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The Frostproof news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00553
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Creation Date: February 29, 2012
Publication Date: 1961-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00553
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text


Visit us on the Internet at www.FrostproofNews.com

Wednesday

February 29, 2012


Frostproof News


Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years


Volumq 92 Number 9-


USPS NO 211-260


*********ORIGIN MIXED ADC
205 SMA LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTO
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA


SI SV ILL / FLU /
GAINESVILLE FL 3


750


Frostproof, Polk County Florida 33843


ght 2 011 2 Sun Coas Meda Group, 00nc.



Copyright 2012 Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.


Windham fits in at FPMSHS


New principal hits the ground running, Chamber members learn


By BRIAN ACKLEY
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.COM
It's usually the students who do
most of the learning at Frostproof
Middle Senior High School.
These days, however, Principal
Kyle Windham is doing a lot of that
himself.
Windham took over as school
principal from Stephen White on
Jan. 2, and has found out firsthand
the rewards and challenges Frost-
proof presents.
Windham, who spent time
earlier in his aees a teaber
for nine yeatsiin Frostproof, was
the guestSpeaker at the Frostproof
Chamber of Cp.mmerce monthly
lunch meeting last week.
"Where I learned to teach was
here. The teachers we haoe are
experienG ed and Oxceptiobal,;'
Windham said."They will continue
to get better, and we'll keep push-
[ng them. They know how to teach
kids in the classroibmf'hey know
how to give them what they need
to know; not just passing tests, but
what they need in life."
. Windham, who banned all stu-
dent electronic devices during the
school day, also addressed the role
of high school sports as part of the
learning experience.
"Our number one objective is us-
ing sports as character education.
Character, hornesty and integrity,
that's the number one purpose for
those athletic programs. You can do
things right, but do the right thing,
every time."
Academics go hand in hand with
the athletic program, as well


"Once that athletic career is
done, you have to have something
there that allows you to get through
this life," Windham said.
He had praise for two other
schools, Ben Hill Griffin Elemen-
tary andWarner University for
helping making his job easier.
"When we receive these students
(from BHG), they are on target,
they are doing what they are sup-
posed to be doing, and thanks to
Warner, who represents most of the
teachers that we have in Frost-
proof," Windham said. "Warner
does an exceptional job of training
their students to become teachers.
Every chance I have to interview
a student fromWamer, I do it, be-
cause youwant the best to educate
our kids."
He also said that more local stu-
dents are being channelled toward
RidgeVocational, where they can
learn a technical trade. As many as
10 Frostproof students have been
pointed there since Windham took
over.
'At Frostproof, they had a grade
point average of less than 2.0 and
were failing or had Ds in more than
half of their classes. What we've
done is found a place that can
make them successful, because it
may not be in the traditional class-
room," he observed. "It might be
at Ridge they have welding, and
auto mechanics, things we can't
offer. We can get them there, they
can get their academics, and then
go into the shop to do what they
like to do. And when they graduate,
. ., WINDHAM 116


At right: Kyle
Windhamdrew a
large crowd as the
guest speaker at
last week's Frost-
proof Chamber of
Commerce monthly
luncheon. He was
recently named prin-
cipal at Frostproof
Middle Senior High
School.


PHOTOS BY
K.M THORNTON SIF.
Above: Kyle
-3,Aindham, new
principal at Frost-
proof lIddle Senior.
High SGhool, shares a
laugh with Michelle
Hutto during last,. _Y.
week's Chamber of .,
Commerce lunchdi"


Talent show opens next weekend


Time is running short to become part
of Frostproof's big money talent show,
which is back for another go-round,
thanks to the Rotary Club, with the
$1,000 grand prize awarded on March
24 at the show's finals.
The club's fifth annual "Frostproof's
Got Talent!" show has preliminary
rounds on March 9-10 at the Ramon
Theater, with the top acts moving on
to the $1,000 finals. It is open to any-
one who lives or goes to school in Lake
Wales, Babson Park. Frostproof, Avon


Park and Fort Meade. It is at 7 p.m.
Applications and it's free to enter
- are available at www.frostproofcham-
ber.com. They are at City Hall and the
Chamber offices. The first 36 acts en-
tered will be allowed to perform. Rules
are on the entry application. Tickets are
$10 per night for anyone 12 and older.
Children's tickets are $5 per show. Adult
tickets for all three shows are $25, and
children's tickets for all three shows are
$10. Tickets are available from members,
city hall, and will be sold at the door.


Input on public transit sought here


County transportation
officials have a question for
Frostproof residents: How
does public transportation
work for you?
Answering that is the goal
of a special "listening" tour
that transportation officials
have embarked on all across
the county. Frostproof
will get its turn tomorrow
starting at 4:30 p.m. in city
council chambers in city


hall. Officials will be on
hand until 6:30 p.m. to get,
feedback from users and
taxpayers.
Currently, Frostproof
has one bus route that is
actually funded mainly by
the Polk County Board of
Commissioners. It makes
several stops each day
in various points around
Frostproof, Babson Park and
Lake Wales, where riders


can transfer to buses that
travel to other points in the.
county.
Tom Phillips, director of
Citrus Connection, said pro-
viding public transportation
that fits what the people
want is necessary in a
county that is so spread out
and has so many people. Ef-
forts in the past have failed,
INPUT 116


TOD DAY'S
CON fNTS






7 05252 00025 8


Calendar............Page 2A
Editorial.............Page 4A
Sports................Page 5A
Obituaries............ Page 8A
.County Report.....Page IB
Feeling Fit............Page 5B
Classified.................Inside


,g *I


BREAKFAST


FFA students
thank
teachers





15A


The


AG TEACHER WINS

Golf ball
drop is
profitable
tradition
9A






Page 2A Frostproof News February 29, 2012


CALENDARt

NOTICE TO CALENDAR EVENT SUBMITTERS
We revised the calendar events we publish in the paper and display online. All events must be entered by
the person submitting them through our website. Itfs easy. Go to www.frostproofnews.net and click on
the"Community Calendar" link on the left. Click"Submit Event," and fill out the appropriate information. The
"Print edition text'area of the form is for information intended for the print edition of the paper. Information
outside of the"Print edition text"area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the "Event Title," as that will
be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be
included in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep) at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact
number must be included in these 120 characters.
This change will give our readers a broader range of community events.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10 per day, per event, per community edition.
Simply choose"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings will run in the location designated
for the event type. If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our website, we can type them in on
your behalf at the rate of $5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not guarantee your event will
make the printed version. Please call (863) 676-3467 Monday through Friday from 9-5 p.m. to make a payment
orto have us enter your event for you.
We reserve the right to exclude any submitted event that does not meet,our specifications or that requires
excessive editing. There is no expressed or implied guarantee that any free listing will be included in any
event calendar or run in any specific location. This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to review
the"GUIDELINES'link on the Submission page to help ensure you get the most information in without exceeding
the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the"Withdraw submission" noted at the bottom of that email, follow
the provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


* Saturday, March 3
Soccer Evaluations, Soccer Evaluations,
Soccer field at Emmanuel Baptist Fellowship, 9:00AM -
12PM, 863-635-5040
Gospel Sing, 7pm, Southside Baptist Church,
314 S. Scenic Hwy, Frostproof, FL 33843, 863-635-3872

* Saturday, March 17
Clay Workshop, 10030 a.m.-noon. Free Family
Fun Workshop. Clay activities. Latt Maxcy Memorial
Library, Frostproof. 863-688-7743.

* Sunday, March 18
Bellringer Soloist, Sun, Mar 18, 4PM Meth-
odist Church, Frostproof. Kristine Stout plays 37 bells.
Tickets $10 at office or Carolyn 635-4975


M oIDuFLORI
aj1'orcommunity credit union


Swiftmud OKs plan

to sell Bairtow office
The Southwest Florida Water
Management District's Gov-
erning Board voted Tuesday.
to begin the process to sell
its Bartow Service Office and
relocate staff to two other
locations. The move is part of
the District's reorganization to
increase efficiencies, reduce
operational costs and meet the
District's core mission respon-
sibilities in the areas of water,
supply, flood protection, water
quality and natural systems.
About 10 field employees will
relocate to the District's exist-
ing Lake Hancock property
about 14 miles north of the
current Bartow Service Office,
which is at 170 Century Blvd.
Staff also \viIl use the Lake
Hancock site to house some of
the District's heavy equipment.
such as airboats.
The process should be com-
pleted during the next several
months.


February 29,2012


Page 2A Frostproof News





February 29, 2012 Frostproof News Page 3A
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February 29, 2012


Frostproof News Page 3A












VIEWPOINT


Polk deserves its own university


Splitting USF Polytechnic off from the University
of South Florida is a good thing for Florida and Polk
County. And sooner, rather than later, would be better
for everyone.
There are currently 11 state universities in the
Florida system.-Making the new school, Florida Poly-
technic, independent would place the state's newest
university in our own backyard.
We think that's good for our county and we are not
part of the chorus calling for State Sen. JD Alexander's
head on a planer for trying to split the school away
from USE
Alexander thinks that USF has dragged its feet in
making this branch campus an equal with the other
USF campuses.
USF did not want to relinquish control of the
branch campus and the school's president, Judy
Genshaftifought the move at every turn. That's
understandable. But what wasn't as understandable
was once the school lost the battle for the campus at
a Board of Governors meeting, the presidentmade
some decisions that seemed to indicate that the
school would still try to keep the campus under USF
control.
When the idea first surfaced last year to make the
campus a full-fledged university, the Board of Gov-
ernors. which oversees Florida's university system,


Our Viewpoint
deliberated the idea. .
It ruled that the school could become an indepen-
dent university if it met several criteria and bench-
marks and called for an orderly transition plan. It,
sounded like a fair and equitable decision.
After that decision was made, USF'sprfesident let it
be known that the school didn't reallyvwant to be part
of any transition plan and, then fired the campus'
chancellor, who was in favor of the split,_replacing
him with an opponent of the campus' independence.
We don't believe that Alexander's recent riov;e tp
make the campus split happen sooner is motivated
by anything other than a sense that USF really didn't
look like it was going to give the Board of Governors'
plan "the old college try."
Alexander is term-limited and won't be in the Leg-
islature next year. If he is right and USF was going to
circumvent the plan, he needed to act now or never.
We are aware that Sen. Alexander is often charac-
terized as heavy-handed, sometimes even called a
bully: Yes, he is powerful and sometimes uses that
power to achieve his goals. Often it is his own person-
ality that leads to that characterization.
He is an enigma in modern politics in the sense
. that he has what he himself calls an "introvert" per-


sonality but yet continued to win election year after
year to the state House and then the Senate since
1998.
He is a native of Lake Wales and we, feel like we,'
know him well. What others call bullying we call using
the power of his office to do what he thinks is best for
our area. .
In many public and private conversations we have
heard Alexander say that Polk County is too big to
be part of the gravitational pull of either Tampa or
Orlando.
The 2010 U.S. Census data showed that we have
more than 600,000 people in Polk County. There are
likely to be at least a million of us in a generation.
We don't always agree with everything our home-
town senator does. We were and remain adamantly
opposed to his recent efforts to privatize the state's
prison system. It was one of his worst ideas ever and
we were glad he failed to make it happen.
But we know as well as anyone that his commit-
ment to education in Florida is real.
We know that, because of efforts throughout his
legislative career, our local schools are better and our
community colleges are better.
We deserve a university in Polk County and we
are glad that JD Alexander is in Tallahassee trying to
make that happen.


Disappointing choices in


Florida U.S. Senate race
To watch the U.S. Senate race, in Florida
is to realize just hov low our level of polin- M
cal leadership has sunk. You know it's bad Cary McMul
when one candidate compares the other to
Charlie Sheen.
The incumbent, Democrat Bill Nelson,
has not had a parncularly insp'irng career.
He appears better at being telegenic than
at making policy. Nelson has been in die
Senate since 2000 and has lirtleo show for
it besides supporting his party. 4 ."
The republicans believe the year and his spouse, U.S. Rep. Mary Bono ME
To end Nelson's tenure. Geo..se)ieuL, R-Calif., each own houses in their home
once d Iputy attorney general kind polti- states. Florida law normally forbids spoi
cal opetive-oryformer Go harlie Cristi, from taking exemptions on two houses,
seemed the favored candidate early on. even if they live in different states, but M
Crist appointed LeN lietfx to filfte might be able to wiggle through a looph
unexpited term bf U.S. Sen. Me Martinez Last week, perhaps not inaccurately,
who resigned in 2009. LeNlieax served 16 LeMieux calledMack"the Charlie Sheer
months and didn't run for the seat, won byv Florida politics." Sheen, of course, was fi
Nlarco Rubio. Now LeMieux is running for for being more reckless in real life than t
Nelson's seat. hedonist he played on TV's "Two and a I
In March, U.S. Rep. Connie Mack Men taliated. His campaign mana
of Fort Myers declined to run against Mack retalated. His campaign mana
LeMieux, but changed hismind in October. JeffCohen, released a letter calling LeMi
Mack's best asset is his name recognition. 'a take-no-prisoners, bare-knuckled
He is the son of former U.S. Sen. Connie political junkie," the "puppet master" of
Mack III and the great-grandson of a Hall- disgraced Republican Party of Florida
of-Famebasebamanagerofthesame chairman Jim Greer, "the mastermind o
of-Fame baseball manager of the same Charlie Crist's political machine," a "libe
Mack, whose real name is Cornelius .(or is it amoral?) political operative who
Harvey McGillicuddy IV also has, shall we created Charlie Crist," and "a truly extract
say, a colorful past. He started his career as dinary political hacck.
a marketing executive for Hooter's, which All that remains in this spectacle is for
seems fitting given some of the tawdry Mack to rename his campaign the Viole
incidents in his past LeMieux's campaign Torpedo of Truth, after Sheen's vindic-
recentlyreleased a list of these indiscre- tive one-man show. Or maybe not, since
tions, which includes two road-rage Sheens act flopped.
incidents, a bar brawl, a confrontation with So to review, our candidates are an
a police officer, a string of unpaid debts and emptysuit, a man who became aWash
a divorce. ton insider without ever facing voters, ai
Now Mack faces questions about the a guys full of entitlement he believes h
property-tax exemption on his house. He McMULLEN |


len


ack,
uses
lack
ole.
i of
hired
he
Half

ger,
eux


f
ral
or-

nt



ng-
nd
is
16A


More conserve


In ninth grade civics class, around 1955,
in a unit on the United States Congress, our
teacher told us about a position called party
whip. His job (virtually all members of Con-
gress being men back then) was to meet
members of Congress as they responded to
a quorum call and tell them how to vote on
the issue on the floor.
The positions of majority whip and
minority whip date back to the 1920s. They
are second in pecking order only to die
majority and minority leaders.
In today's world of e-mail, instant mes-
saging, and texting (with or without dirty
pictures) it seems a rather inefficient way
of giving the party faithful their marching
orders. -
On the other hand. it was probably more
reliable in the middle of die 20th centurythan
flashing the Batr signal against the night sky.

My memory of Miss Brown's civics lesson


itive than tu
S. Frsbie





S.L. Frisbie can be contacted at
slfrisbie@polkcountydemocrat.com
on the role of party whips was brought to
the fore by the bickering between the Re-
publican candidates for president over who
is most conservative.
The implicit message is that the "perfect"
candidate follows the parryline 100 percent
of the time, never stopping to analyze the
issues for himself or herself.
It kind of makes you wonder why we
send those 535 folks to Washington instead
of just letting the majority and minority
leaders of both parties cast proxy votes on
FRISBIE I 16A


The Frostproof News ,.
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
* Aileen Hood.- General Manager left Roslow Editor Brian Ackley Managing Editor


Published every Wednesday at
14 W. Wall Street, Frostproof, FL 33843
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Frostproof, Florida and
additional Entry Office
*Phone f863) 676-3467 'Fax (863) 678-1297
Postmaster: Send address changes to
140 E. Smart Ave.,
Lake Wales, FL 33853-4198


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
Six MonLhs............ ... 12.84 One Year...... .... ....$.20 87
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNTY-IIAIL
SIx Monhs. ....... .. $12 00 One Year. .............. $19.50
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
St\ Months ......... .. .20 00 One Year .. ................$32 50
OUT OF STATE SUBSCRIPTION
SxMonths ......... $22.00 One Year .... ............$3600


We welcome your letters'
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All .
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frostproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews.com or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
Wales Fl. 33853.


.. ..........


Page 4A Frostproof News


February 29, 2012







February 29, 2012 Frostproof News Page 5A


Bulldogs run, jump



past local track rivals
./... I i


Toddrick Gaines stretches out as far as he can in the long jump event. His leap of 20 feet,
1 inch was good enough to take the top spot.


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON
Michael Hutchinson shows great form for the Bulldogs in this relay event.


-r

Mary Metheny takes
to the air in the
long jump event,
recording a leap of
12 feet, 8 inches,
pretty impressive
for a sixth-grader.





















Mike McFar-
lane, whose
teammates
affectionately
know as "Big
Mike;'gets
ready to toss
the shot put.
This effort
flew 37 feet, 4
inches.


Frostproof's Cristella Gonzales takes the first leg in the girls 4x800 relay as
they went on to take first place with a time of 12:16.


Gloria Hamilton, an eighth-grader in Frostproof, makes this attempt in the high jump. Frostproof
hosted all its local rivals Feb. 16 in a four-way meet, and defeated Avon Park, Fort Meade and
Lake Placid.


Frostproof News Page 5A


February 29,2012


.t










Ridge Girl Scouts have a 'ball'


This years' GirlScout annual Father
and Daughter dance was a masquerade
ball, hosted by Wendy Etheridge and
Lake Wales Troop 287 in the Polk Av-
enue Elementary School on Feb. 18.
All Citrus Ridge Service Unit Girl
Scout troops in Babson Park, Frostproof
and Lake Wales were invited to attend
alng.with their father, grandfather or
other significant male role mbdel.
S-The girls look forward to attending
each year because they get a chance
to dress up, dance and play with their
friends, scout leaders noted.
The sit-down dinner catered by Maria
Outlaw was baked chicken breast, pasta
and Alfredo sauce, French-style green
beans, roll, tea or white grape punch
served from a tiered fountain. Ethridge's
mother and longtime troop volunteer
baked a cake for dessert.
Michele Trantham, photographer
with Memories by Michele, provided
a chance for each couple to get their
evening attire captured profession-
ally on film. Mike Sanchez and Mickey
Taylor were the evening DJs. Helping
decorate were: Rachel Sanchez, Amiee
Shahan, Jennifer Huff, April Fridley,
Wendy Tanner, Liz Chambers, Robyn
Taylor, Sally Rickman, Crystal Rickman,


Lisa Aguilar, and Britteny Shahan. Ad-
ditionally, they helped serve and clean
up the cafeteria.
Shelby Hutto of Troop 590 replied,
when asked what the best part of the
night was, "Getting to dance with my
Daddy during the Father and Daughter
dance."
Girl Scouting aims to build girls of
courage, confidence and character who
make the world a better place. This year
Girl Scouts are celebrating their 100th
year of scouting since Juliette Gordon
Low first founded it in March 12, 1912.
March 11-17 is celebrated as the week
of Girl Scouting globally.
The cost to join is $12. Daisy troop
starts with kindergarten and first grade,
Brownies are second and third, Juniors
fourth and fifth, Cadettes sixth and
seventh, Seniors eighth and ninth, Am-
bassadors are 10-12; then the girls can
become Girl Scout Adults.
All Frostproof troops meet at the
Little House at the west end of A Street,
on Lake Clinch. Contact Michelle Hutto
(863) 528-1136 or Donna Nicholson
(863) 632-2871 for further details.
For Babson Park and Lake Wales areas
contact Jennifer Huff, Citrus Ridge Ser-
vice Unit, at (863) 287-3242.


PHOTOS PROVIDED
Shelby Hutto and her father imbo check in for the masquerade ball while Racheal Grabowski
looks on. The annual Girl Scout father-daughter event was held Feb. 18.


Racheal
Grabowski also
had a colorful*
mask. 'i


Taytiana Smith was scored by her Uncle
Derrick McMahon.


A beautiful smile is all that you can really see,
but if you look a little closer, you'll find it's
Taytiana Smith behind that mask.


Ida -- .----
:-..? *:* g


-C

1 ,~,A


Page 6A Frostproof News


y raurbeF 29 2012






February 29, 2012 FrostDroof News Pane 7A


School Board considering outside firm for policies


By STEVE STEINER
SSTEINER @POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT


According to Tom Young, a consul-
tant with NEOLA (formerly Northeast
Ohio Learning Association), all Florida
schools have certain obligations,
among them reviewing policies and
procedures.
That was the pronouncement made
Tuesday, Feb. 21, as he appeared before
the Polk County School Board at its
budget workshop. 14 was accompa-.
nied by Amanda Clapp. whose father
is-the principal owner of NEOLA. The
company seeks a contract o help Polk
County Schools keep current with state
requirements.
"Why should Polk County Schools
review atnd revise its policies?" Young
rhetorically asked. "The law requires
it (be done every two years), and I can
assure you, you have policies that are
outdated."
He said those policies most likely not
in compliance with state and federal
law could expose Polk County Schools
to potential litigation. He concluded by
telling the School Board that reviewing
and revising.its-policies simply is good
business.
What a school system does is review
and assemble all its policies. NEOLA
then compares it to the template it
has developed that shows whether the
school system policies and procedures
are current, as well as those not in
alignment.
One of the questions posed
concerned the structure of the
templates. Each school has differences
that set it apart. How effective were
the templates was a concern to school
board members.
"Our generic templates are a start,"
said Nbung, who added the process is


a collaborative effort between it and
NEOLA. Because of the enormity of
the project, it would be necessary to
conduct workshops.
"This is a huge task. This is a monu-
mental task," he said. Young injected
a measure of levity to underscore just
how enormous by asking how does
one eat a very large animal. "One bite
at a time,' he answered. Those "bites"
would come in the form of 10 sections
that would be addressed through the
workshops.
Was there a limit to the number of
workshops?
"You will have as many workshops as:
you want," Young replied. If begun this
June, it would be reasonable to be able
to implement revisions in time for the
2013-14 school year.
"Implementation is an extensive pro-
cedure and it should be."
"What is the cost?" asked School
Board Member Lori Cunningham.
"The cost is based on a sliding scale
determined by the number of stu-
dents," responded Amanda Clapp. For
Polk County Schools, that cost would
be $89,000, to be paid over the course
of three to four years. In addition,
there would be a cost of $5,000 for the
two updates, with each update costing
$2,500. There is no charge for emergen-
cy updates, added Clapp.
Young said that cost included 120
hours. The additional hourly rate would
be $175.
The prospect of exceeding 120 hours
could be mitigated by being prepared,
Young said. In the past, he sometimes
had encountered situations where
policies and procedures were being
reviewed for the first time with NEOLA.
He recommended that Polk County.
Schools take the 10 sections. delegate
those sections to the school depart-


ments that handle those policies and
procedures, and that the department
heads, in turn, further delegate the
tasks to staff members who handle
those aspects. Then, once the ground-
work had been completed, to meet with
NEOLA.
"If the staff is prepared, the time is
controlled," he said. "If the staff is pre-
pared, 120 hours is not only manage-
able, it's guaranteed."
"How many, if any, counties have
exceeded 120 hours?" asked Board
Member Dick Mullenax. Of the 14
in Florida that have contracts with
NEOLA, only one: Martin County, was
the response.
Had NEOLA ever been challenged in
court, Cunningham asked. Clapp told
her only once, but not in Florida.
Afterwards, Chairwoman Hazel Sell-
ers told fellow board members what she
had discovered.
"I've talked to two districts," Sellers
said. "They were extremely pleased."

About NEOLA
According to its website, NEOLA pro-
vides school districts with a complete
service for developing and updating
Board Bylaws and Policies, Adminis-
trative Guidelines/Procedures,
Forms, Staff Handbooks and
Student/Parent Handbooks. It retains
law firms in Florida (and six other
states) to provide legal reviews for
school districts. Almost all its associ-
ates hail from academia, the majority
of them having been school superin-
tendents. NEOLA develops templates
from the state and customizes the
templates to a district's unique cir-
cumstances. The associates visit twice
per year to review updates and answer
client questions.


A


'Wise'


investment


PHOTO PROVIDED
Doug and Cindy Wise of Wise Seed Company
are the latest from the local business
community to step forward and sponsor a
senior for this spring's Frostproof Project
Graduation Event. Doug is shown with
senior Jennifer Wells who benefits from
the donation. The local annual effort needs
to raise $20,000 to insure that Frostproof
seniors have a drug- and alcohol-free event
to celebrate their final year in school.


FIl, vLFl
Airport Road. Arcadia., FL
# imillp- samih, s. 9--SR70,t


www.arcadiaairport.com


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February 29, 2012


Frostproof News Page 7A


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Page 8A Frostproof News February 29, 2012


OBITUARIES


Russell W. 'Russ' Alice Marie Davis


Gourley
Russell W. "Russ" Gourley, 86, of
Babson Park passed away Tuesday,
Feb. 21, 2012, at the Grace Health
Care in Lake Wales.
He was born Aug. 11, 1925, in
Lowell, Mass., to the late Harry
Russell nd Ida Mae (Olson) Gour-
ley. He came to Babson Park from
Tewksbury, Mass., in 1988. He retired
from Tewksbury Massachusetts Fire
Department. He was a member of the
Tewksbury Elks Lodge, the Tewksbury
Lions Club, Sons of The American
Legion, Lake Wales Elks Lodge and
Lake Wales Moose Lodge.._'- .
Ml.;Gour le^ was a hloisempnr 4
enjod'ed' %wbdworkiihg. Aind was a
building.cpntractior before joining
the fire department in 1965. He loved
his family and friends.
He was'.preceded in death by his
wife, Mildred A.- Gourley, and a sister,
Virginia Ruth Girard.
Survivors include his daughter,
Susan L.Welbbrri of Babson Park; his
son, Russell W. Gourley, Jr. (Jill) of
Newburyport, Mass.; six grandchil-
dren; and seven great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be held from
10:30 a.m. until the memorial service
at 11 a.m. Friday, March 2.,at the
Marion Nelson FiloeurdldalHme in Lake
,Wales with Rev. 'Joe NIatt'ox officiating.
Condolepce taiV be'jpti'0,the
family and t e \vebcast of the ser- -
vice can be viewed at www.marion-
nelsonfuneralhome.com. In place of
flowers, please send a donation to
the Cornerstone Hospice in Winter
Haven.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements..

Charles Eric

Ho-llingswojrth
Chailes Eric Hollingsworth, 4 1, of
Lake WSes, died on Monday, Eeb. 20,
2012, at his home.
He was born on Dec. 27, 1979, in
Lake Wales and was a lifelongie6si-
dent.ITe was disabled for many years
as thd result of an industrial'accident.
He w rai'of the Protestant !
He iWsurvived by his parents, Louise
and Charles "Hal" Hollngpwotrth; a'
brother, Andy Hollingsworf;, aunt,
Elouise Pippin and her husband .
Larry; and cousins, Tracy Hadden,
Bobby Barnhorst, Aaron Ireland, -
Joshua Hadden, Dwayne Pippin, and
Larry Pippin, Jr.
Services will be private.'


Alice Marie Davis, 83, of Babson Park
passed away Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012, at
her residence.
She was born Jan. 2, 1929, in Lake
Wales to the late Henry Holt and Julia Bell
(Watson) Tucker. She had been a lifelong
resident of the area, except when she
lived in Chicago for 20 years.
She was a retired cook from Warner
University, and of the Baptist faith.
She and her husband were the former
owners and operators of Davis Auto
Repair in Lake Wales. She loved to cook,
travel and spend time with her family.
Alice was preceded in death by her
husband, Freddie E. Davis Sr. in 1999; a
son, Freddie E. Davis Jr. in 2009; parents;
two brothers; one sister ;and one great-
granddaughter, Mia Nicole Gonzalez.
Survivors include her daughter, Diane
Badgero (Rick) of Babson Park; brother,
Frank Tucker of Babson Park; four grand-
children; and two great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be 6-8 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 26, and the funeral service will be at
11 a.m. Monday, Feb. 27, at the Marion
Nelson Funeral Home in Lake Wales with
Chaplain Cecil Kent officiating.
Interment will follow at the Lake Wales
Cemetery.
For those who wish, donations may be
made to the Good Shepherd Hospice, 105
Arneson Ave., Auburndale, FL 33823.
Condolences may be sent to the family
and the webcast of the service can be
viewed at www.marionnelsonfuneral
home.com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home-is in
charge of arrangements.

James 'Buddy' E.

McClelland
James "Buddy" E. McClelland of
Frostproof passed away Sunday,
Feb. 19, 2012, in Sebring. He was 77.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home,
Frostproof, is handling arrangements.

Jesse Brock

Jesse Brock of Waverly passed awayvJ
Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012, at his residence
He was 82.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home in Lak-
Wales is handling the services. ,

Kent LaMarr

Bostwick
Kent LaMarr Bostwick of Frostproof
passed away Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012,
at his residence. He was 69.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home, Frost-
proof, is handling arrangements.


Local homeowners


face electric bill hike


By IVAN PENN
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TALLAHASSEE Here's what Prog-
ress Energy customers should expect
from a $288 million refund they'll get
over the next few years: higher electric
bills. But if a-settlement between the
-utilityand the Public Counsel's Office
is approved, their bills will not go up as
much as they otrirnvise would.
The av erage customer's bill on Jan. 1
is expect ed to increase $4.93 a month
per 1,000 kilowatt hours of usage, from
$123.19 to $128.12, subject to adjust-
ments for fuel costs.
J.R. Kelly, the state public counsel who
represents customers before die Public
:..-Sevice C6mmission, called that a win.
I:Y-..!-es, there is some increase, but I
Sinik a big portion of this settlement is
'-balaocing that with what we could po-
tentihlly have seen," he said. "We could
"have been looking at doubling that and
in five years five times that."
The cost analysis came as part of a
public hearing last week before the PSC on
the proposed settlement between Progress
Energy and consumer advocates over the
damaged Crystal River nuclear plant.
Last Wednesday,"the five-member
comfunission approved the agreement.
which includes what a lawyer for the
Florida Retail Federation called "the larg-
est refunid n electric utilirN history that
w\e know of." The agreement is expected
to win commission approval.
The settlement, announced last
month after months of investigation
into the cause of three cracks in Crystal
River's 42-inch-thick concrete reactor


containment building, addresses some
concerns about Progress' multibillion-
dollar nuclear ambitions and how its
customers would pay for them.
Under the agreement, customers will
receive a refund of $288 million spent
to purchase alternative electricity after
the utility took the Crystal River nuclear
plant offline in fall 2009 to replace old
steam generators. Progress botched the
project, severely damaging the contain-
ment building. Current estimated repair
cost: $2.5 billion.
The plant's future remains unclear
because Progress said its insurer, the Nu-
clear Electric Insurance Limited, is refus-
ing to "voluntarily" pay the full amount
allowed under its insurance policy.'
As another part of the proposed settle-
ment, Progress negotiated the right to
cancel the engineering, procurement and
construction contract on its proposed
Levy county nuclear plant.
Consumer advocates agreed they
would not oppose canceling the
contract while gaining agreement that
future customer payments on the Levy
project be limited to $3.45 a month for
the average customer for five years.
Those costs could have reached $20 or
more under Progress' projected figures.
"The settlement agreement before you
is fair, just and reasonable," said Alexander
Glenn. a Progress lawyer.
It remains unclear whether the dam-
ages at Crystal River the utility's only.
e-isting nuclear plant in Florida will ever
get fixed. Progress also faces multiple
challenges to its federal operating license
application to build two reactors on a
3,000-acre site in Levy County.


Friday, March 2 7:30 p.m.
SFCC University Center Auditorium, Avon Park
Tickets $20-$22
Buy Online performances.southflorida.edu
Box Office 863-784-7178 Hours 11:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m.


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Page 8A Frostproof News


February 29, 2012


e








Agriculture teacher wins Golf Ball Drop


There's at least one Frostproof Middle
Senior High School teacher who this
week is thankful that one Project Grad-
uation fundraiser has become a popular
annual tradition.
Paul Webb was the lucky winner of
Frostproof's Project Graduation an-
nual Golf Ball Drop Saturday. He is the


school's agriculture teacher, and he gra-
ciously donated one half of the $1,000
prize back to Project Graduation.
The fundraiser involves dropping golf
balls from the air onto a target on the
ground. The ball closest to the target cen-
ter wins, andWebb had that ball this year.
Greg Waters, owner of Park Air


Helicopters, and David Duke helped
to make this event possible by donat-
ing their time and expertise just as they
have done each year since the drop
began several years ago.
"It is through the generosity of many
people that Project Graduation can
provide a drug-free night of celebration


after graduation for our seniors," said
Lisa Portwood, who is helping to orga-
nize the 2012 event.
The next fundraising event to be held
is a Bass Tournament on Lake Reedy on
March 10. For questions or to register
contact David Mercer at (863) 978-9707
or devildog_2045@yahoo.com.




for reading the
Frostproof News


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON


McKenzie Webb holds up the winning golf ball while in the arms of her grandfather Paul who was
the winner of Saturday's Project Graduation golf ball drop. Also on hand: David Duke of Park Air
Helicopters, McKenzie's sister Piatyn and pilot Gregg Waters.


David Duke got to do the honors Saturday,
dumping out golf balls while hovering high .
above a field near Ben Hill Griffin Elementary 7831 Camp Mack Roa
School. The events was Project Graduation's Lake wales, Fl 33898
annual "golf ball drop."The winner is the Donations accepted
person who's numbered ball ends up closest to > .
a target on the ground. IF. ,


UPWARD


SOCCER


Sign up for Soccer League 2012!
Evaluations:
Saturday March 3 Time: 9am 12pm
Cost is only $55.00

Evaluations held at:
Emmanuel Baptist Fellowship
1300 CR 630 West, Frostproof FL, 33843
863-635-5040
or www,EBFellowshlpFrostproof.com/#lupward-sports


ad
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February 29, 2012


Frostproof News Page 9A







Page 1OA Frostproof News February 29, 2012


Puttin' o the


Ritz pays for the books


PHOTOS BY K.M THORNTON SR.

As usual, members of the Frostproof High School Interact Club, a youth offshoot of Rotary Inter-
national and the Frostproof Rotary Club, was on hand to help serve. Interactors included (from
left): Enid Martinez, Yurel Castillo (from the Frostproof Diner which catered the meal), Salomon
Chavez, Veronica Molina, Jessica Boggs and Ana Vega.


Who is that mysterious woman behind the mask? None other than city council member Diana
Webster-Biehl.


r Kili l- ier *RI i fc ur sMia a
r Play Golf Anytime 'I Play Golf After i Play Golf All
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Bea Reifeis shows off a colorful ensemble which captured the attention of many at the show.


- k- AM m Am mmmmElm o E-E-m % aaNWEmm


Regina Bennett made sure
everyone knew what was
what, and who was who,, while
serving as a most capable
master of ceremonies. The
show was a sellout, and raised
enough money for the Friends
of Latt Maxcy Memorial Library
to cover the local share of the
annual book lease fee.


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FIRST PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
The City of Fort Meade is considering applying to the Florida E)epanment of Econ..m,-c Op-po-rurn.,
(DEO) for a Small Cities Community Development Block Grart C DBCG ,-r up lo Se en Hur,.dac, Tnou-
sand Dollars ($700,000.00). These funds must be used for one of tihe follo ing purp.-:e,
1.To benefit low and moderate income person-.
2. To aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight; or
3. To meet other community development needs of recent origin rna, in a p.nin.lar urj,?n., re..-u-.e e .
isting conditions pose a serious and immediate threat to the healtr or elf ILre o- the c.mornrnoa arnJ here
other financial resources are not available to meet such needs.
The categories of activities for which these funds may be used are in the areas of housing, neighbor-
hood revitalization, commercial revitalization, or economic development and include such improvement
activities as acquisition of real property,-loans to private-for-profit business, purchase of machinery and
equipment. construction of infrastructure, rehabilitation of houses and commercial buildings, and energy
conservation. Additional information regarding the range of activities that may be undertaken will be
provided at the public hearing For each activity that is proposed, at least 70% of the funds must benefit
low and monleraic income per'.onn
In developing in application for submission to DEO, the City of Fort Meade must plan to minimize
displacement of person, a- .. result of planned CDBG activities. In addition, the City of Fort Meade is
required iI Jceclnp a plan to assist displaced persons.
A public hearing to receive citizen views concerning the community's economic and community develop-
ment needs will be held at the Fort Meade City Hall on Tuesday, March 13, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. or as soon
thereafter as possible. For information concerning the public hearing contact: Ms. April Brown, City
Planner, City of Fort Meade, 8 West Broadway, Fort Meade, Florida 33841. Telephone (863) 285-1176.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any handicapped person
requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually impaired should contact the City Clerk at
(863) 285-1100 x-233, at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and an interpreter will be provided.
Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public hearing should contact the City Clerk at
least five calendar days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided. Any handicapped
person requiring special accommodation at this meeting should contact the City Clerk at least five calen-
dar days prior to the meeting.
A Fair Housing/Equal Opportunity/Handicap Accessible Jurisdiction.
2704046


iR9TAURARTAPHBffw4"
- I jimw-


LAi eiq 3S2-SO 3


S Page 10A Frostproof News


February 29, 2012






February 29, 2012 Frostproof News Page hA


We're not sure what this puppet is modeling, but it sure provided a little fun and wild entertain-
ment at the end of the afternoon.


Putting on the Ritz

pays for the books


PHOTOS BY K M THORNTON SR.

Cindy Jimmenez had her lovely dress accented with classy white accessories.

A .. Medical Care Ior Adulls
i'. Office Skin Surgery
'. ~School & WVVork Pn,',sicals
SMedicare and Insurance
1110 Druid Circle, Lake Wales Accepted
(across fromrn Ine Emergeren,, Enr3ne h ine hosplal) Atlcrdable Fees for
86 7 620 Cunvenienil Later
S Monday-Thu[r ay 9AM-SPM, Friday 9AM-12PM Appointments
,ww ,iririjr-irir r:,m *r H ome VIsi ts
g e e.-i L., .
~e a iatb~ -De-rfo' "r-me--d --b'y"t h" e" doc-tor " '


There was plenty of elegance to the day, thanks
in large part to models like Veronica Espinoza.


While June Felt was at one end of the
entertainment scale, at the other was
10-year-old Nicole Snyder and her 9-year-old
sister Makayla.


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Frostproof News Page 11A


February 29,2012






Page 12A Frostproof News February 29, 2012


Bulldogs banquet honors football

players, cheerleaders


It's not always all about football. Several junior varsity players were cited for hiding a 4.0
grade point average. Honorees cited by Head Coach Price Harris (left) and CoachJohnson (right)
included Spencer Allen, Tyler Gonzales, Marshall Maxwell, Sean Smith and Bryce Smith.


PHOTUIUOS BY K M IHUHUN SH


Junior Varsity cheerleading Coach Sheila Britt (left) and members of her squad were cited for
their efforts. Cheerleaders pictured are (from left): Stephanie Theriac, Shania Arms, Amee
Thoiips6, Casey Sousa and Elisa Walker.


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i -. T -J~i^ f


0 k


mm


S Page 12A Frostproof News


February 29, 2012


I


uoommmqml





February 29, 2012 Frostproof News Page 13A


The Frostproof Middle Senior High School gymnasium was the site of the Bulldogs annual foot-
ball banquet Feb. 18.


The junior varsity team members all received shirts and certificates. Coach Herb Johnson noted
that the squad had some 50 middle school kids as part of the program this last fall, a number
that bodes well for future varsity Bulldog squads.


Ua


A special group of Bulldog seniors will be sorely missed on the field when Frostproof heads
back to the gridiron next fall. They include (from left): David Dyer, Zach Jenkins, Tyrone "Bam"
Hamilton, Dakota McCullers, Jake Smith, Dylan Willis, and Dustin Saiz.


While the Bulldogs had a good season on the field, with their first football playoff appearance
in three seasons, there was some stellar off the field efforts as well, as these varsity players
were honored :fr having a 4.0 grade point average. Coach Price Harris (left) honored (from left)
Harrison Johnsoh, Jake Smith and Zack Jenkins. At right is Coach Herb Johnson.


Coach Nancy DeMarco (left) and her varsity cheerleading squad also had quite a good season as
they finished in the Top 10 in state competition. Cheerleaders included (from left): Sunnie Sand-
erson, Leah Lanoue, Kaylee Norris, Katelyn McDaniel, Taylor Miller, Hannah Sikes, April Jones,
Molly Mantel and Destaney King.


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February 29,2012


Frostproof News Page 13A


M M
;m,-iL






Page 14A Frostproof News February 29, 2012


Dease takes

top honor(in

photo show
R y Lynn Dease took top honors Feb. 3
at Frostproof Photography Club'sAnnual
Photography Show with her photograph
titled "Welcome to Sloss."
: Dease, ho6 o rganed and directed the
show, said she wasthrilled at the honor. She
is a freelance photographer for Sun Coast
'Mledia, which publishes the Frostproof
!News.
First place went to Terry Mann for
-"Laddeiof the Ancients." Mann also
tbok- third place \with "Rusty Rooster,"
iWf rotughr.home anh-no'ntable men-
Srion for his "Tunas."
Second place went to CJ Newton's "Bee
All You Can. Bee," and fourth place went
home with 'Leaves-Framed with Water" by
Annette McCardty.who also need an hon-
orable mention for"Predator and Prey."
Fifth place went to "South Dakota Cen-
tral," by Judy Graham, who also won honor-
able mentions for her "Prairie Homestead,
Badlands, S.D." and "Bridge over St. Lucie
River."
Sixth place went to Amanda Hollis'
"Beauty in the Eye of the Storm," and hon-
orable mentions went also to Mike Thorn-
ton's "Orange & Oak," Shirley Brantley's
"Early Morning," "Triplets" by Cynthia Cur-
tis, and Chuck OIver's "Artist of die Beach."
Also bringing home Honorable Mentions
were Beny Torquemadas "'Southern Style"
and three photographs by Debra Lewis:
'Glorious Morning," "Sapphire" and "Water
Angel."
Susan Aschenbrenner's "Shores of Gichee
Gu-Mee" brought most of the voting in the
< People's-Choice category:
'The show was judged by South Florida
Community College digital photography
instructor David Hale.


PHOTO BY K M. THORrTON
A number of local shutterbugs were honored for their work in the recent Frostproof Photography Club show, including, from left: Judge Dave Hale,
Best of Show winner Ray Lynn Dease, Judy Graham, Shirly Brantley, Susan Ashenbranner, Amanda Hollis, Annette McCarthy, Terry Mann, Chuck
Oliver, Cynthia Curtis and C. J. Newton.


PHOTO PROVIDED

Ray Lynn Dease won Best
of Show in the recent
Frostproof Photo Club
show.


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* . ', -' -, r -. -- .
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pDoes acupuncture hurt "- -
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on dogs, cats and horses for:


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February 29, 2012


Page 14A Frostproof News







Frost p rOOfS

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J; M
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i.. ""nThe Frostproof FFA held a a teacher appreciation event last week, which coincided with-National
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-.orange juice and milk. There were also donuts, and hey, the flour for those started out in the
ag fields as well. On hand to help dispense the goodies were FFA members (from left) Zachary
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Teachers enjoyed themselves, and a chance to catch up with each other a little.0Otto Polk is being
Teacher Mary-Jane Newcomer gets something to wet her whistle. served here, while in the background are teachers (from left) Natalie Van Hook, Ashley Byrd,
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Frostproof News Page 15A


I






Page 16A Frostproof News February 29, 2012


WINDHAM
FROM PAGE 1
they will count for our school."
Those students are actually picked up
and dropped off at FPMSHS which elimi-
nates travel issues.
"I asked one of the kids last week how
theywere doing. He said, 'This is wonder-
ful. I actually like school I'm doing great
and I get to get my hands dirty,' That's
what we want. We want kids to be suc-
cessful,"Windham added. "If we're doing
what's right for the kids, everything else is
going to take care of itself"
He also noted that in recent times, the
number of Frostproof students in dual
enrollment classes has increased by as
much as 40 percent.
"We have more students now going to
Polk State College in Lake Wales or South
Florida in Avon Park and taking their
English and math classes there than ever,"
Wihdham noted.


FRISBIE
FROM PAGE 4
behalf of their colleagues.
Why do your own thinking and disturb
all those brain cells when somebody else
has consulted the political Ouija board
apd determined which position is, by
definition, Democratic, and which is Re-
publican? After all, bipartisanship is largely
a'myth, espoused by politicians who need
support from a few members of the op-
posing party to win passage of a resolution
supporting Motherhood.
I e labels'genera. Bore me, I am a
on' rvauve on fisalpolice, and a moder-
n social c e intelligence and
nerity of c da is more important
to e than paty lab .
veek or two ag gotone of those


He explained, too, that the school grade
for-Frostproof is figured on a 70/30 split of
FCAT scores and school performance in a
number of other areas, not the traditional
50/50 split that is now used for regular
Florida high schools that house students
in grades nine through 12 only.
"I am very competitive. I want Frost-
proof to be the first middle senior high
school to be an A school," saidWindham,
who has a firsthand knowledge of what
it might take to get there. He came from
Fort Meade Middle Senior which was one:
point away from being an A school last
year. Frostproof was a B school. "I was
part of that (in Fort Meade), because I was
there. But I'm so competitive, there's no
way they're going to beat us."
About a month ago, the school
launched its 3R program, reading, writing
and arithmetic, he added, to help make
that goal.
"Every day, opposite of the student's
lunch time, these teacher leaders put
together a-program, and on this day, we're


gosh-awful political emails that asserted
that conservatives were united in opposi-
tion to abortion, energy conservation,
universal healthcare, and various other is-
sues, while liberals clearly embrace them.
Excuse me, but I prefer to pick my own
position.
I find little to recommend the terms
"pro-choice" and "pro-life," since few peo-
ple oppose either choice or life. The issue
is abortion, but the terms "pro-abortion"
and "anti-abortion" don't resonate as well.
But if anybody cares, I am "pro-choice"-
andmy choice is adamantly "pro-life." I do
not assert the right to force others to agree
with my position, as do zealots on both
sides.
I absolutely want to leave a planet for
my grandchildren and my yet-unborn
great-grandchildren that has a healthy ery-,
vironment for their own lives. M\ genera-
tion has not done a very good job of that.
And I am not proud of the fact that the


going to cover vocabulary. Another day
they're talking about reading. Another
day they're talking about comprehen-
sion. Another day math. If we have a
five-day week,.then the fifth day they can
do recreational reading. But they have a
lesson every day that these kids are being
hit with, sixth grade through 12th grade.
Hopefully we'll see in the next year, year
and a half, two years, that they're getting
the information and our test scores will
rise. Whatever it takes."
He said he has several phrases that he
likes to-use, including one that is part of.
the day's announcements each morning.
"Be where you're supposed to be, when
yoi'resupposed to be there, doing what
you're supposed to be doing. And com-
plete every task with quality and excel-
lence," he said. "It's nothing I created. I just
grabbed them from someone else. And we
talk about being a champion. Champions
make decisions that create the future they
desire. Losers make decisions that create
the present that they desire."


United States is the only industrialized
nation in the world in which healthcare
is considered a commodity-a luxury,
according to the email to which I referred
a few sentences above and not a right of
citizenship.
As an aside, I made this latter observa-
tion a fewyears ago to a friend who is at
least as liberal as I am conservative. He
replied, "We already have universal health-
care in this country. You just have to learn
the system well enough to access it."
Point well taken.
Negative campaigning is popular with
candidates because it works.
But to win my vote, it will take more
than out-labeling your opponent.
It t ilit akeshowing-me that you will
make the besr decisions, as I view them,
:' tle nadtionot inply follow the doctri-
naife ordersotEyoir party.


INPUT
FROM PAGE 1
perhaps because of a lack ofmunderstand-
ing about its necessity andthfi idea that
more tax dollars would be needed in poor
economic times. Those two thoughts were
cited as the reasons voters turned down
expansion of the service.
Officials are hoping to put together a
comprehensive county transit development
plan to introduce to the public and elected
officials perhaps by the end of this year.
"The solution we proposed last time was
to expand what we had to 17 different mu-
nicipalities, but we have to come up with
something because we're serving an area
the size of a small state," Phillips said. "Now
we're listening and want to understand
what the people want" ..........
"Good public transportation needs to
meet the needs of a majority of citizens,"
Phillips added. He has been in on some of
the listening sessions himself. "We want to
put everything on the table for a transpor-
tation solution. We're casting our net wide
because every municipality is involved.
Why should we limit our options?"
Participants can sign up to be eligible for
a drawing for a $200 pre-paid debit card.


MCMULLEN
FROM PAGE 4


personal behavior doesn't matter.
Terrific.
Whoever the Republican nominee
is- and Mack is ourpoling LeMieux by a
healthy margin it will be an uphill battle
against Nelson, who remains popular
in Florida despite his less-than-notable
record. For voters, itsma mrater'ef the least-
worst choice. 4
Can' A IcAMullen isjbifriatst and editor
u 'ho li vs in Lakelaid. ." .-


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Page 16A Frostproof News


m i i


J


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COUNTY REPORT


PHOTUIO BY JEI- HUSLUW
Ned Waters, a member of the Cattlemen'sAssociation and one who helped design the Cow Camp, cut the ribbon Cracker style Saturday. The ribbon was actually a strand of
barbed wire. After failing to cut it with a whip, he grabbed it and pulled the wood stump from the table to the left.



Historic Cow Camp ends anniversary year


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Polk County's 150th anniversary came
to an end Saturday at the Circle B Bar
Reserve with the opening of the Historic
Cow Camp.
The camp at the 1,267-acre preserve
features a cabin and corral. The dedica-
tion opened with a cattle drive and even
featured a county commissioner riding
horseback.
"Citrus, timber and much of it being
cattle made Polk County what it is


today," Commissioner Sam Johnson
said. "But probably today it's the people
that make it what is."
He said the camp gives people a look
of what it was like to live in Polk County
in the mid 19th century.
"That was a.tough life," he said.
- Lloyd Harris, chairman of the Polk
County Historical Committee, gave a
rundown of what it like for those who
made mid-Florida their home in the 19th
century and he said the opening of the
camp doesn't necessarily close the 150th

/ll


anniversary celebration, whichlasted
a year, but marks the continuation of
learning about the county's history.
"Welcome to the journey," he said to
the 100 people who showed up Satur-
day for the opening. "We're coming to
the close of a year-long celebration with
the opening of a camp at the Circle B
Bar Reserve and opening the showing of
the oldest industry in Polk County."
The Cow Camp was designed by Ned
Waters, based on the design of a 1905
cabin in northeast Polk County and


built by volunteers from the Imperial
Polk County Cattlemen's Association,
with help from the county.
In a non-traditional style, thie ribbon-
cutting was done Cracker style, as Harris
said; as Ned Waters, who helped design
the Cow Camp, rode in on horseback
and tried to cut a barbed wire "ribbon"
with a whip. However, after four failed
attempts, he pulled the barbed wire and
the wood post it was tied to, sitting on a
table, rumbled to the ground.
The camp was officially open.


PHTOB.JF L -Above: Polk County
PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW Historic Museum historic
_preservation manager
Dick Prince on the fiddle and Sally Anderson on PHOTOB PEGGY KEHOE Myrtice Young speaks to
the hammered dulcimer, from Mustang Sally the crowd Saturday at the
and The Hamjos, play for the crowd during David McCullers of Crooked Lake Ranch in Frost- Cow Camp dedication as
the Cow Camp kickoff marking the end of proof bums his ranch brand into the picnictable at Lloyd Harris, chairman of
Polk County's 150th anniversary celebration the Cow Camp during a Thursday evening dinner the Polk County Historical
Saturday at the Circle B Bar Reserve. celebrating the completion of construction. Committee, looks on.


James Finley (left) and Earli
Sullivan sit on the steps of
the cabin at the Circle B Bar
Reserve Cow Camp. Sullivan
recalls spending nights in
a similar cabin on Rough
Island on Lake Hatchineha.
Moss lined the beds and
sometimes he would smoke
it over the fire "to run the
chiggers out," Sullivan said,
and use his saddle for a
pillow. When working the
cattle out there, all the
supplies had to be carried in
by horseback.
PHOTO BY PEGGY KEHOE


Zane Bashdor,
7, gives it
his best shot
with a lasso
Saturday at
the Circle B Bar
Reserve during
the Cow Camp
kickoff there.
PHOTO BY
JEFF ROSLOW


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
One of the many cows crowding a pen
created at the Cow Camp at the Cirde B
Bar Reserve. The cows were driven into
the corral that morning at the camp's
dedication that marked the dosing of
the 150th anniversary of Polk County.






Page B SCG Cetral loria Wenesda. Feruar 2.01


Winter Haven High, Purcell



Elementary staff take top honors


Linda Robinson, a
business and marketing
teacher at Winter Haven
High, and Norm44.eyes,
English for speakers of
other languages paraedu-
cator at Purcell Elemen-
tary in Mulberry, took top
honors Thursday night at
the Polk County Public
Schools 2012 Teacher and
School-Related Employee
of the Year event held at
The Lakeland Center.
Robinson was named
2012 Teacher of the Year
and Reyes was named
2012 School-Related Em-
ployee of the Year before
about 1,000 teachers, staff
members, community
members, event sponsors
and guests.
The School-Related
award is for paraeduca-
tors, secretaries, main-
tenance, foodservice,
transportation and others
in support roles.
Teachers and school-
related employees were
nominated by their indi-
vidual schools.
Robinson and Reyes,
along with award final-
ists announced Thursday, *
received cash awards and
other prizes from event
sponsors.
Judges were representa-
tives from local businesses
and organizations and
included former award
winners and finalists. They
reviewed more than 230
nominee applications and
did not know the nomi-
nees' identity or school
where they work. Teacher


and school-related nomi-
nees completed an appli-
cation with categories that
. included leadership and
~ professional
development
activities,
community
and school
involvement
and teaching
style.
REYES Robinson
and Reyes will
move on to compete for
state Teacher of the Year
and state School-Related
Employee of the Year
honors.
Polk teachers had state
finalists in five of the last
14 years 1998, 1999,
2004, 2005 and 2008. Polk
had state Teachers of the
Year in 2005 Samuel
Bennett, Garner Elemen-
tary-Winter Haven and
1981 Beth Johnson,
Kathleen High.
Polk County Public
Schools is the largest
employer in Polk County
with more than 12,000 em-
ployees.
Robinson has 30 years
.experience as a teacher.
She believes that "life is
about opportunities and
taking advantage of them
when they are presented,"
and she emphasizes this
to her students every day.
Teaching business and
marketing, she strives
to constantly stay up to
date with technology and
expose her students to
current technology topics
that they can relate to and


find interesting.
Robinson's greatest
moments in teaching
are whfi0 eis able to
see-students


adversity and
build their
own success,
she said.
Robinson
ROBINSON received
$5,000 from
MidFlorida Credit Union,
$1,000 from other event
sponsors, a personalized
ring and $500 from Herff
Jones and a commemora-
tive plaque.
Reyes has 10 years
experience.
She is known for pro-
viding comfort to her
Hispanic students when
others cannot seem to
understand their needs.
She always makes sure
that .school meetings and
events run seamlessly and
efficiently, always readily
available to help or solve a
problem, her nomination
stated.
Reyes slogan is "hard
work really pays off." She
uses this to inspire both
her own life and the lives
of her students as well.
She is not only an asset
to her school but to her
community, her nomina-
tor wrote.
She has donated time
to Relay For Life, Toys for
Tots and Pasta for Pennies.
Reyes received $2,500
from MidFlorida Credit
Union, $500 from other


event sponsors, a per-
sonalized ring from Herff
Jones and a commemora-
tive plaque.
Eight finalists for each
award were announced
during the evening prior
to naming the winners.
Other finalists for the
Teacher of the year were
Dee Ann Frey, Dixie-
land Elementary; Heidi
Kindle, James W. Sikes
Elementary; Nicole Tay-
lor, Caldwell Elementary;
Jill Baird, Chain of Lakes
Elementary; Susan Can-
non, Fort Meade Middle-
Senior High; Marcia de
Meza, Lake Gibson High;
and Alison Marie Landry,
Mulberry Middle.
These teachers each
received $1,000 from event
sponsors, a leather port-
folio and pen from Polk
County McDonald's own-
ers/operators, commemo-
rative plaque and flowers.
School-Related
Employee of the Year final-
ists were Sharon LeVine,
Bartow High; Monica
Acuna, Winston Elemen-
tary; Mamie Ciszek Hall,
Bethune Academy; Jan-
netta Dorsey, Eastside El-
ementary; Alexandra Eve,
Garden Grove Elementary;
Marielys Garcia, Sleepy
Hill Elementary; and
Linda Smith, Kingsford
Elementary.
School-Related Em-
ployee of the Year finalists
each received $500 from
event sponsors, a com-
memorative plaque and
flowers.


K of C gives scholarships, awards


Knights of Columbus Coun-
cil7091 of Cypress Gardens
has presented scholarships
totaling $3,500 to seven col-
lege students and announced
the winners of its most recent
monthly distinguished service
awards.
Honored with the council's
Knight of the Month award
was Norman Kuehn with Tom
and Dottie Habina recognized
as Family of the Month.
"We are pleased to honor
-Norman Kuehn and Tom
and Dottie Habina for their
generous donations of time
and talent to the K of C and St.
Matthew Church," said K of C
Trustee Jerry Messner in pre-
senting the awards at a recent
council meeting.
The winners received
certificates and month-long
designated parking space at
the K of C Hall.
A relatively new member of
the K of C, Kuehn was cited for
maintaining the official records
of council meetings in the elec-
tive position of recorder and
for his service to St. Matthew
Church where he serves as a
lecturer. He also assists with a
wide range of youth, charitable
and social activities sponsored
by the K of C and St. Matthew.
A former Grand Knight, Tom
Habina chairs the council's


church and building
committees, volun-
teers as a worker for its
Thursday and Sunday
night Bingo char-
ity fundraisers and
recently spearheaded
sales of K of C "Keep
Christ in Christmas"
themed Christmas
cards.
He also is an active
member and past
faithful navigator of
the council's Frank J.


Durbin Fourth Degree
Assembly. Both Habinas are
actively involved in St. Mat-
thew Church, as well as K of C
charitable arid youth activities,
including the annual Tootsie
Roll Drive to raise funds for
handicapped citizens. Dottie
Habina is along-time member-:
and current president of the
Columbiettes auxiliary.
In keeping with its commit-
ment to youth and education,
the council's Frank J. Durbin
Fourth Degree Assembly
presented college scholar-
ships with a combined value of
$3,500 to seven students who
are children or grandchildren
of knights or members of the
Columbiettes.
The scholarships of $500
each were presented by Chris
Eirich, faithful navigator of


the Fourth Degree Assem
Students who earned sch
arship assistance were Syl
Osborne, daughter of kniE
Wayne Osborne; Ben Brov
son of knight Remington
Brown; Steven Gerst, gran
of knight Richard Gerst, S
Sarah Nelson, granddaugl
of knight Robert Nelson; A
Kohlhase, granddaughter
knight George Bunda; Da
LeVance, granddaughter c


Faithful Navigator Chris Eirich of
the Frank J. Durbin Fourth Degree
Assembly of Knights of Columbus
Council 7091 (center) recently
announced the presentation of
$3,500 in scholarship assistance
to seven students who are either
children or grandchildren of K
of C members. Flanking Eirich,
from left, are Robert Nelson,
Shirley Gayford, Paul LeVance and
Wayne Osbourne. Not present for
the formal presentations were
Remington Brown, Richard Gerst,
Sr. and George Bunda.
PHOTOS
PROVIDED
Tom and Dottie
S'' l Habina show off
i.- e their certificate
for being selected
as Family of the
Month by Knights
of Columbus Coundl'
7091 of Cypress
Gardens. The award
bly. knight Paul was presented by
ol- LeVance former Grand Knight
Iva and Sophie and current Trustee
ght Chase, Jerry Messner, at
wn, grand- right.


idson
r.;
hiter
Anna
of
nielle
of


daughter
of Shirley Gayford, a member
and former president of the
Columbiettes.
All of the students can
qualify for additional K of C

AWARDS| 3B


Poly professor

discusses ways to

improve STEM

education
Rod Brame of the University of
South Florida Polytechnic gave a
presentation on building STEM
capacity for the Florida Department
of Education Bureau of School Im-
provement Differentiated Account-
ability STEM Education
Conference in Orlando
on Feb. 3.
Brame, program direc-
tor of STEM education
and assistant professor
of science education,
discussed STEM educa-
tion programs at USF
BRAME Polytechnic and con-
ducted a STEM activity that showed
the value of student centered,
hands-on, interactive, and problem
based learning.
"We integrated mathematics,
engineering, and science in a chal-
lenge to see who could build the
tallest tower and analyze their data
to learn which characteristics are
common in the tallest structures,"
said Brame. "This exposed the par-
ticipants to principals of engineering
while meeting several science and
mathematics standards. Integrated
activities improve STEM education
and help build STEM capacity.
According to Brame, "Improving
STEM education is a top priority at
the national, state, and local levels.
Our region is engaged in several
programs to improve student perfor-
mance in STEM fields by increasing
proficiency on standardized tests
scores. Teacher quality is the key. We
need to provide integrated opportu-
nities for teachers to increase their
pedagogical content knowledge.
"A 2009 report for the National
Academies National Research Coun-
cil Board of Science Education sug-
gests teacher quality and content
knowledge are the two biggest fac-
tors in student performance on stan-
dardized tests. Brame and Vanessa
Pitts Bannister, John Liontas, Ruth
Sylvester, and Tom Freijo of USF
Polytechnic's Division of Education
teamed with Becky Braaten of Polk
County Public Schools and received
a grant from the Helios Founda-
tion to provide 12 graduate credits
in STEM education in an effort to
improve teacher quality.
Pitts Bannister and Brame received
an additional grant to support el-
ementary school teachers to inte-
grate mathematics and science with
engineering and robotics.
"We must build highly quali-
fied faculty through professional
development and higher educa-
tion, as well as leadership training
at all levels," said Brame. "I have
mentored middle- and high-school
students, undergraduates, gradu-
ates, faculty, district leadership, and
university faculty. These types of
programs and workshops are criti-
cal for improving STEM education.
So much of our education, at all
grade levels, is segregated and lacks
cross-disciplinary and integrated ap-
proaches. Discipline boundaries are
man-made and often artificial; they
are not separated in the real world
and in nature."Sponsored by the
Florida Department of Education,
the conference supported the goal of
implementing a new tiered approach
to working directly with schools to
increase student achievement.
More than 60 STEM educators,
coordinators, and supervisors from
across Florida attended.


Page 2B SCMG Central Florida


Wednesday, February29 2012






Wednesday, February 29, 2012 SCMG Central Florida Page 3B


Cornerstone



opens new office


With a well attended ribbon-cutting
ceremony officiated by the president of the
Sebring Chamber of Commerce, nonprofit
Cornerstone Hospice recently inaugurated
their new office at 2906 Sparta Road and
U.S. 27.
Representatives from The Palms of
Sebring retirement community as well as
dozens of organizations plus the public
in general were present during the two-
hour ribbon-cutting and Open House
ceremonies.
Mary Manrique, interim president
and CEO of the nonprofit Cornerstone
Hospice system, observed, "We are simply
elated to see-our growth in the Highlands
and Hardee region requiring our daily
care team presence with our new office.
Proximity to our patients and families is


always of paramount importance to our
care teams."
Deborah Harley, executive director of'
the Highlands, Hardee and Polk region for
Cornerstone Hospice; indicated, "I am so
pleased that our Highlands and Hardee
patients are cared for by Cornerstone staff
who live in the Highlands/Hardee area.
Living where you serve is a concept of
care extremely important to our Comer-
stone Hospice care philosophy", adding
that" ... Living locally, caring locally. Our
concept of care from Cornerstone Hospice
is neighbor caring for neighbor. I am so
pleased that our staff in Highlands and
Hardee are compassionate, competent
and ready to serve, the needs of the com-
munities in these areas."
Yvonne Cannon RN, patient care super-


PHOTO PROVIDED


At the recent Cornerstone Hospice ribbon-cutting and Open House of their 2906 Sparta Road,
offices, a crowd of well-wishers gathered recently at the nonprofit. From left is Shelly Farquhar
H.R. manager; Ellen Bristol RN, V.P. access and admissions; Autumn Egan clinical liaison; Mandy
Carlisle RN case manager; Arlene Gasper certified nursing assistant, home health; Rachel Edry
RN case manager; officiating with the scissors, Kristy Sottile, president CEO, Greater Sebring
Chamber of Commerce; Lou Acuff RN, manager, clinical liaisons; Deborah Harley, executive
director for Highlands, Hardee, Polk region; Ken Geren, Chaplain; Melissa Carte, licensed prac-
ticing nurse; Kathy Wilde, social worker, bereavement counselor; Yvonne Cannon RN, patient care
supervisor; Ginny Wolfe, community relations coordinator.


visor for Highlands and Hardee coun-
ties, expressed that, "Our goal is growth
of service to patients and families facing
life-threatening and life-limiting illnesses
in the Highlands and Hardee region and


to more efficiently meet the needs in this
area. Yes, all our staff lives in this region,
that is what the community wants and
we have listened. Neighbors taking care of
neighbors."


Cornerstone names Manrique interim president, CEO


Mary Manrique was appointed inter-
im president and CEO of Cornerstone
Hospice Palliative & Care replacing Pat
Lehotsky who retired last week.
The not-for-profit organization cares
for patients and families facing life-
threatening illnesses in Bartow and
throughout all Polk County.
"With over 30 years of hospice ex-
perience and 12 years at Cornerstone
Hospice," Board of Directors Chairman
Ed Clement said, "Mary was the logical


choice to provide leader-
ship and continuity during
this time of transition."
Lehotsky was de-
lighted to learn of this
appointment.
"Mary's work with Cor-
nerstone as VP patient/
MANRIQUE family services/chief oper-
ating officer where she has
been responsible for the development
and management of all clinical


operations that included such activi-
ties as establishing the marketing and
access department, developing, plan-
ning and implementing hospice houses,
developing the award-winning 'Tuck-In'
and Life Enrichment programs as well
as writing CON's (Certificates of Need)
to permit Cornerstone's growth into Or-
ange, Osceola, Polk, Hardee, Highlands
counties."
Transition and change is always
challenging but a constant reality. In


accepting, Manrique said, "I'm hon-
ored to have been entrusted with this
position and appreciate the support I've
been receiving from everyone. Each and
every one at Cornerstone is so impor-
tant to our mission of providing the
very best in end-of-life care to patients
and families. Together with the staff
and the support of the communities
we serve, we will continue to provide
leadership and excellence in hospice
and palliative care."


Foundation names director


Angela Fortunas has been
appointed regional development
director for the Cornerstone
Hospice Foundation, said Nick
Buchholz, executive director for the
multi-county nonprofit.
"Angela, a resident of Lakeland, will
be responsible of all fundraising ef-
forts for Cornerstone Hospice in Polk,
Hardee and Highlands
counties" added Buchholz.
Fortunas has returned to the
Highlands and Polk region after three
years in Tallahassee as the executive
director and chief development
officer of the Big Bend Hospital Foun-
dation, raising more than $5 million
during her tenure.


She has worked
almost exclusively
in the nonprofit
sector as a director
and designer of
education and
community outreach
programs in addition
FORTUNAS to fundraising. r
Fortunas previously
held positions in Lakeland at the
Polk Museum of Art and Keller Wil-
liams Realty, and has taught for Polk
County schools.
She received her undergraduate
degree from Florida State University
-and her graduate degree from, the
University of Central Florida.


AWARDS

FROM PAGE 2B
scholarship aid by maintaining a
3.0 average in school.
They qualified by writing essays
which were selected as winners by
members of the council's youth
scholarship committee. Knights of
Columbus Council 7091 is a fraternal/
charitable organization that each
year donates thousands of dollars to
deserving local, state and national
charities. The council raises funds
for charity though its Sunday and
Thursday evening Bingos, which are
open to the public at the K of C Hall at
401 Third Street, SW inWinter Haven.
At right, Grand Knight Steve Siesel of Knights
of Columbus Council 7091 presents Norman
Kuehn with his Knight of the Month award.


PHOTO PROVIDED


Due to the extended drought, Polk
County Fire Rescue officials have issued
a burn ban.
"We have held off as long as we pos-
sibly can on issuing this burn ban,"
said Polk County Fire Rescue Chief
David Cash. "Conditions are favorable
for the rapid development and spread
of brush fires and we need to take
every step necessary to ensure the
safety of Polk's residents and their
property."
The burn ban includes, but is not
limited to, the burning of trash, yard
debris, campfires, bonfires, construc-
tion debris and fireworks.
Anyone who refuses to comply with
this burn ban will be in violation of
county law which is punishable by a
fine of no more than $500 or by impris-
onment by a term not to exceed 60 days
in the county jail or both.
This action in no way impacts the
burn permits that are issued by the
State Division of Forestry for land
clearing, controlled burning, etc., the


county reports.
The burn ban affects all Polk
County Fire Rescue coverage area w
which includes all unincorporated
Polk County as well as the following
municipalities: Eagle Lake, Hillcrest
Heights, Lake Hamilton, Mulberry, and
Polk City.
Six additional municipalities
have also adopted the burn ban
including Auburndale, Bartow,
Davenport, Dundee, Lake Alfred and
Lakeland.
According to the Division of
Forestry Keetch-Bryum Drought
Index figures, Polk is currently at an
index average of 596. The KBDI index is
used as an indicator to determine the
likelihood and severity of brush fires.
The scale begins at zero and rises to
800.
While high KBDI values are an
indication that conditions are
favorable for the occurrence and spread
of wildfires, drought is not by itself a
prerequisite for such fires.


Burn ban issued


SCMG Central Florida Page 3B


Wednesday, February 29, 2012










Sen. Norman: USF's unlikely hero in Tallahassee


By KIM WILMATH
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TALLAHASSEE State Sen.
Jim Norman sat hunched at his
desk, reviewing spreadsheets
and crunching numbers, trying
to save the University of South
Florida from outsized budget
cuts.
In his office lobby, the phone
was ringing. Emails sailed in.
"I'm really proud to live in your
district," wrote one constituent.
"Go for it, Jim," said another.
Days later, students watching
the session's budget debate silent-
ly pumped their fists as Norman
talked about the importance of
"making USF whole."
Yes, we're talking about that Jim
Norman the former Hillsbor-
ough County commissioner who
just signed an admission of guilt
after the state ethics commission
said he should have disclosed
a half-million dollar gift to his
wife from a prominent business-
man. The man who once was the
subject of a federal investigation
related to that gift, faced ques-
tions about his $95,000 job at the


Salvation Army and was almost
booted off the ballot for state
Senate.
That Jim Norman, helped save

"I don't have
any comments
4 about his past or
anything," said
USF President
Judy Genshaft. "I
don't care. I'm just
NORMAN so happy that he
stood up for the
university and for our commu-
nity and for our students."
"He has led the charge," said
Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New Port
Richey. "Having all this come
from Sen. Norman, as a freshman
senator, has a huge impact.... For
some, it's a stronger message."
"I'm just doing my job," says
Norman, 58.
In a week's time, the Tampa Re-
publican helped turn the tide for
USE The fight pitted him against
powerful Senate budget chair-
man JD Alexander, who some felt
was financially punishing USF
in his quest to. split the Lakeland


branch campus off into the 12th
university.
He went toe-to-toe with
veteran Sen. Evelyn Lynn, the
higher education appropriations
chairwoman criticizing her for
failing to bring USF to the table in
the budgeting process.
And behind the scenes, he
circulated the hallways of the
Capitol, recruiting other senators
to sign on to his cause.
In the end he helped bring
back $46 million in funding for
USF, in addition to persuading Al-
exander to relent on a $25 million
"contingency" he'd tacked on,
pending the university's coopera-
tion in splitting off USF Poly.
Some might call it "opportunis-
tic," but consider this: The budget
committee where Norman
started to fight back against Al-
exander's crusade wouldn't have
even included him had another
senator not been booted off the
week before, following a fight
with Senate leaders.
Fasano lost that position amid
the failed push to privatize state
prisons, a move Fasano opposed.


Norman didn't ask to be put
on the committee, but Fasano
figures the freshman was tapped
because the Republican estab-
lishment assumed he'd keep his
head down and vote their way.
It didn't happen like that.
If Norman hadn't been there,
his first chance to debate the
budget cuts would have been
Thursday on the Senate floor,
with the rest of his colleagues. By
that time, Norman had already
persuaded Alexander to give up
the $25 million, orchestrated
a meeting between Alexander
and Genshaft, and worked out a
handful of amendments giving
USF money back.
Unlike Fasano, who's term-
limited out of the Senate this year,
Norman has a lot to lose. And he
knows it.
"What else can I do?" Norman
said. "My only deal here is my
community. They send me back,
they send me back. They dorit,
they don't."
George Neimann, a Dover
community activist who filed one
of the ethics complaints against


Norman, doesn't buy it. He's
convinced the whole thing is a
political ploy to keep Norman in
power.
"(Legislative leaders) want to
figure out a way to give him a
free pass, and then the USF story
comes up and they say to him
behind the scenes, 'We're going to
save you. You can be the hero on
this one,'" Neimann said. "Where
he's concerned, I am cynical."
What does Norman think of
the theory?
He laughs.
'"A set up?" he says, "Come on."
What about the other stuffhe's
done that hasn't made headlines,
he asks. What about his work on
regional parks and the Tampa
Bay Sports Commission? What
about the bill he's sponsoring that
would give tax relief to surviv-
ing spouses of military veterans?
What about the plaque on his
office wall from the Shriner's
Foundation?
Were all those setups, too?
"I'm not perfect. But am I some
bad guy?" Norman said. "I'm do-
ing my job. That's all I'm doing."


PSC High student to compete at science fair


A Polk State Chain of Lakes Collegiate
High School student will compete at
the Intel International Science and
Engineering Fair where she will pres-
ent a project inspired by the lakes right
here in Polk County.
Kirstie Tandberg, a junior at the high
school, lives on Lake Summit, and so
many of her favorite childhood memo-
ries are of days spent swimming, boating
and tubing the lakes ofWinter Haven.
W: When she noticed a few years ago
how polluted her favorite lakes were
becoming, she was saddened.
Then she decided to do something
about it.
"People would tell me that 50 years
ago, all the lakes in Florida were crystal
clear. Now a lot of them are cloudy
and green and a big part of that is
because of phosphate that causes algae
blooms," said Tandberg, who explained
that phosphate is found in products
such as detergents and fertilizer.
Four years ago, Tandberg began
researching how the calcium compo-
nent contained in cacti can be used to
reduce phosphate levels in water.
She hopes that one day her research
will help restore her beloved lakes to
their former beauty.
"Maybe one day it will be possible to
see the bottom of the lakes again," she
said.
Earlier this
month, Tandberg
competed in the Environmental Sci-
ence category at the Polk Regional
Science and Engineering Fair.
Tandberg received First
Place in her category and
three special monetary -
awards. She was also
a Best of Show run-
ner-up in the senior
division, which in-,
cludes high school

From left, Dr.
Suzanne Halv-
erson, professor
of anatomy and"
physiology and STEM
at Polk State Chain
of Lakes Collegiate
High School, and
Kirstie Tandberg,
who will compete at
the Intel Interna-
tional Science Fair.


and middle school students.
Her strong showing on the county
level sends her to the State Science
and Engineering Fair, planned for
April 3-5 at The Lakeland Center, and
the Intel event, scheduled for May 13-18
in Pittsburgh.
The Intel International Science Fair
got its start in the 1950s and is the larg-
est international pre-college science
competition in the world. Each year,
more than 1,500 high school students
from more than 65 countries, regions
and territories showcase independent
research that is judged by doctoral
level scientists. Participants compete
for more than $4 million in prizes and
scholarships.
Tandberg is a student in Polk State
Chain of Lakes Collegiate High School's
STEM class, in which students conduct
in-depth research and experiments.
She was one of five Polk State Chain
of Lakes Collegiate High School STEM
students who made strong showings
at the county level. Other winners .
include:
Shannon Alivio, a junior from Winter
Haven, who received third place in the
Microbiology category.
Marissa Spruell, a junior from Wa-
verly, who received third place in the
Microbiology category.
Kalie "Bree" Fagins, a senior from
Winter Haven,
who received
jf an Honorable
Mention in
the Medi-
-cal Science
S category.
_- Matt
Smith,
a senior


., ,


PHOTO PROVIDED


Auburndale, who won a special mone-
tary award in the Engineering category.
"I am so proud that five STEM stu-
dents from Polk State Chain of Lakes
Collegiate High School had the oppor-
tunity to participate at the 2012 Polk
Regional Science and Engineering Fair.
. All of our students received recogni-


tions and awards based on their scien-
tific knowledge, dedication, citizenship
and commitment to research. At Polk
State Chain of Lakes Collegiate High
School, we are growing STEM for the
next generation," said Suzanne Halver-
son, professor of anatomy and physiol-
ogy who also teaches STEM.


Wednesday, February 29,2012


Page 4B SCMG Central Florida






,ensdy Feray2.02S eta lrd aeS


FEELING FIT



Prescription card available



to Polk County residents


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW @POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
If you live in Polk County you are
eligible for a discount on your pre-
scribed drugs.
The Health Care Savings Discount
Card Program has been under way
for a while, but it was announced at
a county commission meeting earlier
this month.
This is not a government program
and doesn't cost taxpayer money. It
is done by a private company called
Coast2CoastRx, launched by Well-
dyneRX and is open to anyone who
lives in Polk County. Fifteen counties
in Florida have taken on this program.
Those who have health insurance
and have prescriptions on their plan
can compare the costs and use the
Coast2Coast plan if it is cheaper.
"If you have the discount card
and you have prescriptions covered
by your employer, you can do some
online checking and you can use the
one that gives you the best price," said
Polk County Communications Direc-
tor Mianne Nelson.
And, the discount card can be used
for pet medication, too.
"Some have dogs on medication and
you can get your dog's prescription,
too," Nelsonsaid.
There is another advantage Polk
County gets from this card. Every time
it is used, WellDyneRx will donate
$1.25 to Polk County's Indigent Health
Care Program.
But the biggest advantage to it is that
a lot of people in Polk County can get
more help getting the drugs they need,
and a chance to buy the items they
may have had trouble getting before.


A copy of the prescription card that is good for anyone who lives in Polk County.


"We have plenty of citizens who
need those discounts," said Jan How-
ell, director of the Polk HealthCare
Plan, saying in these tough economic
times people are sometimes making
choices between buying prescription
drugs and getting other items they
need. .
Most major pharmacies are on the
plan and have the cards. They are also
available at other locations through-
out the county, including the Neil
Combee Administration Center in
Bartow.
"They can pick up them anywhere,"'!
Nelson said. "We getting distribution
sites in libraries, city halls." The card
also is available on the website at


www.coast2coastrx.com.
Nelson said with the major pharma-
cies on the plan, prescriptions can be
filled anywhere in the United States.
"Not all pharmacies are on it, but
the major chains are," Nelson said. "So
say if you're in Baton Rouge you can
get it done there."
The website also lists which phar-
macies participate in the plan. It says
there are 59,000 participating pharma-
cies on the plan. They include CVS,
Walmart, Rite Aid, Target, Walgreen's
and Sam's Club, to name just a few.
The company also says this is not
a health care plan and anyone'in the
family is eligible to use the card
including grandchildren.


PHOTOS BY JEFF ROSLOW
People who live in Polk County can get
prescription discounts thanks to a deal the
county made with Coast2Coast. People can look
for a display like this to get a card.


Polk exceeds state goal in immunizations


The Polk County Health
Department said Polk Coun-
ty students in kindergarten
and seventh grade surpassed
the state goal requirement
recently.
Each October, all public
and private schools nation-
wide with a kindergarten
and/or seventh grade class
are required to submit
reports indicating the im-
munization status of those
students. The information
is compiled and sent to the
Bureau of Immunizations.
The purpose is to de-
crease the occurrence of
vaccine-preventable diseases
by increasing immuniza-


tion coverage levels among
school-age children. It also
helps to ensure that state
laws regarding immuniza-
tions are being followed, and
identifies those counties that
need help raising their im-
munization coverage levels
in kindergarten and seventh
grade students to the state
goal of 95 percent.: '
"That trend has been
pretty high," said Pam Crain,
a public information officer
for the Polk County Health'
Department. "It's been trend-
ing that way for the last five
or six years."
Dr. Daniel Haight, director
,of the Polk County Iealth -


Department, said this trend
comes from a successful
partnership between the
health department and the
school district.
- "We are pleased to
report that Polk County'
ranks well above the state
goal of 95 percent compli-
ance. Overall, Polk County
kindergarten students were
97.3 percent compliant with
immunizations, and seventh
graders were ranked at
97.8 percent," Haight said.
"This success is the
result of collaboration
between our school system
and the Polk County Health
.Department's team.of school


nurses," said Michele Ford,
community health services
director. "Our school health
staff, in partnership with
that of the Polk County
School Board, play a key role
in ensuring compliance with
immunization standards.
When students are out of
compliance, letters are sent
home informing parents.
There is a lot of follow up
that goes along with this."
Parents can start preparing
for kindergarten registration
by checking with their pri-
mary medical care provider,
or the Polk County Health
Department. and making
an appointment to obtain


required immunizations. To
avoid the rush at the start of
kindergarten in the fall, early
registration known as Kin-
dergarten Roundup begins in
April of each year..
The locations of the clinics
can be found at http://my
polkhealth.org/locations/.
Call the school your child
will be attending to obtain
the date in April of early
registration.
For information about
immunization requirements,
or other services provided by
the Polk County Health
Department, visit the
website at www.mypolk
h alth.org.


Ii


Winter Haven Hospital


Compassion. Innovation.Trust.


800416670. 0. i -ww- ntrhve *zio


s2Cas Card Polk


' 'i' U -.M---. 02 -- .... t '. ''*,.-*, -




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SCMG Central Florida Page SB


WednesdayFebruary29, 2012








I HEALTH NEWS BRIEFS


Hall is LWMC em'


ee of the month


Ann Marie Hall, certified respiratory
therapist, was named Employee of the
Month for January at Lake Wales Medi-
cal Center.
She has been wich L\VT IC since Jani7
ary 2009. I
In nominatingher, a co-worker
wrote: "Ann Marie is professional, at-
tentive, courteous and caring with her
*patients and always willing to help oth-
ers. She is always considerate, always
comes in with a big smile on her face,
and has a heart of gold. She has a great
attitude and is a very hard worker."


Ann Marie Hall


LWMC health fair
set March 27
Lake Wales Medical Center plans a
Community Health Fair on Tuesday,
March 27, from 9 a.m.-noon at High
Point Church, 501 Burns Ave., in
Lake Wales.
The event will include more than 30
exhibitors and free health screenings.
As part of its health fair, the
hospital will offer free lipid panel
screenings. For this test, participants
must come to the hospital during
available appointment times the first
three weeks in March to have fast-
ing blood work done. Results will be


available at the Health Fair.
Free health screenings available
on-site at the heath fair include
blood pressure, blood glucose,
BNII, nutrition counseling. peak
flow respiratory testing, d brown
bag medication review and much
more.
To make an appointment for the
free lipid panel, or for more informa-
tion about the health fair, call (863)
678-2288.

At Winter Haven Hospital
The following classes and seminars
are at the Regency Center and many
require pre-registration. The Regency
Center for Women & Infants is at 101
Ave. 0. SE, Winter Haven. Call (863)
294-7020.

Basic baby care
The Regency Center for Women &
Infants offers a Baby Care Workshop
class on basic baby care for expect-
ant, adoptive, or brand new parents!.
The class covers issues like getting
to know your baby, bathing, feeding,
crying, and safety.
Grandparents and family members
are welcome.
Class is 6-9:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 7.

Babysitting class
The Regency Center for Women &
Infants has an eight-hour babysitting
class on basic child care.
The class covers being a respon-
sible babysitter, accident prevention,
how to handle emergencies, age
.appropriate playtime activities and
child CPR.
This is for young people between
11 and 16.
Cost is $30. It is 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Friday, July 13.

Breastfeeding
Out and About
The Regency Center has a
Breastfeeding Out and About class
for breastfeeding moms to focus on
breast pumps, milk storage informa-
tion, discreet nursing in public, back
to work issues and breastfeeding and
the law.
The class is 10:30 a.m.-noon
Saturday.


Birth preparation
workshop
The Regency offers a four-week
Birth Preparation Workshop that .
focuses on physical and mental
preparation for labor and birth.
The classes are 7-9:15 p.m.
Space is limited, so call early, the
hospital said. It costs $40 per couple
if delivering at the Regency Cen-
ter and $60 if delivering elsewhere.
People should plan to take the class
three to four weeks before delivery.
Classes are every Tuesday,
July 10-31.

Prep for breastfeeding
The Regency Center has a prepara-
tion for breastfeeding class to help
expectant parents learn ways to get
the breastfeeding experience off to
the best start.
Taught by a lactation consultant,
the class covers suggestions on
breast preparation, the father's role,
returning to work and special
techniques.
Grandparents and family members
are welcome.
It is from 7-9 p.m. Monday, July 9.

Group meeting
The Regency Center has a group
meeting for new parents that meets
3-4:30 p.m. Wednesday.
This is the First Months Club for
parents of babies, newborn to 2 years.
Sessions include informal sharing
as well as information of concern
on topics such as sleeping, feeding,
safety, and growth and development.
Babies are welcome.
There is no charge and no pre-
registration required.

Something for
the grandparents
The Regency has a grandparent's
class for new and expectant
grandparents.
Called Grand is Grand! the goal of
this two-hour class is connecting the
generations and will spotlight cur-
rent trends in childbirth, baby care,
and parenting.
Class are 5:30-7:30 p.m., Tuesday,
July 10.


Lakeland Regional Health Systems


officials travel to Tallahassee


Fulfilling Lakeland
Regional Health Systems'
mission of providing ex-
,.ceptional healthcare means
offering state-of-the-art
facilities, treatments and
technologies; hiring top-
notch physicians, nurses
and staff; and advocating
for the quality care resi-
dents in Polk County and
beyond expect and deserve.
President/CEO Elaine
Thompson and Vice Presi-
dent of Administrative Ser-
,vices Michael Spake plan
to go to Tallahassee this
week to meet with legisla-
tors to discuss the adverse
impact the proposed 2012-
2013 House and Senate
-budgets will have on Lake-
land Regional, its patients


and the community.
Last year, Lakeland
Regional sustained a
$12 million annual reduc-
tion in Medicaid revenue
due to the implementation
of the 2011-12 state budget.
Currently, the recommend-
ed 212-13 budget by the
House of Representatives
will result in an additional
$5.8 million annual reduc-
tion in Medicaid revenue
to Lakeland Regional, while
the proposed 2012-13
Senate budget will further
reduce Lakeland Regional's
Medicaid revenue by
$13.4 million.
In this healthcare envi-
ronment, Lakeland Region-
al has worked closely with
suppliers to renegotiate


costs and reduce expenses,
streamlined efforts to oper-
ate more efficiently, and
endured a reduction in
force resulting in the elimi-
nation of 277 jobs. If more
cuts to Medicaid are im-
posed by the 2012-13 state
budget, Lakel4nd Regional
will be-forced to evalu-
ate additional reductions,
including the elimination
of programs.
Thirty-seven percent of
Polk County's population
lives below 200 percent of
the federal poverty level,
while 23.4 percent does
not have any type of health
insurance, LRMC reports.
Furthermore, there are
37 percent fewer primary
care physicians practic-


ing in Polk County than
compared to Florida's
state average. The lack of
physician access results in
Lakeland Regional hous-
ing the busiest single-site
emergency department in
the state, with approxi-
mately 150,000 annual
visits. Lakeland Regional is
addressing these commu-
nity needs by developing a
strategy to create a medical
home that will offer high-
quality primary and pre-
ventive care at a low cost.
However, if the proposed
reduction in Medicaid is
passed, all plans involving
initial capital expenses and
ongoing operating expens-
es will need to be further
analyzed.


Happiest baby
on the block
The Happiest Baby class for new
parents is planned from 5:30-6:45 p.m.,
Tuesday. Aug. 21, at The Regency
Cen ter for Women & Infants.
The Happiest Baby classes teach
new parents a step-by-step approach
to help all infants sleep longer and
soothe even the fussiest baby in
minutes.
It costs $20, which includes a
parent kit with DVD.

Introduction to
birth experience
"Introduction to the Regency" is
a free session that introduces you
to the classes, services and special
features. that the Regency Center for
Women & Infants has to offer to the
expectant mother and father.

Online birthing classes
The Regency Center has Online
Childbirth Education classes that
offers an alternative for expectant
parents who cannot attend conven-
tional childbirth classes.
The class is ideal if mom has to be
on bed rest or if there are scheduling
conflicts.
The online class is an interactive;
web-based program that includes
animated illustrations and videos.

Baby seats
Do you know how to install your
baby's car seat?
Free car seat inspections .are
offered by appointment at the Re-
gency Center for Women & Infants.

Brothers and
sisters can learn
The Big Brother/Big Sister Classes
are held at the Regency for children
of moms delivering at RMC.
. Topics include what new babies
are like, what it means to be a big
sister or brother, and how to be a
helper at home. A tour of the nursery
is included.
There is no charge but pre-
registration is required.
It is 10-11:15 a.m., Saturday,
Aug. 11.


Polk Family

caregivers

seeks volunteers
Polk Family Caregivers is seek-
ing volunteers to assist with special
events and community activities.
An organizational meeting is
planned at 10:30 a.m. Monday,
March 5, at the Regions Bank down-
town office conference room, 124 S.
Florida Ave., Lakeland.
Polk Family Caregivers helps families
who need emotional support, informa-
tion, and assistance coping with the
demands and challenges of caring for a
loved one in need of constant daily care
due to any chronic, long-term health
condition, the organization said.
Volunteers are needed for office
work, social networking, fundraising,
delivering welcome bags to new care-
givers, and community events.
Additional information about Polk
Family Caregivers is available at
www.polkcaregivers.org or call (863)
603-9110.


,Page 6B SCMG Central Florida


Wednesday, February 29,2012










Is a vegetarian diet healthy for a 9-year-old?


DEAR DR. DONOHUE: My
9-year-old granddaughter be-
came a vegetarian more than a
year ago, and she has stuck to her
guns. Her mother lives a har-
ried life and doesn't have much
time to cook from scratch. My
granddaughter consumes pasta
and vegetarian frozen items. She
eats cheese and eggs. However,
I am concerned that there is not
enough nutritional balance in her
diet. Does she need vitamin and
mineral supplements? E.D.
ANSWER: A vegetarian diet is
a healthy diet, and most of the
world is on such a diet. However,
those people have had genera-
tions of experience with such a
diet and know that such a diet
has to be varied. I believe it's too
much to ask of a 9-year-old to
balance a vegetarian diet. She
could be shortchanging herself
on protein, vitamin B-12, vitamin
D and calcium.
Dairy products are the primary


source of calcium. It's good that
she eats cheese. How about milk?
She needs more than cheese in
her diet to get enough calcium.
Her bones are growing, and she
is at the age where she can store
calcium in them. She also needs
vitamin D to facilitate calcium
absorption. Given that sunlight
converts a skin compound into
vitamin D, if she lives in a North-
ern climate, she's not getting
enough sun year-round for this
conversion to take place. Fortified
dairy products also are a source


of vitamin D. So is orange juice.
Eggs are a good source of pro-
tein. Beans, lentils, peas and nuts
are other good sources.
Meat is the only food with
sufficient vitamin B-12. Some
cereals and soymilk are fortified
with it This needs checking to
make sure she's getting enough of
this vitamin.
I understand that your daugh-
ter leads a harried life. If her
daughter remains on this diet,
then she has a responsibility
of taking instructions from a
dietitian in how best to devise a
vegetarian diet for such a young,
growing child.
A good source on the Internet
is the Vegetarian Food Pyramid
devised by Loma Linda Uni-
versity. You, your daughter and
your granddaughter will find it at
www.vegetariannutrition.org.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: My
wife sleeps for seven or eight
hours without having to get up.


I, on the other hand, require
bladder relief every two hours. I
try to be as quiet as possible. On
occasion, I disrupt her. She re-
turns to a deep sleep very quickly.
She feels that interrupted sleep
doesn't give her proper rest. I feel
that the total time we are in REM
sleep is the important issue, not
that it must be continuous. Will
you comment? KH.
ANSWER: The two divisions
of sleep are REM (rapid eye
movement) sleep and NREM
(non-rapid eye movement
sleep). NREM sleep is subdi-
vided into three stages (some
say four). After the onset of
sleep, NREM sleep sets in. In the
second hour of sleep, REM sleep
takes over. During this stage the
eyes are moving, and sleep is
lighter. Dreams occur in all sleep
stages, but REM dreams are the
dreams people remember. Sleep
experts have found that sleep
interruptions during REM sleep


have no effects on health or on
the refreshing power of sleep.
Interruptions of NREM sleep do
produce daytime sleepiness. Is
your wife sleepy during the day?
And equally important, have
you consulted a doctor about
your nighttime trips to the bath-
room? Medicines often can solve
that problem by relaxing and
downsizing the prostate gland.
If medicines don't work, surgical
procedures are available, some of
which can be done in the doctor's
office.


Dr. Donohue regrets that he is
unable to answer individual let-
ters, but he will incorporate them
in his column whenever possible.
Readers may write him or request
an order form of available health
newsletters at PO. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Readers
may also order health newsletters
from www.rbmamall.com.


The age of stress found at cellular level


The age-old axiom about
ignorance being bliss may also
have relevance to aging itself.
In a small study of 50 women,
half of whom were caring
for relatives with dementia,
researchers at the University of
California, San Francisco found
that participants who most
anticipated a future filled with
stressful tasks looked older at
the cellular level.
The scientists, led by Elissa
Epel, assessed cellular age by
measuring telomeres the
protective caps at the ends of
chromosomes. As people age,
telomeres shorten, a phenom-
enon associated with a variety
of chronic diseases.
Epel and colleagues found
that caregivers anticipated more
threat (stress) than non-caregiv-
ers, when told that they would
be asked to perform the same
public speaking and math tasks.
This tendency to anticipate
more threat put them at


WELL NEWS
Scott LaFee


increased risk for short telo-
meres. Based on that, the re-
searchers posit that higher levels
of anticipated threat in daily life
may promote cellular aging in
chronically stressed individuals.
"Our findings are preliminary
for now," said study co-author
Aoife O'Donovan, "but they
suggest that the major forms
of stress in your life may influ-
ence how your respond to more
minor forms of stress, such as
losing your keys, getting stuck
in traffic or leading a meeting at
work. Our goal is to gain better
understanding of how psycho-
logical stress promotes biologi- -
cal aging so that we can design
targeted interventions that re-
duce risk for disease in stressed
individuals. We now. have
preliminary evidence that higher


anticipatory threat perception
may be one such mechanism."

BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
The adrenal glands, which
produce and release stress
hormones such as cortisol and
adrenaline, reside directly above
the kidneys and change in size
throughout life. In the seventh
month of a fetus' development,
the glands are roughly the same
size as the kidneys. At birth,
they have shrunk slightly, a re-
duction in size that will progress
for the rest of the person's life.
By old age, the glands are
often so small as to be almost
invisible.

COUNTS
64 Percent of college stu-
dents surveyed who said they
would be willing to donate ge-
netic material (blood, tissues) to
a bio-bank in the name of altru-
ism and/or scientific progress.
Source: Southern Methodist
University


DOC TALK
Trim the hedge to remove a
long line of sutures

BEST MEDICINE
A man boarded a plane with
six children. After settling them
into their seats, a woman seated
across the aisle from the man_
asked him, "Are all of those kids
yours?'
"No," the man replied. "I
work for a birth control device
company. These are customer
complaints."

OBSERVATION
"I was going to have cosmetic
surgery until I noticed that the
doctor's office was full of por-
traits by Picasso."
-American comedienne Rita
Rudner

NEVER SAY DIET
The Major League Eating
speed-eating record for corned
beef and cabbage is 10.63
pounds in 10 minutes, held by


Patrick Bertoletti.

LAST WORDS
"Hey, Jimmie! The Chimney
Sweeps. Talk to the Sword. Shut
up, you got a big mouth! Please
come help me up, Henny. Max
come over here ... French Cana-
dian bean soup ... I want to pay,
let them leave me alone.,."
American gangster Ar-
thur Flegenheimer, aka Dutch
Schultz (1902-1935). Flegen-
heimer was grievously wounded
during a mob hit. Taken to a
local Newark hospital, he lin-
gered, often delirious, for more
than a day before succumbing
to his injuries. During that time,
police officers interrogated him,
with Flegenheimer providing
long, often incoherent answers.

To find out more about Scott
LaFee and-read features by other,
Creators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate website at www.
creators.com.


FDA acts to bolster supply of cancer drugs


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration
has launched a series of steps to increase
the supply of critically needed cancer
drugs and build on President Obama's
Executive Order to help prevent future
drug shortages.
'A drug shortage can be a frightening
prospect for patients and President Obama
made it clear that preventing these short-
ages from happening is a top priority of his
administration," said FDA Commissioner
Margaret A. Hamburg. "Through the col-
laborative work of FDA, industry, and other
stakeholders, patients and families waiting
for these products are anxious about their
availability should now be able to get the
medication they need."
In response to the critical shortage of
the cancer drug Doxil and rapidly declin-
ing supplies of methotrexate, the FDA took
proactive steps needed to increase available
supply for patients in the United States.
For Doxil, there will be a temporary im-
portation of a replacement drug, Lipodox
which is expected to end the shortage and
fully meet patient needs in the coming
weeks. For methotrexate, in addition to
already announced actions, the Agency has
approved a new manufacturer of preserva-
tive-free formulation of methotrexate that is
expected to further bolster supply and help


avert a shortage of this lifesaving medicine.
FDA expedited review of the application to
help address this potential shortage.
In addition, in response to the Executive
Order on prescription drug shortages, the
FDA issued draft guidance to industry on
detailed requirements for both mandatory
and voluntary notifications to the agency of
issues that could result in a drug shortage
or supply disruption. Increased awareness
of the importance of early notification due
to the Executive Order and FDAs letter to
manufacturers has resulted in a sixfold in-
crease in voluntary notifications by industry
of potential shortages.
In 2011, there were a total of 195 drug
shortages prevented. Since the Execu-
tive Order, FDA has prevented 114 drug
shortages.
Under FDAs exercise of enforcement
discretion the chemotherapeutic drug
Lipodox will be imported as an alternative
to Doxil. Doxil is used in multiple treatment
regimens, including treatment of ovarian
cancer after failure of platinum-based che-
motherapy. The drug is also indicated for
use in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma and
multiple iimiyeloma. FDA.itic,:ip.ies that the
incoming ,supply of Lipodox will be able to
fully tli rt p.li4Pnt iniels
FDAPO exerse of enforcement discretion


for Lipodox is a temporary, limited ar-
rangement specific to Sun Pharma Global
FZE and its authorized distributor, Caraco
Pharmaceutical Laboratories Ltd.


Temporary importation of unapproved
foreign drugs is considered in rare cases
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SCMG Central Florida Page 71F


Wednesday, February 29, 2012


F7-






Page 8B SCMG Central Florida Wednesday, February 29,2012


Study: Problems with


Medicare contractors persist


MIAMI (AP) Private contractors that are
supposed to guard against Medicare fraud paid
claims submitted in the names of dead providers
or for unnecessary medical treatments, which
were among problems estimated to cost more
than $1 billion in 2009. according to an inspec-
tor general report released Friday.
Federal health officials contract with private
, companies to process and pay Medicare claims
and investigate fraud. The U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services inspector general
examined how effectively several types of fraud
contractors are investigating an estimated an-
nual $60 billion in Medicare fraud.
The report found 62 areas vulnerable to fraud
during a 2009 investigation. The most common
were related to billing and coding, such as pay-
ing a claim even though it had an incorrect code
or a provider who billed for an excessive number
of services. Another common issue included
bills that used the identification numbers of
dead providers.
The contractors were asked to estimate how
much the problems might cost, but they only
accounted for one-third of the issues, which
alone were estimated at $1.2 billion, the report
showed. It's unclear why contractors didn't esti-
mate the full amount.
Federal health officials were notified of the
problems, but 77 percent of them remained


unresolved nearly two years later, according the
U.S. Department of Health and Services inspec-
tor general report.
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Ser-
vices stressed that it's addressing all the issues
raised in the report, but said resolving them is
complicated. Changes in one part of the system
may create problems for other parts of the sys-
tem that could affect providers. Some problems
may also require statutory changes.
The contractors have been submitting reports
highlighting potential fraud since 2007. But
federal health officials did not begin developing
procedures to deal with it until 2010 and still
lack a process to make sure the problems are
resolved, the report said.
The agency has been criticized for lax over-
sight of Medicare contractors in the past. Law-
makers have mandated the agency add various
types of contractors over the years so the system
has grown into a complex labyrinth that experts
say is less than ideal.
Last month, an inspector general report
showed another set of Medicare fraud contrac-
tors were using inaccurate and inconsistent
data that makes it difficult to catch bogus bills
submitted by crooks. The report found repeated
problems among the fraud contractors over a
decade and systemic failures by federal health
officials to adequately supervise them.


Florida can continue

Medicaid pilot


MIAMI (AP) Federal offi-
cials approved the expansion
of a five-county Medicaid
privatization pilot program
that allows for-profit provid-
ers to determine the health
care of recipients, but there's
no indication whether a
statewide expansion will be
allowed.
Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services spokes-
man Alper Ozinal said the
agency was insisting on new
protections, more account-
ability and quality reporting.
Florida needed federal
approval of thefive-county
waiver if it hopes to expand
statewide. The approval was
first reported by The Associ-
ated Press.
The state must also agree
to a provision that would
require private health plans
to spend 85 percent of funds
on patient care, according to
a spokeswoman for the state
Agency for Health Care Ad-
ministration. That issue has
long been a sticking point,


with state lawmakers instead
pushing for a profit-sharing
plan requiring providers to
generate a 5 percent savings
the first year.
Federal health officials
have not signaled whether
they will allow Florida to
continue with an overhaul
that would privatize the
program statewide for nearly
3 million Medicaid recipi-
ents. Officials want to make
sure the state addresses con-
cerns about access to health
care in the program raised by
some residents.
A denial for statewide
expansion could send state
lawmakers scrambling for a
solution to fix the $20 billion
a year Medicaid costs they
say are a strain on a tight
state budget. About half of
the funding comes from the
federal government.
The five-county waiver is
effective through June 30,
2014, but federal health offi-
cials they will be monitoring
Florida's progress.


SUPPLY
FROM PAGE 7B
when there is a shortage of an approved
drug that is critical to patients and the
shortage cannot be resolved in a timely
fashion with FDA-approved drugs.
When a company is identified that is


willing and able to import the needed drug
product, FDA evaluates the foreign-ap-
proved drug to ensure that it is of adequate
quality and that the drug does not pose
significant risks for U.S. patients.
Only after successful evaluation of
these factors does FDA exercise its en-
forcement discretion for the temporary
importation of an overseas drug into the
U.S. market.


BEFORE, KAREN'S HIP WENT TO THE DOGS,


OUR SPECIALISTS GAVE HER A NEW ONE.




"The technology was so impressive.
The computer navigation system made sure
every measure was precise. I was surprised at
how quickly I was up and getting around."
Karen Catarelli
Sebring




As the pain became worse, so did Karen's mnobilin'.
.And walking with a cane made working at the vet impossible.
But since her hip replacement, the pain is gone and so is the
cane. According to the latest NRC (National Research
Corporation) consumer quality ratings, you recently named our
Hospital your first choice for Orthopaedic Services. That means
R comprehensive, patient-centered service to guide you through
___ -"\your journey back to an active and healthy lifestyle.


* E-


1.~

~


Take your first step toward a life free of joint pain.
Call (863) 402-5514 or visit www.FHHeartland.org.


FLORIDA HOSPITAL
RHiL\RFTAD MNIDIC.. CEN TERL
Centerfor Bone, Joint &d Spine


Page 8B SCMG Central Florida


Wednesday, February 29, 2012








REAL ESTATE


Wednesday, February 29, 2012


CLASSIFIED


Sellers, buyers What's HOT in the marketplace?

more realistic I 1
l': :,'K ..'-,-, : ? '.:..., : : - :?.--'? .. . .. "


What type of real estate is
hot right now?
In the past 6 months, in
Lake Wales, there have been
approx 132 homes sold. Over
40 percent of those sold for
under $50,000. 26 percent
sold between $50,000 and
$100,000. As you can see,
the "hot" market right now
is smaller, more affordable
homes. I think this is a good
indication that buyers are
scaling down and realizing,
bigger may not always be
better!
Are sellers realistic about
what their homes are worth?
Sellers are getting much
', fmorel ealtlic with pricing and
listening to our recormmen-
dations. They are beginning
to realize, if thev want to sell
in todaySilarkerthei'nmust-
price the9n home to compete
with the'.tbior sales and fore-
clostires-JIhose w\ho listen,-
are findif'g hqeir homes sold...
and uuallv within 90 days.
Should I rent or buy right-
now? Which is the best


choice?
That question can only be
answered on an individual ba-
sis. So many people are strug-
gling with finances right now
and renting is the best option
while they rebuild their credit
and save for a down payment.
We work with potential buy-
ers everyday that need credit
repair; with the help of repu-
.[able companies it is possible
to position your self to buy
within a year or two.
If you-are able to buy now, -
it is a great time. With histori-
cally low interest rates, pay-
ments are much, more afford-.
able than an time iii recent"
memory.
Dolores Vogel is a broker
with Ltgacti Real EDi(te Ci1teai.
in Lake Wales


This house, located at 2743 Lake Pierce Drive in Lake Wales, listed for $140,000 and sold for $137,500 last week. The
house is a 4 Bed/ 3 Bath with 2,460 square feet of living area. The sale was handled by Legacy Real Estate Center in
Lake Wales. ;


OWNER MOTIVATED!! Co..y.-
warm and.inviting, custom built
home. Move-in ready and well
maintained. Salt water pool,
wood buhming fireplace, 2 acres
of sloped perimeter fenced Wlan
scape. Detached 30x30 garage,
twov 1000 gallon septic tanks,
S8000 water softening system.
Vaulted ceilings, planters shelves, walk-in closets. Low maintenance With
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7 TINA RICHMOND, REALTOR
CELL: 863-557-0606
SEMAIL: INFO? TINARICHMOND.COM
WEB: WWW.TINARICHMOND.COM


To have yow ad placed


inu MARKETPLACEE,


:* cn tact Lyd.say at

863-676-3467


LEGACY REA ESTATE CENTER


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Lake Wales, FL 33853
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-------------------------------------------







Page 2 CLASSIFIEDS February 29, 2012


1000







REAL ESTATE


"We Are Pledged To The Letter And
Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achieve-
ment Of Equal Housing Opportunity
Throughout The Nation. We Encour-
age And Support An Affirmative
Advertising And Marketing Program In
Which there Are No Barriers To
Obtaining Housing Because of Race,
Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Famil-
ial Status Or National Origin."

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FROSTPROOF $79,900.
3/2 Shows like NEW! New
wood lam. Floor, paint, cab,
elec, cha, roof, & fenced.
Keystone Realty Inc., 863-
635-0030
1799 S LAKE REEDY
BLVD, FROSTPROOF
$285,000 3bed/2bath
LAKEFRONT Custom built
home, wood floors, brick
paver drive & patio. Keystone
Realty Inc., 863-635-0030
2055 US HIGHWAY 17,
BABSON PARK $52,500
2/1 Bungalow style home
w/real hardwood floors, cha,
carport, fenced in backyard.
Keystone Realty Inc., 863-
635-0030
2616 SAND PINE TRL,
FROSTPROOF $139,900.
HUGE-30'X90' .METAL WORK-
SHOP 4bed/2bath DW on
3.24 private Wildlife Sanctu-
ary acres. Keystone Realty
Inc., 863-635-0030
315 VIRGINIA ST, FROST-
PROOF $65,000. 2/2
remodeled home on over-
sized yard. Keystone Realty
Inc., 863-635-0030
4 BR, 4 BA. POOL HOME
ON AN ACRE, Beautiful
home with plenty of room
inside and out, fully enclosed
pool and lanai, large utility
laundry room, family room
with fireplace, master suite,
spacious family room, located
on a nice lot with big oaks,
$144,900 ID# 115, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 63.-
676-7040 ww w.primeplus-
realestate.com- -
ALMOST 2 ACRES WITH 3
BR. 2 BA. MOBILE HOME,
built in 2009, good condition,
move in ready, all- fenced
located in country setting
near lake Rosalie,. $85,000
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 ID #
2002 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
.] P- I --..


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
4 Br. 3 Ba. ON A LARGE
LOT, Beautiful Landscaping,
Located In Very Nice Area,
2,634 Ft. Living area, Home
has large family room and
also a game or theater room,
oversized garage, plus addi-
tional living area with separate
bath, new kitchen appliances,
beautiful wood cabinets, new
countertops; hardwood floors
are in most of the entire
home, Just Listed, $159,900,
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 ID#
3010, www.primeplus-
realestate.com
CARLSBERG ESTATES, 2
BR. 2 BA. Nice community
with lake access, clubhouse,
pool, Home built in 2006, has
2 car garage, ID# 241, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
LAKE JUNE POINTE
ESTATE 5 Bedroom, 3 Bath
Custom ,Home in a Gated
Community with screened
pool. Front and back porches
with 1.43 acres of beautiful
landscaped property including
fruit trees. Lots of room to
roam, inside and out with
plenty of parking. Only
$334,900. Debra Ann Worley
Real Estate 863-465-0123
LAKE-FRONT BEAUTY, 2Br
2Ba nestled on private Lake
Cypress in Lake Wales, enjoy
boating, fishing and using
your own private boat ramp.
Offers a spa in the back sun-
room, newer roof, complete
a/c system, kitchen cabinets
and appliances,. Reduced
$254,000 id# 1671 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
LAKEFRONT EXECUTIVE
HOME;, 5,019 FT. OF LIV-
ING AREA! located on an
acre on one of Florida's finest
fishing and boating lakes,
enclosed pool, so many fea-
tures and upgrades, absolute-
ly a gorgeous home, boat
dock, call today for appoint-
ment to see! $395,000,
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 ID# 2513
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
LOCATED NEAR LAKE
PIERCE AND GREAT FISH-
ING, this 3- Br. 2 Ba. Home
has a lot to offer, Built in
2000, thick is a gieat buy for
only ,69.1000 PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE iNC 863676.
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
LOCATED NEAR LAKE PIERCE
AND GREAT FISHING, this 3
Br. 2 Ba. Home has a lot to
offer, Built in,2000, this is a
great buy for only $59,000
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
NEAR KISSIMMEE CHAIN
OF LAKES, East Lake Wales,
3 Br. 1.5 Ba. 2 lots, neat and
clean, move in ready, bring
your boat and fishing poles, 1
block from Lake Rosalie, mari-
na and boat ramp, near state
park, reduced to .$59,000
id# 10755 PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
NEW LISTING LOCATED IN
CROOKED LAKE PARK,
great condition and a perfect
starter home for the first time
home buyer or winter resi-
dent; 2 Br. 1 Ba. $54,900
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 ID #
4801 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
WATER-FRONT BEAUTIFUL
HOME ON CANAL LEADING
TO LAKE WALK IN WATER,
Move-In condition, 3 Br. 2 Ba.,
cathedral ceiling, spacious liv-
ing room,, large Florida room
with view of canal and lake,
formal dining, -plus eating
space next to kitchen, all
appliances, washer and dryer,
2 car garage, workshop,
large covered dock on deep
water canal, just seconds
from the lake, $189,900 id#
6616 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE www.primeplus-
realestate.com
1030 WATERFRONT HOMES
Waterfront Home For Sale
Lake Clay-Ski-Fish-Fun, Sand
Bottom Lake, 3 Bedroom 2
bath, Beautiful Oaks, Fenced
Yard, Spectacular Sunsets.
Debra Ann Worley Real Estate
863-465-0123
1040 CONDOSNILLAS
FOR SALE
CONDO. @ LAKE WALES
COUNTRY CLUB, Beautifully
furnished 2 Bed "2 Bath 1st
floor unit Condo with Spa-
cious Floor Plan. Located in
Golf Community. Family
room/lanai Overlooks Fairway
and Lagoon. Many Communi-
ty Amenities. $105,000 id#
6204 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co,
m
LAKE WALES COUNTRY
CLUB 2nd. Floor Condo,
Fully Furnished, Screened
Balcony, Gre)t Viewv Of Golf
Course And Lagoon,
'$102,000 idY 9202 F'RIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. "
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


1070 DUPLEXES FOR SALE
INCOME PRODUCING
PROPERTY FOR SALE
INCOME, Duplex-2 DBed-
rooms 1 Bath each side-Rent-
ed $1,050 mo. Walk to
Schools, Library, -Shopping,
and Lake June Lakefront Park
and Ball Fields $84,900.
Debra Ann Worley Real Estate
863-465-0123
1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
2 ACRES AND DOUBLE.
WIDE MOBILE HOME,
fenced beautiful 2 acres,
great buy for a home and
land, FORECLOSURE,
$29,900 ID# 209
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC..863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
2 BEDROOM 2 BATH ON
2.45 ACRES, all fenced with
large barn and workshop.
Home has screened porch,
open floor plan, lots of stor-
age space. Small pond and
storage shed on property.
$45,000 (short sale) PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. id #
17379 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH ON
APPRX. 4.86 ACRES all
fenced with workshop, Home
built in 2005, 2,108 ft. living
-area, located just east of
Lake Wales. $79,900 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. id#
17389 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
3 BR. 2 BA. MOBILE HOME
ON 1 ACRE, NICE WELL
MAINTAINED HOME WITH
STORAGE BLD. Located just
east'of Lake Wales near Lake
Rosalie; Great Fishing and
boating lake, $65,000 ID#
2188 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE. INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
3-3/4 ACRE LAKEFRONT
on Lake Lizzy. 2bd, 2ba, sin-
:glewide mobile home, screen
Sporch, w 2 sheds.
863-937-7906
1095 MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE

BRAND NEW HOMES
S FOR SALE
Great Specials;
P: educed Prices .
Beautiful Manufactured.
Home Community
863439-7418 -

1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES
37 ACRE MIDDLE TN FARM
with 13 acre lake, nice home.
Selling at Absolute Auction,
Memorial Day. Van Massey
Auction Lic 1711. (931)433-
8686 Visit vanmassey.com


1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES 1210 HOMES FOR RENT
DEVELOPER FORCED LIQ- Frostproof- 3BR/2BA newer
UIDATION Smoky Mtn. Lake home located on quiet cul-de-
Property Priced @ Foreclo- sac: 2 car garage. Interior
sure/Short sale. Up to 100% washer/dryer hookup. No
Financing/5% interest. Hurry- Pets. $895/month, SD $895.
Only 30 Reservations avail- Call Maggie Stohler at Legacy
able! (877)551-0550 ext 100 Leasing Services, Inc 863-
Waterfront Grand Opening 676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
Sale! One Day Only, Sat. cyLeases.com
March 10th. New log cabin on Frostproof- Spacious 3BR/3BA
2+ acres w/200+ FT. DOCK- home on 2+ acres. -Screen
ABLE WF only $74,500. Save porches on front and back,
tens of thousands on new log indoor utility room. Lots of
cabin w/dockable lake storage, space. $795month,
frontage one of of Alabama's SD $795. Call Maggie Stohler
premier recreational lakes. at Legacy Leasing Services,
Excellent financing. Call now. Inc 863-676-0024 or visit
(866)952-5302 x 151. www.LegacyLeases.com.
1210 HOMES FOR RENT Ft Meade-Cozy 3BR/1BA
home on corner lot with lots
Available Now 2-4 Bedroom of privacy. New interior paint.
Homes. Take Over Payments. Large front porch.
No Money Down. No Credit Washer/dryer hookup.
check! Call Now 1-888-270- $725/month, SD $725.
0372 Available March 1st. Call Mag-
gie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Babson Park- 2BR/1BA cot- Services, Inc 863-676-0024
tage with Crooked Lake or visit
beach access. Home has www.LegacyLeases.com
been updated with new floor-
ing and new kitchen. Wash- LAKE WALES, 1 MONTH
er/dryer included. Lawn care FREE RENT! 3bd/1.5ba,
included. No pets. Renovated. $725 month.
$650/month, SD $650. Call 2324 Linda St.
Maggie Stohler at Legacy 321-251-1118
Leasing Services, Inc 863- Lake Wales- 3BR/1BA with
676-0024 or visit www.Lega- den and screened porch.
cyLeases.com.. Large shaded yard. Interior
BabsonPark-This 4BR/3.5BA laundry room. Detached
home boasts a spacious back garage with lots of storage
screen porch and fenced space. $895/month, SD
backyard. Large living room. $895. Call Maggie Stohler at
Fireplace in the kitchen. 4th Legacy Leasing Services, Inc
bedroom could also be used 863-676-0024 or visit
as an office, den, or play- www.LegacyLeases.com
room. Indoor utility-room. Lake Wales- 3BR/2BA home
Detached garage provides in Highland Crest.subdivision.
additional. storage. -Certain Split floor plan, 2 car garage,
pets ok. $1095 mrinth. SD interior laundry room with
$1095. Available early March. washer/dryer hookup.
Call Maggie Stohler at Legacy $850/month, SD $850. Call
Leasing Services, Inc -863- Maggie Stohler at Legacy
676-0024 or visit www.Lega- Leasing Services,' Inc 863-
cyLeases.com" 676-0024 or visit www Le.a-
BARTOW, Clean lBdr Apart- cyLeases.com.
ment in Duplex, on Bartow's Lake Wales- 3BR/2BA .home
Westside. Ceramic tile floors with split floor plan and vault-
throughout, large Ihtchen. ed ceilings. 2 car garage.
$395/monthly. Updated kitchen.
863-299-8070. ,,. $900/month, SD $900. Call
FORT MEADE lbd, ba Maggie .Stohler at Legacy
walk to grocery, fruit stand, .Leasing Services, Inc 8 3-
library, restaurant. 9 S.E,,First, 676-0024'dr visit www Lega-
St., $500. mo., $500"'securi- cyLeases.com
ty. No pets. Call: 86,3.512.
7.326. -1300 DUPLEXES FO~RRENT
Frostproof- 2BR/2BA-tme, 41 N CHEROKEE, AVE.,
-on Lake, Reedy With docl .-. FORT MEADE- 2br/lba, livin-
Spacjious. yard with beautiful,, groom, eat-in kitchen,, CA/H,
views. 'Washer.'dryer includ- :washer /dryer .., hookups.
ed. No pets.: $80., month,. SD 3$500/monthly. :--863-285-
$800. Call Maggie Stohler at 7273.
Legacy Leasing Services, IncFOR
863-676-0024 or visit FORT MEADE, St Patrick
www.LegacyLeases.com Day Special 2bd lba, fur-
www.LegacyLeases.com nished appliances, garbage,
LAKE WALES AREA. 2 Very trash and lawn service. 863-
Nice Houses For Rent. 2 Bd 559-7035.
$500 mo / 3 Bd $700 Mo.
call 863-635-6399 GET RESULTS-

Classified Wors! USE CLASSIFIED!


can tale you places!


SP108812


Page 2


CLASSIFIED


February 29,2012







February 29,2012 CLASSIHEDS Page 3


1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
lbd, furnished apartment,
clean, utilities furnished. No
pets. 863-285-9422.

BARTOW BEAR CREEK
APARTMENTS
1bd available, special
$485.00/mo.
including water, sewer
& trash removal.
Small pets welcome with
pet deposit.
Close to shopping &
bus transportation.
Call (863) 534-3243.


1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
Happy Home Apartments
719 Wanamaker Ave.
Fort Meade
lbd, Iba, C/H/A, $450 mo.,
plus security deposit.
Two, 2bd, Iba, NEWLY
REMODELED, good neigh-
borhood. Close to school.
Sm. pet friendly w/deposit.
$550.-$650. Contact Sheila.
863-214-5645
LAKE WALES 1Bedroom
apt., no smokers or pets.
$135 wk, $270 to move in.
Water & Elect included. 863-
632-7013


ACROSS ~ 2 3 4
'Defense lawyers
adversaries, for,
-..: short 17 ,-
5 Otherwise!. .: .
10 Smidgen 20 21
14 Certain .
5 Motored '' 23 24
6 Agitate .
17 Member of27 C
Hook's band
18 Ear-related
19 Time-half link 36 37
20 Shooter of soft
confections 40
23 Gp. that issues
canine 43 44 45 .46
pedigrees 48 49
24 Blue wearer,
-.usually '
25 In reserve '
26 Satchel _,-aptly- 58
'- 'harhededoinrthe: -
__-comic"G-t 62 e
:'Fuzzy.' : 6.
28 Make fun of .. .
31 Beatty ot -, B ....
Da erance 6y.S.Levin
32 Formal coif, ,- 66 Overwhm, or a
perhaps relative-f the first
33 More sleazy syllabIlfdft0
'"36 Minor'rioldrin' 36-, ottr3 Across
' mishaps' 67 O'verdohe
40 xecilse ,publicity
popularized by (.-
Jim Fix, -DOWN
41 Tehlins do'-bvers 1 Obstinate beast
43 JFK alternative in 2Doh ,
NYC ,.. . 3Alaska's 907. e.g.
46 Certain stoiQve '4 Clairvoyant
filler '5 Where Moscow is
-47 In-a'eonvincing- .-6 Dowdy.dresser__
w- 7:' wy-'?.'. .AuthotiEphron
48 Palmer With an :.8' Racektifk :
army ' 9Tattle ,'
50 Show about --10 Sketch'ed
Capote 11 Welcome, as a
52 Avenues of new year
access 12 Moniker for
53 Strains credulity Mussolini
58 Rock's partner 13 Hit with a pitch, in
59 "... never see_ a way
lovely as ...": 21. Academic inst.
Kilmer 22 Seeped
60 Build a tree 23 Kwik-E-Mart
house proprietor on
62 Chevy "The Simpsons"
subcompact 27 "And" or "or," e.g.:
63 _firma Abbr.
64 M6tley 28 Overly enthusiastic
65 Greenhorn 29 "I'm all for that!"


1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
Move In Special
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartment
Homes ? off rent for the first 3
Months $100 down on Secu-
rity deposit with a 6-month
payment plan Charlton
Court (863) 285-8380 TDD
(800) 955-8771
Equal Opportunity Housing
Rental Assistance Program
(based on availability)
1340 MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT

NO DEPOSIT / $120 PER
I r fim n m;n,;, ib hr^ l


2/29/1-21
l, I 'E |'ISa31IA3S ElpalN 3unaqll 10( j 1
3 dAH H OA I
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pOAloS aezznd sAepsaupaM


30 Pizazz
33 Bell-shaped lily
34 Therefore
35 Depend (on)
37 Fastening pin,
38 Oil plant
39 Gets to one's feet
42 Jun. grads
43 Maze runner
44 Old-style "Cool!"
45 Rod-and-reel
wielder


1340 MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
LAKE WALES 65X16 Fleet-
wood mobile home, Ca/h, 1-
1/2 Bath, Private Lot. 8 mi
East on HWY 60, turn right on
Breen Rd South, 312 Eucalyp-
tus Rd. 863-696-1928
1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
12 X 16 WORKSHOP, 12
X14 SHED, COUNTY
WATER, ELECTRIC, READY
FOR NEW MOBILE! Located
East ofLake Wales, Paved Rd
-Frontage, Partially Fenced,
$34,900 id # 3148 PRIME
.PLUS! REAL ESTATE INC.
jwww.primeplusrealestate.co
4m11 -: 0o ,': .
-R5 ACRES NEAR LAKE
ROSALIE, Located in a gated
.community in- a rural setting;
;:wildlife: galore, .near--county
boatf ramp arid access to
Lake Rosalie, Deed-restricted
to single family homes only,
beautiful wooded parcel, -
49,900 id# It 11, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
.67r.-7040 iwww.primeplus-
realestate.com .
HOME SITE, Nice half Acre
'lot located in Beautiful Area of
Homes. Growing Region Cen-
trally Located between Winter
Haven and Lake Wales. Par-
tially Cleared and ready to
Build your First Home.
$27,900 id #cc PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. (863) 676-
.7040 www.p.rimeplus-
realestate.com
LAKE FRONT ON LAKE
WALK IN WATER, Just Over
5 Acres, Partially Wooded,
Private Location, Dead End
Street. Great Price! S79,900
id# It22 PRIME PLUS REAL
'ESTATE, INC 863.676-7040.
wwA.pr imeplusrealesitat'.co
n,-. -


47 Mooch, as a
smoke -
49 Domed home
50 Heat unit
51 Plot anew
54 Welcome sign for
a hungry traveler
55 Eject, as lava
56 When tripled, a
1970 war film
57 Waistline unit
61 Golf bag item


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE


COUNTRY LIVING -
WHERE YOU CAN
HAVE IT ALL!!!
THE COUNTY IS DROP-
PING THE IMPACT
FEES FOR THE NEXT
SIX MONTHS AND NOW
IS THE TIME TO BUILD
A NEW HOME!!! SAVE
$$$THOUSANDS BUY-
ING AND BUILDING
NOW.!!,-
ALTURAS, 14,-r acres
(more or less).for sale;
Will divide into mini-
mum of 5 acre tracts.
High and dry. Suitable
for building home, small
grove or raising cattle
or horses. Big enough
to build a home.&-sepa-
rate mother-in-law suite
or 2 homes! Close6'to
Alturas Elementary.
Enjoy country living at
its finest! Just 10-miles
to Bartow, Lake 'Wales
or Winter Have6t.! Fbr
more informations or:to
schedule an appt. call
863-512-0041.
NORTH CAROLINA MOUN-
TAINS MUST SELL! 22.95ac
has everything, views, creek
& hardwood forest. Only
$125,000 Terms Possible.
Includes 2 restorable cabins.
Buy Owner Call 706-374-
1136


Needajo^?

Check Tlhe
\ Classified!.
C':,. st


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
WOODED HOME SITE! 2
Acres of Beautiful Woods in
deed restricted community to
build your new home! Not too
far from Public Boat Ramp
into Lake Rosalie. Owner Moti-
vated and will look at all Rea-
sonable Offers! $39,900 id#
11209 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC (863) 676-7040.
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
1515 WATERFRONT
North Carolina Mountain
Lakefront lots. New gated
waterfront community. Dock-
able lots with up to 300' of
shoreline, Low insurance, Low
property tax. Call Now
(800)709-5253 ...
OWN a waterfront lot in a
gated C.,mrimunit inc, a cus-
to6n park model home, $65K,
6. Mi E of Lake Wales. Karl
863-678-8295
1520 OUT OF TOWN LOTS-
20 Acres-Live 'on Land
NOW!! Only ,$99/mo. .$0
Down. Owner financing. -NO
CREDIT CHECKS! Near El
Paso, Texas. Beautiful Moun-
tain Views! Free Color
Brochure. (800)755-8953.
www.sunsetranches.com
NC mountain property
must go. 4.5 acres with out-
standing views and privacy.
$25,000 OBO, great for
homer, or, ,cabin.. (828)394-
:9298.. Ask for Richard

.Need Cash?
Have A

Garage Sale
. D u.. .. .. .. .. r -?C .. .. .


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


IAvvrIIw IIIUUIIce mo e IUIomIIe.I
SE I Dave- 813-644-114


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process of elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
3 6 1 9 Rating: GOLD
4 5 L9811 V196 Z

3 26 EI 6LZ98Et
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February 29,2012


Page 3


CIASSIFIEDS


,. r





Page 4 CLASSIFIEDS February 29, 2012


* I


Call 863-676-3467 to
a place your ad


IjiKV SLh^tB^^
- ^L* jj^j .^j ^ ^- 1 -


A~


Advertise


your


business


in The


Polk


Business

& Service

Directory


Comrpleteqgpfing Service Since 1970
Shingleis *TPO Rubber
John Ratlift, Jr.
Sticense # CCC 058307
LICENSED BONDED INSURED
johnnyfreely@yahoo.com
L.K.L.D (863) 853-8047
A.U.B. (863) 968-9717


CENTRAL FLORIDA'S COOLING SPECIALISTS
POWELL
A/C& E-RATING
SALES* SERVICE INSTALLATION
All Makes/Models Residential & Commercial
Financing available on new & replacement units
FREE ESTIMATES-A installations & replacements
'INSURE'-.~1TE ff FIEDCACI315459
A S 2S9 "046


ldkeeper WdIlTrav
35 Years Experience
Full Charge Through Trail Balance
My Office or Yours
31549 US27 863-439-5500
863-427-5045
al'I/ing )'ou Tax DollarsL
CALt.- A


and


watch


- "Cut grass
don't smoke it!"


COMMERCIALL
PRESIDENTIAL
hlo ,,,;, I... .,.
Free Estimates
944-5087
Licensed & Insured


your


custQmer
list I
*~ ~~~S ^'vi''!-


N
I. ;


grow.


aFLOORINAIS7SJO CHOeSE FROMa 4
Rates range ofp 4g, $61
incluidiilg wa`g s.we & trash.
222 W. Ethelene St., Bartow
S (Be)ind DO)
--(863)533-4651


i JACOBSEN HOMES
FACTORY O U T L E T
Finance Specials LandlHome Chattel Land-In-Lieu
FHA, VA, Prvate Finance
Also offering
r ._IAsOfrg i-. Park Models
Si- Trade-Ins
- - Repos
$54,900 $49,900 We pay cash for
'86 or newer
863-537-6063
145 S. Hankin Rd. Bartow, FL
(5 mi. E. of Bartow on Hwy 60)
No CostSecV ayAssesswenW
a cati(M63) 223-324


Call today!

63.676-3467


7, Deep Clean ti e
"* Rental Cleanrii_
* Licensed & Insured


WE WILL MATCH OR BEAT ANY WRITTEN Cl


A )Di\ i'; on ol
I-


CLASSIFIED


Page 4


February 29,2012


l I I I I I
pIr ma
PhDliWCiAlAVC --M'A-Wn la P&MVC






February 29,2012 CLASSIFIEDS Page 5


Call 863-676-3467 to
Space your ad


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23773 N. Hwy. 27
Lake Wales


EMBROIDERY

ALTERATIONS
-, ,O
SEWING
CLASSES
863-949-4813


S,-Pasrents
Co Alten ithdll KitchenI
Candy Ceramic Tile throughout, from $405/month;
S Spacious 1Bedroom starting at $475/ ronth.
Large 2 Bedroom Residence with washer/dtyer
hookups + utility room. fronr$595/Tqionth.
w.ifwAM M anor Apcs.c9m
1285 N US 17 BartoW (Aside Wl&Mart)
(863) 533-5600


First Time
Advertisers et
Two Weeks FEE


Call at 676-3467
Ke*1oday 1


I Z U





!The, Rr.stAi
Call Joann ~t.^41g8
O 9,via


COMEABY
PUBLIC AUCTIONS MONDAYS & SATURDAYS 6:30PM
LICENSED & INSURED
Is Your Auctior'Company?
23660 US 27 N., L"e Wales
863-227-7598
SOUTHERNAUCTIONCOMPANY@GMAIL.COM
AB2730 AU3820


LIMITED T!IE OFFER
$199-FIRST MONTH'S RENT
$250 SECURITY DEPOSIT
w/12 MONTH LEASE
WHILE THEY LAST
Space nits with washerldryer hookups available.
Includecentral heat & air conditioning, blinds, stove
& refrigerator, plus on-site laundry facilities
ORANGEMONT VILLAGE/PEACE RIVER KNOLL
401 Winsion Ave Lake Wales. FL 33553 863-676-9213 TDD: 711
En rh n i .n nr Equa] Oppocunuti Prumer & Enplty.-r


Eileen Belanger
Sales Associate
SProperty Manager

AT You SERVICE REALTY


1400 Chalet Suzanne Road
Lake Wales, FL 33859
Cell 863.221.0229 ,
Business 863.676.4448
E-Mail: eileenb@century21 .mm
Please visit my Web Site for your
eealEstatewRentalNeedsat


PWESLSa


2704154


..as .d 1-F*d


TOBAG WG -BG


February 29,2012


CLASSIFIED


Page 5








Page 6 CLASSIFIEDS February 29,2012


1620 COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY
OFFICE FOR LEASE, State
Rd. 60 E., Lake Wales, New
Office Building offers great
exposure on Major Highway,
open floor plan available,
approx. 820 sq.ft. RENT
NEGOTIABLE, Call For
details, Also larger space
available if needed, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 OR 863-632-
0272 (ask for David)
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
OVER 14 ACRES HIGHWAY
FRONTAGE IN AVON
PARK, Multiple parcels,
with mixed use. Excellent
potential for commercial
highway business, or income.
property on U.S. :27. Bank
owned, recent appraisal anrd
priced accordingly, call for,
more information. PRIME'
'PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. -
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
1650 FARMS/RANCHES
Beautiful Log Cabin, stable
with bath & equipment barn
on 2+/- Acres in Chatham,
VA. $148,900. Agnes Dowdy
& Associates Real Estate
(434)851-8522. Photos at
www.AgnesDowdyRE.com

BUY IT!


SELLIT!


FIND IT!


SUN.CLtSSIFIEDS!


2000






EMPLOYMENT

2001 HELP WANTED
$88/Hour Work. No Scam.
Flexibl'-Hours. Start Today:
www.Susans-Blog9.com
A Few Pro Drivers Needed
Top Pay & 401K Great Equip-
iment .' Benrilefit 2 M -. CIDL
Ila :. A Driving E ,p (877)258
;7; www.meltritrui:- corm
ACT F lOW! Flew Pay Iricrea ;e'
37-46,.pm. New Trucks in
201;:,eed 2 months CDL-A
Driving;Experience. (877)258-
8782 Www.meltontruck.com
AFFORDABLE
TRANSPORT, INC.
'Hiring certlied EMT's. Only"
cer tiled! R.3te of pay' -:
depends on experience.
Please call Angel at 863-698-
.9765..
AIRLINES ARE- HIRING
Train for high paying Aviation
Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available. CALL Avi-
ation Institute of Maintenance
(866) 314-3769.
ASAP! New Pay Increase!
3446' cpm`.'- 300 Newer
Trucks Need 2 ronth-. CODL-A
Driving E,.periernce. I(87 1258.
8782 vwww.meltcntrru: I corn
ASSEMBLE-JEWELRY & MAG-
fNETsi:. fr,:ni Home!iYear-Rounhd
Wdrk !' Excellentf P iv! l[I', E'p,
lienr6! To'p -iUS Crompany!
Glu4 -Gun,r F'ainting, Jewelry,
More' Call 1-860-482-3955
-" : ."O ..-- -


"~~~~'1
_____ -~ ,~22L '- -.


2001 HELP WANTED
Assistant Sales Manager
needed for Customer Service
Sales, inventory control.
Excellent verbal and written
skills $500 weekly. Send
resumes
needajobl911@hotmail.com
Bowling Green Country Club,
bartender needed, exp. pre-
ferred. Must be 21. Call Sheila.
863-214-5645
CALL NOW! Top..5% Pay!
Excellent Benefits. 300 New
T660's. Need 2 months. CDL-
A Driving Exp. (877)258-8E 2
www.meltontruck.com
CDL DRIVERS Great Pay!
Tons of-~Texas. Frac" workO
Great company! Company,
paid benefits! Must have bulk
pneumatic tr ailer -e- pererice.
Callft:davy! u800)491-9029.
CDL-A Drivers Relocateifor
Tons of Great Paying Texas
Oilfield. work! Great cormpal
ny/Paid benefitt! Mult -have
bulk pnerurrnai. traife experi-
ence. Call: today! ,(800)491-
9029. .-1 .. ; A
GDL-A DRIVERS. Central Flo0i1
da, 'company seeks" Solo' &
Team Drivers. Tank and 'Dry
Van positions offering some
regional, lyr OTR/ Good MVR
required. (877)882-6537 or
www.oakleytransport:com
CLAIMS ADJUSTERS
NEEDED due to active Storm
Season. JEL's 5-day Boot
Camp, Nations #1 hands-on
trainer can prepare ',rou.'Hieh
'n.: rn? www.JELTraihingg;ofn
- or'mparues waiting
CYPRESS TRUCK LINES
Home: Weekends!!'i Sbuth'bstf
Regional, Top' Pay & Great
Beriefit"' 6 Mor, tf,." 'TT e
CDL with cle'rn MvR. C"ill
l8:0 )4.l 351 'l 9 i
www.cypre tr u I' .cci rn* ,
|--Classified-Werks--


2001 HELP WANTED
DRIVER- Not getting enough
miles? Join Knight Transporta-
tion and increase your income
with our steady freight. New
Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience. (800)414-
9569. www.driveknight.com
Driver- Recession Proof
Freight. Plenty of miles. Need
refresher? No out-of-pocket
tuition at FFE. $1000 Bonus
for CO's & $1500 Incentive
for 0/0's. recruit@ffex.net.
(855)356-7121
Driver-Drivers choose
from Weekly or Daily Pay.
Regional, OTR or Express
Lanes, Full or Part-time, CDL-
A, -3-months recent .experi-
ence -required.. (800)414-
9569 www.driveknight.com
Drivers No Experience -
No problem. '100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Berefit;-.
20,. 1:., program. Trainers
Eari -' 'L :up" : '- to
$.49 'per mile! CRST VAN
EXPEDITED .(800)326-2778
www.JoihCRST.com
Drivers Earn. Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS' 1 yr OTR
Flatbed exp. Call: (800)572-
5489 Susan ext. 227 Joy ext.
238 SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC.
Drivers Earn Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR Flatbed
exp. Call: (800)572-5489 Joy
ext. 238 Susan ext. 227 SUN-
BELT TRANSPORT; LLC. ,
Drivers Wanted-OTR Food,
Grade Tanker Driver',s Needed
Compettive pay, Benelit.,
Gu3rariteed tlimen l 'l.3:ss A
CDL w .tarn er endoremerrnt
F'reer 2yr: e.perienc:e
. S,.ti56-'i- 16 oatt ytran-1
po t.ti:ri.conl .s', ': .
|Employ Classified! |


2001 HELP WANTED
Drivers- No Experience-
No Problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to 49C per mile!
CRST VAN EXPEDITED
(800)326-2778 www.Join-
CRST.com
DRIVERS: $1000 SIGN-ON
BONUS & upto .55cpm run-
ning Flatbed Over the Road.
No Tarping! Great Benefit Pkg!
CDL-A, Clean Background &
MVR Required. CALL: 1-888-
567-4969, x22
Earn Up to $.51cpm!!!:CDL-
A Drivers, Tanker & :Dry Van
positions available ::'l year
OTR experience, Good MVR &
work history needed;: Call
(877)882-6537 -* :*or. apply
www.oakleytransporticomn
EXPERIENCED winrdcw ttin
ters- and audio installers 'heed-
ed. .Call owner at '863-2.23-:
8087. '.
FEDERAL POSTAL JOBS!
Earn 312 'S.48 per hour Ilo
Experience ull -Beiefits /
Paid Training 1-800-593-
2664 Ext. 11.0 l,,v Hirng!'
FRAC SAND HAULERS woth
complete bulk pneumatic rigs
only. Relocate to Texas for
Tons of work. Great compa-
ny/pay. Gas cards/Quick Pay
available. (800)491-9029
Freight Up = More $ 34-46
CPM 2Mos. CDL Class A Dri-
ving Exp (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com.
Heat &' Air JOBS Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands orn environ
ment. Nationwide certifica-
iorn:-. and Local Job Place-
ment As-i.i.tance! ('7)994.-
9904 ... --

ADVERTISE!


2001 HELP WANTED

Join Our Winning
Newspaper Team
Central Florida's .fastest
growing community newspa-
per group is seeking an
aggressive salesperson to
handle a challenging and
rewarding sales territory in
the Polk County area. This is
a rich territory with a wide
variety of businesses, both
large and small. The ideal
person to fill this job is com-
fortable with mom-and pop
businesses as well as major
accounts. Advertising- sales
e,.perience is preferred.
We are a drug free work-
place. Pre-employment drug
testing required.
: ;:Send cover letter and
S resume to:
Jim '.ouv,,I.I., PutlI, h'-r
VP F:I.. ,':,unr, Operatin: ".
:Sun' CoastMedia Group :'
140 EStuartAve. ..;::'
Lake Wales, FI.33853.
Or :rn ld
G ij 'ell l 'L. -e' : r1; i e v ," : irn
JUST GRADUATE? PlFay in
Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New
York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys.
S40,,.-SSOu ;.wkly. : .Rajd
expenses. Signing Bonus. Call
(877)259-6983
Marine Outboard Mechan-
ic Wanted Hands On Experi-
ence. Must Have Own Tools.
Paid Vacation & Holidays.
863-679-8865
Medical Billing Trainees
Needed! Hospitals & Insur-
ance Companies hiring now!
No experience? Local Training
'& Jb Placement available' HS
Grad .or GED & Computer
needed. (888)589-%677 ,
Personal' Assistant' am
ready to pay $,500 per [ eek
c onta:t : 6 m'e -),1 'at
jell 'evin w33@li VeC6nmv.fd
more details.
.] .... I .


CIASSIFIEDS


February 29,2012


Page 6







February 29,2012 CLASSIFIEDS Page 7


2001 HELP WANTED
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED! Hospi-
tals & Insurance Companies
hiring now! No experience?
Local Training &.Job Place-
ment Assistance available!
(888)219-5161.
Medical Management
Careers start here Get con-
nected online. Attend college
on your own time. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com- .
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com .
MOMS WORK FT/PT, no
experience necessary, we
train. New Swarovski Crystal
Jewelry by Touchstone Crys-
tal. $500 TO $5,000/MONTH
(407)295-1522 kontactkelly-
now@aol.com
MOVIE EXTRAS Earn up to
$250 per day To stand in the
backgrounds for a major film
production experience, not
required. All looks needed.
Call NOW!!! (877)435 5877
Need:'CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commercial
experience to transfer-motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses. www.mamo-
transportatijoncom (800)501-
3783 -
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and-buses. www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783
On Site Apartment Com-
plex. Office Manager.
Rural Development. Experi-
ence A-Plus. Salary & Hoius-
ing. Fax Resume To: 352-
787-2712
OTR DRIVERS- Food Grade.
Tank Drivers. CDL-A w/tank.
endorsement. Good MVR &
Hazmat.: within '90 days
required. Up to: 4Zcpm
w/additional mileage incen-
tives & benefits. (877)882-
6537 or www.oakleytrans-
port.com
PART-TIME CHURCH SEC-
RETARY proficient in word
Powerpoint and Excel. Radi-
ate a personality that reflects
Christ's.concern tor people.
'Strong org3rizationral skills.
Excellent conirrard of Englihh
language written and dral.
Email resume to cshutchin-
sonr,.' verizon net t,, March 3,
2012
Personal Assistant am
ready to p;.i,' $500 per week
cr,rn:t me at nelson-
",lI jh,,-i: m for

WANTED: Process Mail From
Home! Pay Weekly! Free Sup-
plies! Bonuses! Genuine
Opportunity! Helping Home-
workers for 20 years! Call 1-
888-302-1512. www.how-
towork-fromhome.com
We have a vacancy in our
office for the post of a team
player and a shopper. Our
company is looking for part
time/full time Work Account
Managers and Sales Repre-
sentatives. It pays $1,200 a
month plus benefits.Must be
Efficient and Dedicated. If you
are interested and need more
information,Contact:
Craig Jackson Email:(crgjack-
son300@gmail.com)


2005 SERVICES
A CHILDLESS, SUCCESSFUL,
COUPLE SEEKS TO ADOPT.
Large extended family. Finan-
cial security. Expenses paid.
Call Lori & Kathy. 1-888-929-
4299. (FL Bar#0150789)
A CHILDLESS, SUCCESSFUL,
WOMAN SEEKS TO ADOPT.
Loving/stable home. Will be
hands-on w/flexible schedule.
Large family w/adopted rela-
tives. Financial security.
Expenses paid. Emily or
Adam 1-800-790-5260.(FL
Bar#0150789)
Abortion Not an Option? Con-
sider Adoption. ft's a Wonder-
ful Choice for an Unplanned
Pregnancy. Living/Medical
Expenses Paid. Loving, Finan-
cially, Secure Families Await.
1-877-341-1309 Atty Ellen
Kaplan (#0875228)
* ADOPT.* College Sweet-
hearts, Creative Professionals
yearn for 1st miracle baby to
Love, cherish & devote our
lives. George & Lisa *
FLBar42311- 1-800-552-
0045.- Expenses Paid
ADOPTION Give your baby a
loving, financially secure fami-
ly. Living expenses paid. Call
Attorney Charlotte Danciu 28
years experience. 1-800-
395-5449 www.adoption-sur-
rogacy.com FL Bar #
307084
ARE YOU PREGNANT? A
Childless Married Couple
Seeks to Adopt! Large
Extended Family. Financial
Security. :Expenses. Paid.
Theresa; ;and Steve 1-877-
8.01-7256&. .(FL Bar, #
01:50789) .- .
Henderson Bookkeeping
Leona Henderson
(863)767-0187
(863)781-0671-cell
Payroll,, Sales Tax, Bill Paying
and Booll I can do all things through
Christ who strenthens me.
Phil 4:13
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA From
Home 6-8 Weeks Accredited
Get A Diploma! Get A Job!
Free Brochure 1.800-264-
8330,www.diplmafromhome.
com Benjamin Franklin High
School
2030 MEDICAL
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to
become a Medical Office
Assistant! No experience need-
ed! Job training.& local place-
ment assistance. HS Diplo-
ma/GED & PC/Internet need-
ed. (888)374-7294.
2100 GENERAL
Apply Now, 12 Drivers
needed Top 5% Pay 2 Mos.
CDL Class A Driving Exp.
(877)258-8782. '
www.meltontruck.com/drive
Driver-Hometime. Choices:
Weekly, 7 ON/7 .OFF.:
14/ON-7/OFF. Daily pay!
New trucks! Van and Refriger-
ated. CDL-A, 3.months recent
experience required. Top bene-
fits! (800)414-9569.
www.driveknight.com
Drivers: Run 5 STATE
REGIONAL! Get home week-
ends. Earn up to 39 cents/mi.
1 yr. ..,TIF HrFltted p ire,.
Call: SUNBELT TRAIJSF1FORT,
LLC (8001572-5489 Ext. 227.


PUT
C/ IASSIFIEDS\
TO WORK FOR
YOU!

FIND JOB!
\ BUYA HOME!/
BUYA CAR!


3000


NOTICES

3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
ADOPTION 866-633-0397
Unplanned Pregnancy?
Provide your baby with a
loving, financially secure
family.
Living/Medical/Counsel-
ing expenses paid. Social
worker on staff. Call com-
passionate attorney Lau-
ren Feingold(FL
Bar#0958107) 24/7
Advertise in Over 100
Papers throughout Florida
Call Advertising Networks of
Florida for statewide & region-
al advertising. (866)742-
1373.
www.florida-classifieds.com
ADVERTISE IN OVER 100
PAPERS throughout Florida
for One Low Rate. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
ALLIED HEALTH career train-
ing-Attend college 100%
online. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid .-if qualified.
SCHEV., certified. Call
(800)481-9409 www.Centu-
raOnlihe.com :' '
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. "Medical, "Busi-
ness, 'Paralegal, "Comput-
ers, 'Criminal Justice Job
placement assistance. Com-
puter available. Financial Aid.d.
qualified. Call-' (87j) -'2032
3179,- -
www.CenturaOnline.c or
BANKRUPTCY, FORECLO-
SURE DEFENSE. Consumer
Rights. Peter Kelegian, Attor-
ney at Law, Gainesville,. Flori-
da. Free no obligation consul-
tation. Serving counties
throughout North Florida.
(352)672-6444.. peter@kele-
gianlaw.com #702706
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE FREE VACATION
VOUCHER UNITED BREAST
CANCER FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast Can-
cer Info www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Fast, Non-Runners
Accepted, -24/7 (888)468-
5964.
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE
FREE VACATION VOUCHER UNIT-
ED BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION
Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer
Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing, Fast,
Non-Runners Accepted, 24/7
(888)468-5964.
GET YOUR AD NOTICED
HERE And, in Over 100
Paper;, throughout Florida for
-One 'Low .:Rate: Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
HORSE LOVERS MAKE $$
FOR YOURSELF OR CHARI-
TY. HOLD A COMPETITIVE
TRAIL CHALLENGE. CALL
ACTHA AT (877)99-
ACTHA(22842) OR VISIT
WWW.ACTHA.US GREAT FUN,
GREAT $$$
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
PREGNANT?
Paul and Anne-Louise, a
British couple, are hoping to
adopt. They can. offer finan-
cial and emotional assis-:
tance. Call Jessica, Heart
of Adoptions, Tampa, FL, 1-
800-590-1108 or email les-
sic a@heartofadoptions.com
(Lic#100019753)

3060 SCHOOLS
S&INSTRUCTION
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train
for hands on Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA approved,
program. Financial aid if quali-
fied Housing available. CALL
Aviation Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-628
ALLIED -HEALTH career
training-Attend college 100%
online. Job placement- assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial -Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified.
(800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home; *Medical; *Busi-
ness, *Criminal Justice, *Hos-
pitality. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.:
SCHEV certified. Call 888-
203-3179 www.CenturaOn-
line.com
AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONICS Graduate in 14
Months. FAA Approved; finan-
cial -aid if qualified. Job place-
ment-assistance. Call Nation-
al Aviation Ac adenmy Today! 1-
800-659-2080 or NAA.edu-, =
Earn your; high .schobfdip [oma
at home. Work at your own
pace.; First Coast Academy,
nationally accredited. Call for
free brochure, 1-800-658-
1180, ext. 77, www.fcahigh-
school.org -
Heat & Air JOBS Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on Environ-
ment. Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job place-
ment Assistance! (877)994-
9904.
NEED YOUR HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA? Finish from home:
last for S399! Nationally
accredited. EZ pay. Free
brochure. www.diplomath-
ome.com Call 800-470-4 7
3090 LOST & FOUND
FOUND Jack Russel with Col-,
la:. No Tag. Found Hwy 60
around 1st Street. Call 863-
258-0851
LOST 2 yr old White English
Pit and Lab. Last seen on
Miami St, Lk Wales. Answers
to Bealla. Locater chip. call
863-241-2656

4000


FINANCIAL

4010 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
$150,000 +/yr. Potential
Turn Key Online Sales & Mar-
keting Wealth Creation Syv-
tem. No Selling to Family &
Friends Start In 24 hrs.
www.thel 50Kgameplan.com
DO YOU EARN $800.00 IN
A DAY? Your Own Local
Candy Route 25 Machines
and Candy All for $9995.00
All Major Credit Cards Accept-
ed (877)915-8222
AINB02653
MA$$IVE CA$H FLOW Return-
ing 2-minute phone calls with
no selling or convincing! TAX
FREE. For Proof Leave Msg.
641-715-3900 Ext 689808#


4010 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
FREE Program on How to
Get Rich. Go to www.Your-
WishisYourCommand.com for
FREE offer. It's the Secret
Behind The Secret, today's
Think and Grow Rich!
Investors Outstanding
and immediate returns in
equipment leasing for frac
industry. Immediate lease out.
Tax benefits and high,returns.
We heed more equipment!
(800)491-9029
Investors Outstanding
and immediate returns in
Equipment leasing for oilfield
industry. Immediate lease out.
Tax benefits and high'returns.
We need more equipment!
(800)491-9029
4020 FINANCIAUMISC.
$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT Cash
Now!! Injury Lawsuit Dragging?
Need 5500-$500,000++
within 48/hours? Low rates
Apply Now By Phone! 1 800-
568-8321. ;,
www.lawcapital.com
CASH NOW! Cash for your
structured settlement or annu-
ity payments. Call J.G. Went-
worth (866) 494-9115. Rated
A+ by the Better Business
Bureau. -
FREE DEBT SOLUTION. End
Foreclosure and Debt Collec-
tions within 90 Days. No Pay-
ments, No. Bankruptcy,; ,and
No Settlements. Guaranteed
Since 1993. (800)477-9256
www.zerodebtguaranteed.co
m. .
GOCT LOTS OF DEBT OR
CREDITORS No Amount Too
Small or Too Large National
"Consumer Program Free Fed-
eral Debt Hot Line (855). 840.
6020 Hablamos Espanol-
4080 LOANS MORTGAGES
Access Reverse Mortgage!
Florida-based: Application &
closing in your home. Experi-
ence: almost 1,000 reverse
mortgages funded. Award-
winning customer service.
-BBB A..rating. NMLS #4566.
1(800)806-7126 i

B ITBUYITT-."

SELL- T!

S-FIND IT. 3

SUX CLASSFIE'it


5000






BUSINESS SERVICES

5115 LEGAL SERVICES
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
5120 MEDICAL SERVICES
ATTENTION DIABETICS with
Medicare. Get a Free Talking
Meter and -diabetic testing
supplies at No Cost, plus Free
home delivery! Best of all,
this meter eliminates painful
finger pricking! Call 888-377-
3536
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order pharma-
cy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 90 percent on all
your medication needs. Call
Today 888-372-6740 for
$25.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping. Pre-
scriptions Dispensed from
Canada are Dispensed by:
Health One Pharmacy.
License Number: 21791
SAVE $500.00.
S 'Take'V,IAGRA?
I100MG andCIALIS 20mg!
40 Pills+ 4/FREE for only
S$99, t Male Enhance-
m nent,-- disdcreet-Shipping.
-Only $2.25/pill. The Blue
i-ill-Now!-1.888 800-1.2801

5230 MISCELLANEOUS.
$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen
on TV-,$$$ Injury Lawsuit
Draggin'g? Need $500-
$500,Q0O-+within, 48/hrs?
Low rates APPLY, NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today!-Toll-Free:
_1 (800)568-8321 wwwlawcapi-
.tal.corn ',.
ADOPTION 888-812-3678
All Expenses Paid.- Choose
a Loving, Financially
Secure family, ,f~or your
child 24 Hrs 7 Days Car-
ing & Confidential. Attor-
ney Amy Hickman. (Lic.
#832340) (Place Under
Attorneys


Page 7


February 29,2012


CLASSIFIED,







CLASSIFIED


February 29, 2012


5230 MISCELLANEOUS
ADOPTION GIVE YOUR
BABY THE BEST IN LIFE!
Many Kind, Loving, Edu-
cated & Financially Secure
Couples Waiting. Living &
Medical Expenses Paid.
Counseling & Transporta-
tion Provided. Former
Birth Moms on Staff!
FLORIDA ADOPTION LAW
GROUP, P.A. Attorneys
who truly care about you.
Jodi Sue Rutstein, M.S.W.,
J.D. Mary Ann Scherer,
R.N., J.D. Over 30 Com-
bined Years of Adoption
Experience. 1-800-852-
0041 Confidential24/7
(#133050&249025)
AT&T U-Verse for just
$29.99/mo! SAVE when you
bundle Internet+Phone+TV
and get up to $300 BACK!.
(select plans). Limited Time
Call NOW! 877-265-1754 -
DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
WANTED!!! Get the Most
Cash, up to $27 per box!
Shipping Paid! Must be
Sealed & Unexpired. Call
Tony 813-528-1480 tonytest-
,strips@hotmail.com
DISH Network. Starting at
$19.99/month PLUS 30 Pre-
mium Movie Channels FREE
for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask
About SAME DAY Installation!
CALL 888-418-9787
Every baby deserves a
healthy start. Join more than
a million people walking and
raising money to support the
March of Dimes. The walk
starts:at marchforbabies.org.
LIVE-WORK-PARTY-PLAY! Play
in Vegas,. Hang in LA, Jet to
New York! Hiring 18-24
girls, guys. .54,00-$800 wkly.
Faid expenses. Signing
Bonus. Are vou energetic &
fun? Call 1-866574-7454
MANTIS .Deluxe.. Tiller. NEW!
FastStart engine. Ships- FREE.
One-Year Money-Back Guaran-
tee wvhen''you buy DIRECT.
Call for the DVD and FREE
Good 'Soil, book! 866-674-
4644
METAL ROOFING & STEEL
BUILDINGS. :Save SSS--buy
direct from manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with trim &
acces.,4 profiles in 26 ga.
panels. Carports, horse
barns, shop ports. Complete-
ly turn key jobs., All Steel
Buildings, Gibsoriton, Florida.
1-800-331-8341. www.all-
steelbuildings.com
PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
ADOPTION? Talk with caring
adoption expert. You choose
from families nationwide. LIV-
ING EXPENSES PAID. Call
24/7 Abby's One True Gift
Adoptions. 866-413-6298.
License #100013125
*REDUCE YOURCABLE BILL!
Get a 4-Room All-Digital
r Satellite system installed for
Free and programming start-
ing at $19.99/mo. Free
HD/DVR upgrade for new
callers, Call Now. 1-800-795-
7279
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone. Packages start
at $89.99/mo (for 12
months.) Options from ALL
major service providers. Call
Acceller today to learn more!
CALL 1-888-903-2647
SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY
BENEFITS. You WIN or Pay Us
Nothing. Contact Disability
Group, Inc. Today! .BBB
Accredited. Call For Your
FREE Book & Consultation.
888-903-1353
SURROGATE MOM Needed to
t carry our Baby. **Generous
Compensation Paid** Char-
lotte H. Danciu 1-800-395-
5449 www.adoption-surroga-
cy.com FL Bar # 307084

Need Cash?
Have A
Garage Sale


5230 MISCELLANEOUS
SWIM SPA LOADED! Brand
New with Warranty, 3 Pumps,
LED lighting, Ozone Deluxe
Cover, maintenance free cab-
inet. Retails for $18,900.
Sacrifice $8995. Can deliver.
727-851-3217
WANTED YOUR DIABETES
TEST STRIPS. Unexpired.
Any Kind/Brand. Up to
$24.00 per box. Shipping
Paid. Hablamos Espanol.
Call -1-800-267-9895 /
www.SellDiabeticstrips.com

6000
Iw vl


MERCHANDISE

'6012 GARAGE SALES
BARTOW Fri./Sat. 8-1, 1600
Davis Ave. HUGH...... tools,
furniture, antique dishes, etc.
BARTOW INTIMIDATORS U-
12 GIRLS SOFTBALL Satur-
day, March 3, 8am-12pm,
Beef O'Brady's- parking lot,
120 E. Van Fleet Dr., Bartow.
Multi-family yard sale. Please
support our girls.
Frostproof Lake Lilly Back-
yard Sale. Saturday March 3,,
8-12,.
OrtiHwy CR630
Lake Wales Hugh Yard Sale..
31 601eander Rd, Fri & Sat, 8,
2._\Appliances, Nurses UnikI
forM5, Infant, clothes:- all
sizei, Kitchen; Boks,. 'Dish,-
es-iA lot For Everybody. ,
Lake Wales Oakwood Golf
Community Garage Sale
March 3, 8-12. 60 east to
Cdtpts Rd Sornething 'For
Everyonre. .
Lake Wales Satur 'dy, S
Grf6okedLdlake Park, Ri` 27
*Sbuth, 40l'Sunshinre-'DrI"
Antiques, Collectables,
Books, Furniture, Electron.
ics, and more
Lake Wales Women's
Club Annualal Se,275 E
Park Ave, Mar 2&3,.84- Fri.
/ 8"1 Sat. for info 863-696-
3766 .. ;

Pafk wide Garage and
Bake sale, Sat. Mar 3. Fur-
niture, knick knacks, dish-
es, misc. Breakfast -7:30
Lunch 11:00 until ?? Frost-
proof Lakefront
Resort, Ulmer Road
Rummage Sale at the First
United Methodist Church Fri-
day March 2nd and Saturday
March 3rd. Time : 8:00 am to
2:00 pm both days. This is a
fun raiser for
support Missions
RUMMAGE SALE, March 3,
7 lil 1, Floral Lakes across
from Bartow Civic Center.
205' S. Floral Ave. Serving
lunch & free coffee.
6020 AUCTIONS
JERRY KOWAL, Your
Friendly Auctioneer. 31
Years'Experience, Will Buy or
You Consign. Have Gavel, Will
Travel 407-721-2776


6020 AUCTIONS
21















21


I'


LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
S799,000. Owner Financing.,
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Propertres.
(800)997-2248. wwwjrrin.
h'orisefroperties .net' !l uJP-,
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM--5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Gaiage,
Scenic, Lake-Frontage,- Bock,.
Pier. Price reduced
S799,000. Owner- Financing.
La'Kle Tiller'., Eart of Chall: dte,
NC. Iron Hur. .e F'r,:pertic.
(800)997-2248. www'iron.
horseproperties. net
L - 6180, HEAVY/CONST.Lso e
EQUIPMENT
SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -
SPRING'SALE -1-Cut lumber
any dimension, anytime.
MAKE 'MONEY and SAVE
MONEY In stock ready to ship.
Starting' at S995M00
www.NorwoodSawmills.com
300N (800)578-1363-
Ext.300N
6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
2007 GMC Sierra 2500
Crew Cab, 4x4, Turbo Diesel,
price $7000, 407-792-2275.
2010 Dodge Grand
Caravan Wheelchair Van
with 10" lowered floor; wheel-
chair ramp; wheelchair tie
downs.
AIRLINES ARE HIRING
Train for hands on Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. .Financial
aid if qualified. Housing avail-
able. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.
LUMBER FOR SALE LAKE
WALES Kiln Dried. Poplar,
Walnut, Cherry. $2 ft & Up.
Call For Appointment 863-
439-7155


6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE


7260 AUTOS WANTED


CASH FOR CARS!
ATTEND COLLEGE ON We Buy ANY Car, Truck or
LINE from home. Medical, Van! Running or Not. Get a
* Business, Criminal Jus- FREE Tap Dollar INSTANT
tice, Hospitality. Job place- Offer NOW! 1-800-558-
ment assistance. Computer 1097 We're'Local!
available. Financial Aid if qual- CASH FOR CARS- All
ified. SCHEV certified. Call CASH FO/Trucks Wanted. Run-
(877)206-5165. Cars/Trucks Wanted. Run
www.CenturaOnline.com ning or Nomt Top Dollar Paid.
We Come To You! Any
GIGANTIC -MIRRORS Jobsite Make/Model. Call For Instant
Leftovers, Brand New, Per- Offer: 1-800-871-9638
fect Condition, 48"x100" (7),
$115 each;- 60"x100" (8) We buy unwanted car,
$140 each; 72"x100" (11), trucks, vans with or without
$165 each. Free delivery. 1- title any condition,
800-473-0619. year,make or model. We pay -
.....up to $20,000 and offer
SPECIAL FINANCING AVAIL- free towing call,813-505-
ABLE Any Credit! -..Any 6939
Income! Foreclosure Homes
and Land -View Properties at:
www.roselandco.com or call.. 7333 MISC. BOATS
Rose Land & Finance Corp. JON BOAT," 1t. 6hp John-
866-937-3557 son w/ galvanized trailer. 28#
TREADMILL, with counter, thurst trolling motor. Live well.
folds flat, make offer. ,, $1200 ,Call863-899, 48.:
/863-6764477 \'.. -* .. " -- i"
i -' ..J / --' ':.J7360GCYCLY SOI ES/i-I
S-6270 WANTEDTO .- SCOOTERS
BUY/TRADE-
2001 Honda CBR-F41 600-
motorcycle. Runs great 17k
BUYING miles
GOLD, SILVER, 863-285-8705. $2,800
COINS, JEWELRY Advertise Today!
Highest Prices In History! - ."

ANY CONDITION .... i"
WE BUY IT ALL, and Pay So Much
We ,,,i I War, i,:, cry. You, of
C ,ur-.e, WilI L urgh With Glee!!
Sunset Pointe',
FHI I.3t ir. ,-. HOLL, FM, hA,.. i ;T E
441 Ave I. rw :I Yard Sale
Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm rSau aya
: .ll fir t [, . r,frr i r1 Ithere
863;299-6031 C Q icK oc~" f4a
Our /Ar,1 ',;-.a "'
Across 60 from
SMALL BOAT TRAILER in i Walmprt, r
r~~r- r~r hn if .tn.


a y iv c nditionuiliuii, UIor uoat & trai-
er. Fort Meade. 1-740-974-
0727
7000







1 TRANSPORTATION

: 7140 MISC.DOMESTIC
AUTOS
1993 GMC CONVERSION
VAN 2500 SERIES, raised
roof, wood cabinets, nice,
clean. Heavy duty. hitch &
transmission fan.
$2800/OBO 863-875-2128
2000 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
less than 55k miles. Pearl
white w/camel vinyl top. Nice
leather interior. Fully loaded.
Exc. cond. $7,200 863-559-
6935


Advertising Neiwprks




1. s i*sDi Mpl.I.',Me o .hil ,*Odin .^ .


The keylE advertising success

-'
-.
8,


1-866-742-1373


www.florida-classifieds.com


Saturday. Mar3
10am.
S145 Broadway
Ft.-Meade
Inspection
-- Frida 3/21 to.4


Auction includes remodeled historic Ft Meade building,
plus late model equipment, fixtures and supplies.
Highlights include ice machine, 4 burner range, walk in cooler, stainless
refrigerator, freezers, ice cream cabinet, double bay deep fryer, shake ma-
chine, booths, tables, chairs, salad bars, hot table, warmers, stainless prep
table, sinks, and more.
vvwww.kincaid.com


Real Estate 10% buyers premium
Equipment 15% buyers premium
FL Lic ab551/au905
R. A. Kincaid Lic R. E. Broker


(863) 666 1977 _ _ _


Page 8


7360 CYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS





2009 HONDA SHADOW,
750cc, 1936 miles. Blue & Silver.
List $9500. $6500/OBO. Call
Paul 863-285-9098.

7370 CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
TRAVEL TRAILER, 33ft
Cougar 302RLS, double slide,
queen bed,-rear. living room.:
Like new! Lots-df-extras! 231-i
633-0024.; l-tinesis!ity)







,,CIassijfied!,,


Absolute Auction!
10AM, Saturday, March 3
Lake front mobile
home on Lk Clinch
Auction held on-site:
14 Lake Street, Frostproof, FL
Lake Clinch Manor
Mobile Home Park
Located in 55+ Community
Preview: 1 hour prior to sale

800'257-4161
Higgenbotham.co9m

AUCTIONEERS
I d71Mw.nrmat ar.

M.E. Higgenbotham, CAI
PFLLic#AU305AB158


-- 7