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The Frostproof news
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00546
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Creation Date: January 11, 2012
Publication Date: 1961-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00546
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text


Visit us on the Internet at www.FrostproofNews.com


Wednesday


.. f w January 11,2012



Frostproof News


Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years


7541


Trhe


Volume 92 Number 2


USPS NO 211-260


Frostproof, Polk County Florida 33843


Copyrgihti 2012 Sun Coast Media Group, Irin


Signs now point to no city sign


Expense questioned by council member, resident


By BRIAN ACKLEY
NEWS @ FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
The idea of Frostproof spending up to
$35,000 for an electronic sign board for
the downtown business district appears
less likely to happen following further
discussion of the matter Monday night.
Although not on the agenda, resident
Randy Scott appeared at the podium dur-
ing the public participation portion of the
meeting to express his concerns about the


city spending money on a sign, contend-
ing that the funds could be spent more
wisely in other ways. Several other audi-
ence members raised their hands when
Councilwoman Martha Neher asked who
else was against the sign purchase.
The council has not actually approved
the purchase of the sign, although it did
include it as a line item in the city's current
budget. At the time, the vote to include it
was 4-1, with Councilwoman Anne Dickin-
son casting a lone vote against.


In December, in another 4-1 vote, the
group approved a first reading that would
change the city's code to allow such a sign
in the central business district, and also
had a sign company bring an LED sign to
a council meeting so they could view it
firsthand.
Any city purchase of more than $10,000
is subject to a council vote. City Man-
ager T.R. Croley is authorized to approve
expenditures under that amount on her
own. Also, any such sign purchase would


first have to be put out to bid before being
finalized.
However, Monday night, Councilwom-
an DianaWebster-Biehl agreed that there
have been issues raised regarding the idea
that need to be more fully considered.
"If you stop and think about some of
the complexities, there's lots of problems,"
Biehl said. "I don't think there's.a way to
address some of those complexities as a
SIGN I5A


Lake Reedy event helps fund

Wounded Warrior camp idea


By JAMES COULTER
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
Call it fishing for a cause. A very good
cause at that.
A tournament and barbecue dinner to
benefit disabled veterans was held last
Saturday at Lake Reedy. The first-ever
Greg Brantley Perch Jerkin' Tournament
and BBQ, held by the Federation of
Christian Sportsmen, raised $1,133 to
fund the construction of a permanent
hunt camp forWoundedWarriors, a
U.S. Army program that assists severely-
wounded soldiers and their families.
The hunt camp will be built on a
state-owned site called the Prairie Tract
located east of Lake Wales on State
Road 60. Designated by the Florida


Forest Service though a legislative
measure called "Operation Outdoor
Freedom," the site has been used in
previous years by the Federation to
host yearly camping and hunting trips
for the Wounded Warriors.
"We provide a chance to get away in
God's creation to enjoy a time of fellow-
ship with some other men that have
experienced some of the same kind
of action as them while defending our
freedoms that we all enjoy," Federation
president Freddie Senterfitt said.
Immediate plans for the hunt camp
include a 24-foot by 48-foot foot mul-
tipurpose pavilion, kitchen area and
electric and water utilities. Future plans
CAMP 5A


Brazilian fungicide is at
center of newest concerns
By MARY CLARE JALONICK
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The Food and Drug
Administration says it will step up testing
for a fungicide that has been found in low
levels in orange juice.
FDA officials said Tuesday they aren't
concerned about the safety of the juice
but will increase testing to make sure the
contamination isn't a problem. In a letter
to the juice industry Monday, the agency
said that an unnamed juice company
contacted FDA in late December and


said it had detected low levels of the
fungicide carbendazim in the company's
own orange juice and also in its competi-
tors' juice. Fungicides are used to control
fungi or fungal spores in agriculture.
Carbendazim is not currently approved
for use on citrus in the United States,
but is used in Brazil, which exports
orange juice to the United States. An FDA
spokeswoman said the company's testing
found levels up to 35 parts per billion of
the fungicide, far below the European
Union's maximum residue level of 200
parts per billion. The United States has
not established a maximum residue level
for carbendazim in oranges.
JUICE 15A


7 05252 00025 8


Calendar..........
Page 2A
Editorial..........
Page 4.-
Obituaries........
Page 6A-7A


County Report..
Page lB
Feeling Fit........
Page 1OB
Classifieds.........
Inside


FROSTY FLORIDA


Farmers turned
to time tested
methods to protect
their crops

Page


13A


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Workers finish -
cleaning up County
Road 630 near the
intersection with
County Road 630A
where a sand truck
overturned Thursday
morning. CR 630 was
closed for several
hours as the mop Up
work continued into
the lunch hour. No
other details as to
injuries or charges
.in the mishap were
available.
PHOTO BY
BRIAN ACKLEY


Orange juice testing

getting closer look


F ,* "H O -
". ; I _.

School district
explains to parents
about magnet school
l changes


lPage JB


v






Pag 2AFo ro es aur 121


ME m inA m I
AENCNDand

A* E AAR EVENTS


Saturday, Jan. 14
Music Series
The second of this year's
Ramon Theater music series
offerings will be The Long
Shot Band. All shows start at
7 p.m.
Information can also be
found, and tickets purchased,
at www.ramontheater.com.


Friday, Jan. 20 and
Saturday, Jan. 21
Flea Market and Bake Sale
First United Methodist Church
of Frostproof, 150 DeVane Street,
will be holding a flea market
and bake sale on Friday from
1 to 5 p.m. and again Saturday
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more
information, call 635-5547.


NEW CALENDAR
ITEM GUIDELINES
We revised The (alendar events we publish
in [he paper and d .play online. All events
must be entered by the person utbmiring
them through our websiie It' easy. Go io
www.fortmeadeleader.com and click on the
"Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event,"and fill out the appropriate
information. The "Print Edition Text"area
of the form is for information intended for
the print edition of the paper. Information
outside of the"Print Edition Text"area will
appear online only. Please don't repeat
the EventTitl,"as that will be included
automatically.,
Wie will print.a maximum of four lines per
event (the Event Title plus 90 additional


characters, to be included in the"Print Edition
Text"field, up to three lines deep) at no cost
to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 90 characters.
This change will give our readers a
broader range of community events.
You may, however, purchase additional
space for $10 per day, per event, per
community edition.
Simply choose"Paid Listing"on the Submit
Event page. All paid events will run in the
location designated for the event type. If you
do not have the ability to enter your events
via ourwebsite, we can type them in on your
behalf at the rate of $5 per event, per commu-
nity edition, but this fee does not guarantee
your event will make the printed version.
Please call (863) 533-4183 Monday through
Friday from 9-5 p.m. to make a payment or to


have us enter your event for you.
We reserve the nght to exclude any
submitted event that does not meet our
specifications or that requires excessive
editing. There is no expressed or implied*
guarantee that any free event will be 1
included in any event calendar or run in
any specific location. This is on a first-come,
first-served basis. Be sure to review the
"GUIDELINES"link on the Submission page to
help ensure you get the most information in
without exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email
you receive after submitting each event. If
you made an error or the event gets canceled,
simply click on the"Withdraw Submission"
noted at the bottom of that email; follow
the provided instruction and then resubmit
the event.


JHusqvarnar o


Full Line of Lawni Equipment & UtilityVehicles
Get your mower serviced before the Spring rush!
Call for infoon our preseason service specials!
Email: brian@cnjequipment.com Website: www.cnjequipment.com
S 16200 Hwy 27, Lake Wales, FL 863-638-0671


-- "- -----m--"" *4 55 minimum sat ings accourn is required for membership 1
with MIDFLORIDA andl a ctieching aco]unl opening boloanies
1 " '^ -ma), vary depending or, check kng occouri opened) is requlire, l
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January 11, 2012


Page 2A Frostproof News





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KIA SEDONA, ONLY45K MILES..........$1 2,965
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Frostproof News Page 3A


aJ nuary 11 2012


III I H





Page 4A Frostproof News January11, 2012


VIEWPOINT



Medicare proposal is good start


Maybe we just want to begin 2012 on an
optimistic note. Or maybe it's because things in
Washington have looked nothing short of dis-
mal much of 2011. But there's something to get
up and shout about in the Medicare proposal
presented this month by GOP Rep. Paul Ryan
of Wisconsin and Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden
of Oregon. Yes, you read that right: Lawmakers
from opposing parties have a common solution,
a somewhat unexpected development after so
many partisan brawls this past year. But there
they were, offering serious ways to control Medi-
care costs to keep this program from going belly
up like Lehman Brothers and leaving seniors
without a safety net.
Ryan previously introduced a Medicare over-
haul that would give seniors government vouch-
ers to pay their premiums for a private health
care plal. His proposal got shoved aside because
i.tdidn't keep traditional Medicare as an option
for them .


Our Viewpoint
Now he's back with a different "premium sup-
port" model. This one would keep traditional
Medicare as a choice for seniors in the future,
much like a version floated recently by former
GOP Sen. Pete Domenici and former Clinton
adviser Alice Rivlin. If seniors like Medicare as
they know it, they can keep it. But if they want to
choose among plans that offer benefits tailored
to their specific needs, they can go that route.
We like the competition choice strategy be-
cause it would force plans to offer better benefits
at lower costs. That's basically what happened
with the prescription drug benefit that Medicare
has offered over the last decade. Competition
among private plans has helped control expens-
es.
R\Wan and W den have included several addi-
tional elements, starting in 2022, that are favor-
able to seniors. For example, seniors with serious


medical needs would receive a greater subsidy
to buy a private plan than would healthy seniors.
The extra money is aimed at stopping insurers
from gearing their plans to only the healthiest
retirees.
The primary unknown is whether Congress
would ever stick to the pair's call to cap Medicare
spending at 1 percent above the gross domestic
product's growth rate. This newspaper supports
a limit so the system has enough money left to
sustain itself; Medicare's major trust fund is now
racing toward bankruptcy.
Legislators have never shown much will to
impose such caps. The recent battle over how
much Congress should pay doctors for treating
Medicare patients is the latest example.
Still, the Ryan-Wyden proposal, which mirrors
one Republican Mitt Romney recently outlined,
is encouraging. Yes, there are kinks that need to
be worked out. But the bipartisan duo has given
Congress a good place to start in 2012.


The language of politics


"I would remind you that extremism
in the defense of liberty is no vice; and
let me remind you also that moderation
in the pursuit of justice is no virtue."
Sen. Barry Goldwater, accepting the
SRepublican nomination for president,
July 16, 1964.

Barry Goldwater had a reputation for
saying \ hat he meant, eloquently and
without equivocation.
You may not have liked where he
stood, but you most assuredly knew
where he stood.
The preceding quote was seized upon
by opponents to label him as a danger-
ous extremist.
One of his campaign slogans was, "In
your heart, you know he's right," a play
on words declaring the validity of his
v iews as well as his place in the political
spectrum.
SThe Lyndon Johnson campaign seized
on that slogan, displaying it against the
background of a mushroom cloud and
warning, "In your heart, you know he
might."
Johnson carried 44 of the 50 states.-

The political spectrum, in my view as
a government major for four years and
a political junkie for 45, is best defined
by the traditional terms "liberal" and
"conservative."
Defining them in a few words is a
challenge, but I suggest that the liberal
'position advocates more government
for the purpose of improving the lives
of its constituents, while the conserva-
tive position holds that people should
; have the greatest reasonable latitude in
controlling their own lives with minimal
involvement of government.
ft is not a battle of good vs. evil.


S.L. Frisbie




.Lt Frbie con he contoaed at
slisiepcipolkwountldemocratcoi


Both positions have merit, and indeed,
absent totalitarianism at one end andf
anarchy at the other, most governments
embrace a position somewhere be-
tween the extremes.
Neither holds exclusive claim to the
moral high ground.

The wide middle ground between
these opposites is generally defined as
"moderate." I find it distressing that in
the endless Republican debates, a ma-
jority of the candidates have declared
themselves to be the most conserva-
tive in the race,-and have labeled those
opponents who have.embraced some
moderate viewpoints to be Enemies of
the Enlightened.
I always have a sense of foreboding
when a politician proudly declares that
he has been awarded a 100 percent
"correct" voting record by extremists at
either end of the political spectrum. [
find it hard to believe that either side :
is so much wiser than the other that its
views should always prevail.

SIf anyone cares, I rank myself as a' :
conservative on fiscal issues. I do not
believe that my grandchildren should
be saddled with debt to pay for my
retirement or for bailouts of Wall Street
giants.


I am somewhat of a moderate on
social issues. I believe that a nation as
wealthy as America can and should en-
sure that adequate medical care is avail-
able to all citizens, but not through a
system of mandates and fines imposed
on the private sector.
SSorry, I will have to leave it to some-
one else to figure out the details.
! My once arch conservative views in
many areas have moved well into the
moderate range, particularly on.civil
rights and human relations, and on


programs like school breakfasts and free
and reduced price school lunches.
I would hate to be held accountable,
four days before my personal odometer
turns over to 71 years of age, for every
view I held when I was 17.


(S.L. Frisbie is retired. He may or may
not have grown wiser in seven decades.
But he most assuredly has grown mel-
lower.)


' Published every Wednesday at
14 W. Wall Street, Frostproof, FL 33843
by Sun Coast Nledia Group. Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Frostproof, Florida and
additional Entry Office
*Phone (863) 676-3467 *Fax (863) 678-1297
Postmaster: Send address changes to
140 E. Stuart Ave.,
Lake Wales, FL 33853-4198


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
Stu Months. ... .........12 O84 ne',ear ..... ..$2087
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNTY MALL
SLx Monlth ...... ... .$12.00 One' lear. .......... .. 19.50
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
Six Months ...... ....... $20.00 One Year. .......... 32.50
OUTOF STATE SUBSCRIPTION
SL, Months .... ..... .$22.00 One iea .............. ... .36.00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be-included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frqstproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews.com or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
Wales Fl. 33853.


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
*._. Aileen Hood General Manager Jeff Roslow Editor Brian Ackley Managing Editor


--


Page 4A Frostproof News


January 11, 2012







January 11,2012 Frostproof News Page 5A


Sheriff deputy cleared in US


27


shooting incident


By KATHY LEIGH BERKOWITZ
NEWS @FROSTPROOFNEWS.NET
A deputy who fired six shots at a
suspect was ruled justified for using
deadly force, according to a letter from
State Attorney Jerry Hill, who noted
that it was his opinion that Polk County
Sheriff's Office deputies were "in fear
for their lives."
None of the shots made contact with
the suspect.
The PCSO was summoned to an
incident on Nov. 25 in which a suspect
was reported to be throwing debris at
vehicles passing by the Kangaroo conve-
nience store in Crooked Lake on U.S. 27.
According to reports, that morning,
Deputies Paul Stroud and Stephen The-
riac responded to a call regarding debris
on U.S. 27.
As the deputies removed the debris,
they noticed a man against the fence line
banging some items together, Hill notes.
They believed him to be a ranch hand
and continued to remove debris.
After they went inside.the conve-
nience store to wash their hands, a man


who worked for Florida Refuse told
them a man on U.S. 27 was throwing
debris into the roadway, noting that a
piece of the debris had hit his truck,
causing minor damage.
When the deputies returned to U.S.
27, they saw broken glass on the road
and saw the same man whom they
thought was a ranch hand, with chains
dangling from his body.
A claw hammer also hung from the
suspect's waist.
STheriac drove his car within a few
feet of the man, and the man appeared
not to be aware of his presence there,
reports said.
Theriac honked his horn to get the
man's attention with no response.
PCSO officials note at this point, the
man stops, turned towards the deputy's
vehicle, looked at him and spit.
Theriac stopped his car and talked
to Stroud, who was in his own vehicle,
behind Theriac.
They conferred as to what to do about
the man's behavior, and as they were
discussing the matter, the man attempt-
ed to pull a lietal DOT sign out of the


grass, bending and destroying the sign
in the process, they reported.
PCSO said that's when the deputies
put him under arrest for criminal mis-
chief of the sign.
Theriac approached the man, who
turned and walked away from him. Both
deputies yelled several times for the man
to stop, but reports note the man did not
acknowledge them in any manner.
Theriac then told the man to stop or
he would be tased, and the man contin-
ued to walk away.
*As Theriac followed the man, the man
allegedly turned and threw the chains
that were attached to his body at
Theriac, according to reports.
The chains struck Theriac in the foot,
so Theriac "continued to engage the
manwith the taser with no success."
: :Then PCSO notes the man removed
the claw hammer from his waist and
threw it at Stroud, causing Stroud to
take evasive action to prevent being
struck in the head.
'Stroud then fired his gun at the sus-
pect six times, and the suspect was not
struck.


The man continued to walk away
from deputies until Theriac was able to
subdue him and place him under arrest,
according to reports.
State Attorney Jerry Hill notes be-
cause of the information he was pro-
vided, it is his opinion both deputies
were in fear for their lives because of
the man's actions.
"Under the circumstances they faced,
Deputy Sheriff Stroud was justified in
his use of deadly force."


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Frostproof News Page 5A


January 11, 2012










OBITUARIESw


Martha
Martha Wright of Lake Wales died on
Jan. 7, 2012, of natural causes.
She was born in Indianapolis, Ind.
to Fred and Loryne Holcomb Stanford
and spent the early part of her life
there.
She was a "straight A" student in high
school and attended DePauw Univer-
sity in Greencastle, Ind. She left college
to marry, and followed her husband,
Kenneth McCoy, to southeastern Geor-
gia where Ken learned the lumber busi-
ness, literally from the ground up.
The attack on Pearl Harbor caused
her return to Indiana so that her
husband could join the military. Ken
*entered Aviation Cadets and Martha
began to earn her credentials in "The
Greatest Generation." She dragged a
most un-cooperative Ken Junior be-
tween training bases in Texas, Oklaho-
ina and Florida to be with her husband
as he trained to be a bombardier in B-
24s. Martha waited as Ken flew combat
missions in Europe and she endured
the tyranny of the telegram as she
learned that he was missing in action.
She later learned that he was safe, and
a prisoner of war in Romania.
After her husband's liberation and
the end ofWorld War II, Martha and her
family settled in Indianapolis where her
second child, Loryne, was born. She
raised her children and lived in Indiana
until her first husband's death in 1971.
Martha moved to Lake Wales and
married Ashley Wright later that year.
They built a home and enjoyed it all
of their lives. She loved golf, with Ash
and with her many friends. She was
a past president of the women's golf
group at Lake Wales Country Club, .
aind volunteered for many years at the


Wright
Ben Hill Griffin
Invitational. She
was proud of her
hole in-one at
LWCC and would
want everyone
to remember it.
Martha stayed
well-informed on
economic mat-
ters and followed
the financial
markets with


Martha Wright


acute interest.
She was an active participant in her
investment club.
A few years ago Martha's friends
in Lake Wales convinced her to play
bridge. She had learned the game as a
child, but had not played for years. Shei
discovered that she remembered how
to play, and was actually pretty good at
it. Friendships at the bridge table lasted
throughout her life.
Martha read lots of books and sup-
ported cultural activity in Lake Wales.
She was a strong supporter of the Pub-
lic Library, the Lake Wales Arts Center
and the Little Theatre.
Martha survived her parents, both of
her brothers and husband. She loved
her two children and doted on her
grandchildren: Sara, a museum curator
and an artist, Ken, a computer whiz,
and Stan, an attorney.
Martha requested no funeral service
or memorial. Her family will meet later
to celebrate her life. Please send no
flowers. The family will appreciate youri
support of any of Martha's favorite or-
ganizations, or of your favorite charity.
Johnson Funeral Home is in charge
of arrangements.


Daniel Paul Smith, 20, passed away
SJan. 2, 2012, at Lakeland Regional Medi-
cal Center due, to injuries sustained in
an accident.
He was born Dec. 6, 1991, in
Pensacola and moved to Frostproof
from Pensacola in 2010.
He worked as a cashier for Walmart in
Sebring. He was a Baptist and an avid
bicyclist.
Mr. Smith was preceded in death
by his paternal grandmother, Georgia
Smith.
He is survived by his father and mother,
Willie Edward Smith, II, and Sandy Smith,


both of Frostproof; his paternal grandfa-
ther, Willie Edward Smith, Sr., of Pensaco-
la; his maternal grandparents, Ernest Paul
Simmons and Marieta.Ann Simmons,
both of Pensacola; three brothers, Tyler
Smith, Dalton Smith and Devin Smith, all
of Frostproof; and two sisters, Miranda
Smith and Skye Smith, both of Frostproof.
Visitation: Thursday, Jan. 12, from
2-3 p.m., at Hancock Funeral Home,
Fort Meade.
Funeral: follows at 3 p.m. with Rev.
Larry Barrentine officiating.
Condolences may be sent to the
family at www.hancockfh.com.


Tax break back to ballot


By DIANE NICHOLS
DNICHOLS @POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
After three previous tries to get his
colleagues on board, County Commis-
sioner Bob English succeeded in having
the county's backing to put a business tax
break on the 2012 ballot.
During Tuesday's meeting English
warned other commissioners that this
would be the last time he would go to bat
for the issue, previously rejected by voters
in 2008 and 2010, saying if Polk County
does not offer this incentive, it would be a
major disadvantage.
"When we first put this on the ballot in
2008, there was nobody in Central Florida
who had that business tax incentive," said
English. "Since then, following our lead,
Hillsborough County has passed it, Hardee
County has passed it, Highlands County,
DeSoto County, Leesburg in Lake County
have passed it. I also just recently heard


that Orange County is putting it on their
ballot for 2012. The bottom line is Polk
County is going to be competing with our
neighboring county and we need that
economic development tool."
The incentive would involve giving
the County Commission the authority to
grant tax exemptions to new or expand-
ing businesses at public hearings on a
case-by-case basis, although the concept
has raised public skepticism about it ben-
efiting friends of commissioners rather
than the average businessman. Goals to
conquer discussed in previous pitches by
English also included educating the pub-
lic on how the tax incentive would work
to diminish the negative stigma that led
to failing votes in previous years. English
attests in 2010 out of 150,000 votes, the
motion failed by 500 votes.
Commissioner Edwin Smith had reser-

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Page 6A FrostproofNews


January 11, 2012


Mh / LI{ Ill


did






January11, 2012 Frostproof News Page 7A


OBITUARIES

CONTINUED


James L. 'Jim' Littleford


James L. "Jim" Littleford, 90, of Lake
Wales passed away Saturday, Jan. 7,
2012 at his residence.
He was born April 8, 1921 in Bristol,
Tenn., to the late Hal Gordon and Hazel
Pauline (McCorkle) Littleford; he came
to Frostproof in 1956 from Bristol,
Tenn. He was a retired citrus inspec-
tor for the State of Florida Department
of Agriculture, a member of the First
Christian Church in Frostproof and a
veteran of World War II, serving in the
U.S. Marines.
He enjoyed reading, fishing and was
an animal lover. He liked watching
sports on TV and he loved his pets.
Jim was preceded in death by his
daughter, Margaret Faircloth and a
granddaughter, Melissa Doyle. Survi-
vors include his sons, James A. "Jim"
Littleford of Speak, Ala., and Gordon
E. Littleford (Elaine) of Winter Haven;
companion, Maureen Jones; sister, Pat-
ty Anthony of Fullerton, Call.; brothers;
Hal G. Littleford of Johnson City, Tenn.


TAX
FROM PAGE 6A
vations as he reflected back to the response
from existing businesses during the 2010
election. Before putting it on the ballot,
Smith felt more in-depth analysis and
information was needed.
'As I recall there was a lot ofpushback
from the existing business community that
this was unfair trade practice and that if


and Kenneth
L. Littleford of
North Carolina;
9 grandchildren,
12 great-grand-
children and
two great-great-
grandchildren.
Memorial
service will be
held 2 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 14,
2012 at the First James L."Jim" Littleford
Christian Church
in Frostproof with Pastor Ken Parrot
officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations
maybe made to the S.PC.A., 5850 Bran-
nen Road S., Lakeland, FL 33813, or the
Victory Church, Missions Fund, 1401
Griffin Road, Lakeland, FL 333810.
Condolences may be sent to the fam-
ily at www.marionnelsonfuneralhome.
com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


we want to give a tax break, we should give
everyone a tax break."
But English said, "A thriving robust econ-
omy raises all ships. The more people we
have employed in Polk County, the more
businesses we have in Polk County that are
making valuable products, the more that
helps everybody. It's going to be a disad-
vantage to the county if we don't have it."
The motion to put.the business tax break
on the ballot with an $25,000 allowance to
educate the public passed unanimously.


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-


Alice J. Patterson, 87, of Frostproof
passed away Saturday, Jan. 7, 2012 at
the Good Shepherd Somers Hospice
House in Sebring.
SShe was born Oct. 3, 1924 in Frost-
proof to the late George and Elizabeth
(Wilson) Kersey; she was a lifelong
resident of the area.,
She enjoyed watching game shows and
wrestling on TV She also enjoyed flower.
gardening, reading, solving crossword
puzzles and listening to country music.
Alice was preceded in death by her
son, Jerry Douglas.
Survivors include her husband of 42
years, Eliam Patterson Jr; three daugh-
ters, Judy Westbrook of Lake Wales,
Linda Carter (Jackie) of Avon Park and
JuanaWaller of Frostproof; three sons,
Lloyd Douglas (Louise) of High Springs,


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Skin Cancer and Skin Surgery Chemical Peels
Botox, Restylane, Juvederm & Dermal Fillers


Board Certified
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Surgery


1109 Bryn Mawr Ave.,
Lake Wales, FL 33853


Now Accepting New Patients
Medicare and Most Insurance Accepted


201




.gF ;


Indoor Exhibits
Vendor Displays
Door Prizes
Demonstrations
Food


A_* -.iLA YL 0if,& Alk. ,

JANUARY 20-21

- i 1 f V lii O L


Bert Harris, Jr.
Agricultural Center
US 27 South at George Ave.
at the blinking light
Sebring

Sponsored by
The Rotary Club
of Lake Placid
Placid ?-


Limited vendor spaces available


863-840-0691


THE
NORTH
FACE l


- q hWbA 'V 9'%1P


-~ 'ri
,* y


Ski JackeAR

Ski Pants

Gloves

Long Underwear

Wool Socks

Hats and Gaitors

T 9(863 299-9"9 T hoii I I


Alice J. Patterson


-


Ip---ss--~--~c --- ---- -_I


ANDYTHORN^AL .


I --- -I-, sLI -~l_--_s--, I -,, ~- I--~ -


Frostproof News Page 7A


January 11, 2012


I


Gayland Douglas of Frostproof and
Johnny Patterson of Frostproof; 19 grand-
children, 38 great-grandchildren and
4 great-great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be held from 1 p.m.
until the funeral service at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2012, at the Marion
Nelson Funeral Home in Frostproof
with Jonathan Keen officiating.
Interment will follow at the Silver Hill
Cemetery.
For those who wish, donations may be
sent to the Good Shepherd Hospice, 1110
Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33870.
Condolences may be sent to the fami
ily and the webcast of the service can:
be viewed at www.marionnelson
funeralhome.com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


>k_ J 0 1 ; IN:p




Page 8A Frostproof News


W O FIRED CAR-B-QOu RIBS
HOLEE SMOKED CHICKENS


CHICKEN


Whole Fryers .991b


Family Pack
Split Breast $1.391b


BEEF


Beef


Rib Eye $6.491b


Sirloin


10Lb Bagged
Leg Quarters $7.90


PORK
Boston Butt Roast $1.891b


Family Pack Pork


Blade Steak


$2.091b


Family Pack Pork
Country Ribs $2.091b


Tip Roast $2.991b

Family Pack
Sirloin$3.291b

PRODI
Red Potatoes 41
Spanish Onio
Tomatoes

HOT FOOD & DE
Chickehi
with Rice & Beans
Cooked Han
Dietz & V
Muenster Chew


We accept: mIs


SI6 H Ra 7o r


Special


offer


We Refill
Propane
201b $14 301b $21
Best price in town!

AmenGasr
America's Propano Company


- ''-"e --


January 11, 2012


41


-:a-:


~r~r~
C




January 11, 2012 Frostproof News Page 9A


- "Se HablaEspanol"


s run from January 14th through January 27th


JCE
5lb Bag $1.99
ns $.491b
- $.791b

1LI SPECIALS
(Pork
& Bread $3.99
r $1.991b
'atson
ese $2.991b


GROCERY SPECIALS
Cape Cod Large Chips -8 8.5oz. 2/$5.00
Pepsi 18 Pk 2/$11.00
Gustafson Water -1 Gal 690
Marcal Soft 4 Pk 79
Bath Tissue 89
Riceland Rice lb 89
Riceland Rice 51b $3.99
Maruchan Instant
Lunch Soup 12pk 2.25oz. $4.99
Hy-top Sqz Ketchup 24oz. 89
Shurfine White Bread 20oz. 99<
Pepsi-1 LT $1.00
BV Bleach -1 Gal $1.39
Hy-top Charcoal 16.61b
BV Laundry Detergent 100oz. $2.99
Cafe El Aquila 6oz. $1.99
BV Sugar 41b $2.99
Masecca Corn Flour 4.411b $3.49
Iberia Beans 15.5oz 89


M. ., WIC will be available February 2012


nr3 F664 668


January 11, 2012


Frostproof News Page 9A






Pane-~ 1O rotrofNwsJnar 1,21


- THE .. e DRAPER -ee The

WALES Lake Wales
S FURNITURE mi News
S I o As of u- Laue e The Comnu-it
**- -, rh+. ;.. l ,, rh.,n,^ 1989r WA^ les Ner.,sp p '/r -. .-;
r- L .. W Musicut,,e--- + "r--
L.AKE \VA LES
lo wh r d DRAPER'S clnb --
SMIUSLYMu Iic
*& CULTURAL finterfanwmourlitthPE
C E NT I -. RDRAPERI
CENTIER \idcrlul.t'mniuntruil -
Operatcd t., h iW.entrlAvenu MI Cpp- Roa

25 s.cr,- Hv r., F'hon .3 Trn.44 123 East ParAvenue Lake Wales, FL 33853
Le WaesL386.3 I 3 L .676. 46.38 863676.
86378429 LakeWales,FL33853 863.676.3467 W



ioio[ P o 1989 [ '
O2 DOIRD11DOD


Bunting, Tripp
& Ingley, LLP
CERTIFIED
0 0] 01L30 PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


N-c, P- --mc-, 1989 Lk:e Wles Co trV C86b 8367-7981 M
L Wales Country Club FAx 863 676-8899
S292SeRoad60P B X 230 EAST TILLMAN AVENUE '
. .- '292:SlteRad 60 E PO BOX 406, '1151 BoToe l
I In .n LakeWs, FL39*-V5269Lke ale F LLAKE WALES. FL 33859-0990
,.Lake Wales, FL
Bus: (863) 676-1404 6766519 .I o.
3 l,64-0+ .863-676-6519- 33859-0406, T,.PAo. FL
Fax: (863) 678-0284- E-M.1AIL: INFO ',TICPA.COt -
3~ .37 3


Restaurant
Bed & Breakfast


"I.1l) Chilet Siuzajnrne Ljne
Lake Wales
i' 11 it'.
863.676.6011 or
800.133.6011



McKeon
CHIROPRACTIC, INC.
Dr Mark J McKeon
S Dr Thomas D McKeon, Jr



-


www,mckeonchiropractic.com
863-676-2717
Fax: 863-676-3390
S43 .iSF hilE
SLje W.al&i, FL i....:;.
L -------


Live Music.
Bullard so
D u l r 1Friends & Spiris.'.:

Agency, Inc.
Personal & Btoinum ..

? Steak, Seafood Shak
& Oyster Bar, inc.
In Lake Wales on
221 fas Sruar Avenue Beautiful Lake Pierce
Ljl.eWalA FL 33853
863-676-1481 www.cherrypocket.com
Fa., 863-676-9353
E-MA' 863439.2031 Fax 863.439.1861
bbullagiv:v' r nizuAn net .1 1 C31I al c0 R 31.i.
Laj Wales. FL 33898


MARION
NELSON
funeral ho mes


L.I I .i ALE:I .
454 So i uth 13 ': ,.-r R,;l
L *l.c \\ 'ilc :.'-I .rj,:l.i rI 5~
Phone: i863i 676-2541

I'i". H hi *, r ":'' E 1 1
Phone: 863 635--41l90
ii,. ',i H ,V .L,
, ,, , i, ,


IEsmtali hedIJ


IEstabl d543 1


- -- I -


January 11, 2012


Page 10A Frostproof News






I


A.D. Baynard
P IU M BIN G, I N






L /..1, \
'" i j L ,.' 1 1 ;/,. '


863-676-2116
Fax: 863-678-0226
16i r Old i vjrT:,, hl,,d
LIaWeWait FLji: ..




GENERAL HOUSEHOLD
PEST CONTROL
Lawn & Ornamental
*Termites. Rodents




GRO0 ER
E.iRar IM, NAI IN C

Phone: 863-324-4428
863-3244429
Fax: 863 3240426
4200 Dundee Road
WlnrerHaven, FL3384-0905
wvw groover-co.ner




DAWVSON'S
SCENIC SERVICE, INC
-NAPA AUTOC-ARE CENTER ,.






NAPA

Eddy [l.a :or,: Owner
863-676-3858

23 SCEIII( HIGHWAY
LAKE WALES FL 33853
i It.3 l bl l nlI Dl


r-.




740 Slate Ruoad 60, W
LaKe Wales FL 3':3853
(863) 676-6748


RGM


620 N. Scenic Highway
Lake Wales, FL 33853
(863) 676-3463
Fax: (863) 676-7251
cE,,,,,

SERVING
EAST POLK
COUNTY
SINCE 1958



A DUSTYS
CAMPER WORLD
A Cmnp ite line
COf :.i nr-1p ':,r
TrailerS- T H,, hi-rs
5th r WheI l:, ai-rL
Class ,.. B anld C
,Motoi hornets:
7400 State
Road 60 East
Bartow, FL 33830
866.644.1256

DustysRV.com


JEWELRY DESIGNERS
& EMPORIUM
J.c\elr& \\aitcli Repair
Cu-ih [i : _crin_
DiE) nmI.id '.zriir,

WE BUY DIAMONDS, GOLD,
ANTIQUES, JEWELRY, STERLING,
ROLEX WATCHES, VINTAGE POCKET
& WRISTWATCHES, COINS
I & t l r t'.lj Cver-owi r t r:
201 E:a.r rij.,rl AvE
La[eWales Fl 33;':'3-4137
863-676-1317




PANDO RA'S
Beattty Bok
HIS & HER'S BARBER CUTS-
KIDS TOO!
*Tanning -
*Nails -' '
Pedicures .

Sit "/0n II, I,.,,,,/,
\l.' '/llli II lll I\ I l



863-676-1349


RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
INDUSTRIAL


PAINrNG, INC.
;5 A/er .t 2rid 'Slreel
FrislprcD FL ;. :.
863-635-4641

Kni^^Hth'mil


WARNER
UNIVERSITY
BEYOND BELIEF



\w \' .\\'(lt'.i l'a r "e(l
13895 H\\v 27
Lake Wales, FL

(863) 638-1426


V 'ill T rui l.
Power. of Altorney
Medicaid & Assel Protectior
Guardiarsnhip, & Pro-bate
24 o East P3r Aer,nue
Lak.e WalI'- FL ;:.85?
863.676.6000
www la ewanleslda rtel




Electric Service
ELECTRICAL
EXPERTS
[id.jriti. I 111iC ri-l,,
I l ; t,:l ;ii'i :ri "

LI*:,- ':: i 1 : Il
L,: nri -:J E:,:.I,-,:l


221 E. Central Ave
Lake Wales, FL 33853
863-676-1113


MOBILE HOME
&
AUTOMOBILE
INSURANCE EXPERTS


Insurl in L" A -: -,
TOLL FREE
1-800-879-1857
Local: 863-676-7800
Fax: 883-678-0591


129 East StuaI t ,t',, e
Lake Wales FL ;3853
1 Ia]61 I.i
BEN HILL GRIFFIN. INC.
Florida Citrus




GRIFFIN
FERTILIZER COMPANY
A0 .'i'OIln l- BErN HILL ,IF.I IFI I i C
SSHAPE V' RGEFORMAT
'-- FERTILIZER&
SPRAY MATERIALS ,:
COMPLETE FIELD SERVICE
(863)635-2281

P 0 Box 127
Frostproof FIrInda .3 3384
(863)635-2251




Roagkiches
F/.,,)irin nj I|.' i n I rt it cnir
PROFESSIONAL RESULTS

',i Ep t iv
Floi rinrlg Windowv
Treajrneni Til Suit
Any budget .': Taste
2325 Hwy. 60 West
Lake Wales, FL 33859

863-6226
863-6258
Fax (863) 878-0743

0I l 1] Ik

DERMATOLOGY
oIrn I: I :,:l n 11- P"
I,, r.- l-I, I,-,! ':,,:I'-i ii.:II -r l IF:'.,.

Complete
Skin Core from
Medical
Professionals

Ih_, : r.13-, .:


I I_'-' r r r.1.: .

I,--, ':ole-' FL -"'
(863) 676-3411


QUALITY
BOATS
Marine Repair


Consignment
Covered Storage
Nissan Marine
Authorized Sales,
Parts & Service


4125 SR 60 E.
Lake Wales, FL 33898
863.679.8865










The Groves
Center

512 S llth St.
Lake 1 ales. FL 33853

(863) 676-8502
Fa':. 1863) 679-9531




J HN'S
optical
Quality Eyewear
at Affordable Prices




Ci.i phlF :,', Ia, ,L i
Fllthchll Fl',llih" [_'llv.(. '
oti thli Enii',, Fmdilv

Professional Ser ice
1863) 676-8488
749) State Ru .Ij ) E
Like \\ale FI 33853





Lake W'ales Ii
Luthlleran
Fss Preschool i
FREEfIL N ICAS


I. 'Jlanit Howa f Wlin Elimnta ry
'Babtfn Iarl Elmri to.
Sally Rickinan

640 S. Scenic Highway
Lit ',ale5, FL :':c3-.4 2?
676-7300


-- '' -- s --


Frostproof News Page 11A


January 11, 2012


Ja01nur ,2012 II FDOrl Nw
_______


I


C:--~~
r
C













20112) Hilurhiail DII eioer
-A


Establishd .-,8.. M Esa lih -,92


.3 taShe3 9B


Lake Wales
Lutheran
Church






-l) South Sicenei HighN u
Lake \\'ic, FL 33'S.X432
,Sh3)h7h-4715
863-676-4715












Sales Installation
Retail Store
.,- ientr l Avi W
Ltl.eW.alt: FL 3:::8 3
863-679-9040
Fa:,t .,'- .7- 2 ,1;
Evergre.rprollp.4.,vernon rnei

Esablshd 98


The

MANESalon

243 East Bullard Ave.
Lake Wales, FL 33853
(863) 676-0744 or
(863)676-0745







Cookware,
Cutlery,
Bakeware Line
Gadgets Galore
Open Monday-Saturday
9:30-5:30
257 East Stuart Ave.
Lake Wale, FL 33853
Phone Fa>
863-679-1146
Theymakesents.com


CASH

CONNECTION
PAWN S H OP
BUY. SELL *TRADE
Ite Buy Gold
Gold Diamonds
Jewelry -Repair
D ah lr for
It Itis i "s lhal Dct it'/tr_
John W. Steedley
214 Domans Ave.
Lake Wales FL 33853-460
863-676-4514

.samlnsh


*CO I "L" I t 'I' L 10 1 L
('OIII'_.1, 1011t{'C
C'Hi.7 il/i C- C'FIc v
-11 111 I-1 O 1 lli S
Wi iuf ipr irid:pfi:rid,: ric-
We it)Her Indrprnjr.n.:
by rol:ring icr~ givr :r whVi:
provide st rvie, jtail:red [I:
ihe dcen[: rint.d: Tht ilrinlt
car, fi l S:Jre lno:i .ini [hat
'We'.jr there [r:1 help with
Iheir dar vi i;.e of dailv living.
1.1 E luinA. F j-
L W .,! le I L <.,fL.1
Phone18631676-1120
Fax (8631676-7291


PEST CONTROL
Lawn & Termite







. P '_, 'PI,[l C ., P, 4
- l'hiiPEPiM li(hi C i'l

676-7727
294-2601/757-0090
Fax: 676-6060
12-' Orr, le ,I e ,. E.:1
Lale V'a/.. FL 338'3


Yesterday's
Treasures






Furniture
Cc'untri Cratt
.. A luch A lcfre
125 llft ; Pik.hi al,_
Ll./, l'/: FL 3.,53'
863-6 78-.588
b/ht,. L a. L.Hl/,.. H._ ,,.,. rl',,.. '
K/_, . .. ,, -,f ,. P,-,.l Q l/,;, I


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Breaklasti Rotary
ilc u v,

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S'.'i.' ) ... L ', ."* li c
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SEdward Lambr
I,:l:ni ,r [jA .. "l i .lF':
One \\'e Centr3l Mc.-nue
S A cit es, In
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(863)-676-1515
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January 11, 2012


Page 12A Frostproof News













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Lake Wales, FL 33853
863.676.3467


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Suite 12, Lake
Wales, FL 33853


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Il A'll 1 1 D II t i


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COMPUTER CENTER

New Computers
Repairs
Upgrades
Virus Removal
Monitors
Printers
125 East Central Ave.
Lake Wales, FL 33853
863-679-6010

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Attorneys

Kent Lily practicing
since 1977

815 State Road 60 E
Lake Wales, FL
33853-4241
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January 11, 2)12


Frostproof News Page 13A


Estalised


I


I










Farming areas OK from short cold snap


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM

Last week's cold weather was not cold
enough to affect the citrus farmers too
badly in Polk County, but it was cold
enough to get people into shelters and
get manatees to seek warmer waters.
"Polk did well and is in pretty good
shape," said Andrew Meadows, a
spokesman for Florida Citrus Mutual.
"There were some pockets that hit the
mid-20s but to no point of duration."
To have an effect on the crops
temperatures have to be below 28
degrees for four or more hours which
didn't seem to happen Tuesday or
Wednesday. Another cold snap is fore-
cast for this weekend, but temps are
expected to be a few degrees warmer
overnight than they were during the
most recent freeze.
As usual, growers turned to time
tested methods to protect their fruit.
"Irrigation also helped quite a bit
and it was very helpful over those two
nights," he said, adding that the cold
weather was not a "non event" for Polk
County. There were some burned leaves
and some slush ice. There was some
hard ice formation, he said, adding
there was just some minor damage.
Temperatures were a little colder
Wednesday night than they were on
Tuesday, but still a little warmer here
than they were in other areas with
crops.
Temperatures in Bartow went down
to 32 degrees according to the National
Weather Service and a little cooler in
Lake Alfred where it was 31 degrees in
the morning. In Frostproof the tem-
perature went down to 26 degrees. But
the thermometer didn't stay that low for


too long.
John Arnold at Showcase of Citrus
in Clermont said December's warm
weather made the orange trees more
vulnerable to the cold. But he said the
trees pulled through the chilly night.
"The trees pulled through exception-
ally. We did not have any ice form in
any of the fruit," Arnold said. "We've got
basically five weeks ahead of us, and if
we do make it five weeks without any
kind of severe weather, we're going to
have an exceptional crop in 2012." ;
Central Florida is one of the state's
main strawberry-growing regions.
January is the beginning of strawberry
harvest season, and cold weather at
this point can damage the entire crop.
But growers especially in western
Hillsborough and eastern Polk coun-
ties were hopeful that ihe overnight
freeze wasn't long enough to do lasting
damage.
The Florida Fruit and Vegetable Asso-
ciation said low temperatures reached
26 degrees in Belle Glade, but the bean
and corn crops fared OK. There were
patchy areas of damage, the association
reported on its Twitter page.
"The Ridge is in southern Polk and
it goes into Highlands and if you go off
the ridge, there's a lump or spine on
both the east and west side that gets
colder. Off that ridge, the damage (was
minimal)," Meadows said.
And though the reports are minimal
Florida Citrus Mutual reports the offi-
cial damage results aren't always known
right away.
"Although by no means (was it) cata-
strophic, we have received reports of
slush ice and twig and leaf damage. Of
course we will not know the full extent
of the damage for the next several days


Notice of Election

Village of Highland Park, Florida

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with Section
100.021, Florida Statutes, the Village of Highland Park
will hold a General Election on Tuesday, April 3, 2012
for the election of one Commission Member for a three
year term in Seat #3.

Qualifying begins at 12:00 noon on Monday February
13, 2012 and ends at 12:00 noon, Friday, February 18,
2011. Candidates shall be qualified elector of the
district from which he/she is nominated. All candidates
shall have continuously been residents of the city for a
period of one year prior to nomination.

IPlease contact the City Clerk's office at tel:863-455-6518


BRIGHT-NOW HEADLIGHT RESTORATION
WHAT ONE HAPPY CUSTOMER HAD TO SAY...
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863-632-1876 or 83-632-3016


however I do expect at least a moderate
impact," Mike Sparks, executive vice
president and CEO of Florida Citrus
Mutual, reported in an email he sent to
growers Thursday night.
The potential for damage from the
cold weather is something growers
contend with each winter and because
they are generally aware of it they are
prepared. To that end Florida Citrus
Mutual is also prepared for it.
"Keep Florida Citrus Mutual's Weather
Watch in mind," Sparks wrote in the
email to growers. "Forecast informa-
tion will be available on Mutual's phone
system so growers can call in and get
the updates they need to plan for any
cold event."
The line is updated every Monday and
people who call can get updates for ev-
ery region in the state. There is an option
to get forecast listings from the National
Weather Service and they can get contact
information if they need help.-
"Every year from December through
mid February to March we do a lot of
weather watching," Meadows said. "It's
one of the things that happens when
you make a living off Mother Nature."
Information from The Associated Press
was used in this report.
pill 111; 90 %7qmm


WILDFIRE DANGER INCREASES
As temperatures across Florida fell last week,
officials with the Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services remind residents the chances of
v'ildhies become more danrgerous.
The increased chance of wildfire results from freeze-
dried vegetation and low levels of humidity. During -
these weather conditions, even small sparks can ignite
larger wildfires.
"Whether you're enjoying time with family and
friends around a campfire or burning yard waste, it is
important to be aware of increased risk this time of
year,"said Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam.
The Fort Meade area had one of its largest such fires
last week near West Lake Buffum Road. There have
been other scattered and smaller fires in recent weeks
as well.
The Florida Forest Service offers these tips:
Never leave any fire unattended
Clear area down to bare soil around campfires and
warming fires
. Do not burn yard waste during dry, windy conditions
Report any suspicious fire to local authorities
Homeowners can protect their homes from sparks
and embers by clearing roof gutters, removing all dead
vegetation within 30 feet of their home and trimming
trees and limbs at least 15 feet from the chimney. Last
year, 4,860 wildfires burned 223,316 acres in Florida.
65 percent were caused by humans, it reports.


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New & Used Household/ Accepting Stop By And Take
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VILLAGE OF HIGHLAND PARK
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AND COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENTS
.I .- .. ......'.i(-, ', 1hI4- I h l I "2 1 ii,'l I"'" '-" .,',, .," II,-h" ",ll.' "l I" .n II s I., : H n lr ,, i .,
l hle lr ,rrr l, II 11 1, ,h,-hi1 ". -ll,- I .- 1-1.- : 0-h T.. 1-1 .1 1 1 1 N _.-._r,. H A.[ I,. "-, l Fl lIl:.r.j
ORDIN \NCE NO 2011.02
'IT. O'l'l' .N~. II-,IN THE I.iTuiRE L- iJl- Ir.I EL r.1L T .iF TIHE
i_,' II I l II1":1 I I I. ';J ,il TI If. II1. L ,.l 0 1 -I'III- ll N I' I-Il. ih- I .Iir F' f T lr t .
1 i I Ii i I. : i : T : i 11,- : 11 iL il ilL, i I L
f F_-I -I fi ..,|Jl', ii, 'r-,.l '., i -.,I' %m l H f l i r .1,-.1 .
ORDINANCE NO 21111.03
AN URDINANCL AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND UsE MAP OF iHE COMPREHENSlvE
PLAN OF THE VILLAGE OF HIGHLAND PARK, FLORIDA, TO CHANGE THE FUTURE LAND
USE DESIGNATION FOR THE PROPERTIES LOCATED AT 1540,, 1542, 1546, 1548, 1550,
1552, AND 0 HIGHLAND PARK DRIVE NORTH; 1701 HIGHLAND PARK DRIVE SOUTH;
AND 1551, 1553, 1555, 1557; 1559, 1561, 1563, AND 1565 HIGHLAND PARK DRIVE
NORTH, FROM "SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL" TO "HISTORIC MULTI-FAMILY
RESIDENTIAL PRESERVATION" PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR A
REPEALER; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Ordinance No. 29111-02 proposes to amend the Future Land Use Element of the Village's Comprehensive Plan
to create the "Historic Multi-Family Residential Preservation" future land use category. Ordinance No. 2011-
03 proposes to amend the Future Land Use Map of the Village's Comprehensive Plan to apply the "Historic
Multi-Family Residential Preservation" future land use category to the properties denoted on the map below.










^^ Ploporri0



77---...-.-- -- -
ORDINANCE NO 2011-04
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT OF THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE VILLAGE OF HIGHLAND PARK, FLORIDA, AMENDING
POLICY 2.1 OF THE FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT; CLARIFYING THAT POLICY 2.1.A. -
ISTATE RESIDENTIAL -- PERTAINS SOLELY TO SINGLE-FAMILY DWELLING UNITS;
DELETING POLICY 2.1.C. -RESIDENTIAL LOW; REVISING OTHER POLICIES FOR THE
PURPOSE OF CLARITY; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR A REPEALER;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Ordinance No. 2011-04 proposes to amend the Future Land Use Element ofl" '.ll '-..1 Comprehensive Plan:
to clarify the "Estate Residential" future land use c ,i. ...1., to delete the i ..1.-i. Low" future land use
category, and to revise other policies for the purpose .. I ',
The proposed Ordinance and a copy of this notice may be inspected by contacting the Village Clerk at (863)
455- 6518 during normal business'hours, Monday through Friday.
All interested parties may appear at the public hearings and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinances.
Comments may also be submitted in writing prior to the hearings to the Village Clerk, P.O. Box 168, Lake Wales,
Florida 33859-0168, or during the public hearings. Persons with disabilities ...is;.. special accommodations
in order to participate in the public hearings should contact the Village Clerk zi t. '.-'., -6518 at least 48 hours
in advance of the public hearings to request such accommodations.
PURSUANT TO SECTION 286.0105, FLORIDA STATUTES, IF ANY PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY
DECISION MADE BY THE VILLAGE COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THESE
PUBLIC HEARINGS, SUCH PERSON WILL NEED A.RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR SUCH
PURPOSE, SUCH PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS
MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. 2680076


January 11, 2012


Page 14A Frostproof News







January 11, 2012 Frostproof News Page 15A


Kirsten Scarborough is Frostproof Rotary's Teen of the Month for December 2011. She is the
founder of the Princess Project at the high school, which collects gently used prom dresses and
redistributes them to those who might not be able to afford a formal gown. She plans to attend
Stetson and become an agriculture lawyer. She is pictured with her mother, Tina Scarborough,
(left) and Frostproof Rotary President Tenny Ruth Croley. Her father is Ben Scarborough.


Frostproof



Rotary Club honors



Teens of the Month

PHOTOS PROVIDED
Zackary Jenkins is Frostproof Rotary's Teen of the Month for August 2011. Among his school
activities, he was the starting quarterback on the Bulldogs varsity football team which made the
playoffs for the first time in three years. He plans to attend college and study athletic training.
He is pictured with his mother, Theresa Jenkins, (left) and Frostproof Rotary President Tenny
Ruth Croley.His father is Anthony Jenkins.






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IAVANNAH URT
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12 East Grove Avenue
Lake Wales, FL 33853
S(863) 679-8246
www.savannahcourtlakewales.com
.Assisted Living Facility License No. 9888


TRAVELERSj



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Specialists Accredited by Accreditation Association for
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Dr. Neil Okun
Board Certified
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Dr. Daniel Welch
Board Certified
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* Dr iohn D To.-nan
* Dr Thomni~a'i BfLrrIon
* Dr lo ln L 1 -i' ds-on


Dr. Damon Welch
Board Eligible
Ophthalmologist
Dr. David Lowey
Board Certified
Ophthalmologist


" ur -i iicijii e % iutinor
* Dr ValcIjo I. MIotdJc
* Di L d.aid I i nawia\


* Dr David N Burry
* Dr. %illiam I Corkins


The Law Offices of


Ho\ward Kai
Piirlner


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I VISIT OUR SITE AT WWW.EYESFL.COM
ADDITIONAL LOCATIONS: CLERM~ONT


, iIiI


Frostproof News Page 15A


January 11, 2012


Angela Pulido
P0I' 7lt,


~7Sbp


A2 m








Pae16 rotrofNesJaury1 21


Library plans art show, book sale


Frostproof's Latt Maxcy Memorial.
libraryis gearing up for two big events
next month.
The first is the annual art show, which
will run from Feb. 6 to March 5.
All entries are due by Feb. 3, and no
late entries will be accepted.
Each artist or photographer can enter
two pieces. Entries must be the original
work of the artist, the piece must never
have been exhibited in the library show
before, and artists are required to exhibit
work completed during the past two years.
Painting, photography and drawings
must be framed and equipped for hang-
ing. No saw-toothed hangers are allowed.
Wire hangers are preferred. And all works
must be two-dimensional.
Categories this year will include


1110 Druid Circle


paintings and drawings, and photog-
raphy (digital or film). Entries can be
dropped off at the library any time up
through Feb. 3. There is no fee.
The annual art show reception is Thurs-
day, Feb. 23, from 6-7 p.m. Prizes will be
announced at 6:30 that evening.
Artwork can be picked up anytime
after the show closes on March 5.
For more information, contact the
library at 635-7857.
Also, the library is planning a huge
used book sale on Thursday, Feb. 16 and
Friday, Feb. 17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each
day, and Saturday, Feb. 18 from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. during the city's Orange Blossom
Festival celebration. The sale is a fund
raiser for the Friends of the Latt Maxcy
Library.


,.,i ,., ;i 1 Medici l Care for Ailull,
^ I. -. L. rirlldren
'-: -i,";_ .'. O fr Ori':e S.kin Surgery
- -. School & Work PhviLjls
Medi:3re and Insuranrce
e, Lake Wales Accepire


l across riom the Emergency Entrance ol the hCiprl l31


Monda -Tnur day 9AM-8PM. Friday AM 12PM
w ; I. to rrBii r r omrr
I -:' -,
S --- -. -- -- -- -- -


* AHfordable Fees lor
I.rnlnsurpe
: Convr,'eni Laler
Appoininierls
- Honle ViilS


O. .

Wednesday 12:30pm & Sunday 6:30pm
Geet Our 'Season Off To A Great Start
Doors open al 10 am Wednesdays


Holy Spirit Catholic Church
644 S. 9th Street. Lake Wales 863-676-1556 or 676-3856
a... ., 11=~--- g~-


SSpringleaf
Lending made personal


SPRINGLEAF FINANCIAL SERVICES HAS MONEY TO LEND
$1,000 TO $25,000*


* Personal Loans


* Bill Consolidation


Home Improvement Any Purpose


Lake Wales
Shoppes on the Ridge
24165 US Hwy 27

863.676.3469

Weekends or after hours 800.697.4719

O ll-- 6 ~ .


: 2012 HighPoint Church Florida Golf Scramble


I~i






'1

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I.,


1-i' .



w
kt
.
i.


-,



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;-..



-.


Grab your clubs, hit the links and help support Compelled by Christ and HighPoinI .Chunrt. .i our
first ever Golf Scramble Tournament! All proceeds go directly to help build an orphanage in
Honduras to get abandoned, abused and neglected kids into loving homes,
Saturday, January 28, 2012
Lake Wales Country Club
Registration Begins at 7:30 a.m. Shotgun Start at 8:30 a.m.
$65.00 per Golfer


Registration Form
Registration Includes 18 Holes of Golf, Lunch and Door Prizes.


Team of 4 Players
(Register a foursome by Jan. 7
and save $20.00 per team.)


___ Single Player, Please Put Me in a Group


,,nmpony rnamo _____________________,____.-___ -
Contact Person:
AdroSs:s
Phone- Fax:
Emeil: __.
Participation Information
Player Nam Handap Phono Email


2. ""___'__
4,
Sorry. I am unable to attend, but I have enclosed my donation of S _.._
Additional sponsorship opportunities are available starting at $100.00. Please see our website at
Compelledbychnst.com for details on sponsorships and for rules of the tournament. Please make
all checks payable to Compelted by Chnst. If paying by multiple checks, please complete
single entry form for a team and submit with all checks.
Registration Forms must be received by Friday, January 20; 2012
Mail To: HighPoint Church, Attn: Bonnie Barker
501 Burns Avenue Lake Wales FL 33853




hrist f-i


Compelled by Christ Ministries
Connecting abandoned, abused and
unwanted children to a life with hope.
The mission of Compelled by Christ Ministries is to get abandoned, abused, and
unwanted Honduran children into loving homes where they will experience
the love and security of a family, and will hear, see, and witness the hope that
trusting in Jesus Christ as savior brings.
Children are separated from their families for many reasons. Some are removed
because of physical, sexual, and mental abuse, as well as neglect. Other children
are brought to the orphanage because their parents struggle to successfully
care for themselves so caring for their children is out of the question. Once
these children are detached from their parents they are put in government
run orphanages, where often times, because of large numbers, they end up
experiencing some of the same types of abuse they were trying to escape from.
Most of these government run orphanages are understaffed, lack funding, and
are short on resources to minister to the children.


We want to move children from these government run orphanages where they
Spend too much of their day existing and surviving, instead of living. Many of
the children actually end up digressing. It is our desire to place these children
into homes where the children will observe "moms and dads"(house parents)
modeling love, respect, honesty, compassion, and authenticity. Ideally, there
will be four to eight children in each home based on the children's needs.
Each children's home will be unique, as our goal is to gear the homes toward the
.needs and backgrounds of the children in them. Placing children with different
issues in the same home and treating all these children the same is a grievous
error and doesn't allow the children to heal. grow, and excel. We will provide
an environment that is designed for them by providing the spiritual, physical,
relational, psychological. nutritional, and educational help they need in order v-
for them to succeed and be prosperous.
Compelled by Christ desires to break the cycle of despair, poverty, the absence ';
.of family values, and the lack of eternal hope by empowering them with
knowledge of Jesus Christ as savior, power of the Holy Spirit, and the hope of
: eternal life. Telling one how to complete a task isn't the same as modeling the
completion of that task and then helping them to complete it themselves.
:,;:. Children who haven't had a good family environment can't comprehend the
.i:,, importance this plays in the marriage relationship, and the relationship be-
.' tween mothers and fathers and their sons and daughters, as well as friendships.
-,' It is our intention to represent the appropriate way to form and manage these
relationships by modeling them in these homes. It is imperative to our success
That our kids see this lived out.
Part of each child's sponsorship will be for them to commue their education
-' past the 5th grade in a bilingual Christian school. We will also strive to teach
Them vocational skills in hands on settings. Learning English and furthering
their education will help open doors for a better job. Learning more about
Christ will help encourage them to serve and show others the love of Christ.

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January 11, 2012


Page 16A Frostproof News










COUNTY REPORT


Siblings, waiting list




top concerns in plan


By PEGGY KEHOE
PKEHOE @ POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Sibling preference and the
waiting list appeared to be
the main concerns of parents
attending a program explain-
ing changes to the Polk County
Public Schools magnet and
choice enrollment process.
Brian Warren, director of the
Magnet Schools Assistance
Program, told a group of about
50 parents and children meeting
at Union Academy last week in
Bartow, that "the waiting list is
intact." However, no new wait-
ing lists will be created under
the revised program.
Each year one grade will be

THE PROCESS
A. What is not changing:
January Open Enrollment Period,
Sibling Surveys, Applications received
online, Must apply annually if not
accepted, Applicant Pools, Existing Waiting
List Remains

B. What is changing:
How students are accepted, How siblings
are accepted into magnet/choice schools

C. Student Assignment
If there is an existing waiting list at
a grade level, students will be pulled


dropped from the waiting list,
beginning with kindergarten
last year, as the district moves
from a multi-year waiting list
to an annual applicant pool.
Names that are on the waiting
list remain, but no new names
will be added.
SSibling preference guidelines
also have been changed. In the
past kindergarten siblings of
students already enrolled in a
magnet or choice school were
given preference over other ap-
plicants. While keeping siblings
in the same school is consid-
ered a value, the district wants
to make sure the schools are
diversified. The new system will
require that an older sibling is

from the waiting list first, and when
that list is depleted, students will then
be pulled from applicant pool. If no
waiting list for a grade level, students
will be pulled from the applicant pool.
Three applicant pools per grade level
based on government range, township,
section (RTS) grid. Points assigned for
Free and Reduced Lunch, Race, Student
with Disabilities and English Language
Learners. Each grid assigned to a
specific pool based on these factors.
Students from each grid are assigned
to magnet/choice school based on
grid factors not individual student
identifiers.


already enrolled in the magnet
elementary school when the
kindergarten.student applies
and will be returning to the
school the next year. Thus, the
policy will not apply if the older
sibling is in the fifth grade.
Up to 50 percent of the avail-
able kindergarten seats may be
filled by siblings under the new
process. However, siblings who
don't make it in the first cut will
be placed in the general appli-
cation pool and have another
shot at enrollment, Warren
explained.
The new system took a year
to develop, he told the group,
and was necessitated by a U.S.
Supreme Court ruling in 2007

D. Sibling Priority
Continued sibling requirements -
When an older sibling is already enrolled
and attending a magnet/choice school at
the time of application and will be returning
the following year, a priority is established.
Kindergarten sibling application must be.
submitted during open enrollment period in
January. Sibling Survey must be completed.
Changing Sibling requirements
Sibling priority will be given for
kindergarten students up to 50 percent of
available kindergarten seats. If a student is
not selected for a sibling seat, the student
will then be placed in the applicant pool,
Information from Polk County Schools


Brian Warren, director of Polk County Magnet Schools Assistance Program,
brought his traveling program to Union Academy last week, using a Power-
Point presentation to help explain changes to the magnet and choice school
enrollment process. About 50 people attended the program.


involving a Seattle school dis-
trict. The Supreme Court ruled
that race may be used in making
school assignments, but can't be
the only factor.
As a temporary solution, the
Polk County school district
merged the minority and non-
minority lists into one of 12,000
students. Students were ac-
cepted in pairs, one from each
list. This worked short-term, but
because the minority list was
depleted first, Warren said, it
was ineffective.
Polk.County Schools received
a Magnet School Assistance
Program federal grant of
$11.3 million on Oct. 1, 2010,
part of which was used to de-
velop the new assignment plan.
Under this plan race is one
of four factors considered in
student assignments. The others


are free and reduced lunch (FR),
students with disabilities (SWD),
and English language learners
(ELL). Three applicant pools per
grade level are based on gov-
ernment range, township and
section (RTS) grids. A grid is one
square mile.
Open enrollment is from Jan.
16 -Feb. 10. Students who are on
waiting lists do not need to ap-
ply. Those in the applicant pool
will need to reapply every year,
Warren emphasized.
Questions and answers along
with the informational slides
presented, may be found online
at www.polk-fl.net/districtinfo/
departments/schoolbased/
schoolchoice. There are presen-
tations for parents at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday at Daniel Jenkins.in
Haines City and at Brigham
Academy in


Parents often puzzled by school options


By MARY CANNADAY
MCANNADAY @LAKEWALESNEWS.COM

It's enough to make a parent
want to hide under the bed
and never come out.
In earlier times, children at-
tended the traditional schools
they were zoned for. Simple
enough.
Now, aside from traditional
schools, there are magnet
schools, charter schools,
alternative schools, schools
of choice, and schools within
schools. What does all that
mean? How does one de-
cide which school suits their
children's needs?
A website set up for parents
by the Polk County Schools
District Office helps to sort
through and understand it all,
to an extent.

Charter Schools
The Polk Schools website
defines charter schools as
public schools operating under
a performance contract called
a charter.
The charter allows the
school to operate under de-
fined rules and regulations. As
part of the contract between
the charter school and the
sponsor (the school board),
charter schools are held strictly
accountable for academic and
financial results.


The schools also have con-
trol over 95 percent of the stu-
dent funds generated through
student enrollments (FTE),
according to the website.
"This freedom is intended
to allow charter schools to be
more innovative, demonstrate
better student performance,
and make the local school the
agent of change for the stu-
dents it serves."
There are a number of char-
ter schools in Polk County; 26,
according to the website.
There are two categories of
charter schools:
The first is Start-Up Charter
Schools those that did not
exist prior to being granted
charter school status. These
brand new schools are often
started by parents, community
members, business partners,
etc. These schools may offer
a specialized curriculum or
serve a specific student popu-
lation such as at-risk students
or special needs students. An
example of a start-up would be
Bok Academy Middle School in
Lake Wales.
The second category is Con-
version Charter Schools A
conversion charter school is an
existing public school that con-
verts to charter school status.
This process requires agree-
ment from the teachers and
parents of the charter school,
the submittal and approval of


a charter application by the
sponsor,.and the negotiation
of a charter contract. Final ap-
proval of a charter contract is
voted on by the school board
after a public hearing. An ex-
ample of a conversion school is
McKeel Academy of Technology
in Lakeland.
(The Lake Wales charter
schools are actually classified
as a system, currently the only
charter school system in the
county.)

Magnet Schools
The magnet schools in
Polk County began as a tool
for helping to desegregate
schools, under court order, in
targeted communities. Mag-
net schools are built around a
certain theme or skill, such a
school of the arts or a school of
technology. These themes are
designed to attract students
to the target schools. Magnet
schools are site-specific.
Historically, there is a waiting
list for the magnets, although in
recent weeks there have been
talks about alternative methods
for admissions, because racial
balance is no longer the driving
purpose. Parent meetings are
currently being held through-
out Polk County to inform
parents of the changes.
There are eight magnet
schools in Polk County,


according to the district's
website. The two in Bartow aie
Bartow Academy and Union
Academy. In Haines City,
Bethune Academy is a magnet
school. These three magnets
focus on science, technology,
engineering and math known
in the school systems as STEM.

Choice Schools
Choice schools are some-
what different than magnets,
although somewhat similar.
Magnets were created
specifically in response to
desegregation orders from
the court, whereas choice
schools can also serve this
purpose but are often created
in response to community
or school interest. In Bartow,
for example, Summerlin
Academy is built around the
theme of military training
and advanced academics.

Specialized programs
within schools
There are also specialty
programs within a number of
Polk County schools, such as
the International Baccalaure-
ate schools at Haines City,
Bartow and Lake Wales High
Schools, and arts and cul-
tural programs at McLaughlin
Middle School in Lake Wales
and Lakeland High School.
At McLaughlin, students take


academic subjects, but also
have a choice of three electives
related to the arts. The school
has drama, music and visual
arts classes available.
Harrison School for the
Arts is a school itself, but the
students take academic classes
at adjacent Lakeland High
School. Admission to Harrison
is by audition only. Harrison's
focus is on theater, music,
dance, motion picture arts and
visual arts.
Admission to 'the Interna-
tional Baccalaureate schools
are based on unweighted grade
point averages (must be at
least 3.5 for rising ninth grad-
ers) on middle school FCAT
scores and the Readi-Step
test administered in middle
schools. The focus in the IB
schools is on rigorous academ-
ics and long-term projects. The
standards are set internation-
ally, by the IB headquarters in
Switzerland.
Additional information
can be obtained online at
www.polk-fl.net. Click on the
schools link near the top of
the page, and then look under
"additional choices" on the left
hand side of the page. Parents
are also welcome to call indi-
vidual schools. For Lake Wales
Charter schools, vist www.
Iwcharterschools.com, and
the telephone number is (863)
679-6560.









Redistricting, budget to dominate legislative session


By STEVE BOUSQUET
TAMPA BAY TIMES
The Florida Legislature convened
Tuesday for an unusual and unpredict-
able 60-day session that will be domi-
hated by two highly partisan subjects:
the redrawing of political districts and
yet another round of budget-cutting.
As lawmak-
ers packed their
bags tfor the next
two months, they
added sweaters
and healy coats to
ward off the biting
chill ofa lani ary
in North Florida.
The state Consti-
rution requires
that a reapportion-
ment session must
'SEN. JD ALEXANDER, begin in Ianuary,
R-LAKE WALES north hi laich as it
usually does.
Beyond redistricting and the budget,
legislators are expected to search anew for
a way to curb rampant fraud in the state's
to-fault car insurance system; debate the
creation of three new casino gambling re-
orts; and consider applying the sales tax
to online consumer purchases of books,
clothing and other items.
Gov. Rick Scott wants legislators
to find another $1 billion for public
schools, even in a year when they must
close a projected budget shortfall of up
to $2 billion.
S "That we need to do," Scott said of
the school money in a Times/Herald
interview. He has threatened to veto a
budget that doesn't include that money
a risky tactic because senators in
particular don't like receiving ultima-
tums of any kind.
Scott's path to that $1 billion for
schools hinges on big cuts in-Medicaid
pay-ments to hospitals which would
have a major impact in urbaiffhospi-
tals in South Florida and Tampa Bap y
that treat large numbers of Medicaid
recipients.
Democrats are angry with Scott's ap-
proach, which they describe as pitting
schoolchildren and teachers against
pregnant women and sick kids, two
groups most dependent on Medicaid.
SBut the remapping of districts to
reflect population growth and demo-
graphic shifts will be the central theme

FIVE KEY ISSUES
Redistricting: After dozens of hearings state-
wide, legislators must redraw the lines for all 160
legislative and 27 congressional seats. They must
adhere to federal and state legal standards and
protect minority power, notto mention the selfish,
re-election interests of lawmakers themselves.
Budget: A year after lawmakers cut state
spending by $4 billion, they're sharpening the
Sbudget-cutting knives again to cover a projected
shortfall of up to $2 billion because of slack tax
Scollections.The math is made evesl more difficult
because Gov. Rick Scott is demanding a $1 billion
increase in spending for public schools.
Gamblingi.Here's a way to create lots of jobs
,iand revenue for the state: Build three new $2 billion
"destination resort"gambling casinos, and limit
future expansion of gambling: But opponents say
more casino gambling is a dangerous roll of the dice
that would harm the state's family-friendly tourism
image.
Insurance fraud: Tampa and Miami are two hubs,
for staged car accidents, overused procedures such as
massages and other types of fraud in the no-fault car
*- insurance system. With fraud pegged at $900 million
a year, lawmakers are under pressure to find a fix. But
they don't have an obvious one; the last legislative
repairjob, in 2007, only made things worse.
Online sales: For years, retailers have complained
of an unfair double standard: Florida stores collect the
6 percent statewide sales tax on purchases, but out-
of-state retailers don't. Business support is growing
to tax online sales, but Gov. Rick Scott insists the tax
must be"revenue neutral,"meaning no additional
money for government. The tax's timing isn't good: In
an election year for all lawmakers, opponents could
easily portray support as a vote to raise taxes.


of the 2012 session from the outset.
It is tense and exhausting work,
made more complicated and unpre-
dictable this year because of two voter-
approved constitutional amendments
that prevent the Legislature from draw-
ing districts to help or hurt a political
party or incumbents.
Republicans, aided by emerging tech-
nology, have posted extensive amounts
of redistricting data online, and the '
hard-edged, me-first machinations of
previous decades have not surfaced.
Not yet, anyway.
"I think personally that it's coming
together smoother than the session
of 10 years ago," said Sen. Jack Lat-
vala, R-Clearwater, who in 2002 was in
charge of re-mapping congressional
districts in the Senate. "The redistrict-
ing process in the Senate has been very
well-managed."
Latvala said he agrees with lawmakers
who say they should delay action on the
new budget until the middle of March
or later when a new estimate of pro-
jected and hopefully for lawmakers,
more tax revenue will be available.
Democrats have a more jaded view of
reapportionment.
"It's a free-for-all," said Rep. Jeff
Clemens, a first-term Democrat from
Palm Beach County. "The weight of
redistricting is going to put a strain
on everybody." Clemens is already
troubled by House maps that chop his
hometown of Lake Worth into four dif--
ferent districts.
The Legislature is controlled over-
whelmingly by Republicans, who hold
majorities of 28-12 in the Senate and
81-39 in the House. The GOP's princi-
pal goals are to draw redistricting plans
that can quickly gain approval by state
and federal courts and to pass a state
budget without raising'any taxes.
"No new taxes. No new fees. A bal-
anced budget," said Senate President
Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island,
succinctly stating his overarching goals.
History suggests a session long on
rhetoric and short on results. One
reason is that it's an election year, when
legislators typically avoid taking con-
troversial positions that will alienate
voters back home.
One influential lawmaker said re-
districting and the budget are the only
must-pass issues.
"I, for one, would be satisfied if little

FIVE KEY PLAYERS
JD Alexander: The Senate budget chairman
controls the purse strings, and most colleagues
respect or fear him too much to challenge him. A
Republican and citrus grower from Lake Wales, the
senator universally known only by his initials is in his
last year in the Legislature.
Dean Cannon: The House speaker, a Republican
from Winter Park in his final session, exerted strong
control over his highly partisan GOP caucus last year,
and he likely will again, even if it antagonizes his
Capitol counterpart, Senate President Mike Harido-
polos. Watch Cannon's role in the emerging casino
gambling debate in which he, like much of greater
Orlando, views casinos as detrimental to Disney's
family-friendly image.
Don Gaetz: Poised to preside over the 40-member
Senate next fall, his power would be on the rise
anyway. But the retired health care executive from
Niceville also directs legislative and congressional
mapmaking as chairman of the Senate Reapportion-
ment Committee.
SJohn Thrasher: A former House speaker turned
lobbyist, he earned millions as head of the power-
.house lobbying firm Southern Strategy Group, then
re-entered the Capitol's revolving door as a senator
from a St. Augustine-area district and now has his
eyes on a possible future Senate presidency.
Will Weatherford: The always-upbeat Pasco
County lawmaker, at 32, is on track to become one
of Florida's youngest Rouse speakers next fall. As
chairman of the House Redistricting Committee,
he, like Gaetz in the Senate, will shape the political
composition of his chamber f6r the next decade.


AP PHOTO
Gov. Rick Scott meets attendees of the 27th annual Everglades Coalition Conference Thursday at
Hutihinson Island Marriott Resort in Stuart. The legislative session started a couple of months
earlier this year.


else occurred," said Rep. Denise Grims-
ley, R-Sebring, the lead budget writer in
,the House.
Another unique twist to reapportion-
ment is that all 160 legislative seats will
be up for election next fall, all of them.
in newly-drawn districts with new
constituents. Many lawmakers will be


eager to get home to start campaigning
and raise money, which they can't do
when they are in the capital.
If the early maps as drawn are ap-
proved, it will pit some incumbents
against each other or force some of
them to move to new communities a
jarringly uncomfortable prospect.


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on Peace River off U.S. Hy 98 East Fort Meade, FL
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----- C -- II- M-- q


Wednesday, January 11,2012


Page 2B SCMG Central Florida





Wednsda, Jnuay 11201 SCG Cntra Flrid Pae 3


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SCMG Central Florida Page 3B


Wednesday, January 11, 2012






Pane 4B SCMG Central Florida Wednesday, January 11,2012


Road honoring Ernie Caldwell now open to traffic

By STEVE STEINER
STAFF WRITER
The dedication that officially -
opened Ernie Caldwell Boulevard mk S .
to traffic Saturday was a multi-
event ceremony and included a 5K
run; dedication service attended
by Caldwell's friends, family and
government officials; and a classic
car parade.
Caldwell was a prominent citi-
zen of Polk County who was able to
balance the need for growth in Polk
County while simultaneously pre-
serving the character of the county,
said several friends and associates, .
including present and former coun-
ty commissioners. Caldwell, himself, Participating in the Jan; 7 Ernie Caldwell
served as a county commissioner. Boulevard grand opening ceremony 5k run PHOTOS BY STEVE STEINER
was Christy Caldwell Wilson (left) and Cahrisse
Rivers Smith. Polk County Commissioner Todd Dantzler (left) and Chairman Sam Johnson, present Kathy
Caldwell with a proclamation honoring her late husband, Ernie, at the ceremony Jan. 7 opening
the road named in his honor.






i ., I U








The grand opening ceremony of the Ernie Ca.dwell Boulevard, which took place Saturday, Jan.
hence the crossroad name. officially opened Jan.7. It was the culmination of several scheduled events that day
7, was made possible by the sponsors listed at left. At one time the area where the boulevard Classic vehicles, many of them containing members of the Caldwell family as well as other
now runs was home to Circus World, and later, where the Kansas City Royals held spring training, dignitaries, are the first vehicles to traverse the Ernie Caldwell Boulevard overpass, which was
hence the crossroad name. + officially opened Jan. 7. It was the culmination of several scheduled events that day.


Louise K. Frisbie captures a glimpse of
Florida's past with wit and wisdom. A truly
unique look into the history of central Florida
and the characters and events that shaped
it. Filled-with photos and facts that only a
true native historian would know.


201Anniversary


POLK SENIOR GAMES
'" \ -7/



















February 25 March 12, 2012
Fun & Friendly Competition for Men & Women Ages 50 & Over

Badminton Basketball Shooting Basketball 3 on 3 Billiards Bocce Bowling
Bridge Checkers Chess Cribbage Ballroom & Social Dancing Darts Euchre
Field Events Fishing Ply Casting Golf, 18 Hole Golf, Putt & Chip Horseshoes
Lawn Bowling Pepper Pickleball* Powerlfting Punt, Pass & Kick Racquetball
Road Race SK* Scrabble $ Senior Smarts* Skeet & Trap Shooting Shuffleboard
Softball Square Dancing Sudoku Swimming Table Tennis
Talent Show Tennis Track Walking
$10 entry fee for first event Includes T-shirt, Refreshments, Goody Bag,
and the Health Fair/Closing Celebration at The Lakeland Center on Monday, March 12
To receive entry booklet call 863-533-0055 or email polkseniorgames@verizon.net
To print entry form or for more Information visit www.polksenlorgames.org
Registration Postmark Deadline February 8, 2012
Bronze Sponsors

p James W. Sikes invp, mont
Sc R iT i is i P atn ily i r
i Sanctioned by the Florida Sports.Foundation and the Florida Senior Games State Championships


c------ ---------------9 II c F


Wednesday, January 11, 2012


Page 48 SCMG Central Florida








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SCMG Central Florida Page 5B


Wednesday, January 11, 2012







Paae 6B SCMG Central Florida Wednesday, January11, 2012


Why early


education?
By TISHNA SHELL
CORRESPONDENT
I am writing this article to inform par-
ents of the benefits of early education.
When children are in a safe and healthy
learning environment where they can
explore and learn in different ways at an
early age; they can build a strong educa-
tional foundation for years to come.
Not only will they be introduced to ba-
sics like colors, shapes, numbers and let -
ters, they will learn social skills, manners,
problem-solving skills and ways to build
confidence that will help them to have a
successful transition into kindergarten.
Children aremable-io explQe interest
areas that aie3afe,'aritrativ\e,-'coinortable
and well-designed with age-appropriate
roys. Educational books and games help
children increase their knowledge.
Children learn i different ways: some are
auditory learnmers: they learn by listening.
)therts are visual learners: they need some-
thing to see. There are kinesthetc learners.
that like moving around while they learn.
It's important to let children engage, explore
and be around other children at a to help
enhance each individual child'sneeds.
I would recommend that parents of
different backgrounds and abilities take
time to consider the importance of early
education for your young child or children
Sand act on it.
Children do much better when they are
well-prepared, excited and ready to learn
when entering school. I would like to see
more children reaching higher levels of
education and enjoying learning in an age-
appropriate environment.
Tishna Shell of Fort le'ade u'orks at
Kid: Are Kid: in Barrouw


How children


learn at child


care centers
By ZELMA THOMAS
CORRESPONDENT
Children learn by depending on
and having trusting relationships.they
build with child care workers in their
lives.
The importance of secure attach-
ments with child care workers is that
it lets children know they are safe,
loved and cared for. Children gain
confidence as they explore things
around them while learning.
Caring and responsive child care
workers who talk with children, read
to them, and teach them songs and
rhymes help build communication
skills in their lives.
Children love to play at child care
centers because playing takes many
forms, such as crawling through a
tunnel or singing songs and doing
movements. They get the opportuni-
ties to develop and learn new skills.
Communicating with child care
workers and other children are ways .
learning can be part of the children's
lives at child care centers.
Zelma Thomas works with the Teen
Parents program of Polk County Public
Schools.



SAVE LIVES. GIVE BLOOD.


Polk State Chain of Lakes Collegiate
High School has its fourth annual
Dream Night Scholarship Competition
at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14, at the
Fine Arts Theatre on the Winter Haven
campus, 999 Ave. H N.E.
Polk State Chain of Lakes students
will compete in categories includ-
ing Interview, Career Wear and
Sunday Attire. The winners receive
their respective titles as Dream
Girl or Dream Guy, as.well as $500
scholarships.
Dream Night contestants compete
in a talent competition. The winner


will receive a $250 scholarship, while
runners-up will receive $125.
Polk State Chain of Lakes Collegiate
High raised the scholarship money,
and students may use their prizes at
any college they choose. .
A panel of volunteers from the com-
munity will judge the 16 contestants.
The theme for the event is "Candy
Land."
Dream Night is open to the public.
Tickets are $5 at the door. Polk State
Chain of Lakes program assistant
Gwen Simmons, also a singer, will be
the event's featured entertainer.


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Dream Night Jan. 14


Wednesday, January 11, 2012


Page 6B SCMG Central Florida





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SCMG Central Florida Page 7B


WednesdayJanuary 1 12











They'll be barking at Bok Saturday


Bok Tower Gardens is going to the
dogs for a good cause from 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 14, during the Bark Tower
Gardens' Winter Dog Day.
Leashed and friendly dogs can visit to
help support the Humane Society of Polk
County which will receive 50 percent of
the event proceeds.
Dog admission, including a doggie
gift bag, is $5 per dog. Regular human
admission rates apply.
"Many of our members, visitors and staff
are dog lovers who enjoy a chance to get
out in nature with their pets," said Presi-
dent David Price. "As a haven for wildlife
and humans, we hope to have more dog-
friendly opportunities in the future."
Tips on health, safety, dog grooming
Sand adoption, a w\ell a.s ome special
Sriendswh'o need go3C homes. will be
Available from 9 a.m.-noon.
Ask a Vet and Ask a Trainer experts will
be on hand to answer questions, and
doggie boutique items will be for sale.


In addition to pet adoptions and micro-
chipping, judges will select the cutest,most
unusual, owner look-a-like, most talented
and best kisser with prizes for the top three
winners in each category.
Water bowls will be located throughout
the Gardens.
The tales of Maggie and Punkin, poster-
dogs for the event, illustrate why people
should consider adopting pets from the
Humane Society and other rescue shelters.
"It was love at first sight," said Martin
Corbin when he found Maggie at the
Humane Society following Hurricane
Katrina. "She literally leapt for joy and seems
to know that my wife and I saved her life."
After losing their house in Hurricane Char-
ley in 2004, Joe Hanus and his wife adopted
more dogs when their home was rebuilt.
"Shelter dogs seem to appreciate having
a home and multiple dogs train each other,
which is why we now have five dogs."
Call (863) 676-1408 or visit www.boktower.
gardens.org for more information.


I'dt i ,
I *
;' ^;':a
, ,.-^
., ,'.: **;-,:,


- *- ,' ,


PHOTO PROVIDED


Dogs will bark at Bok this weekend.


Volunteers sought for

Search and Recovery team
The Polk County Sheriff's Office will hold day of the tryout. Each will need to bring
tryouts for its volunteer Mounted Search horse, trailer, saddle and current Coggins.
and Recovery Team on Saturday, Jan. 21, at All items will be inspected the day of the
Combee Arena in Lakeland. event. A riding exercise and obstacle course
The MSART volunteers work with sworn test will be given to each rider.
deputy sheriffs during deployments where Those interested may contact Detec-
horses and riders are used to search areas tive Jay Scarborough at jscarborough@
that are difficult to access. polksheriff.org before Thursday, Jan. 19, or
Non-law enforcement citizens who have call (863) 287-2224.
an interest in volunteer public service and Tryouts are at 9 a.m. The Combee Arena
horse riding may try out. Those who want is on Fish Hatchery Road between Hardin
to apply for the volunteer team will be re- Combee Road and Morgan Combee Road,
quired to fill out a volunteer application the in Lakeland.


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B 8e gaP SCMG Central Florida










School bus ad bill



narrowly gets panel's nod
J 0 p


TALLAHASSEE (AP) Legislation
that would permit advertising on
the outside of Florida school buses
narrowly survived its first committee
hearing Monday. Critics said they're
worried about unintended
consequences.
The bill (SB 344) cleared the Sen-
ate Prekindergarten-12 Committee
on Monday by a 4-2 vote. It would
have died without support from one
of those critics, Sen. Larcenia Bullard.
The Miami Democrat said she voted
for the measure only to give the spon-
sor, Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee,
a chance to make it more palatable.
"This, quite frankly, is a desperate
move," Montford acknowledged."'But
it's one that's necessary."
Montford, also CEO of the Florida
Association of Disfrict School Super-
intendents, said the state requires
cash-strapped school districts to
transport students, but it provides
just under half of the money needed
to pay for that service.
The bill has been referred to two
more committees in the Senate,
where Montford will have a chance to
offer changes. A similar bill (HB 19)
has been filed in the House but has
not yet had a committee hearing.
Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto was
among those concerned about unin-
tended consequences but also said
such advertising would exacerbate


inequities among children.
The Wellington Republican said
she didn't want children to start and
end their school day by "seeing on
the side of a bus a product they can't
afford or something that children can
use to tease each other" about what
one has and another doesn't have.
In voting for the bill, though,
Sen. Thad Altman, R-Viera, said he
thought plain yellow school buses are
boring.
"I'd kind of like to see them jazzed
up a little bit," Altman said. "If it's
done right, it could be fun."
Montford said the ads would have
to be low-key.
"School buses will continue to look
like school buses," he said.
Altman suggested the buses also
could be used to advertise school
events such as plays and football
games as well as commercial
products..
Bullard was worried about alcoholic
beverages. The bill prohibits ads for
such beverages as well as tobacco and
other products inappropriate for chil-
dren, but a Senate staff analysis noted
such restrictions might be challenged
in court.
Montford said schools have allowed
advertising at athletic stadiums for
years without any such problems. Also
banned would be political ads as well
as messages that are discriminatory in


nature or content or imply an en-
dorsement by the school district.
Besides the superintendents' group,
the legislation has the support of the
Florida School Boards Association.
Martha Harbin, executive direc-
tor of the Florida Beverage Associa-
tion, which represents soft drink and
other nonalcoholic beverage bottlers,
told the panel her members won't be


putting ads on school buses because
they have a policy against advertising
aimed at children under 13.
The bill would allocate half of any
proceeds to transportation and allow
another 25 percent to be spent at the
discretion of school officials. The re-
maining 25 percent would be placed
in endowment funds to match private
contributions to the schools.


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SCMG Central Florida Page 9B -


Wednesday, January 11, 2012






Page lOB SCMG Central Florida Wednesday, January11, 2012


FEELING


Area doctor's study in JAMA



13-year study challenges conventional wisdom on heart disease


ByJEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM


A person who has never had a heart
attack has a larger risk of suffering from
one or dying earlier than a person who
has had a heart attack.
SThat is the result
of a 13-year study
done in part by
a Polk County
cardiologist. The
results of the study
were published in
the Journal of the
American Medi-
calAssociation
(JAMA) on Nov. 16.
The study
looked at more
DR. JOHN CANTO than 1 million
people and
involved 2,000
hospitals, said Dr.
John G. Canto, a cardiologist withWatson
Clinic. Two studies with 542,008 patients
were done benveen 1994 and 2006.
"The study had two focuses," he said.
"The relationship between the risk fac.-:
tors and those kho actually had heart
disease."
The results showed the opposite of
what doctors had previously thought.


"Our data shows that patients with
multiple CHD risk factors present much
earlier in age than patients with fewer
or no risk factors, and that patients with
fewer or no CHD risk factors overall
had higher mortality after the first heart
attack."
Some risk factors of heart disease
include hypertension, smoking, dyslip-
idemia, diabetes and family history of
coronary heart disease, he said.
The study, which he said came from
a "clean population," also showed that
those who are overweight are not neces-
sarily more at danger than people who
are not.
"Our analysis challenged the conven-
tional wisdom and find it rare that obe-
sity is a factor and most people who are
fat have diabetes," he said. "It'svery rare
to have obesity as the only risk factor. A
patient most at risk is someone with a
lowerbody weight. We don't know that
for sure yet."
So that launched him and the team of
doctors around the country into another
study that is under way.
But in this study he has culled some
interesting results that will help him with
patients in the future.
"There are a lot of things possible for
this," he said. "There could be two or
three hypotheses."


One is the more risk factors that people
have the more likely it is those people
will be on medication.
"For example, if someone has high
cholesterol, it's more likely they'll be on a
cholesterol lowering drug. "Maybe treat-
ing these risk factors is a good thing."
Another is the fact that people who
have risk factors are more likely to be
seeing a doctor.
"If you are a healthy person you're
more likely not to see a doctor," he said.
He also suggested that age is a factor.
"We have a strong suspicion in the re-
lationship between risk and age," he said.
"Eventually age becomes a risk factor."
The study has given Canto, and other
cardiologists, help in treating patients
and probably changing some things that
they had been doing previously.
"The clinical implication of our study
is that treating CHD risk factors makes
a tremendous difference in reducing
mortality, and conversely, the absence
of these factors does not necessarily
portend a good prognosis after a heart
attack. Future studies should seek to gain
further insight into possible explanations
for these surprising results."
He said over the past 30 years mor-
tality rates among those who have
suffered from heart attacks or those
who have heart disease have dropped


significantly. And, with this study, the
rates could drop more.
"This is the bottom line," he said.
"The public health message is treating
heart disease; factors make a tremen-
dous difference, a huge difference."
"Thirty years ago the way we treated
this was with bed rest. Now we know a
lot more," and have a lot more treat-
ment options, he added, saying that
bypasses are better and a super-aspirin
is available.
Canto's areas of expertise include
preventive cardiology, chest pain,
myocardial infarction and heart attack,
coronary disease, and women, minori-
ties and elderly with heart disease.
In addition to being a cardiologist at
the clinic since 2004, he serves as the
director of Watson Clinic's Center for
Cardiovascular Prevention, Research
and Education and medical director
of the Chest Pain Center at Lakeland
Regional Medical Center.
As well as having his most recent
study.published in what could be
the most significant medical journal,
Canto has been profiled in USA Today,
Time magazine, The New York Times,
The Wall Street Journal, CNN, BBC,
National Public Radio, Good Morning
America and NBC Nightly News with
Tom Brokaw. .. ,


Hospital introduces carotid stenting


Heart of Florida
SRegional program to
help prevent strokes
When 82-year-old Margaret Crow
had surgery to clear blockages in both
.arteries that carry blood to her brain,
she knew the surgery had significantly
reduced her future risk of stroke.
She never imagined that 15 years later,
facing a 90 percent blockage in one of the
same carotid arteries, she would be the
first patient at Heart of Florida Regional
Medical Center to benefit from a much-
less invasive procedure known as carotid
artery stenting.
This high-profile procedure, per-
formed by interventional cardiologists
Ashish Pal and Irfan Siddiqui provides a
less-invasive alternative to traditional ca-
rotid surgery endarterectomyy) in select
patients who are at high risk for surgery
due to other heart or lung disorders or
previous neck surgery. Carotid stent-
ing, like carotid surgery, was designed to
decrease the incidence of stroke.
"I had had a heart attack, was on blood
Sthinners, and had scar tissue from my
surgery back in 1996, which all would


have made traditional carotid surgery
more difficult," said Crow. "Dr. Pal
thought I was a perfect candidate for this
approach. He told me the recovery time
would be faster, and there would be less
discomfort, and he was right.".
Pal said, "Mrs. Crow came to us with
90 percent blockage which put her at
high risk for a stroke. Her scar tissue
from her earlier surgery was another
Good reason to use this procedure.
Once I explained the procedure, she
was relieved that she could have it per-
formed right here at Heart of Florida,
and even happier to find out it was a
relatively easy procedure that would
result in less discomfort and a faster
recovery."
She was nervous, but the outcome
came as it should have.
"I was really nervous going into this,
but my doctor explained everything.
They gave me something to relax, but
I was awake so I could hold my breath
when they needed.me to and respond
to the doctor's commands during the
procedure."
"She did great," said Pal. "She expe-
rienced no discomfort during the pro-
cedure. We watched her overnight, and
she was able to return home the next


day. She doesn't require any change in
medications or lifestyle."
Now she is back on the golf course. "I
would rather play golf than do just about
anything else. Now I feel well enough
that I can," she said.

What is carotid
artery disease?
There are two carotid arteries the
main arteries in the neck running from
the aorta to the brain. These carotid
arteries supply blood to the brain. When
one or both are blocked by a buildup
of fat/cholesterol deposits the artery
narrows and blood flow to the brain
decreases. If left untreated, this condition
can cause a stroke.

How is the procedure
performed?
"The carotid stenting procedure
begins with a small catheter threaded
from the femoral artery in the groin
area into the carotid artery," said Sid-
diqui. "A collapsed metal mesh stent
is inserted and self-inflates to support
the arterial wall and hold it open. A tiny
balloon is inflated within the stent to


ensure the stent is fully expanded and
implanted in the artery. Eventually, the
artery heals around the stent, protect-
ing the artery from clogging again. A
small filter (called anembolic protec-
tion device) is used as a "safety net" to
prevent any plaque from traveling to
the brain during the procedure. After
insertion of the stent, the embolic pro-
tection device is removed.
"This procedure takes approximately
an hour, and requires only local anes-
thesia and IV sedation," he added.

Who is a candidate for
carotid stenting? .
Currently, the Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services have approved
reimbursement for the procedure only
in those cases in which the patient is
symptomatic, is high-risk for surgery,
and has 70 percent or greater blockage.
Soon, with the publication of data
gathered in recently completed clinical
trials, it is expected to be approved for
low-risk patients as well.
If you don't have a physician, contact
the Heart of Florida Regional Medical
Center Physician Referral Line at (863)
419-2341 or visit www.%heartofflorida.com.


--; ..


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Hospital
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Wednesday, January 11, 2012


Page 10B SCMG Central Florida









Congestive heart failure indicates the heart is weak pump


DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am 79 and
have congestive heart failure with some
high blood pressure. Please give the in-
formation you have on my illness.,- EW.
ANSWER: Congestive heart failure is
a common illness in older people. Up
to 10 percent of those older than 65
have it or have had it. The meaning is
that the heart has become so weak that
it can't pump enough blood to support
all body organs and tissues. You can
call it just heart failure. The "conges-
tive" word confuses people.
The signs of a weakened heart are
breathlessness when trying to do even
relatively easy physical tasks, along
with a feeling that all energy has left the
.body. A third sign is swelling, most often
of the feet and ankles. The lungs also fill
with fluid from backed-up blood, and
that adds to the breathing difficulty. The
lungs: a ire ogest'edwithefluid.-' :
Clogged heart arteries, heart-valve
problems, a previous heart attack, a for-
mer viral heart infection and uncontrolled
high blood pressure are some of the
causes of heart failure. Aging is a major
cause. The heart is beginning to wear out.
This sounds hopeless; it isn't. Plenty
'I ( rI'


and heart muscles.
V Ask Dr. The booklet on congestive heart
failure provides detailed information
Donohue on the condition and its treatment.
Readers can order a copy by writing:
SIDr. Donohue No. 103, Box 536475,
SOrlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a
P.O. Box 536475, check or money order (no cash) for
Orlando, FL $4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the recipient's
32853-6475 printed name and address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: My husband's
can be done. For one, reduce the amount behavior has me concerned. He had
of salt and salty foods that you eat. Salt a flare-up of his ulcerative colitis six
causes fluid retention in the body. Water months ago and began exhibiting
pills (diuretics) remove excess body fluid, obsessive-compulsive behavior -
and they're a constant part of treatment, handwringing and repeatedly rubbing
Drugs called ACE inhibitors not only his mouth with the back of his hand.
regulate blood pressure, but they also His father is obsessive-compulsive.
ease heart failure. This is only a sample My husband also has added four more
of the drugs that are useful for the touching behaviors, and he refuses to
treatment of this condition. have his hair cut. Will this progress? I'm
Once under treatment, you ought to at my wits' end. S.N.
be breathing with ease and feel a return ANSWER: An obsession is a recur-
of pep. An exercise program is then ring idea or thought that brings anxiety
possible and an essential for treatment, and fear. A compulsion is a repetitive
The program is one that should be behavior done to relieve the anxiety
devised by your doctor. Walking is an generated by the fearful thought. It
excellent way to strengthen both body takes many forms constant hand


washing, repeated checking to make
sure the oven is off, touching things in
a stereotypical way.
If O-C disorder interferes with a
person's life or impedes his job perfor-
mance, that person should seek expert
advice. Techniques exist to combat this
illness. (It is an illness.) Cognitive behav-
ior therapy helps root out the obsession.
Deliberately recalling the feared thought
without resorting to a ritual to abolish it
is another therapy. And medicines can
be helpful. Your husband is ruininghis
life and his family's life over something
that is treatable.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: Two weeks
ago, I contracted a cold. It's gone,
except for a troublesome cough, which
is worse at night. I read in an issue
ofAARP Bulletin that a spoonful of
honey at bedtime often gives better
results than cough medicines; I tried
it. The results were nothing less than
miraculous. What do \ou say about, this
remedy?.- EB.
ANSWER: I say stick \ith it. Honey ;
has been used for many years to
suppress coughing. It's even given to
babies older than one year.


The woe in women's health: Study shows gender differences


In studies asking women to rate their
own health, women typically describe
their health as being worse than men's.
Researchers have usually attributed this
to reporting bias. "In general practice,
there has been this idea that women over-
report health problems, or are more likely
to say they are ill or pay attention to their
symptoms than men," as Davide Malmusi
of the Public Health Agency in Barcelona,
Spain, told Scientific American.
But in a new study published in the
European Journal of Public Health; Mal-
muisi and colleagues suggest a different'
reason: Women say they're less healthy
than men because, on average, they ac-
tually are. Specifically, they suffer from a
higher rate of chronic disease.
The researchers analyzed data from
29,000 Spaniards who were queried
about their health. Half of the respon-
dents were between the ages of 16 and
44; the other half was older. Almost
39 percent of the women interviewed
rated their health as poor or very poor;
25.7 percent said they had some sort
of chronic ailment that limited activity.
For men, just 27 percent self-reported
poor health; 19 percent said they had a
chronic limitation of activity.
The study suggests the difference isn't
a matter of groundless complaining.
When researchers compared men and
women with the same type or number
of chronic conditions, gender differ-
ences disappeared. Men and women
equally described poorhealth.
The bigger question of why women


WELL NEWS
Scott LaFee



appear to have a higher rate of chronic
health problems was not resolved, but
Malmusi said it's likely a mix of factors,
biological and social. "Gender influ-
ences the way people are diagnosed and
treated in health systems," he said. "It
.influences the kind of health conditions
they suffer from, the. way people relate
to their own bodies and what kind of
access to health care they have."

Body of knowledge
Fingernails grow faster on the hand
you favor. The nail on the middle finger
grows fastest of all.

Counts
720,000 Number of Americans age
90 and older in 1980
1.9 million -Number in 2010
9 million Projected number in 2050
Source: U.S. Census Bureau


Number cruncher
A bean burrito from Taco Bell (198
grams) contains 370 calories, 90 from
fat. It has 10 grams of total fat or
15 percent of the recommended total fat
intake for a 2,000-calorie daily diet.
It also contains 10 milligrams of


cholesterol (3 percent); 1,200 mg of
sodium (50 percent); 55 grams of total
carbohydrates (18 percent); 8 grams of
dietary fiber; 4 grams of sugar and 14 g
of protein.

Doc talk
Mannitol a natural sugar that acts
as a diuretic (causing urination and
water loss). It is used in cases of drug


overdoses and cerebral swelling

Phobia of the week
Ebulliophobia fear of bubbles

Never say diet
The world's speed-eating record for
burritos is 11.81 pounds in 10 minutes,
held by Tim Janus.


You deserve personalized quality health care!

Benigno Feliciano, M.D
Diplomate of the American
Board of Internal Medicine
l Cardiac Diseases
STreating al High Blood Pressure
adult illnesses Pulmonary Diseases
and diseases: Osteo,. Rheumatoid Arthritis
HypoiHyperthyroidism


1137 Druid Circle
Lake Wales, Florida


* Diabetes
* Skin Diseases/ Cancer
* High Cholesterol


2000 Osprey Blvd., Suite 110 Strokes
Bartow, Florida
Se habla Espanol
Monday Friday: 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
863-533-1617
Accepting new patients 16 and older I
Walk ins welcome Same day appointments I I
Internal Medicine Institute, P.A. ntern, enenseite


Hear what you've been missing
Artis Bassett Hearlni Aids has been in
Business for 45 ears We kI nowV ho'.,
important ,oui hearing Is. We\ strl.e to offer
the best hearing de. ices a. allable 'Iujs
deli..er an e:.':epl tonal patient e...pedience


HEARING ANALYSIS
\V'h3r r, pe o-'f heal rinr,1 I','2 :'u
S- t '- *l E r' 'l.-

LIFESTYLE DISCUSSION
What sounds are part of your
regular environment


EARLY INTERVENTION
IS IMPORTANT
SDon't wait years to
get the help you need.


HEARING AID OPTIONS
\.eII 1,ho'. ,u rhe be'St
2,:-.:| |. T rr'er .,i r ree,:l

BUDGET OISCUSSiON
Pricing and payment options


g Present this
I COuponi for a
I FREE
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Hearing

SEvaluation
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16 an o "


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137 SR 60W Lake Wales 863-676-0616
M-Thurs 10am-4pm


Make an appointment with
our professional hearing
experts today. Your FREE
consultation will include:


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------------------------------------ ---------------U---~------~5-P~SP~.~;~ ~F-~i~~-~LYICi-r;ll~ii~~i--i~_~~~O~


------ I


Wednesday, January 11, 2012


SCMG Central Florida Page 11B









Free Clinic offers health screenings


Lake Wales Free Clinic will offer free
health screenings to the public every
Tuesday, from 4-7 p.m., beginning
Jan. 24.
The Clinic is at 210 Dr. J.A. Wiltshire
Ave. East, Lake Wales.
The health screening will consist
of measuring height, weight, blood


pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol
and blood oxygen levels. A nurse will
review-vital signs with each patient,
along with a review of family and
individual medical history, to ad-
vise patients what risk factors they
have for such chronic conditions as
diabetes, hypertension and heart


disease. Educational materials will
also be available on these and other
conditions.
Patients will be screened to deter-
mine if they are eligible to receive
treatment services at the clinic and, if
eligible, scheduled to see a doctor at
a later date. To be eligible, a patient


must have a family income below 200
percent of the federal poverty level
and have no insurance coverage.
Each patient must have a photo ID.
No appointment is necessary. Patients
need to arrive as early as possible, but
no later than 6:30 p.m. to allow time:
for the screening.


Audiologist gets board certification


Watson Clinic's audiologist
Dr. Katherine Pafunda was awarded
board certification in audiology by the
American Board of Audiology.
This certification
recognizes a knowl-
edge base that is
consistent with the
highest profession-
ally-established
standards, and
also demonstrates
Pafunda's commit-
ment to achieving
these standards
and remaining
h current in the latest
DR. KATHERINE audiology develop-
PAFUNDA ments and issues.
Pafunda
received her bachelor's degree from
the University of Florida, her master's
from the University of South Florida
and her doctorate from the Arizona
School of Health Sciences at A.T. Still
University.
She is a Fellow of the American
Academy of Audiology, a member of
the Florida Academy of Audiology and
a member of the American Speech


Language Hearing Association. She has
been with Watson Clinic since 1987.

Lectures for women coming
"Save the Vanities!," an upcoming
series of community lectures designed
to spotlight all available surgical and
non-surgical options for rejuvenation
and contouring of the face and body,
will take place at the-Watson Women's
Health Center.
Dr. Faeza R. Kazmier will do a presenta-
tion designed to cover the spectrum of
treatments available for facial rejuvena-
tion, from dermal fillers such as Botox,
Dysport, Restylane, Radiesse, and Sculptra
to facial cosmetic surgeries such as mini
face-lifts, at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 7.
Attendees will see a live, in-person injec-
tion demonstration of Sculptra by Kazmier.
The series concludes as Kazmier
discusses the treatment options for
contouring the remainder of the body
- at 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 20.
During this event, topics will in-
clude liposculpture, arm lifts, buttock
augmentation, and abdominoplasty
(tummy tuck) and much more.
Kazmier received her medical degree


from Albany Medical College in Albany,
N.Y., prior to performing her intern-
ship in general surgery and residency
in plastic surgery at the University of
Missouri in Columbia.
The lectures are at Suite B lobby of
the Watson Clinic Women's Center,
1400 Lakeland Hills Blvd., Lakeland.
Seating for each lecture is limited, and
refreshments will be served. Call (863)
680-7676.

Lectures to feature
plastic surgery, urology
Watson Clinic has three lectures
coming in January on plastic surgery
and urology.
The first one is by facial plastic
surgeon Dr. Pranay Patel called "Face a
Brighter Future."
It is at 10 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 14, and
is a review of available facial rejuvena-
tion services, including non-invasive
cosmetic and laser treatments, and
in-depth surgical efforts such as eyelifts
and facelifts.
The lecture is in the first floor lobby
of Watson Clinic's Bella Vista Building,
1755 N. Florida Ave., Lakeland. Call


(863) 904-6231 to RSVP
At 10 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 21, Watson
Clinic facial plastic surgeon Dr. Raam
S. Lakhani presents "Imagine the Pos-
sibilities of Facial Plastic Surgery," an
overview of the wide array of surgical
facial rejuvenation options, as well as
the growing popularity of non-surgical
treatments such as fillers and laser
resurfacing.
He will provide information on the
popular in-office mini facelift and eye-
lid rejuvenation.
This lecture will also be held in the first
floorlobby of Watson Clinic's BellaVista
Building. Call (863) 904-6218 to RSVP
Dr. James M. Belarmino has a presen-
tation called "Treating Erectile Dys-
function" at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 25.
Belarmino will examine the diverse
causes of erectile dysfunction, and
review the various treatments available
to those who suffer from this common
disorder.
The lecture will take place in the
Main Clinic Library, 1600 Lakeland
Hills Blvd., Lakeland. Call (863) 904-
4658 to RSVP
All lectures are free, but seating is
limited.


We're


Heavyweights at Fighting Heart Attacks


The warning signs of a heart attack are always an emergency. Fortunately, Florida Hospitals
Heart & Vascular Center is ready 24/7 to fight back with lightning-fast care. Which means you
can feel confident you will have a greater chance for survival and recovery.

It is important to understand warning signs.


The warning signs for a woman include: shortness of breath, dizziness, fatigue, pain below the left shoulder blade,
pain or tingling in the jaw, elbow, arm or throat, and/or nausea or vomiting.

The warning signs for men include: sudden pressure, squeezing or pain in the center of the chest,
fainting, sweating and shortness of breath and/or rapid heartbeat

Ifyou experience any of these symptoms, call 9-1-1 and ask to be taken to Florida Hospital.
For more information, please visit www.fhheartland.org


FLORIDA HOSPITAL
HEARnAND h'EDIC.AL CENTER


Wednesday, January 11, 2012


B 2le gaP SCMG Central Florida e