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The Frostproof news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00530
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Publication Date: 8/31/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00530
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text


Visit us on the Internet at www.FrostproofNews.com


The


Wednesday -
August 31,2011


Frostproof News


Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years


Volume 91 Number 58


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Frostproot, Polk County Flofida 33843


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A long walk for a great cause


Saturday


car wash just the start of cancer fundraising effort


By BRIAN ACKLEY
EDITOR
The next time you see Lena Down-
ing or Tracy Ormsby out for a walk, you
might want to give them a wave and
wish them good luck.
The two local women both work
at Frostproof's Ben Hill Griffin Elemen-
tary School are walking for a cause


in two months when they embark on a
three-day, 60-mile trek in and around
Tampa as part of a Susan G. Komen
Foundation fundraiser.
Each walker needs to raise at least
$2,300 in order to participate. Proceeds
from the event, which includes two
nights of tent camping between the
three days of walking, are invested in
community based breast health pro-


grams and breast cancer research.
Ormsby had a family member who
battled the disease, and Downing her-
self is a breast cancer survivor, so it was
an easy decision for them to become
involved. They went to an information-
al meeting about the event in Lakeland
earlier this year, and signed up on the
spot that night.
As part of their fundraising efforts,


the two will be hosting a car wash (with
a little help from family and friends
were sure) this Saturday from 9 a.m. to
noon in the parking lot of McDonald's
in Frostproof.
They are also hoping to schedule a
bake sale and other fundraisers before
the walk, which takes place from Oct.
WALK j16A


Are you ready for someC football!











PHOTO BY
S .K.M. Thornton
Sr.
Toddrick
Gaines and
Tyrone
Hamilton
combine on
a defensive
stop. See
more photos
,, .' andgame
previewon
-pages 10-11A.



Care Center board answers call

Eighteenth member board is backbone of organization


By BRIAN ACKLEY
EDITOR
(Editor's Note: This is the first
of a two-part series highlighting
those who direct the Frostproof
Care Center).
Ralph Waters, Executive Direc-
tor of the Frostproof Care Center,
always talks about how it's his
volunteer that make most of the
center's magic happen.


IND i



7 05252 00025 8


Behind that magic is a group
of 18 community leaders who
volunteer their time to sit on the
organization's board of directors,
overseeing everything from bud-
geting to programming and long
range goals.
Six new board members came
aboard in July,. including Rev.
Kelly Galati, Missy Maxwell,
Randy Scott, Kim Strickland, Riley
Williams and Alexandra Wise.,


Countj'............
Page lB
Feeling Fit........
Page 4B
Classifieds........
Inside
Football
Preview...........
Inside


Board members are nominated by
the group's personnel committee
and elected to serve a three-year
terms. Persons can serve two con-
secutive three-year terms before
having to come off the board for
at least one year.
The group is responsible for
selecting a "competent and
committed" executive director,
BOARD116A


Icy spring remembered

with warmthr

Kissengen Spring dedicated
as state historical site
By JEFF ROSLOW
STAFF WRITER ..
The seemingly ever-flo%%ing water of KissengeniSpring
was best remembered as being icy cold but was remem-
bered warmly by the hundreds who attended the dedi-
cation making it d state historical landmark1Thursday at
the Polk County Historical Museum.
"From 1896
ilntil it closed
the water
was always
72 degrees,"
said Dr. Ed
Etheridge, the
former presi-
dent of the
Polk County
Historical As-
sociation. And
though the
through was PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
water was al-
ways inviting Charles Cook unveiled Thursday the sign that
for swimming, proclaims Kissengen Spring a state landmark in
the memories Florida. The sign will be permanently place in
went to more Mosaic Peace River Park near Homeland.
than it just
being a place to get wet.
Kenneth Laurent remembered the dances there when
he was a teen. "Every once in a while someone would
come and collect the coins (from the jukebliox) and play
15 free songs ... we loved that place."
He added, "When the water stopped flowing it was
one of the things that happened to Polk County."
Kissengen Spring, which is southeast of Bartow,
stopped its continuous flow of 20 million gallons of wa-
ter per day into the Peace River in 1950 as the result of
excessive groundwater pumping, according to studies by
the Florida Geological Sturvey. The water was withdrawn


SPRINGS I16A

Sa~i players

and Burgers
Reunion of the
GroveTrotters"

Page


Calendar.........
Page 2.A
Editorial..........
Page 4A
Op/Ed..................
Page 5A
Obituaries........
Page 6A


Murder Incorporated
Frostproof
theatre goers try
to solve a mystery.


Page


12A


I


I






Pan 2AFotro esAgs3,21


CALENDAR and #wo


Friday, Sept. 2
Football game
The Frostproof Bulldogs will open
their 2011 regular season at home
against local rival Avon Park.. Kickoff
at Faris Brannen Stadium is 7 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 3
Cancer fundraiser
Lena Downing and Tracy Ormsby
will be hosting a carwash fundraiser
Saturday at the Frostproof McDon-
alds. The pair are raising money,
and training for a three-day, 60 mile
walk at the end of October that
raises money for the Susan G. Komen
Foundation which provides funds for
breast cancer research and support.
Friday, Sept. 9
Football game
Against Sebring, 7 p.m. kickoff at
Faris Brafnen Stadium.
Saturday, Sept. 10
Ramon Theater Gala
"Lights...Camera...Dancing! Danc-
ing with Polk County Stars." Polk.


County Sheriff Grady Judd will be the
guest emcee. Evening begins at 6:30
p.m. with a social and program starts
at 7 p.m.. Cash bar and heavy hors
d'oeuvres. Door prizes and more. $35
per person advance reservations
requested. Purchase online @www.ra-
montheatre.com. Info: 863-635-9112
or 863-635-7222.
Monday, Sept. 12
City meetings
The Frostproof city council will
meet in regular session starting at 6
p.m. at city hall. At 5:30, the coun-
cil will have a tentative budget and
proposed millage rate hearing. The
Planning and Zoning Board will meet
in city hall starting at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 13
Community Prayer Meeting
Sponsored by the Frostproof Min-
isterial Association. Free and open
to the public. Starts at approximately
12:10 p.m. For more, information con-
tact: Brian Smith at 257-0244.
Wednesday, Sept. 14


Business consultation
The Frostproof Chamber of Com-
merce, in cooperation with the Small
Business Development Center of
CFDC of Polk County is offering free,
confidential,, entrepreneurial techni-
cal assistance, guidance, consulting


and training to our business owners.
Sessions will be offered from 9 a.m. to
12 p.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. in the Ramon
Theater. There is no cost for chamber
members. If you have any questions
or would like to schedule your ap-
pointment call the office at 635-9112.


Upward Basketball and
Cheerleading provides a positive
sports experience for every
child and makes the most of
..... M i AS .... i yourfamily's time and money.
Friendly sports environment where children have fun
*Trained coaches and referees that encourage your child
Life lessons shared at each practice
Registration cost per child for basketball is $55.
Registration cost per child for cheerleading is $55.
L. Deadline for registration is September 3.
*|2 Basketball shorts are included in the registration cost.
Cheerleading mock turtlenecks are optional at a cost of $12.
iB A limited number of partial scholarships are available. Please call for details.


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August 31, 2011


Page 2A Frostproof News


17




Frostproof News Page 3A


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Pae4 rspofNesAgs3,21


VIEWPOINT



Taxpayer dollars spent for your opinion?


Governor Rick Scott came to Floridawith plenty
of experience in private business, but none in pub-
lic service. While some like to think that running
government like a business is a good idea, there is
much evidence to the contrary.
Scott, already no stranger to controversy, has
how come under criticism for giving plush state
jobs to seven political allies at a cost to taxpayers of
$400,000 a year.
At a time when Florida public high schools are
operating without guidance counselors and wa-
ter management districts are laying off engineers,
Scott's move stretches even the most accommodat-
ing definitions of gubernatorial authority.
Scott's newly-created bureaucracy includes two
"deputy directors of public liaison." The office will
be headed by Michael Dew, who will earn $90,000
annually to keep Scott informed of whaf the public
is thinking.
The other deputy director hire is Robin Stublen,
who was helpful to Scott during his election cam-
paign. Stublen runs a lawn care and pest-control.
company in Punta Gorda. Perhaps more important-


A small drinking town


.L JL k. JI. JL. L,-L J. .J- JLJU.J-L


(Seventh in a series of 8)
Ketchikan, Alaska, Aug. 5-- For a
state which proudly proclaims the mas-
sive size of its land area, its glaciers, its
mountains, its salmon, and its hospital-
ity, Alaska comes up dramatically small
in one category: its population.
Our travels today bring;us to the town
that calls itself "Alaska's First City," Ket-
chikan. It takes this nickname from the
fact that it is the first Alaskan commu-.,
nirv encountered by visitors or setilers-
when traveling north.
It is Alaska's fourth largest city, with a
population of only 14.000 people.

To tourists who arrive by shiploads
each day, the immediate reaction is
that it is a small town carved into the
side of a mountain, a place where locals,
have preserved the look and feel of a
114-year-old fishing village.
A second look reveals a fondness for
totem poles, which are placed with
Sthe frequency of Florida's plastic pink
flamingos, but with a far greater eye to"
style.

A tour bus takes us to the nearby
Alaskan Indian village of Saxman. While
enroute, Daniel, our driver and com-
mentator, tells us that Ketchikan has 36
jewelry stores and 27 bars. The main-
stay of the economy, aside from tour-
ism, is salmon packing and shipping,
with half a million pounds of salmon
processed at the town's three canneries
each year.
"We are a small drinking town with
a fishing problem," he says with a
chuckle.


Our Viewpoint
ly for Scott, he is a Tea Party activist.
Stublen has run unsuccessfully for the Charlotte
County Commission, but perhaps more signifi-
cantly, he is the founder and editor of a website,
called "hotteanews." He was a vocal backer of
Scott's election.
In the private world, executives have considerable
lee-way in making such hires, and answer only to
their board of directors, who tend to be close allies.
Corporate stockholders are rarely aware of such
favoritism. State government functions under an
entirely different set of rules, in which the taxpayers
are kept 'in the know' by the function of a free and
independent press.
Scott's long private-sector experience includes
helping found Columbia Hospital Corporation,
which he later merged with Hospital Corporation of
America to create Columbia/HCA. The combination
eventually became the biggest for-profit health-care
company in the U.S., with Scott at the helm.


.B.E- .b_ .-IN VV V L. 0 0


S.L Frisbie




1 I Frisbic cn be comaied at
i trlsbiei'polkcounrydemrnotar corn.


He thanks us for taking his bus. He
says we have rescued him from a career
in the canneries.
Ketchikan also calls itself the Salmon
Capital of the World.
The town gets an average of 13 feet of
rain a year, sometimes more than twice
that much. The abundant rainfall is es-
sential to the salmon harvest.

The residents of Saxman, the small
native village just outside Ketchikan, are
immersed in the tourist industry.
A troupe of dancers ranging from
kindergarten age to grandparents,
dressed in colorful costumes, performs
traditional dances in the clan house, a
wooden structure built by carefully fit-
ting together planks without the use of
nails or screws.
At a carving center, a gray-haired
craftsman goes though the motions of
working on a totem pole. His heart is
not in it.
At the ever-present gift shop, items
labeled "Alaska" and bearing "Made in
China" labels sell for $3 to $5. Crafts
made in Saxman are priced from $60 to
$120.

. Large maps posted on Ketchikan's


The end of Scott's time as CEO, and much of his
experience with government, occurred when the
company came under investigation for Medicare
fraud, and ultimately admitted guilt to 14 felony
charges. The company paid a fine of $600 million.
Scott was not charged. :
Scott defended the creation of the new positions
under the description of "public liaison." "They will
be there to make sure I hear what people.. .what's
important," Scott said.
We fear that Scott has yet to make the mental
adjustments necessary to transition successfully
from the private sector to the public one. A lack of
previous experience in government or elective office
is a handicap.
Florida governors have long relied on legislative
aides and media sources for general political news.
Direct communications from citizens has never
been in short supply, and usually far exceeds any
governor's ability to read and respond to it person-
ally. It is doubtful the creation of a new office will
significantly improve Scott's grasp of what Florida
voters are really thinking.


piers there are four piers where
cruise ships dock bear the names of
the town's streets, alleys, and walkways.
One of them is Married Man's Lane.
Needless to say, Ihave to ask.
It is a semi-secluded walkway leading
to the town's red light district of yester-
year.
As we take a walking tour of Ketchi-
kan, we spot the two-story building that
houses the offices and printing plant of
the Ketchikan Daily News. I had to stop
in. It is a six-day daily (weekdays and
a single weekend edition), beautifully
printed on a four-unit Goss Community,
press with two color towers. The lead
story of the day is a debate by the city


council over whether to convert the
boiler at the new fire station from oil
and electric power to wood pellet fuel.
The added cost of $550,000 in mid-
construction is too high, councilmen
decided on a 4-to-2 vote (with one
member absent and unable to partici-
pate by phone due to poor reception).
Publisher Tena Williams greets us cor-
dially, and appreciates my comments
on the skill of her press crew.
That night, I dream that her head
pressman let me help run the press.

(S. L. Frisbie is retired. Tt was a really
realistic dream: the pressman didn't let
him do much.)


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
* Aileen Hood General Manager Jeff Roslow Editor Brian Ackley Managing Editor


Published every Wednesday at
14 W. Wall Street, Frostproof, FL 33843
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Frostproof, Florida and
additional Entry Office
*Phone 1863) 676-3467 *Fax (863) 678-1297
Postmaster: Send address changes to
140 E. Stuart Ave.,
Lake Wales, FL 33853-4198


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
SLx Monhs.................. ..25.68 One Year .... .................$4 1.73
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE [N-COUNTY MAIL
SLx Months. ............... $24 00 One Year................... $39.00
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
SLx Months.......... .......... $40.00 One Ye: ...... ....................... 65.00
OUT OF ST'ITE SUBSCRIPTION
S Months.................... $44.00 One Yeai......................$72.00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on:virtually any subject, but we do have
some-rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The-Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Frostproof
area can send letters and column submissions to letters@
lakewalesnews.com or mail them to 140 East Stuart Avenue, Lake
Wales FIL33853.


- - -- --


August 31, 2011


Page 4A Frostproof News





Freddie Wright Hugh Wright

... "I went there once but what I ... "Sunday morning we went out
remember is it was ice cold." early and had breakfast of sausage
and grits for 25 cents and swimming
for free all day."


Kenneth Laurent


... "Just going down there for dances
we had when I was a teen ... the
water was always cold but we never
stopped."


Dr. Ed Etheridge

..."It was icy cold and the mystery
of the boil. I went down but I got
chicken when I got about six feet
deep. It was a fearsome thing."


Letters to the editor


The benefits of Highlander Band


Thanks for your editorial recognition arrhythmic and tone-deaf. Ho'
of the Highlander Band. "King Otto" band was only the curriculum
was my-teacher and friend. Tom Bishop One of those things the center
was a mentor and friend. From that educational factory requires.
sixth grade music class at Polk Avenue The learning was life skills: 1
to the 1953 graduation at LWHS, Mr. K affirming discipline, individual
was a constant, caring, and demanding collective responsibility and se
force in my life. And in 1958 when as leadership.
a very green, under-prepared teacher Kudos to LW Charter School
I began this journey into "education" Superintendent Jackson, Princ
I was blessed to be befriended by Tom son and their teams for recogr
Bishop. It was a treat to watch him de- educational and community b
velop and advance the esprit de corps role of the Highlander Band. A
of the Highlander Band. News for backing their play.
For the record, according to a poll of I
our children and grandchildren I am Lake Wales High Cla
Proud of little league girls


ever,
of record.
mporary
listening,
l and
ervant-
Board,
:ipal Dun-
dizing the
building
nd to the
lill Scaggs
ss of 1953


On behalf of the Lake Wales Little
League, LW All Star Team and families,
I would like to say thank you! The sup-
port from our hometown folks, friends,
families and financial support from
local businesses that we received on our
All Star quest is greatly appreciated.
Our journey from districts in Plant
City, sectionals in Haines City, states
in Pbrt St. Lucie, to regionals in War-
ner Robins, Georgia was amazing arid
would not have been possible without
all of your support.
Thank you-to The Lake Wales News
for your coverage in keeping our town
updated with scores and happenings!
While the pain from their loss in Geor-
gia was devastating and their ultimate
goal was to make it to the World Series
in Portland, Oregon, the journey for




for reading the
Frostproof News


these 11 girls, 3 coaches, and their fami-
lies will be a summer they will never
forget!
The fun they had from hotels stays,
restaurants, bowling, skating, and
swimming was enough in itself, but the
friendships they created, the camarade-
rie they shared, and the memories they
made will last a lifetime.
As their coach, I am honored to have
been a part of this once in a lifetime
opportunity and I am very blessed to
have done it with this amazing group of
young ladies. I am proud to call them
Lake Wales Little League softball play-
ers and the State of Florida 2011 Little
League Champions!
Jim Maggard Jr.
President
Lake Wales Little League


www.frostproofnews.com


SEVENTEENTH


ANNUAL


LA
2011


E4FFi


Frostproof News Page 5A


August 31, 2011


The Inquiring Photographer



What is your biggest memory


of Kissengen Spring?






Pae6 rsUofNesAgs3,21


Larry "Big Mac" McDaDiels of Lake
Wales passed away Sunday, Aug. 28,
2011. He was 48.


Mr. Francis M. (Frank) Coyne, 83, was
ushered into the presence of his Lord
and Savior, Jesus Christ on Monday,
Aug. 29, 2011.
Mr. Coyne was
born in Canton,
Ohio, on July 13, -
1928 to John M.
Coyne and Mable
R. Coyne. At an
early age the
family moved to
Miami, Fla. At the
time of his death,
he haid resided
in Lake Wales for Francis M. (Frank)
approximately 35 Coyne
years.
He is survived by his wife of 26 years,
Susan B. Coyne; two sons, Michael V
Coyne (Tiffany) of Clarksville,Tenn. and
David P Coyne (Jennifer) of Hickory,
N.C.; three step-sons, Steven M. Keen
(Jill) of Lake Wales, Mark A. Keen (Mary
Anne) of Marianna and Daniel M. Keen
of Tampa; one sister, Doris I. Spencer
of Lake Wales; and eight grandchildren.
He was predeceased by his parents; first
wife of 25 years, DonaV Coyne; and a
brother, John K. Coyne.
Mr. Coyne graduated from Coral Ga-
bles High School in 1947 and joined the


of Frostproof, and daughter, Alicia A.
Loredo and her fiance Ted Sharp of
Lake Wales, and seven grandchildren;
Destiny, Lexi, Will, Alli, Alaynah, Loupe,
Jr., and Trey.
Memorial services will be Friday,
Sept. 2, 2011, at 10 a.m. at the Johnson
Funeral Home Chapel with Pastor Keith
Thompson officiating.
Johnson Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.


Marion Nelson Funeral Home in Lake
Wales is handling the arrangements.


army shortly thereafter. He served four
years in Germany as a medical techni-
cian. In September 1956 he joined the
Miami Police Department. He later
worked at Tull Industries in Miami, Gulf
Life Insurance Company in Lake Wales
and retired from Inner Alloys in Bartow.
He was an active member of the First
Presbyterian Church where he served
as a Deacon and Elder. In 1996 he was
appointed as the Elder of Visitation, a
position he held for 13 years until his
second retirement in 2009. He will be
missed by his many friends from the
church and community.
A Celebration of Life will be held 11
a.m. Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 at the First
Presbyterian Church with Rev. Chad
Reynolds officiating; and the family will
begin receiving friends at 10 a.m. in the
parlor.
For those who wish, donations may
be made to the First Presbyterian
Church of Lake Wales, Memorial Fund,
16 North Third St., Lake Wales, FL 33853
or to Good Shepherd Hospice, 105
Arneson Avenue, Auburndale, FL 33823.
Condolences may be sent to the family
at www.marionnelsonfuneralhome.
com.
Marion Nelson Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


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Engineer tapped as


Swiftmud director


OBITUARIES

Melody Maria Loredo


Mrs. Melody Maria Loredo, 55, of
Frostproof, Fla., died on Sunday, Aug.
28, 2011, at her home.
She was born July 7,1956 in High
Point, NC, and moved to Frostproof
20 years ago from Avon Park. She was
a retired waitress from the Frostproof
Family Restaurant. She was of the Bap-
tist Faith.
Survivors include her daughter Kelly
G. Luke and her husband Derrick of
Fort Riley, Kansas, son, Loupe L. Loredo


By CRAIG PITTMAN
ST. PETERSBURG TIMES


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TAMPA The new executive direc-
tor of the Southwest Florida Water
Management District is a 50-year-old
engineer from Jupiter who has never
worked for a Florida government
agency before.
Taking the job means taking a pay
cut.
The board of the agency commonly
known as Swiftmud, which oversees
the water supply in a 16-county area,
decided late Monday to hire Blake Guil-
lory, currently the vice president of the
engineering firm of Brown & Caldwell.
They picked him over the other
finalist out of 51 applicants, David
Chardavoyne, whom the board re-
cently learned had sued two previous
employers for breach of contract.
Guillory will be replacing Dave
Moore, a longtime Swiftmud employee
who was promoted to executive direc-
tor in 2003. Moore, who announced
his resignation in May, was making
$194,000. In his application, Guil-
lory told the Swiftmud board he was
making $175,000 a year at Brown &
Caldwell. In the past, he could look
forward to a raise for taking the job
at Swiftmud. But last week Gov. Rick
Scott told all five of the state's water
management districts he wants their
executive directors' salaries capped at
$165,000. He also called for more cuts
to their budgets.
Guillory, who has a master's degree
in engineering from the University of
South Florida, wrote in an e-mail to the
Times last week that he had no quarrel
with Scott's desire to cap salaries or cut


the staff.
"SWFWMD has four deputy direc-
tors, 19 directors, 71 IT employees,
200 employees in management and
administration division. ... 112 admin-
istrative ...... of 725 total employees.
Seems significantly out of balance to
me," he wrote.
Swiftmud would continue concen-
trating on "protecting and managing
our water supply, flood protection,
water quality and natural systems,"
he wrote. "However, it will be a
much leaner and more efficient
agency going forward."
Of the two finalists, only Charda-
voyne has any experience running
a water agency. He was in charge of
the San Antonio, Texas, water supply
system. However, in addition to su-
ing two previous employers, he left
the Texas job under an agreement
that paid him $412,000 in exchange
for a promise not to sue his employ-
er. Guillory, who has spent the past
20 years working as a consultant to
Florida city and county governments
and the three largest water manage-
ment districts, said he has never
been sued nor has he sued anyone'
else.
When Moore quit in the spring,
he did not give a specific reason for
his resignation as executive director.
But his departure is part of a wave of
change washing over the state's five
water districts after Scott said they
all needed to get back to their "core
missions." The executive directors of
the South Florida Water Management
District and the St. Johns River Water
Management District also resigned or
retired recently.


Larry "Big Mac" McDaniels


Francis M. (Frank) Coyne


Page 6A Frostproof News


August 31, 2011








Kids learn the fruit benefit

Putnam visits area school to push Florida's fruits, healthy eating


By DIANE NICHOLS
STAFF WRITER
In an effort to teach kids that their
food is not made by Keebler elves and
that eating healthy can be yummy,
Valleyview Elementary held a Farm to
School Picnic Friday with Agricultural
Commissioner Adam Putnam as the
special guest.
Not only was it a chance for students
to learn where fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles come from, but they were served
corn on the cob, oranges, broccoli
and mangos by Putnam himself who
donned a colorful apron.
"We're getting an incredible reaction
to this," Putnam said. "We've been to
schools all over the state and kids are
really willing to try new things. Nine
times out 10, they love it and then go
home and talk about it. It's just great
they can say, 'Hey, Mom and Dad,
I tried a mango today or I had this
wonderful corn on the cob. Can we get
some of that?' "
The Farm to School Picnic is part of
an ongoing program to stress the im-
portance of providing fresh fruits and
vegetables to the students on a daily
basis. It also relates to the USDA my
plate logo stressing that half your plate
should be fresh fruits and vegetables.
All Florida public school nutrition
departments will fall under the respon-
sibility of the Florida Department of
Agriculture beginning Jan. 1. Accord-
ing to Polk County Schools Director of
School Nutrition Marcia Smith, that is
one of the pluses of having Putnam at
Valleyview to personally speak to the
students. The National School Lunch
program is under the umbrella of the


U.S. Department of Agriculture, so
Smith sees it as a natural fit for Polk's
program to move over to the Florida
Department of Agriculture.
Students were treated to a picnic in
the cafeteria complete with costumed
characters dressed as fruits and vegeta-
bles, then were able to move outdoors
to experience a farmer's market. Local
produce vendors set up booths where
students could fill bags with fruits to
take home. Children could also taste
test treats from the school nutrition de-
partment such as carambola star fruit
and Fresh From Florida Salad.
The Farm to School Picnic was more
than a one-day school activity in the
eyes of Shannon Shepp, acting deputy
commissioner at Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
"This will start them thinking about
the things they keep in their cupboards
at home and teach both the parents
and the kids that healthy options are
out there, but it begins with them," she
said.
Jennifer Sills, director of school
marketing with the Dairy Council of
Florida, said the proof of the prob-
lem was in the lunch bags that come
through the schools every day.
"As long as kids are packing their own
lunches there will be bad choices. The -
.conversation needs to be more than
.telling kids they have to eat their fruits
and vegetables. There needs to be kids
teaching kids to eat better, too."
In a presentation to a packed cafete-
ria of second and third graders with
sticky fingers from eating oranges, Su-
perintendent of Schools Sherrie Nickell
explained her childhood memories of
growing up with a father who planted


the family's vegetables.
"My daddy really thought that it was
important to have fresh fruits and veg-
etables at our house to eat for break-
fast, lunch and dinner," said Nickell.
"He was always planting things and
would spend a lot of time in his garden
where he grew green beans, tomatoes
and squash. It was a wonderful way to
grow up because eating healthy made
us feel good. I look out at all of you and
recognize good things on your plates
today and that's really wonderful."
Putnam compared the students'
bodies to a "well-oiled machine."-He
said foods they choose to eat will make


a difference in how they feel as well as
improve their thinking and concentra-
tion levels resulting in better grades
and FCAT scores.
"We are all so lucky to live here in
Florida where all of these healthy
foods are grown," he told them. "When
other kids are putting on snowshoes
or big heavy coats as they trudge off
to the bus stop, you guys can all come
to school in January and eat oranges,
tangerines, fresh ears of corn, lettuce
and strawberries. Since we live here
and grow them all here where we live,
doesn't it just make sense to put them
in your school?"


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Frostproof News Page 7A


August 31, 2011








Polk may have its own charter school system


By DIANE NICHOLS
STAFF WRITER
Polk County could be the second
location in the state to create its own
charter schools following in the foot-
steps of the Miami Dade Public School
System.
The innovative new schools were
discussed during a school board work
session Aug. 16 and would be geared to
specific student populations of at-risk
students or those that have already
dropped out by using guidance coun-
selors, one to one recruitment, recruit-
ment literature, websites, open houses
and by providing translators as neces-
sary.
The proposed Step Up Academy
would be comprised of seven high
schools staffed with six teachers and an
enrollment target of approximately 150
students for the first year, 225 in the
second year and 300 by the end of the
third year.
The schools.were chosen after evalu-
ating student performance at each
site and are: Haines City, Kathleen,
Lake Gibson, Lake Region, Mulberry.,
Tenoroc and Winter Haven. Each high
school would include its own board
made up of School Board members and
leaders in the community The charter
school will be co-located on each home
high school campus with a written
agreement in place between the charter
school and the school district.
Benefits of this unique district
charter partnership include providing
a small, personalized learning envi-
ronment that will allow teachers and
support staff to build a relationship
with each student as well as putting a
strong, supportive focus on academic
success with specific learning strategies


and technology to assure that students
reach these goals. Students will have
the advantage of a small school setting,
but will also be able to participate in
the course offerings, extra-curricular
and co-curricular activities that a
traditional high school offers. Students
who live in the high school zone will
use school bus transportation already
in place for the high school.
School Board member Hazel Sellers
was sold on the idea.
"I think we all have mixed feelings
about charters," said Sellers. "But these
schools would meet the needs of our
neediest children and that's what char-
ters are all about."
Board Chairwoman Kay Fields also
expressed her support for the new
system.
"I'm not a fan of charters because:
mylove is public schools, but I'm very
pleased by this finished product and
the continuity it offers."'
Cecil McClellan Jr., Principal of
Kathleen High School, was at the work
session along with six other principals
from the proposed seven schools.
"Thank you for envisioning some-
thing for our at-risk kids that have been
slipping through the cracks," said Mc-
Clellan to board members.
Step Up Academy would be unique
and offer things the county hasn't
offered before, said Carolyn Bridges,
Senior director of magnet, choice and
charter schools. Bridges compared
the academy to New Beginnings High
School located in the Gil Jones Center.
in Winter Haven stating that Step Up
would provide a traditional high school
experience that New Beginnings and
other at-risk schools cannot. Bridges
also pointed out that with the Step Up
,schools the at-risk students would not


SIZZLING GRILL


be separated and have the benefit of
unity.


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Frostproof News Page 9A


August 31, 2011


i









Bulldogs look to improve for football opener Friday


Larkin should be OK,


By BRIAN ACKLEY
EDITOR

In a word, last Friday night's Kickoff
Classic against the Haines City Hornets
was, well, a little painful. In more ways
the one.
Important stuff first. Wide receiver
Terrance Larkin is OK after being taken
from the field in an ambulance after
receiving a helmet-to-helmet hit after
catching a pass in the second quarter.
Larkin slumped immediately to the
Joe Stangray Field turf, dropping the
football. The game was held up for
about 25 minutes as he was attended to
and eventually taken to a local hospital.
Frostproof Coach Price Harris said
Tuesday that Larkin will probably miss
a couple of games, although that will be
determined on how quickly he recovers.
None of his injuries is considered overly
serious.
Also a little painful was the final
score, 13-6 in favor of the host I lornets,
who scored all their points in a short
burst in the second period.
The first came on a 16-yard QB keep-
er by Tre West less than a minute into
the second quarter. Three plays later
West picked off a Zack Jenkins pass and
returned it 35 yards for a second score.
Frostproof's point came later in
that same quarter after Trevor McCall
jumped a lose ball at the Haines City 32.
Jenkins then hit Jake Smith on a 20 yard
completion before Tyrone Hamilton
capped off the three-play drive with an
eight-yard touchdown run.
Overall, there was somb good and
some not so good, which is to be ex-
pected in a preseason contest, Harris
noted.
"We were way to high, everything we
did was too high. That's a common mis-
take for young kids," Harris said. "And
sustaining our blocks. We had some
really good blocks, and we handsome
really poor blocks. Our blocking has got
#to get better."
Doing that, he said, would improve
the offensive consistency which was
lacking Friday.
"I thought we had some guys that ran
hard, but you can't just run hard, you
have to block well when you don't have
the football," Harris said. "We've got a
lot of things to work on offensively."
He said the mistakes were under-
standable.
"But only to a degree,",he added. "We
have some veterans that should be able
to pick some of that up. It was typical
stuff, and we tried to put everyone in so
we could see them in a game time situa-
tion."
He also noted that the team's youth
held them back a little too.
"We're young. We got a sophomore
starter on the D-line. We've got two
sophomore corners that never played
variety in their life, we've got a fresh-
man at safety. We've got a bunch of new
kids," Harris noted. "Making the transi-
tion from junior varsity to varsity is a
process, it's doesn't just happen. We just
have to get some game time experience
and we're going to be fine."
Friday night, the Bulldogs open their
regular season by hosting Avon Park.
"I know their a rival, and you never
know what can happen with a rival
game," Harris added. "They've got
speed as always, some good looking
athletes. They're going to be tough on
defense, they're usually pretty physi-
cal. It's always going to be a hard fought
game. What we're trying to worry about
is getting better ourselves."


hurt in 13-6 loss at Haines City


PHOTOS BY K.M.
THORNTON SR.

Terrance Larkin
gives a wave to let
everyone know he
was OK, relatively
speaking, okay after
taking a hard hit.


Brandon Corso looks for some running room. Reggie Allen looks to break this tackle for more yardage.


.Tyrone Hamilton stretches for pa t.
Tyrone Hamilton stretches for paydirt.


August 31, 2011


Page 10A FrostproofNews









Friday Night Preview


WHAT: Avon Park at Frostproof
Bulldogs
WHERE: Faris Brannen Stadium
WHEN: 7 p.m.
LAST WEEK: In
preseason Kickoff
Classics, Frostproof fell
to Haines City, 13-6; Avon
Park lost at Tenoroc, 19-13
in overtime.
KEY PLAYERS: For
Avon Park, Tyler Johnson
established himself as the
go-to running back. Ryan
Dick, quarterback, tossed
a 30-yard scoring strike
is the Red Devils's Kickoff
Classic last week. Running back
Roger Pringle broke off an 80-yard
touchdown run as well. Receiving,
targets include J.D. Hardy and Jarviel
Hart, who caught Dick's TD throw.
For Frostproof, a chance for senior
quarterback Zack Jenkins to test out
the Bulldogs wing-T offense. Also a
chance to see just how improved the


team's offensive line might be. They
impressed coaches with their offsea-
son and preseason work.
THE SKINNY: Frostproof won at
Avon Park last year, 33-6,
giving up just a kickoff
return for a touchdown.
Red Devils coming off
S 3-7 campaign, Frost-
proof was 5-5. Sea-
son opener for both
teams. In past few
years, Frostproof has
had little trouble with
Red Devils. Avon Park
once again is young, but
held their own against an
improving Tenoroc program in
last week's Kickoff Classic. Frostproof
was inconsistent, but showed major
glimpses in falling to Haines City, a
7A school. (Frostproof is Class 3A).
Red Devils linebackirig corps is solid.
Still, it figures that Frostproof might
still have a little too much for their
nearby rivals.


Tyrone "Barn" Hamilton and Jake Smith
(44) get some words of wisdom from Coach
Price Harris.


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ORDINANCE 2011-12

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF
FROSTPROOF, FLORIDA, AMENDING
THE UNIFIED LAND DEVELOPMENT-
CODE OF THE CITY OF FROSTPROOF,
FLORIDA; SPECIFICALLY, TO CORRECT
SCRIVENER ERRORS AND PROVIDE
MINOR UPDATES INCLUDING
AMENDMENTS TO ARTICLE 2 -
DEFINITIONS; ARTICLE 4 ZONING
DISTRICTS AND PERMITTED USES
ARTICLE 8 SIGNS, AND THE CITY'S
ZONING MAP; REPEALING .ALL OTHER
ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREIN;
AND PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.

The Ordinance and Resolution are available for review
in the City Clerk's office, 111 West First Street,
Frostproof, Florida, weekdays from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m. Interested parties may examine the Ordinances
there or appear at the meeting and be heard with
respect to such proposed amendments. In compliance
with the American Disabilities Act (ADA), anyone who
needs a special accommodation for this meeting should
contact the City Clerk's Office at (863) 635-7854 at
least 48 hours in advance of this meeting. At said
hearing any person, his Agent or Attorney, may appear
and be heard. If a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the City Council with respect to any
matter considered at such hearing, they will need a
record of the proceedings, and that, for such purposes,
they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is
.based (F.S. 286.0105).


Frostproof News Page 11A


August 31, 2011









There was a 'murderer' among us


PHOTOS BY K.M. THORNTON SR.
Cast members included, from left: Jim LeFlis,
Dede LeFlis, Sheri Macklin, Diana Biehl,
Lou Amato, Wesley Wise and Eric Hill. The
"murderer" turned out to be Biehl, who was
portraying the role of Mimi Lefleur.


Sheri Macklin, portraying the role of Grace
Medford, finds a comfortable place to take a
load off, in the lap of Chamber board member
Bob Goering.


The Frostproof Chamber hosted another in its
series of popular movie mystery dinner theater
events at the Ramon Theater last Saturday,
"Evil on the Beach" a 1920s classic mystery
with a World War I plot. The Great War has
been over for 10 years and comrades in arms
are reuniting to share their memories. In the
midst of the revelries, Russian poet Gregor
Manov is murdered on the beach. Portraying
the role of Army captain Woody Heartland is
Jim LeFils.


Brian's OtdoOr World
NEW & USED FIREARMS & ACCESSORIES


RUGER s i rw
Pistols Shotguns
Revolvers Knives
Rifles Ammno
Scopes & Optics Holster
We can dospial y _
-:. r,an '; "


Winter Haven: 863.294.6612 -
Bartow: 863.533.7222
Lake Wales: 863.678.0222

*J |^ ^ ,.A|ln


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
FOR THE CITY OF
FROSTPROOF, FLORIDA

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2011, BEGINNING- AT 4:00 P.M.,
THE PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION OF THE CITY
OF FROSTPROOF WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING IN THE
COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 111 WEST FIRST STREET,
FROSTPROOF, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER THE RESOLUTION
LISTED BELOW.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2011, BEGINNING AT 6:00 P.M.,
THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FROSTPROOF WILL
HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS,
111 WEST FIRST STREET, FROSTPROOF, FLORIDA TO
CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION AND
ORDINANCE:

RESOLUTION 2011-09
AN RESOLUTION APPROVING A CONDITIONAL USE
PERMIT TO ALLOW CHURCH (RELIGIOUS
ESTABLISHMENT) USES IN THE FACILITY LOCATED AT
118 WALL STREET (PARCEL ID # 28-31-33-977800-009001);
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.






t -SITE




17I


August 31, 2011


Page 12A Frostproof News




Auus 31 01Fotro esPg 3


'GroveTrotter' gather to have a ball










PHOTOS BY NEIL BYRD "Hubo Bentley and Dim Crooked Fools" band. Members: Jake Cockrell, Brian Draper, and Tim
Steve Wilson, who helped put the reunion together, along with Clark Webb. Ricketts
i i ii--------------i----.=..ii-im
I Tuesday Thursday Friday I
l 1I 8 Ball Pool Tournament All You Care To Eat All You Care To Drink I









On Saturday evening, Babson Park businessman Steven D. Wilson hosted a reunion of the 76-77
LATINthe players would gather at P&J's for hamburgers and refreshments. Approximately 75 playersSaturday
9in







family and friends were there for the celebration with many former competitors also stopping 2957 Hwy 27 North Avon Park, FL (863) 453-9438
by to say hello.Those on hand included, from left: Hugh Holman, Clark Webb, Perry Love, Andy and
Dr per, and SteveWiiso 2 mile South ofPolk Coun Line on U.S. 27 osed Sunday and Monday
th p ,yrs w udg .ra.....rran re sh ntA TIN NIAproHTt El yturda


,[heeae


THE HEALING CONTINUES
PROUD OF THEIR SERVICE PART OF THEIR MEMORIAL
PRESENT IN THEIR HONOR

ENTRY INTO FORT MEADE
ON OCTOBER 27

The cormmnnity is invited to line up
on E. US 98 & N US 17
Destination: American Legion, US 17198N

OPENING CEREMONY
OCTOBER 27 AT 6PM

Te ar a is considered sacreJ. No c il phones. smoking oir disrrabct.oas please
October 28 October 30 9am-9pm
This event brnt.hi to ou 'iv The Fort Mleade Leader


iT~fflf


chaise rocker $ & a
89710/09/08/07 $358
89710/09/08/07 reg. $,399.95


40" LCD HDTV
leh chaiserf
iSS'*448 $599y
104297/96/95 re S.9 reg. $99.95

'-
ra Fospro


Frostproof News Page 13A


August 31, 2011






Pae1AFotro Nw uut3,21


_Paid Advertisement


PAYING C

PRE-1 970


INDIAN CENT
UP TO $500*


3 CENT PIECE
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KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR
UP TO 8X FACE VALUE*


1797 $1
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STANDING LIBERTY QUARTER
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COINS


BRAIDED HAIR LARGE CENT
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JEFFERSON "WAR" NICKEL
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BARBER DIME
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BARBER QUARTER
UP TO $3,200*


PEACE DOLLAR
UP TO $3,000*


DRAPED BUST HALF CENT
UP TO $5,000*


ELBU ALL
I V E
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2 CENT PIECE
UP TO $2,000*


LIBERTY "V" NICKEL
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MERCURY DIME
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WALKING LIBERTY HALF DOLLAR
l i UP TO $4,700*


MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR
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1832 CLASSIC HALF CENT
UP TO $80,000-


I ;

I-


-- r I i ,


~iT"hF~&mbu iii _


WE HAVE UNCOVERED SOME
OF-THE RAREST NOTES IN
UNITED STATES HISTORY!
BRING IN YOUR OLD BANK
NOTES TO FIND OUT IF YOU
:,. HAVE A HIDDEN GEM -


T UESDAY -SA I TUR




AUG 30T SEPT. 3RD
i i i T -F 9AiM-6PM.,

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DIRCTINS:(83) 34-00

&-I1&tlkf ikr.0% =LBl1T^^^


WATCHE,COT-UME


August 31, 2011


'Page 14A Frostproof News


i.


c






August31, 2011 Frostproof News Page 15A


ICCA will be placing ads in newspapers, radio and
running television spots this week asking people to
bring in any old silver and gold coins made before
1970. Those that bring in their coins will be able to
speak with collectors one on one and have their coins
looked at by a specialist. With the help of these
ICCA members, offers will be made to those that have
coins made before 1970. Offers will be made based
on silver or gold content and the rarity of the coins.
All coins made before 1970 will be examined and
purchased including gold coins, silver coins, silver
dollars, all types of nickels and pennies. Those that
decide to sell their coins will be paid on the spot.
If you are like a lot of people you'might have a few
old coins or even a coffee can full lying around. If you
have ever wondered what they are worth now might
be your chance to find out and even sell them if you
choose. -They could be worth a lot according to the
International Coin Collectors Association also known
as ICCA. Collectors will pay a fortune for some coins
arind currency for their c:ll.-.: :, : If.it is rare enough,
one coin could be worth over $100,000 according
to Eric Helms, coin collector and ICCA member. One
ultra rare dime, an 1 894S Barber, sold for a record
$1'.9 million to a collector in July of 2007. While
that is an extreme example,. many rare and valuable
coins are stashed away in dresser drawers or lock
boxes around the country. The ICCA and its collector
members have organized a traveling event in search
of all types of coins and currency. Even common coins
can be worth a significant amount due to the high
price of silver, and gold, says Helms. -Washington
quarters and Roosevelt dimes can be worth many
times their face value. Recent silver markets have
driven the price up on common coins made of silver.
Helms explains that all l,oif dollars, quarters and
dimes made before 1965 contain 90% silver and are
sought after any time silver prices rise. Right now it's
a sellers market he said.
The rarest coins these collectors are looking for
include $20, $10, $5 and $2 1/2 gold coins and






COINS
Any and all coins made before 1970, rare
coins, entire collections, Silver Dollars,
Half Dollars, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes,
Nickels, Three Cent-Pieces, Two Cent Pieces,
Cents, Large Cents, Half Cents and all others.
JEWELRY.
Gold Jewelry, Silver Jewelry, Gold Buillion
Diamond rings, bracelets, earrings, loose
diamonds, all gem stones, scrap gold, broken
jewelry etc.
PLATINUM
Anything made of Platinum.-
GOLD COINS
Including $20, $10, $5, $4, $3, $2.5,
$1, Private Gold, Gold Bars, etc.
INVESTMENT GOLD
Kruggerands, Canadian Maple Leafs,
Pandas, Gold Bars, U.S. Eagles and
Buffalos, etc.
PAPER MONEY ,
All denominations made before 1934.


any coin made before 1 850. These coins always
bring big premiums according to the ICCA. Silver
dollars are also very sought after nowadays.
Other types of items the ICCA will be purchasing
during this event include U.S. currency, gold bullion,
investment gold, silver bars, silver rounds, proof sets,
etc. Even foreign coins are sought after and will be
purchased.
Also at this event anyone can sell their
gold jewelry, dental gold or anything made
of gold on the spot. Gold is currently trading at
Record Highs. Bring anything you think might be gold
and the collectors will examine, test and price it for
free. If you decide to sell, you will be paid on the
spot it has been an unknown fact that coin dealers
have always paid more for jewelry and scrap gold
than other jewelers and pawn brokers.
So whether you have one coin you think might be
valuable or a large collechtin you. recently inherited,
you can talk to these. c-:1I .:i-. for free. If you're lucky
you may have a rarity worth thousands. Either way
there is nothing to lose and it sounds" ,r.- : fun!
For more information on this event visit
WWW.INTERNATIONALCOINCOLLECTORS.COM


* Gather items of interest from your attic,
safe deposit box, garage, basement, etc.
There is no limit to the amount of items
you can bring
* No appointment necessary
* You will be paid on the spot for your
items
* You get 100% of the offer
with no hidden fees.


Also Buying
: : Antiques -
-- War Memorabilia
Costume Jewelry -
Guitars :


PAID $1,800


f 1916
Mercury

PAID $2,800


INTERNATIONAL
COIN COLLECTORS ASSOCIATION


I ( ~*~


PAID $250


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Gold and Silver Coins Selling for Highest Prices


in Over 30 Years Due to Weak Economy and It's


Happening Right Here in Lake Wales!

By KEN MCINTOSH
STAFF WRITER


SILVER


Frostproof News Page 15A "


August 31, 2011


S '-







BOARD: Answering the call


FROM PAGE 1A
adopting a budget, establishing and
review policies, assisting in securing
funds, promoting the mission verbally,
approving staff members, improving
and maintaining the physical facilities,
approving programs, assisting in public
relations and publicity, selecting board
members and ratifying others to be
involved, addressing issues critical to
the future success of the organization,
helping shape long range goals and
holding accountable and supporting all
committees and special committees.
Following is a brief profile of some of


the board members currently serving:
Riley Williams is a Frostproof na-
tive, a citrus dealer and grower as well
as Realtor in Polk County. Besides
being active in the Frostproof United
Methodist Church and Lion's Club, he
said "I want to help the Frostproof Care
Center create and achieve its goals."
Alexandra Wise lives in Frostproof
as is a resource teacher at Frostproof
Elementary School.
"I am committed to connecting edu-
cation and the- community and believe
that serving on the Frostproof Care
Center Board will allow me to further
server the families of the Frostproof


community," Wise noted.
Kelly Galati is a pastor, who relo-
cated to Frostproof in 1994, currently
serving Family Life Church.
"Serving the care center, I see lives
touched and changed for the better,"
Galati noted.
Randy Scott has been a Frostproof
resident for 36 years, graduating from
Frostproof Middle Senior High School
in 1981 before beginning his career
in citrus harvesting. His most recent
endeavor includes residential and
commercial real estate investments.
He resides in Frostproof with his wife
Susan, children and grandchildren.


"I hope to make.a difference in the
lives of Frostproof residents who have
fallen on hard times in the recent reces-
sion," Scott said.
Brian Smith is the pastor of the First
United Methodist Church in Frost-
proof. He is a lifelong Florida resident,
and moved to Frostproof in 2008 with
his wife Rebecca and two children.
"I am serving on the care center
board in hopes of helping to support
and direct this vital ministry to our
community," Smith added. "I also want
to help foster the foundational connec-
tion between the care center and the
churches in our community."


SPRINGS: Historical site


WALK: A great cause


FROM PAGE 1A
primarily for phosphate mining, which
was booming in the area at the time.
The mining operations consumed
75 million gallons of water per day
- more than twice the demand of all
other users in Polk County combined
- and wells as large as 24 inches in
diameter were installed near the spring,
according to a 1951 FGS and other


reports.
But for 75 years it was a hot spot for
Polk County residents and for tourists.
It was the site of political rallies and
during World War II it was a spot for
rest and recreation for soldiers.
Cynthia Barnett, the keynote speaker
at the dedication ceremony Thursday,
said the site was an important part
of Florida's water supply but it meant
more than that.


FROM PAGE 1A
28-30.
"Initially, when we went to that first
meeting, it was like 'wow, this is really
a big deal' to train for it and raise that
kind of money," Downing said.
"But then I said, 'you know what,
when I had cancer, that was a really big
deal to me too.'
Now that we're getting donations


and have people support you, that just
drives you more."
Downing said she had given some
prior thought to the three-day walk
because she has a sister who is a breast
cancer survivor as. well.
"I thought, wouldn't that be awesome
to do that three-day walk,'" she added.
"Yes, the survival rate for breast cancer
has come a long way, but it's not there
yet. People still die from breast cancer."


2011 NISSAN VERSA
DOUBLE REBATES
NISSAN...-1000
HILL ........ -1000

TOTAL REBATE...... s2 0 0 0


2012 NISSAN SENTRA
DOUL EBATES
NISSAN.... -1000
HILL .........-1000

TOTAL REBATE...... u2000

2012 NISSAN ALTIMA
TRIPLE REBATES
NISSAN...-!000

HILL........ -1000


$1



F(


000 MORE 2011 NISSAN QUEST
RDYOUR IPLE REBAS
-NISSAN-..5-750
R YOUR HILL........-750
HILL .........

u *-El HLLTOTAL REBATE...... 2250


2012 NV CARGO VAN


NW-I


Nows23,988


S I I v I


2011 NISSAN TITAN
DOUBLE REBAS
NISSAN...-4250 t-
HILL........-4250
TOE......s8 5 0 #10965

TOTAL REBATE...... $859 O


2011 NISSAN ARMADA
S DOUBL REBATES 3
NISSAN....-3500
i i HILL.........-3500


m -- Iw -


TOTAL REBATE......


$3000


TOTAL REBATE......


$7000


AuDurndale


ssi| i r OPEN
Facig AvaleSUNDAYS
n 1i aabl 12-54


Bartow


i1


I L L I


August 31, 2011


Page 16A Frostproof News


v


SI 'i