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The Frostproof news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00498
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Publication Date: 3/30/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
sobekcm - UF00028406_00498
System ID: UF00028406:00498
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text





Frostproof's
Got Talent
See -,'?- ; SA-7A,


Can the schools
make the grade?


It's going to be
Ken Morrison Day


See Page 8B


S********ORIGIN MIXED ADC 335
20tpr5 SooA LIBRR OF FLORIDA HISTO
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
Frostproof Ne GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


754

Volume 91 Number 26


Frostproof's Hometown News for more than 85 years


USPS NO 211-260


Frostproof, Polk County Florida 33843


Copyright 2011 Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.


Introducing: Ca


Citrus industry to market to children


tain Citrus


ByJEFF ROSLOW
STAFF WRITER
The room went dark, the
Space Odyssey song began and
it began to lighten as Vanessa
Hodak introduced domes-
tic marketing's newest team
member.
A screen showed Florida
Citrus Commission members
a sign with orange letters
proclaiming "From Planet
Orange." It changed to "Intro-
ducing," then it changed to
"Captain Citrus" with a photo
of a full orange and one sliced
in half in front of it.
The lights started to come
up and Hodak and Captain
Citrus were standing before
the board as the music contin-
ued.
There he was, a walking
orange with a green cape and
the capital letter "C" on his
stomach; well in the place
where most would picture a
stomach as oranges don't have
stomachs.
"Today is his debut and
tomorrow he will delve into
a classroom teaching about
200 students in Bowling Green
about the benefits of juice,"
Hodak told the commission-
ers at the March 16 meeting.


"We wanted you to meet him
in person before he flies into
Bowling Green tomorrow."
Citrus grower Sam Jones
joined Captain Citrus at Bowl-
ing Green Elementary on
,Thursday, March 17.
Hodak said Captain Citrus
will visit 15 to 20 schools dur-
ing the rest of the school year
at a rate of two to three schools
per week before flying off for
the summer and starting again
in August when students go
back to school next year.
It is one of the latest moves
by the Citrus Domestic Mar-
keting Department to promote
the future of juice and get the
message to children. They are
attempting to sell juice, help
growers and remind them of
orange juice over the many
other choices there are in cold
drink sections.
There are so many other
choices in the refrigerators of
stores and though the popula-
tion has increased the num-
ber of choices has increased,
too, commissioners were told
during an earlier part of the
Domestic Marketing Depart-
ment's campaign.
With the Internet there are
many other ways to reach con-
sumers and the Domestic Mar-


keting Department is taking
advantage of it. It launched a
Facebook page to promote its
Juicy Scoop campaign that has
reached nearly 27,000 people
in Atlanta, Miami, Philadel-
phia and Boston. And, Amy
Carpenter told commissioners,
a digital marketing campaign
has generated about 12 million
impressions and nearly 3,500
clicks to floridajuice.com.
And Captain Citrus has his
own website, http://captain-
citrus.com/, and on it is a
contest that invites children
in Polk, Hardee and Highlands
counties to create a poster,
painting, poem, story, song or
video through their schools.
There will be 20 winning
entries. The deadline for the.
contest is April 15.
The website also has a teach-
er galaxy, a parent universe, a
grower system and a kid space
that has Captain Citrus explain
who he is.
- "I have come to planet Earth
in search of other superheroes.
I have chosen Florida as my
landing site," it says.
After his three-minute intro-
duction to the commission-
ers and anyone else who was
CAPTAIN S5A


PHOTO PROVIDED
Citrus grower Sam Jones and Captain Citrus visited Bowling Green Elemen-
tary School Thursday, March 17, to teach students about orange juice.
Captain Citrus plans to visit classrooms in 15-20 schools by the end of May.


Orange blossom thank you


Bob O'Hara received a plack Thursday, March 24, from the Frostproof City Council member Wesley
Wise for his work and continuing efforts in the city's annual Orange Blossom Festival held in
February. On hand to present the plaque were, from left, Eddie Hutzelman, Wesley Wise, Bob


O'Hara, Dee De


Expert cites hole in research

Scientist: Phosphate needs to 'open up' to peer review


By GREG MARTIN
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA The
phosphate industry needs
to open up its research
on mine reclamation
techniques to worldwide
scientific review in order
to overcome a daunting
problem: restoring the
underground layers of
sand and clay that had
naturally kept wetlands
and streams on the sur-
face wet.
That's according to
renowned wetlands res-
toration ecologist Kevin
Erwin of Fort Myers. He
was one of more than
a dozen scientists who
spoke Monday on the first
day of a two-day confer-
ence.


ie Lefls and Art Trammel About 120 people at-

Today is last day to ask for abs


People who want to vote absentee in
the Tuesday, April 5 city elections have
until 5 p.m. today to ask for a ballot.
They have to get it from the Supervi-
sor of Elections Office and requests can
be made by calling 534-5888 or through
website at www.polkelections.com.
A completed ballot must be returned
to Election Headquarters in Bartow by
7 p.m. on Election Day in person or
sent by mail.
In the latest voting statistics, Bartow
has the most voters of the cities that
have candidates up for election, the
Supervisor of Elections reports.
For those registered through March
7, Bartow has 9,063 registered to vote.
Of those, 4,619 are Democrats, 3,037
are Republicans, 205 are registered with
other parties and 1,202 are registered in
a category listed as unknown. There are
6,081 white voters, 2,198 black voters,
400 Hispanic, 105 listed as other and


SUPERVISOR OF
ELECTIONS
S. POCOUrTy HORM

279 unknown. There are 3,852 male
voters, 5,051 women voters and 160
unknown.
The city that has the fewest regis-
tered voters is Lake Hamilton, with 747
voters registered through March 7.
A total of 33,785 people are registered
to vote in the eight city elections.
Lake Wales has 7,538 voters regis-
tered. Of those, 3,711 people are regis-
tered as Democrats, 2,610 are Republi-
cans, 271 are registered in other parties
and 946 are listed as unknown. There
are 4,882 white voters, 1,884 black vot-
ers, 454 Hispanic, 85 other voters and
253 listed as unknown. There are 3,126


tended the State of the munity of sci
Science on Phosphate are consider
Mining and the Envi- for or against
ronment, held at the Erwin said. "A
Charlotte Harbor Event we keep this (
and Conference Cen- ourselves, we
ter. Hosted by the U.S. nowhere."
Environmental Protection Erwin has a
Agency, the conference spective. He 1
was intended to identify career in the
gaps in the data to help by pioneering
guide an areawide impact the phosphat
study on phosphate first wetlands
mining by the U.S. Army projects.
Corps of Engineers. He later cri
Erwin displayed a pho- between wor
tograph to illustrate how consultant fo
the mentalities of special try to workinE
interests keep them from pert witness i
working together to solve that challenge
phosphate mining prob- projects.
lems. The photo showed For the pas
two men with boxes over Erwin has bei
their heads butting up ing to restore
against each other.
"This is a small com- WA

entee ballots


men registered, 4,274 women regis-
tered and 138 registered unknown.
Frostproof has 1,281 voters with 502
registered as Democrats, 582 regis-
tered as Republicans, 52 registered
with other parties and 353 listed as
unknown. Among the voters, 1,041 are
white, 401 black voters, 211 Hispanic
voters, 49 listed as other and 94 listed
as unknown. There are 779 male vot-
ers, 983 female voters and 34 listed as
unknown.
Fort Meade statistics were not
released as that town does not have
municipal elections on April 5.
Municipal elections are being held
for the cities of Bartow, Dundee, Frost-
proof, Haines City, Lake Alfred, Lake
Hamilton, Lake Wales and Mulberry are
scheduled April 5. Polls will be open
from 7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Results of the elections will be avail-
able at the Supervisor of Elections web-


dentists who
d either
mining,"
ks long as
contained to
are going

a unique per-
aunched his
early 1980s
g some of
e industry's
restoration

sscrossed
king as a
r the indus-
g as an ex-
or counties
ed mining

t few years,
en work-
wetlands
WATERSHED 1SA


Registered voters
City Total

Bartow 9,063
Dundee 1,796
Frostproof 1,281
Haines City 8,732
Lake Alfred 2,654
Lake Hamilton 747
Lake Wales 7,538
Mulberry 1,974

-site at www.polkelections.com and they
will be published in this newspaper.
The polling locations for each city

VOTERSI5A


ALSO INSIDE:
Police Beat..............................2A Sports.....................................lB
Letters to the Editor ..............4A Out and About ......................3B
Our View Point.......................4A County Report .....................5B
School Page............................ 6A


CONTACT US:
The Frostproof News
P.O. Box 67
Frostproof, Florida 33843
863-635-2171 E-mail:
news@frostproofnews.net


i- Deal of

DEALS and
STEALS
See Pages 6-7B


March 30, 2011


7 05252 00025 8


a ,








Page 2A Frostproof News March 30, 2011


POLICE BEAT


7


The information is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway Patrol, jail and fire records.
Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is determined by the court system.


DUI reveals stole(


By MARY CANNADAY
Staff Writer

A concerned driver
called Lake Wales police
Sunday at 8:36 p.m., to
report that the man in
front of him was driving
erratically westbound on
Hwy. 60.
The dark-colored
Toyota pickup, driven
by Jeffrey Paul Bourcy of
Mulberry, then turned
around and headed East-
ward on 60, still driving
erratically, according to
police.
The police officer
pulled Bourcy over for
no seatbelt and a faulty
brakelight, then Bourcy
confessed that he had
consumed six beers. The
suspect's eyes appeared
glassy, and his speech
slurred, so he was asked
to take a series of field
sobriety tests, and agreed
to the tests, which hd al-
legedly failed.
During the course of
the arrest, the suspect
was found to have a
stolen Smith and Wesson
in his car.
'The suspect was arrest-
ed for Driving Under the
Influence and Possession
of a Stolen Firearm, and
was transported to the
Polk County Jail.

Elsewhere in the city:

Colome Lararo, 41, of
Lake Wales was charged
with simple-battery
on Sunday at 11:32 for
striking a retail mer-
chant with a wooden
table. Reports note
the Bargain City store


owner knew the suspect
and did not want him
in the store, so asked
him to leave. When the
victim turned around,
the suspect picked up a
small wooden table from
a display and struck the
victim with it, then fled
the premises. The victim
did not accept medical
attention, but told police
he wished to charge the
suspect with battery.

Police received a report
of a vehicle stolen from
435 Towerview Dr. Sat-
urday at 10:07 a.m. The
stolen car was located
with the assistance of
OnStar, according to
the arrest report, and
Kristina Renee Stull
was charged with grand
theft auto, burglary to
a structure/convey-
ance, and driving with a
suspended license. Stull's
clothes, purse, and some
stolen items were inside
the vehicle a the time of
recovery, LWPD reported.
Additionally, police
reported that while doing
an inventory of the car's
contents, a Garmin GPS,
a radar detector and car
radios were located in
the trunk. A short time
later Officer Coppedge
met with Michael Brooks
W/M regarding burglary
to his vehicle which oc-
curred at the Lake Wales
Car Wash (SR60 and
Hunt Bros Rd). The items
located in the trunk were
identified as his. Stull
was transported to the
Polk County jail on the
stolen vehicle charge.
Detective Yoxall will


be completing charges
on the burglary to the
vehicle. Also charges are
pending for possession
of controlled substance
reference to pills which
were located in the ve-
hicle. The victim's vehicle
was returned unharmed.

Shauna Lynn McKay,
of 1800 Bruce Blvd.,
Lake Wales, was charged
Saturday with Battery-
Domestic Violence for
entering her former
Some against court
order, and causing a
domestic disturbance
including pushing her
husband and taking the
contents of his wallet
without permission. The
victim said McKay was
not allowed to be at the
home without her grand-
mother present, due to
a court order. When she
arrived, the couple, who
had been dating for 13
years and were married
for one, argued over her
actions, culminating in
the pushing incident, the
report said. The victim
had no signs of physi-
cal injury and did not
require medical atten-
tion. McKay told police


en gun

she had just gone to the
house to pick up some
clothes, when the victim
came out and began
antagonizing her. She
claimed that as they
argued, "one thing led to
another," and the victim
"head-butted her and
punched her in the head,
and that she pushed him
to get away from him.

Students at Spook Hill
Elementary have three
less laptop computers
and two fewer cameras
for their use, due to the
actions of an unknown
person who robbed three
classrooms sometime
over the weekend. The
theft at 321 E. Dr. J.A.
Wiltshire Blvd. was dis-
covered and reported to
police Monday morning,
but there have been ho
arrests yet in the case.
The perpetrator will be
facing charges of Bur-
glary and Grand Theft.

At the other end of Dr.
J.A. Wiltshire Blvd., #19
another crime took place
on Monday,and suspect
Tamoralanna Syquala
Glanton was arrested and
charged with Criminal


Mischief and Burglary to
an Unoccupied Dwelling.
More Reported Arrests

March 25
Christy Guzman, 23, of
120 N. Martin Rd., Lake
Wales charged with
battery.
Samuel Griggs, 50, of
16470 Hwy. 27 South,
Lake Wales charged
with disorderly conduct
and resisting arrest with-
out violence.
Ryan Stephen, 29, of
4918 Roosevelt Ave., Lake
Wales charged with
county or municipal


ordinance.
Juan Garcia, 21, of 2231
SR 60 East, Lake Wales -
charged with larceny.
Vincent Pittman, 22, of
40 Phillips St., Lake Wales
- charged with battery.
March 26
Shauna Mckay, 27, of
1800 Bruce Blvd. #14,
Lake Wales charged
with battery.
William Albritton,
22, of 1839 Jafa Lane,
Lake Wales charged
with contributing to the
deliquency of a minor,
possession of marijuana
and possession of para-
phernalia.


Free Checking.


You can believe it!


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in vehicle


CITY OF LAKE WALES
CITY COMMISSION MEETING DATE CHANGE
Due to the April 5, 2011 city election, the first
regular city commission meeting in April has been
changed from tuesday, April 5, 2011, 6:00 p.m. to
Wednesday, April 6, 2011, 6:00 p.m.
Location:
City of Lake Wales Municipal Administration
Building
City Commissioners Chambers
201 w. Central Avenue, Lake Wales, Florida 33853


_


.<


Page 2A Frostproof News


March 30, 2011








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Frostproof News Page 3A


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'05 SUZUKI BLVD.







Pae4 rotro Nw ach3,21


EDITORIAL


Dickinson deserving of a second term


For the first time in several
years, Frostproof voters will get
a chance to elect a member of
their city council.
Of the two most recently seated
members, one was appointed
(Diana Biehl) and the other was
the only one to file for his seat
(Ralph Waters).
This year, two seats were open.
One will already know will be
filled by newcomer Martha Ne-
her, who was the only candidate
to file valid petitions for the seat
capably filled by Wesley Wise.
The second seat will be a con-
test between incumbent Anne
Dickinson and newcomer Eric
Courtney.
Both are lifetime residents of
Frostproof.
Dickinson is active in any


52 years
A couple of months
ago, my friend Mary an-
nounced that her Apopka
Memorial High School
Class of 1959 was going
to have a 70th birthday
party.
"How can a class cel-
ebrate its 70th birthday?"
I asked.
"That's the year we all
turn 70," she said.
Never question Mary.

Mary was the baby
of her class. It will be a
little while before she
catches up with me. I
turned 70 on Jan. 15, but
who's counting? I am
not a stranger to Mary's
graduating class. She and
I have been attending her
AMHS reunions and class
luncheons together for a
couple of years.
When I go to Apopka,
I introduce myself as S.
L. Grossenbacher, Mary's
husband. It works well.

At our first shared
reunion, I commented to
her that one of the great
things about the passage
of time is that the cliques
disappear.
"The guy seated next to
me tonight," I asked. "He
was a leader in your class,
right? He made me feel
like an old friend."
"Yes," she replied. "He's
Jerome, our student body
president."
"And I saw you talking
to a woman I figure was a


I OUR VIEWPOINT

number of city, county and state
groups, most of which revolve.
upon her family business of cit-
rus and cattle. She is also active
in her church, historical society
and Rotary Club.
When she first was elected in
2008, Frostproof was just in the
early stages of pulling out of a
financial tail spin that saw the
city run in the red as much as
$250,000 just a year or two prior.
Her business acumen has certain
nly been welcome on the coun-
cil.
Courtney is much more of an
unknown to many in the city, but
that does not necessarily make
him a poor choice. He head


makes a difference


THINKING '.,
OUT LOUD



S.L Frisbie

special friend."
"Her name is Janice,
pronounced Janeece. We
were good friends. Janice
was a cheerleader."
Robert was a fellow
scholar of Mary's. He
earned a doctorate in
physics, but never men-
tions it.
Mary was fairly bright,
too. Look who she mar-
ried.

What especially im-
pressed me, 52 years after
the last strains of "Pomp
and Circumstance" faded
away, was that there are
no class presidents, no
cheerleaders, no quar-
terbacks, no valedicto-
rians, no Ph.D.s at these
reunions.
Some classmates
retired as millionaires;
some are living on Social
Security. I could not
tell who is who. Whom?
They are all classmates;
they are all friends. They
gather as social equals.

One is a retired football
coach who agreed to keep
twin brothers, members
of his team, when their
mother left home to take


up with a guy she met on
the Internet.
The first time she met
her sons' foster parents
was the day she left town.
Gerald and his wife still
consider them to be their
sons.
One is serving in the
Army in Iraq. They are
counting down the days
until his return.


Another graduate be-
came a football coach in
western Texas.
The nearest competitor
was 90 miles away. The
farthest was more than
400 miles.
"We took the governors
off the school buses and
drove 80 miles per hour,"
Farmer (yes, that is his
given name) told me.
"It was still an over-
night trip."
Only once did he
mouth off to an official.
"I'll buy you a new flag
if you learn how to use
it!" he told the referee
after three consecutive
backfield in motion calls
that Farmer said were
unmerited.
"That's it! I will penal-
ize your team another
15 yards for every step it
takes you to get off off
the field!" the ref replied.
"I called over two line-
men to carry me off the
field. He still penalized

FRISBIES5A


the FrostproofYouth Baseball
League, with more than 250 par-
ticipants this year.
That is no small undertaking,
even with the help of others in
the league.
One of his main platform
points is bringing the sports
complex located near the high
school back under city control.
As one of the moves made to
help save the city money, control
(and many of the expenses asso-
ciated with the sports complex)
of the facility was handed over to
the county.
There is a committee that
include city, school and county
officials that meet occasionally
to discuss issues and concerns
regarding the site.
It may or may not be a good


idea that Courtney has.
It is certainly worth a closer
look to insure that the city's
youth are being taken care of in
the best manner possible.
However, in what has been a
tumultuous time in the city's
history, Dickinson has brought
much needed perspective and
stability to the five-person board.
She is a questioning voice
whose conservative approach
isn't always in synch with the rest
of the group, but that is refresh-
ing and sometimes necessary in
making sure many points of view
are considered on many different
issues.
-Dickinson is deserving of a sec-
ond term on the Frostproof City
Council. Please make sure your
voice is heard on April 5.


Make a stand on the


It is one of the magical
moments in American
history: On Sept. 4, 1882,
Thomas Edison threw a
ceremonial switch at the
offices ofJ.E Morgan in
NewYork City, and there
was light.
The nearby Pearl Street
Station power plant pro-
vided the electricity for
light bulbs to switch on
throughout the immedi-
ate area. The New York
Times had 52 of thebulbs
and reported they pro-
vided light "soft, mellow,
and graceful to the eye
... without a particle of
flicker to make the head
ache."
The light bulb repre-
sents one of the most
ingenious and useful
American-created com-
mercial products so
ingenious, in fact, that
it's the metaphor for the
arrival of a new idea.
Now, the humble old
incandescent bulb is in its
senescence, about to be
snuffed out entirely by an
act of Congress.
In 2007, Congress
passed and President
George W. Bush signed
an energy bill forbidding
the sale of the traditional,
cheap incandescent bulbs
on grounds that they
aren't energy-efficient
enough. This has stoked
grass-roots opposition
(FreeOurLight.org) and
bulb-hording among
people ready to give
up the old bulbs only if
someone pries them from
their cold, dead fingers.
Republicans in the
House and Senate are
pushing to roll back the
provision in the 2007 law.
Are there more im-
portant matters of state
to attend to? Surely. Is
the lightbulb regulation
rushing us down the road
to serfdom? Probably not.


But it is so annoying, it
deserves the resistance of
friends of freedom and of
nice, clear artificial light.
Think of the national
55-mph speed limit, im-
posed in 1974, also in the
name of energy efficiency.
Congress repealed it in
1995. Think of the metric
system, pushed in the
Metric Conversion Act of
1975, again in the name
of efficiency. It never
quite caught on. Think of,
for that matter, the three-
pence-a-pound Townsh-
end duty on tea.Was that
the end of the world? No,
but it was the principle of
the damn thing.
The more energyef-
ficient bulbs are more
expensive, but make up
their cost in the lower
use of electricity over
time. The Department
of Energy contends that
mandating new bulbs
will save up to $6 billion
for consumers in 2015.
Industry supports the
mandate because it says
it is stoking competition
for the creation of all
sorts of new energyef-
ficieit bulbs some of
them incandescent.
All to the good, but
if the new bulbs are so
wondrous, customers,
can be trusted to adopt
them on their own. Are
we a nation of dolts too
incompetent to balance
the complex factors of
price of bulb, energy
efficiency and quality of
,light on our own? One


light bulb
of the alternatives to the
old incandescent bulb is
the compact fluorescent
lamp, a twisted affair
seemingly modeled on
fusilli pasta. It contains
mercury. If it breaks, you
have to undertake clean-
up measures worthy of a
minor industrial accident.
Its light is inferior to the
old bulb. One congressiow
nal critic says it reminds
him of "something out of
a Soviet stairwell."
It's entirely possible
the compact fluorescent
lamp will catch on and
become as universal and
beloved as the Edison
version. If so, it shouldn't
need an artificial push. At
a hearing on the light-
bulb regulation, Sen.
Rand Paul of Kentucky
castigated the deputy
assistant secretary of
energy in terms she may
have never heard before.
Noting that the Obama
administration professes
to be "prochoice," he ar-
gued, "There is hypocrisy
that goes on in people
that claim to believe in
some choices but don't
want to let the consumer
decide what they can buy
and install in their own
house."
Just so. You can be
forgiven for thinking
no household object or
minor convenience is
safe. First, they made our
toilets less efficient.
Then, they came after
our plastic grocery bags.
Then, they mucked
around with our dish-
washer detergent. At
the light bulb, brilliant
for more than 100 years
and counting, it's time to
make a stand.
Lowry is the editor
of the National Review.
Readers may reach him
at comments.lowry@
national review.com.


1935-2011


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
Aileen Hood General Manager
Brian Acklev Editor


Published every SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
Wednesday and Saturday at Six Months............................$25.68
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- -- hP~ RP~e1 9 ~ ssL~BLY- -b Cr I


March 30, 2011


Page 4A FrostproofNews







March 30, 2011 Frostproof News Page 5A


CAPTAIN: Marketing to children


FROM PAGE 1A
at the meeting, Hodak
asked if there were any
questions for Captain
Citrus. He got none, but
he was the only speaker
before the commission
who got an ovation.
He did, however, get a
few comments.


"That was a very good
presentation," Chairman
George Streetman said.
"That's awfully... boy...
that guy's got some guts."
Then as Streetman was
to introduce the next
part of the agenda he
was momentarily inter-
rupted.
"Captain Citrus has


left the building," a voice
echoed into the room.
Before he introduced
the planning and evalua-
tion part of the meeting,
Chairman Robert Behr
said,
"Maybe if Captain Cit-
rus does well we'll have
a replacement for Peter
Plum."


WATERSHED: Hole in research


FROM PAGE 1A
around the world as a
board member for Wet-
lands International and
the Ramsar Convention,
an organization working
to restore wetlands in
160 countries.
The phosphate indus-
try has been focused on
how to get vegetation to
take root so wildlife can
dwell on reclaimed mine
sites. Problems remain,
however, because the
manmade wetlands on
the sites are "unreliable,"
he said.
The problem stems
from the way mining
removes underground
layers of clay along with
phosphate pebbles and
sand.
To reclaim the sites,
phosphate workers fill
their pits with the left-
over sand.
The clay, which has
been liquified during
the mining process, gets
pumped into in gigantic
disposal reservoirs.
The sand-filled areas
become more porous
and the clay disposal less
porous. That makes the


flow of water through a
site "a wild card," he said.
The challenge is to "re-
construct substrate that
can hold water," Erwin
said.
"We have to give the
soils a lot of attention,"
he said. "To date, we've
given only lip service to
soils."
He displayed a photo
of one wetland he
worked to create some
30 years ago. It now
supports trees that he
planted.
But the site's "un-
derstory," a part of the
ecosystem used by a
variety of wildlife, "looks
like crap," a sign of the
site's altered hydrology,
he said.
Researchers now
have key tools to use to
analyze how water moves
through a site. Erwin
cited a remote sensing
technology called LIDAR.
However, Erwin also
emphasized the need for
phosphate companies to
submit their research for
peer review.
The added costs of
such research should be
consider "full-cost ac-


counting," he said.
"What we're doing is
destroying a resource
and not putting it back
fully," he said.
Other scientists speak-
ing Monday included:
Hydrogeologist
Patricia Metz of the U.S.
Geological Survey, who
reported on a five-year
study that showed
excessive withdrawals
primarily for phosphate
.mining drew down the
Floridan aquifer by as
much as 70 feet by 1975
in the upper Peace River.
That reversed the flow
of water from springs, so
that now, the river's flow
drains down sinkholes
and crevices.
John Garlanger of
Ardaman & Associates,
used a simple mathemat-
ical formula to postulate
that mining causes little
change in the way rain
soaks into the ground
or runs off into streams.
The Peace River flow has
declined 30 percent since
the 1960s, but that's due
to a decline in rainfall, he
said.
E-mail: gmartin@sun-
herald.com


VOTERS: Last.day for absentee ballots


FROM PAGE 1A
are:
Bartow City Residents
vote at: Bartow Civic
Center (Game Room),
2250 S. Floral Ave.
Lake Wales City Resi-
dents vote at: Municipal
Administration Building,
201W. Central Ave.
Frostproof City Resi-
dents vote at: First Bap-
tist Church, 96W. B St.
Haines City- City
Residents:
Residents in'
Precincts 402, 407, 408
vote at: Bethune Neigh-
borhood Center, 915 Ave.
E
Residents in

FRISBIE
FROM PAGE 4A
me another 15 yards."

Another became a col-
lege professor in Okla-
homa.
She returned to Flor-
ida to become a public
school PE teacher for
$10,000 more in salary.
She is now president of
her homeowners' associa-
tion.

Mary's class had 83
graduates, a little more
than half as many as my
1958 graduating class.
I have met many of
them; they have become
friends. They are neat
people.

(S. L. Frisbie is retired.
He is a member of the
Summerlin-by-gosh-
Institute Class of 1958. He
also considers himself to
be a member ofApopka
Memorial High School
Class of 1959, S. L. Gros-
senbacher.)


Precincts 405, 409, 410, &
414 vote at: Haines City
Community Center, 555
Ledwith Ave.
Dundee Town Resi-
dents vote at: Dundee
Community Center, 603
Lake Marie Drive
Lake Alfred City
Residents vote at: Lake


Alfred City Hall, 120 E.
Pomelo S.
Lake Hamilton Town
Residents vote at: Lake
Hamilton Woman's Club,
85 N. Omaha St.
Mulberry City Resi-
dents vote at: Mulberry
Civic Center, 901 NWN
5th St.


www.mcleanfuneralhome,net



www.whiddenmcleanfuneralhome.com
Our Family Serving Yours



Deliver the

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extra cash!

Immediate opening for
Newspaper Delivery Person
Wednesday and Saturday
Early Mornings

Bartow, Fort Meade,
Lake Wales and Frostproof Areas
Must have reliable transportation.
We will train the right candidate.

We are a Drug Free Workplace.
For further information call:
Fa or Pam

863-533-4183

863-676-3467


OBITUARIES

James Gordon Oliver


James Gordon Oliver,
91, passed away Tuesday,
March 22, 2011 at The
Grove Center, Lake Wales,
Florida of causes from
aging.
He was born on July
17, 1919 in Early County,
near Old Damacus, Geor-
gia, to Earnest Earl Oliver
and Ruby Mae Bell Oliver.
He was a farmer of cot-
ton, peanuts, corn and
hogs in Miller County,
Georgia before moving
in 1945 to Lake Wales,
Florida to work for Flor-
ida Citrus Canners (The
Duck) as a laborer and
retired from there in 1982.
He also was employed for
many years by Mountain
Lake Corporation of Lake
Wales.
He was a fisherman,
gardener, loving and giv-
ing, enjoyed his family
and was a member of
Westside Baptist Church.


He was preceded in
death by his father and
mother; wife of 54 years,
Mittie Esther Westbrook
Oliver; daughter, Ginger
Oliver Farmer; sister,
Agnes Oliver Batson; half-
sisters, Jennie Mae Shiver
and Willie O'Dell Phillips;
half-brother, Alton Shiver.
Remaining family are
daughters, Shirley Ann
Oliver Tyler and Debora
Cay Oliver, both of Lake
Wales; grandchildren,
Cole Oliver Tyler and wife,
Elizabeth Harrison, Lake
Wales; Aimee Lee Farmer
Hunt, Deltona, Florida
and William Franklin
Farmer, Clio, Alabama;
great-grandchildren,
Samuel Thomas Hunt,
Rebecca Lynn Westbrook
Hunt, James Taft Farmer,
John Wyatt Farmer, An-
nMarie Elizabeth Tyler
and SaraBeth Lee Tyler.
Other remaining are


sister-in-laws,rPeggy
Westbrook Widner, Lollie
Allen Westbrook and Gla-
dyes Shiver. Also, many
nephews and nieces
in Georgia and Florida
from the Oliver, Shiver
and Westbrook families.
Extended family includes
all the staff, all nurses and
aids, and the director at
The Grove Care Center
and Teresa Harnage.
Graveside services will
be given by Pastor Ste-
phen Bolden ofWestside
Baptist Church at 10:30
a.m. Saturday, March 26,
.2011 with visitation and
lunch immediately fol-
lowing the services at the
fellowship hall at West-
side. Condolences may be
sent to the family at www.
marionnelsonfuneral-
home.com.
Marion Nelson Funeral
Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.


Donald L. Edwards


Donald L. Edwards, 73,
of Bellaire Beach, FL, died
Thursday, March 23, 2011
at his home.
A native of Avon Park,
he had lived in Lake
Wales many years before
moving to Bellaire Beach
following his retirement
from Florida Power Corp
where he had been an
Inspector for Substation
Construction.
He was a US Army

James

Edward

Ferrell
James Edward Ferrell of
Lake Wales passed away
Thursday, March 24, 2011
at his residence. He was
82. Marion Nelson Fu-
neral Home of Lake Wales
is handling the arrange-
ments.


veteran and while in
Lake Wales, was active in
the Elks Lodge and Lake
Wales Sertoma Club.
He attended Wof-
ford College and also
has played professional
football for the St. Louis
Cardinals.
Survivors include
his wife: Marilyn; two
daughters: Yvonne (Bill)
Welborn of Tallahassee,
Mary (Jim) Sherry of


Hendersonville, NC; two
grandchildren (Layton
and Chad Welborn) and
three great grandchil-
dren (Brianna, Tyler, and
Carder Welborn); two
grand dogs.
Graveside services were
Monday, March 28 at 10
a.m. at Serenity Memorial
Gardens, Largo, FL.
Moss Feaster Funeral
Home was in charge of
services.


We're here to help
with ALL your
advertising needs
Lake Wales News
Frostproof News
Polk County Democrat
Ft. Meade Leader


863-676-3467


Missing a loved one,

a co-worker or friend?
Place a 2 to 5 inch memorial
(In Memory Of) for $50 or a 5.1 to
10 inch memorial for $100.
Add your loved one's picture for $20.
Receive a free laminated copy.
Additional copies available for $1 each.




1APPY BIRTHDAY







% .
A S


Call Vicky at
533-4183 to
place your
memorial.
Deadline for
Wednesday
publication is
noon on Friday;
for Saturday
publication is
noon on
Wednesday.


I
I.


Sean C, Dunn
6/25/82 1/31/02
You never said I'm leaving, you
never said goodbye, you were
gone before we knew it and only
God knows why. A million times
we've needed you, a million times
we've cried. If love alone could
have saved you, you never would
have died. In life we loved, you
dearly, In death we 4ove you till.
In our heart you hold a place
that no one else can ever fill. it
broke our heart to lose you, but
you didn't go alone for part Of us
went with you the day God took
you home.
To the most courageous person
we know who gave such uncon-
dltional love everywhere you
went and touched so many lives.
Until we meet again, We love you
forever and always, Mom, Dad,
Trevor, Sara, Destiny and your
friends at Action and Sunrise.


CITY OF FROSTPROOF, FLORIDA
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CANVASSING OF
ABSENTEE AND PROVISIONAL BALLOTS

Notice is hereby given that the Canvassing Board for
the April 5, 2011, City of Frostproof Municipal
Election will meet at 6:30 p.m. on April 5, 2011, at the
Supervisor of Elections Headquarters located at 250
South Broadway, Bartow, Florida, to canvass the
Absentee elector's ballots and precinct returns.


I~ I _
r





Frostproof News Page 5A


March 30, 2011







Pace (3~\ jiostoroof News March30, 2011


Frostp


s Got Talent


HUI-U IB tY MIvK- IMunivRIUIN
Jennipher Kelley sung Miranda Labert's "Gunpowder and Lead
in the 6-8 grade age group Friday at the Frostproof's Got Talent
show.


PHOTO BY MIKE THORNTON
Pattie Conroy sings the Terri Clark song "Gypsy Boots in the
adult group Friday at the Frostproof's Got Talent show.


PHOTO BY MIKE THORNTON
Crystal Williams did sign language signing the lyrics of "Inde-
scribable" in the 6-8 grade age group Friday at the Frostproof's
Got Talent show.


PHOTO BY MIKE THORNTON
Arillana Garcia sung Marti McBride's "Concrete Angel" in the 6-8
grade age group Friday at the Frostproof's Got Talent show.


PHOTO BY MIKE THORNTON
Ryann Gavin sign and dances to "Skunk Song"in the K-3 age
group Friday night at the Frostproof's Got Talent show.


PHOTO BY MIKE THORNTON
Chasity Kincaid sings Reb McIntyre's "Turn on the Radio" in the
adult group Friday at the Frostproof's Got Talent show.


PHOTO BY MIKE THORNTON


PHOTO BY MIKE THORNTON


Keiana Hamilton played "Unfaithful" on the piano in the 9-12 age group at the Frostproof's Got Jarred Gravley plays guitar and sings "You and Me" in the adult group at Friday's Frostproof's Got
Talent show Friday night. Talent.


PHOTO BY MIKE THORNTON


PHOTO BY MIKE THOHN ION


Taylor Waters played "Fireflies on the piano in the 6-8 grade age group Friday at the Frostproof's Chad Williams plays guitar and sings "Diamonds in the Rough" Friday night in the adult group at
Got Talent show. the Frostproof's Got Talent show.


March 30, 2011


e gaP 6A Frostproof News






March 3.0FN s a 7


Frostproof's Got (More) Talent







PHOTO PROVIDED
Shelby Beckman sings
Saturday to Priscilla Renea's
"Dollhouse" at the Frostproof's
Got Talent show at the Ramon
Theater.




PHOTO PROVIDED
Shelby Garrett. Leah Brown and Chloe Martinez sing Teresa Jennings'"My Planet" Saturday at the
Frostproof's Got Talent show at the Ramon Theater.







PHOTO PROVIDED
Nichole Snyder plays the piano
Saturday to Beethoven's "Fur
Elise" at the Frostproof's Got
Talent show.


PHOTO PROVIDED
Michelle Bracken plays piano and does Mozart's "Rondo Alla Turka" Saturday at the Frostproof's
Got Talent show at the Ramon Theater.


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Frostproof News Page 7A


March 30 2011







Pa e 8A Frostproof Ne s


Lake Wales Art Show enjoys perfect weather


Crowds enjoy the two-day extravaganza


;'"sz a lb.


rI


World Drumming Ensemble had a variety of instruments to try __l___
out this past weekend, and Mark Barben took advantage of
that opportunity. Art show visitors enjoyed the many booths.
r- IBer re-st .r..viem a WWW:~.


Citizens Bank &
Trust presented
the 40th Lake
Wales Art
Show this past
weekend.


Cory Cavanah captures this photo on a canvas,
which looks very intriguing.


Susan Kelleghan was working on a live demonstration of a
photograph that she continued to paint around, in other words
where the lens meets the brush.


Dozens of vendors displayed their hard work at the 40th annual
Lake Wales Art Show.


PHOTOS BY
ED MIGA


Metal Mommas offered unique home decorating ideas using
metal products.


This unique rock art is called "SHONA." It was created using
chisels, files and water paper.


Bryan Rivers entertained Saturday's morning crowd by the
shores of Lake Wailes.


S There was a variety of artwork presented at the annual Lake
Wales Art Show.


Lake Wales' own Max Mayer was a participant at the
annual Lake Wales Art Show.


Saturday sported perfect weather for Art Show attendees.


Art can be expressed in many different ways like these clay
flowers.


4


March 30, 2011


,21


J-7


rr ~n





;~~C
h~-~j~lh.~~-~ill~*~
~~a-'.. .. ~u~







Frostproof News Page lB


March 30. 2011


SPORTS eI


Lake Wales picks up



fifth district win


Highlanders shake it out to beat the Bolts


Youth super sports

kicks offspring


By JROY ROWLAND IV
SPORTS CORRESPONDENT

Your hometown High-
lander Baseball team did
something Friday night
that was expected, but
has not happened in
quite some time.
Win.
To start the season,
Lake Wales rolled to a
5-0 start, before drop-
ping their first game
to Osceola in an error-
plagued game at 6-3. Four
out of the five games were
shortened games due to
the 10-run high school
mercy rule.
In the series of games
after the first district
defeat, Lake Wales went
on to win four of the next
six games entering the
Blue Devil Classic. But
an opening round win
was all they could grasp
as they dropped the next

Tourist


Good r
The 2010-2011 Lake
Wales Tourist Club
Shuffleboard season
is quickly coming to a
close. The last open shuf-
fleboarding will be Wed.,
April 20. All are welcome
to join the club and play
on Monday, Wednesday
and Friday at 1 p.m.
There were two special
events played late in Feb-
ruary and early March.
On Feb. 25, an Amateur
Doubles Tournament was
held at Lake Wales Tour-
ist Club. This tourna-
ment was sponsored by
Johnson's Funeral Home.
Trophies and cash prizes
were awarded. The first
four winning teams were
as follows:
1st place Bob Bow-
man and Vern Curtis


two games to Owasso and
Broken Arrows. This past
week, the slide continued
with losses against Winter
Haven and Auburndale.
A Highlander team that
normally implements a
very good pitching and
defensive side of the ball
has been a bit sore after
the spring break tourna-
ment.
An altered pitching
rotation has been used,
as the normal started
received a much needed
rest this past week when
Lake Wales tuned up for
two district games this
week.
Offensively, they
haven't had much trouble
swinging the bats, but
again the bounces haven't
gone their way.
The story line at
Highlander Hill was a bit
different when the Ridge
Community Bolts visited


Highlander Hill this past
Friday night. A team that
has not shown much
competition in the past
for Lake Wales was not
much different this time
either. In their last district
showdown, Lake Wales
pounded out 14 runs on
seven hits in the short-
ened game. This time,
12 runs came across the
plate in six innings for the
hosts.
In the top of the first,
the hosts looked a bit
sluggish as they fell be-
hind 2-0, and took a little
time to wake the bats up
as the Bolts left the bases
loaded in the first frame.
Jeffery Hernandez got the
start and after a rocky
start settled in to throw
strikes to avoid giving up
anything else in the ball
game. He pitched the first
five innings, and PJ Cruz
came in to throw the final


two frames.
Lake Wales broke
through with a run in
each of the first three
innings. In the fifth and
sixth frames, they put the
game away as they went
silent in the fourth.
They went on to beat
the Bolts by the score of
12-2.
The Highlanders im-
proved to 11-6, 5-2 with
the win. They returned
back to the field last night
against another district
opponent, Haines City,
where they previously
beat 14-5 and 11-1. This
game was too late for the
Lake Wales News dead-
line.
Lake Wales also looks
to avenge its first district
loss of the year against
Osceola on Thursday
evening at Highlander
Hill. Game time is set for
7 p.m.


shuffle season a good one


memories of the last season


Trophy winners, (I to r) First Place Double, Robert Bowman and
Vern Curtis; Second Place Double; Willadeen and Bob Campbell.


2nd place- Willadeen
and Bob Campbell
3rd place- Ed Bailey


and Don Navel
4th Ed Lammers and
Geurt Buis


On March 5, the club
held their 7th Annual
Club Rivalry between
Nalcrest and Lake Wales
Tourist Club. It was held
this year at the Tourist
Club.
A total of 36 games
were played, with Lake
Wales Tourist Club being
declared the winner.
A trophy goes to the
winning club to retain
ownership until the club
reconvenes next year.
The Tourist Club is
D located at 205 Fifth St.
North. Anyone interested
in shuffleboard is invited
to join the shuffleboard
fun.
For further informa-
tion, callVern Curtis at
324-6957 or Bob Bow-
man at 439-5438.


PHOTOS BY ED MIGA
Hayden Kulek launches her softball 7 ft. in the grass in one of
Saturday's events.
Jahmai King,
left, spirits
towards the
finish line
with other
Youth Super
Sports kids
in Saturday's
track and field
-event.
Five year old
Jorgia Brewer
leads the pack
in the 100
meter run and
in all of her
track events.


Jordan Henderson joined a variety of kids different in age and
size in YMCA's Youth Super Sports track and field event.


Spring brings new resolve


Sports fans, I'm back.
Happy Wednesday to you
all. I know you are just
as anxious as I am for
upcoming spring sports,
so let's get down to busi-
ness.
Kirkland Gym's Boys
and Girls Club has an
exciting week of basket-
ball games ahead. The
Lake Wales Suns consists
of boys ages 10 and up.
Participants include:
Jimmy Reddick, Darren
Rabb, Anthoney Jones,
Allen Michele Gardner,
Alumbus Barnhill,Vic-
tor Grimef, Joesph Dum-
drage Jr. and Richard
Patterson.
Up next is Bok Acade-
my Soccer. Varsity soccer
played Denison this past
Tuesday. The boys start-
ed their season being
defeated 0-1, while the
girls trumped Denison
with a score of 8-0. The
girls remain undefeated.
Scores from this game
include: Madison Pike
with two points, Taylor
Wolf at 1 point, Maci
Sinner at 1 point, Ashley
Castleberry collecting
1 point, Kayla Shelton
with 1 point, Anna Daly
at 1 point and Sarah An-
derson at 1 point. This
was the fourth shut-out
by Goalies Sarah Lucas
and Ashley Castleberry.
This past Thursday, the


school's junior varsity
soccer played at Stam-
baugh. The boys were
defeated with a score
0-5. JV girls also played
Stambaugh and were vic-
torious with a final score
of 2-0. Jordan Sanchez
scored both of the win-
ning goals for her team.
The varsity girl's soccer
participated in a tourna-
ment this past Saturday.
The girls competed
against Resurrection
Academy, Discovery and
Grace Lutheran of Winter
Haven. Bok Academy
took first place in the
tournament.
Bok Academy foot-
ball had a big week last
Monday; the varsity team
defeated Victory Chris-
tian with a final score of
37-21. Last Wednesday,
the JV football team tied
with Resurrection with
a final score of 41-41,
while varsity came out
with another win over
Resurrection with a final
score of 42-18.


Sports take on many
different forms, and
people get into sports
for various reasons. For
Jane Waters Thomas,
being active in sports is
not about competing, it's
about her life. At 31 years
old, Thomas suffered
from a mild heart attack;
she was 285 pounds
and unhealthy. After her
heart attack, Thomas
decided right then to
change her life.
Thomas began her
road to recovery by tak-
ing up boxing and eating
healthy. In the process,
she lost 170 pounds.
Thomas says she has
been teaching in the
community for seven
years. Her goal is to
teach other women and
girls how to take care of
themselves.
Thomas says boxing
was completely oppo-
site of everything she
thought she was before..
She says she is loving,
and kind by nature.
However, she told herself
to get angry, and said
she learned to hit things,
which helped her relieve
stress.
She said what moti-
vates her is watching
lives change. Thomas
notes she has some re-
ally great success stories.
Thomas says she teaches


PHOTO PROVIDED
Presenting the Edward W. Bok Academy Girls Varsity Soccer Tournament Champions: Back Row
(I to r) :Maci Sinner, Leah Borders, Kayla Shelton, Mrs. Thompson, Ashley Castleberry, Brittany
Adams, Sarah Lucas. Middle Row (Ito r): Kelly Richards, Estefany Revelo, Mariah Daly, Emmalee
Richards. Front Row (I to r): Stephanie Boyer, Hannah Sinner, Madison Pike, Sarah Andreson,
Julia Marbutt, Meredith McKenna, Anna Daly, Taylor Wolf.


a maintenance program
that will help her clients
for life. She says she
"loves being a personal
trainer," but she's most
happy when her clients
don't need her anymore.
Thomas has two pro-
grams; she trains in Win-
ter Haven at the Chain
of Lakes, and she also
trains at the Kelly Recre-
ation Center in Lakeland
where her husband Paul
Thomas also trains in
boxing. Herclasses take
place Saturday mornings
at 9 a.m. She also has


classes on Tuesdays and
Wednesday at 6 p.m.
Thomas said the rea-
son her program works
is because she's seriously
honest with people. On
top of teaching boxing,
she also teaches a diet
program called "The
skinny jeans diet." Her
program is very afford-
able; she charges $5 per
class, and doesn't charge
for students 17 and un-
der. Another motivating
factor in her life is her
14-year-old son Chris-
tian Waters.


She believes that
"Nobody should have to
die to live life, we are all
created to live prosper-
ous and well, and that
is what we should be
doing."
That is all for this
week's sports.
Athletes, parents,
coaches and fans, I
leave you with a quote:
"You can't put a limit on
anything. The more you
dream, the further you
get."


- Michele Phelps


_________I


I












Arts Council announces winners


42nd Annual Student Art Show reveals talent


The Lake Wales Arts
Council announces
winners of the Student
Art Show Exhibit. This
exhibit features local area
student artwork and will
be on display at the Lake
Wales Arts Center in the
Michael Crews Gallery
from Saturday, March
26, 2011 through Sun-
day, April 17, 2011 with a
closing awards ceremony
from 4 to 6 pm.
This year's Student
Art Show showcases 13
elementary schools, in-
cluding Alta Vista, Alturas,
Babson Park, Dundee,
Ben Hill Griffin, Eastside,
Frostproof, Lake Mar-
ian Creek, Laurel, Polk
Avenue, Ridgeview Global
Studies Academy, Sand
Hill and Spook Hill; four
middle schools, including
Bok Academy, Dundee
Ridge, Frostproof and
McLaughlin Fine Arts
Academy; and five high
schools including All
Saints' Academy, Lake
Wales High, Frostproof,
Haines City and Haines
City International Bac-
calaureate. The par-
ticipating students are
in kindergarten through
twelfth grade.
The Student Art Show
was judged by Beth Gar-
cia from Lakeland, Fla.
Garcia holds a Bachelor
of Fine Arts from Austin
Peay University and a
Master of Fine Arts in
printmaking from Univer-
sity ofWisconsin-Madi-
son. In the past, she has
been an adjunct professor
at colleges in Tennes-
see and Illinois. For the
last 12 years, Garcia has
been and is currently a
Polk County art educator.


She has two children; a
daughter who is a gradu-
ate of MIT and a son who
is a current student at
MIT.

The winners of the
42nd Annual Student Art
Show are:

Best of Show: Claudia
Quintero, Frostproof High
School

Kindergarten through
Second Grade Division
First Place: Alyssa
Rapp, Hillcrest
Second Place: Cassidy
Edwards, Frostproof
Third Place: Nata-
lie Williams, Ridgeview
Global Studies Academy
Fourth Place: Abel
Lopez, Alturas
Fifth Place: Hector
Enriquez, Eastside
Honorable Mention:
Aurora Richards, Hill-
crest
Merissa Spence, Laurel
Giovanni Ramd-
hansingh, Laurel
Jatwuan Williams,
Laurel
Jaida Graham, Rid-
geview Global Studies
Alisssa Zurfliehi, Spook
Hill
Austin Martinez, Spook
Hill
Bailey Lightsey, Spook
Hill
Paula Ramos-Ranlo,
Frostproof
Diego Reyes, Frostproof
Jose Santibanez, Frost-
proof
AshleyValarcel, East-
side
Vivyan Rosado Irizarry,
Dundee
Marcos Clea Mora,
Dundee
Annabelle Jones,


Dundee
Laila Brown, Babson
Park
Luray Marston, Babson
Park
Jennifer Padilla-Godoy,
Alta Vista
Marco Romero, Alta
Vista
Tony Pilkenton, Alturas

Third through Fifth
Grade Division:
First Place: Andrea
Gaiser, Dundee
Second Place: Jose
Ortiz-Reyes, Polk Avenue
Third Place: Angela
Badillo, Alturas
Fourth Place: Martisa
Villanos, Hillcrest
Fifth Place: Jessie
Stidham, Sandhill
Honorable Mention:
Damien Rivera, Sand-
hill
Elisa Ferer, Ridgeview
Kasey Rivera, Ridgeview
Brandon Frese, Rid-
geview
Kali Liqus, Ridgeview
Autumn Fiagg, Laurel
Gabrielle Jerome,
Laurel
Julianna Guzzetta,
Hillcrest
Lena Green, Ben Hill
Griffin
Janisa Santos, Eastside
Manuel Magana, East-
side
Juieta Reseniz, Dundee
Julia Brickner, Dundee
David Brown, Dundee
Jake Davis, Babson Park
Justin Looney, Babson
Park
Denis Yanez, Alta Vista
Naomi Chavez, Alta
Vista
Adam Spoon, Alturas

Middle School Division
First Place: Davon


Scott, McLaughlin
Second Place: Francisco
Chavez-Salas, McLaugh-
lin
Third Place: James
Reddick, McLaughlin
Fourth Place: Nathan
Alexander, McLaughlin
Fifth Place: Becky
Cardenas, McLaughlin
Honorable Mention:
Julisa Ayala Felix,
McLaughlin
Brittany Richards,
McLaughlin
Mariela Cruz,
McLaughlin
Lissett Resendez-Cruz,
McLaughlin
Emanual Bennett,
McLaughlin
Jennifer Santos,
McLaughlin
DeAnthony Atmore,
McLaughlin
James Powell,
McLaughlin
Mariah Daly, Bok Acad-
emy
"Group" 3-D, Bok Acad-
emy
Taylor Rich, Frostproof
Allison Brigs, Frostproof
Anderson Morissett,
Dundee Ridge
Savannah Perez,
Dundee Ridge
Christian Hernandez,
Dundee Ridge

High School Division
First Place: Jimmie
Pinion, Frostproof
Second Place: Venancio
Jaramill, Frostproof
Third Place: Gustavo
Martinez, Haines City
Fourth Place: Joseph
Miranda, Haines City IB
Fifth Place: Karey
Crisostomo, Lake Wales
Honorable Mention:
Samantha Brock, Frost-
proof
John Figura, Frostproof


Amber McClendon,
Frostproof
AresminValdez, Frost-
proof
Garciella Cordero,
Frostproof
Megan Terrell, Frost-
proof
John Rooney, Haines
City
Marcus Degnan, Haines
City
LaDahia Gadson,
Haines City
Tabitha White, Haines
City IB
George O'Neill, All
Saints Academy
Kyler Trammell, Lake
Wales


Brittany Buchanan,
Lake Wales
Haley Foster, Lake
Wales
Elizabeth Ramirez, Lake
Wales

Congratulations to all
the winners and thank
you to everyone for
participating in this year's
Student Art Show. For
additional information
about this exhibit, please
contact the Lake Wales
Arts Center at 863-676-
8427 or visit the website,
www.lakewalesartscoun-
cil.org.


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March 30, 2011


Page 2B Frostproof News







March 30, 2011 Frostproof News Page 3B






aAt patrons pint Cthe ton red





Art patrons paint the town red


They came, they saw
and they painted the
town red ... and blue, and
kelly green, and black
and white, and royal
purple. Balanced by the
men in their austere tux-
edos with a red vest or tie
here and there, they vis-
ited, danced and enjoyed
a wonderful evening on
behalf of the Lake Wales
Art Center.
The 40th anniversary
of the arts in Lake Wales
was celebrated in style,
with silver paint cans


filled with red carna-
tions and black graphics
of the buildings in town
notated with the spon-
sors of the event.
The silent auction,
which added consider-
ably to the income, was
versatile and interesting
with everything from
paintings by local artists
to weekends, elegant
jewelry, tickets to sport-
ing events and other
unusual items, including
a child's antique pedal-
operated bright red fire


engine.
Gala Chairperson
Paula Templeton and her
committee created an
unforgettable evening.
Music and dancing in-
cluded a demonstration
of Jack Brandon's contri-
bution to "Dancin' With
the Stars," adding to the
merriment.
The major fundraiser
raised over $40,000 for
the art center programs,
including the popular
summer children's art
camp.















J. D. Alexander and Betty
Wojcik















Laura Hunt, Chairperson,
Paula Templeton, Kathy
Hartley, Nancy Turnquist, and
Kay Weaver















David and Mary Margaret
Fisher; Michael and Stephanie
Gallagher

















Bob and Mertice Kelly


PHOTOS BY
CAROLE D. KUEHN

Tom and Sally Steele

























Jack and Rebecca Brandon


























Donna Barringer


























Scott and Valerie Smith


Tom and Sally Cashel






Page~ 4BFotro ew ac3,21


Canraiser party sponsored

by Polk 4-H


PHOTO PROVIDED
The Polk County 4-H Youth Council collected 125 canned goods
Friday at their"Canraiser Party:" held at the Stuart Center in
Bartow. The price of admission was a canned good, with some
people bringing multiples, organizers said.


By MARY CANNADAY
Staff Writer
Helping the community
is a big part of the 4-H
Club mission, and last
Friday, they once again
proved this, by collecting
125 canned goods for the
Lake Wales Care Cen-
ter. A party, held at the
Stuart Center in Bartow,
featured line dancing,
a chocolate fountain,
games, and other fun
activities with a canned
good as the price of ad-
mission.
Bryah and Leah Hagen,
two of the organizers as
members of the organiza-
tion's Youth Council, said
they were pleased by the
generous response, with
some people bringing
more than the one item
required for entry.





PHOTO PROVIDED
Members of the 4-H Youth
Council, who organized the
"CanRaiser Party,"are: (Front
Row): Henry Whitehouse, Leah
Hagen, Rebecca Whitehouse,
Lori Whitehouse. (Back Row):
Michael Bracewell, Walter
Whitehouse, Bryah Hagen,
Catherine Bissett, and Ella
Bishop.


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ICIlIII TY EP T Y




| I Ri OtU.


By STEVE STEINER
STAFF WRITER

"What's the vision?"
Tom Freijo challenged
the Polk County School
Board at Monday's
retreat. "Given what you
know about education,
what would you like to
see?"
Board member Lori
Cunningham led the
charge. She wanted to
make Polk County an "A"
school district by no later
than the end of the 2013-
2014 school year.
While everyone was on
board with that desire,
reservations were ex-
pressed. School Super-
intendent Dr. Sherrie
Nickell, \\ho firmly stated


I ,


reaching that goal was
possible, said there were
a number of variables
that would need to be
taken into account; one
of those is how success
is measured as according
to the state Legislature.
"But those measures
keep changing, and that
makes me nervous," said
Nickell, who emphasized
that what she was about
to say was only her feel-
ing. It would be of enor-
mous benefit if measures
were unchanged for at
least three years, she
opined. Constant chang-
es, plus recent actions
taken by both houses of
the Florida Legislature
that Gov. Scott signed,
have had a demoralizing


- I


set the goals higher." She
also urged board mem-
bers to be mindful that
whatever they did would,
through the media, be-
come public knowledge.
The bar needed to be set
high.
Comparisons were
made between education
and business, and at one
point. Board Member
Tim Harris, who wanted
to see progress made on
an ever-climbing line,
felt that support from the
business sector in Talla-
hassee was not there
"The Chamber of Com-
merce and the Depart-
ment of Education seem
to be on opposite sides
of the goal," he said.
Further talk ot mea-
sures not remaining stat-
ic ultimately prompted a
reply by Cunningham.
"I don't want to use
'ever changing' as a
crutch," she said. "There
,have to be specific goals
with measurable results."
Yet concerns remained
over that issue. Basing
her comments on her
own experiences as an
educator, Wright felt Polk
County Schools were do-
ing all that could be done
to maintain its current
"B" ranking. She may
have found some limited
support from Nickell.
"We've got to keep


PHOTO BY STEVE STEINER
Polk County School Board member Lori Cunningham pauses in
her note taking at a work session held Monday, March 8.


effect upon teachers.
While everyone agreed
they wanted the school
district to attain and
retain "A" status, is it
possible to achieve in the
.time frame Cunningham
proposed.
Freijo, with the Uni-
versity of South Florida
Polytechnic, moderated
the retreat that was a
follow-up to the Febru-
ary retreat the DOE held.
"Do we have the re-
sources and everything
in place to do that?" que-
ried Board (.hairwoman
Kay Fields. Nickell said
yes for thjs year, but she
was not so sure the fol-
lowing} ear as it is still
not kno\ n %vhat financial
revenues might be.
It began to appear as if
School Board members
were wavering. Debra
Wright felt there were too
many variables.
"Putting a number
might not be the right
path," she said in re-
sponse to Cunningham,
who had made a propos-
al that a fixed percentage
be set to increase the
number of "A" and "B"
schools.
However, Nickell inter-
jected, telling the board
members that despite
low teacher morale, in
good measure due to Tal-
lahassee, "I would love to


Tom Freijo, Learning Outcomes and Assessment director with
USF-Polytechnic, goes over a point raised by Polk County School
Board members. Freijo served as moderator for the Monday,
March 28, work session, which was a continuation of the


February retreat.
moving, but we've got
to be reasonable," she
said as a printout she
had her staff develop
was distributed. The
handout recommended
customizing targets per
hypothetical school and
the model demonstrated
what percentage each of
the schools (classified as
either A, B or C) would
need to achieve in order
to either raise itself to the
next level or maintain
its A status. "These are
stretch goals."
Again the topic re-
turned to the issue of
teachers.
"If I was a teacher,
what are you going to
give me to attain this?"
asked School Board
Member Frank O'Reilly.
Teachers have not had
raises in years, he said,
and reiterated the same
belief Harris had, that
business has not gotten
behind teachers, espe-
cially in light of what the
Legislature did. "Teach-


ers have been beaten
up."
Harris agreed.
"The law the governor
signed, it's going to be a
challenge to recruit and
retain teachers," he said.
It would be, he added,
a major factor in how
and whether the goal to
become an "A" district
would be accomplished.
Regardless of the
challenges, said Board
Member Hazel Sellers,
the board had to move
forward. It could not
settle for less.
"We need to set spe-
cific goals," she said. "If
we announce we are sat-
isfied being a "B" district,
it is not going to set well
with the public."
Harris proposed the
school system strive
toward becoming an
"A" school according to
the current rating scale
established by the state.
His proposal found
favor with the rest of the
board.


By STEVE STEINER
STAFF WRITER

In 2000, Polk County
citizens in a referendum
vote approved changes
to the county charter. It
limited Polk County com-
missioners to two terms,
as well as cut their pay in
half.
Thus it came as a sur-
prise when County Com-
missioner Bob English
announced at the March
22 public session that
term limits in the Polk
County Charter may be
unconstitutional, as also
might be the salary paid
commissioners. Accord-
ing to English, the crux
of the matter was term
limits and salary are to be
decided at the state level.
The matter, English
said, had been brought
to his attention by two
constituents, prompting
him to do some research,
which verified what he
had been told. As a result,
English requested fellow
commissioners approve
a motion authorizing
County Attorney Michael
Craig to research Articles
2.3 and 2.5 of the Polk
County Charter and, if
necessary, bring legal
action.
At that session, Com-
missioner Sam Johnson
said that the term limita-
tions issue was not iso-
lated to just Polk County.
"This has been chal-
lenged across the state
and it has been ruled


Commissioner Bob English
unconstitutional,"
Johnson said. He added,
however, that voters had
overwhelmingly approved
the referendum, which
prompted English to re-
ply, "A majority does not
make it the truth."
The Board of County
Commissioners approved
English's motion and
Craig was instructed to
proceed.
"We're in the process of
preparing to file a declar-.
atory judgment," Craig
recently announced. By
doing so, the BOCC is
essentially asking the
court to make a ruling on
certain acts and law, said
Craig. "We're'asking the
court to give them (the
BOCC) guidance."
Although this issue has
come up in two or three
other counties, there is no
precedent.
"One of the things we're
doing is getting infor-
mation from the other
cases," said Craig. "Each


case is unique and we'll
deal with it as we get the
ruling."
English said he felt the'
court would find in favor
of the BOCC. At the same
time, he acknowledged
that if a ruling is decided
in favor of the BOCC, it
might not sit well with
the general populace, but
overall that is not a factor.
"Whether it's well
received is immaterial, it's
a constitutional issue," he
said."If people want term
limits for local officials, it
has to be done through
an amendment in the
state legislature."
As for the issue of sal-
ary, according to state
statute, Polk County
commissioners should
be paid $82,000. Cur-
rently, their salary is half
that. While that may not
sit well with Polk County
citizens, especially in
this economic turndown,
again it was an issue that
was not in the hands of
the BOCC.
English added his
bringing up the issue was
not a self-serving action
by the BOCC, nor by him.
He said he had not even
given any thought to
whether he would run for
a third term should the
court decide term limits
were unconstitutional.
It might not have had to
come to this, English said,
as he castigated the then-
sitting BOCC. "It should
have been challenged
back in 2000."


County Manager Jim Freeman said
Friday Jim Bell was appointed as In-
terim Executive Director of the Cen-
tral Florida Development Council.
He started his new job on Monday.
"I have full confidence in Jim's
ability to provide stable and effec-
tive leadership during this transi-
tion period for the Central Florida
Development Council," Freeman
said. "Jim has demonstrated the
ability throughout his career to work
effectivelymwith elected officials,
management, staff, citizens and
other stakeholders."
Bell has worked for Polk County
since 1991 and has served as Public
Safety Director, Community Services
Director and Transportation Director.
Before joining Polk County, he was


drops

STAFF, WIRE REPORT
Florida's unemploy-
ment rate dropped by 0.4
of a percentage point to
11.5 percent in February,
the second consecutive
month it's declined, state
labor officials said Friday.
And, in Polk County it
dropped by more than 1
percent, the latest statis-
tics show.
The state figure is the
lowest it's been since last
July, when Florida also
was at 11.5 percent, but
nearly 1.1 million Florid-
ians remain out of work.
In Polk County 32,286 are
out of work. That figure
is down from 35,178 from
last month.
"This decrease in Flor-
ida's unemployment rate,
combined with continued
job growth, is welcome
news and provides ad-
ditional evidence that our
economy is getting back
on track," said Cynthia R.
Lorenzo, director of the
state Agency for Work-
force Innovation.
The agency reported


the City Manager of Auburndale.
He retired after 28 years in the
United States Air Force as a fighter
pilot, the last three months of which
he served as a base commander. Bell
earned a Bachelor of Arts in econom-
ics from Emory University in Atlanta.
"Economic development and job
creation are vital to Polk County's
future," Freeman said. "Therefore, I
have selected the most experienced
director on my staff to take on this
important assignment."
Jerry Miller, president of the CFDC
said he is in support of naming Jim
Bell as Interim Executive Director.
"Jim's proven leadership and man-
agement style is just what we need
during this transition period," Miller
said.


J .

to 11.5 percent

Florida added 22,700 jobs growth rate. Ot
in February and now has tries adding jol
32,700 more jobs than it education and
did in February 2010, an services, profess
increase of 0.5 percent. business service
That's the strongest an- trade, transport
nual growth rate recorded utilities.
since May 2007, when it Those gains
was 0.7 percent. February partly offset by
also is the fifth consecu- shrinkage in ot
tive month of annual job tors led by con:
growth, which was dov
In Polk County the 11.7 jobs, or 4.5 per
percent unemployment losing jobs wer
figure means that out of activities, manw
a registered workforce of information an
274,917, there are 242,631 ment.
people employed. Last Polk County'
month of the 275,890 employment fil
labor force, 240,712 were February 2011
employed. That unem- has the 44th hi
ployment figure was in the state. Th
12.8 percent, 1.1 percent 67 counties in 1
higher. In February 2010 Polk is tied witl
of the 273,008 labor force, Madison count
239,297 people were em- percent.
played. That represented Monroe Cou:
a 12.3 percent unemploy- the state's lowe


ment rate.
The leisure and hospi-
tality industry has led the
way by adding 26,100 jobs
over 12 months through
February, a 2.9 percent


6.9 percent, tol
Liberty County
cent and Alach
percent. Flagle
had the highest
14.9 percent,


her indus-
bs include
health
;sional and
:es, and
station and

have been
continued
her sec-
struction,
vn 15,800
cent. Also
e financial
ufacturing,
Id govern-

s un-
gure for
means it
ghest rate
ere are
the state.
h Lee and
:ies at 11.7

nty had
st rate at
lowed by
Sat 7.1 per-
ua at 7.7
r County
t rate at


Can school system



make the grade?


English: Term



limit ruling may



upset voters


Commissioner said limits, salary

are constitutional issues


Bell named CFDC


interim director


Florida jobless rate


Frostproof News Page 5B


March 30 2011


I







Pag 68Fotro esMrh3,21


One more week until
the 2011 Lakeland Sun'n
Fun EAA Convention and
Fly In takes place, and ac-
cording to Eric Hinshaw,
that means the Chalet
Suzanne Annual Aviator's
Barbeque is just over the
horizon as well.
Tomorrow, March 31,
starting at 8 a.m. until
sunset will be the color-
ful and exciting Skydiv-
ers with Jump Florida.
Better yet, schedule your


own professional tandem
jump now for only S160
by calling (888) 313-JUMP
(5867).
Then from 2 p.m. to 7
p.m., plane rides will be
offered.
Fly an antique 1940
Stearman for $75 or ride
in a modern twin engine
aircraft offering a micro-
gravity experience for
free. There may be other
types available as well.
From 2 p.m. until the


end of the day, S2 beer
and sodas -. ill be offered,
and free if staying for the
barbecue.
Cocktails are S4 each.
At 6 p.m., barbecue is
served, at S20 a person.
Eric Browning will take
over for Mike on the grill
with Boston Butts, Beer
Butt Chicken, Country
Ribs, Smoked Tenderloin
and Sides Galore.
Then at 7 p.m., special
guest speaker Tom Casey


will share his amazing
adventure.
Casey circumnavigated
the globe in an aircraft...
not an easy feat... but try
doing it in a floatplane
with no wheels.
The event promises to
be a fun-filled day.
"Consider stopping
by for an afternoon and
evening of flying fun
and games, swimming,
skydiving, barbeque, beer
and bull," said Hinshaw.


Library to conduct Food for Fines


Going green


on the green


Keep Polk County
Beautiful, Inc. (KPCB)
is gearing up for their
2nd Annual Golf Tour-
nament Fundraiser
"Going Green on the
Green" sponsored by
Magnify Credit Union,
on Saturday, April 30,
2011.
KPCB is seeking
sponsors, teams, indi-
viduals and hole spon-
sors for this event


KPCB is a non-
profit organization
that focuses on Litter
Prevention, Education,
Community Cleanups
and Beautification
projects throughout
Polk County.
For more informa-
tion, please contact
Keep Polk County
Beautiful at 863-676-
7019 or www.keeppolk-
countybeautiful.org.


The Lake Wales Public Library
will conduct their National Library
Week "Food for Fines" beginning
April 1 and continues through April
30.
"Food for Fines" is a semi-annual
fines amnesty program that pro-
vides library patrons the opportu-
nity to "pay" overdue fines with a
donation of food to the Lake Wales
Care Center.
Non-perishable food collected in


By MARY CANNADAY
Staff Writer

Here's your chance to
win big bucks for a proj-
ect that will benefit the
city. Betsy Gauss, of Oak-
wood, hopes to rally Lake
Wales residents around
a Reader's Digest contest
that could put as much
as $40,000 in the city's
coffers to use for projects
and/or improvements.
All you have to do is
"Cheer" for Lake Wales
online, and you can cheer


this drive will go to the Lake Wales
Care Center's Food Pantry.
Donations for this program are
desperately needed. With unem-
ployment exceeding 12% in Polk
County the demand on the Lake
Wales Care Center, and other chari-
table organizations, is on the rise.
Overdue materials may be .
returned with at least five non-per-
ishable food items, or outstanding '
fines owed may be "paid" with the


up to 10 times a day.
Betsy was involved in
the contest when she
lived in Albion, Michigan,
which ended up plac-
ing fourth in the contest.
This was still a winning
position, since the four
runners-up win $10,00.
She is sure that Lake
Wales can be a winner
too. Currently, Lake
Wales is in 115th place, of
the thousands compet-
ing. "Our goal is to reach
at least sixth place," she
said.


same donation.
The library will accept materi-
als, no matter how long overdue.
Overdue materials from any Polk
County Library Cooperative site
may be returned during "Food for
Fines." Lost or damaged materials
are not included in this amnesty
program.
For more information on par-
ticipating in this program call the
library, 863-678-4004, ext. zero.


First place is $40,000,
second place $25,000, and
the next four win $10,000.
The contest is called
"We Hear You America,"
and participants are reas-
sured at the website that
there is no purchase or
subscription required.
No specific project has
been identified yet for
Lake Wales, nor does it
have to be for the city to
win. The prize just has to
be used for a municiple
project.
All entries must be in


by 11:59 on May 30, 2011,
and prizes will be award-
ed on June 8, 2011.
To cheer for Lake Wales,
go to ouamerica.readersdigest.
com.
Betsy is promoting the
contest on her own at
this point, but would like
to see a local organiza-
tion get on board to help
spread the word.
Anyone interested in
helping can reach Betsy
at bsg36@comcast.net.


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March 30, 2011


Page 6B Frostproof News


4b--







Frostproof News Page 7B


March 30 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR and EVENTS


Friday, April 1
"The Miracle Worker"
at Lake Wales Little
Theatre
Immortalized onstage
and screen by Anne
Bancroft and Patty Duke,
this classic tells the story
of Annie Sullivan and her
student, blind and mute
Helen Keller. The Miracle
Worker dramatizes the
volatile relationship be-
tween the lonely teacher
and her charge. Trapped


in a secret, silent world,
unable to communicate,
Helen is violent, spoiled,
almost sub-human and
treated by her family as
such. Only Annie real-
izes that there is a mind
and spirit waiting to be
rescued from the dark,
tortured silence. Direc-
tor Glenda Thurmond,
Mar. 25 Apr. 10. Reserve
seats for each show at
Cliff's True Value Hard-
ware, 101 East Park Ave.,


downtown Lake Wales,
Monday through Friday.
863-676-7278.
Family Story Time
From 11 a.m. 12
p.m. at the Library. Call
678-4004, ext. 224 for
the weekly theme and
information.

Open knitting and
crochet group
Knitters and crocheters
of all experience levels


gather at Lake Wales
Libra-r every Friday for
an hour starting at 5:30
p.m. It is free and wel-
come to all fiber crafters
with some experience;
very little instruction is
provided. Call 678-4004
ext. 224 for details.

Saturday, April 2
Family Tree Climbing
at Bok Tower Gardens
Tackle the challenge
of trying to scale one of


the Gardens' tall live oak
trees. Climb 60-80 feet
above the ground, or
just sit in the harness to
study the environment,
Singing Tower and rolling
hills of citrus. $17 Gen-
eral Public / $12 Mem-
bers. Contact 676-1408
for more information.

Magic: The Gathering
Come and explore
another world as we
introduce you to clas-
sic game playing from
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Magic:
The Gathering has been
around since the early
90's, with good reason.
It's a fast paced card
game where you rule
your own universe. You're
welcome to bring your
own Magic cards. For


teens and adults, ages 13
and up.

Sunday, April 3
Free Tae Kwon Do at
Christ's Church
Tae Kwon Move Group
every Sunday night
from 7 to 8 p.m. at 2039
State Road 60 East in the
shopping plaza across
from Walmart. Contact
Rick McCoy at 863-632-
1781 or rlmccoy9383@
wildblue.net for more
information.

Tween Program
From 4 p.m. 5 p.m. at
the Library. Program for
young people ages 11-12.
Call 678-4004, ext. 224
for information.


Downtown Lake Wales had a little something different trav-
eling down the railroad track on Friday.The North American
Railcar Operators Association (NARCOA) held their annual
get-together.


..- -.

This is what is called a railroad motorcar. It is also called a
"speeder," and one must become a member to travel along
with (NARCOA) on their many different excursions around the
country.


(NARCOA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the legal
operation of railroad equipment that was historically used for
maintenance.


Second time rider Chuck Buchheit"had a great time" during
Friday's excursion on a two part railcar that traveled up to 30
mph.


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Pane BB Frostoroot News March 30, 2011


Signs of life in the old green palace

Construction workers seen on the mezzanine


Former police chief
honored by Mark LeVine
Appreciation Day


IICIUl~ttCC "U'- U'"" w~m9 y~
1 (.i~
'
i:
::lj; . ': ..
,::
-c~ .3T"
I ~


A worker wearing a hard hat walks along the mezza-
nine of the Grand Hotel.


PHOTO BY DEBRA
This man is carrying what appears to be to
the upper edge of the mezzanine. As part o
contract between Dixie Walesbilt LLC and t
of Lake Wales, the hotel must be sealed, in
windows, and have the bottom two floors I
to fire code before the LLC takes ownership


DEBRA(
Slowly, th
signs that
beginning
Grand Hot
has grace
downtown
so many y
project in
is restorin
outside of
building,
which city
say was ne
supposed
been pain
first place


By MARY CANNADAY
Staff Writer
GOUVELLIS Former Lake Wales Po-
lice Chief, the late Mark
ols along LeVine, is being recog-
of the nized today for his years
he City of service and leadership
including through "Chief Mark
brought up LeVine Appreciation
Day," according to a city
proclamation.
PHOTO BY A proclamation was
announced in March and
GOUVELLIS organized by the Lake
ere are Wales Police Department
work is and originally suggested
Son the by NAACP president Da-
:el that vid Smith, Interim Police
d the Chief Chris Velasquez
n area for said. LeVine retired in
ears. One 2004 after 23 years with
the works the agency. On April 18,
g the 2010, he died of cancer at
:the large the age of 60.


a surface
Officials
ever
to have
ted in the


Ken Morrison Day at Bok Tower Gardens


On April 2, Bok Tower
Gardens will celebrate the
life of former director Ken
Morrison (1918-2011).
Designated Ken Morrison
Day, free admission will
be offered for any visitor
who mentions Morrison's
name at the entrance
gate.
Director of Bok Tower
Gardens for more than
20 years, Morrison was
"an inspiration for nature
preservation and was
'green' before it was
fashionable," said David
Price, the Gardens' presi-
dent. "Ken had an ethic


for conservation when
most thought we were in
a time of plenty and our
resources where limitless.
He did not see complexity
in doing the right thing.
For him the choice was
simple: use less, pollute
less, be kind to nature."
The 92-year-old Babson
Park resident who passed
away on March 4 was a
leader and a champion
for environmental causes
serving from the late
.1950s until 1980 as the
second director of Bok
Tower Gardens. During
his leadership the Gar-


dens became recognized
as a leading state organi-
zation for conservation.
"He was a keen observer
of nature and understood
the correlation of the
health of nature to our
own wellbeing," Price
adds. "Ken was always
optimistic for the cause
and never lost his humor
or gave in to pessimism.
Both he and his wife Hel-
en are heroes in the cause
for the environment."
Morrison was president
emeritus of the Florida
Audubon Society and
served on the board of


trustees of the Defend-
ers of Wildlife and the
Nature Conservancy's
Florida chapter. He was a
founder of the Defenders
of Crooked Lake, Florida
Conservation Founda-
tion, Green Horizon Land
Trust and Ridge Audubon
Society. Special caril-
lon concerts at 1 and 3
p.m. will be dedicated to
Morrison. Following the
3 p.m. concert, a celebra-
tion of life ceremony will
include a tree planting,
bird release and other
activities to which the
public is invited.


""He
was
always
mentor-
ing us,
teach- O
ing us
life les-
sons as
well as
profes- Chief Mark LeVine
sional," Velasquez said.
LeVine was a driving
force in the LWPD's
becoming accredited.
LeVine's widow, Sharon
LeVine, said her husband
loved police work. "He
wanted the police officers
to be servants of the
people, but he also tried
to make sure they had
what they needed to be
safe; to go home to their
families."


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March 30, 2011


Page 8B Frostproot News


HILL


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