is experimental and said it is
already covered in many private health-
insurance plans.
By one estimate, including the treat-
ment in the Medicitid program would
cost $12.2 million a year though
AHCA said in the court document last
month that the cost could be "signifi-
cantly higher."


Harmatz, however, said Thursday that
providing the coverage would save money
long term because it would help children
go toycdhool and later get jobs. That could
help prevent them from needing govern-
ment assistance in the future.
In the case, the two sides have battled
about stutiies and analyses that evalu-
ated applied behavior analysis. The
court- document that AHCA filed before
the trial said it is "abundantly clear that
AHCA has not acted arbitrarily or
capriciously" in deciding against cover-
ing the treatment.
But Lenard flatly rejected that con-
clusion. She pointed to a "plethora" of '
analyses and studies that shows the
treatment is "an effective and signifi-
cant treatment to prevent disability and
~restore developmental skills to children
with autism and (autism spectrum
disorder) .


| _

/


TO YOUR
GOOD
HEALTH


Dr. Pa
00001Ue











Diagnostic aid for Alzheimer's gets FDA approval


A TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT PUT OUR


OWN CARE COORDINATOR BACK


IN THE SADDLE ~AGAIN.



"MyPF wh-ole Ehunily is channd'l[ that myr ImJee

replacemert gave me my life back...espcially
myTT horse, Hoc 111~ Badger."
Christene Grifhin, RN
folvss RepFla~~'Conet Gr7~re Gwdnerr



Cthristene chose our Center because as an OR nurse, she
~11 nworked directly with the surgical team for five years. It wvas also
because sh~e wntrned the best technology with the most-
~~. ~n:comp~assionate care. And it certainly was a plus that the Center
Is rankiedby Her"althclr~ades, the leading independent health care
ii ~ratings organizations,. in the top 10960 nationally for Orthopedic
~I Servics., Now,, Christene is our Joint Replacement Care
Coordinator, sharing her knowledge, her insight,

:a- her compassion...and her new lease on life.
Take y-our first step toward a life free of joint pain.
Call (863): 402-3627 or visit mvwK~.FHHeeartlandoorg

]FLORZIDA HOSPITAL
I HFARTLAND MEDICAL CENTER


,0age 12B SCMG centrall Florida


Wednesday, April l8, 2012


doctors could agree about what they
See. The company has devised online
training videos and in-person lectures.
R. Edward Coleman, a consultant
to Eli Lilly and professor of radiol-
ogy at Duke University Medical
Center, said, "This approval marks a
great advancement in nuclear medi-
cine practice."
Amyloid can be present without
symptoms of dementia. "That's why
we say this is not a stand-alone
diagnostic; this is just one test that
is an adjunct in helping physicians
come up with the diagnosis," Skov-
ronsky said.
Avid's technology was developed
after a decade of work by Hank
Kung, a Pemri chemist, who wei~ked
with Skorronisky\.:K ung remainss a
consultant gbd adviser.
Pharmaceutical companies are
testing several new Alzheimer's
drugs aimed at reducing amyloid-
plaque buildup in the brain.
"In the clinical trials that are test-
ing those drugs, they are also using
our compound in arr investigational
manner to see if they can iden-
tify the right patients to treat and
monitor their response to therapy,"
Skovronsky said.
Avid raised $70 million before Eli
Lilly bought the company. Earlier
investors included Safeguard Scien-
tifics Inc. of Wayne, Alta Partners,
AllianceBernstein Venture Fund,
Pfizer Strategic Investments Group,
RK Ventures, and BioAdvance.
The company also is working on
diagnostic imaging agents for Par-
kinson's, diabetes and other neuro-
degenerative diseases.


By LINDA LOYD
THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

A radioactive compound that
lights up plaques in the brain to
help diagnose Alzheimer's disease
has been approved by the Food and
Drug Administration for use in pa- :
tients being evaluated for Alzheing :
er's and other causes of cognitive 3
decline.
The imaging agent, Amyvid, wag
developedd by a Philadelphia biot eh
start-up, Avid Radiopharmaceutid~s
Inc., now owned by Eli Lilly & Co.
It can show amyloid deposits in the
brain that are visible on positron-
emission tomography (PET) scans.
The product got theggreen light late
Friday and willii be artlilable in Junie.
Spun out oi research at the Uni-
versity of Pen niyla n ia, 4tid was
bought in November 29:10 by Eli
Lilly for an initial $3d00 million. The
deal called for an additional $500
million if certain commercial and
regulatory milestones were reached,
including FDA approval of the
chemical known as florbetapir F 18
injection.
The dye binds with plaques that
are a marker of Alzheimer's disease
and that have been studied in sev-
eral thousand people and in three
clinical studies.
"We're excited. The approval
means that this product will finally
be available to the patients who
need, and can benefit from, this,"
said Avid Radiopharmaceuticals'
founder and chief executive officer,
Daniel Skovronsky, 39, a Penn neu-
ropathologist.


PHOTO PROVIDED


"The type of patient who will ben-
efit from this test are people who have
symptoms of cognitive decline, such as
memory loss," he said. "A physician can
order the scan, and it will give them
information about the presence, or ab-
sence, of amyloid plaques in the brain."
Amyloid plaques are a "hallmark -
pathology" of Alzheimer's disease,
but the diagnosis is "sometimes
given inappropriately," Skovronsky
said. "Out of all the patients who
get a diagnosis of Alzheimer's, one
out of five turn out not to have it.
They had something else," such as
vascular disease, stroke, Parkinson's
disease, or "something as com-
mon as depression that can cause
cognitive decline in the elderly."


Amyvid could help doctors rule out
Alzheimer's in some patients with
memory problems. Avid's 75 em-
ployees are working with a team at
Eli Lilly in Indianapolis on the com-
mercial lalimch, sales and marketing.
"It's our desire to make this widely
available in the United States, begin-
ning in June," Skovronsky said. "It
will be up to individual physicians
and their imaging center to decide
whether they want to offer it."
Experts say as many as 5.4 million
Americans of all ages have Alzheim-
er's, a memory-robbing disease.
Before granting approval, the FDA
urged Avid to develop training for
physicians so that there would be uni-
formity in reading the scans and that







r I I Ir -~I I I- I I


231i Cypress Gardens 8lid (WH)~: 842iT~awes itd (~PP 725 N~ Lakeiredh~Plivtf7WI ;;3591 1N US HWF~i
5 BRI4 BA 2 storyi 3 BR,2Ba on 5 b Acres r 39,RT848 bn Quer 2 Arres (Commercal Property)
3 Car Garage Plreat Walt Detrached Gadrage 5 174t 91 Footage
Hardwood,Carpet &1116 Fenced W Fruit Tre- Endlosed.Pool airge: Parketg Area .
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To have one

of your homes
featured here, please call
8 63-676-3467



how easy it is


III


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CIOU;S LIVING; ROOMt, SPLIT BEDROOM PLAN WITH LARGE M 1NTl I R
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STl~oP uT OUr~l O~FFICE: FO Al REE -. LIST Of: I-ORECi:LOSURL5! ~


Wednesday, April 18, 2012


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The attached photo is of a home that recently sold for $160,000. The home is located on a canal to Lake Kissimmee.


700 State Rd. 60 East
Lake W'ales, Fl. 33853
8 63 -67 6-7 040O


Convenient
Central1 Ale.


Beautiful
Country Settinig



'in:rl pj rrl


Lots of
L~iaing AIrea


REAL ESTATE


CLASSIFIED


Should I use


a real estate


broker and why?
When selling or buying real estate, it is always best
to use a professional. If you need medical advice you
go to a doctor, or if you need legal advise you go to
a lawyer. It's no different when you need real estate
services, you should
always get the best i L ASK YOUR
advise you can. A REAL ESTAE
professional real
estate broker has PRO
the knowledge and David McLean
experience to guide Prime Plus Realty,
you through the Inc.
process of buying or c ,
selling your home or
property.
How much money will I need to come up with to
buy a home? Does my realtor help me get my loan or
do I find financing on my own?
We always suggest you consult with your own bank
first to get the advice that fits your mortgage needs.
That should be the first step you take before you start
looking for a home. If your bank cannot help you,
they will refer you to someone who may be able to
provide you with a loan, such a mortgage broker. In
any case you should get pre-approved before you start
your home search. You and your realtor will need this
information in order to know the price range and type
of home you that will be able to purchase. If you plan'
to buy a foreclosure, you will most likely need a pre-
approval letter from your lender in order to make an
offer on a bank .owned foreclosure. -


What's HOT in the marketplace?


LEGACY REAL ESTATE CENTER f


*I Ilf

RI ME ,,,


"'PRIMRIE PLUS; SERVICE YOLI` DESERV'E!"n








I I I I '- II -' el I


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
5 ACRES NEAR LAKE ROS-
.iLIE, Located in a gated com-
nunity in a rural setting;
wildlife galore, near county
boat ramp and access to
.ake Rosalie, Deed restricted
to single family homes only,
beautiful wooded parcel,
$49,900 id# It 11, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
30TTOM LINE PRICES
N0RTH FLORIDA PROPERTIES
I./2 acre to 100 Acres. Call
:-800-294-2313 ext.2873
For information and pictures 7
days a week 7-7, A Bar Sales
Inc.


CWOHUENTERY lUVICNAGN
HAVE IT ALLil**

THE COUNTY IS DROP-
PING THE IMPACT
FEES FOR THE NEXT
SIX MONTHS AND NOW
ISA TNHEEW MOEME BUA ED
$$$THOUSANDS BUY-
ING AND BUILDING
NOW?!

UmRe ,rles1)4for acr.
Will divide into mini-
mum of 5 acre tracts.
High and dry. Suitable
for building home, small
gove ora raoeng cattle


rate mother-in-Cawssuite
Alturas tElementarat
it fnjot Jun r 10inmiles
to Bartow,.Lake Wales
or Winter Haven. For

sc eed5 an at.ore I

H0ME SITE, Nice half Acre lot
located in Beautiful Area of
Homes. Growing Region Cen-
trally Located between Winter
Haven and Lake Wales. Par-
tially Cleared and ready to
Build your First Home.
$27,900 id #cc PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. (863) 676-
1040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

SClaSsified Works!


1210 HOMES FOR RENT

Over 10,000 square feet
available for lease. Fenced
back corridor. Roadside park-
ing. Building has several
rooms including a kitchen.
Located in downtown.
$2000/month, SD neg. Call
Maggie Stohler at Legacy
Leasing Services, Inc 863-
676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Lake Wales- 2BR/2BA with
granite counters in kitchen
and baths, tile throughout.
Washer/dryer included. Large
covered porch- on back of
house. Directly across from
Lake Wailes. $695/month,
SD $695. Call Maggie Stohler
at Legacy Leasing Services,
Inc 863-676-0024 or visit
www. LegacyLeases. com
Lake Wales- Spacious
3BR/2BA-home with separate
living and family rooms, large
kitchen and screen porch.
Huge kitchen. Indoor utility
room with washer/dryer. No
pets. $990/month, SD $990.
Call Maggie Stohler at Legacy
Leasing Services, Inc 863.
676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Ft Meade- Cozy 3BR/1BA
hme on corner toetriwithp tts

Large front porch.
Washer/dryer hookup.
$650/month, SD $650
Available March 1st. Call Mag
gie Stohler atL~e6ac 7L~e

www. LegacyLeases, com
ILakeaWales r3eBnRed2BAwit

Large shaded yard. Interior
laundry room. Detached
spcee w 72 /smnth orSF
$725. CaL Magg ee Solrn a
8aye63~ 76-002 or visit
www. LegacyLeases. com
Lake Wales- Updated, spa-
clous 4BR/2BA. Fenced back.
yard. Tile and laminate floors
throughout. Certain pets ok.
$1100/rnonth, SD $1100.
Call Maggle Stohler at Le acf
Leasing Services, Inc 86 -
67&-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cytleases.com











1285 COTTAGES FOR RENT

LAKE WALES, 1br/1ba
lakeside cottage for rent.
Non-smoker. No Pets. Ref-
erences. 863-676-6201.

1300 DUPLEXES FOR RENT
FORT MEADE, St Patrick
Day ~Special 2bd lba, fur-
nished appliances, garbage,
trash and lawn service. 863-
559-7035.
1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
BARTOW, 1bd, unfurn, remod-
eled, w/stove & refrig. 584
Mooselodge Rd, 1 mi. E. of Bar-
tow. 533-0146 or 512-0453.
COLONIAL SQUARE
APARTMENTS
SPRING SPECIALS !
1 and 2 Bedroom apts with
central a/c and heat, large
floor plans, abundant clos-

space & FREE WATER
Starting at $465/ month
Move-in Specials too
Call 24/7: 866-485-
4961
Or visit us online at:
Colonal~cquaret~artwowmo


Page 2


1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
FORT MEADE lbd, furn.
apartment, clean, utilities
furn. $140/wk Deposit $100.
No pets. 863-285-9422.
FORT MEADE. 1br/1ba
small, clean, quiet. No pets'
Near Patterson Park'
$400/month, $200 security'
Call 863-512-7326 -
LAKE WALES 1Bedroom
ap5 nwok sm20k~erso or pes.
Water & Elect included. 863
632-7013
OAKWOOD MANOR
APARTMENTS
PRICES REDUCED FOR
LEASE UP!
Our updated villa-style
apartment homes provide
comfortable living at a -
great price. Rates include
water.
Studio from only $405/mo
1 BR. from only $475/mo
2 BR with w/d hookups
from only $595/month
Convenient location,
Walk to shopping.
Call 24/7 866-485-
4977
Or visit:
OakwoodManorApts.co
Sm

1340 MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
BARTOW, very clean, good
ode., 2bhdr 2Sr, mob

on1-1/4 ar C/H/A, n
oets, refe enes requireno
$65./o., $600. dep. (863)

1350 EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT

WalesE T4 amnonth, ncLuadke
water, sewer and garbage.
863-605-2030
1390 VACATION
SEASONAL RENTALS
FLORIDA KEYS Marathon
Luxurious Oceanfront vaca
tion homes. 4-6 Bedrooms
Private Pool, hot tub, docks &
more! Start Planning Your
Sprn & Sume V ctin
Now 1-888-5m4-5800ac o
american-paradise.com


1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH ON
APPRX. 4.86 ACRES all
fenced with workshop, Home
built in 2005, 2,108 ft. living
area, located just east of
Lake Wales. $79,900 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. id#
17389 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co

3 BR. 2 BA. MOBILE HOME
ON 1 ACRE, NICE WELL MAIN-
TAINED HOME WITH STOR-
AGE BLD. Located just east of
Lake Wales near .Lake Ros-
alie, Great Fishing and boating
lake, $65,000 ID# 2188
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040
www. primeplusrealestate .co

ALMOST 2 ACRES WITH 3 BR.
2 BA. MOBILE HOME, built in
2009, good condition, move
in ready, all fenced located in
country setting near lake Ros-
alie, $85,000 PRIME PL)S
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 ID # 2002 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
1095 MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE

BRAND NEW HOMES
FOR SALE
Great Specials
Reduced Pnices
Beautiful Manufactured
Home 4Comm nity

1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES
37 ACRE MIDDLE TN FARM
wth 13 acrelaske nice hco .

Memorial Da Van- Masse
Auction Lic 1711. (931)433

8D6EV6EL tER FmOR ED Lm -
UIDATION Smoky Mtn. -Lake
Property Priced @ Foreclo-
Fn nc ng5s/o nteresto Hro -
OnIy 30 R srat-on ail
a ble! (877)5e5sle055 esxtalv0a0
Mobile Home with
acreage, ready to move in,
great for pets, lots of space
for the price, 3/2 serious
offers only, no renters.
(850)308-6473.
1210 HOMES FOR RENT

129 Stevenson Rd, Winter
Haven. 3 bd/2 bath w/1 car
garage & small shop.
5'9:00.00 month + security,
No pets. Call 863-678-1498
or 863-605-0473

BARTOW
755 E. Blvd Street
2 bedroom/1 bath
$550/monthly
$500/security deposit
1 yr. lease.
863-603-7715 or 863-
533-4482
BARTOW, 3Bd 1 Ba Family
home recently remodeled
family room fireplace large
fenced yard $850. Mo 863-
533-4594

NKTE 2WBA Ba $u5s5e0fo
monthly $450/deposit, will
work with you Call 863-676-
5066 NO CALLS after 9pm

Seasonal
Job
Opportunities




clsrh1017 ~Uni
~3~52E-4 n

D Dol a ~

900~~j47 007


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
NEAR WARNER UNIVERSITY, 3
BEDROOM 2 BATH, located in
crooked lake park, spacious
split-floor plan, home has
recently been updated, has
detached garage with RV
parking, screen porch,
$98,500 id# 4918, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
SEBRING FORECLOSURE, 3
Br. 2 Ba. just the house for
investment or rental or a bar-
gajo prjCe fOr a potential
homeowner, block home in
good condition, just reduced
to $49,500, PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 id# 1730 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
WATER-FRONT BEAUTIFUL
HOME ON CANAL LEADING
TO LAKE WALK IN WATER,
Move-in condition, 3 Br. 2 Ba.,
cathedral ceiling, spacious I~v-
ing room, large Florida room
with view of canal and lake,
formal dining, plus eating
space next to kitchen, all
appliances, washer and dryer,
2 car -garage, workshop,
large covered dock on deep
water canal, just seconds
from the lake, $189,900 id#
6616 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTeAsTtEt www.primepius-
rea ett.com

1030 WATERFRONT HOMES

akteer ontS nhe Fo SS ned
Bottom Lake, 3 Bedroom 2
bath, Beautiftl Oaks, Fenced
D bdra A~npn ey aReau esatt
863-465-0123

1040 CFONRDAS/VILLAS

CONDO @ LAKE WALES
COUNTRY CLUB, Beautifully -
furnished 2 Bed 2 Bath 1st
i%.o uLi aneewinMGletC mnd
munity. Family room/lanai
Overlooks Fairway and
Lagoon. Many Community
Amenities. $79,900 id# 6204
PRIME .PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040
www. primeplusrealestate .co

GREAT PRICE ON THIS FUR-
NISHED 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH
CONDO, 1,184 ft. living area,
screened porch, convenient
location to shopping in the
city limits of Lake Wales.
$29,900, PRIME PLUS~ REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
id # 130 www.primeplus-
realestate.com'
LAKE WALES COUNTRY
CLUB 2nd. Floor Condo,
Fully Furnished, Screened
Balcony, Great View -Of Golf
Course And Lagoon,
$102,000 id# 9202 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
1070 DUPLEXES FOR SALE
INCOME PRODUCING
PROPERTY FOR SALE
INCOME, Duplex-2 DBed-
deos110B~ath each s daelRet-
Schools, Library, Shopping,
and Lake June Lakefront Park
and Ball Fields $84,900.
Debra Ann Worley Real Estate
863-465-0123
1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
2 BEDROOM 2 BATH ON 2.45
ACRES, all fenced with large
barn and workshop. Home
has screened porch, open
floor plan, lots of storage
space. Small pond and stor.
age shed on property
$45,000 (short sale) PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. id #
17379 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co


Outgrowm youL~ c'mp4etibon.91


April 18, 2012


CIASSIFIEDS


1 000











"We Are Pledged To The Letter And
Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achieve
rent Of Equal Housing .Opportunity
Throughout The Nation. We Encour
eder idig Ad IV keying Prorma I
Which there Are No Barriers To
Obtaining Housing Because of Race,
Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Farnik
ial Status or National Origin."

1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
4 BR, 4 BA. POOL HOME
ON AN ACRE, Beautiful
home with plenty of room
inside and out, fully enclosed
poo and anal, lrge u ilty
ndthfi eplae m ste sutem
spacious family room, locate]
on a nice l wit big oa s'
$144,900 ID# 115, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
6e67a4 a c www.primeplus-
BARGAIN! 3 Bedroom 2 Bath
just listed, great price on this
hLake Waols edhis] tsa ~rclof
sure and9i Oha b~eenh rdu e
last long! PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
IrDalesalte8ovww.primeplus-
CARLSBERG ESTATES, 2
BR. 2 BA. Nice community
with lake access, clubhouse,

PLoU RaErAaLgeEAE IC. 8h6M3
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate. com
JUST REDUCED, NEW
LISTING LOCATED IN
CROOKED LAKE PARK,
great condition and a perfect
starter home for the first time
home buyer or winter resi-
dent; 2 Br. 1 Ba. '$49~,900
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 ID #
4801 www.primepius-
realestate.com
LAKE JUNE POINTE
ESTATE ~5 Bedroom, 3 Bath
Custom H-ome in a Gated
Community with screened
pool. Front and back porches
with 1.43 acres of beautiful
Landscaped property including
fruit trees. Lots of room to
roam, inside and out with

p$3 4900 Depba Ann Wor e
Real Estate 863-465-0123
Lake Wales, near L.W.M.
Center. 4Bd/3Ba, 2C/g,
FI/Rm w/h Fire PI. 2Liv/r, Laun-
dry rm, pool w/h lanai.
$180,000 863-676-2492
LOCATED NEAR LAKE
PIERCE AND GREAT FISH-
ING, this 3 Br. 2. Ba. Home
has a lot to offer, Built in
2000, this is a great buy for
only $59,000 PRIME .PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
NEAR KISSIMMEE CHAIN
OF LAKES, East Laki! Wales,
3 Br. 1.5 Ba. 2 lots, neat and
clean, move in ready, bring
your boat and fishing poles, 1
block from Lake Rosalie, mari-
na and boat ramp, near state
park, reduced to $59,000
OWNER SAYS MAKE OFFER!
id# 10755 PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!









" I I


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


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column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process of elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest)

71 4 2 5 Rating: GOLD

71 81 8 s E I l 6 L, 9 't 9
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4/18/11


April 18, 2012


Page 3


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
LAKE FRONT ON LAKE WALK
IN WATER, Just Over 5 Acres,
Partially Wooded, Private
Location, Dead End Street.
Great Price! $79,900 id# It22
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE,
INC 863-676-7040
www. pri me plusreale state. co

Waterfront, land or citrus?
Mwww.m rvdsi ~o
a863 -285 7118or


Nee Ca ea

Garage Sale


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
MIDDLE GEORGIA Land Prices
starting at $995 per acre.
Thousands of acres available.
Call for list 478-552-5681

NORTH GEORGIA MOUNTAINS
Seeking Developer to Pur-
chase Beautiful 18 Lot
Approved Su~b iv son. Under

olu0n000 Now 495,00
080 Terms Wi1l Divide Mon-
eymaker, Owner 706-374-
1136

Advertise in
The Classifieds!


ACREAGE
LINA REAL
Unbelievable
and land in
mountains.
hures, fore-
ea informa-
35.


1500 LOTS & At
WESTERN CAROI
ESTATE Offering u
deals on homes ;
the beautiful NC
Call for free brocl
closures, and ar~
tion. 800-924-26:
WOODED HOME SI
of Beautiful Wooc
restricted commur
your new home! ~
Laokm Ros le.B a n
ed and will look at

IAT9E Off~eRs 8E3

www.primeplusreal


1515 WATERFRONT
North Carolina Mountain
Lakefront lots. New gated
waterfront community. Dock-
able lots with up to 300' of
shoreline, Low insurance, Low
property tax. Call Now
(800)709-5253


2001 HELP WANTED
ASAP! New Pay Increase!
34-46 cpm. 300 Newer
Trucks. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
CALL NOW! Top 5% Pa 1
Excellent Benefits. 300 Neg
T660's. Need 2 months. CDL-
A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
CDL DRIVERS Great Pay!
Tons of Texas Frac work!
Great company! Company

pai uacfts Ois e4have reb l

CDL-A Drivers Relocate for
Tons of Great Paying Texas
Oilfield work! Great compa
ny/Paid benefits! Must have
bulk pneumatic trailer experi
ence. Call today! (800)491-
9029
CDL-A DRIVERS. Central Flori-
da codi~pany seeks Solo &
Team Drivers. Tank and Dry
Van positions offering some
regional. 1yr OTR/ Good MVR
required. (877)882-6537 or
www, oakleytransport. com
CLAIMS ADJUSTERS
NEEDED due to active Storm
Season. JEL's 5-day Boot
Camp, Nations #1 hands-on
trainer can prepare you. High
Income www.JELTraining.com
-Companies waiting
CYPRESS TRUCK LINES
Home Weekends! Southeast
Regional, Top Pay & Great
Benefits! 6 Months TT exp
CDL with clean MVR. Call
(800)545-1351
www. cypresstruck. com
DRIVER- Not getting enough
miles? Join Knight Transporta-
tion and increase your income
with our steady freight. New
Trucks! CDL A, 3 months
recent experience. (800)414-
9569. www.dniveknight.com
Driver- Recession Proof
Freight. Plenty of miles. Need
refresher? No out of-pocket
tuition at FFE. $1000 Bonus
for CO's & $1500 Incentive
for O/0's. recruit@ffex.net.
(855)356-7121


2001 HELP WANTED
Drivers Wanted-OTR Food
Grade Tanker Drivers Needed
Competitive pay, Benefits,
Guaranteed time off Class A
CDL-w/tanker endorsement
Prefer 2yrs experience
(800)569-6816 otterytrans-
portation.com
Drivers- No Ex erience-
No Problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
r{/10 program. Tain res
CRST VAN EXPEDITED
C8ROSO3 6-2778 www.Join-

Earn Up to $.51cpm!!! CDL-
A Drivers, Tanker & Dry Van
positions available. 1 year
OTR experience, Good MVR &
work history needed. Call
(877)882-6537 or apply
www.oakleytransport.com
EXPERIENCED window tin-
ters and audio installers need-
ed. Call owner at 863-223-
8087.
Fort Meade Child Develop-
ment Center is now accept-
ing applications for, a child
care teacher and food service
position. No phone calls. 15
South Pine Ave., Fort Meade.
E0E.
FRAC SAND HAULERS with
complete bulk pneumatic rigs
only. Relocate to Texas for
Tons of work. Great compa-
ny/pay. Gas cards/Quick Pay
available. (800)491-9029
Freight Up = Mlore $ 34-46
CPM 2Mos. CDL Class A Dri-
ving Exp (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck~com
FT, LPN for ESE elem. Char-
ter School in LW, full benefits,
sent resume' to:
dori.loyd@ourchildrens.org or
fax 863'679-3944.
GRACE HEALTHCARE OF
LAKE WALES HAS AN IMME-
DIATE OPENING FOR A DIREC-
TOR OF NURSING. MUST BE
AN RN WITH LONG TERM AND
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
EXPERIENCE. PLEASE FAX
RESUME TO 863-676-6315
ATTENTION PATTI SPEARS,
ADMINISTRATOR.


TE! 2 Acres
ds in deed 1520 OUT OF TOWN LOTS
nity to build 20 Acres-Live on Land
Notp itooa NOW!! Only $99/mo. $0
Rra Motivn Down. Owner financing. NO
al Rasn-CREDIT CHECKS! Near El


96U7S6-70_RE0 Baonchu s. (0 e7F5ru-895M3 o
lestae~co www.sunsetranches.com
NC mountain property
must go. 4.5 acres with out-
standing views and privacy
e ~$25,000 080, great for
home or cabin. (828)394-
9298. Ask for Richard
12 1'3 NW YOrk State Land-S;ale
Discounted to 1990's
prices! 3 Acre starter camp
$17,995. 5 acres w/farm-
house $49,995. 52 acres,
stream, 2 ponds, beautiful
woods & views. Access to
road front, utilities and state
2 29 land limited offer. Call
2 2 Christmas & Associates
(800)229-7843 or visit
landandcamps.com
1620 COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY
OFFICE FOR LEASE, State Rd.
60 E., Lake Wales, New
so s'5 Office Building offers great-
exposure on Major Highway,
open floor plan available,
approx. 820 sq.ft. RENT
NEGOTIABLE, Call For details,
A seo lagerP saeav~ailabl~eif
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
OR 863-632-0272 (ask for
4/18/12 David) wwvw.primeplus-
'realestate.~com
unqru zl0z0)
Ss Sn 1650 FARMS/RANCHES
'3No a
II H W. KENTUCKY 3 Premier
Hunting / Investment Farms.
va0 Wildlife Managed, Income,
D1 Excellent Building Sites, Tim.
G NII ber, Road Frontage, Water &
SN tu Electric, Beautiful Views.
SIMVt 2r70m $61,30/ac Owner


S S V 2000
1 0 0 ,
3BS r
3l~l
iNoI l
eM '


ACROSS
1 As yet ,
6 "Atlas Shrugged'
writerAyn
17WIIcarr ers -
star Toins
15 Sautbirly
acronym, & la
Rachael Ray
16 Ear-related
17 "Doesn't bother
me!"
19 "1 Zapata!":
Brando film
20 Harbinger of
lower
temperatures
21 Man on a misi6n
22 Biblical mount
23 More than
hesitant
24 Sgn of puppy
25 Ben & Jerry's
purchase
26 Spice gathered
by hand from
crocus powers
30 Leave no escape
route for
33Aquamarine, e.g.
34 Carol syllables
35 After "on," relying
mostly on hope in
desperate
circumstances

SI Foo cleaner
41 fit: tantrum -
42 "500" race-
sanctioning
group
44 Boxer Max
46 Fed. property
agency
47 Prefix
suggesting
savings
49 Sox, on
scoreboards
52 Creep
54 Dell sandwich
56 Brit of Fox Ne~ws
57 "Shake!"
58 Most draftable
59 Fortitude
60 Cardiologist's
concern
61 Cold War initials
62 Year, on
monuments
63 Small fry


By Norm Guggenbil
DOWN
1 Puccini opera
2 Butterlike

3 oohdruof she
Manhattan
Project
4 Ancient Romar'

5 Herming and
hawing
6 Apply more
varnish to
7 -garde
8 Waters between
Great Britain and
Europe
9 Fawn's mom
10 Chick flick
subject
11 Dangerous
bottom feeders
12 DVR pioneer
13 Battle reminder
18 Wrinkle remover
21 Personal ad abbr-
25 Schoolyard
handshake
27 Sound system
part
28 Cheers for a
torero
29 Not a one
30 Mata _


ler .
EWVt7 'ouI 'soovuaS elpam~ o


Driver-Drivers choose
from Weekly or Daily Pay.
Regional, OTR or Express
Lanes, Full or Part-time, CDL-
A, 3 months recent experi-
ence required. (800)414-
9569 www.driveknigh~t.com
Drivers No Experience -
No problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to
$.49 per mile! CRST VAN
EXPEDITED (800)326-2778
www.JoinCRST.com
Drivers Earn Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR
Flatbed exp. Call: (800)572-
5489 Susani ext. 227 Joy ext.
238 SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC.
Drivers Earn Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR Flatbed
exp. Call: (800)572-5489 Joy
e.2T3R8AS~usan t.L2L2C7 SUN-

Drivers: New Flatbed Freight
Lanes! We Offer: No Tarp-
ing!!! Great Miles, Pay-up to
.60cpm, Benefits & Home
Time. CDL-A, lyr OTR Exp,
Good MVR Frank Donnelly at:
1-888-567-4969, x22.


Heat & Air JOBS Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on environ-
ment. Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job Place-
ment Assist~ance! (877)994-
9904

JUST GRADUATE? Play in
Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New
York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys.
$400-$800 wkly. Paid
expenses. Signing Bonus. Call
(877)259-6983
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED! Hospi-
tals & Insurance Companies
hiring now! No experience?
Local Training & Job Place-
ment Assistance available!
(888)219-5161.
Medical Billing Trainees
Needed! Hospitals & Insur-
ance Companies hiring now!
No experience? Local Training
G aodb Place e~nt available HS
needed. (888)589-9677.
Medical Management
Careers start here Get con-
nected online. Attend college
on your own time. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Finarlcial Aid if qual-
ified. Call (800)481-9409
www.centuraonline. com
Medical Management Careers
start here Git connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial A dO f qafe~d9
www.Centura0nline.com
PERSONAL ASSISTANT, is
needed urgently with/good
Salary. He or she must be 18
plUS. Applicant should con-
tact: bendaton@iive.com


31 Obi-Wan
portrayer
32 Psychological
tricks .
33 Econ. yardstick
36 Org. with a much-
quoted journal
37 Like beer cans
before recycling
38 Dimming gadget
43 Lo- : lite
44 Mackerel-like fish
45 Pre-med subj.


48 Replace a
dancer, perhaps
4~9 Paper-pusher
50 Gold, rush
storyteller Bret
51 "Don't get any "
52 Dynasty during
Confucius' time
53 Legs it
55 Hail in a harbor
57 Sports tour
organizer, for
~short


~B~Apr 21, 2012 -:- 10:00 AM BS
3 Farmws Tostaling 308-t Acres
Colquitt County, GA
Fo Dtilst In "!!nts!""800-323-8388
WEL Owell Auctions, Inc. RW
:TIONS 10%/Buyel'sPrmiu m GALAU-(00E594 AUCTIO


,NS


CIASSIFIEDS


2001 HELP WANTED
A Few Pro Drivers Needed
Top Pay & 401K Great Equip
ment & Benfefits 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp (877)258
8782 www.meltontruck.com
ACT NOW! New Pay Increase'
37-46 cpm. New Trucks in
2011. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258
8782 www.meltontruck.com
AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Aviation
Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Avi-
ation Institute of Maintenance
(866) 314-3769.

SEmploy Classified! 1







I I__


CENTRAL FLORIDA'S COOLING SPECIALISTS

PO WELL
A/;~~C. & EALTING
SALES* SERVICE* INSTALLATION
All Makes/Models Residential & Commercial
Financing available on new & replacement units
FREE ESTIMATES on installations & replacements
INSURED *STAFE (ERIFIED I(Al315459
863-293-5046


~ae80111 ~ar


~rrsrr~,rrrrmmr~Prs~IIPlr~e~ ,..,,


II'JI
II )


----


We offer 1st floor apartment homes that include
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.0Our amenities are
screened-in patios, priva~te~ entrances, swimming
pool, weekly resident functions, WID connections
(in select units) arid so much more! We ~pay some
utilities which include water/sewer and trash.
CALL ANbD ANsK ABOUT OUR
GREAT ~MOVE-IN SPECIALSI
Directions: We are conveniently located behind Publix off State Rd. 60 in Lake Wales, FL.
200 Emerald Ave., Lake Wales, FL 33853
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PUBLIC AUCTIONS MONDAYS, THURSDAYS
& SATURDAYS 6:30PM
We handle Portable Warehrouses &Amish Furniture
23660 US 27 N., Lake Wales
863-227-'7598
SOUTHERNAUCTIONCOMPANY@GMAIL.COMII
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Page 4


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April 18, 2012


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1 & 2 Bedroom Units. Affordable housing for low to
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All units have WID hookups & kitchen appliances.
TDD 800-955-8771 Phone/Fax 863-676-9213
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 7am-Noon
b 401 Winston Ave., Lake Wales, FL 33853 ~
H This institution is on equalopportunityprovider/employer.


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863-430-6700
lmy ~Lee
863-877-8952


AUTO
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WE BUY CARS IN ANY CONDITION
PERFECT OR NOT SO PERFECT We pay up to $30,000
AnyMake -AnyModel All motor vehicles, RV's,
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www constructionandreroelngo I c Ut lR0 HWMS

Gator Conistruction offers improvement
and remodeling of commercial and residential
properties Wle are family owned and
operated with over 29 years of experience.


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Finance Specials LandlHome Chattel Land-in-Lieu
FHA, VA, Prvate Finance

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$54,900 $49,900 weas, ma ~o
'86 or newer!
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'I400C~ihalet Suzanne Road
.lakecrV\al~esr, FL.338595
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Do you know someone that needs to
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Carla J. Meeks, Realtor
WEB PRO REALTY, LLC.
863-604-9287
hittp://hl"~ ome~sbyarlo~net


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863-644-4033 Fax 863-937-5713
David Shoupe-0wner
40 Years experience
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Expert
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-I I


2005 SERVICES
Abortion Not an Option? Con-
sider Adoption. It's a Wonder-
ful Choice for an Unplanned
Pregnancy. Living/Medical
Expenses Paid. Loving, Finan-
cially Secure Families Await.
1-877-341-1309 Atty Ellen
Kaplan (#0875228)
ADOPTION GIVE YOUR
.BABY THE BEST IN LIFE!
Many Kind, Loving, Edu-
cated & Financially Secure
Couples Waiting. Living &
Medical Expenses Paid.
Counseling & Transporta-
tion Provided. -Former
Birth Moms on Staff!
FLORIDA ADOPTION LAW
GROUP, P.A. Attorneys
who truly care about you.
Jodi Sue Rutstein, M.S.W.,
J.D. Mary Ann Scherer,
R.N., J.D. Over 30 Com-
bined Years of Adoption
Experience. 1-800-852-
0041 Confidential 24/7
(#133050&249025)
ADOPTION 866-633-0397
Unplanned Pregnancy?
Provide your baby with a
loving, financially secure
family.
Living/Medical/Counsel-
ing expenses paid. Social
worker on staff. Call com-
passionate attorney Lau-
ren Feingold (FL
Bar#0958107) 24/7
ADOPTION 888-812-3678
AHl Expenses Paid. Choose
a Loving, Financially
Secure family for your
child 24 Hrs 7 Days Car-
ing & Confidential. Attor-
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Striig at sn 1 Si~gnattre

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5E2lu~d~es g~ov fees 1Ba8 r
& Associates

KILL ROACHES & PALMETTO
BUGS! Buy Harris Roach
Tablets. Eliminate Bugs -
HadantedTheA loe DpoA &
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PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
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ING EXPENSES PAID. Call
24/7' Abby's One True Gift
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.License #100013125

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OVERS Mobile Home Roof
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Internet n ed~ed.-24


~ EmployFlorida.com
nam~Esman 1-866-FLA-2345
Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available,
Upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Foloida telephone may be reached by
Spemsons using TTYITTD equipment via the Rlorida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol.


3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
GET YOUR AD NOTICED
HERE And in Over 100
Papers throughout Florida for
One Low Rate. Advertising
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work for You! (866)742-1373
www~florida-classifieds.com.
HORSE LOVERS MAKE $$
FOR YOURSELF OR CHARI-
TY. HOLD A COMPETITIVE
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WWW.ACTHA.US GREAT FUN,
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Huge Discounts when you
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120 community newspapers,
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PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
YOU ARE INVITED TO
WORSHIP WITH US AT
LIGHTHOUSE
BAPTIST CHURCH
307 ABC RD. LAKE WALES, FL
AN INDEPENDENT, FUNDAMEN-
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FAMESUB SEAUN NSGINTGHENG HE
OLD GOSPEL HYMNS FROM A
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10:30 AM
SUNDAY EVENING WORSHIP
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WEDNESDAY BIBLE STUDY AND
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3060 SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
"an You Dig It? delie wi l
train, cer ify & provi eieime
assi toan land ng work. Hir-

hneavy equiptraent og nraas a
(866)362-6497

IT'S NEVER
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i-


April 18, 2012


CIASSIFIEDS


Page 7 '


2001 HELP WANTED
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
owin time. .Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura0nline.com
MOMS WORK FT/PT, ho
experience necessary, we
train. New Swarovski Crystal
Jewelry by Touchstone Crys-
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(407)295-1522 kontactkelly-
now ao.com
MOVIE EXTRAS Earn up to
$250 per day To stand in the
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production experience~not
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Call NOW!!! (877)435-587T
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
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3783
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
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3783
NOW HIRING: Companies
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Office assistant needed for
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i~nf rna ion. Pr meW lus 8Re l
676-7040
OTR DRIVERS- Food Grade
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endorsement, Good MVR &
Hazmat within 90' days
required. Up to 42cpm
w/additional mileage incen-
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r537coor www.oakleytrans-

2005 SERVICES

ADOPTION
Giveyu baby loig

fiingy igx enae poad.
Call Attorney Charlotte
Danciu 28 years experi-
ence. 1-800-395-5449
www.ad ptin-Buarroga-
307084
American Auto Transporters
Reliable Shipping of Your Car
Member BBB, Guaranteed
Rates, Pick up date and satis-
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da to NorthEast 1-800-800-
2580 www.shipcar.com
JEWISHH SURROGATE '
NEEDEll
for Orthodox Couple
Please help us have our
baby! Generous Com-
pensation Paid. Call
Attorney Charlotte Dan-
ciu 1-800-395-5449
FL Bar # 307084


2100 GENERAL
Class-A FlatBed Drivers$
Home EVERY weekend, run SE
US. REQUIRES 1 yr. OTR F.B.
Exp. & pay UP TO .39/mile.
Call (800)572-5489 x227.
Sunbelt Transport, LLC.
Drivers-New Freight for
Refrigerated & Dry Van
lanes. Annual salary $45K to
$60K. Flexible hometime. CDL-
A, 3 months current OTR expe-
rience. (800)414-9569.
www.driveknight.com
FREIGHT UP E uals More $
2 Mos. CDL Class A driving
exp. -(877)258-8782-.
www. m eltontruck. co m/d rive


300










3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
ADVERTISE IN OVER 100
PAPERS throughout Florida
for One Low Rate. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
ALLIED HEALTH career train-

olnA enodb plca nt la~s i
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified.. Call
(800)481-9409 www.Centu-
ra~nline.com
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Busi-
ness, *a alega,u *Com ut

placement assistance. Com-
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qualified. Call (877) 203-
3179,
www.Centtira0nline.com
BANKRUPTCY, FORECLO-
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Rights. Peter Kelegian, Attor-
ney at Law, Gainesville, Flori-
da. Free no obligation consul-
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throughout North Florida.
a35n 726w44 m40p~e r@kele-


Free Mammograms, Breast cancer
Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing, Fast,
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DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE FREE VACATION
VOUCHER UNITED BREAST
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Mammograms, Breast Can-
cer Info www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Fast, Non-RunnerS
Accepted, 24/7 (888)468-
5964.
SClassified Works! /


3060 SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train
for hands on Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if quali-
fied Housing available. CALL
Aviation Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-6283

ATTEND ~COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Busi-
ness, *Criminal Justice, *Hos-
pitality. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call 888-
203-3179 www.Centura0n-
line~com

AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONICS Graduate in 14
Months. FAA Approved; finan-
cial aid if qualified. Job place
ment assistance. Call Nation-
al Aviation Academy Today! 1~
800-659-2080 or NAA.edu

Earn your high school diploma
at home. Work at your own
pace. First Coast Academy,
nationally accredited. Call for
free brochure, 1-800-658-
1180, ext. 77. www.fcahigh-
school.org
EARN YOUR HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA! Educators Inc.
High School over 25 years of
experience. Fully accredited.
Trpaede Shoolo J b.M lit8a
590-9611 www.Eduhigh-
school.com

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
From' Home 6-8 Weeks
Accredited Get A Diploma!
Get A Job! Free Brochure 1-
800-264-8330 www.diplo~
mafromhome.com Benjamin
Franklin High School
3090 LOST & FOUND
FOUND. Male Lab-Mix,
Nurtered, with White Chest
and Throat. Found in Master-
piece Rd and Rolling Hills Ct E
area. Call 863-678-3879.

4000


4010 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
DO YOU EARN $800.00 IN
A DAY? Your Own Local
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All Major Credit Cards Accept-
ed (877)915-8222
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FREE Program on How to
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Investors Outstanding
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Equipment leasing for oilfildd
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Tax benefits and high returns.
We need more equipment!
(800)491-9029
Investors Outstanding
and immediate returns in
equipment leasing for frac
industry. Immediate lease out.
Tax benefits and high returns.
We need more equipment!
(800)491-9029

4020 FINANCIAL/MISC;
CASH NOW! Cash for your
structured settlement or annu-
ity payments. Call J.G. Went-
worth (866) 494-9115. Rated
A+ by the Better Business
Bureau.
FREE DEBT SOLDUeTIN nd

tions within 90 Days. No Pay-
nt S ttlements nkara ntee
Since 1993. (800)4`77-92~56
www. zero debtguara ntee d.co

LAWSUIT CASH
Auto A dent?
All cases Qualf Get CASH
before your case settles!
Fast A~pprova9. 1Lo Fees.
www.glofin.com
OWNER WILL FINANCE. Bank
or seller won't finance? We
help! No qualifying. No cred-
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800-563-2734-
kanthony@cigrealty.com
4080 LOANS/IMORTGAGES
Access Reverse Mortgage!.
Florida-based: Application &
closing in your home. Experi-
ence: almost 1,000 reverse
mrgages ustn's^," Awa
BBB A rating. NMLS #4566.
1(800)806-7126



Ned ajb
Ceck T'1


"eacti foreaknee car hkoe eoursust samet ig
Subscribe to The Polk County Democrat
end get awealt of snounation available
The Polk County Democ~rat
863-533-4183


~Real Results.


~ ,:
,;--.,.1 _I
.~111
~


FINANCIAL

4010 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

$150,000 +/yr. Potential
Turn Key Online Sales & Mar-
keting Wealth Creation Sys-
tem. No Selling to Family &
Friends Start In 24 hrs.
WWW.thel150Kgameplan.com

SAdvertise Today !


CIASSIFIEDS

TO WORK FOR

YOU!



FIND A JOB!

BUY A HOME!








- I I I


CIASSIFIEDS


Apri 18, 2012


5230 MISCELLANEOUS
AT&T U-Verse for just
$29.99/mo! SAVE when you
bundle Internet+Phone+TV
and get up to $300 BACK!
(select plans). Limited Time
CALL NOW! 866-944-0906

Bundle & Save on your
CABLE, INTERNET PHONE,
AND MORE. High Speed Inter-
net starting at less
than$20/mo. CALL NOW!
800-306-1 733

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
WANTED!!! Get the Most
Cash, up to $27 per box!
Shipping Paid! Must be
Sealed & Unexpired. Call
Tony 813-528-1480 tonytest-
strips@hotmail.com
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for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask
About SAME DAY Installation!
CALL 888-418-9787

Every baby deserves a
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raising money to support the
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MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW!
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Call for the DVD and FREE
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4644
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CALL 1-888-903-2647
SWIM SPA LOADED! Brand
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LED lighting, Ozone Deluxe
Cover, maintenance free cab-
inet. Retails for $18,900.
Sacrifice $8995. Can deliver.
727-851-3217
WANTED UN EXPIRED DIABET-
IC TEST STRIPS Up To
$26/Box. Pr ePaid Shipping
Labels. Hablamos Espanol! 1-
800-267-9895 / www.SellDia-
beticstrips.com

$$$ We Buy Diabetic Test
SGtenpsaid fa s 24 ho~u~r! Viit
Traderjackproducts.com/strip
s.6 adllt~oday free quote! 772.


6180 HEAVYICONST.
EQUIPMENT
SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -
SPRING SALE Cut lumber
any dimension, anytime.
MAKE MONEY and SAVE
MONEY In stock ready to ship.
Starting at $995.00
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/
300N (800)578-1363
Ext.300N
6190 TOOLSI MACHINERY
10 INCH Craftsman Table
Saw. Hardly Used. $100.
call 863-223-8333

6232 CATS
FOUND KITTEN, (female) in
the vicinity of Lila & George &
Mann. Call: 533-7432.
6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
AIRLINES ARE HIRING
Train for hands on Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial
aid if qualified. Housing avail-
able. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.
ATTEND COLLEGE ON
LINE from home. Medical,
*Business, Criminal Jus-
tice, Hospitality. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. SCHEV certified. Call
(877)206-5165.
www.Centura0nline.com
BARTOW FOR SALE brown
triple dresser with mirror, 7
drawers. Asking $100. Call:
(863) 533-3457
6270 WANTEDTO
BUYTTRADE


BUYING
GOLD, SILVER,
COINS, JEWIELRY
Highest Prices In History!

W BUY IT L andDPayso Muew
We Almost Want to Cry. You, of
Course, Will Laugh With Glee!!
See PHIL at the former
HOLLY'S ARMY NAWY STORE
3440 Ave G NW
Mon-Sa 1 a -5:30pm
Call first to confirm I'm there
863-299-6031
Our 33rd Year.

Seiz ch sale


7370 CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
TRAVEL TRAILER, 33ft
Cougar 302RLS, double slide,
queen bed, rear living room.
Like new! Lots of extras! 231-
633-0024. (Haines City)


Customer
b* service
cna is our #1
Priority.


Q) consult an
> attorney, you donmI
"Wchoose just
Anyone. You
& choose a
Professional you
L can trust. When
H you need to
Q) advertise your
U products and
U services, why not
Sdo the same and
Sgo with us, the
Q pros you can trust?


O) business is to you,
.X and whatever your
g) advertising needs,
,gwe will listen
gr closely and use
q)every resource
n necessary to get
Q the
CI job dn etirgeht and



TODAY!


The Lake Wales News
The Fort Meade Leader
The Polk County Democrat
Frostproof News


Page 8


50005









5115 LEGAL SERVICES
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt
Anfancially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid-
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
5120 MEDICAL SERVICES
ATTENTION DIABETICS with
Medicare. Get a Free Talking
Meter and diabetic testing
supplies at No Cost, plus Free
home delivery! Best of all,
this meter eliminates painful
finger pricking! Call 888-377-
3536

Canada Drug Center is your
ch ie fo safe and a frdabeld

Canadian mail order pharma-
cy will provide you with say-
ings of up to 90 percent on all
your medication needs. Call
Today 888-372-6740 f r
$25.00 off your first prescrior
tion and free shipping. Pre-
scniptions Dispensed from
'Canada are Dispensed by:
Health One Pharmacy.
License Number: 21791
TAKE VIAGRA/ CIALIS?
Save $500.00! Get 40
100mg/20rng Pills, for
only-$99! .+4-Bonus Pills
FREE! #1Male Enhance-
ment. Discreet Shipping.
Blue Pill Now. Call 1-888-
800-1 280

5230 MISCELLANEOUS
$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen
Dn TV.$ $ Injeurd La$Tsu
$5a0010ng0++within 48/hrs?
Low rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321 www.Iawcapi-
tal.com

Need Cash?
Have A
Garage Sale


6000


7000


6012 GARAGE SALES
BARTOW Friday/Saturday 9
4 1801 Imperial Blvd off
Gandy Rd Peace River Estates
1. Items we have not. used
for a year
Girl Scout Yard Sale; infant
boys-2T, girls, boys, adult &
maternity clothing, toys
books, furniture and more'
323 Jackson St Lake Wales
4/20 & 21 7:30-1:30 "
MOVING SALE Sat. April
21,
8 -1. Antiques, collec-
tables,
household goods, cook-
books, furniture, tools, 2001
Solara. 512 Water Oak
Court, Fort Meade
6020 AUCTIONS
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home,. 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier.~ Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large L\Nksho ,a Garaod
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
borseproperties.net

6030 HOUSEHOLD GOODS


LSAAKE, 2Wd n~ett~e sets, c~o E
w/recliner, formal 9 pc. din-
ingroom set, Lowery Lincoln
wood organ w/bench,
loaded. 407-301-6681-


N ed a ob?
Check The
ClaSSified!


7140 MISC.DOMESTIC
AUTOS
2000 CADILLAC DEVILLE
less than 55k miles. Pearl
white w/camel vinyl top. Nice
leather interior. Fully loaded.
~Exc. cond. $7,200 863-559-
6935
2010 DODGE WHEEL-
CHAIR VAN, 10 inch lowered
floor with tie downs & wheel-
chair ramp. $31,995. 727-
492-1 630
7260 AUTOS WANTED

CASH FOR CARS!
We Buy ANY Car, Truck
or Van! Running or Not.
Get a FREE Top Dollar
INSTANT Offer NOW!
1-800-558-1097 We're
Local!
CASH FOR CARS: All
Cars/Trucks Wanted. Run-
ning or Not! Top Dollar Paid.
We Come To You! Any
Make/Mlodel. Call For Instant
Offer: 1-800-871-9638
We buy unwanted car,
trucks, vans with or without
title any condition
year,make or model. We pay
up to $20,000 and offer
free towing call 813-505-
6939

7333 MISC. BOATS
2 Kawasaki Jets Skis w/trailer
1997 Model 750. Both in
good condition/will run for
their age. $2800.Please call
for more info. 863-696-
3247
JON BOAT, 14ft. 6hp John-
SOn w/ galvanized trailer. 28#
thurst trolling motor. Live well.
$1200 Call 863-899-2648.
7360 CYCLESIMOPEDS/
SCOOTERS
2001 Honda CBR F41 600
motorcycle. Runs great 17k
miles
863-285-8705. $2,800

classified =Sales




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